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CATALOGUE 

OF 

BREVARD 
INSTITUTE 

WITH 

ANNOUNCEMENTS 

FOR 

1929-1930 



Brevard 
North Carolina 






Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



http://www.archive.org/details/brevardinstitute19291930 




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CATALOGUE 

OF 

BREVARD 
INSTITUTE 

WITH 

ANNOUNCEMENTS 

FOR 

1929-1930 



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Brevard 
North Carolina 



4 BREVARD INSTITUTE 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY COUNCIL 

President Mrs. F. F. Stephens, Columbia, Mo. 

General Secretary, Home Department: Mrs. J. W. Downs, Nash- 
ville, Tenn. 
General Treasurer .... Mrs. Ina Davis Fulton, Nashville, Tenn. 



CALENDAR, 1929-1930 

1929 

Wednesday, September 4 — First term begins, Registration. 
Thursday, November 28 — Thanksgiving Day. A holiday. 
Thursday, December 19, 3:30 p.m. — Christmas recess begins. 

1930 
Monday, January 6 — Christmas recess ends. 
Tuesday, January 7, 9 :00 a.m. — -School work is resumed. 
Thursday, January 23 — First term ends. 
Friday, January 24 — Second term begins. Registration. 
Sunday, May 25 — Commencement sermon. 
Thursday, May 29 — Second term ends. Graduating exercises. 
First School Month — September 4 to October 1. 
Second School Month — October 2 to October 29. 
Third School Month — October 30 to November 26 
Fourth School Month — November 27 to January 9. 
Fifth School Month — January 10 to February 6. 
Sixth School Month — February 7 to March 6. 
Seventh School Month — March 7 to April 3. 
Eighth School Month — April 4 to May 1. 
Ninth School Month — May 2, to May 29. 

Annual Events 

October 6 to 13, School Adjustment Week. Revival. 

November 8-9, Inter-Society Field Day and Literary Contest. 

December 17, Ross-Taylor Play. 

February 21, Junior Play. 

March 14, Adelphian-Lgnier Play. 

April 11, Senior Play. 

May 1, May Day Fete. 

Summer Session 

Saturday, May 31 — Summer school begins. Registration. 
Friday, July 25 — Summer school ends. 



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iFamltij, 1950-1030 






J. F. WINTON, A. B., B. D. 

Superintendent 

0. B. ADER, A. B., M. A. 
Dean and Instructor in Science 

H. E. BOUCHER, B. S. 
Dean of Boys and Instructor in Mathematics 

D. W. RICE, A. B. 

Supervisor of Student Labor and Instructor 

in Agriculture and Manual Training 

MISS RUTH BARTHOLOMEW, B. S., M. A. 
English 

MISS FRANCES DENTON, A. B. 

Latin and English 

MISS RUTH SPALDING, A. B., M. A. 
History 

MISS ALBERTA TARR 
French and Physical Education 

MISS MARJORIE BEAIRD, B. S. 
Director Department of Household Arts 

MISS JULIA MERRITT 
Director Department of Music 

MISS EARLEENE POINDEXTER 
Director Department of Business 

MISS JANE G. WILKINSON 
Sixth and Seventh grades 

TO BE SUPPLIED 
Dean of Girls 

MISS ESTHER BOGGS 
Bookkeeper 

MISS JEAN AGNES CLARKE 
Dietitian 

MRS. MINNIE COCHRANE 
House Mother, Boys' Hall 

MRS. J. F. WINTON 
Librarian and Study Hall 

MISS MARGARET GARRISON 
Practical Nurse 

J. A. BISHOP 
Farm Superintendent 

REV. A. L. AYCOCK 

Pastor 



BREVARD INSTITUTE 

ijtHtnrtral 



BREVARD INSTITUTE is the outgrowth of the Brevard 
Epworth School, founded in 1895 by Rev. Fitch Taylor, and aided 
by the Leagues and. Sunday Schools of the Western North Caro- 
lina Conference of the M. E. Church, South. The school and the 
conference suffered a great loss when Mr. Taylor died in Bre- 
vard, March 16, 1909. His life was a benediction to all who 
knew him. 

Due to the lack of sufficient financial support, Mr. Taylor ran 
his school under disadvantages. The enterprise was finally sus- 
pended and remained dormant for two years. The Board of 
Trustees at last offered to finish and furnish the school building 
and to turn the property over to the Woman's Home Mission So- 
ciety of the same Church. The proposal was accepted, and the 
enterprise passed into the hands of the women in June, 1903, E. 
E. Bishop being made principal. On October 20th, the school 
was opened with an enrollment of fifty students, two of whom 
were boarders. The house was enlarged the second year to 
accommodate increased patronage, and the school grew steadily 
year by year. 

In 1907, the Woman's Board needed the services of Mr. 
Bishop to develop their Vashti Home. Mr. C. H. Trowbridge was 
elected to take his place, and served faithfully and efficiently 
until 1923, when he resigned and was elected President of 
Weaver College. His successor, Mr. O. H. Orr, accomplished 
much during the next four years in the way of placing the school 
upon a secure basis, both financially and educationally; he re- 
signed in 1927 to become cashier of the Pisgah Bank of Brevard. 



FORMER SUPERINTENDENTS 

Rev. Fitch Taylor, 1895-1901. 
E. E. Bishop, C. E., 1902-1907. 
C. H. Trowbridge, M. A., 1907-1923 
O. H. Orr, 1923-1927. 



Amumttnmu>ttt0, 1 929-19311 



SCHOLARSHIPS 

The list of scholarships available to worthy students of the 
Institute has been increased this year by two. The Woman's 
Missionary Society of First Church at Charlotte has established 
the Marr Memorial Scholarship, a full scholarship and assignable 
by the society. The Woman's Missionary Society at Dalton, Ga., 
has established the Laura Denton Scholarship, in honor of the 
memory of Miss Laura Denton, and to be used for the help of 
some worthy North Georgia girl. 

In addition to these regular scholarships, there have been 
other notable contributions. The Mary and Martha Sunday 
School class of Dilworth church, Charlotte, has undertaken the 
work of helping a student in whatever extent is deemed neces- 
sary. The year just past this help amounted to one hundred 
dollars. 

The Mary Pescud Auxiliary of the Edenton Street church at 
Raleigh has contributed $100 to our loan fund, honoring the 
memory of Miss Mary Pescud, many years a missionary in Brazil. 

The Thomasville, N. C, Auxiliary has continued their an- 
nual scholarship in the amount of $50.00. 

The P. H. Hanes endowed scholarship has been re-awarded 
again for next year, to Mr. W. Guthrie, who was the beneficiary 
of this award during the year just past. This scholarship was 
donated last year by Mrs. S. Douglas Craig of Winston-Salem, 
in honor of her father, P. H. Hanes. It is administered through 
the North Carolina Division of the U. D. C, and represents an 
investment of $3000, yielding approximately $130 annually. It 
is awarded each year to the descendant of a Confederate Vet- 
eran, chosen by the Educational Committee of the U. D. C, of 
which Mrs. J. S. Welborn of High Point is chairman. 

Miscellaneous donations for the year have been directed to 
the re-equipping of our departments of Domestic and Manual 
arts. The result is that these departments are again on a work- 
ab 1 ^ basis, with the necessary equipment for efficient procedure. 
The ladies of the New Bern district of the North Carolina Con- 
ference Societv have pledged furniture fov our demonstration 
din'nq; room which we expect to have furnished by the open'ng 
of the fall term. 

WINNERS OF MEDALS, 1929 

The winner of the R. Y. Neel Medal this year was Mr. Ar- 
thur Campbell of Montreat, N. C. This medal is donated an- 
'nually by Mr. R. Y. Neel, formerly a member of the Institute 
faculty, now of Johnson City, Tenn., and is awarded to the win- 
ner of the annual contest in declamation. 

The Mabel Jetton Medal was won by Miss Alice Bol'n of 
Hendersonville. This medal is given by Miss Mabel Jetton, a^o 
a former teacher, but who is now in foreign work at Santa 



BREVARD INSTITUTE 9 

Maria, Brazil, and is awarded the winner of the contest in reci- 
tation. These contests are a regular and popular feature of our 
commencement exercises. 

The first award of the Ralph H. Zachary medal was to Mr. 
Carl Drumeiler of Montgomery, Alabama. This medal is to be 
given annually by the Zachary brothers, Jack and Ralph H. Jr., 
in honor of their father. It is awarded to the student in the In- 
stitute who makes the highest average in mathematics. The 
elder Mr. Zachary, for many years a resident of Brevard and 
always a friend and patron of the Institute, was himself a 
mathematician of considerable repute, and we feel sure that 
these young- men in addition to honoring their father, are there- 
by contributing in no mean way to the promotion of interest in 
a science that he loved. 

ANNUAL SOCIETY CONTEST IN ATHLETICS 
AND FIELD EVENTS 

The annual Field day and Literary contest between the two 
groups of brother and sister Literary Societies suffered last 
year from the epidemic of influenza and other untoward circum- 
stances. The event is scheduled to be held in November thi? 
year, and the traditional enthusiasm and spirit of rivalry is ey 
pected to be in evidence. 

SCIENCES 

Especial attention is called to the arrangement and wide 
variety in Science courses offered. Most high schools, with an 
enrollment of 200 or less, employ only one science teacher. By 
combining Sciences with the related fields of Manual Arts and 
Home Economics, we are able to offer practically every high 
school science. Moreover, each science course is provided with 
two extra laboratory periods per week, which are required to 
give a full unit of credit on the course instead of only the half- 
unit credit allowed for five recitation periods per week. The 
schedule is so arranged as to avoid conflicts, if the student's 
work is not scattered over several grades. 

We recommend that you study the "Program of Studies" and 
the schedule, and have in mind the work you wish to take when 
you come to enroll. Keep your course as nearly regular accord- 
ing to grades as possible. Bring or send record of previous work, 
and if there are changes necessary, we will recommend them 
when you enroll. 



10 BREVARD INSTITUTE 

®ft? Purpose of ilje Srijmil 



The purpose of Brevard Institute is clear cut. We endeavor 
to give educational advantages second to no school in our class, 
but at much less than the usual and actual cost. This is made 
possible by reason of the support we receive from the Missionary 
Council, enabling us to care for many boys and girls who would 
otherwise be unable to pay for such advantages. 

For this reason we cannot dissipate our efforts upon those 
who are not worthy of such benefits. We positively do not ac- 
cept pupils of bad habits or character, and parents sending such 
in the hope that we may reform them are laying themselves 
liable to the humiliation of having them dismissed. An incor- 
rigible boy or girl exerts a demoralizing influence on the entire 
group. Neither can we take those in poor health. Our mission 
is to that large and most respectable and sensible group who, 
though unable to pay the usual expenses of boarding school, are 
nevertheless eager for the advantages of an education and 
for the inspiration of the environment found in the cultured 
atmosphere of a Christian school, an inspiration emanating 
largely from daily life and contacts such as the public school 
cannot supply. 

We cater especially to the following classes: 

1. Those who may not see their way clear to go to college, 
and who desire brief technical and vocational courses as a prep- 
aration for life. 

2. Those who do not have adequate educational advantages 
at home. 

3. Those who are especially interested in training themselves 
for distinctively Christian leadership and service. The Church 
is spending much money at Brevard, and the school is in return 
trying to do the distinctive work of the Church in this line. Our 
Bible courses and the influence we strive to exert are directed 
to the double purpose of furnishing such training to those who 
desire it, and of creating the desire in those who have it not. 
We especially strive to impress the fact that the spirit of true 
democracy inheres in the genuine sort of Christianity, while 
prudishness and snobbery have no part in it. No one is excused 
from enrollment in one of the Bible classes. 

4. Those who for reasons, grounded perhaps in no fault of 
their own, are at disadvantage for lack of opportunity, and are 
anxious to help themselves. Our plan makes it possible for 
about twenty such boys and girls to pay their entire expenses 
each year by their own work, provided they are thoroughly in- 
dustrious and reliable. 

Inasmuch as we are not able to take care of all such appli- 
cations, opportunity is given many societies, churches, and even 



BREVARD INSTITUTE 11 

individuals to take advantage of our exceedingly low rates in 
helping some worthy boy or girl of their community to prepare 
for a life of usefulness and honor. 

OWNERSHIP AND GOVERNING POLICY 

Brevard Institute is owned and operated by the Woman's 
Missionary Council of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. It 
has also received large benefactions from the Western North 
Carolina Conference of the same Church, and feels keenly its 
responsibility to both organizations. It feels that the church 
universal has the right to expect returns in the form of Chris- 
tian young people with at least some degree of training for ag- 
gressive church work. Consequently it makes Bible study a part 
of its regular course of study, and encourages practice in many 
forms of Christian leadership. This includes Epworth League 
work, Sunday School work, leading prayer meetings, appreciation 
of Sacred music, etc. At the same time it impresses constantly 
upon all students that these activities fire in themselves only 
external, and that real Christianity manifests itself in consistent 
living, in straightforwardness, and in unselfish service. Our re- 
ligious instruction is non-sectarian. 

