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Full text of "Breeder and sportsman"

f 636.1 B74~ 



-45 



ACCESSION 



147839 



NOT TO BE TAKEN FROM THE LIBRARY 



FORM NO. 37 2M-2-20 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

California State Library Califa/LSTA Grant 



http://www.archive.org/details/breedersportsma451904sanf 




VOL XXV. No. 1. 

36 GEARY STREET. 



147839 SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JULY 2, 1904. 



SUBSCRIPTION 
THREE DOLLARS A YEAR 



-KV3lo.\ 



74 



+5 




(rue £rccoer cms Sportsman 



[JULY 2, 1904 



AT 



O'KANE TRACK HARNESS 



Custom Made Flexible Saddle, California Girth, Open or Blind B'iile, Long Martingale, 

ALL WEARING PARTS RAWHIDE LINED. 

Horse Boots, Hobbles, Clothing, Etc. 



26 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE, SAN FRANCISCO. send FOR catalogue. 

SALINAS DRIVING CLUB 

Race Meetins 

Salinas, CaL, Sep!;. 14, 15, 16 and 17 

Entries Close Tuesday, July 26, 1904 



LIST OF EVENTS. 

Horses Must Be Named With Entry. 

IA1KRS. 



1 — Monterey County Chamber of Coin- 

mrrrr Stftk<-« f..r BlSQ OlftM S600 

2 -GrMn C1»mi. for horses without rec- 

ord- 300 

3 -For honei eligible to the 2:lOclai» 300 
4 — For hones eligible to the 2: 15 class. 300 

TROTTEB3. 

3 -Salloa* DrlTluc Clab Stakes, for 

■:B0 trotters 8GOO 

fl For trotter* of the 2:1 fi class 300 

7— For tireen Cla** trotters, or horses 

wlthoDt records 30O 



DISTRICT RACES. 

8— District (Monterey, San Benito. Santa Cruz 
and San Luis Obispo counties) Three-^ ear- 
Old Stake, for trotting colts tbree years old 
or under, 810 to accompany nomination July 
1st. $15 August 1st and $io September 1st, 
with 850 added by the Club. 

9— District Two-Year-Old Trot conditions and 
added money the same as in No. 8. 

10— Mixed Race, Trotters and Facers, 
2:25 class, for horses owned in Mon- 
terey County S150 

11— Mixed Trottlnc and Pacing Race 
for Members of the Driving Club, 
owners to drive 150 



Entrance 5% and h"„ from money winners. 

Two bones may be entered by one owner in any race on one entrance fee, but not more than one 
can t>c started. 

Races will he arranged so as to give horses starting In more than one race at least 
one day between starts 

All Stakes are for the amount guaranteed— no more, no less. 

Stakes not Oiling satisfactorily to the Board of Directors may be declared off. 

Member National Trotting Association. 

Send for Entry Blanks and address all communications to 

J. D. KALAR. Sec'y, Salinas, Cal. 



GUARANTEED STAKES 

OREGON STATE FAIR 

Salem, Oregon, Sept. 12 to 17, 1904, 

ENTRIES CLOSE JULY 2, 1304. 

2:11 Trot, CAPITAL CITY STAKES, 2 in 3, $1000 
3-year-old Trot, WEBFOOT STAKES, - 500 



Conditions 



t of stoke and 5 per oent oddltlonal from money winners, 

cnt July ii when home must be named, and 3 per cootSopttmt»-r 1. 

not winning a heat in three shall not start 

Lor mora star Mrs, th»^n he munt win a heat in four or go to 

. i -i/ht to a hhnrc of the stake according to their 

'■; niont In 

I Dl '• li WftUt-OTOT. 

money paid In, to be dli hied Til per cent to 

< ill bo entitled to Ural and 

ll lad 10 moro than ono monoy Other 

il Trotting Asocial Ion, of which this association Is a member, to 



I 

1 




W 



W. H. DOWNING. Pres. 



WYLIE A. MOORES, Sec'y, 

SAl.F.M. OltKi.ON. 



EXCURSION RATES 

ST. LOUIS. 



Round Trip Excursion Tickets to 
St. LOUIS and CHICAGO on sale 
July 1, 2, 7, 8, 13, 14, and other 
dates in August, September and 
October at the following rates: 

TO ST, LOUIS $67.50 

TO CHICAGO (?££?& st'i-SK) $72.50 

RETURN LIMIT three months. 

|5(8j StOD-Overs allowed on both 

going and returning trip .. . 

I THESE RATES GOOD ON OVERLAND LIMITED 

Ask about the Through Tourist 
&m Cars direct to the Exposition. 

613 MARKET STREET 

I SOUTHERN PACIFIC 



CAMPBELL'S HORSE EOOT REMEDY best" remedy 

EVER USED ON HORSES' FEET. 

IT PENETRATES and DRIES IN quiokly and DOES 
NOT GUM and FILL UP THE PORES like tar and oil 
compounds. It Is the GREATEST REMEDY ever used to 
remove SORENESS and FEVER from the foot, and makes It 
possible to get good servioes out of a horse working on hard 
and hot pavements 

It gives natural nourishment to the foot and incites a 
rapid, healthy growth— ALL DRYNESS AND BRITTLE- 
NESS quiokly disappears. 

QUARTER CRACKS and SAND CRACKS are rapidly 
grown out when directions given in our booklet are followed. 

It is a SURE CURE for CORNS, CONTRACTED FEET 
and NAIL "WOUNDS If directions are followed. 

It PRESENTS SOUND FEET FROM BECOMING UN- 
SOUND and GROWS a TOUGH. STRONG. ELASTIC WALL 
and HEALTHY FROG— A FOOT WHICH "WILL STAND 
WORK on racecourses. 

Many of the best owners and trainers state that for traok 
work nothing equals it. In many oases horses have reduced 
their reoords several seconds, due to its use. 

It is a CER1 AIN CURE for THRUSH and SCRATCHES 

We Guarantee That It Will Do Wbat We Claim 
and Will Refund Money If It Falls. 

PRICKS:-Quarts, *1 00; Half-Gallon, $1.75; Gallon, 13 00; 
'2K-Gallon, t5.S0; Five-Gallon, 810.00. 

Books giving full directions for Its use and much valuable information as to shoeing are supplied 
free. 

Don't fad to read "ad." giving information concerning Campbell's Iodoform Gall Cure In next 
lasue of this paper. It Is the best and because of its merits Is rapidly displacing all others. 

JAS. B. CA/IPBELL&CO.. Manufacturers, 412 W.Hadlson St., CHICAGO, ILL 

Sold by all Dealers in Hurness and Turf Goods. If not In stock ask them to write any Jobber fori 




ADDITIONAL STAKE 

Pleasanton Fair and Racing Association 

2:16 CLASS TROTTING STAKE, $500, Guaranteed. 
ENTRIES TO CLOSE FRIDAY. JDLY 15, 1901 

•Ikkr. owed to namo 

FRED E. ADAMS, Secretary, 

ill LSAMTOH, i Al.. 



c 



PALACE HOTEL, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA. 



TOURISTS and TRAVELERS will, now, with difllculty rocognize the famous COURT 
Into which for rears carriages havo driven. This space of over a quarter 

of an aero baa recently, by the addition of very handsome furniture, rugs, chandeliers 
and tropical plants, bcon convened into a lounging room— the FINEST IN THE 
WORLD. 

fcDPIRE PARLOR-tho PALM ROOM, furnished In Cerise, with Billiard and 

Lablee for the ludles— tho LOUIS XV PARLOR the LADIES WRITING ROOM 

and numorous other modern Improvements, togothor with tho unexcelled Cuisine and the 

Most Convenient Location in tho City— all add much to the ever Increasing popularity 

of this most famous HOTEL. 



July 2, 1904J 



®he gveeiiev cmfc gtpimsntcm 



THE WEEKLY 



BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

F W. KELLEY, PROPRIETOR. 

Turf and Sporting Authority of the Pacific Coast. 

— OFFICE — 

36 QEARY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

P. O- BOX 2300.1 
TELEPHONE: Black 586. 



San Francisco, Saturday, July 2, 1904 
Dates of Harness Meetings. 

CALIFORNIA. 

Pleasanton July 2? <° July 3° 

San Jose (Breeders) Aug. 3 to Aug. 6 

Vallejo Aug- 11 to Aug. 13 

Santa Kosa (Breeders) Aug. 17 to Aug. 20 

Cal. State Pair, Sacramento Aug. 2-2 to Sept. 3 

Salinas Sept. 14 to Sept. IT 

Hauford Oct. 10 to 15 

Tulare Oct. 17 to S3 

NORTH PACIFIC. 

Everett Aug. 29 to Sept. 3 

Vancouver, B. C Sept. 3 to Sept. 5 

Whatcom Sept. 5 to Sept. 10 

Salem Sept. 12 to Sept. 17 

Seattle Sept. 19 to Sept. 24 

North Yakima Sept. 25 to Oct. 1 

Victoria B. O Sept. 27 lo Oct. 1 

New Westminster, B. C Oct 3 to Oct. 8 

Spokane Oct, 3 to Oct. 8 

Walla Walla Oct. 10 to Oct. 15 

Boise Oct. 17 to Oct. 22 

GRAND CIRCUIT. 

Detroit July 25 to July 30 

Buffalo Aug. 1 to Aug. 6 

Empire City Aug. 8 to Aug. 13 

Brighton Beach Aug. 15 to Aug. 20 

Readville Aug. 22 to Aug. 27 

Providence Aug. 29 to Sept. 3 

Hartford ... Sept. 5 to Sept. 10 

Syracuse — Sept. 12 to Sept. 17 

Columbus Sept. 19 to Sept. 24 

Cincinnati Sept. 26 to Oct. 1 

Memphis Oct. 17 to Oct. 27 



ANEW STAKE has been opened by the Pleasanton 
Association. It is for 2:16 class trotters, and $500 
is guaranteed. Entries will close July loth. 



THE THREE-YEAR-OLDS that are being shaped 
up for the Occident, Stanford and Breeders 
Futuritv Stakes this year have been showing well at 
the different tracks. While there are many fast ones, 
we have not yet heard of one that we think is certain 
to lower the record of the stake this year. The 
record may be beaten but the probability is that a 
colt that can trot three heats in 2:1S will be so close to 
first money that the colt that beats him will have to 
be driven to his limit. 



THE SALINAS MEETING should receive the sup- 
port of every horseman in Caliiornia this year if 
it is possible for him to attend. The Driving Club 
there has arranged a generous list of purses for a 
four days' meeting which will open September 14th. 
The State Fair will close September 3d, and Salinas 
will be the next point where harness racing is held. 
Hollister may follow Salinas and then the Hanford 
and Tulare meeting will take place just prior to a big 
meeting to be given in Los Angeles. Entries to the 
Salinas races close July 26th. 



SIMON H. SEYMOUR, the well known capitalist 
and horseman of this city, met with a sudden 
death in Lake county last Saturday. It is believed 
that a stroke of apoplexy was the indirect cause of his 
death. He left the hotel at Bartlett Springs, where 
he was spending the summer, to walk to Gas Springs, 
a mile distant. The following day his body was found 
in the creek and it is supposed that he was seized with 
a stroke of apoplexy while stooping to get a drink. 
Mr. Seymour was a native of Germany and 75 years 
of age. He came to California in 1852 and worked 
himself up from an humble position of bellboy in the 
old Cosmopolitan Hotel, then located at Bush and 
Sansome streets, to a position of wealth and promi- 
nence in the community. He is credited with haviDg 
left an estate worth in the neighborhood of 8750,000' 
most of which was made through the management of 
the Russ House and in real estate investments. He 
secured the lease and management of the Russ House 
in 1868 and continued in charge of the hotel until 1891. 



Mr Seymour was an ardent lover of road driving and 
was a familiar figure to all who enjoy that pleasure on 
the San Francisco drives. He at one time owned tha* 
splendid stallion Seymour Wilkes 2:084 that is becom. 
ing one of the most popular sires in California. 



Meek Estate Sale. 



Terms— One Year 83. Six Months SI. 75, Three Months 81 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money anould be sent by postal order, draft or by registered letter 
addressed to F. W. Kelley, 38 Geary St., San Francisco. Cal. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's name and 
address, not necessarily for publication, but as a private guarantee 
of good faith. 



Owing to several reasons, among which are the 
fact that many people are out of the city at the 
present time and there is not a heavy demand for 
colts and fillies aged three years and under the sale 
held by Fred H. Chase & Co., last Tuesday night, was 
not a record breaker, although fair prices were re- 
ceived for quite a number of the youngsters sold. The 
average was $100 per head, yearliogs and all included. 
A two-year-old bay filly by Welcome, dam by 
Richards Elector sold for $100, which was the price 
also paid for gelding of the same age by Welcome out 
of Linda by Hawthorne. A bay filly two years old, 
by William Harold out of a mare by Direct brought 
$200, one by the same sire out of a Grand Moor mare 
went for $150, and another out of Leonora by Lustre 
brought $125. 

The three-year-olds brought $100 or over in nearly 
every instance, although mar y were 6hort bred. One 
by Welcome out of Directress by Direct brought $250 
and was purchased by S. B. Wright of Santa Rosa. 
James Hill paid $200 for a filly by William Harold out 
of a mare by Nutwood Wilkes. 

Rose K., a large brown three-year-old filly, own 
sister to Robert I. 2:08| was consigned to the sale by 
Green Meadow Stock Farm. She brought $325 and 
was purchased by J. Hill. 

P. J. Williams offered a two-year-old bay colt by 
Monterey out of Kitty Fox byPancoast. This filly 
was purchased by Mr. E. C. Chase of this city at a 
bid of $250. 

Death ot Thos. J. Vail. 

The following is from an obituary notice written by 
W. T. Chester, which appeared in the last issue of the 
Trotter and Pacer: 

Thomas Jefferson Vail ended a long, busy, useful, 
and, in one way, conspicuous life, by-peacefully closing 
his eyes on the present at the Bruce Private Hospital, 
Hartford, Conn., Sunday, June 20th. By reason of 
strength — strength of constitution — he had passed 
three mile-stones beyond the fourscoie Biblical limit. 

Thomas J Vail was born in Troy, N. Y , February 
12, 1821, but when he was six weeks old his parents, 
Dr. Ira Vail and Mrs. Pamela (Flagler) Vail, moved 
to Louisville, Ky., in which city the father was en- 
gaged in the practice of medicine for many years. 

The National Trotting Association was formed in 
1867 at Providence, R. I. Thomas J. Vail had retired 
from active business then, and was possessed of 
leisure. At the initial meeting his was the governing 
mind. Mr. Longstreet was the first secretary, but 
was contented with clericsl duties, and the man 
from Hartfo rt d was the one to whom all concerned in 
the important movement looked for counsel. Of the 
N. T. &.. we may say with Longfellow: 

"We know what master laid its keel " 

It was laid by the energy and brains of Thomas 
J. Vail. 

In 1870 he became secretary of the organization, 
and the methods which he introduced have been fol- 
lowed, in the main, ever since. In this capacity he 
served for seventeen years. 



A Result ot Inbreeding. 

A Cleveland correspondent of the Kentucky Stock 
Farm sayB: Guy WilkeB 2:15J, son of George Wilkes, 
the greatest of all speed progenitors, lies buried at W. 
J. White's Two Minute Stock Farm, near Cleveland. 
It was a curious coincidence that when there occurred 
the most sensational display of the res jits of inbreed- 
ing ever known on a race track, it should have hap- 
pened within almost a stone's throw of Guy Wilkes' 
grave, and that it was his blood that furnished the 
incident. The winners of the first two races at Roe_- 
port June loth trace to Guy Wilkes no less than five 
times in the first three generations. The colt John 
McEwen has a double cross, and Donald Wilkes has a 
triple infusion of Guy Wilkes blood. John McEwen 
was raised and developed by Harry Stinson, a trainer 
at the Glenville track. He is four years old, and was 
sired by Dr. John, son of Oro Wilkes 2:11 dam by Cobb 
Wilkes 2:18 by Gay Wilkes. The dam of Dr. John 
was Deborah 2:2U by Sable Wilkes. Last year Stin- 
son drove John McEwen, a three-year-old, trial of 
2:114. Donald Wilkes, winner of the second race, is a 
son of Alta Vista, who was got by Guy Wilkes, and 
his dam was a daughter of Sable Guy by Sable Wilkes, 
son of Guy Wilkes and dam by Guy Wilkes. This is 
Inbreeding with a vengeance, but it is a success, 
Donald Wilkes being pronounced one of the best side- 
wheelers seen hereabouts in some time. Donald 
Wilkes was turned over to Vance Nuckols for cam- 
paigning purposes just before the start of Wednes- 
day's race. 



The Crowley Stake. 

The conditions of the side stake suggested bv Mr. 
T. J. Crowley of the Pacific Coast Trotting Horse 
Breeders Association have been formulated and are 
here given. The stake has been named for the 
author of the suggestion, although that gentleman 
did net desire any such honor or notoriety, and only 
yielded when it was agreed that the stake should, if 
repeated, be given the name of the owner of the 
winner of each previous stake. 

The Crowley Stake, a. side stake of $25 each for trot- 
ting and pacing foals of]904 that were entered or sub- 
stituted ana will start in the three-year-old divisions of 
the Breeders Futurity in 1907. All mo ey paid in on 

r„«"™ft' 0al 5- t0 - b - edlTidta am ^g tnose starling in 
the .rotting division, and all money paid in on pacers 
to be divided among those that start in the pacing 

inlTX; B M ° ne y s , diTided 75 and 25 Per cent and to 
go to the first and second horses in this side stake, 
according to their positions in the final summary of 
each race. In case all those in the side stake should 
be distanced in the first heat of either of the regular 
events, they shall start in another race, best two 
heats in three, on the same day, to decide the money 
winners Entrance to the side stake $25 each. The 
money to be deposited in some reputable bank, to 
remain at interest until the stake is trotted. Entries 
close Monday, August 1st, with F W Kellev Secre- 
tary of the P C. T. H. B. A. kelley, becre- 

So that there will be no misunderstandingin regard 
to this side stake we will state that it is a side issue 
and not a part of the regular Futurity. It is like a 
side bet between owners of colts that start iu the 
regular stake. It may be that none of the colts en- 
tered in this side stake will win any part of the regu- 
lar stake. To illustrate, let us suppose there are ten 
starters in the trotting division of the Breeders 
Futurity, of which four have been entered in the 
side stake. These four may all be outside the money 
in the Futurity, but their positions in the final sum- 
mary of the race will decide which are entitled to the 
money in the side stake. Suppose there were 300 
original entries to the side stake— a total of 87500 
Even though none of the four were inside the money 
in the main stake they would still be racing for that 
thousand dollars and the one that stood best in the 
summary would win $5625 and the second would get 
$1875. This would make the race one of the most in- 
teresting events ever trotted. To make it perfectly 
clear we append a summary of a hypothetical race 
which we think will be easily understood by every 
reader: 

Pacific Breeders Futurity of 1907— Trotting Division. 

A.baycolt , , , 

B.brownfilly "" 5 5 5 

C.graycolt .'. tt % 

D.blackcolt 1 t 2 

E.grayfilly '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'..'. i I i 

F.bayally ? f = 

G.blackcolt 777 

H,roancolt .'..".'.'...I..' 8 S 8 

Now it may happens that the last four in this sum- 
mary were named in the Crowley side stake, but the 
first four were not. The money awards would there- 
fore be as follows: 

Futurity— A $1000, B $500, C $250, D $100. 

Crowley Stake— E $5625, F $1875. 

If, however, the winner of the Futurity wasentered 
in the Crowley Stake his winnings would be $6250, 
quite a small fortune. 

One can readily imagine the interest that would be 
aroused in a contest of this kind. Entry blanks will 
be sent to all those having entries in the Breeders 
Futurity No. 4, and it is hoped there will be a liberal 
entry to the Crowley stake 



Mr. Tranter Joins Fasig-Tipton Co. 

The following letter received this week from Lex- 
ington is self explanatory: 

To THE PUBLIC: — The undersigned, joint owners 
of the firm operating under the name of The Tranter- 
Kenney Company, beg to announce that by mutual 
agreement the existence of that company will termi- 
nate on July 1, 1904, existing after that date solely 
for the purpose of closing such business as may be un- 
settled at that time. 

On July 1st. Mr. Tranter will become associated 
with the Fasig-Tipton Company of New York City, 
and official announcement of that fact will be mailed 
from the office of that company. 

Mr. Kenney will continue in the business under his 
own name, following the same policy that has been 
followed in the past by the Tranter-Kenney Co. Due 
announcement of his plans will be made public. 

Thanking the public generally for the cordial sup- 
port that has been given us, we are respectfully, 
J. Tranter 
Frank P. Kenney. 



Wonderful Liniment tor Rheumatism. 



Victob, Mon , Jan. 25, 1903. 
The Lawrence-Williams Co., Cleveland, O.: 

I have been using Gombault's Caustic Balsam for fifteen years 
for rheumatism and neuralgia. It is a wonderful liniment. 

Bert Nelson. 



GTtte gveeocv anif gftMnrterocm 



[JULY 2, 1904 




sMHV 




JOTTINGS. 



In the Sacramento Union of Sunday la9t the fol- 
lowing paragraph appeared in the account of the 
meeting held in that city the day before by the 
Directors of the State Agricultural Society : 

B. \V. Cavaoaugh appeared before the Board and 
said that if the society intended to have any running 
racee at the coming fair tho Directors would have to 
take home decided steps to induce horse owners at 
Seattle to bring their stock down, and in order to do 
this it would be necessary to send an agent to that 
point to induce horse owners to come here. He said 
that the idea was prevalent that there would be no 
meeting here this year and in consequence horse 
owners up North were making no preparations to 
come. He also said that it would be necessary to pro- 
cure a cut rate in railroad transportation, and that 
It would be necessary to have an agent on the ground 
to see that all the horses shipped down were in con- 
dition to run. 

In Monday's issue of the same journal there ap- 
peared the following in regard to this matter: 

At Saturday 's meeting of the Directors of the State 
Agricultural Society a suggestion was made by B. W. 
Cavanaugh that an agent be employed to go to 
Seattle to arrange for bringing a big bunch of run- 
ning horses to this city for the State Fair meet. The 
booking privilege has been considered worth from 
$12,000 to $15,000 to the society each year, and before 
books can be made horses must be in the paddock to 
run. 

It is not probable that the society will send a man 
to Seattle, but it is likely that they will delegate 
Johnnie Bronner, who is now in the north, to act for 
them. 

A gentleman who is thoroughly conversant with 
racing matters and with the problem the directors of 
the society are called upon to solve, yesterd ay said : 

"There must be at least 150 running horses in the 
paddock to insure a good meeting. Most of the run- 
ning horses are in Seattle, and the racing season runs 
there until about the time our fair opens. A week 
after our fair opens the Oregon circuit begins, and 
unless somebody sees to it, no horses would be here 
and the Sacramento racing season would lack for 
bangtails in the different events. 

"The men who own the horses are always broke. 
That is their usual condition. They cannot bring 
their horses down herefrom Seattle if they want to 
do so ever bo bad. Last year Caesar Young and his 
bookmakers bought the racing privilege, and arranged 
to have the horses that had started at the Seattle 
meet brought to this city. They got railroad rates, 
paid the transportation, reserved stalls here, with the 
understanding that they should be paid from the 
winnings of the various horses. That, I understand, 
was done. When a horse won the bookmakers drew 
down the amount of the owner's indebtedness from 
the society. 

"But the booking privilege has not yet been sold 
and will not be sold until about the middle of July, 
and the bookmakers cannot go ahead and arrange for 
bringing the horses now in Seattle to this city. Some- 
body must look after the interests of the society until 
the booking privilege shall have been disposed of, and 
it is necessary to have an agent on the ground." 

If the above does not show beyond every shadow of 
a doubt that running racing at the California State 
Fair has deteriorated to an ordinary cheap gambling 
game, then there is no virtue in evidence. What are 
these running horses, that steps must be taken to 
bring them to Sacramento free of charge, so that the 
"skindicate" may have something on which to 
base a bid for the booking privilege? Is the Cali- 
fornia State Agricultural Society so hard up for 
material with which to make a race program that it 
mult send to Seattle for several car loads of "skates" 
with which to edify and entertain the Californians 
and others who may visit the State Fair this year? 
It is not probable, and those who think tho State 
Board of Agriculture has no other mission than mak- 
ing a two weeks holiday each year for a lot of book- 
makers will doubtless have their minds disabused of 
■uch a thought by the time the fair opens. A big 
list ol barnesB race entries has been received and 
fifteen of the advertised events ordered closed. These 
with the two trotting stakes — the Occident and Stan- 
ford—will make a program of racing that is good 
enough for any State Fair, and if there are no run- 
ning races at all the harness races will furnish 
lit enti rl.lnment for all who attend. Three 
harness races each day for a week can bo given, 
wbloh is its much racing as Is given by any of tho big 
ftssoclfttlons In the East. It will not hurt the fair any 
■ It down to one week — In fact there would 
probably be more numerous entries In all the live 
I ->■• •■'!' done. One of the most 
prominent cattle breeders in California told mo not 
long ilnoo that two weeks was too long for a cattle 
•how at Sacramento In August or September and 
that be would make mm the fair 

held but om ilreotors will in all proba- 

blll'y i dictated to by tho people whoso 

onf/ Interest in the fairlsa doslro to make books on 
inning events. 

he 112,000 or »1 b tho bookmakers pay 

h year for tho bolting privilege a. tho State Fair 



does not look like a very healthy asset. There were 
given last year at Sacramento something in the 
neighborhood of $12,000 in purses for running races 
alone, and to these purses entrance waB free, while 
the owners of pacers and trotters were charged five 
per cent. If the bookmakers pay $12,000 for the 
betting privelege and this sum is all given away to 
the runners, where does the profit to the association 
come in? In the language of the leader of the 
negative in theDarktown Debating Club, "we pause 
for a reply." 

P. J. Williams, owner of that good Btallion Mon- 
terey 2:09}, was in town this week, having brought a 
good looking two-year-old by his horse to the sale 
held by Fred H. Chase & Co. on Tuesday evening. 
He got $250 for the colt, and should have had twice 
or three times the money. Mr. Williams is one of our 
veteran horsemen and breeders, and while he has not 
had the best luck in the world for several years past, 
now sees a bright rift in the clouds, and it may be 
that luck will come his way yet. He deserves the best 
there is in the business. He tells me Monterey did a 
fair season this year, and as the colts by this son of 
Sidney are all promising the horse's patronage should 
inorease every year from now on. Mr. Williams says 
that a stallion is very much like a poet or an arti6t, as 
his worth is seldom recognized until after he is dead. 
During life every fault is enlarged upon and every 
good quality minimized by the critics. But after he 
is dead and gone the knockers cease knocking and 
the horse gets what was due and should have been 
paid while he lived. 

Secretary Fred Adams of the Pleasanton Associa- 
tion was in town this week and made the announce- 
ment that no bookmaking would be permitted at their 
meeting this year, which is the best news of the week 
about the California circuit. As the P. C. T. H. B. 
A. will give two meetings, one at San Jose and 
another at Santa Rosa, at both of which bookmaking 
will be barred, the outlook for good racing is better 
than ever this year. Thos. Smith, manager of the 
Vallejo meeting will probably arrange for auction 
pools at his track, and was down the other day look- 
ing at the Australian totalisator, and pronounced it a 
good thing. So it may be that from the opening of 
the circuit up to the State Fair meeting there will be 
no bookmaking. The Directors of the State Agri- 
cultural Society would make a mighty popular move 
with the people if they would bar the bookmaking 
this year and return to the old plan where the public 
make the odds. Let us hope that they will do so. 



There's another McKinney in the 2:15 list and she 
is out of a mare by Nutwood Wilkes. I refer to Miss 
Georgie, the five-year-old mare that Martin Carter 
bred and sold to W. A. Clark, Jr. last April for $5000. 
She made her first start of the year at Denver last 
week and not only won her race but took a record of 
2:11} in the second heat. The fast gelding Engle- 
wood was favorite and won the first heat in 2:12|, 
but the California mare walked to the front in the 
next two heats in 2:11} and 2:15}. The Denver papers 
state that Ted Hayes, who drove her, had an easy 
time winning and could have driven the mare into the 
2:10 list had it been necessary. Last year Miss 
Georgie won second money in the most of her races, 
but was beaten by Ben F. very decisively in the ma- 
jority of these races and she failed to get a heat. She 
was in no such condition as ehe is this jear, how- 
ever, and while she raced gamely and showed some 
fast trials, Ben F. waa doubtless a faster horse than 
she was that year and beat her on ber merits. When 
she left Pleasanton in May this year, however, Miss 
Georgie looked to be in perfect condition and it was 
expected that she would get a low record before the 
season was far advanced. California horsemen are 
pretty generally of the opinion that she is a 2:05 
mare and that she will prove it before her racing 
career is over. 

Sweet Marie 2:13J went to Denver in charge of 
Robert Smith, who it seems will manage her this 
year, and will race her on the Grand Circuit. Mr. 
Smith stopped off at Denver, but will not start tho 
raaretbero. A gentleman who spent much of his 
time at the Los Angeles track last winter and spring 
told me that he had seen Sweet Marie work out with 
the best pacers at the track and when miles were in 
2:10 or 2:11 and tho last quarter In .'11 seconds, tho 
daughter of McKinney would be right up in the front 
row asking for her head that she might go faster. 
II" -ays she Is tho greatest trotter he ever saw and 
ho has seen some mighty good ones. I hopothe mare 
may get a vory low rocord this year as It would do 
her owner Mr. William Curland, more good thau to 
dump a buckot of coin on his dosk. 

Anothor good piece of news to harness horse men is 
the announcement made by 'lhos. Smith of Vallejo, 
that his meeting will bo for four days Instead of three. 



Mr. Smith closed a program that would give three 
days of excellent racing, but found it impossible to 
arrange it so that all the horses entered in more than 
one event would have one day between races. Mr. 
Smith is a horseman himself and has trained and 
raced many a good one. He knows that it is not a 
very pleasant thing to receive notice from a Secretary 
that the two races in which a horse is entered will 
come on successive days, so he concluded to add one 
more day to his program. He has arranged for a 
four days meeting, the extra d ay being given to local 
races and classes which will be announced later. The 
California circuit seems to be growing and by the 
time the season opens it will have assumed pretty fair 
proportions. All the meetings thus far announced 
from Pleasanton to Santa Rosa are four days each. 



State Fair Races. 



Prospects for the harness races at the State Fair 
which begins August 22d are excellent, a large num- 
ber of horses having entered before the entries closed 
on June 1st. Three of the eighteen races did not fill, 
the free-for-all trot, the three-year-old pace and the 
two-year-old pace, mile heats, 2 in 3, but others will 
be substituted later. 

Many of the horses entered promise to lower their 
records materially during the season and this may 
result in some warm contests for supremacy at the 
fair. Quite a number of the younger ones are now in 
training at Agricultural Park and will be accustomed 
to the track, enabling them to do the best work of 
which they are capable, so that considerable is ex- 
pected of them. Last year "Pop" Jones with his 
track machine leveled and renovated the track, mak- 
ing it several seconds faster, and the horsemen were 
well pleased with the result; so much so that the 
directors have concluded to engage Mr. Jones again to 
perfect the work, so that it is a foregone conclusion 
that when it is finished the society will undoubtedly 
have by far the fastest track on the Coast. 

The speed program as far as the harness horses are 
concerned will be about as follows: Monday, August 
22d— 2:30 trot and Occident. Tuesday, 23d— Green 
pace; Thursday, 25th — 2:10 pace; Friday, 26th — 2:27 
trot, 2:17 pace; Saturday, 27th— 2:13 trot, 2:30 pace; 
Monday, 29th— two-year-old trot and Stanford; Tues- 
day, 30th— 2:19 trot; Wednesday, 31st— 2:14 pace; 
Thursday, Sept. 1st — 2:25 pace, Stanford-Occident 
pace; Friday, 2d — 2:16 trot, three-year-old trot; 
Saturday, 3d — 2:24 trot and free-for-all pace. The 
Occident and Stanford Stakes being trotting stakes, 
and several of the entries having turned out pacers, 
the Stanford-Occident pace has been instituted to give 
them an opportunity to show what stuff they are 
made of and it is said there are several promising ones 
among the five entries. 

The guaranteed purses amount at present, deduct- 
ing those for the three races that did not fill and for 
which others will be substituted, to $11,200, which 
will be augmented by the amount of the Occident and 
Stanford Stakes, on which the final payment are not 
yet due. Last year the Occident Stake amounted to 
$3920 and the Stanford to $1960. They promise this 
year to be equally valuable. 

It is evident that there will be plenty of starters. 
For the 2:24 trotting purse there are 17 entries. For 
the 2:30 trot 18, for the 2:27 trot 12, for the 2:19 trot 
16, for the 2:16 trot 9, for the 2:13 trot 7; for the two- 
year-old Irot 12, for the three-year-old trot 8. For 
the 2:20 pace there are 25 entries, for the green pace 
14, for the 2:25 pace 17, for the 2:17 pace 14. for the 
2:14 pace 10, for the 2:10 pace 13, for the free-for-all 
pace 9 and for the Stanford-Occident pace 5. A num- 
ber in both classes are double entries by the same 
owner, showing that there will be plenty of horses 
available. 

The committee having the running races in charge 
is at work on a program and will soon have one ready 
for announcement that will be most attractive to the 
lovers of the bangtails. 



Prompt Attention 

To the health of one's horses is very Important and desirable 
When the? have been driven hard and are very much exhausted' 
with their blood overheated, It is very easy to contract a cold and 
the numerous germ diseases such as distemper, pinkeye Influenza 
shipping fever, etc The old saying yet remains true that an 
ouuee ol prevention is superior to a pound of oure. Readers of our 
oolumns aro familiar with the famous Craft's Distemper Cure 
wlitoli is the best preventive as well as cure known. Where drug- 
gists happen to be out of it one should get a supply at onoe. which 
eun ho had If desired direct, prepaid, from the manufacturers 
Tho Wells Medicine Co., 13 Third St., Lafayette, Ind. 



Dr. S. A. Tuttle— Lamont. Iowa., June 22, 1902. 

ivarSir: will you pleaso send me another of those treatises 
"" Hi" iior.M' The one you sen! mc 1 gave to a veterinary surgeon 
In KnusUBClty.as we wero schoolmates and I wanted to introduce 
lilm to viuir medicine. It Is a good study, but the Elixir is king of 
all. When you give the Elixir In case of muscle disease, how 
\ouropont the doses Internally? I broughtout a stallion 
with It when all other treatments failed, by applying it to the 
loins, tho spine and muselesof the legs. First dose Internally 
was 2 onnooB, after dose every three hours of 1 ounce, In this dis- 
ease If you utivo any other way of giving it let me know. 

Yours respectfully, A. R. Jones. 



Jackson's Napa Soda does not tongle the feet. 



JDLY 2, 1904] 



©He gveebsv tmt> ^ovtstmxn 



EASTERN GOSSIP. M 

[Culled From Our Exchanges.] K^) 



A great victory has been won by the American 
Trotting Association in the Michigan courts. Some 
men undertook to race a pacer out of his class and 
under various names at various meetings held in 
membership of that body. The horse was identified 
and the association attached him for the money he 
had won unlawfully under names and in classes to 
which he had no right. The owners by hard swear- 
ing and frequent transfers of the gelding defeated the 
association, but on appeal the case has been reversed 
and the horse ordered into the custody of the sheriff 
to be sold to satisfy the claims. The supreme court of 
Michigan holds in this case that when a man is racing 
a horse under the rules of the American Trotting 
Association he renders himself amenable to these 
rules and that the officials have an absolute right to 
enforce these rules to the letter; farther, that from 
these rules there is no appeal The famous ringer 
Jerry W. will therefore be sold at public auction soon, 
unless some legal expedient may prolong the affair. 

Thomas W. Lawson made $60,000 and lost it before 
he was 17 years old. His first $100, acquired when he 
was an office boy from the Christmas benevolence of 
his employers, he spent at once in buying presentB for 
his sister and two brothers. Only he bought the 
sister's present first, and paid $87 for it, and was 
thrown into a state of despair because he had but $13 
left for the other two presents. 

These incidents hit off Lawson 's character, says the 
Chicago Tribune. He makes money furiously and then 
tries to spend it before he can lose it. If he doesn't 
succeed in getting it spent he is likely to become in- 
terested in clay holes in Siam. Then somebody else 
spends it for him. But somehow the money keepB 
going round. Stagnant money annoys Mr. Lawson. 

The suction pipestbrough which he draws stagnant 
money toward him are as various as they are num- 
erous. He invented a substitute for playing cardF. 
He wrote and published a baseball booklet called 
"The Krank; His Language and What It Means." 
Especially for this book he invented a peculiar kind 
of paper called "blood parchment." During the 
presidential campaign of 1888 he compiled a campaign 
history of political parties. The entire work was 
accomplished within thirty-five days. Four hundred 
thousand copies were distributed by national and 
state political committees. He developed the Grand 
River Land Company, and went south to speculate 
in southern real estate. He tried to develop the iron 
and coal regions in the state of Kentucky. He be- 
came interested in so many different things that he 
almost deserved to be regarded as the bagman of 
high finance. But while he was making inventions, 
writing pamphlets, and poking his finger into everj 
mud pie on the continent, he was still a Boston broker, 
finding his main vocation in the stock market. 

In March, 1899, he made his great coup in sugar, 
clearing up abont $1,000,000 in four days. This was 
after he had lost many hundred thousand dollars in 
previous sugar speculations. The money which he 
had Bunk in sugar he had pumped up mainly from 
General Electric. Then after both sugar and General 
Electric came copper and the deal by which in alliance 
with the Standard Oil interests he started the Amal- 
gamated. He now proposes to tell the world hovr 
Amalgamated stock was juggled to the bewilderment 
and improverishment of investors. 

But the suction pipes through which Mr. Lawson 
draws money toward him yield in number to the blow- 
pipes through which he wafts it away from him. He 
is not a sport, though a sportsman, and not a swell, 
though an epicurean. This means that he cannot 
Bpend his money on dissipation or ostentation. The 
credit he deserves for getting it spent is therefore all 
the greater. The devices he employs are horses, 
yachts, dogs, flowers, bronze, paintings and books. 
His office in Boston is a jungle of telephones, carna- 
tions, tickers, pictures, Btatues and ledgers. It is 
probable that he spends more time gratifying his 
taste than amassing the means by which to gratify 
them. Mr. Lawson lives. If one can imagine the 
human soul as an organism with tentacles of ap- 
preciation stretching out into the external universe 
it may truthfully be said that Mr. Lawson seems to 
have more such tentacles than any other prominent 
financier in America. 

This is the man who has sworn to force a restitution 
of the money which was wrenched from Amalgamated 
investors. It will be more interesting than a combat 
between a medieval knight and a brass castle. 



the thirty-one original entries are eligible to start. 
With only one more payment to make, it looks as 
though fifteen horses may face the starter on the day 
of the race and they will make up about the best field 
that has ever been started in this annual event. 
Many of the horses eligible to start have already 
worked fast miles but in none of the other years in 
which this race has had a place on the Detroit pro- 
gram has there been more uncertainty as to which of 
the entries has the best chance of winning. One of 
the horses in Mr. Geer's stable — Alexander — baB been 
a mile in 2:09i, and the other — Stanley Dillon, has 
worked almost as fast. Lisenjero, by Dexter Princei 
in trainingat Syracuse, has been a mile in 2:09|. Jolly 
Bachelor, the Smatbers stable candidate, has trotted 
a fifth workout heat in 2:13J. Anna Hoyt, by Czar, 
in Harry Stinson's stable, has been a mile in 2:15; 
Ruth C, another Cleveland candidate, has been a 
mile in 2:17§, and doubtless several of the others have 
trailed in 2:15 or better. One of these mentioned may 
turn the trick and win the big race, and it may be 
that the winner is to be found among the number not 
mentioned and one of which the public has heard 

little. — Horse World. 

It has often been asserted by turf writers that, 
although Morgan trotterB were rapid gaited, their 
stride waB so short that, unless ciossed with Messen- 
ger blood, they could not trot fast enough to win 
races. Ethan Allen 2:25$, inbred to the Morgan 
strain, "and no Messenger blood, had stride enough to 
trot in 2:15 to pole with running mate two months 
before the world's championship trotting record was 
lowered to 2:17}. Lady Sutton 2:30, an inbred Mor- 
gan, without the aid of a Messenger cross, had stride 
enough to give the famous old-time, inbred Messenger, 
world's trotting record breaker, Lady Suffolk 2:29$, 
the hardest race of her life to harness, and forced her 
to trot to the world's harness record 2:29$ to win. It 
was a seven heat race, and came off at Centerville, 
Long Island, August 3, 1849. Lady Suffolk won the 
first and second heats in 2:29$ and 2:31. Lady Sutton 
won the third and fourth in 2:30 and 2:31$. The fifth 
and sixth were dead heats, and the time was 2:32 and 
2:31, but Lady Suffolk got the seventh and deciding 
heat in 2:38. It was the most stubbornly fought race 
that had ever been trotted up to that time. Lord 
Clinton, by the inbred Morgan stallion Denning Allen, 
and without the aid of Messenger blood, had stride 
enough to win the free-for-all trot at Lansing, Mich., 
August 24, 1894, in 2:08J, 2:12J and 2:09|, and beat such 
good ones as Belle Vara 2:08| by Vatican, Jack 2:12} 
by Pilot Medium, Magnolia 2:09} by Haw Patch, and 
Lee's Pilot by Pilot Medium. The Morgans may 
have some failings, but lack of stride is not one of 
them. — American Morse Breeder. 



It is announced that Twinkle 2:05J has been bred to 
Nervolo 2:04}, and that she will not be raced this 
year. This takes from the fast pacing class a per- 
former that has been counted on as one likely to be a 
factor in the contests on the Grand Circuit tracks this 
year. Twinkle was sired by the California-bred 
pacer Mercury 2:21, son of Sidney, and out of a Tom 
Hal mare. Colbert, the stallion that she had been 
mated with, is a trotting-bred pacer, and whether her 
foal by him will be a pacer or a trotter is something 
no one can say with any certainty of being right. 
Our friend "Raymond" ought to have further re. 
marked that Twinkle is likely to be one of the great 
broodmares of the age. But the chances are great 
that the colt she foals will be a pacer, though it is a 
fact that the fastest trotter ever foaled in Tennessee 
was by Mercury, p. 2:21, sire of Twinkle, and out of a 
Brown Hal mare. I refer to Prank Creamer 2:11} — 
Trotwood in Horse Review. 



The third payment has been made in Detroit's 
$10,000 event, the M. &. M. stake and twenty out of 



There seems to be much interest displayed this year 
in performances by trotters under saddle, and already 
the world's record for an amateur has been lowered. 
If there is one record that would seem to be more 
easily lowered than another it would be that of a 
trotter to saddle, for surely a well-built, stoutly made 
trotter should be capable of carrying one hundred 
and fifty pounds within a few seconds of his best re- 
cord. Thoroughbreds have been seen that could run 
a mile in 1:40 carrying that much weight; in fact I 
think the English rtcord for the distance with 142 
pounds is 1:37$, and while the thoroughbred has been 
bred for generations for no other purpose than to 
carry weight over a distance of ground, the trotter is 
in many instances greatly superior to the thorough- 
bred in muscular development. The mere fact that 
Charlie Mac could at the first time of asking trot a 
mile in 2:17$, ridden by Mr. C. K. G. Billings, who 
must weigh not far from 180 pounds, is evidence 
enough that a trotter built on the lines of John A. 
McKerron and with his tiieless action could carry 150 
pounds and trot a mile in 2:10, and I have not the 
slightest doubt in the world that Mr. Devereux can 
ride his horse that fast. I remember seeing George 



Starr ride Johnston a mile in 2:13, and of hearing 
him say afterward that it was done with little or no 
effort on the part of the horse although the pacer 
had had little or no experience at this style of going. 
I have no doubt that a jockey with the skill of Todd 
Sloan could ride Lou Dillon, if she were not asked to 
carry over 115 pounds, a mile very close to two 
minutes, for with the seat of the modern American 
jockey the weight is nearly over the withers and the 
resistance reduced to a minimum. The amateur 
performances at this style of going will probably be 
much slower, than if the riders were professional 
jockeys as the seat of the average amateur is likely 
to bring the weight somewhat back of the withers 
and the position so erect that the resistance is greater 
than in the so-called Sloan seat. A field of trotters 
ridden by skillful riders would make a much more at- 
tractive spectacle than when drawing the modern 
sulky and doubtless this form of sport will after it 
has been tried sufficiently, become extremely popular. 
I know that Budd Doble, who began his career in the 
saddle, has frequently expressed a deBire to try for the 
record with John A. McKerron, and he was extremely 
confident that he could ride him a mile many seconds 
faster than the then existing record. The position of 
the rider makes it a somewhat difficult and tiring task 
yet not much more so than that of the average jockey 
whose weight is always on the stirrup leather and 
never, when at speed in the saddle itself, and little 
experience should enable some of the leading amateurs 
to place the records to saddle far below where they 
now are. — Hawley. 

This talk took place at Cleveland, the other day, 
according to George Dietrich: "How many times," 
said one of the trainers at the Glenville track, during 
a little talkfest yesterday, "do you hear people say 
'Geers must have a lot of money; he wins so many 
races.' Why Geers, doesn't cash a ticket once a year. 
He gets in wrong more than any man I know. You 
all remember the first year I rubbed a horse for him. 
Early in the spring the Hamlin stable went down east 
for a few races and we all thought no green pacer 
could beat Glendennis. First thing we did was to run 
up against that crook-kneed little Robert J., and he 
beats us. Well, Mr. Hamlin bought him, and when 
we went back to Buffalo to sharpen the horses up for 
Detroit, Robert had a record of only 2:17$ tied to him. 
Just before we Bhipped from Buffalo, Robert stepped 
in 2:10, and in those dayB that could win, and win 
sure. Why, it was as good as two minutes today. 

"Well, sir, we got to Detroit and the little horBe 
was in an easy spot to get some money, but do you 
know that Geers touted us all off Robert J. and onto 
that old horse Lochinvar, just because one morning 
Lochinvar happened to brush by Geers on the back- 
stretch? Ed couldn't get anything into his head but 
that Lochinvar went past him like he was tied. The 
betting was even money and all you wanted of it, 
Robert J. against the field, and as I remember it, 
Geers had four fields at $50 each and Mr. Hamlin had 
five. 

"How did the race come out, did you say? Why, 
Robert J. won in straight heats, best time 2:15}, and 
Lochinvar was outside the money." 

"You have got to give Ed Geers credit for one 
thing, " said another trainer. "He always wins when 
he can, and more than once when I worked for him 
he beat the horse he held a ticket on. Take the race 
at Lexington. He was so sure Oakland Baron could 
beat Boreal that he played against Boreal until he 
stood to win $600. Ed was on the ground that day 
and watching the race. Boreal was getting beat all 
right enough when the judges called Ed to the stand 
and asked him to drive the colt. He didn't tell the 
judges he had played- against the colt, but he drove 
the hardest race I ever saw him in, and finally won. 
So he lost his money. " 

Only line breeding, in and in-breeding, has ever 
established a breed in any other species, or branch of 
animals and why should not this natural law hold 
good in breeding trotters? asks the Western Horseman. 

It has, and it will. Inter-breed trotting-bred trot- 
ters, using skill, judgment and consideration in mak- 
ing individual matings, and you have the whole secret 
of success. This not only brings success, but it brings 
the factors of future and uniform successes. The 
mere fact that the further we get from the primitive 
and hence imperfect crosses, the faBter and more uni« 
form do our trotters trot, ought, of itself, be sufficient 
evidence to every one that orthodox breeding is the 
real and only royal road to Buccess In breeding trotters 
and perfecting a breed of trotters, yet there are those, 
from mere force of habit, we are constrained to be- 
lieve, who will maintain that "new infusions, " espec- 
ially thoroughbred blood, are necessary, In theory 
orthodoxy does not admit of any new infusions, and 
practical facts and figures argue against them. Orthc 
dox breeding is logical, progressive and su 
breeding. 



6 



®he gveebev axxb gftrartsntcm 



[July 2, 1904 



Notes and News, m 



Pleasanton will Dot have books. 



There will be (our days racing at Vallejo. 



M -Kianev has a full book again this season at $200. 



Joe Cuicello la getting third money right along with 
Welladay at Denver. 

Allendale has worked a mile in 2:15, last half in 1:07 
since reaching Cleveland. 



C. K. G. Billings will drive Prince Direct 2:07, to 
pole with Hontas Crooke 2:07}. 



Jack Curry predicts a record of 2:02 for the speed- 
way pacer, Nathan Strauss 2:05}, this season. 



Henry Helman writes that he will not bring his 
horses down to race on the California circuit this 
year. 

A high class trotter and road horse is offered for 
sale by Mr. L. R. Palmer of Walnut Creek. See 
advertisement. 

John Caldwell, the trotter by Strathway owned 
by Col J. C. Kirkpatriek, and now in James Thomp- 
son's, string at Cleveland, worked a handy mile in 
2:13} last week. _____ 

Ted Hayes was highly pleased when he landed Mr. 
Clark's new purchase MisB Georgie a winner in her 
first race since she entered his stable, and gave her 
a mark of 2:11}. 

Athel Princess, the three-year-old trotting Ally by 
Directum that was in the Salisbury string at Pleas- 
anton all winter, worked a half in 1:05 the other day 
at Empire track. 

Peko 2:11;, wagon record 2:13} by Electioneer, 
used for so many years in the matinees by H. K. 
Davereaux, has started in some forty-eight races and 
unplaced but once. 

Memphis will offer six $2000 stakes, to close August 
1st, and the card will include classes for 2:10, 2:14 and 
2:20 trotters, and 2:0tj and 2:13 pacers. Murray Howe 
will tell you about them later. 

Judge Cclburn stepped his trotter Silver Sign a 
mile in 2:11} to wagon at Overland Park, Denver, 
last week in order to win the Driving Club cup race. 
Silver Sign record is 2:10 j, made at Detroit in 1902. 

Ths race meeting of the Saliaas Driving Club will 
be held from September 14th to 17th inclusive. 
Entries close Tuesday, July 26th. There is a good 
track at Salinas and it is a good place to race. Head 
the advertisement in this issue. 



The pair of carriage horses pictured on our front 
page this week are owned and driven by the veteran 
horseman, Thos. Smith of Vallejo. They are six- 
year-old geldings by Grandiseimo, weigh 1200 pounds 
eaoh and are fine steppers. 



Lady Anita, the handsome and fast mare by Gran- 
dtsbimo owned by Mr. A. J. Merle of Alameda, has 
been bred to Budd Doble's great trotter, Kinney Lou 
2:07}, and from this combination of good looks, speed 
and good breeding on both sides we should expect a 
real fast one. 

Tho paoer John McEwen 2:19} by Dr. John is the 
first representative for his sire In the standard list. 
He was worked last year by Harry Stinson, who drove 
him a mile In 2:1 1) [Jr. John ie by Oro Wilkes 2:11 
dam Deborah 2:21} by Sable Wilkes 2:18, grandam 
by Ljgrande. 

Commercial Club Stako, $2000 for 2:24 class 
trotters Is a new stake offored by the Oregon State 
Pair. It Is to be trotted September 17th this year. 
Only horses which woro owned in the North Pacific 
Circuit on January 1, 1904, are eleglble. This bars 
California horses. 

Now that tho California trotter George G. 2:121 has 

bought by a matinee man, Anthony N. lirady, 

■M arc wondering whether this much-talked- 

about borae will be campaigned In the Grand Circuit 

hob. He Is entered in all the big stakes for 

which ho Is eligible. 

' Santa Rosa, has turned his 

trotter R. W. P. 1 i ,,i w. over to 

• who will train and drive Mm In his races 

It. W. I', is re. 

owing as he Is one ol the host 

galtwl and mnat promlnlng irolli-m In training In 

■rnla. 

■track ha.-n.-m at 136 Is ono of tho boat 
tfelnga for th , horseman 

has a custom man- California girth, 

larllngalo ami will be furnished with cither 

,. 

a cat* 

r, ' -Mured in 
Pac'flo i, I. having proven bar- 

ren the farm hat aubatltutod the colt bj Dlreot Heir 
Irop by Sldnoy.ln the itako. This la a 

■ ■It, «lth a ! - and the oil front 

bite, and tool ie of tho kind that win 

money when stm I 



We ar6 pleased to learn that Mr. George Bement of 
Melrose, Alameda county, one of the pioneer horse- 
men and live stock breeders of California, is recover- 
ing from a very severe illness which has kept him 
confined to his house for several months past. He is 
now able to be out and it is hoped he will soon again 
enjoy his usual good health. 



A short dispatch in the Monday morning papers 
stated that the hotel Driard at Victoria, B. C. had 
been partially burned, inflicting a loss of $50,000. 
This is the hotel recently leased by Mr. C. A. Harri- 
son formerly of Los Angeles, well and favorably 
known to all California horsemen. We hope his loss 
is not as serious as reported. 



Secretary Snyder, of the Detroit Driving Club, is In 
the east trying to arrange with Alta McDonald to 
bring Major Delmar 1:591 to the Blue Ribbon meeting 
for a race with Lou Dillon 1:58* for a gold cup. It is 
understood that Mr. Smathers has consented to start 
the great gelding at Detroit if McDonald considers 
him up to a race at that time. 



The 2:16 class trot at Pleasanton should draw 
enough entries to make the race fill. The Pleasanton 
association has enough races to fill its program, but 
as several of the horsemen have asked for a 2:16 class 
trot, the Directors concluded ihey could hang up $500 
for a race of this class if the entries were numerous 
enough to justify it. Entries will close Friday, July 
15, 1904. 

Twenty-three mares have been bred to H. K. Dever- 
eux's great stallion John A. McKerron 2:04J, by Nut- 
wood Wilkes this year, including two mares, Peko 
2:11} and Irene Wilton 2:18}, owned by Mr. Devereux. 
Among those booked by other owners were Mamie 
Griffin 2:12} formerly owned by Col. Park Henshaw 
of Chico and Louise Jefferson 2:09}, Lucille 2:07, and 
Mazette 2:04} owned by Mr. C. K. G. Billings. 



At the fall fair to be held at Victoria, B. C. this 
year there will be three days racing. In the program 
recently published in the Victoria Colonist, we notice 
that our old friend C. A. Harrison, formerly propritor 
of the Hotel Roslyn at Los Angeles, but now proprie- 
tor of the Driard, the leading hotel at Vancouver, has 
offered a handsome cup for the colt race for three- 
year-old trotters and pacers. Mr. Harrison is always 
to the front as a "booster" for the harness horse. 



A most remarkable racing performance was that of 
Vance Nuckols, the Cleveland trainer and d river, who 
won five races out of the six which were on the card 
of the Rockport opening meeting, last week. The 
first day, Nuckols won the 2:27 pace with John Mc- 
Ewen, and the 2:15 pace with Donald Wilkes. The 
second day, he took the 2:17 pace with Sue Dix, the 
2:18 trot with The General, and the 2:19 pace with 
Jim Kyle. The odds were forced down to prohibition 
on all the horses Nuckols drove on the second day. 



Ed Woodward of Denver, has a green trotter by 
Miller Boy, out of the dam of Jim Ferry, 2:10|, that 
he believes is a likely candidate for honors in the M. 
and 11. of 1905. According to Mr. Woodward's story, 
this gelding was unbroken in February, yet trotied a 
mile, May 2d, in 2:24, a second mile, May 6th, in 2:22 
and a third mile, May 10th, in 2:18. This was con- 
sidered a sufficient test of his speed, and the gelding 
will be given a long and careful preparation with a 
view to racing in good stakes next year. Mr. Wood- 
ward is racing Joe Mac, 2:20, |by Actonward,and Fairy 
Medium, by Prince M., through the Colorado Circuit. 



Entries close today for three good stakes offered by 
the King County Fair Association fo.'its fall meeting 
in September. The Seattle Stake of $1250 is for 2:11 
class orotter6 and is a dash of two miles. The Ever- 
green Stake is for 2:14 class pacers and is a dash of 
one mile and a half. The Juvenile Stake of $500 is for 
three-year-old pacers bred in the North Pacific Dis- 
trict and Montana and is a dash of a mile and an 
eighth. Two horses may be named from one stable 
and held for but one nomination fee. Entrance five 
per cent of stake and five per cent additional from 
money winners. Mail your entries to A. T. Van De 
Vanter, Secretary, to-day. 



Mr. E. D. Dudley, of Dixon, Solano county, who 
bred and raised the handsome pacer Allendale by 
Falrose, that Ed. Mills took East recently, met with 
a aevere accident in this city a low days ago. He was 
hurrying to the Ferry building to take the boat 
which connects with the Pleasanton train, and had 
just stopped off the curb at the foot of Sacramento 
street, when he was struck by a fast passing express 
wagon and knocked down. Although he sustained 
no outward bruises that were visible, there were in- 
ternal Injuries that have confined him to a bed at the 
French Hospital in this city for soveral days. Ho will 
probably bo able to leave for his homo this week. 



Thoro have boon many rumors during the past week 
that Mr. .1. I). Springer of Pleasanton had sold his 
fast tnittlng marc Sonoma Girl to Eastern parties for 
a very long price. A message from Pleasanton on 
Thursday afternoon converi d tbe information to this 

hat, while negotiations had beon carried on, 
the mare had not onanged bands up to that timo. 
Itmlii Doble visited I'lcasanton last week at tho re- 

i an Saltern party and drove Sonoma Girl a 
10 seconds. HIb suld that on his report of 

manoe being received a telegram was Bont 

offering I Hum that It took five figures to express, but 
the offer rens doollnod. Howovor, it need not surprise 
our read, tm tn boar at any date that Sonoin:, Girl has 

money than has boon paid for any 

old at private sale this year. And she Is worth 
all the money askod for hor. 



The bay gelding Pathway purchased at Pleasanton, 
Cal., early in May by W. A. Clark Jr., and shipped 
to Denver with other horses coming East for the rac- 
ing season, has been seriously sick with pneumonia 
since reaching Colorado and will not be in shape for 
racing during 1904. Mr. Clark paid $5000 for Pathway 
after the horse had trialed in 2:12} at Pleasanton, and 
expected him to prove a 2:10 trotter before the season 
closed. Contrary to general custom^he car of horses 
of which Pathway was a member was not unloaded at 
Ogden and given a much needed rest, but came direct 
to Denver. Pathway became so exhausted that he 
fell in the car and his lowered vitality caused a flight 
cold to develop into pneumonia. — Western Horseman. 



Monte Carlo 2:07} the California bred trotter for 
which Brayton Ives is said to have paid $20,000 for 
the purpose of defeating John F. Ceckerill's Swift 
2:07 accomplished that result in the special trotting 
championship match race which was the feature of 
the opening matinee of the New York Driving Club 
at the Empire City Park, Yonkers, two weeks ago 
to-day. The time, 2:08o, is the fastest mile trotted 
this season in a race. Swift had the pole, but made a 
break just after the start and lost considerable 
ground. Monte Carlo went to the front rapidly, and 
took the pole at the quarter. He was never headed 
and won easily. The fractional times were as follows. 
First quarter, 0:34; half, 1:04, and three-quarters, 
1:35. The middle half was trotted in 1:01. 



A small boy and a firecracker started a fire last 
Tuesday at San Jose track, that destroyed sixty stalls, 
a lot of feed, harness, boots, etc., in about forty 
minutes and came near burning several valuable 
horses. The fire started in about the sixth stall of 
the long row which begins at Park avenue and runs 
along the west side of Race street to the Alameda. 
There were about ten horses in the stalls, belonging 
to J. N. Minor and T. Cabney of Eureka, H Hogo- 
boom of Woodland and C. L. Jones of Modesto. All 
of the animals were taken out in the nick of time, 
some of the stable men having their hair and clothes 
singed by so doing. By ten minutes, the whole stable 
for two blocks, was like a red hot furnace. Luckily 
the stalls destroyed were not valuable and were little 
used. There loss will only reach about $500. Tbey 
were about to be repaired entirely and estimates of 
the cost were already being made. H. Hogohoom, 
was probably the heaviest loser. He managed to get 
his horses out, but lost $50 worth of boots and three 
new sets of harness, besides a quantity of grain. The 
stalls themselves belonged to the association. They 
were not insured. 

When it was announced last April that White Hat 
McCarthy had found a backer in the person of James 
Murray, a wealthy mining man of Montana, to put up 
$1000 as forfeit in a $2500 bet that McCarty's mare 
Lillian Palmer would take a record of 2:10 in a regular 
race this year, horsemen pretty generally concluded 
that Mr. F. H. Jermyn of Scranton, Pa., who bad the 
other side of the wager, had actually found a thousand 
dollars. The remainder of the bet, $1500 was to have 
been put up yesterday, July 1st, but McCarty con- 
sulted an attorney and the latter served notice on 
Colonel Kirkpatriek, the stake holder, to return the 
$1000 to McCarty. The plea put up by the man who 
wears the fuzzy head piece is that his trainer Albert- 
son went east and left the mare here, even failing to 
enter her on the Eastern circuit where she was 
expeoted to be able to have an easy time winning the 
bet for her owner. Lillian Palmer is a pretty good 
mare, but there are lots of men with money who 
would have been glad to have had Mr. Jermyn'send 
of.the bet. It is said that Mr. S. Christianson of this 
city, induced Mr. Jermyn to let him have half the bet, 
but if the case is taken into tbe courts and the stake- 
holder is instructed to return the stake money to the 
respective bettors, Chris will not make that $500 
forfeit money which he thought he bad a mortgage on. 



Says the Denver News: Negotiations are under way 
for the sale of the Overland park grounds and track 
to a company to be headed by Edwin Gaylord, who 
conducted the race meetings here for several years. 
Overland park is the property of Henry R. Wolcott, 
through whom it was converted into a race track and 
club grounds. The last named part of the enterprise 
has been in the bands of the Denver Country club for 
several years, that organization having succeeded the 
old Overland Golf club. But on January 1st next, the 
country club will move from the Overland grounds to 
its own new place near Harman. There will then be 
left for Overland only the racing privileges, which are 
now leased to the Denver-Overland Racing associa- 
tion, of which E. A. Colburn is president and G. A. 
Wablgreen is secretary. Mr. Gaylord and those 
associated with him have long had their eyes on tbe 
grounds, both as a racing venture, and a speculation 
for the future, when the grounds may be cut up into 
city lots. But they did not feel able to handle it 
alone, as the price was held at something over $100,- 
000. Within the last few days Mr. Gaylord has 
received assurance of backing for half the venture, 
tho new partner being a millionaire interested in 
racing. This much has been told, though the name 
of the last has been kept under cover. He is pre- 
sumed to be W. A. Clark, Jr., of Montana, though 
those associated with him state that he is not likely 
to be the man. Owing to his other interests, they 
say, he would not care to be actively identified with 
the Denver track. But Mr. Gaylord has been nego- 
tiating with Mr. Wolcott, and yesterdayjthe report 
was that tho deal was likely to be closed within a 
short time. Mr. Wolcott would like to settle it while 
ho Is here. If tho transfer is made tbe present racing 
management will likely conduct the meeting again 
next vear. The old club house would bo continued as 
a club house, but probably more as a jockey club and 
racing association. Thecompletion of the deal would 
also give Denver a racing meeting In the fall, to be 
for tho running men only. 



July 2, 1904 1 



©tt£ gveebev ani* gtpovt&man 



The Denver Meeting. 



A Meeting at Los Angeles. 



Horse Show at State Fair. 



There has been some good harness racing at the There will be plenty of harness racing in California Sacramento, June 28.— The entertainment corn- 
meeting which opened at Overland Park on Saturday, this year. One by one the associations are making mittee of the State Fair directors and the local Cham- 
June 18th, the summaries of those of the first two announcements, and the latest news is that a big ber of Commerce held a meeting this morning at the 
days having been given in our last issue. The first harness meetiDg and fair is to be held at Los Angeles' pavilion aDd decided to hold a genuine horse show in 
California horse to win a heat was the pacer Harry J. The Times of last Wednesday says: that structure during the coming State Fair. A 130- 
2:09} by Reavis Steinway, who started in the 2:09 class "For several weeks a quiet tip has been going the foot ring, surrounded by tiers of seats, will be erected 
on Monday, the 20th and won the first heat in 2:13£, rounds among the harness horse gentry that there in the center of the pavilion and all of the choice 
but was then beaten by Laura Spurr and Stranger O. would be 'something doing' for the trotters and pacers stock of the coast will be displayed in an elaborate 
and got but third money. On Tuesday Welladay, this fall at Agricultural Park. The rumor appears program, which will include races and feats of riding 
own sister to Klatawah 2:054, was started in the 2:27 to be very well founded, as yesterday formal notice and driving. A large number of Eastern importers 
pace by Joe Cuicello, and got third money. The same of a fall fair meeting was issued by the attorney for have agreed to exhibit stallions and mares of the big 
day Ted Hayes won the 2:20 pace with W. A. Clark, the Sixth District Agricultural Association. The draft breeds this year audit is said will bring out 
Jr's mare Miss Georgie by McKinney, dam Georgie B. meeting will consist of the usual harness racing 

features, together with exhibits of stock and other 

agricultural products. 
The fair will be given about the first of November. 

It will immediately follow the fairs at Hanford and 

Tulare. The sporting and agricultural features will 



by Nutwood Wilkes. Englewood, a very fast pacer 
and frequent winner was the favorite for this race, 
but the California mare beat him handily and took a 
record of 2:114. in the second heat. 

On Friday, Bert Logan, the popular little pacer 



owned by Dr. Boucher of Pleasanton, was a starter in 
the 2:40 pace. Estabelle a fast mare by Nowood beat 
him the first heat in 2:17} over a track that was quite 
muddy from a rainfall an hour previous, and after 
the heat was paced another down pour compelled 
postponement of the race until Saturday. In the 
meantime Bert Logan was taken sick and had to be 
withdrawn from the race. Estabelle won the deciding 
heat handily, and third money again went to Wella- 
day. The same day Monroe S. by Dictator Wilkes 
was a starter in the 2:13 class pace, but was distanced. 
In the 2:24 clasB trot Getaway by Strathway took 
second money, the race going to Bess ! e Birchwood, a 
mare that is said to be capable of trotting in 2:10. 

The summaries of the races up to and including 
those of last Saturday are as follows: 

TUESDAY JUNE 21. 

Paoihg, 2:2' class, purse $500. 

Estabelle. b m by Nowood 1 2 1 

Obe Croft, br g by Harris 2 12 

Welladay, bm by Steinway 3 3 3 

Trimble Boy, b g by Caneland Wilkes 4 4 4 

Ambolier and Nancy Connor also started. 
Time— 2:17!i, 2:16«, 2:18- 

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22. 

Pacing, 2:20 class, purse J10D0. 

Miss Georgie, br m by McKinney 5 1 1 

Englewood, ch g by Strongwood 14 4 

Bonnie Treasure, ch g by Bonnie Bell 2 2 3 

Lady Elgin, r m by Baron Posey 3 3 2 

Dick Welch, R. R Johnson, Joe Mark, Queen J. and Mabel D. 
also started. 

Time— 2:12Jf, 2:11H, 2:15Ji- 

Trotting, 2:34 olass, purse $500. 

Oronteo, bh by Alfred G 2 1 1 

Silver Star, rg by Silver Thorn 15 3 

Congressman Sibley, b h by Cecilian 4 2 2 

Ed G., grg by Capt. Woodson 3 4 4 

Dewey. MajorH., Al Fox and Annie G. also started. 

TBTJBSnAT, JUNE, 23. 
Trotting, Free for all, Members Gentlemen's Driving Club. 

Silver Sign, b s by Silver Thorn 1 1 

Jim Ferry, gr g by Orange Wilkes 2 2 

Master Delmar, b g by Delmar 3 3 

Time— 2:18M. 2:ll?i- 
Pacing, Free-for-all, Members Gentlemen's Driving Club. 

Daisy Field, ch m by Mark Field 1 1 

JessC, ohgby Electwood 2 2 

Time— 2:22%, 2:15 
Saturday. June 25. 
Pacing, 2:40 class, purse $500— First heat Friday. 

Efltabell, b m by Nowood 1 1 

Fairy Medium, b m by Prince Medium 5 2 

Welladay, brm by Steinway 5 3 

Bert Logan, ch c by Colbert 2 dr 

Obe Croft also started. 

Time— 2:17S£, 2:20K 
Pacing, 2:13 class, purse $1000. 

Daniel J., blfegby Whiteman 2 1 1 

Jess C, ch g by Electwood 1 4 3 

Hello Girl, brm by Hello 4 3 2 

Young Hal, b h by Hal Dillard 6 2 4 

Monroe S., Selden Wilkes and Phoebe Almont also started. 

Time— 2:15!*, 2:13«, 2:16jS£. 
Trotting, 2:24 class, purse $1500. 

Bessie Birchwood, ch mby Birchwood 1 

Getaway, ch g by Strathway 3 

Nordica. b m by Agamemnon 2 

Woody C, b g by Woody R 9 

Queen Sign, Happy Harry. Queen Knight, Congressman Sibley, 
Iosa, Oronteo and Phyllis also started. 

Time— 2:16^, 2:18^. 



be incorporated. 

The dates will come in very handy for the horsemen 
who are doing the California circuit, and prospeets 
are good for some high-class harness event. 

As there is no State appropriation available for a 
fair this year, a number of prominent citizens have 
interested themselves in the project and a fund will 
be provided by subscription for prizes and premiums 
and to cover any deficit in expenditures over and 
above gate receipts and entries. 

The ground s at Agricultural Park were in the early 
days deeded in perpetuity in trust as public property 
for the holding of agricultural fairs. 

It is the intention of the board to revive the policy 
of the old District board in giving annual 'airs at the 
park. The personnel of the newly organized board 
will insure careful management. " 



about eighty head to be shown at the fair. It is also 
announced that Williams & Mardeman and the Ameri- 
can Saddle Horse Breeding Farm would also make 
exhibits. This, it was said, will insure the greatest 
horse exhibit ever given on the coast. 

The Directors of the California Livestock Breeders 
Association held a meeting at the Golden Eagle Hotel 
this week, with the following members present: Judge 
P. J. Shields, F. I. Hodgkins, E.W.Howard, N. A. 
Chisolm and Prof. E. W. Major. 

The main object of the meeting was to arrange for 
a convention of the stock raisers of the State, to be 
held in Sacramento during the coming State Fair. It 
was agreed to hold the convention and to procure 
eminent speakers to deliver addresses on subjects of 
vital interest to stock raisers. 



Market for American Horses. 



Brilliant Matinee at Cleveland. 



Some three thousand five hundred people were at 
the Glenville track Saturday, June 18tb, to witness 
the second annual matinee of the Gentleman's Driving 
Club, The weather was fine, the track fast and the 
matinee a good one. 

The feature of the afternoon was the two specials in 
which Mr. C. K. G. Billings was to drive Lou Dillon an 
exhibition mile to beat 2:10. Also his attempt to re- 
duce the world's amateur record under saddle of 2:19£ 
held by McLeod. In 1899 the Philadelphia horseman, 
Geo. A. Singleton, rode the trotting gelding McLeod a 
mile under saddle in 2:191 over the old Belmont Park 
track. This record stood intact for all these years 
until Saturday. 

The crowd was very anxious to witnessthe perform- 
ance of Lou Dillon, it being the first opportunity 
afforded Cleveland people of seeing the world 's cham- 
pion since her last appearance at the Cleveland mati- 
nees last season. They greeted her with enthusiasm, 
and there was no mistaking the fact that a majority 
of them easily recognized her as Millard Sanders 
jogged her past the grand stand for a slow mile. 

It was past 4 o'clock when Mr. Billings appeared on 
the track with Lou. She was accompanied in the 
mile by Doc Tanner with a pace maker. The first 
half was a slow one, the runner being about four 
lengths back. Nearing the half mile post Doc Tan- 
ner sent the runner up alongside the little mare and 
from the half home the clip was a merry one. They 



James H. Worman, United States Consul-General 
at Munich, writes the State Department that the Rus- 
sian edict forbidding the exportation of horses, on ac- 
count of the war with Japan, has disadvantageously 
affected several sections of Germany, particularly 
those of Northern Germany, which has been accus- 
tomed to depend for its general supply upon the im- 
portation of horses from Russia. In the year 1903 
43,600 horses, valued at 17,000,000 marks ($4,046,000), 
were imported into Germany from Russia. He says: 
Germany has always been the largest buyer of Rus- 
sian horses, and if the edict should continue Icng in 
force United States horse breeders ought to profit by 
this opportunity and again recover the good market 
for horses that was ours in Germany several years 
ago. In this part of Germany quite a number of 
horses are imported from Austria and Hungary, par- 
ticularly from Hungary. I believe, however, that if 
United States horse breeders would make a special ef- 
fort to participate in the races which usually take 
place here in May and later, they would undoubtedly 
make a market for their horses, despite the close 
proximity of Hungary. An average horse cannot be 
bought here for les3 than $250. A pair of horses 
which cost here from S1000 to $1500 would not sell in 
the United States for more than $350 or $400. There 
is much wealth in South Germany, and those who 
have bought American horses here have usually real- 
ized good profits. In North Germany, French and 
Dutch horses fina more or less of a market, especially 
draught horses. 

Good American trotters, well built and with speed, 
would now bring as good prices here as in Vienna; 
but the buyers in this part of the country have not, 
as far as I know, gone to the United States, content- 
ing themselves with the Berlin and Vienna supply. 
The importation of Russian horses into Germany 



1 
2 

9 3 



Mares b.466 

Stallions 24,978 

Other horses 2,461 

Totals 33,905 35.131 43.600 



Lewiston Fair. 



A Generous Act. 



Here is a piece of good news for horsemen who were 
unfortunate enough to be suspended for non-payment 
of entrance money at Los Angeles in 1902 or 1903. 
Manager J. W. Brooks of the Los Angeles Jockey 
Club, the association under whose auspices racing was 



were at the half in 1:05, but from here the pace to the 
three-quarters was in 31J seconds with the last quar- for the last three years was as follows: 
ter in 30 J seconds. She finished the mile without the 
slightest distress and the great crowd felt that what- 
ever task is cut out for her this season the lovely lit- 
tle Lou will meet all expectations. When Mr. Billings 
brought her back the crowd greeted her with enthus- 
iastic applause. 

Immediately after the performance of Lou Dillon 
Mr. Billings made his appearance with Charlie Mac 
and after two scores he was off to capture the world's 
amateur saddle record. Doc Tanner drove the pace 
maker. The first quarter was made in 34J, the half 
in 1:09. From the half home the pace was somewhat 
faster, the mile being in 2:17}. The effort was suc- 
caseful. The finish of the mile or rather the mile it- 
self was an easy one for Charlie Mac, and from ap- 



1902 


1903 


8,228 
25,454 
1,449 


10,994 

30,927 

1,679 



given in the metropolis last year sent the following 

dispatch last Wednesday to F. W. Kelley, Secretary of pearances he looked aa though he could easily beat 

the Board of Appeals of the National Trotting Asso- 2:15 under saddle 



ciation for the Pacific District. 

LOS ANGELES, June 29, 1904. 
F. W. Kelley: — To help harness interests in the 
State, please publish as follows: All forfeits, suspen- 
sions and money due Los Angeles Jockey Club for 
entrance in harness races for seasons of 1902 and 1903 
have been declared off. J. W. BROOKS. 

'The generosity of the association of which Mr. 
Brooks is the secretary and manager should be duly 
appreciated by the horsemen concerned. 



Apart from the two specials there was eleven regu- 
lar events on the program. The events were mile 
dashes and some close contests were witnessed. — 
American Sportsman. 



The Lewiston Interstate Fair of Lewiston, Idaho, 
will hold its fifth annual fair from October 17 to 22, 
inclusive. 

The new secretary, Chris Osmers, writes that they 
have $5000 more to spend this year than formerly, 
and that they will give about $12,000 in purses and 
premiums, including probably several $1000 purses 
and premiums. 

The fair and races will follow after the Walla Walla 
meeting, as it is in direct line and the distance is not 
much over a hundred miles. 

The citizens of Lewiston are very enthusiastic over 
the prospects for this year's fair, and are co-operating 
with the association to make it the best fair yet held. 



R. F. D. No. 3, Greenville, Pa. 
International Stock Food Co., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Gentlemen: I am employed by P. Dtnehart as driver and 
trainer at his stable which contains seven horses with records 
ranging from 2:15 to 2:22%. Your "International Stock Food" is 
always in our stable: in fact, we can't get along without it. It is 
good goods and deserves the highest praise. 

Yours respectfully, E. Coats, 



Back Numbers Wanted at $i Each. 



.Strikel — if they don't give 
Soda when you ask for it. 



you Jackson's Napa 



Jackson's Napa Soda untangles the feet. 



To complete the files of the BREEDER AND SPORTS- 
MAN for a subscriber we wish to procure one copy of 
the following dates: April 24, 1S97, February 5, 1898, 
and will pay $1 for one number of each of these dates. 
Send papers to BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 36 
street, San Francisco. 



8 



©hs Qxeeitev axiis gpavt&xnan 



[July 2, 1904 






ROD, GUN AND KENNEL. 




Conducted by 



De WITT. 




Northwest Tournament. 



The three days' twentieth annual tournament of 
the Northwest Sportsmen's Association began on 
June 23d with a large attendance — about 300 shooters 
being present. The shooters assembled at thegrounda 
early in the morning and continued the sport until 
late in the evening. A westerly wind prevailed by fits 
and starts throughout the day, but at no time became 
strong enough to interfere seriously with the shoot- 
ing. In fact, the weather was quite satisfactory, the 
only disagreeable feature being the dust, which was 
In decided evidence at times. 

The previous day was spent in practice shooting, 
about seventy-five sportsmen being in attendance. In 
the afternoon the wind raged strongly at times and 
m tde it a difficult matter to execute good work at the 
traps. Notwithstanding the windy weather a num- 
bar of very fair scores were made. 

The tournament opening shot was fired at 9 a. m., 
and from thence on everything ran smoothly. Sec- 
retary H. J. Stillman and, in fact, all the members of 
the Pendleton club had worked hard to make the 
shoot a big success. The result proved that the big- 
gest shoot ever held on the Coast went through with- 
out a hitch. 

Tbe feature of the first day's shooting wis the 
remarkable shooting of E. .1. Confarr, of Livingston, 
Mont., who broke 292 targets out of 300, a per- 
centage of over .97. This is regarded as one of the 
best records ever made in the West, considering the 
wind and ether circumstances. The best squad shoot- 
ing was performed by the San Francisco bunch who 
led off tbe first event by breaking all the targets. 
The squad was composed of Gibson, Nauman, Webb, 
Reed and Haight. They also did some particularly 
clever shooting in the various events of the day. The 
Portland, Spokane and Pendleton squads also per- 
formed eqcellent work, but were somewhat outclassed 
by tbe C&lifornians. 

By his excellent shooting on the 23d Confarr 
captured two of the fine trophies which have been 
hung up from year to year by the association. He 
won the Multnomah medal and the Brownlee trophy. 
W. F. Sheard of Tacoma, captured the Anaconda 
cup, but was compelled to work hard for it by Con- 
farr and Brown who were close seconds. 

All the twelve events which were pulled off were 
exciting and proved quite interesting to the visiting 
srortsmen and spectators present. The reputation of 
Oregon hospitality was ably sustained by the ladies 
of the First Presbyterian Church, who severed taste- 
ful luncheons for the shooters. 

The second day's scores, in tbe various events, were 
(or tbe most part exceedingly good, higher averages 
being made than on the first day. Confarr, again 
demonstrated bis superiority and kept up a high 
average throughout the day. He captured the Globe 
trophy, but was compelled to do some clever shooting 
before be could win out. This event was the import- 
ant feature of tbe day and it was also tbe last event 
that was pulled off. In the first round Confarr, Ware 
and Htlhs tied on 48. In the first shoot-off Ware and 
Confarr each broke 43, tbe latter winning in the 
third shoot-off. 

The Walla Walla Brownlee medal was won by E. 
K. Ellis of Seattle, who broke 25 targets straight. 

On the closing day, E. F. Confarr again went to the 
front having annexed the high average for the shoot 
breaking 569 targets out of 600, a percentage of .945; 
E. E. Ellis of Seattle, held second place, breaking 564 
nut of 600; W. F. Sheard of Tacoma, third place with 
I, C. C. Nauman of San Francisco and 
C. Cblogreen of Spokane tied for fourth place, losing 
only 44 out of the 600. In the first and second days' 
events, Confarr broke 486 out of a total of 500 targets, 
rent. This Is considered the best record ever 
made in the Weak. 

The shooting on the last day was excellent and 

[dividual scores were mado. J. E. 

icd made the highest average, break- 

wnt. The team trophy was 

won by tho Spokane squad, tho members being Cbin- 

Ware ann in, Pondleton 

and Portland squadB llod for second place. 

ii medal was «im by Ed llan of 

Mali" of tho day was the 

Individual o in the first shoot 

Niumi '.lluianaun : with 25 tar- 

gets on ated the per- 

> amid great applause. 

"<1 a beautiful In- 
for making tho highest 
light. 

traps 
(Sargent system I and 

•■! live, class 

og. All tr> team race, 

general average. Targets cost 3 cents, 

dodur'. rdiallv 

T' e 

Number of targ 

■ it 19 00; regular 
imber of targ. t 
od money «-'■ 



Third day entrance, trophy events, $10.50; regular 
events $13.50; • total $24. Number of targets 200. 
Added money $200. Total number of targets 600. 
Total entrance $0S. Total added money $600. Eleven 
bieb average cash prizes amounted to a total of $100. 
Ten low average cash prizes amounted to a total of 
$100. 

Total value of trophies $2150.00. Total cash and 
average moneys added made ud a grand total of 
$2950.00. 

The Californiacontingent, composed of E. E. Drake, 
C. A. Haight, W. H. Seaver, A. J. Webb, R. C. Reed, 
Gion W. Gibson and C. C. Nauman, returned this week 
and are all loud In their praises of the good fellow- 
ship and sportsmanlike qualities of the northern 
men — thiB tournament being the first in which Cali- 
fornia men wereeligible, as the northern jurisdiction 
has been but recently extended and now takes in 
California. 
The winnerB in the first day's shooting were: 
Event 1—10 targets, purse $61.20, $15 added, 3 
moneys: Dryden, Stephens, Gibson, Nauman, Mc- 
Millan, Nell, Confarr, Palmer, Sheard, first with 10: 
Seaver, Peck, Kincaid, Beck, Chingreen, Drumgoole, 
Dickson. Orr, Carter, Shields, S. V, McDonald, C. D. 
Ellis, Clark, Spence, W. F. Matlock, Winters, Guist, 
Caldwell, second with 9; Becker,Baker, Howe, Forbes, 
T. H. White, Webb, Bybee, Sewell, Mapes, Robbins, 
Logsdon, Hock, Holohan, Wilson, Roberts, Cullison, 
third with 8. 

Event 2—10 targets, purse $66.20, $20 added, 3 
moneys: Dryden, Seaver, Peck, Kincaid, Word, 
Becker, Stephens, Bybee, Drumgoole, Orr, C. R. Mc- 
Donald, Mapes, Robbins, Shields, C. D. Ellis, Still- 
man, Roberts, Matlock, Cullison, Gibson, Nauman, 
Webb, Reed, Haight, first *ith 10; Denharo, J. H. 
McDonald, Hinale, Howe, Bees:, Chingreen, Forbes, 
T. EL White, Carter, Palmer, Waite, Holohan, Pat- 
terson, Winters, Guist, Hillis, secoud with 9; Ker- 
shaw, C. E. Ellis, Stewart, Dornberg, McMillan, Berg, 
Confarr, Dickshn, Van Gesen, Brigham, Brown, S. E. 
McDonald, Logsdon, Clark, Spence, Sheard, Cald- 
well, third withS. 

Event 3—15 targets, purse $91 40, $20 added, 4 
moneys: Becker, Stephens, Beck, Chingreen, Nau- 
man, M. McMillan, Stillman, Sheard, Ware, Cullison, 
first with 15; Peck, (J. E. Ellis, Hood, Denham, Hindle, 
Forbes, Gibson, Webb, Confarr, Sewell, Robbins, 
Brown, C. D. Ellis, Waite, Spence, Hoch, Guist, sec- 
ond with 14; Seaver, J. H. McDonald, Howe, Reed, 
Bybee, Nell, Brigham, Thompson, Brockank, Palmer, 
Shields, S. E. McDonald, Logsdon, Clark, Holohan, 
Wilson, Matlock, Patterson, third with 13. 

Event 4 — Anaconda cup, 25 targets, unknown 
angles, entrance $4.00: Confarr, Sheard and Brown 
tied with 25. On shoot-off, Confarr and Sheard tied 
with 24. On second shoot-off, Sheard won with 24 
against Confarr's23; Baker, Beck, Chingreen, Gibson, 
Webb, Orr, Sewell, second with 24; Seaver, Hindle, 
Becker, Forbes, Drumgoole, Dickson, Shields, Ware! 
Roberts, Winters, HilliB, third with 23. 

Event 5—10 targets, purse $61.20, $15 added, 3 
moneys: Peck, Word, Gibson, Webb, Reed, Drum- 
goole^ Confarr, Dickson, Sewell, Palmer, C. D. Ellis, 
Logsdon, Holohan, Ware, first with 10; Dryden, 
Seaver, E.E. Ellis, Denham, Becker, Stephens, Baker, 
Beck, Chingreen, Dornberg, Bybee, Nell, Orr, Brig- 
ham, Brady, Robbins, Speme, Hoch, Sheard, Brown- 
lee, Matlock, Guist, Cullison, second with 9; Stewart, 
Howe, White. Nauman, M. McMillan, Berg, Mapes, 
Masterson, Brown, Waite, Clark, Wilson, Roberts, 
Caldwell third with 8. 

Event 6—15 targets, purse $104.20, added $20, 4 
moneys: Chingreen, Nauman, Confarr, Carter, 
Brown, Waite, Holohan, GuiBt, first with 15; Ker- 
shaw, Dryden, Peck, Kincaid, Becker, Stephens, 
Beck, Forbes, Haight, Dickson, Orr, Brigham, Pal- 
mer, Stillman, Clark, Spence, Sheard, Brownlee, 
Wilson, Roberts, Winters, second with 14; Seaver, 

C. E. Ellis, Wood, Howe, Dornberg, White, Webb, 
Reed, Bybee, M. McMillan, Drumgole, Nell, Sewell, 
Mapes. Shields, Logsdon, Copel, Cullison, Hillis, third 
with 13. 

Event 7—20 targets, pur6e $122.40, added $30, 4 
moneys: C. E. Ellis, Becker, Stephens, ForbeB, Dorn- 
berg, Nauman, Confarr Robbins, first with 20; M. 
McMillan, Drumgoole, Nell, Dickson, Mapes, C. D. 
Ellis, Logsdon, Wsite, Clark, Hoch, second with 19; 
Seaver, Peok, Hindle, Book, White, Reed, Brigham, 
Sewell, Palmer, Shields, Stillman, Spence, Sheard, 
Ware, Winters, third with 18. 

Event 8 — Multnomah medal shoot, 25 targets, 
known angles, revorsed pull, $4 entrance: Peck, Chin- 
green, Confarr, Holohan and Sheard tied with 24. On 
the shoot-off, Confarr won with 24, Sheard 23, Chin- 
green 20, Holohan and Peck 19; Cullison, Spence, C. 

D. Ellis, M. McMillan, Nauman, Beck, Stephens, 
Howe, second with 23; Hocb, Brown, Logsdon, Rob- 
bins, Orr, Van Gesen, White, Becker, C E. Ellis, 
third with 22. 

Event 9—10 targets, purse $64.80, added $20, 3 

moneys: Ware, Brown, Orr, Nell, Webb, Reed, 

Forbes, Kershaw, Seaver, first with 10; Winters, 

Guist, Cullison, Hillis, Roberts, Holohan, Sheard, 

Stillman, Hoch, C. D. Ellis, Logsdon, Brady, Robbins, 

Confarr, Dickson, Gibson, Beck, Chin- 

nornberg, Howe, Wood, second with 9; Spence, 

3, E. McDonald, Sewell, E. R. McDonald, 

Bybee, ale. Berg, Nauman, White, Becker, 

Baker, C. E Kills, Dryden, Peck, third with s. 

Event 10—15 targots, purse $'.'2.20, added $25, 4 
monoys: Caldwell, Holohan, Mapes, Carter, Wobb, 
Chingreen, C. E. EUU), Dryden, first with 15; Hillis, 
Matlock, Waite, Clark, Hoch, Brown, Logsdon, Con- 



farr, Dickson, McMillan, Bybee, Gibson, Nauman, 
Reed, Forbes, Dornberg, White, Stephens, Wood, 
Denham, Seavsr, Peck, second with 14; Cullison, 
Patterson, Stillman, Robbins, Palmer, Sewell, Orr, 
Drumgoole, Berg, Haight, Beck, Hindle, Howe, 
Kershaw, third with 13. 

Event 11—20 targets, purse $119.50, added $30, 4 
moneys: Clark, Webb, Becker, Stephens, Hirdle, 
Dryden, Seaver, first with 20; Hillis, Patterson, 
Sheard, Ware, Hoch, Brown, Brigham, Confarr, Orr, 
Forbes, Dornberg, Howe, C. E. Ellis, Denham, second 
with 19; Winters, Guist, Wilson, Roberts, Holohan, 
Waite, Logsdon, Mapes, Thompson, Drumgoole, 
Reed, Beck, Chingreen, Baker, J. H. McDonald, 
Kershaw, Peck, third with 18. 

Event 12 — Brownlee trophy, 25 targets, unknown 
angles, r versed pull, both barrels, purse $110.50: 
Dryden, Gibson, Nauman, Webb, Confarr, Brady, 
Holohan, Sheard and Cullison tied on 25. In shoot-off, 
Confarr won with another 25; Guist, Caldwell, C. D. 
Ellis, Orr, Bybee, Reed, White, Stephens, Baker, 
second with 24; Ellis, Waite, Clark, Spence, Hoch, 
Shields, S. E. McDonald, Logsdon, Masterson, Haight, 
Hindle, Stewart, Seaver, third with 23. 
The high scores during the second day were: 
Event 13—10 targets, purse $59.80, $15 added, 3 
moneys: J. H. McDonald, M. McMillan, Confarr, 
Brady, Palmer. Logsdon, Hoch, Ware, first with 10; 
Dryden, E. E. Ellis, Wood, Denham, Becker, Baker. 
Chingreen, Forbes, Nauman, Berg, Dickson, Van 
Gessen, E. R. McDonald, Smails, C. D. Ellis, Waite, 
Spence, Holohan, Goepel, Guist, Caldwell, second 
with 9; Stewart, White, Beck, Gibson, Webb, Bybee, 
Drumgoole, Nell, Matt Orr, Allen, Robbins, Brown, 
Sheard, Brownlee, Roberts, Matlock, Patterson, Cul- 
lison, Hillis, third with 8. 

Event 14—10 targets, purse $64.80, $20 added, 3 
moneys: Kincaid, E. E. Ellis, Stewart, Hindle, 
Forbes, Dornberg, Webb, Dickson, E. R. McDonald, 
Brigham, Smails, Sewell, RobbinB, Palmer, C. D. 
Ellis, Logsdon, Stillman, Waite, Clark, Spence, Wil- 
son, Guist, first with 10; Peck, Wood, Denham, J. H. 
McDonald, Becker, Baker, Chingreen, White, Gibson, 
MoMillan, Drumgoole, Confarr, Allen, Brady, Mapes, 
Brown, Shields, Hoch, Ware, Brownlee, Goepel, Mat- 
lock, Patterson, Cullison, second with 9; Kershaw, 
Dryden, Beck, Nauman, Berg, Van Gesen, Masterson, 
Sheard, Hillis, Caldwell, third with 8. 

Event 15—15 targets, purse $92.20, $25 added, 4 
moneys: E. E. Ellis, Wood, Nauman, Becker, Webb, 
Allen, Mapes, Stillman, Hoch, Ware, Winters, first 
with 15; Dryden, Kincaid, Stephens, Chingreen, 
Forbes, Dornberg, McMillan, Sewell, Robbins, Shoard, 
Matlock, Guist, Cullison, Hillis, Confarr, second with 
14; Peck, Hindle, Beck, Bybee, Drumgoole, Nell, 
Dickson, Van Gesen, Palmer, S. E. McDonald, Logs- 
don, Waite, Spence, Holohan, Roberts, Patterson, 
Caldwell, third with 13. 

Event 16—25 targets, purse $200.60, $10 added, ex- 
pert rules, indicator pull, known angles, 4 unkown, 1 
known trap, 1 man up, Walla Walla Brownlee medal 
shoot: E. E. Ellis won tne medal with 25; Dryden, 
Kincaid, J. H. McDonald, Becker, White, Nauman: 
Confarr, Hillis, second with 24; Peck, -Denham,. Cihin- 
green, Forbes, Holohan, Sheard, Wilson, third with 23. 
Event 17— 10 targets, purse $59.89, $15 added, 3 
moneys: Becker, Hindle, Webb, Nell, Berg, Palmer, 
Siillman, Waite, Hock, Holohan, first with 10; Ker- 
shaw, E.E.Ellis, Stewart, Wood, J. H. McDonald, 
Stephens, Forbes, Dornberg, Nauman, McMillan, Con- 
farr, Logsdon, Spence, Ware, Guist, Cullison, Cald- 
well, second with 9; Kincaid, Denham, Beck, Chin- 
green, Gib60n, Drumgoole, E. R. McDonald, Brigham, 
Masterson, Brown. Clark, Sheard, Brownlee, Goepel, 
Wilson, Matlock, Hillis, third with 8. 

Event 18—15 targets, purse $62.20, $25 added, 4 
moneys: Denham, Stephens, Baker, Nell, Confarr, 
Holohan, Ware, Caldwell, first with 15; E. E. Ellis, J. 
H. McDonald, Chingreen, Forbes, Wnite, Nauman, 
Webb, E. R. McDonald, Mapes, Brown, C. D. Ellis, 
Waite, Matlock, Guist second with 14; Peck, Becker, 
McMillan, Bybee, Drumgoole, Dickson, Orr, Van 
Gesen, Smails, Allen, Palmer, S. E. McDonald, Logs- 
don, Stillman, Hock, Sheard, Winters, Cullison, third 
with 13. 

Event 19— 15 targets, purse $91.15, $25 added, 4 
moneys: J. H. McDonald, Forbes, Spence, first with 
15; Peck, Kincaid, Beck, Chingreen, Dornberg, White 
Gibson, Nauman, McMillan, Drumgoole, Nell, Con- 
farr, Smails, Dickson, Sewell, C D. Ellis, Robbins, 
Waite, Wilson, Matlock, Winters, Guist, second with 
14; E. E. Ellis, Wood, Denham, Becker, Stephens, 
Baker, Webb, Van Gesen, Mapes, Masterson, Palmer, 
Holohan, Sheard, Ware, Brownlee, Patterson, third 
with 13. 

Event 20—50 targets, purse $192.50, 10 known traps, 
unknown angles, 10 known traps, unknown angles, 
reverse pull, both barrelB. Rest, 10 known traps, 
known angles, reverse pull. Oil up, 5 pairs, 1 man 
up. Globe trophy event: Confarr of Livingston, 
Mont., won the trophy after two shoot-offs. Confarr, 
T. B. Ware of Spokane and Hillis of Portland tied on 
48 in the first shoot, making the highest score ever 
achieved in the Globe trophy contest. In the first 
shoot-off, Ware and Confarr tied at 43, Confarr win- 
ning in third shoot. Dryden. E. E. Ellis, Nauman 
and Stillman were second with 47. Holohan was 
third with 46. 

Event 21—10 targets, purse $58.40, added $15, 3 
moneys: Ellis, Hindle, Baker, Beck, Forbes, Drum- 
goole, Confarr, Dickson, Orr, Brady, Masterson, 
Logsdon, Hoch, Ware, Goepel, Matlock, Guist, Culli- 
son, first with 10; Dryden, Denham, Becker, Stephens, 
Dornberg, Webb, McMillan, Wood, Van Ge6en, C. R. 
McDonald, Sewell, Mapes, Allen, Shields, C. D. Ellis, 
Sheard, Patterson, Hillis, second with 9; Peck, Kin- 
caid, J. H. McDonald, Chingren, Gibson, Smails, Pal- 
mer, Holohan, Brown, Winters, third with 8. 

Event 22—15 targets, purse $85.10, added $20, 4 
moneys: Wood, Stephens, Baker, Chingren, Forbes, 
Dornberg, Nauman, McMillan, Orr; McDonald, Mast- 
erson, C. D. Ellis, Holohan, Sheard, Ware, first with 
15; Dryden, E. E. Ellis, J. H. McDonald, Becker, 
Drumgoole, Nell, Confarr, Dickson, Allen, Brady, 



Jolt. 



1904 



t&fte gveeiiev tmfr gtpoxrtsmcm 



9 



Logsdon, Waite, Brownlee, Matlock, Hillig, second 
with 14; Denham, Hindle, Beck, Gibson, Webb, 
Mapes, Palmer, Clark, Hoch, Wilson, Patterson, 
Winters, Guist, Cullison, third with 13. 

Event 23—10 targets, purse S49.10, added $15, 3 
moneys: Kincaid, E. E. Ellis, Becker, Nauman, C. 

D. Ellis, Stillman, Spence, Holohan, Guist, first with 
10; Denham, Stephens, Hindle, Chingreen, Forbes, 
Bybee, Drumgoole, Confarr, Van Gesen, Smails, S. E. 
McDonald, Hoch, Sheard, Ware, Patterson, Winters, 
Hiliis, secODd with 9; J. H. McDonald, Baker, Orr, 
McDonald, Brigham, Sewell, Allen, Mapes, Brady, 
Waite, third with 8. 

Event 24—15 targets, purse 890.10, added 825, 4 
moneys: Baker, Chingreen, Nauman, Confarr, Smails, 
Brown, C. D. Ellis, Logsdon, Holohan, Sheard, Ware, 
Wilson, Cullison, first with 15; Peck, Denham, Becker, 
Stephens, Webb, Nell, Dickson, Van Gesen, Sewell, 
Palmer, Goepel, Winters, Guist, second with 14; Dry- 
den, Hindle, Forbes, Dornberg, McMillan, Drumgoole, 
Bingham, Allen, Stillman, Clark, Spence, Hoch, 
Brownlee, Matlock, Hiliis, third with 13. 

The winning guns of the last day's events were: 

Event 25—10 targets, purse $59.90, $20 added, 3 
moneys: Dryden, Denham, Stephens, Chingreen, 
Gibson, Nauman, Webb, Confarr, E. R. McDonald, 
Allen, Palmer, Holohan, first with 10; E. E. Ellis, J. 
McDonald, Baker, Forbes, White, McMillan, Bybee, 
Smails, Brady, C. D. Ellis, Logsdon, Stillman, Waite, 
Spence, Hoch, Sheard, Ware, Brownlee, Winters, 
Cullison, second with 9. 

Event 26—15 targets, purse 884.45, $25 added, 4 
moneys; Dryden, E. E. Ellis, Becker, Baker, White, 
Bybee, Nell. Confarr, Dickson, Allen, Hoch, Brownlee, 
first with 15. Kershaw, Peck, Kincaid, Denham, J. 
H. McDonald, Stephens, Beck, ForbeB, Webb, Mc- 
Millan, Van Gesen, E. R. McDonald, Brady, Brown, 
Shields, Logsdon, Spence, Holohan, Sheard, Ware, 
Winters, Guist, Cullison, Hills, second with 14. 

Event 27—15 targets, purse $84.85, $25 added, 4 
moneys: McMillan, Drumgoole, M. Orr, Van Gesen, 

E. R. McDonald, Logsdon, Sheard, Winters, Guist, 
first with fiiteen; Beck, E. E. Ellis, J. H. McDonald, 
Stephens, Webb, Nell, Confarr, Dickson, Brigham, 
Allen, Wilson, Brown, C. D. Ellis, Stillman, SpeDce, 
Holohan, Cullison, Hiliis, Eecond with 14. 

Event 28 — 20 targets, unknown angles, purse $98.80; 
3 men team trophy: Spokane team, Chingreen, Ware; 
Forbes, first; Dayton, Pendleton and Portland, second; 
Harrington, thi/d. 

Event 29—10 targets, purse $59.90, $20 added, 3 
moneys: Dryden, E. E. Ellis, Wood, J. H. McDonald, 
Stephens, Beck, Forbes, Webb, McMillan, Smails, 
Brady, C. D. Ellis, Holohan, Sheard, Ware, Guist, 
Cullison, first with 10; Baker, Dornberg, White, 
Nauman, Bybee, Drumgoole, Mat Orr, E. R. Mc- 
Donald, Brigham, Wilson, Logsdon, Clarke, Winters, 
Hiliis, Becker, second with 9. 

Event 30— 20 targets, purse 8114.80, $35 added, 4 
moneys: Beck, E. E. Ellis, Stephens, Baker, Chin- 
green, Forbes, Nauman, Nell, Smails, C. D. Ellis, 
Hoch, Hiliis, first with 20; Dornbery, White, Drum- 
goole, Berg, Confarr, M. Orr, Brigham, Sewell, Waite, 
Holohan, Sheard, Winters, Cullison, Robbins, second 
with 19. 

Event 31 — Dayton medal, 40 targets, unknown 
angles, purse $151.20: Edward McMillan of Idaho 
Falls, first with 40; McMillen, Allen, Logsdon, Spence, 
Winters, second with 39. 

Event 32—15 targets, purse 879.85, $20 added, 4 
moneys: Webb, McMillan, S. E. McDonald, Winters, 
first with 15; Kershaw, E. E. Ellis, Becker, Stephens, 
Baker, Chingreen, Dornberg, Nell, Berg, M. Orr, E. 
R. McDonald, Smails, Allen, Stillman, Sheard, Goepel, 
Hiliis, second with 14. 

Event 33— 15 targets, purse $89.95, $30 added, 4 
moneys: Beck, Becker, Stephens, Hindle, C. D Ellis, 
Sheard, Winters, Hiliis, first with 15; Wood, Baker, 
Chingreen, White, Nell, Confarr, M. Orr, Brigham, 
Smails, Sewell, Stillman, Waite, Holohan, second 
with 14. 

Event 34—15 targets, purse $84.85, $25 added, 4 
moneys: Dryden, E. E. Ellis, Confarr, Smails, Spence, 
Sheard, Cullison, first with 15; Peck, Kincaid, Den- 
ham, Becker, Stephens, Hindle, Baker, Beck, Chin- 
green, Forbes, Nauman, Webb, McMillan, Nell, Dick- 
son, Brady, Palmer, Logsdon, Hoch, Ware, Guist, 
Becond with 14. 

Event 35 — 25 targets, purse $185.25, known traps, 
known angles, individual championship: Nauman, 
Stillman, Ware and Palmer tied with 25 each; shoot- 
off, Ware won with 25; Kincaid, E. E. Ellis, Becker, 
Stephens, Baker, Chingreen, McMillan, Nell, M. Orr, 
Brady, Robbins, Spence, Cullison, second with 24. 



O'Nitser, the mascot, is in town. He arrived yester- 
day, says the Pendleton Tribune of June 24th, and will 
be one of the distinguished visitors at the shooting 
tournament which began yesterday. O'Nitser is 
wised up on shooting tournaments, shooting scrapes 
and shooting irons, and he knows all the brands of 
powder ever invented. O'Nitser is also on speaking 
terms with most of the bunch of trap celebrities now 
in attendance upon the shoot. 

"Say, me frind," said O'Nitser yesterday as he sat 
down in the hotel lobby, "did ye iver hear iv Peter 
Holohan, th' Wallace prince iv sporrts? Well, if iver 
a man was born that can pick 'em off whin ye're not 
lookin', it's Pete. He's a complete shot, that man is, 
and whin he's half-shot, th' gold medils he's won are 
plinty to fill a boxcar, me frind. I knew Pete before I 
got into th' bullpin, and whin I see htm peddlin' down 
th' street I always lift me bunnit. I'm bettin' me 
solde-money on Pete. 

"An' there is 'Crazy Horse' Nauman iv 'Frisco, th' 
best shot on the PaycifSc coast, barrin' none. He's 
here in Pindleton and th' iducayted look he's wearin' 
makes me think iv home, sweet home. This lad, I 
tell ye' had all iv King Edward's crack shots steppin' 
much some toime ago and when the bayloon ascinsion 
was over all th' sports in Ingland were takin' snap 
Bhots iv 'Crazy Horse.' He's a wonderfil gunner and 
has a big reputashun. 

"I hear that 'Lanky' Kershaw is nursin' a hunch 



that he w._ steal some iv th' trofees. Well, let me 
whisper to ye, t think that Lanky' is ducks, but he's 
out of seaBon just now. Tomorrow is his day. I have 
a gr-reat baylief that he will ixecute some clever lifts, 
provided the wind stops its foolin'. If th' beads are 
wurrkin' roight, 'Lanky' will be there with both feet, 
you bet. 

"Say, I met Fred Waite, th' terrible S-swede, 
yisterday. He was at th' deepot to meet mean'th' 
rist iv th' bunch. Th' way he ixtended th' open palm 
was a rayminder of th' auld countree. There's 
nothin' in Pindleton too good for Ferdy an' mesilf. 

"Well, me frind, I must be auff to th' tr-raps now 
to see if iverthing is wur-rkin' on th' straight. So 
long." 

• 

AT THE TRAPS. 



The Union Gun Club live bird shoot last Sunday 
drew a large attendance of members and visiting 
sportsmen, for the club is a popular one. Besides the 
regular card of three events several extra pools were 
shot. In the first six bird race six straights divided 
the bulk of the purse, the men in the five hole split 
the balance. In the second race the ten straights 
received $3.70 each and the five men received $1.65 
each, there being 27 entries and 9 moneys. 

In the twelve bird race 23 entries, 8 moneys, the 
men who grassed 10 were each in the money to a 
slight extent. 

During the luncheon hour refreshments were served 
at the club tent. 

Chas. I. Baird, the armless shooter, gave an exhibi- 
tion of his skill as a shooter and also shot in several 
poolB. 

The scores made were the following: 

Event No. 1, 6 pigeons, entrance $2.40, $10 added, 
distance handicap, high guns, 1 money for each three 
entries — 

Yds Yds 

Feudner.M.C 33— 222-222— 6 Baird, O.I 26— I120O1— 4 

Potter, J 28—122212—6 Pitres, Dr. E 26—201 101— I 

Sylvester, G 30—112121—6 Creyk, C. G .28-002222-4 

Kerrlson, R. E 28—121112—6 Jacobson, H. P 26— 1*1001 — 3 

Bradrlck. J. W 30—222222—6 Bielawski, H 26—201100-3 

Walsh, P. J 31—111110-5 Lewis, T. L 33— *2100O— 2 

Murdock, W. R ....30—111021—5 Hutton, Dl. J. A. D.28— 200200— 2 

Patrick, B 26—121101-5 Cuneo, W 26—022000—2 

Derby, Dr A. T 30-211220—5 Hunt, Dr. J. S 26— 000«00— 1 

Knick.F 26— *1*111— 4 

* Dead out. 

Event No. 2, 6 pigeons, entrance $2 90, $5 added, 
distance handicap, 2 moneys, 7 and 3 points, Rose 
system — 

Yds. Yds. 

Feudner 32—222222-6 Baird 26-011221-5 

Hodapp, FA .27—122122—6 Derby, Dr 30— 22C022— 4 

Walsh 31—111211—6 Patrick. 26—222020—4 

Hutton 28—111211—6 Pisani, J 28—100111—4 

Bradrick 30—222221—6 Pitres, Dr 26— 022101— 4 

Potter 28—211111—6 Rockwood.C 26—010212—1 

Muller. C. A 28—111122—6 Knick 26—1*2101—4 

Hunt.Dr 26—211211—6 Burflend, D 28—202120—4 

Sylvester 30—121212—6 Frankel. C 26—1 10002—3 

Iverson, M J 30—121221—6 Grosse, Dr 26—110010—3 

Jacobson 26—111110—5 Lewis, T. L 33—1022*0—3 

Gill 26—112*21—5 Bielawski 26—0020*2—2 

Kerrlson 28—211102—5 Cuneo 26-010*01—2 

Creyk 28—222202—5 

Event No. 3, 12 birds, entrance $4.75, $10 added, 
high guns, 1 money for each three entries, distance 
handicap — 

Sylvester 30 yards— 11111 11111 11—12 

Hodapp 27 " —21122 21121 12—12 

Iverson 30 " —21122 21112 22 12 

Kntok 26 " —11121 21221 21—12 

Derby, Dr 30 " —22110 12211 12—11 

Muller 28 " — *1221 11222 11—11 

Bradrick 30 " —20111 11212 11—11 

Gill 26 " —21111 21001 11—10 

Bielawski 26 •■ —01102 11122 12—10 

Hutton 28 " —21110 10111 11—10 

Hunt.Dr 26 " —01111 22210 11—10 

Lewis 28 " —21022 12022 22—10 

Jacobson 26 " —10221 10212 12—10 

Walsh 31 " —112*1 0I11I 12—10 

Chevalier, R. F 26 " —10111 02122 12—10 

Pitres, Dr 26 " —12121 01*12 20-9 

Grosse.Dr 26 " —11221 01211 00—9 

Rockwood : 26 " —20222 02101 00—7 

Kerrlson 28 " —2*111 lll*w —7 

Patrick 26 " —11201 02200 00— 6 

Baird 26 " —20210 2w —4 

Murdock 30 " — 1110W —3 

Cuneo* 26 " — *0012 Ow —2 

* Birds only. 

Event No. 4, six bird pool, entrance $2.40, distance 
handicap — ■ 

Hutton 111211—6 Muller 111122—6 

Sylvester 121112—6 Iverson 121022—5 

"Pickett" 111112—6 Lewis *22202— 1 

Walsh 111112—6 Hunt 11*011—4 

Finnle.Dr 112112—6 Hirschle 101021—4 

Bradrick 111122-6 Pitres 010212—4 

Hodapp 112221—6 

Event No. 5, 6 bird pool, entrance $2.40, distance 
handicap — 
Walsh 111111—6 Hirschle 120101—4 

Hutton 211101-5 Hunt 020112—4 

Hodapp 201111—5 Lewis lOOw —1 

At the Millwood Gun Club shoot last Sunday, W. 
Price was the winner of the monthly medal. The 
following officers for the ensuing year were elected at 
a club meeting held on the same day: George Collins, 
President; Clarence Ashlin, Vice-President; R. Van 
Norden, Secretary-Treasurer; Harry Wagner, Cap- 
tain. The scores made at the shoot were as follows: 

Events 2 3 4 5 

20 targets 15 target 25 targets 15 targets 

Haas 19 8 23 10 

Collins 14 12 19 12 

Price 15 13 21 12 

Ashlin 16 14 19 14 

Wayman 15 10 15 

Kewell 15 10 17 10 

Collins, Jr IS 8 16 9 

Newlands 16 6 15 

Wagner 12 7 16 7 

VanNorden 16 8 14 10 

Shreve 15 8 17 12 

Johnson 10 8 11 10 

Falkenstien 10 7 8 11 

Harvey 18 15 21 14 

Quaill 13 20 

Coldstock 14 10 14 

Butler 10 8 7 

Johns 12 7 7 



San Jose, thirteen members participated. The club 
season embraces five consecutive Sunday shoots. Ray 
Schilling and Norman Metcalf were the high guns laBt 
Sunday. 

The scores in the club match at 25 targets were: N. 
H. Cadwallader 14, S. G. Tompkins 14, Allen Holmes 
15, W. B. Hobson 15, V. J. LaMott 16, E.M.Barnes 
17, N. L. Bettman 14, E. E. Young 11, A.A.Brown 

14, R. Schilling 21, Norman Metcalf 18, N. Hudleberg 

15. 

C. Rockwood of the Rod and Gun Club, Butte, 
Mont., D. Herschle of Vallejo, F. A. Hodapp and C. 
C. Gill of Martinez, P. J. Walsh of Black Point. 
Marin county, were the out of town participants in 
the Union Gun Club pigeon shoot last Sunday. 

The California Wing Club pigeon shoot for July is 
the card at Ingleside to-morrow. 

To-morrow is the fixed date for the final shoot, this 
season, of the College City Gun Club at North 
Berkeley . 

At the Washington Gun Club shoot, last Sunday, 
Monte Newbert won the medal, over the other Sacra- 
mento shooters, with a straight score of 25. One 
more shoot will close the club trap season for 1904. 
The scores made were as follows: 

Ten targets— Ruhstaller 8, 7, 10, 10; F. Adams 6, 5, 
4, 8; Gould 5, 6, 9; Stephens 9, 9 9, 10; Guisto 7, 9, 9, 
6; Vetter 8, 8, 10, 8; Hagerty 8; Newbert 9, 7, 6; D. 
Ruhstaller 5; Morgan 3; Englehart 9, 5; Wulff 5; 
Brown 5; E. Adams 7, 9, 7, 8; Peek 8. 

Fifteen targets— Ruhstaller 12, 14, 12: F. Adams 9, 
10; Newbert 13, 11, 13; Gould 10; Guisto 11, 6, 15, 14; E. 
Adams 14, 13, 10; Vetter 13, 10, 12; Stephens 11, 13. 14, 
14; Hagerty 10; Englehart 11, 11; F. Brown II. 

Club shoot, 25 targets— F. Adams 12; Vetter 20; 
Morgan 20; Ruhstaller 24; E. D. Adams 23; Guisto 20; 
Newbert 25; S;ephens23; Englehart 17; Hagerty 17; 
F. Brown 13. _ 

Game Law Notes. 



At the initial shoot of the Santa Clara County Fish 
and Game Association Gun Club on the 26th inst at 



Many sportsmen throughout the State have recently 
received circulars informing them that certain 
changes of the game laws are in contemplation and 
that a movement has been inaugurated, under the 
auspices of the California State Game and Fish Pro- 
tective Association to bring about these changes in 
several different ways, particularly the statutes per- 
taining to deer and fish. 

The circular, signed by President H. T. Payne, con- 
tains among other things a courteous request, asking 
that recipients will kindly answer to the best of their 
belief and knowledge a series of questions enumerated. 

The purpose in sending the circulars out is to gain 
better knowledge of the local conditions existing on 
all matters relating to the game and fish parts of the 
State. The queries put forth are such as "What is 
your estimate on the number of deer killed in your 
resident county each year; portion illegally killed; 
class of people killing illegally; portion Killed by non- 
residents; time for deer to commence to run; length 
of time you think the open season should be; dates of 
season; how many deer should one person be allowed 
to kill in season; damage done to crops by deer, and 
how many are killed by farmers." Various other 
questions along the same line are asked. Similar 
queries relating to duck, quail, doveB, English snipe, 
shore birds and trout are set forth. One of the prin- 
cipal questions relating to trout is "How many should 
a person be allowed to catch in one day, and what 
should be the size limit?" 

Aside from these numerous queries, all of which are 
of vital interest to the sportsman, are several others 
of a miscellaneous nature, such as "Would you favor 
a license being put on all sportsmen coming into the 
county from other sections for the purpose of killing 
game, the money so collected to be used for the better 
protection of game?" Space is also given for sugges- 
tions. 

San Jose sportsmen are evidently dissatisfied with 
the county law relating to dove shooting for the 
Mercury of the 27uh states: 

There is a growing sentiment among sportsmen of 
this city and county against the long-closed season 
for doves. The state law allows the killing of doves 
from July 1st to February 15th, but several months 
ago, through the efforts of the Santa Clara County 
Fish and Game Association, the board of supervisors 
of this county passed an ordinance prohibiting the 
shooting of doves until October 15th. The members 
of the association did this in order to protect the 
quail, for there were many hunters throughout the 
county, who, instead of confining themselves to kill- 
ing these birds, would shoot quail as well. By pro- 
hibiting the shooting of doves until October 15th the 
association thought it would be able to keep hunters 
from killing quail. 

The action of the board of supervisors has not met 
with general satisfaction throughout the county. 
There are many sportsmen who like dove shooting, 
but who have to do without their sport, as by the 
time the dove law is out all the birds have disap- 
peared. Doves in this valley have nearly all matured 
by the middle of July or the first of August and after 
remaining a few weeks in the grain fields they leave 
for other parts. 

Several weeks ago a petition was circulated and a 
great number of sportsmen signed it, asking the board 
of supervisors to rescind the ordinance. The signers 
of the petition ask that they be allowed to shoot 
doves, at least during the month of August, when 
these birds are most numerous. 

The petition has been presented to the board of 
supervisors and at the last meeting the matter was 
laid over until the next meeting. At that time a 
delegation will visit the board and will speak in behalf 
of their petition. 

Policeman Kavanagh of the Park force arres' 
J. Ferrari, last Sunday, in the act of killin: 
He was caught red-handed by the officer, who 



1G 



©he gveeinev cmfc gtptfrtemcm 



[July 2, ;904 



him wring the neck of a bird and tuck it in his inside 
Docket Ferrari is one of a number of men who have 
been going to the Park and using air guns and other 
noiseless weapons for the killing of quail. He was 
released on $50 cash bail. 

Chief Deputy Commissioner Charles T. Vogelsang 
reports the following disposition of several cases: 

.u.'lield, of Glenville, Kern county, was 

arrested, June 20th, by Deputy Fish Commissioner 

Klein for killing mountain quail. He was taken 

before Justice MoKamy, of Glenville, who promptly 

found him guilty and fined him $25, which he paid. 

T B Hamlin, of Laytonville, Mendocino county, 

was arrested , .1 une 2 1st, by Depu ty Fish Commissioner 

I ivender for having deer meet in hi6 possession 

during the close season. His case was set for trial 

before Justice Braden at Laytonville. 

John Dondera of Jackson, Mendocino county, was 
arrested, June 22d, by Deputy Fish Commissioner O. 
H. Reichling for killlngdoves during the close season. 
He was taken before Judge Goldner, of Jackson, who 
fined him $25 Two men at Sutter Creek were also 
arrested for killing doves during the close season, by 
Deputy Fish Commissioner C B. Arditto. Justice 
Rose of Sutter Creek fined one of them, George John 
son, $50. The other case is set for trial. 

Frank Linville, of Madera county, was arrested, 
June20th, by Game Warden Frank Oyler for killing 
gray squirrel during the close season. Justice John- 
son, o( Fresno Flats, fined him $25. 

P. Pero and C. Vecci were arrested, June 20th, by 
Officer Gardner ol Los Angeles for killing quail. Both 
men were taken before Justice Glover, who found 
them both guilty and fined them each $25. 
•* 

World's Fair Kennel Show. 



The exhibition of dogs at the Universal Exposition 
at St. Louis next October promises to be of intense 
interest in kennel circles and to fanciers in all sections 
of the world where the highest class of dogs are bred. 
The show of dogs at the World's Fair will be for 
the promotion of the special interests of the breeders 
of thoroughbred dogs and will be conducted on the 
same lines that are universal and so popular with the 
exhibitors of all other classes of live stock. The 
classification will include only established breeds of 
record and the chief competition, as UBual at live 
stock shows, will be in the open class. No previous 
prize winner, properly entered, will be debarred from 
competition, whether owned in the United States, 
Canada, or elsewhere. 

Entries of dogs must be filed with Colonel Charles 
F. Mills, Chief of the Department of Live Stock, on 
the prescribed form of the exposition on or before 
September 10, 1904. 

The exposition grounds will be open for the recep- 
tion ol dogs on Saturday, October 22, 1904, and the 
exhibition will begin Tuesday, October 25th, aDd close 
Friday, October 28, 1904. 

The dog classification for the World's Fair is, it is 
claimed, the most complete and advanced from the 
breeders' standpoint, that has ever been published, 
and provides, for each of seventy-three breeds, 
classes for dog, one year old or over; pupry dog, 
six and under twelve months; bitch, one year old or 
over; and puppy bitch, six and under twelve months. 
Breeding qualities will be recognized by prizes for 
the get of one dog, as shown by four animals of either 
sex, aDy age over six months; and the produce of one 
bitch, as shown by two animals of either sex, any age 
over six months. 

The chief trophy to the dog fancier of the Univer- 
sal Exposition will be the premier championship for 
the exbibitor making the best showing of any breeds 
Id all tbe sections named above and as determined by 
the largest aggregate amount of purses awarded to 
animals owned by one exhibitor. 

The cash prizes of the exposition for dogs aggre- 
gates $8<84, with no entry fee or expense to the ex- 
hibitor other than $2.50 to be paid to the committee 
for cage for the dog, the feed, care, exhibition and 
shipment. The leading breeds of dogs will each re- 
ceive $144 In cash prizes and advertising of untold 
value. 

Tbe president of tbe American Kennel Club, Hon. 
August Belmont, the president of the Canadian Ken- 
nel Club, John G. Kent, Mr. Marcel A. Vlti, the 
secretary of the Philadelphia Kennel Show, and other 
leading kennel club authorities have highly compli- 
mented the plans adopted for tbe conduct of the 
World 'e Fal r dog Bhow. 

Tbe following address to the dog fanciers of this 
and foreign countriet by the gentlemen named above 
will be read with interest by fanciers In all portions of 
the world who are conditioning their best dogs for ex- 
hibition at tli,' exposition: 

lilbltors of dogs at tho Universal Exposition 
ol 1804: 
Tho undersigned oommlttee, on behalf ol American 
dog feooLei lontemplati nal at qj hiblts of 

dogs at Ui> Universal Exposition ol 1904, have com- 
pleted extremely satisfactory and ad vanlagoous ar- 
wltn tin, Department <■( Live stock of 
World's Fair whereby tin, oommlttee is to re- 
and return to their 
owners at thoclo*'' nf On. k> i lugs ex- 

.it Hi- Louisiana Purohasi Kxpusltlon, October 

The ' arranged for .standard size 

beuoh ind win provide at 

I on ground pply for all re- 

oommtttee will also provide feed 

"ii exhibition and the 

nocossary uIodhIIs fori ad furnish all needed 

attendants 

Tho committor, for all tho necessary accommoda- 



tions other than the buildings, including cages, furni- 
ture and all services in connection with the receipt, 
feed, care, exhibition and return of dogs, such as are 
usually provided for like exhibitions, agrees to accept 
from "exhibitors in full for first-class service and 
attention, two dollars and fifty cents for each dog or 
puppy exhibited. 

Tbe committee will provide for the best sanitary 
arrangements, and the proper care and feed of the 
dogs during the show, which will be held under the 
immediate personal supervision of competent attend- 
ants of dogs and recognized authorities in such 
matters. 

The committee will use due diligence for the care 
and safety of all dogs exhibited. Watchmen will be 
kept on duty day and night; but it must be distinctly 
understood by all exhibitors that the management 
will not be responsible for loss or damage to any dog 
exhibited, whether the result of accident or other 
cause. 

The kennel show of the universal exposition of 1904 
has been planned on the most advanced and satis- 
factory lines for the promotion of the special interests 
of the breeders of pure-bred dogs and has received 
pledges of the cordial and hearty support of the 
kennel clubs of this and foreign countries. 

The international character of the Universal Ex- 
position Kennel Show and the necessity for the due 
recognition of the registration of dogs from all coun- 
tries, recorded in the home and foreign stud books 
has made it necessary and desirable that the World's 
Fair Kennel Show be held under the expositions own 
code of rules, which meets all the requirements nec- 
cessary to insure competent and just awards and the 
best care of exhibits and is fully approved by the 
presidents of home and foreign kennel clubs. 

It has been decided that inasmuch as the World's 
Fair Kennel Show is universal in character and is to 
be held under rules approved by the officers of the 
kennel clubs of this and foreign countries, we will 
favor the proposition that the wins at the universal 
exposition of 1904 shall be published in the home and 
foreign kennel club stud books. 

In estimating the cost necessary for the benching, 
feeding, care and other expenses at the Bhow this 
committee have made a most careful estimate based 
upon tbe number of probable entries (as indicated in 
correspondence with dog owners conducted by the 
exposition management and through other channels). 
While it is not thought the Bum named will more 
than equal expenses, yet if any surplus should result, 
the amount will be employed for additional testi- 
monial prizes to be awarded to the exhibitors winning 
prizes at the show. 

For further information concerning the foregoing 
address Marcel A. Viti, Secretary of the Committee, 
1416 S. Penn Square, Philadelphia. 

August Belmont, 
Makcel A. Vitti, 
John G. Kent, 

Committee Representing American Dog Fanciers. 



Spokane Show. 

The premium list is out for the second annual show 
of the Spokane Kennel Club at the Interstate Fair 
Grounds, Spokane, Wash., October 5, 6, 7 and 8, 1904. 
Entries will close September 26th. The entry fee will 
be $2.00 for each dog entered in one class only and 
$1.00 additional for each class where a dog is entered 
in more than one class. A listing fee of 25 cents will 
be charged for each dog. If preferable, intending 
exhibitors can register a dog in the Field Stud, the fee 
for which will be $1.00 after July 1st. The classifica- 
tion embraces 322 classes, with Bilver medals to first, 
bronze medals to second as well as diplomas to first, 
second, third and winners. The ribbon colors are the 
same as in vogue at other showB. Medals and diplomas 
will be ready for distribution at the close of the show. 
Among the special prizes are 27 handsome cups offered 
by the leading business men of Spokane. Mr. Julius 
Redelsheimer offers a silver plate for the best kennel 
shown. Glen Tana Collie Kennels offei a cup for the 
best Irish Setter bitch. Cash prizes of $20 each are 
offered handlers for the best string from California, 
Washington, Oregon and British Columbia respec- 
tively. There will be a number of additional prizes 
and Bpecials announced in thecatalogue. The general 
classification arrangement, awards and distribution 
of specials for the various breeds is encouraging for a 
large entry. 

The officers of the club are: Thos. S. Griffith, Presi- 
dent; Jno. M. Bunn, Vice-President; A. B. Jackson 

Secretary-Treasurer. Bench Show Committer a! 

B. Jackson, C. D. Bond, Thos. S. Griffith and A. f! 
Weisman. Veterinary surgeon, Dr. Pike. 

John Bradshaw, of San Francisco, has been engaged 
to judge all breeds. 

For entry blanks, premium lists or other informa- 
tion, address Secretary A. B. Jackson, 39 Jamieson 
Bldg., Spokane, Wash. 



DOINGS IN DOGEOM. 



Tluvr ICnglisli Setter bitch puppies whelped Jan- 
uary 12, 1904, by Sousa (Tony Boy-Sport's Destiny) 
out of Fleety Hill (Oakley Hill-Sport's Fleety) re- 
cently purchased by Mt. View Kennels of A. H. Nel- 
son, Taeoma, Wash., have been nominated by Mr 
Nelson for the Am. Field Futurity for 1905. 

Ml.. View Kennels recently received the Llewellyn 
Setter bitch Ramona (Lady's Count Gladstone Sport's 
Destiny) from A. H. Nelson. 



The charge was absolutely without foundation so 
far as Mrs. Roi was concerned. What its merits 
might develop in another direction— selling a Btolen 
dog and giving a false pedigree is now problematical, 
for the dog is dead, poisoned, it is claimed, by a party 
unknown. The original ownership of the dog can not 
now be proven, and one story in connection therewith 
is as good as another. 

For the present the matter iB ended, Mrs Roi 
being advised by Secretary J. P. Norman in a letter 
dated June 6th: 

"Mrs. A. A. Roi, San Francisco — Dear Madam: I 
take much pleasure in communicating the following 
resolution passed by this committee at its meeting 
held on the 4th inst. 

