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Full text of "Brethren Missionary Herald, The (1941)"

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FROM THE LIBRARY OF 

DR. ALVA J. McC LAIN, 

FOUNDER AND FIRST PRESIDENT OF 

GRACE THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



For Reference 



Not to be taken from this 



room 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/brethrenmissiona3148baum 




»L 3, No. 1 


FOREIGN MISSIONARY NUMBER 


January 4, 19 






- 




WINTER SCENE 

IN SOUTHERN 

CALIFORNIA 







y*.- 







THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



Abound tke Wobld 



By CHAS. W. MAYES 




CHURCH PIONEERS 

IN FIFTH COLUMN ACTIVITY 

WASHINGTON, D. C— Chairman Martin Dies re- 
cently carried to the people his campaign for continu- 
ation of the house committee investigation of un- 
American activities. He said it is needed to combat 
such fifth column activity as recently resulted in the 
crash and destruction of a valuable experimental air- 
plane. 

Yes. we are against the fifth column. It is the old 
story of the Trojan horse and the system of boring 
from within. We are of the opinion, however, that the 
church has pioneered in the business of the fifth 
column. Hitler could learn much if he knew how to 
study church history. For many decades unbelief has 
been couching behind orthodox phrases and at the 
same time has been sapping the spiritual power of 
the church. This day is characterized by God's Word. 
"In the last days perilous times shall come. For men 
shall be ... . traitors .... having a form of godliness, 
but denying the power thereof" (2 Tim. 3:1,4,5). 

Good Americans agree that there should be a care- 
ful investigation of the fifth column activities in the 
government. Good Christians also admit that there 
should be an investigation of the unbelief which em- 
inates from many pulpits. The people in the pew 
should sit with Bible in hand. If they speak not ac- 
cording to God's Word, it is because there is no light 
in them. 



GREAT NUMBERS 
BECOME INTERESTED 
IN GOD'S WORD 

CHRISTIANIA, NORWAY.— People who have not ev- 
en seen or read a Bible for years have become inter- 
ested in the Book in recent months. According to re- 
ports, Bibles are selling so fast that stores cannot 
supply them fast enough. On July 17 a call to Chris- 
tians was published by the Bishop of the National 
Church, the president of a joint committee of Chris- 
tian organizations, and a Baptist preacher. The call 
reads: 



"Norwegian Christians! 

"In this fateful hour we join in repentance and 
prayer! 

"Let us frankly confess our sin and guilt! 

"Let us take upon ourselves our Christian re- 
sponsibility ! 

"Let us come together in prayer for our land 
and people, and especially for those who bear the 
responsibility for our future!" 

It is reported that many churches have been de- 
stroyed by bombs or fire. In some places services are 
now being conducted in homes. It appears that formal 
empty worship is being supplanted by real prayer and 
reading of the Word. 



GRANDMOTHER BLIND TO TRUTH 
LED TO LIGHT BY BLIND 
GRANDSON 

ANDONG, KOREA. — A missionary reports that a 
blind boy who was sent by his parents to learn the 
"art" of sorcery became more interested in the gospel 
than in the power of evil spirits. In answer to prayer, 
he learned many passages from the Bible and came 
to "see" the simplicity of salvation. 

It is reported that the boy's grandmother, 78 years 
of age, stubbornly refused the gospel for many months. 
In answer to more prayer this aged woman came to 
"see" the truth of the gospel, and accepted Christ 
when her blind grandson asked, "Won't you believe 
in Jesus, grandmother, and go to heaven when you 
die?" 

Blind sourcerers are in demand in Korea as they 
are supposed to be able to cajole the spirits into 
bringing good luck and immunity from disease. By 
the power of the Spirit of God some will come to 
"see" that there is no real "good luck" except that 
which comes through the Lord Jesus Christ. 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 

The Brethren Missionary Herald is published weekly, 
four times a month, or 4S times a year, at Herald Press, 
Inc., 1300 West 9th St., Cleveland, Ohio, by the Brethren 
Missionary Herald Co., 3326 So. Calhoun St., Fort Wayne, 
Ind. 

Subscription Price: In the United States and possessions, 

$1.00 a year; Foreign countries, $1.50 a year. 

ADMINISTRATION 

Secretary of Publications: Leo Polman 

Business Office Secretary: Miss Geneva Kuhn 

Editorial Office Secretary: Miss Grace Allshouse 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

President: Russell D. Barnard Secretary: Tom Hammers 

Vice-President: Ralph Rambo Treasurer :' Homer A. Kent 

R. D. Crees Mrs. Roy Patterson R. E. Gingrich 

George Richardson L. L. Grubb Bernard Schneider 

EDITORS 
Foreign Missions: Louis S. Bauman. 
Educational: Alva J. McCIain. 
Home Missions: R. Paul Miller. 
Women's Missionary Council: Mrs. A. B. Kidder. 



Entered as second class matter at the post office at 
Cleveland, Ohio. February 9, 1939, under the act of March 
3, 1879. 



-2— 



JANUARY 4, 1941 



Rketkten MUAionailel Sad fab /tpuca 



By RUSSELL D. BARNARD 



Three Brethren Missionaries— Miss Elizabeth Tyson 
and Rev. and Mrs. Harold Dunning — sailed for Africa 
from the harbor of Port Tampa, Fla. Saturday even- 
ing, December 28th, aboard the "Zarembo," a freight 
boat of about 7,000 tons. 

They spent the night of December 27th aboard, and 
about 6:00 o'clock the next morning the boat pulled 
away from the pier. Some sailing arrangements were 
not complete, so the boat anchored about a mile from 
shore and waited for final orders. 

Mrs. Barnard, Dorcas and I (who happened to be 
vacationing in Florida) were their last visitors. We 
went with them onto the Zarembo and saw them com- 
fortably established in the Guest Chambers of the 
boat. When we went to port the next morning the 
boat had pulled away from the pier, and although it 
was in plain view we were not able to identify any- 
one aboard. How we waved our arms and wished for 
field glasses! 

What hath God wrought! What we believed next 
to the impossible, the Lord has accomplished! Mis- 
sionaries are again sailing to Africa, and with the 
Lord prospering the journey these dear friends will 
arrive at Matadi, up the Congo, in about 25 to 28 
days. February 1st, they may land. 
First Notice Dec. 5th 

We shall never forget our feeling of mingled sur- 
prise and joy when on the morning of December 5th, 
or 6th, Bro. Dunning came rushing into my study in 
the Church in Dayton and almost shouted, "We're 
sailing to Africa on December 20th." This was the 
date the boat was first scheduled to sail, but how we 
thank God for the extra 8 days for this hurried pre- 
paration. 

What a rush there was, helping plan and helping 
pack so the Dunnings could leave the Dayton-Clayton 
community by the Sunday afternoon of December 8th. 
Only the highest words of commendation can be said 
of the people of The Clayton Brethren Church in their 
helpfulness to the Dunnings in the hasty preparation. 
Bro. Dunning had served them as pastor just about 
3 months. 

The weeks from that time to the present have been 
full. The Barnards took no vacation last summer, so 
when we knew the missionary party was to sail from 
Port Tampa, Fla., plans began to form. Well, we came 
to see them off! How glad we are that we came! They 
needed us, and we needed them, and we needed the 
experience of helping get missionaries off. 

Through the graciousness of Dr. V. C. Kelford, a 
member of the Ft. Wayne Brethren Church and Dean 
of The Florida Bible Institute here in Tampa, we were 
all quartered here in the dormitories of the Institute. 
From this fine place I am now writing this report. 
Auto Turns Taxi 

The Institute is 11 miles one direction from the 
heart of Tampa, and the sailing port is 11 miles in 
the opposite direction. Not only Barnard, but Barn- 
ard's machine was needed, during the 5 busy days 



from the time the missionaries arrived until they 
sailed. 

Those were days of purchasing, packing, checking 
and double-checking. There is always so much in 
preparing to sail, but we are told that it is so much 
more work now. The missionaries had only the great- 
est consideration from those with whom they dealt. 
Just to say, "These are missionaries" seemed a magic 
key unlocking unusual kindness. 

We were pleased to learn that all other passengers 
on the Zarembo also were missionaries, and they, too, 
were quartered here at the Institute. In all, there were 
seven other missionaries sailing under The Christian 
and Missionary Alliance Board, going to work at Boma 
in the Belgian Congo. 

They are : 

Rev. and Mrs. Waldo Schindler and Lois Ruth, aged 
8, of Berne, Ind. 

Rev. and Mrs. John M. Loucks and baby Neddie, 
aged 11 months; Miss Catharine Jones, all of Pasa- 
dena, Calif. 

What a happy and congenial missionary party the 
Zarembo is carrying! When we saw them all on 
board, we almost wished the Barnards were going, 
too. Africa didn't seem very far away! 
Miss Myers' Sister There 

One of the isolated friends of Foreign Missions and 
of the Brethren faith surprised us by coming to see 
the missionaries off. I refer to Miss Ethel Myers of 
Chicago— a sister of Miss Estella Myers who is serv- 
ing as a missionary in Africa. Christmas Day Miss 
Tyson, the Dunnings and the Barnards went to the 
beautiful park at the Bok Tower. We met Miss Myers 
there and were her guests for a fine Christmas tur- 
key dinner. Ours was happy fellowship, I assure you. 
We will not soon forget. 

There was one note of sadness in the entire sailing- 
program. The party wasn't complete. Miss Grace By- 
ron was to have sailed, but was taken ill and could 
not leave New York. We asked continuously that the 
Lord might raise her up and rush her to us in time 
to sail, but our petition was not granted. We feel sure 
that by the time you read this Miss Byron will be well 
again and ready to sail with next outgoing party. We 
just feel sure the next sailing date will not be far 
removed, and that God has some better thing in this 
which has been such a mystery to us now. 

Yes, they've sailed! The work is done! The Bar- 
nard's vacation is over. There have been so many 
joys in the experience. Now, we are ready to start. 

It has been one of our happiest vacations, and one 
that will probably make us more considerate and use- 
ful as a member of the Foreign Mission board. Our 
prayer with your prayer is for the safe arrival of the 
Zarembo and her precious human cargo at Matadi. 
Let's pray, too, that soon another boat will be found 
to take our other missionaries and missionary candi- 
dates to the field. 

And we have confidence in this, for our God is 
faithful! 



—3- 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



EDITORIALS 



By Louis S. Baumon, Editor 



Our Cover 



THE SNOW SCENE on the front cover of this issue, 
"believe it or not," is an actual photograph taken in 
Southern California. The missionary editor's wife is 
the owner of a cabin in the mountains 100 miles from 
Long Beach. The picture was taken at Idyllwild, but 
the country about is known as Tauquitz. The great 
promontory, covered with snow and seen in the dis- 
tance, is known as Tauquitz Rock. This rock is in full 
view from the window of the cabin. The building in 
the scene is a large hotel at Idyllwild. The snow is 
all the way from six to eight feet in depth. If anyone 
tells you that Southern California produces nothing 
but oranges and lemons, present them with this evi- 
dence that they are sadly mistaken. We might say that 
Mrs. Bauman and I were not in the cabin the day this 
picture was taken! No picture of our cabin was taken 
at that time because it was a "sight unseen." Well, 
we have almost anything you want in Southern Cali- 
fornia — good and bad. But, under the brilliant 
California sun after the snowstorm this must have 
been a scene of dazzling glory. 



Ex -Communicated ! 

In "The Brethren Annual Number" of THE BRETH- 
REN EVANGELIST, all members of The National Fel- 
lowship of Brethren Churches learn that they have 
"seceded" from The Brethren Church. This is quite 
interesting, as we do not seem to know of it as yet. We 
learn from the published "Minutes" of the National 
Conference of Brethren Churches that assembled at 
Ashland, O., last Aug. 26, that "C. C. Grisso presented 
the following resolution:" 

"Inasmuch as division has come to The Brethren Church and 
seceders have set up independent institutions, boards, confer- 
ences and organizations that are divisive and injurious to The 
Brethren Church and its work; be it resolved by this confer- 
ence: 

"That all churches, ministers, and laymen who have identified 
themselves with and are supporters of seceding conferences, 
boards and institutions, namely, Grace Theological Seminary, 
The Home Mission Council, The Women's Missionary Council, 
The Brethren Missionary Herald, The National Bible Confer- 
ence and Independent District Bible Conferences and any 
other seceding organization ARE NO LONGER MEMBERS OF 
THIS CONFERENCE, NEITHER DO WE CONSIDER SUCH AS 
MEMBERS OF THE BRETHREN CHURCH. 

"THAT WE DO NOT CONSIDER THEY ARE ELIGIBLE TO 
MEMBERSHIP IN THIS CONFERENCE, OR TO MEMBERSHIP 
IN THE BRETHREN CHURCH, unless and until they withdraw 
from any and all of the above named seceding organizations 
and declare their loyalty and support to the regularly constituted 
ond recognized institutions, boards, and conferences of The 
Brethren Church." 

All this lightning is very enlightening. We thought 
we knew what was going on among the so-called 
"Grace Group," at least. But we did not know that 
any one had SECEDED from The Brethren Church 
Our dictionary says that to SECEDE, is "TO WITH- 
DRAW FROM UNION, FELLOWSHIP, OR ASSOCIA- 
TION, ESPECIALLY FROM A POLITICAL OR RELIG- 
IOUS BODY." We knew that a lot of Brethren had 



been cast out of the synagogue, but not that they 
had withdrawn from it. McClain and Hoyt did not 
withdraw from Ashland Seminary. They were un- 
ceremoniously kicked out. Those Indiana sympa- 
thizers with Grace Seminary did not withdraw from 
the Indiana Conference. They were deliberately 
thrown out of it. The same is true in the other con- 
ferences. Those delegates to the National Conference 
who, being sympathetic with Grace Seminary, were 
denied their conference rights, were not seceders. 
They tried to get IN, not OUT, Is that secession? It 
is not secession that has taken place. It is ex-com- 
munication. 

Now, from the beginning. Brethren churches have 
been sovereign institutions. All conferences, national 
or district, have been merely the servants of these 
sovereign churches. Since when has the servant be- 
come greater than the master? Since when has the 
created become greater than the creator? It will 
take more than the action of a subordinate organiza- 
tion in the form of a conference to make sovereign 
churches conscious of the fact that they are no longer 
just that— SOVEREIGN BRETHREN CHURCHES. 

The Brethren Church historian of the morrow will 
not record a division of Brethren churches in 1940 
due to secession; but he will record a division due to 
an attempted "ex-communication." But it will be for 
him to explain whether or not the servant lawfully 
could cast forth the master from the dwelling. Ex- 
communicated? FROM WHAT? Not from The 
Brethren Church, because no "Conference" and no 
"Fellowship" is The Brethren Church. Ex-commun- 
icated? Well, some of us "ain't" conscious of it yet! 
So let's plod along, brothers, to glory, where we will 
all again be CONSCIOUS that we are really brethren. 
Over there, we will either agree that we are all breth- 
ren or we won't be there! The Word of God settles 
that! Hear it: 

"We know that we have passed from death unto life, be- 
cause we love the brethren. He that loveth not his brother 
abideth in death. Whosoever hateth his brother is a murderer: 
and ye know thot no murderer hath eternal life abiding in him." 
i| Jno. 3:14-151. "YOU'RE OUT!" 

"The Brethren Annual" for 1941 omits from its 
"Ministerial List" of Brethren ministers, and from its 
lists of Brethren churches, all Brethren ministers and 
all Brethren churches that refuse to kotow to the 
Ashland College oligarchs. And Ashland College is 
an institution not even legally owned nor controlled 
by The Brethren Church! So, we guess Brother Bar- 
nard was right— "YOU'RE OUT!" However, THE 
BRETHREN ANNUAL published by the authority of 
The National Fellowship of Brethren Churches, con- 
tains ALL the names of sovereign Brethren Churches 
and their ministers, whether they were represented 
at our conference or not. Staying away from a con- 
ference does not divest any Brethren church of its 
sovereign right to be a Brethren church. It is the 
FAITH it holds and teaches that makes a church a 
Brethren church — not the conference to which it may 
send or not send a representative. Yet, in spite of 
the facts in the case, we are told that we are "seced- 
ers"! Brothers over there, quit callin' us names! 



Prayer For Victory Over Hitler 

The Christian Herald, a British magazine, urges its 
readers to pray for victory over Hitler. Great Britain 
has already observed two days of national interces- 
sion. The first of these two days was followed by the 
miraculous evacuation from Dunkirk. The second of 
these days of prayer was followed by sudden storms, 
which smashed and scattered Germany's "invasion 



JANUARY 4, 1941 



fleet" of small boats in Channel ports, when an inva- 
sion was imminent. No wonder we are informed that 
in many places in Great Britain, Christians are meet- 
ing every morning, in homes, in offices and in public 
halls, to pray. Only God can know how much the 
Italian fiasco, that took place when Mussolini attacked 
Greece, is due to Christians upon their knees. Prayer 
can still change things — yes, GREAT things! 



Outlook For Ethiopia 

Brethren naturally are interested in things happen- 
ing in Central Africa and the States that are neighbor 
to it. It is reported that Haile Selasse, the overthrown 
emperor of Abissinia, and his former war minister, 
are in the African Sudan, where conferences are being 
held with native chieftains who slip across the border. 
An uprising against the Italians in Ethiopia seems to 
be near. Certainly the time is strategic for it. We 
hope that if it comes, it will be successful. Evangelical 
missionary work in Ethiopia always had Emperor Haile 
Selasse's earnest support, but since Roman-Catholic 
Italy conquered Ethiopia, the Protestant missionaries 
have been expelled. Recently, while in the east, we 
had a long talk with one of the best-known of these 
expelled missionaries, whose name was quite promi- 
nent in the newspapers at the time. We learned that 
Mussolini's order with regard to Protestant mission- 
aries was inspired in the Vatican. 

All this goes to show what Roman Catholicism will 
do when it is clothed with power. The heart of old 
Rome has not changed through these centuries. And 
yet, sometimes people feel that missionaries in Latin 
America are not needed because they think Christ is 
made known to the masses there through the Roman 
Catholic Church. South America is covered with 
crosses on which dead Christs are hung as idols be- 
fore the eyes of the people, but the living Christ has 
never been made known to those people through the 
emissaries of the Pope of Rome. Not only is South 
America one of the most difficult mission fields in the 
world — it is one of the most needy. We are not to 
pray for easy tasks, but for power to perform difficult 
tasks. 



of war ever compel us to withdraw our missionaries 
from French Equatorial Africa (which we are not 
anticipating at all), then our missionaries will leave 
behind them the Word of God, which has miraculous 
power and will accomplish its work. The promise of 
the eternal God is absolute! "So shall My word be 
that goeth forth out of My mouth: it shall not return 
unto Me void, but it shall accomplish that which I 
please, and it shall prosper in the thing whereunto 
I sent it" (Isa. 55:11). 

Could a dollar be given at the present time to a 
more worthy work than to pay the cost of printing 
this New Testament and giving it to the children 
beneath Afric's sun? 



The Word Still Has Power 

It has always been our belief that if we could do 
nothing more than place the Scriptures in the hands 
of the race of dying men and women, it would prove 
to be a Word of life! We have just read of an Indian 
of Apure down in Venezuela, who got hold of a Bible 
back in 1924 and read it. The Scriptures declare that 
faith is the gift of God, and this Indian received the 
gift and believed what he read. He went forth wit- 
nessing of his faith among the natives in the interior 
of Venezuela. Today in that interior 2,000 converts, 
in round numbers, are worshipping in churches that 
they themselves have built. 

Yes, the Word of God has power — miraculous power. 
We certainly do rejoice that a member of our own 
denomination has just left for Venezuela; and though 
she is working under another board, yet we know 
that Dorothy Black (who is a member of the Long 
Beach church) will not hesitate to tell the full story 
of salvation and of the divine plan, in her personal 
contact with the natives. 

In connection with this, we may say that again we 
rejoice to know that our own Sister Estella Myers, 
almost on the equator in the great heart of Africa, 
is completing her translation of the New Testament 
into the Karre tongue; and should the misfortunes 



Carrying On Under Difficulties 

Some of the most encouraging and refreshing news 
along the line of missions comes to us from Great 
Britain. It is well known that continental Europe, 
dominated by Adolf Hitler, is witnessing the death of 
foreign missionary activity. The foreign missionary 
societies have lost more than $5,000,000 a year through 
the cutting off of missionary offerings. Norway had 
a staff of 462 missionaries in various lands. All of 
them have been cut off from all sources of income. A 
similar situation exists in Denmark, Holland, and 
Finland. 

Apparently, if the making of Christ known to the 
nations is to continue, it will have to be done almost 
entirely by Christians in the United States and the 
British Empire. 

One would think that all interest in foreign mis- 
sionary activity in Great Britain would be on the 
decline, because of the agonies through which Great 
Britain is passing. Her cities are being bombed, and 
her churches and the homes of Christian people are 
being left in ruins. Surely, the Christians of Great 
Britain would be able to say, "We have enough to do 
at home." But are they saying it? No! We are told 
that during the first year of the war, which ended last 
September, a total of 164 missionaries and 58 new 
recruits were sent out by the Church Missionary So- 
ciety from Great Britain. In addition to these 222 
workers, 50 more are on the sailing list, who are seek- 
ing passage to mission stations in Africa and in the 
east. 15 women recruits and five men are reported 
to be sailing shortly for China under the China In- 
land Mission; and eight missionaries have just re- 
turned to the Orient from their furloughs. 

While the bomb of gun-fire was distinctly heard 
above their homes and churches, the Christians were 
holding farewell meetings in London for these mis- 
sionaries. We are reliably informed that the war has 
not reduced the contributions to the missionary socie- 
ties and that the money received for the work dur- 
ing this past year is considerably more than the re- 
ceipts for the same time last year. 

Thus, the banner of the cross is being carried for- 
ward in spite of the tyrants, who are trying to turn 
our world into a living hell. 

But if Great Britain carries on thus as the bombs 
fall, raining death and destruction upon their cities, 
their homes, and their churches, what should the 
Christians of America be doing? Unless gratitude has 
disappeared from our hearts, we know what we will 
do. Instead of talking "hard times',, and holding back 
our offerings for fear of the future, we will join in 
the spirit of Great Britain and advance all along the 
line ! 

We are certainly looking forward to the greatest 



—5- 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



2>Q*ta Jluila 



By MRS. HILL MACONAGHY, Rio Cuarto, Argentina 



The apostle Paul, writing to the Philippians, ad- 
dressed them: "My joy and crown." And without 
doubt one of the greatest joys that a servant of the 

Lord can experi- 

I enca, is to see 
1 Christ being formed 
in the lives of those 
whom He has been 
privileged to lead 
| to the Lord, and to 
watch their growth 
from babes in 
Christ to maturity 
as Christians. 

An example of 
such a one is Dona 
Luisa, who with 
har son, Lorenzo, 
appears in this pic- 
ture that was taken 
recently in their 
little garden. Dona 
Luisa had been at- 
tending the meet- 
ings in Alejandro 
over a number of 
years. but had 
never accepted the 
free gift of God, 
which is salvation 
through our Lord 
Jesus Christ. She 
was a heavy drink- 
er of wine, as are 
many of these peo- 
ple , and perhaps 
that was an ob- 
stacle to her ac- 
cepting the Lord. However, several months ago, she 
made her choice and received the Lord Jesus Christ as 
her Savior. And what a change in her life has been 




Dona Luisa Junco and son Lorenzo. 
They both recently Gccepfcd the Lord 
as their Savior and are very faithful. 
Dona Luisa cannot read, but wants to 
learn, so that she can read the Bible for 
herself. They live in Alejandro. 



wrought since Jesus came into her heart! Everyone 
knows that she is a Christian. One day we asked her 
how everything was, and she replied: "Life is more 
tranquil now." 

Although she is almost crippled wish rheumatism, 
she takes tracts every week to distribute among her 
friends and neighbors. She takes in washings to earn 
a living for herself and son, for at present he is out 
of work. It is almost impossible to secure work now, 
since the war makes it impossible for Argentina to 
ship abroad her large supply of grain, and many who 
formerly worked in the grain can now find nothing at 
all to do. 

Despite their poverty, they are happy in the Lord. 
For after Dona Luisa was saved, her son also accepted 
the Lord, and they both expect to go into the bap- 
tismal waters when we have a baptismal service there 
within the next few weeks. 

Through her we have recently contacted a large 
family of unbelievers. One of the sons of the family 
is known all over town as a drunkard, brawler, and 
criminal. He has come tc the last two services and 
also has bought a New Testament. Please remember 
this family in prayer. What a testimony to the grace 
and saving power of our Lord it would be if they should 
be saved! 

Dona Luisa never learned to read, but now she has 
a desire to learn so that she may be able to read her 
Bible for herself. She isn't satisfied just to listen to 
others and to be dependent upon them. That isn't 
sufficient. She has a hunger for more of the Word. 
O, that more Christians had such a hunger! If such 
were the case, there would be more Christ-likeness, 
and less vaunting of self. 

Pray for Dona Luisa, that she may be enabled to 
learn to read her Bible, and that she and her son will 
continue to grow in grace and in the knowledge of 
our Lord Jesus Christ. 



foreign missionary offering that The Brethren Church 
has ever known. In spite of the fact that we are 
facing great difficulties in the matter of transporta- 
tion, our board will be calling for new recruits. We 
predict that before the next fiscal year has gone, doors 
will open, and we shall be in need of every dollar at 
our command, that we may send forth additional 
recruits to help those on the field to continue the 
battle. No, The Brethren Church will not retreat. 



Liouoi' Breed? Murder 

The Metropolitan Life Insurance Company reports 
that it has made a study of 500 homicides among a 
group of its policy holders. It repoVts that one-half 
of the murderers killed because thev "just got mad." 
A quarrel would start over some trifling incident, and 
the question become more and more heated, until 
some one was killed. The Life Insurance Company 
reports that 116 of the 250 "quarrel-case" homicides 
were in instances where either the slayer, or the vic- 



tim, or both, had been quaffing the intoxicating cup. 
The slayer had not premeditated murder in his heart, 
and had no particular enmity or other motive, but 
alcohol simply brought on the desire to kill. Verily 
"Wine is a mocker, strong drink is raging; and who- 
soever is deceived thereby is not wise" (Prov. 20:1>. 
However, we are not convinced that all this killing 
is due to liquor alone. Men drank liquor 100 years 
ago, even as they are drinking liquor today, but there 
were not so many homicides. We are convinced that 
much of the killing going on today is due to demon 
influence that is sweeping the earth again, even as 
the demon world knows that the coming of the Lord 
draws nigh. Demon activity was great when our 
Lord came to the earth the first time. It will be so 
when He comes again. However, when a man is 
demon-possessed, and you pour strong drink into the 
temple where the demon abides, then there is going 
to be trouble, indeed. May God have mercy upon 
the rulers and upon the people who are responsible 
for legalizing the sale of strong drink in our nations 
in days when we would have trouble enough with- 
out it. 



-6— 



JANUARY 4, 1941 



jfiosn 3 Mi<i<Lio+taiied Zntaute to. Africa 

ELIZABETH TYSON — HAROLD DUNNING — MARGUERITE GRIBBLE DUNNING 




Miss Tyson 



By ELIZABETH TYSON 

"And behold, I am with thee, and will keep thee in 

all places whither thou goest, and I will bring thee 

again into this land, for I will not leave thee, until I 

have done that which I have 

spoken to thee of" (Gen. 28:15>. 

Another furlough has come to 
a close. Another term of service 
in far away Africa is before me. 
I have enjoyed more than I can 
express the privilege of fellow- 
ship with friends old and new 
during my stay in the homeland. 
As I now face again the whitened 
harvest field of the Oubangui- 
Chari, I do thank the Lord for 
answering prayer and opening a 
way across the troubled seas, 
making possible my return. I 
also thank God for each member 
of our church who has contrib- 
uted so generously toward my 
outfit and support. 

Although I am leaving for the field in an hour when 
the perils of the sea have reached their peak in world 
history, there need be no fear, for He who spoke 
peace to stormy Galilee is our Captain. The presence 
and keeping power of the Lord will be sufficient, and 
as I go I know that you will support me just as faith- 
fully in prayer as you always have done, "for we live, 
if ye stand fast." 

"As you saw us buy our tickets, and our trunks begin 
to pack. 

How many times you asked us, 'Are you glad you're 
going back?' 

"For a queer and alien people, how can you really care? 
Please tell us very frankly, Do you like it over there? 

"Can you leave . . . , Oh, please don't say it! That 

was fought out long ago. 
We are going back to Africa, just because they need 

us so. 



"Don't ask us if we like it — the heartache and the 
pain — 

But listen as we tell you, we'll try to make it plain. 

i 

"If we went to make a living, if we went for gold or 
gain, 

Even for a million dollars, we'd not go back again. 

i. 

"We go because the Master loved an alien people, too. 
To sacrifice and service, did He never summon you?" 




Rev. Dunning 



HAROLD DUNNING — AUTOBIOGRAPHY 

On December 27. 1911, in the city of New Brunswick, 
New Jersey, to a deacon of the Baptist Church and his 
wife, was born a boy. Even before his birth he was 
given to the Lord. Although in those _ 
days that home was only a nominal 
Christian home, yet there was enough I 
light in that home to enable the parents ■ 
to surrender this God-gi^en life to its | 
Maker. 

The immediate years that followed is 
the old history of every nominal "church 
member's" home. There was a form of 
godliness but also a friendliness with 
the world. This young man was raised 
in the atmosphere of a dead religion, a 
religion of works without the vitalizing, 
conquering, and controlling power of the 
message of grace. 

Then one day the home was completely changed. 
The parents were led to a church where the grace of 
God was preached. Soon, under the influence of God's 
Word simply taught, the worldliness of their lives and 
the emptiness of their former religious profession came 
to light. Then came the change. The world was swept 
from the home and Christ became its Head. 

The effect of this on the youngest son was almost 
what could be expected. Having been trained in the 
ways of the world he naturally was antagonistic to 
the way of grace. The cross was an offense, and its 
reproach he shunned. Though young in years his life 
became steeped in worldlines. 

One day the message of God came to his heart. 
Anthony Zeoli, a faithful witness, proclaimed God's 
grace, and God used the message to win this young 
worldling to His love. How this call finally reached 
his cold, dead heart is a mystery of grace and the 
power of prayer. But Christ did reach that heart, and 
great was the change He performed. The world lost 
its allure in his eyes, and Christ became his Lord. 

Along with the call into God's grace came the call 
to proclaim that grace. Almost within the same after- 
noon a deep, settled assurance was born in that young 
man's heart that God had called him to tell the old, 
old story in some land beyond the sea. He tried to 
fight it. He tried to rationalize it and discard it as 
mere imagination, but always deep within him, no 
matter where he was or where he went, was that in- 
explicable knowledge that God had singled him out to 
be a missionary. 

Finally this call conquered, and answering it he left 
home and loved ones to follow Christ. Moody Bible 
Institute was the first stop in this God-directed path. 
Here again the Lord turned his eyes to the needy world 
and pointed to Africa, saying, "Go in this thy strength, 
the Lord thy God is with thee whithersoever thou 
goest." Then He led this young man to meet a young 
woman and intertwined their hearts first with a com- 
mon purpose, then that love which causes a man to 
forsake his parents' home and establish his own. 

He debated in his mind whether to apply to the 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



Brethren Missionary Board or to the Mid-Missions 
Board of the Baptist Church. Both had work in French 
Africa, the land to which he had been called. At last 
the Lord led him to apply under the former. Then 
the doctrine and message of the Brethren Church 
began to sink into his consciousness and to confirm 
themselves to him through the study of the Word. His 
beloved sensed this but discreetly kept silent, realizing 
that he must form his own opinion on these matters. 
Not once till after he was a Brethren did she speak 
concerning denominational matters. The struggle was 
not an easy one for him; he had not bean rocked in a 
Brethren cradle. Many of his friends, not having an 
understanding of the Brethren message, confused it 
with legalism and spoke to and of him as one who was 
departing from the message of grace. But the truth of 
God must be believed, and all institutions and senti- 
ment which are contrary to His precepts must be for- 
saken if we are to be loyal to Christ. 

Following his graduation from Moody Bible Insti- 
tute he entered Ashland College where he studied for 
one year. The following sumer vacation. 1938, he and 
Marguerite Gribble were united in marriage. During 
the next year he was received into the membership of 
the Brethren Church in Sunnyside, Washington. 

In the fall of 1938 he enrolled in Grace Theological 
Seminarv. Here under the capable leadership and 
teaching" of the professors of that seminary his train- 
ing was completed. Those were impatient years, years 
of straining at the leash and wanting to run ahead of 
the Lord. They were years of testing and doubting. 
Much that occurred during the first and major part 
of those years would like to be forgotten, and yet they 
were years that were invaluable. Certainly this is an 
evidence that our Lord "doeth all things well" and that 
He makes "all things work together for good to them 
that love God, to them who are the called according 
to his purpose." 

Following graduation Harold Dunning with his wife 
visited many of the eastern Brethren Churches and 
camps in the interest of BSLV. Succeeding this were 
three months of pastoral supplying when suddenly the 
long waited for opening of the door came. December 
3 the word came, and December 24 the boat is to sail. 
He asks your prayers, for he is only a sinner saved by 
grace, but one who as much as in him is, is ready to 
preach the gospel to them that are in Ougangui-Chari 
also. 



AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF 
MRS HAROLD DUNNING 

Marguerite Edna Gribble made her appearance into 
this world on October 29. 1915, in the Hahnneman 
Hospital in Chicago, Illinois. She arrived .iust three 
minutes before noon, and has, as a gen- 
eral rule, been on hand for all other 
meals ever since! Her relatives and older 
friends are frequently embarrassing her 
by relating how she used to be such a 
"cry baby." However, the writer wishes 
to assure you that she has tried to get 
over that because her parents taught her 
early in life that crying would not always 
secure what one wanted. 

Marguerite was richly blessed of God 
with a wonderful heritage, both parents 
being missionaries who firmly believed 
Mrs. Dunning triat "the just shall live by faith" and 
who walked in complete dependence and 
reliance upon God. Before the birth of their little 
daughter she had been dedicated to the Lord for His 
complete control. Elder James Gribble, the father, 
received the assurance that should the Lord tarry the 
one who was to be born would be a "herald of the 




cross." Marguerite was named for Dr. Marguerite 
Everham, a missionary in China and a friend of the 
mother, Dr. Florence Gribble. If she had been a boy 
the parents would have named her Louis for Dr. Louis 
S. Bauman, the father's pastor and Secretary-Treas- 
urer of the Brethren Foreign Missionary Society. 

At around the age of one year and a half she sailed 
with her parents and two other missionaries for 
French Equatorial Africa. (These years are given in 
"A Little Girl's Four Years in Africa" and "Undaunted 
Hope") . 

By the time she was six and a half she was settled 
and already feeling very much at home with Mr. and 
Mrs. Weed of Sunnyside, Washington. Although the 
Weeds never could have and never sought to replace 
the affection that Marguerite bore for her own parents. 
( In fact they constantly reminded her that her own 
parents should come first in everything — even in her 
prayers > . they themselves dear to her that she 
could not love them any more if they were her own 
flesh and blood. She can only thank God for their 
love and gentle care and Christian training, as no 
words of gratitude can ever express adequately the 
thanks that she feels. 

Christian heritage and Christian environment are 
two of the greatest gifts that God can bestow upon 
any human being, and fortunate is the one who has 
them. But praise God, His gracious giving does not 
end there. "For God so loved .... that He gave His 
only begotten Son that whosoever believeth in Him 
should not perish but have everlasting life." Mar- 
guerite early in life believed in the Lord Jesus as her 
personal Savior and was baptized at the age of four 
and a half. However, for ten years from the time she 
was about eight years old she was assailed with doubts 
and fears as to her salvation. She possessed no assur- 
ance whatever, and furthermore, knew there was noth- 
ing more she could do than believe. How many times 
she wished she could De annihilated so she would not 
have to feel the weight of guilt for sin which she could 
not be sure was put away! Because she was always 
afraid of "exposing her ignorance" or of letting peo- 
ple know she was really not the "good little girl whose 
parents were missionaries" she never once voiced her 
fears to a single person. Many were the nights, though, 
that before she could go to sleep she would plead with 
the Lord Jesus not to come back during that night un- 
less He knew for sure she was saved! It sounds rather 
funny, now but it was terrifying then. She knew 
works could never help save her soul. She did believe 
with all her heart that the Lord Jesus alone was her 
only hope, but she did not "feel saved." 

It was during these years that the Lord answered her 
oft-repeated prayer for a little brother or sister about 
three years old. When she was nearing eleven the 
Weeds took into their home little Vernon Bishop who 
was three and a half. It was love at first sight be- 
tween this "brother" and "sister." Vernon soon be- 
came the recipient of all the love and abuse which only 
a big sister can shower upon a kid brother: and he 
soon learned to take his part and became as much of a 
tease as all real kid brothers usually are! 

A short time after he had become a member of the 
family. Marguerite's mother returned for her furlough. 
Since most of this one was to be spent in France study- 
ing French, Dr. Gribble took Marguerite with her. It 
was at this time Marguerite remarked to her mother. 
"I see nothing but a life of misery ahead of me. I 
spend half of my time getting used to being lonesome 
for you, and the rest of it getting over being homesick 
for Mama May." For this reason she learned quite- 
young to let the Lord be her comfort when she was sad 
or lonely. How strange that she did not fully trust 
this same Lord tc keep her soul completely safe! 

She finished grade school and high school at the 



—8— 



JANUARY 4, 1941 



average age and with nothing remarkably outstand- 
ing accomplished. Not yet having decided what to do 
with her life but fighting secretly against being the 
missionary which every one seemed to feel she would 
be, she decided to go to college. But there was no 
money for a college education. Time and space will 
not permit a record of the answer to the prayers of 
her mother and foster parents which enabled her to 
leave that fall for the Moody Bible Institute in Chi- 
cago or how she went through the two and a half years 
she was there almost entirely "on faith." Needless to 
say that was the beginning of a fuller and richer life 
for Marguerite. 

In spite of the way she rejoiced in the Bible study 
and in new found Christian friends she was still trou- 
bled about her salvation. She spent much time study- 
ing the passages given in Personal Evangelism for 
"those who lack assurance of their salvation," but 
every case seemed to de different from her own. Fin- 
allv in desperation one night she determined to stay 
on her knees till things were settled: either she would 
find out that she was saved or why she was not. It 
wasn't long till that familiar John 3:16 came to her 
mind in a new way: " . . . . whosoever believeth in 
Him shall .... have everlasting life." A peace that 
she had not known for years came over her, and 
thanking God for her answered prayer she slept 
soundly. The next day her old fears returned, and she 
tried to fight them in the old way, unsuccessfully. In 
the evening she and a girl chum were studying to- 
gether in her room. Suddenly Marguerite broke the 
silence with, "Ruth, I am afraid I'm not saved"! They 
discussed it together for a few minutes, and then Ruth 
said, "Margie, you are just doubting God, not trusting 
Him to do what He promised." From that time on. 
whenever Satan would remind her of reasons why she 
did not deserve to be saved, she would come back with 
the undeniable promises of God. Never since has she 
had any doubt that she was saved and eternally safe 
because of the matchles grace of God. 

Then she faced the problem of what to do with her 
life. She knew that just as sure as anything if she 
took her hands off her own life it would mean being 
a missionary, and she wanted a career. She didn't 
want to "bury herself in Africa"! A new found friend, 
but an old friend of her mother's, without realizing 
the troubled condition of the heart of the girl to whom 
she was speaking, one day mentioned that there could 
be no success, no real happiness in any path of life 
that was not the one the "Master has chosen." That 
evening Marguerite yielded her life for whatever the 
Lord wanted of her. Because He always does "exceed- 
ing aboundantly above all that we ask or think" before 
a week had passed He made carrying the gospel to the 
natives of Oubangui-Chari the supreme desire of her 
life, far greater than anything else she had ever 
dreamed of. 

Before many more months had passed her path 
crossed that of Harold Dunning whose one ambition 
was to preach the gospel in central Africa. Again the 
Lord began to work "in mysterious ways His wonders 
to perform." Finally both parties concerned were con- 
vinced that the Lord's plan for each of them was to 
go through life with the other! And besides that, 
they were in love! So they became engaged to be 
married. 

A short time after this their applications were sent 
to the Brethren Foreign Missionary Board. Then came 
more than five years of preparation, testing, proving, 
and waiting. At last the time has come when Mar- 
guerite and Harold are to go forth to the land of their 
desire. Orders to sail precede the sailing date of the 
boat by only three weeks exactly. How to get ready 
and on the boat in that length of time'' HE IS ABLE! 
As He has done the impossible things in their lives 
before He will do it again. "Faithful is He that calleth 
you, who also will do it." (I Thess. 5:24). 




Miss Byron 



MISS BYRON ILL — DID NOT SAIL 

Since the editor forwarded his copy to the printer in 
Cleveland, we have some bad news to report. How- 
ever, if we could see things as our Lord sees them, 
knowing the future, we might think 
of it as good news. "God's ways are 
past finding out." 

As we write, it is Saturday night, 
December 21st. We have just re- 
ceived a wire from Miss Grace Byron, 
sent from New York City, reading as 
follows: 

"Got visa. 111. Cannot sail. Heart- 
broken. Grace." 

To this telegram, the Secretary- 
Treasurer immediately sent the fol- 
lowing reply : 

"Cheer up. It is Christmas. Our 
Heavenly Father makes no mistakes, 
though we may not understand. Bet- 
ter days ahead. Another boat will sail. Meantime, 
better come back home. Will steamship company 
cancel reservation? Request Kimmell attend to neces- 
sary business matters. Sign large check over to Eliza- 
beth. Love from all. L. S. Bauman." 

We shall have plenty to do, even as Miss Tyson and 
the Dunnings shall have plenty to do, in making pro- 
per disposition of all Miss Byron's freight and baggage 
which have been forwarded to Port Tampa, Florida, 
and may even be now upon the boat. Time is exceed- 
ingly short, for the boat is leaving Port Tampa on 
December 24th. Your Secretary-Treasurer has never 
been busier in his life than in trying to get these four 
missionaries off at Christmas time. The time was 
exceedingly short when we learned of the possibility 
oi securing passage on the boat. 

At this writing, we have some assurance that other 
missionaries will be able to secure passage for Africa 
some time in January or February. We earnestly hope, 
and pray as we hope, that Miss Byron will fully recover 
from her illness, and be ready to sail at the next op- 
portunity. We are not informed as to the nature oi* 
her illness, but the tremendous strain under which 
she has been working in order to get ready for the 
boat, and the sudden change from a very warm South- 
ern California climate (unusually warm for this time 
of year) into the severe winter that we understand 
folks are having in the east, may have had something 
to dc with her illness. L.S.B. 



tfty 



HOWS YOUR 
"FORGITTERY?" 



"My memory is pretty poor," said the old lady, "but 
I have a mighty good forgittery." 

Often a good "forgittery" is more valuable than a 
good memory. It is especially so at this time of the 
year. 

1. Do not carry into the New Year the worries of the 
old. 

2. Forget, your grudges. 

3. Forget the ugly words that were said and the 
mean things that were done. 

4. Forget your failures. 

5. Forget your doubts. 

6. Forget your fears. 



—9— 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



Wlud Aiuud Mid-Af/uca MiUAXisiaSuel Now? 

By PAUL METZLER, Field Counsellor 



Since my return to the U.S.A., many questions have 
been asked me concerning the position of French 
Equatorial Africa at the present time. Many people 
have thought that we were forced to ieave our field. 
Others have thought that there might be a possibility 
of the Mid-Africa missionaries having to leave the 
field in the near future. Still others have wondered 
if the missionaries would have to get along without 
funds. I am glad to be able to answer some of these 
questions which may be on your minds. 

The party of missionaries which landed with me in 
Brooklyn Aug. 17, did not leave the colony of French 
Equatorial Africa because they were forced to do so. 
Of course there is alway a possibility of our mission- 
aries having to come home, but that possibility is more 
remote today than it was two months ago. Since my 
return to the U.S.A., the French colonies of Tchad, 
Oubangui-Chari, Moyen or Middle Congo, Gabon and 
Cameroun have revolted from the Vichy government 
and have lined up along side of Great Britain. As 
long as Great Britain remains undefeated, our mis- 
sionaries will be able to carry on the work of giving 
out the gospel of the Lord Jesus to the natives of 
French Equatorial Africa. 

At the time of our return, the stocks of food supplies 



were beginning to get quite low; but since we have 
had word from the field that supplies are now going 
into F.E.A., England has agreed to buy the produce of 
the French colonies, which have lined up with her, and 
also to see they receive food supplies. 

I am happy to say that there is no danger of not 
being able to get funds to our missionaries. There are 
several ways by which we can get the money to them. 
You might pray especially for Mr. and Mrs. Burkhardt 
at Fort Archambault, for they were supported by the 
Baptist Church of Rue de Naples of Paris. Their sup- 
port has been cut off since the occupation of France. 
They are doing a wonderful work among the white 
population of the Tchad. 

There are now 15 of the missionaries of our field 
home on furlough. There are five others on their 
way now. Next spring nearly 20 of those now on the 
field are due to return home. At the "resent time 
there is no reason why we who are home cannot return 
to the field when the time does come for us. Will you 
not pray that the doors may remain open, and that 
all of us will have all that is needed for our return 
when that time comes? — Baptist Bulletin, December, 
1940 



A REAL MISSIONARY 



The Secretary-Treasurer, in his mail the evening of 
the 21st of December, received a letter from Mrs. 
Minnie Kennedy, written at Bemiller Station, French 
Equatorial Africa, on May 13th, 1940, more than seven 
months ago. How is that for speed in this boasted age 
of speed! What was it that Sherman said? 

Mrs. Kennedy beat this letter to the United States, 
but she never expected to do it when it was written. 
Mrs. Kennedy has had a serious operation in a Phila- 
delphia hospital, and is now convalescing. The letter, 
however, appeals to us as being of sufficient interest 
to rush it into The Brethren Herald at the earliest 
possible date. That which is of interest to all in the 
letter we now quote: 

"We moved into the new house today and are 
all rather weary. I'm living with the Klievers for 
the time being. Received a letter yesterday from 
Dr. Gribble about going on furlough by the way 
of South Africa. Everybody seems to be taking- 
it for granted that it is a settled fact for me, but 
I'm sorry I'll have to unsettle them. The new party 
hasn't arrived as yet, and I said I was staying 
until they got here, or at least meet them at the 
coast. But after all is said and done, I can't go 
without a passport, and it may be some time be- 
fore mine is ready. I had no way of getting pic- 
tures taken until just recently. So, all I can do 
is sit still. I'm not ready to go just now, anyhow. 

"The other night, the mud kept dropping, drop- 
ping, dropping, so I finally got up to see what was 
what. It was a snake crawling along the wall. 
One of the bad kind, and we didn't get him, either. 
The night before, we killed one of them on the 
veranda. So, I don't mind moving into a better 
place. 

"I'm really too tired to think tonight, so will 
close for this time. . . . Received a letter, telling me 
that Mother went home to glory some time in 



March. Three times before she reached the bor- 
derland, but came back again. This time, she 
stayed, and though I had honed to see her once 
again here, I'm glad for her sake that she is safe 
home." 

Our main purpose in quoting this letter is to reveal 
to our readers the spirit of a real missionary; and, 
Mrs. Minnie Kennedy is just that — A REAL MISSION- 
ARY. It isn't her fault that she is at home, on her 
back in a Philadelphia hospital, and it won't be her 
fault if she doesn't get back to Africa as soon as the 
Board will permit her to go. However, the Board will 
insist on her remaining during her furlough year. No 
Foreign Board in the world has a finer missionary 
than Mrs. Minnie Kennedy. She has literally given 
her all that Christ may be made known to her black- 
skinned brothers and sisters in Africa. Let us earn- 
estly nray for her speedy and complete healing. 

L.S.B. 



MISS EMMERT HOME FOR CHRISTMAS 

Miss Mary Emmert. another real missionary, en- 
joyed Christmas at home with her loved ones in Dallas 
Center, Iowa. Miss Emmert was to have accompanied 
Mrs. Kennedy home. Circumstances, however, sep- 
arated them and placed them on different boats at 
Capetown, South Africa. Mrs. Kennedy sailed first, 
but Miss Emmert's boat, being a much speedier boat, 
almost overtook Mrs. Kennedy before she arrived in 
New York. Miss Emmert is home for her well-deserved 
furlough. She brought with her. Kenneth Sheldon 
and took him to the John Brown School in Siloam 
Springs. Arkansas, where he begins his educational 
tasks. His mother and father, Mr. and Mrs. Chaun- 
cey Sheldon, remain on the Field, due to the shortage 
of workers. As soon as our missionaries arrive on the 
Field, doubtless Brother and Sister Sheldon will be 
heading homeward. Yes, real missionaries are they 
all. —L.S.B. 



—10— 



JANUARY 4, 1941 




"MISSIONARIES' MISSIVES" 



pose of the camp is to lead those who are unsaved to a 
decision for the Lord, and to lead those who are saved 
to a closer walk with the Lord. The national pastors 
and the missionaries are all to have a part. I know 
that all of us would appreciate your prayers and those 
of our Brethren for this new venture, that it might be 
the means of reaching many of the young people for 
the Lord." 



The Brethren Church does not possess two more 
faithful missionaries than Mr. and Mrs. Ricardo E. 
Wagner, although they would not like to have the edi- 
tor say so. They are very modest people. Yet. they 
are always on the job. And though working in one of 
the most difficult mission fields in the world, yet they 
nearly always have good news to report. Mrs. Wagner, 
who was formerly Miss Laura Larson, went to the mis- 
sion field from the Manteca (Calif.) Church. Under 
date of Nov. 23. 1940, she wrote to the editor: 

"We are entering our busiest season of the year now, 
and are looking forward to having a baptismal and 
communion service in Alejandro very soon. There 
will probably be six or eight to be baptized; we aren't 
quite sure yet. 

"Some souls have been saved within the last several 
months, for which we praise our Lord. One man, Mr. 
Carino, was formerly very much opposed to the gospel, 
but about six months ago he opened his home for meet- 
ings. We thought that by having some meetings in 
private homes, we might reach some ^eople who were 
afraid to come to the salon. And shortly after this, 
Mr. Carino himself accepted the Lord ... He has not 
been well for some time, and now is bedfast and suf- 
fering intensely. The other day we visited him, and 
he was in his right mind for a short time. Hill (Mr. 
Maconaghy) spoke to him about trusting the Lord, and 
he nodded "Yes," and such a contented look came over 
his face. His wife has been a Christian for a number 
of years, and it is such a comfort to her to know that 
he is ready to go when the Lord calls him. 

"Another man, who was a heavy drinker and was 
not always very good to his wife, recently accepted, 
the Lord also; and what a change there is in him! 
The other night he came to the service on horseback, 
right from his work. He had been working, herding 
cattle and doing work of that kind out in the country 
since 2 a. m., but he came to the service which began 
at 9 p. m. anyway. And. he didn't go to sleep, either! 

"In Los Cisnes, the son and daughter of the baker 
who allows us to use his salon for our meetings, ac- 
cepted the Lord. They are the first adults there to be 
saved; at least, as far as we know. A number of the 
children who attend the children's class in the after- 
noon have been saved. 

"In this little town, we have an advantage that per- 
haps one wouldn't find in many places here. The 
family which is perhaps the most influential are Chris- 
tians. They have lived there a number of years, and 
have a large grocery store, and own land besides. The 
father, I believe, was not a Christian, but he died 
several years ago. Mrs. Debanne and her daughters 
are faithful Christians, and one of them assists us in 
our children's class, giving an object lesson each time. 
Everyone knows that they are "Evangelicals"; and they 
are so good to the poor people that it has been a real 
influence for good, and people attend the services 
there quite well. 

"We shall be so happy when we get our cars down 
here, so that we can go on to the other towns that do 
not nave any gospel testimony. 

"We expect to have something new this summer. 
The Wagners have initiated a Young People's Camp, 
to be held for three days in January. They have felt 
a burden for the young people, and the two-fold pur- 



As Mrs. Kennedy and Miss Emmert bade goodbye 

to Mrs. Gribble in Cape Town, Mrs. Gribble wrote the 
Secretary-Treasurer a letter in which she expressed 
her joys and her hopes, as follows: 

"To me it is a great joy that our missionaries are 
not being detained longer in Cape Town, because of 
their great need for the rest and relaxation of the 
homeland, and because there are so many friends and 
loved ones awaiting them there with eager longing 
and anticipation. My only natural regret at not being 
able to come to America at this time is tempered by 
the fond hope of seeing my beloved daughter and her 
husband in Africa soon, and also by the hope, scarcely 
less ardent, of soon meeting again our beloved mission- 
aries long on furlough — the Hathaways, the Morrills, 
Miss Tyson and Miss Byron. 

"How delighted, too, I shall be to see the reinforce- 
ments you are so soon sending out . . . Oh, you cannot 
realize how greatly they are needed out in the field. 
Our beloved French Equatorial Africa will be open just 
a few brief months or years now. Then I cannot help 
but feel that we missionaries will no longer be per- 
mitted to labor there; but God will permit us, if we 
are faithful to gather out the church from those 
heathen tribes. 

"I am earnestly praying that He, Himself, will lay 
it upon the hearts of all to disentangle themselves 
from any entanglements in which they may have be- 
come involved during these months of waiting, and 
that He will give them courage, resolution, persever- 
ance, and all — all else that is needed to redeem the 
time in French Equatorial Africa. Just because the 
days are evil (surely, the evil days have descended 
upon us) is no excuse for procrastination, but rather 
for a haste to do His will, trusting Him in the dark, 
and counting not our lives dear, so that His name be 
glorified. 

"May God bless you, Dr. Bauman, in your place of 
responsibility and authority. May He give you wis- 
dom to lead and direct, at this time, all these dear 
ones who have placed themselves upon the altar for 
Oubangui-Chari." 



The Sheldons write us, under date of Sept. 4, a very 
interesting letter from which the following paragraph 
will be of interest to the readers of the Herald: "The 
translation of the Acts of the Apostles in Gbea has 
been completed, and we had hoped to be able to get 
it printed in England, where our other translations 
have been cared for heretofore. But because of the 
terrible war conditions, they are unable to do this 
work at the present. With the uncertainty of world 
events, we are anxious to get this book in the hands 
of the infant church. Therefore we are sending the 
manuscript with Miss Emmert, hoping that the Amer- 
ican Bible Society will be able to care for it. We have 
no idea as to what their rates would be. The British 
and Foreign Bible Society have always charged for 
their work just what they judged our people could pay. 
That, of course, did not cover the expenses of printing; 
but they cared for the remainder from special gifts. 
We wonder if there are any translation funds in your 



-11- 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



Wltcd 2>a liletltleti lielteve? 

By L. LLEWELLYN GRUBB 
( First In a Series) 

HOW TO BECOME A CHRISTIAN 

1. Realize your need of a Savior (Rom. 3:23; Isa. 
53:6). This basic truth of the universal condemnation 
of a holy God upon all men outside of Christ, individ- 
ually and collectively, must be accepted before salva- 
tion can be obtained. 

2. Realize the grave consequences of sin (Rom. 
6:23a; Matt. 25:41,46; Luke 16:19-31). To be lost means 
eternal punishment in a place burning v/ith fire called 
hell. 

3. Realize that you cannot save yourself (Rom. 3:20, 
Eph. 2:8,9). No work, nor group of works, which man 
could perform could possibly be efficacious in saving 
his soul. 

4. Realize that God has provided a plan of salvation 

(John 3:16: Acts 4:12). Before the foundation of the 
world the Father decreed that Jesus Christ should be 
the all-sufficient sacrifice for the sins of all men. 

5. Realize that you must believe in Jesus Christ in 
order to be saved and born into the familv of God. 

(John 1:12; 5:24: Rom. 10:9,10). Hearty, sincere be- 
lief with the whole being is essential to the gaining of 
salvation. 

(To be continued) 



A NEW YEAR MOTTO 

These lines, by an unknown author, are well known 
and provide much food for thought at this season. 

I asked the New Year lor some motto sweet. 
Some rule of life by which to guide my feet. 
I asked and paused. He answered, soft and low: 
"God's will to know." 

"Will knowledge then, suffice, New Year?" I cried. 

But ere the question into silence died. 

The answer came: "Nay, this remember, too, 

God's will to do. 

i 
Once more I asked: "Is there still more to tell?" 
And once again the answer sweetly fell: 
"Yea. this one thing all other things above, 

God's will to love." 



hands that could be used for this. Miss Emmert will 
correspond with you concerning this question." 

Yes, the Secretary-Treasurer has a very nice little 
nest-egg toward the publishing of the Gospels in the 
native African tongues. However, we are going to be 
able to use quite a bit more than we have on hand. 
You will notice that Brother Sheldon asks for the 
printing of "the Acts of the Apostles in Gbea." Miss 
Myers is asking that the entire New Testament be 
printed, but in the Karre language. We thank God 
that our missionaries are preparing to leave the Word 
of God in the hands of the natives in Africa, whatever 
the future may hold in store for the missionaries them- 
selves. A gift at this point, we repeat, will be a gift 
well placed.— L.S.B. 



A STRIKING TESTIMONY 

Heinrich von Heine, a Jew, half German, 
half French, a man of flashing wit, a bril- 
liant writer and poet, a confirmed doubter, 
one day took up i Bible and spent most of 
the day in the unwonted task of reading. 

"What a Book!" he exclaimed, as he laid it 
down; "vast and wide as the world! rooted 
in the abysses of creation, and towering up 
beyond the blue secrets of heaven. Sunrise 
and sunset, birth and death, promise and 
fulfilment, the whole drama of humanity, are 
in this Book!" 



"WINDOWS IN HEAVEN" 




The weather was 
rough, and Mrs. 
Scott was not a 
good sailor; never- 
theless she was full 
of confidence, as 
she boarded the 
liner that was to 
take her on a visit 
to America. 



But the weather 
did not improve; 
indeed it became 

more decidedly stormy. Poor Mrs. Scott became so ill 
that the ship's doctor had to be called. His instruc- 
tions were emphatic: "She must take nothing but 
oranges, or I will not answer for the consequences." 

Two or three days passed, with oranges as the only 
diet, when the stewardess came into the cabin and 
said: "I am sorry madam, but we have come to the 
end. of our oranges." 

Mrs. Scott, who was still very ill, replied: "Well, God 
knows my need, and He will supply it, if I cannot do 
without them." 

The stewardess looked astonished, and said, "You 
forget, madam, we are half across the ocean, and. we 
have no means of getting fruit here." 

"No" said Mrs. Scott. "I do not forget; but my God 
could open 'windows in heaven' if He saw fit thus to 
supply my need." 

The stewardess looked incredulous and left her. Mrs. 
Scott wondered whether she had said too much, but 
soon assurance came that God would indeed under- 
take, and she lay back comforted. 

An hour or so went by. Nobody had come near her 
cabin, but from the decK above came the sound of com- 
motion and excitement. Syrens were hooting. If only 
some one would come! She was too weak to go and 
see for herself. 

Presently rapid steps came her way: it was the 
stewardess, her arms filled with delicious-looking 
oranges. "Look," she exclaimed, "your God has sent 
you these!" 

"How?" was all Mrs. Scott could reply. 

"Have you not heard the syren going?" the stew- 
ardess answered. "Well, that was a ship in distress. 
It had been driven o.ut of its course by the storm, and 
so delayed that all its water was exhausted; and we 
were able to supply the need. Then they mentioned 
that their cargo was oranges, and asked if we would 
accept some in exchange for our help. So now we have 
enough for the remainder of the voyage, even if the 
storm continues." 

Mrs. Scott lifted her heart in thanksgiving for this 
new token of God's love, and for such an opportunity 
of witnessing to His power, especially as the stewardess 
said she would never forget the experience. — Sel. 



-12— 



JANUARY 4, 1941 



A IZixj, cMwrit Ajjtesi Small Qame 



By GRACE BYRON 



The rain came down in torrents all morning. At 
about ten o'clock, the sun succeeded in piercing 
through the thick black clouds and scattering them 
away. At about the same time you could see the na- 
tives everywhere, crawling out of their huts backwards, 
for that is the way they do it. How nice it must have 
seemed to be able to breathe the fresh clean air, after 
having been crowded around the fire in the middle of 
the hut. They lean well over the fire, so that the 
smoke curls around their naked bodies, enveloping 
them in a warm cloak. Their eyes become accustomed 
to the smoke so that they do not mind it. 

Horo and Bissi are the names given to twins, and it 
makes no difference whether they are girls or boys, 
they are called Horo and Bissi. Horo and Bissi are 
twin boys. They lost no time in scrambling out of 
their hut when the sun began to shine. They were 
delighted at the thought of the big hunt there would 
be in the evening, for if it rains hard in the morning, 
and the sun shines before noon, the ants are sure to 
fly in the evening. 

This would be the first hunt of the season. The 
mouths of Horo and Bissi fairly watered at the thought 
of the nice juicy ants they would be eating that even- 
ing. Sometimes the ants would bite their tongues, but 
that would not matter much, for they would eat them 
real fast so that the ants would not give too many bites 
before being bitten in two. 

After they stretched themselves and took a few deep 
breaths, Bissi said: "Let's go and find our hole near 
the ant hill at the foot of the rubber tree. It belonged 
to father and is the best one around here. It is ours 
now since father died and went to heaven." 

"I wonder what kind of ants there are in heaven. 
The Paper of God says that when we get to heaven 
we won't be hungry, and there is going to be a big- 
feast," said Horo. 

"We have had to go to bed so many niehts hungry, 
because if we did not, we would not have any peanuts 
and grain to plant, and then we would starve in the 
dry season. Won't it be good to have our stomachs full 
when we go to bed tonight"? said Bissi as he stroked 
his hand up and down his lean abdomen. 

"Here is the hole, we will have to clean it out so it 
will be ready for tonight. I can hardly wait until 
evening. Can you"? said Horo. 

As soon as the sun died and it was dark (it gets 
dark very quickly after sunset in Africa I , Horo and 
Bissi started off on their big hunt after small game. 
They had a bundle of long dry grass, to be used for 
torches and brooms, and two baskets. The larke bas- 
ket is a dodo in which they will put their ants; and. 
the smaller one is a koro, made of a stout twisted grass 
which is used as a sifter, and in which they will bounce 
the ants up and down to make their wings fall off. 
Horo and Bissi ran straight to the rubber tree, squatted 
down on the ground, and began tapping it with a stick, 
inviting the ants to crawl out, and to unfold their 
newly acquired wings and fly. 

"There they come," said Bissi. "Quick, Horo, bring 
your fire and hold it over the hole. That will entice 
them near, and I will brush them in the hole. O! 
there must be thousands of them. 

"Do not let too many get away. Get them all in 
the hole." 

"Here, take the koro, and scoop several handfuls in 
it, and bounce them up and down. Do not put too 
many in or they might get away. That's it; bounce 
them high so the breeze will carry away their wings. 
Give me a handful before you put them in the dodo." 



Horo smacked his lips and said, "Kli lita," which is 
to say they are very sweet. 

"I wonder if father can see us. Last year we went 
hunting with him. I ain so glad the white people came 
to tell us about Jesus, because father just accepted 
Jesus a short time before he died." 

"I wonder why they did not come sooner. If they 
had, mother might still be living. I hope some more 
white people come to teach us. Banda said there is 
no one to teach in his tribe; and he would not have 
heard if he were not the soldier's servant, and had 
not come here with him," said Bissi. 

"Do you remember how scared Banda was when 
father died? He said that we must send for the me- 
dicine man at once, so that he could find the woman 
with the evil spirit, and kill her"? 

"Yes, and he was so angry when we would not do it. 
and she said we would all die." 

"Had we known the Truth sooner we would not have 
sent for the medicine man when uncle died, or have 
the medicine man give the poison cup to mother," said 
Horo. 

Their basket was about full, and no more ants were 
flying, so they started home. Tomorrow they will 
spread the ants on a flat rock in the sun to dry, and 
they will have meat for many a day. 

The moon had not risen, and it was very dark and 
cold. They held their torches close to their naked 
bodies to keep warm. They talked loudly, as they hur- 
ried along the path, to scare away a leopard or some 
other animal that might be lurking near. 

"The cold is killing me. We will have to sleep close 
to keep warm tonight," said Bissi. "I wish we had s 
blanket or even a mat. The chief bought one at the 
post, when he sold his cotton, but we are too poor to 
think of such luxuries. When I get big I am going to 
kill a buffalo. Then I will have a buffalo skin to sleep 
on — they are nice and warm. Up at the mission hos- 
pital, they give the sick blankets to cover themselves. 
I went up to see Kabara when he was sick, and he 
had his head all wrapped up so I could not see him, 
and his feet sticking out." 

Arriving in front of their hut, Bissi said: "You pull 
the mat to one side and I will hold the fire. Then you 
can see inside, so that you will not crawl on some 
snake or scorpion. Put the dodo up high so that the 
chickens will not eat our ants." 

As they sat by the fire warming themselves, Horo 
said, "I wish I had some of those cakes mother used, 
to make. Do you remember how she used to pound 
the ants in the mortar, then pat them in cakes, and 
wrap them in banana leaves and boil them"? 

"Don't talk about it, Horo. It makes me wish I had 
some right now. Maybe Youdenzi will make us some," 
said Bissi. 

"I hope that rat does not come back tonight after 
another bite of my toe. I am so sleepy I am afraid I 
would not wake up and he might bite it clear off like 
one did grandmother's." 

"If you are that sleepy, I had better read out of my 
Gospel of Jean, and pray and thank our heavenly 
Father for all the food He gave us tonight. I will read 
a part of the 14th chapter about the mansions. I am 
glad heaven is going to be a warm place, and it won't 
make any difference if we have a blanket or not. I 
will be glad when all the New Testament is changed 
into our language so we can read it." 

"Tomorrow I will get my Gospel; then I am going 
to work for a song book," said Horo. 

After they read and prayed, they lay down on the 
ground floor with ther feet close to the fire, and were 
soon sound asleep. 



-13- 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 




OUR BOY'S 
and GIRL'S 
VERY OWN 
PAGE 



i HOW I GOT MY WIFE 

A Missionary Story 

"Ndo, will you tell me how you got vour wife?" With 
a smile and a giggle Ndo answered, "Do you really want 
to know? It was like this! When I thought I was 
quite grown up, I kept asking my father to buy me a 
wife. He kept putting me off until one day he said, 
'Go to Nkom and find a girl there that you like.' I cut 
a part in my hair; oiled my skin until it shone; put on 
my best clean clothes; wore my hat on my cheek; and 
my brother and I set off. 

"We entered the town and seated ourselves in the 
palaver house. All was quiet for awhile, but finally an 
old man looked up from his work and inquired, 'Where 
are you from and what do you want?' My heart stopped 
beating, but my brother was my spokesman and said, 
'We came to see about a girl by the name of Meja. Does 
she live here?' The old man nodded and sent to find 
Meja. 

"After a time the girl came with food for us to eat. 
Without a word she set it down and rushed off. It was 
enough. I could see that she was strong and not too 
bad looking. Later someone came to say we would be 
given our answer in the morning. What a restless 
night. Not a wink did I sleep! In the morning the 
parents asked the girl in my presence, 'Do you love 
this boy?' And her answer was, T do.' It was the 
happiest moment of my life. 

"I stayed in the town several days more clearing 
a garden for my future mother-in-law. I wanted to 
make a good impression. When we went home I was 
given the approval of the missionary pastor and the 
church session. My family killed the fatted goat for 
me and my friends. They were proud of their son. 

"Next my father and mother made a visit to the 
girl's town to see if she were all I had pictured and to 
arrange about the dowry. They approved of her and 
agreed to pay fifteen hundred francs in cash, seven 
goats, and some cloths. Of course beside that the 
mother must have a gift of kettles, dishes and spoons. 
It took a long time to collect everything, but at last the 
day came when all was gathered and we paid over the 
goods. Then the government license was obtained and 
we were married by our pastor. 

"I thought I had finished paying for my wife, but 
soon found out I had not. The family promised to 
bring her soon to my village, but when parting time 
came, the old man said. 'I canot let her go until I get 
a rain coat'; a sister demanded a dress and a pair of 
shoes. There was nothing tc dc but meet their de- 
mands. 

"I went home and got the town cleaned and the 
house ready for my bride. Then one day I heard that 
they had started. Men, women and children were 
bringing my wife, but not as joyful a procession as you 
might imagine. There was weeping and wailing as 
though she were leaving never to return. When they 
got about half way they stopped and a runner was sent 
on to tell us that my wife was being held by a brother 
until we would send him a coat and a cap. Where 
could we find these? I began asking around and a 



brother offered me his to send. Before the company- 
reached our village another runner came to say that 
the father refused to let his daughter go on until we 
paid him two pieces of cloth and twenty francs. Would 
the demands never stop? 

"When they reached the village next to ours, my peo- 
ple all went to meet them, singing and dancing and. 
beating the drums. And at last my wife entered my 
town. The day of feasting began. We killed eight 
goats, twenty chickens, six animals from the forest, 
and eight ducks. The women cooked more plantain, 
peanuts, and other good things than I could count. 
Everyone felt they had been well fed by my people. 
As a farewell request my mother-in-law asked for 
some cups, two dresses, and some salt. Of course her 
request had to be granted! I've been married several 
years now, and am happy, for God has blessed me with 
a good wife, and now I have also a little daughter." 

— The Drum Call. 



WARNING ! ! ! 

Do not let your subscription expire! 

Some will be missing The Brethren Missionarq 
Herald. Some subscriptions will be expiring this 
month. Renew yours NOW — still $1.00 a year. Send 
your dollar in today. 

NAME 



ADDRESS 
CITY 



STATE 



Send to 

THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD CO. 

3326 S. Calhoun St. 
Ft. Wayne, Ind. 



THE CHOSEN PATH 
New Year 1941 

How often, Lord, I try to choose 

The path for Thee; 
Instead of asking Thee to choose 

My path lor me. 
The chosen path of safety. Lord, 

Thy choice must be. 

Sometimes in earnest pleading 
prayer 
I seem to see 
A way that looks like Thine . . . 
O may 
I leave Thee free 
To choose, and plan, and open up 
Thy path for me. 

— L. M. Warner. 



NEW YEAR 

"Don't Let the Past Spoil Your Future" 

Don't let the past spoil your future. Don't let the old 
year spoil the new. No matter how many mistakes or 
failures you have made, or what misfortunes have 
overtaken you, even though you have lost everything 
you had in the world — family, money, friends, prop- 
erty — make a new start. Success does not depend upon 
the distance you have traveled, but the way you are 
headed. No matter how discouraging the outlook, keep 
headed toward your goal. A stout heart, an indomit- 
able will and unwavering faith in the Power that sus- 
tains you will win out in spite of the most unfortunate 
and discouraging conditions. 



—14— 



JANUARY 4, 1941 




READ YOUR 

BIBLE 

THROUGH IN '41 



On Jan. 1, begin reading at Gen. 1:1, read unti: the first text if. 
found, and record the reference. The next day begin reading where 
you left off the day before, find the txt for that day, and record 
the reference. By continuing this throughout the year, by Dec. 31 
you shall have read the Bible through. 

Day Text Reference 

8 Go out in the field and take me some venison 

9 I will surely give the tenth unto thee 



10 In the day the drought consumed me, 
and the frost by night 



11 I will lead on softly- 



12 Behold, this dreamer Cometh 



13 Do not interpretations belong to God?_ 

14 What is this that God has done unto us?. 



WILL WE WORK IN HEAVEN? 

We have never been able to reconcile ourselves to 
the idea that heaven will be a place where we shall sit 
down and spend eternity doing nothing. But work 
there will never be wearisome, but a supreme joy. We 
are created to "be workers together with Him." There 
are others that seem to think as we do in this matter. 
In the last (December) issue of "The Chosen People," 
Joseph Hoffman Cohn says: 

"We are of the conviction that there will be plenty 
of work for the redeemed to do, when we reign with 
Him forever and ever. The running of a universe, in 
which our own world is as a pinhead. is no small job; 
and may it not be that we who are His in this world, 
and are going through days and years of disciplining 
and chastising, are being only prepared for a greater 
day to come when we shall be found worthy to share 
with Him in the heavenly mansions that He is now 
preparing for us? 

"It was Dr. E. J. Pace who took photographs of thou- 
sands upon thousands of snowflakes, and he showed 
these on the stereopticon screen greatly enlarged. He 
explained that of all the countless numbers of snow- 
flakes, there had never yet been found two alike. 
Think of the work there is up there for the architect, 
just to design new snowflakes! Think of the task of 
designing new stars, new comets, new planets! There 
are, the astronomers tell us, many, many other worlds 
in this universe which are inhabited. Will they not 
need rulers to govern them? One statement of our 
Lord in the parable of the talents reveals these possi- 
bilities, "Thou hast bean faithful over a few things, I 
will make thee ruler over many things." If He is to 
make us rulers, surely we must have something over 
which to rule. There will be work for the musicians, 
for the mathematicians, for the mind which can or- 
ganize; in fact there will be a place for every talent 
which the child of God possesses." 



SINCERITY AND DETERMINATION 

The Ford Motor Company is so earnestly convinced 
that it has something which all the nations should 
share that agents carry news of it to all cities in all 
lands. They do not debate as to whether or no the ox 
cart of India, the donkey of Spain, or the camel backs 
of Egypt are sufficient and satisfactory for the trans- 
portation of the populations of these lands. They be- 
lieve in their own product — and they carry it there. 
Neither will the Christian argue or quibble over the 
excellence of other faiths. If he has vital touch with 
God. as men can see Him and know Him in Jesus, he 
will be afire with enthusiasm to carry unto other na- 
tions the good news. — Charles H. Nabers, in Gladness 
in. Christian Living. 



BRETHREN FOREIGN MISSIONARY 
DIRECTORY 

SOUTH AMERICA 

Address: 433 South Rivadavia, Rio Cuarto, Prov. 
Cordoba, Argentina, South America. 

Rev. and Mrs. J. Paul Dowdy. 
Rev. and Mrs. Hill Maconaghy. 
South American National Pastors. 

Domingo Reina, Bible Coach worker, 

Rio Cuarto, Prov. Cordoba, Argentina, S.A. 
Rev. and Mrs. Ricardo E. Wagner, 

Almafuerte, Prov. Cordoba, Argentina, S.A. 
Luis Siccardi, 

Cabrera, Prov. Cordoba, Argentina, S.A. 
Juan B. Pisani, 

Tancacha, Prcv. Cordoba, Argentina, S.A. 
Antonio Gammarra, 

Tancacha, Prov. Cordoba, Argentina, S.A. 
Maximino Periera, 

Laboulaye, Prov. Cordoba, Argentina, S.A. 

AFRICA 

Address: Yaloke. par Boali par Bangui, Oubangui- 

Chari, French Equatorial Africa 
Dr. and Mrs. Floyd W. Taber. 
Rev. and Mrs. Harold Dunning. 
Miss Elizabeth Tyson. 
Address: Bassai, par Bozoum, par Bangui. Oubangui- 
Chari, French Equatorial Africa. 
Miss Estella Myers. 
Miss Mabel Crawford. 
Address: Bozoum, par Bangui. Oubangui-Chari, 
French Equatorial Africa. 
Rev. and Mrs. Orville D. Jobson. 

Address: Bellevue, par Bossangoa, par Bangui, 
Oubangui-Chari, F.E.A. 
Rev. and Mrs. Chauncey B. Sheldon. 
Miss Florence Bickel. 

Address: Bekoro (Be-Miller Station), --ar Bozoum, 
par Bangui, Oubangui-Chari, F.E.A. 

Rev. and Mrs. J. P. Kliever. 

Address: Bouca, par Bangui, Oubangui-Chari, 
French Equatorial Africa 

Rev. and Mrs. Joseph H. Foster. 

Missionaries On Furlough 
Miss Grace Byron, 2026 E. 7th St., Long Beach, Calif. 
Dr. Florence N. Gribble, % American Consul, Cape- 
town. S. Africa. 
Rev. and Mrs. J. W. Hathaway, 524 1st St., Fillmore, Cal. 
Rev. and Mrs. Curtis G. Morrill, 725 Fairbanks, 

Ashland, Ohio. 
Rev. and Mrs. Clarence L. Sickel, 5517 Lewis, Long- 
Beach, Calif. 
Missionaries Under Appointment for Africa and 
Awaiting Transportation 
Rev. and Mrs. Robert Williams, Maison du Fargy, 
Beauport, Quebec, P.Q., Canada. 
Miss Ruth Snyder, 120 Bergemont, Quebec, P.Q., Can. 



—15— 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 




J?et y & Standi the 



Meiu l/eat RixfLt! 



Send *7<4e BletUlea Mi^ilo-Ha/uf <Jfe^aJd ta Soetof cJfame 



The Brethren Missionary Herald if now a 
year old — and growing steadily — not sensa- 
tionally — or its 1st anniversary! 

Considering the difficulties faced in this 
first year, we rejoice in the wonderful pro- 
gress, made. 

We have the highest PAID subscription 
list in the history of cur church. But there is 
no need to stop here. It is not enough. Let's 
go on! 



He 



Here is a Two -Point plan that is meeting 
increasing popularity among our churches : 

IMake it your church goal to send The 
Brethren Missionary Herald into every 
home represented in your church and 
Sunday School. What or how could you 
send anything better, or even as good as The 
Brethren Missionary Herald for only 2c a 
week? How could you stimulate greater in- 
terest ':' 



individual subscriptions... One church that 
adopted this plan last year reports it received 
more from members than it paid out for sub- 
scriptions. THINK OF THAT! Not a bad 
business proposition, is it? Why not try it in 
your church this year? We will gladly fur- 
nish subscription envelopes, and give any 
other help within our power 

Think of the missionary articles — both 
home and foreign — the articles on Brethren 
ordinances — the stories for youth — the Chris- 
tian Endeavor news and helps — The Women's 
Missionary Council reports, programs and 
council suggestions — the seminary news and 
articles and the general articles from our pas- 
tors and leaders, as well as news from the 
churches and societies. 

There can be no better way of interesting 
non-Brethren people in The Brethren Church. 
And surely we can say without reservation 
that our magazine carries just the kind of a 
message we would want these,, as well as our 
own membership, to have. 



2 Let the Church underwrite this sub- 
scription list. Then advise all members 
of this action BY the church, with the 
suggestion that ALL those who care to 
may reimburse the church treasury for their 



If you cannot subscribe for a whole year to 
accomplish such a goal in your church or Sun- 
day School, we shall be glad to receive six 
month subscriptions at 50c each. By all means, 
get them ir. at once. 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD CO. 



3326 SOUTH CALHOUN ST. 



FORT WAYNE, INDIANA 



Leo Polman, Secretary of Publications 



—16— 




Annual G. o. 










THAT NEW YEAR CALENDAR- 




id Educational 




LET'S PUT IT UP 


RIGHT 






.... forgetting those things which are behind, and reaching forth 


unto those 


A/umbefi> 




things which are before .... press toward the mark for the prize 
rolling of God in Christ Jesus. — Phil 3:13,14. 


of the high 


+ 








JANUARY 11, 1941 
.3 No. 2 








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THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 




THE WORD 

and 

THE WORLD 



By Alva J. McClain 

President, Grace Theological Seminary, Winona Lake, Ind 

"Silly" Protestant Ministers 

The Rev. Charles S. Selecman, bishop of the Meth- 
odist Church, shouts an indignant protest at what he 
calls the "infamous" situation in Hollywood because 
the movies generally depict Protestant ministers in 
"uncomplimentary" roles and make them the butt 
of jokes. "Protestant ministers," he says, "are always 
made to look silly in the movies." 

Well, as most readers of the Herald know, I would, 
be the last to attempt any defense of the movies. But 
it ought to be said that the movies are not wholly to 
blame for the fact that some preachers "look silly 
in the movies." Some of them really are that way. 
Any preacher who wastes his time and money attend- 
ing movies, as they are today, not only looks silly, he 
is silly. Perhaps if the average preacher spent more 
time at the job God called him to do, and less time 
fooling around with things that even the world re- 
gards with little respect, the movies might have a 
higher opinion of him. 

One wonders what to think of the ministry when 
bishops are more concerned about the way preachers 
are made to look in the movies than they are about 
the ungodly and immoral pictures that are being 
shown. Bishop Selecman thinks that "all united 
Protestantism should rise up and protest this infamous 
situation in the moving picture industry." What a 
challenge to Christian service and heroism! Surely 
this is a new low in the barometer of spiritual vision. 
The movies would probably tell the bishop to stay 
home if he doesn't like the way the preachers are 
pictured on the screen. And that would be valuable 
advice. 



Trine or Triune Immersion? 

On several occasions people have inquired about 
these two words. Which is correct as a description of 
baptism as the Brethren practice it? The answer is 
that both words are admissible. "Trine" is from the 
Latin "trinus," meaning threefold. "Triune" is from 
two words, "tri" and unus," meaning three in one. 
The former term is doubtless more closely associated 
with threefold baptism historically. But both terms 
have been used in this connection, and I prefer 
"triune" because it carries two important ideas: first, 
that baptism is a threefold rite in action; and second, 
that it is one baptism, not three. In the same way. I 
prefer to speak of the triunity of God rather than the 
trinity, although both terms are perfectly good. It 
is a blessed revelation of Christianity that there are 
three Persons in the Godhead. But we ought never 
lose sight of the other revelation, given first historic- 
ally and just as important, that we worship one God, 
not three Gods. 



side of England, if we finally do enter it, there is 
little doubt that history will give large credit to the 
activity of Lothian while serving as ambassador at 
Washington. All this made him an interesting figure. 
The English ambassadors know how to put their own 
country first. 

But there is another interesting aspect to the death 
of Lord Lothian. For several weeks the ambassador 
had been seriously ill, but he had not consulted a 
physician, because of his religious beliefs, according 
to newspaper reports. This information alone would 
not tell you much. There are many cults whose mem- 
bers do not believe in consulting doctors. But the 
newspaper story goes on to say that "In attendance 
at the time of death were Christian Science practi- 
tioners from Boston." For a newspaper to say even 
this much was somewhat unusual, for the late Mrs. 
Mary Baker Eddy's hierarchy at Boston has found 
ways of making things hot for newspapers which say 
too much about their doings. And so the editors, 
having enough trouble as it is, are careful not to get 
into the hair of the Christian Science Publication 
Committees. 

But consider now the dreadful scene behind that 
simple line written by a newsaper reporter — "In at- 
tendance at the time of death were Christian Science 
practitioners from Boston." There in that room, silent 
except for the final gasps of the dying ambassador, 
stood the gentlemen from Boston who say there is 
no death. There they stood and watched him die. 
the man they had taught not to call a physician, be- 
cause there is no sickness and death. And they could 
do nothing for him in his extremity. And so they 
watched him die, and then went out to give more 
"Free Lectures" telling other gullible men there is no 
death. If you are astonished at this, do not forget 
that the woman who taught them to say there is no 
death is also dead! What a ghastlv travesty to mock 
the hopes of men in the name of Christianity! 



Christian Science Faces Death 

The untimely death of Lord Lothian. British am- 
bassador to this country, was regarded as an irrepara- 
ble loss by his government. In this solemn and critical 
hour for England, he had done perhaps more than any 
other living Englishman to win favor in the United 
States for his country. Whatever we may think about 
the advisability of America entering the war on the 



Reman Catholic Church Wins 

After a long and extended legal battle over a church 
property at Indiana Harbor, the court awarded the 
decision to the Roman Catholic See at Rome, Italy. 
The congregation had tried to sever the overlordship 
of the Pope of Rome by dissolving the original corp- 
oration and reorganizing the church, but found this 
was impossible under the law. So the judge awarded 
the property to the Roman hierarchy, and ruled that 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 

The Brethren Missionary Herald is published weekly, 
four times a month, or 4S times a year, at Herald Press, 
Inc., 1300 West 9th St.. Cleveland. Ohio, by the Brethren 
Missionary Herald Co., 3326 So. Calhoun St., Fort Wayne, 
Ind. 

Subscription Price: In the United States and possessions, 

$1.00 a year: Foreign countries, $1.50 a year. 

ADMINISTRATION 

Secretary of Publications: Leo Polman 

Business Office Secretary: Miss Geneva Kuhn 

Editorial Office Secretary: Miss Grace Allshouse 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

President: Russell D. Barnard Secretary: Tom Hammers 

Vice-President: Ralph Rambo Treasurer: Homer A. Kent 

R. D. Crees Mrs. Roy Patterson R. E. Gingrich 

George Richardson L. L. Grubb Bernard Schneider 

EDITORS 
Foreign Missions: Louis S. Bauman. 
Educational : Alva J. McClain. 
Home Missions: R. Paul Miller. 
Women's Missionary Council: Mrs. A. B. Kidder. 



Entered as second class matter at the post office at 
Cleveland, Ohio, February 9, 1939, under the act of March 
3. 1879. 



JANUARY 11, 1941 



the pastor could not hold his position because he had 
not been appointed by the proper Roman Catholic 
authorities. 

If all this sounds faintly familiar to some of the 
Brethren, be thankful that you are members of The 
Brethren Church, not the Roman Catholic Church. 
When a congregation enters the Roman fold, its free- 
dom is gone forever. No appeal to the courts can help 
you once you have submitted to that government. 
How thankful we should be for the heritage of con- 
gregational church government, and we should resist 
without compromise all efforts to move us in the 
direction of Rome. 



BRETHREN WOMEN'S BIBLE CLASS AT GLENDALE, CALIF. 



"Moth and Rust' 

Occasionally I glance over the financial page in the 
morning paper, not that I own any stocks and bonds 
to worry about, but to watch the trends in a. world 
which is slowly sinking into the pit of bankruptcy. 
Bankruptcy, of course, is not a nice word, and there 
will be nicer words used to describe the experience 
when it comes. But, as someone has accurately ob- 
served, it's boloney no matter how you slice it. 

Here is what I found the other morning, hidden 
under a ponderous and uninteresting headline. Pre- 
ferred and common stocks in the C & N W Railroad 
had been taken off the blackboards in the Chicago 
and New York exchanges because the value had 
shrunk so low that no buyers could be found at any 
price. Recalling vaguely that this stock had once 
been rated very highly, and because of interest in. 
the road over which 1 had ridden many times, I read 
the story, as follows: 

In October, 1913, 27 years ago only, the noted Roger 
Babson had said of this stock: "I consider this one 
of the very best investment stocks which can be pur- 
chased, and heartily recommend it to banks, trustees, 
widows, and all investors." When Babson said this 
the common stock was selling at 138, and even as 
late as 19 9 8 it looked like he had not missed, for it 
reached 150. From there the plunge was downward 
until finally it was offered at 3/16 with no buyers. 
This means that a block of stock which was worth 
over $1000 in 1928, invested in one of the best roads 
in the country, could be bought in 1940 for about 
$1.87, but no one wanted it even at that price. Thus 
an enuity of about $181,000,000 was wiped out. I have 
an idea that, if we could look into the various homes 
where that stock was owned, we might find a great 
deal of traeedv. the blighted hopes of men who trusted 
in material things. 

We reallv know nothing at all until we have learned 
that the things that are seen are temporal. Who 
knows how much good might have been accomplished 
if the $181,000,000 had been invested in carrving the 
gospel to a lost world? Such investments can never 
be wiped out by "moth and rust." 



Speaking of Missionaries 

On Dec. 10 an item of news appeared stating that 
the Presbyterian Church (South), in accordance with 
requests by TJ. S. consular authorities, were with- 
drawing temporarily one hundred missionaries with 
their families from China, Japan, and Korea. 

We can sympathize deeply with the problem of 
foreign boards and missionaries when their govern- 
ment tells them it will no longer be able to guarantee 
protection. But we can hardly feel that, when other 
men are laying down their lives on the battlefield 
for earthly kingdoms the soldiers of the Lord should 
give up the battle even temporarily. We can under- 
stand the feeling that, in these difficult times, the 
women and children should return home. But surely, 
until they are forced out, it does seem that the men, 
wherever possible, should remain at their posts on the 




TOP ROW, left to right— Mrs. Wilson, Masters, Black, Martin 
Matson, Barrow, Letson, Stivers, DeListe, McClellen, Mr. Richardson. 

MIDDLE ROW — Mrs. Lubenville, Greatrex, Richardson, Miss 
Reeves, Mosier, Hengerer, and Walker. 

BOTTOM ROW— Miss Long, Cargion, Shaw, Casey, Stump. 



various foreign fields. If our foreign boards give up 
too easily in the face of opposition and danger, we 
may find the doors shut as they have never been 
before when we try to get back in. We need to pray- 
much for the missionaries throughout the world just 
now, and especially for our own who are sticking by 
their posts, and the others who are anxious and ready 
to go back. 



The Futility of Mere Words 

Some time ago our attention was called to a state- 
ment made by Pope Pius XII in a broadcast from 
Vatican City, in which he appealed to the fighting 
nations to try to observe the Golden Rule in their 
warfare, and not to do to others anything they would 
not want done to them. 

Certainly no one in his right senses would sneer at 
any effort, no matter how feeble, which might have 
the effect of humanizing the conduct of war, if there 
can be such a thing. Therefore, we can wish for 
the Pope nothing but success in his efforts. 

But, after all, there is something both pathetic and 
tragic about the Pope's appeal, when considered in the 
light of his claims. Posing as the very Vicar of Christ 
Himself on earth, claiming to hold the keys of the 
kingdom of heaven, setting himself forth as the right- 
ful king of kings with divine authority to make and 
unmake rulers — yet all he can do is to make feeble 
appeal for a bit of humanity in the business of killing. 
Some day, thank God, there will be a real King of 
kings, One who has a right to the throne of David, 
and who will wield a rod before which all the kings 
of the earth shall bow in submission or be broken to 
pieces. Better look to the Lord at His coming, rather 
than to Popes and religion, for the establishment of 
righteousness on earth. 



The Sickness of Liberty 

Quite often men overlook the most significant events 
of their days. It is not always the spectacular hap- 
penings, but the little things, which have most to do 
with the determination of history. One of the rea- 
sons for this seeming paradox is that men do not 
think the little things matter, and therefore let them 
take their course. Thus a movement may start im- 



—3— 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



perceptibly which later becomes a raging avalanche, 
and then it is too late. The thing is done. The loss 
is irrevocable. 

So it is about the liberties of free men, both polit- 
ically and religiously. Recently a bill was passed by 
both houses of Congress which many thoughtful men 
felt was quite important. Expressed simply, the bill 
gave to us the right to do what we had always sup- 
posed we had a right to do under the constitution, 
namely, get our day in court when any government 
agency tries to rob us of our rights. But, very strange 
to say, a terrific opposition to this bill developed, in 
the executive branch of the federal government, and 
the hatchet men of the President did all within their 
power to kill the bill or let it die. Finally, however, 
the bill got through by a large majority, whereupon 
the President proceeded to veto it, and the veto stands 
because not quite a two-thirds vote could be mustered 
to pass it over the veto. In explanation of his veto, 
the President said that in these times the nation could 
not afford the "luxury of litigation." In plainer Eng- 
lish, the President is saying that at present individual 
liberty is a luxury we cannot afford, for the only gua- 
rantee any person has from the oppression of dic- 
tatorial rulers is found in his right to appeal to the 
courts. And the first step of all would-be dictators is 
to abolish this right. 

Now the strange and ominous part of this matter 
is that men for the most part seem unconcerned about 
it. Probably most people of this country were more 
interested in what Hitler and Mussolini were doing 
than in the fate of the Walter-Logan bill. Yet it is 
wholly possible that sq far as the future of America 
is concerned, the veto and defeat of this bill may 
prove to be far more disastrous to our liberties than 
anything that is happening now over in Europe. The 
tide of totalitarianism rolls, on, even in our own 
country. But the student of the Word of prophecy 
is not surprised. We can only lament that men are 
so apathetic and blind to what is going on. 



SPEAKERS AT THE SEMINARY 

During the semester the faculty and students had 
the pleasure of hearing the Rev. H. B. Centz, repre- 
sentative of the American Mission to the Jews, who 
always brings great blessing to the seminary: Dr. A. 
Christy Brown, retired minister of the Presbyterian 
Church, who studied at Union Seminary in New York 
when that institution held orthodox views under the 
leadership of such men as the late Dr. Shedd; the Rev. 
McCrory, evangelist of the United Presbyterian 
Church; our own Dr. J. C. Beal; and Mrs. Henry M. 
Woods, prominent Christian author and worker, whose 
organization has brought much blessing and inspira- 
tion through the distribution of books on prayer and 
missions. 



MISS PANKHURST COMING 

The seminary has been very fortunate in being able 
to secure the noted English writer and worker. Miss 
Christabel Pankhurst, as a speaker in February. Ac- 
cording to present plans, she will address the faculty 
and students at 2:30 p. m. on Tues.. Feb. 11, and also 
speak the evening of the same day at 7:30 in a public 
meeting held under seminary auspices at one of the 
local churches, probably the Presbyterian. We invite 
any of our pastors and people who are near enough to 
attend these meetings, as this is a very unusual oppor- 
tunity to hear a noted sneaker and writer. Miss Pank- 
hurst has been honored by the British king for per- 
sonal services to the Empire, and her articles will 
appear in the Sunday School Times during the com- 
ing year. She will also be one of the featured speakers 
at the Winona Lake Bible Conference this coming 
summer. Dont forget the date at the Seminary — 
Feb. 11, 2:30 and 7:30. 



DR. KELLY LIBRARY PURCHASED 

The seminary is very happy to announce the pur- 
chase, at a very low figure, of the personal library of 
the late Dr. Frederick T. Kelly, who for many years 
was the professor of Semitics and Archaeology at the 
University of Wisconsin. The total number of books 
was 799, and included many valuable books on arch- 
aeological research in Bible lands, commentaries, and 
technical works in the field of Hebrew and Semitic 
languages. The books were purchased from Mrs. 
Kelly, and the contact was made through Bro. Miles 
Taber, who over a year ago stopped at her home in 
Madison to secure a room for the night while passing 
through Wisconsin. Dr. Kelly also left a case of over 
5,000 stereopticon slides which he had accumulated by 
purchase and while traveling in Bible lands. The case 
alone cost $40 originally, was made of hard oak, and 
contains 150 separate compartments for the filing of 
the pictures. Mrs. Kelly wanted to dispose of both 
the books and the slides, but although the price she 
placed on both was very reasonable, the seminary did 
not feel that it could offer more than the price she 
had set on the books alone. Therefore, Mrs. Kelly 
very graciously sold us the books and gave us the case 
of slides under the provision that the gift should be 
marked in memory of Dr. Kelly, which the seminary 
was glad to do. Many of these slides will prove of 
high value in connection with archeological studies at 
the seminary, and Prof. Kent expects to spend part of 
the Christmas vacation examining and classifying 
them for this purpose. Mrs. Kelly has indicated her 
satisfaction because these books and slides will be 
used in training men for the Christian ministry. And 
the seminary feels that a very useful addition has been 
made to the equipment of the school. Special appre- 
ciation is due to Bro. Miles Taber. Perhaps it should 
be said that nearly 50 books were purchased out of 
the library by the seminary before consummating the 
purchase for the whole library. Hence the total num- 
ber of books would be well over 800. 

The seminary will appreciate it if friends will keep 
their eyes open for personal libraries which might 
be secured either by gift or by purchase at low prices. 
While the seminary has now available nearly 7000 
books, it should be remembered that nearly 5000 of 
these belong to the Winona Summer School of theol- 
ogy; and we are anxious to build up our own library 
so that we would not be handicanoed if at some time in 
the future the other library should be no longer avail- 
able to us. 



BOOKS GIVEN TO SEMINARY 

The seminary also desires to acknowledge receipt 
of books given by Dr. Louis S. Bauman, by Mrs. Henry 
M. Woods of Atlantic City, N. J., by Mrs. Nellie Lyons 
of Sunnyside, Wash., and by Mrs. H. J. Prichard of 
Falls City, Nebr. We are grateful for the thought- 
fulness of these friends of the school. 



iilnliilMliilnliiiiiii 




THINK IT OVER. 

If God has a gigantic task to 
be performed, faith gets the 
contract. 



JANUARY 11, 1941 



Chliltiau Zttdeava* 







OFFICIARY 

President: Rev. Robert A. Ashman, 12 S. Clay St., Peru, Ind. 

Vice President: Mr. Glenn Miller, 1840 Rivera Rd, Whittier, Calif. 

Executive Secretary: Rev. Leo Polman, 3326 S. Calhoun St., Ft 
Wayne, Ind. 

Treasurer: Rev. Ernest F. Pine, 610 8th Ave., Juniata, Altoona, Pa. 

News Editor: Rev. Norman Uphouse, 649 Berryville Ave, Winchester, 
Va. 

Lookout Dept. — Director: Miss Ruth McClain, 1051 W. 81 PI, 
Los Angeles, Calif. 

Assistant: Mr. Paul Guittar, 1610 Dueber Ave. S W.. 
Canton, 0. 

Prayer Meeting Dept. — Director: Miss Grace Allshouse, 3326 S. 
Calhoun St., Ft. Wayne, Ind. 

Assistant: Miss Miriam Gilbert, 1539 25th St. S. E, 
Washington, D. C. 

Missionary Dept. — Director: Rev. Arthur Malles, Parrish Court, 
Covington, Va. 

Assistant: Rev. Miles Taber, Leon, la. 

Social Dept. — Director: Miss Lena Marie Kortemeier, Mabton, 
Wash. 

Assistant: Mr. Archie Parr, Berne, Ind. 



ctfaui ia abiesute. BietUn,e+i ftlatia+tcd G. £. 3>ay 



Suggestions to the leader 

Brethren National C. E. Day is observed annually 
to familiarize every member of every C. E. with the 
splendid work your Brethren National C. E. Union is 
doing, and to make each one realize how great a ser- 
vice to the Lord his hearty cooperation will mean. 
Make the program so interesting that no one present 
can go away from the meeting without feeling that it 
has been unusually worth while, and that the national 
work both needs and merits his earnest prayers and 
loyal support. 

Right now put the meeting definitely on your prayer 
list. Prayerfully select those who are to take each 
part. Pray that each one may take his part effectively. 

The plan of the meeting 

Arrange the chairs in a circle as for an informal 
C. E. business meeting. It would add to the occasion 
to make the room as "homey" as possible, with floor 
lamps, framed pictures on the walls, a few easy chairs, 
and a library table. Have a toy telephone on a near- 
by stand in front of a curtain, behind which the 
speakers are stationed. Or if all societies combine for 
observance of Brethren National C. E. Day, have the 
executive committees of each and all others taking 
part on the platform in such a setting, the C. E. Su- 
perintendent who is over all the groups taking charge. 
He calls on one of the number to lead in a few chor- 
uses which are followed by prayer. An informal dis- 
cussion of C. E. matters begins, when someone sug- 
gests that they find out what some of the leaders ha 
our denomination thini-c about these things. The oth- 
ers agree that this is a fine idea, and suggest phoning 
these leaders immediately. Each call is placed through 
long distance in the customary way, and the party 
being called answers from behind the curtain, the 
sound effect of talking over the phone being made by 
holding an open jar or a bucket at an angle close to 
the mouth. The conversation should be as natural as 
possible, the party making the call introducing him- 



self as from the church at , 

and stating the purpose of his call. Further sugges- 
tions for his part of the conversation are given be- 
tween the brackets in small type, and the one be- 
hind the curtain will answer as forcefully as possible 
in his own words. In reporting to the group, the per- 
son making the call will sum up the conversation in 
two or three sentences, thus giving emphasis to the 
main points. Then the group suggests that someone 
else call another leader concerning another item. It 
would be well for each two who carry on a conversa- 
tion to rehearse their part in advance, that the con- 
versations might sound as natural as possible. 

Suggested program 

Lively choruses in which all take part. 

Prayer. Pass out slips in advance requesting differ- 
ent individuals to pray for the work of the Brethren 
National C. E. Union, for the various departments of 
the National C. E. Board (see officiary above), for 
each of the national C. E. projects, for more coopera- 
tion and support from the local societies for the na- 
tional work, etc. etc. 

Brief remarks leading up to placing the telephone 
calls which introduce the following articles: 
The Endeavorer and the World 
The Endeavorer and the Word 
The Christian Endeavor and the Sinner 
The Endeavorer and Sailor Rescue Work 
The Endeavorer and Prayer 
The Endeavorer and the Society 
The Endeavorer and Summer Camps 



THE ENDEAVORER AND SOCIALS 

And now a word from your Executive Secretary. 
Informal discussion of the value of the Brethren 
National C. E. work and how your society can assist 



—5- 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



in its promotion. This should include a discussion of 
the projects and goals and mention of items of inter- 
est from news reports not already presented to your 
society. 

Hymn: To the Work. 

Benediction. 



WHAT EVERY CHRISTIAN ENDEAVORER 

NEEDS! 

The Society Manual of Standard Christian 

Endeavor. 

How often we have been asked, "What can our so- 
ciety do?" It seems we don't accomplish much." Well, 
with this C. E. Standard Manual, published by our 
own Brethren National C. E. Union, you'll have enough 
to do for the next ten years — something to do for 
every member. Now not only may each member know 
what his own duties are, but he will also be informed of 
the duties of all others, and in an emergency can step 
in to help when needed. 

Presidents, superintendents and leaders, if you want 
to have a real organized, working, enthusiastic society 
so that you can have definite spiritual soul-winning 
results, see that every member has a Standard C. E. 
Manual — yes, everv member! Order today from The 
Brethren National C. E. Union, 3326 S. Calhoun St., 
Ft. Wayne, Ind. (15c per copy). 



THE ENDEAVORER AND THE WORLD 

Rev. L. L, Grubb, Hagerstown, Md 
("We would like your opinion as to what help C. E. 
can be to us as Endeavorers in our relationship to 
the world.") 

Christian Endeavor is one of the most valuable arms 
of the church of Jesus Christ because it provides born- 
again, Spirit-filled, trained leaders for His service to- 
morrow. Only eternity will reveal 
the far reaching effects in glory to 
God emanating from the ministry 
of C. E. throughout the years. 

At its inception this SDlendid or- 
ganization was marked by a deep, 
distinctive, sincere spirituality as 
evidenced in the beautiful lives of 
its founders , Mother and Daddy 
Clark. But unfortunately during 
recent years, in all too many in- 
stances , Christian Endeavor has 
linked her destiny with that of the 
world, and journeyed amicably on- 
ward with her to certain failure 
and spiritual destruction. The gods 
of sin, compromise and worldliness 
have entered and defiled the holy sanctuary of Chris- 
tian Endeavor, and that, through a door which should 
be constantly bolted against them. 
("Why is that?") 

It is comparatively easy to understand this unfor- 
tunate situation when one simply remembers the ut- 
ter, constant depravity of the human heart (Jer. 17: 
9), the appeal of the world, flesh, and the devil to 
such a heart, and the lack of gospel power in the 
pulpit and pew of many modern churches. Many of 
our young people easily succumb to temptation be- 
cause they have not the power to overcome it. In our 
C. E. meeting's discussions on many irrelevant topics 
have supplanted the more essential study of Christian 
truth and doctrine. 

("That isn't true of Brethren C. E. is it?") 
We like to think and believe that this is not true 
in the main of Brethren Christian Endeavor. How- 
ever, we shall surely be strengthened spiritually as 
Endeavorers for Christ by remembering anew what 




He has said about the believer's relationship to the 
world, for in both their nature and destiny these two 
stand in direct contrast. 

By NATURE every sincere believer in Christ is a 
saved individual (Jn. 5:24). "He that heareth my word, 
and believeth on him that sent me, hath everlasting 
life, and shall not come into condemnation; but is 
passed from death into life." Paul also tells us that 
all those who have truly called upon Christ for meres 
are saved (Rom. 10:9,10,13). Volumes could not ex- 
haust the tremendous truth found in this fact. Pas- 
sage from death into life, being a recipient of all the 
precious promises of the Word both now and for the 
future, the provision for every spiritual and physical 
need in the will of our Lord, the constant, divine, in- 
fallible guidance of the Holy Spirit in our lives and 
service for Christ, a soui-satisfying comfort and peace, 
a sense of sweet security in the face of world unrest 
and wars among the nations; all this and infinitely 
more is the result of, and establishes the fact that the 
believer is saved! 

In ominous contrast is the world — LOST! Paul in- 
forms us, "All have sinned, and come short of the 
glory of God (Rom. 3:23), and further in this great 
epistle that "the wages of sin is death" (6:23). Thus 
God has clearly delineated the position of all sinful 
forces and individuals in relation to Himself. Separ- 
ation from a God of love for eternity, the ever present 
knowledge of sins unforgiven, the awful certainty of 
the visitation of God's wrath, no hope in this age or 
that to come, a constant dread and fear in the face 
of world perils; this is the lot of the world — lost! 

Holiness is a distinctive mark of every believer, and 

clearly sets him apart from the world! In his first 
epistle Peter informs us, "Ye are an ... . holy nation 
(or people — 2:9). Paul echoes Peter's words with em- 
phasis as he writes to the Philippian Christians (3: 
20; 4:8,9). Every text of Scripture which bears upon 
the earthly demeanor of the child of God indicates the 
complete necessity on his part and the fullest ex- 
pectancy on God's part of a life which is holy unto 
the Lord. If we are to aualify as "little Christs" this 
is an essential prerequisite! Such divine holiness is 
not acquired by deliberate, frequent, sinful contact 
with the world, but is the result of a life of separa- 
tion and blessed fellowship with Christ. Dillydallying 
and compromising with the world will result in a 
complete loss of Christian holiness. Christian Endeav- 
orers need to learn this lesson all over again! 

See the vivid contrast in the world. In speaking to 
the Galatians Paul pointedly alludes to "this present 
evil world" (1:4). There is no passage of Scripture 
which assures us that the world in this sense is holy. 
Instead, a totally different picture is painted by the 
divine Artist, as a scene of intense evil unfolds to 
our vision. The carnal mind, great established sys- 
tems and institutions of sin, immorality, sins of the 
flesh, God-defying men and organizations, are a far 
cry from the holiness expected by God from His chil- 
dren. 

("There can be absolutely nc sympathy or har- 
mony between the believer and the world in their 
respective natures, can there?" 

No, and a tremendous contrast is likewise evident 
in the DESTINY of both the believer and the world. 
The born-again Christian Endeavorer is destined for 
a blessed portion in heaven with Christ. In His high- 
priestly prayer our Lord prayed that His own might 
be with Him in glory, and we are assured that the 
fullest answer to that prayer is certain (Jn. 17:24). 
When our coming Savior appears we shall see His 
blessed face and be with Him where He is (1 Jn. 3: 
1,2). Even the inspired writers of the sacred text 
have failed to fully describe the infinite glory and 
beauty of that celestial land due to the inadequacy 
of human languages. A place of joy, happiness, peace, 
comfort, no pain, suffering, sorrow, tears or heart- 
aches, and best of all will be that face-to-face fellow- 



—6- 



JANUARY 11, 1941 



ship with our Lord Jesus Christ throughout eternity. 
("What a truly glorious destiny is ours in Christ!") 

As we again turn our attention to the world we 
hear her cries of anguish and remorse issuing from 
eternal perdition. In His own words already the Lord 
has consigned every Christ-rejecting agency and in- 
dividual to eternal punishment (Matt. 25:41,46). "The 
wicked shall be turned into hell, and all the nations 
that forget God" (Ps. 9:17). The Lord graciously chas- 
tens us that we might not be condemned with the 
world (1 Cor. 11:32). The abode of the saints would 
be no fit place for the systems and institutions of 
wickedness existing in this present evil world. Thus 
God has fittingly prepared a place of eternal punsh- 
ment for the devil and his angels, which will be 
shared by all their followers in sin! 

("Yes, the world is doomed!") 

The time is rapidly nearing in the consummation 
of God's 'plan when believers are destined to receive 
rewards for the faithful administration of God-given 
tasks (1 Cor. 3:11-15). We shall all be compelled to 
stand before the judgment seat of Christ and give an 
account of the deeds done in the body (2 Cor. 5:10). 
Some will be able to lay many trophies of grace at 
the feet of Jesus Christ and will be proportionately 
rewarded for their faithfulness with a reward which 
will endure through all eternity. Earthly rewards for 
service well done soon fade and pass away; not so 
with our heavenly rewards. Unfortunately the Scrip- 
ture indicates that there will be some empty-handed 
Christian Endeavorers before that great judgment 
seat (1 Cor. 3:15). In which group will you be found? 

("That's something' to think about, all right.") 

In direct contrast God will also deal out rewards to 
the world, but only in the sense that some will have 
greater and some lesser degrees of punishment (Rev. 
20:12). The sure result of being an accomplice with 
the world in sin of any brand will be a bitter reward 
in God's wrathful displeasure for all eternity! 

This vivid, double contrast in the nature and des- 
tiny of the believer and the world should be enough 
to convince any sincere Christian Endeavorer that to 
fellowship with the world will bring naught but sor- 
row and heart-rending remorse in God's tomorrow. 
A man once asked D. L. Moody this question, "Now 
that I am converted, must I give up the world?" "No," 
answered the great evangelist; "You must not give 
up the world; if you give a good, ringing testimony 
for the Son of God. the world will give vou up pretty 
quick; they won't want you around." Try it! Chris- 
tian Endeavor! 

("We will. Brother Grubb, and 'thanks a million' 
for your help. Come over with your wife and baby 
to see us sometime. Etc. etc. Goodbye." 



THE NEW LEAF 

He came to my desk with quivering lip; 

The lesson was done. 
"Have you a new leaf for me, dear Teacher? 

I have spoiled this one!" 
I took his leaf, all soiled and blotted 

And gave him a new one, all unspotted, 
Then into his tired heart I smiled: 

"Do better now, my child!" 
I went to the throne with trembling heart. 

The year was done. 
"Have you a New Year for me, dear Master? 

I have spoiled this one!" 
He took my year, all soiled and blotted 

And gave me a new one, all unspotted, 
Then, into by tired heart He smiled: 

"Do better now, My child!" 




FLOYD SHIERY 



THE ENDEAVORER AND THE WORD 

Rev. Floyd Shiery, Dallas, Tex. 

("What part would you say that the Word of God 
plays in our lives as Christian Endeavorers?") 

"All scripture is giv- 
ggp en by inspiration of 
'"■ God, and is profitable 
for doctrine, for re- 
proof, for correction, 
f o r instruction i n 
righteousness : that 
the man of God may 
be perfect, throughly 
furnished unto a 1 1 
good works" 

— (II Tim. 3:16-17) 

Christian Endeav- 
orers will find in the 
written Word of God 
everything needful for 
a life of service unto 
the Lord, for the Holy 
Scriptures are the 
complete and true 
Word of God. The 
Apostle Paul told 
Timothy that they are 
"given by inspiration 
of God" that is, "God- 
breathed" as the 
Gretek work literally 
means. They are in- 
deed the very words 
oi uod since the Holy 
Spirit caused the writers of Scripture to pen the divine 
revelation. A further word to this effect is recorded 
in II Peter 1:21, "Men spake from God, being moved 
(literally borne along), by the Holy Spirit." 

The written Word of God was given for the profit 
(note the use of this same word in Matt. 16:26), ad- 
vantage, usefulness and helpfulness of God's people. 
This profitableness is fourfold: 1. for doctrine. 2. For 
reproof. 3. For correction. 4. For instruction in right- 
eousness. 

The Scriptures are profitable for doctrine, which 
word means teaching. The complete revelation of 
God and all things thai pertain to life and godliness 
are recorded in His written Word. All the perplex- 
ing questions of the ages, all the knotty problems that 
have baffled the philosophers of antiquity, questions 
concerning God, the world, man, sin, salvation, the 
present life and the life to come — all these questions 
are answered in the blessed Word, given by inspira- 
tion and for our profit. These Scriptures tell us what 
to believe and what we should teach others that they 
might know and believe the truth of God. "The testi- 
mony of the Lord is sure, making wise the simple" 
(Ps. 19:71. 

The Scriptures are profitable for reproof. The word 
reproof could be better translated conviction as its 
verb form in Jn. 16:8, "And he, when he is come, will 
convict the world in respect of sin, and of righteous- 
ness, and of judgment." See also Jn. 8:9,46, I Cor. 
14:24 and James 2:9. In this respect the Scriptures 
are like a plumbline, exposing the faults by revealing 
the right. This is forcefully demonstrated when we 
read Ex. 20, Matt. 5-7, and Rom. 1:18-3:30. They are 
also like a mirror revealing defilement as we learn 
from. James 1:22-25. 

The Scriptures are profitable for correction. This is 
the only occurrence of the Greek word translated con- 
viction. It means to make right that which is found 
faulty. Note the correcting power of the Word of God 
in Ps. 119:9,11, Jn. 15:3,17:17 and Eph. 5:26. 

The plumbline cannot correct faults and the mirror 
cannot efface defilement, but God's written Word can 
reveal sin and cleanse from sin. The Scriptures are 



—7— 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



profitable for correction because they teach us what 
to do to get right with God. The message for the lost 
may be found in the words of Rom. 3:20-22. The mas- 
sage for the believer out of fellowship may be found 
in I Jn. 1:8-2:2. The message for our every require- 
ment will be found somewhere in the written Word. 
God's will relative to every fault to which believers are 
subject will be corrected by the antidote prescribed. 
Thus we may note for the lack of faith Rom. 10:17, for 
the proud, I Pet. 5:6-7; for the one seeking God's per- 
fect will, Rom. 12:1-2, etc. "The law of the Lord, is 
perfect, converting the soul" (Ps. 19:7). 

The Scriptures are profitable for instruction in 
righteousness. The Greek word translated "instruc- 
tion" means child-training, child-culture or discipline. 
It is translated "chasten" in Heb. 12:5,6,7,8,9,10,11; 
"nurture" in Eph. 6:4; "teach" in Acts 22:3, Titus 2: 
12; "learn" in Acts 7:22 and I Tim. 1:20. 

Let us note a few particulars in which the Word of 
God fulfills its profitableness of "instruction in right- 
eousness. 1, The Word of God is food for the believer: 
"Man doth not live by bread only, but by every word 
that proceedeth out of the mouth of the Lord doth 
man live" (Deut. 8:3). 2, The written Word of God 
leads us to the water of life (Jn. 4:14 and 7:37-39). 
3, The Bible reveals to us the righteousness that truly 
clothes the soul (Rev. 19:8). 4. The Holy Scriptures 
point us to our eternal home (Jn. 14:1-3, Rev. 21:2). 
5, They warn against the evil way iProv. 14:12). 6, 
They guide us in the right way (Jn. 14:6, Matt. 7:13- 
14, Heb. 12:14 and Gal. 5:16). 7, They instruct and 
equip us for the battles of this present life (Eph. 6: 
10-18 and Gal. 5:16-28). 

This fourfold profitableness of the Scriptures has 
as its purpose, not our profit as an end in itself, but, 
as we learn in II Tim. 3:17, "That the man of God may 
be perfect, throughly furnished unto all good works." 

Christian Endeavorers, let this blessed Word of God, 
of which the Apostle Paul reminded Timothy, be your 
constant text-book and guide as you serve your Lord 
and Savior Jesus Christ. May the words of David be 
your prayer as you approach this blessed book: "Open 
thou mine eyes, that I may behold wondrous things 
out of thy law" (Psalm 119:18). 

("Thank you Brother Shiery. Maybe some night 
our C. E. can make a real study of this important 
subject, discussing fully the ideas you have sug- 
gested, instead of using the regular topic. The 
Lord bless you in your seminary work. Etc. etc. 
Goodbye,") 



THE CHRISTIAN ENDEAVOR AND THE 

SINNER 

By Rev. Bernard N. Schneider. Washington, D. C. 

("Do you think Christian Endeavor can be made 
attractive to the unsaved?") 

The greatest and main work of 
the church of Jesus Christ is to 
lead sinners to Him. for salva- 
tion. The C. E. is part of the 
church. Consequently, its main 
work should be to bring lost sin- 
ners to Christ. With the possible 
exception of the Sunday School, 
no other group in the church has 
the opportunity in this work that 
the C. E. group has. However, 
too often little or nothing is ac- 
complished by our C. E. in this 
work. 

("What suggestions can vou 

make as to the conditions 

we must meet in order to reach the sin- 




which 
ner.?" 



1. A soul winning C. E. must be anointed of the 
Lord. By this I mean that the members must be con- 
secrated believers who are willing to live separated 
lives and who know how to pray. A worldly C. E. never 
attracts anyone to the Lord, and won't be able to hold 
what it has. 

2. A soul winning C. E. must be aware of its respon- 
sibility. The Bible clearly teaches us that every per- 
son without Jesus Christ is lost and doomed eternally 
(Acts 4:12, Jn. 3:18). The same Bible also teaches us 
that God holds us responsible for the souls of our fel- 
lowmen whom we can reach (Ezek. 33:8-9). Paul says: 
"I am a debtor" to all. Unless the members of the C. E. 
are aware of these facts, they will not be reaching 
out after sinners. In many instances some sound teach- 
ing along these lines of Bible truth is very necessary 
in the C. E. society. 

3. A soul winning C. E. must be awake to its op- 
portunity. The C. E. holds a unique place in the 
church among the young people. If the group is right, 
it should be the contact group between the church 
and the young people of the community. A consecrated 
young people's C. E. was partly the human instru- 
mentality which led me to Christ. All toe many of 
our C. E. groups are self-centered. They are very much 
interested in each other and in having a happy and 
sociable time together. This is a fine thing, and there 
could be nothing said against it if it were not for the 
fact that there are so many other young people out 
in the world around us who are living a Christless 
life and are on their way to a Christless eternity. Who 
is going to save them? The C. E. has a wonderful op- 
portunity of reaching them. It should make it its 
purpose to reach as many of them as possible. All 
its socials and all its programs should be planned with 
an eye towards attracting new young people. Then 
there must be a great deal of inviting among the 
individual members. After all. that is the most suc- 
cessful way of advertising, through the individual 
members. I know of some C. E. groups that are reach- 
ing other young people continually, and usually bring 
them to the Lord. It can be done. It is being done. 
The Lord wants us to do it. But we must be wide 
awake to this opportunity. A self- centered C. E. will 
not do it. 

4. A sou) winning C. E. must be aggressive in its 
programs. A great deal of the success in winning new 
young people will depend on the programs. I have in 
mind both the weekly programs at the church, and 
the occasional social gathering. I have often looked 
back on the time when I was a young man living in 
sin, and have tried to remember what it was that 
would attract me to a C. E. meeting. I know that a 
"dull." sluggish program will not attract the outsider. 
I know that a "worldly" program can never keep them, 
for we cannot compete with the world in this, and it 
would never have the blessing of the Lord. I know 
that a "holier than thou" attitude will drive most out- 
siders away. 

("How can we make our program aggressive and 
attractive?") 

a. It must be full of life and action. Yes, even for 
the Sunday evening service we need a program with 
plenty of life and snap. Young people like to be where 
things are doing and going. A real live wire song 
leader is 50% of a good program. The same is true 
of the social program. There should be life and action, 
avoiding of course, all things that our Savior would, 
not have participated in as a young man. There is 
no doubt that He wants us to live a happy life in 
healthy bodies. Ours is not a negative faith, but posi- 
tive, and it does give us enthusiasm and life. The fact 
that a good, active, yet truly Christian program of 
recreation and worship will appeal to young people 
has been demonstrated over and over again in our 
summer camps. 

b. A good C. E. program must give proper place to 



— S— 



JANUARY 11, 1941 



the spiritual. The more spiritual the program, the bet- 
ter, even for the outsider. I will never forget the first 
time when I attended a C. E. program. I had never 
been inside a Protestant church before, and I was quite 
sceptical. All went well, until after a fine song ser- 
vice, the leader asked for individual prayers. There 
were a number who responded with sincere prayers. 
I listened with great interest, and for the first time 
I realized that those young people had something that 
I did not have, and there is where my conviction be- 
gan. A sincere, deeply spiritual program always helps 
the saved, and it leaves the unsaved with a longing 
in his heart, even if he should make fun about it. 
Take it from one who knows by experience. The C. E. 
has something to offer that is really the greatest thing 
in the world, even the Lord Jesus Christ. We must 
present Him to the best advantage in every way. We 
must make Him look attractive and must show our 
conviction and confidence in Him. We must present 
Him with the vigor of youth, if we expect to win the 
young people. If we do this, and trust the Lord with 
the results, we will reach many, and out of the many 
save some. 

("We have tried to do this, but we just don't seem 
to be able to interest outsiders.") 

c. A good C. E. program requires the cooperation 
of all who are called on to help. Too many say: "I 
can't do that, let some one else do it." As a result, the 
leader gets discouraged and the program cannot be 
the best. Young people need to realize that as chil- 
dren of God we have been bought with a price and 
do not belong to ourselves. Therefore we ought to be 
willing always to do what we can for His glory (I Cor. 
6:19-20). It is really not a matter of "can," it is a mat- 
ter of the "will." We all can do the best we can, and 
that is all that is asked. Furthermore, when we do 
it for the sake of Christ, and ask Him to enable us 
to do our part, He will certainly do it. The following 
is an illustration which expresses just what I have 
in mind. 

A great violinist was playing in a series of concerts 
in a large city of the south. The crowds were large 
and the man was much admired. Finally it was an- 
nounced that as a special feature on the following 
night, the violinist would play on the most expensive 
instrument, a violin that had cost $25,000.00. The night 
came. The hall was filled to capacity. The musician 
appeared for his special act. He produced a violin and 
began to play such beautiful music that the audience 
sat spellbound. Great applause greeted him when he 
finished. But suddenly he took the instrument with 
both hands, and smashed it into pieces over the back 
of a chair. The people gasped, and were ready to de- 
nounce him for such a fit of temper. But he quieted 
them and said: "The violin that I just played and 
then broke, only cost $7.35. Here is the expensive one. 
I just wanted to show you that it was not the cost of 
the instrument but the hand that played it." Even 
so it is when we work for the Lord. We may be just 
a $7.35 violin and feel our inability to do things, but 
when yielded to the Lord, He can use us as well as 
an expensive one. 

("That's a great thought, and I can't wait another 
minute to tell our group. I may call you. again 
sometime for some more suggestions. Thanks a 
lot. Goodbye." 

NOTE: — In summing up this conversation, do so 
with much enthusiasm and make it as effective 
as possible.) 



THE ENDEAVORER AND PRAYER 
INVENTORY 

Rev. Arthur Carey, Rittman, C. 

("We would like to have your opinion concerning 
the place of prayer in C. E. First, how much pray- 
er should we have in C. E.?") 

How much prayer do you have in your C. E.? Aren't 
some of our C.E.'s powerless because of lack of prayer? 
And yet some have expressed a problem of so much 
spontaneous, free-flowing prayer that there is little 
time left for a C. E. lesson. If my understanding of 
the purpose of C. E. is correct, then it should be a 
training school for Christian life and work. There 
should not be prayer to the exclusion of other phases, 
nor should other things crowd out genuine, earnest 
vrayer. It will be the duty of every society to deter- 
mine its needs as to training in prayer. 

("Is it necessary that our prayers be definite?") 

We dismiss the missionaries from our minds by say- 
ing, "Be with all the missionaries." One cause for 
this is a lack of missionary information, which our 
"Herald" is endeavoring to supply. All information 
should be up-to-date if possible. Then we next say, 
"Bless the home mission pastors," and we feel we 
have done our duty to them, when, we as a matter of 
fact, we have only started. And then we intone the 
words, "Help our church," which the Lord already 
wants to do, but He can't until we get down to more 
definite things. Next we pray, "Bless our pastor," but 
there may be 25 different problems on his mind which 
he would enjoy sharing with some wide-awake, sym- 
pathetic C. E. in prayer. "O Lord, help our C. E. to 
grow and be better," but we stay in the same old ruts, 
and don't seek to define what we mean. And last, 
"We prav for the sinners that thev may find Christ 
as their Savior," which is good, and which is also evil 
because it keens us from the best. In our prayers we 
seek to gain the level above us bv jumping the whole 
flight of stairs that lead to it. We must go a step at 
a time, and each step must be a real, faith-embarking 
definite, positive step. The sooner we clear out the 
generalities in our prayers and put definite step-re- 
auests in their place, that much sooner we will be able 
to thank the Lord for the new levels gained. 

How much do you believe in prayer? If you are a 

modernist, you look at it as merely an exercise. You 
ascribe to it merely a psychological effect — a relief 
of one's mind that would otherwise be burdened — a 
good time for a let-down from life's heavy load. If 
you are fatalistically inclined, you are saving, "What 
is to be will be. and you can't change it. If God knows 
the end from the beginning, and knows the very num- 
ber of hairs on my head, He certainly knows what's 
in the future for me and everybody else, so what's the 
use of praying?" If you are following afar off be- 
cause God didn't answer one of your prayers as you 
expected Him to, you are listening to the sower of 
doubts, and are forgetting that God knows better than 
you what you need, and His answer sometimes is "no" 
or must be delayed until you are spiritually able to 
receive it. If you are a true child of God and under 
the blood, vou should believe more firmlv in prayer 
than Hezekiah did, who by prayer changed the decree 
of God and added 15 years to his life. Prayer does 
change things. 

INVESTIGATION 

What did Jesus do and say about prayer? The best 
place to find out about prayer is in the Bible. Christ, 
no doubt, had heard many a long Pharisaic prayer on 
a street corner. But He repaired to the mountains and 
spent the nights in prayer. From the teaching of Je- 
sus, we learn this about prayer: it should be simple 
(Matt. 6:7), secret (6:5-6), forgiving (6:14-15), suppli- 
ant (7:7-12); believing (17:20-21, 21:22), unified (18: 



—9— 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



19), watchful (26:41), needful (Lk. 11:5-9), persistent 
(Lk. 18:1-8), and penitent (18:9-14). 