ADVANTAGES 

Brevard, North Carolina, is in the famous health region near 
Asheville, and is called, "Th-^ Gate to the Sapphire Country." 
The Institute occupies one hundred and eight acres of land in 
and adjoining the corporate limits of the town. On this prop- 
erty are Spencer Hall, containing accommodations for the lit- 
erary and vocational departments; Taylor Hall, which is the new 
and modern dormitory for g'r's; the old dormitory, containing 
accommodations for the dining hall and kitchen, infirmary, 
laundry, and piano practice rooms; Fannie Ross Hell, a dormi- 
tory for boys; Manual Training budding, four cottages, and a 
large barn. All the large bui'dings are steam heated, and the 
ent're plant is lighted by electricity, and connected with the city 
sewer and water systems. 

DIVERSIONS 

Keeping in mind the pedagogical fact that education shou'd 
train the entire being, and not the intellect only, Brevard Inst'- 
tute stud°n J s are encouraged to participate in literary society 
work, in athletics, and to take part in mountani climbs, to use lib- 
erally the library and reading table, and attend th° lyceum com*"' 1 . 
Grafonola lectures to train musical taste are given frequents. 
A good moving picture machine was installed in 1921, and it is 
frequently us~d. A Rarl'o with a loud sneaker was instaPed in 
San Ang-^o Chapel in March. 1924. Students meet occasionally 
in receptions and parties, supervised by teachers. 

There are four literary societies, the Adelphian, th^ Lame", 
the Taylor, and the Ross. Each student 's expected +o become ^ 
member of one of tlnse societies, as a considerable part of 
school life is connected with them. Each society will be expected 



12 BREVARD INSTITUTE 

to give, at least once each term, a program which will be open 
to the public. 

For outdoor sports, the students play basket ball, baseball, 
tennis, etc. Occasionally hikes are taken to some of the nearby 
waterfalls or mountain peaks. 

LIBRARY AND READING TABLE 

The library consists of about twenty-four hundred volumes. 
It contains several reference works, among them being the Stand- 
ard Dictionary; Bible Dictionary and Encyclopedia; such en- 
cyclopedias as Hill, Johnson, the Brittanica, Househeld Econom- 
ics, and the Nelson Loose-Leaf; also Ridpath's History of the 
World, and about two thousand volumes of our choicest standard 
literature. 

The reading table contains several of our best weekly and 
monthly periodicals, such as Delineator, Youth's Companion, 
Christian Herald, Ladies Home Journal, Literary Digest, Century, 
Review of Reviews, Forum, Good Housekeeping, American, 
Atlantic Monthly and others. 

EXPENSES 

The schedule of fees is found on page 15. All boarding 
students are required to pay the matriculation fee of $2. .00 upon 
application for entrance. If the application, for any satisfac- 
tory reason, is withdrawn prior to August 15, 1929, the matricu- 
lation fee will be returned. Tuition, according to the schedule, 
is payable each term in advance, and laboratory fees upon en- 
rollment for the course. The campus fee, payable at registration, 
covers the cost of medical attention for ordinary sickness, in- 
cluding services of the school physician; light, fuel, culture 
course, membership in the athletic association, and inc ; dental 
and library fees. The breakage deposit is due at registration 
and if exhausted must be renewed. Any unused portion will be 
returned at the time of departure. 

Day students pay matriculation fee, tuition, and incidental 
and library fee at registration. 

(See also Industrial System). 

It has been the custom in the past for the school to furnish 
linens, but this costs heavily in proportion to the value of the 
service rendered. Few students will feel the burden of supply- 
ing their own linens; therefore this custom is to be dispensed 
with. For the year 1929-30, however, we will continue to fur- 
nish pillow cases and towels, having a supply of these on hand. 
We will not furnish sheets, and each student should brine: four, 
full length, three-quarter width. Our beds are single beds. All 
linens should be plainly and indelibly marked with student's 
name, and the linen passes weekly through the hands of the laun- 
dry supervisor who checks it. This insures a fresh, clean supply 
weekly, a necessity in the interests of sanitation. 



BREVARD INSTITUTE 13 

INDUSTRIAL SYSTEM 

All necessary schooi expenses, except for books and supplies, 
amount to approximately $237 in the literary courses. Itemized 
they are as follows: 

Board (nine months) $180 

Tuition (the year) 36 

Campus fee (the year) 10 

Matriculation fee 2 

Laundry (nine months) 9 



This figure makes no allowance for work. As far as is pos- 
sible all the work about the buildings and grounds is done by 
students under the direction of the various supervisors. This 
work provides about twenty work scholarships and an additional 
number of partial scholarships, which are assigned each year to 
those whom we know to be worthy and reliable, and really in 
need of help. Very often applications for such work are made 
by those who are ambitious to help themselves but who do not 
really depend upon such help for their education. Such ambition 
is laudable, but it would not be fair to deprive some worthy 
orphan boy or girl of his chance in life under such circum- 
stances. Owing to the large number of applications received it 
is generally found necessary to reserve the best places for boys 
and girls who have proved their industry find their worth in their 
residence on the campus. For this reason it is suggested that 
every student coming to us for the first time, make every effort 
to secure enough backing in his home community to enable him 
to pay his way for at least half the first vear. In this time he 
can prove his worth and make himself a place in the school com- 
munity. 

Brevard Institute does, however, endeavor to provide a cer- 
tain amount of work for every boy and girl who really wishes to 
Work. We do not compel those who are lazy and indolent to 
work, for the rest of us are too busy to spend our time trying to 
Keep them at it. For such as these the full price of board and 
tuition is charged for the time they remain with us, usually not 
very long. The general atmosphere of industry about the place 
is. however, conducive to the inculcation of such habits in those 
who come here. 

We do not recommend more than twenty hours work per 
month unless in case of financial necessity. This amount can be 
accomplished by working an hour a day or half a day on Mon- 
day, and still leave all the time necessary for play and recreation, 
which is the inalienable right of every boy and girl. Such work, 
paid for at the rate of 15c per hour on account, reduces the 
price of board to $17.00 per month. Of course there are num- 
erous calls for extra work especially at the busy season on the 
farm, and any really industrious boy (or girl) can get in a great 




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BREVARD INSTITUTE 15 

deal more than the actual amount required. Any student who 
prefers to pay the full cost price for all expenses, may do so, 
with the approval of the Superintendent. 

A small laboratory fee is charged in connection with the 
study of expression, music, commercial branches and all the 
sciences, for the purpose of maintaining equipment. 

A course of lyceum lectures and entertainments is arranged 
for each year and all students are required to attend unless 
specially excused. The total cost to each student will not be 
more than $2.00 for the entire course. The money invested in 
this training probably brings in as large returns in culture and 
broadmindedness as any similar part of the fees. 

Since the school is operated without any margin for bad ac- 
counts, and solely for benevolent purposes, it cannot run on the 
credit system. All bills are payable in advance, as follows: 

SCHEDULE OF FEES 

REGULAR AND ACADEMIC 

Matriculation fee of $2.00 is due with application for admission. 

Tuition (per term of 18 weeks) $18.00 

Board (per month) 20.00 

Campus Fee (per term) 5.00 

Incidental and Library Fee (Day students) per term . . . 1.00 
Laundry of Linens (per month) 1.00 

SPECIAL COURSES 
Commercial 

Bookkeeping (per month) . .- 4.50 

Shorthand (per month) 4.50 

Typewriting (per month) 3.00 

Complete Commercial course (per month) 10.00 

Music 

Instrumental or vocal music (per term) 16.00 

(per month) 4.50 

LABORATORY FEES 

Science (per term) 2.50 

Music (per term) 2.50 

Home Economics and Manual Training (per term) .... 1.50 

SPECIAL FEES 

Monthly Test .5.0 

Term Examination 1.00 

Special examination to remove condition 1.00 

Graduation fee, including cost of diploma 2.50 

Key Deposit (Boys) (Redeemable at close of session) . . 1.00 

Breakage Deposit (Returnable if not used) 3.00 




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BREVARD INSTITUTE 17 

IMPORTANT 

All tuition is payable in advance; board at $20.00 per month 
is due in advance but work done about school or farm is credited 
against the board bill at the rate of 15c per hour. We do not 
recommend that a student do more than 20 hours work per month, 
unless in case of financial necessity. This amount of work re- 
duces the cost of board to $17.00 per month, and still leaves time 
for play and recreation such as any growing child craves and 
needs. 

Students working their way through school, or working for 
any considerable portion of their expenses, must bear in mind 
the fact that the school must have returns for the expense in- 
curred, and that favors they receive necessarily obligate them to 
work at times while others may be playing. All such places will 
be filled on contract between the school and the student. The 
student is responsible for time lost, also for arranging substi- 
tute when he is to be absent. 

All work is credited at the end of the school month during 
which the work is performed. Since bills are rendered in ad- 
vance, no work credits can appear on the first month's state- 
ments. Final settlement at the close of the year takes this into 
consideration. 

Any student who cares to pay full expenses, will of course 
be excused from work. Be sure to specify the amount of work 
you wish to do on your application blank Any student who per- 
sistently lags behind or shirks on work assigned, will be charged 
with board at the full rate. 

DRESS FOR GIRLS 

It is not only the privilege, but the duty of every individual 
to present a good appearance. There is sometimes, however, a 
difference of opinion and taste in these matters, and the judg- 
ment of the Dean of Girls is final authority in the school. 

Excessive use of cosmetics is poor taste and is not permitted. 

High heeled shoes (spikes) are detrimental to proper physical 
development and are not allowed. The only exception to this 
rule is in the c".se of Seniors at their graduation, or girls in cos- 
tume work. Every girl should have at least two pairs of sub- 
stantial, comfortable shoes for school and street wear. 

Silk dresses are not permitted for ordinary school wear. 

No uniform is required. If so desired, however, by special 
arrangement with one of the local stores we are in position to 
supply a neat, stylish, but durable, blue serge coat suit, suitable 
for any public occasion at a very moderate price. 

Rain coat, umbrella, and heavy top coat for cold weather 
should be brought from home or provided for. Each girl should 
have an adequate supply of work aprons. 



18 BREVARD INSTITUTE 

All clothing and linens are subject to inspection. 

In the interests of sanitation, borrowing* and lending of 
clothes and linen is absolutely prohibited. Serious skin infec- 
tion may result from violation of this rule. 

Expensive, gaudy or flashy dress is not countenanced at any 
time. The judgment of the Dean is considered final on these 
matters. 

Boys 

Each boy should be provided with clothes sufficient for a neat 
appearance in school and elsewhere in public. Expensive clothes 
are not necessary. In addition, he should have a supply of 
rough wear for work, hikes, and play. 

PARENTS are requested to take these regulations into consider- 
ation and abide by them in providing clothes for their 
children. 



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20 BREVARD INSTITUTE 

In addition to the regular literary work, grades 6 to 11, 
preparatory to college entrance, the Institute offers thorough 
courses in all Commercial branches, music, instrumental or yocal, 
Home Economics, Manual Training, and Vocational Agriculture. 
Work in any of these departments, if of satisfactory nature, may 
"„e counted for High School credit. Our large, well equipped 
farm, offers unusual advantages for practical demonstration 
work in agriculture. Special classes may be organized if there 
is sufficient demand for them, for short courses in dairying, 
printing, and farm accounting. 

We maintain a department doing elementary work of the 
sixth and seventh grades, because of the fact that there are al- 
ways some who come up expecting to do High School work and 
prove incapable of it without additional preparation. We also 
admit those who are really prepared to do work of these 
grades, but we assume no responsibility for keeping them if they 
prove incapable of doing such work. It is necessary to adhere 
strictly to this rule, else we would soon have pupils scattered 
all through the work of all the grades, a task we cannot under- 
take. 

THE DEPARTMENT OF BIBLE STUDY 

Miss Margaret Van Lahr, Director 

We feel that the Department of Bible Study is one of the 
most important phases of our work. It is the field in which we 
do a distinctive work, a work not offered in the public schools. 
From the students in this department, and similar ones in other 
schools, must be recruited the Christian leadership of tomorrow. 

Persuaded by observation and experience, that actual knowl- 
edge of Biblical content is one of the crying needs of the young 
people of today, the first two years of the High School course 
are given to a selective study of the materials making up the 
Old and New Testaments. Very little effort is spent upon in- 
terpretation. The course of study used is that prepared by the 
Committee on Correlation of Bible work in Secondary Schools 
and Colleges, of the National association of Biblical Instructors, 
prepared for Secondary Schools offering a unit of Bible for Col- 
lege Entrance. It is procurable in pamphlet form at a very mod- 
erate price. 

The general aim of the course is to "enable students to 
know the principal narratives and characters of the Bible in 
their historical and social settings; to understand and assimilate 
the thought, and to feel the beauty and spiritual inspiration of 
the Biblical masterpieces." 

The third and fourth years are devoted to a study of the 
origins, nature, and true applications of Christianity as a regen- 
erative force. These courses are of necessity more interpreta- 
tive than those of the lower grades, but the interpretation is 
neither of a denominational nor controversial type. 



BREVARD INSTITUTE 21 

The courses have been designed with the expectation that 
the largest benefit will be derived by the student who begins 
with the first course and follows them through. However, each 
course is an entity in itself, and properly completed, will prove 
well worth the time and effort expended upon it. 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

Miss Earleene Poindexter, Director. 

