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Full text of "British Columbia from the earliest times to the present"

BRITISH 
COLUMBIA 

FROM THE EARLIEST TIMES 
TO THE PRESENT 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



VOLUME IV 



THE S. J. CLARKE PUBLISHING COMPANY 

VANCOUVER PORTLAND SAN FRANCISCO CHICAGO 
1914 




SIR RICHARD McBRIDE 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



SIR RICHARD McBRIDE, K. C. M. G. 

A remarkable career is that of Sir Richard McBride, who at the age of 
thirty-three years, when most young men are taking the initial steps that lead 
to prominence, became premier of British Columbia and has ever since filled 
this office. There is probably no public man within the confines of the province 
who is better known than Sir Richard and there is certainly no one whose record 
has won greater admiration and the absolute indorsement in larger measure of 
the major portion of the population of the province. 

Sir Richard McBride comes of a well known British Columbia family, his 
father being Arthur H. McBride, who held a distinguished place among the earlier 
pioneers of British Columbia. He was a son of the late Thomas McBride, of 
County Down, Ireland, where his birth occurred June 26, 1835, in the city of 
Down, where he later completed his education. In 1854, when nineteen years 
of age, he joined the Royal South Down Militia, in which he won the rank of 
color sergeant and pay sergeant. He proved an excellent soldier, being imbued 
with the highest military sense of honor, and for five years he remained with 
his regiment. He then decided to go to British Columbia because of the stories 
which had reached him concerning the gold discoveries in the Fraser river dis- 
trict. Visiting eastern Canada, he made his way thence to California, where he 
remained for two and a half years,' arriving in British Columbia in the spring 
of 1863. Going direct to the Cariboo district, he there engaged in mining through 
the summer on Williams and Lightning creeks and at the latter location acquired, 
in partnership with others, a large claim but owing to the difficulty of working 
it, they had to abandon the enterprise, although the indications of high-grade ore 
were excellent. At the close of the mining season Mr. McBride returned to 
Victoria, having enjoyed but indifferent success in his mining venture. He then 
accepted a position as sergeant on the police force and, advancing quickly in 
the service, soon became head of the department. Upon the demise of Captain 
Pritchard, in 1870, Mr. McBride was appointed to fill the vacancy and remained 
in that position until 1878, when he was appointed to the office of warden of 
the provincial penitentiary at New Westminster, which had just been completed. 
At the same time he received a commission as justice of the peace under the 
jurisdiction of the sheriff of New Westminster. 

On the 8th of November, 1865. Mr. McBride was united in marriage to Miss 
Mary D'Arcy, a native of Limerick, Ireland, who belongs to the Roman Catholic 
church, while he was a member of the Church of England. Mr. McBride was 
always an ardent disciplinarian, and great credit is due him for founding the 
militia regiments of both Victoria and New Westminster, giving his services 
gratuitously for a number of years as drill instructor to these regiments and 
bringing both to a high state of efficiency. Fraternally Mr. McBride was a mem- 
ber of the Masons and the Ancient Order of United Workmen. His long and 
honorable public career brought him great credit, and the high sound which the 
family name enjoys in British Columbia is but a recognition of his valiant 
efforts on behalf of the general public and is now worthily carried on by his 
distinguished son, Sir Richard. 

5 



6 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

It was in the family home, then being maintained at New Westminster, Brit- 
ish Columbia, that Sir Richard McBride was born December 15, 1870. He 
attended grammar and high schools in his native city until he reached the age of 
sixteen years, when he entered Dalhousie University at Halifax, Nova Scotia, 
being graduated from that institution with the degree of LL. B. in 1890, when 
but twenty years of age. Returning to British Columbia, he then read law under 
T. C. Atkinson, while subsequently his preceptor was the Hon. Angus J. McColl, 
the late chief justice of British Columbia. In July, 1892, Sir Richard was called 
to the bar and began practice as junior member of the firm of Corbould, McColl, 
Wilson & Campbell at New Westminster. This relationship continued until 
1893, after which Sir Richard practiced alone until 1895- He then formed a 
partnership with W. J. Whiteside, which, however, was dissolved the next year 
when he became connected with H. F. Clinton, who has since passed away. 
After the death of Mr. Clinton, Sir Richard formed the firm of McBride & 
Kennedy. He was named a king's counsel in 1905. The ability which he dis- 
played won him distinguished honors along professional lines and further indic- 
ated his fitness for political preferment. Questions of vital importance regard- 
ing municipal, provincial and national affairs have always had the deepest interest 
for him and of such he has been a close and discriminating student. 