What did the apostles do and say about prayer? The 

apostles met for a 10 day's prayer meeting in the upper 
room. Paul was in prayer and fasting often. By their 
deeds and words they taught that prayer should be: 
stedfast (Acts 2:42), united (4:241, continual (6:4. 10: 
2. I Thess. 5:17), intercessory (Acts 12:5,12, I Thess. 
5:25, Heb. 13:18), dedicatory (Acts 13:3, 14:23), un- 
conditional (16:25), benedictory (20:36, 21:5), minis- 
tering 28:8), intelligible (I Cor. 14:13-15), thankful 
(Eph. 5:20), suppliant (6:18, Jas. 5:13), and expectant 
(Rev. 22:20). 

How do you pray? 

IMPROVEMENT 

("Would improvement in prayer help our C. E.?") 

Everybody, no doubt, will answer this in the iffirma- 
tive. If you think negatively, then this article has been 
in vain, and the spiritual life of your C. E. is brought 
into question, for there should always be room for spir- 
itual improvement. Even mountain-top experiences 
can be prolonged and heightened. 

("How shall we improve our prayer?") 

Assign certain members to write certain missionaries 
for prayer requests. Such information will be the most 
up-to-date missionary news. Have various members 
keep in touch with home mission pastors and learn 
their prayer needs. They will be glad to have prayer 
helpers all over this nation. Take definite needs of 
your church and spread them before the Lord. Ask 
your pastor what he would like you to pray for that 
would individually help him accomplish his tasks. Ask 
your C. E. president or supervisor what your C. E. 
specifically needs and pray for those needs. Remember 
the sinners by name and implore the Spirit to search 
out the vulnerable points of their hearts that they may 
be convicted of sin and turned to the Lord. Last of 
all, turn to the Scriptures and make a study of prayer, 
and model yours thereby. If there is not enough 
prayer in your C. E., try these methods. If much prayer 
crowds out other things in your C. E., start your ser- 
vice earlier. May the Lord abundantly enrich and 
bless you. 

("These are certainly fine ideas and I'm going to 
see that our society puts them into practice right 
away. Etc. Goodbye.") 



THE ENDEAVORER AND THE SOCIETY 

Mrs. Miriam McKeefcry Uphouse, Winchester, Va. 

("What relationship do you think should exist be- 
tween the Endeavorer and the C. E.?") 

The Christian Endeavor Society has often been 
called "a training school for Christian service" and 
rightly so. The ideal society should be a place where 
young people can come and meet and discuss their 
problems, and most of all, receive spiritual help. The 
church that finds a place in it's busy schedule for an 
active and consecrated young people's Society, is a 
church that has done much to deepen it's spiritual 
life. 

("Taking for granted then that a Christian En- 
deavor Society is a place where our young people 
are helped and strengthened, what do you con- 
sider that every Endeavorer owes such an organ- 
ization.?") 

First of all, I believe we owe to our society our loy- 
alty. Your C. E. needs your loyalty to the fullest ex- 
tent. If we would become as enthused over our young 
people's work as we do over our school's football games, 
think how much we could accomplish for the Lord! 



Our society is in the business of leading young people 
to Christ and of strengthening young or weak Chris- 
tians, and this work demands our allegience. 

Our loyalty can be shown in many ways. Do you 
cooperate when asked to take part in the discussion? 
Are you anxious to help in the singing, praying and 
testifying? There are so many little things that are 
important. Are you on time, or do you straggle in late 
and disturb the program? Are you always on hand to 
take part in the pre-prayer service? When the leader 
asks you to prepare a part for the next week's pro- 
gram, are you willing or do you have to be coaxed? 
I Cor. 15:58 tells us, "Therefore my beloved brother, 
be ye steadfast, unmovable, always abounding in the 
work of the Lord, forasmuch as ye know that your 
labor is not in vain in the Lord." God tells us that our 
labor for Him is not in vain and therefore we should 
give it willingly. Ask the Lord to show you if you 
have been loyal to Him and to the young people's so- 
ciety. 

("Is that all we owe to our society?") 

Your C. E. Society needs your prayers. God has so 

much in store for us if we would only ask it of Him. 
He has promised to give us whatsoever we ask in His 
name that the Father may be glorified in the Son 
(Jn. 14:13). Is there a lack or a definite need in your 
society? Go to God in prayer about it. If every mem- 
ber of the C. E. is praying for the society, God is going 
to bless and show Himself in a marvelous way. An- 
other way in which we can definitely pray for our 
work is in our pre-prayer service. Don't consider this 
short time spent in prayer before your meeting as un- 
important, but support it and you will find that your 
society will truly go and grow and glo. 

("Thank you Mrs. Uphouse. And wants to 

talk to your husband" — Note: The party making 
this call hands the receiver to the other member, 
and the conversation concerning the Endeavorer 
and summer camps follows immediately.) 



THE ENDEAVORER AND SUMMER CAMPS 

Rev. Norman Uphouse, Winchester, Va. 

("Our C. E. wants some first hand information 
about summer camps for Brethren young people. 
Since you have operated such a camp for several 
years, could you tell us something about it?") 

If it is possible to create ideal or near ideal condi- 
tions for an Endeavor, it must be at a spiritual camp. 
These camps are designed for young people for four 
outstanding reasons. If they accomplish these, the 
camp is a great success. 

Socially. — Here a young person can meet other 
Christian young people. Proper fellowship is enjoyed 
and some lasting friendships are made. No one dare 
oppose the social factor of camps because we believe 
it is a thousand times better for Christian young peo- 
ple to make associations with other Christian young 
people than with people of the world that have little 
interest in the things of the Lord. It will be much 
to the joy of all concerned to know that the youth in 
our camps are in wholesome associations and among 
friends that love the Lord. 

Physically. — Summer time fills us with an urge to 
get away from the noise and heat of the city streets 
and to have a trip to the woods or river. Our camps 
try to operate on the minimum expense and yet offer 
a fine recreational program. Hiking, swimming, soft 
ball, volley ball. Indian tribes, contests, stunts etc. are 
provided. Usually the entire afternoon is given over 
for recreation and rest. 

Mentally. — There is comfort and a satisfaction in 
knowing the facts of the Bible. Certainly it is a help 



10— 



JANUARY 11, 194 1 



to know the deep things of God. At camp learning is 
not hard or tiresome because everything changes, the 
setting is perfect, and the interest among the campers 
runs high. Some of the members have testified favor- 
ably in respect to the great amount of things they 
learned in the few days at camp. Frankly we say 
that we have no time for art, handicraft, woodcraft, 
nature study, etc. These all have a place among young- 
people but they are left to others to teach. Our busi- 
ness is to learn and to teach Bible. 

Spiritually. — This is not the least important factor 
in camp experience, but the most important. Greater 
things can be accomplished spiritually because the 
campuses are removed from the allurements of the 
world. They are away from the busy routine of home 
life and out under the boundless canopy of heaven to 
think on eternal realities. The leader of the vespers 
can easily lead the hearts of many to yieldedness and 
dedication to God. 

("What does the Endeavorer mean tc the camp?") 

He is the one who makes it possible. We look to the 
societies to send out the campers for a time oi vaca - 
tion and feasting. 

("What does the camp mean to the Endeavorer?") 

We promise to send your members back better pre- 
pared to work at home, and with renewed interest to 
do something for the Lord. 

("Well, I guess we couldn't wish for anything bet- 
ter than that. And sometime when you have time, 
drive over and show us some of those snapshots 
of your fine camp. Etc., etc. Goodbye.") 



THE ENDEAVORER AND SOCIALS 

By Mrs. Leo Polman, Ft. Wayne, Ind. 

("We hear that you people at Ft. Wayne have such 
GOOD times at your parties. We thought you 
might be able to give us some ideas.") 

Christian Endeavor is the expression department 
of church organization. To make it full and rounded 
out, the social part of Christian Endeavor proves most 
important. Since C. E. is primarily but not entirely 
for young people, the need of developing the social 
department becomes even more important. 

In days gone by practically all social events in the 
community were sponsored by the church, and the 
life of the family was closely connected with the 
church. But that is not true now. The school, clubs, 
and so many other outside interests seem to have taken 
over the social life of our young people, and that 
should not be. 

("How can we make our socials really worth 
while?") 

There is no one that does not enjoy a really well 
planned social evening. We are made with the capac- 
ity to laugh and to be happy. The thing the social 
committee has to do is to direct this part of our lives 
in a manner pleasing to our Lord, in Whom all Chris- 
tian Endeavorers trust. 

The most important thing to consider is the plan- 
ning of the social evening. It always proves helpful 
to build it around a theme. A World Tour Party; Au- 
tomobile, Bible, Bean, Alphabet Party, and many oth- 
ers could be used. Games like "Fruit Basket" can be 
changed from fruit to cities, automobile parts, Bible 
characters, etc. The party plans sent out by our Na- 
tional C. E. officers should be used. Coakesbury Party 
Book also has many whole evenings planned. 

Remember that the first and last games are the 
most important. Have more games than you think 
you will need. Some game you thought just fine might 
not go over so well. Don't drag it out; change it. You 



may need those two or three you thought were extra. 
Try to have it so unusual that any unsaved folks 
there would say, "If that is the way Christians have 
a good time, I'm interested." Many young people have 
found the Lord as their Savior by first being a guest 
at some C. E. social; then soon attending C. E. and 
church, they hear the Word and are saved. 

("Should we have devotions at EVERY party?") 

Yes, last, but most important of all, is the devo- 
tional period. I have heard of having it in the be- 
ginning of the evening, but believe at the close is a 
better time. It has been said, "If the devotions do 
not seem suitable or seem out of place, then you have 
had the wrong kind of party." 

This is a good time to ask your pastor to speak. You 
will feel better acquainted with him in this way. Your 
sponsor, if you are Intermediates or young people, or 
one of your own group, might lead. 

Do not make devotions long — not over 15 minutes. 
A familiar song, or a few choruses sung. Scripture 
read, a few well chosen words, and prayer, will send 
your guests home with a feeling of good and close 
fellowship with each other and with the Lord. 

("Those are surely fine ideas. By the way, is Bro. 

Polman there?" wants to talk ito him." 

Note: The conversation continues; with the "Word 
From Your Executive Secretary.) 



AND NOW A WORD FROM YOUR EXECUTIVE 
SECRETARY 

By Rev. Leo Polman, Ft. Wayne, Ind. 

("Brother Polman: Our C. E. reallv ought to be 
doing more to help the Brethren National C. E. 
Union I thought maybe I'd better talk to you 
abou'; it.") 

Now that you have read all the splendid articles by 
your Christian Endeavor leaders, a word or perhaps 
even two from your executive secretary would not go 
amiss. 

The Brethren National Christian 
Endeavor Union is a movement 
among our churches to help every 
local society to recruit, train, de- 
velop, and lead young people and 
children to the Lord Jesus Christ. 
And every true Endeavorer and so- 
ciety has this purpose. 

Yet The Brethren National C. E. 
Union cannot do what the local so- 
ciety can do with each individual, 
nor can the local society do what 
our national union can do — so each 
has its place. 

("Since you have pointed out 
what Christian Endeavor should 
have for its purpose in the lo- 
cal society, what about the 
work of our National Union? What can it do for 
the local society?") 

First of all, there must be a common ground upon 
which all our societies can meet. This ground is your 
National Union. 

There are some projects that as Endeavorers, in- 
dividually or by society, we could not sponsor or even 
be able to undertake. Your National Union is not only 
a clearing house for such projects, but also an agency 
that helps to combine the interests of the local so- 
cieties into one big interest and to accomplish it. To 
illustrate, what individual or society would support 
its own missionary out on the field? Yet with the 
cooperation of many societies, our National C. E. Union 
is doing this very thing in sponsoring the support of 




—11— 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



Jake Kliever, our C. E. missionary in Africa. The same 
is true in providing hymn books and communion sets 
for home mission churches; promoting C. E. camps 
and teachers for same, gathering funds for Jewish 
evangelization; as well as keeping the local societies 
informed what others are doing. 

"In union there is strength," and your cooperating 
with our Brethren National C. E. Union will taring- 
strength and real blessing to many hundreds of others 
throughout these United States. 

We have had some very trying times. These have 
made us conscious more than ever that our Lord has 
a work for all of us yet to do. 

("Are the various societies responding pretty 

well?") 

The response to our first three months' report and 
special activity for home missions has been encour- 
aging. Now we are in the midst of our second three 
months' period, emphasizing foreign missions. The 
amount needed is $450. Attain this goal? Sure we 
will! 

If your society has not yet cooperated with our 
National Union, why not begin now? Let's get to- 
gether, all Brethren Christian Endeavorers. There 
are great things yet ahead for us all! Let me hear 
from you. 

IS YOUR SOCIETY AFFILIATED WITH OUR 

NATIONAL C. E. UNION 

? 

IF NOT, THERE'S NO BETTER TIME THAN 
RIGHT NOW! 

What do you do to become affiliated with The 
Brethren National C. E. Union? 

1. Have your society vote to affiliate with the Na- 
tional Union. 

2. Read over the goals for our national work. 

3. Then decide what part you would like to have in 
this work. 

4. Fill out annual pledge and send in to executive 
secretary. 

5. Be sure to fill out report for your society, and 
send in to executive secretary. 

6. Cooperate with National Union in all its work. 

7. Be sure to pray with us. 

The Brethren National Christian Endeavor Union 
Needs your society and your church needs the Union's 
help! So let's help each other that our blessed Lord 
may be glorified. 
Let me hear from you. 

For Christ and His church, 

Leo Polman, Executive Secretary 
3326 S. Calhoun St., Ft. Wayne, Ind. 



ANNUAL SOCIETY PLEDGE 

We hereby pledge our support to the work of the BRETHREN NA- 
TIONAL ENDEAVOR UNION for the year 19. -19 ., in the sum of 

Dollars ($ ). 

Date , 19. . kind of Society 

(Pri-Jr; Jr. Int.; Sr.-lnt; YP; Sr.-Y.P; Adult; Alumni) 



JUNIOR C. E, GOALS 

SPECIAL GOALS FOR PROJECT 1— (January-December) : 

!. At least one home mission meeting during this period, 5 points. 

2. Offering for home mission project sent in on or before Feb. 
28, 1941, 5 points. 

SPECIAL GOALS FOR PROJECT 2— (March-April) : 

3. At least one foreign mission meeting during this period, 5 
points. 

4. Offering for foreign mission project sent in on or before April 
30. 1941, 5 points. 

SPECIAL GOAL FOR PROJECT 3— (May-June) : 

5. Representation at Brethren C. E. rally, 5 points. 

6. Offering for C. E. promotional project sent in not later than 
June 30, 1941, 5 points. 

SPECIAL GOALS FOR PROJECT 3— (July-August) : 

7. At least one meeting stressing Jewish and sailor evangelism 
during this period, 5 points. 

8. Offering for Jewish and sailor evangelism project sent in not 
later than Aug. 15, 1941, 5 points. 

GENERAL GOALS TO BE ACHIEVED DURING THIS PERIOD: 

9. Memory Work — 50% of members memorizing prescribed work, 
1C points. 

The earth is full of the goodness of the Lord (Psulm 33:5 bl. 

Even the wind and the sea obey Him (Mark 4:41 b). 

And Jesus increased in wisdom and stature and in favor with 

God and man (Luke 2:52). 

Children, obey your parents in all things! for this is well 

pleasing unto the Lord (Colossians 3:20). 

Honor thy father and thy mother, as the Lord thy God hath 

commanded thee (Deut. 5:16). 

My help cometh from the Lord which made heaven and earth 

(Psalm 121:2). 

Every man shall give as he is able, according to the blessing 

of the Lord thy God which he hath given thee (Deut. 16:171. 

Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart and with 

all thy soul, and with all thy mind (Matt. 22:37). 

He shall give his angels charge over thee to keep thee in all 

thy ways (Psalm 91:11). 

Ye shall know them by their fruits (Matt. 7:16a). 

What time I am afraid, I will trust in thee (Psalm 56:3). 

A new commandment I give unto you, That ye love one 

another, as I have loved you, that ye also love one another 

(John 13:34). 

Ye are my friends, if ye do whatsoever I command you (John 

15:14). 

10. CHURCH ATTENDANCE.— 50% of membership attending 
one church service each Sunday, 10 points. 

11. BENEVOLENT WORK— Some benevolent work accomplished 
during this period by the C. E. Society, 10 points. 

12. FOUR C. E. SOCIALS during this period, 10 points. 

13. AN INCREASE IN MEMBERSHIP during this period, 10 points. 

14. STATISTICAL BLANKS for each period sent in as desig- 
nated.— Feb. 28, 1941; April 30, 1941; June 30, 1941; Aug. 15, 1941. 



of 



of 



Name cf Church City 

Society President 

Address 

Society Treas Address 

District Payable Monthly, Quarterly, Annually 

Signature 

(Please Print or Write Plainly) 



PROJECTS FOR THE COMING YEAR 

1. HOME MISSIONS to be stressed during September, October 
and November. Goal: $100, to be used in purchasing hymn books 
and communion sets for our home mission churches. Incidently you 
will want to know the part C. E. plays in these home mission churches. 
Be sure to read the reports from two societies elsewhere in this de- 
partment. 

2. FOREIGN MISSIONS to be stressed during December, Janu- 
ary and February. Goal: $450; $350 to be used for the full support 
of our C. E. missionary, J. P. Kliever, in Africa; and $100 toward the 
support of the Bible Coach work in South America. These gifts may 
be sent in through your local church, marked "C.E.." Kliever or 
"C.E." Bible Coach. 

3. CHRISTIAN ENDEAVOR PROMOTION to be stressed during 
March, April and May. Goal: $250, to be used for the support of 
Christian Endeavor teachers in Brethren summer camps, and for 
C. E. promotional and extension work. 

4. JEWISH AND SAILOR EVANGELISM to be stressed during 
June, July and August. Goal: $100, to be used toward the support 



—12- 



JANUARY 11, 1941 



of our Jewish mission in Los Angeles, and of the sailor evangelism 
our Bro. Claude Pearson is carrying on among the seamen who stop 
at the harbors in San Pedro, Calif., Fuson, Korea, and Rangoon, 
Burma. 

5. JUNIOR C. E. PROJECT to be stressed throughout the entire 
year. Goal: $116.67 for the full support of Ann Celeste Kliever, our 
missionary child in Africa. Offerings may be sent in through the 
local church, marked "C.E." Ann Celeste. 

In some of these projects a much larger amount could be used 
to good advantage, so let's go over the top in supporting them 



SOCIETY GOALS FOR 1940-1941 

SPECIAL GOALS FOR PROJECT 1 — (Sept.-Oct.-Nov) : 

1. At least one home mission meeting each month during quarter, 
5 points. 

2. At least one tithing meeting held during the quarter, 5 points. 

3. Offering or pledge for home mission projects and report sent 
in not later than December 15, 1940, 5 points. 

SPECIAL GOALS FOR PROJECT 2— (Dec.-Jan.-Feb.) : 

4. At least one foreign mission meeting each month during quar- 
ter, 5 points. 

5. Observance of Brethren C. E. Day in February, 5 points. 

6. Offering or pledge for foreign mission project and report sent 
in not later than March 15, 1941, 5 points. 

SPECIAL GOALS FOR PROJECT 3— (Mar.-April-May) : 

7. Representation at Brethren C. E. rally during quarter, 5 points. 

8. Quiet Hour pledge meeting at least once during quarter, 5 
points. 

9. Offering or pledge for C. E. Promotional project and report 
sent in not later than June 15, 1941, 5 points. 

SPECIAL GOALS FOR PROJECT 4- (June-July-August) : 

10. At least one meeting each month during quarter stressing 
Jewish and Sailor Evangelism, 5 points. 

11. Delegate sent to Brethren summer camp, 5 points. 

12. Offering for Jewish and Sailor Evangelism project and re- 
port sent in not later than August 15, 1941, 5 points. 
GENERAL GOALS TO BE ACHIEVED DURING THE YEAR: 

13. Pre-prayer circle before C. E. Meetings, 5 points. 

14. Twenty-five per cent of C. E. members having access to the 
C. E. page in The Brethren Missionary Herald, 5 points. 

15. An increase in membership during the year, 5 points. 

16. Conducting some devotional service outside regular C. E. 
Meetings, such as jails, hospitals, missions, Old Folks Home, etc., 
5 points. 

17. Someone won to Christ by individual effort of Society mem- 
ber, 5 points. 

18. Four C. E. socials during year with devotional program at 
close, 5 points. 

19. Monthly review of C. E. Union letter or C. E. news in The 
Brethren Missionary Herald before Society, ond news report of your 
society sent to news editor at least once during the year, 5 points. 

20. Statistical blanks for each quarter sent in as designated, 
and all pledges paid and general goal report sent in by August 15, 
1941, 5 points. 

Total number of points: 100. 

Attractive awards will be given societies meeting these goals, so 
get busy on them at once. 




MONTHLY PRAYER CALENDAR 



On their respective birthdays, the names, 
favorite Scripture verses, and prayer re- 
quests of pastors, missionaries, and 
others in the brotherhood engaged in 
Christian work, will appear under this 
head. Please see thot each member in 
your society is assiqned one of the fol- 
lowing names for daily pi oyer. Assign a 
different name to each member weekly. 
If you know of others whose names should 
have appeared this month, please notify 
The Editorial Office Sec'y of The Breth- 
ren Missionary Herald Co. af once. 



Jan. 1 — Rev. George Kinzie, pastor at Kittanning, 
Pa. Rom. 8:28. No requests submitted. 

Jan. 4— Mrs. Wm. A. Steffler, wife of pastor of Third 
Church, Philadelphia. Ps. 119:11. Requests prayer 
for a safe journey for our missionaries. 

Jan. 7 — Mrs. E. W. Reed, wife of pastor at Sunny- 
side, Wash. Rom. 11:33. Requests prayer for the 
safe arrival of Sunnyside's own missionaries, Harold 
and Marguerite Dunning, in Africa; that the revival 
started in the Yakima Valley may continue, and for 
the complete recovery of her husband who has been 
in the hospital with a chest infection and threatened 
pneumonia. 



Jan. 7 — Rev. Paul 

Church, Los Angeles, 
mitted. 



R. Bauman, pastor of Second 
II Cor. 5:21. No requests sub- 



.... Jan. 15 — Mrs. J. L. Gingrich, wife of pastor at 
Allentown, Pa. Col. 3:1-4. "Pray for our young peo- 
ple and their leaders in our church here, that they 
may be given wisdom and spiritual guidance in real 
Christian service; also that each one, young and old, 
will have a passion for lost souls." 

Jan. 17 — Rev. Robert Ashman, pastor at Peru, Ind. 
No requests submitted. 

Jan. 21 — Mrs. Robert Culver, wife of pastor at An- 
kenytown, O. Jn. 5:24. No requests submitted. 

Jan. 23 — Mrs. Orville Lorenz, wife of pastor at 
Meyersdale, Pa. Jn. 3:16. "Pray that the Lord shall 
especially care for the pastors whose churches are 
divided over our denominational question, that He 
may give them wisdow in their decisions in the 
churches. Praise Him for 'blessings which we have 
not been able to contain' in the Meyersdale church." 

Jan. 26— Mrs. Alva J. McClain, wife of president of 
Grace Theological Seminary. Eph. 2:8. "Pray for un- 
saved loved ones." 

Jan. 26 — Rev. Archie Lynn, pastor of First Church, 
Johnstown, Pa. II Tim. 2:19. No requests submitted. 

Jan. 27 — Mrs. J. Paul Dowdy, missionary in South 
America. No requests submitted. • 

Jan. 27 — Rev. L. L. Grubb, pastor at Hagerstown, Md. 
Phil. 4:19. "Pray that the Lord will give me the divine 
wisdom necessary in making the proper decisions per- 
taining to the building of a mission work, and that 
He will give us a deeper spirituality among our people 
here." 

Jan. 28 — Mrs. Wilhelmina Kennedy, missionary on 
furlough from Africa. II Cor. 9:15. Requests praise 
for answered prayer on her behalf during her recent 
operation, and for the way being opened for some of 
our missionaries to go forth. Requests prayer that the 
doors to ail lands may be kept open until the Lord 
comes. 

Jan. 28 — Mrs. Arthur Malles, wife of pastor at Cov- 
ington, Va. Gal. 2:20. No requests submitted. 



—13— 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



REPORT OF GIFTS TO GRACE THEOLOGICAL 

SEMINARY 

Sept. 1 to Dec. 15 

"And God is able to make all grace abound toward you, 
that ye, having ali sufficiency in all things may abound to 
every good work .... thanks be unto God for his unspeak- 
able gift." HI Cor. 9:8, 15) 



Paui and Anne Povetz, Akron, Ohio 

Mr. and Mrs. Madden Crouse, Milledgeville, III. 

W. M. C, Cleveland, Ohio 

Miss Louise Kimmell, Berne, Indiana 

Miss Angie Garber, Leon, lowo 

Mrs. Geo. Huddleson, Peru, Ind. 

Rev. S. A. Siewert, Whittier, Calif. 

Dr. K. M. Monroe, Los Angeles, Calif. 

First Brethren Church, Peru, Ind. 

Rev. R. I. Humberd, Martinsburg, Pa. 

Mrs. Lucie E. Robertson, Juniata, Altoona, Pa. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Horner, Goshen, Ind. 

Bethel Brethren Church, Berne, Ind. 

Brethren Biblical Seminary Ass'n. IBal. in Treas.l 

Rev. and Mrs. H. A. Kent, Winona Lake, Ind. 

Mrs. Otto Stout, Nappanee, Ind. 

Rev. and Mrs. John M. Aeby, Middlebranch, 0. 

Mr. and Mrs. H. E. Wirth, Middlebranch, 0. 

First Brethren Church, Middlebranch, 0. 

Mr. and Mrs. Elbert Wallace, Ellet, 0. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Turner, Ellet, 0. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ray Hayes, Eller, 0. 

L. A. Wilcox, Akron, I, 

J. A. Jackson, Akron, 0. 

Mr. and Mrs. Madden Crouse, Milledgeville, III. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. A. Bontrager, Waterloo, la. 

Rev. and Mrs. Norman Uphouse, Winchester, Va. 

Mrs. L. S. Stutzman, Cramer, Pa. 

Mrs. Floyd Coe, Canton, 0. 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Guittar, Canton, 0. 

Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Heaston, Canton, 0. 

Mrs. Ralph Lape, Canton, 0. 

Miss June Marsh, Canton, 0. 

Mrs. Wills Ocheltree, Canton, 0. 

Mr. and Mrs. Guy Reynolds, Canton, 0. 

Mr. and Mrs. R. B Smith, Canton, Ohio 

Miss Vina Snyder, Canton, 0. 

Rev. Chas. W. Mayes, Ashland, 0. 

Miss Elizabeth Reichelt, Philadelphia, 



Rev. and Mrs 
A Friend 
Mr. and Mrs. 
Mr. and Mrs. 
Mr. and Mrs. 
Mr. and Mrs. Geo. 
Mr. H. C. Dooley, 
Rev. H. A. Kent, 
"Young Boys' and 
Mrs. John Gnagy, 
Mrs. H. J. Prichard 



R. D. Barnard, Dayton, 



Pa. 




Clifford Yount, Dayton, 0. 
Dewey Long, Dayton, 0. 
Ora Blosser, Dayton, 0. 

Drahman, Dayton, 0. 

Washington, D. C. 

Winona Lake, Ind. 

Girls' Work," Uniontown, Pa. 

Brea, Calif. 
Falls City, Nebr 



Mi. and Mrs. Herman Baerg, Winona Lake, Ind. 

Mr. and Mrs. Madden Crouse, Milledgeville, III. 

Miss Nellie Stover, Dayton, Tenn. 

Miss Margaret Sutek, Canton, 0. 

Mrs. Myrtle Donahue, Roanoke, Va. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Wertman, McKee, Pa. 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Arnold, West Salem, 0. 

Dr. and Mrs. J. W. Tibbals, Panora, la. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Eckstein, Mineral Point, Pa. 

Mr. and Mrs. Tim Kerr, Conemaugh, Pa. 

Christian Endeavor, Pike Brethren Church, 

Mundys Corner, Pa. 
Rev. and Mrs. Kenneth B. Ashman, Conemaugh, Pa. 
Glen Rose, Conemaugh, Pa. 
Mr. and Mrs. Adam Roger, Conemaugh, Pa. 

C. B. Goughnour, Conemaugh, Pa 

Geo. Cunningham, Conemaugh, Pa. 

Glen Crouse, Mineral Point, Pa. 

James Leonard, Conemaugh, Pa. 
Mr. and Mrs. Morgan Kirkpatrick, Conemaugh, Pa. 



Mr. 


and 


Mrs 


Mr. 


and 


Mrs 


Mr. 


and 


Mrs. 


Mr. 


and 


Mrs. 



2190 


5.00 


2191 


5.00 


2192 


19.00 


2193 


5.00 


2194 


5.00 


2195 


5.00 


2196 


5.00 


2197 


10.00 


2198 


1.00 


2199 


5.00 


2200 


10.00 


2201 


5.00 


2202 


25.00 


2203 


34.10 


2205 


5.00 


2206 


1.C0 


2207 


10.00 


2208 


5.00 


2209 


2.00 


2210 


10.00 


2211 


3.00 


2212 


10.00 


2213 


1.00 


2214 


1.00 


2215 


5.00 


2216 


5.00 


2217 


10.00 


2218 


5.00 


2219 


.25 


2220 


1.00 


2221 


5.00 


2222 


2.00 


2223 


3.00 


2224 


.50 


2225 


2.00 


2226 


5.00 


2227 


5.00 


2228 


2.00 


2229 


5.00 


2230 


5.00 


2231 


10.00 


2232 


10.00 


2233 


5.00 


2234 


10.00 


2235 


5.00 


2236 


2.00 


2237 


2.00 


2238 


10.00 


2239 


5.00 


224C 


10.00 


2241 


10.00 


2242 


5.00 


2243 


5.00 


2244 


5.00 


2245 


1.00 


2246 


10.00 


2247 


20.00 


2248 


25.00 


2249 


5.00 


2250 


5.00 


2251 


5.00 


2252 


5.00 


2253 


5.00 


2254 


5.00 


2255 


5.00 


2256 


5.00 


2257 


5.00 


2258 


3.00 


2259 


3.00 



Mr. and Mrs. Isaax Miller, Mineral Point, Pa. 

Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Rose, Conemaugh, Pa. 

Mrs. Floyd Bauman, Mineral Point, Pa. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Griffith, Conemaugh, Pa. 

Mr. and Mrs. Russell Claycomb, Mineral Point, Pa. 

Home Dept. Sunday School, Pike Brethren Church, 

Mundy's Corner, Pa. 
Mrs. Raymond Scrrack, Conemaugh, Pa. 
Mr. and Mrs. Jackson Dishong, Conemaugh, Pa. 
Mrs. Mae Parmenter, Burbank, O. 
Mr. and Mrs. S. C. Cunningham, Conemaugh, Pa. 
Mrs. Wayne Horner, Conemaugh, Pa. 
Mrs. Josephine Kerr, Conemaugh, Pa. 
Miss Verna Rose, Conemaugh, Pa. 
Miss Mary Jane White, Conemaugh, Pa. 
Jean and Bud Emerson, Nanty Glo, Pa. 
Sunday School, Pike Brethren Church, 

Mundy's Corner, Pa. 
Pike Brethren Church, Mundy's Corner, Pa. 
Ethel Morrill, Ellet, O. 
Mrs. Ellen C. Greaves, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Mrs. W. P. Elliott, Morill, Kansas 
C. A. Long, Ellet, O. 

Mr. and Mrs. N. F. McDonald, Milford, Ind. 
Carl J_phouse, Johnstown, Pa. 
Mrs. O. R. Keith, Roanoke, Va. 
Rev. and Mrs. H. W. Nowag, Johnstown, Pa. 
Rev. J. S. Cook, Dallas Center, la. 
Mr. and Mrs. Roy Kinsey, Dayton, O. 
Mr. and Mrs. R. H. Aeby, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Mr. and Mrs. Madden Crouse, Milledgeville, III. 



TOTAL $619.89 



2260 


3.00 


2261 


2.00 


2262 


2.00 


2263 


2.00 


2264 


2.00 


2265 


1.00 


2266 


1.00 


2267 


1.00 


2268 


1.00 


2269 


2.00 


2270 


1.00 


2271 


1.00 


2272 


1.00 


2273 


1.00 


2274 


1.00 


2275 


14.68 


2276 


13.36 


2277 


1.00 


2278 


5.00 


2279 


5.00 


2280 


15.00 


2281 


5.00 


2282 


5.00 


2283 


5.00 


2284 


10.00 


2285 


5.00 


2286 


20.00 


2287 


35.00 


2288 


5.00 






WBBaHWJOOKBSai 



m THE SHADOW 



GARBER — John Fair Garber, son of Samuel A. and Nancy Garber, 
was born near Leon, Iowa, Feb. 13, 1860. 

He united with the German Baptist Brethren Church at a tender 
age, later transferring his membership to the Brethren Church. He 
was active in promoting the building of Crown Chapel, and more 
recently, the Leon Brethren Church. He was a charter member of 
the original Brethren Church and its first Elder. He served several 
years as pastor of the Crown Chapel Church, and later served three 
years as pastor of the Leon Brethren Church. He continued active 
in the service of the Lord to the close of his life. 

He was united in marriage with Nancy Rosetta McClure near 
Leon, Iowa, Feb. 20, 1881. To this union were born seven children, 
four of whom have preceded him: Jessie who died at Glenwood, 
Iowa in 1898, Wilfred D. who died at Montgomery, Ala., Oct. 15, 
1918 while in the service of his country, and two who died in in- 
fancy. Those surviving are his wife, Rosa Garber, two sons, S. E. 
Garber of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, and F. W. Garber of Cheyenne, Wyo , 
and one daughter, Mrs. Wilma Myers of Williamsburg, Iowa. He 
is survived by six grandchildren and fifteen great-grondchildren, 
two sisters, Mrs. U. G. John of Cheyenne, Wyo. and Mrs. Samuel 
Sears of Taylor, Nebr., and two brothers, M. P. Garber of Des Moines, 
Iowa, and Frank A. Garber of Leon, Iowa. 

His entire life was spent near Leon with the exception of four 
years in his early married life in Union county, and the last three 
years in Iowa county where he and his wife have lived at the home 
of his daughter since he was stricken in Nov., 1937. Uncle John, 
as he was often called, was unceasingly active in the upbuilding of 
his community and held many offices of public trust both civil and 
religious. He was a good citizen, a thorough Christian and a de- 
voted husband, a kind and affectionate father and a faithful friend. 

Funeral services were held from the Stewart Funeral Home in 
Leon, Dec. 26, 1940, conducted by Rev. R. H. Kettell and Rev. 
Miles Taber. Burial was in the Leon cemetery. 



—14— 



JANUARY 11, 1941 




READ YOUR 

BIBLE 

THROUGH IN '41 



On Jan. 1, begin reading at Gen. 1:1, read until the first text is 
found, and record the reference. The next day begin reading where 
you left off the day before, find the text for that day, and record 
the reference. By continuing this throughout the year, by Dec. 31 
you shall have reaci the Bibie through. 



(Acts 2:42; Eph. 5:15,16). God's people belong to one 
great family. You should seek the fellowship of the 
members of your family, not Satan's family (Jn. 8:44). 

7. Realize the vital relationship between faith and 
works (Jas. 2:17-26). God expects the believer to 
perform good works before Him and men, not as a 
way of earning salvation, but as the evidence and fruit 
of salvation. A lack of good works in the Christian 
life belies the sincerity of the profession. 

8. Realize that you must seek to win the lost to 
Christ (Dan. 12:3; Prov. 11:30; Mark 8:36,37). Every 
believer should be a soul winner. 

(To be continued) 



Day 



Text 



Reference 



Publication Ojflje/Unxj, 



15 God did send me before you to preserve life 

16 Bury me not, I pray thee, in Egypt 

17 He comforted them, and spake kindly unto them 

18 What is that in thine hand? 

19 Aaron's rod swallowed up their rods 




20 How long wilt thou refuse to 
humble thyself before me? 

21 This is that night of the Lord to be 
observed 



John R. Meyers, Iowa 
E. C. Lortz, Iowa 



Wltai 2>a IZn&UvieM, Believe? 



Ralph Flickinger, Illinois 
Mrs. Maggie Peck, Iowa - 
Victor H. Meyers, Iowa . 

L. E. Long, Iowa 

Mrs. Cleve Miller, Iowa . 
Mr. Cleve Miller, Iowa 



HOW TO LIVE A CHRISTIAN LIFE 

By L. LLEWELLYN GRUBB 
(Continued from Issue of Jan. 4, 1941) 

1. Realize that since you have become a child of 
God there are two natures within you; one depraved, 
the other righteous (Rom. 7:15-25). The conflict of 
the two natures within Paul is a perfect picture of 
what happens within all true Christians. These na- 
tures continue to exist in the same being until the 
believer meets his Lord and is glorified (1 Cor. 
15:52,53). 

2. Realize that God has provided power for victory 
here and now (I Cor. 10:13; I John 5:4). This power 
is available under any and all circumstances. 

3. Realize that God expects you to dedicate your 
body, time, talents, life, and material things to Him 

(Rom. 12:1,2; 1 Cor. 6:19,20). This is entirely fair and 
reasonable in view of what He has done for you in 
redemption. 

4. Realize that God preserves you day by day (John 
10:27-30:5:24). Your life and destiny are perfectly 
safe in the clasped hands of Father and Son. 

5. Realize that you must daily pray and feed upon 
the Word (Mark 11:24; 1 Thess. 5:17; 1 Pet. 2:2; Jer. 
15:16). The babe in Christ must have daily food and 
contact with the Father. 

6. Realize that you must seek Christian fellowship rj 



TO MAKE 

CHRIST 

Known Through 

Christian Literature 

GOAL— $5,000 



$5.00 
$5.00 
$5.00 
$5.00 
.50 
$5.00 
$5.00 
$5.00 
$5.00 
$5.00 
$5.00 
$5.00 
$5.00 
$3.00 



Mr. & Mrs. Edwin J. Schrock, Iowa 

Clyde E. Stephenson, Indiana 

Arthur O. Ringer, Indiana 

Angie Garber, Iowa 

E. A. Myer, Indiana 

Mrs. Seltha Dawson, Indiana 

Miss Pearl Stuber, Indiana .50 

Wm. L. Campbell, Indiana $5.00 

Scott Richael, Pennsylvania $2.00 

Mrs. Mel Smith, Iowa _. $5.00 

Earl Wineland, Iowa $5.00 

Clara E. Seitz, Pennsylvania $5.00 

Carl H. Seitz, Pennsylvania $5.00 



Thank you kindly for these gifts and the Lord bless 
each sacrifice. 

^iiuiiinMiiiiiiTmTTiiiiiiiiinriiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiHiiisiii'i 



RESCUE THE PERISHING 

The saving of souls is the only work worth work- E 

ing at. The rescue of our fellows from coming S 

doom is the only exercise worthy of the never- E 

a 
dying soul of us and of our purchase by the pre- = 

cious blood, of the Son of God. See yonder, oh, E 

see the Bright and Morning Star! E 

— John Robertson, D.D. E 

WllllillElllltlilBlllEIIIEIiUllllinilllllllUlUllllllllllllllilllllllllll^ 



-15— 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



CHRISTIAN ENDEAVOR RALLY AT 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 

The Brethren Christian Endeavor Rally, represent- 
ing Societies from Hagerstown, Winchester, Waynes- 
boro and Washington, was held at the First Brethren 
Church of Washington, D.C. the evening of Dec. 13, 
with more than 1U0 members in attendance. 

The meeting was called to order by the president. 
Miss Lorraine Dyer, the song leader was Floyd Hart- 
man, Rev. Schneider was host pastor. 

A very inspiring address was given by Rev. L. L. 
Grubb of Hagerstown, Md. Each church represented 
contributed musical selections which added greatly to 
the program. 

At the close of the meeting a social hour was en- 
joyed and delicious refreshments were served. Dur- 
ing the evening the Green Mountain Bible Camp 
Quartette sang several numbers. 

The next meeting will be held in Hagerstown, Md. on 
March 14, 1941. 

Signed 

GLADYS STINEBAUGH, Sec. 



PERU, INDIANA 

Dear Christian Endeavors: 

Just to let you know we still have a thriving C.E. 
Society we decided to write and tell you how we spend 
some of our Christmas holidays. 

For the past three years we have gone Christmas 
Caroling to the homes of shut-ins, hospitals, C.C.C. 
camps and jails. 

We fix boxes of fruit and nuts and leave them at 
the homes of shut-ins after we have sung several 
carols. 

At various homes during the trip we are given apples, 
pop corn, cookies and candies to eat. Some of the 
people request that we sing for them although there 
are no sick members in their families. 

After we have gone to the last home on the list 
we usually have a lunch at one of the sponsers homes. 



NEW BOOKS FOR YOUR LIBRARY 

"Guess My Name?" by Mabel Hansen. 44 pages; 
paper cover, 25c. 

Here's just the book C. E. Societies, Sunday School 
teachers, Daily Vacation Bible School workers, and 
social committees have been looking for. This fasci- 
nating Bible quiz, dealing with the leading Bible char- 
acters, combine interest and instruction, and is 
adapted to all ages. The four questions asked con- 
cerning each of these characters should identify him 
to the average person who has frequented the Bible 
School, and Scripture references given with each ques- 
tion enable one to find the answers quickly in Scrip- 
ture. This quiz has proved to be an effective way of 
imparting and reviewing knowledge of the Bible. The 
frequent use you will find for this book will make it 
more than worth its price to you. Order your copy 
today. — G.A. 



"The Golden Key to Bible Interpretation," by W. 

D. Herrstrom. 48 pages, paper cover, price 25c. 

This helpful book which shows how Christ may be 
seen from Genesis to Revelation, would be splendid 
for teachers who want to emphasize the marks of in- 
spiration of Scripture. Pictures of Christ in Bible his- 
tory, biography, ceremony, and parable are pointed 
out. The influence of the Scriptures upon individuals 
and nations, and the indestructibility of the Scriptures 
in spite of determined efforts to destroy them are 
considered. The infallibility and accuracy of the Scrip- 
tures are also dealt with. This would be an inter- 
esting study for C. E. societies, and would emphasize 
the truth that the Bible is distinctive and beyond 
comparison with other books. — GA. 



Respectfully submitted, 
JANE CAIN, 



Sec. Sr. C. E. 



"Man's Future Destiny," by Oswald J. Smith, Litt. 
D. 44 pages; paper; price 25c. 

After reading this book anyone will know without 
a doubt man's future destiny. We believe this would 
be a good book for the unsaved to read and read care- 
fully. These are some of the questions answered: 
Where are the dead? Are they conscious? What 
about purgatory? Is there a hell? What does the 
Bible tell us about heaven? This is not man's opinion 
on this subject, but what Gods' Word reveals through 
careful study. We would recommend to pastors, 
teachers, and all interested in Bible study, this book 
as a study on this particular subject. — Mrs. Virgil 
Springer. 



A BIBLE OR A YEAR'S SUBSCRIPTION FOR YOU 



Once again The Brethren 
Missionary Herald Co. will 
give a beautiful illustrated 
Nelson (King James Ver- 
sion) Bible, with concord- 
ance, complete in a gift box. 

Or, will give a one year's 
subscription to The Breth- 
ren Missionary Herald to 
all who will give $5.00 or 
more to our publication of- 
fering. 

Giving $5.00 or more not 
only will give you one of 
the above gifts, but in so 
doing the giver will become 
a sustaining member of 
The Brethren Missionary 
Herald Co. through next 
general conference. 



SUSTAINING 






MEMBERSHIP 




Believing in the ministry of the printed word and desiring to be one of the 
sustaining members of The Brethren Missionary Herald Co., I hereby enclose my 
gift. I understand a gift of $5.00 or more makes me a voting member of the 
company until next Sept. 15th, and gives me the choice of a Beautiful Nelson 
Gift Bible with Concordance I size 5 3 8x8!8', OR a one year's subscription to 
The Brethren Missionary Herald Magazine. 

Name 

Address 

City State 

Bible Or Subscription 

$ Cash. Pledge To be paid 



—16— 



Vol. 3, No. 3 



HOME MISSIONS COUNCIL— JEWISH NUMBER 



Jan. 18, 1941 




Photo by 0. E. Hacker 



WITH JOY SHALL YE DRAW WATER OUT OF THE WELLS OF SALVATION— Isa. 12:3. 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



MAIL BAG LOST 

A United States mail bag dropped from a 
fast train, was sucked under the train at high 
speed, and badly cut up. Much mail was ru- 
ined. There was mail addressed to The Home 
Missions Council in this bag. One letter, badly 
mutilated, was brought to us. The postmark 
was gone, but there were two crumpled snap 
shots of Oregon scenes in it. We have no idea 
who sent them or what else may have been 
in the envelope. Since there might have been 
a message or an offering enclosed in the en- 
velope, we are taking this means to let any- 
one who might have sent this letter, know of 
the circumstances so that proper steps can be 
taken to correct any loss possibly involved. 
Please write to the Secretary of the Council, 
Berne, Ind. at once regarding this. 

i:!III!iI!IISII!lll!llllllIlMMIIIIIUIEII!ll!lllllll!lili)llllll!!llllllll!ll^ 

| "BIBLE TRUTHS' WANTED 1 

E We need at least 10 copies of "Bible Truths" E 

E by McClain, which is now out of print. Please = 

E let us know of any available copies, and we = 

E will give instructions as to where to mail them. ~ 



"HIM THAT BLESSETH THEE, 
I WILL BLESS" 

Reports of great blessing are coming in from all of 
the churches that had Jewish Bible conferences last 
year. Our Jewish Mission in Los Angeles has a budget 
of $3,400.00. In 1939, the year before we undertook this 
special work in Los Angeles, our churches reported 
$3,300.00 given to Jewish evangelization. Last year, 
1940, our first year with a special Jewish work of our 
own, our offerings totalled $1,487.55 which made it 
necessary for the mission to get funds elsewhere to 
carry on. Quite a number of our churches held no 
Jewish conference last year at all. Then there are 
some churches that have been helping other Jewish 
mission work. We feel that this other work is good, 
but that since we have one of our own that our 
churches should all stand together in supporting our 
own Jewish Mission. Unless there is some binding 
obligation for the future, we urge that all our churches 
turn their Jewish Mission aid toward our own work 
that we might not fail to meet our own needs for 
Israel. 



E THF, BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD CO. = 

= 3326 S, Calhoun St. Ft. Wayne, Ind. | 

rilllillllMIIIIIIIMIHIIillllllilllMlllillllilllllllNllllllllllllHHIiilS^ 

THANKSGIVING OFFERING CLOSES 
FEBRUARY 28th 

To date we are over $9,000.00 short of our 
receipts from the Thanksgiving Offering for 
December as compared with last year. We are 
short $1,000.00 of having enough to care for 
our January payroll. We have received many 
fine reports of larger offerings, but as yet 
very few have been sent in. It will make a 
heavy load for the weeks that remain till the 
offering closes. We urge all pastors and treas- 
urers that such funds as you have on hand 
for this offering be sent in as soon as possible. 



PLEASE SEND YOUR 
THANKSGIVING OFFERING 

We have received many very encouraging reports of 
the fine offerings that have been taken, but reports 
don't meet our payroll nor our other obligations. All 
of our appropriations begin January 1st of each year, 
and that makes the load very heavy right now. So 
pastors, will you kindly urge your treasurers to send 
in as much of your offering as you have ready right 
away. We will surely thank you for it. We need this 
help. 

The Thanksgiving offering closes Feb. 28, and all 
offerings must be in by that date for the comparative 
report goes to press the next day. 



Pastors, now is the time to arrange your Jewish Bi- 
ble conference for 1941. Below is the list of names and 
addresses of our Jewish speakers. There is one in 
your territory. Brethren, don't let us fail in our obli- 
gation to Israel this year. 



Rev. A. B. Machlin 
206 North Park Ave., 
Buffalo, New York. 

Rev. E. S. Davidson 

r Y.M.C.A. 
Dallas, Texas. 



Rev. H. B. Centz 
862 Whitby Ave., 
Yeadon, Pa. 

Rev. E. Zimmerman 
2914 Colorado Blvd. 
Los Angeles, Calif. 



Rev. E. D. Gruen 
1058— 37th Street, 
Des Moines, Iowa. 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 

The Brethren Missionary Herald is published weekly, 
four times a month, or 48 times a year, at Herald Press, 
Inc., 1300 West 9th St., Cleveland, Ohio, by the Brethren 
Missionary Herald Co., 3326 So. Calhoun St., Fort Wayne. 
Ind. 

Subscription Price: In the United States and possessions. 

$1.00 a year; Foreign countries, $1.50 a year. 

ADMINISTRATION 

Secretary of Publications: Leo Polman 

Business Office Secretary: Miss Geneva Kuhn 

Editorial Office Secretary: Miss Grace Allshouse 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

President: Russell D. Barnard Secretary: Tom Hammers 

Vice-President: Ralph Rambo Treasurer: Homer A. Kent 

R. D. Crees Mrs. Roy Patterson R. E. Gingrich 



Bernard Schneider 



George Richardson L. L. Grubb 

EDITORS 
Foreign Missions: Louis S. Bauman. 
Educational: Alva J. McClain. 
Home Missions: R. Paul Miller. 
Women's Missionary Council: Mrs. A. B. Kidder. 



Entered as second class matter at the post office at 
Cleveland, Ohio, February 9, 1939, under the act of March 
3, 1879. 



-2— 



JANUARY 18, 1941 



tyan, flanaikoHb Sake 

By J. HOFFMAN COHN 
General Secretary American Board of Missions to the Jews 




Dr. Cohn 



Saul was dead, Jon- 
athan was dead. The 
one had been David's 
bitterest and most 
fiendish enemy; the 
other had been the 
best friend of David's 
long career, so close a 
friend that the Scrip- 
tures tall us, "The 
soul of Jonathan was 
knit with the soul of 
David, and Jonathan 
loved him as his own 
soul." 

David chose to for- 
get the hate of Saul, 
but to remember the 
love of Jonathan, and 
so we read in II Sam. 
9:1, 

"Is there yet any 
that is left of the 
house of Saul, 
that I may show 
him kindness for 
Jonathan's sake." 
For Jonathan's sake. 
And now years have 
gone by, and David 
sits upon the throne, and Saul is dead, and Jonathan 
is dead. Yet memory lingers, and memory brings back 
thoughts of other days. During one of those soul- 
searching reveries, David bethinks himself of those 
earlier years of his life when every hour he was in 
danger, when he had to hide in caves and behind 
huge boulders and beneath the webs of spiders, to 
elude the darts of the arrows from the bows of Saul 
and his henchmen. So we suppose one day there awoke 
in his heart of conscience the startling question, "What 
has become of Jonathan's family? Is there anyone 
left? I must show him kindness, for Jonathon's sake!" 
And so he sent out men to search through the king- 
dom to find if there should be even one scion of the 
house of the one he loved so dearly in those days of 
struggle and grief. And at last they came back. They 
had found one, and they brought him in the presence 
of the great king. And then King David did. one of 
the most gracious acts of his life, he provided that 
Mephibosheth should eat at the king's table and 
should have every comfort and luxury as long as he 
lives. And then the divine records tell us concerning 
Mephibosheth, "and he was lame on both his feet," 
which only means that he needed all the more the 
care and the attention of the servants who had been 
assigned to him by the king. 

For Jonathan's sake. This is the meaning of Rom- 
ans 11:28, "They are beloved for the fathers' sakes." 
I suppose nothing is more intimate in all Scripture, 
and nothing more wonderful than that story in Gen- 
esis where God calls Abraham, "My friend." And be- 
cause Abraham was God's friend, God loves Israel to- 
day "for Jonathan's sake." Not that the Jew of him- 
self can claim any merits today for God's love, for if 
we face the issues frankly, we would need to confess 
freely that Israel's only deserts from God would be 
complete destruction But God had a friend, and his 
name was Abraham, and God made promises to Abra- 
ham, sealed by His own sacred oath. God cannot lie, 
and so today He seeks to do kindness to any that are 
left of the house of Saul, for Jonathan's sake. 



For Jonathan's sake. Mephibosheth was lame on 
both feet. Can anyone look upon Israel's tortures and 
agonies of the present world situation and not find 
his heart burning within him with a great compas- 
sion and with a great longing, to bring at least some 
measure of relief and help, in the name of Him Whose 
brethren they still are? Was there ever a time in the 
world's history when the church had a better oppor- 
tunity to show kindness to Israel "for Jonathan's 
sake." Look at it a moment: Out of the rape of Po- 
land we see the staggering fact of over 5,000,000 Jews 
now within the borders of Russia alone, just about 
one-third of all the Jews in the world, in that God- 
blaspheming land of the Stalin beast. In Poland what 
Jews remain can count their days ahead almost on 
the fingers of their hands, for they are being de- 
stroyed systematically, brutally and relentlessly day 
by day, until it has become a serious question as to 
whether the Jewish race in Poland will not be com- 
pletely extinct within another year. In Germany out 
of 600,000 Jews that lived happily in that Nazi-ridden 
land before the Nazi curse came upon them, there are 
now less than 160,000 left, and half of these live on 
the charity of other Jewish communities. In Ru- 
mania they are hunted like dogs and shot in the 
streets, one report alone having come to America that 
in one day's massacre in Bucharest some 2,000 Jews 
were shot down in the streets. It was also in Rumania 
that the head of the Orthodox Greek Church had 
gotten an oath sworn in blood, signed by 30,000 ignor- 
ant, stupid and bigoted Catholic peasants, that they 
would see to it that every Jew in Rumania was ex- 
terminated, and this in the name of the Lord Jesus 
Christ. 

For Jonathan's sake. Here in America the tide of 
Jew hate is rising with such an alarming rate as to 
strike terror into the hearts of all Jewry. There are 
organizations which dare to call themselves "Chris- 
tian front" "Christian action" "Christian crusaders," 
and they parade through the centers of our large cit- 
ies, and carry large banners, shouting their shameful 
cries, "Buy Christian, sell Christian, employ Christian! 
Don't buy from a Jew, don't sell to a Jew, don't employ 
a Jew!" What a horrible picture! 

To these problems God has called your American 
Board of Missions to the Jews, and we are literally at 
grips with the most powerful demonical forces of all 
our 45 years of history. Under God's help we are 
reaching out a hand of love and sympathy and genu- 
ine gospel ministry to these destitute world-weary 
Jewish refugees: we go to them across the water, we 
are caring for them right here in New York; we try 
to re-establish them, to put them on an earning basis; 
we try to quiet their minds, to give them, new poise, 
and above all to give them that love which will make 
possible everything else, the gospel of the Lord Jesus 
Christ in their hearts. And God is honoring the work 
in a way which has astounded those who come to see 
for themselves. 

The Brethren Churches of America have so kindly 
centered their Jewish missionary interest with us in 
the unique work that your missionary, Elias Zim- 
merman and his good wife, are doing in Los An- 
geles. An impartial observer of the work there wrote 
us only two days ago, "Elias Zimmerman probably has 
the worst and most inadequate plant, but is doing the 
greatest work in the city of Los Angeles." 

For Jonathan's sake. May God continue to bless the 
Brethren Churches as they rally in still greater 
strength about us in these days so electric with pro- 
phetic fulfillments and with world upheavals. 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



See Mission Picture on Back Cover 



What Qun, Qtetkten Minion, U 2)oin4f 



By ELIAS ZIMMERMAN 
Our Log Angeie; Missionary to the Jews 




Rev. and Mrs. Zimmerman 



It is now about 
a year sines you 
have taken u s 
under the shel- 
ter of your 
wings and have 
adopted us as 
your very own. 
You have sup- 
ported us with 
your Rifts and 
with your pray- 
er before the 
throne of graca 
For all these 
manifestati o n s 
of your deep in- 
terest in the sal- 
vation of the 
lost sheep of Is- 
rael we rejoice 
and give thanks 
to our heavenly 
Father. We are 

also greatly encouraged by the increasing interest on 
the part of a number of the Brethren churches in 
and around Los Angeles. Several groups have not 
only encouraged us by their presence, but have been 
a blessing and an inspiration by taking an active part 
in the services. They bring special music and the 
pastor gives an appropriate message for the evening. 

Since neither time nor space will permit us to give 
a detailed report of all our activities, we will merely 
touch upon the high spots, hoping that this will give 
you a better idea of the work of your Jewish Mission, 
and so will enable you to take a deeper interest and 
also to pray more intelligently. 

Meetings and Discussions — This, of course, is the 
main work of the mission. Heretofore we used to 
have meetings every night with the exception of 
Saturday. We got several good scoldings from Dr. 
Joseph H. Cohn, General Secretary of the American 
Board of Missions to the Jews, because of it. He said 
we would break down under the strain. However, we 
felt constrained to go on. The need was so great and 
the time so short. Dr. Cohn evidently was right, for 
finally we did break down. And so at the advice of 
our physician we cut down our meetings to Sunday, 
Tuesday, and Thursday. 

Attendance 

The attendance at the meetings especially during 
the fall and winter, is very good indeed. The mission 
hall is pretty well filled. Many an evening it is Quite 
crowded, and at times uncomfortably so. Mrs. Zim- 
merman often warns me not to announce our special 
doings on days like Thanksgiving Day and Christmas 
for fear that we would be unable to take care of all 
who come. We often wish and pray we had some 
larger quarters. 

We start our services with the singing of gospel 
hymns, and some have been auite surprised to find 
how well Jews love to sing those grand old gospel 
hymns. For 30 or 45 minutes our little hall literally 
rings with the singing of those songs. And we en- 
courage them in the singing of those hymns because 
so many of them have such wonderful gospel truths. 
After the singing follows the message or discussion. 



Women's and Children's Work 

This is in charge of our brother Henry Neale. 



He 



is a graduate from the Bible Institute of Los Angeles, 
and is a very consecrated young man. The cause of 
Israel is very dear to his heart. However, he is labor- 
ing under great difficulties. The mission is located 
in the very heart of the Jewish business section, and 
the entrance is quite conspicuous. The Jewish woman 
and children are afraid they are watched when they 
come in. On several occasions we were asked if we 
had a back entrance so they could come in unobserved. 
And so our work among the children and women is 
carried on m private homes, which are difficult to 
secure in our location. 

Distribution of Tracts and New Testaments 

We distribute anywhere from 1,000 to 1,500 tracts 
and Shepherds of Israel in our visitation work and 
upon the streets every month. During the year we 
have given away more than 16,000 pieces of literature. 
We have found the Shepherd of Israel, published bv 
the American Board of Missions to the Jews, especially 
very good and helpful. Some Jews look for it and 
read it eagerly. We also give away manv hundreds of 
New Testaments, portions of it, and also entire Bibles. 
But these we give only when thev ask for them or 
promise faithfully to read them. This we do gladly, 
for we know that God's Word will not return unto 
Him void. 

Relief Among the Poor 

Many of those who come to our mission are poor, 
homeless, jobless, lonely Jewish boys and men. We try 
our best to befriend them and help them. When pos- 
sible we try to secure jobs for some of them now and 
then. This, however, we find very difficult to do. Los 
Angeles is the hardest place to get any kind of em- 
ployment. And so we try to do our best in feeding 
the hungry and providing shelter for the homeless. 
We feed and take care of 200 to 600 per month, de- 
pending upon the time of the year. Last March, how- 
ever, was our heaviest month, for we had to take care 
of over 1,000 Jewish boys and men. We do this gladly 
as a means to an end, namely that we might win 
them for the Lord Jesus Christ. We have found the 
best way to win the Jew for Christ is through kind- 
ness and love. And we also remember that our Lord 
Himself worked among the poor and needy and hun- 
gry, and that He said: "Inasmuch as ye have done 
it unto the least of these my (Jewish) brethren, ye 
have done it unto me." 

Results 

We have had seven Jews who took a definite stand 
during the year, and accepted the Lord Jesus Christ 
as their Savior and Redeemer, and made public con- 
fession of their faith by baptism. Aside from these 
a number came to us from time to time and told us 
auietly that they have come to know and believe in 
the Lord Jesus Christ as their Messiah, but that for 
reasons of their own they could not make a public 
confession of their faith. They need our prayers and 
your prayers that they may be willing to forsake all 
for the Lord Jesus Christ and take a definite stand 
for Him. 

While this has been a hard year, and many a time 
Mrs. Zimmerman and I went home late at night from 
the mission discouraged and disheartened, yet we 
have also had many mountain top experiences when 
we rejoiced and praised God that He called us to la- 
bor among the lost sheep of the house of Israel. We 
covet your earnest pravers for God's continued guid- 
ance and blessing upon our ministry among His an- 
cient people, Israel. 



JANUARY 18, 1941 



^e&Umcuu&l jfUMto G&noetited flewti! 



WHAT THE BRETHREN JEWISH MISSION 
HAS MEANT TO THEM 



This Jewish Mission can rightfully be called a haven 
of a refuge. Here Jewish men from all walks of life 
are singing gospel songs, and they hear the testimony 
of the holy Word. The physical as well as the spir- 
itual needs of many are met here. Truly God is bless- 
ing this mission under the capable and loving leader- 
ship of Jewish hearts who have a true knowledge of 
the Lord Jesus Christ. 

— Sam Narosny, Jewish student 
at Bible Institute. 

I also want to express what this mission has done 
for me. It has taught me the truth ana made me a 
better Jew as a Christian. May God bless you for all 
you have done for me. 

— Ed Levine. 

For more than 30 years, up to the time I have come 
to this mission, I have never as much as opened and 
looked into a Bible. I am glad God led me to this 
place. I have received but kindness and love here. 
God bless you! 

— H. L. 

I found the Lord Jesus Christ as my personal Savior 
and Messiah in this mission, and I can truly say that 
it has been joy unspeakable and full of glory since 
then. I came here as one who even doubted the exis- 
tence of God. After coming here for about three 
months the Holy Spirit convicted me of my sins, and 
there was nothing I could do but accept Him of Whom 
Moses and the prophets did write, namely Jesus the 
Christ. Pray for me that the Lord may use me to 
bring many of my people to Jesus Christ as their 
Messiah. 

— Solomon Cohen. 

I wish I could express in just a few words my grat- 
itude and appreciation for what this Jewish Mission 
has done for me. Be.fore I came to this house of God 
I used to scoff and mock at Christ and Christianity. 
I now see where I was very wrong. 

— S. M. 

I have been coming to this mission a long time, and 
it means a good deal to me. It is here where I first 
heard the gospel and where I found the Lord Jesus 
Christ as my Savior. May God bless this mission and 
all the friends who support it. 

— H. Goldstein. 

I have been coming to this mission for about four 
months, and I am enjoying the meetings every time 
I come. I have received great help here and am very 
thankful. 

— J. Dinovitz. 

I want to express my thanks and gratitude to Broth- 
er Zimmerman and his associates for the comfort and 
happiness I have found in their teachings of the Lord 
Jesus Christ. I pray that the Lord may continue to 
give them health and strength to continue this won- 
derful work. May God bless all those friends who 
make the work of Brother Zimmerman possible. 

— Harry Weiss. 

In appreciation for all this mission has done for 
me, I want to express my hearty thanks; also for the 
manner in which Mr. Zimmerman has dealt with me. 
I can see more clearly now the meaning of being a 
good Christian. 

—J. H. 



This is the first Jewish mission I ever attended, and 
it has been a revelation to me. The services have been 
a great inspiration to me and have done a great deal 
of good to me. 

— Joseph Levy. 

I have always been ignorant of the teaching of 
Christ and the Christian faith, and I want to thank 
this mission for leading me to Christ. I am beginning 
to see the Light. 

— L. H. 

It is really wonderful what is done in this Hebrew 
Mission. The love of God is taught here, and the 
hungry and needy are fed and helped. May God give 
you the wisdom and the courage to carry on 

— H. N. 

It is here that I found Christ as my Savior and 
words cannot express all that I would like to say 
"This, our mission, is a place of love. 
It sure was sent from heaven above. 
A place where you can relax. 
As you sit and listen to the facts 
Of a wonderful God and His Son." 
(This is supposed to be poetry). 

— James F. Roseman. 



OUR WORK AMONG JEWISH CHILDREN 

By HENRY NEALE, Worker among Jewish children 

It is three years now since I came to Beth Sar Sha- 
lom at 2005 Brooklyn Ave., the Los Angeles branch of 
the American Board of Missions to the Jews. 

The tactful and patient way which Brother Zim- 
merman presented the gospel appealed very strongly 
to me; and I stayed to serve the Lord with him in this 
very needy portion of God's vineyard. Each worker 
has been of great blessing to me, and we have re- 
joiced together many times because of "one sinner 
that repented." 

The majority of these Jewish converts have been 
forced by circumstances to move to other cities, but 
we have some of them still in our midst to encourage 
us in the work. This certainly more than compen- 
sates for the heartaches which are inevitable in this 
work. 

The work among the children nlso yielded fruit al- 
though numbers were small because of parental ob- 
jection. Those who came were taught by use of the 
Scripture-graph, in the Old Testament; and the mem- 
ory work was Messianic prophecy. Among regular at- 
tendants were the children of a Rabbi, who, when 
"review" week came, not only recited the Bible stories 
perfectly but also gave the spiritual applications. When 
speaking of sin, they would tell of the judgment for 
sin; when they mentioned the sacrifice, they would 
speak of the suffering Messiah; and when asked to 
prove it, they would quote Isaiah 53:6. 

Prayer is especially needed for work among the 
children and women. 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



OUR COMPTON CHURCH WORKS IN 
JEWISH MISSION 

By GRANT E. Mc DONALD 

Brother Zimmerman requested a few words relative 
to the mission among the Jews of Los Angeles. Comp- 
ton church has the privilege of conducting one ser- 
vice each month. It certainly is a joy and an in- 
spiration to serve in this attractive mission to the 
Jews. A spirited song service followed by a Bible 
study or message is given to an attendance of 35 to 
50. Splendid interest and attention are shown. Some- 
times statements are challenged or called into ques- 
tion. Then Brother Zimmerman in his gracious and 
patient manner forestalls any argument, and after 
the service takes time to help any that are seeking 
such. Many of God's chosen have found Jesus Christ 
as their Messiah here and are growing in grace and 
knowledge of the Lord. Brethren dollars invested in 
this work will truly bring results and blessings. 



A BLIND MAN'S VISIT TO OUR JEWISH 
MISSION 

By MELVIN PALMER 

Although I had been a Christian for a number of 
years, and had been much interested in the brethren 
of my Lord after the flesh, I had never visited a Jew- 
ish Mission. At last, when I was finally prompted by 
a strong desire to do so, I telephoned a friend whom 
I was quite certain would know the best place to go, 
and acting upon his suggestion, I made my way to 
the Beth Sar Shalom Mission in Los Angeles. In trav- 
eling about, I have heard different groups of men 
sing, but perhaps in few instances have I heard men 
sing more whole-heartedly, and this fact is especially 
unioue when it is realized that by far the larger ma- 
jority of the men who come to the mission are un- 
saved; vet they sang the gospel songs as though they 
personally knew the One of Whom they sang. It is, 
however, their singing of "Hatikvah (The Hope)" that 
would oerhaps stir the hearts of most Gentile listen- 
ers; for, as wandering sons of Jacob, they must in 
this song exoress something of their own experience, 
as can be se'en in the words of this song: 



HATIKVAH (The Hope) 

The ancient chosen people, driven from their home, 
Groping in darkness, restlessly now roam, 
Rejecting their Messiah, blind in unbelief; 
Know not their hatred, ends in hopeless grief, 

CHORUS 

Savior! Hear us! Hear, Immanuel; 

Save Thy Zion, save Thy Israel. 

Wilful she wanders, drifting farther from Thy side; 

Save Thy misguided and unfaithful bride. 



They chose to walk in darkness, heeded not Thy Word. 
Wake up Thy peopie; save them, blessed Lord. 
Jehovah, do remember Israel today; 
Show them compassion, turn them from their way. 



Remove the veil of Moses from Thy Israel; 
Wake them from slumber, ring the gospel bell. 
Their darkened hearts enlighten; help them to believe, 
That they may know Thee, and Thy peace receive. 



Teach us to love Thy people, plead as Thou did'st plead, 
"Father forgive them," thus we intercede. 
Revive Thy love within us, give it fervency, 
Make us responsive to their misery. 

5. 
The Lord cannot forget them; Israel e'er long 
Shall come rejoicing, singing Zion's song. 
Lord! speed their day of promise, pentecost once more, 
Gather Thy Zion as in days of yore. 



The history of the Beth Sar Shalom Mission is an 
interesting one. The plan was to have a reading room 
for Jews; but on the opening night so many came 
that the God-sent opportunity for an evangelistic mis- 
sion was too clearly evident to be overlooked. At once 
the reading room became the Beth Sar Shalom Mis- 
sion, in which was declared the unsearchable riches 
of Christ, and homeless, wondering Jews began to 
know their Messiah and to be brought under His ten- 
der, shepherding care and the wise, loving, self-sacri- 
ficing ministry of the superintendent of the mission, 
Rev. Elias Zimmerman, and his wife and their co- 
worker, Mr. Henry Neale, so that meals as well as 
beds have been provided for the needy. 

Wonderful, however, as was the beginning of the 
Beth Sar Shalom Mission work, founded and partly 
supported by the American Board of Missions to the 
Jews, help from other quarters was slow in develop- 
ing, especially from Gentile Christians. But, in the 
grace of God, with the passing of time, Brother Ash- 
man of our Whittier church was led to enter into the 
work of the mission; and finally the board of The 
Brethren Home Missions Council took over the over- 
head expenses, and it became our Mission to the Jews. 
Therefore, if for no other reason, it deserves the pray- 
ers and further financial support of all our Brethren 
people. 



"IF I HAD PRAYED" 

'My voice shalt thou hear in the morning. 



-Ps. 5:3. 



Perhaps the day would not have seemed so long, 
The skies would have not seemed so gray, 

If on my knees in humble prayer 
I had begun the day. 

Perhaps the fight would not have seemed so hard- 
Prepared, I might have faced the fray, 

If I had been alone with Him 
Upon my knees, to pray. 

Perhaps I might have cheered a broken heart 

Or helped a wand'rer on the way. 
If I had asked to be a light 

To some dark sou! today. 

I would remember just the pleasant things, 

The harsh words that I meant to say 
I would forget, if I had prayed 

When I began the day. 

I think I could have met life's harder trials 
With hopeful heart and cheerful smile, 

If I had spoken with my Lord 
Just for a little while. 

And. if I pray, I find that all goes well: 

All care at His dear feet is laid. 
My heart is glad, the load is light, 

Because I first have prayed. 

— M. Joyce Rader. 
— Baptist Bulletin, December, 1940. 



—6- 



JANUARY 18, 194 1 



Qelijflaw-en, H BledAed 



By JESSE HALL, Pastor 




"Oh magnify the Lord with me, and let us exalt His 

name together." "Oh sing unto the Lord a new song; 

for He hath done marvelous things: His right hand, 

and His holy arm, hath gotten Him the victory." 

It is with joy that we undertake to report the bless- 
ings that God 

h a s showered. 

upon the work 

of the 1st Breth- 
ren Church in 

Bellflower. 1 1 

has been such a 

long time since 

our last report 

that we wonder 

just where to 

begin. Our Fa- 
ther God has 

blessed us with 

all spiritual 

blessings in 

Christ Jesus, for 

whicli we nraise 

Him. In common 

with all other 

Christians, our 

people have had 

many severe 

testings and 

trials; but we 

are happy to re- 
port that they 

have been used 

of the Lord to 

strengthen our 

faith and to pre- Rev Ha|| and Fomi , 

pare us for even ' 

greater victories in the Lord. In all of the experiences 
incident to our walk and warfare, God has deepened 
the spiritual lives of our people and the fellowship 
that we now enjoy is very precious. 

Our Bible School has shown a marked increase in 
attendance and interest lately. At present the differ- 
ent classes are engaged in a contest designed to pro- 
mote a larger attendance. It is an airplane race and 
our slogan is: "From Bellflower to Bethlehem." One 
of our women has prepared a banner, attractively 
colored, that shows the different stops along the way. 
This banner is stretched across the back of .our audi- 
torium. Each class is represented by a tiny airplane 
suspended on strings that are stretched across in 
front of the banner. In this way the entire school 
can watch the progress of the race. It has added ma- 
terially to the interest. 

We have had some definite decisions for Jesus Christ 
as Savior, which are always the source of great re- 
joicing. We believe that we are not fulfilling God's 
purpose for His church if we do not constantly seek 
the lost and try to win them for Him. Quite a num- 
ber of visitors have been noted in both morning and 
evening services. Our Christian Endeavor societies are 
giving a good account of themselves too. Both of 
them have made a generous offering for home mis- 
sions, and that kind of interest will cause any society 
to grow. 

Our Women's Missionary Council is proving an in- 
valuable aid both to the church and to the pastor. 
At a recent meeting the women elected a visitation 
chairman and have taken over a definite program of 
visitation work. Under the direction of this conse- 
crated chairman they now have several teams that 
are going out in visitation work each week. The wom- 
en certainly have a mind to work for they have also 
taken upon themselves the responsibility oi the clean- 



ing of the church building. Their monthly meetings 
are a real source of inspiration to all that attend. Re- 
cently Miss Grace Byron was the guest speaker. 

The Sisterhood work is doing nicely. Under the 
sponsorship of Mrs. Hall the girls are taking hold and 
showing a fine interest in all their activities. Ten of 
the girls attended the District rally held at Whittier 
recently. 

After many months of prayer God has opened a 
door for us to take the Word of God into Lakewood 
Village. It is located in the Long Beach city limits but 
is situated just three miles south of Bellflower. There 
are around 700 homes in this community and the 
Long Beach Junior College is located there. It is high- 
ly restricted and is a wonderful field. One of our 
families recently built a home there and has opened 
it to us for a Bible class. We have practically covered 
the whole section by house to house calls, leaving a 
gospel tract with a personal invitation to the meet- 
ings. Much prayer is needed to break down the in- 
difference in the hearts of the people. God is able. 
The time is getting short and we do want to buy up 
every opportunity to tell forth the good news. 

With the rapid expansion of the aircraft industry 
in nearby vicinities Bellflower is growing by leaps 
and bounds. The population will soon pass the 20,000 
mark. Only six miles separate the large Vultee plant 
and the new Douglas plant that is now being built 
in Lakewood, and The First Brethren Church of Bell- 
flower is situated right in between them. We are only 
one block east of the main traffic artery that con- 
nects these factories. We are praying that God will 
use us to reach many of the new families that are 
now moving into our district. We are believing that 
God will soon enable us to complete our church build- 
ing. It is greatly needed if we are to do our best work 
in reaching these men and women for Christ. 

We want to thank all of you who have prayed for 
the work here. We are indeed grateful for the mis- 
sionary dollars that you have invested in the Lord's 
work at this place. We are happy to be numbered 
among the many mission churches that are receiving 
help through The Brethren Home Missions Council 
It is your gifts to the Council that have enabled them 
to extend a helping hand to us. Please remember that 
each one of our mission points is looking to you to 
help together by prayer for us, that for the gift be- 
stowed upon us by the means of many nersons thanks 
may be given h? many on oar behalf. Our earnest 
prayer and hope is that many more mission points 
may be opened to The Brethren Church as a result 
of your continued generosity and sacrificial giving. 
Brethren, pray for us. 




The Bellflower Church 






THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



^I4e PnjeA&nt Zull A<fe— 

WHAT SHOULD BE THE CHRISTIANS ATTITUDE TOWARD IT? 



FLOYD W. SHIERY, Dallas, Texas 



In spite of the fanciful dreams of certain moralists 
and reformers, who claim the world is getting better 
in every way, thinking men in general consider them- 
selves to be living in a dangerous and wicked world. 
Just a few years ago the general viewpoint held by 
practically all social scientists was to the effect that 
man in himself is sufficient for all things, and that 
slowly but gradually we are approaching that era of 
righteous equality and material plentitude toward 
which the whole race of men aspire. They narrated 
with pride the triumph of science over disease, fam- 
ine and poverty. They even assured us that war was 
a thing of the past, for men were too enlightened to 
fight again. 

But such wishful thinking has received a great 
shock since an Austrian house painter and German 
army corporal took over the reigns of government 
in one of Europe's most enlightened nations. Today 
that nation is engaged in a policy of ruthless totali- 
tarianism, the result of which has been to inspire the 
whole world to sharpen swords, produce implements 
of destruction, and train its youth to do battle. Man- 
kind is literally turning to rocky caves in the heart 
of the earth and to waging war with a savagery un- 
equaled by the wildest beasts. 

Indeed this is an evil age. But the Bible-loving 
Christian is not surprised to see its evil manifestation. 
He knows it has always been evil. He knows that the 
god of this age is Satan (2 Cor. 4:4), the arch-enemy 
of our God and Father, and that it is not within Sa- 
tan's nower nor always to his purpose to maintain 
righteousness and peace. The Bible-loving Christian 
knows that sinful men, under Satan, dominate the 
present age, and therefore violence is inevitable. But 
his consolation is in God Who rules and overrules all 
things to His blessed purpose. 

The Bible-loving Christian recognizes that he has 
been delivered from this present evil age by the sav- 
ing power of the Lord Jesus Christ (Gal. 1:4), and 
therefore even though he must continue in the world 
he is not of it (1 Cor. 5:10). He knows too that our 
great High Priest has interceded (Jn. 17:14-16), and 
continues to intercede for His own in the world (Heb. 
7:25). 

The Bible-loving Christian knows that when the 
days are evil the business of God's people is to redeem 
the time since it offers precious moments of oppor- 
tunity. The Apostle Paul tells us to be "redeeming 
the time, because the days are evil. Wherefore be ve 
not unwise, but understanding what the will of the 
Lord is" (Eph. 5:16). Now the will of God for the be- 
liever is the same today as it was when He delivered 
it to us in the blessed Book. Our God changes not! 
(Mai. 3:6). His purpose is an eternal purpose (Eph. 
1:4,2:7). unchanged and unchangeable by the shift- 
ing sands of human blunderings. Our Savior changes 
not! (Heb. 13:8). His desire for the sinner's salva- 
tion continues. His command to the believer to preach 
the gosDel is continuous. Hear Him as He leaves His 
orders to the disciples, "Go ye therefore, and teach 
all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, 
and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost" (Matt. 28: 19> . 

Brethren in the Lord, it matters not what is hap- 
pening in the world. Wars may rage about us, em- 
oires mav rise and fall, rulers mav wax and wane, 
but our privilege and duty continues. He did not say, 



"Go until the times become evil" but He said, "Go ye 
therefore . . . and lo, I arn with you alway, even unto 
the end of the world." Sinners are perishing because 
of a lack of the gospel, souls are facing a Christless 
eternity, and the gospel of Jesus Christ is the power 
of God unto salvation to every one that believeth. O 
what a priceless privilege! What a glorious oppor- 
tunity! Brethren, arise and send forth this message 
of redemption before the darkness of night falls. 

Turn in your Bibles and read Jn. 3:16. Now turn 
to Matt. 9:35-38. Does not the love of God revealed 
here warm your heart as you recall that He loved 
you, and gave you everlasting life? Does not the com- 
passion of Christ stir your heart as you behold Him 
full of compassion for the scattered multitudes? 
Brethren, God still loves the sinner. The multitude is 
still without a Shepherd. "Say not ye. There are yet 
four months, and then cometh harvest? behold, I say 
unto you, Lift up your eyes, and look on the fields: 
for they are white already to harvest. And he that 
reapeth receiveth wages, and gathereth fruit unto 
life eternal: that both he that soweth and he that 
reapeth may rejoice together" (Jn 4:35-36). 

Possibly you cannot go forth to preach. Perhaps 
you are without funds to send out a missionary. But 
you can pray. That is what our Savior told His dis- 
ciples to do. He didn't tell them to go first and then 
pray. He told them to pray. If we will pray, He will 
send forth the preachers and also the payers and the 
prayers. May God consecrate us to this great task. 



SIN SHUTS OFF THE POWER 

"If I regard iniquity in my heart, the Lord will not 
hear me" (Ps. 66:18). There is nothing that will shut 
off the blessing and the power of God for us like 
secret and unconfessed sin. 

The story is told of a certain college which was 
without any supply of water one morning. The 
plumber was called and he examined the plumbing, 
but could find nothing wrong. Yet, there was no 
water. Next the water department of the city was 
called and they sent out men to investigate the trou- 
ble. After much searching they finally found the 
cause. A mile away from the college, where the small 
pipe line which supplied the college was connected 
with the large line going into the little city, there at 
the junction, they found a huge toad which had been 
sucked partly into the small line and which had liter- 
ally shut off all the water. The men who removed 
the troublemaker suggested that it had most likely 
gotten in there first as a little tadpole, but had fed 
upon the water until it grew and shut off the water. 

So it is with sin. Manv a Christian has allowed 
some little sin or sinful habit to sneak into his life, 
allowed it to remain there, until he woke up one day, 
and like Samson long ago, found that the power wa.'i 
gone. 



—6- 



JANUARY 18, 1941 







"What The Home Missions Council Is Doing" 



ACROSS 

THE 
NATION 

with our 
secretary 



LANDRUMS HAVE MOVED IN— 

At last the parsonage at Clayhole has been com- 
pleted to the extent that Brother and Sister Landrum 
have moved in. It seemed as though we would never 
get things done. There was a little plumbing unfin- 
ished, a little on the furnaces incomplete, some of the 
carpenter work unfinished, some of the painting to 
be completed; and it seemed like a completely fin- 
ished work would never come. No one seemed able to 
stay till his part of the work was actually completed. 
However, we got the things done that had to be done 
to make the house usuable, and the folks are now in, 



of both buildings, we felt it wise to delay the dedica- 
tion until spring. Then we can have all the little odds 
and ends completed, have sidewalks installed, lawn 
planted, and all the fences up and the building debris 
cleaned away. At that time we may be able to have 
a series of meetings to follow and reap a harvest of 
souls which is the real purpose of all our work. We 
also hope then to ordain Brother Sewell Landrum to 
the ministry. He has had a remarkable ministry 
through the years in spite of this handicap of being 
unordained. On dedication day we hope to have a 
large number of our lay people present from churches 
interested in our Kentucky work. We want to make 
it an all day meeting with a picnic dinner out in the 
spacious yard. 

Another addition not originally considered was a 
two car garage. It is being used now for the clothing 
room from which the things sent down are distributed. 
Literally hundreds of people come for clothing each 
week, and it would be a great mistake to have them 
in the church or the parsonage. We will ultimately 
have to build a special room for that purpose. The 
garage is needed and will serve very well for this at 
the present. This garage is now about ready for use 




The Clayhole Garage 

and they are where they can be clean and comfort- 
able. The new furnace works fine. The electrical work 
is fine, and the plumbing is working well. There are 
some adjustments to be made as there are in any new 
home. 

Brother Wesley Miller did a good job in a short 
time in putting the building up. The structure is 
costing $1,000.00 more than the estimates originally 
indicated, but we have a wonderful value for a very 
low price at that. That house and lot would sell for 
$5,000 or $6,000 anywhere in a city. After starting the 
building we found it best to install a full basement, 
and to obtain a Delco plant for use until the power 
lines would come through, and this compelled the 
purchase of quite a bit of machinery that we would 
not have had to get otherwise. But it is a unit that 
the brotherhood will be pleased with. This is going 
to prove a very attractive trip for our people "from 
now on. A few days spent there will prove a great 
blessing to our people. 

We originally planned to dedicate the church build- 
ing this month, but in view of the unfinished state 



ATTENDANCE IS UP— 

Last Sunday there were 225 in Sunday School and 
church services. We do not have seating for more. 
We are hoping that some good brother who is a car- 
penter can spend a couple of weeks down here and 
make us some seats. We have the oak lumber all 
ready for working up. The interest is continuing and 
many adults are coming, which is a new thing in 
Kentucky. The large adult class of men and women 
is the prize of this work. 



ANOTHER BUS IS NEEDED — 

Some time ago the Clayhole Sunday School pur- 
chased a bus that had been discarded in the Berne 
school district. It has given excellent service. It has 
been wholly inadequate however, and we have had 
to use a truck to haul those the bus could not reach. 
In wet weather it is a very uncomfortable experience 
to have to stand up in a truck and ride for several 
miles in the rain to get to Sunday School. Brother 
Mize Landrum has supplied the truck gladly, but the 
real need is for another bus. A good bus will cost 
about $125.00. 



FIVE MORE COMMUNITIES WAITING— 

There are five more communities greatly similar 
to this Clayhole field waiting for the Brethren 
churches to enter and give them the gospel. A month 
or more ago Brother Landrum sent word to one of 
these communities that he would be up to hold a 
service for them in the school building on the next 
Sunday afternoon. To his surprise there were 124 
assembled and waiting for him. They observed excel- 
lent order during the service and did little running 
in and out of the service as is so often true in this 
country. The following Sunday there were 146 out 
at the service. And the remarkable thing about it 
is that most of these people had never before heard 



—9— 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



the gospel of Christ. It may seem hard for northern 
people to believe that this can be true right here in 
America, but it is true in Kentucky nevertheless. 



TWENTY MORE SCHOOLS 

OPEN TO THE GOSPEL— 

We are now teaching the Bible to 500 boys and girls 
in the day schools of this Clayhole region. There are 
20 more schools up the hills waiting for us to take 
the gosnel to them. Perhaps 1,000 more young hearts 
can thus be reached with the gospel. 



MORE WORKERS NEEDED— 

One man cannot possibly care for the heavy work 
already begun at Clayhole. to say nothing of the 
teaching in all of the day schools, care for the re- 
markable prison work we have begun, and then ex- 
tend the work to the other schools and the new com- 
munities that are waiting for us. There is a real need 
for a pastor to care for the Clayhole work, sc as to 
allow Brother Landrum to push on to the new fields 
which he is so capable of developing, and for the 
school work in which he is so effective. This will mean 
another house to be built as soon as we can manage 
it. But God will provide in His own time. The field 
is ripe and waiting, and a real spiritual awakening is 
at hand in this field. Just anyone cannot do this work 
in Kentucky. The average northerner cannot fit him- 
self into the ways of these people. Great care must be 
exercised in choosing these workers. Before we are 
able to secure the workers, we must have the means 
to support them. That is why the directors of the 
Council are praying so earnestly for a greater offer- 
ing at this Thanksgiving. But it is quite evident that 
God is opening a door of testimony, great and effec- 
tual, here in the Kentucky mountains. May we not 
fail to enter and take it for Christ. 



FLORA FORGES AHEAD— 

It seemed impossible for us to show the home mis- 
sion pictures to the Flora church during the fall when 
we showed them to the rest of the churches, because 
Flora was in the process of building and moving in 
and dedicating their new church. Now that all this 
is off their hands, they were ready to see the pictures 
and take up their home mission offering. 

We found a house full of fine people waiting for 
us when we arrived. The spirit of optimism and de- 
votion for Christ among these people is certainly a 
joy. Their Sunday School and church attendance is 
growing right along. Their building is proving to be 
most commodious and very attractive. Brother Rem- 
pel is doing an excellent work in this field and we be- 
lieve that he will continue to do so. They are meet- 
ing all of their goals financially, for which we praise 
God. So far we have no disappointments in the Flora 
field. 



LODI GROUP IS GROWING— 

One year ago Brother Chas. Maves started a Bible 
class which met each week in Lodi, a town about 20 
miles north of Ashland. The class had manv ups and 
downs during its first year. This last fall Brother 
Mayes secured Arthur Cashman to take over this 
work. Our last report from there is that the class has 
grown to 30 in number and is increasing right along. 
They are now inquiring as to whether The Brethren 
Church will help them establish a permanent work. 
Some of the Homerville people are attending this class, 
and from all appearances at present a strong group 
of Brethren may be established in this place. Please 
pray for the work and the workers. 



SOUTH MANSFIELD BIBLE CLASS 

During most of last year Brother John Aeby, who 
was then located at Middlebranch, O. drove 74 miles 
each way to South Mansfield to establish a Bible 
class. There were many obstacles and not a great 
deal of encouragement. However, there is a real field 
there with thousands of people without a Christian 
work of any kind going on. This last fall Brother 
Arthur Cashman was secured to take over this work 
also. The organization is already made and the com- 
munity is showing a better response than last year. 
The first year is always the hardest in establishing 
any kind of work. Let all the praying folks be sure 
to remember this great opportunity in South Mans- 
field. 



REAL PROGRESS AT FRONT ROYAL, VA. 

Three years ago the Viscose Corporation of America 
started the erection of an artificial silk plant at this 
place. The secretary observed this, and upon investi- 
gation found that the company plans to invest many 
millions of dollars and to employ several thousand 
employees as soon as the plant is completed. This will 
bring about an additional population of this Virginia 
city of about 20.000 people, which will make a real 
opportunity for The Brethren Church. However, we 
were unable to start anything at that time, but this 
fall during a revival at Winchester, Bernard Schneid- 
er and Norman Uphouse organized a group of Breth- 
ren in Front Royal. Three weeks ago they were re- 
joicing over an attendance of 32 in their Bible class. 
The home in which they have been meeting was too 
small to hold all who came. Brother Norman Uphouse 
is enthusiastic regarding the outlook for this new 
work. We are praising God for all these new fields 
and for the evident favor which He is bestowing upon 
us in giving them to us. We give Him all the glory. 



MORE SOULS WON IN KENTUCKY 

Two weeks before Christmas, the secretary went to 
a community about 40 miles southeast of Clayhole to 
an evangelistic meeting among the soft coal miners 
of that region. God richly blessed this meeting with 
many souls. The wonderful way in which the Spirit 
of God strove with the hearts of men was a sight to 
see. The great struggle between the Holy Spirit and 
the spirit of Antichrist was something to behold. It 
would have been a rich experience for many Chris- 
tian workers who have never seen such tremendous 
spiritual battles within the human soul. To see drunk- 
ards, gamblers, adulterers and every other type of 
sinners come under the power of the Spirit of God, 
and b<^so broken down that they actually staggered to 
the pulpit to confess Christ, was great. And then to 
observe these men throw out their whiskey, beer, and 
decks of cards without a second's hesitation was grip- 
ping. Turn to see these same men obtain Bibles and 
set up their familv altars with courage born of deep 
determination to live lor Christ, and to hear them 
stumble out their first prayers of gratitude, praise and 
supplication, would melt anv heart. Fiftv wonderful 
decisions were made during these two weeks of meet- 
ing's. We wouldn't have missed this meeting for any- 
thing. In fact we extended the time of the campaign 
bv taking a week of our time planned at home for 
Christmas in order to reach more souls who were 
steadilv coming to the Lord. We give our blessed 
Lord all the glorv. But beloved, remember this: the 
gospel of Jesus Christ has lost none of its power. 
Praise His name! 



—10- 



JANUARY 18, 1941 



^UaMJz&tfioiHXf O^eiiHty defiant 






NOTE: All gifts for general fund except 
those designated as follows: .(R.P.) River 
Park; (Sh) Sharpsville; (S.L.) Sewell Lan- 
drum; (C.K.) Clayhole, Kentucky; (El Evan- 
gelistic; (Wa) Waterloo; (Wi) Winchester; 
(Witter) Alton Witter; (K) Kentucky; (Tr. 
B.F.) Tracy Building Fund; (Tr. ) Tracy; 
(C.K. P.) Clayhole, Ky. parsonage. 



Mr. & Mrs. I. Wesley Miller, 

Goshen, Indiana ( R.P.) ISh.l (Genl 100.00 

1st Brethren Church, Harrah, Wash. 
Christian Endeavor Society (S.L.) 2.0C 

Mr. & Mrs. Frank B. Lindower, 

Hartville, Ohio 12.50 

Robert F. McBride, 
Troy, Ohio 10.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Nelson J. Buckland, 

Oakland, Calif. 50.00 

Mr. & Mrs. N. F. McDonald, 

Milford, Ind. 5.00 

John J. Wengerl, 
Altoono, Pa. (C.K.) 1.50 

Mr. & Mrs. S. W. Weber and Mrs. 

Alvater, Pittstown, N. J. (GenME) 5.50 

Albert G. Hann, 

Glen Gardner, N. J. 5.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Sam Anderson, 

Roann, Ind. 5.00 

Yellow Creek Brethren Church, 

Hopewell, Pa. 1.30 

1st Brethren Church, Aleppo, Pa. 
Mrs. Ida Ullom, 5.00 

Amount previously reported 84.62 

Total 

Mrs. Joe Haas, 
Lakevillc, Ind. 

Mrs. Bonnie E. Ashton, 
Lewisburg, Ohio 

Red Hill Brethren Church, 
Boone Mill, Va. Congregation 

1st Brethren Church, Listie, Pa. 
Mr. & Mrs. Ira Blough, 
Mr. & Mrs. Ed Good 
Mr. & Mrs. C. J. Larman 
Mrs. Melda Paxton 
Leland Larman 
Mr. & Mrs. Dean Mauer 
Mrs. . J. Schrock 
A Friend 
Gifts less than $5.00 

Total 66.65 



1st Brethren Church, 
Clay City, Indiana 

Mr. & Mrs. A. P. Megenhardt (C.K.) 5.00 
Ever Welcome Class 5.00 

Mrs. L. C. Rentschler 5.00 



89.62 


5.00 


7.00 


9.65 


12.00 


10.00 


5.00 


5.00 


5.00 


5.00 


5.00 


5.00 


14.65 



D. V. Oberholtzer 5.00 

Gifts less thon $5.00 

Total 

Summitt Mills Brethren Church, 
Meyersdale, Pa. 
Mr. Earl Brenneman 
Mr. & Mrs. Clarence Firl 
Mr. & Mrs. W. J. Miller 
Mrs. Annie Miller 
Gifts less thon $5.00 

Total 

1st Brethren Church, Portis, Kans. 
Mr. Charlie Knoll 
Mr. & Mrs. W. L. Brumbaugh 
Mr. & Mrs. D. E. Brumbaugh 
Rev. & Mrs. Geo. E. Cone 
Emma and Maggie Peterson 
Mr. & Mrs. T. N. Garner 
Gifts less than $5.00 



Mr. & Mrs. Warren Coykendall (Tr) 5.00 



Total 

Clavhole Brethren Church, 
Clayhole, Ky. 

Lucinda Landrum 
Ruth Landrum 
Loose Offering 

Total 

Third Brethren Church, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Mr. & Mrs. R. Adams 
Rev. & Mrs. Wm. Steffler (Wa) 
Mr. John Bauers 
Miss G. Gallagher (Wi) 
Mr. & Mrs. J. Upright 
Mr. & Mrs. J. H. Wilkey 
Gifts less than $5.00 
Gifts less than $5.00 (C.K.) 
Gifts less than $5.00 (Wi) 

Total 

Third Brethren Church, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
District Missions for Ind. (Witter) 

1st Brethren Church, New Troy, Mich. 
Congregation 

1st Brethren Church, Sterling, Ohio 

Mr. & Mrs. Ernest Berry (K) 
Mr. & Mrs. Isaiah Close and Son 
Mr. & Mrs. Clyde Rogers 
Mr. & Mrs. F. E. Moine 
Neil and Dale Berry 
Sunday School 
Miscellaneous 
Miscellaneous (C.K.) 



Total 

1st Brethren Church, Tracy, Calif. 
Sunday School 

Turlock Brethren Church (Tr.B.F.; 
Mr. & Mrs. W. R. Lahman 10.00 

Mr. & Mrs. J. B. Coykendall 10.00 

Mr. & Mrs. C. H. Clary (Tr) 5.00 

Mrs. Geo. E. Pepper (Tr) 10.00 



6.35 


Mrs. Alice Wampler 


5.00 




Mr. & Mrs. E. E. Lahman 
Mrs. Nellie Carter 


10.00 


26.35 


10^00 




Mr. & Mrs. Ralph Rambo 


25.00 




Gifts less than $5.00 and 






loose offering 


9.90 


5.00 






5.00 


Total 


131.02 


5.00 


Mr. & Mrs. L. L Funk, 




5.00 


Needmore, W. Va. (E) 


10.00 


31.10 


Mrs. E. J. McClintic, 




51.10 


Jackson, Mich. (E) 


15.00 


(Ellef Brethren Church) 






1st Brethren Church, Peru, Ind. 




10.00 


Mr. & Mrs. R. L. Gilbert (Fl) 


5.00 


10.00 


Rev. & Mrs. R. A. Ashman 


5.00 


10.00 


Madelyn Comerford 


5.00 


10.00 


Mrs. Dan Comerford 


5.00 


5.00 


Mrs. Paul Kesling (Gen) (C.K.) 


6.00 


25.00 


Mr. & Mrs. Geo. Huddleston 


5.00 


18.75 


Berean Y. P. Class (C.K.) 


15.00 




Bible School 


7.18 




88.75 


Gifts less thon $5.00 
Total 


26.15 




79.33 


5.00 


Bethel Brethren Church, Berne, Ind. 




5.00 


Elsie Kuhn 


10.00 


1.50 


Eugene Leininger 


5.00 




Iva Sipe 


5.00 




11.50 


Archie Smitley 


5.00 




Victor Kuhn 


5.00 




Florence Smitley 


5.00 




Clark Sipe 


5.00 


15.00 


Mark Parr 


15.00 


5.00 


Mr. & Mrs. Karl Kauffman 


50.00 


5.00 


Naomi Sipe 


5.00 


5.00 


Shirley Ann Kuhn 


10.00 


5.00 


Mrs. Calvin Stephenson 


5.00 


5.00 


Mrs. Victor Kuhn 


5.00 


15.00 


Mr. & Mrs. Ralph Christy 


5.00 


5.50 


Mrs. John Kuhn 


5.00 


2.00 


Viola Witter 


25.00 




Mrs. J. L. Yaney 
Addie Sipe 


5.00 


62.50 


10.00 




John Kuhn 


10.00 




Mr. & Mrs. Bryson Fetters 


50.00 




Wm. H. Smitley 


10.00 


143.50 


Glen Agler 


5.00 


Norma Sprunger 


15.00 




Thelma Liechty 


5.00 




Genevieve Leininger 


5.00 


32.00 


Mr. & Mrs. Guy Bailey 


5.00 




Mr. & Mrs. Cecil E. Smitley 


15.00 




Mr. & Mrs. Blaine Bailey 


10.00 


10.00 


Archie Parr 


25.00 


10.00 


Mr. & Mrs. George Sipe 


50.00 


5.00 


Mrs. John Leistner 


5.00 


5.00 


Mrs. Archie Parr 


10.00 


5.00 


Mr. & Mrs. Chalmer Smitley 


10.00 


11.03 


Mr. & Mrs. Melvin Myers 


10.00 


17.00 


Mr. & Mrs. Frank Leistner (C.K.) 


10.00 


5.00 


Elaine Christy 


10.00 




Eloise Christy 
Church 

Total 


10 00 


68.03 


127'00 




577.00 


6.12 


Miss Mary Pence, 




25.00 


Limestone, Tenn. (C.K.P.) (Sh.) 


6.00 



(To be continued) 

Respectfully submitted, 

R. PAUL MILLER, Sec. 



—11— 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 




"He asked for the minister very importantly, for 
this was a business call. 'Here is a brick for the new 
church,' he explained. 'It is all I can find to give.' 



OUR BOY'S 
and GIRL'S 
VERY OWN 
PAGE 



Home Mission Story Number 7 

ROGER'S BRICK. 

The silvery raindrops were making a tune on the 
glass the next Sunday morning. No doubt they wanted 
to come in and hear Miss Brice's story, too. 

This is the story: 

"The story today is a let's pretend story. I am tailing 
it to you to help you see more ways about you in 
which' to serve the Lord Jesus Christ. 

"Roger was sitting on the curb in front of his house 
in a very thoughtful mood. His house was a new and 
shiny cottage built in a row with other new and shiny 
cottages. Across the way a foundation was being dug; 
and all about him houses were going up. 

"But there was no church building to which Roger 
could go. People had been holding services in Roger's 
home because the living room and dining room could 
be thrown together and thus provide more room than 
any of the other houses. But now they had outgrown 
these rooms. The new pastor who had come to lead 
them had told them they must have a church building 
if they were to grow any further with the Lord's work. 
After prayer they had felt led to make plans for build- 
ing a church as soon as possible. 

"After church the evening before, Roger's father 
and mother had talked about future plans for the 
church work and Roger had listened carefully to ev- 
erything that was said. 

"He knew that the pastor was going to write to the 
Home Missions Council for help, and he did so hope 
that the people would realize how much they needed 
a church building. He was so homesick to go to Sun- 
day School again. 

"Then he thought how proud he was of his family. 
His father didn't have much money because the pay- 
ments on the bsuse were so high, but he had pledged 
$100.00. He had said. 'We will have to trust the Lord 
to provide this money for us to give, children.' 

"Big sister had gone without a new coat and a 
permanent and had given the money to the building 
fund. Big brother had given the money he was saving 
to buy a bicycle. And he wanted a bicycle too, the 
worst way. 

"Roger was the only one in the family who hadn't 
given anything. No wonder he was thoughtful. He 
said to himself, 'I don't have any money in my bank. 
I don't even have a toy that is new anymore.' 

"While he sat there a truck came slowly down the 
uneven street, and as it passed a brick fell from the 
load it was carrying. It was a dark red brick and it 
reminded Roger that the new church was to be built 
of bricks just like that. 

"Suddenly he thought, 'Why shouldn't that brick be 
mine?' He looked up the street but no cars were com- 
ing. He looked down the street and all was clear, so 
he scrambled into the street and picked up the pre- 
cious brick and then started up the sidewalk to the 
minister's lodging. 



"That is just splendid," answered the minister hear- 
tily, as he took the brick in his own hands. 

"Then he said, 'Wait here a moment,' and went 
back into his study. In a moment he was back with 
a camera in his hands. 

" 'Stand here in the yard,' he said to Roger, 'and 
hold the brick. Hold it out so everyone can see it. I 
am going to take a picture of you and your gift.' 

"That picture went in the letter asking the Council 
for help, and the secretary printed it in the Herald. 
Wherever the picture went people said, 'We want to 
help Roger to build his church.' 

"So it was not many months before Roger was go- 
ing to Sunday School in a beautiful new church. And 
you may be sure that his brick was in the very front 
of the building." 



OIF BIBLE CHARACTER ALPHABET 

Answer to Q: Quartus. 

R was a messenger which the king of Assyria sent 
to the king of Judah after the king of Assyria had 
conquered many nations. R told the messengers of 
the king of Judah that the king of Assyria would sure- 
ly defeat them as he had defeated others if thev fought 
him. Then he tried to frighten the people who were 
listening. His name, and what he said, and whether 
he succeeded in frightening the people are found in 
II Ki. 18:17-19:37. 




%aibf Manna 

READ YOUR 

BIBLE 



THROUGH IN '41 



This schedule for reading the Bible through in a year began in the 
issue of Dec. 28, 1940. For previous readings, see former copies of 
The Brethren Missionary Herald. Begin reading at Gen. 1:1, read 
until the first text is found, arid record the reference. The next day 
begin reading where you left off the day before, find the text for 
that day, and record the reference. By continuing thin you shall 
have reaci the Bible through in a year. 

Day Texf Reference 

15 God did send me before you to preserve life _. 

16 Bury me not, I pray thee, in Egypt 

17 He comforted them, and spake kindly unto them 



18 What is that in thine hand? 

19 Aaron's rod swallowed up their rods 

20 How long wilt thou refuse to humble thyself be- 
fore me ? 

21 This is that night of the Lord to be observed 



-12— 



JANUARY 18, 1941 




WHO CARES? 

"I looked, and behold, no man cared for my soul" 
(Ps. 14^:4). On? of the saddest bits of news appeared 
in a report from Turkey today. It told of the wreck of 
a vessel on the Sea of Marmora. There were 200 Jew- 
ish refugees on that little ship. A storm caught the 
ship and dashed it on the rocks. They tried to launch 
the life boats, and succeeding with two, those two 
sank from evident overloading. Among them were 70 
children. 

What a tragedy it was! Two hundred helpless, harm- 
less, forsaken fathers, mothers, and children trying 
to flee from everywhere. No place held a friend for 
them; no place promised a home for them among the 
peoples they had known; they were cast out. They 
had to go, somewhere — nobody knew where, nor did 
they care, but go they must. 

Who could picture the wringing of hearts of these 
poor souls of Israel's children? They had been living 
in the terror of their lives night and day for years. 
Things finally got so bad they had to flee. All they 
could think of was to flee. But where? No place on 
the land would do. It was filled with enemies. No one 
dared to speak a kind word to them, or protect them, 
or help them. They looked at the Sea of Marmora. 
It invited them. Surely out there on the water they 
could find relief. If they could find no plac3 to land, 
at least they could perhaps find peace in their own 
ship on the lake. So they bought a boat. It was un- 
fit for use, but it was all they could buy. 

With despair giving way to hope, they start out. 
Anything was better than what they had. How many 
days they were in that boat was not told. How many 
ports they had tried to enter in vain was not given. 
We dare say that many a hope was dashed to pieces 
in their desire to find a new home, or to get a chance 
to pass through the Dardanelles and finally reach 
Palestine. What dreams! 

Then comes a storm. Inexperienced Jewish hands, 
unable to care for the emergency, fail to keep the 
ship off the rocks. There is a blinding crash. Children 
cry, women scream, men shout and run about, many 
pray. Two life boats are not enough for 200 people. 
They all try to crowd in. The boats cannot hold up 
under the load, and sink out of sight with their hu- 
man freight. A few strong swimmers struggle against 
impossible odds. Soon all is quiet. Their struggle is 
over. One by one their bodies wash ashore. The old 
hull continues to fall apart on the rocks. 

Many eyes watched their plight from the shore. 
There were many ships and hands that could have 
helped them. But no one dared come to their aid. 
They just had to die. 

The newspapers tell the story in just nine short 
lines. Tomorrow it will be forgotten. How truly spoke 
the weeping prophet with the eye of pity for Israel, 

"Is it nothing to you, all ye that pass by? Behold, and see 
if there be any sorrow like unto my sorrow, which is done 
unto me, wherewith the Lord hath afflicted me in the day 
of his fierce anger" (Lam. 1:12). 

No, Israel, there was no pitying eye on earth. But 
there was an 'all-seeing eye' in heaven that saw that 



ship go down. He saw the hope in their hearts of get- 
ting back to their homeland that He gave their fath- 
ers so long ago. He will not forget the way other peo- 
ple saw them perish without raising a hand to answer 
their cry. The nations will be reminded one of these 
days at the judgment seat of the nations that the 
Son of God once said, in describing the cost of abus- 
ing Israel — 

"Then shall he say also unto them on the left hand, De- 
part from me, ye cursed, into everlasting fire, prepared for 
the devil and his angels: For I was an hungred, and ye 
gave me no meat: I was thirsty, and ye gave me no drink: 
i was a stranger, and ye took me not in: naked, and ye 
clothed me not: sick, and in prison, and ye visited me not. 
Then shall they also answer him, saying, LorJ, when saw 
we thee an hungred, or athirst, or a strong r, or naked, 
or sick, or in prison, and did not minister unto thee? 
Then shall he answer them, saying, Verily I say unto you. 
Inasmuch as ye did it not tc one of the le it of these, ye 
did it not to me" (Mt. 25:41-45). 



WHAT SHALL IT PROFIT? 

Perhaps the most spectacular character to pass 
across the scenes of Wall Street during its entire his- 
tory was Jesse Livermore. We are told that three 
times he built a fortune of many millions of dollars 
through speculation on the stock exchange. Three 
times he lost it all. He finally lost his courage after 
his last financial collapse and seemed unable to rise 
out of his spirit of despondency. As the man who had 
risen to top place in this world's affairs and had 
rolled in wealth at last reached for the means to end 
his life, he wrote a note saying — ■ 

"My life has been a failure/' 

What a warning this should be to thousands and 
millions who are still striving for the riches of this 
world. Little wonder that we are exhorted by the 
great apostle, not to — 

"Trust in uncertain riches, but in the li ing God, Who 
giveth us all things richly to enjoy" (I Trn. 6:17). 

The humblest saint, who has never been heard of 
in this world and yet who has vielded his heart and 
life to the will of God, has not lived in vain, but will 
have a crown awaiting him in the glory. How much 
better it is to live for God. 

"For what shall it profit a man if he sha I gain the whole 
world and lose his own soul" (Mark 8:36). 



COMMUNISM SWEEPS NEW YORK. SCHOOLS 

While radio and press have been shouting them- 
selves hoarse over Fascism and Naziism, practically 
nothing is ever heard of Communism in this country. 
It is evident that Communism has too many friends 
in high places in this government. Suddenly the 



WARNING ! ! ! 

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subscription, expire! 



Some will be missing The Brethren Missionary 
herald. Some subscritions will be expiring this 
month. Renew yours NOW — still $1.00 a year. 
Send your dollar in today. 

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ADDRESS 

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Send to 
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—13- 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



.THINK IT OVER. 



nliiliiliilnl luliilt 




An inconsistent man in the 
Church is like a broken crutch. 



, , i i i i i i i i . . i i i i . i i i i ■ ■ i ■ i ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ' ' ' ■ " ■ ■ ■ 

7,000,000 people in New York City have been rudely 
awakened to the fact that the public school system 
of that city, paid for by the people, are honeycombed 
with Communistic college professors and other teach- 
ers. Nine of the professors in the Brooklyn College 
were active members of the Communistic party, at 
least one of them contributed as much as S500.00 per 
year to its support, and the nine published a maga- 
zine, and had it distributed by the student members 
of the Young Communist League. The editorial pol- 
icy of that magazine was to persuade young men and 
women of America that "The Communist party alone 
can solve your problems." Some of the city school 
teachers are active instructors in the Communist 
school. Dr. Harry Gideonse, President of Brooklyn 
College with a student body of 14,000 and a faculty of 
500. told the investigation committee of state legis- 
lators that when he took office as president the en- 
tire student body was under the control of a small 
organized minority of Communist students, and that 
the only way that hold could be broken was by a 
faculty supervised election of student officers. He 
declared that after that was done his own home was 
picketed for weeks by some students, but mostly by 
outside members of the Communist party, and that 
he was harrassed at all hours of the day and night 
bv heckling calls and humiliating experiences. 

New York is not the only place where this Com- 
munistic program is being actively carried on. It is 
in schools, colleges, in our navy and army, and in a 
hundred other movements among our American youth. 
But our government is seemingly totally unconcerned 
about it and utterly refuses to deport foreigners who 
are in this country actively tearing down our social 
and political structure. One outstanding Australian 
has done untold damage to our nation in the Com- 
munistic movement he has led among Pacific Coast 
lumber and sea workers, and has all but defied the 
government to do anything about it. 

That such a situation should persist in this nation, 
of all nations, and that the people should submit to 
it, is but a sure indication there will be little trouble 
for Antichrist to bring in his hellish regime and rob 
the people of all their cherished liberties. There is 
a spirit of resignation among the American people to- 
day that there is nothing for us to do but submit to 
any change proposed because of the present emer- 
gency. This is what the tremendous wave of propa- 
ganda that has been sweeping this land for the last 
several years has been designed to create. The forces 
aiming for the crushing of the American freedom are 
happy. 

America was not founded by men who first sought a 
political reform. The motive that laid the foundation 
of this country was religious. They were seeking free- 
dom for the worship of God as they chose. They then 
founded a form of government designed to protect a 
Protestant people. Today their descendants have 
just about forsaken their father's God. and as a re- 
sult they see no essential need of the form of govern- 
ment their fathers established. That is why Commu- 
ism. a movement that hates Christianity and liberty 
and all individual expression, is allowed to live and 
prosper in our school svstem that it may mould the 
ideas of our youth who shall make America's future. 



All the presidents and political parties the nation 
could produce can never save this land from the so- 
cial, moral, and spiritual collapse for which she is 
headed today, except a revival that would completely 
alter the attitude of American people toward God, 
His Son, and His Word. God told the way back to 
peace and safety for Israel, and it is the only way 
back for America: 

"If my people, which are called by my nane, shall humble 
themselves, and pray, and seek my face and turn from 
their wicked ways: then will I hear from heoven, and forgive 
their sin, and will heal their land" III Ch:on. 7:14). 

The only men who are doing anything at all to 
save America are true preachers of the gospel of Je- 
sus Christ. 



WHEN WE TRUST 

In glancing through a magazine the other day one 
little line stood out like a bright light. It was this: 

"When it is hardest to trust — then trust.' ' 

The editor needed that verse right then. What a 
gem it is! What a tower of strength to the strained 
and weary spirit of the servant of the Lord! It is when 
you would naturally quit an enterprise that you 
should start to do your best. That is the time when 
the other fellow is likely to nuit also. The chap that 
hangs on and works the hardest when the others 
have given up is the one who carries off the success. 
It is true in spiritual things as well. When you have 
trusted and trusted and waited and waited; when 
the darkness has hung on and hung on, and there 
just seems no chance of it ever growing light again, 
when it seems that there is no use to pray again, when 
every circumstance is contrary to the expectation of 
an answer to your prayer, when your friends have 
lost their courage and advise you to give up, when you 
feel sickest down in side over the outlook and what is 
happenning to your faith, that is the time to trust. 
Shut your eyes and trust and hold on to the promise 
of God! Cried the Psalmist — ■ 

"What time I am afraid, I will trust in thee." 

Lord help us to trust in Thee and win the victory 
and the trophies of faith! 



Found in 




Our Mail 



"Enclosed find one dollar for which renew my sub- 
scription to the Herald. I do not want to miss a num- 
ber. I can hardly wait from one time to another." — 
I. C. Nebraska. 



"It's a good paper. I get a lot of good from it. May 
God richly bless the Herald and supplv the need that 
it may be published until our Lord comes." — H.S., la. 



"Please find $1 bill for one-year subscription for 
The Brethren Missionary Herald. I have been reading 
my neighbor's herald. About time for me to order my 
own. So much wonderful reading in each issue." — 
E. E. S., Indiana. 



"Please renew our subscription to The Brethren Mis- 
sionary Herald. It has been the best paper the Breth- 
ren church ever published." — M. S., Indiana. 



"Please renew my subscription for The Brethren 
Missionary Herald. I don't want to miss it. It surely 
is an inspiration from cover to cover, and I praise the 
Lord for it."— F. Y., Ohio. 



—14— 



JANUARY 18, 194 1 



l^awi tSteffiedtiand, WlU Be AixpAeciated 



Send 'litem in ^aday! 



The Brethren Missionary Herald has now 
rounded out the first year of its existence. We 
are planning for our second year, and would 
appreciate any suggestions or criticisms you 
can offer for our fast growing magazine if you 
have not already sent them in. 



What special articles or features would you 
like to see in the future? 



What do you consider to be the strong 
points of The Brethren Missionary Herald? 
What are its weaknesses? 



What particular articles or features have 
especially appealed to you? Why? Give these 
in the order of your preference. 



Do you think there should be more pictures? 
If so, what would you like? 



What regular departments do you think 
make the best contribution to the magazine? 
What items do you think could just as well 
be omitted? 



What other suggestions or criticisms can 
you make? 



_.- - — — _ ,— _ ____ ._ . — - Address your communication to Editorial 

FIJI THI^OITT TODAY Office, The Brethren Missionary Herald Co., 
1 Al-il-i 1 * IttJ vU 1 1 KJLJn. 1 3326 S. Calhoun St., Ft. Wayne, Ind. 



-15— 






THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



Seivice in Qu/i J?ad Anc^eieA jjeuUik Mliiio-H 



(See article on page 4) 




7&HP V&&& 



From 
Our Workers 



Wedding Bells: "Miss Esther S. Hostetler and Rev. 
Paul E. Dick were united with marriage vows in the 
late afternoon of Dec. 21 in the First Brethren Church, 
Johnstown, Pa. The ceremony was read by Rev. W. H. 
Schaffer, pastor of the Conemaugh Brethren Church, 
a brother-in-law of the bride and former pastor of 
the bridegroom. Rev. A. L. Lynn, pastor of the Johns- 
town First Brethren Church, of which Mrs. Dick is a 
member and assistant organist, assisted. Rev. Dick 
is pastor of the Grafton, W. Va. Brethren Church, 
having been ordained by the Conemaugh Brethren 
Church last July. Mrs. Dick has been a teacher in 
the Richland Township Public Schools for the past 
several years. We pray that God's richest blessings 
may rest upon this couple to the glory of our Lord 
and Master."— W. H. Schaffer. 

A Revival Meeting will be conducted, in the Altoona 
church from Jan. 27-Feb. 9 by Bro. Wm. A. Steffler. 
Your prayers for this meeting will be appreciated. 

Here's a Poem which the W. 10th St. Church of 
Ashland, O. dedicates to those who should do their 
gum chewing before and after services: 



The gum-chewing girl and the cud-chewing cow 
Are somewhat alike, yet different somehow. 
What difference? O yes, I see it now — 
It's the contented look on the face of the cow. 

Brother Wayne Baker, pastor of the Sterling, O. 
church, was ordained at a special service held in the 
Sterling church on Dec. 29 and conducted by Brother 
Chas. W. Mayes. 

A School Bus which is expected to add 50 or 60 to 

the weekly attendance of the Pike Brethren Church, 
Mundy's Corner, Pa., has recently been secured, paint- 
ed and reconditioned by the men and boys of the 
church. The Bible School attendance averaged 165 
for the month of December. 

Mrs. Wilhelmina Kennedy, missionary on furlough 
from Africa, writes from Hatboro, Pa. She is yet not 
back to normal since her recent operation, but is im- 
proving. She says, "I would like to thank all who 
have been remembering me at this time, and praise 
the Lord for answered prayer." She adds, "Up until 
the time I left the field all was well and conditions 
getting even better because of the government turn- 
ing to DeGaulle and England. ' 



—16— 



Vol. 3, No. 4 



W. M. C. NUMBER 



January 25, 1941 



4-6-41 




"JESUS SAVIOR PILOT ME' 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



Aio44*l& the WanJd 



By Chas. W. Mayes 




CHAIN STORE REFUSES TO SELL LIQUOR 

AND POLICY PAYS 

LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA.— "Parents may send 
thair children to any of the 27 Ralphs stores with the 
assurance that the environment will be as wholesome 
as they would find in their own homes ... To this end 
Ralphs stores have adhered to a policy which does not 
permit liquor of any kind to be sold," reports the Los 
Angeles Times. 

Some hard-headed business man more interested 
in gain than in godliness may think that, the com- 
pany will soon go out of business for lack of patron- 
age. According to reports, however, there does not 
seem to be much danger. As reported by the Union 
Signal, the company states, "We have found that this 
policy has repaid us many times in increased confi- 
dence by parents." 



HOLLYWOOD PRODUCES SAINTS 

AS WELL AS MOVIES 

HOLLYWOOD, CALIF.— Although it is thought by 
many people in the east that everyone in California 
either lives in Hollywood or worships the stars of that 
movie city, we must of necessity report otherwise. 
Many godly Californians realize that two-thirds or 
three-fourths of all pictures shown in America's thea- 
ters deal with love, crime, sex, or mystery, or probably 
a combination of all these. Murders, holdups and kid- 
napings are frequent, and marriage is treated only 
lightly. Christianity with its high and holy standard 
of living is only sneered at and the ministry is only 
a joke. When we consider that 10 times as many peo- 
ple attend the movies as go to church, we are not very 
proud of the wares we have offered to the world. 

There are some even in the churches who talk about 
attending a "good" movie from Hollywood. And we 
would never argue but that some little good might 
be tucked away somewhere in some movies. Likewise 
there is good in a garbage can, but who would want 
to eat it? 

Hollywood and vicinity has some splendid ministers 
of Christ. The city may be noted for the movies, but 
God has His choice saints here also. Some people 
really come to Christ, find salvation and are trans- 
formed, quit their old sins, and turn around to live for 
Christ even in Hollywood. 



DISTINGUISHED BRITISHER 
WILL SPEAK IN AMERICA 

LONDON, ENGLAND.— H. G. Wells, the author of the 
notorious book, "Outline of History" in which invec- 



tives against Christianity are poured out sweetly but 
with an insane passion for unbelief, is now in the 
United States. 

Not only has Wells revealed himself to be a bitter 
enemy against Christianity in his writings, but he 
never misses an opportunity to slander the great 
British leaders who are known to be Christians. He is 
said to have called the brilliant Lord Halifax "the 
quintessence of everything an Englishman ought not 
to be," and is also said to have sneered at Lord Gort as 
a "praying general." 

Wells, a man of over 70, ought to stay home and 
behave himself. Through his books he is already 
guilty of spreading enough unbelief in America with- 
out planning a lecture tour to give that people a 
"second work" of unbelief. Britain does not take him 
seriously. We hope America will feel the same way. 

It is common knowledge that not only is the "Out- 
line of History" by Mr. Wells inaccurate, but it is un- 
true. Written from the pure evolutionary viewpoint, he 
delights to relegate to oblivion every fact in the Scrip- 
tures which assumes or presents the supernatural. A 
contemporary historian has said, "Wells is a man who 
writes more history than he reads." This is a mild 
way of saying it. 



AIRPLANES AID 

IN SPREAD OF PLAGUES 

CONSTANTINOPLE, TURKEY.— The coming of the 
airplane has brought its problems as well as its ad- 
vantages. Airplane trips from disease infested areas 
to other centers of population now require less time 
than the incubation period for many deadly diseases. 
This means that air travellers may start for distant 
places and "come down" with a deadly disease after 
they arrive. Harper's magazine states: "No one is un- 
der any illusion as to what will happen if mosquitoes 
carrying yellow fever are given a quick lift from 
Africa to India." 

All this is quite significant to those who read the 
Book of Revelation. For centuries skeptics have crit- 
icized God's Word on the basis of the theory that the 
predicted catastrophies could not find literal fulfill- 
ment. That a great portion of the population of the 
earth could be destroyed by some mysterious plague 
has been thought impossible. Now instead of these 
things seeming impossible or remote, they appear to 
be both reasonable and imminent. Those who have 
discernment can see that with all of man's boasted 
progress and inventions, instead of preparing for a 
glorious age, he is only preparing for the downfall of 
civilization. Man still thinks he is ushering in a 
golden age, but it will turn out to be just as the Bible 
reveals — the great tribulation. 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 

The Brethren Missionary Herald is published weekly, 
four times a month, or 4S times a year, at Herald Press, 
Inc., 1300 West 9th St., Cleveland, Ohio, by the Brethren 
Missionary Herald Co., 3326 So. Calhoun St., Fort Wayne, 
Ind. 

Subscription Price: In the United States and possessions, 

$1.00 a year; Foreign countries, $1.50 a year. 

ADMINISTRATION 

Secretary of Publications: Leo Polman 

Business Office Secretary: Miss Geneva Kuhn 

Editorial Office Secretary: Miss Grace Allshouse 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

President: Russell D. Barnard Secretary: Tom Hammers 

Vice-President: Ralph Rambo Treasurer: Homer A. Kent 

R. D. Crees Mrs. Roy Patterson R. E. Gingrich 

George Richardson L. L. Grubb Bernard Schneider 

EDITORS 
Foreign Missions: Louis S. Bauman. 
Educational: Alva J. McClain. 
Home Missions: R. Paul Miller. 
Women's Missionary Council: Mrs. A. B. Kidder. 



Entered as second class matter at the post office at 
Cleveland, Ohio, February 9, 1939, under the act of March 
3, 1879. 



—2— 



JANUARY 2 5, 1941 



THE 




BRETHREN WOMEN'S 

MISSIONARY 

COUNCIL 

Mrs. A. B. Kidder, Editor 



President — Mrs. Homer A. Kent, Box 102, Winono Lake, Ind. 

Financial Secretary — Mrs. H. W. Koontz, 105 Otterview Ave., Ghent, 
Roanoke, Va. 

Treasurer — Mrs. Orville A. Lorenz, Meyersdale, Pa. 

Literature Secretary — Mrs. Lilly Monroe, 1234 E. 60th St., Los An- 
geles, Calif. 

Editor— Mrs. A. B. Kidder, 211 Girard Ave., S. E., Canton, Ohio. 



All printed supplies are to be secured from Mrs. Monroe, including 
membership cards. All Council funds are to be forv/arded to Mrs. 
Koontz. Send your president's name and address to Mrs. Kidder for 
Devotional Topics. 



OBJECTIVES FOR 1940-1941 

Four major offerings: 

September, October, November — Our National Expense Fund. 
Need $920. 

December, January, February — Bozoum Seminary for native 
evangelists. Need $800. 

March, April, May — Grace Theological Seminary. Need $500. 
June, July, August — • Home Missions. Need $500. 
Scrap books made for mission study. 
Daily prayer cards for home and foreign missionaries. 
That we encourage daily Bible reading with number of chapters 
reported at each council meeting. 

That we encourage definite witnessing to the unsaved on the 
part of every Council. 

That we urge our women to aid in getting The Brethren Mis- 
sionary Herald into every home in the church. 



be of one mind and thus we shall walk closely with 
each other — but more closely as the days come and go. 
And so our fellowship with our Lord and with each 
other grows ever sweeter as the time for His coming 
draweth nigh. 

Work More Consistently 

This second phrase of our slogan is very closely re- 
lated to the first. Our spiritual walk signifies our be- 
havior and activity as children of God — our exercise of 
the eternal life within; our spiritual work signifies the 
task which God has given each of us to perform — our 
mission for Him. Alas! so many Christians fail to 
find their calling — that definite place in His service 
which is God's will for each of us. But the fields are 
still white and the laborers so few; there is surely 
work for everyone in His wide harvest field; and He 
yearns to have each of His own busy at her appointed 
task. So let us every one seek to know what He would 
have us do and then set about doing it with a will to 
obey. 