"Resolved, That Mrs. A. A. Roi be and hereby is 
exonerated from the charge made, of showing a dog 
under a wrong name and pedigree knowingly, and f 
showing said dog as hers, when knowing that it w s 
not her bona fide property, and that no suspicion f 
fraud can be imputed to her action. 

"The papers in the case haye been sent to N ■> 
York for instructions as to further action, and will >e 
returned to you as soon as the matter has be.-i 
terminated." 

Mr. Payne Shatter is much enthused over several 
three months' old Llewellyn puppies by ttar White 
out of his bitch Queen. W. S. Kittle has one of the 
litter and considers he is the lucky possessor of a 
most promising Setter. Chas. W. Kellogg and Prof. 
La Mar also have each one of Queen's puppies. 



The Dove Season. 



The open season for dove shooting commenced 
yesterday, the 1st, and will continue until February 
15th next. The open period is the state law but in 
several counties the season has been shortened as 
follows: 

Fresno — August 15 to February 1. 

Kings — September 1 to February 15, 

Los Angeles — August 1 to September 1. 

Madera — August 15 to February 1. 

Merced — August 15 to February 1. 

Orange — August 1 to February 15. 

San Bernardino — August 1 to October 1. 

Santa Clara — October 15 to February 15. 

Yolo — AuguBt 1 to February 1. 

In all other counties the open season iB that 
mentioned in the general state law. 



The black bass season opened on the 1st. Repots 
from Cisco were encouraging enough to tempt F. H. 
Reed to make the trip to Eagle lake, a good fishing 
water in the vicinity of the mountain town. 



Salmon fishing at Santa Cruz and Capitola is re- 
ported to be in full swing. The fish taken average 
larger in size than those caught a fortnight ago. 
Recently bait has been exceedingly scarce, the boat- 
men having been demanding and getting 75 cents a 
dozen for sardines or anchovies. Many anglers re- 
gard the price in the nature of an imposition and rely 
on the Wilson or Stewart spoons, 4's and 5's. In this 
they have not been disappointed for a large number 
of salmon have been taken on the trolliDg spoons. 

Among the successful anglers last Sunday were 
James Chesley and Walter Burlingame, who came in 
with 16 fine fish in their boat. Another boat contain- 
ing Dr. Redmond Payne, Paul Shattuck and Mr. 
Jones had 14 salmon. Messrs Stevens and Schmidt 
went out at 5:30 and returned at 10:30 a. m. having 
caught 18 splendid fish. Louis Weinman and son also 
were very successful. Numerous other fishermen were 
out and had a great time with the salmon. The run 
bids fair to last several weeks. 



The angling fraternity are now enjoying fly-fi9hing 
on many streams. The exodus of sportsmen to favor- 
ite trout waters to-day and to-morrow is unprecedent- 
ed in the annals of local fishing. 

Coming Events. 



The following resolution of the Pacific Advisory 
Committee was adopted subsequent to proceedings 
takon by that body in investigation of a charge made 
against Mrs. Roi of violation of A. K. C. rules in 
showing a dog owned by another party and under a 
wrongly given pedigree. 



April 1-Sept. 10. Oct. 16-Feb. 1— Open season tor taking steel- 
head in tidewater. 
April 1-Nov. 1— Trout season open. 
May 1-Sept. 1— Close season for shrimp. 
July 1-Jan. 1— Open season for black bass. 

July SO— Saturday Contest No. 9. Class Series, Stow lake 
2:30 p. m. 

July 31— Sunday Contest No 9. Class Series, Stow lake, 10 A. M 

Aug. 15-April 1— Open season for lobsters and crawfish. 

Nov. 1-Sept. 1— Open season for crabs. 

Sept. I0-Oct. 16— Close season in tidewater for steelhead. 

Nov. 15-Sept. 10— Season open for taking salmon above tide 
water. 

Gun. 

July 1-Feb. 15 — Dove season open. 

July 3— California Wing Club. Live birds. Ingleside. 

July 3— College City Gun Club. Blue rocks. North Berkeley. 

July 10— Union Gun Club. Blue rocks. Ingleside. 

July 10— Empire Gun Club. Blue rocks. Alameda Point. 

July 15-Nov. 1— Deer season open. 

July 17— Golden Gate Gun Club. Blue rocks. Ingleside. 

July 31— Millwood Gun Club. Blue rocks. Mill Valley. 

Aug. Merchandise shoot. Blue rocks. Ingleside 

Sept. 1-Feb. 15— Open season for mountain quail, grouse and 
sage hen. 

Feb. 15-Oot. 15— Closed season :or quail, duoks, eto. 
Bencli Shows. 

June 22, 23— Ladles Kennel Association of America Minneola, 
L. I. Miss Gertrude De Coppet. Seoretary, New York City. 

June 25— Long Island Kennel Club. Brighton Beach Raoe 
Track, Coney Island. Jos. M. Dale. Secretary. 

Sept. 12, 13— Newport Bench Show. Newport. R. I. F. M. Ware, 
Secretary. 

Sept 28, 29— Valley Fair Kennel Club. Initial show. Brattle- 
boro, Vt. H. C. Rice, Secretary. 

Oct. 4, r— Danbury Agricultural Society. Danbury, Conn. Jas 
Mortimer, Superintendent. 

Oct. 5, 8— Spokane Kennel Club. Spokane, Wash. W. K. L. 



July. 2, 1904 J 



©Jtte giveeitev cmo gtpovtemcm 



11 



THE FARM. 



Keep a Dairy Record. 

Not one dairyman in ten, I believe, 
keeps any sort of dairy record or knows 
except by guess which are the best and 
which are the poorest cows iD the herd ; 
which pay a profit and which do not pro- 
duce enough milk to pay the feed bill. 

There are men who keep cows (not by 
any means dairymen), who cannot feed 
properly, or in any part of their cow 
keeping do anything properly. 

Advice of any sort would do these "cow- 
keepers" no good. They are lost in in- 
iquity, but to the dairymen who expect 
their cows to keep them, who feed well 
and carefully, who figure closely the ex- 
penses and income of dairying, and who, 
indeed, make a profit on their wel 1 di- 
rected labor, I want to urge just the little 
more care and figuring necessary 10 a 
dairy record, believing it will pay them 
better for thesr labor than any other 
work they ever did in connection with 
their farming operations. 

Where is the man who can guess with 
any degree of accuracy which is the best 
cow in his herd? Let him take into his 
stable for a year a milk scale and a Bab 
cock tester, and it is more than likely 
he will find a half dozen cows that are 
bringing him in more profit than that 
"old fill pail" who has always been the 
apple of his eye. Either her milk is low 
in test or she dries up too soon, making 
the yearly average less than some of the 
more plodding performers who keep on 
all the year around, giving a fair mess of 
reasonable rich milk. And then the 
pleasure knowing all about your cows. 
Would't it be less of drudgery when you 
are milking your string of cows to-morrow 
morniDg to know that the firBt one in the 
line produced last year over 300 pounds 
of butter, and the next one is not giving 
much of a mess now, but the record 
shows that she has already brought in 
$75, and it is about time she went dry 
And here's Besf . She's doing fine for a 
heifer, and then Star. You have got her 
on the list. She is getting pretty plump 
and the butcher is coming around next 
week. There is more money in her for 
steaks than for milk, and so on down the 
line, and before you know it the milking 
iB done, and you wonder why you don't 
dread milking as you used to. Lots of 
wo:k to keep a dairy record? Xot much 
work. All you have to do is to mark off 
a Bbeet of paper in squares and put the 
names or numbers of the cows down the 
left side and the dates across the top, 
tack it on a board and hang it beside the 



Warranted 

to give satisfaction. 




GOMBAILT'S 

CAUSTIC BALSAM 

A safe, speedy and 
positive cure for 

Curb , Splint , Sweeny , Capped Hock , 
Strained Tendons, Founder, Wind Puffs, 
and all lameness from Spavin, Ringbone 
and other bony tumors. Cures all skin 
diseases or Parasites, Thrush, Diphtheria. 
Removes all Bunches from Horses or 
Cattle. 

As a HUMAX REMEDY for Rhen 
matimn. SpruioB, Sore Throat, etc., iu 
is invaluable. 

Every bottle or Caustic Balsam sold is 
Warranted to pive satisfaction Price $1.50 
per bottle. Sold by dmpcists. or sent by ex- 
press, charges paid, with (til) directions for its 
use. Send for descriptive circulars, testimo- 
nials, etc. Address 
TEE LA WREHCB-WILLIAMS COMPANY, Cleveland, Ohio. 



scales in the barn. When each cow's 
milk is weighed mark it down. You. will 
get pretty fai.- results if you weigh only 
one day in the week. At the end of the 
month figure up the month's milk, and 
the amount of butter by the test and 
make out a monthly record sheet.— C. S. 
Arnold. 

— o 

Feeding Horses. 

In caring for the horse the question of 
proper feeding is all important. The care 
given the horse aloug other lines may be 
done exactly right but the feeding may 
not be given proper judgment. Too many 
farmers do not feed their horses suffic- 
iently heavy, while on the other hand 
there are those who overdo the matter. 
The mistake in thelight feeding of horses 
applies especially to the horses that are 
expected to do heavy farm work only, al- 
though a great number of these same 
horses are obliged to do not only farm 
work but road work besides. If we con- 
sult the statistics of some of the large 
cities in reference to this matter we will 
find that horses there are much better fed 
as a rule than those on the farm. To 
illustrate this point the average road 
horse in the city, or the street horses, 
that are drawing cabs and loads of almost 
similar weight, are fed from 14 to 15 
pounds of oats and 10 to 12 pounds of hay 
daily, and where corn is a part of the ra- 
tion the proportions are about 15 pounds 
of corn, 10 pounds of oats and 15 pounds 
of hay. In the feeding of the dray horse, 
whose work is more nearly like that of 
the farm horse, the ration is at least one- 
half more than what it is for horses doing 
lighter work. Let us Btop and compare 
for a moment these rations with thoBe fed 
by the average farmer. With the farm- 
ers, in too many cases, the ration for 
grain is corn and corn stover for rough- 
age, and if corn stover is not used for 
roughage a poor quality of hay is often 
employed. It is not to be wondered at, 
then, that many farm horses quickly 
wear out when the spring work begins. 
The farmer should be prepared to feed 
oats as a part of the regular ration 
throughout the year if at all possible, es- 
pecially is this true when heavy work is 
being carried on. 

He should aim to feed for the work 
which the animalsare expected todo, and 
bear in mind that where horses are em 
ployed to do farm work and go on the 
road besides, great care should be exer- 
cised in feeding properly. — Successful 
Farming. 

m — 

Fattening Heifer Calves. 



year of her life, proved to be absolutely | making without branching off into fiesh- 
worthlesB as a cow. ! making. To secure such cattle we must 

There is no doubt whatever that Bfcrong j first use only bulls of the most pro- 
and decided dairy parentage will he'p | nounced dairy breeds. Second, we must 
very much to hold a heifer quite true to I rear the heifer so her dairy temperament 
her purpose, in spite, even, of neglect or ; or tendency will not be spoiled by Injudi- 
unwise rearing and handling, as well as cious feeding and handling. He is the 



feeding. 

This inherited tendency toward decided 
dairy function is what we call "dairy 
temperament." That is what we are 
after where we select a bvll of the longeat 
and most decided dairy parentage possi- 
ble. On the contrary, it ia the beefy or 
flesh-making tendency or temperament 
that we try to avoid when we reject Birea 
or mothers which show by their build 
that thev possess such tendencies. 

This ia not to say that many cowa of 
beefy form do not possess strong milk 
giving powerB and capacity. But whan 
we are breeding dairy cattle the road lies 
straight before us, and our purpose iB to 
endow each heifer and sire with as strong 
and potent dairy tendencies or tempera- 
ment as we can. In the most decided of 
dairy breeds there occasionally crops out 
an animal that shows a decided leaning 
to the flesh-making temperament. Ib it 
wise then, by feeding to encourage the 
growth of this latent, beefy tendency? 
On the contrary, iB not the better part of 
wisdom to both breed and feed for the en- 
largement of the dairy temperament and 
capacity in our cattle? 

"One swallow does not make a sum- 
mer." Our one experiment does not set- 
tle a principle, but we find in practice 
that we have now altogether too many 
cows in the country with a low, weak 
dairy temperament. The other day an 
Elgin dairyman was complaining to us 
that about eight out of ten of the cowa he 
bought were of such low dairy tempera- 
ment that he could not crowd them to- 
ward milk-making without their putting 
on flesh at once, and gradually drying up 
in milk. 

Here is the line of division in tempera- 
ment. The true dairyman wants cattle 
that can be pushed along toward milk- 



best dairyman who can best develop his 
heifers to be good cowb. 

Third, all after-treatment to the heifer 
either helps or hinders the performance of 
her inborn purpose. The wise dairyman 
studies ou!; what this treatment is for the 
Bake of his own profit. — Hoard's Dairy- 
man. 



"Johnson grass" is regarded aa a farm 
peat in many parts of the south, Texas 
having passed a law which fines railway 
corporations $25 where they allow it to 
grow on their rights of way. Recently a 
Texas farmer brought an action against a 
railway company under this law which 
went against it in the Texas courts. An 
appeal was taken to the United StateB 
supreme court, where the conatitutionality 
of the law was affirmed. 



For years it has been the concensus of 
opinion, with the most studious dairy 
farmers, that it was not a wise thing to 
rear heifer calves in a fat condition. 
ThiB judgment, on the whole, we believe 
to he a sound one. And yet, there is a 
good deal of diverse judgment upon it. 
Dairymen do not agree aB to matters of 
practice, any better than people in other 
professions. On page 229 of the issue of 
the Dairyman of April Sth, George F. 
Vincent make3 the statement that "there 
is no danger of getting the dairy calf too 
fat. If it has good milking ances.ors it g 
chances are all right for a good dairy 
cow." 

It seems to us in the light of some pre- 
vious experiences that Mr. Vincent's, 
statement is too sweeping. A number of 
years ago we had a fine, high-grade JerBey 
cow. The first calf she brought was a 
heifer. We reared this calf in what we 
thought sound practice, keeping her 
thrifty and growing, but not fat. The 
second calf waa also a heifer. We con- 
cluded to make an experiment and feed 
this heifer fattening food from the start, 
till she was a year old. The third calf 
was also a heifer, and we reared her aB 
we did the first. Now for the result. All 
three heifers were sired by first-class Jer- 
sey bulls, ao there was no difficulty about 
"good milking ancestors." The firat and 
third heifers proved to be valuable cows ; 
the second one that we kept fat the first 



Jackson's Napa Soda is sold in every 
city. towD and hamlet in the State. 



PRIVILEGES! 

FO R SA LE. 

Pacific Coast Trotting Horse Breeders 
Association Meeting at 

SAN JOSE 

AUGUST 3, 4, 5 and 6. 1904 

•RIDS FOR THE FOLLOWING PRIVILEGES 
-L* will be received up to noon, "Wednesday, 
July 30, 1904: 

Raftinft 1 /Auction and Mntnel Pools, or\ 
DClllll^ V Auction and Totaliiator ) 

Bar and Cigars, 
Restaurant, 

Candy and Nuts, 
Programmes. 

A certified check for 50 per cent should accom- 
pany each bid. Right reserved to reject any or 
all bids. 

F. W. KELLEI, Secretary, 
36 Geary St., San Francisco 



1879 
GEN. GRANT 

Tinier. 



ORRIN HICKOK 
Driver, 



ST. JULIEN 2:12 3-4 

The old "ST, JULIEN" SHOEING SHOP of MARTIN O'DEA & SON 
removed to Union Square Avenue, directly in rear of old shop. 

MARTIN O'DEA & SON, - - Proprietors. 



COME AND SEE US. 



Phone: Grant 114. 




$100 for 50 Cents 

would be a bargain. Your own druggist will sell you for 50 cents a bottle 
Of CRAFT'S DISTEMPER CURE on a FOSITITE GUARANTEE. It 

will cure distemper and save your horse, or your money back. Isn't that 
fair? Price $4.50 a dozen. Large size $1 a bottle at druggists or direct, 
prepaid. Booklet free. 



Wells Medicine Co. Cbemi * u and 



: Germologists 



3 3d st, Lafayette, Ind. 



SINGMASTER&SONS.ofKeota Iowa, 

BREEDERS AND IMPORTERS OF| 

PERCHERONS, SHIRES, BELGIAN AND FRENCH COACH HORSES 

Have a Branch Barn at 

63 North San Pedro Street, San Jose, Cal. 

High-class ock always on hand. It will pay to call andjnspect stock if you arein need of a 



good stallion 



C. O, STANTON, San Jose Manager. 



HARNESS and SADDLES 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 

Large Stock. Low Prices. 

JEPSEN BROS. CO. inc.) 



110-112 MARKET ST., SAN FRANCISCO, 



TWO BLOCKS 
FROM FERRY 




W. L,. DE CLOW 
Proprietor 



CEDAR RAPIDS (IOWA) JACK FARM 

FARMERS' SUPPLY OF THE MIDDLE WEST. 

In my sale April J>th I; was unable to obtain satisfactory prices for my 
choicest animals in the Belgian and Coach horses, also my best and largest 
Home-bred and Spanish Jacks were not sold. 

I will offer this stock at 50% of their value for the nest thirty days. This" 
is a great opportunity. 

W. L. DE CLOW, Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 



Dp»H i o-i-ppc Tn hi 1 1 at(*t\ and type written read y for framin e r 

rCUlglCCa laUUlalCU Write for prices. Breeder and 
Sportsman, 36 Geary Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



12 



©h* gtjreefccr arib §v"rtsman 



[July 2, 1904 



Creating Breeds by Crossing. 



•»: 



The usual process bv which breeds are created is by 
selection. In nature varieties are thus established. 
Animals led to themselves gradually adjust them- 
selves to the conditions under which they exist, and 
conditions remain unohangod the ani- 
mal organism is persistent in its new type. In such 
cases the new conditions under which a group of 
animals Is called upon to exist, the variations in the 
group are induced primarily by the environment. 
New characters are attaohed to the organisms and 
old ones aro lost. Then the creative power of her- 
edity asserts itself in forming new characters and 
further destroying old ones as a result of the various 
combinations made In the blending of characters. 
Natural selection does the rest to fix and maintain the 
new type. 

The croatlon of breeds by crossing le another mat- 
ter and is purely the work of heredity. At least, 
heredity is the prime faotor in creating new char- 
acters by crossing types more or less violently op- 
posed to each other. The earlier creations of her- 
edity may be influenced by environments and new 
variations induced as a result. But the chief factor 
in creating breeds by crossing is heredity. The pro- 
cess develops a number of serious problems in her- 
edity. 

Crossing is the special delight of the enthusiastic 
amateur breeder and its awful results are often his 
only reward. It looks to be a very simple thing to 
the amateur to combine the excellent qualities of 
two well-bred breeds and destroy those qualities in 
the breeds that aro not desirable. The amateur 
breeder reasons something like this: 

Here is a high-couraged enthusiastic brilliant bresd, 
full of fire and energy. It has plenty of quality, but 
is lacking in certain useful physical and psychical 
characters, and has some undesirable characters. On 
the other hand, there is another breed which lacks 
courage, enthusiasm, brilliancy of performance and 
energy, but it has many useful physical and psycholo- 
gical characters that are wanting in the other breed, 
and certain undesirable characters. The amateurs 
reasons that it is the simplest problem in breeding to 
cross these two breeds and create a new breed that 
will have all the desirable qualities of each breed, 
without any of the undesirable characters. 

Anyone may sit down with a pencil and paper, take 
these two breeds apart and put the parts he likes into 
an ideal and throw the other parts away. But when 
he comes to make the cross he finds the characters do 
not combine and blend in fact as he combined them 
on paper. And the amateur breeder does not know 
why. He might not know to an absolute certainty 
how to cross breeds if he knew all that is known of 
heredity, but the more familiar the breeder is with 
the many problems in heredity that may be solved, 
the greater will be his degree of success in creating a 
breed by crossing. 

It should be understood at the outset that undesira- 
ble characters are just as much a part of a breed in 
which they appear as those characters are which are 
desirable, and a breed is just as likely to be prepotent 
in the one as In the other. The undesirable characters 
In two breeds crossed may therefore assert themselves 
In their progeny, while the desirable characters 
of both breeds would be lost. On the other hand the 
desired characters might appear without the undeslra. 
ble characters. The chances are that neither one of 
these things will happen. Instead, there will be a 
mixture of both — some blended in a desirable way, 
others blended in an undesirable way; soma In their 
entirety and others only in part 

In some cases where crosses aro made a certain 
"nick" happens, which appears to assert Itself with 
great regularity In the progeny of the cross. When 
this h.< niform progeny to 

work on. Hut it ofton happens that a wide degree of 
unllkoness prevails In the progeny, in which case a 
freak animal of little or no value may bo devi 

bo bred. Neither 
will b like the conception of the breeder 

befit; ■ I 

very largely an 

power of pro- 

reproduoeany particular 

charai'i. r fuir guena attho bi 

strongth of any parlh :l study of the 

ly for many 

.'.loin. It will bo llkuly to assert Itself 

similar elm i may mako a fair guess at the 

breeding strength of ■ mr character by a 

study of Hi ■ If It ban appeared regularly 

for many generations It will .. assert Itself 

over r similar character In anoti .,rif two 

ohara ters not too vii. !, other 

od >'V ■ long line of thoy will be 

'- to Mend. I 

tftrMtdri ' !■ --.'log. The 



struggle to unite begins in the first cross and is car- 
ried on continually. That is the first important les- 
son to be learned in crossing. When one set of 
characters are more thoroughly fixed than similar 
characters in the other breed, the older characters 
wlllbelUely to assert themselves. At least there 
will be a greater proportion of such characters in the 
progeny. 

Certain characters in a breed are related naturally 
and others are related by chance. In either case 
these related characters, or a majority of them, are 
likely to appear together. The naturally related or 
allied characters form the stronger relationship and 
aro most difficult to break up. For example a certain 
color or peculiar style of horns may be breed charac- 
ters. The characters with which they are related 
have no further relationship than that they have 
appeared regularly together for many generations. 
Habit is an important factor in heredity and these 
characters may be expected to appear together when 
a cross is made, or they may all be absent. Certain 
breeds of dogs have certain physical and psychical 
relationships that have no other dependence on each 
other than the relationship resulting from habit. The 
same is true of all breeds of animals. 

Naturally related characters are those growing out 
of some generic character like courage for example. 
The high couraged animal is aggressive, loves to 
fight for the fight's sake, is keyed up to the fullest 
nervous pitch, is sometimes illtempered. All these 
and other characters develop and becomeindependent 
characters and form a relationship, and fall into the 
habit of appearing regularly together. Timid animals 
have their related characters growing out of timidity. 
There are many physical relationships both natural 
and accidental that get into the habit of appearing 
together, some of them desirable, others undesirable. 
In crossing two breeds this fact must be taken into 
consideration. The breeder may not know the re- 
lated characters until he has made the cross. But if 
he studies the cross well he will be likely to get a good 
idea of them, although he will be certain to gain some 
additional knowledge in the next cross. 

The great skill in breeding is of course in breaking 
up these related characters and preserving those that 
are desirable and breeding out those that are not 
wanted. To do this successfully the breeder must fix 
his own value on any breed charaoter, and he will 
determine this value largely by the difficulty he has 
in fixing it. For example he may find that a desir- 
able type of neck appears regularly with an undesir- 
able shoulder. What is he to do to get the type of 
neck he desires in his breed? If he finds that the 
poor shoulder is exceptional in the breed he can risk 
breeding from the poor shouldered animal for the 
sake of the rare neck. Of course, in crossing the 
good neck on the poor neck pedigree poorer neck will 
prevail, just as the better shoulder will prevail. But 
out of the many he will get an animal with the de- 
sired combination of neck and shoulder. Once hav- 
ing broken up the relationship the breeder may 
create the new relationship of neck and shoulder and 
fix it in the breed. If there should be no natural 
relationship between the neck and shoulder the new 
relationship could be easily maintained. Natural 
relationships are broken up too, but as before stated 
they are difficult to break up, and hard to maintain 
after they are broken up. Viciousness in the horse is 
naturally related to courage, but breeders are pre- 
eistently breeding viciousness out of their strains. In 
spite of that fact it crops out occasionally. Horses of 
high courage may be made vicious by bad treatment, 
and that viciousness is easily made an hereditary 
character. Natural physical relations are difficult to 
break up and maintain as a breed character. The 
race horse has a running shoulder. Introduce his 
blood into a trotting strain and the disposition to run 
will be greatest in the progeny that has the running 
shoulder. Where tho trotting shoulder prevails the 
trotting disposition and trotting action behind will 
maintain a better relationship. The running shoulder 
has a natural relationship with the running disposi- 
tion and the running action generally. The blood of 
tho running horse Is in the pedigree of our ti otters, 
but tho physical and psychical running relationships 
havo been broken up, and a type of trotters fixed by 
persistent training and selection. The trotter has 
tho courage, tho energy, and tho Instinctivo disposi- 
tion to go fast, but he trots naturally, whereas the 
thoroughbred has the running desire. 

In creating that gioup of horses that Is distin- 
guished from other horses as trotting-brcd, a liberal 
use of tho thoroughbred was made on mongrel bred 
horsos of the best trotting tj po. Speed, stamina and 
roflnomont were needed to help make the trotter out 
of scrubs. Tho shoulder of tho race horse was so per. 
slstont In the now croatlon that mechanical appliances 
woro nocessary to make tho horse pick up his feet and 
tOQUlre the best trotting action. Once this action 
was well fixed and tho disposition to trot bred Into the 



nervous system it was not difficult to maintain and 
improve since the new conditions served to help fix 
the desired quality. Set the trotting-bred horse to 
running and keep him at it for many generations and 
the running shoulder, action and instincts would ap- 
pear and have a natural relationship. 

Some of our coach horses are crossed out for the 
purposes of refinement. The characters intended to 
refine are so well fixed and related to the other breed 
characters that they are difficult to separate, and 
give place to a new combination. 

Crossing a long-back breed on a short-back breed 
for the sake of getting the short strong coupling of 
one with the length of chest of the other often results 
disastrously. The ideal contemplated in the cross 
would be an animal, the volume of whose lung power 
would be moved back from the shoulders, giving 
length of chest instead of depth at the shoulder. 
Such an Ideal would be shallow in the chest at the 
shoulder, but would have much of the lung power in 
middle, that is, would have a large barrel. 

In the cross for such a purpose the parts are not 
likely to combine in the desired way. Instead there 
might be a great lengih of back without strength to 
support it. The result would be a sway-backed ani- 
mal, and sway back might thus be fixed as »n inde- 
pendent character and appear occasionally in animals 
of normal strength. It would have a natural relation- 
ship to long weak backs, and would appear more fre- 
quently with the long-baeked specimens. 

This is only one of the dangers of crossing. But it 
is one of the things necessary to know in crossing 
breeds. The long and the short back may be crossed, 
and an animal produced therefrom with a short stout 
loin and a long chest, the distribution of the lung 
power being such as to place the greater volume in 
the middle, giving a big barrel. 

While horses and other animals go fastin all shapes, 
this last formation is the most conducive to speed 
and endurance. Such a formed animal may not be as 
fastas one of a different form, because the one with the 
poorer middle and back may have the better action, 
and may be superior in other respects. But all other 
things being equal the form described is the most 
desirable, and the most difficult to breed, either by 
crossing long and short animals within the breed, or 
by making a direct outcross. 

But no one must suppose that he has created a breed 
when he has made a successful nick in the first cross. — 
C. B. Wkitjord in Breeders Gazette. 



Prof. W. L. Carlyle of tha Colorado Agricultural 
College last month marketed at Denver the 150 head 
of steers that had been in a feeding experiment near 
Loveland. They were divided into three lots. Lot I 
was fed corn chop and beet pulp and alfalfa hay. Lot 
II had the same kind of a ration except corn, ground 
barley and oats being substituted for corn in an equal 
quantity. Lot III had only beet pulp and alfalfa hay. 
One steer of each lot was killed first to be cut up to 
test the meat. These three killed out very close to 
the same percentage, the steer from Lot I being first, 
dressing 62.76 per cent warm. Lot II dressed 62.46 
percent, while the pulp-fed animal dressed 61.86 per 
cent. The cattle were valued at $5.65 for the corn- 
fed lot; $5.50 for the oats and barley lot and $5.35 for 
the straight pulp-fed cattle. There is great interest 
in this experiment in Northern Colorado, and it is 
estimated that there will be in the neighborhood of 
50,000 cattle fed on beet pulp next winter. While 
the pulp alone produces a fine quality of beef, the 
cattle shrink heavily and the addition of a little grain 
improves the cattle greatly. 



The cattle industry in Mexico is assuming large 
proportions and at present there is no organization 
for handling the stock at market places as it is 
handled in the United States. The Mexican govern- 
ment, however, Has finally consented to the construc- 
tion and operation in that country of stock yards on 
the American plan. An expenditure of $300,000 will be 
made in equipping stock yards near Mexico City, and 
the company behind the enterprise, which is said to 
have a capital of $3, 000,000 in gold, is composed largely 
of men who control some of the prominent stock yards 
in the United States. It is stated that the new com- 
pany will be hedged with many urovisions in the 
interest of the producer and consumer. 



More mutton is being consumed in this country 
than ever before in Hb history. This is because there 
aro more people in the country and because the mut- 
ton is of better quality. The deduction which the 
situation seems to warrant is that the man who en- 
gages in sheep breeding in the right way and stays 
with it is practically sure of making good money. As 
time goes on it becomes more and more apparent that 
mutton and lamb are fashionable meats among the 
American people.) 



July 2, 1904] 



ffiiw gtviefrgj? on& ^prjcnci^mmt 



13 



Preparing Land for Irrigation. 

The United States department of agri- 
culture will soon issue bulletin No. 145, of 
the office of experiment stations, describ 
iDg methods of preparing land for irriga- 
tion and applying water to crops in differ- 
ent sections of the arid region of the 
United States. In this bulletin the 
methods of getting rid of sage brush, 
smoothing the ground, building laterals 
and distributing water over fields aB de- 
veloped by the experience of farmers in 
irrigated districts are brought together 
and described. The tools and implements 
used are illustrated and the cost of the 
*ork based upon actual examples in dif- 
ferent stateB, is given. The purpose is to 
afiord beginners a reliable guide both as 
to the coBt of bringing wild land under 
cultivation and methods best suited to 
different Boils, climates and crops. The 
facts included in this bulletin have been 
gathered by the irrigation investigations 
of this office, acting in co-operation with 
the State experiment stations and State 
engineers' offices. 

The bulletin brings out the fact not 
well understood, that the cost of prepar- 
ing the land for irrigation is in many in- 
stances greater than the cost of building 
canals and reservoirs. Detailed figures 
of the cost of checking land bqow that it 
varies in certain districts in California 
from $9.96 to $18.08 per acre. This is 
more than twice the cost of the canal sys- 
tems in the San Joaquin valley, Califor- 
nia, which is given in the report of the 
census bureau for 1902 as $4.99 per irri- 
gated acre. Where the preparing of the 
land is contracted for the cost of checking 
varies Ifrom $7.50 to $20 per acre. The 
price of preparing land for flooding is 
much less, but iB $5 per acre in Wyoming. 
The need of a better understanding of 
this particular branch of irrigation prac- 
tice is becoming more and more impor- 
tant. Reservoirs and canalB are but 
means to accomplish a purpose. That 
purpose is to increase the products of the 
soil. The value of the ditch or reservoir 
depends upon the acreage of land which 
it will serve and the increase in the value 
of the productB which the U8e of water 
will bring about. The t'me is coming 
when the most important problems con- 
nected with irrigation will be the best 
means of applying water and not, aB at 
present, those of canal and reservoir 
building. 

About thirty different methods of ap- 
plying water are now in use. This does 
not mean that there are thirty distinct 
systems, but includes the different ways 
of preparing land by checking, compart- 
ments, deep and shallow furrows, flood- 
ing, sprinkling and subirrigation This 
bulletin gives some of the results of a 
serieB of tests of different methods of ap- 
plying water and the difference in loss of 
water by evaporation in deep and shallow 
furrows and in flooding. About one and 
one-half times as much water was needed 
to irrigate an acre of land by flooding as 
was required in furrows twelve inches 
deep. About one and one-third timeB aB 
much water was needed to irrigate in fur- 
rows three inches deep as in furrows one 
foot deep. A saving of one-third of the 
water by the adoption of a better system 
would mean not only increased profits to 
farmers but a large increase in the acre- 
age which could be irrigated from canals 
or reservoirs. 

"During one of my visits through the 
country districts," said a Denver profes- 
sor, ' I happened to reach a small villiage 
where they were to have a flag raising at 
the school house. After the banner had 
been flung to the breeze, there was an 
exhibition of drawings which the pupils 
had made and of the work they had done 
during the year. The teacher recited to 
them The Landing of the Pilgrims and 
then requested each pupil to try and 
draw from his or her imagination a pict- 
ure of Plymouth Rock. Moat of them 
went to work at once, but one little fellow 
hesitated and at length raised his hand. 
'Well, Willie, what is it?' asked the 
teacher. 'PleaBe, ma'am, do you want us 
to draw a hen or a rooster?' " 



A Few Courses 

in 

Domestic Economy: 

"Arrow" Lard Compound 
"Monarch" Hams 

Can Be Obtained 

from 

All First-Class Grocers. 

WESTERN MEAT COMPANY of California 



INTERNATIONAL 
STOCK FOOD 

3 FEEDS™ ONI CENT 




SAVES $10 WORTH «E CORN as OATS 
EVERY YEAH e»r EACH HORSE 



STALLIONS 
J1L 

Home of 

JAY BIRD 

GENTS:— 

I have been 
feeding "Inter- 
national Stock 
Food" to Jay 
Bird, Baron 
Wilkes,Jr.,and 
Scarlet Wilkes. 
and it has been 
a great help to 
them. Jay Bird 
made a season 
of S3 and "Inter- 
national Stock 
Food" made 
him a surer 
foal getter. 
W.A.BACON, Jr. 

"IfiTEKNATJONAL 

STOCK FOOD" 

ni tk q a Btallioas 

m aros will raise 
(trongor and more 
vigorous colts. It 
makes colts grow 
very rapidly. It 
makes a delicate 
feeder eat heartily. 
It gives race bosses 
more speed and en- 

them healthy. Will 
yon try it without 
advancing a cent? 
Write us at once 
and we will mail 
testimonials and 
full information . 

ISTERSATIOSAL 
STOCK FOOD CO. 
Minneapolis, Mlno. 



CALIFORNIA 

NORTHWESTERN RAILWAY 

Through Picturesque California. 

The Ideal Route for 

Tie ADgler anQ OntinE Triss 

One day's ride from San Francisco will take 
you to some of the finest Trout Streams in the 
State. Along the line and within easy distance 
are many of the best Springs and Summer Resorts 
in the State. The Company maintains a Pish 
Hatchery and annually stocks the many streams 
reached by its road. One million Trout Fry were 
planted last year in these streams. 

Black Bass Pishing can be enjoyed In Russian 
River Dear Guemevilie, Guernewood Park and 
Camp Vacation, in season. 

The best Striped Bass Pishing waters on the 
Coast reached by the Tiburon Ferry. 

VACATION FOR 1904 

Issued annually by the Company, is now ready. 
This is the standard publication on the Coast for 
information regarding Mineral Springs, Resorts, 
Country Homes and Farms where summer board- 
ers are taken, and Select Camping Spots. 

Beautifully illustrated, 150 pp. and can be had 
in response to mail request or at ticket offices. 

Ticket Offices— 650 Market Street (Chronicle 
Bldg) and Tiburon Ferry, foot of Market Street. 

General Office— Mutual Life Ins. Bldg., cor. 
Sansome and California Sts., San Francisco. 
! JAS. L. FRAZIER, R. X. RYAN, 

Gen. Mgr. Gen. Pass. Act. 



McMURRAY 




Trotting Horses 

in being 3hipped about 
from place tc place on a 
circuit, sub ect to all 
kinds oi weather and 
consequert changes in 
temperature are very like- 
'y to fall sick, chills,colic t 
joldc. pneumonia, &c. t 
may take them at any time. 
Avoid troublei a _imc t / having a supply of 

Turtle's Elixir 

ever ready tin nand. It is invaluable in such 
cases and for hurts, bruises, splints, spavins, &c 
The jest body and leg wash known. 

Used an" Endorsed by Adams Express Company. 

Turtle's Family Elixir "K32SSS 

Kills pain instantly. Our 100 page book' "Veter- 
inary Experience'' F^REE. 

'-.^:'s EU:rir Co., 4370TafTeUSt,3aflFraflcfes£ & '■ 

-> llsmare of so-called Ellilrfl— none<jena!ne but TnKb'j, k 

J \ _:daii blisters » (k$y offer only temp srary reiisi: j. .. * 



Santa Rosa Stock Farm 

HAS FOR SALE 

Three Sidney Dillon Yearlng Colls 

from the following mares: 
Pansy (dam of King Orry 2:21*4, Almonition 
2:24?,£. Lady Pansy Russell 2:26j£. and Pansy 
Russell 2:30) by Cassius M- Clay, Jr. 22, eto. 
Guycara 2:18?^ by Guy Wilkes 2:15%, dam 
Biscari (dam of 5 in list) by Director 2:17, 
second dam Bicari (dam of 6 in list) by 
Harold, etc. 
Rnssle Rnssell by Bay Rose2:20!.i, out of Oakley 
Russell by Happy Russell, son of Happy 
" Medium, etc. 
Apply to IRA PIERCE, 

728 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 



TROTTER FOR SALE. 

OORREL GELDING, 6 YEARS OLD. Stands 
^ 16 2*4 hands high and weighs 1100 pounds. 
Sired by Niccanor by Dexter Prince, dam Flora 
by El Cajon by Don Victor. He is in every re- 
spect a grand individual, handsome, stylish, and 
can show a 2:40 gait or better. With very little 
work I drove him a half this year in 1:22 and a 
quarter In 39 seconds, to cart. He will make a 
grand park horse and should be seen by anyone 
looking for a high-class trotter. Call or address 
L. R. PALMER, Walnut Creek, Cal. 



FOR SALE. 

pAIR OF ?VELL MATCHED, STANDARD- 
r bred coal black Mares; stand 15 3, weigh 1200 
lbs.; well broke, both single and double, and 
afraid of nothing. Can pole together better than 
three minutes, and can trot singly in 2:40. Sired 
by St. Nicholas, son of Sidney, dams full sisters 
by Charles Derby. For further particulars as 
regards price, etc., apply to 

ADOLPH DOBRGENSKY, 
Prop. Vendome Stables, Newman, Cal. 



FOR SALE. 

fyrY ENTIRE STOCK OP STANDARD-BRED 
- LVJ - Trotting and Pacing Horses. Single drivers 
and double teams. Some excellent prospects for 
stake winners entered in the Occident, Stanford 
and Breeders Futurity stakes. A fine carriage 
team, also the great broodmare Daisy S. (dam of 
Tom Smith 2:13%. General Vallejo 2;20>4, Sweet 
Rose 2:28 (trial 2:21) and Little Mac (3) 2:27) . The 
driving horses and colts can be seen at my stable 
In Vallejo, and the broodmares, etc., at the race 
track. Apply to or address 

THOMAS SMITH, Vallejo, Cal. 



FOR SALE. 

Miction RrtV B *? g eldtn e °y SultanJr.; 
misaiUU U\jy stands 16*4 hands and weighs 
over 1100 lbs. A handsome, high-class, gentle- 
man's roadster; stylish action, gentle, and good 
driver. Winner (without preparation) of the 2:30 
pace at the matinee Decoration Day. Address 
T. H. CORCORAN, 
1201 Valencia St., San Francisco. 



Fast Pacer For Sale. 

rpHE PACING GELDING, AL SANDY 2:19% 

J- by Wayland W., dam Rapid Ann by Overland. 
Can pace three heats better than 2:17. Can brush 
very fast on the road. Excellent prospect to race. 
He is one of the best road horses In the city. 
Gentle and intelligent. Safe for lady to drive. 
For price and further particulars address S. 
WATSON, 235 Douglas street/San Francisco 




Price Low. 
McMURRAY SULKIES 

and JOGGING CARTS 

Standard the World Over. 

•SSP-Address for printed matter and prices. 

W. J. Kenney, 

531 Valencia St., San Francisco, Cal. 



COMPRESSED PURE SALT BRICKS 

*" PATENT FEEDERS 

Handy. No Waste. No Neglect. 

5<f a month. 
Refined Dairy Salt Tells. 

ASK YOUR DEALER. 
WELL SEND BOOK FREE. 

. BELM0NT5TABIE5UPPLVC0 

■ PATENTEES ■ MANUFACTURERS ■ 
BROOHLYN.N.Y. 



For Sale. 



COAL BLACK FILLY BY A 
son of Directum 2-05%; is very 
handsome and stylish. Would make a very tine 
saddle animal. Broke to drive. Apply to J. H. 
RAVEKES, San Leandro. 



NO FIRING NO BLISTERING 

A Horse Rubber's Discovery. 

SOLID GOLD 

For broken down horses and for horses that are 
not broken down. The best stuff ever put on 
horses legs. Try It and be Convinced. 
Sample Free. Apply to or address, 

C. G. Simmons, 

Race Track, San Jose 
Or Golden West Hotel, San Jose. 



BREEDERS' DIRECTORY. 



SHORTHORNS AND SHIRES— 

Quinto Herd of Shorthorns. 

41 premiums California State Fair, 1903. 

Young stock for sale. 

Send for catalogue. 

ALSO 

Several fine Shire Stallions, foals of 1902. 
Est. of W. H. HOWARD, 
206 Sansome St., San Francisco. 



HOt STEINS— Winners of every 7 days' butter 
contest at State Fair 1899 1st & 2d for aged cows, 
4-yr., 3-yr. and 2-yr.-olds; 21 Jerseys and Durhams 
competing. 5th year my Holstefns have beaten 
Jerseys for butter. Stock for sale; also pigs. F. 
H. Burke, 30 Montgomery St., S. F. 



JERSEYS , HOLSTEINB AND DURHAM? . 

Dairy Stook specially. Hogs, Poultry. Est at. 
llahed 1876. William Niles & Co.. Los An 
Oal. 



14 



©he gveebev axtif &ppvx&man 



[JULY 2, 1904 




THE BAYWOOD STUD 

THE BUNGALOW, SAN MATEO, CAL. 

(Property ol John Parrott. Esq.) 

Imp. Hackney Stallion 

GREEN'S RUFUS 63 «*> 

Will serve a limited numbor or Approved Mares. Season 1904 

FEE .-- 875 

Reductions made for two or mora mares. 

Manager, WALTER SEALY. 



This is Your Split Second 



IF 



YOU CAN PICK THE 
FIRST THREE 
HORSES IN THE 



AMERICAN or KENTUCKY GAITED 

SADDLE HORSES 

ON EXHIBITION AND FOR SALE 

AT AMERICAN PARK, SAN DIEGO, CAL. 

The Black Saddle Stallion 

REX MONTGOMERY 

No SOU A. 8. H R., will serve a limited Dumber 
of approved mares each season. FEE S50 for season, 
with return privilege. 

THE AMERICAN 

SADDLE HORSE BREEDING FARM 

SAN DIEGO, CAL. 



California Stakes 
$2000 Guaranteed 

(FOR 2:24 CLASS TROTTERS) 
AT THE 

RACE MEETING 

OF THE 




Pacific Coast 




Trolling Horse 
Breeders Association 



BBS-METAL OPEN-FACED SPLIT 
SECOND TIMER. 

Shows seconds and filths. Regis- 
ters minutes, start, stop and fly back 
operated from the crown, split-second 
attachment worked by the side plug. 
The thinnest and best $25 split timer 
in the market. 



\1bm legged Worses 

| SftaeitBMd i i I ond leg under fclmbj ttenseot 

Qui tin's Ointment. 

It i-nm.- tried and reliable, wiicti a horse Iscnrejj 

withOutnn'nOintmeat be Stays Cored. Mr. E.F.Burae 
Ssp3nir0eM,lIO.,mltt!SMtolknre: "I novo been 
OS Inn Oulnn'a Olnim.nl for.cvcrnl.voars and have ej- 

»_ , j ,",«„ v marvelous cures; It wm (to deeper and- 

M Fll&KaH I cVu-ulc'sVilntbunnnybll.-torlevernsed. Tbon B bt 
I . KwS^HP I itniTdutjlortbobenentoriiorsestoreeommendyour 
■ ,,,,, !',it r iamneTeriMtl.outl. ■■ Tlilslstbeeenjral a 

•yellivbotfiveQiilmiM Olnlmeniatr.nl. For 
2_. ,.... ..t... j ,n, i ,.r. hini.'lies it 



WFJfe. 



£jipv&i 



i.u..s. and al", bunches i. 
su'neuuuVd.' " Price SI per boHIo at all drrigglsts 
or suit by mall. Send lor c[rcular 9 , testimonials, Arc. 

W. B. Eddy & Co., Whitehall, H. Y. 



NEW MODEL 
1901 




AKD— 

ROAD CART 



MADE. 



O'BRIEN & SONS 

Cor. < M-l.it ii Gate Are. and Polk St. 
BAN KUANCISCO. CAE. 




Mark Levy & Co 




This Combination consists of a Her- 
cules \\ H. P. Engine; a 5x5 in. brass 
lined double acting suction and force 
pump with machine cut gears; engine 
and pump are set on wood platform and 
securely bolted, making engine and 
pump self-contained. Equipment in- 
cludes gasoline tank, gasoline and water 
pipes and connections, sparking mag- 
neto, spark coll, oiler and wrench; ca- 
pacity, 1,000 to 1,500 gallons per hour 
raised 75 ft.; net weight 800 lbs.; ship, 
ping weight 980 lbe. 

HERCULES (IAS ENOINE WORKS 
1US First Street, San Francisco. 



BLAKE. MOFFITT & TOWNE 



DEAIJUU. Iff- 



6 57 69-61 First Street, S. F. 

TBI.KTIMMI Main i» 



PEIMOREES TABULATED 

And trpo written 
Ready for framing. 
" for prlooa, 
llttUDUi a | ur. 88 Unary Htrool 

Baa PYaocUoo. C«l. 



^ To cure a Bruise or Strain quickly, 

Wrinit out a 
nd hold 
i 

the op- 
l£ to 80 minutes. 
Hub drv mnl a] 

ABSORBINE 

rabbins it in well. I 

i -rocoss 
avand apply tuc viv. 
nori>iur from thrcM I 

■ 

i 

91 pel 

licalcru. 
■ ■ 
W.F.Y0UN0.P.D.F Springfield. Mass. 

>l»ckVtOo, Lai mIbOo., 

Ito.lln.-Wp, i .\ Oo . .'.O'Kmc and J. A MoKirron, 
■II of S»n Kranclhoo. 




San Jose. Aug. 3. 4, 5, 6. 1904 

The following is a list of the horseB entered : 
No. 11. The California Stakes for 2:24 Class Trotters $2000 

S H Hoy's blk m Little Babe by Bradtmoor, dam by Dawn. 
F R Garnsey's b m Alcacita by Red Cloak, dam Alcazette by Alcazar. 
Silva & Wright's b g M J by Bay Bird, dam by Cornelius. 
Martin Carter's ch h T C by Nutwood WilkeB, dam Zeta Carter by Director. 
H C Ahler's br g Telephone by Direct, dam Nellita by Philosopher. 
John A. Cole's b g Jupiter B by Gen Beverly, dam Little Agnes by Gossiper. 
J De La Montanya's ch g Bain by Steinway. 

S K Dougherty's br m Sonoma Girl by Lynwood W, dam Maud Fowler by Anteeo. 
A L McDonald's b g Col. Hickman by Nevada. 

Robt Buress' b g Golden Gate by Bay Bird, dam Dourhka by Western. 
C A Winship's br g Abe Miller by TituB, dam Gazelle by Gossiper. 
H A Bell's b g H D B by Arthur Holt, dam Jennie D by Jerome Eddy. 
W H Lumsden's b s McPherson by McKinney, dam Eveline by Nutwood. 
Walnut Grove Stock Farm's blk m The Boquet by Nushagak, dam Woodflower 
by Ansel. 

Geo W Kingsbury's b g D E Knight by Lynwood, dam Grant, Jr. 

Wm. Morgan's b m Una K by McKinney, dam Nellie K by Gen. Grant, Jr. 

S. Silgen's Birdcatcher by Direct, dam Katberine by Hock Hocking. 

I. N. Minor's br g Morosco by Wayland W, dam Lady Moor by Grand Moor. 

R. W. Peterson's b g R W P by Lynwood W. 

ALL G.UESSES POSITIVELY CLOSE JULY 26, 1904. 

Should more than one person pick the first three horses in the order in which 
they finish two timerB will be given to the first two guesserB in the order in which 
the guesses were received. 

NO STRINGS ATTACHED TO IT 
Every Body May Put in a Guess! 



Cut This Out and Send in Your Guess 

To the BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 

36 Geary Street, San Francisco. 

My selection for the firBt three horses winning money in the California Stakes 
•V-'OOO, to take place at the P. C.T. H. B. A. meeting at San Jose is: 



First 

Second 

Third 

Signed 

Address. ... 
Date 1904, 



July 2, 1904 



®He gxeebev anii gtpovtsntcwt 



15 



NEW PRICE 



No, 00 Armor Steel 
L. C. SMITHIGUNj 




Well!1!,Well! 
Well! 




Still 

Shooting 

The 

Limit 



HUNTER ARMS 00, FULTON, NEW YORK 

PHIL 8. BEKEARTCO.. SAN FRANCISCO. COAST REPRESENTATIVE 




RED BALL BRAND. 



Awarded Gold Medal 
At California Stats 
Fair 1892. 

Every horse owner who 
values his stock should 
constantly have a sup- 
ply of It on hand. It 
improves and keeps 
istock in the pink of 
condition. 
Manhattan Pood Co. 

1253 Folsoxn St., San FranolBCo 

Ask your grocere or dealers for it. 



Positively Cures Colic, Scouring and Indigestion. 

C. P. KEBTELt, Manager 



American Trottii Mister 

PUBLICATIONS. 

THE YEAR BOOK 

This great work will be ready for delivery 
March 15, 1904. 

Contains summaries of races; tables of 2:30 trot- 
ters; 2:25 pacers; sires; great broodmares; cham- 
pion trotters; fastest records, etc. 



Accurately Compiled 

Great aid to £ll Interests 



A year's subscription will pay 
for itself many times over 



25 STRAIGHT! 



CHAS. HANTZ with the 
PARKER GUN, on June 17, 

won the Semi-Export Medal at Michigan State Shoot, Battle 

Creek, Mich , with 25 STRAIGHT. 

The PARKER GUN always wins. YOU should shoot It. Send for Catalogue 




New York Salesrooms: 
32 WARREN STREET. 



MERIDEN, CONN. 



RossMcMahonlS? 5 ' 

Truck, Wagon and Horse Covers, Camp Furniture, etc. 

REASONABLE PRICES. (Phone: Bush 858) 03 MARKET ST., SAN FRANCISCO 



Vol. XIX, 1903, single copies, postpaid. ..$4.00 


Vol. XIX, 1903, 10 or more copies 


each, 




3.36 


Vol. XVIII, 1902, single copies, postpaid.. 4.00 


Vol. XVII, 1901, 


.... 400 


Vol. XVI, 1900, ■ 


.... 4.00 


Vol. XV, 1899. " " " 


.... 4.00 


Vol. XIV, 1898, " " " 


.... 3.00 


Vol. XIII, 1897, 


.... 3.00 


Vol. XII, 1896, 


.... 3.00 


Vol. XI, 1895, " " " 


.... 3.00 


Vol. X, 1894, 


.... 3.00 


Vol. IX, 1893, " " " 


.... 3.00 


Vol. VI, 1890, (limited number). postpaid 2.50 


Vol. V, 1889, 


2.50 


Vol. IV, 1888, " " 


2.50 


Vol. II, 1886, " " 


1.00 


Year Books for 1892, 1891, 1887 and 


1885 out of 


print. 




THE REGISTER 




Vols. Ill to XV, inclusive, in one 


order. 










Vols. I and n are out of print. 




INDEX DIGEST 






J7.50 



This important adjunct contains all the standard 
animals in the first ten volumes, with numbers, 
initial pedigrees, and reference to volume in which 
animal is registered. 



REGISTRATION BLANKS 

will be sent upon application. 
Money must accompany all orders. Address 

American Trotting Reg, Association 

355 Dearborn St., Room 1108, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Or BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

IMPROVED 



(POCKET SIZE) 

100 Pages. Price $1, postpaid. 

Most Complete Book 
of the kind published. 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 
36 Geary St.. San Francisco. 



DOC WILLIAMS' 

BOARDING AND TRAINING STABLE 

Eiehth Avenue, near Fulton Street, 

SAN' FRANCISCO. 

Colts broke and trained to trot and satisfaction 
guaranteed. Terms reasonable. Phone: Page 1324 




Adopted and used by all Jockey Clubs in the 
United States and Canada. 

Published about the 1st and 15th of each month, 
from March to December, at 25c, 50c, 75c, $1, $1 50 
or $2, according to issue. 

A subscription ($18) includes all fortnightly 
issues and an "Annual" (In two volumes) hand- 
somely bound in half morocco. 

For sale by newsdealers throughout the coun- 
try, on race tracks and by 

GOODWIN BROS., 

Proprietors and Publishers. 
1440 Broadway, New York. 

Explanatory circulars mailed free. 



™tr 



BUSINESS COLLEGE 
24 Post Street, San Francisco, Cal, 



The oldest, the largest, the most popular com- 
mercial school on the Pacific Coast. 20,000 gradu- 
ates; 30 teachers; 70 typewriters; over 300 students 
annually placed in positions. Send for catalogue 

E. P. II KALI). President. 



CALIFORNIA 



Photo Engraving Company 

HIGH CLASS ART 



Half Tones and " IAne Engraving 

Artistic Designing. 

506 Mission St,, cor. First, SanFranclioo. 



SFRATTS PATENT. 



DOG 



CAKES 

REMEDIES 

SOAP. 



NEWARK, N. J. Send for free copy of "DOG CULTURE." ST. LOUIS, MO, 

Pacific Coast Branch— 1324 Valencia Street, San Francisco. 

Agents for "SANITAS" Disinfectant. 



VETERINARY. 



AT STUD 



DR. C. MASOERO 

VETERINARY SUROEON 



Graduate of Royal Veterinary 
College of TnrLn 

INFIUMARY AND RESIDENCE — 811 Howard St., 

between Fourth and Fifth Sts., San Francisco. 
Telephone: South 456. 



Ira Barker Dalziel 

VETERINARY DENTIST 

Fancy Carriage, Sad die and Road Horses for Sale 

Office and stable: 605 Golden Gate Avenue, San 
Francisco, Cal. Telephone South 651. 



Dr. "Who., F. IE3g;£m- 

M. R. C. V. S-, F. E. Y. M. S. 

VETERINARY SURGEON. 

Member of the Royal College of Veterinary 
Surgeons, England; Fellow of the Edinburfe 
Veterinary Medical Society; Graduate of the New 
Veterinary College, Edinburgh; Veterinary Sur- 
geon to the S. F. Fire Department; Live Stock 
Inspector forNew Zealand and Australian Colonies 
at the port of San Francisco; Professor of Equine 
Medicine, Veterinary Surgery, Veterinary Depart- 
ment University of California; Ex-President oi 
the California State Veterinary Medical Associa- 
tion; Veterinary Infirmary, Residence and Office, 
San Francisco Veterinary Hospital, 1117 Golden 
Gate Avenue, near Webster St., San Francisco 1 
Telephone Park 128. 



Chronic Bronchitis and Catarrh of the Bladder 

Cared In 4S Hoars. 



CAPSULES 

Mi*. 



Superior to Copaiba, Cubebs or Injection 



,« M *-*., 



>*r 



i:58 1-f 
PALAOH 

KB1I RACE TRACK, PLEASAXION, 0*X 

Flout Wines, Liquors and Cigar* 

Boardimg Hoxme 

A. H. BERNAL, Proprietor, 



CUBA OP KENWOOD 

(Glenbeigh Jr.— Btella) 

SAM'S BOW 

(Plain Sam-Dolly Deo n) 

STOGKDALE KENNELS 

K. M. DODGE, Manager, 

Hakera field, Kern Co., 
Boarding. Pointer Puppies and well-broke* 
Dogs for sale. 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 

Advertisements under this head one cent per word 
ver insertion. Cash to accompany order. 



IKISH AND SCOTCH TERRIERS. 



TRISH AND SCOTCH TERRIERS FOR SALE. 
x Scottle Puppies sired by Ch. Loyne RuCBan 
ana Crimson Rambler. Best Irish stock on the 
Coast. MBS. BRADLEY-DYNE, Saturna P. O.. 
B.C. 



LLEWELLYN SETTERS. 



LLEWELLYN SETTER PUPS FOR SALE, 
containing the blood of Marie's Sport, Oh. 
Gladstone, Roderlgo and Antonio. These are not 
cheap dogs, but high-class stock. MRS. THOS. 
MURPHY, Hollister, Cal. 



FOXHOUNDS. 



TJiOR SALE— THREE WELL-BROKEN DOGS, 
-^ two years old. Two pups five months old. 
These dogs are thoroughbred. Address J. H. 
RAVEKES. San Leandro, Cal. 



IRISH TERRIERS. 



T^OR SALE— CAPITAL BITCH, A WINNER 
L price $15. First-class 8-months-old dog, rood 
in all ways; price $35. BRADLEY-DYNE, 
Saturna P 0-, B. C. 



SCOTCH TERRIERS. 



TTOR SALE— 8-MONTHS-OLD DOG BY CH. 
-^ Loyne Ruffian, very typical; price $20. 12- 
months-old dog, $10. Smart biton, good breeder, 
$12. BRADLEY-DYNE, Saturna P. O., B. C. 



ST. BERNARDS. 



A T STUD— CHAMPION LE KING. GRAND- 
-"- est headed St. Bernard on the Coast. Fee $90. 
W. WALLACE, 58.Boyce St., San Franolico. 



Q0C0ANUT OIL CAKE 

THE BEST FEED FOB 

STOCK, CHICKENS AND PIGS 

FOB SALE IN LOTS TO SUIT BY 

EL DORADO LINSEED OIL WORKS CO 

208 California Street, San Francisco, Cal, 



ROSE HOTEL 

PLEASANTON, CAL. 

Enlarged, Rebuilt. Twenty-five New Rooms 
Newly Furnished, Electric Lights, 
Running Water. Up to date. 
A. S. OLNKT St SON - - Proprle 



16 



ffitte ^vceitev mtfc gppmrtsman 



[July 2, 1901 



TELEPHONE: 




mjiORSE i mSl% 



San Francisco, IvXy^^- 



^«««*##«*«^*###**«1*####^###^ 






* 

* 

* 

* 
I 

* 



THE PACIFIC COAST RECORD MADE I 

W.H. VARIBN Broke 315 Blue Rocks out of 325 Shot At with 1 

U. M. C. SHELLS I 

JUXE 19-20, AT FRESNO GUN CLUB SHOOT. # 

1st High Average, W. H. VARIEN, Pacific Grove, Cal. # 

Longest Straight Run of 78. ?{? 

2d High Average, J. E. VAUGHAN, Los Angeles, Cal. ■& 

3d High Average, J. W. BRADRICK, San Francisco. i'i 

.All X^Tou. -c^ittL XT. ]VE. O. SECSIiIiS # 



UNION METALLIC CARTRIDGE CO. 

E. E. DRAKE, Pacific Coast Manager. 

1 1' • *. glfc .V«., .V|>. »#-. VI'. >»i. £•£ ..**. £jfe ..#'. V|', ..#•- Vt*. £|fc ..'**. .W|ir. V|k.g7.W|ir. ..fir. >|* .«*. £ 



86-88 FIRST STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



RIFLES AND liiiS H O T G U N S 




PACIFIC COAST AGENCY 
127-135 FIRST STREET 



A. MULLEE, Agent. 



SAN FRANCISCO 
CALIFORNIA 



" INFALLIBLE" 




WON 

First and Second at the 

Grand 

American 

Handicap 

Winner, B. D. Goptll of Atkln, Minn. 
SeconO, W. R. Rundal of Tcllurlde, Col. 



" INFALLIBLE" 



Loaded. In O. I*. W . Sm oKeless. 
Winning 1 Hig-hest Averasre at All Shoots. 

IF TOD WANT THE BEST ASK FOR 

California Powder Works 

FACTORY LOADED SHELLS. 

If Tod: Vealer don't keep them write the 

CALIFORNIA POWDER WORKS — Office 330 Market St., San Francisco 

Manufacturers of HEKCCLE8 DYNAMITE, HERCULES GELATINE, CHAMPION 
IMPROVED BLASTING, BLACK BLASTING, BLACK SPORTING 
C. P. W. SMOKELESS and MILITARY SMOKELESS. 
Alio aell CAPS and FUSE. 



At Milton, Pa., May 
Hawkins shot at 100 I 
broke them all with 



39 grains of 
DuPONT SMOKELESS. 



\ 

\ 

I' 



Clabrough, Golcher & Go. 



TONS 
\ Goods 

td for Cat»loguo. 




FISHING 
Tackle 

538 MARKET STREET, S. F. 



You can get these Smokeless Powders in 

FACTORY . . . O l—l t—l ■ g*» 
LOADED .. O PI EL L- L.O 
SHOTGUN RIFLEITE 
BALLISTITE 
LAFLIN Sc RAND 
'INFALLIBLE'" 



DU PONT 
"E. C." 
SCHULTZE 
HAZARD 



What More do vou Want? 




VOI. XI. V. No. 2. 

36 GEARY STREET. 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JULY 9, 1904. 



SUBSCRIPTION 
THREE DOLLARS A TEAR 




»I 



^ 



*•■■"■';>-... 




..- 



HAMBLETONIAN lO (Rysdyk's) 




Qttie gvee&ev anit ^pavtsman 



[July 9, 1904 



O'KANE TRACK HARNESS 



Custom Made Flexible Saddle, California Girth, Open or Blind Bridle, Long Martingale. 

ALL WEARING PARTS RAWHIDE LINED. 

Horse Boots, Hobbles, Clothing, Etc. 

26 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE, SAN FRANCISCO. send FOR catalogue. 



SALINAS DRIVING CLUB 

Race meeting: 
Salinas, CaL, Sept. 14, 15, 16 and 17 

Entries Close Tuesday, July 26, 1904 

LIST OF EVENTS. 

Horses Must Be Named With Entry. 



DISTRICT RACES. 

8— District (Monterey, San Benito. Santa Cruz 
and San Luis Obispo counties) Three-Year- 
Old Stake, for trotting colts three years old 
or under, $10 to accompany nomination July 
26th. $15 August 15th and $25 September 1st, 
with $50 added by the Club. 

9— District Two- Year-Old Trot conditions and 
added money the same as in No. 8. 

10— Mixed Race, Trotters and Pacers, 
2:25 class, for horses owned in Mon- 
terey County SI 50 

11— Mixed Trotting and Pacing Race 
for Members of the Driving Club, 
owners to drive 150 

Entrance h% and b% from money winners. 

Two horses may be entered by one owner in any race on one entrance fee, butr not more than one 
can be started. 

Races will be arranged so as to give horses starting In more than one race at least 
one day between starts. 

All Stakes are for the amount guaranteed— no more, no less. 

Stakes not filling satisfactorily to the Board of Directors may be declared off. 

Member National Trotting Association. 

Send for Entry Blanks and address all communications to 

J. D. KALAR, Sec'y, Salinas, Cal. 



1 — Monterev County Chamber of Com- 
merce Stakes, for 2:20 class $600 

8— Green Class, for horses without rec- 
ords 300 

3— For horses eligible to the 2:10 class. 300 

4— For horses eligible to the 2:15 class. 300 

TROTTERS. 

5— Salinas Driving Club Stakes, for 

8:20 trotters 8600 

6— For trotters of the 2:15 class 300 

7— For Green Class trotters, or horses 

without records 300 



ADDITIONAL STAKE 

Pleasanton Fair and Racing; Association 

2:16 CLASS TROTTING STAKE, $500, Guaranteed. 
ENTRIES TO CLOSE FRIDAY, JDLY IS, 1901 

Entrance 5% of the amount of the Stake. Other conditions same as those of 
stakes which closed June 1, 1904, except nominators will not be allowed to name 
two horses on one entrance fee. 

FRED E. ADAMS, Secretary, 

PLEASANTON, CAL. 




$100 for 50 Cents 

nonld be a bargain. Your own druggist will sell you for 50 cents a bottle 
Of CRAFT'S DISTEMPER CURE on a POSITIVE GUARANTEE It 

will cure distemper and save yonr horse, or your money back. Isn't that 
fair* Price 84 50 a dozen. Large size SI a bottle at druggists or direct, 
prepaid. Booklet free. 



Wells Medicine Co, Cheml,,8and 



Germologlsts 



13 3d st, Lafayette, Ind. 



SINGMASTER & SONS.of Keota Iowa 

BREEDERS AND IMPORTERS OK 

PERCHERONS, SHIRES, BELGIAN AND FRENCH COACH HORSES 



Have a. Branch Barn at 



63 North San Pedro Street, San Jose, Cal. 



Hlgt cI.m 
good Nt.UtOD 



ook always on band. It will pay to call and Inspect stock If you are In need of a 

C. ii. STANTON. San Joie Manager 



HARNESS and SADDLES 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 

Large Stock. Low Prices, 

JEPSEN BROS. CO. inc.) 



110-112 MARKET ST„ SAN FRANCISCO, 



TWO KLOCKS 
FROM Kt.mil 



JsS&EaSSESgi 



EXCURSION RATES 
ST. LOUIS. 



Round Trip Excursion Tickets to 
St. LOUIS and CHICAGO on sale 
July 1, 2, 7, 8, 13, 14, and other 
dates in August, September and 
October at the following rates: 

TO ST. LOUIS $67.50 

TO CHICAGO GSS&VJ3Q S72.50 

RETURN LIMIT three months. 

StoD-Overs allowed on both 
going and returning trip .. . 

THESE EATES GOOD ON OVERLAND LIMITED , a 

Ask about the Through Tourist [jra 

Cars direct to the Exposition. (M 

613 MARKET STREET 

| SOUTHERN PACIFIC I 

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if 

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M 
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EMOLLIO 
IODOFORM 



GALL CURE 




For GALL BACKS and SHOULDERS, CRTJPPE 
SORES and SADDLE GALLS there Is nou 
superior. 

The horse CAN BE WORKED AS USUAL. 

For BARBED WIRE CUTS, CALKS, SCRATCH- 
ES, BLOOD POISONED SORES and ABRASIONS 
OF THE SKIN it has no equal. 

It Is very adhesive and easily applied to a watery 
as well as a dry sore. 

Its use will absolutely prevent BLOOD POISON 
ING- In this respect there is no Gall Cure offerea 
which can justly even claim to be a competitor. 
We placed it on the market relying wholly on its 
merit for success, and notwithstanding the fact that 
comparatively little has been done in the way of 
advertising the salesof 1900 were 100 per cent greats 
er than the aggregate sales of Gall Cure preceding 
that year. This increase was entirely due to lea 
MERITS, and from it we feel justified in saying that 
it is THE GALL CURE OF THE 30TH CENTURY. 

It is a quick and sure cure for those troublesome 
skin cracks under the fe ->ekv aieh injure and often 
lay up race horses. 

All Trainers Should Hare It In Their Stables 



Pa/ irrrPAC T^hlllfltAH and ^P ewrltten ready for framiDg 
Igl CC5 laUUiaiCU Wrlte (op pr[ce8t Breeder and 

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FKICE:— 3 OZ. BOX, 25c; 1 LB. BOX, SI. 00. 

Read our 'ad." on Campbell's Horse Foot Remedy in next issue of this paper. 

JAS. B. CAMPBELL & CO., Mfrs.,412 W. Madison St., Chicago, III. 

Sold by all Dealers in Harness and Turf Goods. If not in stock ask them to write anyJobber for it 



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PALACE HOTEL, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA. 



5 



TOURISTS and TRAVELERS will, now, with difficulty recognize the famous COURT 
into which for twenty-flve years oarriages have driven. This space of over a quarter 
of an acre has recently, by the addition of very handsome furniture, rugs, chandeliers 
and tropical plants, been converted into a lounging room— the FINEST IN THE 
WORLD. 

The EMPIRE PARLOR-the PALM ROOM, furnished in Cerise, with Billiard and 
Pool tables for the ladies— the LOUIS XV PARLOR the LADIES WRITING ROOM 
and numerous other modern Improvements, together with the unexcelled Cuisine and the 
Most Convenient Location In the City— all add much to the ever inoreasing popularity 
of this most famous HOTEL. 



JULY 9, 1904] 



t£l« gveebev cwt& gtpaxtsxnan 



3 



THE WEEKLY 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

T. W. KELLEY, Pbopbibtob. 

Turf and Sporting Authority of the Pacific Coast. 

— OFFICE— 

36 GEARY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

P. O- BOX 2300.1 
Telephone: Black 586. 

Termi- One Year S3. Six Mouths 81.75, Tbree Months 81 
STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money should be sent by postal order, draft or by registered letter 
■ddressed to F. W. Kelley, 38 Geary St., San Francisco. Cal. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's name and 
address, not necessarily for publication, but as a private guarantee 
of good faith. ^^^^^^^^^^ 

San Francisco, Saturday, July 9, 1004. 



Dates of Harness Meetings. 

CALIFORNIA. 

Pleasanton July 27 to July 30 

San Jose (Breeders) Aug. 3 to Aug. 6 

Vallejo : ■ Aug. II to Aug. 13 

Santa Rosa (Breeders) .' Aug. 17 to Aug. 20 

Cal. State Fair, Sacramento Aug. 22 to Sept. 3 

Salinas Sept. 14 to Sept. 17 

Hanford Oct. 10 to 15 

Tulare Oct- 1 7 x ° *8 

NORTH PACIFIC. 

Everett Aug. 29 to Sept. 3 

Vancouver, B. C Sept. 3 to Sept. 5 

Whatcom Sept. 5 to Sept. 10 

Salem Sept. 12 to Sept. 17 

Seattle Sept. 19 to Sept. 24 

North Yakima Sept. 25 to Oct. 1 

Victoria B. C Sept. 27 10 Oct. 1 

New Westminster, B. C Oct 3 to Oct. 8 

Spokane Oct. 3 to Oct. 8 

WaUa Walla Oct. 10 to Oct. 15 

Boise ._• Oct. 17 to Oct. 22 

GRAND CIRCUIT. 

Detroit July 25 to July 30 

Buffalo Aug. 1 to Aug. 6 

Empire City Aug. 8 to Aug. 13 

Brighton Beach Aug. 15 to Aug. 20 

Eeadville Aug. 22 to Aug. 27 

Providence Aug. 29 to Sept. 3 

Hartford Sept. 5 to Sept. 10 

3yraouse Sept. 12 to Sept. 17 

Columbus Sept. 19 to Sept. 24 

Cincinnati Sept. 26 to Oct. 1 

Memphis Oct. 17 to Oct. 27 



GUESSING CONTESTS are nothing new, but the 
Breeder and Sportsman has inaugurated one 
that contains an entirely new feature in that it does 
not cost the guesser anything and he can guess as 
often as he pleaseB up to the dateof closing. A hand- 
some gun-metal split-second timer worth $25 is (The 
prize, and the reader of this journal who sends in the 
first correct guess of the first three horses in the 
California Stake, $2000 for 2:24 class trotters at the 
Breeders San Joee meeting will be entitled to the 
timer. The contest was gotten up by the Breeder 
AND Sportsman for its readers and consequently the 
guesses must be made on the blanks printed in thead- 
vertisment of the contest in this paper. The full con- 
ditions of the contest are there given, together with 
the list of horses entered. Fill out the blank and 
mail it to this office. Remember that the first cor- 
rect guess received will win the time piece. 



a powerfully muscled horse, with tremendous driving 
power and great brain, and there are the qualities 
which when combined with the finer blood of the 
thoroughbred, placed him in the front rank as the 
founder of a great family of trotters. 



Racing on the Fourth at Riverside. 



MUCH DIFFICULTY is being met with by the 
California associations giving meetings this 
year, in filling a 2:12 class trot. The Vallejo Asso- 
ciation received but four entries to the stake offered 
for this class, and the Breeders Association only re- 
ceived the same number for its $600 stake for 2:12 
trotters which was advertised to close July 1st, and 
to he trotted at Santa Rosa. The four horses named 
were Alta Vela 2:111, Tom Smith 2:13£, Forrest W. 
2:14| and What Is It 2:16J. Liege 2:12* would have 
been entered had his trainer not mistaken the date of 
closing. The Breeders Association haB concluded 
that as these horses should make an excellent race, 
they will close the stake if the five horses are again 
entered. Blanks have been sent to their owners and 
It is expected that the five horses will be re-entered. 



MUCH DISCUSSION has been going on lately in 
the Eastern turf press over the question whether 
or not Rysdyk's Hambletonian was or was not a 
coarse horse. The best known picture of the great 
founder of the Hambletonian tribe is the one which 
appears on our front page this week and is from a 
photograph made by Schreiber of New York in 1873, 
when Hambletonian was twenty-four years of age. 
That his head waB large and Roman in outline is con- 
ceded by all, and that his back was swayed with age 
at the time the picture was taken is evident. He was 



CIGHT STAKES FOR RUNNERS are advertised 
J— ' in this issue by the California State Agricultural 
Society to be run at the State Fair meeting which 
opens August 22d. These stakes are much the same 
as were given last year and all have added money. 
There will be a number ot overnight events also 
offered for the runners, which with the splendid list 
of harness events, entries for which have already 
closed, will make a fine program of racing for the fair 
this year. The present Board of Directors of the 
the society is doing everything in its power to make 
tne State Fair popular with the people and the out- 
look for one of the best expositions and race meetings 
in its history is very bright. 



Denver Summaries. 



The Denver meeting came to a close on the Fourth 
of July. The California harness horses, with one or 
two exceptions, have been very little in evidence dur- 
ing the three weeks of racing. Welladay. that had 
been third in most of her starts, moved up a peg and 
got second money in her last race. Miss Georgie won 
again on Monday and paced the first heat in 2:11 J, the 
same notch as the fastest heat of her previous race. 
Bane, the fast trotter owned by J. De La Montanya, 
was started in the 2:25 trot on the last day, but was 
distanced the second heat after being fifth in the first. 
The summaries are as follows: 

Tuesday, juke 28. 

Pacing, 2:11 class, purse $500. 

JessC, ch g by Electwood ■ 1 1 

Martha B , b m by Ashland Wilkes -. 2 2 

Hello Girl.brmby Hello 4 3 

Monroe S. and Amble W. also started. 

Time— 2:12? 4 '2:153i. 

Trotting, 2:40 class, purse $500. 

Lucille K , chm by Wilstar 1 1 

Silver Star, rg by Silver Thorn 2 3 

Johnnie K. gr g unknown 4 2 

Al Fox, Josa and Woody R. also started. 
Time— S:17fcf, 2:\7%. 

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 29. 

Pacing, 2:40 class, purse $500. 

Englewood, ch g by Strongwood 1 1 

Welladay, b m by Steinway. 2 2 

Ima Electrite, b m by Elec trite 3 4 

Obe Croft, Fair Medium and Nancy Conner also started. 

Time— 2:15, 2:I5M- 
Trotting, two-year-olds, purse $500. 

Sally Lunn, b f by Wiggins 2 1 1 

Admiral Togo, b c by Iran Alto 12 2 

Porto Rico Jr., b c by Porto Rico dis 

Time— 2:29H. 2:29^, 2:28^. 
Thursday, June 30. 
Trotting, club race to wagon. 

Mr. Wood worth's Joe Mac 3 1 1 

Mr. Austin's Billy Hayes 12 3 

Mr. Hall's Simon Gugenheim 3 3 2 

-Mr.- Luthes' John R 4 4 4 

Time— 2-.18K. 2:15H. 2:17&. 
Trotting, club race to wagon, half-mile heats. 

Mr. Steven's Selina S 1 1 

Mr. Donaldson's Chrlstola Wilkes 2 2 

Mr. Ferry's Gibbie 3 3 

Prinoess Medium, Black Beauty and Walter B. also started. 
Time— l:ll»i. 1:12k- 
Friday, July 1. 
Pacing, 2:15 class, purse 8500. 

Daniel J., blk g by Whlteman 1 1 

Oregon Maid, rn m by Del Norte ;.. 4 2 

Kiowa, b g by Garnet .Wilkes 2 5 

Bonnie Treasure, Exodus, Jim Dixon, Rice W. and Queen J. 
also started. 

Time— 2:13 tf, 2:13^. 

Trotting, 2:30 class, purse $500. 

Queen Knight, b g by Knight.. 1 1 

Dewey, ch g by Superior 2 5 

Lucille K. chm by Wilstar 7 2 

Annie G., Woodie R., Silver Star, Congressman Sibley, Phyllis 
and Oronteo alsostarted. 

Time— 2:19^.2:18*4- 

SATURDAY, JULY 2. 

Pacing, free-for-all, purse $500. 

WinfieldStratton, bh by Saraway 1 1 

Laura Spurr, ch m by W C P 8 2 

Harry J. b g by Reavls Steinway — 3 3 

Daisy Field and Dora Delp"ha also started. 
Time, 2:11^, 2:14^. 

Trotting, 2:11 class, purse $500. 

Silver Sign, b h by Silver Thorn 1 1 

Jim Ferry, g g by Orange Wilkes 2 2 

Ed Winship. b g by Raymond 3 3 

Time, 2:12^,2:14*4. 

MONDAY, JULY 4. 

Pacing, 2:17 class, parse $500. 

Miss Georgie, br m by McKinney 1 1 

Dick Weloh, r g by Paul N 2 4 

Lady Elgin, rm by Baron Posey 4 2 

Phoebe Almont, Joe Mack, Joe Younger and Exodus also started. 
T.me— 2:11M. 2:13^- 

Trotting, 2:25 class, purse $500. 

Queen Sign, bmby Silver Sign 12 1 

Congressman Sibley, b h by Cecilian 3 1 2 

Redemption, oh g by Superior 2 3 4 

Al Fox, Bane and Susie R. also started. 
Time— 2:21M- 2:19$f- 

Spavin Cured. 

Wm. Jaokson of Castleton, Vt., writes June 28th as follows: "I 
applied Quinn's Ointment three times to a spavin on a horse that 
was given me as he was thought to be of no further use. He is 
entirely well and I would not take one hundred dollars for him. 
I consider it one of the best remedies I have ever bad occasion to 
use." This is the general expression of leading horsemen all over 
the country. For curbs, splints, spavins, windpuffs and all 
bunohes try Quinn's Ointment. Price one dollar per bottle, deliv- 
ered. Satisfaction guaranteed. Address W. B. Eddy & Co., 
Whitehall, N. Y., if you cannot obtain it from druggist. 



In connection with the competitive drill and 
athletic sports given by the Seventh Regiment at the 
park of the Riverside Fair and Driving Association 
on the afternoon of the Fourth, the association put on 
a fine program of races. Every event was well con- 
tested, some good results were made and enthusiasm 
ran high among the great crowd present. 

Following is a summary of the races which were 
half-mile heats: 

2:40 class, the entries were: Pete, S. R. McDougal, 
owner; Dewey, F. Johnson, owner; Dewey, Tom 
Noland, owner; Johnny the Swede, O. E. Bartee, 
owner. 

In the first heat Johnson's Dewey finished first, but 
was set back for fouling Pete. The heat was given to 
Noland's Dewey, Pete second, and Johnny third; 
time, 1:13$. 

Pete was quite badly cut in the first heat and was 
unable to start in the subsequent heat. 

Johnson's Dewey won the second heat, Noland's 
Dewey second; Johnoy was set back for running; 
time, 1:12$. 

The horses finished in the same order in the third 
heat; time, 1:15. Johnny ran away in this heat and 
was withdrawn. 

The two Deweys came to the scratch for the fourth 
heat and Johnson's Dewey won easily; time, 1:17 J. 

2:20 class — The entries were as follows: J. T. Ham- 
ner's Esterbrook, Ed. Graser's Kitty Mason, B. R. 
Smith's Harry H. Jr., F. D. McCord's Rover. 

Kitty Mason won the first heat with Rover a close 
second, Harry H. third and Esterbrook fourth; time, 
1:09*. 

Rover, the Azusa horse, took the next three heats 
In 1:10, 1:12* and 1:13, pressed hard by Kitty Mason. 
Esterbrook dropped out after the second heat and 
Harry H. after the third. 

Ed. Graser won the handsome cap offered by C. W. 
Filkins for the best record made by a Riverside horse 
in the event. 

Free-for-all — The entries were: Harry Ward's Peri, 
W. M. Bartee's Midnight and Alec M. Wilson's 
Willits. 

In the preliminary warm up Peri showed up strong 
and the backers of Midnight began to be afraid that 
this Santa Ana speeder might prove a winner. But 
Midnight won three straight heats and the raceeasily. 
Peri broke badly and the best he could do was to get 
second place in the third heat. Willits being second 
in the other heats. The time was 1:09, 1:07* and 1:04* 
(the track record.) 

The crowd cheered the Riverside horse from start 
to finish. 

The officerB were: Judges — F. D. Lewis, H. Stanley, 
H. L Carnahan, starter — Robert L. Bettner, timer — 
G. W. Dickson — Riverside Press. 



Budd Doble received a couple of keepsakes from 
Mr. C. K. G. Billings last week which he prizes very 
highly. They were one of the hind shoes which Lou 
Dillon wore when she made her world's record of 
1:58* at Memphis, and a neat gold plated pin made 
from one of the nails which held the shoe in place on 
that memorable day. Mr. Doble has had them 
mounted in a neat frame, leaving the shoe just as it 
came from the hoof of the champion mare, without 
nickle plate or other adornment. The shoe is only a 
thin plate, and placed alongside the shoes worn by 
Goldsmith Maid and Nancy Hanks, show a striking 
contrast. The Goldsmith Maid shoe weighs 10 ounces, 
the Nancy Hanks shoe 3£ ounces, while the Lou 
Dillon shoe weighs but 2 ounces. 



Oregon Game Laws. 

At this season of the year sportsmen are beginning 
to make inquiries as to the open and closed season for 
fish and game in Oregon. The following brief synop- 
sis will give information on the most important 
features of the state laws: 

Male deer, antelope and mountain sheep, open sea- 
son July 15 to November 1. Female deer, August 15 
to November 1. Killing of spotted fawns, elk or 
beaver prohibited at all times of the year. No one is 
allowed to take more than five deer in a season. 
Night hunting or with dogs, the purchase or sale of 
hides without tags, or of venison, prohibited. 

Open season for silver gray squirrel, October 1 to 
January 1. 

Rail, plover, open season from August lto January 1. 

Quail, grouse, native pheasants, prairie chickens, 
open season, October 1 to December 1; limit, 10 birds 
per day. 

Ducks, geese, swan, open season from September 
15th to January 1st. Limit of ducks, 100 per week or 
50 in one day. 

Eggs of game and song birds protected the year 
around. 

Trout, open season from April 1st to November 1st. 
To be taken with hook and line only. Sale prohibited 
at all times. 

The laws of the state require non-resident market 
hunters to have a license, costing $10 per season. 

It is unlawful to hnnt within inclosures without 
owner's permission. 

It is unlawful to put sawdust or any lumber waste 
into the streams of the state. 

Shipping game out of the state is prohibited. 



o He ^ciiDcc ntifc gtpcrrtsmem 



[July 9 1904 




will hold a horse show in August. 



The new owner of BUgen has insured the stallion 



Beckers recently refused an offer of $20,000 (or 
Zombro2:ll. 

Two weeks from next Wednesday the oircuit will 
open at Pleasanton. 

Boo F. 2:10 stepped a mile in 2:07J evenly rated at 
Empire track two weeks ago. 



The mile to wagon in 2:043 made by Lou Dillon at 

ud, June 23d, was trotted in a regular gale of 

wind and she had no runner in front with a wind 

shield 1 ut w;i, in the lead herself all the way. She is 

a wonderful mare. 

W. De I 'ons ot Sacramento had the misfortune to 
lose last week by death from lockjaw his very promis- 
ing colt Vibrator by Azmoor, dam Melrose. The colt 
wus entered in the Breeders Futurity and Stanford 
and Occident Stakes of 190b'. 



Other cities could well afford to follow the example 
of Boston and hold a Work Horse Parade annually. 
Such an evi nt would encourage teamsters to take the 
best possible care of their hoi ses in order to win some 
of the prizes which would be offered. 



Lou Dillon's miles in public this year have been 
2U0}, 2:wl, 2;i>*,, 2:07}, 2:06.1 and 2:04j. 

Stanley Dillon worked a mile in 2:08'. last week at 
Columbus, the last quarter in 31 seconds. 



Oscar Duke reports the death of his mare Mississippi 
by Red Nuttle, entered in Pacific Breeders Futurity 
No. 4, and has transferred his nomination to Mr. C. 
J. Berry of Selma, who has named a mare by Me- 
Kinney with a foal by Athaneer in the stake. 



S. K. Trefry worked the Diablo gelding Tom Car- 
neal, a mile in 2:12 at Pleasanton last week. 

The W. A. Clark, Jr. stable of trotters was shipped 
from Der ver to Moberly, Missouri, where racing will 
..ulyllth. 

StamB.2:ir has been shipped to the home of his 
owners, Tuttle Bros, of Rocklin, Placer county, and 
will make a fall season there. 



Bids for privileges at the Pleasanton meeting will 
be received by Secretary Fred Adams up to noon 
Friday, July 15th. See advertisement. 



Major Cook, the fast trotting gelding by Chas. 
Derbr owned by Tony Bernal of Pleasanton, has been 
turned out and will not be raced this year. 



The Electioneer mare Peko 2:11} is getting along 
in years, as she was foaled in 1SS9, yet she pulled a 
wagon and won a mile dash at Cleveland on the 23d 
of last month in 2:I5J. Pretty good for a fifteen-year- 
old mare, but then her second dam was a thorough- 
bred. 

The Pleasanton Times says that Mr. Perry of Cen 
treville, Alameda county, has sold his sorrel pacer by 
Sidmore to Geo. A. Pounder of Los Angeles for $1000. 
Mr. Perry picked this horse up for $75 and finding he 
had speed had him worked a little. He has stepped a 
half in 1:00. 

George G. showed the Clevelandites, last week, 
that he is all that has been claimed for him by his 
California admirers and there are several eastern 
gentlemen now doing a little quiet grumbling to 
themselves because they did not buy him last winter 
when they had a chance. 



Swift B. 2:1CJ, as a three-year-old, by Stam B. looks 
and acts as though he would be a great four-year-old. 
He worked a mile in 2:13} at Denver last week. 



Ted Hayes won the two-year-old trot at Denver last 
week with the filly Sally Lunn by Wiggins. Ed 
Lafferty drove the Iran Alto colt Admiral Togo in 
this race and won the first heat with him in 2:29}, but 
Sally Lunn was too speedy for him, and won the next 
two heats in 2:29} and 2:28}. 



Flare Up 2:14 by Charles Derby was nosed out in a 
matinee wagon race at Pittsburg, June 25th, in 2:13}. 
She is expected to get a mark of 2:10 this year. 



Ozanam 2:08 has been a mile in 2:12} for Ed Benyon 
and gives promise of a return of her 1902 form when 
she won the greatest TranBylvania - ver trotted. 



Cuckoo 2:13} by Stratbway, is working nicely at 
Pleasanton. He stepped the last half of a 6low mile in 
1:05 last week, and came the last quarterin 30 seconds. 



Blackthorne, the gelding by Hawthorne that the 
East View Farm has entered in the M. & M. took a 
matinee wagon record of 2:14} at New York two 
weeks ago to-day. 

Ha 
Pleasant— 

and did it very nicely. She will be a factor in her 
classes on the California circuit. 

• n Creola, the mare pictured above has a pacing 

McKinney now ha6 nine 2:10 performers as Nora ord of 2:1S made at Honolulu on June 11th this 
McKinney got a matinee record of 2:09} at the Empire 
Track, two weeks ago. driven to wagon by her owner 
Hon. Brayton Ives of New York. 



lattie Croner, the pacer in C. F. Bunch's string at 
sasanton worked a mile in 2:123 one day last week 

j -j:j :. «;„~1-. CK„ ~.uT u„ -. r~_» = _ , 




Don't forget that the entries to the 2:1G class trot, 
purse $500, will close on Friday next, July loth, with 
Secretary Fred Adams of the Pleasanton Fair and 
-iciation. Five per cent to enter. 



H. B Gentry, Bloomington, Ind., who owns Mc- 
Kinney 2:11}, owns a yearling, own brother to Jennie 
09, and Dr. Book 2:10, and he looks and acts 
like the "real thin;;" in the way of a trotter. 



\j i i - ■. i ■ _ . i iiiauc <h u t J. '_' n oiutu uu i; uuu i i u i_i u la i .- \ VIW , 

which is the best record held by a Hawaiian bred 
pacer. She is owned by Hon. D. P. R. Isenberg, and 
is by the California bred stallion Creole 2:15 and from 
a thoroughbred dam. 

Thos. Smith, manager of the -Vallejo meeting, 
advertises that he will receive bids for the privileges 
of his meetiog up to August 1st. Mr. Smith has con- 
tracted with the owners of the Australian totalisator 
to have a machine at the meeting, but will accept a 
bid for auction pools or books. 



Aozella 2:06j has worked several miles below 2:15 
this year without showing any signs of lameness, and 
Millard Sanders Is justified in predicting that her 
record will be lower before the end of the season. 



Holllster will not give a race meeting this year. 
There is to be a three days' celebration by the Native 
Sons at that town in September, and it was not 
thought best to attempt a race meeting, which would 
have to be given during the same month to make it 
successful, so the Idea was abandoned. 



Bonnie Russell, the son of Conifer, Is entered In 

astern stakes this year and will be hoard 

from. He is a 2:10 trotter according to those who 

have seen Scott Hudson working him at Cincinnati. 



Last week at Donver W. A. Clark, Jr. purchased 

the trotter Daniel J. by Whitoman and Ted Hayes 

was un behind the gelding the next day when he won 

trot In straight heats, getting a record of 



David Cahlll has announced that he will send 

I 2:»7, again* 1 1 hi; world's record to saddle 

hold by Groat Eastern. In. ee not propose 

to be outdone by either C. K. G Billings or Barry 

Devereaux. 

i hose who know her best, look for Si 
by llru Wilk-'B-Sulsun, to Hep to ■ record around 2:08 
or hotter thin season. Dun Maloney, of White Plains, 
her owner, will start hor In the stakes In which she. is 
h avlly entered. 

Garden City, Kan., boasts of a giant colt. I. 

1 1, a hotelkeeper of that town, Is the owner of 
'hat, while lacking sev ng two 

oars old, weighs 1*00 pounds. The animal is not a 
'. but was bred of ordinary drivln 



Don't get frightened about a fast mile that you 
hear some other man's colt has shown. Keep your 
own in good condition and if he has speed he may win 
a big share of the stake he is entered in. Two or 
three of the colts entered in the Breeders Futurity for 
this year that were showing very fast la6t month are 
now in the hospital. The race is not alwajs to the 
swift. 

An old campaigner remarked the other day: "There 
is a class of people who hold that every race is. fixed 
and that the traincs always know just what horse is 
going to win. Of course we don't, or we wouldn't be 
broke all the time. I should think folks would realize 
that at any good Grand Circuit meetirg the bettiEg 
goes to $300,000, anyway. At that rate it wouldn't 
take over three or four meetings to make millionaires 
of the whole lot; but we have been racing horses for 
thirty years, some of us, and you can't find a rich man 
in the outfit." — Kentucky Stock Farm. 



A guesBing contest that is worth while has been in- 
augurated by the Breeder and Sportsman for the 
benefit of its readers. It is not one of that sort where 
the guesser must pay a certain sum for each guess, 
but can be indulged in without cost by any reader of 
this paper. The prize is a split second timer worth 
$25 and the first person to pick the first three horses 
in the California $2000 stake for 2:24 trotterB at San 
Jose will get the timer. The full conditions of this 
contest will be found in the advertising columns. It 
appeared last week and guesses are already coming 
in on every mail. The guesses will positively close 
July 26th. 

Worms will sometimes aunoy young foals exceed- 
ingly when they have attained the age of three or 
four months, or even earlier. An inquiry into the 
causes and means whereby these parasites enter the 
stomach of the horse would occupy much time. They 
are to be found in some foalB almost from their birth, 
before they have been in pasture or even eaten any 
solid food. When worms affect aged horses they 
may have been caused by the grass from some par- 
ticular locality. Horses are much more likely to be 
troubled with the insects which infest the grass when 
turned out to pasture than when it is fed as hay. It 
is thought that the larvae of certain specimens of 
worms are deposited on the grass. 



A correspondent of the Horse Birieir writes to that 
paper from Cleveland under date of June 25th as 
follows: "Millard Sanders is getting a number of his 
horses right on edge and has several that will be 
heard from when the bell rings. Al Bock 2:08} paced 
a nice mile in 2:08} last Monday, while the green pacer 
China Maid by McKinney, entered in the Chamber of 
Commerce and other rich stakes, is now wearing the 
hopples and a few days ago showed a mile in 2:09$ last 
half in 1:03. Robizola 2:12} is also a far better mare 
than last season, and two heats better than ber rec- 
ord seemed easy for her tbis week. Anzella 2:06} is 
taking her work and eroing sound, trotting a mile in 
2:16i Wednesday. The California trotter George G. 
2:124, recently purchased at a long price by A.N. 
Brady of New York, and now in 'Doc' Tanner's 
charge, was hitched to a wa°on Tuesday and worked 
a mile in 2:11.1, last halfin 1:03}, and the final quarter 
in aOi seconds. While much has been said about this 
gelding he certainly acts like a trotter of the very 
highest class. " 

The stewards of the Grand Circuit at a meetirg at 
the Waldorf Astoria Hotel, New York, Tuesday, 
June 21, 1904, unanimously selected Mr. George W. 
Haight, of Binsrhamton, N. Y., to be presiding judge 
of the Grand Circuit During the discussion of can- 
didates for the judgeship, special stress was laid on 
Mr. Haight's high character, sterling integiily, force- 
ful decision and valuable experience qualities which 
are needed in the judge's stand to put harness racing 
on the plan intended by the new Grand Oircuit organi- 
zation. The fact that not one vote was registered 
against Mr. Haight at the meeting, where five of the 
six stewards of the Grand Circuit were represented, 
argues well for the esteem in which he is held by the 
highest racing authorities in the world. Mr. Haight 
has accepted the judgeship, and his duties will com- 
mence at the Grand Circuit meeting in Detroit, July 
25th. Mr. H. K. Devereux, of Cleveland, O., and 
President Campau were invited to serve as racing 
stewards, and arrange the circuit to 6uit theircrn- 
venience. Albert H. Moone, of Providence, R. I., was 
elected actiDg treasurer of the Grand Circuit. 



A. C. Pennock of Cleveland has sold the pacer Capt. 
Derby 2:17; by Charles Derby, dam Economy 2:30 
(dam of Extravagant 2:281) by Echo, to Eastern 
parties who will race him over the half mile tracks. 
Capt. Derby won the 2:19 pace at Newburgh, N. Y. 
week before last, reducing his record from 2:18} to 
2:17t. 

Nancy Hanks has foaled a very fine bay colt by 
Blngen. Supt. Hall of Forbes Farm says it is one of 
the best lookiug youngsters that Nancy has ever had, 
and the colt has been named Malcolm Forbes. Mayor 
Johnson, of Calais, Me., who now owns Nancy, has 
had several tempting offers to breed her to outside 
stallions, notably to Cresceus and McKinney, but he 
has decided to breed her back to Bingen. — Am. Uorsc 

The //",.. Review says: "While driving Judge 

Groon 2:01} in a workout at Empire City track last 

week, one ot the reins broke, and Charley De Ryder 

sat calmly till hi.- judgeship, with dignity worthy of 

his name, slowed down to a jog and permitted himself 

aught. Those Directum horses have brains as 

- -lie. d. A few years ago, in Wisconsin Charley 

won a heat with a mare by sitting still after the reins 

ken and uieless. In this instance the bell 

was tapped, and the mare returned to the stand 

promptly, ft pays to sit still at times." 



The two-year-old trotting filly, Sallie Lunn, owned 
by W. A. Clark, Jr., of Butte, Mont , and now at 
Denver, Colo., in charge of Ted Hayes, is another 
illustration of the kindly msnner in which the blood 
of The Moor crosses with that of Aberdeen writes 
Columbus in Western Horseman. Sallie Lunn is a 
daughter of Wiggins 2:19}, and her dam is a daughter 
of Alsatian 20255, son of Sultan 2:24 by The Moor 870. 
Wiggins is a 60n of Aberdeen 27: dam Albina de Mer 
by Stamboul 2:07) by Sultan, son of The Moor; gran- 
dam Belle Blanche by The Moor. Wiggins is a 
marked sire of early and extreme speed, and his 
daughter, Katherlne A. (2) 2:14, is joint holder with 
Janie T., of the world's record, in race, for two-year- 
old trotters. Katherlne A. is out of Zoraya by Guy 
Wilkes; grandam Neluska2:30* by Sultan, "son of The 
Moor. This same mare, Zoraya, is likewise the dam 
of Black Arthur 2:27.1 by Wiggins, and grandam of 
Bessie Brown 2:12:], another of the get of Wiggins. 
Aberdeen is the sire of thirty-three sons that are 
represented by one or more standard performers, only 
one of whom has more standard trotters to his credit 
than Wiggins, one of the very youngest sons of this 
Hamblotonian-American Star stallion. Aberdeen 
died in 1892, and Wiggins was foaled the following 
season. At the age of ten years Wiggins is repre- 
sented by eight standard trotters, three of them in 
the 2:15 list and seven in the 2:10 list. 



•TULY 9, 1904] 



®Jte gveebev anit §tpavi&xnan 



EASTERN GOSSIP. M 

[Culled From Oar Exchanges.] fflftj 



Sires are so frequently credited with having accom- 
plished great results, and there are so many stallions 
living and so many more that have passed away that 
have been spoken of as great siree, that the question 
would naturally arise, what constitutes greatness in a 
sire? It is very evident that a long list of 2:30 per- 
formers is by many men proof positiveof great ability 
as a sire, for many stallions with long rolls of honor in 
which cannot be found a single great racehorse are 
crowned as king by some enthusiastic writers. One of 
the most conspicuous names in trotting history was 
borne by a stallion, now dead, whose reputation, and 
he had a very great one, depended entirely upon the 
number of hiB 2:30 performers and what has been 
accomplished by his descendants, for in that list there 
ia not a single trotter or pacer that ever won a classic 
event; not one that ever acquired an extremely fast 
record, or that ever won a brilliant race in good com- 
pany, or that ever defeated a single great horse. Two- 
thirty performers he sired in plenty, and his sons and 
daughters have likewise rolled up his list, and from 
among these have come very great horses, yet he him- 
self, while a very great grandsire, ought not to be 
given the credit for greatness as a sire, unless, of 
course, quantity rather than quality is the standard 
used by horsemen. It would seem but just that any 
stallion, no matter how great his opportunity, that 
never gave to the world a single trotting racehorse of 
more than ordinary capacity should be rated as infe- 
rior to one from which came winners of great events, 
record holders, great colt trotters and trotting cham- 
pions. As an example of the latter how much greater 
appears Director than many other sires with a longer 
list of 2:30 performers. Judging from this point of 
view, where has there ever lived a stallion comparable 
to Alcyone? He accomplished in six stud seasons 
more than most stallions do after a period covering 
three times as many years. Alcyone sired many ex- 
tremely high-class trotters. He not only has an ex- 
tended 2:30 list, but his 2:15 performers would have 
done credit to any sire whose opportunities coveied a 
fifth of a century. Alcyone's get earned their reputa- 
tions in racing, and his fame does not depend on a 
number of 2:30 performers that gained their records 
against time. If quantity rather than quality is de- 
sirable, how much greater Alexander's Abdallah ap- 
P3ars than doe3 Harold, whose years of usefulness 
lasted until he was a comparatively old horse. If 
winners of classic events are the crucial test of a stal- 
lion's ability as a sire, is it not time that due credit be 
given those stallions that are dependent for their rep- 
utation on really high-class racehorses, and that they 
be placed higher in the scale of sires with more than 
one hundred 2:30 performers and not a single first- 
class trotter in the list. Only a comparatively few 
years ago it was the aim of every stallion owner to 
add to his horse's 2:30 list, and time records were as 
numerous as falling leaves in autumn, and the stallion 
with the greatest addition to his list of standard per- 
formers was proclaimed the greatest sire of the year; 
and yet, as frequently was the case, there might not 
be a single first-class horse in the lot. The stallion 
that sires racehorses and the get of which are seen in 
the front in the classic events of the turf is the truly 
great sire, and the more stake winners he gets the 
greater he is, while the horse that piles up a long list 
of standard performers that are not conspicuous in 
public races is inferior to the other, and in fact of 
little value to the breeding world. Great sires beget 
great racehorses, and stallions that cannot accom- 
plish this have no claim to distinction and should not 
be called great, but should be given their proper 
place. One stake winner is worth more to a sirethan 
twenty holders of tincup records, and this should te 
the standard by which the true greatness of a sire ia 
gauged.— Kentucky Stock Farm. 

The death of Allie Trout was one of those shocks 
which grows more intense with the passing days. An 
honor to the profession there waB genuine regret 
when a few months ago he gave up the trotters and 
pacers for the runners. Now that he has been stricken 
down yearB before reaching the prime of life there is 
sorrow and sympathy. Sympathy for his childless 
widow and for his father. Sorrow because a man 
honorable in all his dealings and a friend to all who 
knew him has been taken away. 
.Allie Trout was a natural hoiseman, just as his 
father is. From his boyhood days he was successful 
with all kinds, trotters, pacers, runners, roadsters 
and coachers. When his brother Edgar died almost 
f not quite 20 years ago Allie, then a boy in short 
trousers, decided to follow the calling of his father. 
Jack Trout was then located at old Beacon, and It 



was only a very few years before the silver-haired 
reinsman let the boy drive. The young man did so 
well that the entry list soon bore the name of John 
Trout and son. Along about the spring of 1887 the 
Trouts took stalls at Mystic. From there they went 
to Moodus, Conn, in 1891 Allie received a fine offer 
to train for Col. John E. Thayer and his brother 
Bayard. He accepted and remained with the Lan- 
caster men until they retired from the business this 
past winter. He carried the black and orange of 
Maplehurst Farm to the front in many races the first 
year he was with Col. Thayer. Then with the coming 
of the young Baron Wilkes his ability as a salesman 
began to tell, and of late years ther rt was nothing for 
him to race. He found buyers for everything his 
employers could raise. His specialty was showing 
colts beside a pony, and at this he had no equal; he 
was in a class by himself. Visitors at the 1903 Horse 
Show will recall how cleverly he handled Bingen and 
won first prize when it looked almost a sure thing for 
one of the Dreamwold horses. Allie Trout gained a 
high standing in his chosen calling and many of the 
qualities which brought him prosperity with the 
horses would have made him a success in any other 
vocation. — Trotter and Pacer. 



It would be a good ide^orth£^u^ggS"£t all harnes 
meetings to send all unbroken and dangerous horses 
to the barn and return the owners their entrance 
money. Life should not be endangered by bad acting 
brutes that cannot be controlled in the ordinary 
manner. A writer in the Western Horseman thus de- 
scribes one of the horses that has been racing on the 
Colorado circuit: "There never wa6 a worse actor in 
a harness race than Bonnie Treasure He should 
never be allowed to start in a field of well mannered 
horses, but should be herded around by himself for 
the benefit of those who care to watch an exhibition 
of 'broncho driving.' It requires a 'pitcher' and a 
Catcher' to start the crazy brute, and after the word 
has been received not a single man or horse is free 
from danger until after Bonnie Treasure is unhitched 
at the end of the heat." 



It is plain to most horsemen that Lou Dillon, the 
paerless queen of the trotting turf, did not 
reach the limit of her speed last season when she 
placed the world's trotting record at 1:584. It is 
equally plain that wind shield or no wind shield, she 
can dispell all doubts as to the existence of the two- 
minute trotter. Her mile at Cleveland last Saturday 
in 2:04^, to wagon, no wind shield and a single pace- 
maker, clearly indicates "what wonders she is most 
sure to accomplish the present season. We saw her 
trot her first mile in two ",minutes_ l^st; Reason — at 
Readville — and we did not believe that at' - that time 
that the runner in front was any assistance whatever 
to her, nor do we think so now. Indeed, we believe 
she would have trotted just as fast had she been the 
only horse on the track at the time. She needs noth- 
ing other than her own courage to lead her to extreme 
effort. There is not another trotter like her, there 
never has been one like her, and it is not likely that 
there will be another like her in the immediate future. 
"What is her limit?" We do not know. But con- 
ditions favoring, we do look for the chestnut daughter 
of Sidney Dillon to trot in 1:56 or better this year, 
and, further, we believe that ultimately trotters acd 
pacers, especially pacers, will catch up with the 
present running record. We can see no logical reasons 
for doubting this, for when the harness gaits become 
sufficiently fixed, by line breeding, they will be 
"running" gaits of trotters and pacer?, and, being 
easier gaits than the running gait proper, they should 
be at least as fast. Therefore, as we view the situa- 
tion, great as are Dan Patch 1:56 J,- and Lou Dillon 
1:584 regarded now, the time will come with them as 
it has with Johnson 2:06^ and Maud S. 2:03£, when 
they will look mediocre. It may be difficult for some 
individuals, nearly all individuals, of the present 
generation to grasp these possibilities, but no more 
difficult than was it for past generations to compre- 
hend the possible accomplishments which to us at 
this day are commonplace enough. Neither "time in 
her flight," nor the improvements of progress, turn 
back, even "just for to-night." — Western Horseman. 



Secretary Murray Howe has brought forth a novel 
proposition in the effort to produce something which 
will excite interest in the great fall meeting at Mem- 
phis, it being no leas than the suggestion of a race 
between the champion harness horses at either gait, 
Lou Dillon 1:58J, and Dan Patch 1:56J, driven by their 
owners. The plan is apparently wholly original with 
Mr. Howe, who frankly says that neither owner may 
be willing to make the match, but that he hopes to 
induce both to consent. It would appear that the 
greatest difficulty would be in securing the consent of 
Mr. Billings, for it is an accepted theory that in a 
mixed race a pacer should have a handicap in order to 
equalize the chances of the conteatantB, but as Mr. 



Billings is the owner of the Memphis track, and is 
interested in the success of the meetings thereat, and 
as, moreover, he is known to be a genuine and cour- 
ageous sportsman, there is hope that he will acqui- 
esce in the race proposed by Mr. Howe. As for Mr. 
Savage, the owner of Dan Patch, it hardly seems 
proable that he would object to the match, or in the 
opinion of the majority of horsemen the chances of 
winniLg would be decidedly In his favor. If the 
event is consummated there can be no doubt that it 
will prove the most magnetic attraction ever offered 
on a race track in America.— Trotter and Pacer. 



Sterling R. Holt has donated 81000 to be offered as 
added money to a stake for colts by his trotting stal- 
lion Rex Americus, the race to be decided during the 
Indiana State Fair week at Indianapolis this fall. 
The stake is for two-year-old trotters. 

Arrangements have been made by national horse 
breeders' associations to hold public sales of horses 
during the period of the horse show at the World's 
Fair grounds at St. Louis. Dates have been ap- 
pointed as follows: Tuesday, Aug. 30, Morgans; 
Wednesday, August 31, PerGherons: Thursday, Sept. 
1, French Draft. The highest class of horses has 
been assured for the above, The rules of the exposi- 
tion provide that no sale exceed in number 100 ani- 
mals of one breed, such animals to be selected by their 
breed associations from those entered for prizes, thus 
insuring the highest class of horses with World's 
Fair honors. 

Matinee racing seems to be growing in popularity 
each year. Last season it attained almost incredulous 
proportions, but it will be still more in evidence this 
year. Almost every city in the country has its 
matinee club, and a large number of the smaller 
towns have a similar organization. Amateur reins- 
men have searched the country over for trotters and 
pacers of extreme speed and good deportment, and it 
is to matinee racing that the ready market for fast 
record horses is due. It is not all outclassed horses, 
either, that pass from the professional to the amateur 
ranks. Many very fast trotters and pacers fully able 
to race successfully in their class Lave been bought by 
men who use them exclusively for matinee racing. 
While matinee racing has robbed tne turf of some 
great race horses, it has probably balanced the 
Account by enlarging the demand and raising the 
value of that class of horses. At any rate, matinee 
racing is a permanent feature of our out-of-door 
sports, and it will do more than any other one thing 
to add new recruits to the ranks of those who love 
harness racing. The man who getshis firBt acquaint- 
ance with trotters and pacers through amateur racing 
will become a sincere lover of that form of racing, 
and while he may confine his active participation in it 
to amateur meetings, he will not fail to take advant- 
of every opportunity to see the professional meet- 
ings. — Horse World. 

■ Acknowledging the supremacy of the American 
trotting bred horse on track and highway, so far as 
speed is concerned, and noting its victorious career 
as a sensational high-stepper in our show rings as 
well as its general acceptance as a saleable harness 
horse in the markets of the world, the versatility of 
the breed would seem to have been fully established 
even without evidence that trotting blood is largely 
resorted to in the make-up of quite a number of our 
saddle horses and hunters. 

In addition to all this, however, and, as if to 
clinch the matter, comes the news that not a few 
of the best polo ponies have trotting blood in their 
veins, and it is declared by those supposed to know 
that the more of it a polo pony possesses the more 
amenable to discipline the cute little equine becomes, 
and, iurther, the speed of the pony is said to be 
increased to within an ace of that shown by three- 
quarter bred running horses. 

Taking the matter as it stands under consideration, 
with especial reference to the good values trotting 
bred carriage horses have realized in recent years, 
when carefully selected, properly trained and thor- 
oughly conditioned for show or sale, it would cer- 
tainly seem that, if there is any truth in the state- 
ment that heavy harness horse production is the 
best paying department of the horse breeding indus- 
try, American trotting blood for foundation stock 
is the safest basis to start on. That the blood has 
for several years been proved to be an important 
and influential factor in the make-up of the stylish 
harness and saddle horse is admitted freely on every 
hand. Its admixture with foreign blood of some of 
the blockier breeds, like the hackney and French 
coacher has certainly resulted in rounding up the 
symmetry of produce and imparted an inherentability 
for added speed in action. — Sports of the Times. 

Jackson's Napa Soda untangles the feet. 



mte gveeitev ciixb ^povtstnan 



[July 9, 1904 



Comrades. 

I always let the eld mare Jog 

Along just as she pleases; 
For she enjoys the life with me 

Oat Id the summer breezes. 
You wonder If a horse can think? 

I know she can— when clover 
Perfumes the air, she pricks her ears 

And fairly thrills all over. 

Along the quiet way she wends; 
Her hoofs they clutter oiatter; 

She's in no hurry to get— where? 
To her it doesn't matter. 

She understands my ev'ry word, 
To her they are no puzzle. 

1 ask her who she likes the best- 
She rubs me with her muzzle. 

Ah! when we loiter on the way 

Within some shady treasure, 
She always talks and says: ''Old friend, 

A life like this is pleasure." 
And when some auto driver hies 

Along with maiden glowing 
Close by his side, the old mare says; 

"I quite prefer our going." 

She knows each foot of thoroughfare; 

She needs no touch of finger 
Upon the rein to tell her where 

I lore to pause and linger. 
Sometimes I tell her all about 

My heart and its thanksgiving; 
She nods her head and says to me; 

"This life is worth the living.". 

And so we jog along our way, 

With neither fuss nor flurry; 
Oar fancies are attuned, you see, 

We're neither in a hurry. 
Some time my good comrade will pass, 

And we will be asunder. 
Ah! will that be the final of 

My dear old friend, I wonder? 

— Horace Seymour Keller. 



Racing at Santa Ana. 

. w . On Saturday, July 2d, the newly organized Orange 
County Driving Club opened its first meeting, which 
continued for two days omitting Sunday, and closing 
on the 4th. The attendance was good both days. 
The club now has 140 members. Gate money is 
oharged, privileges sold, and small purses are given, 
as the club is a member of the National Trotting Asso- 
ciation and holdB its race9 strictly to rule, so that 
records, whether slow or fast will be duly accredited. 
There were close finishes in nearly every race and 
split heats in some, and quite a good deal of money 
was wagered on the results. During the meeting the 
twelve year old mare, Florence Covey, was started to 
beat her race record of 2:26 'made the first day and 
reduced It four seconds. She was only trained two 
months by Mr. Collins who cared for McKtnney dur- 
ing all the time that stallion was in California. She 
will be kept in training and Mr. Geo. W. Ford, her 
owner, expects to reduce her record still further this 
fall. 

The next meeting of the club will be held one day 
during the first week in August and meetings will be 
held each month thereafter. If Los Angeles gives a 
meeting this fall, the Orange County Club will follow 
with a three or four days meeting the following week. 
The club is not an amateur organization but proposes 
to give regular racing and will work to stimulate the 
harness horse industry in every legitimate way. The 
summaries of the races held during the two days are 
as follows: 
Trotting, 2:30 class, purse (50. 

Florence Covey, ch m by Alban I i 

Alaclta.bm by Bed Cloak 2 2 

Time-2:38, 2:26. 

Pacing, 2:20 class, purse 150. 

Casey, b g by Athadoo l i 

Sunny Jim, b g by Kotchum 2 2 

Time-2:21' / 4, 2:18«. 

Trotting, 2:40clasa, purse f 9. 

MoKlnney, br g by McKlnnoy 1 1 

Mac, blkgby McKlnney 2 3 

Albert W., b g by Noornut 4 2 

Jim, blkg, unknown 3 4 

Klamath Maid, b m by Quycesca 6 5 

Time— 2:43!<, 2:40tf. 

Paolng, 2:40 class, purse 19. 

Daldy.s m by Kelchum 1 2 1 

Prince McNeal, dun g by Nutford 3 1 3 

Leo, gr s by Grey Cloud 2 8 2 

Pop Eye, br g by Dob Mason 4 4 4 

Laddlo M0K00, gr g by Nutford 6 5 6 

Tlme-2:38X, 2:41*4. 2.42. 

Trotting, 3:U0 class, purse 90. 

yueon, b m by son of Kl'^tlonoor I J 

Ilola.brm by Happy Prluco .... 2 3 

Kid, bg by Neornut 3 3 

Timo-3:0&X. 2:67^. 

Trotting, to boat 2:20. 

Florence Covov, oh m by Alban wt U 

Tlnw 

The judges woro J. P, Snover, ,T. W. Blee ard 
Pete loner. James Sleepor, C. W. Karrar and J. F. 
Snover acted as timers. E. L. Madden was clerk of 
the course. 

Since the Ore at San Jose track some of the boreal 
in trailing there have had to find stall room outside 
he. f»i* unds. New stalls are to bo built before the 
f meeting In August. 



The French Carriage Horse. 

An effort 19 being made to introduce and popularize 
the French carriage horse into this country and to 
try to achieve such results as have been attained in 
France by thorough breeding. Some fine members 
of the breed will be shown at the State Fair by F. I. 
Hodgkinsof the Oakwood Stock Farm and horse 
fanciers who want size combined with style and speed 
will do well to pay particular attention to them. 

The French carriage horse stands In a unique class 
as far as his origin and breeding are concerned, in be- 
ing fostered bred and perfected by the government 
of a country. His pedigree runs back more than two 
hundred years to the time of the "Magnificent 
Monarch, " Louis XIV. During his luxurious and 
ostentatious reign, extravagance reigned supreme. 
The splendor of the king was reflected in the ex- 
travagance of his court. Gorgeous splendor and 
artistic development were stimulated to the highest 
degree. Among the other things elegant horses be- 
came the rage but there was great difficulty in sup- 
plying the demands and national Haras were estab- 
lished and Arab, Barb and other foreign bred stal- 
lions were imported by order of the king. They were 
selected for their rare beauty and high qualities and 
bred to the fineBt mareB of the old saddle breedB of 
Merlevault and the ancient breed of Cotentin, 300 of 
which were gathered at the Royal Haras of Pin. 
From this beginning comes the preaent French corch 
horse. 

Toe judiciouB use cf the Arab and his descendant, 
the thoroughbred, has been continued so far as blood 
can do, the present breed if from pure Arabs en- 
grafted on the old French stock from Normandy. In 
1690 the royal stallions and those approved by royal 
decree as competent to elebate the standard of beauty 
and elevate the breed, numbered 1600. A hundred 
years later the number was 3200. 

Interrupted by the French Revolution, under Na- 
poleon a new direction and impulse was given to the 
work, the great system which gave France her mag- 
nificient roads stimulating the breeders to meet the 
demand for stout, stylish trotters that had the neces- 
sary endurance to draw coaches long distances at 
rapid speed. There was great rivalry among the 
rich, both in city and country to possess the finest and 
most speedy carriage hor66B. The government be- 
came more active in its effort to supply stallions quali- 
fied to impart size, endurance and speed combined 
with style and elegance of form. Between 1815 and 
1833 it bought 1902 stallions, 223 of which were im- 
ported, most of them from Arabia, and the French 
stud was established in the latter year. Heretofore 
the fastest French trotting horses were all small. A 
turf law was enacted shutting out from public races 
all horses under about 15} hands high. 

It was strongly opposed, but the breeders Boon saw 
itB wisdom and immediately began to breed their 
small fast mares to the best larger stallions procur- 
able and the fastest small stallions to the largest fast 
mares. The government realized that the real value 
of every horse must be measured by his endurance. 
It therefore established long distance races on the 
turf. The distance for the French trotting Derby was 
two and one-half miles until 1882, when it was reduced 
to two miles. The St. Leger for three-year-olds is 
still trotted over two and one-half miles and the test 
for five-year-olds is three to four miles, the handicap 
weight for four-year-olds running from 140 to 170 
pounds. The reason for trotting on the sod is that it 
is claimed it necessitates a high round knee action, 
shortening the stride, and makes speed a necessity by 
a quicker movement and at the least expense of power 
through perfect adjustment of thestride. In 1874 the 
number of stallions was ordered increased till it 
amounted to 2500 and the appropriations for prizes 
awarded to breeding animals amounted to a million 
and a half of francs. To maintain the high standard 
a decree was issued in 1885 excluding from public Ber 
vice all stallions not authorized by the government. 
Thus we see that the French Government has fostered 
the production of a new and valuable breed, maintain- 
ing the prices for fine animals as the annual demand 
to supply the Haras creates a constant call for the 
best specimens at very high prices. 

Although the government of this country and this 
State cannot proceed as France has done, the Slate 
Fair does all it has power to do by Inviting exhibitors 
to show tholr stock at the Fair and paying premiums 
to those who are considered to have the best stock 

.nd thus give to the people the same guidance and 
information that France does, at a far less cost. 



be true, and will not if development of the foal is 
systematically carried out. Weanlings have sold at 
$200 to $100 each that would not bring over one-half 
the amount at three or four years old, and why? 
Simply because their owners presumed upon the fact 
that blood lines would alwayB give value to an animal. 
In certain cases such reasoning might hold true, as 
the filly foal of some stallion, like Baron Wilkes, and 
out of a mare like Mabel, dam of Cresceus. A filly 
bred as above indicated would possess value when 
matured as a brood mare. But such are isolated 
cases. The fashionably bred weanling Bells well on 
account of its blood lines. The buying public figures 
that the youngster will mature into a valuable ani- 
mal, and usually it will, if properly grown and devel- 
oped. Without development such foals are not 
worth anywhere near aB much when matured, and 
the owner condemns the "horse business." The his- 
tory of the light harness horse in tho6e sections where 
the business has been profitable proves that develop- 
ment of well bred foals is absolutely necessary. In 
order to make the breeding of high-class road or track 
horses successful and profitable early development of 
the foal is of vital importance. The money making 
horse must be bred in fashionable lines; this matter 
of breeding is essential, even if trainers pass the 
matters over lightly, as many of them are accus 
tomed to do. The foal must inherit certain qualities 
from sire to dam if it matures into a valuable horse, 
but inheritance will not carry the colt through life. 
"Speed is bred with the foal," is a favorite phrase 
with fanciers of both running bred and trotting bred 
horseB. If the foal thus bred is allowed to grow to 
maturity without beiDg properly educated and de- 
veloped, of what value is the "speed" he inherited? 
Does it add any to the value of a mature horse, un* 
broken and poorly grown? As previously stated, 
without development, a well bred weanling is worth 
more than at any age in its life. Owners should re- 
member this when they attempt making a sale of a 
four-year-old that is only halter broken. 



The Modern Horse Stable. 



Development Absolutely Necessary. 

"Practically, as well aB theoretically, development 
Is the only thing that will add value to a foal," wisely 
remarks Dr. Battey. Many a well bred wonnllng Is 
worth more than at any other age. This ought not 



In the up-to-date horse stable hay-racks are 
obsolete. The hay is fed from the floor. Manger 8 
and troughs should be interchangeable, to admit tak- 
ing out, scrubbing and sunning. 

There should be an abundance of water, not stand- 
ing to be fouled, but fed from buckets used for no 
other purposes, and especially should horses be 
watered the last thing at night. 

For working hours, use the "clock" feeding system 
instead of feeding a horse and then jumping him into 
the shafts before his mouth is empty. 

Hay should not be kept over the stable when there 
is facility for keeping it elsewhere, as it accumulates 
odor like tea or butter. 

Neither should men's sleeping quarters be above a 
stable when it can be avoided; a horse does not thrive 
when under the noise of persons moving about. 

Stall division should not go to the floor, but an 
inch or so should give base ventilation, sending odor 
upward, and keeping the feet and legs cool. The par- 
titions can otherwise be built solid, and should not be 
too high to permit horseB to see each other. 

A stalled horse gets very lonely staring for hours at 
a blank wall, which is enough to drive a strong man 
to drink or suicide. No wonder the animal makes 
close friends with a cat, a goat, or whatever living 
thing he can attract for championship. 

In other cases the English "bail" separation is two 
good planks dovetailed hung down from rafters, by 
ropes or chains at head or foot, ending a foot and a 
half from the ground, the upper edge being not less 
than four feet and a half. These separate horses 
effectually and, what's more, are apt to cure stall 
kickers. 

Answers to Correspondents. 

P. H. M. — Will you please give through your valu- 
able paper the record and where won of the bay 
gelding H. D. B. 

Answer — H. D. B. bay gelding by Arthur Holt has 
trotting record of 2:25J made at Colusa, August 14, 
1904. 

E. J M.— Please give the breeding of Prince Alta- 
mont 31863, foaled in 1894 and bred by B. P. Shawhan. 

Answer— By Altamont 3600, dam Florence R. 2:26} 
by Nutwood 600, second dam Irene by Erwin Davis 
5558. 

H. A. B. — Would you kindly let me know in your 
next issue If the Stallion Seven Oaks owned by the 
Sargent Estate, near Gilroy, sired any standard per- 
formers. Also please give his record and breeding. 

AnB. — The stallion you refer to Is John Sevenoaks 
24,350. He Is by Nutwood 600, dam San Juan Belle, 
pedigree not traced. He is the sire of the pacer 
Loupe 2:09} and the trotters Bay Rum 2:163 and Billy 
Oaks 2:30. He has no standard record. 



JULY 9, 1904J 



®tte gveebev anit &p0vt&man 



Bitting, Shoeing and Hitching tor Action. 

[Breeders Gazette.] 
Bitting, or "making the mouth, "is by far the most 
important matter to attend to in contributing to ac- 
tion. You must get the head up and nose in, and cul- 
tivate a responsive mouth, so that when a horse is 
urged and restrained he will step up instead of step- 
ping on. Vigilance is urged against getting horses 
into bad habits in connection with the mouth in the 
process of bitting, such as getting the tongue over 
the bit, retracting the tongue, side lining, going with 
the mouth open, tossing the head, carrying the head 
unsteadily and so forth. If some of these habits are 
developed they will tend to neutralize any beneficial 
efforts that have been made in the cultivation of the 
mouth. 

An easy bit should first be used, such as a straight- 
barred ringed one or a siaffle, so that the colt will 
face it firmly and carry a steady head. In the develop- 
ment of speed it is also imperative to use an easy 
bit, but for the production of style and action a 
curb bit is almost indispensable for the majority of 
horses. The inexperienced are apt to think that a 
curb bit it an instrument of torture. The ignorant 
thoughtless and rough handler of horses can easily 
make it so, but if it is properly used it is really more 
humane for use in many mouths than a less, severe 
one. The curb bit gives very much increased lever- 
age and will make some horses bend that cannot be 
made to do so without it. As soo a as they bend it 
requires very little force to keep the noses in and 
very little pressure need be exerted, so that there is 
no injury nor irritation resulting. In addition to 
this, the pressure is divided between the interior and 
exterior of the mouth, the curb chain exerting its 
Bhare of the pressure just behind the lower lip. 

Some free, courageous horses, especially if short of 
work, will pull to a most uncomfortable extent, both 
to themselves and their drivers, if driven with a 
snaffle bit, that if UBed with curbs will go without 
taking hold and with the exertion of very slight 
restraining force on the part of the driver. The 
perfect handling of a horse with a curb bit is a very 
fine art, where the perfection of carriage and the 
maximum of style and action are effected through its 
medium. To realize fully what the perfect handling 
of a curb bit means in promoting style and action one 
has only to observe a horse skillfully handled with 
one, especially If he has a good mouth. The. dexter- 
ous rider or driver brings out all the responsiveness 
there is in the individual without causing him to 
fight, while the unskillful handler allows a horse to 
carry himself imperfectly and gets him off his balance, 
thereby lessening his gracefulness, style and action. 

In making the change from a snaffle to a curb bit it 
should be done carefully and discreetly, as it takes a 
horse some time to get used to the difference. We 
have good opportunities in the city of observing the 
ill effectB of theabrupt change. A dealer gets a horse 
in from the country that is possibly well broken but 
has never had a curb bit in his mouth. He hitches 
the horse, puts a curb bit in his mouth, and "pulls 
him together, " as it is expressed, that is, he urges 
him with the whip and restrains him to get all the 
style and action he can out of him. He is very much 
encouraged to see his new purchase make such a 
good Bhowing. The next day he puts the horse in 
harness again but finds that he doeB not go so well, 
showing irritability in connection with his moutb. 
The horse may hold his head sideways, open -his 
mouth more or less, put his tongue over the bit, toss 
his head or carry it unsteadily, pull, hitch, go off his 
feet or interfere. He may show any one or a com- 
bination of these faults, showing that he is uncon- 
fortable and out of balance. 

Why this quiok change in manner of going between 
first and second hitching? It is simply due to the 
fact that the delicate tissues of the mouth have 
become bruised or abraded from rough handling of 
a bit, with powerful leverage. His mouth iB sore and 
he cannot face the bit without showing irritability, 
which he manifests in the ways described. The curb 
bit feelB differently in his mouth, the pressure on the 
tongue is greater, and if the curb chain is tightened 
and reins buckled to bit bo as to give much leverage 
many horses will chafe under the increased, newly 
experienced restraint and are apt to pull, thereby 
greatly increasing the injury to the mouth. If this 
iB repeated the mouth is spoiled and bad habits pro- 
duced. 

