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Full text of "Brief historical sketches of seven generations; descendants of Deacon David Baumgartner, who was born 1735"

NYPL RESEARCH LIBRARIES 



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HISTORICAL bKETCHES 



OF 



SEVEN GEJ^EEATiONS 



DESCENDANTS OF 









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Brief 

Historical Sketches 

Seven Generations; 
Descendants 

of 

Deacon David Baumgartner, 

who was born 
17S5 



Compiled 
S. H. Baumgartner, 

a 

Great'Grandson, 

Indianapolis, Ind. 

1908. 










Tnnik of thi-< tru rqirc^oit-t Dai.con David Bmoiiy<irtiHr, horn in nSri. The lanje 

branch to the rljhtiAuulintjio the top ri^.-tscntg Rir. David Baumyartner, the 

othtrs on the trunk npresent his half hrothcrg and sisterii. The tntire 

tree represents seven ytntrotions, of afjout lOoO perso)is. 

{;-.••" 7^( nyi vopicj< ofthu< tra can Ije hud for $.75 jxr tree. Size SSxSS indioi. 




.S. H. liAVMii ARTS Kit, 

Dt.iii>jner nnd Ksecntor of (On>ve Tree 

and 

(Jomiiiler of the lIij>tory of the 'ih<}ve lithUion. 



Preface, 



The compiler of this family history was induced to undertake the 
tedious and laborious task of writing- up brief sketches of the descen- 
dants of Deacon David Baumgartner, by the urgency of a number of 
the descendants, believing that such a compilation would be highly 
appreciated by all connected with this family, and be interesting and 
valuable as a means of preserving^ interest in each other as relatives. 

The author spent much time and hard labor to accomplish this. 
It required the esercise of much patience and forbearance. Some of 
the relatives were either loath to respond to the compiler's questions, 
or were too busily eng^aged in their worldly pursuits to give this 
matter careful and prompt attention. Some would not answer at all, 
and information concerning them had to be gathered the best way 
one could, and is therefore necessarily meager. Some may have 
formed the idea that nothing of interest transpired in their life that 
is worthy of notice or preservation. But though our lives be ever 
so humble, ordinary nr uneventful, one can never foresee or foretell 
future developments, or what might be of great interest for future 
generations. 

The author has tried to be fair and impartial to all. More might 
have been said in praise of all, but this would have made the book 
too large and expensive for the limited number that can be sold. The 
object in writing this history was not to point out defects, or exalt 
any one, but simply give a few facts of interest to all. 

The book has margin enough to note down future events of in- 
terest, as births, marri.<i:^., deaths, vocatio'-- of life, etc. In con- 
clusion the author beg^ paidon for any erfOi> that may have occurred 
in names or dates. Wc 'ricd to v-- -t2 and concise. 

Your Relative, 

Indianapolis, lad. 



/ 



Introduction. 



Ji Brief Sketch of the Mennonites in Switzerland. 

The Mennonites in Switzerland, at the time of their persecu- 
tions, were a simple, earnest, and an industrious people, devoted to 
God and one-another. Their persecution resulted from their disbelief 
in infant baptism, in not taking up arms in time of war, refusing to 
take oaths, or hold State offices. Thej were inoffensive, peaceable; 
but firm in their religious convictions; and scrupulously adhered to 
their belief of right and wrong. They rather suffered violence to 
their bodies, than do yiolence to their consciences and their under- 
standing of the Word of God. It is a well known fact, that they 
were almost constantly persecuted, since the Reformation period, by 
Catholics and the Slate Church. But in spite of it they maintained 
their identity and their individuality to the present time, although 
they did split into many factional organizations through internal and 
doctrinal differences. 

In those times of severe persecutions, a large number of them 
were driven out of the Pfaltz in Germany, and fled for refuge to the 
Jura mountains in Switzerland, where they still have a number of 
societies, and maintain their simplicity and the characteristics of the 
Emmenthalers, and where they are chiefly engaged in cattle raising 
and keeping tavern. The "Tiiufergemeinden" are still found on the 
borders of France, in Alsace, in the Pfaltz, in Vosges, Bavaria, 
Baden, Wuerttemberg, Hesge, Nassau and in the valley of the lower 
Rhine, and count themselves with those in Holland, and in North 
America, where they now are the most numerous and influential. 

The Mennonites, sometimes called "Tiiufer" and "Wieder- 
tiiufer," who lived in Canton Bern, Switzerland, were especially 
cruelly treated during the Reformation period by the State Church. In 
1525 the civil authority employed hard measures against them, be- 
cause of the Waldenses and Albigenses, who inherited fanatical ideas 
from medircval sects. Thus odium was brought upon the Menno- 
nites through their mingling with them. These persecutions were 
instituted as early as 1532, and continued through the sixteenth cen- 
tury, reaching their culmination in the beginning of the seventeenth. 
In 1635 the magistrates of Zurich undertook to compel the "Tiiufer- 
gesinnte*' to unite -vvith the Reformed Church, but failed. In Bern, 
Basel and Schaffhausen, positive steps were taken to stop their prog- 
ress, yea, they attempted their extermination by perpetrating inde- 
scribable oppressions upon them. The cruel treatment these people 
received comports vrith the awful, gruesome atrocities perpetrated 



Historical Sketches of Seven Generations 



upon Christians in the **Dark Ages." Even men like Zwingli, in his 
zeal for reformation, failed to see any good in the "Tiiafergesinnte," 
and believed it expedient to exterminate them. Also Luther and 
Melanchton said some very hard things against them. 

Surely their lot was a hard one, yet they continued to multiply, 
as the Israelites did in Egypt, under Pharaoh's oppression. In the 
history of the "Berner Mennonites," by Ernst Miller, pastor of 
Langnau, (where deacon David Baumgartner lived in 1791), we have, 
on page IS etc. a concise description of the cruelties they had to 
suffer. Some were tortured by violent stretchings of their limbs, 
some were burned to ashes, others were fried hanging to pillars, 
others rent into pieces by redhot thongs, some were locked up in their 
own houses and with everything in them, burned up. Some were 
hung on trees, some slain with swords, some were drowned in water, 
others had short sticks placed into their mouths so they could not 
speak, and were thus allowed to die gradually. Books on Bible 
knowledge were denied them, and if found among them they were 
burned; their property was confiscated, many were imprisoned and 
allowed to starve and rot, many had holes burned into their cheeks 
and were then allowed to go. Those who escaped these atrocities were 
pursued from place to place, where they secreted themselves, like 
owls and night-ravens that hide by day in rocks, clefts and wild 
woods. These were days of extreme tribulations; but for Christ's 
sake they were willing to undergo these tortures, rather than do 
yiolence to their consciences, or resist prejudiced Civil authority. 

It is asserted that some sang praises while they were led forth 
to execution. Young women, when they were compelled to go to 
the place of death, arrayed themselves as though they were going to 
a festal celebration. Others with laughter, approached the water in 
which they were to be drowned, praising God. And others, before 
they were executed, seized the opportunity to preach to their enemies, 
"repentance and newnesss of life." At such calmness, joyousness 
and firmness, with which these unfortunate ones approached death, 
even their persecutors were astonished, but pronounced it "the work 
of the hellish dragon." Aside from the above cruelties, a large num- 
ber of them were sold as slaves to the king of Sardinia, (an island in 
the Mediterranean sea) where they were forced to serve as slaves in 
galleys as oarsmen. These were flat built vessels with one deck, 
propelled with oars and sails. 

To this simple, harmless, cruelly treated people for conscience 
sake, belonged the ancestry of the Baumgartner relation, hereinaf- 
ter portrayed. This family took a more or less active, prominent 
and definite part in defense of the Mennonite doctrines, and the 
stringent rules and regulations they believeil in, and faithfully prac- 
ticed, and sought to enforce and securely establish them wheresoever 
they could. 



Chapter /. 



Fragmentary History of our Ancestry. 

To trace the ancestry back to the first man who bore the name, 
Baumgartner, would indeed be a very interesting bit of history; but 
this is an impossibility, however desirable. We must be content with 
fragmentary history and tradition. The name evidently originated 
from the occupation in which the man who first received the name 
was engaged. The German meaning of the name is "nursery-man," 
or one who takes care of and cultivates trees. Many names thus 
originated. There are quite a large number of families surnamed 
Bauragartner. found in many parts of the United States, Canada, 
Switzerland and Germany, whose relationship can no longer be 
traced back to one ancestor. The last named place is no doubt the 
country in which the man lived who first bore said name, since his- 
tory shows that families of said name fled from the Pfalz in Ger- 
many to the mountains of Switzerland during the Mennonite perse- 
cution. 

Traditionally, the herein named relationship can trace its 
ancestry back about three hundred years to one called Ulrlch Baum- 
gartncr. This claim the writer bases on the testimony of Dr. C. C. 
Raumgartner, now deceased (I'^OT), who was probably the best 
informed on our ancestry; and Maria Sprunger, one of the oldest 
survivors of our ancestry at this time, corroborates the doctor's testi- 
mony. Both stated, that this man formerly lived in Germany, and 
during the intense persecution of the Mennonites there, fled to the 
Jura mountains in Switzerland. He is probably the one who is men- 
tioned in Krnst Miller's Mennonite History on page 122, where a 
visit to Ulrich (I'li) Bauragartner, of Durruetti. in 1(>27, is narrated, 
wbo was for a long time a teacher, "Tiiuferlehrer," and two years 
later, in lt.2'>, was taken prisoner (page 123) on Friday, July 25, and 
the next morning: led to Trachselwald, and from there to Bern on 
Aug. 3, U)2'». The doctor stated to the writer of this history, not 
long before his death, that our ancestor was taken prisoner, but 
later got out ai^ain. Since the narrative in Miller's history of this 
man agrees quite well with the statement of the doctor and Mrs. 
Sprunger, we are quite safe to conclude that the aforesaid Ulrich 
Baumgertner is the ancestor of the herein named families. 



Chapter IL 



Sketch of Deacon David Baumgartner (First Generation). 

We begin our authentic family history with David Baumgartner, 
who was a deacon and a school teacher in the Mennonite Church in 
Switzerland. Farther back the writer could get no positive records 
of men as to their dates of birth. Through the kindness of J. H, 
Tschantz, of Wayne Co., Ohio, we obtained the year of his birth and 
death, taken from some old records yet existing. He was born in 
1735, and died in 1SI'>, at the age of 84 years. That he was con- 
sidered a trustworthy and able officer and good counselor in his 
church is evident from the fact that he was chosen a deacon, which 
is an official position of great importance and deep spiritual obliga- 
tions. And the fact that he was a teacher for many years showed 
competency in teaching. According to a statement ( " Maria Sprun- 
ger, he was one of the mpn who was sent by the Cburcb to the Menno- 
nites in Pfalz, Germany, during their severe oppression and perse- 
cution in 1762, to give them counsel, encouragement and assistance. 

He was married twice. By the kindness of Rev. S. Maurer, of 
the Evangelical Association in Bern, Switzerland, we received several 
official documents concerning our ancestors, from one called "Der 
Burgerrodelfuehrer," secretary of records of citizenship. By request. 
Rev. Maurer went to Buderichgraben and Langnau to search records. 
In Langnau he secured the help of the above named official, who 
gives the following extract of David Baumgartner's marriage found 
in the Baptismal Record of the Society, "Gemeinde," of Langnau, 
Vol. 10, page 180, that he was the husband of Katharina Imhof, and 
shows that they were the parents of Rev. David Baumgartner. (See 
"Burgerrodel," Citizen Record, H= 5, page 144). This record also 
gives the three marriages of Rev. David Baumgartner and the dates 
of the births of his children by his first wife, which record you will 
find embodied in the sketch of his life. 

The following extract shows the action taken by the Court of 
Justice, "Kanzelei," of Bern, recorded in the "Raths" (Counsel) 
"Manual," in the city of Bern, respecting a petition from Deacon 
David Baumgartner of Langnau, to the honorable governor, "Land- 
yogt," of Trachselwald, to secure citizenship rights in I^angnau. 
The extract granting him and others citizenship rights is dated Apr. 
6, 1791, and is undersigned, "Kanzelei Bern." 

"From a petition handed in by one David Baumgartner, (a 
"Tiiufer") an Anna-Baptist of Langnau, and a settler in the bishop- 



Descendants of Deacon David Baumgartner 11 

ric of Basel, we have seen that he, and others of like religious faith, 
who also settled in the same place, concernedly or anxiously desire 
that their children, and their future posterity, might be recorded in 
the Home Record of Langnau as citizens; and that to them might be 
issued the required citizenship certificates. After we have had this 
petition examined, and also the demanded counter information of the 
society (Geraeinde) of Langnau, we granted the request of thesuppli- 
cator, and herewith will, or grant that his children, and those of 
others of like faith, who are born under the sovereignty of the Basel 
bishopric at Langnau, shall have certificates of citizenship issued to 
them, and that they be recorded in the records of Langnau, as citi- 
zens of that place, with this proviso:— that they, like ail who are 
not members of the Society (^Gemeinde) of lyangnau, but live within 
the borders thereof, and upun the same conditions like they, will con- 
tribute their assessed share of taxes and for improvements; and that 
only then they will have the right of their homes maintained, when 
they duly submit to the laws of the country in which they live." 

Deacon David Baumgartner had one child by his first wife Catha- 
rina Imhof, a son called Dayid (see third chapter). And by his sec- 
ond wife, (whose maiden name is not known, but according to recol- 
lection of some, she was an Oberli) he had three sons aud five daugh- 
ters as follows: —Christian, Barbara, Katharina, Peter, TJlrich, Eliza- 
beth and Anna. Whether these names are chronologically arranged 
as to age is not certain, except the first three. The dates of their 
births have thus far not been found. But they were all born in 
Buederichgraben, Jura, Oberamt Courtelary, Canton Bern, Switzer- 
land, before their father moved to Langnau, in the same Canton, in 
the early part of 17''1. From these children issued a large relation- 
ship. At this time ( \'*0~) the seventh generation is already well rep- 
resented, the total relationship numbers nearly one thousand. 



Chapter III. 



Rev. David Baumgartner (Second Generation). 

The subject of tbis sketch was the only child of Deacon David 
Baumg-artner by his first wife Katharina Imhof. According to the 
Civil Record of Langnau, Canton Bern, Switzerland, H. 5, page 144, 
he was born Jan. 25, 1765, in Buederichgraben, Jura, Oberamt 
Courtelarj, Canton Bern, Switzerland. And according to a letter 
headed, "Adams Co., Ind , Jan. 25, ls53," which he addressed to his 
son David in Wajne Co., Ohio, he begins by saying, "To-day I 
begin my S9th year;" it will be seen that 88 years back brings the 
time to the cited date of his birth. Hence, the date of his birth on 
his tombstone. Jan. 15 , 1763, and as recorded on the family tree, is 
evidently incorrect. The above documents came into my hands too 
late to make the correction on the tree. His mother died when he 
was yet a small child. His father again married and with his second 
wife he had eight children as before mentioned. 

At the above named place he grew to manhood. After his father 
moved to Languau in 1791, he presumably inherited, or bought the 
old homestead, where he lived for a long time, and where all his 
children were born. The old house he lived in burned down after he 
sold the homestead. From here he moved to Langnau, in the 
Eoimenthal, of Basel, time not given. And from Langnau he moved to 
La Chausde Fonds, and from there he, wife and children by his third 
wifeemigrated in 1837. to America, Way ne Co., Ohio, where his oldest 
son David already lived. Land already being quite expensive in Ohio, 
he concluded to move to Indiana, where land was yet much cheaper. 
In Aug., 1839 he therefore moved with his younger children to Wells 
Co., Ind., as he states in a letter to his friends in the Fatherland. 
(See letter). And later he moved in with his youngest son Samuel, 
(the writer's father), who lived in French township, Adams Co., Ind., 
two miles southeast of Vera Cruz, Ind. Here he alsodied of old age, 
Nov, 4, 1853. He lie^ buried in the cemeiery near Vera Cruz, Ind. 
He was a minister of the Gospel in the Mennonite Church for about 
65 years, having been made a preacher, according to the Mennonite 
rn5;tom, at the age of 23 years. (Sec ]v.lttt lo his son Djvid). 

He was the first minister and missionary of the Mennonite 
Church in Adams and Wells counties in lad. He also preached in 
Ohio while be lived there. He possessed a very amiable and un- 
_" !. '! .. .^"1;^::. lie vraii .r\^..j.yz> couilcous to iniai^ters of other 
denominations. His convictions were clear, and his Christian charac- 
icii5ii<_s biror.g= He had a hatred lor a^l ibams cr pretentioi:s in 



Descendants of Deacon David Baumgartner 



13 



Church or State. He loved peace, disliked pride and loose morals, 
idleness, dislionesty and a cold and formal religion. He vs-as tender- 
hearted and kind in his family, respectful to his superiors and in- 
feriors, and was a lover of religious conversations. His views on 
morals, religion and education are clearly and fully expressed in his 
own letters to his friends in the Fatherland and bis son David as yon 
will observe in his letters further on in this sketch. 

He was married three times, as follows: — First to Elizabeth 
Mo>er. of Kinderswyl, March 29, 1794. She died May 25, IHOl. The 
following children were the issue of this union: — 

Katharina, born Apr. 2f), 1796; and died Sept. 30, 1834. 

David " Feb. 7, 1798; " " Feb. 4. 18b3. 

Abraham " Jan. 13, 1800; " " Oct. iw, 1848. 
His second wife was Anna Bixler, of Eggiwyl, whom he married 
May 2S, 1802. She died March 29, 1805. To them was born Anna, 
March 29, 1805; and died Apr. 7, 1879. 

He was married the third time to Barbara Steiner, of Signau, by 
Kev. Peter Oberli, of the Mennonite Church, in Tramelan, or Dachs- 
felden. Her mother was a Glauser by birth. She was born March 
27, ]7'0, upon the "Huebeli", Oberarat Courtelary Canton, Bern, 
Swit:^erl2nd. The writer remembers her as being short and corpu- 
lently built. After her husband's death she lived among her chil- 
dren. In her old age she fell down stairs, hurting herself in such a 
way that she never fully recovered. This occurred in her log cabin 
at Mrs. Peter Bixler's. her youngest daughter. She died of old age 
at her son Peter's at the age of 91 years. To this union were born: — 
Christian, Jan. 31, 1809; and died Aug. 24, 1878. . 



John, Dec. 3, 1810; 

Barbara, Dec. 19, 1812; 
Peter, Jan. 6, 1814; 
Elizabeth, Jul. 26, 1816; 
Samuel, Apr. 17, iSlS; 
Maria, Sept. 4, 1820; 



" " June 5, 


1888. 


" •' Oct. 


1847. 


" " Nov. 9, 


1882. 


" " Feb. 7. 


1896. 


" Mar. 22, 


1881. 


" " Jun. 25, 


1897. 



A Personal Letter by Rev. David Baumgartner, Written to his 
Friends in the Fatherland. When he was 84 Years Old. 



The original copy of the following letter is now in the posses- 
sion of Mrs. Mary Reck, eldest daughter of Sn-nuel Baumgartner. 
Kev. D. B. lived with Samual at the time the letter was written. Af- 



14 Historical Sketches of Seven Generations 

ter his death the letter became property of his son Samuel, then of 
Mrs. Beck, and was translated by the writer of this history. The let- 
ter reads as follows: — 

"I wish you all, with my whole heart, the grace and peace from 
God, and knowledge, light and life in Christ, and the sanctification 
of the Spirit, through Jesus Christ, Amen!" 

"I have already waited a long time for a letter from you, but so 
far have not received one. I would have written before this, but 
since 1 have received no reply to my last letter, as I hopefully ex- 
pected, I do not know whether I have offended you in anywise, which 
I did not mean to do. I wrote with upright sincerity. But since an 
opportunity presents itself to me, I concluded to write again. There 
is a dear friend here, named Mathias Miller, from Canton Basel, who 
says, that it is his intention to visit his Fatherland once more, and 
said, if we have a letter to send along with him, he would deliver it 
to Schampo, where he is well acquainted, having often been there; 
and if the Lord gives success to him in his journey, we hope to learn 
of your state and condition, if you have not forgotten us. We often 
think of you, especially in these times of disquietude in Europe. In 
my dreams I see this one and then another. That many of us think 
of you is undoubtedly caused by a letter Samuel's wife received, in 
which it is stated, that you cannot pay for military service, and are 
necessitated to move out of the land. This causes me to wish that 
if only all who are in very limited circumstances would be here, 
where there are yet so many thousand acres of unsettled land, and 
where one can live according to the dictates of one's own conscience; 
although the words, 'in sorrow and toil Shalt thou earn thy living,' 
apply here as well as with you. But those who can and will work, 
have food and raiment, and what more do we want for the short 
pilgrimage, for we have here no abiding city. 

"I do not remember whether I have already written you of our be- 
ginning in America. When we arrived in Wayne Co., Ohio, we were 
SVO.OO in debt; but thanks be to God, we were well and could work. 
Christian and Peter worked at the carpenter trade building houses 
and barns. Samuel was with Abraham Zuercher and received good 
wages. (Wages were at this time two and three shillings per day. 
S. H. B.). I worked in the book-bindery, and mother helped to make 
garments, so that in a little more than two years we were out of 
debt, but had no land. In Sonnenberg the land was quite high. We 
heard that in Indiana (where we now liye), there was yet much land, 
that one could buy from the government for $200 per ICO acres. 

"Christian, with some others, came to Indiana, and after him 
Peter; but the land had to be paid cash. Good friends loaned us 
enough money to buy two quarter sections. We followed Christian 



Descendants of Deacon David Bauragartner 15 



a 



and Peter to Indiana, in August, 1839. Twice we had to remain in 
the woods all night. Christian and his wife came by way of water, 
(likely over lake Erie to Toledo, and then per canal to Ft. Wayne, 
Ind., and then overland to Wells county.— Writer), and were a num- 
ber of days ahead of us. (Christian evidently returned to Ohio to 
brintr his family to Indiana.— Writer). Jeampier Meriliant, who is 
married to Magdalena Kirchhofer, went with us, and each family 
had one wagon with two oxen and two cows. (This must have been 
a tedious trip per wagon, oxen and cows, for a man 76 years old. — 
Writer). When we came to our land we found Christian sick with a 
fever, in a small loghouse, in which there was no room for us. We 
had to live nine days in a "Laubhuette", a hut made of leafy branch- 
es. The first thing we did, was to dig a well for water, for except 
the river, there are no running fountains. We found water, then we 
made a loghouse and lived together, until we had also made one for 
Meriliant's to move in. We were glad when we had houses to liye 
in, and water to drink, but we had little to liye on. The potatoes 
were 51.00 per bushel. We only bought for planting, for the summer 
was very dry, and there were only a few plantfd. Flour per barrel 
is at present (1849) S4 50; we bad to pay SlO.SO, and go far to get it. 
Around us is still all timber. Thus ycu can imsginc tuC amcust Oa 
work there is to do to get the land cleared. On the right side of 
the river (Wabash) where our land is located, (a mile northwest of 
\'era Cruz, Ind.) was no road cut out. And when cne had to seek 
the cows or cattle, one was in danger of becoming lost in the forest. 
It was necessary to make use of the compass. 

"We were also a filicted with sickness. The three brothers had 
the chill fever, also mother, who since then is often troubled with 
rheumatism; only Maria and I escaped. Barbara was sick for 22 
months with consumption, and died in October, 1847. Thus her 
suffering is over, and we thank God who helped us through. When 
we did not know what to do, He assisted us, so that we could bear 
it. The God of mercy be praised for all His mercy and grace. Amen! 

"Now Concerning Our Present Condition in 1849. 

"Christian has six sons and one daughter. He has a quarter 
section of land with 80 acres cleared. He has 1<> head of horses and 
cattle; and he also has hogs and sheep. He sowed 13 acres of wheat. 

"John has 6ve sons and six daughters, and 140 acres of land, six- 
tT of it is cleared. He also sowed 13 acres of wheat. He also has 
horses, cattle, sheep and bogs. 

"Peter also has a section of land, and two horses, and cows; and 
one daughter and two sons. 



16 Historical Sketches of Seven Generations 

"Samuel has 100 acres of land, with some cleared. 

"Maria got married to Peter Bixler, son of Jacob. Thej have 
80 acres of land, which his father ga.ve him. Thej have one horse, 
two cows, a jearling calf, and some hogs which Samuel gave her 
for keeping house for him. Mother and I now live with Samuel, who 
gives us our necessaries of life, and we have plenty to eat. 

"I am, thank God, quite well, excepting feebleness caused by 
old age, (now 84 years old). I can do no hard work. I work in the 
book bindery. This is the third time I work at it, and will likely be 
the last time. Mother is still working on the land, and spins in the 
winter. Thus when jou compare our present condition with the 
former, you will notice quite a change. Of course the sons still have 
debts on their land, and even though the interests are high h^c and 
mere, what is this in comparison with the high interest of 3 — 4 
Qu'doc, when one must yet buy bread. We now also have a flour- 
mill and saw-mill two miles away. 

"At the present there are 16 families that belong to our church. 
Every three weeks we hold divine worship. Christian and I alter- 
nate in giving exhortations. There are also an equal number of 
Amish people near here, also some Reformed church p>eople and 
some Lutherans. There are also some German and French people 
here. I could yet write much that comes to my mind, but must close. 
What I have written in my last letter I do not remember; but one 
thing of which we often speak is a desire to have a school-teacher, 
even if he is not so well educated, if he is only God-fearing; and 
could teach the children to read and write well, and do some figur- 
ing, and acquaint them with God's Word and the love of Christ. In 
our families are 20 children, and there are others who desire that 
their children might receive instructions according to Swiss customs, 
for there is as yet no German school here. We hop>e the Lord will 
fulfil our desires. A school-house is to be built between Samuel's 
and John's farm. (The schoolhouse was built on the N. E. corner 
of my father's farm, and was known as the election schoolhouse of 
French township in Adams Co., Ind, later the place was changed a 
mile northwest. In both of these places the writer attended school. 
— S. H. B.) 

"A few words concerning the inner spiritual condition. I often 
wonder what the state of things are in your society, who your min- 
isters are, and who of the old ones of 1836 are yet alive; and if they 
still teach and practice regeneration and change of mind, or if, as 
among us. some think that if they are brought up in our churches, 
and receive adult baptism, they haye regeneration, when the Lord 
teaches that the imagination of man's heart is evil from his youth, 
and if the heart of man is thus, what does it benefit him even when 



Descendants of Deacon David Baumgartner 17 

the best ordinances, according: to the Gospel, are kept, while the in- 
ner man remains unchanged, as is evident from the vrords of Jesus 
Mk. 7: 20. The Gospel promises no forg-iveness of sin except through 
repentance and betterment of life through faith in Christ. Truly 
all who call themselves Christians say, they believe on Jesus, but 
where are the fruits of the Spirit? When carnal-mindedness reigns 
according to Rom. 8: 5-7, we have no peace with God. I know 
thereby those who are strict on external customs, and who have 
many rules, and in pharisaical pride condemn others; but when they 
have only the outward form of godliness, they do not care when 
they do speak shameful words, and sing worldly and street "gassen" 
songs, and scold with contentious and disgraceful words, and misuse 
the Day of Grace. If one brings to their minds the Word of God, 
the thought comes to me that I read in a book of dreams where it 
says, "Because we have not the power of the Spirit, we are con- 
tented with the dead letter." Some think we ought to teach noth- 
ing but the letter, but if I make no explanation, or discernments of 
the word, what benefit is it to the hearer? He can read it in his own 
home. When we consider how Paul wrote to Timothy that we shall 
continue v.'itb exhortation etc. we should not neglect or overlook 
this main important work, for the Holy Scriptures can thus lead to 
salvation through faith on Jesus Christ. 

"Then in His Word God reveals His Will, and gives counsel as 
to our duties. It is to be lamented that, at the present time, there 
is so little love for the sacred Scriptures, especially in this spiritually 
lifeless age. Oh, that the people might have a desire and joy in the 
law of the Lord, But one looks more upon the visible than the in- 
visible. That as some think, that we should neither take away, nor 
add to the word, I also teach as Jesus taught. Matt. 5:19 and 15:5. 
But when one expresses his discernment and understanding upon the 
Scripture that is read, which is comportable with the Gospel, we 
neither add to or take from it; and thus by preaching the Word can 
often better p3netrate into the hearts of the hearers, than would 
much reading without reflection. But, dearly beloved, do not think 
of rae, or of my writing, as though I want to teach some one, or have 
some one in special view. No, I have only written that you may 
know how things go; that you do not think that we are better in 
America, for we have brought with us flesh and blood, and a sinful 
nature, which is inclined towards evil. But those who love Jesus, 
and desire to serve Him, have liberty here. The Tract Union So- 
ciety distributes many good books and periodicals and many thousands 
of Bibles. We are living in a hazardous time, in which the judg= 
menla of God pass over the world. Oh, let righteousness teach us, and 
let the exhortation of Christ: 'Watch and pray, for ye know not 



18 Historical Sketches of Seven Generations 

when the Lord cometh', be obeyed. His prophesies are going- into 
fulfilment. Herewith are you committed to the grace of God, and 
the enlightenment of the Holy Ghost. The all-merciful God strength- 
en you all, that ye become strong in faith; that Christ may dwell in 
you and us until we are together before the Throne of God, to bless 
and praise the Lord from Eternity to Eternity, Amen'."' 

To Whom This Letter was Written. 

This letter was probably the last one he wrote to his friends in 
Switzerland through the courtesy of the publisher of the American 
Botschafter in 1S49. It is really a remarkable letter for a man 84 
years old. His statements are concise, clear and unpretentious. His 
views on religious experience are good, scriptural and to the point. 
He firmly believed in preaching the whole counsel of God, and that 
salvation is obtained through repentance toward God and faith in 
Christ. That the mere letter of the word is of no profit, but a re- 
newed life is essential, and the continuation of a holy life to the end. 
He held the Bible in high esteem and wished that all might read it 
more, for better information as to its real teachings, and for better- 
ment of life. He believed in a personal, conscious salvation, that 
should manifest itself in the fruits of the spirit. The good of his 
people was the constant end heearnestly sought. He was a strong 
adyocate of the Mennonite doctrines, and had the confidence of his 
Church. The Mennonites at this time bad no paid ministry, hence 
he was necessitated to engage in secular work to make a livelyhood 
for himself and his family. He was a bookbinder by trade. He 
was described to the writer as a tall man somewhat slender and 
heavy boned. Samuel, his youngest sod, resembled him more than 
any one of the other children. 

Here is another letter from Rev. David Baumgartner to his son 
David in Wayne Co., Ohio, dated Jan. 25, 1853, written on his 88th 
birthday. 

•• To my son David. To-day I begin my S'ith year. To you and 
yours, and my acquaintances, I wish the imaieasurable love of Coil, 
and the grace of Jesus Christ, and the enlightenment of the Holy 
Ghost, as my affectionate and hearty greetings. Amen! 

"I have often thought to write to ycu, but sc: ' -: - . 

Since I cannot work much, I have more time to reflect over the past. 
I can remember back a period of SO years, and of T)arents and pious 
old people of 40 jears ago from whom I had verbal reports. I learn 
of the state and condition of cur Church, (Cemciniv ), tb-: ~rcal cot:- 
trast between then and now. When I behold this difference, the 
thought comes to me, what will Snally ccm.e to pass? If \r: an- 



Descendants of Deacon David Baumgartner 19 

oiher hundred years changes are wrought as in the past hundred, 
there will remain liitle but outward ceremonies, and little of the life 
that is of God. 

"I will hasten to what I wanted to write to ycu, namely when 
our forefathers came into the bishopric, and when the persecution in 
Bern continued, many emigrated to places *herc they found liberty, 
where many are yet located, but live quietly and in soiilude, con- 
tented to have food and raiments. But the enemy also showed him- 
self there, and slandered them as though they were an injury to the 
country. They succeeded to influence the prince, "Fuerst," to put 
forth a mandate to the effect that the "Tiiufer" must leave the coun- 
try. The time was set when they were to leave. My stepmother 
related to me, when she was yet on Muensterberg ar, a servant girl, 
in a certain home, that the people she worked for, told her, how the 
persecuted people were in anxiety and sorrow. That they worked no 
lofiger, but were weeping and praying and did not know what to do. 
Then an eminent official took an interest in them and went himself 
to the prince. "Fuerst," and appealed to him in their behalf; saying, 
that tbesi people were no injury to the country, but much more a 
bene6t, whereas there was yet much land that could not be worked 
with plows because of its broken mountainous character, but had to 
be hoed around; and that these people planted and sowed seeds, and 
that the government, by law, received the tenth of the produce. 
"Further" he said, "they work our estates well and pay us the rents 
right, and thus wecin also meet our obligations better." Thereupon 
the sovereign repealed the mandate, however only by freewill and with 
the reservation, that they buy no land, and that they are not tenants 
in the villages, but that they remain up in the mountains. 

"The old man to whom I hired out as a seryant, often said to 
me, that our (Gemeinde) church society was only tolerated by mere 
arbitration, or without any fixed code or rule. But we' were glad 
and thanked (Jod for this much, and exhorted one another to quie- 
tude and proper behavior. And whereas we had much appreciated 
liberty, the Church agreed to manliest our appreciation by a personal 
ackno vlcl^ment tu the f^aiiji prince, or agent, for such favors; and 
it was lurther resolved, that in case a new one is appointed, that to 
him be given a fine linen cloth as an acknowledgment of gratitude to 
niLL:. .'".ly father (dc-acou DiVid B.) ucli'i-u .ju>-c io carry one to the 
land agent, which he gratefully accepted. Thus much of the out- 
ward things, but now also something of the religious, or inner life. 

"I Well remember how it was in my b.-yhood days. When young 
2"! M c -.v ,>l;<.u to unite witii the L t;uroh. they mentioned it, a good 
'^hi!e before, to the oEBcials of the Church, th^n tbey were exhorted 
tt; pr.iy, and the deacons sskcd the Church io piay for them. When 



20 Historical Sketches of Seven Geaerations 

I arrived at my proper ag^e I also pursued this waj, but the proper 
understanding lacked with me, althoujjh I followed the outward cus- 
tom and, like others, believed that this is rig^ht. At that time it was 
the custom to pray three times per day, and these were special days 
appointed in the spring and autumn. The Sabbath was observed, 
although there were some at this time who postponed this prajing 
until Sunday, and forgot Isa. SS: 13, and Ezek. 20: 11—12, and 
through the liberty we had, there was an increased tendency to in- 
difiference and frivolity among the young people, and I was no better. 
But, after Sunday was passed, my conscience often accused me, that 
I spent Sunday badly. I had not much time, for in my 24th year I 
was called to the ministry, and had no time for vain things. I saw 
then keenly as never before what it means to enter into trust with 
Christ through baptism, in as much as one promises not to live for 
himself, or for the world, but lor Him who delivered us from the 
power of Satan, and we are therefore to walk in a new life; for with- 
out repentance and betterment of heart is no forgiveness promised. 
And because we insist on a change of heart, some are hit by the 
Truth, and cannot tolerate it, and accuse us of wanting to toach and 
observe a new faith. But this is far from t>eing so, for we hold to 
the baptism and faith of the apostles, as the right Evangelical teach- 
ing, just as they and their students taught; and as our forefathers 
witnessed with giving up their possessions and their blocd. But be- 
cause we see that many outwardly accept the faith and designated 
baptism, and promise to live for Jesus, and better their lives, of 
which little enough is seen; and inasmuch that the apostle exhorts, 
'"Examine yourselves whether ye be in the faith, prove your own- 
selves." n Cor. 13: 5; and when I consider the words in a song book, 
"prove yourselves," etc=, I realize the many shortcomings of us all. 
But the apostle says, "follow after peace and holiness," etc. May 
God give to me and all who desire it, his grace through Jesus Christ. 

"I will close. Think not my son that I cast insinuations on you, 
or anyone else, I have stated above why I thus write; for we desire 
nothing else but that the Church might be built up, and that the 
kingdom of darkness might be destroyed. But "he enemy can not 
tolera^"^ tbis, and therefore he casts forth slanderous words. The 
Lord forgive him, and let us forgive and pray for him. 

"There would be much to write yet, and to consider, in which 
the falling off in tbe Church consists. Probably at some other time 
more, if I live. Of our condition you have heard from Ramseier. In 
conclusion we greet you all, and wish you prosperity in body and 
spirit. I also greet my brethren in the ministry and all v/ho inquire 
after us. Pray for us, as also I do in my weakness for my children 
and grandchildren, with the desire that they all may become the 
children of God. The Lord be with you all. Amen!" 

"From your wellwisher, David Bau.mgartnkr." 



Chapter III. 

Sec. I. 



Katharina Baumgartner, Ramseicr, (Third Generation). 

Katharina was the first child of Rev. David Baumgartner by his 
first wife. She was born Apr, 2(^, I79b, (see Burg-errodel H. 5, pag-e 
H4.) in Budcrichgraben, Jura, Oheramt Courtelarj, Canton Bern, 
Switzerland. She was married to John Ramseier, of Eggiwjl, date 
not known. He was the son of Rey. Ramseier mentioned in the 
history of the Swiss Mennonites. They were Menoonites. She died 
in Charapoz. Switzerland, of typhoid fever, Sept. 30, 1834. They had 
three children, namely: — 

(A) Elizabeth Ramssicr, Lehman, (Fourth Generation). 
Elizabeth was born at Champozon Mont Girod Oberamt Muenster, 

Canton Bern, Switzerland, July 20, 1S24. She was married to Jacob 
Lehman. Feb. U, 1853. They never had any children. They moved 
to Adams Co., Ind , from Switzerland, and lived oa a farm in French 
township, three miles N. W. of Linn Grove. Ind. Later they sold 
this farm and bought one about two miles N. E. of Bei ne. Ind., 
where she also died Apr. 20, 1892. She was a corpulently built wo- 
man, plain in her habits of life, amiable in disposition, and neigh- 
borly with her neighbors. He, after her death, liyed with his broth- 
er near Berne, where he also died. They were both loyal members 
of the Mennonites. 

(B) Maria Anna Ramseier, Sprunger, (Fourth Generation.) 
r^r ^ - ^-~==.- ....^^^ — -^-^ Maria A. began her earthly life 

Feb. 11, 1S2S at Champoz, on Mont 
^ — ^.^^^ Girod, O. Muenster, Canton Bern, 

\ Switzerland. She was united in 

I '' ', marriage with Abraham Sprunger, 

of Bernr, Ind . Mar. 30, 1S70. She 
/ ' came to America in 1869. They 

. ' ^^_ ^ Hyed in Berne from the timeof their 

-* ^f"'" marriage. He died a highly re- 

spected member of the Mennonite 
church in above named place. She 
is still living in Berne with her 
daughter Dina, but is in feeble 
health, awaiting her summons to 
the heavenly home. She is a short, 
stout built person, with a peaceful 
^-r — ■ --- 4 disposition, and strong religious 

characteristics, trustful in God and 



22 Historical Sketches of Seven Generations 

man, and faithful to her church. The following children are the 
issue of this union: — 

1. Dina R. Sprunger, Habegger, (Fifth Generation), Berne, Ind. 

Dina R. was introduced to the trials of this world Oct. 2, 1871. 
She was baptized and adroitted to the Mennonite church at Berne, 
Ind., by Rev. S. F. Sprunger Jan. 1, 1888. The voyage of wedded 
life, with Louis Habegger, began Dec. 11, 1^00. He was born Dec. 
2, 1876 in Adams Co., Ind. Their marriage ceremony was performed 
by the above named Rev. They reside in Berne, Ind , where he is 
engaged as drayman. They are both esteemed members of the 
Mennonite church. She has a common school education. Their 
home was made happy with four children, born in Berne, Ind., viz: — 

a. Oliva. born Sept. 21, 1901, Sixth Generation. 

b. Wilferd, " June 30, 1903 " " " 

c. Tillman, " Jan. 14, 1906 " 

d. Arvada, •' Nov. 14, 1907 '* " " 

2. Alisa Sprunger, ' Fifth Generation). 

Alisa wasborn in Berne, Ind., Oct. 29, 1873, and died Dec. 30, 
1879. 

(C). Abraham Ramseier, (Fourth Generation). 

Abraham was also born at Petit Champoz. Mont Girod, O. 
Muenster, Canton Bern, Switzerland, Jan. 8, 1831. He was a tall, 
heavy boned built man, with a cheerful, talkative disposition. In the 
old country he made his home for some time with John Baumgartner, 
father to Dr. C. C. B., as the Dr. states in his own autobiography of 
his early life. He came to America when a young- man. He first 
lived in Ohio, later he went to Ind., and did manual labor here and 
there. Here he again met Mary A. Mosf r. a half-second cousin to 
himself, to whom he was also married. She was born at the same 
place be was. May 28, l?3b. They lived for quite a while in Vera 
Cruz, Ind., where he bccaine a partner in a drugstore. In connection 
with the drugstore he also was appointed a^ postmaster, which office 
he held for some time. Later he sold his interest in the store, and 
moved with his family to Lima, Ohio, where he died, July 22, 1903. 
This union was blessed with the following children, all born in Vera 
Cruz, Wells Co., Ind. 

1. Leopold Ramseier, ( Fifth Generation). 

Leopold was born July 9, 1S58. He obtained a village school 
education. He was never married. He died of tuberculosis in Lima, 
Ohio, Aug. 23, 1888. 



Descendants of Deacon David Baumgartner 23 

2. Hcrmania Ramscier, (Fifth Generation). 
Ilermania was born Oct. 16, 1863, and died Nov. 23, 1863. 

3. Hcdwig Ramscier, (Fifth Generation). 

Hedwig was born Nov. 22, 1866. She obtained a village school 
education. She was never married, and also died in Lima, Ohio, Feb. 
6, 1806. 

4. Otto F. Ramscier, (Fifth Generation), Lima, Ohio. 

Otto F. bcg-an his earthly career July 24, 1870. He enjoyed the 
privilege of a good education. He entered matrimonial life with 
Laura L- Reynolds. Jan. U, 1898. She was born in Lima, Ohio, Nov. 
14, 1S71, They live in above named place, where he is in partner- 
ship in the "City Book Store" with W. H. Woolery, and are doing 
well. They have one child, 

(a) Richard L. born June 6, 1<>03, Sixth Generation. 



Chapter IIL 

Sec. 11. 



David Baumgartner, (Third Generation). 

The subject of this brief sketch was the second child of Rev. 
David Baumgartner, by his first wife. He was born in Buderich- 
graben, Jura, Oberamt Courtelary, Canton Bern, Switzerland, Feb. 7, 
1798, and died in Wayne Co., Ohio, Feb. 4, 1863, of consumption. 
He received the rite of water baptism on Easter Sunday 1816, at the 
hands of his father. He was married to Barbara Welty, Apr. 3, 
1824. She was born Apr. 1, 1795, and was baptized Mar. lb, 1813, 
by her father-in-law. She died of old age, June 28, 1880. In 1824, 
they emigrated to America, settling in Wayne Co., Ohio, where he 
followed farming until his death. He was a highly honored member 
of the old Mennonite Church, from the time of his baptism, loyally 
adhering and advocating her doctrines and polity. This union was 
blessed with the following children, all born in Wayne Co., Ohio, 
viz: — 

(A.) Anna D. Baumgartner, Tschantz, (Fourth Generation). 

Anna D. entered life's pathway, Sep. 16, 1825. She was bap- 
tized and received into the Mennonite Church, Mar. 25, 1842, by Rev. 
Peter Schneck. She entered wedded life with Abraham C. Tschantz, 
Sep. 11, 1845. The wedding act was solemnized by the same Rev. 
Her husband was born June 4, 1818, and died of dropsy, Jan. 7, 1897, 
She died of erysipelas. June 4, 1901. She was a Dorcas, for her great- 
est pleasure was to do good to anyone in need. Their vocation was 
farming. They remained faithful and respected members of their 
church until death. The issue of this union consists of the follow- 
ing children, ail born in Wayne Co., Ohio, viz: — 

1. Christian C. Tscha"'- ^Fifth Generation). Orrville, Wayne 
Co., O. 

Christian C. entered this life Jun. 20, 1846. He was baptized 
Apr. 14, 1865, by Ulrich Sommer, and also received into fellowship 
of the Mennonite Church. In Oct. 27, 1870, he was united in mar- 
riage with Mary A. Fiechter, by Rev. John Moser. She was born 
Aug. 28, 1848, in Switzerland. She received baptism, and was 
taken into church, Apr. 10, l^-.s by Kev. C. Sommer. They later united 
with the Mennonites of the General Conference, of which they are 
esteemed members at present. Farming is their vc»catioa of 



Descendants of Deacon David Bautngartner 25 



life. The following: children is the issue of this union, all bora in 
Wajne Co., O., viz: — 

a. Albert F. Tschantz, (Sixth Generation), Orrville, Wajne 

Co., O. 

Albert F. first saw the light of this world Mar. 18, 1872; and 
was baptized and received into the Mennonite Church of the Gen. 
Conf,. by Rev. S. F. Sprunger, of Berne, Ind., Nov. 29, 1888. Aside 
from a fair common school education, he availed himself of a busi- 
ness course at Wadsworth, Ohio. He is yet single and follows farm- 
ing. 

b. Elma E. Tschantz, Moser, (Sixth Generation), Mas- 

sillon, Ohio. 
Elma E. entered the trials of life Jan. 5, 1874. She was bap- 
tized and received into the Mennonite Church of the Gen. Conf., by 
Rev. S. F. Sprue ger, Nov. 29, 1SS8. Besides common school, she 
attended high school, and taught two terms of winter school, and 
two of summer. She was united in marriage with Daniel A. Moser, May 
24, 1S0(>, by Rev. Joel Lehman. He was born Mar. 21, 1872, and bap- 
tized and received into the above named Church Apr. 12, 1895, by 
Kev. J. L. He had the privilege of attending the '"Mount Union 
College," and taught four winter terms of school. For a number of 
years he clerked in a clothing store, but for the last two years he 
owns a clothing store in Massillon, Ohio, and does a good business. 
To them is born in Wayne Co., Ohio, a daughter: — 

1. Ruth M., Dec. 3. 1899, (Seventh Generation). 

c. Clara A. Tschantz, (Sixth Generation). 