We are to work consistently — consistent with what? 
First of all, with the love of our heavenly Father; such 
love deserves our willing service and inspires us to 
offer it to others. Then it should be consistent with 
the grace of our Savior who went to the cross to pro- 
cure for us salvation to the uttermost; we can never do 
anything commensurate with such grace, but we can 
extend the invitation of His grace to a world of lost 
sinners. And our work should be consistent with the 
indwelling Holy Spirit. Yielded to Him, He will work 
in and through us, and our work will thus be consistent 
with His mighty power. And lastly, our work should 
be consistent with our position as missionary women; 
it should all be aimed at getting the gospel out to a 
world in such sad confusion as the world we live in 
today. 

Again, mark that word more — walk more closely; 
work more consistently — there must be progress, not 
retrogression; not standing still, but ever advancing. 
And so our slogan is very suitable and helpful at this 
New Year season. Happy New Year — women of the 
Missionary Council! 



EDITORIALS 

Walk More Closely 

In this first W.M.C. number of the new year, let us 
consider our slogan and what it should mean to us as 
missionary women. Walk more closely — what does it 
mean? That word walk to a Christian means much 
more than the physical exertion of his limbs to convey 
him from place to place. The symbolism carries over 
into the spiritual realm. The very ability to walk up- 
right is the heritage of man. It is not only his rare 
gift and privilege — it is his responsibility as well. How 
often are we impressed with the fact that we do not 
walk enough in these automobile days! Walking is 
a form of exercise which brings into play more of the 
body muscles than any other form. And so it is not 
by chance that our activity as Christians is called our 
walk. The eternal life we receive by the new birth 
needs exercise to be healthy and to grow to spiritual 
maturity, out of babyhood. 

Therefore as W.M.C. members, we are to be active in 
our spiritual life, not stagnant. And we are to walk 
closely: to whom? Each of us will readily answer: To 
our Lord and Savior. And that is true, our nearness 
to Him will determine the success or failure of our 
Christian activity. "How can two walk together ex- 
cept they be agreed?" And so walking in agreement with 
our blessed Lord, we do His will and His service, and 
have His peace and joy within. 

But is is also true that we should walk more closely 
to each other. If the mind of Christ be in us we shall 



Has Every One Been Too Busy? 

We have received not one single request for more 
sheets of those pictures of our home mission pastors; 
neither have we received a report of any district or 
local Council doings. Perhaps the holidays have kept 
us all too occupied — but may we not appeal for more 
co-operation, now that 1941 is upon us? To print 
news, we must have news. 



The Semi-Annual Report Blanks 

With the devotional topics for February we are 
sending out the semi-annual report blanks. Will you 




The semi-annual report blanks have been 
mailed to all local Councils, together with the 
regular devotional topics. Please do not 
overlook them. An immediate reply is de- 
sired. 



—3- 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



not see that your secretary fills them out promptly 
and sends the report to Mrs. Andlauer, reserving the 
copy for your own files? All of the officers appreciate 
it greatly when you are prompt, either with reports 
or funds. 



PRAYER REQUESTS 

National Prayer Chairman: Mrs. Arthur Carey, Ritt- 
man, Ohio. 
Let Us Pray: 

1. That our present major offering — for the Bozoum 
Seminary for native evangelists — which is to be com- 
pleted and sent in to the Financial Secretary in 
February, will meet the need — $800.00: nay, that it 
will go much beyond this, because of the extra need 
at this time in getting our missionaries back to their 
fields. 

2. That our missionaries now on the way to Africa 
may be protected and reach journey's end safely. 

3. That our women may be faithful in their Bible 
reading and witnessing. 

4. That both the home and foreign missionary work 
of our beloved Brethren Church may see great gains 
this year, especially in the number of souls saved. 

5. That God will guide the affairs of our country in 
these difficult times. 



SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR FEBRUARY 

MEETING 

(Program by Mrs. W. A. Ogden, Vice President) 

Subject: Glorifying God by Spreading the Gospel. 

Opening Prayer. 

Song: "I Love to Tell the Story." 

Scripture: Rom. 10:11-15; John 20:21. 

Prayer Circle. 

Song: "Send the Light." 

Topic: "To the Jew" by Mrs. Elizabeth Campbell, 
Dayton, O. 

Topic: "On the Seas" by Claude Pearson, San Pedro, 
Calif. 

Special Solo: "Tell It Again." 

Letter from Miss Mabel Crawford, Africa. 



FINAL STEPS 

Letter from Mrs. Marguerite G. Dunning 

How grateful we are to have this message to pass on. At the re- 
quest of our president, Mrs. Homer A. Kent, Mrs. Dunning found 
time in all the rush to send to the women of the Council this most 
interesting communication: 

What a thrill it gives to realize that we are the 
workmanship, the masterpiece, of God. created unto 
good works before ordained that we should walk in 
them. We can't always see just how God works these 
things out or when, but what a wonderful thing it is 
when we can see Him going ahead preparing and 
opening up the way for us to walk where these or- 
dained good works lie. Another translation of Prov. 
4:12 reads: "As thou goest step by step I will open up 
the way before thee." Truly that has been so in our 
case. A constant refrain has been running through 
my mind the last 21 days: it is, "He shall silently 
plan for thee." Every day I have been able to count 
just one "planned" thing after another. 

I would like to tell you just some of these — the final 
steps that our Lord has been taking to get us off. I 
know the ones that we have seen are just a few of the 
many other things He has done. How wonderful to 
see Him making "all things work together for good." 



Let me begin with about four weeks ago, Nov. 25 
to be exact. My husband received a letter from his 
sister saying that his mother had been operated, on. 
Just the week before we had received a letter saying 
the operation would more than likely not be till in 
the spring — then this sudden news. So Harold went 
home to see how his mother was. While there he went 
into New York to look up possible sailings. Finally, 
after the second day of it he was about to go back to 
his parents' home. He had been told that it would 
be an hour yet before the person who could give him 
any information would arrive. Just as he was about 
to step into the subway train, the doors closed and 
it went on without him. Although another would be 
along in less than five minutes he decided to go back 
to the boat office and wait for the information after 
all. When the gentleman arrived, Harold asked him 
and was informed that had he inquired at that par- 
ticular office just eight hours earlier he could have 
had six passages. However, they would do the best 
they could, but Harold must remember that there 
were 150 missionaries ahead of him yet! 

The day he arrived home he received an air mail 
letter from this Mr. Benson saying there were two 
cancelled reservations that could be had if we would 
wire immediately. Having no authority to do that, 
we sent the letter on special delivery air mail to Dr. 
Bauman who immediately got in touch with Mr. Ben- 
son. Miss Tyson had also been looking in New York 
for boats. Somehow between her and Dr. Bauman 
they got two more passages. Then came the surpris- 
ing thing: we were told we should go if we could get. 
ready. When we sent the letter on we never dreamed 
that it should be we who were to go! Who can un- 
derstand the workings of His sovereign grace? 

I wonder if you have noticed a few of the things that 
"just happened" as we say, without which this sailing 
would not have been. If Harold's mother had not 
Hist happened to change her mind about the opera- 
tion; if his sister had not just happened to write too 
briefly and not clearly; if Harold had. not just hap- 
pened to miss that train, and just happened to change 
his mind: or if Mr. Benson had not just happened to 
write to Harold instead of any of the other 150 mis- 
sionaries he had spoken of! That is not all! 

There was a lot of red tape to go through in order 
to secure Harold's draft exemption. Because he had 
never yet registered in Dayton as a "marryin' parson," 
and because he had not yet received his ordination 
papers, he could not prove that he was a minister — 
even with four men readv to make affidavits to that 
effect. Did he have no official paper besides his min- 
isterial card to prove that he was regularly ordained? 
It just happened that he had his license to marry in 
the District of Columbia. Nearly everything else was 
packed by that time, but it just happened that some- 
how that had been missed. This enabled him to be 
registered in Dayton, which enabled him to get his 
papers just before we had to leave for the East. A 
member of the draft board even drove all the way 
out to Clayton to deliver them! 

Just one more providential incident, and I must 
stop relating them. There are many more. When 
we moved from Lodi, O., to Winona Lake. Ind., about 
a year and a half ago, we left two trunks at Homer- 
ville. Now we needed them. Although it was out of 
our way we must drive there to get them. Since it 
was close to Ashland we stopped there to ask the advice 
of the Morrills on some questions. They did "exceed- 
ing abundantly above all that we asked or thought" 
by inviting us to stay as long as necessary, and they 
themselves worked with us. helping us to get our out- 
fit ready. For five days all four of us worked about 
19 hours a day shopping and packing. Those of you 
who do your Christmas shoDping in crowded cities 
know what we would have faced if it hadn't just hap- 
pened that Brother Morrill had a friend who enabled 
us to buy things at a wholesaler's with a large dis- 
count. No, it didn't just happen that we had to drive 



JANUARY 2 5, 194 1 



near Ashland to get our trunks. We never could have 
got ready without the willing and generous help of the 
Morrills. 

What a wonderful Savior we have, "who worketh 
all things after the counsel of his own will!" We can- 
not understand why He should be sending us forth — 
we know we are unworthy; but oh, the joy of being 
able to look forward to soon working for and with 
Him in the place for which He burdened our hearts 
so long ago. Prayerfully we say with Paul that it is 
"according to our earnest expectation and our hope, 
that in nothing we shall be ashamed, but that with 
all boldness, as always, so now also Christ shall be 
magnified in our bodies, whether it be by life or by 
death." 




New Books 

For Your 

Library 



Books reviewed in this column we consider fundamental to the 
Christian standard, although there may be some small portions with 
which we do not agree or, of which we cannot approve. In such in- 
stances we shall call attention to that with which we are not in 
accord. 

Books reviewed here may be procured from The Brethren Mis- 
sionary Herald Co., 3326 S. Calhoun St., Ft. Wayne, Ind. 

PALESTINE, THE COMING STORM CENTER 

By Dr. Harry Rimmer; 72 pages, cloth cover; price 50c. 

This interesting book on Bible prophecy shows how 
Palestine came to be opened to the Jews after the 
world war, and how the Arab's claims to land they 
have sold, division among the Jews themselves, and 
Mussolini's effective method of stirring the Arabs 
against the Jews, all contribute to the present turmoil 
in Palestine. Then the attention is turned from the 
return of the Jews as predicted in Jer. 23 and Ezek. 
37 to the part the chemical value of the Dead Sea and 
the easy method of procuring these chemicals shall 
play in the coming battle described in Ezek. 38-39. The 
concise, helpful information contained in this book 
will be welcomed by those desiring interesting and 
up-to-date facts bearing on present-day Palestine's 
relation to Bible prophecy. — G.A. 



THE BIBLE BOOK BY BOOK 

By Rev. Wm. Stuart; 115 pages, paper cover, price 60c. 

Demand for a series of studies in the books of the 
Bible for those who cannot take such a course in a 
Bible institute has resulted in the printing of this 
book, the lessons of which were originally prepared as 
a correspondence course for Bible students. For each 
book of the Bible there is an introduction, an outline, 
a few remarks, and a number of questions which will 
enable one desiring to increase his knowledge of the 
Bible to gain for himself the highlights of the book. 
A few helpful charts are included. We recommend it 
for those desiring to pursue an interesting, systematic 
method of Bible study. — G.A. 



•The SISTERHOOD of—, 

MARY and MARTHA 



"To know Him and 



■I- 



to make Him known" 



Pres— Ethel Morrill, Ellet, 0. 

Vice-Pres. — Leah Robinson, Rt. 7, Everhard Rd., North Canton, 0. 

Patroness — Mrs. Leo Polman, 4007 Tacoma St., Fort Wayne, Ind. 

Asst. Patroness — Mrs. W. A. Ogden, 3941 Virginia St., Lynwood, 
Calif. 

General Sec'y. — Genevene Walter, 109 Sterling Ave., Rittman, O. 

Financial Sec'y. — Katherine Sampson, 302 Barr Bldg., 910 17th St., 
N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Treas. — Louise Kimmel, Berne, Ind. 

Literature Sec'y. — Mary Fritz, W. First St., Rittman, 0. 

Bandage Sec'y. — Betty Grace, 3717 N. Percy St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

MAIL ALL BANDAGES to Betty Grace, FIRST BRETH- 
REN CHURCH, 10th and Dauphin Srs., Philadelphia, Pa. 



Goals for Year 1940 and 1941 

1. Twelve devotional meetings using suggested material. 

2. Bible reading: The four Gospels and the Acts. 

Junior reading: John and Mark. 50% membership completing 
Bible reading. 

3. Membership project. 

4. Cabinet meetings in fall and spring. 

5. Bandages sent to bandage Sec'y by July 31, and at least one 
other benevolent work during the year. 

6. Offering sent to financial secretary by Jan. 31 and July 31 for 
administrative purposes. 

7. Two thank offerings received during the year and sent to finan- 
cial secretary. These may be taken any time during the year 
to be sent in at the same time as the regular offering. 

8. An offering sent to financial secretary by July 31 for fund for 
the higher education of missionaries' children. 

9. An offering sent to district secretary by May 31. 



NORTHEAST OHIO DISTRICT RALLY 

The Sisterhood girls of the northeast Ohio district 
met at the Wooster church Dec. 8, 1940. 

Helen Brickel led the group in a song service closing 
with the chorus, "To Know Him." 

The district president. Mary Fritz, led in a discussion 
of the national goals. A district project was discussed 
resulting in a gift for Marguerite Dunning who is sail- 
ing for Africa. 

Girls representing the different churches were asked 
to stand. Ashland had 21 present, Rittman 21, Ellet 
10, Canton 15, Fremont 8, Middlebranch 6, Homerville 
3, Wooster 2, making a total of 86. 

An invitation for the next district rally was extended 
by Canton, and accepted. The date was set for Mar. 1. 

The following officers were elected: Mary Fritz, pres- 
ident; Mary Hutton, vice-pres.; Ruth Robinson, sec- 
treas. 

Joyce Squires lead in devotions reading Eph. 2. 
Opal Bechtel sang a solo. Mrs. Cashman brought the 



—5— 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



message of the afternoon reading and discussing Ps. 
19. God is revealed in nature — knowing God unto 
salvation— seeking God's will— after knowing Christ 
we are called to service — a challenge to make Him 
known in Matt. 28:18— and lastly "let us not be weary 
in well doing for in due season we shall reap if we 
faint not." 

A duet from Ashland sang, "Jesus, Wonderful Lord" 
Mrs. Mayes dismissed the group with prayer. 



DEVOTIONAL PROGRAM FOR JANUARY 

Ready to do. ready to speak, ready to go; 

Then, in the glory where joys overflow, 

God will be ready His "wall done" to show. 

PRAYER 

CHORUSES 

SPECIAL NUMBER 

SPECIAL, NUMBER 

KENTUCKY MISSION REPORT. 

Believing that the Sisterhood is interested in the Kentucky mis- 
sion work, we have asked pcstor Sewell Landrum for a report of 
hr work. 

After one year in the work here at Clayhola we have 
many things for which tc praise the Lord. Our work is 
growing in a wonderful way. Since we have moved 
into the new church the peopla have taken a special 
interest in the work. Always before the folks felt as 
though the work belonged to someone els;, but since 
we have moved to the new church they are beginning 
to think of it as their own work. Last Sunday we had 
184 folks at Sunday School. The adult class is the 
largest class we have now. In the past it has always 
been the smallest. Last Sunday we had 43 in the adult 
class. 

The folks at Clayhole are happy to have the new- 
church. There was one lady who gave a testimony in 
which she said she had been praying for 20 years for 
such a place as we now have here. Throughout the 
past years the people have not had any real church 
where they could go and hear the gospel. The inter- 
est seems tc be increasing each week. 

Every Wednesday evening we have a service in tha 
church. Last night we had about 50 folks out. There 
were quite a number of small children too. Wa spend 
about 40 minutes singing songs and choruses. It is a 
real joy to hear the children sing. Their favorite 
chorus now is "I Love My Jesus." If there is any 
proof in tha way they sing it it is easy to believe they 
do love Him. 

At first we had quite a bit of disturbance on Wednes- 
day evening, but now we have a wonderful time to- 



■ i r i i i i i 




. THINK IT OVER. . 

Christ sends none away empty 
but those who are full of them- 
selves. 



gether. Some of the folks walk from far up in the 
little creeks along the highway. It is no easy task to 
walk out of these creaks after night. Some of the 
creeks have the road in the creek bed. In most cases 
the road is on tha side of the hill. 

We have been going out in the afternoon on Sunday 
to two Sunday Schools up one of the creeks. The Sun- 
day Schools up there are held in the school housas. 
We have had good attendance in these schools. The 
folks up there enjoy having us come. The children 
are especially glad to have the Sunday School. A few 
months ago when I first went to Cockrels Fork I found 
that the children did not know one Bibla verse. They 
could not sing a single song. Now it is a real joy to 
hear them sing and repeat the Bible verses they have 
learned. Last Sunday Satan put in a blow in tha 
Cockrels Fork work. Before I got to the school house 
a young rascal came along drunk. He took out his 
gun and shot some of the window panes out and shot 
through the door. When I got there he was lying 
about 100 yards from tha school house waiting for me 
to come. He followed me to the school house. I found 
the children all scared. After I had gone into the 
house he told those on the outside ha would shoot 
everything up if we started to sing. So that was the 
end of our services for that day. He did not say any- 
thing to me, but I saw his gun. This has by no means 
closed tha work there. Due to the bad weather I will 
not continue again until the weather is better. Pray 
for the folks at Cockrels Fork. 

Thursday evening we go to the jail at Jackson for 
a service. This has proven to ba a real blessing to us. 
It is a real pleasure to hold a service in the jail. The 
boys are very attentive. Last Thursday evening there 
were about 25 in the jail. There were five professed 
conversions. 

Our opportunitias for service here are unlimited. We 
have the opportunity of going into the schools for one 
class each week. We can go to the homes and at all 
times they welcome the gospel whethar they obey it 
or not. Dec. 27 a Gospel team from Winona Lake was 
with us. Please pray for our work that many souls 
may come to know Jesus as their Savior. 



HYMN. 

SEASON OF PRAYER. 

TOPIC : To Know Him and Make Him Known. Scrip- 

tura Lesson: Phil. 3:10: Job 42:5,6; Acts 1:8. 

Miss Elizabeth Tyson writes the devotional topic this month. She 
has recently returned tc her field of service in Africa. Miss Tyson 
wa? born in Montgomery County, Pa. At the age of nine she moved 
to Philadelphia. She became o Christian at the age of 12. 

It was always a childhood dream of hers to be an African mis- 
sionary. After a public school education she became a private nurse. 
Later she entered missionary training in New York to prepare for 
the Lord's work. She applied to the Foreign Missionary Board of 
The Brethren Church for service in Africa; was accepted condi- 
tionally; and departed for Africa in 1925. 

No higher motto was ever taken by any individual or 
group of Christ's followers — to really know Him, not 
only as our Savior but as Lord and King of our life. 



—6— 



JANUARY 2 5, 1941 



Paul knew the Lord as Savior the day he came face 
to face with Him on the road to Damascus, but the 
heart cry of Paul in his latter to the Philippian church 
is that for fellowship with a victorious Lord. He de- 
sired to really know Him, not as we so often sing, 
"More about Jesus would I know." While Paul was 
persecuting the early Christians he knew a great daal 
about Jesus; he was well informed, but he did not 
know Him. It is not enough to know about the sin- 
less life of Christ, but we must know Him as our sin- 
bearer; nor is it sufficient to know Him in His beauti- 
ful character, but as the One who indwells us, making 
our lives fragrant with His presence. 

Several years ago I was sitting in a group of Moslem 
men and women, and I asked them a simple question. 
"Do you know Jesus Christ"? Their faces brightened 
and quickly one replied "O, yes, we know about 'Isa' 
( Jesus). He was a very good man. Ha led a pure life. 
He was a great prophet like our prophet Mohammed. 
Some day Isa is coming again." They knew as much 
about Jesus as do some of our well informed church 
members; yat they do not know Him. as their Savior 
nor as the Son of God. "Yes, we know about Isa;" 
but their hearts are as black as the darkest heathen 
heart, and their lives are as sinful as the civilized 
paoples of other lands who are rejecting Christ, God's 
Son, the Savior of mankind. Do we really know Him? 
— not His doctrine, nor His creed, but Him Whom to 
know is life everlasting, or Whom to know is victory 
over the selfish desires of our own little lives? Job 
tells us, "I have haard of Thee by the hearing of the 
ear, but now mine eye seeth Thee. "What a change 
this vision brought to Job! It was this great change 
that again opened the hand of God and showered 
blassings upon His servant. 

"Hearsay" never cured a leper. We could write 
volumes on the beneficial properties of chalmoogra 
oil, yet not one leper would ba cleansed of that dread 
disease. Neo-salvarsan, that powerful drug used in 
treating yaws, must be injected into the muscle or into 
the blood stream of tha patient in order to cure and 
prevent deformities. The news of its healing virtues 
never removed one ulcer. It is the laper that knows 
the power of the oil — ha is the best testimony; it is 
the man covered with open running soras from yaws 
who knows the value of neo. So it is with the Chris- 
tian, who really knows the Lord that can present Him 
to others. In our Christian lives let us not be satisfied 
with tha experience of others, but let us prove for our- 
selves what it really means to know Him as an all- 
sufficient savior. 

To Make Him Known. 

If we really know Him the natural sequence will be 
to maka Him known. This is the calling of every in- 
dividual child of God. Let us never forget that we are 
saved to tell or serve. Have you ever had a real friend, 
one that meant mora to your life than any other per- 
son? Did you not want to tell of that friend to others? 
Did you not enjoy talking about her and what your 
friendship meant to each other? Have you ever had a 
physician bring restored health and life to a dear one 
and not want to recommend him to every sick and 
suffering one you have contacted? This is the very 
first thing we do in every part of our Die except our 
spiritual life. We are reluctant to speak of the great- 
est Friend we have ever known. 

Just racently a friend of mine bought a "Bendig" 
washing machine and everybody coming into that 
home must see the machine. Other work is dropped 
and a demonstration of the machine is given, and 
everybody talks "Bendig." Isn't it strange what queer 
people we are? We talk food, medicine, friendships, 
fashions, home equipment, social activities without 
hesitancy, and yet whan it comes to making Christ 
known, our tongues are tied and our light is hidden 
under cover, and the world keeps plunging into greater 
darkness. 



How to Make Him Known. 

Before our Lord returned back to His Father, He 
gave a divine commission to His apostles and followers: 
Acts 1:8, "But you shall receive power, after that the 
Holy Ghost is come upon you, and ye shall be witnesses 
unto me both in Jerusalem, and in Judea, and in Sa- 
maria, and unto the uttermost part of the earth." Have 
you ever realized what should be the scope of our wit- 
nessing? To put this in every day language wa might 
say: in your home or in the office; in the home town 
or the state; in the surrounding states or to other 
countries — Africa, India, China or to the islands of the 
saa . . . "Ye are my witnesses." 

Witnessing can be done either by word or life. Both 
are equally important, but may I suggest that we be 
very careful that our life be a true witness for Him. 
You hava heard the old saying, "The things you do 
speak so loud that I cannot hear what you say." May 
this never be said of any of us, especially the girls of 
the Sisterhood of Mary and Martha. When the San- 
hedrin heard Peter and saw the boldness of Peter 
and John, "they marvelled and took knowledge that 
they had been with Jesus." Remember that the great- 
est test of our knowledge of Him is our obedience to 
Him and our love to Him and our Brethren (1 John 
2:3-ll>. 

God grant an experimental knowledge of Himself 
to each one, and give us the courage to impart that 
knowledge to the hungry hearts all around us. May 
it still be said of Christ's followers as it was of the 
early Christian church, "see how they love." This is 
the message the world needs and that is the life that 
counts. 

"I want my life to tell for Jesus, 

I want my life to tell for Jesus 

That everywhere I go men may His goodness know; 

I want my life to tell for Jesus." 

BUSINESS. 
BENEDICTION. 



oun 




Our Mail 



"It is a wonderful magazine — full of the testimonies 
of what Christ is doing for His people and their work 
for Him, and I certainly would not want to miss one 
issue." — J.M.J., Ohio. 



"How we love to read it! We can hardly wait till 
it comes." — B. M., Indiana. 



GOD'S EYES ARE UPON US 

"Neither is there any creature that is not manifest 
in His sight: but all things are naked and opened un- 
to tha eyes of Him with whom, we have to do" (Heb. 
4:13). We have heard of the father who went out to 
steal a sack full of potatoes from another man's field, 
and who took his little boy with him. Before he star- 
ted to dig, the man looked in all four directions, and 
not seeing anyone around that might see him, he pro- 
ceeded with his work. "Daddy," said the little boy 
excitedly, "there is one way you haven't looked." 
"Where is that?" asked the nervous father. "You hav- 
en't looked up," was the simple reply. 



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"SHARING F1 

"Lift up your eyes and look on the fieli 
"The harvest truly is great 1 



TRAINED WORKERS NEEDED 

The outstanding need of The Brethren Church in these last days 
is an abundant supply of well trained workers. The Home Missions 
Council, the Foreign Missionary Society, the W.M.C., the C.E., the 
S.M.M. — all departments of our work are asking for more and 
more leaders. It is required of a soul winner today that he be pre- 
pared to meet the advanced arguments of a generation cursed with 
its own wisdom. In order to meet these arguments, our preachers, 
missionaries, and leaders must have a thorough knowledge of the 
Scriptures and a complete understanding of the attacks made upon 
those Scriptures. This knowledge can best be obtained by a con- 
centrated period of Bible Institute and seminary training. 

400 VOLUNTEERS WAITING TO MEET THE NEED 

The Brethren Student Life Volunteers, sponsored by The Breth- 
ren Home Missions Council, is a movement committed to the dedi- 
cation of Brethren young men and women to the ministry of Christ. 
This movement now stands ready, with 400 volunteers who have 
given their lives for full time service, to meet this great need in 
our church. While the age range of these volunteers is quite ex- 
tensive, the great majority of them are of high school and college 
age. They are, or soon will be, ready to enter the proper institu- 
tions of learning and training for complete preparation. However, 
unless the Brethren people react to our present appeal, these young 
recruits will never be permitted to obtain this much needed train- 
ing. What stands in the way? 

FINANCIAL AID REQUIRED 

Through numerous personal contacts and personal letters, the 
leaders of the B.S.L.V. have learned that these young volunteers, so 
eager and anxious to serve the Lord only, are in need of financial 
aid to tide them over the long period of preparation. We, therefore, 
in the "Sharing for Service" offering, are corning to the Brethren 
people asking them to supply this financial aid to remove another 
hindrance to our denominational expansion. The Brethren people 
have always been responsive to a worthy appeal. It is our firm 
conviction that they will heed this call and generously provide the 
funds that are needed. 



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BRETHREN STUDENT AID FUND BEING ESTABLISHED 

Through the "Sharing for Service" offering, a Brethren Student 
Aid Fund is being established. This fund will be disbursed regu- 
larly to Brethren students who are preparing for full time Christian 
service. The disbursement will be made by a competent committee 
selected from the faculty of Grace Seminary, the members of the 
Home Missions Council, members of the Foreign Missionary Society, 
and representative pastors and laymen. This will not be a system 
of burdensome loans but will be as free gifts, given on the basis of 
need and merit. Prayerful care will be exercised in the allotment 
of the funds you provide. 

GRACE SEMINARY TO BENEFIT 

It shall be emphasized that training be completed in our own 
seminary. Grace Seminary, since its recent creation, has proved 
an inestimable blessing to our churches. These present efforts of 
the B.S.L.V. will make it possible for us to reap even greater bene- 
fits from our investments in Grace. Instead of the limited number 
of students now entering and being graduated from Grace, this 
number will be greatly increased by the inflow of those whom this 
fund will assist. Your present gift, therefore, will greatly increase 
the gift you have already sent to Grace Seminary, and will also 
make it possible for us to increase the number of pastors, mission- 
aries, and leaders being presented to the church yearly. 

PASTORS AND CHURCHES COOPERATING 

A large number of our pastors and churches are already co- 
operating in this effort. We anticipate a 100% response. Literature 
and envelopes have been sent to your church. Join us in definite 
prayer that every Brethren, young and old, will join in the "Sharing 
for Service" offering. Forward all gifts to The Brethren Student 
Life Volunteers, % Rev. Kenneth Ashman, Conemaugh, Pa., R.D. 
No. 1. 

TO B. S. L. V. MEMBERS 

All B.S.L.V. members are urged to assist their pastors in the 
receiving of this special offering. Be sure to have a definite part 
yourself in prayer, encouragement, and giving. You will be glad 
to know that once each month, throughout the coming year, a full 
page of The Brethren Missionary Herald will be given over to 
B.S.L.V. news and articles. Our first page will appear in the Feb. 
8th issue (Educational Number). 



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LIFE VOLUNTEERS 



KSIMMMMK^^^ 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



REVELATION 1 1— Continued from issue of Dec. 28 
By R. I. Humbero 1 



Satan's Man Triumphs 

These two men are immortal until their work is done. 
Then "the beast that ascendeth out of the bottomless 
pit shall make war against them, and shall overcome 
them, and kill them" (v.7). 

How strange the activities of evil men! Let a true 
minister of the gospel preach a heaven-sent message: 
let him speak of righteousness and offer of mercy for 
sin and man raise up in wrath against him. Here 
God's offer of mercy is rejected and the world rages 
against the messengers until they are killed. 

Imagine if we can the fearful time of rejoicing as 
the radios announce their death. For three and one- 
half years the radios carried a daily announcement of 
their' activities and great offers for their destruction. 
Suddenly the news goes out — they are dead. 

Great Rejoicing 

Immediately business will be at standstill; whistles 
will blow; bells will ring; great celebrations will be 
held: special excursions by aeroplane will carry people 
of all "kindreds and tongues and nations" to "see their 
dead bodies three days and one-half" for "they shall 
not suffer their dead bodies to be put in graves" (v.9). 

Special mass meetings will be held to send greetings 
and congratulations to the beast, and they "that dwell 
upon the earth shall rejoice over them." 

Everywhere will be dancing and drinking and a 
general let down as earth dwellers "make merry" over 
their death. Newspapers will run full page advertise- 
ments of Christmas shopping specials as men "send 
gifts one to another" (v.10). 

Torments; And Terrors 

But alas! their joy is short, for "after three days 
and an half the spirit of life from God entered into 
them, and they stood upon their feet; and great fear 
fell upon them which saw them" iv.ll>. 

The city of Jerusalem is crowded from end to end; 
hotels are full; great excursions are bringing tens of 
thousands of other sightseers from every nation under 
heaven. Men mock the dead bodies and kick them 
about. Suddenly, in the very midst of their gaity, 
their eyes open; they begin tc move about and stand 
upon their feet. 

Conscience is a terrible executor. Well do men know 
that to trample under foot the messenger of God is 
to bring sudden and sure destruction upon themselves 
In the midst of this blaspheming orgie of hate and 
shame a sudden fear falls upon those haters of God 
and His people. 

Although unwelcome here, it is not so in heaven for 
"they heard a great voice from heaven saving unto 
them. Come up hither. And they ascended up to 
heaven in a cloud, and their enemies beheld them" 
(v.12). 

The radio will flash to the world a different kind 
of news that night. An earthquake will tear the city 
and 7000 men will die. 



Glory to God 

"The remnant were afrighted, and gave glory to the 
God of heaven" (v.13). They must acknowledge de- 
feat. This does not mean, however, that they are 
saved. Rather are they compelled, as did the magi- 
cians in Egypt, to admit that this is the finger of God. 
Far from repenting, they go from bad to worse until 
under the vials they blaspheme the God of heaven, 
even while gnawing their tongues for pain (ch.l6:lli. 

Forced confession and a religion of fear are never 
to be trusted. Felix trembled as Paul laid before him 
the fearful issues of judgment and righteousness. 
Herod heard John the Baptist gladly. Only release 
the pressure of a death bed scene and men quickly 
relapse into sin. 

The Last Trumpet 

At the preaching of Jonah, Nineveh repented and 
God stayed their judgment. So here, if this were true 
repentance, judgment would be held up. But the angel 
with the seventh trumpet steps forward and "sounded: 
and there were great voices in heaven, saying, the 
kingdoms of this world are become the kingdoms of 
our Lord, and of His Christ" (v. 15). 

This is the last trump. It is in "the days" of this 
trumpet that redemption is to be finished and the 
kingdom age ushered in (Ch.l0:7). The seven vials 
are included in this trumpet. 

Here, as at so many other times in this book, our 
Lord pauses to give the results before the events. This 
is the last "woe" trumpet. The first woe lasted five 
months, during which men were tormented by the 
fearful creatures of the bottomless pit. Under the 
second woe, one-third of men were killed. This last 
woe included the seven vials and other events con- 
nected with the closing history of this age. 

Rewards 

"And the nations were angry, and thy wrath is come, 
and the time of the dead that thev should be judged, 
and that thou shouldst give rewards unto thy servants 
the prophets, and to the saints, and to them that fear 
thy name, small and great; and shouldst destroy them 
which destroy the earth" (v.18). 

Here we have a rehearsal of the events that are to 
take place under this seventh trumpet. The nations 
are angry. The two witnesses "torment" them and the 
vial judgments cause them to suffer, for He Who has 
waited so long in mercy has exhausted His mercy and 
His "wrath is come." 

He will give rewards unto His servants. Today Satan 
is the prince of the world (Jn. 14:30), but a change of 
government brings a change of officials. The saints 
are to rule the world. Daniel will yet stand in his lot; 
Moses will possess his recompence of reward; Abraham 
will inherit the city which hath foundations. All who 
have forsaken houses and lands will now inherit a 
hundred fold. We will be there as friends of the 
Redeemer, or as prisoners brought forth for execution. 
What tremendous issues are at stake as we now set 
the standai - d for our future existence. 

The Ark 

"And the temple of God was opened in heaven, and 



—10— 



JANUARY 2 5, 1941 




FROM THE FIELD 



ASHLAND, OHIO 

(West Tenth Street Brethren Church) 

Many have asked us on various occasions to write 
the story of the West Tenth Street Brethren Church 
in Ashland. We have delayed for several reasons, but 
if what the Lord has done for us here can be of any 
encouragement to others, we are glad to pass on a 
few of the facts. 

Our Beginning 

For a number of years the Union Gospel Mission was 
blessed of the Lord, and the gospel of salvation was 
faithfully presented. This resulted in the gathering 
together of some of God's choice believers. In Oct., 

1937, this group called me to act as supply pastor for 
a time and I am still hare. The first month our aver- 
age Sunday afternoon Sunday School attendance was 
59. Contrary to many such small groups, these people 
had a vision; and through prayer and hard work, they 
planned to do a greater work for the Lord. Accord- 
ingly it was decided early in 1938 to change the mis- 
sion into a Brethren church, hold regular Sunday 
morning services, and erect a new addition to the 
building. At a cost of about $3,500 plus much volunteer 
labor, a new addition of 2600 square feet was added. 
Dr. McClain was our dedication day speaker, Nov. 20, 

1938, and our church launched on a new period of 
history. 

Continuous Hard Work 

West Tenth Street has some of the finest workers 
to b3 found in America. Some of our officers, teach- 
ers and secretaries are always busy calling on new 
people and bringing them in. This is God's plan and 
we cannot change it (Acts 5:42i. No church will ever 
succeed by sitting down and waiting for the people 
to come. We must go after them. 

In the year of 1939 and early 1940 the Lord blessed 
the church as never before. Literally hundreds of 
people came forward to make decisions for Christ. 
God wrought salvation in the lives of great numbers 
of men and women, the stories of which sound more 
like the Pacific Garden Mission in Chicago than a 
church. These people, newly born from above, have 
stepped into the places of responsibility, and their 
growth in grace in many instances is phenomenal. 

Another Building Program 

On Easter Sunday morning, 1940, we held the great- 
est business meeting in all our history. A building 
program, decided upon that day, has now been car- 
ried to completion. Accordingly we now have another 
addition of 2,400 square feet of floor space available 



there was seen in his temple the ark of his testament; 
and there were lightnings, and voices and thunder- 
ings, and an earthquake and great hail" (v.19). 

God's people the Jews must be in the homeland dur- 
ing the kingdom age. For centuries they have been 
as strangers among the nations, but God's covenant 
with them cannot be broken. Here the ark of the 
covenant comes into view and brings to our mind the 
Jew and his future. 

There were also "voices. " We will hear more of these 
voices as events unfold. There are voices like many 
waters and voices like ihunder; voices announcing the 
fall of Babylon; proclaiming' the everlasting gospel and 
voices giving comfort to those persecuted unto death. 



for both class rooms and auditorium. This gives us 
an auditorium which will seat nearly 500. There is 
also a very pleasant and commodious study for the 
pastor. The walls of the old section were replastered 
like the new addition in beautiful cream color. New 
lighting fixtures, and the floor completely carpeted, 
with wood work reconditioned in ivory and chocolate 
brown, give the auditorium a beautiful appearance. 
The lot and building is costing us about $4,500 besides 
about 600 days of volunteer labor from the men of 
the congregation. 

The Recent Dedication 

On Dec. 1, Dr. Alva J. McClain, president of Grace 
Theological Seminary, was our dedication speaker 
again. There were 318 present for the morning Bible 
school and 291 for the morning worship service. Over 
300 were in attendance in the afternoon dedication 
service. This included delegations from many of the 
churches of the East Central District besides some 
from other local churches. Again in the evening ser- 
vice there were 289 present, and the offering for the 
day was $274.36. 

Dr. McClain was also with us for a Bible Conference 
which began the Thursday before dedication day. Few 
men have ever been appreciated by our people as was 
Dr. McClain. His coming was a great blessing to all 
of us. Several of our young people here are looking 
forward to full time Christian service, and we hope 
they will find their way to Grace Seminary. Two of 
our members are already at William Jennings Bryan 
University, and one is in Los Angeles Bible Institute. 

District Conference 

In September we entertained the East Central Dis- 
trict Conference which brought delegates from our 
churches in this district. Dr. Arthur I. Brown was 
secured as the special speaker. The church building 
was practically filled at times for this conference. We 
have also had Dr. W. W. Savage of Pontiac, Mich., Dr. 
John E. Zoller of Detroit, Dr. Louis S. Bauman, Rev. 
Albert L. Flory, Rev. John Aeby, Rev. R. I. Humberd, 
Rev. Robert Culver, and Dr. A. J. Levengood of Bryan 
University. Others have appeared for single services 
whose names we cannot mention here. 

Besides we have entertained the America Back to 
God Quartet from Detroit on two occasions, and the 
Northern Ohio Pre-Millennial Fellowship for several 
monthly meetings. 

Weekly Activity 

Besides our regular mid-week prayer meeting, we 
now hold two Bible classes a week at the church. We 
also have a music class and a home Bible class, the 
latter class taught by J. Ruskin Garber. There are 
six weekly prayer meetings under the auspices of the 
church, conducted either at the church or in homes. 
For the last year our Bible School has averaged 279. 
and the weekly offerings for the last two quarters 
(not counting dedication day) have averaged $92.64 
per Sunday. 

Daily Vacation Bible School 

In spite of the fact that our school last summer was 
greatly hindered by the building program, we had an 
enrollment of 257 and a large daily attendance. Rev. 
Robert Culver was with us for this school and at night 
held meetings which were a real blessing to our peo- 
ple. 

Problems 

We know something about problems and opposition. 
But our victory is from the Lord and from Him alone. 
Were it not for the continuous prayer of the ten regu- 
lar weekly prayer services, and dependence upon the 



—11— 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



Lord by our people, we would have failed long ago. 
Our strength is in the living, risen Christ. All praise 
and honor to Him for His matchless grace! 

Thanks and Appreciation 

As pastor of the West Tenth Street Brethren Church, 
I feel specially moved to offer thanks to the Lord for 
His work in the salvation of many souls and in His 
keeping power. We wish it were possiole to hear the 
testimony of scores of persons whose lives have been 
so marvelously transformed. There is no thrill in the 
world like that of hearing how God has delivered from 
drink, the tobacco habit, modem false religions, world- 
liness, etc. We are expecting the Lord to continue His 
work as He Himself deals with individuals through 
the Spirit of God on the basis of His Word. 

Also, I appreciate the splendid group of workers 
here. From the beginning the people have cooperated 
in building a carefully departmentalized Bible school 
and a working program which seeks the lost. It is 
easy for a good church to fail because the spiritual 
power of the church is not harnessed up with the 
proper methods of work. Many are busy every week 
calling on the careless and the new prospects. Many 
are diligent in prayer. Many feel it their duty to be 
present at the services and to give their very lives for 
the success of the work. Many have dedicated the 
tithe to the Lord. Many have worked hard to become 
effective teachers. Many have also worked with their 
hands. From the drawing of the plans for the build- 
ing on through the laying of the wall, doing the car- 
penter work and painting, and installing the furnaces 
and the lights, our men have done most of the work. 
Aside from the plastering and the roof, all work was 
volunteer with the exception of one head carpenter 
for whose services the church has paid. We were for- 
tunate to secure a contractor who is a Christian and 
is interested in our work. 

In the last two and one half years two additions 
to the building have been made with a total cost of 
about $8,000. Over 200 people have confessed Christ 
for the first time and great numbers have stepped 
into the consecrated, separated Christian life. These 
things have been the direct blessing from our loving- 
heavenly Father, as we have had no help from any 
mission board nor any capitalist. Both spiritually and 
financially God has worked through the lives of the 
many. 

— Chas. W. Mayes, 



GLENDALE, CALIF. 

Greetings to all the brethren in the name of our 
soon coming King. 

We do enjoy the greetings and news of the brother- 
hood, so perhaps you would like a word from us. 

Our hearts have been made glad recently by the way 
our Lord hears and answers prayers. We have been 
praying that the empty pews might be filled and the 
unsaved brought in to hear the blessed Word. We 
thank God that there has been an increase in attend- 
ance. We thank God too for a dear pastor who feeds 
the saints on a well balanced diet and has never failed 
to give the plan of salvation. 

The W. M. C. have much to praise God for. We can't 
speak for the other churches in Southern California, 
but we wish to thank Bro. Paul Bauman and all those 
responsible for the Home Mission pictures. When Bro. 
Bauman came to show the pictures at our church, a 
brother operated the projector who wasn't familiar 
with it. As a result the pictures weren't very clear. 
We truly believe that due to the inspiration' of the 
pictures, the Kentucky work in particular, we have 
eight new members in our W. M. C. 

We as a church voted to release our pastor for the 



Bible class at Bakersfied. It is a great responsibility 
and requires much sacrifice of time and self on his 
part. It is all done for our blessed Redeemer, and we 
know He is able. May souls be won for Him there. 

We have a Brethren women's Bible class on Thurs- 
days. We meet for prayer in the morning at the 
church, then go to someone's home for lunch and the 
Bible lesson. We have an average attendance of 23, 
rain or shine. 

Bro. Richardson is oar teacher. We try to bring in 
the unsaved women. The way of salvation is always 
given. 

After the class Bro. Richardson starts for Bakers- 
field. Will you pray with us for that work and our 
pastor? 

We have men in our church witnessing regularly at 
the city mission's road camps and jails. We thank the 
Lord too for our young men who are really working, 
"For the night cometh when no man can work." 

Pray for us, brethren, that we may be kept faithful 
and "looking up" for His coming. 

Mrs. A. W. Stives, church correspondent. 



LA VERNE, CALIF. 
Greetings to our beloved in the Lord. 

We have so much to thank the Lord for throughout 
the year. 

New Year's eve we met in business council and elec- 
ted officers for the new year. All business was trans- 
acted very pleasantly. Reports of their departmental 
work were given by different ones. Treasurer reported 
all bills paid, and over $2,000 given for home and for- 
eign missions. 

Pastor reported growth spiritually though not num- 
erically, as quite a few have been lettered out. Some 
are in our new mission points where we trust they 
can be more useful in the Lord's work, one is pastor 
in an eastern state and doing good work there, and 
two little ones who were baptized and received as 
members here while with grandparents have gone 
home and been the means of drawing their own par- 
ents to a zeal for the Master's work. So while numbers 



SERMON STARTERS 




THE DAY OF SMALL THINGS 

Lessons from Prov. 20:24-28. 



The ants — Provision for the future. "Now is the ac- 
cepted time." 

The conies — Foundation. Make their houses in the 
rock. 

The locusts— Union. Go all of them by bands (joined 
together I . 

The spider — Communion. Taketh hold and is in 
kings' palaces. 

— R. M. Beresford. 



—12— 



JANUARY 2 5, 1941 



on the church roll have not grown as we'd like, we 
know misjiov work is going on and our dear pastor's 
work is not in vain in the Lord. 

Our fall communion (though not large in numbers) 
was one of the very best spiritually. 

Bro. Paul Bauman's lecture and pictures of our home 
mission work were much enjoyed by all, and we re- 
joice to know of home work accomplished. 

We lately held a C. E. rally and also a C. E. social 
gathering with devotional program. Our own pastor 
is pastor-counselor of our county division of eight or 
more different congregations. 

We had Rev. Goodger, the ''hiking evangelist" with 
us, and by his experiences of his ministry on the high- 
ways were made to see we all could do much more. 

We are now happy in a Bible class called the "I Can 
Class," to learn more on personal work and receive en- 
couragement to do it. We know we are saved to serve, 
but sometimes refuse to serve because we are not in 
the place we choose, and forget He directs and we are 
told, "Do." 

We had a fine Christmas program by the children 
directed by Sisters Carter and Montz, after which Bro. 
Carter gave us a very good illustrated message on gifts 
— the greatest gift Jh. 3:16. 

Instead of a cantata we had vesper services led by 
Bro. Orville Thomason, assistant chorister in S. S. and 
church, after which we enjoyed going to our pastor's 
home as they had open house instead of Christmas 
card sending. The time was enjoyed, and we as a 
church were glad to present them with a nice woolen 
blanket as a token of our love, after which our S. S. 
superintendent, Bro. Fischer, and his wife, were pre- 
sented a silver plate in honor of their silver anniver- 
sary. 

We thank the Lord for our good church paper and 
those who make it what it is. May the Lord bless them 
and all who read it, and may every home in the broth- 
erhood receive it, is our prayer. 

Yours in our blessed hope, 

Mrs. Lydio H. Frantz, correspondent. 



MCKEE, PENNA. 

The year 1940 has just given way to that of 1941, 
and as we thus stand upon the threshold of a new 
year we turn our faces to the past. It is with a mingled 
feeling of joy and sorrow that we look back through 
the mist of the months that have just gone by. 

There is joy, for some have grown in grace and 
knowledge of our Lord, and like the seed on good 
ground, are bringing forth thirty, sixty and an hun- 
dred fold. But there is also an element of sorrow, for 
some, like the seed upon the stony ground, have re- 
vealed their shallow hold and have become unfruitful. 

If we were to compare this congregation with others 
it might not rank so high in quantity, for we are not 
so large in numbers. However, as to quality I believe 
it will take second place to only a few. This quality 
is made manifest by an intense missionary zeal and 
interest in those beyond the confines of our local 



church. This interest may be summed up under four 
heads: denominational, witness bearing, teaching, and 
the printed page. 

First, there is an active W. M. C. In fact this is the 
first time in my ministerial history that I can fully 
support the denominational program, and we rejoice 
that we can now support both foreign and home mis- 
sions, the seminary and the church paper. 

Second — witness bearing. Not only do we rejoice in 
the forwardness of the older members in witnessing 
to friends and neighbors, but also for our young peo- 
ple. A young couple moved to the mountains in the 
south part of the state and started a Sunday school 
and put out Christian literature. A young man is a 
settled pastor, and we rejoice in the favor of the Lord 
upon his ministry. Another made his presence felt 
in college, even to the salvation of some of his fellow 
students. Another is pastor's wife in California. An- 
other is student pastor in Tennessee. Another is doing 
fine work among children by teaching two child evan- 
gelism classes. 

Third — teaching. This is indeed a direct fruit of 
this congregation, for, because of lack of physical 
strength, it would be impossible for the pastor to do 
this work, were it not for the interest and willingness 
of others to carry the load of local needs. This teach- 
ing ministry is directed in three ways. In the Altoona 
School of the Bible; as teacher of the Union Bible 
Class, held in the Hebrew mission in Altoona: and as 
speaker over 50 times in six different states the past 
year. 

Fourth— the printed page. A few years ago plates 
for four of my tracts were financed for a tract com- 
pany in North Carolina. We have heard from as far 
away as England concerning these tracts. The dis- 
tribution, in the Bulgarian language of my tract. 
"Heaven," was financed by these people; the trans- 
lating and printing being done in Bulgaria. We plan 





A pastor who had 100% of his mem- 
bership receiving The Brethren Mis- 
sionary Herald last year writes us now 
for 150 publication offering envelopes, say- 
ing, "We are soliciting our members by mail 
for both subscriptions and offering at the 
same time." 

From another church which is without a pastor we 
receive a number of subscriptions with this word, "In 
the absence of a pastor I am trying to keep our people 
in mind of the paper and get all trie subscriptions pos- 
sible." 

If a church really wants to go over the top with its 
publication offering and subscriptions, it can be done! 
One usually gets just what he goes after. 



—13— 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



to enlarge our ministry among these war torn people 
in the near future. 

Although my literature work seems small at times, 
yet the years have brought orders for some 23,000 of 
my books from the United States, Canada and over a 
score of foreign countries. 

But as we stand thus looking back upon the activi- 
ties of 1940, we turn our faces ahead and wonder what 
our outlook will be in one year hence. Will the end 
of 1941 find us in glory? Verily, the return of our 
Lord is near, and how we thank our God for the 
blessed assurance that all will be well, whether we 
will be here or whether we will be with the Lord. 
Thank God! 

R. I. Humberc!. 



7?£W $%?£& 



From 
Our Workers 



BERNE, IND. 
Bethel Brethren Church 

This letter is a little behind, but we hope it will be 
welcome. We held our annual business meeting Jan. 
1. We have again chosen our faithful minister. Rev. 
John Parr, who has been with us for many years. Bro. 
George Sipe was chosen moderator; Bro. Bryson Fet- 
ters, secretary; Bro. Sam. Leininger, treasurer and 
trustee; Bro. Clark Sipe, class leader; Bro. Archie Parr, 
chorister; Sister Nora Lefever, pianist. 

We decided to improve our church building by put- 
ting a basement under it. Work started last Monday, 
Jan. 6, and is progressing nicely. 

As it is our custom to set aside the first Sunday of 
each year for Jewish work, Bro. Leo Polman was with 
us Jan. 5 and sooke to us both morning and evening 
hi interest of the salvation of the Jews. We enjoved 
these services very much and wish to thank Bro. Pol- 
man. 

Our evangelistic meetings will begin Jan. 20. Bro. 
L. L. Grubb will be with us for these meetings. We 
solicit all your earnest prayers for their success. 

At our business meeting we adopted the following 
resolution which we wish to present as our united tes- 
timony; 

Resolution 

Resolved, that we as a church offer thanks to 
Almighty God that during a year of world un- 
rest and war, a year marked by crime, sorrow 
and sin in every form, we as a church have 
been blessed above measure. 

Our secretary reports probably the best year 
in our history as a church. We have been blessed 
spiritually by guest sneakers of national prom- 
inence, inspired by musical programs from our 
local groups, by such outstanding organizations 
as the Eureka Jubilee Singers, and our church 
is in excellent condition financially. 

We therefore humbly resolve that because God 
has seen fit to thus bless us we will endeavor to 
serve Him more faithfully in this year of 1941. 

We would like also to say with Paul: "Brethren. I 
count not myself to have apprehended: but this one 
thing I do, forgetting those things which are behind. 
I press toward the mark for the prize of the high call- 
ing of God in Christ Jesus" (Phil. 3:13-14). 

Eloisc C. Christy, reporter. 



ANNUALS AVAILABLE 
Additional copies of the last Conference 
Annual may be secured from The Brethren 
Missionary Herald Co. for 25c each. 



"Heralds of Grace" are on the air each Friday even- 
ing at 6:15 over WJEJ, Hagerstown, Md. (1210 on your 
dial), a year's contract having been signed with the 
radio station. The Grace Brethren Church of Hagers- 
town, the First Brethren Church of Waynesboro, and 
The Brethren Home Missions Council are joint spon- 
sors of the program. Brother L. L. Grubb writes, "Even 
though it is just two weeks old, the program is begin- 
ning to receive special contributions from outside in- 
terests and friends. Brethren pray that the Heralds 
of Grace might grow in the time and scope of its mes- 
sage, and be mightily used in the expansion of The 
Brethren Church through the salvation of many souls 
— all the glory to our blessed Lord." 

The Church on the Hill Program, sponsored by the 
Ghent Brethren Church, may also be heard each Fri- 
day at 8:15 A.M. over the new radio station, WSLS. 
Roanoke. From reports received it is evident that 
many are listening to each of these programs also. 

The Martinsburg Circuit of Martinsburg, Pa. is de- 
sirous of corresponding with anyone who would like 
to have a pastorate or to change pastorates. Anyone 
interested should communicate with the correspond- 
ing secretary, Mrs. C. K. Snider, 600 E. Main St., Roar- 
ing Spring, Pa. 

A special feature of the watch night service at 
Washington, D. C. was the presence of Sheik Raphael 
Emanuel a converted native Chaldaean, author and 
world traveler. Dressed in his native costume he spoke 
on Bible Lands — Yesterday and Today. 

Allentov.'n, Pa. reports, "We had another good day 
yesterday (Jan. 5th i. Got off to a good start. Things 
look well for us for the new year." 




%allif Manna 

READ YOUR 

BIBLE 



THROUGH IN '41 



22 I am the Lord that healeth thee 



23 I bare you on eagles' wings and brought you unto 

myself 

24 He that kindled the fire shall surely make restitu- 

tion 

25 Thou shalt make a mercy seat of pure gold 

26 Aaron shall bear their names before the Lord 

27 Once in the year shall he make atonement 

28 The children of Israel stripped themselves of their 

ornaments 



—14— 



JANUARY 2 5, 1941 



WUai 2>a IZietltlea fielieve? 

BAPTISM 

(Continued from Issue of January 11, 1941) 

Christian water baptism was instituted by our Lord 
Jesus Christ in His parting commission to His disci- 
ples (Matt. 28:19, 20; Mark 16:15,16). These words 
are inescapable in their import and meaning. 

Logically, the first question existing in the mind of 
the young Christian is: 

1. What is Christian water baptism, according to the 
Bible? 

a. Baptism is never anything more than a symbol 
of certain great Biblical truths having to do with 
salvation and the work of the God-head in re- 
demption. It is erroneous and unscriptural to 
say that it is essential to salvation, or that it 
adds to salvation (Eph. 2:8,9; Rom. 3:20). 



b. It is immersion in water. 

the following facts: 



This is evident from 



(1) The meaning of the word. In the original 
Greek language the word "baptism" always 
means "to dip," "immerse," "put under." 
Standard Greek lexicons uniformly give this 
meaning. 

(2) The plain statements of Scripture. "They 
went down bor.h into the water"; "When they 
were come up out of the water" (Acts 8:38,39). 
"Jesus .... went up straightway out of the 
water," after John had baptized Him (Matt. 
3:16). 

(3) What it symbolizes. The new birth is set forth 
in symbol (Rom. 6:4; Tit. 3:5). Immersion 
in the waters of baptism symbolizes the real- 
ity of the baptism of the Spirit as the believer 
enters the grave with Christ, and is there 
loosed from his sins (Rom. 6:6), and is raised 
with Christ in resurrection power (Rom. 6:8). 

(4) The testimony of history. Here we find tre- 
mendous evidence for immersion, but do not 
have space to present the mass of material. 



c. It is triple or triune immersion in water. 

is evident from the following facts: 



This 



(1) The meaning of the word. The Greek word 
"baptize" is a frequentative verb meaning 
"to dip repeatedly," not just once. This fact 
is upheld by Thayer and other Greek lexicons. 

(2) The plain statement of Christ. Grammarians 
have agreed that Christ's command demands 
a triple action, an immersion in recognition 
of each of three divine Persons — "In the 
name of the Father", "and of the Son", "and 
of the Holy Ghost" (Matt. 28:19). This was 
Christ's last statement on the subject to His 
disciples before ascending. We would expect 
it to be complete and final. 

(3) What triune immersion symbolizes. The work 
of each member of the God-head in salva- 
tion is seen (Tit. 3:4-6). 

Baptize in the name of the Father— Why? 
Vs. 4— He is the SOURCE of salvation; the 
Fount from which all blessings flow. 

Baptize in the name of the Son — Why? 
Vs. 6— He is the CHANNEL of salvation. His 
blood was shed, and His body given. 



THE BREAKING POINT 

"Don't you feel you're li- 
able to break?" a devoted 
Christian was asked in time 
of severe testings. 

"Yes," he replied. "I often 
feel I might, but not until 
Psalm 50 breaks at v. 15." 

"What does that say?" 
his friend asked. 

He opened his Bible and 
read, "Call upon me in the 
day of trouble: I will de- 
liver thee and thou shalt 
glorify me." 



Baptize in the name of the Holy Ghost — 
Why? Vs. 5— He is the AGENT Who has ap- 
plied all the redemptive blessings to our hearts 
and lives. 

Triune immersion alone can fully paint this 
glorious picture. 

(4) The testimony of history. Here again we 
find overwhelming evidence in favor of triune 
immersion. 

(5) Its complete acceptance in most denomina- 
nations. Practically all churches will accept 
your membership on the basis of triune im- 
mersion. This is not true of other modes of 
baptism. Therefore it must be the most com- 
plete form of baptism. 



d. It is forward immersion in water, 
dent from: 



This is evi- 



(1) The statement of Scripture. Baptism is "in 
the likeness of his death" (Rom. 6:5). How 
did He die? He bowed His head when He 
cried, "It is finished" and gave up the ghost 
(John 19:30). So, we are baptized with bowed 
heads. 

2. Why should believers be baptized? 

a. Because the Lord Jesus Christ commands it 
(Matt. 28:19; Mark 16:15,16). 

b. Because it publicly identifies the believer with 
Christ (1 John 2:3,4). It substantiates the Chris- 
tian's profession before men. 

c. Because it is considered the door into the visible, 
local church. The early church plainly consi- 
dered it essential to membership (Acts 2:41). 
There is no indication that anyone ever joined 
the early churches without baptism. 

d. Because of the additional blessing it brings from 
heaven through our obedience (John 15:10). 

3. When should believers be baptized? 

a. The Bible sets no specific time for baptism. How- 
ever, judging from the practice of the early 
church, water baptism was very closely associated 
in time with the confession of Christ (Acts 2:41; 
8:35-39; 9:17,18; 10:44-48). 

b. Judging from the symbolic meaning of baptism 
it should take place as soon as possible after 
regeneration. 

(To Be Continued) 



-15— 



WluU *7<4e Qtetkten /lie, jbaincj, 

A PICTORIAL REPORT OF THE RECENT DAILY VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL AT PIKE 
BRETHREN CHURCH, MUNDY'S CORNER, PA. KENNETH ASHMAN IS PASTOR. 




TOP ROW — Left: Intermediates taught by Mrs. Wega and Mrs. 
Snyder; Right: Beginners taught by Mrs. Paul, Mrs. Ashman and 
Mrs. Rose. 

2d ROW — Left: Teachers and Parents; Right: Juniors taught by 
Mrs. John Griffith. 



3d ROW — Left: Intermediates taught by Rev. Gehman and Mrs. 
Taylor; Right: Primaries taught by Mrs. Rager and Mrs. Hevener. 

BOTTOM ROW — Left: Juniors taught by Mrs. Geo. Cunningham; 
Right: Juniors taught by Mrs. Eckstein and Mrs. Rager. 



^^—rmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm 



Blaine Snyder 4-6-41 

160 Third St 




FOREIGN 

MISSIONARY 

NUMBER 



FEBRUARY 1, 1941 

3 No. 5 



V3H2p' 



IN THIS ISSUE 

rORIALS BY 
S. BAUMAN — Pages 2-5 

,Y MANNA — Page 5 

rER OFFERING 

REPORT — Pages 6-15 

OR ROLL — Page 15 

ILY OF GOD — Page IS 

AND NIGHT — Pages 17, 18 

YER CALENDAR — Page 18 

M EDITOR'S 

iIAIL BAG — Pages 19-21 

S' & GIRLS' 
CORNER — Page 21 

SVER'S TRIP 

TO THE COAST — Page 22 

S BRIEFS — Page 23 

ETINGS — Page 23 

OUM PRAISE 

ND PRAYER — Page 24 

IT ON TRUTH — Page 24 



: j 






Peb/tapd ^lodcuf,! 

World chaos reigns! 

Bold lawlessness runs faster! 
And Earth's dark night 

With deeper darkness grows! 
In many lands unparalleled disaster — 
Wars, famines, earthquakes, floods, — 

'Mongst many woes. 

The darkness deepens! — yes, 

But Dawn is nearer! 
The Lord from Heaven may soon be on His way. 
The Blessed Hope in these dark days grows dearer, — 
Our Saviour Jesus Christ will come — 

"Perhaps today!' 

— J. Danson Smith 



=- 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 




-EDITORIALS 



By Louis S. Baumon 

The "Easter Offering" Report 

Herewith we are sending forth to our readers at last, 
the final "Report" of our "Easter Offering." Partial 
reports of the offering were made prior to July 1st, 
1940. However, most of our Churches, and especially 
those which gave the larger amounts, withheld their 
offerings until they were assured that their money 
would continue to support the missionaries of our 
Foreign Missionary Society, and not missionaries to 
be chosen and approved by another Board. 

By the action of the "National Conference of The 
Brethren Church (Ashland Group)" which was held 
last August at Ashland, Ohio; and by the action of the 
National Conference of The Brethren Church which 
was held at the same time at Winona Lake, Indiana, 
full power over The Foreign Missionary Society of 
The Brethren Church was placed beyond doubt in the 
hands of the members of the organization and the 
trustees that said Society shall choose from time to 
time; and, moreover, the Constitution has been 
changed by the vote of said members, and the new 
charter has been secured, placing the full power into 
the hands of The Foreign Missionary Society itself, so 
that we are assured that there will be no disruption 
of the work as it has been carried on from the organ- 
ization of the Society: and, also, every one of the mis- 
sionaries on the fields stood loyal to the Society and 
its chosen officials. Therefore, the Churches, reas- 
sured, sent in their "Easter Offerings," and the Board 
of Trustees ordered at its meeting in August that the 
next financial report (which would be the final "Eas- 
ter Offering Report") should be made out to cover an 
eighteen-month period, ending December 31st, 1940. 
Likewise, the Treasurer's Annual Report, which will 
follow this publication of the partial report, will cover 
the period from July 1st, 1939 to December 31st, 1940 
■ — a period of eighteen months. 

We request that all donors whose offerings have 
not been reported before, shall check up their gifts 
with this report; and, if there is any discrepancy or 
error anywhere, let us know at once. We believe this 
report is without error so far as it was reported and 
sent to us, and as we are now sending it to the printer, 
for the bookkeeper says that it "balances to the penny 
with the bank deposits." 

Now, for the next Easter Offering, which we expect 
to be "the greatest ever!" 



Our Next Easter Offering 

Pastors are already sending in their requests for 
"Coin Collectors," etc., and getting things under way 
for our next Easter Offering. In spite of our denom- 
inational Church troubles, the Foreign Missionary So- 
ciety is going forward and increasing its missionary 
forces on the field. Neither has the war changed the 
marching orders of our Lord. We are assuredly taking 
forward steps that call for great faith. But God is 
still on His throne, and we believe that He is able. 
The carrying forward of the message of God to man 
at the closing hours of this age, is a duty that is fall- 
ing full force on the shoulders of the Christian 
Churches of America. We must advance and not re- 
treat. We dare not fail our Lord in this dark hour. 
The members of The Foreign Missionary Society of 
The Brethren Church, and the Churches and the pas- 



tors that support it, will not be found wanting in this 
hour. Unless the Gospel is given to the staggering 
multitudes in this hour of despair, then indeed, the 
future of the world is without hope. But, God will 
never permit the cause of His Son, for which the great 
Sacrifice was made, to fail! If we fail, then God will 
give the high honor of doing this work to some other. 
God has never yet failed for want of some one to hold 
aloft His banners! 

The annual letters from the office to the pastors 
within The Brethren Church will soon be in the mails. 
But do not wait for that before getting the work un- 
der way. 



Dr. Charles G. Trumbull Gone to be With Christ 



On Monday, January 13th, 1941, 
at Hotel Green, Pasadena, Calif., 
Charles G. Trumbull was "loosed 
away upward" to be with Christ. In 
his home-going, the Brethren 
Church lost one of the best friends 
that it ever had outside of its own 
immediate ranks. Through the col- 
umns of The Sunday School Times, 
of which Dr. Trumbull was editor 
for many years, the Brethren 
Church was made known to the 
ends of the earth. On three differ- 
ent occasions he gave a full page 
or more to some distinctive part of 
our work. Missionaries from dif- 




Dr. Trumbull 



ferent parts of the world who were wholly unacquaint- 
ed with our Church prior to reading of it in The Sun- 
day School Times, have written the editor frequently, 
asking about the Church and its work. 

It seems that it cannot be that God would take from 
the ranks of the militant church of Christ, in a time 
like this, such a stalwart defender of the faith. How- 
ever, God makes no mistakes. He may bury His work- 
men, but He will carry on His work. 

The farewell service on the Pacific Coast was held 
for Dr. Trumbull in the Lake Avenue Congregational 
Church in Pasadena, on Friday, January 17th. The 
editor of this magazine brought the message at that 
service, at the request of Mrs. Trumbull. The body 
was taken back to Philadelphia, where dust will be 
returned to dust. We all extend our heartfelt sym- 
pathy to Mrs. Trumbull in her great loss. She was a 
most faithful helper to Dr. Trumbull through his long 
years of service. 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 

The Brethren Missionary Herald is published weekly, 
four times a month, or 48 times a vear, at Herald Press, 
Inc., 1300 West 9th St., Cleveland, Ohio, by the Brethren 
Missionary Herald Co., 3326 So. Calhoun St., Fort Wayne, 
Ind. 

Subscription Price: In the United States and possessions, 
$1.00 a year; Foreign countries, $1.50 a year. 

ADMINISTRATION 

Secretary of Publications: Leo Polman 

Business Office Secretary: Miss Geneva Kuhn 

Editorial Office Secretary: Miss Grace AUshouse 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

President: Russell D. Barnard Secretary: Tom Hammers 

Vice-President: Ralph Rambo Treasurer: Homer A. Kent 

R. D. Crees Mrs. Roy Patterson R. E. Gingrich 

George Richardson L. L. Grubb Bernard Schneider 

EDITORS 
Foreign Missions: Louis S. Bauman. 
Educational: Alva J. McClain. 
Home Missions: R. Paul Miller. 
Women's Missionary Council: Mrs. A. B. Kidder. 



Entered as second class matter at the post office at 
Cleveland, Ohio, February 9, 1939, under the act of March 
3, 1879. 



FEBRUARY 1, 1941 



The Meanderings of Our Missionaries 

As this Foreign Missionary Number of the Herald 
goes to press, three of our missionaries are somewhere 
on the stormy Atlantic (stormy just now in more ways 
than one), en route to the field in French Equatorial 
Africa, whither they are bound for the service of Christ 
and to relieve their overworked comrades. These three 
missionaries are Mr. and Mrs. Harold Dunning and 
Miss Elizabeth Tyson. Mrs. Dunning is the daughter 
of our pioneer missionary, James G. Gribble, who 
opened up that great field. She and her husband are 
new recriuts in our work. Miss Tyson is returning 
from furlough. 

Miss Grace Byron, who was to have sailed with 
these three missionaries, was taken suddenly ill in New 
Itork City, just before the boat sailed. It was impossi- 
ble for her to make the trip to Florida and board the 
Zarembo with her companion missionaries. In a very 
brief message to the office here in Long Beach she 
said simply, "Cannot sail. Heartbroken." However, at 
this writing she is about again in her usual strength 
and hopes to be able to leave in the very near future. 
She expects to go with Mr. and Mrs. Robert S. Williams, 
who should be sailing, if quarters can be secured on 
some boat, about Easter time. 

With the sailing of Miss Byron and Brother and 
Sister Williams, all the missionaries under appoint- 
ment, or whose furloughs at home have ended, will 
have sailed for the field, unless there is some upset 
unforeseen to us now. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert S. Williams are in Quebec, still 
working hard to perfect their French, which is very 
necessary, especially in the case of Brother Williams 
who may be called upon to deal with French officials 
in the capacity of a station superintendent. 

Mr. and Mrs. John W. Hathaway, Mr. and Mrs. Curtis 
G. Morrill and their two children, together with Miss 
Ruth Snyder, are expecting at this writing to board 
the SS Zam Zam in New York on Feb. 28. Miss Snyder 
only, in this party, is a new recruit. 

At this writing there is a bare possibility that it will 
be Miss Byron instead of Miss Snyder that will sail 
with this party, but the present plan is that Miss 
Snyder will precede Miss Byron to the field. 

Thus, marvelously has our God answered the prayers 
of the church and the missionaries on the field, and 
has broken down the barriers for their return to the 
field in a time of war and international upheaval. 
Passage at this time across the seas is not only at a 
premium, but is almost impossible to secure. 

At the other end of the long, long trail is Brother 
and Sister Chauncey B. Sheldon, the time for whose 
furloughs is long since past. We are hoping that they 
will be en route home as our readers peruse these lines, 
and the hour is fast approaching also when Brother 
and Sister Jobson should be coming home on furlough. 
The old furlough schedule has been terribly upset for 
months past. It will be quite a task to get it properly 
adjusted once again. 

Miss Mary L. Emmert arrived safely home on Dec. 
2, and is with her parents in Dallas Center, la. Her 
mother is quite ill. We are very happy that Miss 
Emmert can be with her in this time of stress. 

Mrs. Minnie Kennedy is with her sister, Miss Louise 
Schwab, in Hatboro, Pa. How happy she must be with 
her two fine boys, big as they are, once again upon 
her knees. 

Clarence L. Sickel, superintendent of our mission in 
the Argentine, and his good wife are hoping to get 
back to the field in the near future. For some time he 
has been the pastor of the Second Brethren Church of 
Long Beach. The people there have learned to love 
Brother and Sister Sickel greatly, and are loathe to 



surrender them again for our foreign work; but Bro- 
ther and Sister Sickel feel that the Argentine furnishes 
them with a field of service for life, and are fully ex- 
pecting to return. 

In taking her medical examination, an infirmity of 
the flesh was discovered in the case of Mrs. Sickel that 
made it advisable for her to have an operation per- 
formed before she returns to the Argentine. This 
might have been cared for after her return, but they 
don't have confidence in the Argentine surgeons. More- 
over, such operations are very expensive there and the 
surgeons have little or no sympathy with the Pro- 
testant faith. Arrangements are being made for this 
operation, and when Mrs. Sickel has regained her nor- 
mal health they will be returning to the field that they 
love. 

Their two daughters will remain in this country in 
school; and what fine girls they are! As a rule, the 
children of missionaries are not children that bring 
our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ into disrepute. 

Kathryn and David Jobson, the children of our Afri- 
can superintendent, Orville D. Jobson, are still in 
Batesburg, S. C, in the Westervelt Home for the chil- 
dren of missionaries. Kathryn will be graduating from 
high school soon, and is thinking of her college work 
just ahead. We continue to receive wonderful letters 
from her pen. If our Lord shall tarry, beyond doubt 
Kathryn Jobson is due to become a real missionary 
under our board; at least, such is our confidence. 
Probably the same thing will be true of the boys who 
have not yet been bold enough to express themselves 
with the degree of certainty that Kathryn can. 

The Foreign Board requests earnest and prevailing 
prayer on behalf of our missionaries. 



Outfit For Missionaries Needed 

As most of our readers probably know, our African 
work is on a faith basis, and one of the tests of the 
faith of a missionary is that he shall look to God for 
his outfit; and if the Lord approves him, the Lord will 
provide that outfit. This was a rule laid down by 
James S. Gribble and his wife when the African mis- 
sion was founded. We have tried to follow that rule 
through the years. 

However, it is only just to every missionary that the 
need shall be made known; and while we are not 
making any special request of anybody to supply this 
need, yet we do request that all who are interested in 
the work in Africa shall earnestly pray that these 
outfits may be provided. The Lord lias answered 
prayer in a remarkable way for our missionaries who 
are now en route to Africa. However, we have several 
missionaries that are expecting to leave for the field 
in the near future. Brother and Sister Williams and 
Miss Snyder have been in Quebec, making a careful 
study of the French, which is very vital for our mis- 
sionaries working in French Equatorial Africa; and 
the Lord has been blessing them. The time is ap- 
proaching when they will be leaving for the field. 



The Brethren Mission- 
ary Herald Co. is in a 
position now to supply 
all your music needs for 
choir, church, Sunday 
School, young people's 
societies, children's work, 
etc. 

We are able to furnish music for quartettes, trios, duets, solos, 
children's music, young people, choir, piano and organ duet offer- 
tories, violin and piano offertories, piano offertories, and music books 
for general use. 




THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



We happen to know that Brother and Sister Wil- 
liams are in real need of an outfit, and our readers 
interested in them are requested to pray earnestly that 
this outfit may be provided. It is simply impossible 
for missionaries to leave America and go into the heart 
of heathen Africa and not take with them many 
things that are absolutely necessary and cannot be 
obtained in that land. White men cannot live under 
the same circumstances that the natives in Africa live. 
Once again we ask, pray for the supply of the outfit 
for Brother and Sister Williams. 



A Test of Faith 

The man who, under God, was most largely respon- 
sible for the opening up of French Equatorial Africa 
as a mission field, was James S. Gribble. Those of us 
who recall those days remember well the famous "siege 
of Brazzaville." For nearly two years Mr. and Mrs. 
Gribble, with their little daughter Marguerite, together 
with Miss Estella Myers, were at Brazzaville, the capi- 
tal and gateway of French Equatorial Africa. The 
French government was opposed to their opening up 
a Protestant mission work in the colony known as 
French Equatorial Africa, but there at the gate stood 
James S. Gribble and his determined women helpers, 
resolved that they would stay there until the French 
government would yield and permit them to make 
Christ known in French Equatorial Africa. The out- 
come of that siege is well known. It is only necessary 
to say that they won the battle. 

Brother and Sister Gribble were determined that the 
new work in Africa would be built upon a faith basis. 
One of the greatest tests of the faith of the mission- 
ary, (and, to this pioneer party, an evidence of the 
approval of God upon the missionaries themselves) 
was that they were to receive no assistance from the 
Foreign Missionary Society in the way of securing an 
outfit. They were to look to God alone for the outfit. 
If He supplied it, then they believed that the faith of 
the missionary had stood a real test and that God 
approved the call of said missionary. 

Only under the most extraordinary circumstances 
has the board ever deviated from this rule — the mis- 
sionary must look to the Lord for the supply of his 
outfit. The board will pay for the transportation of 
the outfit to the field, but no more. 

Recently there was a strong temptation to break this 
rule. Very suddenly, after months of waiting, the op- 
portunity came whereby space could be obtained for 
four missionaries on the SS. Zarembo, sailing directly 
from Port Tampa, Fla., lor Matadi at the mouth of the 
Congo. We notified the missionaries that it seemed 
could most quickly and easily obtain their passports, 
visas, outfits, etc. and get to the boat before it was 
due to sail. Two of these missionaries were to sail 
for the first time; namely, Mr. and Mrs. Harold L. 
Dunning. But immediately the problem of securing 
funds for the outfit staggered them. They had been 
in school for years in preparation, and funds were low. 
They made known their desperate need to the secre- 
tary-treasurer of the society. We realized that need, 
immediacy and urgency. We reminded them of the 
rule that Mrs. Dunning's own father laid down, and 
told them that they must look to the Lord for the 
supply of that outfit. It was a desperate trial of their 
faith, for there were but a few days, and not an hour 
to be lost. 

Having little or nothing in the way of money, and 
almost as little in the way of time, they turned their 
eyes unto Jehovah-Jireh ("the Lord will provide"). 

We will now quote from a letter that our Bro. Dun- 
ning wrote to the secretary-treasurer while on the 
train en route for the ship that was to carry him to the 
field chosen for his life's work: 



"Well, we are on our way. Parting is hard, but the 
purpose is glorious and He giveth more grace. We 
have just experienced the hard part of missionary 
work, leaving home; but praise His name, He has 
promised joy and contentment, not only to us, but 
especially to those loved ones that we leave behind . . . 

..I am more than glad that the board did not advance 
us our outfit money. MARGUERITE AND I ARE EN- 
TIRELY IN SYMPATHY WITH THE PLAN OF LET- 
TING THE MISSIONARY MASS HIS OWN OUTFIT. 

We both believe that the way God has supplied our 
outfit in such short order is a great evidence that He 
is behind our outgoing at this time. Other mission- 
aries also, upon seeing how marvelously God was meet- 
ing our needs, have said 'Amen' to the above. I can 
assure you that we go forth with greater confidence 
than we would have if the board had advanced the 
outfit. 

"I have just finished making a check-up on our re- 
ceipts for outfit. Totalling everything, the Lord sent 
us 81,161.35 for our outfit in a little over two weeks' 
time! We do not know what others have said to people 
about our outfit needs. We do know that we have not 
asked anyone or any group of people for help. We 
have not even talked about it unless others first made 
known their desire to know. Yet, for some reason 
(His great grace and love), He has super-abounded 
toward us. Great is His faithfulness. He is a prayer- 
hearing and prayer-answering God. 

"We want to thank you again for your help and en- 
couragement. We appreciate your confidence in the 
Lord for us. He alone is sufficient for our spiritual, 
moral and temporal needs, and we appreciate your 
intercession on our behalf." 

Who shall say that our God does not answer prayer 
in a marvelous way for those that cast themselves 
upon Him? It seems quite evident that the favor of 
the Lord rests upon our Brother and Sister Dunning. 



Martyr Days Appear Again 

When the full story of the present world's confla- 
gration is written, the most amazing part of the story 
will have to do with missionary heroism throughout 
the world. Our brothers and sisters in Christ are the 
forgotten men and women of the hour, but the future 
will bring forth their glory. According to the Prophecy 
Monthly, a Christian Jew who was formerly superin- 
tendent at Brussels, Belgium, for the American Board 
of Missions to the Jews, is now languishing in a Nazi 
concentration camp. In this camp he is trying to con- 
tinue his work, pointing his brethren to Christ. A 
letter from him, which almost miraculously slipped 
through the lines, has been given publicity. In this 
letter he says: "I am here with about 40 brethren" 
(these are mostly his own converts from the Brussels 
mission i "and about 50 other non-Aryan Christians, 
to whom I am giving my spiritual attention, having 
many interviews in the service of the Lord, and hold- 
ing a public service every day. I can attend and ad- 
vance them in the teaching of the Lord. 

"My situation here is very hard. We are lying here 
in very bad barracks on straw. The walls are broken 
and when the mistral east wind storms" (a sand 
storm ) "we are getting always covered with sand. Dur- 
ing the day time it is very hot, and at night we have 
terrible cold. This coldness which comes from the 
ground has made me sick. I have terrible pains in 
by kidneys and chest. From day to day I am getting 
weaker, very often I cannot get up in the morning. 
With all my troubles I do my duty, just like in Brussels. 
I have my meetings and I give from the little I have 
to my comrades. 

"From my poor wife, I know nothing! Alas! Please 
pray for us, that the Lord will deliver us and guide 



FEBRUARY 1, 1941 



us together. The Word of the Lord is every day my 
great consolation. Excuse my fault, I am not in pos- 
session of all my faculties. I must write this letter on 
my knees, we have no table." 



The Black Horse Threatens to Ride 

Nearer and nearer the awful famine, which in the 
first place God's Word foretells, and in the second 
place was recently prophesied by Ex-President Herbert 
Hoover, who of all men understands the world's food 
problem best, comes on apace. The Nazi government 
in Germany tries to make the world believe that it has 
no food problem. However, facts are leaking out from 
Germany that compel us to believe that Germany has 
a tremendous food problem and has to face it in the 
very near future. As far back as Nov. 11, the Time 
magazine contained the following report as to food 
conditions in Germany: 

"To a war menu which already included fish-fed 
poultry, decrepit horses, goats and numerous zoo ani- 
mals, Germany last week added those of its dogs which 
had not been killed by an earlier decree to save food. 
A new law, effective January 1, states that dogs, 
wolves, foxes, bears, badgers and wild hogs have been 
legalized as meat. After being inspected for trichina, 
their carcasses will be dressed, stamped and distrib- 
uted to butchers for rationing to general consumers. 
Of European dog breeds, the German Dachshund is 
considered the most succulent. Cat, known as 'roof 
rabbit,' is like rabbit, except sweeter and tougher. Gen- 
eral cosumers in Germany get only old horses for food 
because the younger ones go to the army." 

Well, brother, it may cost something to be a real 
Christian. You cannot be a Christian and refuse to 
support Christian enterprise. But the cost of sin is 
infinitely greater. A world staggering under debt, and 
sinking deeper into it every day, and a world whose 
oceans and rivers are running red with blood and 
whose land is being fertilized with humanity — a world 
that is facing famine and death as it never has faced 
it in its history — is bearing eloquent yet awful testi- 
mony as to the cost of sin. "It pays to serve Jesus." 



"Trusting as the Bullets Fly" 

A religious magazine, bearing the name Elim Evangel 
of London, in its issue of Oct. 21, apologized for being 
unable to produce the Elim Evangel for two weeks, due 
to air raid damage. On the same pages in which it 
made this apology appeared the words: 

"Trusting as the bullets fly 
Trusting as the flames go by, 
Trusting as the bombs do fall, 
Trusting Jesus, that is all." 

British Christians certainly are beginning to know 
the meaning of a real trust in the Lord Jesus Christ. 
We are told that the presses of the Elim Evangel "are 
now going full speed again." The Lord may permit 
His people to be sorely tried, but in the end they'll win 
the battle. 




JbcUhf Manna 

READ YOUR 

BIBLE 



THROUGH IN '41 



This schedule for reading the Bible through in a year began in the 
issue of Dec. 28, 1940. For previous readings, see former copies of 
The Brethren Missionary Herald. Begin reading at Gen. 1:1, read 
until the first text is found, and record the reference. The next day 
begin reading where you left off the day before, find the text for 
that day, and record the reference. By continuing this you shall 
have read the Bible through in a year. 



Day 



Text 



Reference 



29 He hath filled him with the spirit of God 

30 He made the holy annotating oil, and the pure 
incense of sweet spices 

31 The glory of the Lord filled the tabernacle 

32 He shall lay his hand upon the head of the sin 
offering 

33 His own hands shall bring the offering of the 

Lord 

34 Do not drink wine or strong drink 

35 The priest shall pronounce him clean — 



GRACE 

Dr. V. C. Kelford 



Mercy overlooks the sin 
And sets the guilty free. 

A holy God condoning sin- 
That can never be. 

Justice calls for punishment, 

And that is death for sin. 
If justice is to be our lot, 

Then none may dwell with Him. 

The righteousness of God's at stake 

As well as our salvation, 
And mortal mind no way could find 

To bring a right relation. 

Praise God! He made a way 

For all who come repenting 
His mercy with His justice joined, 

God graciously assenting. 

His righteousness He gave to me; 

He took my guilt and shame. 
Through matchless grace — and grace alone- 

I bear my Father's name. 



—5- 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



THE FOREIGN MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF THE BRETHREN CHURCH 

FINANCIAL REPORT— JULY 16, 1940 - DECEMBER 31, 1940 

(See Editorial on Page 2) 

"EASTER OFFERING" 



The letters given throughout this 
report indicate as to what special 
funds money has been given: 

abh— African Baby Hospital, 
abt— African Bible Translation, 
acb— African Central Bible School 
ah— African Hospital, 
al — African Leper. 
ane— African Native Evangelist, 
asf— African Special Funds, 
asa— African Student's Aid. 
bh— Bethany Home, 
b — Bickel. 

bmh— Brethren Missionary Her- 
ald. 



(Concluded) 

by — Byron. 

c — Crawford. 

d — Dunning. 

e — Emmert. 

f — Foster. 

gb — Gribble Book. 

g — Gribble. 

h — Hathaway. 

j — Jobson. 

k — Kennedy. 

kl — Kliever. 

m — Miller. 

mo — Morrill. 

my — Myers. 

sh — Sheldon. 



sn — Snyder. 

sbt — South American Bible and 
Tract. 

sab — South American Building. 

sah — South American Helper's 
Children. 

sas — South American Special. 

saf — South American Student's 
Aid. 

ta — Taber. 

ty — Tyson. 

un — Undesignated. 

w — Wagner. 

wi — Williams. 



BRETHREN FOREIGN MISSIONARY DIRECTORY 



Address: 433 Rivadovia, Rio Cuarto, Prov. Cordoba, Argentina, 
South America 

Rev. and Mrs. J. Paul Dowdy. 
Rev. and Mrs. Hill Maconaghy. 

AFRICA 

Address: Yaloke, par Boali, par Bangui, Oubangui-Chari, 

French Equatorial Africa. 

Dr. and Mrs. Floyd W. Taber 

Miss Elizabeth Tyson. 

*Dr. Florence N. Gribble. 

*Rev. and Mrs. Harold L. Dunning. 

Address: Bassai, par Bozoum, par Bangui, Oubangui-Chari, 
French Equatorial Africa. 

Miss Estella Myers. 
Miss Mabel Crawford. 

Address: Bellevue, par Bassangoa, par Bangui, Oubangui-Chari, 
French Equatorial Africa. 

Rev. and Mrs. Chauncey B. Sheldon. 
Miss Florence Bickel. 

Address: Bekoro (Be-Miller Station!, par Bozoum, par Bangui, 
Oubangui-Chari, F. E. A. 

Rev. and Mrs. J. P. Kliever. 



Address: Bouca, par Bangui, Oubangui-Chari, 
French Equatorial Africa. 

Rev. and Mrs. Joseph H. Foster. 
Address: Bozoum, par Bangui, Oubangui-Chari, 
French Equatorial Africa. 

Rev. and Mrs. Orville D. Jobson. 
*Dr. Florence N. Gribble (present mailing address, Field of 
work to be determined). 

*Rev. and Mrs. Harold L. Dunning (Present mailing address, 
Field of work to be determined.) 

MISSIONARIES UNDER APPOINTMENT FOR AFRICA AND 
AWAITING TRANSPORTATION 

Rev. and Mrs. Robert S. Wiiliam, 251 Grande Allee, Quebec, Prov. 

Quebec, Canada. 
Miss Ruth Snyder, 120 Bergemont, Quebec, P.Q., Canada. 

MISSIONARIES ON FURLOUGH 

Miss Grace Byron, 1 Park Lane, Apt. 4A, % Mrs. G. 0. Markuson, 

Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 
Rev. & Mrs. J. W. Hathaway, 524 First St., Fillmore, Calif. 
Rev. & Mrs. Curtis G. Morrill, 725 Fairbanks St., Ashland, Ohio. 
Mrs. Minnie Kennedy, % Miss Louise Schwab, Hatboro, Penna. 
Miss Mary Emmert, % Mr. A. Emmert, Dallas Center, la. 
Rev. & Mrs. Clarence L. Sickel, 5517 Lewis Ave, Long Beach, Calif. 



S. A. Africa Total 



Dallas Center, Iowa 
Bartlett, Mrs. K. 



Tarter. Mr, Mrs. G. 10.00 
Cook, Rev., Mrs. J. 0.00 
Emmert, 

Mr.. Mrs. A. 20.00 
Fitz, Mrs. E. R. 
Good. Mrs. Ida 2.50 

Grief, Mr., Mrs. C. 5.00 
Gring. Mr., Mrs. J. 
Hawbaker, Mr., Mrs. N. 
Herr, Mr., Mrs. I. W. 
Hoover, Mr., Mrs. 
Justice, Flo 

Robinson, Mr.. Mrs. E 
Royer, Mr.. Mrs. C. 10.00 
Sunday School 12.61 

Miscellaneous 47.57 



1.00 


1] 


3.0 






sh 


3 mi 






ah 


S.00 


15.00 

10.00 

5.00 

20.00 




e 


5.00 




2.50 






5.00 


5.00 






10 00 




fi 


15.00 


15.00 


5.00 






5.00 






5.00 






e 


15.00 


15.00 


1.00 


sh 


1.00 






ah 


3.00 


5.00 




e 


5.50 


10.00 
12.81 
47.57 



Total 



$112.08 S 14.50 S 89.50 8210. OS 



Church 

Garwin, Iowa 

Cooper, James 
Dohson. Mr.. Mrs, C 
Hall, Micah 
Hall. Mrs. Fetter 
Lowry, Mrs. Perl 
Parks. Rev. .Mrs. It 
Richards. Miss E. 
Richards, Miss G. 
Thurston, Mr.. Mrs. G. 
YVinterowd, Mrs. C. 
W. M. C. 
S. M. M. 
Sunday School 
Miscellaneous 



General S. A. Africa Total 



Totals 



5.00 


5.00 


my 5.00 


5.00 


al 5.00 


5.00 


sbt 5.00 


: 


f 10.00 


10.00 


m 5.00 


5.00 


ah 5.00 


5.00 


ty 15.00 


15.00 


ah 5.00 


5.00 


s 5.00 


5.00 


tf 5.00 


5.00 


m 5.00 


5.00 


ane 5.00 


5.00 


tf 5.70 


5.70 


8 15.00 S 70.70 


8 85.70 



Miscellaneous Funds 

Richards. Miss Goldie to American 
Board of Missions to the Jews 



Church General 

(Los Angeles Work) 
Parks, Rev. and Mrs. H. 
Pearson's Sailor "Work 

Total 

Leon, Iowa 
Bunch. Miss Ethel 
Bunch, Miss Letha 
Chambers. Mrs. G. 
Garber, Miss Anga 
Newlin, Mr., Mrs. M. 



Taber, Pev. M. 
Taber. Mrs. M. 
Senior C. E. 
Junior C. E. 
Sunday School 
Church 



S. to 





Africa 


Total 
9.00 

8.00 




8102.70 


fa 


5.00 


5.00 


U 


5.00 


5.00 


tA 


5.00 


5.00 


kl 


5.00 


5.00 


ta 


2.00 




fi 


2.00 




B 


1.00 


5.00 


ta 


5 00 


5 00 


ta 


5.00 


5.00 


kl 


S.20 


8.20 


kl 


1.50 


1.50 




23.16 


23.16 




S.00 


11.90 



:.30 8 1.60 8 75.86 S 79.70 



—6— 



FEBRUARY 1, 1941 



General S. A. Africa 



Udell, Iowa 
Price, Jos. A. 

Totals 
Waterloo, Iowa 
Alderman, 

Mr., Mrs. J 
Beal, Rev. J. O. 
Burkhart, Mrs. C 
Deits, D, fam. 
Fike, Mr., Mrs. N 
Hady, Mrs. Maude 
Hay, Graham 
Lung, Mr., Mrs. L. 
Meyers, Mr., Mrs. J 
Miller 

Mr., Mrs. C. 
Peck, Mrs. M. 6. 
Pollard, MissG. A. 
Sohrock, 

Mr., Mrs. E. B. 
Schrock, 

Mr., Mrs. E. J. 
Sehrock, 

Mr., Mrs. V. W. 
Smith, Mr., Mrs. M 
Sorenson, Mrs. N. 
Strock, O. L. 
Wengard, Mrs. B 
W. M. C. 
Miscellaneous 



2.00 



10.00 

100.00 

5.00 

35.00 

5.00 

10.00 

10.00 

5.00 

100.00 
0.00 
5.00 

5.00 

25.00 

10.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
10.00 
21.74 



5.00 



Totals 



S3S2.74 



Total 


2.00 


$ 2.00 


10.00 


100.00 


5.00 


5.00 


35.00 


5.00 


10.00 


10.00 


5.00 


100.00 


6.00 


5.00 


5.00 


25.00 


10.00 


5.00 


5.00 


5.00 


5.00 


10.00 


24.74 





General S. A. 



General S. A. 



$ 8.00 $300.74 



Correll, Mrs. W. 

Crawford, 

Mr., Mrs. W. G. 

Frase, J. C. 
Guiley, 

Mr., Mrs. W. 
Guittar, Paul 
Heaston, 

Mr., Mrs. H. A. 
Himes, Mr., Mrs. T. 
Kidder, Mrs A. B. 
Lope, Mr., Mrs. R. 
Marsh, June 
Meiser, Mr., Mrs. G 
Myers, Mr., Mrs. H. 

and Melvin 
Robinson, 

Mr., Mrs. A. Y. 
Robinson, Leah 
Robinson, Rebecca 
Rice, Mrs. D. E. 
Shaffer, Mrs. G. 
Smith, Mr., Mrs. R. 
Snyder, Miss V. 
Sutek, Miss M. 
Stump, T. M. 
Primary Dept. 
Jr. Miss. "Women 
W. M. C. 
Y. P. S. C. E. 
Miscellaneous 



5.00 

20.00 
2.50 

5.00 

5.00 

5.00 

10.00 

5.00 

7.00 

10.00 



5.00 
5.00 
5.00 

30.00 
5.65 
5.00 

22.13 

8.00 



kl 5.00 
g 5.00 



;.00 
;.00 



kl 5.00 



kl 10.00 
kl 5.00 



10.00 
5.00 

20.00 
5.00 

5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
10.00 
5.00 
5.00 

7.00 

10.00 

10.00 

5.00 

5.00 

5.00 

5.00 

30.00 

5.65 

5.00 

22.13 

25.00 

8.00 

5.00 

86.24 



EAST CENTRAL DISTRICT 



Akron (Ellet) Ohio 
Flatten, Miss M. 



Hayes, Mr., Mrs. R. 

and family 
Hoyt, Mr., Mrs. H. 
Mi'I'lintic, Mrs. E. 

J. & Bobby 
Misbler, Miss M. 

Smith, Mrs. M. 
Smith, Mr., Mrs. H. 
Wallace, Mr., Mrs. I 
Junior G. E. 
Jr. W. M. O. 
Y. P. C. E. 
Thomas, Mr., Mrs. C 
Banks 
Miscellaneous 



mac 5.00 al 



10.00 
35.00 



2.50 



sn 1 
kl 

sn 1 
kl 



5.00 
5.00 
2.50 

0.00 
4.50 
7.00 
5.00 
2.50 

4.00 



10.00 

10.00 
35.00 

25.00 

10.00 
5.00 
5.00 

10.00 
4.50 

17.00 
5.00 
5.00 

22. S3 
9.75 



Totals 



$103.58 $ 10.00 $ 60.50 $174. OS 



North Hill Station Sunday School (Akron, 
Braucher, 

Mr., Mrs. W. D. 5.00 
Hancock, 

Mr. Mre. K. E. 6.00 

Cole, Mr., Mrs. E. 4.00 



Ohio) 
5.00 



6.00 
4.00 



Totals 



15.00 



$ 15.00 



Ohio 



Ankenytown, 
Beal, 

Mr., Mrs. C. un 
Beohtel, Mr H. u 
Bechtel, Mrs H. 
Bechtel Miss L. 
Brubaker, 

Mrs. Rite 
Cook, Iva 
Guthrie, 

Mr., Mrs. J. 
Guthrie, Mrs. E 
Guthrie, W. 
Leedy, O. J. 
Leedy, W. H. 
McMillen, 

Mrs. Rilla 
Moses, W. S. 
Birthday 

Offering 
Miscellaneous 



un 



un 



5.00 

10.00 

5.00 

5.00 

10.00 
7.00 

5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 

5.00 
5.00 

6.51 

26.49 



5.00 

10.00 

5.00 

5.00 

10.00 
7.00 

5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 

5.00 
5.00 

0.51 
26.49 



Totals 



S25S.52 $ 



.00 $ 82.50 $340.02 



Cleveland, Ohio 
Clum, Mr., Mrs. R. 
Cole, Mr., Mrs. H. 
Davis, Mr. Mrs. L. 
Feathers. 

Mr., Mrs. Geo. 
Hammers, 

Rev., Mrs. Tom 
Link, Mr., Mrs. S. '. 
McAdoo. 

Mr., Mrs. H. 
Peck, Mr., Mrs. G. 
Peer. Mr., Mrs. G. 
Such, Mr., Mrs. H. 
Wearer. Mass H. 
W. M. C. 
Y. P. C. E. 
Y. P. Bible CI. 
Young Married 

People's CI. 
A Friend 
Biblo School 
Miscellaneous 
Church 



10.00 
5.00 
5.00 

5.00 

10.00 
00.00 

10.00 
22.00 
10.00 
5.00 
5.00 
10.00 

10.08 

n 07 

20.00 
9.90 

25.75 
5.82 



10.00 
5.00 
5.00 



10.00 
200.00 

10.00 
22.00 
10.00 
5.00 
5.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.08 

9,07 

20.00 

9.90 

25.75 



Totals 



$385.82 



$ 10.00 $395.8: 



Fremont, Ohio 
Decker, Mrs. R 
Gonaweiu, Mrs. G. 
Hague, Mr., Mrs. F. 
Simmons, P. J. 
Voss, Mrs. J & Elsie 
Winters, Mrs. O. 
Church 



5.00 
in nil 
5.00 
5.90 
5.00 
10.00 
5.00 



Totals 



$ 40.50 



5.00 
10.00 
5.00 
5.90 
5.00 
10 00 
5.00 

$ 46.50 



Totals 



$110.00 



Ashland, (West 10th Street) 

Allliouse, Miss G. 

Massie, Raymond 6.00 

Ballou, Golda 5.00 

Fry, Viola 5.00 

Garber, Mrs. L. 20.00 
Greenlun, 

Mr., Mrs. R. M. 20.00 
Mayes, Rev. C. 

W., family 10.00 

Weaver, Daisy 7.00 
Miscl. Church 

& Bible School 7.41 



Ohio 
ah ! 



Danville, Ohio 
Banbury, Mrs. H. 
Conrad, 

Mr., Mrs. D. 
Magers, 

Mr., Mrs. R. 
Wi,."ia, Nellie 
McElroy 

Mr., Mrs. Basil 
Wheaton. Mrs. 

Sina, daughter 
Williams. Mrs. E. 
Wolford. L. A. 

and family 
Sherman, Mrs. M 
Miscellaneous 

Totals 



10.00 
20.00 



5.00 
5.00 

5.00 
10.00 
2.00 

$102.00 



10.00 
10.00 



10.00 
20.00 



5.00 
5.00 

5.00 

10.00 
8.00 



mo 6.00 

$ 0.00 $108.00 





20.00 




20.00 


Boettler, Mrs. M. 




kl 5.00 


5.00 


Brown, Mrs. T. 


5.00 




5.00 


Etoush, Ella 


5.00 




5.00 


Royer, Mr., Mrs. D. 




10.00 


10.00 










J. C.& Richard 




kl 15.00 


15.00 


Y. P. C. E. 




kl 5.00 


5.00 


Sunday School 




kl 12.94 


12.94 




21.35 


2.00 4.00 








kl 2.50 


29.85 






7.00 


7.00 


No Name 


20.00 




20.00 


No Name 


20.00 




20.00 


Totals $ 


91.35 $ 


2.00 $ 01.44 


$154.79 


Rittman, Ohio 








Armstrong, 
Mr., Mrs. W. 


10.00 




10.00 


Baker, Mr., Mrs. C. 


7.00 




24.00 


Blatter, Miss Eula 


24.00 




Blatter, 






15.00 


Mr., Mrs. F. V. 


15.00 




Blatter. 






15.00 


Mr., Mrs. J. A. 


15.00 




Blatter, 








Mr., Mrs. M. J. 


0.75 






Brickel, Mr., Mrs. F 


. 6.00 






Castor. Chas. E. 


0.00 




6.00 


Fritz. Miss Mary 


5.50 






Grubb, 






35.00 




35.00 




Hoover, Mis.:. Floy 


10.50 




10 50 










Mr., Mrs. F. 


13.00 




13.00 


Hoover, Miss G. 


8.00 




8.00 










Mr., Mrs. L. 


20.00 




20.00 


Kosier Mrs. V. 


10.00 




10.00 


Kunkler, 








Mr., Mrs. C. 


10.00 




10.00 


Moine, A. C. 


5.00 




5.00 


Moomaw, 








Mr., Mrs. C. C. 


25.00 




25.00 


Slaybaugh, Mrs. T. 


11.10 




11.10 


Miscellaneous 


47.32 


mo 14.20 


61.52 


Totals $ 


200.17 


$ 14.20 


$304.37 


Sterling, Ohio 










mo 25.00 


25.00 


Beery, Mr., Mrs. E. 




mo 20.00 


20.00 


Beery, Miss Mary 




mo 5.00 




Beery, Neil, Dale 




mo 5.00 




Close, Buddy 




mo 5.00 




Close, Mr., Mrs. I. L. 


mo 15.00 




Hartzler, Mr., Mrs. 


H. 


mo. 25.00 








mo 5.00 


5.00 






mo. 5.00 


5.00 


Hubacher, Mable 




mo 5.00 


5.00 


Hubacher, Raymond 


mo. 5.00 


5.00 


Kuhn, Miss Bertha 




mo 20.00 


20.00 






mo 5.00 


5.00 


Kuhn, Miss Ruby 




mo 15.00 


15.00 


Moine, Mr., Mrs. Ed. 


mo 25.00 


25.00 


Moine, Mr., Mrs. F. 


E. 


mo 25.00 


25.00 


Norton, Mrs. R. S. 




mo 5.00 


5.00 


Rogers, Mr., Mrs. C 




mo 5.00 


5.00 


Sterner, Miss Betty 


mo 5.00 


5.00 


Steiner, Miss Martha 


mo 5.00 


5.00 


Steiner, Mr., Mrs. R. 


mo 10.00 


10.00 


Wheeler. Mr., Mrs. 


N. 


mo 5.00 


5.00 


Winter, Mr., Mrs. 1 


B. 


mo 10.00 


10.00 


A Friend 




mo 10.00 


10.00 






mo 5.00 


5.00 


A Friend 




mo 5.00 


5.00 


Sunbeam S.S. Class 




mo 7.25 


7.25 


Birthday Offering 




mo 22.60 


22.00 


Sunday School 




mo 57.13 


57.13 


Miscellaneous 




mo 10.50 


16.56 



Totals 



$135.41 



Canton, Ohio 
Allen, Wm. 
Beachey, 

Mr. , Mrs. E. 
Bell, Mr., Mrs. L. 



5.00 
5.00 



Homerville, (West Homer) 
Correll, Mr., Mrs. J. 
Davis, Rev., Mrs. P. 3.00 
Hastings. 

Mr., Mrs. E. 

Hopkins, 

Mr., Mrs. Roy 15.00 
Keyser, Mr., Mrs. L. 5.00 
McDaniels 

Mr., Mrs. H. 5.00 

McFerren 

Mr., Mrs. G. 5.00 

Miscellaneous 20.00 

Trapp, Mr., Mrs. O. 



Ohio 

mac' ~ 



i.00 
1.00 



25.00 
5.00 



11.00 mol2.00 
f 12.00 



15.00 
10.00 



5.00 



mo 5.00 



10.00 
20.00 



sh 5.00 

g 15.00 35.00 



S37S.54 $378.54 



Wooster, Ohio 
Arnold, Mr.. Mrs. P. 
Johnson, Mr., Mrs. J. 
Martin, Wm. C. 
Messmore, Miss T. 
Palmer, Mr.. Mrs. H. 
Squires, Mr., Mrs. J. 
Miscellaneous 



10.00 

4.00 

mac S.00 



15.00 
5.00 
4.00 

d 15.00 
.00 

9.00 



25.00 
5.00 
8.00 
8.00 

15.00 

III llll 

9.00 



Totals 



$ 27.00 $ 53.00 $ 80.00 



50.00 167.00 



INDIANA DISTRICT 

Berne, Indiana 

Agler, Mr. G. 2.50 

Bailey. Miss Alice 5.00 

Bollenbacher, 

Mr. Chalmer 5.00 

Christy, Miss E. 10.00 

Christy, Miss Eloise 15.00 
Christy, Mr., Mrs. R. 5.00 
Dudgeon, Miss B. 5.00 

Egley, Mr. S. S. 5.00 

Fetters, Mr. B. C. 25.00 
Juillerat. 

Mr., Mrs. E. R. 5.00 
Kuhn, Miss Elsie 10.00 
Kauffman, Mr. K. 15.00 



5.00 
5.00 

5.00 

10.00 

15.00 

5.00 

5 00 

5.00 

25.00 

5.00 
10.00 
15.00 



—7— 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



General S. A. 



Kauffman, Mrs. K. 


15.00 


Kuhn, Mr. J. 


10.00 


Kuhn, Mr.. Mrs. V. 


30.00 


Kuhn, Mrs. J. 


10.00 


Leininger, Miss G. 


5.00 


Leininger, Mrs. S. 


5.00 


Leininger, Mr. 6. J 


5.00 


Leichty, Mrs. R. 


5.00 


Leistner. Mrs. J. 


6.00 


Myers. Mr., Mrs. G 


10.00 


Parr, Mr. Archie 


15 ii" 


Parr, Mrs. Archie 


10.00 


Parr, Mrs. Bert 


5.00 


Parr, Mr. Bert 


10.00 


Parr, Rev.John 




and family 


25.00 


Parr, Keith 




Parr, Marcus 


17.00 


Parr, Margaret 




Parr, Robert 




Riesen, Mr. .Mrs. G 


5.00 


Sipe, Mr., Mrs. 0. 


211 Mil 


Sipe. Miss Naomi 


5.03 


Smitley, 




Mr. Mrs. A. H. 


10.00 


Smitley, Mrs. W. 


10.00 


Smitley, Mr C. 


10.00 


Smitley, Mrs. C. 


5.00 


Smitley, Mr. C. 


5.00 


Sprunger, Mrs. I. 


10.00 


Stephenson. Mrs. C 


5.00 


WitteT, Lorys 


5.00 


Witter, Mrs. R. 


50.00 


Women's CI. No. 


a 5.oo 


S. M. M. 


5.00 


Church 


316.97 



Africa Totat 

15.00 

10.00 

30.00 

10.00 

5.00 

5.00 

5.00 

5.00 

6.00 

10.00 

15.00 

10.00 

5.00 10.00 

10.00 





25.00 


5.00 


5.00 




17.00 


5.00 


5.00 


5.00 


5.00 




5.00 




20.00 




5.03 



10.00 

10.00 

10.00 

5.00 

5.00 

10.00 

5.00 

5.00 

50.00 

5.00 

5.00 

310.07 



$862.50 



$ 22.50 $885.00 



Miscellaneous Funds 

Church, to Pearson's Sailor Work 



Bunker Hill, (Lorse) Indiana 
Church 



Flora, Indiana 

Clingenpeel, 

Mr., Mrs. Leon 5.00 
Dvson, Wilbur 10.00 

Fife. Mr. Mrs. L. 20.00 
Fisher, Mr. Melvin 5.00 
Hanna, Mr.Mrs. H. 25.00 
Jordan. Mrs. Jennie 5.00 
Hendrix, Mr., Mrs. 5.00 
Landis. Mr., Mrs. R. . 
Mahan. Mrs Laura 5,00 
Mver, Mr.. Mrs. D. 50.00 
Mver, Mr.. Mrs B.A. 5 00 
RempeP Mr Henry 5 00 
Rice. Mr, Mrs. F. 5.00 
Robertson, Mr., Mrs. 

Wnndrow 10.00 

Roskuski Mrs. S. 
Toler. Mnry M. 5.00 

W. M. C. 6.10 

Church & S.S. 44.66 

Church 



Totals 



Fort Wayne, Indiana 
AUshouse. Mi«s G. 
Agler, Mr . Mrs. C. 10 00 
Armey. Mr. R. G. 36 00 
Armey. M-^s Suzette 5 00 



Armey. Miss V. 


15.00 


Beberstein, 




Mr.. Mrs. H A. 


3.00 


Blough. Miss J. 


25 00 


Blnugh. Mr R. 


10.00 


Elder. Mr.. Mrs. 




Ben Jk dnughter 


8.00 


Etter, Mr., Mrs. A 


5.00 


Evans, Mis. C. T>. 


5.00 


Funk. Mr.. Mrs. L. 


15.00 


Grasberger. Rubv 


12.50 


Hoover, Mrs H. 


5.00 


HudcUeson, Mrs. G 


5 00 


Raster, Mr., Mrs. K 


6.00 


Kerns, Delia A. 


10.00 


Kerns, Mr. F. A. 


20.00 


Kerns, Mrs. R. 




& Marv Alice 


0.00 


Kimmel. Miss L. 


3 5.00 


Kuhn. Miss G. G 


5.00 


Logan, O. L. 


5.00 


Miller. Carl 


6.00 


Miller, Howard 




(In memory ) 


5.00 


Miller. Marjorie A 


in 


(In Memory) 


5.00 


Miller, Martha 


13.00 


Miller, Mary C. 


10.00 


Miller,, Paul, Jr. 


10.00 


Miller, Warde 


10.00 


Miller, Wesley H. 


6.00 


Myers, Miss Irene 


5.00 


Nelson, Mr., Mrs. A 


. 1.00 



$ 3.00 $ 3.00 



5.00 

10.00 

20.00 

5.00 

25.00 

5.00 

5.00 

10.00 

5.00 

50.00 

5.00 

5.00 

5.00 

10 00 
15.00 
5.00 
6.16 
44 66 
16.80 



$ 210.82 $ 5.00 $ 36.80 252.62 



10.00 



155 00 

10 00 

36 nn 

5 no 

15.00 

5.00 
25,00 
10.00 

s. no 

5.00 

5.00 
15.00 

12.50 
5.00 

n. no 

o.nn 

moo 

20.00 

0.00 
35.00 
5.00 
5.00 
6.00 

5.00 

5.00 
13.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
6.00 
5.00 
21.00 



General S. A. 



Africa Total 



Osborn, Mr., Mrs. J. 0.00 



°olman, Miss E. 

I'olman, Mr. G 
'olman, Joyce 
'olman, Mr. Leo 

Polman, Mrs. Leo 

Riesen, Mr., Mrs.G. 

Uay, Floyd, Howard 



10.00 
10.00 
5.00 
15.00 
15.00 

111 llll 

6.00 



5.00 
5.00 



kl 
kl 

kl 



5.00 
5.00 
5.00 



Seibert, Mrs. Dan 10.00 
Springer, Mrs. June 5.25 
Stevens, Mrs. B. 25.00 
Thiemes, Mr., Mrs. 5.00 



Virts, Mrs. Earl 
Yaney, Mr., Mrs.M. 
W. M. S. 
1. M. F. Club 
S. M. M. 
Tumor C. E. 
Y. P. C. E. 
Adult C. E. 
Church 

Sunday School 
S. S. Birthday Off. 



5.00 
15.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 



30.62 

20.83 

4.46 



kl 16.00 

kl 5.00 

kl. 10.00 

0.93 



Totals 



$535.06 $20.00 $217.93 $790.59 



Miscellaneous Funds 
Oriental Prayer Band 
to Oriental Miss. So. 



$844.39 



Goshen, Indiana 
Hoover, Claude H. 



Totals 



$17.00 



$ 17.00 



Lake Odessa, (Campbell Brethren) 

Ularding, Mr.. Mrs. 

Carey, Mr. G. A. 25.00 

Clum, Mr. Lewis 5.00 

Darby, Mr. Mrs. C.F. 

Darby, Miss M. 5.00 

Groff, Mr., Mrs. H. 0.00 

Groff, Lelah 8.00 

Henney, Alice 

-Tenney, 0. L. 

Henney, Mrs. Mary Lu 

Klopfenstine, Mrs. E. 

Miller, Mr., Mrs. L. 5.00 

Mote, Mr., Mrs. S. 15.00 

Nash, Mr., Mrs. C. 

Price, Mr., Mrs. R. 10.43 

W. M. C. 10.00 

Intercessory 

Prayer Band 5.00 

Miscellaneous 23.47 



;.oo 



.-, llll 

5.00 



2.50 



Michigan 
10.00 



s ,1,1 

5.00 



5.00 

5.00 

10.00 

5.00 

5.00 

5.00 



10.00 

25.00 

5.00 

10.00 

10.00 

6.00 

8.00 

5.00 

5.00 

Hi on 

10.00 

15.00 

15.00 

7.50 

10.43 

10.00 

5.00 
23.47 



Totals 



$117.90 $14.50 $ 58.00 $190.40 



New Troy, Michigan 
Williams, Mr., Mrs.R. 
Miscellaneous 



5.00 5.00 

20.38 20.38 



Totals 



Osceola, Indiana 
Johansen, William 50.00 
Williams, Mr.. Mrs.R. 



Schumacher, 

Mr.. Mrs. H. J. 
Miscellaneous 



5.00 
3.50 



m 5.00 
vi 12.60 



r.n.on 

5.00 



5.00 
10.10 



17.60 $ 76.10 



Peru, Indiana 
Ashman. 

Mr., Mrs. R. A. 15 
Comerford, Mrs. D. 
Gilbert, Mr., Mrs. L. 
Resting, Mrs. Paul 
Stuber, Mr., Mrs. J. 
Junior C. E. 
Berean Young People 
Altruist's B. Class 
Bible School 
Church 



6.00 

6.00 

\vi 5.00 

5.00 

kl 5.00 

kl 5.60 

kl 8.23 

wi 10.75 

18.25 

wi 15.35 



15.35 
6.00 
6.00 
5.00 

: 

5.00 
5.60 
8.23 

10.75 

33.00 



Totals 



$ 94. IS S 94.18 



Sharpsville, Indiana 
Stuber, Martha 
Church 



wi 10.00 10,00 
wi .51 .51 



Tntnls 



10.51 $ 10.51 



Sidney, Indiana 
Church 

Birthday Off. 8.13 



Totals 



$ 8.13 



$ 8.13 



South Bend, (River Park Mission) 
Balsley, Mr.,Mrs.A. 10.00 
Crawford 

Mr., Mrs. Frank 10.00 
Follis, Miss Doris 



10.00 



Church 



General S. A. 



Africa Total 



(memory of father) 
Irs. Jack Follis 
Herel, Mrs. Clarence 
Horner, Mr., Mrs.M. 
•villinn. Miss H. 10.00 
Miller, Mr., Mrs. I. 
Ruskuski, Mr.. Mrs. C. 
Sahli, Mr., Mrs. F. mac 

Witter, Mr., Mrs. A. 
Miscellaneous 3.22 



f 25.00 

f 5.00 

wi 5.00 

5.00 

10.00 

5.00 

wi 2.50 

10.00 

1.00 

d 3.00 



25.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 

10.00 

10.00 
5.00 
5.00 

10.00 



$ 33.22 $ 2.50 $ 71.50 $107.22 



Warsaw, Indiana 
Rlunehart, Mrs. G. 



my 12.50 

g 12.50 25.00 



25.00 S 25.00 



Indiana District 

Minear, Miss Lillie 5.00 



Totals 



.00 



MIDWEST DISTRICT 

Beaver City, Nebraska 
Kitchens, Mrs. Viva 



40.00 40.00 



Totals 



40.00 40.00 



Falls City, Nebraska 
Grush, Mr., Mrs. J. 



Kimmel, Mrs. S. 

Prichard, Mrs. H. J. 10.00 



5.00 wi 2.00 




5.00 


12.00 


5.00 5.00 


10.00 


10.00 10.00 


30.00 



$ 10.00 $20.00 $ 22.00 $ 



Mc Louth, Kansas 
Brethren Bible 
Study Club 
Church 



Ti. tils 



3.00 

13 mi 



$ 13.00 $ 16.00 



Portis. Kansas 
Brumbaugh. Dan 
Brumbaugh. Nettie 
Brumbaugh, Vera 
Brumbaugh, W. L. 
Cone, Geo., family 

Garner, Mr.. Mrs. T. 
Knoll, Charles 
Peterson. M. & E. 
Ratliff. Mrs. B. 
Smith. Mrs. Geo. 
Stewarts. The 
Sunday School 
Miscellaneous 



5.00 

5.10 





7 mi 


5.00 


5.00 


ni 10.00 


io no 




5.00 


3.00 




kl 7 00 


in nn 


wi 15 00 


2n.n0 


27.00 


27.00 


10.00 


io. on 




5 00 




5.10 


5.00 


5.00 


5.49 


5.49 


5.53 




g .50 


16.28 



$ 37.35 



$ 03.52 S130.S7 



NORTHERN CALIFORNIA DISTRICT 

Lothrop, California 



Church, per Sickel 

Total 



Manteca, California 
Church, per Sickel 



G.21 



Modesto, California 
Bowman. 
Mr., Mrs. 



Larson, 

Larson, 

Larson, 

Larson, 

Garber, 

W. M. 

S liar en brock 

Bible Schoo' 

Miscellaneous 

Totals 



A. E. io.no 



Mr. Geo. 
Hannah 
Frank 
Mrs. Frank 

Emery 
C. 

Geo. 



5.00 

wa 

wa 

wa 1 
6.50 

wa 

wa 1 
5.00 
S.50 



00 

fi 00 

80 

5.00 
4.00 



io no 


5 nn 


5.00 


6.00 


17.80 


6.50 


: 


14.00 


15.00 


16. S5 



S 45.00 $56.15 



Tracy, California 
Carter, Mrs. N. V. 20.00 
Clary, Mr. C. H. 5.00 
Coykendall, Mrs. H. 5.00 
Coykendall, 

Mr., Mrs.J. B. 5.00 
Coykendall. 

Mr.. Mr.;. K. 10.00 

Dempsey. Mr.,Mrs.H. 10.00 

Lehman. 

Mr., Mrs. W. R. 10.00 
Miller, Mr., Mrs. R. mac 10.00 



20.00 
5.00 
5.00 



in nn 

10.00 



10.00 
10.00 



-s— 



'FEBRUARY 1, 1941 



Church 



General S. A. Africa Total 



•pper, Mrs. G. E. 7.00 

■pper, Herbert 

imbo, Mr. Ralph 5.00 

imbo, Mrs. Ralph 5.00 

hopp, Mr., Mrs.P. 5.00 

ampler, Mrs. Alice 5.00 

. M. O. 5.00 

,nks, 21.49 

rthday Offerings S.92 

isceilaneous 15.85 s 3.45 



5.00 f 10.00 
3.00 ta 5.00 



22.00 
8.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 

21.49 
8.92 

19.30 



Church 



General S. A. 



Baraca-Philathea 

Class 
Berean Class 
Busy Bee Class 
Primary Department 
No Name 
John 3:16 
Miscellaneous 



5.10 
0.00 



5.00 
23.35 



1.00 



Totals 



$133.26 $ 31.45 $15.00 $179.71 



Turlock, California 
Buekland, 

Mr., Mrs. N. J. 50.00 

I Miscellaneous 



50.00 
00.00 



Totals 


$ 50.00 


$ 60.00 


$110.00 


Tlory, Mrs. I. D. 




mo 50.00 


50.00 


Totals 




50.00 


50.00 



NORTHWEST DISTRICT 



Harrah, Washington 
Breding, H. C. 5.00 

Cuiver, S. C. 20.00 

Labbee, Luella 5.00 

Farton, Mr., Mrs. 

Harry & family 10.00 
Pickett, Mrs. V. 5.00 
Reuman, Clio 5.00 

Schanz, Mr., Mrs. F. 
Schanz, Mr., Mrs. J. 5.00 
Stover, Mr., Mrs. C. 5.00 
Stover, Mr.,Mrs.W. 15.00 
Sommers, Mrs. ^.lga 
Summers, 

Mr., Mrs. J. H. 25.00 
Wahers, Mr. Fred M. 
Kocher, Mr. Sam 
S. S. Birthday Off. 
Sunday School 16.21 



wi 


10.00 


ah 


25.00 

5.00 

12.74 



5.00 

20.00 

5.00 

10.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
15.00 
10.00 

25.00 
50.00 
5.00 
12.74 
16.21 



Totals 



$116.21 $25.00 $ 57.74 $198.95 



Sunnyside, Washington 
Allshouse, Miss Grace 
Ball, Mrs. Opal 7.00 

Bishop, Thomas 
Bishop, Vernon 
Bridgman, Mrs.N.E. 5.00 
Cable, Mrs. Lillian 
Chambers, 

Mr., Mrs. F. A. 15.00 
Chapman, E. E. 7.00 

Early, Elsie 5.00 

Faw, Mrs. J. W. 
Fuerst, Mr. Joe 25.00 
Fuerst, Mrs. John 2.00 
Goodman, Mrs. Ed 5.00 
Hadiey, Mr.,Mrs.D. 10.00 
Harris, Eleanor 5.00 

Mrs. Nettie 



3.00 
1.00 



5.00 
5.00 



7.00 
2.00 



Harris 
Harris, 
Heath, 
S. N. 
Hoffman, 
Hostetier, 



Vernon 
Mr., Mrs. 
& family 
Mrs. M. 
Mary 



5.00 

10.00 
15.00 
10.00 



Kennedy, Mr., Mrs.W. 
Kortmeier 

Mr., Mrs. H. A. 20.00 
Mackey, Mr., Mrs.H. 
Matheson, Mrs. J.W. 
Miller, Mr., Mrs. G. 25.00 
Miller, Noah, family 5.00 
Morgan, Mr., Mrs.E. 5.00 
Mowen, Mrs. Geo. 
Mowen, Mr.,Mrs.R. 10.00 
Muir, Mrs. T. R., 

& family 100.00 

Murray, E. & N. 
O'Neal, Mr. F. W. 5.00 
Padgham, C. H. 5.00 
Padgham, Mrs. C.H. 5.00 
Reed, Rev. E. W. 
Reed, Mrs. E. W. 
Reed, Miss Lucille 
Reed, Walter 
Reynolds, Mrs. R.F. 5.00 
Shockley, 

Mr., Mrs. Cecil 5.00 
Speck, Laura A. 5.00 
Speck, M. C. 75.00 

Strout, Esther 
Strout, Mr. J. L 
Turner, Ella Marie 
Trice, Mrs. Emma 5.00 
Turner, Mrs. Grace 
Turner, Bessie 
Turner, Mr.,Mrs.F. 30.00 
Turner, Ruth 
Weed, Mr., Mrs. J. 10.00 

Westcott. F. R. 
and Mabel 

Whitfield, R. W. 5.00 
Whitfield, Mrs. F.N. 4.00 
A Friend 
Dunning, Mr., Mrs. H. 



wi 10.00 



25.00 

10.00 

d 5.00 



wi 5.00 

al 5.00 

ah 6.25 

ab 6.65 



d 5.00 

i 10.00 

d 5.00 

d 15.00 
5.25 

d 8.25 
d 10.00 
g 5.00 

10.00 
g 10.00 



180.00 
5.00 
5.00 



150.00 
7.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 

15.00 
7.00 
5.00 

10.00 

25.00 
5.00 
5.00 

10.00 
5.00 

10.00 
5.00 

10.00 

15.00 

10.00 

5.00 

20.00 

25.00 

10.00 

30.00 

5.00 

5.00 

5.00 

10.00 

100.00 
6.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
6.25 
6.65 
5.00 

5.00 
5.00 

75.00 
5.00 

20.00 
5.00 
5.00 

15.00 
5.25 

30.00 



25.00 



20.00 

5.00 

6.00 

180.00 

10.00 



Sunday School 
Totals 



10.06 
5.00 



5.50 
1.00 



5.10 
7.50 
6.00 
10.06 
5.00 
5.00 

29. S5 
51.50 



51.50 



$529.95 $17.00 $575.46 1,122.41 



Church 



General S. A. 



(* This amount is for printing of Scripture Por 
tions.) 
Northwest District 
.\eihart Montana, S.S. 
^eufield, Mrs. J 1.00 



15.00 
kl 11.00 



15.00 
12.00 



Total 



$ 1.00 



S 20.00 $ 27.00 



OHIO DISTRICT 

Clayton, (Clayton Progressive Church) Ohio 

Bowser, Mis.-. ItUih 

Cashman, 

Kev., Mrs. A. D. kl 

Cashman, Edwin kl 

Lanuis, Mr., Mrs. R. 
Loffman, Mr. Chas. 
Royer, Mrs. Lawrence I. 
Shank, Ira J. 5.00 

Shank, Mr., Mrs. W. 
Seil'er, Mrs. W. A. 20.00 
Waymire, Miss Huth 5.00 
Weant, Mr. Frank 
Whiting, Mr., Mrs. B. 



5.00 

25.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 

10.00 



A Friend 
C. E. 
Miscellaneous 



5.00 

5.00 

mo 5.00 

d 5.00 

d 5.00 

d 67.00 



5.00 

25.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
10.00 
20.00 
5.00 
5.00 

10.00 
5.00 
5.00 

70.50 



$ 3S.50 



$152.00 $190.50 



Dayton, Ohio 
Abrat, Oscar 



15.00 

15.00 

5.00 



Aorat, Belle 
Abrat, Alice 
Alexander, 

Mr., Mrs. D. F. 5.00 
Baker, Mr., Mrs. W. 5.00 
Barnard, Miss D. 5.00 
Barnard, 

Dr., Mrs. R. D. 35.00 
Beatty, Mr., Mrs. O. 5.00 
Beeghley, Mrs. A. 15.00 
Blosser, Mr., Mrs. O. 8.25 
Boiender, Mr., Mrs. H. 5.00 
Buck, Miss Grace L. 

& Mrs. Teeter 13.85 
Burkett, L. T.,Dollie 
Campbell,* Mr., Mrs. 

Chas. & Billy 25.00 
Campbell, Mrs. E. 
Campbell, Mr., Mrs. 5.00 
Comer, Mr., Mrs. C. 5.00 
Deecer, Miss M. 18.00 

Diehl, Mr., Mrs. O. 5.00 
Drahan, 

Mr., Mrs. Geo. 26.50 
Ewing, Mrs Belle 5.00 
Grubbs, Mr., Mrs. A. 
Gallichio, Mrs. Joe 11.50 
Hacker, Mr. O. E. 10.00 
Haller, Mr., Mrs. H. 5.00 
Ham, Mr., Mrs. R. 5.00 
Hart, Miss Delight 3.50 
Hoover, Mr. Herbert 5.00 
Hoffman, 

Mr., Mrs. J. M. 10.00 
Hoover, 

Rev., Mrs. M. M. 10.00 
Jackson, Bertha, G. 5.00 
Kendig, I. 16.15 

King, Mr., Mrs. W. 25.00 
Kinsey, Miss Mabel SO.O'i 
Kinsey, Phyllis J. 5.00 
Kinsey, Mr., Mrs. R. 50.00 
Klepiner, Robert M. 5.00 
Long, Mr., Mrs. D. 
Longnecker, 

Dr., Mrs. E.W. 
Lutz, Mrs. Pearl 
Marshall, 

Mr., Mrs. E. E. 11.50 
Patterson, Mr., Mrs. 

