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Full text of "Braille Book Review, Pre-Publication Manuscripts"

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M.C. MIGEL MEMORIAL LIBRARY 
American Foundation for the Blind 

15 West 16th Street. New York. New York 
10011 



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olume 6 



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THE BRAILLE BOOK REVIEW 
A Guide to Braille and Talking Book Publications 
Published Monthly at the 
American printing House for the Blind 
1839 Frankfort Avenue 
Louisville, Kentucky 

Printed for 

The Net; York public Lihrary 

42nd Street and Fifth Avenue 

Hew Tork City 

(Henry F» Homes Fund) 



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January, 1937 



Contents 



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Vol 6, /fi> 7 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/braillebookrevie1937amer 



Braille Book Review, January, 1937 2. 

Book Announce riente 
(Books in this list are in Grade 2 unless otherwise noted) 

Berry, Mildred* From Genesis to Revelation; an outline of the Bible's whole contents* 8t. 
Grade 1&* ARC Gar in process* ^^Wf 

Bible: The school Bible; selections from the authorised version* 5v* NIB 

Bradford, Gamaliel* American portraits; 1875-1900* 2vVaBB (Provided by the U.S. Government) 
Also available in grade Tfc in IJYPL* Contents* Sketches of Hark Twain, Henry James, 
James IcNeill v/histler, Ja: ies Blaine, Henry Adams, Sidney Lanier, Grover Cleveland, 
and Joseph Jefferson* Each sketch leaves with the reader a distinct picture of a real 
and interesting personality* 

Breasted, James Henry* The dawn of conscience* 4v* 1933. B1A (Provided by the U*S* Govern- 
ment} Then and where did man first take the step that forever differentiated him from 
the brutes? Vfoat led to the growth of rules of conduct, however crude, and what were 
the "beginnings of "moral order"? .hen, and where and how did that indescribable thing 
we call 'conscience '"begin? These are the questions that Professor Breasted answers in 
his new book* Prom long years of study of the fragments of Egyptian antiquity, "both 
old and recently unearthed, the author has made the conclusion that conscience, mor- 
ality, moral order, and the other mi^ity intangihles upon which civilization is founded 
were "born in the valley of the Nile* It was with the Sun-God Ra that moral ideas, the 
I struggle with death, and the thought of a celestial hereafter had their birth* 

Buchan, John* The man from the Norlands* 2v* BIA (Provided by the U*S* Government) Romantic 
story of adventure scened on the ITOrfolk marshes, the hills of Rhodesia, and the Norland 
Island of sheep* Sir Riclard Hannay with his friends Lombard and Lord Clanroyden, as 
well as his young son Peter Jolm, come to the aid of Valderiar Haraldsen and his young 
daughter Anna* The final "battle in this game of wits takes place on the lonely island 
somewhere north of Scotland, where stands Harpldsen^s great stronghold of stone and 
timber* 

Chess strategy and tactics, fifty master games, selected and annotated "by Fred Reinfeld and 
Irving Chernev* lv* NIB 

Chesterton, G*K* The autobiography of G*K* Chesterton* 3v* 1936 BIA (Provided "by the U*S* 
Governmentp This autobiography of the regretted Gilbert Keith Chesterton is the story 
of almost every consequential Englishman of letters in our time except himself* Here 
is Hardy plain, and Shaw and wells and Be Hoc and a host of others with whom Chesterton 
tilted "both the glass of good-fellowship and the lance of controversy in the course of 
what he called "an Indefensibly fortunate and happy life"* Here the great and the near 
great of England's latter nineteenth and early Twentieth century writers, and a platoon 
m of celebrities in politics, publishing and plutocracy, are paraded before us by a sage 
™ observer to whom all the things he saw in a full life as a journalist, essayist and 
novelist meant less than the punch and Judy show that opened wide his "boyish eyes and 
his mystic mind on Canipden Hill in the seventies* 

Douglas, 0* Penny plain* 4v* NIB An excellent story of present day domestic life in the 
"border country "by the Tweed* 

Ets, larie II. Mister Penny* lv* Grade lij.ARC From metal plates* 

Fisher, H.A.L* A history of Europe, part I* 6v. NIB Widely acclaimed as one of the finest 
historical works, "both for material and style, of the present time* The first part 
covers European history from ancient Greece to the Renaissance* 

Fltler, Mary Biddle* Kid* 5v* Grade $• ARC Garin process* Fiction. 

Grey, Zane* The lost wagon trail* 3v* CIH (Provided "by the U.S. Government) A good western. 

Hall, Jennie* Four old Greeks* 2v* Grade 3&« 1935 HUP Greek life, customs and art in the 
stories of Achilles, Herakles, Dionysos, and Alkestis* Has vocabulary and suggestions 
to teachers. 

Hymnals; Selections from "Hymnal for American youth", compiled by H*A* Smith. 2v. ARC 
Garin process* 

Jeans, James* The new "background of science* 3v* NIB A picture in broad outline of the 

present position in theoretical physics drawn against a sketchy background of rudimen- 
tal philosophy - the philosophy of a scientist* 

Kyne, Peter B* The pride of Palomar* Sv* 1920 BIA (Provided "by the U*S* Government) Fiction 
laid in the Southwest* 



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Maurois, Andre* Prophets and poets, translated by Hani oh ilea. St. 1935 APH (Provided 

by the U.S. Government) A series of studies of English authors, originally delivered 
as lectures to a French audience* Contents: Rudyard Kipling, H.G* './ells, Bernard rhaw, 
G.K. Chesterton, Joseph Conrad, Lytton strachey, D*H. Laurence, Aldous Huxley, Katherine 
Mansfield. 

Saint Augustine* The confessions of St* Augustine, translated and annotated by J.G. Pil- 

kington, with biographical introduction^ w (Provided by the U.S. Government) "A wonderful 
combination of childlike piety and intellectual power. It nay be safely predicted that 
while the mind of nan yearns for knowledge and his heart seeks rest "The Confessions" 
will retain that foremost place in the world's literature which it has secured by its 
sublime outpourings of devotion and profound philosophical spirit". 

Stong, Phil. The farmer in the dell. i?v* AEC Garin process. Fiction. 

Ten Greek plays; translated by Gilbert Murray, and others; preface by H*B* Densmore; Intro- 
duction by Lane Cooper* 4v* BIA (provided by the U*s. Government) Contents: Oe'ipus, 
king of Thebes, and Antigone, by rophoclesj Agamemnon, and The Ch*ephoroe, and The 
Eumenides, by Aeschylus; Plectra, and Iphigenia in Tauris, and Medea, by Euripides; 
The frogs, and plutus the god of riches, by Aristophanes. The clear and simple intro- 
duction brings out the main facts about the writing and production of these plays and 
a few items of criticism* The translations are highly poetic and follow closely the 
form and spirit of the original* 

wayland, J.Y/* 3ien Christmas came to the world, lv. Grade l£-. ARC Garln process. 

wodehouse, P.G* The luck of the Bodkins* 2v. CPH (provided by the U.S. Government) A model 
steward Albert Peaseraarch, like the incomparable valet, Jeeves, Is Mr. yodehouse's new- 
est creation in tills en-route-to-ftolly ood tale* rodehouce fans will find on board 
with Peasemarch, one Ivor Llewellyn, Hollywood magnate; Monty Bodkin, composing epistles 
to his beloved Gertrude Lotus Blossom, film star with lipstick; Ambrose Tennyson (not 
The Tennyson); and other odehouse cargo* 



Hand-copied Books. 

(Books in this list are in grade l£ unless otherwise noted. Our information in regard to 

the ownership of hand-copied books by libraries is incomplete as all libraries do not report 

their additions to us.) 

Abbe," Patience, Richard, and John* Around the world In eleven years. 2v* St. Louis, NLB 
Travel and description. 

Alexander, Elizabeth* The bride's return* lv* Sacramento. Fiction* 

Arnold, I.ason H* Rusty* 2v* NYPL Juvenile fiction. 
s jftwater, Mary M* Crime in corn-weather* 3v* Sacramento* Fiction* 

Batchelder, Roger* seerets* 3v* !ILB Fiction. 

Beaupre, Olive Miller* In the nursery of my bookhouse. 4v. Perkins* Fiction. 

Beaupre, Olive Miller* Up one pair of stairs of my bookhouse* 5v* Perkins. Fiction. 

Benefield, Barry* Valiant is the word for Carrie* 4r* LC Fiction. 

Bentley, S*C* Trent's last case, 5v* LC» Cincinnati. Fiction* ciUo w^- ^ V 

Bonnard, Abel* The art of friendship* £v* Sacramento. Ethics. 

Bowers, W.C* The Church at work in the modern world* 6v. NLB Religion. 

Browne, Lewis* How odd of God* 3v* Sacramento, Oklahoma. History* 

Burstein, Abraham* The ghetto Messenger; sixty tales of a unique seventy year old telegraph 
messenger "boy"* lv* Jewish Eraille Library* Fiction* 

Cameron, Constance* Thad comes home* lv* 1TLB Fiction* 

Christie, Agatha. Murder in Mesopotamia* 5v* Sacramento. Fiction. 

Clifford, Charles L* Broken mirror; and, The first robin, by Lenora Mattingly. lv. Indian- 
apolis. Fiction* 

Connor, Ralph, pseudonym. Sky pilot In no man's land* 6v. HLB Fiction. 

Coolidge, Calvin* Massachusetts and its position in the life of the nation, lv. Sacramento. 

Cooper, C.R* Ten thousand public enemies; with a foreword by J* Edgar Hoover. 8v. Detroit. 
Social pathology* 

Cothren, M.B* Cher Ami; the story of a carrier pigeon, lv. Sacramento, St. Louis. 

Crampton, H.E* Tho coming and evolution of life* 2v* NLB Science. 

Dalgliesh, Alice* The blue teapot, Sandy Cove stories, lv. Perkins. Juvenile fiction. 

Dockeray, F.T* General psychology* 8v* NLB 









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Erts, Susan. How we set out. Cv. LC Fiction* 

Facre, J.H. Insect adventures, selections retold for young people "by Louise Hasbrouck. 

St. Chicago. 
Fein, Harry H., translator. A harvest of Heorew verse; poenr of the cultural renaissance 

and national revival; translated from the original Hehrew. 2v. Jewish Braille Library. 
Gager, C.S. Plant world. 3v. HLB Science. 
Gladden, vashington. Who wrote the Bible. 6v. HLB Religion. 
Glassie, Ada B. Sketches in American history. 2v. LC History. 

Guille, G.E. Cleansing the clean or soiled feet in the Master's Ijunds. lv. Richmond. Religion. 
Hinds, Roy. Enclosed please find "5500,000 and other stories. 2v. LC Fiction. 
Horgan, Paul. The fault of angels. 5v. Chicago. Fiction. 
Huber, Mrs. Miriam, Hkags, the milk horse, lv. Perkins. 
Huneker, James. Ilezzotints in modern music. 4v. HLB Fiction. 
Hunt, R.D* California the golden. 7v* racramento. History. 
Hunter, Bonnie. Saving grace, lv. HLB Fiction. 
Kelland, Clarence B. Roxana. 4v. Detroit. Fiction. 
Kelley, Hubert. The singing iceman; and, Have you heard? "by Margaret Culkin Banning, lv. 

Sacramento. Fiction. 
Keon, Grace, (pseudonym.) Hot a judgment, 5v. Chicago. Fiction. 
JSlng, G.R. The "I arf' adorations and affirmations, lv. HLB Religion. 
^Sipling, Rudyard. The light that failed. 5v. LC Fiction. 
Lamb, Harold* Hur Mahal. 5v. HLB Fiction. 
Lathoury, Clarence. God winning us. 3v. HLB Religion. 
Luts, G.L.H. Patch of "blue. 3v. HLB Fiction. 
Mahie, Louise K. Six Wednesday nights, lv. HLB Fiction. 
McCutcheon, G.B. Castle Craneycrow* 5v. HLB Fiction. 

Maclaren, Ian, pseudonym. Doctor of the old school, lv. HLB, Sacramento. Fiction. 
- McCloskey, Jo&n C. Modern English composition. 9v. Grade two. Chicago. 
Mackail, Denis. The flower show. 7v. Dallas Fiction. 
HaeCurdy, George. The coming of man. 5 v. HLB Science. 

Harsh, Harriett, and Florence. History of Detroit for young people. 8v. Detroit. 
Meigs, Cornelia L. The willow whistle. Ev. Perkins. Juvenile fiction. 
Melville, Herman. The story of loby Dick the great white whale, adapted from the novel "by 

Herman Melville, lv. Seattle. Fiction. 
Miller, Mrs. Alice Duer. Come out of the pantry, and other stories. 2v. Detroit. Fiction. 
Monahan, Helen. Gaily and Golly and Tap tain Kid; the adventures of three little cats at 

the fair. lv. Chicago. Juvenile fiction, 
^rrison, R.S. The mother of God* lv. St* Louis. 
Heedham, J.G. Animal world. 2v. HLB Science. 

Hutting, rHaoe. Massachusetts "beautiful. 2v. .Sacramento. History. 
Packard, F.L. The gold skull murder. 5 v. HLB Fiction. 

Paine, Albert Bigelow. The hollow tree and deep woods hook* 3v. Perkins. Fiction. 
Parrott, Ursula. For no earthly reason, lv. HLB Fiction. 
Pease, Howard. Shanghai passage. 4v. HYPL Sea story. 

Priestley, J.B* English journey. 8v. LC Also available in grade 2 from HIB. 
Reeds, C.A. The earth. 29. HLB Science. 

Russell, G.S. The Konestary hy the river. 2v. LC, Cincinnati. English literature. 
Schwarta, C.P. Lessons in citizensliip for naturalization, lv. Chica^. To prepare persons 

for examinations for second papers. 
Sheldon, H or ton. Space, time and relativity. 2v. HLB Science. 
Smith, Eleanor. Christmas tree* 4v. HLB Fiction. 
Smith, Faith Ellen. Happy birthday; and, The watch man, "by r.ackinlay Kantor; and, Undertow, 

"by Hamilton illiamson. lv. Sacramento. Fiction. 
Smith, Mrs. Susan. Made in France, lv. Chicago. Fine arts. 
Smith, Mrs. Susan. Made in Sweden, lv* Chicago. Fine arts. 
Spyri, Johanna. The rose child, lv. Sacramento, Chicago. Juvenile fiction. 
Stolberg, Benjamin, and 'arren Jay Vinton. The economic consequences of the Hew Deal. lv. 

Perkins. 
Terhune, A .P. Runaway bag. 5v. Detroit, HLB Fiction. 
Tallins, G.H. Words in the making. 2v. Detroit. English lan.-^uage. 






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Tan Dine, S.S., pseudonym. The dragon murder case; a Phllo Vance story. 5r. LC Fiction. 
Vestal, Stanley. Kit Carson, the happy warrior of the old Y/est. 4t. Chicago. History. 
Waggaman, II. T. Han Nohody. ZW* Chicago. Juvenile fiction, 
v.hite, Stewart Edward. Daniel Boone, wilderness scout. 4v. LC, rt. Louis. 
4hite, Stewart Edward. Gold. 7t. racramento. Fiction. 
«©lff, v/illiam Almon. The trial of Mary Dugan; from the play "by Bayard Veiller. 4t. LC Fiction. 



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Talking Books awc^iL/ 

(The talking books are supplied by the U. 8, Governnont and are eafcrmlaleu by the 
sane libraries that circulate braille books from the Government) 
Bible: New Testament. The Epistle of I aul to the Galatians through the Revelation of 

St. John the Divine. King Jones version, la records. This completes the Lew Te 

anent in 40 records. / 

Bible: Old Testament. The books of the Old Testament now available ire uth, Esther, 

Job, Psalms, Proverbs, Isaiah, Daniel, Hosea, Joel, .Amos, (r.icah, 'ahum. King JanuA 

version. 13 records. 
Emerson, Ralph Yaldo. Assays. To be released later. Contents:! K* story, elf-reliant, 

Compensation, Spiritual laws, Friendship, Koroisn, The ovcr-isoul, Intellect. 
Grey, ^ane. Riders of the purple sage. To be relented. 
Fart, Mr3. Frances Mewbold. The Bellamy trial. 19 records. Ih|s is a ne.y thing in ft 



stories— b transcript of a murder trial, 



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mystery 

the witnesses, the cross examinations, the bickerings of th£ lawyers, the ruling 
of the judge, the summing up and the verdict of the jury. 7ith 4Xa touches of re- 
lieving humor, and good characterisation it holds the interest W the last page. 

Jeans, Sir James, Through 3pace and time. To be released. 

Johnson, Allen* Jefferson and hi b colleagues. To be released. 

Heller, Kelen. Ae story cf my life. To he released. 

Peattie, Tonald C. Singing in the wilderness. To be r/leased. 

Sabatini, Rafael. The Sgahawk. To be Released* 

Selected readings froai --Shakespeare, and' frcn I-r. Antptiio, by Booth Tarki^gton, by 
Otis Skinner. I record. ■ here is a rare opportui ity ftor many readers^ to listen 
for the first time, to a few of the characterizations which have won for Ir.' Skin- 
ner a p^etee among the truly great actors of all time.' r From Talking Book fyplcs. 

Short stories by Thomas Bailey Aldrich, 2 ark Tajain, Nathaniel Hawthorne, »nd &erran 






Melville. To be released. 
'tra,^hey, lytton. Kminent Victorians. 



To 



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BOOKS HSVSR 00 OUT OF STYLE, by Helen 'oodward* Froa TBS PUBLI "lEnft* 1K&L1, July 16,1936* 

There art; ten beauty parlors ami twenty-five saloons to every bookstore in the TT nited 
states* Ten places to stimulate the skin, twenty-five to stimulate the soul, and only one 
to stimulate the mind* This is shocking* It ha3 worried the publishers and it ha;j vorried 
the authors even more* But I know ho.? to change all that* I have an idea that will make 
bookstores at least as numerous as beauty parlors and as important as saloons, I have 
already submitted this idea to the Publishers Association, but they turned it down. I ought 
to have known they would, since it is their fault that things are as bad as they are. 
Always talking the way they do about getting people to read books, mong themselves, I 
assure you, they even talk about making people read. Yet everybody who koeps in touch with 
the tines knows that people nowadays never have a minute to read even one book. It is all 
along the *rong lines. 

The automobile industry, on the other hand, is runt on the right lines^-that's why it 
is booming along. Wven Hoover talked about two oars in every garage. Did you ever hear 
any resident talk about tea books to every home? Let us learn from the automobile manufac- 
turer* Does he try to force the public to buy a car that you can get in and out of, or that 
you can drive on the Joston Post load? Or to enjoy scenery? ot at all. trean-linin^ and 
speed— those are the big ideas* Ninety miles an hour when you cnn't see the road over the 
top of the steering wheel* And that is what <eople like, even though they get round-ehouldeiv 
ed crouching in the seatg, and though they get nervous prostration with fear of i otor cops* 
Jto.t the big thing is that they f ve £ot a now model car* 

And let's take the patent medicines, "o they advertise me icine a3 cures? No, they 
advertise them as means to attract husbands and lovers* 

ow if we just approach the selling of books that way we will hav something, let' 3 
stop all this nonsense about reading books. It is sad to think of the money that has been 
spent to spread the idea that books are interesting to read* Publishers have even sent 
authors out on long trips to autograph books in department tores, hey liave ;iven parties 
with plenty of -otch so that reviewers could see Jiow e citin g th< new book3 really ar • 
And yet the sale of books lags behind the sale of cosmetics. let's stop all this waste of 
work. From now on let the publishers sell books for a to tally different purpose— that is, for 
the purpose of decoration* 

If that seems a startling idea to you, it is not a bit more 3© than the plan of selling 
automobiles too low to get Into and too fast to run on any public road. 

It is true that publishers have never expected ;eople to read all through a book, ardly 
anyone knows hoi? *Hain treot'' ended, or even got to the middle of "Of ime anri the " iver*" 
All they really hope for is that customers will read a part of a book, say a chapter or t o, 
and then the book can lie around on the table to impre.s visitors. 

u dish.rs look forlorn when they say that books are left on the table to inpreei 
o^sitors* They think this is a bad thing* ut if they woul d watch othe" industries they 
would know that the way to success is bo take the worst thin^ about your product and make 
it a big advertising point* It is an American custom to leave books unread on the middle of 
the livin>room table* Let's not fight against it* Let's ride on it to success. 

The American woman with her heroic love of what is usually calle "Home" will go vithout 
proper food to buy a new lamp or chair or rug* She kno;s that nobody can look inside her 
to find out what she has eaten, and she has learne 7 that anyway food might run to fat, o 
with her woman's sense of realism she puts the money into house furnishings, knowing that 
then everybody can see what she has spent* 

The same is true about her mind* v/hy stuff her mind with what' s inside books? ,T obody 
can look into her mind and find out whether she has read the book or read only the review* 
But if she once knows that a book, or a whole row of books, or even a bookcase will give 
her prestige with culture lovers, then she will buy book3 freely. 

A new and startling idea like this should not be thrown at the public abruptly. It should 
be built up gradually* Begin, say, with the use of one book - any book will do. 

In thi3 brief outline I can't give a list of all the ways in which one book can be used* 
Two or three examples will do* Suppose the doorbell rings. lie hostess can take her one 
book and lay it down, open on its face, on the couch* This gives the impression that she 
has just that minute stopped reading, so the visitor /ill immediately apologize and be put in 
a proper frame of mind* If the couch is covered in chintz, the book should be bou d in one 
of the colors of the chintz* This is simple because each month books come out boun in every 
conceivable color*, and the buyer can take her pick. If the couch is covered in a plain mater- 
ial the paper jacket should be left on the book to ^ive a touch of bright vivacity* In 
putting the book o-. th couch care shout be taken to lay it eater-cornered, to give that 
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The same book can be used successfully In a wholly different -./ay, as part of a cost t.;. 
It la smart this year to woar neutral shades with touches of bright color. Gray happens 
to be fashionable, and almost any of the now books would be effective with a *ray costume. 
Bright blue, green or red would all be tx>d; and yellow with a gray costure would be subtle 
and French, 

A good-looking scarf costs two to five dollars, art' a womn ;et3 self-co-xscious about 
wearing the same scarf all the time. l?br leas raney she can buy a book and it will ne er 
occur to anybody that the book has gone out of fashion or has been worn before. It can even 
be use! a second year. To get variety she should sometimes wear it with the paper Jacket, 
and sometimes without. I any a girl has carried one book around for years without ever golna 
out of style. 

/hen Dolly radiaon was in the fhite Houso she always came down the broad stairs with a 
boot close over her fingers* A few people knew that Dolly I.fadison never read any book. But 
what difference did that make? She was the most successful hostess the Tiite !'ouae ever had* 
She knew what she was doing. 

Years ago, ladies traveling on trains and dining in hotels oft . n wore a copy of f e 
Atlantic ronthly. This costs less than a book, but its meaning has changed and it is wiser 
for an alert ^Lrl nowadays to carry a book. '-Then those ladies set the Atlantic ronthly 
against the sugar bowl, they told the world that they were too intellectual to have an/thin*? 
jk do with men. The modern young woman would hate to do that. Instead, she can carry a 
cSok to show that she is so intellectual any man oan spoak to her without insulting her. 

Then there is the book for bedtime purposes, This has been handled all wro.-ig by pub- 
lishers. They even talk about people sitting down to do the heavy work of reading. ven I, 
who all my life have had the reading habit, have to lie down to read. 'cientific analysis 

of many different books has shown that many recoiaaendod as bedtime books are ineffective 
because they're too interesting, and that books for bedtime reading should be dull, -lso 
that books are excellent, particularly for men, as soporifics on railroad trains. It would 
be a waste of time to use this appeal for women because they don't like to *o to sleep in a 
chair car. They know how awful they look. But men don't care. 5or them publishers can sell 
books as soporifics. 

From all this you can sect a little of what can be done with one book. nd that's 
merely the beginning. For instance, take a string of seven or eight books lying on a table. 
The woman who can afford to pay for a Hiag vase ia pretty puffed up about it. But a "ing 
vase costs thousands of dollars, and you can get the same effect by buying onl: eight or 
nine books and setting them in a row on y ur table. Add a -*ood lamp and as ashtray #11'. a 
burning cigarette - and there you are. Could anything bo more literary? 

Of course, intellectual conversation would cost a woman even lesa, but it might be hard 
o<#uer and her guests. 

As a decoration, books never go out of fashion. They fit as well into ''•eorgian inte- 
riors as into Spanish, into American Colonial as into the most modern stoel and leather 
furniture. Of course, with certain more pompous styles like the Italian it is necessary to 
have all the books bound u iformly in brown leather. But a uniform row of books bound in 
brown leather ia no more forbidding than a room in New York done in Italian * enaissance 
furnishings. 

This isn't a bit far-fetched, fhen I was young I use to work for a publishing house 
that sold tons of books. And never once did they say a word about reading. "That they talked 
about was how fine a set of Dickens would look in your parlor. And how your social position 
would improve if you owned a History of the Torld." They really sold rillions of those 
books. Of course, I am not suggesting that we should turn back to all that. c must not 
insist on a set of Dickens or a History. ? J obody wants old things like that now. ?7ew books 
have to be used, the one3 just out thi3 week or this month. And there should he a Board of 
Decorators who would pick out the ^est-Lookinj and martest ^ook of the Vont .. 



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Erne 3 1 Hemingway 

One of the moat popular spokesman or the young post-war generation 1?* Ernest Heringway, 
born in Oak Park, Illinois, July 21, 1898. Ili.j father wad a doctor, ani during his boyhood 
Hemingwn; used to accompany him frequently on is visits; many of those exoerienees are re- 
flected in hi3 short stories, jarticularly in "IN Our Time", f.'o^t of his boyhood was soent 
in Michigan. He attended public schools, where he was popular for his prowess as a football 
player and a boxer. Afte^ graduation he retorted on the Kansas City Star for a few ronths. 

Hemingway went to France, before America entere : the war, as a volunteer in an American 
ambulance unit. He later vent to Italy and enlisted in the Italian Arditi, server; at the 
Italian front, and was seriously wounded; he will always carry a silver plate in one shoulder 
because of an injury received. Ke was decorated with two of the highest re als of the 
country, the "Medaglia d*Argento al Valore Military* and the "Croce 'i Guerre." 

^hen he returned to the United States after the Armistice, Henin^'ay married and re- 
entered newaoaper work. The following year he was "star" reporter for the "Toronto Ftar," and 
became its European correspondent. He reported n few battles in the Near East and sore of the 
Activities of the Greeks, who at that time were in the midst of revolution and disorder, and 
went to Paris as a correspondent for William Randolph Hearst's syndicated news. 

By the time he was twenty-five Hlmingway had become alrost a myth anr a tradition. He 
was a well-kno ;n figure in Paris and had many friends. He had attained unu mal success, was 

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popular personally, anu even then had many imitators in his writing. 

During thi3 Paris period he played tennia almost daily. He is naturally fond of sports, 
is a rabii fiahermen, and enjoy3 apending vacations on long bicycle tours* lie talks to bull- 
fighters whenever possible, and likes to go to fights. Several anecdotes are told about hi'-; 
one is that he and sons friends entered the arena at a bull-fight and, not oroving as good 
toreadors as they had thou;ht, eventu lly ran for tht ir 1 .ves. An ther story is told in 
connection with hia boxing ability; at a middleweight championship fi/ht in th< alle ^agram 
in Paris Hemingway become incensed by the foul blows the *innin • contestant was givin 5 his 
opponent, jumped into the ring, and knocked out the champion. 

Hemingway, "Hem" as he is kno^n to all his friends, is referred to by them as a "swell 
guy". He is tall, broad shouldered, and handsome, v/ith a fin chin, a dark moustache, clear 






' 1 



eyes, and . iort hair which is slightly curly. He has a orewhat arrogant but not unpleasant 
slouch, and waller with his elbows crooke a little aw hi i arrs swinging fron hi 3 shoulders, 
like a boxer. 

Hemingway was married fur a nec.ond tine in the a -miner of 1927. He has lived for .one 
time in Key 'eat, Florida, and was living in yor-in • t jorarily in 19J0-31* Vt, Herring ay 
dislikes New York, and cannot be ersuaded to stay there longer thun is necessary in pB 3sing 
thru. He keeps himself al>of particularly from quarrel.., cliques, and the co.irio 1 ty of the 
New York literary circles. His recreations are "skiing, fishing, shooting, • nri drinkin •." 

The volume of Hemin^ay's published work is very small in comparison with the influence 
it has had. His writing typifies this generation, at once "hardboile " and ten er-heartel, 
^disillusioned and optimistic. His hemes are simple, ;md his style irect, cungently 
collogquial with clear-cut, stacc-ito .sentences. 

A comple bibliography of his books follows: Three Stories and Ten Poems, Pa-is, 1923; 

In Our Time, Paris, 1924, New York, 1925, 1930 rith introduction by Edmund /ilson; The 

Torrents of Spring, New York, 1926; The un Also Rises, New York, 1926; Today is Friday, 

Snglewood, N.J. , 1926; an eight page pamphlet J Men ithout 'omen, New York, 1927; A Farewell 

to Arms, New York:, 1929 9 Hemingwpy has also contirbutei to Transatlantic Peview, This 

* 
Quarter, Scribner's, and other magazines. 

- Bo lo a t work on -a- new ng vol /hlch will d u al with - "bulls , b ulr3 ^ i lgiaing ^--aniMsTltt- 

fightflrg." 

tU^ «X, c^~ h ^ ~J%^ &JU^U ^w-^ — 



-3 












I 



• 



Volume 6 



' ! 









A 



OS BRAILLE BOOK REVIBifT 
A Guide to Braille and Talking Book Publications 
Published Monthly at the 
American Printing Houae for the Blind 
1839 Frankfort Avenue 
Louisville, Kentucky 

Printed for 

The New York Public Library 

Fifth Avenue and 42nd. Street 

New York City 

(Henry F« Homes Fund) 

February, 1937 





















Number 2 



Contents 



&_ gvrL , tt-4- o^A (rJL< 






^ 



ssv^J-\ 



\ I/VVVWO ClG/^ 









t 



Braille Book Review, February, 19ii7 



fc. 



cinnati and LC Popular fiction, 
/ashington, D.G, 



2v. 



acene 



is laid around 



sa otherwise noted) 
a, 

3 London 'imes states "we bolieve this 
?hich untiring discipline has moulded 
3, and reasons with U3 why it must be so, 
> 18613, 5r. APH (Provided by the U. . 
>ackground of New England literature. 
Lth Napoleon. 2v. aPH (Provided by 
leral de Caulaincourt, iAike of Yicenza; 
iu; translate 1 , edited and with an 
iccount of the Congress of Chatillon 
representative, discusses the treach- 
suicide,and closes with llba looming 

ty in two acts, lv, NIB Ric iard II, 
btoricul play. Tine, 1365, when 
Richard is nineteen, 
as, Alexandre. The "Forty- five", 8v, NIB A medley, containing nany scenes of romance 
and tragedy. The "Forty-five" is the famous bodyguard of Henry III, 
Ford, Antoinette, and Lyons and Carnahan. Gopher tales; stories from the history of i'inne- 




— ..— ..wv. vr* 



»-J.u JU.> 



& - 



■ota, lv. Grade 1&» APH 



See article on 



Ford, Antoinette, Lyons and Carnahan. My Minnesota. 3v. Grade 1.;, APH 
Frost, Robert, Selected poems, lv. BIA (Provided by the U,: , Government) 

Frost in Braille Book Review for November, 1936. 
Games: Backgammon up-to-date. Pamphlet, NIB 
Geddes, Patrick, and Arthur Thomson. Evolution. 2v. MB 
Haldane, J.S. The philosophy of a biologist, lv. NIB 

Hobart, Alice T. Tang and Yin; a novel of an American doctor in China. 3v. APE (Provided 
by the U.S. Government) Story of the conflict between Enst and 7est, the old and the 
new, as dramatized in the life of an American doctor, Peter Fraser, statione in China, 
and his young wife, Diana. The tiiie is from shortly after the Boxer uprising in 1920, 
Hobbs, /illiam H. Peary. CPU To be embossed, 

Hugo, Victor. The toilers of the sea. 4v. 1966. APJ1 (Provided by the U.S. Government) 
This was written duriig Hugo's e ile on the island of Guernsey, It contains su >erb 
descriptions of the sea. Represents the eternal struggle between man's will and the 
4P elemental powers of nature. 
Irwin, Margaret. The proud servant, 7v, NIB Fiction. 

Lincoln, J,C. Great-aunt Lavinia. 3v, 1936 (Provided by the U.S. Government) Ca ; >e Cod 
in the early days of the twentieth century is the setting for this story of Lavinia 
aged 75. The shrewd, kindly old lady takes a hand in the destiny of a great-niece and 
puts her on the road to success in several senses of the word. 
Loney, 3.L, i-leraents of trigonometry, 2v, NIB 
Lorac, E.C.R. Murder in t. John's ifood. 3v. NUi Fiction, 
Nicholson, E,M. How birds live, lv. NIB Natural history. 
Orczy, Baroness. The tangled skein. 4 v. NIB Fiction. 

Patterson, F.T. .fhite wampum, the story of Kateri Tekakwitha, 2v, Grade 1{, APH Concerning 
the Indians of America, 
uck, Berta, Change here for happiness, 4v, NIB Fiction. 
>w, G.B. Arms and the man; a pleasant play. lv. 1898 API! (Provided by the U.S, Govern- 
ment) From the volume of "Plays, Pleasant and Unpleasant." Shaw's early plays all 
y ad a large reading public before they became a success on the stage. An interesting 
^tch on Shaw appeared in the March, 1933, Braille Book Review. 
and social credit. Pamphlet, NIB 
Horn-Ashbaugh High School speller. 5 paraphlots. Grades 1 and 1{, AiH 
nia Sackville-. The land. lv. NIB The author first became known as a poet. 
,n won the Hawthornden Prize for joetry in 1926. 






zz 







Braille Book Reviow, February, 19i57 2. 

Book Announcements 
(Books in thia li3t are in Grade 2 unleaa otherwise noted) 
Blake, Nicholas. A question of proof • sv« NIB Fiction. 
Blind university graduates. Pamphlet. NIB 

Bridges, Robert. The testament of beauty. 2v. NIB The London lues states "we believe thia 
to be the greatest poem he has written. In verse which untiring discipline has moulded 
to a new freedom he tells us that life is happinesu, and reasons with U3 why it must be so. 
Brooks, Van fyck. The flowering of Now England -1815 to 186b. 5v. APH (Provider: by the U. . 
Government) Stimulating narrative history of the background of New England literature. 
Caulaincourt, Armand Auguatin, Marquis de. No poace with Napoleon. 2v. aPH (Provide^ by 

the U.S. Go-vernment) Concluding the Memoirs of General de Caulaincourt, Duke of Vicenza; 
from the Original Memoirs as e ited by Joan Hanoteau; tranalate- 1 , edited and with an 
introduction by George Libaire. This contains an account of the Congress of Chatillon 
in February, 1014, where the author was Napoleon's representative, diacuasea the treach- 
ery of the men Napoleon trusted, and the attempted suicide, and closes with Llba looming 
on the immediate horizon. 
Daviot, Gordon (pseudonym). Richard of Bordeaux; a play in two acts. lv. NIB Ric iard II, 
aon of the Black Prince, is the subject of this historical play. Tine, 1365, when 
Richard ia nineteen. 
4P>umaa, Alexandre. The "Forty- five". 8v. NIB A medley, containing many scenes of romance 
and trage: ;;. The "Forty-five* 1 is the famous bodyguard of Henry III. 
Ford, Antoinette, and Lyons and Carnahan. Gopher tales; stories from the history of Minne- 
sota, lv. Grade lj> APH 
Ford, Antoinette, Lyons and Carnahan. My Minnesota. 3v. Grade 1{j. APH 
Frost, Robert. Selected poems, lv. BIA (Provided by the U. . Government) Sec article on 

Frost in Braille Book Review for November, 1930. 
Games: Backgammon up-to-date. Pamphlet. NIB 
Geddes, Patrick, and Arthur Thomson. Evolution. 2v. NIB 
Haldane, J.S. The philosophy of a biologist, lv. NIB 

Hobart, Alice T. Tang and Yin; a novel of an American doctor in China. 3v. APH (provided 
by the U.S. Government) Story of the conflict between E'>st and test, the old and the 
new, as dramatized in the life of an .American doctor, Peter Fraser, statione in China, 
and his young wife, Diana. The ti.'ie is from shortly after the Boxer uprising in 1928. 
Hobbs, /illiam II. Peary. CPU To be embossed. 

Hugo, Victor. The toilers of the sea. 4v. 1866. AH! (Provide I by the U. . Government) 
This was written during Hugo's e lie on the island of Guernsey. It contains superb 
descriptions of the sea. Represents the etornal struggle between man's will and the 
V elemental powers of nature. 
Irwin, Margaret. The proud servant. 7v. NIB Fiction. 

Lincoln, J.C. Great-aunt Lavinla. 3v. 1936 (Provided by the U.S. Government) Cape Cod 
in the early days of the twentieth century is the setting for this story of Lavinia 
aged 75. The shrewd, kindly old lady takes a hand in the destiny of a great-niece and 
puts her on the road to success in several senses of the word. 
Loney, 3.L. elements of trigonometry. 2v. NIB 
Lorae, E.C.R. Murder in -t. John's food. 3v. NIB Fiction. 
Nicholson, E.M. How birds live. lv. NIB Natural history. 
Orczy, Baroness. The tangled skein. 4v. NIB Fiction. 

Patterson, F.T. /hite wampum, the story of Kateri Tekakwitha. 2v. Grade 1£. APH Concerning 
the Indians of America. 
\ uck, Berta. Change here for happiness. 4v. NIB Fiction. 

\ >w, G.B. Arms and the man; a pleasant play. lv. 1898 AHI (Provided by the U.S. Govern- 
\ ment) From the volume of "Plays, Pleasant and Unpleasant." Shaw's early plays all 

ad a large reading public before they became a auccess on the stage. An intereating 
\ itch on Shaw appeared in the March, 1933, Braille Book Review. 

\ and aocial credit. Pamphlet. NIB 

\ Horn-Ashbaugh High School speller. 5 pamphlets. Grades 1 and l£-. AHI 

\ nia Sackville-. The land. lv. NIB The author firat became known as a poet. 

\ ,n won the Hawthornden Prize for joetry in 1926. 






— 1 







' 



Braille Book Review, February, 19.7 2. 

Book Announcements 
(Booka in this li3t are in Grade 2 unless otherwise noted) 

Blake, Nicholas. A question of proof. ,-v. NIB Fiction. 

Blind university graduates. Pamphlet. NIB 

Bridges, Robert. The testament of beauty. 2v. NIB The London 'imes states "we believe this 
to be the greatest poem he has written. In verse which untiring discipline has moulded 
to a new freedom he tells us that life is happiness, and reasons with U3 why it must be so. 

Brooks, Van fyck. The flowering of Now England -181 5 to 1865. 5v. APH (Provider: by the U. . 
Government) Stimulating narrative history of the background of New England literature. 

Caulaincourt, Amend Augustin, Marquis de. No peace with Napoleon. 2v. APH (Provide^ by 

the U.S. Government) Concluding the Memoirs of General de Caulaincourt, I-uke of Vicenza; 
from the Original Memoirs as e ited by Jean Hanoteau; translate?', edited and with an 
introduction by George Libalre. This contains an account of the Congress of Chatillon 
in February, 1814, where the author was Napoleon's representative, discussea the treach- 
ery of the men Napoleon trusted, and the attempted suicide, and closes with 3 lba loaning 
on the immediate horizon* 

Daviot, Gordon (pseudonym). Richard of Bordeaux; a play in two acts. lv. NIB Richard II, 
son of the Black Prince, is the subject of this historical play. Tine, 1J85, when 
Richard is nineteen. 

Pumas, Alexandre. The "Forty- five" . 8v. NIB A medley, containing many scenes of romance 
and tragB(>/. The "Forty-five" is the famous bodyguard of Henry III. 

Ford, Antoinette, and Lyons and Carnahan. Gopher tales; stories from the history of Minne- 
aota. lv. Grade Ijp APH 

Ford, Antoinette, Lyons and Carnahan. My Minnesota. 3v. Grade l{j. APH 

Frost, Robert. Selected poems, lv. BIA (Provided by the U. . Government) Sec article on 
Frost in Braille Book Review for November, 1936. 

Games: Backgammon up-to-date. Pamphlet. NIB 

Geddes, Patrick, and Arthur Thomson. Evolution. 2v. NIB 

Haldane, J.S # The philosophy of a biologist, lv. NIB 

Hobart, Alice T. Yang and Yin; a novel of an American doctor in China. 3v. APE (Provided 
by the U.S. Government) Story of the conflict between Enst and 7est, the old and the 
new, as dramatized in the life of an American doctor, Peter Fraser, stationed in China, 
and his young wife, Diana. The tliTe is from shortly after the Boxer uprising in 1920. 