In getting a horse used to the curb bit it is a good 
plan to let him stand with it in his mouth In the stable 
for a few hours a day. This gets him used to the 
shape and size of a new bit in his mouth, after which 
pressure can be brought to bear upon it by degrees. 
Some trainers are opposed to the use of a dumb jockey. 
Of course the mouth cannot be perfected by the use of 
this device alone, but it is a very useful auxiliary to 
other measures. The dumb jockey is a rubber con- 



trivance attached to a girth and crupper and with 
elastic reins to buckle to the bit. The prejudice 
against it is largely the result of the irrational man- 
ner in which it is used. In the majority of instances 
the reins are buckled too tightly at first, causing too 
much pressure on the mouth and forcing the head 
and neck into an unnaturally constrained position. 
This, instead of cultivating responsiveness of the 
mouth, causes irritation of that organ, gets a horse 
into fusBy habits and makes him lie on the bit, doiDg 
more harm than good. One not infrequently sees a 
horse standing in a stall with a dumb jockey on himi 
his mouth partly open, his tongue over the bit and 
boring down on it and sweating profusely from the 
discomfort he is suffering. A dumb jockey used in 
this way is worse than useless. One of the objects of 
using a jockey is to get the nose in, and from the 
manner in which it is used by many it is evident that 
they Beek to accomplish this by sheer mechanical 
force, forgetting that they are training nerves and 
muscles to responsiveness, which can only be done by 
degrees. 

As soon as a horse shows evidence of discomfort 
loosen the reins and tighten them gradually again. 
If the subject draws his tongue up in his mouth 
or puts it over the bit, raise the bit in his mouth. 
Some horseB get their headB too low with a dumb- 
jockey on. In Buch it is of much benefit to use a 
bearing rein attachment to keep their heads in 
proper position. The benefit desirable from a dumb- 
jockey used in the stable is enhanced by using it 
when a horse is in motion. Some horses will bend 
when standing that will not do so when moving so 
have to be trained to it. Beneficial as a dumb-jockey 
may be, a rider with good hands on a horse's back, 
that can use his legs on the horse's sides, urging 
him by degrees into proper position with hind legs 
well under him and head up and nose in, can accom- 
plish more, as he can humor the horse a,t will. Next 
to riding driving in single harness is best, aB it is 
hardly possible to humor a horse's mouth as well in 
double as in single harness. The tendency with 
most trainers, is to hurry matters too much. Urging 
a horse into the bit too soon causeB him to fuss with 
his mouth and is apt to make him fight the bit. The 
successful trainer needs a lot of patience and persever- 
ance. 

If in the process of biting the mcuth by accident 
gets sore rest it by keeping the bit out of it until it 
is better. This can be accomplished in the oountry 
or in a small town without keeping a horse out of 
work altogether by putting on the canvesson and 
dumb-jockey and having the reins tightly buckled 
to the canvesson and led alongside of another horse 
in this way or lunged. It is a bad plan to let a horse 
that is in the process of biting or breaking get too 
fresh, as he is apt to reinjure his mouth when he is 
put in harness again. 

Curb bits for driving are so made that different 
degrees of leverage can be exerted. It can be laid 
down as a rule that it is not wise to use any more 
leverage than is essential, otherwise the mouth is apt 
to become sore and carried unsteadily. 

There is some diversity of opinion as to the wisdom 
of using bearing-reins. Some people are very much 
opposed to their use particularly the inexperienced. 
Occasionally one finds a horse (much more rarely a 
pair) that carrieB himself so well — head up, nose in 
and head steady — that a bearing-rein is superfluous. 
The majority of horses, however, carry themselves 
better, drive more comfortably and are really more 
comfortable themselves when driven with bearing- 
reins. They can, of course, be made instruments of 
torture, if used too tightly buckled up and for too 
long periods at a time, but most horses will not only 
carry their heads too low, but bore, pull and "duck," 
if not "borne up." The low carriage of the head is 
not only unsightly in a carriage horse, but causes too 
much weight to be thrown on the forelegs for their 
welfare. The French check is very much better than 
the pulley bridoon. The bearing-rein should not be 
used so tightly that a horse cannot bend his head up- 
on his neck if he is capable of doing so. The bearing- 
reins should seldom, if ever, be used on the driving 
bit; if it is at all tight it pulls the bit too high up in 
the mouth causing a horse to bore and usually to 
bruise the bars severely immediately in front of the 
grinders. A joinied bit should be used in the mouth 
in addition t: the driving bit and the bearing-rein 
buckled to it. 

So far we have been referring to bitting only as 
having a contributing influence in increasing thefor- 
ward or knee action, but it has also a marked effect 
in improving the hock action. It is extraordinary 
how much the hock action can be increased by culti- 
vating a responsive mouth, dropping the nose into 
its proper position, or in other words balancing a 
horse. 

Before we leave the subject of the mouth and 
bitting altogether, we muBt refer to condition as an 



important factor in contributing to action. Before a 
horse can be made to show all the action there is in 
him he must be toned up to the highest pitch. He 
must be full of nervous energy and bis muscles 
thoroughly developed. He must not only feel like 
doing it, but must also have the power. It takes 
time to bring this about. The cultivation of the 
mouth and the toning up of the system should pro- 
ceed together, but never let the toning up get ahead 
of the education of the mouth. It is better not to 
have a horse feeling too well while you are cultivating 
his mouth for if his spirits are too exuberant he will 
not learn so fast and is apt to fight and increase hia 
chances of developing bad habits. In cases in which 
actioncontributes to a horse's value he must also look 
well. Without being too gross, he should be in full 
flesh, it should be well put on and there is nothing 
like a lot of slow work for this. From an hour to two 
hours walking exercise every day will make the flesh 
look solid and give a finish that a horEe Bimply fat- 
tened up without work never shows. Slow work if a 
horse gets a sufficiency of good feed and proper 
grooming will not prevent the accumulation of flesh 
as fast work does, and it keeps the manners of the 
individual good. The development of speed in trot- 
ting-bred horses is a slow process with many of them. 
It takes several years in some individuals to bring it 
to its zenith. This is in a measure true of action, if 
we look to perfecting it. A good deal can be ac- 
complished in a couple of months with some horses, 
but much more can be attained In two years. We 
have examples of horses well known in the Bhow rings 
of this country to-day that have gone on improving 
in brilliance of style and action for years. Bitting 
and conditioning are the chief contributing factors. 

The practical man who is conditioning and develop- 
ing horses' action for sale is limited as to time. He 
can afford to spend it and he has to be guided by cir- 
cumstances; but the principle of development is the 
same, whether for the market or show ring. A great 
deal is said about shoeing in contributing, to action, 
and it is a point that should be studied and carefully 
attended to, but it is decidedly secondary in import- 
ance to either bitting or conditioning. Some years 
ago a great deal of weight was used in shoeing show 
and style horses. You would frequently see a horse 
running from 1000 to 1100 pounds carrying from one 
pound and a half to two pounds weight and even more 
on each forefoot. This answers for some purposes 
and before some judges, but if an owner wishes to sell 
or show a horse on his merits it does not do. A lot of 
weight on a horse's feet will make him show more 
action for a 6hort time, particularly if shown in hand 
and if he is feeling fresh and well. If, however, he is 
called upon to exert himself for any length of time, 
especially if the going is heavy and if he has to draw 
any weight, he will soon begin to labor, pound the 
ground, very likely forge, and the character of his 
action will be destroyed. With a good judge the 
character of the action is of more importance than 
the amount of it, and he would not look a second time 
at a horse that labors and pounds, no matter how 
high he goes. One has to be guided by the individual 
and the object in view in determining the amount of 
weight to put in a horse's 6hoes in order to get the 
best results in the way of action. From 16 to 22 
ounces is usually sufficient, but there are horses for 
which a little less or a little more may be carried with 
advantage for sale or show purposes. 

In addition to carrying a moderate amount of 
weight the hoofs should be allowed to grow to a 
fair length. Length of toe causes a horse to exert 
increased effort in raising and extending the foreleg, 
so the tendency is to increase the action. Defects 
of action can in a measure be corrected by modify- 
ing the shoes and form of the hoof. For instance, 
some horses extend too much and do not fold or bend 
their knees sufficiently, but what is called "point" 
and are apt to go on their heels, or come down heel 
first instead of planting the foot squarely— heel and 
toe at the same time. For this defect have the toes 
fairly short, lighten the web of the shoe at the toe, 
and increase its weight gradually towards the heel. 
With a horBe that folds too much and does not extend 
sufficiently, put the weight towards the toe and 
lighten the heel. In a horse that "dishes," "wings" 
or "winds out, " the heavy portion of the web should 
be in the inside branch, while in a horse that "winds 
in" just the opposite should be done 

In carrying out theBe modifications they must be 
done so as not to interfere with the level of the foot. 
If a horse does not tread level, ill results in the shape 
of lameness or wear and tear of the leg and foot are 
likely to follow. F. C. GEENSIDE, V. S. 

New York Co , N. Y. 



Back Number Wanted at $i. 

To complete the files of the Breeder and Sports- 
man for a subscriber we wish to procure one copy of 
February 5, 1898, and will pay $1 for one number of 
that date. Send paper to BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 
36 Gearv street, San Francisco. 



®he $vcttrer cutfr f&pvvisnxan 



[July 9, 1904 



ROD, GUN AND KENNEL. 



Conducted by ■". X. De WITT. 



Calling Jackals. 

- cousin of the coyote (cauls latrane) is the 
jackal of India (canis aureus), for there is a marked 
resemblance in type, conformation and color mark- 
ings. In sneaking, cunningand nocturnal marauding 
propensities their habits and instincts are almost 
identical, the only difference probably heing the 
adaptation and application of their particular rascally 
propensities as developed by environment and 
habitat — the results are equally exasperating wherever 
either animal ranges. Their vocal accomplishments 
are on par and similar in style of rendition. 

We are familiar with numerous methods of bagging 
the measly coyote, but we have never heard of an 
attempt being made to get the varmint • itbin reach 
by calling. Stalking a coyote is quite a clever per- 
formance and to a certain extent easy of accomplish- 
ment by a hunter familiar with the animals' habits. 

The following Btoi y, written for the Ind 
interesting ant. nas a reliable coloring — but there is 
one featr re of the proceeding that leaves a certain 
stage oi the performance open to question. And that 
is, whilst the caller is kicking up such a racket and 
raising the clouds of dust described, how can he con- 
tinue to utter naturally the seriesof animal imitations 
and cries he does without choking or having the 
accuracy of utterance impaired by the dust? For if 
the dust ! s too thick for the shrewd eyes of the lured 
jackals, it seems as if it would be also dense enough to 
affect the working qualities of the human throat or 
vocal organs. However, we give the story as we find 
it and as there is plenty of material to work on in this 
State, possibly some ingenious Coast Nimrod may 
evolve a new style of coyote bunting, for the animal, 
so far, seems to thrive in spite of poison, rifle and 
shotgun, or any of the methods now in vogue for his 
extinction: 

"I think that few of your readers probably have 
ever heard of jackals being called out from jungles, 
aud still fewer have ever seen it done, yet it is very 
commonly done by certain classes of natives. One 
caste in particular called "Koonghurs," a wandering 
tribe, partly shikaris and partly thieves, who move 
about Puroeah, Dinajpur and the adjacent districts, 
living in small movable huts, made chiefly of reed 
mats, are adepts in thus calling out jackals which 
they hunt and kill with their dogs for food, and on 
whioh they, to a great extent, live when unfortunate 
enough to be unable to annex a meal from among the 
pigeons, fowls or pigs of any village they may be 
camping near. 1 will describe the method employed 
as witnessed by me in the Purneah District. The first 
time I ever heard of such a thing 1 was riding along a 
main road and observing a gipsy encampment ea- 
quired when and whence they had come, etc. A num- 
ber of rather smart-looking does were hanging about, 
apparently a superior class of pariahs with probably 
a touch of Rampur in them, they stood up tall, erect 
and keen, and were, I was told, used by their masters 
for hunting jackals and foxes. In conversation the 
men explained that they called jackals out of any 
jungles that they might be near and then hunted 
them down. I hardly altogether believed this, and 
was of course anxious to see it done, and my camp 
being only two mihs off they promised to come on 
there in the afternoon, so at about 4 P. >i , four rough 
looking fellows, with four equally rascally looking 
dogs turned up, they knew nothing of the country 
thereabouts, but there were several patches of low 
shrubs and jungles about, and they felt sure of being 
able to find jackals in almost any of them, they 
selected at sight a long line of low bushes about twenty 
to thirty feet deep in front of which lay a ploughed 
field; one of them broke a large leafy branch off a 
bush and wont out with it on to the field, and sat 
down about forty yards from the bushes. One of his 
companions with two of the dogs then went off aod 
hid among the bushes about a hundred yards away 
and the other two with the other dogs similarly bid 
about the same distance off in the opposite direction. 
I sat down behind a tree beyond the field to watch 
proceedings. When all were in their places, the 
fellow In the field crouching low on the ground began 
imitating a jackal's cry, and switching his branch 
about Boon raised a great dust round himself, he then 
began mixing up with the jackal's cry, the bleating of 
a goat and Us agonized cries when seized by some ani- 
mal, then followed the snapping and snarling of an 
enraged jackal. 

"In a few minutes I saw a jackal cautiously appear 
from among the bushes In front and stand Intently 
watching the field. The Koonghur by that time had 
raised such a cloud of dust about him that it was al- 
most Impossible to distinguish bis figure at all, or to 
make out what was really there, the noise exactly re- 
sembled the cackling and snarling of two or three 
jackals savagely fighting among themselves and the 
piteous cries of a goat apparently being torn to pieces 
among them. In a short time a second jackal ap- 
peared at the edge of the bushes and the first comer 
ng bolder and evidently deBlrous of sharing In 
the good things before him, trott-d out a few paces, 
the second animal following him, tbey came on 
stealthily, stopping to reoonooitre every few paces 
anil aaeure thomselves that there was really a fei 'I In 
prospect, after each pause tbey trotted, on a bit 
quicker, t ic Koonghur's branch in the leunlinio 
on the ground quicker and quicker. theduBt 
nme thicker and the fiendish noises In- 
ben at length the two jackals unable to re- 



stain themselves longer made a final rush in among 
the dust and on to the man, but though he laid about 
him strenuously it almost appeared to me that they 
must get hold of him; not so, still continuing his un- 
earthly noises he kept them deceived and employed, 
knowing that assistance was at hand. Four savage 
hounds being loosed from either side were then ap 
proaching with long strides half way across the field, 
the men who had held them were also running up and 
their shouts first startled the jackals, who glancing 
round and at once taking in the situation quick as 
thought dashed off in different directions for dear life, 
the one followed by three of the dogs and the other 
by one alone. All the dogs were very fast but the 
single animal was not able alone to follow all the 
jackal's sudden twists and turns though he was too 
fast for him on the straight, and he soon hopelessly 
lost him, but the three dogs together were too much 
for their quarry, each and all were as fast as he, 
while whichever way he jinked, one or the other of 
them was sure to be ready for him. After he had 
escaped their teeth over and over again one of them 
managed at last to get hold of his neck and drag him 
down, when in a moment the others joined in, the 
jackal made a good fight for it but was soon finished, 
when the men coming up the dogs were taken off. 
I paid the men well for the entertainment they had 
afforded me, and the following day in order to show 
me that there was no chance about the matter and 
that they could generally be sure of their game, they 
again came to the camp to show what they could do. 
I took them off about a mile to some long grass where 
I had in the morning shot a hare and they almost 
immediately called five jackals out of it, all of which 
quickly displayed the keenest' interest possible in 
what might be going on in that cloud of dust in front 
of them, their shikari instincts were thoroughly 
aroused, but they could not entirely throw off all 
their usual natural suspicion and caution, and were 
not to be drawn at once. 

"It was evidently past their belief that so tooth- 
som a morsel as a goat was really to be so easily had 
for the sking, first one then another edged out, of 
course still a bit undecided, then one bolder than his 
fellows trotted out into the open and with his head 
well up took a long steady look at the dust cloud and 
then with his nose to the ground tried to sniff out 
what might be going on there. He then trotted on a 
few paces, the noise and dust increasing rapidly, his 
fellows behind gathered confidence, seeing him ahead 
and still safe, and all followed him, he, afraid lest 
they should arrive before him, made a hasty rush on, 
the rest followed, and in a moment tbey were all lost 
to sight in the dust cloud which seemed momentarily 
to increase, as did the horrible noises Suddenly all 
was changed, with savage yelps, like a whirlwind, four 
hounds were among them, and, scattered right and 
left, the frightened jackals made the best of their 
way out of the scrimmage, but the dogs quickly 
siogled out one, and pursued and mobbed it and within 
three hundred vard*s had him down among them; a 
second in his consternation almost run into one of the 
men who was running up, and who. deftly throwing 
his lathi, bowled him over when one" or two blows on 
the head quieted him. Thus the Koonghur's pantry 
was well and easily Bupplied for at least two or three 
days. I afterward discovered that Mr T., a planter 
in the district, who was very skillful with all animals 
and who could imitate most of their calls, had learned 
this trick of calling out jackals, and we got him one 
day to show his skill before a number of the Btation 
people. He was quite as expert as the Koonghurs, 
but he said it was often ticklish work to keep clear of 
the teeth of two or three jackals when they made a 
rush into the dust, as it was often difficult to see tbem 
at all then through the dust, and he had more than 
once had his clothestorn before his dogs got up. I 
should think it mOBt ticklish work and should be very 
sorry to try it myself." 



The California Pompano. 

During the latter days of the summer of 1897 the 
Santa Cruz fishermen had two days of fishing for that 
rare fish, the pompano, which comes so infrequently 
that its arrival causes an excitement along the wharf 
almost as great as would the coming inshore of a 
Bohool of whales. Some 1500 pounds of pompano were 
taken by the nets in those two days and were sold in 
this city at 50 cents per pound. The scene in the bay 
on these occasions was as interesting to the spectators 
on the shore as exciting to the fisherman participo. 
ting. The description of one day is a repetition of 
the other. 

It was a hot afternoon. Business was dull along 
th ■ wharf and many of the fishermen had gone up 
the beach dredging for bait. It was full tide and 
tl oamy waves rolled high upon the sands. Part 
of .ic fishermen olambered over the rocks along the 
b! a holding the great troll net at one end, while 
01 ts In a boat at the other end dragged It through 
t waters in a circular course. Several times they 
> idled In the net with little reward for their pains, 
till at length they gathered In a whole school of fish. 

nil- astonishment and delight waB unbounded when 
1 was discovered upon hauling In that the troll nets 

.re lull of pompano. Some 700 or 800 pounds were 
caught on the first day by the several fisbermon; and 
on the second day Perez's men took about 800 pounds. 

Those were the biggest catches of pompano ever 



known on the Coast. A remarkable feature of the 
catch was that scarcely a fish escaped the net. The 
entire school had been feeding on the anchovies, 
which in high tide seek food among the rocks, and 
were scooped in with scarcely any other fish— only a 
few salmon and sardines being among them. 

Unquestionably the king of food fishes on the Pat ific 
Coast is the so-called California pompano. His scaly, 
little bod y, wriggling in the rush basket of the regular 
fisherman, is a sight to tempt the jealousy of the 
angler, for this wily, little fish must be dragged from 
his feediog grounds in Monterey bay with the meic;- 
less troll. No angler with all his skill and templing 
bait or lures can entice him from his frolicsome fel- 
lows, who scurry with him through the cool kelp 
beds. He tickles the palat6 and he tickles the pocket, 
but the basket of the angler knows him not. Nor is 
it so easy to gather him in with the troll. He comes 
when no man knoweth, and scarcely are you aware of 
his presence ere he flirts his tail and is but a memory. 
In the dark autumn nights when the drift nets are set 
for baracouda he sometimes is taken, but so few are 
such occasions, so rare the pompano at that season, 
that he brings a dollar and a half a pound. 

So, when some lucky fisher scoops his finny spoil 
from the bay his comrades gather round him to cele- 
brate with a smile. 

Pompano is a Spanish word meaning grape It af. 
The European pompano is a very different fish from 
the pompano of the Atlantic. Onr jfcQm.p&p,Q..ia.;£iot a 
pompano at all except by couriesy of name? The 
European pompano is large, weighing sometimes 
fifteen or twenty pounds, while all the varieties of 
American pompano are small, the California fish the 
smallest of all. He belongs to a different family. He 
belongs to the Stromateida» family, while the true 
pompano is the Trachynotae. The California pomp- 
ar o is so called because of his great similarity to the 
Carolina or common pompano. He is the only repre 
sentative of his family in Pacific waters — his brothers 
being the butter fish of Long Island sound ai_d the 
Virginia whiting. 

The true pompano or Trachynotae is represent! d 
by the sound pompano, the banner pompano and the 
Carolina pompano. A few of these latter have re- 
cently been observed in the Gulf of California, but 
they live mainly in the Gulf of Mexico, though, beirg 
of very migrating disposition, no special waters can 
be assigned to them. They are regarded as the best 
table fish in the gulf and command an exorbitant 
price in the northern markets. The spawning time 
and breeding ground of this fish is not well known. 
Like the mackerel, its egg are light and float upon 
the surface of the water. 

The pompano is a social fish. He never goes off by 
himself but stajs with the boys of the tribe. Tbev 
run in schools of from 3,000 to 50,000. They feed upon 
sardines and small shell fish and in turn are the prey 
of sharks and porpoises who follow the schools and 
consume vast quantities of them. 

The California pompano is so similar to the Care- 
lino pompano that from the latter variety be takes 
his name. He is about eight and ooe half inches in 
length and weighs about a half-pound when full 
grown. He has a short bead^a^roa^ c tbin_ body, 
greenish above and white beneqjg^J3esHie8 its delici- 
ous flavor, this fish is relished because of its very soft 
bones, which, when cooked, render it a rsost pala- 
table dish. He is known all along the coasts of Oregon 
and California, but south of San Diego the fish never 
seems to visit. The pompano apparently ma^es a 
favorite resort of the waters near Santa Cruz and 
Santa Barbara, however, more than any other places 
along the coast. Here they come oftenest in the sum- 
mer and fall, though the winter visits are rot infre- 
quent. The fish was unheard of until about 1S70, but 
since then it has increased wonderfully. 



Upon the subject of salmon lore a writer who has 
given the subject a casual thought, says of his im- 
pressions: "It is disheartening to listen to an expert 
fisherman talking salmon. He will start eff with 
'sockeyes,' and land you in a labyrinth of queer 
phrases. The full grown fish is the salmon. On its 
second return from the sea it is a gerling, ai d on its 
first return a botcher. Under five pounds it is a 
grilse, and under two pounds is a salmon-peal. From 
one to two years before it has gone to sea it is a parr, 
pink, smolt, smelt, salmon-fry, spragg, salmon-spring, 
6amlet, brandling, fingerling, black fin, shed, skegger, 
graveling, hepper, laepring, gravell-lsspring, ster- 
ling, or sparling. And, as if these names were not 
enough, we have the milter, summer-cock, gibfisb, 
simen, etc. A salmon which remains in fresh water 
during the summer, without going to sea, is a laurel. 
After spawning, this is a kelt, or slat. A male is a 
skipper, a female a shedder, or baggit. The list 
might be extended indefinitely." 



An earnest effort on the part of local sportsmen to 
have the country dove laws repealed will be made at 
the next meeting of the tania Clara county super- 
visors. The dove season in the other counties of lhe 
State opened on the 1st, but the season in the county 
of Santa Clara will remain closed until October 1, 
unless the pressure brought to bear by the sportsmen 
proves too strong. It is rumored that a compromise 
will be made and the season opened on the 1st of 
August. 

There has been considerable activity around the 
sporting headquarters of Chris Hommrich, where a 
great many parties are fitting out for camping trips 
to the mountains, says the San Jose jjfercury. The 
majority of them go to the western side of the valley, 
eo that they can take in the Coast streams, where the 
fishing 1b now at its best. 



Many of the returning San Jose fishermen report 
having seen an unusually large number of deer, so it 
is probable that when the season opens on the 15th of 
this month, the sport will be very successful. 



JOLT. 9, 1904 



&h$ gvee&ev attis ^poxt&xnatx 



9 



Talks to Dog Owners. 

The kennels having- been erected and provided with 
everything that is necessary for the comfort and well- 
being- of their occupantB, and the beginner having 
been likewise supplied with some information on the 
feeding and management of his dogs, it now become s 
necessary to offer some suggestions upon the subject 
of breeding. To commence with, the advice may be 
offered that it would be wise for the novice to gain a 
little experience of the canine race before he embarks 
in the difficulties of raising his own stock; but as a 
rule the beginner, provided he feels that he has the 
spaci at his disposal, and that he can afford time to 
look after his kennel, is in a hurry to commence, and 
therefore the following suggestions may assist him in 
securing the best results. 

It may be premised that very frequently the most 
successful show bitches are absolutely worthless for 
breeding puposes, and vica versa. Unless he really 
knows something about the sort of itock she throws, 
anyone who buys a bitch for breeding is trusting a 
good deal to chance, though of course the question of 
her breeding and her (apparent) suitability by looks 
and pedigree for crossing with a certain dog decidedly 
influences the prospects of success. The matter of 
selecting a brood bitch does not, however, enter into 
the scope of this chapter which deals more with the 
management of the brood bitch than in her selection. 
The symptoms portrayed by the bitch when she is 
approaching the time when she can visit the stud dog 
are unmUtakeable. The organs commence oy swell- 
ing, and after a few days there is a discharge of blood, 
which is in turn succeeded by the emission of pale- 
colored discharge, and then the visit should take 
place at once To increase the chances of her being 
in whelp two visits to the stud dog are usually made, 
the interval between them being about three days, 
dependent upon circumstances. From the time the 
first symptoms of any swelling of the generative 
organs or a disposition to romp with dogs appears, 
the bitch should be thoroughly and completely iso- 
lated, and ihe door of the shed or room where she is 
confined kept locked in order to prevent her from 
receiving the attentions of an undesirable mate. 
Every possible precaution should be adopted to en- 
sure her privacy, and it must not be forgotten — this 
is really important — that the bitch is often juat as 
anxious to get to him as some highly-undesirable 
suitor is to get at her. Nor must the vigilance of the 
owner be relaxed for a minute even though she has 
been served, until the organs regain their normal 
condition, which may take a fortnight. 

The period of gestation in the bitch is sixty-three 
days, but after she has regained her usual state of 
health she may be allowed to lead her customary 
existence for quite a month, though anj very violent 
exercise is better avoided. "When half her time has 
gone, or thereabouts, and it is believed she is in 
whelp, he> exercise should be regular and gentle, her 
general health, and particularly the action of her 
bowels, studied, and the quality of her food increased 
a little. About three weeks before her time is up the 
bitch should be removed to the place where it is 
decided she shall whelp, so that she can become 
accustomed to the surroundings. The quieter this 
place is the better, as nothing upsets an animal in this 
condition more than to be pestered by other dogs. It 
should also be warm and free from draughts, and, if 
possible, have a wooden floor. No raised bench is 
required for her to lie upon — in fact, the less jumping 
on and off a height that in-whelp bitches getthrough- 
out the whole of their pregnancy the better. Conse- 
quently, a bed may be made up for her on the floor in 
a corner. It should be composed of straw laid on 
boards, tacked together, unless the apartment has a 
wooden floor, and a strip of wood, three or four 
inches wide, will serve to keep the straw in its place. 
If the weather is bad, it is best to keep the bitch in, 
for it is unwise to risk her taking cold, but otherwise 
some gentle exercise and liberty to run about in a 
yard should certainly be provided her, as she should 
on no account be chained up until her puppies are 
weaned. 

About a couple of days before she is due to whelp a 
fresh bed of clean straw may be given her, and twenty- 
four hours later — that is, a day before her time is up — 
a dose of salad oil ought to be administered. Some 
people prefer stronger medicines, but experience has 
proved that salad oil is quite sufficient. She must not 
be over supplied with rich or heating food at this 
time, but her diet should be liberal and nutritious, 
and a plentiful allowance of clean water should be 
placed within easy reach of her. 

Having adopted the above precautions, the begin- 
ner may rest satisfied that he has clone pretty well all 
that he can to ensure the comfort of the bitch and 
the welfare of her puppies when they arrive. Should 
complications arise he will not be able to deal with 
them, and therefore he will be wise if he arranges for 
professional assistance or that of some experienced 
dog breeder to be promptly available on an emergency. 
As a general rule, however, everything will go on 
satisfactorily, provided that the bitch is not unsettled 
by unnecessary intrusions on her privacy, though, of 
cou.'se, an occasional and stealthy visit to her is 
desirable la case all may not be well. 

For the first three or four days after she has 
whelped the bitch s hould be encouraged to partake of 
gruel in considerable quantities, but it is a grave mis 
xake to allow a vessel of this food to remain by her 
long enough for it to turn sour, as this will assuredly 
affect her milk and so injure the puppies she is 
suckling. After all traceB of feverishness have left 
her, biscuits soaked in broth, and gradually some 
flesh, may be substituted for the gruel, and in fact, 
she be allowed her usual fare, though it must not be 
forgotten that there is a great strain on her owing to 
the exactions of her litter, and therefore her diet 



should include meat and any other strengthening 
form of food. 

There is no necessity at all, but most decidedlj the 
reverse, for interfering wi h the bitch in the manage- 
ment of her puppies under normal conditions; and the 
less the youngsters are handled for the first few days 
of their existence the better it will be. Most particu- 
larly of all it may be laid down that their bed is not 
interfered with in any way if possible; this injunction 
to the beginner being necessary by reason of the fact 
that the bitch forms her bed in such a way that the 
puppies lie on the floor — hence the necessity for board s 
beneath them, as recommended above — with the 
straw piled up all around them. The reason she 
gdopts this course is obvious, as it enables her to keep 
the puppies clean in their bed, and prevents them 
Boiling and wetting the straw they have to lie upon. — 
English Stock-Keeper. 



DOINGS IN DOGDOM. 



W. B. Coutts left for the East two weeks ago. He 
had a string of ten dogs with him including Kilgarif 
and Lady owned by J. E.Terry, Sacramento and Som- 
bra belonging to Hon. Henry M. Keller of Santa 
Monica, all winners at the Coast Field Trials. He 
has with him, six Derby candidates, three of which 
belong to Mr. J, W. Flynn of this city. They are by 
Dr. Daniels out of Senator P'sMistress Nell — formerly 
Nellie Bang. These dogs are looked upon by field 
trial sportsmen as being almost certain to win. 



The Llewellyn Setter Dan Thiers is now owned by 
John W Considine of Seattle, who will put him in 
the stud in charge of an agent in or near Chicago. 



Thomas Johnson, of Winnipeg, Man. has purchased 
Minnesota Joe Jr. 

Entries for the Toronto show close on August 15th. 
Cash prizes for the large breeds are: Puppies, $5 to 
first, $3 to second; novice, $7 to first, $3 to second; 
limit and open, $8 to first, $5 to second, diploma to 
third in all classes. Entry blanks at:d premium lists 
can be obtained of Mr. John G. Kent, Toronto, Can. 



The English Mastiff is not the biggest dog we 
possess, says the Field, and even at a time when he 
was in every way a better and a more popular animal 
than is the case now, only the very largest and 
heaviest specimens could approach the St. Bernard 
in weight. A fully-grown Great Dane would likewise 
stand higher at the shoulders than our biggest 
Mastiffs, and was, as a rule, heavier. Of late years 
Belgium appears to have furnished some of the 
heaviest animals of this old English race of ours, but 
as a rule such had only size to recommend them, 
being abnormally thick in skull and bearing in their 
faces a surly, ignoble expression, far removed from 
the bright, honest-looking face so pleasant a feature 
in great dogs as Mr. F Robinson's Turk and Miss 
Aglionby's Wolf formed such admirable examples. 
These dogs weighed about 160 pounds each at" the 
very most. There has just died in Belgium a notable 
brindled Mastiff called Marius, which, it is said, stood 
35 inches at the shoulders, and weighed over 200 
pounds. He had won various prizes at Continental 
shows, and, although a very big dog, like most of the 
same variety to-day, bore little resemblance to the 
famous dogs of old that once flourished at Lynne Hall, 
and became historical. As to which were best is all a 
matter of fancy, but it seems that an out-cross has 
spoiled the modern strain, but whether that cross 
has been of Bulldog or St. Bernard only the breeders 
knew. Another huge Mastiff bred on the Continent 
and exhibited in this country was Black Antony, a 
brindled dog, and evidently of such a ferocious dis- 
position that he was specially guarded when on the 
bench, and we have Been two men lead him into the 
ring, although he was muzzled at the time. He had 
enormous bone, and probably weighing 200 pounds. 
For a dog of his variety his disposition and tempera- 
ment were all wrong, his character being apparent in 
his countenance and expression. Possibly the largest 
Mastiff bred in England was British Lion, a very 
handsome fawn dog, which, when weighed in public 
on February 7, 1877, scaled 196 pounds, nor had he 
been fed up in order to give him an abnormal size. 
Lion, a finely bred dog, combining the famous strains 
of Wolf, Lukey's Governor, and going back to 
Thompson's Countess, was bred at Windermere, about 
three miles from Eethwaite Lodge, where, at that 
period, and previously, the late Miss Aglionby had 
such a good kennel of Mastiffs of a type which ap- 
pears to be quite unobtainable at the present time. 
The decadence of the Mastiff can easliy be traceable 
from the time the great Crown Prince made his ap- 
pearance, and at once took the fancy of judges, being 
awarded leading honors. As a fact, with his Dudley 
markings, heavy jowl and dewlaps, huge skull and 
foreign expression, there seemed to be little of the 
Mastiff about him, excepting his shape, body, colour, 
and size. Unfortnnately, he appeared to transfer all 
his bad qualities to his progeny, even throughseveral 
generations. 

C. C. Lees' English Setter bitch Laura L. (Cato- 
Maggie F.) was served on June 22d by Wm. Feige's 
Ch. Buckwa (Luke C. -Nancy Hanks ) Both of these 
Setters are well known to local show goers. Buckwa 
Is said to be a good field dog and Laura has the nose 
and bird Bense of her dam, who has been a consistent 
field trial performer. Possibly the "nick" may turn 
out some puppies that will combine the much sought 
for dual qualitiesdesired in the Setter — good on bench 
and in the field. 

Although the Airedale Terrier is one of the best all- 
round workers we have, suitable for many purposes, 
yet not supposed to be specially adopted for any par- 
ticular one, he does not take placeamong the sporting 
breeds which he is really entitled to. Sportsmen do 
not use him very often, yet today there are a far 



greater number of Airedales bred than there used to 
be, and they are undoubtedly better looking than 
they were. 

For some time this "waterside dog," as he waB 
called in Yorkshire, his native county, has been ob- 
taining an amount of attention and attracting new 
admirers to such an extent that one has begun to ask 
himself whether the breed has not now reached as 
high a point as can be expected. In all breeds, with 
one or two exceptions, there is a time when rapid 
strides are taken, and popularly obtained, and then, 
after a while, a "waning" stage, and gradually loss of 
position as a popular breed. For instance, at the time 
when the Airedale was little known, and the entries 
at dog shows very few, the Bedlington Terrier, 
another English north country breed, was one of the 
most ralued breeds, and kept in large numbers be- 
cause ot its gameness and also for the purposes of 
show competition. But it is now thought little of, 
and in favor and number is a long way behind the 
Airedale. 

This is accounted for by the extraordinary impor- 
tance breeders and exhibitors have attached to the 
coat of the Bedlington; that is to say, a too great 
fondness for a certain point and the consequent over- 
valuing of that point has caused the breed to be one 
which very few exhibitors will now have anything to 
do with. It is not believed that the Airedale will lose 
his present popularity from a similar cause, yet it is 
doubted that he has reached such an average state of 
perfection that the difference between one good Aire- 
dale and another is very small, and that when one 
has to beat the o, her he will be made to do so by 
means of either the color or texture of his coat, with 
the result that a property to which only reasonable 
value was attached will have a much exaggerated 
value, and the breed suffer in consequence. It is a 
singular thing, but it is unfortunately true, that when 
a rough-coated breed has become well-nigh perfect, 
or, at any rate, undergone great improvement, the 
last requirement is deemed to be the coat, and the 
whole study of the breeder and exhibitor is given to 
it. It has almost ousted the unfortunate Bedlington; 
it has confined the breeding of Yorkshire Terriers to 
very few, and has done more harm than good to the 
Dandie Dinmont. At no time, it is claimed, has the 
coat of the Airedale been such as to warrant the 
present attempts at improvement. 



Spratt's Patent have been awarded the contract 
for cooping and feeding the immense poultry exhibit 
at the St. Louis Exposition in November. They will 
also bench the dog6 at the same time. 



Mr. George Raper bas recently purchased the crack 
wire haired bitch Bonnyface of Mr. Dean. She is 
sired by Jim Crow and is winner of numerous prizes. 
She will be served by Briar Sportsman before coming 
across to her future home on this side. 



The Nebraska Field Trials Association 's third 
annual trials will be held at O'Neill, Neb., August 22, 
19()4. There will be a Derby All Age and Nebraska 
Stake. Entries close August 1, and all stakes close on 
the same date. There will be five cash prizes in each 
stake. The money prizes will be 30, 25, 20, 15 and 10 
percent of entry fees, after a certain proportion, not 
to exceed 15 per cent, has been deducted for the run- 
ning expenses of the trials. Mr. McCarthy is the 
secretary of these trials, O'Neill, Neb. 

The Spokane Kennel Club is making great prepara- 
tions for the bench show to be held at the fairgrounds 
this fall. The club is rapidly increasing in member- 
ship and already enough dogs have been guaranteed 
for a good show. The premiums offered by the inter- 
state fair management, in addition to the special 
prizes ofiered by the kennel club, are big inducements 
and it is expected that many dogs from out of the 
city will be in attendance. 

The interstate fair management has appropriated 
$500 for premiums in the canine department and in- 
stead of giving cash prizes medals will be awarded, as 
follows: Silver medals for first prizes, bronze medals 
for second prizes, and diplomas for third prizes. 

In addition to this kennel club is offering a series of 
silver cups for the winners' class The cups will cost 
in the neighborhood of S20 ea^h and are to be tastily 
gotten up. They are being donated by the various 
dog fanciers of the city and several of the business 
houses. 

A press dispatch from Omaha states that a New- 
foundland dog, taken from Omaha to Portland, Or.- 
when his owners moved there a year ago, recently re, 
turned to his old home in Omaha. His blistered feet 
and shaggy coat were sufficient evidence that a large 
part of the 1800 miles was covered on foot. A letter 
of inquiry about the animal was received from bis 
owner in Portland, two months ago. It seems he 
never liked the new home, and showed every symptom 
of homesickness, refusing to eat and losing all his 
playfulness. The dog wao plainly disappointed at 
finding strangers at the old home. He is now cared 
for by neighbors. The trip occupied six months. 



AT THE TRAPS. 



The scores made at the California Wing Club live 
bird shoot on the 3d Inst were: 

Club match, 12 pigeons — M. O. Feudner, 33 yards, 
11; P. B. Bekeart, 29 yards, 11; P. J. Walsh, 29 yards, 
11; Lester Wood, 29 yards, 11; W J. Golcher, 29 yards 
10; "Slade," 30 yards, 11; C. C. Nauman, 34 yards, 12; 
W. E. Murdock, 28 yards, 11: E. G. McCnnnell, 31 
yards, 12; A. T. Derby, 31 yards, 12: E. Klevesahl, 2fi 
yards, 12; A. M. Shields, 2*6 yards, 9; W. Hanson, 27 
yards, 10; Frank Turner. 28 yards, 11. 

Six-bird pool- Feudner 6, Holling 6, Golcher 6, Mc- 
Connell 6, Derby 6, Bekeart 4, Shields 6, "Slade" 3 
(withdrew), Walsh 6, Turner 5, Johnson 5, Smith 3, 
Hanson 6, Klevesahl 1 (withdrew). 

Six-bird pool— Feudner 6, Derby 1 (withdrew), 



10 



©hi gveeitev tm& gtpxjrtsmcut 



[July 9, 1904 



Golcher 6, McConnell 5, Holling 6, Nauman 5, Turner 
4, Shield»6, Walsh6, Bekeartli, Johnson O(withdrew). 
Six-bird pool— McConnell 6, Shields 5, Walsh 0. 
Nauman 6, Johnson 4, Holling 5. 

The Capital City Bluerook Club held a practice 
shoot at the Kimball-Upson Company's grounds 
at Agricultural Park Sunday, shooting over the Leg- 
gett trap. John Gusto carried off the honors of the 
day, making a straight run of 57 broken targets out 
of a possible GO. After the waru>-up shooting was 
indulged In, the money being about evenly divided 
among the shooters. 

Next Sunday the Washington Gun Club will close 
the season with a merchandise shoot and promises 



Fish Lines. 




A FeW'Pamp" Gons nsed at the Northwestern Tournament 

prizes for almost everybody. Thereafter all hands 
will devote themselves to seeking the swift-flying turtle 
dove. A summary of the scores made Sunday is the 
following: 

At 10 targets— Dr. Smith, 9-7-4-8-7-4; E. D. Adams, 
7-6-9; J. Gusto, 9-10-10-8; O. Stevens, 9-8-8-6-6; O. 
Heilbron, 5-4: D. Korn, 5: C. Palm, 7-6-5-4; D. E. 
Newbert, 10-9-5: Morgan, 7-1-5; P. Brown, 9; J. W. 
Hughes, 5; Englehart, 5. 

At 15 targets — Korn, 4; Heilbron, 10; Gu6to, 15-14- 
10-12-8-9; E. D. Adams, 11-11-12-13-12-12; Stevens, 
13-11-12-8-12-11; Smtth, 10-13-9-10-10-6; Palm, 10-8- 
13-10-6-6; J. W. Hughei, 13-8-8-10-11; Brown, 11-10- 
7-9; Tower, 7-9; D. E. Newbert, 11-13-9-13-8; Engle- 
hart 11-11-11-9; Vetter, 10; Callahan, 5-5; Morgan, 
3-9; De Merritt, 6-8. 

The portrait on this page is that of Mr. W. H. 
Varien of Pacific Grove, Cal. Mr. Varien has been 
doing some clever shooting recently, his recent per- 
formance at Fresno, when he made a new Coast rec- 
ord, 315 out of 325 places him in the front rank oj 
trapshooters. 

The fifth annual Grand American Handicap at in- 
animate targets on the grounds of the Indianapolis 
Gun Club June 21-24, at Indianapolis, was the most 
successful shoot yet arranged by the association. 

The record breaking entry of 321 shooters took part 
in the three days shooting. The winner of the pre- 
liminary handicap was L. A. Cummings of Bunker 
Hill, 111., who broke 98 out of 100. R. D. Guptill of 
Atkin, Minn., won the G. A. H. trophy with 96 out of 
100 being tied W. M. Randall of Colorado. On the 
shoot off he scored 53 out of 60, again shooting three 
ties, 20 birds each, the 6cores were, 17 and 17; 17 and 
17 and 19 to 15. W. H. Heer won the Consolation 
trophy with 98 out of 100. Harvey McMurchy of the 
Hunter Arms Company ended with 97, he shot a fine 
pace all the week, and in the event made four straight 
scores but lost three in one event during an unusual 
gust of wind. 

Five sets of traps, Sergeant system, were in use and 
the total number of targets thrown amounted, in four 
days and a half, to 152,300. Mr. A. Morrison made the 
amateur high average, leading J. R. Elliott, high pro- 
fessional average, by one point. First money for 98 
was 1141.50 and second money for 98 was $127.35 in 
the Preliminarv Handicap. The 97's received $106, 
96'b $56.60, 95's $20.55, 94's and 93's $14.15. There 
were 273 contestants. 

On the second day there were 318 starters in the G. 
A. H. handicap — including 56 post entries. Mr. 
Guptill also won $312, besides the cup. Mr. Randall, 
the runner-up received $280. The 94's won $171 60 
each, 93's$43 65 each, 92 '6 $31.20 each, 91 's $29.35 each. 
The total purse amounted to $3118.50. 

In the Consolation W. H. Heer won $86.50 and 
Harvey McMurchy $77.85, there was 163 contestants 
In the raco. 

D. Scoular and P. H. Lacy forgot all about the 
game laws and went bunting recently in the vicinity 
of Highland Springs. In the course of their peram- 
bulations they came upon and slaughtered a fine buck. 
The sportsmen removed the animal to the hotel and 
before thoy could dispose of the carcass it was learned 
that Deputy Fish Commltsloner Lea was on their 
trail. It had been previously reported that he was 
in another county, but the Fish Commissioners had 
beard of the Highland Springs hunters and ordered 
him home. 

Lea states that Scoulor and Lacy dragged their 
venison under tbe house and attempted to cri mate It 
in a furnace. Lea emelled the burning m at from 
where he was waiting and located tbe sportsmen, who 
had burned but half the buck. 

Judge Hunt of Kelsey villi In ard the oast and an- 
nounced that justice would not feel satisfied .vith less 
than 8150 w:th which to sooth the outraged majesty 
of the law. 

One Ferrari was fined 3100 by Police Judge Conlan 
last week, for having killed quail in Golden Gate Park. 



Never in many years past have the attractions of 
the trout streams been so alluring as prevails in this 
State at present, and most unusually 60 in the many 
etreams easy of access from this city. The exodus of 
devotees of the rod this week and during the brief 
holidays was unprecedented. 

Not only are the finny inhabitants of the waters 
plentiful, but there is a nice variety as well, for the 
choice of trout and black bass fishing is open to the 
fly or bait casting angler, and the royal salmon, game 
striped bass and the small, unconsidered trifles of salt 
water fishing, such as smelt, tomcod, rockfish, perch, 
capazoni, seatrout, etc., invite the attention of the 
disciples of the rugged school of angling. 



On the Truckee although the river is still high, 
fly fishing flourishes, and good catches are being 
made at Boca, Reno, Floriston, Verdi and various 
favorite resorts along the river. Lake Tahoe fishing 
is reported to be more than satisfactory. At Inde- 
pendence and Webber lakes the fish are beginning to 
take the fly lures with avidity. TheLangerman, blue 
bottle, march brown and black gnat are the moBt 
effective lures. In fact, tbe two latter flies are good 
killers in almost any trout waters just now. 



At Lemoine, Sims, Upper Soda Springs and points 
on the McCloud fly fishing is fairly good and getting 
better daily. The tributaries of Russian river and 
other streams of Sonoma, Napa and Mendocino coun- 
ties are nearly all low and clear, and good for a nice 
basket of trout almost at any point the waters are 
whipped. 




W .H. VAKIEN 



To the south the streams are in great shape. In 
the Soquel there are plenty of small fish, and a few 
big steelbeads are also to be seen. Bouldercreek, the 
San Lorenzo and other creeks nearby are giviug good 
fly fishing now to numerous anglerB. 



In San Mateo county, the San Gregorio, Purissima 
and La Honda are now in nice form. The Garcia 
river at Point Arena is full of trout — fair-sized fish, 
too. Carlor G. Young and a party are now enjoying 
the sport at that resort. 



At the Big Meadows, in PlumaB county, there is a 
bunch of Waltonians at present vho are looked upon 
by the outside rodster contingent as lucky fishermen 
indeed. Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Richards have just re- 
turned from a three weeks' stop at the Big Meadows. 
Mr. Richards states that the season there was late 
this year by reason of the high water. The "forked 
tails" were swarming June 1st. The abundance of 
salmon flies and other live food precluded the chances 
of much fly fishing during June, Bave for the expert 
fly caster. The fishing at Gould '6 for trout should be 
on in good shape now. Angling at the "falls" is also 
good at present for the fly fishermen. One catch at 
the "falls" by Mr. and Mrs. Richards and Frank Le 
Coste aggregated 149 tiout, a number being one and 
a quarter pounds in weight Tbe catch scaled over 
forty pounds. The killing flies were the black gnat 
and white forked tails. Mr. Richards is a persistent 
advocate of the efficiency of a four and a half ounce 
rod. His success with light tackle is testimony in Its 
favor. 

Alex T. Vogelsang, Mr. Higgins and Mr. Okell 
caught a number of fine large fish at Doty's Springs 
and in the Hamilton branch Sam A. Heller, S. A. 
Wells and F.li Marks were also very successful In 
landing trout with a fly recently. 

The even tenor of peaceful events was ruptured 
when Vogelsang caught tbe the famous "Big Mike." 
This trout proved to be a female and was full of 
ipawn. Its identity was known by a scarred jaw 
acquired in breaking away from a camper's tackle. 



This famous trout had for yearB past been a fixture 
and attraction at the Big Meadows. Its favorite 
lurking place was under the bridge, and the cunning 
and wariness it displayed in eluding the countless 
attempts made for its capture earned the fish, at last, 
practical immunity from the many anglers who 
annually frequent the resort. And then to be taken 
on a spoon attached to a leader of fine piano wire was 
indeed a disappointing end to a glorious career. The 
fish weighed nine pounds and measured twenty-eight 
and a half inches. Before this tragedy, LevC a Pitt 
river Indian, had taken a big trout that weighed 
eight pounds and was thirty-two inches long. 

A. B. Finch and Mr. and Mrs. Frank Bell and party 
were the latests arrival at the Big Meadows. 



Among the anglers who went away this and last 
week were: Ed Edwards to Upper Soda Springs- 
Charles Johnson, Verdi; Clarence Ashlin, Floriston; 
A. H. Hills, a southern Oregon point; J. Bostwell 
Kenniff and party, Verdi. 

Black bass fijhingin Russian river and Guerneville 
Camp Vacation, Duncan's Mills and points along the 
river in that section is reported to be excellent. F 
H. Feed will go to Cisco, and from thence to Eagle 
lake, where there is fine blajk bass angling to be had. 

W. C. Swain and "President" John Lemmer caught 
with minnow baits, 27 black bass on Sunday last in 
Crescent lake, on the preserve of the Paint Reyes 
Sportsmen's Club. 

Salmon trolling continues at Capitola and Santa 
Cruz. Good takes are made daily by anglers out in 
boats 

P. A. H. Rhodes and W. L. Sherriil returned from 
a successful fishing trip to the Big Basin and the San 
Lorenzo river, where they found the trout affoided 
excellent sport. These sportsmen also took in Capi- 
tola and Santa Cruz, where the salmon are still run- 
ning. Some ten and twelve-pounders were amongst 
their catch of salmon. 



The Arroya Honda is now in excellent csndition for 
trout fishing. This is considered to be one of the best 
stocked streams in the county. During the past 
week Professor H. C. Worcester succeeded in landing 
150 of the largest in the river. Dave Hobson was 
another of the lucky anglers who came back from La 
Honda with a well-filled basket. H. P. Fleming also 
fished there for several days last week and obtained a 
daily average of 50. 

Trout fishing is now at its height and the follower! 
of Isaak Walton are enjoying the moBt successful sea- 
son held in many years in the Santa Clara valley 
The mountain streams are now in the best condition 
for fly casting, but it requires an experienced and 
delicate caster to lure the wary beauties from their 
haunts, for the reason that the waters arelow and very 
clear. The sportsmen who have been out for the last 
week, however, have all returned with well-laden 
baskets. 

Belonging to the sunfish family, the rock bass is 
one of the good pan fishes in American waters. It is 
found from Canada, Vermont and New York west- 
ward to Manitoba and south to Louisiana and Texas. 
It is numerous in the Great lakes and Mississippi 
river region, and through the efforts of the United 
StateB Fish Commission has been transplanted in 
hundreds of Western lakes and streams. 

In appearance the rock bass somewhat resembles 
the black bass, but is deeper and more compressed - 
the dorsal and anal fins are, in comparison, larger 
and more powerful. The eye is large and the mouth 
capacious and filled with small teeth, those in the 
roof of the mouth being sharp. 

The color is green in various shades, with brassy 
reflections often mottled with black, forming broken 
lines along the sides. The iris of the eye is scarlet, 
hence the southern and western name of "red eye." 
A dark spot is found on the angle of the gill-cover, 
and mottling6 on the soft dorsal and caudal fins. 

The rock bass prefers clear streams and lakes fed 
by cold waters, to still water bodies. Rocky condi- 
tions attract it, and it will be found in small schools 
on gravel bars, around mill dams and in ponds, near 
weed patches. In streams it delights to dwell in 
holes from three to eight feet deep. 

The rock bass reaches a length of twelve inches, 
and a weight of from one to one and a half pounds. 
The fish is more popular in the Mississippi valley than 
further north, where it suffers by comparison with 
better fish. 

It spawns in the spring and early summer, mak- 
ing a nest, like the black bass, in streams where the 
water is moderately swift, or on a bar, if in a lake. 
It feeds on larva;, small minnows and crawfish, and 
the parents defend their nests with the pugnacity of 
the black bass. 

Sport is afforded anglers who use light tackle and 
trout flies on hooks Nos. 5 and 7. Although not put- 
ting up the fight that the black basses do, it is not a 
mean antagonist. When the tackle is light, the fish, 
by reason of its powerful fins and habit of curling its 
broad body in opposition to the strain of the rod, 
gives the angler good sport. 

The rock bass ri6es to many flies, notably the coach- 
man, gray drake, brown drake and stone fly. Toward 
evening is the best time for fly fishing. The flies 
should be allowed to sink after every cast. 

For bait fishing, alight weight bait rod, small reel 
and light braided line, with Sproat hooks Nos. 3 to 4, 
make a suitable tackle. The bait should be small 
minnows, hooked through the lips and oast lightly 
into likely places, then reeled in slowly. 

For still fishing, white grubs, crawfish, cut bait or 
wormB, used with a float, often result In large strings. 
Often on lakes the fish is taken by trolling, using a 
small spoon hook. 



Jackson's Napa Soda does not tangle the feat. 



July 9, 1904] 



Waz gveeiiev anft ^pavtemtm 



11 



Trade Notes. 



Wilfcesbarre, Pa., June 14th and 15th, Neaf Apear, 
first general average, 311 out of 340. shooting Du Pont 
and Schultze. Second general average, J. S. Fanning, 
310 out of 340, shooting "Infallible." First amateur 
average, B. C. Derk, 301 oat of 340, shooting "In- 
fallible." Second amateur average, H. A. Dimmick, 
290 out of 340, shooting "Infallible." Third amateur 
average, John Booth, 278 out of 340, shootiDg Du Pont. 

Warm Springs, Ga., June 14th and 15th, Walter 
Huff, first general average, 387 out of 400, shooting 
Du Pont. Second general average and first amateur 
average, A. M. Hatcher, of Bristol, Va , 380 out of 
300, shootine Schultz. Second amateur average, B. 
H. Worthen of Atlanta, Ga., 368 out of 400, shooting 
Du Pont. Third amateur average, G. M. Collins of 
Due West, S. C, 366 out of 400, shooting Du Pont. 

Akron, Ohio, June 14th-16th, W. H. Heer, first 
general average, 502 out of 525, shooting E. C. and 
Du Pont. Second general average, L. J. Squier, 
shooting Du Pont, and J. A. R. Elliott, shooting 
Schultze, 500 out of 525. First amateur average and 
third general average, C.A.Young of Springfield, 
Ohio, 495 out of 525, shooting Du Pont. Second 
amateur average, J. R. Taylor of Newark, Ohio, 486 
out of 525, shooting Du Pont. Third amateur average, 

D. A. Upson of Cleveland, Ohio, 483 out of 525, shoot- 
ing Du Pont. State open championship won by A. 
Young, shooting Du Pont. State amateur champion- 
ship R. S. Rhoades, shooting Du Pont. Team cham- 
pionship was won by the Columbia Cun Club of Bar- 
berton, Ohio, aB follows: Gait — 24, shooting Du Pont; 
Kneider— 25, shooting "Infallible"— 49 out of 50. The 
Press-Post trophy, E. W. Hull, 50 straight, shooting 

E. C. 

New London, Iowa, June 14th-16th, firBt general 
average, Fred Gilbert, 581 out of 600, shooting Du 
Pont. Second general average, Charles Spencer, 571 
out of 600, shooting Du Pont. Third general average 
and first amateur average, R. D. Guptill of Atkin, 
Minn., 564 out of 600, shooting Laflin & Rand powder. 
Second amateur average, Robt. Jackson of Waterloo, 
Iowa, 559 out of 600, shooting Du Pont. Third amateur 
average E. D. Rambo of Knoxville, Ills., 557 out of 
600, shooting Schultze. 

Excellent reports of Winchester shells and guns 
come from the recent Montana State shoot held at 
Butte, May 28, 29, 30. Every event except one was 
won by shooters using Winchester "Leader" shells. 
The following tells the tale: Brownlee medal, won by 
Gallagher; 3-team match, won by Story, Casey and 
Schlecter; Brownlee challenge medal, won by Irwin; 
Butte Rod and Gun Ciub medal, won by Yancey; 
Kelpetko challenge medal, won by Mosely; individual 
championship at 50 targets, won by Towhy; handicap 
medal shoot, won by Confarr. All of the above names 
used Winchester "Leader" shells and 30 of the con- 



testants shot Winchester repeating shotguns through- 
out. 

Harold Money, with a score of 383 out of 400, won 
high expert average for the tournament held at 
Wytheville, Va., June 1st. 

At DaytoD, O., May 31, at EaBton June 1, and at 
Richwood June 2, 3, C. O. LeCompte and R. L. Trim- 
ble won first and second high expert average respec- 
tively. Both used Winchester "Leader" shells. 

J. M. Hawkins continues his remarkable shooting 
with Winchester ' Leader" shells. At the shoot of 
the Milton (Pa.) Social Gun Club held at Milton, May 
30, he won high expert average with a straigth score 
of 100 out of a possible 100. 

All averages at the Owensboro (Ky) shoot on May 
30 were won by Winchester "Leader" shells. Chas. 
Dreihs won high expert average and Ab. Newman, 
M. H. Morton and W. A. Penn won first, second and 
third amateur averages. 

At the South Dakota State shoot, Watertown, S. 
D., June 1-2, Fred Gilbert won high expert average 
and F. H. Lord was second. 

At the Champlain, N. Y., shot, May 30-31, first and 
second amateur averages were won by Craig and Bar- 
rett, respectively, the secand day, Mr. Barrett win- 
ning first average the first day. 



Mr. J. E. Cullison of Portland, Ore., won the Day- 
ton medal, using U, M. C. "Magic" shells making 40 
straight. 

Mr. F. C. Stephens, of Pomeroy, Wash , made the 
highest average for the third day, 190 out of a pos- 
sible 200, using U. M. C. "Magic" shells and a Reming- 
ton gun. 

The three-man team trophy was won by the Spo- 
kane team, consisting of Messrs. T. B. Ware, Jack 
Forbes and P. J. Holohan, all using TJ. M. C. "Magic" 
shells loaded by Messrs. Ware Bros., of Spokane, 
making 48 out of 50. 

The Individual Championship medal was won by 
Mr. T. B. Ware, making a run of 25 straight, as well 
as 25 straight in the shoot-off, making a total of 50 
straight, using U. M. C. "Magic" shells. 

Out of the 42 double guns used, English and Ameri- 
can makes, eleven were the grade "D-E-O" $155.00, 
as manufactured by the Remington Arms Company. 
Yours very truly, 

E. E. Drake, Manager. 



By what was probably the most exciting finish ever 
witnessed in a Grand American tournament, Richard 
L. Guptill of Aiken, Minn., won the Grand American 
Handicap at Indianapolis, June 23, 1904, using U. M. 
C. shells, with a winning score of 96, breaking the 
previous Grand American record by two points. 

The winning of Grand American landicaps with 
U. M. C. shells seems to be a habit. At Kansas City, 
last year, Mr. Diefenderfer landed the cup with the 
above ammunition. Winning shooters seem to have 
the U. M. C. habit. 

Pendleton, Ore., June 26, 1904. 
Mr. W. S. Wattles, San Francisco, Cal. 

Dear Sir: — The Twentieth Annual Tournament of 
the Northwest Sportsman's Association given under 
the auspices of the Pendleton Sportsman's Association 
at Pendleton, Ore., was brought to a successful close 
yesterday, June 25, 1904. 

Shooters were in attendance from California, Idaho. 
Utah, Montana, Washington, Oregon and British 
Columbia, and every contestant was highly satisfied 
with the manner in which the affair was conducted. 

Too much credit cannot be given to the managing 
committee, composed of Messrs. H. J. Stillman, J. M. 
Spence, F. W. Waite, C. E. Berkeley. There were 77 
contestants, and out of this number 46 UBed the Union 
Metallic Cartridge Company shells in Pacific Coast 
loads. 

The longest continuous run was made by P. J. Holo- 
han, of Wallace, Ida., breaking 84 continuous birds 
and Bhooting U. M. C. "Magic" shells aB loaded by 
Majsrs. Ware Bros., of Spokane, Wash. 



The Hunter Arms Company of Fulton, N. Y., make 
the following important announcement to the sports- 
men of the world: 

"Being unable to make, under favorable conditions, 
an exhibition of our Smith gunB at the Louisiana 
Purchase Exposition, St. Louis, Mo., we have the 
pleasure to announce that through the kindness of 
our friends we have a fine exhibit at the Simmons 
Hardware Company's retail store, Broadway and 
Charles streets, also on top floor of the Norvell- 
Shapleigh Hardware Company's store. These ex- 
hibitions show every gun we manufacture and are 
worthy of your attention and examination. ' Hoping 
to hear that you have seen them, we remain, 
Yours very truly, 
The Hunter Arms Company, 

Fulton, New York, U. S. A." 

This exhibition is a free one and is arranged and 
located so that admirers and users of the shotgun 
may have an opportunity of keeping posted on the 
L. C. Smith gun. 

At the blue rock tournament held at Gridley on 
June 18th and 19th Winchester shotgunB and Win- 
chester shells carried off the honors as usual. The 
high average for the two days was won by Mr. F. M. 
Newbert of Sacramento, shooting a Winchester 
"pump" gun and Winchester "Leader" shells. The 
championship of doubles and the championship of 
singles were also won with Winchester ' pump" guns 
and "Leader" shells. Mr. Newbert, shooting a Win- 
chester "pump" gun and "Leader" shells, also won 
the Kimball-Upson trophy, emblematic of the cham- 
pionship of Central California. 



Strike! — if they don't give you Jackson's Naps 
Soda when you ask for it. 



Poultry Notes. 

An excellent wash for swelled head is 
quinine dissolved in water. 

Irregular feeding ie apt to cause a de- 
rangement of the digestive organs. 

The poultryman who is continuously 
changing breeds never succeeds in the 
business. 

Winter is the season to feed green cut 
bone to poultry. It is good egg making 
material. 

Do not adopt every bill of fare you hear 
of. If yours is producing good results 
stick to it. 

If you feed green cut bone see that it is 
fresh and that it is not from animals that 
have died of disease. 

Begin in a small way, grow gradually, 
stick to it — that is the foundation upon 



f-|orse Owners 

Look to your interests and use 
the safest, speediest and most 
positive cure for ailments of 
your horses, for which an ex- 
ternal remedy can be used, viz : 

GOMBAULT'S 

CAUSTIC BALSAM 

Prepared exclusively 

~ T. E. Gombault, ex- 

srinary Surgeon to 

French Government 




SUPERSEDES ALL CAUTERY OR FIRING. 

Impossible to produce any scar or blemish. 
The safest best Blister ever used. Takes the 

glace of all liniments for mild or severe action, 
emoves all Bunches or Blemishes from Horses 
or Cattle. 

Every bottle of Caustic Balaam sold Is 
Warranted to give satisfaction. Price 81. SO 
per bottle. Sold by drag-gists, or sent by ex- 
press, charges paid, with full directions for lta 
use. Send for descriptive circulars, testimo- 
nials, etc. Address 

THE LAWREHCE- WILLIAMS C0MPAKY, CUreknd, Oiia 



which successful poultry plants have been 
built. 

It coats no more to feed and. care for a 
pure bred flock than it does for a mongrel 
lot, and the profits are gre-ter with the 
former. 

The Brown Leghorns lay the smallest 
egg and the Light Brahmas the largest of 
the popular breeds of to-day. — Farm 
Journal. 

Swine Notes. 



If you have not the feed or the cash to 
buy with, it will pay you better to sell a 
few pigs and buy feed for the rest than 
try and starve the whole of them through. 
And when you are selling try to sell Buch 
as will leave your drove uniform in size. 
They will do so much better. 

How good a few radishes, a plate of 
lettuce or even a dish of strawberries 
taste during the hot weather. You do 
not want to live on them, however. You 
want some more solid food. Just so with 
the pigs. They enjoy the treat of a fresh 
pasture and it helps to make them thrifty ; 
but they need some grain fed if they are 
going to do their best. Are you going to 
Btop eating bread because flour is a little 
higher than it was a year ago? No. 
Neither Bhould the pig be deprived of 
what is essential to his welfare and 
thriftiness just because grain feed is a lit- 
tle high in price. — Agriculturalist. 



Whitewash needs to be well made to do 
its work effectually. Too often it comes 
off in flakes when the house ia dry if the 
woodwork is touched. Finely slacked 
lime should be dissolved in hot water, 
making the lime as thick aa poaaible. 
Add a little Boft soap and some paraffin 
and the whitewash will kill the lice and 
Btick to the woodwork. It should be ap- 
plied hot, the walls of the poultry house 
being firBt Bwep down to clean them of 
cobweba. 



CALIFORNIA STATE FAIR FOR 1904. 

SACRAMENTO, CAL. 

AUGUST 22 TO SEPTEMBER 3, 1904. 

Entries to Close will Secretary, Weiiesiay, Ant 3, 1304 



All 



Races to be Contested at the State Fair on days to be 
Hereafter Designated by the Board of Directors. 



Jackson's Napa Soda is sold in every 
city, town and hamlet in the State. 



Ko. 1. Tom Fox Stake— For all ages. Entrance $10, to accompany nomination; $15 additional 
for horses not declared by 4 p m. the day preceding the race; $300 added by the Society, of which $50 
to second and $25 to third. Non-winners of three races this year, if three years old and over, al- 
lowed 5 lbs.; non-winners of two races 7 lbs.; and non-winners of one race 10 lbs. Maidens, three 
years old, allowed o lbs; four years old and over 7 lbs. additional. Six furlongs. 

No. 2. Western Hotel Stake— For two-year-old Allies. Entrance '$10, to accompany nomin, 
ation; $15 additional if not declared by 4 p. m. the day preceding the race; $300 added by the Society- 
of which $50 to second and $25 to third. Weights 5 lbs. below the scale. A winner of a stake race in 
1904, or a winner of three or more races of any value, other than selling races, 5 lbs. extra. Non-win- 
ners of two races allowed 4 lbs. Maidens allowed 7 lbs., and if such are the produce of a mare that 
has not produced a winner at the time of starting, 10 lbs. Maidens beaten three or more times since 
closing of the stake, allowed 5 lbs.; and if not placed second or third, 7 lbs. additional. Five fur- 
longs. 

No. 3. The Governor's Stake — A handicap for three-year-olds and upward. Entrance $10, to 
accompany nomination; $20 additional for horses not declared by 4 p. m. day preceding the race; 
with $350 added by the Society, of which $70 to second and $30 to third. Weights posted at 12 m. day 
preceding the race. A winner of a race other than a selling race, after the weights are published, 
to carry 5 lbs. extra. One mile and a furlong 

No. 4. Golden Eagle Hotel Selling Stake— For three-year-olds and upward. Entrance $10, 
to accompany nomination; $15 additional for horses not declared by 4 p. m. the day preceding the 
race; $300 added by the Society, of which $50 to second and $30 to third. Winner to be sold at auc- 
tion. If for $2000, to oarryrule weights; if for less, one lb. allowed for each $100 to $1000; thence 2 lbs. 
for each $100 to $400. Selling price to be placed on starters through entry box by 4 p. m. on the day 
preceding the race. A winner of a stake race or three or more races of any value after closing of 
stake, to carry 5 lbs. extra. Maidens allowed 7 lbs. One mile- 
No. 5. California State Fair Annual Stake— Handicap for two-year-olds. Entrance $10, to 
accompany nomination: $20 additional for horses not declared by 4 p. m. the day preceding the raoe; 
with $350 added bv the Society, of which $70 to the second and $30 to the third. Weights posted at 
12 p. m. day preceding race. A winner of a race other than a selling race, after the weights are 
published, to carry 5 lbs. extra. Seven furlongs. 

No, 6. The President's Stake— A handicap for three-year-olds and upward. Entrance $15, to 
accompany nomination; $25 additional for horses not declared by 4 p. m. day preceding race; $350 
added by the Society, of which $70 to second and $30 to third. Weights posted at 12 m. day preceding 
race. A winner of a race other than a selling purse, after the weights are published, to carry 5 lbs. 
extra. One and one-quarter miles. 

No. 7. The Vlnctor Stake— For three-year-olds and upward. Entrance $10, to accompany 
nomination; $20 additional for horses not declared by 4 p. m. day preceding race; with $350 added by 
the Society, of which $70 to second and $30 to third. Stake to be named after the winner if Vinctor's 
time (1:40) is beaten. A non-winner of a stake race In 1903, or a race of the value of $500, allowed, if a 
non-winner of five races other than selling races, 5 lbs Maidens 7 lbs. additional. One mile. 

t J. Rose Selling Stake— For two-year-olds. Entrance $10, to accompany nomination; $15 ad- 
ditional for colts not declared by 4 p. m. the day preceding the race; with $350 added by the Society, 
of which $50 to second and $25 to third. Horses may be entered not to be sold, and carry rule weight. 
If entered to be sold for $1000, allowed 3 lbs ; $700 6 lbs ; $400 10 lbs. Winners of one race after clos- 
ing of stake to carry 3 lbs. extra; of two or more 7 lbs extra. Maidens .beaten three times, allowed 5 
lbs.; four or more times 7 lbs. Value to be placed on starters through entry box by 4 p. m. day before 
race. Six furlongs. 

The State Agricultural Society's regular and special rules to govern, except where conditions 
are otherwise. All declarations and olaims for allowances due at 4 p. m. day preceding race, unless 
otherwise specified in conditions. Owners and trainers will be held responsible for same. Entrance 
and declaration money to go to winner. No added moaey for less than four starters In different in- 
terests. In selling races, beaten horsesnot liable to claim. Right to use starting gait is reserved. 

Entries must state name, color, sex, and pedigree of horse, with racing colors of the owner. 

Applications for stabling must be made to the Secretary. Applicants will be furnished with 
blanks, which must be rilled out and approved before a horse Is admitted to the grounds. The track 
Superintendent will stable no horse until this course has been pursued. No stabling will be guaran- 
teed except for race horses In training and ready to raoe, and those entered in stakes to have 

Pr Owners who ship to track without notice will not be allowed to take stalls until application has 
been made to the Secretary and approved. 

Special stalls will be allotted to horses competing for premiums. 

L. R. MILLER, Secretary, BENJ. F. RUSH, President. 

SACRAMENTO, CAL. 



12 



®ft£ g tecifev cm& gporteroatt 



[July 9. 1904 



The New Treatment ot Milk-Fever 
in Cows. 

This affection has been a steadily grow- 
ing evil among dairy-herds of advanced 
niilkiug-breeds, becoming not only in- 
creasingly prevalent, but more and more 
fatal, bo that it has become justly a cause 
of dread on the part of the owners of 
valuable stock. 

Milk-fever is peculiarly a disease of 
heavy-milking cows, and no other class 
of animal has been bred up to the same 
exalted standard of great power of di- 
gestion and assimilation and enormous 
yield of milk. The disorder ie usually 
unknown in scrub or common herds, 
while it ie common and deadly in the 
great milking-breeds — Holstein, Guern- 
sey, Jersey, Alderney, Dutch, Flemish, 
Ayrshire, Swiss, Norman, red polled and 
milking shorthorn. 

Again, it is unknown with the firBt or 
second calf, and becomes increasingly 
rare as the animal passes a maximum 
of milk-yield and enters on the stage of 
decline. From six to ten yeaTS of age 
furnishes the greatest number of cases 

Heavy and rich feeding prior to and 
just after calving will render the disease 
relatively common and destructive, and 
hence the affection can be to a large 
extent warded off by starving for a fort- 
night before and a week after calving. 

All of these conditions operate toward 
one end— a suddenly induced plethora in 
the calving cow. This is further shown 
in the tmall size of the blood globules, 
which implies a dense, rich condition of 
the plasma in which these float. The 
sudden contraction of the womb after 
the birth, and the more speedy secretion 
of the water than of the solids of the 
blood, tend to the further concentration 
of this liquid. Plethora therefore, both 
as regards excess and richness of blood, is 
one of the most marked and essential con- 
ditions of milk-fever. 

The absorbtion of toxic matters has 
been growing in favor as an explanation. 
Lafosse thought poisons were absorbed 
from the womb, Abadie and Kaiser from 
the intestines, Hartenstein from the 
overw rked muscles, Allemani and Gra- 
tia from the udder. But the womb shows 
leBS putrefactive change in its condition 
than after a difficult and assisted parturi- 
tion, and the muscles are much more 
overworked in the prolonged, obstructed 
and painful calving than in the easy one 
in which milk-fever habitually occurs. 
There seems, therefore, a strong probabil- 
ity that the source of the poison is to be 
found, if at all, in the udder. 

It has been strongly Buspected, though 
it is not yet p.oved, that the source of the 
poison is a microbian ferment, and 
microbeB are not uncommon in the milk- 
ducts apart from this disease. The proba- 
bility of a microbian origin is very greatly 
favored by the fact, as noted by Bifsauge 
and the present writer, that ceilain ham- 
letB and farms habitually furnish cases of 
milk-fever, while neighboring ones, with 
the same breeds and apparently the same 
management, escape ; also, by the observa- 
tion of Russell and Wortley Axe, that the 
malady will sometimes be suddenly 
arrested in a herd by the simple expedi- 
ent of having the cows moved to a new 
and previously unoccupied stable for 
calving and for the first nine days there- 
after. The sudden production, muscular 
weakness, unconsciousness and coma, are 
strongly suggestive of a naicotic poison of 
microbian origin, and the rapid and com- 
plete recoveries are equally in keeping 
with luch theory, the poison having been 
presumably eliminated or neutralized in 
the system. Any marked structural 
change producing equivalent nervous dis- 
order would make no such rapid improve- 
ment. Dangerous narcotic poisons 
('eucomainB) mav, however, be generated 
in the Bystem without an invasion of 
microbes from outside, as when epbcmerel 
f« ver follows an overexertion, or when 
,e milk becomes poisonous when unduly 
tained under overexertion and excite- 



ment. The suckling is often poisoned 
under such conditions, and everything 
points, :.s we shall see under treatment, 
to the origin of the milk-fever poison in 
the udder. 

The presence of poisons in the system 
is further shown in the constancy with 
which we find sugar in the urine in these 
caBeB. This points very directly to dis- 
ordered function of the base of the brain 
or liver. It should be stated that the 
mere presence of sugar cannot be looked 
upon as the cause of the milk-fever, as 
the elimination of sugar continues for days 
after the cow has virtually recovered and 
is apparently quite we'l. The quantity 
of sugar in the urine, however, is in ratio 
with the violence of the attack, and there- 
fore it is an index to the amount of the 
real narcotic poison produced in the 
system. 

A wide variation of temperature from 
the normal is another indication of the 
violence of the attack and its gravity. 
If much below the normal, it implies a 
specially depressing narcotic poison and 
a probably fatal issue. A slow rise to 
{not above) the normal is a favorable in- 
dication. A rise above the normal usually 
implies inflammatory complication in the 
lungs through inhalation of food products, 
in the bowels, in the womb or elsewhere. 
All such cases are to be dreaded, as the 
system becomes further depressed by the 
toxins furnished by the microbian of the 
inflamed part, inadditionto those already 
furnished from the udder. Such accessory 
infectious inflammations may render un- 
successful the best measures of treatment. 
In 1897 J. Schmidt published his suc- 
cessful treatment of milk fever by the in- 
jection of the teats and milk-ducts with 
a solution of seven to fifteen grams of 
iodide of potassium in one litre of boiled 
water. The solution must have been 
boiled for fifteen minutes, and cooled to 
forty degrees centigrade, before inject- 
ing. The apparatus for injecting is a 
small rubber tube, five or more feet in 
length, having a milking tube fitted into 
one end and a funnel into the other. 
This iB to be rendered aBeptic by being 
boiled, and should be kept thereafter in 
a solution of mercuric chloride (1 to 1000) 
until wanted for use. The udder and 
teats, the hands of the operator and as- 
sistants, are thoroughly washed with 
soap and water, rinsed ofl with boiled 
water, and then soaked in a solution of 
carbolic acid (2 to 100). The udder is 
milked empty before disinfecting, and is 
manipulated after the injection to force 
liquid into all parts of the milk-ductB 

As the result of this treatment the 
mortality was reduced seventeen per 
cent, instead of fifty to seventy per cent 
under the old treatment. 

The avowed object of Schmidt was to 
check secretion in the gland, for which 
iodine was especially promising. He even 
advised the introduction of a little air 
into the udder, to favor the diffusion of 
the iodide solution. Others went a step 
further. Thus Wandinat doubled the 
amount of the iodide solution injected, 
and used eserine and pilocarpine hypo- 
dermically to roi se the peristalsis of the 
intestines, and reduce the mortality to 
live per cent. 

The great success of the Schmidt 
method inspired a number of veterina- 
rians in both Europe and America to in- 
ject the udder with other antiseptic so- 
lutions, all of which proved successful in 
a higli degree. Amon^the solutions in- 
jected were those of lysol, cresol, cninosol 
and common salt. Finally the injection 
of simple water, sterilized by boiling and 
cooled to blood heat, proved eminently 
satiBfact j.y. In the ubo of theBe injec- 
tions it ■ nine to be recognized that the 
more fully the udder was distended the 
better was the result. 

Distfi lion of the udder by gas was now 
a very obvious alternative, but although 
t had need some atmospheric air 
along with his iodide solution, the idea of 
antisepsis had so preoccupied the minds 
of the operators that for a time those 
gases only were used that had some anti- 



septic power. Kortman used etherized 
air with success Oxygen got into veiy 
general use, first in Switzerland, then in 
London, Canada and elsewhere, and as 
the quarters were well filled with the gas 
the mortality practically disappeared — 
every case recovered. The first case of 
the present writer was a mature Jersey 
with a record of three pounds of butter 
daily. She was attacked within twelve 
hours after calving, and the case should 
therefore in time past have proved fatal. 
In one hour she was on her feet, and by 
the next day she bad fully recovered, and 
has given her usual heavy yield of milk 
ever since. 

Experiment had advanced so far that 
the conclusion was unavoidable that the 
value of the injection lay in its quantity 
rather than in its quality. The benefit 
came from the distention of the udder by 
the overfilling of the milk-ducts, and it 
mattered little what agent was used, pro- 
vided that it was bland and non-irritat- 
This conclusion was strengthened 



ing. 

by the experience of the breeders on the 

island of Jersey. 

They had suffered heavy losses from 
milk-fever until they fell upon the ex- 
pedient of omitting to milk out the udder 
for twenty-four hours after calving, which 
had at once the happiest result. The 
disease which had been the scouige of 
high class Jerseys was at once "shorn of 
its terror." 

It only remained to fully distend the 
udder of the affected cow with ordinary 
atmospheric air which had been robbed 
of its living germs by filtration, and the 
triumph over milk-fever became easy and 
complete. The first case to which I 
applied this was a mature half-breed Hol- 
stein which had been attacked lesB than 
twelve hours after calving, and which had 
been injected with Schmidt's iodide solu- 
tiou, yet eight hours afterward Btill re- 
mained down, unable to rise, in a condi- 
tion of stupor, and with no sign of dis- 
charge of feces or urine. On having my 
attention called to the case, I atonce fully 
distended the udder with Bterilized air, 
retaining it by means of tapes tied 
around the ends of ihe teats, and in a 
little over two hours she was up, seeking 
water and even food, passing feces and 
urine freely, and with bright expression 
of face and eyes and every promise of 
recovery. The tapes were now taken off, 
but no milking allowed until the follow- 
ing day, when the patient appeared to be 
perfectly well. Since that date she has 
had the reputation of being the best 
milker in the heavy-milking herd. 

The case is an example of many others 
in many different hands so invariably 
successful that there is good warrant for 
the assertion frequently made that there 
need be little or no apprehension of a 
fatal result in even the worst cases of 
milk fever if they are promptly subjected 
to treatment. The modern treatment 
acts like magic, and seems to hardly 
admit of a failure. 

We must not Bhut our eyes to the in- 
evitable abuse and danger of the new 
treatment. The main danger is theintro- 
duction of germs into the udder and the 
setting up of infective inflammation in 
the gland. Readers will recall the show- 
cows in Toronto a few years ago, the 
udderB of which were fatally infected by 
milk injected to make a falBe show in the 
prize-ring. Already in Europe, and in 
the hands of veterinarians, the Schmidt 
treatment has brought on a Email pro- 
portion of cases of infective mammitis. 
How many mure such ca6eB will develop 
if this treatment shall become a popular 
domestic retort, applied by the dairyman 
in all sortB of surroundings and with little 
or no antiseptic precaution? This result 
iB inevitable, but we may feel some conso- 
lation in the thought that even so the 
mortality and loss must be far less than 
It has been in the past, when at least half 
the animals attacked by milk-fever died. 
To obviate such dangers entirely the 
treatment must be applied under careful 
measures of asepsie, such as are used in 
all work in the bacteriological laboratory. 



From one who has not had the privilege 
of such laboratory training, be he veteri- 
narian or layman, we cannot expect per- 
fect results, but we can at least lessen 
tne evils by giving full instructions as to 
the precautions necessary : 

FirBt- Provide an elastic-rubber ball 
and tubes furnished with valveB to direct 
the current of air, as in a common David- 
son syringe. 

Second— On the delivery-tube place a 
cylinder of tin or other metal made in 
two parts which teleEcope within each 
other, making an air-tight joint, and 
pack this cylinder with sterilized cotton. 
On each end of the cylinder have a pro- 
jection in the form of a fine tube, on 
which the rubber tubes are fitted. 

Third— In the free end of the rubber 
tube leading from the cylinder fit a milk- 
ing-tube, to be inserted into the teat. 

Fourth — Sterilize this apparatus by 
boiling for fifteen minutes, and without 
touching the milking-tube, wrap it in a 
tow T el which has been sterilized in a 
water-bath or in live Bteam, dried and 
ironed. 

Fifth — On reaching the patient, draw 
no milk from the teats, but wash them 
and the udder thoroughly with warm 
soap-suds, rinse off with well-boiled (and 
cooled) water, and apply to the teats, 
and especially their tips, a five-per-cent 
solution of creolin or .ysol, taking great 
care that the teats are allowed to touch 
nothing until the injecting apparatus is 
placed in use. As the cow is usually 
down, they may be rested on a cushion of 
sterilized cotton or a sterile towel. 

Sixth — All being ready, the apparatus 
iB produced, great care being taken to 
keep the milking-tube from touching any 
object but the teat, and the middle of 
the teat being held between the finger 
and thumb of the left hand, the teat-tube 
is inserted into the milk-duct with the 
right. Meanwhile the assistant manip-- 
ulates the rubber bah until the quarter is 
as full as it will hold, when the tube is 
withdrawn and held by its attached end, 
while the teat is tied with a tape to pre- 
vent the escape of the air. 

Seventh — The tube is now dipped in 
strong creolin or carbolic acid, rinsed off 
in water that has been boiled, and is used 
on the second teat as on the first, and in 
turn on the third and fourth, until all 
four quarters are thoroughly distended 
and the teats tied. 

Eighth— The recumbent cow is to be 
kept on her breast-bone, and with the 
head elevated, even if it should be neces- 
sary to pack her with Btraw bundles or 
to suspend the head by a baiter. Lying 
on her side may develop fatal bloating. 

Ninth — If in two hours the cow is not on 
her feet, nor looking brighter and more 
intelligent, if she has passed no manure 
nor urine, and if the air has become ab- 
sorbed, leaving the udder leas tense, the 
injection of the bag may be repeated 
under the same scrupulous and rigid an- 
tiseptic precautions as at firBt. This may 
be repeated later if necessary. In all 
leases, but especially in Bevere ones, it is 
iwell to keep watch of the cow for twenty- 
four hours, and if there is any indication 
of a return of the attack to repeat the 
treatment by udder-distention. 

Tenth — It is the common experience 
that when the cow gets on her feet, or 
very shortly after, the bowels will move 
freely and the urine will be discharged 
copiously, indicating a resumption of the 
normal nervous functions, and furnishing 
one of the best guarantees of complete 
success. If such motions are wanting or 
limited in amount, the patient should be 
carefully watched, so that the earliest 
symptoms of relapse may be detected and 
the treatment renewed. 

If possible the case should be in the 
hands of an accomplished veterinarian 
who is not only a trained bacteriologist, 
but a man of experience and skill in other 
reBpects. In the absence of such a one, 
the enormous mortality of the disease 
when left to itself or treated according to 
the obsolete methods would fully warrant 
an instant resort to the treatment by 



July 9, 1904] 



gctte ^veebev *ro& g^Mirtemttw 



13 



sterilized air, even at the risk of a email 
percentage of complications and fatalities. 
—James i/aw, F. R. C. V. S., Director 
New York, State Veterinary College, in 
The Holstein-Friesian World. 



Raising Pekin Ducks. 

The Pekin duck was first imported to 
this country from China in 1872. They 
are now known in every community in 
the Eastern and Central States and many 
of the Western States. They are raised 
by the thousands in. the Eastern States 
where they have gained a great reputa- 
tion for market purpose. 

They are very easy to raise and are not 
subject to as many diseases as chickens. 
They lay from one hundred to one hun- 
dred and thirty eggB in a season if they 
get proper care and feed during the egg- 
laying season. 

While they are a timid bird, tbey are 
very domestic in their habits and never 
wander far from their quarters when 
given their liberty. 

The white plumage of the Pekin is of 
great value as they are never afflicted 
with vermin ol any kind. 

There is always a ready market for Pe- 
kin ducks, and also their feathers. 

Ducks can be raised without water to 
Bwim in, but as a general rule, results are 
better if they have water to swim in dur- 
ing the egg-laying season. 

A two-foot wire netting fence is suffi- 
cient to hold matured ducks, while a 
twelve-inch board will answer for the 
young ducks. 

There Bhould be some shade provided 
for the young duckB in hot weather. 
During the laying season, we feed equal 
parts of bran, shorts, ground corn, ground 
qatB and a little oilmeal. This is thorough- 
ly mixed and moistened with hot water 
and left until cooled off before feeding. 
Every other day we add some boiled 
potatoes or meat scraps ; we also keep a 
constant supply of oyster shells, sand and 
water before them. In cold weather, we 
aim to keep our duck house floor well 
covered with dry and clean straw. 

Ducks start laying in March or April 
(here in Minnesota) and they generally 
lay their eggB in the morning, and they 
should be kept shut up until 8 a. m. then 
you are sure of getting all the eggs. 

Pekin duck eggs must be hatched out 
with chicken hens or incubators, as the 
Pekin duck is no good for hatching out 
eggs. 

Do not feed young ducks anything the 
first twenty-four hours. After that feed 
four or five times a day with corn meal 
and Bhorts mixed and scalded before 
feeding. When five or six weeks old, feed 
but three times a day, and let them run 
out on some grass after the dew is off and 
they will catch all the bugs and inBecta in 
Bight. 

After they are ten weeks old they 
Bhould be nearly aa large as old ducks, 
if they received proper feed and are the 
real pure-bred Pekins. Always give 
ducks plenty of water to drink. — Minm 
sola Farmer. 



A Few Courses 

in 

Domestic Economy: 

"Arrow" Lard Compound 
"Monarch" Hams 

Can Be Obtained 

from 

All First-Class Grocers. 

WESTERN MEAT COMPANY of California 



Up until within the paBt year all mo- 
hair dreae goods used in this country have 
been derived from England. Owing to 
the growing popularity in the United 
States of the lightweight fabrics made 
of mohair an American mill some time 
ago began the manufacture of these goods 
and is said to be the first one to success- 
fully duplicate the English productions. 
This opens a new use and indicates an in- 
creased demand for domestic goat hair, 
which is ranging in price from 17 to 38 
cents the pound. 

o 

Anent the milk-giving capacity of goats 
a Southwestern breeder asserts that a 
good goat will give two quarts of milk 
daily for ten months at a cost not exceed- 
ing one cent a day. Aa to the prolificacy 
of the goat the same authority stateB that 
the Maltese goat brings two and often 
three kids at a birth. 



CALIFORNIA 

NORTHWESTERN RAILWAY 

Through Picturesque California, 

The Ideal Route for 

The ADEler anfl Ontint Trips 

One day's ride from San Francisco will take 
you to some of the finest Trout Streams in the 
State. Along the line and within easy distance 
are many of the best Springs and Summer Resorts 
in the State. The Company maintains a Fish 
Hatchery and annually stooks the many streams 
reached by its road. One million Trout Fry were 
planted last year in these streams. 

Black Bass Fisblng can be enjoyed in Russian 
River near Guerneville, Guernewood Park and 
Camp Vacation, in season. 

The best Striped Bass Fishing waters on the 
Coast reached by the Tiburon Ferry. 

VACATION FOR 1904 

Issued annualls by the Company, is now ready. 
This is the standard publication on the Coast for 
information regarding Mineral Springs, Resorts, 
Country Homes and Farms where summer board- 
ers are taken, and Select Camping Spots. 

Beautifully illustrated, 150 pp. and can be had 
in response to mail request or at ticket offices. 
Ticket Offices— 650 Market Street (Chronicle 

, Bldg) and Tiburon Ferry, foot of Market Street. 

I General Office— Mutual Life Ins. Bldg., cor. 
Sansome and California Sts., San Francisco. 



Auction Sale of Horses. 

16 Highly-bred Mares, Fillies and Colts. 

Standard animals. Are all registered and include some of the best blood in 
the State. Everything will be sold without reserve. Sale 

At Agricultural Park, San Jose, at 1:30 p. m., 

Saturday, July 16, 1904, 

and will open with sale of Miss Gordon, dam of fastest two-year-old in California. 
Catalogues ready day of sale. 

G. B. BLANCHARD, San Jose, Cal, 
J. C. MURPHY, Auctioneer. 



JAS. L. FRAZIER, 
Gen. Mgr. 



K. X. RYAN, 

Gen. Pass. Agt. 




L, DE CLOW 

Proprietor 



CEDAR RAPIDS (IOWA) JACK FARM 

FARMERS' SUPPLY OP THE MIDDLE WEST. 

In my sale April 5th I was unable to obtain satisfactory prices for my 
choicest animals in the Belgian and Coach horses, also my best and largest 
Home-bred and Spanish Jacks were not sold. 

I will offer this stock at 50% of their value for the nest thirty days. This 
is a great opportunity. 

W. L. DE CLOW, Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 



Six hogs to an acre are quite enough to 
run on an alfalfa field and then mow it 
regularly when it should be cut— that is 
when it begins to bloom. Hogs really 
only make paths through a part of it and 
this number does not interfere with cut- 
ting a fine hay crop and thus have alfalfa 
fresh for the hogs every six weeks or two 
months. In addition to alfalfa, growing 
pigs should be fed all the corncob char- 
coal they will eat, as this supplies the 
needed mineral matter. In a teat pigs 
were forced to the limit of feed and 
weighed daily when it was found that the 
gains were proportionate to the amount 
of corncob charcoal eaten. With growing 
animalB other than pigs we have not 
found it necessary to supply more mineral 
matter than that furnished by alfalfa. 



Sober up on Jackson's Napa Soda. 



|IKTERMTI0MAL1 
(POULTRY FOODS 




MAKES HENS 

L.AY MORE EGGS 
FOK 25 CENTS 

Cures or Prevents Chicken Cholera. It 
makes young chicks grow very rapidly 
and Fattens all kinds of Poultry in less 
time. Ask Dealers for it. Price refunded 
if it ever fails. If not for sale in your town 
t\ be sure and Write Direct To Us. '■ 

rt\ IfiTEMiTIOKU STOCK FOOD CO., JuOBtapolis.Mhui. 



WANTED. 



formation that will dock well. Any color 
but gray. One that is handsome, with good action 
and styie, 15.3 hands and not over 16 hands. Send 
full description and where horse can be seen. 
Address W. J., ahis office. 



Privileges For Sale 

FOR 

Vallej o Race Meeting 

4 Days— AUGUST 10, 11, 13 and 13,1904. 

Bids for the following privileges will be re- 
ceived up to noon, MONDAY, August 1, 1904: 

BETTING, Pools or Books. 

BAR PRIVILEGE, including sale of all drinks 
inside the grounds. 

RESTAURANT, LUNCH COUNTER, etc 

Aoerilfied oheck for 50 per cent must accom- 
pany each bid. Right reserved to reject any or 
all bids. 

THOS SMITH, Manager, 
Yallejo, Cal. 



Fnr 'snip brand new studebaker, 

1 ui t^aic* cushion-tire Road Buggy. Never 
used. Will take $40 less than cost, at> owner has 
no use for it. Apply to this office. 



TROTTER FOR SALE. 

OORREL GELDING, 6 YEARS OLD. Stands 
^ 16 2& hands high and weighs 1100 pounds 
Sired by Niccanor by Dexter Prinoe, dam Flora 
by El Cajon by Don Victor. He is in every re- 
spect a grand Individual, handsome, stylish, and 
can show a 2:40 gall or better. With very little 
work I drove him a half this year in 1:22 and a 
quarter in 39 seconds, to cart. He will make a 
grand park horse and should be seen by any one 
looking for a high-class trotter. Call or address 
L. R. PALMER, Walnut Creek, Cal, 



Santa Rosa Stock Farm 

HAS FOR SALE 

Three Sidney Dillon Year! ng Colls 

from the following mares: 
Pansy (dam of King Orry 2:21^, Almonition 
'2:24?4. Lady Pansy Russell 2:26^. and Pansy 
Russell 2:30) by Cassius M. Clay, Jr. 22, etc 
Gaycara 2:18?^ by Guy Wilkes 2:15^, dam 
Biscari (dam of 5 in list) by Director 2:17, 
second dam Bicari (dam of 6 In list) by 
Harold, etc 
RusBle Russell by Bay Rose2:20!s, out of Oakley 
Russell by Happy Russell, son of Happy 
Z Medium, etc 
Apply to IRA PIERCE, 

728 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 



FOR SALE. 

Mission Rnv B "y gelding by Sultan Jr.; 
iUIBOIUU L»UJ stands 16! ; hands and weighs 
over 1100 lbs. A handsome, high-class, gentle- 
man's roadster; stylish action, gentle, and good 
driver. Winner (without preparation) of tho 2:30 
pace at the matinee Decoration Day. Address 
T. H. CORCORAN, 
1201 Valencia St., San Francisco, 



McMURRAY 




McMURRAY SULKIES 

and JOQQINQ CARTS 

STANDARD THE WORLD OVER. 

■flEtf-Address, for printed matter and prices. 

W. J. EENNEY 

531 Valencia St., San Francisco, Cal. 



At the 



Tongues End 

5T0CK GET JUST ENOUGH AT THE RIGHT TIME. 

COMPHE 55ED PURE SALT BRICK5. 
AND PATENT FEEDERS. 

No waste. no neqlect.all convenience. 
Your dealer has it Write us for the boo A. 

BELMONT STABIE SUPPLY CO. 

PATENTEES MANUFACTURERS 

BrooKlyn, n.y. 



Fast Pacer For Sale. 

'pHE PACING GELDING, AL SANDY2:19H 
- 1 - by Wayland W., dam Rapid Ann by Overland. 
Can pace three heats better than 2:17. Can brush 
very last on the road. Excellent prospect to race. 
He is one of the best road horses In the city. 
Gentle and intelligent. Safe for lady to drive. 
For price and further particulars address S. 
WATSON, 235 Douglas street, San Francisco 



Fnr ^fllp COAL BLACK FILLY BY A 

i ui oaic. S0D of Directum 2-05#: Is very 
handsome and stylish. Would make a very fine 
saddle animal. Broke to drive. Apply to J. H. 
RAVEKES, San Leandro. 



BREEDERS' DIRECTORY. 



SHORTHORNS AND SHIRES— 

Quinto Herd of Shorthorns. 

41 premiums California State Fair, 1903. 

Young stock for sale. 

Send for catalogue. 

ALSO 

Several fine Shire Stallions, foals of 1902. 
Est. Of W. H. HOWARD, 
206 Sansome St., San Francisco. 



HOLSTEINS— Winners of every 7 days' butter 
contest at State Fair 1889 1st & 2d for aged cows, 
4-yr., 3-yr. and 2-yr.-olds; 21 Jerseys and Durhama 
competing. 5th year my Holsteins have beaten 
Jerseys for butter. Stook for sale; also pigs. F. 
H. Burke, 30 Montgomery St., S. F. 



JERSEYS, HOLSTEINS AND DURHAM?- 

Dairy Stock specially. Hogs, Poultry. Est 
listed 1876, William Nilea & Co.. Los £ 
Gal, 




©he gveebev axiti ^psxvt&tnan 



[JTJLY 9, 1904 



THE BAYWOOD STUD 

THE BUNGALOW, SAN MATEO, CAL. 

(Propertr or Jons Parroit, Esq.) 

Imp. Hackney Stallion 

GREEN'S RUFUS 63 w» 

Will servo a limited number ot Approved Mares, Season 1904 

TEE --- 875 

Reductions made for two or more mares. 

Manager, WALTER SEALT. 



AMERICAN or KENTUCKY GAITED 

SADDLE HORSES 

ON EXHIBITION AND FOR SALE 

AT AMERICAN PARK, SAN DIEGO, GAL. 

The Black Saddle Stallion 

REX MONTGOMERY 

No 2011 A. S. H. B., will serve a limited number 
of approved mares each season. FEE S50 (or season 
with return privilege. 

THE AMERICAN 

SADDLE HORSE BREEDING FARM 

SAN DIEGO, CAL. 




Quinm$iniment\ 



&2 



Will Make A Horse Over; 



mm 



I will put sound legs under him and Jl . 

will save him from the cheap hawker and trader. It is the I 
standard cure for Spavins, Curbs, Splints, Windpuffs and all 
the various lumps and bunches of like kind. Keep it always on 
hand and you will be prepared when trouble comes. Leading | 
I horsemen everywhere know it and use it. 

Mr H.H. Clark, Fredonia. N. T., writes: "The bottle of 
Oulnn's Ointment purchased from you about two years ago 
removed a curb and thoroughpin and did it for good. My 
horse's leg 1b as smooth as ever." 

Price J1.00 per bottle. Sold by all druggists or sent by mail' 

write for circulars, testimonials, etc. 
W.B. EDDY & COMPANY, WHITEHALL, H. Y. 



NEW MODEL 
1904 




THE BEST IN THE WORLD, 
O'BRIEN & SONS 

Cor, Golden Gate Ave. and Polk St. 
SAN FRANCISCO. CAI* 



PRIVILEGES! 

FO R SA LE. 

Pacific Coast Trotting Horse Breeders 
Association Meeting at 

SAN JOSE 

AUGUST 3, 4, 5 and 6, 1904 

"RIDS FOR THE FOLLOWING PRIVILEGES 
^ will be received up to noon, Wednesday, 

) 



July 20, 1904 

Belting ( AO 



Mutuel Pools, or 
Auction and Totallsator 




Bar and Cigars, 
Restaurant, 

Candy and Nuts, 
Programmes, 

A certified check for 50 per oent should accom- 
pany each bid. Right reserved to reject any or 
all bids. 

F. W. HELLEY, Secretary, 

36 Geary St., San Francisco 



£*; 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 



-DEAI.KIIH IN- 



55-67-69-61 First Street, S. F. 
Tkupuohi Maim 1W 

PEDIGREES TABULATED 

And typo wrltlon 
Ilcudy for framing. 
Write for prices. 
.kkcdxh awd Sportsman, 36 Geary Street 
San Franolaoo, Cal. 



SYNOVITIS 

IS VERY ANNOYING 

At least, You can cure it with 

Absorbine, Jr., 

CURES 

All Strained Joints or Ligaments. 

Allays all inflammation 
quickly. Pleasant to use. fi.oo 
per bottle delivered. Address 

W. F. YOUNG, P. D. 

SPRING I IIXD. 



For nolo by Mack A Co.. L&Qgley AMlohnoIiCo. 
Redlnjrtoii.tCo., J. O'Kane and J. A. MoKorron 
all of San I 'nmoiaco. 



AP 



FOR SALE. 

Y ENTIRE STOCK OF STANDARD-BRED 

Trotting and Pacing Horses. Single drivers 

and douM' teams. Some oxoollent prospoDtn for 

■ fjnterml In tho Ocoldunt, Stanford 

and Breodon Futurity HtalcoH. A lino oarriago 

toam, also the «reat broodmare DhJhv S. (dtimof 

'■' -.in hi -m. <■• oeral Vail* |o kUU. Sweel 

Ro»eS;2S (trial Ml) and Llttln Mac (8)2:27). The 
driving liorsea and colts oan bo noon at my stablo 
In Vniii jo, and tho hroodmaros, etc., at tho race 
track. Apply to or mldroas 

THOMAS SMITH, Vallejo, Col. 



This is Your Split Second 



IF 



YOU CAN PICK THE 
FIRST THREE 
HORSES IN THE 



California Stakes 
$2000 Guaranteed 

(FOR 2:24 CLASS TROTTERS) 
AT THE 

RACE MEETING 

OF THE 

Pacific Coast 



Trotting Horse 
Breeders Association 




GUN-METAL OPEN-FACED SPLIT 
SECOND TIMER. 

Shows secondB and fifths. Regis- 
ters minutes, start, stop and fly back 
operated from the crown, split-second 
attachment worked by the side plug. 
The thinnest and best $25 split timer 
in the market. 



San Jose, Aug. 3, 4, 5, 6, 1904 

The following is a list of the horses entered : 
No. 11. The California Stakes for 2:24 Class Trotters $2000 

S H Hoy'B blk m Little Babe by Bradtmoor, dam by Dawn. 
F R Garnsey's b m Alcacita by Red Cloak, dam Alcazette by Alcazar. 
Silva & Wright's b g M J by Bay Bird, dam by Cornelius. 
Martin Carter's ch h T C by Nutwood Wilkes, dam Zeta Carter by Director. 
H C Ahler's br g Telephone by Direct, dam Nellita by Philosopher. 
John A. Cole's b g Jupiter B by Gen Beverly, dam Little Agnes by Gossiper. 
J De La Montanya's ch g Bain by Steinway. 

S K Dougherty's br m Sonoma Girl by Lynwood W, dam Maud Fowler by Anteeo. 
A L McDonald's b g Col. Hickman by Nevada. 

Robt BureBs' b g Golden Gate by Bay Bird, dam Dourhka by Western. 
C A Winship's br g Abe Miller by Titus, dam Gazelle by Gossiper. 
H A Bell's b g H D B by Arthur Holt, dam Jennie D by Jerome Eddy. 
W H Lumsden's b a McPheraon by McKinney, dam Eveline by Nutwood. 
Walnut Grove Stock Farm's blk m The Boquet by Nuahagak, dam Woodflower 
by Ansel. 

Geo W Kingsbury's b g D E Knight by Lynwood, dam Grant, Jr. 

Wm. Morgan's b m Una K by McKinney, dam Nellie K by Gen. Grant, Jr. 

S. Silgen's Birdcatcher by Direct, dam Katherine by Hock Hocking. 

I. N. Minnr'B br g Morosco by Wayland W, dam Lady Moor by Grand Moor. 

R. W. Peterson's b g R W P by Lynwood W. 

ALL GUESSES POSITIVELY CLOSE JULY 26, 1904. 

Should more than one person pick the firBt three horses in the order in which 
they finish two timers will be given to the first two guessers in the order in which 
the guesses were received. 

NO STRINGS ATTACHED TO IT 
Every Body May Put in a Guess! 



Gut This Out and Send in Your Guess 

To the BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 

36 Geary Street, San Francisco. 

My selection for the first three horses winning money in the California Stakes 
$2000, to take place at the P. C. T. H. B. A. meeting at San Jose is: 



First 

Second 

Third 

Signed 

Address 

Date 1904, 



July 9, 1904 



©tte gtxeeifev anb gtpovt&tnait 



15 



SMITH GUNS 

WIN 

LONGEST 
STRAIGHT RUNS 




At S. F. Trap Shooting 

Association 

May 88-23— 84— 86 

VAUGHN, - - 73 Straights 

FECDNKR, - 63 " 

Also loDgest straight ruD 
and flrat monies at live birds 



All Kinds of Ammunition.. 



Catalog on 
application to 



Hunter Arms Co., Fulton, N.Y. 




RED BALL BRAND. 



Awarded Gold Medal 
At California Stata 
Fair 1893. 

Every horse owner who 
values his stock should 
constantly have a sup- 
ply of it on hand. It 
improves and keeps 
■stock in the pink of 
'condition. 
Manhattan Pood Co. 

1353 Foleom St., San Francisco 

ABk your grocers or dealers for it. 



Well! Well! 
Well! 




Still 

Shooting 

The 

Limit 



f^C? QyQ • lAUTI CHAS. HANTZ with the 
£. O W I nMI \Jk n I ! PARKKR GUN, on Jnne 17, 

won the Semi-Export Medal at Michigan State Shoot, Battle 

Creek, Mich., with 35 STRAIGHT. 

The PARKER GUN always wins. YOU should shoot It. Send for Catalogue. 




New York Salesrooms: 
33 WARREN STREET. 



MERIDEN, CONN. 



Positlvelv Cures Colic, Scouring and Indigestion. 

C. P. EIXTELL. Manager 



American Trottii Beiister 

PUBLICATIONS. 



Accurately Compiled 

Great aid to All Interests. 



THE YEAR BOOK 

This great work will be ready for delivery 
March 15, 1904. 

Contains summaries of races; tables of 2:30 trot- 
ters; 2:35 pacers; sires; grea* brood *>s; cham- 
pion trotters; fastest recordr 

Vol. XIX, 1903, single copies, postpaid... $4.00 
Vol. XIX, 1903, 10 or more copies, each, 

3.35 



f. o. b 

Vol. XVIII, 1902, single copies, postpaid. 

Vol. XVII, 1901, 

Vol. XVI, 1900, " " " 
Vol. XV, 1899. " " " 

Vol. XIV, 1898, 

Vol. XIII, 1897, 

Vol. XII, 1896, " ~ " " ■ 

Vol. XI, 

Vol. X, 

Vol. IX, 

Vol. VI, 

Vol. V, 

Vol. IV, 

Vol. II, 

Year Books for 
print. 



1895, 
1894, 
1893, 



4.00 
400 
4.00 
4.00 
3.00 
3.00 
3.00 
3.00 
3.00 
3.00 



1890, (limited number). postpaid 2.50 
1889, " " " 250 

1888, " " " 2.50 

1886, " " " 100 

II, 1887 and 1885 out of 



THE REGISTER 

Vols. IH to XV, inclusive, in one order, 

f. o. b 8600° 

Single Volumes, postpaid 5.00 

Vols. I and n are out of print. 

INDEX DIGEST 

Postpaid W.50 

This important adjunct contains all the standard 
animals in the first ten volumes, with numbers, 
initial pedigrees, and reference to volume in which 
animal is registered. 



REGISTRATION BLANKS 

will be sent upon application. 
Money must accompany all orders. Address 

American Trotting Reg. Association 

355 Dearborn St., Room 1108, 
CHICAGO, DDIi. 

Or BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

IMPROVED 

STALLION SERVICE BOOKS 



(POCKET SIZE) 

100 Pages. Price $1, postpaid. 

Most Complete Book 
of the kind published. 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 

36 Geary St., San Francisco, 



DOC WILLIAMS' 

BOARDING AND TRAINING STABLE 

Eiehth Avenue, near .Fulton Street 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

Colts broke and trained to trot and satisfaction 
guaranteed. Terms reasonable. Phone: Page 1324 



A year's subscription will pay 
for itself many times over — 




RossMcMahonlfi^' 

Truck, Wagon and Horse Covers, Camp Furniture, etc. 

REASONABLE PRICES. (Phone: Bush 858) 00 MAKKlI Olip oAN rnANGIoCU 



GEN. GRANT 

Tinier. 



ST. JULIEN 2:12 3-4 



ORRIN HICKOE 
Driver, 



Adopted and used by all Jookey Clubs in the 
United States and Canada. 

Published about the 1st and 15th of each month, 
from March to December, at 25c, 50c, 75c, $1, $1 50 
or $2, according to issue. 

A subscription ($18) includes all fortnightly 
issues and an "Annual" (in two volumes) hand- 
somely bound in half morocco. 

For sale by newsdealers throughout the coun- 
try, on race tracks and by 

GOODWIN BROS., 
Proprietors and Publishers. 
1440 Broadway, New York. 
Explanatory circulars mailed free. 



BUSINESS COLLEGE 



24 Post Street, San Francisco, Cal, 



The oldest, the largest, the most popular com- 
mercial school on the Pacific Coast. 20,000 gradu- 
ates; 30 teachers; 70 typewriters; over 300 students 
annually placed In positions. Send for catalogue 



E. P. HEALO, President. 



CALIFORNIA 



Photo Engraving Company 

HIGH CLASS ART 



Half Tones and Line Engraving 

Artistic Designing. 

506 Mission St.. cor. First, SanFranclBCO. 



The old "ST. JULIEN" SHOEING SHOP of MARTIN O'DEA & SON 
removed to Union Square Avenue, directly in rear of old shop. 



MARTIN ODEA & SON, 

COME AND SEE US. 



Proprietors. 

Phone: Grant 114. 



VETERINARY. 



DR. C. MASOERO 

VETERINARY SURGEON 

Graduate of Royal Veterinary 
College of Turin. 

Lnfiumart and Residence— 811 Howard St. 
between Fourth and Fifth Sts., San Francisco. 
Telephone: South 456. 



Ira Barker Dalziel 

VETERINARY DENTIST 

Fancy Carrlage.Saddle and Roat 1 Horses for Sale 

Office and stable: 805 Golden Gate Avenue, San 
Francisco, Cal. Telephone South 651. 



M. R. C. V. S., F. E. V. M. S. 

VETERINARY SURGEON. 

Member of the Royal College of Veterinary 
Surgeons, England; Fellow of the Edinburfe 
Veterinary Medical Society; Graduate of the New 
Veterinary College, Edinburgh; Veterinary Sur- 
geon to the S. F. Fire Department; Live Stock 
Inspector forNew Zealand and AustralianColonies 
at the port of San Francisco; Professor of Equine 
Medicine, Veterinary Surgery, Veterinary Depart- 
ment University of California; Ex-President oi 
the California State Veterinary Medical Associa- 
tion; Veterinary Infirmary, Residence and Office, 
San Francisco Veterinary Hospital, 1117 Golden 
Gate Avenue, near Webster St., San Francisco: 
Telephone Park 128. 



Chronic Bronchitis and Catarrh of the Bladder 

Cured In 48 Hours. 



CAPSULES 



Superior to Copaiba. Cubebfl or Injection 



\jf"^ 1:58 1-2 ■I©' 

FAIjAOB] 

hear race track, pleasanton, cai 

Finest Wines, Liquors and Cigars 

Boarding House. 

A. H. BERNAL, Proprietor, 



AT STUD 



CUBA OP KENWOOD 

(Glenbeigh Jr.— Stella; 

SAM'S BOW 

(Plain Sam-Dolly Dee n) 

STOCKDALE KENNELS 

K. M. DODGE, Manager, 
Rabersfleld, Kern Co., 

Boarding. Pointer Puppies and w«ll-brokem 
Dogs for sale. 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 

Advertisements under this head one cent ptr word 
per insertion. Cash to accompany order. 



IRISH AND SCOTCH TEBRIEBS. 



TRISH AND SCOTCH TERRIERS FOR SALE. 
- 1 Scottle Puppies sired by Ch. Loyne Ruffian 
and Crimson Rambler. Best Irish- stock on the 
Coast. Mrs. BRADLEY-DYNE, Saturna P. O., 
B.C. 



LLEWELLYN SETTERS. 



T LEWELLYN SETTER PTJPS FOR SALE, 
-L* containing the blood of Marie's Sport, Ob. 
Gladstone, Roderigo and Antonio. These are not 
cheap dogs, but high-class stock. MRS. THOS. 
MURPHY, Hollister, Cal. 



IBISH TERRIERS. 



TfOR SALE-CAPITAL BITCH , A WINNER 
*- price $15. First-class 8-months-old dog. good 
in all ways; price $25. BRADLEY-DYNE, 
Saturna P. O , B. C. 



SCOTCH TERRIERS. 



pOR SALE-8-M0NTHS-0LD DOG BY CH. 
-^ Loyne Ruffian, very typical; price $30. 18- 
mohths-old dog, $10. Smart bitoh, good breeder, 
$12. BRADLEY-DYNE, Saturna P. O., B. C. 



ST. BERNARDS. 



A T STDD— CHAMPION LE KING. GRAND- 
-"- est headed St. Bernard on the Coast. Fee 190. 
W. WALLACE, 58 Boyce St., San Franoiico. 



Q0C0ANUT OIL CAKE 

THE BEST FEED EOB 

STOCK, CHICKENS AND PIOS 

FOR SALE IN LOTS TO 8BIT BY 

EL DORADO LINSEED OIL WORKS CO; 
308 California Street, San Franelioo, Oat. 



ROSE HOTEL 

PLEASANTON, CAI. 

Enlarged, Rebuilt. Twenty-five New Room. 

Newly Furnished. Electric Light*, 

Running Water. Up to date. 

A. S. OLHII * SON - - PropHotort 



16 



@Tlte gSree&er ctnb gtp&vtsimcm 



[July 9, 190, 



TELEPHONE-. 

South 640 r 




ORSE BOOTS 



San Francisco, CaI.^ B ^® 5 



U. M. C. SHOOTERS WIN 



# 



♦ 






Grand American Handicap, Highest General Averages 
of all Targets shot at, also Consolation Handicap. 

R. D. GUPTILL of Minnesota, 19 yards. 96 out of 100; 53 out of 60 on shoot-off. 

J. L. D. MORRISON of Minnesota won premier honors for the entire series. 277 out of 300 at 19 and 20 yds; 491 out of 500 at 16 yds. 
W. H. HEER of Kansas, winner of Consolation, 98 out of 100, at 20 yards with a Remington Gun. 

-A.11 -Won -c^itu. XT. 3VC. O. SHESIjIiS 

UNION METALLIC CARTRIDGE CO. 

E. E. DRAKE, Pacific Coast Manager. 



# 



86-88 FIRST STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



^r^^-- 



jr#####################l############################# 



RIFLES AND » SHOTGUNS 




PACIFIC COAST AGENCY 
127-135 FIRST STREET 



A.ivj:itfl:TJ3>jn?ioTxr 

A. MUILEE, Agent. 



SAN FRANCISCO 
CALIFORNIA 



DuPONT SMOKELESS. 

Mr. Fred Gilbert, from May 3d to June 2d, 
Hhot In seven tournaments, a total of 18 
days, and broke 

3260 out or 3400 targets, 

An average of 06%, 

Mblrnlgbt from the 23-yard mark. 

Is not this the World's Record? 

AlBO 

50 or more straight, 13 times. 
100 or more straight, 4 times. 

DuPONT SMOKELESS 

(The Record Breaker). 




Loaded lxx O. P. W . Smok.eless. 
Winning- Hisrhest Average at All Shoots. 

IF YOU WANT THK BEST ASK FOB 

California Powder Works 

FACTORY LOADED SHELLS. 

If Von: ■>. ,1,-r tlon't keep them write the 

CALIFORNIA POWDER WORKS — Office 330 Market St., San Francisco 

Mm mtiirera of HERCULES DYNAMITE, HERCULES GELATINE, CHAMPION 
IMPROVED BLASTING, BLACK BLASTING, BLACK SPORTING 
O. P. W. SMOKELESS Bud MILITARY SMOKELESS. 
> tell CAPS and FUSE. 



"INFALLIBLE" 

(America's Dense Powder) 

At Camden, Ark., June 8th and 9th 

Mr. Turner Hubby won 

1st general average 

(377 ex 400 targets). 

Mr. Hood Waters and Mr. F. M. Faurote 

won 

3d and 4th general averages 

(369 and 368 ex 400 targets). 

All shot 



"INFALLIBLE" 



Cldbrough, Gucher & Go, 



RUNS 
Sun Goods 

«#-3ond for Catalogue. 




FISHING 
Tackle 

538 MARKET STREET, S. F. 



You can get these Smokeless Powders in 

S E L B Y a K v b6 S H E L LS 



DU PONT 

"E. C." 

SCHULTZE 

HAZARD 



SHOTGUN RIFLEITE 
BALLISTITE 
LAFLIN & RAND 
'INFALLIBLE" 



What More do you Want? 




VOL. XI V. No. 3. 

36 GEARY STREET. 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JULY 16, 1904. 



SUBSCRIPTION 
THREE DOLLARS A YEAR 






ffl 



^-=^^^-s^ 




Two Probable Sta. '^ v "era :00 ° Trot at San Jo * e ' Au K ust 6th 



©tte gveebev anb gijrort&mctn 



[July 16, 1904 



O'KANE TRACK HARNESS 



Custom Made Flexible Saddle, California Girth, Open or Bliud Bridle, Long Martingale. 

ALL WEARING PARTS RAWHIDE LINED 

Horse Boots, Hobbles, Clothing, Etc. 

, O'K-ACTIES 



26 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE, SAN FRANCISCO. send for catalogue. 



CALIFORNIA STATE FAIR FOR 1904. 

SACRAMENTO, CAL. 

AUGUST 22 TO SEPTEMBER 3, 1904. 

Entries to Close win Secretary, Welnesflay, An. 3, 1904 



All 



Races to be Contested at the State Fair on days to be 
Hereafter Designated by the Board of Directors. 



No. l. Tom Fox Stake— For all ages. Entrance $10, to accompany nomination; $15 additional 
Tor horses not declared by 4 p m. the day preceding the race; $300 added by the Society, of which £50 
to second and ?-J5 to third. Non-winners of three races this year, if three years old and over, al- 
lowed 5 lbs.; non-winners of two races 7 lbs.; and non-winners of one race 10 lbs. Maidens, three 
years old, allowed 5 lbs; four years old and over 7 lbs. additional Six furlongs- 

No 'J. VTesteru Hotel State— For two-year-old Allies. Entrance $10. to accompany nomin, 
ation; $15 additional if not declared by 4 p. m the day preceding the race; $300 added by the Society- 
of which $50 to second and?25 to third Weights 5 lbs. below the scale. A winner of a stake race in 
1904, or a winner of three or more races of any value, other than selling races, 5 lbs extra. Non- win- 
ners of two races allowed 4 lbs Maidens allowed 7 lbs , and if such are the produce of a mare that 
has not produced a winner at the time of starting. 10 lbs. Maidens beaten three or more times since 
closing of the stake, allowed 5 lbs; and if not placed second or third, 7 lbs. additional. Five fur- 
longs- 
No. 3. The Governor's Stake— A handicap for three-year-olds and upward. Entrance $10, to 
accompany nomination; $J0 additional for horses not declared by 4 p. m. day preceding the race; 
with $350 added by the Society, of which$70 to second and $30 to third. Weights posted at 12 m. day 
preceding the race. A winner of a race other than a selling race after the weights are published. 
to carry 5 lbs. extra. One mile and a furlong 

No. 4. Golden Eagle Hotel Selling Stake— For three-year-olds and upward- Entrance $10, 
to accompany nomination; $!5 additional for horses not declared by 4 p. m. the day preceding the 
raoe; $300 added by the Society, of which $50 to second and $30 to third. Winner to be sold at auc- 
tion. If for $SO00. to carry rule weights; if for less, one lb. allowed for each $100 to $1000; thence 2 lbs 
for each $100 to $400. Selling price to be placed on starters through entry box by 4 p. m. on the day 
preceding the race. A winner of a stake race or three or more races of any value after closing of 
stake, to carry 5 lbs. extra Maidens allowed 7 lbs. One mile. 

No. 6 California Mate Fair Annual Stake— Handicap for two-year-olds Entrance $10. to 
accompany nomination: $20 additional for horses not declared bv 4 p. m. the day preceding the raoe; 
Ttih $350 added by the Society, of which $70 to the second and $30 to the third. Weights posted at 
12 p. m. day preceding race. A winner of a race other than a selling race, after the weights are 
published, to carry h lbs extra. Seven furlongs. 

No. 6. The President's Stake— A handicap for three-year-olds and upward. Entrance $15, to 
accompany nomination; $25 additional for horses not declared by 4 p. m. day preceding race; $350 
added by the Society, of which $70 to second and $30 to third. Weights posted at 12 m. day preceding 
race. A winner of a race other than a selling purse, after the weights are published, to carry 5 lbs. 
extra. One and one-quarter miles. 

No. 7. The Vinctor Stake— For three-year-olds and upward. Entrance $10, to accompany 
nomination; $20 additional for horses not declared by 4 p m. day preceding race; with $350 added by 
the Society of which |70 to second and $30 to third. Stake to be named after the winner if Vinctor's 
time (1:40) is beaten. A non-winner of a stake race in 1903, or a race of the value of $500, allowed, if a 
noD-winner of five races other than selling races, 5 lbs Maidens 7 lbs. additional. One mile. 

L J. Rose Selling «*take— For two-year-olds. Entrance $10, to accompany nomination;$l5 ad- 
ditional for colts not declared by 4 p m. the day preoeding the race; with $350 added by the Society, 
of which $50 to seoond and $25 to third. Horses may bs entered not to be sold, and carry rnle weight. 
If entered to be sold for $1000. allowed 3 lbs ; $700 6 lbs ; $400 10 lbs. Winners of one race after clos- 
ing or stake to carry 3 lbs. extra: of two or more 7 lbs extra. Maidens beaten three times, allowed 5 
lbs.; four or more times 7 lbs. Value to be placed on starters through entry box by 4 p. m. day before 
race- Six lurlongs. 

The State Agricultural Society's regular and special rules to govern, except where conditions 
are otherwise. All declarations and claims for allowances due at 4 p m day preceding race, unless 
otherwise specifled In conditions. Owners and trainers will be held responsible for same. Entrance 
and declaration money to go to winner. No added money for less than four starters in different in- 
terests. In selling races, beaten horses not liable to claim. Right to use starting gait is reserved. 

Entries must state name, color, sex, and pedigree of horse, with racing colors of the owner. 

Applications for stabling must be made to the Secretary. Applicants will be furnished with 
blanks, which must be filled out and approved before a horse is admitted to the grounds. The track 
Superintendent will stable no horse until this course has been pursued. No stabling will be guaran- 
teed except for race horses in training and ready to raoe, and those entered in stakes to have 
preference. 

Owners who ship to track without notice will not be allowed to take stalls until application has 
been made to the Secretary and approved. 

Special stalls will be allotted to horses competing for premiums. 

R. MILLER, Secretary, 

SACRAMENTO, CAL. 



SALINAS DRIVING CLUB 

Salinas, Cal., Sept. 14, 15, 16 and 17 
Entries Close Tuesday, July 26, 1904 

LIST OF EVENTS. 

Horses Must Be Named With Entry. 



L. 



BENJ. F. RUSH, President. 



CAMPBELL'S HORSE FOOT REMEDY best" 'remedy 

EVER USED ON HORSES' FEET. 

IT PENETRATES and DRIES IN quickly and DOES 
NOT GUM and FILL UP THE PORE8 like tar and oil 
compouods. It 1s the GREATEST REMEDY ever used to 
remoTo SORENESS and FEVER from the foot, and makes it 
possible to get good servloes out of a horse working on hard 
and hot pavoments 

It gives natural nourishment to the foot and inoites a 
rapid, healthy growtb-ALL DRYNESS AND BRITTLE- 
NESS qulokly disappears. 

QUARTER CRACKS and SAND CRACKS are rapidly 
grown out when directions given In our booklet are followed. 

It Is a SURE CURE for CORNS, CONTRACTED FEET 
and NAIL WOUNDS If directions are followed 

It PREA'KKTfl SOUND FEET FROM BECOMING UN- 
SOUND and GROWS a TOUGH, STRONG. ELASTIC WALL 
•Dd HEALTHY FROG-A FOOT WHICH WILL STAND 
WORK on racecourses. 

Many of the best owners and trainers state that for track 
work nothing oquais it. In many cases horses have reduced 
their records several seconds, due to its use. 

It Is a CER1 AIN CURE for THRUSH and SCRATCHES 
We Guarantee That It Will Do What We Claim 
and Will Refund Money If It Palls. 

I'R1CB8:-Quans. |1 0Ol Half-Gallon, 11.75; Gallon, $3 00; 
liVi-Gallon, $5.50; Five-Gallon, 110.00. 

Book* firing fall directions for Its uv- and much valuable Information m to shoeing are supplied 
free. 

Don't fall to read "ad " giving Information concerning Carnpboirs Iodoform Gall Cure In next 
Issue if this paper. It Is the best sod becauso or Its merits Is rapidly displacing all others. 

JAS. B. CAflPBELLACO . Manufacturers, 4 1 2 W.riadlson St., CHICAGO, ILL 

kll Dealers Id Harness and Turf Goods. If not In stock ask thorn to write any Jobber for It 

F^H I rrt-«»*»C T^lhll I «1 +**H and l JP e wr ltten ready for framing 
.uigreeb lauuiaieu Write for pr!c6- breeder and 

i.sman, 36 Geary Street.San! Francisco, Cal. 



PACERS. 

1 — Mouterfv County Chamber of Com- 
merce Stakes, for 2:90 class S600 

2 — Green Class, for horses without rec- 
ords 30O 

3— For horses eligible to the 2:10 class. 300 

4— For horses eligible to the 3:15 class. 300 

TROTTERS. 

5— Salinas Driving Club Stakes, for 

2 :20 t rotters 8600 

6— For trotters of the 2:15 class 300 

7— For Green Class trotters, or horses 

without records 300 

Entrance 5% and h% from money winners. 

Two horses may be entered by one owner In any race on one entrance fee, but not more than one 
can be started. 

Races will be arranged so as to give horses starting in more than one race at least 
one day between starts. 

All Stakes are for the amount guaranteed— no more, no less. 

Stakes not filling satisfactorily to the Board of Directors may be declared off. 

Member National Trotting Association. 

Send for Entry Blanks and address all communications to 



DISTRICT RACES. 

S— District (Monterey, San Benito, Santa Cruz 
and San Luis Obispo oounties) Three-Year- 
Old Stake, for trotting colts three years old 
or under, $10 to accompany nomination July 
26th, $15 August 15th and $35 September 1st, 
with $50 added by the Club. 

9— District Two- Year-Old Trot, conditions and 
added money the same as in No. S. 

10— Mixed Race, Trotters and Pacers, 
2:25 class, for horses owned In Mon- 
terey County S150 

11— Mixed Trotting and Pacing Race 
for Members of the Driving Clob, 
owners to drive 150 



J. D. KALAR, Sec'y, Salinas, Cal. 



£ 



PALACE HOTEL, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 




*w 



TOURISTS and TRAVELERS will, now, with difficulty recognize the famous COURT 
into which for twenty-five years carriages have driven. This space of over a quarter 
of an acre has recently, by the addition of very handsome furniture, rugs, chandeliers 
and tropical plants, been converted into a lounging room— the FINEST IN THE 
WORLD. 

The EMPIRE PARLOR— the PALM ROOM, furnished in Cerise, with Billiard and 
Pool tables for the ladies— the LOUIS XV PARLOR the LADIES WRITING ROOM 
and numerous other modern improvements, together with the unexcelled Cuisine and the 
Most Convenient Location In the City— all add much to the ever increasing popularity 
of this most famous HOTEL. 




HARNESS and SADDLES 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 

Large Stock. Low Prices. 

JEPSEN BROS. CO. inc.) 

110-112 MARKET ST., SAN FRANCISCO, 



TWO BLOCKS 
FROM FERRY 



SINGMASTER&SONS.ofKeota Iowa. 