Clara A. was born Apr. 24, 1S7S, and died of croup, Nov. 24, 
1S81. 

d Lillian L. Tschantz. Hofstetter, (Sixth Generation), Orr- 
ville, Ohio. 

Lillian L. came to this world Sept. 24, 1881; and was baptized 
:ind icceivcd into the Mennonite Church of the Gen. Conf., Sept. 16, 
ls'>7, by Rev. J. Lehman. She was united in marriage with Wilson 
Hofstetter, Nov, 25, 1902, Rev. A. Sommer officiating^ H** ^-- borti 
Nov. 13, 1881. and baptized and received into the same Chui<.u, and 
by the same pastor as she, Mar. 13, 1S99. Farming is their vocation. 

2. Daniel H. Tschantz, (Fifth Generation), Orrpille, Ohio. 

Danie! H. entered this life Oct. i, lo-T. He was baptized and 
received into the old Mennonit;- Cnurch by Rev, C. Sotnmer. Apr. 10, 
18b8. He took to wife Katharina J. Gerber, Oct. 22, 1874. She was 



26 Historical Sketches of Seven Generations 

born Aug. 24. 1848, and was baptized and received into his Church at 
the satse time he was. Both are loyal and active i^embers of their 
church. Aside from a common school education, he also had the op- 
portunity of attending the "Bildungs Anstalt" at Wadsworth, Ohio, 
for one year. He is a successful farmer. They have no children. 
They are loyal members of their Church. 

3. Barbara L. Tschantz, Amstutz, (Fifth Generation), Apple 
Creek, Ohio. 

Barbara L. was born Jan. 7, 1851. She received baptism and 
reception into the Mennonite Church, Apr. 23, 1869. She became 
the wife of John L. Amstutz, Oct. 24, 1872, with Rev. C. Sommer sol- 
emnizing the v.^cdding act. He was born in Canton Bern, Switzerland, 
Feb. 2, 1848; and was baptized on Easter Sunday 1S63, by Rev. Jacob 
Schneck. He has held the office of an "Elder" in the Church for 
fourteen years. He has also been elected chorister of the Church 
every year since the Church of the Gen. Conf. was organized in 
Wayne Co. Ohio, in 1SS6. In connection with farming, he is also 
secretary of "The Sonnenberg Fire and Lightning^ Insurance As- 
sociation," having held the office for over tv^enty years. This shows 
that he is held in high esteem by all, and that his work is highly 
appreciated. They are faithful members of the Gen. Conf. Church. 
The following are their children, all born in Wayne Co., Ohio: — 

a. Henry Amstutz, (Sixth Generation), Orrville, Ohio. 

Henry began his earthly career Sept. 7, 1873. He received bap- 
tism and reception into the Mennonite Church of the Gen. Conf. 
Nov, 29, 18SS, by Rev. S. F. Sprunger. He married Ada Brenneman 
May 9, 1897, with Rey. D. M. Irvin officiating. She was born Sept. 
23, 1873. His occupation is farming. Their home is made happy 
with the following children born in Wayne Co , Ohio: — 

1. Lizzie M., born June 2, 1898, (Seventh Generation). 

2. Irvin D., born Oct. 20, 1903, (Seventh Generation). 

b. Franklin B. Amstutz, (Sixth Generation), Berne, Ind. 

Franklin B. began his earthly journey July 6, 1876. He was 
baptized and admitted to the privileges of the Mennonite Church of 
the Gen Conf. Oct. 14, 1892, by Rev. J. Lehman. He was joined in 
wedlock to Naorae Sprunger, Oct. 28, 1902, by the same Rev. She 
was born near Berne, Ind., Oct. 8, 18S0. and baptized and admitted in- 
to the same Church by Rev. S. F. Sprunger. He is a stockholder of 
the "Bcrnc Lumber Co.," at Berne, Ind., where he holds a favorable 
position as Forc-r.an in the Planiug Mill. He has a common 
school education. To them is born in Berne, Ind. 



Descendants of Deacon David Baumgartner 27 



1. Dessic I., Nov. 5, 1903, (Seyenth Generation), 

c. Levi E. AmsUitz, (Sixth Generation), Apple Creek. O. 

Levi K. was born Apr. 28, TS78. lie was baptized and admitted 
into church-fellowship of the Mennonite Church of the Gen. Conf., 
Oct. f), LSM3, by Kev. J. Lehman. He received a common school 
education. P^arming is his occupation. He was married to Ida E. 
Sprunger, at Berne, Ind , on Dec. 5, 1907, where the latter was born 
July 5, 1881, and baptized and united with theMennonitechurcb there, 
in which she has been an active member and Sunday-school teac"her. 

d. John E. Amstutz, (Sixth Generation), Bluffton, Ohio. 

John E. began life Apr. 1, 188L He received baptism and re- 
ception into the Mennonite Church of the Gen. Conf., Apr. 12, 1895, 
by Rev. J. Lehman. He attended the Dalton High school, and two 
years the "Central Mennonite College," of Bluffton, O. He taught 
three summer and three winter terms of school. Then he engaged 
io farm work in Wayne Co., O. Later he re-entered the above named 
College, and in June 190(). graduated from the same. He is continu- 
ing his studies, preparing for religious work. He was married to 
Layina Amstutz, of Bluffton, Obio, on Jan. 26, 1905, by Rev. J. W, 
Kliewcr, of Berne. Ind. She was born Apr. 9, 1882, and was bap- 
tized by Rev. John Moser. and united with the Mennonite Church, 
ai Bluffton, O., on "Good Friday," 1900. Last year he had charge of 
the Trenton, O., Mennonite Church, filling the place of Rev. H. J. 
Krehbiel. who had a leave of absence for one year granted him. To 
tbcm is born: — 

1. Eernice Easter, .-\pr 15, 1906, (Seventh Generation). 

e. Susan R. Amstutz, (Sixth Generation), Apple Creek, O. 

Susan R. began this life June 17, 1SS5. She received a common 
school education. The rite of baptism was administered on her by 
Rev. J. Lehman. Apr. 13, 1900, who aNo received her at this time in- 
to church fellowship, of the Gen. Conf.. Mennonite Church. She 
has annually been electc^i church organist for a number of years. 

f. Martha D. Amstutz, (Sixth Generation), Apple Creek, O. 

Martha D. was born Apr. 29, 1887, and was baptized and re- 
ceived into the Mennonite Church of the Gen, Conf., Sept. 28, 1902, 
by Kev. A. A. Sommer, She also received a common school educa- 
tion. 

g. Huldah R. Amstutz, (Sixth Generation), Apple Creek, O. 

Hu'.iJih R. came into this world July 17, 1893. She is now pur- 
suing a common school education. 



28 Historical Sketches of Seven Generations 

h. Paul Otto Amstutz, (Sixth Generation). 
Paul O. was born July 8, 1897, and died the sameday. 

4. Elizabeth Tchantz, Amstutz, (Fifth Generation), Dalton, O. 

Elizabeth entered the arena of life Nov. 20, 1852. Apr. 14, 1S72, 
she received baptism and was also admitted into the Mennonite 
Church by Rev. C. Sommer. Later she united with the Mennonite 
Church of the Gen. Conf. She became the wife of Abraham Am- 
stutz, Oct, 22, 1S74, the above named clergy uniting them in mar- 
riage. He was born in Canton Bern, Switzerland, Dec. 9, 1849. He 
was baptized and admitted into church fellowship by Rev. David 
Nusbaum. He is a farmer. Both are faithful members of the above 
named Church. The following children were born to them near 
Dalton, Wayne Co., O., 

a. Ida Amstutz, Badertscher. (Sixth Generation), Dalton, O. 

Ida began the trials of life June 20, 1S75. She was baptized and 
received into the Mennonite Church, Apr. 18S9, by Rev. A. A. Som- 
mer. She entered the matrimonial life with Fred Badertscher, May 
10, 1896, Rev. J. Lehman cflBciating. He was born in Canton Bern, 
Switzerland, Apr. 7, 1871. As a young man he came to America, 
settling in Wajne Co , O., where he was also bap'ized and received 
into church by Rev. S. F. Sprunger. Both have a common school 
education. He pursues farming. The following children were born 
to them near Dalton, O., viz: — 

1. Elma.June. 2, 1897, (Seventh Generation). 

2. Amos, June 31, 1898, (Seventh Generation). 

3. Elam, Jan. 23, l'>00, and died Ftb. IS, 1900. 

4. Marie, Oct. 5, 1902, and died the same day. 

5. Monroe, Dec. 26, 1903, (Seventh Generation.) 

6. Edwin, Nov. 1, 1905. (Seventh Gentration). 

b. Bertha Amstutz, (Sixth Generation). 

Bertha began life Oct. (>, 1876. She being feeble mindfd, was 
never baptized, but Jesus loved her just the same, and when she died, 
Dec. 10, 1905, He received her into Giory, for His blood also atoned 
for her, and her condition in Heaven will be the same as all of God's 
redeemed children. 

c. Edwin E. Amstutz, (Sixth Generation) 

Edwin E. was born Nov. 29, 1877, and was baptized and received 
into the Mennonite Church of the Gen. Conf., Oct. 6, 1893, by Rev. 
J. Lehman. He died of liver and stomach consumption, Mar. 15» 



Descendants of Deacon David Baumg^artner - 29 

l'»02 He had a common school education. 

d. Caroline Amstutz, (Sixth Generation), Dalton, O. 

Caroline entered upon the arena of time, Sept. 19, 1879. She 
obtained a fair common school training. She was baptized and be- 
came identified with her mother's church Oct. 6, 1893, under the ad- 
ministration of Rev. J. Lehman. She chose to travel the single path 

of life. 

c. Reuben Amstutz,, (Sixth Generation) Dalton, O. 

Keuben entered the shifting scenes of life Jan. 31, 1881. The 
rite of baptism, and reception into the parental Church took place 
Apr. 3, 1896. while Rev. J. Lehman was pastor. His occupation is 
farming. He obtained a fair education, and is single jet. 

f. Esther Amstutz, (Sixth Generation), Dalton, O. 

Esther's career in life dates from Mar. 25, 1882. She was bapn 
tizcd and received into her parents' Church, by Rev. J. Lehman, 
Nov. K", 1S98. She has a fair education, and is single. 

g. Memo S. Amstutz, (Sixth Generation), Dalton, O. 

>!err.c S. began the struggle of life Aug. 4, 1SS3. He was bap- 
tized and received into his parents' Church, Nov. 13, 1898. Aside from 
common school he attended High School in town. He has taught a 
number of terms of school, which profession he still follows with 
marked success and satisfaction. In Sep. 1906 he entered "The 
Moody Bible Institute." of Chicago. He is preparing himself for 
religious work. 

h. Mollic Amstutz, (Sixth Generation). 

Mollie's trials of life began Sept. 2, 1S85. Rev. J. Lehman bap- 
tized and admitted her to church fellowship Apr. 13, 1900. Aside 
from common school she also too'K advantage of a high school train- 
ing. After this she taught a term of both summer and winter 
school. Her life work was cut short by consumption, which ended 
her life, Oct. 10, 1903. She was plucked as a gardener plucks a 
beautiful flower in his garden. She was a very pleasant young wo- 
man, a sweet singer, a faithful organist, dearly beloved by all who 
knew her. 

i. David Amstutz, (Sixth Generation), Dalton, Ohio. 
David began the journey of life Jun. 2, 18s7. He was baptized 
and received into church fellowship by Rev. A. A. Sommer Sept. 8, 
1''02. He works on the farm, and has received a common school 
education. He is a lover of music, and a splendid singer. 



30 Historical Sketches of Seven Generations 

j. Elmer Amstutz, (Sixth Generation), Dalton, O. 
Elmer was born Apr. 12, 1802. He is still attending- common 
school. 

5. John H. Tschantz, (Fifth Generation), Dalton O. 

John H. commenced his eartblj life, Dec. 4, 1854. He was bap- 
tized and admitted into the Mennonite Church bj Rev. Chr. Soramer, 
Apr. 14, 1876. He is now a member of the Gen. Conf. branch of the 
Mennonite Church. He began the vojage of matrimonial life -with 
Lydia Steiner, Oct. 1, 1878. The wedding was solemnized by the 
above named Rev. His wife was born Nov. 30, 1S5T, in Putnam Co., 
O. The above named pastor also baptized, and received her into 
church, Apr. 11, 1873. She died of blood-poison Jan. 9. 1888. He 
was married the second time to Elisabeth Geiger, Feb. 16, 1892. She 
was born in Putnam Co., O., Jan. 17, 1866. She was baptized and 
received into the Mennonite Church by Rev. J. Moser, Mar. 23, 1883. 

Aside from a common school education, John availed himself of 
the opportunity of attending one year, "The Bildungs Anstalt" at 
Wadsworth, Ohio, and the "Smithville High School", and "Wooster 
University", one term each. Thus he laid a good educational 
foundation, to discharge with ability and credit, his duties as a 
Christian and a citizen. In hi? church he has held, and is holding 
now, the office of Trustee for sixteen years. He has also held the 
office of Sunday school Supt. for sixteen years. He is also the Presi- 
dent of "The Sonnenberg Fire and Ivightniug Insurance Associa- 
tion", for the last fifteen years, and has again been elected for an- 
other term of five years. These things are evidences of his ability, 
tactfulness and integrity in the discharge of his entrusted duties, 
both in the church, and in temporal affairs. In his Sunday-school 
work he is very deeply interested, prompt and regular; and is avail- 
ing himself of every opportunity to become better qualified for his 
important work as superintendent. 

His love and loyalty to his church is beyond questioning. His 
oversight over the Insurance Association keeps him very busy. 
Aside from this he is a practical and successful farmer. The follov?- 
iog children are the fruits with his two companions, all born near Dal- 
ton, Wayne Co., Ohio; five with the first, and two with the second, 
viz: 

a. W. Irving Tschantz, (Sixth Generation), Dalton, Ohio. 

W. Irving was born July 17, 1879. He was baptized and re- 
ceived into the church of his parents by Rev. J. Lehman, April 12, 
1895. He has a good common school education. Farming is his oc- 
cupation. He was married to Dessie Fvudy Jan. 19th 1905. Dessie 



Descendants of Deacon David Baumgartner 31 

was born May 12, 1882. She was admitted into the United Presby- 
terian church in 18'>5. To them is bora: 

(1.) Clair D. March 16th V)0(}. (Seventh Generation). 

b. Olive M. Tschantz Gerber, (Sixth Generation). 

Oliyo M. first saw the light of the world Nov. 25, 1882. She 
was baptized and received into her parents church, by Rev. J. Leh- 
inan Sept. 16, 1S97. Aside from common school, she attended the 
"Central Mennonite College," at Bluffton, Ohio, one year and thus 
has laid a good foundation for intellectual and Christian usefulness 
in the world. She entered matrimonial life with Reuben S. Gerber, 
Nov. 1, l'»0<., of Wayne Co., Ohio. Rey. A. A. Somraer tied the 
nuptial knot. Reuben was born March 1st, 1876. Baptized by Rev. 
Joel Lehman, Nov. 20 18^>1. He has now taken charge of his father's 
farm. 

c. Dora C. Tschantz, (Sixth Generation), Dalton, Ohio. 

Dora C. arrived on the scene of action, April 1, 1885. She was 
baptized and admitted into her parents' church by Rev. J. Lehman, 
April 13, I'JOO. Besides a common school education, she also re- 
ceived a year's training in the "Central Mennonite College," at Bluff- 
ton. ( )hio, and is prepared to become a greater blessing to man. 

d. Amos A. Tschantz, (Sixth Generation) Dalton, Ohio. 

Amos A. began the pathway of life, Dec. 31, 1887. At the age 

of sixteen Nov. S, r>03, he received baptism from Rev. A. A. Som- 

mer, and was admitted into his parents' church. He attended the 
common schools. His vocation is farming. 

e. Lizzie E. Tschantz, (Sixth Generation), Dalton, Ohio. 

IZ/./.ie E. began her brief earthly life, Dec. 31, 1S87. She was a 
t«ia sister to Amos. She died of malaria fever Jan. 13, 1S91. 

f. Sylvie L Tschantz, (Sixth Generation), Dalton, Ohio. 

Sylvie r^ was born Jan. 23, 1S'»3. ^'^-^ •■•"?s baptized at the 
Salem .Mennonite church Oct. 28, ]"»06, ana also received into church. 
She has a common school education. 

g. Clyde M. Tschantz, (Sixth Generation). 

Clyde M. was born July 24, 1S'»S, and is now attending common 
school. 

6. Anna Tschantz, (Fifth Generation). 

Anna was horn Mar. IS, 18.-)7, and died ten days old. 



32 Historical Sketches of Seven Generations 

7. Caroline Tschantz, Sprunger, (Fifth Generation), Berne, Ind. 

Caroline commenced her earthly life Dec. 10, 1859. She was 
baptized and received into the Mennonite Church in 1877. On Apr. 
9, 1895, she joined hands in wedlock with David C. Sprunger, who 
was born near Berne, Adams Co., Ind., Apr. 3, 1857. He received 
baptism and reception into the Mennonite Church in 1875. Both 
have a fair common school education, and are highly respected mem- 
bers of their church, exerting- a salutary influence over their com- 
munity and acquaintances, for both have been earnest and faithful 
church and S. S. workers during the entire time of their connection 
with the church. They are ever ready to work in any branch of the 
church. They live on a farm one mile south of Berne. The follow- 
ing children are the fruit of their union, all born on their farm: — 

a. Milton F., Jan. 25, 1897. (Sixth Generation). 

b. Alida S., Nov. 4, 1899. 

c. Leslie E., Feb. 26, 1901. 

8. Sarah A. Tschantz Badertscher, (Fifth Generation), Wayne 

Co., Ohio. 

Sarah A. entered this life Nov. 2, 1S65. Rev. J. Nusbaum bap- 
tized and admitted her into church fellowship Apr. 3, 1885. She was 
united in marriage to John Badertscher, Jan. 1, 1902, by Rev. A. A. 
Sommer. She died of blood poison, May 5, 1903. He was born Mar. 
27, 1867 in Canton Bern, Switzerland. He came to America, Wayne 
Co., O., where he was baptized and received into the Mennonite 
Church by Rev. C. Sommer, Apr. 7, 1SS2. John is quite a church 
and S. S. worker. At present he is elder of the church and assistant 
Supt. of the S. S. To them was born: — 

(a) Milton, May 1, 1903, (Sixth Generation). 

9. William P. Tschantz, (Fifth Generation), Apple Creek. O. 

William P. began the shifting scenes of life, Aug. 27, 1867. The 
ordinance of baptism was .^''tuinister ' ..-'■■• him by Rev. S. F. 
Sprunger^ Dec. 1, 1H86. who also receiyc. i,;ni into church fellow- 
ship of the Mennonite Chu'c".! of the Gen. Conf. He entered upon 



t\,, 



i.o-^, r\ev. J. 



Lehman tying the nuptial knot. She was born ia Canton Bern, 
Switzerland, Dec. 30, 1871, and was baptized and received into the 
Mennonite Church Apr, 10, iS'>0, ^7 '^ •' c^-^~,3r^ He is a farmer 

by CCCUpstiC".. G. Tv .^-N,>:sC.I i •.l-iCLi, d.li'1 riU ^uu:;-:- ' '.;>ctn;;cr C-i iJiS 

church. The following children ^'■e hor? to vbis -iiion, near Apple 
Creek, Wajne Co., O., viz:— 



s 



Descendants of Deacon David Baumg^artner 33 

a. Elrena, May 20, 1895, (Sixth Gjceration) 

b. Milton, Nov. 16, 1897, 

c. Martha. Sept. 16, 1899, " '* died Sept. 18, 1899. 

d. Sylvan, *' 29, 1900, " " " June 9, 1902. 
c. Mcnno, Oct. 3. 1902, " " " Oct. 5, " 

f. Clayton Alvin, Jan. 21, 1906, " 

(B). Jacob Baumgartncr, (Fourth Generation), Dalton, Ohio. 

Jacob made his appearance on the arena of time Jan. 31, 1827. 
lie was baptized and received into the Mennonite Church by Rev. P. 
Schneck, Apr. 5, 1844. May 18, 1S54, he entered marriage life with 
Elizabeth J. Gerber. Rev. U. Sommer solemnized the marriage act. 
She was born Kov. 14, 1831, and was baptized and admitted into the 
same Church when a young woman, by the same Rev. He was a 
farmer. They never had any children, but gaye a pleasant Christian 
home to five orphans, to Mary Fiechter, and to four of his brother 
John's children. He and his wife were great benefactors, always 
lending a helping hand to those in need. They helped to support 
the "Geo. Mueller Orphanage" for many years. They always took a 
great interest in mission work. Thus they proved themselves to be very 
worthy members of their Church, and highly respected citizens of 
their community. They celebrated their golden wedding May 18, 
1904. He was of a kind and genial disposition. He died from a 
complication of diseases, Sunday morning, Nov. 11, 1906. 

(C). Elizabeth Baumgartncr, (Fourth Generation). 

Elizabeth was born Aug. 3, 1S28. She was baptized and ad- 
mitted into the Mennonite Church by Rev. P. Schneck, Apr. 5, 1844. 
She retnanined unmarried, and was always faithful to her faith and 
ncr God until death relieved her from sufTering, caused bj stomach 
trouble, on Apr. 25. 1886. Many were her noble deeds to the needy 
ones, who have missed her departure. "Blessed are the dead that die 
in the Lord." 

(D). David D. Baumgartncr, (Fourth Generation). 

David D. began the trials of life Jun. 18, 1830. His baptism and 
reception into the Mennonite Church took place Apr. 21, 1848, by 
RcT. P. S-hneck. On Oct. f., 1855, Rev. U. Sommer united hiro in 
marriage with Elizabeth Gerber. She was born Oct. 17, 1833, and 
was bapii: od and received into the same Church by the same Rev., 
Apr. h, 1.S49. He was a respected member of his Church until death, 
which occiirrpd Oct. 1*^. 1904. resulting from epileptic fits and dropsy, 
lie wi., a gicat, bu'. j'^tieut sutlerer the last years of his life. His 
o.:-',ip.«t;--^ w;,<j «-=rr..;na^. The following clilldrcn issued from this 
uniou, ?.! t>orn in Wayne Co.. Ohio. 



34 Historical Sketches of Seven Generations 

1. Christian D. Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation), Apple Creek, 

Ohio. 

Christian D. came to this world Sept. 18, 1856. The ordinance of 
baptism and reception to the privileges of the Mennonite Church, by 
Rev. C. Sommer, took place Apr. 14, 1876. He entered marriage life 
with Barbara Welty, Dec. 10, 18.S5, Rev, J. Nusbaum officiating. She 
was born Dec. 9, 1863, in Wayne Co., O. She was baptized and re- 
ceived into the same Church, and by the same pastor, Apr. 7, 1882. 
Her thread of life was cut by death, Apr 1887, caused by blood- 
poison. He is a model farmer. After his wife's death he returned 
to his parents' home and took charge of his father's farms, and since 
managed them. To them was born one son in Wayne Co., O. 

a. Albert A. Baumgartner, (Sixth Generation), Apple 
Creek, Ohio. 
Albert A. was born Apr. 6, 1887. He has received a common 
school education, and is a member of the Mennonite Church. Farm- 
ing is his occupation. 

2. Barbara Baumgartner, Lehman, (Fifth Generation), Apple 

Creek, O. 
Barbara entered the changeable life of earth, Jul. 29, 1859. On 
Apr. 14, 1876, she was made the recipient of baptism by Rev. C. 
Sommer, who also received her into the Mennonite Church; and on 
Nov. 17, 1881, united her in marriage to Peter A. Lehman. He was 
born Jan. 12, 1845; and received baptism and admission into the 
Mennonite Church by the same Rev. Mar. 25. 1864. They enjoy the 
good con6dence of their church people, and are still demoted to their 
faith. Farming is their occupation. Their marriage was made happy 
with the fojlowing children, all born in Wayne Co., O. 

a. Reuben R. Lehman, (Sixth Generation), Apple Creek. O. 
Reuben R. began his career on earth Aug. 13, 18S2. He was 

baptized and admitted into church fellowship of his parents' church 
by Rev. J. Nusbaum Apr. 15, 1900. He is engaged in farming. He 
has received a very goad common school education. 

b. Ella M. Lehman, (Sixth Generation), Apple Creek, O. 
Ella M. was initiated into the earthly life Aug. 28, 1885. She 

was baptized and admitted into her parents' church, by Rev. J. Nus- 
baum, Apr. 10, 1903. She attended common school. 

c. Levina A. Lehman. (Sixth Generation). 

Levina A. was born Jan. 28, 1889. She was baptized and ad- 
mitted into her parents' church by Rev. Jacob Nussbanm March 29, 



Descendants of Deacon David Biumgartner 35 

r>07. She received a common school education. 

d. Waldo E. Lehman, (Sixth Gen.) was born Dec. 20. 1893. 
c. Sarah A. Lehman, " " " " Nov. 27, 18%. 
f. Anna E. Lehman, " " " •' Nov. 17, 1898. 

3. Mary Baumgartner, Wclty, (Fifth Generation). 

Mary's earthly life dates from Oct. 17, 1S61. She was baptized 
and received into the Mcnnonite Church, Mar. 26, ISSO hj Rev. C. 
Sommcr. The journey of matrimonial life was begun with Benjamin 
Wclty Dec. 10, iss.=. Rev. J. Nussbaum tied the nuptial knot. He 
was born in Wayne Co., O., July, 7, l>^f>2, and was baptized and ad- 
mitted into the same church, and by the same Rev. as she was, Apr. 
7. 1SS2. Pneumonia cut her thread of life, Jan. 15, 18'i6. To them 
was born one son, viz: — 

a. David Welty, (Sixth Generation), 

David was born Nov. 26, 1S>M. He is now attending- common 
school. 

4. Fanny Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation), Apple Creek, O. 

Fanny was born Feb. 27, 1S((5. She was baptized and received 
into the Mcnnonite Church by Rev. J. Nussbaum, Apr. 11, 1SS4. She 
attended common school, and is still living- a maiden life. She is a 
faithful member of her Church, living consistent with her profession. 
She is a strong stay to her parents. 

5. Anna E. Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation), Apple Creek, O. 

.\nna E. entered upon the pathway of life, Jun. 18, 1868, and 
received baptism and admission into the Mennonite church, Apr. 23, 
l^s*. by Rev. J. Nussbaum. She attended common school. Like her 
sister she chose the single path of life, and is also a faithful member 
of the Church. She is a great support to her mother, and has taken 
the place of a house wife. 

(E). John D. Baumgartner, (Fourth Generation). 

John D. entered this worM Sept. 2, 1S33. He was baptized and 
received into the .Mennonite Church, .Mar. 25, 1S53, bj Rev. U. 
Sommer. He gave his hand in wedlock to Katharina Gerber, May 9. 
l^*A, pastor Sommer officiating. She entered life Nov. 23, 1833, and 

was baptized and admitted into the Mennonite Church by 

Rev. P. Schncck. She died of blood-poison, Nov. 7, IS67. His life 
work was farming. He departed this life for the realms above Jun. 
IS 1S7:. Both were highly respected church members. Five chil- 
dren issued from this union as follows, all born in Wayne Co., Ohio: 



36 Historic?! Sketches of Seven Generations 

1. Caroline Bauragartncr. (Fifth Generation), Ddlton, O. 

Caroline began the voyage of life Mar. 19, 1862. She received 
baptism and church fellowship in the Mennonite Church Mar. 26, 
1880, bj Rev, C. Sommer. Later she became a member of the Menno- 
nites of the Gen. Conf. She is a faithful member of her Church. 
She is unmarried and graces her life with uprightness. She also is 
a faithful support to her foster parents ever since she has grown to 
womanhood. 

2. Rosina Baumgartner, Kirchhofcr, (Fifth Generation), Dal- 

ton, Ohio. 

Rosina entered upon the scene of action, Jun. 17, 1863. The 

ordinance of baptism was administered by Rev. C. Sommer 

who also received her into the Mennonite Church. Later she 
changed her Church relation to the Mennonites of the Gen. Conf. 
She was united in marriage with Daniel Kirchhofer, Aug. 9, 1896, 
by Rev. J. Lehman. He was born in Wayne Co., O., April 15, 1860, 
and was baptised and admitted to the priyileges of the Mennonite 
Church of the Gen. Conf. Jun. 1, 1884, by Rev. C. Krehbiel. He 
availed himself of the opportunity of attending the "Fortbildungs 
Schule" at Halstead, Kans. He is quite a writer. Farming is his 
vocation. Their home was made happy with the followingchildren, 
all born in Wayne Co., Ohio: — 

a. Roy M., Jun. 19, 1897, (Sixth Generation). 

b. Estella M., May 29, 1898, " 

c. Dora E., July 12. 1899, " " " 

d. Delvin C, May 31. 1901, '* " " 

3. Sarah Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation), Dalton, O. 

Sarah was initiated into the trials of life, Oct. 12, 1864. Her 
baptism and reception into the Mennonite Church took place Mar. 23, 
1883, by Rey. C. Sommer. She is still a faithful member of her 
church, and is living a single life. Sae has been suffering with 
headaches almost all her life but is a very patient sufferer with the 
full assurance that her Master means it well with her. 

4. Daniel W. Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation). 

Daniel W. began the conflicts of life June 30, 1866. His baptism 
and reception into the Mennonite Church took place Apr. 13, 188b, by 
Rev. J. Xusbaum. He was united in the marriage bond with Caroline 
Basinger, Sept. 24, 1891, by Rev. P. P. Lehman. She was born in 
Putnam Co., O., Oct. 2, 1866. Later they moved to Morgan Co., 
Mo., where they now reside. She was baptized and received into the 
Mennonite Church of the Gen. Conf. Apr. 3, 1885, by Rev. P. P. 



Descendants of Deacon David Baumgartner 37 



Lehman. He is a farmer. The following- children were bom unto 
them in Morgan Co., Mo. 

a. Wade D., Aug. 4, 180S. (Sixth Generation). 

b. Oliver E, Oct. 21, 1900. *• 

c. Neal W., Feb. 22. 1904. " 

d. A son, July 9, 1906. " 

5. Elizabeth L. Baumgartner, Basinger, (Fifth Generation), 
Morgan Co., Mo. 

Elizabeth L. came to this world, Oct. 22. 1S07. She was bap- 
tized and admitted to the Mennonite Church, Apr. 11, 1884, by Rev. 
J. Nusbaum. Later she joined the Mennonites of the Gen. Conf. 
She was married to Elias A. Basinger, Feb. 9, 1893, bj Rev. P. P. 
Lehman officiating. He was born in Morgan Co., Mo., Sept. 17, 
1S67, and was baptized and received into the Mennonite Church, Apr. 
r>, 18S9, bv Rev. M. S. Mojer. They live in the above named place 
on a farm where the following children were born to them, viz: — 

a. Sarah, Oct. 12. 1S')3. (Sixth Generation). 

b. David, Apr. 2S, 1896. 

c. Mary, " 11, 1899. 

d. Amos, " :A 1902. ' 

e. Walter, June 5, 1904. " " 

(F.) Abraham D. Baumgartner. (Fourth Generation). 

Abraham D. entered this unfriendly world. M ir. 22, 1835, in 
Wayne Co.. O , and departed this life Dec. 5. 1903, in Harvey Co., 
Kan., resulting by being run over by a R. R. train, while crossing 
the track. The voyage of wedded life, with Barbara Gerber, began 
Apr. t), lSt.5. Rev C. Sommer solemnized the marriage vow. He 
received the ordinance of baptism and reception into the Mennonite 
Church. Mar. 25, 1S53. from the hands of Rev. U. Sommer. His wife 
was born Feb. 13, 1847 in Wayne Co., O., and was baptized and re- 
ceived into tlic same Church Apr. 3. 1863, by Rev. U. Sommer. His 
esteem and prominence in the church is proven by the trusts en- 
trusted to him. He was repeatedly sent as a delegate to the Gen. 
Conf. branch of the Mennonite Church. He also served for twelve 
years, as a director of the "Bethel College" of his church, located in 
Newton, Kansas. He also for many years served as a member of the 
"Public School Board." and through his untiring efforts helped to 
build up the best school in the county, A.Uhough he was not an 
educated man. he engaged his powers, and utilized every opportunity 
to promote education. This he evidenced by sending eight of his 



Historical Sketches of Seven Ccncrations 




Descendants of Deacon David Baumg-artner „ 39 

children to the above named college. He was an honorable citizen, 
held in high esteem, and took an active part in civil affairs. His 
political faith was Republican. From his fifteenth to his thirtieth 
year he was a practical shoemaker. After that he followed farming' 
until death. He moved from Wayne Co., O., to Missouri in 1869, 
and later to Halstead, Harvej Co., Kans., in Mar. 1884. She died 
Mar. 15, 190<^), at home. She was a noble Christian mother, and left 
an indelible impress on the memory of her children. From this union 
issued a large group of happy children as follows: — 

1 and 2. Simeon P. and Peter Baumgartner, (F'ifth Generation), 
Newton, Harvey Co., Kans. 

Simeon P. and Peter were twin brothers, born in Wayne Co., O., 
Dec. <>, ISUU. Peter died the same day he was born. Simeon grew 
up and received a common country school education. He moved to 
Missouri with his parents in 18b9; and to Harvey Co., Kans., Mar. 
18S4. He was baptized and received into his father's Church as a 
young man, and is still a faithful member thereof. His matrimonial 
life with Saloma Hoffstetter, of Morgan Co., Mo., dates from Dec. 
20, T'OO, the marriage ceremony was performed by Rev. M. S. 
Mover. He is a practical and successful farmer. They have as yet 
no children. She was born July 6, 18b3 and was baptized and re- 
ceived into the Mcnnoaite Church Mar. 25, 1S82, by Rev. C. Sommer. 

3. John H. Baumgartncr, (Fifth Generation), Halstead, Harvey 

Co., Kans. 

John H., began this earthly life in Wayne Co., O., December 15, 
ISf.S. In Mar. 18S4, he moved with his parents to Halstead, Harvey 
Co., Kans., where he grew up to manhood, and enjoyed fair school 
privileges. In Oct. 189ff. he took unto himself a helpmeet in the person 
of Bertha Fendrick. The wedding was sol'^'"i5i?ed b^ h'e". J. S. >*-l!cr. 
of the Kans. Conf. of the Evangelical Association, of which both are 
honored members. He has been honored by his Church with super- 
intending the Sunday-school, and also served as one of the Trustees 
of the Church. He is a successful farmer. The foUc^ii" ...:rl.-r, 
are born to them in Harvey Co., Kans., viz: — 

a. Clarence VVillard, Ser-* '><* 1<^,"' - '■ Gin^ii^ion.) 

b. Ruth. Ft,. 5, 190U ** " " 

c. Lccta, Dec. 14, 1«>03. " " " 

d. Mihon Edwin, Jan. 28, VK<k " " '» 

4. Albert E Baumgartner. ^Fiiih Geaeration). 

The l.-iof lif:- of All-ert K. began Mar. 8, "870. in Morg-an C.-.. 
Mo., and closed Nov. 1, 1871. 



40 



Historical Sketches of Seven Generations 



5. Prof. William J. Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation), Law- 
rence, Kans. 

William J., entered the arena of time, May 14, 1S71, in Morgan 
Co., Mo., and in Mar. 1S84, moved to Halstead, Harvey Co., Kans., 
with his parents. In his youth he received the rite of baptism and 
reception into the Mennonite Church, Halstead, Kans., of which he 
is a very worthy member. The voyage of matrimonial life, with 
Olga E. Leisy, of Wisner, Nebraska, was commenced on Dec. 1'', T'OO. 
He enjoyed the opportunity of obtaining^ a liberal education at home, 
then followed seven years of successful teaching. He attended edu- 
cational institutions as follows: — "Halstead Seminary" two years; 




O'ga Leisy 



Leona 
Baumgartner. 



William J. 



"Salina Normal" one term; "Bethel College" of the Mennonite 
Church one year; "Kansas State University," three years, from which 
institution he also graduated in 1''00, and also served as a teacher, in 
the same, one year; and the "University of Chicago," three years, 
and taught here one year as associate teacher, and was a Fellow for 
two years up to r'04, and has since received his degree of Ph. D. He 
is at the present engaged as Asst. Prof, of Zoology and Histology in 
the "Kansas State University." He is eminently qualified for an 
instructor, and will make his life-work tell for great good in the 
world. The fact that he was employed as assistant teacher in Uni- 



Descendants of DcaCon David Baumgartner 41 

versities, while attending school, is good evidence of his ability to 
teach. He is highly esteemed by the University instructors and 
directors. During his college days he was elected to the honorary 
literary fraternity "Phi Beta Kappa; and also to the honorary scientific 
society Sigma Xi. He is now a member of the following scientific 
societies: "The Kansas Academy of Science," "The American Asso- 
ciation for the Advancement of Science," "The American Associa- 
tion of Anatomists," "The Central Branch of the American Zoo- 
logists." He-Jias published the following papers: "The Spermatid 
Transformation in (in'llii> J55/w///s with Special Reference to the 
Nobenkern" in Science Bulletin University of Kansas. "Some New 
Evidences for the Individuality of the Chromosomes" in "Biological 
Bulletin Woodshall." He is the happy father of a daughter, born in 
Chicago, 111., viz: — 

a. Leona, Aug. 18, ]''02. (Sixth Generation). 

6. Caroline M. Baumgartner, Hahn. (Fifth Generation), Hal- 

stead, Harvey Co., Kans. 

Caroline M, was born in Morgan Co., Mo., Nov. 1, 1872. In 
March 1^S4, she moved with her parents to Halstead, Harvey Co., 
Kans., where she grew to womanhood. She became a member of the 
Mcnnonite Cl-.urch of the Gen. Conf. in early life, of which she still 
is a faithful member. She was united in marriage with August Hahn, 
of Harvey Co., Kans., in Mar. I'tOl, by Rev. C. Krehbiel. She re- 
ceived a fair education. Her liusband was born in Summerfield, 111., 
Jan. 10, 1S75. They are farming, and are respectable citizens of 
above named place. To them is born a daughter: — 

a. Helen Barbara, May 10, l'»04, (Sixth Generation). 

7. Prof. Milton D. Baumgartner, ( Fifth Generation). Address 

Ivincoln, Neb. 

Milton I), also began the activities of life in Morgan Co., Mo , 
Jan. 4. K^74. He is also a loyal member of the Mennonite Church of 
the Gen. Conf. , in Halstead, Kansas. Aside from attending common 
school, he also had the opportunity of attending "Bethel College" of 
the Mennonite Church, in Newton. Kans.. for three years; and then 
the "Kansas University" for three years, from which he also gradu- 
ated in l'»02. Previously he taught public school for four years, thus 
'ayin^ a good foundation for higher positions in the scholastic life. 
In Halstead he taught the "Gemeinde Schule" one term. Since 1903 
he has been doing graduate work in the "University of Chicago," 
and teaching alternatively, thus getting both theory and practice. 
In the winter of IVQS he substituted in German, in "Buttler College," 



Historical Sketches of Seven Generations 






f- 






1.- 




Descendants of I>eai03 David Hautngartner 



Ar> 






















..^:n^'% 






-^^yF. 



— ^^-^ 



--~ - '■ If I * 



44 Historical Sketches of Seven Gecerations 

Irving-lOD, lod. In 1906-7 he was acting- as assistant Professor of 
German in the "Missouri University," and in the Spring and 
Summer of 1907 he again attended the Chicago University but soon 
again left his study at Chicago, to act as head of the Ger- 
man department in "Miami University" at Oxford, Ohio, but re- 
turned in the Autumn to Chicago to resume his studies in the Uni- 
versity, where he finished the Ph. D. Course in 1908. He is a 
member of the "Fellow in Germanics" 1906-1908, and Presi- 
dent of the Fellow's Club and also of the Germanics Club in 1907 at 
the University of Chicago; in January 1908 he was appointed In- 
structor of Germanic Languages and Literatures at the University 
of Nebraska, and in April be was promoted to Adjunct Professor; 
and was also made a member of the "Modern Language Association 
of America." Thus he is prepared for a very useful life in the edu- 
cational field, and has a bright future before him. He is still un- 
married. 

8. Martha Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation). 
Martha was born Oct. 21, 1876, and died Dec. 20, 1877. 

9. Bertha I. Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation), Newton, Kans. 
Bertha L came to this world in Morgan Co., Mo., Aug 7, 187.S, 

and with her parents moved to Harvey Co., Kans., in 1SS4. She also 
is a devoted member of the Mennonite Church, of the Gen. Conf. 
She enjoyed the privilege of attending the "Boihel College" in New- 
ton, Kans. for two years. She taught school one year. She is now 
following dressmaking. She is still living a single life. 

10. Elizabeth B Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation), Newton» 

Kans. 
Elizabeth B entered upon the scene of time in Morgan Co., Mo., 
Apr. 9, 1S80. She became identified with her parents' Church Apr. 
30, 1899, and is now a consistent member of the Halstead Mennonite 
society. She also availed herself tf the opportunity of attending the 
"Bethel College" in Newton, Kans., for three years. She taught 
public school for six years, and the "Gemeinde Schule" four years. 
In 1904 she attended "Baker University" in Baldwin, Kans., and 
now has a professional Teacher's certificate for life for the State of 
Kansas. She is still unmarried. 

11 and 12. Walter C. and Jennie E. Baumgartner, (Fifth Gen- 
eration), Newton, Kans. 

Walter C and Jennie E. are twins, 'born in Morgan Co., Mo., 
March 12, 1882. At the age of seventeen they united with their 
parents' Church, of which they are still worthy members. Walter is 
a practical farmer, farming the home place, and is looking- after the 



Descendants of Heaioa navi<l P>auingartner 



;?,-«.»,'■ i>V.'jl^i,"'tf" iVrt-,- 







-«( ! *' I r 










n^} 



{%<^i 



-N^:^ 



VI 




•>j^ 



l 



. - fv'% v« 



■^tt T...'.i»aA»-MiiiTtr«ii*'^[ia>lBfaaB«a*A**i 



Jl 



44 Historical Sketches of Seven Generations 

Irving-iOD, Ind, In l'J06-7 he was acting as assistant Professor of 
German in the "Missouri University," and in the Spring and 
Summer of 1907 he again attended the Chicago University but soon 
again left his study at Chicago, to act as head of the Ger- 
man department in "Miami University" at Oxford, Ohio, but re- 
turned in the Autumn to Chicago to resume his studies in the Uni- 
versity, where he finished the Ph. D, Course in 190s. He is a 
member of the "Fellow in Germanics" 1906-1908, and Presi- 
dent of the Fellow's Club and also of the Germanics Club in 1907 at 
the University of Chicago; in January 1908 he was appointed In- 
structor of Germanic Languages and Literatures at the University 
of Nebraska, and in April be was promoted to Adjunct Professor; 
and was also made a member of the "Modern Language Association 
of America." Thus he is prepared for a very useful life in the edu- 
cational 6eld, and has a bright future before him. He is still un- 
married. 

8. Martha Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation). 
Martha was born Oct. 21, 187f), and died Dec. 20, 1877. 

9. Bertha I. Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation), Newton, Kans. 
Bertha L came to this world in Morgan Co., Mo., Aug 7. 187s, 

and with her parentu moved to Harvey Co., Kans., in 1884. She also 
is a devoted member of the Menaonite Church, of the Gen. Conf. 
She enjoyed the privile.ye of attending the "Bethel College" in New- 
ton, Kans. for two years. She taught school one year. She is now 
following dressmaking. She is still living a single life. 

10. Elizabeth B Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation), Newton, 

Kans. 
Elizabeth B entered upon the scene of time in Morgan Co., Mo., 
Apr. 9, 1880. She became identified with her parents' Church Apr. 
30, 1899, and is now a consistent member of the Halstead Meniionite 
society. She also availed herself cf the opportunity of attending the 
"Bethel College" in Newton, Kans., for three years. She taught 
public school for six years, and the "Gemeinde Schule" four years. 
In 1904 she attended "Baker University" in Baldwin, Kans., and 
now has a professional Teacher's certiBcate for life for the State of 
Kansas. She is still unmarried. 

11 and 12. Walter C. and Jennie E. Baumgartner, (Fifth Gen- 
eration), Newton, Kans. 

"Walter C and Jennie E- are twins, born in Morgan Co., Mo., 
March 12, 1882. At the age of seventeen they united with their 
parents' Church, of which they are still worthy members. Walter is 
a practical farmer, farming the home place, and is looking after the 



Descendants of Deacon David Baumgartner 45 



estate's interests. lie also received a good education. He attended 
"Bctbel College" in Newton, Kans., for two years, and was at the 
"State Agricultural College," at Manhattan, Kans., one term. 
Jennie attended "Bethel College" two years, and also taught public 
school two years. Since then she has been at home. Both are yet 
traveling the single course of life. 

13. Rosa E. Bauingartner, (Fifth Generation), Newton, Kans. 
Rose K. was born in Ilarvey Co., Kans., April 14, 1884. She is 

also a member of her parents' Church in Halstead, Kans., since April 
30, !><'*"». Her school privileges were also good. She is still at home 
living a single life. 

14. David C. Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation). Newton, Kans. 
David C. entered life's pathway in Harvey Co., Kans., July 24, 

1S85. He is now in partnership with his brother Walter, on the 
home farm, where he is industrious and persevering in his work. 

15. Edwin A. Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation), Newton, Kans. 
Edwin A. was also born in Harvey Co., Kans., Feb, 14, 1887. He 

attended "Bethel College" in Newton. Kans, two years, and in the 
Autumn of T'O') he entered the "State University" of Kansas at Law- 
rence, where he is distinguishing himself as a student, is preparing 
for an academic career, and taking a six year medical course. 

16. Rachel A. Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation), Newton, Kans. 

Kachel A. was born in Harvey Co., Kans., Nov. 18, 1889. She 
united with her parents' Church Aug. 26. 1907. After graduating 
from the public school, she attended "Bethel College" one year, from 
1005 — f). At present she is living with her brother William J. at 
Lawrence, where she is attending the High school. 

(G.) Peter D. Baumgartner, (Fourth Generation), Apple Creek, O. 