Hobbs, 71111am H. Peary. CPH To be embossed. 

Hugo, Victor. The toilers of the 3ea. 4v. 1BCG. APE (Provided by the U.S. Government) 
This was written during Hugo's e lie on the island of Guernsey. It contains su;>erb 
^ descriptions of the sea. Represents the eternal struggle between man's will and the 
^P elemental powers of nature. 

Irwin, Margaret. The proud servant. 7v. NIB Fiction. 

Lincoln, J.C. Great-aunt Lavinia. 3v. 1936 (Provided by the U.S. Government) Cape Cod 
in the early days of the twentieth century is the setting for tliis story of Lavinia 
aged 75. The shrewd, kindly old lady takes a hand in the destiny of a great-niece and 
puts her on the road to success in several senses of the word. 

Loney, 3.L. Elements of trigonorae try. 2v. NIB 

Lorac, E.C.R. Murder in t. John's Wood. 3v. NU3 Fiction. 

Nicholson, £JS« How birds live. lv. NIB Natural history. 

Orczy, Baroness. The tangled skein. 4v. NIB Fiction. 

Patterson, F.T. flhite wampum, the story of Kateri Tekakwltha. 2v. Grade l|r. APH Concerning 
the Indians of America. 

Ruck, Berta. Change here for happiness. 4v. NIB Fiction. 

Shaw, G.B. Arms and the man; a pleasant play. lv. 1898 APH (Provided by the U.S. Govern- 
ment) From the volume of "Plays, Pleasant and Unpleasant." Shaw's early plays all 
had a large reading public before they became a success on the stage. An interesting 
sketch on Shaw appeared In the March, 1933, Braille Book Review. 

Socialism and social credit. Pamphlet. NIB 
Spellers: Horn-Ashbaugh High School speller. 5 pamphlets. Grades 1 and 1^. APH 

vyWeat, Virginia Sackville-. The land. lv. NIB The author first becane known as a poet. 
"The land" won the Hawthornden Prize for poetry in 1926. 






— »- 






• 






- 



3. 

White, K.S. Secret harbour. 2v. 1926 CPH (Provided by the U.S. Government) A story of 
the prevention of the theft of an Alaskan gold mine* 

Wilson, Harry L. Haggles of Red dap. 3v. APH (Provided by the U.S. Government) The enter- 
taining story of an impeccable English butler vrfio brings old world culture to a forth 
American community* 

(Editor* s note. Any back number of the Braille Book Review may be borrows' from the New 
York Public Library, 137 West 25th Street, Bo* York City.) 






I 






^«troit. 



»— rr> 






n «*ard to 



Hand— copieu _ 

(Books in this list are in grade 1& unless otherwise nor- 
ths ownership of hand-copied ho ka by libraries is incomplete as ■**. . 

their additions to us.) *~ 

Baldwin, F.C* The homing instinct* It. IIYPL Religious* 

Barbour. R*H* Around 1he end. 4v. IIYPL Football story by a popular author. 

Barbour. B.H. :/eatherhy»8 inning* 4v* Perkins. A story of college life and baseball. 

Barclay. Florence. The rosary. 7v* Chicago, Ft. Louis. Also available in grade 2 in 
NTPL Popular fiction. 

Barrington, E., pseudonyn. Anne Boleyn. 7v* Chicago, NLB A dare-devil beauty stakes all and 
loses in the ga-ie of kings and kingdoms. 

Barrington, E*, pseudonym. The £xeat ror antic* 6** Chicago. Tempestuous story of the great 
Samuel Pepys. 

Bassett, S.w* Hidden shoals* 4v* Cincinnati. Fiction. 

Binyon, Fir Laurence* Akbar* 2v. Chicago. History. 

Blossom, Frederick A*, editor* Told at the Explorers Club; true tales of modern explora- 
tion. 6v. Chicago, ITTPL 



Broster, d.A* Fir Isumbras at the Ford. 9v..Alb« 



Fioti o 



ra&uArt^- 



(XyV~U7*-~ 



^jBurkett, D*L* Canary birds; a conplete galde^rea^raent inhcalth' and disease, lv. LC 
Byrne, Donu* Blind Raftery, and hie wife, Ililaria. 2v. Detroit, LC, Philadelphia, IILB, 

St. Louis* Fiction laid in Ireland. 
Byrne, Donn. Leaser liarco Polo* 2v* Ft* Louis, LC, NTPL Fiction. 
Christensen, W*A* Almo, 'His master's eyes"* lv* Chicago* The true story of a famous 

hero eye dog* 
Cobb, Irwin S* Thunders of silence, lv. Chicago. Fiction. 
Cobb, Stanwood, editor. The wisdom of Y?u ling Fu* lv* Sacrauento. 

Coughlin, Rev. C.E* Explanation of the sixteen principles of social justice, lv. St. Louis. 
Curtis, A.T* A little uaid of pr vincetorai. 2v. NYPL Story of a little Cape Cod girl 

during the revolution. 
De la Roche, hazo. Explorers of the dawn* 4v* LC, 1TPL, Fcattle* Adventures of three little 

English boys delightfully vritten. 

motoring* 7v. Cincinnati. 
hurst, Fannie. Lurmox. 6v. W&L This oympa hetic novel 18 ' ?iction - 
of a servant girl is a notable achievement. 

#) ati* 

HLB 

Portland. A stirring tale of the 

r* 2v* LC 
Pentecost* 4v. Cincinnati, Albany, 



■n ~. 




oner for refugses (Jewish and others) 
coming from Germany. 2v* Jevish Braille Library. Addressed to the recretary General of 
the League of Hat ions* ith an annex containing an analysis oi the measures in Germany 
against non Aryans and of their effect in creating refugees* 

Oppenheim, E*P* The treasure house of I art in* llv* LC, Detroit. Fiction. 

Pound, Arthur, once a wilderness. 7v. Detroit. A story of frontier life in ichigan. 

Priest ley ^ J.B* \Tbert goes through* lv* Chicago* 

Rinehart, I ary Roberts* The romantics* 4v. Ft* Louis, Cleveland, Chicago, Facramento. Fiction. 

Rinehart, Mar.v Roberts* The state versus Elinor Norton* 4v* Chicago. Fiction. 

Rogers, Samuel* Dusk at the grove. Gv* Chicago, Sacramento. \~^<X*-ov\ 

Rohmer, Faa, pseudonyu* Daughter of Fu Meachu. jkv Detroit. Detective story. 



I 







■*- ^troit. 



»— Tr» 






* ^ 



n ««!ard to 



Hand-copieu _ 
(Books in this list are in grade ljl unless otherwise no«.~- 
the ownership of hand-copied ho ks by libraries is incomplete as ■*_ 
their additions to us*) 

Baldwin, F.C« The homing instinct. It, NYPL Religious* 

Barbour. H.H. Around 1he end. 4v. HYPL Football story by a popular author. 
Barbour. H.H. /eatherby's inning. 4v. Perkins. A story of college life and baseball. 
Barclay, Florence. The rosary. 7v. Chicago, Ft. Louis. Also available in grade 2 in 

NTPL Popular fiction. 
Barrington, E., pseudonyn. Anne Boleyn. 7v. Chicago, NLB A dare-devil beauty stakes all and 

loses in the ga-ie of Icings and kingdoms. 
Barrington, 3., pseudonym. The {reat ronantic. uv. Chicago. Tempestuous story of the great 

Samuel Pepys. 
Bassett, S«¥« Hidden shoals. 4v. Cincinnati. Fiction. 
Binyon, Fir Laurence. Akbar. 2v. Chicago. History. 

Blossom, Frederick A., editor. Told at the Explorers Club; true tales of nodern explora- 
tion. 6v. Chicago, NTPL 
Broster, D.A. Fir Isurabras at the Ford. 9v. ^^any^i^c^ianj^ M />A^ r <x~~£- 
^Burkett, D«L. Canary birds; a conplete guide/jtreatraent Inhcaltn' and disease, lv. LC 
Byrne, Donn. Blind Raftery, and his wife, Itilaria. 2v. Detroit, LC, Philadelphia, NLB, 

St. Louis. Fiction laid in Ireland. 
Byrne, Donn. I easer i.arco Polo. 2v. Ft. Louis, LC, NYPL Fiction. 
Christensen, W.A« Almo, 'His master's eyes", lv. Chicago. The true story of a famous 

hero eye dog. 
Cobb, Irwin s. Thunders of silence, lv. Chicago. Fiction. 
Cobb, stanwood, editor. The wisdom of v/u ling Fu. lv. Sacramento. 

Coughlin, Rev. C.E. Explanation of the sixteen principles of social justice, lv. St. Louis. 
Curtis, A.T. A little said of pr vincetov;n. 2v. NYPL Story of a little Cape Cod girl 

during the revolution. 
De la Roche, I'azo. Explorers of t3;e dawn. 4v. LC, NYPL, "cattle. Adventures of three little 

English boys delightfully vritten. 
Desmond, A.C. Fouth Aiaerican adventures. 6v. LC. nistory. 

Dixon, W.H. Westward hoboes; ups and downs of frontier motoring. 7v. Cincinnati. 
Dopp, K.S. The story o: the early cave-men. lv. Ft. Louis. Fiction. 
Eberhart, Ll.G. The house on the roof. 5v. LC Fiction. 
3prd, P.L. The story of an untold love. 3v. Fadramento. Fiction. 
Galsworthy, John. Escape; an epiiodic play. 2v. Cincinnati. 
Glasgow, Jllen. The sheltered life. 6v. Chicago, NYPL, NLB Fiction. 
Hall, Leland. Falah and his Africans. 3v. LC History. 
Hergesheimer, Joseph, vild oranges. 2v. Chicago, NTPL, Portland. A stirring tale of the 

orange groves of Georgia. 
-^Mllyer, R.S., editor. Collected verse of Robert Hillyer. 2v. LC 
^ Jones, E. Stanley. The Christ of every road; a study in Pentecost. 4v. Cincinnati, Albany, 

Sacramento. Devotional talks. 
Kelly, Eleanor ]'. Basquerie. 7v. :acranento. Fiction. 
Kyne, P.B. Jim the conqueror. Dv. Cliicago. Fiction. 
Lutz, G.L.H. Duskin. 4v. Cincinnati, Sacramento. Fiction. 
LcCraw, L.H. Starward. lv. Sacramento, Richmond. Fiction. 
VcDonald, James G. Letter of resignation; High Commissioner for refugees (Jewish and others) 

coming from Germany. 2r. Jewish Braille Library. Addressed to the secretary General of 

the League of Nations. ith an annex containing an analysis of the measures in Germany 

against non Aryans and of their effect in creating refugees. 
Oppenheim, E.P. The treasure house of I art in. llv. LC, Detroit. Fiction. 
Pound, Arthur, once a /ilderness. 7v. Detroit. A story of frontier life in ichigan. 
Priest ley* J.B* Albert goes through, lv. Chicago. 

Rinehart, iary Roberts. The rojiantics. 4v. Ft. Louis, Cleveland, Chicago, Facranento. Fiction. 
Rinehart, ; ar;/ Roberts. The state versus Elinor Norton. 4v. Chicago. Fiction. 
Rogers, Samuel. Dusk at the grove. Gv. Chicago, Sacramento. \-^<£*-ir^ 
Rohmer, Sax, pseudonyu. BMI0l*f0 of Fu Maachu. lAv Detroit. Detective story. 



1- - 



-■ — r 



• 



■ 






D 






A tale of youth and summer- 



eldes, Teorge. Freedom of the press • 7v. Detroit. 
Starrett, Vincent. The private life of herlock Holmes. 3r. LC 
Stong, Phil. The stranger's return. 4v. Chicago. 
Tarkington, Booth, seventeen. 5v. Indianapolis, IC, Pittsburgh. 

time. 
Tarshish, Jacob. Judaism and socialism. It. Jewish Braille Library. 

Tan Loo^ Heudrik /illem. The story of inventions; man, the iracle maker. 3v. Sacramento. 
Ventura, Lugi Donato. Peppino; with introduction and vocabulary. French text. lv. LC 
Wallace, Edgar, jhite face. 6v. Detroit, Chicago. Fiction. 
Yalpole, Hugh. Judith Paris, llv. acramento, LC Fiction. 

verfel, Franz. The eternal road; translated "by Ludwig Lcwisohn. 2v. Jewish Braille Library, 
Drama. 

hitell, Bvelyn. Lovingly in the hands of the father. 2v. Detroit, . c t. Louis. 

ilkineon, Clennell. Coeur de Lion. 3v. Detroit. History. 



Religious. 



# 



\ 









/ ■— 



The Flowering of New England, 1815-1865, by Van tfyck Brooks. 
Rejuewed by Carl Van boron. 

This, Van Kyck Brooks saya in his preface, is, "the first of a number of volumes 
in which I iiope to sketch the lit rary history of the Unite states. It is an episode of 
a larger cycle, neither the first nor the last. .. Whether I can carry out the whole of 
this undertaking, I have no means of knowing at the moment." 

Nobody can read his book without excitedly hoping that he will have all the 
3trength and encouragement he may need for the completion of his work. For if he con- 
tinues and finishes it on the same scale as this, and with the same knowledge, range, 
insight, precis on and grace, he will have written, not only ti;e best history of American 
literature, but one of the bost literary histories in any language. 

It was a happy choice of Mr. Brooks's to deal in his first episode with the fifty 
years during which New England, sta ding somewhat aside from the tumult of American life as 
a whole, produced a literature of its own within the literature of the naton. New England 
was the most homogeneous section of the United states, had nost nearly the same culture 
throughout its ports, and had been most disciplined to reading as well as to writing. 

No doubt what now seems to hare been a compact and orderly development seemed much 
less so to New inlanders a hundred years ago* After all, iloknor and Thoroau were about 
as far apart aa it is possible for contemporaries to be. Cambridge was not Boston, Concord 
^ was far from being like either of theau The inland Yankees were sharply differentiated 
W from the seaboard gentry, and Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont were still frontiers. 

But all New Kngland had so much in common, in history, economic interests, moral 
concepts, and intellectual dialect, that it could be e repressed through the voices of its 
best writers and could recognise itself in that expression. No other large chapter in the 
literary history of the United States fits itself so naturally to the hand of the historian. 

To the hand of any historian, and particularly to that of Van fyck 3rooks. ! e 
has always shown hinself acutely sensitive to society, and r.uch concerned with the rela- 
tions between it and its artists* Mark Twain in Van wyck Brooks's study of him compromises 
with society. Henry James runs away from it. Only merson knows how to stand facing it, 
meet it, understand it, and master it, along with himself. 

I have long felt that behind Mr. Brooks's preoccupation lay some fear of his own, 
some dread of society as ominous to hin, which has led hin, rationalizing, to make the 
conflict between society and artist more general and more oppressive than I think it is. 
But New .England appears to trouble Mr* Brooks less than the whole of Aw rica, and he has 
reconstructed New -gland in its flowering with a hand which shows no signs of his earliew 
fears. Although I do not know him very well, I ri3k the guess that ho is himself much 
stronger and surer than he was when he wrote about the ordeal of Mark iwain sixteen years 
01 ago. 

Certainly this latest book is stronger and surer than any Van yck Brooks has 
ever written. In it he is actually at his best in his chapters on New England as a whole. 
He begins with a cha )ter on the BoatOtt of Gilbert Stuart which brings the community pie- 
torially to life, and follows it with an account of Harvard in 1815 which reads like the 
first scene of a drama after the stage has been set. 

uickly he widens the scene and the action by setting forth the contrast between 
the coast and the hinterland, with the Bowditch of the "Practical Navigator" and the 
Webster of the spelling-book and the dictionary as heroes, ihen come the travels of 
George Tlcknor and Kdward Kverett and all they brought back to Boston, Just as its new 
age began, ±his was of course an age of scholarship which Mr. Brooks makes so dramatic 
that Prescott's "Ferdinand and Isabella" arrives with a thrilling flourish of trumpets. 

That same year Longfellow settled in Cambridge and Hawthorne published his "Twice- 
Told Tale3." All at once there was a younger generation, and m rson was its rophet. 

From this point on Mr. Brooks's story is less unified than before, for the reason 
that New England was less unified. Now there was Concord, full of thunderbolts, as well as 
Cambridge full of sch lars, and Boston full of wealth and a growing conservatism. the 
united province was split over slavery. It is hard to imagino a better chapter of moral 
history than Mr. Brooks has devoted to the anti-slavery writers. 

And not all New England lived at home. As the age had its you ^er generation, so 
had it its expatriates, most of all In Italy, the scene of Hawthorne* 3 "Marble Faun". 
Nothing in "The Flowering of New England" Is more fresh, original, and enetrating t an its 
analysis of the "romantic pusillanimous" attitude to\rard England, best seen in the novels 

m 



of Henry James, and the "serene aplomb" of the American travelers of the forties and fifties* 
"It was not u til after the Civil ifar that the groat diaspora began nnd with it the tradition 
of deracination." Not, that is, u til New England, at its ripest and fullest unity Just 
before the Civil /ar, began t; break up and to dissolve into the larger American system* 

Mr. Brooks is so masterly in his general narrative that I once or twice felt im- 
patient when he cheeked the powerful stream to talk about individuals: Longfellow, Emerson, 
Thoreau, Holmes, Lowell. Yet it is difficult to see how he could have written a history 
of literature without taking up its men of letters* Once more he use' a r.ethod he has 
made familiar. Seeming to know the entire works of his "various writers by .:eart, he lets 
them speak largely In their own words, whfcnh he brilliantly composes into harmonious ex- 
position and chronicle. He is specially successful with Holmes, \?ho has lately been neg- 
lected* 

I think there is something symptomatic in this. For Mr. Brooks, though he has 
concerned hi self almost wholly in his criticism with American affairs, has regularly atood 
up for universal standards as against anything laaly provincial* He is not in the least 
provincial here, but neither is he afraid of appearing to be. The tine for that is past. 

American literature is no lon^r a minor matter, but one of the first literatures 
of the world. An Italian noveli3t who reoontly came to see me tolrl me thot, because Italy 
under fascism has virtually no literary life, he like to visit the United States once a 
year of so to *vatch the proceo3os of literature in the makin;> Otherwise he would have to 
^ read about it at a distance* How singularly, I thought, the tables had been turned on 
Henry James* No American now goes to London or Paris to get the benefits of literature, 
any more than, to Home or Berlin* 

The current importance of American literature dignifies its past. Its history 
becomes valuable, and it may be taken on more or les3 its own terms* No need for the 
historian to waste his time arguing about whethor there is an American literature and 
what it is* Let him tell the story, as Mr. Brooks does, and the literature will noeak 
for itself. 



4 



1 P.I 1 



Gone ; lth he inil, tor Margaret litchell. The Civil ar in Georgia's rod clay hill» 
vividly told from the viewpoint of the women left behind. Taken in part from a review in 
Herald Tribune Books. 

liat is remarkable about this book, is not the hilosophy, to explicitly set forth, 
or even the historical authenticity of it all, but the richness of texture, the narrative v 
vigor, the sweop and abundance and generosity of incident and of drama, piled up with 
carelessness and even with aba ;don, the ability to create characters and give them anima- 
tion and reality, The men and women \7ho (slide so graciously or who storm so lustily through 
these pages are full blodded and full bodied and convincing. And the story, told .7ith such 
sincerity nnd pas ion, alluminated by such understanding, woven of the stuff of history 
and of disciplined imagination, ia endlessly interacting. It is dramatic; even melodra- 
matic; it is romantic and occasionally sentimental; it braxonly employs oil of the trap- 
pings of the old-fashioned historical novel, and all of the stock characters of the old- 
fashioned Southern romance, but it rises triumphantly over thi i material and becomes, if 
net a work of art, a dramatic re-creation of life itself. 

The setting is in northern Georgia, on the plantation of Tare and in the bustling, 
pushing, vulgar city of Atlanta during the years of the Civil »'ar and Reconstruction. 
We are introduced first to the County, to the Georgia version of "So Red the Rose" or 
of" tShe" Battleground," and if it is portrayed with less subtlety nan Stark Young or lien 
Glasgow use, that is right, because tho society of northern Georgia, only a generation 
4gjpld, lacked the finish, the polish, tho graeiousneaa of the Yazoo country or of the Valley. 
Yet there was beauty here, and a society, too, that was deeply rooted for all its youth. 
Families from -avannah and from Charleston had planted themselves here, and had taken on 
something of the strength and the cmdeness of the re soil of Georgia that they came to 
love 30 well. This society is presented faithfully nnd understandingly - the great County 
families with their far-flung relationships, the crackers, the house darkies with their 
social distinctions. The County families - the Tarletons and Bontainos, the ilkeses and 
Munroes and Calverts - are cut out of a conventional pattern: the r*irls are all pretty 
coquettes or gentle ladies, the boys are tall and handsome and know how to ride and to shoot. 
But not so with the O'Haras, and it is of the , Haras that Mrs. Hitchell writes. And a 
grand family it i3J Kllen, the nother, a groat lady who meets all of the specifications 
that Benet laid down for thot role in that wonderful description of ally Lou In-nte; 
Gerald, the father, a stocky, red-headed, hard-drinltnjt,hard-ridlng, violent Irishman, 
pushing and vigorous and rough and kind, proud of his Ir sh background and passionately 
fond of Tara, nhieh. he has made, and of his wife; the tliree daughters, weak little Carreen, 
and spoiled, pouting Suellen, and Scarlett herself. 

Best of all is Scarlett, who wanted to be her mother's child but as inescapably 
her father's; Scarlett, who wa3 vain and petty and Jealous and unscrupulous and ruthless, 
^it who had beauty and courage and fortitude. i-Jhe had no mind, but she had a mind of her 
own; she had no subtlety, but oho had a genius for getting below the surface of things 
and knowing their roality; she was full of pretenee ant; of wile, but oho was impatient 
of all sham, convention, shibboleth. Her depth was the depth of the earth; her realism 
the realism of the soil; her gallantry wa3 impersonal almost unconscious. he was not 
a lady, though she wanted to be, but a magnificent woman, a vital, oroud, passionate 
creature, undismayed by life or by death, tenacious of what was hers, acquisitive of what 
was not, hungry for admiration rather than for love, ruthless but capable of ten erness, 
ambitious but capable of sacrifice, sentl ental, but without nonsense, deeply rooted in 
the soil of Tara, but uprootod, too, and lost. 

It is the war that uproots her, as it u roots tliem all, smashing to pieces not only 
the material fabric of their civilization but tho spirit that produced and sustained it. 
"War i3 a man's business, not a woman's," says Saarlett bitterly, a nuisance that killed 
men senselessly and cost money and mode luxuries hard to get." But war was a woman's bus- 
iness, too, as she learned when all of her frien- s marched off to be killed or maimed or 
1: prisoned, her husband and tho man she loved among them. She fie to Atlanta, brash, 
exciting Atlanta, where the old familios fought a losing fight against tho new eople who 
crowded into the town, tho soldiers and speculators nnd irofltoers, men and women on the 
make, people without standards and without values. Hore was Melanie, married to the man 
Scarlett loved, holding on to the old way of life, sustaining the tradition that cralett 
was ready to abandon, a great lady in her generation. And iere, too, was Rhett Butler, 
black sheep of a Charleston family, a scoundrel and a wastrel, cynical, ruthless, unscrup- 



7 



ulcus, but utterly charming, making money hand over fist out of the society widch had 
cast hi pi out and which he scorned and u derstood and secretly loved* 

It is the story of ->c«rlett and Rhett that furnishes the central theme of the book. 
They are two of a kind, and Rhett loiows it, though ■ carle tt does not, She is dazzled by 
his audacity and intrigued by his mind and excited by his money, but she lives in the dream 
of the past and worships a dreamer, Ashley /likes, though ;>he does not understand him. 
Rhett understands hin, and his contempt is the contempt of the new for the old, of success 
for failure, but it is a comtonrpt that is tinged with envy and admiration. 

oon human is battering his way into Georgia and Atlanta is besieged. Never had 
a chapter of the war been more realistically re-created, more vividly described, not even 
in "Long Remember" which use something of the same technique, v/e share the confidence 
of the Georgians as Joe Johnston holds Sherman at bay; we sense the growing uncertainty, 
the fear, as flank movement after flank movement brings the Yankees ever closer to the doomed 
city; we are stirred by the gambler's hope as Hood replaced Johnston and prepares to take 
the offensive; we see the Home Guards, old men and boys and slackers, march out for the 
last defense, and know the hopelessness of it all. Thep the city is abandoned, in a night- 
mare of confusion and agony. Hhett goes off to join the ragged Confederate army, while 
Scarlett and Melanie escape in the night, the rickety wagon Jolting along the deep-rutted 
roads, Melanie lying on the rough boards with her new-born baby hugged to her breast, 
Scarlett prodding the emaciated ifcile. 
^j But the blows of reconstruction were worse than tho blows of war, for reconstruction 

* wasted those impalpable values that had accumulated during generations of gentle living 
and hardened men as not even war had done. Scarlett, too, was har&ene- • he returned 

to Tara and for two years battled to nave it from the triple threat of Yankee soldiers, Con- 
federate com isaaries, and carpet-bag tax gatherers* Her experience furnished a justifi- 
cation, a logic, to her character and she determine that never again would she or hers 
know hunger o: want, never again would Tara be in danger. 

It was the struggle to save Tara that took Scarlett back to Atlanta and to Rhett 
Butler, the one man who had money. °he old Atlanta was gone, the old families broken. 
But not Scarlett. She put graves resolutely out of her mind and parte ' company with the 
ghosts of the past. The new Atlanta, more bustling and more vulgar than ever, offered 
an opportunity for the display of her peculiar talents, and she seized it with characteris- 
tic audacity. She went into business, she used convict labor, she associate with carpet- 
baggers and scalawags and bought immunity from interference by her social grace and pres- 
tige. She won her way to financial security, for herself and for her family and for Tara, 
above all for Tara. But )he lwst everything that Tara stood for; she lost her standing 
in society, she forfeited the affection and respect of the old families and of her own 
family. Only Tara remained - Tara, symbol of everything that she had known and loved 

• nd forfeited, symbol of what she might have been and might still be. 



£U 






r 









Margaret Mitchell. From the Wilson Bulletin, September, 1936. 

Autobiographical sketch of Margaret Mitchell, whose first novel Gone 71 th the Sind is 
the current best seller: 

n I was born in Atlanta and have lived here all my life. My parents were born 
in Atlanta. My grandparo ?ts had cotton plantations in the vici.nit; of Atlanta before 
the town was built. As far a3 I can trace, my people have always lived in the outh, 
most of them in Georgia, since the ^evolution. I can find no record of any of my people 
living durther north than Brittan , 3 Heck, North Carolina, My >eople have been cotton 
planters, lawyers, and Methodist ministers* 

My father is Sugene M. Mitchell, a lawyer of considerable prominence here in Geor- 
gia* He is an authority on Georgia and Southern history and president of the Atlanta 
Historical Society. My mother, now dead, was Maybello Stephens, also an authority on 
Southern hist ry, >articularly that pertaining to the Civil 7ar. I have one brother, 
older than I am, Stephens Mitchell. Ho is a lawyer, president of the Atlanta Lawyers 
Club and e itor of the Atlanta Historical Bulletin. 

My ancestors have been getting into wars ever since 1680. They've fought in 
Colonial Indian campaigns, the Revolution, the -far of 1812, Mexican Jar, Seminole Sars, 
Civil tfar, and the younger fry fouggt in the last war. 

I was e ueated in the Atlanta Public Schools and at Washington Seminary, an 
Atlanta preparatory school. I hoped to study medicine but while I was at Smith College 
my mother died and I had to come hone to keep house. A year or so later I got a job 
on the Atlanta Journal and wrote run-of-the-mine reporting stuff as well as signed feature 
stories, for about six years. 

After giving up active newspaper work I began on Gone 7ith the 7ind. I think I 
started it in 1926 but can't be sure of that. Practically all of it was written betw en 
1926 and 1929. It was high tide of the Jazz Age and the Boom Era was on us but I would 
write a Victorian type novel and one about hard times. The reason it took so long in 
the writing was that my own health was not so good and also every member of my familty 
and all my friends were seriously ill during that >erlod. I spent months and years in 
hospital corridors and outside of operating rooms. Finally it seemed that I would never 
finish it, due to the many outside calls on ray tine, so I put it away and forgot about 
i$. I never submitted it to any publisher or any agent as I thought it pretty terrible. 

Then Mr. H. S. Latham was in Atlanta, a little over a year ago, he heard about 
the manuscrpit and took it away /ith him and bought it. He was the first >erson beside 
myself who had ever laid eyes on it. Except my husband - and he had not seen all of it 
nor could he make heads or tails of it due to my unfortunate habit of writing from the 
back of the book toward the front. 

My husband is John R. Marsh, a Kentuckian. le were married in 1925. He is manager 
of the advertising department of the Georgia Power Company. He is a former newspaper 
man. ?e have no children. 



I chose the Civil Sar »riod to trite about because I was raise on it. As a 
child I listened for hours on Sunday afternoons to stories of f ghting in Virginia and 
Georgia, to the horror of Sherman's approach, his final arrival and the burning and 
' lotting, and the way the r fugees crowded the trains and the roads to Macon. Ind I 
heard about Reconstruction. In fact I heard everything except that the Confederates lost 
the war. /lien I was ten years old, it was a violent sleek to learn -.hat General Lee had 
been licked. And I thought it has all happened just a few years before I was born. 

If the novel has a theme, the theme is that of survival. hat makes some people 
able to come through catastrophes and others, apparently just as able, strong, and brave, 
go under? We've seen it in the present depression. It happens in every upheaval. ome 
people survive; others don't, '/hat qualities are in those who fight their way through 
triumphantly that are lacking in those who go under? What was it that made some of our 



Southern people able to come throng a tar, a Reconstruction, and a complete wrecking 
It Z, B °I ? an ? J ?» nocilc system? I don't know. I only know that the survivors used 
plopl^ h did'n "«*ion". So I wrote about the people who had emotion and the 



. 



V^ 2__ 



I 



THE BRAILLE BOOK REVIEW 
A Guide to Braille and Talking Book Publications 
Publi3he ''■. Monthly at the 
American Printing }k>use for the Blind 
1839 I'rankfort Avonue 
Louisville, Kentucky 

Printed for 
The New York Public Library 
Fifth Avenue and 42nd street 
1J..W York City 
(Henry F» Hones Fund) 



Volume (^ 



March, 1937 



Number 3 



Contents 







Braillo Book Review, Inreh, 19,7 ■• 

ook Announcements 
(Books in thia li3t are in Grade 2 unless other\7ise noted) 

Abdication supplement to the Braille Hall* Pamphlet. NIB Contains King Edward VIII's 
message to Parliament and broadens* speech, Mr. Baldwin's speech, Queen Mary's 
message to the nation, and a summary of the broadcast address of the Archbishop of 
Canterbury. Price 1 pence. 
Andrade, E.N. da, and Julian Hu:d.oy. An introduction to science, forces at work. Book 3. 3v. 
IIIB This concluding book of the series deals with electricity, magnetism, light and 
inorganic and organic chomistry. 
Buchan, John. Oliver Cromwell. 6v. NIB A splendid picture by a great stylist and a sound 

historian of one of the greatest of Englishmen. 
Chase, Mary Ellen. Mary Peters. 5v. ARC (Provided by the U.S. Government) Mary Peters 
passed the early years of her life on board her father's sailing ship. It was not 
until she was in her teens and the ship was wrecked off the California coast that she 
spent much time on land in the Maine village where her ancestors had lived. 'ith 
the wisdom gained from her broad-minded mother and her life at 3ea, Mary lived a 
full, intelligent life, unhampered by narrow conventions, and was able to view with 
peace the aporoach of a lonely old age. 
Deland, Margaret. Awakening of Helena Richie. 3v. 1906 BIA (Provided by the U.S. Govern- 
ment) Portrays the soul awakening of a woman through the influence of Dr. Lavender 
and a homeless child whom she takes in. 

Dickinson, G. Lowes. The Greek view of life. 2v. AHi (Provided by the U.S. Government) 
Gracefully written and with copious quotations from the original authorities. lie 
describes and illustrates the attitude of the Greeks toward religion, luw, the State, 
education, and social problems. 

Dodd, • • Expansion and conflict. 3v. APR Now ready. ce December isnue for book note. 

Freeman, Douglas S. R. E. Lee. Part IV 7v. aPH How ready. See November is.ue for 
book note. 

Galsworthy, John. Old English* Iv. 1925 ABB (Provided by the U.S. Government) Lrama. 

Geography: Human geographies. Book 2. Hie Atlantic hemisphere, by Fairgrieve and 
Young. 4v. NIB Chapters on vogetation, wind systems and rain belts, Africa, North 
and South America, the Atlantic basin, forest and land foms, latitude and longetude, 
etc., ho maps. Book 3. Euro-A3ia, by Fairgrieve and Young. 4v. NIB Chapters on 
India, the Far ast, Australian continent, Europe, Roasts «nd Siberia, otc.,no maps. 

Gibson, Charles R. The romance of nodern electricity; describing in non-teclinical 
language what is known about electricity and many of its interesting applications; 
new and revised edition. 3v. 1930 APH (Provided by the U.S. Government) 

Grey Owl, pseudonym. Men of the last frontier. 3v. NIB The author is a half-breed 
Indian now world famous, who gives a vivid picture of the life of men and beasts of 
the world on the last fading line of the vanishing frontier in Canada. 

Hudson, /.H. Far away and long ago; a history of my early life. 5v. 1813. CFK (Provided 
by the U.S. Government) The romantic childhood of an English naturalist who was 
brought up on the Argentine pampas in the days of the tyranjt Rosas. The grotesque 
natives, the plant and animal life, the picturesque squalor of Buenos Aires in the 
forties and the English family in the midst of such unusual surroundings are ex- 
quisitely pictured. 

Johnson, Allen. Union and democracy. 3v. 1915 AifH (Provided by the U.S. Government) 
"Union and democracy" is the second volume of "Riverside history of the United 
States," edited by W.E. Dodd. "Expansion and conflict," by Dodd is the third vol- 
ume of this series. These books are brilliantly written and present fresh views 
and interesting interpretations. 

King, Godfre Ray, pseudonym. Unveiled mysterios. 2v. ABB This recounts the exper- 
iences of an American, Mr. G.\7. Ballard, writing under the name of Godfre Ray King, 
with the ascended Master Saint Germain. The book is a gift of students who are in- 
terested in the subject and may be found in many of the libraries. It is the first 
of a series of which "The Magic -rosence" is tho 3ocond and the "I Am" discourses 
is the third. 









3. 

Lamb, Harold* The crusades; the flame of Islam. 4 v. dll (Provided by the U.S. Government) 
This begins with the rousing of the Moslem powers in 1169 against the victorious cru- 
saders and tells the story of the one hundred and fifty years stru&;le for supremacy 
that followed* 

McFee, William* The beachcomber* 4v* 1935 CIH (Provided by the U*S. Government) Among 
t:;e passengers on the ship Camotan sailing to the He3t Indies, are Sidney Nevile, 
ex-sea-captain, the mysterious Athalie Rhys, and a writer of mystery stories, !'rs. 
Kavanagh* Mrs* Kavanagh becomes interested in Nevile and gradually hears hia story 
from Chief Engineer Spcnlove who has been his friend for twenty yoars* The 3tory 
is long and covers Nevile* s many early love affairs, and, after an interval of two 
years, his last and great love for Athalie Rhys. 

Mason, A*E.W* They wouldn't be chesamen. 4v* NIB A first class mystery solved by a 
French detective and mostly laid in Franco* 

Merrick, Leonard* Conrad in quest of his youth* 2v* 1911 BIA (Provided by the U*S. 
Government) Conrad revisits boyhood scenes in the hope that their associations may 
revive the emotions of youth* His quest is unsuccessful but a hapny readjustment follows. 

Rochester, G.E* The flying spy* 2v* NIB A first rate yarn for boys of secret service 
men and desperate adventurers of the air. 

Schreiner, Olive* Story of an African fain. 3v* 1934 BIA (Provided by the U.S. Government) 
A novel as unusual in scheme and almost as poetical as '.'fathering Heights, .'aldo and 
Lyndall on an ostrich farm in the S* African veldt work out for themselves the univer- 
sal problem of human life and destiny, the vast loneliness of the scenery symbolizing 
artistically the solitude and helplessness of nan and tho inscrutable mi ght of nature. 

Scott, Sir /alter. Redgauntlet. 6v. NIB The scene in laid in the Border Country and 
the story deals with attempt to restore the Yoxmg Pretender, now old* According to 
Andrew Lang this is a book which for variety and excellence of character has never 
been e celled save by Shakespeare* Contains one of the greatest > hort stories of 
the world - "tendering 7illie» s Tale." 

Thomson, A.L* 3irds* 2v* NIB An introduction to ornithology dealing mainly with the 
habits and behavior of British birds and written si ply for the general reader* 

Voss, .7. J* The light of the mind* 2v. NIB The record of an Australian officer blinded 
in the war describing how he re-established his contact \7ith the outer world. Full 
of humor and Pictures of travel. 

Wharton, S'ith* The world over* 2v* 1936 BIa (Provided by the U*S, Government) -even 
short stories, the scenes of which raige from New York City to Rome* Contents: Cham 
incorporated* Pomegranate seed* Permanent wave* Confession* Haman fever* -he 
looking-glass* Duration* 



Talking Books 
(These books are supplied by the U*S* Government) 

Emerson, Ralph /aldo* Essays. 11 rocords. Now ready. Contents: History. Self-reliance. 
Compensation* Spiritual law3* Friendship* Heroism* The over-soul* Intellect. 

Grey, Zane. Riders of the purple sage. 18 records. Now ready. This is a popular book 
in all libraries. Readers will be served in order of their requests. 

Johnson, Allen. Jefferson and his colleagues. 1921 12 records. Now ready. This is from 
the "Chronicles of America series,' edited by .alien Johnson. It is an attractive 
series planned to appeal to the general reader. The books in this series are for t 
most nart scholarly and at the same tine written in an unusually interesting story- 
telling manner. 

Sabatini, .afael. The Sea-hawk. 21 records. Now ready. 



H 

Hand-copied Books 
(Books in this list are in grade ly unless other ise noted. Our information in regard to 
the ownership of hand-copied "books "by libraries is incomplete as all libraries do not report 
their additions to us*) 

Editor* 8 note j The libraries which own these hand-copied books are indicated right after 
each title. If you will uote the library which owns the book you. wish and will write direct- 
ly to that Horary you will get good service. If several libraries own the book, write first 
to the nearest one. k list of the abbreviations uaed-to- indicate the libraries is given in 
^Me^^an^HMptber^ HF > Ie«rt» taflFB^Ehe^-H*^ 1 ?^^ 
Adams, G.B. Constitutional hirtory of England, llv. NLB Of especial value to the college 

student in advanced work, i noweegge of political history is assumed. 
Barton, Sruce* The book nobody knows* 4v. LC, NYPL, NLB* Religion. 
Catalogs: The Community orkers, 172 Bast 96 street, Hew York City, has just issued a braille 

catalog of the hooks in Its circulating Horary. This catalog is cent free upon request. 

The collection is made up largely of hand-copied "books, in grades !& and 2, which are 

circulated to readers throughout the country* They welcome new readers. rite to the 

Community Torkers for further information and for its "braille catalog. 
Chesterton, G.K* Rohert Louis rtevenson* 2v* Chicago* 

Coughlin, Rev. C.B* Money I aestions and answers* 3t* St. Louit. Finance. 
Crawford, P* Marion. sant» Ilario. 9v* LC Fiction. 
a Dalgliesh, Alice, compiler. Christrias, a "book of stories old and new. 4v. Detroit. 
~ Juvenile fiction. 