R. A. & Dorothy 25.00 
Lentz, Mr., Mrs. O. 10.00 
Price, Mr., Mrs. J.V. 5.00 

Priser, Mr., Mrs. O. 10.00 4.40 
Pry, Mr. F.& family 5.26 
Rayburn, Mr.,Mrs.L. 5.00 1.00 
Reed, Mrs. Thelma 17.50 
Schaeff, H., family 12.00 
Shipley, 

Mrs. O. M., family 7.50 
Shomo, Mrs. Anna 5.00 
Trissel, Mr.,Mrs.R. 16.00 
Underwood, Mr. C. 5.00 
Welch, Mrs. Gladys 5.00 
Wogaman, 

Geo. & Carrie E. 10.00 



10.00 
1.00 



300.00 



S 5.00 
my 5.00 



M3.00 



10.00 



5.00 
5.75 



15.00 

15.00 

5.00 

5.00 

5.00 
5.00 

35.00 

5.00 

15.00 

18.25 

0.00 

13.85 
300.00 

25 00 
20.00 

5.00 
5.00 

28.00 
5 00 

26 50 
5.00 
5.00 

11.50 
1 1) 00 
5.00 
5.00 
6.50 
5. CO 



20.00 30.00 

10.00 
00 

10.35 
25.00 

:;o no 
5 oo 

50.00 

5.00 

10.00 

5.00 
5.75 

11.50 

25.00 

10.00 

5.00 

14.40 

5.26 

6.00 

17.50 

12.00 

7.50 
5.00 
16.00 
5.00 
5.00 

10.00 



Wolfe, Mr., Mrs. D. 

and Bobby 50.00 

Younce, Mrs. D. 7.00 

Yount, Mr., Mrs.C. 10.00 

Agarean Class 7.50 

Beginner's Dept. 12.00 

Boethian Class 37.30 

Cradle Roll 5.00 

Jun. S.S. Dept. 30.00 
Jun. High C. E. 

Sunday School 21.90 

Primary Dept. 16.01 
Gleaner's BibleClass 5.00 

WinOne Bible Class 25.00 
Woman's Bible 

Fellowship Club 

Miscellaneous 98.14 



kl 5.00 



»asf 36.00 
d 100.60 



50.00 

7.00 
10.00 

7.50 
12.00 
37.30 

5.00 
30.00 

5.00 
21.90 
16.01 

5.00 
25.00 

36.00 
198.74 



Totals 



.11 $12.40 $534.60 1,430.11 



New Lebanon, Ohio 
Blosser, Mr., Mrs.V. 5.00 
Denhnger, Mr. Mrs. 5.00 



Eck, Nora C. 
Wysong, Susie 
Miscellaneous 

Totals 



25.00 

5.00 

11.00 



5.00 
5.00 

25.00 
5.00 

11.00 

$ 51.00 



Pleasant Hill, Ohio 
Sunday School 21.00 



$ 21.00 



$ 21.00 



Ohio District 
Laughman, Mr. 
Middletown, Ohio 
Bible Class 

Totals 



1.00 
20.00 



1.00 
20.00 



$ 21.00 $ 21.00 



PENNSYLVANIA D 

Allentown, Pennsylvania 
Beige, Mrs. Paul 
Deifer, Mr., Mrs. G. 
Fennel, Clarence E. 
Feline], Miss Grace 
Gingrich, Rev., Mrs. J.L. 
Huffort, Mr., Mrs. J. 
Kamoie, Mr., Mrs. J. 
Kline, Mr. , Mrs. Anson S. 
Kunkel, Donald 
Kunkel, Mr., Mrs. R. 
Musselman, Mr., Mrs. W.P. 
Ogden, Mr., Mrs. John 
Oswald, Mr., Mrs. Willis 
Sohaffer, Mr., Mrs. Wm. H. 
Seagraves, Mr., Mrs. G. 
Silberman, Miss Elsie 
Silberman, Misses Ethel & Eileen 
Silberman, Mr., Mrs. Geo. 
Silberman, Miss Miriam 
Silberman, Mr., Mrs. Russell 
Zahn, Miss Kathryn A. 
Zahn, Mr., Mrs. Geo. 
Ambassadors 
Beginner's Dept. 
Excelsior Bible Class 
Intermediate Dept. 
Junior Dept. 

Nursery Cradle Roll Dept. 
Primary Dept. 
Senior Dept. 
Miscellaneous 



ta 


8.05 


8.05 


ta 


22.50 


22.50 


ta 


7.50 


7.50 


ta 


11.50 


11.50 


ta 


7.00 


7.00 


ta 


6.50 


6.50 


ta 


12.00 


12.00 


ta 


6.45 


6.45 


ta 


5.00 


5.00 


ta 


15.12 


15.12 


ta 


11.50 


11.50 


ta 


5.00 


5.00 


ta 


5.80 


5.80 


ta 


20.00 


20.00 


ta 


19.30 


19.30 


ta 


17.50 


17.50 


ta 


6.50 


6.50 


ta 


12.50 


12.50 


ta 


10.00 


10.00 


ta 


7.50 


7.50 


ta 


5.00 


5.00 


ta 


18.10 


18.10 


ta 


23.00 


23.00 


ta 


7.07 


7.07 


ta 


9.65 


9.65 


ta 


20.69 


20.09 


ta 


13.87 


13.87 


ta 


22.15 


22.15 


ta 


6.49 


6.49 


ta 


12.32 


12.32 


ta 


:2.23 




ty 


7.00 


49.23 



$404. S9 $404. S9 



Altoona, Pennsylvania 

Miscellaneous 
W. M. W. 



ty 12.33 
ty 5.00 



12.33 
5.00 



17.33 $ 17.33 



Conemaugh, Pennsylvania 
Anthony, Mr., Mrs. R. 
Brallier, 

Mr., Mrs. E. J. 30.00 
Custer, Mr., Mrs.H. 15.00 
Good, Mr., Mrs. J.C. 
Grove, Mr., Mrs. D. 5.00 
Grove, Mrs. Ellen 10.00 
Hamel, Mrs. Don 5.00 
Hildebrand, Mrs. I. 7.00 
Hildebrand, 

Mr., Mrs. Russell 10.00 
Hostetier, 

Mr., Mrs. Allen 10.00 
Keilen, Mr., Mrs. E. 5.00 
Knipper, Mr.,Mrs.F. 5.00 
Maekall, 

Mr., Mrs. .Tas. I. 50.00 
Novel, Mr. Lewis 10.00 
Plunk, Mr., Mrs. T. 5.00 
Rager, Howard 5.00 

Reighard, 

Mr., Mrs. Robert 5.00 
Sigg, Mr., Mrs. Chas. 
Simmons, 
Mr., Mrs. Chas. 20.00 



sn 30.00 


30.00 




30.00 




15.00 


sn 10.00 


10.00 




5.00 




10.00 




5.00 




7.00 




10.00 




10.09 




5.00 




5.00 




50.00 




10.00 




5.00 




5.00 




5.00 


sn 10.00 


10.00 



—9— 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



Church 



General S. A. 



Smith, G. W. 10.00 

Snyder, Blaine 
Snyder, Grover 
Snyder, Rose 
Snyder, Ruth 
Wertz, Mr., Mrs. W 
Yeager, Mr., Mrs. 

W. C, Jr. 5.00 

Florence N. 

Gribble Class 
Work to Win Class 3^.00 
Senior W. M. S, 
Young Men's Class 
A Friend 

Sunday School 50.00 

Miscellaneous •>" (is 







10.00 


sn 


25.00 


25.00 


SN 





50.00 


sn 


: 


50.00 




25.00 


25.00 


ta 


5.00 


5.00 
5.00 


g 


25.00 


25 00 
35.00 


sn 


24.00 


24.00 


sn 


5.00 


5.00 


ty 


10.00 


10.00 
50.00 


ty 


19.04 




sn 500.00 


569.72 



$347. OS 



S79S.70 1.140.3S 



Johnstown, Pennsylvania (1st Church) 

Church ty 28.17 28.11 



Totals 



8 2S.17 8 28.17 



Juniata, Pennsylvania 
Church 



ty 3. GO 
S 3.66 8 3.G6 



Kittaning, Pennsylvania 
Church 



ty 5.00 5.00 



3.00 $ 5.00 



Leamersville, Pennsylvania 



Beach, Mrs. 


5.00 


Bindle, Lloyd 


5.00 


Campbell, Mrs. S. 


10.00 


Diehl, Mrs. C. 


5.00 


Dively, Mr. Jacob 


5.00 


Gartland, C. W. 


12 7 


Gartland. E. L. 


5.00 


Helsel, Irviu 





Hoover, Frank 


5.S5 


Johnston, H. H. 


r, no 


Liugeufelter, Miss P 


: 


Teeter, Mr. .7. 


0.00 


Walls, Mrs. Lewis 


H nil 


Y\ ineland, Mrs. H 


5.00 


Wineland, 




Mr., Mrs. W. S. 


5.00 


Miscellaneous 


58.45 



ty 15.31 



5.00 
.-, in) 

l 

5.00 
5.00 

12.70 
5.00 
5.00 
5. S3 
5.00 
5.00 
6.00 
S.00 
5.00 

5.00 
73.76 



S 15.31 $106.31 



Listie, Pennsylvania 
Beech, Mr., Mrs. A. 5.00 
Blough, Mr., Mrs. I 75.00 
Fisher, Mrs. F. 
Freidline, 

Mr.. Mrs. W. P. 5.00 
Good. Mr., Mrs. E. 10.00 
Good, Miss E. A. 5.00 

Griffith. Mrs. W. 
Johns, Mrs. G. B. 
Kreger, Mrs. D. E. 5.00 
Larmon, Mr. C. J. 10.00 
Larnion, Master L. 15.00 
Letcher, Miss Jane 5.00 
Mostolier, 

Mr., Mrs. Geo. 5.00 

Maurer, Mr., Mrs. D. 
Miller, Miss Helen 10.10 
Miller, Vernou 5.00 

Mustnlcr, 

Mr., Mrs. N. E. 
Mostolier, Rebecca 
Mostolier, Miss R. 5.00 
Mull, Mr., Mrs. H. 
Nowag. Rev. H. 
Paxton, Mrs. Laurence 

and family 5.00 

Trisk, Mrs. T. 
Ringler, W. O. 
Schrock, 

Mr.. Mrs. E. J. 15.00 
Shaffer, Mrs M. 
Nh.iilh- 

Mr., Mrs. F. F. 10,00 
Smith, B. & D. 5.00 

Swimson. 

Mr., Mrs. O. W. 
Trent, Miss Dorothy 
Trimpey. Mr., Mrs. G. 
Urban, Mr.. Mrs. 

H. and family 5.00 

Urban, Vivian 12.00 

Will, Mrs. C. A. 
Zeigler, Mr.. Mrs. C. 
Zeigler. Miss Mao 
O. E. Society 
Charity Bible Class 
Friendly Bible CI. 
Gleaner's S S. Class 
S. M. M. 
Sunday School 
W. M. C. 



5.00 

75.00 

5.00 

5.00 

10.00 

5.00 

5.00 

6.00 

5.00 

10.00 

15.00 

5.00 



5.00 

20.00 20.00 

10.10 

5.00 



5.00 
0.00 



r 

10.00 
5.00 
5.00 

70.00 



nil 



5.00 
10.00 



5.00 
70.00 



5.00 15.00 
5.00 5.00 

5.00 5.00 

15.00 
5.00 5.00 

10.00 
5.00 

2.50 5.00 

5.00 5.00 

50.00 50.00 



5.00 
12.00 

-II Mil 

20.00 

II llll 

2.50 
50.00 
15.00 

5.00 

5.00 
25.00 

5.00 



20,00 
20.00 

0.00 

2.50 

5 1',. 00 

15.00 

0.00 

5.00 

25.00 

5.00 



Church 
Miscellaneous 

Totals 



Africa Total 



90.20 
ty 8.00 98.20 



S6S3.30 80S3.30 



Martinsburg, Pennsylvania 
Wisher, Alice 5.00 

Longuecker, Minnie 5.00 
Church 



Totals 



s io.oo 



5.00 

5.00 

ty 5.00 5.00 

$ 5.00 $ 15.00 



Mineral Point (Grace Brethren Church) Penna. 

Gehman, David wi 5 no 5 00 

Gehrnan, Rev., Mrs. O. wi 10.00 10.00 
Havener, 

Mr., Mrs. R., Jr. 5. 00 5 00 



Totals 



20.00 $ 20.00 



IVlcKee, Pennsylvania 
DeLozier, Mr., Mrs. S. 
Dick, Mr., Mrs. R. 
Greenleaf, Harry C 
Horner, Mrs. Alma 
Platon, Sylvia 
Wertman, W. W. 
King's Daughter's 

S. S. Class 
Sunshine S.S. Class 
Boy's Class 
Junior Girl's CI. 
Miscellaneous 



5.00 
5.00 
5.00 

2 .Ml 

5.00 
10.00 

11.10 

11.50 

8.69 

7.60 

11.90 

ty 5.09 



5.00 

1 

5.00 

5.00 

5.00 

10.00 

11.10 

11.50 
s r.'.i 
7.00 

16.99 



50 8 SS.3S 8 95. 8S 



Meyersdale, Pennsylvania 
Earlier. Mr. , Mrs. M. 
Beal. Miss Gertrude 
Bittner, Mrs. John 
Bowman, Mr., Mrs. G. 
Bowser, Mr., Mrs. M. 
Fike, Mrs. Grace 
Forney, Miss Charlotte 
Lorentz, Mrs. Ada O. 
Lorenz, Mr., Mrs. O. 
Meyers, Mrs Orpha 
Meyers, Mr., Mrs. J. 
Poorbaugh, Mr., Mrs. A. 
Sunday School 
Christian Endeavor 
Miscellaneous 

Totals 



mo 10.00 
mo 10.00 
mo 5.00 
mo 20.00 
mo 5.00 
mo 5.00 
mo 0.50 

mo 40.00 
mo 20.00 
mo 25.00 
mo 10.00 

mo 5.00 
mo 77.12 

mo 13.00 
mo 5 6.22 



10.00 

10.00 

5.00 

20,00 

5.00 

.-, nil 

6.50 

40.00 

20.00 

25.00 

10.00 

5.00 

77.12 

13.00 

50.22 



$307. S4 5307. S4 



Corners (Pike Brethren) Pennsylvania 



IVlundy's 
Ashman, 

Rev., Mrs. K. 
P.urkhart, Mr. H. 
Crouse, Mr., Mrs. G 
Cunningham, 

Mr., Mrs. 'S. C. 
Goughnour, 

Mr., Mrs. C. B. 
Griffith. Mr., Mrs. J. 
Helsel. Mrs. G. 
Kerr, Mrs. Tim 
Kirkpatrick, Mrs. A. 
Leonard. Mr., Mrs. J 
Leidy, Mr., Mrs. C. 
Miller. Mr. . Mrs. I. 
Nagel. Mr., Mrs. 

Henry, Jr. 
Rose. Mrs. Marg. 
Rose, Mr., Mrs. G. 
Rose, Miss Verna 
Rager, Mr. Adam 
C. E. 
S. M. M. 
W. M. C. 
White. Miss Mary 
Class No. 1 
Class No. 2 
Class No. 3 
Class No. 4 
Class No. 5 
Class No. 



2.7S mac i 
5.00 
5.00 

16.16 

5.00 

1.32 10 

5.00 

8.00 

1.32 

6.00 



5.00 
5.00 
5.91 



.00 wiS.OO 



12. 7S 
5.00 
5.00 



Miscellaneous 



18.00 
5.00 
4.55 

1 1 sn 
3.00 
9.45 
9.50 
'.1 nil 

59.12 





5.00 


10.00 


21.32 




5.00 




S.00 


7.50 


15.00 


20.00 


21.32 




0.00 




.-, nil 




: 


2.50 


5.00 




: 




5.00 




5.91 


kl 10.00 


10 (III 


mo 5.00 


5.00 




IS. 00 




5.00 




4.55 




11. SO 




3.00 




9.45 




9.50 




11 mi 


ty 26.00 


S7.12 



$206.90 $ 30.00 8 91.00 $327.90 



Philadelphia. Pennsylvania (1st) 
Baker. 

Mrs. Hattie & Sons ty 9.54 9.54 

Balderston, Laura 35.20 35.20 

Ballentine, 

Mr., Mrs. J. 8.65 8.05 

Banzbaf. Miss Ida 21.51 21.51 

Banzhaf. 

Mr., Mrs. M. 15.05 15.05 

Bauers, Winfield 22.45 22.45 

Baumgar'.ner, 

Mrs. Anna 10.00 10.00 

Bemer. Mrs M. 7.50 7.50 

Borneman, Ida 5.00 5.00 



Church 



General S. A. 



Borneman, Miss Iva 
Borneman, 

Mr., Mrs. Wm. 
Bragg. Mrs. Ethel 

and Robert 
Bryant, Mrs. Anna 
Cassel, Mrs Sarah 
Christiansen, 

Mrs. A. 
Cooper, Mrs. S. M. 
Cooper, Miss Sue 
Corry, Mary 
Craig, Mr., Mrs. D. 
drill, Mrs. Eliz. 
Crist, Mr., Mrs. R. 
Croker, Mr., Mrs. C. 
Croker, Miss Ruth 
Davis, Mrs. Mary 
Davis, Alam & Doris 
Everwein, Miss M. 24 
Eckes, Mr. H. E. 41 
Foster, Mr. Harry 
Frank, Mr., Mrs. F. 10 



10.47 
5.05 

7.00 
14.50 
10.00 

5.00 
25.00 

5.00 
21.80 

5.25 
10.00 

6.20 



ty 11.10 



ty 5.00 



.00 



Fritz, Mrs. F. 




f 


5.25 






ty 


5.00 


Fry, Miss C. E. 


10.00 




10.00 






ty 10.00 






k 


5.00 


Galliger, Mr J. 








Ginader, Hazel 


5.00 






Grace, Wm. J. 




ty 


25.00 






abh 


_•:, nil 


Grace, Miss Eliz. 




abh 10.00 


Graham, Mr., Mrs. E. 




18.37 


Graham. Ed. Jr., 








and Walter 




ty 


5.30 


Greaves, Mrs. Ellen 




ty 


15.00 


Hain. Mrs. A. 








and Miss Alice 




ty 10 


Haines, Mrs. Esther 




ty 


2.00 






al 


2.00 






ta 


2.00 


Harkness, Mrs. I. 


15.00 






Harkness, Mr. J 




ty 


6 05 


Harrington, Mrs. P. 




mac 3.00 ty 


7 60 






k 
i 


3.00 
3.00 






kl 


3.00 


Hearn, Mrs. G. 


3S.O0 






Hearn. Miss Hazel 


12.00 






Hendley, Clara J. 


',-. mi 






Hetrick, 








Mr.. Mrs. Wm. 


10.00 






Hewlett. Miss Rose 


5.00 






Hofer, The family 


7.61 






Hoffman, Mrs. Cora 




mac 1.00 f 


1.00 






ta 


1.00 






] 


1.00 






kl 


1.00 



Hollway. Eleanor 
Hooker, Violet 
Howard, Mr. C. 
Hutt. Miss Madge J 
.Taouith, Dorothy 
Johnson. Mr..MrsM. 7.20 
Jones, Mr., Mrs. J. 9.00 
Jones, Mr., Mrs. R. 9.25 
Kearns Family 

Kennedy, Lester 

and Paul 
Kimmell, Kev.A.V. 15.00 
Kimmell. Mrs.A.V. 10.10 
Kimmell, Miss Ella 15 00 



11.00 



k 12.00 



Kimmell, Orlyn 
Kingsmill. Mrs. O, 
Kolb. Mr., Mrs. H. 
Kolb, Harry, Jr. 
Kolb, Miss Iva M. 
Kolb. William 
Lamb, Betty 
Lauter, Mrs. G. 
Lewis. Edw.S Ruth 10.15 
Livezey, Mr.,Mrs.B. 10.00 



10.00 

5 05 
19 50 
12.50 

5.00 

7 00 
2.00 maclO.OO 
2S.00 



; 00 

i.00 



Loesch. Mrs. M. 
Loesch, 55. R. 
Lovehdge, Mrs. T. 
Me Cabe. Mrs. C. 
McDowell. 

Mr.. Mrs. R. J. 
McDowell. 

Mr., Mrs. R. A. 
McDowell. E R. 
McKeefrey, Mrs. A. 
McKeefrey, W. 
Maeder, Edith 
Malick. Dorothy M. 
Marouart, Victor 
Marsden, Miss Ida 
Maust. Mrs. S. I. 
Mil's. Mrs. Mary 
M ; sselwitz. Louise 
Myers Bovs 
Oliver Mrs. Anna 10 00 
Oliver, Anna &Mary 6.39 
Oliver Children 
Overpeck, H. M. 
Patterson, Minnie 
Powell, Dorothy 
Pritchard, Mrs. E. 
Pritchard, Mar. Jean 
Reicbelt, Miss E. 
Roberts. Mrs. Sallie 5.00 
Robinson, Mrs. E. 11.05 
Ross, Mr. Wm. H. 20.00 
Ruby, Mrs. Edith M. 5.00 



15 



51.50 

20.35 

15 25 
15 00 
5 00 
35 00 
10 00 
S 50 
i.00 

i.00 



10.00 
0.70 



.10 



5 00 
2.00 



tylO.OO 



ty 5 00 
k 5.00 



ty 5.00 



ty 7.61 



5.00 
3.00 



—10— 



FEBRUARY 1, 1941 



General S. A. Africa Total 



Sehrepple, Miss A. 5.00 








5.00 


Schwab, Miss Louise 






5.00 


5.00 


Schwartz, Clara E. 5.00 








5.00 


Schwartz, Mrs. Ada 










and Chas. E. 7.95 








7.95 


Schwartz, 










Mr., Mrs. Wm. G. 




tv 


15.75 








k 


15.00 


30.75 


Seitz, Mrs. Carl mac 


10.00 


f 

ty 
ta 


10.00 

5.35 

10.00 

10.00 








b 


5.00 


50.35 


Seitz, E. Marion 




c 


5.00 








R 


5.00 


10.00 


Seitz, Miss Anna M. 




sh 


5.00 


5.00 


Seitz, Lois 




1 


5.00 


5.00 


Seitz, Jr., Carl 




k 


5.00 


5.00 


Seitz, John 




B 


5.00 


5.00 


Seitz, Pauline V. 30.00 mac20.00 






50.00 



Shaw, Mrs. M. 10.00 

Shyer, Mrs. H. 22.70 

Smith, Dorothy 12.00 
Smith, Geo. 5.57 

Smith, Russell 6.50 

Smith. Jean 10.00 

Smith, Thelma 6.00 

Smith, Mrs. M. 5.25 

Soubirou, Mrs. Ada 10.00 
Stevens 

Mr., Mrs. Ed 10.00 
Teeter, Forest 5.00 

Townsend. Alice 13.00 
Tyson, Miss E. mac 15.00 

Epdegrave, Mr. E. 5.25 
Updegrave, Mr. S. 5.25 
Uphouse, Mrs. M. 12.25 
Viewig, Mrs. B. F. 

Wheitsel, MissDora 32.25 
Wilkinson. Miss C. 

memory of mother 5.00 
Williams, 

Mr., Mrs. H. C. 10.00 
Wilson. Mrs. J.D. 5.00 
Boardman, Mrs. C. 5.00 

E. P. L. 60.00 

Senior C. E. 10.00 
Int.& Junior C.E. 6.50 

Choir 10.00 

Usher's Ass'n 15.00 
W. M. S. mac 10.00 



k 5.00 
g 5.00 



Senior 
Junior 
Signal 
King's 
Iva M 



S.M.M. 
S.M.M. 
Lights 
Daughters 
Kolb Aux. 

Home Dept. 

Miscellaneous, 
Church & S 



15.00 

5.00 

6.00 

15.00 

10.00 



S. 28.91 



*f 25. 0C 
f 5.00 

ty 5.00 
k 5.00 



ty 11.40 
tylSO.OO 



10.00 

22.70 

12.00 

5.57 

6.50 

10.00 

6.00 

5.25 

10.00 

10.00 
5.00 

13.00 

15.00 
5.25 
5.25 

12.25 



5.00 

10.00 

5.00 

5.00 

00.00 

10.00 

6.50 

10.00 

15.00 



50.00 
15.00 
5.00 
6.00 
15.00 
10.00 
11.40 

178.91 



General S. A. 



Totals 



1,389.21 S7G.O0 S084.12 1.149.33 



Miscellaneous Funds 

Jobson, Mrs. O. D. for American Board 

of Missions to the Jews 10.00 

Haines, Mrs Esther for Mr. & Mrs. 

Theodore Bubeck 2.00 

Haines, Mrs. Esther for Mr. & Mrs. 

Norman Couser 2.00 

Hoffman, Mrs. Cora, for Mr. & Mrs. 

Norman Couser 1.00 

Kimmel, Rev. A. V. for Mr. & Mrs. 

Norman Couser 10.00 

Miscellaneous for Mr. & Mrs. Norman Couser 15.00 



Class No. 2 


4.75 


4.00 


8.75 


Class No. 3 5.00 






5.00 


Cradle Ro'l 


ah 


5.00 


5.00 


Junior C. E. 


ah 


6.30 






kl 


3.70 


10.00 


Miss Emhart's Class 5.00 






5.00 


Primary Dept. 5.00 






5.00 


Senior S. M. M. 5.00 






5.09 


S. O. S. Class 10.00 






10.00 


Woman's Friendly 








Bible Class mac 


5.00 ty 


5.00 


10.00 


W. M. S. mac 


11.00 ha 


29.00 


40.00 


Young Ladies 








Bible C'ass 30.00 






30.00 


No Name 5.00 






5.00 


No Name 


3.00 


3.00 


0.00 


Miss Mildied 








Horst's S.S. Class 5.00 






5 00 


Sunday School 


ty 


24.83 


24.83 


Miscellaneous 57.75 




1.00 






ty 


4.50 


03.25 


Totals $322.75 


111.75 $1 


59.50 


$618.83 


Pittstown, (Calvary) N. J. 








Hann, Albert G. 15.00 






15.00 


Totals $ 15.00 






$ 15.00 


Summitt Mills, Pennsylvanis 








Fike. Mr. F. J. 5.00 






5.00 


Fike, Mr., Mrs.I.H. 


2.50 


2.50 


5.00 


Fike, Mrs. Sue M. 5.00 






5.00 


Miller, ?.frs. Annie 5.00 






5.00 


Miller, W..J.& Mary 5.00 






5.00 


C. E. 


kl 


10.00 


10.00 


Miscellaneous 30.20 






30.20 


Totals $ 50.26 


S 2.50 $ 


12.50 


$ C5.2G 



Total 



$2,189.33 



Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (3rd) 

Adams, Mr., Mrs. R. 

Bauers, Mr., Mrs. J. 

BauSrs. Mr.. Mrs. W. 

Bothwell, Mrs. T. 

Buchter, 

Mr., Mrs. C. 
Dunyan, Miss O. 2.00 ty 3.00 

Edelman, 

Mr., Mrs. H. ! 

Ellis, Mr., Mrs. R. 
Gallagher, Miss G. 
Gault, Mrs. 
Haines, Mr., Mrs. F. 
Henry, Mr., Mrs. J. 
Jones. Mr . Mrs. W. 
Kalesse, Fred H. 
Kalesse, Mr., Mrs.F. 
Kolb, Mr., Mrs.L. Jr 
Muller. Mr Jacques 30.00 
Pfaff, Mr.,Mrs.P.T. 10.00 
Pfaff, Mr , Mrs. P. 
Romig, Mrs. Sarah 

and Miss Irene 
Shaw, Mr..Mrs. H.W. mac 5.00 ty 

Steffler, Rev., Mrs. mac 5.00 i 

Struth, Mr., Mrs. G. 
Upright, Mr., Mrs. J 
Wallace. Mrs. Wm. 5.00 
Welte. Mr., Mrs. G. mac 5.00 ty 5.00 

Wilkey, Mr., Mrs.J. 5.00 

Beginners 12.00 

Intermediate C. E. kl 25.00 



18.00 
10.00 
50.00 



15.00 



5.00 

5.00 

2.50 

mac 5.00 

5.00 

mac 25.00 

5.00 

5.00 

a 
mac 5.00 



2.50 
mac 5.00 
mac 5.00 
mac 5.00 
10.00 



5.00 
25.00 



10.00 
5.00 



2.50 
5.00 
5.00 



General S. A. 



Total 



IS. 00 

10.00 

50.00 

6.00 

15.00 
5.00 

25.00 

5.00 

5.00 

5.00 

10.00 

50.00 

5.00 

5.00 

10.00 

10.00 

30.00 

10.00 

10.00 

5.00 
10.00 
10.00 

5.00 
10.00 

5.00 
10.00 

5.00 
12.00 
25.00 



Uniontown, Pennsylvania ( 
Collier. Miss Thelma 5.25 
Cunningham. 

Mr.. Mrs. Harry 5.00 
Fox, Mr., Mrs. P. 6.00 
Hileman, Mr., Mrs.C. 

Hobaugh. Mr..Mrs.H. 
Lucas. Mrs M. 
McCann. Mr. Geo. 5.00 
Petroskev, 

Mr.. Mrs. Frank 5.00 
Stacy, Miss Mary 15.00 
Sumey, Mr., Mrs.C. 
Welch, Mr.. Mrs. H. 5.00 
Wolfe, Sr.. Mrs. E. 0.45 
Adult C. E 
Junior C. E. 
S. M. M. 

Sunday School 95.29 

Truthseeker's Class 
W. M. C. 

Women's Bible Class 5.00 
Miscellaneous 81.90 







5.00 






6.00 




5.00 




Wl 


5.00 


10.00 




5.00 


5.00 




10.00 


10.00 
5.00 

5.00 
15.00 




25.00 


25.00 
5.00 
6.45 


kl 


8.46 


8.46 


kl 


5.00 


5.00 


abh 


13.20 


13.20 
95.29 




"0.00 


"0 00 




17.55 


17.55 

5.00 

81.90 



Totals 



$234.89 



$114.21 $349.10 



Vinco, Pennsylvania (Grace Church! 
Church ty 9.10 



$ 9.10 $ 9.16 



Waynesboro, Pennsylvania 

Alter. Mr.. Mrs. C.W. 
Baumgardner, 

Mr., Mrs. Frank 
Beariuger, 

Mr., Mrs. W.E. 
Bearinger, W. H. 
Beariuger, 

Mr.. Mrs. E. H. 
Cordell.Mr., Mrs.J. 
Crees, Rev. Roht.D. 
Crees, Mis. Roht.D. 
Fogle, Mr.. Mrs. R. 
Foster. Mrs.F. B. 
Harmony. Mr.. Mrs. F. 
Cordell. Mr.. Mrs.J.,Jr. 
Helman, G. E. 
Heefner, Mr.. Mrs. Kenneth 
Heefner. Mr.. Mrs.W. 
KMppinger. Mr.. Mrs. J. 
Manns, Mr.. Mrs. F. 
Martin. Chas. E. 
Matthews, J. E. 
Minnich. Mr. Mrs. W.E. 
Rock. Mr., Mrs M. 
Rosenberger, Mrs. Clara 
Rosenberger. H. J. 
Sheelev, Mr., Mrs. Carl 
Sheeley, Mr.. Mrs. D.C. 
Stains, Mr.. Mrs. B.L. 
Stains, Miss Phvllis 
Sweeney, Mr.. Mrs. G.H. d 
Wogsman, Ernest B. 
Wolff. Mr.. Mrs. G. B. 
Wollard, Mr.. Mrs. J. 
Young, Mr., Mrs. L. 
A Friend 
A Friend 
Friendship Bible Class 



a 

f 

by 
kl 
ta 
ta 
kl 



d 5.00 



gr 

ty 
ty 
ta 
i 
k 
my 
ta 
sh 

h 
sh 



10.00 
1 5.00 



15.00 


15.00 


10.00 


10.00 


15.00 


15.00 


10.00 


10.00 


5.00 


5.00 


5.00 


5.00 


5.00 


5.00 


5.00 


5.00 


5.00 


5.00 




5.00 


10.00 


10.00 


7.00 


7.0' - 


5.00 


S.O' - 


12.00 


12 OC 


5.00 


5 r 


8.00 


8.0 r 


5.00 


5. Or 


20.00 


20.0' 


7.00 


7.0' 


5.00 


5.0' 


7.00 


7.0' 


5.00 


5.0' 


5.00 


5.0' 


10.00 


10.0 


5.00 


5.0 




10 <• 


5.00 


5.0 


15.00 


15.0 


5.00 


5.0 


6.00 


6.0 


5.00 


9.0 


50.35 


50.35 



Intermediate C.E. 




kl 5.00 


5.00 


Junior Dept. of S.S. 




wi 26.75 


26.75 


Junior C. E. 




kl 12.00 


12.00 


Live Wire Class mac 5.00 




5.00 


Men's Bible Class s 


25.00 




25.00 


Mrs. Minnich's Class 




my 5.00 


5.00 


Nursery & Beginners 




kl 8.00 


8.00 


Philathea Bible Class 




mo 15.00 


15.00 


1st Primary Class 




k 8.00 


8.00 


2nd Primary Class 


s 8.55 




8.55 


3rd Primary Girls 




c 6.95 


6.95 


3rd Primary Boys 




i 8.30 


8.30 


Senior C. E. 




kl 10.00 


10.00 


Sisterhood of M.M. ( Sr. ) 




g 5.00 


5.00 


Munsmne Class Workers 




g 5.00 


5.00 


W. M. C. 




f 10.00 


10.00 


Signal Lights 




kl 5.00 


5.00 


Miscellaneous 


1.00 


1.00 




mac 


50.35 


ta 50.35 


102.70 



$113.00 $251.35 $588.75 



Pennsylvania District 
W. M. C. 



ty 10.00 



$ 10.00 $ 10.00 



Buena Vista, 

Jenkins, Mr. .Mrs.J. 10.00 
Lynn, Mr.. Mrs. Bill 5.00 
Mollis, Mr., Mrs. A. 5.00 
Smals. Mr , Mrs. A. 5.00 
Church 26.50 



SOUTHEAST DISTRICT 

Virginia 



Totals 



$ 51.56 



10.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.90 

26.56 

$ 51.56 



Covington, Virginia 
Cook, Mrs. Lossie 
Oraghead, 

Mr., Mrs. B. V. 
Craghead. Mr, J. J. 
Crawford. 

Mr., Mrs. W. O. 
Gross. Mr.. Mrs.C. C. 
Hawkins, Mr., Mrs.I.B. 
Hill, Mr., Mrs. Haven 
Hill, Mr . Mrs. Homer 
Humphries, Miss Ina 
Key. Earl 

Landrum, Mr., Mrs.J. 
Lee. Mr., Mrs. R.P. 
Martin. Mr.. Mrs. J.N. 
McMillioii. Miss Pearl 
Painter. Mr., Mrs. R.T. 
Pearman. Mr. Paul 
Perdue, Mr., Mrs. C.A. 
Perdue. Mrs. S. E. 
Persinger, Miss Lottie 
Radford. Mr. C. J. 
Radford, Mr., Mrs. H. 
Schneider. Mr.. Mrs. B. 
Wills. Mrs. Pearl 
Miscellaneous 



10.00 


10 00 


5.00 


5.00 


5.00 


5.00 


25.00 


25.00 


15.00 


15.00 


5.00 


5.00 


6.50 


6.50 


5.00 


5.00 


5.00 


5.00 


5.00 


5.00 


5.00 


5.00 


5.00 


5.00 


5.00 


5.00 


5.00 


5.00 


5.00 


5.00 


25.00 


25.00 


5.00 


5.00 


5.00 


5.00 


5.00 


5.00 


5.00 


5.00 


10.00 


10 00 


6.00 


6.00 


35.50 


35.50 



Totals 



$213.00 $213.00 



Harrisonburg, Virginia 
Bethlehem Brethren 
Thompson. Miss T. 5.00 
Miscellaneous 1.00 



5.00 
1.00 



Totals 



$ 6.00 



Hagerstown, Maryland (2nd Church) 
Finfrock, 



Mr., Mrs. H G. 


5.00 


Long, Mr., Mrs. R. 


5.00 


Williams 




Mr., Mrs A. H. 


5.00 


Junior C. E. 




Senior C. E. 




Sandv. Mrs. 




Miscellaneous 


7.25 





5.00 




5.00 




5.00 


1 5.00 


5 00 


1 5.00 


5.00 


i 10.00 


10.00 




7.25 



Totals $ 22.25 






5 


20.00 $ 


42.25 


Limestone. Tennessee 












Armen trout, 












Mr., Mrs. J. R. 7.00 


maeO 


50 




6.50 


20 00 


Arnold. Miss I.elia 


maco 


Oil 




10.00 


15.00 


Arnold. Mrs. M.D. 15.00 










15.00 


Brobeck, Mr.. Mrs.J. 








5.00 


5.00 


Cartwright. Miss E. 5.00 










5.00 


Holland. C E. 








20.00 


20 00 


Lewis. Rev. W. J. 5.00 










5.00 


McCracken, 












Mr.. Mrs. O. E. 5.00 










5.00 


Mongold. Mrs. J. M. 5.00 










5.00 


Pence, Miss Mary 50.00 










50.00 


Yeager, Mrs, C. G. 5.00 










5.00 


Yeaeer, Mrs. O. G. 5.00 










5.00 


C. E. 






kl 


10.00 


10.00 


W. M. C. mac 10.00 






10.00 


S. M. M. mac 2 


00 


ah 


2.00 


4.00 


Miscellaneous 20.33 


mac 2 


67 




1.00 


24.00 



$117.33 $26.17 $ 59.50 $203.00 



—11— 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



Miscellaneous gifts 

Church to American Board of Missions 
to the Jews (Los Aneeles Work) 

Total 
Clayhole, Kentucky 
Landrura, Miss L. 5.00 
Landrurn. 

Mr., Mrs. Clyde 5.00 
Landrum, 

Mr., Mrs. Sewell 10.00 
S.S. Birthday Banks __ kl 4 

Miscellaneous 1.75 



1.00 



204.00 

5.00 

5.00 

10.00 
4.08 
1.75 



Totals 



H.75 



4. 08 $ 20.43 



Roanoke, (Mountain View) Virginia 
Church Offering 130.78 



130.78 



Totals $130. 7S *$ 136.7! 

* N.B. Those having contributed five dollars or 
more in the above offering are listed as follows: 
Akers, Mrs. Lois N.; Burnett, Harry W. ; Bur- 
nett, Harvey; Carter, Mrs. D. G.; Dowdy, Miss 
Elizabeth: Emerson, Mrs. Theodore; Carman, 
L. J. ; Hamblin, F. N. ; Harper, D. G. ; Harris, 
Mrs Wni. ;Legg. Mr. Lawrence ; McCutcheon, 
Mrs. Lvnn ; Meador. Mrs. H. H. ; Meador, W. P. ; 
Michael, Mr. & Mrs. Jas. ; Nininger. Mr. & 
Mrs Chas. M. ; Patterson, Rev. J. E. ; Beed, 
B. T. ; Stanley, C. S. ; Woody, Mrs. O. D. 



Roanoke, (Ghent) Virginia 
Brumbaugh, 

Mr.. Mrs. F.L. 
Brumbaugh, Miss V. 
Coffey, Mr., Mrs. S.M. 
Clingeiipeel, Mr., Mrs. G.V. 
Connor. Mr., Mrs. B H. 
Dangerfield, Mr., Mrs. J. E. 
Dangerfield, Mr., Mrs.W.B. 
Findley. W. V. 
Greig, Mr., Mrs.R. A. 
Hale. Goldie & Ronnie 
Harris, Mrs Everett 
Huffman, Mr.. Mrs.J.B. 
Kingerv. Mr.. Mrs. Elwood 
Keith. Mr . Mrs. O. R. 
Kingery, Mr.. Mrs. Coy 
Kingery, Miss Ollie 
Koontz, Rev.. Mrs. H, 
Lloyd, Mrs. ,T. Lewis 
Mills. Mr., Mrs. H.E. 
Moore, Mr., Mrs. S.A. 
Murphy, Mr., Mrs.E. B. 
Murray, Mr., Mrs. G.D. 
Parsell. Mr., Mrs. E.V. 
Perdue. Mr.. Mrs. R.G. 
Putt. Mr., Mrs. .1. H. 
Richardson, K. E. 
Richardson, Miss Ruth 
Rumberg, Miss Gertrude 
Shepherd. Clelia 
Simmons, Mr., Mrs. H. O. 
Junior C. E. 
Miscellaneous 



r. 


25.00 


25.00 


'■ 


25 on 


25 'in 


c 


f 


.-, nu 


in 


5.00 


5. no 




40.17 


40.17 


n 


io.no 


i 


c. 


2." 


25.(10 


c, 


1." 


1.-, mi 





14.00 


14.00 




7 1" 


7.10 


c 


10.00 


10.00 




11.70 


11.70 


<■ 


6.00 


o.on 




0.35 


6.35 







5. no 


r. 


5.00 


5 no 


' 


26.00 


20. on 




5.28 


5.2S 


r 


25 00 


2.-1 on 


0. 


14.00 


i i no 




12.00 


12.0(1 


c 


25 on 


25. on 




16.00 


io.no 


e 


in. on 


10.00 




19.00 


19.00 


c 


75.00 


75. on 


r. 


49.00 


40.00 




12. on 


12.1)0 




20 50 


20.50 




7. on 


7.00 


'- 


:. i n 


5.10 




!•> ss 


!■' ss 


y 


7.55 


50.43 



Totals 



$ 5SG.G0 § 586. G9 



Washington, D. C. 
Anderson, Mrs. H.D. 
Barse. Mrs. S. H. 
Blomberg, 

Mr., Mrs. R. D. 
Brumbaugh, Paul 
Campbell. 
Mr.. Mrs. F. L. 
Charles. W.T. family 
Davis. Mr., Mrs, Ed 
Donaldson, Mr. R.E 

Donaldson. Mabel E 
Dooley. Mr., Mrs. II. 
Downs. Mrs. May 
Dyer, Mrs. R. C. 
Dyer, Miss L. E. 
Enswiller, 
Mr.. Mrs. Carl 
Enswiller. Mrs. F. 
Engle, Mrs. C. D. 
Fairall, Mrs. A. A. 
Fernsner. Miss B. 
Fogle. Mr. S. O. 
Gardner, Mr., Mrs, F. 
Gilbert. Miss M. P. 
Hale, Mr,, Mrs 1' 
Hart, Mr., Mrs. I.II. 
Hartman, 

Mr, . Mrs. F. W. 
Hostetler, Miss R, 
Kent, Rev., Mrs. H, 

Lindsay. Mr, J. 
Manherz. 

Mr., Mrs. W. B. 
Mehoffie, John E. 
Merrick, 

Mrs. E. T, & Mary 
Merrick, 

Mr.. Mrs. R. L. 
Munch, Mr,, Mis A. 
Munch, Mr., Mrs. I. 
Murray, Mrs. A. D. 



5.00 




5.00 




Li 


10.00 


.-..nil 




5.00 


20.00 




20.00 


10.00 




10.00 


.- 




3.00 


0.00 


f 100,00 


0.00 




al 40.00 


1 1 




kl 100.00 


100.00 


20 no 




2(1 (ill 


10.00 




III no 




10.00 


in. on 




5.00 


5.00 


5.00 




5.00 




5 00 


5.00 




2.50 2.50 


5.00 




." 


5.00 


5.00 




5. no 


6.00 




o.on 


5.00 




5.00 


10.(10 




10.00 


. 


in. no 


10.00 


5.00 




5.00 


10.00 




10.00 


5.00 


5.00 10.00 


5.00 




d 1.00 


lfi.on 


10.00 




10.00 


5.00 




5.00 


5.00 




5.00 


7.50 




7.50 


30.00 




3 




20.00 30.00 


50 nu 


111 llll 




in nu 


5.00 




5.00 



Church 



General S. A. 



Myers, Mr., Mrs.R. 10.00 
Needoraanski, 

Mr., Mrs. C. R. 
Newcomer, 

Mr., Mrs. B. F. 
Parks, Mr., Mrs. J. 5.00 
Raum, Mr., Mrs.L. 10.00 
Rowland, Mrs. V. L. 5.00 
Sampson, Miss K. J. 5.00 
Sampson, Miss M.C. 5.00 
Sampson, Mrs. D. B. 

and Beulah 20.00 

Sams, Mrs. O. L. 20.00 
Saunders. R. T. 
Shockley, 

Mr., Mrs. D. K. 
Simmons. Mr., Mrs.F. 
Smith, Mr.,Mrs.W. 25.00 
Stilhvell. 

Mr., Mrs. J. M. 15.00 
Tamkin, Mr. Mrs. E. 
Taylor, Mr. Oscar 5.00 
Taylor, Mrs. M. E. 
Vickerv, Mr. H. .family 
Watt, Miss Marion 5.00 
Wiles, Mr., Mrs. C. 25.00 
Wood, Mr.. Mrs. W. 
Senior s M M 5 00 

Senior C. E 
Junior C. E. 
Intermediate C. E. 
Sunday School 50 1 7 

Miscellaneous 20.00 



2.50 
10(1. 00 



10.00 
5.00 



M- 



50 
1.50 



fiO.OO 

:1 5.00 

;1 5.00 

5.00 

10.50 

14.50 



10.00 

15.00 
5.00 

10.00 
5.00 

: 

5.00 

20.00 
20.00 
25.00 

5.00 
100.00 

25.0 

15.00 
45. on 

5 no 
III (III 

10 00 

5.00 

25.00 

GO. On 

5.00 

5.00 

5.00 

5.00 

70.17 

42.00 



Totals 



$446.67 $64.50 $027.50 1,138.07 



Miscellaneous Gifts 
Blomberg, Mr. & Mrs. R.D. 
to Belgian Gospel Mission 

Total 
Winchester, Virginia 
Boyer, Mrs. Daisy 
Anderson. Mr.. Mrs. W.O. 
Clark, Mr., Mrs. D. 
Frye, Mr.. Mrs. A. C. 
Garber. Mr., Mrs. Geo. 
Hausenfiuck, Simon 
Hildebrand. Mr., Mrs. E. 
Lookhart, Mr. C. L. 
Lnckhart. Mrs. C. L. 
Rohart. Rev., Mrs. E. 
Spellman. Mrs. Helen 
Stultz. Mrs. Emma 
Uphouse, Mrs. N. H. 
tTphouse, Mr. N. H. 
Mr. Hildebrand's S.S. Class 
Adult C. E. 
Y. P. C. E. 
Junior C. E. 

Mrs. Uphouse' S.S. Class 
Sunday School 
Miscellaneous 

Totals 



: 

5.00 

5.00 

15.00 

5.00 

5.00 

5.00 

5.00 

5.00 

7.00 

5 00 

10 00 

25.00 

25.00 

5 00 

15.00 

6.00 

5. on 

5. nn 

38.53 

20.47 



SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA 

Bellflower, California 
Burt. Mr. Jack 4n.0rt 
Candler. Mrs. E. fi.00 
Course. Mr., Mrs.W. 5.00 
' ; niham. 

Mr.. Mrs. Neil 
Hall. Mr.. Mrs. J. 
MacDona.lcl, Mrs. 
Marsh. Mr., Mrs.L. 
Pine, Mrs. Floy 
Miscellaneous 



50.00 


5 00 


L 10 00 


,. 10.00 


5.00 


40.61 



50.00 
5.00 
5.00 

15 no 

5.00 

5 on 
5 no 

: 

5 on 
7 no 
5.00 

in no 

25. nn 

25 oo 

5.00 

15 on 
6. no 
.-, nn 
5. no 

311.51 
20.47 



40 00 
fi 00 
5.00 

50.00 

5 on 

14 10 

in.no 

5 no 

46.01 



Tola's 



S177.G1 



4.10 $181.71 



Compton, California 
Bradley. Mrs. L. C. 
Carpenter. Mrs. W. 1 
Carpenter, Mr. W. 1 
Cnnowav, Mr. O.L. 
Main. L. L. 
McDonald, 
Mr.. Mrs. N. F. 
Mi/.e. Warren I 

Skinner, 

Mr., Mrs. H. L. 
Smith, Chas. E. 
Adult C. E. 
Birthday Offerings 1 
Sunday School 3 

Miscellaneous 1 

Totals 



50 

50 

on 



5 nn 
,-, nu 

0.00 
9.00 

8.11 

2.S7 
80 



5.00 
12.50 

12.50 
5.00 
5.00 

5.00 
10.00 

o.on 

5 nn 

IS. 11 

32 S7 

15. SO 

S 15.00 8140.78 



Fillmore, California 
Bennet. Mr., Mrs. O. 
Eiselstein, 

Mr., Mrs. Paul 
Le Bard. Mr. A.V. 5.00 
Parr, Mrs. Frances 5.00 
Robinson. 

Mr.. Mrs. E. R. 10.00 
Robinson 

Mr.. Mrs. H. 10.00 

Sargent. Mrs. J. S. 
Scott. Miss Mary 5.00 
Strickland, 



10.00 
25.00 



5.00 



25.00 
5.00 
5.00 



10.00 
5.00 
5.00 



Church General 

Mr., Mrs. Jas 15.00 
Williams, Mr., Mrs.R. 
Wilson, Mr., Mrs. E. 
Senior C. E. 
W. M. S. 13.00 

Sunday School 60.64 

Junior C. E. 
Mr & Mrs X 
Miscellaneous 



Africa Total 



ta 10.00 

10.00 

kl 25.00 



kl 3.60 
30.00 



s 8.90 
M- 
S123.64 $ 8.90 §118.60 $251.14 



Glendale, California 
Brown. C. H. 5.00 

Cameron, Mr., Mrs.S. 
Culver, Mr.,Mrs.G. 10.00 
Dunn, Yvonne 5.00 

Dunn, Ronnie 5.00 

Dunn, Mr., Mrs .J. 10.00 
Gates, Mr., Mrs. J. 5.00 
Hammer, Mr., Mrs.O. 
Hengerer. Mrs. Wm. 1.00 
Judson, Mrs. M. 15.00 
Kirby. Mr., Mrs.R. 50.00 
Lovejoy, Mr., Mrs.T. 
Masters, Mr., Mrs.L 
McDavid, Mr., Mrs.H. 
Meyer, Laura H. 
Richardson, Mr., Mrs. 

Geo. & daughters i 

Shaw, Dora Noble 
Whitney, Mrs. M. 

Junior C. E. 

Brown, Jess & Lenna 5.00 

Miscellaneous 166.29 



30.00 



12.50 kl 12.50 
1.00 3.00 



5.00 


5.00 


2500 my25.00 


50.00 


2.50 2.50 


5.00 


2.50 2.50 


5.00 


.60 6.00 


11.60 


5.00 


5.00 


k 3.00 




kl 3.00 


6.00 


5.08 


5.03 




5.00 




166.29 


$54.10 $ 97. 5S 


S428.97 



Miscellaneous Funds 

Riehardso l, Mrs. Henry for Mr. & Mrs. 
Simpson of the Central American Mission 



La Verne, California 
Bath, Mrs Clara 
Boiling. Mrs. E, 
Bruce. Gerald E. i 
Broad, Mrs. Katie 
Carter, Donald F. ; 
Clemmer, 

Mr., Mrs. O. W 
Cobaugh, Miss S 
Colburn, Mr., Mrs.O 



10. no 

1 -, on 



s 5. no 



Dahlem, R. J. 50.00 

Dailey, Mr., Mrs. A. .61 S.S5 

Doutt. Mrs. Sarah 

Fischer, Mr. Rudolph s 5.00 

Frantz, Mr., Mrs. D. .50 s 2.00 

Grant. Mr.. Mrs. W. 8.00 
Gump. Mrs. Viola 
Haines. Mrs Opal 
Hanawalt, Mrs. S. 15.00 
Hay, Mr., Mrs. G.A. 

Jeffers. Mr.. Mrs. I 5.00 

Keating. Mr. O.W. 25.00 

Lapp. Mr., Mrs. F. s 25.00 

Linderman, 

Mr., Mrs. W. H. 5.00 5.00 
Manning 

Mr., Mrs. F. 10 0(1 
Marston. Mr. H. 8.00 

MoMahan, 

Mr. Mrs. Claude G.35 .50 

McClellan. 

Mr.. Mrs. J. A. 5.00 
Mnnia. Mr.. Mrs.E. 45.00 
Mnntz, Mrs A L. 5 00 
Ihler, MrsHilda 1.90 

It.iley. Mr.. Mrs. V. 5.00 
Rager. Mrs. Elsie 
Robinson. Mrs. Anna 
Sickel. Mr.. Mrs. Ben 
Sickel. Mrs. Lena Bell 
Sickel. Rev. C. 11.00 

Swank. Mrs. Erba F. 
Thomas. Mr.. Mrs. P. 
Thompson, Mrs. L. 1(101) 
White. Mr.. Mrs.E. 25 no 
White, Mr . Mrs. J. 2n.0n 
A Friend 10.00 

W. jr. C. 

Women's BibleClass 5.00 
Junior C V. 

Sunday School 85.54 

Miscellaneous 53.14 



2.00 
40.00 



5.00 



mo 2 50 
sh 2.50 

00 

5.00 

mo 5 00 

mo 1.50 

sh 1.50 

mo 00 
33.00 

sh 10 00 
ah 5.00 



.90 

sh 15.00 



5.00 
5.00 



5.00 
3.75 



ah 25 00 
g 10.00 



wi 4.50 
sh 5.00 
kl 5.00 



10 00 
8.00 

7.75 

20 on 

45 nn 

5 no 

15 50 

5 00 

25 00 

in nn 

5 no 

5 no 

11 oo 
5,00 

1(1 00 

10 oo 
25 on 
20 on 
in on 

4 5n 

15.00 

5.00 

85.54 
GO. 44 



Totals 



$453.04 $06.30 $234.95 S7S4.29 



Long Beach, 
A. B. C. 



California (1st) 



Adema. i.Ir. Wm. 5 
Alexander, Mrs. S. 
Andrews, Mr.. Mrs.C. 

Eugenia 

('tis I 

Ruth 

Mr.. Mrs.L. 



Andrews. 
Andrews, 
Andrews, 
Andrews 



.00 



100.00 
5.00 



al 25.00 
ta 262 50 
wi 175.00 



15.00 
100.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 



i.OO 
c 
by 



462.50 

5.00 

15.00 

20 ' 

in. on 

111 on 

10.00 



—12— 



FEBRUARY 1, 1941 



Anthony, 

Mr., Mrs. J. 11. 20.00 
Askins, Mr., Mrs.H. 
Auge, Mr. C. C. 
Auge, Mrs. C. O. 
Anonymous 
Anonymous 

Anonymous 

Bailey, R. S. 20.00 



Earnheisel, N. W. 
Baurnan, Mrs. L. S. 
Bearss, Mrs. J. H. 10.00 
BeatO'. Ruby, Cbas. 
Beaver, .Mr., Mrs.W. 
Beck, .1. W 5.00 

Be.t, Mr., Mrs. C.T. 
Benner, Mr., Mrs. P. 
Benson, Mr., Mrs.F. 

Biederbeck, Addie J. 
B.evins, Howard 
Bodermann, 

Mr., Mrs. D. E. 
Boober, 

Mr., Mrs. L. N. 
Brison, Mrs. S. M. 
Brown, R. W. 
Brubaker 

Mr., Mrs. J.B. 
Buerkin, Jobn M. 
Bulach, Geo. C. 
Burch, Bessie B. 
Burcb. R. F. 
Burt, Mr., Mrs. A.H. 
Byron, M'ss Grace 
Candler, Mrs. C.F. 
Carnaban, Mrs. H.L. 
Chaffee, Ira T. s 

Cobler, Mrs. J. W. 
Colburn, Mrs. Alvina 
Colburn, Ralph 
Cole, Ruth E. 
Cole, Mr., Mrs. W.H. 
Comstock, Mrs. B.C. 
Coon, Mr , Mrs. B.W. 
Coon, Mr., Mrs. W. 25.00 
Coplin, Mr., Mrs. W. 
Cottle, Mrs. Alma 
Crozier, Helen 
Davis, Mrs. C. L. 15.00 

Davis, Mr . Mrs. Drew 
Dean, Mr., Mrs. L.L. 
Densmore, 

Mr..Mrs.C.S. bmhC.OO 
Derrick, Mr. J. C. 
Derrick, Mrs. J. C. 
Dewhirst, Fred 7.00 

Didriksen, Mrs. Mark 
Dodds, Mr., Mrs. J. 5.00 
Doney, Mr. S. bmh25.00* 

Doney, Mrs. S. 

Doney. Mr., Mrs. C. 5.0C 

Daugherty, Mrs. J. A. 



wi 


10.00 




5.00 




5.00 


un 


10.25 




2.00 


ta 


5.00 




10.00 


ta 


5.00 


sh 


10.00 


k 


10.00 


ta 


5.00 


M 


5.00 


t 


10.00 


al 


5.00 


k 


50.00 


tu 


5.00 


d 


52.00 


100.00 


nn 


15.00 


tv 


10.00 


by 


10.00 




2.50 


un 


5.00 



25.00 
20.00 



5.00 
6.00 



." 'i 

50.00 

un 5.00 

wi 10.00 

6.00 

un 100.00 

2.50 2.50 

un 30.00 

2.50 

t 5.00 

25.00 

2 5 IHl 

25.00 
ty200.00 
ta 5.00 
by 01.00 
un 5.00 
kl 5.00 
5.00 

: 

5.00 
5.00 



ty 



wi 
by 



un 



5.00 
5.00 



.00 



Downing. Mr., Mrs. 
Dull, M'ss Verona 
Drum. Mr.. Mrs. E. 
Dunjil Mr. J., Sr. 
Dunjil, Mrs. J. E. 
Eaton. W. R. 
Eisenman, 

Mr.. Mrs. W. S. 
Ericson. E. 
Esser, Mr., Mrs. C 
Esser, Miss Marj. 
Eye, Mrs. Christie 



C. 
5.00 
10.00 



.00 



sas25.00 ty25.00 
abt 25.00 
ta 5.00 
10.00 10.00 
ah 5.00 
5.00 
5.00 

un 25.00 
un 25.00 
un 20.00 



un 5.00 



f 

ty 
by 



Friends 


20.00 


A Friend 




A Friend 


5.00 


A Friend 


5.00 


A Friend 


5.00 


A Friend 




Friends 




Fairbanks, Mrs. C. 


15.00 


Feller. Mr., Mrs. J. 


10.00 


Feller, Ms-. E. 


5.00 


Fisher. Mrs. Lilly 


5.00 


Fisher, C. D. 




Fletcher, A. L. 




Flick, C, C. 


30.00 



5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
g 275.00 

ta 10.00 
ty 10.00 
g 10.00 



♦as 20.00 
25.00 



Frady, Mrs. Clara 
Frady, L. C. 
W. W. G. 

Gallup, Mr., Mrs. W. 
Garwood, W. E. 
Garwood, Lotta 
Geisler,Mr..Mrs. J. 3 
Gentollon. Mrs. V, 
Gnagy, E'izabeth 
Goodall, Mr. Mrs. C. 
Goode, Mrs. B 
Gordon. Adeline 
Gould. Mr. Wm. 
Gowan, Mabel S. 



.00 



25.00 

20.00 

10. 00 

5.00 

5.00 

10.25 

7.00 

10.00 

5.00 



60.00 
5.00 

50.00 

10.00 
5.00 

52.00 

5.00 

100.00 

15.00 

20.00 
5.00 
5.00 

5.00 

25.00 
20.00 
20.00 

10.00 

5.00 

6.00 

50.00 

50.00 

5.00 

10.00 

6.00 

100.00 

5.00 

30.00 

2.50 

5.00 

35.00 

25.00 

25.00 

200.00 

30.00 

91.00 

5.00 

5.00 

25.00 
5.00 
5.00 

6.00 
5.00 
5.00 
7.00 
5.00 
5.00 

100.00 

5.00 

25.00 

5.00 

5.00 

10.00 

10.00 

25.00 

25.00 

20.00 

20.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 



290.00 
20.00 



30.00 

5.00 

5.00 

5.00 

20.00 

25.00 

15.00 

10.00 

5.00 

5.00 

5.00 

5.00 

30.00 



un 5.00 


5.00 


un 5.00 


5.00 


un 10.00 


10.00 


un 5.00 


5.00 


un 7.00 


7.00 




5.00 


un 5.00 


5.00 




15.00 


un 15.00 


15.00 


2.50 2.50 


5.00 


un 35.00 


35.00 


20.00 


20.00 


ta 5.00 


5.00 


un 5.00 


5.00 


5.00 


5.00 



General S. A. Africa Total 



Grove, Frona M. 
Gunn. Jobn R. 
and family 

Halberg.Mr., Mrs. C. 

Hall, Mr., Mrs. J. 

Hall, Dr. W P. 5.00 

Hansen, Louis, Clara 

Harmonson. Mr. L. 12.50 

Harmonson.Mrs. L. 12.50 

Harvey, Mrs. N. 

Hatch, L. J. 

Hayden, 

Mr., Mrs. Dory 15.00 
Hayden, Robert 
Hearn, Miss Frances 
Hearn, Mrs. W. S. 5.00 

Heater. Mrs. Car. 6.00 

Helm. Mr. W. P. 
Herring, Mr., Mrs. A. 
Herring, Mr., Mrs. W. 
Hess. Foster C. 
Htldreth, Ch & L. 
Hill. Mrs. Lenore 5.00 

Hilligoss Mr. .Mrs. .T. 
Hinkel, Mr , Mrs. H. 

Hinkel, Mr., Mrs. R. 
Hocking. Mr. G. 
Hocking, Mrs. G. 

Hocking, Donald 

Hoffman, Mr.. Mrs. G. 
Holiday. Mr., Mrs. F. 
Hnmc Dept. Friend 
Hnfell. 

Mrs. G. & Don. 
Howard. Mrs. L. 
Hoxworth, Mrs. Mary 
Hussey, Mrs L.H. 
Jenison. R. W. 
Johnson. Anna M. 
Judd, Mr.. Mrs. J. 
Judd, Miss Geraldine 

Karrnker. Mr.. Mrs.A. 
Karraker.Mr.,Mrs. D. 
TT~ P i„ r . -\r vs Mr= F.A. 
Keeler, Mr., Mrs. F. 
Keller. Miss L. 10.00 

Kellogg.Mr .Mrs K. 25.00 
Kollngg. M-ss Betty 
K>mpf Mrs. C. 
Kent. Eleanor G. 
Kot^her^de, 

Mr.. Mrs. Hush 
Kmdig Mr Mrs F. 35 00 
King, Mr.. Mrs. C. 10.00 
Kinsey, Mr., Mrs. F. 
Kirhy, Adrien, H. 
Kirknatrick 

Mrs FWence 
Lady, Mr.. Mrs. J. 15.00 
T^aNobS. Mr. Rov 5 00 

Lantz. GladvsM. 10.00 
Lee. Mr.. Mrs. H. 
Lenoir. Mr.. Mrs. S. 
Lichti. Mr.. Mrs. P. 10.00 
L'ger. Mr., Mrs. J. 
Liggett. Mr. Mrs. C. 
Liggett. D. W. 
Lookwnod. Mr., Mrs. 

L. & "atsv Ann 
Lorenz. Mr. Mrs H 20.00 
Lovejoy, Mr., Mrs.H. 

bmh 10.00 
Lovejoy. Carolyn 
Lvnn. Mr.. Mrs. H. 
McClain, A. J. 

MVCipllan 
Mr.. Mrs. J. S. 
McCnnahay, 

Mr.. Mrs R, J. 
MrCnwen Mr., Mrs. J. 
MnCnv. Ka+h. A. 
MfKin^y, Riley 
Mc^eelev H. 
Madison Mr.. Mrs. J. 
Maeers. Mr.. Mrs W 
Marvin, Mr., Mrs. L. 
Mason, Paul 

Melton. J. B. 
Member, A. 
Mendell. Mrs. Nina 
Merrill. W. J. 
M'Per. Mrs. Mary 
MiPer. M ; ss Grace 
M''ton.Mr..Mrs.E. 
M^nor, Mrs. C. 
Mintzer, Chas. L. 
MHchell. Mr.rtonO. 10.00 
Monroe. K. M. 
Montgomery, 

Mr., Mrs. Geo. 
Morgan. Mrs. L. 
Mu T herron. Mrs. F. 
Murdock Mr..Mrs.M. 
Naples Bible Sch. 
^"e'son. Mrs. Floy 
Nelson, Miss B. 
Nelson, Mrs. C. 
Nelson. Dr.. Mrs. O. 
Newland, Mr., Mrs. H. 
Nichols, Mr. C. J. 25.00 



25.00 

d 60.00 
wi 4.00 
un 30.00 
ta 5.00 

10.50 



ta 


5.00 


un 


5.00 




6.00 


ta 


26.50 


5.00 


5.00 


ta 


5.00 


abt 


5.00 


un 


10.00 


0.00 


10.00 


5.00 




un 


5.00 


5.00 




ta 


50.00 


mo 


50.00 


un 


5.00 


ty 100.00 




40.00 


alio 




2.50 


al 


2 50 


wi 


50.00 


un 


20 no 


un 


10.00 


un 


5.00 


un 


10 00 


un 


5.00 


k 


5 00 


un 


5.00 


by 100 00 


by 47.00 


by 


5.00 


wi 


5 00 


ty 12.50 


un 


5 00 


5.00 


5.00 


ta 


5.00 


un 


5.00 




5.00 


d 


50.00 



5.00 



5.00 
5.00 
5.00 





5.00 




5.00 


un 
un 


5.00 
5.00 


un. 
un 
un 


5.00 

in no 

25.00 


un 


10.00 


ta 10.00 
kl 10. on 
un 5 00 
kl 5 00 
un 5 00 
wi 25.00 
sn 25.00 


un 


15.00 


by 80 00 
5.00 


un 
un 


20 00 
5.00 


un 


5.00 


un 5 00 

d 345 00 

5 00 

un 10 00 

un 65.00 

un in no 

15.00 

10.00 

d 400.00 



10.00 



5.00 



5.00 

2.50 
15.00 
f 12.50 
un 10.00 
un 10.00 
un 10.00 
un 15.00 
un 10.00 



30.00 



64.00 

30.00 

5.00 

5.00 

10.50 

12.50 

12.50 

5.00 

5.00 

15.00 

6.00 

20.50 

20.00 
6.00 
5.00 
10.00 
20 00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 

100.00 

5.00 

100.00 

50.00 

5.00 
50 00 
20 on 
10.00 

5.00 

io on 

5.00 

5.00 

5 00 

100.00 

47.00 

10 00 
12 50 

5 ft rt 
10.00 

5 0" 
10 n" 

25 on 
5 on 
5 nn 

50.00 

50 on 
35. nn 
ln.nn 



s.nn 
15 nn 



in nn 
25.00 



in on 
20.00 



35 on 
5 nn 
5.00 



5 nn 
5.00 
20. on 
5 on 
5 on 
5.00 
5 00 

5 on 

5 on 

345 on 

5.nn 

in nn 

65 no 

10.00 

15 oo 
10.00 
400 on 
in. no 
10.00 

5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
15 00 
12.50 
10.00 
10 00 

in. nn 

15.00 
10.00 
25.00 



General S. A. 



Nicholson, Mrs. H. 






by 5.00 
wi 5.00 


10.00 


Nielsen, Miss J. 




a 10.00 
w 5.00 


10.00 


25.00 


Nielsen, N, Jr. 






un 5.84 


5.84 


Nix, P. C. 






un 15.00 


15.00 


Norton, F. L. 






un 5.00 


5.00 


Norton, Mrs. D. 






un 5.00 


5.00 


North, Mrs. Nellie 






un 5.00 


5.00 


Offutt, Mrs. E. 






un 5.00 


5.00 


Ogilvie, Miss M. 




5.00 


5.00 


10.00 


Oliver, Mrs. W. 






ta 50.00 

ty 50.00 

by 100.00 

d 250.00 


450.00 


Oliver, Mr. W. 






ty 225.00 


225.00 


Owens, Mr. Wm. 






un 20.00 


20.00 


Paschal], Mrs.I. bmh 5.00 






5.00 


Parker, Mr., Mrs.M 






un 7.00 


7.0) 


Pearce. 










Mr.. Mrs.A. bmh 37.00 






37.00 


Pearson, Mrs. C. 


1.00 


2.00 


2.00 


5.00 


Pearson, Mr. C. H. 






un 10.00 


10.00 


Persons. Mrs. A. 






un 5.00 


5.00 


Pettitt. Mr., Mrs. A. 


5.00 






5.00 


Philbps.Mrs. L. 




5.O0 


ta 25.00 


30.00 


Quinton, S, J. 






un 10.00 


10.00 


Quinton.Helen C. 






un 5.00 


5.00 


Quinton, E. N. 






un 5.00 


5.00 


Quinton, W. J. 






un 5.00 


5.00 


Quinton, W. B. 






un 5.00 


5.00 


Radcliffe, Mr..Mrs.T. 




un 5.00 


5.00 


Rath. Mrs. G. A. 






un 5.00 


5.00 


Richardson. 










Mr., Mrs. Sim 






un 10.00 


in. oo 


Redman. H. F. 




2.O0 


ta 3.00 


5.00 


Rich. N. & Grace 


2.00 




kl 3.00 


5 00 


Richards, Mrs. R. 






un 10 nn 


in.no 


Riddlebargcrs. The 






un 25.00 


25 no 


Roberson, D. O. 


25.00 






25 00 


Roderick. Mrs. S. 






un 5.00 


5.00 


Royer.Moses 






sh 1.00 
ta 1.00 

mo 1.00 
j 1.00 
c 1.00 


5 nn 


Ryan. Mrs. Ethel 






15.00 


15.00 


Salmi, John H. 




5.00 


5 on 

nn 5 nn 


15 00 


Sargent. Mr.. Mrs. J. 






un 5.00 


5.00 


Sauressig. Mr. Joe 






kl 5.00 


5 no 


Soheid. Miss L. 


20.00 






20.00 


Schilling, J. R. 






un 5.50 


5 50 


Schuster. Mrs L. 






un 5.00 


5.00 


Schuster, Miss Ruth 






un 5 00 


5 00 


Scott. Mrs. Marg. 






un 20.00 


2000 


Service. Mrs. H. 






al 5 00 


5.00 


Seelig. Miss Mary 






un 5.00 


5.00 


Shaw. Mrs. Anna 






un 12.00 


12.00 


Shnff. E. W 






un 5.00 


5.00 


Simms. Miss Eva 






un 30.00 


30.00 


Simpson, Mrs. E. 






un 20.00 


20.00 


Smallwood. .1. S. 






un 10.00 


10.00 


Smallwood. Mrs. D. 






un 5.00 


5.00 


Sorensen, Mrs. A. 






ta 5.00 


5.00 


Spangler, Mrs. D. 






b 5.00 


5.00 


Sparks. Mr., Mrs. C. 


10.00 






10.00 


Spurrier, A. H. 




10.00 




10.00 


Srack, Grace P. 






ta 5.00 


5.00 


Steffen, Mrs. X. 






ta 5.00 
b 5.00 


10.00 


Stettenbenz. W. 






un 50.00 


50.00 


Stevens, Mrs E. 


35.43 






35.43 


Stevens. Ed. bmhlS.OO 






15.00 


Stevens, Miss L 






kl 5.00 


5.00 


Stitzinger, Jack 






un 10.50 


10.50 


Stous. P. & fam. 






un 25.00 


25.00 


Stover, C. S. 






ta 5.00 


5.00 


Strobele, Mr. C. 






un 15.00 


15.00 


Strobele, Mrs. C. 






ta 10.00 
un 5.00 


15.00 


Sturdivant, G. L. 




2.50 


2.50 


5.00 


Sturdy, Mrs. M. 






un 5.00 


5.00 


Sundstrom, J, A, 






un 25.00 
ty 25.00 


50.00 


Surface. Mrs T. 


25 00 






25.00 


Sutherland, Mrs. E. 


5.00 






5.00 


Swinton Bessie 


S.31 






8.31 


Taber, Mr.,Mrs.,W. 






ta 125.00 


125.00 


Taber, Rose A. 






ah 5.00 


5.00 


Thatcher. Mr., Mrs. 










& D. Seiber 






un 5.00 


5.00 


Thiessen, H. J. 






un 5.00 


5.00 


Thomas, Frank 






ta 5.00 


5.00 


Thompson, Mrs. M. 






un 15.00 


15.00 


Thome, Mr. Mrs. J. 






d 50.00 


50.00 


Trimmer, C. E. 




5.00 




5.00 


Turpin. Wm 




7.00 


7.00 


14.00 


VanBuskirk, 










Mr., Mrs D. 






5.00 


5.00 


Voorhees, 










Mr., Mrs. W. 






30.00 
d 70.00 


100.00 


Voorhees. Mr. E. 


30.00 






30.00 


Waller, Mr.,Mrs.D. 




15.00 


ta 10.00 


25.00 


Ward, Mrs. H. 






un 25.00 


25.00 


Ward, Dr. Allen 


10.00 






10. OO 


Welton,Mr.,Mrs.C. 


20.00 




al 7.00 


27.00 


West. Mr., Mrs. G. 






un 15.00 


15.00 


Whidden. G & A. 






un 5.00 


5.00 


Willcuts, Mrs. F. 




10.00 


10.00 

mal 5.00 

ta 5.00 


30.00 


Willcuts, 










Mr., Mrs. M. bmh 


25.00 






25.00 


White, Miss N. 






by 75.00 


75.00 


Wilbur, Mis. M. 






un 40.00 


40.00 


Wilson, Mrs. Mary 




5.00 


5.00 





—13— 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



Church 


General 


S 


A 


Africa 1 




**sas 


1.00 


al 5.00 


Winter, Family 








by 20.00 ; 


Winter, Hugh 




10.00 


io.oo : 


Winthei, SI. ss SI. 








nil 25.00 


Woodmansee, 










Mrs. Katkerine 








sh 5.00 


Wormer, Mrs. L. 


SO. 00 








Yott, A<r. K. 


5.00 








Berean Bible CI. 








d 20.15 I 


Primary Dept. 








ta 3.50 
ty 8.71 
by 8.00 : 


Jr. High Dept. 








al 3.83 
wi 1.35 


Primary Jr. C. E. 








kl 15.00 


Intermediate C.E. 








ta 4.00 


Beginner's Dpt. 








al 1.00 


Senior C. E. 




* 




asf 12.50 : 










un 10.00 


W. M. 0. 








k 25.00 
al 8.10 : 


W. W. M. S. 








ta 5.00 


Misc. Church Off. 


40.13 


•J. 


00 


25.35 


bmh 3.30 






al 4.38 



Total 

16.00 
20.00 
20.00 
25.00 

: 



." 

10.15 



IS 

1 ." 

4.00 

1.00 

12.30 

10.00 

33.10 
00 



kl 
f 



Misc. Bible 
School Off. 



Totals 



8.00 

5.00 

7.00 

ty 4.35 

by 34.50 

wi 5.80 

310.75 

un 438.04 



430. 3S 
43S.04 



1,048.49 359 



,234.40 8,041.93 



Miscellaneous Gifts 

Pe.rson's Sailor Work 

Beck, J. W 

Miller, Miss Grace 

Hebron Community Center 

Burcb, Mr. Raymond F. 

Burch. Mrs. Haymond F. 

Mrs. Beatrice Van Meter 

Friend, -V 

Miller, Miss Grace 

Nelson. Mrs. Honey 

Willcutts. Mrs. Florence 

Wilson, Mrs. Mary- 
American Board of Missions to tno Jews 

Gunn. Mr. and Mrs. John, & family 

Quaintance, Miss B. B. 

Ryan, Mrs. Ethel 

Willcutts. Mrs. Florence 

Primary I >i partmenl ol tli< Bibli sc ill 
Los Angeles Hebrew Mission 

Church 



10.00 
1.00 

5. DO 
5.O.' 

5.00 

.-, DM 
ID 00 



." 

3.00 
3.00 

,-, DM 

11.3S 

3 00 



Total $S, 728.1 

* For National Bible Conference in Africa. 
** For Sickel Auto. 
*** For Chapel Visitation work in Africa. 



Long Beach, (2nd) California 








Ahruire, Mr., Mrs. J. 11. 


kl 


5.00 


5.00 


Alguire, Mr., Mrs. L. 


kl 


5.00 


.-, nn 


Bishop. Mrs. Lillie 


kl 


5.00 


5.00 


Burdick, Mr. E. K. 


kl 


: 


5.00 


Codona, Mr., Mrs E. 


k 


5.00 


5.00 


Denton, Mrs. Luther 


k, 


1 


10.00 




kl 


3D mi 


3 




kl 


r, un 


r 


Gilrnore, Mr.. Mrs. L. 


kl 


10.00 


10.00 


Hartshorn. Mr., SIrs.J. mac 1.00 k 


6.00 


7.00 


Kirby, Hairy A. 


k 


15.00 


15.00 


Kirby. Miss Hazel 


kl 


5.00 


5.00 


Kirby, Mrs. Julia 


kl 


30.00 


30.00 


Lacv. Mrs. Estella 


kl 


5.00 


5.00 




k 


1,1 llll 


1 




kl 


,-, IMI 


., nn 


Lane, Mr. J. M. 


kl 


5.00 


5.00 


Lawson, Mr.. Mrs. O.J. 


kl 


.-, DD 


5.00 


Leinhard, Mr., Mrs. .1 G. 


kl 


: 


5.00 


Lindblom, Miss Charlotte 


kl 


5 nil 


5 MM 


Lindblom, Miss Dorothy 


kl 


.-, nil 


.-, llll 


Miller, Mr., Mrs. Ralph 


kl 


0.00 


0.00 


Momme, Mr., Mrs. Geo. 


kl 





10.00 


Niles. Mrs. L. H. 


kl 


5 nn 


5.00 


Niles, Mrs. W. J. 


kl 


s nn 


8 on 


Parks. Mrs. J. F. 


kl 


: 


5.00 


Peck, Prof. Claud.' E. 


k 


: 


3D nn 


Pierce, Mr.. Mrs. R.V. 


kl 


i 


10.00 


Pitts. Mr.. Mrs C.A. 


kl 


20.00 


2 


Prigmore, Ina W 


kl 


5.00 


5.00 


Scow, Mr. Mrs. <> 


kl 


: 


5 nn 


Shank. Mrs. Nellie M. 


kl 


1 ' 


10.00 


Skofstad, Mr. M. I. 


kl 


5.00 


5.00 


Stevens, Mrs. Marjorie 


kl 


; 


5.00 


Willard. C. E. 


kl 


io.oo 


10.00 


Williams, Mr.. Mrs. R. 


kl 


25.00 


25 nn 


Wills. Rev. Walter V. 


kl 


r, nn 


5.00 


Junior C. E, 


k 


In ml 


in. on 


Kliever. Mr., Mrs. J. P. 


un 


68.66 


6S.30 


Adult C. E. 


kl 


5.00 


5 DM 


Senior Y. P. S. C E. 


kl 


:, nil 


5.00 


Fellowship Bible Class 


kl 


: 


5.00 


Miscellanems 


k! 


-,_■ no 


.-,!• 66 


Bible School Birthday Offerings 


kl 


35.70 


:i 


Easter Banells 


kl 


30.84 


30.84 


A Friend 


kl 


20.00 


20.00 


Totals $ 1.00 


S 603. SO $ 604. SO 


Los Angeles, (1st) California 








Ayers, Mrs O. E. 15.00 






15.00 


Ayers, Miss Frances 5.00 






5.00 



Church 



General 



Atndt, Mr., Mrs. C. 5.00 
Arnett, Donald 10.00 
Cassell, Harry C. 5.00 
Cooper, Mr., Mrs. R. 10.00 
Coverdale 

Mr., Mrs. Carl 10.00 
Deibert, Mrs. Effie 5.00 
Edmonds, Miss J. 10.00 
Emmons, Mrs. E. 7.00 
Evenson, Mr., Mrs. N. 5.00 
Foster, Mr., Mrs.C. 5.00 
Harrison, Miss M. 25.00 
Hough, Mr., Mrs.W. 6.00 
Haw, Mr., Mrs. G. 50.00 
Jones, Mr., Mrs.H. 10.00 
Keller, Mr., Mrs.W. 
Larsen, Helen 
Leffler, 

Mr., Mrs. C. 
Leffler, Mrs. Ida 
Lyttou, Mr.. Mrs. L. 
Miller, Mrs.S.E. 
Ogden, Rev. W. A. 
Sayior, SLss Adda 30.00 
Powell, Mr., Mrs. C. £ 

Savlui , M ■- 1. 1| ..■ 

Scbisler, Mrs. B. F. 
Sehmitt, Mr.,Mrs.S. 5.00 
Snyder, Mr. C. E. 5.00 
Weisbaupt, 

Mr., Mrs H. 25.00 

Adult C. E. 
2:15 Class 
Junior C. E 
S.S. & Misc. 104.84 



5.00 
5.00 

10.00 

5.00 

14.00 

10.00 



5.00 
5.00 
5.00 



5.00 
15.00 



ah 50.00 

f 00.00 

kl 5.00 



Total 

5.00 
10.00 

5.00 
10.00 

10.00 
5.00 

10.00 
7.00 
5.00 
: 

35.00 
6.00 

50.00 

10.00 
5.00 
5.00 

10.00 

5.00 

14.00 

10. iO 

r 

30.00 

10.00 

15. 0J 

5.00 

5.00 

5.00 

25.00 
3D mi 
60.00 
5.00 
92.85 



Total 



$401.84 $20.00 $175.00 $596.84 



Los Angeles, (2nd) California 
Adams, Mr.Arthur 31.00 
Adler, Mrs. Lulu 5.00 
Baerg, Mr. Herman 5.00 
Baker, Mr.,Mrs.G. 10.00 
Bauman, s 10.00 

Elder. Mrs. P. R. sah 5.00 

Bauman, Mary Virginia 
Bauman, Louis P. 
Beam, Mrs Iverna 5.00 
Beard, Edward 12.00 
Beard, Miss M. 25.00 
Beatty, Jr.. James 5.00 
Brady, Mr., Mrs. L. 5.00 
Brown, Mr.. Mrs.J. 21.00 
Brown, Clifford 5.00 
Brydon, Mr. C. C. 7.50 
Brydon. Mrs. C. C. 7.50 
Butenboff. Mr. 5.00 

Caldwell, Mrs.E. 17 50 
rvdweli, Mr. G C. 17.50 
Conkle, Mr., Mrs.V. 0.25 

Davis, Mr., Mrs.H. 15.00 
Dickinson, 

Mir., M|rs. L. E. 5.00 
Early, Elder, Mrs. 10.00 
Filliou, 

SIrs.Belle & Sons 8.00 
Fillion, 

Mr.. Mrs. Win. 10.00 
Fillion, Gloria 5.00 

Filliou. Edrie 5.00 

Free. Mr.. Mrs. A. 10.00 
Goddard, Mrs. E. 5.00 
Gulley. SIr.,.MrsH. 10.00 
Gustafson, Helen 5.00 10.00 
Hay, Mr., Mrs. C. 15.00 
Hay, Miss C. 15.00 

Hay, Mrs. Ethel F. 6.00 
Howard. A. Leroy 5.00 
Kelly. Martha 5.00 

Knapper, 



: 

5.00 



Joe 



Mr. Mrs. Chas. 
Hoffman, 

Sir.. Mrs 
Hoffman, 

Jr., Joseph R. 
Hoffman, Lois M. 
Hardin. Mrs. Nellie 

and Harry 
Hutchinson, 

Mr.. Mis. W. A. 
Jones, Miss Virginia 
Jones. Mr.. SIrs.SI. 
Leffingwell 

Mr., Mis 

Leffingwell 

Mr.. Mrs. J. A. 
Lepp, Marjorie Anne 

Lepp. Mr . Mi- w l I 

Martin, Mr. Dallas 25.00 
Mayer. Mr.. Mrs.H. 25.00 
McCall, Ray 100,00 

Mi'Clain. Miss R. 100.00 
McCleary, 



5.00 

10.00 

5.00 
5.00 

2.00 3.00 

5.00 
5.00 
5.00 



!.00 



A. L. 5.00 



, nn 



Rex 

. Mrs.W T . 



W. E. 10.00 



Mr.. Mrs. E. 
McCornvek 

Mr.. Mrs. 

McMinn, Mr. 
McNeil, 

Mr.. Mr 
Mercer, 

Mi.. Mis. W. T. 10.00 
Miller. Mr.. Mrs.C. 10.00 
Morrison. Mrs. Ida 
Pearct. Mr.Mis.E. 10.00 
Peterson. Florence 10.00 
Purdy, Mr., Mrs.C. 5.00 



wi 100.00 



2.50 kl 2.50 
10.00 10.00 



ty 5.00 



31.00 
5.00 
9.00 

10.00 

15.00 

:, nn 

:, nn 

5.00 

12.00 

25.00 

:, nn 

5.00 

21.00 

5.00 

7 50 

7.50 

5.00 

17,50 

17.50 

12 50 

15.00 

5.00 
10.00 

8.00 

10 00 
5.00 
5.00 

ID MM 

5.00 
10.00 

25.00 

15.00 

15.00 

6.00 

5.00 

;, m, 

5.00 

30.00 

5.00 
5.00 



:. nn 
.-, nn 
5.00 

5.00 

HID Dll 

5.00 
In un 
2S.00 

•J.', DD 

100.00 
100.00 

8.00 

5.00 
20.00 

10.00 

ID DD 
in nn 

5 00 
10.00 
10.00 

5.00 



Church 



General S. A. 



Read, Mr., Mrs. L. 14.00 
Reedy, Mr., Mrs. C. 35.00 
Reeves, Mrs. Ola 0.00 
Reeves, Mr., Mrs.C. 7.00 
Reuier, Mr., Mrs.C. 50.00 
Reuter, Dwight 
Kowiand, Miss J. 
ttuuottum, 

Mr., Mrs. W.L. 
Rnnyon, F. I. 
Kunyon, 
Mr., Mrs. Ray 
Schiegel, Mr., Mrs. 

John U. 50.00 

Sewell, Mi.. Mrs. A. 5.00 
Scott, Mr., Mrs.O. 30.00 
Shively, C. B. 
Sbively, Miss H. 
Soverns, 

Mr., Mrs. Carl 
Soverns, Mr., Mrs.H. 5.00 
Turner, Mr., Mrs.C. 5.00 



15.00 
,.00 



25.00 



15.00 



5.00 
25.00 



10.00 



Wenner, Mrs, E. 
Winners', 

Mr., Mrs Paul 
Wrightsmau, 
Miss Mary C. 
Miscellaneous 



D.00 



10.00 
289.10 



Total 

14.00 

35.00 

6.00 

7.00 

50.00 

15.00 

5.00 

25.00 
10.00 

15.00 

50.00 
5.00 
30.00 
25 00 
25.00 

10.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 

5.00 

10.00 
289.10 



Totals $1,344.10 


$61.75 


$149.75 


1,555.60 


Los Angeles, (3rd) California 






Church 


s 4.48 
S 4.4S 




4.48 


Totals 




$ 4.4S 


San Diego, California 








Carringtu:i, P. M. 


5.00 


5.00 


10.00 


Crowe, Miss Olive 




10.00 


10.00 


Dexheimer, Frieda 




6.00 


6.00 


Flory, Rev. Albert 




20.00 


20.00 


Fox, Mr.. Mrs. Joe 




5.00 


5.00 


Hall. C.L. & family 




8.00 


8.00 


Laughliu. Mr., Mrs.R. 


3.00 


3 00 








ha 5.00 


11.00 


Lange. Mr, Mrs. HE. 


12.50 


12.50 


25.00 


MacDougall, Lucile 


10.00 


15.00 


25.00 


Mueller, Y\ in. 




5.00 


5.00 


Xowag, Annie EH. 




:, nn 


5.00 


Nevagold, Mr., Mrs.R. 




10.00 


10.00 


Nevagold, Jr., Rau 




5.00 


5.00 


Prentiss. Mrs. J. E. 




10.00 


10.00 


Prentiss, Miss M. 5.00 






5.00 


Payne. Orson W. 




5.00 


5.00 


Proeshaw, Mrs. G.M. 




6.00 


6.00 


Richardson 








Mr.. Mrs. Galen 




10.00 


10.00 


Svelmoe, Gordon, 




5.00 


5 00 


Smith, Chas. E. 5.00 






5.00 


Smith, Herbert 




9.00 


9.00 


Smith, Mr.,-Mrs. C. 




10.00 


10.00 


S'urz. Mr., Mrs. H. 


4.00 


4.00 


8:00 


W. M. C. 




11.00 


11.00 


Men's Bible Class 




6.80 


O.SO 


T. P. S. C. E. 




5.00 


5.00 


Bible School 








Birthday Offering 




7.91 


7.91 


Miscellaneous 


25.00 


26.29 
$ 230.50 


51.29 


Totals $ 10.00 $ 


59.50 


S 300.00 


South Gate, California 








Babcock. Mrs. C. 6.00 






6.00 


Bramaric. Mrs L. 5.00 






5.00 


Bullis. Mr.. Mrs. R. 5 00 






5.00 


Burk. Mr Mrs A, 5.50 






5.50 


Coleman. Mr.. Mrs.D. 




ah 5.00 


5.00 


Crane. Mrs. S. M. 5.00 






5 00 


Dorsey, Mr Mrs B. 10 00 






10 "0 


Dunn. Mrs. Ila 5.00 






5 00 


Force, Mr.. SIrs.G. 10.00 






10.00 


Fuqua. Miss Ruth 




al 5.00 


5.00 


Mn^wn 








Mr.. Mrs. S. 30.00 






30.00 


w -ri-on, Mrs. L.H. 


5.00 




5.00 


Hickey, 








Mr Mrs F C. 15.00 






15 00 


Lee, Sir.. Mrs LH. 8.00 






8.00 


McXiel. .Mrs. Paul 




al 10 00 


10.00 


Mow, Mr., Mrs. B. 




30 00 






ane 


40.00 


Sandy, Mr.. Mrs.C. 20 00 




wi 5.00 


25 00 


Schopp, Mr.. Mrs C. 5 00 






5 00 


Smith. Mr.. Mrs.W. 5.00 






5.00 


White 








Elder. Mrs. E. 15.00 






15.00 


B'ble School a 1.90 






21.90 


"riniary Pept. 19.05 






19.05 


W. M. C. 2.00 






2.00 


Junior C. E. 




kl 4.00 


4 00 


D. V. B. S. 1.0C 




8 40 


9.40 


Chlirc-h, Misc. 62.15 


5.99 


d 1.00 








sn 1.00 


70.14 


Totals $ 255.66 8 


10.99 


$ 69.40 


$ 346.05 


Whittier, California 








Adams, Deroy 




f 30.00 


30 00 


Akers. Sirs. Alice s 


5.00 




5.00 


Ashman. Sir.. SIrs.C 




£ 25.00 


25 00 


Barmore. Sirs. SI. lO'VOO 






inn ni> 


Beeson. Sirs. Ruth 




f 5.00 


5.00 


Brown. Mr., Mrs.O. s 


15.00 




15.00 


Bushnell, Mr., SIrs.O. 


10.00 




10.00 



—14— 



FEBRUARY 1, 1941 



Church 



Chidester, Lola 


8 


5.00 


Coffmau, Mrs. P.A. 




2.50 


Crawford, Mr. H.M. 


8 


10.00 


Crawford, Mrs. H. 






Crawford, Zelpha 






Culp, Mr., Mrs. E.L. 


a 


20.00 


Culp. Ellen 


a 


10.00 


Culp, Lynn 


fi 


10.00 


Culp, Robert Lee 






Culp, Mr., Mrs.Orlyn 






Driver, E. W. 


R 


37.00 


Ensign, Mrs. Frank 






Epperly, 






Mr., Mrs. D. 0. 10.01 


s 


10.00 


Epperly, Helene 




i 5.00 


Epperly, Elizabeth 


R 


5.00 


Epperly, Jim 


ft 


5.00 


F ory, Ohas H. , Laura 


,s 


5.00 


Flory, Eunice 


s 


15.00 


F.ory, Geo. A. 


ft 


25.00 


Flory, Mr. , Mrs G. Jr. 






Fralick, Richard 


a 


17.00 


Frick, Mr.. Mrs. Byron 






Garber, Mr., Mrs.Wm. 




50.00 


Gnagy, Mr., Mrs. J. 


s 


5.00 


Guest, Elizabeth 


R 


30.00 


Haag, Mr . Mrs. G. 


ft 


25.00 


Haag, Walter 


a 


5.00 



General S. A. Africa Total 



5.00 

5.00 
10.00 
10.00 

5.00 
20.011 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
37.00 

5.00 



f 10.00 
5.00 



10.00 
f 10.00 



Hand. Mr , Mrs. 

Wm. D. & Bill 
Herr, Mr., Mrs. M. r 2.50 

Hill, Leon C. 5.00 

Hopwood, 

Mr., Mrs. R. B. 13.30 

Jones, Mrs. Ida O. r 10.00 

Jones, W;n. H. s 10.00 

Keeley, Mrs. Ida 5.00 
Knipp, Mrs E. 7.50 

Kreiler, Mr., Mrs.C. s 10.00 

Larkins, Mrs. S. 

Miller, Mr. Glen E. s 10.00 

Miller, Mr., Mrs. 

Glenn E. 
Miller, J. M. s 5.00 

Miller, Mildred s 10 00 

Miller, Mrs. Opal s 5 00 

Miller. Mr., Mrs. P. s 5.00 

Morrison, Mrs. H. s 5.00 

Mulkins, Mr., Mrs.E. 

Mulkins, Mrs. R. 5.00 

Needham, Mrs. J. s 10 00 

Ogden, Mrs. E. s 10 00 

Palmer, Mrs. C.E. s 10.00 

Peterson, Mr., Mrs.G. s 10.00 

Peterson, 

Mr., Mrs. R. 5.00 

Richardson, 

Mr., Mrs. E. D. s 5.00 

Hideout, Mr., Mrs.A. s 21 00 

Robinson, Mr., Mrs. R. s 20 00 

Root, Mr., Mrs. J.E. a 10.00 

Rough, E. L. s 5 00 

Routledge, Mrs.L.O. 
Shaniberger, Mr., Mis.J 2 50 

Shiery, Mr , Mrs.F.W. s 10.00 

Sisson, Ed, and 

Ruth Stroud 
Stanfield, Mr., Mrs.F. 
Sterling, 

Mr., Sin A. L. 10.00 
Sterling, Miss B. 
Sterling, Clifford 2.50 
Strand, Mr., Mrs.H. 
Ulery, Mrs. Geo. 



5.00 



f 10.00 

f 5.00 

50.00 

f 10.00 

c 5.00 



20.33 
2.50 



f 50.00 



kl 10.00 



f 10.00 
acb 10.00 



kl 5.00 



f 20.00 
2.50 



5.00 
5.00 



f 5.00 

2.50 

5.00 

5.00 

f 24.00 



20.00 

5.00 

5.00 

5.00 

10.00 

15.00 

25.03 

10.00 

17.00 

5.00 

100.00 

20.00 

30.00 

25.00 

5.00 

2G.33 
5.00 
5.00 

13.30 
10.00 
10.00 
5.00 
7 50 
10.00 
50.00 
10.00 

10.00 
5.00 

10.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 

20.00 
5.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 

5.00 

5.00 
21.00 
25.00 
10.00 

5.00 
20.00 

5.00 
10.00 

5.00 
5.00 

10.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 

29.00 



Church 

Vaughn. Mr.. Mrs.C. 
Veale, Mr., Mrs. C. 
Wahlford. Hazel 
Zook, Mr., Mrs.C. 
Zook, Mr. Boyd 
Junior S. M. M. 
Junior C. E. 
General C. E. 
Berean Class 
Miscellaneous 196 



General S. A. 

s 15.00 

s 10.00 

s 5.00 



s 10.00 
9.20 



al 2.00 

20.00 

ah 5.00 

kl 5.00 
kl 20.49 



Total 

15.00 

10.00 

5.00 

7.00 

40.00 

5.00 

5.00 

29.49 

10.00 

205.71 



Totals 



351.51 $ 005.00 $ 420. S2 1,383.33 



Southern California District 
Larson Mr., Mrs.H. wa 12 



Totals 



12.00 



12.00 
12.00 



General and Miscellaneous Contributions 
National C. E. Union kl 28.14 

American Mission to the Lepers al 75.00 



National S. M. M. 
National W. M. C. 
Brethren Missionary Herald 
(cash saies Gribble Book) 

Totals 



abb. 007.30 
♦f 794.48 



gb 12.05 



28.14 

75.00 

607.35 

794.48 

12.05 



1,577.02 1,577.0^ 



SUMMARY OF TOTALS FOR ALL FUNDS IN 
EASTER OFFERING 

General Fund $10,769.81 

SoulIi American General 2,173.27 

African General 4,812.56 

African Baby Hospital 715.55 

African Bible Translation 409.79 

African Central Bio,e School 35.00 

African Hospital Fund 658.14 

African Leper Fund 277.16 

African Native Evangelist 20.00 

African Special Funds 91.50 

African Student's Aid 155.00 

Bethany Home 10.00 

BicKei Fund 459.00 

Byron Fund 916.46 

Crawford Fund 399.45 

Dunning Fund 1,651.55 

Enimert Fund 303.50 

Foster Fund 1,428.32 

Gnbole Book Fund 12.05 

Gribble Fund 686.56 

Haulaway lund 185.00 

Jobsjn Fund 62.30 

Kennedy lund 1S6.00 

Kliever Fund 1,568.82 

Morrill Fund 1,233.69 

Myers Fund 200.00 

Sheldon Fund 402.76 

Snyder Fund 767.66 

So. American Bible and Tract 10.00 

So. American Special Funds 120.50 

Taber l\ind 1,235 44 

Tyson Fund 1,337.64 

Undesignated Funds 2,632.54 

Wagner Fund 103.80 

Williams Fund 903 77 

W. M. S. 1,004.00 



MISCELLANEOUS FUNDS OUTSIDE THE 
DENOMINATION 

Oriental Missionary Society 125.30 



Belgian Gospel Mission 
Hebron Community Center 



16.00 
15.00 



Church 



General 



S. A. 



Africa Total 

10.00 
20.00 
40.00 



Christian and Missionary Alliance 
Los Angeles Hebrew Mission 
Verna Pepper (C. I. M. ) 
American Board of Missions to 

the Jews 65.88 

Claude Pearson 119.00 

Mrs. Rosemary Foulke and 

Mrs. Rosemary Wang 10.00 

Stokley's Navajo Evangelization 

Movement 3.00 

Central American Mission 105.00 

Mrs. Beatrice Van Meter 34.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Bubeck 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Norman F. Couser 28.00 



Total all funds 



$45,181.77 



THE TWENTYFIVE LEADING CHURCHES IN THE 
1940 EASTER OFFERING 

Long Beach, California (1st) 9,546.1 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (1st) 2,189.: 

Los Angeles, California (2nd) 1,505.1 

Dayton, Ohio 1,484. 

Whittier, California 1,395 

Johiisu.wn, Pennsylvania (1st) 1,378 

Washington, D. C. 1,167 

Coneniaugh, Pennsylvania 1,155 

Sunnyside, Washington 1,122 
Berne, Indiana 910 

La Verne, California 906 

Fort Wayne, Indiana 844 

Listie, Pennsylvania 683 

Waynesboro, Pennsylvania 642 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (3rd) 618 
Conemaugb, Pennsylvania 606 

Long Beach, California (2nd) 605 

Roanoke, (Ghent) Virginia 601 

Waterloo, Iowa 065 

Glendale, California 433 

Cleveland, Ohio 425 

Allentcwn, Pennsylvania 404 

Elkhart, Indiana 400 

Sterling, Ohio 385 

Canton, Ohio 35 7 



33 
60 
11 
84 
45 
14 
95 
.41 
00 
79 
39 
30 
91 
83 
00 
66 
39 
74 
97 
82 
89 
00 
54 
29 



SUMMARY OF ENTIRE 1940 EASTER OFFERING 
BY DISTRICTS 



Southern California District 
Pennsylvania District 
Indiana District 
South Eastern District 
East Central District 
Ohio District 
North West District 
Central District 
Northern California District 
Midwest District 
Miscellaneous: 
Esta'.e of Jesse Eyenlan 
Rent, Wells Property 
American Mission to Lepers 
National C. E. Union 
National W. M. S. 
National S. M. M. 
National W. M. C. 
Brethren Missionary Herald for 
Gribble Books 



16,565.74 
9,280.46 
4,002.06 
2,886.08 
2,637.62 
1,991.68 
1,481.56 
1,370.19 
1,033.05 
391.72 

213.59 
72.00 

100.00 

28.14 

1,004.00 

067.35 

794.48 

12.05 



Total Easter Offerings 

LOUIS S. 
PEARLE W. 



$45,181.77 
BAUMAN, Sec'y-Treas. 
PEARCE, Bookkeeper. 



PUBLICATION OFFERING 




TO MAKE 

CHRIST 

Known Through 

Christian Literature 

GOAL— $5,000 



Mrs. C. D. Miller, Nebraska 

Mrs. D. L. Fox, California 

George Sipe, Indiana 

Ralph Christy, Indiana 

S. J. Leininger, Ohio 

Mr. and Mrs. Guy Bailey, Indiana 

Rev. John Parr, Indiana 



$5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 



Bryson C. Fetters, Indiana 
John Howard Parr, Indiana 
Forest C. Leistner, Ohio 
True Hunt, Indiana 
Ethel M. Bunch, Iowa 
Rev. H. A. Hoyt, Indiana 
Miss Jo L. Morris, Indiana 
Mrs. Leila Polman, Indiana 
Rev. Leo Polman, Indiana 
Guy McNeal, Indiana 
Victor H. Meyers, Indiana 
R. Anderson, New York 



5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
2.00 
4.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
1.00 
4.50 
1.00 



Thank you, each and all, for this substantial aid 
which you are giving to publications by these offer- 
ings. In thus sharing your gifts, you are automatical- 
ly sharing the task which is ours in the office. 

THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD CO. 

3326 S. Calhoun St. Fort Wayne, Indiana 



—15— 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



By Dr. Florence N. Gribble on furlough at Cape Town, S. Africa 




Dr. Gribble 



Eph. 3:14-15: "Our Lord Jesus Christ, of whom the 
whole family in heaven and earth is named." 

It has been through 
dwelling at the Andrew 
Murray Missionary Home 
that my thoughts have 
been led to dwell upon the 
church as a family. Beau- 
tiful as are the relation- 
ships of fellowship and 
communion, even here they 
can be but a type of the 
family of which our text 
speaks. 

My memory goes back 
this afternoon to the great 
Student Volunteer Conven- 
tion, which was held 35 
years ago in Nashville, 
Tenn. At the close of one of the sessions, the names of 
all Student Volunteers who had died upon the fields in 
the four years, which had elapsed since the previous 
convention, were read. Then those majestic verses in 
Hbr. 12:1-2 were quoted: 

"Wherefore, seeing we also are compassed about 
with so great a cloud of witnesses, let us lay aside 
every weight, and the sin which doth so easily be- 
set us, looking unto Jesus, the Author and finisher 
of our faith " 

And then was sung that majestic hymn of Bishop 
Howe's: 
"For all the saints who from their labors rest, 
"Who by their lives, their faith in Thee confessed, 

"Thy name, oh, Jesus, be forever blest, 
"Allelulia, amen." 

That great "cloud of witnesses" — what will it be to 
see them at last? Shall we not exclaim in wonder 
and amazement: 

"Who are these in white array 

Brighter than the noon-day sun"? 

Here at the Andrew Murray Missionary Home, the 
family consists not only of those who are gathered here 
at the present time from the Gold Coast, from the 
Belgian Congo, from Rhodesia, from Natal, and from 
French Equatorial Africa; it consists not only of those 
who in the last 18 years have been the recipients of 
its benefits, and who have gone forth from its walls 
either to their various African fields, or to rest and re- 
cuperate in their respective homelands; but it consists 
also of those who, while mission fields are open, and 
until our Lord's return, shall pass through its busy 
halls. 

In like manner, the whole family in heaven and in 
earth, of which we as a Home are but a type, consists 
not only of that cloud of witnesses gone on before; 
not only of that true and invisible church, which at 
the present moment awaits the coming of the Lord; 
it consists also of those whom we are yet to win 
through missionary endeavor. In Hbr. 11:39-40, the 
author, after that wonderful discourse on the heroes of 
faith says: 

"And these all, having obtained a good report 
through faith, received not the promise: God hav- 
ing provided some better thing for us, that they 
without us should not be made perfect." 
Just as they who have gone before shall not be made 
a perfect and complete family without us who now 
are, so we who now are cannot be made perfect without 
those who are to come. 



How often we sing, "Tell Me the Old, Old Story!" 
Let us henceforth sing it: "Tell them the old, old 
story!" "Tell it to those who have never heard!" "Tell 
it out among the heathen." We without them shall 
not be made perfect! 

There is a story of a caravan which was lost in the 
desert. Wandering helplessly on, worn out and weary, 
they at last decided to send forth scouts to find an 
oasis. The scouts went forth, and by the good hand of 
their God upon them, soon came to an oasis. They had 
been disappointed by mirage after mirage, but now 
they found an oasis indeed, with water flowing in 
abundance from a bubbling spring, and with date palms 
loaded with luscious fruit. "Let us praise God," ex- 
claimed one ot the scouts after they had partaken of 
the luscious fruit, and had quenched their thirst with 
the sparkling water. They all agreed, and sang hymns 
of praise together. They offered prayer and petitions; 
they read from those Holy Scrolls which they carried 
with them. Again they regaled themselves with the 
tempting fruit and water. Many days and nights they 
rested there, until at last one of their number be- 
thought himself of the caravan in the desert. Tardily 
they returned, carrying with them loads of dates, and 
bottles of water to refresh their comrades on their 
weary way. Tardily, yes, too tardily; for the caravan 
had perished! I need not point out the application. 
The heathen must be evangelized. Among them are 
members of the church which is to be His bride. We 
without them shall not be made perfect. Why do we 
tarry? 

"Shall we whose souls are lighted with wisdom from 
on high, 

Shall we to men benighted the lamp of life deny?" 

As a young missionary, I was appointed to labor 
among the Kikuyu people in the highlands of Kenya. 
A mission station had there been established for seven 
years, but no medical missionary had ever labored 
among them. The superstition of the tribe forbade 
anyone to die in a hut. The moment death was con- 
sidered imminent, the sufferer was carried forth in the 
jungle, either to die or to be devoured while yet alive 
by the hyena, the universal scavenger of the jungle. 
Gradually they came to know there was a missionary 
doctor, who spent her time travelling over the hills 
and mountains of Kikuyu land, ministering to the sick 
and recovering the dying from the bush. Her profes- 
sional name was "Bibi Murigiti." To the living and 
well she was "Bibi wa Maitho." To the dying she was 
"The lady the doctor" — "Bibi Murigiti." On one of 
these trips, she was travelling accompanied by a na- 
tive assistant, through the dense bamboo forests on 
the mountain above Kijabe mission station. She heard 
a faint distant cry in the jungle: "Bibi Murigiti." It 
was from a cast-out woman, hoping that the mission- 
ary might be passing that way. 

With her assistant, the missionary turned aside from 
the path into the jungle. There she found a daying 
woman, who had been visited by a hyena the night 
before. One of her limbs had been entirely devoured, 
before, frightened (we know not how), the hyena had 
left his mangled victim. There was no time to carry 
her down to the mission station. Death was too near. 
She was cleansed and made as comfortable as possible 
on a bed of forest leaves. Then before consciousness 
departed, she was told "the old, old story." 

Falteringly, first, in the Kikuyu tongue so lately and 
so imperfectly acquired, the missionary spoke to her 
of Jesus. Then fearing lest the woman might not have 
understood, the native assistant told it again and 
again. Wonderingly, and at first uncomprehendingly, 



-16— 



FEBRUARY 1, 1941 



^bcuf, and PJityltt 

By Floyd Tober, M.D., Yaloke, Par Bangui, F. E. Africa 




Dr. Taber 



"Lord, give the doctor strength to pray for me day 
and night." This prayer was not intended as a rebuke 
to me, but it cut to the quick. 

The speaker was the office 
boy who does typing and mul- 
tigraph work. About two 
months ago, when he came 
back after a period of wan- 
dering, I had spent much time 
in prayer with him and for 
him. Then, thinking he was 
relatively out of danger, I 
had allowed the burden for 
other prodigals to crowd this 
lad from a prominent place in 
my prayers. Once more he 
had slipped, and in sobbed 
prayer of penitence, gave vent 
to his crying need for an un- 
failing intercessor. "Lord, give 
the doctor strength to pray 
for me day and night." 

Day and night. 

Four p. m. The end of a full day. 

With a load of evangelists in the "carryall," I set 
out for the mining camp at Datoli, dropping two at 
each prominent village to hold sundown services. 
Workmen from this camp had been pleading for 
months for a resident evangelist and teacher. Only 
a month ago were weable to fill the need. I find a 
live group of about 7o converts, proud of their first 
month's offering of 73 francs. According to the ex- 
change, that makes less than $2.00. But, based on 
their wages, it means the equivalent of $2.00 apiece. 
My joy is even greater to learn that they are enthusi- 
astic to build a chapel for themselves — the first chapel 
to be built by native converts in Banouland. And 
better still, they take a great interest in learning to 
read the Word. 

Just as I leave Datoli, the headlights burn out. So, 
with the help of the parking light and a native on each 
fender to shout "Right," "Left," I started home — 20 
miles of African road — in the rain! It was in the full- 
est sense a case of driving by faith and not by sight. 
The enforced slowness ate the gas, and we ran out 
just as we were turning in the driveway at the mission. 
The Lord was good! 

After three hours of this grueling, my nerves were 
too tired to go to bed right away. Besides, the director 
Of the mining camp had given me some sausages and 
head cheese and liver pudding, and some other pork 
delicacies such as we had not tasted since coming to 
Africa. When the children heard us and called to ask 



the woman looked up into their faces, saying in a plain- 
tive voice: "Ndinaigwa tene" "Nobody ever told me be- 
fore." Gratified at even this evidence of comprehen- 
sion, the missionary said to her assistant, "Tell her 
again and again. As long as she can understand any- 
thing, hold before her the name of Jesus." And then just 
before the feeble flame of life flickered out, she cried, 
"Ningumuenda, Ningumuenda" ("I love Him, I do love 
Him I. And so her soul found rest with her Savior, 
and one more of the family of our Lord Jesus Christ, 
from Whom the whole family in heaven and earth is 
named, entered the gates of glory, and lay in Jesus' 
bosom. 

"Lamb of God, Thy father's bosom 
Ever was Thy dwelling place." 



what we were doing, we told them to go to sleep! 
(Pigs eating pig, I'll say! — L.S.B.). But we, the big 
children, had no one to tell us, and we simply could 
not resist the temptation 

Next morning we overslept. Six o'clock. No time 
left for private devotions before the thousand petty 
duties of the day began crowding in. And between 
interruptions, I simply must get some letters off to the 
dear friends in the homeland who have waited so 
long 

The hospital caretaker wants money for food for the 
patients. I must not forget to mark it in the book, or 
at the inevitable end of the month .... The head 
medical assistant wants the keys. The workmen's 
captain wants to know how to divide the men among 
the various jobs. 

Write a few lines of a letter. The head evangelist 
comes in with a woman — wife of one of our best 
Christians — who wants to confess to living in sin with 
our table boy for the past two years. She treats the 
affair lightly, but has the one indispensable mark of 
a certain degree of genuine repentance — to confess 
something we did not already know about and confront 
her with. Called in the table boy, prayed for him, 
tried to deal with him, did my best to paint the holi- 
ness of God and let him see the filth of some of the 
aggravating circumstances in his case. Confessed the 
facts, but repeated obstinately he had nothing else to 
say. Faced with a Satan-blinded soul, I was power- 
less to make him see the blinding light of God's holi- 
ness, because I was not at white heat. I had failed 
Day and night 

A few more lines at the letter. . . . The brick machine 
is broken — fortunately nothing serious, but it took the 
better part of an hour to repair and show the men how 
to use it to avoid a repetition of the accident On re- 
turning, the native medical assistants are waiting for 
me to examine new patients, confirm microscopic find- 
ings, make up exhausted medicines, look over the 
cards of the patients treated to see that they have 
made no too serious blunders, and give intravenous in- 
jections. I spend an average of an hour-and-a-half 
on the medical work — half of the time as just men- 
tioned, the other half in a class to try to teach the 
native assistants how to take more of the responsi- 
bility. 

But today the class is to be replaced by prayer and 
a general discussion of our relationships in the work, 
in particular the spiny question of how much pay they 
should receive. Will I be able to place this whole dis- 
cussion on the spiritual Diane, and give them a vision 
of the real nature of their work, in collaboration with 
me and with God — to minister to the body in such a 
way as will testify to the soul of the compassion of 
the Lord Jesus Christ? Perhaps — if I had been in 
prayer — day and night 

Time to eat. Ada gently, but firmly, refuses to allow 
me to forget that. 

No siesta today. I must get those letters off. I begin 
to collect my thoughts. What was I saying? Oh, 
yes 

Knock, knock. A delegation at the door. "We did 
not get our gift of salt along with the rest of the 
workmen." 

"Did you come at the hour I set for the distribution 
on Saturday?" 

"No." 

"Did you come the following Wednesday when I set 
a second hour?" 



—17— 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



"No." 

"How many times do you want me to run out to the 
garage to give away salt?" 

"Just this once!" 

Knowing there will be other groups or individuals at 
least once a day, I steel my heart. "No, I will set an- 
other hour later." 

"But we are hungry now!" 

One letter almost finished. The workmen's captain 
at the door. Ever since the theft of the Scripture 
sales money two weeks ago, he has noticed Kombili 
with various pieces of new clothing. My heart sinks. 
Kombili is an orphan lad Mr. Hathaway had brought 
from Bangui to try to make something of him. Bou- 
meli, native pastor, adopted him as his own son. We 
have tried, in our weak way, to carry on the Hath- 
aways' efforts. Can he be the thief? 

A glance at my watch (which today is running for 
a change > . Just time for my class in Sango New Test- 
ament. 

"Tell him to come here when class is out." 
He is late. By miracle, there is an uninterrupted 
half hour for the spiritual preparation absolutely 
necessasary before dealing with him. But alas, the 
spiritual approach is fruitless. He affirms glibly he 
wants to be right with the Lord, but confesses noth- 
ing. So, with a heart of lead, I have to resort to cross- 
examining. It is unbelievable the number of different 
lies he invents, all contradictory. The one he clings 
to most tenaciously is that he won the money by gam- 
bling. Finally he confesses, and says he wants to 
straighten up everything and earn the money to pay 
back. He accounts for spending a third of the money, 
brings back another third, and affirms with tears of 
contrition ( ? i that all the rest is gone — right while he 
has some of it in his pocket. After trying in every 
conceivable way for three days to bring him to repent- 
ance, we have to give it up. I had not prayed day and 
night. 

During the same time, a hammer disappears. Only 
a hammer; why bother about it? Because, if not con- 
fessed, that hammer can nail the door of salvation 
against some soul. Pierre, the medical assistant re- 
sponsible for the hammer, got some Arab "medicine" 
guaranteed to cause the death of the thief and all 
his family. Can I make him see the enormity of his 
sin of murder, and the still greater sin of spiritual 
adultery? Perhaps — if I have been in prayer — day 
and night. 

He seems repentant, throws away the "medicine," 
and even confesses a number of other sins, mostly 
petty thefts. But he maintains his previous resolu- 
tion to leave the mission — carrying with him the Seed 
of life, or the seed of death? Only the Lord knows. 

"We are a savor; to the one, of death unto death; 
to the other, of life unto life." To some, we are a 
death-dealing miasma; to others, a life-giving per- 
fume. We cannot help ourselves. Our very presence 
here carries the death sentence to some, and the as- 
surance of life to others. Whether we will or not, we 
use Peter's keys. 

"Who is sufficient for these things?" "Our sufficien- 



cy is of God." But how can we receive His sufficiency, 
if not by prayer — day and night? 

"The spirit is willing, but the flesh is weak." 

That is where your part comes in. Would you like 
to be able to save our table boy, and Kombili, and 
Pierre, and others like them — to save them even before 
they fall? If there is a word of truth in the Bible 
teaching about prayer, you can save them. 

You cannot know the individual needs, and times of 
crisis. But you can uphold us in prayer, that we may 
be fit to deal with them, and save them from death 
to life. You can "pray without ceasing" for us, that 
we may be "instant in prayer" — day and night! 




Mo-nthly Pl&if&i Calendar 

On their respective birthdays, the names, 
favorite Scripture verses and prayer re- 
quests of pastors, missionaries, and 
others in the brotherhood engaged in 
Christian work, will appear under this 
head. Please see * h ot each member in 
your society is assianed one of the fol- 
lowing names for daily picypr. Assign a 
different name to each member week'y. 
If you know of others whose names should 
have appeared this month, please notify 
The Editorial Office Sec'y of The Breth- 
ren Missionary Herald Co. at once 

Feb. 1 — Mrs. Glenn O'Neal, wife of Grace Seminary 
student pastor of Talma (Ind.t Christian Church. Jn. 
14:1-3. "Pray that the Lord will give me strength to 
help my husband in every way possible during his ser- 
vice in the ministry." 

Feb. 2 — Rev. Ord Gehman, pastor at Vinco, Pa. Rom. 
8:28. "Pray for a real unity among His children and 
for a real spirit of sacrificial giving for His work, to 
His eternal glory." 

Feb. 7 — Mrs. R. D. Crees, wife of pastor at Waynes- 
boro, Pa. Eph. 2:8-9. Desires prayer concerning an 
unspoken request. 

Feb. 7 — Rev. J. L. Gingrich, pastor at Allen cown, Pa. 
Rom. 8:28. "Pray definitely that our pastors and 
churches may have peace, harmony, and the blessing 
of His Holy Spirit on our work for the vear. and that 
souls may be saved." 

Feb. 11 — Rev. Glenn O'Neal, Grace Seminary student, 
pastor of Talma Christian Church. Josh. l:tf. "Pray 
that the Lord will raise up men to sro into full-time 
service for Him in The Brethren Church ." 

Feb. 12— Rev. C. H. Ashman, pastor at Wnittier, 
Calif. Rom. 8:28. "Pray that I might always be in the 
will of the Lord in all things." 

Feb. 14 — Mrs. Bernard Schneider wife of pastor at 
Washington, D. C. Col. 3:17. "Pray that we may carry 
the glad news of salvation to many unsaved; that we 
might also lead many who know Him into a more 
abundant life; and that our young people may set 
themselves apart for His service. Praise Him for an- 
swers to prayer and for His patience." 

Feb. 17— Rev. C. W. Mayes, pastor at 10th St. churcn, 
Ashland, O. Ph. 1.4:13. "Pray for the salvation of 50 



—18— 



FEBRUARY 1, 1941 



0}n,o*n the Zditaii Mad Baf 

A LETTER FROM THE SHELDONS, AFRICA 



The following letter, though written last July, wos received by 
the editor the middle of January. Thus cometh the mail! One 
letter may reach us in six or seven weeks. Another takes six months 
Air mail matters not. But then, letters like the following make 
good reading at any time. 

Brother and Sister Sheldon may be en route home as you read 
this. They are the next missionaries to sail for home on furlough. 
The time for leaving for home on furlough is long since past. They 
will be coming just as soon as the Lord provides a ship for their 
passage. 

By the way, think of not yet having received in July, 1940, their 
Christmas presents that should have been received by Christmas, 
1939! Isn't it great to be c missionary? Yes, it is 1 The Lord 
Jesus Christ was a missionary! And what a tempestuous life was 
His!— LS.B. 

Bossangoa par Bangui 
French Eq.Africa 
July 26, 1940 
Dear Friends in the Homeland: 

No mail in five weeks and no hopes of getting any 
soon. The boats have been sunk, mostly, and the air- 
planes have ceased to coma to our remote corner of 
the world. How would you like to be without your 
daily paper and your news over the radio, to be ab- 
sent from friends and relatives, and to receive no news 
from them? Young people in the homeland have often 
said, "My! but it must be thrilling to be a missionary!" 
I have just mentioned a few of the "thrills." 

Because of the unstable conditions, imported foods 
are scarce. Ration cards are given to us, but one is 
often unable to find the foods that are allowed on the 
cards. This week we were thankful to get a sack of 
flour, even if it had been rained on, and smelled musty, 
and was inhabited by weevils. We have had to quit 
eating oatmeal and cocoa, for they are unobtainable. 
Macaroni and cheese haven't been seen around here 
recently either. Milk can be purchased only for babies. 
We have some goats from which we get some milk, 
and we are thankful for it, even tho it isn't sufficient 
for our family. Miss Bickel also has a few goats. A 
half dozen of these don't give as much milk as one in 



men to whom we are witnessing and whom we have on 
our prayer list." 

Feb. 19— Rev. Albert Flory, pastor at San Diego, 
Calif. Eph. 1:3. No requests submitted. 

Feb. 22— Mrs. Homer A. Kent, wife of Grace Semi- 
nary professor and national W.M.C. president. Isa. 
26:3. "Pray that the members of the W. M. C. may 
glorify Christ in their own personal lives." 

Feb.23 — Rev. Wayne Baker, pastor at Sterling, O. Eph. 
3:20. "Pray that in all things He might have the pre- 
eminence in our lives and ministry and in that of all 
saints." 

Feb. 23— Rev. Wm. A. Steffler, pastor at Third 
church, Philadelphia. Josh. 1:9. "Pray that I might 
be a better soul winner for my Lord, and for the re- 
vival meeting I am conducting in Altoona, Jan. 27- 
Feb. 9." 

Feb. 25— Mrs. Paul R. Bauman, wife of pastor of 2d 
Church, Los Angeles. No requests submitted. 

Feb. 26. — Mrs. Herman W. Koontz, wife of pastor at 
Roanoke, Va. Col. 1:18. "Pray for our Christian young 
people in the high school systems of today, and for 
the radio programs in which the Lord Jesus Christ is 
honored." 



California. Our garden supplies us with some vege- 
tables, and we should soon be able to buy potatoes from 
the natives. 

The rains at this season haven't been as regular as 
heretofore, but this week it has made up for lost time. 
Night before last a storm came up, and the thunder 
was quite vigorous, one bolt being especially loud. Soon 
afterwards we smelled smoke, and Mr. Sheldon went 
out on the veranda to find it filled with smoke. Over 
the hill in the native village a blaze was coming out 
of a house. It later proved to be the house of our 
native pastor, Jacob Yase. They had all retired when 
the bolt struck the house, tearing a hole in the mud 
wall where it went out. The Lord marvelously spared 
Jacob Yase and his family, all escaping with nothing 
but minor burns. They were able to save his bicycle 
as well as all other contents of the house. So once 
again we praise the Lord for delivering His own. 

This is cotton planting time as well as the season 
for garden work in general. Many of the natives 
around us are getting to be like "enlightened" people 
in the homeland, in that they do not keep the Lord's 
day but go to their gardens instead. Those who work 
hard six days can set aside the Lord's day and never 
be the loser. We dismissed the school children a week 
so they could help their parents in the fields. 

Every Sunday p. m. a group of about 10 or 12 na- 
tive Christians go out to preach to the villagers. When 
Mr. Sheldon is home with the car, we usually go also, 
letting the workers off at the different villages. The 
next time we take another direction, thus giving a lift 
to all in time. At Bossangoa and some of the other 
chapels, a few of the Christians go out to tell the 
story. Some villages are very indifferent, and don't 
want the gospel. They don't want to part with their 
idols because they are afraid of them. In others there 
are a few who desire the things of life. In one village 
there are 13 interested, of which a woman seems the 
most interested. She was here yesterday and said 
that during the week they gather at her home for 
prayer from time to time. 

An interesting feature of our church service is the 
attendance of as many as seven blind men. A little 
girl always leads the oldest and they sit on one bench. 
Five are already Christians, and another came for- 
ward recently saying he wanted to accept the Lord. 
But alas! we have recently learned that he has been 
offering sacrifices or working his sorcery in behalf of a 
sick baby. It is only the 'Lord who can turn the hard- 
ened heart to Himself. 

We are hoping to get our Christmas presents soon 
(I mean for 1939). Christmas came and went, and 
many more days as well, until it is now the latter part 
of July, and still the presents we ordered for the chil- 
dren more than a year ago have not arrived. Miss 
Bickel, as well as the other medical workers, have been 
waiting a year for the much needed bandages also. 
However, we have heard that they have arrived at the 
Cameroons, and we hope to receive them some day — 
maybe next Christmas! These are just a few of the 



—19— 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



inconveniences caused by war, but I suppose they are 
nothing to be compared to the privations in Europe. 
As you can see by this letter, we are still here, altho 
we thought we would be seeing some of you by con- 
ference time. Then when we decided to remain on 
the field for the time being, we planned to send Ken- 
neth home so he could enter school in September. But 
none of these plans were realized, and now we have 
none, and are just waiting for the Lord to work out 
all for us. If we don't see you on earth — then perhaps 
it will be in the air. Keep looking up. 