Peter D. entered this unfriendly world, Dec. 11, 1836. He was 
baptized and received into the privileges of the Mennonite Church 
by Key. U. Sommcr, March 21. 1856. On Oct. S, 1S&3, he took unto 
himself a wife named Barbara A. Lehman; the marriage act was 
solemnized by the aforesaid minister. She began this life in Wayne 
Co., O.. Nov. 4, 1S43, and was baptized and received into Church, 
Mar. 2't, 1S61, by the aforesaid Rev. They are both loyal and re- 
spected members of their church, and seek to exert a good moral and 
religious influence in their sphere of life. He is a practical and in- 
dustrious farmer, possessed with frugal habits of life, kind in his 
social intercourse with his neighbors, and disposed to be helpful to 
those in need. His home was made happy with the following chil* 
dren, all born near Apple Creek, Wayne Co., 0., viz: — 



46 Historical Sketches of Seven Generations 

1. Solomon C. Baumgartner, (Fifih Generation), Pandora, Put- 

nam Co., O. 

Solomon C. started life's pathway June 26, 1S65. He was bap- 
tized and admitted to the privileges of the Mennonite Church April 
23, 1886, bj Rev. J. Nusbaum. The matrimonial life with Anna 
Sutter was begun Jan. 8, 1891, Rev. J. Moser performed the wedding 
act. She was born in Putnam Co.. O., Jan. 25, 1865, and was bap- 
tized and admitted into the Mennonite Church Mar= 23, 1883, also by 
Rev, J. M. He is a busy and successful farmer. This union is 
blessed with the following children born near Pandora, Putnam Co., 
O., viz:— 

a. Naomi D . Ftb 2 1892. (Sixth Generation). 

b. Elmira R., Sept. 9, 1893. 

c. Mary L., Aug. 1, 1896. " 

d. Alban P., Mar. 15, 1898. 
died Jan. 30, 1901, of croup. 

e. Olin C , Feb. 19, 1900. 

f. Hulda, June 7, 1902. 

died June 13, 1902. 

g. Almeda, May 21, 1905. 

2. Delila Baumgartrer, Bixel, (Fifth Geceraticn,) Bluffton, O. 

Delila began this probationary life Jan. 1, 1867. Her baptism 
and reception into the Mennonite Church took place Aor. 23, 1S86, 
by Rev. J. Nusbaum. She was united in marriage with David Bixel, 
Dec. 3, 1891, by Rev. J. Moser. He was born in Allen Co., O., May 
26, 1866, and baptized and admitted into churchfellowship of the 
Mennonite Church, Apr. 3, 1885, by Rev. J. Moser. He is a Jeweler, 
in Bluffton, O., where he is doing a proGtable business. Their 
familv circle is made happy with the following named children, born 
in Bluffton, O., viz: — 

a. Dora, Mar. 8, 1893. (Sixth Generation). 

b. Mildred, Jan. 24, 1895. 

c. Go=-do.n, Sept. 14, 1896. 

d. Fern, Feb. 1, 1900. 

3. William Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation), Pandora, Putnam 

Co., O. 

"William began the contlict of life Sept. 3, 1S68. He received bap- 
tism and reception into the Mennonite Church Apr. 1'', 188'*. by Rev. 
J. Nusbaum. The matrimonial life with Martha Ii.isir,ger began 
Sept. 5, lSv3. She was born in Putnam Co., O., Dec. 18. 1869, and 
received baptism and reception into the Mennonite Church Apr. 23, 



Descendants of Deacon David Baumg^artner 47 

1SS6, by Kev. J. Moser. lie is a day laborer. They have two chil- 
dren. She died Apr. 2% 1907, of paralysis. 

a. Alta, May 12, 1896. (Sixth Generation). 

b. Ivan, Jan. 15, 1906. ♦' 

4. Jacob Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation), Wayne Co. O. 

Jacob arrived in this world May 12, 1870. He was baptized and 
received into the Mennonite Church by Rev. J. Nusbautn, Mar. 27, 
IS'H. On Jan< 11, 1S94. he was united in marriage with Lina Am- 
slutz. She was born Nov. 15, l.'-!(,7, and baptized and admitted into 
the Mennonite Church by the aforesaid minis'.er, Apr. 5, 1885. 
He is a day laborer. This union is blessed with one child: — 

a. David, Sept. 6, 1S94. (Sixth Generation). 

5. Clara Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation), Apple Creek, 

Wayne Co., O. 

Clara entered the shifting- scenes of life Feb. 18, i872. She has 
received a district school education. She was baptized and admitted 
into the Mennonite Church by Rev. J. Nusbaum, Mar. 27, 1891, of 
which she is a loyal member. She is still traveling- the journey of 
life alone. 

6. David Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation). 

David was bora Apr. 12, 1S74, and died of spinal and brain fever 
Feb. 15, 1S78. 

7. Rosa Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation), -\pple Creek, Wayne 

Co., O. 

Rosa began the trials of life May 23, 1S7^). She was baptized 
and received into the Mrnnonite Church by Rev. J. Nusbauiu, Mar. 
2.'. iS''4. She ii a faithful member of her church. She attended 
common «-rhool. S'" is 3t borne and is unmarried. 

8. Pr*"- *^--umgartner, (Fifth Generation^, .'.yple Creek, Wayne 

Cu., O. 

Peter's career cf tarthly life dates from Sept. 12, 1878. His 
.^.-i^v^l p..v i-cgcb were only district schools. He was baptized and 
admitted iu;o the privileges of the Mennonite Church by Rev. J. 
Xusbaum, Apr. 10, 1897. His occupation is farming. Not caring- 
to tra.- ' ''''~' " •'--.7 a'.-np, he those Katie Martin, of Wayne Co.. 
• '., losiiar- r-s p;e?-ur v; 2,:r! ijcrrows. They were married Dec. 2, 
yn^f. sj Rishcp I. H^ch-alter. <5he w?s bora in Elkhart Co.. led.. 
---■_:-'. "•, l.^Sl. She .u iiso a. iiicir-ber of the Mennonite Charch. 



48 Historical Sketches of Seven Generations 



9 Katharina Baumgartner, Shoup, (Fifth Generation), Beach 
Cit>, Holmes Co., O. 

Katharina entered the trials of life June 27, 1S80. She received 
a common school education. She was baptized and received into the 
Mennonite Church bj Rev. J. Nusbaum, Mar. 31, 189V. She became 
the wife of William F. Shoup Jan. 1, 1903. The nuptial knot was 
tied by Rev. I. Buch waiter. He was born Aug. 12, ISSl, in Holmes 
Cj., O , where he was also baptized and received into the Mennonite 
church, May, 1897, by Rev. I. B. He is a farmer by occupation. 
To them are bom: — 

a. Gladys, Feb. 11, 1904. (Sixth Generation) 

b. Elma, Feb. 18, 1906. " " 

10. Martha Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation), Apple Creek, 

Wayne Co., O. 
Martha entered this life May 20, 18S2, and was baptized and 
admitted into the Mennonite Church, Apr. 15, l')00 by Rev. J. Nus- 
baum. She has a common school education. 

11. Naomi Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation). 

Naoma was born Oct. 28, 1885, and died of spinal disease, Apr. 
24, 1886. 

H. Katharina Baumgartner, (Fourth Generation). 

Katharina was born Nov. 22, 1840, and died Apr. 2, 1845. 



Chapter III. 

Sec, HI. 



Abraham Baumgartner, (Third Generation). 

Abraham was the third child of Rev. Ddvid Bautngartner bj his 
first wife. He was born in Buderichgrabeo, Jura, Oberamt Courtel- 
arj. Canton I^ern, Switzerland, Jan. 13, 1800. The name of his wife, 
to whom he was married, Oct. 25, 1828, at Perrefitte, was Barbara 
(Jberli, of Lutzelfiiih. She was born May 5, 1802, and died in Un- 
der.elier. May '), 1S79. The writer remembers of hearing his father 
«iay, of his half-brother Abraham, as having- been a strong man, and 
knew no fear, even dared sccalled "spooks" to come forth and meet 
him. But they were either only imaginary apparitions in the minds 
of fearful people, or they were afraid to meet him. He and his 
family were members of the Mennonite Church in Switzerland. His 
death occurred Oct. 19, 1S4S. The fruits of this union were as fol- 
lows, born at Lagot, Souboz, Oberamt Ccurtelary, Canton Bern, 
Switzerland. 

(A.) Maria Anna Baumgartner, (Fourth Generation). 

Maria A., was born D^c. 7, l'^29. She died at Bauschwyl, Can- 
ton Solothurn, Feb. 2-^, 1S'»5. She was never married. She be- 
lont,ed to the Mennonite Church. 

(B.) John Baumgartner, (Fourth Generation). 

John was born Sept. 10, 1S34, and died unmarried. 

(C.) Katharina Baumgartner, Bahler, (Fourth Generation). 

Katharina was born Oct. 14, 183'>. She was united in marriage 
to John Bahler of Buchholterberg on Corgemontberg, Oberamt 
Courtelary, Canton, Bern, Nov. IS, lSt.5, where they also afterwards 
lived. He was born in 1S3S in Eggiwyl. Emmental, Canton Bern. 
In his 19th year he was necessitated to flee to Jura, Canton Bern. 
The reason is not stated, but likely on account of war. She died 
Dec. 2, 1^'»7. .".fter her death be broke up housekeeping, and now 
lives with neighbors. At one time he possessed considerable land 
and live stock; but he is now in limited circumstances, depending on 
his daily earnings for a living. But he writes that he never was as 
well as now, and as free from anxiety as now. Their union was 
blessed with the following children, all born on Corgemontberg, 
Oberaiit Courtelary, Canton Bern, Switzerland, viz: — 



50 Historical Sketches of Seven Generations 



1. Anna Elizabeth Bahler, Oberli, (Fifth Generation). 

Anna E. was born May 25, 186S. She was married to Edward 
Oberli March 14, 18<.»3. He was born in Lutzelfliih, Etnmental. 
Their present address is Prerno, Tramelan, Canton Bern. They 
are members of the Mennonite Church. They never had any chil- 
dren. 

2. Mary Anna Bahler, Lerch, (Fifth Generation). 

Mary A. began the journey of life April 10, 186'*. She was 
married to Christian Lerch, Feb. 20, 1892. He was born in Sumis- 
wald, Emmental, Canton Bern, Switzerland. Their vocation is 
farming. They are also members of the Mennonite Church. Their 
address is la Tanne, Tramelan, Canton Bern. The following children 
are born unto them on Corgemontberg, viz: — 

Christian, Oct 19, 1893. (Sixth Generation). 

Jan. 1, 1895. 

Mar. 18, 1896. 

May 23. 1897. 

July 19. 1898, 

Jan. 17, 1900. 

Nov. 3. 1901. 

Aug. 12. 1903. 

Oct. 9, 1904. 

3. Verena Bahler, Zaugg, (Fifth Generation). 

Verena was born July 16, 1S70. She began the voyai^^e of mar- 
ried life with Peter Zaugg, Jan. 17, 1896. He was born Jan. 8, 1S70, 
in Balmcowitb, Trub. The> live in France, Borchye, Delle, where all 
their children were born, and where he has a large farm and many 
cattle. Their children are as follows: — 

a. John, Aug. 25, 1896. (Sixth Generation). 

b. Peter, June 17, 1897. 

c. Louis, Aug. 6, 1898. " '* 

d. Paul, Oct. 28, 1899. •• ♦' 

e. Frida, Oct. 11, 1900. " " 

f. Anna, Dec. 25, 1901. '* '* 

g. Henry, Dec. 24, 1902. " •• 
h. Ernst, May 4, 1904. " " 

4. Katharina Bahler, Zuercher, (Fifth Generation). 

Katharina arrived in this world June 10, 1S71. She was joined 
in marriage to John Zuercher, Feb. 13, 1S92. He was born in 
Riiderswyl, Emmental, Canton Bern, Switzerland. They now live on 



a. 


Chnstij 


b. 


Peter, 


c. 


Emma, 


d. 


Henry, 


e. 


Ida, 


f. 


Otto, 


g- 


Isaac, 


h. 


John, 


i. 


Jacob, 



Dv'scendants of Deacon David Baumgartner 



51 



(Sixth Generation). 



Sonbevalberg. Their address is la Tanne, Tramelan. He is a tarm- 
er. Their children are as follows: — 

a. John, Feb. IK, 1894. 

b. Anna, Feb. 29, 1895. 

c. Abraham. Mar. 20, 1896. 

d. Samuel, June 18, 1897. 
c. Christian, Sept. 27, 1898. 

f. Dina, June 28, 1901. 

g. J'eter, Sept. 27, 1902. 
h. Katharina.Jan. 9, 1904. 



5. Barbara Bahler, Oberli, (Fifth Generation). 

Barbara was born July 10, 1872, and was married to Abraham 
Ooerli, Oct. 27, 1S93. She died May 3, 1902. He lives at Chaumoat, 
Cerlates, Saigneleg-ier. To this union were given the following chil- 
dren, all born at Cbautnont: — 

a. Samuel, Oct. 21, 1894. (Sixth Generation). 

b. Peter, Jan. 6, 1896. 

c. Mary, June 17, 1898. 

d. Lydia, '* " *' 
c. Anna, April 13, 1899. 
f. Abraham, July 4, 1900. 



Chapter III, 

Sec. IV, 



Anna Baumgartner, Lehman, (Third Generation). 

Anna was the fourth child of Rev. David Baumffartner, by his 
second wife, whose surname was Bixler. She was bora in Budericb- 
graben, Jura, Oberamt Courtelarj, Canton Bern, Switzerland, March 
29, 1805. She was united in marriage to Peter Lehman, Mar. 10, 
1827. He was born in 179'>. His mother's name was Katharina 
Sommer. They were members of the Mennonite Church. They 
never had any children. She died of old age, Apr- 7, 1879, in Corge- 
mont, Switzerland. 



Chapter III. 

Sec. V. 



Rev. Chrislian Baunigartner, (Third Generation). 
Christian was the first child of Rev. David Bautagartner, by his 
third wife. Jle began his journey of life in this unfriendly world, in 
Buderichcjraben, Jura, Oberamt Courtelary, Canton Bern, Switzer- 
land, Jan. 31, ISO'*. His school privileges were meager, yet he 
achieved a fair German education. He came to America, settling in 
\Vayne Co., (>., in the spring of 1S37. Believing the Scripture, that 
it is not good for man to be alone, he entered the marriage bond 
with Fanny Schrag, Aug. 4, lS3s. Rev. Peter Schneck, of the Men- 
nonite Church of the Sonnenberg society, in Wayne Co., O., solem- 
nized the wedding ceremony. Land in Ohio being dear, and hearing 
of government land yet to be had in Indiana at low figures, he con- 
cluded to move there. So in the Fall of 1S3<> he moved with his 
family to Wells Co., Ind., about one mile northwest of Vera Cruz, 
where he bought one quarter section of mostly heavily timbered land. 
Here he continued to live until his death, which occurred Aug. 24, 
1878, resulting from brain fever of a few days' duration only. 

His first wife, Fanny Schrag, died Oct. 24, 1S50. This left him 
with seven small children. He looked about for a second wife and 
mother to his children. Katharina Baumgartner, (nee Lehman, who 
was the widow of John Baumgartner, and the mother of the well 
known Dr. C. C. Baumgartner), became his second wife, Dec. 2, 1852. 
The marriage was solemnized evidently by his father. Christian be- 
came associate minister to his father. Mar. 18, 1845, when the lot, 
according to the method pursued by the Mennonites, fell on him. 
Later he was released from this obligation, as the writer was in- 
formed, but again made minister the second time Oct. 21, 1866. (See 
record in his Bible, now the property of his daughter, Maria Neader- 
hausett. He snd his father aUi mated lo preaching. They preached 
everv three weeks, both in Adams and '.Veils counties, according to 
his father's own statement. (See father's letter). He remained, af- 
ter the second installation into the ministry, a minister until death. 
He was very loyal to his Church, and strictly adhered to her polity, 
and to his religious convictions, and almost considered it a religious 
duty to shun those of his own household who held to other religious 
faiths. 

In his younger davi be frequently walked three miles to church, 
on Sunday mornings, that he might be better able to meditate on the 



54 Historical Sketches of Seven Generations 

subject he wished to bring- before the people. The writer of this 
sketch can see him yet with the mind's eye, walking- along- the pub- 
lic highway, in a deep contemplative mood, or in bad weather riding- 
with his family, on a spring- wagon, when Sunday morning- came. He 
g-enerally wore a long- cutaway swallow-tailed coat, without a lay- 
down collar. He was a man of medium height and weight, with 
round shoulders, and wore medium long whiskers. His life was not 
without trials and tribulations. He lived in an age when ignorance, 
lax morals and sectarianism often had high sway, and caused 
spirited disputations, and vexation of spirit. But gradually out of 
this chaos came better things, holier belief and Hying, and denomi- 
national toleration emerged from the former chaotic conditions. In 
disposition he was peaceful, in work industrious, and in habits 
frugal, and thus he succeeded in making a comfortable living for his 
family. His children were all born in Wells Co., Ind., in the follow- 
ing order: — 

(A). Samuel Baumgartner, (Fourth Generation). 

Samuel was born Sept. 14, 1S39, and died Feb. 10, 1881. When 
a child of two years, he was bitten by a rattlesnake, which brought 
periodical falling fits, and as a consequence remained a simpleton to 
his death. 

(E). David Baun^gartner, (Fourth Generation). 

David was born Feb. 14, 1841, and died by drowning, while 
swimming below the Vera Cruz dam in the Wabash river, July 7, 
1863. He was a promising young man. 

(C). Benjamin Baumgartner, (Fourth Generation), Bluffton, Ind. 

Benjamin entered the scene of action May 10, 1842. His educa- 
tional advantages were quite limited from lack of good schools and 
teachers. Having become of age he went to Wayne Co., O., where 
after some time be became engag^ed to Magdalena Sommer and was 
married to her Oct. S, 1865. In Nov. they moved to Wells Co., Ind., 
near Vera Cruz, but in Nov. 1S67 they moved back to Ohio, and in 
Oct. 1874 to Vv'adsworth, Medina Co., O., and in Apr. 1892 to Bluff- 
ton, Allen Co., O. From here tbej moved io Adams Co., Ind., in 
Mar. 1895; and to Bluffton, Ind., in 1901 where they have since lived. 
They are members of the NTc^nonite Church, holding tbeir member- 
ship in Berne, Ind. He is in the employ of the "Bluffton Windmill 
Co."' He is quite portly in built, unassuming in disposition, and in- 
dustrious. To them were born the following children: — 

1. An-:u Chrict'.~a Bav'rr,s,artncr, (Fifih i.eneratioc). 
Anna C, was born in Wells Co., Ind., July 18, 1866, and died 
ihrecdays later. 



Descendants of Deacon David Biumgartner 55 



2. Prof. Gideon U. Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation), Seville, 

Medina Co., O. 
Gideon U. entered the pathway of life in Wells Co., Ind., near 
Vera Cruz, June 24, 1867. His bojhood days were spent in doing 
farm work, and attending public school. He availed himself of the 
opportunities that came to him for getting an education. He at- 
tended the Normal School of Wadsworth for three jears. He re- 
ceived his Staje license in l'>05. Thus he is well fitted for a public 
school instructor. He has followed teaching for seventeen year?. In 
l">04-5 he superintended the schools of Seville. O., and in 1906-7 
those of Creston, O. The impress of his intellectual training is be- 
ing indelibly stamped on the minds of the present generations around 
him. He was married to Delia Koppes, Mar. 29, 1893. She was bora 
near Medina Co., C Jan. 26, 1868. He was first a member of the 
Mennonite Church, but is now a member of the Presbyterian Church. 
Their home is blessed with one child, born in Seville, Ohio: — 

a. Harold K., June 28, 1895, (Sixth Generation). 

3. Sarah Matilda Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation), Blufftoo. 

Ind. 

Sarah M. began her pathway of life in Wayne Co., O , Mar. 19, 
1S(.9. She enjoyed medium school privileges. When quite young 
she became a member of the Mennonite Church, but after moving to 
BlulTton, Ind., she became identified with the First Reformed Church 
of said place. She also is a member of the C. E. Society, and is ac- 
tive in both. She is a profes>ional dressmaker, which occupation she 
has followed for many years. Thus far she has preferred to travel 
the path of life alone. 

4. Israel Jacob Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation), Markle, Ind., 

Photographtr. 

Israel J. entered the race of life in Wayne Co., O., Aug. 7, 1870. 
lie secured a good education in the High school of Bluffton. O., and 
three years of training in the Normal School of Wadsworth, O. 
Later oo he learned the art of photography in Bluffton. Ind , under 
Heuj. Ashbaucher. with whom he staved three years. Then he moved 
to Markle, Huntington Co., Ind., where he is owner of a photograph 
^zWerj, and is doing a very profitable and acceptable business. He 
was united in marriage with Arnettie Reese, Jan. 11, 1^98. She was 
born in BlufTton, Ohio, Jan. 28, ]s7l. They were both respected 
njembcrs of the First Reformed Church ic Bluffton, Ind., until in 
r»06, when they transferred their membership to the M. E. Church in 



56 Historical Sketches of Seven Generations 

Markle, Ind. The following children are the fruit of this union, 
born in Markle: — 

a. Earl Reese, May 23, 18'>9. (Sixth Generation). 

b. Irene Easter, Apr. 7, 1901. " " " 

died Julj 7, 1902. 

c. Benj. Kent, July 27, 1902. •' " ♦♦ 

5. Lovina Jane Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation), BluflFton, 

Ind. 

Lovina J. was initiated into the shifting- scenes of this life in 
Mt. Eaton, Wajne Co., O., Oct. 11, 1874. She also received a high 
school education in Wadsworth, Ohio. She became identiSed with 
the Mennonite Church in 1895, and with the First Reformed Church 
of BlufiFton, Ind., in 1905, of which she is now an acceptable mem- 
ber. Her occupation is general housework. She is jet single. 

6. Rachel Alma Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation). 

Rachel A. was born Feb. 10, 1S75, in Wadsworth, O., and died 
11 davs old. 

7. Ida Caroline Baumgartner, Oldfather, (Fifth Generation), 

BluflFton, Ind. 

Ida C. entered the activities of life in Wayne Co., O., Mar. 24, 
1S76. She also enjoyed the privilege of attending the Wadsworth 
Normal school for three years. Her matrimonial life with John T. 

Oldfather commenced Dec. 4, 1898. He was born Feb 1875 in 

Rockcreek, Wells Co., Ind. They now live in Wells Co., Ind., eight 
miles northwest of Bluffton on their farm. They are respected mem- 
bers of the St. Paul Reformed Church in Rockcreek township. The 
following children have come to gladden their home, all born on the 
farm: — 

a. Donald Michael, Dec. 23, 1901. (Sixth Generation). 

b. Robert Benjamin, Mar. 3, 1903. " 

8. Cyrus Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation), Bluffton, Ind. 

Cyrus began the trials in this life in Milton township, Wayne 
Co., O., Sept. 14, 1878. He availed himself of the good High school 
privileges in Bluffton, Ohio. He is now an acceptable salesman in 
the "Leader Store" in Bluffton, Ind. In 1897 he united with the 
Mennonite Church, but later joined the First Reformed Church, in 
Bluffton, Ind. He is still living a single life. 

9. Susanna Mary Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation), Bluffton, 

Ind. 

Susanna M. also started her journey of life where brother Cyrus 



Descendants of Deacon David Baamgartner 57 

did, on Jan. 31, ISSI. She utilized her school days in securing- a 
good education, graduating in the Bluffton High School in 1900. She 
is now employed as a clerk in the "W. Evans, and Winter's dry- 
goods store" of Bluffton, Ind. She is also a member of the First 
Reformed Church of above named place. She is yet traveling the 
single path of life. 
(D.) Daniel Baumgartner, (Fourth Generation). 

Daniel be^an his earthly career Dec. 3, 1843. His educational 
privileges were meager. He was reared on the farm. On Mar. 9, 
lSi>7 he entered the marriage bond with Elizabeth Althaus, of 
Wayne Co., O. She was born Mar. 16, 1839, in Wayne Co., O., and 
died in Bluffton, O., Nov. 15, 1S86. They were members of the 
Mennonite Church. After he farmed awhile he followed the shoe- 
maker trade a good part of his subsequent life. He was in the 
clothing business in Bluffton, ()., about 12 years. He succumbed to 
the ravages of disease, in Bluffton, O., Feb. U., 1**04. The issue of 
this union are the following children: — 

1. Mary A. Baumgartner, Steiner, (Fifth Generation), Bluff- 
ton, Ohio. 

>!ary A. «a5 born Aug. 9, 1568. She had the opportunity to 
attend good public schools in BlufTton, O. She became the wife of 
Gideon C. Steiner, Nov. I, 1888. He was born near Pandora, Put- 
nam Co. ,0 Aside from attending the country school he 

took the privilege of attending the Normal School at Ada, O. He 
taught school for a number of years prior and after his marriage. 
Thcv now possess fourt}- acres of good land and are in comfortable 
circumstances. They are both loyal members of the Swiss Menno- 
nite Church. Their home is made happy with the following fruit of 
their union, born in Putnam Co., O., viz: — 

a. Orville Edison, Oct. 20, 18S9. (Sixth Generation). 

b. Edna Elizabeth, Jan. 1, 1891. 

c. Myron Elmer. Nov. 8, 1S92. " " 

died Feb. 28, 1893. 

d. Lillian Ella, July 12. 1894. " '' 

died Oct. 8, 1894. 

e. Olga Magdalena, Aug. 14, 1895. " " 

f. Zella Perleah, Sept. 8, 1897. 

g. Christian A., Jan. 2S, 1899. " *' 
h. Daniel Clayton, Nov. 16, 1900. " " 
i. Samuel Lysle, Oct. 4, 1902. " •' 

died Feb. 11, 1904. 

j. Barbara Grace, Nov. 24, 1903. " " 

died Dec. 27, 1903. 
k. " *' 



58 Historical Sketches of Seven Generations 

2. Joel E. Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation), Salem, Oregon, 

(Bank Clerk). 

Joel E. entered the arena of time Nov. 6, 1869, near Wooster, 
O. He received a good public school education in Bluffton, Ohio. 
Later he sought his place of activity in Salem, Oregon, where he 
met Ada Stapleton, wooed her and then married her Dec. 23, 18%. 
The marriage ceremony was solemnized by Rev. N. B. Maghau of 
the Episcopal Church, of which she is a member. She was born 
in Salem, Ore., June 29, 1872. He is a very efficient clerk of the 
"Ladd and Bush Banker's" bank in Salem, Ore. Two children have 
come to their home, both born in Salem, Ore., viz: — 

a. Josephine, July 14, 1901. (Sixth Generation). 

b. Lenta, June 25, 1%4. '* " 

3. Albert L. Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation), Bluffton, Ohio, 

(Clothier). 
Albert L. commenced his earthly career near Bluffton, 0-, Feb. 
28, 1871. He grew up to manhood in Bluffton, O., where he secured 
a good public school education. June 24, 1896, he took unto himself 
a wife named Ella Hilty, of Chicago, 111. They are both members 
of the English Lutheran Church in Bluffton, O., where he is a suc- 
cesful merchant, being the first member of the "Baumgartner, Loch- 
er and Co. Shoe and Clothing Furnishings Firm" successors to bis 
father Daniel. To them were born the following children, in above 
named place, viz: — 

a. Frederick Lyslc, Mar. 28, 1897. (Sixth Generation), 

b. Albert Donovan, Apr. 24. 1898. 

c. Magdalena, June 12, 1901. " " 

d. Allen Lee, Aug. 10, 1903. 

e. Baby Girl, Jan. 30, 1908. " " 

4. Regina Lucy Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation). 
Regina L. was born Oct. 15, 1872, and died Apr. 13, 1874. 

5. William Elmer Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation), Alliance* 

Ohio, (Salesman). 

William E. began the battle of life in Wells Co., Ind., Jan. 12, 
1875. He has a good business education. In 1891 he began work in 
a wholesale shoe store in Toledo, O., with which establishment he 
was connected until 1895. Then he entered the "Bethel College" of 
the Mennonite Church, located in Newton, Kans., remaining there 
until the summer of 1896. From here he went, to Paulding Centre, 
Ohio, as a clerk in a "Clothing and shoe store." June 15, 1898, he 
enlisted for the "Spanish American War," and was enrolled as a pri- 



Descendants of Deacon David Baumgartner 59 



vate in Co. C. 2nd O. V. J., until Nov. 1.S98, when he was transferred 
to serve in the K.th Co. U. S. V. signal corps. In Jan. 1899 be left 
for Cuba, where he served until Maj of the same year, when he was 
honorably discharged on account of his company being mustered out- 
Returning to Bluflion, O., be became a traveling: salesman. Not 
wishing to go alone through this world he decided to enter matri- 
monial life with Grace Martin, Apr. 11, 1901. The nuptial knot 
was bound in the English Lutheran Church, in Bluffton, O., by Rev. 
Greenew'alt, of Findiay, O. She was born in Sonora, Musk- 
ingum Co., O., July 11, 1879. In 1905 they moved to Alliance, O., 
where they built a house for themselves. They are both members 
of the English Lutheran Church. They are the happy parents of:— 

a. Martin Meredith, June 28, 1902, (Sixth Generation). 

b 1906, '♦ 

E. Christian C. Baumgartner, (Fourth Generation), Berne, Ind. 

Christian C- was born Apr. 15. 1845. He was reared on the 
farm. He only attended District school. When of age he went to 
Wayne Co., Ohio, where he later married Fanny Gerber, Feb. 1, 
lSb'». Rev. Cbr. Sommer officiated. She was born May 9, 1846, in 
Wayne Co., Ohio, and was baptized and received in the Mennonite 
Church in isf,4. She lived a good Christian life. She succumbed to 
consumption in Berne, Ind., Mar. 2.^, 1888, After marriage they 
continued to live in Wayne Co., O., until sometime in 1872 when 
they moved a mile northwest of Vera Cruz, Ind. In 1^78 they moved 
one mile north of town in the woods where he engaged in cutting 
timber. From here they moved in 1879 to a place one mile north of 
Berne, and in IS^^l one-half mile south of it, and in 1882 one-half 
mile east of it and then south again until in 18^4, when they moved 
into Berae. The following children were born to them* — 

1. Eli Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation), Berne, Ind , Car|>enter 
and Contractor. 

Eli started in life's pathway in Wayne Co., O., Dec 11, 1869. 
In 1><72 he moved with his parents to Indiana. He remembers riding 
on the train, and wearing a dress. His inclination to handle carpen- 
ter tools manifested itself when he was seven years old when be 
made himself a wagon with an old hatchet anl No. 10 saw. When 
eight years old he began to help his father cutting down trees one 
mile north of ^'ora Cruz, lod. From youth up he was an industrious 
fellow, and bad to depend largely upon his own physical resources. 
When he was twelve years old he commenced to work in a tile 
factory, where he continued for four summers. In 1886 he began 



t.O 



Historical Sketches of Seven (fenerations 



working for J. A- Sprunger doing all kinds of work, in factory and 
saw-mill, engineering, making "Mougey harrows," cider-press work, 
painting, and doing carpenter work on houses. Tlien he chose tor 
his trade carpenter-work, ami continued under a boss until l^''.", 
when hebcgan contracting himself and hasdoneso eversince. He says. 






IJ 







Lou. S3 anJ V.'.\ BaU!iit;3rlr.er 
Oia Ira K'.va 



"He built the im-l houses in IL-rne. worked on nearly ivxry hou-~e in 
town. !)uiUHng addition-, or repairing. Thus he has by hard and 
careful and hcr.esl work made hiin-elf a great reputation as carpen- 
ter and builder. 

He only had common school privileges. As a young man he be- 



Descendants of Deacon David Baumgartoer 61 

came identified with the Mennonite Church, Jan. 1, 1888, and fol- 
lowed bis mother's admonitions. He has the respect and good will 
of the church people. He was united in the sacred bonds of mar- 
riage with Louisa Lehman, by Rev. S. F. Spruager, in the Menno- 
nite Church in Rerne, Ind., Dec. 23, 1S94. She was born at Berne, 
Feb. 2S, 1S73, and united with his Church the same time he did. 
Their union was blessed with the following children, all born in 
Berne, Ind., 

a. L*eb, Apr. \n, lH<u,. (Sixth Generation). 

died same daj. 

b. Ira, July 20, 1SV7. 

c. Ora, Feb. 10, 1900. 

d. Elva, Nov. 10, 1906. 

2. Emma Louisa Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation). 

Emma L. was born Ju!j 10, 1S71 in Wayne Co, O. She was a 
member of her mother's Church when she died, Apr. 2, 1889. She 
was a noble young woman, died of consumption. 

3. Calvin C. Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation). 

Calvin C. was born at Vera Cruz, Ind., Mar, 2, 1874, and died 
Aug. 27, 1874. 

4. Levina M. Baumgartner, Amstutz, (Fifth Generation), 

Apple Creek, Wayne Co., Ohio. 
IvCvina NL entered upon the scene of life at Vera Cruz, Ind., Jan. 
s, lS7(i. She was baptiz.-d and admitted into the Mennonite Church, 
Mar. .^1, 1S93, by Kiv. J. Xusbaum. She took the marriage vow 
with I'lias Amstutz. of Wayne Co., CJhio, Oct. 25, 1900, by authority 
of the s ime minister that took her into church. He was born in 
Wa\ne Co. O, D.-c. 7, 1S75, and was baptized and received into the 
Mennr.ailc Church, Mar. 23. l.s'*4. He is a farmer living on their 
farm near Apple Creek, Ohio. They boih received only a common 
-■>-:i)ui>l education. Their union was blessed with two children born 
on their farm, 

a. Mcnno S , Apr. 7. l'*04. (Sixth Generation). 

b. Ellis E , Sept, 13, l'>Ob. 

5 Sarah Ann Baumgartner, (Filth Generation). 

Sarah A. was born at Vera Cruz, Ind., Sept. 19, 1S77, and died 
("»ct. ?. Is77. 

:. -iiUuii 0. Baumgartner, (Fifth iJeneralioo). 

\1'';:a C. w«s born 3t B.erne, Ind . .\p.'. 17. l.S,S0, and ult.l July 



62 Historical Sketv,be<» of Seven Generations 

7. Edwin C. Baumgartncr, (Fifth Generation), Berne, Indiana, 

Bridg-e-carpenter. 
Edwin C entered upon the activities of life at Berne, Ind., July 
1, 1881. He received a common school education. He also followed 
the godlj example of his mother, and as a young man was baptized 
and received into the Mennonite Church on Dec. 24, IS^^O by Rev. S. 
F. Sprunger, and since remained a worthy member. By occupation 
he is a successful bridge-carpenter on the Grand Rapids and Indiana 
R. R. He was united in marriage with Delila Sprunger, by Rev. J. 
W. Kliewer, of Berne, Indiana, Jan. 4, 1906. She was born near 
Berne, Ind., and is a member of the Mennonite Church, since Feb. 9, 
1902. To them were bora: — 

a. Florine Verena, Aug. 29, 1907. (Sixth Generation). 

died next day. 

b. Pauline Regina, July 20, 1908. 

8. George C. Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation), Berne, Ind., 

Plasterer. 
George C. entered this life Oct. 21, 1882, in Berne, Ind. He re- 
ceived a common school education. He has also followed the pious 
example of his mother, and affiliated with the Mennonite Church 
Apr. 5, ivOl, by authority of Rev. J. Nusbaum. He has followed 
the carpenter trade for a while, but since 1904 he is a plasterer, in 
which trade he is meeting with good success. He is industrious and 
frugal in his habits of life. At the last presidential election, a Cin- 
cinnati paper offered certain sums of money for those who can guess 
the number of popular votes cast, or nearest to it, for presidential 
candidates. Geo. was one of the winners. He obtained the sum of 
$800.00. He is yet on the single list. 

9. Lenhart Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation). 

Lenhart was born in Berne, Ind., Nov. 26, 1887, and died Jan. 
23, 1888. -». 

(F.) Maria Baumgartner, Niederhauser, (Fourth Generation), 
Linn Groye, Ind. 
Maria began the conflicts of this earthly life, Dec. 30, 1846. At 
an early age she was baptized and admitted into the Mennonite 
Church, of which her father was one of the pastors. Later, how- 
ever, while she worked in Elkhart, Ind. she consciously awoke to 
her spiritually unsaved condition, under preaching by ministers of 
the Evangelical Association, and after her conversion to God, she 
joined that denomination, however not without censure from home. 
On Oct. 2'^ 1871, she was united in marriage with Emmanuel Nie- 
derhauser, a widower of Linn Grove, Adams Co., Ind., Nov. H, the 



Descendants of Deacon David Baumgartner 63 

same year, she moved to his home, where she still resides. He owned 
a g^ood "Grist Mill" in this place, and did quite a lucrative business. 
For many years he was quite prominent in the Church of the Ev. 
Association in Linn Grove, Ind.; and remained an honored member 
until death. The following- children are the i??ae of this union, all 
born in Linn Grove: — 

1. Frank Niederhauser, (Fifth Generation). 

P'rank was born Sept. 26, 1S72, and died June 30, 1873. 

2. Elmer Niederhauser, (Fifth Generation). 
Elmer was born Nov. 6, 1873, and died Nov. 28, 1875. 

3 Cora Niederhauser, (Fifth Generation), Pennville, Ind., 

(Clerk). 
Cora entered upon the scene of time, Feb. 23, 1875. She ob- 
tained a good schooling in the graded village school of Linn Grove. 
Under the pastorate of Rey. John Huflfman she was converted to 
God. and united with the Evangelical Association in 1882. For 
some years she has been a very efScient clerk in "Bender, Walmer 
and Barr's Drygoods Store", in Bluffton Ind. In Oct. 1906 she took 
a position as clerk in a store at Pennville, Ind., as manager of the 
drygoods department. She is of an amiable disposition, and thus far 
has preferred to live a single life. 

4 and 5. Jesse and Karl Niederhauser, (Fifth Generation). 
Jesse and Karl (Twins) were born May 26, 1S77, and died the 

next day. 

6. Effic Niederhauser, (FifthGencration), Bluffton, Ind., (Clerk). 

Effie's life dates from Apr. 5, 1878. She secured a good educa- 
tion at Linn Grove- Under the labors of Rev. D. D. Spangler she 
was converted to God, and joined the Evangelical Association at 
Linn G:oye. She has proven herself a faithful and devoted worker. 
She served very acceptably for one year as Sunday-school Superintend- 
ent of her church; and also as steward. She has followed dressmak- 
ing for some years, at Linn Grove. In Oct. 1906, she accepted a po- 
sition as clerk in the remedling department in what is known as 
Bender, Walmer A: Barr's Drygoods Store, in Bluffton, Ind. She is yet 
single. 

7. Nellie Niederhauser, (Fifth Generation), Bluffton, Ind., 

(Clerk). 

Nellie began the realities of life June 29, 1880. She also ob- 
tained a good education. She became a member of the Evangelical 
Association in Linn Grove under the labors of Rev. D. D. Spanger in 
1S99. She clerked in Haecker c't Niederhauser'sGen. Merchandize Store 



64 Historical Sketches of Seven Generations 

in Berne, Ind., for three jears. She has also been a successful clerk 
in "Bender, Waltner and Barr's Drjgoods Store" in BlufFton, Ind., 
since 1901. She has a cheery disposition, and is still ^^ingle. 

8. Milton Niederhauser, (Fifth Generation). 
Milton was born May 10, 18S2 and died Sept. 1«), 1885. 

9. Telsa Niederhauser, (Fifth Generation), Linn Grove, Ind. 
Telsa arrived in this world Apr. 10, 18S4. She also received a 

g-ood education. She was converted to God, under the labors of Rev. 
J. H. Rilling and united with the Evangelical Association, at Linn 
Grove, Ind. She follows dressmaking-. 

10. Homer Niederhauser, (Fifth Generation), Linn Grove, 

Ind., (Clerk). 
Homer stepped upon the arena of time, Dec. 18, 1886. He was 
converted to God and united with the Evangelical Association at 
Linn Grove, Ind.. at the age of sixteen, under Rey. J. H. Rilling. 
He worked on his mother's farm and also for a while worked in a 
stonequarry. He made good use of his school privileges, and suc- 
cessfully taught one term of country school. In 1906 he hired out as 
clerk to his half-brother Fred Niederhauser, in his store io Linn 
Grove, Ind. 

11. Ida Harrison Niederhauser, (Fifth Generation), Linn 

Grove, Ind. 
Ida H. began the career of life Mar. 27, 1889. She has passed 
through the graded school at Linn Grove, Ind , and made good use 
of her school privileges. General housework is her occupation. 

(G.) Jacob J. Baumgartner, (Fourth Generation), Bluffton, Ind., 
(Clerk). 

Jacob J. began the trials of life Nov. 23, 1X48. His boyhood 
dajs were spent on his father's farm, and attending country school. 
He was baptized in Wadsvforth, Ohio, and became a member of the 
Mennonite Church " -- 2! years old. He had to quit public cchool 
at the age of fourteea; but being dissatisQed with the meagerly ac- 
quired knowledge, he entered a three months' "Normal School" in 
Bluffton, Ind., in 18f'9, at the close of which he passed successfully a 
teacher's examination and secured a license to teach a four months' 
winter term of school. This was in the winter of 1S69 — 70. Becom- 
ing embued with the spirit of teaching, he availed himself of the 
privilege of attending tb? "Mennonite College" in Wadswort'a, 
Ohio, from Spring to Fall of 1871. Here be obtained a fund of wholt- 
soine knowledge. Returning home 'ne taught one term of school in 






n 



■4 



i 



I 

i 



Descendants of Deacon David Baumgartoer 65 

the election school house. District No. 3, of French township, Adams 
Co., Ind., which at that time stood on the farm of the writer's father, 
lie also gave instruction in vocal music with ability and success. 
From him the writer learned to read music, when eleven years old. 
Soon after the close of the school in Apr. 1872, he accepted a posi- 
tion as clerk in "H. C. Arnold & Go's. Drygoods Store" in Bluffton, 
Ind. After some years he formed partnership with other men as 
"drygoods and shoe merchant", first in Bluffton, Ind. Later selling 
out here, he launchtd out in the same line of business in Warren, 
Huntington Co., Ind. After a while he again sold out, and moved 
back to HiufTton, Ind., and hired out in 1894 as clerk to the Ash- 
bauchfr Bro's who conducted a "Gents Clothing Store", in this 
city, and on Jan. 1, 1906, he remained with "Ober & Weisell" suc- 
cessors to Ashbaucher Bro's. and has since been with them. 

He was born and endowed with a spirit of integrity and fairness, 
and wiih a conception of things that would not tally evenly with 
most men, in quest of wealth and fame. "It is a noticeable fact," 
Jacob sajs, "that mankind in this age of grab, measures manhood 
by his property, not by his moral and.^eligious worth." There were 
few men wiih loftier ambitions than heha^*, when he entered uoon 
the competitive arena of life in i.s69, when he had reached his ma- 
JDrity age. However he was not as fortunate as others to realize the 
ambition and the desire of his heart. But a life of integrity and good 
manhood and right intentions are a greater store of wealth than 
acres, houses, silver and gold. He owns his own property. 

In Bluffton be became identified with the M, ■ E. Church, of 
which he is a worthy member and in v/hich he held tb^ office of Sec. 
of the official board for some time. He and his wife "conducted the 
choir of the M. K. Church for I'lve years. Not believing that it is 
good for man to live alone, be wooed, and then married S, Amelia 
Tribolct. of Eluilton, Ind., Aug. 26, jS75. Kev. C. Martiedale, pas- 
tor of the M. E. Church, tied the nuptial knot. She was born in Vvells 
Co., Ind., Dec. 24, 1S54. Their union was blessed with two sons, 
both born in Bluffton. Wells Co,, Ind. viz: — 

1. Ralph E. Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation), Bluffton, Ind. 

Ralph C. entered this world Aug. 2-4, 18F.0. IJ .^, tu .-^.cuaiu 

school privileges in Bluffton. He is now engaged as machinist in a 
pucup factory in Bluffton, Ind., where he resides. He started on the 
u.atrimonial pathway with Anna Gregg June 21. 1904. She was 

born He i"5 - tncmber of the M. ". Chui^.u i:i liiun- 

ton and she of the Baptist Cburch. To them is born a daughter: — 

a. Charlotte L., July 2.\ 1906, (Sixth Generation). 



66 Historical Sketches of Seven Generations 

2. Walter E. Baumgartner, (Fifth Gpneration), Bluffton, Ind. 

Walter E. arrived in this world Nov. 1<>. 1S81. Not being satis- 
fied with the amount of schooling be could get in the BlulTton High 
School, he entered "Purdue Universitj" in Lafayette, Ind., where he 
has now been studying civil engineering for three years, and has one 
more year of studying to complete the course. He has also been do- 
ing practical engineering between school terms in which he has 
shown himself well qualified. He is a member of the M. E Church 
in Bluffton. 

(H). Peter Baumgartner, (Fourth Generation^. 

Peter was the first child by his father's second wife, he was born 
in 1853, and died 11 days old. 

(I). John C. Baumgartner. (Fourth Generation). 

John C. was born Dec 7, 1854. He received a fair education. 
He followed farming for his father until 1880. He was quite a singer, 
and gave instruction in vocal and instrumental music with efficiency. 
He was united in marriage with Mary A. Asbbaucher, of Adams Co., 
Dec. 26, 1878, at the bride's home by Key. P. Vitz, her pastor. As a 
young man he was baptised and admitted into the Mennonite Church, 
but after marriage he united with the First Reformed Church in 
Bluffton, Ind. After marriage he stayed two years on the farm, then 
he bought a sawmill in Travesville, four miles south of Bluffton, 
and removed it to Poplar Grove, where soon thereafter he had the 
misfortune of getting his forearm sawed off. ..iter his arm had 
healed he engaged as agent of a Publishing House selling Bibles. In 
the Spring of 1S86 he began clerking for justice Clark and Biel, hard- 
ware dealers in Bluffcoa. After remaining with them a short time, 
he engaged in abstract business. But soon thereafter, with his in- 
fiuential friends he succeeded in getting the nomination for Re- 
corder of Wells Co., Ind , and was elected in the Fall of 18S6, which 
office be held for two consecutive terms, beginning Nov. 1887. After 
the expiration of his second term, he went into "The Folding Chair" 
business with C. Thomas as partner. While in this business he fell 
and received an injury which b: ught on his death on Mar. 16, 1894. 
He was a member of the K. of P. lodge. To them were born the 
following children: — 

1. A daughter, still-born. 

2. Charles Edwin Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation), Bluffton, 

Ind. Grocer. 
Charles E. was born Aug. 16, 1881. He received a good public 
school education in Bluffton. He entered marriage life with Add^ 



Descendants of Deacon David Baumgartner 67 

Oman, of Bluflton, Ind., Jan. 21, 1898. She was born Aug- 1880. 