Davis. R.H. Cinderella* lv. IILB 3v. Chicago. Fiction* 

Be Kruif, Paul* Children can live; and* Cannibal farm hands, by J.w* Vandercook* lv. St. Louis. 
Eherhardt, M.G* Cases of - usan Bare* 4v. IILB Fiction* 
Elliott, Grace L* women after forty* 3v. Chicago. 
Epictetus. Discourses, translated "by George Long* 3v. Chicago. 
Ferher, Edna* One happy Jew* 4v* Chicago. 
Fishhack, : argaret* Out of my head* lv* NLB Fiction* 
Haig-Brown, R*L* Ki-Yu; a story of a panther* 3v* Juvenile fiction* 
Haines, illian Jister* Slim* 7v. -acranento* Fiction* 
Harkness, Georgia. The resources of religion* 4v. NLB 
Hemington, L.E. Our new shrine* Grade 1* lv* NLB Fiction* 

Eillis, < arjorie. Live alone and like it; a guide for the extra woman. 2v. St. Louis. 
Jews In America, "by the editors of Fortune magazine, lv. Jewish Iraille Library. 
Johnson, J.w* God*s tra.honea; teven negro sermons in verse, lv. LC Poetry. 
Johnson, J./. Negro Americans, viiat now? lv. LC History. 
King, G •!*( A Magic resjince* 6v* NLB Religious. 
wi:ipling, Rudyard* Thy servant a dog, told by Boots* lv* acramento. Juvenile fiction. 
Kohut, Rehekah. My portion (an autobiography.) 4v. Jewish Braille Library. Sociology. 
Lull, R.S. Fossils. 2v. NLB Science* 
Luts, G.L*H. Silver wings. 4v. NLB Fiction. 
IScClure, A.K., editor. Famous Aneri can statesmen and orator c. 22v* Chicago* Biographical 

sketches and famous oration?. 
Mensel, D.H* Stars and planet d. 2v. NLB Science* 
Miller, H.T* The flaming Gahagans. 4v* Chicago* Fiction* 
Mosenthal, S*H« stories of Jewish hone life* 4v* Chicago. 
I'.undy, Talbot. Om, the secret of Ah"bor Valley* 7v* Chicago. Fiction. 
Patterson, F.T* The end of Manhattan; and, E&rnyardia, by CM. ilson; and, Easter in the 

Ukraine, "by Nathalie Troubetskoy. lv* Xavier Publication Society for the Blind. 
Reese, Llsette \u pastures and other poems* lv* NLB Poetry* 
Rideout, H*M* Far cry. 3v. NYPL Fiction. Scene la the south -ea Islands* 
Shubert, larle. Minute myths and legends. 3v* Chicago. Juvenile fiction. 
Smith, -usan. Made in Mexico, lv. Chicago, line arts. 
Smith, T.7. ..Philosophic way of life. 3v. Chicago. 
Stevenson, R*L* f^ee entry under Chesterton, G*K* 
'Stringer, vrthur. "peed hound; and, She owl's ear, "by Erckmann-Chatrian; and, Love in the 

dragon's shadow, "by Konrad Bercovlci* lv* Philadelphia* 



Tan Dyke, Henry. The lost word; a C rlstmaa legend of lone ago. !▼• ' *• Louis, LC, Port- 
land. Fiction. 

Yan Hoy, Kathryne, and Elinor Kedrick. Jack and Latt of the Wx. 2t. Detroit. Jurenile fiction. 

Yance, L.J. Lone wolf. 4v. IIYPL ilction. 

Voynich, E.L. The gadfly. 7v. Chicago. A story of Italy in the early 19th century. The 

gadfly is the unacknowledged von of a priest who cornes ii to conflict with his father, 
a cardinal. 

Wagner, Richard. The Yalkyrie; a dramatic poem, freely translated in poetic narrative form 
by Oliver Huckel. 2v. Chicago. 

valkinshaw, Robert. On Puget ound. Zr, Chicago. History. 

Wendell, Barrett. BagU«B oonpocition. 5v. HLB 

./iggin, Kate Douglas. The story of Patsy, lv. racraraento. F .ction. 

Willets-Burnhaia, Anita. Round the world on a penny. 3t. Chicago, travel and description. 

wylie, llinor. Mr. nodge and L'r. Hazard. 3v. Chicago. Fiction. 

Teager, D.G. Bob Flaioe, Rocky Mountain ranger. 4v. Detroit. Fiction. 

Xoung, JE.B. liy brother Jonathan. 7v. Chicago. Fiction. 

CEneroIlowing titles are taken from a series of pamphlets prepared under a grant from the 

General Education Board to the American Council on Education. The pamphlets are designed 

to meet, first of all, the needs of the workers* and adult education groups for readable 

materials in the social sciences. The series represents an attenpt to present, in a spirit 

►jOf scientific inquiry but in non- technical language, a discussion x>f current issues ^in q 

economics, politics and sociology. 'K'&juzm. lt-v-vtvV^ *~ vt - ~^ ^y-^~ ^tUc^i^o ^^J(AL-~e- ^i^Xr\c^n^A , 

Crighton, J.C., and Senturia, J.J. Business and ;30verament. lv. 

Davis, Kingsley. Youth in the depression. lv. 

Borne, R.L. The farm business, lv. 

Ogburn, 7.F. You and machine, lv. 

Pratt, J..f. Friends or enemies, lv. 

Rose, Marc, and R.L.Eowe. loney. lv. 

Senturia, J. J. Strikes, lv. 

Notice to Subscribers: Subscribers to the Braille Book Iteviev; are requested to notify the 
American Printing House for the Blind, 1BD9 Frankfort .avenue, Louisville, Ky. 9 if they wish 
to have their subscriptions continued. This check-up is necessary in order that only those 
who are interested will continue to receive the magazine. 

Books In Grade 1-ij. 
Readers who wish books in grade l-£ are reminded that although the printing presses have put 
out few books in this type since 1933 there are a large number of hand-copied books in 
^rade 1§. in the various libraries. liew books in this type are being transcribed by vol- 
unteers right along. The trick Is to learn how to locate these books. A braille catalog of 
all hand-copied books in the country has been compiled by Miss lioyt, Acting-Director of 
Braille. Many copies of this have been placed in all libraries. You can easily borrow a 
copy from your nearest library for the blind. It is in four volumes. In order to use it 
intelligently you must observe which library owns the book you want and write directly to 
that library. All libraries lend their hand-copied books freely into any state for as a rule 
there is only one copy of these books to be had. 7e hope that Ml as lioyt will publish a 
supplement to this catalog in time. 

If you are interested in reading grade l£ we suggest that you write to the libraries for 
lists of their new hand-copied books. The New York Public Library, 137 Vest 25th Street, 
New York City, has a braille list of its hand-copied books to give away. If you wish a copy 
just write for it. 



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Fannie Ilurst r^~x "iyJ^^c^CUXtS^nA • 

Fannie Hurst was born on October 19, 18; 9, in I.amilton, yhio. "I usually- 
pass the honor on to st.Loui3," she soys, "since I was taken t I I for 
the exclusive purpose of toe in" born there in an old. prandparental honestea< , 
and returned to St.Lo iis while still in the beety, underdone info tile star-e." 
She spent the first twenty years of her life in St.Louis. r pare ts were 
fairly well-to-co. 

The fact that she was an only chile rave her lonr^ periods for reaci; . 
From the time she was old enough to hold a volume on her knee, her rea. in - as 
uncensored and unrestricted. At nine she read "Thomas a Becket"; at eleven, 
Coleridge's "Christabel"; at thirteen, ickens, Thackeray, Ouida, and the 
Merediths, She corresponded with James .hitecomb Riley and wrote unanswered 
letters to Booth Tarkington. 3he collected a scrap book of verse labeled, 
"Keats and Others." 

At fourteen ambit Imn . iss Hurst submitted .• eaeue in blank verse to the 
"Saturday Evening lost". She attracted attention in high school by her sbowy 
precocity. At one time she was nearly excelled whan it was discovered that 
she was writing themes for her cless-mates in return for mathematics prolle .s« 
She manifested an excess of vitality end engaged in athletics end dramatics , 
besides contributing to the "High school Lews". In spare momenta she wrote 
verse and fiction which she pro ptly nailed out to publishers. 

By the time she entered ..as: in ton University in St. Louis, "iss I T urst 
had accumulated quite a large collection of magazine rejection slips, she 
wrote for the "University Student Life." Her striking personality brought 
her one or two assignments fro i St. Louis nc s ers. At the university she 
was a good student and participated in dramatics and out-door sports. It 
was her custo i to write late at ni ht in her suite In the women 1 s rmitory. 
A colle e friend relates: w 'ne used to speculate as to the meaning of the 
midni ht oil that urned in her tower room until three -ur and g aa 



five o* clock in the Horning* She never referred to these late hours, or if 
teased, made light of thera and would appear a onf us in the university i ining- 
room next morning as fresh as if she had on joyed a normal allotment of sleep. n 

Har ion Reedy, editor of "Reedy's ;irror" in st.Lo is, published a vignette 
he received from this unknown author. During their ocquaintar.ee of the rent 
few yer,rs he was her patient adviser. 

An unhappy year followed graduation fron ,-ashin -ton University in 1909. 
Fannie Hurst was impatient to try her nettle but her parents kept her hone. 
They pointed to her years of futile atte pts at getting manuscripts published 
and her twenty-one rejection slips fron the "seturday Evening Post". She at- 
tempted newspaper work again n nd produood a ono-aot play. Finally she broke 
away rith graduate work at Columbia University as vn excuse. Her course in 
Anglo-Saxon met three days o week, ihe rest of the time she walked around 
New York City or wrote in her little roon near tho university. She recall*! 
"For a stretch of twenty-six months, without even mooting an editor, writer, 
or publisher, absolutely ignorant of the game end an entire stranger in Hew 
York, I wrote, peddled, rewrote, repeddled, without so much as one acceptance 
or word of encouragement. I wrote all day from loneliness, and all evening 
for the same reason." She had the experience of not hearing "the s un< of a 
human voice addressed directly to you for days." The twenty-one rejection 
slips swelled to thirty-six. 

One ti e Miss Hurst's parents cut off her allowance in an effort to ~et 
her to cone hone, but her mother quickly repented and sent a check. To gain 
experience the girl worked as a waitress, nursemaid, sales irl , and sweatshop 
worker. she crossed the Atlantic in steerage. 3he lived for a few weeks in 
a room over m Armenian tobacconist's shop on the waterfront* 3he played in 
a Broadway show. 

In her second year in Hew York Lliss Hurst met her first editor - Robert 
H. Davis of gunsey's. He told her she could \Trite. success then followed 
swiftly, and her first book, a collection of stories cnlled "Just round the 



< 






Corner ," was published in 1914 • In 1915 she mrrried Jacaues J. I anlelaon of 
New York, e pianist, but the larrlaee was not announced until five years later. 

Miss Hurst published four volumes of short stories before she atte .T,ted 
a novel, besides Just ^ound the Corner, they were: Lvery soul Hath Its 
Song, Gas Li^ht Sonatas, and ilumoresque. Her first novel was ->tar Lust. 
Her second Lummox, established her re utation. In 1924 :.;iss Hurst visited 
Russia. The novels that followed were: Appassionata, Manneouin, awarded a 
$50,000 prize by a moving picture corporation; a President Is ] orn, Five and 
Ten, and Back Street. The last is the tory of a woman who loved greatly 
enough to live in the "back street" of a -en's life. 

Miss Hurst now lives in an apartment of medieval and ascetic atmosphere 
on West sixty-seventh Street in Hew York City, where her library t< -.Me 3 are 
stacked with books on science, classic history, and exploration. She is known 
as a charming hostess. Opulently handsome, she wears incomparable furs, lace, 
brocade, and glowing colors. 



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THE BRAILLE BOOK REVIEW 
A Guide to Braillo and Talking Book Publications 
Published Monthly at the 
American Printing House for the Blind 
1839 Frankfort Avenue 
L ui3ville, Kentucky 

Printed for 
The New York Public Library 
Fifth Avenue and 42nd ^treot 
New York City 
(Henry F. Hones Fund) 

April, 1937 



Contents 






\ ax~X^ %kaJ6^: 



h 



(khJCH 






T ■ \ 



Number 4 












1 



- ^ 






ttomia. Manuel F. 



- 

Braille Book Review, April, 1937 
t Book Announcements 

(Books in t ds list are in Grade 2 unless otherwise noted) 
Diplomacy of the American Revolution. 4v. 1935 QSB (Provided by 

~* *~- *^« nart playe by France, Spain, Austria and the 

n„n K ,.„ -arHer to 1803. 



2. 




ehbrr^. lv. 

cornodities 
terials for I 
have fecial 




- ])or lozen. 
the B iad f JaeJreonviUe, Illinois. 



>e sent to c 



Couch- nil 1 or, air ztn«««^, — _ 

i) lectures on Byron, ..•helley, Hilton,Chaucer and his successors, tiie yictonau a & « 
and Shakespeare* s Antony and Cleopatra. 

Doyle, iir a.C. Lemolrs of Sherlock I olnes. 3v. 1893 BIA (Provide by the U.S. Gov- 
ernment J 

Ford, E.B. Mendelism and Evolution. IV. RIB *. short survey of the evolutionary 
aspect of modern genetics, the scionce concorncu with the problems of variation 
and heredity. A glossary of scientific terms is included. 

Fox, George. Journal. <^v. 193? BXa. (Provided by the U.S. Government) The founder 
of the Society of i'riends, the organization of which he completed about 166£. 

Guedalla, P. The hundred Years. 3v. CPU The history- of the last hundred years told 
thru a selection of some thirty episodes or significant moments. These dramatic 
moments, from which came great changes in the civilization of the Western world, 
begin with the coning of Victoria to the throne in 1837. Great Britain, France, 
Germany, Russia and tho United tataa are the scenes for these episodes; the 
selections themselves include the inauguration of Van Burer during a depression, 
the end of the liexic^n war, the overthrow of Louis Philippe, the liberation of the 
serfs, the death of Albert, the collapse of Russia, etc; and, from the 19^0s, the 

^ Reichstag fire, President Roosevelt taking office, and the accession of Edward VIII. 

"wyrni, Stephen. Oliver Goldsmith. 4v. RIB A brilliant study of a life made up of 
contradictions, with a critical estimate of Goldsmith's orarrtsaaa.^hip. 

Horace. Horace rendered in English verse by -Alexander laleoner ! orison. 3v. 1901 APH 
(Provided by the U.S. Government) Ix>race, tho wittiest, roost widely read, most 
often quoted and translate <■ of all Latin poets. Be was cool, collected, intellectual, 
serious in hi3 careful turning of phrases and meters. Take life as it cores and 
live serenely is his *^7.dsophy." John lacy. 

Hunter, istelle B^Ajaew self-teaching course in practical Knglish and effective 

speech; compcM3iI^^ vocabulary development , ;rarr.nr, pronunciation, enunciation, 
and the principles of effective oral expression. 5v« Grade 1- . 1935. (. ub- 
lished by the Better-Speech Institute of /inerica. 

Hymns: Select ons from Hymnal for American youth; manual of hynn study and interpre- 
tation, editorial supervision of H. Augustine Smith. 2v. Garin process. Grade % 
kBC 

Jackson, Holbrook. The ei :h r .een nineties; a review of :irt and ideas at the close of 
the nineteenth century. 3v. 1922 <uH (Provided by tho U.: . .ioveroment ) 

Jaffe, Bernard* 0utpost3 of science. -- journey to the workshops of our lending ron of 
science and research. J3v. C^I 1935 (Provide A by the U.S. Government) accounts 
of the work being done in America in the research laboratories of scientists. 
Built arouud sketches of men and wome%.who have played a prominent part in the work. 

1 disease , cancer, 




Ln 



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2. 






Braille Book Review, April, 1937 
« Book Announcements 

(Books in this list are in Oracle 2 unless otherwise noted) 
Beciis, Samuel F. Diplomacy of the American devolution. 4v. 1935 C15I (Provided by 
the U.S. Government) Discus ho s the part playe by France, Spain, Austria and the 
Netherlands in the affairs of the American colonies from 1775 or earlier to 1803. 
Based upon recent researches in the archives of the United states and the hnropean 
countries concerned. A scholarly and entertaining account. 
Catherine de Medici, see entry under Ralph Roeder. 

Chambers, Sir E.K. Introduction and notes to =hakospeare*s Tragedy of I acbeth. "15» \<- 
Ntl.B^ These are from the well known Yfarwick Shakespeart; in/* o/^l by one of the 
foremost Shakespearian scholars of today. The referencesaHBe to the braille 



edition of Macbeth published by the H^IwBl 
;ie, Agatha. Cards on the table. 2v. 193( 



Christie, Agatha. Cards on the table. 2v. 1936 CFH (Provided by the U.S. Government) 
Detective story. One critic states that the opening situation in this book is the 
best the author has yet devised. 

Conrad, Joseph. Hostromo; a tale of the seaboard. 5v. 1904 CEH (Provided by the 

U.S. Government) A romantic tale of politics, adventure and intrigue In. a maritime 
republic of k>uth America. M - 

Couch- uiller, Sir Arthur, studies in literature, second series. 4v„ /v/oVBlluminating 

^ lectures on Byron, Shelley, Hilton,Chaucer and his successors, t^e Victorian age 
and Shakespeare* s Antony and Cleopatra. 

Doyle, Jir a.C. Hemoirs of Sherlock I olnes. 3v. 1093 BIA (Provide by the U.S. Gov- 
ernment ) 

Ford, E.B. Kendelism and Svolution. IV. SIB & short 'survey of the evolutionary 
aspect of modern genetics, the science concerned Bite the problems of variation 
and heredity. A glossary of scientific terns is included. 

Fox, George. Journal. <*v. 1937 Bla (Provided by the U.S. Government) The founder 
of the Society of i'riends, the organization of which he completed about 1669. 

Guedalla, P. The hundred Years. 3v. CPI1 The history of the last hundred years told 
thru a selection of some thirty episodes or significant moments. These dramatic 
moments, from which came great changes in the civilization of the Western world, 
begin with the coming of Victoria to the throne in 1837. Great Britain, France, 
Germany, Russia and the United tates are the scenes for these episodes; the 
selections themselves include the inauguration of Van Burer. daring a depression, 
the end of the Mexican war, the overthrow of Louis Philippe, the liberation of the 
serfs, the death of Albert, the collapse of Russia, etc; and, from the 19^0s, the 
Reichstag fire, President Roosevelt taking office, and the accession of Edward Till. 

Stephen. Oliver Goldsmith. 4v. NIB A brilliant study of a life made up of 
contradictions, with a critical estimate of Goldsmith's orafteaaanhip. 

Horace. Horace rendered in English verse by Alexander Falconer ! oriton. 3v. 1931 
(Provided by the U.S. Government) liorace, the wittiest, most widely reed, most 
often quoted and translate' of all latin poets, i q was cool, collected, intellectual, 
serious in his careful turning of phrases and meters. Take life as it comes and 
live serenely is hisart^i^sophy.'' John I acy. 

Hunter, iistelle B^A^new self- teaching course in practical English and effective 

speech; compwyP&§|f^ vocabulary development , greaanar, pronunciation, enunciation, 

5v. Grade 1 



•rwynn, 



19.35. (. ub- 

hynn study and intsrpre- 
Garin process. Grade £. 



and the principles of effective oral expression. 

lished by the Better-Speech Institute of /America. 
Hymns: Select ons from Hymnal for .american youth; manual of 

tation, editorial supervision of H. Augustine Smith. 2v« 

^RC 
Jackson, Holbrook. The eighteen nineties; a review of art and ideas at the close of 

the nineteenth century. 3v. 1922 A£B (Provided by 
Jaffe, Sernard. 0utpost3 of science. 

science and research. 3v. Cifi 



the U.- . Government) 
■ • journey to the workshops of our leading ren of 
1935 (Provide d by the U.S. Government) accounts 



of the work being clone in Series in the research laboratories of scientists. 

Built around sketches of men and wome%.w!\o have played a prominent part in the work. 

p&yeleal disease, *CaUWH , 

a 




I 



There are chapters devoted to genetics, anthropology, physical disease, cancer, 
mental diseases, glands, vitamins, inaecbs, natter, radiation, astrophysics, 
weather, galaxies. j 

Jame3, «'illiam. Th-3 varieraes of religious experience; a study in human nature. 

1902 Off (Provided t$ the d«S* Government) a standard work on the psychological 
study of religion which retains its great popularity. It is nade up of the 
Gifford leetures on natural religion delivered at Edinburgh 1901-02. 

Kipling, Rudyard. Life's handicap. 4v. NIB A collection of short stories containing 
such masterpieces as The Incarnation of ' ishna Mulvaney; The Mark of the Be^st; 
The Return of Imray; The City of Dreadful Night; The Lead of the District; etc. 

Luther, Martin, see entry under Preserved Smith. 

MacCarthy, Desmond. Experience. Sv. NIB Collected essays by a distinguished essayist 
and critic, divide-' into three sections: Of human nature, During the war, and 
Digressions of a reviewer. 

McLaughlin, Andrew C. Constitutional history of the Unite states. 11 v. 1935* APH 
(Provided by the U.S. Government ) history of the development of constitutional 
principles in the United states from before the devolution to 193^. -he author 
is professor emeritus of history at the University of Chicago. He has succeere 
in ?/riting an account of the greatest constitutional controversy of our history, whth 
j in addition to profound leajtain ;, combines to a very ext:-aordinary degree, the 

'■?' qualities of aloofness and (lisoriiiinatini; judgr-ent with those of imaginative par- 
ticipation and freshness of intercut. C ne may add that he is the one person in 
the world who could have done this; and that it can never, need never be done a^ain. 
As to it3 principal thene, the work is final. Again and again, I rofessor McLaughlin 
regards his readers Kith sons observation of discernment - the not juste , so to 
speak, for the topic trader consideration. That insight which complete comand 
of a subject 2an al ne supply is encountered in these pages at every turn. 

Moore, F.G. The Roman's world* ov. 19.36 AJH (Provided by the 0*3. Government) 

* A topical history of Bene, the city-state and the empire, r ith chapters on agricul- 
ture, commerce, religion, Tamil;/ customs, education, literature, architecture, etc. 
The autnor is professor of Latin at Columbia University. This book is one of the 
best introductions to the subject and is quite sufficient for the general reader 
^ who may wish to besoms acquainted with :?oman antiquities to the tine of Augustine 
in the West and Justinian in the Bast* 

Moore, John. Country men. f?v. NIB A fresh and vivid work of criticism, of biography, 
and of praise of England. The author p ortrays robust or eccentric characters like 
Cobbett or John Milton, and quiet and subtle spirits ouch as Gilbert /hite, Izaak 

£ 'alton and »J.H. Hudson, and writes of rustic traditions, angling, horsemanship, 
hunting, etc. 

Murray, Gilbert. Euripides and his a 33. 2v. 191C5 AFH (Provided by the U.S. Govern- 
ment) An original, fresh and sympathetic study of the age, tradition and ateos- 
phere of the fjt£5h century Athens in which Euripides lived; of his methods and 
genius in adopting tho prevailing art form - tragic drama - of the period. :be 
biography of Euripides is here made a piece of genuinely historical reconstruction. 
An excellent work by a specialist on his special subject. 

Paxson, Frederic 1. The new nation. 3v. 1927 IMP (Provided by the U. . o-vemment) 
This is the Inst volume of the "Riverside history of the United ! tates' series, 
edited by v/.E. iodd. These books are brilliantly written and present fresh views 
and interesting interpretations, 
-edlar, Margaret. The splendid folly. 3v. RIB A love story. 

Boeder, Ralph. Catherine de Medici and tho lost revolution. ?v. 1937 ._' (Provided 
by the U.S. Government) This biography of Catherine de Medici is also essentially 
apolitical history oT Prases during the years rrtien Catherine as wide of one 
.■0HPt$^j^pf^--3ja& mother of his t roe successors, error to an influence over the 
politics of the gov; rrment. 

hussell, I ajor. rue adventures of secret service, lv. NIB Exciting adventures of 
secret service agents in the ireot 'ar. 

Smith, Preserved* Life and letters of Martin Luther. f5v. 1911 ABB (Provided by 
the U.S. SoveriFnont) he tells the entire story of Luther's epoch-making career 
with fullness and vi*or, fine historic p?asp, and keen insi ^rt 



^ VCul JvU-v^l- 



^" 



1 



4. 

Squire Sir John, Shakespeare as a dramatist. 2v. NIB A study based on the discovery 
r that Jhakespe&re has been discussed very little as a dramatist or a poet, 
Trollope Anthony. (Trollope was a prolific writer whose works number a hundred or more 
volumes, including novels, tales, history, travel, and biography. Forty-odd novels 
are divided into three series: "The Chronicles of Darsetshire, or The Cathedral 
stories"; "The Parliamentary Hovels"; and "The Manor-House Hovels." Each series 
forms a chain of stories in which the same characters appear again and again. Although 
the novels gain by being read in sequence, each volume is complete in itself. The 
Earsotshire novels form the most popular series. The stories are all laid in the 
cathedral town of Barchester, and the characters consist mainly of the clergy, bishops, 
archdeacons, rectors, and curates. Although Trollope* s personal acquaintance with 
ecclesiastical life was slight, his portraits of clergymen are the best in English 
fintion. ) The most famous series is The Chronicles of Barsetshire. Of these the 
following are in braille: 
The warden. 3v. NIB 1855. First of series. 

Barchester Towers. 7v. NIB 1857. 12v. grade &§ HYPL Second of aeries. 
Dr. Thorne. 8v. NIB 1858. Third of series. 
Framley Parsonage. 7v. NIB 1861. Fourth of series. 

The last chronicle of Barse*. lOv. 1807. CPH (Provided by the U.S. Government) Sixth in 
series. The fifth in the series is the Small house at Allington. It is not yet in braille 
**^hite, s.E. Secret harbour. 2v. CPH (Provided by the U.S.Government) A novel concerned 
with preventing the theft of an Alaskan gold mine. 

Correction: The Flowering of New Linglanu, by Van .yck crooks, was erroneously announced 
in the March number as published by the American minting I^ouse. -his book was pub- 
lished by the How* iemorial Press locate as we all know, in x,he heart of New England. 

Notice to -Subscribers: Subscribers who have not requested a renewal of tliis magazine 
before tlie end of April will not receive the Hay number and their names will be dropped 
from the mailing list. 



Hand-copied Books 
(If you wish to borrow a hand-copied bock you must write directly to the library that 
owns the book. Names of libraries owning the books are indicated after each title. Books 
in this list are in grade l-£ unless otherwise noted). 

Alexander, grand duke of Rusola. Once a grand duke. 7v. Detroit. History. 
Barbour, R.H. Behind the line; a 3tory of college life and football. 3v. N1TL Juvenile 
# fiction. 
Best, Herbert. Flag of the desert. 3v. NYPL Juvenile fiction. 
Brisbane, Arthur. Six articles about what to read. lv. Atlanta. Literature. 
Davis, Richard Harding. Soldiers of fortune. 5v. NLB riction. 

Douglas, Lloyd C. Green light* 4v. NLB, Portland. Available in grade 2 in all libraries. 
Doyle, A. Conan. The case book of Sherlock liolmes. lv. Sacramento. Fiction. 
Eliot, T.S. Murder in the cathedral, lv. KXPL A play written for publication at the 

Canterbury Festival, June, 1935. A series of episodes dealing with the last few weeks 

of the life of Thomas a Socket. 
Fox, John, Jr. Heart of the hills. 6v. NLB Fiction. 
Frost, Robert. North of Boston. 2v. Sacramento. Poetry. 
Frost, Robert. Vest-running brook, lv. Sacramento, NYPL Poetry. 
Guitry, Sacha. If memory serves. 4v. NLB Reminiscences. 
Haig-Brovm, R.L. Ki-Ku: a story of a panther. NYPL Juvenile fiction. 
Harrison, H.S. The good hope. 2v. Sacramento, NLB Fiction. 
Hilton, James. Lost horizon. 4v. NLB, Chicago, LC Available in grade 2 in all the 

libraries. 
Houaman, A f K. More poems, lv. NYPL 

Jones, Susfiui C. The La Chance mine mystery. 4v. Detroit. Fiction. 
Kastner, j£rich von. Erail und die detektive; edited, with introduction, notes, exercises 

and vocabulary, by Stroebe and llofrichter. 4v. LC German text. 
Kelly, Raymond. 0-Go, the beaver. 2v. Detroit. Juvenile fiction. 



»- 



I 



It. 



5. 
Bant, Louise A. The terrace. 5v. HYPL The scene is a town not far from Boston. Literary 

charm and human interest. 
Kerr, Sophie. Tigers is only cats. lv. NLB Fiction. 
Lane, Rose Wilder. Give me liberty, lv. NLB Essay. 
Newton, A. Edward. Off to the grand national; from, Derby day and other adventures. 

Detroit. _ ..., 

O'Brien, H.V. Folding Bedouins; or, Adrift in a trailer. 2v. Chicago. Travel. 
Oatenso, Martha, .mid geese. 5v. St.Louis, Sacramento, LC Fiction. 
Page, Thomas Nelson. Red Rock. 12v. NLB Fiction. 
Palliere, Aime. The unknown sanctuary; a pilgrimage from Rome to Israel. 3v. Jewish Braille 

Library. Religion. 
Raine, W.M. Roaring river. 5v. NLB Fiction. 

Raid, Christian, pseudonym. A little moid of Arcady. 4v. Chicago. Fiction. 
Reynolds, 13. J. The terror. 4v. NLB Fiction. 
Roe, E.P. Near to nature's heart. 8v. NLB Fiction. 
Roe, E.P. Opening of a chestnut burr. 9v. 2ILB Fiction. 

Rousseau, Jean Jacques. The social contract and discourses. 8v. LC Religion. 
Rubinstein, Marion. Adventuring in Palestine. 3v. Jewish Braille Library. Fiction. 
Santayana, George. Poems. 2v. NYPL 

Singmaster, Elsie. Bennett Walin. 5v. Sacramento. Fiction. 
Strong, A.L. I change worlds; the re-making of nn American. 9v. 2YPL Personal history of an 

American woman, which describes her early life in this country, her experiences in the 

Mexican and Chinese revolutions and lays special stress upon her fourteen years in 

Soviet Russia. 
Tarkington, Booth. The flirt. 5v. NLB Fiction. 

Taylor, Mrs. Howard. 71 th P'U and his brigands, lv. Richmond, Orlando. Religion. 
Telman, Rita. Ghosts of glory, lv. NLB Fiction. 
West, V.Sackville-. Dark island. 5v. NLB Fiction. 

Wefcmore, Alexander. Canaries; their care and management, lv. LC Zoology. 
Widdemer, Margaret. Graven imge. 5v. St.Louis. Fiction. 
Wilson, Mary B. From nine to five. 4v. NLB Fiction. 
Woodward, Kathleen. Jipping Street; childhood in a London slum. 2v. Chicago. Sociology. 

Talking Books 
(These books are supplied by the U.S. Government ) 

Aldrich, Thomas Beiloy. Mademoiselle Dlympe Zabriski and other stories by various authors. 
18 records. Contents: Apiece of club gossip, Marjorie Daw, Miss Mehetabel's son,cxw^ 
Quite so, by T.B.Aldrich. Tlie canvasser's tale, The celebrated jumping frog of 
Calaveras County, The great deadwppd mystery, The great revolution In Pitcairn, How I 
escaped being killed in a cuef^Z&e recent great French duel, by Samuel L. Clemens. 
The celestial railroad, Dr. Heidegger's experiment, Ethen Brand; or, "fine unpardonable 
sin, The great carbuncle: a mystery of the Vhite Mountains, Bww p Md Howe's masquerade*' 
T-^Jl c^juxK pX&^SL. •fy^*- -5u, Mr. Higginbotham' s catastrophe, The white old maid, by 
Nathaniel nawthorne. The Town-Ho's story, by Herman Melvillo. 

Bacon, Francis. More selected essays of 3acon with Lord Macaulay's Essay on Bacon; and 

More selected essays of Eli a, by Charles Lamb. 11 records. Bacon's best known book is 
his "Essays". He seems to have read all the wisdom in the world and boiled every ides 
down to its essence. His style i3 epigrammatic, fluent, rich in analogies and informed 
by a kind of plain common sense that distinguishes it from much of the too fantastic 
prose of tho period. Essays of Elia were first published in 1823 and Last Essays of 
Ella, ten years later. Lamb i3 the Prince of English essayists, as Bacon is the King. 
These essays, following the style of the writers of the mid-seventeenth century, are 
imbued with Lamb's own laughing philosophy. 

Conrad, Joseph. Youth and two other stories. IB records. 1902. Contents: Youth; Heart of 
darkness; The end of the Tether. Youth is a story of the sea. Heart of darkness is a 
study of the white man in Africa. The end of the tether is a narrative of an heroic 
old sea-captain who, for the sake of a dependent daughter retains command of his vessel 
even after blindness renders him incapable. 



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Jeans, Sir James. Through space and time. 11 records. 1934. The substance of lectures 

delivered at the Royal Institution to an audience ranging in ar*e from eight to eighty. 
After chapters on the earth, the air, and the sky, the author takes up in turn, the 
moon, the planets, the sun, the stars, and the nebulae, presenting in popular style 
modern scientific knowledge concerning them* 

Keller, Helen. The story of my life. IE records. 1903. The narrative of one who has been 
deaf and blind since infancy written in a style which is not only idiomatic but indi- 
vidual and rhythmical. The story itself and the years of effort which have made its 
telling possible, the personality which it reveals, and the creation of that personality- 
these are things which seora little short of miraculous* 

Millikan, Robert A. Evolution in science and religion. 4 records. 1927. A physicist 
discusses the relations of religion to science. The first lecture is pure physics 
and sketches the extraordinary evolution of his own subject, physics, for the last 
thirty years! The second lecture considers the relations between new truth and old 
as revealed in the history of physics. The third deals with the evolution of religion 
under the influence of science. The3o are written with notable clarity and simplicity 
notwithstanding their scientific character. An interesting, hopeful and constructive 
exposition of the present day status and possible future of religion, from the view- 
point of a scientist. 

Peattie, Donald Culross. Singing in the wilderness; a salute to John James Audubon. 
i 8 records. 1935. An imaginative, delicately written memoir of Audubon and his wife. 

Strachey, G.Lytton. Eminent Victorians. 19 records. 1910. Contents: Henry Edward Harming, 
Florence Nightingale, Thomas Arnold, Charles George Gordon. Infused with sketches of 
almost Glbbonesque irony, these biographical studies of four distinguished and famous 
personages present them in aspects which are more or less familiar. 






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a Periodicals iniblished in the United states (school magazines not include ) 
^ The following magazines are published by the American -Tinting 




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House for the Blind, 1839 Frankfort Ave., Louisville, Ly. 
Braille Book Review. Published for The Ne.7 York Public Library. Monthly. Grade 2. Free. 
Church Herald for the Blind.- p ubll3hed for the National Council of the Protestant 

Episcopal Church. Monthly. Grade l£« Free, 
Current Events; the national school newspaper Published by the American Printing House 

for the Blind. Weekly during the scho ol year. Grade I£« 12-,. cents per copy, plus postage. 
Discovery. Published for the John Milton Foundation. Monthly, September-May. Grade L§» Free. 
John Milton Magazine Published for the John Milton Foundation. Monthly. Grade 1{. Free. 
Minnesotan, Published *or the Minnesota State Council of Agencies for the Blind. 

Monthly. Grade 2. Free to readers in Minnesota. 
My Weekly Reader, ■ Published by the American Printing House for the Blind. 

Weekly during the sc*iO0l year. Grade 1-r. 7-.^ cents per copy, plus postage. 
Reader's Digest, braille edition. Published by the American Printing House for the Blind. 

Monthly. Pamphlet form; 3 pai is; grade 2. vlO.OO per year, including postage. 
Seer, Published for the Pennsylvania Association for the Blind, Inc. Quarterly. Grade 1. 
The following magazines are published by the Braille Institute of 
America, 741 North Vermont Ave., Los Angeles, Calif. 
Braille Mirror, monthly. Grade 2» Special rate to blind readers 02.50 a year, Pate to 

Libraries and Institutions 5.00 a year. 
^Christian Science Bible Lessons, monthly. Grade 1 • 2.50 a year. 
Herald of Christian Science, quarterly. Gride 1 . 1.00 a year. 
Lutheran Messenger for the Blind, monthly. Grade 2. Free. 
March of ^ve its, monthly. Grade 2. special rate to blind re- ders 2.50 a y ar. ate to 

Librarian and Institutions 5.00 a year. 
New Moon, Moon Type, monthly. Special rate to blind readers o.OO a year. Pate to 

Libraries and Institutions 6.00 a year. 

The following magazines are published by the national Braille Press, 
110 Fremont St., Boston, Ma3s. 
Jewish Braille Review, monthly. Grade 2. Free. 
Our Special, monthly. Grade 1^. Free. 
Weekly News. Grade 2. Free. 

The following zoe jasJ ■ thlisl ■■■.- ilo .--intin? 

House for th. id, Kt- , 

Braille adio News, Monthly. Grade 1... r. . cvr to indivifiu.v. - , 3.00 a year 
to libraries and institutions. * 

forward i^ay by Day, bi-rcnthl;-. Grace 1- . MUAM by the tant Episcopal 

m Church. Free. «^«j- 

International Lions, Juvenile Braille Monthly. Grade l'. Free. 
rhe Lamp, quarterly, ."-rude 2. Religious reeding. 
Unity Daily tord, monthly. Grade 1. . j'ree. 

The following magazines are published by the Zie^Ler Publishing Co., 

Monsey, Now York. 
The Ziegler Magazine, montiily. Editions in grade 1-^-, New York point and Moon. Free. 



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Books Backstage, From The Publishers' Weekly. I arch G, 1937 
One morning just a few weeks ago I found in my mail a letter from Bernard -imon, 
press representative for Gilbert filler, the theatrical producer, Mr. Sinon, it seems, 
had the day before been backstage at the Henry lliller Theatre, where "The Country Vife," 
was then playing. And there he had come upon a young man conducting a rental library 
for the members of the cast, /ould I be interested, he asked, in a story about the 
young man, whose name was Barry Villiams, and his unique circulating library? 

,Now"Mr, Simon ia an ent e rprising pr e ss e^cnt. He was interested chiefly in telling 
igh mo the readers of the /orld-Telogram, that actors, and particularly thdse 
appearing 1$. "The Country .Ife," were voracious readers. Hot that he e peeted that piece 
jause everyone who road it to rnah out and buy/tickets for the play. But it's 
t*8 job to get the name of bis play/me ntioneu in every way and every place 




His story turned out to be news, at least for booksellers, for to them it will prove 
(l) that actors do read and (2) that catering to their tastes is a business that pays, 

Barry Williams is a very young man and be began his bookselling career only last 
May, For him it was a means of combining his two pet hobbies - the theatar and books, 
?/hile still at school he had acted with summer stock companies and when he got out of 
school he had become chief usher in a theater. It was ,/hile he was chief usher that the 
idea of a backstage rental library came to him. 

Starting the business wasn' t easy. There were plenty of rebuffs in the beginning 
as anyone who has tried to get backstage will readily understand. Strange as it seems 
he soon found that it was often easier to get to the stars than to the actors of minor 
parts. And once the orineipals approved the rest was smooth sailing. Now he is ad- 
mitted and welcomed at the stage door of virtually every important theater in the Broad- 
way district. 

He shares a small office at 505 Fifth Avenue with a Mr. Halpern, who collect auto- 
graphs and gives lectures, and another gentleman who operates a circulating library 
in large office buildings. However, the office is only head uarters. All business is 
conducted backstage at the different theaters, he players expect his visits on certain 
days of the week and are prepared to return the books they have read and take out others. 

Every Mb iday night between 7:30 and 8 Mr. -Villiams and his library may be found 
at the Music Box Theatre calling on tho company in "Stage Door,'' The curtain doesn't go 
up until 0:30 but he arrives early to avoid interfering witlrnore important business. 
During intermission he goes up to the Porre3t Theatre to see the "Tobacoo Road" people". 
And so on through the week, two play3 a night. On /ednesdays and Thursdays the schedule 
is augmented to i iclude two matinees. His Wednesday afternoons are divided between "Tover- 
ich" at the ilymouth Theatre and Katherine Cornell's company in " Vingless Victor; .' 

He now visits some twenty-five theatres a week with a large sack of twenty to thirty 
book3, w ich all told, weigh almost fifty pounds. Usually he also carried with him a 
portable rack which can be 3et up in a jiffy but in some theaters he has found a ledge 
or trunk that work3 just as well, hen his display has been set up the players gather 
about to select their reading matter for the week. They are not required to pay any 
deposit - just twenty-five cents a week for each book* 

' T Mr , Vi l l i ans fee ls tha t- a depo si t is un necessary -•»- the fact thst anyone renting a 
book is in the cast of a play is sufficient reference because a notice is always >osted 
two weeks before a show closes. In his office Mr. '■Villi ams keeps a card file, with a 
card for each customer, '.Vheai he goes to make a call, he takes with liixa only V.jose cards 
he wil^i noeu on that particular trip, inee starting out he has experimented with vari- 
ous to^es of ca*is\but he finafttliat the simplest is al30 the most efficient - a card Trrth 
tl a rcu a tbmor^ - aame N on which he roeopdg th» title^©^ each booK andTthe date • 

The most popular books among hi3 customers, as one might expect, are books on the 
theater, and particularly this season Stanislavski's "An Actor Prepares," Oddly enough, 
a popular number in this stock is Shepard Traube's book "So You <ant to Go Into the 
Theatre" - a strange item for people already in. 

All of the bo >ks on the ballet, but especially the Nijlnsky biographies, have been 
popular. Of course, like everyone else, the stage people read "Gone with the Vind." At 
one tine Mr, Ullioms' library contained 1A copies - there are only five going the rounds 
today. 