Our school of business offers, we think, practically every 
advantage that is to be had in any well equipped and directed 
business college. No time or pains is spared in individual drill 
and instruction in order that the student may have a thorough 
comprehension of the principles underlying the work which he 
in doing. Thoroughly competent instruction, coupled with the 
most modern textbooks and methods, substantiate our claim that 
our advantages, though offered at much lower rates than ordin- 
arily found, compare favorably with those of the best schools. 
The following is a description of the courses: 

BOOKKEEPING 

The Twentieth Century Bookkeeping is used, upon comple- 
tion of which a Certificate is issued to the student from the com- 
pany publishing this text. 

The requirements are as follows: 

1. Twenty-five exerecises introducing the ledger, general journal 

cash book, sales journal, purchase journal, and trial bal- 
ance. No more than two weeks should be devoted to this 
introductory part of the course. 

2. Part I. This is modeled on a retail grocery business, and 

with it the student becomes familiar with the simple trans- 
actions and incoming and outgoing papers. 

3. Part II. Partnership. Part II is a Grain and Coal business. 

4. Part III. Corporation. Wholesale grocery and manufacturing. 

At the end of each month of the bookkeeping transactions, 
the student is required to make out trial balances, working 
sheets, statements of profit and loss, balance sheets, adjustment 
entries, closing entries, and post-closing entries. 

5. Standard Tests are given upon the completion of each 
section. 

It should not take more than nine months to complete the 
entire course if a student can spend three or four periods a day 
with the bookkeeping course; even less time is required if the 
student is unusually apt at the work. 

SHORTHAND 

The student may elect either Gregg or Isaac Pitman Short- 
hand. The requirements in the shorthand courses are as 
follows: 



22 BREVARD INSTITUTE 

1. Completion of Textbook, including principles of shorthand, 

dictation of words, sentences, and letters. 

2. Dictation at the rate of 60, 80, and 100 words a minute. 

3. Three one-hundred word letters dictated at the rate of 100 
Words a minute, and a transcript of these letters. 

4. Upon the completion of each section, tests are given which 

the student must pass before he can begin the next section. 
Immediately upon the completion of the principles, a test 
of two huhdred words is given, and the student must pass this 
test before completing the shorthand course. 

TYPEWRITING 

The Touch System of Typewriting is taught. 
The requirements are as follows: 

1. Learning the keyboard with Victrola Rhythm Records, 

learning the technical names of the principal operative parts 
of the typewriter, caring for the typewriter. 

2. One hundred perfect pages, including finger drills, words, 

figures, sentences, tabulated work, and letters. 

3. Writing at the rate of 40 words a minute for 15 minutes on 

unfamiliar copy with not more than 5 errors. 

4. Becoming familiar with more than one make of machine; 

such as Underwood, Royal, L. C. Smith, Remington. 
Timed tests are given from time to time, and each month 
tests are given as furnished by the Typewriter Company. 

PRACTICAL LAW 

The Practical Law course is not intended to make lawyers 
out of those in the class, but to enable them to become familiar 
with the rules of conduct governing ordinary business procedure. 

The following are the requirements for the Bookkeeping 
certificate : 

Completion of the bookkeeping course. 
Completion of the practical law course. 
Completion, of C. spelling. 

The following are t|ie requirements for the Shorthand cer- 
tificate: 

Completion of the shorthand course. 
Completion of the practical law course. 
Completion of the typewriting course. 
Completion of C. spelling. . ,. 

Completion of a short course in business English which 
includes spelling, punctuation, arranging letters, etc. 

The following are the requirements for the Typewriting 
certificate : 

Completion of the typewriting course. 

Completion of the practical law. course. 

Completion ! of C. spelling. , 

Completion of the business English course. ■ .! ; 



BREVARD INSTITUTE 23 

HOME ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT 

Miss Marjorie Beaird, Director. 

DOMESTIC ART I-A (First half, first year) 

This course consists of the study of materials and styles 
suitable for underwear and the making of a complete suit of 
underwear, and some sample work. 

Problems covered: Plain, flat fell, and French seams; run- 
ning, back, combination, machine, feather and blanket stitches; 
simple embroidery stitches, hemstitching; hemmed and over- 
hand patches; button holes; sewing on hooks and eyes, snaps 
and buttons, and mitering corners, 

DOMESTIC ART I-B (Second half, first year) 

This course consists of a study of the care and use of the 
machine, dressmaking, costume designing, simple textiles and 
renovation of clothes. 

Problems covered: Miaking of a cotton dress, a linen dress, 
renovation of a dress and a hat. 

DOMESTIC ART II-A (First half, second year) 

This course consists of a study of budget making, household 
linens, tailored sewing and millinery. 

Problems covered: Budget for a family of four, personal 
budget, a wool dress and a hat. 

DOMESTIC ART II-B. (Second half, second year) 

This course consists of a study of the layette and children's 
clothes, the making of a silk dress, and Home Nursing. 

Problems covered : Listing of articles needed in the layette, 
making of one of these articles, a garment for a child and a 
silk dress for student. 

Equipment needed in all Domestic Art classes: Scissors, 
needles, pins, thimble, pin cushion, emery, tape measure, ma- 
chine bobbin, machine needles, thread. 

DOMESTIC SCIENCE I-A (First half, first year) 

This course consists of a study of the food principles, their 
effect upon the body, how to cook each, the classification of 
foods, the planning of balanced meals and table service for 
s'mple meals. 

DOMESTIC SCIENCE I-B (Second half, first year) 

This course consists of the study of the preparation of suit- 
able dishes for lunches or suppers and dinners and the serving 
of each meal. 

DOMESTIC SCIENCE II-A (First half, second year) 

This course consists of a study of ways of preserving foods, 
diets suitable for various common diseases as digestive dis- 
orders, fevers, infectious diseases, and convalescent diet, special 
attention given to the diet needed by each student. 



24 BREVARD INSTITUTE 

Problems covered: Canning - , preserving, drying, pickling 
and jelly making, preparation of diets for each disease, weigh- 
ing and measuring each student and making a week's menus 
meeting the needs of each student. 

DOMESTIC SCIENCE II-B (Second half, second year) 

This course consists of a study of the preparation of fancy 
dishes, types of service, and home management. 

Problems covered: An afternoon tea, a buffet luncheon, a 
child's party, a dinner and a program for the housewife's work. 

All girls in the Domestic Science classes will be required to 
have white aprons and caps which may be purchased after they 
arrive. 

MUSIC DEPARTMENT 

Miss Julia Merritt, Director. 

Courses as described below are offered in the department of 
music. State adopted text-books are used. 

I. PREPARATORY MUSIC COURSE. 

This course includes the study of elementary theory, sight 
singing, ear training and a short course in music appreciation. 

The class shall meet three forty-five minute periods a week. 
Credit V2 unit 

•II. HARMONY AND HISTORY OF MUSIC. 

The course in harmony includes the study of the tendencies 
of scale tones, intervals and their inversions, triads and their 
inversions, chords of the dominant seventh and their inversions, 
the harmonizing of melodies. 

The course in the history of music traces the development of 
the art and science of music from the earliest records to the 
present day. 

The class shall meet three forty-five minute periods a week, 
the time being divided between the two subjects according to 
the discretion of the teacher Credit V2 unit 

PIANO — Private lessons in piano are given. By this means 
the course can be arranged to meet the needs of the individual 
pupil. 

Technic is regarded only as a means to an end. However, 
all pupils are required to take a certain amount of technic, in 
order that they may learn more quickly how to play the piano 
acceptably. Technical exercises including trills, scales, arpeggios, 
octaves and chords are employed as the needs demand. 

Studies from Burgmuller, Czerny, Bach and other composers 
are taught. 

Careful attention is directed toward teaching the pupil how 
to play musically and artistically pieces suited to his or her 
ability. 



BREVARD INSTITUTE 25 

All pupils are expected to take part in public recitals. All 
solo work is performed from memory in these recitals. 

Two half-hour lessons a week and an hour of practice each 
day are required Credit V2 unit 

For the diploma in piano, in addition to the general require- 
ments for graduation and courses one and two in the music 
department, the following or its equivalent will be required: 

To play all major and minor scales readily and with reason- 
able facility. 

To be able to identify all keys either from the page or from 
the keyboard. 

To perform in satisfactory manner, both technically and in- 
terpretatively, three Little Preludes or Two-voiced Inventions of 
Bach, a sonata by Haydn, Mozart or Beethoven, three represen- 
tative studies from Czerny — Opus 740, and at least two pieces 
by modern composers. 

Two units in music are allowed toward meeting college en- 
trance requirements. 

GLEE CLUB — A boys' glee club and a girls' glee club are 
extra curricular activities of the school. Once a week these glee 
clubs combine for ensemble practice. Training is given in 
voice placement and part singing. Regular attendance at re- 
hearsals and participation in all public performances are re- 
quired. A fee of twenty five cents a month plus the cost of the 
music used is charged each member. 

*III. HARMONY AND MUSIC APPRECIATION. 
(Description of Course in Harmony as found in Course II.) 

The course in music appreciation is designed to lead the 
pupil to a mo^e intelligent understanding 1 and an appreciation 
of music. Victrola records are used in order to illustrate the 
various types and forms of music in the different schools of 
composition. 

The class shall meet three forty-five minute periods a week, 
the time being divided between the two subjects according v,o 
the discretion of the teacher Credit % unit 

( T f this course is added, Course II will be History of 
Music only.) 

VOICE 

Provided there is sufficient demand there will be a class or- 
gan'zed for the elementary study of voice, to meet once a week 
for which a charge of twenty-five cents a lesson will be made. 
This work will include tone-placing, breathing exercises, ear- 
training, part s'nging, solo singing, ensemble work; special 
vocal studies and instruction. 

Individual lessons in this department will be available at the 
rates given in the schedule of fees. Such individual lessons will 
presuppose the completion of a year of study in Piano, and will 



26 BREVARD INSTITUTE 

involve breathing exercises, tone placing, development of throat 
freedom, the singing of scales, arpeggios, exercises and vocalizes 
carefully selected from Sieber, Concone, and Marchesi, and the 
singing of songs and ballads of simple style from representative 
composers. 

STRINGED AND BAND INSTRUMENTS. Instruction in 
stringed and band instruments will be provided for those wish- 
ing it. 

DEPARTMENT OF MANUAL ARTS 

D. W. Rice, Director. 

A thoroughly competent instructor is in charge of this de- 
partment, and courses will be offered for high school credit. 
This department is being introduced for the benefit of all boys 
who enjoy working with their hands, and work in this field is 
recommended for all those who can fit it into their course. It 
is especially for the benefit of those boys whose minds have the 
mechanical turn rather than the abstract. A given amount of 
work is assigned and required to be completed for credit. The 
character of the work done is also considered. 

Manual Training I. This is an introductory course in wood 
working, using at first hand tools, and progressing to the use of 
machines. Study of woods and grains is made, and there are 
various projects required to be completed. 

Manual Training II. This course is a further development 
of skill in the use of tools, and also requires more difficult pro- 
jects. Mechanical drawing and geometrical constructions are 
introduced. The aim is to develop independence and self-con- 
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28 BREVARD INSTITUTE 

(Eoura? of &tub# 



ELEMENTARY 

A regular course of study is followed in the seventh grade, 
according to the outline recommended by the North Carolina 
Department of Education. 
Text Books: Geography Book II: Brigham and McFarlane. 

Good English Book III: Elson-Marsh-Royster. 

History of the United States: Waddy Thompson. 

Arithmetic: Wentworth & Smith, Book II. 

Speller: Lippincott's Horn-Ashbaugh Spelling Book. 

HIGH SCHOOL 

To receive the High School diploma of graduation, the stu- 
dent must have completed sixteen units of regular high school 
work. A half unit in Bible for each year the student is in at- 
tendance at Brevard Institute is also a requirement. Failure in 
more than one such course precludes graduation. 

The passing grade is 75. If deemed advisable, a grade of 65 
on the first semester's work may be accepted as a condition, to 
be made up during the last semester. The average for the two 
semesters must be 75. A good grade made during the first 
semester positively cannot bring up a failure on the last semes- 
ter's work. Such failure must be made up with extra work. 

The minimum requirements for High School graduation in 
North Carolina are as follows: 

English 4 units 

History 2 units 

Science 1 unit 

Mathematics 2 units 

Foreign Language 2 units 

Elective 5 units 

Practically all colleges, however, require Plane Geometry 
for entrance. BREVARD INSTITUTE, therefore, offers the fol- 
lowing 

PROGRAM OF STUDIES: 
First Year 
Required Elective 

English I (One to be taken) 

Math. I, Arith. and Algebra Science I, General 

Hist. I, Community Civics Home Economics I 

Bible I, Old Testament Litera- Agriculture I 

ture Manual Training I 

Second Year 
Required Elective 

English II (Two to be, taken) 

Math II, Algebra Science II, Biology 

Bible II, New Testament Lit- Hist, II, Modern European 
erature Home Economics I or II 

Agriculture II 
Manual Training I or II 



BREVARD INSTITUTE 29 

Third Year 
Required Elective 

English III (Two to be taken) 

Math. Ill, Plane Geometry Science III, Human Physiology, 

Bible III, Origin of Christianity Industrial and Commercial 

Geography 
Hist. Ill, Ancient and Medieval 
Latin I 
French I 

Manual Training II 
Home Economics II 
Fourth Year 
Required Elective 

English IV (Two to be taken) 

Hist. IV, United States Science IV, Physics 

Bible IV, Christianity and the Latin II 
Social Order French II 

Math. IV, Solid Geom. and 
Advanced Algebra 
Commercial courses may also be elected to the extent of 2 
units. 