BREEDERS AND IMPORTERS OF 

PERCHERONS, SHIRES, BELGIAN AND FRENCH COACH HORSES 

Have a Branch Barn at 

63 North San Pedro Street, San Jose, Cal. 



High-class 
good stallion 



ook always on hand. It will pay to call and inspect stock if you are in need of i 

C. O, STANTON, San Jose Manager. 




CEDAR RAPIDS (IOWA) JACK FARM 



W. L. DE CLOW 

Proprietor 

FARMERS' SCPPLY OF THE MIDDLE WEST. 

In my sale April. 5th I' was unable to obtain satisfactory prices for my 
choices: animals in the Belgian and Coach horses, also my best and largest 
Home-bred and Spanish Jacks were not sold. 

I will offer tblsstock at 50% of their value for the next thirty days. This 
Is a great opportunity. 

W. L. DE CLOW, Cedar Rapids, Iowa 

Health Insurance for 50 Gents. 

Why allow your stock to suffer from distemper, couRhs. colds, etc., when 
Craftfr Distemper Core at 50 cents a bottle will INSURE a benefit, or 
your money back. Big bottles St, small bottles 50c each or $4-50 a dozen, at 
your druggist or direot, prepaid. You may have a booklet free. Write 
right now. 



Wells Medicine Co, Vr 



3ermologlsts 



13 3d st, Lafayette, Ind, 



July 16, 1904] 



®he $veeiszv anit gtpvvt&tncm 



THE WEEKLY 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

P. w. KELLEY, Proprietor. 

rurf and Sporting Authority of the Pacific Coast. 

— OFFICE — 

36 QEARY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

P. O. BOX 2300. 
telephone: Blacfe 586. 



Terms -One Tear S3, Six Month* 81.75, Three Months SI 
STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. ' 

Money snould be sent by postal order, draft or by registered letter 
addressed to P. W. Kellet, 36 Geary St., San Francisco. Cal. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's name and 
address, not necessarily for publication, but as a private guarantee 
of good faith. 

San Francisco, Saturday, July 16, 1904. 



Dates of Harness Meetings. 

CALIFORNIA. 

Pleasanton July 27 to July 30 

San Jose (Breeders) Aug. 3 to Aug. 6 

Vallejo Aug. 11 to Aug. 13 

Santa Rosa (Breeders) Aug. 17 to Aug. 20 

Cal. State Fair, Sacramento Aug. 22 to Sept. 3 

Salinas Sept. 14 to Sept. 17 

Hanford Oct. 10 to 15 

Tulare ,Oct. 17 to 22 

NORTH PACIFIC. 

Everett Aug. 29 to Sept. 3 

Vancouver, B. C Sept. 3 to Sept. 5 

Whatcom Sept. 5 to Sept. 10 

Salem Sept. 12 to Sept. 17 

Seattle Sept. 19 to Sept. 24 

North Yakima Sept. 25 to Oct. 1 

Victoria. B. C Sept. 27 to Oct. 1 

New Westminster, B. C Oct 3 to Oct. 8 

Spokane. . Oct. 3 to Oct. 8 

Walla Walla Oct. 10 to Oct. 15 

Boise Oot. 17 to Oct. 22 

GRAND CIRCUIT. 

Detroit July 25 to July 30 

Buffalo Aug. 1 to Aug. 6 

Empire City Aug. 8 to Aug. IE 

Brighton Beach Aug. 15 to Aug. 20 

Readville Aug. 22 to Aug. 27 

Providence Aug. 29 to Sept. 3 

Hartford Sept. 5 to Sept. 10 

Syracuse Sept. 12 to Sept. 17 

Columbus Sept. 19 to Sept. 24 

Cincinnati Sept. 26" to Oct. 1 

Memphis Oct. 17 to Oct. 27 

AS THE TIME draws near for the opening of the 
California circuit, the prospects seem brighter 
and brighter for one of the best seasons of harness 
racing -seen in California for years. Horses and horse- 
men are arriving at Pleasanton (where the circuit 
opens Wednesday, July 27th) every day, andthe- 
place already presents a lively appearance. There 
promises to be big fields in every race during the four 
days' racing there and while fast time will be made 
there will be but very few favorites which will be at 
shorter odds than two to one. In fact there are so 
many good ones to Btart in every class that favorites 
will be very hard to pick. As the public will make 
the odds, and the "skindicate" book be conspicuous 
by its absence at this meeting and the Breeders meet- 
ings which follow it, winners will get good odds for 
their money. Every part of the Coast has sent its 
best trotters and pacers to the Pleasanton meeting, 
the Directors have made arrangements that are com- 
plete in every particular, and the result will be racing 
of Grand Circuit calibre. 



STARTING PAYMENTS must be made on July 
25th (which falls on Monday after next) on the 
colts and fillies that will start in the two-year-old and 
three-year-old divisions of the Pacific Breeders Futur- 
ity Stakes to be trotted at the San Jose meeting 
during the first week in August. There were fifty- 
four three-year-olds eligible to Stake No. 1 on January 
1st, but one or two of these have since died. About 
a hundred and forty two-year-olds are eligible to start 
in Stake No. 2, but, of course, all are not in training, 
as many owners do not race their colts until they are 
three-year-oldB. Colts and fillies that start in the 
two-year-old division of stake No. 2 this year can also 
Btart in the three-year-old division next year. The 
prospects are for a great race by the three-year-olds 
with heats below 2:20. There are at least a half 
dozen of the eligible three-year-olds that have worked 
close to this time time already and some have beaten 
it. Some of those that have shown the most speed 
are not in the best of Bhape, however, and the proba- 
bility is that some colt that is not much talked about 
will get first money. That is often the case. But the 
important thing for owners to bear in mind at the 
present time is that starting payments must be made 
by Monday, July 25th, on those that will start in these 
races. 



ADVERTISING IS NECESSARY in every busi- 
•**■ ness and the man who advertises judiciously will 
get a good return for his money. As a general rule 
the men who own trotting bred stallions are not 
judicious advertisers, the principal reason being that 
they have devoted no study to this branch of their 
business. The coming State Fair which will open at 
Sacramento, August 22d, will afford owners a most 
excellent opportunity to advertise their stallions and 
while we do not expect any very large number will 
take advantage of the situation we feel as though the 
matter should be brought to their attention. The 
State Fair is held at a time when the breeding season 
is over, and there will be no loss of services or time 
that is valuable, if stallions are shipped there and 
placed On exhibition. But if this exhibition is not 
made in a proper manner it would be better not to 
make it all. In the first place the horse should be in 
a show condition; that is, he should be reasonably 
fat, in good coat and feeling well. His stall should 
be kept perfectly clean and decorated in a neat but 
not lavish manner. There should be a large card on 
the outside giving his name and breeding and such 
facts in regard to his record and produce as can be 
stated in a few words. During certain hours of the 
day the horse should be on exhibition, with an attend- 
ant to lead him out for the inspection of breeders. 
Small cards containing a good picture of the horse if 
possible, his tabulated pedigree, terms of service and 
where he will make the next season should be given 
out freely. If the horse is for sale it should be 60 
stated. To take a stallion to the State Fair at Sacra- 
mento and exhibit him there will not cost more than 
a couple of average priced service fees, and ten times 
this number may be secured by such advertising. 
The man who owns a stallion and would make a profit 
from him, must be ready and willing to make his 
horse's qualifications known to the public. Advertis- 
ing through the turf papers is the most profitabe way 
of accomplishing this end, but exhibiting at fairs is a 
great assistance and can be done at a small cost. We 
should like to see the standard bred trotting stallions 
make a numerous and creditable showing at Sacra- 
mento this year. 



A BIG HORSE SHOW is to be the leading feature 
of the pavilion exhibit at the California State 
Fairthis year. The directors have secured the ser- 
vices of Mr. Richard Graham, who has had an ex- 
tended experience in managing horse shows, and an 
endeavor will be made to make the Sacramento show 
a decided success. The entries will be classified and 
money prizes, cups and medals be given for saddle 
horses, gentlemen and lady riders, equipages, turn- 
outs of all kinds, ponies, etc. The Sacramento Union 
says it has been arranged to hold the big show in the 
center of the main floor of the pavilion, where an oval 
68x175 feet will be laid out. The floor will be braced 
for the additional weight and will be covered with 
three or four inches of earth, this, in turn, to be cap- 
ped with a thick layer of tanbark, which will give a 
spring to the floor, and will prevent dust, etc. On 
one side of the ring private boxes, which will be 
rented for the season, will be ereoted, and on the op- 
posite side tiers of seats will be raised for which 
charges will be made. The seats and boxes will not 
interfere with the view from the gallery. In addition 
to the horse show the prize herds of cattle shown at 
the park will be judged in the arena each night. 
There will be riding tournaments also, and each eve- 
ning's programme will consist of interesting and 
novel features. 

The space at the northeast corner of the pavilion 
which haB heretofore been set apart for the poultry 
exhibit will be turned into stables for the horses, and 
the poultry will be exhibited in the north wing of the 
Davilion. Director Wilson, who is the originator of 
the horse show idea, is much pleased with the outlook 
and has faitb in the departure. 



A CABLEGRAM brought the news this week that 
Mr. A. B. Spreckels of this city who has been at 
Carlsbad since the first of June for the benefit of his 
health has gone to Berlin to be operated upon for an 
attack of appendicitis. It is to be sincerely hoped 
that the operatian, if performed, will be completely 
successful and that Mr. Spreckels will be restored to 
complete health. Mr Spreckels is the second Bon of 
Claua Spreckels, is vice-president of the John D. 
Spreckels Bros. Company and interested in many 
great enterprises. He is an ardent horseman and 
horse breeder, having one of the finest thoroughbred 
breeding farms in America at Napa, and a trotting 
horse breeding farm at Aptos. He is a member of the 
Pacific District Board of Appeals of the National 
Trotting Association, a director of the PaciOc Coast 
Trotting Horse Breeders Association, and was for 
several years President of the California State Agri- 
cultural Society. Mr, Spreckels* health has been un- 
certain for several months. In May last, accom. 



panied by his friend, E. Aigeltinger, a former mem- 
ber of the Board of Supervisors, he went to Carlsbad 
to take the cure which it was hoped would benefit 
him. 



CNTRY BLANKS will be sent out during the com- 
*-* ing week to every person that has made an entry 
in Pacific Breeders Futurity No. 4, inviting them to 
name their colt or filly in the side stake suggested by 
Mr. T. J. Crowley, one of the Directors of the Pacific 
Coast Trotting Horse Breeders Association. The 
entrance to this side stake will be $25, to be paid at 
the time entry is made, August 1st. It is hoped that 
a large number of nominations will be made to this 
side Btake, and if so, it will make one of the most in- 
teresting features of the harness racing season of 
1907 in California. As the entire sum received with 
the exception of the very small amount necessary to 
pay for the printing and mailing of the entry blanks 
will be deposited in bank and draw interest until the 
day of the race, there will be a goodly sum to be 
divided among the horses that are "in the money." 



OWNERS OF RUNNERS should not forget that 
eight good stakes are offered by the State Agri- 
cultural Society, to close August 3d with L. R. Miller, 
Secretary, at Sacramento. These stakes are to be 
run at the State Fair this year. Three of them are 
for two-year-olds, one of which is exclusively for 
fillies. The other five are for three-year-olds and up- 
wards, except the Tom Fox Stake at six furlongs 
Which is for all ages. All have added money. 



Answers to Correspondents. 

M. B. S., Hanford — The Year Book does not give 
Pleasanton Belle credit for a standard record. 



J. D., Butte, Montana — We can find no mention of 
any pacer called Doge. 



L. S. G., City — The dam of Sonoma Girl is Maud 
Fowler 2:21| by Anteeo. Maud Fowler is a trotter 
and made her record at Petaluma in 1893 in the fifth 
heat of a race which she won. She is now 16 years 
old, strong and vigorous and a regular breeder. Yes; 
Sonoma Girl is an example of the Wilkes-Electioneer 
cross. 



John Gilmore Speed, agent for the U. S. govern- 
ment, who has been at Lexington, Ky., buying horses 
to breed a tribe of cavalry equines for the use of the 
American soldiers in the Philippines, has completed 
his work and shipped his purchases. He secured 87 
head for exportation, 50 of which he bought in Ken- 
tucky and the rest in Missouri and in several New 
England states. All the stock he secured passed the 
examination of the government veterinarian, H. L. 
Casey. Of the horses in the big exportation, four 
are thoroughbred Btallions, eight saddle stallions, 
standard bred, and 75 brood mares. 



The annual harness meeting at Windsor, Ont , has 
always been considered a sort of Grand Circuit curtain 
raiser, coming as it does the week previous to the big 
meeting at Grosse Point. On account of there being 
no conflict in dates this seascn between their meeting 
and Columbus, the management have decided to in- 
crease their purses, and this season 315,000 is offered to 
be contested for the meeting which opens next Mon- 
day. The majority of the purses are $S00 and none 
are less than $600. 

Santa Rosa does not propose losing its reputation 
for having the fastest track in the State, and when 
the horses reach there for the Breeders meeting which 
opens August 17th, they will have a "velvet" track to 
trot over. Records will be reduced at Santa Rosa this 
year. 

Silver Ore, the green trotter which is causing such 
a sensation by his fast work at Glenville, was pur- 
chased by hi= present owner for S250. An offer of 
$5000 for him was recently turned down. 

Robert McGregor is very likely to gain another 2:10 
trotter through his daughters, as the chestnut geld- 
ing Kent 2:12A is reported to be the best race prospect 
in the Smathers' stable. 



Allendale, the Fa'rose pacer, now owned by Mr. C. 
R. Moody, of Cleveland, won his first matinee start at 
that city on July 2d, winning his heats easily in 2:1S 

and 2:20. 

♦ 

Harry Stinson is said to have announced that Oro 
Wilkes 2:11 will be trained for a record below 2:10. 
He was timed in 2:09$ as a four-year-old. 



Eagletta, 4, 2:11, Shepherd Rose 2:151, Annie Burns 
2:10$, Sweet Violets 2:16, Rispah 2:131 and Alice 2:14 
have been bred to Rey Direct 2:10. 



The full sister to John A. McKerron 2:04f, owned 
by Nutwood Stock Farm, trotted a mile in 2:J 
the San Jose track last week. 



®lie fgveeoev «tti> gftwrrtsrotcm 



[July 16, lttH 




CTteS^E-^'i?^ 



JOTTINGS. 



BUT TEN DAYS MORE ana then the bell will 
ring at Pleasanton for the opening of the Cali- 
fornia circuit o( harness races for 1904. There is every 
reason for the prediction of a large attendance, first- 
class racing and a very successful meeting. A four 
days' program has been filled with one of the best 
lists of entries ever received by a racing association 
In California and the Pleasanton association, although 
a new organization, has in its preliminary work shown 
Iteelf to be up-to-date, enterprising and energetic. 
The meeting will open on Wednesday, July 27th, with 
the Citizens stake of $1000 for pacers of the 2:20 class. 
There were originally twenty-three entries in this 
race, and it is probable that twelve or more of the 
best green pacers ever seen in California will line up 
for the word. The sale of the McKinney-Nutwood 
Wilkes mare Miss Georgie to W. A. Clark Jr., has 
removed what would doubtless have been the favorite 
from the contest, as Mr. Clark shipped her to Denver 
where she has won both her starts and taken a record 
of 2:11}, and will race her in the east. The absence of 
Miss Georgie will only make the race more interesting 
and the field of starters larger, as many horsemen 
were of the opinion that she had a mortgage on the 
stake and would have won it hands down had she 
been kept in it. There are several "warm ones" re- 
maining, however, and the race should be one of the 
best contests ever seen on the local circuit. ' Farmer" 
Bunch who is training B. Croner's mare Hattie 
Croner by Bay Bird for this event, stepped this mare 
a mile in 2:12} recently and she is credited with the 
capability of three heats faster than that. H. H. 
Dunlap's Harold D. by Dexter Prince has shown just 
as much speed and is known to be game. S. K- 
Trefry's Tom Carneal by Diablo has also paced 
below 2:13 in hi6 work, while Capt. Goodall's two 
entries Rajah and Uncle John have been working so 
nicely for Fred Chadbourne lately that some horse- 
men are saying the winner to this pace will come from 
the Goodall stable. Chas. Whitehead's mare The 
Mrs. ought to be in the money and it will take heats 
below 2:12 to beat her. Mildred O., the roan mare by 
Secretary that started a couple of times last year but 
acted badly, is said to be very steady now that she is 
in tbe hands of Mr. J. W. Zibbell, and her speed is 
known to be of the 2:10 order. There will be quite a 
contingent of side wheelers from Southern California 
in the race, one of them a gelding by Welcome 2:10} 
called Cavalier that is said to be a free-for-all candi- 
date. There is no doubt but the $1000 stake will be 
so hotly contested at Pleasanton that unless one of 
the starters should display surprising form and com- 
pletely outclass his field, the question as to which is 
the best horse will be still open when nearly the same 
field of horses meet the next week at the Breeders 
meeting at San Jose for a stake of $1500. 



purses areas follows: First day, 2:30 trot $500,2:08 
pace $900, 2:20 trot $700; second day, 2:25 pace $500, 
2:12 trot $800, 2:17 pace $700; third day, 2:13 pace $800, 
2:24 trot $600, free-for-all pace $1000; fourth day, 2:15 
trot $800, 2:21 pace $700, free-for all trot $1000. Now 
this is a good program, but it is no better and not 
near as extensive as the harness program given by 
the California State Agricultural Society at Sacra- 
mento every year. "Distance lends enchantment to 
the view," but California horsemen who look long- 
ingly over the Rockies and imagine that the harness 
meetings there are big events, will, if they investigate 
a little, find that States of no greater population than 
California have no bigger meetings, and not as large 
purses as are given here. Anyone who will take up 
the Year Book and look over the meetings where 2:10 
horses are racing for from $300 to $500 on half-mile 
tracks will find that the list is quite long. California, 
owing to the cutting out of appropriations for district 
fairs, has been a little short on meetings for the past 
two years, but those given will rank well with the 
majority of those held in the eastern and middle 
states. 

A orusade has been started in the East against race 
track betting that is very likely to assume immense 
proportions before long and lead to the closing of 
many prominent tracks. The big dailies of New York 
and Chicago are taking the matter up, the weekly 
papers and the magazines contain lengthy articles 
signed by mayors, governors and other high officials, 
and the politicians are beginning to see an issue in 
the race tracks and pool rooms. Breeders and owners 
of harness horses are pleased to notice that the attack 
is not against harness racing which is only a diversion 
indulged in for a week or two each year at any race 
track. It is the running races that have aroused the 
public to ''view with alarm" the tremendous growth 
of gambling, and whatever action is taken towards 
abolishing betting will be because the business men 
of the country have come to the conclusion that 
gambling on running horses has become a craze and 
-should be curtailed. In New York such a great news- 
paper aB the Sun, recognizing the great evils of con- 
tinuous gambling, and desiring to lend no aid to it, 
has discontinued the publication of the daily form 
chart of tbe races. The Sun sees no evil in the racing 
of horses for sport, but deprecates it as a business 
pursued solely for gambling purposes. The views ex- 
pressed by such journals as the Sun and the Times of 
New York are the views of the general public in the 
matter Here in California there is as yet no 
organized attack on continuous racing, but it is sure 
to come as the sun will continue to shine. Already 
mutterings are heard, and it need not surprise anyone 
if the Legislature to meet at Sacramento next winter 
is called upon to vote on bills abolishing race track 
betting altogether. 



outs are not races and the chances are against last 
years California record of 2:12} being beaten. 



And while Miss Georgie is out of the stake it might 
bewail to remember that her breeder and former 
owner Martin Carter, proprietor of the Nutwood 
Stock Farm, sold his nominations to Mr. John D. 
Springer who named his good pacer Billy Red for tbe 
stakes in which the McKinney mare was engaged. 
Billy Rsd Is a green horse, never having been raced 
but be is very fast, has good manners and has paced 
some of tbe fastest halves ever seen on the Pleasanton 
track. Mose Hart discovered Billy Red and bought 
him from Geo. A. Kelly, superintendent of tbe Pleas- 
anton track. Mr. Hart got him to going nicely, 
showed one or two fast quarters with him and when 
Mr. Springer asked for a price did not ask for the 
earth but fixed a fair figure and the sale was made. 
In Mr. Springer's hands Billy Red has constantly im- 
proved, though we do not believe anyone, not even 
his owner, knows how fast tbe horse can pace a mile. 
The horse that beats him will get some of the money 
though. 

Indiana Is one of tbe Important States of the Union 
In harness horse breeding as In everything else. It 
has about three million people within Its borders, or 
about twice as many as California has, yet our State 
la over four times as large as the Hoosler State In 
area. I received this week from Secretary Charles 
Downing, of the Indiana State Fair Association, a 
copy of the official premium list and speed program 
of the fair to be held In September this year, which 
led me to look up the facts about population and area 
here stated. There will be sixty-four district fairs 
held In Indiana this year at nearly every one of wbloh 
then will be harness racing and at the majority of 
then' the tracks are only half-mile rings. Now what 
strr k me very forcibly was that the racing program 
h big State Fair In Indiana Is of but four days' 
r.Mon and the events are all harness events. The 



This anti-gambling crusade is not confined to the 
purists and the newspapers. Business houses and cor- 
porations employing large numbers of people have 
taken the matter up, and orders have been issued by 
many firms to the effect that employes visiting race 
tracks and pool rooms will be discharged. The surety 
companies furnishing bonds for persons occupying 
positions of trust are refusing to write bonds for race 
playerB on any terms. These acts on the part of busi- 
ness men are having their effect and running racing 
is rapidly losing its position as the greatest of sports. 
There is nothing strange that such a condition of 
things should obtain. Whenever any sport falls into 
the hands of those whose only interest in it is the 
opportunity it affords them to gamble, it deteriorates 
and soon arouseB the antagonism of organized society. 
Owners and breeders and those who are identified 
with the American trotting horse in any way should 
learn a lesson from the condition that now confronts 
the running associations and steer clear of all those 
advisors who have been and are now advocating the 
introduction of running methods on the trotting 
tracks. 

Sonoma Girl, the daughter of Lynwood W. and 
Maud Fowler, will not be raoed in California this 
year. She has not been Bold, although I understand 
Mr. Springer has refused one big offer for her and is 
considering a raise on that. He is not anxious to sel] 
as he believes he has in this handsome mare a trotter 
that can win in almost any company, and as he wants 
to race her through the Grand Circuit next year doeB 
not want her to get a record this Beason that will bar 
her from the big stakes like the M. & M. So Mr. 
Springer has declared Sonoma Girl out of all the 
stakes In which she was entered in California and it 
will be much harder to pick the winners in these 
events as Bhe doubtless outclassed every field of horses 
she would have mot on the California circuit. There 
are several trotters that will start in these stakes that 
can beat 2:15 and three or four that ought to show a 
mile close to 2:10 under favorable auspices, but work- 



The McKinney family will not be denied. A world's 
record went to one of them two weeks ago to-day at 
Cleveland when Mr. C. K. G. Billings rode Charley 
Mac a mile to saddle in 2:15} which is a quarter of a 
Becond under the record of Great Eastern which has 
stood since September 22, 1877. Mr. Billings has now 
given Charley Mac three public trials at this way of 
going. The first time he trotted the mile in 2:17}, a 
week later made it in 2:17} and has now beaten Great 
Eastern's time. It is very probable that Mr. Billings 
will set a saddle record of 2:12 or better for Charley 
Mac before the year is over. 

It looks very much as if the running racing game is 
being overdone in this country. There is not a day 
except Sundays but horses are racing on some tracks 
in the United StateB, and many of the associations 
make big profits. But the sales of thoroughbred 
yearlings Bhow a big decline in prices this year. 
After the sale of the Haggin horses in New Y"ork last 
month, more than a hundred were sent back to his 
big farm at Elmendorf, Kentucky. Mr. Haggin was 
interviewed by a representative of the Kentucky Far- 
mer and Breeder in regard to the matter and in the 
statement given out by Mr. Haggin, that gentleman 
said: 

"I Bent a number of yearlings back to Kentucky 
because no one wanted them, and I couldn 't sell them. 
The prices were very low, and there was little demand, 
I think this was probably due to a scarcity of money 
among horsemen, and possibly to a slight over pro- 
duction. I shall probably breed fewer horses next 
year." 

Thos. Smith, manager of the Vallejo meeting, has 
made arrangements with the Ward Totalizator Com- 
pany to hare one of its machines at his meeting 
which opens August 11th. It may be that these 
machines will be used at Pleasanton and San Jose but 
as the betting privileges for those meetings have not 
been let at this time, the statement that they will be 
used cannot be made. The idea Is becoming very 
prevalent among those who would like to see the 
district fair race meetingB resumed in California, that 
the totalizator is the key to the situation. The asso- 
ciations should own and operate their own machines 
and take out ten per cent commission as they do in 
Australia and New Zealand. In France the amount 
of money that goes through these machines in a year 
runs up into the millions, yet 12 per cent is taken out 
in that country. Even 12 per cent is much less than 
the amount taken out by the skindicate books who 
never figure on keeping less than forty per cent of 
the money that passes through their hands. If the 
California State Fair association owned a totalizator 
and employed clerks to operate it, the tone of the 
State meeting would be vastly improved, and the 
profits greater. 

Almaden, one of the best two-year-oldB ever Been in 
California and the favorite for the three-year-old 
trotting division of the Pacific Breeders Futurity and 
the Occident stake, will not be a starter after all. The 
lameness which threw him out of training a few days 
ago will prevent his being a starter, and although it 
is only a minor ailment and one that a few weeks' 
rest will entirely cure, those few weeks are a factor 
that must be reckoned with, and his owner has wisely 
concluded that it is best to take no chances with such 
a valuable colt for the sake of winning a few thousand 
dollars. I have heard men say who are pretty good 
judges of a trotter that Almaden could win his races 
this year on three legs. It is very poor policy, how- 
ever, to start a three-} ear-old that can be sold for 
$10,000 in a race when he is not just right. It is much 
better to scratch and wait awhile. Almaden is, with- 
out doubt, one of the handsomest, best formed, 
gamest and best gaited colts ever seen in California. 
He Is by Direct 2:05} out of Rose McKinney by Mc- 
Kinney 2:11} and looks like both his sires although 
they were unlike in appearance. When a colt in- 
herits the good points from both Bides of two such 
houses, he will do to play your money on when he is 
right. If Almaden had not gone wrong the Occident 
record would have been lowered this year, but as it 
is I don't think the winner will have to beat Tuna's 
fasteBt heat in it la6t year, which was 2:18}. She had 
to trot a heat in 2:16} to beat Swift B. in the Stanford 
one week later, however. 



If you want that split Becond timer guess the three 
best horses in the $2000 stake for 2:24 trotters at San 
Jose. Fill out the coupon with your guess or make as 
many as you wish and send them in to this offiee. The 
one who sends in the first correct guess wllllbe awarded 
the time piece. It 1b worth $25 and is as good a timer 
as is made for that money. 



Hon. John L. Mitchell, ex-Senator of the United 
States and an extensive breeder of trotters, died at 
his home in Greenfield, Wis., on June 29. For many 
years he was president of the Northwestern Breeders' 
Association. 



JULY 16, 1904] 



®tte greater tmi» ^povtatnan 



6 




The starting payments which must he paid by Mon- 
day, July 25th, on colts and fillies that start in the 
Pacific Breeders Futurities at San Jose this year are 
as follows: On two-year-old pacers, $25; on two-year- 
old trotters, $35; on three-year-old pacers, $35; on 
three-year-old trotters, $50. 



The bell will ring 



One week from Wed nesday 



At the Pleasanton race track. 



You will score by the pole horse. 



And don't come down ahead of him or you will be 
fined. 

An Eastern journal says that a very large propor- 
tion of the foals of 1904 by McKinney are fillies. 



Ted HayeB went to Davenport, Iowa, with W. A. 
Clark, Jr's string of horses at the clOBe of the Denver 
meeting. 

Dolly Dillon won the International handicap at 
Vienna on July 2d. The distance was 2700 metres 
and her time 3:50. 

It is reported that Ed Geers has decided to start 
Stafciey Dillon in the M. & M. instead of the much 
touted Alexander. 

Ellert 2:11, the bay gelding by Stamboul, passed 
through an auction sale at Philadelphia last week 
and brought $700. 

The United States exported 31,397 horses during 
the fiscal year just closed. This is an increase over 
the previous year of 5667. 



James Y. Gatcomb says that he has refused an offer 
of $17,500 for his three-year-old filly Grace Bond (2) 
2:14$. She is, of course, well staked. 

Twenty-six three-year-old colts and fillies were eli- 
gible to the Occident Stake of this year after third 
payments were made on January 2d. 

Don't forget that starting payments for the two- 
year-old and three year-old divisions of the Pacific 
$6000 Futurities must be paid by July 25th. 



The Grand Circuit opens one week from Monday 
next at Detroit. The Chamber of Commerce Stake, 
$5000 for 2:24 class pacers is down for decision on the 
opening day. 

If you want to get a line on the horses and see some 
of the best harness racing seen In California for years, 
be at the PleasantOD meeting on the opening day, 
Wednesday, July 27th. 

Goodwin's Turf Guide, containing summaries of all 
the running races held in the United States during 
the first half of the year 1904, has been issued and is 
for sale at thl*offlce. Price $1.50. 



The guesses are coming in lively for The California 
stake for 2:24 class trotters to be decided at the 
Breeder's San Jose meeting. Now that Sonoma Girl 
has been declared out of the races many of the guesses 
will have to be revised. 



The Sacramento Chamber of Com merce will aid the 
Directors of the State Agricultural Society in getting 
a big display for the State Fair this year and to that 
end will raise a fund of $3000 among the citizens of 
the capital city. 

Almaden, winner of last year's two-year-old division 
of Breeders Futurity No. 1, will not be a starter in the 
three-year-old division at San Jose next month. He 
is lame and is too valuable a colt to take any chances 
with even for first money in a rich stake like this. 



Of the MoKlnneys that should get into the 2:10 list 
this year are Miss Georgie 2:11$;, Sweet Marie 2:13$, 
China Maid that has work a mile for Millard Sanders 
lately in 2:08} and Marengo King that Ed Geers re- 
cently drove a mile in 2:13. And there are others. 



It is reported that Margaret Worth 2:15 by Alex- 
ander Button, dam Adelina Patti by Effingham, is 
dead. She was owned by Mr. Caryl Burr of New 
York, and bred by Mr Randolph Jordan, Jr. of San 
FranciBCO. Margaret Worth took her record of 2:15 
at Los Angeles in 1897. Mr. Jordan bred her dam to 
McKinney and raised the good gelding El Milagro, 
which he sold in New York as a yearling for $700, 
and which afterwards took a record of 2:11$. 



Dr. Boucher took his colt Bert Logan from Denver 
to Moberly, Missouri, and will race him through the 
Mississippi Valley circuit. Bert Logan worked a mile 
in 2:16 in the mud over the Denver track, which was 
a remarkable performance He is going fast and 
Bteady and should beat 2:10 this year. 



After George G. trotted in 2:07} during laBt Satur- 
day's matinee at Cleveland, J. Albertson brought 
him out again and brushed him through the last 
quarter in the face of the heavy wind. It was timed 
in 28} seconds, making the faBtest authenticallv timed 
quarter ever made by a trotter, next to Lou Dillon. 



Alto Arnold by Altamont has a fine bay filly by 
Diablo that is entered in the Breeders Futurity for 
foals of 1904. Alto Arnold was named in this stake 
by D. M. Webster of Vancouver, B. C. Mr. Webster 
stateB that the filly is a dark bay with black points 
and one of the finest looking youngsters in the North- 
west. - 

There will be auction sale At horees at Agricultural 
Park, San Joae, to-day. Sixteen .head of trotting 
bred horses, all registered, are to be sold to the 
highest bidder. Miss Gordon, the registered mare 
by Bismark and the dam of what is claimed to be 
now the fastest two-year-old in California, will be 
among those offered. 




The above is reproduced from a photograph of the 
two-year-old bay filly Devilletta b'y.Dia.'bld 2:09|, dam 
Clara H. by Hark, son of Brigadier:. She is owned by 
Mr. W. S. Harkey of Gridleyi Cal. 



Governor Otero of New Mexico is trying to intro- 
duce th« New Mexican broncho into the Philippine 
Islands. A bunch of about forty head will be shipped 
from Doming in a few days, and will be sent to the 
Philippines by transport, accompanied by a New Mex- 
ican cowboy. If they do well over there some heavy 
shipments will be made. 



Josh Albertson, who is at Cleveland with the trot- 
ter George G. 2:12}, showed the spectators at the 
track there on July 2d that the son of Homeward is 
all that is claimed for him by California horsemen. 
He drove the gelding a mile in 2:07| in the face cf a 
strong wind, and then gave him a quarter in 28} 
seconds just to show them that George G. has better 
than two minute speed. 



Hugh CaBey of Sacramento has one of the hand- 
somest colts in the State. It is by F. W. Perkins' 
stallion Athamax and out of Mr. Casey's mare by 
Fallis. AH who have seen the youngster proaounce 
it one of the most perfeotly formed colts they have 
ever seen. 

Walter Wilkes, the green trotter that Jack Groom 
is training at San Jose, and will start at the Santa 
Rosa meeting is an aged horse by Sable Wilkes out of 
a mare by Patchen Vernon. He is a good gaited one 
and has great speed. He is owned by V. J. GuinasBO 
of this city. 

Joe Cuicello reached Pleasanton from Denver with 
his string of horses this week. He says there was a 
good meeting at Denver and he came out a li ttle ahead 
by winning third and second moneys. Ed Lafferty 
went on EaBt In charge of Ed Gay lord's James Madi- 
son mare Confienza, sister to Tuna. 



Notes for Secretaries of Members is the title of a 
neat little pamphlet just issued by the National Trot- 
ting Association. It contains the gist of the most 
important of the rules in regard to entries, fines, 
identification, protests, suspensions, and other things 
that all secretaries Bhould be familiar with, but which 
so many new secretaries have little knowledge of. 
The pamphlet can be carried in the pocket and every 
secretary should keep one with him before and during 
a meeting. 

In New Zealand all trotters and pacers must be 
registered with the Secretary of the New Zealand 
Trotting Association before they can race. We have 
juBt received from Secretary Rollitt, a book of one 
hundred pages containing the names of all horses 
registered with him from August 1899 to AuguBt 1903. 
•The name of the horse, color, sex, age, sire and dam, 
height and markings are given. These books are for 
sale by the Secretary at Chrlstchurch, New Zealand, 
for two shillings per copy. 



A dispatch from New Orleans, dated July 12th, 
stateB: Creole ponies from the prairies of South- 
western Louisiana and broncos from the plains of 
Texas may be seeing war service within two monthB. 
It is learned that a Texas firm has been approached 
by Minister Takahira of Japan with a view to pro- 
curing 100,000 head of horses of the type now used by 
the Japanese cavalry. The Creole ponies and Texas 
broncos, with wonderful staying qualities, easily fed 
and kept, are considered ideal mounts for the Japanese 
sabermen and it is understood that negotiations have 
been opened with the traffic department of the 
Southern Pacific Railroad for a large number of stock 
cars so that everything may be in readiness to rush 
the ponieB to San Francisco and thence by ship direct 
to Korea. 



Two McKinney colts, entered in the Occident Stan- 
ford and Breeders Futurity for this year, and eligible 
to start, are owned by Mr. James Gray of Santa Rosa, 
who desires to sell one and start the other. Either of 
theBe colts are liable to win. They are now at Santa 
RoBa track but will be taken to Pleasanton after Tues- 
day next. One is out of a mare by Bay Rose, son of 
Sultan and the other out of Biscari, dam of four in 
the list, by Director. Mr. Gray will sell either one of 
them. Here is a good opportunity to get a choicely 
bred McKinney colt that iB a trotter, at a reasonable 
figure. 

A New Zealand paper Bays: "Apparently there is 
not much chance of the Almont-Ribbonwood match 
eventuating in New Zealand; for, from the tone of the 
communications received here, Almont's owners are 
not inclined to take on the contract. Anxious to make 
a match for his champion, D. J. Price has issued a 
challenge in the Australian papers, offering to raoe 
Ribbonwood against anything in the commonwealth, 
for any amount and over any distance. By giving 
the Australian horses everything in their favor, Price 
anticipates his challenge being taken up, in which 
event he will endeavor to have the match arranged 
as early as possible." 

Brayton Ives, it is stated, will not starteither Monte 
Carlo 2:07$ or Nora McKinney 2:12$ in any of the 
matinees to be held at the Empire track during the 
next few weeks. Mr. Ives' horseB have had Beveral 
pretty stiff races thus far, and he is of the opinion 
that they will be far better next fall if let up during 
the extremely hot weather. Although he haB beaten 
John F. Cockerill's game gelding Swift 2:07 on both 
occasions that the two met, there are many of the 
opinion that Swift would give the Ives horse a beat- 
ing after he has had another race or two, and the 
enthusiasts will therefore be disappointed if the two 
favorites do not come together again. — Horse Seview 



What will be the fastest field of trotters that ever 
faced a starter is scheduled to participate in the 
championship race at the intercity matinee in Cleve- 
land next month, the following six having been 
practically named: C. K. G. Billings' Lou Dillon 1:58}, 
E. E.Smathers' Major Delmar 1:59}; Anthony Brady's 
George G. 2:12}, Brayton IveB' Monte Carlo 2:07$. 
Lou Dillon is already Btepping miles lower than 2:05, 
while news comes from New York that Monte Carlo 
has been drawing a wagon in the matinees two heats 
better than 2:09. Major Delmar wintered finely and 
s as fast as ever. Anzella 1b again showing her great 
ispeed, as she worked a mile in 2:11 easily a few days 
ago at Glenville. Angle iB very fast, just how fast 
no one knows, but Calvary Morris thinks her good 
enough to send into this great race. George G. will 
also represent the Cleveland Club, and a mile in two 
minutes is what his former owner expects him to reel 
off before the season is over. 



Mr. D. F. Oglesby, owner of the stallion Almonada, 
writes the Breeder and Sportsman that he waB in 
Lob Angeles receutly and interviewed Walter Maben, 
who informed him that he had driven The Scout by 
his horse a mile in 2:14$. That he had a small splint 
on one of his legs, so would not go on the circuit. Mr. 
Maben further said he had driven the pacer La 
Paloma by Almonada a mile in 2:22 with less than 
three months' work. Mr. OgleBby says he saw Maben 
drive the green horse Bob Russell by Bob Mason a 
mile in 2:10|. Maben's horses all look in fine condi- 
tion and ready for the raceB. Mr. Henry Delaney has 
Zolock '2: Hi; in fine fix and the horse is fast approach- 
ing racing condition. Mr. Delaney has the three- 
year-old Almo by Almonada that trotted a mile in 
2:40 after he had him two weeks, and would have soon 
been in the list had he not taken the epizootic. Mr. 
Oglesby says he saw two Zolock eolts, one a pacer and 
the other a trotter, that made their miles in 2:18 and 
2:30 respectively. 

The sporting editor of the Toledo Times-Bee directs 
attention to a new source of trouble which trotting 
horse owners experience from automobiles. We copy 
his own description: "A few evenings since, I saw a 
horse driven leisurely along Bancroft street suddenly 
sprawl out and in an instant was down. There was 
no 'going to Bleep' or 'tangle-legs' excuse for the fall, 
and after the horse had risen to his feet and the 
owner had tied up a broken thill and driven away, I 
investigated the cause, and found that the horse had 
slipped on a spot covered with grease and oil. Then 
I recalled an automobile having been stalled on that 
very spot the evening before for a half hour. The 
-next morning, on my way down Madison street, in 
company with a well known horseman, we saw two 
horses slip and fall on the pavement, within two 
blocks of one another. We investigated and found 
the same conditions as I had discovered on Bancroft 
street the evening before. Thus does a new danger 
loom up before the horseman's eyes." 



The fastest two-year-old of the year is Sally Lunn 
2:28$, owned by W. A. Clark, Jr., of Montana 
and trained at Pleasanton during the spring. She is 
a bay filly, foaled May 6, 1902, sired by Wiggins 
2.19J; dam Belle de Baron by Alsatian (a son of 
Sultan and Alma Mater); second dam Greenwood 
Belle 2:29} by Caliban; third dam Greenwood Maid by 
Strathmore; fourth dam by Belmont; fifth dam 
Venus (third dam of Kremlin 2:07}) by American 
Star, etc. This filly was bred by L. B. M. Bedford, 
PariB, Kentucky, and bought in February, 1903, from 
him by Mr. George Hossack, Cobbs Creek, Virginia, 
for Mrs. Rosalyn Land on of the same place. Mr. 
Hossack developed her through the summer, and she 
showed sensational speed. Her owner entered Sally 
Lunn in the Old Glory Bale, held last year in New 
York, and in her preparation for that sale she step- 
ped a full mile, on October 21, 1903, in 3:34}, last half 
in 1:16}, without a break. She was knocked down 
for $1050 to A. M. Carr of Butte, Montana, who was 
Mr. Clark's agent in the transaction. 



6 



mte gveeixev crofc gpottztnan 



[J-DLY 16, 1904 



£»fe^s2ts 



EASTERN GOSSIP. II 



ICulltJ From Our Ej-changtc] pHj 



There are many breeders who do not realize the 
importance of keeping their stock before the public. 
We frequently receive letters of inquiry asking who 
owns certain stallions, what their fees are, etc. These 
questions in many instances refer to stallions that 
should have a national reputation, being noted 
through the performance of their get, but the short- 
sighted policy of their owners precludes the possi- 
bility of their becoming known outside of their im- 
mediate neighborhood. Every owner of a stallion 
that has any desire to let the public know that he is 
in the horse business should keep a standing adver- 
tisement in at least one turf paper, so that the public 
may know that he is in the business to stay. Judicious 
advertising never "broke" any man but has made 
colossal fortunes for thousands. A breeder can have 
no better possible policy than to disseminate as much 
knowledge as he can about his stallions — thev breed- 
ing, service fee, where they are in service, etc., so 
that when one of them sends out a phenomenon that 
electrifies the world with its speed, the mere mention 
of its sire will convey a great deal of information to 
the public which is likely to bring handsome returns 
to the sire's owner. Breeding establishments like 
East View Farm, Hudson River Farm, Allen Farm, 
Walnut Hall Farm and others which are achieving 
the greatest success in their business, realize this fact 
and keep their advertisements in the turf papers all 
the time. Every man who owns a stallion whose 
services are open to the public should adopt the same 
policy. No matter if the advertisement is only a line 
giving the name of the stallion, his fee, and where he 
stands, it should be kept before the public all the 
time. — Trotter and Pacer. 



export trade. The motto should be to breed only the 
best, for in high quality is where the greatest profit 
lies in the industry. Let any skeptical farmer convince 
himself of the greater profit in breeding good draft 
horses that sell readily at maturity at $175 to $300 and 
upward, as compared with the profit in raising steers 
for the market. A well kept draft foal three years 
old will sell at $150 to $225 and how much will a steer 
at the same age command that ha9 been fed specifi- 
cally for the block? A simple problem in the cost of 
production compared with the selling price at the 
same age will demonstrate which kind of stock pays 
the larger profit over the cost of production. 



Geo. Beckers writes the following characteristic 
letter to the Kentucky Stock Farm: "I see that the 
young Zombros are stepping some in California. Lee 
Mayberry's Geraldine, a three-year-old filly, trotted 
a mile in 2:20*, last half in 1:08}. Will Durfee's two- 
year-old filly Bellemont by Zombro, dam by Altamont 
trotted a mile in 2:28}, last quarter in ;J4i second;, 
and I. C. Mosher's two-year-old colt Orsola trotted a 
mile in 2:24}, last half in 1:10}. All the above named 
colts are at Los Angeles. I expect five or more two- 
year-olds by Zombro to enter the list this year, and 
about three of his three-year-olds to step in 2:20 or 
better, and five or more to enter the 2:15 list and two 
the 2:10 list. I guess this will be a good average 
showing for a young sire with as few colts as Zombro 
has. I made a big miBtake by coming EaBt. With 
what it will cost me while I am East and what mares 
I missed by leaving California, I will be out about 
$4000 this year. California is good enough for me 
from now on. The great trouble with me is I don't 
know when I am doing well, and d'ju't leave well 
enough alone. I have learned a good lesson this year. 
Of course, we have not got the class of mares West as 
you have here, but that doesn't seem to make much 
difference with Zombro, as he gets trotters from all 
kinds of mares. I worked Zombowyette 2:18 a mile 
In 2:174, last half in 1:07*, and Tee Dee Cee 2:19} a 
mile In 2:26 to a cart." 



(Ye have several times made allusion to the cause of 
the scarcity of good draft horses. Recently the 
l>r"fi i\s' Journal stated that the chief reason was 
because of the ruinous prices prevailing in 1893 to 
1896, when farmer became discouraged, quit breeding 
and sold their good draft mares. Under such con- 
ditions it takes several years to recover from such 
losses and to again obtain good breeding mares and 
grow a supply. Briefly thiB has been .the situation 
for sime time past. The Journal, referring to the 
result of this death, says: For four years there has 
been a steady appreciation of values for draft animals 
which culminated in the sensational prices $500 to 
8600 for fancy offerings at the Chicago market the 
ourrent season. It Is most unfortunate for the agri- 
cultural interests of the country that when prices are 
so phenomenally high but a moderate surplus exists 
to supply the demand. Thoro has been a Rip Van 
Winkle resurroction of the industry after It inertia of 
nearly a decade and farmors everywhere are once 
more roused to activity to exploit the industry by the 
current blgh prices and the encouraging prospect of 
the domestic and forolgn demand. The best draft 
st' Ulons In Europe have been Imported during the 
f *st four years to Improve the quality of our domestic 
fc >rses. 'i ho standard of brooding has been elovated 

nd the outlook Is propitious for the draft horse 
!.. lustry of the west and northwest, which furnishes 
the bulk of the horses which supply tbo domestic and 



Secretary W. H. Wilson of the Lexington, Ky., 
track has issued the list of entries made in the races 
which will be trotted and paced at the October meet- 
ing this season in the capital of the blue-grass region. 
In the $22,000 Futurity for three-year-olds there are 
seventy four colts and fillies on which payments have 
been made, and in the two-year-old division of the 
same race the eligibles are almost as many. In the 
other fixed events of the Kentucky Trotting Horse 
Breeders Association the number of horses named is 
highly encouraging to the association, and it goes 
without saying that the best horses in the country 
are named in these rich events. The Walnut Hall 
Cup stake for 2:15 trotters, for instance, has thirty- 
eight horses named to go in it. 



The sensation of the day at the N9w York Fourth 
of July matinee ""as furnished by Jack Curry. In 
fact, if there are any sensations floating about, Jack 
is generally found in the storm center. Mr. M. J. 
Hanley, the Providence horseman, visited the track 
to see his remarkable pacer. Prince Alert 1:57, and 
Curry concluded th»t the Prince was in first-class 
shape to show "the boss" that he is still able to get 
over the ground at lightning speed, although early 
in the season for extremely fast miles. Usually at 
this time of the year the horse has not been asked to 
go faster than around 2:10 or so. Jack gave him two 
slow miles without the hopples and then ordered him 
to .be dressed up for a time-killing work. All the 
clocks along the fence were out as Jack breezed away 
on his journey after a couple of scores. Ae he passed 
the fir6t quarter, going as if it was only play in 33J 
seconds, it was remarked that Jack was not going to 
try that time; but there was a very perceptible in- 
crease in his 6peed going the second quarter, which 
seems to be the fastest part of the track, and he was 
caught at the half in 1:04}. From that point. the 
great sidewheeler split the air, going the quarter, 
around the upper turn in 29} seconds, and as he 
swung into the stretch, exclamations all along the 
line of "Great goodness, ain't he flying? See him 
come! He'll beat 2:04 after all!" were heard. The 
last half was covered in 59} seconds, the last eighth 
in 15 and the mile in 2:03|, the fastest mile of the year. 
The king of pacing geldings did not appear to be the 
least bothered by his effort, which was really wonder- 
ful considering all the oircumstanceB. He went the 
mile entirely on his own courage and apparently made 
no more effort than when he stepped one in 2:15 or 
Blower. It is early in the season, so considered at 
least by all the trainers, and, added to all that, this 
will be the ninth season for the hor6e, and there is not 
so much as a windpuff on him. Mr. Hanley smiled 
quietly as he returned the watch to his pocket, and 
remarked that he could drive him as Blow as that 
himself and he would not consider that the old horse 
was going much short of a mile in 1:55. 

"Well, if we both keep well," replied Curry, "I will 
show you one around that notch or better." 

"Curry waB always inclined to be optimistic, " re- 
marked one of the horsemen standing near, which is 
quite true; but he almost always makes his optimistic 
prognostication b hit close around the truth, and what 
there is in a horse ni\\ usually show on the best side 
under his ministrations. — Trotter and Pacer. 



half-mile track. She has been placed in charge of the 
veteran campaigner Monroe Salisbury, and has been 
shipped to Oakley Park. What a broodmare she 
should make when retired from the track. — American 
Morse Breeder. 

There is no doubt but that the craze for gambling 
on races, which, by the way, is almost entirely con- 
fined to running races, so far as it affects the young 
men in the employ of the corporations and city busi- 
ness houses is harmful, and that the threat made by 
certain employers to discharge such of their employ- 
ees as continue to bet, or to be seen on a race track, 
or in a pool-room, or in company with persons whose 
business is to place bets on races, will do more to put 
a stop to this form of gambling than all the raids that 
could be made on poolroomB, and the most drastic 
legislation that could be enacted would do. Betting 
on races is no worse than betting on the future value 
of stocks, of oil or of wheat, if the man who does the 
betting can afford to lose the amount of money he is 
calJed upon to risk. The men who are warning their 
employes that they will lose their situation if they bet 
on races are, in many cases, continually engaged in 
speculation of a similar character, the difference being 
that they are abundantly able to stand such losses as 
they are called upon to meet when their judgment 
proves to be faulty. Harness racing, as a sport, is to 
be congratulated on the fact that in no poolrooms are 
bets made on this clasB of racing. What betting is 
done on it is confined to the track on which the racing 
is done and as a rule the men who bet on them may be 
divided into two classes, those who own the horses 
and can afford to do so and those who place now and 
then a moderate wager to test their judgment." The 
craze for betting, day in and day out, which prevails 
among the clerical forces of corporations and business 
establishments, is almost entirely confined to the run- 
ning branch of horse racing. — Morse World. 

For the past two years George Odom, the leading 
jockey of America, has been under contract to Capt. 
S. S. Brown, the Pittsburg millionaire, who pays him 
an annual retainer of $15,000. Then he sells what is 
known on the turf as "second call" to John Madden 
for an amount approaching half of the first contract 
price. When neither owner is starting a horse Odom 
has the privilege of accepting out&ide mounts. From 
this source a rider of hiE Bkill accumulates aB much 
money as he receives from regular contracts. In gifts 
and prizes in special races he receives an additional 
amount. Odom cannot give the exact figures of 'his 
income this seaBon until, at the end of the year, he 
has summed up his outside amounts and perquisites. 
Safely he may count on $30,000 as the figures which 
he may credit for one year of wearing, the silks and 
satins and riding American race horses to splendid 
and, some times unexpected, victory. The figures 
will startle you, and at first you will be much inclined 
to wonder. Then, as you look at his attenuated 
figure and the old, old face, and note the heaviness of 
his speech and the some times pathos of his voice, 
then it is thrust in upon you that, after all, at twenty- 
one, it iB hardly worth while; and that George Odom, 
the jockey, earning more each y ar than directors of 
great human events, is underpaid. The reward 
doesn't seem to be commensurate with the labor. 
There is brilliancy, acclaim, praise : n extravagance, 
sycophantic following — all of that for the little old 
man-boy who rides. But he has lost so much, and life 
for him in its active moments has been such a carp- 
ing, racking life, that he has paid a great price for the 
pride of his place. George Odom, jockey, is ofttimes 
a pitiable figure. — Everybody's Magazine. 



It is announced that James Butler of New York 
City has bought through A. J. Meston from R. W, 
Rosemire, Goshen, N. Y., the promising five-year-old 
trotting mare, Minter (three-year-old reoord 2:28}), 
and the price stated is $5000. Minter was bred by C. 
W. Williams of GaleBburg, 111. Her Bire is Expedition 
2:15J, and her dam is the great broodmare Minna 
Wilkes (dam of Refina 2:08}, ect ) by George Wilkes 
2:22, Becond dam the great broodmare Minna (dam of 
Kentucky Wilkes 2:21',, Madison Wilkes 2:24}, etc) 
by Red Jacket, third dam Undine by the noted four- 
mile race horse Grey Eagle. Expedition 2:16}, aire 
of Minter, was got by the renowned Electioneer, and 
his dam, Lady Russell, is a full sister of the once 
world's champion tiotter Maud S. 2:08}, and also a 
full sister of Lord Russell, Biro of Kremlin 2:073, etc. 
This is as choice breeding as tho most critical could 
wish. It Is stated upon good authority that Minter 
recently trotted a mile In 2:10 on the Goshen N. Y.) 



Kenney, the bike man is still supplying owners of 
fast trotters and pacers with McMurray sulkies and 
carts. He sold two speed carts this week, one to Mr. 
P. Giovannoni, the well known commission man of 
this city, and another to Mr. E. C. Chase, of this city, 
who recently purchased the handsome young stallion 
Duke of Monterey from P. J. Williams. If you want 
a new bike or cart or an old one put in order, better 
see Kenney at 531 Valencia Btreet. 



J. A. Richardssn, Boise, Idaho, is on a business trip 
to Chicago and will remain in that city the greater 
part of the summer. He will have his stable of 
horses raced over the Great Western Circuit this 
year. The 6tar of his stable is tho four-year-old 
trotter Swift B., which last year as a three-year-old 
took a record of 2:16}. This gelding is by Stam B. 
and his dam is Swift Bird 2:183, by Waldstein. -Mr. 
Richardson raced his horses on the California circuit 
last year and the gelding took his record at Salem, 
Ore., on September 17. 

Mush 2:0S} has had more bad luck. He recently 
picked up a nail and did not go with the Butler horses 
to Columbus. 

m 

Jackson's Napa Soda does not tangle the feat. 



JULY 16, 1904] 



©Jte gvsebev cm& ^povtsnxan 



Sport in British Columbia. 2:10 list in 1801, and only one— Fereno 2:05J— has since blame, you must lay a part of the cause of the trouble 

done so. In 1901 the result was better; that season where it belongs, and that is to the "cheap horse 

Meetings where racing and broncho "busting" are eight trotters made rECords between 2:10 and 2:11, of owner; " the man that wants his horse shod so the 

the main sports are annually held at different points which Susie J. scored 2:06} and Anzella 2:06f in 1902, shoes will stay on for four or five months or longer if 

in the northwest and are largely attended. Many of while a third, Mabel Onward, scored 2:09} in 1903. In it be possible. Then he comes in with a great long 

these are private affairs, the entire expenses being 1902, however, it was the old story over again — twelve growth of surplus foot for the sboer to remove, and 

borne by some wealthy rancher or stockman who in- trotters ended the season just outside the list, and the sheer discovers a corn. And the horse being 

vites all his neighbors and acquaintances within a on iy two— McKinley 2:07} and Dr. Strong 2:091— properly shod in the first place, who is to blanao, the 

radius of a hundred miles and eDtertains them for entered it in 1903. They had, however, a remarkable shoer or the owner? As I said before, corns as I 

several days. An account of one of these meetings comrade in Lily Young 2:09}, whose previous record believe, are caused by contraction. I do not mean to 

printed in the Victoria Colonist has been sent us by of 2:10} had been made, seven years before, in 1896 — a say by this that afoot has to be pinched up narrow 

our friend, C. A. Harrison, proprietor of the Hotel unique case without precedent. Casting up, then, we and contracted all out of shape, such afoot as a 

Driard at Victoria, and is as follows: have this net result: During 1900, 1901 and 1902, 35 genuine case of contraction shows. But I do say 

Grande Prairie, B. C, July 4. — After four days of trotters made records between 2:10 and 2:11, but dur- where you find a corn you will find contraction in 

horse racing and broncho "busting, " typically char- i n g 1901, 1902 and 1903 only six of them "got off the some form. It may be from an injury or it may be 

acteristic of the west, the Beventh annual race meet fraction"— despite the fact that in these three years from the bones in the foot being too large for the 

given by Walter W. Homftay on his private track n0 i e3s than 66 trotters entered the 2:10 list — 11 in outside horn, in that case, you will have too much 

was brought to a close to-night. Brilliant weather 1901, 29 in 1902 and 26 in 1903. Could the truth of our pressure on wing, consequently you have corns. If 

was responsible for a big crowd that included many original contention be more forcibly exemplified? all corns are caused by improper shoeing what are 
from Kamloops, Nicola, Vernon and the Okanagan. While there is life, however, there is hope. And as you going to do or say about the horse that comes to 

Smartly gowned society women, with their gentlemen a hopeful contribution to the subject, we herewith your shop that has never been shod and has a well 

escorts, mingled with gaily bedecked squaws and present the list of horses which just failed to enter developed corn or maybe two of them, one in each 

their braves, while dozens of picturesquely attired the 2:10 list in 1903. There are fourteen of them, as foot? I know it has been disputed by some that a 

cowboys added the finishing touches to a gathering f u ws: horse never has corns until they are shod, but I know 

that, while being essentially cosmopolitan in its make- FBANCE9 b , ch m by Al'camedia (p) 2:19X-Belle d. 2:29i< from experience that such is not the case, for I have 

nn was of the West, western. byWarwickBoy 2:10M seen a number of them on young horses that never 

r ' T .. j T7i +..1, ,..,..-. ..^ JunGE Ctjllen, bib g by Raven Wilkes 2:15!4-Jessie , , 

Polo pony races, Indian and Klootchman races and Sprague by Governor Sprague 2:20k 2:10j< wereshod. 

broncho "busting" were the chief features of the Judge Green, bg by Directum 2:05K, dam by Anteeo Jr. Some may ask what caused them in the unshod 

meet that most caught the fancy of the visitors. The Q ^ : ^ LKEs ; b ^- by L exin g ton wVito8,'d'am'by Pbalias * m hor3e? I will say contraction of the coronary band. 

bucking contest, with a big bay gelding outlaw from 2:i3i£ 2:ioj< What caused it? Any number of things will cause it. 

the B. X. ranch, was the centre of attraction. For WAnracoir,^ h by Alcy Wilkes 2:i6-Sorceress by King ^ In a y 0ung r horse I might say it was from an injury or 

years this outlaw had stood at the head of his class as allabrieve, bg by Elyria2:25«-Belie Wilkes by Brown bruise at the coronary band, and caused the foot to 

the most vicious and unmanageable beast on four legs Wilkes 2:2i*£ 2:10H contract and grow in until there was a pressure on 

, ^ -. , - in. * ,1 r\~ „f ( -„ n „,,.h .. Grace Keller, b m by Anderson Wilkes 2:22w-Laura ., . f ., «. . r~, , . ... .. 

the heralded champion "buster." One after another, Keiiar by Jim Monroe ." 2:1014 the wing of the coffin bone. Then what causes it in the 

as Tommy Graham, Lou Fox and Francis, ahalfbreed John Taylor, g g by Dispute (p) 2:i5M-Doily by Joe S. foot that is shod? Many different things. Improper 

Indian, attempted the feat of sticking to the saddle MAB ^'; c ' hm ' ' by ' Young 'jimlRosa' 'ciaV by' American * W% shoeing, then again leaving the shoes on too long; in 

without holding leather, he succeeded, through one Clay.. 2:104 fact the manner of making the foot contract and 

trick or anotner, of finally dismounting them. Each Berxalda^ blkm by Patron 2:14«-Jeanne by Kentucky ^ causing corns are too numerous to mention, but it is 

.n turn rode him for a space, only to be placed hors de Jm FEHKTi g g by orange Wilkes-Silver Queen by Bac- a fact after a shoe is on a foot for about four weeks 

combat. Then it was that a sturdy Indian from the onus.. 2:10& the foot has grown and spread out as far as it is 

Nicola country staidly walked to the judges' stand, 1 ^^^. h f,^.^' e ^ nn ^ e ^ e .^^ 7 ,^^ el0 ^ 2:10K possible to go, for the nails and shoe holds it in firm 

and, with a handful of bills in his hands, challenged Robert Mc, b g by McRoberts-Hettle D. by Hector position, but the foot does not stop growing, and in 

the owner of the majestic beast for another try. A TOl J^S^;iV^'a'£"i»tt to)"iwlc^ii^j *"* the place of growing out wide as it should.it starts 

tremendous shout of approval testified the spectators by Covington 2:ioj£ to grow down and narrow, then you have contraction, 

desire for another contest, so the outlaw was brought Some years ago we headed a similar table "2:10 then corns Then the owner says you have ruined 

to the centre of the enclosure, and in a twinkling the Probabilities, " but in the light of subsequent events, his horse, when it 13 the owner's fault and not the 

Indian had vaulted into the saddle and the fight was we have thought best to change the caption to "2:10 shoer's Some may ask how do you know that a corn 

on. This time the outlaw met his Waterloo. After Possibilities, " as we now know that it is possible for starts at the wing of the coffin bone? I will say, get a 

Beveral seconds of frantic bucking and rearing, he them— or most of them— to enter the 2:10 list, but not good, fresh foot from a dead horse that you knew in 

reluctantly gave in, acknowledging the rider his mas- very strongly probable that they will. Two at least life had corns, dissect it, saw down through the 

ter. It was a superb exhibition of horsemanship that cannot do so— for Wainscott, one of the best in the quarter just at the wing of the coffin bone and see if 

won the approval not only of the visitors but every list, has been shipped to Europe, while Bernalda was there is not diseased and inflamed blood at that point, 

cowboy present. burnt to death last summer soon after her record was Then follow it up and you will find it comes through 

The event of the racing was the half-mile and re- made. Of the remaining twelve, even with the past the sole at the corn station, 
peat, weight for age, which was carried of by J. as a warning, we shall feel disappointed if several do Corns will come in a foot from anything or any 
Smith's Katie Bell in 54, with W. U. Homfray's not beat 2:10 very considerably — especially such as cause that will cause contraction. I have been look- 
Fancy Free a close second. Judge Green, John Taylor and Robert Mac Several— ing all these years for a cure for corns, but have 
The officials of the meet were: E. Brocklehurst as Frances B., Mary D., Uncle William and perhaps failed so far to find a complete cure. But there are 
and George Butler, judges; F. Gordon, clerk of the others— are, it is said, to be used as matinee per- many different remedies to relieve them, such as bar 
course, and John Cameron and James Mellor, starters, formers which, of course, will militate against their shoes, side calks, rubber and leather pads, tar and 
Thanks to the splendid arrangements provided by chances. All in all, however, the list seems to us to oakum, butter of antimony, thermofuge, poultices, 
the host and hostess, their numerous guests were contain less dead wood than usual, and it may remain etc. The best shoe I have ever tried is the Caesar 
comfortably quartered in the Adelphi hotel and f or 1904 to demonstrate that the just outsiders can Faschi Tip, invented in the fifteenth century. It 
private residences. A pleasing social function that trot into the 2:10 list almost as easily as the rank gives a horse all the advantages of being barefooted, 
was thoroughly enjoyed was an informal dance, at outsiders. Let us wait and see. onl y be has the toe and quarters protected from wear 

which Mrs. Mcintosh of Kamloops, voluntarily pre- . by the tip. A good way to use the tip is to thin the 

aided at the piano. Altogether the meet was a big Somethinp: About Corns inside quarter of the hoof in the region of wing of 

success. The racing was keen with each event well _ ' coffin bone from coronary band down to near bottom 

filled and the charming weather did much to hold In the Horseskoers Journal, W. H. Anderson, of of wall, then adjust the tip and blister the band so as 

together for the four days as jolly and well-contented Jacksonville, 111., contributes a most excellent article t0 start a new rapid growth of wall. It is best to do 

a lot of visitors as ever graced the prairie with their on CO rns, their causes and treatment, which is here thia ln the fal1 when ;t is convenient, and by spring 

attendance. reproduced: Corns, what are they? A spot of con- you will have a very fair looking foot. And I have 

geBted or inflamed blood. What causes them? Con- found as a rule a horse will work as well with the 

Some 2:10 Probabilities. traction. What causes contraction? A great num- smooth tip as he wi ll with his lopg calks on hia shoes. 

ber of things may cause contraction. Anything that „,,..,, , n.- ,. 

rR„ r „ Revipwi j *u ■ t .u pc Cleveland holds pretty nearly everything in the 

[Horse Review] causes an undue pressure on the wing of the coffin L . / ■.'«!.- .-.•." , , 

, , ,, .,, T , , ,. ... line of amateur records, but Chicago secured one last 

The unluckiness of "getting into the nine holes" bone will cause corns. I have been reading with a gatur wben & w _ Marks wm all the races on the 

has become proverbial. The expression suggests that great deal of interest the subject of corns as published ^ Washington Park, Chicago, a feat unique in 

eondition of being "so near and yet so far," which in the Journal, and have noticed the different 'Opinions ^ , poleg- Mr . Marks came into fame as 

aeema next to impossible to amend. A curious parallel of the writers, but have not found many of them that = ... j T r> » k 

JBKU13 uoiu »u nuyuijai « r » an amateur whip when he teamed.J«e Patchen so sue - 

to this which exists on the trotting turf-or so it gave the correct cause of corns as I look at the case 06ssfull an d although he sold the iron horse somo 

appears to us-long ago attracted our attention and, in question. I have had more than a quarter of a time he ^ ^^ lost hig ^ fop & ^^ 

in fact, some years since we spoke of it in these century of experience in this business, and I believe I oflat rahe ha3 00nfined h ig racing strictly to 

columns. This is that when a trotter finishes the have given the cause of corns a close study in fact, I amat6ur eveDt9 and this season has a more preten- 

season with a record outs.de the 2:10 list- that is, of have read all I could get hold of that treated on corns ^^ - ^.^ . g heaJe(J the ^^ 

2:10}, 2:10}, or 2:10|-it is apparently ordained that in and have come to the conclusion that corns are caused acerofla5t Tom Keene 2:04}. The lat- 

about nine cases out of ten, he never afterward is by contraction. As a rule they are caused by con- ^ ^ ratber erratio ^ Hmeg ^ but Mr 

able to "get off the fraction." It is one of those traction of the coronary band, and as the foot grows ^^ entertaing h that the ge]ding will race 

phases of racing which, above all things, reveal its down the pressure on the wing of the coffin bone is so ^ ^ ^^ I( h& does . ( . g probable he wi „ be 

possession of that quality of uncertainty which, great that it causes the rupture of the small blood seen at Lexit on and Memphis in the fall-O^o 

according to the adage, is what makes the sport. At vessels and as the hoof grows down, the congested 

the first blush, no horses would seem so apt, so blood grows down with it, and we have what we call a ' ~ 

certain, to achieve 2:10 honors, as those which have corn. Whether it is a corn or just a spot of congested Albert H. Merrill, of Danvers, Mass., the well known 

already escaped them so narrowly. Theoretically, blood, I snow they are a source of great annoyance Eastern starting judge, will have a very busy season, 

the chances are all in their favor; actually they have to the shoer, for he is the man who gets all the blame having been engaged to give the word at eighteen 

proven to be all against them. for their being in the foot I notice some of the meetings, including the Grand Circuit meetings at 

Glancing back over the occurrences of the past few writers lay the cause of corns to the "Cheap John" Detroit; Empire City track, New York; Brighton 

years they illustrate this peculiar condition with im- horseshoer. Beach track, New York; Providence and Columbi 

pressiveness. In 1900 fifteen trotters made records of Now, I do not want to uphold the cheap horse- Also the New England Breeders' meeting at 1 

2-10 "and a fraction." Not one of these entered the shoer, and while I must say they are in a manner to ville, in September. 



8 



®he gveeitev txxxli gxyovtztnan 



[July 16, 1904 



ROD, GUN AND KENNEL. 

Conducted by J. X. De WITT. 




The Call of the Stream. 



I am sitting to-day at the desk alone, 

And the letters are bard to tame; 
like to shift to a mossy stone. 

Nor bother with pelf and fame. 
I know a pool where the waters cool 

Rest under the brawling falls, 
And the song and gleam of that mountain stream, 

Oh, It calls— and calls— and calls! 

There's a hook and line tn a wayside store, 

Where the grangers buy their plug 
And the loggers barter their rirer lore 

For a jag they can hardly lug; 
And I figure bow long that tackle may lie, 

All useless as any dumb foot, 
Unless I happen along to buy 

And sneak for that mountain pool. 

Ob, bother the flies: I guess there's enough— 

I know where the worms are thick— 
By Billy's old pen; oh, they are the stuff ! 

You can dig a quart with a stick 1 
The rod is all right and the reel Is tight, 

And if they sbould;happen to fall 
There's little birch rods that arelflt for gods 

Whon they follow the trout brook trail. 

I: jingl the demon has rung me up— 

The "Central" up in the woods- 
Waders and oreel and a pooket cupl 

I'm after the only goods. 
Wire for Hank and the old buckboard, 

The secret, I guess, Is out; 
Don't bother me now, you'll get in a row— 

I'm catching the train for trout. 

— Charles H. Crandall. 

' * 

Pacific Coast Derby. 

The entry for the twenty-second annual Coast 
Derby next January, near Bakersfield, comprises 
thirty-nine nominations— 22 English Setters and 17 
Pointers as follows: 

SETTERS. 

J. E. Terry's (Sacramento! orange and white bitch 
Lady Like (Orion-Terry's Lady) whelped July 25, 
1903. Breeder, owner. 

Same owner's orange and white dog Rival; same 
breeding. 

Same owner's orange and white dog Romp, same 
breeding. 

Same owner's white, black and tan dog Kenwood 
(Kilgarif-Iona S.) whelped June 22, 1903. Breeder, 
owner. 

Same owner's black, white and tan bitch Kilona, 
same breeding. 

Same owner's white, black and tan bitch Gleam 
Galore (Marse Ben-Mecca II) whelped April 11, 1903. 
Breeder, W. W. Titus, West Point, Miss. 

Same owner's white, black and tan bitch Dainty 
(Count Whitestone-Mecca's Lady) whelped July 13, 

1903. Same breeder. 

T.J. Watt8on's(San Francisco) black, white and 
tan bitch (unnamed) (California Bell Boy-Clipper's 
Black Marie) whelped July 29, 1903. Breeder, Dr. C. 
E, Wilson, San Francisco, Cal. 

Dr. C. E. Wilson's (San Francisco) white, black and 
tan dog (unnamed) (California Bell Boy-Clipper's 
Black Marie) whelped July 29, 1903. Breeder, owner. 

John H. Schumacher's (Los AngeleB) black and 
white dog Sir Broderick( Detroit Joe-Dolores)whelped 
May 19, 1903. Breeder, owner. 

Same owner's black and white bitch Katherine M, 
Same breeding as preceding. 

C. W. Coggins' (San Francisco) black, white and 
tan bitch Lady DeBtlny (Ch. Lady's Count Gladstone 
-Sport's Destiny) whelped March 25, 1903. Breeder, 
A. H. NeUon, Tacoma, Wash. 

A. A. Nelson's (Tacoma, Wash.) black, white and 
tan bitcb, Ramona. Same breeding as preceding. 

J. W. Coneldine's (New York) black, white and tan 
bitch Hamburg Belle (Count's Blackle-Chevalier's 
Gypsy) whelped June 13, 1903. Breeder, owner. 

W. W. Van Arsdale'B (San Francisco) white, black 
and tan bitch Modesto (Detroit Joe-Countess Mark) 
whelped March, 1903. Breeder, owner. 

Same owner's black, white and tan dog Mariposa. 
Same breeding as preceding. 

Same owner's white, black and tan bitch Cambria 
(Count's Mark-Shasta) whelped April, 1903. Breeder, 
owner. 

Same owner's white, black and tan bitch Cloudy 
iMcCloud Boy-Rod'e Lark) whelped July, 1903. 
Breeder, owner 

Same owner's white, black and tan dog Mojave. 
Same brooding as preceding. 

If, EC. Nicholson's (San Francisco) white and black 
dog Kilogram (Kllgarlf-Maggle F.) whelped April 3, 

1904. Breeder, P. D. Linnville, San Francisco. 

M. Lawrence'B (Tallac) white and lemon bitch 
Youley (Stamboul-Ruby 5th) whelped January 4, 
1903. Breeder, Warren A. Day, Los Angeles, Cal. 

S. Chrlstensen's (San Francisco) white, black and 
tan bitch Del Rey Bell (Cal. Boll ISoy-CouoteBs Mark) 
whelped October 21, 1903. Breeder, \V. W. Van Ars- 
dal> , San Francisco, Cal. 

POINTERS. 

"/. B. Coutt's (Kenwood, Cal.) liver and whito dog 

' lln'o Duko( Alford's John-Florence FauBtor)whelped 

l„s5, 1903. Breeder, William Bolin, Warren, 'nd. 

..me owner's black and white bitch (Hive Blossom 



(Bang TJp-Mlss Rip) whelped April 7, 1903. Breeder, 
owner. 

A. Gregory Cadogan's (San Rafael) liver and white 
bitch Chequite (Dr. Daniels Fan Go) whelped May 17, 
1903. Breeder, Mt. View Kennels, San Rafael, Cal. 

Mt. View Kennels' (San Rafael, Cal., J. E. Lucas, 
Manager) liver and white bitch Fandango, same 
breeding as preceding. 

Same owner's lemon and white bitch Do tson (Jingo's 
Light-Spring Dotjwhelped February 25, 1903. Breeder 
J. B. Turner, Chicago. 

C. E. Worden's (San Francisco) liver and white 
dog Searchlight (Jingo's Light-Pearl's Jingle) 
whelped February 25, 1903. Breeder, owner. 

Same owner's liver and white bitch Betty Tread- 
well (Dr. Daniels-Senator's Mistress Nell, formerly 
Nellie Bang) whelped March 20, 1903. Breeder, J. 
W. Flynn, San Francicso, Cal. 

J. W. Flynn's (San Francisco) lemon and white 
bitch Nellie P. (Dr. Daniels-Senator's Mistress Nell, 
formerly Nellie Bang) whelped March 20, 1903. 
Breeder, owner. 

Same owner's lemon and white dog Romp On, same 
breeding. 

Same owner's black and white dog Burbank, same 
breeding. 

W. W. Van Arsdale's liver and white dog Dunsmir 
same breeding. 

Stockdale Kennels' (Bakersfield, Cal., R. M. Dodge, 
Managerjblack and white dog Bob White (Cuba's 
Zep-Nellie Wilson) whelped January 11, 1903. Breeder 
owner. 

Same owner's black and white dog Cuba's Rector 
(Ch. Cubr of Kenwood-Winnepeg Fly) whelped May 
13, 1903 Breeder, owner. 

Same owner's black and white dog Cuba's JapaD, 
lame breeding. 

Same owner's black and white dog Cuba's Tempest, 
same breeding. 

Same owner's liver and white dog Check Mate 
(Cuba Jr. -Bow's Daughter) whelped August 1, 1903. 
Breeder, owner. 

Same owner's liver and white bitch Florida II, 
same breeding. 

Changes in the Rules oi the W. K. L. 

The Kennel Editor of the Breeder and 
Sportsman.— Dear Sir: There have been some 
changes in the rules of the Western Kennel League to 
which it is desirable to call the attention of exhibit- 
ors, both new and old, before the Bummer shows are 
with us. We should appreciate therefore your cour- 
tesy in publishing this letter in the next issue of your 
valuable paper. 

The rule of most importance to exhibitors Is that 
which makes it necessary to either register dogs in 
the American Field Dog Stud book or list them with 
the Western Kennel League. 

The cost of registration is one dollar. If a dog is 
not eligible for registration, or his owner does not 
care to go to the expense of registering him, the dog 
can be listed with the W. K. L at an annual charge 
of twenty-five cents. This listing fee entitles an 
exhibitor to enter his dog at all W. K. L. shows for 
the year during which the dog is listed. Application 
for both listing and registration forms should be 
made to the secretary of the league and not to the 
publishers of the stud book. In the past the league 
has recognized the stud books of the English Cana- 
dian and American clubs. It does so no longer, and 
dogs registered in any of those stud bcoks must be re- 
registered in the official stud book of the league or 
listed with its secretary. 

Another important change has been made which 
disqualifies any exhibitor who shows at any show 
held west of the 110th degree of west longitude, 
under rules other than those of the W. K. L. This 
means that any exhibitor who in future shows at any 
C. K. C. or A. K. C. show on this Coast, can never 
again Bhow at any W. K. L. show. As this rule is 
somewhat drastic in its action and is sure to meet with 
opposition from the A. K. C sympathizers on the 
Coast, it might be well to review the events which 
led up to its becoming law. 

Last February, a meeting of the Pacific Kennel 
League was held at Seattle and certain proposals were 
made by the league to the A. K.C. If these condi- 
tions were acceptable to the A. K. C. the Coast was to 
return to the A. K. C. These proposals were not 
passed upon by the A. K. C. until June (an example 
of the way in whloh the New York Club conducts the 
kennel business of the country) and as is well known 
the proposals of the league were "turned down" by 
the A. K. C. At the same time it became known to 
us that the A. K. C. intended fighting the League in 
its own territory. We were told that A. K. C. shows 
would be held in every town which at present gave 
W. K. L. shows. In one case, at least, money (the 
amount, I believe, was $300) and a guarantee of fifty 
dogs from San Francisco was offered to some fanciers 
of the north to got up an A. K. C show in opposition 
to the W. K. L club in that town. It is always hard 
to got Information of such offers as they are naturally 
made "sub rosa, " but it Is only fair to assume that a 
similar offer was made to other fanciers in other 
towns. 

The leaguo was thus placed in the position of see- 
ing ii.H clubs ruined financially by opposing shows 
being hold In its town (probably on the same dates) 
backed by the capital of tho A. K. C. trust and of its 
clubs being broken up by bribery. There was but 
one thing which the league could do to proteot itself 
and that was to disqualify oxhibltors who might give 
their Bupport to the Now York club. 



Now, exhibitors must decide whether they will 
stand by the home club and help build it into a great 
national league, or whether they will support the 
autocratic dog trust in New York, which by its mis- 
government of the Coast caused every club from 
Victoria to Los Angeles (with the exception of one) 
to break away from it and join the W. K. L. 

This one exception is San Francisco, the only club 
west of Chicago which holds its shows under A. K. C. 
rules. This new rule therefore practically only dis- 
qualifies exhibitors showing at San Francisco. It 
does not prevent a man with a good dog from send- 
ing it East to meet competition which he can not find 
ou the Coast, and for this reason is not such a drastic 
measure as it appears at first sight. 

The league was formed by the fanciers of the whole 
of this great Pacific Coast and we feel sure that when 
the fight comes they will stand loyally by the league 
which they have called into existence and by refusiDg 
to show under ;he A. K. C, whose misrule they have 
already repudiated, assist in tolling the death knell 
of the American Kennel Club on this Coast. 

Yours obediently, Norman J. Stewart, 
Seet'y. W. K. L. 



Time to Begin Training. 

The time is now at hand when preliminary training 
should be begun. If you have a puppy on hand that 
you expect to put into the field on game this fall, do 
not fall into the error of sportsmen of bygone years, 
holding to the old, long ago exploded fallacies in 
bringing up the youngster, remarks the well-known 
trainer, Ed. F. Haberlein, in a generally interesting 
way. 

Formerly the owner of a puppy would be apt to 
exclaim: "O, I won't bother with those puppies now 
in the summer. I'll wait till the shooting season is at 
hand, and will then take them along when I go afield 
with old Sport. They won't need any particular 
training, anyway, being of the best breeding; they 
are spry, intelligent fellows, and take to retrieving 
naturally; as to real bird sense, they have lots of it. 
You Bhould see them draw on and pointing chickens 
and birds about the yard — why, they stand like old 
dogs, and I feel satisfied they will hunt well and make 
a rattling brace after having had a little chance on 
game." 

No greater mistake could be made. To take a 
puppy along on a shooting trip, before the aspirant 
has been accustomed to the gun, may result in 
creating gunshyness; the flutter of wings may cause 
the puppy to become birdshy; if perchance he should 
run out to a bird that was brought down and pick it 
up, it's ten to one he will deem it a special treat, 
toss it about, orunch and chew, and probably eat it. 
Neither of such initiatory lessons will be beneficial 
to the puppy, but on the other hand require an 
abundance of time, patience andgood judgment to 
overcome. 

If worth doing at all, it'sworth doing well, hence 
the training of a young dog should be conducted 
systematicalty from the start, a specific course 
selected and adhered to with the one object in view — 
training subservient to the gun afield. From lack of 
proper training the majority of dogs taken afield are 
practically unfit to be shot over. A dog of the moBt 
approved breeding, possessed of all necessary natural 
qualities without the requisite training, must neces- 
sarily be a source of annoyance to such an extent as 
to rob the shooter of the enjoyment anticipated. 

The supposition that to become the possessor of a 
fine field dog, the only requisite is to procure a puppy 
of some noted breed and strain of bird dogs, and after 
it has reached the proper age that it can be taken 
afield, hunted and shot over with pleasure, is an illu- 
sion. The dog inherits instinctive qualities — nose, 
speed, ambition to hunt for game anr 1 get it into his 
possession, etc., but not one particle of the accom- 
plishments of its progenitors acquired by judicious 
training is transmitted, and, therefore, all such ac- 
complishments as are desired must be taught to each 
and every individual dog. 

Not every sportsman has the gift to properly train 
his dog without having made the subject a study- 
some even lack in conception of how a dog should per- 
form afield. The systematic training of a bird dog 
reuuires time, a reasonable amount of patience, con- 
trollable temper, love for his pupil and perseverance. 
One endeavoring to accomplish all at once must nec- 
essarily find his efforts a failure To devote a little 
time each day to a puppy (at home) during Borne 
week9 before the season on game opens, is all that 
need be done, if the right course be pursued, in order 
to fully prepare your puppy for real work, such aB 
will be oonducive to pleasure. Therefore begin now! 



Advertising in this journal evidently pays, as will 
be noted from the following letter received from the 
energetic owner of the Gabilan Kennels at Hollister: 

"Kennel Editor, Dear Sir: Please discontinue 
my "ad" and send bill to Mr. M. at Hollister. I sold 
all the pups; one went to Dr. J.TJC. Lane, Fortuna, 
Humboldt county, through your "ad." MoBt all my 
inquiries came from the Breeder and Sportsman. 
Thanking you in advance, I am, very truly, 

Mrs. Thos. Murphy." 

Mrs. Murphy has been very successful with high- 
class English Setter and Llewellyn stock. 



St. Bernard fanciers and breeders should not over- 
look the importance of the short stay in this city of 
that famous Bmooth coat Champion Alta Sylvia. Mrs. 
Lee sold him to Senor Orrega of Mexico City, the dog 
will stay over for one month iD 'Fri6CO while en route 
to his future Mexican home. He is in charge of Mr. 
Mahoney, the well known St. Bernard fancier, who 
announces on page 15, the Btud conditions. 



JDLS 16, 1904 



&he fSlveeiiev axib gtportsmcm 



9 



Hints on Breeding. 

On the subject of successful breeding the English 
Stock- Keeper in one of the interesting series of "TalkB 
to Dog Owners" says: 

Paradoxical as it may appear, it is nevertheless a 
positive fact, that whilst breedingdogs is to a certain 
extent a lottery, a man is at the same time almost 
sure to Bucceed in the long run if he adheres to the 
proper methods which command success. The great 
and only course to follow is to breed from healthy 
stook and to stick to blood. By adopting the latter 
expression, it is intended to impress upon the mind of 
the novice the important and uncontrovertible fact, 
that though experimental and fantastic crosses may 
occasionally succeed in individual cases, Buch things 
in the vast majority of cases bring disappointment in 
their train, and result in the undoing of many years 
of careful breeding. An unhealthy dog or bitch 
ought never to be bred from unless under the most 
exceptional cases, by anybody who has conceived the 
very laudable ambition of establishing a strain of his 
own, for, as must be obvious to the meanest capacity, 
the infirmities of the parents will probably appear 
amongst their descendants, if not in the first, at all 
events in some subsequent generation. 

This is Btill more likely to be the cise amongst in- 
bred dogs, and in establishing a strain there must be 
a certain amount of sibbing i. e., inbreeding resorted 
to when it is desired to fix tne type. Opinions differ 
a good deal as regards the best way to proceed in the 
inbreeding line, but speaking generally, experience 
has shown us that putting father to daughter or 
mother to son is preferable to breeding brother to 
sister. Of course, it must be patent to the merest 
beginner that a continuous system of close inbreed- 
ing, or even practising the same for a couple of 
generations, would affect, the stamina, constitution, 
and size of the family, and consequently an outcross 
of some kind is absolutely neoessary. When this is 
resorted to, as it very often must be, it is wise to seek 
for a suitable animal whioh belongs to a different 
branch of the original strain from which the parents 
of the family for wnich the cross is being Bought for 
has come; in fact, a distant relative though not a full 
blooded one. 

Due observance should, of course, be paid to the 
points which it is desired that the puppies should 
possess, and it is reasonable to hope that the perfec- 
tions of the one parent may obliterate the failings of 
the other — hence the greatest of all reasons for advo- 
cating the advantages of judicious inbreeding, as 
when a certain strain is known to possess peculiar 
characteristics of itB own which are strongly marked, 
it is not likely that these characteristics will be 
affected if a distant member of the family is used as a 
cross, as they will be if outside blood is introduced. 

It should always be remembered that when a type 
is not strongly impressed upon a strain, an outside 
cross is just as likely to produce the bad points of 
both parents in their offspring as the good ones, and 
hensa the desirability, one might say necessity, of fix- 
ing certain characteristics, which can only be accom- 
plished by judicious sibbing. 

The stud dog or the brood bitch, which above all 
others are to be shunned for breeding purposes, are 
great prize winners of doubtful parentage. In the 
first place, these animals may be the results of the 
rankest flukes in the way of crosses; or secondly, they 
may possess — a generation or two back, or perhaps 
even more — a strain of blood which might introduce 
some most objectionable failings into a strain. Con- 
sequently, the dog breeder who means to be success- 
ful must be ever on his guard against the good-look- 
ing flat-catcher, and if he is a cautious man he will 
look ahead and look back as well as at the present. 
Once get a cross of objectionable blood into your 
strain — and it is remarkable, if the matter is followed 
up, how often the blood of two families which are 
good in themselves will fail to nick with each other— 
and there is no saying when or where it will crop up. 
Possibly the effects of the bar sinister may not appear 
for years, and this is the greatest misfortune that 
could fall upon a breeder, as, believing himself to be 
safe, he may have got the taint into the blood of every 
member of his kennel during the interval; but when 
it doeB show itself it may prove to be the undoing of 
years of thought. CrosseB, to put it plainly, should 
be well considered, and to the man who takeB the 
trouble to make the proper inquiries there is gener- 
ally some useful information to be derived from the 
experiences of others. 

Speaking generally, it is not desirable that a bitch 
should be bred from until she is about eighteen 
months or so of age. Individual animals, of course, 
vary in the extent of their development, but the off- 
spring of quite immature dams are Beldom robust in 
constitution, or altogether satisfactory, no matter 
how good-looking they may be. In the "case of Bull- 
dogs and large-headed varieties, which are by their 
formation difficult puppies to be brought into the 
world, it is unwise to allow a bitch to remain so long 
unbred from that the bones and musoles connected 
with the passage through which the puppies pass 
become set, and so difficult to relax. Therefore the 
bitches of such breeds may be allowed a litter at an 
earlier age than others, but after the first one they 
may be given a rest for at least one heat. 

So long as his energies are notovertaxed, a dogmay 
be used for service when he is a year old, or even 
under. Occasionally it is for his benefit that this 
should be so, but it is not likely to be otherwise than 
unbeneficial to his subsequent development if his sub- 
scription-list is other than a very limited one, until 
he is at least eighteen months old. 

Amongst the many trials which beset the dog 
owner who goes in for breeding is the possession of a 
valuable and well-bred bitch whioh has earned for 
herself the unenviable distinction of being either bar- 
ren or a shy breeder. Such an animal is a most dis- 
appointing acquisition to any kennel, and, unfortuna- 
tely, there is no infallible remedy that can be sug- 
festod. It may be mentioned, however, that some 
ve-and-twenty years a correspondent of one of the 



sporting papers related that he had been successful in 
obtaining puppies from more than one bitch that had 
borne the reputation of being non-breederB, and he 
described his method of procedure. It was to reduce 
the strength of the bitch by blood-letting almost to 
the point of fainting, and then, without delay, intro- 
ducing her to the dog. The idea, it must be admitted, 
is not attractive, and very possibly it may be entirely 
fallacious, but the present writer adopted it in the 
case of a Greyhound bitch which was a pronounced 
non-breeder, and she presented him with a litter of 
six. The experiment was not repeated as the bitch 
in question was sold; and under any circumstances 
should any owner of a presumably barren bitch think 
of trying it, he should avail himself of the services of 
a veterinary surgeon to perform the operation of 
blood-letting, else it maybe found impossible to check 
the bleeding. Possibly the case referred to above 
was of the nature of a coincidence, and the Greyhound 
bitch would have bred under any circumstances, but 
the circumstances were as described, and she did not 
Buffer in any way, either at the time, as the bleeding 
was apparently quite painless, or in her future life. 

A Btud dog or brood bitch which is overburdened 
with a load of superfluous flesh is far less likely to 
produce stock than one which is in good hard condi- 
tion at the time of service, and the more healthy and 
active lives such animals lead the greateris the proba- 
bility of their offspring being strong and vigorous. 
No doubt many puppies have been bred in the midst 
of unwholesome surroundings and under very dis- 
advantageous circumstances, but taken as a general 
rule, it is the offspring of the parents who are in 
Bound condition that rrake the moBt healthy dogs, 
and which in their turn beget the best constitutional 
puppies. 

Lastly, it may be suggested that autumn and 
winter-whelped puppies are not usually so well 
developed dogs as those which are born at other 
times of the year, this being due to the fact that their 
earlier existence is not associated with warmth and 
sunshine, which are so essential to the welfare and 
growth of all young animals. 



Elliott's Rockcliffe Mollie, bred to Faultless; Frank 
P. Dole's Edgewood Marguerite of Navarre, bred to 
Edgewood Bioomabury Hero; Frank F. Dole's Edge- 
wood Estelle, bred to Edgewood Bloomsbury Hero; 
Frank F. Dole's Edgewood Jean III, bred t Edge- 
wood Bioomabury Hero; W. I. Campbell's Roselyn 
Buttons, bred to Prince Arundel; J. T.MIchaud's 
Lady Barker, bred to General Lawton. 



DOINGS IN DOGDOM. 



We are authorized to offer several well bred Cocker 
puppieB that are for Bale at a reasonable figure. For 
particulars address the Kennel Editor. 



In announcing the demise of the great Greyhound 
Rubber Ankles in a recent issue, we stated that the 
famous courser had been bred by her owner Mr. J. H. 
Rossiter, in this we were mistaken for the bitch was 
bred by that popular leashman Mr. M. C. Delano of 
Rocklin, Placer county, who gave the bitch to Mr. 
Rossiter when she was a puppy. Mr. Delano has been 
the owner of a number of local greensward celebrities 
and still has some good stock in his kennels. 



As even and nice a looking litter of Pointer puppies 
as we have seen for a long time is the bunch of nine 
two month's old Dups by E. Courtney Ford's Boston 
out of Mrs. L. S." Bolter'B BeSB (Glen Du Pont-Fay) 
Boston is the winning Pointer brought out here last 
December and probably the best looking Pointer 
owned in this city to-day. 

The puppies are prettily marked and very strong 
and healthy. The opportunity of procuring a puppy 
is offered in the classified ad column on page 15. 



Mr. E. W. Jacquet, Secretary of the English Ken- 
nel Club sends out important information regarding 
the exportation of dogs to America. To explain the 
letter it must be mentioned that no dog is eligible for 
the E. K. C. S. B. unless he has won a prize at a show 
or tJial under itB rules. The new regulation is of a 
very far reaching character, and will come hard on 
importers of small means. 

"Sir — I am instructed by my committee to inform 
you, for the information of your readers, that the 
Kennel Club has for some time past been in communi- 
cation with the United States Department of Agri- 
cuiture at Washington with reference to the question 
of the particulars necessary to appear on the consular 
pedigree certificates issued by the Kennel Club to pass 
dogs into the United States free of duty. 

My committee ha^e now been informed that in 
future the Government of the United States will re- 
quire that the dog to be exported, as well as its sire 
and dam, and its grandsires and granddams (i- e., 
two generations), must be entered in the Kennel Club 
Stud Book. Unless the requirements of the Ameri- 
can Government can be complied with, no consular 
pedigree [certificates will be issued by the Kennel 
Club." 

The Produce Stakes of the Bull Terrier Breeders' 
Association, have closed with twenty-one nomina- 
tions. It will be noticed that the well known Clap- 
ham Topper is one of the most favored sires. Some 
exceptionally good puppieB by this dog are looked 
forward to, aB his breeding comprises the best strains 
from the other side, and his individual merit is much 
above the average. The nominations are: 

Dr. R. L. James' Lottie Fleetwood bred, to Bobby 
Buster; D. W. Godard's Lady Wonder, bred to Clap- 
ham Topper; John Karn's Mollie Wonder, bred to 
Bobby Buster; Clair Foster's Blossom of the Point, 
bred to Clapham Topper; Dr. A. P. Northridge's 
Noross Show Girl, bred to Clapham Topper; R. H. 
Elliott's Rockcliffe Nellie, bred to Edgewood Blooms- 
bury Hero; Clair Foster's Flyer'B Bloomsbury Sur- 
prise, bred to Clapham Topper; Clair Foster's Char- 
wood Victoria Wild, bred to Clapham Topper; Frank 
W. Temple's Roselyn Cricket, bred to Clapham Top- 
per; R. H. Elliott's Lady Cheater, bred to Edgewood 
Rudyard Kipling; Geo. B. Lawrence's Bendigo Belle, 
bred to Clapham Topper; D. W. Godard's Edgewood 
Jet, bred to Bobby Buster; Frank W. Temple's 
Roselyn Bonnie, bred to Prince Arundel; W. A. Pros- 
ser's Maybell, bred to Bobby Buster; J. G. Walter's 
Epsom Edgewood 'Ariet, bred to Faultless; R. H. 



Like young Lochinvar, of our Scottish thoughts, 
there is reported to have come out of the West a more 
than useful young wirehaired dog by Bank Note from 
a bitch by Limefield Roderick. He is eighth month, 
and is a Bristles' marked one — which in other words, 
means that he has heavy body patches of black and 
tan, a very Bporty color for a terrier originally pro- 
duced to run with Fox or other hounds. Bred by 
Mr. Daniel E. Lynn of Port Huron, Mich., a brother 
of Mr. J. J. Lynn, who judged the breed at Mineola 
show, the puppy has grown up among appreciative 
people. Mr. Mayhew is also said to have a very good 
wire in pickle by Ch. Wandee Uoastguard, now in the 
kennels of hiB owner, Mr. C. K. Harley, of San Fran- 
cisco. 

The Deer Season. 



The open season for shooting bucks began yester- 
day and will close on November 1st, three months and 
a half. The individual bag is limited to three male 
deer during the season, doeB and spotted fawns being 
in close season at all times. 

The open season prescribed by the State law has 
been shortened in a number of counties as follows: 

El Dorado county, September 1 to November 1. 

Lake county, July 15 to September 15. 

Los Angeles county, July 15 to September 15. 

Marin county, July 15 to September 15. 

Mendocino county, July 15 to October 1. 

Monterey county, Jul} 15 to October 1. 

Napa county, July 15 to September 15. 

Riverside county, July 15 to September 15. 

San Benito county , August 1 to October 1. 

San Bernardino county, September 1 to October 1. 

San Mateo county, August 1 to October 1. 

Santa Cruz county, August 1 to September 30. 

Santa Clara county, July 15 to October 1. 

Santa Barbara, July 15 to September 15. 

Siskiyou county, August 15 to October 15.. 

Sonoma county, July 15 to September 1. 

Trinity county, September 15 to November 1. 

Yolo county, July 15 to September 15. 

The open season in Nevada state is from September 
15 until November 15. 



An Important Game Law Decision. 

Mere possession of game out of season in New York 
State is not unlawful. The Appellate Division of the 
Supreme Court has decided against the state game 
protector in his action to recover more than $1,000,- 
000 in fines from a cold storage company for having 
in storage in May and June many thousands of game 
birds, ranging all the way from reed birdB to ducks, 
affirming the decision of Supreme Court Justice 
O'Gorman in dismissing the suits. In this case the 
game in question was lawfully killed outside of the 
Btate and brought into the state when such importa- 
tion is permitted. 

EOther States than New York, in the very commen- 
dable desire to protect their game — beast, bird and 
fish — have similar laws punishing by fine the having 
in possession of game during the home closed season, 
though that game may have been killed in another 
state at a time when it was lawful. The assumption 
is that the "possession" clause is necessary to pre- 
vent the unprincipled pot hunter from evading the 
home protective law, but such laws ignore the prin- 
ciple that the burden of proof rests with the accuser. 
The mere possession of a partridge or a grouse, for 
instance, or of a duck, quail or venison in this 
State, during the closed season, is considered proof 
that it was killed in violation of the spirit, if not the 
actual letter of the California laws, and a fine will be 
imposed even though the game came from outside 
the State. 

-♦ 

Tournament at Vallejo. 

The Vallejo Gun Club have made arrangements for 
a big trap shoot to come off on the 24th inst, at the 
Retreat range. 

The tournament was originally fixed for a contest be- 
tween the Union Gun Club of San Francisco, Hercules 
Gun Club of Pinole and the Vallejo club. When the 
arrangement became generally known to shooters of 
this section of the state there was a universal desire 
on the part of many sportsmen to participate. The 
Vallejo shooters, like the genial sportsmen they are, 
on this showing decided to make the shoot an open to 
all affair. Shooters from Napa, Sacramento, Vaca- 
ville, Santa RoBa, Martinez, San Francisoo and various 
other points will be present and participate in the 
events scheduled. The Vallejo Chronicle states' that 
the shoot will be held at the Retreat raDge, beginning 
early in the morning and lasting all day. Refresh- 
ments will be on hand in ample quantity and a bull's 
head spread may be one of the features of the day's 
sport. This will be decided at a latter day. 

The shoot will include live bird races as well as blue- 
rock matches and will be for cash purses along with 
merchandise prizes. There will be individual and 
team shoots, and from the large number who will 
enter there should be some close and exoiting con- 
tests. 

« 

Strikel — if they don't (five you Jaokion'j 
Soda when you ask for it. 



1G 



©itc fgveeiiev anif Qpoxt&man 



[July 16, 1904 



AT THE TRAPS. 

The Golden Gate Gun Club shoot for July, at the 
. Ingleside grounds, is the only regular local trap event 
for tomorrow. 

The indications for a large attendance at the mer- 
chandise shot at Ingleside on the 28th inst are 
manv. More than seventy prizes will be distributed 
among the contestants. The attendance of shooters 
at a similar affair last year was 109; it is believed that 
this number will be greatly exceeded. 



A summaiy of the events and scores shot at the 
Union Gun Club shoot last Sunday is given below. 
The best average of the day was made by George 
Sylvester. Among the visiting shooters was Jl. 
Holling of Dixon. • 

Club handicap match, 25 targets, class shooting, 8 
classes, 16 y.rds-J. W. Bradrick 22, D Daniels 21, 
W. Cuneo 15, H. BielawsKi 10, "Slade" 22, W. R. 
Murdock 21, C. C. Nauman 21, fl. Frahm 10, B. Pat- 
rick 16, T. L. Lewie 20, Dr. J. A. D. Hutton 18, J. L. 
Dutton 19, E. Holloing 22, Dr. E. Pitres 15, J.Scott 
Lsary 15, Geo. Sylvester 23, M.J. Iverson 23, P. Han- 
sen 14, E. Klevesahl 19, Dr. Grosse 4, J. Biller 14, K. 
A. Williams IT, W. A. Robertson 21, Geo. Barber 11, 
J. Pisani 14, F. Knick 16. 

The winners were: First class. 24 or 25 breaks— 
none. Second class, 22 and 23 breaks— Sylvester and 
Iverson. Third class, 20 and 21 breaks— Murdock, 
Daniels, Nauman and Robertson. Fourth class, 18 
and 19 breaks— Frahm, Dutton and E. Klevesahl. 
Fifth class, 16 and 17 breaks— Williams. Sixth class, 
14 and 15 breaks— Cuneo, Pitres and Leary. Seventh 
class, 11, 12, or 13 breaks— Barb3r. Eighth class, 10 
breaks or less — Bielawski. 

Club handioap match, 25 to 30 targets, 16 yards, 2 
classes— Bradrick (18 yards) shot at 26, broke 21; 
Daniels (18 yards) 26-18; Cuneo 28-21; Bielawski 30-11; 
"Slade" 26-22; Murdock 26-22; Nauman 26-24; Frahm 
27-14; Patrick 28-13; Lewis 26-20; (back score) 26-21; 
Hutton 27-19; Dutton 27-23. Pitres 26-25; Leary 28-21; 
Sylvester 25-24; Iverson (18 yards) 25-18; Hansen 30- 
16, Klevesahl 27-22; Biller 30-9; Williams 27-16; Bar- 
ber 30-14; Pisani 30-21. 

Sylvester and Nauman tied on 24 breaks for the 
first class medal, Sylvester won on the shoot-off, 24 to 
23. Dr. Pitres won the second class medal. The 
shooters at 18 yards were previous monthly medal 
winners. 

Open to all event, handicap, 20 to 25 targets, high 
guns, 3 moneys — Holling, shot at 20, broke 18; "Slade" 
22-17; Naumann 20-18; Hutton 25-13: .Bradrick 20-19; 
Sylvester 20-19; Lewis 20-14: Patrick 25-12; Daniels 
21-17; Klevesahl 22-19; Shreve 23-12; Frahm 22-17; 
Dutton 22-17; Robertson 20-14; Bielawski 25-9; Barber 
25-13; Murdock 21-19; Iverson 20-19. 

The winners were Sylvester, Bradrick, Murdock, 
Iverson and Klevesahl, 19 breaks each — 

Open to all event, 10 singles at 16 yards, 5 pairs at 
14 yards— Holling 9 singles, 5 at pairs-14; Nauman 9- 
8-16; Hutton 8-4-12; Bradrick 8-6-14; Sylvester 9-8-17; 
Lewis 9-5-14; Daniels 10-7-17; Frahm 7-3-10; Iverson 
6-3-9; Pitres 8-8-16. 

Sylvester and Daniels divided first money, Nauman 
and Pitrei second money and Holling, Bradrick and 
Lewis split third money. 

Silver trophy race, sealed conditions and secret 
handicaps, 16 yards— Frahm 22, Bielitwski 21, Sylves- 
ter 21, Hutton 19, Kerrison 21, Knick 21, Lewis 13, 
Holling 25, Biller 17, Pitres 21, Patrick 22, Barber 22, 
Hunt 17, Iverson 19, Pisani 24, Nauman 24, Daniels 23, 
Bradrick 25. Holling and Bradrick tied and will 
shoot off in August. 

Thirty target race, N W. Association Globe trophy 
conditions, 30 targets, singles at 16 yarjs, doubles at 
14 yards — Holling 22, Nauman 24, Murdock 21, Brad- 
rick 21, Lewis 19; Daniels 27; Iverson 25; Sylvester 25; 
Pitres 26; Klevesahl 18; Bielawski 9, Robertson 22. 

Daniels won first-class money, Pietres second, Syl- 
vester and Iverson third class money. 



The final shoot of this season of the Empire Gun 
Club was held last Sunday at Alameda Point. 

The winners for the season were: A. J. Webb, club 
championship trophy. L. H. Allen and Dr. Clyde 
Payne weru second and third high average respec- 
tively. Louis H. Allen won the gold cuff buttons 
and W. O. Cullen won the silver cuff buttons offered 
as prizes for the first and second high averages in the 
"money match." 

A. J. Webb also won the special handicap match 
prize. L. H. Allen and W. O. Cullen were also first 
and second high scores in this contest. J. B. Hauer 
won the Sweeney record medal — the winning score 
was shot in June: 5 singles at 16 yards; 5 at 18 yard6; 
5 pairs at 20 yards; at 22 yards he broke the first two 
pair and missed the 25th target, a total of 24 breaks 
and a clover record under difficult conditions. 

The scores shot last Sunday in the regular club 
events were the following: 

Club championship race, 25 targets— J. B. Hsuer 21; 
W. O. Cullen 23; A. J. Webb 22; L. H. Allen 23; Dr. 
Clyde Payne is; p, L. Houpt 17; Dr. Clyde Payne 
(back Bcoro)23; J. Peltier 21; Dr. A. J. SylveBter 19; 
jr. Howlett 18. 

y match, 15 singles and 5 pairs, distance handl. 
oap: 

First class— J. B. Hauer, 20 yards, broko 14; W O 
Cullen 18-19; A. J. Webb 22-23; L. H. Allon 18-18; j! 
Peltier 14-24. Peltier's score was highest and won 
class money. 

Second class— Dr. C. Payne, 18 yards, broko 20; F 
L. Houpt 18-19; Dr. A. J. Sylvoster 18-17, Frank 
Howlett 22-17. Dr. Payne was the winner In this class. 

Special handicap prize race at 20 targets, 10 
singles and 5 pairs: 

.1. B. Hauer, 21' yards, broke 9; W. O. Cullen 18-15; 
A .. Webb22-16; L. II. Allon 18-17: Dr. C. Tavne 
Frank Howloit 22-17. 

•'•" woeney rocord medal race— This is a continuous 
ik, mlss-and-out match, and for each five birds 
'ten the shooter is distance handicappod two 



yards until the twenty-yard mark is reached, when 
doubles must be shot under original conditions. 
Highest score of the season only in this event counted 
for the medal: 

J. B. Hauer 9-3-0-7; L. H. Allen 8-3-4-6; A. J. Webb 
13-16-3-3; j. Peltier 0-4-3; Dr. C. Payne 1; W. O. 
Cullen 0-0. 

Second and third moneys in this event were won by 
A. J. Wepb and R. C. Reed who had next highest 
scores. Hauer winning the medal as previously noted. 

Ten target races— Hauer 9; Cullen 7-8-10; Allen 10- 
7-7; Dr. A. J. Sylvester 7-7-9; Dr. C. Payne 10-10-9- 
10; Peltier 9-6; C. Sylvester 3-3-2; Haupt 8. 



DL/PONT 



A Great Aquarium for San Francisco. 

The project of establishing an aquarium in Golden 
Gate Park has now, it seems, taken tangible shape. 
Dr. Harry TeviB of this city, it is reported, will under- 
take to erect in the park an aquarium which it iB in- 
tended will be unequaled by any other similar structure 
in the world. 

Dr. Tevis has considered the matter for some time 
and has now determined to defray the cost of tbe 
aquarium at an expense of between three and four 
million dollars — the structure 
being intended as a memorial 
of his father, the late Lloyd 
Tevis. John Galen Howard, 
the supervising architect of the 
University of California is now 
preparing the plans for what 
will eventually be one of the 
most unique memorial build- 
ings in existence. 

The building will have great 
glass tanks for rare fish, as well 
as deeper pools for strange 
denizens of the South Seas and 
the Arctic waters. The heat- 
ing apparatus of the aquarium 
will be wonderfully arranged so 
that fish of the temperate zone 
will swim in waters of which 
the temperature is perfectly 
gauged to that of the cool 
waters of their native haunts. 
The rarely beautiful whiteangel 
fish and other luminous sea 
creatures from southern oceans 
will feel quite at home in tanks 
of water heated to the proper 
degree, while seals and Arctic 
fish will be cool in the warmest 
California weather. 

It is Dr. Tevis' intention to 
have the San Francisco aquari- 
um more complete than the 
notable one at Naples, and it 
will far surpass the aquarium in 
Battery Park, New York, which is world-famous. 
In this building the several rooms are lined with glass 
tanks in which curious finny creatures swim to the 
edification of the public. The water is constantly 
changing, and an ingenious arrangement of pipes 
keeps the temperature of each tank properly guaged. 
Lights are arranged back of the glass tanks so that 
their strange inhabitants may be clearly seen. In the 
center of the halls are broad uncovered tanks for 
seals and larger fish. The fish become quite ac- 
customed to the public gaze, and dinner served by the 
keepers is an interesting event. 

The San Francisco piscatorial collection will be far 
more extensive and will contain more rare specimens 
than may the one in Battery Park. Agents will 
collect rare specimens in different parts of the world 
to be shipped to this city, where men thoroughly 
familiar with their habits and needs will be placed in 
charge of them. 

The Tevis Aquarium will doubtless add much to 
science, interest sportsmen, and will attract visitors 
from all over the world. The building will be archi- 
tecurally beautiful, and in the setting of the green 
lawns of Golden Gate Park it will be an attraction 
such aB few cities possess. 



club preserves will be a good place to avoid for those 
who take pride in keeping an unperforated 
epidermis. 

The reported scarcity of doves has had a tendency 
to keep Santa Rosa hunters at home this season, but 
some good bags are reported. Messrs. Hesse and 
McQuitty secured thirty-two in a little over an hour 
out towards Sebastopol, and two other sportsmen 
bagged forty; George Hartman reports some pretty 
fair bags on several occasions. In Bennett Valley and 
the Kenwood country along Sonoma Creek trespass 
notices are plentiful, and a hunter who is not ac- 
quainted and does not secure permission to shoot 
stands a chance of being ordered off the premises. 
At this season of the year there is a good deal of hay 
on the ground and farmers are afraid of fires started 
by burning wads or careless hunters. 

Towards Sepastopol and on the road between Santa 
RoBa and Windsor, says the Democrat, there are no 
restrictions, and hunters can enjoy themselves with- 
out molestation. As far as the scarcity of doves is 
concerned, some well informed hunters think the 
dove season should be extended until July 15, as many 
of the doves are very small on the first of the month 
and two weeks makes much difference in the growth 
of a bird. Besides this, in Sonoma county doves 
would raise two broods a year if they were not hunted 



Ssw 







THE DU PONT SQUAD 

which shot through the entire program of the Grand American Handicap. Reading 

from left to right: Victor Du Pont, 3d; Eugene Du Pont; Victor 

Du Pont Jr.; Alexis Du Pont; Eugene E. Du Pont. 



so early in the season. The deer season opened Fri- 
day, the 15th, and already many of the local sports- 
men have gone forth to the tall timber in Mendocino 
county. Ralph Slusser and Charlie Talmadge have 
gone to Mendocino and Dr. Crawford, O. M. Tuttle 
and C. H. Pond will hunt around Covelo. Mr. Vice 
of Glen Ellen has also left for Covelo, accompanied by 
James Shaw, an old time hunter of Sonoma county, 
who recently returned from the Klondike. Attorney 
Leppo has started for the woods. Deer have been 
reported this season as seen occasionally around the 
head of Mark West Creek and Sonoma Creek and in 
Alexander valley. 

On account of the objections of sheep men, hunters 
in the Bheep country have to get along without 
hounds, but they find plenty of sport notwithstand- 
ing. Wesley Hopper is already on the ground in 
Mendocino county awaitiDg the opening of the deer 
season. 



Coming Events. 



GOSSIP FOR SPORTSMEN. 



Henry E. Skinner, well known to and popular with 
the sportsmen of this city and, in fact, the whole 
Coast, is now associated with the Shreve-Barber 
Company of this city. Mr. Skinner was formerly 
with tbe E. T. Allen Company and recently president 
of the H. E. Skinner Co. He is an expert on anglers' 
outfits, camping and outing goods and sportsmen's 
requirements generally. 

Doves are reported plentiful in the vicinity of 
Llvermor* and aUo near Martinez. 



Black bass fishing in Russian river in the vicinity 
of Guerneville and Camp Vacation — above the dam, 
has been excellent since the 1st inst. 



Fly-fishing is improving daily on most every avail- 
able fishing water. The Truckee is rounding up in 
fine shape for the fly. August givos promise of splen- 
did Bport on the river. 

At the different Sierra lakes good catches have been 
made lately. 

Striped bass fishing In the "straitB" is improving. 

Many local Bportsmen loft this city yesterday and 
to-day bound for the mountains and foothills in quest 
of veniBon. General reports from the various hunting 
districts are that deer are plentiful. To-morrow there 
will bo, ail over the state, an army of deer hunters 
out. Tho firing-lines on the bordors of the Marin 



Rod. 

April 1-Sept. 10. Oct. 16-Feb. 1— Open season for taking steel- 
nead in tidewater. 

April 1-Nov. 1— Trout season open 

May 1-Sept. 1— Close season for shrimp. 

July 1-Jan. 1— Open season for black bass. 

July 30-Saturday Contest No. 9. Class Series, Stow lake 

July 31— Sunday Contest No 9. Class Series, Stow lake. 10 A. M 
Aug. 15-April 1— Open season for lobsters and crawfish. 
Nov. 1-Sept. 1— Open season for crabs. 
Sept. 10-Oct. 16 -Close season in tidewater for steelhead. 
Nov. 15-Sept. 10— Season open for taking salmon above tide 
water. 

Gun. 

July 1-Feb. 15— Dove season open. 
July 15-Nov. 1— Deer season open. 

July 17— Golden Gate Gun Club. Blue rooks Ingleside. 
July 31— Millwood Gun Club. Blue rocks. Mill Valley. 
Aug. 7— California Wing Club. Live birds. Ingleside. 
Aug. 14— Union Gun Club. Blue rocks. Ingleside. 
Aug. 28— Merchandise shoot. Blue rocks. Ingleside. 
Sept. 1-Feb. 15— Open season for mountain quail, grouse and 
sage hen. 

Feb. 15-Oot. 15— Closed season .'or quail, ducks, etc 

Bench Shows. 
Sept. 12, 13— Newport flench Show. Newport, R. I, 



F. M. Ware, 
Initial show. Brattle- 



Danbury.Conn. Jas 



Secretary 

Sopt 28, 29— Valley Fair Kennel Club, 
boro, Vt. H. O. Rice, Seoretary. 

Oot 4, 7— Danbury Agricultural Society 
Mortimer, Superintendent. 

Oct. 5. 8— Spokane Kennel Club. Spokane, Wash. W. K. L. 

Oct. 10-Brunswlok Fur Club. Foxhound show. Barre, Mass, 
B. S. Turpln. Secretary. 

Oot. 18, SI— FroderloU Agricultural Sooiety. Frederick, Md 
Roger McSherry, Seoretary. 

Nov. 8, 1 l-World's Fair Dog Show, St. Louis, Mo. F. D. Coburn, 
Chief of L. S. Dept., St. Louis, Mo, ' 

Nov. 16, 19-Boston Terrier Club. Specialty show. Boston, 
Mass. Walter E Stone, Secretary. 

Nov. 2J, S5-Phlladelphla Dog Show Association. Philadelphia 
J. Sergeant Price, Secretary. 



Pa. 



JULY 16, 1904] 



©he giceeZiev cm© gtyavteman 



11 



Trade Notes. 



Fred Gilbert is certainly the wonder of the world. 
At his last 4000 targets he has broken 97%. Early in 
June, at MarBhalltown, la., Mr. Gilbert, shootiDg the 
Parker gun, established a woild's record, breaking 50 
targets straight at 22 yards rise— a wonderful per- 
formance. Mr. Gilbert and the Parker are insepar- 
able. 

J. W. Nelson of Duluth, Minn., shootiDg the Parker 
gun on June 6, broke 49 out of 50. This is also pretty 
good work for the "Old Reliable " 

R. S. Rhoades, Columbus, O., won the amateur 
championship of Ohio at the State shoot, June 15, 
shooting the Parker gun. 

H. D. Bates, Ridgetown, Ont., made high average 
June 16 and 17 at London, Ont., shooting sliding han- 
dicap, 16 to 22 yards, unknown angles and unknown 
traps. Mr. Bates' record is 259 out of 290— consider- 
ing the conditions, a remarkable performance. 

A.11 of the above records speak credit for the "Old 
Reliable" Parker. 

Expert winnings with U. M. C. shot 9hells: R. D- 
Pulford won high average at the Rochester, N Y., 
shoot; T. D. Hubby won high average at Waco, Tex., 
May 9, scoring 98%; F. C. Riehl won first average at 
Hal's, Tenn., on May 11, scoring 96%; T. E. Hubby 
won high average at the Rockdale, Tex., shoot, May 
11, with 96j%; J. L. Head won the Decatur and He- 
bron shoots on May 11 and 14, the shoot at Indianap- 
.olis on May 21, and the shooo at Earl Park, Ind., 
May 19; T. A. Marshall von high average for the en- 
tire Bhoot Of the Minneapolis Gun Club tournament, 
May 19-21; T. E. Hubby scored 97-100 at Wooten 
Wells, 1'ex.; J. L. Head won the Champlain, N. Y., 
shoot on May 30. C. B. Adams won high average at 
Fort Dodge, la., June 3, scaring 292-300, making 97J%. 
C. W. Budd was second, scoring 284-300— 94j%. Mr. 
Adams made a run of 161 and Mr. Budd a run. of 124 
straight. This excellent shooting was done with 
"Nitro Club" shells. At Wyethsville, Va., June 2, 
Mr. E. Huff scored 380-400. 

All these excellent winnings were made with U. M. 
C. Smokeless Powder shot shells. 



U. M. C. "Nitro Club" shells. Mr. H. H. Hontz won 
high average at the Wolcottville, Ind., tournament 
May 18. At Williamsport, Pa., June 2, E. N. Dirk 
won the West Branch Rod and Gun Club's champion- 
ship silver cup, event open to any amateur in the 
State scoring 98-100. W. T. Speiser with Arrow 
shells at the same tournament broke 99-100. 



Amateur winnings with U. M. C. shot shells: At 
the Franklin, O., shoot, Chas. Young won high 
average, scoring 9bJ%. At Vicksburg, Miss., shoot, 
Mr. Brady won high amateur average, 95%. O. N. 
Ford won the Iowa target championship; A P. Mc- 
Dowell won the Iowa diamond badge at Spirit Lake, 
May 13. Fred Coleman at Mahanoy City, Pa., won 
the famous Cooper-Coleman match. At Watertown, 
Wis., Gun Club shoot, May 15, G. V. During won high 
average. At Liichfield, 111., May 18, W. T. Craig 
won high average, scoring 163-175. Ihe Nebraska 
State championship was won by Wm. Townsend. At 
Marshallton, la., Mr. Taylor scored 377 out of 400, 
making 94%, and winning high average on June 25 
and 26. At Kent, O., J. A. Flick scored 70 out of 75, 
winning high average June 25. At Madison, Wis., 
G. V. Dering scored 397-320, 96%, winning high aver- 
age June 25 and 26. At Wooten, Tex., Dr. Jackson 
scored 271-300 winning first amateur average, and 
Geo. Bancroft broke 269-300, winning second amateur 
average. At Sparta, Wis., G. V. Dering won high 
average; Wm. Schiltz won second. At Watertown, 
S. D., June 1 H. G. Taylor won high amateur average 
and the South Dakota championship. A. Newman, a 
prominent amateur of Owensboro, Ky., has been 
doing some remarkable shooting of late at the trap, 
breaking 48-50 on April 22; on May 6 he scored 45-50: 
May 12 he scored 192-210 at Cannellton, Ind., tourna- 
ment, and on May 20 at Owensboro, Ky., 49-50, using 



The same old story. Shooters of Winchester goods 
carried off the honors at the Twentieth Annual Tour- 
nament of the Sportsmen's Association of the North- 
west, Pendleton, Oregon on June 23-24-25, under the 
auspices of the Pendleton Sportsmen's Association. 
The Anaconda cup, shot for on the opening day, was 
captured by W. F. Sheard of Tacoma, Wash., 
with a Winchester "pump" gun and Winchester 
"Leader" shells, after shooting off two ties. The first 
with F. W. Brown of Harrington, Wash., and E. F. 
Confarr, of Livingston, Mont , and the final tie with 
Mr. Confarr. To win this cup it was necessary for 
1r. Sheard to score 73 out of 75 The Multnomah 
medal, 25 targets, reversed pull, was won by E. F. 
Confarr, with a Winchester "pump" gun and the 
"Leader" shell, after shooting off a tie with W. F. 
Sheard of Tacoma, Wash., P. J. Holohan of Wallace, 
Idaho, H. W. Peck of Walla Walla, Wash., and E. J. 
Chingreen of Spokane, Wash. To «n this medal Mr. 
Confarr had to score 48 out of the possible 50 which is 
splendid shooting on reversed pull. The Brownlee 
trophy, 25 targets, unknown angles, reversed pull, 
use of both barrels, was also captured by Mr. Confarr 
with a Winchester "pump" gun and the "Leader" 
shell, after shooting off a tie with G. W. Gibson, C. C. 
Nauman and A. J. Webb of San Francl6co, Cal., W. 
Dryden of Walla Walla, Wash., J. Brady of Harring- 
ton, Wash., P. J. Holohan of Wallace, Idaho, W. F. 
Sheard of Tacoma, Wash., and J. E. Callison of Port- 
land, Or. To win this trophy Mr. Confarr scored 50 
straight. The Walla Walla Brownlee medal, 25 tar- 
gets, expert rules, one man up, five traps, unknown 
traps, known angles, was won by E. E.Elli6 of Seattle, 
Wash., on the only straight score in this event. Mr. 
Ellis shot an L. C. Smith gun and Winchester "Lead- 
er" shells. The Globe trophy, the famous hotly 
contested trophy of the Northwest, by reason of the 
several different styles of shooting covering this 
event, was captured by Mr. E. F. Confarr, after shoot- 
ing off two ties. The first with T. B. Ware of Spo- 
kane, Wash., and Wm. Hillis of Portland, Or., and 
the final with Mr. Ware. To win this trophy Mr. 
Confarr scored 136 out of 150 shot at with Mb "pump" 
gun and the "Leader" shell. Of the seven men in on 
the first five high averages for the tournament, three 
shot the Winchester "pump" guns and five the Win- 
chester "Leader" shell, as follows: First, E. F Con- 
farr, Livingston, Mont., 550 out of 580, 94.82%, Win- 
chester "pump, " Leader shell. Second, E. E. Ellis, 
Seattle, Wash., 541 out of 580, 93.29%, L. C. Smith 
gun, Leader shell. Third, W. F. Sheard, Tacoma, 
Wash.. 539 out of 580, 92 93%', Winchester "pump," 
Leader shell. Fourth, C. C. Nauman, San Francisco, 
Cal., 536 out of 580, 92 41%, Clabrough gun, Magic 
shell. Fifth, W. H. Seaver, San Francisco, Cal., 535 
out of 580, 92.94% Winchester "pump," Leader shell. 
Fifth, E. J. Chingreen, Spokane, Wash.. 535 out of 
580, 92 94%, L. C. Smith gun, Leader shell. Fifth, F. 
C. Stephens, Pomeroy, Wash., 535 out of 580, 92.94%, 
Remington gun, Magic shell. 

The two longest straight runs of the tournament 
were made by shooters using Winchester "pump" 
guns. First by P. J. Holohan of Wallace, Idaho, 84. 
Second by E. F. Confarr of Livingston, Mont., 83. 

New Haven, Conn., June 9, E. C. Griffith of Pas- 
coag, R. I", first general average, 126 out of 130, shoot- 
ing "Infallible." 



Camden. Ark., June 8 and 9, Turner Hubby of 
Waco, Texas, first general average, 377 out of 400, 
shooting "Infallible." Second general average and 
first amateur average, Ed Brady of MemphiB, Tenn., 
373 out of 400, shooting Du Pont. Third general 
average, Hood Waters, 369 out of 400, shooting "In- 
fallible." Fourth general average, F. M. Faurote of 
Dallas, Tex. and J. E. Wells, of Pine Bluffs, Ark., 
368 out of 400, shooting "Infallible" and Du Pont 
respectively. Second amateur average, J. E. Wells, 
368 out of 400, shooting Du Pont. 

Huntington, W. Va., June 8-10, first general aver- 
age, J. A. R. Elliott. 568 out of 600,shooting Schultze, 
Second general average, R. L. Trimble, 556 out of 600, 
shooting Du Pont. Third general average, J. M. 
Hawkins, 552 out of 600, shooting Du Pont. Fourth 
general average, C. O. Le Compte, 548 out of 600, 
shooting "Infallible." First amateur average, J. F, 
Mallory of Parkersburg, W. Va. and F. D. Alkire o. 
Woodlyn, O., 523 out of 600, shooting Du Pont. Secf 
ond amateur average, T. R. Shepherd of Huntington- 
W. Va., 542 out of 600. Third amateur average, E, 
F. Douthitt of Huntington, W. Va., 521 out of 600. 
shooting "Infallible." State Championship was won 
by Wm. Trapp of Marietta, O., 48 out of 50. State 
team championship was won by J. F. Mallory and F. 
E. Mallory, shooting Du Pont. 

Lakeville, Ohio, June 10, first general average, D. 

D. Gross, 190 out of 200, shooting Du Pont. Second 
general average, L. J . Squier, 188 out of 200, shooting 
Du Pont. Third general average, E. F. Haak, 186 
out of 200, shooting Hazard. First amateur average, 

E. F. Haak, 186 out of 200, shooting Hazard. Second 
amateur average, H. M. Brown, 184 out of 200 shoot- 
ing "Laflin & Rand." Third amateur average, W. 
E. Guest and G. M. Tait, 172 out of 200, shootfng Du 
Pont and Laflin & Rand respectively. 

Warwick, N. Y., June 10, J. S. Fanning, first gen- 
eral average, 93 out of 100, shooting "Infallible." 

Some interesting smokeless powder notes are the 
following: 

Battle Creek, Mich., June 15 and 16, F. M. Faurote, 
first general average, 337 out of 355, shooting "In- 
fallible." Second general average, J. M. Hawkins, 
335 out of 355, shooting Du Pont. Third general 
average, C. O. Le Compte, 334 out of 355, shooting 
"Infallible." First amateur average, W. Renniek of 
Detroit, Mich., 324 out of 355, Bhooting Du Pont. 
Second amateur average, W. E. Hubbard of Battle 
Creek, Mich., 313 out of 355, shooting "Infallible." 
Third amateur average, Frtd Keefe of Kalamazoo, 
Mich., 302 out of 355, shooting "Infallible." Michigan 
e xpert championship, Max HenBler, shooting "In- 

illible. " Semi-expert championship, Chas. Houtz, 
s hooting Du Pont. Amateur championship, C. E. 
Vermillya, Bhooting Du Pont. 

North Side Gun Club, Pittsburgl , Pa , June 18, L. 
Z. Lawrence, 99 out of 100, run of 78, shooting "In- 
fallible." 

Waterloo, Iowa, May 26 and 27, Fred Gilbert, first 
general average, 398 out of 420, shooting Du Pont 
Smokeless. Second general average C. B. Adams: 
386 out of 420, shooting Laflin &■ Rand Smokeless. 
Third general average, Charles W. Budd, 383 out of 
420, shooting Schultze. Fir9t amateur average, W. 
Lambert, 382 out of 420, shooting Du Pont. Second 
amateur average, R. L. Storm, 381 out of 420, shoot- 
ing Du Pont Third amateur average, H G. Taylor, 
375 out of 420, shooting tchultze and Du Pont. 

Cleveland, Ohio, May 30, D. A. Upson, first general 
average, 139 cut of 150, shooting Du Pont powder. 
Second general average, C. O. Le Compte and Robert 
Worthington, 133 out of 150, shooting "Infallible" 
and "E. C," respectively. Third general average, 
Frank G. Hogan, 125 out of 150, shooting "E. C." 



For Colic in Horses. 