His men customers liked "Inside Europe" - not a single woman asked for it. They hare 
been reading "Without Prejudice" by Gloria Vanderbilt. 

One nice thing about those readers is that they do not insist on new books. In fact 
they prefer those they've heard a ipod deal about and having been hearing about for some 
time. Thus, Mr. 7illiams doesn't worry about buying all the latest books but 7aite until 
they are asked for. His customers, for instance, expressed no desire to read "L st B&Wh 
izon" until very recently when there was a lot of talk and advance publicity about the 
movie version. 

"Nine Old Men" is another book thut is just beginning to attract attention backstage. 
"Enjoyment of Laughter" they like too* The play about Parnell aroused interest in Joan 
Haslip's "Parnell." 

The largest per capita book borrowing this season has been among the pla; era support- 
ing Margaret .ullavan in "Stage Door." Mis3 oullavan doesn't borrow books - she 'oesn't 
have to because her rusband is Leland Uayward, the agent. Often 3he suggests books to 
the other players and once in a while she becomes Mr. 'Williams* competitor by lending her 
books to the others* 

Beatrice Lillie rents a lot of books* One that pleased her nor e than most was 
William Seabrook's "Asylum." Ray Bolger and his wife are good customers and am Byrd, who 
gained fame in "Tobacco Road" and then became a producer is one of the very best accounts. 
The "Victoria Retina" cast prefer inglish authors. Host of them read "Sparkenbroke" and 
Rosamond Lebmann's last novel "The Vea the r in the Streets*** 

For a short while Mr. Williams found a large number of readers among the fifty dancing 
Rockettes at Radio City Music Hall* Then* the manager got the idea of putting a rental 
library in the building* 

Until all theaters are able to do that Barry Jillisms will have a thriv'ng business. 
Booksellers in other cities would do well to adopt 3ome of his methods* 



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THE BRAILLE BOOK REVIEW 
A Guide to Braille and Talking Book Publications 
Published Monthly at the 
American Printing House for the Blind 
1839 Frankfort Avenue 
Louisville, Kentucky 









Printed for 
The New York Public Library 
Fifth Avenue and 42nd street 
New York City 
(Henry F. Home a Fund) 









Volume 6 



May, 1937 



Number 5 



Contents 



Cb<J<^ CU — zt^^vl^lsCJa\ (?a^^ v^cJL ^tvAa; V\- 




(3- <^v v^o^Jw^-^n 



^-C^TttAXc\ 






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3 



Draillo Book Review, May, 1937 2. 

Book Announcements 
(Books in tills list are in Grade 2 unless otherwise note ) 

Adam3 f Mrs. Henry* Letters* 4v. To be embossed. 

Adams, James Truslow. Revolutionary New England, 1G91-177G. 5v. CIH (Provide : by the 
U.S. Government) A sequel to Founding of Hew England. Carries the Colonial story 
from 1G91 to the Declaration of Independence, The origin of grievances, the 3low 
growth of revolutionary sentiment, and the rise of a ro-ical .arty, together with 
economic, social and political changes are ably traced and interpreted in this inform- 
ing study. 

Anderson, Maxwell. Valley Forgo, lv. To be embossed. 

Bacharaeh, a.L., editor. Lives of the great composers. 5v. To be embossed. 

Baikie, James. The sea-kings of Crete. 2v. To be embossed. 

Barrie, J.M. Dear Brutus, lv. To bo embossed. 

Blaker, Richard. But beauty vanishes. 3v. To be embossed. 

Buck, Pearl 3. Fighting angel; portrait of a soul. 2v. APII (Provided by the U.S. Govern- 
ment) This biography of the author's father is a companion volume to her biography 
of her mother, The exile. Its very difficulty makes this an even finer book„ttwr~ 
•-♦•B eeB^aniottrp±#CG , ! The^eadtle ^. the H-fe-of^iier-iBotbe* published earlier this year. 
This is thS work of maturity - hard-won maturity of heart. A good many layers of 
soil had to be lived away and written away before this rock could be laid bare. And 
nobody who ha3 not read the earlier book can know quite what an achievement this one is. 

Chanler, Margaret. Autumn in the valley. 2v. To be embossed. 

Chapman, P.M. Camps and cruises of an ornithologist. 3v. To be embossed. 

Creasy, Edward. The fifteen decisive battles of the world, from Marathon to /aterloo. 6v. 
CPH (Provided by the U.S. Government) Contents: Marathon; Defeat of the Athenians 
at Syracuse; Arbela; Metaurus; Victory of iirminlus; Chalons; Tours; Hastings: Joan of 
Arc's victory of the English at Orleans; Defeat of the Spanish Armada; Blenheim; 
Pultowa; Saratoga; Valmy; Jaterloo; Pall of Quebec; Yorktown; Vicksburg; Gettysburg; 
Sedan; Manilla Bay; Santiago; Tsu-Shima; Marne. '.Thile this book is not of the highest 
historical value, it i3 a very convenient work of reference. 

De la Roche, Maaso. ^iteoak harvest. 3v. To be embossed. 

Douglas, Lloyd C. White banners. 4v« APH (Provided by the U.S. Government) Then pretty, 
incompetent Karcia 7ard allows Hannah Parmalee to step into her kitchen, she unwittingly 
turns over to her the ordering of the family life for the ne t twenty years. The story 
is concerned in part with the '.Jards* progress from debt and near-poverty to affluence, 
in part with Hannah's secret, but chiefly with Hannah's philosophy of life which influ- 
ences the lives of so many others. 
Jtumas, Alexandre. The queen's necklaoe. Ov. 1893 BIA (Provided by the U.S. Government) 
Time 1784-85, the beginning of the ill-fated reign of Louis XVI. 

Einstein, Albert. Living philosophies. 3v. To be embossed. 

Farnol, Jeffery. A pageant of victory. 4v. To be embossed. 

Ferrero, Guglielmo, and Corrado Barbagallo. A short history of Rome; the monarchy and the 
republic from the foundation of the city to the death of Julius Caesar. 754 BC - 44 BC. 
8v. *il918. CPH (Provided by the U.S. Government) The groat Italian historian, 
Ferrero, writes history entirely in the light of contemporary events. He uses the past 
to interpret the present, and compares modern with ancient conditions. 

Flint, Margaret. The old Ashbura Place. 3v. To be embossed. 

Foldes, Jolan. The Street of the Fishing Cat. 2v. To be embossed. 

Forbes, Esther. Paradise. 5v. BIA (Provided by the U.S. Government) In 1639 sixteen 
settlers led by Andrew Redbank, minister, and Jude Parre, gentleman, petitioned for 
the right to depart from Boston and settle twenty miles inland, -irrived at the location 
later named Canaan, Judo bought from the Indians a large holding and proceeded to lay 
out his estate called Paradise. The story of Jude and his five children and numerous 
servants, their relations with the other colonists and with the Indians, ends at about 
the time of King Philip's war. 

Frost, Robert. A further range, lv. 1936 APH (Provided by the U.S. Government) In his 
sixth book of verse Robert Frost has chosen a further range for his attitude toward 
life, but whether he wanders beyond the VThite Mountains to the Rockies, the Sierras, 



3. 
the Himalayas, beyond "even into the ronlm of government and religion'' he always comes 
back in the end to his own New England landscape. See article on Frost by Stephen 
Benet in November, 1936 issue. 

Goldsmith, Oliver, Selected essays. 2v. NIB Thirty- two essays illustrating the charac- 
teristics and variety of Goldsmith's prose, with introduction and notes, 

Gulbranssen, Trygve, Beyond sing the woods; translated by Naomi ./alford, 3v, 1936 APH 
(Provided by the U.S, Government) Chronicle of fifty years in a Norwegian family 
living on their huge estate in the hills. The Bjorndal bred strong men, but they came 
to tragic ends until one of them, Dag, married a wife from the fertile valley lands, 
and spent his energies in piling up wealth for himself and his descendants, rhe tale 
ends with the engagement of the remaining son of Old Dag, and a beautiful girl from 
the town* 

Haldane, John Scott, The philosophy of a biologist, lv. 1935 NIB (Provided by the 

U.S, Government) The scope of this book is far wider than its title seems to august. 
Instead of being an apologia pro philosophia mea, a personal account of the manner in 
which a certain individual biologist looks upon life and its problems, it proposes 
to set forth, from the view-point of the sciences nnd particularly from that of 
biology and psychology, the conclusions which, in the author's opinion, we can draw 
from modern philosophy on the fundamental problems which agitate the human mind, 
(Second notice) 
\j Henry, Robert S. The story of the Confederacy, 5v. Vo be embossed, 
• Hutchinson, R.C. Shining scabbard, 5v, To be embossed. 

Kelland, C«B. Spotlight. 2v. To be embossed. 

Keller, Kent Ellsworth. Prosperity through employment; a job for every man and woman who 
wants to work. 2v. 1936 APH (Provided by the U.S. Government) "Congressman Keller 
has devoted seven years of diligent labor to this task. To it he brought a concept 
gained by a first-hand study of the hardships, and a sympathetic attitude for the 
sufferings, of his fellows. To it he lias devoted many years of research. In the 
expansion and elaboration of this volume he sought the advice and guidance of every 
student of economics, political science, government, and finance available among the 
ranks of specialists in the national capital." From the Introduction. 

King, Godfre Ray, pseudonym. The magic presence. 3v. ABB (Provided by the U.S. Govern- 
ment) This book is the second in a series of which "Unveiled mysteries" is the first 
and the "I am" discourses is the third. Braille copies of "Unveiler mysteries" and 
of the "Magic presence" may be found in all of the libraries as gifts of students 
who are interested in this subject. It deals with the near approach of the millenium. 

Kipling, Rudyard. Something of myself. 2v. To be embossed. 
^Language series, by Russell A. Sharp. Sharp's English exercises for the high school. 
W Books 1, 2, 3. j^ach book consists of t./o loose-leaf pamphlets. APH 

Martyr, tfeston. The 5: 200 millionaire. 4v. NIB Short stories. The title story is a 
delightful study of an elderly man who journeys along the inland waters of Europe. 

Merimee, Ernest. A history of Spanish literature. lOv. To be embossed. 

Milton, John. Comus and minor poems, lv. NIB Includes the Nativity Hymn, L' Allegro 

and 11 Penseroso, the Sonnets (including the famous On The Late Massacre in Piedmont, 
On Blindness, To the Nightingale) and several short poems. 

Parkhurst, Helen H. Cathedral. 3v. To be embossed. 

Poushkin, Alexander. The prose tales of Poushkin. 4v. To be embossed. 

Rees, Rosemary, Concealed turning, 3v, NIB A love story of the road. Its main episode 
being a motor coach tour from London to Birmingham and then to Devon. 

Rourke, Constance. Audubon. 2v. To be embossed. 

Sabatini, Rafael. Fortunes of Captain Blood. 2v. APH (Provided by the U.S. Government) 
The further adventures of Blood on the Spanish main. There are six sanguine stories 
in these volumes. Each leaves the buccaneer triumphant and intact. 

Sackville-Yest, V. Saint Joan of Arc. 4v. To be embossed. 

Sayers, Dorothy L. Busman's honeymoon. 4v. 1937 BIA (Provided by the U.S. Government) 
To the mind of this reviewer, Dorothy Sayers is the most entertaining of detective- 
story writers, and Busman's Honeymoon, ne-t to The Nine Tailors, is her beet novel. 
Not that Miss Sayers excels in the invention of murder mysteries, though she is as good 
as any in the manipulation of this somewhat mechanical though amusing ; -£»ne. But she 



4. 
covers the bones of her mystery stories with human fle3h as no other writer does, 

Sehultz, James W« With the Indians in the Rockies. 2v. Grade If* APH Vivid account 
of the northwest trading posts in 1855 base on the true adventures of Thomas Fox 
who when about fifteen went with his uncle up the Missouri, made friends with an 
Indian boy and while trapping with him was cut off by snow and obliged to spend the 
winter there. 

Shanks, Edward. Old King Cole. 3v. NIB A mystery of the present which has its roots 
in the remotest past. A tale of what happens when a country squire remembers, from 
family tradition, the withdrawal of the Roman legion, and the ensuing terrible crire. 

Shaw, G.B. Caesar and Cleopatra, lv. 1900 .JIB (Provided by the U.S. Government) From 
"Three plays for Puritans." A tew interpretation of a historic situation. 

Starkie, 'alter. Don Gypsy. 5v. To be embossed. 

Stephenson, Nathaniel 7. Lincoln. 4v. 1922 BMP (Provided by the U.S. Government) An 
account of his personal life, especially of its springs of action as revealed and 
deepened by the ordeal of war. Here is a volume quite without parallel in the long 
list of Lincolniant. The author has attempted not a mere biography, but what is more 
difficult, a progressive character study of one of the most complex figures of history. 

Stokley, James. Stars and telescopes. 3v. 1936 IfclP (Provided by the U.S. Government) 
The associate director of the Fels planetarium at Franklin Institute has written this 
survey of astronomy for the lawman. The subjects discussed include motions in the 
"S) sky, ancient and modern ideas of astronomy, telescopes, the heavenly bodies, and life 
in the universe. -A^^ftliography^ad a-^Lossary -are included. Index. 

Tarkington, Booth* Alice Adams. 3v. To be embossed. 

Toequeville, Alexis de. Democracy in .America. 9v. To be embossed. 

Undset, Sigrid. Gunnar's daughter, lv. To be embossed, 

Walpole, Hugh. A prayer for my son. 3v. To be embossed. 

Ward, F. Kingdon. Romance of plant hunting. 2v. To be embossed. 

Vilkins, Mary E. The best stories of Mary E. tfilkins. 4v. To be embossed. 

Yeats-Brown, F.C.C. Lancer at large. 3v. APH (Provided by the U.S. Government) The 
author of Lives of a Bengal Lancer revisits India after an absence of fifteen years, 
and writes with sympathy and authority of the true life in India. Of particular in- 
terest are his accounts of Hindu mysticism and yogi practices, including the Samadhi, 
or self-induced state of trance resembling death. There are further chapters on 
social and economic conditions in modern India; and on education, sanitation, and 
medical and hospital care. 

Hand-copied Books 
{!& you wish to borrow a hand-copied book you must write directly to the library that 
owns the book. Names of libraries owning the books are indicated after each title. Books 
in this list are in grade l£- unless otherwise noted.) 
Banning, Margaret Culkiiu The iron will. 3v. Detroit. Fiction. 

Benefield, Barry. Valiant is the word for Carrie. 4v. Pittsburgh, Chicago, LC Fiction. 
Bene t, Stephen Vincent. James Shore's daughter. 3v. Pittsburgh. Fiction. 
Benson, Robert H. The king*s achievement. 7v. Chicago. Fiction. 
Bingham, Rowland V. The making of the beautiful; the life story of Annie Johnson Flint, lv/ 

-*#R Braille Circulating Library, Richmond* Va. (Cwwfcef t» C\tf\ty 
Bowen, Elizabeth. The house in Paris. 5v. Pittsburgh. Fiction. 
Brink, Carol. Caddie /oodlawn. 4v. Seattle, N5TPL Juvenile fiction. 
Bromfield, Louis. Three faces in the mirror. 2v. Albany. Fiction. 
Brown, Abbie Farwell. John of the woods. 3v. Perkins. Juvenile fiction. 
Buchan, John. The thirty-nine steps. 2v. Atlanta, LC Fiction. Available in grade 2. 
Buck, Frank. Fang and claw* 4v. Detroit. Zoology. 
Buck, Pearl S. Is there a case for foreign missions? lv. Cleveland. 
Chambers, Robert «"• Secret service operator 13. 8v. Cleveland, LC Fiction. 
Childs, Marquis .7. Sweden: ifhere capitalism is controlled, lv. Cleveland. 
Christie, Agatha. The mystery of the blue train. 4v. Cleveland, acramento. Fiction. 
-Crawford, Phyllis. Vertical file service cutalog. 5v. Indianapolis. 
Cummins, Maria Susanna. The lamplighter. Bv. Chicago, NLB Fiction. 
Davis, Richard Harding. Once upon a tine. 4v. Cleveland. Fiction. 



1 



_ ^ _ ___ 5# 

fivlu fU'Ulu, Jenny TJsewdonym. Aimer quand nemo. 6v. le. 

De Paola, Peter. Wall smacker. 5v. Indianapolis. 

Donham, 7allaee B. Business adrift} with an introduction by -alfreri Worth Whitehead. 3v. 
Clef© land. 

Douglas, Lloyd C. Precious Jeopardy, a Christmas story, lv. Dallas, Jacksonville, Okla- 
homa City, Seattle, Chicago. 

Earhart, Amelia. The fun of it; random records of my own flying and of women in aviation. 
4 v. Cleveland, LC, Jacksonville. 

Edward VIII, former king of England. Text of farewell, lv. .Philadelphia. 

Ferber, Edna. They brought their women; a book of short otories. 4v. Detroit. 

Field, Rachel Lyman. Little dog Toby. 2v. Perkins. Juvenile fiction. 

French, Allen. The story of Greta, the strong. 2v. Perkins. Juvenile fiction. 

French poems for memorizing, lv. LC 

Frost, Robert. North of Boston. 2v. Cleveland, Sacramento. Poetry. 

Fuller, Timothy. Harvard has a homicide. 3v. Chicago. Fiction. 

Garth, David. A love like that. 3v. Albany* Fiction. 

German poems for memorizing, lv. LC 

Gibbs, A. Hamilton. Rivers glide on. 6v. Cincinnati, LC Fiction. 

Haggard, Howard W. Devils, drug3 and doctors; the story of the science of healing, from 

medicine-man to doctor. 9v. Community Workers. 
\Halliburton, Richard. Seven league boot 3. 6v* St. Louis. Travel. 

'Hayward, Walter 3. Last continent of adventure; a narrative of gallant men and bold ex- 
ploits in Antarctica. 5v. Perkins. 

Bolton, Prlscilla* The blue junk. 2v. St. Louis. Fiction. 

Holzwarth and Price. Intermediate French. 9 v. Chicago. 

Janvier, Thomas A. In the Sargasso Sea. 5v. Albany. Fiction. 

Kalisher, Betty. Watchmen of the night. 3v. Jewish Braille Library. 

Kerr, Sophie. Boulevardier , s return, lv. Detroit. 

Lamb, Harold. The flame of Islam. Saladin, the victory bringer; Baibars, the panther; 
Richard the Lion Heart; Saint Louis; Barbarossa. llv. Sacramento. 

Larrimore, Lida, pseudgv^ j M rsr IAo>rf xu , r'imo i 'e iTurner Ifocaaaa) True by the sun. From/T^ 
Detroit Free Preas.^Sv. Detroit* 

Leonard, Jonathan. Tools of tomorrow. 6v. Indianapolis. 

lew 4#» Ernest, pseudonym. Beowulf; guide dog to the blind. 4v. Detroit. Fiction. 

Lofting, Hugh. Voyages of Dr. Dollttle. 4v. Community Workers. Juvenile fiction. 

Longley, Janice. Courage in her pocket. 4v. Dallas. Fiction. 

McDonald, Etta Austin. The kelpies. 2v. Perkins. Juvenile fiction. 
^5cNabb, F. V* Saint John Fisher. 2v. St. Louis, 
^keigs, Cornelia. Willow whistle. 2v. Indianapolis, Perkins. Juvenile fiction. 

Miller, Olive Beaupre. In the nursery of my book-house, lv. Perkins. Juvenile fiction. 

Moody, D. L. Anecdotes, illustrations and incidents. 2v. Richmond. Religion. 

Moody, John. The long road home; an autobiography. 3v. Chicago. 

Morcomb, Margaret E. Red feather stories. 2v* Jacksonville. 

Morgan, Charles. Sparkenbroke. 9v. Chicago* Fiction. 

Morley, Christopher. Hasta la vista; or ,(Sj^ postcard from Peru. 2v. Cleveland. 

Mowery, William 3. Resurrection river. 5v. Indianapolis. 

O'Brien, P.J. Will Rogers. 6v. Indianapolis. Available in grade 2 in all the libraries. 

OHfoara, Col. E.J* I v d live it again. 4v. Chicago* History* 

Orezy, Baroness* Lady Itolly of Scotland Yard* Gv. Detroit. Fiction* 

Orton, Helen Fuller. The twin lambs* lv* Perkins. Juvenile fiction. 

Phelps, Elizabeth Stuart. Comrades. Cleveland, lv. 

Poole, Ernest. One of us. 4v* Community Workers. Available in grade 2 in all libraries 
Fiction. 

Raine, W* M* A man foursquare* 4v* Indianapolis. 

Rath, E. J. Brains of the family. 4v. Indianapolis. 

Rawlinson, Private James H* Through St. Dunstan's to light. 2v. Perkins. 

Rice, Alice Hogan. Mr. Opp. 3v. Indianapolis. 

Rice, Alice Hogan. Mr. Pete and Co. 3v. Atlanta, Chicago, Sacramento. Fiction. 

/ 



r^ucXt--< / v\ 



6. 



Richmond, ^LiBr. Challengers* 5v. Indianapolis. 

Richmond, Grace tiki-. The second violin. 4v. Cleveland* Sacramento* 

Robinson, William A. Voyage to Galapagos. 3v. Chicago* History* 

Bockne, Knute. An autobiography* Edited by Bonnie Skiles Bockne and with an Introduction 
and postscript by Father John Cavanaugh. 5v. Cleveland, Chicago, NYPL 

Bolt, Mary F. A baby's life of Jesus Christ* 2v* Indianapolis* 

Scott, Martin J. For better, for worse; a novel. 2v* Chicago, Xavier* Fiction* 

Sedgwick, Anne Douglas* The encounter* 6v. St* Louis* Fiction* 

Siple, Paul* A boy scout with Byrd. 3v. Cincinnati, Perkins, Pittsburgh, Sacramento* 
K Sociology, Introduction to. (From: Encyclopaedia of the social sciences; editor-in-chief, 
Edwin R.A.Seligman. ) lv* Philadelphia. 

Stevenson, Robert Louis* Travels with a donkey, in the Cevennes* 3v* Sacramento, Phil- 
adelphia, Detroit. 

Strachey, John. Unstable money, lv* Cleveland. Economics. ,. 

Tarkington, Booth* The two Vanrevels* 4v. Sacramento. ^^tJu^s^ 

Tarshish, Jacob* Little journeys with the lamplighter* 4v. Jewish Braille Library. 

Taylor, Mrs* Howard. Sister Eva, a story without an end. lv. st* Louis* 

Thomas, Norman, vs Earl Browder* Debate - ,7hich road for American workers, socialist or 
communist? 2v. Cleveland* 

Travers, P*L. Mary Poppins comes back. 4v. Chicago* Juvenile fiction. 

Waddell, Helen. Peter Abelard, a novel. 5v. Albany. 
) Wallace , Edgar. The colossus* 5v* Detroit* x^fc^\ , 

Wells, H.G* Tnings to come; a film. A new story based on the material contained in his 
book, "The shape of things to come." 3v. 3t. Louis* 

Wharton, Edith* Certain people* 4v. Albany, Chicago, Cincinnati, Detroit. Fiction* 

Wilde, Oscar. Three fairy tales* lv* Indianapolis* 

Wilson, William E* Blue Boy and other stories* lv* Indianapolis* 

Woollcott, Alexander. Verdun Belle* lv. Detroit* V^lc&w^* 

Talklng Books 
(These books are supplied by the U.S. Government) 
Day, Clarence. Life with father. 8 records* Humorous essays on the life of a New York 
family during the brownstone front era* It is one of the most chuckling books of our 
time and is certain to enlarge the author's audience* Although written with the same 
perspective, the same gentle wisdom and affectionate humor of" God and My Father" it 
has a wider view, more amenity, and more comedy to comend it* The scenes are delight- 
ful out of all proportion to their canvas* The author has selected the most char- 
acteristic detail and the exact colloquialism .with which to tell it. That is what 
makes his pages so easy to read alewd. cuU^-A, - 
Y Benet, Stephen Vincent* John Brown's body* 22 records* To be released* 
V^^Brand, Albert R* Wild birds and their songs* 2 records. To be released* 
"~~Kellor, Kent Ellsworth. Prosperity through employment. 14 records. This book is the 

result of a lecture delivered to coal miners out of work. Its effect on the audience 
led to the author's election to Congress in 1930. See an Interesting account of his 
life in the March number of Tallying Book Topics published by the American Foundation 
for the Blind. Mr* Keller points out the need of now public policies to assure a job 
for every man and woman who wantsto work. 
Parry, C.E.H. Studies of great composers. 17 records. To be released. 






^_ 



1 



1. 












3 



THE BRAILLE BOOK REVIEW 
A Guide to Braille and Talking Book Publications 
Published Monthly at the 
American Printing House for the Blind 
1839 Frankfort Avenue 
Louisville, Kentucky 

Printed for 
The New York Public Library 
Fifth Avenue and 42nd Street 
New Yorl: City 
(Henry F» Hones Fund) 



Volume 6 



m 



June, 1937 



Number 6 






X <WvsV**&- 



Contents 



c«. - 







■ \ 



H-6 






. I •< "V ' 



* 



J 



I 



Braille Book Review, June, 1937 2. 

Book Announcer sent! 
(Books in this list are in Grade 2 unless otherwise noted) 

Adams, Henry. History of the United States of America during the administration of Thomas 
Jefferson, 1889 Book I, 3v. , Book II, 4v., Book III, 4v. , Book IV, 4t. APH (Provided 
by the U.S. Government) A valuable and scholarly work. 

Adams, Mrs. Henry. Letters, 1865-1883, edited by Ward Thoron. 4v. 1936 APH (Provided 
by the U.S. Government) W Lth the exception of one letter written in 1865, this col- 
lection consists of letters written by the wife of Henry Adams to her father, Dr. R. W. 
Hooper, during the years 1872 to 1883. They contain chatty accounts of her personal 
and social life in England, on the Continent, and in Washington, and ^ive interesting 
sidelights on the characters of many of the famous people of her day. 

Aldrich, B.S. Selections from "The Man Who Caught the Weather and other stories." lv. 
Grade 1-| AFH Popular fiction. 

Anderson, Maxwell. Valley Forge, a play in three acts. lv. 1934 CPH (Provided by the 
U.S. Government) In this three-act play Washington is shown during the bitterest hours 
of the Revolution, fighting against the plottings of Congress and rival generals, and 
the growing desire for peace on the part of non-combatants. For a short jeriod he 
is tempted to make peace with the British but the loyalty and devotion of a group of 
common soldiers restores his determination to continue the fight. 

Bacharach, A.L. , editor. Lives of the great composers, with an introduction by II. C. 

Collea. 5v. 1935 APH (Provided by the U.S. Government) Sketches of the lives, not 
the works, of twenty-nine composers, written by various hands. The composers included 
are: Bach, Beethoven, Berlioz, Brahms, Byrd, Chopin, Debussy, Dvorak, Elgar, Gluck, 
Grieg, Handel, Haydn, Liszt, Mendelssohn, Moussorgsky, Mozart, Palestrina, Pureell, 
Rossini, The Scarlattis, Schubert, Schumann, Tchaikovsky, Verdi, Wagner, Weber, and Wolf. 

Bailey, Temple. The radiant tree. 3v. ARC Garin process. Popular fiction. 

Barrie, J.M. Dear Brutus, lv. 1922 ABB (Provided by the U.S. Government) Presents the 
magical experience of a midsummer house party with the "second chance" for which they 
have longed only to discover it leaves them quite unchanged in spirit and no nearer 
happiness. 



> 



nun* 



» i\r»r\n&a:?.. 



Blaker, Blchard. But beauty vanishes. 3v. BIA (Provided by the UiS.aoveranmtl *.n„.i*« 

lr£lV M ° 8t BeaUtlm "■■* Hester Bill " OT . 5. heroine of*™^' i ' 
ina from her wniinrtfi in +.h« t««/i«« v.~ -» i . ■ . . _ * . a " awT Vt *" 



recover- 



* 



book. Bollock, her rescuer, makes a more difficult rocovery than does Festf,. J*T 

££\* ?" ^° ken thread3 ° f her llfo ' ana " TOS teSZZZ years more until "he he. 
seen her daughter settle down a bit from her war hysteria; to L to'aon i.™^ 
successful lawyer; and Pollock regain his self-resneet a,,^™ «h- L~ ' ' M " Bt ' * 



self-respect during the war. 



l— 4.vvw auu xouut 



the most arresting and individual families in current fiction, and she Keeps tnem alive 
and growing. 

Dunn, Joseph Allan. The sextant. From "The Boy Scouts Yearbook for 1928." lv. Grade lj 
ARC Garin process. 

Einstein, Albert, and others. Living philosophies* 3v. 1931 ATH (Provide 1 by the U.S. 
Government) Albert Einstein, Sir James Jeans, Theodore Dreiser, James Truslow Adams, 
Beatrice Webb, John Dewey and sixteen others attempt with all sincerity to state their 
fundamental beliefs. Unusually interestin - to the thoughtful reader for the views ex- 
pressed and superficially so to many others for the personality of the writers. A sti - 
ulating an I interesting book, rather than an impressive or important contribution to 
philosophical thinking. There is no professional philosophy in evidence, no metaphysics, 
no epiatemology, just views about the conduct of life, in short the Greek notion of 
philosophy. 

Flint, Margaret. The old Ashburn place. 3v. ABB (i^rovided by the U.S. Government) The 
old Ashburn farm was near the village of Parkston, Maine, and tree generations of 



I 



I 



! 



Bralllo Book Review, June, 1937 2. 

Book Announcements 
(Books In this list are in Grade 2 unless otherwise noted) 

Adams, Henry. History of the United States of America during the administration of Thomas 
Jefferson, 1889 Book I, 3v. , Book II, 4t., Book III, 4v. , Book IV, 4t. APH (Provided 
by the U.S. Government) A valuable and scholarly work. 

Adams, Mrs. Henry. Letters, 1865-1883, edited by Ward Thoron. 4v. 1936 APH (Provided 
by the U.S. Government) With the exception of one letter written in 1865, this col- 
lection consists of letters written by the wife of Henry Adams to her father, Dr. R. W. 
Hooper, during the years 1872 to 1883. They contain chatty accounts of her personal 
and social life in England, on the Continent, and in Washington, and ^ive interesting 
sidelights on the characters of many of the famous people of her day. 

Aldrich, B.S. Selections from "The Man Who Caught the Weather and other stories." lv. 
Grade 1-^ APH Popular fiction. 

Anderson, Maxwell. Valley Forge, a play in three acts. lv. 1934 CPH (Provided by the 
U.S. Government) In this three-act play Washington is shown during the bitterest hours 
of the Revolution, fighting against the plottinga of Congress and rival generals, and 
the growing desire for peace on the part of non-combatants. For a short period he 
is tempted to make peace with the British but the loyalty and devotion of a group of 
common soldiers restores his determination to continue the fight. 

JBacharach, A.L. , editor. Lives of the great composers, with an introduction by H. C# 
w Collea. 5v. 1935 AHI (Provided by the U.S. Government) Sketches of the lives, not 

the works, of twenty-nine composers, written by various hands. The composers included 
are: Bach, Beethoven, Berlioz, Brahms, Byrd, Chopin, Debussy, Dvorak, Elgar, Gluck, 
Grieg, Handel, Haydn, Liszt, Mendelssohn, Mousaorgsky, Mozart, Palestrina, Purcell, 
Rossini, The Scarlattis, Schubert, Schumann, Tchaikovsky, Verdi, Wagner, Weber, and Wolf. 

Bailey, Temple. The radiant tree. 3v. ARC Garin process. Popular fiction. 

Barrie, J.M. Dear Brutus, lv. 1922 ABB (Provided by the U.S. Government) Presents the 
magical experience of a midsummer house party with the "second chance" for which they 
have longed only to discover it leaves them quite unchanged in spirit and no nearer 
happiness. 

Boileau, Ethel. A gay family. 5v. ARC Garin process. 

Cable, George W. Old Creole days. 2v. 1079 BIA (Provided by the U.S. Government) 

Contents: Madame Delphine Cafe dee exiles; Belles demoiselles plantation; Posson Jone; 
Jean-ah Pouquelin; Tite Poulette; Sieur George; Madame Delicieuse. 

Chanler, Margaret. Autumn in the valley. 2v. 1936 APH (Provided by the U.S. Government) 
Continues the author's reminiscences begun in Roman Spring. In 1904 the Chanlers returned 
to America and lived ilrst in Newport and then at Sweet Briar Farm in the Genesee valley. 
Mingle with stories of the Chanler children, who preferred to go to bed to a Mozart 
march, are memories of her friends, among wham were Mrs. "Jack" Gardner, Sheriff Bob 
Chanler, Mrs. Borden Harriman, Edith Wharton, and Henry James. 

de la Roche, Mazo. Whiteoak harvest. 3v. 1936 BIA ( rovlded by the U.S. Government) 
This, the sixth Hovel in the Jalna aeries, follows the fortunes of the Whiteoak family 
during the years 1934 and 1935. In the Whiteoaks Miss de la Roche has create one of 
the most arresting and individual families in current fiction, and she keeps them alive 
and growing. 

Dunn, Joseph Allan. The sextant. From "The Boy Scouts Yearbook for 1928." 
ARC Garin process. 

Einstein, Albert, and others. Living philosophies. 3v. 1931 ATH (Providec' by the U.S. 
Government) Albert Einstein, Sir James Jeans, Theodore Dreiser, James Truslow Adans, 
Beatrice Webb, John Dewey and sixteen others attempt with all sincerity to state their 
fundamental beliefs. Unusually interestin 5 to the thoughtful reader for the views ex- 
pressed and superficially so to many others for the personality of the writers. A stim- 
ulating an 1 interesting book, rather than an impressive or important contribution to 
philosophical thinking. There is no professional philosophy in evidence, no metaphysics, 
no epistemology, just views about the conduct of life, in short the Greek notion of 
philosophy. 

Flint, Margaret. The old Aahburn place. 3v. ABB (Provided by the U.S. Government) The 
old Ashburn farm was near the village of Parkston, Maine, and tree generations of 

- 



ft 



lv. Grade 1| 



i 



! 
,1 



A 



Henry , Robert Selph. Story of the confe eracy. 5t. 1931 CPH (Provider by the U.S. 
Glove nmont) A remarkably clear, sympathetic, ac Pirate and Inclusive account of 
the rise and fall of the Confederate states. The only serious criticism to bo 
Charged against an otherwise model volume is that the political, economic and dip- 
. lomatic history of the Confederacy is so largely subordinated to the more spec- 
C\J taeular but not more significant chronicle of Arms and the Man, In the whole body 
of literature that has grown up around the Civil far it would be difficult to recom- 
ment a more completely satisfactory secondary account of military events and lead- 
ers than is here presented. 



S* 



N 






urarxana, naraiin. Other main-travelled roadu. .W. 1892 BIA l-rroviae' oy ™e u.d. 'jovern- 
ment) Short stories representing the roactions of a sensitive spirit to the grim real- 
ities of pioneer farm life, 

Guide to Rule 34 of Standard English braille. Pamphlet. Published in both inkprint and 
braille by the New York Institute for the Blind, 999 Pelham Parkway, New York City. 
~\ On sale at the Institute for a small fee. Particularly helpful in connection with 



teenth century. 
usual gifts of < 
Johnson, James Weldo 
Garin process. 




"Standard English Braille in twenty lessons," by Madeleine Loomis. 

Jeans, Sir James. The new background of science. 3v. 1934 edition. NIB (Provided by the 
U.S. Government) Current physical theory and its bearing on science and philosophy. 
Philosophy and scien/se are more cl sely interwoven now than at any tine since the seien- 

this fresh study of their interaction Sir James Jeans brings his 
ty and orderliness. For readers who enjoyed "The Universe Around Us, n 
food's trombones; seven negro sermons in verse, lv. Grade l£ ARC 
of memories of his boyhood, .the poet has recreate the art of the 
old time preachers, achieving effects quite remarkably without the use of dialect. 

Kipling, Rudyard. Something of myself; for my friends known and unknown. 2v. 1937 -II 

(Provided by the U.S. Government) This last volume from Kipling' s pen, is an autobiography 
written after he wae seventy and apparently unfinished. The first six chapters tell the 
story of his childhood and youth, his early apprenticeship days doing Journalistic work 
in India, his successful years in London in the nineties, life in Vermont and South 
Africa, and experiences in the Boer war. One more chapter tells the story of Batensn's, 
The Very-Own Bouse, and the final chapter discusses a writing man's working- tools. Through- 
out the work are allusions to the genesis of many of his books, and tales of their progress. 
Those who want to write will do well to read this book, not once but twice over, for, 
unless they are obtuse, it will teach them things about their own m ntal processes Trtiich 
might otherwise take them seventy years to discover. This book is the corner-stone of 
that complete biography which awaits some Anglo-American architect. 

Lutz, G.L.H. The Christmas bride. 6v. Grade lh ARC Garin process. Popular fiction. 

Mansfield, Katherine. The garden party and other stories. 2v. ABB (Provided by the U.S, 
Government) Contents: At the bay; The garden party; The daughters of the late Colonel; 
Mr. and Mrs. Dove; The young girl; Life of Ma Parker; Marriage a la mode; The voyage; 
Miss Brill; Her first ball; The singing lesion; The stranger; Bank holiday; An ideal 
family; The lady's-maid. 

Morgan, Edmund M. Introduction to the study of law. 2v. 1926 C?H (Provided by the U.S. 
Government) This book, may be borrowed from the f e ll a rin^ llbrai it a. Jjus\ JcJkejvdl^ 



w^-\U° 



Nevinson, Henry W» 




\AA 



•\ ^HxAA/i WUjWU/V 



man and poet. 5v. ARC Garin process. A sympathetic portrait 



of Goethe. The author has stressed those periods in the poet's life which narked the 
finest steps in his development, and those of his works which are remembered for the ir 
lasting beauty. Mr. Nevinson' s portrait is an e cellent one - vivid and trenen*ously 
alive; while the background of eighteenth- century Germany, court life of eimar, the 
French Revolution, Napoleon and Schiller, are admirably sketched in. 
Parkhurst, Helen H. Cathedral; a Gothic pilgrimage. 3v. 1936 Ai^ (Provided by the U. . 






! 

1 






HI 



si 



teenth century. 
usual gifts of < 
Johnson, James Weldo 
Garin process. 




3. 
Maine fanners had owned it* The hero of the book is Charlie Ashburn, who though 
seemingly a failure, had inherited the best qialitl^s of his sturdy ancestors. In 
working out the story of Charlie's fate the author paints as background a picture 
of comfortable country life. 

Foldes, Jolan. The street of the Fishing Cat, translated from the Hungarian by Elizabeth 
Jacobs. 2v. BMP (Provided by the U.S. Government) dinner of the All-Nations Prize 
Novel Competition, this, the Hungarian entry, is the story of a group of post-war 
refugees in Paris. The Barabas children and their parents, furriers from Hungary, 
are the principal characters, living with other interna tional emigres in the little 
Street of the Fishing Cat. Though widely diverse in nationality and political belief 
(among them are Lithuanian socialists, T ,7hite Russians, French comnunists, and Spanish 
anarchists) a feeling of comradeship and common purpose binds them together. The 
joys and griefs, the fortunes and misadventures of the Barabas farlly form the central 
theme, and in the sense that theirs are emotions and experiences shared by the rxiled 
group as a whole, the story acquires a larger humanitarian significance. 

Garland, Hamlin. Other main-tr rivalled roadn. ov, 1892 BIA (Provide' by the U.S. Govern- 
ment) Short stories representing the reactions of a sensitive spirit to the grim real- 
ities of pioneer farm life. 

Guide to Rule 34 of Standard English braillo. Pamphlet. Published in both inkprint and 
braille by the New York Institute for the Blind, 9^9 Pelham Parkway, New York City, 
"V On sale at the Institute for a small fee. Particularly helpful in connection with 

l^> "Standard English Braille in twenty lessons," by Madeleine Loomis. 
'^Jeans, Sir James, The new background of science, 3v, 1934 edition, NIB (Provided by the 
U.S, Government) Current physical theory and its bearing on science and philoso >hy. 
Philosophy and scieqee are more cl sely interwoven now than at any time since the seien- 

this fresh study of their interaction Sir James Jeans brings his 
ty and orderliness. For readers who enjoyed "The Universe Around Us. n 
God 1 a trombones; seven negro sermons in verse, lv. Grade 1? ARC 
of memories of his boyhood, .the poet has recreate the art of the 
old time preachers, achieving effects quite remarkably without the use of dialect. 