He was for a while a partner with his brother in conducting a news 
stand, but later dissolved partnership, and launched out in grocery 
business, in which he is doing well. He is an active member in the 
First Reformed Church in Bluflton, Ind. They have one son. 
a. Robert, June 12, 1898, (Sixth Generation). 

3. Orin \ViIfred Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation), BlufiFton, 
Ind. Newsdealer. 

Orin W. began life Dec. 19, 1885. He also obtained a good 
public school education. He was united in marriage with Golda 
Long, June 29, 1905. He is the owner of a news stand in the city, 
doing good business. He is also the interurban ticket agent. He is 
a member of the First Reformed Church in the city. His wife is a 
member of the M. E. Church. To them is born 

a. Anna Louise, Feb. 28, r>06, (Sixth Generation). 

(J). Abraham Baumgartner, (Fourth Generation). 

No record could be found of his birth and death, likely about 
185f.. 

(K.) Frederick Baumgartner, (Fourth Generation), died 28 days old. 



Chapter III. 

Sec. VL 



John Baumgartner, (Third Geaeration). 

John was the second son of Rey. David Baumgartner by his 
third wife, Barbara Steiner. He was born in Buderichgraben, Jura, 
Oberamt Courtelarv Canton Bern, Switzerland, Dec. 3, 1810. He 
died of kidney trouble June 5, ISRS in Berne, Ind. He was married 
to Katharina Amstutz. of Sigriswyl, Canton Bern, Switzerland, Feb. 
16, 1833 at Souboz. She was born Feb. 2, 1814, and died Feb. 26, 
1891 in Berne, Ind., from results of the grip. They moved to 
America, Wayne Co., Ohio, in 1S35; and then to French township, 
Adams Co., Ind., one and a half mile east of Vera Cruz, Ind., Oct. 
20, 1S39. Here he had bought a quarter section of heavy timber 
land. Later he sold twenty acres to his brother Samuel. Here they 
remained and raised their large family, until 1SS2, when the farm 
was sold, and a small one was bought near Linn Grove, Ind. They 
lived here until 1887, when they sold out and bought property in 
Berne, where they lived the rest of their days. They were both ro- 
bust, affable in disposition, helpful in their attitude to neighbors, in- 
dustrious in work, economic in their habits, faithful to the Menno- 
nite Church, of which they were members. They were of medium 
bight, somewhat corpulent, but most of their children grew head 
and shoulder aboye them, one son reaching a height of six feet six 
and one-half inches, and a number considerable over the ayerage in 
weight and physical strength. Seventeen children were bora to 
them, as follows: — 

(A). David Baumgartner, (Fourth Generation) 

David was born in Switzerland. Mar. 7, 1834, and died an in- 
fant. 

(B). Maria Anna Baumgartner, (Fourth Generation). 
Maria A. was born May 6, 1835, and died an infant. 

(C). John J. Baumgartner, (Fourth Generation), Carpenter and 
Farmer. 

John J. entered the pathway of life in Wayne Co., O., June 18, 
183h. His educational advantages were meager in his boyhood 
days. He was reared ou the farm. When of age he learned and fol- 
lowed the carpenter trade, and became a master in it. For a life 
companion he chose Rosina Horn, of Meximo, Ohio, to whom he was 



Descendants of Deaccn David Baumgartner 69 

married Sept. 9, 1862. She was born March 27, 1842. He was a' 
member of the Mennonite Church at the time of his marriag-e, but 
she belonged to the Reformed Church. This fact necessitated him 
to confess to the Church that he ought not to have married a wom- 
an not a member of his church, or be excluded from the fold. He 
confessed and kept the woman and remained a member of the church. 
But later however they both realized the need of a change of heart, 
and under the preaching of ministers of the Evangelical Associa- 
tion at Linn Grove, they were led to conversion to God. and forth- 
with united with the Ev. Association, of which he remained a faith- 
ful member until death. He held various important Church offices, as 
class leader, exhorter, trustee and was an active worker in the Sun- 
day-school. He alwavs exerted a noble Christian influence is his 
community and society to which he belonged and over the entire 
Vera Cruz circuit. He was of a patient, loving and unassuming 
disposition, industrious, frugal and neighborly in his habits. He fell 
a prey to the ravages of Bright's disease Feb. 11, 1804. In stature 
he was tall and slender built. By trade he was a carpenter, but in 
later life made farming his chief occupation until death. One sum- 
mer day, in the early seventies, a terrific jumping cyclone swooped 
down upon his Iioum; on the farm, and tore it all to pieces, also the 
orchard. His sister Katharina Ellenberger lived in it at the time, 
and had one child killed. John at this time lived in Linn Grove, fol- 
lowing exclusively carpenter work. The following children are the 
fruits of this union, viz: — 

1. Levi Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation), Decatur, Ind., (Sur- 
veyor). 

Levi came upon the scene of action in Adams Co., Ind., Oct. 16, 
IXfK^. Aside from common school he had the privilege of attending 
Normal school at Decatur. His profession was that of public school 
teaching for the greater part of twenty years. For a time he taught 
in the graded schools of Berne and Linn Groye. He also for a while 
clerked in stores in Berne and Elwood. At this writing he is Coun- 
ty Surveyor of Adams Co., Ind., to which office he was elected for 
the second term by the Democratic party. Prior to his election he 
attended the Civil engineering school at Angola, Ind., to fit himself 
more fully for the work. In early life he was converted to God and 
united with the Evangelical Association. A new epoch in life came 
to him, when he took unto himself f^illian Studebaker as wife, Apr. 
6, 1SS7. His wife was born near Vera Cruz, Ind., Aug. 3, 18«>6. She 
was reared in the "New Light Christian Faith," but later united 
with the Ev. Association. To them were born: 



70 Historical Sketches of Seven Generatioas 

a. Bessie M. Baumgartncr, (Sixth Generation). 

Bessie M. was born in Berne, Ind., June f>, 1888. She is enjoy- 
ing- good school privileges. She is a member of the Evangelical 
Association. 

b. Chester I. Baumgartncr, (Sixth Generation). 

Chester I. was born Aug. 19, 1889, in Berne, Ind. He took sick 
with tuberculosis, and after an illness of a few months died July 28, 
1906. He was a bright boy, highly esteemed by his friends. He 
was converted at the age of eleven, and joined the Evangelical As- 
sociation, in Linn Grove, Ind., and was active in the church and Sun- 
day-school. He was secretary of the S. S. He lies buried in the 
Six Mile Church cemetery east of Blufirton, Ind. 

c. Clyde R. Baumgartncr, (Sixth Generation), Decatur, 

Ind. 
Clyde was born in Berne, Ind., Mar. 9, 1891. He is now in pur- 
suit of an education. 

d. Pearl R. Baumgaj^ner, (Sixth Generation), Decatur, 

Ind. 

Pearl was born in Elwood, Ind., Oct. 22, 1893. She is now 
getting an education. 

c. John A. Baumgartncr, (Sixth Generation), Decatur, Ind. 

John A. was born in Elwood, Ind. Dec. 16, 1894, and is now 
pursuing his school work. 

2. Caroline Baumgartncr, Mcshberger, (Fifth Generation), 
Linn Grove, Ind. 

Caroline began her journey of life Dec. IS, 1S64, near Linn 
Grove, Ind. She obtained a common school education. Early in 
life she experienced the regeneration of heart, and became identified 
with the Evangelical Association in Linn Grove, of which she isstill 
a worthy member. She entered the matrimonial life with John 
Meshberger, Oct. 29, 1891, Kev. J. H. Evans officiated at the wed- 
ding. He was born a mile north of Linn Grove. His education is 
limited. He is farming his farm two miles northwest of Linn 
Grove. He also was converted and united with her church. Their 
home is graced with three daughters, all born near Linn Grove, Ind., 
viz: — 

a. Clista, May 27, 1S92. (Sixth Generation). 

b. Tressie, Aug. 2, 1894. 

c. FIvbsie, Nov. 12, 1899. 



D.'scendants of Deacon David Baumgartner 71 

3. Henry Baumgartner, (Fifth Geoeration). 
Henry was born in 1S66, and died an infant. 

4 and 5. Edward H. and Edwin Baumgattner, (Fifth Genera- 
tion), Linn Grove, Ind. • 

P'dward and F^dwio were born Aug^. 12, iSf>S, near Linn Grove,' 
Ind. Edwin died an infant. Edward enjoyed good common school 
privileges, and he also enjoyed the privilege of attending the Val- 
paraiso and Angola Normal Schools of Indiana. He taught school 
successfully for ten terms. He is now making a splendid success of 
farming the homestead. Like the rest of the children he received 
early Christian training:. He was converted to God at the age of 
fourteen, and united with the Evangelical Association at Linn 
Grove, Ind , where he is a consistent and active wcrkfr in the church. 
He has graced the office of Class leader, S. S. Sup'., and Trustee of 
the church. For two years he has served very acceptably as town- 
ship S. S. Supt., of French township, in which he takes a deep in- 
terest. He is a highly res-pected citizen, republican in politics and 
exerts a strong uplifting an."! educative influence among his fellow- 
men. He hds thus far preferred the single path of life. 

6. John M. Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation). 

John M. began his earthly life near Linn Grove, Ind., Oct. 4, 
1^')'*. He also received a good common school education, and en- 
joyed Normal school privileges. He taught public school for a num- 
ber of terms. When quite young he was converted to God and 
united with the EvangelTcal Association, of which he remained a con- 
sistent member until deatb. caused by erysipelas Mar. 22, 1891. 

7. Albert Baumgartner, (Fifih Generation). 

Albert was born near Linn Grove, in 1870 and died 9 months old. 

8 Prof. D A. Bnumgartncr, (Fi'th Generation), DvC^^tur, 

Indiana. 

Daniel A. started his pilgrimage on earth near Linn Grove, Ind., 
Nov. 22, 1S71. Aside from a good common school training, he ob- 
tained a Normal Course of education at Valparaiso, Ind. He then fol- 
lowed public school teaching for a number of ye»'-. '!'hen he en- 
tered journalistic work as editor of the Vanburen, Ind., weekly pa- 
per, and edited the same with ability and general satisfaction to the 
public. N!eanwhile he entered matriiconial life with Amelia Huff- 
man, of near Linn Grove, lad.. Sept. 5, 1896, with whom he lived 



72 Historical Sketches of Seven Generations 

bappily, until death unexpectedly separated them. Feb. 8, l')01. 
After her death he quit journalism, returned to Linn Grove, and 
again taught school. During the summer of r>05, he entered Bloom- 
ington State University, making "German" and "Algebra" a spe- 
cialty. He is now engaged as professor in these branches in the 
Decatur High School, where he teaches with great acceptability. He 
also early in life became identified ^ith the Evangelical Association 
of which he is still a member. In politics he is republican. The 
following children were born to them: — 

a. Cleo, Jan. 26, 1898. (Sixth Generation.) 

died July 22. 1900. 

b. Herbert H., Dec. 8, 1899. 

9. Leonhard Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation.) 
Leonhard was born in 1873, and died 21 days old. 

10. Emma Baumgartner, Rohn, (Fifth Generation), Linn 

Grove, Ind. 

Emma made her appearance in life near Lien Grove, Ind., Dec- 
18, 1875. She obtained a good common school education. She was 
converted to God iu her youth, and united with the Evangelical As- 
sociation at Linn Grove, Ind. She is a dressmaker. She gave her 
hand as wife to Leander Rohn, of Linn Grove, Ind., Jan. 9, 1906. He 
was born His vocation is 

11. Noah A. Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation). Photographer, 

Rockford, Ohio. 

Noah A. began the trials of life Dec. 18, 1877, near Linn Grove, 
Ind. Aside from a good common schooling, he also received Normal 
School training at Angola, Steuben Co., Ind. He taught two terms 
of public schoo]. To share tlic *'uu3 and frowns" of life he chose 
Fanny Stuckcy, of I^ian Grove, Ind. They were married Apr. 10, 

1904, by Rev S^- was born two miles north v^est of 

Linn Grove, Jan. 14, 1880. He was converted to God in the Evan- 
gelical A oociatio-. ' ^ in Grove, i"d.; but both <iro now, 
members of the Melfcc , t Episcopal Church in Rockford, Ohio. He 
is a photo fapber by occupation in Rockford, doing a profitable 



(a). Lucile Stuckey, born July 13, V>Oh, (Sixth Generation). 
12. Mary Bs)^~p&rtn< r Onljg-r. (P'ifth Generation). Decatur.. 

' "'i'.Zl.j.. 

Mary starf*^ on b?r eartb!7 jot:rnc7 D^c. 1". IS79, near Linn 
Grove, r-d. HF^Jd^s .-■'iijtn'.'u iuiboois sht also attended the Aormal 



Descendants of Deacon David Baumgartner 73 

School at Ang^ola, Ind. She has taught several terms of school, with 
admirable success. Iler social wajs nave made her many friends. 
She was converted to God when quite young and united with the Ev. 
Association, at Linn Grove, and took an active part in church work. 
She was married to Lawrence E. Opliger, of Linn Grove, Feb. 8, 
190f>. at 6 P. M. at the heme of her mother. Rev. Edw. Greiner, of 
Linn Groye Cir. of the Ind. Conf. of the Ev. Asso. tied the nuptial 
knot. A few weeks before this event, her husband was elected as 
County Supt. of public schools of Adams Co , Ind. He is an active 
educator of the rising generation, and is highly esteemed by his fel- 
low-teachers. They now live in the county seat of Decatur. 

13. William Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation). 
William was born in 1S81, and died 21 days old. 

14. Ida Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation), Linn Grove, Ind. 
Ida's trials of life began near Linn Grove, Ind., Dec. 6, 1882. 

Besides common schools she also attended the Normal School at An- 
gola, Ind. She ha* taught three years of school with marked suc- 
cess. She was converted to God early in life and has since been active 
in the Evangelical Church of Linn Grove. 

15. Charles C. Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation). Linn Grove, 

Indiana. 
Charles C was born near Linn Grove, May 12, 1887. He is a 
graduate of the district school. He also is a member of the Ev. 
Asso. at Linn Grove, Ind. la the summer he assis.s his brother 
Edw. on the farm of their mother. He is now a public school teach- 
er in Berne, Ind. ♦-*— . 

(D). Maria Ann Baumgartner, Kirchhofer, (Fourth Generation). 

Maria A. (her name is the same as her oldest sister who died), 
began the shifting scenes of life Aug. lSJ^7, in Wayne Co.,0. In early 
life she became a member of the Mennonite Church. Her education- 
al privileges were limited. House-work, spinning and weaving was 
largely her occupation while at home. She was married to Abraham 
Kirchhofer May 14, 1S<)4. The marriaee was solemnised by Rev. 
Uli Kipfer. of French town"hir>. AJiuis Co., Ind., who was then a 
minister of the Mennonite Courch. Her husband was born Jan. 28, 
lS4;s. First they lived in Wayne Co.. O. In the spring of 1881 they 
moved to Missouri and lived on a farm until her peaceful death in 
Jan. i^><3. She was a -ie-cted mother to her faaiiiy, lived a godly life, 
ana aiwajs taught her children how to bear the most precious fruits. 
:iL-r I:fc vr^> -.Ddelil'lj uupiesscd upon the minds of her children, and 
all follow her example, for they all belong to churches and try to 



74 Historical Sketches of Seven Generations 

serve God and humanity. Their children were all born in Wayne 
Co., O., as follows: — 

1. Sarah Kirchhofer, Reusser, (Fifth Generation), Berne, Ind. 

Sarah was born Apr. 26, 1865. She enjoyed coram '>n school 
privileges. As a young- woman she united with the Mennonite 
Church. She entered marriage life with William Reusser Feb. 7, 
18S6. He was born near Berne, Ind., Aug. 7, 1864. They are active 
members in their Church in Berne. His occupation is dairy farm- 
ing. Their home is made happy with the following children, all 
born in Berne, Ind.: — 

a. Ada. Nov. 5, 1886. (Sixth Generation). 

b. Elmer, May 26, 1888. 

c. Ohmer, Dec. 17, 1889. " " 

d. Emma, Dec. 17, 1890. " " 
c. Mahala, Dec. 2, 1892. " 

f. Chlista, Apr. 7, 1894. 

g. Herman, Jun. 1, 1900. 

died Apr. 20, 1901. 

2. John^Kirchhofer, (Fifth Generation), Berne, Ind. Carpenter. 

John entered the conflicts in life July 31, 1866. He only had 
the opportunity to attend common schools. He entered upon the 
voyage of matrimonial life with Lydia P. Lehman, Sept. 13, 18"»1, 
Rev. S. F. Sprunger uniting them in marriage. They are both re- 
spected members in the Mennonite Church in Berne, lod. He united 
with the Church July 2*^, 1885. He is a carp.'nter by trade, in which 
he is quite successful. He has a small farm on which they live, one 
mile west of Berne. Their union is blessed with the following chil- 
dren, all born near Berne: — 

a. Erwin, Sept. 2'), 18')2. (Sixth Generation). 

b. Delia, Sept. 25, 1893. 

c. Louisa, July 5, 1896. " '* 

d. Cora, Apr. 5, 18<>8. 

e. Albert, D<;c. 8, 1900. 

f. Lillie, Oct. 22, 1902. 

g. Tilman, Apr. 3, DOS. 

h. Infant born and died same day Jan. 17, 1907. 

3. William Kirchhofer, (Fifth Generation), Berne Ind. Painter. 

William's life dates from Dec. 13, 1867. He also only had a 
common school education. He is still single and resides in Berne, 
Ind. He is a painter by trade. He is also a member of the Menno- 
nite Church in Berne, Ind. 



Descendants of Deacon BaumgartnerDayid 



75 




Joel G. Kirchhofer, (Fiftb Generation), Chicago, 111., 
Book binder. 

. Joel stepped upon the scene of 

' action, Dec. 8, 1868. He made 
I the best of his common school 
' privileges. Early in life he was 
thrown upon his own resources 
' for a living. He learned book 
binding, which trade he is now 
I following. For a number of years 
he worked at this trade in Berne, 
Ind., then in the Ft. Wayne book 
bindery, owned by Joel Welty, 
but since about I'JOO he continued 
his trade in a Chicago book bind- 
ery. He has studious habits of 
life. His religious convictions 
and love for a pure religion is 
strong. These facts concerning 
him came under the observation 
of the writer of this sketch while 
he frequently went in and out in 
bis home and church during his pastorate in the Bethel Church of 
the Evangelical Asso , in Ft. Wayne, Ind. His amiable disposition 
won him Bertlia Warner, of Chicago, as life companion, Oct. 4, 1902. 
She was born July 11, IS'^0. He united with the Mennonite Church 
when seventeen years old. He is now a member of the Moody Insti- 
tute in Chicago. They have as a fruit of their union: — 

a. Arvella Evangeline, July 16, 1003, (Sixth Generation). 



Joel G. Kirchhofer. 



5. David Kirchhofer, (Fifth Generation), Roanoke, Kansas. 

David began the shifting scenes of life Sept. 25, LSTO. He seems 
to be possessed of a spirit that loves variety of environments. Leav- 
ing his native land, he spent four years in the great North West, two 
years in Dakota working on a horse ranch, for a while he worked in 
a lumber camp in northern Wisconsin, then he worked in Duluth, 
Minn., where he also was converted to God in Bethel mission in 1901. 
In r»04 he was in Oklahoma working in a cement factory. He was 
the wandering boy in the family, but his mother's counsel and pray- 
ers followed him, until he yielded to the call unto salvation. May 
he continue in this way. He only has a common school education. 
He is yet single. He now has a farm near Roanoke, Kansas. 



76 



Historical Sketches of Seven Generations 



6. Maria Matilda Kirchhofer, (Fifth Generation). Fore-ladj, 
Berne, Ind. 

Maria M. commenced her earth- 
-. ..M^j^- ..- -.->> - A— -^ — = ,^ jy career Dec. 22, 1871. She re- 
ceived a common school educa- 
tion. Thus far she has journeyed 
life's pathway alone. She is a 
member of the Berne Mennonite 
Church, and is held in high es- 
T^ ' teem. She is industrious in her 

~ occupation, and has earned the 

position as fore-lady in the 
"Berne Overall Manufacturing 
Co.," where she has labored for 
a goodly number of years. 



Msris Maiiida Kirchhofer. 

7. Albert Amos Kirchhofer, 
(Fifth Generation). 

Merchant, Berne, Ind. 

Albert A. began his pathway 
of life Mar. 4, 1873. Like the 
rest, he only had a common 
school education. For his life 
companion he chose Emma Huser, 
of near Berne. They were mar- 
ried April 30, 1S99, by Rev. S. F. 
Sprunger. She was born Feb. 
20, 1878. He united with the 
Mennonite Church in Berne in 1893 
same Church 



i > 



1 



Alb^ Amos Kirchhofer. 



"She is also a member of the 
He is a harness maker by trade, and launched out as 
harness merchant in 18't8, in the town of Berne, where he did a prof- 
itable business. He sold his business in Oct. 1905. But in Oct. l90f^> 
he again opened a harness shop. In 1904 he became a member of the 
town council of Berne. The following children are the joy of their 
home: — 

a. Rufus, Feb. 22, 1903. (Sixth Generation). 

b. Florence, Mar. 25, 1905. " 



Descendants of Deacon David Baumgartner 77 

8. Elias E. Kirchhofcr, (Fifth Generation). Carpenter and 

Assessor. 
Elias E. began the course of this life, Dec. 26, 1874. Not be- 
lieving- that it is good for man to be alone, he wooed Ida Nusbaum, 
who became his wife Dec. 31, 1896. She was born Sept. 18, 1875, in 
Wayne Co., Ohio. They are both esteemed members of the Menno- 
nite Church of the Gen. Conf. in Wayne Co., O. His general occu- 
pation is carf>entering. In 1904 he was also Assessor of Sugar Creek 
township, of Wayne Co., O. Aside from attending common school, 
he also had the opportunity of attending the "Angola Normal 
School," in Steuben Co., Ind. Their home has been blessed with the 
following children: — 

a. Wilma Diette, Oct. 5,1897. (Sixth Generation). 

b. Melvin Lester, Mar. 17, 1899. " 

c. Ellis Glen, May 4, 1901. 

d. Ethel Elvina, July 6, 19U3. •' 

e. Claio Daniel, Feb. 5, 1906. 

9. A daufjhter unnamed was born Oct. 16, 1876 and death un- 

known. 

(El. Abraham Baumgartner, (Fourth Generation). Carpenter. 

Abraham's earthly career dates from Nov. 24, 1838. bora in 
Wayne Co., O. With his parents he moved to Ind. in 1839. He 
chose for his life companion Caroline Ellenberger June 15, 1864. She 

was born in Mt. Eaton, Ohio, He died in consciousness 

of salvation, Aug. 14, 1898, resulting from dropsy and other compli- 
cations. Some time after marriage he was converted to God and 
joined the Menronite Church, of which he remained a faithful mem- 
ber until his demise. He filled the office of an elder in the Church 
for si.K years. His educational advantages were meager owing to poor 
schools. He was a good singer aud al^^o taught vocal music for a 
while. He was an excellent carpenter, but he also was a practical 
farmer. Throughout the country, where he followed his trade, he 
was soon known to be the champion in physical strength, and fre- 
quent amusing episodes occurred at raisings of barns and house?, for 
when the buildings were "up. "attempts were frequently made to hoist 
him up from the ground, and carry him . und the raised building, 
but generally failed. He also did considerable clearing of timber, 
and would often carry logs to log-heaps, that would have tried the 
strength of two and three men together. It was often said that he 
had strength like a horse. No doubt he often overtaxed his colossal 
strength, and this helped to break him down prematurely. He was 
about six feet and six inches high, weighed about two hundred pounds. 
In disfXDsition he was cheerful and unassuming, in habits of life he 



78 Historical Sketches of Sevea Generations 

was industrious and economical. He first owned a farm on the right 
bank of the Wabash riyer, about three miles below Linn Grove, of 
which the island was a part. Later he sold it, and bought a larger 
one about four miles N. W. of Berne, where he died. His widow now 
lives in Berne, Ind. The following children were born to them, all 
in Adams Co., Ind. 

1. Josephine Baumgartner, Wittwer, (Fifth Generation), 

Berne, Ind. 

Josephine first saw the lig^ht of this world June 11, 1865. She 
onlv had common school privileges. In her girlhood days she united 
with the Mennonite church. She became the wife of Christian 
Wittwer. Sept. 11, 1887, Rev. S. F. Sprunger tied the nuptial knot. 
He was born June 24, 1857, in Wajne Co., O. He is a carpenter by 
trade. They are now both members of the Mennonite Church in 
Berne, Adams Co., Ind., where they live on a farm. The fruit of 
their union is as follows: — 

a. Aldina, June 22, 1888. (Sixth Generation). 

b. Noah, Oct. 4, 1889. 

c. Sarah, Feb. 22, 1891. 

d. Edward, Sept. 23, 1892. 

e. Otto, Sept. 3, 1894. 

f. Amos, Mar. 11, 1896. 

g. Adolph, Nov. 5, 1897. 
h. Albert, Dec. 14. 1899. 
i. Edna, Dec. 20, 1901. 
j. Levi. Jan. 13, 1904. 
k. Jessie, Jan. 24, 1906. 

2. Matilda Baumgartner. Sprunger, (Fifth Generation). Berne, 

Ind. 
Matilda arrived in this world Dec. lf>, 1866. Her educational 
advantages were only common schools. Levi Sprunger received her 
band for a life companion, Oct. 16, 18^7. He was born Nov. 7, 1863. 
The" "^ere married in the ^lennonite C;-r:h la Berre, of which they 
are esteemed members, by Rev. S. F. Sprunger. They reside in 
Berne wherehe is co-partner of the "Sprunger, Lehman andCo." dry- 
goods store. The following children came to their home, ail born 
in Berne, Ind. 

a. Alina, Oct. 22, 1 888. (Sixth Generation). 

b. Grover, July 27, 1890. 

c. Lydia, Feb. 13, 1692. 

d. Harry, Mar. 28, 1894. 

e. Leona, Aug. 14, 1397. 



Descendants of Deacon David Baumgartner 79 



3. Edward Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation). 
Edward was born April •>, 1.S68, and died 9 days old. 

4. Louisa Ann Baumgartner, Wintercgg, (Fifth Generation), 

Berne, Ind. 

Louisa commenced her earthly pilgrimage Jan. 28, 1870. She 
only attended common school. On Jan. 18, 18'»1 she became the wife 
of David Winteregg. The wedding act was performed by Rev. S. F. 
Sprunger, in the Mennonite Church in Berne, to which they both be- 
long. He began life July 17, 1862. They live three miles north 
of Berne on a farm. Their home is blessed with the following fruits 
of their union, all born near Berne, Ind. 

a. Caroline, Oct. 15, 1881. (Sixth Generation). 

died twelve days old. 

b Elmer, Sept. 1, 1892. 

c. Homar, Oct. 2, 1894. 

d. Cora, May 21, 1898. 
c. Bertha, Jan. 25, 1900. 
f. Elda, May 13, 1%3. 

5. Mary Ellen Baumgartner, Nussbaum, (Fifth Generation). 

Berne, Ind. 

Mary E. started the pathway of life May 17, 1872. She has a 
common school education. She took the marriage vow with John 
Nusbaum, Aug. 16, 1891, before Rev. S. F. Sprunger. He was born 
Nov. 5, 1864. near Berne. Ind. They are respected members of the 
Mennonite Church, in Berne. They live on their farm one mile north 
of Berue. Their home is made happy with the following children, 
all born near Berne. 

a. Cora. Feb. 2^, IS'C ' *^m a th Generation), 
died, Sept. 12, \H'H. 

b. Franklin, M.ii. 30, 1893. " '» 

c. Sylvester, Apr. 12, 1894. " •• 
<j. Mitta, Aoi. 26. l" -~. «♦ 

e. Alfred. Nov. 14, 1896. •• ♦' 

f. F.lda, '"cb *>. ■'8'^S. '• •' 
g vvin. May 2, 18'i9. »' »• 
h. Wilbcrt, Aug. 10, 1900. 

i. Bcrnhard, Feb. 2, 1902. " " 

j. Albert. Mar. 2r., ...... •' 

k. Victor, Nov. 25, 1904. •• •' 

1. John, June ', \'Hth. "■ •• 

m, Hiram, Dec. 4, iVOi. ** " 



80 Historical Sketches of Seven Generations 

6. Ida Aldina Baumgartncr, Nusbaum, (Fifth Generation), 

Berne, Ind. 
Ida A. beg-an her earthly pilgrimage Mar. 23, 1874. She at- 
tended common school only. She became ihe wife of Peter Nusbaum 
Jan. 20, 1895. R :v. S. F. Sprunger solemnizing the wedding act. Bjth 
are acceptable members of the Mennonite Church at Berne, Ind. He 
was born Feb. 16, lSb7, near Berne, Ind. They live two and one- 
half miles north of Berne. The following- children have issued from 
this union, all born near Berne, viz: — 

a. Delia, Oct. 12, 1895. (Sixth Generation). 

b. Rufus, Jan. 31, 1897. 
c Henry, Dec. 20, 1897. 

d. Martha, Dec. IS, 1898. 

e. Walter, July 13, 1900. 
died, Aug. next. 

f. Caroline, July 1, 1904. 

7. Emma Frances Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation), Berne, 

Ind. 
Emma F. began her pathway of life Oct. . . ., 1876. She only at- 
tended common school. She is also a member of the Mennonite 
Church in Berne, Ind. She is yet single, and stays at home with 
mother doing housework. 

S. Albert William Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation), Berne, 
Ind. 

Albert W. began the encouragements and discouragements of life 
July 5, 1879. He has a common school education. He is a farmer 
by occupation. He entered matrimonial life with Matilda Mesh- 
berger Dec. 22, 1900. She was born April 9, 1875, in Adams Co., 
Ind., near Vera Cruz. She died July 18, 1901, of consumption, leav- 
ing no children. He was married the second time in California to 
Dora Sprunger, (a daughter of Rev, S. F. Sprunger), Nov. 14, 1903 
They are both members of the Mennonite Church in Berne, Ind., 
having returned to Ind. They live on his father's homestead about 
three miles N. W. of Berne. She was born Oct. 21, 1879. The fol 
lowing children have come to their home: — 

a. Ornell Ried. Oct. 2, 1904. (Sixth Generation). 

b. Kenneth Walden. Nov. 11, 1906. 

9. and 10. Noah A. and Caroline May Baumgartner, (Fifth 

Generation). Berne, lod. 
Noah A. and Caroline May were born July 10, 18S1. N's abode 
on earth was brief, departing from the family circle May 6, 1883. 



D.'sceadants of Deacon David Baumg'artner 



81 



Sister C. grew up to womanhood, and received a common school edu- 
cation. She is also a member of the Mennonite Church in Berne, 
Ind. She was married to Noah Augsburger, Sept. 1, 1904. He was 
born Jan. 27, 18S0. They live four miles west of Berne, on his 
father's place. To them is born:— 

a A boy still-born. Aug. 9. 1905. (Sixth Generation). 

b. Palmer Maxwell, Oct. 23, 1907. 

11. Samuel Ludwig Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation), Berne, 
Ind. 

Samuel L. entered the pathway of life, Nov. 20, 1883. He has a 
coaimon school education. He also is a member of the Mennonite 
Church, in Berne, Ind. He is a day laborer, and is still traveling 
the single path of life. 

(F). Katharina Baumgartner, Ellenberger, (Fourth Genera- 
tion), Berne, Ind. 

Katharina took up her trials in this life Jan. 10, 1840, in 
French township, Adams county, Indiana. Her educational 
opportunities were very limited. When a young woman she 
became identified with the Mennonite Church. She was united in 
marriage with Henry Ellenberger, Oct. 31, 1867 by John McConnel, 
of Decatur, Ind., Clerk of Adams Co. He was born Mar. 25, 1842, in 
Mt. Eaton, Ohio. They now live on a farm about four miles N. W. 
of Berne. When they lived on her brother John's place two miles 
N. W. of Linn Grove, Ind., a cyclone leaf>ed down upon the house 
and tore it to pieces, killing one child. The following named chil- 
dren were born to them in Adams Co., Ind., and only received a 
country school education, viz: — 

1. Sarah Ellenberger, Beer, (Fifth Generation), Berne, Ind. 

Sarah was born Mar. 4, 1S6S. She began the pathway of marriage 
life with Christian Beer, Dec. 9, 188S. Rev. S. F. Sprunger united 
them in the marriage bonds. He was born Aug. 30, 1866. They 
are both re>pected members of the Reformed Church in Berne, Ind. 
They live on a farm four miles north of Berne. Their children were 
all born in Adams Co., Ind , as follows; — 



a. 


Harvey, 


Dec. 


20, 


18S9. 


b. 


Lovina, 


Mar. 


3, 


1891. 


c. 


Caroline, 


Oct. 


8, 


1892. 


d. 

e. 


Delia, ) 
LiUie, \ 


June 


25, 


1894. 


f. 


RuTina, 


Apr. 


15, 


1896. 


g- 


Dora, 


Apr. 


25, 


1897. 



(Sixth Generation). 



82 Historical Sketches of Seven Generations 



h. 


Erwin, 


Jan. 


11, 


18'>9. 


i 


Rosali, 


Sept. 


15, 


1900. 


J- 


Jesse. 


Aug. 


6, 


1902. 


k. 


Edna, 








1 


Elmer, 









(Sixth Generation). 



2. Albert Ellenberger, (Fifth Generation). 

Albert was born May 30, 1869, and died, resulting from a cjclone 
that tore down the house, April 15, 1871. 

3. William E. Ellenberger, (Fifth Generation). 

William E. first saw the light of this world Dec. 15, 1871. On 
Aug. 18, 1892. he joined hand with Lydia Nusbaum in marriage. He 
followed farming fiye miles N. W. of Berne. On Apr. 26, 1899 he 
was summoned into the great beyond. He was a member of the 

Mennonite Church in Berne. She was born To this 

union were born four children, as follows: — 

a. Harvey, Dee. 27, 18*»2. (Sixth Generation) 

b Clara. Mar. 16, 1894. 

c George, Oct. 13, 1895. " " 

d. Cora, Jan. 19, 1897. 

4 Joel Ellenberger, (Fifth Generation), Geneva, Ind. 

Joel was born Mar. 20, 1872. He was married to Olive Liliie 
Flory, Sept. 3. 1904 by Rev. E. H. Vornbolt of the Reformed 
Church in Berne. She was born Nov. 6, 1887 in Berne, lad. They 
now live in Geneva, Ind. To them are bora in Berne. Ind. 

a. Opal. Apr. 17, 1905. (Sixth Generation). 

b. Floyd, May 21, 1906. 

c. Girl, Dec. 18. 1907. 

5. Amos Ellenberger, (Fifth Generation), Berne, Ind. Butcher. 

Amos began the earthly life Aug. 30, 1873. He was married to 
Delia Flory in 1S9S by Rev. E. H. Vornbolt, of the Reformed Church 
in Berne. She was born July 13, 1881, in Berne, Ind. They united 
with the Mennonite Church in Berne, March 190f.. They live in 
Berne, where he is in partnership with his brother Noah since the 
winter of 1903, in an up-lo date meat merchant business. In l''0.s 
he bought a butcher shop in Geneva, Ind. To them are born in 
Berne, Ind.: 

a. Jesse, June 25, 1902. (Sixth Generation). 

b. Leona, Oct. 2'., 1903. 

c. Herman, Apr. 10, 1905. " 

d. Merlin, Dec. 24, 1906. 



Descendants of Deacon David Baumg^rtner 83 

6. Caroline Ellenbcrger, Schenbeck, (Fifth Generation), 

Berne, Ind. 

Caroline entered the arena of life Jan. 1, 1875. She took the 
Hjarriag^e vow with David Schenbeck, Oct. 26, 18%. He was intro- 
duced to the trials of life Apr. 6, 1S72. She is a member of the Ev- 
angelical Church in Berne. He departed this life leaving 

wife and the following two children: — 

a. Lorena, Sept. 6, lvS97. (Sixth Generation). 

b. Erma, Feb. 25, 1899. " " 

7. Noah Ellenbcrger, (Fifth Generation), Berne, Ind. Butcher. 

Noah's introduction to this world took place Jan. 14, 1876. In 
1898 he was in the harness business for a short time with Amos 
Kirchhofer; but is now also in the meat business with his brother 
Amos. He is a member of the Mennonite Church in Berne. He en- 
tered the matrimonial life with Leah Luginbill Oct. \h, 1904, and 
resides in Berne. According to latest account three children are 
born to them, namelj: — 

a. Goldie. Sept. 19, 1905. (Sixth Generation). 

b. Joyce L. Aug. 19, 1906. 

c. Flossie, July 17. I't08. 

8. Mary J. Ellenbcrger, Liddy, (Fifth Generation), Petroleum, 

Wells Co., Ind. 

Marj J. first saw the light of this world Aug. 20, 1877. She 
worked out as private servant girl in Blufiton, Ind., until she gave 
her hand in marriage to John \V. Liddj, of Petroleum, V/ells Co., 
Ind., Sept. 21, r'05. Kev, Ewd. Greiner, of the Evangelical Church 
at T.ion Grove. Ind.. tied the nuptial knot. His vocation is black- 
smithing in Petroleum where they now live. 

9 and 10. Henry A. and Rosie Ellenbcrger, (Fifth Generation). 
Twins. 

Henry and Rosie were born Dec. 20, 1878. Fosie died two days 
later. Henry has grown up to manhood. His vocation is farming. 
He was united in marriage with Lii:-:ie Moser, "Sov.'K 1905. She was 
born Sept. 17, ls84. Tbey have one child: — 

a. Arlie. Nov. 6, T>0<.. (Sixth Generation). 

11. Katie EUenberger, Studler, (Fifth Generation). 

Ka:ic was born to the alternations of life July 1, 1881. She is a 
member of the Mennonite Church in Berne. She was married to F. 
W. Studler, Jan. 5, r>05. He is a farmer near Linn Grove, Indiana. 



84 Historical Sketches of Seven Generations 

The following children are bom to them: — 

a. Frieda M., Oct. 8, l'»05. (Sixth Generation). 

b. Mable M., Dec 7, l'X)6. 

12. Rosa Ellenberger, Steiner, (Fifth Generation). 

Rosa began the tribulations of life June 7, 1885. She became 
married to Ferdinand Steiner on May 7, 1908, Rev. H. H. Kattmann, 
of the Reformed Church at Berne, lod., performing the ceremony. 
They now live in Geneva. Indiana, where he is conducting a meat 
market. 

(G). Barbara Ann Baurr.gartner, (Fourth Generation). 

Barbara A. was born 1841, and died 18 years old of typhoid fever. 

(H). Maria Baumgartner, (Fourth Generation). 

Maria was born in 1842, and died the same year. This girl was 
named after her oldest sister who died in infancy. 

(I). Elizabeth Baumgartner, Augsburger, (Fourth Generation), 
Berne, Ind. 
Elizabeth was born in French township, Adams Co., Ind., Dec. 
10, 1843. Like the rest of her sisters she had a limited opportunity 
for an education, but had to do housework, sewing, spinning, weav- 
ing, etc. She was united in marriage to Christian Augsburger near 
Linn Grove, Ind., Jan. 21, 18(.9. He was born June 3, 1843. They 
lived on a farm about one mile north of Linn Grove, where their 
children were born. She was a member of the Meononite Church 
for some years, and he of the Amisb; but later they united with the 
Defenseless Mennonite Church, four miles west of Berne. To them 
were born the following children, who only had opportunity to at- 
tend country schools. 

1. Rosa Augsburger, who died in infancy. 

2. Anna Augsburger, Meshbergc, (Fifth Generation), Linn 

Grove, Ind. 
Anna was bora Apr. 30, 1870. She was married to Ed. Mesh- 
berger, of near Linn Groye, Ind., July 27, 1893. He was born Aug. 
6, 1857. He is a farmer. They are members of the D»;fenseless Men- 
nonite Church. Thev live on their farm one mile north of Linn 
Grove, where their children were born as follows: — 

a. Esther, May 31, 1894. (Sixth Generation). 

b. Elmer, Nov. 9, 1896. 
c Ezra, Aug. 20, 1898. 

d. Raymon, Aug. 30, 1900. 

e. Christian, Dec. 23, 1902. 

f. Pearly. Feb. 13, l'>04. 

g. Homer, Mar. 22, 1906. 



Descendants of Deacon BauragartnerDavid 85 



3. John Augsburgcr, (Fifth Generation). 

John was born Jan. 7, 1S72 and died Aug. 7, 1872. 

4. Emma Augsburgcr, Bicberstein, (Fifth Generation), Linn 

Grove, Ind. 
Emma began her trials of life July 11, 1873. She was married 
to Adam Bieberstein. near Linn Grove. Ind., N07. 25, l'i02. He was 
born May 13, 1S74. He is a farmer by occupation. She is a mem- 
ber of the Defenseless Mennonite Church. The following is the 
fruit of their union: — 

a. Nona, Aug. 16, 1">03. (Sixth Generation). 

b. Lloyd, Nov. 11, 1904. " " 

c. Verna, May 31, 1906. " " 

5. Samuel Augsburgcr, (Fifth Generation), Carpenter. 
Samuel began the shifting scenes of life Dec. 20, 1875. He is 

yet single. He is a carpenter by trade. 

6. Adam Augsburgcr, (Fifth Generation), Berne, Ind., Laborer. 
Adam entered life's activities Sept. 5, 1877. He is yet single. 

7. Jephtha Augsburgcr, (Fifth Generation), Berne, Ind. 

Jepbtha entered this life Mar. 3, 1880. He has been following 
the carpenter trade for a number of years. He wooed and won the 
heart of Sadie Ashbaucher, of French township, Adams Co., and 
was married to her Feb. 6, 1907, by the pastor of the Reformed 
Church, at Vera Cruz, Ind. They now reside west of Linn Grove. 
She -was born May u, 18S2, and is a member of the Reformed Church 
at Vera Cruz, Ind. One child is born to them: — 

a. Robert Clark, July 26. l'>07. (Sixth Generation). 

8. Elias Augsburgcr, (Fifth Generation). 

Elias entered the arena of time, Feb. 24, 1882. He is farming. 
He was married to his wife Emma Wanner, June "'■', 1905. She -s-as 
born Oct. 18, 1887. To them are born: — 

a. Dorothy Opal, Aug. 18, 1906. (Sixth Generation). 

b. Marcella Fcstcna, Mar. 1908. *' " 

9. Joel Augsburgcr, (Fifth Generation), Berne, Ind., R. F. D. 

Joel entered the temporal life Mar. 3, 1884. He is a farmer near 
Geneva, Ind. He was married to his wife Ida Stuckey April 14, 1906. 
She was born Oct. 19, 1886. They have one child: 

a. Sylvanus Garold, July 24, 19u8. (Sixth Generation). 



86 Historical Sketches of Seven Generations 

10. Christian Augsburger, (Fifth Generation), Berne, Ind. 
Christian started the earthly career on a national holiday, the 

4th of July, 1886. He is a day laborer. 

11. Edward Augsburger, (Fifth Generation), Berne, Ind. 

Edward commenced his journey of life Oct. 29, 1888, and is a 
teamster. 

(I). Joel Baumgartner, (Fourth Generation), New Stark, Hancock 
Co., O. 
Joel began the earthly life in French township, Adams Co., 
Ind., May 20, 1845. His educational opportunities were limited to 
common schools. When he became of a^e he followed the carpenter 
trade. Physically he grew up to a large portly man weighing- con- 
siderably over 2()0 pounds. Not wishing to travel the path of life 
singlehanded he chose Christina Thut, of Holmes Co., Ohio, for a 
life companion in 1871, She was born in Holmes Co., Apr. 10, 1848. 
They are both highly respected members of the Mennonite Church 
where they live. He is well to-do, runs a large farm very success- 
fully. The issue of this union consists of the following children: — 

1. John Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation), New Stark, Han- 
cock Co , O., Eagineer. 

John entered this life in Allen Co., Ohio, Nov. 16, 1871. He 
enjoyed good common school privileges. He is an engineer by oc- 
cupation. He entered matrimonial life with Sarah Stutzman, Feb. 
13, 1898, Rev. John Elosser soiemaized the wedding act. They art 
respectable members of the Mennonite Church where they live. To 
them are born in Hancock Co., 

a. Gaius, Apr. 22, 1899. (Sixth Generation). 

b. Merle, Aug. 24, 1900 

c. Girl, May. 19, l*/02. 
Died May 31, 1902. 

d. Son, Dec. 26, 1903. 
Died two days lat'^r. 

2. Moses E. Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation), New Stark, 

Hancock Co., Ohio. 
Moses E. began the struggle of life, May 23, 1873. His school 
privileges were confined to rural schools. He also is a member of the 
Mennonite Church. He follovvs farming. He is jet single. 

2. Henry Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation). 

iTAr.rj K H^ t-vrn Apr. 30, !875, and died Aug. („ 1876, 



Descendants of Deacon David Baumgartner 87 

4. Ezra Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation), New Stark, Han- 

cock Co., Ohio. 
Ezra commenced this earthlj life Apr. 17, 1877. He obtained a 
good common school education. His occupation is farming-. He is 
also a member of the Mennonite Church. He started on his matri- 
monial vojage with Isabella Fol.z, Sept. 23, l'>03 Rev E. S. Keller 
tied the nuptial knot. He lost his wife by death Sept. 2, l'>05. To 
them was born a daughter, 

a. Elizabeth May, Maj 10, 1905. (Sixth Generation). 

5. EInora Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation). New Stark, Han- 

cock, Co., Ohio., Nurse. 
EInora entered upon her jiurney of life Apr. 20, 1878. She ob- 
tained a good education. She is making- her life count as a profes- 
sional nurse. She is an honored member of the Mennoniie Church. 