When any considerable number of 
horses are kept on a ranch scarcely a year 
passes without having developed among 
them one or more cases of flatulent colic. 
Among the most frequent causes of this 
form of colic are to be mentioned sudden 
changes of food, too long fasting, food 
then given while the animaliaexbausted 



Warranted to Give Satisfaction. 

GombauWs 

Caustic Balsam 




Has Imitators But No Competitors. 

A Safe, Speedy and Positive Cure for 
Curb, Splint. Sheeny, Capped Hock, 
Strained Tendons, Founder, Wind 
Puffs, and all lameness from Spavin, 
Ringbone and other bony tumors. 
Cures all skin diseases or Parasites, 
Thrush, Diphtheria. Removes all 
Bunches from Horses or Cattle. 
As a Human Remedy for Rheumatism, 
Sprains, Sore Throat, etc, it is invaluable. 
Vveiy bottle of Caustic Balsam sold is 
warranted to (jive sntislaction. Price ffil BO 
per bottle. Sold by drucrfsts, or sent by ex- 
press, charges paid, witn full directions for 
its use. £3~Send for descriptive circulars 
testimonials, etc. Address 

The Lawrence-Williams Co., Cleveland, 0. 



new hay or grain, large quantities of 
green food, feed that has lain in the 
manger for some time and become sour, 
indigestible food, irregular teeth, crib bit- 
ing, and, in fact, anything that produces 
indigestion may produce flatulent colic, 

The symptoms of wind colic are not so 
suddenly developed, nor so severe as 
those of cramp colic. At firBt the horsfe 
is noticed to be dull, paws slightly and 
may or may not lie down. The pains 
from the beginning are continuous. The 
belly enlarges and by striking it in front 
of the haunches a drumlike sound re- 
sults. If not soon relieved the symptoms 
are aggravated, and in addition there are 
noticed difficult breathing, bloodshot 
eyes, and red mucous membranes, loud, 
tumultuous heart beats, profuse perspir- 
ation, trembling of the front legs, sighing 
respiration, staggering from side to side, 
and finally the animal plunges forward 
dead. The diagnostic symptom of flatu- 
lent colic is the distension of the bowels, 
with gas, detected by the bloated appear- 
and resonance on percussion. 

The treatment for wind colic differs 
materially from that of cramp colic. Ab- 
sorbents are of some service and charcoal 
may be given in any quantity. Relaxants 
are aho beneficial in this form of colic. 
Chloral hydrate not only possesses this 
quality, but it is also a, pain reliever. It 
is then particularly well adapted to the 
treatment of wind colic, and should be 
given in one ounce doses in a pint of 
water. Diluted alcohol or whiskey may 
be given, or aromatic spirits of ammonia 
in one ounce doses at short intervals. A 



physic should always be given in flatulent 
colic as early as possible, the best being 
ono ounce doses of Barbadoes aloes. 
Renal injections of turpentine, one to two 
ounces, and linseed oil, eight ouncep, 
may be given frequently to stimulate the 
peristaltic motion of the bowels and favor 
the escape of wind. 

Blankets wrung out of hot water do 
much to afford relief. They should be re- 
newed every five or ten minutes and cov- \ 
ered with a dry woolen blanket. This 
form is much more fatal than cramp 
colic, and requires prompt and persistent 
treatment. It is entirely unsafe to pre- 



tacks going on to a speedy death, while 
others appear at the onset to be severe 
yield readily to treatment. Do not ceate 
effortB unless the animal is dead. In se- 
vere cases puncturing of the bowels in the 
moBt distended part by means of a small 
trocar and cannula or with a needle of a 
hypodermic syringe, thus allowing the es- 
cape of gas haB often saved life, and such 
punctures, if made with a clean, sharp 
instrument, that is not allowed to remain 
in the horBO too long, are accompanied by 
Utile danger, and do more to quickly re- 
lieve the patient than any other treat- 
ment. — Denver Field and Farm. 



diet the result some apparently mild at- 



Use a little coal oil to remove gum 
from the tools which are used in trim- 
ming. ■ 



THE CROWLEY STAKE 

A SIDE STAKE FOR STARTERS IN THE 
THREE-YEAR-OLD DIVISIONS 

OF THE 

Pacific Breeders Futurity Stakes No. 4 

(FOALS OF 1904-TO TAKE PLACE IN 1907) 

Entries to Close Monday, August 1, 1904 

CONDITIONS. 

A Side Stake of $25 each tor Trotting and Pacing Foals ot 1904 that were entered or substituted 
and will start in the Three- Year-Old Divisions of the Breeders Futurity in 1907. All money pa d in 
on trotting foals to be divided among those starting in the trotting division, and all money paid in 
on paoers to be divided among those that start in the pacing division. Moneys divided raann.s 
per cent and to go to the first and second horses in this aids stake, according to their positions in me 
anal summary of each race. In oase all those in the side stake should be ^distanced in tne 
of either of the regular events, they shall start in another race, best two heats in three no i 
day, to decide the money winners. Entrance to the side stake $25 each. The money to Du 
In some reputable bank, to remain at interest until the stake is trotted. 

Entries Close Monday, August 1st, with F. W. KELIEY, Seoretary F. C. T. H, 



12 



®tt* gveeliev cm& ^povteman 



[July 16, 1904 



A Cow Study. 



There has been a vast deal of study 
given to cows in the last ten years, both 
by scientific investigators and by dairy- 
men on the farm. May it not be that 
this attention to this important domestic 
animal— the comprehension of what the 
cow is, what we want of her, and how we 
shall best go to work to realize what we 
are after— has been seriously defective as 
well as radically wrong? Investigators, 
if no! their followers and the people whom 
they seek to serve, run on certain lines, 
follow prescribed grooves in their work, 
without giving due consideration to other 
quite as important factors bearing on 
their subject. In the investigations with 
the cow, the object sought, has been to 
secrre more milk. This one idea has been 
the point on which every effort has been 
centered. Not a thought has been given 
to first building a cow that can stand up 
to the strain of giving an increased flow 
of the product desired. 

The law of nature has been ignored, 
that when one organ in a body is abnor- 
mally developed, there is a corresponding 
lack of development of other closely 
related organs. While great progress has 
been made in this one factor of produc- 
tion, as a result, we have an unbalanced 
animal giving the milk. Hence, an in- 
orease in the troubles that beset the cow 
and her offspring, milk fever, abortion, 
failure to breed, calf cholera. It seemB to 
be a reasonable conclusion the Nebraska 
Station has arrived at, that a weakened 
vitality of the cow is a necessary requisite 
to the starting of these diseases. It is a 
severe strain on the vital energy of the 
cow to force her to keep up a liberal flow 
of milk nearly or quite throughout the 
year, and bring forth a calf in the 
same time. With the milking forced to 
such a tension, it is not strange that the 
vitality of the calf is weakened. All this 
comes from the fact that while the milk- 
ing powers of thecow have been developed 
through years of effort in this special 
direction, there has not been a corre- 
sponding development of other powers, to 
enable her to carry on the increased draft 
on her system. 

The very rational theory of balanced 
rations as now applied in practice cannot 
fail of a tendency to unbalance the cow 
to which it is furnished. We are feeding 
the balanced ration to get more milk. 
To increase the milk flow we increase the 
proportion of protein fodders. Not a 
thought is given to the fact that an in- 
crease of milk flow calls for a correspond- 
ing increase at the same time, of the all 
around vital powers of the machine that 
makes the milk. We go on developing 
and forcing the milk production just as 
though that were all there is to a cow. 
The practice is to feed a little more pro- 
tein to get a little more milk. Thecow 
thus fed is forced to keep up a liberal 
flow nearly or quite up to the time of 
bringing forth her increase. The fodder 
material absolutely necessary to the de- 
velopment of the growing offspring has 
been diverted to the making of milk, and 
then the owner wonders that the calf 
shows a weakened vi.ality and that dis- 
eases are on the increase among the cows. 
Cow owners, breeders and feeders have 
been chasing exclusively after more milk 
lung enough. It in quite time to revise 
our course of teaching and of practice 
and bring our study of the eow down 
onto a more rational basis. Constitu- 
tional vigor should be of first considera- 
tion.— Maine F<i 



Sore Necks on Horses. 



American Beef in England. 



The most of the machinery now used on 
the farm is balanced by the tongue, and 
consequently a great deal of weight comes 
on the horse's neck, which is liable to get 
sore during the hot weather. I know how 
disagreeable it is to drive a horse with a 
sore neck, besides the pain and annoyance 
it gives the horse, writes Forest Henry in 
Northwestern Agriculturist. 

I find that the trouble usually can be 
avoided by observing the following rules : 
Never check the horse while at work so 
he cannot lower his head and work the 
collar front slightly while standing. You 
will always notice it is the horse that car- 
ries his head high that is most liable to 
get a sore neck. See that the collar fits 
the neck of the horse so it will not work 
from side to side as he walks. See also 
that it is not too short. A short collar 
is sure to make a sore neck in warm 
weather. 

See that the hameB fit the collar. A 
hame that has to be let out by lengthening 
the strap at the top is also liable to make 
a sore neck. As the horse pulls the hames 
will spread on Buch a fit, pulling the col- 
lar together endwise and spreading it at 
the same time, so it will work back and 
forth and is sure to cause trouble. For 
tbis reason I prefer the high hame to the 
Bhort one. AVith the short hame any al- 
teration has to be made by lengthining 
or shortening the strap, while it is the 
hame that should be shortened or length- 
ened. I have found a sole leather pad that 
is very generally used a very good pad for 
the top of the collar. A pad made of deer 
skin and heavy harness leather is excel- 
lent, where the collar is long enough to 
admit of its use. It requires a collar an 
inch longer where it is UBed with the 
leather pad. 

A sore neck is usually preceded by a 
bunch coming on the top of the neck 
where the collar rests. If this is left and 
the horse worked it soon becomeB a deep- 
seated sore, causing no end of trouble. If 
this buncn is noticed the first day it ap. 
pears it can be entirely removed and tbe 
horse worked continually if the cause of 
the trouble is removed snd the lump 
treated with oil of spike every night and 
morning. It pays to look after the wel- 
fare of the horse as he is our main de- 
pendence during the rushing work of sum- 
mer, and a horse with a sore neck cannot 
do his work easily nor as satisfactorily as 
if he were sound. It never pays to over- 
do a horse when the weather is exces- 
sively warm, and he is almost sure to get 
sore shoulders or a sore neck, no matter 
how well his collar fits, if his blood gets 
overheated, it will often pay to give a 
horse a pail of water between meals in 
very warm weather. It may mean some 
work, but it will pay in the long run to 
not neglect atything that will add to the 
comfort of the hard worked animal. 



Tbe success of a young sow with her 
first litter has much to do with her future 
value and consequently it is very im- 
portant that all of the conditions within 
the owner's control be made favorable. 
As the hog is naturally an herbivorous 
anima' its system at this time above all 
other requires succulent food. It is not 
le for its young to be properly de- 
>; 'J without it and must be furnished 
'. laturally or artificially. 



The Biggest Egg Farm. 

What is said to be the largest egg farm 
in the world is one owned and managed 
by C. E. L. Hayward at Hancock, N. II. 
According to the) Mural JVeto Yorker it 
has at this time over 8400 hens, kept in 
000 small houses, fourteen in each. The 
hens are never allowed outside their 
little eight-foot-square coops, and are 
never fed green feed, contrary to the 
teachings of all other poultry-keepers. 
Each hen gets about a quarter of a pound 
per day of beef scraps, gluten hominy 
feed, wheat, etc., with a little salt, ground 
shells, grit, and charcoal, and plenty of 
clean water. They average 100 eggB each 
during the year, for which the high aver- 
age of 20 eents a dozen is received, or a 
a total of $2.17. It costs about $1.17 each 
for feed, so that the profit on each hen is 
about $1. The droppings go to fertilize a 
large orchard and are a Bource of consid- 
erable profit. Only young hens are kept ; 
the second year they are sold and pullets 
are bought for the next year's egg crop. 

Sober up on Jackson's Napa Soda. 



In view of the fact that the average 
Englishman finds little in America that 
meets with his approval and less to com- 
mend, the comments on American beef 
in the report of the health officer of Lon- 
don issued recently must be taken a high 
compliment, says the Drovers Telegram. 
While Englishmen have developed a good 
appetite for American beef they have 
never quite forgotten us for breaking into 
their market and relegating C nadian 
beef to a seat in the rear. Dr. W. H. 
CollinBridge, the health officer of the city 
of London, evidently does not share the 
prejudice which most Englishmen have 
against American beef producers, or he is 
broad enough to forget this prejudice 
while preparing an official document and 
diecusses the merits of American beef 
impartially. The following ie an extract 
from his report: 

"The cIobb of the war in South Africa 
has left the firms engaged in the export 
of meat from the Argentine at liberty to 
supply the wants of this country and re- 
frigerated beef from the River Platte dis- 
trict is now on sale daily at the Central 
market, and proves a formidable competi- 
tor to the Bimilarly preserved article from 
the United States with which we have 
been for so long conversant ; but it must 
be admitted that there is still much to be 
desired in point of quality the Argentine 
productions of to-day being about on 
level with, the early consignments from 
America thirty years ago, and it is easy 
to understand that careful selection at 
the breeding farm, together with the 
importation of some of the beBt blood in 
this country have effected considerable 
improvement during that period. The 
effect on the meat coming to this country 
is still more marked, as it has been always 
found, both in regard to frozen and re. 
frigerated meat, that if any were preju- 
dicially affected by conditions obtaining 
during the time of preservation, it was 
the carcasses of imperfectly fed animals 
which suffered most, and when it is borne 
in mind that the passage from Buenos 
Ayres takes three weeks while that from 
New York occupies six days it will be 
seen that any deficiency of quality is sure 
to tell upon the Argentine beef to 
greater extent than upon that from North 
America. 

"The American beef trade in London is 
mainly in the hands of some half dozen 
firms, and the article they supply is now 
bo well known as to render comment un 
necessary; it has been on Bale in tufficient 
quantities of satisfactory quality. Some 
of tnese same firms are also engaged in 
bringing live cattle to the waterside mar- 
ket at Deptford, Birkenhead, etc. ; these 
are now so carefully prepared and brought 
so free from bruises or other injury as to 
be more than ever in competition with 
the home-grown cattle; but as, against 
this, they have themselves to face com- 
petitors of no mean order in the produc- 
tions of the great plains of Canada, the 
presence of which in Buch large numbers 
of excellent quality on our English mar- 
kets is one of the best features of the 
year. 

A New York broker, says the Product 
Neios, recently received a car of California 
eggs 400 cases, which he sold at 30 cents a 
dozen. Strictly sperking, these were not 
California eggs. They were bought in 
Kansas in the spring, shipped to the 
coast and stored. The New York prices 
were so attractive that the eggs were 
shipped first to Chicago and then to New 
York. The freight on these eggs was 
quite a little item, amounting to $424. 
This hardly cuts much figure when it is 
understood that the 400 cases brought 
$3600, Eggs are breaking all records this 
year. Getting $3000 for a car of storage 
eggs is something remarkable. It would 
be interesting to know if these eggs 
reached the consumer as "strictly fresh," 
and what their quality proved to be. 



A Model Dairy Farm. 

During the recent investigation 
brought by the Board of Health of San 
Francisco officials of the body visited all 
of the dairies supplying milk to the city 
and for the most part found them in a 
thoroughly unsatisfactory condition. 
The Sleepy Hollow Dairy in Marin 
county, however, proved an agreeable 
exception and was ranked by the inspec- 
tors as the model dairy of that section 
of the country, and will be used as a 
standard which the other dairies muBt 
emulate. The noticeable feature of the 
Sleepy Hollow dairy was the extreme 
cleanliness of the premises, the animals 
and the men who conduct the place. 
The cows are curried before each milk- 
ing, the men wear clean uniforms and 
the cow barns are washed out after each 
milking and lime sprinkled on the floors. 
The barns are built high and large win- 
dows and ventilators permit the access 
of plenty of fresh air and sunshine. The 
feed boxes are cleaned daily and the 
cooling rooms and can-washing racks 
are always kept in a state of neatness 
that surpasses the condition of many 
kitchens. Both Dr. Kagan and Dr. 
Hassler were enthusiastic after leaving 
the Hotaling farm, and it was with a 
sigh of regret that they went from this 
model of a dairy to places of filth anc 
stench conducted by neighboring 
farmers. 



Success With a Small Flock. 



Fred Grundy, in Farm and Fireside, 
telle how he made fifty-five hens pay $3.31 
each in one year. He thinks it was done 
chiefly by giving them the best care. At 
the close of the season he found the sales 
of eggs were 701 dozen, amounting to 
$181.40. Seven hundred and thirty-six 
chicks were sold for $250.24. The bill for 
feed amounted to $166.33. It costs 82 
cents a head to feed the hens one year. 
It does not cost many farmers half -that, 
because they have a large range, and the 
hena pick up a large part of their living 
from what otherwise would go to waste. 
o 

"Scab inspection as usually practiced is 
a humbug," is the way a Western stock- 
man expresses himself. "When tbe dis- 
ease is bad enough for an inspector to 
find it any one can see it and until it 
breaks out it is foolish for an inspector to 
examine a flock of sheep with a micro- 
Bcope. The only thing an inspector can 
do is to enforce the law when a case of 
■cab is known to exist and if he will only 
do this conscientiously we will hear less 
trouble about tbe spread of the disease in 
this country. At present the way is too 
easy for men to pass up dipping and many 
think that the federal regulations are too 
much in favor of careless owners and not 
calculated to stop the mischief. There ia 
no possible or palpable excuse for bad 
dipping and yet we know of hundreds of 
cases where it is treated as an intolerable 
nuisance to be rid of at the least trouble 
and expense. Let the watchword be dip 
thoroughly, preach it everywhere, adopt 
it, encourage it, enforce it. for in the dip- 
ping process alone can the disease find its 
ultimate and certain eradication." 



If there is any doubt about eggs being 
fi-esb, don't sell them. Keep them at 
home. It is better for a bad egg to be 
broken there than by a oustomer. 

Young fowls should not be pushed too 
much for eggs. It Is hard on the sys- 
tem. Only well matured fowls should 
be crowded. 



Jackson's 
feet. 



Napa Soda untangles the 



Eggs intended for hatchingi'sbould 
be placed in a box or basket and cov- 
ered with a cloth or paper to prevent 
undue evaporation. 



Keep the floor under the peroh well 
strewn with dry earth, mix occasion- 
ally and use in the garden. 



July 16, 1904] 



&he gveebev oni» &p&vt&mcm 



13 



Relation of Salt to Dairying. 



Cowe should be salted regularly, or, 
better still, should hare constant access 
to salt. The practice of salting them 
once a day is not a good one, as the most 
of cattle will lick a little salt every day if 
they can Iget to it. Thus provided they 
will yield more and better milk than 
otherwise, and will also maintain a bet- 
ter degree of health. As salt provokes 
thirst, the milch animal should have as 
free access to water as to the saline min- 
eral, or the latter will do her more harm 
than good. 

Speaking of salt leadB me to say that 
some failures in dairy butter making I 
have noted came about by salting the 
cattle and the butter out of the same bar- 
rel. In other words, coarse insoluble salt 
was used for the butter, when only the 
highest and most refined grade should be 
employed. Salt that is not soluble will 
not permeate the substance of butter 
evenly, and thus rancidity may be in- 
duced. 

Again, grains of salt in butter always 
detracts from its appearance, and are in- 
imical to even flavor, from these causes 
alone lowering its market value. Let me 
Bay here that there are to-day just as fine 
grades of American dairy salt produced as 
come from England. 

American milch cattle fed on American 
grass produce butter salted with Ameri- 
can salt that is the peer of any on earth, 
and is so conceded in foreign markets 
In attaining this result, however, one 
muBt utilize the best of everything, think 
ing not that poor or cheap material can 
be introduced with impunity to future 
quality. 

I knew a dairyman once who, in a 
spasm of economy (?) sought to save fifty 
cents by purchasing a cheaper grade of 
salt than was his wont, and later lost on 
his shipment of butter thereby seven dol- 
lars. It was one of the most effective les- 
sons he could have been taught in practi- 
cal dairying, exemplifying aB it did that 
cheap material always produces cheap 
quality. When it comes to cheese mak- 
ing, salt holds just as important a posi- 
tion as in other dairy lines, i. e , that 
solubility and purity are highly neces- 
sary. 

The relation of salt, be it understood, 
to all phases ot dairying is a highly im- 
portant one, and because this fact is so 
little appreciated accounts for many dairy 
failures. — Farmers' Advocate. 



Sheep insist being kept constantly in a 
healthful condition to yield sound fleeces 
of valuable wool. 

A short-legged, ahort-bodied sheep is of- 
ten heavier and will produce more wool 
than one that looks to be twice as large. 

A sheep should never be caught, held 
or lifted by the wool, but be caught by 
the hind leg above the hoof or by the 
neck. 

At any time the time required to fatten 
sheep depends somewhat on their age and 
condition at commencement. 



It is often the case that the wormy 
fruit in the orchard can be consumed to a 
good advantage by the sheep 

The sheep rsiBS who is not progressive 
cannot expect to attain Derfection in his 
calling. — Farmers' Voire,. 



Eggs intended for hatching should not 
be kept more than two or th.'ee weeks. 
Ill-shaped eggs should never be used, as 
they are likely to prodnce ill-shaped 
chickens. The regular size and usual 
shape are the best. 



Sheep Notes. 



The ewes should be two years old be- 
fore bred. 

Lambs Bell more per pound and cost less 
to produce than mutton. 

Sheep have excellent digestion and 
hence they utilize food to the fullest de- 
gree. 

If sheep are not kept constantly in good 
condition the quality of the wool is af- 
fected. 

Erequent change of pasture makes fat 
•heep. It will not pay to rear a poor 
■heep for market. 

Sheep should always be fat when mar- 
keted. Fat is produced cheaper than 
lean, hence there is more profit. 

"When a man has improved his flock, 
until he can sell his poorest sheep at re- 
munerative prices he can then afford the 
best. 

There are very few animals that are as 
dainty and choice about their food as 
sheep. 

Under present conditions of sheep rais- 
ing the farmer cannot afford to keep sheep 
for any one object. 

If a sheep is not making a good growth, 
raising a lamb or two into market condi- 
tion, it is not profitable to the owner. 

With sheep a change of pasture will be 
found an advantage when the flocks can 
be put in a better place. 

To make sheep raising profitable young, 
uniformly, well-wooled sheep to grow 
heavy fleeces of merchantable wool are 
needed. 



A Few Courses 

in 

Domestic Economy: 

"Arrow" Lard Compound 
"Monarch" Hams 

Can Be Obtained 

from 

All First-Class Grocers. 

WESTERN MEAT COMPANY of California 



$100 Reward 

For long years we have offered 
to pay this amount for any 
case of Lameness, Curb, 
SpIint,ContractedCord, 
Colic, Distemper, etc, 
which cannot be cured by 

Tuttle's 
Elixir 

We have never been obliged to pay the re- 
ward for obvious reasons. It's infallible in all 
cases of Thrush, Cra-cked and Grease 
Keel and all forms of Lameness, 

Tuttle's American Condition Powders 

—a spedfic for Impure blood and all diseases arising there- 
from. Tones up and Invigorates the entire system. 
Tirnlp's Famllv Elixir Isuneqoalledasarem 




send a sample free for 6c in stamps, merely to pay postage. 
Send at once for our 100-page book "Veterinary Experi- 
ence," which we mall free. 
Tunic's ElixirCo., 437 , Farre[ISl.,SanFrMcIsco,C«I. 

Beware of so^alled Elixirs— none genuine bat Tuttle's, 
Avo li all blisters; they offer only temporary relief, If any. 



Futurity Candidates For Sale 

I have two McKinney Stallions eligible to 
start in the Breeders Futurity, Stanford and 
Occident Stakes of this season. As I can start 
but one, will offer one for sale. 

Either one is likely to win, which I will 
demonstrate to any one meaning business. 

Will be in Santa Rosa until Tuesday next 
when they will be shipped to Pleasanton. 

James H. Gray, 

SANTA ROSA. 



CALIFORNIA 

NORTHWESTERN RAILWAY 

Through Picturesque California, 

The Ideal Route for 

Tie Aucler anfl OatinE Trips 

One day's ride from San Francisco will take 
you to some of the finest Trout Streams In the 
State. Along the line and within easy distance 
are many of the best Springs and Summer Resorts 
In the State. The Company maintains a Fish 
Hatchery and annually stooks the many streams 
reached by Its road. One million Trout Fry were 
planted last year in these streams. 

Black Bass Fishing can be enjoyed in Russian 
River near Guemeville, Guernewood Park and 
Camp Vacation, in season. 

The best Striped Bass Fishing waters on the 
Coast reached by the Tiburon Ferry. 

VACATION FOR 1904 

Issued aonualb* by the Company, is now ready. 
This Is the standard publication on the Coast for 
information regarding Mineral Springs, Resorts, 
Country Homes and Farms where summer board- 
ers are taken, and Select Camping Spots. 

Beautifully illustrated, 150 pp. and can be had 
In response to mail request or at ticket offices. 

Ticket Offices— 650 Market Street (Chronicle 
Bldg) and Tiburon Ferry, foot of Market Street. 

General Office— Mutual Life Ins. Bldg., cor. 
Sansome and California Sts., San Francisco. 



JAS. L. FRAZIER, 
Gen. MgT. 



B. X. RYAN, 

Gen. Pass. Agt. 



McMURRAY 



* 



STARTING PAYMENTS DUE 
JULY 25, 1904. 

Pacific Breeders Futurity Stakes 

Nos. X £tnd £2. 

Two-Year-Olds. Three-Year-Olds. 



(FOALS OF 1903) 

On Pacers $25 

On Trotters $35 

Money Divided. 

Two-I ear-Old Trotters S1250 

Two-Tear-Old Pacers 750 

Nominator Dam of Winner Trot 200 

Nominator Dam of Winner Pace. . — 200 



(FOALS OF 1901) 

On Pacers $35 

On Trotters ....$50 

Money Divided. 

Three-Tear-Old Trotters 82000 

Three-Year-old Pacers 1000 

Nominator Dam of Winner Trot 200 

Nominator Dam of Winner Pace 200 



Owner of Stallion, sire of Winner of Three-Year-Old Trot, when mare was bred. .8100 
Owner of Stallion, sire of Winner of Three- Year-Old Pace, when mare was bred.. 100 

Nominators must designate, when making payments to start, whether the 
horse entered is a trotter Or a pacer. 

Two-Year-Olds that start are not barred from starting again in the 
Three-Year-Old divisions. 



E. P. HEALD, President. 



F. W. KELLEY. Secretary, 

36 GEARY ST., SAN FRANCISCO. 



JOG CART 

Especially adapted for 

Jogging, Training and 

Matinee Driving. 

Price Low. 
McMURRAY SULKIES 

and JOGGING CARTS 

Standard the World Over. 

JSr* Address for printed matter and prices. 

W. J. Kenney, 

531 Valencia St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Privileges For Sale 

FOR 

Vallejo Race Meeting- 

4 Days— AUGUST 10, 11, 12 and IS, 1904. 

Bids for the following privileges will be re- 
ceived up to noon, MONDAY, August 1, 1901: 

BETTING, Pools or Books. 

BAB PRIVILEGE, including sale of all drinks 
inside the grounds. 

RESTAURANT, LUNCH COUNTER, etc. 

A certified oheck for 50 per cent must accom- 
pany each bid. Right reserved to reject any or 

all bids. 

TIIOS. SMITH, Manager, 

Vallejo, Cal. 



WANTED. 

A DRIVIXG HORSE OF HACKNEY CO 
-^- formation that will dook well. Any cc 
but gray. One that is handsome, wi th good ac 
and style, 15.3 hands and not over 16 hands. E 
full description and where horse oan bo ut 
Address W- J.,'>thls office. ' 




®he gveeltev emit gtpsxzt&tnan 



[July 16, 3904 



THE BAYWOOD STUD This is Youp Split Second 



THE BUNGALOW, SAN MATEO, CAL 

(Properly ol John Pabbott, Esq.) 

Imp. Hackney Stallion 

GREEN'S RUFUS 63 «" 

Will serve a limited number of Approved Mares, Season 1904 

FEE --- $75 

Reductions made lor two or more mares. 

Manager, WALTER SEALY. 



Istit He Worth 5sv'mg? x 

Why trade off or sell at a beggarlv price a good 
horse just because he "goes lame," "throws a 
■ curb" or develops some other blemish? There 
is nothing in the way of Spavins, Curbs, Splints, 
Windpuffs or Bunches which will not yield 
readilv and permanentlv to treatment with 

QUINN'S 

*■? OINTMENT. 

Dr. K. H. Davenport, a prominent physician o£ Sheridan . Iod., 
writes. 1 have n^ed a number of remedies for the removal of 
. cQtbs. splints, thUkened tendons and tissues generally, but for 
I the last two years I have not been without Qu Inn's Ointment. I have tested it thor- 
oughly at different times, and say without hesitancy that it is the only reliable reme- 
dy oT the Kind 1 haveevertried.'* Price 51.00 per bottle. Sold by all druggists or 

" W.B.Eddy & Co., Whitehall, N.Y. 




ill Wrlw ui far 




NEW MODEL 

1904: 




BEST ROAD CART MADE, 
O'BRIEN & SONS 

Cor. Golden Gate Ave. and Polk St. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL 



TROTTER FOR SALE. 

C;ORREL GELDING, 6 YEARS OLD. Stands 
*3 16 2i4 hands high and weighs HCO pounds. 
Sired by Niccanorby Dexter Prince, dam Flora 
by El Cajon by Don Victor. He is in every re- 
spect a grand individual, handsome, stylish, and 
can show a 2:40 gall or better. With very little 
work I drove him a half this year in 1:23 and a 
quarter in 39 seconds, to cart. He will make a 
grand park horse and should be seen by any one 
looking for a high-class trotter. Call or address 
L. R. PALMER, Walnut Creek, Cal. 

Santa Rosa Stock Farm 

HAS FOR SALE 

Three Sidney Dillon Yearling Colts 

from the following mares: 
Pans* (dam of King Orry 2:21H, Almonitlon 
2:21 3£. Lady Pansy Russell 2:28;^. and Pansy 
Russell 2:30) by Casslus M- Clay, Jr. 22, eto. 
Goycara 2:18* by Guy Wilkes 2:15*. dam 
BIscarl (dam of 5 In list) by Director 2:17, 
second dam Blcarl (dam of 6 in list) by 
Harold, etc 
BuMle Russell by Bay Rose 2:2014, out of Oakley 
Russell by Happy Russell, son of Happy 
™ Medium, eto. 
Apply to IRA PIERCE, 

718 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 



PRIVILEGES! 

FO R SA LE. 

Pacific Coast Trotting Horse Breeders 

Association Meeting at 

SAN J05E 

AUGUST 3, 4, 5 and 6, 1904 

T)IDS FOR THE FOLLOWING PRIVILEGES 
■*-* will be received up to noon, Wednesday, 
July 20, 1004: 

DnHinrr /Auction and Mutuel Pools, or, 
UClllllg ^ Auction and TotalUator ) 

Bar and Cigars, 
Restaurant, 

Candy and Nuts, 
Programmes. 

A certified check for 50 per cent should accom- 
pany each bid. Right reserved to reject any or 
all bids. 

F. W. KELLEY, Secretary, 
36 Geary St., San Francisco 




I You Can't Cut Out 

A BOG SPAVIN ok 
TH0R0UGHPIN, but 

ABSORBINE 

will clean them off, and you 
work the horse same time. 
Does not blister or remove tin 
hair. "Will tell you more if 
you write. $2.00 per bottle, 
delivered. 

W. F. YOUNG, P. D. F., 

Springfield. Mass 
Forsaleby Mack&Co Langley &MichaelsCo 
Redlngton & Co., J. O'Kane and J. A. McKerron 
all of San Francisco. 



FOR SALE. 

XfY ENTIRE STOCK OF STANDARD-BRED 
■ L>i Trotting and Pacing Horses. Single drivers 
and double teams. Some excellent prospects for 
stake winners entered in the Occident. Stanford 
and Breeders Futurity stakes. A floe carriage 
team, also tho great broodmare Daisy S. (dam of 
Tom Smith 2:13»*. Genoral Vallojo 2:20^. Sweet 
Row £28 (trial 2:21) and Little Mac (8) 2:-„*7). The 
driving horses and colts can be seen at my stable 
In Vallojo, and tho broodmares, etc., at the race 
track. Apply to or address 

THOMAS SMITH, Vallojo, Cal. 



FOR SALE. 

M.Qcinn Rnv Ha ? B° latn K DV Sultan Jr.; 
JUlMslUll t>UV stands Ifttf hands and wolirha 
ever 1100 lbs. A handsome, high-class, Rcntlo- 
man's roadster, stylish action, gentlo. and good 
drlTer. Winner (without preparation) of tho 2:30 
pace at tho matlnoo Decoration Day. Address 
T. EC. CORCORAN, 
1901 Valencia St., San Francisco. 



Fast Pacer For Sale. 

'THE PACING GELDING, AL SANDY lll9U 

' by Waylsnd W . dam Rapid Ann by Overland. 
Can pace throe heats bettor than 2:17. Can bnuli 
Mt on the road. Excellent prospect to race. 
He is one of the best road horses In the oily. 
Gentle and Intelligent. Safe for lady to drive. 
For price and further particulars address 8. 
WATSON, 836 Donglas stroet, San FranoUoo 




BLAKE, M0FFITT & TOWNE 



-DEALERS IK- 



S5-57-59-61 First Street, S. F. 



Telephone Main : 



PEDIGREES TABULATED 

And typo written 
Ready for framing. 

Write for prices. 

UitKKDEii and Sportsman, 33 Goory Street 
Sao Franolsoo. Cal. 



IF 



YOU CAN PICK THE 
FIRST THREE 
HORSES IN THE 



California Stakes 
$2000 Guaranteed 

(FOR 2:24 CLASS TROTTERS) 
AT THE 

RACE MEETING ; 

OF THE 

Pacific Coast 




Trolling Horse 



Breeders Association 



■ GOT-METAL OPEN-FACED SPLIT 
SECOND TIM'JR. 

I Shows seconds and fift'hs. Regis- 
ters minutes, start, stop'Spd fly back 

' operated from the crown, split-second 
attachment worked by the side plug. 
The thinnest and beet $25 split timer 
in the market. 



San Jose, Aug. 3, 4, 5, 6, 1904 

The following is a list of the horses entered : 
No. 11. The California Stakes for 2:24 Class Trotters $2000 

S H Hoy's blk m Little Babe by Bradtmoor, dam by Dawn. 
F E Garnsey's b m Alcacita by Red Cloak, dam Alcazette by Alcazar. 
Silva & Wright's b g M J by Bay Bird, dam by Cornelius. 
Martin Carter's ch h T C by Nutwood Wilkes, dam Zeta Carter by Director. 
H C Ahler's br g Telephone by Direct, dam Nellita by Philosopher. 
John A. Cole's b g Jupiter B by Gen Beverly, dam Little Agnes by Goesiper. 
J De La Montanya's ch g Bain by Charles Derby, dam Empress by Flaxtail. 
A L McDonald's bl g Charlie T. by Zombro, dam Sarah Benton by Albion. 
Robt Buress' b g Golden Gate by Bay Bird, dam Dourhka by Western. 
C A Winship's br g Abe Miller by Titus, dam Gazelle by Gossiper. 
H A Bell's b g H D B by Arthur Holt, dam Jennie D by Jerome Eddy. 
W H Lumsden's b s McPhereon by McKinney, dam Eveline by Nutwood. 
Walnut Grove Stock Farm's blk m The Boquet by Nushagak, dam Woodflowei 
by Ansel. 

Geo W Kingsbury's b g D E Knight by Lynwood, dam Grant, Jr. 

Wva. Morgan's b m Una K by McKinney, dam Nellie K by Gen. Grant, Jr. 

S. Silgen's Birdcatcher by Direct, dam Katherine by Hock Hocking. 

I. N. Minor's br g Morosco by Wayland W, dam Lady Moor by Grand Moor. 

R. W. Peterson's b g R W P by Lynwood W. 

ALL GUESSES POSITIVELY CLOSE JULY 26, 1904. 

Should more than one person pick the first three horses in the order in which 
they finish two timers will be given to the firBt two guessers in the order in which 
the guesses were received. 

NO STRINGS ATTACHED TO IT. 

YOU MAY PUT IN ANY NUMBER OF GUESSES. 



Gut This Out and Send in Your Guess 

To the BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 

36 Qeary Street, San Francisco. 

My selection for the first three horses winning money in the California Stakes 
$2000, to take place at the P. C. T. H. B. A. meeting at San Jose iB: 



First. 



Second 
Third 



Signed 



Address 



Date 



1904. 



,< I I u 



®he Qvusfosv unit gtportsmcm 



15 



NEW PRICE 



No. 00 Armor Steel 
L, G, SMITH GUN 




HUNTER ARMS CO., FULTON, NEW YORK 




Awarded Gold Medal 
At California Stata 
Fair 1892. 

Every horse owner who 
values his stock should 
constantly have a sup- 
ply of It on hand. It 
improves and keeps 
stook In the pink of 
condition. 
Manhattan Pood Co. 



BALL BRAND. 



1353 Folsom St., San Francisco 

Ask your grocers or dealers for it. 



RED 

Positively Cures Colic, Scouring and Indigestion. 

C. F. KKKTEI.r,. Manager 



American TrOttH Mi* Accurately Compiled 



PUBLICATIONS. 



THE YEAR BOOK 

This great work will be ready for delivery 
Maroh 15, 1904. 

Contains summaries of races; tables of 2:30 trot- 
ters; 2:25 pacers; sires; grea* brood »s; cham- 
pion trotters; fastest recordr 

Vol. XIX, 1903, single copies, postpaid... $4.00 
Vol. XIX, 1903, 10 or more copies, each, 

f. o. b 33s 

Vol. XVIII, 1902, single copies, postpaid.. 4.00 



j Great aid to All Interests, 

A year's subscription will pay 
for itself many times over 



Vol. XVII 


1901, 


" 




" 


.... 400 


Vol. XVI, 


1900, 


" 


" 


" 


.... 4.00 


Vol. XV, 


1899, 


" 


" 


" 


.... 4.00 


Vol. XIV, 


1898, 


" 


" 


" 


.... 3:00 


Vol. XIII 


1897, 


" 


" 


" 


.... 3.00 


Vol. XII, 


1896, 


" 


" 


" 


.... 3.00 


Vol. XI, 


1895, 


" 


" 


" 


.... 3.00 


Vol. X, 


1894, 


" 




" 


.... 3.00 


Vol. IX, 


1893, 


" 


" 


" 


.... 3.00 


Vol VI, 


1890, (limited number) postpaid 2.50 


Vol. V, 


1889, 


" 


" 




2.50 


Vol. IV, 


1888, 


" 


" 




2.50 


vol. n, 


1886, 


" 


" 




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Year Books for 1S92, 


1891, 


1887 


and 


1885 out of 


print. 













THE REGISTER 

Vols, in to XV, inclusive, in one order. 

f.o.b $60-00 

Single Volumes, postpaid 5.00 

Vols. I and n are out of print. 

INDEX DIGEST 

Postpaid $7.50 

This important adjunct contains all the standard 
animals in the first ten volumes, with numbers, 
initial pedigrees, and reference to volume in which 
animal is registered. 



REGISTRATION BLANKS 

will be sent upon application. 
Money must accompany all orders. Address 

American Trotting Reg. Association 

355 Dearborn St., Room 1108, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Or BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL 




Adopted and used by all Jockey Clubs in the 
United States and Canada. 

Published about the 1st and 15th of each month, 
from March to December, at 25c, 50c, 75c, SI, SI 50 
or $2, according to issue. 

A subscription ($18) inoludes all fortnightly 
issues and an ' ! Annual" (in two volumes) hand- 
somely bound in half morocco. 

For sale by newsdealers throughout the coun- 
try, on race tracks and by 

GOODWIN BROS., 

Proprietors and Publishers. 
1440 Broadway, New York. 

Explanatory circulars mailed free. 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

IMPROVED 

STALLION SERVICE BOOKS 

(POCKET SIZE) 

100 Pages. Price $1, postpaid. 

Most Complete Book 
of the kind published. 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 

36 Geary St., San Francisco. 



DOC WILLIAMS' 

BOARDING AND TRAINING STABLE 

Eilerhth Avenue, near Fulton Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

Colts broke and trained to trot and satisfaction 
guaranteed. Terms reasonable. Phone: Page 1324 



nrarcin 



BUSINESS COLLEGE 
24 Post Street, San Francisco, Cal, 



The oldest, the largest, the most popular com- 
mercial school on the Pacific Coast. 20,000 gradu- 
ates; 30 teachers; TO typewriters; over 300 students 
annually plaoed in positions. Send for oatalogue 

E. F. HEALD, President. 



CALIFORNIA 



The WONDER of the WORLD 

4000 SHOT AT 

BR OKE 97 P ER cent 

FRED GILBERT, in his last 4000 targets, has shot 97 per cent, 

OF COURSE this could only be accomplished with the PARKER Qun. 

Fred Gilbert with his PARKER Gun sets the Pace for all 
others. The PARKER Qun is growing better every day. 



Send for 
Catalogue. 



New York Salesrooms: 
33 WARREN STREET. 



MERIDEN, CONN. 



1879 

GEN. GRANT 

Timer. 



ST. JULIEN 2:12 3-4 



ORRIN I1ICROK 
Driver, 



Photo Engraving Company 

HIGH CLASS ART 



Half Tones and IAne Engraving 

Artistic Designing. 

506 Mission St., cor. First, SanFranclsco 



The old "ST, JULIEN" SHOEING SHOP of MARTIN O'DEA & SON 
removed to Union Square Avenue, directly in rear of old shop. 

MARTIN ODEA & SON, - - Proprietors. 



COME AND SEE US. 



I'll one: Grant 114. 



BREEDERS' DIRECTORY. 



SHORTHORNS AND SHIRES— 

Quinto Herd of Shorthorns. 

41 premiums California State Fair, 1903. 

Young stock for sale. 

Send for catalogue. 

ALSO 

Several fine Shire Stallions, foals of 1903. 
Est. of W. H. HOWARD, 
206 Sansome St., San Francisco. 



HOLSTEINS — Winners of every 7 days' butter 
contest at State Fair 1899 1st & 2d for aged cows, 
4-yr., 3-yr. and 2-yr.-olds; 21 Jerseys and Durhams 
competing. 5th year my Holsteins have beateD 
Jerseys for butter. Stook for sale; also pigs. F 
H. Burke, SO Montgomery St.. S. F. 



JERSEYS, HOLSTEINS AND DURHAMS. 

Dairy Stock speoially. Hogs, Poultry. Estab 
lished 187S. William Niles & Co.- Los Angeles 
Cal. 



VETERINARY. 



DR. C. MASOERO 

VETERINARY SURQE0N 

Graduate of Royal Veterinary 
College of Toxin 

Lnfiumary and Residence— 811 Howard St.; 

between Fourth and Fifth Sts., San Francisco. 

Telephone: South 456. 



C0MPRE55ED PIRESALT BRICKS 

>"> PATENT FEEDERS 
Handy No Waste. No Neglect 

5<t a month. 

Refined Dairy 5al! tells. 

ASK YOUR DEALER. 
WE'LL SEND BOOK FREE. 

J BELMONTSTABltSUPPLYCO 

- PATENTEES • MANUFACTURERS ■ 
BROOKLYN, M.-V. 



AT STUD 



Ira Barker Dalziel 

VETERINARY DENTIST 

Fancy Carrlage.Saddle and Roar 1 Horses for Sale 

Office and stable: 605 Golden Gate Avenue, San 
Francisco, Cal. Telephone South 851. 



Br. "V^Txxx, ^*. iEs^tia.. 

M. R. C. V. S.. F. E. Y. M. S. 

VETERINARY SURGEON. 

Member of the Royal College of Veterinary 
Surgeons, England; Fellow of the Edinburg 
Veterinary Medical Society; Graduate of the New 
Veterinary College, Edinburgh; Veterinary Sur- 
geon to the S. F. Fire Department; Live Stock 
Inspector forNew Zealand and Australian Colonies 
at the port of San Francisco; Professor of Equine 
Medicine, Veterinary Surgery, Veterinary Depart- 
ment University of California; Ex-President oi 
the California State Veterinary Medical Associa- 
tion; Veterinary Infirmary, Residence and Office, 
San Francisco Veterinary Hospital, 1117 Golden 
Gate Avenue, near Webster St., San Francisco- 
Telephone Park 128. 

Chronic Bronchitis and Catarrh of the Bladder 

Cured In 48 Hours. 



CAPSULES 



Superior to Copaiba. Cubebs or Injeotton 



■ft* 1:88 1-2 JV' 

FAIiAOB 

KEAJt KACE TRACK. PLEASANTON, Oil 

Finest Wines, Liquors and Cigars 
Boarding Hoaae. 

A. H. BERNAL, Proprietor 



CUBA OP KENWOOD 

(Qlenbeigh Jr.— Stella) 

SAM'S BOW 

(Plain Sam-Dolly Dee n) 

STOCKDALE KENNELS 

K. M. DODGE, Manager, 

Bakersrleld, Kern Co., 
Boarding. Pointer Puppies and well-broken 
Dogs for sale. 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 

Advertisements under this head one cent per word 
per insertion. Cash to accompany order. 



POINTERS 



POINTER P3PPIES FOR SALE BY BOS 
x ton Bessie-King of Kent, Glenbeigh and Rip 
Rap crosses. For further particulars address 
L. S. BOLTER, Forrest ave-, Fruitvale. 



IRISH AND SCOTCH TERRIERS. 



TRISH AND SCOTCH TERRIERS FOR SALE. 
- 1 - Scottle Puppies sired by Ch. Loyne Ruffian 
and Crimson Rambler. Best Irish stock on the 
Coast. MRS. BRADLEY-DYNE, Saturna P. O., 
B.C. 



IRISH TERRIERS. 



FOR SALE— CAPITAL BITCH , A WINNER 
prioe $15. First-class 8-months-old dog, good 
in all ways; price $25. BRADLEY-DYNE, 
Saturna P. O., B. C. 



SCOTCH TERRIERS. 



■pOR SALE— 8-MONTHS-OLD DOG BY CH. 
*- Loyne Ruffian, very typical; price $30. 18- 
months-old dog, $10- Smart bitch, good breeder, 
$12. BRADLEY-DYNE, Saturna P.O., B.C. 



ST. BERNARDS. 



A T STUD-CHAMPION LE KING. GHAND- 
-"- est headed St. Bernard ou the Coast. Fee $20. 
W. WALLACE, 58 Boyce St., San Franoisco. 



£0COANUT OIL CAKE 

THE BEST FEED FOB 

STOCK. CHICKENS AND P1QS 

FOB SALE IN LOTS TO SUIT BY 

EL DORADO LINSEED OIL WORKS CO 

308 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



ROSE HOTEL 

PLEASANTON, CAL. 

Enlarged, Rebuilt. Twenty-five New Rooms 
Newly Furnished, Electric Lights, 
Running W»ter. Cp to date. 
A. S. OLNIY A SON - - Proprlet 



16 



©Ite gteee&ev atib gtpuvt&tnan 



[July i», 1904 



TELEPHONE, 

South 640 




m HORSE BOOTS 



" San Francisco, Cal.^ D ^ 



U. M. C. SHOOTERS WIN 



§ 

s 



i 



Grand American Handicap, Highest General Averages 
of all Targets shot at, also Consolation Handicap. 

R. D. GUPTILL of Minnesota, 19 yards. 96 out of 100; S3 out of 60 on shoot-off. 

J. L. D. MORRISON of Minnesota won premier honors for the entire series. 277 out of 300 at 19 and 20 yds; 491 out of 500 at 16 yds. 
W. H. HEER of Kansas, winner of Consolation, 98 out of 100, at 20 yards with a Remington Gun. 

.ja.ll ^Won witJfci. XT. 3ME. O. SHEIIiIjS 

UNION METALLIC CARTRIDGE CO. 86-88 FIRST STREET 

E. E. DRAKE, Pacific Coast Manager. SAN FRANCISCO. 



"i»?T* 






RIFLES AND SHOTGUNS 



PACIFIC COAST AGENCY 
127-135 FIRST STREET 



A. MULLER, Agent. 



SAN FRANCISCO 
CALIFORNIA 



In order to obtain 

Toe 1905 Calendar 

(Size 13*; r28 Inches) 

of the 

Latiln & Rand Powder Co.— 

One of the most beautiful hunting 

pictures we have overseen— 

Send your full name and street 

address, the kind of powder you shoot 

and 10 oents In coin or tamps to 

Advertising Bureau, Room 513, 

W Cedar St., New York City. 

N. B.— Shipment made November, 

but doo't delay. 

The edition Is limited. 




Loaded 1x3. O. P. w . Smol3Leless. 
Winning* Highest Averasre at All Shoots. 

IF TOC WANT THE BEST ASK FOB 

California Powder Works 

FACTORY LOADED SHELLS. 

If Yon; \>ealer don't keep them write the 

CALIFORNIA POWDER WORKS — Office 330 Market St., San Francisco 

Munnfnctureni of HERCULES DYNAMITE. HERCULES GELATINE, CHAMPION 
IMPROVED BLASTING, BLACK BLASTING, BLACK SPORTING 
C. P. H . SMOKELESS and MILITARY BMOKKLKSS. 
AbK> "ill CAPS and FUSE. 



More 

DuPONT SMOKELESS 

was shot at the 
Grand American Handicap 

than all other powders combined. 

During the Handicap 

Air. Walter HnlT with 132 straight 

made 

the longest run with 

DuPONT SMOKELESS. 



Glabrough, 

RUNS 
bun Goods 

**~3cnd for Catalogue 



Golcher & Go. 




FISHING 



:^ 



Tackle 

538 MARKET STREET, S. F. 



You can get these Smokeless Powders in 

factory ...eun I O 

LOADED.. On ILL. L.O 
DU PONT SHOTGUN RIFLEITE 

"E. C." BALLISTITE 

SCHULTZE LAFLIN & RAND 

HAZARD 'INFALLIBLE*" 

What More do vou Want? 




VOL XIT. No. i. 

36 GEARY STREET. 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JULY 23, 1904. 



SUBSCRIPTION 
THREE DOLLARS A TEAR 




©lie gveeirev antt Qpcrvtaman 



[July 23, 1904 



TROTTERS AND RUNNERS 

LARGEST STOCK IN THE WEST. 

LOW PRICES BEST PLACE TO BUY. LOW PRICES 



SEND FOR CATALOGUE. 



J. 0'K.ANES 



26 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



1560 BROADWAY 
NEW YORK 



CALIFORNIA STATE FAIR FOR I904. 

SACRAMENTO, CAL. 

AUGUST 22 TO SEPTEMBER 3, 1904. 



SALINAS DRIVING CLUB 

Race nVXeetirxer 

Salinas, Cal., Sept. 14, 15, 16 and 17 



"tries to Close will Secretary, WefliiesQay, Am. 3, 1901 Entries ciose Tuesday, j u i y 26, 1904 



All 



Races to be Contested at the State Fair on days to be 
Hereafter Designated by the Board of Directors. 



No. 1. Tom Fox Stake -For all ages Entrance $10, to accompany nomination; $15 additional 
for horses not declared by 4 p m. the day preceding the race; $300 added by the Society, ot which $50 
to second and $25 to third. Non-winners of three races this year, if three years old and over, al- 
lowed 5 lbs.; non-winners of two races 7 lbs.; and non-winners of one race 10 lbs. Maidens, three 
years old, allowed 5 lbs; four years old and over 7 lbs. additional Six furlongs. 

No. 2. Western Hotel Stake— For two-year-old flllieB. Entrance $10. to accompany nomin, 
ation; $15 additional if not declared by 4 p. m the day preceding the race; $300 added by the Society- 
of which $50 to second and $25 to third Weights 5 1 bs. below the scale. A winner of a stake race fn 
1904, or a winner of three or more races of any value, other than selling races, 5 lbs extra. Non-win- 
ners of two races allowed 4 lbs Maidens allowed 7 lbs , and If such are the produce of a mare that 
has not produced a winner at the time of starting. 10 lbs. Maidens beaten three or more times since 
closing of the stake, allowed 5 lbs.; and if not placed seoond or third, 7 lbs. additional Five fur- 
longs. 

No. 3. The Governor's Stake— A handicap for three-year-olds and upward. Entrance $10, to 
accompany nomination; $20 additional for horses not declared by 4 p. m. day preceding the race; 
with $350 added by the Society, of wbich$70 to second and $30 to third. Weights posted at 12 m. day 
precedtog the race. A winner of a race other than a selling race after the weights are published, 
to carry 5 lbs. extra. One mile and a furlong 

No. 4. Golden Eagle Hotel Selling Stake— For three-year-olds and upward. Entrance $10, 
to accompany nomination; $15 additional for horses not declared by 4 p. m. the day preceding the 
raoe; $3U0 added by the Society, of which $50 to seoond and $30 to third. Winner to be sold at auc- 
tion. If for $200u. to carry rule weights; if for less, one lb. allowed for each $100 to $1000; thence 2 lbs. 
for each$100 to$400. Selling price to be placed on starters through entry box by 4 p. m. on the day 
preceding the race. A winner of a stake race or three or more races of any value after closing of 
stake, to carry 5 lbs. extra. Maidens allowed 7 lbs. One mile. 

No. a California state Fair Annual Stake— Handicap for two-year-olds Entrance $10, to 
accompany nomination: $20 additional for horses not declared by 4 p. m. the day preceding the race; 
-vuh $350 added by the Society, of which $70 to the second and $30 to the third. Weights posted at 
12 p. m. day preceding race. A winner of a race other than a selling race, after the weights are 
published, to carry 5 lbs extra. Seven furlongs. 

No. 6. The Prealdent's Stake— A handicap for three-year-olds and upward- Entrance $15, to 
accompany nomination; $35 additional for horses not declared by 4 p. m day preceding raoe; $350 
added by the Society, of which $70 to second and $30 to third. Weights posted at 13 m. day preceding 
race. A winner of a race other than a selling purse, after the weights are published, to carry 5 lbs. 
extra. One and one-quarter miles. 

No. 7. The vtnctor Stake— For three-year-olds and upward. Entrance $10, to accompany 
nomination; $20 additional for horses not declared by 4 p m. day preceding race; with $250 added by 
the Society, of whioh $70 to second and $30 to third. Stake to be named after the winner if VInotor's 
time (1:40) is beaten. A non-winner of a stake race in 1903, or a race of the value of $500, allowed, If a 
non-winner of five races other than selling races, 5 lbs Maidens 7 lbs. additional- One mile. 

L. J. Kng« Selling; "*take— For two-year-olds. Entrance $10, to accompany nomination; $15 ad- 
ditional for colts not declared by 4 p. m the day preoeding the race; with $350 added by the Society, 
of which $50 to second and $25 to third. Horses may bs entered not to be sold, and carry rule weight. 
If entered to be sold for $1000, allowed 3 lbs ; $700 6 lbs ; $400 10 lbs. Winners of one race after clos- 
ing of stake to carry 3 lbs. extra; of two or more 7 lbs extra. Maidens beaten three times, allowed 5 
lbs ; four or more times 7 lb3. Value to be placed on starters through entry box by 4 p. m. day before 
race. Six furlongs. 

The State Agricultural Society's regular and special rules to govern, except where conditions 
are otherwise. All declarations and claims for allowances due at 4 p. m day preceding race, unless 
otherwise specified in conditions. Owners and trainers will be held responsible for same. Entrance 
and declaration money to go to winner. No added money for less than four starters in different in- 
terests. In selling races, beaten horses not liable to claim. Right to use starting gait Is reserved. 

Entries must state name, color, sex, and pedigree of horse, with racing colors of the owner. 

Applications for stabling must be made to the Secretary. Applicants will be furnished with 
blanks, which must be filled out and approved before a horse Is admitted to the grounds. The track 
Superintendent will stable no horse until this course has been pursued, No stabliug will be guaran- 
teed except for race horses In training and ready to raoe, and those entered in stakes to have 
preference. 

Owners who ship to track without notice will not be allowed to, take stalls until application has 
been made to the Secretary and approved. 

Special stalls will be allotted to horses competing for premiums. 



L. R. MILLER, Secretary, 

SACRAMENTO, CAL. 



BENJ. F. RUSH, President. 



CAMPBELL'S 



EMOLLIO 
IODOFORM 



GALL CURE 

For GALL BACKS and SHOULDERS, CRUPPE 
SORES and SADDLE GALLS there is non 
superior. 

The horse CAN BE WORKED AS USUAL. 

For BARBED WIRE CUTS, CALKS, SCRATCH- 
ES. BLOOD POISON ED SORES and ABRASIONS 
OF THE SKIN it has no equal. 

It is very adhesive and easily applied to a watery 
as well as a dry sore. 

Its use will absolutely prevent BLOOD POISON 
ING. In this respect there la no Gall Cure offered 
whioh can Justly even claim to be a competitor. 
We placed It on tho market relying wholly on its 
merit for success, and notwithstanding the fact that 
comparatively little has been done In the way of 
miv<TtlMlng tho salesof 1900 were 100 per cent great- 
er than the aggregate sales of Gall Cure preceding 
that yoar. This Increase was ontlroly due to Us 
MERiTS.undfromit wefeol Justified iu saying that 
It in THEOALLCUREOFTHE20Tn CENTURY. 

it Is a quick and sure euro for those troublesome 
«kln cracks under the fe -^ckv olohinjuro and often 
lay up race borsos. 

All Trainers Should Have It In Their Stables 

TRICE:— 3 OX< IIO.X, i-'flo.; 1 LB. IIOX, Sl.OO. 
Road our "ad." on OtmpboH'H Homo Foot Remedy in noxt issue of this paper. 

JAS. B. CAMPBELL & CO., Mfrs.,412 W. Madison St., Chicago, III. 

Sold oy all Dealers In Harness and Turf Goods. If not In slock ask thorn to write anyJobber for It 
r*aHirrrA*»C X«lhll1«lf^H aDd typewritten ready for framing 

vUlglCW laUUIdltU WrUe for prlce6i BREEDER AND 

--^.RTSMAN, 36 Geary Street.San Francisco, Cal 




LIST OF EVENTS. 

Horses Must Be Named With Entry. 



PACERS. 

1— Monterey County Chamber of Com- 
merce Stakes, for 2:20 class $600 

2— Green Class, for horses without rec- 
ords 300 

3— For horses eligible to the 2:10 class. 300 

4— For horses eligible to the 2 : 16 class. 300 



DISTRICT RACES. 

8 — District (Monterey, San Benito, Santa Cruz 
and San Luis Obispo oounties) Three- Year- 
Old Stake, for trotting colts three years old 
or under, $10 to accompany nomination July 
26th, $15 August 15th and $25 September 1st, 
with $50 added by the Club. 

9— District Two- Year-Old Trot, conditions and 
added money the same as in No. 8. 

10— Mixed Race, Trotters and Pacers, 
2:25 class, for horses owned tn Mon- 
terey Connty 6150 

11— Mixed Trotting and Pacing Race 
for Members of the Driving Club, 
owners to drive 150 



TROTTERS. 

5— Salinas Driving Club Stakes, for 

2:20 trotters 8600 

6— For trotters of the 2:15 class 300 

7— For Green Class trotters, or horses 

without records 300 

Entrance 5% and b% from money winners. 

Two horses may be entered by one owner in any race on one entrance fee, but not more than one 
can be started. 

Races will be arranged so as lo give horses starting in more than one race at least 
one day between starts. 

All Stakes are for the amount guaranteed— no more, no less. 

Stake? not filling satisfactorily to the Board of Directors may be declared off. 

Member National Trotting Association. 

Send for Entry Blanks and address all communications to 

J. D. KALAR. Sec'y. Salinas, Cal. 



c 



PALACE HOTEL, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA. 



5 



TOURISTS and TRAVELERS will, now, with difficulty recognize the famous COURT 
inta whioh for twenty-flve years carriages have driven. This space of over a quarter 
of an aore has recently, by the addition of very handsome furniture, rugs, chandeliers 
and tropical plants, been converted into a lounging room— the FINEST IN THE 
WORLD. 

The EMPIRE PARLOR— the PALM ROOM, furnished in Cerise, with Billiard and 
Pool tables for the ladles— the LOUIS XV PARLOR the LADIES WRITING ROOM 
and numerous other modern improvements, together with the unexcelled Cuisine and the 
Most Convenient Looation in the City— all add much to the ever increasing popularity 
of this most famous HOTEL. 






HARNESS and SADDLES 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 
Large Stock. Low Prices. 

JEPSEN BROS. CO. inc.) 



10-112 MARKET ST., SAN FRANCISCO. 



TWO BLOCKS 
FROM FKKKY 



SINGMASTER&SONS.ofKeota Iowa, 



BREEDERS AND IMPORTERS OP| 



PERCHERONS, SHIRES, BELGIAN AND FRENCH COACH HORSES 



63 North San 



Have a Branch Barn at 

Pedro Street, San 



Jose, Cal. 



High-class 
good stallion 



ock always on hand. 



It will pay to call and inspect stock if you are in need of a 
C. O, STANTON, San Jose Manager. 




DOUBT 



DEBATE 



DON'T SSK„ DON'T %$ 

When distemper, couebsor colds come to your barn get a bottle of CRAFT'S 
DISTKMPKR CURB of your druggist. He will GUARANTEE Its effi- 
ciency. We trust your gratitude and honesty. You take our word 50o for 
tho small bottle, $1 for the large bottle. Booklet free on request. Nothing 
lor this advice. 

Wells Medicine Co, SSSX&iSi 13 3d st, Lafayette, Ind 1 

W. L 1>K CLOW 
Proprietor 

FARMERS' SUPPLY OF THE MIDDLE WEST. 

f HAVE THE LARGEST AND BEST IMPORTED AND HOMEBRED 
1 JACKS In America, and also the linest line and best assortment of Bel- 
gian horses freshly Imported; also some of the latest prize winners In Ger- 
many and France In Peroheron and Oldenburg Stallions. I quote consistent 
living prices on all stock, and will sell you more quality for the money than 
vou can buy elsewhere. Terms to suit the purchaser. Write for photographs 
and catalogue. W. L. DE CLOW, Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 



CEDAR RAPIDS (IOWA) JACK FARM 



July 23, i»04] 



©he Qxe&bsx axib grpjcurfcemcm 



3 



THE WEEKLY 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

P. W. KELLEY, Proprietor. 

furf and Sporting Authority of the Pacific Coast, 

— OFFICE— 

36 GEARY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 



P. O BOX 2300. 

telephone: Black 586. 



Terms— One Tear 83. Six Months 81.75, Three Months 81 
STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money anould be sent by postal order, draft or by registered letter 
addressed to F. W. Kelley, 36 Geary St., San Francisco. Cal. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's name and 
address, not necessarily for publication, but as a private guarantee 
of good faith. 

San Francisco, Saturday, July 23, 1904. 



Dates of Harness Meetings. 

CALIFORNIA. 

Pieasanton July 27 to July 30 

San Jose (Breeders) Aug. 3 to Aug. 6 

Vallejo Aug. 11 to Aug. 13 

"Santa Rosa (Breeders) Aug. 17 to Aug. 20 

Cal. State Fair, Sacramento Aug. 22 to Sept. 3 

Salinas Sept. 14 to Sept. 17 

Hanford '. Oot. 10 to 15 

Tulare Oct. 17 to 22 

NORTH PACIFIC. 

Everett Aug. 29 to Sept. 3 

Vancouver, B. C Sept. 3 to Sept. 5 

Whatcom Sept. 5 to Sept. 10 

Salem Sept. 12 to Sept. 17 

Seattle Sept. 19 to Sept. 24 

North Yakima Sept. 25 to Oct. 1 

Victoria B. C Sept. 27 to Oct. 1 

New Westminster, B. C Oct 3 to Oot. 8 

Spokane Oct. 3 to Oot. 8 

Walla Walla Oot. 10 to Oct. 15 

Boise Oct. 17 to Oct. 22 

GRAND CIRCUIT. 

Detroit July 25 to July 30 

Buffalo Aug.ltoAug.6 

Empire City Aug. 8 to Aug. IS 

Brighton Beach Aug. 15 to Aug. 20 

Readville Aug. 22 to Aug. 27 

Providence Aug. 29 to Sept. 3 

Hartford Sept. 5 to Sept. 10 

Syracuse Sept. 12 to Sept. 17 

Columbus Sept. 19 to Sept. 24 

Cincinnati Sept. 26 to Oct. 1 

Memphis Oct. 17 to Oct. 27 



PLEASANTON IS READY for the first meeting- of 
the California circuit which will open there on 
Wednesday next. Over three hundred trotters and 
pacers are quartered at the track and in public and 
private stables in the town, and the entire population 
of the horse centre is enthusiastically at work boom- 
ing- the meeting. No organization in California ever 
had a more energetic board of directors than has 
charge of the first meeting of the Pieasanton Fair and 
Racing Association, and no board ever had a more 
deeply interested and more active community behind 
It. The famous track is in perfect condition and will 
be kept so during the week, so that the horses can put 
forth their best efforts in every race. The trains run- 
ning between San Francisco and Pieasanton enable 
residents of this city and intermediate points to attend 
the meeting and be at home for dinner every evening. 
The Southern Pacific boats leaving the ferry at the 
foot of Market street at 7:30 and 8:30 in the morning 
connect with trains for Pieasanton, the trip requiring- 
but two hours. Returning a train leaves Pieasanton 
at 5:30 in the afternoon and the management will 
endeavor to have the racing completed each day in 
time for San Franciscans to catch this train which 
will land them in the city at 7:20 P. M. The rac. 
ing promises to be the best seen in California for 
years. The fields will be large in nearly every 
event and fast time is certain. Many high class trot- 
ters and pacers have been developed in California this 
year and nearly every horse of any note is booked to 
start at this meeting. There will be no book betting 
but auctions and pari-mutual pools under the manage- 
ment of Fred H. Chase & Co., successors to Killip & 
Co. of this city. The climate of Pieasanton and the 
entire Livermore Valley is ideal at this season, being 
warm and sunny without excessive heat. Every trot* 
ting horse enthusiast in California who possibly can, 
should spend at least one day at Pieasanton during 
the four days of excellent racing which will open there 
on Wednesday next. 



THE BREEDERS MEETING at San Jose which 
follows the Pieasanton meeting, will open on 
Wednesday, August 3d. There has never been a 
brighter prospect for four days of high clasB harness 
racing. The entry list is the best received in years, 
and more fast horses have been named. The races 



around which the greatest interests circleB are the 
$2000 trot, the $1500 pace, and the four colt events. 
The $2000 trot promises to be a battle royal, and four 
or Ive horses of the dozen that will doubtless start, 
will divide favoritism. The $1500 pace will furnish 
much the same state of affairs. At this meeting the 
first contest for three-year-old b in the Breeders Fu- 
turity will take place. This $6000 stake was inagur- 
ated by the Pacific Coast Trotting Horse Breeders 
Association in 1900. Last year at the meeting held 
by the association at Petaluma the two-year-old di- 
visions of this stake were trotted and paced. Mrs. C. 
A. Durfee's black colt Almaden by Direct, dam Rose 
McKinney by McKinney, won the trotting division, 
his best time being 2:22}. Mr. E. Montgomery's colt 
Seymow by Diawood 2:11, dam by Upstart, won the 
pacing division, best time 2:23. This year there will 
in all probability be large fields in both three-year-old 
divisions of this stake. The fact that Almaden, 
winner of the two-year-old trotting division of last 
year, will not be able to start this year will doubtless 
lead to several starting payments being made that 
would not otherwise have been paid in, as he was 
trotting so fast in his work that he was thought to 
have a mortgage on first money. There's many a 
slip between the workout and the race, however. Be 
sides these two races for the three-year-olds there 
will be two for the two-jear-olds in Stake No. 2. 
Much interest is manifest in both events and the fields 
of starters will be much larger than last year. The 
San Jose track is one of the best and fastest in the 
State, and is in superb oondition for fast time. There 
is a first-class program for every day of the meeting. 
Don't miss the Breeders meeting at San Jose this year 
if you want to eee high class racing. 



TJORSE BREEDERS AND OWNERS should make 
1 1 a special effort this year to have a fine display at 
the State Fair. There are many entries to the har- 
ness races, and the runners will be on hand to compete 
for the purses that will be hung up, but it is to the 
breeders of draft stock, saddle horses, roadsters, car- 
riage horses and ponies that we would appeal. Cali- 
fornia is without doubt the best place in the world to 
breed horses. Not that we can raise any better horses 
than Kentucky or New England, but we can raise 
them for less money, and therefore can compete with 
the world in selling them. Every person who is ac- 
quainted with the condition of things in the horse 
market knows that there is a shortage of good horses 
in all breedB unless it be the runners. In the draft 
breeds especially does the supply fail to come up to 
the demand. And this shortage cannot be made up 
for years. The farmers and stock breeders of this 
Coast have just awakened to this fact, and quite a 
number of fine stallions have been imported to the 
State during the past year. It is to be hoped their 
owners will see the advisability of taking these horses 
to Sacramento and showing them at the State Fair 
this year, as a fine display of draft stock will not only 
get the farmers of the State interested in breeding 
heavy horses, but such a show will make one of the 
most attractive features of the fair. To all breeders 
we would say: Exhibit your stock. It will pay. 



CALIFORNIA HORSES did this State proud at 
the Columbus meeting last week which was a 
sort of curtain raiser for the Grand Circuit meeting 
which opens at Detroit next Monday. On another 
page will be found a complete summary of the Colum- 
bus races, and it will be seen that the California bred 
and trained horses won the biggest part of the money. 
Out of ten races in which they started, five first and 
five second moneys went to the Californians. No 
other State can make such a showing, and while the 
breeders and trainers on this Coast are a long way 
from the harness racing centre they manage to fur- 
nish a large proportion of the fastest and the best of 
the money winnerB every year. California horses are 
doing their part in advertising this State as the 
greatest breeding and training ground on earth. The 
records made at Columbus were little short of won- 
derful for this early in the season, and a California 
bred mare, China Maid by McKinney, paced the 
fastest mile of the meeting. The horses in the Salis- 
bury string all did well and were never behind the 
money. The first important meeting of the year 
shows California in the lead. 



SPLENDID WORK is being done by the committees 
of the different athletic and racing associations 
appointed to raise $25,000 to be paid over to the Park 
Commissioners to enable them to build a new athletic 
field and speedway in Golden Gate Park. Treasurer 
Frank O'Kane reports that $17,500 of the amount has 
been subscribed and is confident that the entire sum 
will be raised. While the horsemen and road drivers 
of this city have subscribed very liberally toward the 
project, the Breeder and Sportsman makes the 



earnest request that the good work be kept up ard 
that every person who t*kes pleasure in road driving 
or speed contests will not only himself subscribe but 
get his friend and neighbor to subscribe. By a little 
hard work during the next few weeks the entire sum 
can b« subscribed and paid over to the Park Com- 
missioners, who will immediately order the work to 
begin on this Bplendid improvement that will be for 
the benefit of all. 



T^HE CROWLEY STAKE is creating lots of talk 
1 among those who have entries in the Pacific 
Breeders Futurity of 1907, and there is every reason 
to believe that a large proportion of those having 
nominations in the latter will also name tbem in the 
side stake. Blanks were sent out this week to all 
nominators, accompanied by a circular letter from 
the gentleman who suggested the side stake, and for 
wnom it has been named. We hope there will be a 
general response to it, and that the number of entries 
will be so large that the stake will be the richest ever 
inaugurated in California. Entries close one week 
from Monday next. 



'THE CABLEGRAM received by the Associated 
1 Press of this city from Carlsbad last week, in 
which it was stated that Mr. A. B. Spreckels was 
seriously ill there with appendicitis, proves to have 
been badly mixed in transmission. On the day after 
this information was published another cablegram 
stated that the unfortunate sufferer was Mr. Rudolph 
Spreckels, a brother, and on the third day came a 
wire that Mr. Claus Spreckels, father of the two, wai 
the afflicted one. It now transpires that Mr. Rudolph 
Spreckels was really the sick man, but that he is 
rapidly improving and no operation will be necesBary 
at this time. 



Development of Fire Department Horses. 

An interesting feature of the World's Fair horse 
show is the provision made to recognize the merits of 
horses particularly adapted for the use of fire depart- 
ments. The rigid requirements in this regard make 
the demand for fire department horses constantly in 
excess of the available supply, and fire department 
chiefs in all parts of the country agree that money 
can be made in breeding a type of horses suitable for 
this use. 

The World's Fair live stock department has gone 
to considerable pains in recognizing this fact to pro- 
vide a classification which will develop the best types 
of firemen's horses. Chief Mills has had numerous 
consultations with experts in the needs of firemen and 
the section provided for the fire department horse is 
a notable step in recognizing the advanced demands 
for this type of animals. 

The Executive Committee of the National Firemen's 
Association of the United States has recognized the 
opportunity offered by the World's Fair and notified 
Colonel Charles F. Mills, the Exposition's Chief of 
Live Stock, of its desire to co-operate in this display 
in every possible manner. The National Firemen's 
Tournament has been arranged to be held at the 
World's Fair on August 24-28th in order to come at 
the same time as the Exposition Horse Show, and the 
National Firemen's Association is urging every city 
council and fire department in the country to send 
the best horses possible to the tournament and the 
Horse Show in order to develop interest in the best 
type of fire department horses. 

The association has passed a resolution commending 
Chief Mills and the Exposition management for its 
liberal prizes for fire department horses. The resolu- 
tion pays: "They have made a great step towards 
enlarging the emulative features of the horse breed- 
ing industry in the United States, and have signally 
helped to meet the imperative demand existing in 
every good sized city in our land where the reduction 
of fire hazard by speed and agility of horses is a criti 
cal study." 

Lisonjero by Dexter Prince, trotted to a record of 
2:16}, won the 2:23 class trot at Dover, New Hamp- 
shire, July 8th. He was bred at Palo Alto. Liso, a 
full brother to this borst, reduced his record to 2:21} 
at Beaver Falls, Penn., the same week. The dam of 
these trotters is Liska 2:28} by Electioneer, the second 
dam Liz-zie, dam of three in the list, by the thorough- 
bred horBe Wildidle, and the third dam, the old time 
trotting mare Mayflower 2:30J, that waB one of 
Senator Stanford's early purchases, and that has 
founded quite a family of fast trotters. 



Mr. J. W. Zibbell, whose address is Pieasanton, 
wants to purchase a three-year-old trotter that Is 
eligible to start in the Occident and Stanford Stakes 
this year with a fair prospect of winning. 



Jackson's Napa Soda does not tangle the feet. 



CMie ^reeocr anH gponsmcm 



I.JULY 23 1004 



i| JOTTINGS. M 



STANLEY DILLON, the bay gelding by Sidney 
Dillon out of a Steinway mare, made good the 
first time hestartcd, and his record is now 2:11}. It 
seems as if everyone of the get of Sidney Dillon get 
fast records as soon as they are raced. There is 
probably not one of the few that have scored for the 
word in an actual race but has a record. Stanley 
Dillon made his first start at Columbus, Ohio, July 
13th, in the 2:23 trot for a purse of $1000. Ed. Geers 
drove him and won in straight heats. The time was 
2:15$, 2:12!) and 2:11}. There were three other starters 
— Leta, the brown mare by McKinney that Monroe 
Salisbury took East last May, Douglas V., a gelding 
by Capricorn, and Ruth C, a gray mare by Patron. 
A local turf scribe says: "The race can be summed 
up in a few words. There was nothing in it to drive 
Stanley Dillon out. He is.evidently a high class trot- 
ter of better than 2:10 merit and his track behavior is 
ideal." Stanley Dillon will be a starter in the M. & 
M. next week at Detroit, and it will take heats better 
than 2:10 to beat him. J. H. Brown of Detroit owns 
the horse, having bought him at the Blue Ribbon 
sale at Cleveland last year out of the Santa Rosa 
Stock Farm consignment and paid but $550 for him. 
Mr. Brown could take ten times that amount for him 
now. Athenian, the dam of this gelding, is by Stein- 
way, out of Ida Wood, the dam of Owyhee 2:11 and 
Babe Marion 2:17J by Simmons. The next dam is Ida 
W. by Mambrino Patchen, and the next was a mare 
that could both trot and pace fast and was said to be 
by a thoroughbred horse, although nothing authentic 
is known of her breeding. 



But Stanley Dillon is not the only California horse 
that made a good showiDg at Columbus. Judge 
Greene, the big bay gelding by Directum that trot- 
ted to a record of 2:10} last season, and was the star 
of the Salisbury string at Pleasanton during the 
winter, showed himself in shape by winning his first 
start of the year and getting into the 2:10 class at the 
same time. He won his race in straight heats and is 
ready to trot to a still lower record — one of 2:05 will 
not surprise me. 

In the same race where Stanley Dillon got his record 
of 2:11} Monroe Salisbury started the brown mare 
Lita by McKinney out of a mare by Monroe Chief. 
Lita was third in the first heat, which was in 2:15}, 
but was a bang-up second next time in 2:12:], and came 
back the third heat still faster and was right close to 
the Dillon horse in 2:11}, trotting her mile in 2:12, 
separately timed. She could not have beaten him, as 
be was just "buggy riding," as the teamsters say, 
but she is a 2:12 performer sure. 

The sensation of the meeting was the mare China 
Maid by McKinney out of Blaccbeward by Onward. 
She is a Chamber of Commerce candidate. It will be 
remembered that this mare was bred by Thos. Drais 
of Farmington, who in 1001 sold her to Ho Yow at 
that time the Chinese Consul General at this port. 
Ho Yow had Farmer Buoch for his trainer that year, 
and seot the Farmer to pick out and purchase a few 
horses to go to the meetings with. It was the Consul's 
intention to race a string of horses through this cir- 
cuit and the East, and he went so far as to have made 
a set of colors for Bunch to wear that would have 
dazzled the eyes of the spectators when he donned 
them. I believe they were of the royal Chineee 
yellow with three eyed peacock feathers worked in 
embroidery all over the front and an embroidered 
Chinese dragon on the back. Ho Vow's superiors did 
not approve of his trotting and pacing to popularity 
on the race track and they bad him recalled to China, 
before the colors wero ever seen. It can't be denied 
that Bunch picked out some good ones for him how- 
ever, as on one trip he bought with the Chinaman's 
money the mare Sola by McKinney that he afterwards 
marked in 2:14}, and China Maid that paced two heats 
at Columbus last week In 2:0(5} and 2:05}, the fastest 
time over made by any pacer in its maiden race. After 
Ho Yow was recalled to China he sold, or gave China 
Maid to J. M. Nelson, who took her East with several 
other horses, but never started her. Millard Sanders 
finally got bold of her last winter and has trained her 
up to this time, although he did not drive ber in the 
race. She wears the hopples and Millard does not 
like to drive that kind. There Is talk of this mare 
getting a mark as low as Coney 2:02, that other fast 
pacer by McKinney. She Is doubtless capable of 
doing It. Hut whether Bhe does or does not paco that 
fast, tl o fact remains that Farmer Hunch picked her 
- a good one when * ho was green. 



Salisbury's brother and taken to Salt Lake where he 
was roaded all summer and then sent back to Pleas- 
anton to be trained during the winter, marched into 
the 2:15 list at the Columbus meeting and won his 
race. He trotted his heats in 2:13* and 2:13}, and 
showed himself a pretty good road horse. He is out 
of a mare by Director. 



Ben F. 2rl0 by Bradtmoor was also a starter at 
Columbus but failed to win, although he was a good 
second in 2:08A and got second money out of the $1000 
purse. Marengo King was another California horse 
that started at the meeting, but did not win. He was 
not right and Geer6 drew him after the first heat. 



Millard Sanders was decidedly in luck at the Colum- 
bus meeting. Besides the races above nentioned he 
won the big end of the 2:08 pace with Al Bock and 
reduced his record a quarter of a second. This was 
one of those "every heat a race" affairs, Al Block 
getting the first two in 2:08} and 2:08, and Charley 
Deryder capturing the third with the California bred 
mare Trilby Direct in 2:08}. And by the way A 
Bock's dam is the Sidney mare Countess, a full sister 
to Mr. A. C. Dietz's stallion Longworth 2:19. 



Consuella S. the bay mare by Directum reduced her 
record to 2:10$ on the last day at Columbus, winning 
her race in straight heats in 2:11} and 2:10}. She 
should drop into the 2:10 list the next time out and 
will doubtless win money all through the circuit as 
she is a hardy and fast mare that is ready to race 
every day in the week. 



In the same race in which Marengo King started, 
the mare Leonora 2:18} by Mendocino was a starter. 
She was third the first heat in 2:1U and second the 
next heat in 2:12}, and decided second and third 
moneys with Checkmate. 



Californi i bred horses started in ten of the seven- 
teen raceB pulled off during the Columbus meeting. 
Of these they won five races, got five second moneys 
and divided second and third moneys once, winning a 
total of about $5000 during the week. But one of 
them — Marengo King— was outside the money. 



While the Californians were getting the money at 
Columbus, one that was bred in this State made a new 
record and got first money at Providence, Rhode 
Island. I refer to the pacer B. S. Dillon, son of Sid- 
ney Dillon and the great broodmare Biscari by Direc- 
tor. This product of the Santa Rosa Stock Farm 
took a record of 2:10} last year, and he reduced this 
two full seconds at Providence, where he won handily 
in straight heats. Last week was a red-letter one for 
the California horses. 



Columbus, Ohio, Races. 

July u— Trotting, 2:15 class, purse$1500, each heat a race: 

Direct View, br h by Direct (De Ryder) 3 l 2 

HallFry, bgby Woodsprite (Foote and Snow) 4 2 1 

Mary Gage, b m by Oro Wilkes (Kenny) 1 3 4 

Bessie Birchwood, cb m by Btrchwood (McGulre) 2 4 5 

Alexander, b g by Star Duroc (Geers) 5 5 3 

Gold Bug b h by Mambrino Hambletonian (Stewart) ds 

Time— 2:1154, 2:1054, 2:1054. 

Paolng, 2:18 class, purse $1000, 3 in 5: 

£?f u , s „? oin £ er ' b e ? y Sidney Pointer (McPherson) 1 l l 

Ethel Mc. cb m by Jersey Wilkes (McCarthy) 2 2 J 

Mlnaloid, br m by Coraloid (Snow 4 3 4 

Bonnie Treasure, chm by Bow Bells (Cassidv) 3 4? 

McEurie, ro g by son ot McKwens (Geers) ds 

John Burns, g g by Bobby Burns (Hedrick) ds 

Ethel Rice, b m by Dr. Horner [ ." White) ds 

Time— 2:1054, 2:lli£. 2:1054. 

Trotting, 2:07 class, purse $800, 2 in 3: 

Chase, b g by Keeler. - rGfiprsi i i 

Consuella S.,bm by DIreotum (De Rvderl 2 9 

Topsy, b m by El Monarch "7 "."... :.$£%] 3 3 

Time— 2:08J£. 2:10. 

July 13— Pacing, 2:06 class, purse $800, 2 in 3- 

Wintield Stratton, bsbySaraway (McGuirel 1 l 

Star Hal, brs by Brown Hal (Snow) 2 \ 

Hal Chaffln.bs by Brown Hal fleers! 4 i 

Elderone. b g by Box Elder .".'.".'.' (Si mnw) 3 4 

Time— 2:07, 2:0854. 

Pacing, 2:12 class, purse $1500. (novelty race): 

Eudora, blk m by Willon (Snow) l l t 

Bessie Drake, ro m by Moquette (Geerai 1 <t i 

Hazel Patob, blk g by Haw Patch (Flack) 2 2 2 

Englewood. ch g by Strongwood (McGuire) 4 4 4 

Bob. chg by Allle Wilkes (Wilson) 5 5 \ 

Byzole.chgbyVizant ifHaSn) 6 Is 

Time— 2:08»i, 2:0754, 2:084. 

Trotting, 2:23 class, purse $1000. 

Stanley Dillon, bgby Sidney Dillon (Geers) I l l 

Leta, brm by McKinney (DeRyder) 3 2 2 

Douglas v., bgby Capricorn (valentine 2 I I 

Ruth C.grm by Patron ..(Kenney) 4 4 3 

Time— 2:1534, 2:1254, 3:1154. 
July 14— Trotting, 2:11 class, purse $1500. 

Judge Green, b g by Directum (Deryder) 1 1 l 

Billy Foster Boy, b g by Foster Boy (Critohfleld) 2 2 2 

Robert Mc, b g by McRobert (Geers) 3 <i 1 

John Taylor, g g by Dispute '.'.'.(Wilson) dis 

Tlme-2:09»i, 2:1051, 2:11. 

Trotting, 2:17 class, purse, $1000. 

Snyder McGregor, chg by Gilman McGregor.... (Hogan) 1 1 1 

John Mc, b g by Res Amerious (Geers) ° 2 3 

Hal Fry, b g by Woodsprite !!!(Foott) 6 5 2 

Pat Ford, ch g, by Blitzen (Kenyon) 3 3 4 

Bonner, b o by Jay Hawker (Hays) 5 4 6 

Ben Potts, b g by Burden (Valentine) 4 6 t 

Time-2:0954, 2:1054, 2:0954. 

Special match race, 2:04 pacing, purse $1000, 2 in 3 heats. 

Major C, b s by Coastman (Geers) 1 1 

Little Squaw, blk m by Kewanee Boy (ciiderburg) 2 2 

Time— 2:08?4, 2:06. 

Paoing, 2:20 class, purse $800, 2 in 3 heats. 

Stein, b g by Joe Daily (McLary) 8 1 1 



In an announcement sent out by Secretary Reeves 
of the Empire City track I find the following para- 
graph: 

"The John H. Shults Experimental Stake at Empire 
is for 2:15 trotters and will be conducted under a plan 
original with Mr. Shults. To test the race a purse of 
$1500 is offered. It will be a straight two in-three 
event. The entrance fee will be 2.1 per cent, and all 
thesb fees shall go with the stake. Horses will be 
started by a man on horseback, riding on the outside 
of the field. He will be known as the guide, and no 
horse shall score down ahead of him. Should all the 
horses come down to a trot at the start, and a couple 
of horses happ ned to be ahead of the guide, the 
starter may give the word and those horses ahead of 
the guide shall be unplaced in that heat. This is ex- 
pected to effectually cure the scoring evil." 

This plan of starting is not entirely original with 
Mr. Shults Ten years or so ago the late Capt. Ben 
E, Harris of this city tried the experiment of starting 
trotters from horseback at a Breeders meeting held 
at the old Bay District track in this city. The cap- 
tain was quite a heavy man weighing close to 200 
pounds, but was a thorough horseman and sat his 
mount like a centaur. His plan was to ride the horse 
from the scoring point to the wire, and he carried a 
gong bell strapped across his chest to call them back 
with. There was no rule which permitted the word 
being given and penalizing horses that were in front 
of the guide horse, as in Mr. Shults' plan, but other- 
wise Capt. Harris was a pioneer at this manner of 
starting. After a fair trial it was not considered as 
good a plan as the old way, and was never afterwards 
tried here. 

Horsemen residing in any part of the United States 
can now pack their grips and start out on the circuits 
with perfect confidence that the country will not go 
to the demnition bowwows, even though they do not 
get back home in time to vote for Prosldent in Novenv 
ber. Both Parker and Itoosovelt are good horsemen, 
good judges of a horse and prefer using them to rid- 
ing in an automobile. The country is safe. 



Hal Fredda, b m by Brown Hal (Brawley) 

Bad News, b g by Coastman ' (Wilson) 

Willas, b g by Box Elder '. (Simms) 3 

Glad Bells, b h by Bow Bells (Geers) 5 

The May Patch, ch m by Bourbon Patch .'.(Grove) w 

Peruna, b g by Norval (Murphy) 

Gawking Boy, g g by King of Bellaire (Majors) 

Time— 2:1154, 2:0954, 2:1054. 

July 15— Trotting, 2:21 class, purse $800, 8 in 3. 

Blackthorn, br g Hawthorne (De Ryder) 

Hardwood, blk g by Gamwood (Critchfleld) 

Douglass V.,bg by Capricorn (Valentine) 

Little Bridget, ch m by Geo. T. Putney (Hall) 

Time— 2:1354,2:1354. 

Pacing 2:16 class, purse $1500, every heat a race. 

Coina Maid, b m by MoKinney (McLaughlin) 1 

Baron Gratton. b g by Gratton (Geers) 2 

Bob Hughes, b h by Ashland Wilkes (Highnight) 3 

Angus Pointer, bg by Sidney Pointer (McPherson) 4 

Ash Rose, b h by Ashland Wilkes (Weather by) 5 

Time— 2:0654,2:0554, 2:0854. 



dis 
7 ds 



Trotting, 2:15 class, purse g 



in 3. 



Miss Gray, b m by Ashland Wilkes (Wilson) 

Checkmate, b g by Phylie (Richie) 

Leonora, b mby Mendocino (De Ryder) 

Hatlie Mac. b m by Red Lambert , (Snow) 

Marengo King, blkh by McKinney (Geers) 

Time— 2:1154,2:1254. 

Pacing, 2:10 class, purse $1000, 3 in 5. 

King Direct, blk h by Direct (Geers) t 

Ben F . bg by Bradtmore (De Ryder) 

Five Points, blk h by J. H. L (Hogan) 

Sadie Baron, ch m by Baron Bell (Snow) 

Time— 2:0854. 2:1054, 2:1254. 

July 16— Trotting, 2:25 olass, purse $800. 

I Live, b m by Highwood (Geers) 

Lita, br m by McKinney (Deryder) 

Ruth C, g m by Patron (Kenney) 

Miss Rosedale, ch m by Rosedale (Brawley) 

Silver Ore, g g by Norminier (Stewart and Valentine) 

Time— 2:1454, 2:1154: 

Pacing, 2:08 olass, every heat a race, purse $1500. 

Al Bock, blkh by Nedwood (Sanders) 1 

Trilby Dlreot, blk m by Dlreot (Deryder) 3 

Baron Rogers, br g by Baron Dillon (McLary) 2 

Time— 2:0854, 2:08, 2:0854. 

Trotting, 2:13 class, purse $800. 

Consuella S. b m by Directum (Deryder) 

Joymaker, b h by Noroatur (Geers) 

Hallle Hardin, ch m by Russell Hardin. (McGuire) 

Tlme-2:lli;, 2:10J£. 



3 5 
5 4 



1 1 

2 3 

3 2 
5 4 
4dr 



1 1 

2 2 
4 3 

3dis 



3 4 
5 5 



1 2 
3 1 

2 8 



2 2 

3 S 



George Ketcham of Toledo, O., the owner of the 
celebrated Cresceus last week purchased from Al.G. 
Pennock of Glenville the trotter Marvel Girl, 2:23} . 
The price paid is said to have been $0000. It is re- 
ported that Ketchum acted as agent for Walter 
Winans, of England. Marvel Girl is by Marvelous 
first dam Bertha Red. by Red Wilkes, second dam 
Bertha F., by Pancoast, the sire of Patronage, who in 
turn sired Alix 2:03}. The third dam is Mary Force 
by Happy Medium who sired Nancy Hanks, 2:04. 
Pannock drove Marvel Girl a mile in 2:14} over the 
Glenville track this spring, the last half in 1:04 She 
has shown quarters in 31 seconds and eighths in 15 
seconds, Pennock drove the mare over a heavy 
track at Cleveland in 32 seconds. Ketcham, it is said, 
has been anxious to purchase the mare for some time. 



:kthorne, the brown gelding by Hawthorne that 
ro based from A. W. Shlppee last year by Mr. 



Mary Gage, four-year old mare by Oro Wilkes, 
took a reoord of 2:11} at Columbus last week. She 
had a three-year-old record of 2:16}. 



Strikel — if they don't give you Jackson's Napa 
Soda when you ask for It. 



July 23, 1904] 



®tte gveeifev ani> gtptnrtsrocm 



««-4=>Gy2>^*<^23N5 




The Cascade county fair and races will be held at 
Great FallB, MoDt., Sept. 26th, 27th, 28th and 29th. 
Over- $5000 have been hung up in purees. Entries for 
harness races close Aug. 20th at noon. 



The Californians are going some. 



China Maid 2:05} in ber first race. 



Consuela S. reduces her record to 2:10}. 



Judge Greene reduces bis mark to 2:09}. 



Stanley Dillon gets a record of 2:11} the first time 
out. 

Blackthorne, the Hawthorne gelding, trots and 
wins in 2:13}. 

B. S. Dillon by Sidney Dillon wins and reduces his 
record to 2:14}. 

Ben F. 2:10 finished a close second at Columbus in 
•2:08} and gets second money. 



Stanley Dillon 2:11} in his first race. He will get 
into the 2:10 list pretty soon. 



The stakes for 2:11 class trotters, offered by the 
Seattle and Salem associations did not fill. 



Leta, the brown mare by McKinney, trots second to 
Stanley Dillon in 2:11} and wins second money. 



Alone 2:09} by Nearest stepped a mile in 2:09 last 
week at San Jose and can beat that by considerable. 



The colt recently foaled by Nancy Hanks 2:04 and 
sired by Bingen 2:06} has been named Malcolm Forbes. 



Derbertha, the full sister to Diablo that Matt 
Zahner purchased from Ed Mills and took to Oregon, 
worked a mile at Salem recently in 2:16. 



Lady Jones, the mare by Captain Jones, son of Mc- 
Kinney, stepped a mile in 2:15} for Henry Helman 
over the Salem, Oregon, track two weeks ago. 



Mr. C. K. G. Billings has written to Secretary 
Jewett that he will start Lou Dillon 1:58J at the Read- 
ville Grand Circuit meeting to beat her record. 



Marengo King, son of McKinney and By By by 
Nutwood, stepped a mile in 2:11} for Ed Geers at 
Columbus the week before the meeting opened. 



The proposed race between Dan Patch and Lou 
Dillon, owners to drive, is now said to have had no 
foundation beyond the dope in the brain of an 
eastern newspaper man who dreamed about it. 



Kenneth C, black colt by McKinney out of High- 
land Maid by Cresco, bred by S. F Martin of Oak- 
land, has been sold to S. K. Trefry of Pleasanton. 
Kenneth C. is a two-year-old and is entered in the 
Breeders Futurity and the Stanford Stake at the 
State Fair. He will not be raced until next year. 



Nathan Straus 2:05} beat Don Derby 2:04} in a 
matinee at New York two weeks ago, in slow time 
2:09 and 2:10J, both horses being very tired at the end 
of the race, as they were not keyed up for fast repeats. 



Nearest 2:22 the full brother to John A. McKerron 
2:04i is getting speed from all sorts of mares. One of 
his two-year-olds paced a mile in 2:173 at San Jose 
last Monday. 

Captain Derby by Chas. Derby out of Economy by 
Echo, reduced his record to 2:17} recently on one of 
the Eastern tracks. He has recently been purchased 
by W. H. Byers of Buffalo. 

Sam Casto sued Mrs. William Murray recently in a 
Salem court for the recovery of the stallion Diablo 
2:09} on a lease, or $2000 in money. The case waB 
decided in favor of Mrs. Murray. 



An Eastern scribe aptly remarks: "The driver 
that is alwayslooking for the best of it and frequently 
gets it, should not complain if once in a while he gets 
what he thinks is the worst of it." 



A two-year-old stallion by Diablo 2:09} out of a 
mare by a half thoroughbred son of Guy Wilkes, 
second dam by Venture 2:27}, sire of Sidney Dillon's 
dam, is offered for sale at a bargain. See advertise- 
ment. 

Pan Michael won a race at Readville on the Fourth 
of July, pacing one heat in 2:06J, the fastest mile of 
the year up to that date. His previous record was 
2:07}. He is an own brother to the trotter Boralma 
2:07. 

James Duncan of Monterey county, recently sold at 
a long price a very handsome weanling filly by Baron- 
dale 2:11}, dam Cecino by Mendocino. The little miss 
is a natural pacer and fast. George J. Fiese was the 
purchaser. 

The speedy but unmarked pacer, High Pointer by 
Sky Pointer, brother to Star Pointer 1:59}, dam 
Bessie Hal, the dam of Direct Hal 2:04}, dropped 
dead at the end of an easy workout mile at Columbia, 
Tenn. a few days ago. 



The Leffiston, Idaho, Inter State Fair will be held 
from October 17th oo 22d inclusive. $10,000 in purses 
and stakes will be given for the racing program. 
Entries will close with C. F. Osmers, Secretary, at 9 
A. M. the first day of the meeting. 



Secretary Murray Howe has announced his pro- 
gram for the Memphis meeting, October 18-26. 
There are five early closing events worth $2,000; each 
to close August 1st. The classes are 2:10, 2:14, 2:20 
trotting and 2:06 and 2:13 pacing. 



Dr. Book 2:10 has been set to pacing and took a 
record of 2:24} his first time out at the sidewheel 
gait. 

The bay gelding Chase 2:07} defeated Consuela S. 
at Columbus last week, trotting his two heats in 2:08} 
and 2:10. 

The trotting stallion Don Fallis is offered for sale. 
Sea advertisement in this issue for pedigree, which is 
first-class. 

The Davenport, Iowa, meeting will open August 2d 
and continue four days. Several California horses 
are expected to start. 

Sam Bowers 2:11 will be out again on the Northern 
circuit this year in charge of John Lance, who is 
training at Salem, Oregon. 

Sam Hoy, of Winters, reached Pleasanton this week 
with nine head of horses, the majority of which will 
be raced through the circuit. 

Direct View, the handsome son of Direct that was 
trained at Pleasanton last winter, reduced his record 
to 2:10} at Columbus, July 11th. 



Enter at the Salinas meeting. Entries close next 
Tuesday. Read the advertisement in this issue of 
the Breeder and Sportsman. 




China Maid 2:05 1-4 



T. W. Barstow worked High Fly, his two year-old 
pacer by Nearest 2:22, a mile in 2:17} at San Jose track 
last Monday. The track was not fast as it had not 
been sprinkled for two days, and the showing made 
by the two year was therefore especially good. 



Winfield Stratton, the Denver pacer won at Colum- 
bus and paced his two heats in 2:07 and 2:08}. He is 
by Saraway, own brother to Charles Derby, and his 
dam is by a son of old Blue Bull 75. 



The $2000 stake for 2:24 class trotters offered by the 
Oregon State Fair did not fill. There was a provision 
that no horses were eligible except those owned in the 
North Pacific district on January lsth, this year, and 
it turned out that there were not enough of~them to 
fill the stake. Several California trotters would 
have been entered for the stake had it been open to 
them. 

The McKinney family are pretty well, thank you. 
China Maid has paced to a world's record of 2:05} in 
her first race, Charley Mac has lowered the world's 
saddle record to 2:15}, Nora McKinney has trotted to 
a matinee record of 2:09} and MissGeorgiehasreduced 
her pacing record to 2:11}. All these within a month 
shows that the McKicneys have acquired the habit of 
getting fast records. 

The trotting mare Pocahontas 2:26}, was the first 
harness performer to sell for $40,000, this being in 
1864. Other trotting mares that have since changed 
hands at fancy prices are: Sunol 2:08}, for $41,000; 
Maud S. 2:08}, for whom Robert Bonner paid $40,000; 
Nancy Hanks 2:04, sold to the late J. Malcom Forbes 
for $40,000; Goldsmith Maid 2:J4, for $32,000, and 
Lady Thorn 2:08}, for $30,000. 



An advertiser offers for sale a grandly bred two- 
year-old stallion. His sire is Exioneer (son of Boodle 
2:12} and Expressive 2:12} by Electioneer) and his dam 
is the mare Gertrude Russell 2:23* (own sister to Palo 
Alto 2:08}) by Electioneer. See advertisement. 

Have you sent in your guess of the first three horses 
in the California Stake ($2000 for 2:24 class trotters) 
at the Breeders San Jose meeting? All guesses must 
be in by Tuesday next, July 26th. It costs nothing 
to guess, and if you pick them you will get a $25 split 
second timer. 

John Kelly is working the great Idolita 2:09}. 
Many having seen hiTi at speed predict that he will 
take a record of 2:04 or 2:05, should no accident occur 
to mar his prospects, and Trainer Kelly, while not 
over-sanguine, believes him right in the Directum 
2:05} class as a trotter. 

Starting payments in the Breeders Futurity races 
must be made on or before Monday next, July 25th, 
if you want your colt or filly to start in either of the 
divisions this year. Remember there will be the 
three-year-old divisions of stake No. 1 and the two- 
year-old divisions of stake No. 2. 

They say Princess Athel (3) by Directum Kelly is 
capable of beating 2:10 away off. Monroe Salisbury, 
before leaving for Columbus, said she is the best he 
has ever had, and that must mean that she can shade 
2:10, as he had Directum 2:11}, at three, and Expres- 
sive 2:12}, a famous race filly, in the long ago. 

The first one to make an entry in the Crowley Stake 
was Capt. N. P. Batchelder, who came to the office of 
the Breeder and Sportsman on Thursday of this 
week and deposited $50, on two entries, one by Mon- 
terey 2:09} out of Luella (dam of Myrtle 2:13} and 
Prince Nutwood 2:12}) by Nutwood; the other by 
Searchlight 2:03} out of the pacing mare Trifle by 
Dexter Prince. Trifle has not foaled yet, but the 
Captain «ays it will go fast enough to win the pacing 
division of the side stake. 



Job. Neal, the efficient city clerk of Pleasanton, will 
act as clerk of the course during the meeting which 
opens at the horse centre next Wednesday. Mr. Neal 
has kept the books of meetings before, and knows 
how as well as any man. He was Monroe Salisbury's 
chief clerk during more than one campaign through 
the Grand Circuit and no more efficient man in the 
stand can be found in California. 



The Dillon family are keeping in front rank again 
this year. They are not very numerous, but what 
they lack in quantity ihey make up in quality. Lou 
Dillon, the champion, is as good as ever and some say 
faster; Dolly Dillon 2:06} is beating the European 
cracks in Austria; Stanley Dillon has won his first 
start and taken a record of 2:11}, wh le B. S. Dillon 
has won and reduced his record to 2:14}. 



The Chamber of Commerce $5000 stake for 2:24 
class pacers will be decided on Monday next at De- 
troit's opening of the Grand Circuit. There were 
twenty original entries in this race. China Maid by 
McKinney, dam Blanchard by Onward is a probable 
starter. She is in Willard Sanders string ard has 
paced to a record of 2:05} this year. China Maid was 
rnce owned by the ex-Chinese Consul of this city, Ho 
Yow. She was bred by Thos Drais of Farmington. 

The Stanford -Occident pace at the State Fair prom- 
ises to be quite a Nutwood Wilkes family affair. Of 
the five entries, four are by Mr. Martin Carter's great 
stallion Nutwood Wilkes. Two are colts and two 
fillies, and all are well bred on the dam's side One is 
out of Allie Cresco by Cresco, one out of Grace Kaiser 
dam of Coney 2:02, Stipulator 2:11}, McZeus 2:13 and 
Grace McK 2:21}, by Kaiser, one out of Little Witch 
by Director and the other out of Net, dam of two in 
the list, by Magic. 

Grace Bond, winner of the two-year-old division of 
the Kentucky Futurity last year, must be a wonder- 
ful trotter, and it is not surprising that Jimmy Gat- 
comb lately refused $17,500 for her. She took a record 
of 2:14} in her last race at Lexington, the week after 
winning the Futurity, and she is now considered good 
enough to lower Fantasy 's champion three-year-old 
record of 2:08}. Gatcomb says be never sat behind 
so fast a trotter and that she can now trot a quarter 
better than 30 seconds and a half in 1:01. 



The plan of having the judges' stand on the opposite 
side of the track from the pole is being adopted by 
nearly all newly built tracks. The plan prevails at 
the Empire track, at Brighton Beach, at Elkwood 
Park and many others of the trotting tracks through- 
out the country. The reason for the change is that 
the race can be judged better and there is less chance 
of errors being made in placing the horses. Many 
times the position of the horse at the pole in a close 
finish has been misjudged by his being overlooked 
from the judges' stand_. 

Stipulator 2:11}, the b'ack stallion bred by Mr. G 
W. Gardner of Los Angeles, dropped dead at the 
Mendota, Illinois, track week before last while being 
jogged. Stipulator took a pacing record of 2:11} 
last year at Milwaukee and was thought to he a 2:10 
performer this year. He started at La Salle, Illinois, 
on the Fourth of July and made a fair showing, get- 
ting fourth money. The time was not faBt for the 
class, 2:13} being the fastest heat, but as the track is 
a half mile affair, and not a very good one at that, the 
performance was creditable. Stipulator was by 
Titus, own brother to Direct 2:05}, and his dam was 
Grace Kaiser, the dam of Coney 2:02, McZeus 2:13 and 
Grace McK 2:21}. 

At a matinee given at Cleveland, O., on Saturday, 
July 9th, Lou Dillon again cut down the 1904 record 
for trotting to wagon. While Mr. C. K. G. Billings 
was not present at the matinee, Mr. Sanders brought 
out the champion trotting mare, and although the 
weather conditions were unfavorable, with a raiD- 
storm approaching, accompanied by considerable 
wind, the gallant little mare was sent a mile to wagon 
against her record at that hitch of 2:04} made several 
days ago. Three thousand enthusiastic spectators 
saw Queen Lou make the mile in 2:04} — the quarters 
being as follows: 0:32, 1:02, 1:32,2:04}. This is t' 
track record of the season and the fastest mile 
trotted to wagon so early in the year. 



6 



®he gveefrev a*tfr Qportsntan 



[July 23, 1904 



Pleasanton ProgTam. 



FIRST DAY— WEDNESDAY, JULY 27. 

Citizens Stake— Pacing, 2:20 class, $1000— Hattie 
Croner by Bay Bird, Mildred O. by Secretary, Gertie 
A. by Diablo, Olivetta by Richard's Elector, Harold 
D. by Dexter Prince, The Mrs. by Derby Ash, Billy 
Red by Glenelg, Tom Carueal by Diablo, Uncle John 
or Rajah both by Chas. Derby, Tammany by Iris, 
Sky Pointer Jr. or Hail Pointer both by Sky Pointer, 
Welladay by Steinway Dr. J. by Dock Hicks, Sunny 
Jim by Ketchum, Rose Thome by Hawthorne, Cavalier 
by Welcome, Giggler by Bayswater Wilkes or Ruby 
H. by Bradtmoor, unnamed stallion by Peter the 
Great. 

Trotting, 2:30 class, $500— D. E. Knight by Lyn- 
mont, Mamie R. by Nutwood Wilkes, M J. by Bay 
Bird or Talisman by Steinway, Directum II by 
Direotum, Wilmar by Wildnut, Monocrat by Wocd- 
crat or Reta H. by McKinney, The Trotter by Silk- 
wood, Lady Madison by James Madison, Erosmont 
by Eros, Walter Wilkes by Sable Wilkes, Morosco by 
Wayland W., Pat Rose by Steinway. 

Road Race— Local Horses — Hattie C. by Direct, 
Anita by Diablo, Joe by Eros, George J. by Rokeby, 
Diablo Bill by Diablo, Tommy by Antrim. 

SECOND DAY— THURSDAY JULY", 28. 

Pacing, 2:13 clasB, $500— Edwin S. by Dock Hicks, 
Harry Hurst by Delwin, The Mrs. by Derby Ash or 
Delphi by Director, Rey del Diablo by Diablo, Oma A, 
by Dictatus or Tidal Wave by Nutwood Wilkes, 
Margaretta by Direct, Uncle John or Rajah both by 
Chas. Derby, Tammany by Iris, Cuckoo by Strath- 
way, I Direct by Direct, Lorna Doon by Bayswater 
Wilkes. 

Trotting, 2:18 class, $500— Annie Hazen by Robert 
McGregor, Louis6 Croner by Wild Boy, Verona by 
Nutwood Wilkes, Rozell by Bob Mason, Briney K. or 
Idlewild by McKinney, Herbert L. by Antrim, M. J. 
by Bay Bird, Talisman by Steinway, Cuate by Mc- 
Kinney, Homeway by Strathway, Sutter by Noonday 

Local Race — To close later. 

THIRD DAY— FRIDAY", JULY" 29. 

Trotting, three-year-olds, $600 — Allesandro bv 
Athaneer, Era by Zombro, True Heart by Nearest, 
sorrel gelding by Prince Ansel, Silver Moon by Silver 
Bow Jr , Maggie Glynn by Robin, Paprika by Bro. 
Belmont, Mamie R. by son of Oro Wilkes, Murray M. 
by Hambletonian Wilkes. 

Trotting, 2:13 class, $500— Red Skin by Red Cloak, 
Ole by Silas Skinner, What Is It by Direct, Tom 
Smith by McKinney, Foiest W. by Wayland W. 

District race — Entries to close later. 

FOURTH DAY — SATURDAY, JULY 30. 

Pacing, 2:25 class, $500— Sky Pointer Jr. or Hail 
Pointer both by Sky Pointer, Giggler by Bayswater 
Wilkes, Gertie A. by Diablo, Miss Idaho by Nutwocd 
WilkeB, Blackwood by Baywood, Tom Carneal by 
Diablo, Cavaliero by Stanton Wilkes, Swanhilda by 
Orkney Wilkes, Hattie Cron«r by Bay Bird, Henry 
N. by Raymond, Si Perkins by Iris, Cavalier by 
Welcome, Muriel by James Madison, Rose Thome by 
Hawthorne, Dr. J. by Dock Hicks, Dart by Hector, 
Ring Rose by Falrose, Harry W. unknown, The MrB, 
by Derby Abu, Lady Shamrock by Grover Clay, Dr. 
W. by Robert Basler, Tammany by Iris, Lady 
Petrina by Directum, Prince Almo by Prince Almont, 
Evangie byShadeland Onward. 

Livermore Stake, trotting, 2:24 class, $1000— Una 
K by McKinney, Telephone by Direct, The Bouquet 
by Nushagak, H. D. B. by Arthur Holt, Birdcatcher 
by Direct, D. E. Knight by Lynmont, Golden Gate by 
Bay Bird, Major Cook by Chas. Derby, T. C. by Nut- 
wood Wilkes. Moroeco by Wayland W., Royal Dame 
by Chas. Derby, Erosmont by Eros, Bain by Stein- 
way, Alcacita by Red Cloak, Jupiter B. by Gen. 
Beverley, Little Babe by Bradtmoor, Reta H. by Mc- 
Kinney or Electro Mac by McKinney, Abe Miller by 
Titus, Charlie T. by Zombro. 

Pacing, 2:J0 class, $600— Oma A. by Dictatus or 
Tidal Wave by Nutwood Wilkes, Kelly Briggs by 
Bayswater Wilkes. Polka Dot by Mendocino, Alone 
by Nearest, Highball by Sllkwood, Zolock by Mc- 
Kinney, Dlctatress by Dictatus, Daedallon by Diablo, 
Edwin S. by Dock Hlckt, Toppy by Delphi or Delphi 
by Director, Cuckoo by Strathway, Dr. W. by Robert 

Basler. 

♦- 

The remarkable gelding The Monk 2:05} Is said to 
have more speed than over this season. The Monk 
was foaled In 1893. In 1897 be started In thirteen 
races and won them all but two. Among tho races he 
loBt was the Transylvania, In which he won two heats 
of the seven trotted. The race was won by Rllma* 
Ills i tbcr losing race was theeigbt-heat affair at Fort 
Wi i ne, won by CresceuB 2:02}. There were thirteen 
r«, and The Monk won two. Five of his winning 
■in £ were won in straight heats. Altogether he won 
y-flve heats that year. 



State Fair Directors Meet. 

The meeting of the State Board of Agricultural 
Directors, held last Saturday afternoon, was presided 
over by Director J. W. Wilson in the absence of 
President Rush, and the following members were 
present: C. W. Paine, Thomas Fox, William Land, 
E. W. Howard, G. W. Kingsbury and L. J. Rose, Jr. 

After the Board was called to order an attempt was 
made to have an executive session declared, but the 
motion was voted down by a vote of 5 to 2. Director 
Wilson declaring the State Fair required all the 
publicity it could get to make it a success. 

Richard Graham, who has been engaged by the 
Directors to take charge of and promote the horse 
show that is to be given during the fair in the pa- 
vilion, reported that that outlook for a successful 
horse show is excellent. He had already secured the 
promises of several of the leading owners of fancy rigs 
and horses in San Francisco to enter their outfits and 
hid also secured the gift of several valuable cups to 
be offered as prizes for the exhibits. 

Directors Burke and Fox were selected to join with 
a like number of Directors of the Chamber of Com- 
merce as a committee to have full charge of this im- 
portant feature and it was agreed that they should 
formulate the various classes, and get up entry blanks 
as soon as possible. Mr. Graham announced that he 
had Becured the promise of those who own hurdle- 
jumping horses to bring their stock for exhibit in the 
pavilion in jumping contests. 

It was decided to erect additional boxes in the 
spectators' circle around the ring in which the horse 
show will be held, as the demand for private boxes is 
far in excess to the original number ordered to he 
erected. 

The Secretary was directed to advertise for bid6for 
music, refreshment stands in the pavilion, program 
of races at the park, policing the grounds and for 
whitewashing and cleaning the buildings at Agri- 
cultural Park, the bids to be opened July 20th. 

A discussion arose over the subject of advertising 
for bids for the pool selling privileges at the park 
during the races, but it was eventually agreed to hold 
this in abeyance until it was ascertained how many 
running horses would be in attendance and the class 
of horses that would be entered. 

Secretary Miller Btates that he has received as- 
surance that fully 300 head of good running stock 
would be brought down from Seattle alone as the 
racing in that vicinity has not been satisfactory. — 
iSacrame?ito Union. 

Favors Cross Saddle for Ladies. 

Dr. J. B. Coakley, a leading physician of Buffalo, 
New York, recently wrote the following article for 
the Horse World in regard to ladies riding astride: 

The question as to the propriety of women riding 
astride of a horse in the same fashion that men have 
always been best able to manage it, is one of more or 
less importance to both women and horse. It has 
been so long the custom for women to sit on the side 
of the animal, holding on by an ill-conditioned leg, 
that It seems to require considerable courage to 
abandon the method and assume the right and sensi- 
ble one. 

Nearly everyone has noticed that a horse on which 
a woman is riding appears more restless and excitable 
than the horse of her male companion. The reason 
for this chiefly lies in the fact that the side saddle is 
torture to the horse. It must be girded very tightly 
in the first place, thus impeding respiration, and then 
when the woman is on it, the weight, instead of falling 
upon the ridge-pole center of the animal construction, 
as It were, puts the horse in a constant strain in 
muscular co ordination and tensity. ThiB Is so per- 
fectly evident that it does not need the double 
barreled declaration of a surgeon to prove it. In 
every way the man Btyle is more healthy for both 
horse and rider. 

So far as the question of propriety is concerned, 
that is merely a mode of honi Boit qui mal y pense. 

The habit adopted by women riders is really modest 
to an extreme; more so than the tight-trousered 
man's! The divided skirt, while not so graceful, per- 
haps, as the flowing gown on the side, provides much 
more comfort, and allowB the woman a fair chance to 
obtain the splendid health that horseback riding can 
promote, and to observe the best practical ruleB for 
proper exercise. 

The good rider should sit with erect body and well 
down in the saddle. The order Is frequently heard 
given to cavalry soldiers in drill: "Show no daylight 
between your seat and saddle!" No more stupid or 
abominable practice could be conceived than that of 
the rider who springs In the air with the regular mo- 
tion of the horse. That style never suggested the 
centaur. And to be graceful as well as practical, the 
toes should not be pointed out at right angles from 
the horse. They should be pointed straight ahead 



with the knees clasping sides. This is,' of course, 
necessary when wearing spurs, but lookB better and is 
safer anyway. The pigeon-toed style of the Indian 
came from this constant habit, but there need be no 
fear that we will be a nation of pigeon toes by the 
horseback riding of the present. Perhaps even that 
would be preferable to the haunted aspect of the auto 
fiend. 

But to turn back to "the woman astride of th 
horse" question; it may give more courage to Amerl- 
oan horsewomen to say that the new method is being 
extensively adopted among the English riders. The 
young Princess Victoria has now determined to break 
the rule of the royal house made so far back as 1341, 
when Anne of Bohemia appeared publicly riding side- 
ways on a horse, and thus created a fashion that has 
lasted five and one-half centuries. 

There is interesting evidence that horseback riding, 
far from being on the wane since the advent of ma- 
chine locomotion, is decidedly on the increase in 
America. In Buffalo, where asphalt roads and park 
riding probably attract more automobilists than any 
other place in the world, comparatively, there is more 
horseback riding by men and women than ever, and 
it is also observed that many of the latter have ven- 
tured out in divided skirts and been not afraid. 



Dan Patch's Conformation. 



Some time since, a member of th e R eniew staff visited 
the light harness champion Dan Patch 1:56J at his 
home, Mr. M. W. Savage's International Farm, at 
Savage, Mich., and while there made carefully accu- 
rate measurements of the brown monarch, in which 
Superintendent Hersey courteously assisted. The 
question of conformation has lately been the subject 
of considerable discussion in the columns of the 
Review, and as it is an exceedingly interesting one, 
these measurements of Dan Patch were made in the 
belief that they might add a valuable item to the 
existing data of the subject, says the Horse Review. 
We shall defer presenting the full details at present; 
but they are to be laid before our readers in a future 
issue, and at this time we will merely call attention 
to a feature of Dan Patch's conformation which they 
revealed; one of which is, we think, of unusual 
interest. 

It is the general idea, we believe, that the pac- 
ing kiug is a tall horse — 16 hands or over. It will 
therefore come as a surprise to many horsemen to 
learn that, under the standard, he measures just 
15 hands, 2J inches at the withers. There i6, how- 
ever, a still more remarkable structural trait which 
the measuring stick disclosed, viz., that he stands 15 
hands 35 inches at the rump. In other words, this 
marvel of the pacing world, instead of posEessing the 
so called "pacing slope" — greater height at the 
withers than the rump — possesses the so-called "trot- 
ting pitch;" he is higher behind than forward. 

Recently the Review has had something to say con. 
cerning the fact Rysdyk's Hambletonian possessed 
this characteristic — greater height behind — and that 
it has bred on, from him, in all branches of the light 
harness breed of which he was the real founder. Dan 
Patch is a triple Hambletonian; his sire is a great 
grandson of the "old horse"; the sire of his dam is a 
great grandson; the sire of his grandam was a grand- 
son. Hence it is not at all strange that his thiee- 
times progenitor has transmitted to him one of the 
most strongly marked features of his conformation. 

While "one swallow does not make summer," the 
case of Dan Patch may be said to demonstrate more 
thoroughly than anything else yet has the essentially 
close relationship of the two light harness gaits and 
to confirm the opinion that the old-fashioned pacing 
type "built down hill all the way, from ears to tail," 
and thereby known on sight of all men as a "side- 
wheeler," is a thing of the past. 



Suppressing Time. 

The attempt to keep a horse in a slower class is the 
foundation of suppressing time in harness races where 
classes are arranged according to race records. It is 
a gross fraud to keep a 2:20 horse in a 2:30 class by 
suppressing his time in public performances. Instead 
of a system of equitable handicaps^.by which a faster 
horse is penalized by weight or distance to make him 
only equal to a slower horse, the harness perfomers 
compelled to start in classes according to their public 
records. To obviate the suppression of time in races 
to aid fast horses to be eligible to start in slower 
events than their actual records, the National associa- 
tion and American parent association will employ ex- 
pert outside timers to keep records of the winning 
horses. The penalty for suppressing time is drastic, 
involving the expulsion of the horse, driver and 
owner and the imposition of a fine of $500 against the 
track where the fraud was perpetrated. — Exchange. 



JULY 23, 1904| 



f&hs gveebev anit gtpavt&man 



Hawley Favors Two in Three. 

It is somewhat disappointing that the advertised 
programs of the Grand Circuit meetings that have 
thus far been published do not provide for the two-in- 
three system exclusively, for it has become more and 
more apparent each year that the old plan does not 
please the public, nor can it be said to have one re- 
deeming feature. I have no doubt that if the question 
could be settled by the racing public itself there never 
again would be seen a race on the three-in-five system, 
nor do I believe that the average owner prefers the 
old to the more modern plan. I believe that the three- 
in-five system has been kept alive through a desire on 
the part of the drivers to practice the laying up of. 
heats and to win as a result of such practice, together 
with a desire on the part of the managers of associa- 
tions to curry favor with that part of the betting ele- 
ment that follows racing as a means of livelihood. 
The three-in-five system is archaic; it does not fit the 
present day; it does not furnish that form of racing 
which is demanded by the public nor does it settle 
the question of supremacy between two or more horses. 
The result of a race under this system depends more 
on the ability of the driver to manoeuver and to avoid 
the early struggles, and in the end the winner, fre- 
quently an animal inferior to others in the race, iB 
given a victory, not always through his own en- 
deavors, but frequently as a result of circumstances, 
combinations and fraudulent practices that would be 
next to impossible under the two-in-three system. If 
any man for a minute believes that the racing public 
is in favor of the three in-five system his mind can be 
disabused of this idea by placing himself in the grand- 
stand at any Grand Circuit meeting and Btudying the 
spectators. 

Just why it should take three heats to settle a race 
is hard to understand, especially in view of the fact 
that the same horses are frequently engaged in many 
events of like conditions. If only one race were given 
in a year, it might do very well to decide such an 
event on the three-in-five plan and give not only the 
spectators but the horses themselves their fill of it, 
but as many weeks' racing are given and on each day 
several events are carded, it seems little short of folly 
to expect the spectators and the horses to stand such 
a strain, and after all, is there any element more 
deeply interested or more deserving of some attention 
than the spectators? The three-in five system is no 
doubt eminently satisfactory to the professional bet- 
ting element; it no doubt satisfies every driver of an 
inferior horse who hopes that by means of the wiles 
and schemes, the accidents ard the series of adverse 
circumstances that may arise the best horses or those 
that contend from the first will meet defeat, and it 
alBO may satisfy the short-sighted owner who is not 
capable of looking ahead beyond one day, and is 
desirious of winning regardless of how, and at what 
sacrifices, and consequently is willing that his horse 
should be ruined through a system of racing that is 
in itself barbarious and inhumane. I have no doubt 
in my mind that twenty-five years from now the 
enlightened horsemen of this country will look back 
with astonishment on the system that prevails today 
and will wonder how it was possible for men to expect 
horses of two-minute speed to score incessantly, con- 
test in long-drawn-out races of seven or more heats 
and survive the ordeal. The only possible reason 
why this state of mind may not be reached within 
twenty-five years will be that it may take longer than 
that for trotting horse followerB to learn anything. 

Fortunately for the light-harness horse himself, 
for the racing public which admires the sport and 
patronizes it, there are three associations in America, 
two of which are under one management, that are 
controlled by men of enough enlightenment and pro- 
gressive spirit to recognize the condition of affairs and 
to take steps to lead horsemen out of their blind folly. 
The Memphis Association has ever Bince its founda- 
tion shown a desire to really improve light harness 
racing, and much can be expected in the future in the 
way of progress from this association. At Empire 
city and Brighton Beach metropolitan crowds will 
IhiB season be furnished with light-harness racing con- 
ducted in a manner that must surely prevail in the 
future, and owners of good horses and the racing pub. 
He in general, as well as every one interested in the 
welfare of the Bport and who admires the light 
harness horse and believes that his burdens should be 
lightened, will owe a debt of gratitude to the manage- 
ment of these two New York tracks for furnishing a 
bill of fare that is at last palatible and for establish- 
ing a precedent from which the old -fashioned maybe 
induced to change their ways. Doubtless there will 
be found many short-sighted trotting-horse men un- 
able to appreciate what is being done for them, and I 
have no doubt in the world that some of my esteemed 
contemporaries will enlarge on the follies of such a 
system and thevirtueB of the old one; yet, the hand 
writing is on the wall, and the day of the three-in-five 



system is fast waning, and when racing the light- 
harness horse becomes a first class sport, if it ever 
does, it will be when all trotting meetings are con- 
ducted on the same plan as will be seen at Empire 
City and Brighton Beach this summer. — Hawley in 
Kentucky Stock Farm. 



Racing in Japan. 

From the first race meeting held in Yokohama in 
January, 1867, to the one just closed, the better class 
of the foreign population of Japan, together with 
many prominent Japanese gentlemen, have taken a 
lively interest in running races, and if they have not 
succeeded in attracting the highest class of horses, 
they should feel great satisfaction in the fact that no 
suspicion of dishonesty or foul racing has ever been 
breathed against their meetings. 

In Japan it certainly is high-class sport managed 
by gentlemen or honor and integrity and without 
prejudice or favoritism. 

The emperor with his staff usually are present at 
these meetings and occupy boxes in the ladies' stand 
built for his exclusive use, but owing to the gravity 
of the war situation, the emperor this year was un- 
able to attend in person, but sent one of his officials 
to represent him. The absence of the emperor was 
very much regretted by all and it had its effect upon 
the attendance, as he is very popular in Yokohama. 

The track of the Nippon Race Club, the only track 
in Japan, is situated at the edge of this city, upon a 
high elevation, alike commanding and beautiful. In 
shape it is an irregular oval track ninety feet wide, 
and a full mile on the turf, which has never been 
broken or disturbed. From the wire to the quarter 
there is a descent and ascent of about sixteen feet, so 
that the horses can scarcely be seen at the point of 
the lowest elevation. Then again at the third quar- 
ter another ascent of a few feet is made. It is the 
opinion of good judges that the grades make the 
track at least twelve seconds Blow. 

It goes without saying that in Japan the horses are 
started from right to left, and they are started from 
the ground without barrier or chute. A running 
start is given them and the "managing" upon the 
part of the jockeys for a good start is frequently quite 
amusing, and calls for the usual amount of scolding 
by the starter. 

The Japanese riders do not approach our American 
boys in skillful riding. They are overweight usually 
and are not natural riders or horsemen. They ride 
rough as a rule, and are lacking in the ability to assist 
their mounts at a critical moment in the race. How- 
ever, they are honest and trying all the time — from 
start to finish — and that is what makes good horse 
racing. 

It costs four yens (two d ollars in gold ) to be ad mitted 

to the grand stand. The general admission being two 

yens, entitling one to a seat in a large covered stand. 

The betting is carried on through auction and Pari- 

Mutual pools. 

Tne lowest amount which one can bet is five yens in 
the Pari-Mutuals. In the auctions there is no limit to 
the amount, and as everybody betsthe amounts passed 
through the boxesis very large, upon all of which the 
club retains 8 per cent commission, which would be 
considered quite excessive in America. The owner is 
entitled to all of the pools on his own horse if he de- 
Bires them. — Corr. Chicago Soneman. 



A Stage Coach Reminiscence. 

The author of "Frontier Sketches," a very inter- 
esting department in the Field and Farm of Denver, 
writes as follows: 

Stage coaching In the long, long ago was pleasant 
even in winter, but how much more so it must have 
been when all conditions were wholly favorable. The 
The coaching parties of to-day, with their new-fangled 
vehicles, bedizened footmen and amateur bugler, high- 
stepping horBes and gold-plated harness, may enter- 
tain the thought that they know something of the 
delights of coaching; but it seems, at least to one of 
the old fellows who utilized the Concord coach long 
before a single rod of railway had been built in the 
State, that there can be no comparison with respect 
to that between the past and the present. 