Kipling, Rudyard. Something of myself; for my friends known and unknown, 2v, 193? AFH 

(Provided by the U.S. Government) This last volume from Kipling' s pen, is an autobiography 
written after he was seventy and apparently unfinished. The first Six chapters tell the 
story of his childhood and youth, his early apprenticeship days doing Journalistic work 
in India, his successful years in London in the nineties, life in Vermont and South 
Africa, and experiences in the Boer war. One more chapter tells the story of Batsman* s, 
The Very-Own Bouse, and the final chapter discusses a writing man* s working- tools, Through- 
m$. n out the work are allusions to the genesis of many of his books, and tales of their progress. 

p Those who want to write will do well to read this book, not once but twice over, for, 

unless they are obtuse, it will teach them things about their own m ntal processes which 
might otherwise take them seventy years to discover. This book is the corner-stone of 
that complete biography which awaits some Anglo-American architect, 

Lutz, G.L.H, The Christmas bride, 6v, Grade lv; ARC Garin process. Popular fiction. 

Mansfield, Katharine, The garden party and other stories, 2v, ABB (Provided by the U.S, 
Government) Contents: At the bay; The garden party; The daughters of the late Colonel; 
Mr, and Mrs, Dove; The young girl; Life of Ma Parker; Marriage a la mode; The voyage; 
Miss Brill; Her first ball; The singing les ion; The stranger; Bank holiday; An ideal 
family; The lady*s-maid. 

Morgan, Edmund M, Introduction to the study of law, 2v, 1926 CJB (Provided by the U.S, 
Government) This book, may be borrowed from the fell s wtog llbriu ' lusi Xk^\ JhJkej^^ 

CAAuS^r J^pr t^nrW ^ryMl ^fl G^jLWl^T S^ Mj >H £^ v - 

Nevinson, Henry W, Goethe, man and poet, 5v, ARC Garin process. A sympathetic portrait 
of Goethe, The author has stressed those periods in the poet's life which narked the 
finest steps in his development, and those of his works which are remembered for their 
lasting beauty, Mr, Nevinson* s portrait is an e cellent one - vivid and tremendously 
alive; while the background of eighteenth- century Germany, court life of eimar, the 
French Revolution, Napoleon and Schiller, are admirably sketched in. 
Parkhurst, Helen H, Cathedral; a Gothic pilgrimage. 3v. 1936 APH (Provided by the U. . 



L-\ 






c 



D 



4. 

Government) Study of the cathedral of the middle ages aa viewed in the larger context 
of poetry, music, legend, ritual, and symbolism* It has been the author* a aim to 
portray the cathedral not only as the focus of mediaeval life, but as the mirror of that 
life, reflecting with amaz ng completeness the beliefs, hopes, fears, dreams, and mys- 
tical imaginings of mediaeval man* 

Roosevelt, Mrs* Franklin D. A trip to Washington* lv* Grade l£ ABC Garln process, 

Untermeyer, Louis, editor* Modern American poetry; a critical anthology* 7v* CrH 

(Provided by the U*S. Government) A revised and enlarged third edition of this excellent 
anthology* 

V/alpole, Hugh* A prayer for my son; a novel* 3v. APH (Provided by the U.P* Governrent) 
A psychological horror story*. Rose Clennell, an unmarrie J mother, goes to see her son 
whoa she has given over to his paternal grandfather, Colonel Fawcus, ten years before* 
After the first few hours she begins to sense that something is wrong and gradually 
learns the truth about the Colonel and his influence over the numbers of his household. 

West, Victoria Mayy Sackville-. Saint Joan of Arc. 4v* 1936 APH (Provided by the U.S. 
Government) The author has attempted, by as ambling in a straight-forward narrative the 
well known facta of Joan* a career, to come to some solution of the mystery of the Voices, 
the miracles and the power of the Maid* In her conclusion she admits defeat, torn be- 
tween instinct and reason, resting in a belief that some day science may find an ex- 
planation and that this explanation may well be that Joan was one of a few nortala 
"in touch with a unity for which we have no name— of which we apprehend but the snallest 
segment*" 

White, tfilllam Allen* Masks in a pageant. 9v. Grade l£ ARC Garin process. These 
vigorous portraits of presidents and politicians drawn from Mr. TThite* s memory of them 
make up a pageant whose background is a continuous history of American politics during 
the last fifty years. Those who appear in the pageant are Croker, Piatt, Harrison, 
Grover Cleveland, McKinley, Mark Hanna, Bryan, Theodore Roosevelt, Taft, Woodrow Wilson, 
Harding, Coolidge, Alfred Emanuel Smith, u'llliam Hale Thompson. 

Whitechurch, Victor L. A bishop out of residence. 4v. Grade 1§ ARC Garin process. 

Whitechurch, Victor L. The canon in residence. 3v. Grade l£ Garin process. 

Wodehouse, P.G. Heavy weather* 5v. Grade l£ ARC Garin process. This returns to a 
scene of an earlier book, "Fish preferred." 

Hand-copied Books 

(If you wish to borrow a hand-copied book you must write directly to the library that owns 

the book. Names of libraries owning the books are indicated after each title. Boc ks in 

this list are in grade 1§ unless otherwise noted.) 

\llen, James Lane. Heroine in bronze. 3v. NLB 
%& aum, E. Frank. The road to Oz. 5v* Seattle. Juve oile fiction. 

Bean, R.B. The races of man. 2v. KLB Science. 

Benet, Stephen, and Rosemary Benet. A book of Americans. Salt Lake City. American liter- 
ature. 

Brewster, Stanley F. Twelve men in a box* 3v* Chicago* Law* 

Burns, Robert* Selections from his ;*>ems, with foreword and glossary* Atlanta* 
— Conrad, Joseph, and F.M. Hueffer. The inheritors* 4V.NLB Fiction. 

Cook, Roy J*, compiler* One hundred and one famous poems. Indianapolis, Chicago, LC 

Coulevain, Pierre de, pseudonym* On the branch, translated from the French by Alice Hall 
Ward* 7v* Albany* Fiction* 

Davis, Owen* The ni th guest; a mystery melodrama in three acts, from the novel by Gwen 
Briston and Bruce Manning* 2v* Salt Lake City* 

Dawson, Coningsby* The glory of the trenches; an interpretation* 2v* Cincinnati, NLB History 

Douglas, Norman* South wind* 7v* Salt Lake City. Fiction. 

Dunn, L.C. Heredity and variations* 2v* NLB Science. 

Flexner, Hortense. This stubborn root and other poems. Jewish Braille Library. "ESMBf. 
*Garnett, David. The grasshoppers come. Hv. Cincinnati, Detroit, Salt Lake City. Fiction. 
' uuiterman, Arthur* >7ildwood fables* Salt Lake City* American literature. 

Hardy, Thomas. The Dynasts, a drama of the Napoleonic wars in three parts, nineteen acts, 
and one hundred and thirty scenes. 9v. NJfPL Drama. The author's poetic masterpiece. 
A po verful book. 






■ »■- 



' 



_; 



1 



Hogan, Pendleton* The dark comes early, an American novel* 6v. ; enver. 

Hooker, Forrestine C. Star; the story of an Indian pony. 2v. Chicago, Cincinnati, 
NYPL Juvenile fiction. 

James, Will. Young cowboy, arranged from "Big linough" and "Sun Up". Detroit. Juvenile 
fiction. 

Gribbs, Philip. The goldon years. ?v. Cincinnati. Fiction. 

Kane, William T. For greater things; the story of Saint Stanislaus Kostka. 2v. Chicago, 
Religion. 

Katibah, H.I. Stories from other Arabian nights, lv. NLB Fiction. 

Kyne, Peter B. The cold trail. (From Colliers Weekly Jy^Cincinnati. , 0*- 

Lehmann, Rosamund. Weather in the streets. 9v. NLB Fiction. 

rimer, Graeme, and Sarah Loriraer. Men are like street cars. 3v. Cincinnati. Fiction. 

Martin, Alfred W. Great moral loaders. 2v. Albany, NYiL Biography. 

McCleary, Dorothy. Not for heaven. 6v. NLB Fiction. 

Millay, Edna St. Vincent. Poems. 3V. Salt Lake City. 

Miller, Dr. Janet. Jungles preferred. 7v. NLB Fiction. 

Otero, Nina. Old Spain in our southwest. 2v. Chicago. 

Palmer, Media. Biney. lv. NLB Fiction. 

Parker, Dorothy. After such pleasures. 2v. Indianapolis. Fiction. 

Pease, Ho.vard. Hurricane weather. 3v. NYPL A story of adventure in the South Seas, 
written by a favorite author of books for older boys. 

Pound, Arthur. Second growth. 6v. Detroit. Fiction. 

Reynolds, Robert. Brothers in the west. 6v. St. Louis. Fiction. 

Ripperger, Walter. The magic touch, ^ y Seattle. ^ _yV- 

Seabrook, William. Asylum. 4v. Detroit. Inorder to cure himself of a severe case 
of alcoholism, the author asked to be committed to a famous mental hospital. The 
book is an account of the life in a fine modern institution of this type and of 
his cure. 

Shuster, George N. The hill of happiness. 2v. Chicago. Fiction. 

Spearman, Frank H. The daughter of a magnate. 3v. Chicago. Fiction. 

Stong, Phil. Farm boy; a hunt for Indian treasure. Detroit. Juvenile fiction. 

Stout, Rex. The rubber band; a Nero Wolfe mystery. 5v. Detroit. Fiction. 

Thompson, Dorothy. One great war of words. Seattle, 

Wagner, Richard. The dusk of the gods (Gtotterdammerung); a dramatic poem, freely trans- 
lated in poetic narrative form by Oliver Huckel. 2v. NYPL 

Ward, Mrs. Humphrey. Helena. 5v. NLB Fiction. 
' Whitean, C.H. Seven contemporary plays. 14v. NLB Drama. 

World's best-loved poems. Atlanta. 




Talking Books 



oksare--supplied by the U.S. Government) 

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a scheme for a little excitement and danger. They notify the owners of three closely 
guarded Scottish estates that at a certain tine the undersigned, John Macnab, will 
successfully poach on their property. As the three -Englishmen on account of their 
position in life cannot afford to be caught as a poacher there is excitement in the 
plan* They are more or less successful in the enterprise and much entertained. 

Freeman, Richard Austin. Dr. Thorndyke's discovery. 16 records, A detective story by 
one of the best mystery writers of the day. 

Gaskell, Mrs. Elizabeth. Cranford. 8 records. A novel of old-fashioned country life, 
dealing mostly with spinsters and widows living in genteel poverty. Humorous de- 
scriptions of bygone etiquette, tea drinkings, formal parties and gossip. 

Hardy, Thomas. Under the greenwood tree; a rural painting of the Dutch school. 7 records* 
One of his early novels exhibiting his sense of the comic and the beginnings of his 
irony. A purely rustic novel, rich and racy in character and idiom and delightful in 
Its unaffected humor. 

Hope, Anthony, pseudonym. Prisoner of Zenda. 7 records. A novel presenting the neroirs 
of Rudolph Rassendyll and his adventures in an imaginary kingdom in the Austrian Tyrol. 

Raleigh, Sir Walter. Shakespeare. 9 records. Monograph interpreting Shakespeare the man 
from his dramas. A brilliant essay rather than a formal biography. 

Robinson, Edwin Arlington. Tristram. 7 records. This long narrative poem is a dramatic 
rendering of the legend of Tristram and the two Isolts. It is a bold thing to retell 
a story so rich already in notable telling. Robinson has proved equal to the test 
' <«J imposed by so famous a theme. He has restated its essential values, leaving the story 
romantic still, but romantic in terms intelligible to the present. 

Williamson, H. N. Salar the salmon. 8 records. The life history of Salar, an English 

salmon. lie goes through every variety of salmon experience, from his first appearance 
as a five-year-old returning from the sea to his end as an aged battered kelt. 



^/V^-^-^^f 1/wLC, 



Talking Books 
(These books are supplied by the U.S. Government) 
Note on the English records: As you all know, the English records « ««£• * jj* 
on a machine revolving at the rate of 24 revolutions per minute, kany of the 
Zeli7£ ^£ou2- canbe flowed down to 24 r.p.m. by adjusting the speed control, 
Sse ZSZ which can be thus adjusted are all of the «^^* ^^ 
US-ll, and US-14, irres ective of serial numbers; nodel UlO-5640 and up, model 
AC12-1640 and up model U13-4150 and up. If your machine does need modifying 
in or^et tTplay tn^se records it must be sent to the American Foundation for 
alteration. The charge is 31.00 plus the cost of transportation to and from 
the Foundation. 



-r.x^eoe- s narrative account of his various descents into the depths of the ocean 
in the now-famous bathysphere. The climax is reached in the descent to 3028 feet 
below the surface where the ocean was absolutely black except for the pin ooints 
of light furnished by living creatures. Prece ing these chapters are several de- 
scribing other methods and achievements of under-water exploring. The book also 
contains a number of appendices, describing the bathysphere, Dr. Beebe's scientific 

n™«*° ffr ; J" 8 * unedited telephone conversations between the divers and the shio. etc. 

Brand Albert B.V7ild birds and their songs. 2 records. with Sinking in the 7ildernes s , 
« 1 /!? i e » which ia la B re co rda » a» bird songs were recorded by Albert R. 
Brand of the Department of Ornithology, Cornell University. By means of a specially 
devised parabolic microphone stationed at strategic points he vras able to record the 
songs of birds often several hundred feet away. Along with the bird calls and son-s 
m * 0n f^ arable amount of descriptive material so blind listeners will not only be 
able to identify the bird when they hear it but will also learn of its habits and 
habitat. Taken from "Talking Book Topics". 

Buchan, John. John Macnab. 11 records. Tliroe Englishmen, much bored .rith life, hit upon 






— — , 

a scheme for a little excitement and danger. They notify the owners of three closely 
guarded Scottish estates that at a certain tine the undersigned, John tlacnab, will 
successfully poach on their property. As the three Englishmen on account of their 
position in life cannot afford to be caught as a poacher there is excitement in the 
plan, They are more or less successful in the enterprise and much entertained. 

Freeman, Richard Austin. Dr. Thorndyke's discovery. 16 records. A detective story by 
one of the best mystery writers of the day. 

Gaskell, Mrs. Elizabeth. Cranford. 8 records. A novel of old-fashioned country life, 
dealing mostly with spinsters and widows living in genteel poverty. Humorous de- 
scriptions of bygone etiquette, tea drinkings, formal parties and gossip. 

Hardy Thomas. Under the greenwood tree; a rural painting of the Dutch school. 7 records. 
One of his early novels exhibiting his sense of the comic and the beginnings of his 
irony. A purely rustic novel, rich and racy in character and idiom and delightful in 
its unaffected humor. 

Hope, Anthony, pseudonym. Prisoner of Zenda. 7 records. A novel presenting the nenolra 
of Rudolph Rassendyll and his adventures in an imaginary kingdom in the Austrian Tyrol. 

Raleigh Sir Walter. Shakespeare. 9 records. Monograph interpreting Shakespeare the man 
from his dramas. A brilliant essay rather than a formal biography. 

Robinson, Edwin Arlington. Tristram. 7 records. This long narrative poen is a dramatic 
' rendering of the legend of Tristram and the two Isolts. It is a bold thing to retell 
m . a story so rich already in notable telling. Robinson has proved equal to the test 

. y frp»— I by so famous a theme. He has restated its essential values, leaving the story 

romantic still, but romantic in terms intelligible to the present. 

Williamson, H. N. Salar the salmon. 8 records. The life history of Salar, an English 

salmon. He goes through every variety of salmon experience, from his first appearance 
as a five-year-old returning from the sea to his end as an aged battered kelt. 



(^ v ^-^^(^- 'A \a-v Lc ( 



Talking Books 



/ 



h 



iUl&lUjJ UUUJU9 

. ^^ (These books are sup >lied by the U.S. <Jovernment) 

J Note on the English records: As you all know, the English records are made to play 
on a machine revolving at the rate of 24 revolutions per ninute. Many of the 
Jjoserican machines can be slewed down to 24 r.p.m. by adjusting the speed control. 
. -.I'apuyj ijM j f Inf^utftt^n ^Jfee^jnaeh in e s whte^efce^aet requ ire m od ification in order to 
•pft<ythe^Saslt»h records aaw all /US-10, U3-11 an* US-14-models , irrespective ef- 
serial numbers; model U10-5640 and up; model AC12-1640 and up; model U13-4150 i 

and up. If your^machine does need modifying in order to play these records it 
muSt-oV seatr^bo the American Foundation for alteration. The charge Is CI. 00 
)iaa-4to cost of transportation to and from the Foundation. 
Beebe, William. Half mile down. 12 records. The main part of this book contains 

Dr. Beebe* s narrative accou .t of his various descents into the depths of the ocean 
in the now- famous bathysphere. The climax is reached in the descent to 3028 feet 
below the surface where the ocean was absolutely black except for the pin points 
of light furnished by living creatures. Prece ing these chapters are several de- 
scribing other methods and achievements of under-water exploring. The book also 
contains a number of appendices, describing the bathysphere, Dr. Beebe f s scientific 
observations, unedited telephone conversations between the divers and the ship, etc. 
Brand, Albert B. Wild birds and their song3. 2 records. .71 th sinking in the Tilderness 
by D.Q. Peattie, which is in 8 records. The bird songs were recorded by Albert 3. 
Brand of the Department of Ornithology, Cornell University. By means of a specially 
devised parabolic microphone stationed at strategic points he was able to record the 
songs of birds, often several hundred feet away. Along with the bird calls and songs 
is a considerable amount of descriptive material 30 blind listeners will not only be 
able to identify the bird when they hear it but will also loarn of its habits and 
habitat. Taken from "Talking Book Topics". 

Buchan, John. John Macnab. 11 records. Throe Englishmen, much bored ,;ith life, hit upc. 



y 



6. 
a scheme for a little excitement and danger. They notify the owners of three closely 
guarded Scottish estates that at a certain tine the undersigned, John Llacnab, will 
successfully poach on their property. As the three Englishmen on account of their 
position in life cannot afford to be caught as a poacher there is excitement in the 
plan. They are more or less successful in the enterprise and much entertained* 

Freeman, Richard Austin, Dr. Thorndyke's discovery. 16 records, A detective story by 
one of the best mystery writers of the day* 

Gaskell, Mrs. Elizabeth. Cranford. 8 records. A novel of old-fashioned country life, 
dealing mostly with spinsters and widows living in genteel poverty. Humorous de- 
scriptions of bygone etiquette, tea drinkings, formal parties and gossip. 

Hardy, Thomas. Under the greenwood tree; a rural painting of the Dutch school. 7 records. 
One of his early novels exhibiting his sense of the comic and the beginnings of his 
irony* A purely rustic novel, rich and racy in character and idiom and delightful in 
Its unaffected humor* 

Hope, Anthony, pseudonym* Prisoner of Zenda. 7 records. A novel presenting the neroira 

of Rudolph Rassendyll and his adventures in an imaginary kingdom in the Austrian Tyrol. 

Raleigh, Sir Walter. Shakespeare* 9 records. I'.onograph interpreting Shakespeare the man 
from his dramas* A brilliant essay rather than a formal biography* 

Robinson, Edwin Arlington* Tristrem* 7 records. This long narrative poem is a dramatic 
rendering of the legend of Tristram and the two Isolts. It is a bold thing to retell 
a story so rich already in notable telling. Robinson has proved equal to the test 
\) imposed by so famous a theme. He has restated its essential values, leaving the story 

romantic still, but romantic in terms intelligible to the present. 

Williamson, H. N* Salar the salmon* 8 records* The life history of Salar, an English 

salmon* lis goes through every variety of salmon experience, from his first appearance 
as a five-year-old returning from the sea to his end as an aged battered kelt* 



7 






Li3t of abbreviations use*] in this magazine for the libraries for the blind. 
Albany New York State Library, Department for the Blind, Albany, 1I.Y. 

Atlanta Krlegshaber Memorial Lighthouse for the Blind, 760 Washington street, S # W, 

Atlanta, -SgeiBgi*- G\.(X. 
Austin Texas State Library, Department for the Blind, Austin, lorces 

Canada Canadian National Library, 64 Baldwin street, Toronto, Canada 

Chicago Chicago Public Library, Department for the Blind, 4536 - 44 Lincoln Avenue 

Chicago, Ill*6o*» 
The Cincinnati Library Society for the Blind, lit. Healthy, Ohio 
Cleveland Public Library, Department for the Blind, Cleveland, Ohio 
Community Workers Community /orkers, 172 Last 96th St., New York City 






Cincinnati 
v Cleveland 



Denver 

Detroit 

Faribault 

Indianapolis 

Jacksonville 



Denver Public Library, Department for the Blind, Denver, Col rado 

Library for the Blind, 3661 Trumbull Avenue, Detroit, Michfcgaer 

Minnesota School for the Blind, Faribault, Minnesota 

Indiana State Library, Indianapolis, Indiana 

Illinois Free Circulating Library for the Blind, Jacksonville, IlL&irtiSt 



Jewish Braille Library Jewish Br lille Library, 1825 Harrison Ave. New York City 



LC 

Los Angeles 

New Orleans 

-fc LB 
"iftPL 






at 



Library of Congress, Service for the Blind, Washington D.C. 

Braille Institute Library, 749 North Vermont Ave., Los Angeles, Calif. 

New Orleans Public Library, Department for the Blind, Lee Circle and St. 

Charles Avenue, New Orleans, L ouisiana Sp^« 
National Library for the Blind, 1126 - 21st Street, H.W. Washington, D.C. 
New York Public Library, Library for the Blind, 137 Jest 25 St. New York City 
Oklahoma City Oklahoma Library Commission, Department for the Blind, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 
Perkins Perkins Institution for the BLind, Jatortown, Massgfek&aecfetsK 

i^hiladelphia . Free Library of -Philadelphia , %e£artaent for the Blind, Logan Square, 
^biiadeSrTftiia , -Peansylvania ^K • 

Carnegie Library, Department for the Blind, -lltsliiLFgh, Pennsyl v ania ^<v 
Library Association of Portland, Department for the Blind, iortland, Oregon 
Braille Circulating Library, Richmond, Va. 

California 3tate Library, Department for the Blinc' , Sacramento, Calife^r^Q7 
Michigan state Library for* the Blind, Saginaw, Michjft&H-/ 

St. Louis Public Library, Department for the Blind, St. Louis, Mis s ouri - W\Q, 
City Salt Lake C ty Public Library, Department for the Blind, 15 South State 
treet, >alt Lake Cit; , Utah 
Seattle Seattle Public Library, Blind Division, Seattle, fashington f 



Pittsburgh 

Portland 

Richmond 

Sacramento 

Saginaw 

St. Louis 

Salt Lake 



i .Y. 



Guild 



17Z East 96th 



St. IT.Y.C. 



O 






List of the ten libraries in which a small collection of selected legal works will 
be deposited for loan to blind readers throughout the United States, 

Please note the library which y u should use if you wish to borrow 
these books on law. There is one library for each of the ten 
Federal Judicial Circuits, 



Atlanta: 

Chicago: 
Cincinnati: 
Denver: 
LC: 

NYPL: 
Perkins: 
Philadelphia: 
Sacramento: 

St. L uia: 



'.Till serve readers in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, 

Mississippi, Texas. 

Will serve Illinois, Indiana, Wisconsin. 

Will serve Kentucky, Michigan, Ohio, Tennessee. 

Will serve Colorado, Kansas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Utah, Wyoming. 

Will serve District of Columbia, Maryland, North Carolina, South 

Carolina, Virginia, West Virginia. 

Will serve Connecticut, New York State, Vermont. 

Will serve Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island. 

Will serve Delaware, New Jersey, Pennsylvania. 

Will serve Arizona, California, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Ore [ym, 

Washington State. 

Will serve Arkansas, Iowa, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North 

Dakota, South Dakota. 



« 



7 



- 



TIE BRaILLE BOOK REVIEW 
A Guide to Braille and Talking Book Publications 
Published Monthly at the 
American Printing House for the Blind 
1859 Frankfort Avenue 
Louisville, Kentucky 

Printed for 
The New York Public Library 
Fifth Avenue and 42nd Street 
New York City 
(Henry F. nomes Fund) 



Volume 6 



July, 1937 



Number 7 



Contents 



? 



<^^JU<\ \J^rVl/0- \c30Cq^v^x r^- ^"icriA^V 







o 



\ uJH>\a\ 






1 \ 






Jl«l » 



7 



Braille Book Review, July, 1937 2 

Book Announcements 
(Books In this 11 3t are In Grade 2 unless otherwise noted) 

Aldrich, Bess Streeter* Miss Bishop, 3v. ARC 1933 Garin process. About a woman who 
devotes her life to teaching 

Andrews, Li*R*3* A lost commander: Florence Nightingale, 4v. Grade l£* ARC Garin process, 
A somewhat romanticized life of one of the greatest of modern women* 

Baikie, James* The sea-kings of Crete* 2v* 1910 2v* (Provided by the U.S. Government) 
An account of archeological research in Crete which is interesting for the general 
reader* The author writes with keen but tempered enthusiasm of the finds at Cnossus, 
Phaestus, and Hagia Triada, and what they seem to show • • • The relations of Crete with 
Greece, the Cyclades, and Egypt are discussed and illustrated by parallelisms in pottery, 
sculpture, and metal-working; end-about thirty- excellent half -tone piatee show the 
-principal- architectural and artistic results of the various excavations* 

Harper, Fowler V* A treatise on the law of torts; a preliminary treatise on civil liability 
for harms to legally protected interests* 14v. 1933 APE (Provided by the U*S* Govern- 
ment) 

Kelland, C*B. Spotlight* 2v. CPH (Provided by the U.S. Government) Blue blood and Park 
Avenue aru * boredom are Nadla Horne's heritage — but she has one talent, and, in spite of 
her horrified parents, takes a job as a night club entertainer* Nadla becomes the hit of 
the season and interesting people come into her life; Pazzy Mayner, her night club manager, 
a diamond in the rough; Chester Roget, elegant blackmailer; and a young man from the .'est 

[eyes, F.P. The safe bridge. 4v. ARC Garin process^ -J^^_^^4A^% w* 

jynd, Roberts S«, and Helen M* Lynd* 



Middletown in transition; a study in cultural conflicts}^ 



6v* CPH (Provided by the U*S*Government) A sequel to the authors earlier book, 
Middletown, which was a study in contemporary American culture as evidenced in a typical 
American community* The present investigation does not in any sense supplant the earlier 
study covering the years 1085-1925. It is built upon the earlier work, and brings down 
to date that record of forty years of change* Many of its elaborations can be understood 
only when viewed from the base lino of the earlier study* The format of six sections and 
twenty-nine chapters of the earlier study is here compressed to thirteen chapters. All 
six areas are brought down to date, and in general the earlier method of building the 
chapters around persistent institutional functions is followed* 

Miller, Justin* Handbook of criminal law* llv. 1934 APH (Provided by the U.S. Government^ 

O'Brien, Jack* Silver Chief; dog of the North* 2v* Grade lg* APH (Provided by the U*S, 
Government) An adventure story of the Canadian wilderness in which Silver Chief, a 
beautiful dog; son of a husky and a wolf, is the hero. lie is tamed and trained by Jim 
Thome of the Canadian Mounted Police and the book describes the friendship and under- 
standing between the two* 
^Reynolds, G.H* Very private secretary* 4v* ARC Garin process* An excellent tale of 
intrigue and adventure in London and Belgium* 

Tarkington, Booth* Alice Adams* 3v« BIA (Provided by the U.S. Government) Awarded the 

Pulitzer prize 1922* Alice Adams is a small town girl of the Middle 7est* he has charm 
and ambition, but, handicapped as she i3 by lack of money, background and ideals, her 
imagination can compass no higher career than struggling to keep up with the childhood 
friends whose fortunes have grown with the town* Alice is a pathetic figure, at once 
amusing, appealing and irritating, as are her self-sacrificing but one-ideaed mother and 
her simple-minded, goaded father* A lightly handled albeit penetrating study* 

Tomlinson, H.M. Pipe all hands. 3v. APH (Provided by the U*S* Government) A new story of 
the sea, ships and sailors by the author of Gallions Reach* The chief protagonist of 
this tale is the tramp steamer Hestia herself, a ship her crew regard with superstitious 
awe, her owner as a pawn in the game of markets and merchandise, her master as a sacred 
trust to be brought safely into port in spite of queer tricks, queerer orders, and the 
elements themselves* 

Undset, Sigrid* Gunnar , s daughter; translated from the Norwegian by Arthur G.Chater. lv* 
BIA (Provided by the U*S ♦Government) In simple unadorned style is told th« >■ ■ ' ■ 
story of Vigdis Gunner sdatter, a beautiful Nm»m*wh-«» -*-* 
youth, ^i-^ - (Provided by the U.s.Governmer.t) 



'\\ 



iarin process. 



•E 



Braille Book Review, July, 1937 
Book Announcements 
(Books in this list are in Grade 2 unless otherwise noted) 

Aldrich, Bess Streeter. Wise Bishop. 3v. ARC 1933 Garin process. About a woman who 
devotes her life to teaching 

Andrews, M.R.S. A lost conmander: Florence Nightingale. 4v. Grade lfr. ARC 
A somewhat romanticized life of one of the greatest of modern women. 

Baikie, James* The sea-kings of Crete. 2v. 1910 2v. (Provided by the U.S. Government) 
An account of archeological research in Crete which is interesting for the general 
reader. The author writes with keen but tempered enthusiasm of the finds at Cnoseus, 
Phaestus, and Hagia Triada, and what they seem to show • • • The relations of Crete with 
Greece, the Cyclades, and Egypt are discussed and illustrated by ./Parallelisms in pottery, 
sculpture, and metal-working; and-nbout thirty- exeellent half -tone plates show the 
-principal architectural and artistic results of the various excavations* 

Harper, Fowler V. A treatise on the law of torts; a preliminary treatise on civil liability 
for harms to legally protected interests. 14v. 1933 APE (Provided by the U.S. Govern- 
ment) 

Kelland, C.B. Spotlight. 2v. CPH (Provided by the U.S.Governcient) Blue blood and Park 
Avenue and boredom are Nadla Home's heritage— but she has one talent, and, in spite of 
her horrified parents, takes a job as a night club entertainer. Nadla becomes the hit of 
the season and interesting people come into her life; Pazzy Mayner, her night club manager, 
a diamond in the roughjChester Roget, elegant blackmailer; and a young man from the 'est L .. 

eyes, F.P. The safe bridge. 4v. ARC Garin processTA^^^^ 

ynd, Roberts S. f and Helen M. Lynd. Middle town in transition; a study in cultural conflicts}^ 
6v. CPH (Provided by the U.S •Government) A sequel to the author's earlier book, 
Middletown, which was a study in contemporary American culture as evidenced in a typical 
American community. The present investigation does not in any sense supplant the earlier 
study covering the years 1085-1925. It is built upon the earlier work, and brings down 
to date that record of forty years of change. Many of its elaborations can be understood 
only when viewed from the base line of the earlier study. The format of six sections and 
twenty-nine chapters of the earlier study i3 here compressed to thirteen chapters. All 
six areas are brought down to date, and in general the earlier method of building the 
chapters around persistent institutional functions is followed. 

Miller, Justin. Handbook of criminal law. llv. 1934 APH (Provided by the U.S.Governmentfr 

0»Brien, Jack. Silver Chief; dog of the North. 2v. Grade l|r. APH (Provided by the U.S. 
Government) An adventure story of the Canadian wilderness in which Silver Chief, a 
beautiful dog; son of a husky and a wolf, is the hero. Be is tamed and trained by Jim 
Thome of the Canadian Mounted Police and the book describes the friendship and under- 
' standing between the two. 

.Reynolds, G.H. Very private secretary. 4v. ARC Garin process. An excellent tale of 
intrigue and adventure in London and Belgium. 

Tarkington, Booth. Alice Adam3. 3v. BIA (Provided by the U.S. Government) Awarded the 

Pulitzer prize 1922. Alice Adams is a small town girl of the Middle 7est. .he has charm 
and ambition, but, handicapped as she i3 by lack of money, background and ideals, her 
imagination can compass no higher career than struggling to keep up with the childhood 
friends whose fortunes have grown with the town. Alice is a pathetic figure, at once 
amusing, appealing and irritating, as are her self-sacrificing but one-ideaed mother and 
her simple-minded, goaded father. A lightly handled albeit penetrating study. 

Tomlinson, H.M. Pipe all hands. 3v. APH (Provided by the U.S. Government) A new story of 
the sea, ships and sailors by the author of Gallions Reach. The chief protagonist of 
this tale is the tramp steamer Hestia herself, a ship her crew regard with superstitious 
awe, her owner as a pawn in the game of markets and merchandise, her master as a sacred 
trust to be brought safely into port in spite of queer tricks, queerer orders, and the 
elements themselves. 

Undaet, Sigrld. Gunner* s daughter; translated from the Norwegian by Arthur G.Chater. lv. 

BIA (Provided by the U.S. Government) In simple unadorned style is told the tragic love 
story of Vigdis Gunnarsdatter, a beautiful Norwegian girl, and sjotj a hot-headed Icelandic 

youth. Scene laid in the tine of King Olav Trygvesson. 



\ 



, 



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Chekhov, Anton. 

Curwood, James v 
Davis, deorgp . 

Far son, Negley. 

Faure, Gabriel, 
Fels, Samuel S. 
Field, Rachel* 

Gibbs, Philip. 



Hand-copied Iiooks 
(In borrowing these hand-copied books readers must write to the library that owns the book. 
The name of the library owning the book is given after each title. A list of the names of 
the libraries in their abbreviated form is in the Braille Book Review for June). 
Andrews, K.R.S. Her country, lv. Sacramento. Fiction. 
Baha'i teachings on economics, a compilation, lv. Cleveland* 
Beebe, Charles W. Beneath tropic seas; a record of diving among the coral reefs of Haiti. 

3v. Chicago, Sacramento. 
Blakemore, Evans, and Robert 0. Roseler. College German. 6v. Chicago. 
Browne, Lewis. That man Heine; a biography* 7v* Jewish Braille Library* 

Selections from his short stories; translated by Constance Garnett. 4v. 
Oklahoma City. 
0* Flower of the north; a modern romance. 5 v. LC Fiction* 
Rebuilding Palestine according to prophecy. 2v. Braille Circulating Library, 
Richmond. 
The way of a transgressor* 17v. Community Yorkers. Autobiographical story 

of the far-flung adventures of an American journalist. 
Rome. 4v. LC Travel and description* 

This changing worldf as I see its trends and purposes. 4v. Oklahoma City. 
Godfts pocket; the story of Captain Samuel Hadlock, Junior, of Cranberry Isles, 

rlaine. Sv. Seattle, S t. Louis. 
England speaks. 7v. Grade 2. Sacramento* Economic conditions, re flee ted in 
talks with all manner of men* 
Golden mountain; marvellous tales of Rabbi Israel, Baal Shem and his great-grandson retold by 

Meyer Levin. 6v* Jewish Braille Library* 
Guiterman, Arthur* Wildwood fables, lv* oalt Lake City, Seattle* 
Hackney, Louise Wallace. Win# of fame; a novel based on the life of James Smithson. 5v. 

Sacramento. 
Hagboldt, Peter. Essentials of German reviewed* bv. Chicago* 

Hall, Leland* Salah and his American, Sv. LC, MLB, Sacramento* It takes courage and a 
great love of truth to write a book today which deliberately argues for inequality. 
Mr. Hall has both of these qualities and also a human sympathy and understanding, ^ble 
psychology and good descriptive prose. 
Hamilton, Patrick. Rope; a play in three acta. &v. Oklahoma City* 
Eartwell, E*C. Teachers* manual; story hour readings, fourth year. 7v. Seattle. 
Johnson, Josephine* Winter orchard, and other atoriea. 5v. Community Workers. 
Jones, Rufus M. A preface to Christian faith in a new age. 3v. LC 

Kaufman, George S., and Edna Ferber. The royal family; a comedy in three acts. 2v. LC 
Kirby, Wm. The golden dog. Ii5v. HLB Fiction. 
k Knulp: drei geschichten aus dem leben Knulp«, von Hermann Hesse. Edited with introduction, 

exercises, notes and vocabulary by William Diamond and Ohristel B. Schomaker. 2v. Chicago. 
Laughlin, Clara E. Traveling through life; an autobiography. 5v* LC 
Lawrence, Josephine. If I have four apples. 5v. Jotroit, Seattle. Fiction. 
Lea, F. H. Anchor man. 5v. Fiction. LC 

Lurie, Rose G* The great march; post-Biblical Jewish stories. 3v, 
Lutz, G.L.H. The ransom. 5v. LC Fiction* 

Marshall, Edison* Sam Campbell, gentleman. 4v. St. Louis. Fiction* 
Matthews, I*G« Old Testament life and literature* 5v* Chicago* 

I'illay, Edna St .Vincent. The buck in the snow, and other poems, lv* 

Neidig, William J* The trap* lv. Seattle* Fiction* 

Prokosch, Frederic* The Asiatics. $v* Community Workers. A combination travel book and 

novel which carries the reader from Syria to the China Sea. 
Redd, Rose Henry. Heartsease and other poems, lv. Braille Circulating Library. Richmond. 
Richards, Laura E. Captain January, lv. NLB Juvenile fiction. 

Sayre, Wallace 3. Your government; an outline for every American voter. 2v. Chicago. 
Schwarz, Leo W., editor. The Jewish caravan, great stories of twenty-five centuries. 7v. 

Jewish Braille Library. 
Watson, Evelyn M. Poems of the Niagara frontier. 2v. LC 



Jewish Braille Library, 



NYPL, Oklahoma City. 



V 



Weigall, Arthur. Nero, the singing emperor of Rome. 5v. Sacramento. 

Wiisnn t? m r, * Arwh*>a. lv. Albany, Chicago, Cleveland, Detroit, LC, ITPL, 

n, F.T. our constitution and its make 



Zeitlin, Solomon. 



_:ers. 15v. 
Maimonides; a biography. 3 V . 
scholar of the middle ages. 



:jlb 

Sacramento. 



The most celebrated Je 



".VI S 



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Talking Books 



sivwPlTlTf 



'""s- i= ~~ *% Sr.rs's.i- "—-..., 



£^S?£KS5SI?Msr«s?a^.- 






of various ££ ™ S"**" 8 ° f * rea ™ ~*7 concerT 72*'' ««*>».* 

«««»! ^ e usfL^iSf :r : the iuuai - -n™-r ea £":vr ent8: m ° 

paoiflaa; The practical use^f f alt i^*' The "^"n soLC- !T,i Plea f ° r tru9 
to pray; The Christian lnt»™ f i ' The revo l* against i™.=H < inter Pretatlon of 
immortality. " Ian lnter ?retatlon of li fe . a tarrtrlo r££ £° n; & * le «rning ho, 

Hsrgesheiasr, Joseph. Java Head ,. fa0t; ^ ^ttostlons of ' 

— y m portrey^f •S^-^-^S.'SS ^iS » * 

time as Pepys's Diary x 

moods. Yet it is a mysteriously rotictm* r __ _. 

from it or from other sources .just what were the relations botween -mitt and beaTcrrax. 
Stella (Esther Johnson), la are not concerned with inquisitive chatter about the private 
lives of great writers; by their works we shall know them. But an understanding of Swift's 
life is necessary to an understanding of hi3 writings. And misun erstan ing of the man 
results in misunderstanding of his geniu3, as in Thackeray's brilliant but mistaken essay. 
A satisfactory life of ^wift has not yet been written, and perhaps it never will be written. 
His work is intensely personal and practice}.; no man's work is more intimately related to 
his character, even in Gulliver and the Tale of a Tub, which are narratives projected 
outside himself. His biography is therefore more worth study and investigation than those 
of most literary men. The more we study him the more we shall come to believe that he 
bore intense suffering with fortitude and that his cold ferocity covered a generous and 
affectionate nature. What he hated was not mankind but sham, and he was himself the most 
honest of men. This honesty had a direct effect on his style which is plain and downright, 
without affectations or embellishments, surpassed in beauty by more poetical writers but 
unrivaled for its naked athletic power. 

In contrast with the hard vigor of Swift are the ease and urbanity of Joseph Addison 
and Richard Steele. Their joint work (with other contributors) is the Spectator. It was 
a small daily paper, consisting of a short essay and some brief advertisements and announce- 
ments. In those days there was nothing like the modern newspaper, and the English gentleman 
found at hia breakfast tabic not the Times b t, whilo it lasted, about t.70 :ears, the Spec- 
tator with its neat little essay on manners, morals, books, religion, character. Ad i son 
and Steele (Addison especially) were moralists, whose aim was to entertain and at the same 
tine teach refinement and good tasto. And their humor was genuine, both spontaneous 
afld deliberately critical and philosophical. 

There is one technical philosopher of the time who belongs to literature because he 
knew how to write. Thether George Berkeley is a great philosopher is a question which we 
will leave to the philosophers; his debatable idealiaa is outside the scope of our incuiry. 
But that he was one of the great masters of -nglish prose is beyond debate. Most . nglish 
and German philosophy is turgid and difficult to read. Berkeley's Hew ~fteory of Vision 
and Principles of Human Knowledge and all his works are clear as plate glass. 