In His name, 

Hattie C. Sheldon. 



FROM MRS. LAURA LARSON WAGNER 

Almafuerte, Cordoba, Argentina 

Dear Fellow-workers in the Homeland: 

As it has been such a long time since I have written 
you directly, I will take time now, before we get into 
the whirl of summer activities, to write just a little 
about our work in this little corner. We do appreciate 
so much your constancy in helping through your 
prayers and offerings, most especially when we stop to 
think how seldom you hear from us — a deficiency on 
our part that we hope we may be able to overcome in 
the future. 

During the winter and spring months, our work is 
more or less of a routine nature. We continue to have 
services regularly here in Almafuerte as well as in 
Berrotaran and Elena. The meetings in the hills have 
been suspended since July, for at that time the family 
in whose home we held the services moved to Berro- 
taran, and they continue to cooperate in the services 
there. 

We visit the remaining three believers in the hills as 
often as possible, for they do need help in spiritual 
things. They consist of a middle-aged woman and 
her married daughter and son-in-law. The only ones 
in the whole family who know how to read are the 
elder woman and her husband. The woman reads 
poorly and lor only a little while at a time, for her 
eyes bother her; and her husband hasn't enough in- 
terest in the things of God to read aloud for the bene- 
fit of the family. They have passed through severe 
testings this past winter in the way of sickness and 
financial reverses. At first the husband and father 
of the family was very contrary to the gospel, for he 
blamed all of their "bad luck" to the fact that his wife 
was baptized in the fall. However, he has come to 
feel somewhat differently of late, but he still does not 
yield himself to the Lord. Pray for this family. Denied 
the opportunities of regular services and of fellowship 
with other believers, and with difficulties in the read- 
ing of the Bible or any other helpful literature, they 
grow slowly in the knowledge of the Lord and His 
Word. 

The problems that confront us in these three towns 
are numerous. How frequently our hearts are grieved 
to see how slowly some of our believers grasp spiritual 
truth! How quickly they turn aside to error or fall 
into the tempter's snare! So many of them do not 
know how to read, and their mental development is in 
so many ways scarcely more than that of a primary 
child. Then there are others who, although they un- 
derstand, find the world so attractive that they allow 
it to interfere with their spiritual development. How- 
ever, we do praise the Lord for those who take in- 
creasing delight in God's Word, and who have learned 
to pray both in private and public, and in whose lives 
are other notable signs of growth. 

In the desire to further help our people, we have 
organized groups in each town to the end of forming 
libraries and stimulating interest in reading. To be 



sure, that will be helpful only to those who know how 
to read. In Berrotaran and Elena, these groups in- 
clude both young and old, practically all of whom are 
believers. Here in Almafuerte the group consists of 
young folks, of whom only two have accepted the Lord. 
The great burden of our hearts is to see these young 
folks to come to a saving knowledge of the Lord. Most 
of them have known the gospel message for many years, 
but have never definitely accepted it. Pray for them. 

Not the least of our problems is trying to stretch our 
time and strength to meet the growing needs of this 
district. During the cold winter and spring months, 
it has been impossible for me to help as actively as 
during warmer weather. Cold weather is especially 
hard on me physically, and on several occasions I have 
been obliged to remain in bed, though not for more 
than a day or two at a time. I am fully persuaded, 
however, that all of this has been only another "meth- 
od" of my wonderful, divine Teacher to bring me to a 
realization of the need of finding and training helpers 
in these towns, that they may share the task of carry- 
ing the work forward. So far, we have no S. S. teachers 
or leaders of any kind, and you may well imagine how 
great a burden it is for two people to have to attend to 
everything-, in most cases even to the cleaning of the 
place of meeting. Pray with us, therefore, that the 
Lord will raise up willing hands and hearts for His ser- 
vice from among our Brethren here. 

The increasing conviction of the need of helpers, 
together with the tremendous spiritual needs of our 
young folks, has led to still another project. I have 
read with deep interest, first the advertising and then 
the reports of your summer camps, and have thought 
of how nice it would be if we could have something 
like that for our youth down here. "Of course, it is 
impossible," I thought. But why? One day it occurred 
to me that I might invite all of the girls from our par- 
ticular district to meet for several days here in Alma- 
fuerte. Then it seemed a pity to not include the boys 
too, as we could make room for them in the garage. 
Plans were begun, and Bro. and Sister Maconaghy 
agreed to help us in a three-day convention, to be 
held in November. Soon difficulties presented them- 
selves, which finally led us to extend our invitation 
to all of the missions, and to change the date to Jan. 
4th to 6th. And so we are now initiating what we hope 
may later become a summer camp for Brethren young 
folks of Argentina. This summer it can only be an 
imitation, but we trust that it may be of great spiritual 
blessing to all who come. We will greatly appreciate 
your prayers on behalf of the project, that the Lord, 
and the Lord only, may be glorified in every detail. 

Mrs. R. E. Wagner. 



Our brother, Dr. V. C. Kelford, who is teaching in 
the Florida Bible Institute in Tampa, Fla., did yoeman 
service in helping to make the departure of our mis- 
sionaries on Dec. 28 a pleasant and happy event. Rev. 
and Mrs. Russell Barnard of Dayton, O., were also on 
hand to do what they could. Apparently, the boat, 
"Zarembo" did not make much appeal to Dr. Kelford. 
But those missionaries would have ridden an old cow, 
had there been no other way, and had they been per- 
suaded she could make the swim, in order to get to 
Africa. Dr. Kelford's impression of the boat, the only 
one we had been able to secure, will interest our read- 
ers: 

"The Barnards, Miss Tyson and I took a run down to 
look the Zarembo over. God has graciously told me 
a lot about 'grace', but as I look at the boat our mis- 



-20— 



FEBRUARY 1, 1941 



sionaries will call home for the next three weeks, I 
realize I'd need to pray for a lot more grace than I 
now have, to go with them. 

"They were loading with phosphate, presumably for 
fertilizer. The air was thick with powder, but we 
could clearly discern a huge American flag as big as 
the side of a barn painted on the side of the ship, 
which reminded me that I'd need a little more grace 
than mere discomfort called for. The sight of the 
flag bespoke submarines, and surface raiders 

"When I left the group, they were in the best of 
spirits; as who wouldn't be, with Barnard and Dun- 
ning to give life to the party? Happily, there were 
four other missionaries from the Christian and Mis- 
sionary Alliance who were to sail on the Zarembo. They 
too were at the Institute awaiting the sailing. They 
were a very happy party, and well acquainted before 
leaving the school 

"In case others of oui missionaries sail from Tampa, 
I hope you'll give us the privilege of taking care of 
the necessary detail, and you may rest assured that 
if they come to the Institute we shall do all in our 
power to make their departure a pleasant one. . . . 
Thanking you for permitting us to have some little 
part in your great missionary enterprise." 



Miss Tyson also writes, .iust before the "Zarembo" 
sailed, to say: 

"I do not see how we ever could have gotten along 
without Mr. Barnard. I want to pay him something 
toward the expenses of the car, for he has had it in 
almost constant use for our party; but so far I have 
not made much progress along that line. Perhaps 
you can take this up with him. He has certainly been 
a jewel, and how good it was of the Lord to put it 
into their hearts to come to Florida at this time. 
Truly, the Lord is good! 

It is possible that we may sail tomorow. You see, 
the boat is loading phosphate here, and they had two 
rainy days and could not load, and this has delayed 
the sailing 

Ethel Myers has been here in Tampa for several 
days. She came down to see Grace and me sail. On 
Christmas the Barnards took us over to see the Bok 
tower, and Ethel took the whole crowd out for Christ- 
mas dinner. We had quite a celebration, but some- 
how my thoughts kept wandering northward, as I 
thought of the entire family at the Grace home for 
the family gathering." 



Under date of Oct. 12, 1940, Supt. Jobson writes that 
he had just received mail which left the United States 
in June. He says; 

"So, you can see with what speed our mail is com- 
ing through." Then Brother Jobson continues: 

"Being hemmed in as we are, due to slow and un- 
certain mail service, we have not been keeping you 
abreast of the moves in French Equatorial Africa. 
Knowing that the world at large has its eyes centered 
on Africa, we have been assured that you are follow- 
ing the rapid moves of French Equatorial Africa and 
French Occidental Africa with unusual interest, as 
these moves affect our evangelistic work in this coun- 
try. The Colonel De Larminat took over the reins of 
the government here on Aug. 28, in the name of Free 
France in Africa, under the De Gaulle government. 
The move has been received favorably by all commer- 
cial enterprises, and a great number of officia. Things 
are moving along normally as far as the native life is 
concerned, and our evangelistic work has not been 
hindered in the least. We have sufficient food stuffs, 
and life as far as the missionaries moves along as 
usual. Of course the uncertainty of the times con- 
tinually hangs over us, affecting all forward moves 
that we might otherwise make if we were certain of 
receiving new missionaries, and getting those on fur- 
lough back into the country." 




and 




by Mrs. Keith Altig 

We thought that you yould like to meet some of our 
boys and girls down here in the Argentine. Since you 

can't meet them in 
person we have 
sent you a picture 
who attend our 
Children's Class in 
Los Cisnes, and will 
introduce you to 
some. 

On the front row 
the little boy in 
overalls is Jorge 
Dragone. He is 
more fortunate 
than most of the 
children, because 
his mother and 
father, grandmoth- 
er and aunts are 
Christians, and 
ever since he was very small, they have been teaching 
him about the Lord Jesus. He says that he wants to 
be a preacher when he grows up, but is very much 
worried because he says he can't sing very well. Jorge 
remembers the lessons and the memory verses, and 
although he is a little shy about repeating them in 
the meeting, he tells them to his folks at home. 

On the third row, second from the right, is Felix. 
He is the constant companion of Jorge. His home life 
is very different from that of his little friend. Felix's 
father is a drunkard and had to be sent away to a 
hospital because he drank so much and treated Felix's 
mother very cruelly. But we are sure that Felix is 
not going to follow his father's footsteps because he 
has accepted the Lord Jesus as his personal Savior. 
He never misses a meeting, and is always ready to 
answer the questions about the Bible lesson. 

Standing next to Felix, third from the right, is 
Pedro, who comes from a Greek Catholic home, and, 
who recently accepted the Lord Jesus as his Savior. 
He looks like a Christian boy, doesn't he, with that 
shiny, smiling face? 

And next to Pedro is Antonio. He came to the meet- 
ing last week for the first time, and when the invita- 
tion was given to receive the Lord Jesus, his little 
friends urged him to accept Him. But Antonio didn't 
quite understand, so after the meeting one of the little 
boys said: "Antonio wants to be saved but he doesn't 
understand it very well." You see, boys and girls, this 
was probably the first time that he had heard the 
gospel. So my husband talked with him and told him 
about the Lord Jesus' death on the cross for every per- 
son in the world. Then Antonio understood and re- 
ceived Him into his heart as his own Savior. 

Some of the other boys and girls in this picture 
have been saved too, recently, and still others come 



-21- 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



KUeoefib ^Jlip, to- the Qaalt 



For the first time in about 18 months, we are in- 
formed that our missionaries in Africa managed to get 
to the coast after their freight at Kribi and return 
home safely. Our readers will be interested in Jake 
Kliever's account of this trip. Jake Kliever is a great 
missionary — a missionary after Dr. Taber's own heart. 
Remember? "Send us some comedians." Well, Jake 
was sent. However, Jake is a great soul winner also. 
We are ready to say that he is an ideal missionary. 
He loves the Lord; He loves everybody at home; he 
loves everybody that has a black sin; he loves little 
children; he loves cats and dogs; he loves fun; he 
loves work — well, Jake loves about everything, appar- 
ently, but "figgers." This letter of Jake's gives us folks 
in the homeland another slant on the African char- 
acter. Now, it's about time we quote the letter; 

"Dust and noise from the 'Bush Station,' Bekoro." 
Dear Fellow- workers: 

I am almost ashamed to start to write to you all, as 
I have been misbehaving worse than usual. . . . 

I started my vacation by wrastling the trucks up to 
Yaloke .... I was delegated to get the waiting freight 
at the coast; and, since for the moment, all the intelli- 
gent and common-sense members of the mission were 
too busy, I was asked to be acting delegate at the Union 
Committee Meeting of Mission, invited by the Presby- 
terian Mission of the Camerouns. I arrived there on 
my birthday, and had three very profitable days of 
fellowship. 



who weren't present in time to be in the picture. But 
there are many children in the town who don't come 
to the classes to learn about the Lord Jesus. Will you 
not pray for them, boys and girls, that they may come, 
and that, hearing the Word of God, they may come to 
know the Lord Jesus as their Savior? Pray too for the 
Christian boys and girls, that they may be like little 
lights shining for the Lord Jesus in their homes and 
wherever they go. 

Yours because of Calvary, 

Mrs. Hill Maconaghy. 



PEOPLE WHO MADE BIBLE HISTORY 

.—.was praised for his beauty. 

tried to be king just before his father died. 

. was captain over the whole army of Isreal. 

ABSALOM DAVID JOAB 

ABNER ADONIJAH NATHAN 

did not protect his master, the king. 

was a prophet who ministered to a king. 

- -Was a song writer and poet. 

Fill in the blanks with the proper names given in 
the center, if in doubt consult these references: 2 Sam- 
uel 7:2,3; 2 Samuel 22:1; 20:23; 14:25; 1 Samuel 26:15; 
1 Kings 1:25. 



WE THANK THEE 

prayer for little folks. 
For food, for clothes, for time to play. 
For sunshine bright, for night, for day. 
For happy thoughts that come our way. 
For laughter light, for warmth, for love. 
We know they come from God above. 



Then off we went again; more running around; 
some business to take care of at Elat. On the way, 
seven sheep were masacred; a whole herd ran head 
on into trie front of tne truck! ! My boy thought it 
was the end for us, but it was just the end for some 
foolish sheep. There was sure a lot of lamb chops 
strung out over the road! ! I found that this is a very 
common experience for the missionaries, and tnat they 
are almost disappointed if there are no sheep getting 
into the way. The natives just can't bother taking care 
of them; and then, too, there is a chance to feast if 
some sheep get killed! There are plenty left. 

Getting back to Bozoum, the schedule was all made 
.... Then to Bozoum, after being laid up at Yaloke 
for a week, waiting lor a spring part. Freda was all 
worried about our garden — the first sign of anything 
coming up and being eatable for months, and now we 
were galavanting around the country! I also was 
starting to get a little worried. Keeping books on the 
cuff, or on the back of envelopes, etc., hoping I would 
remember all I was supposed to about what I wrote 
thus. Then also, seven weeks away from the station, 
what would I find? I was sure all would be hidden in 
the tall grass. 

We got to Paoua, and the administrator said things 
looked good our way. He was pleased that the natives 
thought enough of their white man to take good care 
of things, even though I had been gone so long. Sure 
enough, the garden was all weeded, the orchards were 
cleared, the paths clean and wide, the lawns in fan- 
shape, the house cleaned and aired. They had been 
expecting us every day for a month, and had not given 
up, working and preparing every day for our return, 
even building a fire and boiling drinking water. What 
a picture of what the Church should be doing — on the 
job, even if the Lord delays His coming! We were so 
glad that they are learning to bear responsibility. 

Then as to garden and fruit, we came back in just 
the right time to get in on canning some beans, toma- 
toes, and guavas for jam and jelly. Beans had gotten 
dry. tomatoes and Paipai had spoiled, but there were 
many left. And. we had a big batch of yellow bantam 
corn, just right to eat from the cob! ! ! ! 

For a solid week I have done nothing but sit, sit, sit, 
filling pages with figures, finally arriving at a balance, 
and reports made, and mercantile order formulated. 
My head aches, my back aches, and where I sit aches. 
Why. I even sit on a pillow at the table to eat. You 
would think I had gotten a hard spanking! ! ! ! 

We have been having fine meeting's with the church. 
Am meeting them twice a week in a semi-formal 
teaching and business meeting combined. The chapel 
was filled Sunday .... Pray for us and the coming 
conference. 



SERMON STARTERS 




Played 



1. The PLACE of Prayer (Matt. 6.6). 

2. The PERIOD of Prayer (Luke 18:1), 

3. The PERSON of Prayer (Jer. 33:3). 

4. The PURPOSE of Prayer (Matt. 26:41). 

5. The PRIVILEGE of Prayer (Jcs. 5:16). 

6. The PROMISE of Prayer (John 15:7). 

7. The POWER of Prayer (Rom. 10:1). 



—22— 



FEBRUARY 1, 1941 



IfSHP &&£& 



From 
Our Workers 



Brother Orville Jobson writes us from Africa, "At 
the close of the Bible School this year, we ordained 
Noel Gaiwaka, the only student that took the work of 
all four terms. The other students were changed from 
term to term because of the demand of their fields. 
Dr. Taber, Bro. Jake Kliever, and Jean Noetimo (the 
only other ordained native elder), assisted in the ser- 
vice. Noel now takes charge of the native churches in 
the Bozoum field, which includes Bocaranga, Kounang, 
and Biabokoum. He has just left for a six weeks' tour 
of these different places." 

7 lbs. 11 oz. worth of boy arrived at the home of 
Mr. and Mrs. Herman A. Hoyt, our seminary friends at 
Winona Lake, on Jan. 13. The little fellow sends us 
word that his name is Edwin Max. 

Concerning the evangelistic meeting which Bro. 
Robert Culver recently held at the Talma, Ind., where 
Glenn O'Neal is student pastor of the Talma Christian 
Church, we are informed: "There was really only one 
public decision for Christ, but what a decision that 
was! This man is middle-aged, and hadn't missed a 
night in 20 years to go to the pool hall to play cards. 
It was quite a step for him, but he really is gloriously 
saved. Then there was also another decision, but not 
public. However, we feel that the meetings revived 
the members of our own church, which certainly is a 
thing for which to praise the Lord. They were surely 
in a state that needed reviving." 

Bro. Maconaghy in S. America writes, "The war has 
affected this country in many ways. First, this coun- 
try is practically entirely agricultural, having huge 
harvests every year. That is fine when things are nor- 
mal and they can sell it to the rest of the world. How- 
ever, now all this has stopped. As a result last year's 
harvest is stored away in bulging warehouses, and no 
one knows where this year's harvest will be put. The 
people of this land who make their bread and butter 
working in such things have nothing to do, and find 
themselves in a sad condition. Also all the coal came 
from England, and when the war sta.rted, they had 
to substitute wood for coal on the railroads. There are 
other ways also, such as having daylight saving time 
in the winter. However, we are not really suffering 
any, for which we praise the Lord." 

Brother and Sister Garner Hoyt, Grace Seminary 
students, have started a Gospel Mission at Milford, 
Ind. They write, "The Lord has been blessing us in 
a wonderful way. At first it was very difficult to get 
anyone to come out, but we spent many hours calling 
at homes and doing personal work while there. So 
the news is spreading all over the town, and it is at- 
tracting their attention. These last two weeks have 
been great: attendance 56 and 41. A few weeks ago 
we did well to get 10 out, but I believe that is over now. 
Pray for souls up here." 

An organization known as the Old Guard is assist- 
ing the pastor at the Roanoke, Va., church in the work 
of visitation. 

The Spokane, Wash., church reports, "The work 
here is moving along nicely. Strangers are seen at 
nearly all services. A fine spirit of Christian fellow- 
ship prevails, for which we give God all the glory." 

If you have any news that could be used in this 
column, address it to Editorial Office, The Brethren 
Missionary Herald Co., 3326 S. Calhoun St., Ft. Wayne, 
Ind. 





jilaMM 



FROM THE FIELD 



The First Brethren Church of the El let District, Akron, 0., was 
host to Rev. Leo Polman Sunday, Jan. 19. It was indeed a full day 
for Bro. Polman. He began by presenting the music for the Brethren 

Radio Hour over station WJW, which 
program is sponsored by the Ellet 
church each Sunday morning from 
8:30 to 9:00, and has been for the 
past 72 weeks. He continued by 
taking a general survey of the Bible 
School classes (22 in number) for the 
purpose of giving valuable assistance 
in its improvement, especially relative 
to the use of the Brethren literature, 
where possible. Mr. Polman then pre- 
sented the morning worship message 
Ellet Church ot 10.30, and sang again at the 

Monthly Brethren Songfest held the 
third Sunday of each month in the church auditorium, at 2:30 P. M. 

Again at 7:30 P. M. Bro. Polman preached to a splendid audience 
which had gathered in spite of the cold weather and icy pave- 
ments. In addition to making an appeal for subscriptions to The 
Brethren Missionary Herald magazine and for gifts to the company, 
Rev. Polman made a strong and effective appeal at both the morn- 
ing and evening for decisions for Christ. His appeal was so hon- 
ored by 5 confessions of Christ at the morning service and 45 deci- 
sions at the evening, 3 of which were to receive Christ as Savior, 
42 reaffirmations of faith in Christ and dedications to service for 
Him. Of this latter number several will mean additions to the 
church, we believe, one of whom already was reinstated into church 
membership after a period during which she had forfeited her mem- 
bership here. It was an inspiring and soul-searching scene to wit- 
ness, and Bible School officers, teachers, church officials, and lay- 
men surrounded the choir and pulpit platform in penitence and con- 
fession of sins and dedication of life to Christ. 

While we have not had a series of evangelistic services yet this 
year, the spirit of evangelism pervades every service, resulting in 
decisions at nearly every Lord's Day service. Baptism is admin- 
istered two and sometimes three Sundays each month. Each Sun- 
day evening at 7:00 P. M. a group of praying brethren gather in a 
prayer room for intercession in behalf of lost souls. Herein is one 
of the secrets for the fires of evangelism and soul-winning that per- 
vades the Sunday services. Another secret is the group of members 
of the Bible School staff which gathers each Friday evening in the 
church basement for prayer, and then goes out, two by two, in the 
quest for souls. The more these two groups labor for the Lord the 
more souls are coming to church and then to the Lord. This in 
turn stimulates more and greater interest in visitation and prayer, 
and so the work progresses. 

There are many other thrilling incidents and scenes which might 
be related concerning the work here. Three choirs and a men's 
chorus are functioning regularly in the church. 20 some students 
are enrolled in the Akron Bible Institute preparing for a more 
effectual ministry for Him. The pastor is teaching two hours each 
Thursday evening in the Institute, one a class in Bible Doctrine and 
the other a class in Christian Evidences. The W.M.C. and the 
S.M.M are both filling a very definite place in the life of our 
women and young ladies. Finances are in satisfactory condition. 

All of the above may sound too good to be true of an institution 
in this sinful environment. Well, the church has also her problems: 
differences arise; disappointments come; sin creeps in; unfaithful- 
ness, in too many instances, exists; friends prove false; foes do op- 
press; but God prevails and the church marches on. May God be 
praised and given the glory and honor. May we be found faithful 
when He shall appear, and be found worthy to reign with Him. 



—23- 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



Ha^aum P>iati& and PtiGUf&i 
J\latel 

The 15th of each month, as perhaps some of you 
know, is the day set aside for prayer. The Lord richly 
blessed in our prayer services here last week as we 
unitedly asked in the Spirit for such things as Uod has 
promised according to His precious Word. We do con- 
tinue to praise the Lord that the door in French Equa- 
torial Africa is still open to the gospel, and that many 
are coming to know Jesus as their personal savior. Let 
us pray that a mighty revival may spread over this 
land, and may this revival start in us. 

Sunday proved to be a full and blessed day here. Our 
regular church service was held in the morning, and 
25 came forward stating their desire to take Jesus as 
their personal Savior. Many have faithfully attended 
the inquirers' class every morning for the past two 
years, and Sunday 55 were buried in the waters of 
baptism. This truly was a haopy day tor these new 
creatures in Christ Jesus. Their black shiny faces 
beamed with joy as they testified, praising God for 
His goodness and mercy to them. 

Let us not forget to pray for them, as many shall en- 
dure persecution. One woman, a soldier's wife, came 
to service in the morning, and was one of the 25 who 
accepted the Lord. She went to the nlace of baptism; 
but before the service, her husband came and took her 
away and whipped her. We asked smie of the Chris- 
tians why he did it, and they said, "Because she wants 
to be a Christian." Pray for her, also her wicked hus- 
band, that he too may be saved. 

Pray that the way may be opened for the return 
of our missionaries; also that the missionaries on the 
field may be given the needed health and strength. 
Remember Dr. Gribble, who has gone to South Africa 
on furlough. 

Pray for the Bible School students and their wives 
as they continue to study God's Word and hide it in 
their hearts. Romans 8:26-27. 

Mrs. O. D. Jobson 




LIGHT on TRUTH 

By Bernard Schneider 



In Is. 59:2 we read that our sins have separated be- 
tween us and God, and are hiding His face from us. 
That is the awful thing about sin, it separates, even 
unto an eternal separation from God and His home, 
with all that it means. However, in Is. 38:17 we read 
what God has done with the sins of the person who 
has come to the cross with them. "Thou hast in love 
to my soul delivered it from the pit of corruption: for 
Thou hast cast all my sins behind Thy back." What 
a wonderful change there is now. Before I came to 
the Lord, all my sins stood between me and God, hid- 
ing His blessed face. But now, God stands between me 
and all my sins, and I shall never be judged of them 
any more. What a wonderful salvation is ours! 

m THE SHADOW 



WESCOTT, MRS. MABEL, 64, wife of Fred Wescott of Seattle, 
Wash., departed to be with her Lord on Dec. 27, after an illness of 
several months. Mrs. Wescott was born in Andrew, la., and moved 
to Washington 35 years ago, settling at Sunnyside where she was a 
faithful member of The First Brethren Church. For the past 16 
years the Wescotts have resided in Seattle, where she was interred 
in the Evergreen Cemetery after funeral services in the Bleitz Funeral 
Parlors. Mrs. Wescott is survived by her husband and five children. 



1+1 = 2 



minimum 



nmmnsii 



immimiimmn 



| May We Go-unt an tyau? 



E The other day we received the following letter from M. E. 

— Horner: 

E "If each subscriber to the Herald would 

S send in one new subscription, it would 

E help a bit. So I wish to start that list." 

E In the same mail came another letter from Miss Doris Fallis: 

= "Enclosed find $2.00. P_ease renew my 
subscription for one year and please 

E send the Herald for one year to ... " 

E And still another in the same mail from Rev. Alan S. Pearce: 

= "We are going after subscriptions in 

E cur church as never before, so that you 

E may expect to receive a goodly number 

S more from time to time during the next 

E month." 

E There letters gave us an idea — A DOUBLE 

E ONE Campaign. So we are out after double 

E ones. What is it? 

— 1. — Send In your own subscrintion to THE 
E BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 
~ — $1.00 for one year. 

E —and — 

E 2. — Then send an extra $1.00 for another 

= one year subscription to The Brethren 

E Missionary Herald to be sent to a friend 

E or relative. 

| YOUR DOLLAR DOUBLED 

S will send forth the Word of God through the 

E printed pages of The Brethren Missionary 

E Herald to more than double. 

— Your dollar doubled will be sending a Christian testimony 
S — the kind that you yourself would want to send out — for 
= less than you could send a tract each week into a home — 
E And The Brethren Missionary Herald, with its 16 or more 
~ pages 48 times each year, certainly is better than a single 
~ tract sent out once eech week. 

E Here is my dollars for 

E MY SUBSCRIPTION 

E Renewal Q or New Q 

s Name 

E Address 



City State ._. 

And with my double dollar, send 
The Brethren Missionary Herald for one year to 

Name 

Address 

City State _ __ 



Inclosed find $ For additional sub- 
scriptions use blank paper. 

THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD CO. 

3326 S. Calhoun St. Fort Wayne, Ind 



—24— 




EDUCATIONAL 
NUMBER 

FEBRUARY 8, 1941 
3 No. 6 



>3ffWraSx 



IN THIS ISSUE 



OUND THE WORLD— Page 2 
IWINARY NEWS — Page 3 

SPEI, TEAM 

ACTIVITIES — Pages 4,5 

CULTY PREACHING 
ENGAGEMENTS — Pages 6, 7 

VIINARY DAY 
OF PRAYER — Page 7 

JLE SCHOOL DEPT.— Page 8 

PTISM OF 
HOLY SPIRIT — Page 9 

[RIST DIED FOR 

OUR SINS — Page 10 

S. L. V. NEWS — Page 11 

>YS' & GIRLS' — Page 12 

SIEN SINGLE 

IMMERSION BEGAN— Page 13 



SAT DO BRETHREN 
BELIEVE — 


Page 13 


ULY MANNA — 


Page 13 


(OKING UNTO 
JESUS — 


Page 14 


GHT ON TRUTH — 


Page 14 


E. DEPT. — 


Page 15 


:WS BRIEFS — 


Page 15 


IEETINGS — 


Page 16 



Qod's Silence 




I hear the traffic of the street 
But not the white world o'er the town; 

I hear the gun at sunset roar, 
I do not hear the sun go down. 



Are work and workmen greater when 
The trumpet blows their fame abroad? 

Nowhere on earth is found the man 
Who works as silently as God. 

— Author Unknown. 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



Al&ustd the WanM 



great revival which will save boys and girls by the 
millions. 




By CHAS. W. MAYES 

SURREY, England. — Kenneth Kerner, soon to be 10 
years of age, recently applied to the British Air Min- 
ister for an opportunity to become an air pilot. His 
letter printed with his own hand follows: 
To the Air Minister. 

Please could you train me on a small gloster 
gladiator in about two weeks my age is nine 
I will be ten on December third 1940. 

From Kenneth Kerner. 

The air minister politely turned down his letter of 
request, saying that Great Britain has no airplane 
small enough to train the little fellow. So Kenneth 
went back to building small model planes, and says 
that he will apply again when he grows up. 

Boys of 10 may be too small to serve their country 
in the air service, but they can serve the Lord in ser- 
vice if they know the meaning of simple faith in 
Christ. In one of our churches one boy of 10 brought 
about a dozen other boys to the Bible school. In the 
years that have passed, at least half of this number 
have come to Christ and some of them are out bring- 
ing in more boys. Such work may not receive world- 
wide publicity, but it is more valuable than the work 
of all the armies of the earth. Wise Christian leaders 
will enlist the services of boys and girls at an early 
age. 



YOU MAY HELP STOP CRIME 

INDIANAPOLIS, Indiana.— The Law Enforcement 
Committee of the American Bar Association recently 
held its meeting in this city. The committee reports 
that on the basis of reliable statistics of the past there 
are now 200,000 persons in the United States who 
will commit murder before they die. The annual cost 
of crime in this country is over $15,000,000 and it is 
getting larger each year. A major crime is committed 
every 22 seconds, and today the United States has the 
greatest percentage of her population in jail for crime 
of all the nations of earth. 

If next Sunday morning you drive out of your way 
to pick up a 12 year old boy and take him to Bible 
school, and encourage him to come to Christ, and he 
is saved as a result of your efforts, you may save a 
criminal from becoming a criminal, and place a pre- 
cious soul on the way to heaven. 

If you continue to encourage the lad and teach him 
the Word so that the Lord can call him to be a preach- 
er or a missionary, you will be setting in motion the 
spiritual machinery to bless tens of thousands with 
the gospel. 

The best insurance against crime in America is a 



MEN PRAY 

AS SHELLS EXPLODE 

PARIS, France. — Evidence is available to indicate 
that certain gospel work has been carried on amid 
the most severe bombings from the German army, and 
those under the fire know a peace which passeth un- 
derstanding when the presence of God is realized. 

The following translated article printed in Revel- 
ation magazine, and written by a Protestant chaplain 
is most interesting. 

"One Sunday evening at nightfall, I closed my last 
service in a dug-out where 18 soldiers and officers of 
all ranks had found place. In the woods, 800 yards 
from the front line, I was walking along, a little tired, 
toward the road where a car was waiting for me three 
miles away. Suddenly I perceived four human forms 
coming towards me in the semi-darkness. Since I had 
a similar experience in October when a German pa- 
trol threw hand grenades at me, I was very circum- 
spect. But they proved to be four French soldiers, 
muddy and hairy, who had lost their way in looking 
for the place where the service was to be held. Happy 
to see me, they expressed, nevertheless, their regrets 
at missing the meeting. I asked them if they knew 
the hymn, "Jusqu'a la mort nous Te serons fideles" 
(Until death we will be faithful to Thee), and they 
did, and soon our solemn voices lifted this hymn into 
the silence of the foggy evening. The great shadows 
of night were advancing more and more. I recited 
the 23d Psalm from memory. One of the boys got 
down on his knees, and we all knelt together. Just as 
I began to pray, some German shells were fired, ex- 
ploding in the air above us, the pieces of steel shat- 
tering through the trees above us. No one moved, and 
the reflex action which usually sends everyone to 
cover in such moments, just didn't work. After the 
brief commentary which I made on the Psalm, and 
the prayer together, one of the soldiers said, "It wasn't 
the moment to flop to cover. We were just saying, 
'Yea though I walk through the valley of the shadow 
of death, I will fear no evil,' and it would have been 
an affront to Him to try to hide in such a moment!" 
And the chaplain adds, "Such is the simple faith of 
many at the front. It is as in the days of old. And 
continuing my way through the night I thanked the 
Lord for another proof of His constant presence." 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 

The Brethren Missionary Herald is published weekly, 
four times a month, or 48 times a vear, at Herald Press, 
Inc., 1300 West 9th St., Cleveland, Ohio, by the Brethren 
Missionary Herald Co.. 3326 So. Calhoun St., Fort Wayne, 
Ind. 

Subscription Price: In the United States and possessions, 

$1.00 a year; Foreign countries, 51.50 a year. 

ADMINISTRATION 

Secretary of Publications: Leo Polman 

Business Office Secretary: Miss Geneva Kuhn 

Editorial Office Secretary: Miss Grace Allshouse 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

President: Russell D. Barnard Secretary: Tom Hammers 

Vice-President: Ralph Rambo Treasurer: Homer A. Kent 

R. D. Crees Mrs. Roy Patterson R. E. Gingrich 

George Richardson L. L. Grubb Bernard Schneider 

EDITORS 
Foreign Missions: Louis S. Bauman. 
Educational: Alva J. McClain. 
Home Missions: R. Paul Miller. 
Women's Missionary Council: Mrs. A. B. Kidder. 



Entered as second class matter at the post office at 
Cleveland, Ohio, February 9, 1939, under the act of March 
3, 1879. 



—2— 



FEBRUARY 8, 1941 



SEMINARY 
NEWS 







-:j£fi^g> '% ■ -■ 



ALVA J. McCLAIN 

President of Grace Theological Seminary 

Winona Lake, Ind. 



Seminary Annual Day of Prayer 

On Friday, Jan. 17, all classes and ordinary activi- 
ties at the seminary were dismissed and the entire day 
was given to prayer. The fore noon session was de- 
voted primarily to self-examination and confession, 
the afternoon to praise and thinksgiving, and the even- 
ing to special requests and general petition. For those 
interested, the detailed program of the day will be 
found on page 7 in this issue of the Herald. When 
we come down from the mountain-top, after such an 
experience as students and faculty enjoyed, it is diffi- 
cult to find words with which to tell about what hap- 
pened there. Prehaps that is the way the Lord would 
have it. The "secret of His presence" must be person- 
ally experienced in order to be known. So we shall 
not attempt to say more than that the Lord graciously 
manifested Himself to us all, spoke to our hearts, and 
brought us more fully into the knowledge of His will. 

One characteristic of the day was deeply impressive. 
So many "days of prayer" we have seen have been so 
cluttered up with human addresses and leadership 
that the voice of God was almost crowded out. There- 
fore, we were anxious that this should be trulv a day 
of prayer. To this end no addresses at all were 
planned, there were no special numbers of music, and 
as far as possible human leadership was relegated to 
the background. The sole purpose of making any 
"program" at all was to insure that no important ele- 
ment of prayer might be overlooked or crowded out. 
And lest even this might quench some good thing the 
Spirit of the Lord might have for us, we planned for 
a final session where nothing would be planned, but 
only announced the place and time of meeting. All else 
was left for the leadership of the Holy Spirit, and He 
blessed us richly. 

Another unforgettable experience of the day came 
at the evening session for special requests. Professor 
Hoyt opened the session with a personal testimony, 
telling very simply the story of the salvation and "loos- 
ing away upward" of his father-in-law, for whom the 
seminary had prayed many times. Then about half 
an hour was given to the hearing of special requests. 
And the remarkable thing was that practically every 
reauest was for the salvation of unsaved friends and 
loved ones. It seemed that the Spirit wanted to pour 
out upon the school a deeper concern for the lost. And 
since that day, both faculty members and students 
have seen opportunities for personal soul-winning 
open in the most unexpected ways. "The Lord hath 
done great things for us; whereof we are glad." (Psa. 
126:3). 



Is It Worthwhile? 

Elsewhere in this issue the reader will find consid- 
erable space given to the outside activities of both 
faculty members and student Gospel teams. This is 
only a partial report. Nothing has been said in detail 
about the ministry of the comparatively large number 
of students who act as pastors of churches. But we 
want the friends of the seminary to understand that 
we do more here than study and learn. The first 



business of a seminary, of course, is study and teach- 
ing. But we believe that within proper limits the 
activities of preaching and soul-winning are neces- 
sary to keep us healthy spiritually. And therefore 
we are glad for the many opportunities which have 
opened up to faculty members and students to hear 
the testimony of His grace, and for the souls reached 
for salvation and service. 

It might be pointed out here that even if one should 
not be interested in the support of a theological semi- 
nary for the training of ministers and missionaries, 
but only in direct evangelistic and missionary work, 
as some are, it would be well worth while to maintain 
such a school as Grace Seminary as a purely mission 
project. Considering the people reached with the gos- 
pel and the lives saved and dedicated to our Lord, we 
believe that it could easily be shown that the money 
expended to support the seminary brings immediate 
results which would compare favorably with the aver- 
age missionary project. And this is only a by-product 
of the seminary. Our first task is the preparation of 
men and women in an educational way. 

What has been said is no attempt at self-congrat- 
ulation. At our best, none of us can boast that we are 
profitable servants. But what we have said is for the 
information especially of the many friends who have 
joined in the financial support of Grace Seminary. 
Pray for us, that we may continue in diligence, to the 
end that no Christian donor may lose his reward 
through our negligence. 



Three New Students 

It is not often that students apply for entrance at 
the middle of the year, because as a rule certain 
required courses begin at the first semester, and the 
faculty recommends entrance then as the most advan- 
tageous. However, we are glad to announce that three 
new students were admitted at the beginning of the 
second semester, since the way they have planned their 
work will permit such an arrangement. They are Mr. 
and Mrs. Irwin Weyhe of Gary, Ind., who have been 
engaged in evangelistic work for the past several 
years; and Mr. Lawrence Lawlor of Waverly, N. Y., who 
was saved by the personal ministry of Brother Frank 
G. Coleman, Jr., during a meeting at Allentown, Pa. 
Brother Lawlor is a graduate of a musical conservatory, 
has played professionally in bands and orchestras, 
and teaches the reed instruments. 

At the same time we regret to say that Bro. Jack 
Shafer of Canton, O., has withdrawn from the semi- 
nary temporarily. He is a member of the First Breth- 
ren Church of that city, and had entered the seminary 
in September. At the completion of his first semester, 
he returned to his home for the holidays with some 
fines grades and in splendid health. While at home a 
slight injury to his knee turned into a rather serious 
case of blood poison, necessitating surgical attention, 
and made him a week late for the second semester. 
Shortly after arriving he suffered a relapse, and after 
several days in the hospital it seemed best for him 
to return home for rest and further treatment. We 
ask that our friends everywhere will join in prayer 



—3— 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



that Jack may be quickly and completely restored, so 
that he may be able to resume his studies in the near 
future. We feel certain that the Lord has a great work 
for him in teaching and preaching the Word. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Cook also withdrew at the close 
of the first semester, having accepted a call to go out 
as missionaries to Haiti. 



Another "New" Student 

While we are talking about students, doubtless we 
should announce a new "prospective student" in the 
family of Professor and Mrs. Herman A. Hoyt. His 
name is Edwin Max Hoyt, and he arrived on the morn- 
ing of Jan. 13, which was registration day at the sem- 
inary.. We trust that, should the Lord tarry, he may 
some day fill out a registration card here, be as good 
a scholar as his father, and be as good looking as his 
mother. Little Joe Paul, now four years old, is greatly 
enthused about his new brother. And while on this 
subject, perhaps the readers of the Herald will enjoy 
hearing about what a great help Joe Paul is to his 
father. Prof. Hoyt had gone down to the store to buy 
some groceries, and having completed and paid for 
his purchases, like the typical absent-minded profes- 
sor, got Joe Paul by the hand and started home, leav- 
ing the packages on the counter. Joe Paul let his 
father get out the door and then remarked rather 
gravely, "Daddy, don't you think we had better take 
those things home!" 



Qa4,p,el jeant ActiiutieA, 

"And the Word of the Lord was published" 

(ACTS 13:49) 

The Lord has opened many doors of service this last 
semester for the "Ambassadors of Grace," for which 
we are deeply thankful to Him. Every member of the 
seminary student body is also a member of the gospel 
teams; and when a call comes in for a team, the 
officers of the student body meet, and after prayer for 
definite guidance a team is selected from students who 
are available at that particular time. Thus we feel 
that every team going out is the Lord's own choice. 

Up to the beginning of the second semester the 
teams have held 30 services in 14 churches, traveling 
about 3,500 miles in the fulfillment of these appoint- 
ments. 

Among the places where the teams have ministered 
are the following: 

Bethel Brethren Church, Berne, Ind. 

Grace Brethren Church, Fremont, O. 

W. Tenth Street Brethren Church, Ashland, O. 

First Brethren Church, Cleveland, O. 

Danville Brethren Church, Danville, O. 

Grace Brethren Church, Flora, Ind. 

Bethel Brethren Church, Osceola, Ind. 

First Brethren Church, Peru, Ind. 

Grace Brethren Church, Sharpsville, Ind. 

Christian Church, Talma, Ind. 

United Presbyterian Church, California, Mich. 

Argus Christian Church, Argus, Ind. 

Christian Church, Palestine, Ind. 

Free Methodist Church, Winona Lake, Ind. 

Besides the above engagements, there were three 
teams at work throughout the Christmas holidays, 
which this year extended for three weeks. One team 
was in Kentucky, another in the mid-west, and the 
third was traveling through the east. Separate reports 
of the work of these teams appear below. Many prec- 
ious souls have been led to the Lord through the testi- 
mony of the students, and others have dedicated their 
lives to the service of Him who loved us and gave 
Himself for us. To Him be all the glory. 

— Ralph Rambo 



P^eacUltta the Qal^el Ut the 
Jlaccd flail 

"And the prisoners heard them" 

(ACTS 16:25) 

The Gospel of Christ is the power of God unto sal- 
vation to every one that believeth. The Lord is no 
respector of persons, for He came to seek and to save 
that which was LOST! It has been our privilege again 
this year to take the Gospel into the Warsaw County 
Jail The Lord has commissioned us to sow the seed 
with the promise that He will give the increase in due 
time. Souls have been saved, and we praise the Lord 
for the confessions made thus far. 

At one meeting, for example, the Lord's hand was 
shown, and He worked in a real way. There were six 
men in the cell. One was sleeping and did not bother 
to come out of his bunk. When we questioned the 
other five, four of them admitted their lost condition, 
but one posed as an agnostic. After we had borne our 
testimonies the agnostic began discussions which dis- 
tracted the attention of the other men. It seemed that 
Satan had begun his work in using this man as an 
instrument, but the Lord overruled. Very shortly an 
officer came to take him to trial. We rejoiced that the 
hindrance had been removed, for now the Spirit was 
able to work freely. We talked further with the four 
remaining men concerning the things of the Lord, and 
without any persuasion on our part, each one openly 
confessed Christ as his personal Savior. The follow- 
ing Sunday we could see the change in their hearts, 
because their faces beamed with the joy of the Lord. 

During this past Christmas season two more men, 
having never heard the Gospel before, accepted the 
Lord Jesus Christ as their Savior. Truly the harvest 
is ripe in our very own fields! 

— By The Team 



"1L& ^eam that Went Welt 

"And there they preached the gospel" 

(ACTS 14:7) 
If anyone should try to tell you that real old-fash- 
ioned hospitality can only be found south of the Mason 
and Dixon line, then they should be sent out in the 
middle west to follow the trail of the gospel team com- 
posed of Sidney Erwin and Robert HOI, and they will 
return with the conclusion that the folks out there 
not only love the Word but also know how to take care 
of itinerant preachers. 

This team was on the road for a good part of the 
vacation period, and had the privilege of visiting and 
ministering in churches through Kansas, Nebraska, 
and Iowa. At every place the Lord was gracious in 
manifesting His blessing on the testimony to His grace. 

Our first stop was at Portis, Kan., where we greatly 
enjoyed the fellowship with Brother and Sister Cone. 
After several meetings there, the team moved up to 
Beaver City, Nebr., and there had the joy of seeing a 
young girl accept the Lord as her Savior. From the 
plains of Kansas and Nebraska we went over into Iowa, 
holding meetings at Leon, Dallas Center, and Waterloo. 
In all we traveled over 2,300 miles, and the blessings 
to us personally were even more numerous. The total 
results were 23 decisions for the Lord, all young peo- 
ple, which should result in many new members for the 
Brethren Student Life Volunteers. God is still able 
to bless His people today as always, and exceeding 
abundantly above all that we ask or think. 

— By The Team 



FEBRUARY 8, 1941 



Pleaching the Qa<L<p,el Ut the 
Cad 



"And when they had preached the gospel 
returned again" 

(ACTS 14:21) 



. they 



A gospel team from Grace Seminary, consisting of 
Mr. & Mrs. Herman Baerg, Harold Mayer, and Mr. & 
Mrs. Ralph Rambo, left Winona Lake at four o'clock 
Thursday morning, Dec. 26, for a tour of some of our 
churches in Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Maryland. 
Our first stop was at Akron, O., where we had lunch 
with the family of Brother Mayer. This was one of 
the bright spots of our tour, for there we had the priv- 
ilege of spending an hour with one of God's choicest 
saints, Bro. Mayer's mother. Although she has been 
on a bed of affliction for 17 years, she has the radiant 
face of one who really knows her Lord. It is a bene- 
diction just to be in her presence, and it was through 
her consistent prayer that Bro. Mayer was brought to 
the saving knowledge of the Lord Jesus Christ. 

Our first meeting was scheduled for the Pike Breth- 
ren Church at Mundy's Corner, Pa., where Brother 
Kenneth Ashman is pastor, but we ran into one of 
those Pennsylvania fogs (we thought for a while that 
we were in California) and were delayed; so we missed 
our service there. However, we were able to return 
the following Monday night, and had a fine meeting 
with Brother and Sister Ashman and their people. 
It was also at Mundy's Corner that we had our first 
calamity. Mrs. Baerg contracted a severe cold on the 
way out, making it necessary to leave her there until 
our return for the meeting on Monday evening. Under 
the skillful care of Sister Ashman, who is a trained 
nurse, she was so far recovered that she was able to 
continue with the party. 

On Friday night we were with Brother and Sister 
Ord Gehman at Vinco. Although it was pouring down 
rain, quite a number were out, and we had a blessed 
time in the Lord. The following night, Saturday, we 
were in the Conemaugh church, where Brother and 
Sister William Schaffer are ministering. It was Sat- 
urday evening and the attendance was not great; but, 
nevertheless, God wonderfully blessed, and we have 
heard some unusually encouraging reports from this 
meeting. We also had the pleasure of being enter- 
tained in the home of Bro. Blaine Snyder while in 
Conemaugh. Bro. Blaine was the honor student of 
our last year's graduating class. 

On Sunday morning we were with Brother and Sister 
Lorenz in Meyersdale and Summit Mills. Brother 
Lorenz preaches in the Summit Mills church at 9:30 
A. M., and in the Meyersdale church at 10:30 A. M. 
The churches are three miles apart and we made the 
trip that morning in nothing flat Brother Lorenz 
is not only a good preacher, but also a good driver. 
We had two fine meetings here, and Sunday evening 
we were with Brother and Sister Clough in the Union- 
town Church. About 300 were present in the church 
— our largest attendance. The Spirit of God was very 
much in evidence in this meeting and decisions were 
made for Christ. 

After spending Monday evening with Bro. Ashman 
in Mundys Corner, we set out for Hagerstown, where 
we spent New Year's Eve with Brother and Sister Lew 
Grubb in the watch night service. This was another 
bright spot, especially for Mr. and Mrs. Rambo, as 
the Lord save them the privilege of ministering there 
last summer. It was, indeed, a joy to meet old friends 
again, as well as some of the fine new people who have 
been attending since Bro. Grubb was called as pastor. 



Several decisions were made in the meeting which 
lasted from 8:00 p. m., until 12:00 mid-night. We 
thank God for Brother and Sister Grubb's ministry 
in this place. 

New Year's Day was spent in our national capital, 
where we were entertained in the home of one of our 
fellow students, Bro. Gene Allen. This was not the 
first time we had had this privilege and pleasure, so 
it was a joy to meet again these dear friends. 

Thursday evening found us with Brother and Sister 
Robert Crees in Waynesboro, who are much beloved by 
their congregation. The attendance here was very 
good, and we had a fine service. On Friday we passed 
through Hagerstown at noon, just in time to enjoy an 
excellent ham dinner with Brother and Sister Albert 
Williams; then on to Winchester, Virginia, to be with 
Brother and Sister Uphouse, where we were enter- 
tained in the beautiful new parsonage. Sister Uphouse 
was a very gracious hostess to us. The meeting here 
was fine. 

Saturday evening we were in the Covington church, 
where Brother and Sister Arthur Malles are doing ex- 
cellent work. This church is also the home of our 
pl-esent student body president, Brother Phillip J. 
(Jack to us) Simmons. We had the pleasure of meet- 
ing Jack's parents and being in his home. (Now we 
know why Jack is so fine). The people in this church 
are on fire for the Lord, and souls are being saved. 

Sunday morning we arose early and drove down 
the valley to Roanoke to be with Brother and Sister 
Koontz. This was one of our finest meetings, in spite 
of an epidemic of flu. The church was well filled, and 
God richly blessed the service. Sunday afternoon we 
drove to Buena Vista to be in the church where our 
old friends, Eddie and Mildred Bowman, are located. 
These fine young people both graduated from Grace 
Seminary last year, and it was a real joy for us to be 
in their home, and to see how God is blessing their 
ministry. There were four decisions in the evening 
service. 

Our next meeting was in the Philadelphia First 



WOULDN'T THIS APPLY TO 
CHURCHES TOO? 







-5— 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



Brethren Church with Bro. Kimmel, who is president 
of the Seminary Board of Trustees. While the attend- 
ance was not as large as in some of the other churches, 
the spirit was fine, and we had a good service. It was 
a real joy for Mrs. Rambo to be in the church again 
where she had given her heart to the Lord Jesus, and 
where she spent her girlhood days. Her father and 
mother, Mr. and Mrs. Harry C. Cassel, were charter 
members of this church. We were entertained while 
in Philadelphia in the beautiful China Inland Mission 
Home in Germantown. 

Our next stop was at Allentown, where Brother and 
Sister J. L. Gingrich are now located. We found there 
a very beautiful church building, and a congregation 
100% behind their pastor. One of the outstanding 
things about the service here was the unusual num- 
ber of young people present. There were three Sun- 
day school classes with 100% of their members present 
and 21 officers and teachers also present. The super- 
intendent of this Bible School, Carrol Parks, is a young- 
high school teacher, and is very much interested in 
Grace Seminary. There is room in the Brethren min- 
istry for young men of this character. While in Allen- 
town we received the following telegram: 

"Grace gospel team invited to a turkey dinner 

— three p. m. Saturday." 

Signed, Ken Ashman. 

Needless to say we accepted the invitation, and arrived 
in Mundy's Corner in time to enjoy a regular feast in 
the home of Brother and sister C. B. Goughnour. 

Our last service was held Sunday morning, Jan. 12, 
in the church at Kittanning, where Brother and Sister 
George Kinzie are ministering. There were about 150 
present, and they gave us a very warm reception. After 
a splendid dinner in the home of Brother and Sister 
Kinzie. where we met their two fine boys, and their 
daughter and her husband, we started at 2:30 p. m. 
for Winona Lake. We ware homeward bound, tired 
but happy — happy because we had been serving our 
blessed Lord. We arrived home about midnight Sun- 
day, after having traveled almost 3,000 miles, and 
holding 15 services in 18 days. We spoke to 1,520 peo- 
ple; and the best of all. 15 decisions were made for 
Christ. This was a glorious trip, and we praise God 
for the privilege that was ours. Nevertheless, we are 
glad to be back in our beloved Seminary again. 

— Ey The Team Leader 



faculty Pleachituj, and 

"Christ in you, the hope of glory . . . Whom we preach" 

(COL. 1:27) 
Prof. Hoyt held several week-end Bible conferences. 
one being in the First Brethren Church of Ellet, O , 
and another in the First Brethren Church of Canton, 
O. He was also the guest speaker at home-coming 
services in the First Baptist Church of Kewanna, Ind., 
and in the First Brethren Church of Peru, Ind. At 
the special services in connection with the laying of 
the cornerstone for the new church at Flora, Ind., 
Prof. Hoyt delivered the main address. In closing a 
county-wide season of Sunday School teacher training, 
the various churches of Marshall County, Ind.. invited 
him to deliver the address. At this gathering a Sem- 
inary Quartet was also present with special selections. 

Prof. Homer A. Kent, who joined the faculty perm- 
anently at the beginning of this school year, has also 
been kept quite busy with outside engagements. In 
addition to his regular work teaching in the seminary, 
Prof. Homer A. Kent has answered a number of calls 



I "Just One Life, 
.^. v 'twill soon be past, 
Only what's done 
for Christ, will last" 



to minister in churches in the vicinity of Winona dur- 
ing the recent months. He preached one Sunday 
morning and evening at the First Baptist Church of 
Mentone, Ind., from which church has come one stu- 
dent to the seminary. During the absence of its pas- 
tor, Rev. Alton Witter, who was ministering in Penn- 
sylvania, he preached morning and evening at the 
River Park Brethren Mission last November. He found 
these people enthusiastically looking forward to the 
building of a new church as soon as the Lord opens 
the way. 

Prof. Kent has also preached in the First Baptist 
Church of Warsaw, Ind., where he found a fine con- 
gregation of people who love the Lord. During the 
Christmas holidays he preached for two of the student 
pastors who were on gospel team trips. These churches 
were the Inboddy Union Church near South Bend, Ind., 
of which Rev. Keith Altig is the much loved student 
pastor, and the Brethren Church of Osceola, Ind., of 
which Rev. Robert Hill of the seminary is the highly 
esteemed minister. 

On three occasions Bro. Kent was called to accom- 
pany gospel teams for special occasions in three Breth- 
ren churches. At Berne. Ind., he preached at the morn- 
ing service while the gospel team had charge of the 
rest of the services of the day which was set aside as 
home-coming day by that church. Then he and the 
gospel team had part in the services of dedication for 
the church at Flora, Ind. Then just last Sunday he 
accompanied a gospel team to Peru, Ind., where he 
preached at the morning service with the gospel team 
aiding in many ways and having full charge of the 
other services of the day. 

President McClain: During the semester I have 
supplied the pulpit for three of the local churches, the 
First Baptist of Warsaw, and the Presbyterian and 
Free Methodist Churches of Winona Lake. The pas- 
tors of all three of these congregations are warm 
friends of the seminary, and have more than once in- 
vited faculty members and gospel teams to minister 

During the Christmas vacation Mrs. McClain 

and I spent several days in the home of Mr. H. E. Eavey 
of Xenia, O., and while there I had the pleasure of 
preaching the Word in the First Reformed Church at 
the request of the pastor. Rev. Scherry. For the in- 
formation of Herald readers who were acquainted with 
her remarkable work, perhaps I should also say that 
Mrs. Eavey departed to be with her Lord in November. 
The funeral service, at which Mr. Eavey requested me 
to deliver the message, was very impressive for the 
large number of personal testimonies which came re- 
garding her wide ministry of teaching and soul-win- 
ning. Rev. Ralph Stewart, director of radio work at 



—6— 



FEBRUARY 8, 1941 



the Moody Bible Institute, and son-in-law of the 
family, presided during the services. 

During the week of Oct. 20-27, when Prof. Kent grac- 
iously conducted my mid-semester examinations, I 
had the privilege of fellowship with Brother and Sister 
Barnard and their people in a Bible conference. It 
was in 1915, as I recall, that I first preached in this 
church, and since that time I have occupied the pulpit 
many times, once acting as supply preacher continu- 
ously for a period of about five months. It has always 
been a pleasure to minister there, but in all these past 
25 years I have not had such a fine spiritual response 
as during this recent conference. And comparing it 
with other similar conferences in other places, I felt 
that the attendance was unusually fine both in size 
and constancy. This fact will be appreciated all the 
more, if it is remembered that this congregation has 
been working under unusual strain for the past 
months. Yet in spite of this situation, I saw no dis- 
couraged people. On the contrary, I received a great 
blessing myself in spending a week with these believers 
who in the midst of their own problems are seeking 
constantly to share their own Christian joy with the 
lost of their community. Not only so, but their loyal 
and uncompromising stand for the truth has become 
known far and wide, advertising the work of pastor 
and people in a way that could not possibly be done 
by the expenditure of any amount of money. Person- 
ally, I have little doubt about the outcome of their 
present courageous defence, but regardless of the out- 
come this church is bound to prosper if our Lord shall 
tarry further. May God bless them. 

From Nov. 28 to Dec. 1, Thursday to Sunday, I was 
with Bro. Mayes and his people at Ashland, O., in a 
Bible conference and special dedication services. Bro. 
Mayes has already reported this ministry, but I feel 
that something more might well be said. If there 
should be any discouraged pastors in our churches 
(I know of none), it would do their hearts great good 
to spend several days with Bro. Mayes and his church. 
And don't think they have not faced real problems. 
About three things, I think, have taken them through 
all their difficulties: under the leadership of the pas- 
tor, the people have come to love the Word of God, 
to love the work of winning the lost, and to love the 
ministry of prayer. The result is a happy church, and 



a growing church. I found that even people in the 
city who care little or nothing for the Lord actually 
marvel at the miracles of conversion which have taken 
place there. Some of the stories and testimonies 
sound almost like the Acts of the apostles. 

The last week in September was spent at The Moody 
Bible Institute delivering a series of studies on the 23rd 
Psalm over the radio WMBI during the noon hour. 
While there I had the pleasure of addressing the school 
at the Monday chapel service, which included faculty 
members, students and employees; also the regular 
prayer hour for the women students. There were also 
profitable conferences with students who are looking 
forward to seminary work in future years. Many peo- 
ple do not realize how manifold and large the various 
ministries of the Moody Institute are. The fellowship 
with Institute officials and teachers brought real bless- 
ing to me personally, particularly that with Rev. Ralph 
Stewart and Dr. Fitzwater. Grace Seminary appre- 
ciates the opportunity given by the Institute of having 
a share in their wide radio ministry. 

I do not think this account should be closed without 
saying something about a recent speaking angagement 
before the Kiwanis Club of Mishawaka, Ind. Last 
year several men from this club happened to drop in 
at a noonday meeting of the Warsaw Club at which I 
was speaking on Archaeology and the Word of God. 
One of the visitors, a leading medical specialist, asked 
whether I would be willing to come to his Club at 
Mishawaka for an address, to which I agreed, think- 
ing that perhaps he just wanted to be polite and would 
forget about the matter. But just a few weeks ago he 
wrote to claim the fulfilment of my promise, and I 
spoke there last Tuesday. The day being fine, there 
was an unusually large attendance, and at no time in 
the years of my teaching have I ever been given a 
more interested and friendly hearing. Readers will be 
interested to learn that I chose to speak on the Reve- 
lation of God in the Lord Jesus Christ. It proves, I 
think, that the hearts of men are hungry for the living 
God. The president of the club said he felt that I had 
been "sent" there especially to deal with that particu- 
lar subject. The experience confirmed something I 
have always tried to stress with students, namely, that 
the minister always gets along best when he sticks to 
his own field, which is the Book. 



PROGRAM OF THE SEMINARY DAY OF PRAYER 



January 17, 1941 

Self-Examination and Confession 

9:00 to 11:30 

1. Opening Session — 9:00 to 9:20. 

Text: "Let us therefore come boldly unto the 
throne of grace, that we may obtain mercy, and 
find grace to help in time of need" (Heb. 4:16). 

2. Group Sessions— 9:25 to 10:00. 

Text: "God be merciful unto us, and bless us, and 
cause His face to shine upon us; that thy way 
may be known upon earth" (Psa. 67). 

3. United Session— 10:10 to 11:30. 

Text: "But let a man examine himself" — "If we 
confess our sins, He is faithful and just to for- 
give us our sins, and to cleanse us from all un- 
righteousness" (1 Cor. 11:28, 1 John 1:9). 

Praise and Thanksgiving 
2:30 to 4:30 

1. Praise in Song — 2:30 to 2:50. 

Text: "Speaking to yourselves in psalms and 
hymns and spiritual songs, singing and making 
melody in your heart to the Lord" (Eph.5:19). 



2. Praise in Testimony— 2 : 50 to 3:30. 

Text: "O Lord, open thou my lips, and my mouth 
shall show forth thy praise" (Psa. 51:15). 

3. Prayer with Thanksgiving— 3:40 to 4:30. 

Text: "In everything by prayer and supplication 
with thanksgiving let your requests be made 
known unto God" (Phil. 4:6). 

Fellowship Supper 

5:30 to 6:30 
In the Library Room 

Special Requests and General Petition 

7:00 to 9:00 

1. Songs and Precious Promises — 7:00 to 7:25. 
Text: "Whereby are given unto us exceeding great 

and precious promises" (2 Pet. 1:4). 

2. Special Requests and Prayer — 7:25 to 8:30. 
Text: "For God is my witness . . . that without 

ceasing I make mention of you in my prayers" 
( Rom. 1:9). 

3. Final Session— 8:40 to 9:00. 

Text: "Praying in the Holy Ghost" (Jude 20). 
No human leader in this final session. 



—7- 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 




BlUe ScUoxd 



PASTORS, SUPERINTENDENTS, TEACHERS 
PLEASE NOTE- 
HOW our whole Bible course meets the needs of 
your Junior Boys and Girls 

ONLY THE BEST FOR OUR YOUTH !— AND WE MEAN JUST THAT 

Before writing any of our graded literature, we made 
a careful study of the characteristics, interests and 
needs of all ages from the cradle roll through the 
young people's departments, and this is what we 
found : 

The outsanding characteristics of Juniors 
(ages 9-11, school grades 4-6) 

(1) Hero-worship. Heroic deeds make a tremen- 
dous appeal, and the heroes become their ideals whom 
they strive to imitate in everything, whether good or 
bad. 

(2) Memory at its peak, both to learn and return. 
Never again will memory powers be so great. 

(3) Ability for the first time in their lives, to re- 
member events in the order in which they occurred, 
and to fix locations. 

And so on the basis of these findings we planned a 
chronological through-the-Bible course, placing em- 
phasis as follows: 

Bible heroes and events studied in the order in which 
they lived. Where the school is able to have separate 
classes for pupils of each age, each year those gradu- 
ating from the Primary Department begin with Gen- 
esis and get the order of Bible events fixed in mind. 
This lays an excellent foundation for future Bible 
study, and avoids much of the confusion and diffi- 
culty so often encountered in later years. 

Drills to fix the location of important chapters, 
characters and events in Scripture, are included. Did 
you ever say, "I wish I could remember where to find 
that passage of Scripture?" Juniors properly drilled 
will know instantly where to turn to find the impor- 
tant events of Scripture and the characters connected 
with each. 

Important places are located on the map. Other- 
wise, in some cases, passages lose their significance. 

Special emphasis is laid on salvation. Other spiritual 
truths especially adapted to Juniors are included as 
opportunity affords. 

Special features of the Junior course 

The pupil connot study his lesson without using his 
Bible. Thus Bible study becomes a habit early in life. 
The course is planned as a treasure hunt, the treas- 
ure being the lesson truths which are hunted in the 
chapters of the Bible covering the lesson. The treas- 
ure is discovered by the use of interesting clues. This 
is fun! 

Every book of the Bible is touched in some way, the 
events being studied chronologically. Job is studied 
before Abraham. The Psalms are studied in connec- 
tion with David's experiences. Solomon's writings are 
touched upon simply in connection with his life, and 
the prophets in connection with the kings during 
whose reign they prophesied. Their message is not 
difficult with this historical light thrown upon them. 
The Pauline epistles are studied at the points on Paul's 
missionary journey where they were written, the study 
being built around the vivid illustrations Paul used, 
making it one of the most fascinating parts of the 
entire three year course. 



Even teachers completing this course find their 
knowledge of the Bible greatly increased. 

In the teacher's quarterly every Sunday there is a 
Bible drill, a theme in common with all the lessons 
studied throughout the department on that day, and 
an object lesson to drive home this main truth already 
seen in the respective classes. 

How users of this course feel about it 
Many of our Brethren Bible Schools reported a de- 
cided increase in decisions for Christ among the Jun- 
iors after changing to this course. 

One of our largest Brethren Bible Schools, whose at- 
tendance was greatly increased because parents took 
their children out of other Sunday Schools to give 
them the advantage of this course, was frequently in- 
formed by these parents: 

"We help our children with their lessons, and are 
learning many things we ourselves did not know 
were in the Bible." 

The Sunday School of the largest church of another 
denomination in the world writes us, after using this 
course for an entire year: 
"Our boys and girls have been blessed through the 
use of your graded lessons, and the executive com- 
mittee has unanimously approved the continuance 
of this series .... Your editorial staff receives our 
congratulations for this splendid series of instruc- 
tion in grace and the Christian development of 
the young boys and girls." 

TROPHIES FOR RECOGNITION 
What are they? 

The trophies are small cards of various shapes, de- 
signs and colors, which are given the pupils in recog- 
nition of honor. Each quarter there is a trophy for 
completing the quarterly and one for learning all the 
memory texts. There are other trophies for learning 
the books of the Old Testament, the books of the 
New Testament, salvation verses, missionary verses, 
verses on prayer, and other selected passages of Scrip- 
ture. 

How are they used? 

A strip of narrow red ribbon (the red representing 
salvation) is provided for each pupil in the depart- 
ment. Then, near the top of each ribbon, a card bear- 
ing the name of the pupil is fastened. This is done 
by placing the ribbon between a sticker and the back 
of the name card. The various trophies are added in 
the same way as soon as the work is completed. When 
more ribbon is needed, the original strip is extended 
by fastening a new strip with a sticker to the back 
of the last trophy. 

What is their value? 

The trophies are a very inexpensive way of recog- 
nizing merit — just Vzc each. 

They are a most effective way of encouraging the 
pupils to hide God's Word in their hearts. Those who 
complete their quarterlies and do their memory work 
delight to see their ribbons grow, and try to outdo 
each other with the longest display of trophies. Those 
not so ambitious soon become ashamed of their rib- 
bons with few or no trophies, and get busy to extend 
them. 

The trophy ribbons are very attractive displayed 
on the department or classroom walls, and the pupils 
will work as hard for these as they will for expensive 
awards. 

With whom can they be used? 

Although each group of four (and in one case fivel 
trophies were chosen because they are especially ap- 
propriate for a particular quarter of the Junior course, 
they can be used as effectively with Junior High pu- 
pils who have not already completed this work. The 
memory verses and passages cover a wide variety of 
timely subjects, making them a well-balanced, prac- 
tical memory work course for any age except small 
children. 



— S— 



FEBRUARY 8, 1941 



and SHALL WE SPEAK WITH OTHER TONGUES? 

By Dr. V. C. Kelford, Dean of Florida Bible Institute 



"God has not changed, hence we should see the 
miracles of apostolic times." This is an expression used 
on every side by those who believe in the "signs of 
the times" as associated with the "gifts of the Spirit." 

True, God does not change, but His methods change. 
For instance, the Word of God distinctly teaches seven 
dispensations; and the Bible student will note that 
God changes His approach to man in each of these 
dispensations. The "gifts of the Spirit" which many 
see as an indication that the end of the age is ap- 
proaching are not to be confused with the "signs" 
which the Lord Jesus Christ gave to His disciples in 
the 24th chapter of Matthew. That is to say, we must 
differentiate between "signs" and "sign gifts." When 
we speak of the "sign gifts" we have reference to those 
spoken of in Jn. 20:30, 31: "And many other signs truly 
did Jesus in the presence of His disciples, which are 
not written in this book: But these are written, that 
ye might believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of 
God; and that believing ye might have life through 
His name." 

You will note that these "signs" or "sign gifts" were 
for the one purpose of authenticating the ministry of 
our Savior. In Mk. 16:17 we read, "Those signs shall 
follow them that believe." Now, to say that this ob- 
tains up to the end of the present dispensation is not 
Scriptural; but was, without doubt, given by the Holy 
Spirit, for precisely the same purpose as the Lord used 
them: that is, to introduce and authenticate the new 
message of the gospel of grace. 

There is an old saying "everything appears yellow 
to the jaunted eye." In other words, when the eye is 
blurred by any one thing, whatever that one thing 
might be, the whole system of thinking is affected 
thereby. 

We are not told to look for "signs" as some people 
seem to think; for if we do, we will see signs in every- 
thing, and our interpretation of the Word of God will 
be lopsided. This seems to be the condition of many 
would-be students. We are told to look at them. 

Here are a few things to note in our study of the 
"signs," "sign gifts" and "the end of the age." First, 
note the warning in Mat. 24:24, "For there shall arise 
false Christs, and false prophets, and shall show great 
signs and wonders; insomuch that, if it were possible, 
they should deceive the very elect." It is interesting 
to note that the very "signs" or "sign gifts" which the 
Lord Jesus Christ used and gave to His disciples, at 
the beginning of this dispensation, would be used by 
the anti-Christ at the end of it. Read, if you please, 
II Thess. 2:1-2; and Rev. 13. Perhaps it would not 
be complimentary to some of God's children if we 
called their attention to Christ's words in Mt. 12:31. 
"An evil and adulterous generation seeketh after a 
sign." Have you noticed how often those organiza- 
tions which lay emphasis on the "signs" are so often 
mixed up in "adultery?" In fact, the two ideas have 
almost come to be synonymous. 

Now, coming to the question of the baptism of the 
Holy Spirit and the "gifts of the spirit" as they are 
related to this present day, we would call your atten- 
tion, not to the gospels but to the church epistles. 
And surely, this would be rightly dividing the Word 
of truth. Paul says in I Cor. i2:13, "For by one Spirit 
are we all baptized into one body." That is, the bap- 
tism of the Holy Spirit is that which puts us into the 
body of Christ, or, in other words, makes us a member 
of His church. As one is baptized and received into 
the local church, so one is baptized by the Spirit of 
God into the church or body of Jesus Christ. When 



Paul uses the word all he means exactly that. One 
cannot be a Christian if he is not baptized by the 
Holy Ghost. This is not something which is subse- 
quent to salvation, but it is a part of that work of 
the Holy Spirit which makes us a child of God. 

Turning now to Ephesians 5:8 the apostle Paul ex- 
horts us to be filled with the Spirit. All Christians are 
baptized, but not all Christians are filled with the 
Spirit. We are filled, insofar as we have yielded to the 
Spirit of God. That may be a work subsequent to sal- 
vation; but if it is, it is either due to our ignorance or 
carnality. 

"Now concerning spiritual gifts, brethren, I would 
not have you ignorant" (I Cor. 12:1). Paul is dealing 
with that vexed question of the "gifts of the Spirit" 
to the church. And we would beg that you should no- 
tice the unity of the teaching found from this verse 
on to the end of chap. 14. In chap 12 Paul enumer- 
ates the gifts three times. In v. 31 he says, "But covet 
earnestly the best gifts: and yet show I unto you a 
more excellent way." He is going to show then some- 
thing better than gifts: and that something is clearly 
set forth in chap. 13 i.e. love. Why is love better than 
gifts? Because God is Love. In other words, love is 
God's own character, and it is more important that 
we should have what God is rather than what God 
gives. 

You will observe in 13:1, the writer begins to enum- 
erate the gifts again; but he does a strange thing with 
them. In his previous enumerations he puts the gift 
of tongues last. However, beginning with 13:1. he puts 
them first, and then continues down the list. Evident- 
ly, there is a reason for this and the reason is found 
in chap. 14., because while Paul has indicated, through 
his line-up of the gifts, that tongues is the least of 
all important, yet it is the gift that has given the 
most trouble since its inception. Incidentally, we were 
recently reminded that every organ of the body gets 
tired, except the tongue. I wonder why? Can it be, 
as James says, "Even so the tongue is a little member, 
and boasteth great things? Behold, how great a mat- 
ter a little fire kindleth! And the tongue is a fire, a 
world of iniquity: so is the tongue among our mem- 
bers, that it defileth the whole body, and setteth on 
fire the course of nature; and it is set on fire of hell" 
(James 3:5-6). If this is true of just one tongue, what 
could be expected of many? 

Now, let us go back to the auestion of the "gifts" in 
contract with love. Paul dealing with it in 13:8 says, 
"Love never faileth; but whether there be prophecies, 
they shall fail." Does this mean to say that the pro- 
phecies of the Word of God shall fail to come to pass? 
Not by any manner or means! "Though heaven and 
earth shall pass away not one jot or one tittle shall 
pass from the law until all be fulfilled." What then, 
does this mean? Simply this, that the days of pro- 
phesying shall come to an end. And, so they did with 
the writings of the apostle John, as he reminds us in 
Rev. 22:18, "For I testify unto every man that heareth 
the words of the prophecy of this book. If any man 
shall add unto these things, God shall add unto him 
the plagues that are written in this book." 

God has no prophets in the world today in the sense 
of foretelling. The best we can do is to call attention 
to what the prophets have said, and to the fulfillment 
of prophecy. As the days of the prophets ended, so 
the days of tongues have ended. "Whether there be 
tongues they shall cease .... whether there be knowl- 



—9— 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



edge it shall vanish away." Why will knowledge vanish 
away? Because, "We know in part, and we prophesy 
in part. But when that which is perfect is come, then 
that which is in part shall be done away." 

The evident meaning is: since they had no New 
Testament, Paul was calling attention to the fact that 
their knowledge was only in part. And when he says 
"that which is perfect" he means a perfect revelation 
of God, which we know as the Bible. And when that 
is come we shall walk by faith and not by sight. The 
implication is that the "sign gifts" were given to tide 
over the church in its babyhood until it could walk 
by faith in a perfect revelation of God's will. 

Those who would point to the "sign gifts" as an 
indication that they have something superior or ad- 
vanced in the Christian experience, are being led as- 
tray. Paul says, "When I was a child, I spake as a 
child. I understood as a child, I thought as a child: 
but when I became a man, I put away childish things." 
These things are the gifts of God to an immature and 
ignorant church. Instead of pointing me forward to 
something mature and advanced, they are pointing 
me backward to the babyhood of the church. In other 
words, they want me to walk by sight and not by 
faith. 

"But," somebody says, "doesn't Paul say in I Cor. 
14, T thank my God I speak with tongues more than 
ye all' and again in v. 39, 'Forbid not to speak with 
tongues'?" Yes, exactly, but remember, the writer is 
dealing with the time in which he lived, when the 
"sign gifts" were still in operation. Then the Word of 
God was not complete. You will notice also that this 
and all other "sign gifts" end with this chapter, and 
are never spoken of again anywhere in the New Tes- 
tament. 

James calls our attention to divine healing which, 
by the grace of God, has been manifest in all ages; 
but we are not contending with regard to divine heal- 
ing, but to divine healers. 

Quite recently a dear sister in the Lord, to whom 
we were speaking of this matter of the "gifts" of the 
spirit," and especially the gift of tongues, asked "Well, 
then, if I do not have the gift of tongues, what do I 
have? I'm sure I have something." Our reply was 
that we would answer her question by asking another 
one. What do the Mormans have, who deny salvation 
by the grace of God, as we understand it, and yet 
claim and practice the gift of tongues as an apostolic 
experience? 

The best we can say concerning this whole contro- 
versy is "Study to shew thyself approved unto God a 
workman that needeth not to be ashamed, rightly di- 
viding the word of truth" (II Tim. 2:15). 

....... .... THINK IT OVER. ......... ,,, 



"Christ had no 'place to lay His 
head' — yet He had a time and 
a place to pray.'' 





1 Cor. 15:3 

Paul E. Dick, pastor, Grafton, Va. 

The elimination of the doctrine of the death of Je- 
sus Christ from the religion that bears His name would 
mean the surrender and uniqueness of its claim to be 
the only true religion — the supreme and final revela- 
tion from God to the sons 
of man. That Christ died 
on the cross is not to be 
questioned, although it is 
from the modern view- 
points. His death in itself 
is a known fact and an 
event that is not only a 
reality but an actuality. 
Men who are experts in 
their own class as histor- 
ians record the death of 
Christ as a known fact. 

As has been said, the 
modernistic views are tak- 
en and believed by many 
people. The modernistic be- 
liever fails to see in the 
doctrine of the atonement 
what the orthodox faith 
has held for centuries to be 
the truth of God regarding 
this fundamental Christian 
Elder Dick doctrine. Some people be- 

lieve today that the death 
of Christ was but the death of a martyr, counted in 
the same catagory as the death of John Huss, etc. 

To some people the death of Christ was an exhibi- 
tion to a sinful world of God's love. Some believe that 
Calvary may have been an episode in God's govern- 
ment of the world. God, being holy, deemed it neces- 
sary to show to the world His hatred of sin, and so 
His wrath fell upon Christ. Just how the modernistic 
mind can reason this out is almost a total illogical 
procedure. The modern minds do not consider Christ's 
death as in any sense vicarious, or substitutionary. 
Indeed, it fails to see the justice as well as the need 
or possibility of one man, and He so innocent, suffer- 
ing for the sins of the whole race, past, present, and 
future. Every man must bear the penalty of His own 
sin, so we are told; from which there is no escape, un- 
less, it is fervently hoped and confidently expected, 
that God. whose wondrous love surpasses all human 
conception, should, as He doubtless will, overlook the 
eternal conseauences of man's sin because of the great 
love wherewith He loves the human race. 

The Christian church must turn to the Word of God 
in order to combat these warfares. If the so-called 
modern mind and it's doctrinal views agree with the 
Scriptures, then the Christian church may allow her- 
self to be influenced by the Spirit of the age. However, 
if the modern mind and the church of Christ do not 
agree in their results, then the two must part com- 
pany because Modernism and Fundamentalism do not 
mix. 

Many theories have appeared in every generation. 
They cannot all be right because they contradict each 
other in regard to belief. They oppose each other in 
their declarations, but the Word of God remains un- 
changed and infallable (Ps. 119:89). Man can find 
the way of salvation very easily (Acts 16:31) in the 
Word of God, and after becoming a child of God 
through his faith in Christ, the Scriptures open up 



IS IT TRUE? — If we would talk more to Christ about the lost sinners, we would talk more to the lost sinners 

about Christ. — Lester Myers 



10— 



FEBRUARY 8, 1941 




BRETHREN STUDENT 
LIFE VOLUNTEERS 




Rev. Kenneth Ashman, Conemaugh, Pa., R.D. 1, National Supt. 



"What? Know ye not that your body is the temple of the Holy 
Ghost which is in you, which ye have of God, and ye are not 
your own? For ye are bought with a price: Theretore glorify 
God in your body, and in your spirit, which are God's" (1 Cor. 
6:19,20). 

"SHARING FOR SERVICE OFFERING" 

"Freely ye have received, freely give." Yes, the Lord 
has freely blessed The Brethren Church with many 
and open opportunities for serving Him. In order to 
appropriate these opportunities we need a large num- 
ber of'trained ministers, missionaries, and leaders. The 
B.S.L.V. is endeavoring to make it possible for our 
"Volunteers" to meet this need. "The Sharing For 
Service Offering," to be used for the establishment of 
a "Brethren Student Aid Fund," is an important step 
in the right direction. We appeal to all of our loyal 
friends for prayerful support of this endeavor. 

Thanks to the pastors who have thus far so gra- 
ciously cooperated. Offering materials have been sent 
to you, accompanied with our earnest prayers that 
you yourselves and your churches will be blessed in 
their giving. Many of our churches will be receiving 
their offerings during this month of February, other 
churches at later dates. Some money has already 
come to us for the student aid fund. Thank you great- 
ly. 

One pastor writes that it would be better to receive 
the "Sharing For Service Offering" during June eacn 



to him more beautifully and more easily than ever 
before. 

I Cor. 2:14 tells us, "the natural man receiveth not 
the things of the Spirit of God." Man refuses to al- 
low God to direct him through the only way which 
these things can be revealed to him, and that is 
through the Holy Spirit. 

The necessity of the atonement lay in a two-fold 
fact: The holiness of God and the sinfulness of man. 
The doctrine of the atonement is a related subject, 
and it cannot be fully understood until viewed as 
such. It is related to certain conditions existing be- 
tween God and man — a condition and relation which 
has been effected by sin. This relation between God 
and man is a personal matter. No matter how sin 
came to be here we are morally conscious, by the tes- 
timony of a bad conscience, that we are guilty, and 
that our sin is not merely a matter of personal guilt 
but a violation of a universal moral law. Christ's 
death was the ground on which God, Who is abso- 
lutely holy, could deal with the whole race of men, 
and pardon their sins. 

John 1:29, I Tim. 3:6— For the world. If all men 
were not capable of being saved, how then could we 
pray to that end? 

The text would suggest that the apostle Paul ex- 
perienced these words in his personal life, and as a 
result could pass them along to others. Someone has 
said this was possibly the greatest sermon Paul ever 
preached. Whether it was or not, we do know for a 
fact that without the death of Christ we would be 
yet dead in our sins. 

As a result of the sacrifice Christ made in dying for 
our sins we find we have access to God (Heb. 9:7,8), 
purification of the conscience (Heb. 9:14), and eternal 
redemption (Heb. 9:12). 



year. We heartily agree, and hope, the Lord willing, 
to make that our practice in the future. However, 
funds are needed right now to assist those already in 
school and to build up a reserve for the fall term of 
school. We only urge that you assist in this offering 
when best suited to your local work. But be sure to 
write for the offering materials, and name the ap- 
proximate date when we may expect your offering to 
be received. 

B. S.L. V. NEWS PAGE REVIVED 

Beginning with this issue, the B.S.L.V. news will be 
published each month in the Educational Number of 
the Herald. This form of contact with our members 
and friends appears to be the least expensive and the 
most effective of all. We thank the Herald for making 
these monthly publications possible. 

B. S. L. V. MEMBERSHIP CARDS 

Many of you young people have received B.S.L.V. lit- 
erature, but have never responded. Then too, many 
have written to us and we have not responded. These 
conditions have been brought about by the haste of 
our organization and growth. Membership cards are 
now ready to be sent to you. We want to obtain a 
complete roll and mailing list at once. Please fill out 
the blank below and return the same to the proper 
address at once. Membership cards are ready and 
awaiting your reply. 

DISTRICTS BEING ORGANIZED 

It is our plan to organize local groups of B.S.L.V. 
members, who shall in turn cooperate with district 
and national organizations. Accordingly, the mem- 
bers of the advisory committee, with your superinten- 
dent, have been holding district and local rallies. More 
rallies are being planned for the near future. Each 
district will be bounded by the possibility of the 
churches included to meet for regular rallies. A dis- 
trict superintendent will be chosen to further the 
B.S.L.V. activities in that particular district. Watch 
for the announcement of the next rally nearest to 
you, and be sure to attend. 

VIRGINIA RALLIES CONDUCTED 

Early in December, Orville Lorenz and Ken Ashman, 
accompanied by Mrs. Ashman, made an 800 mile tour 
of our Virginia churches in the interest of the B.S.L.V. 
work. Arriving in Winchester, we were greeted by 
Norman and Miriam Uphouse and a fine group of 
their loyal soul-winners. These had gathered for a 
fellowship supper in the basement of the parsonage. 
Following the evening rally at the church, the B.S.L.V. 
members present elected Miss Naomi Shanholtzer to 
be their local leader. This group meets each Sunday 
evening at the home of the pastor for prayer and 
planning. Their present plans include the distribution 
of tracts in the town and in the home surrounding the 
church. Offering for the rally, $4.59. 

Following a fine supper with Ed and Mildred Bow- 
man, we enjoyed a rousing young peoples' service at 
the Buena Vista Brethren Church. This was a well 
attended service, mostly young people. 24 tarried for 
the B.S.L.V. after meeting, electing Mildred Bowman 
as their temporary leader, complete organization to 
follow later. Offering, $3.61. 

Roanoke and Hollins joined together at a rally in 
the church of Bro. Herman Koontz. We were greatly 
impressed by the newly erected sign on the church 
steeple. Bro. Koontz, rightfully proud of the sign, 
drove us to vantage points over the city from which 
the sign is clearly visible. The young people of these 
two churches are going forth to prove that the sign 
Jesus Saves," is no idle tale, but is a blessed fact and 
experience. Captains chosen following the rally were: 
Roanoke, Miss Ruby Keith; Hollins, Miss Marguerite 
Hamblin. Offering, $6.29. 

Friday evening found us gathered about the festive 
board in Covington. The young folks, under the lead- 
ership of Art and Gladys Molles had gathered for a 



—11— 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 




;/i^t 



W i- 



Boyd.' 

and 



by Mrs. Keith Altig 

"ONLY A BOY" 
How Robert Moffatt became a Missionary to Africa 

Many years ago a faithful Scottish minister, coming- 
early to church, met one of his deacons, whose facs 
wore a very resolute but distressed expression. 

"I came early to meet you," he said. "I have some- 
thing on my conscience to say to you, pastor. There 
must be something radically wrong in your preaching 
and work; there has been only one person added to 
the church in a whole year, and he is only a boy." 

"I feel it all," the minister said, "I feel it, but God 
knows that I have tried to do my duty, and I can trust 
Him for results." 

"Yes, yes," said the deacon, "but 'By their fruits ye 
shall know them,' and one new member — and he, too, 
only a boy — seems to me rather a slight evidence of 



fine fellowship supper. Here we had the privilege of 
meeting the youthful Christians who will make possible 
the continued growth of The Brethren Church at this 
place. The following rally was a fine one. The 
B.S.L.V. recruits, 21 of them, chose Miss Mary Opal 
Sharp as their captain. Under her leadership, this 
group intends to flood the town of Covington with 
personal and written testimonies to the saving power 
of Jesus Christ, their Lord. Offering, $7.56. 

Thess B.S.L.V. rallies are proving very successful. 
They are a source of inspiration to pastors and people 
alike. The B.S.L.V. workers are ready to conduct a 
rally in your church. Pastors, please write to us, nam- 
ing the time best suited for such a rally in your local 
church. Paul Baunijin is responsible for this work on 
the West Coast. Ralph Rambo, using Grace Seminary 
students, is waiting to serve you in the Mid-West and 
Ohio districts. Orville Lorenz and Kenneth Ashman 
will conduct the rallies in Eastern Ohio and other 
Eastern churches. Watch for the announcement of 
the rally nearest to you, and be sure to attend. 

B. S. L. V. APPLICATION BLANK 

Name 

Address 

Home Church 



Age __ Birthday 

I am a member ._ I wish to become a member 

I am interested in aiding this work _ . Return this 
blank to Rev. Kenneth Ashman, Conemaugh, Pa., R. 1. 

(Next Month— Contest for B.S.L.V. song; announce- 
ment of districts and superintendents; further reports 
of rallies and activities). 



true faith and zeal. I don't want to be hard, but I 
have this matter on my conscience, and I have done 
my duty in speaking plainly." 

"True," said the old man, "but 'Charity suffereth 
long, and is kind; .... beareth all things, .... hopeth 
all things.' I have great hopes of that boy — Robert. 
Some seed that we sow bears fruit late, but that fruit 
is generally the most precious of all." 

The old minister went to the pulpit that day with 
a grieved and heavy heart. He closed his discourse 
with dim and tearful eyes. He lingered in the dear 
old church after the rest were gone. He wished to be 
alone. The place was sacred and very dear to him, 
but there he had been told at last that his work was 
no longer owned and blessed by God. 

No one remained. No one? "Only a boy." 

The boy was Robert Moffat. He watched the tremb- 
ling old man. His soul was filled with loving sympathy. 
He went to him and laid his hand on his black gown. 

"Well, Robert?" said the minister. 

"Do you think, if I were willing to work hard for an 
education, I could ever become a preacher?" the boy 
asked. 

"A preacher?" 

"Perhaps a missionary." 

There was a pause. Tears filled the eyes of the old 
minister. At length he said, "This heals the ache in 
my heart, Robert. I see the divine hand now. May 
God bless you, my boy. Yes, I think you will become 
a preacher." 

Years later there returned to London an aged mis- 
sionary. His name was spoken with reverance. When 
he went into an assembly the people rose; when he 
spoke in public there was a deep silence. Princes 
stood uncovered before him; nobles invited him to 
their homes. 

Robert Moffat had brought under the gospel influ- 
ence the most savage of African chiefs, had given the 
translated Bible to strange tribes, had enriched with 
valuable knowledge the Royal Geographical Society, 
and had honored the humble place of his birth. 

The old minister long before had gone to be with 
his Savior, but men remembered his work because of 
what he was to that one boy, and that one boy was 
to the world. 



Christian Readers Digest, 
and the Word of the Cross. 



Taken from Christ Life 



LITTLE THINGS 

Shamgar had an ox-goad, (Judg. 3:31 ». 

Rahab had a string, (Josh. 2:1-15). 
Gideon had a trumpet, (Judg. 7:15-22). 

David had a sling, (I Sam. 17:40-50). 
Samson had a jaw bone, (Judg. 16:11-171. 

Moses had a rod, (Ex.-2-8-10-19-21; 8:5-6 etc.). 
Dorcas had a needle — (Acts 6 10:36-41). 



All were used for God. 



-Sunday School Times 



OUR BIBLE CHARACTER ALPHABET 

Answer to R: Rabshakeh. 

S was a man who had the nerve to show his hatred 
for a king by cursing him and throwing stones at 
him while the king was in trouble. You will find his 
name, the king's name, and what the king did about 
it when his trouble was over, in II Sam. 16:5-8; 
19:16-23. 



—12— 



FEBRUARY 8, 1941 



When Single 9mme?iUa+t Be^an 

By Rev. Miles Taber, pastor First Brethren Church, Leon, la. 



The average American, when he first hears of trine 
immersion, wonders, "When did that fad begin?" But 
the church historian searches, not for the origin of 
trine immersion, but for the origin of single immer- 
sion. Trine immersion was the original; when and 
how did single immersion begin to take its place as a 
substitute? 

Sozomen, the church historian, who died A. D. 450, 
says, "Some say that Eunomius was the first who dared 
to bring forward the notion that the divine baptism 
ought to be administered by a single immersion, and 
to corrupt the tradition which has been handed down 
from the apostles, and which is still observed by all. 
.... But whether it was Eunomius, or any other person, 
who first introduced heretical opinions concerning 
baptism, .... it must be admitted that they introduced 
a practice to which they had not themselves sub- 
mitted and thus undertook to administer to others 
what had never been administered to themselves." 

Theodoret (A.D. 393-457), bishop of Cyrus, says, with 
reference to the heretic Eunomius, "He subverted the 



law of holy baptism, which had been handed down 
from the beginning from the Lord and the apostles, 
and made a contrary law, asserting that it is not neces- 
sary to immerse the candidate for baptism thrice, nor 
to mention the names of the Trinity, but to baptize 
once only into the death of Christ." 

Pope Pelagius, who died A.D. 560, says, "There are 
many who say that they baptize in the name of Christ 
alone and by a single immersion. But the gospel com- 
mand, which was given by God Himself and our Lord 
and Savior Jesus Christ, reminds us that we should 
administer holy baptism to every one in the name of 
the Trinity and by trine immersion, for our Lord said 
to his disciples, 'Go baptize all nations in the name of 
the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit." 

Single immersion began, not with Jesus, nor with 
the apostles, nor in the first century, nor the second 
or third centuries, but in the latter half of the fourth 
century. It began with a heretic who could not tol- 
erate a mode of baptism that honored the Trinity be- 
cause he did not believe in the deity of our Lord. 
Eunomius and his teachings were formally condemned 
by the council of Constantinople in A.D. 381. 



What jba Rnetltlett Believe? 

LAYING ON OF HANDS 

By L. Llewellyn Grubb 

(Fourth in Series) 

(Continued from issue of Jan. 25) 

After the child of God has duly passed through the 
preliminary doors of the Christian experience, he 
should immediately choose a wide-awake, fundamental 
church in which actively to find fellowship and aven- 
ues of Christian service (Heb. 10:25). We are "saved" 
to "serve!" But the acceptable servant must be en- 
dued with spiritual power by the infilling of the blessed 
Holy Spirit (Acts 1:8). The laying on of hands at the 
entrance of the believer into the visible church sym- 
bolizes this infilling. 

This beautiful service in the early church seems to 
have been a symbolic rite connected with the various 
ministries of the Holy Spirit (Acts 6:3,6; 8:17; 19:6). 
Therefore, it is very appropriately observed by the 
Brethren at the reception of believers into the mem- 
bership of the visible church, as a symbol of the in- 
filling of the Holy Spirit for service, and also as a 
symbol of the Spirit's sovereign bestowal of His gifts 
(1 Tim. 4:14; 1 Cor. 12:11). 

The Brethren do not believe that the Holy Spirit or 
any of His operations can be conferred by the impo- 
sition of human hands. In the present age, all true 
believers receive both the indwelling and the baptism 
of the Holy Spirit at the moment when they believe 
on Christ for salvation (1 Cor. 6:19; 12:13 ARV; with 
1:1, 2). But there may be many infillings of the Spirit, 
as the servant yields his entire being in service for 
the Lord (Rom. 12:1,2; Eph. 5:18). The command of 
Scripture to the Christian believer is, "Be ye filled with 
the Spirit." 




READ YOUR 

BIBLE 

THROUGH IN '41 



This schedule for reading the Bible through in a year began in the 
issue of Dec. 28, 1940. For previous readings, see former copies of 
The Brethren Missionary Herald. Begin reading at Gen. 1:1, read 
until the first text is found, and record the reference. The next day 
begin reading where you left off the day before, find the text for 
that day, and record the reference. By continuing this you shall 
have read the Bible through in a year. 
Day Text Reference 

36 He shall take to cleanse the house, two birds and 

cedarwood 

37 He shall let go the goat in the wilderness 

38 Ye shall keep my sabbaths, and reverence m 

sanctuary 

39 The seventh day is the sabbath of rest, an holy 

convocation 



40 Fear thy God, that thy brother may live with 

thee 

41 I will remember the land 



42 The Levites shall keep the charge of the taber- 
nacle of testimony 



—13- 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



(HEBREWS 12:1-3) 
By Fred Wm. Walter, pastor, Harrah, Wash. 



rr 



As we look about us we see discouraging things on 
every hand. The war news from abroad tells us of 
suffering and misery. War, seemingly at least, is com- 
ing nearer our own shores. Drunkenness and crime 
are increasing as the days go by. Even our Christian 
people are growing cold and indifferent to spiritual 
realities. Our outlook is, upon the surface, very dis- 
couraging. 

But as we turn to the Word of God in the Epistle 
to the Hebrews, we discover words of encouragement, 
words that should cheer our hearts and strengthen us 
for whatever test may come as our Lord tarries. In 
12:1 we have an allusion to the stadium of the Greeks 
and the Romans, where the persons stood who were to 
engage in the exercises of their public games, sur- 
rounded by great multitudes of spectators. In a con- 
dition resembling this, the writer now places the 
Hebrew Christians whom he is addressing,, and sur- 
rounds them with the multitude of worthies and mar- 
tyrs, to whom he has been alluding in the preceding 
chapter. Having called attention to the examples of 
this multitude of witnesses, who by their experiences 
testified to the faithfulness of God to His people, and 
having represented this multitude as, figuratively at 
least, looking down upon them and urging them on in 
their efforts, the writer now proceeds to exhort the 
contestants to prepare for the contest before them. 

We could not expect to win a race if we entered 
wearing an overcoat and carrying a suitcase in each 
hand. Therefore, as the runner lays aside his clothing 
that would impede his movements, and trains his body 
that he may endure the strains of the race, so the 
apostle exhorts us to lay aside all that may in any way 
hinder the running of the race set before us. Prepar- 
ing ourselves in this way we are next exhorted to run 
the race set before us with 'patience'. The thought 
suggested by this word 'patience' is that of endurance 
or perserverance. We are not to faint by the way, but 
to press on; not looking at obstacles, not being over- 
come by circumstances, but looking away unto Jesus 
the Author and Finisher of our faith. 

We are encouraged by the testimony of the multi- 
tude of saints who have gone before us. But we are 
now exhorted to look to One Who has a greater mes- 
sage of encouragement than any of these saints of old. 
This One never fails. He is the Author of faith, our 
Leader, the Captain of our salvation. We are to look 
to Him as our great example of the life of faith. 

As we look to our Lord Jesus we are encouraged, for 
the course He had to run was one of extreme hard- 
ship, danger and suffering. Yet He overcame all ob- 
stacles and is now exalted to the right hand of the 
throne of God. The great joy of seeing lost men and 
women reconciled to God led Him on to endure the 
cross with all its shame. The cross has come to be a 
thing of glory to us, but at that time it represented 
the most shameful death possible. Yet with confidence 
in God and that great eternal love for men, He went 
forward to that death, even the death of the cross. But 
that was not the end of the race for Him. Death could 
not hold Him. He arose a Victor over death and hell. 
He is alive forevermore. He is now exalted to the right 
hand of the throne of God. This is the Leader we are 
urged to look to. He knows the way. He has been 
over the course. He knows our weaknesses. He knows 
our needs. With Jesus as Captain of our salvation we 
cannot fail. Why should we be discouraged with such 
a leader? Look to Jesus as the one who is conducting 



us along in the race, who is at the goal ready to reward 
us with the "well done thou good and faithful ser- 
vant, enter thou into the joy of thy Lord." 

Again we face the difficulties of our daily tasks. The 
burdens are heavy — the clouds of trouble and distress 
hang heavy about us. We find ourselves in the posi- 
tion of the children of Israel in the wilderness: "And 
the soul of the people was much discouraged because 
of the way." We are prone to become weary and faint. 
But here in v. 3 we are exhorted to consider him, Jesus 
our Captain. We are to compare our trials and trou- 
bles with that which He suffered. Surely as we medi- 
tate upon what He suffered for us, our trials are small 
in comparison. Let us look away from these distress- 
ing circumstances unto Jesus the Author and Finisher 
of our faith, realizing that we are more than con- 
querors through Him that loved us. Let us keep our 
eyes upon Him, and we shall renew our strength and 
finish our course without fainting, all to the glory of 
His grace. 




LIGHT on TRUTH 



By Bernard Schneider 



HOW LONG SINCE YOU FOUND IT OUT? 

An evangelist was traveling by train to his next place 
of service. During the hours of his journey he began 
to hum to himself the beautiful hymn: "I Have Been 
Redeemed." Soon he noticed that a passenger who 
was sitting across the aisle from him was humming it 
with him. After he finished the verse the evangelist 
turned to the passenger and asked: "Well, and have 
you been redeemed?" "O yes" replied the man, "I 
have been redeemed 1900 years ago." The evangelist 
thought for a moment that perhaps he had a lunatic 
on his hands, when the other man smiled and ex- 
plained: "Yes, I was redeemed 1900 years ago, but 
it has just been two months since I have found it out." 
Christ paid the ransom price for all, but only those 
who accept it, will be saved. 



ONLY A LITTLE WHILE 

Onl.v a little while longer to labor; 

Only a little while longer to pray; 
Then, in the joy of meeting my Savior, 

I shall be home alway. 

Only a little while longer to linger; 

Sharing the burdens of those on the way; 
Telling the story, so sweet and so tender; 

Then to be caught away. 

Only a little while longer to suffer; 

Bearing reproach for the Savior I love; 
Then He will call me to meet Him in glory; 

Ever to live above. 

Only a little while longer for heartaches; 

Borne on the wings of loved one's fair smiles; 
Then, in the midst of His glorious presence 

Eternal rest and peace! 

— G. W. Kinzie 



BULLETIN BOARD — God wants you, not your excuses. — Albert L Scherry 



FEBRUARY 8, 1941 



CHRISTIAN ENDEAVOR DEPARTMENT 



President 

Robert A. Ashman 

12 S. Clay St. 
Peru, Ind. 

Vice-President 

Glenn Miller 
1840 Rivera Rd. 
Whittier, Calif. 




Executive Secretary 

Rev. Leo Polman 

4007 Tacoma Ave. 
Fort Wayne, Ind. 

Treasurer 
Ernest F. Pine 

610 8th Ave. 
Juniata, Altoona, P-. 



noke; Vice President, Maynard D. Wilmer of Buena 
Vista; Secretary, Margaret Mills of Covington; Treas- 
urer, Kenneth Teague of Buena Vista. 

We also had a flute solo by Mrs. Bowman, and a fine 
sermon by Rev. Malles of Covington, Va., which con- 
cluded our program. 

A good time was had by everyone present and we 
hope to have a larger attendance at our next meeting 
which will be held in February at the Brethren Church 
in Covington. 

Yours in His Service, 

— Lawrence Mitchell, Pres. 



News Editor: Norman Uphouse, 649 Berry ville Ave., Winchester, Va. 



ATTENTION SOCIAL CHAIRMEN 

Everybody loves a party: Children, young people, 
sophisticated grown-ups; therefore begin planning 
now. 

Do not wait until someone suggests, "It's about time 
we were having a party," to look hastily about for 
suggestions. Get the "Scrap Book" habit — save all 
party and game suggestions you can find in news- 
papers and magazines. It is a good idea to classify 
and index them as you enter them in your Scrap Book. 
Sometimes they may require changing or revising to 
make them more acceptable for use in a Christian 
group. 

Acquire the habit of thinking about ways of adapt- 
ing game suggestions, and make notations in your 
book. You will find these invaluable in successful 
entertainment planning. 

Many fine Bible study outlines and suggestions ap- 
pear in our church and other Christian periodicals. 
Consider their value for use at your party devotional 
times. Reserve a section for these in your Scrap Book. 

FOR THE LOOKOUT COMMITTEE 

Go in groups Sunday afternoon to call on prospec- 
tive members, bringing them back to a light lunch 
(possibly sandwiches and cocoa) at 5:45, and all stay- 
ing for C. E. and church. 

SOMETHING DIFFERENT FOR C. E. 

About two weeks before the meeting, give each of 10 
Endeavorers a different verse from Rom. 12, from 
which to prepare a three minute sermonette. At the 
meeting the 10 contestants sit on the front row. A 
judge selects the best sermonette, timing the partici- 
pants and taking points off for those who speak over 
three minutes. 

NEWS FROM THE SOUTHEAST 

Greetings to all C. E. societies from the southern 
half of the South Eastern District of Christian En- 
deavors. 

Last December 20th we held a meeting attended by 
four churches: The Brethren Church of Hollins, Va.; 
The Brethren Church of Covington, Va.; The Brethren 
Church of Buena Vista, Va.; The Ghent Brethren 
Church of Roanoke, Va. 

We had a splendid crowd of young people present 
as well as a crowd of older people visiting us at our 
meeting. 

The young people of Buena Vista, Va., came in a 
large bus and entered the church in a group. 

The devotions were read by Rev. Bowman of Buena 
Vista, Va., and prayer by Rev. Patterson of Hollins, 
Va., followed. 

At the election of officers the following young peo- 
ple were elected : President, Lawrence Mitchell of Roa- 



BUlLflr/N/ 



For All 
Endeavorers 



Everybody seems to be waiting for everybody else to 
send in the news. Instruct the secretary of your 
society to drop a post card to your news editor, Rev. 
Norman Uphouse, 649 Berryville Ave., Winchester, Va., 
at least every six weeks. 



■#&& -frWff 




From 
Our Workers 



If you have any news that could be used in this column, address 
it to Editorial Office, The Brethren Missionary Herald Co., 3326 S. 
Calhoun St., Ft. Wayne, Ind. 

A revival is to be conducted at the Waynesboro 
church by Bro. R. D. Barnard from Feb. 11-Mar. 2. 
Concerning the transportation committee of the 

First Brethren Church, Long Beach, the church bulle- 
tin carries the following interesting item: "This unique 
feature of our Bible School has been in operation for 
the past 15 years, having been organized at that time 
with but three autos, bringing in an average of 25 
per Sunday. During the year just closed, with 60 
autos in service, an average of 556 children were 
brought to the Bible School each Sunday, or a grand 
total of 28,942 for the year! This is an entirely volun- 
tary service to the Lord on the part of the drivers, who 
give their time and cars to this work so faithfully every 
Sunday morning. One of the remarkable features of 
this work is that there has been no accident to any 
of these thousands of children, as they have been 
brought to God's house each Sunday, through the 
rushing traffic from all parts of Long Beach. Truly, 
this is an evidence of God's care and protection of 
those in His work, and a stamp also of His approval." 
The First Brethren Church, San Diego, reports the 
addition of 44 members during 1940. Of these, eight 
have been lost, making a net gain of 36. 

Speaking of progress, the report of the Bible School 
superintendent of the Second Church, Los Angeles, 
surely shows it. The average attendance per Sunday 
was 350 in 1938, 368 in 1939, and 378 in 1940. The 
amounts subscribed and given were $3,377.93 in 1938, 
$3,522.35 in 1939, and $3,777.00 in 1940. The Bible School 
attendance was under 300, 9 Sundays in 1939 and only 



—15— 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



3 in 1940; it was over 400, 6 Sundays in 1939 and 13 in 
1940; it was over 500 once in 1939 and twice in 1940. 

The First Brethren Church of Modesto, Calif., has 
moved to the Guild Hall, very suitably located on 14th 
St., which hall they are furnishing as a real church 
chapel. They report their new quarters to be a home- 
like, worshipful place. 

Dr. J. C. Beal is scheduled to conduct a Bible con- 
ference at the First Church, Los Angeles, Feb. 10-16, 
after having completed conferences at the Second 
Church, Los Angeles, at Compton, and at the Second 
Church, Long Beach. 

Even the atheists are not fooled by the emptiness 
of modernism. From the American Association for the 
Advancement of Atheism comes this statement: "Much 
as we dislike modernists, we must recognize that for 
many, modernism is but a stop-over on the road to 
atheism. Perhaps we should have a little more pa- 
tience with these our weaker brothers who are unable 
to go straight from orthodoxy to atheism without rest- 
ing at the camps of liberalism along the way. Modern- 
ism being no abiding place for the reasoning mind, 
some of them will yet arrive." 



DON'T FORGET— 




FROM 
COVINGTON, VA. 




1+1=2 



iiiiiiiiiiiii 



iiiiiiiiiiii 



(JMIIIIIIIIillllllll 



The accompanying picture is a part of the Men's 
Gospel Team of The First Brethren Church of Coving- 
ton. These men, about 24 in all, have two churches in 
the mountains near Covington that they serve. Both 
have no pastor other than these men. Every other 
Sunday afternoon at 3:00 they hold services at Potts 
Creek; every other Sunday night at 7:30 they hold 
services at Snake Run. The other Sunday afternoon 
an elderly lady on crutches hobbled up the isle and 
accepted Christ during the men's service. 

A few Sunday nights ago they (about 3 go at a time 
on a team) were on their way to Snake Run for their 
services. A few miles from the church they picked up 
a young man walking to the church for the service. 
Just before reaching the church the men stopped as 
they always do for prayer. The prayer over, they 
started the car again. The young man was astonished. 
He told the men that he had been in cars before that 
had stopped beside the road for every other sinful 
purpose they could mention, but that was the first 
time he had stopped beside the road at night in a 
car for PRAYER! 

In His Grace, 

Art Malles. 



1 Mcuf, We Gaunt an Ijau? 



S The other day we received the following letter from M. E 
~ Horner: 

"If each subscriber to the Herald would 
E send in one new subscription, it would help 
= a bit. So I wish to start that list." 

S In the same mail came another letter from Miss Doris Fallis: 

"Enclosed find $2.00. Please renew my sub- 
S scription for one year and please send the 
E Herald for one year to . . ." 

E And still another in the same mail from Rev. Alan S. Pearce: 

s "We are going after subscriptions in our 

E church as never before, so that you may 

E expect to receive a goodly number more 

E from time to time during the next month." 

E These letters gave us an idea— A DOUBLE ONE 
E Campaign. So we are out after double ones. What 
= is it? 

E 1.— Send in vour subscription to THE BRETH- 

E REN MISSIONARY HERALD — $1.00 for 

E one year. 

= — and — 

E 2. — Then send an extra SI. 00 for another one 
E year subscription to The Brethren Mission- 

E ary Herald to be sent to a friend or relative. 

E YOUR DOLLAR DOUBLED 

E will send forth the Word of God through the 

E printed pages of The Brethren Missionary Herald 

E to more than double. 

— Your dollar doubled will be sending a Christian testimony 

~ — the kind that you yourself would want to send out — for less 

E than you could send a tract each week into a home — 

~ And The Brethren Missionary Herald, with its 16 or more 

E pages 48 times each year, certainly is better than a single 

E tract sent out once each week. 

E Here is my dollars for 

MY SUBSCRIPTION 

E Renewal [ or New [ 

E Name 



Address 
City . . . 



State 



And with my double dollar, send 
The Brethren Missionary Herald for one year to 

Nome 

Address 

City 



State 



Inclosed find $ For additional subscriptions 

use blank paper. 

THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD CO. 

3326 S. Calhoun St. Fort Wayne, Ind. 



—16— 



ma 




if T hird St 





4-6-4. 




: 




When it is evening, ye say, It will be fair weother: for the sky is 
red. And in the morning, It will be foul weather today: for the sky 



is red and lowring. ye hypocrites, ye can discern the face of the 
sky; but can ye not discern the signs of the times?— Mt. 16:2-3. 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 




tUellfoUd 



By CHAS. W. MAYES 



SOME HOPE METHODIST CHURCH 
MAY "COME BACK" AS DYNAMIC 
SPIRITUAL INFLUENCE 

ATLANTIC CITY, N. J.— The Commission on Evan- 
gelism in the Methodist Church recently met in this 
city and adopted definite and far-reaching plans to 
reclaim backsliders and revive the old-time evangelis- 
tic spirit. This is certainly music to the ears of ail 
who love God's Word and believe that all man need 
to be saved, and that it takes the old fashioned mes- 
sage of salvation to save them. We hope that the com- 
mission may awaken some of the Methodist politicians 
to realize that it is a million times more important to 
get souls saved for eternity than to try to build an- 
other world peace program. 

However, it must be remembered that after the 
Commission on Evangelism has given its full report, 
it may not be accepted or at least it may not be exe- 
cuted. 

Furthermore it takes more than a few resolutions 
and plans to produce the kind of revivals which were 
enjoyed in the days of Wesley. Before the Methodist 
Church can get the results of Wesley, she will have 
to reproduce the gospel of Wesley. That means that 
the propaganda about social gospel (really not the 
gospel at all), world peace, and popular book reviews, 
will have to be laid aside. In their place the Bible 
must be faithfully preached in the power of the Spirit. 
If the Methodist Church would really get on fire for 
God as she once was, it would start a revival which 
would warm every spot on the earth, from the hum- 
blest village to the capitals of Europe where the dic- 
tators now sit in blasphemy against God. 



ity to the living God by refusing God's one written 
revelation, the Bible, and by refusing the only Sav- 
ior, the Lord Jesus Christ. Centuries ago, unbelieving 
men said, "We will not have this man reign over us." 
Men say the same thing when Jesus Christ is refused 
the place of Lordship today. The natural man would 
like to set himself up as a little king running his own 
affairs and doing as he pleases, with no concern for 
rightful authority. Isaiah the prophet described this 
attitude of the sinful heart thus: "We have turned 
every one to his own way" (Isa. 53:6). 



OHIO MAN SETS UP 

HIS OWN KINGDOM 

LIMA, Ohio. — A man named Alexander, overtaken 
by the government officials after he had refused to 
register for the recent draft, told authorities that he 
seceded from the United States several days before 
the date of registration to form the kingdom of Alex- 
ander, and that he is now waiting to discover a piece 
of property somewhere over which he may reign. He 
reports that he has written the Secretary of State 
for the privilege of remaining in the United States 
until such a time as he may secure the coveted piece 
of property. 

Some men will feel like anathematizing "King Al- 
exander" for such ingratitude and disrespect toward 
his native land. It is a ridiculous action for the pur- 
pose of evading all responsibility to the nation which 
gave him birth and protection for many years. We 
will all agree that this action deserves anything but 
commendation: yet there is an attitude of heart which 
is infinitely worse. 

Every man born on this earth owes infinitely more 
to God than "King Alexander" owes to the nation. Yet 
everywhere we see men repudiating their responsibil- 



UNITED STATES WILL BE POPULAR 
IN ALL EUROPE 

BERLIN, Germany. — Emil Ludwig. a German au- 
thority has recently stated that out of this European 
chaos will arise a great united states of Europe. Prob- 
ably Mr. Ludwig thinks also that Germany will be 
the center of that great union of states. Regardless 
of what he may think about that matter, his idea of 
a united states of Europe is worth consideration. Of 
course this is no new idea to those who study God's 
Word. The Bible reveals that there will be more 
than one united states of Europe near the end of 
this age. There will be one united states made up of 
those nations sympathetic with the king of the north, 
Russia. There will be r.nother made up of all those 
nations sympathetic with Tarshish, Great Britain. 
There will be still another united states of Europe 
made up of ten special kingdoms bound together by 
a force hitherto unknown in all the world. It will be 
the Satan-inspired power of the greatest dictator the 
world has ever yet known. This last united states will 
eventually control all the other groups of united 
states, and for a short time this dictator shall rule the 
world as the predicted antichrist, actually claiming 
that he is God. 

Then there is still another united states. When the 
King, the Lord Jesus Christ, shall reign in bodily pres- 
ence in Jerusalem on the throne of David, the whole 
world shall be ruled by Him in peace. It will be God's 
kingdom on the earth for which God's people have 
long prayed. It will truly be a united states in the 
full meaning of the term. 

Readers may figure out for themselves where the 
United States of America comes in. 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 

The Brethren Missionary Herald is published weekly, 
four times a month, or 43 times a year, at Herald Press, 
Inc., 1300 West 9th St., Cleveland, Ohio, by the Brethren 
Missionary Herald Co., 3326 So. Calhoun St., Fort Wayne, 
Ind. 

Subscription Price: In the United States and possessions, 

$1.00 a year; Foreign countries, $1.50 a year. 

ADMINISTRATION 

Secretary of Publications : Leo Polman 

Business Office Secretary: Miss Geneva Kuhn 

Editorial Office Secretary: Miss Grace Allshouse 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

President: Russell D. Barnard Secretary: Tom Hammers 

Vice-President: Ralph Rambo Treasurer: Homer A. Kent 

R. D. Crees Mrs. Roy Patterson R. E. Gingrich 

George Richardson L. L. Grubb Bernard Schneider 

EDITORS 
Foreign Missions : Louis S. Bauman. 
Educational: Alva J. McClain. 
Home Missions: R. Paul Miller. 
Women's Missionary Council: Mrs. A. B. Kidder. 



Entered as second class matter at the post office at 
Cleveland, Ohio, February 9, 1939,. under the act of March 
3, 1879. 



FEBRUARY 15, 1941 



A JEWISH CONFERENCE IN EVERY 
BRETHREN CHURCH THIS YEAR 

The precious harvest of Jewish hearts saved in oui 
Los Angeles Jewish Mission last year should stir our 
people to strehgthen and extend this great work. Since 
the Brethren churches now have our own Jewish mis- 
sion work, all our churches should do their Jewish 
evangelization through our own mission. There are 
other churches that will care for other works, but 
others will not care for ours. 

The only means we have for supporting our own 
mission is through special Jewish Bible conferences, 
for which speakers will be provided each year. A Jew- 
ish Bible conference each year in every Brethren 
church is necessary to keep our people concerned for 
Israel, and to provide the funds for our mission. Pas- 
tors, please write in for your conference date now so 
that we will be able to care fully for all our needs for 
the mission. We had batter fall down on almost any- 
thing else than this obligation. "Pray for the peace of 
Jerusalem; they shall prosper that love thee" IPs. 122: 
6). Do it now, preacher! 



WE NEED HELP IN PRAYER ! 

FIRST, 

Our Thanksgiving offering is now coming in much 
better than it did through November and December. 
However, there is going to have to be a tremendous 
increase if we are going to reach our goal of $30,000.00, 
without which we cannot make the advances planned 
at the beginning of the year. This is no time for us 
to sag. This is no time to lower our gifts. Now is the 
time to throw everything into the work for Christ 
while we have the privilege. It may not be so long 
till all we have will be seized and we cannot give to 
the cause of Christ. Pray much that no church will 
fail to do her best at this time. 

SECOND, 

Our Hagerstown field is showing tremendous prom- 
ise, but there are great difficulties facing us. A new 
building is needed at once, and unless our Thanks- 
giving offering reaches its goal, this work will be ser- 
iously hampered at a most critical time of its begin- 
ning. Pray for the new radio program here that funds 
may be supplied that the gospel may go out over ail 
that country without fail. Pray for Bro. Grubb who 
is humbled by the magnitude of the task God has giv- 
en him. 

THIRD, 

Dedication of the Clayhole church in Kentucky is 
planned for the month of May or June. Our funds for 
this work are exhausted and yet it is not finished. 
The back porch is still unfinished on the parsonage. 
The finishing work on the church is not complete, and 
we need double the amount of pews that we now have 
to care for the increasing attendance. We have been 
praying for a carpenter from among our Brethren 
somewhere who could give about two weeks of time 
this winter to his Lord and finish these things. We 
can provide transportation and expenses while down 
there. This is a real need. Pray definitely for it. 

FOURTH, 

Bro. Barnard is working hard to get the new Middle- 
town field ready for starting a real work there this 
spring with a pastor on the ground. To develop this 
field beside his heavy work in Dayton is demanding 
a lot of him. This is a great field for us and a needy 
one. Pray much that God will provide the grace nec- 
essary to overcome all our own inabilities. We must 
not stand still at such a time. 

FIFTH, 

There should be a tent campaign held in Hagers- 
town, Cleveland, New Troy, and Winchester this sum- 



mer. These involve much expense and lots of hard 
work against odds, but they often spell the break for 
Christ in a new community such as these are for us. 
Pray earnestly for wisdom and grace for these. 

SIXTH, 

Lodi and Front Royal are new fields that have de- 
veloped this year since our budget was made. They 
have been showing up fast. Pray definitely for these 
that the directors may have wisdom in providing for 
them and that sufficient funds will be sent in above 
our budget to care for them. The Bakersfield project 
has run against a hard situation. It looks as if a tent 
campaign will be necessary to break this field open 
to the whole gospel. Remember Bro. Richardson as 
he cares for it, that he may keep full of courage in 
face of many difficulties. The field is there. We ought 
to take it. 

SEVENTH, 

Many Brethren, young men as well as families, are 
moving to San Diego because of the great increase of 
naval expansion. That town is a marine and naval 
base. This influx of population is putting a tremen- 
dous responsibility upon Bro. Albert Flory to care for 
these young men away from home and for these new 
families, that they do not drift away from fellowship 
with God. 

"Faithful is He that calleth you, Who also will do 
it" (1 Thess. 5:24). 



'PRAY FOR THE PEACE OF JERUSALEM" 

Scattered by God's avenging hand, 

Afflicted and forlorn, 
Sad wanderers from their pleasant land, 

Do Judah's children mourn; 
And e'en in Christian countries,, few 
Breath thoughts of pity for the Jew. 

Yet listen, Gentiles, do you love 

The Bible's precious page? 
Then let your hearts with kindness move 

To Israel's heritage; 
Who traced those lines of love for you? 
Each sacred writer was a Jew. 

And when as years and ages passed, 

And nations rose and fell, 
Though clouds and darkness oft were cast 

O'er captive Israel, 
The Oracles of God for you 
Were kept in safety by the Jew. 

And when the Great Redeemer came 

For guilty man to bleed, 
He did not take an angel's name 

No — born of Abraham's seed, 
Jesus, Who gave His life for you, 
The Gentile Saviour was a Jew. 

Although His own received Him not, 

And turned in pride away, 
Whence is the Gentile's happier lot? 

Are you more just than they? 
No; God in pity turned to you — 
Have you no pity for the Jew? 

Go, then, and bend your knee to pray 

For Israel's ancient race; 
Ask the dear Saviour every day 

To call them by His grace; 
Go, for a debt of love is due 
From Christian Gentiles to the Jew. 

— Author Unknown. 



—3- 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 




By R. Paul Miller, Editor 

How About the Thanksgiving Offering? 

For some unexplainable reason our Thanksgiving 
offering was very slow in starting to come in. We 
never had such low receipts for November and Decern • 
ber. But January made a difference. During this 
month offerings really began to come in. At the writ- 
ing of these notes, over $12,000.00 have come in and 
the large offerings are just starting to arrive. We have 
found that the reason for the delay this year has 
been due to the fact that we did not make an appeal 
for early offerings. But it is coming in now and all 
is well. The closing date for the offering is Feb. 28. 
The comparative report goes in the next day to the 
magazine for publication, so treasurers, don't wait 
on those late arriving pledges. Let them come later. 
We want the bulk of your report in so as to give your 
church a real representation along with the others. 
This first report is the most informative of all. Don't 
miss your place in it. 



Is America Preparing to Commit Suicide? 

In a recent radio broadcast that has stirred the na- 
tion, Dr. Robert M. Hutchins, president of Chicago 
University said, 

"I speak tonight because I believe that the Am- 
erican people are about to commit suicide. We 
are not planning to. We have no plan. We are 
drifting into suicide. Deafened by martial mu- 
sic, fine language and large appropriations, we 
are drifting into war." 

While Dr. Hutchins is far from an evangelical Chris- 
tian; yet with calm and clear mind he sees this na- 
tion plunging madly and blindly into a worldwide 
holocaust in which all of the treasures of a free peo- 
ple will be wiped out, not to be regained for perhaps 
100 years. His speech should act as a means to cool 
off some of the hectic minds that are shouting war 
hysteria into the nation's ears, but we doubt if it will 
succeed. He evidently believes that to plunge into 
this present war would result in the loss of practically 
every human advance our generation has made. He 
believes that the lofty talk of our president about 
America setting the world right and policing it for the 
future is the "pursuit of the unattainable." America 
sent millions of her sons to Europe 20 years ago, fired 
with the lofty words of another president to "make 
the world safe for democracy." Thousands of Ameri- 
can mothers' boys were 'plowed under' Europe's soil 
in that first foolish debacle. Today we are blindly 
starting to repeat the same folly. Says Hutchins, if 
America enters the war we can do nothing for the 
world, but if we stay out we can at least help to re- 
build after it is over. Even then, we cannot help the 
world until we have cleaned up our own back yard. 

There is no doubt but what he is right so far as a 
worldly view of things is concerned. But his state- 
ment about suicide is a sober one. In his eyes the 
America that we have known, America as a nation of 
high ideals, is about to bring about her own death. 
If we enter this war he says, 

"For a generation, perhaps 100 years, we shall 
not be able to struggle back to where we were. 
We shall think no more of justice, the moral 
order, and the supremacy of human rights." 



This can only mean that he expects totalitarianism 
in this land as a result of war. It means a dictator. 
As we write these words the president, backed by a 
powerful propaganda organization, is seeking to 
frighten the nation into granting him purely dicta- 
torial powers that would silence the voice of congress. 
Once that power was granted, even for a short time, 
it would never be released again. 

Those of us who are native Americans and have 
breathed the air of liberty all our lives naturally re- 
coil at this, and shudder. It means the loss of the 
privilege to preach the whole counsel of God and the 
crushing of the organized Christian church through 
persecution and prosecution as well as strangulation. 
That is what has happened under the dictators in 
Europe and Asia. Surely the "perilous times" are be- 
ginning for the world and the church. Who could 
convince the Christians of Europe and Russia that 
the "great tribulation" is not upon them? We wonder 
sometimes at what will happen to some of our escha- 
tological views when the events of the end time ful- 
filling the prophetic Word actually begin to appear! 
But in our opinion, America will not commit suicide 
when she plunges into the present war. America com- 
mitted suicide long ago when she turned her back 
on God and enthroned unbelief in her schools. To- 
day, the proof that America has already committed 
suicide is found in her empty church pews, and in 
her crowded movies. Dr. Hutchins is a little late with 
his opinion — that is all. 



Why Doesn't God Do Something? 

In talking to a man about his soul the other day, 
while he was casting about wildly for some way to 
put up a defense for his unbelief, he suddenly burst 
out with, "If God is almighty, and if God is good, why 
doesn't He stop all that is going on in Europe?" We 
answered, "Why do you think He should interfere?" 
He replied, "Why, because of the awful deeds they are 
doing and the way innocent people and little children 
are suffering." We asked, "Which side should God 
help out? Which nation is righteous? Which nation 
has clean hands?" Said he, "Neither." "Then God 
couldn't champion either side could He?" "No." Then 
we concluded, "My friend, the only way God could 
interfere at all would be in judgment on sin, and that 
would blast all the world and land them in hell. And 
furthermore, friend, that would take you in and land 
you in the same place, for you are as guilty as they. 
By the life you are living you are doing more harm 
to your little boys through your example than any suf- 
ferings of war. War may destroy their bodies, but 
your example would send your boys to hell. God is 
not going to let the nations go much longer. He is 
coming back soon to set things right and judge the 
nations. The nations have rejected Christ and so 
have you. If you do not accept Christ you will reap 
with them." 