For instance, picture a rare day in July away back 
in the early '60s. A coach fresh and sweet as the 
daisies and Indian pines growing so profusely along 
the highway; four horses, all prime roadsters, each 
one knowing i.s business; a Jehu on the seat with a 
long-lashed whip in hand with which he can flick a fly 
off the ear of either leader, the sun just showingabove 
the horizon. The team is fresh and bowling along at 
almost a 2:40 rate and breakfast iB only five miles 
ahead. You are Beated by the driver, and he has told 
you of the virtues of old Buck, the off leader, and 
what Zeke, the near one, can do, when, just as he is 
starting into the story of the wheelers, the refrain of 



a horn comes floating to your ears upon the soft, 
balmy air of that sweet morning. Again and again it 
comes, and as it dies away for the last time Bill GettB 
draws from under his seat a long tin horn and, seem- 
ingly without effort, evolves from it such notes as it 
would seem impossible to produce from such a source. 
It was his answer |to his brother driver coming from 
tho other direction. 

Half an hour elapses and with a blast from the horns 
and sharp cracks of the whips the coaches pass each 
other. In less than half an hour more the coach 
draws up to the station and one's olfactories are greet, 
ed with an odor of frying chicken, boiling coffee and 
browning cornbread. As you descend from your 
ofty seat a face beneath a homemade chip hat sur- 
rounded by a while ribbon and tied beneath the chin 
with a blue one, greets you with a pleasant smile, 
while a curl of soft brown hair is creeping down from 
under the hat in an attempt to kiss the dimple on the 
rosy cheek. • 

The surprise to you is complete, for the girl was in 
the coach when you mounted the seat on the outside. 
Naturally you open the coach door, take her by the 
hand and escort her into the dining-room of the sta- 
tion. In resuming the journey, at your invitation 
Bbe takes a seat beside you and the driver, and half 
a day 's drive brings the coach to the front of a homely 
double log house, where the girl alights, taking with 
her your heart, even though you had met her for the 
first time that morning. The result of one such acci- 
dental meeting witnessed by the writer, between a 
young man and maiden, was a wedding within a year 
and .the foundation of one of the most eminent fami- 
lies of Denver. 

A Pathetic Story. 

During the progress of the 2:24 trot at the Valley 
track last week on Wednesday and again on Thurs- 
day, there was being enacted a bit of tragedy of which 
the large crowd was entirely ignorant. John Bell, 
the 75-year old colored owner and driver of the trotter 
Charles Marion 2:22^, was driving to win the race of 
his life. Perhaps no driver ever contested for a purse 
where first money meant more than did his effort to 
win with Charles Mason. 

If he succeeded he would retain the possession of 
his trotter, which he regarded with the affection of 
his life. Not being a rich man, but very poor, laBt 
winter, when the ground was deeply covered with 
snow and the wind blew a gale off Lake Erie, it found 
John Bell without money or feed for his horse. 
Nothing was left for him but to seek a loan, which he 
did, placing a mortgage loan on the horse to secure 
the small sum which he borrowed . 

On Wednesday when he went to pay his entrance 
he only had sixteen dollars. Secretary Schneider 
took fifteen and gave him back a dollar to buy bread 
with. 

The man who had the mortgage was interested, 
being present, and informed the aged owner that the 
claim must be paid. 

On Wednesday five heats were trotted, Charles 
Marion winning two of the five, when the race was 
postponed until Thursday. On Thursday the first 
heat went to Chanita. The next heat would decide 
the fate of John Bell and his trotter. In this heat 
John Bell was at the wire first, but his horse had made 
three breaks in the mile while Chanita had trotted 
second without a skip. 

As soon as possible the aged driver got down from 
behind his trotter and went straight to the judges' 
stand. He was making his last piay. There was 
pathos in his voice when in the broad accent of his 
race he said: "I done ah bes' I could; I tried to win." 
Then with a bow, his cap in hand, he left the stand 
and went slowly back to his favorite horse. He, limp, 
ing, walked slowly, for John Bell's life had been a hard 
one — one of toil and labor — and age is beginning to 
tell. The judges held a long consultation. Then the 
starter announced through the big megaphone: "Re- 
sult of the final heat in the 2:24 trot — Charles Marion 
wins the heat and race." There were tears in John 
Bell's eyes; he was happy; he had won. — American 
Sportsman. 



Money For a Horse 

is olten freely given and at a rate of three times the ordinary 
value of the horse's services This happens when a horse is sick 
and a substitute is desired for urgent work. The owner who has 
foresight is not usually in this predicament. He administers to 
his horse from week to week a tome and preventive from a bottle 
of Craft's famous Distemper and Cough Cure. The forgetful man 
must use it after his horse is sick and loses a few days of the 
horse's time. It is economy to use it before the horse is sick. Any 
of our readers who have not a supply on hand should consult a 
druggist at onoe and if necessary it may be ordered direct, pre- 
paid, from the manufacturers, the Wells Medicine Co., 13 Third 
street, Lafayette, Ind 

One who doubtless knows whereof he speaks as 
follows in the Kentucky Stock Farm: "A horse is 
never 50 to 1 except after thecombined study of about 
1000 hard-working men, bookmarkers and players, 
the early morning watchfulness of a half-hundred 
'dockers' and the despair of his owner all seem to 
point conclusively to the belief that the hor=c 
a possible chance." 



8 



©he gvee&ev atxJy ^povtsxxxan 



[July 23, 1904 



ROD, GUN AND KENNEL. I 

Conducted by J. X. De WITT. !i^j 



April 1-Sept. 10. 
Quad In tidewater, 



Coming Events. 

Rod. 

Oct. 16-Feb. 1— Open season tor taking steel- 



April l-Nov. 1— Trout season open. 

May 1-Sept. 1— Close season for shrimp. 

July I-Jan. 1— Open season for black bass. 

July 3i— Saturday Contest No. 9. Class Series, Stow lake 
2:30 p. II. 

July 31— Sunday Contest No 9. Class Series, Stow lake, 10 a. m 

Aug. 15-Aprll 1— Open season for lobsters and crawfish. 

Nov. 1-Sept. 1— Open season for crabs. 

Sept. 10-Oct. 16— Close season In tidewater for steelbead. 

Nov. 15-Sept. 10— Season open for taking salmon above tide 
water. 

float 

July 1-Feb. 15 — Dove season opeo. 

July 15-Nov. 1— Deer season open. 

July SI— Millwood Gun Club. Blue rocks. Mill Valley. 

Aug. 7— California Wing Club. Live birds. Ingleslde. 

Aug. 14— Union Gun Club. Blue rocks. Ingleslde. 

Aug. 21 — Golden Gate Gun Club. Blue rocks. Ingleslde. 

Aug. 28— Merchandise shoot. Blue rocks. Ingleslde. 

Sept. 1-Feb. 15 — Open season for mountain quail, grouse and 
sage hen. 

Sept. II— Union Gun Club. Blue rocks. Ingleslde. 

Sept. 18— Golden Gate Qon Club. Blue rocks. Ingleslde. 

Feb. 15-Oot. 15 — Closed season .'or quail, ducks, eto. 
Bench Shows. 

Sept. 5, 10— Toronto Kennel Club. Toronto, Can. J. G. Kent, 
Chairman. 

Sept. 12, 13— Newport Bench Show. Newport, R. I. F. M. Ware, 
Secretary. 

Sept 28, 29— Valley Fair Kennel Club. Initial show. Brattle- 
boro, Vt. H. C. Rice, Secretary. 

Oct. 4, 7— Danbury Agricultural Society. Danbury, Conn. Jas 
Mortimer, Superintendent. 

Oet. 5, 8— Spokane Kennel Club. Spokane, Wash. W. K. L. 

Oct. 10— Brunswick Fur Club. Foxhound show. Barre, Mass. 

B. S. Turpin, Secretary. 

Oct. 18, 21— Frederick Agricultural Society. Frederick, Md. 
Roger McSherry, Secretary. 

Nov. 8, 11— World's Fair Dog Show, St. Louis, Mo. F. D. Coburn, 
Chief of L. S. Dept.. St. Louis, Mo, 

Nov. 16, 19— Boston Terrier Club. Specialty show. Boston, 
Mass. Walter E. Stone, Secretary. 

Nov. 22, 25— Philadelphia Dog Show Association. Philadelphia, 
Pa. J. Sergeant Price, Secretary. 

Field Trials. 

Aug. 22— Nebraska Field Trials Association. 3d annual trials. 
O'Neill, Neb M. H. McCarthy, Secretary. 

Aug. 30— Iowa Field Trials Club. O'Neill, Neb. George 
Cooper, Secretary, Dea Moines, la. 

Sept. 5— Western Canada Kennel Club. La Salle, Man. Wm. 

C. Lee, Acting Secretary, Winnipeg, Man. 

Sept. 6— Manitoba Field Trials Club. I8th annual trials. Car- 
man, Man. Eric Hamber, Secretary, Winnipeg, Man. 

Sept 30— British Columbia Field Trial Club. Steveston, B. C. 
Norman F. Tyne, Secretary-Treasurer, Vancouver, B. C. 

Oct 31— Monongahela Field Trials Club. 

A. C. Peterson. Secretary, Homestead, Pa. 

Oct. 31— Missouri Field Trial Association. Sturgeon, Mo. L. 
S. Eddlns, Secretary, Sedalia, Mo. 

Nov. 1— Sportsmen's Field Trial Club. Clare, Mich. Erwin C. 
Smith, Seoretary, Midland, Mich. 

Nov. 7— Independent Field Trials Club. 6th annual trials. 
. H. S. Humphrey, Secretary, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Nov. 14— Illinois Field Trials Association. 6th annual trials. 
Robinson. Ills. W. R. Green, Secretary, Marshall, 111. 

Nov. 15— Michigan Field Trial Club. , Mich. Chas. 

E. Sfsson, Secretary, Muskegon, Mich. 

Nov. 29— Virginia Field Trial Association. Martinsville, Va. 
C. B. Cooke, Secretary. 

■ Indiana Kennel Club. Field trials. Clay City, Ind. 

C F. Young. Secretary, Clay City, Ind. Week following Ills. Ch. 
trials. 

Dec. 3— Continental Field Trials Club. 10th annual trials. 
Thomasvllle, N. C John White, Seoretary, Hempstead, L. I. 

Dec. 12— Alabama Field Trials Club , Ala. J. M. 

Kirkpatrlck, Secretary, Huntsvllle, Ala. 

Dec. 17— Eastern Field Trial Club. Waynesboro, Qa. Simon C. 
Bradley, Secretary-Treasurer, Greenfield Hills, Conn. 

American Field Trial Futurity Stake. For Pointers 

and Setters whelped on or after January 1, 1904, whose dams have 
been duly qualified. Am. Field Pnbllshlng Co., Chicago. 

Jan. 9— Pacific Coast Field Trials Club. Bakersfleld, Cal. 
Albert Belz, Secretary. 201 Parrot! Bldg., San Francisco, Cal. 

Jan. 10— Georgia Field Trials Association. Albany, Ga. P.M. 
Esslg, Secretary, Atlanta, Ga. 

Jan. 10— Texas Field Trials Club. 3d annual trials. , 

Tex. T. A. Ferlet, Secretary, San Antonio, Tex. 



De Clickin' ob de Reel. 



I's beard de bullfrog bellow, 

De fatty 'possum squeal; 
But dat's no muslo like unto 

Da clickin' ob de reel. 

I's heard do locus' slngln', 

De kllldea'a noisy peal; 
But dal don't wake de heart up 

Like de clickin' ob de reel. 

Is yor eber bin a boatiu' 

In de sblp without do keel, 
En seen de rod a bcndln' 

To do cllokln' ob de reel: 

De trow dey call de "oastln,"' 

En when do "strike" ye's foel, 
De lino sbo goes a-slzzln' 

To do cllokln' obdo reel. 

Yor bet'ln tor wind' or In dan 

Wld all ye's nlggar zoal, 
For ye's like tor cotch'd or bass, sab, 

Wld do clickin ol> do reel. 

From ebery neck en cornor 

Natur'a inel'drlos roun' mo stoal, 
But nun ob dom am In It 

Wld do clickin' obde reel. —fiugtii* Firi'l. 



Hints on Handling a Revolver. 

Pistol manufacturers in this country are evolving a 
new style of weapon, it is claimed by some experts. 
For quite a while past both the barrels and handles 
have been made shorter and the powder charge in- 
creased. These changes in some ways are an improve- 
ment and in others a great disadvantage. Tbe ex- 
ceedingly short handle of some makes can not be 
gripped properly and the charge of powder used in 
the load is fully one-third too heavy. Such a strong 
powder charge is in vogue mow-a-days as to 
make the heavy recoil from the shot throw the pistol 
barrel back and up from the target. A short barrel, 
however, has the advantage of being whipped from 
one's hip pocket, holster or where else carried with 
ease and speed ; this in itself is most important. In- 
stances are far from few where a life was lost because 
a pistol barrel was a half inch too long and caught or 
dragged just enough in the effort to draw to enable 
the adversary to get the first shot, or the opportunity 
to send in several shots. 

In gun fights of all kinds results show that very few 
persons are hit in proportion to the number shot at 
with revolvers. The principal reason for this is that 
comparatively few people really know how to use a 
gun properly. As a rule a man is mad or desperate, 
he usually whips out his pistol and aims point blank 
at his enemy's, or attempted victim's head. This 
action accounts for the locating of so many shots in a 
ceiling, or other elevated place, after the shooting. 

A man's head is a very small target and difficult to 
hit, particularly aB most shooters will try to imitate 
cowboy style by throwing the barrel end up after 
each discharge. The "bead ' ' is taken from the target 
at each shot, consequently the shooter must "get on'-' 
to the target after each firing, at a Iobs of time and 
accuracy. 

A well known pistol expert suggests the following 
tactics for the using of a revolver when one has to 
draw — and it is a good practice, too, never to draw 
unless you shoot: 

"When your life is in danger and you have to bring 
down your man, follow this plan. Quickly pull your 
revolver from your pocket while you fix your eye on 
your enemy. Sweep the end of your pistol in aline 
with the ground to his feet, never bring the end of 
the weapon from the clouds downward. From his 
feet raise the pistol along and up, until it points to 
the abdomen, then fire. A man is widest there, and 
there are no bones to protect him, as are in the head, 
and he usually d rops. If you only want to maim him, 
fire when the revolver is pointing about the knees. 
While firing, keep the pistol pointing at the target 
all the time." 

In further exploitation of gun play, the gentleman 
continued : 

"Beware of letting your antagonist get hold of your 
gun in a fight. Here is a trick of the trade known to 
expert highwaymen and burglars," and the narrator 
put his unloaded revolver into his visitor's hands. 

"Now, snap the gun at me," he said; but before this 
could be done he had seized the end of the pistol, 
pointed it skyward and slid his hand along the barrel 
to the break spring. With a touch the revolver 
broke and every cartridge would have been ejected 
had the gun been loaded, and the user would have 
been helpless in his enemy's hands. 

Revolvers built of gun metal are highly In favor 
with many who have occasion to bear arms. Those 
nickle or silver plated flash like a reflecting mirrow 
in the sun, and to sight one of these burnished barrels 
is like gazing along the surface of a looking glass. In 
holding one of these bright weapons at one's side, or 
in any position, they can be seen as plainly as a lan- 
tern in the moonlight. About their only redeeming 
feature is, that as a menace to the evil or vengeful 
disposed a bright and shining pistol may be potent 
enough to cause an avoidance of hostilities or the 
withdrawal of attack when preparation for tbe same 
has been noticed. 

Pistols with brass sights are made that way on the 
theory that the sight can be lined up well in a poor 
light. This is a bit fallacious, for but few men have 
time, or are expert enough, to quickly sight with a 
revolver, and can only point the weapon at the mark 
and fire. 

A very important rule to be followed and relig- 
iously so by the novice, when practicing with a re- 
volver unless one intends to fire it, never manipulate 
a pistol or practice pulling it from pocket or holster 
unlesB absolutely certain the weapon is unloaded. 



Hunting Elk in Oregon. 

A few years ago sportsmen who were interested in 
the preservation of big game in Oregon were in- 
strumental In having a law passed in that state limit- 
ing the destroying of deer and prohibiting for a period 
of several years the killing of elk. As a consequence 
both deer and elk, which at one time promised to be 

f >ractically exterminated by the market hunter, have 
ncreased tenfold. This season is the first open one 
for oik since the above law was enacted, and no doubt 
many will take advantage of it. It Is to be hoped, 
however, that every sportsman wbo hunts for elk will 
be merciful to the cows and young, and be content 
with one specimen of spreading antlers. Just where 



to hunt elk is a question. There are many in the 
Coast ranges, but it is doubtful if one would be as suc- 
cessful there as in some other parts of Oregon. While 
they range near the settlements, they do not band, 
but scatter, here, there and everywhere, oyer many 
square miles of territory. Generally speaking, the 
Coast range elk, from occupying grounds compara- 
tively uninhabited by deer.have not been disturbed and 
frightened by the continual sharp crack of the deer- 
hunter's rifle, but live gentle and content, fearful of 
nothing.— Sherman Powell in Sunset Magazine for 
August. 

. 

A Business Change. 

In announcing a change in the Coast agency for the 
Hunter Arms Company the following circular dated 
July 1st was issued to the gun trade by the Phil. B. 
Bekeart Company: 

"Gentlemen:— Please be advised that we are no 
longer agents for the Hunter Arms C(.., of Fulton, N. 
Y., our resignation having been accepted to take 
effect this date. 

In severing our connection with the Hunter Arms 
Co., we know that the prestige of the L. C. Smith gun 
on this Coast is in no way jeopardized, as we feel that 
out efforts in their behalf are no longer needed 

Our association with the Hunter Arms Co , for over 
ten years, has at all times been of a most pleasant 
nature, and we take this method of testifying to the 
unfailing courtesy that they and Mr. McMurchy have 
shown ub. Yours respectfully, 

Phil. B. Bekeart Co." 



A New Kennel Club in Seattle. 



The rumpus up north, at least in Seattle, has taken 
another whirl, from which Is evolved the organization 
of an independent club — that is, unattached for the 
present. 

Under the present threatening conditions, if the 
fanciers at large would organize independent kennel 
clubs in the interest of self protection, the question as 
to which body will govern the Coast would soon be 
settled, and settled in the interests of those most con- 
cerned. In reference to the recently formed kennel 
club Secretary R. M. Palmer writeB: 

"The regular annual meeting of the charter mem- 
bers and stockholders in the newly organized Seattle 
Kennel Club (incorporated) was held Friday evening, 
July 1st. 

The meeting was largely attended by its enthusiastic 
membership and doggy affairs given a thorongh 
"talk over." The club's constitution and by-laws 
were formally adopted and ordered printed as also 
were stock blanks and membership application forms. 
The club capital stock is $500, divided into one hun- 
dred shares, at $5 each. Annual dues are $1. Ad- 
mission to meubership will be by written application 
filed and endorsed by two members, a three-fourth's 
vote of members present at any meeting of the club 
teight being the minimum quorum required) is neces- 
sary to admit new members. The stock is non- 
transferable and ownership limited to one share per 
individual member. All dog fanciers are cordially 
invited to join. The membership being limited to 100, 
its roster will soon be full. 

The club is composed of leading fanciers of Seattle 
and should continue to successfully give annual shows 
with increasing patronage. 

The officers elected were: President, Dr. W. C. 
Sharpies, for years past the most prominent patron 
and successful breeder of Cocker Spaniels in the 
Northwest; Vice-President, F. A. Pontius; Secretary, 
Charles McAllister; Treasurer, Arthur Murphy; 
Trustees, Walter L. Piper; James H. Norton and 
Robert M. Palmer. These seven gentlemen will con- 
stitute a board of trustees for the management of 
the club's affairs. A new departure is that, the bench 
show committee, will each year, be elected from the 
club membership at large for the management of the 
show, and not necessarily composed of members of 
the board of trustees. Club members who are espec- 
ially qualified to manage the bench show will then be 
called upon annually for that specific purpose, inde- 
pendently of the general club government. 

The Seattle Kennel Club, Incorporated, is not at 
present affiliated with either the American Kennel 
Club or the Western Kennel League. A show will be 
held next year, the details for which will be announced 
in due course." 



At the recent Paris dog show at one time about the 
ringside there were 72 countesses, 10 marquises, and a 
duchess or two, so there was a show outside as well as 
inside the enclosure, where, it is stated, the judges 
were more inclined to look upon the charms of the 
fair exhibitors than the beauty or show qualifications 
of their dogs. And who shall blame them, when, as 
is often the case, the toy dog of the Parisienne may 
be anything with four legs, a head and a tail. "Crop 
his ears, dock his tail and call him a Terrier" is a 
pretty good description of the general dog of the 
boudoir, if we except the ultra-fashionable French 
Bulldog of today. But be it to their "credit the French 
men and women know how to charge for these bat- 
eared brindled treasures of doubtful origin! Those 
Americans who have been in Paris recently on the 
lookout for French "Bulls" know this to their cost. 
The news circulates quicker than wireless telegraphy, 
which is saying a good deal, the unfortunate visitor 
being waylaid at his or her hotel, while the telephone 
is more than ever the very devil in disguise. And the 
prices! Those have already frightened away two 
that we we wot of lately. It is not every day that a 
person with the Mrs. O. H. P. Belmont purse goes 
abuylng Frenchies in Paris, and those who have 
followed the Hempstead lady have found that out to 
their unutterable dismay. 



JOL? 23, 1904 



®He gveebev cmfc g^wrrtsmcm 



9 



An English View of Faking. 

Fanciers in England and America are taking a deal 
of interest in the proposition for the suppression of 
the growing evil of faking — or as it is mildly put the 
extremes in conditioning dogs for show and sales. 
The following from the Enqlish Illustrated Kennel yews 
is replete with suggestive matter and also gives prac- 
tical information to an extent that we quote the 
article for the perusal of our readers: 

The immense interest which our interview with 
Mr. J. C. Tinne, vice-chairman of the kennel club, 
has created, prompted us to seek an inturview with 
Mr Edgar Farman on the absorbing subject of 
"Faking." We entered the office of this busy lawyer 
with a certain amount of misgiving, as we overheard 
him say to the clerk who took our editor's card: 
"Ob, Mr. Joachim; show him in. I want to tackle 
him for publishing my Kennel Gazette news" How- 
ever, we explained that we had not come to discuss 
anything else but faking, and to interview him. 
"Well," replied Mr. Farman, "nothing whatever 
would induce me to be interviewed, except for the 
fact that the worthy vice-chairman has set the ex- 
ample, and also because I hold equally strong views 
on the subject." 

"Now, Mr. Farman, we particularly desire to elicit 
your opinion, because the breeds with which you have 
been closely connected can be shown without artificial 
preparation. Your mind is, consequently, perfectly 
unbiased, and you can speak upon the subject as it 
affects the general public as well as the fancier." 

"Well, my view is this," said Mr. Farman. "The 
Kennel Club is established to promote the breeding 
of good dogs, not artificially preparing them for 
exhibition. The general public which goes to shows 
expects to see dogs in a clean and proper condition, 
but at the same time in a natural state. The public 
has hitherto looked upon shows under rules and 
regulations of the Kennel Club as above suspicion, 
but if trimming, powdering, weighing, etc., is going 
to be winked at, the sooner it is publicly stated that 
these things are allowed, the better. Meantime, it 
is a fraud on the public to weight a dog's ears, to 
alter their carriage pro tern, to artificially curl a coat 
and glossen it, or trim a dog to make a coat that is 
too long appear of the correct length, or hide defects 
of formation by taking the coat off in certain parts, 
and this practice of 'legitimate trimming' is simply 
the modern expression for high-class faking." 

"But," we observed, "don't you agree with Mr. 
Tinne that the subject of over-trimming is bristling 
with difficulties?" 

"Not a bit," replied Mr. Farman. "I consider that 
this attitude toward the subject savors of excusing 
what goes on at the present day— in fact, it seems to 
me that the whole trend of that interview is an 
apology on behalf of the Terrier fancy. It is quite 
plain that trimming is faking, and faking illegitimate. 
That 'sea-water' proposition ana soul to the club to 
be dealt with, and 'dry white powder cleansing,'" 
continued Mr. Farman, warming to the subject, "is 
just the thin edge of the wedge, which gives rise to 
the possibility of fakirs being able to discuss with 
honest men, and with the calmest assurance possible, 
whether it is wrong to weight a dog's ears before he 
goes into the show, or pull out surplas hairs, which 
are surplus because they would spoil the dog's chance 
of winning." 

"However," we said, "kennel clnb rules admit 
certain practices. Look at the ' regulation for pre- 
paring dogs for show. ' " 

"As they are," replied Mr. Farman, "one could 
almost drive a half-a-dozen carriages and pairs 
through them. For instance, the chalk remedies and 
the little carbolic acid for killing fleas is simply an 
excuse for the artistic faker. I see Mr. Tinne refers 
to the question of powdering dogs, and states some 
judges take a very lenient view of this and mentions 
one who, on finding white dust flying out of the coat 
on being patted, advised the exhibitor to retire and 
give the dog a good brushing, and bring him baok 
again. In my opinion, that judge and exhibitor 
should have been brought up under Rule 12. Look 
here," cried Mr. Farman, "the kennel club was in- 
tended to 'promote the general improvement of dogs,' 
but if the moral standard of the dog world is to be 
leveled down to the grade of the faker or legitimate 
trimmer, if he is to be called so, all I can say Is, the 
above mentioned rule should read 'promote the 
general improvement of dogs by artificial methods or 
otherwise.' " 

Referring more particularly to trimming, we drew 
Mr. Farman's attention to the fact that only last 
week a well known judge stated in a kennel organ 
that: "You cannot exhibit a wire-haired Fox Terrier 
with a coat like an unshorn sheep. Nobody will buy 
or keep such dogs, they are practically valueless." 

"Well, there you are," emphatically remarked Mr. 
Farman, "this just supports what I say. The whole 
practice is a fraud on the public. I have never heard 
anything more forcibly condemnatory of the practice 
of trimming, although the gentlemen in question did 
not make his statement for that purpose. 

Does it not mean, in other words, that the public, 
who know nothing of this artificial preparation, are 
induced by the appearance of such dogs at shows to 
buy them, or puppies bred from them, or use them as 
sires, and are thereby cheated out of their money for 
dogs which, when their coat is grown to its natural 
and normal state, are 'valueless'? Why, I hear, even 
the King had an experience of the kind. His Majesty 
acquired a certain dog, not a hundred years ago, and 
at once took an immense fancy to it. The animal was 
shortly after taken to the royal kennel, where it nat- 
urally received proper brushing and grooming, and 
was not again seen by His Majesty for a short time; 
but. lo and behold! when he next saw the dog, he did 
not know it, and, in fact, refused to acknowledge that 
it was the same animal at all." 

"Anyhow, " we added, "that the majority of these 
dogs are shown in this deceptive manner seems to be 



proved by the before-mentioned judge's further state- 
ment: 

"'If, indeed, such a condition [by which he evi- 
dently means showing the dogs in their natural coat] 
is insisted upon, we venture to predict that half the 
fancy will go out of the breed.' " 

"And," retorted Mr. Farman, "the very best possi- 
ble event which could happen in the interest of the 
public, and, to my mind, the interests of dogdom." 

"Now, to come to the crucial point," we observed. 
"We have no doubt it is the desire of the kennel club 
to discountenance such-deception, as it must be detri- 
mental to certain breeds in particular, and the repu- 
tation of dog-showing in general. What do you, who 
have a long and intimate experience of kennel club 
committee work, estimate is its power to Btop what is 
an acknowledged fact bj those 'in the know,' and 
may become a public scandal; also, what should be 
the action of members of the kennel club committee 
who are particularly concerned in these breeds?" 

"The committee," explained Mr. Farman, "has 
plenty of power, if its majority will only exercise it. 
In fact, it is in a unique position, as everj exhibitor 
under keanel club rules or regulations hands himself 
over bodily and agrees to the publication of his mis- 
deeds in the official organ, the Kennel Gazette. I con- 
sider that in these days the cause of the faker has 
obtained a lamentable foothold. The stumbling block 
is the unholy alliance with such a thing as 'legitimate 
trimming.' " 

"We recollect that in a chapter you wrote in the 
Dog Owner's Annual, you say that you would allow 
faking." 

"Ah, there you have it," was the prompt reply. 
"Yes, I would, as things are at present, and if they 
cannot be stopped, allow faking, and publicly an- 
nounce that it is allowed. Then everybody would be 
placed on the same level. The novice would know 
where he is, and have a sporting chance with the old 
hand, and, provided he is a good barber, or employs 
one, have an equal chance with him. Besides, ex- 
hibitors of certain breeds would be able to do openly 
and honestly what they now do secretly. The public, 
too, would know what to expect Of a dog after beiDg 
purchased, namely, a complete transformation." 



DOINGS IN DOGDOM. 



Who has a pug dog for sale? Must be not less than 
six months old. Address with particulars, Kennd 
Editor 

The record entry for a one day show is credited to 
the Richmond show, England. This being the largest 
entry to date for a single day's exhibition. Manager 
Cox no doubt is in a happy mood over the patronage 
of his show, k full corps of judges will have a lively 
time getting through the classes. 



Edgewood Jean II has been bred to Croydon Czar. 
A sister of Jean has a litter also by Silk wood Kennels' 
Czar. 

A one day A. K. C. show will be held at San Mateo 
in September under the patronage of Mr. Irving C. 
Ackerman. 

An A K. C. three day's show under the patronage 
of the Fabiola Hospital, we are informed, will be held 
in Oakland early in September. W. E. Chute has 
been engaged as superintendent. Needless to say 
that Spratts will look after the benching. The show 
will be under canvass. 

Two excellent Llewellyn puppies by Petrels Count- 
Gath's Moxey, handsomely marked black, white and 
tans, are among the late arrivals at Mt. View Kennels 
so John Lucas informs us. The puppies were whelped 
last April and will be just riyht and ready for pre- 
liminarv field work this fall. 



Ch. Alta Sylvia arrived in town last Tuesday in 
fine condition. He is looked upon by those who saw 
him this week as one of the most typical St. Bernards 
on the Coast today. He stands about 32 inches at the 
shoulders and is as handsome a smooth coat as one 
would wish to see. He is orange and white with 
grand black markings — in fact, a "picture" dog. He 
should do well for the breed here during his brief 
stay of one month. 

Two finely bred English Setter puppies by Albert's 
Rumney Ranger (full brother to Rumney Racket) out 
of Mallwyd Beatrice, bred by A. M. Tuckerof Boston, 
the well known judge of the breed, will arrive in this 
city next week, consigned to a prominent young 
fancier. TheBe puppies should be something good. 
Mr. Tucker has bred the winning puppies of both 
sexes for three seasons past at the Boston show. 



There is a promise of a lively war among the Coast 
dog "tongs," the "hatchetmen" of both factions are 
working assiduously to down each other. It does not 
matter which side prevails the "one dog men" and 
individual exhibitors who are the main support of 
dog shows here will be the sufferers. 

We believe, and so does a large number of fanciers 
whom we have met, that the exclusion clause of the 
W. K. L. is not a diplomatic move. It may prove to 
be a boomerang. 

In this respect, we contend that their is a usurpa- 
tion of authority that is unwarranted and that the 
dual whipping into line, present and contemplated, of 
the supporters of bench shows of the Coast is not 
sportsmanlike and to the detriment of the fancy at 
large— a body composed of willing exhibitors under 
each jurisdiction. 

The present situation has brought into existence a 
third faction — a close corporation working under 
strong union rules and which might without exag- 
geration be termed the Western Grafters' League. 



Mr. Thos. S. Griffith of Spokane, besides being the 
owner of some good Collies also has a brace of clever 
Bloodhounds, as the following interesting account of 
a recent performance by his prize winning hounds 
will show: 

"Some three years ago I purchased a couple of 
Bloodhounds from the famous Ravenswood Kennels 
in Kentucky for the sake of coyote hunting, and had 
them trained at the penitentiary at Walla Walla a3 
man trailers. I have often read of the sagacity and 
keen scent of these dogs, and only the other day had 
an opportunity of proving their prowess. Having 
lately purchased a small band of thoroughbred Angora 
goats I sent them to my ranch on the Little Spokane 
river, and my foreman, not being familiar with the 
requirements of these quadrupeds, turned them loose 
in a lot with a low fence around it, the consequence 
being that in the morning the goats were non est. 
Needless to say, all hands were requisitioned as hunters 
and wore themselves out scrambling over the hills and 
through the underbrush, ending in a fruitless search. 
Mrs. Griffith suddenly bethought herself of the Blood- 
hounds and soon had them at work. Taking a scent 
from the aforesaid lot, and after circling around three 
or four times, they suddenly struck off in a bee line, 
Mrs. Griffith following on horseback. After a run of 
over two miles they located the runaways calmly 
browsing around a spring, and soon had them back in 
the fold. The ground covered was very hilly and in- 
terspersed with "motts" of heavy timber, and the 
time consumed in rounding up che goats was a little 
less than an hour, which we all thought remarkably 
quick." 

Mr. Wackerman, who owns the Bonnybred Kennels 
at Brooklyn, is at war to the knife with the Society 
for Preventing Cruelty to Animals, who collect dog 
licenses, and pick up dogs that have not the society's 
badge on their collars. The society requires a certi- 
ficate for every dog owned in the Maujer street Kennel 
and noo only has Mr. Wackerman refused to so fall in 
with its views, but he intends to fight the society to 
the finish in the law courts — going to the highest 
tribunal in the land, if it be necea-ary, writes Fred- 
erick Freeman Lloyd in an exchange. He contends 
that the society has no right to demand fees from 
citizens of the United States for the privilege of keep- 
ing a dog [In this he is correct, if decisions on the 
point are any criterion — Ed] and that a dog being 
property in state law, the dogcatchers of the society 
have no right to pick up off the street any dog and 
detain or destroy it, if it is not claimed by its owner, 
who, according to the system in vogue, has to pay 
three dullars, o hat being one dollar "fine," and two 
for the license Mr. Wackerman further averB that 
all dogs picked up do not find their way to the shelter; 
that he has been offered animals of more value than 
the ordinary street cur. Here then is a fine kettle of 
fish! Wackerman is a determined man, and says that 
no private corporation may infringe the rights of a 
citizen, never minding who granted it a charter. 
Some such a case has before been decided in the 
Court of Appeals, and to a certain extent the present 
defendant depends on that finding, and is confident of 
coming out top dog at the finish. Other owners in 
Brooklyn, it is reported, have found themselves in a 
like position, and if a combined front were made by 
the proprietors of large kennels, the burden would 
not fall on the shoulders of one person who, however, 
is ready and willing to fight a battle for what he con- 
siders — and is advised— are his rights. 



Speaking of the Bonnybred Kennels reminds us 
what a wonderful Bull Terrier Woodcote Wonder 
is, and when at his age, may we see his like again? 
With eleven years to his credit he does not look his 
summers, and he is one of those young-old dogs that 
live vigorously and soundly until the moment of 
passing away. Woodcote Wonder was well named; 
he is a Terrier that the next generation will be talk- 
ing about in all its wisdom and remembrances of the 
period, when cropping was allowed on the quiet, and 
Bull Terriers appeared as such, and not as the soft 
and sloppy creatures as may be seen on the English 
benches today. For Woodcote Wonderis theembodi- 
ment of a Terrier albeit he is quite five or six pounds 
too heavy, and his master being on his three weeks' 
vacation the dog does not get his gallop behind a 
bicycle, three or four times a day to Fire-station No. 
37, in the Bmoky borough. Possessing a beautiful 
head, with a jaw that could break a colt's leg, be haB 
that power, length and strength there, without the 
suspicion of coarseness A blind man with his staff 
could find out his breed by running it over him, and 
there he remains almost the dog today as he was 
eight or nine years ago! Mr. John W. McCauliffe, 
Scranton, Pa., has just bred a litter to him from 
Bessie Sunshine, and they are said to be doing well, 
and there are other bitches in whelp to the old warrior, 
while that real good bitch, Pirebell, by this time will 
have visited him. 

Dogdom in England is at present much taken up 
with the important subject of "faking." Under this 
general head the matter is geting a raking over from 
center to circumference. Trimming, cropping and 
certain embellishments of the dog for the bench is 
also coming under criticism and discussion. Several 
prominent breeders and fanciers have apparently 
gotten into hot water with the kennel authorities, one 
in particular having been penalized with several years 
disqualification for coloring an Irish Terrier's coat. 
In this case, the statement has been made, that a 
stumbling block in the way of other ambitious fanciers 
of the same breed has been sidetracked and the "unco 
guid" believe that they will now have an easiertime of 
it with their dogs, for the ousted breeder invariably 
walloped the most of them with his entries and conse- 
quently made the most sales for the best prices. 

His Majesty King Edward himself could not escape 
the designed ingenuity of one dealer who sold to the 
royal kennels apparently a crack terrier — trimmed, 
combed and colored artistically when purchased but 
which afterwards turned out to be a faked up' 



1G 



®he gveeiiev cm& grptfrtsOTcm 



[July 23, 1904 



AT THE TRAPS. 

There being no regular local trap event tomorrow 
will enable a number of shooting enthusiasm to attend 
the tournament of the Vallejo Gun Club. 

The program comprises both live bird and blue 
rock events, their being five live bird races, under 
handicap conditions and six target races also under 
handicaps. The whole program is arranged in such 
manner as tc give a satisfactory variety. A feature 
of the meeting will be a team shoot, at targets, be- 
tween Union, Vallejo and HerculeB Gun Club members. 

Via Southern Pacific train, shooters can take tne 
7 o'clock boat at the ferry. 

The Golden Gate Gun Club shoot at Ingleside last 
Sunday was well attended ana a lively schedule of 
events kept the shooters busy all day. Besides the 
regular club program two extra features were shot— ■ 
the Phil B. Bekeart trophy race and a ■ novelty 
match. It will be remembered that at the last A?°°t 
for the Bekeart trophy, on Decoration Day, Webb 
and Varien tied with 96 each, there were six other 
contestants in this race. On Sunday the tie was snot 
off and three other shooters also contested. Webb 
beat Varien by one target, 93 to 92. The race was 
won, however, by E. Holling of Dixon, who broke 9, 
out of 100 and established a Coast record in a 100 
target race. Holling broke his first 25 straigl t, 
missed one of the second 25, broke straight on the 
third section of 25 and lost two in succession on his 
last 25. both targets were thrown low, right and left 
quartering. 

In the "novelty" shoot at oO targets— 10 at known 
traps, known angles; 10 known traps, unknown angles; 
10 known traps, known angles reverse, 10 known traps, 
unknown angles, reverse pull, both barrels and 10 in 
5 pairs, the variety was enough to keep the talent 
guessing. Nauman won first mosey with 43 breaks, 
a very good score, Sylvester second with 41 and Webb 
third with 40 breaks. 

In the regular events, Holling and Bradnck won 
medals in the champion class, with 25 and 24 breaks 
respectively. Sylvester 25 and Gamble 24 won medals 
in the first class. Second class medals were won by 
Knauft 20 and Burton 19. 

In the $150 purse race, the five high guns were: 
Nauman, Webb and W. J. Golcher 24 each, Foster 
and Gamble 23 each. 

The winners in the consolation event, three moneys, 
were: Nauman and Brad rick 25 breaks, Webb and 
Holling 24 each, champion class. First class, Iverson 
25, "Slade" 24, Sylvester 23, Gamble 21, Green 20, 
Klevesahl 20, Murdock 20, five moneys. Second class, 
Lewis 18, Knauft 18, Clark 18, Turner 17, four moneys. 

The high guns in the "sealed condition" event were: 
Nauman 14, Holling, Webb, Bradrick, Klevesahl and 
Dr. Hutton 13 each. 

A summary of scores in the different events is the 
following: 



Boiling 

Nauman 

Webb 

Bradrick 

Varien 

Baight 

Forster 

Green 

Iverson 

Gamble 

Klevesahl, E.. 

Golcher 

Sylvester, G. . 

Murdock 

"Slade" 

Button, Dr — 

Kbauft 

Lewis, T. L .. 

Potter 

Wattles 

Balloran 

Bowen 

Patrlok 

Clark 

Turner 

Burton 

Daniels 



o" 2 















K 


i^ 
















s» 


of* 


•SiS 














O 


03 


24 


13 


35 


14 


24 


13 


25 


13 


22 


12 


22 




20 


10 


25 




21 


9 


20 


13 


19 


12 


23 


12 


20 


9 


24 


11 


20 


13 


18 


9 


18 


10 


19 


11 


19 




11 


8 


16 


7 


18 


8 


17 


8 


16 





Phil B. Bekeart perpetual challenge trophy race, 
100 targets- 
Boiling, E 25 

Nauman, C.C 23 

Webb, A. J 24 

Varien, W. H '-'I 

Bradrick. J. W 23 



S4 


25 


23-97 


its 


25 


24—95 


24 


21 


24-93 


a 


23 


23-93 


23 


22 


52—90 



The best run of straights we can call to mind was 
that of Ed Schultz, In the tournament at Ingleside 
three years ago. when he broke 112 straight, two 20's 
In two events, and three 20's In shooting off the ties, 
thence breaking straight until his 113th target. 



The West Woodland Gun Glub held a blue rock 
shoot on June 26th, at which the following scores 
were made: At singles — H. Hennlgan, shot at 100, 
broke 59; J. D. Keys 90-53; J. A. Webb 50-32; Wm. G. 
Van Zee 100-75; G. Howard 50-33; P. Lawson 60-38; 
JoeBalrd 80-53; Jim Bainl 10-37; Joe Balrd, Jr. 40-23; 
Jos. Flshbaok 60-31; A. Oliver 90-60; W. Herd 70-48; 
H. Furch 20-14; Wm. Martin 50-31. 

At doubles— H. Hennigan, shot at 10, broke 3; H. 
Furch 10-3; Jim Balrd 10-8; Wm. Van. Zee 2m lOj P. 
Lawson 10-6; J. Keys 10-3. 



The Golden Gate Club will hang up $1400 in added 
money next year — $200 for each of seven club shoots. 
There will be five 20 target races, 14 to 20 yards 
lurid icap, $10 for each event, no on trance, price of 
bi ds 2 cents or 40 cents for each event. The dues for 
i j year will bo $25, payable In advance. Thlsshould 
' 1 oil some warm contests. 



Lloyd Eaton's Remains Arrive From Alaska. 

The steamer St. Paul, which arrived from Alaska 
last week, brought down the remains of the late Lloyd 
Eaton. 

It will be remembered that he passed away several 
month ago at Nome. Mrs. Eaton and his daughter 
also came down on the steamer. 

The remains will be interred in one of the cemeteries 
in San Mateo county. Lloyd, before embarking in 
business at Nome, was a resident of San Mateo county 
where he had a splendid country home surrounded by 
beautiful grounds. 

m 

GOSSIP FOR SPORTSMEN. 



Over 300 sportsmen attended the annual camp stew 
of the Grass Valley Sportsmen's Association at Indian 
Springs reoently. The function is declared to have 
been the greatest and most enjoyable event of the 
kind given by the club in many years. Among the 
local sportsmen present were Deputy Fish Commis- 
sioner H. T. Payne, John K. Orr and Dr. A. K. Craw- 
ford. Dr. A. M. Barker of San Jose was also present- 
Over 1000 doves, besides a bountiful supply of chick- 
ens, obtained no man knows how, cottontail rabbits, 
jack rabbits and other toothsome ingredients were 
used in making up the "sportsman's stew." Trout 
were alBO plentiful as a side dish. 

Among the speakers during the afternoon were: H. 
T. Payne, Judge F. T. Nilon, "Uncle" George Bromley 
of San Francisco, Hon. T. J. Sherwood of Marysville, 
District Attorney Jones, Dr Crawford, Dr. Barker, 
Jo V. Snyder, Arthur R. Biggs and others. Senator 
Tyrrell presided as toastmaster and was the right 
man in the right place. 



Frank Bercher, a rancher living in the foothills 
north of Berkeley, a distance of less than ten miles 
from this city, had a lively scrimmage with a wounded 
California lion (Felis concolor) last Sunday morning. 
The big cat had been marauding the farmers' stock 
in the vicinity of Schmidtville, a little place just north 
of Berkeley, for several days last week. Although 
the country side was up in arms the animal was not 
seen by anyone until Bercher, who was on the war 
path with a shotgun came upon the brute while it was 
drinking from a pool in one of the small canyons bs ck 
of Schmidtville. The meeting was a mutual surprise, 
the lion true to its usual practice tried to slink away. 
Not counting the consequences of his temerity in at- 
tempting to bag a mountain lion with small shot 
Bercher fired, with the result that it was only wounded 
in the shoulder. Angered by the pain the animal 
turned in its tracks and made one great leap toward 
its pursuer. It fell short a bit but Bercher was taken 
bo unawares that he fell over from fright. In this 
position the animal could have killed him but it 
seemed more intent on getting away, for it merely 
gave him two or three slaps with its paw and then 
slunk off. 

Although the slaps were few they were not dainty. 
The claws tore big furrows into the flesh, so large 
that the Point Richmond doctor who treated him 
says he will wear scarB for the rest of his life. 

The story of Bercher's encounter spread over the 
countryside and in a little while hunting parties were 
scouring the hills for the beast. The brush in all the 
canyons was beat up for miles around. Only one 
hunter got a glimpse of the lion, however, and that 
was while it was creeping among some brush, ap- 
parently wounded but still able to make good time 

This mountain lion has been making life miserable 
for the ranchers of Schmidtville by stealing their 
sheep and calves. It probably came up and along the 
foothills from the Mt Hamilton region, or further 
south, where a few of these beasts are known to be. 



Hunters of big game have been successful recently 
in bagging several bears. One of the most indefati- 
gable of these hunters is A. H. Russ, called in the 
north "Geronimo" Russ. Russ started out a short 
time ago from Bear Wallow in Shasta county, accom- 
panied by guides and dogs, and has already succeeded 
in bringing down three bears. One, a cinnamon, 
weighed 700 pounds dressed; the other two were black 
bears and weighed 550 and 600 pounds respectively. 
On returning the party was nearly lost in the snow, 
and crossed and recrossed o»e creek before locating 
their camp. Russ intends to stay in the mountains 
for three months, and will hunt bear until the snow- 
fall makes further sport impossible. 

W. H. Stanley of Alameda, In business in this city, 
is spending a few days at Klamath SpringB, Siskiyou 
county. On the 15th inst while he was following a 
mountain stream for trout in company with a chum 
and a half breed Indian as a guide, the party came 
very near stepping on an old she bear and a six- 
months-old cub, but Stanley fortunately had his 
Winchester repeating rifle handy and killed the old 
bear at the first fire. A second shot struck the cub 
in the shoulder as it sought safety in a tree, and then 
another shot brought it to the ground. Both skins 
are on the way to this city to be mounted. 



The mountains of San Mateo county contain, this 
year, more campers than any previous year within 
the memory of the "oldest Inhabitant." This state- 
ment is especially true in reference to the vicinity of 
La Honda. It is estimated that there at the present 
time no less than 250 camping parties in the vicinity 
of that placo and at Harrison, a short distance away 
In the Pescadoro valley. The visitors came from 
various parts of the Coast. Santa Clara county is 
very well represented as also San Francisco and Ala- 
meda counties. San Mateo county, of course, holds 
the lead. The camping season is now at its height, 
but when the public schools reopen the crowds will 
be materially lessened. 



In never rains but it pourB, so we have another ad- 
venture with mountain lions, two of them this time 
Deputy Sheriff Frank B. O'Reilly had, one day last 
week, a despei ate encounter with two half famished 
and hungry lions. He was out hunting in the mountains 
near Watsonville when he suddenly came upon game 
a bit larger than he anticipated. 

Deputy O'Reilly was alone. The beasts did not run 
when discovered, but instead turned upon the hunter, 
being in that hungry condition possibly which made 
them bold enough to attack a human being, besides a 
pair of these animals will work together on the 
offensive where a single varmint would sneak away. 
O'Reilly was cool and equal to the emergency, a quick 
and accurate Bhot at one of the crouching lions put 
the beast out of business. When he fired the first 
shot he shifted position and none too quick for the 
other brute made a rush but luckily was dropped by 
the second shot almost at the feet of the attacked 
hunter. The beasts were skinned where they fell and 
the pelts taken into Watsonville. They will be made 
into a pair of nice rugs as mementoes of tfie scrimmage. 



Hurrah! for Dustproof Hairy! He was a long time 
getting there, that is, in exercising the police functions 
of his deputyship, but he has now come to the front 
like a stake horse. 

In San Mateo county the deer season opens on 
August 1st. Early this week it was current gossip in 
Redwood City that a party of hunters had gone into 
the bills last Saturday and bagged a number of bucks 
Deputy Fish Commissioner H. T. Payne was present 
in San Mateo last Monday and heard of the affair 
Payne and County Game Warden Chase Littleiohn 
immediately swore out enough John Doe warrants to 
cover the case and with Constable Cronk went over 
to the coast section on a round up. 

Last Tuesday they returned to Redwood Citv in 
carnages and automobiles, the procession looked 
more like a swell excursion to the Big Basin than a 
party of accused law violators. The arrested parties 
were: A T Gilcrest, D E Blackman, Joseph Francis 
G F Wyman, Fred A. Simmonds, Eugene Daneri FP 
Granger, Frank Nunes, Joseph Daneri and Martin 
Albrecht, ten prominent citizens of the coast section 
of the county. 

They were arraigned before Justice Hanlon and re- 
leased on $25 cash deposit each to appear at a future 
hearing. The arrested men did not deny the charees 
against them, the killing of five bucks, but claimed 
that they believed the county law had been chaneed 
(Had they read the Breeder and Sportsman thev 
would have known what the law in their county was 1 
As the matter now stands, it is probable that the ar- 
rested hunters will plead guilty and be let off with the 
minimum fine of $25. 

Mr. Payne has been engaged in special game and 
hsh protection work for several years past and has 
been instrumental in the adoption, by various county 
governments, of ordinances that are now 6een to be 
for the best interests of sportsmen and the general 
public. 

At the meeting of the San Mateo board of super- 
visors last Monday the petition for the extension of 
the county deer open season was denied. Mr. Payne 
and others addressed the board on the subject the 
general conclusion was the season as at present 
authorized is ample, and any extension would result 
in opening the county to outside sportsmen, who 
combined with the local hunters, would within'a few 
years exterminate the game supply. 

E. J. Crane and Jos. Call of Menlo Park were 
arrested for having venison in their possession. The 
claim was made that the meat came from Santa Clara 
county where the season is open, the San Mateo 
county ordinance prohibits the possession of venison 
in close season. 

W. W. Richards and Mrs. Richards are both 
sojourning at the Riverside Hotel, Santa Cruz. "Bill" 
writes he is catching lots of trout. He also tells a 
good story about a foppish young man who was stop- 
ping at a certain Santa Cruz hotel recently. The 
young man, by reason of his peculiar mannerisms had 
created a fund of amusement for the various guests 
from time to time and one afternoon he capped the 
cl'max in the following manner: 

He quietly came into the parlor where the laodlay 
was entertaining several guests, and said: "Would 
you oblige me, Madam, with a glass of water?" His 
request was granted. In a few minutes the young 
man appeared again and asked for another glass of 
water. The second requeBt was granted. Then the 
young man came again and said: 'Pardon me, Madam, 
for troubling you again, but will you kindly let me 
have a pail of water this time?' " 

"Certainly, Mr. Jones," replied the landlady, "I 
shall Bee that it is secured for you. Would you like 
to meet some of my friends?" 

"I am very sorry, Mrs. Brown, I have not the time. 
The fact is, my room is on fire." 



For the first season in the history of the County 
Club the members returned last week empty handed 
from the season's initial hunt. Foggy weather and 
an unusual wariness and cunning displayed by the 
bucks accounts for the lack of success on the part of 
many Marin county hunters, club members and others. 
Whilst the bucks were assiduously keeping out of 
sight, the does and fawns sought, seemingly, to make 
their presence as conspicuous as possible, for many of 
these protected acimals have frequently been seen. 

The Tamalpais Club and Lagunitas Club members 
also returned without a buck last Sunday. 

The Point Reyes Sportsmen's Club members bagged 
three bucks last week. Fred S. J ohnson got two and 
Superintendent Pease got a fat one on Saturday. 

A party composed of George McCotd, Bill McCord, 
Tom McCord, Thos. J. Craig, Mel Vaughn and Harry 
Edgar are now in camp on the Big river about 18 
miles from Albion, where they are located in a good 
district for deer hunting and tiout fishing. 



July 23, 1904] 



®ite gveebev cmo §p<irtsmcm 



Trade Notes. 



Some remarkable amateur results Mr Ed Bowen, 
Pikesville, Md., with the Parker gun, on July 2, in a 
match with Mr. Walker broke 25 targets straight 
from the 19 yard line. Mr. Bowen has only been 
shooting targets two seasons in a very limited way. 
This performance speaks with great credit to him as 
a shooter and also bears out the continued reputation 
of the "Old Reliable" Parker gun for reliability and 
effectiveness. If you would shoot to win you should 
shoot the Parker gun and no other. 

Down in Texas at the Waco shoot June 15 and 16, 
Mr. M. E. Atchison with a Parker gun won high 
average in two days at the 19 yard mark of 207 out of 
a possible 225. In the gold medal event Mr. Atchison 
broke 47 out of 50. Mr. Dick Jackson and J. A. Jack- 
son won second and third high average respectively, 
all shooting the "Old Reliable" Parker. 

Considering Fred Gilbert's handicap at the Grand 
American, his shooting is without a parallel amongst 
all of the shooters at this large event. Fred Gilbert 
shooting the Parker gun Erom scratch shot a general 
average of 94.33% at 21 and 22 yards, which is, con- 
sidering the handicap, the best shooting of all con- 
testants. 

Mr Walter Huff made a straight run of 132, which 
is the longest run made. Mr. Huff shooting as he 
always does the "Old Reliable" Parker gun, at the 
same shoot. 



Mulford, Mason City, Wis., 
"Infallible." 



out of 100, shooting 



'xhe action of the Minister of Finance of the 
Dominion Government under the provision of the 
"dumping clause" of recent legislation has forced 
manufacturers of all kinds of goods in the United 
States to reduce export prices on merchandise and 
wares sent into Canada. This, of ceurse, includes 
guns rifles and ammunition. The consequence has 
been that domestic prices are almost without excep- 
tion the rule when purchasing American goods in 
Canada. Under this state of affairs the U. M. C. 
goods— shells, loaded and unloaded, and metallic 
cartridges— are sold throughout Canada and British 
Columbia at the same prices that prevail in the United 
States. This has been taken advantage of by the 
"Kanuks" to a great degree, if the steady increase in 
the demand for and purchase of U. M. C. goods is 
any criterion to go by. 



At the Grand American Handicap, held at Indian- 
apolis, Indiana, June 21-24, J. L. D. Morrison, an 
amateur of St. Paul, Minn., first general average, 293 
out of 300 targets. J. A. R. Elliott of New York, 
second general average, 292 out of 300. Mr. Morrison 
shot "Infallible" and Mr. Elliott "Schullze." The 
Preliminary handicap was won by L. A. Cummings 
of Bunker Hill, 111., shooting "Schultze. " W. H. 
Clay of St. Louis was second. He shot "E. C." 

The Grand American Handicap was won by R. D. 
Guptillof Atkin, Minn .shooting "Infallible.,' Second 
W. R. Randal of Telluride, Colo. Mr. Randal shot 
"Infallible." The Consolation handicap was won by 
W. H. Heer who broke 98 out of 100 from the 20 yard 
mark, shooting "E.G." Harvey McMurchy of Fulton, 
N. Y., was second, 97 out of 100, shooting "Schultze." 



In the Indianapolis tournament, J. L. D M orriEOn 
an amateur of St. Paul, Minn., using "Infallible" 
and shooting from the 16 yard mark, in practice and 
regular Drogram, made scores as follows: June 18th — 
99 out of 100, June 20th— 99 out of 100, June 21st-97 
out of 200, June 24th 96 out of 100, or a total score of 
491 out of 500 targets. 

Lincoln, 111., June 15-18, C. M. Powers, first general 
average, 393 out of 410, shooting "E. C." J. R. 
Graham of Long Lake, 111., second general average, 
390 out of 410, shooting "E. C. " Geo. Roll of Chicago, 
111 , third general average, 385 out of 410 shooting 
"DuPont." Cascajal Plantation Co's trophy, C. B. 
Wiggins of Homer, 111, 48 out of 50, Mr. Wiggins also 
won the L. C. Smith gun, 92 out of 100, shooting "Du 
Pont." The L.C.Smith trophy, J. R. Graham, 24 
out of 25, shooting "E.C." L. C. Willard of Chicago, 
won the Board of Trade diamond badge shooting "Du 
Pont," breaking 97 out of 100 and tying with W. R. 
Crospy, and winning the tie with 23 out of 25. The 
Grand Lincoln handicap at targets was won by A. J. 



A notable feature of the Golden Gate Gun Club 
shoot, held at Ingleside, Sunday, July 17th, was the 
fact that all of the winners used U- M. C. ammunition. 
Emil Holling, of Dixon, Cal., of the championship 
class won first medal. J. W. Bradrick won second 
medal. G. Sylvester of the first class won first and 
E. Gamble second medal. F. Knauft, of Pacheco, 
Cal., of the second class won fiistand E. Burton, of 
San Francisco, won the second medal. In the conso- 
iation event of the championship class Messrs Nau- 
man and Bradrick won first and second and Messrs. 
Webb and Holling won third. Of the first class 
Messrs Iverson, Knowles, Sylvester and Gamble won 
first, second, third and fourth. Messrs. Murdock, 
Klevesahl and Green won fifth. Of the second class 
Messrs. Lewis, Clark and Knauft divided first, second 
and third, and Turner won fourth. 

The particular and most important event of the 
day was the shooting off of the Bekeart 100-bird 
trophy tied between Messrs. Varien and Webb, both 
of whom scored 96 out of a possible 100 at the recent 
tournament of the Pacific Coast Trap Shooting Asso- 
ciation. Besides these two "crack" shots, Messrs 
Nauman, Bradrick and Holling competed in the race. 
This event was unquestionably the most attractive 
and important one of the season as the respective 
scores of the contestants will attest, and which was a9 
follows: Varien 92, Webb 93, Nauman 95. Bradrick 90, 
Holling 97. Thus Emil Holling, of Dixon, Cal, is 
now in the lead and holds the Coast 100-bird record. 
All of the above contestants — with the exception of 
two — used Union Metallic Cartridge Company's am- 
munition. 

The cartridges as manufactured by the Union 
Metallic Cartridge Company, practically won all the 
honors at the Grand American Handicap at Indian- 
apolis, scoring greater success than any ammunition 
in the history of this great annual event. It seems to 
be a custom among winning amateurs to use the 
Union Metallic Cartridge Company's shells for the 
trying ordeals of the shoots, where important trophies 
and purses are at stake. R. D. Guptill, of Minnesota, 
won the fourth G. A. H. at targets from 19 yards with 
a score of 96 out of 100, with 53 out of 60 on the shoot- 
off. J. L. D. Morrison, of Minnesota, took premier 
honors for the entire series. He broke 277 out of 300 
from 19 yards, and 491 out of 500 from 16 yardB. W. 
H. Heer, of Kansas, won the Consolation by a score of 
98 out of 100 from the 20 yard mark, shooting a Rem- 
ington gun. 

At the State Sportsman's Association, held June 16, 
at Lincoln, 111 , the world's record for target shooting 
was broken by a team of five men, as follows: Powers, 



___^_ ^.1 

of Decatur, 111; Marshall, of Keithsburg, 111.; Post, 

Altnn !,.^,^ 1 - ^"T^ ° f Pekin ' ™-i Win] o 
fhl*»'l V a11 breaking 150 straight. All but one of 
these shooters used U. M. C, shells in making this 
phenomenal record. 8 . u ' s 

At the Golden Gate Gun Club shoot, held on July 7, 
SJlW'J' 6 w ? re 34 shooters, 31 of whom used 
Union Metallic Cartridge Company's shells. 

The first annual blue rock tournament of the Bell- 
ingham Bay Gun Club was held at Bellingham, Wash 
on July 3. Of the twenty-seven shooters who faced 
tde traps at this tournament, twenty five shot Win- 
chester ■ Leader" shells, and ten used Winchester 
■ pump guns. The highest general average for the 
tournament was tied for by Dell Cooper and Geo. W 
Miller, of Bellingham on 90}%. Both Mr. Cooper and 
Mr. Miller shot Winchester "pump" gans and the 

Leader shells. The second high average, 90J%, was 
tied for by by E. E. Ellis of Seattle, and S. R ! Yan 
Zant, of Vancouver, B. C. Mr. Ellis shot a Smith 
gun and "Leader" shells, while Mr. Van Zant used a 
Parker gun and "Leader" shells. The third high 
average, 90%, was captured by W. H. Seaver of San 
Francisco, Cal., with a Winchester "pump" and the 

'Leader" shell. The three man teanftrophy was won 
by the Bellingham team, composed of J. Ings, G W. 
Smith and C. H Collier. Messrs. Ings and Collier 
shot Lefever guns, while Mr. Smith used an L. C. 
Smith gun. All three gentlemen shot Winchester 

Leader" shells After the regular program eventB 
were shot out, pool shooting vas indulged in, in which 
Mr. Seaver, of San Francisco, scored 97 out of the 100 
shot at, making on run of 56 straight and another o 
37, with a Winchester "pump"gun and the "Leader" 
shell. 



At the fifth regular monthly shoot of theUnionGun 
Club held at Ingleside, Sunday, July 10, Winchester 
"Leader' shells proved their superiority over all 
other makes by winning every event shot off that 
day. 

In the regular club event, G. Sylvester and M. J. 
Iverson tied for first place.breaking 23 out of 25 birds. 
Both these gentlemen shot Winchester "Leader" 
Bhells. The high guns in the first class medal shoot 
were G. Sylvester and C. C. Nauman, both being tie 
with 24 breaks. In the shoot-off. Mr. Sylvester shoot- 
ing "Leader" shells, won with a score of 24. The 
high guns in the added money event were G. Sylves- 
ter, M. J. Iverson, Wm. Murdock and E. Kleversahl. 
Mr. Sylvester and Mr. Iverson, as before stated, used 
the "Leader" shell. The high average for the last 
event, which consisted of doublet, singles and the 
reverse system, was won by G. Sylvester with 91j%. 



Winchester shells and repeating shotguns covered 
themselves with glory at the Grand American Handi- 
cap tournament, and in winning leave no room for 
doubt of their superiority over all other makes of 
shells and guns on the market. Of theseveral brands 
of shells used in this great tournament, considerably 
over 50%, were Winchester make, a fact which proves 
that Winchester Bhells rank first in popularity as 
well as in winnings. The preliminary handicap was 
tied for by L. A. Cummings and W. H. Clay on 98 out 
of the possible 100, Mr. Cummings winning the shoot 
off. Both gentlemen used the Winchester "Leader" 
shells, and in connection Mr. Cummirgs shot a Win- 
chester "pump" gun. The Grand American Handi- 
cap was captured by R. D. Guptill, using a Winches- 
ter "pump" gun. The high average for the tourna- 
ment was won by J. L. D. Morrison with a Winches 
ter "pump" gun. 



Muster Day in Germany. 

Foreign customs in dealing with the 
horse and his well being in some instances 
are well worthy of emulation in this side 
of the big brook. London has its draft 
horae day and Germany its mustering 
day. The mustering of horses, which ac- 




cording to law takes place in time of 
peace is an annual custom. All horse 
owners are summoned to bring their 
horses, one and all, to the mustering at 
the appointed times and places. The 
horse owners who do not make their ap. 
pearance at the proper times and who 
attend without the full number of their 
horses are to be subject to a money fine 
up to 150 marks ($35.70) and, besides the 
fine, all costs in bringing about a compul 
sory appearance of the horses. These 
horses are to be brought to the mustering 
place a half hour at leaBt before the ap- 
pointed time, unharnessed and free, each 
horse accompanied by an attendant. 



compelled to wallow in fiUhy holes and 
stagnant pools. 

When the pigs begin to smell around 
the trough, give them some milk and oata 
or middlings in a small trough, in a pen 
not accessible to the sow. 

Twenty-four hours after the pigs are 
born give the sow a slop of wheat midd- 
lings or bran. A little warm water or 
milk do no harm at any time. 



WILL NOT SCAR OR BLEMISH. 

GOMBAULT'S 

CAUSTIC BALSAM 

Is the safest and most effective lotion or 
blister for ailments cV 

HORSES and CATTLE 

and supersedes all cautery or firing. 

It is prepared exclusively by J. E. Gom- 
bault, ex-Veterinary Surgeon to the French 
Government Stud. 

As a HUMAN REMEDY for Khen- 
matiim, Sprains, Sore Throat, etc., It 

is invaluable. 

Every bottle of Caustic Balsam sold Is 
Warranted to give satisfaction. Price &1.SO 
per bottle. Sold by drag-gists, or sent by ex- 
press, charges paid, with full directions for Its 
use. Send for descriptive circulars, testimo- 
nials, etc. Address 

THE LAWSlHCg-WH&IiMS C0HPAKT. OleveUnd, QUO. 



Hog Notes. 



Charcoal given to the bow will correct 
scours in the pigs. 

A small handful of oil meal will have 
a good effect on the system. 

The hog pastures must have shade, or 
shelters, and abundant water. 

Drain off the filthy wallowing holes and 
give the hog a bath of clean water to 
plunge in. 

Young sows that do well with their first 
litters may be considered good brood 
sows. 

Watch the hogs and be Bure that they 
are not lousy. If lice are found, spray 
the hogs with some good dip or kerosene 
emulsion. 

Hogs thrive best when they are sur- 
rounded by clean, dry conditions and not 



When animals have wounds of any 
kind, they should be washed carefully 
with some antiseptic preparation. Car- 



A Poultry Table. 



An ingenious statistician has drawn up 
a table to show how many eggs the va- 
rions kinds of domestic fowls lay per an- 
num, and how many of the different 
kinds of eggs will weigh a pound : 

Geese, 4 to the pound ; 30 per annum. 

Polish, 9 to the pound; 150 per annum. 

Bantams, 16 to the pound; 100 per an- 
num. 

Hamburgs, 9 to the pound ; 200 per an- 
num. 



Turkeys, 5 to the pound; 30 to 60 per 
bohc acid and boras are the simplest and ! annum 



best known. Borax may be sprinkled on 
the wound after it is cleansed. 



Theory says that pigs fed beyond eight 
or nine months, is feed thrown away. It 
is difficult to make some believe this, and 
more difficult to put it into practice. It 
is easy to demonstrate this, if the feed 
bill don't get too high. 



Concrete is radidly taking the place of 
boards for floors in stables and barns. 
When the sills and joist are counted, it is 
no more expensive than a plank floor. 
It is cleaner and lasts longer. It is made 
by mixing sand, cement and cinders or 
gravel. 



Game fowl, 9 to the pound ; 160 per an- 
num. 

Leghorns, 9 to the pound; 200 per an- 
num . 

Plymouth Rocks, 8 to the pound; 150 
per annum. 

Langshanr, S to the pound; 150 per an- 
num. 

Brahmas, 7 to the pound; 130 per an- 
num. 

Ducks, 5 to the pound ; 30 to 60 per an- 
num. 



There is a strong tendency to save 
every likely looking male for breeding 
purposes. It should not be done. Noth- 
ing that has not a good pedigree should 
be kept. The tendency should be up 
ward. 



Animals which are made ;o mature as 
young as possible make the most desirable 
butcher stock. 

THREE=YEAR=OLD TROTTER 
WANTED. 

I want to purchase a Three-Year-Old 
eligible for Stanford and Occident Stakes 
of 1904, and one that is a good prospect 
for a winner. Address 

J. W. ZIBBELL, Pleasant- 



12 



®tte gxceiisv twfc Qpovtamcm 



[Jody 23, 1904 



Live Stock Buildings at World's 
Fair. 



Ample provision is made for the dis- 
playe oi live stock at the World's Fair by 
a well located site, situated on the high- 
est point of the grounds and adjoining one 
of the main entranceB. The floor Bpace 
of all the Exposition palaces covers less 
than 120 acres, while the several live 
stock shows will occupy abont 200 acres, 
or CO acres more than all the balance of 
the World's Fair exhibits under roof. 
The extent and value of the Live Stock 
Show of the Exposition is only partially 
understood by a very limitited number oi 
students of animal husbandry. Some 
idea may be gained from a brief summary 
of the provisions made for buildings. 

LIVE STOCK FORI M 

The largest building on the site has 
been designated the Live Stock Forum 
which is "to accommodate the court by 
which the comparative merits of the 
various competitive exhibits of live stock 
are to be judged, and the awards an- 
nounced to the public in attendance." 

The Live Stock Fornm is located a short 
distance west of University Boulevard 
and with an adjoining station lor the 
intramural road. The ground plan is 
elliptical and encloses an area of 250x500 
feet. It is the largest amphitheater ever 
provided for displays of live stock. Only 
that portion of the arena given over to 
seats is roofed over, and the ring will be 
covered with sawdust or tanbark. 

This is the only structure provided for 
the live stock department that can be 
given any notable degree of architectural 
effect comporting with Exposition con- 
struction. The building is given pro- 
nounced elevation effect by the UBe of up- 
right columns in the exterior wall con- 
struction. 

The Forum is very substantially con- 
structed and provided with eight tierB of 
raised amphitheater Beats encircling the 
arena. The arena is surrounded with a 
six-foot promenade on a level with the 
ground floor. A substantial partition or 
fence separates the arena from the lower 
promenade. The upper promenade is 
within one foot of the uppper tier of seatB 
of the amphitheater and twelve feet in 
width. 

The main entrances to the Forum are 
provided for visitors, one located at the 
east side and one at the center of the 
north end of the Forum. There are 
twelve minor entrances for visitors, with 
suitable stairs from the lower to the upper 
promenade, on each side of the four main 
entrances and on one Bide of the twelve 
minor entrances. 

The outside of the Forum is enclosed 
and the amphitheater Beats are amply 
protected. Provision is made for both 
day and evening exhibitions. 

THE STOCK BARNS. 

The barns provided for the World's 
Fair exhibits ot' live stock are mainly 200 
feet long by 40 feet wide, and provide for 
3000 stalls 5 feet wide and 10 feet deep, 
and 350 box stalls 10 x 10 feet, five at each 
end of and on opposite sides of each barn. 
They are well ventilated, with good day 
lighting by windows, and electric lights 
by night. 

Water is supplied by hydrants inBide of 
and at each end of the barns; also by 
hydrant with water trough, on a washing 
platform with grade and with sewage 
facilities for carrying waste water away 
from the platform. 

The stalls have stationary hay mangers 
full width of the stall and 36 inches high 
for horses, and are provided with loose 
feed boxes, 18 x 12 incites and 6 incheB 
deep (or grain. In each box stall are 
loose feed boxes for each end of the 
manger. The box stalls are constructed 
with open work in front from four feet 
above the ground, for convenience for see- 
ing the animals within. Each open stall 
is provided with a lifting front door four 
feet high, for use during the show of 
"v.' ib and sheep. The dirt floors of the 
< are to be maintained smooth, rolled 



and covered with not lesB than three 
inches of saw dust or tan bark. 

A line of guard posts 4 x 4, is set three 
feet in the rear of the stall partitions, 15 
feet apart— the posts 3> a feet in height 
with hole three inches from the top and 
one-inch guard rope extending east and 
west is provided with hook and staple to 
fasten at each end of each 30-foot section 
of rope. 

The loft of each barn extends from the 
Bides of the barn over the stalls and 
toward the center of the barn twelve feet. 
Pulleys with ropes and hooks are pro- 
vided on either side of each barn for hoist- 
ing feed and baggage to the loft which 
will be used as Bleeping quarters for the 
herdsmen and the storage of the current 
supply of grain and forage. A stationary 
ladder leading to the lofts is located on 
each side at the end of eaoh barn. 

Barns are numbered on each end, and 
each stall is to be numbered with figures 
not less than four incheB in height. Sign 
boards are placed at each end of each 
block giving its designation, thus: "East 
Block," "Central Block." 

The grounds are supplied with suitably 
constructed water closets and lavatories. 

Each barn is to be provided with a flag 
staff 12 feet high at either end, with rope 
and pulley. 

LIVE STOCK REVIEW PARK. 

The Live Stock Review Park is provided 
for the purpose of assembling for close 
personal inspection of the press and the 
public the horses and cattle as judged and 
immediately after the awards in each 
Bection have been made. The stock will 
be conducted directly from the Live Stock 
Forum as judged to the Review Park 
adjoining and be ranked in the order of 
merit as determined by the judge. Every 
facility will be provided for the preBS 
and public in the Review Park to give 
the animals critical and deliberate ex- 
amination, to confer with the judge and 
to determine the respective merits of the 
entries and complete for publication a de- 
tailed review of the work of the judge in 
the Forum. 

The Review Park is located near the 
Forum and is enclosed with a woven wire 
fence four feet high with eliding ten-foot 
entrance gate at the center of the eaBt 
side and a similar gate for exit located 
opposite and in the center of the west 
Bide of the enclosure. 

A roofed platform twelve feet in width 
is placed entirely across each end of the 
Park, and on each writing tables and 
chairs are provided for the use of the 
representatives of the presB. 



especially the white variety. There used 
to be an old idea that white fowls were 
invariably more delicate than colored 
ones; but this has been disregarded long 
since. The White Leghorn is one of our 
most prolific layers and being a non-sitter 
is the chief member of the Leghorn 
family; it is not hampered by broodinesB 
and lay a great number of eggs It can be 
recommended as a most useful laying 
breed, doing well in most situations. 
Those prefer a dark plumage fowl will 
find the Black Leghorn a very free layer 
and a showy bird. 

No reference to laying breeds would in 
any way compete without alluBion to the 
Black Minorca, a fowl more generally 
kept throughout the States than any other 
nowadays The eggs are large and white; 
the hens with an occasional exception, 
are non-sitters and they bear confinement 
well, the dark plumage rendering tbem 
suited to dark and smoky places. 

The Black and the Buff Orpington, 
especially the latter are very popular 
fowls at the present time. Though bear- 
ing the same name, they are of entirely 
different pedigree. The Buff being of the 
fashionable shade iB in much request, but 
the shape and color of the bird suggest 
a large admixture of Cochin blood, which 
i9 again apparent in the strong tendency 
to broodiness displayed by the hens ; of 
tbe two the black may be preferred as a 
layer, neither variety, however, coming 
up in this respect to the others men- 
tioned. 



When They 



Abandoned 
Sheep. 



Washing 



Valuable Laying Breeds. 

The number of good laying breeds of 
fowls has been largely increased of late 
years, either imported from other parts 
of the world or manufactured by a ju- 
dicious blending of old varieties at home. 
Some of these are undoubtedly a great 
acquisition, so much so, that it is most 
difficult to arrive at a conclusion as to 
which are the most valuable. 

Owing to the increased interest be- 
Btowed on fowl culture the ranks of poultry 
keepers are constantly being added to 
and the question, "What is the most 
profitable breed?" frequently asked. 
The conditions on which the fowls are 
to be kept, should to some extent influence 
the answer. 

There is no doubt that WyandotteB are 
profitable poultry. The White Wyandotte 
is a inoBt valuable breed, coming into 
much estimation. It is wonderful hardy, 
probably more so, than any breed that we 
have. It will lay through the coldest 
weather and average a vast number of 
eggs in the year. Some strains of Silver 
WyandotteB, occasionally throw white 
chickens and these white pullets will not 
only be the first of the brood to commence 
to lay, but they will lay freely throughout 
the winter. The <. olden and Silver 
WyandotteB are good layers of tinted 
eggs of medium size and they are decidedly 
very handsome birds. 

A valuable laying breed is the Leghorn 



A convention of wool growers was held 
at Cleveland, O., in the year 1863. The 
principal topic discussed was whether 
shearing Bhould be done before or after 
washing. After a careful consideration 
of the question it was reBolved that the 
practice of washing sheep be abolished, 
because : 

lBt — Abolishing it permits early shear- 
ing, which secures a greater quantity of 
wool, a longer staple, and a better condi- 
tion of sheep and ewes, through the year. 

2d— Because of the exposure to con- 
tagious diseases, such as scab, foot-rot, 
etc , in placeB frequented by different 
flocks to be waBhed. 

3d — Because it is an expensive, un- 
pleasant job, and unhealthy both for man 
and sheep. 

4th — Because the manufacturer must 
cleanse the wool at all events, and he can 
do it cheaper than the grower. 

5th — That it is to the interest of wool 
growerB to put their unwashed wool in 
as good condition as possible, by keeping 
their yards well littered, and by throwing 
away all filth that can be separated from 
the wool. 

6th— Some lots of wool are more gross 
and gummy than others, therefore no 
rate of deduction could be agreed upon 
suitable to all grades and classes, but 
that each lot should be bought upon its 
own merits for quality and condition. 

7th — As generally practiced, washing is 
little or no improvement to the fleece. 



White cotton cloth may be used for 
windows in poultry bouses, It admits 
light and heat, and the sun in shining 
through it does not dry out as badly as 
through glaBB. It will turn water more 
readily than supposed. If painted with 
oil, it can be rendered waterproof. 

Hens may be held back from doing 
theli beBt at laying by the ration you 
feed. Feed a maintenance ration now, 
and a heavy, egg-producing ration after 
a whllo, or when the price gets good. 
o 

Eggs are not always cash, but they 
are oqual to cash In bringing to the 
home anything that is in the country 
store. 



The Theory of Soil Moisture. 

The vital necessity of an adequate Bnp- 
ply of soil moisture is apparent when we 
consider that water constitutes sixty to 
sixty-five per cent of the structure of 
growing plants and that the amount of 
water consumed during the growing 
period is several hundred times the 
weight of the matured crop. Water also 
performs the important function of die- 
solving and holding in solution the min- 
eral elements of the soil and being taken 
up by the roots carries them to the leaves 
— the digestive organs— where, by the 
wonderful processes of nature's labora- 
tory, the minerals are transformed into 
the solid parts of the plant. 

Although the quantity of moisture 
demanded by different plants varies, it iB 
found that vegetation thrives best when 
thirteen to twenty per cent of water is 
present in the soil. The water holding 
capacity of soils varies with their texture. 
In itB natural state light or sandy soil 
contains only five to ten percent of water, 
while heavy clay soil contains fifteen to 
twenty per cent. This difference is due 
to the size of the soil grainB, the interven- 
ing space and the consequent relative re- 
sistance offered to the flo.v of gravity 
water through the soil Water may 
exist in the soil in three forms, only two 
of which are vital to this discussion. Free 
or gravity water, furnished by rains and 
irrigation— though the source of supply 
for plant life— flows downwardly and is 
not used directly by plants. 

Capillary water flows independently of 
gravity, chiefly from below toward the 
surface and it is by this that plants and 
trees are fed. Careful experiments show 
that under most favorable conditions — 
fine texture and uniform structure — capil- 
lary action is strong enough to raise the 
water from the depth of five or six feet. 
When the surface of the ground is left 
undisturbed and becomes hard capillary 
action is established directly with the 
atmosphere and the soil moisture passes 
off rapidly by evaporation. Cultivation 
breaks up this capillary connection by 
destroying tbe minute pores or tubes 
through which the water escapes, forms 
a non-conductor soil mulch and forces the 
moisture to remain in the soil below 
where it is accessible to the tree and 
plant rootB. 

It might be well to add in this connec- 
tion that in its natural state the soil has 
the appearance of being a compact, solid 
mass but in fact only fifty per cent of its 
bulk is composed of soil grains. The 
remainder of the Bpace is occupied by air 
and water, the presence of both being 
imperatively necessary to the life and 
growth of plants. The oxygen breaks 
down and decomposes the organic matter 
in the soil and renders the plant food 
available and it is claimed by some scien- 
tific authorities that a part of the free 
nitrogen of the air is taken up by the 
rootB and utilized in nourishing plant life. 
Therefore, air is just as essential among 
the soil particles as moifture. And if by 
irrigation the soil becomes saturated with 
water and the air is excluded the soil 
becomes sodden and sour, the roots decay 
and the tree or plant dies. — Field and 

Farm. 

Farmers, or their wives, take the lead 
as successful poultry raiserB. The} are 
fixed to grow fowls at less cost than any 
one, and hence make more clear profit 
than others. They do not succeed well 
as breeders of extra fancy poultry. 



Early matured pullets will sometimes 
lay from maturity until they moult 
next fall. Such birds are worth keeping. 



It is not a good plan to sell all the 
young chickens, nor old hens. Use 
part of them at home. Fried chicken 
and chicken pie Is good enough for any 
one, even for homefolks. 

Few, if any, fowl is better for the table 
than a fat young guinea. This may in 
some way compensate for the incessant 
noise they make from morn till night. 
o 

Sober up on Jackson'B Napa Soda. 



JDLY 23, 1904] 



gDhe gveebev c*tti> ^povtsmaxx 



13 



Does It Pay to Raise Scrubs? 

[Livermore Herald] 
Does it pay to raise scrubs? Whilethere 
may be a few California farmers who will 
contend that it does and that it is a clear 
gain, as "they can pick up a living for 
next to nothing," there are very few men 
who can stop to think who will say that 
it does. No matter how little it costs to 
feed them, there is no profit in them. 
Some may turn out fairly well, but the 
outcome is always uncertain. 

For the breeder of course the very best 
specimens of a class are none too good 
and this is true also of the farmer. But 
the latter, if he wishes to improve hiB 
stock, finds that his very best specimens 
cost considerable money. If he can afford 
it, it will pay him to buy the very best. 
But if he cannot he should get the best 
he can afford. There are thousands of 
pure bred horses, cattle, sheep and hogs 
that would not take a blue ribbon at the 
State Fair, but are still immeasurably 
superior to the scrubs on the farm and 
although they are not prize winners, on 
the other hand do not cost so much as 
prize winnerB and yet will uplift the 
standard of the farmer's stock and bring 
in such immediate returnH in the way of 
increased profits aB to enable him in a 
very few years to purchase the best. The 
beef animal that will dress 600 pounds is 
more than one-half better than the one 
that will dress 400 pounds, because there 
is not bo much waste and the best fetches 
a better price. And the two cost about 
the same to keep. 

This is the subject upon which the care- 
less farmer iB not apt to do much think- 
ing, but it will pay him well to turn a new 
leaf. Farming has arrived at the point 
of the survival of the fittest and if he 
wishes to make a living he must keep up 
with the procession He should go to 
the State Fair, first of all. examine care 
fully the finest stock on exhibition, ask 
questions and find out all he can about 
them. He will find the breeders of the 
various classes of stock no less willing to 
give him information than he is to re- 
ceive it. He will find out that although 
they only have such specimens on ex- 
hibition as will conform to conditions for 
prizes they have others at home that, 
while equally pure bred do not possess 
the neceESsvrv show form for prizewinners 
but on the other hand can be bought for 
a price within his reach. He will also 
find out, perhaps much to his astonish- 
ment, that pure bred cattle do not re- 
quire to be stall fed and groomed and 
that the main requirements to make them 
profitable are good feed and plenty of 
pure water and they will give a good ac- 
count of themselves. There iB nothing 
mysterious about the handling of fine 
stock. All that is necessary is to give it 
such care as every animal on a farm 
should get and it will .-eturn it tenfold to 
itB owner. Let the farmer who is always 
complaining of his luck get some good 
stock and try it once fairly and see if be 
is not satisfied with the result. 



Poultry Points. 

Some hens appear to be hungry all the 
time. There is no money in such gor- 
mandizers. 

The proper food from the beginning 
will hasten the laying period for several 
weeks 

Parched wheat will correctalmost any 
trouble in fowls. It stimulates the whole 
digestive apparatus. 

There is no business in which being 
just on time adds more to the Buccess 
than in poultry raising 

Soft shelled eggs are an indication of 
hens that are too fat. Change the ration 
and have lime within easy reach. 

Poultry is now sold by the pound, it 
makeB a difference whether the male is 
large or small, when it comes to the sell- 
ing time. Someiryers will weigh a third 



or half more than others of the same age. 

The cut green grass or clover should be 
fed in a rack, as the fowlB scratch it 
about and waste it if it is fed on the 
ground. 

Turkey raising is very profitable if 
carried on properly. They have so much 
of their wild nature remaining tnat they 
do not thrive if confined. 

Lime sprinkled freely everywhere, 
takes away bad odors, so prevalent in all 
henhouses. It is good for a wash for 
coops and all oarts of the house. Wash 
the percbeB with coal oil. 

When chickens are a good price, it is a 
great temptation to sell off the largest, 
handsomest in the flock. It should not 
be done. Keep the beBt. They are the 
breeders and layers for next year. 



3-Year-0ld THOROUGHBRED FILLIES 

FOR SALE. 

SIEED BT BRIGHT PHOEBUS. 

Bay Filly out o[ Lovellght by Racine-Imp. Flirt: 

second dam Romping Girl 
Bay Filly out ot Haidee by King Alronso-Imp. 

Inverness; second dam ElMda 
Bay Filly out of Eda II by Powbattan-Haldee. 
Address D. W. DONNELLY, San Mateo. 



w 



Jackson's Napa Soda Is sold In every 
city, town and hamlet in the State. 



FOR SALE OR EXCHANGE. 

•ILL SELL OR EXCHANGE THE STAND- 
ard-bred trotting mare PACETA 2:26. raised 
on Palo Alto Stock Farm, sired by Lone Pine he 
by Electioneer. She Is now at the Ple3santon 
track The only reason (or offering her tor sale is 
that she Is a little too light for family use Will 
exchange for larger family horse or outfit com- 
plete with trap or carriage. Paceta Is very valu- 
able for a brood mare or a fine road mare. Also 
have a Ally sired by Sidney Dillon, dam Paceta. 
This is a One opportunity to secure stock of the 
highest breeding. Address Breeder: and 
Spobtsmah, 36 Geary St , San Francisco. 



SAVES THE "DUST" 
IMPROVES THE CRUST 



'ARROW" Lard Compound 

FOR BAKING. 



YOUNO STALLION FOR SALE. 

CEAL BROWN, TWO-YEAR-OLD STALLION 
° sired by Exloneer 33525 (son of Boodle 2:12*4 
and Expressive (3) 2:12>4 by Electioneer), dam 
Gertrude Russell 2:23^ (own sister to Palo Alto 
2:08&) by Electioneer. Bred at Palo Alto Stock 
Farm. For Drice and particulars address W. 
J. P., this office. 

P/\r ^aIa Two-year-old brown Stallion by 
roi oaic. Di aD i 2:09^. dam by halt thor- 
oughbred son of Guy Wilkes, second dam by Ven- 
ture 2:27^, thoroughbred sou of Belmont. Has 
stake entries, iB just broken and is a good pros- 
pect. Apply to this office. 



POSITION WANTED. 

TJ7 - ANTED— POSITION AS SUPERINTEND- 
W ent or trainer by a thoroughly competent 
man with 18 years' experience in bitting, breaking 
and developing high-aoting carriage horses and 
schooling saddlers. References -as >o ability, 
honesty and sobriety from present employer. 
A. H. BRINTON, 
Maplewood Hackney Stud, Attloa, N. Y. 



WESTERN MEAT COMPANY 
OF CALIFORNIA 



THE CROWLEY STAKE 

A SIDE STAKE FOR STARTERS IN THE 
THREE-YEAR-OLD DIVISIONS 

OF THE 

Pacific Breeders Futurity Stakes No. 4 

(FOALS OF 1904-TO TAKE PLACE IN 1907) 

Entries to Close Monday, August 1, 1904 

CONDITIONS. 

A Side Stake of $35 each for Trotting and Pacing Foals of 1904 that were entered or substituted 
and will start ia the Three- Year-Old Divisions of the Breeders Futurity in 1907. All money paid in 
| on trotting foals to be divided among those starting in the trotting division, and all money paid in 
I on pacers to be divided among those that start in the pacing division. Moneys divided 75 and 25 
1 per cent and to go to the first and second horses in this side stake, according to their positions in the 
i final summary of eaoh race In case all those in the side stake should be distanced in the first heat 
of either of the regular events, they shall start in another race, best two heats in three, on the same 
I day. to decide the money winners. Entrance to the side stake $25 eaoh. The money to be deposited 
in some reputable bank, to remain at interest until the stake is trotted. 

Entries Close Monday, August 1st, with F. W. KELLET, Secretary P. C. T. H. B A. 



The usual program for fattening beef ia 
to take it off the grass when about eigh- 
teen monthB old and crowd it until old 
enough and fat enough for beef. The 
three or four-year-old beef is a thing of 

the past. 

o 

Some believe that the flesh of sheep 
partakes more of the flavor of their food 
than any other animal. Hence, care 
should be taken to have the food care- 
fully selected before killing. 
o 

Jackson's Napa Soda untangles the 
feet. 



STARTING PAYMENTS DUE 
JULY 25, 1904. 

Pacific Breeders Futurity Stakes 
Two-Year-Olds. Three-Year-Olds. 



IOR SALE. 

rpHE TROTTING STALLION DON FAjLLIS 
J- by Fallis47&!, son ot Electioneer 125; dam by 
Bayswater: second dam by Lancet, son of Black- 
hawk 767; third dam by Werner's Rattler 262, etc. 
His breeding is one of the choicest, being a com- 
bination of the strongest trotting and weight 
carrying thoroughbred strains. For further par- 
ticulars address Mrs. S. W. RALSTON, owner, 
Courtland. Sacramento Co., or BEN MILLER, 
Guernevllle, Cal. 



(FOALS OF 1903) 

On Pacers $25 

On Trotters $35 

Money Divided. 

Two- Year-Old Trotters $1250 

Two- Year-Old Pacers 750 

Nominator Dam of Winner Trot 20O 

Nominator Dam of Winner Face . 300 



(FOALS OF 1901) 

On Pacers $35 

On Trotters $50 

Money Divided. 

Tliree-Year-Old Trotters 83000 

Three- Year-Old Pacers 1O0O 

Nominator Dam of Winner Trot 300 

Nominator Dam of Winner Pace 300 

Owner of Stallion, sire o' Wionerof Three-Year-Old Trot, when mare was bred. ,8100 
Owner of Stallion, sire of Winner of Three- Year-Old Pace, when mare was bred.. 100 

Nominators must designate, when making payments to start, whether the 
horse entered is a trotter or a pacer. 

Two-Year-Olds that start are not barred from starting again In the 
Three-Year-Old divisions. 

E. P. HEALD, President. F. W. KELLEY. Secretary, 

36 GEARY ST., SAN FRANCISCO. 



A 



WANTED. 

DRFVING HORSE OF HACKNEY CON- 
formation that will dock well. Any color 
but gray. One that is handsome, with good action 
and style, 15.3 hands and not over 16 hands. Send 
full description and where horse can be seen. 
Address W. J., this office. 



McMURRAY 




McMURRAY SULKIES 

and JOGGING CARTS 

STANDARD THE WORLD OVER. 

JJS-Address, for printed matter and prices, 

W. J. KENNEY 

531 Valencia St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Privileges For Sale 

— for — ■ 

Vallejo Race Meeting* 

4 Days— AUGUST 10, 11, 13 and 13, 1904. 

Bids for the following privileges will be re* 
celved up to noon, MONDAY, August 1, 1904: 

BETTING, Pools or Books. 

BAR PRIVILEGE, Including sale of all drinks 
inside the grounds. 

RESTAURANT, LUNCH COUNTER, etc. 

A certified check for 50 per cent mast accom- 
pany each bid. Right reserved to reject any or 
all bids. 

THOS. SMITH, Manager, 
Vallejo, Cal. 



At the 



H Tongues End 

STOCK GET JUST ENOUGH AT THE RIGHT Tl 

COMPRESSED PURE-SALT BRICH5. 
AND PATENT FEEDER5. 

ffo waste, no neglect.all convenience. 
Your dealer his it. Write us for the booh. 

BELMONT STABLE SUPPLY CO. 

PATENTEES MANUFACTURERS 

Broohlyn. !\.Y. 



14 



©tie gxeebev axw gpsrvtsman 



[July 23, 1904 




THE BAYWOOD STUD 

THE BUNGALOW, SAN MATEO, CAL. 

(Property of John Pabbott, Esq.) 

Imp. Hackney Stallion 

GREEN'S RUFUS 63 «■> 

Will serve a limited number of Approved Mares, Season 1904 

FEE - - - 875 

Reductions made for two or more mares. 

Manager, WAITER SKALY. 



This is Your Split Second 



IF 




TakeitttlniTime 

, If you have the remedy on hand, and are ready to 
act promptlv, you will find that there is nothing in 
the form of Spavins, Splints. Curbs, Wicdpuffs and 
Bunches which will not yield promptly and perma- 
nently to 

Quinn's Ointment 

It has saved thousands of pood horses £rom the peddler's 
cart and the broken-down horse market. Mr. C. B. Dick- 
I ens. of Minneapolis, Minn., who conducts one of the largest livery stables in the Northwest, 
I write? as follows: I have beenusinp Qulno'a Ointment for some time and with the createst 
I success. I take pleasure in recommending it to my friends. No horseman Bhould be with- 
I out it In his stable. For curbs, splints, spavins, wind puffs and all bunches it has no equal." 
Price 9 t. 00 per bottle. Sold by all druggists or sent by mail. "Write us for circulars, 

KSEaSSSfe.?"" W. B. Eddy & Co., Whitehall, H. Y. 




NEW MODEL 
1904 




THE BEST IN THE WORLD. 
O'BRIEN & SONS 

Cor. Golden Gate Ave. and Polk St. 

SAX FRANCISCO. CAL 



TROTTER FOR SALE. 

OORREL GELDING, 6 YEARS OLD. Stands 
& 16 5^ hands high and weighs 1100 pounds. 
Sired by Niccanor by Dexter Prince, dam Flora 
by El Cajon by Don Victor. He is in every re- 
spect a grand individual, handsome, stylish, and 
can show a 2:40 gall or better. With very little 
work I drove him a half this year in 1:22 and a 
quarter in 39 seconds, to cart. He will make a 
grand park horse and should be seen by any one 
looking for a high-class trotter. Call or address 
L. R. PALMER, Walnut Creek, Cal. 



Santa Rosa Stock Farm 

HAS FOR SALE 

Three Sidney Dillon Yearling Colts 

from the following mares: 
Pansy (dam of King Orry 2:2\%, Almonitlon 

2:345£. Lady Pansy Russell 2:26^. and Pansy 

Russell 2:3)) by Cassius M. Clay, Jr. 22, etc 
Uuycara 2:]8£ by Guy Wilkes 2:15^. dam 

Biscari (dam of 5 in list) by Director 2:17. 

second dam Bloarl (dam of In list) by 

Harold, etc 
BoMle Russell by Bay Rose 2:20^, out of Oakley 

Russell by Happy Russell, son of Happy 
^Z Medium, etc 
- Apply to IRA PIERCE, 

728 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 



FOR SALE. 

-vrY ENTIRE STOCK OF STANDARD-BRED 
^ A Trotting and Pacing Horses. Single drivers 
and double teams. Some excellent prospects for 
stake winners entered In the Oocldent, Stanford 
ond Breeders Futurity stakes. A flno carriage 
team, also the great broodmare Daisys, (dam of 
Tom Smith 2:13*. General Vallojo 2-.2UM. Sweet 
Rose 2:28 (trial 2:21) and Little Mac (3)2:27). The 
driving horses and colts can bo seen at my stable 
In Vallcjo, and the broodmares, etc., at the race 
track. Apply to or address 

THOMAS SMITH, Vallojo, CaL 

FOR SALE. 

MicQinn Rnv Bfty eo'dto? by SulUnJr.; 
JUlbSIUIl UU) Btuods \H% bands and weighs 
over 1100 lbs. A handsome, high-class, gentle- 
man's roadster, stylish action, gentle, and good 
ilrlvi r. Winnor (without preparation) of the 2:3U 
pace at tho matinee Decoration Day. Address 
T. II. CORCORAN, 
1201 Valencia St., San Francisco. 



Fast Paoer For Sale. 

rpT F, PACING GELDING, AL HAN l>\ 2 : I u , 

■Vaylaod \V\, dam Rapid Ann by Ovorlaod. 

toe throe heata better than 2:17. Cun brush 

- fa»t on the road. Excellent prospect to raoo. 

S ono of tho best road horses In tho city. 

.<i Intelligent. Safe for lady to drive. 

price "and further particulars address S. 

-ON, 23S Douglas street, San Francisco 




Bursal Elargements, 
Stiff Joints, Arthritis, 
CURED 



^^Absorbinejr. 



A pleasant Liniment to use, causing no 
inconvenience. $1.00 per bottle delivered. 

Describe your case fully. Special'direc- 
tion, if needed, will be furnished free. 
Address 

W. F. YOUNG, P. D. F., 

SPRINGFIELD, > - MASS. 

Forsaleby Mac^&Co Langley &MlchaeIs Co 
Redlngton & Co., J. O'Kane and J. A. McKerron 
all of San Francisco. 




BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 



-DIAMKS IN- 



YOU CAN PICK THE 
FIRST THREE 
HORSES IN THE 

California Stakes 
$2000 Guaranteed 

(FOR 2:24 CLASS TROTTERS) 
AT THE 

RACE MEETING 

OF THE 



ific Coast 



Trotting Horse 




Breeders Association: 



GUN-METAL OPEN-FACED SPLIT 
SECOND TIMER. 

Shows Beconds and fifths. Regis- 
ters minutes, start, stop and fly back 
operated from the crown, split-second 
attachment worked by the side plug. 
The thinnest and best $25 split timer 
in the market. 



CALIFORNIA 

NORTHWESTERN RAILWAY 

Through Picturesque California. 

The Ideal Route for 

Tie Angler anil Onting Trips 

One day's ride from San Francisco will take 
you to some of the finest Trout Streams In the 
State. Along the line and within easy distance 
are many of the best Springs and Summer Resorts 
in the State. The Company maintains a Pish 
Hatchery and annually stocks the many streams 
reached by Its road. One million Trout Fry were 
planted last year in these streams. 

Black Bass Fishing can be enjoyed in Russian 
River near Guerneville, Guernewood Park and 
Camp Vacation, in season. 

The best Striped Bass Fishing waters on the 
Coast reached by the Tiburon Ferry. 

VACATION FOR 1904 

Issued annualls by the Company, is now ready. 
This Is the standard publication on the Coast for 
Information regarding Mineral Springs, Resorts, 
Country Homes and Farms where summer board- 
ers are taken, and Select Camping Spots. 

Beautifully illustrated, 150 pp. and can be had 
in response to mail request or at ticket offices. 

Ticket Offices— 650 Market Street (Chroniole 
Bldg) and Tiburon Ferry, foot of Market Street. 

General Office— Mutual Life Ins. Bldg., cor. 
Sansome and California Sts., San Francisco. 

JAS. L FRAZIER, R. X. RYAN, 

Gen. Mgr. Gen. Pass. Afirt. 



55-57-69-61 First Street, S. F. 

Telephone Main 190 



San Jose, Aug. 3, 4, 5, 6, 1904 

The following is a list of the horseB entered: 
No. It. The California Stakes for 2:24 Class Trotters $2000 

S H Hoy's blk m Little Babe by Bradtmoor, dam by Dawn. 
F R Garnsey's b m Alcacita by Red Cloak, dam Alcazette by Alcazar. 
Silva & Wright's b g M J by Bay Bird, dam by Cornelius. 
Martin Carter's ch h T C by Nutwood Wilkes, dam Zeta Carter by Director. 
H C Ahler's br g Telephone by Direct, dam Nellita by Philosopher. 
John A. Cole's b g Jupiter B by Gen Beverly, dam Little Agnes by GosBiper. 
J De La Montanya's ch g Bain by Charles Derby, dam Empress by Flaxtail. 
A L McDonald's bl g Charlie T. by Zombro, dam Sarah Benton by Albion. 
Robt Buress' b g Golden Gate by Bay Bird, dam Dourhka by Western. 
C A Winship's br g Abe Miller by Titus, dam Gazelle by Gossiper. 
H A Bell's b g H D B by Arthur Holt, dam Jennie D by Jerome Eddy. 
W H Lumsden'a b s McPherson by McKinney, dam Eveline by Nutwood. 
Walnut Grove Stock Farm's blk m The Boquet by Nushagak, dam Woodflowei 
by Ansel. 

Geo W Kingsbury's b g D E Knight by Lynwood, dam Grant, Jr. 

Wm. Morgan's b m Una K by McKinney, dam Nellie K by Gen. Grant, Jr. 

S. Silgen's Birdcatcher by Direct, dam Katherine by Hock Hocking. 

I. N. Minor's br g Morosco by Wayland W, dam Lady Moor by Grand Moor. 

R. W. Peterson's b g R W P by Lynwood W. 

V. J. Guinasso'a bl g Walter Wilkes by Sable Wilkes, dam by Patchen Vernon. 

ALL QUESSES POSITIVELY CLOSE JULY 26, 1904. 

Should more than one per9on pick the first three horses in the order in which 
they finish two timers will be given to the first two guessers in the order in which 
the guesses were received. 

NO STRINGS ATTACHED TO IT. 

MAY PUT IN ANV NUMBER OF GUESSES. 



Gut This Out and Send in Your Guess 

To the BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 

36 Geary Street, San Francisco. 

My selection for the first three horseB winning money in the California Stakes 
.$2000, to take place at the P. C. T. H. B. A. meeting at San Jose ie: 



First 



Second 



Third 



Signed 



Date 



Address. ... 
1904, 



July 23, 1904] 



®he gvee&zv emit gtpjavtstman 



15 



SMITH GUNS 



LONGEST 
STRAIGHT RUNS 




At S. F. Trap Shooting 

Association 

May 22— 23— 24— 28 

VAUGHN, - - 72 Straights 

FEDONKK, - 62 " 

Also longest straight run 
and first monlesat live birds 



All Kinds of Ammunition... 



Catalog on 

application 



t o Hunter Arms Co., Fulton, N.Y. 




RED BALL BRAND. 



Awarded Gold Medal 
At California State 
Fair 1892. 
Every horse owner who 
values his stock should 
iconstantly have a sup- 
ply of It on hand. It 
improves and keeps 
stock in the pink of 
condition. 
Manhattan Pood Co. 

1 253 Folsom St., San Francisco 
Ast your grocers or dealers for it. 



Positively Cures Colic, Scouring and Indigestion. 

C P. KEBTELL, Manager 



American Trotting Register 

PUBLICATIONS. 

THE YEAR BOOK 

This great work will be ready for delivery 
March 15, 1904. 

Contains summaries of races; tables of 2:30 trot- 
ters; 2:25 pacers; sires; grea* brood *s; cham- 
pion trotters; fastest record? 

Vol. XIX, 1903, single copies, postpaid.. .84.00 
Vol. XIX, 1903, 10 or more copies, each, 

f.O. b 3.35 



Accurately Compiled 

Great aid to All Interests. 



A year's subscription will pay 
tor itself many times over — 



Vol. XVIII, 1902, single copies, postpaid. 
Vol. XVII, 1901, 



4.00 

400 

.... 4.00 

.... 4.00 

" .... 3.00 

.... 3.00 

' " ....3.00 

.... 3.00 

.... 3.00 

....3.00 

umber), postpaid 2.50 

" " 2.50 

2.50 

" " 1.00 

1887 and 1885 out of 



THE REGISTER 

Vols, in to XV, inclusive, in one order. 

f. o. b 860-00 

Single Volumes, postpaid 5.00 

Vols. I and II are out of print. 

INDEX DIGEST 

Postpaid W-50 

This important adjunct contains all the standard 
animals in the first ten volumes, with numbers, 
initial pedigrees, and reference to volume in which 
animal is registered. 



Vol. XVI, 


1900, 


" ' 


Vol. XV, 


1899. 


" ' 


Vol. XIV, 


1898, 


" 


Vol. XIII 


1897, 


ii , 


Vol. XII, 


1896, 


ii . 


Vol. XI, 


1895, 


" ' 


Vol. X, 


1894, 


" '■ 


Vol. IX, 


1893, 




Vol VI, 


1890, (limited n 


Vol. V, 


1889, 


" 


Vol. IV, 


1888, 


" 


Vol. II, 


1886, 


" 


Year Books for 1892, 


1891. 


print. 







REGISTRATION BLANKS 

will be sent upon application. 
Money must accompany all orders. Address 

American Trotting Reg. Association 

355 Dearborn St., Room 1108, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Or BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 

SAN FKANCISCO, CAL 




Adopted and used by all Jookey Clubs in the 
United States and Canada. 

Published about the 1st and 15th of each month, 
from March to December, at 25c, 50c, 75c, $1, $1.50 
or $2, according to issue. 

A subscription ($18) includes all fortnightly 
issues and an "Annual" (in two volumes) hand- 
somely bound in half morocco. 

For sale by newsdealers throughout the coun- 
try, on race tracks and by 

GOODWIN BROS., 

Proprietors and Publishers, 
1440 Broadway, New York. 

Explanatory ciroulars mailed free. 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

IMPROVED 

STALLION SERVICE BOOKS 

(POCKET SIZE) 

100 Pages. Price $1, postpaid. 

Most Complete Boob 
of the kind published. 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 
36 Geary St., San Francisco. 



DOC WILLIAMS' 

BOARDING AND TRAINING STABLE 

Elehth Avenue, near Fulton Street. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

Colts broke and trained to trot and satisfaction 
guaranteed. Terms reasonable. Phone: Page 1324 



ETflliB 



BUSINESS COLLEGE 
24 Post Street, San Francisco, Cal, 



The oldest, the largest, the most popular com* 
uieroial school on the Pacific Coast. 20,000 gradu- 
ates; 30 teachers; 70 typewriters; over 300 students 
annually placed In positions. Send for catalogue 

E. P. HEALD, President. 



CALIFORNIA 



Photo Engraving Company 

HIGH CLASS ART 



Half Tones and Line Engraving 

Artlstlo Designing. 

506 Mission St., cor. First, San Francisco 



Anybody CAN 

ANOTHER 

Remarkable 
Performance 



DO IT! 

By an Amateur 
with trie 




On July 2d, in a match with Mr. Walker, at 19 yards rise, Mr, 
Ed Bowen of Plkesville, Md., an amateur of only two seasons, 
scored 25 STRAIGHT. YOU can do it if yon shoot the ''Old 
Reliable," a gun they cannot equal. Send for Catalogue. 



New York Salesrooms: 
33 WARREN STREET. 



MERIDEN. CONN. 



GEN. GRANT 
Timer. 



ST. JULIEN 2:12 3-4 



ORRLN II ICKOK 
Driver, 



The old "ST. JULIEN" SHOEING SHOP of MARTIN O'DEA & SON 
removed to Union Square Avenue, directly in rear ot old shop. 



MARTIN O'DEA & SON, 



COME AND SEE US. 



Proprietors. 

Phone: Grant 114. 



BREEDERS' DIRECTORY. AT STUD 



SHORTHORNS AND SHIRES— 

Quinto Herd of Shorthorns. 

41 premiums California State Pair, 1903. 

Young stock for sale. 

Send for catalogue. 

ALSO 

Several fine Shire StallioDs. foals of 1902. 
Est. Of W. H. HOWARD, 
206 Sansome St., San Francisco. 



HOLSTEINS— Winners of every 7 days 1 butter 
contest at State Fair 1899 1st & 2d for aged cows, 
4-yr.,3-yr. and 2-yr.-olds; 21 Jerseys and Durhams 
competing. 5th year my Holsteins have beaten 
Jerseys for butter. Stook for sale; also pigs. F 
H. Burke, 80 Montgomery St., S. F. 



CUBA OF- KENWOOD 

(Glenbeigh Jr.— 8tella) 

SAM'S BOW 

(Plain Sam-Dolly Dee LT) 

STOCKOALE KENNELS 

R. M. DODGE, Manager, 
Bakersfleld, Kern Co., 
Boarding. Pointer Puppies and well-broken 
Dogs for sale. 



JERSEYS, HOLSTEINS AND DURHAMS. 

Dairy Stock specially. Hogs, Poultry. Estab- 
lished 1876. William Niles & Co.. Los Angeles 
Oal. 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 

Advertisements under this head one cent per word 
per insertion. Cask to accompany order. 



VETERINARY. 



POINTERS. 



DR. C. MASOERO 

VETERINARY SURGEON 

Graduate of Royal Veterinary 
College of Turin 

tNFlUMARY AND RESIDENCE— 8 1 1 Howard St. 

between Fourth and Fifth Sts., San Francisco, 
Telephone: South 456. 



pOINTER PUPPIES FOR SALE BY BOS- 
± ton-Bessie— King of Kent, Glenbeigh and Rip 
Rap crosses. For further particulars address 
L. S. BOLTER, Forrest ave , Fruitvale. 



ST. BERNARDS. 



Ira Barker Dalziel 

VETERINARY DENTIST 

Fancy Carriage, Saddle and Road Morses for Sale 

Office and stable; 605 Golden Gate Avenue, San 
Francisco, Cal. Telephone South 651. 



I>r. "V\7"2XL, IF 1 . SSs^zx. 

M. R. C. V. S-, F. E. V. M. S. 

VETERINARY SURGEON. 

Member of the Royal College of Veterinary 
Surgeons, England; Fellow of the Edinburfc 
Veterinary Medical Society; Graduate of the New 
Veterinary College, Edinburgh; Veterinary Sur- 
geon to the S. F. Fire Department; Live Stock 
Inspector forNew Zealand and Australian Colonies 
at the port of San Francisco; Professor of Equine 
Medioine, Veterinary Surgery,. Veterinary Depart- 
ment University of California; Ex-President oi 
the California State Veterinary Medical Associa- 
tion; Veterinary Infirmary, Residence and Office, 
San Francisco Veterinary Hospital, 1117 Golden 
Gate Avenue, near Webster St., San Francisco' 
Telephone Park 128. 



Chronic Bronchitis and Catarrh of the Bladder 

Cured in 48 Hours. 



CAPSULES 



Superior to Copaiba, Cubebs or Injection 



pHAMPION ALTA SYLVIA WILL STAND 
v ^ at stud in San Francisco from August 1st to 
September 1st only. Fee $35. J. F. MAHONEY, 
552 Second avenue, S. F. 



A T STUD— CHAMPION LE KING. GRAND- 
- rt - est headed St. Bernard on the Coast. Fee 120. 
W. WALLACE, 58 Boyce St., San Franoisco. 



IRISH AND SCOTCH TEEKIERS. 



TRISH AND SCOTCH TERRIERS FOR SALE. 
- 1 - Scottle Puppies sired by Cb. Loyne Ruffian 
and Crimson Rambler. Best Irish stock on the 
Coast. Mrs. BRADLEY-DYNE, Saturna P. O., 
B.C. 



IRISH TERRIERS. 



TJOE SALE-CAPITAL BITCH , A WINNER 
J- price $15. First-class 8-months-old dog, good 
in all ways; price $25. BRADLEY-DYNE, 
Saturna P. O., B. C. 



SCOTCH TERRIERS. 



TfOR SALE— 8-MONTHS-OLD DOG BY CH. 
-^ Loyne Ruffian, very typical; price $20. 12- 
montbs-old dog, $10. Smart bitch, good breeder. 
$12. BRADLEY-DYNE, Saturna P. O., B. C. 



£0C0ANUT OIL CAKE 

THE BEST FEED FOR 

STOCK, CHICKENS AND PIGS 

FOB SALE IN LOTS TO SUIT BY 

EL DORADO LINSEED OIL WORKS CO 

208 California Street, San Francisco, Oal, 



ROSE HOTEL 

PLEASANTON, CAL. 

Enlarged, Rebuilt. Twenty-five New Rooms 

Newly Furnished. Electric Lights, 

Banning Water. Up to date. 

A. S. OLNET & SON - - Proprietors 



PEDIGREES TABULATED 



And type written 
Ready for framing. 
Wri*e for prices. 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 33 Geary 

San Franoisoo, Cal. 



13 



©he fgveeiiev emir gpp<*rfcsmcm 



[July 23, 1904 



* 




'i ne Harness 

Am U rsE BOOTS 



San Francisco, Cal.^ clj ^ 



^pv -^^ ~4p* *^V "<*l* "^W ""W!* "W^ ~4* W^ H* 4Vr "Tf * "^f * *i* ^f ■ »f * tf ■ *f * ?■ f * '-9* I* *f * f* '? -■ "■».* 'T^ *?■■ *f * ■?■ "?* *f* ^f * ^T" 'f * *f * *ff* '?*■ *f * *f * *f» 't* *»"■ "*?* "'?* '*! * *f» "r" v »(» «f » ' 

IU. M. C. SHOOTERS WIN 



Grand American Handicap, Highest General Averages 
of all Targets shot at, also Consolation Handicap. 

R. D. GUPTILL of Minnesota, 19 yards. 96 out of 100; S3 out of 60 on shoot-off. 

J. L. D. MORRISON of Minnesota won premier honors for the entire series. 277 out of 300 at 19 and 20 yds; 491 out of 500 at 16 yds 

W. H. HEER of Kansas, winner of Consolation, 98 out of 100, at 20 yards with a Remington Gun. 

.All XtToxa. -W7itH XT. M. O. SECBIjXjS 

86-88 FIRST STREET | 
SAN FRANCISCO, f 



* 



i 

t 

I UNION METALLIC CARTRIDGE CO. 

E. E. DRAKE, Pacific Coast Manager. 



m 



RIFLES AND SHOTGUNS 

Wucmm 



PACIFIC COAST AGENCY 
127-135 FIRST STREET 



AMIHIJNITIOM 

A. MTJILEK. Agent. 



SAN FRANCISCO 
CALIFORNIA 



At the 

UBAND AMERICAN HANDICAP 

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main events. 

137 divided the purses. 

65 WINNERS SHOT 

Du PONT SMOKELESS 

and won 
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Winning' Higrhest Average at All Shoots. 



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VOL XIV. 
36 GEARY 



No. B. 
STREET. 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JULY 30, 1904. 



SUBSCRIPTION 
THREE DOLLARS A YEAR 




I&he gveebev aixtt ^povt&tnan 



[July 30, 1904 



TROTTERS AND RUNNERS 

LARGEST STOCK IN THE WEST. 
LOW PRICES BEST PLACE TO BUY. LOW PRICES 



SEND FOR CATALOGUE. 



J. 0'K.ANES 



26 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



1560 BROADWAY 
NEW YORK 



Pacific Coast Trotting Horse Breeders Association 

RACE lUEEZEIMTXTGr 

AUGUST 3, 4, 5 AND 6, 1904. 



WEDNESDAY-FIRST DAY-AUGUST 3. 

No. 1— GREEN CLASS TROTTING STAKES (Horses Without RecordB), S800. 

W. G. Durfee's br s Electro Mc by McKinney, dam El Mae by Electricity. 

F. R. Garnsey*s b m Alcacita by Red Cloak, dam Alcazette by Alcazar. 

S. K Dougherty's br m Sonoma Girl by Linwood W., dam Maud Fowler by Anteeo. 

Martin Carter's ch m Mamie R. by Nutwood Wilkes, dam Ingar by Direotor. 

Silva &, Wright's b m Queen S. by Sable Wilkes, dam by Harold. 

B. Croner's ch g Larkln W. by Boodle Jr. 

H. C. Ahler's br g Telephone by Direct, dam Nellita by Philosopher. 
John A. Cole's b g Jupiter B by Gen. Beverly, dam Little Agues by Gossiper. 
M. J. Reams' b m Mamie R by son of Oro Wilkes, dam Muscova by Belmont. 
P. H. McEvoy's brsMlllbrae by Prince Airlie, dam Fearless by Fallis— substituted for Sadie 
Thompson. 

A. L. McDonald's bl g Charlie T. by Zombro. dam Sarah Benton— substituted for Pathway. 

No. 2— PACIFIC SLOPE STAKES (for 3:30 Class Pacers), *1500. 

Thomas Charlton's s m Rose Thome by Hawthorne, dam Bell by Dexter Prince. 
Mrs. L. J. Hastings" bs Sky Pointer Jr. by Sky Pointer, dam Juliet D. by McK'nney. 

E. A. Servis' rn g Doctor J. by Dr. Hicks. 

C. Whitehead's b m The Mrs. by Derby Ash. dam Spurwick Girl by Hawthorne. 
J. W. Oflutt's rn m Mildred O. by Secretary, dam Vesper Bell by Don. 

R H. Bonner's b m Olivette by Richard's Elector, dam by Mountain Boy. 

Ed. Ellis' b m Baby Ellis bv Alcona Jr., dam Luce by General Washington. 

J. D Springer's b g Billy Red by Glenelg. 

James Coffin's br m Welladay by Stelnway, dam Katy G. by Electioneer. 

H. W Goodall's b g Uncle John by Charles Derby, dam Naualaka by Balkan. 

S. K. Trefry's b g Tom Carneal by Diablo, dam Mountain Maid by Cresoo. 

George A. Davis' ch m San Lucas Maid by Dlctatus, dam by Sidney. 

S. A. Eddy's b g Tammany by Iris. 

H. H. Dunlap's ch g Harold D. by Dexter Prince, dam Sunrise II by Gossiper. 

F. R. Garnsey's b g Sunny Jim by Ketcbum, dam Nellie B. by Christmas. 
W. G. Durfee's br g Cavalier by Welcome, dam by Steinway. 

T. C. Caboev'-s b m Lady Petrina by Directum, dam Petrina by Piedmont. 

S. H. Hoy's s m Miss Winn by Demonio. dam by Nutwood Wilkes— substituted for The Giggler. 

V. Verllhac's b m Flora G.— substituted for Nellie R. 

No. 3—3:13 CLASS TROTTING, 8700. 

E. P. Heald's br s Tom Smith by MoKlnney, dam Daisy S. by McDonald Chief. 

A. L. McDonald's br g Forrest W. by Wayland W., dam Silver Shield by Poscora Hayward. 

C. F. White's b h Liege by Lebasco, dam Raven. 

J. B. Iverson's b m Princess by Eugeneer, dam Belle by Kentucky Prince. 

Grace Bros.' b g Ole by Silas skinner, dam Eveline. 

S. S. Bailey's ch g Red Skin by Red Cloak. 

C. Whitehead's s g Deputy by Derby Ash, dam by Priam. 

THURSDAY- SECOND DAY-AUGUST 4. 

No. 4-TWO YEAR-OLD PACING DIVISION BREEDERS FUTURITY STAKES 
No. 2—80000 Guaranteed— 8050. 

M. Carter's b c Lord Alwin by Nutwood Wilkes, dam Ingar by Director. 
Ben Davies' b f Delilah by Zolock, dam Gipsy by General Booth. 
J. W. Marshall's b t Mona Wilkes by Demonio, dam Trix by Nutwood Wilkes. 
I. L Borden's bl f Roberta by Robert I., dam Allie Cresoo by Cresco. 

No. 5—2:18 CLASS TROTTING, 8000. 

Silva A: Wright's blk m Royal Dame by Charles Derby, dam Princess. 
Dan Lloginger's b g Cicero by Brentwood. 

B Croner's grin Louise Croner by Wild Boy, dam Abbie S by Abbotsford. 
C. A. Durfee's b g Cuate by McKlnney, dam Leonora by Dashwood. 

F. Gommet's b m Verona by Nuiwood Wilkes, dam by California Nutwood. 
C. A. Arvedson's b s Sutter by Noonday, dam Eva B. by Prompter. 

W. G. Durfee's br s Coronado by McKlnney, dam Johanoab Treat by Thos. Rysdyk. 

Mrs L. J. H. Hastings' ch m Annie Hazen by Robt. McGregor, dam Lady Pepper by Onward. 

No. 6-3:10 CLASS PACING STAKES, 880O. 

J. B. Iverson's ch m Dlctatress by Dlctatus, dam Salinas Belle by Carr's Vermont. 

s> a i;idv s b g Cuckoo by Strathway, dam Edith M. by Milton M. 

a i ntlDger'i br s Daedallon by Diablo, dam Grace by Buccaneer. 

T. W. Barstow'H b m Alone by Nearest, dam Grenett by Chrlsman's Hamblotonlan. 

James Sutherland's b g Ben F by Bradtmoor. dam by Stelnway. 

Mabry McMabon's blk s I Direct by Direct, dam Franclsca by Almont. 

C. Whitehead's blk § Delphi by Director, dam Etta by Dexter Prince. 

C. Whitehead's s g Toppy by Delphi. 

S S. Bailey's b m Oma A by Dlctatus, dam by Director. 

S. 8. Bailey's ch s Tidal Wavo by Nutwood Wilkes, dam by McKlnney. 

E. A. Servis' ch g Edwin S. by Dr. Hicks, dam by La Harp 

SllvaX Wright's bg Kelly Brtggs by Bayswater Wilkos, dam Algenie 

John A. Cole's blk ■ Zolock by MoKlnney, dam by Gosalper-substltutcd for Jonesa Easier. 



FRIDAY-THIRD DAY-AUGUST 5. 

No. 7-f WO-YE4.R-OLD ;TROTTING DIVISION BREEDERS FUTURITY STAKES 

No. 3— S6000 Guaranteed— 81450. 

W. G. Durfee's b f Bellemont by Zombro, dam Daisy Q. Hill by Altamont. 

J. W. Haile & Co.'s b f Mamonio by Demonio, dam May Noriss by Noriss. 

M. Carter's b t Elma S. by Nutwood Wilkes, dam Bessie C. by Oal. Nutwood. 

N. M. Strong's br c AmbuBh by Zolock, dam May Kinney by Silkwood. 

J. B. Iverson's b c North Star by Nutwood Wilkes, dam Ivoneer by Eugeneer. 

Alex Brown's b e HI Rey by Nushagak, dam Pioche by Dexter Prince. 

I. C. Mosiers b f Gluck by Zombro, dam Scappoose by Roy Wilkes. 

George L. Warlow's b c Athasham by Athadon, dam Cora WIckersham by Junio. 

Mrs. Ella Warlow's b f Sextette by Athablo, dam Donnatrine by Athadon. 

Dingee & Greene's gr c Dingee by Nutwood Wilkes, dam Little Witch by Director. 

No. 8-3:25 CLASS PACING. 8600. 

B. Croner's b m Hattie Croner by Bay Bird, dam by Algona. 
W. Mastin's b g Elmoreno by Iris. 

C. Whitehead's b m The Mrs. by Derby Ash, dam Spurwick Girl by Hawthorne. 
S. A. Eddy's b g Tammany by Iris. 

W- G. Durfee'sjb s Unnamed by Peter the Great, dam by Sultan. 

H. W. Goodall's b g Uncle John by Chas. Derby, dam Naualaka by Balkan. 

F. R. Garnsey's b g Sunny Jim by Ketcbum, dam Nellie B. by Christmas. 
L G. Richard's blue m Ruby H by Bayswater Wilkes, dam by Prompter. 
E- A. Servis' rn g Doctor J by Dr. Hicks. 

Thos. Charlton's s m Rose Thome by Hawthorne, dam Belle by Dexter Prince. 
J. D Springer's ch m Miss Idaho by Nutwood Wilkes, dam by Forrest Clay— substituted for 
Explosion. 

V. Verilhac's b m Gertie A. by Diablo, dam Lola by Sidney— substituted for Hail Pointer. 

No. 9-THREE-YEAR-OLD PACING DIVISION BREEDERS FCTURITT STAKES 
No. 1—86000 Guaranteed— 81300. 

J. E. Montgomery's b c Seymow M. by Diawood, dam Nancy H. by Upstart. 

E. D. Dudley's brf Friskarina by Bayswater Wilkes, dam Bee by Stirling. 

G. W. Kirkman's gr f My Way by Stoneway, dam Ethel Basler by Robt. Basler. 

SATURDAY-FOURTH DAY-AUGUST 5. 

No. 10— THREE-YEAR-OLD TROTTING DIVISION BREEDERS FUTURITY STAKES 

No. 1— 86000 Guaranteed— 82300. 

Jas. H. Gray's b c Calamauca by McKinney. dam Russie Russell by Bay Rose. 
W. Mastin's b c Marvin Wilkes by Don Marvin, dam Nora S. by Sable Wilkes. 

F. R. Garnsey's b c Murray M. by Hamb. Wilkes, dam Anna Belle by Dawn. 

C. L. Jones' b c Carlokin by McKlnney, dam Carlotta Wilkes by Charley Wilkes. 
T. W. Barstow's b f True Heart by Nearest, dam Gamma by Norway. 
J. H. Vance's b f Geraldine by Zombro, dam Gipsy Girl by Nuoleus. 

No. 11— THE CALIFORNIA STAKE (for 3:3* Class Trotters), 82000. 

Wm. Morgan's b m Una K. by McKinney, dam Nellie K. by Gen. Grant Jr. 

S. H. Hoy's blk m Little Babe by Bradtmoor, dam by Dawn. 

F. R Garnsey's b m Alcacita by Red Cloak, dam Alcazette by Alcazar. 

Silva & Wright's b g M. J. by Bay Bird, dam by Cornelius. 

Martin Carter's ch h T C by Nutwood Wilkes, dam Zeta Carter by Director. 

H. C. Ahler's br g Telephone by Direct, dam Nellita by Philospher. 

John A. Cole's b g Jupiter B. by Gen. Beverly, dam Little Agnes by Gossiper. 

J De La Montanya's oh g Bain by Steinway. 

S. K. Dougherty's br m Sonoma Girl by Lynwood W.. dam Maud Fowler by Anteeo. 

A. L. McDonald's blk g Charley T. by Zombro, dam Sarah Benton by Albion— substituted for 
Col. Hickman. 

Robt. Burress' b g Golden Gate by Bay Bird, dam Dourhka by Western, 

C. A Wlnshlp's br g Abe Miller by Titus, dam Gazelle by Gossiper. 

H. A. Bell's b g H D B. by Arthur Holt, dam Jennie D. by Jerome Eddy. 

W H. Lumsden's br s McPherson by McKinney. dam Eveline by Nutwood. 

Walnut Grove Stock Farm's blk m The Boquet by Nushagak, dam Woodflower by Ansel. 

Geo. W. Kingsbury's b g D. E. Knight by Lynmont, dam Daisy A. by Friday McCracken. 

S. Siljan's Birdcatcher by Direct, dam Katherine by Hook Hooking— substituted for Sadie 
Thompson. 

I. N. Minor's br g Morosco by Wayland W., dam Lady Moor by Grand Moor— substituted for 
Pathway. 

R. W. Peterson's b g R. W. P. by Lynwood W.— substituted for Gertie \. 

No. 12—2:14 CLASS PACING STAKES, 8700. 

Ed. Ellis' b m Baby Ellis by Alcona Jr., dam Luce by General Washington. 

E. D. Dudley's br m Lorna Doone by Bayswater Wilkes, dam by Sterling. 

E. A. Servis' cb g Edwin S. by Dr. Hicks, dam La Harp. 

W. Mastin's b g Penrose by Kalrose, dam Miss Moonev Filly by Brigadier. 

S. A Eddy's b g Cuckoo by Strathway, dam Edith M. by Milton R. 

fl. W. Goodall's b g Uncle John by Charles Derby, dam Naualaka by Balkan. 

Silva & Wright's b m Polka Dot by Meodoclno, dam Maud Merrill. 

H. H. Duulap's b h King Cadenza by Stelnway. dam Empr< ss by Flaxtail. 

V. Verllhac's b g Harry Hurst by Delwin, dam Lady Kohl by LeGrande— substituted for Oma A 



Under the Condition*, by the payment of an additional 3 per cent Substitutions can be made op to August 1st. RACES BEGIN AT 1:30 O'CLOCK. 

E. P. HEAIiD, President. 




CEDAR RAPIDS (IOWA) JACK FARM 



W. L OE CLOW 
Proprietor 

FARMERS' SUPPLY OF THE MIDDLE WEST. 