The good Bishop Berkeley Is serine, reflective, and perfectly restrained In argument. 
Daniel Defoe, who was e igaged in controversy all his life, lacks the finesse of Berkeley 
and Addi3ion and Swift, but his vigor is unoqualed and keeps many of his pamphlets alive, 
even after the subject has become a dead issue. It is not, however, as a pamphleteer fiat 
we remember Defoe, but as the author of Robinson Crusoe. j?hi3 i3 probably the most widely 
read story in the BngUah language and we have only to name it to remind ourselves of 
its merits and of the joy it gave \i3 in childhood. In maturity we enjoy it even more 
bi cause we appreciate the skill of it. Lost novels and tales are the story of the individ- 
ual in society, in the m^dst of nen. Robinson Crusoe is the story of the individual in 
solitude, and its heroism Is tho quality that v/e all admire arcJ fe .; of us have, self- 
reliance. The minor writings of Defoe have been elbowed asidd by Robii.wcn Crusoe, but 




J 



HGLISH PROSE OF THE EIGHTEiiNTH CENTURY 
By far the greatest man of that tir.e was Jonathan Swift.- Carlyle. 

The eighteenth century in English literature is an ago of pro so, not because the 
poetry is very bad but because the orose is very good. The supreme master in the first 
part of the century is Swift. Gulliver's Travels is a classic which overy boy enjoys, 
delighted by Gulliver's adventures with Lilliputians, who are so snail that Gulliver is 
a giant among them, and with the giants among whom Gulliver i3 a pygray. The mature reader 
knows that Gulliver's ship is loaded with vitriol, that the book is a devastating 3atire 
on the human race. The account of the country of the Houyhnhnms, where horses are the 
real people and human beings. Yahoos, are their filthy servants, has a savage tower un- 
eqaled in English literature or any literature. The secret of the >ower is tliat there 
i3 no visible sign of anger, no raising the voice; the one is cold, restrained, ironic, 
varied only by some flashes of fooling when wift'3 senna of the ridiculous gets the 
better of him. 

The Journal to Stella i3 as important for the detailed history and gossip of the 
time as Pepys's Diary is for the period just before. And it reveals Swift in all his 
moods. Yet it is a mysteriously reticent book, and we have nover been able to learn 
from it or from other sources just what were the relations botween Swift and beautiful 
Stella (Esther Johnson), te are not concerned with inquisitive chatter about the private 
lives of great writers; by their works we shall know them. But an understanding of Swift's 
life is necessary to an understanding of hi 3 writings. And mi sunders tan iing of the man 
results in raisu iders tending of his geniu3, as in Thackeray's brilliant but mistaken essay. 
A satisfactory life of Swift has not yot been written, and perhaps it never will be written* 
His work is intensely >er3onal and practice}.; no man's work is more intimately related to 
his character, even in Gulliver and the Tale of a Tub, which are narratives projected 
outside himself. His biography is therefore more worth study and investigation than those 
of most literary men. The more we 3tudy him the more we shall come to believe that he 
bore intense suffering with fortitude and that his cold ferocity covered a generous and 
affectionate nature. What he hated was not mankind but sham, and he was himself the most 
honest of men. This honesty had a direct effect on his style which is plain and downright, 
without affectations or embellishments, surpassed in boauty by more poetical writers but 
unrivaled for its naked athletic power. 

In contrast with the hard vigor of Swift are the ease and urbanity of Joseph Addison 
and Richard Steele. Their joint work (with other contributors) is the Spectator. It was 
a small daily paper, consisting of a short essay and some brief advertisements and announce- 
ments. In those days there was nothing like the modern newspaper, and the English gentleman 
found at his breakfast table not the Times b t, whilo it lasted, about two :ears, the Spec- 
tator with its neat little essay on manners, morals, books, religion, character. Ad i son 
and Steele (Addison especially) wero moralists, whose aim was to entertain and at the sane 
tine teach refinement and good taste. And their humor was genuine, both spontaneous 
afld deliberately critical and philosophical. 

There is one technical philosopher of the time who belongs to literature because he 
knew how to write. Thether George Berkeley is a great philosopher is a question which we 
will leave to the philosophers; his debatable idealiaa is outside the scope of our inouiry. 
But that he was one of the great masters of English prose is beyond debate. Most - nglish 
and German philosophy is turgid and difficult to read. Berkeley's New Theory of Vision 
and Principles of Human Knowledge and all his works are clear as plate {-lass. 

The good Bishop Berkeley Is serine, reflective, and perfectly restrained in argument. 
Daniel Defoe, who was engaged in controversy all his life, lacks the finesse of Berkeley 
and Addi3ion and Swift, but his vigor is unoqualed and keeps many of his pamphlets alive, 
even after the subject has become a dead issue. It is not, however, as a penphleteer that 
we remember Defoe, but as the author of Robinson Crusoe. This is probably the most widely 
read story in the English language and we have only to name it oo remind ourselves of 
its merits and of the joy it gave U3 in childhood. In maturity we enjoy it even more 
because we appreciate the skill of it. Lost novels and tales are the story of the individ- 
ual in society, in the m^dst of nen. Robinson Crusoe is the story of the individual in 
solitude, and its heroism is tho quality that we all admire fcfii fe ■ of us have, self- 
reliance. The minor writings of Defoe have been elbowed aside" by Robii.jcn Crusoe, but 






' 



they are enough to make the fortune of a leader man* If he were alivo today he would 
I be making Mr* H. G. /ells and others look to their laurels and he would certainly be a 
star reporter and newspaper correspondent. Defoe is our first great realistic novelist, 
a "dime-novelist" at his lov7est, a genius at his best. His interest is in adventure 
rather than in character; his people are real in e temals, in action, but he cares very 
little for their soul3. 

The first English novelist to get inside the heart, especially of \70man, is Samuel 
Richardson. A century before him the dramatists had studied and portrayed character, and 
the vivid delineation of peoplo in ooetry goes back at least as far as Chaucer. All the 
material for the novel and indeed the finished treatment of it in short form is oreaent in 
Boccaccio, whom all literary Englishmen knew in translation, Prose romance with impos- 
sibly heroic heroes goes back to the Middle Ages. But the nglish novel, as we know it, 
begins, if anything has a beginning, in the eighteenth century, and Richardson is the 
father of it. Clarissa is our first great novel of sentiment, the interest of which is 
not so much in the plot or adventure as in the emotions of a woman. There is a plot, 
a quite simple one, the persecution of an innocent girl by a libertine. I is written in 
the form of letters, to us a tedious form, and it is one of the longest novels in the 
language. There is not a spark of humor in it. But the Tirl, Clarissa, is alive, her 
pathetic story became immediately popular not only in Eagjjand but in France and Germany 
and had an immense influence on the modern novel. Ho othor English writer before cott 
and Byron enjoyed during his life- time such a \?ide reputation at home and abroad. 

An earlier work of Richardson's, Pamela; or Virtue Rewarded, which is almost absurd 
fc in its sentimental moralism, is important not only because its success encoxragerl Richard- 
W son to go on to his masterpiece but because it inspired the first comic novel of the 
greatest English novelists, Henry Fielding. 

The goody-goodness of Pamela' tickled Fielding's funnybone, and in Joseph Andrews 
he reversed the situation by mailing a virtuous young man the object of the affections of 
Lady Booby. If he had stopped there he would have given us merely a laughable burlesque 
or parody. But he forgot or grew away from his original intention of ridiculing ieh* 
ardson and wrote a real novel of character and manners. His interest, certainly our in- 
terest, is not so much in Joseph as in Irs. Slipslop and Parson Adams, who is an imortal 
creation. In Joseph Andrews Fielding discovered his method, the peculiar genius which e 
was to develop in ~om Jones. 

In writing about books which we admire we use the word3 "great" and "greater r too 
often and tod indiscrininately. 3ut there is no other word for Tom Jones, which baa 
all the merits that a novel can have and which every virile novelist for a hundred and 
fifty years has regarded with admiration and envy. It was Fielding who gave shape to 
the English novel. His introductory essays to the various books are digressions with 
, which a novelist of our time could not interrupt his story; and Fielding enjoyed in the 
- eighteenth century a freedom of e pres.sion, necessary to the vigorous candor of his 

nature, a freedom which the taste of the net century borbade. As thackeray regretfully 
says: "Since the author of bra Jones was buried, no writer of fiction among us has 
been permitted to depict to his utmost power a MAN." But the hand of Fiel ing is dis- 
cornable in most humorous English fiction after -torn Jone3. His characters are not only 
of eighteenth-century England; they are of today and tomorrow. Fielding himself is a 
most engaging character, very much of a man, a raagist ate honest and just, whose exper- 
ience with the slnnjgL'u of this zorld deepened his sympathy and sharpened his perception. 
He saw life ironically, but his vision was fair and generous, and his irony was without 
bitterness. 

The eighteenth century might be called the age of laughter as well as the age of 
prose, for almost every man of letters, except Richardson, was born with a sense of fun. 
And a sense of fun means a sense of life. A robust humorist of the ti e is Tobias 
Smollett, much loss of an artist than Fielding, but like Fielding a shrewd observer of 
people. He was for a tire surgeon* 3 mate in the navy, where he learned the character of 
the English 3ailor, whom he was the first to portray in all his coarse humor. He is the 
first of the seafaring writers, the company which includes Cooper and I'iarryat, :md Joseph 
Conrad, who, of course, are not so rough as Smollett dared to be. Smollett also Icnew 
people as they are on land, and the scones of Ms masterpiece, Humphrey Clinker, are 
not on the sea but in Scotland and England. His other best known stories, Roderick 
Random and Peregrine Pickle are a trifle too strong for weak stomachs, but they are full 
of life and action and they were immensely admired by Scott and by Dickens, the latter 









iT I 



of whom learned from Smollett something of hia art of drawing grotesque but humanly true 
characters. 

A common characteristic of Defoe, Fielding, Smollett, and of Swift, is their vigor- 
ous sanity, their stout common sense, at least in the structure and texture of their 
writing. The humor of Laurence Sterne is brilliant, fantastic, eccentric. Tristram 
Shandy is probably the craziest masterpiece in the world as it is one of the most delight- 
ful. The book has no apparent order, but i3 capricious and whimsical in its leaps from 
one subject to another. Yet Sterne knew what he was about, and beneath his superficial 
frivolity is the deepest of all unities, the strong timber of character, Trio tram's father 
and his Uncle Toby, the everlastingly charming, simple-minded old oentimontalist. Sterne 
wrote with his tongue in his cheek and with a wink which was some, times a leer. But when 
he let his tongue go, it is one of most brilliant that ever wagged; and there is no real 
evil in his eye. The Sentimental Journey, is a short, half-autobiographical excursion, 
Sterne at his best in pathos and humor, not so freakish in style as much of Tristram 
Shandy. 

It is possible to dislike Sterne as a later sentimental humorist, Thackeray, did 
dislike him, and to find fault with the mannerisms which mar his genius. It is impossible 
not to like those admirable friends, Samuel Johnson and Oliver Goldsmith and to recognize 
that whatever their shortcomings they carry on the tradition of normal sane prose. 

Dr. Johnson is the massive center of the intellectual life of the second half of the 
eighteenth century, and is the loader and embodiment of the critical standards of his time. 
A century and a half of criticism with different standards and a finer sense of beauty 
separate him from us, and he no longer has the authority which his contemporaries almost 
worshipfully conceded to him. It has been said truly that his best book is Boswell* s 
Life of him. If it is the best biography of a man of letters, the reason is not only that 
Boswell had the right kind of talent and devotion to portray his hero but that his hero 
was really great. A great man, and a prince of talkers, but not a great writer. For 
Johnson is the only important man of letters who lias left no important work of art. Eis 
Die ionary is a monument to his industry and learning and the preface to it tingles with 
his personality; but a dictionary is not art even when the definitions are amusingly 
original. His once famous fiction, Rasselas, is dull* His ossays, modeled on the Spec- 
tator, are heavy, lack the grace of the earlier masters and oddly enough have little of 
the vivacity of Johnson's best conversation. His Lives of the Poets, many of which deal 
with minor versifiers, are almost dead except as an historical record of his taete and the 
taste of his time. His verse is negligible. Yet he was a great man, the man whom Boswell 
has preserved and whom the wisest men of his time loved and respected. 

Goldsmith was an artist in everything he touched, except his pot-boiling hack work. 
The Vicar of Wakefield, with its romantic plot and humorous character drawing, has 
been more *idely read and more often reprinted than any other eighteen century fiction 
except, possibly, Robinson Crusoe. Probably the only man in the world who failed to like 
it was Mark Twain, who thought the episode in which the boy Lloses is cheated at the fair 
not amusing but painfully pathetic. Goldsmith, however, knew whet he was doing and was 
aware of the pathos which underlies the comedy of life. It is not only the English who 
have enjoyed the Vicar. That Thackeray says is almost literally true: that "with that 
sweet story" Goldsmith "found entry into every castle and every hamlet in -urope." And 
Goethe speaks of Goldsmith's "lefty and benevolent irony, that fair and indulgent view 
of all infirmities and faults." 

She stoops to Conquer, the better of Goldsmith's two plays, has lived on the stege 
for a century and a half, and it and the plays of Sheridan, The Rivals, and The School 
for Scandal, are the only dramas of that day wliich have shown such persistent -vitality. 

Retaliation, in which Goldsmith wittily scores his friends, containes the lines: 
'.iTho, born for the universe, narrowed his mind, 
And to party gave up what was meant for mankind. 
The subject of these lines, is -dmund Burke, orator and politician, who might better be 
described as having given up to practical politics what was meant for literature. Kost 
of his speeches and pamphlets are on subjects that arc flot quite so vital in our day as 
they were in his. One of them, the speech On Conciliation v/ith -America, lias especial in- 
terest to us, and its eloquence and logic are unimpaired by the passage of time and by 



w 

the immediate fact that English statesmen did not heed its wisdom. Burke held his con- 
victions passionately, and even when he may have been mistaken his sincerity gives the 
ring of truth to his splendid rhetoric. His images are often poetic and his best sen- 
tences have a noble resonance, 

A contemporary of Burke who has as lofty an eloquence, though of a different kind, is 
Edward Gibbon. His Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire is the most gorgeously written 
history in the language. Later historians have added details to his, have corrected 
inaccuracies and revised some of his interpretations. But he dwarfs them all in the 
magnitude of his vision, his power to organize facts, and above all to make history fas- 
cinating literature. 

Most of the prose classics of the eighteenth century have been many tines reprinted. 
Eighteenth century prose is cl se to us, and much nineteenth century prose is of course 
continuous from it. Later English writers have come to be more and more appreciative of 
the merits of the "Augustan age," not only of the vigorous writers of prose, the giants, 
Swift and Fielding, but of their leaser brothers, the poets. 



«c 



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3 



THE BRAILLE BOOK REVIEW 
A Guide to Braille and Talking Book Publications 
Published Monthly at the 
American Printing House for the Blind 
1839 Frankfort Avenue 
Louisville, Kentucky- 
Printed for 
The New York Public Library 
Fifth Avenue and 42nd Street 
New York City 
(Hsnry F, Homes Fund) 



Volume 6 



August, 1937 



Number 8 



> , 



Content 8 

Book Announcements: Press books; Talking Books. 
Complete Catalog of Talking Books, August 1937. 






' 



* 









> 



Book Announcements / ) 

(Books in this li3t are in Grade 2 unless otherwise noted) 



, Anson, Sir William R. Principles of the law of contract. C voluuius w - u in b r aille. 1930, 
BMP (Provided by the U.S.Govornment) 0v/ ' 

Chapman, Frank M. Camps and cruises of an ornithologist. 3v. 1906 BIA (Provided by the 

U.S .Government) Contains information about species of birds m£ which our knowledge is meage 
Farnol, Jeffery. A page an t of victory. 4v. CPH (Provided by tlie U.S. Government) Histor- 
ical novel which shows throo generations of the Falconbridgo family fighting for American 
ideals in Revolutionary times, in the 1860's and in the present century. 
Grey, Zane. Thunder Mountain. 2v. CHI (Provided by the U.S. Government) Adventure in a 

. T estorn boom town. 
Grey, Zane. West of the Poco3. 2v. BIA (Provided by the U.S.GOTOrnment) Novel of advent- 
ure in the Southwest. 
Hendrick, Burton J. Bulwark of the Republic; a biography of the Constitution. 5v. CPH 

(Provided by the U.S .Government) A history of the Constitution ;Alch interweaves in the 
story of that document lively characterizations of its interpreters and the statesmen who 
shaped it to its prosont form, with dramatic political episodes of the past 150 years. A 
readable book, with individuality and power. 
Hutchinson, R.C. Shining scabbard. 5v. CPH (Provided by the U.S. Government) During the 
Franco-Prussian war a French officer, Colonel Seroerin, had boon court-martialed for 
cov/ardice. Since that time the family had been intent upon having the stain removed from 
the family name. One son, Pierre, was on colonial service in Africa; except for him all 
""} the members of the family were gathered together in a strange menage at Baulon, a small 
town between Pari 3 and the Rhine. Circumstances made it imperative that Pierre send his 
Eurasian wife and two children home to Baulon, thus complicating an already over-stocked 
household. The story, which is a working out of the strange destinies of the Severins, 
ends in 1914. 
Johnson, James Jeldon. God's trombones; seven negro sermons in verse, lv. Grade l{. ARC 

Garin process. Out of memories of his boyhood, the poet has recreated the art of the old 
time preachers, achieving effects quite remarkably without the use of dialect. 
Merlmee, Ernest. A history of Spanish literature, translated by S.G.Morley. 10v. 1930 edition 
BIA (Provided by the U.S. Government) A Irench work published in 1908 and revised in 
1922. "Stands out as a clear and accurately balanced handbook and a finely conceived 
, piece of literary history, rich with mellow critical values"-Preface by translator. 
Moliere, J.B.P. The misanthrope, done into English by William 1 '• Giese. lv. BIA (Provided 
by the U.S. Government) First published in 1666. lloliere is the creator of French comedy 
and the greatest name in French literature, /omen and electors are his favorite objects 
of ridicule. "Tartuffe" is probably his greatest creation. The L'lsanthrope ranks next. 

Jevinson, Henry W. Goethe; man and poet, written for the centenary of Goethe* s death on 
March 22, 1932. 5v. ARC Garin process. A short and sympathetic biography which pro- 
J) vides an excellent introduction to the poet's life and work. 










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Poushkin, Alexander. Prose taloa; translated from the Russian by T. Keana. 4v. CPII (Pro- 
vided by the U«S .Government) Pouslikin is regarded as the founder of Russian literature 
and as Russia* s most representative poet* 
Radio index of short wave stations, arranged by frequencies. November 1936. lv. ARC Grade 1^- 

Garin process* 
Radio index, standard radio stations in North America, arranged according to frequency, and 

also according to call letters. November 193G. lv. ARC Grade 1{.- Garin process. 
Rourke, Constance M. Audubon. 2v. 1936 BIA. (Provided by the U.S. Government) This biogra- 
phy of Audubon describes all aides of hi3 life and activities as naturalist, artist, and 
woodsman, and shows his place in American, history. Altho intended ft>r young readers, it is 
of equal interest to adults. The book is illustrated with twelve reproductions in color 
from the folio prints of Audubon'B Bird f s of America, and with black and white illustrations 
by James IlacDonald. 
Starkie, /alter. Don Gypsy. 5v. CPE (Provided by the U.S. Government) The author is a pro- 
fessor of Spanish in Dublin university, a fiddler as well as a scholar, and in the present 
volume takes his fiddle with him once more, Romany fashion, thru southern Spain. Dr. 
Starkie knows the gipsies of Spain and chronicles, with humor and insight, intimate details 
of that primitive life. Ilia personal itinerary covers first Spanish Morocco, then 
Andalusia, Malaga and other southern towns in Spain just prior to the outbreak of the Civil 
war. 
.Tells, H.G. The croquet player, lv. ABB (Provided by the U.S # Government) The Croquet 
Player is a most effective ghost story, but it is not, of course, traditional. The young 
man who likes to play croquet (He is a blameless and ineffectual sort) listens to the fear© 
ful tale of a doctor retired to country practice in the fens, called Cainaoarsh. Here all 
the natives live in the shadow of 3ome huge and terrifying presence which makes them cruel 
and suspicious of each other. This ateiosphere grows upon the doctor, till he feels himself 
becoming like them-living in fear of a brutality that seems to come from the ground. He 
seeks the aid of Dr. Herbert, the alienist, and Dr. lTorbert f s practical explanation, that 
modern man is beset by the cavo man cropping up again (in various social manifestations) 
is a Wellsian sermon that does little to lay the ghost, 
ffilkins, Mary E. The best stories of ilary E. \'ilklns, selected and with an introduction by 
Henry W. Lanier. 4v. CPK (Provided by the U.S. Government) Contents: A humble romance. 
The revolt of Mother. Little-girl-afraid-eT-a-dog. A New England nun. One good time. The 
1st gift. A New England prophet. A village singer. Old \Jonan Mafpun. The joy of youth. 
Billy and Susy. The butterfly. Both cheeks. A solitary. Two old lovers. Gentian. The 
wind in the rose-bush. A conflict ended. A conquest of humility. The apple tree. 
Noblesse. The outside of the house. Coronation. The gold. The gospel according to John. 



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Talking Books 
(Those books are supplied by the U.S. Government) 
Barr i!' Sir Jam0a ' Mar saret Ogllvy. 6r.Includes Peter Pan in Kensington Oerdena 4_. 

-Margaret OgUV is a charming picture of Barrio's mother, a shrewd? mSSul pious and 
intensely human woman. Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens is a fantasy SuiWof £ter 
j^jS Ef*" With the fairtes ***** lockout tine in Kensington^Ln^wnere Z 
Bemelrt, Arnold. Drean, «**> «tl*». ^toriea- by UfcgUah authors. 19r. 

i^'in^l^. H -' V ' All3n - Trent,a «"» caG - **• active story in which Trent himself 

-""-•'i Tbeniae. — An Ohio Table; and other a*or_»a by Jimml ,i ■ ■ 

Cl__na, Samuel L. (Mark Twin). The adventurea of KueklSSxyW^lSr'. The famoua a tor. 
of boy life on the Klaelsaippi. a combination of romance realism __._.«£ _?T Z2. 
in the delineation of character only attainable trrTSSrt latuat ' ' POmr 

^Manne;:: NaS 3 ~* ^ ** (C °~' ^ ^ ««_. factor. 
SSjT'iS - To^neTaerr ' ST^S gSLT '* l " lra * " m * 10r ' 

y^srs^^^^JZ^J^jz autobiosraphy of a " iost *■ 

^Ve^nathff V&g *" ^ ^^ ** * n ° luaeB » b *" • «*•• ^ -then. 
>erriam, John 0. The living put. 4r. 7ith Throuah space and Mm. by James Jeans Th. 

SSjftcT^^C °° 0k ° n Prehl8t0rf0 »*** - ^ llfcTiert 8 ; Jtn sc_. 

3 *"TbST_ "coteSdT ,■£? En ^ 8l \5° et8 - s «°^ -*«. 14r. Theae include eelectlon. 

Van Dine, S.s. .pseudonym. The kidnap murder case. 12r. Detective story. 

Brand, Albert h. n iiu __* — _ _____ 

wilderness, by D.C.Peattie. lOr 

Catherine II, Empress of Hussia. Catherine, the portrait of an empress, by Gina Kause 25r 
Includes She bet, by Anton Chekhov, lr Both read by John Knight. 

Chekhov, Anton. The bet. lr Read by John Knight. >7ith Catherine the Great, by Gina Kaus, 25r 

Cobb, Irvin S, Speaking of operations. 2r Read by Fred Uttal. 

Coleridge, Samuel T. The ri e of the ancient mariner, lr Read by Gerald Cornell. 

/institution of the United States, and Declaration of Independence. 2r Read by Gerald Cornell, 
'ith Patriotic documents. 5r 

_>ana, Richard Henry. Two years before the mast. 25r Read by Alwyn Bach. 

Davis, Watson. The advance of science. 27r Read by Allun Brons. 

Declaration of Independence; and, Constitution of the United States. _r Read by Gerald Cornell. 
With Patriotic documents. 5r 

De Krulf, Paul H. lien against death. lOr Read by /illian Brenton* 

Ditmars, Raymond I. Thrills of a naturalist's quest. 13r Read by the author and Alwyn Baeh. 

Emerson, Ralph ?aldo. Essays; first series, llr (History, Self-reliance, Compensation, Spirit- 
ual laws) Read by Donald Meyer. 

Emerson, Ralph V/aldo. Essays; second 3erie3, 8r (The poet, Experience, Character, Fanners, 
Nature) Read by Alwyn Bach. 

Fabre, J.H.C. The mason-bees; translated b; Alexander Teixoira de liattos. lOr Read by Alwyn 

Bach. 
^Finley, John Houston. A pilgrim in Palestine. 7r Road by the author. 

Franklin, Benjamin. The autobiography of Benjamin Franklin, edited by Ha than G. Goodman, llr 
Read by House Jameson. 

Freeman, Richard Austin. Dr. Thorndyke's discovery. 16r Read by Alwyn Bach. 

hoover, Irwin II. Forty-two years in the ;/hite House. 15r Read by Jilliam lardy. 

Hopkins, Harry L. Message to the blind of America; and, Talking book instructions, lr Read 






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, T^ok-Revlew,- August, 199? 
C^r^^oUM. Catalog of Talking books. 
These books are provided by the United States Government through the Library of Congress. They 
nay be borrowed from the twenty-seven distributing libraries a list of which was given in the 
June Braille Book Review, <C? 

"Use the library nearest to you and use only one library. The collections' of talking books // 
-are— the same in all libraries. 

Non-fiction 
Andrews, Roy Chapman, This business of exploring, 15r Read by John Knight. Includes Into 

old Mexico by auto, by J.G,Bradley. 3r 
Bacon, Francis, Selected essays; and Excerpt from Lord Bacon, by T.B.Macaulay. It Read by 

John Knight, Includes Selected essays of Elia, by Charles Lamb, 9r 
Baldwin, Hanson W. R.M.S. Titanic, lr ,*,(?',„ -t- m P P i\ vm P *xlP 0>/x, 

Barrie, JJL Peter Pan. 4r Read by John Neill. U) Sa f^c^X Oog/^, ^ \^- 0*** 
Barrie, Mrs, Margaret Ogilvie, Margaret Ogilvle, by James M. Barry. 6r Read by Wesley Addy. 
Beebe, William. Half mile down. 12r First record read by the author, remainder by Alwyn Bach, 
Benet, Stephen Vincent, John Brown's body. 22r Read by a cast. 
The Bible: King James' version. Old Testament. 32r Ruth, Esther, Job, Psalms, Proverbs,. 

Isaiah, Daniel, Hosea, Joel, Amos, Micah, Nahum, Read by Dr. Wylie, Dr. Robinson and 

Wm, Brenton, 
The Bible: New Testament. Complete in 40r Read by Dr. Robinson, John Knight, "fa, Brenton and 
\ Gerald Cornell, 
fhe Bible: Douay version. 21r Gospels of St.Matthew and ^t.Mark. Gospels of St, Luke and 

Acts of the Apostles. 
The Bible: Scripture passages for the use of the blind; recorded for the American Bible Society, 

2r King James version. 
Bradford, Gamaliel. As God made them; portraits of some nineteenth-century Americans, fci. 

^^^.tit^sir*' Hora ~ ore6iey> Mrtn *«*> ^ 

^^lorfC^.f^r 00 ^ " ,t0 - B "^ ^ th ° ~' "" h ™* »«*»™ °' 

Brand, Albert R. Wild birds and their songs. 2r Read by John Knight. 71 th Singing in the 
wilderness, by D.C.Peattie. lOr 

Catherine II, Empress of Russia, Catherine, the portrait of an empress, by Gina Kaus. 25r 
Includes The bet, by Anton Chekhov, lr Both read by John Knight, 

Chekhov, Anton, The bet, lr Read by John Knight. With Catherine the Great, by Gina Kaus, 25r 

Cobb, Irvin S, Speaking of operations. 2r Read by Fred Uttal, 

Coleridge, Samuel T. The ri e of the ancient mariner, lr Read by Gerald Cornell, 

institution of the United States, and Declaration of Independence, 2r Read by Gerald Cornell. 

v With Patriotic documents. 5r 

Jana, Richard Henry. Two years before the naet. 25r Read by Alwyn Bach. 

Davis, Watson. The advance of science. 27r Read by AUun Bvons, 

Declaration of Independence; and, Constitution of the United States, 2r Read by Gerald Cornell, 
With Patriotic documents, 5r 

De Krulf , Paul H. Men against death. lOr Read by 71111am Brenton* 

Dltmars, Raymond L. Thrills of a naturalist's quest. I3r Read by the author and Alwyn Baeh. 

Emerson, Ralph Waldo, Essays; first series, llr (History, Self-reliance, Compensation, Spirit- 
ual laws) Read by Donald Meyer. 

Emerson, Ralph Waldo, Essays; second 3eries, 8r (The poet. Experience, Character, Manners, 
Nature) Read by Alwyn Bach, 

Fabre, J.H.C. The mason-bees; translated b; Alexander Teixoira de Mattos, lOr Read by Alwyn 
Bach, 
LFinley, John Houston, A pilgrim in Palestine. 7r Road by the author. 

pTranklln, Benjamin, The autobiography of Benjamin Franklin, edited by Nathan G. Goodman, llr 
Read by House Jameson, 

Freeman, Richard Austin. Dr. Thorndyke's discovery. 16r Read by Alwyn Bach. 
Ioover, Irwin II. Forty-two years in the White House. 15r Read by 'William I ardy, 

Hopkins, Iiarry L. Message to the blind of America; and, Talking book instructions, lr 






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Jame*, /illiam. The will to believe and other essays in popular philosophy. 12r Read by 

.In, Brenton. 
Jeans, Sir James H. Through space and tine; and, Grasping the universe, by Allan Broms. Up 

Read by 
Johnson, Allen, Jefferson and his colleagues. 12r Read by Alwyn Bach, 
Kearton, Cherry, The island of penquins. 7r Read by Russell Walker. 

Keller, Helen, The story of my life; with her letters 1887-1901, 12r Read by Ethel Everett. 
Keller, Kent E, Prosperity through employment, 14r Read by the author, 
Lagerlof , Selma, Marbacka. lOr Autobiography, Read by John Knight, 
Lamb, Charles. Selected essays of Elia, 9r Read by Howard G, Barnes and "ta, Brenton. 7ith 

Selected essays, by Francis Bacon, 7r 
Lincoln,Abraham, Gettysburg address; and, First and Second Inaugural addresses, lr Read by 

Gerald Cornell, fith Patriotic documents. 5r 
Lindbergh, Anne Morrow, North to the Orient, 8r Head by Gertrude Onnen. 
Luhan, Mabel Dodge, /inter in Taos, lOr Read by John Knight, 

Macy, Anne Sullivan, The story behind Helen Keller, by Nella Braddy. 20r Read by John Knight. 
Merriam, John C, The living past. 4r Read by John Knight, 
Millikan, Robert A, Evolution in science and religion, 4r Read by Alwyn Bach. (Handel, Bach, 

-Hejptoy- Mogart , Dooth o v o n , ^c huhflrt . T Ma ndol afl ohn, lYaqner ) 
Patriotic documents. 5r (Constitution of the United States. Declaration of Independence. 

Washington's Farewell address and Valley Forge letter to Congress, Lincoln's Gettysburg 
._/ address and First and Second Inaugural addresses) Read by Gerald Cornell. 

Peattie, Donald Culross. Singing in the wilderness; a salute to John James Audubon. 8r Read 

by John Knight, Includes Wild birds and their songs, by A,R,Brand, 2r 
Pepya, Samuel, Passages from the Diary of Samuel Pepys, edited by Richard LeGalliene, 19r 

Read by House Jameson, 
Plutarch, Lives; translated by John Dryden and revised by Arthur Hugh Clough. 14r Read by 

House Jameson, 
Poems by American and English authors, 14r (Selections from Whlttier, Bryant, Langfellow, 

Whitman, Holmes, E,A,Robinson and other American poets; Coleridge, Leigh Hunt and Matthew 

Arnold) Read by Alwyn Bach, House Jameson and Herman Hagedorn, 
Raleigh, Sir Walter, Shakespeare, 9r British record, 
Rawlings, Marjorie K. Alligators, lr 

Robinson, Edwin Arlington. Tristram. 7r Read by House Jameson. 
Selected poemsV^selections from Browning, Byron, Keats, Longfellow, Milton, Poe, Shelley, 

Tennyson, Wordsworth.^ Read by John Knight with the exception of Poe's poems which ^ere 

read by Maurice Franklyn, 
jS(a"^kespeare. Antony and Cleopatra. 7r With LoveSs labour's lost; and selections from the 
* Sonnets, 6r Both plays read by a cast, 

^ Shakespeare. As you like it; and selections from the Sonnets. 5r All of the Shakespearian 

records with two exceptions are read by John Knight. 
Shakespeare, Julius Caesar; and, Ben Johnson entertains the Man from Stratford, by Edwin 

Arlington Robinson. 3r 
Shakespeare. King Lear, 6r 
Shakespeare, Love , s labour's lost and selections from the Sonnets, 6r Includes Antony and 

Cleopatra, 7r Both plays read by a ca3t, 
Shakespeare, Othello, moor of Venice. 6r 
Shakespeare, Sonnets, Selections from the Sonnets will be found with the following plays: 

As you like it, Sove's labour's lost, Taming of the shrew, Macbeth, Merchant of Venice, 



Shakespeare. 
Shakespeare. 
Shakespeare, 
Shakespeare, 

Shakespeare, 
Shakespeare. 
Shakespeare. 



Tempest. 4r 

Taming of the shrew; and selections from the Sonnets, 5r 

Tragedy of Hamlet, 7r 

The tragedy of Macbeth; and selections from the Sonnets, 5r 

The merchant of Venice; and selections from the Sonnets, 5r 
Romeo and Juliet, 5r 
Twelfth night, 4r 



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Shakespeare, Winter's tale, if 6 

Shakespeare, Selected readings from Shakespeare; and, LIT, Antonio, by Booth Tarklngton, 

lr Head by Otis skinner. 
Sherrlff, Hohert C. Journey^ end; and, The hoy comes home, hy A.A.rilne. 4r Read by the 

Faculty Group of the Colle e of the City of New York. 
Stove, Lyman" Beecher. Saints, Dinners and Beecher o. 22r Head hy Stowe and Alvin Bach, 
Strahoey lytton. Eminent Victorians, 19r (Henry Edward M&nning, Florence Nightingale, 

Thomas Arnold, Charles Genre Gordon) Head hy John yni. ht. 
Thomas a Kempis, Of the imitation of Christ, Books I, II, III, 6r Head hy Wm. Brenton. 
Victoria, Queen of England. tyueen Victoria, hy Edward F, Benson. 20r Head by John Knight. 
Washington, George, Farewell address; and his Valley Forge letter to the Continental 

Congress. 2r Re&d hy Gerald Cornell, with patriotic documents. 5r 
Wells, H.G. A short history of the world. 19r Head by Barry iTahol. 



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lot9i«?fltor 
J^fisA tl^e iu?o l>y Arnold, Be 
e ; tftese tri^eTtrny*T61In Tial sra>rtfcy,»" Bfoe jftshop+s 
k dress, T 1 lit. 1 ** ?i.a*a»-*&**to**wnnA | theee J&ree are 




n^ier^^sjT~m^ ^ ° ^vlUQn ^nil i ..tlii iiiM w i )ra , l ■ 




Fiction 
Bagnold, Enid. National velvet, llr Head by John Knight. 
Barnes, Margaret Ayer. Years of (-race, 27r Read by House Jameson. 

D re^mi a n rktato*^-^^ Read hy 



al readers 

visitor, strange 

ion sum.jer of a 

Che dell in the-^iuk 

tall 

*i Hy 

Bentley, Edmund C. Trent* s last case; and, The monkey *o paw, by • .Jacobs. 12r Head by 

Wm. Brenton. 
Bentley, Edmund C, and H.Warner Allen* Trent* e own cage* lGr Head by Alwyn Bach. 
Boyd, James, Brums. 25r Head by Alivyn Bach. Includes The miracle, by waiter Buranty. 

lr Head by Frank wohldecker, 
Bronte, Charlotte. Jane Eyre. 34r Head by Ethel Everett. 
Buchan, John. John i acnab. llr British record. 

Buyyan, John* Pilgrim's progress. Book I llr Head by Dr. Matthews, 
Byrne, Bonn. Mesaer Marco Polo. 4r Head by John Knight. 
Carroll, Gladys. As the earth turns, ISr Read by Fred Uttall. 

Carroll, Lewis, pseudonym. .Mice's adventures in wonderland; and, Alice through the looking- 
glass. lOr Head by Nelson elch. 
p~ Christie, Amtha. Murder in the Calais coach. lOr Read by John Knight. 
^-Christie, Agatha. The murder of aojjor Ackroyd. 8r British record. 

Clemens, Samuel L. (Mark Twain, pseudonym). The adventures of Huckleberry Finn. 19r Read 

by George Kuehn. 
Cobb, Humphrey. Paths of glory* llr Read by Kaurlce Franklyn. 
Collins, Allkie. The woman in white. 26r Head by John Knight. 
Conrad, Joseph. Typhoon; and, Your ship has to be humored, from The mirror of the sea. 4r 

British record. 
Conrad, Joseph. Youth; and Heart of darkness; and End of the tether. 18r Read by Alwyn 

Bach. 
Bavis, Elmer. Friends of llr* Sweeney; and, A bird of Bagdad, by 0. Henry. 12r Read by 

Fred Uttall. 
Bay, Clarence. Life with father. 8r Read by House Jameson. 
Delafield, E.M., pseudonym. Diary of a provincial lady; and, The things s the play, by O.Henry, 

9r Head by Gerald Cornell. 
Detective stories, 14r Head by John Knight with one exception, 
Dickens, Charles, Christmas carol. 6r Head by Tom Torris. 
Dickens, Charles. The cricket on the hearth; and, Kr. Pickwick in the Ladies* Seminary, 

Read by Fred Uttall. Includes ®ie Chii.es. 6r Read by Richard l!oody. 
Dickens, Charles* A tale of two cities. 2<lr Read by John Knight. 
Bouglas, Lloyd C. Magnificent obsession* 14r Read by John Knight. 
Dumas, Alexandre. The black tulip, llr Head by House Jameson. 



Duranty, 'alter. The miracle, lr Road by prank Wohldecker. Y7lth Drums, by James Boyd. 

freeman, Richard Austin* Dr. Thorndyke f s discovery. 16r Read by Alwyn Bach. 

Gaskell, Elizabeth Gleghorn. Cranford. 8r British record. 

Goldsmith. Oliver. The viour of wake fl old | and, The desertod village (a poem), llr Read 
"by iTbu Brenton. 

Goodspoed, Edgar J. The curse in the colophon. lOr Road by Rouse Jameson. 

Grey. Zane. Riders of the purple sage. 18r Read by House Jameson. 

Grey, Zane. To the last man. 17r Read by John Knight. 

Hardy, Thomas* Far from the maiding; crowd. 23r Read by John Knight. 

Hardy* Thomas. Under the grt enwood tr< e. 7r British record. 

Hart, Frances A. The Bellamy trial. 19r Read by House Jameson. 

Harte, Bret. Short stories. Includes five stories by 0. Henry, llr Read by John Knight. 

Henry, 0., pseudonym. Short stories. 5r Read by John Knltfht. with Short stories, by 
Bret Harte. 

Hergesheimer, Joseph. Java head. 12r Read by Alwyn Bach. 

Hilton, James. Lost horizon, llr Read by John Knight. 

Hope, Anthony, pseudonym. Prisoner of Zenda} and, The cask of Amontillado, by Edgar Alien 
Poe. 7r British record. 

Hull, Helen. Hardy perennial. 15r Read by Ethel Everett. 

Jarre tt, Cora* Night over Fitches pond. 12r Read by John Knight. 
\ Kantor, MacKinlay. The voice of Bugle Ann. 3r Read by Russell walker. 
-J Holland, Clarence B. The oat»o paw. lOr Read by John Knight. 

Kipling* Rudyard. The "brushwood boy. £r Read by John Knight. 

Kipling, Rudyard. The village that voted the earth was flatj and. The incarnation of 
Krishna Jvulvaney. 4r ,Read by John Kni^at. 

Kyne, Peter B. Cappy Ricks cones back. 14r Read hy liSaurice Franklyn. 

Lang, Don. Rajah and Barry, lr 

London, Jack. The call of the wild and other stories. 9r (To build a fire. The heathen. 
The strength of the strong.) Read by Alwyn Bach. 