6. Raymond Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation), Masontown, 

Ptnn. 
Raymond entered the arena of life Jan. 6, 18S1. Aside from a 
good coraraon school education he also enjojed the privilege of at- 
tending the Mennonite Collegf for several terra«, then located in 
Elkhart, Ind. He was married to fi izabeth Hausaker, of Penn., 
Dec. 17, l'*02, by Ajron Laucks Time of her birth was not re- 
ported to the writer. He is farming in Masontown, Penu. Tbej . 
are meinbtrs of the Mennonite Church. To them is born, 

a. Sarah Clova. June 14, 1904. (Sixth Generation). 

7. Benjamm F. Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation), New Stark, 

Hancock Co., Ohio. 
Benjamin F. began the trials of life D.c. 22, 1882. He has 
availed himself of the opportunity of getting a good education. He 
IS now following teaching. He al^o is a member of the Mennonite 
Church, and is yet single. 

8. Harry Henry Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation), New Stark, 

Hancock, Co., Ohio. 
Harry H. appeared upon the ^hore of time May 2(», 1884. He 
also has availed himself of the privileges of getting a good 
education. His profession is teaching. He is also identified 
with The Mennonite Church, and is yet living a single life. 

9. Carl Ba-jmgartner, (Fifth Generation ). New Stark, Han- 

cock Co., Ohio. 

Carl entered upon the scene of life Sept. 21, 1886. He received 



88 Historical Sketches of Seven Generations 

a fair education. Ke follows farming- lie also is a member of the 
Mennonite Church. 

10. An infant daughter was born Apr. 16, 1888 and died Maj 
8, same jear. 

(K). Ephraim Baumgartncr, (Fourth Generation), Berne, Ind. 

Epbraim began his trip across the fea of life July 25, 1846. He 
was born in French township, Adams Co., Ind. Like the rest he 
only had poor country school advantages. He is physically a short 
and portly man with strong muscles. He was united in marriage 
with Magdalena Gerber of Wajne Co., Ohio, Feb. 1, 1872, by Rev. 
Christian Sommer. He is now a retired farmer, Hying in Berne, do- 
ing odd jobs. She was born in Wayne Co., O., Apr. 7, 1848. He 
was eighteen and she seventeen when they united with the Menno- 
nite Church. After marriage they first lived on his father's farm iu 
French township. Later they bought a small farm near Linn Grove, 
Ind., but in the fall of 1SS5, they sold out and bought a farm south- 
east of Berne, where they lived until the fall of 1*>04, when they 
moved to Berne, Ind. He is also a carpenter, at which trade he 
worked two years prior to his marriage. This union is blessed with 
the following children, all born in Adams Co., Ind. 

1. Aldina A. Baumgartner, Sprunger, (Fifth Generation). 

Berne, Ind. 
Aldina A. was born into this world Jan. 26, 1874. She received 
a rural school education. She became a member of the Mennonite 
Church at the age of fifteen. She was led to the hymenial alter by 
Gideon Sprunger Nov. 15, 18%, Rev. S. F. Sprunger performing the 
wedding act. He was born near Berne, Ind., Sept. 6, 1866. His oc- 
cupation is farming. The following named children are fruits of 
"this union: — 

a. Gertrude Alvena, July 11, isvf». (Sixth Generation). 

b. Maria Magdalena, Oct. 16, 1900. 

c. Esther Edna, June 19, 1902. 

d. Palmer Ottis, Feb. 26, 1">05. 

2. Noah Aswin Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation), Berne, Ind. 

Noah began the trials of life Dec. 4, 1S75. He only attended 
the rural district schools. He became a member of the Mennonite 
Church at the age of seventeen. He is employed by the "Gilliom 
Lumber Co," in Berne, Ind. Not thinking it best to travel the path 
of life all the way alone he tcok to wife Meta Steiner, Jan. 2S. r»02. 
Rev. S. F. Sprunger tied the nuptial knot. She was born in Berne, 
Ind., Jan. 21, 18S2. She is also a member of the Mennonite Church 



Descendants of Deacoa David Bautngartner 89 

since April 8, 1898. The following children, born in Berne, have 
come to their home: — 

a. Ina Dorotha, Dec. 25, 1902. (Sixth Generation). 

b. Estella, Aug. 12, 1905. ♦• .. 

3. Hirman Henry Baumo^artner, (Fifth Generation), Berne, Ind. 
Hiram H. first saw the light of this world Sept. 19, 1877. He 

only attended the country schools. He united with the Mennonite 
Church at the age of eighteen. He believed the Scripture that it 
was not good for man to be alone, so he chose MoUie Sprunger to 
share his joys and sorrows the 4th day of Oct., 1903. She was born 
near Berne, Ind., Nov. 5, 1SS4. She united with the Mennonite 
Church and was baptized Feb. •«, 1902. He is farming his father-in- 
law's place, one and a half mile northwest of town. In June 1906 he 
bought the Peter C. Moser farm. They have two children born in 
Monroe tov/nship, Adams Co., Ind., viz: — 

a. Wilma Aganeta, Mar. 19, 1">06. (Sixth Generation.) 

b. July , 1908. " " 

4. Manas Milo Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation), Berne, Ind. 

Music Teacher. 
Manas M. began the realities of the earthly life, Sept. 25. 1879. 
He has enjoyed, besides rural schools, one year of training in the 
"Central Mennonite College", at Bluffton, Ohio. He became a mem- 
ber of his parents' Church at the age of 18. He is a proficient car- 
penter. He is also a great lover of vocal music, and on Jan. 2, 1906 
he entered the 'Oberlin Conservatory of Music'', where he made 
vocal music a specialty. He also had several terms of vocal training 
in the C. M. College, at Bluffton. Ohio. He is now the leader of the 
Male Choir of the Mennonite Church in Berne, Ind., organized nine 
years ago, which has done the local Christian Endeavor Society great 
service. Thus far he traveled the path of life alone. He has one- 
half interest with bis father in an up-to-date restaurant in Berne, 
Ind. 

5. Cora Emelia Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation). 
Cora Iv was bcra Apr. 25, ISSl, and died Aug. 29, 1897. 

6. Amanda Saloma Baumgartner, Steiner, (Fifth Generation), 

Lima, Ohio. 
Amanda S. came upon the arena of life July 2, 1883. She re- 
ceived a common school education. Oscar Steiner, born May 29, 
isso, near Berne, Ind.. won her heart, and led her to the hymenial 
altar. May 2. 1905, when by authority of Rev. J. W. Kliewer, she 
was made his wife. She became a member of her parents' Church at 



90 Historical Sketches of Seven Generations 

the age of 16. He also is a member of the same church since July 
14, 1895. Thej now reside at Lima, Ohio, where he is working in a 
Tilercofiog Factory. To them are born: — 

a. Carlton Clyde, Maj 19, 1906 Sixth Generation. 

b. Pearl, Dec. 16, 1907. 

7. Leonora May Baumgartncr, (Fifth Generation). 
Leonora M. was born in 1885, and died an infant. 

8. LiUie Ora Baumgartncr, (Fifth Generation). Berne, Ind. 
Lillie O. began her earthly career Sept. 15, 1887. She has a 

fair common school education. She united with her parents' Church 
May 24, 1903. 

9. Orva Milton Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation). 

Orva M. entered life Apr. 2, 1889. He died the same day. 

(L). Mary Baumgartner, (Fourth Generation), Berne, Ind. 

Mary cam** upon the scene of earthly activities July 10, 1848. 
She chose to walk the path of life alone. For many years she was 
the stay and comfort of her parents until their demise. She has 
been a very successful rag-carpet weaver for over twenty years. She 
joined the Mennonite church at the age of fifteen, of which she has 
ever since remained an honored and useful member. She had a home 
in Berne, Ind. She is generous and kind hearted, and honest in her 
work. At present she is stajing at the Old Peoples Home at Ander- 
sen, Indiana, an institution belonging to the Saints. 

(M). Benjamin Baumgartner, (Fourth Generation), Ransom, Ness 
Co., Kans. 
Benjamin entered upon the activities of this life Nov. 1, 184'*. 
His school advantages were very limited He became a member of 
the Mennonite Church when a young man. He was united in marri- 
age to Elizabeth Tbut from Ohio in 1^73. But she already died 
about two years later in February. They lived on his father's farm 
in French township in Adams Co., Ind. One child was born to them 
Feb. 11, 1874, and died eight days old. He was married the second 
time to Mary L. Ummel, June 14, 1883. She was born in Canton 
Neuenburg, Switzerland. He had a small farm one-half mile N. W. 
of Linn Grove, Ind., where they lived until he sold out in 188(>. Not 
enjoying good health in Ind., he moved to Kansas and bought a farm 
near Ransom, Ness Co., Kans., in theyear 18S7, where they have since 
lived, and have been respected members of the Mennonite Church. 
He has been a sufferer for many years with acute headaches, which 
finally terminated in an impaired mind. He died Apr. 28, 1907 in 
the hospital after being there but a little over three weeks. Now he 



Descendants of Deacon Davjd Baumg-artner 91 

is at rest and in the full enjoyment of all his mental faculties. The 
following are their children, all born in Ness Co., Kans., except the 
three oldest, which were born near Linn Grove, Ind. 

1. Rufus F. Baumgartncr, (Fifth Generation). 

Rufus F. was born Mar. 10, 1884. He has a common school 
training-. His occupation is farming'. 

2. Lydia Emma Baumgartncr, (Fifth Generation). 

Lydia E. started her earthly journey Aug. 17, 1885. She also 
only attended common district school. Her occupation is house work. 
She is yet single. 

3. Harry Edward Baumgartncr, (Fifth Generation). 

Harry E. made his appearance in life Feb. 21, 1887. He has a 
fair common school education. He is a member of the Progressive 
Christian Church. He also is yet single. Farming is his occupation. 

4. Rosa Bertha Baumgartncr, (Fifth Generation). 

Rosa B. was born Apr. 5, 1889, and has a common school educa- 
tion. She is a member of the Mennonite Church. 

5. Hattie Odd Baumgartncr, (Fifth Generation). 

Hatlie O. was born Feb. 17, 1892. Common school is all she 
could attend. 

6. Anna Grace Baumgartncr, (Fifth Generation). 

AnnaG. was born Apr. 5, 1894, and is receiving a common school 
education. 

7. David Philip Baumgartncr, (Fifth Generation). 

David P. was born Aug. 29, 189f), and is attending district 
school. 

8. Elma Baumgartncr, (Fifth Generation). 

Elma was born Apr. 19, 1«»01, and is just entering upon common 
school work. 

(N). Samuel Baumgartncr, (Fourth Generation). 

Samuel was born May 9, 1851. His school privileges were 
ordinary. He was a tall young man f)'.- feet, and possessed great 
strength, and a courageous spirit. His thread of life was cut short 
unexpectedly in Apr. 1872 of brain fever. 

(O). Christina Baumgartncr, (Fourth Generation). 

Christina -^as born Apr. 1853, and died of smallpox when one 
year old. 



92 Historical Sketches of Seven Generations 

(P). Anna Baumgartner, Augsburger, (Fourth Generation), Berne, 
Ind. 
Anna began the path of life Apr. 6, 1856. She only had an 
ordinary district school education. She was married to David Augs- 
burger June 14, 1S75. He v?as born May 23, 1850 near Linn Grove, 
Ind. He learned the gunsmith trade, which he followed for 26 
years. They lived one mile north of Linn Grove, until they moved 
to Berne, Ind., in the year 1899 where he has opened a bicycle and 
sewing machine shop. They first united with the Defenseless Men- 
nonite Church four miles west of Berne, and later with the Mission- 
ary church in Berne, where they are active and consistent 
members. To them were born two daughters near Linn Grove, Ind. :- 

1. Aldina Augsburger, Brenneman, (Fifth Generation), Berne, 

Ind. R. F. D. 
Aldina came upon the arena of time Sept. 27, 1875. She has a 
common school education. She entered into matrimonial relations 
with Moody Brenneman Dec. 12, 1903, Rev. A. M Clauser solemnized 
the marriage contract. They are honored members of the Defense- 
less Mennonite Church four miles west of Berne. He was born Novem- 
ber 12, 1S77. His occupation is farming. They now live four miles 
west of Berne. To them are born the following children: — 

a. Ester Evangeline, April 5, 1906. Sixth Generation. 

b. Lonna, Oct. 17, 1907. 

2. Bertha A. Augsburger, Schindler, (Fifth Generation, Berne, 

Ind. 
Bertba A. entered the door of life Feb. 13, 1879. Like her sister 
she only attended district schools. She was united in the bonds of 
marriage with Henry Schindler Feb. 19, 1901 by Rev. A. M. Clauser, 
pastor of the Missionary Church four miles west of Berne, of which 
both are respected members. He was born Jan. 15, 1876 near Linn 
Grove, Ind. They live in Berne, Ind., where, until recently, he has 
been in the furniture and undertaking business since Jan. 15, 1903. 
From this union issued: — 

a. Arra Alma, Mar. 1, 1902. Sixth Generation. 

b. Nnomi Ruth, Ayg. 22, 1904. *' 



•^ 



Chapter III. 

Sec. VII. 



Barbara Baumgartncr, (Third Generation). 

Barbara was born in Jura, Budericbgraben, Oberamt Courtelarj, 
Canton Bern. Switzerland, Dec. 19, 1812, She was a member of the 
Mennonite Church. She came to America with her parents, and first 
Jived in Wajne Co., Ohio. From here she moved with her parents 
to Wells Co., Ind , near Vera Cruz. She fell a prey to lingering 
consumption lasting 22 months and died in Oct. 1847 at the age of 
33 jears. She was never married. 



Chapter III. 

Sec. UIII. 



Peter Baumgartner. (Third (lenerationt. 

Peter entered the arena of time, in Jura. Mudcrichgraben. ( )!)er- 
amt Courtelary, I'anton Hern. Switzerland. June '•. 1"-14. In Swit;:- 
erland he learned wag^on making' under one Amstutz. In is.^r he 



l,JJ^tHL^l..J^^J 





c 



^ 



^ 



't-\ 



I'ri. % la'linMi'i t«nrii- .ifff* 



Peter ar.i Verera BaumL;artner 



Descendants of Deacon David Baumgartner 95 

immig^rated to America, first settling- in Wayne Co., Ohio, but in 
1839 he moved to French township, Adams Co., Ind., two miles 
southeast of Vera Cruz, Ind. He was united in marriage with 
Verena Bassinger, of Putnam Co., Ohio, Feb. 4, 1843. She was 
born in Elsace, Germany, July 2. 1821. From a statement of his fath- 
er in his letter to friends, he followed the carpenter trade while in 
Ohio, and after his removal to Indiana, he more or less continued the 
trade. He also was to some extent a cabinet maker, and made fine 
farming implements, such as hay-forks, rakes, and ax-handles, 
baskets and flax-ropes. He was an all-around handy man. Soon 
after arrivino: in Indiana he bought an 80 acre heavy timbered piece 
of land, at above named place, and cleared it up. Later he bought 
another 40 acre piece of timber adjoining his farm on the west, and 
one piece of 3<) acres adjoining the east half on the south. His built 
was medium height, round shouldered, full chested, somewhat cor- 
pulent and light complected. In his habits he was industrious, hon- 
est and economic. He took pride in keeping his farm and fences 
look well. His orchard was always neatly trimmed. 

Both he and his wife were staunch and loyal members of the 
Mennonite Church to the end of their earthly career. He was also 
one of the trustees of the Church-building that stood on his farm, 
on the northeast corner; and acted for many years as janitor thereof. 
He was a respected citizen and democratic in political yiews. Through 
an accident he became ruptured, which gave him at times no little 
sutfering and inconvenience. He lived on his farm until death, when 
he hopefully passed into the celestial world, Nov. '*, 1SS2, His de- 
mise was caused by inflammation of the bowels and congestion of the 
lungs. 

His wife died of lingering consumption Oct. 2, 1S86. With great 
patience and resignation she bore her long suffering. She lived a 
godly life, which no doubt left a strong religious Impress upon the 
minds of their children. The writer of this sketch, in his early 
Christian life, often received religious encouragement from her. He 
was permitted not a great while prior to her death, by her special 
request, to preach to her and many old acquaintances, in her home, 
one Sunday afternoon. This was in the summer of iSSfi, while the 
writer was home from college. It was one of his first efforts at 
preaching, and he will not forget the good spirit that pervaded this 
meeting, and her encouraging parting words, which proved to be 
the last to him. To this union were born, on the farm, the follow- 
ing children: — 



96 Historical Sketches of Seven Generations 

(A). Marianna Baumgartner, (Fourth Generation). 

Marianca -was born Julj 12, 1845. Her life was of a few years, 
dying of typhoid fever Au^. 6, 1S5'). This was a great loss to them. 
She was a good girl. 

(B). Jonathan Baumgartner, (Fourth Generation). BluEFton, Ind. 

Jonathan began the trials of life Dec. 1*», 1846. Opportunities 
for an education were limited in his boyhood days, neither, as he 
said, did he care for an education, just as many others in those days. 
He became a member of the "Mennonite Church at the age of fifteen. 
After he was of age he followed the carp-enter trade for nineteen 
years, four years from 1891 — 4, in Ft. Wayne, Ind. His first mar- 
riage was to Maria Ann Shoemaker, Sept. 7, 1873. Rev, J. K. 
Trover, of the Evangelical Church, of Vera Cruz, united them. She 
was born Dec. 7, 1842, in Reading, Ptnn., and died in Vera Cruz, 
where they lived, Sept. 19, 1888. She was a respected member of 
the Ev. Association at the time of her marriage uBtil death. He 
was converted after marriage under Rev. J. K. Troyer and also 
united with her Church. To them was born: — 

1. Charles Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation). Bluffton, Ind. 

Charles was born Dec. 21, 1877 in Vera Cruz, Ind. He was mar- 
ried to Mary Oxcly, Bluffton, Ind. He and his wife later parted. 

Jonathan was married the second time to EHzibeth Meyer, May 
20, 1893, by Rev. H. Heuser, of the Reformed Church, in Vera Cruz, 
Ind,, of which she was a member. In 1905 he united with her 
Church. They now live on his farm one mile up the river from 
Vera Cruz on the west side. To them are born at that place two 
sons: — 

1. Oral S., May 5, 1S95. (Fifth Generation). 

2. Dewey A., July 8. 1898. 

(C). David Henry Baumgartner, (Fourth Generation). 

David H. was born, Oct. 18, 1848, and died Aug. . . xbiS. 



Descendants of Deacon David Baumgartner 



97 



(D). 



Anna Baumgartner, (Amstutz), Beer, (Fourth Generation), 
Berne, Indiana. 

Anna was born May 11, 1850. 
She has a meager education. 
She had many spiritual conflicts 
brought on by a conduct, for 
which her conscience condemned 
and depressed her, and led her 
into great and sudden fears, and 
a realization of the need of a 
better life. She was married to 
Abraham R. Amstulz, April 27, 
1884, by Rev. S. F. Sprunger. 
He was born in Oberamt Futschy, 
Canton Bern, Switzerland, June 
15, 1853. He came to America 
in 1S7*», settling first in Pandora, 
Ohio. After marriage they lived 
on a farm a few miles north of 
Berne, Ind. Later they moved 
to Tippecanoe, Ind., where he 
soon afterwards died, Feb. 24, 
1890. They were both Menno- 
nites. To them are born near 




Noah 



Amstutz 
Mrs. Anna K. Beer. 



Berne, Ind., the following children: — 

1. Noah £dv/ard Amstutz, (Fifth Generation), Bluffton, Ohio. 
Noah E. was born May 21, 1885. He reached the 8th grade in 

school, when he had to look out for himself. From his 8th year on 
he worked six years lor Wm. R. Lehman, then two years for his 
uncle David Moser, then two years as printer, and since Dec. 3, 1*»05 
he works on a farm in Allen Co.. Ohio. lie is a member of the Re- 
formed ('hurch since May 15, 1903. 

2. William Adam Amstutz, (Fifth Generation), Geneva, led. 

R. F. D. 



William A. was born July 13, 18S< 
his life. 



Writer has no account of 



3. Annette Amanda Amstutz, (Fifth Generation), BlulTton. O. 

Annette A- was born July 13, 1SS'». She is a "Hello" Telephone 
girl. She has worked at this work since r''04, for a ■while in Berne, 
Ind., then in Bluffton, Ohio. 

Anna was married the second time to Christian Beer, of Berne, 
Ind., Oct. 10, l'*02, by Kev. E H. \'ornho!i, who was tlieu pastor of 
the Berne Reformed Church. She now enjoys a comfortable living. 

: 



98 Historical Sketches of Seven Generations 

(E). Christian Wilhelm Baumgartner, (Fourth Generation), Berne, 
Ind. 

The subject of this sketch was born Dec. 7, 1851. At the age of 
20 he united with his parents' Church. He alwajs was industrious 
and economic in his habits of life. After reaching the age of twenty- 
one, he engaged in carpenter work, and subsequently became regular 
contractor of houses, barns, etc. His brother Peter later became a 
partner with him. Not believing that it was good for man to be 
alone he took the marriage vow with Caroline Riesen, March 9, 1879, 
by authority of Rev. S. F. Sprunger in the Meanonite church that 
stood on his father's farm. Soon after marriage he bought an 80 
acre farm, mostly heavy timber, about one mile S. E. of Berne. Here 
they have lived ever since, and all of their children were born here. 
They are both devoted members of the Church, having experienced a 
conscious change of heart through faith in Christ's atonement for 
their sins. His religious inclinations are strong, and zealously en- 
gages in the Master's work. In this he possesses his mother's nature 
and disposition. He is at present, 1906, one of the Deacons in the 
Church. His school privileges were also limited for want of good 
schools and from lack of time. He has become a very successful 
farmer, and is now comfortably situated. Their union was blessed 
with the following children:— 

1. Bertha Amelia Baumgartner, Michaud, (Fifth Generation), 

Berne. Ind. 

Bertha A. stepped into this world May 9, 1880- She enjoyed 
good district school privileges. She became a member of the Menno- 
nite Church in Berne Mar. 23, 1894. She gave her hand in marriage 
to Justin Michaud Nov. IT, 1901. He was born Jan. 25, 1876 in Vera 
Cruz, Ind. His occupation is barbcring and auctioneering. They 
live in Berne. To them are born: — 

a. Howard Henry, Oct. 12, 1902. Sixth Generation. 

b. Lores Christian, Aug. 28, 1906. " " 

2. Gideon William Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation). 
Gideoa W. was born Dec. 5, issi, and died March 3, 1882. 

3. Cordelia Ella Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation), Berne, Ind. 
Cordelia ^" ; "tpred the sphere of earthly activities, March 1, 

1883. She became a member of the Mennonite Church in Berne 
April 8, 1898, At iLe present she is clerking in the "Sprunger & 
Lehman Drygoods Store" in Berne, Ind. She has a fair common 
3cbocl e'itvc?.tion. 

4. Emma Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation). 
Emma was tx-ra Dec. 2<>, 1SS4, and died four days old. 



Sii 



Descendants of Deacon David Baumgartner 



99 



5. Sarah Leah Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation). 

Sarah L. started her journey of life Mar. 8, 1886. She has re- 
ceived a fair common school education. She became a member of 
the Mennonite Church Feb- 9, r>02. Her occupation is assisting her 
parents on the farm. 

6. Bernhart Wesley Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation). 
Bernhart W. was born Oct. 11, 1887, and died Jan. 18, 1888. 

7. Elmer Walter Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation). 

Elmer W. entered upon the arena of time Apr. 18, 1890. He has 
had good rural school privileges and made good use of them. He 
became a member of the Mennonite Church April 2, 1905. 

8. Martha Lina Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation). 

Martha L. found a welcome into this life Apr. 16, 1892. She is 
now availing herself of her school privileges by attending the Berne 
High School, She became a member of the Mennonite Church June 
3. 1906. 

9. Martin \Vilbur Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation). 

Martin W. began the path of life May 25, 1895, and is now get- 
ting an education. 

(D), Peter John Baumgartner, (Fourth Generation), Berne, Ind. 
Hardware Merchant. 



S tiT'aw asg^tf. 



^ 



'et'r J. Baumgartner. 



Peter J. entered upon the trials 
of life Nov. 5, 1853. He formed 
industrious and economic habits 
of life while at home. His school 
privileges were also quite limited. 
In his physique he is the pattern 
of his father. After the age of 
twenty-one he learned the car- 
penter trade, and later became 
partner in contracting for build- 
ing of houses, '--rns, etc, with 
his brother Christian. On Jan. 
24. 1885 he led Bertha S. Saurer 
to the hymenial altar, in the pres- 
ence, of Rev. Otto Vitzof the Re- 
formed Church at Vera Cruz, 
Ind., who united them as one in 
the flesh. She was born one mile 
X. K. of Vera Cruz, Ind., just 
across the Adams Co. line, Julj 



100 



Historical Sketches of Seven Gener-itions 



1 1864. She became a member of the Reformed Church at the age 
of Hjears He united with her church in the year 1S78, and both 
are honored members of the church. He was Deacon of the church 
for four years. He entered into hardware business with his cousm 
Christian Beer in Berne, Ind., in the year lSS3but in the year 1886 
they dissolved partnership, and sold their stock of goods. P^Ur then 
became a clerk in "L. A. Brickly & Son's Hardware Store' , in Bluff- 
ton Ind On Jan. 1. 18SS he and his brother William formed part- 
nership in hardware business in Berne, Ind , under the name -Baum- 
eartner Bros", where they have since carried on their business suc- 
cessfully. Besides hardware they handle agricultural impl.ments 
building material, vehicles, stoves, and are in partnership with Emil 
Liechty in the pump and windmill business. They took Eli Lugin- 
bill in as partner in 1'.'02, changing the firm's name to Baumgartner 
Bros .k Co They are doing an extensive and lucrative business 
along all lines unde'rtaken. They are one of the leading firms in the 
town The firm is known near and far for doing square business 
They are conservative in their undertaking, which is a very essential 
business qualification, for a healthful development in business. Peter 
and his wife are the happy parents of the following children born in 
Betne, led.: — 

1. Homer Howard Baumgartner. (Fifth Generation), Berne, 

Ind. 
Fomer H. was initiated into this world Oct. 29. 1SS5. He has 
enjoyed a good public school education in Berne. Since he quit 
school he helped clerking in his father's store, and worked at odd 
jobs. He is a member of the Reformed Church. 

2. Grover Calvin Baumgartner, ^Fifth Generation), Berne, Ind. 
Grover C. came upon the scene of action Aug. 5, 1887. He also 

enioyed good school privileges. He is a member of the Reformed 
Church. His occupation is clerk in his father s store. 

3 Elroy Peter Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation). 
Elroy P. was born June 6, 18<.2, and died Sept. 20, 1894. 

4 Mahala Bertha Baumgartner. (Fifth Generation). 
Mahala B. was born Kov. 17, 1893 and died Oct. 5, 1894. 

5 lima Etna Baumgartner. (Fifth Generation). 

lima E. v.as born July 17, 1898. She is now a school girl. 

6 Horace George Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation). 
Horace G. was born July 21, 1903. and died Sept. 24, 1904. 



Descendants of Deacon David Bautngarlner 101 



7. Carl Ernst Baumgartn^r, (Fifth Generation). 
Carl Ernst was born Oct. 4, 1W5. 

(E). Mary M. Baumgartner, Moscr, (Fourth Generation), Berne, 
Ind. 
Mary M. entered upon her journej of life Nov. 16, 1856. She 
only had common school advantages. She is quite portly inbuilt. 
She united with the Mennonite Church at the age of 16 years. In 
Dec. 12, 18S0 she was united in marriage with David J. Moser, by 
Kev. Peter Vitz. He was born in Adams Co., Ind., Apr. 14, 1856, 
and died in Berne, Ind., Apr. 10, 1003, where she still lives. After 
marriage they lived for eight years on the old Nusbaum farm about 
six miles N. W. of Berne, which he had bought. In 1892 he sold this 
farm and bought his wife's parents' farm after their death, where 
they lived until he was necessitated to quit farming on account of 
failing health, and sold out and moved to Berne. The following 
children were born to them in French township, Adams Co., Ind. 

1. Emil Moscr, (Fifth Generation). 

Emil was born Jan. 21, iSs:, and died Jan. 21, 1885. 

2. Albert Moser, (Fifth Generation). 

Albert was born Apr. 7, 1883, and died Sept. 2, 1898. He was a 
promising young lad. 

3. Ida Moser, (Fifth Generation), Berne. Ind. 

Ida entered upon the scene of time Sept. 20, 1885. She has en- 
joyed a fair common school education. Her occupation is working 
in the Berne Mfg. Co. of Berne. She is a member of the Mennonite 
Church since May 24, 1903. She is still traveling the single path of 
life. 

4. Matilda Moser, (Fifth Generation), Berne, Ind. 

Matilda began her earthly pilgrimage Jan. 22, 1888. She also 
enjoyed a fair common school education. Her occupation is working 
in Berne Mfg- Co. of Berne. She is a member of the Mennonite 
Church since May 24, 1003. She also is yet single. 

5. Grover Moser, (Fifth Generation), Berne, Ind. 

Grover began the trials of life Feb. 5, 1893. He has enjoyed 
splendid school privileges in the public school of Berne. He is em- 
ployed as a clerk in a drygoods store at Berne. 

6. Emma Moser, (Fifth Generation). 

Emma was born Aug. 7, 1898, and died Dec. 13, 1898, 



lo: 



Historical Sketches of Seven Generations 




(F). William Baumgartner, (Fourth Generation), Berne, Ind. Hard- 
ware Merchant. 

William began his trials of life 
Noy. 2, 1858. He only could at- 
tend district schools. He was 
employed in farming until he en- 
tered hardware business with his 
brother Peter, Jan. 1, 1888. In 
partnership with Samuel Leh- 
man he also was engaged in the 
undertaking business in Berne, 
Ind.. from 18'»2-98, when he sold 
out. He was a member of the 
town council, 3d ward, from 1890- 
96, during which time the Town 
Hall and Fire Engine house was 
built. Like most men he believed 
that marriage was honorable, 
hence be took unto himself, for a 
sharer of his joys and sorrows, 
Wm. Baumgartner. Mary Saurer, Oct. 27, 1881, Rev. 

Petei Vitz, of the Reformed 
Church of Vera Cruz, Ind., tied the nuptial knot. She was born 
Sept. 8. 18f)l, one mile N. E of Vera Cruz. She died a faithful mem- 
ber of the Reformed Church in Berne, Ind., Feb. 11, 1893. She was 
confirmed and taken into church at the age ot 15. On her deathbed 
she found peace in God through faith in Christ's atonement for her. 
He united with her Church after marriage in the year 1882 and was 
since an esteemed member thereof, holding important ofl&ces as fol- 
lows: 4 years as Deacon and 12 as Elder and at present, 1906, he is 
one of the Trustees. To this union were born: — 

1. Otto Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation). Berne, Ind. 

Otto entered life's pathway Aug. 25, 1882. He enjoyed good 
school privileges. He is a member of the Reformed Church in Berne 
since Mar. 31, 1899. He does general work. Re is yet single. 

2. George W. Baumgartner, (F'ifth Generation). 
George W. was born Nov. 11, 18S4, and died June 7, 1>^85. 

3. Delia A. Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation). 

Delia A. was born Mar. 25, 1886, and died May 6, 1890. 

4. Walter A. Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation). 

Walter A. first saw the light of this world Aug. 10, 1890. He 



Descendants of Deacon David Baumg-artner 



103 



was baptized an infant. He died May 4, 1898. 

5, Victor H. Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation). 

Victor H. was born Feb. 3, 1S93, and died 20 days old.. 

On Apr. 19, 1894, William again entered the marriage bond with 
Maria Soldner, Rev, B. Ruff, of the Reformed Church in Berne,' Ind., 
officiating. She was born a few miles S. W. of Berne, Sept. 2, 1864. 
She was baptized when IS years old in the Mennonite Church. After 
marriage she united with the Reformed Church in Berne, Ind. All 
his children were baptized in infancy. To them are born in Berne 
the following-:— 



Henry, 

died, 

Leonard, 

Willis, 

Edison, 

Oscar, 



Feb. 4, 1895. 
11 days old. 
Feb. 20, 1897. 
Sept. 15, 1899. 
June 12, 1901. 
June 3, 1908. 



(Fifth Generation). 



(G). John Philip Baumgartner, (Fourth Generation), Ft. Wayne, 
Ind. 

John P. was initiated into the. 
trials of this world Jan. 14, 1861. 
He obtained a fair common 
school education, and attended 
one winter the graded school in 
Lion Grove, Ind., and one term 
the Normal County school at De- 
catur. He was in his school 
days quite a noted speller in the 
oldfashioned spelling schools, of- 
ten coming out best. He re- 
mained on the farm until in the 
Fall of 1887, when he took a trip 
to Oregon, Washington and Cal- 
ifornia for his health. ,. ^'^i 
the sceneries of the snow-capped 
mountains, and waterfalls, and 
the PaciSc Ocean, and visited the 
cities of Tacoma, Portland, 
Salem, San Francisco with its 
golden gate park, besides orange 
groves, vineyards etc. He re- 
turned home in the Fall of 1888 much improyed in health. He en- 
tered the machinist work, in partnership with A. Moser, in Berne, 




. 1 



Myrtle 

Josephine and John P. Baumgartner 

Ltonel. 



104 



Historical Sketches of Seven (jcnerations 



Ind., in Is'tS. Hut ajj^ain on account of failinj,-^ health, sold Ins in- 
terest in ls'»s. He then hired out as janitor of the iJerne Public 
School building-, and held this position until 1'mii. when he took up 
general work. On Nov. 17. l^'t.^ he was united in marriage with 
Josephine KitTe. by Kov. I>, KulT. of the Reformed Church in Kerne. 
She was born Nov. 12. lsi,'». m Adams Co., Ind. He became a mem- 
ber of the Reformed Church in IL-rne. Ind.. in 1^'tv The)- m'^ived 
to Ft. Wayne. Ind., Sept. 2ti. I'mm,. where he is now assisting in the 
construction of cement block buildings. To them were born in 
Berne. Ind.. 

1. Myrtle S., Sept. S, IS'ti,. (Fifth C.eneration ). 

2. Leonel E.. Dec. 7, l''0.>. 




W;!liam F. anJ Kalhanr.e Staffer 
Delia Howard 

Heiinan Ka'p^^ 



lU. Kalharina Bau'.iit^ariner. Stager, i l-'ourth ( '.cnL ration). IJ'.uiT- 
tOD. ( )hio. 
Katharina began the trials of life May 2-. 1^.,; She only at- 
tended district s.liools. Siie was married to \Vm. I' Stager, of 
IJlulTtcn. Ohio, Feb. 22. l^'".. Rev. 11. Ruli. of Heme. Ind.. oth;iat- 
ing. He was born in Richland Co.. < Miio, Julv 2. >.-^. He followed 
farming near HlulTton, Ohio, until I'cc ^. l'"'.^. wlien they moved in- 



Descendants of Deacon David Baumgartner 105 



to Bluffton. The following children were born to them:— 

1. A daughter, Feb. 23, 1897. (Fifth Generation). 
Died a few dajs old. 

2. Delia K., Nov. 11, 1898. 

3. Howard W., Aug. 30, 1900. " ♦' 

4. Ralph E., Aug. 15, 1903. " •♦ 

5. Herman F., Sep. 26, 1905. *' '• 



Chapter III. 

Sec. IX. 



Elizabeth Baumgartner, Beer, (Third Generation). 

Elizabeth was born in Jura 
Buderichgraben, Oberamt Court- 
elary, Canton Bern, Switzer- 
land, July 2f>, 1816. She came 
to America with her parents, and 
first settled in Wayne Co., Ohio. 
Here she met Christian Beer and 
entered marriage life with him 
in 1837. He was a son of Chris- 
tian Beer and his wife Barbara, 
who, was an Ingold. He was 
born Mar. 10, 1812 on Sonnen- 
berg, Oberamt Muenster, Canton 
Bern, Switzerland. He died 
Apr. 13, 1850, in Wajne Co., 
Ohio, of cancer of the throat. 
He came to Wayne Co., O., in 
1824. Mrs. Beer with her family 
moved to Vera Cruz, Wells Co., 
Ind., in the spring of 1853. She 
remained a member o\ the Mennonite Church until about 1877 when 
under the pastorate of Rev. Enos R. Troyer she united with the 
Eyangelical Association at Vera Cruz, Ind., and remained an ac- 
ceptable and faithful member until she fell asleep in Jesus in Bluff- 
ton, Ind., Feb. 7, lS9ti, v.'here she lived the last few years, keeping 
house for her son W^illiam. She was a great admirer of garden 
flowers and house plants, and always had a great plenty of them 
summer and winter. This fact accounts for her being named by her 
familiar friends, "Biuroen Lizzie." She was corpulently built, and 
possessed a cheerful and amiable disposition. This fact made her 
many intimate friends. The following named children were the fruit 
of their union, all born in Wayne Co., Ohio, viz: — 

(A). Marian Beer, North, (Fourth Generation), Portland, Ind. 

Marian's earthly pilgrimage dates from Dec. 20, 1838. Her op- 
portunities to obtain an education were limited owing to poor school 
privileges and the necessity of working to make a living. She was 




Mrs. Elizabeth Beer. 



Descendants of Deacon David Baumgartner 107 

always industrious and followed general sewing among people, aside 
doing general housework. The mythical cupid of love aided Isaac 
North, of Vera Cruz, by degrees to twine his cords of love about her, 
to which she readily responded, which resulted in a marriage union on 
Apr. 20, 1862. He was born in Cumberland Co., Penn., July 15. 
1839. He obtained a fair education. For many years he had an in- 
terest in the Vera Cruz Grist Mill with other men, finally he became 
sole owner of it. But on account of a new Roller process that every- 
where came into use, and the town being disadvantageously located, 
for any kind of business, he considered it imprudent to introduce the 
new process, and therefore he sold out all his property in town, and 
moved to Portland, county-seat of Jay Co., Ind., February 1895, 
where he bought a house and feed-barn and is doing a prosperous 
business. She was converted to God under the labors of Rev. Geo. 
Roederer, pastor of the Evangelical Church at Vera Cruz, Ind,, 
where she also united, and remained an acceptable member until 
their removal to Portland, where she is now a member of the same 
Church in good standing. She is a portly woman and an affection- 
ate mother. Their home was blessed with the following children, all 
born in Vera Cruz, Ind., viz. — 

1. Albert Edwin North, (Fifth Generation), Xendallville, Ind. 
Albert E. began the struggle of life Jan. 8, 1863. He obtained 

a good graded school education, in Vera Cruz, Ind., where he also 
taught school afterwards for a while. Here he also attended the 
Sunday-school of his mother's Church, learning some German. There 
being no work in town to give a young man steady employment, and 
a chance to make something of oneself, he went to Bluffton, Ind., 
and clerked in a store for some time. Later, in the year 1894 he 
moved to Markle, Ind., and took charge for eleven years of the Studa- 
baker Sale & Co., which under his management did a lucrative busi- 
ness. In 1906 he removed to Garret, Ind., where he engaged in 
saw milling. He was married to Isabelle Gromer, Dec. 21, 1898 at 
Jackson, Michigan, by G. R. Foster. She was bore Oct. 10, 1863 in 
Frankfort, Herkimer Co., N. Y. She is identified with the M. E. 
Church, since 1897. In Oct. 1*^7 they moved to Kendallville, Noble 
Co., Ind., where he entered partnership with his uncle Wm. Beer, 
and his brother Daniel, as hardware merchants. 

2. Levi McClellen North, (Fifth Generation). 
Levi was born Aug. 8, 1864, and died Nov. 11, 1864. 

3. Daniel Oscar North, (Fifth Generation), Kendallville, Ind. 
Daniel O. found a welcome to this world, Oct. 9, 1865. He re- 
ceived a good graded school and Normal school education in Vera 



108 Historical Sketches of Seven Generations 

Cruz and Bluflfton, Ind. He also took a course in Indianapolis Busi- 
ness College. He was a successful school teacher, which profession 
he followed for twelve terms. From 1S94 to IS'JS he served as deputy 
surveyor of Wells Co., Ind. From 189S to 1902 he served an oil com- 
pany as oil guager. In Nov. 1902, he was elected to the surveyorship of 
Wells Co., Ind, which office he held for four years. In 190f) he moved 
to Garret, where he did city engineering. He never became identi- 
fied with any church, but in his boyhood days he attended the Sun- 
day-school of his mother's church in Vera Cruz, Ind. He was mar- 
ried to Arlie A. Brickley, of Biuffton, Ind., Oct. 10, 1902. She was 
born in Lancaster township, Wells Co, Ind., Nov. S, 1876. They 
have one daughter, 

a. Roberta, Aug. 19, 1906. (Sixth Generation). 

4. Sarah Agnes N'^rth, (Fifth Generation). 

Sarah A. was born July 15, 1867, and died Dec. 6, 1874. She 
was a bright girl. 

5. Charles Benjamin North, (Fifth Generation), Portland. Ind. 
Charles B. began his earthly career May iS, 186'}. He obtained 

a fair graded school education in Vera Cruz, Ind. He attended Sun- 
day-school iti Lis mother's Church in aforenamed place. In 1S9.> 
he moved with his pirents to Portland, Ind. Here he met Emma R. 
Rees, a sister of R^:v. John Rees of the Evangelical Association, and 
was married to her July 16. 1899. She was born near Wordington. 
Dark Co., Ohio, Feb. 10, 1872. They live on her mother's farm near 
Portland, where he is farming. She is a member of the Evangeli- 
cal Association in Portland, Ind. To them are born, — 

a. Marian Pauline, Nov. 18, 1901. (Sixth Generation). 

b. Carl Isaac, Sep. 18, 1905. 

6. Mary Frances North, (Fifth Generation), Chicago, 111., 

Dressmaker. 
Mary F. commonly called, "Fannie", began her journey of life, 
Apr. 1. 1871. She received a good graded school education in Vera 
Cruz, Tnd. She also has a fair musical schooling both vocal and instru- 
mec:_.. She served as organist of the Evangelical Church in \ era 
Cruz for quite a number of years. She was converted to God under 
the labors of Rev. Bruckart, in 1889, and united with the Ev. Asso- 
ciation in aforenamed place, and still is a faithful member of the 
same, in Portland, Ind., to which place she moved with her parents. 
She is now largely deprived of her own church privileges owing to 
her 'oeing away from home most all the time. Since she moved to 
Portland she has successfully followed dressmaking. For some 
years she has followed her trade in Chicago among the wealthy peo- 



Descendants of Deacon David Baumgartner 109 

pie with great ability and success, earning large wages. Thus far 
she has preferred to travel her path of life alone. Her address is 
1)700 Wentworth Ave. Chicago. . 

7. William Harrison North, (Fifth Generation), Bellingham, 

Wash., Civil Engineer. 
William H. came upon the scene of action Dec. 25, 1873. After 
finishing the graded school of Vera Cruz, Ind., he pursued a course 
of civil engineering in "Purdue Universitj*' at Lafayette, Ind. 
Since l'>05 he has followed civil engineering in Chicago, with 
splendid ability and success. He is not married. He went west 
Sept. 9, 1906, and is now at Bellingham, Wash., and will be in that 
section of this country for an indefinite period. 

8. and 9. Anna Minerva North, Mendenhall, and Emma Eliza- 

beth North, (Fifth Generation). 
Anna M. and Emma E. entered the path of life Nov. 24, 1875. 
Emma died Sept. 17, 1879. Anna grew up and received a good edu- 
cation in Vera Cruz, Ind. She successfully taught public school for 
several terms. She gave her hand in marriage to Wm. Foreman 
Mendenhall, Dunkirk, Ind., Dec. 26, 1902. They reside in Terre 
Haute, Ind., where Mr. Mendenhall is employed as book keeper in 
North Baltimore bottle glass factory. The following children found 
welcome into their home:— 

a. Frances North, (Sixth Generation). 
Died one week old. 

b. Willa Francis, Feb. 2, 1903. " " 

c. Florence Minerva, Jan. 26, 1905. *' " 

d. John Isaac, Nov. 10, 1906. " ♦' 

(B). John Beer, (Fourth Generation). 

John began bis brief career in life Jnly 4, l>i-i«i. ^nd die^ Mav 
5, 1855. 

(C.) Benjamin Beer, (Fourth Generation). 

Benjauiin began the con.Hiris of life July I-"' 1842. TTi>. , o-.-:^,. 
tional privileges were also limited ov^ing to poor schools, aii.! little 
time. He was a coppersmith by trade. He made the ro^Dbter en the 
tower Oi tuc Keioriiicu v^Liurcu ».^ _ wik._. ^^^., wLicu Las ;>civeu 

as a weatbervane for many years. When the Civil War was on in 
the United States, be volunteered as a substitute, and as a soldier 
experienced many hardships, but suffered willingly for *': r."'" "^^ 
his country. TT^ was united in mairirige vviih Emma r»i:iG; "'^ 
Springfield, 111., Oct., 1870. They lived in this pla'— for a nmabrr 
of years, then ti;ej moved to Aurora, 111.. later thej u:cv£d tc 



110 Historical Sketches of Seven Generations 

Chicago, where he died of typhoid fever in 1898. She was born in 
New Jersey in 1SS2. She is now living in Chicago. The following 
children were born to this union: — 

1. May Beer, Friend, (Fifth Generation), Chicago, 

May began her earthly life in Springfield, 111., June 6, 1872. She 
obtained a good education in Aurora, 111. She became the wife of 
Joseph Friend, Aug. 18. 18% in New York city. They now reside 
in Chicago, 111. 

2. Aldine Beer, Coles, (Fifth Generation), Chicago. 

Aldine began the trials of life in SpringSeld, 111., Aug. 6, 1877. 
She received a good education in the Chicago schools. She was 
united with Romulus Coles, of Chicago, 111., May 31, 1>01. They 
■ also leside in Chicago. 

3. Charles Albert Beer, (Fifth Generation), Chicago. 

Charles A. entered the activities of this life in Aurora, 111., 
Nov. 23, 1887. He also has enjoyed good school privileges in 
Chicago. 

4. Elirscr Burton Beer, (Fifth Generation). 

Elmer B. was born in Chicago, Nov 1889, and died April 16, 

1890. 