Note a: Two years in one foreign language, either ancient or 
modern, is required for entrance by most standard col- 
leges. 

Note b: Two years of physical education are required of girls. 
Physical Ed. I is open to Freshmen and Sophomores. 
Physical Ed. II is open to Juniors and Seniors. One- 
half unit of credit is allowed on each course. 

Note c : Two years of spelling is also required in High School. 
No credit is allowed. The work is offered in the inter- 
est of a very apparent need. 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 



HIGH SCHOOL 



Five periods per week for 36 weeks: 1 unit, except in Science, 
where 2 additional laboratory periods are required. 

First Year 
English I. 5 periods, 36 weeks. 

1. Formal work: Thorough drill in the essentials of 
Grammar and punctuation. Practice in writing short 
themes; emphasis on oral drill and practice in speak- 
ing. 

Text: Sentence and Theme, Ward. 

2. Literature: Study of classics. 

Text: "Literature and Life," Book I. 

3. Parallel reading: Outside reading of four books, with 
report on them. 

General Science with Laboratory. 7 periods, 36 weeks. 

Essentials of every day Science with Laboratory projects 
and reports. 

Text: General Science, Snyder. 



30 BREVARD INSTITUTE 

Mathematics I. Arithmetic: 5 periods, 18 weeks (fall). 

A review of general principles, with emphasis on practical 
applications, short methods, and theory. 

Text: Advanced Arithmetic, Wentworth-Smith. 
Algebra: 5 periods, 18 weeks (spring). Through factoring. 
Text: Academic Algebra, Wentworth-Smith. 
History I. Community Civics: 5 periods, 36 weeks. 

A study of men in their every day relations with others in 
an ordered and self-governed society — a study of customs 
and practices. 

Text: Community Life and Civic Problems, Hill. 
Agriculture I. 7 periods, 36 weeks. 

An elementary study in soils, soil fertilization, farm 
crops and prevention of pests. 

Text: Productive Farm. Crops, Montgomery. 
Home Economics I. 7 periods, 36 weeks. 1 unit. 

See Home Economics Department. 
Manual Training I. 7 periods, 36 weeks. 1 unit. 

See Manual Training Department. 
Bible I. Biblical content: 3 periods, 36 weeks. 

Outline of Old Testament material, memory work and 
reading in the Old Testament. Use is made of maps to 
make the study more interesting and intelligible. 

Text: Pamphlet: Outline prepared for and adopted by 
the National Association of Biblical Instructors. 

Second Year 

English II. 5 periods, 36 weeks. 

1. Formal work: Further drills in the essentials of Gram- 
mar and punctuation; numerous written exercises. 

Text: Correct English Usage, Evalin Pribble. 

2. Literature: Literature as Story. 
Text: "Literature and Life," Book II. 

3. Parallel Reading: Outside reading of four books, with 
reports on them. 

Mathematics II. 5 periods, 36 weeks. 
Algebra completed. 

Text: Academic Algebra, Wentworth-Smith. 
Science II. Biology: 7 periods, 33 weeks. 

Application of principles of Biology to plant and animal 
life. Field and laboratory work required. 

Text: New Biology, Smallwood, Reveley, Bailey. 
History II. Modern European: 5 periods, 36 weeks. 

Study of the movements and forces molding the trend of 
events in Europe since the middle ages. 

Text: History of Europe, Robinson and Beaird. 
Agriculture II. 7 periods, 36 weeks. 

(Fall) Animal Husbandry. (Spring) Farm methods and 
use and care of farm equipment. 

Text: (Fall) Animal Husbandry, Harper; (Spring, 
Garden Farming, Corbett. 
Home Economics I or II. 7 periods, 36 weeks. 1 unit. 

See Home Economics Department. 
Manual Training I or II. 7 periods, 36 weeks. 1 unit. 
See Manual Training Department. 



BREVARD INSTITUTE 31 

Bible II. Biblical content: 3 periods, 36 weeks. 

Outline of New Testament material, memory work and 
reading in the New Testament. Maps are used as in 
Bible I. 

Text: Same as Bible I. 

Third Year 
English III. 5 periods, 36 weeks. 

1. Formal work: Study of rhetoric and composition; ex- 
tensive work in oral and written composition. 

Text: "High School English," Miller and Palmer. 

2. Literature: Study of classics. 

Text: "Literature and Life," Book III. 

3. Parallel reading: Outside reading of five books, with 
reports on them. 

Mathematics III. Plane Geometry: 5 periods, 36 weeks. 

Completion of the five books of Plane Geometry. Orig- 
inal exercises are stressed. The aim is to cultivate the 
pupil's reasoning powers, rather than his memory. 
Text: Plane Geometry, Wentworth-Smith. 

History III. Ancient and Medieval: 5 periods, 36 weeks. 
From the dawn of History down to modern times. 
Text: Early Progress, West. 

Latin. I. 5 periods, 36 weeks. 

Grammar, with reading in prose. Composition. "Latin of 
Today" is used as a text, and emphasizes Roman customs. 
It is a great aid to the study of Roman History. There is 
also much drill in English cognates. 

Text: "Latin of Today," Gray and Jenkins. 
French I. 5 periods, 36 weeks. 

Elements of French. The conversational method is 
largely used. Reading in simple French prose. 

Text: New French Grammar, Frazier and Squair. 
Manual Training II. 7 periods, 36 weeks. 

See Manual Training Department. 
Home Economics II. 7 periods, 36 weeks. 
See Home Economics Department. 
Science III. Human Physiology: 7 periods, 18 weeks (fall). 
Text: Lippincott's Physiology. 
Industrial and Commercial Geography: 7 periods, 18 
weeks (spring). 

Text: Physical and Regional Geography, Chamberlain. 
Bible III. Life and Work of Jesus: 3 periods, 18 weeks (fall). 
Life and Work of Paul: 3 periods, 18 weeks (spring) This 
course is a study in the foundations of Christianity. The 
aim is to give the pupil real insight into the origin and real 
meaning of Christianity as a saving force in a world of 
sin. The instruction is entirely undenominational. 
Text: Life of Christ, Stalker. 
Life of Paul, Stalker. 



32 BREVARD INSTITUTE 

Fourth Year 

English IV. 5 periods, 36 weeks. 

1. Formal work: Rapid and extensive review of the 
principles of grammar, oral and written composition. 

Text: "High School English," Miller and Palmer. 

2. Literature: Extensive study of English literature and 
a briefer study of American literature. 

Text: "Literature and Life," Book IV. 

3. Parallel reading: Six books will be read outside class 
and reports made on them. 

History IV. American History and Government: 5 periods, 36 
weeks. 

American civil problems and the operation of the Ameri- 
can government will be studied. 
Text: The American People, West. 

Science IV. Physics: 7 periods, 36 weeks. 

A treatment of principles and theory, coupled with lab- 
oratory work, experiments and observation. An introduc- 
tory course. 

Text: To be selected. 

Latin II. 5 periods, 36 weeks. 

The amount of Latin prose required by the American 
Classical League is read. Grammar, prose and composition. 
Text: "Second Year Latin," Foster. 

French II. 5 periods, 36 weeks. 

Irregular verbs. Between 250 and 300 pages of reading 
in French is required, consisting of drama, short stories, 
and journals. Conversation is emphasized in the classroom. 
Text: Grammar as in French I. 
Reader : France,. Michaud and Marinoni. 

Mathematics IV. Solid Geometry: 5 periods, 18 weeks (fall). 
Advanced Algebra: 5 periods, 18 weeks (spring). 
Text: To be selected. 

Latin III. 5 periods, 36 weeks. 

This course will be offered if there is a demand for it. It 
consists in the reading of the equivalent of six orations 
of Cicero. Grammar. Composition. Sight reading. 
Text: To be selected. 

Bible IV. Christianity and the Social Order: 3 periods, 36 weeks. 
The aim of this course is to follow that of Bible III. It 
is hoped that the pupil, with a knowledge of the true aim 
and purpose of Christianity, will be given an insight into 
the need and method of its actual application to social 
problems of today. 

Text: Shackford: The Program of the Christian Re- 
ligion. 
Auxiliary: Rauschenbush : Christianizing the Social Or- 
der. 



BREVARD INSTITUTE 33 

General Stegulatuma 

Read carefully. Unless you can abide by the 
following regulations, do not ask for admittance. 

1. Girls who have reached their thirteenth birthday and boys 
who have reached their fourteenth birthday, of good health and 
good character may be received as boarding pupils, provided they 
are prepared to do the work of the school, which means grades 6 
to 11. Children who are not prepared for the sixth grade, posi- 
tively need not apply. Children under the ages given above, but 
who are prepared to do the work we offer can be admitted at an 
additional charge of $2.50 per month. 

2. Those desiring to enter school should fill out application 
blank and return to the superintendent, with matriculation fee. 
If the application is not approved, the fee will be returned. 

3. Credits from other schools are accepted at the superin- 
tendent's discretion. All new pupils should bring with them 
reports from former schools. 

4. Parents wishing their children to leave the Institute at any 
time other than the beginning of the Christmas vacation or the 
close of the year in May must notify the superintendent directly, 
not through the pupil. Such notice must reach the superintend- 
ent at least one week before the absence desired, so that the 
superintendent may communicate with the parents if necessary, 
before the request is granted. 

5. No boarding student will be exempt from attendance as 
requ'red on Sunday School and church services; nor from indus- 
trial duties except by special arrangement. 

6. Girls in the dormitory cannot receive visits or mail from 
young men except when their parents send to the superintendent 
written permission for them to do so. All communication with 
young men must be with the knowledge and consent of both par- 
ents and superintendent. No form of written communication 
with boys or men in or near the school is permitted. 

7. No boarding pupil is allowed to leave the Institute grounds 
at any time without permission of the proper supervisor, except 
that it is understood the boys may visit town on Saturday after- 
noon after school, and may go for walks and hikes in groups on 
Sunday afternoon. In no case is loitering and loafing around 
streets and stores, permitted. 

8. Day pupils are required to be prompt and regular in at- 
tendance, and not loiter on the streets or in the stores on even- 
ings just preceding a school day. It is understood that when on 
or about the campus they will conform to the same standard of 
conduct required of boarding pupils. 

9. Boarding students are not expected to visit home or friends 
oftener than once in six weeks unless for urgent cause. 

10. In case of expulsion for improper or immoral conduct, 
money cannot be refunded, as unruly students are expensive at 
any price and are not wanted. Pupils knowing themselves to be 
impure, dishonest, or immoral are advised not to come here. 



34 BREVARD INSTITUTE 

11. Students must pay full value for damage done to prop- 
erty. The cost of breakage in bedrooms must be paid by the oc- 
cupants equally in cases where the blame cannot be definitely 
located. 

12. Boarding students are not allowed to keep guns, pets, 
or automobiles. 

13. The use of extra electrical equipment, with the excep- 
tion of curlers, is prohibited. Ironing in the rooms positively 
must not be done. Tampering with, or re-arrangement of elec- 
tric wiring is expressly forbidden, and will be severely dealt 
with. 

14. The Institute cannot advance money or school supplies, 
but parents may make deposit with the cashier to be used as 
needed. Students must not borrow money or clothing from each 
other. 

15. If a student is compelled to be absent for two weeks 
or more in succession, time will be extended into next semester, 
if cause of absence is promptly reported to the principal and ap- 
proved by him. 

16. Tuition fees and board are payable on entrance and in 
advance at the beginning of each term thereafter, for the eighteen 
weeks, or the remainder thereof unless monthly payments without 
discounts are preferred. In no case can contracts be made for 
board for less than a month, and no money can be returned for 
an'" departure b-fore the end of the school month. For dates 
of termination of school months, see calendar. 

17. If accounts cannot be paid in full, a note from patron 
for amount due at 6 per cent interest will be accepted with the 
approval of the superintendent. 

18. Music or other "extra" lessons missed through fault of 
teacher or school will be made up to the student. If missed 
through fault of student or on account of holidays or examina- 
tions, they will not be deducted from bill. 

19. All complaints or requests of parents should be sent to 
the superintendent by separate letter and not in student's letter. 

20. Polite conduct is required of every student on all occa- 
sions. Development of cultured character : s regarded as one of 
our chief functions. 

21. Anv student who repeatedlv violates anv of the above 
rules, or who shows himself consistently to be out of harmonv 
with the spirit of the Institute, mav be a?ked at any time to 
sever his connections with the school. 

22. Except in case of emergency, do not ask to leave ahead 
of time for holidays or week-ends. If unavo ; dablv detained at 
home, the pupil must bring a written explanation from hom°, or 
no excuse will be granted. An unexcu?ed absence counts 5 per 
cent against the monthly grade. 

23. Failure in any subject for three months in succession 
means demotion to the next lower grade in that subject. If anv 
nupil fails three months in success : on on all his work, he is sent 
home. 