Preachers Already Climbing 

On the War Band Wagon 

We have just been sickened by reading an article 
by a great preacher and soul winner of other days 
whom we have always held in high esteem. In this 
article he writes to justify his endorsement of train- 
ing young men to be officers in the army, claiming 
that it is entirely fitting and consistent for Christian 
young men. It is still fresh in our memory how preach- 
ers did the same thing 20 years ago. Before war was 
declared they were all against it. Shortly after young 
men began leaving home for the front, the preachers 
began to feel that they should do something to fit 
the occasion. At first they tried to quiet the fears of 



FEBRUARY 15, 19'4 1 




*7*4e (Zelaiiaa a$ the Jdaw> 

to- the Betieuen, In Q%ace 



Our earth is full of tragedies of various sorts; but 
one of the worst, and yet the least spectacular, is the 
tragedy of the multitudes of human beings who are 
depending on the merit of human action to secure 
them favor with God for salvation. Even when many, 
who call themselves Christian, repeatedly read in the 
Scriptures that "no man is justified by the deeds of 
the law," they are prone to think merely of the ten 
commandments or the whole system of government 
for O. T. Israel, rather than all efforts of the flesh. 

When the apostle Paul, in spite of all his splendid 
inheritance and personal attainments, tells us that 
he had "no confidence in the flesh" (Phil. 3:3,4), ail 
of us should be compelled to abandon our puny ef- 
forts as having saving value before God. While Paul's 
rigid keeping of the law was of the highest attained 
by any among the Pharisees, even beyond the possi- 
bility of human criticism (Phil. 3:5,6), yet it failed 
to satisfy the demands of our Lord as expressed in 
the words, "Except your righteousness shall exceed 
the righteousness of the scribes and Pharisees, ye shall 
in no case enter into the kingdom of heaven (Matt. 
5:20). It was a glorious day for Paul when he learned 
that Christ's righteousness alone exceeded that of the 
scribes and Pharisees, and that it is bestowed on all 
who accept it by faith (Phil. 3:9). How anxious he be- 
came to share his discovery with others of his kind, 
and to tell them that "Christ is the end of the law 



the parents of young men who had gone to war with- 
out Christ. They started preaching that young men 
who died on the battlefield for their country were saved 
because they had "made the supreme sacrifice" just 
as Christ did! It was not long after that when they 
began to preach war hate against Germany in the 
pulpit dedicated to the love of Christ. 

Already we are seeing the parade start all over 
again. A year ago, pulpits that were then shouting 
against war at all are now preaching destruction of 
hitler as an enemy of God. There is no doubt that 
Hitler is an enemy of Christ, but why pick out Hitler? 
How about England with her sad record in India, and 
China, and Africa? These preachers having "itching 
ears" are a sad tragedy for the gospel. Trying to be 
popular with a Christ-rejecting world by fitting a 
chameleon gospel to ever changing situation to justi- 
fy the acts of men, is heading for a terrible judgment. 
God's true preacher sounds forth the same message 
no matter how men .urge and change about him. He 
is not trying to please men or to be popular; he is 
only concerned about being popular with God! Elijah, 
Isaiah, and Jeremiah were men who spoke for God. 
They didn't change their message in order to be pop- 
ular, even though it cost them great suffering. It 
would be far better to sit in the slime pit with Jere- 
miah and be true to God than to speak falsely to 
please a sinful world and finally stand discredited 
and rejected before God. There is undoubtedly perse- 
cution ahead for every preacher who will preach the 
Scriptural truth of non-resistance, but God forbid 
that any Brethren preacher should in these late days 
hide the truth for fear of the cost. 



Arthur D. Cashman 



for righteousness to every one that believeth" (Rom. 
10:4). Lest he fail to get this great truth across ef- 
fectively to men everywhere, note how he drives and 
drills by repetition in Rom. 5:15-19. Read also 1 Cor. 
1:30 and 2 Cor. 5:21. 

After Paul's great discovery of the truth of "im- 
puted righteousness" (Rom. 4:11,22,23,24), did he 
advocate that the law was no good and that the be- 
liever could keep or break it at will? Do we find him 
becoming slack in his spiritual life, indulging pro- 
miscuously in fleshly lusts and worldly practices? Pos- 
itively not! Rather do we find him attaining to spir- 
itual heights never before dreamed of by him, be- 
cause he had a new victorious power after conversion 
which he did not know before. In fact, he just learned 
how to keep the law better after he was saved by 
grace. He found the answer to his own question, "O 
wretched man that I am! who shall deliver me from 
the body of this death?" I thank God through Jesus 
Christ our Lord" (Rom. 4:24,25). Hear him as. he says, 
"I can do all things through Christ which strength- 
eneth me" (Phil. 4:13); "for me to live is Christ" (Phil. 
1:21); "Christ liveth in me" (Gal. 2:20); "it is God 
which worketh in you both to will and to do of his 
good pleasure" (Phil. 2:13). Paul was constrained by 
the mercies of God to present his body a living sacri- 
fice to God. He was not more conformed to this 
world but less. He was transformed by the renewing 
of his mind long before he admonished others to do 
it (Rom. 12:1-2). He kept his body under (1 Cor. 9: 
27). He "reckoned himself dead indeed unto sin but 
alive unto God through Jesus Christ" (Rom. 6:11). 

Paul admitted that "the law is holy, and the com- 
mandment holy and just and good" (Rom. 7:12) — 
"holy" because the things which it forbids are evil, 
and because it is a copy of God's holy character; 
"just," because it demands rewards and punishments; 
"good" because it was given for the good of man- 
kind. It makes its observers good, although not per- 
fect. In short, Paul knew that the law gives man a 
knowledge of sin, condemns him, and prepares the 
way for the gospel of grace. If this grace is accepted 
by faith, it will save the condemned sinner from the 
penalty which the law threatens, and place him in 
a position whereby he may render obedience to that 
law. Only through grace can the believer say with 
the Psalmist, "O, how I love thy law; it is my medi- 
tation all the day." 

As Christians, we would have no further use for 
the law if the work of grace were perfected within 
us and we appropriated all of God's power through 
the indwelling Spirit for victory. But since the pur- 
pose of God's grace is not perfected within us, inas- 
much as there is a tendency oftentimes toward evil, 
the law of God is necessary for us who are not under 
the law but under grace. Henceforth the law is use- 
ful for keeping- us under grace. The law, as a tutor, 
not only leads us, first of all to Christ, but keeps us 
trusting in the Savior. 

It is difficult for the casual reader of the New Tes- 
tament to reconcile Paul's declaration that the moral 
law is holy and just and good with the seemingly dis- 
paraging manner in which he speaks of it as follows: 



—5- 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



"the law worketh wrath"; "the law entered that the 
offense might abound"; "the strength of the sin is 
the law"; "become dead to the law" and "be delivered 
from the law." But the difficulty is only seemingly 
so. The law was ordained to produce holiness and 
happiness. If everything in man had remained as 
it was created, man never would have had any diffi- 
culty with the law. But through the fall, he is out 
of his original relations to the law, and has inclina- 
tions through his sinful nature, which makes the 
keeping of the law a burden. 

That which is good was not made an offense to 
man by divine arrangement, but by man's transgres- 
sion. We can understand this better by realizing that 
if the divine law could be altered so that it should 
agree with man's sinful inclinations, he could be hap- 
py in sin. But God thru His foreknowledge, seeing 
man in sin and unhappy under the law which is con- 
trary to his inclinations, made a plan through grace 
which changes the inclinations, making obedience not 
only a possibility but a pleasure. 

Sometimes physicians find two bodily disorders in 
the same person. The one is most critical and will 
keep the patient weak and useless if not treated with 
a certain potent medicine. But the other disorder, 
while not in itself critical, is such that if the remedy 
for the first disorder is administered, it will lead to 
deadly complications. So it might be said of the law 
that it is too strong a medicine for the human soul. 
Jesus Christ is the great Physician Who, by His grace, 
both delivers the believing victim from the guilt of 
the broken law and enables him to have the strength 
and power to "abound unto every good work." In- 
stead of threatening him with punishment for his 
failures as the law does, the plan of grace finds God 
indebted to pay rewards for the good works done in 
order to keep salvation free (Rom. 4:4-5). This does 
not discourage good works, but as in the case of Paul, 
"the love of Christ constraineth us" to go far beyond 
that which even the law demanded of us. 

As believers, dealing with souls in the same predica- 
ment in which we were at one time, let us not be 
guilty of slighting the law, forgetting what it did for 
us. What the Psalmist says is true: "the law of the 
Lord is perfect, converting the soul" (Ps. 19:7). "For 
where no law is, there is no transgression" (Rom. 4: 
15). "I had not known sin but by the law" (Rom. 7: 
7 ) ; and without tire knowledge of sin, it is useless to 
talk of Christ and His grace. 



WAIT ! 

Romans 12:12 

God's delays are not denials; 

He has heard your prayer; 
He knows all about your trials, 

Knows your every care. 

God's delays are not denials; 

Help is on the way; 
He is watching o'er life's dials, 

Bringing forth the day. 

God's delays are not denials; 

You will find Him true. 
Working through the hardest trials 

What is best for you! 

— Selected. 



A GOOD WAY TO BACKSLIDE 

Sleep every time you are sleepy. 
Rest every time you are tired. 
Eat every time you are hungry. 




"What The Home Missions Council Is Doing" 

ACROSS 

THE 
NATION 

with our 

secretary 

New Field at Front Royal Still Growing 

A letter from Norman Uphouse is simply filled with 
zeal and joy and blessing. He writes that the new 
group being started at Front Royal, Va., is getting 
larger and larger. Last week the home they met in 
was crowded out. There were 33 folks that tried to 
get in. No room could hold them, so Norman took the 
adults in the kitchen and his wife took the children 
to the living room and some were on the stairs. But 
they got through with it and had a wonderful time. 
They are teaching the simplest fundamentals of what 
salvation means, and the peonle are eager for it. They 
are now looking for a place large enough for them 
to meet in without so much discomfort. It appears 
that the big silk mill there is gaining in momentum 
daily, and soon there will be a great new community 
in which to work, something after the order of Cov- 
ington. 

Plans are already being considered for putting up 
a tent there next summer to carry on a daily vaca- 
tion Bible School during the day and to hold evan- 
gelistic meetings at night. Needless to say, things 
are full to promise in this field right now. 



Winchester Is Still Going Strong 

We have also received word that the Sunday School 
attendance here is still taxing the capacity of the 
building and that they are compelled to use part of 
the parsonage in order to accommodate some of the 
pupils. We expect before many days that we will be 
compelled to build a new church edifice here that is 
worthy of the fine field in which our folks are labor- 
ing. God is doing a great work in this district through 
Brother and Sister Uphouse. Pray for them daily. 



— Ft. Wayne Bulletin. 



Hagerstown Is Booming 

Bro. Lew Grubb, pastor at our Hagerstown church, 
stopped into the office the other day just as we were 
packing to leave for another trip to Flora, Ind. He 
was just starting a meeting at Bethel Church at Berne. 
He reported that the new radio urogram was going 
fine, and that the Waynesboro church and their pas- 
tor, Robert Crees, were co-operating in the very fin- 
est way. Bro. Crees is taking full charge of the radio 
program during Bro. Grubb's absence. The program 
is so successful that more time is being considered on 
the station. Many new people are being interested in 
our work there, which gives every evidence that a 
substantial congregation will be formed in Hagers- 
town at a very early date. A new building will have 
to be erected here before summer is over. In fact, al- 
ready it appears that larger quarters will be needed 



—6— 



FEBRUARY 15, 1941 



even before the new building can be provided. We 
nraise God for these blessings, and humble ourselves 
before Him that these blessings may continue to flow. 



possible, together with a most congenial fellowship. 
The hospitality of these people is mighty fins and 
we enjoyed it every bit. May Our Father God bless 
them all and keep them up in the lead for God till 
our Lord returns. 



First Revival at Fremont 

On Dec. 31 we opened a meeting in this new field. 
Here we have a new group of about 50 people. That 
is what we did have before the recent meetings began. 
They are meeting in a little Presbyterian mission 
building at the edge of town. The accommodations 
here are not so good, but they have served fine under 
the circumstances, and our group has grown steadily 
in spite of any handicaps. 

Phillip Jefferson Simmons is pastor of this group. 
He is now in his last year at Grace Seminary, and 
graduates in June. He has been caring for this group 
of folks ever since they were started last spring. He 
has done a good work under many difficulties. Much 
more could have been done had he been able to give 
all his time to the work instead of just week ends. 
It is remarkable that as much has been done. It 
necessarily follows that such progress could not have 
been made except there were a fine and faithful group 
of laymen working right along through the week. 
They kept their prayer meetings up to about 30 as 
an average, and did much of the pastoral calling to 
help out. He has a very fine group of people to work 
with who are not afraid to work. 

Most of the group are now made up of young people. 
Quite a number of young married people are being 
drawn into the work, and that makes for the strong- 
est kind of a future. Gray hair is hard to find in 
this congregation right now. 

The entire congregation was surely eager for the 
meetings and were ready to pay the price of success. 
They did not hold back like many do, but did every- 
thing they were asked to do and did it with alacrity. 
They did not listen to the appeal to go out and seek 
others, and then pay no attention to it and go right 
on as before. They got busy and went out from door 
to door after their neighbors and friends. I was told 
that some of them stayed as late as two o'clock in the 
morning talking about Christ to unsaved souls. And 
they brought them to Jesus. We shall never forget 
that last night when we saw a stalwart son take his 
father by the arm and walk with him to the front. 
It was a great sight. To our knowledge there was not 
an unsaved soul left in that audience that night. The 
Lord simply cleaned house. We could almost hear the 
angels singing over it all. Needless to say, we had a 
great time together with the Lord. 

The hardest thing to do in Fremont is buy a lot for 
a good location for a church. We have scoured that 
town over and over. We had every real estate man 
in town, it seemed, trying to find a site for us. We 
had the money to pay for it and couldn't find a thing 
to buy. Now wasn't that something! We were very 
desirous to have the lots chosen before the meeting 
closed, but in vain. However, we feel that we will 
have this item decided before long. At least it will be 
in time to build in the spring. In the meantime the 
folks are adding to their building fund, for they will 
need a lot of funds on hand when the building starts 
in the late spring. Can't get too much ahead. 

There is a great field for the Brethren Church with 
the gospel she preaches in Fremont. There is not a 
church in the town with a Sunday School over 300. 
In one church, whose building cost over $460,000.00. 
the Sunday School is no larger than that. The other 
churches are mostly down in the center of town and 
the children are not down town. We plan to build 
out where the children and young people are. 

Our home, while in Fremont, was with Brother and 
Sister Gordon Gonawein. They have a lovely country 
home, and we had every convenience and comfort 



Flora Visited by God 

This church is now 10 months old. It has had a 
pastor since April. It dedicated its new church build- 
ing Dec. 1. Its membership grew to 89 during the first 
10 months of its existence. The local people raised 
over $5,000.00 for the work during this first year. Such 
a record can only reveal the fact that God's hand is 
on the work for good. He evidently has a real work 
for this people to carry out for Him in these tragic 
days. 

That there is a tremendous need for a congregation 
that will preach the living gospel and strive for the 
separated life in this community is unquestioned. 
There are some of the finest and most commodious 
church buildings that could be found in a small town 
of this size. But the out and out testimony for Jesus 
Christ has dwindled to a mighty small group. Some 
churches have no prayer meetings at all, and the 
spirit of soul winning has about died out of the hearts 
of the church members. In view of this, it is little won- 
der that modernism and worldliness have about eaten 
the heart out of the Christian forces of the town. Such 
a situation of course, is not new, it is to be found 
spreading swiftly all over the land. To "have a name 
to live and yet be dead" is a characteristic of the days 
that close this age. Naturally there are some precious 
souls who want the truth and want to live separated 
lives, and are willing to sacrifice with others of like 
heart in order to have a church of that kind in which 
to worship. It is in this needy field that the Grace 
Brethren Church prays that God will use them to 
His own glory. 

Bro. Henry Rempel, pastor of this growing church, 
has done most excellent work since the start of the 
church. Since he has taken to himself a most capable 
wife, he is doing much better work! We found that 
all whom we met in the town had a high regard for 
the sincerity and courage of Bro. Rempel in his min- 
istry. Any man who courageously stands for the truth 
in faith and life will be subjected to criticism by those 
who want to follow the "broad" way. Nevertheless 
those who want reality in Christ are steadily coming 
to Grace Brethren Church from every direction. 

This is the first revival that has been held in the 
church since its organization. Bro. Beal held a Bible 
Conference here last fall, and the benefits of that 
ministry are still remembered as a high spot in many 
lives. We found that Bro. Rempel had made thorough 
preparation for the meetings. The community cer- 
tainly knew what was going on at Grace Church. We 
had a good attendance from the first night — no over- 
flow crowds, but no small crowds either. He has or- 
ganized a fine choir, and with himself as song leader 
we had excellent musical support for the meetings. 
Brother Rempel has a very pleasing manner which 
leaves a pleasant atmosphere on the congregation. 

Our home while in Flora was with Brother and Sis- 
ter Rempel, and a most pleasant experience it has 
been. The devotion to Christ of both of them makes 
a home a joy to enter. May His richest blessings at- 
tend their ministry is our prayer. Our work in Flora 
is in good hands. 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 




By W. H. Schaffer, Pastor, Conemaugh, Pa. 

(Excerpts from sermon preached in the Conemaugh Brethren Church 
Nov. 10th, 1940, Morning I 



Elder Schaffer 



The restless sea in 
the Scriptures is a 
symbol of Gentile 
world powers. One 
good panoramic look 
at this world ought 
to convince us that 
the nations of the 
world are anything 
but quiet and peace- 
ful. 

Matthew records 
the account of the 
Lord and the disci- 
ples on the sea: the 
Master, weary o f 
body, fell asleep, 
while a storm arose 
with such fury that 
the toiling disciples 
were about to give 
up hope of safety, 
when they rudely awoke Him and cried, "Lord, save 
us, we perish." First of all He rebuked them for their 
lack of faith and then rebuked the tempest, and there 
followed a great calm (Matt. 8:23-27). 

There are three things I would like to call to your at- 
tention. First, all the men in that boat were Jews. 
The tempest was raging ; they were_being tossed about, 
and were at the mercy of that storm and about to 
be drowned, when they remembered the presence of 
the Master. And when all hope of their being saved 
was gone. He acted at the proper time. While the 
Jews are being driven from pillar to post in this 
world, and are trying to save themselves from such 
occurences where they still have freedom, they are 
fearful of this tempest among the nations. The pro- 
gram that is broadcast every Saturday night by the 
leading Rabbis of Judaism convince me that the ob- 
ject is to ward off a possible persecution in the grow- 
ing tide of anti-Semitism, even under the liberty of 
the stars and stripes. 

Under the ungodly alliance the leaders of Judaism 
will make with the antichrist, there will be a lull in 
the storm as far as the Jew is concerned, but it will 
be only the calm before the final blast. The prophet 
Zechariah describes, in his closing chapters, the arm- 
ies of the nations seeking to annihilate every last ves- 
tage of God's chosen people; and when they them- 
selves even believe they are about to be destroyed, 
they will call upon Messiah for deliverance. John the 
Revelator describes this great answer to the pleadings 
of the remnant in chapter 19. Then, and only then, 
will the same Jesus Who spoke to the tempest on the 
sea of Galilee bring calm and peace to a troubled 
world. 

And now let us look at this situation from another 
viewpoint — this time from the viewpoint of the be- 
liever. All of the men in that ship with the Lord Je- 
sus were believers on Him except "one. You will recall 
how that in His high priestly prayer in Jn. 17 the 
Lord said, ". . . . those that Thou gavest Me I have 
kept, and none of them is lost, but the son of perdi- 
tion; that the Scriptures might be fulfilled." 



Looking at the world from the Christian's viewpoint, 
and compared with the pages of history at our finger 
tips, it is not difficult to realize that the world has 
never witnessed such a stormy time. Certain parts 
of the world have from time to time been subject to 
the desolation of war, but never in history has the 
whole world been affected like it is today. Where will 
this war end? How far will it spread? We cannot set 
any boundaries, but we do believe that every nation 
will be vitally effected and engulfed before the close 
of this dispensation. Did not the Lord give us, who 
are living in the latter days, some signs whereby we 
might know of His coming again? When He speaks as 
in Matt. 24:6-7 we believe He means to inform us that 
such conditions will be universal; also Lk. 21:25-28. 

After the recent election, a prominent business man 
of the community who lives in Johnstown said, "I 
never made more money in my life than I'm making 
now; but Rev. Schaffer, what is this world coming 
to?" This man is a good Christian, a high official in 
his church; but he knows very little of what the Word 
of God has to say about present conditions. He fur- 
ther mentioned to his amazement the vote on Sunday 
movies in Johnstown, which vote to open the theaters 
on Sunday was won by several thousand ballots. When 
I reminded him that Conemaugh had lost the vote 
against Sunday movies by 22 votes he hardly knew 
what to say. I gave him a few words of encourag- 
ment to this effect. This means that the time of this 
dispensation is drawing to a close, and swifter than 
we sometimes would like to admit. What then are we 
Christians going to do about it. Throw up our hands 
and surrender to the forces of iniquity, and woefully 
shake our heads and exclaim, "What's the use of try- 
ing?" 

And this leads us to our final point. As Christians 
we should use every legitimate means to combat and 
hold back these onrushing tides of iniquity, even 
though we are aware that they must exist before our 
Lord's return. Paul, in writing his second letter to 
Timothy, so informs in the third chapter, Listen to 
a few of these words: "This know also, that in the 
last days perilous times shall come. For men shall 
be lovers of their own selves, covetous, boasters, proud, 
blasphemers, disobedient to parents, unthankful, un- 
holy .... traitors, heady, highminded, lovers of pleas- 
ures more than lovers of God; having a form of god- 
liness but denying the power thereof: from such turn 
away." What does Paul say we as Christians should 
do under such conditions? "From such turn away!" 
Not that we should shun them and leave them with- 
out a witness, but not to fellowship with them as bo- 
som companions. He puts it like this in 2 Cor. 6:14: 
"Be ye not unequally yoked together with unbelievers 
.... be ye separate . . ." 

These conditions should make us more than ever 
determined to separate ourselves from the practices 
of this present evil world. With increasing tempta- 
tions lying before us day by day. we need a more pos- 
itive testimony, a closer walk with our Lord, a more 
intimate relationship with Him through the reading 
of His Word and prayer. One man remarked to me 
after he heard the election returns, "Well, Reverend, 
you'll have to preach better sermons on Sunday 
nights." That may be so, and by the grace of God I 
hope to do so; but what we also need is more genuine 
Christian living in our church members. The best of 



— S- 



FEBRUARY 15, 1941 



preaching will avail nothing if consistent Christian 
living aoes not loiiow. Wnen tne Sunday movie ques- 
tion came up the last time, tne uatnoiic priests co- 
operated in tne lignt. 'inis time one priest expressed 
hrmseii tnus: "We are not interested in ngnting «un- 
day movies if there are no snows until aiternoon. As 
long as our people come to tne mass in tne morning 
we are not concerned what they do tne rest of tne 
day." How many Protestants nave the idea that as 
long as they attend tne Sunday School, or even stay 
for the cnurch services on fcsunday morning, trie rest 
of the day is for them to do as tney please? Are you 
one? God pity you if that is your idea of Christianity. 
There are already too many compromisers witn tne 
world who are satisfied to fiave tneir names on church 
records, not stopping to ask if their names are in the 
Lamb's book of life. 

Now, just one more observation on this "raging 
tempest." This world is quickly developing into one 
great piece of machinery, a military machine. The 
common man is no longer allowed to think ior him- 
self in certain European countries. He is not allowed 
to ask questions, and much less to protest. He is but 
one unit of a great organization which acts and moves 
and is controlled by a master mind. Shades of anti- 
christ? We believe so. How long will this freedom we 
now cherish under the stars and stripes be ours? We 
shudder to venture a guess. 

Thinking is becoming a lost art. Men are satisfied 
to let some one else do their thinking for them. I 
have tried in my ministry (and I may have failed at 
times, but at least I have tried) to preach the facts 
with a challenge for men and women to think them 
through, come to their own conclusions, and then 
know for certain what they believe and why. The 
greater failure I feel has been in the pew with those 
who refuse to exercise the call of the Lord as Isaiah 
says, "Come now, and let us reason together, saith 
the Lord: though your sins be as scarlet, they shall 
be as white as snow; though they be red like crimson, 
they shall be as wool." Some Christians will swallow 
hook, line, sinker, and even the pole, before they will 
stop to reason the conclusions of the matter presented 
to them. How swiftly men and women are turning 
themselves into machines which react according to 
impulse rather than to the God given properties of 
reasoning. 

Is this a reason why the average church member 
has no clear-cut testimony for his Lord? Is he allow- 
ing himself to become engulfed in this "raging temp- 
est?" Are we getting so used to having things done 
for us by the press of a button or the manipulation 
of a lever that our thinking apparatus is getting slug- 
gish? With all these labor-saving devices (and I often 
wonder how our forefathers ever got along without 
them) are we reading our Bibles and studying them' 
How much time do we save that we might have more 
time for prayer? 

These world conditions ought to challenge us to 
live more for Christ and less for self. Do they? 
"Jesus, Savior, pilot me 
Over life's tempestuous sea." 



AROUND THE COUNCIL TABLE ~ J 




■ THINK IT OVER ,. 



Have you ever introduced a 
soul to Jesus? If not, why 
not? 



CLAYHOLE, KENTUCKY 

A few evenings ago in our Wednesday evening ser- 
vice we asked tor testimonies. There was one testi- 
mony I think will be of interest to all our readers, 
especially those who have helped to establish the 
Brethren work here at Clayhole. An old lady told of 
how she had been praying the last 40 years for a 
place like we now have here at Clayhole. She said 
she did not realize God would answer in such a won- 
derful way. She has not lived at Clayhole in many 
years, but she realized what it would mean to this 
community if a church were built. 

The buildings are almost completed. We moved 
into the new parsonage Dec. 24. We had to rush 
things in order to spend Christmas in the new house. 
This was the finest Christmas we have ever had. Our 
three little girls received many nice gifts from many 
friends in other Brethren churches. 

The day following Christmas the Clayhole com- 
munity received another real blessing. This blessing 
was in the form of a gospel team from Grace Semin- 
ary at Winona Lake, Ind. The members of the team 
were Mr. and Mrs. Keith Altig, Miss Flo Mellick and 
Elving Ericson. The two little Altig girls came along 
also. In spite of the flue epidemic we had some good 
meetings. We had an exceptional team. Each mem- 
ber could play one or more musical instruments and 
could sing. They had two piano accordians which 
were enjoyed a great deal. We also enjoyed the gospel 
messages which were presented by Mr. Altig. During 
the week there were 28 decisions. Some time in April 
we will have a baptismal service. We are hoping to 
have this team with us again during the Easter va- 
cation. 

The Sunday before Christmas we had our Christ- 
mas program. The entire program was centered 
around the birth of Christ. After the program we 
gave out about 200 presents that had been sent to 
us by our friends in other Brethren churches. Every 
child present received a toy of some kind. 

The attendance at our services is good. During De- 
cember we averaged more than 150 per Sunday. Christ- 
mas Sunday it was about 225. The adult class is the 
largest class we have now. Until the last few months 
it was the smallest. 

Please pray for us that we may be faithful in giving 
out the gospel here in the mountains. Our opportun- 
ities are unlimited. 

— Sewell Londrum. 



NEW TROY, MICH. 

"For we know that all things work together for 
good to them that love God, to them who are the 
called according to His purpose" has become a very 
precious promise to us in New Troy during the past 
six months. The Lord has been very rich in pouring 
out blessings upon us through testings which could 
only seem to bring sorrow and disappointment. Ail 
doors seemed shut and it was as though we were fac- 
ing a solid wall; then suddenly, like Jericho, the wall 
fell before us and we walked forward with joy and re- 
joicing. 

The first instance I would mention involved the 
church as a whole. For several months the work was 
not going as it should. Nothing could be defined, but 



-9— 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



the church was powerless in her testimony. Then came 
a time of real testing. There was perplexity and an- 
ger and sorrow. Things began to happen. A meeting 
was held. The thing which was hindering the work 
was uncovered. Everything was put under the blood 
and the entire church was knit in unity. There was 
a renewed interest in the study of the Word. Prayers 
became powerful. The whole atmosphere of the group 
changed. As a result, people who had been promising 
to come but who never arrived began to appear. 

The next testing fell en the pastor and his wife. The 
combined strain of Christmas and flu left my wife 
very weak. Somehow she did not seem to regain her 
strength as she should. "How could any blessing come 
from this?" was the question in several minds. A care- 
ful check-up revealed a condition which had been de- 
veloping for years. This condition would soon have 
developed into something serious, but because it was 
found in time it can be cured. But more than this 
there was an effect on the church itself. Some who 
might have had a tendency to lay down on the job 
became active and interested, while others readily 
assumed the responsibility which they had more or 
less expected to lay on the minister's wife. 

If a church is in the right spiritual condition it 
ought to grow. We believe our church has grown in 
recent months. It has had a small numerical growth. 
Those who have been added to the membership have 
come because of definite conviction, and are intensly 
interested in the Word and the winning of souls. Side 
by side with this, there has been a noticeable spiritu- 
al growth in the older membership of the church. The 
prayer meeting attendance at the present time is half 
as large as the membership. Another growth has been 
in finances. This church has never had a paid pastor 
before for any length of time. During one month two 
years ago, the church raised $3.50 toward the pastor's 
salary. There has been a gradual increase since then. 
Last December the back salary was given to the 
church, and now they are raising their salary to be 
paid at the first of each month. 

There has been growth in the organization and 
operation of the S. S. Most of the advances have been 
made in the face of accepted customs and practices. 
The first move was the decision of the ladies to stop 
using church suppers as a means of financing the 
church. That was over two years ago. Next in order, 
the practice of giving out Easter eggs on Easter Sun- 
day was recognized as a heathen practice which keeps 
men from seeing a risen Lord. The most important 
step came when the David C. Cook publications were 
discarded and our own graded materials were supplied. 
The most recent step is the barring of Santa Claus 
from the church Christmas program. Everyone sees 
Santa Claus. How many see Christ? As these practices 
have been discontinued, more effective plans have 
been adopted by the Sunday School. 

We now have three pressing needs for our Sundav 
School. First of all we need more trained consecrated 
teachers so we can establish a full graded system. 
Then we have a very real need for class equipment 
and rooms before we can expand as we hope. Last of 
all, we need a bus to bring in the children. I believe 
a bus would at least double our Sunday School attend- 
ance. These are three of our present goals. We are 
tryiii'g to fill the immediate need as we keep the vis- 
ion of what we want before us. 

The activities of one class in the Sunday School 
may be of interest. It was their custom to have a 
birthday party for the different members. They met 
at a different home each month. The guests began 
arriving about 7:30. Everyone might be there by 8:30 
They would sit and talk until 9:00. The president 
would call a meeting to discuss business which was 
never decided. At the close of the business session, 
gifts were given to those whose birthdays were in that 
month. The hostess would furnish games, for which 
prizes were given, to fill the rest of the evening. At 



midnight or after, she would serve a threshers' dinner, 
and everyone went home to nightmares and stomach 
aches. 

We still have the class meetings, but now every third 
meeting is an open missionary meeting. A missionary 
is invited as the speaker and the public is invited to 
the meeting. The second meeting is a regular busi- 
ness meeting, while the other is a social meeting. 

The Women's Missionary Council now has a mem- 
bership of 22. It is a real aid to the spiritual growth 
of the church. Aside from planning to meet the goals 
of the national Council for the coming year, they have 
been active in supplying some of the needs of the 
church. They have bought towels and basins for the 
communion service, and have also sent two boxes of 
clothes to our Bro. Sewell Landrum and the mission 
in Kentucky. 

The field here is a growing field. Houses are at a 
premium in New Troy. A building program is in prog- 
ress in the community. Shop workers come here and 
build and drive to the near-by towns. There are also 
a number of Chicago people who come out for a va- 
cation and stay to live. 

Our plans to reach the lost in the coming year in- 
clude a revival which is to begin Feb. 9. The last week 
of May we are planning to hold a Summer Bible 
School. And we are hoping to hold a tent meeting 
during the month of July or August. This last we be- 
lieve, will be an especially effective way of reaching 
the indifferent and unconcerned in this particular 
community. We are also laying great stress upon the 
fact that every Christian ought to be a personal evan- 
gelist and soul-winner. 

There is a real desire to let the Lord lead in the 
most minute matters. Coupled with this are many 
evident expressions of his blessing above that we de- 
serve or ask or think, and the feeling that the work 
here is to be used in reaching many of the lost in the 
near future. 

We want to thank every Missionary Herald reader 
for your gifts and sacrifices and prayers which make 
this work possible. With the church, we covet your 
prayers. We are your fellow-servants in the bonds of 
His grace. 

Margaret and Russell Williams. 



WINONA LAKE, IND. 

I would like to send you a report of the meetings 
held at Clayhole by the gospel team from Grace Sem- 
inary. 

The team consisted of four members: Miss Flo 
Mellick, Mr. Elving Ericson, and Mr. and Mrs. J. Keith 
Altig, not to mention Janice and Jean, the small 
daughters of the Altigs. 

We arrived at Clayhole. Thurs., Dec. 26, and began 
services that night. The "flu" had arrived there be- 
fore we did, and this made the attendance very much 
less than it ordinarily would have been. There were 
about 60 the first night, and the attendance and in- 
terest increased and the "flu" decreased, until on the 
last night, which was Wed. Jan. 1, 1941, we had 160. 

The Lord blessed His Word and gave us 28 confes- 
sions of faith in the church and 7 in the jail at Jack- 
son where we held a service on Sunday afternoon. 

We held two children's meetings in the afternoon 
in the church, and then followed the children to school 
two mornings and held a service for them there. 

We had a varied program for the people, which at- 
tracted and retained their interest. Miss Mellick and 
Mr. Ericson each had an accordian and a guitar. Mr. 
Ericson played a trombone. I played a saxaphone 



—10— 



FEBRUARY 15, 1941 



while Mrs. Altig played the piano. We all sang, giv- 
ing us various combinations of quartettes, trios, duets 
and solos, both vocal and instrumental. Miss Mellick 
presented chalk talks to the children and Mrs. Altig 
an object lesson. I brought the messages each even- 
ing and Mr. Ericson led the congregational singing. 

We found the field ripe for a meeting of this kind 
due to the faithful labors of Mr. and Mrs. Landrum, 
whose acquaintance and fellowship we enjoyed great- 
ly. 

They are certainly well fitted to carry on that needy 
work and are being mightily used of God in a diffi- 
cult field. 

We all stayed with the Landrums in the new par- 
sonage or the church, and offerings were received 
for the Gospel Team Association, which amounted to 
$9.63. 

I am sure that in the hearts of each one of us on 
the gospel team there will always be a warm place 
and a prayer for the work at Clayhole and the Lan- 
drums as they labor there. 

J. Keith Altig. 



FREMONT, OHIO 

It is with great joy, and with thanks to our Lord, 
that we report our meeting at Fremont. 

Bro. Miller arrived on New Year's Eve for his first 
service. As the new year approached, our congrega- 
tion was in prayer for the success of our meetings. 
Prior to this prayer lists had been handed out, cot- 
tage prayer meetings held, and calling done. 

From the very first the Lord blessed. Our crowds 
were not as large as we had hoped for at the begin- 
ing, but this gave a challenge for personal calling. The 
crowds and interest grew constantly. 

In planning the meetings we realized there would 
be many handicaps which must be overcome. The 
pastor, who is completing his training at Grace in 
May, could not be on the field full time before the 
evangelist arrived. We do not have our building yet, 
and our present location is neither attractive nor well 
located. This was our first evangelistic meeting, and 
to be perfectly frank about it, such are regarded as 
a thing of the past by the vast majority of the people 
and churches of Fremont. The defense which un- 
believers threw up at the very idea, and other prob- 
lems which Satan can bring up. Many of these are 
not uncommon to other meetings, but in our case 
that made them no less real. 

The outstanding results were within our member- 
ship. The meeting was just what we needed, and 
many of our young Christians were drawn into a 
closer walk with their Lord, and received a greater 
vision of the need and possibilities. About half of 
the public decisions were within our membership, but 
no less important, and no less vital to the future of 
the work. 

The Lord worked miracles of Grace both within and 
without our group. The decisions totaled fifty-six, for 
each of which we are praising the Lord. In one case 
we saw a young father step out for Christ. The next 
night his wife came, and the next he brought his 
father. This past Sunday morning he brought his 
four fine children and placed them in our Sunday 
School. In the afternoon he followed His Lord into 
the waters of Baptism. This is just another miracle 
of Grace, and shows how God can and does work. 

The results of the meetings have affected every de- 
partment of our work. We are praising the Lord, and 
encouraged more than ever to go ahead. Each Sun- 
day finds our building fund growing, and everyone is 
trusting and praying to get into our new building this 
summer. 

This year is a vital year to our Fremont work. Will 
you join us in prayer as we work and pray for our 
new building? It is needed in reaching as many as 
possible for Christ before He comes. 




by Mrs. Keith Altig 
HOME MISSION STORY No. 8 
After the beautiful choruses were sung, Miss Bryce 
asked the children for sentence prayers. They were 
always glad to respond, for they loved to thank their 
heavenly Father for His good gifts to them, and to 
bring their wishes and needs to Him. This Sunday one 
little girl who prayed aloud was thankful that the 
Lord Jesus died for children as well as grownups. 

After prayers were over Miss Bryce said, "I was 
glad for your prayer, Patty, because it shows that you 
know that the Lord Jesus loves to see children saved 
by His precious blood. 

"My story today comes from a teacher in one of 
our own mission churches, and proves that there is 
another little girl who is glad that Christ died for 
her. This is a truly-true story. 

"Our little heroine is a very quiet, shy, little girl in 
the Primary Department. She has a lovely Christian 
home, with parents who love Jesus and who live their 
love for Him by serving Him joyfully and faithfully. 
No doubt they never pray without asking that each 
of their children should be saved, for that is what 
Christian parents wish most of all for their children. 
How glad they were as each member of the family 
took this important step. Finally only our little Pri- 
mary girl remained. 

"Of course when she saw the beautiful Christian 
lives in her family she wanted to be a Christian too. 
She longed to have her sins forgiven and to have Je- 
sus live in her heart. She wanted to belong to the 
church and to have a place at the communion tables. 
But she felt so small and frightened and weak. It 
seemed to her that she could never go down the aisle 
before all the people in the church as the others had 
done. But the Holy Spirit kept whispering that Jesus 
wanted her and that she must accept Him. 

"At last, all by herself, she went out behind a green 
shed back of her home, and there she told the Lord 
Jesus Christ that she accepted Him as he Savior. A 
great happiness filled her heart, but she knew that 
the Bible said she should confess Him before men, 
and she still shrank from taking that step. 

"Now mothers are very understanding persons who 
often know how to help their children, and this little 
girl's mother was no exception to the rule. She felt 
that what her little girl needed to give her courage 
was prayer, and so she quietly asked a few friends to 
pray that the little girl who had accepted Christ be- 
hind the green shed would be given the courage to 
confess Him openly. 

"So the mother and father prayed and the friends 
prayed, and one day the little girl found that her love 
for Jesus was stronger than her fear of people. Bravely 
she went to the front of the church and shook the 
pastor's hand and answered his questions about her 
faith in Christ. Later she was baptized and joined 
the church, and we may be sure she is a shining light 
in the corner God has given her to make bright. Per- 
haps after she has grown older she may find that the 
Lord has a special work for her to do for Him in far 



-11- 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



away lands. Whatever it is we may be sure she will 
accept it, because she has learned the secret that it 
is Christ that gives the strength." 

Miss Bryce smiled winningly as she said. "There 
are children here who need to follow this little girl's 
example. The Lord Jesus is whispering to each of you, 
'Give me your heart.' When you do He will give you 
the strength to follow Him." 



CHRISTIAN STEWARDSHIP 

By L. Llewellyn Grubb 
i Fifth in series — continued from issue of Feb. 3 : 

Christian stewardship assumes a position of major 
importance in the service of Christ. The Apostle Paul 
refers to it in both letters to the church at Corinth, 
while two whole chapters of the second epistle are 
devoted to its consideration < 8, 9 » . Christ referred to 
it in conversation with the Pharisees (Matt. 23:23; 
Luke 11:42), and with His disciples (Luke 6:38). The 
Scriptures indicate various types of stewardship: that 
of life, time, talents, and material things. Our inter- 
est is particularly in the latter. There has been so 
much irrational and unbiblical teaching on this sub- 
ject that we are constrained to inquire, "What does 
the Bible really teach about Christian giving?" 

1. It is the direct command of God and the Lord 
Jesus Christ in both the Old and New Testaments 

(Lev. 27:30; Mai. 3:1-10: Matt. 23:23; Luke 11:42; 6: 
38; 1 Cor. 16:2; 2 Cor. 8:7-9,24). This command is 
just as imperative as that concerning baptism. Every 
believer, young or old, rich or poor, is called upon to 
obey (1 Cor. 16:2, "every one of you"). 

2. It is a voluntary, spontaneous, hilarious steward- 
ship (2 Cor. 9:7). Forced, compulsory giving is not 
acceptable with God. and should not be practiced. The 
constraining love of Christ must motivate the offer- 
ings of His people (2 Cor. 8:9. 11, 12). It is not a duty 
to be performed, but a privilege to be enjoy 3d. 

3. It is at least one-tenth of the net income ac- 
cording to the Old Testament standard (Lev. 27:30; 
Mai. 3:10; Matt. 23:23). A careful study of Jawish 
giving will reveal that he gave nearer one-fifth to 
one-third rather than one-tenth of his income. It 
was the common custom to set aside the Lord's share 
from the income first (Ex. 22:29,30). True, tithing was 
a part of the law, but was commanded and practiced 
both before and after it (Gen. 14:20; Matt. 23:23), and 
is thus yet divinely ordained. The Christian must not 
give less than one-tenth of his net income. 

4. It is giving "as God hath prospered" (1 Cor. 16: 
2 ) . Both Old and New Testament systems embody the 
idea of "proportionate'' giving. All the wealth of the 
world belongs to God (Hag. 2:8; Psa. 50:11.12; 24:1). 
but He asks for only a part of it in return. Should 
this part be less or more than one-tenth today? It 
could not be less! It certainly should be more; first, 
because Jesus Christ has done so much more for us 
in this age of grace (2 Cor. 8:9) ; second, because grace 
is so much better than law (Gal. 3:10-14); third, be- 
cause our future prospects in Christ are greater than 
those of Israel (1 John 3:2: Isa. 11); fourth, because 
Christ enthusiastically approved the widow's giving 
all she possessed (Luke 21:1-4), being just on the 
brink of the age of grace, as over against the one- 
tenth of the Pharisees. As the believer's love for 
Christ increases, so will his gifts! 

5. It is a systematic stewardship (1 Cor. 16:2, "upon 
the first day of the week"). At regular periods, pre- 
ferably weekly, the offering of the saints should be 



placed on the altar of service. Systematic gifts make 
systematic progress possible! 

6. It is a stewardship which brings reward (Prov. 
19:17; Luke 6:38). Future reward should not be the 
incentive in giving, but is inseparably connected with 
it. God will duly reward the faithful stewardship of 
His people. 

(To be continued) 




New Books 

For Your 

Library 



Books reviewed in this column we consider fundamental to the 
Christian standard, although there may be some small portions with 
which we do not agree or, of which we cannot approve. In such in- 
stances we shall call attention to that with which we are not in 
accord. 

Books reviewed here may be procured from The Brethren Mis- 
sionary Herald Co., 3326 S. Calhoun St., Ft. Wayne, Ind. 



Spurgeon's immortal 

TREASURY OF DAVID 

condensed by David Otis; Fuller 

Two handy volumes, comprising 708 pages, priced at $6.95 complete. 

This work of Charles Haddon Spurgeon has long- 
been regarded as the most exhaustive and helpful 
study of the Psalms in existence. However, because 
of the cost, scarcity, and voluminous nature of the 
books, many Bible students have been unable to avail 
themselves of their resources. Therefore, every lover 
of the Psalms will welcome the present abridgment of 
this work which Dr. Fuller has so successfully accom- 
plished. As is true of all abridgments there are some 
passages which are omitted entirely, but the possessor 
of these volumes will discover an abundance of rich 
devotional material on the greatest devotional por- 
tion of Scripture. These books would make an excel- 
lent companion to the daily quiet hour study of the 
Psalms. We recommend them without reservation. 

— J. M. Aeby. 



REVEALED UNTO BABES, by John Raymond Hand. 

147 pages. Polzin Press, publishers. Cloth $1.00; paper 60 
cents. Order from The Brethren Missionary Herald Co. 

This book considers that great 'Magna Carta' of Christian liberty, 
Eph. 2. A book of many fertile suggestions for real Bible study. 
The writer makes no attempt to establish any doctrinal point, but 
rather in a simple, non-technical, straightforward outline, the 
major points of Bible teaching. 

A good book to hand to 'babes in Christ' and will be a greet 
delight to all other readers. 

Some of the chapters deal with: figures, types and symbols, dis- 
pensational truth, what God says about Himself, about sin, salva- 
tion, security, prayer, the church, the devil, heaven and many other 
subjects. — L. P. 



SOUTH ON SILVER WINGS, by Ruth P. Overholtzer. 

128 pages, published by International Headquarters Child Evan- 
gelism. Fellowship. Paper cover, $1.00. Order from The Brethren 
Missionary Herald Co. 

A Christian Travel Book for boys and girls, dealing with the 



-12- 



FEBRUARY 15, 1941 



countries of Cuba, Jamaica, Panama, Columbia, Ecuador, and Peru. 
Many pictures from these countries and their people are to be 
found in the book. A valuable mission study book for Child Evan- 
gelism classes, vacation Bible schools, Sunday Schools, and children's 
summer camps. 






WORLD-WIDE WAR AND THE BIBLE, by Evangelist John R. Rice. 

122 pages. Paper, 25 cents. Sword of the Lord Publishers. Order 
from The Brethren Missionary Herald Co. 

With more than three-quarters of the earth's population at war, 
and the rest likely to become soon, this book is timely in that it 
answers many perplexing questions on the subject of war. 

The writer deals with such questions as: will America get into 
the war?; should Christians fight?; universal wickedness and the 
inevitable collapse of human civilization; the prophisied future line- 
up of the nations; and lastly, the general sign of war, and how it 
bears on the soon coming of the Lord Jesus Christ. 

A valuable book for pastors and prophetic students and teachers. 



ACTS ANALYZED, by Adam Kennedy Adcock. 

281 pages. Cloth $2.00. Standard Publishing Co., printers. Order 
from The Brethren Missionary Herald Co. 

Acts Analyzed deals with the important characters, events and 
teachings of the early church. The author has placed within the 
book some very valuable outlines. He has worked on the principle 
that "it is much better to discover sermons in the Bible than to 
make them from little texts." 

Acting on this principle, he has made a worthy contribution to 
Bible students and gospel preachers. It is rich with suggestions for 
evangelistic messages. In reality it is a commentary on the book 
of Acts, written to meet the need for sermonic material for exposi- 
tory preaching. It is an analysis of the book of conversions, the book 
of Acts. 



DOES AMERICA NEED CHRIST? 

13,000,000 children under 18 years of age have no 
religious training at all! 

85,000,000 attend the movies weekly, spending one 
billion dollars. 30,000,000 go to church once a week. 
They give $357,000,0000 yearly to church! 

According to F.B.I, one murder is committed every 
45 minutes; a robbery every two minutes; a felony 
every 24 seconds! 

There is a broken home behind 9 out of every 10 
boys in the reform schools; one marriage out of four 
fails to last even five years! 

15,000 churches closed their doors last year! No 
funds! America certainly does need Christ! 

— Bulletin, 2d Church, Los Angeles. 



SERMON STARTERS 




II Tim. I— "The Faith Committed" 
II Tim. 2— "The Faith Fought For" 
II Tim. 3— "The Faith Denied" 
II Tim. 4— "The Faith Kept" 

— R. D. Crees. 



A girl said to her friend, "Isn't that lovely?" as she 
held up an elaborate piece which she had embroidered. 
She had taken nearly four weeks to do this work. But 
that same girl had given up her class of little girls in 
a mission Sunday School because, as she had said, 
she "simply had no time in which to prepare the les- 
son." Let us seek to use time in the best way. 

— La Verne Bulletin. 



READ YOUR 

BIBLE 




THROUGH IN '41 



This schedule for reading the Bible through in a year began in the 
issue of Dec. 28, 1940. For previous readings, see former copies of 
The Brethren Missionary Herald. Begin reading at Gen. 1:1, read 
until the first text is found, and record the reference. The next day 
begin reading where you left off the day before, find the text for 
that day, and record the reference. By continuing this you shall 
have read the Bible through in a year. 

Day Text Reference 

43 They shall not touch any holy thing, lest they 
die 



44 He shall consecrate unto the Lord the days of 
his separation 



45 He heard the voice of one speaking unto him from 
off the mercy seat 



46 Come thou with us, and we will do thee good 

47 If the Lord delight in us then he will bring us 

into this land . 

48 The Lord will show who are his, and who are 

holy 



49 It is a covenant of salt for ever before the Lord 



ONE BAPTISM OR THREE 

By Rev. Miles Taber, Pasror First Brethren Church, Leon, la. 

Sometimes it is charged that in trine immersion we 
really practice three baptisms, thus being out of har- 
mony with Eph. 4:5, "One Lord, one faith, one bap- 
tism." Here again church history comes to our de- 
fense, for while the exact wording of some of the 
ancient witnesses to trine immersion may seem to 
suggest three baptisms, others are careful to state 
clearly that it is "one baptism." 

Cyril, who was made bishop of Jerusalem in A.D. 
350, seems to emphasize the trinity in his teaching 
about baptism. He wrote, "Then you were conducted 
to the font of the holy baptism, and each one was 
asked whether he believed in the name of the Father, 
and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost. And you 
made the sound confession of faith, and were three 
times baptized in the water." 

Basil (A.D. 329-379), bishop of Cesarea in Cappa- 
docia, likewise says, "By three immersions, therefore, 
and by three invocations, we administer the important 
ceremony of baptism ..." 

But Jerome (A.D. 331-420) assures us that though it 
represents the Trinity, it is but one baptism. In his 
commentary on Eph. 4:5, this great Christian scholar 
wrote, "We are dipped in water that the mystery of 
the Trinity may appear to be but one, and therefore, 

(Continued on page 16) 



—13— 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



^Uatm&fyiitiHCj, 0fye>iiH<f Repait 



NOTE: All funds ore for the general fund 
except those designated as follows: IE) 
Evangelism; (K) Kentucky; (Ha) Hagers- 
town; (C.K.) Clayhole, Ky.; (NT.) New 
troy; (Har.) Harrah, Wash.; (F.W.) Fred 
Walter; (A.W.) Alton Witter; (Sh.) Sharps- 
ville. 

Campbell Brethren Church, 
Lake Odessa, Mich. 



Mr. & Mrs. R. G. Price 


11 25 


Mr. & Mrs. Russell Price (GenXE) 


10 00 


Mr. & Mrs. J. Allarding 


10.00 


Mr. & Mrs. Morris Carter 


5 00 


Mr. & Mrs C. L. Henney 


500 


Mr. & Mrs. L. J. Miller (N.T.) 


5.00 


Mary L. Henney (NT) 


5.00 


Mrs. Ira Hulliberger 


5.00 


Lelah Groff 


5.00 


Church offering 


5.00 


Total 


66.25 


River Fork Brethren Church, 




South Bend, Ind 




Mr. & Mrs. Arthur Balsley (EXGen) 


10 00 


C. E. Hevel 


5.00 


Bring a Body Class 


5.00 


Mr. Frank Crawford 


500 


Miss Carolyn Beth Crawford 


5.00 


Church offering 


1.68 


Gifts less than $5.00 (E) 


3.00 


Amt. previously reported 


50.00 


Gifts less than $5.00 


1.25 



Total 

River Park Brethren Church, 
South Bend, Ind. 



90.93 



Indiana District Missions (A.W.) 


5.00 


Northwest District Missions (F.W.) 


20 27 


Amt. previously reported for Ind. 




Dist. Miss. (A.W.) (Sh) 


50.00 


Total Dist. Missions 


75.27 


1st Brethren Church 




San Diego, Calif. 




Olive Crowe 


10.00 


Freida Dexheimer 


10.00 


Herberf Smith 


10.00 


Mr. & Mrs. C. W. Smith 


15.00 


Zaeda B. Hall 


5.00 


Mrs. Annie Nowag 


5.00 


Mr. & Mrs. Ralph Pearson 


25 00 


R. A. Laughlin 


500 


Mr. & Mrs. Edgar Altman 


5.00 


Mr. A. L. Flory 


10 00 


Mr. & Mrs. H. E. Lange 


15.00 


Mr. & Mrs. R. W. Nevegold 


15.00 


Mr. Orson W. Payne 


9.00 


Mrs. Cora L. Hall 


5.00 


Mr. & Mrs. Wendell Cramm 


5.00 


Jack Lange 


5.00 


Ray Nevegold, Jr. 


5.00 


Mr. & Mrs. M. S. Parker 


6.00 


Gifts less than $5.00 


41.00 



Total 

1st Brethren Church, 
Dallas Center, Iowa. 

Mr. & Mrs. E. B. Robinson 
Mr. & Mrs. Noah Hawbaker 
Ida Good 



207.00 



500 
5.00 
5.00 



'Continued) 








Mr. & Mrs. Glenn Hoover 


15.00 


1st Brethren Church, 




Mr. & Mrs. Chas. A. Royer 


10 00 


Spokane, Wash. 




Mr. fr Mrs. Conrad Grief 


10.00 


S. L. Roberts 


10.00 


Mr. & Mrs. Gorden Carter 


10.00 


Miss L. Bowers 


5.00 


Rev. J. S. Cook 


5.00 


Miss L. Deck 


5.00 


Gifts less than $5.00 


38.1! 


Mr. B. G. Jones 


5.00 






Mrs. E. Berry 
Young People's Class 


5.00 
12.10 


Total 


103.11 






Miscellaneous 


31.05 


1st Brethren Church, 




Total 




Clayton, Ohio. 


73.15 


Bernard Barton 


5.00 






Rev. & Mrs. H. L. Dunning (EXGen) 


10 00 


1st Brethren Church, 




Mr. & Mrs. Ray Landis 


500 


Limestone, Tenn. 




Miss Lillie Landis 


5.00 


Mr. 5 Mrs. J. R. Armentrout 


10.00 


Mr. W A. Siefer 


10.00 


Lelia Arnold 


10.00 


Mrs. W. A. Siefer and girls 


10 00 


M. D. Arnold 


10.00 


Mr. & Mrs. W. P. R. Shank 


5.00 


Mr. & Mrs. J. F. Brobeck 


5.00 


Mrs. Ruth Waymire (K) 


5.00 


Mr. & Mrs. O. E. McCracken 


5.00 


Mr. & Mrs. Beryl Whiting 


10.00 


Mrs. J. M. Mongold 


5.00 


Mr. & Mrs. E. E. Zeisert 


5.00 


Mary Pence (Gen.) (C.K.) 


35.00 


Gifts less than $5.00 


1.00 


Senior C. E. 


8.00 






Intermediate C. E. 
Church 

Total 


4.00 


Total 


71.00 


10.00 


Grace Brethren Church, 


102.00 


Hagerstown, Md. 








Rev. & Mrs. L. L. Grubb 


50.00 


1st Brethren Church, 




Mr. & Mrs. A. H. Williams 


15.00 


Danville, Ohio. 




Mr. & Mrs H. G. Finfrock 


10 20 


Mr. & Mrs. Ross Magers and son 


25.00 


Bible School 


10.00 


Sunday School 


25.00 


Mr. & Mrs. Henry Biser 


5.00 


Mrs. Hugh Banbury 


10.00 


Mr. & Mrs, Roy S. Long 


5.C0 


Wilma Magers 


10.00 


Mrs Lutie Bowers 


5.C0 


Ray Conrad 


10.00 


Gifts less than $5.00 


1580 


Dorcas Conrad 


10.00 



Total 116.00 

1st Brethren Church, 
Peru, Ind. (Additional) 

Mrs. Ed. Cooper 5.00 

Jr. S. M. M. 2.00 

Amt, previously reported 79.33 

Total 86.33 

Third Brethren Church, 
Los Angeles, Calif. 

Mr. a Mrs. Keith Altig 5.C0 

Mr. & Mrs. Emmif Adams 10 00 

Rev. 6 Mrs. Arnold Kriegbaum 10 00 

Mr. & Mrs. D. M. Lilly 5.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Melvin McKenzie 10.00 

Mr. fir Mrs. I. J. Moulton 50.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Rex Hoyt 5 00 

Church and S. S. (Gen.) (C.K.) 30.50 

Total 125.50 

Juniata, Brethren Church, 
Juniata, Pa. 

Mr. & Mrs. Wallace F. Holmes 10 00 
Mr. & Mrs. Guy Dively (Gen.XC.K.) 1000 

Mr. & Mrs. Wm. Dively 5 00 

Sharon E. Kime and Mother 5.C0 

J. D, Brumbaugh and family 500 

R. E. Glass 5.00 

Mrs. Eva Harpster 5.00 

I. E. Miller and family 5.00 

Mrs. L.ucie Robertson 5 f • 

Rev. & Mrs. E. F. Pine 5.00 

Miscellaneous 1754 

Mr. & Mrs. Ford Beringer 10JT0 

Total 87.54 



Nellie Magers 

S. M. Justice 

Mr. L. A. Wolford and family 

Mrs. Mollie Sherman 

Mr. a Mrs. Basil McElroy 

Mr. & Mrs. Thurman Strouse 

Mrs. Sina Wheaton and daughter 

Grace Sherman 

Gifts less than $5.00 

Total 

1st Brethren Church, 
Waynesboro, Pa. 

G. E. Helman 

Mr. & Mrs. John Kleppinger 

Mrs. Lulu B. Minnich 

Mr. & Mrs. E. H. Bearinger 

Mr. & Mrs. Frank Baumgardner 

Mr. & Mrs. John Wollard 

Mr. & Mrs. Geo. H. Sweeney 

(C.K.) (Gen) 
Mr. & Mrs. Charles Alter 
Mr. & Mrs. W. E. Bearinger 
Mr. & Mrs. Carl Sheeley 
Mr. & Mrs. W. B. Heefner 
Roy W. Fogle (C.K.) 
Mr. & Mrs. Cletus Rock 
Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth M. Heefner 
Mr. & Mrs. J. Edw. Cordell, Sr. 
Mr. & Mrs. Raymond E. Carson 
Phyllis M. Stains 
Mrs. B L Stains (C K ) 
Mr. & Mrs. Lloyd Schildf 
B. L. Stains 

Mr. a Mrs. Wm. Kriner (E) 
Chas. E. Martin 
Miss Elsie Good 
R, D. Crees (Ha) 
Mrs. R. D. Crees (Ha) 



10.00 
10.00 
5.00 
5.00 
50C 
5.C0 
5.00 
5.00 
9 60 



159.60 



50.00 
30.00 
30.00 
25.00 

25 : , 

25.00 

25.00 
15.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
1000 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
9.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.C0 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.C0 



—14— 



FEBRUARY 15, 1941 



Rosemary and Dorothy Crees 5.00 

Mrs. Guy Anderson (C.K.) 8.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Floyd Manns 5.00 

Paul Miller 5.00 

D. C. Sheeley 5.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Lawrence Young 5.00 

Melvin Rock 5.00 

Mrs. Roy W. Fogle 5.00 

Mrs. Melvin Rock 5.C0 

Mr. & Mrs. H. J. Rosenberger 5.00 

A Friend 10.00 

Adult C. E. 10.00 

Junior C. E. 10.00 

Signal Lights 10.00 

Intermediate C. E. 5.C0 

Senior S. M. M. 3.00 

Beginner's Department 27.00 

Primary Dept. 51 51 

Junior Dept. 42.60 

Intermediate Dept. 45.50 

Young People's Dept. 6.50 

Friendship Class 56.00 

Philathea Class 37.50 

Ben's Bible Class 46.00 

Contributions less than $5.00 46.60 



1st Brethren Church, 
Canton, Ohio. 



Total 


804.21 


McKee Brethren Church, 




McKee, Pa. 




E. L. Gartland 


5.00 


Mrs. E. L. Gartland 


5.00 


Shirley Gartland 


5.00 


Harry C. Greenleaf (E) 


5.00 


Mr. & Mrs. W. W. Wertman (E) 


5.00 


King's Daughter's Class 


5.06 


H. K. Replogle (E) 


5.00 


Gifts less than $5.00 (E) 


8.50 


Gifts less than $5.00 


8.60 



Total 

1st Brethren Church, 
Grafton, W. Va. 



Total 

1st Brethren Church, 
Allentown, Pa. 



52.16 



Mrs. Alice Nicola 


7.00 


Mr. A. D. Comp 


5.00 


Class No. 7 


20.00 


Women's Missionary Society 


5.00 


Sunday School 


10.00 


Rev. Paul E. Dick 


5.50 


Gfits less than $5.00 (E) 


1.00 


Gifts less than $5.00 


30.50 


Total 


84.00 


1st Brethren Church, 




Clayhole, Ky. (Additional) 




Mr. & Mrs. Sewell Landrum 


10.00 


Gifts less than $5.00 


1.00 


Amt. previously reported 


11.50 



22.50 



Mr. 5 Mrs. Paul Beige 


7.50 


Grace Fehnel 


7.2s 


Rev. & Mrs. J. L. Gingrich 


10.40 


Mr. & Mrs. Raymond Kunkel 


19.53 


Mr. & Mrs. James Kamoie 


12.00 


Mr. & Mrs. Geo. Sieberman 


18.00 


Elsie Sieberman 


10.00 


Mr. & Mrs. Russell Sieberman 


5.75 


Eileen and Ethel Sieberman 


5.00 


Mr. & Mrs. Geo. Seagreaves 


11.90 


Mr. & Mrs. Geo. Zahn 


11.57 


Sunday School 


86.63 


Christian Endeavor Societies 


5.51 



Mr. & Mrs. R. B. Smith 


5.00 


Mr. & Mrs. Waldo Guiley 


20.00 


Mr. & Mrs. Paul Guittar 


6.00 


Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Himes 


5.00 


Junior Missionary Women 


5.00 


June Marsh 


5.00 


Ann Maro 


5.00 


Mr. & Mrs. Geo. F. Meiser 


5.00 


Primary Dept. 


21.19 


Mrs. Carl Shaffer 


25.00 


Mr. & Mrs. Emlyn Smith 


5.00 


Miss Vina Snyder 


30.00 


Mr. & Mrs. J. Davenport 


5.00 


Thomas M. Stump 


5.00 


Mr. & Mrs. Ralph Lape 


5.00 


Harold Wagner 


5.00 


Margaret Sutek 


10.60 


Mr. & Mrs. Walter Crawford 


5.00 


Mrs. A Y. Robinson and daughters, 




in memory of A. Y. Robinson 


20.0C 


Mr. & Mrs. LeRoy Bell 


10.00 


Miscellaneous 


35.40 



Total 

1st Brethren Church, 
New Troy, Mich. 

Mrs. W. P. Warren 

Rev. & Mrs. Russell Williams 

Mi. & Mrs. Jack Kempton 

Mrs. Sarah Williams 

Gifts less than $5.00 

Total 

1st Brethren Church, 
Listie, Pa. (Additional) 

Mrs. C. A. Will 
Sent in previously 

Total 

1st Brethren Church, 
Winchester, Va. 



Total 



211.04 



Total 

Grace Brethren Church, 
Fremont, Ohio. 

Elsie and Mrs. John Voss 
Mrs. T. W. Price 

Phillip J. Simmons 
Mrs. Roy Decker 
Mr. & Mrs. Fred Hague 
Mrs. Gordon Gonawein 



238.79 



Mrs. Daisy Boyer 


90.00 


Rev. & Norman Uphouse 


50.00 


Mr. & Mrs. Alva Frye 


25.00 


Adult C. E. Society 


20.00 


Mrs. Emma Stultz 


15.00 


Mr. & Mrs. C. L. Lockhart 


10.00 


Y. P. S. C. E. 


10.00 


Jr. High S. S. Class 


7.00 


Jr. C. E. 


5.00 


Mrs. Mason's S. S. Class 


5.00 


Mr. & Mrs. Leonard Mason 


5.00 


C. E. Graber and family 


5.C0 


Marguerite Farmer 


5.00 


Mr. a Mrs. Geo. Garber 


5.00 


Mrs. Edna Hyde 


5.00 


Mr. & Mrs. W. O. Anderson 


5.00 


Mr. & Mrs. Guy Coffelt 


5.00 


Mrs. Helen Spillman 


5.00 


Mrs. Bessie E. Petrie 


5.00 


Miss Susie Eaton 


5.00 


Church offering 


33.30 



320.30 



5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
25.00 



Mrs. Oliver Winters 
Crusaders Class 
Challengers Class 
Church 
Additional 

Total 

1st Brethren Church, 
Martinsburg, Pa. 



Total 

1st Brethren Church, 
Sunnyside, Wash. 



Total for Dist. Missions 

1st Brethren Church, 
Modesto, Calif. 

Arthur Morgan 

Sisterhood Girls 

Richard Harding 

Mr. & Mrs. A. E. Bowman 

Earl Bowman 

Dilwin Studebaker 

Mr. & Mrs. K. W. Holgate 

Mr. & Mrs. Mel Stoner 

Emery Garber 

Received when pictures were shown 

Gifts less than $5.00 

Total 

Bethel Brethren Church, 
Berne, Ind. (Additional). 

Bernice Dudgeon 

Amt. previously reported 



Total 



(To be continued) 



25.00 

21.50 

3.52 

8.05 

2.00 

110.U7 



Dr. & Mrs. C. K. Snider 


90.00 


David Snider 


10.00 


Wayne Snider 


10.00 


Alice Snider 


10.00 


Mrs. J. E. Dilling 


5.00 


Mr. J. E. Dilling (K.) 


5.00 


Mrs. Alice Wisler 


10.00 


Ladies Bible Class 


10.00 


Men's Bible Class 


5.00 


Juvenile S. S. Class 


5.00 


Mrs. John Loose and sons 


6.00 


Willing Workers Class (K.) 


20.00 


Gifts less than $5.00 


18.63 



204.63 



5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
9.00 
8.00 


Rev. & Mrs. E. W. Reed 


9.75 


Miss Lucile Reed 


5.00 


Mr. Walter Reed 


5.00 


Mr. Robert 1. Reed 


5.00 


Mrs. H. M. Lichty 


5.00 


Mr. & Mrs. F. R. Wescott 
Mrs. John Fuerst, Sr. 


30.00 


32.00 


5.00 


Mr. C. H. Padgham 


5.00 




Mrs. Grace Turner 


5.00 




Mr. Joyce Strout 


5.00 




Mrs. Nettie Harris 


5.00 


20.00 


Mr. & Mrs. F. E. Lacey 


5.00 


66.65 


Mrs. Wendell Morgan 


10.00 




Offerings less than $5.00 


11 00 


86.65 








Total 


110.75 




1st Brethren Church, 






Sunnyside, Wash. 




90.00 
50.00 


District Missions (Har.) 


10.00 



10.00 



5.00 
7.25 
5.00 
10.00 
6.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
1.30 
7.25 

60.80 



5.00 
577.00 

582.00 



Respectfully submitted, 
R. PAUL MILLER, Secretary. 



-15— 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



INTERESTING ITEMS CONCERNING ISRAEL 

A Cat Can't — But God Can ! ! A recent Associated. 
Press dispatch from Warsaw, Poland, tells us of Hit- 
ler's latest demoniacal attempt to exterminate Semitic 
blood within the borders of th3 Reich. His henchmen 
have built an eight foot concrete wall around the 
central ghetto district comprising about 100 or more 
city blocks. It is reputed to be "so tight that a cat 
couldn't get through it.' By placing a f3W guards at 
the 18 entrances the Nazis can effectively bottle up 
the 500,000 Jews and Poles who are forced to live with- 
in these limits! ... Or can they? Only so long as 
God is willing to permit these atrocities to continue! 
But for Hitler's information, He has long since warned 
all who seek the Jews hurt that they are "playing 
with fire." He says in Zech. 12:3 that "in that day 
(the day of His wrath) will I make Jerusalem a bur- 
densome stone for all people: all that burden them- 
selves with it shall be cut in pieces, . . .". True, that 
day has not yet arrived, but bestial brutalities like the 
above are hastening the day when God will fight for 
His people "as He did in the day of battle." Incident- 
ally, an eight foot wall of concrete won't be much of 
a barrier to Him, either! 
Is Another Link About to Be Forged? ? 

"B'nai B'rith" reports that "The British Government, 
looking ahead to the end of the war, is considering the 
creation of a federation of Arab States with Palestine 
as autonomous Jewish territory." While we are of the 
opinion that their anticipation of the "end of the war" 
is wistful optimism, we are nevertheless interested 
every time we see Palestine mentioned by the British 
Government, or any of the nations for that matter. 
For almost always there is a prophetic possibility. 
Zionists have dreamed for decades of the restoration 
of the land as a national entity. Since the last World 
War many of these dreams have come to reality. And 
the intimation of the mandatory power which Great 
Britain holds over Palestine leads us to wonder if 
maybe another link in the chain of prophecies con- 
cerning the restoration of the people to the land in 
unbelief is not being forged. 

The Shadow of The Crooked Cross always brings 
sorrow to the hounded sons of Jacob. Since Hitler's 
occupation of Rumania many thousands of Jews have 
been forced to evacuate their homes to make quarters 
for the Nazi legions. Certainly the mills of persecu- 
tion are working overtime to force Israel into 

A new kind of "bottleneck." This word, popular- 
ized by the newspapermen and commentators with 
reference to recent defense problems, might well be 
used to describe the part which Palestine will play in 
the "hour of trial" ahead of the Jews. When the en- 
raged beasts concentrate their godless hosts on the 
blotting out of God's chosen people, thev (the Jews) 
will find themselves with no wav out. They will be 
in the neck of the bottle with cork secure. And just 
when it looks as though the last blood will flow from 
Jewish veins into the Judean hills, Jehovah, their 
Messiah and Savior, will deliver them! Truly, the re- 
turn of our Lord Jesus Christ is the only hope for this 
despised people! That many may accept Him now is 
our prayer! 



DON'T FORGET- 



( Continued from page 13) 
though we be thrice put under water to represent the 
mystery of the Trinity, yet it is reputed but one bap- 
tism." 

Chrysostom, (A.D. 354-407), bishop of Antioch, savs, 
"Christ delivered to his disciples one baptism in three 
immersions of the bodv when he said to them 'Go 
teach all nations, baptizing them in the name of the 
Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.' " 

So trine immersion is one baptism, even as single 
immersion. But trine immersion represents the faith 
of the Trinitarian; single immersion represents the 
faith of the Unitarian. 



1+1 = 2 



iiiiiimini 



iimiiiiBii 



RMiiiiiiiiiiimiiit 



| May We Count a*t tyou? 



— The other day we received the following letter from M. E 

~ Horner: 

"If each subscriber to the Herald would 

E send in one new subscription, it would help 

E a bit. So I wish to start that list." 

E In the some mail came another letter from Miss Doris Fallis: 

~ "Enclosed find $2.00. Please renew my sub- 

E scription for one year and please send the 

« Herald for one year to . . ." 

E And still another in the same mail from Rev. Alan S. Pearce: 

E "We are going after subscriptions in our 

E church as never before, so that you may 

E expect to receive a goodly number more 

= from time to time during the next month." 

E These letters gave us an idea— A DOUBLE ONE 

E Campaign. So we are out after double ones. What 

= is it? 

E 1.— Send in your subscription to THE BRETH- 

E REN MISSIONARY HERALD — §1.00 for 

S one year. 

= — and — 

E 2. — Then send an extra $1.00 for another one 

E year subscription to The Brethren Mission- 

E ary Herald to be sent to a friend or relative. 

E YOUR DOLLAR DOUBLED 

E will send forth the Word of God through the 

E printed pages of The Brethren Missionary Herald 

E to more than double. 

~ Your dollar doubled will be sending a Christian testimony 

S — the kind that you yourself would want to send out — for less 

E fhan you could send a tract each week into a home — 

~ And The Brethren Missionary Herald, with its 16 or more 

E pages 48 times each year, certainly is better than a single 

E tract sent out once each week. 

E Here is my dollars for 

MY SUBSCRIPTION 

E Renewal rj or New rj 

E Name 



Address 
City . . . 



State 



E And with my double dollar, send 

E The Brethren Missionary Herald for one year to 

— Name 



Address 
City . . . 



State 



Inclosed find $ For additional subscriptions 

use blank paper. 

THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD CO. 

3326 S. Calhoun St. Fort Wayne, Ind. 



-16— 




W. M. C. 
NUMBER 



FEBRUARY 22, 1941 
3 — No. 8 



VjDEBp^ 



IN THIS ISSUE 

(UND THE WORLD— Page 2 

I. C. NEWS — Pages 3-5 

I. M. NEWS — Pages 6, 7 

UGGLES OF THE 
SUBSTITUTES — Page 7 

*ACE OF COMIC 
MAGAZINE — Pages 8,9 

J MUST ACCEPT 

SE SUBSTITUTE — Page 10 

1 WONDERFUL 
SALVATION — Page 11 

\T DO BRETHREN 
BELIEVE? — Pages 12, 13 

LY MANNA — Page 13 

PS BRIEFS — Page 13 

NK IT OVER — Page 13 

S' & GIRLS' — Page 14 

is FROM BRETHREN 
CHURCHES — Page 15 



TTON CHURCH 
HNS LAWSUIT 



Page 16 



BRETHREN 
CHURCHES 




COME WITH US AND WE WILL 
DO THEE GOOD— Numbers 10:29 



Conemaugh, Pa. 




Long Beach, Calif. (2d) 







THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 




tAe Itfodd 



By CHAS. W. MAYES 

ENCOURAGEMENT 
FOR EVOLUTIONISTS 

LONDON, ENGLAND. Every viewpoint of religion, 
science, or philosophy may be found in this great city. 
There is a society or organization for the defence of 
almost everything. Some are still holding to the 
theory of evolution, long ago completely discredited 
by true science. We also have eminent British scien- 
tists who calmly state that in all the British Museum 
there is not one single logical evidence of the evolu- 
tion theory. 

The following little poem is being sent forth from 
some British subjects as an encouragement to those 
who still have faith of sufficient magnitude to believe 
the hoax of evolution. 

EVOLUTION 

Once I was a tadpole grubbing in the mire, 

Till I became ambitious and started to aspire; 

I rubbed my tail so vigorously against the sunken log 

It disappeared completely and I found myself a frog. 

I struggled from my puddle and jumped upon dry 

land, 
And the feeling that was in me, was glorious and 

grand, 
It made me kind o' frisky so I hopped around a tree 
Till I landed in the branches as happy as could be. 
And there I spent some aeons evoluting without fail 
Till I became a monkey and grew another tail. 
But still I had ambitions as the aeons quickly sped, 
So I climbed down from the branches and walked the 

earth instead. 
Till my tail got tired with trailing on the hard earth 

every day, 
And twice within my "process" that appendage passed 

away. 
Once again I evoluted, and believe it if you can, 
I awoke one summer morning and found myself — a 

man. 
Now you tadpoles in the mire just think what you 

may be 
If you'll only in your puddles start to climb the family 

tree ; 
I'm the genus homo "finished," for all the world to see, 
For when I told my story I was given a D.D. 

— J.H.H. 



SEARCH FOR "SOMETHING FOR NOTHING" 
CONTINUES — SOMETIMES 

EDISON, OHIO. An estimated $16,000 in currency 
was scattered for four miles along the New York 
Central railroad between here and Cardington when 
a mail sack thrown from a baggage car was torn and 
the precious paper scattered. 

Men, women and children combed the territory in a 
modern "gold rush" looking for the money immedi- 
ately after the news of the currency shower had 



spread. It is reported that people came from miles 
around hoping to get in on the money hunt. 

Deep in the human heart there seems to be an in- 
dominable desire to get something for nothing. Some 
men would walk 100 miles in search for a dollar bill. 
The Bible reveals that God has placed salvation on the 
basis of something for nothing. "The gift of God 
is eternal life through Jesus Christ our Lord" (Rom. 
6:23». You cannot buy salvation, steal it from the 
neighbors, inherit it from your forebears, nor pro- 
duce it of yourself. It is a free gift. One might think 
that there would be a "salvation rush" in which all 
men would enthusiastically participate, rejoicing to 
get something for nothing. But not so! Men do not 
rush to God. No man comes to God unless the Holy 
Spirit draws him. The human heart is not only de- 
ceitful, but rebellious against God. Whatever God 
desires is just what the natural human heart does 
not want. 



CHURCH CAN HELP UNCLE SAM 
MAKE MONEY 

DENVER, COLO. Uncle Sam seems to be having 
the same trouble as his many neices and nephews; 
he cannot make money fast enough. Due to the 
expansion of the national defense program, increased 
use of coin machines, and the increased number of 
various types of sales taxes, the Denver mint has been 
running day and night seven days a week trying to 
supply the demands for pennies, nickels and dimes. 

Marshall Reddish, chief clerk at the Denver mint, 
reports that a continuing increased demand on the 
United States mint may serve as a good barometer 
for national prosperity. 

They who study God's Word carefully will discover 
that God is more interested in real prosperity than 
we are. He even gives us the recipe for the same. 
Perhaps Mr. Roosevelt may not realize it, but the key 
to prosperity in the United States is not in the hands 
of the bankers or the big corporations, or even the 
government. Prosperity today is dependent on the 
professing church of Jesus Christ. "If my people, 
who are called by my name, shall humble themselves, 
and pray, and seek my face, and turn from their 
wicked ways; then I will hear from heaven and for- 
give their sin, and will heal their land" (2 Chron. 
7:14), is a principle which goes beyond the bounds 
of the dispensation of the law even to the present 
hour. God lays the burden for financial prosperity 
right at the door of His professing people. Uncle Sam 
could make money faster if his nieces and nephews 
were right with God. 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 

The Brethren Missionary Herald is published weekly, 
four times a month, or 48 times a year, at Herald Press, 
Inc., 1300 West 9th St., Cleveland, Ohio, by the Brethren 
Missionary Herald Co., 3326 So. Calhoun St., Fort Wayne. 
Ind. 

Subscription Price: In the United States and possessions, 

$1.00 a year; Foreign countries, $1.50 a year. 

ADMINISTRATION 

Secretary of Publications: Leo Polman 

Business Office Secretary: Miss Geneva Kuhn 

Editorial Office Secretary: Miss Grace Allshouse 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

President: Russell D. Barnard Secretary: Tom Hammers 

Vice-President: Ralph Rambo Treasurer: Homer A. Kent 

R. D. Crees Mrs. Roy Patterson R. E. Gingrich 

George Richardson L. L. Grubb Bernard Schneider 

EDITORS 
Foreign Missions: Louis S. Bauman. 
Educational: Alva J. McClain. 
Home Missions: R. Paul Miller. 
Women's Missionary Council: Mrs. A. B. Kidder. 



Entered as second class matter at the post office at 
Cleveland, Ohio, February 9, 1939, under the act of March 
3, 1879. 



—2— 



FEBRUARY 2 2, 1941 



THE 




BRETHREN WOMEN'S 

MISSIONARY 

COUNCIL 

Mrs. A. B. Kidder, Editor 



President — Mrs. Homer A. Kent, Box 102, Winona Lake, Ind. 

Financial Secretary — Mrs. H. W. Koontz, 105 Otterview Ave., Ghent, 
Roanoke, Va. 

Treasurer — Mrs. Orville A. Lorenz, Meyersdale, Pa. 

Literature Secretary — Mrs. Lilly Monroe, 1234 E. 60th St., Los An- 
geles, Calif. 

Editor — Mrs. A. B. Kidder, 211 Girard Ave., S. E., Canton, Ohio. 



All printed supplies are to be secured from Mrs. Monroe, including 
membership cards. All Council funds are to be forwarded to Mrs. 
Koontz. Send your president's name and address to Mrs. Kidder for 
Devotional Topics. 



OBJECTIVES FOR 1940-1941 

1. Four major offerings: 

September, October, November — Our National Expense Fund. 

Need $920. 

December, January, February — ■ Bozoum Seminary for native 

evangelists. Need $800. 

March, April, May — Grace Theological Seminary. Need $500. 

June, July, August — Home Missions. Need $500. 

2. Scrap books made for mission study. 

3. Daily prayer cards for home and foreign missionaries. 

4. That we encourage daily Bible reading with number of chapters 
reported at each council meeting. 

5. That we encourage definite witnessing to the unsaved on the 
part of every Council. 

6. That we urge our women to aid in getting The Brethren Mis- 
sionary Herald into every home in the church. 



J.0 - 



Sdjfouall 







Glorifying God in Sickness 

A friend who is not a Christian asked us the 
other day, "How do you account for the fact that so 
many Christians are sick and suffering in this flu 
epidemic"? Our answer that Christians are not prom- 
ised immunity from disease or suffering in this age 
seemed to satisfy; but after thinking a bit, this ques- 
tion was asked, "But I knew a Mrs. So and So, a fine 
Christian woman, who lay for years a hopeless invalid 
from rheumatism. How do you account for that"? 
Well, we praise the Lord that we need not account for 
any of these things; what is needed is to trust that 
a loving heavenly Father knows best what is good for 
His children. But all of this set up a train of thought 
which seems pertinent in these days when we are 
surrounded by cases of illness and each letter received 
tells of more cases. 



Should not our attitude be that of glorifying God 
when we are ill? And how can we best glorify Him 
in such circumstances? This being our devotional 
subject for this year, is it not wise to apply it to the 
events of the year; namely, the present epidemic? 

In the first place, a child of God has no excuse for 
exhibiting an embittered spirit when temporarily laid 
aside by illness. What a blessed privilege it is to know 
the meaning of 1 Thess. 5:18 — "In everything give 
thanks; for this is the will of God in Christ Jesus con- 
cerning you." The word this does not refer to the 
giving of thanks. It is indeed God's will that we be 
thankful; but when we learn that this present cir- 
cumstance, in which we find ourselves, no matter 
what it may be, is the will of God for us, we may in- 
deed and wholeheartedly render thanks therefor, be- 
cause His will is always best for us. And as we render 
our thanks, in the midst of our illnesses, our testimony 
will shine forth more brightly unto His glory- 
Again, if we yield ourselves completely to Him, the 
Holy Spirit may use the illness to cultivate within 
us the marvelous Christian grace of patience — to most 
of us the most difficult of all graces to attain. But 
the patient endurance of suffering is another testi- 
mony which the world is bound to respect, and there- 
fore it is to the glory of God our Savior. 

Last, but not least, who of us in this day of speed 
and hustle can say with the Psalmist, "O how love I 
Thy law! It is my meditation all the day" (Ps. 119: 
97). These busy lives of ours give us all too few oppor- 
tunities for meditation. We rush from this to that all 
our waking hours; many times all this haste and rush 
is not of our choosing, but we are caught in the whirl- 
pool of modern life and helplessly tossed to and fro. 
Then the Lord kindly permits us to be laid aside for a 
time: if we are wise we use the quiet moments to 
think on the things of God and to enjoy richly His 
presence with the world shut out. 



Grace Seminary Offering 

It was with a shock that we just came to a realiza- 
tion that with the February meetings our W.M.C. year 
will have reached the half way mark. Our foreign 
missionary offering will have been turned in, and 
now we are looking forward to the Grace Seminary 
offering through March, April and May. 

Let us not forget that Grace Seminary is a vital 
part of the missionary activity of The Brethren 
Church. It is the training school for our missionaries 
for both home and foreign service. It sets the stand- 
ards for that work; and we may well be proud of 
those standards. The high respect in which our school 
is held by those not of our brotherhood warms our 
hearts. The W.M.C. can wholeheartedly support the 
seminary in prayer and with our gifts, assured that 
in so doing we are indeed glorifying God. 



PRAYER REQUESTS 

National Prayer Chairman: Mrs. Arthur Carey, Ritt- 
man, O. 

1. Praise the Lord for answered prayer. Passage 
has been privided to Africa for three of our mission- 
aries. 

2. Pray that a safe journey may be granted our 
missionaries now sailing or about to sail. 

3. Pray that God will definitely lead each graduat- 
ing student from Grace Seminary into the field where 
God may best use him. 

4. Pray that each Brethren Student Life Volunteer 
may feel the direct leading of the Lord, and that all 
their leaders may be given wisdom and guidance from 
above. 



—3— 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



Suggested Program for the March Meeting 

Subject: Glorifying God in Child Evangelism. 

Song: "Bring Them In." 

Prayer Circle: Praying for missionaries and children 
in all lands. 

Song: "Open the Door to the Children." 

Scripture: Matt. 18:1-6. 

Prayer. 

Business. 

Song: "Tell It Again" (into a tent where a gypsy 
boy lay). 

Topic: "Our Responsibility to the Child"— by Mrs. 
John Gnagy, Brea, Calif. 

Topic: "How to Lead a Child to Accept Christ" — by 
Mrs. Irene Ranney, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Special Number. 

Missionary News: "A Word from India" — by Miss 
Jean Buchan. 

(This program suggested by Mrs. John Gnagy, Brea, 
Calif.) 

So Busy, But So Happy 

Mrs. Sewell Landrum writes us from Clayhole, Ky.; 
and we are very glad indeed to have this cheery word 
from her: 

Dear members of the W.M.C.: — 

It is out of hearts filled with praise and thanksgiving 
to God for His goodness to us that we write this 
letter, and trust it will be of interest to you all. 

At Christmas time we are always busy working on 
our Christmas program and all the things that go with 
it; such as sorting toys, sacking candy, simple decora- 
tions for the church. This year the Young Women's 
Class did the decorating with evergreen and spruce 
which they had gathered from the hills. The Christ- 
mas season is also the time when we have dozens of 
boxes and bags of clothing to sort and distribute to 
the people. 

This past Christmas has been filled with extra bless- 
ings for us. The day before Christmas we moved into 
the new house which was made possible by you folks. 
Only those of you who have visited here the past few 
months can truly understand what the new house 
means to us. What fun we had putting all the gifts 
in their place. We wanted to write a personal letter 
to each one who sent in a gift. So we will give each 
of you a special "thank you" here. Ruth Marie, Peggy 
Ann, and Lois Kay send their thanks also to the many 
folks who remembered them. 

The day following Christmas a gospel team from 
Grace Seminary arrived at our place. We had a won- 
derful time while they were here. Many souls were 
saved during the meetings. A report of these meetings 
appeared in another issue of the Herald. 
In His Name, 

Mrs. Sewell Landrum. 




A DAY 
ON BOARD 
THE SHIPS 



Here is the second article in the series by Bro. Claude H. Pearson 
concerning his sailor work. 

Before boarding ships, passes from U. S. Customs, 
Shipping Agents and Oil Companies are necessary. 15 



leading tracts, pamphlets, gospel and books in assort- 
ment are filed so that literature will not be the same 
for every man or room. 

Literature is carried in a well worn, small suitcase, 
placed in a conspicuous place, yet not where it will 
hinder the ship's work. It must be dilapidated or some 
sailor may borrow it for need of his own while we are 
fore or aft. 

Generally the officers' rooms are visited first, but 
this varies as to the time of the day. There are always 
some men at leisure; cooks at one time, engineers and 
sailors at another. One needs to be careful not to hin- 
der the work of the crew. We knock at doors of the 
cabins which may accommodate from one to 20 men. 
If there is no answer we walk right in, place gospels 
under pillows, on a bench, or in any convenient place. 

Inside, we may find men asleep, or writing, or even 
ditching work. We introduce ourselves and offer liter- 
ature, placing a good supply on the desk as we do. We 
know the sailor reads much whether he acts interested 
or not. If at all cordial we park for a conversation, 
and then turn it to personal salvation as soon as pos- 
sible. Here is where we do our best work. 

In the afternoon the men stop for tea, coffee, sand- 
wich or a smoke. In these groups we openly challenge 
the bully, the infidel, skeptic or unbeliever on the 
fundamentals. As the conversation or argument ad- 
vances, we watch for those with whom the Spirit is 
dealing and later help them. 

Older type ships are often overcrowded; tobacco 
smoke like a fog, and other odors too; the left over 
food on the table strong enough to walk, and if not, 
there are plenty of cockroaches to help it move. Often 
the men are very bitter, speaking out their abuse to 
the Sky Pilot, as we are called; and now and then a 
hungry hearted, broken spirit, discouraged soul will 
listen to the old sweet story and surrender. 

After visiting two or three ships like this the worker 
is weary of body and goes home and, with Him pre- 
pares for the next day. 




Out of the Mail Bag 

A letter from Uniontown, Pa. 



Dear Sister Kidder: 

I am sending you a copy of our Year Book, not that 
it is such an unusual or beautiful one, but it is so 
easy and simple to make. Our vice-president, Sister 
Isa Wonsettler, had charge of making them. 

We enjoy the letters from our missionaries on our 
programs; they nearly always provoke some comment 
from our members and create an interest in missions. 

Our W.M.C. is on a higher plane spiritually than 
ever in the past. 

Thanks again for the splendid topics! 

Best Wishes for the New Year, 
In Him. 

Mrs. Geo. B. McCann. 
Uniontown First Brethren. 

Editor's note: We wish we could share with you the 

Year Book— its blue cover with silver lettering; its 

title page with the theme for the year and the W.M.C. 

slogan; its monthly programs and list of officers. It 

breathes the very spirit of our beloved W.M.C. 



FEBRUARY 2 2, 1941 



CALIFORNIA IS ON THE W.M.C. MAP 

Fall Conference 

The fall conference of the Southern California Dis- 
trict W.M.C. was held at the Second Brethren Church 
of Los Angeles, Oct. 31, 1940. 

The meeting opened at 10 A. M. with singing led 
by Mrs. Hand of Wnittier with Miss Johanna Nielson 
of Long Beach at the piano. 

Mrs. Harry Crawiord, mother of our missionary, Miss 
Mabel Crawiord, led trie devotions using Titus 2. Mrs. 
Monroe, president of the hostess Council, gave a wel- 
come to all present. Special music was rendered by 
Mrs. Arnold Kriegbaum from Los Angeles and Miss 
Kreigbaum from Long Beach. 

Tne hignlignts or rational Conference were given 
by Mrs. Asnman of Wnittier. Mrs. Paul Bauman of 
Los Angeles told about the Seminary at Winona Lake, 
Ind., ana Mrs. Ogden of Whittier gave us many inter- 
esting tnings about their trip to Clayhole, Ky. 

The objectives for this year were presented by Mrs. 
John Gnagy of Whittier, and she asked that definite 
intercession for the unsaved should be made in every 
council this year. She also urged that The Brethren 
Missionary Herald should be in every home this com- 
ing year. 

Miss Grace Byron, one of our missionaries, showed 
her scrap book which was very interesting, and urged 
that all of us should gather information about our 
work and make scrap books. 

Mrs. W. A. Ogden of trie First Los Angeles Church 
told about the sisterhood work and asked that each 
Council try to have some one sponsor the work for 
its church. 

The noon luncheon was served by the ladies of the 
hostess church and the table decorations and colors 
were silver and blue. 

The afternoon session opened by singing led by Mrs. 
Monia of La Verne with Miss Nielson at the piano. The 
registration comittee reported 165 registered from 
Southern California, and we had visitors Irom Wash- 
ington, D. C, and Ypsilanti, Mich. 

Mrs. Clarence Sickel, missionary from South Amer- 
ica, led the devotions taking 2 Cor. 3:3-6,18. A special 
feature from the La Verne church was presented by 
Mrs. Rager, Mrs. Maxwell and Mrs. Gump. A whistling 
solo "Wnen They Ring Those Golden Bells" was given 
by Mrs. Pansy Runyon with Mrs. Alice Hall at the 
piano. 

The speaker of the afternon, Mrs. Rachel Seiver, 
was introduced by her friend Miss Grace Byron. Mrs. 
Seiver gave a very interesting talk on Egypt where she 
was a missionary many years. 

The following otncers were elected for the year: 
president, Mrs. John Gnagy, Whittier; vice-president, 
Mrs. R. W. Drigs, Compton; secretary, Mrs. W. E. 
McNiell, Los Angeles; treasurer, Mrs. Elmer Monia, 
La Verne. An invitation by the Whittier ladies for 
the meeting of the spring conference was accepted, 
after which we were dismissed with prayer by Mrs. 
Ogden. 

Mrs. W. E. McNiell, Secy. 



Tracy Council Asks Your Prayers 

The Tracy Brethren W.M.C. closed another year of 
service in November ( 1940) . In this year the Lord gave 
definite spiritual and numerical growth. We meet 
each month at the church, assembling at ten o'clock 
to sew. For the noon hour we eat together the food 
hidden under "covered dishes," and the meeting proper 
starts at 2 P. M. 

As is our custom, we "reveal" ourselves to our secret 
sisters at the November meeting by presenting a gift 
with the giver's name attached. This month was no 
exception, and after election of officers the gifts were 
distributed. The table was beautifully set with fruit fall- 
ing from a horn o' plenty. Around this horn the gifts 
were grouped with a ribbon attached to each gift run- 



ning off the end of the table. On the end of the rib- 
bon hung a walnut in which was hidden the donor's 
name. After many surprises, tea and cake were served. 

Since we have only recently become a member of the 
W.M.C. we did not follow its course of study last year 
We used "Fulfilled Prophecies that Prove the Bible." 
Many were the blessings as we learned how accurately 
and wonderfully the Word of God has been fulfilled 

The new officers are: Mrs. R. C. Ferguson, presi- 
dent; Mrs. Elis Lehman, vice-president; Mrs. Wm. Cor- 
bett, secy.-treas.; Mrs. Emery Sasser, asst. secy.-treas 

Pray for the W.M.C. in the Tracy church. Ours is a 
mission church with a real need for yielded leaders 
God must and will do for us the impossible, but we 
must pray. Will you and your Council help us in the 
praying? 



A Fine Report From Long Beach Second 

Greetings to all our Sister W.M.C.'s in the name of 
our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ, from the W M C of 
the Second Brethren, Long Beach. 

It has been some time since we have written you and 
knowing you like to hear of the progress of each Coun- 
cil, we are happy to tell you of ours. All praise to the 
Lord. 

Last week we handed our yearly report to the 
church, and all was gain. We had a gain of 19 in 
membership. Our enrollment is now 43. Our offer- 
ings since being free-will average much more. 

We had our 12 regular devotional meetings two 
public meetings and approximately 40 sewing days 
Our ladies are very much interested in sewing. They 
have pieced and made five large comforts and 43 crib 
size ones. We gave 207 garments and most of these 
were made on our sewing days. We sent to the dis- 
trict chairman in charge of bandages 650 rolls In 
supplying the physical needs we have the chance of 
supplying spiritual help. 

We like the four major offerings, and hope our 
Council will be able to give its share. Just now we 
certainly feel the need of training native evangelists 
so if the Lord tarries and our missionaries are called 
home we will have trained workers left in the field 
I hope this offering will be twice the goal. 

We enjoy The Brethren Missionary Herald so much 
So far we have sent in orders two different times We 
ask your prayers for our Council. Rejoicing in hope: 
patient in tribulation; continuing instant in prayer 
(Rom. 12:12). 

Yours in His Blessed Name, 

Mrs. Ralph Williams, Secy. 



Los Angeles Third Has An Evangelistic Program 

I wish to thank you for the example of the kind of 
letters you wished to receive from the councils that I 
found in The Brethren Missionary Herald. 

The W.M.C. of the Third Brethren Church of Los 
Angeles is two and one half years old. We started 
with a membership of 10 and have an average attend- 
ance of fifteen. Our largest attendance was 24. 

We are looking forward to our next meeting that is 
to be devoted to membership. We are doing our best 
to accomplish the objectives for 1940-1941, and have 
a few for our own Council. We feel we would like to 
be busy so we have set aside one day a month for a 
work day. We are making thumbless mittens for the 
Brittons. We are to start a comfort to be given to 
the Los Angeles mission as a Christmas token. 

We have been very fortunate in obtaining speakers 
who are consecrated women and are true to the Word. 
Through these speakers we have had some who have 
accepted Him as their Savior. 

Our prayer is that through our members and meet- 
ings more will know Him too — that we may be true 
to Him and work for Him until He comes. Pray for us. 
In His Service, 

Mrs. Opal E. Henke, Secy. 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



SISTERHOOD of— , 

MARY and MARTHA 



"To know Him and 



f 



to make Him known" 



Pres — Ethel Morrill, Ellet, 0. 

Vice-Pres.— Leah Robinson, Rt. 7, Everhard Rd., North Canton, 0. 

Patroness— Mrs. Leo Polman, 4007 Tacoma St., Fort Wayne, Ind. 

Asst Patroness— Mrs. W. A. Ogden, 3941 Virginia St., Lynwood, 
Calif. 

General Sec'y. — Genevene Walter, 109 Sterling Ave., Rittman, 0. 

Financial Sec'y. — Katherine Sampson, 302 Barr Bldg., 910 17th St., 
N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Treas. — Louise Kimmel, Berne, Ind. 

Literature Sec'y— Mary Fritz, W. First St., Rittman, 0. 

Bandage Sec'y.— Betty Grace, 3717 N. Percy St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

MAIL ALL BANDAGES to Betty Grace, FIRST BRETH- 
REN CHURCH, 10th and Dauphin Sts., Philadelphia, Pa. 



Goals for Year 1940 and 1941 

1. Twelve devotional meetings using suggested material. 

2. Bible reading: The four Gospels and the Acts. 

Junior reading: John and Mark. 50x membership completing 
Bible reading. 

3. Membership project. 

4. Cabinet meetings in fall and spring. 

5. Bandages sent to bandage Sec'y by July 31, and at least one 
other benevolent work during the year. 

6. Offering sent to financial secretary by Jan. 31 and July 31 for 
administrative purposes. 

7. Two thank offerings received during the year and sent to finan- 
cial secretary. These may be taken any time during the year 
to be sent in at the same time as the regular offering. 

8. An offering sent to financial secretary by July 31 for fund for 
the higher education of missionaries' children. 

9. An offering sent to district secretary by May 31. 

WEAR A SISTERHOOD PIN! 

Beautiful S.M.M. pins are now available for all 
Sisterhood girls. The pins are of an open Bible de- 
sign with the initials S.M.M. across pages, in green 
and white enamel. All pins will have safety catches. 
Can be had with chain and guard with your own 
initials or cross also. Prices as follows: 

Silver plate pin with safety catch only, 35c ea. — 
$3.75 doz.; with chain and guard, 95c ea. 

Sterling Silver with safety catch only, 45c ea. — 
$4.75 doz.; with chain and guard, $1.10 ea. 

Order from The Brethren Missionary Herald Co., 
3326 South Calhoun St., Ft. Wayne, Ind. 



TWO NEW SOCIETIES IN ASHLAND 

We are happy to announce that a Junior and a 
Senior Sisterhood were organized at Ashland West 
Tenth Jan. 26. May the Lord bless you as you start 
in this new field of service for Him. 

We hope to have a Sisterhood in every church of 
our Brethren denomination by next year. Let us 
hear more reports like this one! 



DON'T FAIL US 

Don't forget to send your news to the general sec- 
retary. She received no news from you this month. 
Every society is anxious to know what you are doing 



ARE YOU MEETING YOUR GOALS? 

Better have another check. Did you send in your 
first offering? Please let us keep up to date in our 
Bible reading. 



WORK TO BE DONE 

The fact that so many have fallen by the way, af- 
fords no excuse to us to slacken our pace. We must go 
forth with renewed vigor. 

When we think of the millions of souls who have 
never heard of Christ we are stirred to service. May 
we not linger, till all have heard? 



DEVOTIONAL PROGRAM FOR MARCH 

Musical prelude. 

Opening prayer. 

Poem : 
In the fields of the Master there are harvests white; 
Who will go forth to labor with his soul and might? 
Let us haste now to answer ere the evening falls; 
Tis the Lord of the harvest who His servant calls. 

I am list'ning each moment for the Lord's command; 
At the call of the Master I will take my stand; 
I am ready to follow where He bids me go; 
I will hasten still onward all His will to know. 

Till our work for the Master on the earth is done, 
Till He calls us to glory when our race is run. 
We must hasten still onward all His will to do, 
For the fields still are rip'ning, and the reapers few. 

Then, at last, at the Bema of our blessed Lord, 
As we stand there for reck'ning, and we hear His word. 
May the Lord of the harvest to us sweetly say, 
"You were faithful to fellow, and my word obey." 

— Gems of Gold. 

Hymn: Bringing in the Sheaves. 

Scripture: Rom. 10:11-15. 

Special number. 

Prayer chorus followed by prayer for our mission- 
aries: those sailing and those on the field. Pray for 
Sister Mary Emmert who writes our topic for this 
month. She is home on furlough. Remember the 
new societies and ask that we might see more new 
ones organized. Don't forget to praise Him. 

Hymn: Jesus Calls Us. 

Topic. 

Business: Check on Bible reading. Does each girl 
have a thank offering box? Have you had your band- 
age sewing? Stress prayer in daily lives of all Sister- 
hood girls. 

Benediction: I will extol thee, my God, O King; and 
I will bless Thy name forever and ever. Every day will 
I bless Thee: and I will praise Thy name for ever and 
ever (Ps. 145: 1-2 >. 



JONATHAN 

I. Jonathan The Hero (1 Sam. 14:6-15). 

Prince Jonathan was not inexperienced. He had 
already won a notable victory over a garrison of Phil- 
istines with the aid of his small army. But this vic- 
tory had only served to bring down the enemy in 
larger numbers than before. Besides, he and his 
father, Saul, had no weapons to furnish their army 
(1 Sam. 13:19-20). So they were in a very bad plight. 

It was neither inexperience nor the rashness of 
youth that made Jonathan and his armourbearer go 



—6— 



FEBRUARY 2 2, 1941 



up alone to meet the host. Notice in v. 6 of our 
lesson that his trust was in God. There is no bravado 
here. 

Jonathan does not think in his heart: "I shall make 
me a great name in Israel today." Rather, he has the 
conviction that God wanted to give Israel the victory, 
and that God was able to do so by many or by few. 

So also we, if we do gain a victory against the evil 
forces in our own lives through mere strength of will 
power, are apt to find other temptations rushing down 
upon us thick and fast. The worthlessness of self 
reformation is taught plainly in Jesus' words about 
the seven evil spirits that came into the heart where 
one had been driven out. 

Then we too are made aware of the fact that we 
have no weapons adequate against such a host. But 
we may be certain that God wants to give us the 
victory, and will honor simple faith where He finds it. 

The simplicity of faith of our African Christians is 
a good example for us. Yolo and Jodiwan, for in- 
stance, when they were still young Christians, defied 
the sorcerer by stepping over a magic death line. It 
was dangerous because the corcerer was apt to poison 
them secretly in order to uphold the reputation of 
his magic. But they proclaimed boldly that God would 
keep them. 

II. The Hero Meets a Greater Hero (I Sam. 18:1-4). 

Although Jonathan was very brave and put his trust 
in God, yet there came an enemy against his people 
that he was unable to conquer. Doubtless Jonathan 
longed to go out and conquer Goliath, but he was not 
the man for it. When God sent His man, David, and 
when the dread giant was overthrown, instead of being 
jealous of David, as would have been only natural, 
Jonathan fell in love with him. "He loved him as 
his own soul." And that was no small soul! How 
rare is a heart where no jealousy hides! 

In just the same way, we should fall in love with 
the Lord Jesus Christ. He is the Victor over the arch 
enemy of our souls. He has conquered Satan, with 
whom we were unable to cope. How we should love 
Him! 

And Jonathan stripped himself of his goods and 
gave them to David. What a generous warm heart 
Jonathan had! Here too we can learn a lesson from 
the lowly African. When his friend comes to visit 
him, he will actually part with his only garment, if 
necessary, in order to give his friend a handsome pre- 
sent. Oh that this generosity might be turned toward 
the Lord! 

Everything we give willingly to Jesus now will be 
richly rewarded when He comes into His kingdom. 

III. Jonathan Suffers for His Hero (I Sam. 20:30-34). 

Jonathan deserves first place as the most unselfish 
man in the Bible. His love for David grew stronger 
and stronger, so much so, that he was willing to sacri- 
fice his chance to rule in favor of his friend. He knew 
that God had chosen David to rule over Israel. And 
he actually preferred David to rule instead of him. 

This is just where we must come to in our own lives. 
We must give the kingdom of our hearts over willingly, 
joyfully to the Lord to govern. 

This lovable character suffered persecution for the 
choice he made, but he was able to be of great service 
to his friend, and in turn his descendants were blessed 
by David. 

So our African Christians, many of them, are under- 
going persecution, as they press onward into a closer 
walk with the Lord. For example, Pauline's relatives 
will have nothing to do with her because she would 
not join in the heathenish mourning rites when her 



mother died. Silas' relatives likewise speak only evil 
of him because he would allow no devilish ceremonies 
to be carried on to prevent more of his children from 
dying. He had lost three small children, and the 
heathen all said it was because he had forsaken the 
religion of his fathers. 

And so all who have learned to love the Lord truly 
are called to suffer for His sake. But let us, too be 
Jonathans in loving sacrifice for our Lord. 

Mary L. Emmert. 



^ke Sttuffilel ay the 
Substituted, 

(4th in Scries on Baptism) 
By Rev. MILES TABER, pastor First Brethren Church, Leon, Iowa 

In previous articles we have shown that trine im- 
mersion was the original mode of Christian baptism. 
Single immersion was introduced in the latter half of 
the 4th century by heretics. Later, sprinkling and 
pouring, with either single or trine action, were also 
substituted. But these innovations were always recog- 
nized as substitutes, and they continued to be the ex- 
ception for another thousand years. Throughout this 
long millenium, trine immersion was still the rule; 
variations were the exception. 

Gregory the Great, made Pope in 590, commanded: 
"Let the priest baptize with a triple immersion." 

Theodore, Archbishop of Canterbury, (A. D. 669), 
said, "If any bishop or presbyter does not perform the 
one initiation with three immersions, but with giving 
one imersion only, into the death of the Lord, let him 
be deposed." 

Walafrid Strabo, Abbot of Richenau, (A. D. 840) says, 
"Suffice it to say that the trine immersion prevails 
everywhere in the world this day, and that it can by 
no means be changed, unless in accordance with a 
rash desire of novelty and to the scandal of the weak." 

The Council of Worcester, in 1240, enjoined, "Let the 
candidate for baptism always be thrice immersed." 

The Council of Ravenna, in 1311, was the first to 
allow a substitute. It ordered: "Baptism is to be ad- 
ministered by trine aspersion or immersion." 

Our next witness cannot be charged with being pre- 
judiced in favor of trine immersion. It is Henry S. 
Burrage, in "The Act of Baptism in the History of the 
Christian Church," published by the American Baptist 
Publication Society. At the end of chapter III, cover- 
ing the period A. D. 325-633, he comments: "It is 
evident from these citations that throughout this 
period trine immersion was the rule in the Christian 
Church." At the end of chapter IV, (633-1311) he 
adds, "During this period, also trine immersion held 
its place as the general rule." And at the beginning 
of Chapter V he states: "Though the Council of Ra- 
venna recognized trine aspersion and trine immersion 
as equally valid, the latter was only gradually super- 
seded." 

Thus trine immersion was the generally recognized 
mode of baptism in the church during the first 1300 
years of its history. 









THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 





Menace pf the Cwic ttfagajihe 

iJSii ^J-razel ~sr. ^Juniteacl 



Chicago, III 







Reprinted from The Church School Promoter 

Copyrighted, used by permission 



Take me with you, or I'll 



"I want to go with you! 
do something bad!" 

Thus a twelve-year-old boy threatened his parents. 
They did not take him as he wished, and when they 
returned from their evening's entertainment they 
found their home burned down and their son dead by 
his own hand. Investigation revealed that the boy 
had been a "comic" magazine addict, and had often 
acted the parts of the heroes and villians as he played 
about the farm. 

Another little boy astonished his father when he 
asked: "Daddy, is it better to kill a man with a gun, 
a dagger, a blackjack, or a big dose of poison?" 

Upon inquiring as to where the child had become 
familiar with these modern terms of the underworld, 
the father found the child had been reading comic 
magazines. His childish mind was confused as to the 
best method of getting rid of his friend — for some 
magazines seemed to use one method more than the 
others, yet all were successful. 

These stories can undoubtedly be reproduced again 
and again in the lives of many American boys and 
girls whose minds are being crammed full of murder, 
kidnapping, torture, raw melodrama, tales of extrava- 
gant exploits in strange lands and upon other planets. 

Phenomenal Growth 

The rise of the misnamed "comic" magazines has 
been one of the most amazing phenomena of the pre- 
sent age. Within the space of a few short years, one 
or two magazines of this type have been multiplied 
into 108 different publications; the circulation has 
increased from a few thousand to 12,000,000 copies a 
month. Figuring on an avergae of four readers to 
one copy (most children exchange their copies among 
their playmates), there is an aggregate reader circu- 
lation of approximately 48,000,000 each month! 

Sold at ten cents a copy, these magazines may be 
procured from any newsstand, candy store, drug store, 
magazine and novelty shop. Some might tend to 
minimize the harmfulness of this type of "literature," 
but let us be openminded and examine the facts. Buy 
a few copies and examine them yourself; ask yourself, 
"Should I permit my child to fill his mind with this 
trash?" 

Out of a pile of these papers, we shall select a copy 
at random. Forget the gaudy cover for the moment 
— we'll return to that later. Here is a serial strip. Let's 
follow the sequence. 

A federal judge, because he does not receive an ap- 
pointment which he desires, turns traitor to his coun- 
try and smuggles aliens across the border. A young 
F.B.I, agent is put on his trail. After a series of breath- 
taking events and narrow escapes from almost certain 



death in a most horrifying manner, our hero lands 
the renegade judge in the penitentiary. 

Well, you say, what's so harmful about that? Right 
and justice win out, the hero hands the villain his just 
deserts — what more could you ask? This is no worse 
than the hair-raising dime novels I read when a child, 
you insist. Ah, but you have overlooked something. 
While the forces of right and justice are overcoming 
the forces of evil, what has been going on in the mean- 
time? A re-examination of this particular strip tells 
us that the child has been shown how to use a black- 
jack, how to hop a ride on a fast-moving automobile, 
how to rob and plunder, how to handle an automatic 
and a submachine gun. Moreover, it has told him his 
own judges, policeman, and jailers are not trustworthy, 
and that they can be ••bought." 

The evil effects of these prolonged brutalities can- 
not be dismissed by a final hasty triumph of law and 
justice. Many times this triumph takes the form of 
more blood-curdling scenes of murder, torture, and 
death. 

Several Types Available 

The so-called "crime" or "detective" comics are not 
the only type available — there are also a larger num- 
ber that devote most of their pages to exhioitionism. 
The characters of both sexes, but especially the males. 
are almost entirely nude. In other styles of comics 
they portray hideous monsters, madman, creatures 
that are half brute and half human, in an irreducible 
minimum of a loincloth. 

A great many of these yellow journalistic efforts 
are now turning to the portrayal of soldier life in 
Europe, going into great detail to describe the horrible 
atrocities of the Germans to the heroes and heroines. 
They picture demoralized, perverted soldiers in filthy 
clothes with unshaven faces and lustful expressions as 
typical German soldiers, and usually have them tortur- 
ing or pursuing a beautiful American or English 
woman. The child's mind is not capable of distin- 
guishing between the German people and the politi- 
cal machine which is now driving them to do things 
they themselves hate. The child will think of his 
playmates and schoolmates of German descent, as 
those so horribly portrayed. This is definitely un- 
American. 

By far the most popular type of comic magazine 
is the "superman" type. There are multitudes of such 
heroes who can fly and display superhuman strength. 
Among the best sellers in this group are Superman, 
The Arrow. The Blue Bolt, Dick Cale the Wonder Boy. 
The Batman, The Crimson Avenger, The Masked Mar- 
vel, Neon the Unknown, Blaze Barton, Red Bee, Her- 
cules, The White Streak, The Shadow, The Hooded 
Wasp, The Raven, and many others. These men are 
dressed in freakish clothes, usually consisting of a 
fantastic mask and cape. Their strength is drawn 
from various sources — drinking liquid sun, following 



FEBRUARY 2 2, 1941 



a druggist's prescription, taking special pills, secret 
formulas, the use of wonder belts, or just from nature! 
One dear young superhuman "champ" battles against 
wicked doctors and gangsters to get back his secret 
formula so that all youtn may have strength such as 
his! 



(The superman theory has always been the "escape" psychology of 
a frustrated soul or one suffering with an inferiority complex. Be- 
yong doubt, it was this type of abnormal personality which drove 
Nietzsche (1844-1900) to propound his superman philosophy. "Down 
with the servility and humility of Christianity!" he said in effect 
"Down with renunciation and self-sacrifice; up with strength and 
ruthlessness!" This same devilish obsession appears to have gripped 
Hitler and his henchmen, and is now having its golden opportunity 
to seize the youth of America through these wildly fantastic comic 
serials. — The Editors.) 



Harmful Effects Upon the Child 

For the most part, the art work on these cheap pulp 
magazines is appallingly crude, the colors are too 
vivid, while the cover pictures are lurid and horror- 
inspiring beyond description. In comparison to these, 
the most violent of the old-fashioned "Dead-Eye Dick" 
novels become almost vapid. While some of the syn- 
dicated comic strips appearing in the magazines are 
also reproduced in newspapers, most of the material 
used is so crude that a self-respecting newspaper would 
refuse to publish it. It is, in brief, an appeal to the 
moronic mind, and is in the same category with the 
adventure and detective story magazines read by men 
and the cheap love story periodicals avidly devoured 
by low-minded women. 

This morbid literature produces within the child's 
mind a peculiar and unnatural reaction to the real- 
istic things of life. These tales, wildly absurd as we 
see them, nevertheless become real in the child's mind. 
Subconsciously, he himself acts out the parts and falls 
into the same situations as the heroes and heroines 
pictured so vividly on the page before his eyes. When 
an interruption brings him back to his natural life, 
his real or imagined weaknesses are magnified, and 
an intense disappointment ensues as he realizes how 
far short he is of his superman ideal. Lack of personal 
confidence and introvert tendencies logically result. 
To compensate for this, the child turns more and 
more from reality to the dream-world which these 
comics create for him. Finally, it becomes almost 
impossible for the child to differentiate between the 
real and the imaginary. As he walks the streets he 
"sees" spies, man-made monsters, gangsters, and 
wicked scientists on every corner, behind every hedge, 
down every dark alley, and sinister secret agents in- 
habit every old dilapidated house. 

How can we expect to instill spiritual truths in a 
mind that is full of this rubbish? How can we lead 
a soul to the Savior, when he prefers to live in a world 
of fantastic make-believe? How can we train a child 
to lead a consistent Christian life when his heart is 
set on having a "tommy-gun"? 

We do not try to deny that children crave for ad- 
venture, excitement, and color, but we believe we can 
supply this need in a purer, more wholesome way — 
one which is Christian, American, and by which the 
child is benefited. Next month we shall consider ways 
and means of taking these corrupt, un-American cess- 
pools of influence from the newsstands and what may 
be given in exchange. 



NOTE: Reprints of this article may be secured from The Church 
School Promoter, 800 North Clark Street, Chicago, III., at 5c ea., 
three copies, 10c; 30c a doz. Order copies for your friends, for 
parents, public school teachers, leaders of various civic organiza- 
tions, etc. Start the ball rolling to drive this menace out of your 
community. 

* Since the original printing of Mr. North's excellent article (See 
column on right) last May, the circulation of the comic magazines 
has grown by 2,000,000— The Editors. 



WISDOM FROM 
SCRIPTURES 

"Continue thou in the things 
which thou hast learned," was 
spoken only to one of whom it 
could be soid, "from a child thou 
hast known the holy Scriptures, 
which are able to make thee 
wise unto salvation through faith 
which is in Christ Jesus." For- 
tunate indeed is the child with 
such a heritage today! 




And a Challenge to American Parents 

Virtually every child in America is reading color "comic maga- 
zines — a poisonous mushroom growth of the last two years. 

Ten million" copies of these sex-horror serials are sold every 
month. One million dollars ere taken from the pockets of Amer- 
ica's children in exchange for graphic insanity. 

Frankly we were not perturbed when we first heard about the 
rise of the action comics. We imagined (as do most parents) 
that they were no worse than the "funnies" in the newspapers. 
But a careful examination of the 108 periodicals now on the 
stands shocked us into activity. At least 70 per cent of the toti! 
were of a nature no respectable newspaper would think of accepting. 

Save for a scattering of more or less innocuous "gag" comics 
and some reprints of newspaper strips, we found that the bulk of 
these lurid publications depend for their appeal upon mayhem, 
murder, torture and abduction — often with a child as the victim. 
Superman heroics, voluptuous females in scanty attire, blazing 
machine guns, hooded "justice," and cheap political propaganda 
were to be found on almost every page. 

The old dime novels in which an occasional redskin bit the dust 
were classic literature compared to the sadistic drivel pouring from 
the presses today. 

Badly drawn, badly written, and badly printed — a strain on 
young eyes ond young nervous systems — the effect of these pulp- 
paper nightmares is that af a violent stimulant. Their crude blacks 
and reds spoil the child's natural sense of color; their hypodermic 
infections of sex and murder make the child impatient with better, 
though quieter, stories. Unless we want a coming generation even 
more ferocious than the present one, parents and teachers through- 
out America must band together to break the comic magazine. 

But, of course, the children must be furnished a good substitute. 
There is nothing dull about WESTWARD HO or TREASURE ISLAND. 
Sinbad the Sailor didn't need spinach to effect his feats of strength. 
The classics are full of humor and adventure — plus good writing. 
And never before in the history of book publishing have there 
been so many fine new books for children, or better edited chil- 
dren's magazines. 

The shame lies largely with the parents who don't know ond 
don't care what their children are reading. It lies with unimagin- 
ative teachers who force stupid, dull twaddle down eager young 
throats, and, of course, it lies with the completely immoral pub- 
lishers of the comics — guilty of a cultural slaughter of the inno- 
cents. 

But the antidote to the comic magazine poison can be found in 
any library or good bookstore. The parent who does not acquire 
that antidote for his child is guilty of criminal negligence. 
— Sterling North, Literary Editor, Chicago Daily News, May 8, 1940 



—9- 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



yyr ljau MuA,t Accept the Substitute" 



By Robert E. Miller, Pastor, Tracy, Calif. 



Substitutes are quite common in our superficial age. 
We are cautioned often: "None genuine without this 
signature." But whether we speak of this common 
idea or the more deeply important Biblical teaching 
of the substitutionary atonement of our blessed Lord, 
tha "substitute" takes the place of another. To be 
sure, you do not desire the substitute instead of the 
genuine article. A counterfeit is seldom preferred to 
the genuine currency. But this is not the burden of 
our brief message to you at this time. 

It is our purpose to bring you quickly to the Word 
of God and show you plainly that the Genuine is the 
One and only Substitute for the guilty sinner in the 
presence of the God of heaven and earth. Who is 
"holy, holy, holy!" 

You now have a reaction perhaps like this: "You 
don't mean that I need a substitute, do you?" "I want 
co take what is coming to me!" "Am I so bad that I 
cannot stand on my own?" God has the answer ready 
for you in Romans, the fifth chapter: 

". . . Christ died for the ungodly." "While we 
were yet sinners, Christ died for us." 
"When we were enemies, we were reconciled to 
God by the death of His Son." 
This is our starting point always. What does God 
say? What does God say about you? It really is not 
important what you think about yourself because God 
knows your heart. God says to you that Christ died 
for the ungodly, the sinners, enemies of God. And as 
you say in your heart "Am I included in such a class 
of people?" we answer in these words: 

I. YOU ARE A REJECTED SINNER IN NEED OF THE 
SUBSTITUTE. 

The first thing you must recognize is the truth of 
God concerning your condition without Christ. Out 
of the many statements in the Word we choose the 
strongest: "AH have sinned and come short of the 
glory of God." Christ died for this kind of people, 
for the ungodly, for the sinners. But you say you are 
a bit different. Let us notice the last part of the 
verse preceding the one quoted above: "There is no 
difference." 

You have never felt this and never can feel it: it 
is a fact for which you must believe God. He says 
conclusively and with great finality, including Jews 
and Gentiles, that they "are all under sin." One uni- 
versal picture is unmistakably painted before our eyes 
— a guilty world, having no hope and without God. 
The master-trick of the "father of lies" is to deceive 
the poor, lost, hell-bound sinner by making him to 
think he has the "divine spark" which needs only to 
be fanned into the "divine fire." Perish these forgers 
of lies in the world today who preach such damnable 
doctrine of the devil. Job had the label correctly: 
"They are all physicians of no value." 

"There is no difference" with God, my sinner friend. 
Of course there are differences in heinousness or de- 
gradation of sins. We all know that. But by nature 
we do not know, nor can we feel, that there is no 
difference as to where every sinner stands in his own 
righteousnesses before God. We do not know except 
God tell us that "our righteousnesses are but filthy 
rags." The one question is, guilty or not guilty? There 
can be no degrees as to guilt. "He that offends in one 
point is guilty of all," and nothing less. He that of- 
fends in all points is guilty of all and nothing more. 
Differences as to offences, yes, but no difference as 
to guilt. The picture remains, all guilty before God. 
"There is none that doeth good, no, not one." 

Look at the prodigal son. The moment he crossed 
his father's threshold with his pockets full of money 
and a respectable dress, he was as guilty, as really a 



sinner as when he was among the swine. He was more 
degraded, among the swine, but not more guilty. In 
fact it was the very husks refused by the hogs which 
proved to be his greatest mercy, for these led him to 
see his guilty condition. A lull pocket and respectable 
dress are the worst things a guilty sinner can have, 
because these lead him to believe he is rich and has 
need of nothing. The prodigal as he leaves home can- 
not feel his destiny in the dust and dirt. His ears are 
deaf, his heart dulled to the need of a substitute for 
his guilty soul. 

To admit that you need a substitute may indeed be 
the deathblow to your pride, selfish ambition, and to 
all the soft sophistries preached in the synagogues of 
Satan today. But praise God for the one great blow 
which fells the fleshly tree of rejecting the Lord Je- 
sus Christ. This is the root of all sin — self. "There 
is no diiference." You are rejected in the sight, of 
God without the substitute. You need the substitute. 

II. YOU CAN BECOME A RECONCILED SINNER 
THROUGH THE SUBSTITUTE. 

This is the heart of the message God wants you to 
know. God knows you are a needy, helpless sinner in 
need of salvation. And he tells you the truth about 
yourself that you may see your need and receive the 
reconciliation of God. Remember, "while we were 
enemies, we were reconciled to God by the death of 
His Son." 

Yes, God has provided the remedy in His own Son 
Who died that we might live forever, he paid the 
penalty for our guilt! 

"God was in Christ reconciling the world unto 
himself, not imputing their trespasses unto 
them . . . "(2 Cor. 5:20). 
It is stupendous! God loves us. God saves us. You 
cannot explain it. Neither can I. Accept the marvel- 
ous truth and receive your precious substitute today. 
God has nothing against any sinner for He says so. 
This will make the reconciliation of Christ and the 
accompanying truth more real. Listen to the follow- 
ing story. It is true to fact. 

A well-known Bible teacher entered a saloon in the 
old days and as he approached the bar-keeper to tes- 
tify for Christ, as was his custom, he held out his 
hand and said, "My brother, God has nothing against 
you." The bar-keeper was astounded by the news and 
asked for the statement to be repeated. The great 
love of this Bible-teacher for the souls of men promp- 
ted him to repeat the wonderful fact of God's love 
with greater fervor. The saloon-keeper said earnestly, 
"If I really thought God had nothing against me I 
would take off this apron, go out that door, nail it 
shut and never return!" The Bible teacher turned to 
this very verse: "God was in Christ reconciling the 
world unto himself, not imputing their trespasses un- 
to them." The man was gloriously saved. He ac- 
cepted the Substitute for himself! Will you? 

Christ died for your sins. Christ died for you. He 
died for the sinner. It is almost too good to be true, 
but the one word so important here, for, meaning 
"instead of," or "as a price paid for," is the one word 
used in every passage wherein the great truth of the 
death of Christ is set forth as a redemption or ran- 
som paid to the holy demands of God for the sinner's 
reconciliation and pardon. You cannot pay the pen- 
alty except by your eternal death. But He died that 
you may live! Christ Himself in "His own self bare 
our sins in His own body on the tree." Sinner, behold 
your Substitute! Christ "by Himself purged our sins" 
once and for all. Sinner, you must accept the substi- 
tute! 



-10— 



FEBRUARY 2 2, 1941 



Qui tyJandesijful Saluatian 



As Revealed In I Peter 1. 

By G. W. KINZIE 







s# 


If** 


<J 




s 




faM 


' 


^'20? 





Elder Kinzie 



The really born-again person, with any conception 
whatever of the barest facts relative to his salvation, 
is charmed more and more with the story of redeem- 
ing love, and what it has done in 
his behalf. No part of it ever be- 
comes "threadbare." It is always 
fresh and fragrant and always en- 
joyable. 

In I Peter 1 we find one of the 
richest descriptions of our wonder- 
ful salvation to be found anywhere 
in Holy Writ. In a short treatise, 
such as this, we can only step in- 
side the gateway and take a very 
hasty look at the wonders that 
meet our gaze, as we hurriedly ex- 
plore the estate that is ours in 
Christ Jesus. As we do this, we 
cannot but feel that we are much 
like a ragged, dirty, homeless, hope- 
less little waif of the street, who has known only curses 
and blows, and lived out of garbage cans, with no 
place to call, or resemble home; until one day a great, 
good, kindly, fabulously wealthy man looked upon our 
wretched condition with infinite pity, and graciously 
adopted us as his very own; took us to live with him 
in his most magnificent palace, gorgeously furnished, 
immaculately clean and bright, with everything that 
heart could wish for — and he tells us that this is to 
be our home! 