I HAVE THE LARGEST AND BEST IMPORTED AND HOMEBRED 
J- JACKS In America, and also the tlnest line and best assortment of Bel. 
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living prices on all stock, and wlU soil rou muru Quality for the money than 
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and catalogue. W. L. DK CLOW, Cedar Rapids, Iowa 




F. W. KELLET, Secretary. 

SAVE YOUR HORSES 
YOU'LL NEED 'EM AGAIN 

CRAFT'S DISTEMPER CURE is sold on a positive guarantee that It 
will benefit your horse. Your druggist wilt tell you so and return your 
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Germologlste 



13 3d st, Lafayette, Ind, 



July 30, 1804] 



&he gvee&ev cmfc sportsman 



3 



THE WEEKLY 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

F. W. KELLEY, Proprietor. 

furl and Sporting Authority of the Pacific Coast, 

— OFFICE — 

36 GEARY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

P. O. BOX 2300. 
Telephone: Blacfe 586. 



Terms— One Year 83, Six Months SI. 75. Three Months SI 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money snould be sent by postal order, draft or by registered letter 
addressed to F. W. Kelley, 38 Geary St., San Francisco. Cal. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's name and 
address, not necessarily for publication, but as a private guarantee 
of good faith. 

San Francisco, Saturday, July 30, 1904. 



Dates of Harness Meetings. 

CALIFORNIA. 

San Jose (Breeders) Aug. 3 to Aug. 6 

Vallejo Aug. 11 to Aug. 13 

Santa Rosa (Breeders)...' Aug. 17 to Aug. 20 

Cal. State Fair, Sacramento Aug. 22 to Sept. 3 

Salinas Sept. 14 to Sept. 17 

Hanford Oct. 10 to 1 5 

Tulare Oct. 17 to 22 

NORTH PACIFIC. 

Everett Aug. 29 to Sept. 3 

Vancouver, B. C Sept. 3 to Sept. 5 

Whatcom Sept. 5 to Sept. 10 

Salem Sept. 12 to Sept. 17 

Seattle Sept. 19 to Sept. 24 

North Yakima Sept. 25 to Oct. 1 

Victoria B. C Sept. 27 10 Oct. 1 

New Westminster, B. C Oct 3 to Oct. 8 

Spokane Oct. 3 to Opt. 8 

Walla Walla Oct. 10 to Oct. 15 

Boise Oct. 17 to Oct. 22 

GRAND CIRCUIT. 

Buffalo Aug. 1 to Aug. 6 

Empire City Aug. 8 to Aug. IS 

Brighton Beach Aug. 15 to Aug. 20 

Readville Aug. 22 to Aug. 27 

Providence Aug. 29 to Sept. 3 

Hartford Sept. 5 to Sept. 10 

Syracuse Sept. 12 to Sept. 17 

Columbus Sept. 19 to Sept. 24 

Cincinnati Sept. 28 to Oct. 1 

Memphis Oct. 17 to Oct. 27 

THE BIG MEETING OF THE YEAR will open 
at San Jose next Wednesday where the Pacific 
Coast Trotting Horse Breeders Association will hold 
its annual meeting. There will he $11,000 to contest 
for, and among the leading events will be The Cali. 
fornia Stake, $2000 for 2:24 class trotters, The Pacific 
Slope Stake, $1500 for 2:20 class pacers, the $6000 
Breeders Futurity for two-year-olds and three-year- 
olds in four divisions, besides many other big stakes. 
The entire program will be found in our advertising 
pages today. __^^^^^___^^^_ 

CALIFORNIA CIRCUIT OPENS. 



Large Crowds See Good Racing at the Famous 
Pleasanton Track. 



The California circuit of harness racing opened at 
Pleasanton on Wednesday with a good program and 
good racing. Of course some of the horses whose 
work has been heralded as very fast were beaten in 
slower time than they had been given credit for, but 
this always happens, and the races only went to prove 
that working a mile next to the pole inder every favor- 
able circumstance is a different proposition from rac- 
ing in a big field with all the uncertainties of bad luck 
and faster horses to contend against. 

There was a good attendance, probably not less than 
fifteen hundred people being on the grounds. The 
track fas in fair shaDe, the weather was just warm 
enough to be comfortable for those who had shady 
seats, and the time was excellent for a country meet- 
ing, the slowest heat being 2:16. 

When the horses were called up for the first heat 
of the 2:20 pace, the judges stand was occupied by 
Col. J. C. Kirkpatrick, Capt. J. H. Bennett and Mr. 
Martin Carter, with Jos. Neal as Clerk of the Course. 
Richard Havey, James Sullivan and Claude Burlin- 
game, three experience "dockers" were in the timers 
stand. The starter was Wm. Fallon, a resident of 
Pleasanton who, found the job a little harder one than 
he had surmised it would be, and who resigned his 
commission at the close of the day. Mr. Fallon did 
the best he knew how, and the starts were not so bad ) 
but the postion needed a man of more experience. 

Ten horses came out to contest for the $1000 stake 
for 2:20 class pacers. In drawing for position Billy 
Red, the favorite, got the inside position, The Mrs. 
was second, Tammany third, Dr. J. fourth and Hattie 



Croner fifth. These were supposed to be in the front 
tier. Tom Carneal was sixth, next the pole in the 
second row, Sunny Jim seventh, Uncle John eighth, 
Cavalier ninth and Mildred O. tenth. Thelast named, 
rigged with a pair of spreaders that made her look aB 
if she had walked through a six-cornered kite and 
earned away the frame, soon occupied the centre of 
the stage, as it were. She is an ugly acting brute and 
probably not another trainer on the track except 
young Zibble could have been hired to drive her. 
She buck-jumped and plunged from the first score, 
ran into Dr J. and threw him down, smashed two or 
three sulkies, and got the Doctor to acting in the 
same manner, delaying the start of the first heat over 
an hour. Mr. Daniels, the driver of Dr. J., finally 
asked to withdraw his horse for fear he would he 
ruined entirely and the request was quickly granted 
him. Mr. Zibbell with an exhibition of remarkable 
grit, but poor judgment, insisted on starting his mare 
and when the horses were finally sent away got her 
to the half pole, but she fell there, and was distanced, 
much to the delight of the spectators and the peace 
of mind of the drivers who were piloting the other 
horses. 

The race itself does not require much description. 
Billy Red, the favorite, won in three straight heats, 
admirably driven by his trainer and owner, Mr. J. D. 
Springer. Billy Red made .a break in the first heat, 
just after passing the first quarter, but soon regained 
his feet and went round the field rath6r easily and 
beat the leader Hattie Croner handily in the stretch. 
The Bay Bird mare is very fast for the first half but 
like nearly all that sort tires coming home. If she 
could be controlled and rated during the first part of 
the race, she would be a better race mare. But this 
was her first race and she may do better later on. Of 
the ten horses that scored for the word, none but the 
four money winners made anything of a showing. 
Cavalier, the handsome gelding by Welcome, paced a 
nice mile in the last heat and took second position. 
He will probably get a mark better than the fastest 
heat in this race before the season is ended and looks 
like a 2:10 prospect. Tom Carneal, winner of fourth 
money, is a better horse than the summary shows. 
He had a lot of bad luck, but acted well throughout 
the race and is game. 

The only horses in this race that did not wear the 
straps were Cavalier, Tom Carneal and Uncle John. 
Billy Red is a handsome horse, a blood bay and 
although he wears hopples would probably race with- 
out them as he wears them very high. He does not 
wear a boot of any kind and has a splendid disposi- 
tion. Mr. Springer received congratulations from 
such reinsmen as Budd Doble and others for his 
excellent driving in this race. 

Pools on this event sold the evening before the race 
by Chase & Co. as follows: Billy Red $10, Hattie 
Croner $0, Tom Carneal $4, Cavalier S3, Uncle John 
$3, the other five $1 each. After the first heat they 
sold Billy Red $10, Field Bo. 

There were six starters in the 2:30 trot, and the wise 
contingent, without any reason but a reported mile in 
2:14 made the brown gelding Walter Wilkes a favorite 
at $10 against $6 for the field. This horse is entirely 
green and has only had a few weeks work. In draw- 
ing for positions Lady Madison had the pole, The 
Trotter second, Walter Wilkes in third place, Rita H. 
fourth, Morosco fifth and Pat Rose on the outside. 
They were sent off after a few scores and Walter 
Wilkes marched right to the front where he stayed to 
the end of the heat, in 2:15}. The Trotter showed 
well in the heat, finishing a good second. W. G. 
Durfee's mare Rita H. was sent away all mixed up, 
vent to a break and was a distance out at the half. 
Here she began to move however and coming the last 
half in about 1 :05 finished fifth. Those who had seen 
this performance took a few field tickets before the 
n^xt heat at the same odds that had prevailed prior 
to the race. In the second heat Rita H. got off better 
but was quite a ways back going up the back stretch, 
but at the three-quarter pole Durfee began to make 
his drive. It resulted in one of the prettiest finishes 
ever seen between two horses. Both drivers were 
urging their mounts to the utmost, and they passed 
under the wire only noses apart, with the McKinney 
mare's nose in front in 2:15} the same notch as the 
previous heat. 

The remaining heats went to Rita H. easily and 
both were in 2:16. The summary will tell how the 
others finished. 

A race for buggy horses owned by citizens of Pleas, 
anton caused lots of sport. Dr. Colestock drove his 
pacing gelding by Eros to victory in straight heats, 
amid great applause. Summaries: 

Pacing, 2:20 class, purse S10C0. 

Billy Red, b g by Glenelg-Bunnell ■ — (Springer) 1 1 1 

Hattie Croner, bm by Bay Bird (Bunch) 2 2 6 

Cavalier, br g by Welcome (W. Dnjfee) 5 6 2 

Tom Carneal.bg by Diablo (S. Trefry) 6 3 3 

Sunny Jim, br g by Ketchum (Garnsey) 4 4 5 

. Uncle John, b g by Chas. Derby (Chadbourne) 7 5 4 

The Mrs, b m by Derby Ash (Whitehead) 3 dis 

Tammany, br g by Iris (Leggett) 8 dis 



Mildred O , r m by Secretary ( W. Zibbell) dis 

Dr. J. : r g by Dock Hicks (Daniels) w 

Time— 2:15, 2:12)5, 2:15 

Trotting, 2:30 class, purse $500. 

Rita H., brm by McKinney-Smut (W. Durfee) 5 111 

Walter Wilkes, brg by Sable Wilkes (Groom) 12 3 4 

Lady Madison, b m by James Madison (Ward) 4 3 3 2 

The Irotter.blkhby Sllkwood (Judd) 2 4 4 3 

Morosco, b h by Wayland W (Cabney) 3 dis 

Pat Rose, b g by Falrose - (Hoy) 6 dis 

Time— 2:I5i,i, 2:I5U, 2:16, 2:16. 

Trot or pace— Buggy horses, purse S100. 

Joe (p) b g by Eros (Dr. L. A. Colestock) 1 1 

Hattie C, bm by Diablo ..(Mr. Chadbourne) 2 2 

George J.,grg by Bokeby... (Mr. Johnson) 3 8 

Time— 42:32, £:'2)4. 

The second day's program at Pleasanton drew a 
still larger attendance, and some good racing was en- 
joyed. A new starter, Mr. Ed S. Smith of Los 
Angeles was in the stand, and was a success. Mr. 
Smith has a fine voice, gets acquainted with the 
horses very quickly and can tell when they are going 
squarely. He is prompt and gets them away with 
little delay. His announcements of results can be 
heard by everybody within a reasonable distance of 
the stand. He looks like the right man in the right 
place and will - start at the Breeders meeting at San 
Jose next week. The judges on Tuesday at Pleasan- 
ton were William Fallon, J. C. Kirkpatrick and Geo. 
A. Davis. 

The first race on the card was the 2:13 class pace in 
which there were six starters. Edwin S. was made 
the favorite at $10 to $3 for the entire field and the 
short enders cashed as they generally do at the early 
meetings on the circuit. Edwin S. had the speed of 
the bunch and took two heats in faster time than his 
former record, but he made a break in the third heat, 
broke his harness and was distanced. The Strath- 
way gelding Cuckoo then won in three straight heats, 
Ama A by Dictatus driving him out every time. Rey 
del Diablo got third money and Harry Hurst was 
fourth. 

There were but three starters in the 2:18 class trot 
out of eleven entries, and of the eight that did not 
start it is said that seven were either lame or sick. 
Briney K, Rozell and Verona were the starters and 
they went around the ring three times in that order. 
Briney K had an easy thing of it, and although they 
made him trot a little faster each heat he was only 
jogging and the race was uninteresting except the 
finish of the last heat which was drawn pretty fine 
and made the uninitiated think they were looking at 
a horse race. 

The race for buggy horses owned in Washington 
and Eden townships was won easily by the mare 
Izobel, a daughter of McKinney and Cricket 2:10 by 
Steinway. She was driven by Geo. Gray, Public Ad- 
ministrator of Alameda county, who used to train and 
drive years ago, and who can give many of the pres 
ent day trainers a few points in both training and 
driving. He reduced Izobel's record to 2:19 in the 
final heat of the race. The summaries: 

Pacing, 2:13 class, purse 5500. 

Cuckoo, b g by Strathway (Moody) 4 2 111 

Ama A., b m by Dictatus (Mosher) 5 4 2 2 2 

Rey del Diablo, chg by Diablo (Alviso) 2 3 3 3 3 

Harry Hurst, ch g by Delwin (Groom) 3 5 4 5 5 

Rajah, b g by Chas. Derby (Chadbourne) 6 6 5 4 4 

Edwin S., ch g by Dr. Hicks (Daniels) 1 1 dis 

Time— 2:12)4, 2:13, 2:14Ji, 2:13, 2:145£. 
Trotting, 2:18 class, purse S500. 

Briney K, b g by Strathway (W. Durfee) ill 

Rozell, gr g by Bob Mason (Vance) 2 2 2 

Verona, b m by Nutwood Wilkes (McDonald) 3 3 3 

Time— 2:26)4, 2:22, 2:18)4- 
Trotting, buggy horses, purse S100. 

Izobel, bm by MoKinney (Mr. Gray) 1 1 

Polly D (Mr. Holland) 2 2 

Guy Wilkes, Jr (Mr. Rix) 3 3 

Time— 2:29, 2:19. 
Pacing, to beat 2:26. 

Arner, b s by Charles Derby-Bertha (B. Simpson) won 

Time— 2:17»£. 
Trotting, to beat 2:38. 

Belladonna by Athadon (C. E. Clark) won 

Time— 2:28)4. 



Chehalis 2:04}, the black whirlwind and fastest of 
the get of Altamont, died at Morrisville, Vermont, on 
the 12th of this month. California race goers will 
remember when Chehalis was raced through the 
Pacific Coast by his owner and trainer Frank Frazier, 
of Pendleton, Oregon. He beat all the best in his 
class that year and got a record of 2:09}. Mr. Frazier 
afterwards took him East and finally sold him, and 
in Columbus, Ohio, In 1898, Chehalis reduced his mark 
to 2:04}. He was a very handsome horse, having the 
appearance of a thoroughbred and when Frazier had 
him could be placed anywhere in a race. Mr. Frazier 
used to delight in drawing a close finish, driving with 
one hand and winning by a nose when the heats were 
around 2:10. Chehalis was a son of Altamont and the 
famous old mare Tecora. There are eight full broth- 
ers and sisters of this family that have standard 
recordB. Chehalis is the sire of seven standard per- 
formers, the fastest of which is Umahalis 2:15}. He) 

was foaled in 1890. 

•» 

Jackson's Napa Soda Is sold in every olty, ti 
and hamlet in the State* 



mie gvsettev tm& ^povtsxnaxi 



[July 30, 1904 




Ed. Geers has seta mark (or the trainers to shoot 
at that will be hard to hit. Winning both the Cham- 
ber of Commerce and Merchants and Manufacturers 
Stakes at one meeting is a hard thing to do and one 
must have good horses and good luck to do it. 



Rita H. 2:15* trotting. 
Billy Red 2:12$ pacing. 



■Walter Wilkes 2:15} trotting. 



Pretty good for the opening day at Pleasanton. 
Judge Greene 2:09 is Directum's first 2:10 trotter. 



• Records will be broken at San Jose. The track 
there Is fast. 

Who will win the timer? The guesses are all in and 
the race comes off next Saturday. 



The 2:06 class pacers raced at Windsor for a $600 
purse and the two heats were in 2:06} and 2:05}. 



Out of ten starters in the first pacing race of the 
season, at Pleasanton, all but three wore hopples. 



Jim Perry, a Denver horse, trotted a half mile to 
road wagon on the Overland track last Saturday 
in 1:02}. 

Sweet Marie got into the 2:10 list the first time she 
hit a Grand Circuit track and the track was slow 
at that. 

Fred H. Chase & Co. handled the auction and 
mutuals at Pleasanton this week to the satisfaction of 
all concerned. 

Harry McKerron, son of John A. McKerron 2:04}, 
has been a mile in 2:18 with a last half in 1:07. He 
looks like a high-class three-year-old. 



H. H. Dunlap, owner of KiDg Cadenza 2:15}, has 
purchased the Hotel Antlers at Nevada City, and will 
make that place his residence. He will ship his horses 
there, including Harold D., the fast green pacer by 
Dexter Prince, and will not race on the circuit this 
year. 

Another aspirant for championship saddle honors 
trotting has appeared in the gray gelding YVaubun 
2:09}. It is said that H K. Devereux will ride the 
unsexed son of Pilot Medium against the world's sad- 
dle record trotting on the last day of this month at 
Cleveland. 

Tom Carneal by Diablo, paced a good race and 
was well handled in the 2:20 pace at Pleasanton 
by the veteran S K. Trefry. Tom Carneal is game 
and but for a horse that was directly in front of him 
breaking in the first heat he would have had third 
money instead of fourth. 

The showing made by Walter Wilkes in the 2:30 
trot at Pleasanton was a good oie. Jack Grooji has 
only had him a few weeks, and to win the first heat 
he ever started in 2:15} shows that thehorsehas some 
class. He should not have been favorite against a 
seasoned race mare like Rita H. 



Charlie T., the fast trotter by Zombro, that was ex- 
pected to start at all the meetings on the California 
Circuit, was injured last week by slipping and fall- 
ing in his stall and may not be able to start at all 
this year. He had worked in 2:15 and gave every 
promise of being a money winner. 



The Crowley Stake will close on Monday next, 
August 1st. See that your Futurity candidate is 
entered in this side stake. 



A little more generous use of water for sprinkling 
the grounds and walks at the Pleasanton track would 
have made it more pleasant for visitors. We under- 
stand, however, that the supply of water expected 
from the city pipes, was inadequate and the water 
used for sprinkling had to be hauled more than a 
mile. 



There is a little black pacer by Titus down at Los 
Angeles that has paced miles below 2:10 and has no 
mark. He will not be raced this year. 



An advertiser offers for sale a yearling by Stam B. 
2:11}, dam a full sister to Balkan 2:15. This yearliDg 
is entered in both the Stanford and Occident Stakes. 



Several entries have already been made to the 
Crowlej Stake which closes on Monday next. The KidA-AjJ.. 
prospects are for agood list of entries and a side stake [ 
of good value. 

Bad acting horses that buck, jump and bolt should 
be barred from the track as soon as they develop the 
habit. They are too dangerous a factor to be per- 
mitted In a race. 

Ten two-year old trotters have had starting pay- 
ments made on them to start in the Breeders Futurity 
at San Jose. It should prove a fine rac3 as some high 
class youngsters will start. 




Cavalier by Welcome won third money in the 2:20 
pace at Pleasanton on the opening day, by coming 
second in the last heat. He looks like a horse that 
will be a factor in his class all through the circuit. 



The Grand Circuit horses will race next week at 
Buffalo. The largest stakes are the 2:08 pace and the 
2:11 trot, each having a value of $5000. The pace will 
be decided on Wednesday and the trot on Thursday. 



Titus, the sire of Stipulator 2:11}, is not a full 
brother to Direct 2:05} as stated in the Year Book. 
He is by Director, and his dam is Belle Echo 2:20 by 
Echo, Becond dam Titus mare by Williamson's Belmont 

San Jose is all ready (or the Breeders meeting 
which opeDB there next Wednesday and some great 
racing may be expected. Many horses that did not 
start at Pleasanton this week will face the starter at 
San Jose. 

Nutwood Wilkes not only sires extreme speed but 
his sons are following the good example he set them. 
\'»h John A McKerron 2:04}, Nearest 2:22 and Stan- 
ton Wilkes 2:10}. They have all acquired the speed 
siring habit. 

Vlotor Verllhac of this city has purchased (rom M. 
M. Donnelly the pacing mare Flora G. and bought a 
substitution (or her in the Pacific Slope $1500 pace 
which comes off on the opening day of the San Jose 
meeting next week. 

When all those fast eastern trotters and pacers are 
ready to go Into winter quarters after the racing sea- 
son of 1904, their owners will probably realize that 
there were quite a number of California horses out for 
the money this year. 

The San Jose track has betn put In fine shape and 
will be lightning fast next Wednesday, the opening 
day, when the Pacific Slope Stake for 2:20 class pacers 
is to be decided. This promises to be a great race 
with heats in 2:10 or better. 



RITA H. 2:15 1-4 

Winner 2:30 Trot at Pleasanton 



Gib Judd, who will be remembered as the owner 
trainer and driver of the famous horse Klamath 2:07}, 
made his reappearance in the sulky at the Pleasanton 
meeting with The Trotter, a son of Silkwood 2:07. He 
won fourth money with this horse and will do better 
later on as The Trotter looks like one that is on the 
in* prove. 



Rices for local horses create a great deal of interest 
and are keenly enjoyed by the people who fill the 
grand stands and should be encouraged. They should, 
bowevet, always be placed last on the program and 
not interfere with the regular events. It is not treat- 
ing owners right, who pay entrance money and are 
racing for big purses, to be delayed and bothered by 
a race that is only for fun. 



There were three starters in the two-year-old pac- 
ing division of Breeders Futurity No. 1 at the meet- 
ing last year. These were Seymow by Diawood, 
Freskarina by Bayswater Wilkes and My Way by 
Stoneway and they finished in that order. The same 
three will be the only starters in the three-year-old 
pacing division of the stake next week at San Jose. 

Budd Doble was an interested spectator of the races 
on the opening day at Pleasanton. Many Californlans 
would like to see this accomplished reinsman in the 
sulky at the Breeders meetings at San Jose. Perhaps 
he can be induced to exhibit his great horse Kinney 
Lou 2:073, although that fast trotter is as fat as a big 
pumpkin and in no condition to Bhow speed. 



The Davisville Percheron Association was formed 
at Davisville, Yolo county, with H. M. Larue, Presi- 
dent, Geo. W. Pierce, Secretary. There are eleven 
members of the Association which was formed for the 
purpose of owning and handling Percheron stallions. 
The stallion Fortuny, an importation from Franc", 
has been purchased for $3600. The horse is a jet 
black, three years old and weighs 1780 pounds. He is 
said to be a very handsome individual and a choice 
specimen of the breed. 

Mr. T. J. Fogarty, of Bakersfield, owner of that 
good trotter Richmond Chief 2:11} is also the owner 
of the Steinway mare Athenian, dam of the M. & M. 
winner Stanley Dillon 2:11}. He writes the Breeder 
and Sportsman that Athenian dropped a very 
handsome filly foal on the 21st of July that is the best 
looking and largest foal by bis stallion that has 
appeared this year. Mr. Fogarty wants to sell Athe- 
nian and as her foal came so late will not breed her 
back this year, so that anyone who would like to own 
a full brother or sister to Stanley Dillon, can secure 
one by purchasing this mare and breeding her to 
Sidney Dillon next season. Richmond Chief has made 
a good season this year and is in fine shape at the 
present time. 

The closing time for the Montana State Fair har- 
ness races has been changed from August 28th to 
August 13th, in order that horsemen may take in the 
Anaconda meeting. The secretary of the State Fair 
has issued new entry blanks which will be mailed to 
all the horsemen and has also sent out about two 
hundred notices to that effect. The original time of 
closing was on the Bozeman opening day, but later 
Billings set their date ahead of Bozeman and recently 
the Anaconda meeting was assured and this necessi- 
tated the change of the State Fair closing time which 
allows horsemen to take in Bozeman and Billings 
without a bar. The Capital City handicap which did 
not fill has been changed to a one and one-quarter 
mile handicap to close the evening of October 3d and 
to be run on Friday, October 7th. 



Amon<* the morning workouts, at Empire track, 
two weels ago, Braylon Ives drove Monte Carlo 2:07}, 
n fsr' miles, as follows: 2:10}, last hal( in i. 

hall in 1:05, and his handsome mare, Nora 
Lov, two miles In 2:12} and 2:11}. 



Oaward Silver 2:05} was sold last week to Baron 
Franchetti, a horse breeder of Florence, Italy, for 
$21,000. Onward Silver is by Onward, dam Sylvan 
Maid by Aberdeen, grandam Kentucky Central, dam 
of Kentuoky Union 2:07) by BaUora. He was bred by 
W. A. Collier, Memphis, Tennessee, and made Mb 
record at that place in October, last year, In a trial 
against time. Recently, his owner, Mr. J. C. Damien, 
made a wager that the M. A M. would yet be won by 
a three-year-old sited by Onward Silver. His oldest 
foals are now two-year olds. 



S. H. Hoy, the well known Yolo county horseman, 
who as he himself remarked, has bred and raced some 
good ones, and some that were not so good, states that 
it is Lis observation that a horse that will stop in a 
slow mile if he has been properly conditioned will also 
stop in a fast mile no matter how well on edge he may 
be. In other words when a trainer has put a 2:15 
horse in condition to go a mile in 2:30 duriDgthe early 
part of the season, and finds that he backs up a little 
going a mile at that rate, he can depend that the 
horse will also back up when given his mile in 2:15 
late in the year when he iB in as good condition as it 
is possible to get him. Any horse will stop when not 
in condition, but if you have one that is in shape to 
do what you ask of him and he fails to do it without 
backing up you can d-epend upon it that he is that 
kind of a horse. The one that gamely and cheerfully 
trots the last end of his mile in 2:20 when in condition 
to do only that, will also respond gamely at the finish 
of a fast mile when in proper shape. 



Starting payment has been made oa six three year 
olds entered in the Breeders $6000 Futurity. The 
race will come off on Saturday next the last day of 
the meeting at San Jose. There are four colts and 
two fillies on which this starting payment has been 
made, as follows: Calamanca, bay colt by McKinney, 
dam Russie Russell by Bay Rose, owned by James H. 
Gray of Santa Rosa; Marvin Wilkes, bay colt by Don 
Marvin, dam Nora S. by Sable Wilkes, owned by 
Walter Mastin of Sacramento; Murray M., bay colt 
by Hambletonian Wilkes, dam Anna Belle by Dawn, 
owned by F. R. Garnsey of Santa Ana; Carlokin, bay 
colt by McKinney, dam Carlotta Wilkes by Charley 
Wilkes, owned by C. L. Jones of Modesto; True Heart , 
biy filly by Nearest, dam Camma by Norway, owned by 
T. W. Barstow of San Jose; Geraldine, bay filly by Zom- 
bro, dam Gipsy by Nucleus, owned by W. H. Coleman 
of Los Angeles. First money in this stake will be $1000, 
with $200 additional to the person who nominated the 
dam of the winner, and $100 to the owner of the win- 
ners sire at the time the colt was bred. While we do 
not expect the winner wiil have to beat 2:18 more 
than once to win, the race will be a very interesting 
one and is liable to prove a warm contest. 



The chestnut mare Net 2:34} by Magie, son of Elmo 
S91, dam Madgeline, pedigree not traced, is dead from 
inflammation of the bowels. She died at the home of 
her owner, Mrs. Emily D. Knott, at Mayfield in this 
State. Net became a member of the great brood 
mare list last year when her son Del Oro paced a mile 
in 2:23}, another son, Leonel, having trotted to a 
record of 2:17} several years before. When Net was a 
four-year-old she was driven some on the roads in 
San Francisco by Mr. James G. Chesley and without 
other training than her road work was put into a race 
at Oakland and won the seventh heat and the race in 
2:34}. She was a grand individual and game as a 
pebble. She was bred to Searchlight this year and 
was in foal at the time of her death. Net left ten liv- 
ing foals. One, La Honda, was never worked but had 
considerable natural speed; two were by Leo Wilkes, 
one, Leonel, was sold ^n(^ raced to a record of 2:17}, 
the other Leo Net is still owned by Mrs. Knott, and is 
fast but has never been trained. Her foal by Oro 
Wilkes, Del Oro, took a record last year. She had 
two foals by Eros, one being sold for a family horse, 
the other a" mare called Trilby Net that is very speedy 
and handsome and is being used as a broodmare. Two 
of her foals by Willeroo, son of McKinney are un- 
broken, another by Nutwood Wilkes is now at San 
Jose track in John Phippens' hands and has shown 
great speed. Her yearling by McKinney is a promis- 
ing youngster. Net was foaled in 1885, and but for 
her illness would probably have lived several years 
and been a regular breeder as she was a very strong 
and vigorous mare. 



JULY 30, 1904] 



f&he gveebev cmi> §tpovxs«ton 



II EASTERN GOSSIP. M 

m m 

f [Culled From Our Exchanges.] ESS) 



The Arion trotter Captain Haff has taken a record 
of 2:17J. 

Eastern horsemen are touting Grade Kellar 2:105 
for the Massachusetts $15,000 stake. 



The performance of Snyder McGregor at Columbus 
makes the chestnut gelding look like one of the sea- 
son's sensations. The average time of his three heats 
was 2:09|. 

Bert Logan started on July 12th at Nevada, Mis- 
souri, in the 2:28 class pace for a purse of $500. The 
heats were in 2:19}, 2:23, 2:19} and 2:22. Jim Crow 
won the first, third and fourth heats and Bert Logan 
the second heat and second money. 



Monroe 2:12} by Seymour Wilkes will probably not 
start until late in the season. His feet troubled him 
last year but they are all right now, and Mr. Salis- 
bury says he drove him an eighth, just before leav- 
ing New York, faster than he had ever before driven 
a trotter. 

With respect to his caretaker, Stanley Dillon 2:11} 
wears the 'Indian Sign," writes "Marque." The 
colored man, Ansel Sutton, who grooms him, has a 
record scarcely equaled. He joined Mr. Geers' forces 
in 1897 and since then has cared for American Belle 
(3) 2:12J, Lady of the Manor 2:04}, Direct Hal 2:04}, 
Equity 2:12}, and Billy Buch 2:07}. This quintette 
are certainly a famous group for one groom to have 
had in the course of seven years. Ansel thinks Stan- 
ley Dillon will prove the Billy Buch of 1904. 



A peculiar feature of Lou Dillon's work is that her 
performances this season are almost identical with 
those of 1903. Lou made her first public appearance 
at Glenville, June 16th, last year, when she trotted 
to wagon in 2:06}. June 19, 1904, her time to wagon 
was 2:06J. June 29, 1903, marked her second appear- 
ance, her time then being 2:04f, which time was 
equaled precisely on her second appearance this year, 
June 25th. Her third appearance last year, July 4th, 
gave her a wagon mark of 2:04}, and when she made 
her third start this year, July 9th, she again trotted 
in 2:04}. 

Elsie S. 2:11}, the great Stamboul mare, owned by 
E. H. Harriman, is stapping great guns this summer, 
in the hands of Wm. Robbins, GoHhen, N. Y., man- 
ager for Mr. Harriman. Early this season Robbins 
said he was going to work her along slowly, just to 
keep her in condition for Mr. Harriman's road driving 
when he should want her. It seems that was just the 
kind of work she needed, and it may be remarked, in 
passing, that every trotter would be better and race 
faster if they had more slow miles, instead of heart 
breaking trials and workouts. At the mile track re- 
cently she felt so fine, stepping along at 2:20 gait to a 
road cart, that he let her out the last eighth, which 
she reeled off easily in 15J seconds. 



The provisions of the novelty races at Columbus last 
week kept the trainers very busy figuring out just 
what they would have to pay in the way of entrance 
money and what they would receive if they won any 
part of the purse. The conditions were that the race 
would end at the conclusion of the third heat. Each 
heat constituted a race. The entrance fee was five 
per cent with two and a half per cent additional for 
winning any portion of the money. One hundred and 
fifty dollars was added to the winnings of the horse 
standing best in the summary at the end of the third 
heat. The money was divided each heat in the pro- 
portion of sixty, twenty-five and fifteen percent. 'jLhe 
horsemen maintained, or at least many of them did, 
that the two and a half additiontalshould|be computed 
on the basis of the division of the purse offered for 
each heat while the management insisted that it 
should be on the whole purse. On this basis if a 
horse won one heat and another two both would 
secure more money from the association than would 
be the case if the purse had been divided according to 
the usual custom. The horse that finished third in 
but one heat would be money out of pocket for his 
owner but if he came third three times he would be 
ahead. If the division of the money should be con- 
fined to three horses it would cost the association 
more to give the purse than would be the caBe if under 
the old method but if nine different horses should win 
money, a possibility but not a probability, then the 
association would be ahead of the game. The 
"novelty" races had the merit of shortening the races 
and because of that fact waB appreciated by trainers 
and the public. Conditions might ari«e, howeveri 



under which the races would not be satisfactory. 
For instance, if after winning two heats a horse should 
be distanced the pool money would go to him and all 
auction selling was at an end after two heats had been 
won by one horse deBpite the fact that there was an- 
other heat to go. On the whole it is not probable 
that these races will become very popular although 
any association deserves the thanks of the public 
which is willing to test any plan which has for its 
object the shortening of the racrs. Up t» the present 
time it looks as though the two in three system is 
the most popular plan to date. The dash system has 
great possibilities and the coming test at the Empire 
and Brighton Beach tracks will be eagerly awaited by 
the public and the horsemen. These races will be 
st re to please the man with small capital who wishes 
to speculate on the result, a thing he is debarred from 
doing under the auction pool system of betting. For 
this reason alone the dashes at the New York tracks 
are scheduled to prove very popular with the general 
public. The only objection the trainers have raised 
to the dash system in New York is that there are to be 
tried at a time when all of the horses will be ready 
for long contests on the three in five system. Ab 
regards that, however, all of the horses will be on the 
same footing. 

The arm and saddle cloth numbers at Columbus 
were red in a black ground and were a great improve- 
ment over the white numbers, as they could be much 
more easily distinguished by the spectators. Secre 
taries looking for details to please the public can take 
notice. 

The California trotter, George G. 2:125, bought by 
Mr. A. N. Brady, of Now York, will be turned over to 
Geers at Detroit. He is engaged in the Roger 
Williams, The Massachusetts and the Empire and 
Brighton $10,000 stakes. Geers will race him and in 
the fall the gelding will also be raced in the amateur 
events at Memphis. Two weeks ago, at Cleveland, 
he trotted a mile in 2:07}, and Saturday last Mr. 
Billings drove him a mile to wagon in 2:10}. — "Marque" 
n Horse Beview. 

One WeBtern horseman profited last season because 
of his belief in silver, and the proprietor of a restau- 
rant in New York state lost a chance to make a few 
easy dollars because of his idea that paper currency 
is the only legal medium. Just as the Western horse 
owner was about to pay his check a man in front of 
him threw a silver dollar on the cashier's desk and 
was quickly informed by the proprietor that it was 
"no good here." The coin was of an ancient vintage 
bearing an engraving of "Liberty, " but this did not 
deter the Westerner from saying as he threw down a 
dollar bill, "I will cash that for you, mister. 
Silver is good out where I came from. " On his return 
to Missouri the purchaser of the silver showed it to 
the cashier of the bank who after looked over his coin 
book exclaimed, "I will give you four dollars for it," 
and the exchange was quickly made. 



A New York paper says that after the matinee at 
Empire track, July 14th, Mr. Butler offered to wager 
a gold timer that Mr. Cockerill could not beat 2:08 
with his Speedway champion. Swift 2:07. Bert Web- 
ster drove the prompter and tried his best to rate tie 
mile bo that the ponies would get home in the time 
limit, but the best he could do was 2:08i. 



"I do not believe that there will be large fields at 
any of the Grand Circuit meetings this year, "said a 
well known racing man at Columbus the other day. 
"Many of the most prominent stables will turn back 
from Buffalo and race at the Western meetings, and 
in consequence I do not believe there will be big entry 
lists at any of the Eastern tracks. This will, I believe, 
make better racing and more enjoyable sport than if 
the lelds were large and unwieldly." This is the 
opinion of many other horsemen, and it is generally 
conceded that there will be a great series of meetings 
throughout the Western circuits. 



Prof. A. J.Feek, the veteran reinsman of Syracuse, 
was in attendance at the Utica races the past week 
for a little outing. He is a wealthy gentleman but 
loves a good race just as well as in the good old sum- 
mer time in the sweet long ago when he was a familiar 
driver down the Grand Circuit. "I would not mind 
driving in one more race, if I could choose my com- 
pany," said the Prof, with a smile, during a social 
chat. "These young drivers are too much for me. 
Some of them shut their eyes the first score down 
and never open them the entire mile! My company 
would be the true and tried old guard, like Gen. John 
E. Turner, Budd Doble, Charles Marvin, and per- 
haps one or two others, if they promised faithfully to 
be good." By the way, how few of the real old guard 
remain. The Scythe of Time is on the homestretch, 
and nearing the wire for the last dead heat. — Horse 
World. 



The two-year-old trotting filly, Sallie Lunn, owned 
by W. A. Clark, Jr., of Butte, Mont., and raced at 
Denver, Colo., where she took a record of 2:28J, is 
another illustration of the kindly manner in which 
the blood of The Moor crosses with that of Aberdeen. 
Sallie Lunn is a daughter of Wiggins 2:195 and her 
dam is a daughter of Alsatian 20255, son of Sultan 2:24 
by The Moor 870. Wiggins is a son of Aberdeen 27, 
dam Albina de Mer by Stamboul 2:07}, by Sultan, son 
of The Moor, grandam Belle Blanche by The Moor. 

The Roman 2:09} by McKinney is working nicely 
for Trainer W. L. Snow. He worked two miles in 
2:09f at Columbus, Thursday, did them both well 
within himself, and he acts very much like he *ill be 
a strong factor in the 2:10 trots this season. Snowbaa 
him going very good-gaited, and he appears to have 
more brush than usual with him, and he is at least 
one hundred pounds heavier than he waslast year. 



Of the great three-yeai-old trotters of last year, the 
first to sppear in public this season ia Mary Gage by 
Oro Wilkes, and in her first race at Columbus, a race 
of three heats in which every heat was a race, she 
won the first reducing her record from 2:165 to 2:11}. 
Judging from her first race the daughter of Oro 
Wilkes will probably get into the 2:10 list before the 
season is over. 

James Cassidy, of Denver, gave an exhibition of 
courage and reinsmanship at Columbus last week, 
when he drove the Bonnie Bells gelding Bonnie 
Treasurer in the 2:18 pace that, it can safely be said 
was never previously duplicated on a harness race 
track. 

Cassidy, it will be remembered, years ago sustained 
the loss of his right arm and left leg in a railway acci- 
dent. He also had a few ribs and other minor portions 
of his anatomy scattered and dislocated, requiring a 
silver plate to hold the "inwards" of his left side in 
place. Despite thiB he created a sensation a few years 
ago by driving Raymond M. 2:08} in many hard races. 
Raymond was, however, a good mannered horse, but 
Bonnie Treasure has a well-earned reputation as an 
outlaw. Nor is this all that troubles him. Some 
time ago he cut the quarter of Mb left front foot 
severely and lack of attention caused the wound to 
eat away about a fourth of the foot. Naturally it is 
tender and has caused the gelding much pain. At 
any rate, he showed his displeasure by kicking any 
and every vehicle hitched to him into minute atoms. 
After being pronounced useless Cassidy appeared up- 
on the~seene and immediately the struggle for mastery 
began. I saw Bonnie in the shop just before his race 
last Monday. Jim Clark stuffed a double handful of 
oakum into the now healed cavity of the foot and 
wound several yards of rubber tape around the hoof 
to hold it in place. At present the foot gives the 
horse no pain, but the kicking habit is still in work- 
ing order. 

Later Cassidy appeared on the track with the 
Treasure hooked to a war-chariot that discounted any- 
thing the oldest circuiter had ever seen. In order to 
avoid possible contact with Bonnie's heels Cassidy had 
rigged an ancient attachment-bike with an extra seat, 
which is located two feet to the rear of the regular 
seat. Bunches of rubber adorned the arch of the war 
wagon to act as a buffer together with ropes and two 
long rods of iron to keep the wheels from running for- 
ward when the horse rears up. Bonnie wore hobbles 
and many other things, and, in all respects was 
"sulkied and bridled and fit for the fray." 

Cassidy weighs perhaps 110 pounds, but 110 pounds 
of human being were never before in this world 
endowed with a more courageous heart than is pos, 
sessed by this little man whom the doctors have 
sawed up and rigged and patched with wood and 
metal. Most any other mortal afflicted as is CasBidy 
would be content to spend his days in some reposeful 
occupation — but there he is going into a race with a 
combination of horse and rig that no other driver 
would care to chance his neck with for a slow jog 
around the track. 

The Treasure was on his best behavior throughout 
the race and the much-looked for and predicted smas h 
up failed to come off. Cassidy passed the lines around 
his shoulders, holdinglhis left rein, watch and whip 
in his one hand. Could Cassidy drive? Well! You 
would not have to ask the question had you seen him 
finish the third heat. For the final 100 yards he kept 
Bonnie on his tip-toes, lifting him, whipping him and 
sending him forward faster and faster with each 
stride. 

If Mr. Carnegie cares to add a department of game 
ness to Mb "hero fund, "Cassidy should win the limit 
prize. All who saw him drive this race agree that he 
is entitled to the belt and no questions asked. 

Incidentally Bonnie Treasure can pace several heats 
close to 2:10 right now, despite his bum foot and the 
heavy war wagon. — "Marque" in Horse P. 



6 



©he gveebev mtfc gposiantcm 



[July 30, 1904 



Grand Circuit Opens at Detroit. 

Record breaking marked the opening of the Grand 
Circuit at Detroit last Monday, the Chamber of Com- 
merce $5000 stake being paced in faster time than 
ever before, and won by Ed Geers' horse Baron Grat- 
tan. Morning Star, a 6on of the old champion Star 
Pointer, won the first heat of this big stake in 2:06}, 
breaking the record of the race made by Direct Hal 
two years ago when he paced a heat in 2:06J. Baron 
Grattan took the next three heats in 2:06.}, 2:06J and 
2:09}. China Maid 2:05}, that defeated Baron Grat- 
tan at Columbus two weeks before, was distanced in 
the first heat. The betting oo the Chamber of Com- 
merce stake was very heavy, a sample pool being 
Baron Grattan $350, China Maid $200, Morning Star 
$200, Angus Pointer $45, Ethel Mao $45, the field $15. 
The raoe was a duel between Baron Grattan and Morn- 
ing Star, but the Grattan horse was the best. 

The 2:20 class trot went to Alexander in straight 
heats, and the favorite Snyder McGregor was outside 
the money. Snyder McGregor is the horse that won 
so impressively at Columbus, trotting his three heats 
there in 2:09}, 2:10} and 2:09}. Three California 
horses got money in the 2:20 trot, Bonnie Russell by 
Conifer gettiDg second money, John Caldwell by 
Strathway third money, and Leta by McKinney 
fourth. As the heats were from 2:11 to 2:10} the 
horses that won money all made a good showing. 
John Caldwell was a good second in the second heat, 
which was in 2:11. He is owned by Col. J C. Kirk- 
patrick of this city. 

Star Hal won the 2:07 class in two straight heats, 
Winfield Stratton and Captain Sphinx dividing sec- 
ond and third money. Summaries: 

Trotting, 2:20 class, purse $1500. 

Alexander, b g bv Star Duroo. (Geers) 1 1 1 

Bonnie Russell, bh (Hudson and Snow) 2 3 2 

John Caldwell, b g (Thompson) 3 2 7 

Iota, blk m (De Ryder) 5 4 S 

Snyder McGregor, ch g (Hogan) 4 5 6 

GovernorMcCauley.bg.. (Foote) 9 10 4 

Jennie Scott, b m (Collins) 8 8 5 

Enchantress cb m (Norton) 6 7 9 

Miss Leo Rex, b m : (W.Marvin) 10 6 10 

GtorgeE.brg (Clement) 11 9 8 

Cbeekmate.bg (Ritchie) 7 d 

Time— 2:11, 2:11, 2:10«. 

The Chamber of Commerce Stakes, $5000, for 2:24 pacers. 

Baron Grattan b g by Grattan (Geers) 2 111 

Morning Star, b h. (MoClary) 14 2 2 

Ethel Mao, oh m (McCarthy and Snow) 3 2 4 

West.bg (Agnew) 4 3 3 

Angus Pointer, b g . . - (Macpherson) d 

China Maid, b m (MoLaughlin) d 

Judge Denny, b g (Kerr) d 

Time-2:06!4, 2:06*. 2:06K, 2:09i£. 

Pacing, 2:07 class, purse $1500. 

Star Hal. brh by Brown Hal (Snow) 1 "1 

Wlnfleld Stratton, bh (McGuire) 2 3 

CaplainSphlnx.bg (Hopkins) 3 2 

Sufreet.blkm (Wilson) 5 4 

Baron Rodgers, br g (G. MoCleary) 6 5 

Stratbline.bg (Burns) 4 d 

Tlme-2:04^, 2:06«. 

On Tuesday, the M. & M. $1000 stake, the first of 
the big trotting stakes of the year, went to the Cali- 
fornia horse Stanley Dillon with ease. The time was 
slower than anyone expected, 2:11} being the fastest 
heat, but Stanley Dillon did not have to extend him- 
self as the field of eleven others was not up to ex- 
pectations. At least twelve thousand people saw the 
race. In the first pools sold Stanley Dillon brought 
$200, Miss Gay $125, Italia $50, Ruth C. $10, Emma 
Hoyt $10 and the field $10. Miss Gay was always a 
heavily backed second choice, but she came out lame, 
and after showing badly for two heats, was withdrawn. 

Blackthorne, the Hawthorne gelding of the Salis- 
bury string, got third money. 

In the first heat Italia by Zombro took the load, 
broke on the turn and gave way to Baraja, who led 
past the half, with Jolly Bachelor in close attendance. 
Geers bad gradually been working Stanley Dillon 
forward, and shot him into the lead. He won as he 
llkod. 

The second heat was without a ripple of excitemont. 
Stanley Dillon was never headed. The third went to 
Stanley Dillon in a veritablo walk, in 2:13. 

By winning the Chamber of Commerce Stake, with 
Baron Gratton, and following It up by his M. & M. 
victory Tuesday with Stanley Dillon, Geers ac- 
complished a feat that has never been duplicated. 
Summaries: 

Pacing, 2:1>, class, pursetloOU. 

Benny, br g by Sphinx (Colby) 1 l l 

VlcoRcgal.bg (James) 3 2 5 

JalTa.bg (Shackett) 4 4 2 

Bourbon, c b g (McMalion) 2 5 4 

Mlnalold.brm (Snow) 5 3 3 

Sloln. ug (G. McClory) d 

Edgar Boy, bh (Fuller) d 

Time— 8:10*, 2:i2n, fcllW. 

Trotting, 2:21 class, tin; Merchants' and Manufacturers' stakcsi 

$10,000. 

Stanley Dlllon.bg by Sldnoy Dillon, by Stolnway.(Geors) l 1 1 

;'rra (Kei 

Black Thorn, blkh (DoRydor) 5 6 3 

Jolly Bachelor, bg (Spear) 6 3 6 

-ediile.cli m (Brawlor 

i i>iinnel'e, blk m (Elters 

Emma Hoy , b m (SUuhoo) 12 6 7 

A II Ic Jay, » m (MoKee I 

Bh hwood, ch m (McGuire) 3 9 d 

(Hudson) 7 7 a 

(Shaw) 11 11 d 

:n (Wilson) 10 12 d 

Tlme-2:12?i,J:lltf, 2:13. 



Pacing, 2:13 class, purse $1500. 

Bub Oreil. ch g by Edwin V (McMahon) 2 1 1 

Black Hal, big (Snow) 14 4 

Bob. chg . . . (Wilson) 3 3 2 

Hazel Patch, brg (Flack) 4 2 3 

Klngnii.re.bb (Pearcel 5.5 

Vyzole, oh g (Harrison) 7 6 6 

EllaOla.bm (Saam) 6 5 d 

Englewood.ch g (McGuire) d 

Time-2:07X, 2:08JK, 3:09. 

Trotting, 2:12 class, purse $2000. 

ConsuelaS., bm by Directum (De Ryder) 1 1 

FosterBoy.bg (Critchfleld) 2 2 

Lady Patchie, bm (Ekers) 3 3 

Kent.chg (Spear) 4 4 

Time— 2MH, 2 1024. 

California horses are advertising this State all right 
on the Grand Circuit. They get money in about 
every race they start in. On Wednesday Sweet 
Marie, the handsome McKinney mare owned by 
William Garland of Los Angele9, won the 2:14 class 
trot in three straight heats and incidentally because 
a new member of her sire's rapidly growing and re- 
markable 2:10 list which now contains eleven of which 
Beven are trotters. 

In the 2:10 trot Dr. Strong, one of the high-class 
trotters of 1903 was the favorite, but Judge Greene 
took the first heat from him in 2:09, and earned 
second money, while the Roman won third money. 
Tne finish in the third heat took the crowd off its feet 
as there was a furious drive through the stretch with 
Dr. Strong, Norrie, The Roman and John Taylor fin- 
ishing heads apart. 

The track record of 2:05 held by Cresceus, had a 
second knocked off it by Lou Dillon. Millard Sanders 
drove her to a sulky as the track was very heavy and 
she is not partial to soft footing. Her first quarter 
was in 30J, the half in 1:01 and the three quarters in 
1:32}. 

The 2:09 pace was the heaviest betting race of the 
meeting, thus far. Galagher and John M. alternated 
as favorites. E. E. Smathers, owner of John M., sent 
a heavy commission into the ring on him. John M. 
won in Btraight heats, the first easily, the second by a 
neck only. Summaries: 

Pacing, 2:09 class, purse $2000. 

John M., blk g by Paris-Laura (Spear) 1 1 

King Dliect. blk h (Geers) 3 2 

Gallagher, b g (James) 2 3 

Al Bock, blkh (Sanders) 4 4 

Red Bird, b h (Michael) 5 d 

Time— 2:07, 2:06^. 

Trotting, 2:14 class, purse $1500. 

Sweet Marie, b m by McKinney (Smith) 1 1 1 

Angola, ch m (Ames) 3 2 2 

Wild Wilton, brg (Cares) 2 3 7 

Direct View, brh (DeRyder) 6 5 3 

Joymaker, b h (Geers) 4 4 4 

HallFry.bg (Foote) 5 6 5 

NellaJay.rom (McKee) 7 7 6 

GoldBug.bg (Stewart) 8 d 

Time— 2:10, 2:10H, 2-.WH. 

Trotting, 2:10 class, purse $1500. 

Dr. Strong, gr g by Strong Boy-Viola S (Gaghan) 2 1 1 

JudgeGreene.bg (DeRyder) 1 3 5 

TheRoman.bg (Snow) 4 2 3 

Norrie.bg (B. Shank! 3 5 2 

John Taylor, brg (Wilson) 5 6 4 

Lady Gail Hamilton, blk m (Hudson) 6 4 7 

RobertMac.bg (Geers) 8 8 6 

Queen Wilkes, bm (Spear) 7 7 dr 

Topsey, b m (Haws) 4 

Time— 2:09, 2:09!i, 2:10M- 

Pacing, 2:25 class, purse $150C. 

Endora blk m by Wilton.... (Snow) 1 1 1 

MoEurie, ro g " (Geers) 4 2 2 

Joe Gratton, ch h (B. Shank) 2 5 5 

Monarch Chimes, blk h (Cares) 5 3 3 

William M„bg (McCarthy) 6 6 4 

Starch, br h (Foote) 3 4 a 

Winnie King, ch m (Wilson) d 

Time— 2:10&, 2:12J£, 2:12H- 

The McKinney mare Leta was landed a winner by 
Charley DeRyder at Detroit on Thursday, trotted her 
three heats all below 2:15 and now has a record of 
2:13}. She beat the favorite, Ed Geers' mare Hive, 
handily. In the Chamber of Commerce consolation 
purse China Maid acted badly, making two standstill 
breaks in the first heat, but paced like a whirlwind 
and saved her distance. Her driver, McLaughlin, 
was taken out and Teachout substituted, but the 
Maid broke as before. The race went to Angus 
Pointer in two straight heats. The talent thought 
Joe Pointer could win the 2:05 class pace, but the 
Pointer horse was beaten a head in a furious drive the 
first heat by Frank Yoakum in 2:05}, and the latter 
took the next heat and the race. There was perfect 
weather, a large attendance and brisk speculation. 
The summaries: 

Pacing, 2:17 olass, purse $2000. 

Bob Hughes, b h by Ashland Wilkes (Hlghntght) 1 1 1 

John Burns, g h (Heldrlok) 2 2 2 

GlpsyGIrl, gm (Kennedy) 8 4 3 

Hal Fredda, blk m (Browly) 4 6 4 

Ash Rose, bh (Weutherly) 6 6 5 

Glad Bells, bh. (Geers) 6 3 4 

Vernon, ch m — (Samuels) 7 7d 

Bonnie Treasure, ch g (Johnson) 3 ro 

Tlmo-2:10!i, 2:11(11,, 2:10',. 

Pacing, 2:21 olass, Chamber of Commerce consolation, puree 
$1000. 

Angus Pointer, b g by Sidney Pointer (MacPherson) 1 i 

West, b g (Agnew) 2 ., 

China Maid, b m (MoLaughlin nnd Teachout) 3 a 

Tlme-2:08VS. 2:08J£. 

Trotting, 2:25 olass, puise $1500. 

Lota, bm by McKinney (DoRydor) 1 1 1 

Illvc, bm ((.Jeers) 2 2 4 

Silver Oro, gg (Snow) 7 I 2 

Kathryn R., bm (Hudson) CSS 

Sylvester J., b h (Stenson) s d 

Florls. bg (Teachout) 4 d 

Mary Scott; bm (Collin*) 5 d 

Tlmc-2:13tf, 213X, 2:11)4. 



Pacing, 2:05 class, purse $1500. 

Frank Yoakum, b g by Parker (Gosnel) 1 1 

Joe Pointer, bh (McClary) 2 3 

Little Squaw, brm (Ceiderburg) 3 2 

Locanda, brh (Rosemire) 4 4 

Time— 2:05^, 2:06)4. 



Windsor Summaries. 

July 19— Trotting, 2:16 class, purse $800. 

HallFrye, bg by Wcodsprite (Foote) 4 111 

Mary Gage, brm by Ora Wilkes (Kinney) 12 3 3 

Ben Potts, brg (Valentine) 2 4 2 2 

Leonora, bm (DeRyder) 3 3 4 4 

Time— 2:12«, 2:11J4, 2:11W, 2:16)4. 

Pacing, 2:12 class, purse $800.* 

Hazel Patch, blk g by Hard Patch (Flack) l l l 

Dr. H.,bg (Smith) 8 2 2 

John F. g g (Rush) 4 3 3 

Bob, ch g ( Wilson) 3 dis 

Bessie Drake, rm (Geers) 1 dis 

Time-2:08M, 2:13, 2:12 

Trotting, 2:24 class, purse $600. 

Alexander, b g by Star Duroc (Geers) 5 1 1 

RuthC.gm (Kenney) 2 3 2 

EmmaHoyt.bm (Stinson) 3 2 3 

Mary Scott, bm (Collins) 4 4 4 

Black Thorn, blk g (DeRyder) 1 dis 

Time— 2:15M, 2: 13«, 2: 14V4- 

Pacing, 2:24 class, purse $600. 

West, b g by West Wilkes (Agnew) 1 1 

Eudora. blk m (Snow) 3 2 

Judge Denny, b g (Kerr) 2 5 

Vice Regal, bg (Jamesl 4 3 

BadNews.bg (Wilson) 5 4 

William M., b g (McCarthy) ds 

Willas.bg (Simms) ds 

Time— 2:12^,2:11;.,. 

July 20— Pacing, 2:18 class, purse $800. 

Angus Pointer, b g by Sidney Pointer (McPherson) 111 

Ethel Mc, ch m (McCarthy) 2 2 2 

LittleSandy.bg (Kennedy) 3 3 6 

Mionaloid, br m (Snow) 5 5 3 

Benny, brg (Colby) 4 4 7 

BonnleTreasure.bg (Cassidy ) 7 6 4 

Little Tim, bg (Khaket) 6 7 5 

Time— 2:08^, 2:09!4, 2:10)4. 

Trotting, 2:12 class, purse $600. 

Gold Standard, b g by Count Louis (Castie) 1 1 

Wild Wilton, br g (Oares) 2 4 

Direct View, br s (DeRyder) 4 2 

Angiola.bm (Ames) 3 3 

Time— 2:13, 2:lli£. 

Pacing, 2:14 class, purse $800. 

Black Hal, blk g by Star Hal (Snow) 1 1 1 

BobO'Rell, chg (McMahon) 3 2 2 

EllaOla.bm [Burns) 2 4 3 

Vyzole, chg (Harrison) 4 3 4 

Bonnie Patchen, b s .(Moon) 5 5 5 

Time-2:10K, 2:08«, 2:10. 

July 21— Trotting, 2:20 class, purse $800. 

Baraja, b g by Colonel Cochran (Shaw) 6 111 

Checkmate.bg (Richie) 5 2 2 2 

Jennie Scott, b m (Collins) 2 5 3 5 

Ozone, bg (Foote) 3 3 4 3 

Leta, brm (DeRyder) 4 4 5 4 

Silver Ore, gg (Stewart) 1 dis 

Time— 2:16, 2:14^, 2:15)4, 2:18»£. 

Pacing; 2:06 class, purse $600. 

Star Hal, bs by Brown Hal (Snow) 1 1 

Joe Pointer, b s (McClary) 2 2 

CaptainSphinx.bg (Hopkins) 3 3 

Frank Yoakum, b s (Gosnell) 4 4 

Strathline, b g (Burns) 5 5 

William Mc, blkg (Castle) 6 6 

Elderone, b g (Simms) 7 dr 

Time— 2:05)4, 2:06^. 

Pacing, 2:16 class, purse $800. 

John Burns, g s by Bobby Burns (Hedrick) 1 1 1 

Monarch Chimes, brs (Cares) 5 2 3 

GipsyGirl.gm (Kennedy) 2 4 4 

Jaffa.bg (Shaket) 4 5 2 

Hal Patron, brs (Hopkins) 3 3 6 

BourbonC.bg (McMahon) 7 6 5 

Irene D., blk m (Glassford) 6 dr 

Time— 2:14X, 2:12H, 2:14. 

The program for July 22d, the last day of the Windsor meeting, 
had to be declared off on account of rain. 



The Horse in Turkey. 

A. C. Barkley, in his book, "Between the Danube 
and the Black Sea, " says of the Turkish horseman: 
"All his movements are bo quiet and collected that a 
horse soon forgets all fear of him, and to find a restive 
horse is rare indeed. Pullers are very common and 
most Turkish horses have bad mouths, owing to their 
being ridden with severe bits from the time they are 
first mounted. This will always he so, for it is 'the 
custom,' and it is hard to get a Turk to change a 
custom as an Englishman. A Turk never rides fast, 
and his favorite pace on a long journey is either a jog 
or a tripple; the latter is preferred, as it is faster and 
much easier to the rider. Whenever he passes water, 
winter or summer, he lets his horse drink as much as 
it wants; but when he has done so he rides it on fast 
at once; he never lets it stand still after drinking. If 
possible, he gives his horse its fill of water half an 
hour before the end of its journey. Directly he dis- 
mounts he loosens the girth and leads the horse about 
till he is quite cool; he is then put in the stable with 
the saddle on, and this is not taken off for an hour or 
more. When this is done, and when he has had water 
on his way home he nev jr 'breaks out,' and never re- 
fuses his feed of barley. " 



Mr. Thos. Ronan, proprietor of the Pleasanton 
track received word this week of the death of his 
stallion Alexis at Dayton, Washington. Alexis was 
by William L. sire of Axtell 2:12, etc., and his dam 
was Sue Stout by Surplus. Alexis was the sire of five 
standard porformers, the fastest being Ben Bolt 2:18. 



Jackson's Napa Soda does not tangle the feet. 



July 30, 1904J 



©ft* gretbev anb ^povt&tnan 



"May Sacrifice the Bird." 

In speaking of George G., the California horse re- 
cently purchased by Eastern parties, "Hawley," of 
the Kentucky Stock Farm, writes as follows: "If the 
owner of George G., the fast California trotter, should 
decide that the son of Homeward shall fill hit engage- 
ments, he will be a formidable candidate in several of 
the important events of the year, and in the Mas- 
sachusetts, Roger Williams and other events in which 
he is engaged, he must b© looked upon as having' 
more than an even chance, for nothing in these races 
has shown the same quality as the California-bred 
trotter displayed when he trotted a mile in 2:07^ at 
Cleveland. His speed, of course, is unquestioned, and 
if one can judge from his racing of last season, he is 
at least a fairly good race horse, for his victories, 
while over ordinary fields, were made without much 
effort. Any trotter at this season of the year that can 
cover a mile in 2:07|, after having shown such a 
terrific turn of speed as George G. has displayed on 
previous occasions must be reckoned with in con- 
sidering the important eventB of the year, and he 
would have to be little short of a counterfeit did he 
not perform creditably. George G. is, however, as 
far as his Eastern form is concerned, a comparatively 
unknown quantity, for it has been proved on more 
than one occasion that great speed alone does not 
necessarily prove that there is great racing ability, 
and this most conspicuous of all the trotters eligible 
to the 2:12 class may prove that the race is no- always 
to the swift. 

"Nevertheless, his performance at .Cleveland is 
quite remarkable; in fact, so much so that if I owned 
him I would consider his chances greater than those 
of any other of winning his engagements. His owner, 
Mr. Anthoney N. Brady, may elect to reserve him for 
matinee races, in which event his real capacity may 
not be discovered until late in the year, all of which 
would be somewhat unfortunate, for it is always a 
matter of regret whenever an extremely fast trotter 
and one possessing as many good qualities as seem to 
belong to this horse is not seen in public races. Men 
of great wealth frequently prefer the pleasure of own- 
ing an extremely fast trotter to the delight of witness- 
ing a victory in a classic event, yet the sweets of vic- 
tory in a race in which the best of that particular 
division are eligible are always more enjoyable, when 
once tasted, than mere contests against time or in 
specials. The two exceptions tc this, I think, are the 
Cleveland Challenge Trophy and the Gold Cup at 
Memphis, two of the most distinctly sporty events 
ever held in America, and two races in which there 
appeared two trotters that, while they never appeared 
in so-called public events, earned reputations for 
superb courage and racing ability. John A. McKer- 
ron and Lou Dillon in these two races proved them- 
selves race horses of the first flight, and showed very 
plainly that had they been allowed to take part in the 
important events of the Grand Circuit would have 
added to their fame by becoming classic event win- 
ners, which fame, however, would have added little if 
any to the reputation they now possess. Owners of 
trotters more than any class of horsemen are given to 
waiting for fuller development, and not infrequently 
sacrifice the bird in the hand for the prospective two 
in the bush. 

"An example of this may be the result of a deter- 
mination on the part of the owners of Vice-Commo- 
dore, a trotter that is reputed to be a tremendously 
high-class horse, to save him for the future, and to 
withdraw him from the rich three-year-old engage- 
ments, in which, if victorious, he would haveacquired 
a reputation as a colt trotter more valuable than any 
victories at maturity, for the breeders of today attach 
more importance to capacity in a three-year-old than 
in a matured horse, and with good reason, for it is the 
colt trotters that are siring the stake winners. The 
owners of Vice-Commodore may have very good 
reason for not starting him in his three-year-old form 
and in fact may profit by this determination, if indeed 
it is a fact that the horse is not to appear this year; 
yet to moBt men the temptation would be very great 
in possessing a really high-class trotter to establish 
the fact in his three-year-old form, especially if in 
doing so, valuable stakes and purses would be gath- 
ered in. This is an age in which natural trotters are 
more desirable than those which come to their best 
form at maturity, as many of the most interesting 
races of the year are for youngsters, and many of the 
most brilliant performers, trotters of tender age, and 
while it is folly to force beyond his endurance an 
immature horse to victory in the Futurity or any 
other important three-year-old event is of incalculable 
value to a horse's reputation, especially if he is 
intended for the stud. I am in hopes that the owners 
of Vice-Commodore may decide to start this superbly 
bred young horse in public races, for it is doubtful if 
there has ever appeared a more fashionably bred 
trotter than he, or one more justly entitled by his 
heritage to be a brilliant performer." 




Baron Grattan 2:06 1-4 

Winner of Chamber of Commerce Stake 



Horses Have Their Favorites. 



"Racehorses have their favorite animals, just as 
human beings have, sajs a veteran trainer. "Some 
of them are born with a hankering for the society of 
goats, others are dead gone on any old kind of a dog, 
and others are partial to cats, and still others to par- 
rots. I knew a high-class Missouri-bred horse who 
wouldn't do a single thiog his trainer asked of him 
unless a young pig was kept in his stall. He'd got 
used to the piggies when a yearling on the Missouri 
farm, and he demanded the company of a pig for the 
remainder of his career. The trainers down here re- 
member what a deuce of a time the owner and trainer 
of the horse Widow's Mite had in trying to ship him 
to Washington without the goat last fall. Widow's 
Mite had had a goat for a side partner ever since his 
weanling days, but the goat, realizing his bulge, had 
begun to boss things around the stable, and when the 
horses were to be sent to Bennings last fall the owner 
and trainer decided to leave the goat behind at 
Gravesend. But he had another decide coming. All 
the rest of the horses trotted up the gangway and 
into the car willing enough, but when his turn came 
Widow's Mite planted his four feet like an unbusted 
cayuse and said 'No!' in eighteen different dialects. 
He didn't see his goat pal anj where around, and he 
made it dead plain that no goat friend of his was go- 
ing to be left behind and get the shake that way. 
And even when they were forced to unhobble the 
goat and fetch him forth so that Widow's Mite could 
see him and smell him, the horse saw to it that they 
weren't going to spring any phony business on him. 
He wouldn't budge until he'd seen the goat taken on 
board the car first. Then he trotted up the gang- 
plank to the car as if he liked hill work." — Exchange* 



Rita H. promises to be as good and fast at the trot 
as she was last year at the lateral gait. She won 
nearly every start she made last year in the pacing 
division closing the season with a mark of 2:11£. Will 
Durfee shifted her to the trot last spring and she 
took a record of 2:15* and won her race at Pleasanton 
last Wednesday in a manner that makes her look like 
a^2:12 or better trotter before the end of the season 
She is by McKinney 2:11^ and was bred by Sam Hoy 
of Winters who sold her to Byron Erkenbrecher of 
Los Angeles her present owner. Mr. Hoy has a mare 
by Bayswater Wilkes out of the dam of Rita H. that 
will be seen on the circuit. She is a blue roan and a 
natural pacer, "_ 

George G. will go into Ed Geers hands, it is said, 
and be raced through his engagements on the Grand 
Circuit. Josh Albertson has many friends here in 
California who would like to have seen him up behind 
the Homeward gelding when he started for the 
money, as they believe the man who has given him 
all his training can drive him as fast a mile and as 
good a race as the next one. 



Bert Logan Shows them in Missouri. 

John Martin of Woodland received the following 
letter from Doc Boucher this week, and the many 
friends of the little favorite at Pleasanton track will 
be pleased to hear he is doing so well: 

Moberly, Mo., July 21, 1904. 

I send you a few lines to say that we won our first 
race, 2:20 class, $1000 purse, with eighteen starters. I 
drew fifteenth place and had to race two heats for a 
position, over a slow and rough track against a good 
field of aged horses. I wish you could have seen the 
colt race; he is much like his dam when it comes to 
fighting it out. The first heat he was eighth, second 
heat sixth, next three as first in 2:15£, 2:16£ and 
2:15^, always winning at the wire. He will develoD 
into a great racing machine if he keeps sound. 

We go from here to Columbia, Mo., to start in the 
2:20 class for a purse of S1000. I am very much pleased 
with the horse, but I have to do many things with 
him which I much dislike, that is, to race him over 
these poor tracks. I am taking great chances of in- 
juring him, besides it will do him no good, I fear. He 
is 15 hands high and now weighs in racing form 972 
pounds. Everyone likes him very much, they say he 
is a high class colt. Yours truly, 

G. W. BOCCHER. 

— ♦ 

The greatest race horse ever owned in Colorado 
is Winfield Stratton 2:06£, by Saraway, own brother 
to Charles Derby 2:20, etc. Saraway is also a half- 
brother to Klatawah 2:05A, the dam of each being 
Katie G., by Electioneer 125 While Winfield Stratton 
has been a consistent and suc?essful race horse since 
first started after the money, he promises to prove 
a better horse during 1904 than ever before in his 
racing career. This stallion is credited in the last 
volume of the Year Book as having won forty-one 
heats in 2:25 or better. A compilation of his races 
shows that the pony pacer has won sixty-four heats 
in standard time. Last season the son of Saraway 
started in nineteen races, winning eight, was second in 
six, third twice, once fourth and outside the money in 
two. So far this season Winfield Stratton has started 
three times, finishing first in each event. — Western 
Horseman _ 

The Minnesota State Fair has one of the greatest 
lists of entries ever received for a harness racing 
program. For the twelve events a total of 414, or an 
average of 34£ to the class. The two big events, 
namely, the $5000 purse for 2:21 trotters and the $5000 
purse for 2:13 pacers, have 34 and 47 entries .each, re- 
spectively. This list does not look as though there is 
a scarcity of campaigning material in the country. 



Strike!— if they don't giv9 you Jackson's Napa 
Soda when you ask for it. 



Jackson's Napa Soda untangles the feet. 



©he gveeiiev aiib ^oxtsman 




ROD, GUN AND KENNEL. 



Conducted by J. X. De WITT. 



Coming Events. 

Bod. 

April 1-Sept. 10. Oct. 16-Feb. 1— Open season (or taking steel- 
nead In tidewater. 

April 1-Nov. 1— Trout season open. 

May 1-Sept. 1— Close season for sflrlmp. 

July 1-Jan. 1— Open season for black bass. 

July 3u— Saturday Contest No. 9. Class Series, Stow lake 
2:3u p. M. 

July 31— Sunday Contest No 9. Class Series, Stow lake. 10 a. m 

Aug. la-April I— Open season for lobsters and crawfish. 

Nov. 1-Sept. 1— Open season for crabs. 

Sept. 10-Oct. 16 -Close season In tidewater for steelbead. 

Nov. 15-Sepl. 10— Season open for taking salmon above tide 
water. 

Gun. 

July 1-Feb. IS— Dove season open. 

July 15-Nov. 1— Deer season open. 

July 31— Millwood Gun Club. Blue rocks. Mill Valley. 

Aug. 7— California Wing Club. Live birds. Ingleside. 

Aug. M— Union Gun Club. Blue rocks. Ingleside. 

Aug. SI— Golden Gate Gun Club. Blue rocks. Ingleside. 

Aug. -'•—Merchandise shoot. Blue rocks. Ingleside. 

Sept. 1-Feb. 15 — Open season for mountain quail, grouse and 
aage hen. 

Sept. II— Union Gun Club. Blue rocks. Ingleside. 

Sept. IS— Golden Gate Gun Club. Blue rocks. Ingleside. 

Feb. 15-Oct. 15 — Closed season .'or quail, ducks, eto. 
Bench Shows. 

Sept. 1,2. 3— Oakland. 3 day show. A. K. C. rules. W. E. Chute, 
Superintendent. 

Sept. li— San Mateo. 1 day show. A. K. C. rules. 

Sept. 5, 8 — Canadian National Exhibition's Bench Show. Dr. A. 
W. Bell, Superintendent. 

Sept. 5, 10— Toronto Kennel Club. Toronto, Can. J. G. Kent, 
Chairman. 

Sept. 12, 13— Newport Bench Show. Newport, R. I. F. M. Ware, 
Secretary. 

Sept. 13, 16 — Orange County Fair Association's Bench Show. 
Mlddletown. N. Y. W. H Saxton, Superintendent. 

Sept. IT— Bryn Mawr Kennel Club. Bryn Nawr, Pa. J. A. 
Caldwell Jr., Secretary. 

Sept. 17— Scottish Terrier Clnb Specialty Show. Bryn Mawr, 
Pa. E. S. Woodward, Secretary. 

Sept 28, 29— Valley Fair Kennel Club. Initial show. Brattle- 
boro. Vt. H. C. Rice, Secretary. 

Oct. 4, 7 — Danbury Agricultural Society. Danbury, Conn. Jas 
Mortimer, Superintendent. 

Oct. 5, 8— Spokane Kennel Club. Spokane, Wash. W. K. L. 

Oct. 10— Brunswick Fur Club. Foxhound show. Barre, Mass. 

B. S. Turpin, Secretary. 

Oct. 18, 21— Frederick Agricultural Society. Frederick, Md. 
Roger McSherry, Secretary. 

Oct. 25, 28— World's Fair Dog Show, St. Louis, Mo. F. D. Coburn, 
Chief of L. S. Dept., St. Louis, Mo, 

Nov. 16, 19— Boston Terrier Club. Specialty show. Boston, 
Mass. Walter E. Stone, Secretary. 

Nov. 22, 25— Philadelphia Dog Show Association. Philadelphia, 
Pa. J. Sergeant Price, Secretary. 

Field Trials. 

Aug. 22— Nebraska Field Trials Association. 3d annual trials. 
O'Neill, Neb M. H. McCarthy, Secretary. 

Aug. 30— Iowa Field Trials Club. O'Neill, Neb. George 
Cooper, Secretary, Des Moines, la. 

Sept. 5— Western Canada Kennel Club. La Salle, Man. Wm. 

C. Lee, Acting Secretary, Winnipeg, Man. 

Sept. 8— Manitoba Field Trials Club. 18th annual trials. Car- 
man, Man. Eric Hamber, Secretary, Winnipeg, Man. 

Sept. 30— British Columbia Field Trial Club. Steveston, B.C. 
Norman F. Tyne. Secretary-Treasurer, Vancouver, B. C. 

Oct. 31— Monongahela Field Trials Club. Oblong, 111. A. C. 
Peterson, Secretary, Homestead, Pa. 

Oct. 31— Missouri Field Trial Association. Sturgeon, Mo. L. 
S. Eddlns. Secretary, Sedalla, Mo. 

Nov. 1— Sportsmen's Field Trial Club. Clare, Mloh. Erwin C. 
Smith, Secretary, Midland, Mich. 

Nov. 7— Independent Field Trials Club. 6th annual trials. 
. H. S. Humphrey, Secretary, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Nov. 14— Illinois Field Trials Association. 6th annual trials. 
Robinson. Ills. W. R. Green, Secretary, Marshall, 111. 

Nov. 15— Michigan Field Trial Clnb. , Mich. ChaB 

E. Sisson, Secretaiy, Muskegon, Mich. 

Nov. a— Virginia Field Trial Association. Martinsville, Va. 
C. B. Cooke. Secretary. 

Indiana Kennel Club. Field trials. Clay City, Ind. 

C F. Young. Secretary, day City, Ind. Week following Ills. Ch. 
trials. 

Dec. 3— Continental Field Trials Club. 10th annual trials. 
Thomasvllle, N. C John White, Seoretary, Hempstead, L. I. 

Dec I2-Alabama Field Trials Club , Ala. J. M- 

Klrkpatrlck. Secretary, Huntsvllle, Ala. 

Dee. 17— Eastern Field Trial Club. Waynesboro, Oa. Simon C. 
Bradley, Secretary-Treasurer, Greenfield Hills, Conn. 

American Field Futurity Stake. For Pointers and 

Setters whelped on or after January 1, 1904, whose dams have 
been duly qualified. Am. Field Publishing Co., Chicago. 

Jan. 9— Pacific Coast Field Trials Club. Bakersfield, Cal. 
Albert Belz, Secretary. 201 Parrott Bldg., San Francisco, Cal. 

Jan. 10— Georgia Field Trials Association. Albany, On. P. M. 
Eaalg, Seoretary, Atlanta, Ga. 

Jan. 10— Texas Field Trials Club. 3d annual trials. ■ , 

Tex. T. A. Ferlet, Secretary, San Antonio, Tex. 



The mountain lion that has been such a terror to 
the inhabitants of the Berkeley hills the last two 
weeks is on deck again, says a press dispatch of the 
24th. His sleek, elusive form was seen Saturday last 
several miles from his first haunts around Schmidt- 
ville. He appeared in an abandoned quarry on the 
old Fish ranch road, where a gang of telephone line- 
men was at work. The men got only a glimpse of the 
beast as be slunk off Into the brush when frightened 
by them, but that glimpse was enough to convince 
them that he Is a full grown animal. To some of the 
men, indeed, he looked as big as an elephant and al- 
together ho corresponds in description to the animal 
seen by tbe tamers of Schmldtville. 

The lion first made himself known lo that neighbor- 
hood by killing off a lot of sheep and calves In 
Schmldtville. A party of hunters went after him, but 
they were unsuccessful In running him down. In at- 
tain ptrig to shoot him one Sunday morning Frank 

r, it will be remembered, was attacked by the 

nd soverely wounded. 



Rods tor Deep Sea Fishing. 

A sportsman is a man who captures fish or game 
for the pleasure of the taking, irrespective of the 
kind taken. It is generally conceded that he who 
gives the quarry the most chance to escape — in other 
words, he who meets it on the most equal footing — is 
the truest sportsman. Whether the object of sport is 
a fish, or a bird is immaterial. The principle is the 
same. 

Several years ago, one of our veteran anglers con- 
ceived the idea of attempting the capture of a tuna on 
a rod and line, and after many attempts, he was 
fortunate enough to take one of these enormous fish 
in that manner. 

The practice almost immediately became popular. 
Realizing the value of the tarpon to Florida as an at- 
traction, it soon became evident that in California 
waters there swam a fish that was at least the equal 
of the tarpon for dogged perseverance, and the cap- 
ture of that fish was encouraged at Santa Catalina. 
Quite a number of enthusiastic anglers tried the new 
sport, and were delighted with it. Tuna fishing be- 
came almost immediately popular, and owing to the 
enormous strength of the fish, very short, stiff rods, 
similar to those used for tarpon, were constructed, 
and thin, though wonderfully strong lines made to be 
used with large, powerful reels in taking tuna. 

As is usually the case, the sportsmen greatly over- 
estimated the difficulties of taking the fish, and 
adopted a short, stiff, and almost unbreakable rod for 
the fishing. It was really stronger than need be. 
Now, as the capture of the tuna is being reduced to a 
more exact science, the requirements of sport compel 
the meeting of the great fish on more equal terms, 
and tuna fishers are beginning to realize it. 

A veteran tuna fisher has the following suggestions 
to offer in this respect: 

"Some time ago I noticed in the Los Angeles _&- 
jiress an extract from the New York Sun giving H. 
Gray Griswold's catch of tuna at the tournament of 
last season at Santa Catalina island. It was in brief 
aB follows: Thirteen fish in about a week, eleven of 
which he landed in from five to twenty minutes, and 
two in two hours and twenty minutes, and one in one 
hour and seventeen minutes. Mr. Gri6Wold claims 
as a result of this experience that the average tuna 
should be landed in thirty minutes, and this is his 
average. 

"Mr. Griswold created something of a sensation 
among the Tuna club members at Avalon, who had 
labored from two to fourteen hours over their fish 
and the object of the writer is to ask the question if 
Mr. Griswold in making this remarkable record did 
not use what is known as a Tarpon club rod — a very 
short, stiff six-foot rod, or so. Also, if anglers are to 
use rods with no restriction as to length, are they 
living up to the highest standards of sport? 

"With a rod of six, or even six and a half feet long, 
no large fish has a fair show for his life, and that such 
rods are built a glance at the stock of any large firm 
will show. 

"That this tendency is in evidence among tarpon 
anglers is shown by the following from an article in 
Scribner's by Robert Grant. He says, in speaking of 
the length of the rod : 'The length varies from seven 
to eight and a half feet. Those anglers who aim to 
kill their fish in the shortest possible time use as near 
an approach to a stick as the sportsmanlike spirit of 
the locality will tolerate without demur; but the 
ambition should now rather be to increase the length 
and suppleness of the rod.' 

"This is a true sportsmanlike expression, and it 
finds an application on this Coast. It is not true sport 
to use a club-like rod and see how quickly a tuna can 
be landed, but rather to give the fish a fair chance 
for its life. I do not know just who is respoasible for 
the rules which regulate the tournaments of the Tuna 
club, but surely it i6 a curious fact that in the restric 
tions there is nothing said about the length of the 
rod, and an angler can contest for the tuna cup with 
a rod four feet in length if so disposed, all of which is 
wrong. Tarpon and tuna rods should not be less than 
eight feet in length." 

Here is one man's view, and it must be admitted 
that he has had the experience necessary to give his 
statements weight. He has caueht fish all over the 
waters of America, and now leaves the field open to 
the disciples of the short rod. We would like to hear 

from them. 

* 

Some of the Attractions of the McCloud. 



The McCloud river is one of the most charming of 
all tbe water courses of California. It is in the Mt. 
Shasta region, being a tribuutary of the Pitt river, 
which is the principal tributary of the Upper Sacra- 
mento river, and In fact Is larger than the latter 
where the two unite. 

The water of the McCloud is as clear as a diamond, 
the stream being fed by melting snows and giant 
springs that gush from the sides of the precipitous 
canyons through which It flows. There is no great 
difference In the volume of the river in summer or 
winter, and Its water Is always icy cold. It is the 
home of the beautiful species of trout known as the 
Dolly Varden, characterized by bright spots of large 
size along the sides of the fish. 

Salmon abound In the McCloud in the summer, 



[July 30, 1904 



swimming all the way from the ocean, hundreds of 
miles, to spawn in the cold water on the beds of 
gravel near Bairds. On this stream the Government 
has a fish hatchery, where great numbers of fish are 
propagated for the restocking of the depleted waters. 

The McCloud is a favorite stream among anglers, 
and of late years has been much frequented by them. 
Some of the most beautiful locations have been passed 
under private ownership and are held for purposes of 
recreation by wealthy men. But there are still places 
accessible to the public for angling, and fine sport 
may be enjoyed along the river at the proper season. 

Despite extensivelumbering operations in the region 
there are still many fine old trees to be seen in the 
neighborhood of the river, the firs and cedars being 
particularly large and tall. Deer abound in the for- 
ests, and also feathered game, while hunters who 
have strong inclinations for bear may find an oppor- 
tunity at times to put their markmanship to the test. 

The mountain sheep was once an inhabitant of the 
region, and some years ago at the town of Sisson 
there were specimens of horns that resembled those 
of the ibex, said to be those of an extinct denizen of 
the heights. The country is full of interest to the 
naturalist as well as to the sportsman, and for health 
and recreation it affords many inviting features dur- 
ing the summer months, when the mountain climate 
may be found at its best. The nights are alwayscool, 
and even on days when the sunshine is too warm for 
comfort there is a refreshing coolness in the shade. 
After sunset the temperature falls rapidly, and a 
blazing fire of pitch pine is a luxury that all appre- 
ciate. The air is of the purest and gives health and 
strength to the weak. 



Smokeless Powder Cloth. 



Interesting experiments are being made by 
officers of the United States Army Ordnance Depai 
ment to find a substitute for the cotton duck bag 
which powder charges for the big guns of the army 
and navy are packed for handling as well as for load- 
ing the guns. The objection to canvas or other woven 
fabrics is that it does not burn during the combustion 
of the powder charge, and must be removed from the 
breech of the gun by hand, sometimes in a smoulder- 
ing state. To rid the gun of this mass of canvas takes 
time and to make the process of loading and firing 
more rapid than at present it has been deemed neces- 
sary to find something else to take the place of the 
canvas bags. 

Rifle shooters have for several years known the 
merits of wads that, when placed over the powder 
charges in their cartridges, are consumed together 
with the powder. They serve the purpose, which is 
to confine the powder in a given space up to the 
moment of ignition, and are then consumed. Per- 
haps this knowledge enabled the inventors of the old 
world to perfect a material resembling cloth, but 
which will burn as readily as flashlight papers. At 
any rate, the representatives of the United States 
Army who are stationed in Germany learned that 
cloth of this kind was being experimented with there, 
and obtaining some of it, forwarded it to the army 
ordnance department at Washington. 

The cloth is woven from threads obtained in a 
process very similar to that followed in the manu- 
facture of artificial silk. The difference is that the 
artificial sils is made from cellulose. In the manu- 
facturr of each the glutinous compound is forced 
through tiny holes in a steel plate, forming tiny 
threads which, when they become dry, are exceed- 
ingly strong; indeed it is claimed that when spun their 
tensil strength is equal to that of silk, which they re- 
semble in appearance, their colorbeing creamy whiter 
Furthermore, these threads are said to be very simila. 
to the product of the sillkworm. It is further claimed 
that this cloth, if worn by women as silk is worn, 
would outwear the latter, so tough and flexible is it, 
but this is not likely to be done, for a yard of the 
material will burn like a flash on being exposed to the 
flame of a match, leaving scarcely any ash. 

The ordnance department intends to experiment 
with this product. It will be made up into bags for 
the powder charges of the big guns, and these bags 
will be tied up with cords made of the same material, 
so that, if all that is claimed is true, powder, bag and 
cord will disappear with the firing of the big guns. 
As it is reasonable to believe that nitrocellulose in this 
form will give high pressures when confined, it is 
likely that by this method the breech pressures of big 
guns* will be increased slightly by the use of these 
bags. And if the material gives satisfactory results, 
the government may arrange to manufacture it. 



Rifle Stocks. 



There was received at one of the private factories 
making riflle stocks under contract for the govern- 
ment an Illinois walnut log, 16 feet in length and 
showing more than 24 inches of sound wood at its 
small end. It was sound, clear and far above the 
average for black walnut, but after it-had been cut 
up to the best advantage it represented the rough 
material for only 123 stocks for the new Springfield 
magazine rifles. The contractor was pie; Bed, as the 
profit from 123 stocks is quite a little sum, but when 
the increasing scarcity of good black walnut and the 
demand for it from home and foreign markets are 
taken into consideration, it seems remarkable that 
the supply has lasted until the present time. It seems, 
too, that "of all the varieties of wood to be found in 
this hemisphere American black walnut will alone fill 
tbe requirements. Not that other varieties of wood 
have not been tried, for hard maple was for a long 
time the standard material for rifle and gun stocks; 
birdseye maple, bay mahogany, jungle mahogany and 



JUL? 30, 1904 



f&he =§xseissv cmfr grputrtemcm 



numerous other varietiea have all been used more or 
less successfully. Black walnut, however, is now the 
standard, and American wood only is available for 
such stocks as the government requires for rifles cost- 
ing, complete, about $14. 

Aluminum has been tried as a substitute for wood, 
but failed. Stocks made of this material are smooth, 
neat and durable, but as they were only tried on low- 
priced rifles, it wus found that it cost almost as much 
if not fully as much to make them as it did to make 
walnut stocks. Neither were they much lighter than 
walnut, although hollowing out the stockB was in- 
cluded in the experiments. 



Pacific Advisory Board Retaliates. 

The action of the W. K. L. directed against ex- 
hibitors at shows west of the 110th degree of long- 
itude, who will be barred from making any entries at, 
or taking part in W. K. L. shows, has been taken 
cognizance of by the Pacific Advisory Board, which 
body at a meeting held July 23d has adopted retalia- 
tory tactics as will be seen in the following preamble 
and resolution: 

Kennel Editor Breeder and Sportsman:— 
The following resolutions were passed at the meeting 
of the Pacific Advisory Committee of the American 
Kennel Club held today: 

Whereas it has come to the knowledge of this com- 
mittee, that the organization known as the Western 
Kennel League has seen fit to incorporate into its 
Constitution and Rules a clause disqualifying all per- 
sons who may exhibit dogs at shows held west of the 
110th degree of longitude under the rules of the 
American Kennel Club, and whereas such a clause 
proves that the organization has been formed and 
exists in a spirit of undisguised hostility to the 
American Kennel Club, and whereas such action is 
prejudicial to the best interests of dogsand dog shows; 
therefore be it 

Resolved, that from and after this date, any person 
or persons actiDg in any official capacity, paid or 
unpaid, including that of judge, secretary, superin- 
tendent, steward or clerk of a show, or as a member 
of a bench show committee of a club holding a show 
west of the 110th degree of longitude under the rules 
of the Western Kennel League, or under any rules 
other than those of the American Kennel Club, shall 
be and hereby are disqualified and debarred from all 
privileges of the American Kennel Club. Carried. 

By giving publicity to the above resolution in the 
columns of your valuable paper, you will much oblige, 
Yours very truly, 
Pacific Advisory Committee, A. K C. 
J. P. Norman, Secretary. 

The 110th degree of longitude divides Montana 
about in the middle, runs through Yellowstone 
National Park, takes in a portion of western Wyoming 
and all of Utah and Arizona but the smaller eastern 
section of each, practically embracing in the pro- 
hibited zone the Pacific Coast states and territories. 



Vaccination of Puppies. 

A recent communication from Stockdale Kennels, 
Bakersfield, in which Manager R. M. Dodge recounts 
the successful results of vaccination as a preventative 
of distemper will be of much interest to breeders and 
fanciers. 

There has at various times appeared in the columns 
of the Breeder and Sportsman descriptive articles 
and also instances enumerating the results in other 
cases on this subject, but the cases cited here are the 
first important ones coming under our observation on 
the Coast. 

"Having received so many letters in reference to 
vaccination of puppies against distemper, I find it 
impossible to answer them, so I fall back on the good 
old plan of sending a few lines to representative 
periodicals, for I know then that it will reach all. 

"Having seen Pasteur Vaccine Company'sfChicago, 
111.) circular in regard to canine distemper cure, I 
thought I would try it. I also sent for one of their 
hypodermic syringes, and in April, 1903, I vaccinated, 
according to directions, which are sent with the vac- 
cine, five puppies, three months old, and in October, 
1903, I vaccinated sixteen more, leaving several not 
vaccinated. Two seasons before we lost nearly all our 
youngsters, about thirty. Having dogs of the same 
age which were not vaccinated, 1 was in doubt as to 
its value, until after my experience at the bench show 
at Los Angeles, last May, where a well-developed case 
of distemper was within a few feet of my four vacci- 
nated youngsters, and also on the adjoining bench to 
a dog I had sold to a party in Los Angeles. I sold 
quite a number of these vaccinated dogs. One went 
to Honolulu, B. I., and one to San Salvador, Central 
America. Not a case of distemper has as yet been 
reported snd I have had no distemper in our kennels 
up to date. 

"This has been my experience. I am now awaiting 
some vaccine which I will use on all our youngsters, 
especially on our six American Field Futurity entries, 
by Champion Cuba of Kenwood— Petronella. 

"We have a fine lot of youngsters to pick from 
again this year for next year's Derby. I have all of 
them pretty well yard broken and have started in 
teaching them retrieving. I always like to teach my 
puppies to retrieve. Most dogs like this part of hunt- 
ing and if allowed to pick up a bird or so once in a 
while they will learn to mark their birds and be much 
more steady to shot and wing. Most people do not 
believe this, but if a dog is taught not to go or pick up 
a bird until he is told, he will naturally wait for the 
cummand and go. Think over this brother handlers, 
and try it. / 



Whippet Racing. 

Whippets and Whippet racing are subjets that we 
have heard somewhat frequently discussed and there 
seems to be some interest and curiousity excited in 
regard thereto, how lasting or strong the sentiment 
may be we. will not at present venture to surmise. 
Nevertheless in anBwer to an inquiry this week we 
will give some general information, the first at hand, 
that may be of passing interest to the few and a 
pointer or two to the fancy, concerning a breed of 
dogs that are thought well of in the East and across 
the water. 

Whippets are a comparatively unknown quantity to 
the majority of the Coast fancy, but few specimens 
have been seen here, probably the best one ever 
brought here was shown by L. A. Klein at the spring 
show in 1902. This was a bitch, and, by the few here 
familiar with the breed, conceded to be a very good 
one. Her career, unfortunately, was cut short one 
morning during the show, for Madame Chaddy, an 
ugly tempered Bull bitch, made short work of her. 

If we are not much mistaken, Borne five years ago, 
there was an effort made to introduce Whippet racing 
here. This, for many good reasons easily understood 
by anyone familiar with the sport, was found to be 
impracticable. Instead, a compromise was attempted 
and Fox Terrier racing Offered instead. The dogs 
were to chase pendant small cages containing rats 
gyrated over a circular course of limited diameter. 
It was believed by the promoters that the enthusiasm 
created in favor of the proposed new sporting innova- 
tion, Whippet racing, would be strong enough to take 
up and foster the substitute, in this those interested 
were disappointed. 

In England Whippet racing haBlongbeen a popular 
and recognized branch of sport. In the Eastern 
states, particuiarly in New York and Pennsylvania, 
it has been gaining in popularity of late. Referring 
to this sport, at home and abroad, a New York writer 
makes the following general comment: 

An effort is to be made to give a better standing to 
dog racing in the East, so that the sport will be 
brought to a higher level and conducted under more 
attractive conditions. Those at the back of there- 
forms believe that if properly organized the sport will 
be taken up at the country clubs. In England, where 
the existing abuses have become too firmly planted to 
be rooted out, the attempt of the Ladies' Kennel 
Association to establish dog racing under society 
auspices at Ranelagh did not succeed. This does not 
daunt the Americans, who point out that dog racing 
is too little known here to have become overweighted 
with abuses, and they are confident that what will be 
practically a new pastime may be instituted here. 

There are meetings two or threetimes a week about 
London, usually promoted bp a "sporting publican." 
Whippets have been a small class at our bench 
shows for some five years, but only last season did the 
few owners begin to canvass the possibilities in dog 
racing. Among the exhibitors of Whippets at the 
New York Bhows have been Charles W. Keyes the 
Bay View Kennels of Fall River, Mrs. James L. 
Kernochan, W. J. Nugent, Harriet L. Robins and the 
Newton Abbot kennels. Whippet racing has flourished 
in a manner, however, throughout the East, where- 
ever there is a colony of English factory hands, but 
these owners have not patronized bench shows. 

There was a successful meeting last spring at Hemp- 
stead, the first under the sanction of the Ladies' 
Kennel Association of America, and other meetings 
under fashionable management in Boston and Phila- 
delphia. At Hempstead one of the Whippets ran 220 
yards in 12J seconds, which gives an idea of the speed 
of these dainty dogs. 

The Whippet originally was a cross between the 
Italian Greyhound and the Fox Terrier. It resembles 
the small, pet type of Greyhound, but the Terrier 
cross has made it stouter and sturdier in build and 
temperament. The Whippet is now a distinct breed, 
and the types of today could not be produced by the 
first cross. 

Here the tracks are merely a carefully rolled strip of 
the regular dirt course, but in England the dogs are 
raced on cinder paths, such as sprinters use; but the 
top is kept soft, so that the dogs' feet wilj not get 
sore. In England, too, the course is divided into long 
parallel alleys, each one and a half yards wide, so 
that the dogs cannot cross each other. The judge is 
in a box sunk to the level of the ground, but our rac- 
ing is still too primitive for these accessories. 

The races are from 50 to 220 yards and they are 
usually handicaps run in heats. Six dogs to a heat is 
the preferred number. The handicapping is on 
weight and previous performances, but a bitch is 
always rated faster than a dog. A fifteen-pound bitch 
has to give a dog of the same weight four yards. 
Six to eigh ounces over weight is permissible. 

Chalk lines at intervals of one yard are drawn 
across the track for some thirty yards from the start- 
ing line, and the dogs are handicapped by being 
placed on different marks. They are distinguished 
by colors, worn as a collar by each dog. 

A unique feature of the racing is that the owner of 
each dog, or trainer, who is called a "runner up," 
precedes the dog down the track to the finish line. 
The spectacle of the line of ungainly and motely clad 
"rnnners up," each shouting to his dog in endearing 
terms and waving a rag to attract its attention is 
regarded as necessary in England, but the Americans 
would like to do away with it as an objectionable part 
of the sport. American sportsmen and fanciers be- 
lieve a Whippet may be taught to run its best to the 
trainer guided only by a whistle. 

Beyond each winning line is the "over-mark," 
placed fifteen yards from the finish. The rule is that 
the "runners up" must all be beyond the "over-mark" 
before the winning dog passes the finish line. When 
ready for a race, the handlers take their marks with 
their dogs. Each dog is held in a towel, from which 



it struggles to escape to reach its "runner up." As 
the men cross the finish and get on the "over-mark," 
all calling and gesticulating, the starter fires Mb 
pistol and the handlers slip their dogs. The Whippets 
"go like streaks of lightning" to their "runners up," 
and the color of the winner is soon waved high in 
triumph 

Aside from abolishing the "runners up" and their 
noise, the American reforms contemplated include 
some way of classification that will bring together 
dogs of one size and weight, and so avoid the starting 
in the same heat of dogs ranging from nine to twenty 
pounds. Some simultaneous and automatic way of 
starting is also to be urged, for instance, from boxes 
to be opened by a spring in the manner of pigeon 
traps, for the chance of a Whippet winning a sprint, 
under the present system is frequently spoiled by a 
bungling or designing handler. 



DOINGS IN DOGDOM. 



The initial field trial meet of the fall circuit will be 
that of the Nebraska Field Trial Association at 
O'Neill, Neb., next month. Mr. Samuel H. Socwell 
of Indianapolis will be in the saddle. Mr. Socwell has 
owned and bred a number of field trial dogs and also 
many good field dogs, and from early experience with 
the wary prairie chicken is well qualified to fill the 
trying position. 

W. B. Coutts states that he is now on ground (near 
O'Neill, Neb.) that is almost Ideal for working his 
string of dogs. Several of the California dogs, how- 
ever, did not take readily to prairie chickens at first. 



Irish Setters seem to be looking up a bit in the 
East. Rumor has it that some good ones will be seen 
in the different trials this season. 

Down in Los Angeles Mr. Paul Piepers proposes to 
assemble a strong kennel. He has recently purchased 
from Dr. Van Born of Bloomsburg, Pa., a full sister 
to Eibernian Ben. He has also acquired Madge Fin- 
glas by Champion Finglas, and from J. J. Scanlon, 
Fall River, Mass., a son of Inchiquin II. Madge was 
first sent to Mr. Contoit's kennels to be bred to Ch. 
St. Cloud II, after which - she will reach the Coast. 
Royal Dan, owned by Mr. Piepers, was a winner at 
the Los Angeles show in May. 



Mr. L. Contoit, Secretary of the Irish Setter Club, 
is enthusiastic over the growing prospects of the club. 
Many influential names have been recently added to 
the club's roster. In consequence he believes the 
breed will soon have a stronger foothold. In the fu- 
ture Irish Setters are to have particular attention at 
many bench shows in the form of special prizes, and 
an effort will also be made to enhance their import- 
ance in the field. 

Among the recent bitches served by St. Cloud II 
are: W. B. Comer's Ch. Bonnie Bess, J. J. Donohoe's 
Queen Signal, Mrs. R. W. Gilford's Vic, Dr. C. S. Van 
Horn's Lady Finis, J. J. Scanlon'B Lady Law, Ben F. 
LewiB' Ch. Red Bess II and G. M. Leventvitt's 
Heather Pet. This bitch was formerly owned by Mr. 
Jos. Vandergrift (Vancroft Kennels). Her last whelp- 
ing was a litter of eight to Prince Victor. 



R. P. Huntington and Theo. Sturges— the third 
judge will be selected later — have been selected to act 
at the Continental trials. Entries for the Derby close 
August 15th with Mr. John White, Secretarv, Hemp- 
stead, N.Y. 

The Oakland show dates will probably be Septem- 
ber 1, 2 and 3. An Eastern judge, it is reported, will 
pass on most of the breeds. The show will be under 
the patronage of the Ladies of the Fabiola Hospital. 
The proceeds of the show will be devoted to a charit- 
able end. Present indications promise a large entry 
and a remunerative patronage. 



The San Mateo one-day open air show will take 
place September 9th. The location for the function 
is an ideal one, being no less than the lawn on the 
magnificent grounds of Mr. Francis Cardan's pictur- 
esque country residence, a beautiful manor near the 
Burlingame Country Club's demesne. 

Local talent will preside in the ring. Here Mr. 
Phil Wand will take charge of Bull Terrier classes, his 
initial appearance in a position which he is accredited 
with being well qualified to fill. 



It is now the fashion in Paris for society dogs — that 
is, dogs owned by prominent society people — to be 
invited by chic acquaintances of their masters for a 
dog party and luncheon once or twice a week. The 
invitations, of course, are limited to the best 
bred and best behaved animals whose owneis' 
Dames are found in the swell circles of the Paris blue 
book. It is understood that no limit is placed on 
flirting. 

St. Bernards have been just a bit sidetracked for 
several years past, that is, somewhat more in num- 
bers at our shows than in quality. We have here a 
few good ones and a fair following of enthusiastic 
breeders who are willing and ready to place "holies" 
In the front again. Among them may be mentioned 
Mr. AuguBt P". Chamot, J . W. Matthews, W. Wallace, 
J. F. Mahoney, A. B. Fately, F. i: Lueck, E. D. Con- 
nolly, Capt. W. S. Overton, Mrs. Ernest P. Silber, S. 
J. Ackerman, Herbert White, Phil C. Meyers, A. 
McDougall, A. L. Hamilton, Mrs. C. A. Smart, Mrs. 
S. Sickles and many others. 

There must, however, be some encouragement and 
support given St. Bernard fanciers by the various 
kennel clubs. 

Some years ago St. Bernards were a strong entry at 
our shows, notably so at the Pacific Kennel Club 
show in '96 there was nearly 100 St. Bernards shown. 
The dogs were placed in a special section of the hall 
and the exhibit was a memorable one. Since then, 



10 



©ite gveebcv cmfc Qpovt&txxaxx 



[July 30, 1904 



notwithstanding there have been a goodly number 
shown at subsequent exhibitions here, there seems to 
have been a gradual lack of general interest in the 
breed. The St. Bernard Club of California, was, at 
one time a very strong organization, but has been 
out of existence' for several years. 

In a laudable attempt to revive interest and 
strengthen the status of the breed there has been re- 
cently organized the Pacific St. Bernard Club, which 
starts offron we hope a successful career, with a mem- 
bership of thlrtv. J. W.Matthews is the president 
and J. F. Mahonev the secretary of the new organiza- 

Whenit is remembered that we have had here such 
dogs as Ch. California Bernardo, Alta Millo, Ch. Grand 
Master Tammanv, Ch. Le Prince, Jr., Alta Rachel, 
Grand Master II.", Omar Khayyam, California Ebor- 
acum, Peincess Rachel, Ch. Mountain Queen, Melrose 
Svlvia, Princess Sseherazade, General B.and among 
the smooth coats the stock of Franz Frey and Mr. 
Salazar, and many good dogs besides, in fact to num- 
erous a lot to mention in our limited space. There 
surely should be something left to work up from, pro- 
viding there is the proper infusion of new blood and 
encouragement for the breeder. 

Speaking of new blood, or rather a new dog and a 
grand one at that, reminds us that Ch. Alta Sylvia is 
at present in this city and at the stud disposal of the 
owners of good bitches. 

Of the dogs here and within this vicinity we will 
state that there are a number of goods ones. Among 
the smooth coats, the kennels of Mr. Chamot is made 
ud of importations from the Hospice. Here should 
be found the corner stone for the foundation of some- 
thing acceptable in "saintlies" on the Coast. 

We have mentioned briefly a number of exhibitors 
and dogs familiar to show patrons. Aside from 
this, we know of a large number of St. Bernard lovers 
and of the existence of many dogs, the owners of 
which would take a more or less active interest in the 
prosperity of the breed and in our bench shows, were 
they sought out and invited to join the ranks of 
the fancv 

The new St. Bernard club can, and no doubt will, 
do much in this respect, we wish the organization 
and its members every success. 

As we intimated last week the differences between 
the A. K. C. and W. K. L. magnates on the Coast 
have assumed a harsher phase as will be understood 
by perusal of the Advisory Board resolution. 

The W. K. L. prohibition clause strikes at the indi- 
vidual exhibitor. The recent A. K. C. fiat restrains 
the official corps only from taking part in any show 
not under A. K. C. rules. Between them both, the 
exhibitor and the class which makes up the conduc- 
tion, following and support of bench shows, are "be- 
tween the devil and the deep sea" as it were. 

To state that many breeders and fanciers are non- 
plussed and in numerous cases deeply incensed, at the 
present status of affairs is drawing it mildly. 

In principle, the preliminary prohibitive action is 
an unwarranted usurpation of authority, the subse- 
quent retaliatory tactics is on the same plane, not- 
withstanding the asserted saving clause of self-pro- 
tection. 

The Amcricun Field, in a recent issue, commented 
in forcible language on the; action of the W. K. L. in 
adopting the barring clause in its constitution. The 
claim therein that it was un-American and not sports- 
manlike and for the injury of doggy interests is not 
without truth, despite its drastic style of expression. 

We have been reminded that the recent action of 
the Advisory Board was unrortunately just a little 
premature and that action was to be taken in the im- 
mediate future tending to moderate the objectional 
feature of the W. K. L. constitution, but that now, in 
the light of recent developments, such favorable 
league legislation would be stayed. What truth there 
may be in this rumor we are not cognizant of. 

Now, in the general interest of Coast dogdom and 
for the fancy at large we suggest that the representa- 
tives of both factions get together, and that soon, and 
adjust matters to the extent that differences will be 
toned down to a mutually agreeable basis. There is 
nothing to be gained by antagonism. The fancy at 
large have rights in the matter that should" be 
recognized. 

A change of residence is the cause that prompts the 
owner of a high-class Boston Terrier to seek a pur- 
chaser. The dog is about a year and a half old, of 
good and wining stock, a beautiful brindleand weighs 
about eighteen pounds. Particulars may be had from 
the Kennel Editor. 

* 

AT THE TRAPS. 



When Jack Fanning was heard from last be was at 
Little Rock, Ark., where he was "fanning" a lot of 
targets out of shape at the gun club shoots. 



The Millwood Gun Club regular monthly shoot is 
the inanimate target card for tomorrow. The shoot 
will be held on the Mill Valley grounds. 

The Vallejo Gun Club shoot last Sunday was 
attended by a number of local shooters. The meet 
passed off pleasantly, the committre in charge used 
their beet efforts to make the guests and members "at 
home." The weather was ideal and the presence of 
a number of ladies added to the enjoyment of the 
occasion. 

The main event was the team race at 25 targets per 
man, between the Union and Vallejo Gun Clubs for a 
trophy, the former club winning. The trophy must be 
won two out of three shoots before permanent owner- 
ship ensues. 

The Union Gun Club teams shot from the 18 yard 
mark ■ nd the home team stood at 16 yards. The 
score* were: 

m Gun Club, Bradrlck 20; Rolling 22; G. Syl- 
18; Xaumann 20; I Person 20; total 100. 



Vallejo Gun Club, Chappell 21: Drake 16: O'Hara 
19; Clark 22; Beveridge 12; total 90. 

A summary of scores in four target events is the 
following: 

20 20 20 25 

Targets Targets Targets Targets 

Iverson 10 20 ..20 

Sylvester.C 17 18 18 

Maglstrinl... 

Forster 17 

McCutchan 16 

O'Hara 

Lewis' 14 18 

Clark 

Bradrlck 19 20 

Lowry 

Knlck 17 

Chappell 

C. M C. Mascot 8 

Bassford 

HolUng 19 20 

Pltres 15 

Wattles' 16 

Shields 

Nauman 18 18 17 S3 

Halght 16 17 20 

Seaver* 17 

Carter 14 

Drake 

Shelly 20 

Golcher 18 18 

Leavell 

Master-son 10 

Hall 

Hutton ■•. .. 11 

Parker 

Burnett IS 

Sylvester, C 

Dunphy 17 

Darby H 

Grosse 

Beveridge .. 12 

* Targets only. 

The scores at live birds, 10 pigeons, were: A. M. 
Shields, 30 yards, 10; W. J. Golcher, 30-9; Drake, 
26-8; Nauman, 34-9; O'Hara, 2S-7; Chappell, 28-7; 
Wattles, 28-7; Beveridge, 28-7; Magistrini, 28-7. 

Among the visiting shooters were J. T. Shelly of 
Wilmington, Del., and Messrs. Hall and C. Sylvester 
of Pinole, Dr. Hutton of Berkeley, and others. The 
high average of the day was made by E. Holling of 
Dixon. 

The Northwestern tournament next year will take 
place at Portland. A movement has been started for 
the purpose of holding the tournament in this city in 
1906, and a good move it will be if carried out. 



GOSSIP FOR SPORTSMEN. 



If every deer hunter who has gone after venison 
since the 15th inst. had used his Winchester with suc- 
cess, there |would be a scarcity of bucks for many 
future seasons. Hardly without exception, every 
sportsman who could get away has already been on a 
hunt or is contemplating a trip in the near future. 
The exodus of deer hunters this season, all over the 
State, has been unprecedented. The returns so far, 
taken all together, show that quite a number of fat 
bucks have been bagged, and when the open season 
is on in a number of counties yet closed to deer hunt- 
ing, the returns will be increased to quite a degree. 
The one saving factor for bucks, for a week or so 
past, has been the bright moonlight nights. The 
deer have, as is their habit, been feeding during the 
moon brightened hours of the night and then in the 
early hours of the morning seek covert for rest and 
sleep. An old buck, that has safely weathered sev- 
eral open seasons, particularly anywhere within reach 
of local sportsmen can do some stunts in the way of 
keeping out of sight in the daytime and avoiding dogs 
and men, that shows a surprising amount of educated 
entelligence and a keenly developed instinctive faculty 
in retaining his hide and horns. Some sportsmen in 
recounting the tricks of a buck in outwitting their ef- 
forts at capture, would almost lead one to believe 
that the animal was endowed with a keen sense of 
humor and was playing it low down on the boys. 

By this time most of the nearby districts have been 
pretty well hunted over and the deer have had the 
time of their fleet footed careers in getting away from 
baying hounds, dodging the pumping of leaden missiles 
from the hunters posted in covert and on ranges where 
the runways of the hunted stags led them in their 
efforts to seek safety. 

While the bucks have been kept on the move, the 
contrary has been the experience of does and fawns. 
The latter, have of course, been jumped frequently 
by the dogs, but we will here give our sportsmen 
general credit for respecting the written and unwrit- 
ten laws of the chase and letting does and fawns go 
away unharmed. As a consequence, these practically 
unmolested animals have become accustomed to the 
preience of man in their domain and are tame to a 
surprising degree. 

In Sonoma county deer are reported to be plentiful 
around the head of Mark West and Sonoma creeks 
and also in Alexander valley. Many good hunting 
grounds in the county have been posted against deer 
and doye hunters. At this season of the year there 
Is plenty of hay on the ground and farmers are afraid 
of damage from fires and by fences being broken 
down. The Burdell ranches, among others, are all 
posted against hunting parties. Further north, in 
.Mendocino and Lake counties, the deer hunting is 
said to offer special inducements to sportsmen. 

In Monterey county the Big Sur country has 
attracted a number of hunters. The San Felipe dis- 
trict and the Black mountains are reported to contain 
bucks in number sufficient to promise good sport. 
Deer are reported very plentiful in the hunting grounds 
within the lines of Santa Cruz county. 

The open season for bucks in Santa Cruz county 
begins next Monday, August 1st. Last year W. W. 
Richards bagged the first buck of the county season. 
Today Kir. Richards will start for the "chalks" in 
Big Basin where he will on Monday morning endeavor 
to duplicate bis last season's exploit. One drawback 
against the success of the party is, that the fogs have 
been so thick and contlnuousevery morning for weeks 
past that should this particular weather condition 
prevail on Monday, a buck could be within 50 feet of 



the hounds and run by without the dogs ever seeing 
him. 

Mr. Richards has been enjoying some good trout 
fishing "right in front" of the Riverside Hotel in the 
San Lorenzo river. Twenty-five or thirty nice sized 
fish every afternoon with the fly. 



Salmon are again in evidence off Santa Cruz, at 
Capitola there seems to be a temporary absence of the 
fish. Last Sunday Louis Weinman," Mr. Harrison, 
Mr. Painter and Mr. Murdock were at Santa Cruz 
salmon fishing. Bait was scarce and the boats re- 
turned with few fish. One angler was so unlucky as 
to lose overboard a $30 reel. 

W. W. Richards and Walter D. Mansfield were 
high hook with 19 fish, all large sized, the heaviest 
weighed 23 pounds. A number of these fish were 
taken on a No. 4 Wilson German silver spoon. The 
day before, Mansfield and Richards made the best 
catch of the day, 26 splendid conditioned salmon. 
There were 40 boats out. This run of fish are larger 
than have been taken previously. 



Reports from various fishing resorts are favorable 
to good sport with the fly. On the Truckee at 
Verdi and Boca the fishing is getting better every 
day. J. B. Kenniff recently returned from a week's 
sojourn at the Country Club resort near Verdi and is 
enthusiastic over the excellent accommodations avail- 
able for the angler at this point. 



It will be of interest to anglers to know that the 
hotel at Boca is again open, under competent and 
accommodating management. 



Reports from Castella state that fly-fishirg is now 
good at that point. Mr. F. M. Haight and family 
were enjoying the fishing in the river and streams 
near Castella this week. 



Achille Roos and S. A. Heller have recently re- 
turned from a fishing trip near Cisco. They found 
fly-fishing conditions excellent. Black bass fishing in 
Campell's, Black Bass and Turtle lakes is also very 
good. 

At Lake Tahoe trolling is now good. Fly-fishing is 
fair at Webber and Independence lakes. 

Reports from Lemoine, Sims, Upper Soda and the 
McCloud are that good fly-fishing prevails. Big 
Meadows, Kalmath Hot Springs and Point Arena are 
also ripe for the angler. 

Bert Golcher, the Mclsaac boys, the Gallager boys 
and young McNeill composed a hunting party which 
bagged four nice bucks in the Black mountain dis- 
trict back of Nieasio during the first days of the 
present serson. James Maynard, Jr. dropped the 
first buck this season on the Lagunitas club preserve. 

The Yosemite Valley streams will be stocked with 
50,000 Eastern brook trout fry sent down to Wawona 
by train this week. Deputy Fish Commissioner M. 
L. Cross will liberate 20,000 young fiih in the streams 
about Wawona and the balance will be planted in the 
meadow stretches of the Merced river in the valley. 
J. H. Davis and R. W. Requa took charge of the con- 
signment of young trout, which were shipped down 
from Sisson hatchery in Siskiyou county to the Oak- 
land mole and from that point transferred to another 
train and sent on to their destination via Raymond. 



The finest angling in the Sacramento river in the 
vicinity of Redding for several years is now being en- 
joyed. The fish had practically deserted the river at 
this point. Their departure was believed to be due to 
granulated slag that was poured into the river from 
the Keswick smelter. Fine particles entered and re- 
mained in the gills of the fish, killing them by 
thousands. 

The Fish Commissioners of the State finally made 
the Mountain Copper Company dump its slag on the 
mountain side instead of into the river. That was 
two years ago. Last year a few fish came back. This 
year the river is full of fish, including trout, catfish, 
carp and many other varieties. 

Game Warden Koppel, Constable Shannon and 
Deputy Constable George Doll of San Jose are to be 
congratulated for the clever arrest of fourteen game 
law violators a week ago. These fellows belong to 
the same foreign class that is notorious throughout 
many sections of the United States as systematic 
game law violators. Every feathered inhabitant of 
field or wood is gathered in by them, nor do they 
respect the rights of ownership when opportunity 
offers to loot the hen roost or barnyard. In their 
foraging depredations they are as destructive as 
locusts, everything is acceptable for the pot. In the 
East these rascals are called "Guineas." 

For some weeks past a number of Italian fruit ven- 
ders who reside in the vicinity of Coyote, Santa Clara 
county, have been in the habit of going hunting on 
Saturdays and Sundays and killing any and all sorts 
of game, song birds and protected animals that came 
in range of their guns. A short time ago Warden 
Koppel caught one man whom he considered the ring- 
leader of the gang and secured his conviction in the 
local court6. For a timethe practice of indiscriminate 
killing of birds was stopped, but lately it has broken 
out again. Saturday was the day planned to catch 
them. The warden and the constable went down to 
Coyote and caught the entire crowd at their hunting 
game, but there were too many to handle, and they 
allowed them to return toward San Jose wltbcut 
molestation until the edge of the town was reached, 
when they arrested them with the assistance of Doll. 

The five rigs came up, at some distance apart, and 
as they did so an officer quietly stepped up to each 
one, covered the occupants with a gun and ordered 



July 30, 1904J 



fflhe gveeiiev anu Qpovlsmcxtt 



11 



the head of the Stevens creek, Smith creek section 
and the west slopes of Loma Prieta creek region and 
numerous other places. 



Trade Notes. 



them to step out. The Italians were too surprised to 
resist, although their shotguns and rifles were handy. 
All vehemently denied having any game in their 
possession, but a search of their telescope baskets and 
fr ps showed the following: Twelve full ™fj°™ s > 
nne small dove which must have been taken from 
°ZnZ asii "walcovered only with pin feathers; one 
sparrow hawk; one oriole; a songbird and conse- 
quently illegal to kill; several robins, kildees and 

m wL r n b a b rrested the men gathered together and 
snoke excitedly in their native tongue. Unfortunately 
o'r them Co-table Doll understood Ita .an .and 
according to him the prisoners formed the following 
clever plot All the blame was to he thrown on one 
membe P r of the gang. The judge would then be ln t 6r 
viewed and the Sne placed as small as possible. The 
othlrs would then "chip in" and pay it and then they 
would all go and have a drink. 

Six of the fourteen members of the party were allowed 
to go because there was no direct evidence of their 
having killed any birds. hn „A a ; n the 

All of the prisoners were released on bonds in the 
sum of S100 each for their appearance 

Early this week John Dimorana Sarvotor Gonco, 
F Derbinobi, Bud Verbmote, Manfer Marcel, A. 
Musio, G. Culero and G. Rosso were arranged in 
Justice Benson's court on a charge of shooting game 

° U The men°pleaded not guilty to the charges against Parker , shooting "Infallible, 
them, demanded separate trials, and the cases were c ,, g51 of 60Q 

setTor hearing today, with the intention of segregat- 
ing thenj and fixing further dates for hearing. 

A recent game law violation case at Dos Palos, 
Merced county, resulted in the conviction of W. 
Chalfant for killing plover out of season. 

The Dos Palos Star recounts the matter in the 

^ulcfcoSame down from Los Banc, ..and 
held court in Colony Center, J. G. Weir ^f San Fran- 
cisco was the prosecuting attorney and tbe^efendjint 



fol- 



wasrepre ented by Hayi and Meroh of Los Banoa. 
Chalfant was found guilty and the minimum fine of 
S25 was imposed. After the jury verdict on Chalfant 
H. Sailing and R. Sailing, who had also been arrested 
for unlawful killing of game, compromised with the 

°°There were five complaints and four arrests made. 
The lucky lad flew the coop, and his whereabouts are 
unknown. The name, however, was obtained, but it 
need not be made public unless arrest should be made. 

The next arrest was Ed Sorg, and as he desired to 
fiTht the case his trial was postponed till the next 
day. He phoned in the evening to Merced for Berry. 
Berry was on hand the next morning, but nothing 
was done in the forenon but to empanel the jury. 

Havs of Los Banos was not retained by the defend- 
ant, but Merch held his place, and while a hindrance 
rather than an assistance filled space; or better, per- 
haps, the spaca was filled with bad whiskey. _ Had t 
not been for likely contamination by taking into his 
Hands, Berry by his attitude would have been tempted 
to silence his unwelcome partner. However, Berry 
fought the case stubbornly and won out by proving 
that the birds produced as evidence were not the 
birds Sorg had put in the sack to ship. The jury was 
out only a few minutes and returned with the verdict 
not guilty. . 



Santa Clara county sportsmen have bagged many 
deer since the season opened. Bucks have been 
found at Black mountain, near Madrone Sprmgs.near 
Guadalupe, on the western side of the valley near the 
summit of the mountains, San Antonio valley, near 



Litchfield, 111., July 12th and 13th, J. L. Head of 
Peru, Ind., first general average, 328 out of 350, shoot- 
ing Du Pont. Second general average, C. G. Spender, 
320 out of 350, shooting Du Pont. Third general 
average, Walter Huff, 317 out of 350. shooting Du 
Pont. First amateur average, C. M. Powers of 
Decatur, 111., 318 out of 350, shooting Du Pont. Sec 
cond amateur average, W. H. Caly of St. Louis, 31" 
out of 350, shooting "E. C." and Hazard. Third 
amateur average, T. A- Hall of Loraine, 111., 315 out 
of 360, shootiog Du Pont. 

St. Paul, Minn., July 12th, 13th, and 14th, J. L. D. 
Morrison, first general and first amateur average, 
555 out of 600, shooting "Infallible." Secord general 
average, R. D. Guptill. shooting "Infallible" and 
Hirold Money, shooting "E. C," 552 out of 600. Sec- 
cond amateur average, R. D. Guptill, 552 out of 600, 
shooting "Infallible." Third general average L. E. 
and Wm. Heer, shoot- 
shooting "Infallible." 
Fourth general average, C. O. Le Compte, 547 out of 
600, shooting "Infallible." 

Denver, Colo., July 12th to 15th, Fred Gilbert, first 
general average, 579 out of 600, shooting Du Pont. 
John W. Garrett of Colorado Springs and Wm. Clay- 
ton of Kansas City, Mo., tied for second general and 
first amateur average, 561 out of 600, shooting Du 
Pont. B. Lawton of Denver, third general and sec- 
ond amateur average, 558 out of 600, shooting Du 
Pont. Chas. Younkman of Denver, third amateur 
average, 556 out of 600, shooting "Infallible." On the 
14th inst., Fred Gilbert, at 22 yards, broke 194 out of 
200, run of 83 straight, which is a world's record. On 
the 15th inst., Mr. Gilbert broke 94 out of his first 
100 and 91 out of the second 100, at 23 yards. John 
W. Garrett, shooting Du Pont, had an unfinished 
run of 111 from the 16 yard mark. On the 13th inst., 
the Denver Trap Club Trophy was won by G. A. 
Mann of Hastings, Neb., with a clean score of 25 from 
the 18 yard mark, shooting "Infallible." Chas. 
Younkman of Denver and Harry Sherman of Kansas 
City, both shooting "Infallible," were in the tie, but 
were shot out. On the 15th inst., the Boyd-Park 
cup handicap was won by Henry Anderson of Salina, 
Kansas, 49 out of 50, snooting Du Pont Smokeless. 
Geo. Maxwell of Holstein, Neb., a one-armed man, 
tied for the Grand Western handicap, and was shot 
out only in the third string of 20 in the ties, and 
finished with a general average for the whole tourna- 
ment of above 90% shooting Du Pont Smokeless. 

Scottdale, Pa., July 13th and 14th, first general 
average, E. D. Fulford, 336 out of 350, shooting 
Schultze. Second general average, L. J. Squier, 326 
out of 350, Bhooting Du Pont. Third general average 
and first amateur average, A. B. Kelly, 319 out of 350, 
shooting Du Pont. Second amateur average, D. N. 
Carroll, 301 out of 350, shooting Du Pont. Third 
amateur average, W. H. Chain, 284 out of 350, shoot- 
ing Du Pont. 



Menominee, Mich., July 13th and 14th, W. R. 
Crosby, first general average, 340 out of 350, shooting 
"E. C." Second general average, J. S. Boa, 325 out 
of 350, shooting "E. C." Third general average and 
first amateur average, Guy Dering, 319 out of 350, 
shooting Schultze. 

At the National Gun Club shoot, French Lick 
Springs, Ind., the Parker gun in the hands of Mr. C. 
M. PowerB won high general average over all. Mr. 
Powers' total of 757 out of 800 targets, shooting at 20 
and 21 yards rise, is a remarkable showing, and speaks 
well for the reliability and uniformity of the Parker. 
Mr. Powers is a magnificent shot, and his performance 
at French Lick Springs is remarkable, winning high 
general average, and is of no small merit. 

At Paris, Tex., recently, Mr. W. A. Lane broke 49 
out of 50, and 99 out of 105 blue rocks with his "Old 
Reliable" Parker gun. 

Down in Arkansas, in the little town of Camden, Mr. 
J. P. Wright won the State target medal in a 
championship match by 47 out of 50. This medal has 
been shot for ten times since July, 1903, and has been 
defended successfully nine times out of ten by the 
Parker gun. Mr. I. J. Vick, of Pine Bluff, defending 
it six times out of seven, and Mr. J. P. Wright defend- 
ing it the other three times. You will always find 
the Parker gun in evidence at every prominent shoot 
in the country. 

Down in Texas, Mr. M. E. Atchison, was high 
amateur with 14 to the good in the shoot at Brenham, 
Texas, May 26 and 27. Mr. Atchison also won the Alf 
Gardner trophy, a silver loving cup, with a score of 93 
out of 100, 5 birds ahead of the other shooters. At 
Abilene, Texas, May 13 and 14, Mr. Atchison was high 
amateur with a score of 349 out of 400. Mr. Atchison 
is a remarkable amateur, and a strong advocate of the 
Parker gun. 

At the Vallejo Gun Club shoot on the 24th inst. at 
live birds and inanimate targets Mr. Emil Holling, 
(Coast record shooter in a 100 target match, 97 out 
of 100) again demonstrated his superior shooting 
qualifications, winning high average with U. M. C. 
ammunition. Mr. W. J. Golcher, second high aver- 
age also shot TJ. M. C. ammunition. 

Of the 37 shooterB participating, 33 used TJ M. C. 
ammunition — this was only one of the many shoots 
all testifying to the popularity of the ammunition 
manufactured by the Union Metallic Cartridge Com- 
pany. 

Winchester guns keep on winning. On the 2nd 
inst., at the National Gun Club tournament, French 
Lick, Ind., W. R. Crosby won high expert average 
with a score of 780 out of 800 targets. C. M. Powers 
won high amateur average, breaking 757 out of 800, 
Both Mr. Crosby and Mr. Powers used "Winchester 
"Leader" shells. 

Some very strong Winchester shooting was done at 
the tournament of the Memphis Gun Club, Memphis, 
Tenn., on the 5th and 6th inst. On the 5th the first 
and second high expert averages were won by W. R. 
(Billy) Crosby and C. G. Spencer, respectively; and 
first, second and third amateur averages were won by 
H. R. Hosley, P. C. Ward and W. L. Fletcher. All 
the above gentlemen used the Winchester "Leader" 
shells, and Messrs. Spencer, Hosley, Ward and Fletcher 
in connection used Winchester "pump" guns. On 
the 6th, Mr. Crosby took high expert average with 
the splendid score of 197 out of 200 targets, and in the 
amateur class Leo Mercer. John Fletcher and D. W. 
Brobeale captured first, second and third amateur 
averages with Winchester "pump" guns and "Win- 
chester "Leader" shells. Of the 45 contestants at this 
tournament, 22 used the Winchester "pump" guns. 



All About Turkeys. 



Bulletin No. 200 of the Department of 
Agriculture tells of turkeyB and their 
management. According to this author- 
ity there are three species of the wild tur- 
key, the North American.the Mexican and 
theCentral American. It is stated that 
the growing of turkeys seems to have 
improved within the last few years as a 
result of a determined effort on the 
part of producers of what is termed 
standard bred or exhibition stock to 
demonstrate that it is more profitable to 
use pure bred breeding Btock than the 
smaller and less vigorous stock of daya 

gone by. 