24. It is earnestly urged that if you find it necessary to leave 



BREVARD INSTITUTE 35 

school, you take the matter up with the business office before 
leaving, in order that the proper adjustment of accounts may be 
made on our books. 

PENALTIES 

Penalties are used only as a last resort or in flagrant cases of 
misconduct. The pupil of right mind and proper training will 
respond to suggestion, reproof, and correction. 

Any penalty assessed is designed to meet the particular sit- 
uation for which it is assessed. The purpose of punishment is 
correction, and in some instances, such as damaged property, the 
recovery of values. Various penalties may be employed, at the 
discretion of the teacher or supervisor, except that no major 
penalty may be assessed without the approval of the superin- 
tendent. A major penalty is the assessment of ten or more de- 
merits for one offense. 

DEMERITS 

Demerits are cumulative. They may be assessed by any 
teacher or supervisor for misconduct in the class-room or else- 
where, but demerits assessed must be reported weekly to the 
superintends. 

When any student accumulates 25 demerits, he is warned in 
regard to Irs conduct, and all penalties assigned according to the 
nature of the case. 

When a student accumulates 50 demerits, all personal priv- 
ileges are forfeited for a period of one month, or longer unless 
his conduct improves. Such privileges include all social contacts 
with the other sex, permission to visit home or elsewhere, or to 
leave the campus unless on urgent business, and then only when 
properly chaperoned. He is also ineligible to hold any special 
work or scholarship from the school. These places are cons'd- 
ered as rewards for merit. 

When a student accumulates 75 demerits, he is considered 
hopelessly out of harmony with the ideals of our institution, and 
it is suggested that he leave school before it becomes necessary 
to resort to expulsion. If he prefers to stay and reform his con- 
duct, he has a margin of 25 ; n his favor, but the accumulation 
of 100 demerits during one term automatically severs his con- 
nection with the school. All demerits above 75 are assessed by 
majority vote of the faculty. 

WHAT THE STUDENT SHOULD BRING 

1. REPORT CARD OR RECORD OF PREVIOUS WORK. 

2. All personal wearing apparel and toilet articles. 

3. Four sheets. 

4. REPORT CARD OR RECORD OF PREVIOUS WORK. 

5. Umbrella, Raincoat, Overcoat. 

6. A willing heart and 

7. REPORT CARD OR RECORD OF PREVIOUS WORK. 



36 BREVARD INSTITUTE 

g>wj0ej0tt0ttfl to JJarenifi 

1. Give your children the advantage of an education. This 
may require a sacrifice on your part, but it will increase the hap- 
piness of your children through all their lives, besides multiply- 
ing their capacity for usefulness. 

2. After they have been placed in school, give them to un- 
derstand that they must sacrifice enough to remain there faith- 
fully unless real emergency prevents. Success always requires 
sacrifice. 

3. Write at least once a week to your children and have them 
write to you not less frequently. Loving letters, firm when nec- 
essary, but always loving are the inherent right of every child 
away from home. 

4. If your child needs special care or attention in any 
respect, write to the superintendent about it. If the Institute 
can undertake to give this special attention, it should be begun 
early. If it cannot be given, you should know it. 

5. Do not make unnecessary special requests, particularly 
about irregular entrance or departure. One great advantage of 
boarding school life is the lesson of regularity it inculcates, and 
this is utterly lost to those who receive special treatment. 

If further information is desired, write 

J. F. WINTON, Superintendent, 

Brevard, N. C. 



BREVARD INSTITUTE 37 

ijntuirfl for ^rijolarBfjipa ttt $lre moita ffrara 

1908— Ella (Lilly) Harris, Raleigh, N. C. 

1909 — Connie (Jolley) Duncan, Spruce Pine, N. C. 

1910 — Ada (Blum) Wetmore, Reidsville, N. C. 

1911 — Bessie Tyler, Lawrenceville, Va. 

1912 — Aleph (Baber) Hendrickson, Spartanburg, S. C. 

1913 — Ola Callahan, Mexico. 

1914 — Alva Queen, Wolf Mountain, N. C. 

1916 — Marie (Hamrick) Barnett, Ellenboro, N. C. 

1917 — Harold Norwood, Brevard, N. C. 

1918 — Amanda (Stutts) Parker, Wolf Mountain, N. C. 

1919 — Ruth Horton, Gaffney, S. C. 

1920 — Ferd Hayes, Kings Mountain, N. C. 

1921— John McNeil, Miller's Creek, N. C. 

1922 — John McNeil, Miller's Creek, N. C. 

1923— John McNeil, Miller's Creek, N. C. 

1924 — John McNeil, Miller's Creek, N. C. 

1925 — Ena Williams, Penrose, N. C. 

1926— Lorene Short, Shelby, N. C. 

1927 — Opal Goodman, Concord, N. C. 

1928 — Carl Drumeller, Montgomery, Ala. 

1929 — Hope Menendez, Tampa, Fla. 



38 BREVARD INSTITUTE 

Alumni Assnriatum 



OFFICERS 



President Mr. 0. H. Orr, '10, Brevard, N. C. 

Vice-President .... Miss Ressie Kate Meece, '27, Brevard, N. C 

Cor. Secretary . . Miss Earleenne Poindexter, '11, Brevard, N. C. 

Rec. Secretary . . Miss Earleene Poindexter, '11, Brevard, N. C 

Treasurer Miss Earleene Poindexter, '11, Brevard, N. <J. 

Chaplain Miss Estella Powell, '25, Cullowhee, N. C. 

GRADUATING CLASS OF 1907 

High School — Mary Lou (Gray) Hurst, Saskatchewan, Canada; 
Ella Rebecca Smith, deceased; Jennie (Weilt) Maybach, Bre- 
vard, N. C. 

Business — Edith (England) Patton, Brevard, N. C; Walter Weilt, 
Brevard, N. C. 

Dressmaking — Leona Allen, Hendersonville, N. C. ; Myrtle 
(Baber) Falls, Winston-Salem, N. C; Etta (Carroll) Robbins, 
Forest City, N. C; Mabel (Edney) Freeman, Bat Cave, N. C. ; 
Eula (McLean) Grogan, Brevard, N. C; Stella Seaford, 
Rutherfordton, N. C. 

GRADUATING CLASS OF 1908 

High School Department — Eugene Allison, Brevard, N. C. ; Wil- 
liam Hicks Allison, deceased. 

Piano Department — Effie Toleva (Maxwell) Brown, deceased. 

Dressmaking — Estelle Florence Moore, Cheraw, S. C; Cora 
Eugenia Jenkins, Dallas, N. C. 

CERTIFICATES GRANTED IN 19D8 

Bookkeeping — Carl Hamilton Case, Brevard, N. C. 

Typewriting and Shorthand — Laura Elvira Smith, Allons, Tenn. 

Bookkeeping and Typewriting — Juanita Weaver, Hazelwood, N.C. 
GRADUATING CLASS OF 1909 

Normal Department — Mary (Kirkendall) Smith, Winston-Salem, 
N. C.J Emma (Brannock) Jones, Chicago, 111. 

Domestic Art Department — Grace Louise (Taylor) Lumley, 
Augustine, Alabama. 

GRADUATING CLASS OF 1910 

High School Department — Mabel Reid Ashe, York, S. C. ; Hilary 
Brenton Brounot, Wilkinsburg, Pa.; Kathleen Adelaide Er- 
win, Brevard, N. C. ; Bessie Marie (Rice) Pickelsimer, Bre- 
vard, N. C. , 

Normal Department — Mary Ward (Underwood) Boyks, Hen- 
dersonville, N. C; Bessie Agnes (Wh'te) Hinson, High Point, 
N. C. 

Bookkeeping and Stenography — Connie Ethel (Jolly) Duncan, 
Spruce Pine, N. C. ; Richard Huskin, Mercer, Pa. 
CERTIFICATES GRANTED IN 1910 

Stenography — Ola Eugene Callahan, Mexico; Earle c ne Lehman 
Poindexter, Brevard, N. C. ; Ammie (Wilson) Melton, Caro- 
leen, N. C. 













■ * . 



iliffilliSiil^ 






o 
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a 

o 
o 







■ ■ 



-■- •■ -I 'frill 1 I 






-. _ .. • 



40 BREVARD INSTITUTE 

English and Modern Language — Mary (Breese) Allison, Bre- 
vard, N. C. 
Typewriting — Mildred Lucile (Timmons) Tisdale, Shelton, S. C 

GRADUATING CLASS OF 1911 

High School — Florence Delia (Aiken) Clayton, St. Petersburg, 
Fla. ; Kanella Josephine Bradley, Councils, N. C; Mary Kate 
(Gash) Maxwell, Pisgah Forest, N. C. ; William Walter Hurst, 
Newport, Va. ; Sallie Sophronia Merrill, Etowah, N. C. ; Mary 
Elizabeth (Rice) Loftis, Brevard, N. C; Ammie (Wilson) 
Melton, Caroleen, N. C. 

Normal Department — Mary Kate (Gash) Maxwell, Pisgah For- 
est, N. C; Sallie Sophronia Merrill, Etowah, N. C. ; Elizabeth 
Veale Tyler, Lawrenceville, N. C. 

Commercial Department — Earleene Lehman Poindexter, Bre- 
vard, N. C. 

Piano Department — Mabel (Wells) Smith, Forest City, N. C. 

Domestic Art Department — Annie Claywell Howard, deceased. 

CERTIFICATES GRANTED IN 1911 

Stenography — Allie (Cantrell) Wilson, Brevard, N. C. ; Una Cot- 
ron Edwards, Cliffside, N. C; Lela Mae (Huntley) Sherrill, 
Lenoir, N. C. ; William Walter Hurst, Newport, Va. ; Lila Belle 
Lewis, Rutherfordton, N. C; Grace Kathryne Morrison, 
Pontiac, Mich.; Mary (Underwood) Boyles, Hendersonville, 
N. C. 

Dressmaking and Millinery — Alada Ruth (Drummond) Miller, 
Hendersonville, N. C. ; Alice Mae (McBrayer) Gray, Spring 
Hope, N. C. ; Clemantine Via, Spray, N. C. 

Lacemaking — Reba (McGaha) Raxter, Brevard, N. C. ; Emma 
Mary Wooten, Raleigh, N. C. 

GRADUATING CLASS OF 1912 

Classical Department — Frances A. (Atkins) Tomlinson, Thomas- 
ville, N. C; Ada L. (Blum) Wetmore, Reidsville, N. C. ; Vera 
(House) Ivey, Birnr'ngham, Ala.; Beulah B. (King) Berry- 
hill, Charlotte, N. C. ; Nena (Palmer) Wheeler, Washington, 
D. C. ; Meda M. (Penland) Darraut>h, Calexico, Cal.; Eliza 
W. (Wallis) Rawls, Asheville, N. C. 

Normal Department — Ada (Blum) Wetmore, Reidsville, N. C; 
Esther (Gray) Willis, New Bern, N. C; Matilda (Gray) Dry- 
mon, Tuckaseigee, N. C. ; Sallie (Rice) Spencer, Canton, N. C. 

Agriculture Department — John E. Ivey, B'rmingham, Ala. 

Commercial Department — Clarence D. Douglas, Raleigh, N. C; 
Geo. S. Shuford, Cliffside, N. C. 

Domestic Art Department — Ava (Ashworth) Paxton, Brevard, 
N. C; Jennie Hodges, Tigersville, S. C. ; Ammie (Wilson) 
Melton, Caroleen, N. C. 

CERTIFICATES GRANTED IN 1912 

Stenography — Kathryne Peterson, Whiteville, N. C. 
Shorthand — Mary (Breese) Broughton, Meridian, M ; ss. 
Dressmak'ng and Millinery — Ruby (Brintle) Burns, Chattanooga, 
Tenn. ; Drucilla (Hamlin) Ashworth, Brevard, N. C. 



BREVARD INSTITUTE 41 

Dressmaking — Julia Pippin, Davidson, N. C. ; Lola Belk Mc- 

Brayer, Rutherfordton, N. C. ; Mary (Harrell) Gelbach, 

Townson, Md. 
Millinery — Esther (Sizemore) Smith, Greenville, S. C. ; Annie 

(Crawford) Shelton, Erwin, Tenn. 
Household Economics — Mary (Harrell) Gelbach, Townson, Md. ; 

Ruby (Brintle) Burns, Chattanooga, Tenn. 
Basketry — Eula (Ivey) Blalock, Norwood, N. C. 

GRADUATING CLASS OF 1913 

Classical Department — Mary Blanche Brown, Walnut Cove, N. 
C. ; Arah West (Davis) Hamlin, Asheville, N. C; Lillian 
(Hurst) Parris, deceased; Clara Elizabeth (Leatherwood) 
Starnes, Crossville, Tenn.; Elsie (Matheson) Smeidberg, Balt- 
imore, Md.; T. Purvis Runyan, Charlotte, N. C; Laura Bessie 
Smith, Drayton, S. C. ; William Martin Sheridan, Spartan- 
burg, S. C; Blanch Bell (Whitaker) Untriner, Pensacola, Fla. 