First of all, may we notice that the basis upon which 
our salvation rests is here said to be the "abundant 
mercy of God." When we consider that He is the 
infinitely Holy One, and that we are vile, unworthy, 
hell-deserving sinners, what abundant mercy He has 
manifested toward us, to have made any provision 
whatsoever for our salvation! Seeing us, the cap- 
sheaf of His creation, choosing each his own sinful 
way, and knowing the miseries that this entails, botn 
in time and in eternity, His great heart yearned after 
us with infinitely tender compassion (v. 3). But 
mercy is an active element. Had He just looked upon 
us pityingly, and done nothing about it, we would still 
have been hopeless. So His mercy, being real, caused 
Him to do something about it. It called into action 
His grace (v. 10), by which, in His eternal counsels, 
He provided deliverance for us in Christ before the 
foundation of the world (v. 20). In spite of our ex- 
ceeding sinfulness and consequent unworthiness, He 
elected, or chose, us to be the recipients of this won- 
derful salvation, which His grace alone provides, 
through the shed blood of Christ (vs. 2, 18, 19: cf. John 
15:16; Eph. 1:4). 

Nor are we left to guess whether or not we may 
be saved sometime. He leaves us in no uncertainty. 
He has given us the most positive assurance of our 
present and final salvation possible. This assurance 
is guaranteed by the resurrection from the dead of 
Christ, our Redeemer (vs. 3,9). Believers are born 
again unto an ever-living hope, by His resurrection; 
and to an "imperishable, undefiled and unfading" in- 
heritance (Weymouth trans.) which is reserved in hea- 
ven for us (vs. 3,4). 

Physically, most of us are born in very humble cir- 
cumstances; and some of us are born in exceedingly 
poor circumstances, with little or no hope of ever 
having anything of consequence in this world. How 
many of us have wished that we might have been 
born to a Rockefeller, a Ford, or some other multi- 
millionaire, in order that we might participate in their 



estate, being an heir! But in the spiritual realm, 
whosoever will believe on the Lord Jesus Christ be- 
comes an heir of God, being born into His family, and 
has this "imperishable, undefiled and unfading" in- 
heritance "reserved in heaven" for him! If this is an 
ever-living hope, and if the inheritance is "incorrupt- 
ible, undefiled, and that fadeth not away," how say 
some among us that we may not rest eternally secure 
in our salvation? Can an ever-living hope die? Can 
our inheritance which is under guard of the hosts of 
heaven become corrupted, defiled, or fade away? Nay, 
but that is not all. We have the further assurance 
that this inheritance is made secure to the believer 
because he is also "kept by the power of God." (v. 5), 
and shall appear "unto praise and honor and glory at 
the appearing of Jesus Christ" (v. 7). Our hope is 
ever-living; our inheritance is incorruptible, undefiled, 
and unfading, reserved by Him Who knows the end 
from the beginning; we are assured of glory at Christ's 
second coming! No wonder we "greatly rejoice, . . . 
with joy unspeakable and full of glory"! (vs. 6,8). 

However, the obligation under which this puts the 
believer should not be regarded lightly. 

(1) We are to be sober-minded (v. 13). We must 
ever remember who we are, and what we are here 
for, "bringing every thought into captivity unto the 
obedience of Christ" (2 Cor. 10:5). 

(2) We are to persevere — "hope to the end" (v .13). 

(3) We are obliged to be obedient (v. 14). We are 
saved by grace through faith, apart from any human 
merit. Obedience does not secure salvation, but sal- 
vation surely produces obedience. Obedience is a re- 
sult, not a cause. Failure to obey God is proof of lack 
of faith, hence the absence of salvation. 

(4) We are obliged to forsake the old life which 
we lived when we were ignorant; having become en- 
lightened of the Holy Spirit, we are to "walk in the 
light" (v. 14). 

(5) We are obliged to a life of holiness "in all man- 
ner of conversation" (vs. 15, 16) — ("in all your habits 
of life" — Weymouth) . Let no one make you believe 
that those of us who believe in the eternal security of 
the believer, and salvation by grace through faith 
apart from works, teach, or believe, that it matters 
not what kind of life one lives. He who lives a dis- 
obedient life proves thereby that he is not saved. The 
legalist has no monopoly upon obedience; 

(6) We are obliged to live a life of pure, boiling- 
hot, ("fervent") love for one another (v. 22). No higher 
obligation rests upon the believer than to love his 
brethren. "By this shall all men know that ye are my 
disciples, if ye have love one to another" (John 13:35). 

We are told that this salvation by grace was so 
entrancing to the prophets who foretold its coming, 
that they "inquired and searched diligently, .... 
searching what, or what manner of time the Spirit 
.... did signify, when it testified beforehand of the 
sufferings of Christ (vs. 10, 11). Furthermore, "the 
angels desire to look into" this matter of salvation by 
grace (v. 12). Now, if the prophets were concerned 
enough to diligently inquire and search into the sal- 
vation which they knew was to be ministered unto 
us, and not unto themselves (v. 12 ) ; and if the holy 
angels were interested enough to desire to know and 
understand a salvation which could not be theirs (be- 
cause sinless ) ; how much more ought we, the heirs 
of such a salvation, concern ourselves enough to find 
out all we can about it, seeing that our eternal des- 
tiny is involved in its reception or rejection? 



—11— 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



TilUcd 3>a BtetUnen Helteve? 

By L. Llewellyn Grubb 

Sixth in series Continued from Issue of Feb. 15 

VI 
MINISTRY OF CHRIST IN SYMBOL 

The ordinances of the Christian church are simply 
those means used by God to remind His people of cer- 
tain great, spiritual, foundation truths upon which the 
house of their redemption is built. Both Christ and 
the apostles clearly enjoined the observance of the 
ordinances (John 13:17; 1 Cor. 11:23). 

However, especially in this day of legalistic tenden- 
cies, God's people must be warned against relying 
upon the observance of the ordinances for the gaining 
of salvation, standing, and favor with God. Rather 
view them as tender, loving reminders of the past, 
present, and future ministry of Christ in redeeming 
His own. 

The Brethren Church, together with other groups 
of believers, follows a distinctive. Biblical service of 
communion, setting forth the threefold ministry of our 
Lord Jesus Christ in symbol. This service consists of 
the Eucharist, or the Holy Communion of the bread 
and wine, the washing of the saint's feet, and the 
love-feast. (See diagram on next page). 

Perhaps the greatest single passage in the New Tes- 
tament on the past present and future ministry of 
Christ is Eph. 5:25-27. 

Past Ministry of Christ 

V. 25 narrates the blessed fact of the vicarious death 
of Christ because He loved lost, dying sinners. The 
greatest commentary in Scripture on this statement 
was written by the same Apostle Paul (Phil. 2:5-8). 
No instance of greater humility, love and sacrifice has 
ever been recorded. In God's own due time Christ; 
died for the ungodly (Rom. 5:6). Four times do the 
Gospel writers narrate a story of divine vividness con- 
cerning that momentous scene on Golgotha's brow 
almost 2,000 years ago. There the body of Jesus Christ 
was given, and His blood shed for all sinners (Psa. 
22: Isa. 53). 

As a direct result of this efficacious sacrifice, "who- 
soever will" may be saved by belief in the Lord Jesus 
Christ (John 3:16; Acts 16:31; 4:12). The believer is 
immediately justified, declared righteous, and stands 
"just-as-if-he'd-never-sinned" in God's sight (Rom. 
5:1). 

How beautifully, then, does the Eucharist, which 
means "a giving of thanks," symbolize what Christ did 



for His bride in the past. Paul sums up the whole 
matter in one brief statement (1 Cor. 11:26). The 
broken bread and the wine become the sacred em- 
blems of our Lord's past ministry. 

Present Ministry of Christ 

V. 26 (A.R.V.) of the Ephesian text teaches us that 
as Christ sought and saved us in the past, He also 
cares for us in the present by continually washing 
us from daily sin in the "laver" of His word. 

The Old Testament "laver," or "basin," in which the 
priest washed himself, is used by the apostle as a 
type of that which is now our Lord's instrument of 
cleansing for the saints (Exod. 30:17-21). 

The blessed result in our lives is a complete, daily 
purging from the power and defilement of sin. As we 
walk through a sinful world order, we are constantly 
contaminated by contacts with it. This contamina- 
tion does not in any way impair our "standing" in 
Christ (1 Cor. 1:4-9), but necessitates the cleansing of 
our "state" (Col. 3:1,8,9). We are progressively sanc- 
tified as we study, read, and practice the Word of 
God, and bathe in its fathomless depths (John 17:17). 

Then, we wonder in profound amazement as we 
read John 13:1-17, and see the Lord of glory, Creator 
of the universe, Possessor of heaven and earth, gird- 
ing Himself with a towel, and washing the feet of pro- 
testing Peter and other disciples. Yes, here is abject 
humility, and the perfect attitude of the ministering 
servant, but infinitely more, for here Christ teaches 
and symbolizes the great truth of the daily cleansing 
of the believer's walk. "If ye know these things, happy 
are ye if ye do them" (13:17). How utterly indispens- 
able is this present ministry of the Lord. 

Future Ministry of Christ 

V. 27 of the Ephesian text unfolds a glorious scene 
before our spiritual eyes. Jesus Christ, the Bride- 
groom, is coming in the air some day to claim His 
bride, the church (1 Thess. 4:13-18). A short time 
after this great event a marriage ceremony will be 
solemnized in heaven, after which the bride and the 
Bridegroom shall be seated about the festive board 
of that celestial place, partaking of a bounteous feast 
provided by the Father, and fellowshipping in the 
most intimate communion (Rev. 19:7-9). 

Our bodies at present afford us little more than 
pain, suffering and discomfort, but how wonderful 
to realize that when we see Jesus face to face the 
old body shall be changed and fashioned anew after 
the pattern of the Lord's own glorified body (Phil. 
3:21; Rom. 8:29,30; 1 Cor. 15:53). Glorification of the 
body is the door to future, heavenly fellowship with 
Christ. It is utterly impossible for these sinful, earthly 



MINISTRY OF CHRIST IN SYMBOL 



Time 


Past 


Present 


Future 


Nature 


Death 

Rom. 5:6, Eph. 5:25 

Heb. 9:26 

Salvation 

from Guilt of Sin 

Acts 4:12; 16:31 

John 5:24 


Washing Believers in 

Laver of Word 
Eph. 5:26; John 17:17 


Rapture of Church 

(Body of Christ) 

1 Thess. 4:13-18; Eph. 5:27 


Result 


Daily Cleansing of 

Believer's Walk 

Eph. 5:26 


Glorifying of Believer's 

Body 

Rom. 8:29,30 

Marriage Supper of Lambs 

Rev. 19:7-9 


Doctrine 


Justification 
Rom. 5:9 


Sanctification 
John 17:17 


Glorification 
Rom. 8:29,30 


Symbol 


Eucharist 
1 Cor. 11:26 


Feet-Washing 
John 13:1-17 


Love-Feast 

John 13:2; Luke 22:20 

Jude 12 (A.R.V.) 



—12— 



FEBRUARY 2 2, 1941 



bodies to enjoy and appreciate the blessings of such 
fellowship (Matt. 17:1-8). 



7&W VMSff 



From 
Our Workers 



If you have any news that could be used in this column, address 
it to Editorial Office, The Brethren Missionary Herald Co., 3326 S. 
Calhoun St., Ft. Wayne, Ind. 

"Everything: at Wooster (Ohio) seems to be fine 
just now," writes a member of the church there. "We 
are looking forward to our coming meetings with R. 
Paul Miller in March. We have started a W.M.C. and 
also a Junior and Senior C. E." 



Our gracious Lord has not left us without an ap- 
propriate symbol of this aspect of His ministry. We 
learn that before going to the cross He ate a supper 
with His disciples (John 13:2; 1 Cor. 11:25; Luke 22: 
20). This is properly called "the Lord's Supper," and 
is not the meal which was eaten at the passover. It 
was the consistent custom of early Christians to par- 
ticipate in such "love-feasts" (Jude 12 A.R.V.). The 
Apostle Paul reproved the sinful conduct of the Corin- 
thians on such occasions (1 Cor. 11:21,22). What glor- 
ious prospects are before us as we fellowship in this 
symbol of Christ's future ministry! 

The Garwin, la. church is lowering its ceiling and 

The order of service, according to the best trans- decorating its walls, covering the interior with cellotex 
lation of the Scripture involved, is: first, the wash- or new wood. It will require several weeks to com- 
ing of the saint's feet: second, the fellowship of the plete this work, during which services are being held 
love-feast; third, the Eucharist. The reason for this in the school house. The pastor, Rev. H. S. Parks, is 
order is obvious; for the walk of the saint must be still teaching the Bible one hour a week in five rural 
cleansed in the laver of the Word before full fellow- schools, and reports much interest and eagerness on 
ship can be enjoyed with either Christians or the Lord the part of the pupils. 

(1 John 1:7). Partaking of the Eucharist without this Mrs . Loree sickel miss i nary to So. America and 

cleansing, symbolized oy the washing of feet is to in- wife of the pas tor of the Second Brethren Church, of 

vite the wrath of God upon us (1 Cor. 11:29,30) Like- Lo ng Beach, Calif., underwent an operation in a Santa 

wise must untainted fellowship full participation m Ana Calif hospital, Feb. 3rd. God answered prayer, 

that Christ-centered and provided life, precede the and at this writ ing (Feb. 8th,) she is making satis- 

Jiucnanst. factory progress to full recovery. She will be at home 

(To be continued) in Long Beach, 5517 Lewis Ave., by Feb. 15th, accord- 
ing to present plans. She and her husband, Rev. 

Clarence Sickel, plan to return to the Argentine as 

soon as her health and other conditions will permit. 

m^^— ) It will be hard for the people of 60th and Orange to 

/$55^S\ give them up, as they have won their way into the 

^X */ HA W "' ■— ^*i-~* *m ■ hearts of us all but we would not have them remain. 

ZtjdtvH- jVlCLflPbCL w^^t^M |C9*?^| when the Lord is calling them to a greater field of 

f ' Jhmk WafrsfiilHA service to Him." Ralph Miler, Publicity chairman. 

READ YOUR ^f^ "jB""™fH|W The Waynesboro, Pa. Bible School reports that 59 

3?i3L3Sp^~i '■/;• -' '"3^ "' its members had a perfect attendance during the 

PS I 0™ '^gXlBSsJ^''"' j(&^ past vear - 15 °f these have nol missed a Sunday lot 

Y% \ r *l'>^|^ i c5rV**"£»'^ liV( ' y ears ,jr mure, and three have had a perfect at- 

U |» Lv ,; T^^Bfe&>^l tendance for 10 years. 

THRDIirH IN 'ii "'''aslO BB^*-- Bro - Conard Sandy will be concluding evangelistic 

inituuiiti iin 41 '^wRr services at the Harrah, Wash., church by the time this 

reaches our readers. He plans to conduct a two weeks' 

x , . , . , , .. ,, „., , j. .. . ., meeting at the Sunnyside church at the close of the 

This schedule for reading the Bible through in a year began in the Harrah campaign, 
issue ot Dec. la, 1940. For previous readings, see former copies of _.. , Z, , _ . . 

The Brethren Missionary Herald. Begin reading at Gen. 1:1, read The Blble School Cabinet of an Ohio Church recently 

until the first text is found, and record the reference. The next day vot ed to give a $1.50 award, to be applied toward the 

begin reading where you left off the day before, find the text for expenses in the district Brethren young people's camp, 

that day, and record the reference. By continuing this you shall to all Bible School pupils Of camp age Who have a 

have read the Bible through in a year. perfect attendance record from Jan. 1 until camp 

opens in June. 

Day Text Reference Bro - A - v - Kimmell has been added to the faculty 

of the Bible Institute of Pensylvania. 

The broadcast sponsored by the Ellet, O., church 

50 Spring up O well- sing ye unto it which has come over station WJW for the past 75 

weeks will be heard over station WAKR, Akron at 7:45 
A. M. eastern standard time from now on. Those who 

51 What has uod wrought > have been enjoying this program in the past will want 

to notice this change of station and time. WAKR 

52 The land shall be divided by lot broadcasts over a frequency of 1530 kilocycles. 

53 They shall be without blemish 



54 Shall your brethren go to war, and shall ye sit 
here? 

55 I shall do unto you as I thought to do unto them 

56 Ye shall not respect persons in judgment 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiii 



. THINK IT OVER. . . 



■ i ■ ■! ■ i ■ i> 




"The advancing Christian 
does all for love of Christ and 
nothing for reward." 

IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUfllllllllllllllltlllMlilllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllltllltllllllHI 



-13- 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



\ V and 




A DISPUTED COIN 

By MARY S. STOVER 
Taken from the Juvenile Pleasure 

"See this quarter I found," crowed Ted. 

"Say, that's mine! Anyhow, I lost a quarter yester- 
day and you have been right over the route I took 
down town," said Jerry. He could not tell just where 
it had been dropped or how worn the coin was. 

"I'm not giving this up unless you can claim prop- 
erty better," scoffed Ted. Yet he did not have such 
pride in his find now. He would not feel quite right 
about spending it. Jerry too could not be certain this 
was his quarter. Both boys were frowning, uncom- 
fortable, getting a little angry. Their friends took 
sides, and sharp words were being tossed about when 
Alf came by. 

"It's a fix and that's sure, but cheer up. I know a 
jolly way to fix this just all right," he announced, 
slipping one hand into his inside pocket. Out came 
the hand with a flourish. Alf bent in a deep bow to 
imitate the magician all the boys had seen a month 
ago. "Place the coin in this envelope and all your 
troubles will be over," he directed grandly. 

Most of the crowd stared at him in a skeptical way, 
but Ted and Jerry caught the idea at once. "You 
mean we are to put the quarter in next Sunday's mis- 
sionary offering?" demanded Ted. 

Alf nodded. "Without any name on it. Then Jerry 
can think he is giving it, and you can think you are. 
The money goes for a grand, good purpose and every- 
body feels fine!" 

"Guess it will go father than if I spent it," chuckled 
Ted. 

"Suits me," agreed Jerry. They insisted that Alf 
should be custodian of the money and drop it into the 
collection basket; but on Sunday the class secretary 
wanted to know whose name belonged on this en- 
velope, so the plan came out. 

"That's an idea!" cried another boy. "I've had a 
mean quarrel with a fellow over ten cents he is sure 
he paid twice. I don't think so, but I've not wanted 
to spend the money. Bob does not attend our Sun- 
day School, but I'll ask about some other place we 
can agree on for that dime." 

"You really have something big there," declared 
their teacher with enthusiasm. "Quarrels, fights, life- 
long grudges, even murders and wars, could be saved 
by following you boys' policy. Let's all remember and 
use it whenever needed. 



THE FINEST LAD 

I have a little brother; 

He's just the finest lad 
That any little sister 

Or brother ever had. 

He brings the coal for mother, 
And sweeps the kitchen floor, 

And then before you know it 
He's running to the store. 

Some boys would blush to say it, 

But not my brother dear; 
He's proud to help his mother, 

And father, too, when here. 

Now I'm a girl, and really, 

I'd often rather do 
The things that help my father — ■ 

I guess because they're few. 

— Our Jewels. 



Fill in the blanks of the following verses on "Chil- 
dren." You will find the verses in the following 
chapters: 

Isaiah 11. Deuteronomy 14. 

Galatians 6. Psalm 34 



Ye are the children of the your — 

Come, ye children, unto me; I will- 



you the fear of the- 



And a- 



Children, 
for this is— 



-child shall- 
your 



-them. 

in the Lord: 



OUR BIBLE CHARACTER ALPHABET 

Answer to S: Shimei. 

T was an enemy of the Jews who did not want them 
to rebuild the walls of Jerusalem. He and another 
man thought they could make the Jews quit working 
by making much fun of them. Find their names, and 
what they said, and whether their plan worked, in 
Neh. 4:1-6. 





A SCIENTIST'S 
ESTIMATE OF 
THE BIBLE 

"The Bible is the only book in the 
world that will tell you truthfully 
what you are and where you are going!" 
AVritten over 3,000 years ago, the words of 
Gen. 1 anticipate in a marvelous way the 
scientific discoveries of the day. It veri- 
fies itself by its exactitude. 

Prof. Dana said of the first chapter in 
the Bible: " I find it to be in perfect accord with 
known science." His famous words to a graduating 
class in Yale are worthy of remembrance: "Young 
men! As you go out into the world to face scientific 
problems, remember that I, an old man who has known 
science all my life long, say to you, that there is 
nothing truer in all the universe than the scientific 
statements contained in the Word of God." 



—14— 



FEBRUARY 2 2, 1941 



0-M 











CLEVELAND CELEBRATES 
SIXTH ANNIVERSARY 

The First Brethren Church of Cleveland Heights, en- 
joyed six of the greatest days in its history— January 
26 to Feb. 1— celebrating its 6th anniversary in special 
evangelistic services under the leadership of Rev. and 
Mrs. Leo Polman. 

The Lord wonderfully blessed the ministry of Brother 
and Sister Polman, giving us 21 definite decisions for 
the Lord, two of which were first time confessions. 

For the anniversary offering the brethren did some 
"hilarious" giving, cash and pledges totalling $1006.00, 
which just doubled the goal of $500 set for the day. 

During the Sunday afternoon service, Bro. Polman 
made a recording of brief anniversary messages from 
the pastor and Mrs. Hammers, as well as a song by the 
Girl's Chorus. The record was given to the church 
for use at future anniversary services. 

Another feature of the anniversary was the pre- 
sentation to the church of a beautiful oak pulpit by 
Mr. and Mrs. H. M. Cole, charter members of the Cleve- 
land church. The pulpit has since been dedicated 
with appropriate services. 

As we look back over the past six years, we have 
only praise for the faithfulness of our Lord. For in 
spite of the fact that ail but one of the six years have 
been spent in school buildings, nevertheless, the Lord 
has added 126 souls to this congregation, 65 of whom 
it has been the privilege of the pastor to baptize by 
triune immersion, the other 61 coming by relation or 
letter. In the six year period we lost two members 



THE 

CLEVELAND 

CHURCH 

IN WINTER 




by death, and 19 by letter, leaving a present mem- 
bership of 108, which will be reduced somewhat in 
the near future by a roll revision. 

In addition to the souls which the Lord has given, He 
has provided for us a fine property and a good build- 
ing in a very excellent location. 

Financially the Lord has enabled us to meet not 
only the local obligations of this work, but also to 
share in the national work of our denomination. 

As we consider the goodness of our God during these 
six years, we are made to think of the words of the 
Psalmist (Ps. 126:3) — "The Lord hath done great 
things for us; whereof we are glad." And again we 
want to express our deepest appreciation to The 
Brethren Home Missions Council for their support of 
this work, as well as to you individually as "brethren 



in Christ," who through the years have been so faith- 
ful in giving and praying for the Cleveland church. 
We particularly ask you to pray for Cleveland dur- 
ing the months just ahead, as we expect to bring our 
ministry here to a close in the very near future. Will 
you pray that God's choice may be called into this 
great and needy field, and that the Lord may open 
to us another field where we may serve Him until He 
comes? 

Tom Hammers, Pastor 

2706 Noble Rd., Cleveland Hts., 0. 



Berne, Ind. 

We wish to magnify the Lord for the wonderful suc- 
cess of our revival which just closed. He was truly 
with us! 

Our evangelist, Rev. L. L. Grubb, of Hagerstown, 
Md., delivered some Spirit-filled and inspirational pro- 
phetic messages. We are grateful to him. 

At our last Sunday morning Bible School and wor- 
ship service we had 181 present, and our church was 
completely filled Sunday evening for the most won- 
derful service we have had for a long time. 

Altogether in our meetings there were 12 first time 
confessions, 18 rededications, and seven who came de- 
siring to unite with us in church membership. 

Pray for the growth of our church in the truth and 
knowledge of His Word, and that all of her people may 
ever work for Him. 

Yours in the Lord's work, 

Eloise C. Christy, correspondent. 




A CHURCH OF TITHERS 



Do you know a church composed entirely of tithers? 
An account of it would be worth while if you do. Dr. 
Hugh McKean of Chienginai, Siam, tells of one in 
that country. There are 400 members, and every mem- 
ber tithes. They receive 40 strangs (less than twenty 
cents) and their rice each week. Of this, each gives 
weekly one-tenth. Because of this they have more 
for Christian work than any other church in Siam. 
They pay their own pastor, and have sent two mis- 
sionary families to spread the gospel in a community 
cut off from the outside world. They are entirely re- 
sponsible for this work and are very earnest about it. 
They are intensely interested in all forms of Christian 
work, especially work for unfortunates of every kind, 
and their gifts for this kind of work are large. They 
not only have accepted Christ but, having found Him 
good, are making Him known to others. And every 
member is a leper. 

— Church Calendar, Whittier, Calif. 



HOSPITAL REVEALS THE FACTS 

"Approximately a third of all persons involved in 
traffic accidents and taken to the hospital (Indian- 
apolis City Hospital) are definitely drunk and another 
third have been drinking." 

— Dr. Kenneth G. Kohlstaedt, Assistant Super- 
intendent, Indianapolis City Hospital, December 4, 



BULLETIN BOARD— The Deliverer has come. Are you free?— Rev. Albert L. Scherrv 



-15— 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



QiMt IZnetUe* Clutch | Ma * W * G<Mnt °" ^^ 
Wind, Suit at Thaiftan 




The First Breth- 
ren Church, 1900 W. 
Third Street, Day- 
ton, Ohio, won a de- 
cision February 17, 
when the Common 
Pleas Court of Mont- 
gomery County, O., 

rendered a decision in its favor in a suit instituted 
in October, 1939, by a group of members who had 
left the church and formed an organization of their 
own. 

The Court found, in substance: 

1. That the First Brethren Church (of Day- 
ton) being congregational in government, 
had a right to 'withdraw from the Brethren 
church conferences and its cooperating or- 
ganizations. 

2. That the First Brethren Church (of Day- 
ton) did NOT, by majority action of its 
members, depart from the organization 
and characteristic faith or doctrine of the 
(Brethren) denomination; those persons 
who left the First Brethren Church (of 
Dayton) must be considered to have aban- 
doned their right in the property. 

3. That there was no breach of the trust. 

Attorneys for the plaintiffs who instituted the 
proceedings were George R. Murray and George 
Kem, of Dayton. 

Attorneys for the defendant (First Brethren 
Church of Dayton) were Sprigg & Sprigg, of Day- 
ton. 

The decision is 22 pages in length. 



SOMETHING TO THINK ABOUT 

I am not what I ought to be; 

I am not what I want to be; 

But thank God I am not what I used to be. 

— Ft. Wayne Bulletin. 



S The other day we received the following letter from M. E 

E Horner: 

S "If each subscriber to the Herald would 

E send in one new subscription, it would help 

E a bit. So I wish to start that list." 

5 In the same mail came another letter from Miss Doris Fallis: 

E "Enclosed find $2.00. Please renew my sub- 

= scription for one year and pleass send the 

E Herald for one year to . . ." 

= And still another in the same mail from Rev. Alan S. Pearce: 

E "We are going after subscriptions in our 

E church as never before, so that you may 

= expect to receive a goodly number more 

E from time to time during the next month." 

These letters save us an idea— A DOUBLE ONE 

— Campaign. So we are out after double ones. What 

= is it? 

E 1.— Send in your subscription to THE BRETH- 

E REN MISSIONARY HERALD — $1.00 for 

= one year. 

E — and — 

E 2. — Then send an extra SI. 00 for another one 

s year subscription to The Brethren Mission- 

E ary Herald to be sent to a friend or relative. 

I YOUR DOLLAR DOUBLED 

E will send forth the Word of God through the 

E printed pages of The Brethren Missionary Herald 

= to more than double. 

~ Your dollar doubled will be sending a Christian testimony 

~ — the kind thot you yourself would want to send out — for less 

~ than you could send a tract each week into a home — 

E And The Brethren Missionary Herald, with its 16 or more 

S pages 48 times each year, certainly is better than a single 

~ tract sent out once each week. 

« Here is my _ dollars for 



MY SUBSCRIPTION 



Renewal [ 



New [ 



Name 
Address 
City . . 



State 



And with my double dollar, send 
The Brethren Missionary Herald for one year to 



E Name 
— Address 
E City . . . 



State 



Inclosed find $ For additional subscriptions 

use blank paper. 

THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD CO. 

3326 S. Calhoun St. Fort Wayne, Ind. 



IS IT TRUE? — No Christian man, woman or child ever said on his death bed, "If I had it to 
do over again, I would NOT accept Christ." — Lester Myers 



—16— 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



50 - 



SdUosdovU 





By Louis S. Boumon, Editor 

THE EASTER OFFERING 

The annual offering for foreign missions in The 
Brethren Church — Easter Sunday, Apr. 13! Notwith- 
standing a war that is rocking the earth — notwith- 
standing an unhappy division of forces in the church 
which we love — we belive that our God is going to 
answer prayer, and give us the largest annual foreign 
missionary offering in the history of our denomination. 
We believe this because we believe in the Brethren 
pastors who are squarely back of the fine group of 
ambassadors for Christ that they have sent to repre- 
sent them, their churches, and their Lord upon the 
foreign fields. 

It took no small measure of faith for the Foreign 
Board and the Society itself to thrust forth into the 
African field under existing circumstances and in a 
time like this, five new missionaries, but we did it 
knowing that Jehovah — jireh is the name of Him 
Whose we are and Whom we serve. Conditions would 
seem to call for retrenchment. Instead of that, we 
advance! May it be "upon our knees." 

Pastors, members of The Foreign Missionary Society, 
members of The Brethren Church, we dare not fail! 
Never will victory be so significant of our prayer- 
answering God, as now. Never will success be the 
evidence that we believe in our cause, more than now. 

Look into the faces that appear on other pages in 
this magazine. Not theirs is the fault of divided forces 
at home. They have done that whereunto they were 
sent. We shall not desert them. They are depending 
on us! But more — they are depending upon God! 
They shall not — they cannot be disappointed! 

Now, altogether in His name, PRAY, GIVE, and GO! 



AS TO CHURCHES DEFINITELY 
SUPPORTING MISSIONARIES 

Elsewhere in this issue we have listed our mission- 
aries and indicated what churches are furnishing them 
with support. There is a bit of confusion existing in 
the minds of the folks who are caring for things in 
the office in this matter, but ere our next issue goes 
into print, we hope to have everything straightened 
out. 

Will the churches that believe themselves to be 
definitely supporting certain missionaries check up 
with us in this matter, and if there is error anywhere 
kindly let us know? 



OFF ON THE "ZAM ZAM!" 

Prayer again has been answered! Once again the 
Lord has shown that He can open the steel gates that 
Satan would close and lock in the face of His am- 
bassadors. Even as we write, two different groups 
of missionaries are asking us how it was done! Our 
reply is: God! 

On Mar. 10. the Steamship "Zam Zara" of the Amer- 
ican South African Line, is due to sail from New York 
for Capetown, South Africa. This boat will make im- 
mediate connections with a boat going to Matadi, from 
which point missionaries en route to Oubangi-Chari, 
French Equatorial Africa, finish the long journey by 



boat. On this boat will be Mr. and Mrs. Curtis G. 
Morrill and their two children; Mr. and Mrs. Robert S. 
Williams, Miss Ruth Snyder, and Miss Grace Byron — 
all en route for "the heart of Africa." (Miss Byron 
was to have sailed on the "Zarembo" recently from 
Port Tampa, but a sudden attack of the flu prevented. > 
The Williamses and Miss Snyder are wholly new re- 
cruits. Pray for a safe journey over the troubled sea! 
God has called, and God will take care of His own! 



HOMEWARD BOUND! 

Advice by cable from Bozoum, F.E.A., informs us 
that Brother and Sister Sheldon, their son, Donald; 
and Brother and Sister Jobson and their son, Roger, 
all expect to leave their stations for well-deserved fur- 
loughs, on or about Mar. 1. The furloughs of Mr. and 
Mrs. Sheldon are a year overdue; but in spite of the 
danger to life itself, they stayed by their posts until 
helpers from the homeland would arrive to relieve 
them. Just as they are leaving, Miss Elizabeth Tyson, 
Mr. and Mrs. Harold Dunning, and Dr. Florence N. 
Gribble, are arriving again upon the field. A cable 
brought us the news of the safe arrival of Miss Tyson 
and the Dunnings, at Leopoldville, in the Belgian 
Congo, on Jan. 26. 



"DECISION FOR THE DEFENDANT. 
PSALM 103" 

Such was the content received over the wire just as 
we were about to send the copy for this issue of "The 
Herald" to the printer. 

This telegram referred, of course, to the outcome 
of the trial in Dayton, O., brought about by an attempt 
on the part of a minority group in that church to 
dispossess the majority group, on the ground that the 
majority group, refusing to support Ashland College 
and its conference and boards, was no longer 
"Brethren," and by these groups, professing to 
be The Brethren Church, had been excommunicated 
therefrom. Moreover, in order to win their case, and 
make all Brethren churches subservient to the over- 
lords who sit on "College Hill," the prosecution con- 
tended that "The Brethren Church" is no longer 
strictly congregational in its form of government. 

Naturally, we rejoice to know that the cause we 
have believed to be just, has had its first vindication 
in the courts of the land. Those who so long had 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 

The Brethren Missionary Herald is published weekly, 
four times a month, or 4S times a year, at Herald Press, 
Inc., 1300 West 9th St., Cleveland, Ohio, by the Brethren 
Missionary Herald Co., 3326 So. Calhoun St., Fort Wayne, 
Ind. 

Subscription Price: In the United States and possessions, 

$1.00 a year; Foreign countries, SI. 50 a year. 

ADMINISTRATION 

Secretary of Publications: Leo Polman 

Business Office Secretary: Miss Geneva Kuhn 

Editorial Office Secretary: Miss Grace Allshouse 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

President: Russell D. Barnard Secretary: Tom Hammers 

Vice-President: Ralph Rambo Treasurer: Homer A. Kent 

R. D. Crees Mrs. Roy Patterson R. E. Gingrich 

George Richardson L. L. Grubb Bernard Schneider 

EDITORS 
Foreign Missions: Louis S. Bauman. 
Educational: Alva J. McClain. 
Home Missions: R. Paul Miller. 
Women's Missionary Council: Mrs. A. B. Kidder. 



Entered as second class matter at the post office at 
Cleveland, Ohio, February 9, 1939, under the act of March 
3, 1879. 



-2— 



MARCH 1, 1941 



cried, "Beware!" and threatened dire results to their 
brethren with whom they disagreed, made their appeal 
unto "Caesar," and "Caesar" has given answer. They 
should now be satisfied. 

It was to enjoy the privileges of a strictly congre- 
gational form of government that our fathers gave 
birth to "The Brethren Church." "The Brethren 
Church" was born as a protest against the ecclesiast- 
ical domination of church powers. The earliest 
church memories of the writer are memories of that 
battle. Every unbiased mind, reading the history of 
"The Brethren Church" must know the foregoing facts. 
We should have been astonished if any judge, with the 
history of the church in his hands, would have decided 
otherwise. 

But now the question is, where do we go from 
here? This decision of an Ohio Court says that every 
"Brethren Church" is sovereign in its local affairs — 
a Brethren church is not determined "Brethren" ac- 
cording as it shall support this or that conference — 
this or that board. As we see it, all "Brethren 
churches" that were recognized as "Brethren churches" 
before these recent "ex-communications" by the Ash- 
land College groups, are still Brethren churches, and 
are recognized as such by the court of justice. 

A local "Brethren church" can support what Breth- 
ren conference it will, what Brethren board it will, 
and still be "Brethren." And if any Brethren cannot 
love their fellow Brethren, and wish to walk separately, 
there is no reason why they should not do so. John 
Smith and Joe bmith are brothers. If they cannot 
walk along together, then let them walk separately. 
But walking separately does not make either one of 
them not a Smith. 

The editor feels that now, since a court of justice 
has heard all the testimony, and has spent eight long 
months of time weighing that testimony, and has 
rendered the decision that every "Brethren church" 
is still a "Brethren church," the part of wisdom would 
be for us to do what should have been done long ago 
— get around a table as "Brethren," and consider our 
belongings, our mutual interest, our duty to the Lord 
Jesus Christ whose servants we profess to be — and 
determine some method whereby we may continue to 
serve our Lord acceptably instead of making ourselves 
a spectacle unto men and angels. 

It is the fervent prayer of the writer and foreign 
missionary editor, that all "Brethren" shall still be 
"Brethren" enough to meet and plan the reasonable 
future course of "The Brethren Church," so that it 
shall be what our fathers intended it to be — an evangel 
to give a whole gospel to a whole world. 



WARNING! 

We have received a notice in our office from the 
Africa Committee of the Foreign Missions Conference 
in New lork, warning us in connection with the mat- 
ter of sending money to missionaries in Africa. The 
Committee says that on Jan. 17 a letter was received 
from Rev. H. Wakelin Coxill, General Secretary of 
the Congo Protestant Council; and from this letter 
the following quotations were given us: 

"Can you warn missionary friends in America 
against sending currency notes to missionaries in 
Congo in unregistered envelopes? The censorship 
people here are finding quite a lot of 'greenbacks' 
sent in this way to our people. No currency is 
legally permitted entry into Congo by mail except 
under registered cover. This is a regular provision, 
not a war measure. 

"The Congo postal authorities have the right to 
send these unregistered letters with their contents 



back to the postal authorities in America who have 
the right, I understand, to fine the senders." 
(Note: In many parts of French, British and 
Portuguese Africa bank notes are also prohibited 
in unregistered mail. E.R.) 

"In like manner, some of our missionaries are 
trying to send money out of the Congo. Since 
May of 1940, that is not allowed. Cheques can be 
sent — but dollar bills, etc., cannot. I am remind- 
ing all missionaries in Congo of this fact in my 
next circular." 

At the present there is only one way whereby money 
can be sent to Africa with any assurance that the 
missionaries will get it. Our office in Long Beach is 
now remitting money through one of the large oil 
companies. This company takes our check, and, with- 
out further cost to us, cables to their company in Leo- 
poldville, Belgian Congo, to pay the money over to 
our missionaries in whatever coin the missionary de- 
sires. Therefore, right in these troubled war times, 
when it seemed that every avenue for the transmis- 
sion of money to Africa was closed, the Lord opened 
a way that is easier and less expensive than any 
method we have ever used in the history of our work. 
Verily, Jehovah-Jireh is His name. 



UNHAPPY FACES IN RUSSIA 

Last November a correspondent of the Magazine 
Time crossed Russia. On his return to the United 
States, we are told his impressions of Moscow. He 
informs us that people looked better fed and better 
clad than they did years ago, although he said plenty 
regarding the poverty. He affirms, however, that no 
change whatsoever has come in the expression of the 
people's faces. We quote: 

"Whether their faces were stolid or keen, arro- 
gant or subdued, not one of them looked happy. 
Those radiant, laughing faces which you see ex- 
hibited in so many Soviet propaganda pamphlets 
are sheer humbug. The people of Russia don't 
look like that. They look uniformly disgruntled 
and unhappy. It is plainly written on their faces 
that they lead joyless lives." 

It takes more than food and clothes to put joy in 
the heart and a smile upon the face. Our Lord Jesus 
Christ is the great face-changer of the ages. 

Marcus Dodds, the famous globe trotter, once said 
as nearly as we can quote from memory: 

"I have been in every land on which the sun 
shines and never have I anywhere seen a single 
happy hopeful face among women where the gos- 
pel of Jesus Christ has not been preached." 



WHAT'S THE MATTER WITH ENGLAND? 

During the past two years gun boats patrolling the 
shores of Palestine, the land which God gave to 
Abraham and his seed, have kept thousands of home- 




HOW IT WORKS 



The missionary spirit first strikes the head. After 
a while it gets as far as the mouth. Then it goes 
to the heart, conscience and will. By and by it 
reaches the pocket, and last of all the legs and feet. 
__Sel. 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



less Jews from the home that is rightfully their own. 
England has an open Bible, wherein she cannot fail 
to read a significant statement that God made to 
Israel: "He that toucheth you toucheth the apple of my 
eye." 

Moreover, Great Britain has been courting Moham- 
medan support for some time past. According to The 
Christian (London), the government has decided to 
present a site for a mosque and Mohammedan cultural 
center in London. The British Parliament has been 
invited by the government to vote the necessary funds, 
up to the limit of half-a-million dollars, for this 
Mohammedan center. While thus supporting Moham- 
medanism, the British government has not been giving 
any support to the Protestant evangelical churches. 
One thing sure, the courting of the favor of the Mo- 
hammedan, a heathen religion, is not courting the 
favor of God. If the Almighty God, Who reigns in 
the heavens and puts up whom He will and puts down 
whom He will, were given a little more recognition by 
Great Britain and her allies, perhaps the newspapers 
would be telling a different story. 



great tribulation that Israel must endure in the latter 
end, sets forth the fact that in those days "Israel shall 
be saved out of it" (see Jer. 30:7,8; Dan. 12:1; Joel 
3:9,17; Rev. 12). Whether they know it or not, the 
second coming of our Lord Jesus Christ is the only 
hope for Israel; but He is enough! 



WHAT'S THE MATTER WITH AMERICA? 

This question has been frequently asked in recent 
years: "What's the matter with America?" Well, here 
are some statistics that have been unearthed and con- 
firmed that may tell us something about what's the 
matter wih America. 

1. 13,000,000 children under 18 years of age are 
without any religious training at all! 

2. 85,000,000 attend the movies weekly, spending 
$1,000,000,000. Only 30,000,000 go to church "once a 
week." 

3. Billions upon billions are piled up for the imple- 
ments of war, but in a whole year America gives only 
$357,000,000 to the church. 

4. According to the F.B.I. , one murder is committed 
every 45 minutes, one robbery every 2 minutes, and 
one felony every 24 seconds. 

5. One marriage out of every 4 fails to last even 
5 years, and 9 out of every 10 boys in our reform 
schools come out of homes broken by divorce. 

6. 15,000 churches last year closed their doors. Rea- 
son? No funds. 

America, whither away? 



JEWISH TRIBULATION 

According to the Jewish Press, the year 1940 will 
go down in history as the year of greatest sorrow for 
Israel since the destruction of their temple in old 
Jerusalem. Millions of Jews in Europe have been cast 
forth out of their homes. Tens of thousands died in 
Poland as the result of torture and persecution. As 
we write, there are 3,000,000 Jews in Nazi-held terri- 
tory who are unable to flee from Nazi wrath, and, un- 
able to find homes elsewhere, are facing extinction. 
There are 1,500,000 Jews in Hungary, Slovakia and 
Rumania that are likewise facing extinction. It is a 
big world in which we live, but apparently it is not 
large enough to give a decent home to the race that 
gave us our Lord. Should Adolf Hitler conquer Eng- 
land and become the master of Europe, then the 
world is due to see horrors in the way of a ruthless 
persecution — the greatest horrors that Israel has ever 
endured, and that is saying much — with the one ob- 
ject of destroying the Jewish race. Hitler came into 
power on a platform; one of whose planks was tne 
sterilization of the Jews. No one can read the words 
of our Lord in Matt. 24, nor the revelation that was 
given to John in Rev. 23, and not understand the mean- 
ing of all this agony through which the Jews are 
again passing. Great tribulation is ahead for Israel. 
However, every declaration of the prophets as to the 



THE DESPERATE NEED OF 
JEWISH MISSIONS 

" One half of all the Jews in the U.S.A. live in 
Greater New York." Such is the declaration of the 
Home and Foreign Jewish Mission. As a matter of 
fact, only 60,000 of the 2,000,000 Jews who live within 
the metropolitan area of New York ever darken the 
doors of a synagogue. We are informed that many 
Jews are drifting into atheism, Christian Science, and 
every other sort of false religion, simply because the 
gospel of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ is not being 
given to them except in comparatively small measure. 
The Jew is more or less neglected in other cities 
wherein many of them dwell. $1.00 sent to The Breth- 
ren Home Missions Council for the support of our 
Jewish Mission in Eastern Los Angeles is $1.00 well 
spent. 



THE "LONGER BIBLE" 

Something like 15 years ago, a "Shorter Bible" was 
published, which eliminated the miracles and the su- 
pernatural within the Word of God. Those that gave 
us this Bible presumed that the Bible was merely a 
human book which men could change at will. How- 
ever, Satan in his modernistic garb failed to take 
away our Bible or any part of it. Discouraged in that, 
he is now trying to pawn off on the world of men 
another trick. He has given us the "Longer Bible" or, 
as it is called, "the Bible of the World." According 
to The Pentecostal Evangel, this "Bible of the World" 
is a mixture of Buddhaism, Mohammedanism, Hindu- 
ism, Confuscionism, Zoroastrianism, Taoism, Judaism 
and Christianity. When the modernism that has in- 
vaded our churches in America runs its course, that's 
exactly what we will have — a mixture of the writings 
of all the religions of the world. However, Christianity 
mixes with nothing. God's Word is pure. The curse of 
God will rest upon any man who pollutes the Word 
of God by adding to it the philosophies of men of the 
falsehoods of pagan religion. The last testimony of 
our Lord Jesus Christ unto men was a solemn warn- 
ing: "If any man shall add unto these things, God 
shall add unto him the plagues that are written in 
this book: and if any man shall take away from the 
words of the book of this prophecy, God shall take 
away his part out of the book of life" (Rev. 22:17,-181. 
We predict that the "Longer Bible" will go the way of 
the "Shorter Bible" — both belong in the trash barrel 
out in the alley. 



THERE IS A PEACE 

By Alice Honsche Mortenson 

There is a peace, though kingdoms fall and crumble, 

A peace amid this hurricane of war, 
A quiet peace that "passeth understanding," 

While chaos rages at our very door. 

There is a peace, not bought by worldly honor, 
Nor at the price of many millions slain, 

But by the blood of One, God's Son, Who suffered; 
And even now, He did not die in vain! 

There is a peace deep down within the Christian, 
A rock on which to lean in time of storm, 

A lasting peace that will outlive the ages. 
In spite of those who ridicule and scorn. 

There is a peace! Let's cling to it and hold it 
In life or death, in days of peace or war — 

That quiet peace which "passeth understanding," 
Though chaos rages at our very door. 



MARCH 1, 1941 



■:-"**$?.'? -^•■T-^yi"- 3*/^J---".p :; . 








Miss Grace Byron 



-£e^ Me Qa Hack 



Note: When the editor asked Miss Grace Byron to leave with us a 
"farewell message," she handed us this poem, as expressing the 
fulness of her heart. — L.S.B. 



By a Missionary on Furlough 

"Let me go back! I am homesick 

For the land of my love and toil, 
Though I thrill at sight of my native hills, 

The touch of my native soil. 
Thank God for the dear home country, 

Unconquered and free and grand, 
But the shores of Africa for me 

Are the shores of the promised land. 



"For there are my chosen people, 

And that is my place to fill, 
To spend the last of my life and strength 

In doing ray Master's will. 
Let me go back! 'Tis nothing 

To suffer and do and dare; 
For the Lord has faithfully kept His word, 

He is with me always there." 



Miss Ruth Snyder 

tf-GSl&UAeU 

In September, 1912, a litle girl was born in Cone- 
maugh, Pa. They tell her she arrived on Sunday 
morning while the church bells were ringing. Par- 
haps there was no stronger influence in her life than 
those very church bells, for this child was one of the 
happy few who go to church in the arms of their 
parents long before their own desires would take them 
there. 

And so this baby grew until she can remember 
being "me." Then "I" attended the public school until 
they had done their best for me there. My next step 
was college. After four years there, I spent some time 
in God's own school learning to say, "Yes, Lord." 

Having learned the best lesson of all in yielding to 
His will, it was my happy privilege to attend the 
seminary for three years. 

This summer I saw a new world for me. It was 
the world where the liberties enjoyed through the 
gospel of Jesus Christ are unknown. How that ex- 
perience made me appreciate more and more the pri- 
vilege of our liberty in Christ. 

When the word to prepare to sail arrived in Quebec 
and I began to pack for the trip home, an old French 
Canadian said to me, "You are making a lot of trou- 
ble for yourself." My landlady replied, "It is for the 
good God she goes." The old man shook his head and 
said, "I can say nothing." 

Instead of being without words as was this old man, 
we Christians are filled with joy at the prospect of 
bearing the Word of God to a people who are starv- 
ing for the news which has rejoiced us for so long. 

There is nothing for my familiar world but, "Fare- 
well." Ahead shines the glorious privilege of serving 
my Lord in His appointed place for me. I praise His 
name that even to me He has committed the word 
of reconciliation to bear to His other sheep. 

His grace will be enough for each day with its pro- 
blems. I covet the prayers of each one that I might 
always be a humble and willing instrument in His 

hands. — Ruth Snyder. 



—5- 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



"WHEN HE PUTTETH FORTH HIS OWN SHEEP, 
HE GOETH BEFORE THEM"— John 10:4 





Curtiss G. Morrill 



Mrs. Curtiss G. Morrill 





Robert S. Williams 



Mrs. Robert S. Williams 



-6— 



MARCH 1, 1941 



By Miss Mary Emmerf, Missionary on furlough, Dallas Center, Iowa 

THE HERITAGE WHICH GOD HATH GIVEN US 



God Hath Chosen Our Inheritance For Us. Ps. 47:4. 
"He shall choose our inheritance for us." 

All Brethren who have been raised in the church 
are familiar with the beginnings of the African work. 
We remember how, in 1910, the vision came to a lone 
missionary on his sick bed in East Africa. The un- 
reached tribes in French Equatorial Africa stretched 
out their hands to James S. Gribble, and beckoned 
him, as did the Macedonians to Paul of old. 

The final result of this vision was an ever increas- 
ingly clear call to the "regions beyond." The Ouban- 
gui-Chari Mission was eventually organized, and the 
Gribbles and their little band were authorized by The 
Foreign Missionary Society of the Brethren Church 
to begin work in French Equatorial Africa. 

James Gribble spent much careful study on a de- 
tailed map of the region they were about to enter. 
One day, after earnest prayer, he put his finger on 
a village marked Bozoum. "That place lies near to 
the point where we shall, in the providence of God, 
open our first mission station in Oubangui-Chari." 
This was in the year 1915. 

Even after they entered Oubangui-Chari in 1913, 
three years of testing awaited the little band before 
they were finally given government permission to be- 
gin missionary work. We know how those three years 
were spent. They continually waited on God in faith 
and believing prayer, and they persevered in their 
call to that particular territory. 

Does The Brethren Church not realize that their 
prayers, and the prayers of their missionaries in those 
days of waiting, were needed in order to have written 
in the Treaty of Versailles the clause stipulating that 
the French colonies must be opened to missionary 
work? Do not believe for a moment that such re- 
strictions are put in war treaties by chance. No, they 
come by persistent prayer. And our small church 
was not the least of those who were used of the Lord 
to open the doors of French Equatorial Africa to the 
gospel. 

Then when the French official finally asked this 
man of vision, "Where will you go now that permission 
has been granted?" you may recall that Mr. Gribble 
was afraid that to name the desired location would 
only frustrate his aim. 



So he said simply, "Where would the Governor wish 
me to go?" leaving it in God's hands. 

And the answer came, "How would vou like to locate 
near Bozoum?" And so God's seal was set on Bozoum 
and vicinity. 

It Is a Goodly Heritage. Ps. 16:6. "Yea, I have a 
goodly heritage." 

The site so chosen was a very good one. The eleva- 
tion was high and healthful — as Africa goes. What 
is more, it was virgin soil from a mission standpoint. 
The Karre tribe was practically untouched — even by 
the government; the fact that they were difficult to 
subdue was one of the reasons, doubtless, why the lo- 
cation was suggested to the unwanted band of mis- 
sionaries. 

There were no "isms" to combat; the people were 
raw heathen — which after all is an advantage. The 
response was truly marvelous. The three years' prayer 
foundation brought a rich reward. Nowhere did the 
natives really set themselves against the gospel. Since 
that time every tribe in which work has been done, 
lias been open to receive the good news in a marked 
way, with the exception of a few sections where Mo- 
hamedanism or Catholicism have entered in the mean- 
time. 

Nor has the vein run out. Just as the diamond 
mines of Kimberly, the gold mines of Johannesburg, 
and the copper of the Katanga district are still hold- 
ing out, so are the inexhaustible treasures of ebony in 
that colossal country of Africa. 

Villages are still calling for teachers. "Why do you 
send evangelists to that village beyond us, and not 
place one here? If we go to the bad place that you 
speak about, when we die, it will all be your fault. 
How are we to know the way to heaven without some 
one to teach us?" 

We see no end to the workers we could use, if we had 
them, nor to the number of stations we should estab- 
lish in order to occupy the part allotted to us, even 
reasonably well. The vast stretches of country between 
our stations are not evangelized in the real sense of 
the word, and the untouched "regions beyond" are 
always haunting us. 

"There Are Many Adversaries" — I Cor. 16:9. 

Yes, a great door and effectual is opened unto us, 




"The People 

were raw heathen- 

which, after all, 

was an 

advantage." 



-7— 






Joseph H. Foster 



Mrs. J. H. Foster 



Dr. Florence Gribble 



Joke P. Kliever 



Mrs. J. P. Klieve 




Miss Estella Myers 




Dr. Floyd W. Taber 




Mrs. F. W. Taber 



FOREIGN MISSIONARIES 

J. H. FOSTER: Born Aug 20, member of Philadelphia, Pa, 1st; 
supported by Whittier, Cal.; went to field, 1925; present loca- 
tion, Bouca, F.E.A. 

MRS. FOSTER: Born June 9, member Philadelphia 1st; supported 
by Whittier Cal; went to field, 1925; present location, Bouca. 
F.E.A. 

MRS. F. GRIBBLE, Physician: Born Dec. 3; member Dayton, O, 1st 
supported by member of Sunnyside Wash; went to Field, 1918; 
en route to field. 

J. P. KLIEVER: Born Aug 21; member Long Beach, Cal., 2nd: sup- 
ported Natl C E • went to field 1936; present location, Bekoro, 
FEA. 

MRS. KLIEVER: Born Nov. 12, member Long Beach, Cal, 2nd; sup- 
ported, Long Beach 2nd, went to field, 1936; present location, 
Bekoro, F.EA. 

MISS E. MYERS, Graduate Nurse: Born Aug 19; member, Millers- 
burg, la.; self-supported; went to field, 1918; present location, 
Bassai, F.EA. 

F. W. TABER, Physician: Born Aug 16, member Long Beoch, Cal.. 
1st; supported by a member of Long Beach 1st; went to field, 
1937; present location, Yaloke, F.EA 

MRS. TABER: Born July 8; member Allentown, Pa; supported, Allen- 
town, Pa; went to field, 1937, present location, Yaloke, FEA 

0. D. JOBSON, African Field Supt .: Born July 11; member Phila- 
delphia 1st; supported, Long Beach, Cal , 1st; went to field, 1921, 
present location, Bczoum, F.E A. 

MRS. JOBSON: Born July 21; member Philadelphia, 1st; went to 
field 1921; present location, Bozoum, F.E.A. 

MISS M. CRAWFORD: Bern Nov. 21; member, Whittier, Cal; sup- 
ported, Roanoke, Va , went to field, 1932; present location 
Bassai, F.EA. 

MISS G. BYRON: Born May 7; member Pleasant Grove, la; sup- 
ported, Long Beach, Cal, 1st; went to field, 1930; station, 
Bassai, F.E.A; sailing from N. Y. Mar. 10. 

MISS F. BICKEL: Born July 10, member Elkort. Ind; supported, Elk- 
hart, Ind.; went to field, 1923; present location, Bellevue, FEA 

MISS E. TYSON: Graduate Nurse: Born Aug. 25; member Philadel- 
phia 1st; supported, Phiia. 1st; went to field, 1925; present 
location, Yaloke, FEA. 

C. B. SHELDON: Born Nov. S, member, La Verne, Calif; went to 
field 1925; present location, Bellevue, F.EA 

MRS. SHELDON: Born Mar. 21, member, Lost Creek, Ky ; supported, 
So. Bend, Ind; went to field, 1925; present location Bellevue. 




Orville D. Jobson 




Mrs. O. D. Jobson 




Chauncey B. Sheldon 



T"> *^l 






— . 


■cam& 


f' 




Miss Mabel Crawford 



Miss Grace Byron 



Miss Florence Bickel Miss Elizabeth Tyson 



Mrs. C. B. Sheldon 



Mrs. Wi 









■Curtis G. Morrill 



Mrs. C. G. Morrill 



Clarence L. Sickel 



Mrs. C. L. Sickel 



J. Paul Dowdy 




Robert S. Williams 






mtM ''$^ 



$J ^sssg 




Mrs. R. S. Williams 




Miss Ruth Snyder 



BRETHREN CHURCH 

C. G. MORRILL: Born Apr 18, member La Verne, CaL; supported 

Sterling, 0; went to field, 1935; soiling from N. Y. Mar. 10 
MRS. MORRILL: Graduate Nurse: Born Aug. 12, member Ashlond, 

0., W. 10th St.; supported, Meyersdale, Pa; went to field, 1935; 

sailing from N. Y. Mar 10. 
C. L SICKEL, S. A. Field Supt. • Born Aug. 11; member Long Beach, 

Col., 2nd; supported, Whittier, Col ; went to field, 1928; on 

furlough, Long Beach, Cal. 
MRS. SICKEL: Born Sept. 10; member Long Beach Cal., 2nd; sup- 
ported, Long Beach, 1st; went to field, 1928; on furlough, Long 

Beach, Cal. 
R. S. WILLIAMS: Born July 15; member Harrah, Wash.; supported 

by member of Long Beach, Cal., 1st; leaving for field Mar. 10, 

1941, from N. Y. 
MRS. WILLIAMS: Graduate Nurse: Born Apr. 15, member Harrah, 

Wash.; supported, Waynesboro, Pa; leaving for field Mar. 10, 

1941, from N. Y. 

MISS R. SNYDER: Born Sept. 8; member, Conemaugh, Pa; sup- 
ported, Conemaugh, Pa; leaving for field Mar. 10, 1941, from 
N. Y. 

J. P. DOWDY,Acting Supt. S A; Born Oct. 18; member Hollins, Va ; 
supported, Long Beach 1st, went to field, 1937; present loca- 
tion, Rio Cuorto, Argentina. 

MRS. DOWDY:Born Jan. 27; member Rittman, O; supported, Long 
Beach 1st; went to field, 1937; present location Rio Cuarto, 
Argentina. 

H. MACONAGHY: Born Nov. 25; member Philadelphia 1st; went to 
field, 1938; present location, Rio Cuarto, Argentina. 

MRS. MACONAGHY: Born Mar. 21; member Philadelphia, Pa., 1st; 
went to field, 1938; present location ,Rio Cuarto, Argentina. 

MRS. W. KENNEDY: Born Jan. 28; member Philadelphia, Pa., Un- 
supported, Long Beach, Cal., 1st; went to field 1925; station, 
Bekoro, F.EA; on furlough Hatboro Pa. 

MISS M. EMMERT: Born Dec. 4; member Dallas Center, la.; sup- 
ported, Waterloo, la, 1st; went to field, 1925; station, Yaloke, 
F.EA; on furlough, Dallas Center, la. 

H. L. DUNNING: Born Dec. 27; member Sunnyside, Wash.; supported, 
Sunnyside, Wash.; went tc field, 1941; en route to field. 

MRS. DUNNING: Born Oct. 29, member Sunnyside, Wash.; supported, 
Sunnyside, Wash.; went to field, 1941; en route to field. 

R. E. WAGNER, Natl. Pastor, S. A; Born July 16; location, Alma- 
fuerte, Argentina. 

MRS. WAGNER, (nee, Laura Larson of Calif); Born June 17; mem- 
ber Manteca, Cal; went to field, 1931; present location, Alma- 
fuerte, Argentina. 




Mrs. J. P. Dowdy 




Hill Maconaghy 




Mrs. Hill Maconaghy 




ly Miss Mary L. Emmert 



Harold L. Dunning Mrs. H. L. Dunning 



Ricardo E. Wagner 



Mrs. R. E. Wagner 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 




"How are we to know the way to heaven without 
some one to teach us?" 



and there are many adversaries. Let not The Breth- 
ren Church think that a work that has been opened 
at such a cost — a cost of lives as well as of agonizing 
in prayer — can be kept open without a struggle. To 
paraphrase: "Are we so foolish? having begun in the 
Spirit, do we expect to continue in the power of the 
flesh?" 

How easily that door could go shut again in these 
trying times! Is it needful to say more? Let us be 
watchful in prayer against this very thing. A victory 
won on our knees must be maintained on our knees. 
Pray that the open door may remain open. 

There are many adversaries. The following brief 
examples may give you an idea of some of the ad- 
versaries the native Christians have to meet. 

Jude was a young man, who had finished school 
and was working as a day laborer on the station. One 
evening he seemed especially sad, so we ventured to 
ask him the cause. He said that the native guard, 
or policeman, had compelled his girl friend to carry 
a load to the Poste, and had not let her return to her 
parents. 

Our "righteous indignation" was aroused, and we ac- 
companied Jude to the Poste, and secured the release 
of the girl. The guard was furious, and said to the 
young man in the native language, "Wait until I 
catch you some day, and you will pay for this!" 

Jude answered: "Do you mean death?" and of 
course the guard said he did not. We then entered 
into the conversation, and told the guard that we had 
understood what was said, and that if anything hap- 



pened to the young man, we would hold him respon- 
sible. 

To make doubly sure that no harm would come to 
the boy, he was given personal employment, where 
we could keep close track of him. But the guard 
worked upon the girl's relatives not to allow her to 
marry Jude. In a year's time he had become dis- 
couraged, and so careless in his work that he was 
dismissed. A few months later, we returned to the 
station after a short absence to conference, and were 
told that Jude was dead. 

"How did he die?' 

"He wasn't sick. He ate some food, and died quite 
suddenly," There ware no witnesses, no proof obtain- 
able, as he had died at a village quite far from 
Yaloke. 

Another story is about one of our school girls, named 
Alice. Her school boy friend had gone off to a dis- 
tant mining camp for work, and had married another 
girl. So her brother decided to arrange a marriage 
for her with a polygamus chief. She was unwilling, 
at first; but her brother, although once a professing 
Christian, was ambitious for advancement through 
this chief, so ha finally over-persuaded his sister. 

When I saw her last, I asked her: "Are you happy, 
Alice?" 

She answered: "Sometimes I think I am, but other 
times I am not." 

Ah, the influence of those who have once tasted of 
the heavenly gift, and then have turned back into 
heathenism ! 

Levi is another example. He has not definitely re- 
turned to paganism; but, like Lot of old, he has chosen 
to live in Sodom where he can make more money. 
Having a relative who had a good position with a 
white man, our ex-vernacular teacher left the mission 
upon a slight provocation, and went to ba a tailor 
near his brother. He is making high wages in com- 
parison with what tha mission pays. But it is far 
from drawing him closer to the Lord. 

One of our evangelists confessed, without exactly 
naming Levi, that he had baen tempted to forsake 
his calling, and settle down as a carpenter at this 
same place. He asked for prayer, saying. "The Lord 
has called me to preach the gospel, and I was almost 
persuaded to listen to the tempter's voice." 

So there are enemies without and within to guard 
against in the African church work. The pride of 




"The elevation was high and healthful — as Africa 
goes." 



-10- 



MARCH 1, 1941 



life, the love of filthy lucre, and the lust of the flesh 
are the most common avenues of approach. 

But the enemy of our souls is not content to rest 
there. He has tried to bring discord among the mis- 
sionaries in order to divide the work. And need we 
mention the havoc he has wrought in the homeland? 
We shall all awaken to the fact, one day, that we are 
duped into fighting one another, instead of advancing 
unitedly against him. 

Let us not, however, be cheated out of our heritage. 
Our little church has been given a definite part of 
Oubangui-Chari to evangelize. It as a goodly heri- 
tage, divinely chosen as our lot. Let us be watchful 
to possess our possessions. 

Oh that The Brethren Church might realize that, 
just as God so confused Israel's enemies time and 
again that thev fell to fighting one another, even so 
Satan is using the same tactics today, and is causing 
the members of the same body to fight among them- 
selves instead of facing the common foe. 

Let us not be duped. The work in Oubangui-Chari 
needs our united prayers and our united efforts for 
its continuance. 









Jlaahtiuj, ^JltU Waif 

Over the ocean, across the wild wave, 
Heathens are dying, with no one to save, 
No one to rescue from grief and dismay; 
The heathen are waiting and looking this way. 

Looking this way, yes, looking this way, 
Watching and waiting for some golden ray, 
Hung'ring and dying in darkness today, 
Millions of heathens are looking this way. 



Looking for you, brother, happy in grace, 
Living each day in the light of His face; 
Looking for you, sister; how can you stay, 
When the heathen are calling and looking this way? 

Think of the grace that to you has been given: 
Knowledge of Jesus, the Saviour in heaven, 
God's Holy Bible, the light of life's way, 
Unknown to the heathen still looking this way. 

"Show us the light, which to you has been given: 
Bright Sun of Righteousness, sent down from heaven. 
Come over and help us, send messengers, pray; 
We are fainting and dying by thousands today. 

Idols of stone cannot help us, we know, 
But where is your God? oh, where shall we go?" 
Going to judgment, without one glad day, 
The heathen are waiting and looking this way. 

Jesus the Savior, bright Morning Star, 
Looking for lost ones straying afar; 
Be His glad messenger, speed on your way 
To the millions of heathen waiting today. 

— Selected. 



MibbtowaAM WanJz 

By Mrs. Domingo (Margarita) Reina, Rio Cuarto, Argentina 

The Lord has opened the way for us to carry the 
message of salvation to people in the saddest condi- 
tion. The Lazareto is a hospital for tuberculosis and 
other contagious diseases. Lepers are kept here until 
they can be sent to the colony. 

You may have seen a photo I sent Mrs. Sickel of a 
blind mother. She and her husband are blind, and 
besides this he is tubercular, and is in this hospital. 
We have made two visits there. It is open to us, for 
there are neither priests nor nuns there, and it is 
such a fearsome place that none go there to visit. 
The ones in charge appreciate our visits and let us 
read the Word and pray with the sick ones. 

We first went to visit the blind man, whose wife we 
visit in her home, and we found a young woman who 
was brought in the Sunday School, but had backslid- 
den. With what joy did she listen to us! She was to 
read the Scriptures to the blind man, but at our 
second visit she was so ill she could hardly speak, but 
made a great effort to repeat John 3:16 with us. Never 
shall I forget the face of this dying girl as she re- 
peated this text and we prayed with her. Two days 
later she was gone. 

Another man was in the room with the blind man, 
and he did not care to hear about God, blaming Him 
for his misfortune. But after my husband and Gam- 
arra had talked to him, he confessed that he was a 
drunkard, listened to the message, and at last joined 
in the prayer, repeating every word with apparent 
sincerity. I wish you would pray for the Word given 
out and for the souls in this place. 

The appearance of these people in this isolated 
place impresses one very much. While I have the 
strength and the opportunity, I shall not cease going 
there to testify for the Lord. How I have praised the 
Lord for the opportunity to go to these sick ones and 
give them comfort and hope in Christ. Mrs. W goes 
with me, and with tears begs the sick ones to give 
themselves to the Lord. I have such a sense of ob- 
ligation in this matter that I have no fear of conta- 
gion. 

.... Domingo is in Corral de Bustos now with the 
coach. There is much interest there. One elderly 
man who was converted begged to be baptized, so they 
went to the river and he was baptized. He is a Czech 
of Jewish parentage, and gives a stirring testimony. 
There are many interested families. 

.... We are praying for the speedy return of the 
Sickels. Perhaps the folks up there do not realize 
how much they are needed here. 

;■::,■:. THINK IT OVER. ......... ... 



If I refuse to give anything 
to missions, I cast my ballot in 
favor of the recall of every 
missionary. 




..... Illl I I I I . 



MllllllllllKlt'IUIUIIIIIilll 



— 11— 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



^n&ueL 



aam 



By Miss Mary L. Emmert, Dallas Center, Iowa 



Almost three months of traveling, and we are home 
again! Mrs. Kennedy, Kenneth Sheldon, and I, left 
Bangui Sept. 10 for the homeland. Mrs. Kennedy 
landed at New York Nov. 25, and Kenneth and I the 
30th. We had separated in order to facilitate Mrs. 
Kennedy s getting an early passage home, since she 
needed medical care. Kenneth and I 'finally arrived 
at Dallas Center, la., on Dec. 7. 

It certainly was a long trip, as we traveled well 
over 12,000 miles from "Valoke to Iowa. We had hoped 
to get a boat directly home from the mouth of the 
Congo to New York, as a new route had been estab- 
lished there, but whan we reached Leopoldville, where 
we should make the final arrangements for it, the boat 
had just been recalled. The government had need of 
it elsewhere. Sailing via Europe was also impossible, 
as permission to touch at Portugal was cancelled from 
our American passport before our eyes. And the Amer- 
ican cargo boat had not yet revoked its refusal to 
take passengers. No way was open except to South 
Africa, so to Cape Town we went. 

You probably would want to know if we ran into 
any dangers. Yes, I suppose we did — dangers all the 
way from the infinitesimal microbes swarming on the 
poorly washed dishes on an over-crowded river boat, 
to the possible raider or submerged mine in the South 
Atlantic Ocean and through the West Indies. Judging 
from the high-frequency of the former, and the rari- 
ty of the latter, we needed the Lord's protection from 
the disease germs more than from the mines. But 
we certainly praise Him for bringing us safely through 
all the way. 

The over-crowding on the first river boat was due 
to the fact that at last the Free France faction in 
our part of Africa had gained control of the situation, 
and was sending their political opponents out of the 
country. 140 passengers on a boat that was supposed 
to hold only 40 or 50 made it resemble a military bar- 
rack. Of course, we did not feel like complaining, 
for we realized that it made a great difference to out- 
work to have Vichy sympathizers driven out. It 
meant open ways of communication with our own 
country for one thing, and we believe that it means 
an open door tor the gospel for at least a while longer. 

In French territory they were still feeling the results 
of the internal upheaval, and of course of the terrible 
blow of the fall of Paris. In Belgian territory, there 
was no indecision or lack of unity of purpose visible. 
They were squarely on the English side, and maKing 
all plans accordingly. There was some fear of an 
attack from some unknown source — perhaps the Ital- 
ians — at that moment. They seemed to think it pro- 
bable that the war would be transferred to Africa at 
any moment. 

On the river boat, and also on the first train toward 
Cape Town, there were three German prisoners and 
a few Italians, who were being sent farther South to 
detention camps. We also met train loads of British 
soldiers and American trucks being sent probably to 
the border lines of the English colonies. 

In Cape Town the atmosphere was different. There 
was a calm, even cheerful determination to "carry 
on," as they say. Since war is their lot, they will get 
on with the business, and go through with it unto the 
end. Big business places had this notice posted: 
"Please understand that we are not interested in any 
speculations on the chances of defeat." 

What was most impressive was to have everything 
stop suddenly at noon for three minutes of silent 
prayer. I was in a huge city bank the first day, when. 



inexplicably to me, everyone -stopped talking, the type- 
writers and adding machines "iroze" still, and every- 
one stood where they were with bowed heads. Another 
day I was on the street, when I saw some mounted 
soldiers lining up with bugles ready to sound the sig- 
nal. People had already begun to stand still. At the 
first signal, all traffic stopped and there was quiet, at 
the second signal prayer oegan. It was a nation pray- 
ing — not merely a lew Christian groups — out a wnole 
government who put their trust in the Lord. May 
Uod help the English! 

We had gone to Cape Town with reluctance, for it 
was reported that all boats were booked up until May. 
But the Lord made a way for us. The Consul had 
already wired to America for emergency permission 
for the next boat to carry 50 passengers oyer capacity. 
So there was a boat leaving 10 days after our arrival in 
Cape Town with room tor ourselves and the party of 
seven missionaries with whom we were traveling. We 
were strongly advised to take it, as the next two boats 
were to be filled with refugees before they ever reached 
the Cape. Everyone said we were very fortunate in- 
deed. 

One of our greatest difficulties was to satisfy the 
new South African money regulations. We had been 
obliged to carry enough money upon entering the 
Union of S. Africa to guarantee our exit, and yet the 
same money could not be used to buy our steamship 
tickets, unless we had a certificate to prove that it 
had come directly from the U. S. Money coming in- 
directly from America would not do. But once more 
the Lord had provided for us, and we were enabled to 
get all papers in order after three days of unraveling 
the necessary red tape. 

Dr. Gribble had gained considerable knowledge of 
the "ropes" during her stay at the Cape, and was of 
great help in various ways. We were sorry that she 
was not going to America with us, but "all is well that 
ends well," and we trust that by this time she is happi- 
ly reunited with Harold and Marguerite. 

How good the American flag looked, painted con- 
spicuously on the sides and the deck of the President 
Polk, when we finally were allowed on board! No 
visitors were permitted near the docks, so we had 
been obliged to say, "Goodbye" to Dr. Gribble nearly 
a mile away. There were 17 nationalities represented 
on the passenger list, mostly people who were seeking 
refuge in America from the European storm. They 
were willing to put their trust in the American flag, 
but they spent their time in gambling, dancing and 
drinking, and were conspicuously absent at all relig- 
ious services. We were thankful that we could look 
higher than the American flag to protect us. 

Among the passengers were 32 Mormon boys re- 
turning from missionary work in South Africa. They 
were every active in doing personal work on the boat. 
We understand that every good Mormon sends his 
son on some such "mission" at his own expense. What 
zeal! It occurred to us that we who know we are 
saved by grace and not by works should nevertheless 
work as though our salvation depended upon what 
we do. Should we be less zealous because we know 
that we are already saved? 

Our 20 day trip from the Cape to New York was 
broken only by a short stop at Trinadad, off the 
northeast coast of South America. We were delighted 
a week later to see New York City once more. Then 
when we reached Philadelphia and heard the good 
news that at last the way had opened up for an out- 
going party to sail to Africa, our cup was running 



—12- 



MARCH 1, 1941 




over. We hope and pray that they reach their desti- 
nation as safely as we did. 

Kenneth is now enjoying school at the Julia Brown 
Academy at Sulphur Springs, Ark. It is under the 
auspices of the John Brown University at Siloam 
Springs, which is noted as a fundamental religious 
school. We hope that the outgoing of a missionary 
party at this time will mean the return of Kenneth's 
parents to the homeland this summer. They are al- 
ready a year overdue and are in need of a rest. They 
felt that they should not leave the work, however, 
until some one was in sight to man the station. How 
we hope that the others who are ready, may soon 
find it possible to go forth. Let us pray them out! 



BOZOUM PRAISE AND PRAYER 
NOTES 

Mrs. 0. D. Jobson, Bozoum, F. E. Africa 



Eph. 6:18,19; "Praying always with all prayer and 
supplication in the Spirit." 

Let us be faithful in interceding, and God will do 
the impossible. How we do praise the Lord for the 
peace and joy H3 daily bestows upon us as we con- 
tinue to labor for Him. 

While the world has its eyes on the war that is 
waging, and many are engulfed in it, we praise the 
Lord that the door in French Eq. Africa is still wide 
open to the gospel story, and we have the blessed priv- 
ilege of proclaiming the good news to the many who 
are still in utter darkness and sin. Opportunities for 
preaching and teaching the Word have never been 
greater, and souls are hungry to know more of Christ 
and His power to save. Pray that strength may be 
given as we continue in His service. 

Last week Mr. Jobson, Roger and I spent a few days 
at Paoua and M'Baindi where two of our largest 
chapels are located. 30 entered the waters of bap- 
tism. Several of these had been faithful in attend- 
ing the inquirers' class for nearly three years. 12 
Christian couples were married, and 35 accepted Jesus 
as their personal Savior. There were also a number 
of confessions of sin on the part of believers. Truly 
the Lord is working in the hearts of many. Let us be 
faithful in praying for these new believers. 

We know you remembered Miss Emmert, Mrs. Ken- 
nedy, and Kenneth Sheldon as they travelled home- 
ward. Also pray for Dr. Gribble who has gone to South 
Africa for six months. 

D.V., we hope to have our yearly conference next 
month, but we are only a few. Let us pray that our 
missionaries may soon be forthcoming to the field. 
He alone can open the way and thrust them forth. 
Furloughs are due, but no reinforcements. Pray that 
needed strength may be given daily. 



RECEIVING TO GIVE 



(With apologies to Helen H. Jackson) 

"I am a humble pensioner, myself, for my manna- 
bread; 

Shall I forget my brothers who seem in greater need? 

I know not how it happened that I have more than 
they, 

Unless God meant that I should give a larger part 
away. j 

The humblest black Negrito and I have wants the 
same, 

Close side by side we walked when God called out 
one name. 

So, brother, it but happened the name He called was 
mine; 

The food was given for both — here, half of it is thine." 



READ YOUR 

BIBLE ■ 




THROUGH IN '41 



This schedule for reoding the Bible through in a year began in the 
issue of Dec. 28, 1940. For previous readings, see former copies of 
The Brethren Missionary Herald. Begin reading at Gen. 1:1, read 
until the first text is found, and record the reference. The next day 
begin reading where you left off the day before, find the text for 
that day, and record the reference. By continuing this you shall 
have read the Bible through in a year. 



Day 



Text 



Reference 



57 The Lord your God he shall fight for you 

58 O that there were such an heart in them, that they 
would fear me __ 

59 It is he that giveth thee power to get wealth 



60 Behold I set before you this day a blessing and a 



curse 



61 Thou shalt not seethe a kid in his mother's milk 



62 He shall write him a copy of this law in a book 



63 The tree of the field is man's life 



—13— 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 




"MISSIONARIES' MISSIVES" 



Orville D. Jobson, under date of Oct. 12, has 

written to the secretary-treasurer, from which we 
quote in part: "Yesterday we received another small 
mail. Most of the letters were written in June; one 
or two in July. So you can see with what speed our 
mail is getting through. The letters from the States 
in this mail came via Lisbon, Portugal. In this group, 
I received just one from you. It is dated June 13. . . . 
"Being hemmed in as we are, due to slow and uncer- 
tain mail service, we have not been keeping you abreast 
of the moves in French Equatorial Africa. Knowing 
that the world at large has its eyes centered on Africa, 
we have been assured that you are following the rapid 
moves of French Equatorial Africa and French Occi- 
dental Africa with unusual interest, as these moves 
affect our evangelistic work in this country. The 
Colonel De Larminat took over the reins of the govern- 
ment here on Aug. 28, in the name of Free France in 
Africa, under the De Gaulle government. The move 
has been received favorably by all commercial enter- 
prises, and a great number of officials. Things are 
moving along normally as far as the native life is con- 
cerned, and our evangelistic work has not been hin- 
dered in the least. We have sufficient food stuffs; 
and life, as far as the missionaries are concerned, 
moves along as usual. Of course, the uncertainty of 
the times continually hangs over us, affecting all for- 
ward moves that we might otherwise make if we were 
certain of receiving new missionaries, and getting 
those on furlough back into the country." 



the Lord's supper. After we return home, we will write 
you something about the time there. 

All of us down here are anxious to hear something 
as to when the Sickels are expecting to arrive back 
here on the field. Lp until the present, we have not 
heard a word from anvone. We certainly do need 
them, as this field is large and the workers are few . . . 

We rejoice with our brethren in Airica for the re- 
cruits which are on their way to join them there in 
the work. Our prayer is that they may arrive safely. 
Also, we trust that as the board is occupied in send- 
ing new workers to Africa, they will not forget the 
responsibility of The Brethren Church to the equally 
lost souls of South America, and will send us recruits. 
Besides the recruits, which we need and need des- 
perately now, are cars in which to get to the places 
where the people are living. It fills us with great sad- 
ness to know that every day — in fact every hour — we 
fail to reach some of these other towns which have 
absolutely no testimony of the gospel, souls are going 
out into eternity lost — souls for whom we were sent 
here to fill up the gap and whom we should warn of 
their danger. But what good is a watchman, whose 
duty is to warn the people of their danger, if he is 
not where the people are? This is our problem here. 

May the Lord richly bless you and the work of our 
beloved church in the homeland to the salvation of 
many souls." 



Under date of Jan. '50, Hill Maconaghy writes from 
Rio Cuarto, Argentina: 

"We returned this past Tuesday after having been 
away for about two weeks. During those weeks we 
were in Los Cisnes conducting a Daily Vacation Bible 
School and holding meetings in the evenings. Truly 
the Lord blessed in a remarkable way. We have been 
going over there every 15 days for about six months. 
From the beginning the response has been good 

The average attendance in the Bible School was 26. 
Of course, we reached many more children than that, 
but some days not all of them could attend because 
of work. Also we had the opposition of some of the 
families that are Catholic. The last day I gave the 
invitation to accept the Lord Jesus, about four or five 
raised their hands signifying their decision. We wish 
that you could have heard them sing the choruses. 
They seemed as if they would burst the veins in their 
necks as they sang so heartily. The last day many 
of them were hoarse from singing 

In the evening meetings we had a good attendance 
after the first few nights. The Catholics are getting 
in a great hurry, since we have entered with the gospel, 
to build a church, and thus try and force us out. Tnus 
the first part of our time there, they were having 
dances, gambling of all kinds, and moving pictures, 
in order to raise funds for the erection of the church. 
It appears to us as if Rev. 3:9 might fit the Catholic 
Church in this particular instance. Certainly, they 
cannot build any church of our blessed Lord with 
such means, and we who have to deal with them con- 
tinually know that their fruits prove that they do not 
belong to the true body of Christ 

Now, we are getting ready to go to Alejandro for 
about 12 days. We will hold a Daily Vacation Bible 
School there, and have meetings in the evenings. 
While we are there, we expect to have baptism and 



From Mrs. Ricardo Wagner, of Almafuerte, Argen- 
tina, comes a letter in which she says: "The possi- 
bility of a work in Corralito has presented itself. Of 
course, we can't tell just how the town will respond 
until we have really tried to have meetings there, 
but the results of Ricardo's last visit there were en- 
couraging. Now, should a work be opened there, that 
would put Almafuerte more in the center of things. 
Am inclosing a map that will show you the location 
of these towns. But it is impossible for us even to 
think of opening another work with what we already 
have on our hands. For some time, we have felt that 
our work is very inefficient, simply because we have 
too much to do. I am sometimes sick at heart when 
I see how very little time Ricardo has for study. You 
know better than I do what a pastor's study time 
means to his work, and I would like to ask you to 
put this matter on your prayer list: that somehow, 
by the leading of the Holy Spirit, we may be able to 
rearrange our program so that there will be time for 
study. If Elena could be taken care of in some other 
way, that would leave us free to give more attention 
to the towns to the north." 

Our Foreign Board has no more faithful mission- 
aries, devoted to the tasks that God has given them, 
than our Brother and Sister Wagner. Note their re- 
quest for a place on our prayer list. Pray that God 
may give them wisdom in the arrangement of their 
work in a field where they have entirely too much for 
a couple with three children to care for. 



FOREIGN MISSIONARY REPORT OF THE 
BRETHREN CHURCH 

Financial Statement for the Month of January, 1941 
AFRICAN GENERAL FUND 

Estate of Charles E. Wilson, per 

David Mentzer $ $167.44 

AFRICAN BABY HOSPITAL 

Senior S.M.M., Philadelphia, Penna 19.47 

AFRICAN BIBLE TRANSLATION 

A Friend, Turlock, Calif 50.00 

Harry Skiles, Casper, Calif. 

(Long Beach, Calif., 1st Church) 7.00 57.00 

AFRICAN HOSPITAL FUND 

Miss Grace Allhouse, Fort Wayne, Ind. 



—14— 



MARCH 1, 1941 



per C. N. Agler for Taber 

Travelling Expense 50.00 

Estate of Charles E. Wilson, per 

David Mentzer 167.45 217.45 

AFRICAN LEPER FUND 

Compton, Calif., 1st Church per 

H. L. Skinner 2.11 

American Mission to Lepers, 

quarterly appropriation 25.00 27.11 

BICKEL FUND 
Miss Nell Zetty, Phoenix, Ariz. 

McGaheysville, Mt. Olive, Va.) 25.00 

BYRON FUND 

Miss Nell Zetty, Phoenix, Ariz. 

(McGaheysville, Mt. Olive, Va.) 25.00 

DUNNING FUND 

Grace Theological Seminary Student 

Body, per Earl D. Umbaugh 13.00 

The Brantigam Family, Paterson, N. J. 

(Penna. District) per C. W. Bailey .... 2.00 
Madison Avenue Baptist Church, 

Patterson, N. J., per C. W. Bailey 3.00 18.00 

FOSTER FUND 

Latsha, Mr. and Mrs. Ruben, Rebuck, 

Penna. (Philadelphia 1st) 10.00 

GRIBBLE FUND 

Miss Nell Zetty, Phoenix, Ariz. 

(McGahaysville, Mt. Olive, Va.) 25.00 

A Friend, Sunnyside, Wash 20.00 45.00 

KENNEDY FUND 

Zilpha Summers Sutton, Canton, Ohio 5.00 

W.M.C., Long Beach, 1st, Calif 5.00 10.00 

KLIEVER FUND 

Long Beach, Colif. 1st Church, 
Junior C. E 1.50 

MORRILL FUND 

Jean Miller, Cleveland, Ohio, per C. G. 

Morrill (Outfit) 5.00 

1st Brethren Church, Cleveland, Ohio 

per C. G. Morrill (Outfit) 2.78 

M. A. Morrill, La Verne, Calif., 

per C. G. Morrill (Outfit) 20.00 

Ashland, Ohio (W. 10th Street Church) 

(outfit) per C. G. Morrill 1.00 

Garber, Mrs. Louise, Ashland, Ohio, 

(W. 10th Street Church) (Outfit) 

per C. G. Morrill 10.00 

Prichard, Mrs. H. J., Falls City, Nebr. 

per C. G. Morrill, 5.00 

Dunning, Rev. and Mrs. 

per C. G. Morrill 10.00 53.78 

MYERS FUND 

Miss Nell Zetty, Phoenix, Ariz. 

(McGaheysville, Mt. Olive, Va.) 50.00 

MISCELLANEOUS GIFTS TO FUNDS 
OUTSIDE THE DENOMINATION 

1st Brethren Church, Fort Wayne, Ind., 

to Oriental Missionary Society 34.55 

Total receipts for the month of January, 1941 $761.30 

LOUIS S. BAUMAN, Secy.-Treas. 
FEARLE W. PEARCE, Bookkeeper. 



^TLoffy. "ji j s finished" Provision 

SERMON STARTERS Enough. 



MONTHLY PRAYER CALENDAR 

On their respective birthdays, the names, 
favorite Scripture verses, and prayer re- 
quests of pastors, missionaries, and 
others in the brotherhood engaged in 
Christian work, will appear under this 
head. Please see that each member in 
your society is assiqned one of the fol- 
lowing names for daily player. Assign a 
different name to each member weekly. 
If you know of others whose names should 
have appeared this month, please notify 
The Editorial Office Sec'y of The Breth- 
ren Missionary Herald Co. at once 

MAR. 1— MRS. GEO. E. CONE, wife of pastor at Portis, 
II Tim. 2:15. No requests received. 




Kans. 




"It is written 
Enough. 



_ Proof 
"It is I" Presence Enough. 



MAR. 4— REV. J. E. PATTERSON, pastor of Mountain View 
church, Hollins, Va. Rom. 8:28. "Pray that I may always follow 
the leading of the blessed Holy Spirit in all things; also that our 
Easter offering for missions may be increased." 

MAR. 5— REV. WM. CLOUGH, pastor at Uniontown, Pa. Rom. 
8:28. "Pray that I might be able to win more souls to the Lord 
Jesus Christ; also for our Bible Fellowship Radio Ministry every 
day in Uniontown." 

MAR. 11— MRS. HERMAN A. HOYT, wife of Grace Seminary 
professor. Phil. 4:19. "My last year's request was answered. My 
invalid father was gloriously saved toward the close of 1940. I 
want to thank all who prayed for his salvation. This year my re- 
quest is for greater consecration that I may rear up my two small 
sons to love, honor and serve the Lord Jesus." 

MAR. 12— REV. HERMAN A. HOYT. Grace Seminary professor. 
Gal. 2:20. "Pray that God may lay his hand upon the warlords 
of the world, to the extent that the gospel of His grace may go 
forward at home and abroad, and may save many before their lives 
are snuffed out and the day of salvation is past." 

MAR. 17.— REV. HENRY REMPEL, pastor of Grace church, Flora. 
Col. 3:17. "Pray for the unsaved in this community; for a deeper 
spirituality in the lives of our members; and for grace to give 
forth a clean-cut testimony without compromise and without fear." 

MAR. 18— MRS. KENNETH ASHMAN, wife of pastor at Pike 
church, Mundy's Corner, Pa. Ps. 19:14. No requests received. 

MAR. 19— REV. VERN STUBER, pastor at Sharpsville, Ind. No 
requests received. 

MAR. 21— MRS. C. B. SHELDON, missionary to Africa. (Re- 
quests supplied by a missionary on furlough.) Pray for the native 
workers; for Mrs. Sheldon's health; for the Sheldons' furlough; for 
Kenneth Sheldon, who, separated from his parents for the first time, 
came home to enter the John Brown school; and for the transpor- 
tation of the missionaries to and from the field. 

MAR. 21— MRS. HILL MACONAGHY, missionary in South 
America. Prov. 18:10. Pray for the seed sown in the recent 
young people's camp and in the recent Daily Vacation Bible Schools, 
as well as in the regular children's classes and other missionary 
endeavors. 

MAR. 24— REV. ARNOLD KRIEGBAUM, supply pastor at Fillmore, 
Calif. Rom. 8:28. Pray for Jewish work, for Dr. Beal's Bible con- 
ference work on the west coast, for the planning of summer youth 
camps, for three unsaved men, and for willingness on the part cf 
Christians to submit to the Lord. 

MAR. 24— MRS. GRANT McDONALD, wife of pastor at Comp- 
ton, Calif. II Cor. 4:15,17. Pray for continued strength and health 
to serve Him, for transportation to and from Sunday School for 
children in the rapidly growing unchurched communities in and 
near Compton, and for the S.M.M. in S. Calif. 

MAR. 31— MRS. GARNER KOYT, missionary candidate to Africa 
and wife of student pastor of new work in Milford, Ind. Josh. 
1:9. Pray for this new work, and for the salvation of souls through 
their ministry. 



-15— 



THE- BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 




A LITTLE CHILD SHALL LEAD THEM 

A True Story From Kentucky — By Mrs. Keith Altig 

One Sunday morning at the breakfast table, little 
Joan, who is about five years old, said, "Mother, I want 
to go to Suuday School this morning. Can't Bud take 
me?" 

"Aw, I don't wanta, ". Bud quickly replied, for he did 
not care to go since he was a little older than Joan 
and was afraid of ridicule from his friends. 

"Daddy will you take me?" Joan asked. 

"No. I don't have time, but Bud can. Bud you get 
ready and take your sister to Sunday School," said 
the father. 

With much grumbling and evident distate, Bud 
finally agreed. 

For many weeks Bud and Joan went down the path 
to the little Sunday School. Finally Bud accepted the 
Lord Jesus Christ as his Savior. That made Joan very 
happy, but she still yearned for her mother and father 
to go with her. 

One Sunday morning Joan asked her mother once 
more to go. 

"Mother, please come with us to Sunday School. 
Lots of other children's parents come." 

Mother, being able to find no excuse this time, said. 
"Oh all right this once, but I can't go every Sunday." 

Of course after her mother started once, the music 
was so good and the classes so interesting, that she 
just couldn't stay home. She, too, soon became a 
Christian. 

If you would like to visit Joan you must walk about 
a mile up the creek. Let us in imagination do so. 
We'll start from the new parsonage at Clayhole, and 
cross the highway. In order to walk up the path, we 
must pass along a ledge where there is room for just 
one foot at a time. Since there is a bridge crossing 
the creek right there, we can hold on one side of it 
while climbing around the ledge two or three feet. 

Now we are safe. There is a narrow path, sometimes 
near Troublesome and sometimes far, far, above. That 
is a very good name for this stream, for not long ago 
it rose so high it washed away many bridges and 
houses. Many homes are built along the creek and in 
order to get to Joan's home we must cross a small 
creek where it empties into Troublesome, and walk 
up this small creek, and sometimes right in it, to get 
to her home. 

Can you see the difficulty which Joan had to meet 
to be able to come to Sunday School? Indeed she is 
a true little missionary, for she is trying to get hei 
daddy to go to Sunday School too. Shall we all pray 
for Joan's father to become a Christian? 



A Challenge 
To Us! 



TWO DOGS . . . TWO HUNDRED AND 
FIFTY STICKS OF NATIVE MONEY . . . 
SIX CHICKENS . . . ONE GOAT WITH A 
KID ... A QUANTITY OF PEANUTS AND 
SOME FARM PRODUCE . . . This is a 
record of African gifts. 

Yes, Africans know how to give! They 
have grown mightily in this precious grace in 
the last few years. 

The above gifts require more effort and sac- 
rifice than for some people in the homeland to 
give $500 or $1,000. Our interest in calling 
souls from condemnation to life will be mea- 
sured at this Easter time by our gifts to for- 
eign missions. 

Lester W. Kennedy laid down his life for 
the salvation of precious souls in Africa. His 
body lies buried on African soil. He said: 

"Had I a thousand lives to live, I 
would give them all to Africa." 

You are not now being asked to give your 
life for Africa. 

But you are asked to give your money. 

Why not raise that $5.00 gift to $10.00, or 
that $10.00 gift to $25.03? Why not? Your 
money is needed NOW for Foreign Missions. 

With world conditions as they are, we do 
not know how long the door will be open. It 
is still open! 

Give foreign missions a large place in your 
prayers and in your gifts now! 

Make ready for the largest foreign mission- 
ary offering ever given ! 



—16— 




1DUCATIONAL 
NUMBER 



MARCH 8, 1941 
3 — No. 10 



IN THIS ISSUE 



LYSIS OF DAYTON 
DECISION — Pages 2, 9 

GE CECIL'S DECISION 

* DAYTON CASE— Pages 3-9 

LE SCHOOL DEPT.— Page 11 

IS FROM 

JR CHURCHES— Pages 12-14 



/S BRIEFS 



Page 14 



LY MANNA — Page 14 



S & GIRLS — Page 15 



P EMERSION — Page 16 




"HEAVEN AND EARTH SHALL PASS AWAY, BUT MY 

WORDS SHALL NOT PASS AWAY." 

Matthew 24:35 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



Am, AttaLf&a ajj tk& ^bcufton jbeoMcM 



By ALVA J. McCLAIN 



Judge Cecil of the Dayton Court of Common Pleas, 
who heard the evidence in this case and wrote the 
decision which is published in this issue of the Herald, 
very deeply impressed those of us who attended the 
trial for his courtesy and fairness in handling this 
important case. Attorneys for both sides were entirely 
satisfied in advance to have the case tried in his court. 
And no one acquainted with the lime and careful at- 
tention which he gave to the evidence could fail to 
appreciate his effort to render true justice. His open- 
ing paragraph is evidence of his concern and impar- 
tial sympathies for both parties to the controversy. 
The attorneys on both sides were admittedly able men. 
And it is not detracting in the least from the fine work 
of the presiding judge to add that the attorneys for 
the defendants, Judge Carroll Sprigg and his son, laid 
the evidential foundation for a favorable decision by 
their painstaking research and brilliant argument. In 
this Bro. Roy A. Patterson also made no small contri- 
bution. 

Doubtless it should be said here that this is the first 
and only law-suit between the two groups in The 
Brethren Church which has been carried to an official 
decision in a trial court. The earlier Ashland case was 
between the publishing company and two of its em- 
ployees, and was settled by compromise. Other suits 
have been filed, always by the Ashland College faction, 
but none of these have been pressed to a decision. The 
outcome of this first suit, therefore, is doubly signifi- 
cant, and undoubtedly indicates the fate of any other 
suits which may be filed by this faction against the 
Brethren. 

The evidence and the court's decision reveal many 
interesting things. Among these is the fact that the 
teaching at Ashland College was under serious sus- 
picion as far back as 1919, as pointed out by Judge 
Cecil. But the purpose of this analysis is to point out 
certain disputed matters upon which the court ren- 
dered a definite opinion. 

I. The Dayton Court decided that the government 
of The Brethren Church is CONGREGATIONAL in 
form. After citing the three general classes of church 
bodies, as regards property rights, Judge Cecil found 
that The Brethren Church belonged to the second class 
under which the local church, "so far as church gov- 
ernment is concerned, owes no fealty or obligation to 
any higher authority." And after examining the hist- 
orical records of the denomination, he concludes that 
the Brethren fathers who met in the original Dayton 
Convention "did not provide for any superior eccles- 
iastical tribunals .... and that they distinctly con- 
templated and provided for congregational control of 
local churches." 

II. The Dayton Court decided that The Brethren 
Church did not abandon the principle of congrega- 
tional government in the year 1915. Many of the pre- 
sent sincere supporters of Ashland College will be quite 
amazed, I am sine, to learn thai this was one of the 
main arguments advanced by the Ashland group in 
the Dayton trial. Through their attorneys they argued 
that the original Brethren position of congregational 
government was voted away when the delegates to the 
1915 General Conference adopted the Manual of Pro- 
cedure which has governed that conference since 1915! 
Lest my readers should think such an argument un- 
believable, here are the exact words of the court, "It 
is the contention of counsel for the plaintiffs that if 
the Brethren Churches ever had congregational con- 
trol, they lost it in 1915." If this argument had been 



sustained by the court, it would have been a shocking 
situation to find that a denomination had voted into 
oblivion one of its fundamental doctrines without 
knowing that it was doing so! But here again, after 
an examination of this manual and that of the Ohio 
Conference, the judge found that "the local churches 
did not, thereby, surrender their congregational type 
of government." The judge adds that this might be 
done if the churches elected delegates and sent them 
to a conference for this express purpose, or if the con- 
ference took such an action and referred it to all the 
churches for ratification. But he finds from the testi- 
mony that even the plaintiffs never claimed "that any 
such power was ever given to either the General or 
District Conference by the local churches." And I 
would like to add just here that it is surely a clear 
indication of the recklessness of the Ashland group to 
find its leaders willing to scuttle a fundamental doc- 
trine of historic Brethrenism in order, if possible, to 
gam the power of life and death over our local 
churches. Furthermore, the churches of the Ashland 
group should watch their step, lest by following such 
leadership they might find that they have voted away 
their congregational rights in such a way as suggested 
by the court as a possibility. 

III. The Dayton Court decided that local Brethren 
Churches have a right to withdraw support from 
church conferences and co-operating organizations. 

"In the light of conclusions already reached." Judge 
Cecil writes, 'The First Brethren Church of Dayton, 
Ohio, being congregational in government, had a right 
to withdraw its support from the church conference, 
and its co-operating organizations." The logic of this 
opinion is without flaw. Any lesser view would invali- 
date and destroy the whole principle of true congre- 
gational government. 

IV. The Dayton Court decided that a local Brethren 
church has a right to withdraw support from a school 
or board and give support to other schools or boards. 

This was the point in dispute and on the basis oi 
which the so-called "Ashland General Conference" 
assumed to pronounce the ban of excommunication 
upon all who refused to support Ashland College or 
who supported Grace Seminary. "There is no absolute 

(Continued on Page 9) 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 

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Entered as second class matter at the post office at 
Cleveland, Ohio, February 9, 1939, under the act of March 
3. 1879. 



-2— 



MARCH 8, 1941 



Oudae QeoiJX ^becMost Ut tlte ^bcuft&*t Qaie 



(EDITORIAL NOTE: Since the Dayton case is of such wide in- 
terest, both to Brethren churches and other orthodox congregations 
throughout this country, the editors are publishing in full the written 
decision of the court. For the benefit of readers not acquainted with 
the case, the following information is given. 

The background of this legal case extends at least 25 years into 
the past, and centers at Ashland College, Ashland, Ohio, where, as 
Judge Cecil points out, "A question as to the faith and doctrine 
taught at Ashland College hod been raised as far back as 1919." 
Throughout the intervening years there was a struggle in the church 
over this situation, one group insisting that the college teaching 
must conform to the Word of God, the opposing group defending the 
teachers under suspicion. The crisis of the struggle was reached in 
June, 1937, when a coalition of liberal trustees and teachers ac- 
complished the discharge of Dean McClain and Prof. Hoyt of the 
seminary, who had been leading the battle for orthodoxy within the 
institution. Both were dismissed without notice or specific charges, 
in direct violation of the academic rules of the school. The college 
board then proceeded to change its constitution so as to place the 
power of election in its own hands, thus enabling it to exclude from 
membership those trustees who had been leaders of the orthodox 
group in the denomination. At the same time, openly defying the 
request of the General Conference, the college board increased the 
number of liberal and non-brethren trustees. Facing frankly the 
loss of the school to the liberal party, and being opposed on historic 
Brethren grounds to the carrying of the controversy into the courts, 
about half the denomination's churches and pastors joined in the 
founding of a new school, Grace Theological Seminary of Winona 
Lake, Ind., to perpetuate the spiritual and Biblical ideals which they 
had hoped to see realized at Ashland College and Seminary. Thus 
the two groups of churches within the denomination came to be 
called "the ASHLAND Churches" and "The GRACE Churches." 

In the meantime, the Ashland churches and leaders by a tre- 
mendous drive managed to capture control of the 1938 General Con- 
ference officiary by the slender margin of an average of less than 
12 votes out of 643 delegates. A year later (1939), with the Gen- 
eral Conference officiary completely in their control, the Ashland 
group proceeded, in open violation of conference rules and estab- 
lished usage, to exclude nearly 100 delegates sent from recognized 
Brethren churches. By this scheme the Ashland leaders consolidated 
their control of General Conference beyond any possibility of loss. 
Immediately this controlled conference officially endorsed Ashland 
College as an institution of The Brethren Church, and later passed 
a decree of excommunication against all "churches, ministers and 
laymen" which supported Grace Theological Seminary and any boards 
or organizations sympathetic with Grace Theological Seminary (1940 
Minutes, page 13). Again the leaders of the Grace churches, be- 
cause of their adherence to the historic Brethren doctrine of non- 
litigation, decided to accept the loss of their conference rights rather 
than carry the matter into the courts, and met for fellowship in a 
separate group called the National Brethren Bible Conference. Now 
among the excluded delegates were the pastor and leaders of the 
First Brethren Church of Dayton, Ohio, one of the three largest 
Brethren congregations in the United States and owner of valuable 
buildings and property. In this church there was a minority group, 
led by the vicepresident of 'he Ashland College Board of trustees, 
which still supported that institution. This minority group withdrew 
from the First Brethren Church, formed a new church corporation 
called "The Brethren Church of Dayton," and, aided by Ashland 
College leaders, entered suit against the trustees and pastor of the 
original church for control of its property. Their contention was 
that since the pastor and majority of that church were no longer 
members of the General Conference, and because they refused any 
longer to support Ashland College or other projects under the domin- 
ation of that school, and because the church had voted to support 
Grace Seminary, therefore the First Brethren Church of Dayton had 
departed from the Brethren faith and should no longer have possess- 
ion of property accumulated for the purpose of extending this faith. 
This suit entered by the Ashland group, if won by them, would prob- 
ably hove been followed by other suits throughout the United States 
for the property of other congregations. 



The careful and scholarly decision of the Dayton Court which ap- 
pears below, written by Judge Cecil, one of the ablest jurists of that 
region, will bring no small comfort to all orthodox churches which 
hold to the Biblical policy of congregational government, regardless 
of denomination. It should be on the list of required reading for all 
who are interested in The Brethren faith, the validity of congrega- 
tional polity, and the cause of Christian freedom.) 



IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS, 
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, OHIO 
RUSSELL KEMP, et al, : 

as Trustee of The Brethren 
Church of Dayton, Ohio : 



Plaintiffs. 
— vs — 

OSCAR LENTZ, et al, 
as Trustees of The First 
Brethren Church of Dayton, 
Ohio, 

Defendants. 



CASE NO. 90072 
DECISION 



February 17, 1941 



CECIL, J. 

We come to the writing of this opinion with the 
realization that "religious opposition is the most in- 
tolerant of all prejudice:;," as stated by Mr. Holsinger 
in his "History of the Tunkers and the Brethren 
Church." It is not a pleasant duty to determine by 
the hard principles of law conflicts arising out of deep 
feelings of the heart. Courts of law only adjudicate 
ecclesiastical matters when civil and property rights 
are involved. While we can determine the property 
rights according to the law, as we are given to see it, 
we are conscious that any conclusion of ours will be 
little consolation to those having a deep sense of loy- 
alty to conflicting institutions which have been built 
up by their prayers and their sacrifices over the years. 
As we write these lines on the anniversary of Lincoln's 
leaving Springfield to take up the duties of President, 
we recall his farewell address in which he said: 

"Trusting in Him who can go with me and remain with 
you, and be everywhere for good, let us confidently hope 
that all will yet be well." 

The plaintiffs in this case are Trustees of The 
Brethren Church of Dayton, Ohio, organized as a cor- 
poration not for profit. The defendants are Trustees 
of The First Brethren Church of Dayton, Ohio, also 
organized as a corporation not for profit. 

The plaintiffs seek to recover from the defendants 
the possession of the temporalities of The First Breth- 
ren Church of Dayton, Ohio, now occupied by the de- 



CONFERENCE DATE CHANGED 

The time of the Na- 
tional Brethren Bible 
Conference has been set 
ahead a week, making 
the dates Aug. 25-31 
instead of the first 
week in September, as 
formerly announced. 




THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



fendants and being used by them for the purpose of 
holding religious services and conducting the business 
and affairs of The First Brethren Church of Dayton, 
Ohio. 

The case was tried to the court as a chancery case 
upon the pleadings and the evidence. The pleadings 
are long and for the sake of clarity and brevity we 
will not refer to the claims made by the respective 
parties in them, except to say that they support the 
testimony offered at the trial. The case was finally 
submitted to the court upon November 16, 1940, by 
full and complete briefs and letters of counsel. Sev- 
eral legal propositions are involved and we will state 
the facts as we find them from the evidence along 
with the discussion of each of these propositions. 

One of the principle questions involved and one 
which we deem important to settle first, is — What is 
the type or nature of government by which the First 
Brethren Church of Dayton. Ohio, is regulated? 

In the case of Watson vs. Jones, 80 U. S., 679, 13 
Wallace, 679, at page 722, Mr. Justice Miller delivering 
the opinion of the court classified ecclesiastical bodies, 
so far as property rights were concerned, under three 
general heads. They arc- as follows: 

"1. The first of these is when the property which is the 
subject of controversy has been, by the deed or will of the 
donor, or other instrument by which the property is held, by 
the express terms of the instrument devoted to the teaching, 
support, or spread of some specific form of religious doc- 
trine or belief. 

2. The second is when the property is held by a religious 
congregation which, by the nature of its organization, is 
strictly independent of other ecclesiastical associations, and 
so far as church government is concerned, owes no fealty 
or obligation to any higher authority. 

3. The third is where the religious congregation or ecclesi- 
astical body holding the property is but a subordinate mem- 
ber of some general church organization in which there are 
superior ecclesiastical tribunals with a general and ultimate 
power of control more or less complete, in some supreme 
judicatory ove,- the whole membership of that general or- 
ganization." 

The First Brethren Church of Dayton. Ohio, is a 
successor to a church organized as a Brethren Church, 
as that denomination was established at a convention 
held m Dayton, Ohio, on June 6th and 7th, 1883. That 
convention was made up of delegates and members of 
local churches throughout the greater part of the 
United States. Persons who were in attendance were 
members, or former members of The German Baptist 
Church, and were out of harmony with some of the 
practices of that denomination. 

Since the denomination was organized at the Day- 
ton Convention in 1883. if there were any superior 
ecclesiastical tribunals with general and ultimate 
power of control, they would have been created bv 
that convention. We have carefully read and exam- 
ined the proceedings of that convention (Plaintiffs' 
Exhibit R) with this idea in mind. As a matter of 
fact, the one thing that seemed to be uppermost in 
the minds of the delegates, and in the minds of those 
who wrote letters to the convention because of in- 
ability to attend, was that the churches should be con- 
gregational in government. They were very jealous 
of any ecclesiastical conference that should have the 
power of government or regulation over the individual 
churches. 

On page 47 of the Proceedings of the Dayton Con- 
vention, we find a letter from Elder Isaac Price of 
Schuykill. Pennsylvania. Mr. Price was an aged man 
of about eighty, r.nd a prominent person in the church. 
He said, in part — 

"Conventions may be held for constitution and for unity of 
action, but for making ecclesiastical laws, never. No head 
but Christ, no law but (he blessed gospel of Jesus. If it 



be considered proper to adjourn sine die at the call of any 
churches, well; or if a day be named, let it be three to 
five years. And be sure to advise that the same names be 
not repeated in official stations at conventions. But above 
all, avoid forming another heirarchy." 

In a resolution sent to the convention from Farm- 
ersville, Ohio, the fourth sub-division reads as follows: 

"That we denounce all ecclesiastical councils for the purpose 
of riveting opinions upon members of the church and making 
laws or mandates, obedience to which is made essential to 
church relationship." 

The first report of the committee on church govern- 
ment was rejected. This report attempted to inter- 
pret or elaborate upon the New Testament and set 
forth some of the ordinances and beliefs for which the 
denomination stood. The fifth subdivision of this re- 
port which was the only part that specifically referred 
to church government was as follows: — 

"Our form of church government shall not be based upon 
creeds, confessions and mandates of uninspired men, but 
upon the inspired record of pure truth." 

It must have been a dramatic, as well as historic 
occasion for The Brethren Church when P. J. Brown, 
making the second report for the committee on 
Church Government saiH — • 

"I have the honor to report our views in full. They are here 
set forth." I hands the Chcirman a copy of the New Testa- 
ment!. 

The Chairman read as follows: 

"The title of this report is the New Testament of our 
Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ, translated, etc." 

On motion made, this report was adopted by the 
Convention rising and singing "Praise God from Whom 
All Blessings Flow." 

"The Brethren Church" was incorporated in Ohio 
on August 25, 1883. This was in conformity to a reso- 
lution passed at the Dayton Convention authorizing 
the appointment of a committee for the purpose of 
obtaining a charter for the newly organized denomin- 
ation. The charter of 'his church, a copy of which 
was offered in evidence as plaintiffs' Exhibit A, pro- 
vides — 

"The purpose for which this corporation is formed is to 
perpetuate and extend the Christian religion and the in- 
fluence of the gsopel and to that end to promote the har- 
mony, efficiency and progress of all local Brethren Churches 
in the United States without interfering with congrega- 
tional control and government seeking to set up or establish 
any creed but the New Testament. To further that purpose 
all members of Brethren Churches in the United States may 
become members of this corporation." 

We are of the opinion that the Dayton Convention 
which organized the church did not provide for any 
superior ecclesiastical tribunals, and we are further 
of the opinion that they distincly contemplated and 
provided for congregational control of local churches. 

We have examined all of the documentary evidence 
before us and the testimony of the witnesses to de- 
termine when and how, if ever, congregational con- 
trol was surrendered by the local churches to either 



skk/ 




The Lord God is a sun and shield: the 
Lord will give grace and glory: no good 
thing will he withhold from them that 
walk uprightly (Ps. 84:11). 



/'/TpoV 



MARCH 8, 1941 



the General or District Conferences of The Brethren 
Church. 

It is the contention of counsel for the plaintiffs that 
if the Brethren Churches ever had congregational 
control, they lost it in 1915. The General Conference 
of 1915 adopted a Manual of Procedure, a copy of 
which has been offered in evidence and marked 
Plaintiffs' Exhibit F. The minutes of the convention 
containing the enacting legislation of this Manual was 
not offered in evidence. The Preamble reads as fol- 
lows: 

"The General Conference of Brethren churches to secure 
a uniform method of procedure in the organization of new 
churches, and the administration of the churches already 
established, adopts the following manual of procedure. What 
is herein contained, except Section II of Chapter Two, re- 
ferring to General Conference, is advisory, and not man- 
datory." 

Obviously the only thing in this Manual of Proced- 
ure which is mandatory is Section II of Chapter Two. 
All else is advisory. We turn to Section II of Chapter 
Two and find the heading, "General Conference." Ar- 
ticle I sets forth the purpose which we quote as fol- 
lows: 

"The purposes of the General Conference shall be: the 
promotion of a sense of comradeship among the members 
of the church throughout the whole Brotherhood; to bring 
about increased efficiency and a profounder spirituality 
and a missionary and evangelistic spirit in all the churches; 
to consider and provide for missionary, educational and liter- 
ary activities of the denomination as a whole, and to ac- 
quaint the church with the moral and spiritual welfare of 
society and to encourage activity looking toward the moral 
and social uplift of mankind through the application of the 
gospel of Jesus Christ." 

Article 2 sets forth the powers granted, which we 
also Quote: 

"The General Conference shall have the power: — to provide 
for its own perpetual succession; to provide for the holding 
of property by purchase or gift and to sell, convey, or dis- 
pose of the same, whether real or personal; to provide for 
and promote in every way denominational unity and effi- 
ciency in all efforts looking toward the realization of the 
supreme task of the church namely: the evangelization 
of the world; to direct end control all cooperating organi- 
zations of its own creation, as defined in Article 6, B, of 
this section; and to effect its own organization, determine 
the time and place of its meeting and to adopt a consti- 
tution and by-laws for its own government. It shall have 
no power to interfere with the work of any local church 
nor with the work of the several District Conferences.' 

It should be noted that the last sentence of this 
Article clearly sets forth that the General Confer- 
ence — 

"shall have no power to interfere with the work of any 
local church . . ." 

Article 3 provides for Membership. This article sets 
forth who may be delegates to the General Conference. 
Such persons and representatives as are provided for 
may participate in the General Conference, but there 
is no attempt to impose an obligation upon a church 
to send delegates to the conference. Article 4 provides 
for the organization and officers of the General Con- 
ference. Article 5 provides for standing and special 
committees and their duties. Article 6 is entitled 
"Special Provisions" and provides for time of meet- 
ing, co-operating organizations and order of business. 
Article 7 provides for Amendment. 

While this is referred to as a Manual of Procedure, 
it is in the nature of a constitution, — a constitution 
for the government and organization of the General 




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Conference. It is mandatory, but only upon the Gen- 
eral Conference. It does not purport to impose any 
duties or obligations upon the local church of a gov- 
ernmental nature or otherwise. By the passage of 
this Manual of Procedure by the General Conference, 
it performed the right which it clearly had and which 
is inherent in any organization, to adopt a procedure 
for its own government and organization. It does not 
set itself up as a superior ecclesiastical tribunal. 

Its schedule of adoption is interesting. All parts of 
Chapter I which is headed "The Organization of the 
Church" is ordered to be referred to the local churches 
for adoption. All parts of Section I of Chapter 2, which 
is headed "The District Annual Conference" is re- 
ferred to the several district conferences for adoption 
and all parts of Chapter II, Section 2 which we have 
heretofore discussed, were ordered to be effective at 
the adjournment of the General Conference of the 
Brethren Church, in 1915. 

Let us now turn to the "Handbook for Ohio Confer- 
ences of Brethren Churches" or "Manual of Procedure" 
offered in evidence as plaintiffs' Exhibit G. We find 
this Manual of Procedure headed by a Preamble in 
the exact language as the Preamble heading the Man- 
ual of Procedure adopted by the General Conference. 
This is unquestionably an error and conceded to be 
such by the witnesses who testified in the case. It 
was undoubtedly intended that the last sentence of 
it should have been adjusted to suit the occasion — 
that is, to have been made applicable to a constitu- 
tion or Manual of Procedure for the District Confer- 
ence. 

What then is its significance? Can it be cast out 
as more surplusage? This cannot be done without 
casting out the entire Manual of Procedure, because 
who can say that the Manual of Procedure would 
have been adopted if it had been considered to have 
been mandatory in its entirety. Can we make the 
change which was obviously intended? Were we to 
do this, we believe the last sentence would read as 
follows : 

"What is herein contained, except Section I of Chapter 2 
referring to the District Annual Conference including by- 
laws, Ohio Conference of Brethren Churches is advisory, 
and not mandatory." 

This, then, would create exactly the same situation 
as we have in the General Conference. The Annual 
District Conference provided for a Manual of Pro- 
cedure or constitution for its own organization and 
government. It does not purport to, nor could it im- 
pose, duties and obligations upon the local churches 
which would be binding upon them without their con- 
sent. 

Chapter I of the document now under consideration 
provides for the organization of the church and is 
an exact duplicate of Chapter I of the Manual of 
Procedure adopted by the General Conference. This, 
the General Conference referred to the local Churches 
for adoption. How then could the District Annual 



—5- 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



Conference adopt the provisions of this chapter and 
make them mandatory upon the local churches? 

We believe that we have no right to avail ourselves 
of any legerdemain by which we can either strike out 
the Preamble or reconstruct it. If we leave it as it 
is, it is clearly ambiguous and there is nothing to 
which we can apply the mandatory feature. 

Since our view is that neither of these Manuals of 
Procedure impose any mandatory duties or obliga- 
tions of a governmental nature upon the local 
churches, we come to the conclusion that the local 
churches did not, thereby, surrender their congrega- 
tional type of government and control. 

This should close the discussion upon this subject, 
but we consider that we should refer to a contention 
made by counsel for the plaintiffs. That is, that the 
local churches, including The First Brethren Church 
of Dayton, Ohio, having submitted to the government 
of the constitutions above set forth, cannot now deny 
their effect. The gist of this argument is that the 
local churches having submitted themselves to the 
government of a constitution which was not adopted 
in such a manner as to become legally effective 
against them, have not only submitted themselves to 
the government of that constitution but have recog- 
nized the conferences which adopted it as superior 
ecclesiastical tribunals. It seems that the fallacy of 
this argument is clear. Were we to assume that the 
local churches had submitted to the government of 
a constitution illegally adopted, it might be said that 
they were bound by the provisions of that constitu- 
tion. That is, were questions to arise as to their du- 
ties or obligations under the constitution, they might 
be in a position where they could not set up the il- 
legality of the constitution or its method of adoption. 
Such was the nature 01 the question in the case of 
Bear vs. Heasley, 98 Michigan. 279. The question there 
raised involved the instrument itself and the assump- 
tion in that case was that the Church was of the 
third classification heretofore set forth in the case of 
Watson vs. Jones, supra. The case of David L. Rike, 
et al, Trustees vs. Halleck Floyd, et al, 6 O. C. C, 80, 
and Philomath College vs. Wyatt. 27 Oregon, 390. arose 
out of the same denominational dispute that was in- 
volved in the case of Bear vs. Heasley, supra, and the 
questions presented are substantially the same. The 
reasoning adopted here is not only that the local 
church would be bound by the provisions of the in- 
strument in question, but because it had permitted 
itself to be bound by said instrument it recognized 
the Annual and General Conferences as constituting 
a church heirarchy or superior governmental tribunals. 

It seems to us that under such a democracy as has 
existed in The Brethren Church, there is no way for 
the General or District Conferences to obtain legis- 
lative authority by which they can bind the local 
churches unless that authority is given to said Con- 
ferences by the churches themselves. This might be 
done in two ways — 

1. By the churches electing delegates and sending them 
to the conferences for that express purpose, or 

2. By the conferences adopting such procedure and send- 
ing it back to the churches for ratification. 

The testimony in this case does not show, nor in- 
deed is it claimed by counsel for the plaintiffs that 



WHOM DO YOU GO TO CHURCH TO MEET? 

One day the telephone in the office of the Rector of 
President Roosevelt's Washington church rang, and an 
eager voice said: "Tell me, do you expect the President 
in church this Sunday?" "That," the Rector explained 
patiently, "I cannot promise. But, we expect God to 
be there, and we fancy that will be incentive enough 
for a reasonably large attendance." — Sel. 



any such power was ever given to either the General 
or District Conference by the local churches. We must 
conclude upon this point that the local churches of 
the Brethren denomination are of the second class 
set forth in the case of Watson vs. Jones, supra. That 
is, that they are independent of other ecclesiastical 
associations, and so far as church government is con- 
cerned, hold no fealty or obligation to any higher au- 
thority. We may say here that this conclusion does 
not extend so far as to permit the majority of a local 
church to change its denomination or its basic or 
characteristic belief or doctrine. This subject will be 
discussed further under another question involved in 
the case. 

Did the First Brethren Church of Dayton, Ohio, have 
the right to withdraw its support from Ashland Col- 
lege and Seminary and from the Mission Board of the 
Brethren Church? 

We find from the facts that on November 29, 1938, 
by a majority vote of a special called meeting of the 
congregation, The First Brethren Church of Dayton, 
Ohio, passed a resolution whereby Ashland College and 
Seminary and the Mission Board of The Brethren 
Church were renounced and the support of the churcn 
withdrawn from them. 

By Article 6 of Section 2 of Chapter Two of the 
Manual of Procedure adopted by General Conference 
in 1915, the Missionary Board of the Brethren Church 
and the Board of Education were made co-operating 
organizations of the General Conference. This is in 
that part of the Manual of Procedure which we have 
held to be mandatory upon General Conference. Since 
this section imposes no duties or obligations of a 
mandatory nature upon the local churches and since 
the local churches have congregational control, there 
is no absolute requirement that the churches must 
recognize and support the co-operating organizations 
of General Conference. The First Brethren Church of 
Dayton, Ohio, therefore was within its right in with- 
drawing its support from Ashland College and Sem- 
inary and the Mission Board of the Brethren Church. 
Under the power of amendment contained in Article 
7 of Section 2 of Chapter Two, the General Conference 
itself could withdraw its support from any one or 
more of its cooperating organizations by a two-thirds 
vote. 

Counsel for plaintiffs argue that there is a trust 
impressed upon the land upon which the church 
building of The First Brethren Church of Dayton, 
Ohio, is built. If there is such a trust, has the use of 
the land in question been diverted from the purposes 
of the trust? 

It is claimed that the real estate in question is im- 
pressed with a trust by virtue of the language used in 
the deed (marked Plaintiffs' Exhibit Ci to plaintiffs' 
predecessors from the Ohio Mission Board of the 
Brethren Church of Ohio. — "for the benefit and use 
of said The Dayton Brethren Church of Dayton, Ohio, 
a branch of The Brethren Church, Incorporated under 
the laws of the State of Ohio as aforesaid, their suc- 
cessors, heirs and assigns, in trust as aforesaid." 

We do not consider this question of great moment 
for the reason that it merges into another question of 
greater importance. Were we to find that the land 
in question is impressed with a trust or should we as- 
sume for the purposes of argument that there is such 
a trust as is contended for by plaintiffs' counsel, our 
next inquiry would be whether or not the majority 
of The First Brethren Church of Dayton. Ohio, had 
diverted the use of the property from the purposes of 
the trust. This inquiry would lead us to the question 
concerning the doctrine of The Brethren Church. 

In the case of Watson vs. Jones, supra, we quoted 
the three clasifications of ecclesiastical organizations. 
We have heretofore determined that The First Breth- 
ren Church comes in the second classification. Mr. 



—6— 



MARCH 8, 1941 



Justice Miller, in delivering the opinion of the court 
indicated that the majority in a church of this classi- 
fication had almost unlimited latitude in determining 
affairs of the church. We are of the opinion that the 
majority in such a church has some limitation and 
that the rule is more nearly expressed in the case of 
Mitchell, et al vs. Church of Christ at Mt. Olive, 221 
Alabama, 315. The second syllabus reads as follows: 

"Majority of independent religious society may not divert 
property to another denomination or to support of doctrines 
fundamentally opposed to society's doctrines." 

See also Smith, et al vs. Pedigo, et al, 145 Indiana, 
361. Mt. Zion Baptist Church, et al vs. Whitmore, et 
al, 83 Iowa, 138. 

Did The First Brethren Church of Dayton, Ohio, 
change its doctrine when a majority of the members 
voted to support Grace Theological Seminary? 

A question as to the faith and doctrine taught at 
Ashland College had been raised as far back as 1919. 
On August 17th of that year, we find from the Minutes 
of The First Brethren Church of Dayton, Ohio, that a 
resolution was adopted pertaining to the faith and 
doctrine taught at Ashland College. This resolution 
was not offered in evidence as a whole but was re- 
ferred to in the cross examination of Roy H. Kinsey. 
This resolution contained the statement — 

"That in order to preserve the Brethren purity of faith, we 
adopt or rather re-affirm the old established doctrine and 
practices of The Brethren Church, viz:" 

Here followed then an enumeration of matters of 
doctrine subscribed to by The Brethren Church. 

In the spring of 1937, Professor Alva McClain was 
dismissed from his position at Ashland College. On 
June 2nd, of the same year, Professor McClain and 
others held a meeting at the home of Doctor Beal of 
Ashland, Ohio, and took steps to organize Grace The- 
ological Seminary. 

At the annual business meeting of The First Breth- 
ren Church, Dayton, Ohio, held January 5, 1938, ref- 
erence was made in a resolution to the denominational 
problem with respect to Ashland College and Sem- 
inary and Grace Theological Seminary. It was re- 
solved that members of the church keep an open mind 
upon the subject and that the Advisory Board be in- 
structed to use members of the church without re- 
spect to their position on the College and Seminary 
question, and further, that in matters of special of- 
ferings and appeals, if the issue were involved, the 
individual members be given the privilege to direct 
to what work or institution their offerings were to 
be used, and that the support of these institutions 
should not be a test or hindrance to the good stand- 
ing of a member in the congregation. 

On April 12, 1938, Grace Theological Seminary was 
incorporated in Ohio. The corporation was formed 
for the purpose of providing Biblical and theological 
education for students who "desire to enter the Chris- 
tian Ministry, Foreign Missionary work or other types 
of Christian service," and other stated purposes nec- 
essary for the carrying on of such an educational in- 
stitution. The Articles of Incorporation contain a 
covenant of faith which purports to be a statement 
of doctrine and faith which characterizes the Breth- 
ren Denomination. 