London, Jack. Seed of itoOoyi and other stories hy various authors. 15r Read by several 
readers. (This collection includes the following stories: Afterward, by Edith vharton. 
The masque of the red death, by BAfl** Allan Poe. The Sire de Kaletroit'e door, by 
R.L.Stevenson. The two churches of Quawket, by H.C.Bunner. The procurator of Judea, 
"by Anatole France. The ambitious ,;uest, "by Nathaniel Hawthorne. The darling, "by 
Anton Chekhov. A letter horne, "by Arnold Bennett. Psyche and the skyscraper, and. 
Shocks of doom, by 0. Henry. The star in the valley, "by C.E.Craddock. Desiree's "baby, 
by Kate Chopin. An occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge, by Ambrose Biorce. 

Masefield, John. Bird of Dawning, llr Read hy Gerald Cornell. 

1 Maupassant, Guy de. The necklace; and. Happiness, lr 

Murray, w.H.H. How John Norton kept his Christmas | and, The pine tree, "by Hans Christian 

Andersen. 3r Read by John Knight. 
Poe, Ed^r Allan. Short stories. 17r Read by William Brenton and Maurice Franklin. 

Sabatini, Rafael, The sea-hawk. Zlv Road by Alwyn Bach. 

Short stories hy American authors; first series. 18r Read by several readers. ( This col 
lection includes f.ade, loisello elynpe Zabrieki, A piece of club gossip. ; ar jorie Daw 
Miss Mehet^bel's son, .ute so, by Thomas Bailey Aldrich. the canvasser's tale. The' 
celebrated junping frog of Calaveras County, The great Deadwood mystery. The great 
revolution in Pitcairn. How 1 escaped being killed in a duel, The recent r at F„eno 
duel, by Samuel % cleans t ark Twain). The celestial railroad. Dr. Heidegger's ex- 
periment. Etftaa Brand, Ths r- at carbuncle* a r^otery of the white : a ntains. The 
great stone face. Howe' . aequerade. a tale of the old rrovence House, llr. Hi t in- 
Vothnm's cateatrophe. The vJ.ite old ..aid, by Imthanici Hawthorne. The Town-ho»8 
story, Vy nerraan elville. 

Short stories by American authors! second series. l?r Read by several readers. (This col- 
lection includes An Ohio table., by Thorns fcoyd. The scarlet woman, by i.ouie Bror>. 
till , # , f J^uewindfall, by frothy Canfield risher. The master of tho inn, by Ro- 
bert Herrick. The bo csi.k ladies, by Sidney Ho^d. i rn. Lofter'e ride, Vj.I, 

t 1 ;'^ '**? " fair ' by J - A - "»■**»• «" lo <* speech, by H. . orrcw. Rachel 
and her children, by , r ance m . k friend , ty , lsie ^^ 



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not what they do," by . . t^ele. The renurkatie ..reck of the "Thomas Hyke", and A 
tale oi negative parity, by P,R, Stockton, liary Sr.iith, "by Booth Tarkington. I in u, by 
Edith wharton. 
Short stories "by English authors, l'Jr Head by ueveraL '.uthors. (This collection includes 
Dream, The hat, The night ";itor, and !':t ranee a. fair in a hotel, "by Arnold Bennett, 
Awakening, Indian sunnier o: i , oreyttg by Joitn Galsworthy, The B^shop^e come<1y, The 
doll lntthe pink silk drees* Little lower-£n-the -wood* by Leon* rd ...errick. The tall 
master, "by Biff Gilbert i < , The pavilion on the links, tnd ill o» the mill, by 
H. ,::tevenson. 



■ftshntlnl t-^&JQ^lSv^-JIh^-aea^emL^ 21r Read-fry A lwvn Daifo . 

Street, Julian Leonard, The need of change* 2r Read by Wm. Brenton. 

Swinnerton, I'tank. Nocturne; and, Louise, by Saki. lOr Read by Norma Chambers* 

Tarkington, Booth, Monsieur Beaucaire; and, other stories by various authors. Ur Read by 
John Knight, (This collection includes the following stories. Lost on dress parade, by 
0* Henry. The necklace, and Happiness, by Guy de Maupassant. Zodomirsky' s duel, by 
Alexandre Dumas. The perfect tribute, by Mary R, AndBffwe. The match, by Oliver Curwood. 
The pit and the pendulum, by Edgar Allan Poe. The lady or the tiger, by F.R. Stockton. 
The princess and the puma, by 0. Henry. The man without a country, by £•£• Hale. 

Tarkington, Booth. Presenting Lily Mars. 15r Read by John Knight. 

Van Dine, S.S., pseudonym. Tlie kidnap murder case. 12r Read by John Knight. 

Wilder, Thornton N. The bridge of San Luis Rey. 6r Read by John Knight. 

Williamson, Henry. Salar the salmon. 8r British record. 

Wister, Owen. The Virginian, 21r Read by John Knight. 

Wodehouse, P.G. Very good Jeeves. 16r Read by Fred Uttall. 

Woollcott, Alexander. While Rome burns; selected readings, llr Read by the author and Fred 
Uttall. /~~ a^ Ja- -zx 



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THE BRAILLE BOOK HSVZBf 

A Guide to Braille and Talking Book Publications 

Published Monthly at the 
American Printing House for the Blind 

1839 Frankfort Avenue 

Louisville, Kentucky 



Volume 6 



Printed for 
The New York Public Library 
Fifth Avenue and 42nd Street 
New York City 
(Henry F* Homes Fund) 

October, 1937 



/o 
Number 9 



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Contents 
n oo k Aimo uncamBntar* 



tfig* 'Books • 






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Braille Book Review, October 1937 
Book Announcements 
Allen, Arthur A. The book of bird life; a study of birds in their native haunts. 3v. 1930 
APH (Provided by the U.S. Government) In two parts; the first deals with the classifi- 
cation, distribution, habits and relationships of birds, and the second with various 

— J — - miirt« to bird habits rather than bird identification. 

Borrow,, George. The "V 1 

Wve of travel In %aln g fg,?*'**" t, the penlno^ f'tS.ggJ*^ 



Bergson, Henri, me t»wu ovux^ww w - . 

Bible: Fifty selected psalms* Authorised version. Grade 1. NIB 
Bonham, R. W. Algebraic system of writing chess, lv. NIB 
"^Borrow, George. The Bible in Spain. T » be emb o ss e d . BIA 
'Borrow, George. Lavengre. To be embossed. ABB 
Boswell, James. Bo swell's journal of a tour to the Hebrides with Samuel Johnson. To be embossed. 

CPH 
^Eurgess, Gelett. Two o'clock courage. 6v. ARC Garin process. Humor. 
wWipbell, Malcolm. Thunder ahead. 3v. NIB A thrilling yarn of the motor racing track written 

by the greatest racing motorist of today. 
Cannan, Johanna. The hills sleep on. 3v. NIB A well written story of secret service in Tibet. 
Carnegie, Dale. How to win friends and influence people. To be embossed. APE 
Carroll, Mrs. Gladys .HaS^S * Neighbor to the sky. 3v. BIA (Provided by the U.S. Government) 
i Because her childhood had been spent on a desolate Vermont farm, Margery Lee wanted to 

escape from the country and live always near the glamour of city lights. After years of 
struggle she acquired an education and taught school. The next step in her rise to fame, 

according to her plan, was to be Broadway stardom. Then she met Luke Gil man, a quiet, 

contented Maine farmer. After their marriage Margery turned her energies to the making of 

a college professor of Luke. Step by step Luke went up the ladder of success until, in a 

crisis, Margery herself began to doubt her wisdom, and when Luke took matters into his 

own hands and returned to Maine, Margery followed willingly. 
Chapman, Frank M. Autobiography of a bird-lover. To be embossed. CPH 
Clemens, Samuel L. Roughing it. To be embossed. BIA 

Ctonrad, Joseph. Victory. 3v. BIA (Provided by the U.S. Government) Axel Heyst, and intro- 
^t spective Swede, after the failure of his one effort to connect himself with the reality of 

business, retires to the South Seas, and is again drawn into activity in a chivalrous 

attempt to protect a pathetic waif from a traveling show troupe, thus achieving a degree 

of belated victory. 
Cook, Captain. Voyages of discovery. To be embossed. CPH 

Cournos, John, editor. American short stories of the nineteenth century. To be embossed. HMP 
Coward, Noel* Present indicative. To be embossed. BMP 
Crofts, F. W. Crime at Guilford. 4v. NIB How two crimes - a murder in Surrey and a robbery 

in London - were found to be connected and were solved by Chief Inspector French. 
pe Qulncey^jThomas. Reminiscences of the English poets. 5v. NIB Intimate studies of Coleridge, 
wu ^flaxfawffipth , Southey, and other less famous members of the Lakes literary coterie, of which 

$e Quincey himself was a distinguished member. 
Din&is, Enid. Father Damien. lv. NIB A short account of the heroic apostle of the lepers. 
Dostoevsky, Feodor M. Crime and punishment. 7v. NIB A book which contains the deepest essence 

of tragedy, gathering the piteous, the terrible, the human and the sublime into a vast 

compendium. 
Doyle, A. C. The return of Sherlock Holmes. 3v. AHI ^Provided by the U.S. Government ) This 

book continues the series of detective stories that form the life history of the amateur 






5 



v 



Braille Book Review, October 1937 
Book Announcements 
Allen, Arthur A. The book of bird life; a study of birds in their native haunts. 3v. 1930 
AFH (Provided by the U.S. Government) In two parts; the first deals with the classifi- 
cation, distribution, habits and relationships of birds, and the second with various 
methods of bird study. Offered as a guide to bird habitB rather than bird identification. 
- Fully 111 - uaLraUifl by jJliu lugraphu. 

Baikie, James. The glamour of Near East excavation. To be embossed. BLIP 
, Balzac, Honors de. Christ in Flanders, and other stories. To be embossed. CPB 
( /Balzac, Honore de. The magic skin. 3v. BIA (Provided by the U.S. Government) An allegory of 
a miraculous piece of shagreen that gives the owner certain powers of self-gratification, 
but is also the measure of his life. One of Balzac's highest flights of pure imagination, 
and one his gravest commentaries on human life. 

Barrle, J. M. A window in Thrums. To be embossed. HIP 

Becker, Carl Lotus. Beginnings of the American people. To be embossed. ABB 

Bekker, Paul. The story of the orchestra. To be embossed. CPH 

Bergson, Henri. The two sources of morality and religion. To be embossed. APH 

Bible: Fifty selected psalms* Authorised version. Grade 1. NIB 

Bonham, R. W. Algebraic system of writing chess, lv. NIB 
^Borrow, George. The Bible in Spain. Te- be emboss e d. — B3EA- 

Borrow, George. Lavengre. To be embossed. ABB 

Boswell, James, Bo swell* s journal of a tour to the Hebrides with Samuel Johnson. To be embossed. 

CPH 
JBurgess, Gelett. Two o f clock courage. 6v. ARC Garin process. Humor. 

Rampbell, Malcolm. Thunder ahead. 3v. NIB A thrilling yarn of the motor racing track written 
by the greatest racing motorist of today. 

Cannan, Johanna. The hills sleep on. 3v. NIB A well written story of secret service in Tibet. 

Carnegie, Dale. How to win friends and influence people. To be embossed. APH 

Carroll, Mrs. Gladys HaS^f t _ neighbor to the sky. 3v. BIA (Provided by the U.S. Government) 

, Because her childhood had been spent on a desolate Vermont farm, Margery Lee wanted to 

escape from the country and live always near the glamour of city lights. After years of 
struggle she acquired an education and taught 3chool. The next step in her rise to fame, 
according to her plan, was to be Broadway stardom. Then she met Luke Gilman, a quiet, 
contented Maine farmer. After their marriage Margery turned her energies to the making of 
a college professor of Luke. Step by step Luke went up the ladder of success until, in a 
crisis, Margery herself began to doubt her wisdom, and when Luke took matters into his 
own hands and returned to Maine, Margery followed willingly. 

Chapman, Frank M. Autobiography of a bird-lover. To be embossed. CPH 

Clemens, Samuel L. Roughing it. To be embossed. BIA 

Ctonrad, Joseph. Victory. 3v. BIA (Provided by the U.S. Government) Axel Heyst, and intro- 

^i spective Swede, after the failure of his one effort to connect himself with the reality of 
business, retires to the South Sea3, and is again drawn into activity in a chivalrous 
attempt to protect a pathetic waif from a traveling show troupe, thus achieving a degree 
of belated victory. 

Cook, Captain. Voyages of discovery. To be embossed. CPH 

Cournos, John, editor. American short stories of the nineteenth century. To be embossed. HMP 

Coward, Noel. Present indicative. To be embossed. 1 2 IP 

Crofts, F. W. Crime at Guilford. 4v. NIB How two crimes - a murder in Surrey and a robbery 
in London - were found to be connected and were solved by Chief Inspector French. 

pe Quincey^jffhomas. Reminiscences of the English poets. 5v. NIB Intimate studies of Coleridge, 
w^ ^aelawOrth -, Southey, and other less famous members of the Lakes literary coterie, of which 
$e Quincey himself was a distinguished member. 

Dimis, Enid. Father Damien. lv. NIB A short account of the heroic apostle of the lepers. 

Dostoevsky, Feodor M. Crime and punishment. 7v. NIB A book which contains the deepest essence 
of tragedy, gathering the piteous, the terrible, the human and the sublime into a vast 
compendium. 

Doyle, A. C. The return of Sherlock Holmes. 3v. AH1 ^Provided by the U.S. Government ) This 
book continues the series of detective stories that form the life history of the amateur 



' 



\ - .. 



detective whose almost super-human powers of observation, and inductive sagacity make him 
the prince of detectives. 
-m — 'v-i.m. vh m Du Mauriers. -'o be embossed. 



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~wi». i,nM/»n" bv 7f.D.Howells. 



Du Maurier, Daphne. The Da lanriers 3v 

ly flattened history of the author'f LSr""2 " y tho U - S -G°™™nent) A nart 

£-» *» i" ^ early years of tLnllta^th ^ f0Unded * «" say you^f 
truss of the Duke of York i>h„ ?1 nl ° eteent s century rrna notorious ». *v . 

-■Hen v,ae a child of ££* La^erT^f " 2 I(il ° " hen *» ^2." dau^r 
^llby, Gerald, the actor, and n^L^^tCM"'*' ** ■«■»* 



• • 



% 



story of the British navy in the early nineteenth century. £sseubi<u.j^ *.» *» «. j^* 

of a man, captain of an English frigate. Hornblower, son of a country doctor, is a man 
uncertain of his own powers, of his technical skill and of the admiration of his men, yet, 
when he is sent under sealed orders to the Pacific coast of Central America, he ac- 
complishes his mission brilliantly, and fight3 two successful battles with the same 
Spanish warship* 

Galsworthy, John, The country house. 4v. NIB This story of English country life in 1891 

1} is perhaps the be3t of Galsworthy's novels outside The Forsyte Saga and its sequels. 

Gatty, Reginald. Robert Clive and the founding of British India. Ev. NIB -$ft Vivid account 
of one of the most stirring epics of British Imperial history. 

Gilbertson, Catherine. Harriet Beecher Stowe. To be embossed. BIA 

Gordon. Caroline. None shall look back. To be embossed. CPE 

Gra3set, K. Weaving and pattern drafting, lv. NIB Instruction on how to weave thread into 
plain or pattern material, illustrated by diagrams. 

Grayson, David, pseudonym. Adventures of David Grayson. To be embossed. BIA 

Hadin, Oven. A conquest of Tibet. To be embossed. BMP 

Hague, E. F. , Mary Chalmers, and Marie A. Kelly. Studies in conduct, with character case 
conferences, book II. 6v. Grade l£- ARC Garin process. 

Haines, 7. 7. Slim. 6v. ARC Garin process. Fiction. 

Hardy, Marjorie. New stories. 2v. Grade 1. APH 

Hardy, Thomas. Under the greenwood tree. 3v. NIB Described by its author as "a rural 

painting of the Dutch school" , this book is an exquisite idol of r/essex life, its court- 
ships, its choirs, its customs, its humor. 
auff, «"• The caravan; translated by S. Mendel, lv. NIB This relative of the "Arabian 
Nights" is among the most delightful and charming of the many contributions made by the 
Germans to fabled literature. 

Hay, Ian. Housemaster. To be embossed. BIA 

Hilton, James. \1e are not alone. To be embossed. CPH 

Homer. The Iliad for boys and girls; told in simple language by Rev. Alfred J. Church. 2v. 
Grade l£ APH A dignified and simple rendering of the old Greek epic. 

Homer. Odyssey for boys and &irls; told from Homer by Rev. Alfred J. Church. 2v. Grade l£ 
APH 

Jones, Rufus !.. ome problems of life. lv. 1937 APH (Provided by the U.S. Government) The 
book is the text of the Cole lectures delivered last year at Vanderbilt University. They 
express the mature judgments of the lecturer, who was a teacher of philosophy in Haverford 
College for forty-three years. They express the faith of one who believes tremendously 
in the spiritual potentialities in human nature, and at the same time moves with ease in 
the reflections of the great philosophers and can draw upon them to strengthen his argument. 

Kastner, Erich. The missing miniature. To be embossed. ABB 

Kelly, Eleanor M. Basquerie. 5v. ARC Garin process. Fiction. 

Negro poets and their poems. 3v. 1923 APH 
"I am" discourses. ABB 



Kerlin, Robert T. 
King, Godfre Ray. 






Ovvvyvvj 






/ 






detective whose almost super-human powers of observation, and inductive sagacity make him 
the prince of detectives. 

Du Maurier, Daphne. The Du Mauriers. Jo be embossed. ABB 

Dunbar, Paul Laurence. Complete poems; with an introduction to "Lowly lyrics" by .V.D.Howells. 
4v. APH (Provided by the U.S. Government) The first distinguished negro poet in America 
was bo -n in Ohio of parents who were slaves. He did newspaper work, served on the staff 
of the Library of Congress and died of tuberculosis at 34. 

Eckstein, Gustav. Canary: the history of a family. To be embossed. CHI 

Elson basic readers: Pre-primer. Psnphlet. Grade 1. APH 

Elson-Gray. Dick and Jane. lv. Grade l-£- HMP 

Bison-Gray. More Dick and Jano stories. lv. Grade 1^- HMP 

Fish, Anna Gardner. The joy of giving, lv. Grade l£ Perkins play no. 14. 

Fish, Anna Gardner. A shepherd boy of Judea. lv. Grade l£ Perkins play no. 13. 

Fisher, H. A. L. History of Europe. Part 2, 5v. HZB Tho second part of this monumental 
work covers the period from the Renaissance to the years before the French Revolution. 

Forester, Cecil Scott. Beat to quarters. 2v. CPH (Provided by the U.S. Government) A sea 
story of the British navy in the early nineteenth century. Essentially it is a portrait 
of a man, captain of an English frigate. Hornblower, son of a country doctor, is a man 
uncertain of his own powers, of his technical skill and of the admiration of his men, yet, 
when he is sent under sealed orders to the Pacific coast of Central America, he ac- 
complishes his mission brilliantly, and fights two successful battles with the same 
Spanish warship. 

r Galsworthy, John. The country house. 4v. NIB This story of English country life in 1891 
is perhaps the be3t of Gal3worthy f 3 novels outside The Forsyte Saga and its sequels. 
Gatty, Reginald* Robert Clive and the founding of British India. 2v. NIB ^£ Vivid account 
of one of the roost stirring epics of British Imperial history. 
Gilbertson, Catherine. Harriet Beecher Stowe. To be embossed. BIA 
Gordon, Caroline. None shall look back. To be embossed. CPH 
Grasset, K. Weaving and pattern drafting, lv. NIB Instruction on how to weave thread into 

plain or pattern material, illustrated by diagrams. 
Grayson, David, pseudonym. Adventures of David Grayson. To be embosser.. BIA 
Hadin, Sven. A conquest of Tibet. To be embossed. HMP 
Hague, E. F. , Mary Chalmers, and Marie A. Kelly. Studies in conduct, with character case 

conferences, book II. 6v. Grade l{v ARC Garin process. 
Haines, 7. f« Slim. 6v. ARC Garin process. Fiction. 
Hardy, Marjorie. New stories. 2v. Grade 1. APH 
Hardy, Thomas. Under the greenwood tree. 3v. NIB Described by its author as "a rural 

painting of the Dutch school", this book is an exquisite idol of 'Vessex life, its court- 
ships, its choirs, its customs, its humor, 
auff, W. The caravan; translated by S. Mendel, lv. NIB This relative of the "Arabian 
Nights" is among the most delightful and charming of the many contributions made by the 
Germans to fabled literature. 
Hay, Ian. Housemaster. To be embossed. BIA 
Hilton, James. 7e are not alone. To be embossed. CPH 
Homer. The Iliad for boys and girls; told in simple language by Rev. Alfred J. Church. 2v. 

Grade lfr APH A dignified and simple rendering of the old Greek epic. 
Homer. Odyssey for boys and girls; told from Homer by Rev. Alfred J. Church. 2v. 

APH 
Jones, Rufus !.. >ome problems of life. lv. 1937 APH (Provided by the U.S. Government) The 
book is the text of the Cole lectures delivered last year at Vanderbilt University. They 
express the mature judgments of the lecturer, who was a teacher of philosophy in Haverford 
College for forty-three years. They express the faith of one who believes tremendously 
in the spiritual potentialities in human nature, and at the same time moves with ease in 
the reflections of the great philosophers and can draw upon them to strengthen his argument. 
Kastner, Erich. The missing miniature. To be embossed. ABB 

Basquerie. 5v. ARC Garin process. Fiction. 
Negro poets and their poems. 3v. 1923 APH 
M I am" discourses. ABB 



m 



Grade l£ 



Kelly, Eleanor M. 
Kerlin, Robert T. 
King, Godfre Ray. 



^\0\(J\W\AV) 






- / 



Kipling, Rudyard. Indian tales. To be embossed. CHI 

Kitson, Charles Herbert. Counterpoint for beginners. lv. NIB The author, who is Professor 
of Music at the University of Dublin, presents his subject in a manner suited to the be- 
ginner. It is made especially clear through the use of copious notation examples. A 
valuable addition to the student's library, which should help the young composer to avoid 
many pitfalls* 

Legendre, Sidney J. Land of the nhite parasol and the million elephants; a journey through the 
jungles of Indo-China. 3v. 1936 AHI (Provided by the U.S. Government) Account of the 
adventures of the Legendre expedition to Indo-China to collect specimens for the American 
Museum of Natural History. The story is told in an informal, chatty, and frequently 
humorous tone, the scientific aims and achievements of the expedition being almost sub- 
merged in the tale of personal adventures with natives, colonial officials, and a variety 
of wild animals from mice to tigers. 

Lewis, Flannery. Suns go down. 2v. APH (Provided by the U.S. Government) A portrait of the 
author's grandmother, now ninety years old, who as a bride of sixteen was "the first decent 
white woman in the Corastock Lode district." The book combines a picture of Mrs. Flannery 
today in the dead Virginia City where she still lives, with reminiscences of the days when 
the town was the second largest city in the West. Finally there are the writer's memories 
of his own boyhood when Grandmother was an important influence in his life. 

Lincoln, Abraham. Speeches and letters. To be embossed. BIA 

Link, Henry C. The return to religion. To be embossed. HMP 

Ludwig, Emil. The Nile; the life-3tary of a river; translated by Mary Lindsay. CPH 5v. 
^ (Provided by the U.S. Government) Because he felt that a river Is like the life of a man, 
9 Emil Lud\?ig has written this "biography" of the Nile. He personifies the river while 

tracing its course, from its excapades as a young creature thru the first adventure of Wm 
Murchison Falls, Its encounter with s«/amps, and its association with the Blue l.'ile, or 
"wilder brother." The various scenes of Its 4000 mile course are described, as are the 
customs of the people on its banks, and the conflict between European powers and native 
tribes. The latter part of the book describes -fiie subjection of the Nile to man's use, 
and life at the river's "golden mouth." 

McAdoo, Eleanor \'U The \7oodrow Wilsons. To be embossed. CPH 

McFarland, Raymond. The masts of Gloucester; recollections of a fisherman. 2v. APH (Pro- 
vided by the U.S .Government) In the early 1890' a, young Raymond MacFarland, anxious to 
earn money for a college course, shipped for two seasons of mackerel fishing in his uncle'f 
old time Gloucester schooner, the Yosemite. This book contains a record of his experience? 
on these two long voyages as the ship followed the mackerel from the Virginia Capes to 
the Gulf of St. Lawrence. 

Macaulay, T. B. Milton, lv. NIB A brilliant study of Milton's genius and its historical 

' environment. 

4R^haffy, J. P. Social life in Greece from Homer to Menander. To be embossed. APH 

Malory, Sir Thomas. Le Morte d' Arthur. To be embossed. CPH 

Martindale, C. C. At mass. lv. NIB A brief description of the offering of mass and its 
significance. 

Martindale, C. C. Some broadcast sermons, lv. NIB Dealing with conscience, character, In- 
fluence, self-discipline, the transfiguration, the Holy Trinity, etc. 

Masters, David. On the wing. To be embossed. CPH 

Mayer, Joseph. The seven seals of science. To be embossed. APH 

Nathan, Robert. The enchanted voyage, lv. APH (Provided by the U.S. Government) Mr. Hector 
Pecket was an unsuccessful carpenter somewhere in the Bronx. His wife, Sarah Pecket, was 
a managing woman, capable of facing facts, even tho her husband was not. In his dreams 
Mr. Pecket sailed the seven seas in the little boat which he had built and kept in the 
back yard. Then Mrs. Pecket had wheels put under the boat and sold it to the butcher to 
use for a lunch wagon it was just too much. Mr. Pecket hoisted his sail, and with Mary 
Kelly, a weary little Fordham Road waitress for crew, sailed south. On the way they 
picked up a travel ing^entist who was also a knife-grinder, and the way was paved ibr 
romance and adventure. 

Nevinson, Henry W. Fire of life. 4v. NIB "No better autobiography has been written in 
English in the last one hundred years", says John Masefleld. A noble record, set down 
with charm, wit and graceful irony, by a man who has met nearly all the great men and 
women of the last fifty years. 



L 



m 



Oliver, J. R. The good shepherd* To be embossed. CPH 

Page, Thomas Kelson. In ole Virginia; or, Marse Chan and other stories, 2v. CiH (Provided 
by the U.S. Government) stories of the old South. Contents: Marse Chan. Unc' 
Edinburgh drowndin'. Meh Lady. Ole 'stracted. Mo haid pawn. Polly, a Christmas 
recollection* 

Pascal. Thoughts, translated and edited by C.S.Jerram* 2v. NIB This selection of the 

"thoughts" of a great philosopher and religious thinker - a keen legition and a man of 
science but a humble Christian - is proceeded by a study of his genius and a short life 
written by his sister. 

Peattie, Donald Culross. A book of hours. To be embossed. BIA 

Power, Rhode. The age of discovery. 2v. NIB Brilliant with the great names of Marco Polo, 

Vasco da Gama, Columbus, the Cabots, Magellan, Willoughby, Chancellor , Frobisher and Levis. 

Prayer books: Lectionary from the revised prayer book. lv. NIB 

Ostenso, Martha. The stone field. To be embossed. ABB 

Priestley, J* B. Midnight on the desert. To be embossed. CPII 

Ragg, T. M. Emperor Charles V. and the rise of modern Europe, lv. NIB An outstanding 
personality who dominated the Europe of the Reformation age. 

Remarque, Erich Maria. Three comrades. To be embossed. BIA 

aichter, Conrad. The sea of grass, lv. ABB (Provided by the U.S. Government) A novelette 
in which the author tells a story reminiscent in some degree of V'illa Cather's A Lost 
Lady. The heroine, a delicate, refined, lovely lady, leaves her husband and children and 
the life on a huge cattle ranch to return to the city. Twenty years later, her youngest 
son, v7ho is not, according to the whispers of the country, her husband's child, is killed 
as a desperado, and Lutie Brew ton comes back to the man who has loved her in spite of 
everything. 

Riley, J. f. Best loved poems and ballads. 2v. BIA (Provided by the U.S. Government) 

Professor Pattee writes of Riley: "In his preference for native themes and homely, uiw 
literary treatment of seemingly uripoetie material he continued the work of the Pike 
County balladists. More than any one else Riley is responsible for the modern newspaper 
type of ballad that is to poetry v/hat ragtime is to music... Riley not only inherited 
7ill Carloton's public entire but lie added to it very considerably." Imitators of 
"The Hoosior Poet" have been many, Sam '.Falter Fo3s and Edgar Guest being the best known. 

Rinehart, M. R. Married people. To be embossed. CPH 

Roberts, Kenneth. Northwest pa3sa;50. 7v. BIA (Provided by the U.S.Government) The central 
figure of this historical novel is Major Robert Rogers, American ranger commander who 
led the expedition against the Indian town of St. Francis in 1759, and who3e dream was 
to find an overland passage to the Pacific. The narrator is one Langdon Towne, from 
Kittery, Maine, whose two ambitions were to paint $ho Indians as they really looked, and 
to follow Rogers. The book falls into three sections, the first dealing with the 
3t. Francis expedition; the second with the interlude in London, when Rogers ms attempt- 
ing to gain influential friends and money and Towne was learning to paint; and the third 
dealing with Rogers* career as governor of Michillmackinac, his court martial, and Townefis 
success as a painter. The book is issued also in a United, t wo -v olmro redition*- Ifra. . 
sac© ad volume of *hleh contains some of the hi ator i cal seuro» material- en wki eh- "fee 
■p wi ±m bia wa Jf — 

Russell, E. S. The behaviour of animals. 3v. NIB A sketch of the problems of animal be- 
haviour, scientifically authoritative but simple and straightforward, of service both 
to the student and the general reader. 

Ryan, Arthur, compiler. Gospel story of the passion of our Lord. lv. NIB 

Sanson, Katherine. Living in Tokyo. To be embossed. APH 

Schweitzer, Albert. The Ibrest Hospital at Lambarene. To be embossed. CPH 

Scott, Sir Walter* Kenilworth. 6v. NIB The tragic story of Countess Amy and Leicester, 
set in the spacious days of Queen Elisabeth, with splendid pictures of the court and of 
the pageants at Kenilworth Castle. 

Shepard, Odell. Pedlar* s progress; the life of Bronson Alcott. 5v. 1937 APR (Provided by 
the U.S. Government) In preparation for the writing of this biography, the author read 
all of the fifty volumes of Alcott' s journals, and has based his work upon them, and 
upon his correspondence, and contemporary records. The book gives a detailed study of the 
life of the Connecticut farmer's 3on who, from being an itinerant peddler, rose to be a 
teacher and philosopher, <hom Emerson called "the most refined and the most advanced soul 
we have had in New England." 



1 



Smith, Nila Banton. Tom's trip. lv. Grade l£ HMP 



lv. 1TIB Written expressly for the use and 



> 



3t. Grade li 



Villi era, Alan. 
Wallace, Edgar. 
Walpole, Hugh. 
alpole, Hugh. 



Smith, T. H. Um Pianoforte tuning and repairing. 

guidance of blind tuners. 
Stark, Freda. The southern gates of Arabia. To be embossed. HMP 
Spelling: Everyday spelling - higher grades, by Suzallo, Pearson and Hillegas. 

ARC Garin process. 
Sutton, George M. Birds in the wilderness. To be embossed. BIA 
Thucydides. The history of the Peloponnesian War. To be embossed. APH 

Tocque/ville, Alexia de. Democracy in America, tranalated by Henry Reeves, with a critical 
and biographical introduction by John Bigelow. Book I, 5v. Book II, 4v. 1904 APH 
(Provided by the U.S. Government) It remains the best philosophical discussion of 
democracy illustrated by the experience of the United States, up to the time it was 
written, which can be found in any language. One of the few treatises on the philoso- 
phy of politics which has risen to the rank of a classic. 
Trevelyan, George Macaulay. Grey of Fallodon. To be embossed. HIP 
Turgenev, Ivan. Sportman , s sketches translated by Constance Garnett. NIB Delightful 

studies of Russian country life by the master of Russian realistic fiction. 
Tyndall, John. The glaciers of the Alps and mountaineering in 1B61. To be embossed. APH 
Cruise of the Conrad. To be embossed. CPH 
Room 13. 3v. NIB Detective. 
The fortress. lOv. Grade 2} ARC Garin process. Fiction. 
The inquisitor; a novel. 5v. APH (Provided by the U.S. Government) 
Polchester, the small English cathedral town which was the scene of three of the authorfia 
earlier books: Harmer John, The Cathedral, and The Old Ladies, is the background for the 
present novel. The time is the present. An old usurer, whom many in the town have 
reason to hate, suddenly disappeared and his ghost was said to walk the town. Strange 
things took place in Polchester, in which the Cathedral itself seemed to have a part. 
The action culminated when the inhabitants of Seatown, a nearby slum district, rioted at 
the very door of the Cathedral. 
Walpole, Hugh. Rogue Harries. 9v. Grade l£ ARC Garin process. Eighteenth century England 

with all of its carousing is the background for swaggering Herries, dreamer and rogue. 
Walpole, Hugh. Judith Paris. 9v. Grade 1§ ARC Garin process. The sequel to Rogue Herries, 

gives a colorful picture of vivid young Judith, daughter of the Rogue. 
Webb, Walter Prescott. The great plains. To be embossed. APH 

Wells, H. G. The anatomy of frustration; a modern synthesis. To be embossed. APH 
'/eaterman, Percy. The call of the sea. 2v. NIB A first-rate sea yarn for boys. 
White, E. L. The wheel spins. 3v. NIB A witty, deft 3tory of a thrilling Journey in a 

continental express, superbly constructed and with a truly Macabre atnosphere. One dare 
hardly read on - yet one must. 
Whitman, Walt. Leaves of grass. To be embossed. APH 

Wilkins, Vaughan. And so - Victoria. 6v. CPH The background is pre-Victorian England of 
the years between Victoria's babyhood and her accession to the throne. It follows in 
detail the career of Christopher Harnish, supposed to be the son of Princess Amelia, 
youngest daughter of George III. Surrounded by plots and counter-plots he fights his 
way to a cleaner and more peaceful way of life, after having cleared the way for 
Victoria to mount the throne of England. 
Woolf, Virginia. The years. 4v. BIA (Provided by the U.S. Government) Taking the members 
of three interrelated English families as a basis, the author has woven together their 
stories to make a pattern of English upper middle-class life from 1880 to the present. 
"As in Tolstoy's 'War and Peace' and in Proust, the chief character is time itself... 
A father leaves his club, goes to the City, returns home for tea, meets his children. 
A mother lies ill in a hushed house. A son worries about his career. A young girl goes 
in for good works. The generations grow up. People cp to parties and think about people 
and return from parties not saying what happened at them. Eccentricities and foibles 
develop. A man goes to the war, another returns from Africa, a dinner party is held in 
a basement during an air raid.. .What are we? Whore are we going? No one can put his 
thoughts in words; all drift about the fringes of the subject. I'any may wonder what 
Mrs. Woolf is trying to say in so many pages. The last chapter plainly tells. It is 
a sunning up of those fifty years in all their aspects. 



Woolley, Sir Leonard. Abraham; recent discoveries and Hebrew origins. To be embossed. APE 

Catalogs of Talking Books 
Copies of an up-to-date braille catalog of all the talking books now available may be had 
without charge upon request from the American Printing Bouse, 1839 Frankfort Avenue, 
Louisville, Kentucky. This service is through the courtesy of The New York Public Library, 
New York City. 

Talking Book Machines far the Blind 
The ,V*P*A. project for the manufacture of Talking Book machines under the supervision of the 
American Foundation for the Blind recently received an additional grant, making possible the 
construction of 2,000 more electric talking book machines. This will bring the total number 
produced by this project to 17,000. The machines so constructed are allotted among the 
States in the proportion which their population bears to the general population of the 
country. For example, if a State has a population equal to one twentieth of the population 
of the entire country, it is entitled to receive one twentieth of the talking book machines 
made on the project. 

These machines are loaned to a library or a State Comnission in each State, and that agency 
in turn lends the machines to blind people who cannot afford to purchase them for themselves. 
Blind people who need a talking book machine and cannot afford to buy one should make immediate 
application either to the agency in their state handling the machines or to the American 
Foundation for the Blind. Applications received by the Foundation will be transmitted promptly 
to the proper authorities. Action in this matter should be taken promptly. If you know a 
% blind person who 3hould have one of these machines and who cannot afford to purchase one, 
please write the Foundation at once, and ask the blind person to write also. 
This project had not been in operation very long before it became evident to the Foundation 
that some of the work could be done by blind people. Five or six sightless persons were taken 
on first to do testing work. Later 'others were tried in the assembly line, and the proportion 
was gradually increased until at one time 100 <kf the 200 employees were blind. This was a 
great boon to these men as some of them had been out of work for upwards of ten years. 

The Searchlight Short Story Contest 
The New York Association for the Blind announces its annual prize award of £20.00 for the best 
original short story submitted by a reader of the Searchlight. The rules are as follows: 

1. Contestants may select their own subjects, but we would like to stress their writing about 
scenes and characters with which they have soiae familiarity. Love stories are eliminated 
from consideration* 

2. Stories submitted should contain not less than 1,000 and not more than 2,000 words. 

3. The contestants must be under 18 years of age at the time they submit their stories which 
£ j should be sent in either Braille or typewriting to the Searchlight, c/o The New York 

Association for the Blind, 111 East 59th Street, New York City* 

4. Each contestant may submit only one story* The full name, address, age, date of mailing 
and school should be written clearly on a separate slip of paper and securely fastened to 
the manuscript. 

5. February 1st, 1938 is the closing date for reception of stories. Announcement of the 
prize winner will be made in the June number* 






l.< 






F 



TH EBAILL13 BOOK REVIEW 
A Guide to Braille and Talking Book publications 
Published Ilonthly at the 
American printing House for the Blind 
1839 Frankfort Avenue 
Louisville, Kentucky 

printed for 

The New York public Library 
Fifth Avenue and 42nd street 
JJevj york city 
(Henry F. Hones Fund) 



Volume 6 



November, 19; 7 



Nunber 10 



Contents 













V 






'. 



.- 



Braille Book Review, November, 1937 2. 

Book Announces nt 8 
(Books in this list are in Grade 2 unless otherwise noted) 

American short stories of the 19th century edited by John Cournos. 3v. IfttP (Provided by 
the U.Sa Government) Gontentsj peter Rug{^ the mis ing man, by van. Austin. Rip Van 
inkle, by Washington Irving. The tell-tale heart, by Poe. Ethan Brand, by Hawthorne. 
The "Town-he's" story, by Herman llelville. v. 2. The dianond lens. A passionate pil- 
grim, by Henry James* v.3. The grif in and the minor canon, by F.R. Stockton. A 
horseman in the 3ky, by Ambrose Bierce. Sieur George, by G.W. Cable. Hadame Celestin f 8 
divorce, by Kate Chopin. The little room, by liadelene Yale inne. A village lear, by 
Mary 3. /ilkins. Van Bibber's burgler, by R.H. Davis. The god of his fathers, by Jack 
London. The furnished room, by 0. Henry. 

Baikie, James. The glamour of Hear liast excavation. 3v. Ifl/J? 1927 (Provided by the U.S. 
Government) An account of the treasure-hunt for the buried art, wisdom and history of 
the ancient East, from the Nile to Babylon, the adventures, disappointments and triumphs 
of the hunters, and the knowledge thus acquired of the ancient world. There is a glamor 
and a romance in the story \i ich is told in an alluring fashion. It is no dry-as-dust 
archaeological disquisition, but a moving tale of adventure for the excavators, and as 
wondrous a revelation of ancient life. 

Barrows, I ar jorie; compiler. A book of famous poems. 2v. Gr;\de ]£ HMP 

Book of Common prayer. The order for the administration of the Lord»s supper, lv. 
Grade ij CPH 
^fcryant, I arguerite. Christopher ilibbault, roadmaker. 7v. ARC Grade l*r Garin process. 
^^ A story of peculiar charm and originality. It follows the fortunes of a poor ^nglish 
boy who is adopted "by a wealthy nobleman* s son. 

Carnegie, Dale. How to win friends and influence people. 3v. 1936 APH (Provided by the 
U.S. Government) A genuine interest in the other fellow and a recognition of his need 
for a sense of personal Importance are two of the factors stressed in this practical 
guide for pleasing people in business or in society. Examples are cited of the suc- 
cesses or failures of famous people in their daily contacts with others. Frankly a 
popular, Inspirational book. Author conducts courses in effective speaking and applied 
psychology. 