(D). Elizabeth Beer, Gilliom, (Fourth Generation), Indianapolis, 
Indiana. 
Elizabeth entered the shifting scenes of life Apr. 1, 1844. She 
oaly received a limited education owing to poor school privileges. 
When grown to womanhood she followed sewing and general house- 
work. When Adam Gilliom fully realized that it was not good for 
man to be alone, like Adam in Eden, he found his Eye in Elizabeth 
Beer who gave him her hand in marriage Mar. 28, 18b4. He was 
born in Wayne Co., Ohio, Feb. 8, 1835 They lived in Vera Cruz, 
Ind., one year, then they moved to Warren, Ind., where, they lived 
one year. From here they moved to Bluffton, Ind,, where he was 

engaged in In the year they moved to Minnesota, 

and remained there.. ..years. From there they moved back to Vera 
Cruz, Ind. But in the year they moved to Hickory Co., Mis- 
souri, where they lived three years. Here he was in general mer- 
chandize business. From here they again moved back to Vera Cruz, 
Ind.. and he was chiefly engaged in overseeing farming. In 1892 they 
moved to Decatur, Ind., where he was in the shoe business and gen- 
eral merchandise. They again sold out, moved to Indianapolis in 
1902 where they live a retired life. The old adage "that a rolling 



Descendants of Deacon David Baumgartner 111 



stone does not f?ather moss," did not come true in their oft moving, 
but usually resulted in financial improvement for them. Adam,* 
though not possessing much of an education, had a keen and practi- 
cal eye for business, and in all his business enterprises developed 
marked success. He also had a practical eye for successful farming 
She was first a member of the Reformed Church in Vera Cruz Ind 
But under the labors of Rev. E. K. Troyer, she became a member of 
the Evangelical Association of the above named place. This was in 
1877. He was converted to God under the labors of Rey. J. H 
Evans in 1S91, and also united with her Church. They are now 
honored members of the First Church of the Ev. Association in In- 
dianapolis, Ind. The following Children were born to this union:- 

1. Priscilla A. Gilliom. Marsh, (Fifth Generation), Kokomo. 
Indiana. 

Priscilla A. entered upon the path of earthly activity Sept 24 
1866, in BluflFton, Ind. She received a good graded school education! 
Also had the opportunity of attending the Bluflfton Normal School 
She taught one term of public school. Then she became tbe wife of 
William Marsh July 3, 1886. He was born Oct ... . 1862 in Wells Co 
Ind., near the Salem Evangelical Church. He obtained a good edul 
cation, and taught eight terms of school with great acceptability 
Then he became partner with Wm. Mertz in the Druggist business 
in Uniondale, Huntington Co., Ind. Later he bought out his part- 
ner. And soon thereafter he sold out his business and bought out 
Dr. Buell's Drug Store in Bluffton, Ind., until he became deputy 
Auditor of Wells Co., Ind.. which position he held for eight years 
Then he was cashier of the "Wells Co. Bank" for one year. In 1901 he 
was again elected as Auditor of above named county and held the 
office for four years. In vm they moved to Kokomo where he be- 
came cashier of the "Kokomo National Bank". They are members 

of the M. E. Church, since To them was born one son, 

a. Prof. Howard Waring Marsh, (Sisth Generation). 

Howard W. began his journey in life Aug. 16, 1888 He is a 
graduate of the Bluffton High School. He also attended several 
years the "Purdue University" in Lafayette. Ind., stuaring civil en- 
g.ncenng and is now in the "Chicago University" completing his 
work. He IS a bright young man with a bright future before him 
He IS a teacher of vocal music in Denison College (Baptist) Granville' 
Ohio. ' 

2. Emma Louise Gilliom, (Fifth Generation), Book-keeper 

Indianapolis, Ind. ' 

Emma L. started her voyage of life in Vera Cruz, Ind July 3 

1869. She availed herself of the opportunities of obtaining a good 



112 Historical Sketches of Seven Generations 



education. After having completed the graded school work in Vera 
Cruz, she attended two terms of Normal School work in BlufiFton, 
Ind. She taught one terra of school when fourteen jears old. Later 
she went to Ft. Wayne, Ind., attending the "Ft. Wajne Internation- 
al Business College" and made an unprecedented record, completing 
the full course in one year. This fact accounts for her having become 
a member of the faculty of the college, immediately after graduation. 
She was promoted to the principalship of the Short Hand depart- 
ment, which position she held for three years, giving excellent satis- 
faction. After a short interim of two years for rest at her parental 
home at Decatur, Ind., she went to Indianaj>olis, Ind., entered the 
"Indianapolis Business University" and graduated from it in 1901. 
Since then she has been in the employ of a great monetary concern, 
"The Marion Trust Co.," as chief book-keeper, giving excellent 
satisfaction. 

She was converted to God in a Campmeeting ot the Evangelical 
Association, held in John Schaupp's woods about a mile east of Linn 
Grove, Ind., in the summer of ISSS, and united with the Evangelical 
Association, and has been an honored member ever since. She is 
now identiOed with the Grace Church of the aforesaid Association, 
in Indianapolis. She was elected a member of the Board of Trustees 
of said Church, at its organization, served five years, and was secre- 
tary of the Board. Sue has undoubtedly the distinction of being 
the first woman in the Church who held the office of a trustee. She 
is also otherwise actively engaged in the Church. The fruits of her 
labors of love in the church are visible, and her efforts much appre- 
ciated. 

3. Hetty Alice Gilliom, (Fifth Generation), Book-keeper, In- 
dianapolis, Indiana. 

Hetty A. commenced the conflicts of this world in Wheatland, 
Hickory Co., Mo., Mar. 18, 1S71. She also received a good graded 
school education in Vera Cruz, Ind. She was converted to God in a 
Campmeeting of the Eyangelical Association held in John Schaupp's 
woods one mile east of Linn Grove, Ind., and also united with the 
Ev, Association, since which she has remained a respected member 
thereof. Having contracted a severe ailment she was necessitated to 
change climate for a while. From 18'»5 to 1897 she spent her time 
in Montana, and in and about "The National Yellow Stone Park." 
After staying here for two years, she returned to Decatur, Indiana, 
where her parents lived, very much improved in health. Soon there- 
after, 1898, she was employed as book-keeper in "Charles True's 
General Store;" and remained until 1902, when she moved with her 
parents to Indianapolis, Ind. Since 1903 she is a book-keeper of 



Descendanis of Deacon David Baumg-artner n; 



-The Polar Ice and Fuel Co., of Indianapol.s." She now is a mem- 
ber of the First Church of the Ev. Asso. in Indianapolis. 

4. Ard A. Gilliom, (Fifth Generation), Columbus, Ohio 

« ^^,[^ ^^ ^'^f ° '"^ '"'"''^^ '^' P"'^ °^ ''^^ '° ^^^^ Cruz, Ind., June 
f; C .u !° "^^^''^ ^"^^ ''^°°^ privileges. After beine 

through he graded school at Vera Cruz, he attended for a whil- he 
Blufftoa hgh School. He has had a rovi.g spirit, traveling over 
lands and seas practically around the world. The following were 
some of the more interesting places he visited: He sailed from Port! 

Holland, landed in ^ew York and toured the Eastern States H. 
was n^arried to Maud Burdge, of Van Wert, Ohio, June 19, 1898 

busloessr ""'' " ""''""'"' ""'"' "'"^ '^ ''^ ^"^^^^^ - ^^<J^lery 

5. Mary B. Gilliom. Davis, (Fifth Generation), Indianapolis 

Indiana. K^^a. 

1. ;'l.^;^^-/°'"^^'-"P°"^^^^^^"^onife in Vera Cruz, Ind., De'- 
1., 18.9. Sne enjoved good school privileges. She completed the 
third year of high school work in Decatur, Ind. On account of 
phjs,cald,sabintyshewas necessitated to quit school bef^e shl 
could graduate. In this citj, under the pastorate of Rev S B KrW 
pastor of the Evangelical Church, she became converted to God and 
united with the Church, and has since remained a faithful member 
being at present a member of the First Church of the Ev. Asso Tn 
Indianapolis where She resides. She also obtained a good musical 
education in Indianapolis having attended the "Metropolitan Schoo 

? rot Prof r?" n" ' 'T ''''''' °° ''' P'P^ -^- -^ harmony 
from Prof. Chas. Hanson. For one year she officiated at the pine or^^n 
of the First Church in the Ev. Asso. in Indianapolis. She wTuaUed 
in marriage with Constantine Davis, March 7 1907 H. u 

in Marion, Ind.. Dec. -0 lS7h He s . fr, Iv , ^' ^°" 

T A- 1- '. ^^- -^' ^^'^- -lie is a traveling salesman for the 

Church." " "' '''■■ ^' '^ ' "=""" "' "=' M. E 

(E), Samuel Beer, (Fourth Generation). 

Samuel was born July 13, 1845, and died Sept. 3, 1845. 
(F). Daniel Beer, (Fourth Generation), Lumber Dealer 

Daniel began his earthly career, Aug. 12, 1S46. He received a 
common school education. During the Civil War in our coun Ihe 
volunteered as a substitute soldier. While at Nashville, Tenn be 
was nearly starving for want of food. He wrote home to his f'olk! 
or help lest he should die. which was gladly complied with 
He was married, (name of his wife and date of marriage could nl^^ 



114 Historical Sketches of Seven Generations 

found out), and lived for some time in Tower, Minn. To them were 
born the following sons: — 

1. Donald, (Fifth Generation). 

2. Walter, " 

3. Gordon, " " 

His wife died 1895. He married ag-ain a lady from Minneapolis, 
Minn., about a year ago. They now live somewhere in northwestern 
Canada, where he is engaged in the lumber business. 

(G ) Christian Beer, (Fourth Generation), Bluffton, Ind. 

Christian's journey in life dates from May 21, 1848. He also only 
received a common school education. He was a general day-laborer 
during most of bis single life. On July 5, 1874 he was united in 
marriage to Aldine Sunier, of Vera Cruz, Ind. She was born July 
28, 1851. and was a daughter of Sunier, the merchant in the golden 
days of Vera Cruz. His occupation is farming one mile southeast of 
Bluffton, Ind., where he owns a good farm lying on the south side of 
the Wabash river. Before farming he was conducting a hardware 
store in Berne, Ind. The following children have graced their 
home: — 

1. Emma C. Beer, (F'ifth Generation). 

Emma C. was born Jan. 26, 1876, and died Aug. 20, 1878. 

2. Lorene H. Beer Daugherty, Fifth Generation). 

Lorene H. began her journey of life Aug. 20. 1877. She has re- 
ceived a good education. She was converted to God and united with 
the M. E. Church. She became the wife of Charles B. Daugherty 
May 5, I89f.. He was converted to God in an evangelistic meeting 
conducted by evangelist Ried in the M. E. Church in Bluffton, Ind., 
in the winter of 1905 and also united with the M. E. Church. He 
soon thereafter felt called to preach the Gospel of Christ. He ap- 
plied to the North M. E. Conference for license to preach, which 
was granted him. He applied for a field of labor and Hoagland 
charge, north of Ft. VTayne, was assigned him, which he served ac- 
ceptably for two years. At the conference session in the spring of 

1907 he v.-as assigned to • • • • They are both much 

interested in religious work. To them were born in Bluffton, Ind., 

a. Martha A., Nov. 24, 1896. Sixth Generation). 

b. Grace. Oct. 30, 1898. 

c. Donald E., Mar. 7, 1901. 

3. Celestine E. Beer, Armbrecht, (Fifth Generation), Bluffton, 

Ind. 
Celestine E. entered the arena of life Mar. 31, 1879. She also 



Descendants of Deacon Dayid Baumgartner 115 



received a good education. For some time she was clerking in one 
of the stores in Bluffton. She entered upon the path of matrimonial 
life with Roj Armbrecht, Aug. 8, 1905. He is a painter and paper 
hanger by trade, he also works in a laundry at times. He was bom 
Aug. 8, 1884, Both are respected members of the Six-Mile New- 
light Christian Church, about two miles southeast of Bluffton. 

4. Edward A. Beer, (Fifth Generation), Soldier. 

Edward A. commenced his earthly life Apr. 15, 1881. He also 
received a good education. He followed farming until he resolved 
to become a soldier in the Regular Army of the United States, and 
did service for three years, most all the time in the distant Philippine 
Island. He returned home in 1006. He then applied to the United 
States for a Rural mail route from BluflFton, Ind., in which he was 
successful. He only went out a few times when he contracted a fatal 
ailment, pneumonia, from which he died Jan. 26, 1907. 

5. Mary S. Beer, (Fifth Generation), Clerk, Biuflfton, Ind. 
Mary S. was welcomed to this life July 24, 1884. She has also 

obtained a good education. She followed clerking in a store in Bluff- 
ton for a while. But having learned stenographic work she applied 
for a position as stenographer for "Davenport and Ely", which posi- 
tion she obtained, and is now, l')07, engaged as such. She is also a 
member of the Six-Mile Christian Church, two miles southeast of 
BluflFton. 

6. An infant son was bom Dec, 19, 1896, and died four days 

later. ^ 

(H). William Beer,(Fourth Generation), Mercbant,Kendallville,Ind. 
William entered upon the realities of this life Aug. 6, 1850. He 
succeeded in obtaining a fair education. From 1867 to 1872 he worked 
on the carpenter trade, then to 1875 he worked at wagon making, 
under David Mosure, in Vera Cruz. Then he went to Bluffton, Ind.^ 
and commenced clerking for "Studebaker & V^eily, Dry Goods 
Store", and remained with them for two years. Then in 1877, he 
returned to Vera Cruz, and clerked for his brotber-in-law Adam 'Gil- 
liom in a "General Merchnat store" until 18S2. Then he again went 
to Bluffton, and entered _.c. "Shoe-business" with Mr. Sunier and re- 
mained for four years. Then until 1S<*2 he followed general work, 
when he began clerking for "Justus, Rogers, and Biel Hardware 
Store", then for their successors "Justus and Rogers", then "Rogers 
A: Cole", and in l'»07, "Cole i^ Co." He is now Hardware merchant 
in Kendallville, Ind. PoHiically be is democratic. He is a tall, 
well-built man. He is still unmarried. 

(I). Josephine, was by the second marriage of her mother, and died 
3 young girl. 



Chapter III. 

Sec. X. 



Samuel Baumgartner, (Third Generatioa). 181 S— 1881. 

The subject of this sketch entered the arena of life in Jura, 
Buderich-Graben, Oberamt Courtelary, Canton Bern, Switzerland, 
Apr. 17, 1818. Here, and in Langnau and LaChauxde Fonds, where his 
father successively lived, he spent his boyhood days in simplicity, 
poverty and few civil liberties. The country where he lived was 
mountainous, and the tilling of the ground laborious and unproduc- 
tive. School opportunities were few and crude, and from a lack of 
means and time, he had to forego even such as there were. To im- 
prove civil and religious conditions and temporal comforts, he, v?ith 
the rest of his father's family, imigrated to America in the Spring of 
1837, first settled in Wayne Co , Ohio; but in the fall of 1839, he, 
with the rest, moved to Wells Co., Ind. 

Being the youngest of the boys he was soon put out among 
English speaking people, south of the Wabash river, to learn enough 
of their language to do needed business with them. He soon picked 
up sufficient to converse with them and transact business for the 
rest of the family. Like in the fatherland, he never had any school 
privileges in this country. However by studying at home, and later, 
after marriage, through bis wife's eflorts, who had a fair German 
education, he became a ready German reader. He was also a lover 
of sacred songs, and readily picked up new songs he heard away 
from home, and then made use of them in religious services at home, 
where he was a leader in congregational singing, for nearly his 
whole life- 

On Apr. 29, 184S, be bought a heavy timbered farm of 80 acres, 
in Fren^ib 'owns^io, Adams Co . two miles S. E. of Vera Cruz, Ind., 
from bis brother Peter for S-OO.OU, The same day be also bought 
20 acres fr^^ Tsaa.- T;- ^ Whining the SO seres on the north nf the 
west half- for $74.00. ^uis was also timberiaod. On Oct. '', ISSZ, 
he^purcna-^cd 40 acrcb from Amos C. Man for $30000 a quarter of a 
. - . rr s,.^i »,^r. ♦r-art<i wprp a Hravv vellow 

clay, hard of cultivation and not very productive. The other was 
lov7 wet, and blue clay with some loam, but very fertile. These 

farms required n::-"- -—'■ '" to clear away the timber and make 

the soil imuie- r-vc; V ^paic n' ■>. •- - „.....^ - -. ^4 ^ 

rails, buildin*' *":^ces, drainip.T for- iand, and tilling the ground. 



Descendants of Deacon David Baumgartner 117 



These were days of hardship, of which the present generation can 
form no real conception. 

At first his sister Maria kept house for him; but in course of a 
few years she was married, leaving- him alone. This neccessitated 
him to look about for a life-companion. He went to Putnam Co., 
Ohio, where there were many Swiss people, and inquired of their 
minister for a suitable wife. At the minister's home, at this time, 
was a young woman, Verena Welty, who was upstairs, busy at 
weaving. She was mentioned as a suitable and industrious person, 
and he acccordingly obtained permission to see her. After intro^ 
ducing himself, they chatted awhile. Presently he revealed to ber 
his real purpose, which found favor with her, and soon they 
had an understanding, an engagement was contracted, and not long 
thereafter, on Feb. 1, 184^, they were married in the home of her 
oldest brother, John Welty, in Allen Co., Ohio. Rev. Christian 
SteJner, of the Swiss Mennonite Church in that place, solemnized 
the marriage. They lived together through joys and sorrows for 
over 32 years, when he died of pleurisy, after only a few days of in- 
tense suffering. Mar. 22, 1881. 

His wife was born in Bagischwand, Lauperswyl, Emmen- 
thal, Canton Bern, Switzerland, on Apr. 25., 1X24. Her father 
John Welty, was born in Leuenberg, Canton Basel, in 17%,' 
and was married to Christina Gerber in 1815. She imigrated to 
America with her older brothers in 1S44, and settled near BluflFtoa, 
Ohio. Her parents with their four youngest children followed in 
loc>5. 

Not being satisfied with their religious life, and unable to find 
the true light in their Church, the Mennonite, as it was then, they 
concluded to visit the services of missionaries of the Evangelical 
Association, who had come into the community, preaching an experi- 
mental religion. They soon received needed light and knowledge, and 
were convinced of the error of their way. They at once began seek- 
ing pardon for ?iB, justification by faith in Christ's atonement, and re- 
generation of the Holy Ghost, instead by trusting in Church ordinan- 
ces, or outward identification with some Church. In 1854 they were 
both happily converted to God under the labors of Rev. John Fuchs. 
Mother first found peace and rest for her soul. Father, after seek- 
ing a long while, was converted on John Gottschalk's farm, near the 
old barn, by a large stump, and a small tree, which has since grown 
to a fcir size. Geo. Gottschalk, according to his testimony to the 
writer, was an eye-witness from the old barn. Both then united 
with the Evangelical As'^ociation at Vera Cruz, Ind., and remained 
faithful members until death. 

Aimost coatlauaily since father's conyersion be held important 



118 Historical Sketches of Seven Generations 

church oflBces. He was class-leader over twenty jears, and also ex- 
horter for awhile, and for years a trustee of the parsonage and the 
church in Vera Cruz. He was scrupulously conscientious in church 
work, ever trying to meet his moral and religious obligations. In 
temporal matters he was industrious, frugal in his habits of life, 
kind and faithful to his family and neighbors. His life adorned his 
Christian profession, and therefore had the confidence and good will 
of the people in general, in and out of the church, and his counsel in 
religious matters was frequently sought. His greatest delight was 
in participating in revival meetings. He often ventured through the 
severest kind of weather to attend the meetings, and assist in win- 
ning souls for Heaven= He always enjoyed the company of minis- 
ters, and loved to converse on religious subjects. His counsel was 
frequently sought by them. When anybody was in trouble, or in 
need of sympathy and help, and it was in his power to render aid, he 
did it cheerfully. It was no uncommon thing for him to be called out, 
by day or ni^ht, by religious scoffers and others, when seriously 
ill, to come and pray for them that God might have mercy on them 
and spare their lives, or save them. 

On account of his religious activities and firmness to his convic- 
tions, he often encountered criticisms from his unenlightened neigh- 
bors, especially when there was a new spiritual awakening. In the 
house of God he loved order and consistency, and not infrequently 
sat among the scoffers, firmly and thoughtfully reprimanded them 
for their misconduct. He was fearless when under the power of the 
Spirit, and no rufSan dared to resist or molest him. In his worship 
he was enthusiastic, at times quite demonstrative, especially when 
he had good hold on God through faith in prayer. His zeal for sav- 
ing souls was constant. He also had a wide circle of friends beyond 
the borders of Newville Circuit. He left a strong religious impress 
upon his children and his neighbors, which was more valuable than 
a legacy of earthly wealth. In worldly store he was limited, but 
yet very liberal in the support of the Gospel, and other worthy ob- 
jects. 

He was almost constantly afflicted, in the last twenty years, 
with chronic rheumatism in the hips, and neuralgic pains, until he 
finally succumbed. In his physique he was broad and square 
shouldered, heavy boned, had a low chest, broad fore head, wide 
chin and mouth, large cheek bones, high-bridged Roman nose, gray 
eyes and black hain He had large hands, and feet requiring No. 11 
shoes, and was five feet and ten inches tall, weighing about ITS 
pwunds. In politics he was first a Democrat, but turned Republican 
on the slavery question, when Abraham Lincoln was first elected to 
the presidency of the United States. He was drafted to do army 



Descendants of Deacon David Baumg-artaer 121 

2. Herman Samuel Beck, (Fifth Generation), Huntington, Ind. 

Herman S. commenced his earthly trip Sept. 20, 1885, near Hunt- 
ington, Ind., on his father's farm. He had good school privileges. 
After attending high school for a while, he concluded to quit and en- 
tered "The Business College" in Huntington, where he attended for 
a while. But having a strong inclination for manual labor, he did 
not finish the business course. He began to work in the Ohio & 
Western Lime Co. Then for a while he clerked in a "Gents Cloth- 
ing'"' store, but not liking this line of work, he waited for an oppor- 
tunity to get in as an apprentice in the machine shop of the Erie 
R. R. located in Huntington. He entered as an apprentice Oct. 
1**05 and has been making rapid progress. His ambition is to be- 
come a master mechanic. His industrious nature will contribute 
much to succeed. 

(C). Caroline Baumgartner, Mos'man, (Fourth Generation), South 
Bend, Indiana. 
Caroline entered upyn the activities of life, Sept. 27, 1856. She 
only received a common school education. She often had a longing 
for a higher school education, but never realized her desires. She 
was converted to God at the age of ten years, also under the labors 
of Rev. J. Fuchs, and united with the Ev. Association in Vera Cruz. 
Her amiable disposition always made her many friends. She is 
gifted in song, and had she had the opportunity of voice culture, she 
would have developed into a first class singer. She gave her hand 
in marriage to Samuel Mosiman, of Vera Cruz, Ind., May 13, 1877, 
Rev. E R. Troyer tied the nuptial knot. He was born at Vera Cruz, 
Ind., Feb. 3, 1856. At the time of marriage he was conducting a 
General Store, in his native town and continued until he sold out in 
1890. On Sept. 25, 1890, he moved with his family to Nappanee, 
Elkhart Co., Ind., where he previously had bought out a partnership 
merchant in a hard>vare store and tinshop. In 18''9 he sold his in- 
terest to \Veiss iV Frevert but remained with the new firm as tinner 
until 1<»02. In r»03 they sold their property in Nappanee, and 
bought in South Bend, Ind., to which place they moved in Novem- 
ber of the same year. In V>04 he aeain took up his trade with 
C. G. Folsom Mfg. Co. In Nappanee he served as town clerk for 2'; 
terms, was also a member of ihe town council for one term. On ac- 
count of his firm stand against the saloon element, he was defeated 
in the election for the second term by one vote. Politically he was 
always a loyal Republican. In Nappanee they started a church so- 
ciety of the Ev. Association with six charter members. Here he 
served as S. S. Supt. for seven years, as class leader ten years and as 
trustee for twelve years, resigning the two latter ofi5ceswhea moving^ 



122 Historical Sketches of Seven Generations 



to South Bend. They are now members of the St. Paul M. E. Church 
in South Bend. They both love spiritual life and an active aggressive- 
ness in church work. She has served as S. S. teacher for 4 jears, 
and he as S. S. treasurer for 3 years in Mizpah Church of the Ev. 
Asso. in S. Bend. Their home v/as made happy with the following 
children, all born in Vera Cruz, Ind , except the two youngest, who 
•were born in Nappanee, Ind,: 

1. Surelda Elmira Mosiman, (Fifth Generation), South Bend, 

Indiana, Clerk. 
Surelda entered the pathway of life Feb. 12, 1878. She received 
a good public school education in Nappanee. After she quit school, 
she took a position as clerk in "Hartman Bro.'s Drygoods and 
Grocery Store,' in Nappanee, giving most excellent satisfaction. She 
remained with them nine jcars, and was the greater part of this 
time the head lady in the store. When her parents moved to South 
Bend, she resigned her place, and also went with them. After rest- 
ing a while from this kind of work, she again took up the work in 
South Bend, first with Happ & Mark, later she took a position with 
McLain & Baird where she has since been, givingentire satisfaction, 
and several times received the offer as forelady, but not wishing to 
resume so great responsibility she declined the offer. Sbe was con- 
verted to God at the age of thirteen and united with the Ev. Asso. at 
Nappanee. where sbe took a prominent part in the Church choir. 
She is deeply religious and devoted to her Church. She is now a 
member of the St. Paul M. E. Church in Souih Bend, Ind. She has 
served as steward for 3 years in Mizpah Church. Thus far she pre- 
ferred traveling the single path of life. 

2. William Henry Mosiman, (Fifth Generation). 

William H. began his short earthly career Dec. 24, 1879, He was 
a bright, affectionate and industrious boj, with strong religious ten- 
dencies. He died of diphtheria in Nappanee, Noy. 4, 18V0. 

3. Lillian Alvina Mosiman, Krause, (Fifth Generation). In- 

dianapolis, Ind. 
Lillian A. found a welcome io this life, April 21, 1882. She re- 
ceived a good public school education in Nappanee, Ind. Then she 
followed general housework, and learned dressmaking, helped out in 
clerking in Hartman Bro.'s Store, where her sister S. clerked, in busy 
seasons and on Saturdays- She accepted Christ as her Savior when 
ten years old, and also became identified with theEv. Association in 
Nappanee, Ind., and was always an active member, sang in the choir, 
and assisted at the organ. In r»02 sbe was sent as delegate from 
their Young People's Alliance, to Oak wood Park Y. P. A. Convea- 



Descendants of Deacon David Bautngartner - 121 

tion, of the Indiana Conference of the Ev. Asso., and received a 
special interest and inspiration in the work, which interest has not 
abated since. Here, in committee work, she met Harry Krause, of 
Indianaf>o!is, which later developed into a loye affair, and then ma- 
trimony, which took place June IS, 1904, her uncle, S. H. Baumgart- 
ner, solemnized the wedding act, a ring ceremony. They live in 
Indianapolis, in their own beautiful home. He was born in Indiana- 
polis, June 30, 1875, He is a partner in the "Krause Bro.'s Gents 
Furnishing Store." They arc both members of the First Church of 
the Ev. Association in their city. She has served as president of 
the local Y. P. A. for two years, is a S. S. teacher, and is an active 
member in the Ladies' Aid and Woman's Missionary societies. He 
has served fiye years as Conference Branch Y. P. A. missionary sec- 
retary with great success, and is now missionary sec. of the local 
Y. P. A. and S. S. Supt. 

4. Edna May Mosiman, (Fifth Generation), South Bend, Ind. 

Stenographer. 

Edna M. was initiated into the shifting scenes of life Sept. 25, 
1?S4. She obtained a good education, graduating with honors from 
the Nappauee High School May 1^03. After this she finished a 
course in the "South Bend Business School." She took a position as 
oflBce girl and stenographer in Shidler Bro,'s Hardware Store in 
South Bend, and remained with them until they sold out, in 1906, 
giving entire satisfaction. After a short vacation she again took up 
stenography with Geo. Cutter Co. where she has worked since Sept, 
17, 1906. She was converted to God at the age of 14 years and 
united with the Ev. Asso., in Nappanee, Ind. She also took an ac- 
tive part in ail the church services, S. S. and Y, P. A. work. She is 
blessed with good business qualities and a hopeful disposition as the 
rest are. She is now a member of the St. Paul M.E. Church, of South 
Bend, where her activities in tne Church are continuing. She has 
served as secretary of the S. S. o^^ Mi.pah society for / vears and 
two as Y. P. A. President. 

5. Ina Orviila Mosiman, (Fifth Licneratioiii. L^c-ai'u Bend, Ind. 

Seamstress. 

Ina O. hi'gan tr»- '" - f^v- -...= ..? \.:~ j -_:. r, Ifr". She slsc 

enjoyed good school privileges. She finished the second year in 

High School, in Nappanee. Not wishing to rcsunie her school-work 

in South Bend, she took up the work as se^n^'^*^!'? .:= sjl-r.me. if> which 

f.Vip ic ar»t and SllCCC^' "'.T^. '^"'" TT'j; :l:l.'C7-;,U ic .i^J -i. i4>.. « . iU 

year, and joined the l^v. Association in Nappanee, Sne is also ac- 
tive in the Church, and hfS held various onices ia the •>, S. acd "i. 



124 



Historical Sketches of Seven Generations 



P. A. She has also served one year as organist of the Church. She 
has taken up instrumental music by herself and has made commend- 
able progress, so that it is not difBcult for her to preside at the 
organ for choir purposes. She has a sweet alto voice, and has for 
some years been a member of the choir. She is also now a member 
of the St. Paul M. E. Church in South Bend, Ind. 

6. Lloyd Baumgartner Mosiman, (Fifth Generation), South 

Bend, Indiana. 
Lloyd B. came on the stage of action, April 22, 18*t3. He is 
now attending public school in South Bend. He was converted to 
God in the winter of 1904, under the labors of Rev. R. C. Stoll, pas- 
tor of the Mizpah Church, with which he also united. During vaca- 
tion and after school hours he works in a Grocery Store with accept- 
ability and aptness. He is industrious and ambitious. For about a 
year he delivered milk in the city for Mr. Lerner. He is now a mem- 
ber of the St. Paul M. E. Church. 

7. Kenton McKinley Mosiman, (Fifth Generation), 

Kenton began his trials in life July IS, 189(). He is now attend- 
public school in South Bend, Ind. He is a bright and active boy. 

joined Mizpah Church during the winter of 1906, 10 years of age. 

is now a member of the St. Paul M. E. Church. 



ing 
He 
He 

(D). 



/■ 



Abraham W. Baumgartner, (Fourth Generation). 

^_^ ->> Abraham W. entered the path- 

^^, i way of life Jan. 26, 1S58. On 

account of the abundance of farm 
work he could not attend school 
regularly. At the age of seven- 
teen he quit going to school. He 
later went to Coraraercial School 
in North Western College, Naper- 
ville. 111., but found the work too 
strenuous for his physical condi- 
tion, and could therefore not 
finish the course. At twenty 
years old he contracted chronic 
rheumatism, largely resulting 
from over-exertion in hewing tim- 
ber for Christian and Peter 
Baumgartner, building contract- 
ors. He was in his teens quite 
strong, robust and ambitious, not 
surmising that he might overtax 



Abraham W. Baumgartner. 



Descendants of Deacon David Baumgartner 125 

his body and prematurely exhaust his strength. This attack was fol- 
lowed by typhoid fever, which left him with impaired health the 
rest of his life. Hoping that a change of climate might benefit him, 
he went to Holdredge, Keb., and later to Ness City, Kansas, where 
he followed his carpenter trade, which he learned after becoming of 
age, but after about two years he again returned without being much 
improved, and farmed mother's place. Feeling that he needed a life- 
companion, he won the ailections of Mary Hocker, of Vera Cruz, 
Ind., to whom he was married Jan. 13, . 1891. They moved on the 
old homestead, and mother moved to Vera Cruz. His ailment gradu- 
ally grew worse and finally developed into catarrh of the stomach 
and jaundice, which caused him intense suffering prior to his death, 
Aug. S, 1893. His peaceful life made him many friends. In his 
Christian life he never had a very clear evidence of his acceptance be- 
fore God, but shortly before death he could hopefully say to his 
companion, "There is rest for the weary". He had united with the 
Ev. Association in Feb. ISSl, and was faithful to the same to the 
end. His wife was born in Massillon, Stark Co., Ohio. She was 
converted to God Jan. 18S0. She availed herself of the opportunities 
of getting a good education. She taught nine terms of district 
school prior to their marriage. She has followed teaching in Berne, 
Ind., the primary department, since Sept. 1894 with exceptional 
success. She is an active member of the Ev. Association in Berne, 
Ind., having served as president of the Woman's Missionary Society 
for 3 years, and as teacher of the S. School for 10 years. The fol- 
lowing two sons are the fruit of this union: — 

1. Herman Franklin Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation), Berne, 

Ind. 
Herman F. was initiated to the trials of this life Jan. 15, 1892, 
on the old homestead, two miles S. E. of Vera Cruz, Ind. He is now 
receiving an education in the Berne Public school. He is an in- 
dustrious boy, during vacations he has worked on farms and in 
groceries, and will make his mark some day in the world. He united 
with the Ev. Association in the winter of 1905. He became a mem- 
ber of an orchestra in Berne, 1908, and took up the study of playing 
the violincello. 

2. Leslie Abraham Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation), Berne, 

Ind. 
Leslie A. began his earthly career, after his father's death, in 
Vera Cruz, Ind., in the old Ev. Parsonage, Sept. 2b, 1893. He is 
now attending Public school in Berne, Ind. He also has worked on 
the farm during vacations and is fond of animals and farm life. He 
united with the Ev. Association in the winter of 1904. He became a 



126 Historical Sketches of Seven Generations 

member of an orchestra in Berne, 1908, and is the piano accompanist. 

(E). Frederick Baumgartner, ^Fourth Generation). 

Frederick was born Feb. 1, 1859, and died of cholera infantum 
Sept. 30, same year. 

<F.) Samuel Henry Baumgartner, (Fourth Generation), Indiana- </ 
polis, Ind. Minister. 

Samuel H. commenced his earthly life Mar. 2, 1S60. He could 
only attend district school irregularly until his eighteenth year, Oct. 
1«78, when he began attending the graded school in Linn Grove, Ind., 
and continued for two consecutive terms of six months' each. This 
was really the beginning of his school life. In the fall of 18S0, he 
attended the ten weeks' County Normal in Decatur, Ind., includinjf 
the County Institute. Succeeding in getting a six months teachers' 
license, he applied to Trustee C. Ashbaucher for district school No. 
7, in French township, Adams Co., Ind., commonly called the 
"Schlatter" school. He taught this school three consecutive terms 
of six months each. In the interim he worked on the farm, until the 
County Normal of>ened, which he attended, and each time increased 
his license by six mouths. He yery much enjoyed teaching, and gave 
general satisfaction to pupils and patrons. But feeling the need of 
a more extensive and thorough education than the County Normal 
could offer, he concluded to enter, Sept. 1883, "North Western 
College," at Naperville, 111., the Mecca of learning of the Evangelical 
Association. He took up the English Scientific course of four years, 
graduating in June 1S87. These were years of hard mental work, 
but fruitious in gaining knowledge, and social culture, and religious 
enthusiasm, which of were great utility for his future life-work, the 
Ministry ot the Gospel of Christ. 

He often deplored the fact that he was not willing to accept 
salvation in his youth and become interested in religious work, and 
early develop Christian character, and accumulate religious knowl- 
edge. For every year spent in sin is a loss to permanent usefulness 
in future religious activities. He was converted to God, Jan. 31. 
1881, in a gracious revival held in the Linn Grove Ev. Church, con- 
ducted by the pastor. Rev. Geo. Roederer, of Newville Circuit, as it 
was then called. It was high time, for one night when the claim of 
salvation was pressed upon him by his cousin John J. Baumgartner, 
near Linn Grove, the Spirit spoke to him, like an audible voice of a 
man, "Now or never". Almost instantly he looked to God for help, 
rose to his feet, walked out to the altar of prayer, and for eight days 
sought earnestly for pardon of sin, and a new heart, when taith took 
hold of God's promises, and the peace of God began to flow into his 
soul, increasing in volume, as a stream does by the continued rain- 



Descendants of Deacon David Baumgartner 127 



fall. In Feb., ^ith a crowd of others, he united with the Ev. Asso- 
ciation, in the Linn Grove Church, and became a member of the Vera 
Cruz class. In the summer following- he was baptized bj pouring, in 
the Wabash river, at Linn Grove, below the dam, having knelt in 
the water, Rev. I. B. Fisher, pastor of St. Mary's circuit, near 
Decatur, officiated. 

When his father died on Mar. 22, 1881, a vacancy in the class 
leadership in the Country class occurred, and on the Board of Trus- 
tees of the Vera Cruz church. Soon thereafter a class-leader election 
was held, and to his great surprise the duty that father had performed 
over twenty years fell on hira with an almast crushing burden, 
which he can not describe; and soon thereafter he was also elected a 
trustee in father's stead. Young, inexperienced and weak, with fear 
and trembling, and some misgivings, he tODkup the cross, and served 
in this capicity for two and one-half years, when he started off to 
College. He was of a yery timid disposition, and often greatly 
trembled when he had to lead prayer and class meetings. For over 
a year his timidity was often a real torture to him, when the time 
for leading meetings came, but gradually wore off, though not en- 
tirely free yet, especially when he must preach before certain classes 
of people and preachers. 

He soon felt the call to the sacred ministry, and after many 
severe struggles within himself about this matter, continuing for a 
year and a half, on a Monday afternoon, after listening to an earnest 
appeal for workers on the previous Sunday evening in a Y. M. C. 
Association meeting led by Rev. J. Lerch, the matter was brought to 
a head, in his own room, by making a proposition to God for a clear 
and definite understanding of the Divine call to the ministry. God 
look him up on his own proposition. That Monday night, for the 
first time, for a year and a half, after retiring at the usual time, he 
immediately fell into a sweet and quiet sleep, whereas before it was a 
rolling and tossing from one side to the other from one to three 
hours. The next morning the struggle was over, quietude reigned 
within, the evidence to the Divine call was perfectly clear, and study- 
in?; again became a pleasure greater than ever, and to this day he 
has not doubted his call to this high and holy calling. 

After graduating in June 18S7, he moved with his wife to West 
Point, Huntington Co., Ind., to help serve Wabash Mission, (which 
then included West Point), as per appointment by Bishop J. J. Esher, 
at the conference session held in Rochester, Ind. Rev. C. C. Beyrer 
was appointed preacher in charge. The next year West Point and 
Bethel Classes were detached from Wabash Mission, and he was 
placed in charge of the new mission. From Apr. 1SS9 to 1891 he 
served Bunker Hill circuit in Miami and Howard Counties. From 



128 Historical Sketches of Seven Generations 

Apr. 1891 to 1892 be served Rochester station, in Rochester, Ind. 
From Apr. 1892 to 1894 he served Kendallville Mission, which com- 
prised the city of Kendallville and the town of Avilla, both in Noble 
Co., Ind. Then from 1894 to 1898 he had charge of Ft. Wayne Mis- 
sion, where under his administration a $2,000 church lot was bought, 
and a $13,000 church and a $2,000 parsonage built. From Apr'. 1898 
to 1899 he served Wabash Mission, and in Apr. 1899 he was elected pre- 
siding elder for four years, and stationed on Elkhart District, which 
he served four years. In Apr. l'»03 he was re-elected as presiding 
elder for another four years, and served Ft. Wayne district two years, 
and Elkhart district two. In Apr. 1907 he was stationed to the First 
Church of the Ev. Asso. in Indianapolis, Ind. He also served the 
Indiana Conference eight years as secretary, resigned the ninth time, 
being elected presiding elder. He is now serving the ninth year as 
a member on the Board of Conference Trustees, and during this time 
represented the conference three years on the Board of Trustees of 
North Western College and Union Biblical Institute, at Naperviile, 
111. Four times was he elected as delegate to the General Confer- 
ence of the Ev. Association, held respectively at Elgin, 111., St. Paul, 
Minn., Berlin, Canada, and Milwaukee, Wis,, in Oct. 1S95, 1899, 1903 
and 1907. Thrice be represented the Conference on the General Board 
of Missions of the Church. Many interesting facts pertaining to the 
ministry might be said but modesty refrains. 

Not desiring to go through life alone, be vjooed Kezzie Keiper, 
daughter of Rev. Jacob Keiper of the Ev. Association, now of the 
united Ev. Church, and was united with her in marriage June 22, 
1886, in the College Chapel, in Naperviile, 111., in the presence of 
about forty invited guests. President H. H. Rassweiler tying the 
nuptial knot. She was born Sept. *>, 1860, in Muscatine, Iowa. Her 
father being an itinerant minister, she lived in various parts in Iowa, 
Indiana and Ohio. From Van Wert, Ohio, which was his last charge, 
they moved in 1873 to Naperviile, 111., wheie she continued to live 
until in June 1S8T. She was converted to God at the age of ten, and 
united with the Ev. Asso., while they lived in Benton, Elkhart Co , 
Ind. She is also a graduate of North Western College, having com- 
pleted the English Scientific course in June, 1882. She also took a 
term and a half of oil painting and crayon work, in the Art depart- 
ment, in the same college; and was also an active member of the 
"Musical Union" of the college, and teacher in the College Chapel 
Sunday-school for some years. While at Bunker Hill, she took quite 
an active part in "Woman's Christian Temperance Union" work. For 
many years she has been active in "Woman's Missionary Society" 
work in local societies, and in the Ind. Conf. Branch W. M. S. work, 
in which she served two years as corresponding secretary, five years 



Descendants of Deacon David Baumg-artner 



129 



as vice pres., and five years as president, until failing health necessi- 
tated her to draw back from public activities. Two times was she 
elected as delegate of thelnd. Conf. Branch W. M. S., to the General 
Missionary quadrennial meetings held at Dayton, Ohio, and Tiffin, 
Ohio. As a S. S. teacher and Young People's Alliance worker, she 
has always met with good success, and has always nobly stood bj 
her husband in the scul-saving work, as strength and health per- 
mitted. To them is born one son: — 

1. Hope Lcroy Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation), Indianapolis, 
Ind. 

Hope L. was initiated into the 
earthly life in Rochester, Ind., 
Aug. 6, IS'^l. He enjoyed good 
school advantages, which began 
in Ft. Wayne. He graduated 
from the Crammer schc>ol in Elk- 
hart in June 1905, having for his 
graduating subject, "History of 
the American Navy". Then he 
attended two years high school in 
Elkhart, and tnoying to Indiana- 
polis with his parents in 1907, he 
is now attending third year high 
school there. Being strongly 
musically inclined he began tak- 
ing music lessons when nine years 
old, first on the organ, then at 
eleven he began taking piano les- 
sons at irregular periods of time, 
and one summer elementary har- 
mony. He is since 1**07 attend- 
ing "The Indianapolis Conservatory of Music", where he con- 
tinues his piano work and harmony, with commendable success. He 
began composing sacred and instrumental mus'c in his eleventh year. 
Hnd has now a number published. He was baptiircd Mar. 17, 1892 
by Key. D. Martz, then presiding elder of Elkhart Dist. He received 
the evidence that he was a child of God at the age of five, after pray- 
ing for it. He united with the Church of his parents at Elkhart, 
Ind., in the Division St. Church, under the pastorate of Rev. Thom. 
Finkbeiner, at the age of eight years. He is of an industrious, ambi- 
tious disposition, rather works than play. With a small printing 
outfit he has earned enough to pay for his p:at?o and is earning the 
greater portion of bis musical education. He is now (1908) teaching 
piano. 



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y-^" 



H. L. Baumgartner. 



130 Historical Sketches of Seven Generations 

(G.) Christina Baumgartner, Vance, (Fourth Generation). 

Christina was born Aug-. 5, 1S61. She only attended district 
school, and had in consequence only a limited education. She was 
converted to God under the pastorate of Rev. J. K. Troyer, when ten 
years old. She also at this time united with the Ev. Ass., and be- 
came a very active personal worker, winning quite a number for 
Christ. For several years she was under a cloud concerning- her ac- 
ceptance before God, which sorely depressed her, but she held on to 
God, until new light and evidence streamed into her soul, and she 
became firmly established in the faith. She became the wife of Dr. 
U. S. Vance, Dec. 1894, Rev. N. J. Platz performing the weddinjf 
act. Farly in the spring she contracted a serious cold and cough, 
by some mysterious way, which developed into quick consumption, as 
Dr. Vance declared, which other Drs. however, who had known her 
for many years, greatly doubted. She peacefully fell asleep, after 
intense suffering, Aug. 14, 1895. She possessed strong winning 
qualities, and lived scrupulously consistent with her moral convic- 
tions. She was a prominent S. S. and Woman's Missionary Society 
worker in her local Church. For many years she followed Gents 
tailoring, first in Elkhart, Ind., but later in Bluffton, Ind. In her 
habits of life she was strictly honest, industrious, economic and 
liberal towards the needy. 

(H). Sarah Ann Baumgartner, (Fourth Generation). 

Sarah A. was born Oct. 6, 1865, and died of diphtheria Oct. 14, 
iS7S. She had a feeble constitution, but was bright intellectually, 
with strong religious tendencies. She was converted when eleven 
years old, under the pastorate of Rey. J. Miller, and also united with 
her parents' Church. She died with conscious acceptance before God. 

(I.) Lucinda Baumgartner, (Fourth Generation). 

Lucinda was born Dec. 24, 1S67, and died of diphtheria Aug. 28, 
iS7S. She was a. strong robvist girl, full of activity, but suddendlj 
she was prostrated by the aforesaid ailment, and in a few days suc- 
cujabed, with these words, -'Weep not for me, we will meet again in 
heaven." 



Chapter III. 

Sec. XI. 



Maria Baumgartncr, Bixler, (Third Generation). 