Normal Department — Allie Maude (Cantrell) Wilson, Brevard, 
N. C. ; Arah West (Davis) Hamlin, Asheville, N. C. ; Beulah 
Bell (King) Berryhill, Charlotte, N. C; Mary Elizabeth 
(Rice) Loftis, Brevard, N. C. 

Agriculture Department — George Benjamin Blum, Lexington, N. 
C; Herschell L. Wilson, Brevard, N. C. 

Commercial Department — Sallie Mabel (Doub) Hauser, Wins- 
ton-Salem, N. C. 

Piano Department — Florence (Carter) Bearden, Proctor, N. C; 
Mary Elizabeth (Rice) Loftis, Brevard, N. C. 

Household Economics Department — Ruby May (Brintle) Burns, 
Chattanooga, Tenn. 

CERTIFICATES GRANTED IN 1913 

Dressmaking — Eunice Hathcock, Norwood, N. C; Beulah Belle 

(King) Berryhill, Charlotte, N. C; Alice Cary Martin, Wades- 

boro, N. C. 
Stenography — Annie Lee (Ferree) Baden, Wilmington, N. C. ; 

Eunice Janet (Grist) Steding, Greenville, S. C; Nena Palmer 

Wheeler, Washington, D. C. 
Bookkeeping — Frank Dillard, Central, S. C. 

DIPLOMAS GRANTED IN 1914 

Classical Department — Sarah Marguerite Galloway, Greensboro, 
N. C; Clarence D. Douglas, Raleigh, N. C; Zula Marie Wil- 
liams, Greensboro, N. C. ; Ola Eugene Callahan, Mexico, Ossie 
Mendora Clayton, Hendersonville, N. C; William Russell 
Wells, Spindale, N. C. 

High School Department — Gertrude Inez Edwards, deceased; 
Moleta Cone (Yow) Baynes, Greensboro, N. C; Etta Evelyn 
Henderson, deceased; Ethel Mae (Leatherwood) Barnhill, 
Roanoke Rapids, N. C. ; Neppie Clary (Brothers) Griffin, 
Asheville, N. C; Daisy Birdelle (Jennings) Moore, Cleve- 
land, N. C; Omra B. Jones, China Grove, N. C; Antonio 
Macias y Martinez, Santiago, Cuba. 

Normal Department— Lillian (Hurst) Parris, deceased; Cora 
Willson, Clinton, S. C. 



42 BREVARD INSTITUTE 

Commercial Department — Jennie (Hensley) Tweed, Asheville, N. 

C; Ethel Leona (Stanton) Greer, East Flat Rock, N. C; Her- 

schell Wilson, Brevard, N. C. ; Wilhelmina (Williams) Frans, 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 
Household Economics Department — Beulah (King) Berryhill, 

Charlotte, N.C.; Cora Willson, Clinton, S. C. 
Domestic Art Department — Lillian (Hurst) Parris, deceased; 

Ethel Mae (Leatherwood) Barnhill, Roanoke Rapids, N. C. 

DIPLOMAS GRANTED IN 1915 

Classical Department — Fannie Augusta Bame, Charlotte, N. C; 
Annie Mae (Galloway) Sheldon, Liberty, S. C; Bertha Carl 
Hipp, Charlotte, N. C; Jeter Matthews, Florida; Alva Queen, 
Wolf Mountain, N. C. 

High School Department — Elizabeth Matilda (Bennett ) Brimmer, 
Asheville, N. C; Venie Boyd Johnson, Columbia, S. C. ; Gladys 
Evelyn (Martin) Crawley, Alton, Va.; Effie Orr Matthews, 
Argura, N. C. ; Flora Arlee (Messer) Marrow, Ola, N. C; 
James Hilliard Sheridan, Spartanburg, S. C. ; Mabel (Wells) 
Smith, Forest City, N. C. 

Normal Department — Nellie (Clayton) Boyette, Goldsboro, N. 
C. ; Flora Arlee (Messer) Marrow, Ola, N. C. ; Alva Queen, 
Wolf Mountain, N. C. ; Fannie Helena Rudisill, Iron Moun- 
tain, N. C. 

Domestic Art Department — May Buchanan, Sylva, N. C. 

Domestic Science Department — Ethel Mae (Leatherwood) Barn- 
hill, Roanoke Rapids, N. C. 

Piano Department — Clarence D. Douglas, Raleigh, N. C. Gladys 
Evelyn (Martin) Crawley, Alton, Va. ; Venie Boyd Johnson, 
Columbia, S. C. 

Voice Department — Mabel (Wells) Smith, Forest City, N. C. 

Commercial Department — Ola Eugene Callahan, Mexico; Lillie 
May (Collins) McCall, Penrose, N. C; Linda Lee (Ward) 
Crowell, Asheville, N. C; Ruth (Berry) Rogers, Atlanta, Ga. 

CERTIFICATES GRANTED IN 1915 

Bookkeeping and Typewriting — Mabel Truzella (Gilleland) 

Smith, Catawba, N. C. 
Shorthand and Typewriting — Rosa Bell Bonkemeyer, Randleman, 

N .C. 
Dressmaking — Carrie May (Wasson) Shirrill, Statesville, N. C. 

DIPLOMAS GRANTED IN 1916 

College Entrance — Annie Mae (Galloway) Sheldon, Liberty, S. C. 

Classical Department — Viva Jane King, Charlotte, N. C. ; Carrie 
Louise McNeelv, Lake Toxaway, N. C. ; Woodford Zachary, 
Brevard, N. C. 

High School Department — Robert Earl Crawford, Chesnee, S. C. ; 
Laura (Hannah) Faas, Apollo, Pa.; Mayme Eva Hastings, 
Dallas, N. C; Austin O'Kelley, Lynchburg, Va. ; Cecil Herbert 
Sheffidd, Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Normal Department— Lillie Mae Allen, Charlotte, N. C; Mayme 
Eva Hastings, Dallas, N. C. ; Etta Evelyn, Henderson, de- 
ceased. 



BREVARD INSTITUTE 43 

Agriculture Department — Robert Earl Crawford, Chesnee, S. 
C. ; Marcias y Martinez, Santiago, Cuba.; Jeter Matthews, 
St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Domestic Art Department — Elizabeth Matilda (Bennett) Brim- 
mer, Ashevilh , N. C; Catherine Hope (Wells) Logan, Forest 
City, N. C. 

Household Economics Department — Fannie Bame, Charlotte, N. C. 

CERTIFICATES GRANTED IN 1916 

Domestic Art — Eva Myrtle Kiser, Bessemer City, N. C; Willie 

Mae (Baber) Bright, Welford, S. C. 
Household Economics — Catherine Hope (Wells) Logan, Forest 

City, N. C. 
Bookkeeping — William Russell Wells, Spindale, N. C. 

DIPLOMAS GRANTED IN 1917 

College Entrance — Georg\ Lazelle Smith, Bostic, N. C. 

Classical Department — Laura Frances Beard, Mount Airy, N. C. ; 
Marie (Hamrick) Barnette, Ellenboro, N. C. 

High School Department — Lattie Milton Hensley, Columbia, S. 
C. ; Elsie Salome Teeter, Albemarle, N. C. 

Normal Department- — Ruth Naomi Brooks, Brevard, N. C. ; Le- 
nora Allen Hipp, Charlotte, N. C. 

Piano Department — Ellen Virginia (Bagwell) Matthews, Green- 
ville, S. C. 

Domestic Art Department — Viva Jane King, Charlotte, N. C; 
Edna (Hunt) War,, West Asheville, N. C. 

Agriculture Department — Cecil Herbert Sh c ffield, Winston- 
Salem, N. C. 

CERTIFICATES GRANTED IN 1917 

Household Economics — Willie Mae (Baber) Bright, Welford, S. 
C; Kath> rine (Boggs) Lyday, Pisgah Forest, N. C; Ferrr, 
Jewell Kiser, Bessemer City, N. C. ; Emma Dell (Searcy) 
Sheridan, Spartanburg, S. C. 

Domestic Art — Katherine Grant (Boggs) Lyday, Pisgah Forest, 
N. C; Florence Virginia Moore, Cliffside, N. C. 

Dressmaking — Julia Dancy Chase, Jacksonville, Fla. 

Voice — Magdalene Parham, Newbern, N. C. 

Piano — Kate Annie Patton, Brevard, N. C. 

Bookkeeping — T. Purvis Runyan, Charlotte, N. C. 

DIPLOMAS GRANTED IN 1918 

Classical Department — Frank Siler Clark. Ansonvilie, N. C; Eus- 
tace Erastus Leatherwood, deceased ; William Joseph Scruggs, 
Br vard, N. C. ; Elizabeth Zachary, Brevard, N. C. 

High School Department — Bess'e Lee Allen, Horse Shoe, N .C; 
Lela Mae (Bennett) Clark, West Asheville, N. C; Thomas L. 
Dillard, Central, S. C; Charles Amos Hamrick, Caroleen, 
N. C. ; Addie Verona Harrelson, Charleston, S. C. ; Roy B. 
Holland, Forest City, N. C; William Oscar Park- r, Wolf 
Mountain, N. C; Emma Dell (Searcy) Sheridan, Spartanburg, 
S. C. ; Russell Lowell Young, Columbia, S. C. 

Normal Department — Marie (Hamr'ck* Barnette, EUenboro N. C. 

Household Economics D partm"nt — Lillian Myrtle (Baber) FTs, 
Shelby, N. C; Emma Dell (Searcy) Shcr'dan, Spartanburg, S. C. 



44 BREVARD INSTITUTE 

CERTIFICATES GRANTED IN 1918 

Dressmaking — Daisy Elizabeth Daniel, Forest City, N. C. ; Mary 

Elizabeth Vining, Florida. 
Domestic Art — Lillie Bell (Hines) Bennett, Merriweather, S. C. 
Household Economics — Pearl Mae Ervin, Troutman, N. C. 
Shorthand — Marinda (Smart) Brown, Tryphosa, N. C. 

DIPLOMAS GRANTED IN 1919 

Classical Department — Minnie Mahala (Burns) Clayton, Cedar 

Mountain, N. C; Lamar Galloway, Asheville, N. C. ; Maud 

Dewry McNeely, Lake Toxaway, N. C. 
High School Department — Alda Edna English, Ashford, N. C; 

Pearl Mae Ervin, Troutman, N. C. ; Elzora Simpson, Brevard, 

N. C. 
Normal Department — Ewer Laurence Bame, Salisbury, N. C. ; 

Minnie Mahala (Burns) Clayton, Cedar Mountain, N. C; 

Ruby Rutiel McLean, Whittier, N. C. 
Commercial Department — Martha Marinda (Smart) Brown, 

Tryphosa, N. C. 
Dressmaking^Myrtle Isabelle Kitchen, Balsam Grove, N. C. 

CERTIFICATES GRANTED IN 1919 

Dressmaking — Myrtle Isabelle Kitchen. Balsam Grove, N. C; 
Julia Ashley Williams, Worthville, N. C; Tabitha Dorothy 
(Vining) Fullwood, Miami, Fla. 

Household Economics — Mary Melrose Duckworth, Kernersville, 
N. C; Estelle Reeves, Arlington, S. C. 

Stenography — Fay Eva (Best) Cole, Cliffside, N. C. ; Sarah Cath- 
erine (Wells) Caines, Port Royal, S. C. 

Bookkeeping — William Josk ph Scruggs, Brevard, N. C. 

DIPLOMAS GRANTED IN 1920 

(Begining with 1920, all diplomas are of eleven grades value. 

Prior to this date only the College Entrance Diplomas r\ quired 

eleven years of work.) 

College Entrance Department — R. ba Ashworth, Brevard, N. C. ; 
Anna Mae Garren, Brevard, N. C. 

Academic Department — Mary Louise Smith, Inman, S. C; Ella 
Eliza Zachary, Calvert, N. C; Cora Blanch Turner, Gastonia, 
N. C; Gladys Louis*. Williams, Lake Toxaway, N. C. 

Pedagogy Department — Nelle Mae Allen. Horse Shoe, N. C. ; 
Alda Edna English, Ashford, N. C; Maude Reid Fox, Spin- 
dale, N. C. 

Home Economics Departmt nt — Julia Fay Shuford, Atlanta, Ga. ; 
Cora Blanch Turner, Gastonia, N. C. 

CERTIFICATES GRANTED IN 1920 

Stenography — Pallie Rhee Modlin, Lexington, N. C. 
Dressmaking — Gladys Louise Williams, Lake Toxaway, N. C. 

DIPLOMAS GRANTED IN 1921 

College Entrance Department — Myrtle Estelle Mauney, Kinsey, 
S. C; Amanda B. (Stutts) Parker, Wolf Mountain, N. C. ; 
Helen Juanita Voorheis, Mill Spring, N. C; Joseph C. Wh's- 
nant, Henrietta, N. C. 



BREVARD INSTITUTE 45 

Academic Department — Alyce Geneva James, Cliff side, N. C; 
Myrtle Isabel Kitchen, Balsam Grove, N. C.; Florence Eliza- 
beth Manly, Ware Shoals, S. C. ; Wilma Gladys Martin, Ware 
Shoals, S. C; Nell Augusta Moore, Cliff side, N. C. ; Ruby Mc- 
Manus, Charlotte, N. C; Mary Elizabeth Vining, Florida; 
Mary Olivet Walter, Charlotte, N. C.; Naomi Elizabeth Wells, 
Forest City, N. C; Gladys Birddell Whitaker, Woodruff, S. C. 