Throughout the country the attention 
of turkey growers has been called to the 
successful production of market turkeys 
in Khode Island. There has never been 
a more active demand for market turkeys 
than during the past ten years and there 
is no reason why this should not con- 
tinually increase. The average wholesale , 
New York price the past ten years has 
ranged from eight cents to twenty 
cents per pound ; Chicago from aix cents 
to eighteen centa. In conaidering these 
figures it must be remembered that the 
best quality of stock always commands 
good prices, while for poor, ill-favored 
stock low prices must be accepted. The 
bulletin states that there is no other kind 
of live stock which will return so large a 
profit to the successful producer, as will 
poultry and that no kind of poultry is 
more profitable than turkeys when they 



are properly handled. They may be 
termed aelf-8ustaining foragers. The fact 
that they will from the time they are six 
weeks old unti. winter sets in gain the 
greater part of there entire living from 
bugs, grasshoppers and the waste grain 
that they pick up in their extensive wan- 
derings assures their existence through 
this period at little or no cost to the 
grower. The bulletin is of some forty 
pagea and is quite a complete document 
containing det?iled instructions on turkey 
raising from the egg to the market. 



Dairy Points. 

A dairyman in an exchange gives the 
following list of things that are not done 
in his dairy. It is a list that any dairy- 
man may consider with profit: 

1. We do not consider that we know 
everything about butter-making, as some- 
thing new is being discovered every 
month. Not only from our own work are 
we continually learning, but also from 
the observation and research of others. 

2. We do not keep a cow that makes 
less than two hundred pounds of butter a 
year. 

3. "We do not put the dry cow on a star- 
vation ration. 

4. We do not expect a cow to make 
something of nothing. 

5. We do not keep our cowa in an ice 
house, hog-pen or dungeon. 

6 We do;not allow them to go a whole 
year without carding or brushing them. 



7. We do not depend on pasture alone 
for a supply of Slimmer food. 

8. We do not allow the milk to Btand 
very long in the stable to absorb foul 
odors. 

9. We do not mix sweet cream with 
cream to be churned less than twelve 
hours before churning. The cream is rip- 
ened in one vessel which holds the cream 
for a whole churning. 

10. We do not add scalding water to the 
cream ; nor guess at the temperature with 
the finger; nor take two or three houra to 
churn. 

11. We do not gather the butter till the 
"dasher stands on top," and then dip it 
out of the Duttermilk. 

12. We do not add coarse salt by guess ; 
nor work the butter into grease. 

13. We do not neglect to strain the milk 
at once after milking. 

14. We do not send our butter to mar- 
ket wrapped in old raga that may have 
seen other service in the house. 



A million pounds of canned beef haa 
been delivered en the Pacific Coaat for 
shipment to Japan. It will be used by 
the Japanese army if the Russian cruisers 
do not capture and confiscate it. 



James J. Hill of the Great Northern 

Railroad is quoted as saying that the 

United Statea will not grow more than 

600,000,000 buahela of wheat with the best 

' possible conditions from now on. 



Horse Owners Should Vse 

GOMBAILT'S 

CAUSTIC BALSAM 

The Great French Veterinary Remedy. 
A SAFE, SPEEDY & POSITIVE CURE. 

Pre pared exclusively 
by J. E. Gombaolt, ei- 
veterinary Surgeon, to 
the French Government 




SUPERSEDES ALL CAUTERY OR FIRING. 

Impossible to produce any scar or Memlsti. 
The tafesr best Blister ever used. Takes the 
place of all liniments for mild or severe action. 
Removes all Bunches or Blemishes from Horses 
or Cattle. „ 

As a HTTMA5T REMEDY for Rheu- 
matism. Sprains, Sore Throat, etc., it 
is invaluable. 

"WE GUARANTEE that one table- 
spoonful of Caustic Balsam will produce 
more actual results than a whole bottle of any 
liniment or spavin cure mixture ever made. 

Everv bottle of Caustic Balaam sold is. 
"Warranted to give satisfaction. Price S1.50 
per bottle. Sold by druggists, or sent by ex- 
press, charges paid, with tull directions for ita 
use. Send for descriptive circulars, testimo- 
nials, etc. Address 
THE UWMNCE-mLLIiMS COMPAST, Cleveland, OMo. 



THREE-YEAR-OLD TROTTER 
WANTED. 

I want to purchase a Three-Year-Old 
eligible for Stanford and Occident Stakes 
of 1904, and one that is a good prospect 
for a winner. Address 

J. W. ZIBBELL, Pleasanton, Co 



12 



i&tte grecfcc-e cm& gtpxxrtsman 



[July 30, 1904 



Breeding 



and Care of 
California. 



Swine in 



(Ellas Gailup of Hanford In Live Stock and 
Dairy Journal.) 
I will give you my observation, cover- 
ing a period ot twenty-five years tbat 1 
have been before tbe public ae a breeder 
and seller ot thoroughbred swine. There 
are a great many different breeds of swine, 
bat I will speak only of those that are 
bred in the United States or in this State 
In the early'60'e in this State there was 
a Bmall black hog raised called the Chinese 
hog. I do not think that they could be 
called a breed, but derived their name 
because they were the style of hog de- 
sired by the Chinese batchers. About 
that time, in the early We, J. D Pater- 
son imported to this State the Essex. We 
bought a male pig from him and crossed 
him with some sowb that we had of no 
particular breed. They were easy keepers 
and their flesh, when fattened, was firm 
and of a superior quality, which is a 
characteristic of the Essex. At the 
present time there are but few breeders 
in the East raising Essex, and only two 
breeders that are breeding EBsex in this 
State. 

There are a few small Yorkshires bred 
in California — a small white hog that 
has his nose turned up to everybody he 
Bees. There were a few Victorias raised 
in California twenty years ago. They 
were a medium white hog, resembling 
the Berkshire 

A few years ago Sheyt & Davie, from 
Indiana, showed at the State Fair a car- 
load of these hogs, but they did not find 
favor with the swine raisers in this State. 
There have been and are a few hogs 
called IOC hogs imported from Ohio to 
this State; but as they do not cross well 
with our native black hog, tbey have 
never been a success with those who 
owned them. 

The CheBter Whites are raised in the 
East successfully, but I do not know of 
any in this State; they, like all white 
breeds, do not do well in this hot, dry 
climate, and tbe farmers do not take 
kindly to them. 

DUBOC. 

The Duroc Jersey was twenty-five years 
ago raised in Monterey county and sold 
in tli is State, and you often see a red hog 
among a lot of stock hogs in this county. 
They are good feeders, good mothers, and 
would ae bred by modern breeders, be 
good hogs for our alfalfa pastures, and a 
profitable hog for the farmer. There 
must be something underneath that red 
coat of hair that is profitable to the pork 
producer of the great middle West, or 
the breed would soon pass into obscurity. 
I would like to see some enterprising far- 
mer import some to this county. Their 
make-up resembles the Poland-Chinaand, 
as bred today, they are very prolific and 
good feeders. There is no breed that bas 
improved bo much in the last ten yearB as 
tbe Duroc Jersey. By referring to their 
records, covering a number of years, I 
find tbe sows usually raise from nine to 
ten pige, the pigs usually being remarka- 
bly even in size and general appearance. 
The dame are abundantly able to suckle 
them. The pigs are active and will hold 
their own as grazers, and, when finished 
for market, will account for every pound 
of grain that has been eaten. 
BTOKBHI&E. 

The Berkshire did for a long time hold 
foremost position among the breeds ot 
Bwine and has, no doubt, been a source 
of help to them. Any breed that has 
Btood the teet of time and is in the second 
century of its existence, is certainly 
second in tbe future. It is of necessity a 
survival of the fittest— the Berkshire is to 
the ewine field as the grand old oak is to 
tbe forest. He has had no booms or soar- 
ing prices, but has gone Bteadily on in 
the even tenor of his ways to that practi- 
cal in provement which makes him today 
the aristocrat of all breeds. He has had 
help from the wealthy breeders of the 
. middle Weet, and he is an Englieh- 
; birth, imported to America, tbat 



has kept him popular among many. The 
American breeders had much to do with 
the improvement of the Berkshire as they 
are bred today. We do not have to go to 
England to find the best specimens of the 
breed. England comes to us. The Ameri- 
can breeder has done as much in tbe last 
twenty yeare to improve the Berkshire as 
would have been done by the English 
breeder in fifty years. As I have said be- 
fore, the Berkshire is the aristocrat of all 
breeds, but it is not always the eons of 
aristocrats that make a success of busi- 
ness. 

POLAND CHINA. 

The Poland-China started in the world 
with a mixed parentage. He was, you 
might say, an orphan child, without a 
parent at all. The hog that the farmer 
and feeder want is one that will convert 
bis surplus grain into meat and make the 
most pounds for tbe amount consumed. 
The farmers of the great middle WeBt 
were not long in finding that the Poland- 
China filled the bill. So far ae I am 
capable of judging, and I have had twenty 
five yearB' experience, I think the Poland- 
China hog possesses all the constituents 
of hardiness with power of assimilation 
second to no breed. They may be bred 
to any size desired, may be fattened at 
any age and are ae prolific as our modern 
breedB. I breed them because the 
people buy them, and that is my bueiness. 
I raiBe hogs to sell. There are more 
Poland-Chinas raised in tne United StateB 
than all other breeds combined, and the 
pork producers are men of brains and 
know juBt what they are doing. 

CARE ESSENTIAL. 

But I would say to you that the breed 
doeB not cut as much |of a figure as the 
care you give the hog. As that is the im- 
portant part, I will give you my ideas on 
that subject. In raising hogs of any 
breed you have got to care for them to 
make them profitable. I have given you 
my ideas about breeds, but I will Bay to 
you : do not mix them. If you deeire to 
raise BerkshireB, continue to raise them. 
The idea that crossing breeds makes them 
hardy is all wrong. The BerkshireB 
crossed on the common hog does not im- 
prove them as fast as the Poland-China. 
The latter have larger hams and seem to 
mix well with the common hogs. Some 
farmerB claim that the Berkshire is too 
wild and unmanageable. They are high 
tempered and require very kind treat- 
ment. The Poland-China as bred to-day 
are very different from what they were 
twenty years ago— have more style, finish 
and temper. We need style and temper. 
A lazy hog I would not want, whatever 
breed it might be. There is no animal 
that will reBiat unkind treatment ss much 
as the hog. To be eucceesful in raising 
hogs, you must have eiree and dams that 
are strong and vigorous, and when mated 
they should be in good thrift and in good 
flesh. 

THE PIQ AND HIS SIRE. 

The most important time in a pig's life' 
is from farrowing time until he is three 
months old. If he ie in good growing 
shape at the end of three months you will 
have no trouble in keeping him growing. 
The reason that many fail in making the 
ewine business pay is that they do not 
give the hog proper care. He is allowed 
to run and range over the neighborhood 
and is the worst looking animal on the 
farm. If you have common sows and 
wish to improve them, go to somereliabl* 
breeder and secure a male pig and raise 
him yourself; grow him up thrifty and 
strong; keep him in a lot by himself; feed 
him well— plenty of grass and grain, with 
a chance to exercise; don't have him so 
poor and scrawny that you are ashamed 
to show him to your neighbors. 

THE DAM. 

The sow to be a good breeder, should 
receive the same good care, and at farrow- 
ing time should be in good flesh. I do 
not think she should be too fat, but if the 
flesh is put on in the right way it will all 
be needed to carry the pig through to 
weaning time. I do not mean tbat a sow 



SAVES THE "DUST" 
IMPROVES THE CRUST 



L 



U 



7? 



ARROW 

FOR 



Lard Compound 

BAKING. 



WESTERN 
OF 



MEAT COMPANY 
CALIFORNIA 



Bhould be in so high a state of flesh as the 
show ring requiree. When in that con- 
dition it takes an expert to reduce them 
successfully. I believe in plenty of flesh 
and to keep that flesh gaining from day 
of birth till time of using, and try your 
best to keep them improving, but there is 
a vaBt difference between the good flesh 
and the flesh a boar or sow must carry to 
win at our leading fairs or shows. 

CAEE OF SOW AND PIGS. 

You may aBk what I would feed the sow 
and her litter. We have to feed what 
ever we can raise on the farm, but there 
is nothing that will make a pig grow as 
fast as cow's milk and middlings. But in 
the absence of milk we are obliged to use 
the beet substitutes. Great care should 
be taken when the pige are young not to 
overfeed the dam to create too large a 
flow of nature's food, the mother's milk. 

Herein liee one of tbe* great secrets of 
success with young pigs— that is, getting 
them started right. Generally, when 
young pigs get a backset of any kind they 
Beldom ever recover and develop as their 
more fortunate cousin that has been 
started right. 

Cold, damp sleeping places and foul 
bedding ib a source of serious trouble 
with very young pigs, and should be 
guarded against. Nothing but warm, dry 
places should be supplied, with due allow- 
ance made for a place to exercise in as 
they grow older, and as soon as possible 
they should be allowed to run on a good 
grass lot. Their growth for the first three 
to five weeks will be secured through 
their dam, and if they have had no seri- 
oub backset up to this time they will 
begin to eat. They Bhould then be sup- 
plied with a Bide dish of their own. 

The little fellows are now at the age 
of five or six weeks and they have begun 
to rustle for dear life with their dam, and 
at this time we can gradually begin to 
increase their feed and slop. We are 
approaching the stage in the pig's history 
when we should supplant the expensive 
grain ration with nature's cheapest hog 
food, the green alfalfa pasture, which is 
not only economy in hog production but 
is conducive of health and is a good bone 
and muBcle forming food. With good 
alfalfa pasture provided, we are able to 
produce pork very cheap, not losing Bight 
of the fact that the kitchen slop, skim 
milk and grain ration should not be dis- 
pensed with, but all used together. Eter- 
nal vigilance, with plenty of push, will 
land us at the envied goal with some 
very fine porkers. 

FEEDINQ. 

In conclusion allow me to say that, 
laying aside the outlay and not taking 
into account the cheapness of the fuel to 
be consumed, we know of no better hog 
food than that of shortB and skim milk 
from our skimming stations, and they 
should be fed and hardened with corn or 
barley, it is within the province of this 
paper that the food advised was with a 
view to cheapen the production of that 
which is the ultimate end of the hog, the 



pork barrel. You will secure grand re- 
sults with this treatment and food men- 
tioned, and at the eame time largely de- 
crease the cost ot your production, which 
is the greatest achievement to be Becured. 



Belgians at World's Fair. 



Mr. A. Van Schelle, Special Com- 
missioner of the Belgian Government, 
haB made entry with the World's Fair 
Department of Live Stock of sixteen 
Belgian stallions and thirteen mares for 
the World's Fair Horse Show. The ex- 
hibit creditably repreeente the leading 
Belgian horse breedere. The Belgian 
Government haB gone to considerable ex- 
pense to make this exhibit fully creditable 
and representative of the high plane upon 
which the breeding of draft horses is 
carried out in that country. The horseB 
have already been landed in this country 
and are temporarily in Illinois awaiting 
completion of the barna for their recep- 
tion at the Exposition. 

Commissioner Van Schelle iB a gentle- 
man of extended experience in live stock 
breeding and in exposition work. In 
realization of the large opportunity offer- 
ed by the World's Fair, his government 
has made special plans for exploiting the 
Belgian horse industry at the Exposition 
and the large exhibit of Belgian horses 
will be one of the leading features of the 
Universal Exposition Horse Show. 
Colonel Mills, the Chief of the Depart- 
ment of Live Stock, predicts that the 
exhibit of Belgian Draft horses at the 
World's Fair will not only be the largest 
in numbers but in quality ever displayed 
in America by the advocates of this 
popular breed. 

Mr. Van Schelle is accompanied by Mr. 
Emile Honoteau, a large stockman, die 
tiller and eugar manufacturer of Belgium, 
who has a number of Btallions and mares 
in the exhibit of Belgian draft horses. 



If pork or bacon produced by wheat will 
be as marketable as that produced by 
corn the lat.er will take second place in 
the pork-growing process. At the Oregon 
Experiment Station 3.70 pounds of wheat 
a day produced 1 pound of hog meat daily, 
whereas it took 5.5S pounds of corn to 
produce the same result. Tbe period of 
the test was 21 days. Another fact dis- 
closed was that the hogs fatten almcst 
half as fast again the first half of the fat- 
tening period as they doduringthesecond 
half. The heavy lard hogs take more feed 
than the younger smaller bacon hogs. 



A Canadian authority 6ays that the 
keeping of spring ducks for Thanksgiving 
or Christmas trade, where one hae to feed 
them constantly, is a losing game; but if 
the ducks are sold when they are first 
ready — say, nine weeks old — there is 
likely to be a good margin of profit from 
them. 



Sober up on Jackson's Napa Soda. 



July 30, 1904] 



©h* gveebev ani> ^povtsmaxt 



13 



Maud Muller, a Chicken Raiser. 



Maud Muller, on a summer's day, ! — •= 
Set a hen in a brand new way. 3*? 

(Maud, you see, was a city girl, 
Trying the rural life a whirl.) 

She covered a bos with tinsel gay, 
Lined it snugly with new-mown hay. 

Filled it nicely with eggs, and then 
Started to look tor a likely hen. 

Out of the flock she selected one; 

And then she thought that her work was done. 

It would have been, but this stubborn hen 
Stood up and cackled "Ka doot!" and then 

Maud Muller came and with hurt surprise 
Looked coldly into thecreature's eyes; 

Then tied its legs to the box. ' You bet," 
Said she, "I know how to make you set." 

But still it stood, and, worse and worse, 
Shrieked forth its wrongs to the universe; 

Kicked over the box with its tinsel gay 
And ignominiously flapped away. 

Then a bad boy over the barnyard fence 
Tee-heed: "Say, Maud, there's a difference 

'Tween hens, you know, an' it is that 
One says 'Ka-doot:' an' one 'Ka dat!' " 

Then Maud recalled that the ugly brute 
She tried to set had said "Ka-doot!" 

And ever since that historic day 
She blushes in an embarrassed way, 

To think of the blunder she made once when 
She tried to set a gentleman hen. 

— Northwest Farmer. 



The Common Cow. 



If aDy man knows the American cow, 
that man is Prof. T. L. Haecker of the 
Minnesota Experiment Station. In Far- 
mers' Advocate he writes on "the common 
cow" as follows: 

I referred to the fact a few months ago 
that the average yield of Minnesota cows 
was 140 pounds per year. At the experi- 
ment station the annual average of our 
herd is 350 pounds per cow. The herd is 
a mixed one, comprising representatives 
of the various breeds, and common cows 
as well. The milk from these cows is 
weighed at each milking and a test made 
with the Babcock tester, so that we know 
just what we are doing. 

We have the common cow in the herd, 
because we must know what Boe can do, 
as well as others. We must know this 
because she is the cow kept by the aver- 
age farmer throughout the State. The 
average butter product of the common 
cow in our herd is 240 pounds per year, or 
nearly 100 pounds better than out on the 
farm. 

Kindness is one of the reasons for this, 
and I wish I cou'd impress upon you the 
great importance of treating the cow 
kindly. It is as important as feeding and 
will give great returns in the pail. The 
cow must be well kept, kindly treated, 
and she will give most excellent returns, 
even though she may be a common cow. 
I used to urge upon the farmer to take 
the well bred dairy cow, but I have gotten 
over that, because it does no good. At 
the experiment station we receive as high 
as 450 pounds of butter per year from the 
best dairy cows. But this fact does not 
impress itself upon the farmer, even from 
the financial standpoint. The trouble is, 
the average farmer will not take to the 
high bred dairy cow, because be wantB 
one that will also prove a good beef ani. 
mal. Now you cannot successfully com- 
bine the two in the way he desires. But 
he cannot see this, and I have given up 
trying to make him. 

Did you ever stop to think that in the 
dairy business the farmer gets the profit 
resulting from Mb work, while in the beef 
business he does not? In the beef busi- 
ness you are paid just what the beef 
combine agrees to give youj and they take 
the profit. In the dairy business you con- 
trol yourselves, even practically to the 
commission the commission man gets. 
Now, why try to make a success of both, 
when one or the other is practical? If 
you wish to follow dairying why not take 
the best cow and reap the largest profits? 
This large return I have Bpoken of from 



the dairy cow is from the butter products 
alone. I have not counted in the calf, 
because that is not fair, for one calf may 
be worth more than another. Now, you 
say the steer calf from this high bred 
dairy cow is worthless, and we lose it 
altogether. No you don't. You can get 
about as mucb, if not fully as much, for 
it for veal as you can for calf from the 
beef breeds, and the increased return from 
the high bred cow will more than make 
up the difference you would make in the 
beef steer. 

But right here comes the complaint, 
"you are receiving aid from the govern- 
ment to carry on the experiment station* 
If out on the farm we could have such a 
fund to fall back upon, so that we could 
make some of these high, expensive foods, 
we could make some of these high rec- 
ords " Now, it is true that we receive 
government aid and aid from the state 
also. The government has recognized 
the value of the work we are doing, and 
is encouraging it. But in the handling of 
this dairy herd we aim to make it as 
practical as possible, so it will be of some 
benefit to the farmers of the state. 

For the purpose of ascertaining the true 
value of these foods, the herd was divided 
and one portion was fed on these more 
expensive foods, while the other portion 
was fed from what every farmer has in 
his bin — a combination of corn, barley 
and oats, in equal parts. Now, what was 
the result? A careful account was kept 
of these two sections, and just as good re- 
turns were received from the portion of 
the herd fed on corn, barley and oats as 
from the one fed on high priced foods. 
The farmer has everything in his barn 
from which to get as good resultB from 
the dairy cow as we have at the Btation. 

Now, the real trouble is, the average 
farmer does not like to milk, and he does 
not any longer than he can help. In ten 
or fifteen years be often makes enough 
out of the common cow so that he can 
retire from the business and simply raise 
beef, and I am glad he has a business that 
gives him such good results— even from 
the common cow. 

A good dairy cow, well and comfort- 
ably kept, ought to pay her owner $100 
per year. And when it comes down to 
the steer from the dairy cow, there is not 
really as much difference aB we are often 
told. I have at the experiment station 
six steers from registered dairy cows, not 
yet two years old, fed as any farmer 
should feed them, that will weigh from 
900 to 1200 Dounds each. They are just 
as good as any of your beef breeds, and 
the profit from them and the cow would 
be much greater. The condemnation of 
the steer of the high bred dairy cow is 
simply a matter of prejudice. 
*■ 

Sir Bredwell, the noted Hereford bull 
bred by T. F. B. Sotham and sold by him 
at auction in Kansas City in March, 1899, 
for $5000 to Col. C. C. Slaughter, died on 
July 9th at the Slaughter ranch near Eob- 
well, N. M. A local veterinarian states 
that the bull died of gastritis. Sir Bred- 
well was the champion bull of the breed 
at the Omaha Exposition in 1898 and was 
a son of Corrector. 



Carload Cattle Exhibits. 



The Millbrook Land and Livestock 
Company of Laiamie, Wyoming, has the 
honor of filing the first entry for en ex- 
hibit at the World's Fair of a carload of 
range steers. Mr. E. J. Bell, the mana- 
ger of this company who recently filed 
the entry referred to has selected and 
fitted a carload of range steers for the Fat 
Stock Show of the Universal Exposition 
that will certainly prove a sensation in 
the show ring. 



Shropshire Rams 

FOR SALE. 

T HAVE FOB SALE FIFTY OR MORE FINE 
■*- Shropshire yearling Rams. Are sired by a ram 
purchased from Dr. Davidson of Millbrook, New 
York. Are fine big fellows and free from disease. 
Call on or address 

E. D. DUDLEY, Dixon, Cal. 



FOR SALE OR EXCHANGE. 

TTILL SELL OR EXCHANGE THE STAND- 
" ard-bred trotting mare PACETA 2:26. raised 
on Palo Alto Stock Farm, sired by Lone Pine, he 
by Electioneer. She is now at the Pleasanton 
track. The only reason for offering her for sale is 
that she is a little too light for family use. Will 
exchange for larger family horse or outfit com- 
plete with trap or carriage. Paceta is very valu- 
able for a brood mare or a fine road mare. Also 
have a filly sired by Sidney Dillon, dam Paceta. 
This is a fine opportunity to secure stock of the 
highest breeding. Address Breederuand 
Sportsman, 36 Geary St., San Francisco- 




A Body Wash 

that will takeout and 
prevent colds, pneu- 
monia, etc., is abso- 
lutely essential to the 
race horse owner. 

Txittle'S; 
Elixir 

will do all of these things better and more 
surelv than any like preparation ever known. 
As a Leg Wash it keeps the speed end of a 
horse always in perfect tune. Apply to legs 
and bandage lightly. Sponge the body with it 
and throw on Hunt blanket. ' 

Turtle's American Condition Powders— A specific 
for impute blood and all diseases arisiag therefrom. 

Tuttle's Fa-mily Elixir ^/^S £■»,? 

\\c=end a sample free for 6c la stamps, merely to pay 

^Sendatonce for our 100-page book, "Veterinary Ex- 
perience." lvuich we mail free. 
Tuttle'sElUJrCo.,437 OTarreU SL.SanFraadsco.Cal. 

Beware ofso-calledElUfrs— noneB«>nlnebnlTnttlts*i. 
Avoid all blisters; they offer only temporary relief. If any. 



FOR SALE. 

QTAM B. YEARLING FILLY, ENTERED IN 
^ Stanford and Occident Stakes. Dam a full 
sister to Balkan 2: 15. Also, a sis-year-old Mare, 
good roadster, gentle and can be driven by a lady. 
Apply to F. HAHN, 201 Third street, San Fran- 
cisco, or Mr. LEE, south side Forty-fourth street, 
near San Pablo avenue, Oakland. 



PRIVILEGES 

FO R SA LE. 

Pacific Coast Trotting Horse Breeders 
Association Meeting at 

SANTA ROSA 
AUGUST 17, 18, 19 and 20 

gIDS FOR THE FOLLOWING PRIVILEGES 
will be received up to noon, MONDAY, 
AUGUST 8, 1904: 

BETTING (Auction and Mutuel Pools) 

CANDY AND NUTS, 

PROGRAMMES. 

A certified check for 50 percent should accom- 
pany each bid. 
Right reserved to reject any or all bids. 

F. W. KELLEI. Secretary, 
36 Geary Street, San Francisco. 



Fnr ^nlf* Two-year-old brown Stallion by 
1 ui oaic. Diabl0 a . 09 ^ ) dam by haIf thor . 

oughbred son of Guy Wilkes, second dam by Ven- 
ture 2:27#, thoroughbred son of Belmont. Has 
stake entries, is just broken and is a good pros- 
peot. Apply to this office. 

POSITION WANTED. 

T\ T ANTED— POSITION AS SUPERINTEND- 
v * ent or trainer by a thoroughly competent 
man with 18 years* experience in bit ting, breaking 
and developing high-acting carriage horses and 
sohooling saddlers. References as to ability, 
honesty and sobriety from present employer. 
A. H. BRINTON, 
Maplewood Hackney Stud, Attica, N. Y. 



WANTED. 



A DRIVING HORSE OF HACKNEY CON- 
•**- formation that will dock well. Any color 
but gray. One that is handsome, withgood action 
and style, 15.3 hands and not over 16 hands. Send 
full description and where horse can be seen. 
Address W. J., this office. 




COMPRESSED PURESALT BRICKS 

*! PATENT FEEDERS 



v 5* a month. 

Refined Dairy Salt tells. 

ASK YOUR DEALER. 
WELL 5EHD BOOK FREE. 

JElMONniABOPPlYCO. 

• PATENTEES MANUFACTURERS • 
BROOKLYN, IM . Y. 



JOG CART 

Especially adapted for 

Jogging, Training and 

Matinee Driving. 

Price Low. 
McMURRAY SULKIES 

and JOGGING CARTS 

Standard the World Over. 

-85f-Address for printed matter and prices. 

W. J. Kenney, 

531 Valencia St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Privileges For Sale 

— FOB — 

Vallejo Race Meeting* 

4 Days— AUGUST 10,11, 12 and 13, 1904. 

Bids for the following privileges will be re- 
ceived up to noon, MONDAY, August 1, 1904: 

BETTING, Pools or Books. 

BAB PRIVILEGE, including sale of all drinks 
inside the grounds. 

RESTAURANT, LUNCH COUNTER, etc. 

A certified check for 50 per cent must accom- 
pany each bid. Right reserved to reject any or 
all bids. 

THOS. SMITH, Manager, 
Vallejo, Cal. 



THE GROWLET STAKE 

A SIDE STAKE FOR STARTERS IN THE 
THREE-YEAR-OLD DIVISIONS 



Pacific Breeders Futurity Stakes No. 4 

(FOALS OF 1904-TO TAKE PLACE IN 1907) 

Entries to Close Monday, August 1, 1904 

CONDITIONS. 

A Side Stake of $25 each for Trotting and Pacing Foals of 1904 that were entered or substituted 
and will start in the Three- Year-Old Divisions of the Breeders Futurity in 1907. All money paid in 
on trotting foals to be divided among those starting in the trotting division, and all money paid in 
on pacers to be divided among those that start in the pacing division. Moneys divided ?5 and 25 
per cent and to go to the first and second horses In this side stake, according to their positions In the 
final summary of each race. In case all those in the side stake should be distanced In the first heat 
of either of the regular events, they shall start In another race, best two heats In three, on the same 
day, to decide the money winners. Entrance to the side stake 825 each. The money to be deposited 
in some reputable bank, to remain at interest until the stake Is trotted. 

Entries Close Monday, Angnst let, with F. W. KELLEY, Secretary P. C. T. H, B. A. 



HARNESS and SADDLES 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 

Large Stock. Low Prices, 

JEPSEN BROS. CO. inc. 



10-112 MARKET ST., SAN FRANCISCO, 



TWO BLOCK? 
FKOM FEKK E 



14 



©*w gveeiiev axt& ^pnvteman 



[July 30, 1904 




THE BAYWOOD STUD 

THE BUNGALOW, SAN MATEO, CAL. 

(Property of Jobh Parbott, Esq.) 

Imp. Hackney Stallion 

GREEN'S RUFUS 63 <«»» 

Will serve a limited number of Approved Mares, Season 1904 

TEE - - - $75 

Reductions made for two or more mares. 

Manager, WALTER SKALY. 



\Wfeeisggea "Horses^ 

I ore not curiosities bv any menus. The country is full of them The 
fourth \es is there nil riRht but it is not worth anything because of a curb, • 
splint spavin or other like bunch. You can cure the horse of any of these 
I ailments and put another sound leg under him by the use of 

Qui tin's Ointment. 



n\wm. 



i time tried and reliable. 'When a horse is cared 
with Qu inn's Ointment he etavs cured. Mr. E. F. Burke 
ofSprinptleld.Mo., writesaa tollows: "I have been 
u«intr Qulnn's Ointment for several veara and have ef- 
fected many marvelous cures; It will go deeper and 
| causeless pain than anj- blister I ever used. Thought 
it my duty for the benefit of horses to recommend your 
Ointment. Iamneverwithoutlt." This is thepenfiral 
verdict by all who prive Qulnn's ointment a trial. For 
curbs, splints, spavins, windpuff s, and al» bunches it 
is unequaled. Price 91 per bottle- at all druggists 
or sent by mail. Send for circulars, testimonials, &c. 
W. B. Eddy & Co., Whitehall, N. Y. 



NEW MODEL 
1904 




BEST ROAD CART MADE. 

One TRUSS BAR PATTERN and one 
1903 MODEL SULKY f-r sale at special 
price. 

O'BRIEN & SONS 

Cor. Golden Gate Ave. and Folk St. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL 



TROTTER FOR SALE. 

OOBREL GELDING, 6 YEARS OLD. Stands 
*3 16 2% hands high and weighs 1100 pounds. 
Sired by Nlccanor by Dexter Prince, dam Flora 
by El Cajon by Don Victor. He Is in every re- 
spect a grand Individual, handsome, stylish, and 
can show a 2:40 gall or better. With very little 
work I drove him a half this year in 1:33 and a 
quarter In 39 seconds, to cart. He will make a 
grand park horse and should be seen by any one 
looking for a high-class trotter. Call or address 
L. R. PALMER, Walnut Creek, Cal. 



Santa Rosa Stock Farm 

HAS FOR SALE 

Three Sidney Dillon Yearling Colls 

from the following mares: 
Pansy (dam of King Orry 2:21H. Almonltlon 
ii:24?i,Lady Pansy Russell 2:28 tf, and Pansy 
Russell 2:30) by Casslus M. Clay, Jr. 22, etc 
Goycara 2:18% by Guy Wilkes 2:15*i, dam 
Biscarl (dam of 5 in list) by Director 2:17, 
second dam Bicarl (dam of 6 in list) by 
Harold, etc. 
KiinhU; Russell by Bay Rose 2:20>' ai out of Oakley 
Russell by Happy Russell, son of Happy 
^^ Medium, etc 

Apply to IRA PIERCE, 

728 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 



CALIFORNIA 

NORTHWESTERN RAILWAY 

Through Picturesque California, 

The Ideal Route for 

The Angler anfl Onting Trips 

One day's ride from San Francisco will take 
you to some of the finest Trout Streams in the 
State. Along the line and within easy distance 
are many of the best Springs and Summer Resorts 
in the State. The Company maintains a Fish 
Hatchery and annually stocks the many streams 
reached by its road. One million Trout Fry were 
planted last year in these streams. 

Black Bass Fishing can be enjoyed in Russian 
River near Guerneville, Guernewood Park and 
Camp Vacation, in season. 

The best Striped Bass Fishing waters on the 
Coast reached by the Tiburon Ferry. 

VACATION FOR 1904 

Issued annualls by the Company, Is now ready. 
This is the standard publication on the Coast for 
information regarding Mineral Springs, Resorts, 
Country Homes and Farms where summer board- 
ers are taken, and Select Camping Spots. 

Beautifully illustrated, 150 pp. and can be had 
in response to mail request or at ticket offices. 

Ticket Oftices— 650 Market Street (Chronicle 
Bldg) and Tiburon Ferry, foot of Market Street. 

General Office— Mutual Life Ins. Bldg., cor. 
Sansome and California Sts., San Francisco. 



JAS. L. FRAZIER, 

Gen. Mgr. 



K. X. BYAN, 

Gen. Pass. Agt. 



M* 



FOR SALE. 

IV ENTIRE STOCK OF STANDARD-BRED 
Trotting and Pacing Horses. Single drivers 
and doable teams. Some excellent prospects for 
stake winners ontoredin the Occident, Stanford 
and Breeders Futurity stakes. A fine carriage 
team, also the great broodmare Daisy S. (dam of 
Tom Smith 2:13M. General Vallojo 2:20K, Sweet 
Roae2:28 (trial 2:21) and Little Mac (3)2:27). The 
driving horses and colts can be soon at my stable 
In Vailejo, and the broodmares, etc., at the race 
track. Apply to or address 

THOMAS SMITH, Vailejo, Cal. 

FOR SALE. 

MIccInn Rnv Ba y K° ldIn B b ? Sultan Jr.; 
JfllSSlUU UUV stands 10^ hands and wolghs 
over 1100 lbs. A handsome, high-class, gentle- 
man's roadster; stylish action, gentle, and good 
driver. Winner (without preparation) of the 2:30 
paoe at the matinee Decoration Day. Address 
T. H. CORCORAN, 
1201 Valencia St., San Francisco. 



last Paoer For Sale. 

THE PACING GELDING, AL SANDY B:1B] 
Yr Wayland W., dam Rapid Ann by Overland. 
Can ace three heats better than 2:17. Can brush 
vory -\st on the road. Excellent prospect to^raoo. 
one of the best road horses In the city, 
and Intelligent. Safe for lady to drive, 
price and further particulars address S. 
"-■ TSON, 235 Douglas street, San Franclsoo 



Thick, Swollen Glands 

can be removed 
. . with . . 

ABS0RBINE 

or any Bunch or 
Swelling caused by 
strain or inflam- 
mation. $2.00 pet 
bottle, delivered. 

W. F. YOUNG, P. D. F., 

Sprinjrfleld, Mass* 
Foraaleby Mack&Co. Langley &MichaelsCo 
Redlngton & Co., J. O'Kane and J. A. MoKerron 
all of San Francisco. 





OALIFORNIA STATE FAIR FOR 1904. 

SACRAMENTO, CAL. 

AUGUST 22 TO SEPTEMBER 3, 1904. 

^tries to Close fill Secretary, Weinrty, At. 3, 1904 

All Races to be Contested at the State Fair on days to be 
Hereafter Designated by the Board of Directors. 

No. 1. Tom Fox Stake— For all ages. Entrance 810, to accompany nomination; $ia additional 
for horses not declared by 4 p m. the day preceding the race; $300 added by the Society, of which $50 
to second and $25 to third. Non-winners of three races this year, if three years old and over, al- 
lowed 5 lbs.; non-winners of two races 7 lbs.; and non-winners of one race 10 lbs. Maidens, three 
years old, allowed 5 lbs; four years old and over 7 lbs. additional Six furlongs. 

No. 2. Western Hotel Stake— For two-year-old flllles. Entrance $10, to accompany nomin, 
ation; $15 additional if not declared by 4 p m the day preceding the race; $300 added by the Society- 
of which $50 to second and $25 to third Weights 5 lbs. below the scale. A winner of a stake race In 
1904, or a winner of three or more races of any value, other than selling races, 5 lbs extra. Non-win- 
ners of two races allowed 4 lbs Maidens allowed 7 lbs , and If such are the produce of a mare that 
has not produced a winner at the time of starting, 10 lbs. Maidens beaten three or more times since 
closing of the stake, allowed 5 lbs.; and if not placed second or third, 7 lbs. additional. Five fur- 
longs. 

No. 3. The Governor's Stake— A handicap for three-year-olds and upward. Entrance $10, to 
accompany nomination; $20 additional for horses not .declared by 4 p. m. day preceding the race; 
with $350 added by the Society, of which$7G to second and $30 to third. Weights posted at 12 m. day 
preceding the race. A winner of a race other than a selling race after the weights are published, 
to carry 5 lbs. extra. One mile and a furlong 

No. 4. Golden Eagle Hotel Selling Stake— For three-year-olds and upward. Entrance $10, 
to accompany nomination; $15 additional for horses not declared by 4 p. m. the day preceding the 
raoe; $300 added by the Society, or which $50 to second and $30 to third. Winner to be sold at auc- 
tion. If for $2000, to carry rule weights; if for less, one lb. allowed for each $100 to $1000; thence 2 lbs. 
for each $100 to $400. Selling price to be placed on starters through entry box by 4 p. m. on the day 
preceding the race. A winner of a stake race or three or more races of any value after closing of 
stake, to carry 5 lbs. extra. Maidens allowed 7 lbs. One mile. 

No. 5 California State Fair Annual Stake— Handicap for two-year-olds Entrance $10, to 
accompany nomination: $20 additional forhorses not declared by 4 p. m. the day preceding the race; 
-vith $350 added bv the Society, of which $70 to the second and $30 to the third. Weights posted at 
12 p. m. day preceding race. A winner of a race other than a selling race, after the weights are 
published, to carry 5 lbs extra. Seven furlongs. 

No, 6. The President's Stake— A handicap for three-year-olds and upward. Entrance $15, to 
accompany nomination; $25 additional for horses not declared by 4 p. m. day preceding raee;$350 
added by the Society, of which $70 to second and $30 to third. Weights posted at 12 m. day preceding 
race. A winner of a race other than a selling purse, after the weights are published, to carry 5 lbs. 
extra. One and one-quarter miles. 

No. 7. The Vlnctor Stake — For three-year-olds and upward. Entrance $10, to accompany 
nomination; $20 additional for horses not declared by 4 p. m. day preceding race; with $350 added by 
the Society, of which $70 to second and $30 to third. Stake to be named after the winner if Vinctor's 
time (1:40) isbeaten. A non-winner of a stake race In 1903, or a race of the value of $500, allowed, if a 
non-winner of five races other than selling races, 5 lbs Maidens 7 lbs. additional. One mile. 

X- J. Rose Selling stake— For two-year-olds. Entrance $10, to accompany nomination; $15 ad- 
ditional for colts not declared by 4 p. m. the day preceding the race; with $350 added by the Society, 
of which $50 to second and $25 to third. Horses may be entered not to be sold, and carry rule weight. 
If entered to be sold for $1000, allowed 3 lbs ; $700 6 lbs ; $400 10 lbs- Winners of one race after clos- 
ing of stake to carry 3 lbs. extra; of two or more 7 lbs extra. Maidens beaten three times, allowed 5 
lbs.; four or more times 7 lbs. Value to be placed on starters through entry box by 4 p. m. day before 
race. Six furlongs. 

The State Agricultural Society's regular and special rules to govern, except where conditions 
are otherwise. All declarations and claims for allowances due at 4 p. m day preceding race, unless 
otherwise specified in conditions. Owners and trainers will be held responsible for same. Entrance 
and declaration money to go to winner. No added money for less than four starters in different in- 
terests. In selling races, beaten horses not liable to claim. Right to use starting gait is reserved. 
Entries must state name, color, sex, and pedigree of horse, with racing colors of the owner. 
Applications for stabling must be made to the Secretary. Applicants will be furnished with 
blanks, which must be filled out and approved before a horse is admitted to the grounds. The track 
Superintendent will stable no horse until this course has been pursued. No stabling will be guaran- 
teed except for race horses in training and ready to raoe, and those entered in stakes to have 
preference. 

Owners who ship to track without notice will not be allowed to take stalls until application has 
been made to the Secretary and approved. 

Special stalls will be allotted to horses competing for premiums. 



L. R. MILLER, Secretary, 

SACRAMENTO, CAL. 



BENJ. F. RUSH, President. 



CAMPBELL'S HORSE FOOT REMEDY best* remedy 

EVER USED ON HORSES' FEET. 

IT PENETRATES and DRIES IN quickly and DOES 
NOT GUM and FILL UP THE PORES like tar and oil 
oompounds. It is the GREATEST REMEDY ever used to 
remove SORENESS and FEVER from the foot, and makes it 
possible to get good services out of a horse working on hard 
and hot pavements. 

It gives natural nourishment to the foot and incites a 
rapid, healthy growth— ALL DRYNESS AND BRITTLE- 
NESS quickly disappears. 

QUARTER CRACKS and SAND CRACKS are rapidly 
grown out when directions given in our booklet are followed. 

It is a SURE CURE for CORNS, CONTRACTED FEET 
and NAIL WOUNDS if directions are followed. 

It PRE.VE5JTS SOUND FEET FROM BECOMING UN- 
SOUND and GROWS a TOUGH, STRONG. ELASTIC WALL 
and HEALTHY FROG— A FOOT WHICH WILL STAND 
WORK on racecourses. 

Many of the best owners and trainers state that for track 
work nothing equals it. In many cases horses have reduced 
their reoords Beveral seconds, due to its use. 

It Is a CERTAIN CURE for THRUSH and SCRATCHES 

We Guarantee That It Will Do What We Claim 
and Will Refund Money If It Falls. 

PRICKS:— Quarts, $100; Half-Gallon, $1.75; Gallon, $300; 
^-Gallon, $5.50; Five-Gallon, $10.00. 

Books giving full directions for its use and much valuable information as to shoeing are supplied 

Don't fall to read "ad." giving Information concerning Campbell's Iodoform Gall Cure in next 
Issue of this paper. It is the best and because of its merits is rapidly displacing all others. 

JAS. B. CAHPBELL&CO.. Manufacturers, 412 W.nadlson St., CHICAGO, ILL 

Sold by all Dealers in Harness and Turf Goods, If not in stock ask them to write any Jobber for it 




free. 



f 



PALACE HOTEL, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA. 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 



-DEALERS IN- 



55-57-59-61 First Street, 5. F. 



Telephone Main 169 



5 



TOURISTS and TRAVELERS will, now, with difficulty reoognlze the famous COURT 
into which for twenty-five years carriages have driven. This space of over a quarter 
of an acre has recently, by the addition of very handsome furniture, rugs, chandeliers 
and tropical plants, been converted into a lounging room— the FINEST IN THE 
WORLD. 

The EMPIRE PARLOR— the PALM ROOM, furnished in Cerise, with Billiard and 
Pool tables for the ladios-the LOUIS XV PARLOR the LADIES WRITING ROOM 
and numerous other modern improvements, together with the unexcelled Cuisine and the 
Most Convenient Location in the City— all add much to the ever increasing popularity 
of this most famous HOTEL. 



SINGMASTER & SONS.of Keota Iowa, 



HKKEDKKS AND IMPORTERS OF| 



PERCHERONS, SHIRES, BELGIAN AND FRENCH COACH HORSES 



Have a Branch. Barn at 



63 North San Pedro Street, San Jose, Cal. 

High-class ooli always on hand. It will pay to oall and inspect stock it you are In need of 8 
goodstalllon C. O, STANTON, San Jose Manager. 



P^Hirri-p>AC Tahiilflfprl and type written ready for framIng 

rCUI^ICCS 1 dUUIalCU Write for prices. Breeder and 
Sportsman, 36JGeary Street,San|Franclsco, Cal. 



July 30, 1904] 



©he ^veefrsv cuxit &p0vt&tnatt 



15 



NEW PRICE 



No, 00 Armor Steel 
L. G. SMITH GUN 




Send for Catalogue 



HUNTER ARMS GO, FULTON, NEW YORK 



When looking for an INVESTMENT you look 
for PERMANENCE and SAFETY. When you 
buy a GUN you want the same qualities. You 
can buy a gun as well as anyone. We make it 
a BUSINESS to give YOU the benefit of over 40 
Years' experience, and we can and will serve 
YOU well. 

All inquiries courteously and promptly an- 
swered. Write us today. 




RED BALL BRAND. 



Awarded GoldMedal 
At California State 
Fair 1892. 

Every horse owner who 
values his stock should 
constantly have a sup- 
ply of it on hand. It 
improves and keeps 
stock in the pink of 
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16 



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[July 30, 1904 




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#«*HMHHMMMMMHMHMN*#^ 



I 

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RESULTS TELL THE STORY 



OF 1 TJbL-Iii 



Multiple Successes of U. M. G. AMMUNITION 

Ingleside, July 17th— THE WINNERS USED IT. 

Pacific Coast Trap Shooting Association, Bekeart Trophy, 100 Bird Shoot— 

Varien 92, Webb 93, Nauman 95, Bradrick 90, Holling 97. 

Eacli Shooter used XJ. M. O. SIIEHjLS 

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E. E. DRAKE, Pacific Coast Manager. SAN FRANCISCO. 



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At the 

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137 divided the pnrnei, 

60 WINNERS SHOT 

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KACB HX/EEETITXTGr 



AUGUST 17, 18, 19 AND 20, 1904. 

SANTA ROSA. 



WEDNESDAY-FIRST DAY-AUGUST 17. 

No. 1—2:34 CLASS TROT, S500 

W. G. Durfee's blk h Monoorat by Monwood, dam by Altamont Jr. 

J. Panke>'s blk g The Trotter by Silkwood, dam by Blackwood. 

R. W. Peterson's b g R. W. P. by Lynwood W. 

F. R. Garnsey's b m Alcacita by Red Cloab, dam Alcazette by Alcazar. 

Dingee & Greene's blk h Directum II by Directum, dam Little Witch by Director. 

H. A. Bell's b g H D B. by Arthur Holt, dam Jennie D. by Jerome Eddy. 

P. H. McEvoy's brs Millbrae by Prince Alrlie, dam Fearless by Fallis. 

Nutwood Stock Farm's ch h T. C. by Nutwood Wilkes, dam Zeta Carter by Director. 

Dan Lleginger's b g Cicero by Brentwood. 

Sllva & Wright's blk m Royal Dame by Charles Derby, dam Princess. 

W. O. Bowers chg Glide by Silver Bee, dam Mollie M. by Starlight Golddust. 

Ben F. Chaboya's br h Erosmont by Eros, dam Francisca by Almont. 

S. H. Hoy's b g Pat Rose by Falrose, dam by General Washington. 

V. J. Guinasso's blk g Walter Wilkes by Sable Wilkes, dam Jennie McCarty. 

No. 2 — 2:20 CLASS PACE (Santa Rosa Stakes), 81500. 

S. H. Hoy's s m Miss Winn by Demonio. dam by Nutwood Wilkes. 
V. Verilnac's b m Flora G. by El Echo, dam by Geo. M. Patchen, Jr. 

F. R. Garnsey's b g Sunny Jim by Ketchum, dam Nellie B. by Christmas. 
W. G. Durfee's br g Cavalier by Welcome, dam by Steinway. 

T. E. Richardson's r m Mabel R. by Stratbway, dam by Algona. 

B. Croner's b m Hattie Croner by Bay Bird, dam by Algona. 

J. A. Mini's blk s Blackwood by Bay wood, dam Lottie Lee by Moslem. 

Ed. Ellis* bm Baby Ellis by Alcona Jr.. dam Luce by General Washington. 

H. W Goodall's b g Rajah by Charles Derby, dam Edon by Gen. Benton. 

C iVbltehead's b m The Mrs. by Derby Ash, dam Spurwlck Girl by Hawthorne. 

H. H. Duolap's ch g Harold D. by Daxter Prince, dam Sunrise II by Gosslper. 

Thomas Charlton's a m Rose Thome by Hawthorne, dam Bell by Dexter Prince, 

S- K. Trefry's b g Tom Carneal by Diablo, dam Mountain Maid by Cresco. 

J. D Springer's b g Billy Red by Glenelg, dam Bunnella by Ingraham. 

E. A. Servls' rn g Doctor J. by Doc Hicks, dam by Singleton 

J. W Oflutt's rn m Mildred O. by Seoretary, dam Vesper Bell by Don. 

0. Mowers' ch m Gladys M. by Ketonum, dam Norlocoa by Nutford. 
Victor VerUhac's ch m Gertie A. by Diablo, dam Lola by Sidney. 
Charles E. Clark's ch g SI Perkins by Iris, dam by Almont Medium. 
S. A. Eddy's b g Tammany by Iris 

1. N. Minor's b m Lady Petrlna by Directum, dam Petrina by Piedmont. 
Joseph Long's b m Nellie R. by Wayland W., dam Topsy by Whippleton. 

No. 3-2:10 CLASS PACE, 8600. 

S A. Eddy's b g Cuckoo by Strathway, dam Edith M. by Milton R. 

J. H. Vance's blk h Highball by Silkwood, dam by Star Sultan. 

H. Delaney's br s Zilock by McKinney, dam Gazelle by Gossiper. 

E. A. Servls' ch g Edwin S. by Dr. Hicks, dam by La Harp 

Mahry MoMabon's blk s I Dlreot by Direct, dam Francisca by Almont 33. 

T. W. Barstow's b m Alone by Nearest, dam Grenett by Chrlsman's Hambletonian. 

J. It iverson's ch m Dictatress by Diet at us dam Salinas Belle by Carr's Vermont 

C. Whitehead's s g Toppy by Delphi, dam by Dexter Prince. 

C. Whitehead's blk s Delphi by Director, dam Etta by Dexter Prince. 

A. Ottlnger's br s Daedalian by Diablo, dam Grace by Buccaneer. 

Silva A: Wright's b g Kelly Briggs by Bayswater Wilkes, dam Algenle by Algona. 

THURSDAY- SECOND DAY- AUGUST 18. 

No. 4— TWO-YKAR-liLU PACE, 8300. 

I. L Borden's bl f Roberta by Robert I., dam Allle Cresco by Cresco. 
Nutwood Stock Form's b c Lord Alwio by Nutwood Wilkes, dam Iogar by Director 
J. W. Marsha 11 'n b f Mods Wilfes by Djmonto. dam Trlx by Nutwood Wilkes 
Grace Bros.' b g Sid Allen by Sidney Dillon, dam Flora Allen. 

G. W. Klrkmon's b f Stoncltta by Stoneway. dam Ethel Basler by Robert Basler 
John A. Cole's b ( Delll&h by Zolock, dam Gipsy by General Booth. 

NO. 0-9:16 CLASS TROT, 8500. 

W. G. Durfee's b g Brlnoy K. by Strathway. 

J. B. Iverson's b m Princess by Euguneer, aam Bollo by Kentucky Prince. 

Grace Bros.' b g Ole by Silas bkloner, dam Eveline. 

.1 H. Vance's g g Rozelle by Bob Mason. 

C A Arv«;dsoij\ it h Sutter by Noonday, dam Eva B by Prompter. 

mraet'fl b m Verona \>$ Nutwood Wilkes, dam by California Nutwood. 
E P. Hoald'sb m Lady Rowena by Pilot Prlnoe, dam Nona Y. by Admiral. 

No. 0-2:25 CLASS PACK, 8500. 

J. D. Springer's ch m Miss Idaho by Nutwood Wllke.i, dom by ForreatClay Jr. 

W. MttHliu'n b k Elmorvno i>y Iris 

ThOB. Charlton's sm Rose Thome by Hawthorne, dam Btlleby Dexter Prince. 

E. A. Servls' rn g Doctor J by Doc BtokS, dam by Singleton, 

E. Llodlcy's blk y, I > irt by Hector, dam Julia Klluruey. 

siiva t Harry W 

L O. K'lhard'.s bine m Kut.v H bj Boyawater Wilkes, dom by Prompter. 
i: If It oner's b m Olivette by Richard'* Elector, dom by Mouolaln Boy. 
J w. /, ttbell'K tj k Prince Almo by Prince Almont, dam Cop by Pal lis. 
K. D. ludley's br m Lorno Doone by Bayswotcr Wilkes, dam by Sterling. 

B. Cror or'sbm Hattlo Croner by Bay Bird, dam by Algona. 

R CEB BEGIN AT 1 :30 OTUK'K, 



0. Mowers' b g Casey by Athadon, dam Oregon Nell. 

J. H. Vance's g g Henry N. by Raymond, dam by A. W. Richmond. 

S. A. Eddy's b g Tammany by Iris. 

A w. Wiley's b h Cavaliero by Stanton Wilkes, dam by Electioneer. 

No. 7—2:30 CLASS TROT (Tb.ree-Year-OIds), 840O, 

E. Lindley's b m Mamie R. by son of Oro Wilkes, dam Moscovia by Belmont. 

F. R. Garnsey's b c Murray M. by Hamb. Wilkes, dam Anna Belle by Dawn. 
Jas. H. Gray's bro Carahina by McKinney, dam Biscara by Director. 

Jas. H Gray's b c Calamanca by McKinney. dam Russie Russell by Bay Rose. 
C. L. Jones' b c Carlouin by McKinney, dam Carlotta Wilkes by Charley Wilkes. 
E. D. Dudley's ch m Paprika by Oro Belmont, dam Auntie by Dawn. 
W. Mastin's b c Marvin Wilkes by Don Marvin, dam Nora S by Sable Wilkes. 
Grace Bros.' b g Wilmas by Wildnut, dam Sweet Marie by Stamboul. 
George L. Warlow's br s Allesandro by Athaneer, dam Narcola by Athadon. 

FRIDAY-THIRD DAY-AUGUST 19. 

No. S— THREE-YEAR-OLD PACE, 8400. 

G. W. Kirkman's gr f My Way by Stoneway, dam Ethel Basler by Robt. Basler. 
E. D. Dudley's br f Friskarina by Bayswater Wilkes, dam Bee by Stirling. 

J. B. Iverson's en m Thelma by Dictatus, dam Salinas Belle by Carr's Mambrino. 

Nutwood Stock Farm's g m Gray Witch by Nutwood Wilkes, dam Little Witch by Director. 

1. L. Borden's b c Cresco Wilkes by Nutwood Wilkes, dam Allie Cresco by Cresco. 
J. E. Montgomery's b c Seymow M. by Diawood, dam Nancy H by Upstart. 

No. 9—2:12 CLASS TROT, 8600. 

E. P. Heald's br s Tom Smith by MoKinney, dam Daisy S. by McDonald Chief. 

A. L. McDonald's br g Forrest W. by Wayland W., dam Silver Shield by Poscora Hayward. 
C. F. White's b h Liege by Lebasco, dam Raven. 
WJffiW. W. Mendenhall's g g What Is It by Direct, dam Lassie Jean by Brigadier. 

F. Gommet'sb s Alta Vela by Electioneer, dam Loretta by Piedmont. 

No. 10— 2:1 \ CLASS PACE, 850O. 

W. Mastin's b g Penrose by Falrose, dam Miss Mooney Filly by Brigadier. 

V. Verilhac's b g Harry Hurst by Delwin, dam Lady Kohl by LeGrande. 

E. A. Servis' ch g Edwin S. by Dr. Hicks, dam by La Harp. 

Charles Galindo's ch g Rey del Diablo by Diablo, dam Rosita A. by Adrian. 

Silva & Wright's b m Economizer by Charles Derby, dam Economy by Eoho. 

H. W. Goodall's b g Uncle John by Chas. Derby, dam Naualaka by Balkan. 

S. A. Eddy's b g Cuckoo by Strathway, dam Edith M. by Milton R 

E. P. Heald's b m Nance O'Neil by Pilot Prince, dam Nona Y. by Admiral. 

SATURDAY-FOURTH DAY-AUGUST 20. 

No. 11— TWO YEAR-OLD TROT, 830O. 

I. C. Mosier's b f Gluck by Zombro, dam Scappoose by Roy Wilkes. 
Mrs. Ella Warlow's b f Sextette by Athablo, dam Donnatrine by Athadon. 
George L. Warlow's b c Athasham by Athadon, dam Cora Wlckersham by Junio. 
A. L. McDonald's b g Rey McGregor by Rey Direct. 

E. P. Heald's b c San Juan by Nutwood Wilkes, dam Princess McKinney by McKinney. 
C. A. Arvedson's b f Lady Sutter by Sutter, dam Anna Phelp? by Tilton Almont. 
John A. Cole's br c Ambush by Zolock, dam May Kinney by Silkwood. 

Dingee & Greene's gr c Dingee by Nutwood Wilkes, dam Little Witch by Director. 
W. G. Durfee's b f Bellemont by Zombro, dam Daisy Q. Hill by Altamont. 
G W. Kingsbury's b t Delia K. by Silver Bow, dam Elma by El Benton. 
James Caiiln's b c Admiral Togo by Iran Alto, dam Aria by Bernal. 

No. 12—2:19 CLASS TROT (Sonoma County Stakes), 81500. 

A. W. Wiley's b to Lady Madison by James Madison, dam by Nephew. 

S. H. Hoy's blk m Little Babe by Bradtmoor, dam by Dawn. 

A. L. McDonald's blk g Charley T. by Zombro. dam Sarah Benton by Albion. 

H. C. Ahler's br g Telephone by Direct, dam Nellita by Philospher. 

J. D. Springer's br m Sonoma Girl by Lynwood W., dam Maud Fowler by Anteeo. 

Robt Burress' b g Golden Gate by Bay Bird, dam Dourhka by Western. 

Sllva irWright'ss g Talisman by Steinway. dam by Woodnut. 

Martin Carter's ch m Mamie R by Nutwood Wilkes, dam Ingar by Director. 

R, W. Peterson's b g R. W. P. by Lynwood W. 

J. H.Pankey'sblkgThe Trotter by Silkwood dam by Blackwood. 

W. G. Durlee's b m Rita H. by McKinney. 

Geo. W. Kingsbury's b k D. E. Knight by Lynmont. dam Daisy A. by Friday MoCracken. 

W. H. Lutnsilen's br s McPherson by McKinney. dam Eveline by Nutwood. 

F. Gommet's b m Verona by Nutwood Wilkes, dam by California Nutwood. 
I. N. Minor's br g Morosco by Wayland W., dam Lady Moor by Grand Moor. 

No, 13— FREE-FOR-ALL PACE, 8G00. 

J. W. Zlbbell's ch m Lottie Smart by Roswell. 

.!. H Iverson's chm Dictatress by Dictatus, dam Salinas Belle by Carr's Vermont. 
E. A. Servls* ch g Edwin S. by D"oc Hicks, dam by La Harp. 
Sllva & Wright's b m Polko Dot by Mendocino, dam Maud Merrill. 
H. Delaney's br s Zolook by McKinney, dam Gazelle by Gossiper. 
T. W. Barstow's b m Alone by Nearest, dam Grenetta by Chrlsman's Hambletonian. 
I. N. Minor's s g Fredericksburg by Nephew Jr., dam Minnie Hubbard by Hubbard. 
No 14— SPECIAL FOR LOCAL HORSES (Entries to this Race Close August 17), 



?. HEALD, President. 



F. W. KEI/LEY, Secretary. 



August 6, 1904] 



&he gvesiiev cmfc grpurtsroan 



3 



THE WEEKLY 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

P. W. KELLEY, PROPRIETOR. 

Turf and Sporting Authority ot the Pacific Coast, 

— OFFICE — 

36 GEARY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

P. O. BOX 2300. 
Telephone: Black 586. 



Terms— One Tear 83, Six Months 81.75, Three Months 81 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money snould be sent by postal order, draft or by registered letter 
addressed to F. W. Kelley, 36 Geary St., San Francisco. Cal. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's name and 
address, not necessarily for publication, but as a private guarantee 
of good faith. 

San Francisco, Saturday, August 6, 1904. 



BREEDERS MEETING A BIG SUCCESS. 



Large Crowds Enjoy High Class Racing 
at the San Jose Track. 

If there are any disgruntled and soured pessimists 
living; in California who still believe that harness 
racing is not popular with the public, they have not 
been at Pleasanton or San Jose where the grand 
stands were filled with people cheering the winners 
as they have come under the wire during the past 
two weeks. The Pleasanton meeting was a success, 
both financially and from a racing standpoint, and 
the Breeders meeting, which closes at San Jose this 
afternoon, is the same, except that the crowds are 
much larger and more enthusiastic. This i9 because 
San Jose is a much larger city than Pleasanton, but 
it has been asserted time and again that San Jose was 
a poor racing town and the people would not turn 
out, so it is a pleasure for one who has always claimed 
that good racing would draw the San Jose public, to 
write that the attendance at the Breeders meeting 
has been large every day and promises to be a record 
breaker this afternoon. 

The meeting opened Wednesday with the best at- 
tendance for an opening day seen at a Breeders meet- 
ing for years. The weather was perfect and the 
track in fine shape. Directors T. J. Crowley and Geo. 
H. Kingsbury occupied the judge's stand with Ed. R. 
Smith of Los Angeles, who acted as starter. Mr. 
Smith did good work at Pleasanton, although big 
fields and a narrow track made even starting an im- 
possibility there, but his work at San Jose is a big 
improvement on the Pleasanton efforts. There is no 
starter but has some faults — the perfect one not hav- 
ing been born yet — and Mr. Smith has a few. With 
more experience he will have fewer faults, however, 
and we can truthfully say that he is doing the best 
work now that has been done in California for some 
time. 

The opening race of the San Jose meeting was the 
Pacific Slope Stakes, $1503 for 2:20 class pacers, for 
which there were nine starters. On his Pleasanton 
performance, Mr. J. D. Springer's Billy Red was 
made favorite at even money over the field, but Cap- 
tain H. W. Goodall's twelve time loser Rajah by Chas. 
Derby, saw a chance to knock the 13 hoodoo into 
smithereens, and in this his thirteenth race walked 
away with first money and took a record of 2:10J the 
first heat he ever reached the wire in the lead of a 
competitor. The performance of Rajah placed 
another feather in the cap of the young trainer Fred 
Chadbourne of Pleasanton, who has been handling 
the horse about one month. AH who know the geld- 
ing are aware of the fact that he has great speed, but 
has almost invariably made a stand still break and 
been distanced the first or second heat. He raced 
nicely for Chadbourne however and broke but once 
during the race and that was at the finish of the last 
heat, and it did not lose him the race. Billy Red 
made two or three breaks during the race which his 
owner and driver thinks cost him first money. The 
roan pacer Dr. J. pulled a heavy cart in the race and 
acted well. He will take a fast record before the cir 
cuit is over if he continues his good behavior. Dan 
Leiginger had bad luck with Flora G. the chestnut 
mare owned by M. M. Donnellj. She was a good 
second to Rajah in the first heat and was separately 
timed in 2:11, but she made a tangled break booh after 
getting the word in the second heat and was dis- 
tanced. This is a fast and game mare and will be 
heard from later on. 

Jupiter B., a very handsome little horse by General 
Beverly, won the green class trot very handiiy and 
took a record of 2:16 j in the last heat. Millbrae, a 
fine looking son of Prince Airlie owned by Supervisor 
McEvoy of San Mateo county and driven by his owner 
in the first heat of this race, made an excellent show- 



ing. The horse has had a bad quarter crack which i 
growing out, but has bothered him much and pre- 
vented his being worked enough to condition him. 
Mr. McEvoy finished third with him the first heat, 
and then turned bim over to John Phippen who 
landed him second the next heat in faster time, and 
finally got second money. 

The 2:13 class trot was also a straight heat affair 
and furnished a surprise as to time. The favorite, 
Ole, won his race very handily and stepped his firct 
mile in 2:11 J. He was well driven by John Quitn. 
Ole is owned by Grace Bros, of Santa Rosa. He is by 
that game old race horse Silas Skinner and his dam 
is the great broodmare Eveline by Nutwood, that is 
also the dam of Roblet 2:12, Maud Fowler 2:21 J (dam 
of Sonoma Girl), and Tietain 2:19. 

Before the regular events on Wednesday two young 
pacers were sent for records against time and won. 
The summaries: 

Pacing to beat 2:30. 

High Fly, b c by Nearest. won 

Time— 2:24%. 

Pacing to beat 2:25^. 

Alta Nola, blk m by Altamont won 

Time— 2:233£. 

Trotting, green class, purse $800. 

Jupiter B., b g by General Beverly-Little Agnes 

....' (W. G. Durfee) 1 1 1 

Millbrae, br h by Prince Alrlie-Fearless. . {John Phippen) 3 2 3 

Lady Madison, b m by James Madison-Nephew 

(T.E.Ward) 5 3 2 

Mamie R., ch m by Nutwood Wilkes-Ingar (W.Cecil) 2 4 5 

Telephone, br g by Direct-Nellita (Springer) 4 5 4 

Time— 2:19»i, 2:17, 2:16J£. 

Pacing, The Pacific Slope Stakes, 2:20 class, purse $1500. 

Rajah, b g by Charles Derby-Gen. Benton ..(Chadbourne) .1 1 I 

Billy Red. by Glenelg , (Springer) 3 4 2 

Doctor J. by Doc Hicks (Daniels) 5 2 3 

Hattie Croner by Bay Bird-Algona (Bunch) 4 3 4 

Flora G.. ch m by son of Ecbo (Leiginger) 2 dis 

Miss Winn, Cavalier. Tom Carneal and Mildred O. also started 
but were distanced in first heat. 

Time— 2:10>J, 2:12, 2:13. 

Trotting, 2:13 class, purse $700. 

Ole, bg by Silas Skinner-Eveline (JobnQuinn) 1 1 1 

Forest W., br g by Wayland W.-Silver Shield 

(McDonald) 3 2 3 

Red Skin, ch g by Red Cloak (Mosier) 5 3 2 

Leige, b h by Lobasco-Raven (Groom) 2 5 5 

Tom Smith, br h by McKinney-Daisy (J. W. Zibbell) 4 4 6 

Princess, b m by Eugeneer-Belle (Parker) 6 6 4 

Time— 2:1154, 2:13, 2:U%. 

On Thursday the attendance was nearly twice as 
large as on the opening day. The big grand stand, 
which will seat 2000 people, was nearly filled and there 
were over two hundred buggies, carriages and other 
rigs in the infield. After two or three horses had 
been sent for records against time, the first race of 
the day, the two-year-old pacing division of the Pacific 
Breeders $6000 Futurity was called. There were but 
three starters: Ben Davies'bay filly Delilah by Zolock 
2:09J, James W. Marshall's bay filly Mona Wilkes by 
Demonio 2:11 J, and I. L. Borden's black filly Roberta 
by Robert I. 2:08|. It will be noticed that the sires 
of these fillies are all pacers with fast records. The 
race went to Delilah in straight heats and in the 
final heat she paced a handy mile in 2:16^ which is 
the fastest two-year-old mile of the year. Mona 
Wilkes and Roberta are both very handsome and 
high class fillies and the fact that they were well with- 
in the distance in the last heat shows something of 
their capabilities. Messrs. Marshall and Borden were 
defeated, and were not disgraced but honored by the 
performances of their fillies. Delilah is a very high 
class young miss and a credit to her sire. 

Briney K. 2:17| had what the boys call "a puddin' " 
in the 2:18 trot. There were but four starters. Dur- 
fee took his horse three easy miles and the other 
horses finished in the same position every heat. 
Second money went to the three-year-old filly Mamie 
R. by a son of Oro Wilkes. Not being in any stakes 
she has to be started against aged horses. She beat 
Verona and Cicero very handily in every heat and 
raced like an aged horse. Mr. Reams, her owner, has 
leased her racing qualities to Silva & Wright for the 
season. After this race Durfee worked Briney K. a 
heat in 2:13J. 

The last race was the 2:10 class pace in which two 
horses, Kelly Briggs and Zolock, entered the 2:10 list 
for the first time. Kelly Briggs was the favorite at 
$10 to $7 for all the others and won the first heat in a 
drive from Zolock in 2:09J although he was off last. 
Dictatreis set the pace and went to the half in 1:04 i. 
Kelly Briggs paced the last half of this mile in 1:03} 
and won like a race horse. In the second heat he was 
leading two hundred yards from the wire, when 
Zolock came with a rush and collared him. In the 
effort to keep in the lead Wright forced Kelly BriggB 
to a break and Zolock beat him out in 2:09£. Then 
the bettors began to switch around and there was 
considerable pool selling, but Kelly Briggs took the 
next two heats rather handily in 2:11 and 2:13. Mr. 
Barstow hesitated about starling his mare Alcne as 
she was not in good condition. Dictatress went an 
excellent race. This little mare is always trying and 
races every part of the mile. The summaries: 

Trotting, to beat 2:35. 

Dorothy P. b m by Nutwood Wilkes los* 

Time— 2:40. 



Trotting, to beat 2:35. 

Major Mc, chs by Nutwood Wilkes-Ingar wen 

Time— 2:28. 
Trotting, to beat 2:30. 

Dick, b g by St. Whips won 

Time— 2:28J*. 
The Breeders Fnlurity, for two-year-old pacers, $950. 

Delilah, b f by Zolock-Gipsy (S. Donahue) 1 1 

Mona Wilkes, b f by Demonic-Trix (F. Chadbourne) 2 2 

Hoberta, blk t by Robert I.- \llie Cresco (J. Creason) 3 3 

Time— 2:22><, 2:16%. 

Trotting, 2:18class, $600. 

Brinty K.. b g by Stralhway (W. G. Durfee) 1 1 1 

Mamie R., b m by son of Oro Wllkes-Muscova (M Reams) 2 2 2 

Verona, b m by Nutweod Wilkes (A. L McDonald) 3 3 3 

Cicero, b g by Brentwood (D Leiginger) 4 4 4 

TIme-2:20,2:19,2:18J4. 

Pacing, 2:10 class, purse $8C0. 

Kelly Briggs, b g by Bayswater Wilkes-AIgenie 

(Wright) 12 11 

Zolock, blk h by McKinney-dam by Gossiper (Delaney) 2 1 3 2 
Dictatress, b m by Diotatus-Salinas Belle. ...(Parker) 4 4 2 3 

Alone, b m by Nearest-Grenetta (Barstow) 3 3 4 4 

Fredericksburg, by Nephew-Minnie Hubbard (Cabney) 6 5 5 d 

I D rect. bin, by Direct-Franeisca (Freeman) 5 d 

Daedalion.'br h by Diablo-Grace (Ira Ward) d 

Time— 2:09X, 2:09M, 2:11,2:13. 



The Vallejo Program. 

The horses racing on the California circuit will 
move to Vallejo next week, where an excellent meet- 
ing will o_pen on Wednesday and continue four days. 
The program is as follows: 

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 11. 

Pacing, 2:15 class, purse $500 — Tidal Wave, Lin- 
wood, Harry Hurst, Alto Genoa, Rey del Diablo, 
Tammany, Gaff Topsail, Polka Dot, Edwin S. 

Pacing, green class, $500 — Miss Idaho, Corset 
Maker, Dr. W., Cavalier, Flora G., Lady Shamrock, 
Dr. J., The Mrs, Ruby H., Rose Thorn, Venus Derby, 
Prince (Umo, Muriel. 

THURSDAY. 

Trotting, 2:16 class, purse $500— Redskin, Louise 
Croner, Cuate, Verona, Ole, Hank, Rozell, Briney K , 
Cicero, Sutter, Ring Rose, Idlewild, Dollican, Prin- 
cess. 

Trotting, 2:24 class, purse $1000— Erosmont. Tele- 
phone, The Trotter, Talisman, Golden Gate, Rita H. 
Gertie H., Alcacita, T. C, D. E.;Knight, Sadie Thomp- 
son, Little Babe, H. D. B., Bain, Abe Miller, Morosco, 
Jupiter B., Birdcatcher, Lady Madi6on. 
FRIDAY. 

Trotting, 2:12 class, purse $500— Probable starters, 
Liege, Forest W., Red Skin, Princess and Tom Smitb. 

Pacing, 2:20 class, purse $1000— Billy Red, Norda, 
Kid, Hattie Croner, Mildred O., Gertie A., Tom Car- 
neal, Tammany, Cavaliero, Henry N., Dr. J., Sunny 
Jim, The Mrs., Miss Winn, Dart, Rose Thorn, Nance 
O'Neil, Baby Ellis, Lady Petrina, Blackwood. 

Stake, colts and fillies by Gaff Topsail — Spinnaker, 
Bonnie Jean, Abe Lincoln and Madigan filly. 
SATURDAY. 

Trotting, 2:30 class, purse $500— Una K., Millbrae, 
Erosmont, Princess Belle, Harry B., Husky, Talisman, 
Monocrat, Mamie R., PrinceEs W., Morosco, Jupiter 
B., Birdcatcher, Pat Rose. 

Pacing, 2:10 class, purse $600 — Oma A., Daedalion, 
Dictatress, Cuckoo, Kelly Briggs, Polka Dot, Zolock, 
Highball, Edwin S., Alon°, Toppy, Delphi, Frede- 
ricksburg. 

Program for State Fair Harness Races. 

The program for the harness races at the State 
Fair has been arranged as follows: 

August 22— Occident Stake and 2:30 trot. 

August 23 — Green pace and 2:15 trot. 

August 24 — Two-mile dash for trotters and two-year- 
old pace. 

August 25 — -Two-year-old trot and two mile da6h for 
pacers. 

August 26 — 2:27 trot and 2:17 pace. 

August 27 — 2:13 trot and 2:10 pace. 

August 29 — Stanford Stake and 2:20 pace. 

August 30 — 2:19 trot and green trot. 

August 31—2:14 pace and 2:12 trot. 

Sept. 1 — 2:25 pace and Stanford-Occident pace. 

Sept. 2 — 2:16 trot and three-year-old trot. 

Sept. 3 — 2:24 trot and free-for-all pace. 

Of the above, all have closed except the following; 
which will close Wednesday next, August 10th: 2:15 
trot, 2:12 trot, green trot, two mile dash for 2:17 class 
trotters; two-year-old pace, two mile dash or 2:17 
class pacers. 

Fred E. Adams, who is editor of the Pleasanton 
Times, and Secretary of the Pleasanton Racin ; Asso- 
ciation which closed a highly successful meeting last 
Saturday, was awakened on Mond.iy 11'ght of this 
week by a burglar trying to climb thiough his bed- 
room window. Adams jumped out of bed and made a 
demand on the fellow for entrance money, hut the 
burglar turned and got away on the first Bcore at a 
two-minute clip. The editor-secretary says his first 
impulse was to start after him, but recalled the rule 
that there Bhall be no race started after dark and 
went back to bed. He learned next morning that Mr. 
Burglar won a small purse of $2.50 which he entered 
for at the residence of a neighbor. 



Che greener ani> gpartsmcm 



[August 6, 1904 



Close of Pleasanton MeetiDg. 

The Pleasanton Racing Association is to be con- 
gratulated. With Utile or no previous experience in 
giving a race meeting its Board of Directors last week 
held lour days of harness racing that was as good as 
was ever seen on a race track in California. The 
racing was clean, thecontests close in many instances 
and there was a big attendance of the best people of 
the surrounding country every day. There was an 
entire absence of the touts and sure thing gamblers 
that often infest race meetings, and every day's rac- 
ing was thoroughly eDJoyed by the crowds present. 
During the four days twelve good races were given, 
and in but two was there even a suspicion that every 
horse was not being driven to win. In these two the 
judges called the drivers under suspicion to the stand 
and after questioning them closely arrived at the con- 
clusion that while their driving was open to criticism, 
which was made, there was no proof of criminal in- 
tent, and th6 heats which had a "laying up" look 
were not driven to save records or win money on 
the other horses. In other words, as was remarked 
by one of the Directors, "Those two races did not 
look exactly right, but we had absolutely no evidence 
on which to inflict punishment on anyone." 

On Friday the first race brought out a field of five 
three-year-olds. Mannie Reams of Suisun, drove 
his three-year-old filly Mamie R. to victory in this 
race in three straight heats. Mamie R. was the 
favorite and won as she pleased. She has every ap- 
pearance of being a high-clasB filly, but is not entered 
in any of the big stakes to be trotted in California 
this year. She was bred by Rush & Haile of Suisun, 
and is by an unnamed son of Oro Wilkes, her dam 
being the mare Moscova by Belmont 64, that the late 
William Corbitt paid $4500 for in Kentucky and 
brought to this State. Moscova died when this filly 
was three days old, and Mr. Rush gave the little 
orphan to Mr. Reams, who raised her on cows milk. 
Mamie R's record of 2:21 i made in the last heat is no 
measure of her speed. 

Murry M., a full brother to Robert I. 2:08|, made a 
good showing in this race, as did Allesandro, the colt 
owned by Mr. Geo. Warlow of Fresno. 

The 2:13 trot went to the game and consistent trot- 
ter, Ole by Silas Skinner, in three straight heats. In 
this race Forest W. had been played as favorite, and 
many thought that Al McDonald could have driven 
him better. McDonald was called to the stand, and 
protested that he had done his best, giving a loose 
boot that Happed during the entire mile as one excuse. 
He was cautioned and permitted to finish the race in 
which his horse got third money. Redskin and Tom 
Smith got too close together rounding the first turn 
in one heat and both drivers sat at an angle of 45 
degrees for a few seconds, but luckily remained cool 
and no damage was done. Redskin never left his feet 
during the collision, but Tom Smith went to a bad 
break. The time of the first heat — 2:13i — was good 
for the trBck. 

Considerable interest was taken in a race for buggy 
horses owned in Contra Costa county. The entries 
were Edna de Beck, owned by P. Harland and dis- 
tanced in the first heat; Djwey, owned by J. Minor, 
and Mary D , the property of H. W. Curry. Mary 
took the first heat in 2:21 A , with hard driving, but 
did not have to go faster than 2:24 to win the second 
heat. She vtd-i a favorite ia the betting from start to 
finish. 
-The summaries: 

FRIDAY .]i I.\ 28 
Troltlop, three-year-olds, purse 1600. 

Mamie It , b r by son of o.- > WUIces Moscova (Ream*) l i j 

Murray M , b a by HamoletOQlao Wilkes (Garnsey) 4 -J -J 

Paprika i [m al (Hoy) a 4 4 

Allesaadro. b o b (ZlbbaH) 3 3 3 

MaggfcGlyoo, b f by R>blo (Bunch) 5 5 5 

Tim. 

Trot: purse $500. 
Ole. b (,' by alias SKInii.r Eveline (Qulou) I I I 

RedskiD loan (Moiber) 3 y 3 

Forest IV Mi i,i, -J | •_• 

TomSnji' (Zlbboll) 4 3 4 

Tlmr sis: !:i i 8:15, 
Race Tor roadsters owned In Contra Costa Co.. purse $100. 

inlo-Sldmore (Chadhource) 1 1 

K'lDiiIsi (Palmer) 2 2 

Dewey, ct X (trotter). Harlan) 3 dr 

Tlmo-2:3l'. 
There was a big crowd present on Saturday, the 
closing day of tin- in setlng and one of the best pro- 
grams ever witnessed on a Lotting track was fur- 
nished for their entertainment. The 2:25 pace had 
ten starters with Mr. J. D. Springer's Miss Idaho by 
Nutwood Wilkes selling as an even money favorito 
against the Hold. The race proved to be a seven heat 
affair and Miss Idaho finally won the rare after belDg 
a contending horse In ever; i but tho fust, in 

which Bhe finished sixth after getting away badly and 
mak'ng a break. The first heat went to Tom" Car- 
nasi Is 2:13, fast time for tho class. In the second 
he StaDton Wilkes horse Cavallero won in 2:14, 
i n Tom Carneal came back the third heat and 



won by a narrow margin from Miss Idaho in the same 
time while Cavaliero was a very close third. In the 
fourth heat Cavaliero got to the wire a little ahead of 
Miss Idaho in 2:15, and the race then looked to be 
between him and the Diablo gelding. All the horses 
were getting tired and the time was getting a little 
slower. When the horses were given the word in the 
fifth heat Cavaliero was slow in getting away and 
was soon in a pocket. Miss Idaho's gameness began 
to tell and when she finished the mile in front in 2:16J 
there was great cheering and hand clapping as the 
little mare and her owner are great favorites at Plea'- 
anton. All but the three heat winners were sent to 
the stables and Miss Idaho won the next two heats by 
sheer gameness in slow time. 

The 2:24 trot for a purse of $1000 was a gift for the 
McKinney mare, Una K., that won in straight heats 
and took a record of 2:154,. lupiter B. took second 
money, H. D. B. third and Abe Miller fourth. 

Kelly Briggs walked away with the 2:10 pace in 
straight heats, although the McKinney stallion Zolock 
came with a tremendous rush in the third and drove 
Kelly Briggs to a break just before reaching the wire. 
Frank Wright landed his little horse first, however, 
and the race was ended. In the first heat, the mare 
Alone got off last, and paced the mile, it is said, by 
those who timed her in 2:08|, but was short and could 
not repeat the performance. The judges questioned 
Barstow about the lethargy of his finish in the second 
heat, which looked as if he was not trying to beat 
Kelly Briggs at the finish, but he explained that he 
had tried to beat the Bayswater Wilkes horse twice 
in the stretch and the gelding had shot away from 
his mare both times, so he did not want to punish her 
by making another futile attempt. The fact that he 
did not wish to start the mare in the race owing to 
her being short of work, but was persuaded to by 
friends who convinced him he could get second money 
anyway, was considered by the judges, and he was 
not "derricked." The summaries: 

SATURDAY, JTJXY 30. 
Pacing. 2:25 class, purse $500. 
Miss Idaho ch m bv Nutwood Wilkes-untraced 

(Springer) 6 2 2 2 111 

Cavaliero, b h by Stanton Wilkes-Electioneer. 

(Ward) 2 13 12 2 2 

Tom Carneal.bg by Diablo-Cresco.. .. (Trefry) I 6 I 9 6 3 3 

Dr. W. blks by Robert Basler (Liggett) 3 4 4 3 3 ro 

Swanhilda.bm by Orkney Wilkes (Ober) 5 3 6 5 5 

Prince Almo. bg by Prince Almont. ...(Zibble) 4 8 7 7 4 

Cavalier, br g by Welcome (W Durfee) 8 9 9 4 8 

Harry W. ch g untraced (Wright) 9 7 5 8 9 

Si Perkins, ch g by Iris (Clark) 7 10 8 6 7 

Henry N-, grg by Raymond (Vance) 10 5 dis 

Time— 2:13, 2:14, 2:14, 2:15, 2:1614, 2:22, 2:22. 

Trotting, 2:24 class, purse $1000. 

Una K.. bm by McKinney-by Gen. Grant Jr (Vance) 1 1 1 

Jupiter B ,bg by Gen Beverley (W. Durfee) 3 2 2 

H. D B . b g by Arthur Holt (Wright) 2 8 3 

Abe Miller, brg by Titus (Mosherl 4 4 4 

Little Babe, blk m by Bradtmoor (Hoy) 5 6 5 

Golden Gate, b g by Bay Bird (Brown) 10 5 6 

Telephone, br g by Direct : (Prellson) 6 7 7 

Bain, ch g by Sieinway (Cuicello) 7 8 8 

Alcacita. b m by Red Cloak (Garnsey) 9 9 9 

The Trotter, blk g by Silkwood (Judd) 8 dis 

Time— 2:17^, 2:15M, 2:15^. 

Pacing, 2:10 class, purse $600. 

Kelly Briggs, bg by Bayswater Wilkes-AIgenle (Wright) 1 1 1 

Alone, b m by Nearest (Barstow) 2 2 3 

Zolock, br s by McKinney (Delany) 6 6 2 

Highball, blk g by Sllkwood (Vance) 3 5 5 

Dlctatress, ch m by DIctatus (Parker) 5 4 4 

Tidal Wave, chs by Nutwood Wilkes (Mosher) 4 5 6 

Time— 2:10J4, 2:11, 2:11. 



$675 in the Crowley Stake. 

Twenty-seven colts and fillies nominated in the Pa- 
cific Breeders $6000 Futurity for foals of 1904 have been 
entered in the Crowley side stake and the sum of the 
payments made at $25 each is $675, which will make 
the contest quite interesting wOen the stakes are 
trotted or paced for when the colts are three years 
old Mr. Crowley, who suggested this stake, was 
rather disappointed in the number of entries, as he 
thought there would be at least one hundred owners 
who would put up $25 each on their colts. However, 
the stake will be well worth contesting for and as the 
money is to be put on interest for three years, it will 
amount to over $700 after all the expenses of print- 
ing and sending out entry blanks are taken out> 
According to figures one of the get of P. J. Williams' 
good and fast stallion Monterey 2:09J has the btst 
chance to win, as four of them have been named in 
the stake, while no other stallion is represented by 
more than one foal except Iran Alto 2:12J and John 
A. 2:12} that have two each. The list of entries is as 
follows: 

N. P. Batchelder'sch c by Monterey, dam Luella 

by Nutwood; by Searchlight, dam Trifle by 

Doxter Prince. 

I. L. Borden's b c by Nutwood Wilkes, dam Allie 
Cresco by Cresco; s f by Cresco Wilkes, dam Alice 
Bell by Washington. 

Thos. H. Brents' b f Reina del Norte by Del Norte, 
dam Laurella by Caution. 

Alex Brown's br c by Prince Ansel, dam Lottie by 
San Diego; b f by Nushagak, dam Piocho by Dexter 
Prince. 



T. J. Crowley's b c Commodore Sloat by Monterey, 
dam Lottie Parks by Cupid. 

C. A. Durfee's br f Aunt Joe by Iran Alto, dam 
Rose McKinney by McK'.nney. 

Elwert & Berryman'sbc by Monterey, dam Dot 
McKinney by McKinney. 

Griffith & McConnell's b or br f by Bonnie Direct, 
dam Victoria S. by Rory O'Moore. 

F. Hahn's blk c by Chas. Derby, dam Nellie Emmo- 
line by Leo Corbett. 

J. A. Kirkman's blk c Radium by Stoneway, dam 
Carrie by A. W. Richmond. 

La Siesta Ranch's b c by Iran Alto, dam Lady Belle 
Isle by Eros. 

Geo. H. McCann's b f Emma A. by John A., dam 
Fidelity by Falrose. 

A. McLaughlin's b f Lilly Dillon by Sidney Dillon, 
dam Lilly S. by Direct. 

J. J. McMahon's b f Jubilee by Prince Nutwood, 
dam Lucy L. by Gen. McClellan, Jr. 

A. E. Mastin's br s Johnny J. by John A., dam 
Celmar by Falrose. 

D. S. Matthew's b f Valentine B. by Edward B., 
dam Rhoney G. by Terrex. 

W. W. Mendenhall's b f Maytime by Stam B., dam 
Elsie Downs by Boodle. 

J. A. Milton's b c Bay Guy by Guy McKinney, dam 
Princess Alice by King Dent. 

Rose Dale Stock Farm's b f by Washington Mc- 
Kinney, dam Zora by Daly. 

H. P. Smith's b c Monte Norfolk by Montesol, dam 
Bessie Norfolk by Duke of Norfolk. 

L. H. Todhunter's b c by Zombro, dam The Silver 
Bell by Silver Bow. 

Fred W. Wadham's ch f Irene S. by Petigru, dam 
Johannah Treat by Thos. Rysdyk. 

C. F. White's b f by Monterey, dam Dollexa by 
Alexis. 

Mrs. C. H. Williams' brc by Del Oro, dam Royal 
Net by Royal Sid. 

• 

Last Day at Detroit. 

The Blue Ribbon meeting came to a successful close 
at Detroit on Friday of last week. Jolly Bachelor 
and Angus Pointer, respectively, made the 2:24 class 
trotting and 2:10 pacing events simple propositions by 
winning in straight heats. The son of Bourbon 
Wilkes started favorite at $250 to $50 and beat a field 
of six so handily in the first heat that the race was 
considered won before he entered upon the second. 
In the winning heat Jolly Bachelor was overhauled 
by Jeanoette at the half, but responded when urged 
and easily took the lead, widening the distance be- 
tween himself and his field in the last dozen lengths. 

Angus Pointer was still clearer the class of the 2:10 
pace. He headed his field from the start and oever 
relinquished the lead. Ben F. and Bessie Drake weio 
second and third, respectively, in both heats. 

John Mac, the favorite, was conquered by Hal Fry 
ia the 2:17 trot with ridiculous ease, odds of 10 to 1 
being plaved on the bay gelding after the second heat. 
Hal Fry lost the third heat because of a bad break. 
Summaries: 

Trotting 2:24 class, Merchants' ahd Manufacturers ConsolBtloD 
purse $2000, 2 In 3. 

Jolly Bachelor, b g by Bourbon Wilkes (Spear) 1 1 

Miss Rosedale, ch m (Brawley) 2 4 

Bessie BIrchwood, ch m (McCuire) 4 2 

Miss Jeanette, blk m (Ecliers) 3 3 

Laura J., Emma Hoyt an-l Allie N. also started. 
Time— 2:14M. 2:15^. 

Pacing, 2:10 class, purse $1500, 2 in 3. 

Angus Pointer, b g by Sidney Pointer (Macpherson) l l 

Ben F., bg (De Ryder) 2 3 

Bessie Drake, rom (Geersi 3 3 

WayneKing.bg (Colby) 5 4 

Sadie Baron, Roy B., John F., Kingmore and Red Bird also 
started. 

Time— 2:08;-4', 2:08?i. 

TrottiDg, 2:17 class, purse $1500, 3 in 5 

Hal Fry, b g by Woodsprite (Foote) l l 4 l 

JohnMac.bg (Geers) 2 2 12 

Redwood, b g (Burns) 4 3 2 

Leacora. b m (De Ryder) 5 4 5 

Mary Gage, Miss Leo Res ajd Ben Potts also started. 
Time-2:09<*, 2:10^, 2:13^, 3:13. 
-»- 

Has No Equal as a Horse Liniment. 

The Dalles, Ore., Nov. I, 19(2. 
The Lawrence-Williams Co., Cleveland, O : 

I have always used and advised my friends to use Gombault's 
Caustic Balsam, and believe thatlt has no equal as a liniment for 
the horse. When the directions are followed it will not fail to 
cure any bunch, bog or bone spavin, puffs or galls— in fact. lame- 
ness of any kind. We sell a great many bottles durlDg each year, 
although there are many other preparations of like nature on the 
market. In my opinion none are as good as yfturs. 

Geo. C. Blakelt. 

We now have three more generations in the2:10 
list. Angus Pointer 2:08g is by Sidney Pointer 2:07J, 
and Sidney Pointer is a son of Star Pointer 1:59J. 

Dr. 3. A. Tuttle— Canisteo, N. V., Oot. 31, 1902. 

Dear Sir: The bos or Elixir shipped me to Olean last summer, 
together with Worm Medicine and Powders, reached me O. E. 
We used the Elixir as a body wash on all our horses. We raced 
John Durrett nearly every week from July 1st until October 1st. 
In that time he took no cold or a sore step. We also cured a case 
of collo in Ave minutes, The family Elixir I did not get a chance 
to try, as It was stolen. Will send an order soon for another 
dozen, also some Condition Powders. I believe your medicine the 
bost all around thing on the market. Yours truly, 

Dwigbt Cook, 
Trainer for J. S. & P. L. Coonley. 



August 6, 1904] 



?&he gtvee&gv cm& gtptitrtsmcm 



iSSSfeaCsS 



EASTERN GOSSIP. 



[Culled From Our Exchanges.] 



The pacing mare Monica 2:15 by McKinney that 
was thought to be a back number for all kinds of 
racing, won a four-heat race at a Cleveland matinee 
two weeks ago and pulled a wagon in 2:17. 



Anaconda 2:01J is reported to have worked a mile 
in 2:17 on a trot for Jack Trout recently. 

The twenty-two heats paced at Columbus average 
2:08.81, and the twenty-two heats trotted average 
2:11.34. 

It is early for horses to step the half-mile rings 
where Hetty G. 2:05} went, atUtica last week, a third 
heat in 2:07}. 

The entry list for the Minnesota State Fair at Ham- 
line is beyond all precedent in the history of that or- 
ganization, a total of 338 nominations having been 
made. 

During her racing carer Miss Brock 2:15} by 
Stranger, in Vance Nuckols' stable, has started in 
about forty races, and has only failed to bring home 
a piece of the money in one 

Daniel Messner, the Indiana horseman who bred 
Dan Patch 1:561, b- a3 a four-year old stallion byAller- 
ton 2:09}, dam Zelica, the dam of Dan Patch, which is 
considered a great prospect. 

Both Ruth O, who won second in the M. & M., and 
Baron Grattan received a good part of their education 
over the Glenville track. Baron Grattan was used 
last year in the matinees and started a number of 
times. He was fast and his high rate of speed is no 
surprise to Cleveland horsemen. 



Ruben S 2:25J by Guy Wilkes made his first start 
in the Cleveland matinee, Saturday, and while he did 
not win he made a most excellent showing, indicating 
that he was the making of a high-class racehorse. He 
is owned and was bred by W. P. Murray, who also 
owns Jack "Wilkes and Italia. The dam of Ruben S. 
is Bifty Duck 2:30 by Zezant, grandam Bay Duck 
(dam of Lenora G. 2:19|) by Guide. 

Wilbur Duntley has signed a contract with the 
Fasig-Tipton Company. He is to have charge of the 
Boston office in addition to looking after the firm's 
entire advertising. He is to continue on the staff of 
the American Horse Breeder. 

It is now certain that the bay pacing stallion which 
won several races last season under the name of King 
Wilkes, also won at Newburg, Baltimore and Troy 
this season, and was represented to be by King Buzz, 
dam by Young Jim, has been identified by the Na- 
tional Trotting Association as Jim Kennedy 2:09} by 
Bobby Burns. 

At the Mansfield, Ohio, meeting Mr. Laird, owner 
of Rey Direct 2:10, exhibited two suckling colts by 
this sire in front of the grand stand. They were very 
much admired. The dam of one, Rizpah 2:13, is 
owned by Frank Rockefeller. 

Mr. Joseph E. Meyer, owner of the Speedway pacer 
Nathan Straus 2:05J, has offered to match his horse 
against Mr. James A. Murphy's Don Derby 2-.04J in 
two races at Empire City and Brighton for $2500 a 
side each race. In Speedway brushes the two horses 
have been about even. 

The National Trotting Association has recovered 
all the unlawful winnings of the horse Jim Kennedy, 
alias King Wilkes, and the money has been paid over 
to the parties entitled to it. 

A well-authenticated report comes from Jewettville 
that the covered mile track has been permanently 
closed, and that Western New York trainers will be 
forced to seek other winter training quarters in the 
future. At the opening of the present racing season 
Mr. Henry G. Jewett, owner of the properties, is said 
to have served notice on trainers White, Andrews, 
Kinney, Bever, Snow, Baker, McDonald and all others 
who have trained in past years under the big shed 
that no quarters would be assigned to any one tbe 
coming winter, and that access to the track would be 
denied to all. Mr. Jewett's inability to give personal 
supervision to the properties is said to have been the 
reason for the edict. 

Katrinka G. 2:14| is the latest addition to the long 
list of record horses that have been secured within 
past years for European export. She is a full sister 
to Klatawah 2:05J, Charles Derby, etc. 



Baron Grattan 2:061, winner of the Chamber of 
Commerce Stakes at Detroit, is a five-year-old gelding 
by Grattan 2:13, dam Mary Gamaleon by Gamaleon 
2:251, grandam Slipper 4th (dam of Leo B. 2:27 and 
Red Archie (2) 2:29}) by Red Cedar 7107, son of Red 
Wilkes; third dam Slipper II. (dam of Red Gamaleon 
2:16J) by Orphan (brother to Wapsie 2:251, fourth 
dam Bradsbaw mare (dam of Senator N. 2:25 and 
Glenwood 2:27f) by Mambrino Patcben. Gamaleon 
2:251 w »s got by Gambetta Wilkes, dam Lady Pepper 
by Onward 2:251. 

Scott Hudson has been obliged to send back to 
Kentucky the trotterB Jay McGregor 2:08, and Tre- 
gantle, the latter a green horse that has shown a 
mile better than 2:12, both being lame. Jay Mc" 
Gregor was one of the mainstays of the Hudson stable 
last year, and a gamer horse never wore harness. He 
was sick the fore part of the campaign, and towards 
its close lameness made it a hard thing- for him to 
race up to his clip, but no matter how sore the stal- 
lion's muscles were he always went out and tried for 
all there waB in him, with the result that he won a 
lot of money at a time when a horse with less courage 
would have been in the hospital or at pasture. Hud- 
son has his stable at Detroit and will no doubt win 
his share of the grand circuit money, although he is 
not represented in the early closing events this year 
for the reason that he did not fancy their conditions. 
The talk is that Hudson has a formidable candidate 
for the 2:12 classes in Gail Hamilton that he got 
second money with in the Kentucky Futurity of 1902, 
later in the season driving her to a mark of 2:11| at 
Memphis. She was not started last year, but is 
reDorted to have gone fast in her work and to be ripe 
now for a mile that will keep the other 2:12 trotters 
busy. 

There was a sale at Ketcham Farm, Toledo, the 
other day. The Conqueror 2:121 w as sold to Dr. 
R. E. Davis and Dr. J. V. Newton of Toledo at the 
bid of S1410. A yearling bay filly by Cresceus 2:02} 
went to Perry Knapp of Toledo at the bid of $495. 
Lady Eoff, bay mare, foaled in 1888, by Hamdallah, 
dam Maud by Oliver Goldsmith, went to Sim Don- 
nelly, Temperance, Mich., at his bid of $225. A ful^ 
sister to Crescent Route 2:08} was sold to J. R. Smith 
of Jackson, Tenn., for $650. A yearling colt by Cres- 
ceus, dam dam of Ruby Mac 2:081, went to C. E. 
Parker of West Mentor, Ohio, for $450. A number of 
others were sold at prices ranging from $225 to 250. 



big running meetings are: Song and Wine, out of 
Widow Chicquot; Jocund, by Mirthful; Careless, out 
of Indifference; Grand Opera, by Wagner; Twenty- 
third, out of High Degree; Simplicity, by the Com- 
moner; Palmbearer, out of Handmaid; Sorcery, by 
Horoscope; Sheen, out of Lustre; Intrigue, out of 
Pink Domino; Reminiscence, out of Recollection; 
April Shower, out of Raindrop; Divination, by Horo- 
scope; Old England, out of Queen Bess; Ship Shape, 
by On Deck; Early Eve, out of Gloaming; Unmasked, 
by Domino; Emigrant, out of Westbound; The Claim- 
ant, out of Pretense; Hot Shot, out of Royal Gun; 
Rhythm, by The Bard; Halcyon Days, out of Vaca. 
tion; Highborn, by His Highness; Reticent, out of 
Secretive; Remorseful, out of Repentant. Once a 
beginning is made in giving good names it will come 
easy to give significant and appropriate names. 
There is no reason why the thoroughbreds should 
have more pleasing names than the trotters and 
pacers, but the fact remains that, as a rule, they do. 



Word comes from the International Stock Food 
Farm track, Glendale, Minn., that Dan Patch, 1:561, 
is rapidly approaching championship form. On July 
26th he paced the farm track in 2:02J, the last half in 
0:59. He should turn the Indianapolis track close to 
his record on Thursday, Aug. 11th. 



FraDk Coler, of Norton, Kan., who says he is "a 
lover of horses, " offers the following suggestion fo'r 
the consideration of owners and drivers of road, draft 
or race horses: "When your horse is harnessed will 
you please examine the bridle and notice if the blind- 
ers set so close to the eyes that the eyelashes strike 
against the leather, or if the leather is so loose that it 
strikes against the eye when the horse moves at a 
faster gait than the walk? If you find such to be the 
case will you let a harness-maker remedy the evil? It 
will cost you a very Bmall sum and make existence for 
your patient horses more endurable." 

Hall Frey that trotted to a record of 2:091 at Buffalo 
this week is a horBe of tremendous speed. It will be 
remembered he was injured in a railroad wreck in the 
spring of 1903, as was also W. O. Foote, his trainer. 
Hall was wedged between two horses that were killed. 
His injuries, for the most part, were a broken tail 
bone — that member now hanging loose giving him a 
queer, cut-off appearance behind. When he went 
down the Grand Circuit in 1902, he was a hurdler 
"from way back." Mr. Foote sayB he has spent 
many weary days educating him to stick to the trot, 
and while he still makes an occasional break, he is a 
much improved horse. He was bred near Sedalia, 
Mo., where his dam, Pee Wee, by Fortunatus, is still 
owned. F. S. Hutton, of Kansas City, owns the geld- 
ing, Mr. Foote leasing his racing qualities for the 
season. . 

Anent horse nomenclature Raymond aptly re. 
marks: Among the very fast performers, those bred 
at Village Farm have possessed more pleasing names 
than those from any other establishment. The Abbot, 
Lord Derby, The Monk, Fantasy and Nightingale 
among the trotters; and Lady of the Manor, Heir-at" 
Law and Moonstone among the pacers are good ex- 
amples of naming. Such names are far preferable to 
Robert J., Dan R., Maud S., or Major Delmar. As a 
rule there are more thoroughbreds with pleasing and 
significant names than harness horses, although a 
great improvement in this respect has been made 
during the last few years. Among the mostappropri- 
ate names to be found in the entry lists of this year's 



Germany produces only partly enough horses to 
supply the demand of the people of that empire, and 
its annual importation of horses amounts to about 
$4,000,000. Russia has heretofore supplied the great 
bulk of these animals, but owing to the war with 
Japan the Czar has issued an edict forbidding the 
exportation of any horses from that country. The 
effect of this prohibition will be to compel Germany 
to purchase most of its horses in this country. 
Neither England nor France produces the type of 
horse, to any considerable extent, demanded by the 
German market; and, with Russia shut out, the 
American dealers will have a practical monopoly of 
the German trade as long as the present conditions 
continue. The horses required for this trade are 
none too plentiful in the New York market, End com- 
mand prices that makes their production quite profit- 
able. While a fair amount of speed is desirable, a 
great amount is not essential. The horses most in 
demand by the German people are smooth good-sized 
coach horses. A cross of the hackney with the 
American trotter will come about as near fulfilling 
the requirements as anything now obtainable. Cer- 
tain German sportsmen purchase harness race horses 
quite liberally in this country, but these animals con- 
stitute but a small percentage of the importations re- 
quired for the general market, and while the war is 
most deplorable, yet so long as it continues the Ameri- 
can breeders are likely to reap much benefit from the 
misfortune. 

July 3 was the sixth anniversary of the date on 
which the New York Speedway was first thrown open 
to the public. 

Jamas Butler, owner of Direct and Directum Kelly, 
is quite a busy man these days. He owns and operates 
127 retail groceries in Manhattan and Brooklyn, 
besides his immense wholesale grocery house in 
Washington street, and is establishing new grocery 
stores at the rate of two a month. The care and 
labor necessary to bestow upon this enterprise would 
seem to be sufficient to incapacitate a man for any 
outside undertaking. But he is the principal stock- 
holder and President of the Empire City Trotting As- 
sociation. He is also president of the New York Trot- 
ting Association, under whose auspices the Brighton 
Beach meeting is to be given, and, in addition to this, 
he has three different stables of campaigneis out this 
season. Some of his horses are in charge of Ed. Geers, 
some are with Charles De Ryder, and some with 
Thomas Murphy. The magnitude of these under- 
takings seems not to worry him in the least, and at 
every matinee given at the Empire City track he is 
present, and when his horses are here he is a frequent 
participant In the contests and has developed into 
one of the best amateur reinsmen of which the Road 
Driver's Association can boast. 



Gen. Boulanger's Charger. 

New York, July 31. — A cable to the World from 
Paris says: A column of troops marched past the 
Alsace column, in the Place de la Concorde, Friday 
morning, with drums beating and fifes playing. A 
broken-down old black horse drawing a vegetable 
cart heard the music and saw the soldiers. At the 
sound of the drums and the sight of the soldiers the 
old horse came to life. He pranced and trotted to 
the head of the marching column, nearly shaking the 
driver off the seat. Half way across the square the 
horse stopped. His knees gave way and he fell dead. 
The driver was dumped to the ground . The soldiers 
marched around the wreck and laughed. 

In front of the Alsace column, just seventeen years 
ago almost to a day, this same black horse nearly up- 
set the Government of France. On that day he 
pranced through the Place de la Concorde carrying 
on his back General Boulanger, who came within an 
ace of being another Napoleon. 



6 



©:jte ^reefcrrc tmfc gppurtemcHt 



[August 6, 1904 



Notes and News. 





Diok 2:28j by St. Whips 



Billy Red 2.121 by Glenelg. 



Mary D. 2:24 by Diablo 2:091. 



Cuckoo 2:13 by Strathway 2:19 



Delilah (2) 2:16* by Zolock 2:09}. 



Edwin S. 2:121 by Doctor Hicks. 



Zolock 2:091 by McKinney 2:11}. 



Tom Carneal 2-13 by Diablo 2:09}. 



High Fly (2) 2:24} by Nearest 2:22. 



Alto Nola 2:23} by Altamont 2:26}. 



Arner 2:17} by Charles Derby 2:20. 
Rajah 2:10} by Charles Derby 2:20. 



Cavaliero 2:14 by Stanton Wilkes 2:10*. 



Miss Idaho 2:16* by Nutwood Wilkes 2:16*. 



Kelly Briggs 2:09} by Bayswater Wilkes 2:25*. 



All the above are new pacing records made this year 
on the California Circuit. Following are the new 
trotting records made on the California Circuit this 
year up to August 4th: 

Isobel 2:19 by McKinney 2:11}. 



Ole 2:11* by Silas Skinner 2:17. 



Una K. 2:15} by McKinney 2:11}. 



Rita H. 2:15* by McKinney 2:11}. 



Major Mc 2:28 by Nutwood Wilkes 2:16*. 



Walter Wilkes 2:15* by Sable Wilkes 2:18. 



Jupiter B. 2:16} by General Beverly 2:21*. 



Mamie R. (3) 2:21} by son of Oro Wilkes 2:11. 



Rey del Valle, three-year-old by Rey Direct 2:10, 
worked a mile in 2:12 at Detroit during the week of 
the Grand Circuit meeting. 

Bids for trotting privileges at the State Fair are 
advertised for in this issue of the Breeder and 
Sportsman. They will be received up to 1:30 p. m. 
next Monday. 

Owners of trotters and pacers should not forget 
that entries to several good purses at the State Fair 
close next Wednesday, August 10th. Don't miss 
entering if you want to race. 



China Maid 2:05} is not entitled to the honor of being 
the fastest pacer to take a record in her first race It 
seems that she started in two races in 1902, once at 
St. Paul, Minnesota, and again at Freeport, Illinois, 
She was distanced in both. 



Kenney the bikeman is on the circuit and will make 
any repairs necessary on your bikes or carts at short 
notice and in the right manner. He will sell you a 
sulky .hat you can win with, and sell it right. Tell 
Kenney your bike troubles and he will straighten 
them out all right. 

Matt Storn, the well known horseman, dfed suddenly 
in this city on Wednesday evening of this week. Mr. 
Storn has been an invalid for some time, but his death 
was not expected so soon. He was a native of Ireland 
and about 60 years of age. He started his career on 
the track as a jockey and achieved fame in the saddle 
on the Eastern tracks many years ago. When he 
became too heavy to ride he turned his talents to 
training horses and trained for many prominent 
owners. He bred and owned many horses himself and 
raced them on all the leading tracks in America. At 
one time ho was very well-to-do, owning considerable 
property. He was a kindly genial soul, a worthy 
gentleman and had a host of friends. He was a 
prominent Mason and bis funeral will be under the 
auspices of that order. 



State Fair Directors Meet. 



[Sacramento Talon, July 31.] 
At least three of the State Agricultural Directors, 
Messrs. Howard, WllBOn and Kingsbury, have an- 
nounced themselves as adverse to any booking privi- 
leges talng let for the coming State Fair, and there 
are otuers who are decidedly on the fence, so it is un- 
certain at the present time as to whether or not the 
Tiooi lakers will be allowed on the race track. 

fact cropped up yesterday afternoon at the 
. g of the Directors, when the proposition was 



made to advertise for bids for the bettiDg privileges 
of the fair. Director J. W. Wilson introduced the 
subject by a motion that the Secretary be instructed 
to advertise for the sale of the betting privileges. 
Director F. H. Burke said that he wanted to advertise 
simply for auction pools and paris mutuals, and Di- 
rector G. W. Kingsbury agteed with him. 

Then Director Paine remarked that if this was done 
it would probably be impossible to raise the necessary 
$10,000 or $12,000 that was needed. He was backed 
up by Director Fox, while Director Wilson and 
Howard ranged themselves on the other side, and for 
a time the controversy waxed rather warm. 

Eventually, as a compromise, it was agreed that 
the Secretary be instructed to insert the same adver- 
tisement used last year, that is, for auction pools, 
paris mutuals and bookmaking, with the proviso 
that any or all bids could be rejected, and it waB 
agreed that the subject of bookmaking at the fair 
should be taken up when there was a full board meet- 
ing and a decision arrived at. On this showing Di- 
rector Burke agreed to vote on the Paine-Fox side, 
but Howard, Kingsbury and Wilson stood pat and 
voted no. The motion carried, however, and the last 
year's advertisement will run. 

Director Wilson placed in nomination for the posi- 
tion of Financial Secretary the name of Prentice 
Maslin,and Director Burke nominated Joseph Dimond 
for the same job. A vote was taken which resulted 
in a tie, Mr. Kingsbury refusing to vote. 

It was agreed that the board would meet on the 8th 
of August, appoint its clerks and officers, open the 
betting privileges and thresh out the subject as to 
whether books will be allowed or barred. 

The ring for the horse show to be given in the 
pavilion is rapidly nearing completion and the work- 
men are now engaged in putting the earth layer on 
the floor. This will be covered with tanbark. In all 
there are thirty private boxes, seventeen of which 
have already been spoken for and engaged. 

Those who have bought boxes in the pavilion for 
the season are Hale Bros., Weinstock, Lubin & Co., 
E. R. Hamilton, Albert Elkus, D. O Mills, National 
Bank, California State Bank, C. Kaufman, L. F- 
Breuner, Frank Ruhstaller, Hall, Luhrs & Co., A. 
Meister & Son, C Kingsbury, Frank H. Burke, L. J. 
Rose Jr., Mr. Christopher, Barton-Fi6her. 

Each box will accommodate six people and the cost 
is $20 for the season of two weeks. At this rate the 
seats will cost occupants of boxes about 27* cents a 
night. One box is reserved for the Governor and 
party and another for the Secretary of State and 
State Treasurer, these officers constituting the Board 
of State Capitol Commissioners and having control of 
the grounds surrounding the Agricultural Pavilion. 



Buffalo Races. 



The Grand Circuit horses moved to Buffalo this 
week, the meeting opening on Monday with a track 
that was lightning fast, and a crowd that was large 
and anxious to back the horses. The first race was 
the Preparation stake of $1000 for three-year-olds, 
the conditions being that the race should end after 
two heats. Princess Athel, the bay filly by Directum 
Kelly out of Athelia Princess by Walkill Prince, won 
the first heat in 2:15} and AHa Axworthy, a chestnut 
filly by Axworthy won the second heat. Princess 
Athel was awarded first money as she had won the 
fastest heat, China Maid started in the 2:04 pace but 
was distanced in the first heat. Evidently this mare 
is not in condition or else she is a rank counterfeit. 
After her great race at Columbus she has not won a 
heat, but been distanced in every race in which she 
has started. Bonnie Russell, the Conifer horse from 
Los Angeles, was second to Ed Geers' Alexander in 
the 2:20 trot. Albuta, the Altivo colt owned by Col. 
J. C. Kirkpatrick of this city got third money in the 
three-year-old pace. Summaries: 

The Preparation stakes, three-year-old trotters, $1000. 

Prlnoess Athel, b f by Directum Kelly (Do Ryder) 1 9 

AHa Axworthy, ch f by Axworthy (Thomas) 2 1 

Major Guothleln.bs (Hudson) 3 3 

Fatly Felix, bo (Barrett d 

Lord Revclstoke, b s (MoClary) d 

Ttme-2:15M, 2:1514. 

The Introduction, three-year-old pacers, $1000. 

Simon Kenton, br o by Dernadotte (Hudson) 1 2 

I>,,rls «.. bJ by Grnttan (Snowj 4 1 

Albuta, bllt o (McLaughlin) 2 3 

TeddyWeaver.be. (Dillon) 3 5 

DoroasH..bI (D.Thomas) S -1 

Bolass, s f (Jolly) d 

Timo-2:13J4, 2:I8K. 

Trotting, 2:20 olass, purso $1000. 

Alexander, b g by Star Duroo (Gc*rs) l l 

Bonnie Russell. b s (Hudson) 2 2 

Silver Ore, g g (Snow) 3 3 

Tlmo-2:llM, 2:lUi- 

Pacing. 2:04 olass, 81500 

Major C.bs by Coastman (Geers) 1 1 

LIHlo Suuaw, bllt m (Coldeburg and McLaughlin) 3 2 

Looando. b s (Hoscmlrt) 2 3 

Joo Pointer, bn ....(McClni-y) 4 I 

China Maid, bm (McLaughlin) d 

Tlmo-2:05S, 2:0SX. 
There was no racing at Buffalo on Tuesday owing to 



rain but on Wednesday the horses stepped fast and 
two California bred ones Lisonjero by Dexter Prince 
and Consuella S. by Directum trotted into the 2:10 
list, the former getting a record of 2:08} and the latter 
one of 2:09}. Stanley Dillon winner of the M. & M. at 
Detroit was badly beaten in the 2:19 trot being next 
to last in the summary. Snyder McGregor took the 
first heat of this race in 2:09}, Lisonjero the second in 
2:08}, and Hal Frey the third in 2:09}. The Strath- 
way gelding John Caldwell was fourth, a good show- 
ing for such a fast race, while Confienza, sister to 
Tuna winner of last year's Occident and Stanford 
stakes, was fifth. 

A surprise came in the 2:07 class pace, in which the 
local speedway horse, Dr. E. D. Preston's Anidrosis, 
an outsider in the pools, won the second and third 
heats, after brushing it out with Winfield Stratton in 
the first. Star Hal, the favorite, could never get 
up. 

After the first heat of the 2:09 trot, the judges 

ordered Driver Gahagan down and put Geers in his 

place behind Dr. Strong The gelding won the next 

heats in faster time. Bets were declared off on the 

first heat, and Gahagaa's case will be dealt with later. 

Summaries: 

Trotting, the Queen City stakes, 2:19 class, every heat a race, 
purse $2000. 

Snyder McGregor, chg by Gilman McGregor (Hogan) 1 2 2 

Hal Frey. b g by Woodsprlte (Foote) 2 5 1 

Lisonjero, b g by Dexter Prince (Howard) 3 19 

JohnUaldwell.bg (Thomson) 7 3 4 

Confienza, bm (McGuire) * 8 3 

RuthC.gm (Kenny) 6 4 5 

Blackthorn.bg (DeRyder) 4 7 8 

JollyBachelor.bg (Spear) 5 9 6 

Stanley Dillon, hg (Geers) 8 6 7 

Ballast.bg dis 

Time— 2:09^, 2:08'4, 2:095i. * Placed owing to an accident. 

Pacing, 2:07 class, purse $1500. 

Anidrosis, ch g by Saint Croixi (Allen) 2 11 

Winfield Stratton, bs by Saraway (MoGulre) 12 2 

Sufreet.bm (Wilson) 3 4 4 

StarHal.brs (Snow) 4 3 5 

Foxey Curd.blkm (McClary) 5 5 6 

Bessie Drake, rm (Geers) 6 6 3 

Time-2:05X, 2:05M. 2:09)*. 

Trotting, 2:09 class, purse $1500. 

Dr. Strong, gr g by Strong Boy (Gahagan and Geers) 2 11 

Consuella S., bm by Directum (DeRyder) 12 2 

TheRoman.bg (Snow) 3 3 8 

Prince Greenlander. b g (Curry) 4 dis 

Billy Foster Boy, b g (Crltchfleld) dis 

Time— 2:09X, 2:08, 2:08JJ. 

Pacing, 2:18 class, purse $1000. 

Cheery Lass, b m by Bobby McGregor (Andrews) 1 1 

Glad Bells, bs .- (Geers) 2 2 

John Burns, gs (Hedriok) 3 4 

ViceRegal.bg (James) 5 3 

Bessie Abbott, brm (Hudson) 4 5 

Star Light, ch S- (Wilson) 6 8 

Daisy V.,sm (Valentine) 10 6 

Arol.sm (Haws) 8 7 

AnglinWIlkes.bg (Curry) 7 9 

Peruna.bg (Murphy) 9 10 

Time— 2:09M, 2:08^{. 

Prince Alert tried to beat 2:00 at Buffalo on Thurs- 
day, but failed by one and a quarter seconds. His 
quarters were in 30*. ] :00, 1:30, 2:01}. 

Ecstatic furnished the surprise of the day by win- 
ning the 2:13 pace in straight heats. Doctor M. was 
the favorite. 

In the 2:10 trot John Mc, the favorite, on about 
even terms with the field, took two straight heats 
without much trouble. 

The big race of the afternoon was the Empire State 
stakes of $5000, for 2:08 pacers, and the Canadians 
were overjoyed at the result, their horse, Gallagher, 
taking two of the three heats, which were well con- 
tested. Summaries: 

Pacing, 2:13 class, $1001, 2 in 3. 

Ecstatic, bm by Oratoria (Long) 1 1 

DoctorM.,bg (Smith) 2 3 

KatieH.bm (Hornberger) 3 2 

Edgar Day, bh (Fuller) 4 4 

Time-2:08;i, 2:06M. 

Trotting, 2:10 class, $1000, 2 in 3. 

Joon Mc, b g by Rex Amerlcus (Geers) 1 I 

T. E. H.,bh (Moore) 2 2 

Euxenite, rm (A.Thomas) 3 3 

Leonora, b m (Deryder) 6 4 

Bessie Birchwood, ch m (McGuire) 4 d 

VictorJr.bg (Estes) 5 d 

Ben Potts, brg (Valentine) 7 d 

GoldBug.bg (Stewart) d 

Time-2:10«;, 2:095i. 

The Empire State Stake, $5000. 

Gallager, bg by Royal Rysdyk (James) 7 I 1 

MorningStar.bg (McDonald) 1 4 2 

JohnM.bg (Speer) 2 7 5 

Dr. Madara, ch g (Hudson) 9 2 7 

King Direct, bs (Geers) 3 6 6 

BaronRogers.bg (McCleary) 10 3 5 

Pinchem Wilkes bg (Estes) 6 5 4 

Red Bird, b s (Michael) 6 118 

Endora.bm (Snow) 11 10 9 

Strathllne.bg (Burns) 4 d 

BoxHughes.bg (Hlgbnlght) 8 8d 

Bob.l.K .-.-..(Wilson) 12 d 

Dry Monopole. brs (formerly Dick Wilson) (Curry) * 9 d 

Time 3:04' 4 , 2:04?.;, 2:04!5. 
* Placed on acoount of accident. 



The veteran John Splan rode the fastest mile of his 
life at Cleveland, on Saturday, July 17th, when he 
worked the pacer Dan R. 2:01} in 2:06. 



Millard Sanders drove his great four-year-old trot- 
ter Tom Axworthy a mile in 2:09 at Cleveland two 
weeks ago. 

Monte Carlo 2:07} may be started on the Grand 
Circuit, possibly at New York. 



AUGUST 6, 1904] 



©he gveebev an& gipxjrtsmcm 



How Stanley Dillon Won the M. & M. 

[Detroit Free Pi ess, July 27.] 

Without once stepping as fast as in the mile in 
which he took his race record of 2:11J at Columbus— 
without, in his fastest mile, getting closer than half a 
second to the slowest time made ou Monday by Geers' 
M. & M. discard, Alexander— Stanley Dillon, owned 
by John H. Brown, of this city, and trained and 
driven by Ed Geers, who had chosen the Detroit geld- 
ing in preference to his own horse when the time came 
to decide which should be left in, yesterday won the 
renewal of the Merchants' and Manufacturers' $10,- 
000 trotting stake at the Grosse Pointe track. Senti- 
ment made it a popular victory, because for the first 
time in the history of the Detroit meetings' famous 
stake a Detroit owned horse became its winner. 

Though Stanley Dillon won the race, the veteran 
Geers was the lion of the afternoon. The completion 
of hisdays' work gave him a great record. Never 
before has it happened that any driver has won both 
the Chamber of Commerce and M. & M. in any one 
year. No other driver, as has Geers now, had his 
name twice in the winning list of the pacing classic. 
One other driver, George Spear, who drove the M. & 
M. winners of 1891 and 1899, Temple Bar and Royal 
Baron respectively, has his name twice in the M. & M. 
winning list. It has been a tradition among the horse- 
men that no driver could win this event three times. 
Geers, however, has done this thing. It is true that 
in 1895, when he drove The Corporal, the horse was 
not his entry, and that he did not start the race be- 
hind the animal. But he drove The Corporal in each 
of his three winning heats. Chandler was taken 
down aftei the second heat, having finished fourth 
and eleventh in a field of twelve. Geers took the horse 
in the third heat, by direction of the judges, finishing 
fifth In that mile, and taking the next three in a row. 
In 1900 Geers drove Lady Geraldine to victory in a 
very poor race. Yesterday was one of the very few 
occasions on which the event has been landed in 
straight heats. 

Selling on the M. & M. began at 10 o'clock, and it 
proved to be an enticing proposition for the bettors, 
though none of the pools reached the thousand dollar 
mark. Stanley Dillon was the natural favorite, but 
Dick Wilson's followers hung to Miss Gay. Italia 
from Hudson's stable always figured slightly above 
the field, while AUie Gay did not cut any figure in the 
betting. Stories were afloat that the mare had a very 
bad leg, which raised the suspicion that she was being 
kept under cover for a possible killing. A peculiar 
fact was that Stanley Dillion did not appeal to the 
local betting contingent, practically all of the big 
tickets going to easterners, except what owner Brown 
oould annex and he placed his money through a com- 
missioner. 

In the early selling an average pool was as follows: 
Stanley Dillon, $200; Miss Gay, $105; Italia, $30; 
Emma Hoyt, $15; Black Thorn, $10; Miss Jeanette, 
$10: Jolly Bachelor, $10; Bessie Birchwood, $10 and 
the field, made up to Allie Jay, Miss Rosedale, Ruth 
C. and Baraja, $20. In selling against the field Stan- 
ley Dillon brought $50 and the field $60, while Miss 
Gay sold for $25 and the field $50. With alight varia- 
tions these figures held up to the start of the race. 

There was a big cheer when the stake horses came 
out. They were lined up near the quarter turn and 
each was introduced coming past the stand. Italia 
drew the pole, Stanley Dillon second, Miss Gay third, 
Jolly Bachelor fourth, Baraja fifth, Bessie Birchwood 
sixth, Emma Hoyt seventh, Ruth C. eighth, Miss 
Rosedale ninth, Miss Jeanette tenth, Black Thorn 
eleventh and Allie Jay twelfth. It happened that the 
three favorites drew the choice positions: Stanley 
Dillon broke the first time down, while Wilson had 
Miss Gay out in front, which made the Kentucky con- 
tingent happy. After scoring twice there was a delay 
owing to MisB Gay breaking a boot. 

They got the word on the fifth score to a frightful 
start, Stanley Dillon being back eighth, while Italia 
and Miss Gay were out in front. Fully fifteen lengths 
separated the first and last horse at the start. Hud- 
son sent Italia along and opened a gap of two lengths, 
but the mare broke just after passing the quarter and 
fell back to Miss Gay. Stanley Dillon was sixth on 
the turn, but attention was riveted on Baraja, Shaw 
sending the gelding around the field and he over- 
hauled Italia on the backstretch. He showed half a 
length in front, but did not last, as Italia hung on 
and had a slight lead at the half. Geers then started 
to move up with the favorite, going into foarth place 
behind Miss Gay. At the three-quarters the latter 
started a drive, but broke and Stanley Dillon dis- 
placed her. In the rush to the head of the stretch 
the favorite easily overhauled Italia and led the bunch 
home, while Bessie Birchwood and Miss Rosedale 
closed up fast. They could not catch the favorite, 
but at the last eighth the gray mare Ruth C. came on 



the outside and got .to Geer's sulky as they passed 
under the wire. 

Though the time, 2:12J, was slow, it was a good mile 
for the favorite under the circumstances, the Detroit 
horse showing plenty of stamina and unusual ability 
to go level. Both Italia and Miss Gay quit the last 
quarter, Ruth C. finishing second, Bessie Birchwood 
third and Miss Rosedale fourth. 

Stanley Dillon's stock went up before the second 
heat and he sold for $50 to $21 for the field. This 
time they got away to a fair start on the second score. 
The favorite held the pole and Ruth C. dropped in 
behind, lapped by Jolly Bachelor. Geers was simply 
jogging in front, there being nothing to give the 
gelding an argument. The field was strung out be- 
hind Ruth C. and Jolly Batchelor, who teamed it 
down the backstretch. Near the three-quarters Jolly 
Bachelor forged alongside of Stanley Dillon, but Geers 
let out a wrap and was soon out of danger. The last 
eighth Ruth C. started a drive and over-hauled Jolly 
Bachelor, while Geers was looking back and driving 
the favorite, finishing a slow mile in 2:114. Italia and 
Miss Gay did not figure in the race, and Miss Rose- 
dale again landed fourth place by driving the last 
quarter. 

Miss Gay was drawn before the third heat and there 
was practically no betting, the stake being conceded 
to Stanley Dillon. It took half a dozen scores to get 
them away, and Hudson beat the starter with Italia, 
but the latter went in the air, losing the advantage. 
Jolly Bachelor and Ruth C. again started to give the 
favorite an argument, but they could not trot fast 
enough to bother him and Jolly Bachelor stopped 
like a hound when rounding the turn to the stretch. 
The only excitement was a pretty brush between 
Ruth C. and Black Thorn, the latter coming from the 
rear, but he broke just before reaching the wire. 

The race was a disappointment, but the victory was 
a popular one and Geers was given a hand when he 
was presented with a floral sulky. 

Stanley Dillon, the winner, is by the same sire as 
Lou Dillon l:58i, Sidney Dillon, and his dam is a 
daughter of Steinway. He was bred at the Santa 
Rosa farm, California, and was sold to Millard San- 
ders, trainer of Lou Dillon, at the Santa Rosa dis- 
persal sale, at Cleveland, in May of last year. San- 
ders paid $550 for the horse. Mr. Brown immediately 
offered him a bonus of $500 for his bargain, and got 
the geldiog. Stanley Dillon thus cost his owner 
$1050. First money in the M. & M. is $4500, and it 
costs $500 in all to start. Mr. Brown won heavily in 
pools. His expenses represent what the horse has