Maria was welcomed to this world Sept. 4, 1820. Her birth- 
place was also Jura, Buderich Graben. Oberamt Courtelarj, Canton 
Bern, Switzerland. She moved to America with her parents in 1837, 
first settled with them in Wajne Co., Ohio, and two years later to 
Indiana. For a while she kept bouse for her brother Samuel until 
she became the wife of Peter Bixler in 1S48. His father bought them 
anSO acrefarm near her brothersin French township, AdamsCo., Ind., 
and immediately after marriag-e they moved on it. About 1882 they 
sold the farm and bought another two miles N. W. of Berne, where 
they remained a few years, until he could farm no more. Then they 
sold out and bought property in the town of Berne, Ind., where after 
a few years she died Jan. 25, 1S97. He died a few years later in 
Wayne Co., Ohio, where he had gone to live with his relatiyes. They 
were both devoted members of the Mennonite Church. She, like her 
sister, Elizabeth, was a great lover of flowers. She was a yery sociable 
and accommodating woman, which fact made her many friends. 
Their earthly departure was peaceful, and with the assurance of 
eternal life. They never had any children. 



Chapter IV. 



Christian Baumgartner, (Second Generation), Bookbinder. 

Christian was the second son of Deacon David Baumgartner 
(our ancestral father), by his second wife, hence he v;as a half- 
brother to Rev. David Baumgartner. He was born somewhere in 
Canton Bern, Switzerland, the exact date of birth could not be found, 
but his half- brother was born Jan. 25, 1765, so he was probably born 
in 1768. He was a bookbinder by trade, and when he became a 
widower, he lived with his son John. When his son John was very 
sick in 1848, his (John's) wife fell into a well holding herself firmly 
on the edge of the well, and called for help. Old Christian heard 
her call, ran out, saw her perilous condition and succeeded in heljv 
ing her out before she lost her grip. In 184') he moved with his son 
John to Fluh, on a high mountain, where he remained until his son 
died, which was a severe blow to him, now being quite aged. His 
son's wife then decided to immigrate to America, so he moved to his 
daughter Katharina in 1851, who also lived at Fluh. Here he no 
doubt died. (From Dr. C. C, B.'s historical sketch). 



Chapter IV. 

Sec. I. 



John Baumgartner, (Third Generation), Teacher and Bookbinder. 

John was the only son of Christian. The exact time and place 
of his birth could not be found, except that he was born in Canton 
Bern. Switzerland, about the beginning of the nineteenth centurj. 
His son Dr. C. C. said of him, in his life sketch, that he was a small 
crippled man with eyes of fire; that he had been a student in 
Oberwyl, and began his life-work as school teacher; but because his 
associates in the faith were bitterly opposed to all that was new, and 
adhered to ways a century old, he gave up teaching, though he had 
a splendid talent for it, and possessed excellent knowledge in tbis 
line of work, and governing qualities. His reproofs in the school 
room were pointed and eflfective, and commanded great respect and 
quick obedience; but he was also kind in the home, and had a meek 
spirit. 

The Dr. further remarked that some of his father's fellow citi- 
zens, at this time, looked on Science as a Sodomisb fruit, and prayed 
God to protect their children from studying arithmetic and grammar, 
because they were unacquainted with such things in their youth. He 
carefully directed the inclinai:oas of his sons, particularly the Dr.'s 
because he had from childhood a feeble body. In 1S48 he became 
critically ill, all doubted his recovery, he himself also, therefore he 
gave his sons his parting counsel with deep feeling and effect, which 
they promised with tears to hf ed. By request of grandfather the Dr. 
prayed in his childish way to spare his father's life, which was 
granted. 

In the fall of 1S4'^ he moved with his family to Flub, on a high 
mountain. In 1851 he again took seriously ill with dropsy of the 
heart, which baffled the skill of the best doctors. A few days before 
his death he wrote with a lead pencil his last exhortation to his sons, 
which they treasured up and heeded, though not always as carelully 
as they should have done. After two months of sickness he died 
June ^, ls51, with full .^s-iurance of eternal life. His body rests in 
the cemetery at Sornetan, Rev. Dayid Nussbaum officiated at the 
funeral services. He was married to Katharina Lehman, who after 
immigrating to America, became the wife to Rey. Christian Baum- 
gartner. To them were born the following children: — 



134 



Historical Sketches of Seven Generations 



(A). John Jacob Baumgartncr, (Fourth Generation). Soldier. 

Jacob, as be was usually called, was born in 1S39 in Orange, 
Dachsfelden, Canton Bern, Switzerland. He was tall, handsome and 
quite a musician. With his mother he came to America in 1S52, first 
staying with friends in Wayne Co., Ohio, and after seven weeks re- 
sumed their trip to Adams Co., Ind., first living with his uncle Peter 
Lehman near where Berne is now located. After his mother's second 
marriage in Dec. 1852, he made his home with Samuel Baumgartner, 
the writer's father. He had a good German education. When the 
Civil War broke out in the United States, he volunteered to serve in 
the Federal Army, 44th Ind. Vol. Co. He was wounded in the battle 
of Chicamauga, which lasted two days, and was fought Sept. 19-20, 
1863, in which the Federal Army was partly routed; but under Gen. 
Thomas was, after a bard fight successful in completely routing 
the Confederates. It seems he was taken prisoner when the Federal 
Army was first unsuccessful, and was taken to Andersonville prison, 
the history ot which is indescribably gruesome, where he died from 
lack of proper care and starvation. 

(B). Rev. Dr. Christian Cleophas Baumgartner, (Fourth Genera- 
tion). 

Cleophas, as he was commonly 
called, began bis eventful life in 
Orange, Dachsfelden, Canton 
Bern, Switzerland, Feb. 2, 1S42. 
He received a good education; he 
read print readily at the age of 
four years. In his youth he was 
weakly. He was a boy of much 
wit and humor and did many 
humorous things, as the sketch 
of his early life shows. Concern- 
iog his singing talents, he says, 
he had none at the age of eight. 
Mother tried to teach him melo- 
dies, noticing in a song book 
many songs beaded "After its own 
melody", he thought that is the 
book that suits him to sing his 
own melodies, which he did for 
hours, that, as he says, it was 
terrible to listen to them. Later he became a good singer, and an 
able instructor in vocal music through life. He was naturally in- 
clined to Literature and History, reading early in life Bunyan's Pil- 




R«v. Dr. C. C. Baumgartner. 



Descendants of Deacon David Baumgartner 135 



grimage. StilHng's Works, Huebner's Biblical History, History of 
Turkish Wars, and of Switzerland, and Natural History. 

He began going to school at six, to his father. At this age he 
also read French and was one of the best in a class of boys thirteen 
years old. In the fall of 1849 he moved with his parents to Fluh. 
Tne high mountait.s awakened poetic feelings in him, which at times 
gave way to poetic work. Close by their house was a beautiful water- 
fall, beneath which were fish, and in his eagerness to catch them he 
.ell in, and had not his brother been with him, and called for help, 
which brought his parents to the scene, he would have drowned. 
Here he often would catch crabs and unceremoniously eat them raw, 
for this mother often had to punish him, to brake him of it 

The death of his father caused him many tears. Soon thereafter 
his mother decided to go to America, believing she could do better 
for her children. On Mar. 10, 1852, they left for America. He says 
in his sketch, -that it went quite hard to leave old home, friends 
and the blue Jura mountains." After five days' tarry at Havre, they 
boarded the ship "Gentleman of Norfolk". After forty-two days' 
rocking on the billowy ocean they reached the new world at eventide 
in Manhattan bay. New York. Of the 160 passengers, all took sea- 
sick except three, of which Le was one. He describes the harbor as 
.ollows, "The lights of New York and Brooklyn cast their light up- 
on the ship, to the right were seen the palaces of Castle Garden, and 
the light bouse of Sandy Hook, to the left was Ft. Lafayette with 
her 200 cannons, looking threatening upon the placid waters; and the 
masts of the ships in New York harbor numbered thousands, looking 
like a large piece of timber, making an imposing scene. Back of 
these were the green ocean waves, with numerous ships and pilot- 
boats, that noiselessly run too and fro, like swans." Many sad 
thoughts came to him when he thought of the Fatherland, severed 
friendship, alpme scenes, glaciers, and the fantastic colors of the 
morning and evening sun playing on them, and never to hear again 
tne ringing of church bells on Sunday morning, with the indescrib- 
able beautiful echoing and re-echoing among the mountains. Now 
lay before him a new untried world, with an unknown language and 
customs. But past memories could not thwart their purpose. In 
the morning after their arrival they larded, and in the evening of 
tne same nay, the steamship "Henry Hudson"' was boarded, and the 
next morning they arrived in Albany, N. Y. From here they went 
to Bu'Talo by railroad, then on the steamship "Diamond" to Cleve- 
land, O., and then on through Massillon to the much praised Sugar 
Creek township, in Wayne Co., Ohio, where friends royally received 
them After se.en weeks' tarrying in Ohio, they left foi Indiana, 
tneir fixed destiny. Going back to Cleveland, they took voyage on 



136 Historical Sketches of Seven Generations 



lake Erie on the "Sandusky" to Toledo, and then per can*' to Ft. 
Wayne, Ind., and the next day they arrived at Rev. Christian Baum- 
gartner's, near Vera Cruz, Ind. It was summer. 

The country was yet wild, wolves unmelodiously howled at night 
that made them feel fearful, the owls hooted, that almost raised a 
stranger's hair for fear not knowing what it was. His mother and 
brother were both working out near the home of his uncle Peter 
Lehman, with whom they first lived. He was left alone a good share 
of the time, with little enjoyment for his nature. There were no new 
books to read, re-reading old ones became obnoxious. He felt neg- 
lected, especially in the matter of teaching him English. Farming 
bad no charms for him. Studying books was his delight. After his 
mother's marriage in Dec. to Rev. C. Baumgartner, he again had a 
pleasant home, and could now attend English school, which was his 
great desire, and he made rapid progress. His third teacher, named 
Nelson, found delight calliag him "dutchman". At a spelling school 
across the river, he and his teacher were on hand. The teacher 
headed one side of the spelling match. When choosing was over, he 
was a^ked if there were others of his school present, when be sneer- 
ingly said there was yet a dutchman here. Amidst laughter he was 
called. He took his place determined to win. Soon one after an other 
was spelled down by him, and last his teacher also. His friend J. 
L, Steiner hurrahed for the dutchman, three cheers were given him. 
The Studabaker's, Markley's and Miller's congratulated him to the 
discomfort of his teacher, who thereafter ceased calling him Datch- 



mao. 



In April 1855, he went to school in Bluffton. This was a happy 
time for him. Everybody was kind to him. At leisure hours he 
often sat by the Wabash river fishing, and thinking of the Indians, 
when Red Jacket and Tecumseh lived along the stream; and of tne 
camp fires of the Shawnees and Delawares that lived under old 
Sycamore trees, smokiag their pipes, and with tomahawks la band, 
gave the war cry to the terror of new settlers. Here he also soon 
ranked first in class-work and spelling. His combatants were John 
McBride- Daniel Bulger, Mary Jane Studabaker and Edwin Clark. 
His attachment to bio telluw scholars was tender; when the time lor 
separation came he wrote, "Farewell my friend?, a long and loving 

farewell until we meet in 3 better land." 

He was now thirteen years old. It was decided that he must be 
a school teacher. He took an examination, but failed by reason of 
being examined in books he had not studied. He re-took tne exami- 
^:.t;oG four days later, passed satisfactorily, rer^^-p^ V^-'' license, ^r.'^ 
iovously returned home. Now followed teaching with many amusing 
and aggravating experiences. He had to 'kal with grown scholars 



Descendants of Deacon David Baumgartner 137 



who were as ignorant in some things as brutes, ill-mannered and un- 
able to learn. His first school was the one at home, which he taught 
two winters. His motives were often misunderstood, was persecuted 
and slandered, but he never gave upbut always maintained his credit. 
Few experience so much of real life in so short time as he did. He 
also taught on Muensterberg, Adams Co., where some of his scholars 
went with him to school in Switzerland. Here he was more appre- 
ciated. Here he had a fine sieging class. When school was out he 
was almost a physical wreck, the tension was too much for his weak 
constitution. But regaining his health during the summer, he again 
taught the same school the winter following. When this school 
closed, he taught the school Dist. No. 3 located on the N. E. corner 
of Samuel Baumgartner's farm, known as the election school house 
of French township. 

At different times he was called upon as interpreter before the 
Court. As a youth from 14-16 years old he often wrote attacks on 
wrong and defended right. Profanity was awful, slanders many, 
the neighborhood was like a volcano, not knowing what minute the 
lava of persecution would pour forth. He says, there was in reality 
a religious war in progress. His attack on the inconsistencies of 
church members induced one "Strabm" to say that he was a denier 
of God, an infidel, but could not prove it. In presidential campaigns 
he toot an actiye part supporting the Democratic party. He often 
debated with opponents, but later in life he espoused the faith of 
Republicanism. 

At this time ague raged throughout the country. It was at this 
time that he felt a strong desire to study medicine, to which he also 
yielded. When he taught his first school a Rev. Klein, of Tiffin, 
Ohio, urged him to enter the Reformed Seminary there. But he had 
no inclination to become a preacher, realizing how wrong it was to 
preach to suit the motives of the world. In May 27, 1S59, age 17, 
he left home --ivith the parents' consent, without a recommendation, 
or a guarantee for means to pay for his tuition, hopefully looking to 
God for a way, Lc went to Wayne Co., Ohio His parents promised 
him sor-:~ ^--r-.p-ort. First he found a place for ';iu(lyitig medicine in 
Akroo, « u, iii ibe home of S. W. Bartges. Here be also met Dr. 
BarricV which he considered providential. He began practicing medi- 
-..,„ ... \v = vr..- Cr. r^hi'-i ai'd remained there until 1S65. "b r; ^-e 
moved to Linn Grove, Ind-. where he practiced ten years with great 
ability and satisfaction to the public. He became known near and 
far as a -rcfc?:vlcns;. He was often called by other doctors for 
,.^ ^, ;.. . _. - < •; ..,.,.,c ..■• •- . -tb-T^. failed. 

While I'i^v. Jo'uu Fuchs was pastor on Kewville Circuit of the 
i\v. A^?^>:iKi!'j-: !iul.5lng a Tnc^dng in .the New-Light church ner.r 



138 Historical Sketches of Seven Generations 

Linn Grove, he was seized with conviction, was converted to God 
and then united with the Ev. Association at said place. He con- 
tinued following his profession, but soon felt the call to the Ministry 
of the Gospel. He recciyed license as preacher on probation in the 
fall of 1870, but continued his medical profession, until the fall of 
1875, when he entered the active ministry, receiving for his field 
Wabash Mission. The Lord sealed his work and call by giving- him 
marked success, and many souls for his hire. He took up an ap- 
p>ointment in the Speicher settlement near Urbana, and many were 
converted and were organized into a class of the Eyangelical Associ- 
ation. He served this Mission until April 1878. Then he served 
Elkhart, Division St. society one year, when in April 1879 he was 
elected presiding elder, and stationed on Indianapolis district, 
which he served four years, living two years in Indianapolis, and 
two in Wabash. He was re-elected to the office in 1883, and stationed 
unto Elkhart district, which he served four years, living meanwhile 
in Elkhart, Ind. Through an injury received on his right knee he 
became crippled and disabled for ministerial work and hence in the 
spring of 1SS7 he located. He again took up the medical profession 
in Elkhart, Ind., and continued until he died of liver trouble, super- 
induced by gallstone, Sept. 3, 1902. 

His preaching was uniquely peculiar to himself. His Scriptur- 
al insight was clear and comprehensive, his discriptive powers 
strong, his delivery easy and with fervency and feeling, his preach- 
ing biblical, instructive and efTective. He was eminently qualified for 
the ministry, using a perfect German and English, and was a well 
read man on sciences, and issues of the day. He was also an occa- 
sional contributor of religious articles to the Church papers. He 
was a careful counselor, and on the conference floor his word had ef- 
fect. Two years he served as conference secretary, and twice he was 
a delegate to General Conference of the Ey. Association. 

He was married to Barbara Lehman, of Sugar Creek township, 
Wayne Co., Ohio. Oct. 8, 18h3, by Rev. Ulrich Sommer of the Men- 
nonite Church, of which they were members. She was born Oct. 4, 
1843. She was a faithful wife to him in the family and the minis- 
terial life. She was also converted lo God under the labors of John 
Fuchs the time he was. She had only a common school education, 
but made good use of it. She still resides in Elkhart, with her oldest 
son William, where she is an honored member of the now First 
Church of the Ev. Asso. To them were born the following children; 
all t-orn in Linn Grove. Ind., excepting the first, which was born in 
Wayne Co., Ohio, 



Descendants of Deacon David Bautng-artner X39 

1. William H. Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation), Elkhart, Ind. 

Carriage Trimmer. 

William H. made his debut on the stage of life Jan 2, 1865. He 
received his education in various schools where his parents lived, 
Linn Grove, Wabash, Elkhart and Indianapolis. When they lived 
the second time in Wabash he became delivery boy and clerk in a gro- 
cery store. And when be moved to Elkhart with his parents in April 
1883, he began carriage trimming in the "Elkhart Pratt Buggy Fac- 
tory" where he has since worked continuously under the same fore- 
man. This is a fine record and is good evidence of his excellent 
workmanship. He united with the Ev. Association in 1887, and is 
now a member of the First Church of the Ev. Asso. in the city. For 
his life-companion he chose Barbara Ruch, of Elkhart, Ind., to 
whom he was married May 24. 1888, Rev. M. W. Steffey solemnizing 
the wedding act. She was born near Harrison Center, Elkhart Co., 
Ind., Nov. 2S, 1865. She obtained a good education. She became a 
member of the Ev. Association at the age of seyenteen, and has ever 
since remained an active member of the Church, serving as S. S- teach- 
er for many years very successfully, and ably filled other ofiBces in 
the church. She has also availed herself of the opportunity of tak- 
ing voice culture for singing under Mrs. Rev. BrowU; a first class 
vocal teacher. They have no children. 

2. Dr. Albert J. Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation), Elkhart, 

Ind. 

Albert J. entered the joys of life July 11, 1867. He attended 
public school at the following places respectively, Linn Grove, Wa- 
bash, Eikhart, Indianapolis, Wabash and Elkhart in Indiana. He 
clerked in Goldman's Drug store from 1S84 to 18'>2. He entered Rush 
Medical College of Chicago, Illinois, in 18'»2, and graduated in the 
College of Physicians and Surgeons of Cincinnati, Ohio, April 1895. 
He began practicing medicine with his father in Elkhart, Ind., in 
1S95, under the name "Baumgartner & Son", and continued until his 
father's death in 1902. After this in 1903 he took a position as 
Corresponding Dr. and Medical adyiser at Dr. Miles' Dispensary of 
Elkhart, Ind., at a good salary, meeting with commendable success. 
He is also a member of the State Medical Society. He also availed 
himself of the opportunities of obtaining a good education 
in vocal music under the instructoin of Prof. McHenry, of 
Elmira, New York, and is now one of the popular singers 
in Elkhart, singing on various occasions, and is a member of a 
noted male quartett and the splendid choir of the Congregational 
Church in Elkhart, of which he is also a member. I*olitically he is 
a loyal son of the Republican party. He is also a member of the 



140 Historical Sketches of Seven Generations 



Elks lodge. He was united in marriage v?ith Gertrude Bickel, ot 
Elkhart, Ind., December 1903. She was born in Elkhart Dec. 25, 
1877. She graduated from the Elkhart High School in 1S%. After 
this she entered the Conservatory of Music in Oberlin, Ohio, and has 
become a popular soprano singer in the city, and is the very success- 
ful choir director in the Congregational Church, of which she also is 
a member. 

3. Rufus L. Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation). 

Rufus L. was born in Linn Grove, Ind., Sept. 12, l.S6'>, and died 
May 11, 1871. 

4. Emma E. Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation). 

Emma E. was born in Linn Grove, Ind., Oct. 4, 1872, and died 
Dec 16, 1873. 

5. Ruben R. Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation), Toledo, Ohio. 
Ruben R. entered the race of life in Linn Grove, Ind., Dec. 6» 

1874. He enjoyed fine school privileges in Elkhart, Indianapolis, 
Wabash and Elkhart again. He attended the Elkhart High School 
for a while. But not wishing to complete the High School work he 
quit, and began working in the office of the Cincinnati, Wabash and 
Michigan R. R. in Elkhart. Later he became a passenger breakm an 
for seven months on the L. S. and M. S. R. R. After this he took a 
position as clerk in the J. J. Huffman Wholesale Grocery store, and 
continued \«.ith him for about five years. He proved himself a very 
capable man in this work. Next he availed himself of the oppor- 
tunity of salesman for the Miles' Medical Co., and traveled for the 
Co. for three years, with honor to himself and the Co., doing very 
efficient and satisfactory work. Being neccessitated to be away 
almost constantly from home, he gave up the work and for a while 
traveled for a Chair Factory. In 1902, Dec. ISth, he entered matri- 
moaial life with Louisa Lovejoy, of Elkhart, Ind. For about three 
years they have lived in Toledo, Ohio, where he is employed in an 
Automobile Factory. 

(C and D.) Christian David and John Peter Baumgartner, (Fourth 
Generation). 
Christian D. and John P. were born in Dachsfelden, Canton 
Bern, Switzerland, in 1846. J. P. only lived eleven days, and C. D. 
followed a few weeks later. 



Chapter IV, 

Sec. 11. 



Katharina Baumgartner, (Third Generation). 

Katharina, and aunt to Dr. C. C. B., was born somewhere in 
Canton Bern, Switzerland, time not known. She may have been 
older than her brother John. According to a statement by Dr. C. C. 
Baumgartaer in his sketch of his childhood and boyhood days, she 
lived on a high mountain, a place called "FJuh" with her children, 
to which place the doctor's father moved in 1S49. The Dr. in the 
sketch speaks of having played with her children, but the writer 
could not find anything further concerning her, or her children, in 
his sketch, nor to whom she was married. 



Chapter IV. 

Sec. Ill 



Elizabeth Baumgartner, (Third Generation). 

Elizabeth was a daughter of Christian Baumgartner of Chapter 
4 and sister to John and Katharina. This the writer has from 
Christian Baumgartner, of Pandora, Ohio, who claims she was a 
daughter of Christian, a brother to his grandfather Peter B. 



Chapter V. 



Barbara Baumgartner, Moser, (Second Generation). 

Barbara began her earthlj journej in Canton Bern, Switzer- 
land about 1768 or 69. She died in the seventies. She was a full 
sister of Christian B. of Chapter IV, and a half-sister of Rev. David 
B. of Chapter III. The writer has failed in getting- any further re- 
liable facts of her i>ersonal life. Her decendants are (juite numerous, 
scattered in Switzerland, Ohio, Indiana, Missouri, Kansas, Oklaho- 
ma and other places. She became the wife of Dr. John Moser. who 
lived on a high mountain, close to Moutier, called Champoz. The 
time of marriage is not known. In 1721 Hans Moser, grandfather of 
Dr. John, had to flee from a hospital in Bern, Switzerland, where he 
was employed as a nurse, on account of being a Mennonite, which 
were then severely persecuted. He fled to Petit Champoz, in Canton 
Bern, and there began practicing medicine. He had a son Ulrich, 
who had four sons, John or "Hans". Christian, Ulrich and David. 
John became a doctor, and was commonly called "Champoz Hans", 
with "z" silent, who married Barbara B. To them were born near 
Moutier, Jacob, John, David, Abraham, Lizzie and Maryann. 



Chapter V. 



Sec I. 



Jacob Moser, (Third Gsneration). 

Jacob was born in Petit Champoz, near Moutier, Can- 
ton Bern, Switzerland, in 1799, and died May 1, 1S50, when Sarah, 
his daug-hter, the writer's informant, was twelve years old. He was 
united in marriage with Magdalena Welty, April 26, 1826. He was 
professionally a doctor, known as Champoz Jacob, He was also a 
bookbinder, according to a statement by Jacob Moser. of Lima, Ohio. 
To them were born in above named place the follow.- ; bildren: — 

CA). Benjamin Moser, (Fourth Generation), Moutier, Switzerland- 
Benjamin first saw the light of this world May 12, 1828, in Petit 
ChampwDZ, near Moutier, Canton Bern, Switzerland. He was married 
to Katharina von Kiiusl, date of marriage not given. In his young- 
er dajs he was a school teacher. Thereafter for many years he was 
secretary and Supt. of a large Watch Factory in Moutier. He now 
lives a retired life. He is a member of the Reformed Church. Two 
sons were born to them in above place: namely, 

1. William Arnold Moser, (Fifth Generation). 

William A. was born Apr. 27, 1864. Nothing more could be 
learned of him. 

2. John Otto Sigmund Moser, (Fifth Generation). 

John O. S. began his earthly life June 1, 1874. He was anited 
in inarrisge ^*ith Anna Maria Kath. Ruber. Time not given. To 
them is bora, 

a. Max, July 8, 1905. (Sixth Generation). 



(B.) Rachel Moser, Schafiter, (Fourth Generation), Moutier, Switz- 
erland. 

Rachel was born Sept. 23, 18.>0 in Petit Champoz, Moutier, 
Switzerland. She was married to Aug. Schaffter in 1859. He was 
born in 1H35. and died in 1875. She belonged to the Reformed 
church. He also belonged to this church up to his death. The fol- 
lowing children were given ihem, all ben in Canton Bern, Switzer 
land: — 



144 Historical Sketches of Seven Geaeratioa« 



1. Augusta Schaffter, Gueriad, (Fifth Generation), Switzerland. 

Augusta entered upon the path of life June 13, 1860. She was 
married to M. Gueriad Sept. 29, 1S84. He was born in 1853 and 
died June 13, 1904. To them were born in Canton Bern, Switzer- 
land: — 

a. Elvania U. B., June 13, 1885. (Sixth Generation). 

b. Victor, Sept. 1, 1887, *' " 

c. Helena H. May 11, 1890. " »♦ 

d. Rachel A., Dec. 23, 1895. •♦ 

e. John M., Jan. 10, 1897. *' " 

2. Elisa Schaffter, Racine, (Fifth Generation), Switzerland. 
Elisa began her earthly journey Feb. 22, 1863. She became the 

wife of Julius Racine, Mr.rch 3, 1893. He was born Nov. 1, 1870, 
and died July 23, 1903. To them were born: — 

a. George, Dec. 15, 1895. (Sixth Generation). 

b. Frederic, Feb. 8, 1897. " " 

c. Ferdinand, Mar. 19, 1899. " 

died Nov. 23, 1899. 

3. Dina Schaffter, Fink, (Fifth Generation), Switzerland. 
Dina was admitted to this life Nov. 17, 1867. She was united 

in marriage with John Fink Nov. 13, 1897. He was born Dec. 17, 
1865. To them is born in Canton Bern, Switzerland: — 

a. Magdalena, June 31, 1902. (Sixth Generation). 

(C). Judith Moser, Logenbill, (Fourth Generation), El-Reno, Okla. 

Judith entered the path of life July 22. 1833. She immigrated 
to America with her uncle David Moser in 1853, settling in Wayne 
Co.. Ohio. Here she entered the marriage life with Daniel Logen- 
bill, a farmer, on Oct. 6, 1855. They moved to Morgan Co., Mo., in 
1S6S. He died April 3 1892. at the age of 58 years, 9 months and 
12 days. Both were faithful members of the Mennonite Church. She 
still lives, and is living with some of her children now in Okla. The 
following- children were born to them:— 

1. Rosa A. Logenbill, Neuenschwander, (Fifth Generation), 
Ness City, Kansas. 

Rosa A. began b-r -ie*r«ce in Wayne Co., Ohio, Sept, 14, 185b. 
Her school privileges were limited to common schools. She entered 
matrimonial life with Christian Neuenschwander, of Morgan Co., 
Mo., who is a successful farmer. They are members of the Menno- 
u!we v.^--^»c"ii. Tacy ar.'* b;^..it;il -sith the 'olio v.'lzjg children all bora 
in Morgan Co., Mo. 



Desceadants of Deacon David Baumgartner 145 



a. 


Sybilla, 


Aug. 


3, 


18S0. 


b. 


Calvin, 


Mar. 


24, 


1882. 


c. 


Daniel, 


Jan. 


21, 


1884. 


d. 


Menno, 


Nov. 


3, 


1885. 


e. 


Martha, 


Dec. 


2% 


1887. 


f. 


Ora, 


Feb. 


22. 


1890. 


g- 


Otto, 


Sept. 


4, 


1891. 


h. 


Dclila. 


Dec. 


8. 


1892. 


i. 


Ida, 


May 


12, 


1894. 


]• 


Lorenz, 


Sept. 


4, 


1895. 


k. 


Esther, 


Nov. 


4, 


1896. 


1. 


Kathcrine, 


June 


16, 


1900. 


m. 


Ernst, 


Dec. 


23, 


1902. 



(Sixth Generation). 



2 Dina E. Logenbill, Meshberger, (Fifth Generation), El-Reno, 
Oklahoma. • 

Dina began her earthly life in Wayne Co., Ohio, Feb. 10, 1858. 
She has a coaimon school education. She is a member of the Men- 
nonite Church. She assisted as a missionary in Cantonment, Indian 
Territory, for a while. Here she was married to Jacob Meshberger, 
Sept. 2, 18SS. He was born Nov. IS, 1S57, near Linn Grove, Ind. 
He is a farmer. The following children are born to them: — 

a. Daniel B., Aug. 15, 1889. (Sixth Generation). 

b. Zilla J., Nov. 13, 1891. " " 

c. Zipora S., Sept. ... 18')3. " ♦♦ 

d. Rufus O., Dec. 23, 1895. *' " 

e. Adas., Feb. 23, 1898. " " 

f. Lois E., Aug. 10, 1900. *• »• 

g. Silas J. Jan. 15, 1902. " ♦♦ 

3. Martha S, Logenbill, Sprunger, (Fifth Generation), El-Reno, 
Oklahoma. 

Martha S. arrived in this world in Wayne Co., Ohio, Nov. 13, 
1S5''. She has a common school education. She is a member of the 
Mennonite Church. For some time she assisted in missionary work 
at Darlington, Oklahoma, where she also entered matrimonial life 
with Joel Sprunger Nov. 23, ISSW. He was born near U.zzne, Ind., 
Aug. 17, 1S5^:. Farming is their vocation. The following children 
came to their home, viz: — 

a. Rosa, May 16, 18<>2. (Sixth Generation). 

died the same day. 

b. Omcr S., Nov. 24, 1893. " " 

c. Eldon C, Nov. 21, 1894. ** 

died Jan. .., 1895. 



l'W> Historical Sketches of Seven Generations 



d. Elda v.. Apr. 13, 1897. (Sixth Generation). 

e. Albert H., May 9, 1898. 

f. Oscar J , Aug. 17, 1900. " ♦' 

died June 21, 1901. 

g. Irene J., Sept. 28, 1902. ♦' " 

4. John W. Loganbill, (Fifth Generation), Versailles, Morgan 
Co., Mo. 

John W. entered upon the arena of life in Wayne Co., Ohio, Dec. 
13, 1861. He had only rural school privileges. He is a member of 
the Mennonite Church where he resides. He was married wiih Sarah 
S. Gerber, of Morgan Co., Mo., Oct. 1(>, 1886. She was born June 17, 
1867, and died Jan. 29, 1892. She was a member of the Mennonite 
Church. The following children were born to them, namely: — 

a. Arthur O., Dec. 13, 1888. (Sixth Generation). 

died Sept. 17, 1896. 

b. Joseph H., June 20, 1890. 

c. Calvin, Jan. 16, 1892. 

died June 17, 1892. 

He was married the second time to Ida F. Rhodus July 20, 1893. 
She was born in Pike Co., 111., Feb. 10, 1875. She is also a member 
of the Mennonite Church. To this union were born, 

(Sixth Generation). 



a. 


Bessie E., 


July 


14, 


1894. 


b. 


Samuel M., 


Sept. 


4, 


1895. 


c. 


Fannie M., 


May 


1% 


1897. 


d. 


Ella L., 


Feb. 


17, 


1898. 


c. 


Cecil C, 


Dec. 


29, 


1901. 


f. 


Roy E., 


Apr. 


23, 


1904. 



5. Clara Loganbill, (Fifth Generation). 

Clara was born in 1863, in Wayne Co., O., and died Nov. 9, 1S69. 

6. Marie S- Loganbill, (Fifth Generation), El-Reno, Okla. 
Marie S. was initiated into this life in Wayne Co., Ohio, Dec. 

25, 1865. Her school privileges were limited. She is a member of 
the Mennonite Church and lives a single life- 

7. Joel E. Loganbill, (Fifth Generation). 

Joel E. found a welcome into this world in Wayne Co., Ohio. 
April 10, 1867. He has had access to common schools. He is a mem- 
ber of the Mennonite Church. He has chosen the Bachelor's course 
of life. General farm work is his occupation. 



Descendants of Deacon David Baumgartner 147 



8. Albert E. Loganbill, (Fifth Geaeration), Gearj, Okla. 

Albert E. entered upon the shifting scenes of life in Morgan Co., 
Mo., Mar. S, 1869. His school privileges were common schools. He 
IS a member of the Mennonite Church. He took to wife Miss Barbara 
Bixler from Wayne Co., Ohio, on 17th day of December 1891. The 
following children were welcomed to their home in Morgan Co., Mo. 

a. Effie F., Dec. 6, 1892. (Sixth Generation). 

b. Aldus C„ Jan. 14, 1894. '• 

c. Orvilla M., June 17, 1895. " «♦ 

d. Martha E., May 8, 1897. ♦' •• 

e. Daniel W., Oct. 10, 1898. " •♦ 

f. Frieda K., Nov. 1, 1902. " «« 

g. Daughter, Sept. 1906. " " 

9. Ida M. Loganbill, Bentler, (Fifth Generation), Kansas. 

Ida M.^was admitted to the pathway of life in Morgan Co., Mo., 
Feb. 28, 1871. She only received a common school education. She 
IS also a member of the Mennonite Church. She gave her hand in 
marriage to Albert Bentler. but the time could not be learned. They 
are blessed with three boys and two daughters, but their names and 
date of birth could not be found out. 

10. Edmund F. Loganbill, (Fifth Generation), Okarche, Okla. 
Edmund F. began his journey of life in Morgan Co., Mo., June 8 

18/3. He only attended district schools. He is a member of the 
Mennonite Church. Not desiring to travel the path of life alone he 
chose as companion Sophia Neuenschwander to whom he was married 
Dec. 2o, 1902. She was born in McPherson Co., Kan., May 1, 1880. 
To them were born in Canadian Co., Okla. 

a. Verna H., May 10, l'*04. (Sixth Generation^ 

b. ElmaR.. July 13,1905. •♦ " 

c. EveretE., June 6, 1906. " " 

died, Nov. 16, 1906. " «» 

d. Christina M., Nov. 14, 1907. " •♦ 

11. Allen B. Loganbill. (Fifth Generation), Okarche, Okla. 
Allen B. was introduced to the trials of this world in Morgan 

Co., Mo., Nov. 6. 1875. He also only had district school advantages 
He IS a member of the Mennonite Church. He was united in marri^ 
age with Katharine Kuntze, Dec. 4, 1895, in Morgan Co., Mo She 
was born in Hickory Co., Mo. The following children are the fruit 
of this union, all born in Morgan Co., Mo. 

a. ElvaM.. Aug. 1S96. (Sixth Generation). 

b. Amelia J,, Aug. 24, 1898. »♦ •' 

c. HarvcyJ., Aug.27, 1899. " 



148 Historical Sketches of Seven Generations 



12. Sarah E. Loganbill, (Fifth Generation). 
Sarah E. was born in 1877, and died April 6, 1879. 

(D). Sarah Moser, Loganbill, (Fourth Generation), Fortuna, Moni- 
teau Co., Mo. 

Sarah was initiated to the trials of life, June 6, 183(.. She at- 
tended school both German and French, in Petit Champoz. where she 
was born, until 1853 when she came to America with her uncle David 
Moser, making her home with her uncle Nicolaus Gerber, in Wayne 
Co Ohio On Oct. 6, 1855, she entered into a matrimonial contract 
with John Loganbill, of Wayne Co., Ohio. The year previous she 
became identified with the Meunoaite Church, and ever since lived a 
consistent life before God and man. They continued to live in W ayne 
Co., Ohio, until spring of 1S66, when they moved to Morgan Co.. 
Mo where they still reside on a farm. She was for a number of 
years the president of the Young Giris' Sewing Society, which she 
very ably conducted until she was necessitated by reason of age to 
resign in 1905. 

On Oct 6 1905, they were permitted to celebrate their golden 
wedding. This was a happy occasion for them, one that comes to 
few life companions. There were about one hundred guests present 
to enioy the day with them. The exercises of the occasion consisted 
in a few appropriate addresses which were interspersed with songs, 
then followed a dinner prepared by their friends and neighbors. 
Their vocation is farming, in which he was quite successful. He was 
born Jan. 25, 1835 in Wayne Co , Ohio, and united with the Menno- 
nite Church in 1854. The following children were welcomed to their 
family circle:— 

1. BenjamineF. Loganbill. (Fifth Generation), Versailles, 

Morgan Co., Mo- R. F. D. I. 
Beniamine F. began the varieties of life in Wayne Co., Ohio, July 
9 isl " school pfivileges were district schools and he made good 
use of bis school davs. He was raised on the farm and became a 
; actica la^ succesWul farmer. Not believing that it was good or 
L :: travel the path of life alone, he chose for ^^ ^^^--P-'^ 
Lizzie J Lehman, to whom he was joined m wedlock on Jan .-, 
ISs Both are vJorthy members of the Mennonite Church. He is 
he Mission treasurer of his local Church Society -^J Yhe ^•ice 
acceptable teacher in the Sunday-school. His wife is now the wee 
' e fd^^^^^^ of the Woman's Sewing Society in the Church, and is also a 
lonhy teacher in the Sunday-school. Their family circle is made 
happy with the following children born in Morgan Co.. Mo. 



Descendants of Deacon David Banmgartner 149 

a. Alpha A. Loganbill, (Sixth Generation), Versailles, 

Morgan Co., Mo. 
Alpha A, was the beginning of the family additions, beginning 
ter pilgrimage Jan. 4, 1S8(). She has enjoyed good district school 
privileges, and is also a highly respected member of her parents' 
church. She holds the office of treasurer of the Women's Sewing 
Society, and teaches a class in the Sunday-school. She is yet single. 

b. Ella Cornelia Loganbill, (Sixth Generation), Versailles, 

Morgan Co., Mo. 
Ella C. gladdened the family circle with her presence Oct 2, 
IJ^'/O, but her stay on earth was brief, dying Dec 11, 1841. 

c. Delbert C. Loganbill, (Sixth Generation), Versailles, 

Morgan Co., Mo. 

Delbert C made his appearance on the stage of action Nov. 2, 

1893. He is now in quest of an education to fit him for the duties of 
a citizen. 

2. Caroline E. Loganbill, Lehman, (Fifth Generation). 

Caroline E. was born into the family circle Mar. 30, 1858, in 
Wayne Co., Ohio. She secured a fair education, and taught one 
term of German school for the special benefit of the children of Men- 
nonite families. In youth she became a member of the Mennonite 
Church and lived consistent to her faith before God and man. On 
Feb. r>, 1S85, she entered upon the matrimonial voyage with M. E. 
Lehman, who also was a member of her church. He was born June 
24, 1S54 in Wayne Co., Ohio. She died Feb. 9, 1901. To this union 
were born in Moniteau Co., Mo., the following children: — 

a. Hilda R , Jan. 22, 1S87. (Sixth Generation), 
died, Aug. 6, 1888. 

26, 1889. " '♦ 

22, 1891. " '♦ 

23, 1893. " " 
29, 1895. " " 
10, 1900. " 
16, 1902. 

3. Solomon M. Loganbill, (Fifth Generation). 

Solomon M. also was born in Wayne Co., Ohio, Aug. 24, 1859. 
He had a great desire for a good education, and succeeded well in 
getting one. At the age of eighteen years be began teaching school, 
and continued until death summoned him to the redeemed in Heaven. 
In youth he joined the Mennonite Church. He died Oct. 24, 1881, 



b. 


Elma C, 


Apr. 


c. 


Elvin R., 


Feb. 


d. 


Delia E., 


tt 


e. 


Ada C, 


Nov. 


f. 


Lydia S., 


July 




died, 


Feb. 



150 Historical Sketches of Seven Generationt 



4. Emilie M. Loganbill, (Fifth Generation). 

Emilie M. was born in Wajne Co., Ohio, Jan. 6, 1862, and died 
the same year Jan. 22. 

5. William M. Loganbill, (Fifth Generation). 

William M. was born in Wajne Co., Ohio, Nov. 24, 1863, and 
died Sept. 6, 1864. 

(E). Solomon Moser, (Fourth Generation). 

Solomon was born about 1837. He was ambitious for an educa- 
tion. While in some College death called him from labor to reward. 
Time of death not learned. 

(F). Dina Moser, Gerber, (Fourth Generation), Dalton, Wajne Co., 
Ohio. R. F. D. 3. 
Dina first sav the light of this world Aug. 19, 1839, She came 
to America wiia her uncle David Moser in 1S53, and settled in Wayne 
Co.i Ohio, making her home with her uncle Nicolaus Gerber. She 
obtained a fair German schooling. She became a member of the 
Mennonite Church in Ohio, and is still an honored member thereof. 
She was united in marriage with Mathias Gerber about 1861. He is 
a successful farmer and carpenter. Four children came to their 
home, all born in Wajne Co., Ohio. 

1. Salome Gerber, Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation), 
Salome was introduced to this life Julj 6, 1863. She received a 

common school education. She is a member of the old Mennonite 
Church in Wayne Co., Ohio. She married Simon P. Baumgartner. 

2. Melinda Gerber, (Fifth Generation), Dalton^ Wayne Co., 

Ohio. 
Melinda entered the trials of life Nov. 12. i;>o4. She also ob- 
tained a common school education. She is a meiiib^r of tijc Old 
Mennonite Church in Wayne Co., Ohio. She remained unmarried. 

3. Valentine M. Gerber, (Fifth Generation), Dalton, Wajnc 

Co., Ohio. 
Valentine entered upon the stage oi .aiiacuc-ii. vto. i-*, i?«>a. 
His school advantages were limited to coLamon schools. He became 
a member of the Menaoaite Church at the age of He is a car- 
penter by occupation. He entered the matrimonial life witb " ._, 
J. Kofstetter on December 18, 1890. Sb. -.vas t>orn bept. Ii7, iKbS iu 
Wavne Co., Ohio. She also is a tnember of his Church. S'=t-->> child= 
ren were given tbem as follows. 



Descendants of Deacon David Baumgartaer 



151 



a. Allen, June 9, 1894. (Sixth Generation). 

b. Nelson, May 4, 1895. " 

c. Emma, Feb. 15, 1897. *• 

d. Enos, Sept. 16, 1898. 

died, Feb. 7, 1900. 

e. Effie, Mar. 7, 1901. " 

f. Merle, Apr. 25, 1905. 

g. Ora. Sept. 3, 1907. ♦» ♦♦ 

4. Jacob M, Gerbcr, (Fifth Generation), Dalton, Wayne Co., 

Ohio. 
Jacob's earthly life dates from Sept. 1, 1872. He also only had 
common school privileges. He is a successful carpenter by occupa- 
tion. He united with the Old Mennonite Church at the age of 19. 
His marriage life with Lina C. Sommer dates from June 1, 1895. She 
was born in Wayne Co., Ohio, June f>, 1874, and is also a memt)er of 
his Church since 1892. To them were born the following children: — 

25, 1896. (Sixth Generation). 

4, 1898. 

21, 1900. 

4, 1<>03. 

20, 1905. " " 

28. 1907. " " 

7, 1907. 



a. 


Susan, 


Apr. 


b. 


Hilda, 


Sept. 


c. 


Eva, 


July 


d. 


Einicr, 


Nov. 


e. 


Otto, 


Oct. 


f. 


Dina, 


Nov= 




died. 


Dec. 



Chapter V. 

Sec. II. 



John Moser, (Third Generation). 

John was the second child of Barbara Moser, nee Baumgartner. 
He also was born in Petit Champoz, near Moutier, Canton Bern, 
Switzerland, July 29, 1801. He was a turner by trade. He bad a 
good German education, and also some Freach. He emigrated to 
America in 1852, and settled in Indiana, and died near Vera Cruz, 
Ind., some fifty years old. He was married about 183S or ?>'), to 

Anna She died Nov. 25, 186S, aged (<0 years, 11 months 

and 10 days. The following children were born to them in the fath- 
erland: — 

(A). Jacob }. Moser. (Fourth Generation). 

Jacob J. was burn in Oberarat Muenster, Canton Bern, Switzer- 
land, Oct, 13, 1840. He emigrated to America with his parents in 
1852, and with them located near Vera Cruz, Ind. He bad a fair 
German education. He was married to Caroline Buehler, of Adams 
Co., Ind., Nov. If), 1866, by Rev. Philip Porr, the pastor of Newville 
Circuit, of the Indiana Conference, of the Ev. Association. Some 
time before his marriage he became a member of the aforesaid 
Church, and filled, at different times, the offices of exhorter, class- 
leader, trustee, S. S. Supt., and also as S. S. teacher. For some 
years he lived one-hall mile east of Vera Cruz, later he moved into 
town. When his uncle David Moser died, he bought his farm, lying 
half-mile, northeast of town, just across the Adams County line, 
adjoining the Newville Cemetery on the east. Here he died in the 
peace of God, Dec. 5, 1903. They had no children. 

(B). Frederick Moser, (Fourth Generation). 

Frederick was born about 1842. He grew to manhood, was about 
::2 years old, when he drowned in the Wabash river above the Vera 
Cruz dam, where he went swimming alone. The writer distinctly 
remembers the sad occurrence. 
(C). Elizabeth Moser, Knoble, (Fourth Generation). 

Elizabeth was also born in Oberamt Muenster, Canton Bern, 
Switzerland, about 1844. She became the wife of Anthon Knoble, 
time not known, and according to last account obtained, she lived in 
Indian Territory, where she died Jan. 18, 1902, leaving husband 
and one son, name not given. 



Descendants of Deacon David Baaragartner 153 

(D). Sarah Moscr, Hilt, (Fourth Generation), Battle Ground, Ind. 
Sarah was born about 184f) in Switzerland. She was married to 
a Mr. Hilt, and thej live, according to last account, in Battle Ground, 
Ind. She has children but their names and time of birth could not be 
learned. 