Cooper, James Fenimore. The pilot, a tale of the sea. 5v. CPH (Provided by the U. S. 
Government) The daring exploits of Paul Jones in 'English waters, about 1778, furnish 
the theme. 
-Becet tur, see noLe under author Charles Lee t ewi^u 

Gilbertson, Catherine. Harriet Beecher rtowe. 3v. 1937 BIA (Provided by the U.S. 
^^ Government) A biography of the author of Uncle Ton's cabin. The author does not claim 
^P much new material but has attempted to write an account which vill balance the ei rly 
laudatory works of friends and relatives, and the coldly scientific study produced by 
Constance Rourke more recently. 

Hilton,. James. ve are not alone, lv. CPH (Provided by the U.S. Government) A busy, 

preoccupied doctor, affectionately known as the "little doctor" In the English cathedral 
town where he practised, is the central character of the novelette. Just by chance he 
was sent for to attend a young German dancer at a fifth-rate theater, and from that 
meeting to their tra t £c deaths the two were strangely united. The time is 1914, just 
before the outbreak of the vorld war. 

History of the expeditions of Captains Lewis and Clark, 1804-5-6; reprinted from the edition 

of 1814, fifth edition. Book I, 6v. Book II, 5v. APH (Provided by the U.S. Government) 
^Lincoln, Abraham. Speeches and letters. 2v. 1929 BIA (Provided by the U.S. Government) 
A collection of Lincoln , s greatest speeches and moot noteworthy letters. Includes 
Lincoln's "lost speech" so called because all the reporters present were so absorbed in 
it as to forget to take notes. 

Lincoln, Joseph. The storm girl. 2v. APH (Provided by the U.S. Government) Emily Blanchard 
came back to her aunt's Cape Cod boarding house, announcing that she had left forever her 
job as bookkeeper in Gloucester. There was some mystery ahout Emily's change of heart, and 
when her past cauplit up with her, It was her rough but kindly uncle Sim who settled her 
difficulty. 

Lyman, George. Ralston's ring. California plunders the comstock lode. 3v. CPH (Provided 

by the U.S. Government) Historical study of the boom days on the est coast and especially 



of V/Illlam Chapman Ralston and bis ring in California and ITevada in the »608 and f 708. 
Adolph Sutro, whose persistence in the plan to drain the Comstock lode nines brought 
hira into violent opposition to the Ralston ring, id an important figure of the "book. 
Ralston was the kind of man everyone is fond of; he did everything in the gr?nd manner. 
Dr. Lyman is fond of hira, too, as readers will he. He was and is such good theater. 
And it is precisely because this hook about him is magnificent melodrama throughout 
that it will find a large and ea^er audience. 

Mayer, Joseph. The seven seals of science; an account of the unfoldment of orderly know- 
ledge and its influence on human affairs; revised student's edition. 4v. 1937 APR" 
(Provided by the U.S. Government) The author tells the story of science as a contin- 
uous development. His thesis is "That the sciences did not ariBe and could not have 
arisen simultaneously, that they form a well defined structure with mathematics at the 
bottom." Psychology and social science he regards as still in process of evolution. 
Should help fill the need for a popularized history of science. 

NBC music appreciation hour, 1937-1938, conducted by waiter Damrosch. Student's notebooks. 
4 pamphlets. ARC 25^ each. 

0sten80, llartha. The stone field. 3v. ABB (Provided by the U.S. Government) The first 
Ashbrooke Hilyard had moved into the Northwest and carved out a farm for his family tut 
had left many acres of timber untouched. Thi3 story is concerned chiefly with vhat his 
descendants of the second and third generations did with the land and the timber he had 
bequeathed them. 
eattie, Donald Culross. A book of hours, lv. 1937 BIA (Provided by the U.S. Government) 
Twenty-four essays, one for each our of the day and the night. In them the author in- 
terprets for the ordinary individual the philosophy of science as it appears to him. "I 
have faith in science. I believe in the reality of ethics. I have beheld beauty." 

Saint Francis of Assisi. The little flowers of St. Francis; and "The mirror of perfection" 
and Bonaventura's "Life of St. Francis." 5v. APH (Provided by the U.S. Government) 
This literary gem relates the life of Francis, his companions and disciples, as it 
appeared to the popular imagination at the beginning of the fourteenth century. That 
which gives these stories an inestimable worth is what for want of a better term we 
might call their atmosphere. They are legendary, worked over, exaggerated, false even, 
if you please, but they give us with a vivacity and intensity of coloring something that 
we shall search for In vain elsewhere— the surroundings in which St. Francis lived. 

Sansom, Katherine. Living in Tokyo. 2v. 1937 APH (provided by the U.S. Government) 
Through more than twenty years of residence in Japan the author has learned to know 
something of the Japanese people and their ways of living. She writes of happenings 
in the street, the park, the I itchen, the dining room, on the trolleys, etc. It is 
^fe a singularly delightful hook. 
^Ptowe, Harriet Beecher, see notd under author Catherine Gilbertson. 

Sutton, George M. Birds in the wilderness; adventures of an ornithologist. 2v. BIA 193S 
(Provided by the U.S. Government) Some accounts of the adventures and misadventures 
which the writer has encountered in many localities in his pursuit of birds. The author 
is curator of the Museum of ornithology at Cornell University. 

Thucydides. The history of the peloponnesian ,/ar; translated by Richard Crawley. 6v. APH 
(Provided by the U.S. Government) Thucydides is the first of the "military historians." 
He had military training which fitted him to understand the science of war. His Ideal 
of history is said to have been first accuracy and then relevancy. Unlike Herodotus he 
rarely digressed. His cliosen subject was the peloponnesian .ar, which covered twenty- 
seven years of his own lifetime, 431-404 B.C. His history is unfinished, breaking off 
in the middle of the year 411 B.C. 

Tyndall, John. The glaciers of the Alps, mountaineer lag in 1861. 3v. APE 1906 (Provided 
by the U.S. Government ) 

Webb, alter ?rescott. The great plains. 5v. 1931 APH (Provided by the U.S. Government) 
A study of the special conditions imposed by the arid and semi-arid plain region west 
of the I is sis sip pi on frontier life and subsequent civilisation. One of the most original, 
suggestive, and thoughtful contributions to the science of history in recent years. 

Jells, H.G. The anatomy of frustration; a i odern synthesis. 2v. 1936 APH (Provided by 
the U.S. Government) In this new book Jr. .ells reviews and summarizes the many-v lumed 
work of a hypothetical American writer, a scientist, industrialist and student of world 




L .= 



affairs, '/illiam Burroughs Steele. In his masterpiece, the Anatomy of Frustration, Steele 
had analyzed twentieth cent iry conditions in science, religion, war, "business and lore, 
and presented suggestions for their improvement. The ideas are, of course, actually those 
of Mr. »ells, himself, here presented in a novel synthesis. 

Wells, H.G. Love and Mr. Lewisham. 2v. CPH (Provided "by the U.S. Government) A i:tudy of 
the life of very ordinary and commonplace people. i;r. Lewisham is a schoolmaster and a 
student who spoils his plana for advancement "by falling in love, and ruins his literary 
and socialist ambitions hy getting Married. 

Yvhitman, valt. Leaves of grass (18J35-71). Everyman*s Library edition. 4v. AJB (Provided 
"by the U.r. Government) Time has criticized the New England poets severely but the fame 
of Vi/hitman is constantly advancing. He is increasingly read and understood. 

woolley, Sir Leonard. Abraham; recent discoveries and Hebrew origins. 2v. 1936 APH (Pro- 
vided by the U.S. Government) Sir Leonard <;oolley, starting from the Biblical account 
of the Migration of Terali and his family from Ur of the Chaldees to naran and of Abraham»s 
leadership of the party thence into Palestine, "builds up a case for the view that the 
traditional story is an accurate "but simplified version of the real events, and he fills 
in the outline with a wealth of archaeological detail. 



Talking Books 
(These "books are supplied by the U.S. Government) 
Bradford, Gamaliel. American portraits. 10 records, sketches of nark Twain. Henry Adams. 
| Sidney Lanier. James IicNeil ,'histler, James G. Blaine. Grover Cleveland. Henry Janes. 

™ Joseph Jefferson. This "book is already in grade 2 "by the Government and in grade 1^- in 

many libraries. 
Christie, Agatha. The murder of Roger Ackroyd. 8 records. This is available in , rade 2. 

A mystery story. Recorded in England. 
Greek plays; Agamemnon; choephoroe, or Hie mourners; and The Kumenides, or The reconcilia- 
tion, by Aeschylus. The Alcestis; Iphigenia in Aulis; and Oedipus, king of Thebes, by 
Euripides. 16 records. 
Halliburton, Richard. Royal road to romance. 16 records. Part literary travel and part 
adventure it might be classed with Sterne's Sentimental Journey, it is so enthusiastic 
and romantic. 
Mason, A.E.W. House of the arrow. 14 records. This book is available in grade 2. A mystery 

story. Recorded in sftgland. 
Millikan, Robert A. Science and the new civilization. 7 records. This book is available in 
grade 1^-. Bight addresses for lay audiences, they give the scientist's attitude on the 
relation of science to progress. 
Washington, George, "by oodrow Wilson. 15 records. This book is available in grade l{.. 
It is for the general reader rather than the special student. It is a fascinating 
account of ,/ashington - the ran., the soldier and the statesman - by a master of gooo 
English. 



Hand-copied Books 
(Unless otherwise noted these hand-copied "books are in grade 1?,-. In borrowing those "books 
readers should write to the library that owns the book. The name of the library owning 
the book is given after each title* A list of the names of the libraries in their abbre- 
viated form is in the Braille Book Review for June.) 

Adler, Felix. Incompatibility In marriage and other essays. 2v. NYPL 
Alsamora, Lucia and others. Storm warnings, lv. Albany. Fiction. 
Arundale, George B« Tou. 4v. Theosophical Book Association, 184 : outh Oxford Street, Los 

Angeles, Gal. 
Balzac, Ilonore de. Pere Goriot. Gv. NLB Fiction. 
BarDour, Ralph. Merrltt leads the nine. 3v. NYPL 

Score is tied. 3v. NYPL 
Essentials of upholstery. 2v. Indianapolis. 
Atlantic adventure; and Above all eloe, by Vivien Bretherton. 2v. Detroit. 



Barbour, Ralph. 
Bast, Herbert. 
Bourbon, Diana. 

Fiction. 
Broster, D.K. 
Browne, Lewis. 



htpl, 



VXm Rowl, a historical romance. 8v. LC Fiction. 
Stranger than fiction, a si ort history of the Jews from earliest tir.es to 
the present day. Gv. LC 

Carr, Mary Jane. Children of the covered wagon; a story of the old Oregon trail. 3v. 
Sacra lento • 

Cohen, Lester. Sweepings. 9v. Sacramento. Fiction. 

Corneille, Pierre, and Jean Racine. Plays. 6v. NYPL Gontentsj The Cid. Cinna. Andro- 
mache. Brit tannic us. Phaedra. Athaliah. The first two plays are by corneille, the 
rest by Racine. 

Cothern, iiarion B. Cher ami; tin story of a carrier pigeon, lv. Chicago, St. Louis, 
Sacramento. 

Crawford, F. Iiarion. Cecilia; a story of modern Rome. 5v. Chicago. Fiction. 

Curwood, James Oliver. The black hunter; a novel of old uebec. 8v. Cleveland, Detroit, 

Douglas, Norman. South wind. 9v. Detroit, salt Lake City. 

Finger, Charles J. Adventure under sapphire skies. 4v. LC, NLB. History. 

Galsworthy, John. Forsytes, pendyces and others. <ith a foreword "by Ada Galsworthy. 5v. 
LC. Fiction. 

Gardiner, Alice and Nancy Osborne. Father's gone a-whaling; adventures in Nantucket a hun- 
dred years ago. 3v. Perkins. Juvenile fiction. 

Gregory, Jaclson. The shadow on the ] esa. 4v. Fiction. St. Louis. 

Hackney, Louise allace. zing of -came, a novel based on the life of James rraithson. 5v. 
Sac rament o • 

Hoy 1 Igor, ~ illinnu Bagk-coni.iu at.«*-~ gvw" F^rtieta. 

^febmer. The Odyssey, newly trazislated into English prose by T. E. Shaw (Lawrence of Arabia), v 
LC, Sacramento, APH 

Lewis, Sinclair. Dodsworth; a novel. 10v. Chicago, -hiladelphia. 

Lord, Daniel A. You can't live that way. lv. Detroit. Religion. 

Hueston, Ethel. Blithe Baldwin, Gv. Albany. Fiction. 

Kearton, Cherry. The island of penguins. 2v. NLB, Sacramento, ITCTL Zoology 

Kummer, Frederic A. Eight "bells, lv. Albany, Cincinnati, 
^ffhe KybaHon; a otnd^t-ef the herafitic^phlloao^hy of anciexit-JSgypt and Greece, by three 
initiates. 3v. Theoso ihical Book As: ooiat ion, Los Angelts, Cal. 

Leopold, .erner. Reise ;urch XratseLlanG; a cultural f_rst reader. 3v. 

Light of Catholic action, by a "ister of Christian Charity, lv. Chicago, 

Macaulay, Thomas Batington. 'Sssay on Johnson, lv. LC 

Mason, &•£«¥• * Ho other ti :e • Gv. LC Fiction. 

Maugham, W. Somerset. The narrow corner. 4v. Chicago. Fiction. 

liiln, Louise Jordan. Ruben and Ivy i:en. 7v. racramento. Fiction. 

Moody, Paul Dwight, and Arthur Percy ] itt. The shorter life of D. L. 
Library, Richmond; Orlando, .la. 

S**fean, Robert. The enchanted voyage. 2v. Albany, piakian. 

Obsjornsen, P«0* Fairy tales of the iar north. 3v. t. Louis, miction. 

Parrish, Randall. I.'y lady oi the ro.ith; a story of the civil war. 6v. LC Fiction. 



Chicago. 



Moody. 3v. Braille 



°ater, ..alter, rarlus, the epicurean. 5v. NYPL 

Pease, Howard, Secret cargo. ! v. NYPL 

Ratzesberger, Anna. Cornel "belle; a toy of Bagdad, lv, Perkins, Juvenile fiction. 

Hideout, H. . Fern seed, ;Jv. NYPL riot ion. 

Rinehart, r.ary Roberts, Tish, the chronicles of her escapades and excursions, 

Albany, LC Fiction, 
Rosmon, Alice Grant. The young and secret. 4v. Chicago. Fiction. 

Russo, J.L. lomentary Italian grammar with vocabulary and index. 8v. No contrac I ions, 

Sedgwick, Anne Douglas, The old countess, 5v. Grade 2. Cincinnati, Portland. Fiction. 



7v. 






Tarkington, Booth, 



?he two Vanrevelo. 4v. 



LC# Nacrnnento. miction. 

Theodore Roosevelt's letters to his children. 2v. Joseph Bucklin Bishop, editor. 

Thirty years in the golden north, translated "by pauj. Selver v;ith a foreword by Karel Capek. 5v. 
Seattle. Travel. 

Union TJTsyer bookj Evening service for the sabbath, lv. Jewish Braille Library. 

Union prayer book: Horning service for the Sabbath, lv. Jewish Braille Library. 

Van Loon, Hendrik. Tolerance. 10v. Philadelphia. Non-fiction. 

Vestal, Stanley. Sitting Bull, champion of the rioux, a biography. 7v. Chicago. Phil- 
adelphia. 

Wagner, Richard. Siegfried; libretto with leading motives in music; second opera of the 
Rhine gold trilogy. 2v. NYPL 

Waller, Mary E, The windmill on the dune. 12v. Chicago, 

v/alpole, Hugh. All souls' night; a book of short stories, 
garner, Sylvia Townsend. We* fortune's maggot. 2v. NLB 

Wassermann, Jakob. Bula i .atari; das leben Stanleys. 6v. 

;hite, illiam Chapman. Llade in Russia* 2v. Chicago, Perkins, history, 
iddemer, largaret. The rose-garden husband. 3v. Albany, Chicago, Cleveland, LC, Phil- 
adelphia, Sacramento. 
illou^iby, llrn. Florence (Barrett) Li Lti.ouse keener at the end of west, lv, 

Willougiby, Barrett. Treasure islands of the . dst. lv. Detroit. Fiction. 



J .'LB, Perkins, Sacramento, 
bv. Sacranento. 

Sacramento, 



LC 



• 



* 



Harry Leon V?il3on 1867- 

Earry Leon 7ilson, American novelist and playwright, was born in Oregon, Illinois, 
on May 1, 1867, the son of Samuel and Adeline Kidder Wilson. lie attended the 1 cal 
public school but hated it and left at the age of fifteen, he said, to "live his own 
life." 

His father being publisher of one of the two weekly papers in Oregon, he worke-: as 
"a sort of printer's devil at odd times; inked the Washington )iand press, ran off things 
on the job press, folded papers every Wednesday, and typed," By the time he was twenty 
he had gone west to the Sierra Hcvada country as stenograph r to the men who were -ent 
there to write a life of Fremont. He lived in mining carats and playod poker with pro- 
fessional gamblers. 

"My first writing," says /il3on, "was sent to Puck about 168? from Denver. I sent 
the paper things from time to ti e for the net five years. Then - I -,;as in Omaha at 
the time - an offer came to join the staff. I couldn't believe it. But I went." 

For ten years from 1892 he lived in New York City, first as associate editor of 
Puck and then, after the death of H. C. Bunner In 1896, as editor. His first book, Jig 
Zag tales, appeared in 1896, when he wa3 twenty- nine, "'ilson' s nostalgia for the 'est 
increased until he decided, in 1902, that "the only way to get out of Hew York was to 
write a successful novel." He wrote The S enders, basing the story upon certain contrasts 
between Eastern and Western people that he had observer since coming to New York, and 
took the title suggested by Irving Bachellor a3 being superior to his own title, "The 
Third Generation." He secured an advance of two thousand dollars on the book, gait his 
job, married Hose O'Neill, the author and Illustrator, on June 7, 1902, and went to the 
mountains of Colorado, where he camped all summer beside a lake. 

The Spdnders was a successful novel, as was Lions of the Lord, the story of the 
Mormon trek to Salt Lake, which followed in 1903. Both books were ill istrated by Miss 
O'Neill, from whom Wilson v/as later divorced. 

About 1904 he met Booth Tarkington at the home of Julian Street. According to Street, 
"Tarkington's subtlety appealed to /Ilson no les3 than '/ilson' a robust and often sardonic 
comedy appealed to Tarkington. . . • and they became devoted friends." 

Commissioned by the theatrical managc3r George C. Tyler to collaborate in the writing 
of a play, Yilson and Tarkington went to Italy late in 1905 and spent the winter on the 
island of Capri, near Naples, in Flihu Vedder's villa. Here, says Julian Street, who 
went along with them, visitors continually dropped in upon the two autljors, and Tilson 
"developed a technique for entertaining itinerant males. Ignoring the Blue Grotto and the 
ruins of Villa Jovis, palace of the En eror Tiberius, he would take tliem to the Cafe 
Morgano for a study of the flora of Capri, with special reference to the vine, followed 
by postgraduate courses in the oroducts of Scotland, Cognac, and Rheins." 

During most of the succeeding three years, 1906-09, .'ilson live! in Paris, the only 
city he ever lived in contentedly, lie says. Tar ington nrvc!. street were t'.ere too, and 
in the last afternoons the three would gather at the &fe du Done in ! or.tparnasse; when 
they wished to give themselves a party the: would dine at the Restaurant a la Tour d*.-r~ent. 

In the little French town of Champlgny, southwest of Paris 4 where farkingtoB took a 
villa temporarily, the collaborators turned out their nost successfiil play, The i'an From 
Home. "I did nost of the work," says ,'ilson. "In fact, I did all of it. From start- 
to finish he never struck a note on the typewriter* ;ill he did v/as to sit around and snoke 
those giant cigarettes. He did, to be sure, outline the action, describe the characters 
and recite their speeches, but I had to tahe It all down and I even worL-ed in one speech 
of my own...." 

The Man from Home was first produced by George C. Tyler in Chicago in the fall of 1917, 
with the co-authors present. The comedy was so successful, says /ilson, "runninj Biz years 
with our first star, Bill Hodge, that .ye at once wrote same more plays, ten or a dozen, 
following our original schene of collaboration." But none of them achieved the popularity 
of The Man From Hone. 

Arthur Bartlett Maurice roports the next move in ,/ils n T s career: "Fighting all those 
plays to the footlights once more kept Mr. ^ilson around New York too much for his liking, 
so again, when op ortunity came, he b oke for the Test. He took four months in the Canadian 
Rockies, cleared his system of Broadway, and decided to stay ft. st. He wanted a camping 
place with an ocean in the front yard and mountains in the back. He started down the 
coast of North -America 1 oking for this and by now would have been "somewhere in Patagonia" 
if he had not Tound it in Carnal, California. " 



There, from 1912 to 1919, he wrote the books for which he is beat known: Bunker 
Bean, in which the hero does a number of startling and unusual things, one of then being 
the purchase of an Egyptian mummy supposed to have been himself in one of his previous 
incarnations; Ruggles of Red Gap, the tale of an impeccable English butler who brings 
old world culture to the North iimerican coisaunity; and Ma Pettengill, a group of eleven 
stories about the mistress of Arrowhead ranch. 

In 1922 cane Merton of the liovies, the story ofaa raw country youth who goes to 
Hollywood and displays such an innocent talent for over-acting hat he is nade the star 
of a cowboy oarody. This story was dramatized in 1925 by George 3. Kaufman and I -arc 
Connelly and achieved extraordinary success on the stage, starring Glenn Hu iter. Twice 
it was filmed in Hollywood. 

Wilson broke a silence of four years in 1929 withJLone Tree, the story of a rancher, 
and in 1931 he published Two Black Sheep, a tale of Hollywood* 

Thomas L. Masson writes: "Mr. /ilson has other qualities besides the talent of writing 
humor. Indeed his humor may be said to be a by-product. He is a novelist; he is a satir- 
ist. He is one of the few humorists in .america who have risen above the personal pronoun 

IT» ■ 

JL ... 

In his hey-day ''ilson had the reputation of a prankster and a wit. One tie he and 
Tarkingfcon abducted a strange man from a barroom and entertained him lavishly for several 
days in Indianapolis because he bore a resemblance to Edgar Allan Poe* It was Tilson who, 
looking for the first t e at the Grand Canyon, delivere 1 the famous line: "At last I 
know where to throw my old razor blades." 

i Wilson continues to live at Carmel, California, lie has married again. Ee says he 

has traveled around the world e cept for the stretch between Tripoli and • ingapore, but 
has never visited England because the authorities would not admit his bull pup without 
a six months' quarantine. He thinks. New York is the ugliest city in the world and he 
prefers country weeklies to all other newspapers. He is a member of the National Insti- 
tute of Arts and Letters* 



♦ 



THE BRAILLE BOOK REVIEW 
A Guide to Braille and Talking Book publications 
Published Monthly at the 
American printing House for the Blind 
1839 Frankfort Avenue 
Louisville, Kentucky 

Printed for 

The New York Public Lihrary 
Fifth Avenue and 42nd Street 
Hew York City 
(Henry F« Homes Fund) 



Volume 6 



Deceiiber, 1937 



Number 11 



+~~u\^- C-v-cuvX.c\ 



Contents 

y\o$JI ^^i^ uXv^a wu ^jw^c- 



xv 




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Braille Book Review, Decenher, 1927 2. 

Book Announcements 
(Books in this list are in Grade 2 unless otherwise noted) 

Baker, Ray Staimard. Adventures of David Grayson, 3v. BIA (Provided "b^ the U.S. Govern- 
ment) Contents: Adventures in friendship; Advent area in contentment; Great possescions. 
Friendly refreshing essays and sketches revealing love of the c untry-side and the sim- 
ple way3 of country life.^ 

Benet, Rosemary and tephen>\ A "book of Americans. Grade Ig-J To "be embossed. 

Bergson, Henri L. Two sources of norality and religion. 3v. APH (Provided "by the U.S. 
Government) This hook is too deep in essential wisdom, too wise with suggestions that 
seem to touch the subsoil of experience out of which philosophy grows, to be quarreled 
with on the g ounds of a point here or even of a total scheme. It is so rich ith his- 
torical, poetical and human illustration, so packed with repeated psychological subtle- 
ties and dreaming precisions, that to miss it is to miss, as Bergson says of the prophets 
and the Christian mystics, one of the voices of Life itself. 

Clemens, Samuel L. (Mark Twain). Roughing it. 4v. 1872 BIA (Provided by the U.S. Govern- 
ment) A personal narrtive of several years of vagabondizing in the iar est. 

Deming, Therese 0. and Albert v/hitman. Little Eagle; a story of Indian life. lv. Grade 1/ 
APH 

Eckstein, Gustav. Canary, the history of a family, lv. 1936 CPH (Provided "by the U.S. 
Government) Several years ago the author purchased a canary as a Christmas present for 
a friend and then discovered the present would he unwelcome. He kept the "bird and 
"bought another to keep it company, and let the "birds have their freedom in his labora- 

g. tory. As tine went on, more and more canaries joined the founders of the family and 

^ Dr. Eckstein became interested in their lives and customs. His hook is a delightful 
account of his observations of these canaries over a period of eleven years. 

Eddington, sir Arthur Stanley. Stars and atoms, lv. 1927 edition. NIB (Provided by the 
U.S. Government) The modern theory of the stars and the way it fits in with and makes 
use of the modern theory of the atom is a fascinating story however told. The author 
tells it with full vigour of a owerful and gifted imagination. 

Ford, Paul Leicester. The honorahle peter Stirling. 5v. 1894 CPH (Provided "by the U.S. 
Government) To show the need for men of hi^b type in political affairs is the purpose 
of this 8 tory of a young Harvard graduate who practices law in New York and enters 
municipal politics. 

Galsworthy, John. Escape; anjipisodic day in a prologue and two parts, lv. APH (Provided 
"by the U.S. Government ) 

Gordon, Caroline. None shall look back. 4v. CPH To he embossed. 

Ian, pseudonym. Housemaster, a novel. 2v. BIA (Provided by the U.S. Government) 
Mr. Donkin, senior headmaster of an English public school of the best type, was settled 
and happy in his bachelor ways of living when there descended upon hin three young 
nieces and their middle-aged aunt. Tlie effect upon the school and ,..r. Donkin was demor- 
alizing for a time, but far from hopeless in the Outcome. 

Hedin, Syen. a conquest of Tihet. MP To be embossed. 

Hogan, Inez. Nicoderaus and Ids little sister, pamphlet. Grade 1/ APH 

Homer. The Odyssey done into English prose by Samuel II. Butcher and Andrew Lang. 4v. 1928 
edition. NIB (Provided by the U.S. Government) This is decidedly the best prose 
translation. The most stirring episodes are given and the connecting story is told in 
an attractive way. 

James, Marquis. Andrew Jac .son; portrait of a president, aph To be embossed. 

Kastner, Erich. The missing mini at re; or, The adventures of a sensitive author. 2v. ABB 
(Provided by the U.S. Government) Girl versus gang of international thieves in a com- 
plex chase from Copenhagen to -Berlin. 

Lewis, Charles Lee. The romantic Decatur. 3v. CPH (Provided \ the U.S. Government) An 
American naval officer who ained distinction in the Tripolitan war, saw active service 
in the war of 1812 and wan killed in a duel with James Barron in 1820. 

Lien, Islarie. Tiny tales for tiny tots. lv. Grade 1/ APH 

Lindman lf ana albert hitman. Snipp, snapp, Snurr stories, lv. Grade 1. APR 

Link, Henry C. Return to religion. IDT To he embossed. 

Maclaren, Ian. a doctor of the old school. Grade 1-ry hmp To be emhossed. 



Hay, 



3. 

line, A. A. Christopher S >bin verses; "being "v/hen we were very young" and "Now we are 

six." 2v. Grade 1, iFB 
i,:oon, Mrs. Grace and Carl loon. Book of Hah-wee. pabphlet. Grade 3& APH 
Headers: Reading exercises "based on initial lessons from "The inston primer," compiled "by 

Marie Lien, Grade 1 Pa-nphlet AFB 
Remarque, Erich H« Three co.rades; translated from the German "by A../, heen. 4v. BIA 

(Provided "by the U.S. Government) Three German ex-30ldiers, none of them over thirty, 
in the year 1928 made a precarious living from a garage and car repair "business* They 
were comrades and shared their resources, and the advantages of their "beloved car, Karl. 
On one of their exc jrsions in yarl they met the girl pat, and all fell in love with her. 
But it was Ro"b"by who was completely her slave, and the story of their love and Pat* a 
struggle with tuberculosis and her death complete the story. 
Richards, Laura E. Tirra libra; rhymes old and new. 3*. Grade lg 2v. APH 
Schweitzer, Albert. The forest hospital at Lambarene. lv. CPH To be endorsed. 
Undset, Sigrid. The faithful wife; translated from the Norwegian by a. G. Chater. 3v. CPH 
(Provided by the U.S. Government) After sixteen years of happy married life, Nathalie 
Nordgaard learns that her husband, tho he still loves her, has become entangled with 
another woman and that there is t be a child. Nathalie consents to a divorce, and 
later accepts a former suitor as a lover, but when circumstances open the way to a recon- 
ciliation, she takes her husband back. 



Hand-copied Books 

(Unless otherwise noted these hand-copied books are in grade $§-* In borrowing these books 

^aders should write to the library that owns the book. The name of the library owning 

xhe book is given after each title, a list of the names of the libraries in their abbre- 
viated form is in the Braille Book Review for June.) 

Aldrich, Darrach. Red-headed school r.&'am. 5v. Indianapolis, fiction. 

Baldwin, Faith. Private duty. 6v. Indianapolis. 

Biggers, Marl D. Keeper of the keys. 6v. Indianapolis." 

Brown, v. A. Church and state in contemporary ianerica. 7v. NLB 

Brown, A. A. Life of prayer. Z v. NLB 

Carpenter, Helen K. \7histling in the dark. 5v# Indianapolis. 

Charnwood, Lord. Abraham Lincoln. 10v. NLB An English scholar has drawn upon all the 

sources and used them vith a clear historical perspective, producing a remarkable study. 

Corelli, i.:arie. Ardath. 14v. HLB Fiction. 

Flexner, Hortense. This stubborn root and other poems, lv. Jewish Braille Library. 

Fox, John, Jr. Kentuckians. 2v. NLB Fiction. 
- Gallico, Paul. The flood, lv. TTLL Fiction. 

Voiding, Louis. Day of atonement. bv» Jewish Braille Library. The story of Leah and Eli, 

4p Russian Jews and their son, Reuben. Deals with the pasr ionate diabh between the Christian 
and the Jew. oJUa^ 

Grey, Zane. elections from "Tales of lonely trails." 3v. Indianapolis. 

Hill, C.M# Selections from "world's groat religious poetry." lv. Indianapolis. 

Lea, Fanny H. Summer people. 3v. NLB Fiction. 

Levin, L'eyer. '?he golden mountain. 6v. Jewish Braille Library. Legends of the miraculous 
deeds of Rabbi Israel whose piety and wisdom enabled him to overpower the Evil Spirits. 

Loft 8, florah. Here was a man. 4v. irYPL Recent fiction. 

Maugham, Somerset. Favorite short stories, llv. NLB 

Mendelsohn, 5. Felix. The Jew laughs, lv. Jewish Braille Library, writers of long ago 
observe that the European Jew illustrates everything he tells by clever story or anec- 
dote. This characteristic has been transplanted and flourishes on American soil. 

Philipson, David. Old European Jewries. 4v. Jewish ^raille Library. A study of the official- 
ly instituted Ghetto. 

Richmond, Grace S. Under the Christinas stars, lv. NLB Fiction. 

Roe, E.P. Knight of the XlXth century. 8v. NLB Fiction. 

Sears, Edward H. Zatthu. 9v. NLB Religion. 

Shoemaker, S.M. Religion that works. 2v. NLB 

Toksvig, Signe. The life of Hans christian Andersen. 5v. NYPL Told by a sympathetic and 
understanding writer, should be appreciated by teachers. 

Watson, John. God's message to the human soul. 3v. NLB Religion. 









-_ 



4. 

Wood, Mrs, H. Jiast Lynne, 15v, NLB Fiction. 

WXi#it, Harold Bell, Helen of the old house, 6v, Indianapolis, Fiction. 

Zweig, Arnold, Claudia, 3v, Jewish Braille Library, The story of a sensitive Oeman 

girl of the upper classes during the tine of her courtship and her early married life. 



( 



; 



Talking Books 
(These "books are supplied by the U«r» Government) 

Fowler, illiara W« The city-state of the Greeks and Romans. 15 records. A discussion 
of the origin and nature of the political organization of the ancient world, 

Morton, II, V, In the steps of the I aster, 16 records, Recorded In England. Bible in 
hand the author travelled thru the Holy Land searching out the sites associated with 
Jesus and his followers. This account of his trip is written in reverent and earnest 
fashion, 

rhaw, G,B, St, Joan, 5 records; Typhoon, by Joseph Conrad, 4 records. Recorded in 

England. St, Joan is a fine and moving interpretation of the liaid of Orleans, offer- 
ing a purely rationalistic explanation of her powers, sweeps aride all the super- 
natural elements, but gives a reverent presentation of Joan and is remarkably fair 
in the treatment of her judges. The Typhoon is the tale of a ship's battle against 
a furious China sea hurricane, hile the characters are well drawn Conradfts greatest 
success lies in recounting the storm* s fury. 

Unique I ervice From the Indiana ? tate Library 
^The Indiana State Library announces a new and distinctive feature in its service for the 
blind. From the vast store of unanalyzed embossed periodicals which has accumulated in 
that library during the past several years, material is being carefully selected, classi- 
fied according to suhject, and lied for ready U3e. This; project, although considerably 
less than one year old, already offers a comparatively wide range of subjects, and owing 
to the fact that most of this xiterial has already been condensed, it is possible for a 
file with only a few entries to erfbody many facts on a specific subject. Therefore, the 
reader is able to find the information he desires without extensive reading, which is 
indeed a boon to the tactual reader. The Library is supplying the Indiana tate School 
for the Blind with a complete card index of material available and shall "be r;lad to 
extend this service to other Institutions upon request . For further details of this ser- 
vice, you are deferred to Muriel I ercer J'.eyer, Librarian, Service for the Blind, Indiana 
State Library, Indianapolis, Indiana. 

Full Gospel Magazine 
The Full Gospel Publishing Company for the Blind will resume the publication of their r.ag- 
4^zine, The Full Gospel Monthly, begiming with January, 1928, The nr.gazine will contain 
the text and a comment on the Inter at ional Sunday School Lessons. Those wishing to receive 
this iif gazine should write s at or.ee. Address: Full Gospel pal lishing Co, for the Blind, 
431 Delaney St., Orlando, Fin, 



' ! 



e 



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THE FIRST AHTI-.7AR PLAY, BY B HTH HAMILTON, TAKEN IN HOT FRO THE : ATURDAY BEVIEW OF LITERATES 

The greatest piece of anti-wax literature there is in the world was written 2,35'> years 
ago. This is a statement worth a thought or two* nothing since, no description or denuncia- 
tion of war's terrors and futilities, ranks with the "Trojan omen," which was ,jut upon the 
Athenian stage "by Euripides in the year 416 B.C. In that faraway age a man saw with perfect 
clarity what war was, and wrote what he taw in a play of surpassing power, and then - nothing 
happened. No one was won over to his side - no hand of eager disciples took up his idea and 
went preaching it to a war-ridden orld. That superlatively efficient war-machine, Home, de- 
scribed "by one of her own historians as having fought continuously for eight hundred years, 
went on to greater and greater ef iciency, with never n glimmer from Euripides to disturb 
her complacency. In the long annals of literature no writer is recorded who took over his 
point of view, A few ofcjoctors to war are kn wn to us# They crop out sporadically through 
the ages, "but rarely and never with iuripides's deliberate intention of sho ing war up for wnat 
it is* And except for Chri3t, to whom non-resistance was fundamental, we do not know of any- 
one else who dishelieved in violence as a means of doing good. None of Christ^ so—called 
followers followed Him there until co poratively modern times. Not one medieval saint stands 
out to oppose the thousands of sai ntly believers in the holiness of this war or that. One 
soldier there was in the early days of Christianity, a simple, uneducated man, who refused to 
fight when he was converted, hecau.se, a3 he explained, Christ did not approve of men killing 
each other. But he was easily silenced - and the church never denounced his executioners. 
He never came near to "being nade a saint* His very naae, I aximian, is known only to the 
curious. That was doctrine too dangerous for the Fathers of the Church. Christians refuse 
to fight? Rather set up a cross as the tanner of a triumphant army, conquering under that 
andard, killing in His name. 

The men of religion, along with the men of letters, passed "by, unseeing, the road 
Euripides had opened, and each usually vied with tiie other in glorifying and magnifying 
nolle, heroic, and holy war. 

Consider the greatest of all, ' hakespeare. Be never "bothered to think war through. 
Of course, that was not his way with anything. He had another method. Did he "believe in 
"Contumelious, "beastly, mad-"brain f d war"? or in "pride, pomp and circumstance of glorious 
war"? He says as much on the one side as on the other. It is not possible to know what 
Shakespeare really thought afcout war, if he really thought ahout it at all. always that 
disconcerting power of imagination "blocks the way t our knowledge of him. He saw eye to 
eye with Henry on one page and with, the citizens of Harfleur on the next, and what he saw 
when he looked only for himself, he did not care to record. 

In our western world Euripides stands alone. He understood what the world has only 
"begun to understand. 

"The "burden of the valley of v eion, " wrote Isaiah, when he alone knew what could save 

#s world from ruin. To perceive an overwhelmingly important truth of which no one else sees 
glimmer, is loneliness such as few even in the long history of the world can have had to 
suffer. But Euripides suffered it for the greater part of his long life. The valley of 
vision was his ahiding place. 

He was the youngest of the three Greek tragic poets, hut only a few years younger 
than Sophocles, who, indeed, survived him. The difference "between the two men was great. 
Each had the keen discernment and the profound spiritual perception of the supreme artist. 
Each lived and suffered through the long drawn-out war, Which ended in the crushing defeat of 
Athens, and together they watched the human deterioration h ought ahout during those years. 
But what they saw was not the sane. T.ophoclea never dreamed of a world in which such things 
could not he. To him the way to he enahled to endure what was happening, the only way for a 
man to >ut life through no matter hat hap ened, was to face facts unwaveringly and accent 
them, to perceive clearly and hear steadfastly the "burden of the human lot, which is as it 
is and never will he different. To look at the world thus, with profundity but In tran- 
quillity of spirit, without "bitterness, has "been given to few, and to no other writer so 
completely as to ophocles. 

But Euripides saw clearest of all not what is, "but what might he. fo rehels are made* 
Great rehels all. know the valley of v sion. They see possibilities* this evil and that 
ended; human life transformed; eople good and happy. "And there shall he neither sorrow 
nor crying, nor any more ain: for the former things are passed away." The clarity with 
which they see "brings them anguish; they have a pasrion of longing to make their vision 



/' 



a reality. They feel, like a personal experience, the ^ant agony of the world Not ™„/ 
among the greatest stand higher than Euripides in* this aristocrat of h^anit"' * 
oophocles said, «n thing is wrong which gods command." huripides said, "If 















NOBEL PRIZE. FROM THE PUBLISHERS' WEEKLY 

Roger Martin du Gard, French, novelist, is the winner of the 1937 Nobel prize 
for literature. The announcement of the literature, physics and chemistry awards was 
made in Stockholm on November 11th. 

Roger Martin du Gard is not very well known to American readers. Only a small 
portion of his work has "been published in translation in the United States. In 1926 
Boni and Liveright published the first two volumes of his cycle "The Thibaults, " in a 
translation "by Madeleine Boyd. "Les Thibaults, " which is considered du Gard's most 
important work, is a series of novels about a French family, volume 1 of the Boni 
and Liveright edition contained "The Grey Note Book" and "The Penitentiary"; Volume 
2 contained "The Springtime of Life." 

Roger Martin du Gard, who is a member of the board of the widely-read French 
literary publication Les Nouvelles Litteraires, was born at Neuillylsur-Seine in 1881. 
He studied at the University of Paris and the Ecole des Chartes, and became an archi- 
vist and paleographer. His first published work was a monograph about the "Abbaye de 
Gumieges." His first novel, "Devenir," was published in 1909. Four years later he 
published "Jean Barois," an important novel about the state of French youth in the 
period from 1900 to 1910, with much attention to the influence of the Dreyfus Case on 
the young people of France. He began to publish the series of "Les Thibaults* 1 in 1922. 

M. du Gard is married and has one daughter. He lives at 10 rue du Dragon, 
in Paris. He is a Knight of the Legion of Honor. The Nobel prize is the first lit- 
erary award he has received. 

The Publishers' Weekly understands that several New York publishers are at 
present negotiating for the rights to publish the work of Roger Martin du Gard in 
America. 



/ 






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N0.7R281 

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FO R SPEEDWAY FASTENER 
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Speed Products Company. Inc. 

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