At a special business meeting held by the Dayton 
Brethren Church on November 20, 1938, a motion was 
adopted for a special called meeting to be held on 
November 29, 1938, for the purpose of giving the facts 
relative to the local and denominational controversies. 
The meeting was held on November 29, 1938, and after 
much discussion certain resolutions were adopted and 
the meeting adjourned at 12:40 A.M. A resolution was 
adopted whereby support was withdrawn from Ash- 



THE TWO WAYS 

Man's Way: — "Survival of the fittest." 
God's Way: — "Revival of the unfittest." 

— Bulletin, 2d Church, Long Beach. 



land College and Grace Theological Seminary offi- 
cially recognized. This resolution recited that the 
Ashland College controversy was one of many years 
standing and enumerated grievances as follows: 

The Board of Trustees of Ashland College increased 
its membership from thirty-six to forty-two members, 
with the increase being from non-Brethren sources 
and in opposition to the express will of the 1936 Na- 
tional Conference; 

Adopted a New or Revised Constitution for the Col- 
lege without any ratification of any Brethren District 
Conference; 

Removed Church and Conference control one step 
farther by permitting the trustees to elect their own 
members from two nominees made by the respective 
District Conferences; 

'Eliminated' "unceremoniously" Alva J. McClain and 
Herman A. Hoyt, two professors of Ashland Theologi- 
cal Seminary from the faculty of said Seminary with- 
out a hearing; and because it was indicated that the 
Board of Trustees of Ashland College could change 
its constitution or its Board membership basis, or its 
Faculty without any means of protest from the Church 
which it claimed to serve. 

It was resolved, — 

"that we, the members of The First Brethren Church, Day- 
ton, Ohio, feel it our duty to the Lord Jesus Christ to 
hereby renounce any and all official relationship with the 
Ashland College and Seminary, 

And that we shall henceforth give it only such considera- 
tion as might be extended to any other secular educational 
institution, 

And that we also favor a complete divorcement of Ashland 
College and Seminary from all affairs of the Brethren De- 
nomination, 

And that since, Grace Theological Seminary has been or- 
ganized and incorporated upon a basis, which, we believe, 
more completely expresses and guarantees the ideals, teach- 
ings and practices primary to the Brethren Faith, 
THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that we give official recog- 
nition to Grace Theological Seminary." 

Another resolution was adopted by which the 
Church renounced all official relationship with the 
Missionary Board of The Brethren Church and gave 
official recognition to the Brethren Home Missions 
Council as the Home Missions Agency of the Church. 
By this resolution, members were given full liberty to 
support any agency of the denomination which they 
desired, but no official presentation could be made 
to the congregation or any agency not endorsed in 
the resolution unless permission were given by the 
Advisory Board of the Church. 

The pledge card for the Easter Gift to Foreign Mis- 
sions contained the provision that it was to be received 
with the understanding — 

"it is to be used only in the support of those missionaries 
and mission stations that are in complete harmony with the 
Grace Seminary viewpoint in the present denominational 
situation." 

The card contained the further provision that if 
the monies were not so used, the giver could demand 
the return of his proportionate share of the amount 
unused. 

The Brethren Home Missions Council was incor- 
porated in Indiana on the first day of September, 1939. 



-7— 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



The 51st General Conference of The Brethren 
Church was held at Winona Lake, Indiana, August 
28th to September 3, 1939. The Dayton delegates were 
not seated. This conference adopted a resolution 
(Plaintiffs' Exhibit M) in which the action of the 
credentials committee refusing to seat a number of 
delegates was sustained. At this time the unseated 
delegates of the conference and many others in sym- 
pathy with them held another meeting which they 
called National Brethren Bible Conference. The un- 
seated delegates from Dayton made a report to the 
First Brethren Church of Dayton in which they set 
forth the action of the National Brethren Conference, 
and that of the National Brethren Bible Conference. 
The conclusion of this report is as follows: 

"We conclude by saying that after listening to reports 
and observing the spirit which prevailed we feel perfectly 
justified in recommending your cooperation with this Na- 
tional Brethren Bible Conference and that our church con- 
tinue to support our Foreign Missionary Society, Brethren 
Home Missions Council and Grace Seminary." 

At a special business meeting of The First Brethren 
Church of Dayton, held on September 13, 1939, the 
report of the Dayton Delegates was accepted. Other 
action was taken as evidenced by the Minutes as fol- 
lows: 

"(2) The recommendation "that our church give full co- 
operation in the National Brethren Bible Conference 
to be held at Winona Lake, Indiana, August 26 to 
September 1, 1940" was adopted by properly supported 
motion. 

(31 The recommendation "that any member of this church 
who shall directly or indirectly become party to any 
legal action against this congregation or against 
any other Brethren Congregation, shall immediately 
and automatically be suspended from membership in 
this Church" was adopted by properly supported mo- 
tion. 

i4> It was moved and seconded that we adopt the recom- 
mendation of the Advisory Board "that every officer 
and teacher of the Church and her auxiliaries will be 
asked to sign a pledge of conscientious loyalty and 
support to the church, her services, purposes and poli- 
cies by October 1, 1939 or resign from the office held: 
or that on October 1, 1939 the office be declared 
vacant and successors who will pledge such loyalty 
be elected or appointed and that the carrying out of 
the provisions of this action be entrusted to the 
Official Board of the Church. A standing vote was 
called for which resulted in 247 "for" and 75 
"against" the adoption." 

"That in view of the fact that a number of our 
women, delegates tc the W. M. S. were refused a 
seat in the National Conference because of their 
Grace Seminary viewpoint, and since those in control 
of the National W. M. S. are of the Ashlond College 
viewpoint and that part of the money goes to support 
Ashland College and the Home Missions Board, grant- 
ing us no privilege as to designating where our money 
is to go; that in view of the fact that we are refused 
the proper standing in the National Conference, and 
as the W. M. S. will meet in conjunction with that 
conference, we feel that it will be both inconsistent 
and inconvenient for us to continue longer as a part 
of this organization. 

Therefore we recommend that the local W. M. S. dis- 
band and that a local womens' Missionary Council be 
organized as a part of the National W. M. C. which 
is a fellowship of Brethren Women who are in harmony 
with the Home Missions Council and Grace Seminary." 

In accordance with the above resolution, the follow- 
ing Loyalty Pledge Card marked Plaintiffs' Exhibit J 
was sent out: 



"Church Loyalty Pledge Card" 

"In my official Position, I 

hereby pledge my conscientious loyalty and support to the 
services, purposes and policies of The First Brethren Church, 
1900 W. Third St., Dayton, Ohio. 
Date Name." 

On September 27, 1939, Articles of Incorporation for 
The Brethren Church of Dayton, Ohio, were issued 
in which the plaintiffs herein were named as Trustees 
of said Church. 

On October 3, 1939, the Petition in this case was 
filed and announcement made of it in the local daily 
papers of that date. A special business meeting of 
the congregation of The First Brethren Church of 
Dayton, Ohio, was held on October 9, 1939 and the 
following action taken: 

1. The action of the Official Board automatically sus- 
pending certain members was approved. The members 
suspended were M. J. Beeghly, Everett Keplinger, Herlie 
Lehman, W. E. Moist, Perry Bowman, Herchel Klepinger, 
Myron S. Kem, Russell Fox and Russell Kemp. These 
men were the plaintiffs in the within action. 

2. Resolution was adopted to employ legal counsel for de- 
fense of the action filed in court and for the protection 
of the church property. 

We have enumerated above in chronological order 
the successive steps as a result of which the plaintiffs 
and the members of The Brethren Church of Dayton, 
Ohio, split off from the parent church, The First 
Brethren Church of Dayton, Ohio, and became a sep- 
arate organization. 

We have examined all of the above papers, records 
and minutes to determine whether or not the members 
of The First Brethren Church of Dayton, Ohio, by ma- 
jority action, have deviated from the doctrine which 
has characterized and identified The Brethren Church 
as a denomination. We are unable to find throughout 
all of these records and documents any place where 
the question of doctrine has even been discussed, 
much less voted on or adopted. The only official ac- 
tion that could approach any matter of doctrine is 
the action of the Board taken at its meeting on No- 
vember 29, 1938, in which it was resolved — 

"that we give official recognition to Grace Theological 
Seminary." 

This certainly could not be said to amount to sub- 
scribing to the doctrine of faith set forth in the Ar- 
ticles of Incorporation of Grace Theological Semin- 
ary mentioned above. The local churches of the de- 
nomination including the First Brethren Church of 
Dayton, Ohio, being congregational in government 
and control would have the right by a majority vote 
to recognize and give financial assistance to any edu- 
cational institution which it might choose. 

We will not discuss the doctrine or covenant of 
faith set forth in the Articles of Incorporation of 
Grace Theological Seminary for the reason that since 
The First Brethren Church of Dayton, Ohio, did not 
adopt this covenant of faith, no question can arise 
that the church deviated from its doctrine. Had the 
First Brethren Church of Dayton, Ohio, pledged its 
members to that covenant of faith, it would have be- 
come necessary for the court to analyze it for the 



A GOD- SATISFIED FACE 

A young girl casually met Frances Ridley Havergal 
at a railway station. But the passing sight of that 
glowing countenance made an indelible impression, 
and years afterwards she said: "I am so glad that I 
saw, just once, that God-satisfied face." 

— Alan Pearce's Scrap Book. 



MARCH 8, 1941 



purpose of determining whether or not The First 
Brethren Church had deviated from or changed the 
doctrine which characterizes and distinguishes the 
Brethren Denomination from other denominations. 

Having arrived at the conclusion that The First 
Brethren Church of Dayton, Ohio, did not change its 
denomination, creed or doctrine, and that it is still a 
Brethren Church, there can be no question of trust 
property having been diverted from its use. Therefore, 
General Code Sections 10015, 10016 and 10020 are not 
applicable. 

Counsel for plaintiffs in their briefs have argued 
"That the majority faction had no power to dismiss 
the minority." According to the evidence, the only 
persons who were suspended from The First Brethren 
Church of Dayton, Ohio, are the plaintiffs in this 
case who filed the Petition as Trustees of The Breth- 
ren Church of Dayton, Ohio. This Church was in- 
corporated on September 27, 1939, the Petition was 
filed on October 3, 1939 and the suspensions were made 
on October 9, 1939. Whether or not these plaintiffs 
were legally suspended or dismissed does not seem to 
us to be an issue in the case. Therefore the cases cited 
on this principle are not applicable. It would hardly 
seem reasonable to suppose that the plaintiffs having 
organized a new Church before their suspension, ex- 
pected to remain in the original church which they 
claimed had seceded from the denomination and from 
which they were trying to recover property. 

Counsel for plaintiffs have cited the case of Harri- 
son, et al vs. Hoyle, et al, 24 O. S., 254, as being one of 
the cases controlling the case at bar. This involved 
the Ohio Yearly meeting of the Society of Friends. 
The Society of Friends was organized in 1682 and 
consisted of four grades of Church judicatories of 
which The Yearly Meeting was the highest in author- 
ity. The local churches were known as "Monthly 
Meetings." At a meeting of the Ohio Yearly Meeting, 
two different persons claimed to have been electd 
Secretary and both claimed to represent the Ohio 
Yearly Meeting. Each person had a group of followers. 
It thus became necessary for the Court to determine 
which was the regularly constituted Yearly Meeting. 
The question involved here was the regularity of the 
election and was determined on the basis of the rules 
and government of the Society. Our basic question is 
whether or not The First Brethren Church deviated 
from Brethren doctrine. 

The law governing seceding factions is stated in 
the case of The Christian Church of Sand Creek, et 
al vs. Church of Christ of Sand Creek, et al, 219 111., 
503. Syllabus 5 reads as follows: 

"Members of a seceding faction of a congregation, who 
form a new organization and teach and practice innova- 
tions not recognized or taught by the original congregation, 
abandon their interest in the property belonging to the 
original congregation at the time of the division." 

The terms "seceders" and "secessionists" were used 
throughout the trial of the case at bar and in briefs 
of counsel. They are also used in a great many of 
the cases which have been cited to us. The plaintiffs 
in this case contend that the defendants have seceded 
from the denomination, whereas the defendants con- 



■'■»■<'■« THINK IT OVER. 



tend that the plaintiffs have seceded from The First 
Brethren Church of Dayton, Ohio. In the light of 
conclusions already reached, The First Brethren 
Church of Dayton, Ohio, being congregational in gov- 
ernment, had a right to withdraw its support from 
the church conferences, and its co-operating organ- 
izations. Heckman, et al vs Mees, et al, 16 Ohio, 584. 

Finding as we have that the church did not by ma- 
jority action of its members depart from the organi- 
zation and the characteristic faith or doctrine of the 
denomination, those persons who left The First Breth- 
ren Church of Dayton, Ohio, must be considered to 
have abandoned their right in the property. 

In the case of First Regular Baptist Church of In- 
diana, Pennsylvania vs. Allison, et al, 304 Pennsyl- 
vania, 1; 154 Atlantic, 913, the Court held according 
to Syllabus 3; 

"Majority of members of unincorporated Baptist church 
connot make changes resulting in departure from religious 
principles, beliefs, and forms of worship of church, if prop- 
erty rights are affected." 

It was said the church could not do that which was 
"Non-Baptistic." The same principle would apply to 
The First Brethren Church of Dayton, Ohio. It could 
not adopt covenants which were "Non-Brethren." Our 
conclusion is that it has not done so. See also, Monk 
vs. Little, 122 Arkansas, 7; The Apostolic Holiness Un- 
ion of Post Falls vs. Knudson, et al, 21 Idaho, 589; 
Bouldin vs. Alexander, 15 Wall, 131; Grupe, et al vs. 
Rudisill, et al, 101 N. J. Eq., 145; Woodrum, et al vs. 
Burton, et al, 88 West Virginia, 322. 

The decision of Judge Elliott in the case of Ex Parte, 
Shoupe, 9 O. D. Rep. 643, follows the law as laid down 
by these decisions and many others. The progressive 
branch of the German Baptist or Tunker Church 
formed a new denomination and they were thus not 
entitled to the property of the parent or original 
church. 

The case of Schilstra, et al, vs. Van Den Heuvel, 82 
N. J. Eq., 155, has been cited by counsel for the plain- 
tiffs. This was a case in which the church had a 
higher judicatory and where the majority attempted 
to join another denomination. Either the higher ju- 
dicatory or the attempt to join another denomina- 
tion would prevent the majority from controlling the 
property. It is hardly applicable to the case at bar. 

The annotations of A. L. R., in Volume 8 at page 105, 
and Volume 70 at page 75, set forth principles of law 
and cite many cases in which the property rights be- 
tween contending factions of an independent or con- 
gregational church have been determined. 

Having arrived at the conclusions heretofore indi- 
cated, judgment must be rendered in favor of the de- 
fendants. 

George R. Murray, 

George F. Kem, Attys. for Plaintiffs. 

Carroll Sprigg, and 

John N. Sprigg, Attys. for Defendants. 




He that saveth a soul from 
death is greater than he that 
conquereth the world. 



/Itt ritoalyliA, aft tUe 2>eci<tia*t 
at 3>aifto4i, 

(Continued from Page 2) 

requirement," said the Dayton Court, "that the 
churches must recognize and support the cooperating 
organizations of General Conference. The First Breth- 
ren Church of Dayton, Ohio, there was within its right 
in withdrawing- its support from Ashland College and 
Seminary and the Mission Board of the Brethren 



—9— 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



Church." Such a sweeping decision should lift the 
burden of fear from local churches and pastors who 
have sincerely feared that they might lose their church 
membership or property rights if they failed to sup- 
port Ashland College or gave their support to Grace 
Seminary. Churches and laymen and pastors may 
support whatever institution they feel are loyal to the 
Word of God, which is as it should be. Any school or 
board which tries to use the whip of ecclesiastical 
coercion to keep its support deserves to be abandoned. 
The only fear the local churches need feel is about 
the efforts of Ashland minorities which may work to 
gain control of the local church. But the churches 
have nothing to fear from the outside. 

V. The Dayton Court decided that a local Brethren 
Church may withdraw its support from any conference 
or board and still continue to be a Brethren Church. 

This point, it may be said, was the very heart of the 
dispute at Dayton. The Ashland group argued that 
the Dayton church, in transfering its support from 
Ashland College to Grace Seminary, etc., had left the 
Brethren doctrine and ceased to be a true Brethren 
Church. The Court reviewed the evidence and testi- 
mony here at considerable length, and concluded that 
"the local churches of the denomination, including the 
First Brethren Church of Dayton, Ohio, being congre- 
gational in government and control, would have the 
right by a majority vote to recognize and give financial 
assistance to any educational institution which it 
might choose." And the Court sums up the whole 
matter by saying, "Having arrived at the conclusion 
that The First Brethren Church of Dayton, Ohio, did 
not change its denomination, creed or doctrine, and 
that IT IS STILL A BRETHREN CHURCH there can 
be no question of trust property having been diverted 
from its use." The judgment of the court was there- 
fore rendered in favor of the defendants, that is, in 
favor of Bro. R. D. Barnard and the great majority of 
his church who have stood together so loyally in de- 
fense of the truth. 

VI. Since the Dayton Court has ruled, first, that 
The Brethren Church is congregational in government; 
second, that it has no ecclesiastical bodies with super- 
ior powers over the local congregational; and third, 
that the First Brethren Church of Dayton was within 
its rights in asserting its congregational rights; then 
it seems to me that the legal implication is plain, 
namely, that the Ashland group has departed from the 
fundamental doctrine of The Brethren Church be- 
cause they have attempted to set up conferences with 
ecclesiastical powers over the local churches, and have 
attempted to enforce these powers in the legal attack 
upon Bro. Barnard and his people. If this implication 
is sound, then it would appear that in a local Brethren 
Church which joins the Ashland group, any minority 
group might, if it chose, enter suit against the ma- 
jority for control of the property, on the ground that 
the majority had departed from Brethren principles 
for which the church was established. Whether any 
of our people would inaugurate such legal procedure, 
we cannot tell, but the possibility might well be some- 
thing for all Brethren Churches to think about. There 
are some strong dissenting minorities in several con- 
gregations where the majority have thrown the church 
behind the present Ashland College group. And it 
should be kept in mind that while the Dayton decision 
asserts the sovereignty of the congregation in its own 
affairs, there is one thing the local congregation can- 
not do safely, even by majority vote, that is, depart 
from any fundamental of the denominational system 
polity of doctrine. This was the legal principle on 
which the Ashland group based its case against the 
majority at Dayton. Apparently the legal principle 
was sound, but the Ashland minority failed to prove 
a departure from Brethren faith. But if the principle 
is sound, might it not be turned against a majority 
which has very evidently departed from the Brethren 



fundamental of congregational government? I do not 
pretend to any technical knowledge of law, but the 
implication seems in accord with common sense. And 
it is a poor legal principle that will not work both 
ways. 

In conclusion, while there is occasion for real re- 
joicing over the triumph of justice in the Dayton case, 
might it not be wise to temper our rejoicing with a 
sense of humiliation that Brethren people, pledged 
to the principles of historic Brethrenism, should have 
found it necessary to defend from attack in a civil 
court of law a doctrine of The Brethren Church which 
previously had never been questioned, namely, the doc- 
trine of congregational government? 

wHiiimmnmiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiNiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiimi'-: 



= EXTRA HERALDS AVAILABLE ! E 

E Extra copies of this issue (March 8, 1941), E 

E of the Brethren Missionary Herald are E 

E available. Order yours today— while they 5 

| last. | 

| Write— | 

= The Brethren Missionary Herald Co. E 

E 3326 So. Calhoun St. Ft. Wayne, Ind. E 

E = 

FiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiEiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiigiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiic 

A PRAYER 

I love Thee, blessed Lord, and seek to do Thy will, 

But please deliver me, I ask, from that pest, Annie Pill. 

I love Thy church, O Gcd, the house of Thine abode, 

But while Doc Bright our pastor is. I'll bear naught of 
its load. 

I thank Thee for my voice and power to inspire, 

But don't expect much help from me while so-and-so 
leads the choir. 

Thy table, precious God, is with Thy bounties spread. 

But if John Jones officiates, I'll take no wine or bread. 

All that I am or have dear Lord, are gifts that come 
from Thee, 

But I will not Thy cause support; I'm sore at Tessie 
Lee. 

Please, Lord, I need thy help, and for it now I pray. 

Prepare a place in heaven for me, but not near Mrs. 
Gray. 

— Contributed. 



YES, SIR WE CAN EXPECT IT— 

Disagreement is certain. 

"I'm afraid I'll disagree with you," remarked Jonah 
as the whale swallowed him. 

"Perhaps," replied the whale, "but it won't be a cir- 
cumstance to the way the theologians disagree when 
they come to discuss this incident." — Sel. 



-10— 






MARCH 8, 1941 




BMe. ScUacU 







PASTORS, SUPERINTENDENTS, TEACHERS 

Let's Not Neglect These Teen Age Young People 

The greatest losses in the Bible School come in the 
Junior High Department (ages 12-14, school grades 
7-9), the very department which presents the greatest 
opportunity because more people accept Christ during 
those ages than at any other time. Why this great 
loss in th3 most fruitful department? Because the 
Bible School is not holding their interest. And why 
does it fail to hold their interest? Certainly not be- 
cause the Bible cannot meet their needs, for the high 
percentage of those who accept Christ during these 
ages proves that the Bible makes a tremendous appeal 
to them. Then what is the trouble? 

Usually the lessons. Often the pupils are given the 
same Bible stories they have had again and again from 
the time they first started to Bible School, without 
any change of method or the addition of new or inter- 
esting touches. Is it any wonder that they lose inter- 
est? And often, if the lessons are new, they are neither 
of particular interest to pupils of that age nor adapted 
to meet their needs. 

How Brethren Literature Meets the Need 

Before writing our Junior High course, a careful in- 
vestigation was made of the characteristics, interests 
and needs of boys and girls of these ages. This is 
what we found! 

1. Their interests are constantly changing. The 
thing that absorbs their undivided attention today will 
be forgotten in a few weeks, and they will be giving 
themselves wholeheartedly to some entirely different 
interest. 

2. Their interests cover a wide range of subjects — 
in fact they want to investigate almost every realm 
of knowledge. 

3. They demand proof of facts. No longer will 
they accept statements just because their Sunday 
School teacher makes them. 

4. It is the great period of decision for Christ. 

On the basis of these findings, the Junior High 
course was carefully planned. 

Features of the Junior High Course 

1. It fully meets the needs of the Junior High age. 

2. It covers a wide variety of subjects. 

3. It presents truths the pupils have never had 
before. 

4. It takes up matters the pupils are vitally inter- 
ested in — thing's they really want to know. 

5. It is patterned after standard Bible Institute 
courses. 

6. It gives the pupils a good, practical working 
knowledge of the Bible. 

7. The pupil must use his Bible in order to study 
each lesson. 

Subjects Studied in the Junior High Course 

"The Marvels of God's Wonder Book" (1 quarter). 
Evidence that the Bible is true, as seen from fulfilled 
prophecy, science, archaeology, transformed lives, etc. 



A fascinating study of Scripture, especially designed to 
fortify the pupils against the unbelief so often taught 
them in the public school. 

"Facts No One Knew Until God Revealed Them" 

(1 quarter). Imparts a general knowledge of the out- 
standing doctrines of the Word: the Bible itself, God, 
man, sin, salvation, assurance, the second coming, etc. 

"Bible Pictures of God's Plan of Salvation" (1 quar- 
ter). Designed to give the pupils a thorough under- 
standing of salvation, and to bring them to an imme- 
diate acceptance of Christ. Our need of salvation, 
deliverance from judgment, deliverance from death, 
cleansing, forgiveness, union with Christ, partnership 
with Him in service, and other phases of salvation, are 
made vivid by illustrations of these truths from Scrip- 
ture. No one could take this course and be in doubt 
as to how to be saved. 

"The Family Life of God's Children" (1 quarter). 
Designed to make clear what is expected of a Christian 
and of what the Christian life consists. Discusses, in 
a particularly interesting comparison between the na- 
tural life and the spiritual life, such subjects as: the 
Christian's birth, food, walk, companions, home life, 
habits, work, and warfare. 

"Great People We Cannot Forget" (1 year). Bio- 
graphical study of Bible characters, applying the princ- 
iples studied during the previous year, and showing 
why these characters were successes or failures. Very 
practical in helping the pupils to form high ideals. The 
difference in the characters holds the pupils' interest 
over this extended period. 

"God's Revelation about Time" (1 quarter). Deals 
with the seven dispensations and the seven covenants, 
an understanding of which is essential in a proper in- 
terpretation of Scripture. 

"How to Understand God's Word" and "Happy Hours 
with the Bible" (1 quarter each). Deals with princi- 
ples to keep in mind in interpreting Scripture. Among 
the many subjects discussed are: salvation and re- 
wards; faith and works; law and grace; the Jew, the 
Gentile and the church; the two comings of Christ; the 
two natures; our standing and our state; the church 
and the kingdom. 

"An Old Testament Previexv of New Testament 
Scenes" (1 quarter). A study of types, particularly the 
pictures of Christ in the Old Testament. 

With such a thorough course, you man see the rea- 
son for our slogan: 

"EVERY BIBLE SCHOOL A BIBLE INSTITUTE" 

How Users Feel About This Course 

Bible Schools using this course report increased in- 
terest and a decided increase in decisions for Christ. 

The pastor of the largest Brethren Bible School in 
America is one of the many who, having used the liter- 
ature of other publishers which is considered "tops," 
reports after careful examination and trial of our own, 
"It is second to none." 



HOW TO OBTAIN ASSURANCE 

How can we know certainly that we are saved? 

(1) By the sure warrant of the Word of God. 

(2) By the witness of the Spirit in our experience. 

(3) By the habitual bent of the life. 

The Bible repeatedly declares that we know it, from 
Genesis to Revelation. John wrote his first epistle on 
purpose to make this plain to believers. In this brief 
epistle he says, "We know" about 40 times, and "we 
hope," or "are trying" etc. not once. What a wonder- 
ful thing that we know. 

—La Verne, Calif., Bulletin. 



-11— 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



New4, main 




ALLENTOWN, PA. 

This letter is written to give you some information relative to 
the work of the Ambassador Bible Class of our Bible School, and 
in the hope that it may help others throughout the brotherhood. 

On Thursday evening, Feb. 13, 1941, the class celebrated their 
first anniversary. The class was organized Feb. 8, 1940, and held 
its first Bible study Sunday, Feb. 11, 1940. This class then became 
a joint class of young married men and women who had formerly 
been two classes, one for men and the other for women. The name, 
Ambassador Bible Class was chosen because the members felt it 
expressed the purpose of the class along with the Scripture found 
in II Cor. 5:20, "Now then we are ambassadors for Christ, as 
though God did beseech you by us; we pray you in Christ's stead, 
be ye reconciled to God." The song, "W-j ore Christ's Ambassadors' 
was chosen for the theme song of the class. 

We are Christ's ambassadors, 

And our colors we must unfurl; 

We must wear a spotless robe, 

Clean and righteous before the world; 

We must show we're cleansed from sin, 

And that Jesus dwells within, 

Proving duly that we're truly 

Christ's ambassadors. 

At the close of the year jur class membership totaled 37, having 
had an attendance throughout the year of 1217 people of whom 
217 were visitors. 758 Bibles were brought by the members and 
we had but 33 tardy throughout the entire year. Offerings totaled 
approximately $150.00, which were used for our Bible School, our 
class, and missions. 

Our anniversary was celebrated with a banquet at which 60 peo- 
ple attended. The Sunday before, our class was in charge of the 
Bible School session. 

The teacher of the class, James O. Huffort, is also the senior 
deacon of the church as well gs financial secretary. Ass't. teacher, 
Carl Hornig, is a member of the nominating committee of the 
church. Pres. George Zahn is head usher of the church, Vice-pres. 
David Dettra is a trustee of the church. The other officers are: 
treasurer, Mrs. Mary Musselman, and Sec'y, Otto Kaepple. 

Secretary in charge of visitation, Carl Hornig, and usher, Horace 
Hunsicker, complete the officiary of the class. We meet regularly 
every Sunday on the balcony in our church, and hold business and 
fellowship meetings approximately once every six weeks. Occa- 
sionally visiting Bible teachers are brought in to vary the teaching 
program. The international Sunday School lessons are taught. 

We hope this information may be of some use to you ond others, 
for we submit it with our prayers for the advancement of the Lord's 
work. 

In His Service, 

— James O. Huffort, teacher. 



BERNE, IND. 

The readers of our BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD should be 
informed of God's gracious blessings as He bestows them in various 
portions of our brotherhood. Thus we are glad to report the distinct 
favor of our Lord in the salvation of souls and the edification of the 
saints in a two weeks' evangelistic effort in Bethel Brethren Church, 
Berne, Ind.., where Bro. John Parr is pastor. From Jan. 20-Feb. 2 
each night and Sundays, the Word of God found its powerful way 
into waiting hearts. Many evidenced their hunger for the gospel 
by practically filling the chuich auditorium each night, with over- 
flow crowds coming in on each Sunday evening. Mrs. Grubb brought 
a special object lesson each night for all the children. A total 



of 345 boys and girls attended the services and sat in these classes 
during the two weeks. A contest was staged between the boys and 
girls with the boys winning by a scant margin of one. Miniature 
gold crosses were distributed as prizes. How fertile and fallow is 
the ground of these childhood hearts! 

Bro. Archie Parr, the pastor's son, rendered great assistance in 
procuring a great variety of excellent special music, featuring the 
Bethel Male Quartet; and Sister Nora Lefever presided each night 
at the piano with her usual efficiency. A spirit of cooperation, 
prayer and dedication prevailed throughout the meeting, which is 
evidenced by the fact that 3 z r decisions were made for Christ, 12 
for the first time with 22 laying their all on the altar of service, 
among them many young people. 

During our brief stay Mrs. Grubb and I enjoyed the abundant, 
Christian hospitality of Brother and Sister John Parr. It is always 
a great joy to fellowship with these fine Christian friends. Bethei s 
proverbial hospitality in good Indiana pork and beef was in no wise 
ocated, as we found in our visits in the various homes. 

Brother Parr and his people are to be commended for the fine 
additions to their building, including a newly excavated and beau- 
tifully finished basement, and the fine spirit of cooperation and 
tellowshp which exists between them. 

So, we praise the Lord for the baring of His all-powerful arm, 
and say, "May He continually bless our good friends at Berne and 
all of you elsewnere in His service!" 

— L. L. Grubb, Hagerstown, Md. 



WASHINGTON, D. C. 

This report is rather late, but some folks say that it is better late 
than never, so here goes. First of all I want to give thanks to our 
heaveniy earner for tne way in wmen He nas been dealing with us. 
Not everything has gone the way we thought it ought to at the 
time, but His ways are always best. 

After witnessing for the Lcrd in Covington, Va., for about five 
and one half years, He apparently led us to come and witness for 
Him in Washington for a wnile. During the time that we spent in 
Covington, the Lord worked very graciously through us to the sal- 
vation of many souls. If He should never use us again to save 
another soul, the experience of that field will never permit us to 
doubt the Lord or to be ungrateful. It was wonderful. As to out- 
ward evidences of God's blessings, the work in Covington grew 
from 13 members to 213 members in five years. It grew from a 
little mission group which met in a former beer parlor, into a fine 
self supporting congregation with a practicable and comfortable 
church building, all paid for. While there we saw not only individual 
lives and homes changed, but a whole community transformed 
through the influence of the gospel. As another evidence of God's 
blessing, one young man went out from that congregation into fuil 
time service (Bro. Jock Simmons 1 , and is now the student pastor of 
the Grace Brethren at Fremont, O. Another has applied for en- 
trance at Bob Jones College with a view towards the ministry. An 
active and enthusiastic Men's Gospel Team from that congregation 
witnesses regularly in communities surrounding Covington. All these 
things the Lord brought to pess in a short time, and we praise Him 
for it all. 

From all this it may be easily seen that it was rather hard for 
us to leave the work. The ties there were closer between pastor 
and people than is usually the case in well established congregations. 
We olways will have a warm place in our hearts for those dear 
folks at Covington. We are anxiously looking forward to that time 
when we can sit down in glory and talk about old times with old 
friends. In the meantime — tnere is much work to do, and all we can 
do is remember each other in prayer. 

The people in Covington were very fortunate in being able to 
secure Bro. Arthur Malles as their new pastor. We think very highly 
of him and his wife as workers for the Lord. Already, they have 
gotten hold of things there and the Lord is blessing. We believe 
that we will hear good things from that church in the future for the 
glory of the Lord. Of course, the congregation has not been without 
its trials, nor ever will be. The greater its testimony, the harder 
Satan tries to upset a people. Our earnest prayer is thot the First 



—12— 



MARCH 8, 194 1 



Brethren Church of Covington, Va., will always stand as a true light- 
house for Jesus Christ until the trumpet of the Lord shall sound 
and our work will be over. 

And now we are in Washington. We don't know yet just how 
we got here, but here we are. We are tempted to think that the 
Lord made a mistake, but He never does, and we are willing to be 
used of Him wherever He desires us. The people of this great city 
with whom we have come in contact seem to be kindly disposed 
toward us, and already we have learned to love the folks at the First 
Brethren Church. 

Our impressions of this field here ore many. We are impressed 
with the apparent difficulties. But our Lord is greater than they, 
and difficulties just make the work more attractive. We are im- 
pressed with the fine Sunday School, the beautiful church building, 
and the excellent financial support which this work enjoys. Bro. 
Homer A. Kent, who was pasSor of this congregation for 15 years, 
certainly did a fine job of leading these people in the work of the 
Lord. After 15 years he is still held in high regard here by young 
and old. We are also very much impressed with the amount of 
talent for everything, and it is a shame that not more of our people 
here are in full time service for the Lord. They surely seem to have 
the abilities. 

Most of all however, we are impressed with the greatness of the 
opportunity for the gospel here. !n Washington as well as else- 
where, churches and pastors have fallen wholesale for the "social 
gospel" and there is a confusion of voices. Vast multitudes here 
are not being reached with the gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ. 
They know nothing of His power to save to the uttermost, nor of 
His return. Satan is busy keeping them ignorant of these things and 
satisfied in their condition. He has his work well organized. It is 
hard to break through His guard. But the people are really hungry 
for the real thing, and we find them not one bit different than in 
Covington. Get the Word to them, and the result is the same. It 
is still the power of God unto salvation. 

Our great hope here is in Bible studies, and we hope to have 
classes strung all over the city. Already, I am teaching three dif- 
ferent Bible classes a week outside of the Sunday work. One class 
meets in Alexandria, Va., 114 miles from here), one in the great 
N.W. section of Washington, and one here at the church. Through 
these classes we are reaching over 100 people a week, and the Lord 
is using this testimony. There are opportunities for more classes, 
and there will be more soon. This congregation has a great minis- 
try of Bible teaching through the Sunday School. The average 
attendance is around 400 a Sunday and the Word of God is being 
taught in every class. 

Our one great need here seems to be a closer consecration of the 
people of the church to the things of God. The devil would hove 
us believe that it is all right to compromise just a bit with the world. 
But the Lord says: "Come ye out from among them and be ye sep- 
arate," and He cannot use the testimony of those who want to mix 
the things of the Lord with the things of the world. As it appears 
to us, the opportunities for the Lord's work here are great. The 
finances are sufficient. The local talent is excellent. The pastor 
is willing. The Lord is ready to send the fire. If we are ready 
to pay the price, we shall see an outpouring of God's blessings and an 
ingathering of precious souls here at the First Brethren Church of 
Washington, D. C. We are praying for this continually. We be- 
lieve that it will come to pass. Please, help us pray for this. 

— Bernard N. Schneider. 



WRAPPED IN CHRIST'S MERITS 

An Irish Catholic who had spent many happy hours 
reading the New Testament, remarked as he was about 
to pass from this life, "I die, not in my own sin, nor in 
my own righteousness, but wrapped in the merits of 
Jesus Christ." This is the simple truth of the gospel. 
Only His righteousness can make us acceptable before 
hsaven's bar of judgment. That perfect righteousness 
is ours by simple faith in the Lord Jesus Christ. 

— W. 10th St. (Ashland, O.) Church Bulletin. 



BOUCA, FRENCH EQUATORIAL AFRICA 

(Ed. Note: We share with our readers the following interesting 
extracts from a letter from Mrs. Joseph Foster, dated Nov. 19, which 
came to our office.) 

It is indeed strange how quickly the Bible you sent us came 
through. You mailed it Sept. 17 and we had it Nov. 5. Since last 
Moy scarcely any mail has come throjgh; so you can well imagine 
our surprise when we received it along with a few letters. We have 
missed the mail from home so much, and I suppose the home folks 
miss ours. We have just been advised that the American boats will 
again be stopping at the African ports. How thankful we will be, 
if it is true. 

We surely appreciate your prayers on our behalf. There have been 
times when we have not known just what the day would bring forth. 
However, the Lord has undertaken in marvelous ways, so that we 
have been able to go forward with our work without any great hind- 
rance. Then, too, the Lord has given us marvelous peace in our souls; 
for without peace it would be most difficult to concentrate on our 
work. Evere since the beginning of hostilities, and from time to 
time when it appeared almost certain that there would be trouble 
here, the Lord has brought Ps. 91:7b to our minds: "It shall not 
come nigh thee." Then later when we needed fresh encouragement 
He gave us Isa. 52:12, "For ye shall not go out with haste, nor go 
by flight: for the Lord will go before you; and the God of Israel will 
be your reward." Thus surrounded by our God, we are able daily 
to go ahead with our work as though the whole world were at peace 
instead of turmoil. How gracious our wonderful God is to those 
who put their trust in Him. Continue to pray for us. . . . 

Naturally our work has suffered many drawbacks; especially being 
located right at a government post. But now that the heaviest 
part of the plantation work is finished, the work is taking on new 
life again. All the classes are better attended, and many more are 
accepting the Lord as their Savior, for which we praise Him. We 
are making every effort to reach every village in our district this 
dry season. Therefore continue to pray for us. 

— The Fosters. 



WEST KITTANNING, PA. 

Greetings, Sister Churches: 

V/e have been enjoying your fine letters through the Herald. It 
has been o pleasure, indeed, to read such interesting news from 
the field. We rejoice with you in victory through our blessed Lord. 

His grace has been sufficient through the past year. His love 
has sent blessings without number. Praise His name! 

The closing of last year brought with it the usual Christmas ser- 
vice. The Sr. Berean Bible Class, with the help of others, pre- 
sented the Christmas play to a well-pleased and capacity audience. 
They deserve much credit for the effort put forth. Singing, recita- 
tions and a short play by the Intermediate Sisterhood were also 
features of the evening. 

New Year brought with it the watch night service. This was 
in charge of the Young People's C.E. Readings, music, a talk by 
the pastor, Rev. Kinzie, and an address by a visiting pastor, gave 
us a new inspiration to live for Christ through a coming year. 

The annual business meeting in January revealed an increase in 
interest and attendance in various church activities. We realize 
more each day the promise, 'The Lord will provide," when we, even 
though struggling through financial difficulties, are able to pay all 
our local debts. 

In January a gospel team — Brother and Sister Rambo, Brother 
and Sister Baerg, and Brother Mayer — from Grace Seminary brought 
touching messages in song and testimony in a Sunday morning 
service. These manifested the power of God's wonderful grace. 
What a Savior! What a miracle that He can transform our lives 
into such lives of beauty and helpfulness to others in voicing His 
praise! Press on, seminary students. He's a wonderful Lord! 

Brother and Sister Polman were with us in February. The mes- 
sage was inspiring, as well as the splendid special musical numbers. 
We are looking forward to more of these fine services as Rev. 



—13— 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



Polman is scheduled to hold a two weeks' revival for us beginning 
Mar. 4. Pray for us, brethren, that many souls may be saved in 
these perilous times. "The harvest truly is great, but the labourers 
are few." 

Charles S. Drain, Jr., Publicity Supt., Pa. State C.E. Union, spoke 
at a Young Peoples Rally held Feb. 8 at our church. He is a very 
fluent speaker and brought a helpful message. 

Recently a seven piece orchestra has been re-organized. It is 
coming along nicely and adds a lot of interest to the service. The 
girls' chorus has been practicing every week for special singing. 
It has been organized under a competent leader. 

A religious census is soon to be taken of West Kittanning and 
vicinity in connection with our coming revival. It is hoped that we 
may reach many who are not saved through this means. Pray with 
us as we endeavor to bring souls unto Him. 

In His name, 

— Mrs. Walter Jordan, Cor. Sec. 



%&& $&£& 



From 
Our Workers 



The greatest day in the history of the San Diego, 
Calif., church was Jan. 19. The attendance reached 
119 in the Bible School, 168 in the morning church ser- 
vice and 132 in the evening church service. Nine mem- 
bers were added to the church, and five more accepted 
the Lord for the first time. Other signs of life in this 
thriving home mission church are a home mission 
offering of $207; an addition of 44 members to the 
church during the past year, making a net gain of 36; 
and one day a week set aside by the women of the 
church for prayer and visitation. 

Bro. Wayne Baker resigned his pastorate at Sterling, 
O., and at this writing is on his way to Northern Cali- 
fornia, where he plans to do rural district mission 
work. Bro. Mark Malles, who has been pastor of the 
Olena, O., Presbyterian Church for some months, has 
accepted the call to the Sterling church. 

The annual report of Bro. Robert Culver, pastor of 
the Ankenytown, O., church, shows progress in the 
work there, although this student pastor gave full 
time to the work only during the 15 summer weeks 
when he resided in the community, and the remainder 
of the year traveled about 450 miles weekly to perform 
pastoral work on week ends only. The church mem- 
bership showed a net gain of eight, and an investiga- 
tion of the Bible School records for the past ten years 
showed that last year surpassed them all, both from 
the standpoint of attendance and finances. For the 
first time in the church's history there are two preach- 
ing services every Sunday, and the church has almost 
doubled its budget for current expenses. Among the 
improvements made during the past year were the 
addition of Sunday School rooms. 

"Three births in the pastor's family in one week" 
— so reads an item in the Waynesboro, Pa., bulletin. 
The two young daughters of Bro. Robert Crees were 
born again on Feb. 9, and on Feb. 12 a third daughter, 
named Roberta Ann, was born the first time. The 
father states that she added 8 lbs. 12 oz. of joy to the 
household. 

The auditorium of the Sunnyside, Wash., church has 
recently been refinished by lowering the ceiling, cover- 
ing the walls and ceiling with celotex, and repainting 
the floors. 

106 men and boys recently enjoyed the father and 
son banquet at the Waynesboro, Pa., church. Bro. 
L. L. Grubb, pastor of the Hagerstown (2d) church, 



brought a stirring message on the subject, "When Is 
a Man a Man?" 

"A day of prayer was observed by members and 
friends of the Ft. Wayne, Ind., church on Wed., Feb. 
19. It was a day of confession, humbling, intercession 
and praise! Sessions of an hour each were held, be- 
ginning at 8:00 A. M. and continuing through 6:00 
P. M„ with various avenues of our denominational and 
local ministry as themes for each. The day was clim- 
axed by the evening prayer and praise service. Many 
testified that this was the greatest day they had ever 
known. Problems were solved, lives were deepened, 
decisions were made, and answers to prayer were re- 
ceived even as we were engaged in prayer. We believe 
this marks the beginning of a new day in the life and 
ministry of the Fort Wayne church. One of the 
members who attended nearly all the sessions testified 
in the evening service that he had wondered how we 
would spend a whole day in prayer, but that the time 
was gone before he realized it and we didn't get half 
through! Many expressed the desire that this might 
be made a monthly occasion. 15 persons attended 
one or more of the daily sessions and 38 were present 
at the evening service." — J. M. Aeby. 

Add to your prayer list the following special meet- 
ings: At Whittier, Calif., Mar. 9-30, a revival con- 
ducted by Dr. Harry McCormick Lintz, formerly evan- 
gelist for the Moody Bible Institute; and at Bellf lower, 
Calif., Mar. 3-9, a Bible conference conducted by Dr. 
J. C. Beal. 



READ YOUR 

BIBL 




THROUGH IN '41 



This schedule for reading the Bible through in a year began in the 
issue of Dec. 28, 1940. For previous readings, see former copies of 
The Brethren Missionary Herald. Begin reading at Gen. 1:1, read 
until the first text is found, end record the reference. The next day 
begin reading where you left off the day before, find the text for 
that day, and record the reference. By continuing this you shall 
have read the Bible through in a year. 



Day 



Text 



Reference 



64 Thou shalt remember that thou wast a bondman 
in Egypt _ _ 



65 The Lord shall open unto thee his good treasure 



66 Those things which are revealed belong unto us 
and to our children forever 

67 Their rock is not as our Rock 

68 There arose not a prophet since in Israel like unto 
Moses 

69 What mean ye by these stones? 

70 So the Lord turned from the fierceness of his 
anger _ _ 



MARCH 8, 1941 




KENNETH'S THREE SERMONS 

Clarabelle Hope 

"Another tardy slip from your teacher, Kenneth, 
my boy. How is it that you were late again yesterday? 
Your breakfast was served on time and all your clothes 
were ready for you." 

Kenneth looked straight down at the floor. He im- 
agined he knew how the rabbit felt when he chased n, 
into a hollow tree and there was no way out but to 
back down again and come straight out at the hunt- 
ers feet. 

"I had to go back for my arithmetic," he stammered 
out. 

"That would take less than half a minute if you had 
set your room to rights and put it in its proper place 
—neither of which Kenneth had done. 

"I guess I didn't straighten my room, mums," con- 
fessed Kenneth, "when you told me to yesterday. So 
it took me a long time to find that book." 

"Kenneth, you have a great battle before you. I know 
that you mean to obey, but how often, when you put it 
off till some other time, do you fail! In the Bible we 
read of people who meant to get some oil in their 
lamps, but they put it off expecting to get around to 
it later. They finally got their oil, but when they got 
to the gate they found it tightly closed with no one 
there to open it for them." 

Kenneth kissed Mother good-bye but he was any- 
thing but happy as he started off to school. He knew 
that this habit of putting off his tasks and being late 
at everything was "getting" him. 

When he was far down the highway he looked back 
and saw Mother waving to him. He could not hear 
any prayer going up from her lips, but he could feel 
them. 

Kenneth was ashamed of the two tardy slips his 
mother had received that week. He was sorry too 
that he had grieved her by leaving his wood so often 
till after dark, and waiting till the chickens were 
chilled before shutting up the henhouse door. 

On his way home he saw Mildred trying to fix her 
roller skate. 

"May I fix it for you?" he asked politely. Mildred 
was glad for his help. She didn't understand skates 
as boys did. 

"Oh, Kenneth," she said, "I'm so glad you are going 
to help me. Our class is having a prayer meeting at 
Rita's home and how I do hate being late. I read in 
the Bible to-day about the dreadfullest thing happen- 
ing to some girls who were behind time getting their 
lamps fixed up. They were going to a wedding, but 
they had neglected to bring extra oil. They just lay 
there sleeping, waiting for the wedding to come off. 



"At last some one called out that the bridegroom 
was coming. They got up to go in to the marriage but 
the oil had burned out of their lamps. While they 
went to get more oil those who had brought some 
extra oil along went in with the bridegroom to che 
marriage. 

"And when those girls got back the gate was shut 
and locked. They called and screamed but the gate 
never opened again. They only heard some one saying 
in a very stern voice, 'Depart'! 

"Mother said the gate meant heaven and the bride- 
groom Jesus. When Jesus comes to take us all to 
heaven I'd like to have everything that His Word tells 
us, so I wouldn't be too late to be caught up with 
Him in the clouds, with mother and our pastor and the 
rest. I'd hate to be left behind, Kenneth, wouldn't 
you?" 

Kenneth's face was burning red. He knew that Jesus 
was talking to him first through his mother's lips and 
now through Mildred's. 

"There! the skate is all fixed up again," he said, and 
half-frightened like went hurrying down the road. 

"Thanks," called Mildred, "for helping me out." 

'Thank you for the sermon," Kenneth called back. 
"I hope you'll be in time for your meeting." 

On the way home Kenneth heard a shrill chirping 
from the withered grass close by. 

"Ah, my little feathered friend! So you were 'late,' 
too. were you?" he asked, picking up a robin that was 
chilled half through. 

"Too busy picking up worms, I guess, when your 
mates flew south. So you got left behind, didn't you? 

"Doesn't pay to be late — ever — does it, 'Preacher 
Redbreast'?" Kenneth tucked the chivering bird up 
close against his heart. 

When Kenneth reached home mother knew by his 
smile and the way he stepped about his chores that her 
prayer had been aswered. 

"He's different already. Thank you, Jesus," Ken- 
neth heard her say as he softly closed the door after 
bringing in the first load of kindling away before sun- 
down. 

"After hearing three sermons in one day it looks as 
if a fellow ought to change some," he was thinking. 

— Juvenile Pleasure. 



NUMERICAL PUZZLE 

To the number of deacons chosen in Acts 6, add the 
number of spies sent by Moses into Canaan, (Numbers 
13), subtract the number of disciples chosen by Jesus 
(Matt. 10), add the number of days Jonah was in the 
whale, (Jonah 1:17) add the number of Jacob's sons 
(Gen. 35:22), then add the number of books in the 
New Testament beginning with the letter "T" and you 
will have the number of books in the entire New Test- 
ament. 



OUR BIBLE CHARACTER ALPHABET 

Answer to T: Tobiah 

U was a king whose hobby was farming and raising 
cattle. He was quite famous during his lifetime. He 
had a large, well equipped standing army and his 
national defense program interests us because he built 
many towers, on which he put engines which could 
shoot arrows and great stones in case of war. You will 
want to read about him in II Chron. 26:8-21. 



-15— 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



TRINE IMMERSION IN THE WORLD TODAY 

(Last in Series) 
By REV. MILES TABER, Pastor First Brethren Church, Leon, la. 

Since the time of the Reformation, substitutes for 
baptism by trine immersion have prevailed in many 
parts of the Christian church. But the original mode 
still prevails much more widely than most American 
Protestants realize. 

In the Larger Catechism of the Graeco-Russian 

Church (1839i, is found the following question and an- 
swer: "What is most essential in the administration 
of baptism? Trine immersion in watar, in the name 
of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost." 

Concerning baptism in the Abbyssinian Church, 

Bernard Picart says, "As soon as the benediction of 
the font is over he plunges the infant into it three 
times successively." 

Richard Pococke gives this description of baptism in 
the Coptic Church: "The Coptic Church is something 
like the Greek Church in its ceremonies. At baptism 
they plunge the child three times into the water ..." 

The ritual of the Armenians, as given by Assemani, 
includes the following sentence: "This he says thrice, 
and immerses him three times, burying in the water 
the sins of the old man, and in order to represent the 
three days' burial of Christ and his resurrection." 

Many other churches use the trine action in baptism 
though not by immersion. Thus we see that some 
have departed from the trine action, others have de- 
parted from immersion, while still others have de- 
parted from both. To contend for a return to either 
one while ignoring the other is certainly inconsistent. 
This fact is recognized by Rev. James Chrystal (Epis- 
copalian) who, in his "History of the Modes of Chris- 
tian Baptism" says: 

"It is evident — 1. That if we restore immersion, we 
only restore what has ever been our theory so far back 
as the history of the Anglican Church extends. We 
correct only a late, and not primitive, practice. 
2. Should we restore the trine immersion as the gen- 
eral practice, we shall have good reason to lay claim 
to the only mode which, so far as we can judge from 
all the testimony which the early church affords, can 
lay historically-attested claim to being the normal 
mode of the apostles." 

£JI B 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 M 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 1 M 1 1 M 1 1 3 1 1 ■ 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 J ] 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 *_^ 

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THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD CO. 
3326 S. Calhoun St. — Ft. Wayne, Indiana 



—16- 




HOME 




MISSIONS 




NUMBER 




MARCH 15, 1941 




1. 3 — No. 


11 


^JnTjTff^ 




IN THIS ISSUE 




JIVE" NOT "BUY 
AND SELL" — Pages 1 


o 


BSERVER — Page 


4 


BE RENT VEIL — Page 


5 


HANKSGIVING 

OFFERING — Pages ( 


i-8 


ROUND THE 

COUNCIL TABLE— Pages 9, 


10 


EWS FROM 

»UR CHURCHES— Pages 10- 


12 


EWS BRIEFS — Page 


12 


'HAT DO BRETHREN 

BELIEVE — Pages 12, 


13 


LTCCESSFUL PRAYER 

MEETING — Page 


13 


CROSS THE 

NATION — Page 


14 


FHY RIGHTEOUS 

SUFFER — Page 


15 


OYS & GIRLS — Page 


16 


IAILY MANNA — Page 


16 




As the rain comerh down and the SNOW from heaven, and returneth not thither, but 
watereth the earth, and maketh it bring forth and bud, that it may give seed to 
the sower and bread to the eater; so shall my word be that goeth forth out of my 
mouth; it shall not return unto me void, but it shall accomplish that which I please, 
and it shall prosper in the thing whereto I sent it. — Isa. 55:10-11 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



"Qioe," ii JlU Command; A/at "Buy and £ell" 



The Reverend August W. Brustat 



(Reprinted by courtesy of "Church Business") 
The following is a somewhat obridged form of a very timely article 
which appeared in a recent issue of the "American Lutheran." Grate- 
ful acknowledgment is hereby made to that magazine and to the 
Rev. Mr. Brustat for the privilege of reprinting. 

By "New Testament Stewardship Plan" we mean, 
oriefly, the support of the local Church and the King- 
dom of God at large entirely by free-will offerings, 
without tha selling of tickets for any function or the 
running of money-making or money-raising schemes 
of any kind. 

Some of the reasons that have been advanced 
against money-making schemes are the following. Tha 
reader may be able to add others. 

1. The Church that enters any business except the 
business for which it is chartered by the State is sail- 
ing under false colors. The Church is chartered to 
proclaim the Gospel of Christ — and nothing- else. It 
ought to bend all its efforts and energies, all its gifts 
and talents in doing that one thing well. The Church 
is called to witness to the whole counsel of God under 
the leadership of the Holy Spirit. And if we follow 
His leadership.. He will never lead us along the lines 
of worldly activity. 

2. The Church has no moral right to compete with 
bakeries, haberdasheries, restaurants, or casinos. 

3. Money-making schemes cast an odium upon the 
Christian Church. 

This afternoon we visited a family that recently 
moved into our community. Before deciding to join 
our Church they wanted this one question cleared up: 
"Do you have money-making schemes in your 
Church?" They were determined" not to join a Church 
which would prove a repetition of their former ex- 
perience when they were asked to purchase one ticket 
after another and to serve on this luncheon and that 
bingo committee. They felt that the Church should 
be supported by free-will offerings only. People who 
are really interested in the Lord's work are becoming 
a bit tired of getting anything but spiritual benefits 
from the Church. 

Oftentimes we have heard the charge hurled against 
the Church: "The Church is too commercialized, it 
has become a racket." We actually heard a man ask 
a clergyman to whom he had just been introduced: 
"How's your racket?" Sad it is, but in all too many 
instances it is true that the Church has become a 
racket. 

4. Attendance at Church functions salves the con- 
sciences of nonchurchgoers. 

When we first came to our present parish, we visited 
some whose names appeared in the Church records 
but who had not attended the services since our in- 
stallation. When we inquired about it, we received the 
answer: "Why, I come, I've attended every affair at 
the Church for the last few years." But they did not 
come to the services. They came to affairs — and no 
doubt they thought that in buying tickets they were 
duly supporting the Church and incidentally acquired 
a sort of invisible ticket which would assure entrance 
through the Pearly Gates. 

5. To arrange money-making affairs diverts the 
attention of the Church members from the real work 
of the Church. 

The Ladies' Aid Society or Men's Club that, like 
Martha, is everlastingly busy in the kitchen, or in the 
committee meeting arranging for the next bazaar, or 



bingo, or bunco, will not, like Mary, have much time 
left to sit at Jesus' feet to hear His Word and then do 
it. 

People are not won for the Lord Jesus by attending 
card parties and bazaars. They are won only by at- 
tending to the things of the Lord. But, you say, here 
is a chance to meet the unchurched and invite them 
to the services. But now really, are you much in the 
mood to speak of Christ and His great salvation over 
the card table? Are the unchurched inclined to listen 
if you should suggest the subject? The amount of 
time consumed by many Church members over Church 
affairs seems a misuse of the stewardship of time. 

Free-will giving has been advocated for the follow- 
ing reasons: 

1. It is Scriptural. 

Nowhere do we read that the Lord or His people 
in the Old Testament, or the Apostles and Evangelists 
in the New Testament, advocated any other kind of 
Church support than free-will offerings. 

The Lord Jesus tells us how to secure money for the 
Church's support when He says: "Give, and it shall 
be given unto you; good measure, pressed down, . . . 
and running over, shall men give into your bosom. 
For with what measure ye mete, it shall be measured 
to you again." 

In the Old Testament we read numerous passages 
which insist that the Lord's work be supported by the 
tithe. That same principle should be the basis of our 
giving In these New Testament times, for the tithe 
was never, to our knowledge, revoked. In fact, Jesus 
commended tithing and St. Paul inferred it. They 
encouraged free-will offerings. "Freely ye have re- 
ceived, freely give." For all the blessings of Calvary 
we should be willing to give, if need be, our all, to 
carry on the great work of our Lord. 

2. Free - will giving allows the members of the 
Church more time in which to do the real work of 
the Lord. It helps to make Church members realize 
the importance of the stewardship of time as well 
as the stewardship of money. 

3. When the members of a Christian congregation 
do the Lord's work and stick to that one job, that 
congregation will command the respect of even the 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 

The Brethren Missionary Herald is published weekly, 
four times a month, or 48 times a year, at Herald Press, 
Inc., 1300 West 9th St., Cleveland, Ohio, by the Brethren 
Missionary Herald Co., 3326 So. Calhoun St., Fort Wayne, 
Ind. 

Subscription Price: In the United States and possessions, 

$1.00 a year; Foreign countries, $1.60 a year. 

ADMINISTRATION 

Secretary of Publications: Leo Polman 

Business Office Secretary: Miss Geneva Kuhn 

Editorial Office Secretary: Miss Grace Allshouse 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

President: Russell D. Barnard Secretary: Tom Hammers 

Vice-President: Ralph Rambo Treasurer: Homer A. Kent 

R. D. Crees Mrs. Roy Patterson R. E. Gingrich 

George Richardson L. L. Grubb Bernard Schneider 

EDITORS 
Foreign Missions: Louis S. Bauman. 
Educational: Alva J. McClain. 
Home Missions: R. Paul Miller. 
Women's Missionary Council: Mrs. A. B. Kidder. 



Entered as second class matter at the post office at 
Cleveland, Ohio, February 9, 1939, under the act of March 
3, 1879. 



-2— 



MARCH 15, 1941 



unchurched in the community. If the Churches of 
America would universally follow the free-will giving 
plan, the Church would, we believe, regain much of 
the dignity and prestige it has lost during the money- 
making era. 

4. Free-will giving will be an incentive to have peo- 
pl3 bring their offerings to the Church Service, if they 
love their Lord at all. And once in the service, they 
will hear the Word of God and find soul-strength in 
the Church's ministrations. The free-will offering 
plan will cause people to realize that their connection 
with the Church must and can be only through the 
Church's God-appointed ministrations. In other 
words, people will begin to realize that they come to 
Church for purposes of worship, not for purposes of 
entertainment. 

5. The free-will offering plan is the best to bal- 
ance the Church's budget — to keep the Church out of 
the red. Generally, the money-making Churches are 
always short of money and in debt. We have often 
wondered why this is, when they are always making 
money. Is it perhaps because it costs real money to 
arrange money-making schemes? Is it because the 
ticket-buying constituency has begun to feel that 
such is the only way to support the Church, or that 
ten cents in the weekly offering envelope ought to 
be enough because the Ladies' Aid just gave the 
Church $100, which represented the proceeds from the 
last bingo party? Is it because money-making schemes 
kill the spirit of real giving? Is it, perhaps, because 
the Lord can't use and bless that kind of money? 

6. Free-will offerings, even though these may not 
be as generous in manv instances as they ought to be, 
will, nevertheless, be blessed of God, and will give both 
the pastor and the members the satisfaction that the 
work of the Lord, as far as they are concerned, is done 
in the Scriptural manner. 

Some Objections Answered 

1. "We have in our congregation a poor widow who 
can barely manage to live on her meagre earnings, 
but would like to help the Lord's work with her bak- 
ing. She is an exceptionally fine baker of pies. Why 
should she not be able to bake her pies and sell thern 
at the bazaar, and thus dedicate that talent to the 
Lord and so contribute to the Church?" 

We would suggest in the first place that she might 
secure a number of customers privately without bring- 
ing her business into the Church. Better perhaps 
would be the suggestion that she just put the cost of 
making the pies on the collection plate. 

The comparatively few folks who are in such a 
position ought not to be a veil for the others who are 
too niggardly to give generously to the Lord's work 
and salve their consciences by "working so hard" for 
the bazaar. 

2. Another asks: "What can we do to keep the la- 
dies busy if we eliminate the money-making pro- 
gram with which they have been occupied since their 
inception?" 

If it is really true that the Ladies' Aid can do noth- 
ing else than sell tickets and arrange money-making 
schemes, they ought to be dissolved without further 
ado. No organization has a right to exist as a society 
of the Christian Church without a good missionary 
and educational program. Let's make Priscilla's and 
Tabitha's out of our ladies. Get them busy visiting 
the poor and the sick and the missionary prospects, 
sewing gratis for the hospital and orphanage. Give 
them some real Bible study and make it interesting, 
and you can keep the ladies busy until Jesus returns 
to take His Church into glory. And your Church will 
grow and prosper and have sufficient funds for its 



THANKSGIVING OFFERING CLOSED FEB. 28 

All offerings for Home Missions which reached 
our office by Feb. 28 will be included in the com- 
parative report. This report is now completed 
and will appear in the April Home Mission Num- 
ber. All funds sent in after March 1 will be 
shown in the annual report. 



CLAYHOLE DEDICATION IS COMING 

It now appears that the dedication of the Clayhole, 
Kentucky, mission buildings will be held the last week 
of May. 

B-U-T we are not ready for it!! We have received 
all of the curtain rods and five of the window shades 
for the parsonage. This still leaves the following to 
be supplied: 

Window Shades 

3, 42x53 inches; 2, 30x53 inches; 2, 30x28 inches; 1, 
30x38 inches; 2, 30x46 inches. 

Rugs 

Dining room, 6'x9' (congoleum) ; living room, 10'x 
20'; bedroom. 5'x7'; bedroom 6'x9'; bedroom 9'xl2'. 

Furniture 

1 double bed, 1 dresser, 1 dining room suite (table, 
chairs, etc.) 

We would not feel like dedicating if Brother and 
Sister Landrum were still without furniture for their 
house or rugs for their floors. These self-sacrificing 
servants for Christ do not complain, but that does 
not lessen the need. Let our various Women's Mis- 
sionary Councils, C. E. societies and Sunday Schools 
pick out one item such as a rug or a bed and provide 
it promptly. We must have all things ready soon. Be- 
fore sending anything, be sure to write the secretary 
of the Council, R. Paul Miller, Berne, Ind. 



OUR COVER PICTURE 

For our "Snowbound" scene on the front 
cover of this issue we are indebted to Brother 
Robert Ashman, pastor at Peru, Ind. It is a 
prize-winning photo he snapped several years 
ago on the Monoher highway a few mdes east 
of Johnstown, Pa. Entered in a Pittsburgh 
newspaper photograph contest, it won a prize 
for Brother Ashman. 



local work as well as that of the far-flung empire of 
the Church. 

Christian Sociability 

This consideration does not mean, of course, that 
we are to have no Christian sociability in our Church- 
es Social events which enable Christians to rejoice 
in the company of fellow-Christians are very much m 
order. 

Let the Seniors give their Biblical drama in the 
Parish Hall. Let the ladies celebrate that Church an- 
niversary with a congregational supper. Let the Jun- 
iors have that beach party. Let the Men's Club spon- 
sor that Ladies' Night. But remind them that no 
tickets are to be sold for the occasion. Only a free- 
will offering will be taken. The event is not sponsored 
for the purpose of making money for the Church, but 
for the fellowship of Christian believers. 

We may add that in eight years of experience with 
free-will giving, we have never had any social event 
that did not more than pay for itself. 



—3— 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 




By R. Paul Miller, Editor 

THE BEGINNING OF THE END? 

United States Supreme Court Justice Reed, one of 
the recent "New Deal" appointees, recently handed 
down a formal decision in which it is stated: 

"Free speech may be absolutely prohibited only 
under the most pressing national emergency." 

Article I, under the Bill of Rights of the United 
States Constitution, reads as follows: 

"Congress shall make no law respecting an es- 
tablishment of religion or prohibiting the free 
exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of 
speech or of the press." 

Since the authority of the Supreme Court is based 
only upon the constitution and all of its decisions are 
to be made in the light of it, we wonder where Justice 
Reed got his authority for stating that freedom of 
speech may be prohibited under any circumstances. 
The growing tendency among our national leaders to 
assume that present world conditions justify a laying 
aside of the constitution or any other law or ruling 
that interferes with their ideas of what America needs, 
makes us wonder if this is but the first opening wedge 
to final and complete smothering of the voice of the 
people. We are made to recall those significant words 
of a great mind. 

"The little rift within the lute 

That by and by shall make the music mute 

And ever widening slowly silence all." 

If such a statement from Justice Reed goes un- 
challenged, boldness will follow to abrogate all free- 
dom of speech. It will be easy to assume situations 
that to certain eyes will be "most pressing national 
emergency." 

Then any man can be persecuted, imprisoned, or 
hanged without trial of any kind. Any preacher can 
then be silenced in America just like Niemoeller was 
silenced by the Nazis. Justice Reed's significant state- 
ment may long be remembered by the Christian peo- 
ple of America. But we would rather be in Niemoeller's 
shoes than in Hitler's when eternity dawns. It is time 
that Christians begin to gird themselves for the test- 
ing days ahead. 



IS MUSSOLINI THE ANTICHRIST? 

"What do you think of Mussolini now? Doesn't look 
like the Antichrist today, does he?" This question was 
thrown at the writer recently in a meeting by a man 
who had heard me speak of the subject of Antichrist 
several years ago. We reminded him that we have 
never stated Mussolini to be the Antichrist. We have 
always been careful to state that we were merely try- 
ing to obey the Scriptural injunction to "watch and 
be sober." 

As for Mussolini, there are several characteristics 
that he does not have which we believe the Antichrist 
will have. One of these is that he is not a Jew (Dan- 
iel 11:37). However, there may be a good many things 
which we believe among the details of eschatology 
which may never appear in fulfillment. But our sal- 
vation does not depend upon our ideas of eschatology. 

But as for Mussolini, the fact of his recent military 
reverses would not necessarily mean that he is out 



of the picture from the standpoint of Antichrist. If 
all other qualifications were found in him, the one 
experience of Antichrist to "receive a wound by a 
sword and yet live," could yet be realized, for he is 
certainly receiving a "wound by a sword" today. It 
has not been so long since he was looked upon as a 
mighty man of war. Many asked the question in other 
days, "Who is like unto him, who is able to make war 
with him?" He has made all Europe to tremble with 
his saber rattling in ether days. A come-back by 
Mussolini could "make all the world wonder" after 
him! 

It is not up to us to identify the Antichrist before 
he appears. We are to "watch and be sober." If we 
do this, we will be looking more for Christ than for 
Antichrist, and will be rewarded for it. "Unto them 
that look for Him shall He appear the second time." 
Keep looking up, brother! 



FATHER'S LEGACY 

In a recent testimony meeting during a revival at 
Flora, Ind. a brother arose and testified. He held in 
his hand a Bible given him by his father when he 
was 17 years old. Said he, "I want to read you the 
inscription my father wrote there on the first page 
with his own hand 40 years ago. I confess that this 
Book was forgotten for many years, but I would not 
take a fortune in gold for it today." 

Here is the inscription as he gave it to us afterward. 
"A present from H. G. Berkey to my son H. H. Berkey 
on his 17th birthday. My son, read these sacred truths 
and treasure them up in your heart, and they will 
lead you to immortal glory. Remember your dying 
mother's request to meet her in heaven. My prayer is 
for the good of your body, soul and spirit." 



WAS LORD LOTHIAN RIGHT? 

This gentleman, former British ambassador to the 
United States, made a statement in the spring of 1937 
in a public address in England as follows: 

"That the world is going to fall into four or five 
main political or economic groups, each in great 
measure self supporting, each under the leader- 
ship of a great state equipped with modern mil- 
itary and air power, seems certain — and nothing 
that we can do can prevent it." 
So far as the world breaking up into four parts is 
concerned, we believe the Scriptures teach it. It is 
evident that during the great tribulation, which is the 
prelude to the battle of Armageddon, the great mili- 
tary struggles will be carried on by four political 
groups of nations. There will be the "kings of the 
East" (Rev. 16:12, and 9:14 > , constituted evidently by 
Japan and China. There will be the "king of the 
North" (Ezek. 38:1-4,6) made up of Russia, Germany 
and Turkey. Then there will be the "king of the 
South" (Dan. 11:5,9,11,14,40), undoubtedly meaning 
Great Britain and her allies. Then there remains 
Antichrist, swaying rule over western Europe, the ter- 
ritory of the old Roman Empire, described as "A 
mighty king shall stand up that shall rule with great 
dominion and do according to his will" (Dan. 11:3). 

Here are the four parts into which the world system 
will undoubtedly fall as the days ahead unfold, and 
the time of the end approaches. But none of these 
things move us who trust in Christ and know our 
Bibles. We know there is another King coming, not 
from Europe, but from heaven, and He shall have the 
armies of heaven with Him (Rev. 19:11-21; Ex. 14:1-41. 
He shall meet the armies of Antichrist and "dash 
them in pieces as a potter's vessel." Rejoice there- 
fore, O ye saints, for the final triumph is yours with 
Christ. 



MARCH 15, 1941 



^e (lent Veil—Oil Qlaiiaud, Meaning 

by Professor Herman A. Hoyt, Grace Theological Seminary, Winona Lake, Indiana 

"Having therefore, brethren, boldness to enter into the holiest by the blood of Jesus, by a new and living way, which he hath consecrated 

for us, through the veil, that is to say, his flesh" (Heb. 10:19-20). 



"Brethren .... boldness .... blood." Momentous 
words are these from the hand of the Spirit-moved 
writer and fresh from the heart of God. And they 
strike like a flood of sunshine across the path of men 
whose way had been under the leaden-gray skies of 
partial and imperfect fellowship with God. These 
words describe a spiritual revolution that began in the 
days of the cross and has been marching across the 
continents and the centuries with the same revolu- 
tionizing and gladdening effect. 

1. "Brethren." Such is the prominent word with 
which this passage opens, conveying the message of 
a unique relationship among men. and such a rela- 
tionship for which men have vainly striven, to which 
the history of the world both then and now testifies. 
This is a relationship of father and children, of broth- 
er with brother, which is not to be construed as meer- 
ly the universal relationship of humankind, nor even 
the racial relationship of the Jewish people, but as 
a spiritual relationship; for the writer insists that 
this brotherhood has an entrance into the holiest of 
all, into which place none but those who have been 
joined spiritually to the Son of God can gain entrance 
(John 14:6). 

"Brethren" is the word which to the mind of that 
day immediately conveyed the blessed truth of unity 
of origin, as coming from the same womb. And since 
every one who belongs to this family of God enters 
this family by the same way, by being born into it 
through the operation of the Spirit of God (John 3:3), 
it is only natural that the word which points to this 
unity of origin should be employed from the very first 
to delineate this fact. Hence this word became prec- 
ious on the lips of sovereign and slave alike, as mark- 
ing the abolition of class, caste, and condition, and as 
expressing an intimacy, tenderness, and affection 
that had never been known before on land or sea. 

Nor does this truth terminate here, for brotherhood 
implies a common Father who begat the brethren. 
And it is this relationship of tenderness, intimacy, and 
love that sends the believer hastening with eagerness 
and joy into the presence of a loving Father to pillow 
the weary head upon his responsive breast; to pour 
out the burdens of a heart bursting with emotion; to 
claim the precious, patient, purposive care of this 
loving Father. 

2. And "boldness" is the way the believer dares to 
enter into the presence of this holiest of all persons, 
thus placing in most startling contrast the privileges 
and practice of the believers in two dispensations. 
Through the long centuries of Jewish history, only by 
the most elaborate ceremonial system could the Old 
Testament believer gain access to God, and even then 
he entered only by a representative into the most holy 
place of the temple, and even this was but the figure 
of the presence of the holy God. Into this place of the 
temple, separated by a great veil from the rest of 
the temple, the high priest went once a year, with 
blood. The dwelling glory of God manifested by the 
diffused light which appeared over the mercy seat and 
beneath the wings of the cherubim was the assurance 
he sought that God was still with his people. Anxious- 
ly, fearfully, this entrance was made once a year; and 
the only evidence that the waiting multitude had that 
their representative had been received and was still 
alive was the tinkle of the bells on the fringe of his 
garment. Undoubtedly, as the waiting multitude saw 



him emerge safely each year from this inner sanctu- 
ary of God's presence, they heaved a sigh of relief 
that this precious but perilous experience had once 
more been passed in safety. 

Placed in unmistakable contrast with this is the 
"boldness" with which the believer in the new dis- 
pensation enters, not through the veil of the temple 
into the most holy place, but into the very presence 
of God in the heavens (9:24). And we note with joy, 
as did those early believers, that this writer meant 
that the believer could enter with the attitude of ut- 
ter confidence, full assurance, fearless eagerness; and 
so far as practice is concerned, with no studied re- 
serve or effort to conceal, but with openness, frank- 
ness, and fullness of speech. It is therefore of the 
greatest importance to note that he is speaking of the 
believer's entrance into the heavens in prayer. And 
we ask with pointedness, how was this impassable 
gulf spanned? how was the impregnable veil rent? 
how was the unapproachable Person made approach- 
able? And the answer is "blood." 

3. "Blood" is the answer to these questions. Blood 
is the basis of "boldness" and "brethren." And blood 
tells a story all its own, a story of butchery, broken 
bones, blasted lives, bleeding hearts; and most of all 
the story of that One bleeding heart that was broken 
for you and me, that we might be "brethren" with 
"boldness" to enter into the holiest. Just as the high 
priest took blood once a year with which to open the 
way into the holiest of the temple, so there was ef- 
fected for the believer a bleeding sacrifice on Calvary, 
the effects of which flow unceasingly into the hands 
of the believer to keep open that way into the Father's 
presence. 

But the Spirit of God was not satisfied with the 
mere mention of blood. For the readers might get the 
impression that this blood, even though it be the blood 
of the Son of God, is like the blood of animals which 
served for one entrance into the holiest and ceased 
to have any further efficacy. So he moves the writer 
to add several words that flash with light and hope. 
The first is the word "new" which literally means 
freshly slain, meaning fresh in the sense that never 
before had this way been open, and never again will 
it need to be opened. Just as on Calvary that day, when 
the veil of His flesh was opened, so that flesh of His 
stands freshly slain forever. The second is the word 
"living" marking the eternal, personal warmth of life. 
This is not the picture of the dead carcase of an ani- 
mal, which, having served its purpose, is gone and 
gone forever. But it is the picture of an active per- 
sonality that lives and invites the fellowship of be- 
lievers. 

It was this freshly slain and fervent way that was 
"consecrated" once and for all time, never to be re- 
peated as the priests must perform their task all over 
again the next year. But once and for all time this 
"new and living way" was inaugurated through the 
veil of flesh of the blessed Son of God, never to be 
repeated; for it was sufficient for all, deficient for 
none, and efficient for all those who by faith will 
travel its way into the holiest in the heavens. To ne- 
glect this way of prayer made and kept open at such 
a price is a sad commentary upon the spiritual con- 
dition of such a one. But for those who with "bold- 
ness" enter into the holiest there are pleasures for- 
evermore. 



-5— 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



^UanJz6,<fio.i*Uf Oj^e/iirUf, Refiakt 



(Continued) 



NOTE: All funds ore for the generol funj 
except those designated as follows: (N.H.) 
North Hill, Akron; (CI.) Cleveland; (Ky.) 
Kentucky; (Cal.) California; (S.D.) San Di- 
ego; (C.K.) Clayhole, Ky.; (Sha) Sharps- 
ville; (Ju.) Juniata; (Wi.) Winchester; 
(Ba) Bakersfield; (Gl) Glendale; (E) Evan- 
gelistic; (Co.) Compton; (Ho.) Hagers- 
town; (Wo) Wooster. 



Mt. View Brethren Church, 
Hollins, Va. 

Congregation 



227.22 



Total 227.?2 

(Those contributing $5.00 or more in the 
offering are as follows: Rev. J. E. Patterson, 
Mr. & Mrs. F. N. Hamblin, Miss Lois Ham- 
blin, L. J. Gannon, Mrs. Lynn McCuthchen, 
Mr. a Mrs. C. M. Nininger, Lawrence Legg, 
B. T. Reed, D. H. Harper, H. W. Burnett, 
Mrs. Evelyn Carter, Mrs. J. L. Richardson, 
W. P. Meador, Mr. & Mrs. J. W. Patterson, 
Mr. & Mrs. J. W. Michael.) 



1st Brethren Church, 




Ellet, Ohio. 




Mr. & Mrs. E. Wallace, (N.H ) 


20.00 


Mr. & Mrs. H. Bowers (N.H.) 


5.00 


Mr. & Mrs. K. E. Hancock (N H.) 


6.C0 


Mr. & Mrs. H. W Smith (N.H.) 


5.00 


Mr. & Mrs. C. H. Turner (N.H.) 


10 00 


Mr. & Mrs. S. G. Redinger (N.H.) 


5.00 


Mr. & Mrs. A. Black (N.H.) 


5.00 


Mr & Mrs. E. Johnson (N.H.) 


5.00 


Mr. & Mrs H. A. Hoyt (N.H.) 


35.00 


Blaine Snyder (N.H.) 


10.00 


Miscellaneous (N H.) 


13 00 


Miscellaneous (E) 


.50 


Miscellaneous (L) 


1.00 



Total 120.50 

1st Brethren Church, 

Danville, Ohio. (Corrected report) 

Mr & Mrs. Ross Magers and Son 25.00 

Sunday School 25.00 

Mrs. Hugh Banbury 10.00 

Wilma Magers 10.00 

Ray Conrad 10.00 

Mrs. Ray Conrad 10.00 

Dorcas Conrad 10.00 

Nellie Magers 10.00 

S. M Justice 10.00 

Mr. L A, Wolford and family 5.00 

Mrs. Mollie Sherman 5.C0 

Mr. & Mrs. Basil McElroy 5.00 
Mr. & Mrs. Thurman Strouse 

Mrs. Sina Wheaton and daughter 5.00 

Grace Sherman 5.00 

Gifts less than $5.00 9.60 

Total 159.60 

1st Brethren Church, 
Osceola, Ind. 

Mr. & Mrs. Wm. Johanson 10.00 

1st Brethren Church, 
Anlcenytown, Ohio. 

Mr. & Mrs. John Guthrie 10.00 

Miss Lois Bechtel 5.00 

Mrs. W. H. Leedy 5.00 

H. M. Bechtel 5.00 



Gifts less than $5.00 24.57 

Total 49.57 

1st Brethren Church, 
Whittier, Calif. 

Mr. & Mrs. J. M. Anthony 500 

Rev. & Mrs. C. H. Ashman (CI) 15.00 

Maxine Barker (Ky) 1100 

Mayme Fleming Barmore 50.00 

Mrs. Ruth Beeson 5.00 

The Berean Class 10 00 

Ed. Bushnell 10 00 

H, E. Capron 5.00 

Mrs. Eli-. Coffman 5.00 

Mr. & Mrs. G. M. Comsfock 5.00 

H. M. Comstock 5.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Harry Crawford 20 00 

E. L. Culp 10.00 

Mrs. E. L. Culp 10.00 

Orlyn Culp 5.00 

Robert Culp 10.00 

E. W. Driver 39.00 

Mrs. Nellie O. Ecklund 10.00 

Mrs. Maurice Epperly 5.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Oliver Epperly 10.00 

Anna L & C. H. Flory 5.00 

Geo. A, Flory 10.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Byron Frick 5.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Wm. J. Garber 100.00 

Mrs. Garwood 5.00 

John Gnagy (Gen) (Cal) 7.50 

Elizabeth Guest 500 

Mr & Mrs. Geo. Haag 15 00 

R. B. Hopwood 5.00 

Mr. & Mrs. John Hubbling (SD.) 5.00 

Clyde Irwin 25.00 

Wm. H. Jones 5.00 

Dick Kelly 25.00 

Mr. & Mrs. C. S. Kreiter 500 

Alice Larkins 25.00 

W. C. Linsay and family 5.00 

Loyal Women's Class 5.00 

Mr. & Mrs. G. E. Miller 10 00 

Mr. & Mrs. Glen Miller 5.00 

L E. Miller 5.10 

P. J. Miller 500 
Mr. & Mrs. Earl Mulkins (GenXKy) 12.00 

Jennie V. Needham 5.00 

Elizabeth Ogden 10.00 

Cora E. Palmer 5 00 

Coda end Albert Patching 5.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Glen Peterson 10.00 
Mr. & Mrs. R. L. Peterson 

E. H. and Neta Rough 15.00 

E. L. Rough 5.00 

Robr. Robinson 5.00 
Mr. & Mrs. Roy Robinson (KyMGen) 2500 

J. E. Root 5.00 

A. L. Sterling 10.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Harry Stroud 5.00 

Mrs. Geo. Ulery 50.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Clayton Vaughn 10.00 

Roy Waldron 5.00 

Mrs. John Gnagy (C.K.) 7.5C 

W. H. 1000 

Angle L. Zook 5.00 

C. V. Zook 5.C0 

Boyd Zuck and family 20.00 

A Friend 50.00 

A Friend 25.00 

A Friend (C.K.) 14.00 

Young People's C. E. 14 56 



General C. E. 
Mrs. Elizabeth Knipp 
Betty Bowman 
Miscellaneous 
Miscellaneous (Ky) 

Total 



25.00 

7.50 

5.00 

146.57 

3.00 

1,052.63 



Ghent Brethren Church, 
Roanoke, Va. 

Mrs. F. L. Brumbaugh 25.00 

Mr. & Mrs. R. G. Perdue & family 12.00 

V. V. Findley 16.00 

Mr. & Mrs. E. V. Parsell & family 16.00 

Rev. & Mrs. H. W. Koontz & children 30.00 

Mr. & Mrs. S. A. Moore, 1500 

Mr. & Mrs. S. M. Coffey 15.00 

Mrs. Rusha Harris 15.00 
Mr. & Mrs. J. B. Huffman & daughter 17.00 

Miss Ruth Richardson 37.00 

Mr. a Mrs. H. O. Simmons & children 7.00 

Mrs E. B. Murphy 10.00 

Mr. & Mrs. O. R. Keith & family 12.00 

Mrs. J. L Lloyd & Dean 9.10 

Miss Gertrude Rumberg 20.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Wm. B. Dangerfield 30.00 
Mr, & Mrs G. V. Clingenpeel 

and children 5.00 

Mr. & Mrs. R. A. Greig & children 31.00 

Goldie and Ronnie Hale 9.00 

Mr. & Mrs. B, H. Conner & children 46 00 

Mr, a Mrs. K. E Richardson 44.00 

Mr. & Mrs. H. E. Mills 30 00 

Mr. & Mrs. J. E. Dangerfield 10.00 

Mr & Mrs. Dewey Murray & Eva 2665 

Mrs L F. Wright & children 600 

Mrs Clelia Shepherd 26.00 

Senior S M M. 5 00 

W. K. Jefferson 5 00 

J. H. Putt 1000 

Mrs. J. H. Putt 10.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Moda Coffey & Peggy 5.00 

Miss Virginia Brumbaugh 15.00 

Sunday School 38. 9-1 

Gifts less than $5.00 79.85 

Total 688.54 

Grace Brethren Church, 
Flora, Ind. 



Mr. & Mrs. Lester Fife 


10.00 


Rev. & Mrs. Henry Rempel 


10.00 


Mr E. A. Myer (Gen) (Sha) 


6.00 


Lorena Myer 


5.00 


Mrs Saroh Roskuski 


5.00 


Mrs. Jennie Jordan 


5.00 


Mr & Mrs. Homer Hanna 


5.C0 


Mr. & Mrs. Roy Garrison 


5.00 


Mr. & Mrs. C. A. Hendrix 


5.00 


Mr. & Mrs. Melvin Fisher 


5.00 


Children's Department 


6.31 


Blake Landrum (C.K.) 


15.50 


Young People's Mission Band 


23 20 


Church offering 


32.49 


Mr. & Mrs. Dalta Myers 


50.00 


Total 


188.50 


1st Brethren Church, 




Covington, Va. 




Mrs. Lossie Cook 


8.00 


Viola Brankenridge 


5.0C 


Margaret Mills 


5.00 



—6- 



MARCH 15, 1941 



Mr. & Mrs. W. C. Crawford 
Mr. & Mrs. Cary Perdue 
Earl Key 

B. V. Craghead 
Lottie Persinger 
Ina Humphries 
Mark Martin 

Mr. & Mrs. S. E. Perdue 

J. J. Craghead 

Everett Duncan 

Bill Burger 

Pearl McMillion 

Mrs. J. E. Carroll 

Robert Painter 

Rev. A. N. Malles 

Haven Hill 

H. L. Radford 

K. W. Duncan 

Mr. & Mrs. Homer Hill 

Mr. & Mrs. C. W. Sorrel Is 

C. L. Simmons 
A. M. Mills 

Mr. & Mrs. R. G. Batten 
Mr. & Mrs. Charles Cross 
C. J. Radford 
Loyd Persinger 
Paul Pearman 
C. E. Leape 
Roy Duncan 
Loose Offering 

Total 

1st Brethren Church, 
Bellflower, Calif. 

Mr. Neil Graham 

Mr. & Mrs. W. L. Waite 

Mr. & Mrs. W. L. Course 

Mrs. Carr 

Young People's C. E. Society 

Mrs. Louise Macdonald 

Mr. & Mrs. Giles Mellen 

Mr. & Mrs. Geo. Latshaw 

Jr. C. E. Society 

Rev. & Mrs. Jesse Hall 

Mr. & Mrs. L. C. Marsh 

Mr. Jack Burt 

Banks 

Loose Offering 

Bible School offering 

Total 

Pleasant Grove Brethren Church, 
Williamsburg, Iowa. 

Mr. & Mrs. John R. Myers 
Loose Offering 

Total 

Mr. & Mrs. S. J. Davis, 
Altoona, Pa. 

Grace Brethren Church, 
Conemaugh, Pa. 

Congregation (Ju) 

1st Brethren Church, 
Johnstown, Pa. 



Mr. 


& Mrs. 


C. E. Stump 


Mr. 


& Mrs. 


Byron Noon 


Mr. 


& Mrs 


E. Halliwell 


Mr. 


& Mrs 


R. V. Redinc 


Mr. 


& Mrs. 


T. H. Kyler 


Mr. 


& Mrs. 


Leslie Moore 


Mr. 


& Mrs 


Max Probst 


Mr. 


& Mrs. 


Carl Uphouse 


Miss Janet 


Huston 


Mr. 


& Mrs. 


J. B. Gunter 


Mrs 


. Paul C 


ick 


Mr. 


& Mrs. 


Blair Dick 



5.00 


Mr. & Mrs. M. E. Rose (Ky) 


10.00 


25.00 


Mr. & Mrs. Clair Barron (Wi) 


10.00 


25.00 


Mr. a Mrs. Robert Sigg 


10.00 


15.00 


Mr. & Mrs. Vincent Reighard 


10.00 


10.00 


Mrs. Evelyn McClain 


10.00 


10.00 


Rev. & Mrs. A. L. Lynn 


10.00 


10.00 


Mrs. Rachel Devlin 


10.00 


10.00 


Mrs. Mary Bifano 


10.00 


7.00 


Mr. James Bifano 


10.00 


10.00 


Mr. & Mrs. Carl Furst 


10.00 


25.00 


Mr. W. R. Miller 


7.00 


6.00 


Mr. Harold Palliser 


5.00 


5.00 


Mr. Robert Kyler 


5.C0 


12.00 


Miss Lois Kyler 


5.00 


15.C0 


Miss Margaret Kyler 


5.00 


7.00 


Mr. & Mrs. W. G. Home 


5.00 


10.00 


Mrs. C. J. & Lottie Heilman (CI) 


5.C0 


10.C0 


Mrs. Irvin Harbaugh 


5.00 


12.00 


Mr. & Mrs. Ben Stutzman 


5.00 


25.00 


Mr. & Mrs. David Reighard 


5.00 


5.00 


Mrs. Sylvanus Custer 


5.00 


10.00 


Mr. Donald Rager 


5.00 


5.00 


Mrs. L. H. Mitchell 


5.00 


30.00 


Miss Essie Teeter 


5.00 


5.00 


Mr. Thomas Watkins 


5.00 


5.00 


Miss Mary Eva Byers 


5.00 


10.00 


Mr. & Mrs. H. N. Cober 


5.00 


10.00 


Miss Margaret Cook 


5.00 


5.00 


Mr. & Mrs. Stanley Custer 


5.00 


44.20 


Mr. & Mrs. F. L. Gardner 


5.00 




Mr. a Mrs. Clarence Miller 
Mr. H. A. Schmucker 


5.C0 
5.00 


401.20 




A Friend 


5.00 




Mr. Fyock (CI) 


8.75 




Brother of Alexander Mack 


30.00 


12.50 


Women's Missionary Council 


25.00 


5.00 


Gleaners Bible Class 


25.00 


5.00 


Loyal Women's Bible Class 


20.00 


5.00 


Sunday School 


12.29 


1 0.00 


Primary Class 


10.56 


10.00 


Intermediate C. E. Society 


5.00 


5.00 


Junior C. E. 


3.C0 


5.00 


Gifts less than $5.00 


43.60 


6.20 


Gifts less than $5.00 (CI) 


2.00 


5.00 







1000 
15.00 

4.63 
21.21 

5.13 

124.72 



25.00 
2.50 

27.50 

5.00 

2.00 



100.00 
50.00 
35.00 
35.00 
30.00 
30.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
20.00 
1000 
5.00 



Total 792.20 

1st Brethren Church, 
Johnstown, Pa. (District Missions) 

Mrs. Paul Dick (Grafton) 5.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Blair Dick (Grafton) 5.00 

Miscellaneous (Grafton) 1.00 

Total 11.00 

1st Brethren Church, 
Glendale, Calif. 

Mr. & Mrs. Fred Behm 10.00 

Flora H. Meyer 5.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Horton MacDavid 5.00 

Mr. & Mrs. A. S. Rothbun (E) 5.00 

Roy and Esther Kirby 50.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Guy Culver 15.00 

Mr. & Mrs. O. J. Hammer 20.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Earl Hedrick (Gl) 10.00 

Mrs. Mattie Jgdson 5.00 

Mrs. Ruby Richardson (Ba) 25.00 
Stanley Goodwin & Stanley Cameron 50.00 

Miscellaneous 124.10 

Total 397.41 

1st Brethren Church, 
Middlebranch, Ohic. 

Mr. & Mrs. Newton Roush 5.00 

Miss Ruth Brown 5.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Paul Mohler (C.K.ME) 5.00 

Gifts less than $5.00 5.50 

Totol 20.50 



1st Brethren Church, 




Tracy, Calif. (Additional) 




W. M. C. 


5.03 


1st Brethren Church, 




Compton, Calif. 




Mr. & Mrs. H. L. Skinner, (Co) 


8.00 


O. L. Conoway 


6.00 


Elder Grant McDonald 


10.00 


Mr. & Mrs. W. L. Carpenter 


5.00 


Warren Mize 


5.00 


Mrs. Isabel Bradley 


5.00 


Sunday School 


23.98 


Gifts less than $5.00 


14.50 



Total 

1st Brethren Church, 

Canton, Ohio. (Additional) 

Mrs. A. B. Kidder 
Amt. previously reported 
Additional 



77.48 



5.00 

238.79 

15.00 



258.79 


5.00 


5.00 


5.00 


5.00 


5.00 


5.00 


12.00 



Total 

Mrs. W. P. Elliott, 
Morrill, Kans. 

1st Brethren Church, 
Fillmore, Calif. 

Mr. Oscar Bennett, 
Mr. James Strickland 
Mr. Paul Eiselstein 
Intermediate C. E. 
Mr. Eddie Wilson 
Miscellaneous 

Total 

1st Brethren Church, 
Meyersdale, Pa. 

Mr. & Mrs. M. L. Barker 
Mrs. John Bittner 
Mr. & Mrs. G. G. Bowman 
Mrs. Grace Fike 
Miss Charlotte Forney 
Mr. & Mrs. Ed. Hillegas 
Mrs. Ada E. Lorentz 
Rev. and Mrs. O. A. Lorenz 
Mrs: Orpha Meyers 
Mr. John I. Meyers 
J. L. Tressler family 
S. S. offering 
Men's Gospel Team 
Church offering and all gifts less 
than $5.00 

Total 

Carlton Brethren Church, 
Garwin, Iowa. 

Sunday School 

Mrs. Perl Lowry 

Rev. & Mrs. H. S. Parks (K) 

C E. Jr. and Sr. 

W. M. C. 

Mrs. Chas Eggers 

Mrs. Glenn Thurston 

Church offering 

Total 

Miscellaneous 

Rev. & Mrs. H. E. Parks, (Claud 
Pearson's Mission) 

Total 

1st Brethren Church, 
Rittman, Ohio. 

Mr. & Mrs. Emmett Adams 5.20 

Mr. & Mrs. Virgil Armstrong 15.50 

Mr. & Mrs. J. W. Arwood and family 5.10 



37.00 



10.00 

5.00 

5.00 

5.00 

5.00 

5.00 

30.00 

10.00 

20.00 

5.00 

9.00 

44.85 

13.00 

5200 

230.85 



10.00 
10.00 
5.00 
5.00 
7.00 
5.00 
5.00 
9.83 

56.83 



5.00 
61.83 



—7— 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



Mr. & Mrs. Charles Baker 
Mr. & Mrs. James Blatter 
Miss Eula Blatter 



Mr. 

Mr. 

Mr. 

Rev. 

Mr. 

Mr. 

Mr. 

Mr. 

Mr. 

Mrs 

Mr. 

Mr. 

Mr. 

Mrs 

Mr. 

Sr 

Mr 



fa- 



Mrs Fred Blatter (Ha) (Gen) 
& Mrs. Wm. Brown (Ha) (Gen) 
Charles Castor, Jr. 
& Mrs. Arthur Carey 
& Mrs. Roy Fix 
& Mrs. Charles Gammell 
& Mrs. Floyd Hoover 
& Mrs. Lloyd Hoover 
& Mrs. Atlee Hostetler 
Verle Kosier 

& Mrs. Charles Moomaw 
Lester Pifer 
& Mrs. Walter Shultz 
T. E. Slaybaugh 
& Mrs Melvin Walter 
C. E. 
& Mrs. Clarence Kunkler 



(GenMC.K.) 

Miscellaneous and gifts less than 5.00 
Miscellaneous (C.K.) 

Total 326.03 

1st Brethren Church, 
Rittman, Ohio. 

District Missions. 

Adult C. E. (El let Radio Program) 6.1b 

Total ~~^S 

1st Brethren Church, 
Cleveland, Ohio. 

Mr. & Mrs. S. W. Link 40.00 

Mrs. Edna Moore, 25 .UU 

Mr. & Mrs. Ralph Clum 12.50 

Mr & Mrs. George Peck, 10.00 

Mr. & Mrs. L. S. Berkebile 10.00 

Mr & Mrs. Geo. Peer 10.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Earle Peer 15.00 

Friends ^yO 

Mr & Mrs. Harry Such 5.00 

Mrs. H M. Cole 5.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Foster Tresise 5.00 

Mr. & Mrs. George Feathers 5.00 
Mr. & Mrs. Frank Griffin 

Friend 5.00 

Bible School 7.75 

Young People's Class 13.30 

Adult Class 5.C0 

Women's Missionary Council 10.00 

Christian Endeavor Society 6 30 

Gifts less than $5.00 25.90 

Rev. and Mrs. Tom Hammers 10.00 
Mr & Mrs. Marion May and family 10.00 

Mr. H. M. Cole and family 10 CO 

Total 260.75 

Grace Brethren Church, 
Waterloo, Iowa. 

Rev. & Mrs. Frank G. Coleman 5.00 

Mr & Mrs. J. Frank Meyers 5.00 

Miss Grace A. Pollard 5.00 

Mrs. Maude Hady 5.00 

Mr. & Mrs. N. J. Fike 15.00 

Mr. & Mrs. E. J. Schrock 25.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Cleve Miller 50.00 

Mr. & Mrs. V. W. Schrock 5.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Jerry Alderman 5.00 

Mr. C. L. Strock 5.00 

Mr. & Mrs. L. E. Long 25.00 

Mr. & Mrs. A. A. Bontrager 500, 

Mrs. N. P. Sorensen 5.00 

Maggie G. Peck _ 5.00 

Mrs. Ira Gayman ' 5.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Mel Smith 5.00 



10.00 


Df. J. C. Beal 


60.00 


20.00 


Miscellaneous 


12.00 


25.00 








20.00 


Total 


247.00 


8.00 






5.00 


West Homer Brethren Church, 




25.00 


Homerville, Ohio. 




5.00 


Mr. & Mrs. H. C. McDaniel, (Wo) 


20.00 


14.25 


Mr. & Mrs. O. C. Trapp 


55.00 


15.00 


Edwin Cashman 


5.00 


10.00 


Rev. & Mrs. A. D. Cashman 


25.00 


5.00 


Mr. & Mrs. T. E. Hastings 


50.00 


13.00 


Mr. & Mrs. Lester Keyser (GenHE) 


15.00 


35.00 


Mr. & Mrs. G. A. McFerren 


20.00 


5.00 


Mr. & Mrs. John Correll (Wo) 


25.00 


8.50 


Mr. & Mrs. Roy Hopkins 


20.00 


10.00 


A Friend 


10.00 


11.00 


A Friend 


10.00 


5.C0 


A Friend 


6.00 




A Friend 


6.00 


7.C0 


Foundation Builders Banks 


9.00 


J 40.48 


Miscellaneous and gifts less than 5.00 


19.48 


3. CO 


Mrs. Lelah Kissell 


5.00 



Total 

1st Brethren Church, 
Harrah, Wash. 



300.48 



Mrs. Luelle Caffee 


5.00 


Rev. & Mrs. Fred Walter 


10.00 


Dr. & Mrs. Milton Lindblad 


25.00 


Gifts less than $5.00 


3.19 


Total 


43.19 


Milledgeville, III. 




Miss Dessa M. Hanna 


25.00 


Mr. & Mrs. Madden Crouse 


60 00 



Total 85.00 

Nappanee, Indiana. 

Mr. & Mrs. Ben Weaver 7.00 

Mrs. Otto Stout 1.00 

Mrs. Barbara Musser 5.00 

Mrs. Harold Weygard 5.00 

Total 18.00 

1st Brethren Church, 
Beaver City, Nebr. 

Mrs. Emma Atwood, 

Lincoln, Nebr. 10.00 

Mr. & Mrs. G. B. Seibert, Helen and 

W. H. Kilpatrick, Jr., 

Beatrice, Nebr. 50.00 

Maurine Miller 10.00 

Mrs. C. D. Miller (K) 5.00 

Mrs. Viva Kitchens 25.00 

Total 100.00 

North Hill, Ohio. Sunday School. 
Akron, Ohio. 

District Missions 

Mr. & Mrs. W. D. Broucher (NH ) 5.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Joe Bry (N.H.) 5.00 

Mr. a Mrs. E. R. Cole (N.H.) 5.00 

Sunday School (N. H ) 15.00 

Total 30.C0 

1st Brethren Church, 
Sunnyside, Wash. (Additional) 

Miss Grace Allshouse • 10.00 

Mr. Cj Mrs. Floyd Turner 10 00 

Mrs. Rex Rowland 5.00 

Noah Millers 5.00 

Mrs. Matt and Marguerite Hoffman 5.00 



Sunday School 

Gifts less than $5.00 

Amt. previously reported 

Total 

Lanark, III. 

Mr. & Mrs. Harry E. Miller 
Mr. Ralph Flickinger 
Mr. Edwin P. Flickinger 

Total 



5.17 

5.70 

10.75 



156.62 



10.00 
25.00 
10.00 

45.00 



OFFERINGS RECEIVED WHEN HOME 
MISSION PICTURES WERE SHOWN 



Portis, Kans. 
Beaver City, Nebr. 
Leon, Iowa 
Dallas Center, la. 
Pleasant Grove, la. 
Waterloo, Iowa, 

Grace Brethren Church 
Milledgeville, III. 
Canton, Ohio 

Ashland, Ohio, West 10th St, Bre. Ch 
Fremont, O., Grace Brethren Church 
Homerville, Ohio 
Danville, Ohio 
Ankenytown, Ohio 
Rittman, Ohio 
Sterling, Ohio 
Cleveland, Ohio 
Middlebranch, Ohio 
Wooster, Ohio 

Berne, Ind. (Bethel Brethren Church) 
Sharpsville, Ind. 
Fort Wayne, Ind. 
Peru, Ind. 
New Troy, Mich. 
Lake Odessa, Mich. 
Dayton, Ohio 
Meyersdale, Pa. 
Uniontown, Pa. 
Martinsburg, Pa. 
Leamersville, Pa. 
Altoona, Pa. 
Juniata, Pa. 
Conemaugh, Pa. 
Vinco, Pa. 
Mundy's Corner, Pa. 
Listie, Pa. 
Hagerstown, Md. 
Waynesboro, Pa. 
Washington, D. C. 
Buena Vista, Va. 
Covington, Va. 
Roanoke, Va. 
Philadelphia, Pa 
Hollins, Va. 
Winchester, Va. 
San Diego, Calif. 
Bellflower, Calif. 
Whittier, Calif. 
Los Angeles, Calif. 1st 
Los Angeles, Calif. 2nd 
Compton, Calif. 
Long Beach, 2nd 
La Verne, Calif. 

Total 



1st Church 



15.56 
15.56 

6.19 
10.38 

7.50 

20.17 

37.00 

17.18 

7.70 

7.00 

6.19 

5.71 

3.54 

10.45 

5.51 

14.00 

5.C5 

3.70 

18.17 

5.25 

6.47 

3.00 

1.81 

12.46 

25.54 

12.00 

11.10 

7.67 

9.74 

18.72 

8.01 

9.70 

9.70 

15.44 

6.00 

7.00 

22.10 

23.00 

5.80 

10.88 

11.45 

14.76 

8.63 

8.68 

11.06 

3.50 

8.26 

6.00 

11.46 

3.00 

3.76 

10.28 

549.30 



Respectfully submitted, 



R. Paul Miller, Sec. 



— S- 



MARCH 15, 1941 



mmm the council table 




WINCHESTER, VIRGINIA 

Dr. V. C. Kelford has been with us for a week, lead- 
ing us in one of the finest Bible Conferences we have 
ever had. The Winchester School of the Bible sup- 
ported the meetings throughout the weak. Members 
from various churches came faithfully and expressed 
their great satisfaction for the messages Dr. Kelford 
delivered. 

Winchester is a city that is filled with modernism. 
There is no possibility of bring an outstanding funda- 
mental man in to speak that would be approved by 
the leaders in the churches. However there is a scat- 
tering of Bible loving people in all of the churches, 
and they really appreciated a man like Dr. Kelford. 
One lady said that it was the best she ever heard. As 
pastor of the church I want to say it was like sitting 
in a class room taking a post graduate course in the- 
ology. , 

Dr. Kelford has an excellent presentation through 
colorful charts, and makes an appeal for the lost to 
come to the Lord. He had gracious words of praise 
for Grace Theological Seminary, which made me think 
we ought to secure his services as a contact man ad- 
vertising Grace on this continent. 

Every Brethren Church ought to try to get this 
man for a meeting. As far as we are concerned, we 
have extended a standing invitation for Him to come 
again anytime. He can be reached by simply address- 
ing him at Waterloo, la. 

— Norman H. Uphouse. 



FLORA, INDIANA 

"Oh, that men would praise the Lord for His good- 
ness and for His wonderful works to the children of 
men! For He satisfieth the longing soul and filleth 
the hungry soul with goodness" (Ps. 107:8,9). These 
words from the pen of the Psalmist portray very well 
the results of our recent revival in our church under 
the able leadership of our beloved Bro. R. Paul Miller. 
The congregation here prayed very earnestly, and the 
Lord was pleased to hear us and to send us a time of 
real spiritual refreshing. Preparatory to our meetings 
our membership met in cottage prayer groups for two 
weeks. Many fervent prayers ascended to God's throne 
in behalf of a real revival within our church ranks, 
and also in behalf of an awakening among the un- 
saved in this community. 

Our meeting commenced on Tues., Jan. 21 with most 
of our own members present to welcome Bro. Millar 
into the field. The messages of the opening nights 
were devoted to prophetic studies, and these created 
keen interest in the hearts of people and resulted in 
very splendid attendance from the very beginning of 
the series. Even though the evangelist spoke prophet- 
ically, he never failed to throw out the challenge for 
men and women to accept Christ as personal Savior. 
The "Question-Box" was greatly used, and proved to 
be a very helpful feature throughout the meetings. 

As soon as the meetings were in full swing Bro. 
Miller preached forceful evangelistic messages such 
as we used to hear years ago. These messages were 
wonderfully used by the Spirit of God to bring con- 
viction of sin in the hearts of people. We thank God 
for His blessed Spirit Who is always faithful in dealing 
with sin both in the saint and in the sinner. The 
greatest response in the meetings came on the part 
of our own members, in that many rededications of 
life were registered. How we rejoice that so many felt 



the need of drawing closer to the Lord in a more in- 
timate walk with Him. After God had cleared the 
way in that many of His people made new decisions, 
the unsaved commenced to come to Christ. That has 
always been God's order (1 Peter 4:17), for judgment 
must first begin with the saints. 

We greatly rejoiced to see the working of the Lord 
in the lives of the unsaved. How we thank God that 
a number came and 'drank of the water of life,' while 
others were under deep conviction of sin, and yet 
refused to receive the gift of God, which is eternal 
life through Jesus Christ. 

In all we tallied 65 decisions; of these 12 were led 
into the baptismal waters and received into the mem- 
bership of this church. Still others are awaiting bap- 
tism. Truly we can say here at Flora, "Oh, that men 
would praise the Lord for his wonderful works to the 
children of men." The entire church rejoices over 
the victories of this meeting, for indeed it was a time 
of spiritual refreshing. Our church is larger and 
stronger than before; our vision for service is broader, 
and our zeal for the Lord to win the lost is greater. 
Our prayer meetings are different in that they are 
livelier, and full of praise and prayer. We thank Bro. 
Miller for his untiring efforts among us, and to God 
be all the glory and praise for what has been accomp- 
lished. 



In the blessed hope, 



Henry Rempel, Pastor. 



FORT WAYNE, INDIANA 

We have been on the field here in Fort Wayne now 
ZVz months. For 3% years prior, we spent a delightful 
pastorate in Middlebranch, Ohio. The Lord blessed 
our ministry there with the salvation of many pre- 
cious souls. The pastorate grew from a student part 
time work to a full time resident pastorate. Many 
real problems were faced and settled. The people 
supported the ministry of the Word in a commendable 
way, and as we look back to the ZYz years there after 
being gone for 3 v 2 months from the work, we have 
nothing but praise in our hearts for the experience, 
jov and blessing that the Lord gave us in the fellow- 
ship with the brethren at that place. May God bless 
them as they continue their witness and labor for 
Him in these dark days. 

And now, concerning the 3V2 months here in Fort 
Wayne, may we say that we know the Lord has led 
us here. Before we came to Fort Wayne we were 
somewhat overwhelmed with the task that lay before 
us. But since we liave learned a little from our own 
first hand experience here, we are more than ever 
humbled and burdened with the responsibility that 
is ours. This is a city of churches but a city with very 
few gospel testimonies. As a reaction against the cold 
and formal "ehurchiamty" many independent works, 
many of pentecostalist tendencies, have sprung up. 
Between these two extremes we believe there is a real 
need for a consistent, evangelistic and expository Bible 
testimony. This by the grace of our all-sufficient God 
we hope to bring. 

Among the victories which the Lord has given since 
the first of November are the largest Thanksgiving 
offering in the history of the church, six new mem- 
bers, five first time decisions for Christ, and a num- 
ber of rededications of life to the Lord. We are con- 



The eyes of the 
Lord are in every 
place, beholding 
the evil and the 
good (Prov. 15:3) 




THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



stantly having new folks come into our services, and 
we praise the Lord for these new opportunities of 
service. 

Another avenue of ministry which we believe the 
Lord has opened is the work of the Child Evangelism 
Fellowship in this city. We have a weekly teachers' 
training class and about 10 neighborhood classes at 
the present time, with more new classes opening up 
right along. Although this work is interdenomina- 
tional, it is bringing us new contacts here in our lo- 
cal work. Then too, we rejoice that a number of chil- 
dren in these neighborhood classes have accepted the 
Lord. 

This letter would not be complete without our ex- 
pression of gratitude to the Polmans for their minis- 
try prior to our coming, for their help in making us 
acquainted not only with the folks and work here but 
with the city as well, and to the many friends in the 
Lord whom we have already found real helpers in the 
ministry of the Word. We are working out plans for 
a canvass of the vicinity within a seven block radius 
of the church here as the first step in our program to 
raise our Bible School attendance over the 200 mark 
by the end of this year. 

Several improvements have been made in our build- 
ing facilities during the last three months. A fine 
men's room is in the process of being completed in 
the north wing. This has been greatly needed. Then 
too, a furnace has been installed on the south side 
so that the building, laree as it is, is comfortably 
heated in the coldest of weather. In the coming year 
we plan to put a basement under the west part of the 
auditorium, paint the exterior of the church, and re- 
model the balance of the north wing of the building 
which still shows the damage suffered by a fire which 
occured prior to the time the building was purchased, 
by our people. , 

The help of the Council, made possible by the gen- 
erous gifts of the Brethren everywhere, is greatly ap- 
preciated. But we intend to go off the support of the 
Council at the end of this year and begin to pour back 
into Home Mission channels more each year that 
might be used to open up new fields for Christ. We 
solicit your prayers that under His guidance we may 
be able to accomplish these goals for Him. 
In His matchless grace, 

John M. Aeby, Pastor. 



TESTS OF A CHRISTIAN 

The Christian life is one of deep, abiding satisfac- 
tion, independent of circumstances, and manifested in 
speech and action indicating a heaven-born purpose. 
God is its author, Christ its channel, the Spirit of God 
its life, and it is lived by faith which is sustained by 
the Word of God and prayer. The true test of a Chris- 
tian life is the possession of Christ. "He that hath 
the Son hath life; and he that hath not the Son of 
God hath not life." 

— Sunday School Times 



wiiimi 



Dist. Mission Council, 
Arthur N. Malles, Sec. 



Pastors and people of 
the Southeast District: 
Has your church sent in 
its offering for district 
missions? Only $99.00 
of the $300 00 goal has 
yet been sent in. Bring 
this matter before your 
church and send your 
offering to Mr. R. E. 
Donaldson, 531 14th St. 
S. E., Washington, D. C, 
at once. 



ISIetltlea 







jls. 



£fcH 




LONG BEACH, CALIFORNIA 

It has been truthfully said that "light is like water 
and love; remove what hinders it, and nothing can 
hold it back." 

During our recent evangelistic campaign (Jan. 26- 
Feb. 9), there were many here at "Fifth & Cherry" 

who could say 
in their hearts, 
that, as all hin- 
drances were 
laid aside, the 
Word was car- 
ried t o hun- 
dreds, yes thou- 
sands, of un- 
saved souls. The 
meetings did not measure up to those of former years 
on the basis of visible fruit, but we rejoice in the fact 
that the Word was faithfully sown, and that a great 
volume of prayer went up each day in the behalf of 
the entire community. Cottage prayer meetings were 
held each day for three weeks. Many of the men in 
The Church Brotherhood paired off in teams to do 
personal work. The Eureka Jubilee Singers, a colored 
septet of unusual talent, drew hundreds into the house 
of God who would not have come otherwise. And our 
evangelist, Dr. L. S. Bauman, gave each one of us 
the blessed assurance that we had delivered our- 
selves from the blood of everyone who sat under the 
sound of his voice. 

There is a barrier that is higher than Calvary, but, 
praise the Lord, there is unspeakable joy in the 
knowledge that the gospel of our God has been glor- 
iously vindicated among the unsaved. "The savor of 
death unto death" we have been to the lost, but "unto 
God a sweet savor of Christ." And just as the hus- 
bandman places an especial value on his crop in the 
lean season, so in this campaign we prize more than 
ever these precious souls who have found the Savior. 

Men's Magnify, a group of consecrated laymen, are 
rejoicing these days in the opening of a new door of 
utterance — a prison camp on Mt. Baldy. Five meet- 
ings have been held to date. Over 50 have accepted 
Christ as Savior. And not only so, but the Lord has 
called one of the prisoners to organize and teach a 
Bible class, which was so needed if those who have 
accepted Christ are to grow in grace and in the knowl- 
edge of spiritual things. According to a recent letter 
from one of the boys, the class is progressing nicely. 
Men's Magnify continues to minister in the jail also. 
Last year's report was very encouraging: first con- 
fessions, 128; hands for prayer, 156; tracts given out, 
908; Gospels of John, 467. In churches where they 
ministered there was a total of 51 first confessions, 
2 dedications, and 2 rededications. Financial aid was 
also given to a brother who is preparing for the min- 
istry. 

The Church Brotherhood is continuing this year in 
its effort to bring the men and boys of the church 
into closer fellowship with one another — a most worth 
while objective. Their monthly meeting also provides 
each man with an opportunity to bring the unsaved 
and unchurched into" fellowship with surrendered 
Christians. Stirring music, excellent food, and a gos- 
pel message, have led many to accept Christ and come 
into the fellowship of the church. Many decisions in 



—10— 



MARCH 15, 1941 



the important matter of dedication have also been 
noted in the Brotherhood itself. 

Feb. 12 the Brotherhood held its first meeting at 
th3 great Union Rescue Mission in Los Angeles, an 
hour's drive from Long Beach. Most of the time was 
given to testimonies, with the closing message by 
our Brother John Gunn. We know how you will re- 
joice with us in the 53 who came and knelt at the 
altar to pray the sinner's prayer and accept Jesus 
Christ into their hearts as personal Savior. At the 
meeting's close, the Brotherhood was told that the 
testimonies were unlike those from other churches. 
"It was as though men from the mission itself had 
been testifying, the deliverances were so many and 
so remarkable," said the mission evangelist. This work 
is to be carried on the second Saturday of each month 
Please pray for our Brotherhood and Men's Magnify 
as they publish the Word abroad. May it truly be 
said of us "The Lord gave the Word; great was the 
company of those that published it." , 

Much has been said of the men, little or nothing 
of the women of our church. Certainly their lives 
speak louder and more elonuently to us than any 
words which might be used here. Behind the scenes 
largely, in the church kitchen, nursery, library, and 
office; in Bible classes, in missionary activity, in child 
evangelism, in personal work, etc., and above all, in 
prayer, their labor is accomplished for the blessed 
Master. We are bound to give thanks upon every re- 
membrance of them. 

Many paragraphs could be devoted to our great 
Bible School, which now has an average attendance 
of 1276, and our equally great Christian Endeavor so- 
cieties, 9 in number, with an average attendance of 
316. Suffice it to say that we are lifting our hearts 
daily to God in thanksgiving for these blessings, pray- 
ing diligently that they may expand into other needy 
communities all around us, such as those which have 
been begun in Naples and Seal Beach under the su- 
pervision of Ralph Colburn, and Hawaian Gardens 
under Gene Halier. 

"Peace be with you all that are in Christ Jesus" (2 
Pet. 5:14). 

Gene Farrell 



PERU, INDIANA 

"And the Lord added to them day by day those that 
were saved." 

It was a group of 53 members who gathered at Pray- 
er Meeting February 27th to kneel in praise for the 
victories in souls won during our revival, February 9th 
through 23rd, with Brother R. Paul Miller as the evan- 
gelist. 

As we feel is always true of a real revival effort, the 
total extent of blessing and profit is not told in the 
visible results which in this case brought 58 decisions 
for Christ. Of this number more than half will be 
added as new members to the Church. Others came 
renewing their allegiance to the Lord, and others for 
full time dedication as He shall lead. In addition to 
the above every consecrated member of the Church 
was awakened, more than ever before, to the respon- 
sibility of being a true witness for the Lord. Brother 
Miller's messages were not presented to favor any, but 
courageous and out of the Word. Those who came 
certainly left with much to think about and his mes- 
sages brought conviction to the hearts of many. We 
enjoyed having Brother Miller with us and the Peru 
Brethren are praying a greater ministry for him, as 
God's servant, as he goes from place to place, in these 
closing days. 

Since our evangelist could not be with us until the 
first Tuesday of the meeting, the messages on Sun- 
day were given by the pastor. On the first Monday 



IS IT TRUE ? 

If you are not a Christian seven 

days of the week, you are not 

a Christian one day of 

the week, 

— Lester Myers. 



night a Men's Fellowship Meeting was held with more 
than 50 men present. The program of the evening 
was presented by Rev. & Mrs. Irvin Weyhe, students 
at Grace Seminary, and a real challenge to men it 
was. Much sickness and cold weather the first week 
caused the attendances to be small at the beginning. 
A number of the personal workers and committee 
members were down with the flu, including the pas- 
tor and wife who were forced to remain at home for 
the first two nights Brother Miller was present. At- 
tendances gradually increased and interest grew, those 
sick at the start were able to get out more and bring 
others in, until the closing nights were a thrill in- 
deed. The attendances on the closing Sunday were 
among the largest on record, with Bible School going 
to 259. The Children's Harjpy Hour the last week 
brought from 50 to 60 girls and boys to the Church 
following school, for a time of singing and illustrated 
messages. Thru these children a number of parents 
were reached and attended services which we could 
not reach otherwise, making more real to us the por- 
tion, "And a little child shall lead them." All in all 
the leaders of the Church and the membership in 
general have been brought face to face with a re- 
newed vision of what is our mission for the Master in 
Peru and unto the uttermost parts of the world. 

During the meeting we were honored with the pres- 
ence of Brethren from Flora, Scharpsville, Loree, Den- 
ver, Roann, Mexico and Center Chapel. 

Thursdav night, March 6th, has been set aside as 
Brethren Fellowship Night. It will be an evening of 
fellowship and a service of formal welcoming of the 
new members into the Church, baptism of those who 
have confessed His name and the presentation of 
baptismal and membership certificates. 

We sincerelv reouest your prayers for the work and 
Brethren at Peru," that God may bring glory to His 
name in spite of the stumbling stones which the ad- 
versary is placing in our path from day to day. 

Robert A. Ashman 



LA VERNE, CALIFORNIA 

Beloved in the Lord: 

Two months have passed since writing, and we have 
had an over abundance of rain; but we also have had 
an over abundance of showers of blessings too. Be- 
sides our regular Sunday services, our Bible class on 
Monday evenings by Rev. Sheerer, and our Tuesday 
morning and Wednesday evening prayer meetings, we 
have had one S. S. teachers' and officers' meeting; 
and the following are some of the extra showers. 

Jan. 22-23, Eureka Jubilee Singers. 

Jan. 24, Men's Magnify group— Dr. Bailes of Glen- 
dale church was speaker. 

Jan. 27, Rev. Thomas McDonald, Sec'y of European 
Missions, lectured and showed pictures of his work. 

Feb. 10-11, Rev. Abraham Machlin of the American 
Board of Jewish Missions, talked. 

Feb. 16, Women's Glee Club of Biola Institute. 

Feb. 18. Dr. R. E. Neighbor talked on "Why I Be- 
lieve Christ's Return Is Soon." 



—11— 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 



Our next big treat is our expected Bible Conference 
Mar. 17-24 with Bro. Beal. 

We have also had special singers and song programs 
preceeding our Sunday evening evangelistic sermons. 

Bro. Carter has been appointed chaplin for the Con- 
scientious Objector Boys in camp to be located in San 
Dimas Canyon about 20 miles away. 

Our pastor is to speak Thursday night this week in 
our Los Angeles mission to the Jews. 

This evening a number of our C. Es. are going to 
Los Angeles to hold service in the Rescue Mission. 

Pastor and wife are conducting a childrens class 
each Tuesday P.M. and our young people's recreation- 
al program on Thursday evenings continues with in- 
terest. 

Our W.M.C. has been sewing and knitting refugee 
garments, as aid to the Red Cross. 

One member was lettered out and three were re- 
ceived by letter since Jan. 1st. 

We thank the Lord for our many mercies and bless- 
ings, and ask His guidance that we may be able to 
do more and better work for Him while awaiting that 
blessed hope which is for all His children. 



Yours in Him, 



Mrs. Lydia H. Franfz. 






From 
Our Workers 



This note of progress comes to our desk: 

"Since Jan. 1, 1941, we have received 22 members 
into the membership of the Ellet Brethren Church 
through confession of Christ and baptism, with five 
more awaiting baptism. These have been made 
through our regular Sunday services. At the same 
time we have revised our church roll, dropning the 
names of those persons who have shown a sustained 
and prolonged absence and lack of interest in church 
services. The church roll is made up of active mem- 
bers only." 

The following- reports of recent revival meetings 
have been gleaned from church calendars: 

A successful evangelistic campaign was held in the 
Grafton, Va. Brethren Church by the pastor, Rev. 
Paul E. Dick. Souls were saved and the saints of the 
Lord brought closer to Him. 

The Leamersville, Pa. church was filled every night, 
with many unsaved attending the meetings, conducted 
by Bro. Wm. Schaffer. Souls were likewise saved dur- 
ing this campaign." 

Among the special features of the evangelistic re- 
vival recently conducted at the First Church, Phila- 
delphia, by Michael Walsh, were the testimonies of 
an exprizefighter who is now a child of God, and of 
a window cleaner who tries to lead his customers to 
Christ. A talented' violinist also played at some of the 
services. 

Among the revival meetings you are asked to re- 
member in your prayers are the campaign which be- 
gan in the Spokane, Wash, church Mar. 11 with Rev. 
and Mrs. Conard Sandy, and the campaign to be 
launched by Bro. A. L. Lynn at the Conemaugh, Pa. 
church. 

A few decisions every evening were reported toward 
the close of the meetings Bro. R. D. Barnard held at 
the Waynesboro, Pa. church. 



Rev. Clarence Sickel, pastor of the Second Brethren 
Church of Long Beach, Calif., has begun a twelve 
weeks' course in personal evangelism instead of the 
regular Bible study at the mid-week prayer meeting 
of his church. 

Our California churches will be interested to know 
that Mr. James A. Walton, superintendent of the Anti- 
Cigarette League, editor of The Shield, and lecturer 
on the cigarette problem in day schools, Sunday 
Schools and churches, is available for an address at 
the Sunday School hour or young people's hour. 

The W. M. C. recently sponsored open house for Miss 
Ruth Snyder, who is soon to leave for Africa, at the 
Conemaugh, Pa. church of which she is a member. 
Different groups presented a 15 minuta devotional 
period at the beginning of each hour of the afternoon 
and evening. The occasion was pronounced a great 
succjss by all who attended. $54.00 was contributed 
toward an Electrolux kerosene refrigerator for Miss 
Snyder. 

The work at the Middlebranch, O. church is reported 
to be going fine under the leadership of Rev. Harland 
O'dell. Two men of the community for whom some 
of the members have long been praying have taken 
their stand for the Lord. 

The missionary spirit characteristic of our home 
mission churches is not lacking in our Wooster, O. 
church. Thev recently sent in their home mission of- 
fering of $143.00 just two weeks after paying an in- 
debtedness of $175.00 which thev could have turned 
over to The Brethren Home Missions Council. 



THE HOLY KISS 

By L. Llewellyn Grubb 
I Seventh in a Series) 

In Scripture the "kiss" has been invested with many 
different meanings. Thera is the "kiss of sin" (Prov. 
7:13): the "kiss of betrayal" (Matt. 26:48); the "kiss 
of love" (1 Sam. 20: 41), etc. The early church con- 
sistently used the kiss, not as a common greeting, 
but as a baautiful, holy symbol of love and fellowship 
in Jesus Christ (1 Thess. 5:26; Rom. 16:16; 1 Cor. 16: 
20; 1 Pet. 5:14). As a part of the service of the wash- 
ing of the saint's feet, men with men, and women with 
women, it becomes a tender symbol of the sacred 
band and relationship existing between us as Chris- 
tians, and our Lord Jesus Christ. 



NON-RESISTANCE 

Since its inception in 1708 The Brethren Church has 
assumed a clear and definite policy in respect to her 
attitude toward war and the Christian's participation 
in it. Frequently Brethren conferences have rede- 
clared that position. It may be briefly summarized as 
follows: 

1. The Christian's primary citizenship is "heaven- 
ly,"rather than "earthly" (Phil. 3:20 A.R.V.: Acts 5: 
29). He belongs to the family of God, and not to the 
family of Satan (John S:44). His warfare is spiritual, 
and not carnal (2 Cor. 10:3,4). His soldiery pertains 
to the "kingdom of God," and not to the "kingdoms of 
men" (John 18:36). He is absolutely forbidden to take 
human life (Exod. 20:13; Matt. 5:21K His hope for 
the future is in "Christ," not in the "world" (Rom. 
8:35-39). 

Thus, every distinctive ch