(E). Caroline Moser, Buehler, (Fourth Generation). 

Caroline was born about 1S48, also in Switzerland. She mar- 
ried Fred Buehler, who lives just south across the river from Vera 
'Cruz. She has suffered much bj mental affliction and was finally 
taken to the Asylum where she now stajs. Four children were born 
to them at above named place: — 

1. An infant, (Fifth Generation). 

2. Emma, Sept. 20, 1880. .» " 

3. Edward, Nov. 10, 1884. 

4. William, died 1^2 jears old, " *' 

(F). Rachel Moser, Geisel, (Fourth Generation), Vera Cruz, Ind. 

Rachel was born in 1850 in Switzerland. Sheis married to a Mr. 
Geisel and they live about 3 to 4 miles northeast of \'era Cruz, Ind. 
The following are their children all born where they live. 

(Fifth Generation). 



1. 


Clara, 


Apr. 


8, 


1870. 


2. 


Lydia, 


Feb. 


4, 


1874. 


3. 


Albert, 


Apr. 


16, 


1876. 


4. 


Bertha, 


Aug, 


29, 


1879. 


5. 


George, 


Oct. 


20, 


1880. 


6. 


Adolph, 


Mar. 


8, 


1882. 


7. 


Mary, 


June 


4. 


1883. 




died Aug. 13, 


. 1883, 


8. 


Samuel, 


Aug. 


11, 


1886. 


9. 


Lillie, 


Aug, 


11, 


1886, 




died th 


e same 


day, 





Chapter V. 

Sec, in. 



David Moser, (Third Generation). 

David, third child of Barbara Moser, nee Baumg-artner, entered 
upon the pathway of life in Petit Champoz near Moutier, Canton, 
Bern, Switzerland, Mar. 8, 1808. He had a good German education 
and knew some French. He was a hatter by trade. The writer can 
well remember wearing wool hats which he made from lambs wool. 
He emigrated to America in 1853, and first stopped in Wayne Co., 
Ohio, then moved to Indiana where land was yet cheaper. He set- 
tled about half a mile northeast of Vera Cruz. Ind., just across the 
west Adams county line. He was quite a friend of music, vocal and 
instrumental, and a good singer himself. He belonged to the Men- 
nonite Church. He entered the marriage bond with Anna Ha- 
begger, a sister to a former Mennonite minister, June 10, 1S34. She 
was born July 16, 1810, and died Apr. 15, 1878. He died Jan. 24, 
1879, both are laid to rest in the cemetery just across the county 
line, west from the house they lived in. He was of a jovial and en- 
tertaining disposition. The following children were born to them 
in Petit Champoz, near Moutier, Canton, Bern, Switzerland. 

(A). Jacob Moser, (Fourth Generation), Lima, Ohio. 

Jacob began his busy earthly life Apr. 13, 1835. He received a 
good education in the German in the fatherland, and soon acquired 
a good English education in America after his arrival here with his 
parents in 1853. Not desiring to travel the path of life selfishly 
alone, he found his life-companion in Elizabeth Neuenschwander in 
1860. He was first engaged in Drug Business in Vera Cruz, Ind. In 
1861 he moved to Blufftcn, Ohio, where he continued in the same 
business until in 1870, when he removed to Lima, Ohio, and con- 
tinued the same business for six more years, in partnership with 
John Meyer. Then he went into the furniture and undertaking 
business; but for the last fourteen years he has been looking after 
the interest of the "Loan and Savings Association" of Lima, as its 
secretary and treasurer, which is quite a responsible position to fill. 
This is evidence of his able qualifications for that place, and that he 
has the esteem and confidence of the constituency of the Associa- 
tion. He is an active member of the German Reformed Church in 
Lima, Ohio. He is also prominently connected with several lodges, 
and is active in Republican politics. For nine years he was a mem- 



Descendants of Deacon David Bautng-artner 155 

ber of the School Board of Lima, and acted as its secretary, and thus 
was actively eng-aged in furthering educational interests. He also 
served several years as a director of the Lima National Bank, and 
was prominently associated with other enterprises of the city. In- 
deed, his life was one full of activity, responsibility and aggressive- 
ness. His influences were felt in the family, the Church and the 
city. He is still carrying heavy burdens for an old man. which is 
proof of a vigorous mind and body. Four children have found wel- 
come into their family circle, namely: — 

1. Emma Moser, Stueber, (Fifth Generation"), Lima, Ohio. 

Emma entered upon the arena of time in Bluffton, Ohio, June 
20, 1863. She enjoyed good school privileges, and for a time in her 
childhood day bad to be kept out of school to avoid over-taxation of 
the body. She became the estimable wife of Dr. Stueber, of Lima, 
Ohio, Apr. 10, 1884. Rev. J. H. Stepler performed the marriage 
ceremony. He is an Eye Specialist, and is meeting with commend- 
able success. Tbey are both members of the Reformed Church in 
Lima. He was born at Sachsenflur, Baden, Germany, May 18, 1860. 
To them are born, 

a. Paul, Feb. 17, 1886. (Sixth Generation). 
He was born in Petersburg, Hlinois. He is now a medical 
student at Ann Arbor, Michigan. 

b Ruth, Feb. 13, 1S'»1. (Sixth Generation). 
She was born in Lima, Ohio. She is now attending Lima Col- 
lege, where she is preparing herself for some Conservatory of Music. 
She expects to make music her life work. 

2. Bertha Moser. Deakin, (Fifth Generation), Lima, Ohio. 
Bertha was welcomed to this world, May 12, 1865, in Bluffton, 

Ohio. She also received a good education. She is a member of the 
Reformed Church in Lima. She entered into the matrimonial bond 
with W. H. Deakin Oct. 6, 1887. He was born at Richford. Wiscon- 
sin, Feb. 10, 1S62. He is a business merchant. They have three 
children, born in Lima, Ohio, namely; 

a. Carl, Nov. 14, 1888. (Sixth Generation). 

He is now at Ann Arbor University, Mich., studying Civil 
Ethics. 

b. lima, May 21, 1890. (Sixth Generation). 

She is now a music student, and studying voice culture. 

c. Albert W., Feb. 16, 18<>9. (Sixth Generation). 
He is an ioyalid. 



156 Historical Sketches of Seven Generations 



3. Calvin Moser, (Fifth Generation). 

Calvid was born Sept. 21, lSf)7, and died July 16, 1893. 

4. Dr. Albert Moser, (Fifth Generation). 

Albert began the conflicts of life May 2, 1870, and died Dec. 8, 
1903. He was a promising: young man, full of ambition. He availed 
himself of the opportunity of obtaining a splendid education, and 
succeeded well in qualifying himself for itaportant positions in life. 
He graduated in the Lima High School, then in the Oberlin Univer- 
sity and then in Harvard University. After this he enlisted in the 
Army as a surgeon. He was in Japan, also in China and in the 
Philippines. Then he came back to the United States, his health 
failing- him. he went up into the Adirondac Mountains in N. Y., 
for two years, but finally succumbed to consumption. 

(3.) Mary Moser, Ramseyer, (Fourth Generation). Lima, Ohio. 

Mary was initiated into this life in Petit Champoz, Canton Bern, 
Switzerland, May 28, 1830. She obtained a common school educa- 
tion. She united with the German Reformed Church when a young 
woman. She entered the marriage bond with Abraham Ramseyer, 
a half-seccnd cousin, in 1862. She is now residing in Lima, Ohio, 
to which place they moved, some years ago, where he died. I^or the 
history of her children see Chapter III, Sec. L letter "C", No. 1, 2, 
3 and 4. 

(C ) Eliza Moser, Saurcr, (Fourth Generation^. 

Eliza began her journey in life in Petit Champoz, near Mou- 
tier, Cintoa Bern, Switzerlani, Mar. 12,183'^. She received only 
a common school education. She became a member of the Reform- 
ed Church in Switzerland, when a young girl of 13 }ears. In ls53 she 
came to America with her parents. She became the wife of Gott- 
lieb Saurer, May 19, 1860. They first lived in Wells Co., Ind., but 
in 1873 the}- moved on the farm they bought three-fourths of a mile 
northeast of the French township election schoolhouse. The farm 
was heavily timbered, and low and wet and required much hard labor, 
to secure a comf'^'*-''nle living. In this they did succeed. Later by 
reason of age thc^ mjIu the farm and moved to Bluffton, Ind., where 
some of their children lived- Here they united with the First Ref. 
Church. She died May 12, 1904. She was an affectionate mother 
and possessed an amiable disj>osition. He is still living in this 
place. The fruit of this union consists of the following children:— 

1. Edward Saurer, (Fifth Generation), BlulTton, Ind. 
^ Edward found admission to the pathway of life in "^Vells Co., 
Ird., Jan. 13, 1861. He received a common district school education. 
He followed farming for bis father until he reached his majority. 



Descendants of Deacon David Baumgartner 157 

when he went to Bluffton, Ind., entering into the sale of organs and 
sewing machines. In 18S9 he went into harness business, but after a 
brief time sold out, and began clerking. Next he engaged in selling 
farming implements, then he entered actively into Democratic poli- 
tics and gradually gained the confidence of his party constituency 
until he was nominated for treasurer of Wells Co., Ind., and was 
successfully elected in November 1904, and again re-elected in 1906. 
He became a member of the Reformed Church of Vera Cruz, Ind., in 
1875. He took unto him«elf a wife in the person of Lucinda Mast, of 
Bluffton, Ind., Aug. 9, 18S7. She also is a member of the Reformed 
Church. He transferred his membership to the First Reformed 
Church in Bluffton, Ind., in 1887. To them were born two sons, 
namely: 

a. Harold Dale, Dec. 1, 18SS, {Sixth Generation), Bluffton, 

Indiana. 
Harold Dale graduated from the Bluffton High School in l'>07. 
He is a member of his parents' church. 

b. Paul Mast, July 27, 1890, (Sixth Generation), Bluffton, 

Indiana. 
Paul Mast is now in his third year High School. He also is a 
member of his parents' church. 

2. Ida Saurer, Hocker, (Fifth Generation), Elreno, Oklahoma. 

Ida was welcomed to this world Apr. 5, 1802. She attended dis- 
trict school only. She was confirmed and taken into the Reformed 
Church in Vera Cruz, Ind., at the age of 14 years. She became the 
wife of Prof. Frank P. Hocker, Aug. 3, 1887. He has an excellent 
education. Aside from district schools, he attended the Adams Co., 
Fall Normal School at Decatur, Ind., in 1880, when he and the -jcriter 
roomed and boarded together. The winter following' he taojfht s.rhcwi1 
No. 3, in French Township. After this he attended Valparaiso Normal 
College for some time, and also taught school during wister moatbs. 
After completing his work in College he obtained a position as super- 
ini^ndent of the Audubon Schools in Audubon, Iowa, and rctusi^ed 
hcic until r'05, when they moved to Elreno, Oklahocua, where be is 
now manufacturing washing machines. In Iowa he became a T:?m- 
ber of the Methodist E. Church. They are the j ..^ o» %ot toi- 
lowing children, born in Audubon, Iowa, namely: 

a. Karl Gottlieb, Dec. 31, 1892. (Sixth Generation). 

b. Clara Eli7a, July 14, 1899. 

died July 16, 1903. 

c. Alfred FrAnklin, Apr. 29, 1902. 



158 Historical Sketches of Seven Generations 



3. Louisa Saurer, Ashbaucher, (Fifth Generation). 

Louisa beg-aa her vojage of life in Wells Co., Ind., Feb. 27, 
1864. She only could attend common schools. She united with the 
Reformed Church at the age of 14 years. She gave her hand in 
wedlock to Benjamin Ashbaucher, Aug. 10, 1882, who was then a 
resident of Blufifton, Ind. He is a first class photographer, also 
handles organs, pianos and sewing machines. He is also a member 
of the Reformed Church in Blufftoa, of which he has been Elder and 
Sunday-school Supt., ever since he is a member of it. Politically he 
is a Demorcrat, somewhat of a politician and campaigner. She died 
of consumption, March 13, 1900. To them were born in BlufTton, 
Indiana: 

a. George Edw. B., Apr. 17, 1883. (Sixth Generation). 

died of consumption, Dec 9, 1905. 

b. Herman Godfrey, Sepr. 7, 18*>3. (Sixth Generation). 

member of the Reformed Church, 1904. 

c. Hermina Eliza, Sept. 7, 1893. (Sixth Generation). 

member of the Reformed Church, 1904. 

4. Robert Saurer, (Fifth Generation), BlufTton, Ind. 

Robert made his debut in life in Wells Co., Ind., June 4, 18f>5. 
His school privileges were limited to district schools. When 15 years 
old he was confirmed and became a metrber of the Reformed Church 
in Vera Cruz, Ind. He followed farming until he was of age, when 
he went to Bluffton and became a clerk in Tribolet Clothiag Store, 
now Bender, Walmer and Bar, and has now been here for thirteen 
years. Having found favor with Widdella Klick, of BlufTton, he 
won her to his wife Sept. 12, 1890. They are both respected mem- 
bers of the First Reformed Church of Bluffton. In politics he is a 
Democrat. They have no children. 

5. Meta Saurer, Ashbaucher, (Fifth Generation). 

Meta was born in Wells Co., Ind., July 13, 1808. She only 
could attend district schools. She also became a member of the Re- 
formed Church in Vera Cruz, Ind., when about 14 years old. She 
entered matrimonial relations with Godfrey Ashbaucher Oct. 4, 1891. 
He was born in Adams Co.. Ind. He followed farming, threshing, 
then he began clerking, and later entered into the clothing business 
with his brother Fred, and established a great business. She died 
Dec. 3, 1S''2. To them was born one child, who died in infancy. 

6. Lena Saurer, (Fifth Generation). 

Lena was born in Wells Co., Ind., Aug. 7, 1876, died of con- 
sumption May 27, 1903. 



Descendants of Deacon David Bautngartn^r 159 

7. Emma Saurer, (Fifth Generation). 

Emma was born in Wells Co., Ind., Dec. 25, 1872, and died Sept. 
9, 1876. 

8. Mary Eliza Saurer, Linn, (Fifth Generation), Bluffton, Ind. 
Mary E. first saw the light of this world in Adams Co., Ind., 

Apr. 2, 1875. She only had district school privileges. At the age 
of 14 years she was confirmed and made a member of the Reformed 
Church in Vera Cruz, Ind. She gave her hand in marriage to L. A. 
Linn, of Bluffton, Ind., where he is a merchant. 

9. Oswald Frederick Saurer, (Fifth Generation). 

Oswald F. was born in Adams Co., Ind., Nov. 21, 1877, and died 
Sept. 26, 1895. 

10. Alfred Gottlieb Saurer, (Fifth Generation), Bluffton, Ind. 
Alfred G. began the earthly career in Adams Co., Ind., Jan. 28, 

18S0. He is yet single, resides in Bluffton, received a good educa- 
tion. He is now engaged in shoe business and is doing well. 

11. Elma Anna Saurer, (Fifth Generation). 

Elma A. was born in Adams Co., Ind., Jan. 6, 1883, and died 
Apr. 26. 1888. 

(D) Frederick Moser, (Fourth Generation). 

Frederick was born in Petit Champoz near Moutier, Canton 
Bern, Switzerland, Dec. 2, 1840. He' came to America with his 
parents in 1853. He was a cripple in his feet. He was commonly 
called "Fritzly," being small of stature. He had a good German 
education, ar.d could speak some French. For some years he was in 
the drug business in Vera Cruz, Ind., in partnership with his brother- 
in-law Abraham Ramseyer. He also was Post Master for some 
years. Later he sold out to William Mertz, and moved to Lima, 
Ohio, where his brother Jacob liyed. He was never married. He 
died in 18%. 

(E). Rosina Moser, Annen, (Fourth Generation), Magley, Adams 
Co., Ind. 

Rosina was bo'r? iaOberamt Muenster, Canton Bern, Switzerland, 
Feb. 11, 1844, In 1S53 she immigrated with her parentsto America, 
who settled in Adams Co., Ind., near Vera Cruz. V/hen a young wo- 
man she became a member of the Reformed Church, Vera Cruz, Ind. 
Her education was limited. She was married to Christian Annen, 
Dec. 5, 1867. He was born in Lauenen, OberamtSarnen, Canton Bern, 
SwiUerland, O^t. 13. 1834. Forsomeyears they lived aquarterof a mile 
north of the election school house of French township, in Adams Co., 
lun. Later they sold out and bought a farm near Magley, in the 



160 Historical Sketches of Seven Generations 

same county, where thej now live. To them were born the follow- 
ing children, all in the first named place: 

1. Theodore Anncn, (Fifth Generation). 

Theodore was born Sept. 23, 1868, and died Oct. 25, 1868. 

2. Reinhold Annen, (Fifth Generation). 

Reinhold was born Sept. 12, 186<», and died Oct. 1, 186'). 

3. Aldina Annen, (Fifth Generation), Magley, Ind. 

Aldina began her earthly pilgrimage Sept. 16, 1870. She only 
enjoyed district school advantages. She is a member of her parents' 
Church. Her chief occupation is housework. 

4. Leopold Annen, (Fifth Generation), Decatur, Ind. 
Leopold entered this life Oct. 4, 1871. His school privileges 

were limited to district schools. Having won the atlections of Anna 
Parish, they were united in marriage Aug. 24, 1900, but their journey 
together vyas short, her life being cut short Oct. 1, 1903. in Decatur, 
where they lived. His occupation is general work. 

5. Hermina A. Annen, Niblick, (Fifth Generation). 
Herniina A. began her journey of life June 12, 1873. Her school 

opportunities were limited to district schools. Her matrimonial life 
dates from Dec. 24. IS'tS, and closed in death Oct. 24, 1S99, in Mag- 
ley, Ind. 

6. Edward Annen, (Fifth Generation). 

Edward first saw the light of this world Aug. 19, 1875. He re- 
ceived a district school education. He does general work, and is yet 
single. 

7. Emma Annen, (Fifth Generation). 

Emma was born Aug. 4, 1876, and died April 10, 1877. 

8. Albert Annen, (Fifth Generation). 

Albert was born July 22, ls78, and died Sept. 14, 187H. 

9. Albert F. Annen, (Fifth Generation), Magley, Ind. 
Albert F. entered his course of earthly lite Feb. 23, ISSO. He 

also only had rural school privileges. He is also a day laborer. 

10. Franklin D. Annen, (Fifth Generation), Magley, Ind. 
Franklin D. came upon the arena of time March 5, 18S1. He re- 
ceived a common school education, and is employed as a day laborer. 

11. Ella Anncn, (Fifth Generation). 

Ella was born Dec 18, 1886, and died the same day. 

12. Selma Annen. (Fifth Generation). 

Selma was born Jan. 21, 1891, and died Sept. 11, same year. 



A^ 



Chapter V. 

Sec, w. 



Abraham Moser, (Third Generation), Moutier, Switzerland. 

Abraham was the fourth child of Barbara Moser Baumgartner, 
began his earthly life in Petit Champoz, near Moutier, Canton Bern, 
Switzerland about ISIO. By information from Jacob Moser, Lim2, 
Ohio, Abraham was a Knife-Smith. He was married and had chil- 
dren, of which one was called Louis. The family is living on the old 
home place above named. This is all the writer could learn from 
Abraham and his family. 



Chapter V. 

Sec. V. 



Maria Moser, Schwartz, (Third Generation), Moutier, Switzerland, 
Maria was the fifth child of Barbara Moser, nee Baumgartner, 
and was born in Petit Champoz, near Moutier, Canton Bern, Switzer- 
land, 1S12. She was married to John Schwartz. They are members 
of the Mennonite Church in Switzerland. They have some children, 
of which one is named: 

John Schwartz, (Fourth Generation), Wayne Co., Ohio. 

John was born near Moutier, Switzerland, about 1830. He lives 
in Wayne Co., Ohio. No further information could be learned from 
this family. 



Chapter V. 

Sec. VI. 



Lizzie Moser, Gciger, (Fourth Generation). Delemont, Switzerland, 
lizzie was the sixth child of Barbara Moser, nee Baumgartner, 
born in Petit Champoz, nearMoutier, Canton Bern, Switzerland, about 
1814. She was married to a Mr. Geiger, and live close to Delemont. 
Nothing more could be learned of this family. 

11 



Chapter VI. 



Katharina Baumgartner, Neuenschwander. (Second Generation). 

With Katharina another chapter in this history begins. She 
was the third child of Deacon Dayid Baumgartner. by his second 
wife. She was born in Buederich Graben, Jura, Oberamt Courte- 
lary, Canton Bern, Switzerland, about 1772 or 73. The writer failed 
to learn anything deSnite about her family life. She was married 
to John Neuenschwander, time not known, but about 1810, for her 
daughter Elizabeth was born in 1812. which was the only child they 
had. They were Mennonites and lived in Biefenz, Oberamt Muen- 
ster, Canton Bern, Switzerland, where she also died, time not known. 



Chapter VI. 

Sec. I. 



Elizabeth Neuenschwander. Habegger, (Third Generation). 

Elizabeth was born in Biefenz, Oberamt Muenster, Canton Bern. 
Switzerland, May 12, 1S12. She was united in marriage with Rev. 
Peter Habegger, a minister of the Mennonite Church, time not given. 
They eraigr°ated to America in isb5 with four children and settled 
in Adams Co.. Ind., near Berne. She died Feb. 16. 1SV7. m Allen 
Co , Ohio, where she evidently had gone to live with one of her 
children. He was born Feb. 21, 1S09, also where she was born, and 
died in Adams Co., Ind., May 15, 1872. The following children 
were born to them in the Fatherland: — 
(A). Anna Habegger, Steiner, (Fourth Generation), Allen Co., Ohio. 

Anna began her earthly career Jan. 12, 1S34. In 1S65 she came 
to America with her parents, settling near Berne, Ind. Later she 
became the wife of Chrisiian Steiner, a widower. He is now dead. 
.They had no children together. She is a resf^ected member of the 
Swiss Mennonite Church in Alleu Co., Ohio. 



Descendants of Deacon David Baumgartner 163 

(Bj. Barbara Habegger, (Fourth Generation), Allen Co., Ohio. 

Barbara began her earthly journey Sept. 9, 1835. In 1865 she 
came to America with her parents, settling near Berne, Ind. She 
was never married, and lives in Allen Co., Ohio, where sheis a mem- 
ber of the Swiss Mennonite Church. 

(C). Maria Anna Habegger, Neuenschvi/ander, (Liechty), (Fourth 
Generation), Allen Co., Ohio. 
Maria first saw the light of this world March 18, 1839. She also 
came to America in 1865 with her parents. Soon after arriving in 
America near Berne, Indiana, she became united in marriage with 
Michael Neuenschwander. They then settled in Allen Co., Ohio, 
where he also died. Time of their marriage could not be given nor 
time of his death. To them was born one child, namely: 

1. Elizabeth Neuenschwander, (Fifth Generation), Allen Co., 
Ohio. 

Elizabeth was born in Allen Co., Ohio, but the time is not 
learned. Her mother Maria was married again to Jacob C. Lichty. 
Time not learned. They have no children. 

(D). Jacob Habegger, (Fourth Generation), Berne, Ind. 

Jacob was born Oct. 17, 1842, where the rest of the children 
were born, and came to America the same time and to the same 
place, where he has since lived as a farmer. He is a member of the 
Old Mennonite Church, and is loyal to his faith. He was married 
in Switzerland to Katharina Oberli, May 1862. She died May 13, 
1880. May 1881 he again was united in marriage with Katharina 
Nussbaum. By these two unions he had the following children: — 

1. Maria Anna Habegger, Nussbaum, (Fifth Generation), 

Berne, Ind. 

Maria A. was born March 8, 1863, in Muenster, Canton Bern, 
Switzerland, and came to America with her parents in 1865. Her 
educational privileges were limited. She is a member of the Old 
Mennonite Church. She entered the marriage life with Daniel C. 
Nussbaum in 18'>0. He was bore May ^c?. He is a farmer. 

The following children are the fruit of this union: — 

a. Samuel, Sept. 30, 18'n. (Sixth Generation). 

b. Lizzie, Sept. 20, 1893. 

c. Jacob, Mar. 1, 1899. 

d. Philip, Sept. 11, 1901. 

2. Elizabeth Habegger, Nussbaum. (Fifth Generation), Berne, 

Indiana. 
Elizabeth entered the path of life Aug. 8, 1864, also in Switzer- 



164 Historical Sketches of Seven Generationt 

land, and came to America with her parents in 1865. She only had 
limited school advantages. She is a member of the Old Mennonite 
Church. She was married to Solomon I. Nussbaum in 1S89. He 
was born Oct. 17, 1863. He is a farmer bj occupation near Berne. 
To them were born: 

a. Rosa, Dec. 7, 18<K). (Sixth Generation). 

b. Katharina, Jan. 26, 1893. 

c. Lydia, Aug. 7, 1895. " " 

d. Susanna, Nov. 12, 1897. " 

e. Sarah, Sept. 23, 1900. 

f. Emma, Sept. 23, 1900. " " died. 

3. Peter Habegger, (Fifth Generation), Berne, Ind. 

Peter began the shifting scenes of iife near Berne, Ind., Sept. 
15, 1865. He only received a limited education. He is a member of 
the Old Mennonite Church. He took unio himself Rosina Schwartz 
as wife in 1890. She was born Jan. 1, 1S(>6, near Berne, Ind. He is 
farmer. The following children were born to them, but \\\ died, 
namelj; 

a. Katharina, Feb. 6, 1891. (Sixth Generation). Died. 

b. Amelia, May 21, 1892. " 

c. Maria, Sept. 18, 1893. " 

d. Joseph, Apr. 9, 1895. " 

e. Rachel, Apr. 22, 18'»7. » 

f. Rosina, Mar. 10, 1900. " 

g. Adel, " •• 
h. Lina, Mar. 29, 1902. " 

Dates of deaths not given. 

4, Samuel Kabcgeer, (Fifth Generation). Rerne, Ind. 

Samuel entered upon the arena of time near Berne, Indiana, Oct. 
22, 1867. He atienueJ diclrict:>cbccl5 only. •^•» I>elonged to the Old 
Mennonite Church. He vvas a farmer by vocation. He was untied in 
wedlock with Anna Md.c:.- abcu; " " ^^'^^ born Sent. 24. 1870. 

He died in 1905. They bad four chiluicn, namely: 

' -.-.V. IL •'^•''8- (Sixth Generation). 

b. Menro, Mar. 13, 1900. 

c. David. May 25, 1902. 

d. Samuel, Au?. 17, 1904. 



5. Daniel D. Habegger, (Fifth «Jienpni:ui.,. Ccrae, ind. 



Daniel found bis 'liltl'ilion to th:s ^-j-.'i'k !«•-*» i^: 



T-^:.,^, 



Descendants of Deacon David Baumg-artner 165 

Oct. 28, 1869. He only attended district schools, and is a memt)er of 
his father's church. He is a day-laborer, and is unmarried. 

6. Abraham Habegger, (Fifth Generation). 
Abraham was born Oct. 25, 1871, and died Sept. 5, 1877. 

7. Rachel Habegger, (Fifth Generation). 

Rachel was born July 16, 1873, and died Aug. 30, 1877. 

8. Joel Habegger, (Fifth Generation), Berne, Ind. 

Joel was born to the trials of life near Berne, Ind., Nov. 18, 
1874. His school privileges were only that of common schools. He 
is a farmer. He was united in marriage with Elizabeth Mazelin in 
18"'6. She was bora near Berne, Ind., Mar. 31, 1877. This union 
was blessed with the following children: — 

a. Vcrena, Feb. 21, 1897. (Sixth Generation). 

b. Noah, Dec. 26, 1898. 

c. David, Jan. 14, 1901. *' " 

d. Barbara, Aug. 6, 1902. " " 

e. Lina, Nov. 15, 1904. »' 

9. Katharina Habegger, (Fifth Generation). 

Katharina was born June 22, 1876, and died Aug. 22, 1877. 

10. Que bora dead June 22, 1876. 

11. Daniel Habegger, (Fifth Generation), Berne, Ind. 

Daniel entered life's pathway near Berne, Ind., Apr. 5, 1878. 
His school privileges were also meager. He entered matrimony with 
Lina Mazelin in 1900, She was born Sept. 3, 1879. He is a farmer. 
They belong to the Old Mennonite Church. Their children are as 
follows: — 

a. Rachel. Dec. 20, 1901. (Sixth Generation). 

b. Helena, Nov. 10, 1903. 

12. Lina Habegger, Schwartz, (Fifth Generation) Berne, Ind. 

Lina Vias introduced to this life Aug. 18, 1879. She only at- 
tended district schools. She entered the marriage bond with Jacob 
J. Schv.'artz. in 1*»01. He was born June 23, 1S70. He is a farmer. 
They are members of the Old Mennonite Church. Their home is 
made happy with, 

a. Ruben, Mar. 2S, \'>03. (Sixth Generation). 

b. A daughter. 

Now follow the children with Jacob's second wife, all born 
near Eerne, Inn., namclj; 



166 



Historical Sketches of Seven Generations 



13. 


Emmanuel, Apr. 


4. 1S83. 


14. 


Jacob, Feb. 


6, 1885. 


15. 


Noah, Dec. 


18, 1891. 




died Mar. 18, 


1894. 


16. 


John, Sept. 


7, 1894. 


17. 


Anna, Feb. 


23, 1896. 




died June 13, 


1900. 


18. 


Barbara, Apr. 


12, 1898. 


19. 


Amos, Aug. 


18, 1899. 



(Fifth Generation). 



/k7 



Chapter VII. 



Peter Baumgartner, (Second Generation). 

Peter was a son of deacon Dayid Baumgartner. Christian 
Baumgartner, a grandson of Peter, thinks he was born in 1776, from 
the fact that he heard his father saj Peter was 57 years old when he 
died, and it is known that he died near Tavanne, Switzerland in 
1S33. He was born where the rest of his brother's and sister's were 
born. He was married to Barbara Ramseier near Court, Canton 
Bern, Switzerland in 1SI6. She died near Fuet, Switzerland in 1848. 
To them were born two children, a son and a daughter; the latter 
died in infancy. 



/■^J 



Chapter VII. 

Sec, /. 



Abraham Baumgartner, (Third Generation). 

Abraham first saw the light of this world near Court, Canton 
Bern, Switzerland, Aug. 30, 1818, and was baptized bj Rev. John 
Lingg, on Easter Sunday, 1834, and received into the Mennonite 
Church. He was married to Katharina Amstutz Nov. 25, 1S47, by 
Rev. Jacob Nussbaum near Sornetan. She was born near this place 
in 1811, and died near Fuet, Apr. ">, 1869. She was baptized by Rev. 
Nussbaum. To them were born four children near Fuet, Switzer- 
land. He emigrated with his children to America in 1872, and 
settled in the Swiss settlement near Bluffton, Allen Co., Ohio, where 
be died Nov. 27, 1892. 

(A). Abraham Baumgartner, (Fourth Generation). 

Abraham entered upon the arena of time Sept. 4, 1S48. He was 
baptized and received into the Mennonite Church on ICasier 
Sunday 1864 near Corgemont by Rev. David Nussbaum. He em- 
igrated to America in the fall of 1871, and settled near BlutTton. 
Alien Co., Ohio, where he died May 27, 1874. He was never mar- 
ried. 

(B). Christian Baumgartner, (Fourth Generation). Pandora, Put- 
nam Co., Ohio. 

Christian was initiated to the trials of life Nov. 7, ls50, near 
Corgemont, Canton Bern, Switzerland. He was baptized and re- 
ceived into the Mennonite Church on Easier Sunday of lSb7. by Rev. 
Peter Schnegg. He was married to Elizabeth Welty, (a cousin to 
the writer of this history on his mother's side), on Jan. 15, 1874, by 
Rev. J. Moser near Pandora, Putnam Co., Ohio. She was born Aug. 
14 1850 in Putnam Co. Ohio, and baptized and received into the 
Mennonite Church by Rev. J. Moser in 1867. She died Mar. 20. 
18't2, near Pandora, Ohio. Farming was his main occupation until 
he sold his farm in Mar. r»07, and moved to Pandora where he 
bought property. He obtained a good education. He learned Ger- 
man of his father, and also attended French school at Fuet. Switer- 
land in 1863 and <.4. seven months in all. After coming to this 
country he attended public school in Wayne Co., Ohio, for three 
months in 1873. 



Descendants of Deacon David Baumgartser 169 

In 1904 he made a trip to the Holy Land with about eight-hun- 
dred delegates and visitors. He gives a description of this trip as 
follows:~"Oa Mar. 8, 1904 at 4 p. m. the "Grosser Kurfurst" left 
Hoboken, N. Y., with over 800 pilgrims for Jerusalem, to attend 
the Fourth International Sunday-school Convention. We had divine 
services, lectures and Sunday-school on the ocean, and the Mediter- 
ranean Sea. The first attendance at the S. S. Convention was 551, 
and a collection of $100 00. We stopped on our way to the Holy 
Land at the beautiful island of Madeira, at Gibraltar and Algiers. 
Of the Biblical places we visited Malta, Athens, Smyrna, and 
Ephesus; then we landed at Jaffa, and from there we went to Jerusa- 
lem per railway. We also stopped at Constantinople, Beyrout and 
Caifa. Very interesting to me was the communion service, near 
Calvary, of more than 500 attendants from the different denomina- 
tions of all parts of the world, in which all participated in Christian 
unity and devotion. Also the gathering at the convention of about 
1500 persons from twenty-six different countries, representing forty- 
three denominations, in Christian harmony. In the fourteen days I 
was in Jerusalem and vicinity, I visited the following places: — 
Jericho, Dead Sea, Jordan river, Mt. Olivet, Bethany, Bethlehem 
and Hebron. In Jerusalem the Mosques Omar and El-Akoa on 
the Temple site; the Holy Sepulcher, Gordon's tomb, Calvary, Geth- 
semane and many other places of interest. From here on the home- 
ward trip I had a view of a world's granery, Egypt; and then the 
sunny Italy, then returned to New York, arriving May 19, and the 
next day I took the train home." 

He was away from home eleven weeks, traveled about 15,000 

miles, received many blessings under God's care and grace. This 

was certainly a very desirable and delightful trip, and the writer 
wishes he might haye been one of the pilgrims. 

To this union the following children were given, all born near 
Pandora, Putnam Co., (^hio. 

1. Peter Baum^artner, (Fif.h Generation), Pandora, Putnam 
Co., O. 

Peter was admitted to this world Apr. 29, 1875, and was bap- 
tized and admitted to the privileges of the MennoniteChurch by Rev. 
J. Moser, Mar. 2.^, 1S'»4. He has received a rural school education. 
He entered the matrimonial life with Anna Basingcr Sept. 3, r»02. 
She was born Mar. 11, 1S74, and was baptized and received into the 
above named Church by the aforesaid minister Apr. .'^. 1903. They 
live near Pandora, Ohio on a farm. Thus far no addiiion has come 
to the home. 



170 Historical Sketches of Seven Generations 



2. Abraham Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation), Pandora, Tut- 
nam Co., O. 

Abraham entered upon the path of life Aug. 6, 1877. lie re- 
ceived a rural school education. He was baptized and received into 
the Mennonite Church by Rev. J, Moser Mar. 23, 1S94. Not desir- 
ing to travel life's pathway alone he chose his life-companion in the 
person of Elizabeth Habegger, July 22, 1%2. She began her earth- 
ly career near Pandora, Ohio, July IS, 187(). She was baptized and 
received into church-fellowship by Rev. J. Moser Mar. 23, l.'<'t4. 
They live near Pandora, O. He is a farmer. To them were born at 
above named place, 

a. Silvia Viola, Sept. 7, 1903. (Sixth Generation). 

b. Erving Victor, Dec. 6, 1904. 

3 John Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation), Stuttgart, Ark. 

John made his debut on the arena of time July 28, 1880. He 
was baptized and received into the Mennonite Church by Rey. J. 
Moser, in 1897. He graduated from the Pandora High School Apr. 
12, 1900. He was married to Lon Ella Van Arsdel, a popular young 
lady of Stuttgart, Arkansas, Apr. 25, 1908, where he teaches school. 

4. Fannie Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation), Pandora, Ohio. 

Fannie entered upon her journey of life Mar. 7, 1883. She made 
good use of her school privileges. She was baptized and accepted 
into the Mennonite Church by Rev. J. Moser in iS'>7. She has at' 
tended the Bible Training School of Ft. Wayne, Ind., preparatory to 
special work in her church and the world. 

5. Katie Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation). 

Katie began her career in this life Apr. 5, IHSO. She also made 
good use of her school advantages. She -.vas baptized and received 
into the Mennonite Church by Rev. J. Moser Apr. 10, 1903. On 
account of ill health she went to Upland in California. 

6. Marie A. Baumgartner, (Fifth Generation), Pandora, Ohio. 
Marie was welcomed to this world M.'iv 15, 1SS8. The ordinance 

of baptism was administered to her by Rev. J. Moser Apr. 10, rM33, 
and at the same time became a member of the Mennonite Church. 
She also has received a good district school education. She is now 
keeping house for her father. 

(C). Katharina Baumgartner, Steiner. (now Biederman). (Fourth 
Generation), Bluffton, O. 
Katharina was born Sept. 14, 1852 near Furi, Canton Bern, 



Descendants of Deacon David Baumgartner 171 

Switzerland. She was baptized and received into the Mennonite 
Church on Easter Sunday of 1867 by Rev. Peter Schneggr. She had 
a fair German education. She was united in marriage with L-ivy 
Steiner, near Bluff ton, Ohio, by Rev. J. Moser, time not given. He 
died Mar. 24, 1S92. She again entered matrimonial life with Geo. 
Biederman, Apr. 28, 1S95. They live near Bluff ton, Ohio, where one 
child was born to them, namely:— 

a. Rosalia, Mar. 12, 1897, (Fifth Generation). 

(D). Elizabeth Baumgartner, (Fourth Generation). 

Elizabeth was born near Fuet, Canton Bern, Switzerland, June 
14, 1854. She was baptized and received into the Mennonite Church 
on Easter Sunday 1S6V by Rev. Peter Schnegg. She came to America 
with the family and died near Bluffton, Ohio, June 1, 1876. 



Chapter VIII. 



Ulrich Baumgartner, (Second Generation). 
Ulrich was also a son of deacon David Baumgartner. Time of 
birth not found, but about 1780. He was a Mennonite, and died in 
1846. He was never married. 



Chapter IX. 



Elizabeth Baumgartner, (Second Generation). 
Elizabeth was a daughter of deacon David B. Titne of her birth 
could not be found, but about 1782, T'-nc of her death is net '. -own 
either. 



Chapter X. 



Maria Baumgartner. r?,ecct!d G**ne>- = :-jn ». 
Msiia v^as also a daughter of deacon David B. No record of Let 
birth could be found but about 17S4. She dieu .<u l?<4s= 



Chapter XI. 

Anna Baumgartner, Schneck, (Second Generation). 
Anna was born in Buderich Graben, Canton Bern, Switzerland. 
Time of her birth is not positively known, but about 17'>0. She 
was baptized bj Rev. David Baumg^artner Aug. 17, 1S14, on Gorg-e- 
montberg after Catechism. The time of his death is not 
known. She was married to Abraham Schneck, a deacon in the 
Mennonite Church on Sonnenberg, Canton Bern, Switzerland; about 
1810. His father was also a deacon in a society near 
by. This union was blessed with the following children, namely: — 



Chapter XL 

Sec. I. 



Christian Schneck, (Third Generation). 

Christian was born December 5, 1811 on Sonnenberg, Canton 
Bern, Switzerland. He received a good German education. He was 
a carpenter by trade. He entered marriage life with Elizabeth Leh- 
man, (a twin sister to Kath. Lehman, who was the mother of Dr. C. 
C. Baumgartner), Mar. .15, 1834, Rev. David Baumgartner solemnizing 
the wedding act. They lived on Corgemontberg. or Sonnenberg, 
Canton Bern, Switzerland, where all their children were born. They 
moved to America in 1852, or 53, and settled in Adams Co., Ind., on 
a farm, which now constitutes the northeast part of the town of 
Berne. In lSo9 he moved to Hickory Co., Missouri, where he died 
Sept. 11, 1870 of quick consumption. 67 years and '' months old. She 
died from blood poison Aug. 27, LS^7, at the age of 72 years. 3he 
was ailing for twenty years, and was impaired mentally. The last two 
years of her lite on earth her mind became a total blank, but the two 
last days before death, her mind again was clear. Both gave evi- 
dence before death of their salvation. To them were born three sons. 
namely: — 

(A). The oldest, not named, born 1838, (I-'ourth Generation), died 
eight weeks old. 

(B). The second, not named, born 1^44, (Fourth Generation), died 
on the day bora. 



Descendants of Deacon David Baumgartner 




Abraham Schncck. 



(C). Abraham Schneck. (Fourth Generation), Berne, Ind. 

Abraham was initiated to the 
trials of this life on Corgeaont- 
bergr, Canton Bern, Switzerland, 
Feb. 11, 1846. In 1852 or 53 he 
emigrated with his parents to 
America, settling in Adams Co., 
Ind., amidst the heayy timbered 
white oak land now the N. E. 
quarter of the town of Berne. He 
united with the MennoniteChurch 
in Berne, Apr. 18, 18&2. He was 
catechised, baptized and received 
into church bj his uncle Rev 
Peters. Lehman. He only re-* 
ceived Smonthsof district school- 
ing, but availing himself of other 
opportunities for gaining an edu- 
cation, he learned to become a 
good reader and writer. He be- 

Lina Bichsel, of Elkton, Mo , July 4""l877' %\''''^''"i^M'^^ "^'^^ 
tt'pH Vtt ;,,-^ ( ■ ■'"'•'"iJ-5, 10/7. The nuptial kno^ was 

tied bj his afore mentioned uncle. After twelve years, in ijo Tu! 
died of consumption, at the age of 32 jears. 10 months' and 1'days 

189,7 T^°'°''''°'''^^^^^'^P^^^''t« b-d moved In jfo' 
8 be moved back to Berne, Ind., with his children. On Aug 4* 
lb>7 he again was united in marriage with Verena Neuenschwand;r' 
His vocation in life consisted in farming in Mo. painTinrtrim 
m.ng of grapes and shrubbery and pruning trees He is . . Kr ' 
servant of Berne as night-watchm'a n sin^ce o"' 5 1893 an'^^d .' 
charges his duty most faithfully and carefully to the great satfsfac 
tion of his townsmen. He also takes care a/iZ n I l^^'^^""^- 

or the Cottage Hotel, and the G. K.^lTk^R^lp., t 7a ^'Ze ' 
he was necessitated to pass through many sorrows in htearthV 
career, but his faith in God supported and anchored him in Christ 
^e everlasting Rx-k. The following are bis children with his first* 
wife, all born near Elkton, Hickory Co., Mo.- ' 

1. AlbertOtto Schneck, (Fifth G<ncralicn), Ft. Wa3ne. Jrd 

Albert O. first saw the light of this world June 18 1S78 Hi. 
only attended district schools. He was h;.nt,-v.^ ! ^ 

the MennoniteChurch at Bene, by Rev s'Fs'.r 'If "*" 

is'id TT^ • , --'uc, _iy i\eF. a. t. bprunger. Mar. 2^ 

18H. lie ,san employee in a Box Manufactory, in Ft. Wayne 
xnd. he is yti single. vvayne, 



174 Historical Sketches of Seven Generations 

2. Edwin Christian Schneck, (Fifth Generation), Chicago, 111. 

Engineer. 

Edwin C. came upon the scene of action Dec. 2,^, 1879. lie only 
had rural school advantages. He was baptized and received into the 
Mennonite Church at Berne, bj Rev. S. F. Sprunger, Apr. 8, 1898. 
He is an engineer in Chicago, 111. He was married to Grace Coopei*, 

of Ft. Wayne, Ind., Oct 1*»04. To them was born at 53 Beethoven 

Place, Chicago, 

a. Lorain, Jan. 16, 1908. (Sixth Generation). 

3. Selma Elizabeth Schneck, (Fifth Generation), Berne, Ind. 

Nurse. 
Selma E. was welcomed to this life Oct. 14, 18S1. She only had 
common school privileges. She was baptized and admitted into the 
Mennonite Church by Rev. S. F. Sprunger, Apr. 8, 1898. Her voca- 
tion is nursing. She attended the Alma Sanitarium, in Michigan, 
for two years, and then six years in a hospital in Illinois. She is 
thus well fitted for the work of nursing, and is already known for her 
ability in her calling. 

4. Estella Anna Schneck, (Fifth Generation). 

Estella A. was born Jan. 10, 1884, and died of typhoid fever 
Sept. 9, 1888, in Mo. 

5. Emilin Dora Schneck, (Fifth Generation), Ft. Wayne, Ind. 

Cashier. 

Emilin D. was introduced to this life Apr. 6, 1SS6. She attended 
the Berne schools. She was baptized and received into the Menno- 
nite Church at Berne, by Rev. S. F. Sprunger, Feb. 9, 1902. She is 
cashier in the grocery department of "The White Fruit House", Ft. 
Wayne, Ind., and is giving good satisfaction. She is single yet. 

6. John Cleophas Schneck, (Fifth Generation), Chicago, 111. 

Engrineering. 

John C. was admitted to this life July 27, l8s8. He has a com- 
mon school education. He is single yet. He recently completed a 
course in engineering at Chicago and then enlisted for a three years^ 
term in the U. S. Navy. He is now receiving his mail in care of the 
U. S. S. Hancock, New York City. 

7. and 8. Ivan Edward and Eyrina Etna, June 27, 1902, 

(Fifth Generation). Children with second wife, 
twins, born in Berne, Ind. 



/ 7^ 



Chapter XI. 

Sec. II and III. 



' Abrabatn Schneck was born on Corgemontberg, Canton Bern, 
Switzerland in 1x14. He was a son of Anna Baumgartner, Schneck. 
He is dead, but date of death not known. He was married and had 
a son named Abraham, but it is not known whether he is yet alive. 

Jacob was born at the same place where his brothers were, in 
1816. He also is dead, but date of death not known. He was married, 
and had one son, who died in infancy. 



177