Pedagogy Department — Mollis Grace Dalton, Mill Spring, N. C; 
Elsie Pearl (Edwards) Egerton, Mill Spring, N. C. ; Myrtle 
Isabel Kitchen, Balsam Grove, N. C. 

Household Economics Department — Mary E. Vining, Florida. 
CERTIFICATES GRANTED IN 1921 

Domestic Art Department — Evelyn Allison, Barker's Creek, 
N. C; Euna Dean Allison, Horse Shoe, N. C; Mertis Octavia 
Ballard, Winston-Salem, N. C; Bessie J. Powell, Horse Shoe, 
N. C. 

Household Economics Department — Evelyn M. Allison, Barker's 
Creek, N. C. ; Daisy Ophelia Edwards, Marshville, N. C. ; Grace 
Ingram Neeves, Taylors, S. C; Mary D. Palmer, Lawndale, N. 
C. ; Myrtle Potter, Chesnee, S. C. ; Rachel Inez Smart, Frank- 
lin, N. C. 

Stenography — Eva Medora Hancock, Rockf ord, N. C. ; Gladys 
Lucile Reaves, Greer, S. C. 

Stenography and Bookkeeping — Eva Josephine (Long) Miller, 
Brevard, N. C. 

DIPLOMAS GRANTED IN 1922 

Collenge Entrance Department — Plato Moore Allison, Brevard, 
N. C. ; Bernice J. Guffy, Cleveland, N. C. ; Kenneth Harris, 
Charlotte, N. C; Ralph H. Zachary, Jr., Brevard, N. C. 

Academic Department — Letha M. Bame, Salisbury, N. C. ; Paul- 
ine Gibbs, Spartanburg, S. C. ; Mary McKinney, Chesnee, S. 
C. ; Loyd D. Shuf ord, Lenoir, N. C. ; Rachel Inez Smart, Frank- 
lin, N. C; Marion Eugenia Yongue, Brevard, N. C. ; Joe Her- 
man Young, Asheville, N. C. 

Pedagogy Department — Sadie Ulysses Anderson, Hendersonville, 
N. C; Mary Ellen Edwards, Mill Spring, N. C; Essie Irene 
Ewards, Mill Spring, N. C. ; Virginia W. Elliott, Shelby, N. 
C. ; Lillian Lucile King, Brevard, N. C. 

Household Economics — Letha M. Bame, Salisbury, N. C. 

Piano Department — Ella Eliza Zachary, Calvert, N. C. 
CERTIFICATES GRANTED IN 1922 

Stenography — Emma G. (Brakefield) Collins, Greenville, S. C; 
Virginia Ruth Davis, Cliffside, N. C. ; Euna (Doub) Sandefur, 
Winston-Salem, N. C; Mildred Jean (Harris) Duckworth, 
Brevard, N. C. ; Mildred Lucile (Jones) Dominick, Greenville, 
S. C; Marie C. Way, Sumter, S. C. 

Bookkeeping — Edmund Frazier, Rockingham, N. C. 
DIPLOMAS GRANTED IN 1923 

College Entrance Department — Virginia Louise Bowen, Green- 
ville, S. C; Thurmond Douglas, Rusk. N. C; Alita (Polk) 
Mixon, Varnvllle, S. C. ; Carl Edwin Wike, Sapphire, N. C. 



46 BREVARD INSTITUTE 

Academic Department — Mertis Octavia Ballard, Winston-Salem, 
N. C; Janet Harden, Chester, S. C. ; Garnet Lyday, Penrose, 
N. C; Marie Lyday, Penrose, N. C. ; Erma (McDaniel) Huss, 
Greenville, S. C. ; Rose Eunice Neves, Taylors, S. C; Thomas 
Roy Slight, Seneca, S. C. ; Mary N. Smith, Windsor, N. C.; 
Mary Grace (Wells) Carter, Hendersonville, N. C. ; Annie 
Zachary, Calvert, N. C. 

Pedagogy Department — Euna D. Allison, Horse Shoe, N. C; Flo 
M. Ezell, Whittier, N. C. ; Mildred L. (Jones) Dominick, Lex- 
ington, Va. ; William Albert Hart, Easley, S. C; Lenora M. 
Matthews, Argura, N. C; Alcovia M. Orr, Brevard, N. C; 
Mary F. Sitton, Horse Shoe, N. C; Beulah M. Gillespie, Ros- 
man, N. C. 

CERTIFICATES GRANTED IN 19.23 

Dressmaking — Carrie (McConnell) Kuykendoll, Franklin, N. C. 

Millinery — Maude Slaton, Greenville, S. C. 

Shorthand and Typewriting — James Hazel Carson, York, S. C. ; 
Nan Eh'zabeth Kilpatrick, Brevard, N. C. ; Melissa Russell, 
Washington, D. C. 

Typewriting — Ernest E. Monteith, Sapphire, N. C. 
DIPLOMAS GRANTED IN 1924 

College Entrance Department — John McNeill, Miller's Creek, 
N. C. 

Academic Department — Roy B. Blackwelder, Concord. N. C. ; 
Vaughty May Deyton, Green Mountain, N. C. ; J. Parker 
Edens, Pickens, S. C; Ruth Virginia Humber, Wrightsville 
Beach, N. C. ; Fannie G. (Holliday) Bull, GFnn Springs. S. 
C; Arthur A. Harrell, Charlotte, N. C; M. Laura Huggins, 
Columbia, S. C; Lillian G. Hunt, DacusvtfL, S. C. ; Bess'e 
King, Charleston, S. C. ; Mary F. Lewis, Weaverville, N. C; 
Nancy Rose Moore, Cleveland, N. C; Lora May Noble, Green- 
ville, ' S. C; Margaret I. Stradley, Asheville, N. C. ; Ethel 
Sugg, Wilmington, N. C; Leonard H. Thomas, Lake Toxaway, 
N. C. 

Pedagogy Department — Eura Jeanette CCoston) Hill. Henderson- 
ville, N. C. ; Nell Gibbons, New Z ; on, S. C. ; Hallie Newman, 
Mayodan, N. C; Edith Sitton. Horse Shoe, N. C. ; Mary Mar- 
guerite Yawn, Greenville, S. C. 

CERTIFICATES GRANTED IN 1924 

Shorthand and Typewriting — SaUie Mae Teachev, Rose Hill, N. 
C. ; Mildred Olive Williams, Washington. D. C. 

Domestic Art — Maude Slaton, GreenvHle, S. C. 
DIPLOMAS GRANTED IN 1925 

College Entrance — Cecil Agnes Jones, South Bend, Ind. ; Rouss 
Emma McKnieht, Fountain Inn. S. C. : Eva Belle Newman, 
Leakesville, N. C. ; Blanche (Osborne) Sims, Brevard, N. C. ; 
Mildred Floride Martin, Ware Shoals, S. C. 

Academic Department — Estey Aberdeen (Collins) McCall, Ashe- 
ville, N. C.; Lee Royster Domimck. Greenwood. S. C. : Doris 
Nell Greer, Atlanta, Ga. ; Helen Hope Holcomb. Dacusville, 
S. C. ; Edward Osborn° Hudson. Waxhaw, N. C; Ed ; th Louise 
Hunt, Brevard, N. C. ; Jessie Hunt, Dacusville, S. C; Ruth 



BREVARD INSTITUTE 47 

Malandia Jenkins, Kings Mountain, N. C; Nora Justus, Ashe- 
ville, N. C; Estelle Kelly, Montgomery, Ala.; James Yancy 
Martin, Ware Shoals, S. C; William J. Nesbitt, Edneyville, 
N. C; Raleigh Marie (Rains) Hall, Lake Toxaway, N. C. ; 
Louise Register, Savannah, Ga. ; Flora Smith, Smithfield, N. 
C. ; Mattie Lee Teachey, Rose Hill, N. C. 

Normal Department — Belle English, Ashf ord, N. C. ; Eula Bernice 
Matthews, Argura, N. C. ; Estelle Elizabeth Powell, Asheville, 
N. C; Frances Scruggs, Greenville, S. C.; Ena Elizabeth Wil- 
liams, Penrose, N. C. 

Post Graduate — Mary Frances Lewis, Weaverville, N. C. 
CERTIFICATES GRANTED IN 1925 

Shorthand and Typewriting — Emma (McMTnn) Huggins, Chapel 
Hill, N. C. ; Martha Atwell, Asheville, N. C. ; Beatrice Barks- 
dale, Asheville, N. C. 

Domestic Art Department — Edna Meece, Brevard, N. C. 

Domestic Science — Mary Anderson. Asheville, N. C. ; Ruth M. 
Jenkins, Kings Mountain, N. C; Annie Dee Owen, 
Canton, N. C. 

DIPLOMAS GRANTED IN 1926 

College Entrance — Lloyd Averv Allison, Brevard. N. C; Julia 
Wall Atwell, Winchester, Va.; Reola Merle Bridges, Ellen- 
boro, N. C; Robert Glenn Bridges, Ellenboro, N. C. : Mary L. 
Burks. Amherst. Va. : Ina Mae Daniels. Cowpens, S. C; Lil- 
ian Goodlett, Travelers, Rest, S. C; Loretta Grace Markey, 
High Springs, Fla. 

Academic Department — Mary Wiley Andprson, Wilkesboro, N. 
C. ; Delia Carola Capps, Hendersonville, N. C. : Martha De- 
wessee Caswell, Tampa, Fla.; Jessie Lenna (Elliott ) Jollev, 
Lawndale. N. C. ; Sophia Jane Elliott. Lawndale, N. C; Alvin 
Mitchell Hooper, Svlva, N. C: Lucy Mae Johnson, Atlanta, 
Ga. : Olive Jones. Greenv'lle, S. C. ; Fav Kilpatrick. Pen v ose, 
N. C; Marguerite Roland (Matthews) Batson. Detroit. Mich.; 
William G. Maxwell. Horse Shoe, N. C; Fr^d Marion O^teen, 
Gr°envillp. S. C ; Annie Elizabeth (Poe) Harrell, Bostic, N. 
C. ; Bonnie L. Siprnori. "Rosman, N. C: Elsie N^vem Tanner 
Harr : s, N. C; Mabel Willard. H"ceas°d; Flora Wike, Brevard, 
N. C: Bobby Wright, Thomasville, Ga.' 

Commercial Department — Ruth Daisv Gaston, Laurens, S. C. 
CERTIFICATES GRANTED IN 1926 

Domestic Art — Louise Gossett, Spartanburg. S. C. : Marguerite 
Roland (Matthews) Batson, Detroit. Mich.; Annie Wiles, 
Crumpler, N. C. 

DIPLOMAS GRANTED IN 1927 

College Entrance Department — Dora E. Blanton, Gaffney, S. C. ; 
Lita Christine Brooks, Hot Springs, N. C. ; Ressie Kate Meece, 
Brevard, N. C; LnTan Moss. Hendersonville, N. C; Annie 
Dee Ow^n, Canton, N. C. ; William Clinton Stubbs, Blounts 
Creek, N. C. 



48 BREVARD INSTITUTE 

Academic Department — George Dewey Blanton, Cliffside, N. C. ; 
Roy demons Cash, Cowpens, S. C. ; Lydia Margaret Deyton, 
Green Mountain, N. C. ; Ivey W. Elliott, Lawndale, N. C. ; 
Cecil A. Hitt, Duncan, S. C; Ralph Maurice Huls, Washington, 
D. C; Deborah Sarah Longe, Greenville, S. C; Alma Lee 
Morgan, Jacksonville, Fla. ; Vera N. Otto, Atlanta, Ga. ; Grace 
Ariel Ramer, Pisgah Forest, N. C. ; Anna M. Reynolds, Wood- 
land, N. C. ; Jess M. Robinson, Clover, S. C; Iva Mae Sanders, 
Lake Toxaway, N. C; Lorene E. Short, Shelby, N. C. ; Gladys 
A. Walker, Charlotte, N. C; Willie Moselle (Young) Cash, 
Cowpens, S. C; Clarence Pinkney Deyton, Green Mountain, 
N. C. 

Commercial Department — Albert Lee Johnson, Kannapolis, N. C. 

CERTIFICATES GRANTED IN 1927 

Shorthand, Typewriting, Bookkeeping — Reola Merle Bridges, 
Lawndale, N. C; Leota Oneida Collins, Brevard, N. C; Pearl 
Evel-n Jolley, Forest City, N. C; Gladys Blaine Sell, Con- 
cord, N. C. 

Bookkeeping — Oliver O'Dell Daniel, Cowpens, S. C; Carl Aldrich 
Frady, Pisgah Forest, N. C; Hilda Koth, Early Branch, S. C; 
Joseph Poole, Brevard, N. C. ; Wilson F. Yarborough, Fay- 
etteville, N. C. 

Shorthand and Typewriting — Rebekah Blythe Glenn, Brevard, N. 
C. ; Leona Mae McKeever, Pittsburg, Pa. 

HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMAS GRANTED IN 1928 

Louise Atwell, Roanoke, Va. ; William Atwell, Roanoke, Va. ; 
Eleanor Barker, Valdosta, Ga. ; Marguerite Bell, Wampee, S. 
C. ; Henrietta Campbell, Cuba; Clyde Clark, Flat Rock, 
N. C; Pierce E. Cook, Rembert, S. C; Ruth Maie Dag 
gett, Hendersonville, N. C; Dixie Ell'ott, Lawndale, N. C. ; 
Fred England, Brevard, N. C; Opal Goodman, Concord, N. 
C. ; Fannie Green, Cowarts, N. C. ; Marjorie Hall, Spartan- 
burg, S. C; Cecil Hefner, Wingate, N. C. ; Elizabeth Huls, 
Washington. D. C; Leon Lyday, Brevard, N. C; Randall Ly- 
day, Brevard, N. C. ; Lena McKinney, Chesnee. S. C: Mildred 
Meece, Brevard, N. C. ; Ruth Olds. Elberton. Ga. ; Estelle Ol- 
iver, Murrells Inlet, S. C. ; Coral L c e Pickels'mer, Grim- 
shawes, N. C. ; Antoinette Pitisci, Tampa, Fla. ; Wdliam 
Pruett. Pisgah Forest, N. C; Lenith Randall. Bostic, N. C; 
Mary Sanchez, Tampa, Fla.; Lucy Short. Shelby, N. C. ; Dor- 
othy Simmers, Washington. D. C. : Maude Slrtton, G"~enville, 
S. C. : Hazel Slaughter, Valdosta, Ga.; Jessie Vereen, Waverly 
Mills, S. C; Eugema Wells, Brevard, N. C. ; Annie Wiles, 
Crumpler, N. C; Arnold Williams, Brevard, N. C. ; Ethel Wil- 
liams, Brevard, N. C. 

COMMERCIAL DIPLOMAS GRANTED IN 1928 

Grace Hamilton, Brevard, N. C. 

CERTIFICATES GRANTED IN 1928 

Shorthand, Typewriting, Bookkeeping — Edna Cochran, Concord, 

N. C; Zenobia Longshore, Goldville, S. C. 
Shorthand and Typewriting — Virginia Mason, Brevard, N. C; 

Heien Morrow, Brevard, N. C; Pauline Mull, Brevard, N. C. 



BREVARD INSTITUTE 49 

Bookkeeping and Typewriting — Lena Dalton, Asheville, N. C. ; 
Julia Lee, Augusta, Ga. ; Eva Moore, Concord, N. C. 

Bookkeeping — Ralph Huls, Washington, D. C. 

Typewriting- — Fannie Green, Cowarts, N. C. ; Cecil Hefner, Win- 
gate, N. C. 

HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMAS GRANTED IN 1929 

Halley Bencomo, Tampa, Fla. ; Marion Bizzell, Asheville, N. C; 
Mildred Blackwelder, Charlotte, N. C; Fannie Sue Blanford, 
Lewisport, Ky. ; Alice Bolin, Hendersonville, N. C; Thelma 
Burks, _Amherst, Va. ; Faith Curtis, Greensboro, N. C; Ida 
Hutchings, Schuyler Lake, N. Y. ; Davis Lebby, Greenville, S. 
C; Edwin Mattox, Penhook, Va. ; Margaret McWhite, Con- 
way, S. C. ; Frank Nicholson, Wolf Mountain, N. C; Alice 
Pike, Atlanta, Ga.; Fred Priddy, Danbury, N. C. ; Blanche 
Rice, Asheville, N. C; Porter Roberts, Marshall, N. C; Lucy 
Caroline Teachey, Rose Hill, N. C; William Teachey, Rose 
Hill, N. C; Ruby Jane Wells, Bostic, N. C; Allena Wigg : ns, 
Newnan, Ga. 

COMMERCIAL DIPLOMAS GRANTED IN 1929 

Mordecia Saltz, Brevard, N. C; Bonnie L. Sigmon, Rosman, N. C. 

CERTIFICATES GRANTED IN 1929 

Bookkeeping, Shorthand, Typewriting, — Antonio Hernandez 
Garcia, Havana, Cuba; Rafael Garcia, New York, N. Y. 

Bookkeeping — George Dewey Gravely, Brevard, N. C. ; Venell 
Johnson, Eure, N. C. ; Leon F. Lyday, Jr., Brevard, N. C. 

ENROLLMENT 1928-1929 

Boys 80 Girls 80 Total 160 

SUMMER SCHOOL 
Boys 29 Girls 42 Total 71 
Total enrollment for the year 231 



50 



BREVARD INSTITUTE 

lEnmlimjmi, IQ2B-23 



Bermudez, Angel 
Brown, Raphael 
Campbell, Stuart 
Canals, Frank 
Cooper, Alexa 
Dunn, Guy 
Fernandez, Felix 
Garcia, Hurda 
Gowin, Virginia 



Ball, Jennings 
Bizzell, Kate 
Brown, Edna 
Byrd, Dorothy 
Clontz, Dave 
Cochrane, Hilliard 
Crosby, R. D. 
Daggett, Nancy 
Davis, Tallie 
Dunakin, Henry 
Fulmer, Adrian 
Garrison, Margaret 
Gould, John 



Ballard, Frances 
Bennett, Julian 
Britt, Lucy 
Bryant, Arline 
Chapman, Robei't 
Clanton, Avery 
Cochrane, Emma 
Denny, Mary 
Deyton, John 



Allison, Lena 
Barnette, Samuel 
Boggs, Troy 
Campbell, Arthur 
Clayton, Christy 
Curtis, Pauline 
Curtis, Dennis 
Davis, Essie 



ELEMENTARY 

Grant, Frances 
Gregory, William 
Hartley, Elizabeth 
Hernandez, J. L. 
Jolly, Jack 
Lloyd, Lola 
Longshore, Edward 
Ownbey, Clara 
Ownbey, Elda 

First Year 

Guthrie, Woodrow 
Hamrick, Evelyn 
Hernandez, Casimiro 
Hernandez, Paul 
Hill, Ira 
Jernigan, Frank 
Joiner, Winnie Helen 
Kirton, James 
Larmon, Elizabeth 
Lee, Garnell 
Matthews, Oliver 
Menendez, Joe 
Menendez, Richard 

Second Year 

Fisher, Mabel 
Goodwin, James 
Graham, Thomas 
Greear, Sol 
Hawkins, Cornelia 
James, Elsie 
Jolly, Lyle 
Lumley, James 
Menendez, Robert 

Third Year 

Drumeller, Carl 
Duncan, Charles 
Garr'son, Marguerite 
Goodman, Hobart 
James, Viola 
Laughter, Lillian 
Menend-z, Hope 
Mered - th, Beulah 



Pickelsimer, Otus, Jr. 
Rogers, Ella May 
Routheir, Charles 
Santos, Robert 
Santos, Sebastian 
Tripp, Katherine 
Walden, Norma 



Mitchell, Prillo 
Mitchell, William 
McCracken, Paul 
Nelson, N. B. Jr. 
Ownbey, Elbert 
Padgett, Penthesiliea 
Price, Louise 
Rice. Thomas 
Smith, Dorothy 
Vaughan, Jack 
Walker, Marie 
Wells. Martha 
Wiggins, James 



Moore, Blanton 
Nelson, Margaret 
Pell, Henrietta 
Regan, Joseph 
Stanford, Harold 
Tidwell, Maudie B. 
Wildey, Jack 
Williams, Ward 
Williamson, Hazel 



McCracken, Wilma 
Ownbey, Mamie Lee 
Rikard, Wilbur 
Taylor, Lillie Mae 
Taylor, Rosita 
Walker, Esther 
Wright, E izabcth 
Young, Beulah 



BREVARD INSTITUTE 



51 



Bencomo, Halley 
Bizzell, Marion 
Blackwelder, Mildred 
Blanford, Fannie Sue 
Bolin, Alice 
Burks, Thelma 
Curtis, Faith 
Forshee, Adele 
Hutchings, Ida 
Lebby, Davis 



Fourth Year 

Lyday, Willie Mae 
Mattox, Edwin 
Mendenhall, Tessie 
McWhite, Margaret 
Morgan, Alvia Mae 
Nicholson, Frank 
Pike, Alice 
Priddy, Fred 
Rice, Blanche 
Rigdon, Eleanor 



Roberts, Porter 
Tanner, Eber 
Teachey, Lucy Caroline 
Teachey, William 
Thompson, Golden 
Truslow, Maynard 
Weast, Rex 
Wells, Ruby Jane 
Wiggins, Allena 



NEW ENROLLMENT— SUMMER SCHOOL 

Bowen, Annie McMinn, Ethel Talley, Holland 

Boyd, Alice Parker, Carlton Turner, Anna Hughes 

Briggs, Smith Perry, Ruth Dorothy Turner, Mary Dwight 

Brown, Ernest Sledge, Garland Whitmire, Vernie 

Henderson, Anna Mae Smith, F. Jr. Young, Marjorie 
Stout, Claude Preston 

COMMERCIAL 

Aycock, Helen Garcia, Ralph Lee, Julia 

Burns, Thelma Gravely, Dewey Lyday, Leon 

Carter, Henry Harris, Mrs. A. H. Saltz, Mordecia 

Cochrane, Mrs. Minnie Hernandez. Antonio Sigmon, Bonnie 

Fisher, Roy Hunt, Edith Slaton, Maude 
Johnson, Venell 



COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT 
Shorthand 



Aycock, Helen Garcia, Ralph 

Blanford, Fannie Sue Gravely, Dewey 
Burns, Thelma Harris, Mrs. A. H. 

Carter, Henry Hernandez, Antonio 

Curtis, Faith Hernandez, J. L. 



Aycock, Helen 
Bennett, Julian 
Bermudez, Angel 
Blackwelder, Mildred 
Blanford, Fannie Sue 
Burns, Thelma 
Canals, Frank 
Carter, Henry 
Curtis, Faith 
Fernandez, Felix 
Fisher, Mable 



Typewriting 

Fisher, Roy 
Garcia, Hurda 
Garcia, Ralph 
Gould, John 
Gravely, Dewey 
Hernandez, Antonio 
Hernandez, J. L. 
Hernandez, Paul 
Hunt, Edith 
Johnson, Ven.ll 
Lee Julia 



Lee, Julia 
Saltz, Mordecia 
Sigmon, Bonnie 
Slaton, Maude 
Smith, Dorothy 



Lyday, Leon 
Lyday, Willie Mae 
Mendenhall,, Tess ; e 
Menendez, Richard 
Saltz, Mordecia 
Sigmon, Bonnie 
Slaton, Maude 
Smith, Dorothy 
Stanford, Harold 
Weast, Rex 
Wells, Ruby Jane 



52 



BREVARD INSTITUTE 



Bookkeeping 



Aycock, Helen 

Blanford, Fannie Sue 

Carter, Henry 

Cochrane, Mrs. Minnie Hunt, Edith 

Garcia, Ralph Johnsom, Venell 



Gravely, Dewey Saltz, Mordecia 

Hernandez, Antonio Sigmon, Bonnie 
Hernandez, Casimirio Slaton, Maude 
Walker, Esther 
Weast, Rex. 



Lyday, Leon 



Bishop, Sarah 
Bizzell, Kate 
Bizzell, Marion 
Britt, Lucy 
Daggett, Nancy 
Denny, Mary 
Dunakin, Henry 



MUSIC DEPARTMENT 
Piano 



Garcia, Hurda 
Hartley, Elizabeth 
Hawkins, Cornelia 
James, Elsie 
Jolly, Jack 
Larmon, Elizabeth 
Lee, Garnell 



Ownbey, Mamie Lee 
Padgett, Penthesiliea 
Price, Louise 
Walden, Norma 
Walker, Marie 
Winton, Cornelia 



BREVARD INSTITUTE 

Brevard, North Carolina. 

APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION 

Date , 192, 

1. Name 

2. Address „ , 

3. Birthday and age 

4. Condition of health 

5. Height Weight When will you enroll 

6. Check course you expect to take: 

High School. . . .Year. . . . Elementary. . . .Commercial. . . 



7. Of what church are you a member? 

8. To whom way we refer concerning you? 

Name Business . 

Address 



10. What grade have you completed? See back of 

this sheet. 

11. Specify exactly how much work you wish to do. (See 
Indusrtial system, and page of fees, in catalogue.) ......... 



12. Sign the following pledge: 

If admitted to Brevard Institute, I promise to do my best 
in all the work assigned me, and to faithfully observe the 
rules of the school. 



Signed 



13. Have parent, guardian, or friend sign the following: 

I hereby approve the above application, and I agree to pay 
promptly all the school fees as required. 

S'gned 



HIGH SCHOOL CREDITS 

If you have already some high school work to your credit, 
fill out the following blank. The credit listed will be verified by 
referring it to the principal of the school where work was done. 



Name of School 



Post Office 



Name of Student. 
Subjects 



Grades 



Subjects 



Grades 



English 
English 
English 
History 
History 
Civics . 
Latin . 
Latin . 



Arithmetic 
Algebra . . 
Algebra . . 
Geometry 
Science . . 
Science . . 
French . . . 
French . . . 



The above record is correct. 



Principal. 



State briefly your reasons for wishing to get an education : 




^.''-'•^■'W- T