In 1896 Sir Richard entered the political arena, unsuccessfully contesting 
New Westminster in the Dominion general election. In 1898 he was returned 
as a member of the British Columbia legislature for Dewdney Riding, at the 
general election, as a supporter of the Turner government. On June 21, 1900, 
he was called to the executive department of the provincial government, enter- 
ing the cabinet as minister of mines, but owning to a difference on a matter of 
policy, he resigned from the government the following year. Going again before 
the people, he was reelected by acclamation and in 1902 chosen leader of the 
opposition in the legislature, becoming premier of British Columbia on June i, 
1903, having since been returned to power at the general elections of 1907, 
1909 and 1912 and holding this office at present. He sits as senior member for 
the city of Victoria and besides being premier still holds the portfolio of minister 
of mines. It was he who won for the conservative party such a glorious victory 
in this province. He introduced party lines in provincial politics when he became 
premier in 1903 and in that way became the head of the first liberal-conservative 
government of the province. 

In September, 1896, Sir Richard married Miss Margaret McGillivray and 
to them have been born six daughters. 

One of the foremost statesmen of the Canadian west, Sir Richard was in 
attendance at the coronation of Their Majesties, King George and Queen Mary. 
In 1912 merited distinction came to him when, as one of the birthday honors, he 
was created a Knight of the Cross of St. Michael and St. George- He was invested 
with the insignia of this distinguished order by His Royal Highness the Duke 
of Connaught, the governor-general, at Victoria, in October, 1912. Another 
distinguished honor was conferred upon Sir Richard McBride on March 22, 
1913, when the degree of LL. D. was conferred upon him by the University of 
California. 



WILLIAM MASSEY SILCOCK. 



William Massey Silcock is secretary and treasurer of the Bungalow Finance 
& Building Company, Ltd., in which connection he has taken active part in the sub- 
stantial improvement and adornment of Vancouver. He was born in Warrineton 
Lancashire England February 23, 1877, a son of William and Annie Rovai 
(Nightingale) Silcock, representatives of old Lancanshire families, originally 
from West Houghton, near Wigan, England. 




W. MASSEY SILCOCK 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 9 

In private schools of Cheshire, England, William M. Silcock pursued his edu- 
cation and afterward was employed in Parr's Bank of Liverpool and London, re- 
maining in that institution in different capacities for fourteen years. In 1907 he 
came to Canada and for two years occupied various positions. In 1909, 
however, he came to Vancouver and in 1911 entered into employment with F. W. 
Killam in bungalow construction, the business having formerly been conducted 
under the name of the Bungalow Construction Association with Mr. Killam as 
proprietor. In May, 1912, it was incorporated and Mr. Silcock was elected secre- 
tary and treasurer and also one of the directors. The bungalow is preeminently 
a feature of western home building. It is splendidly adapted to this section of the 
country, where the warm Pacific current so tempers the climate, that vegetation 
grows in luxuriance, for the bungalow is peculiarly adapted to the adornment 
furnished by landscape gardening. It seems in such conditions a very part of the 
scene and in the house construction there is to be found every feature of light, 
air, sanitation, utility, comfort and beauty. The company of which Mr. Silcock 
is now secretary and treasurer has erected some of the most attractive bungalows 
' in the city, embodying the most modern styles of bungalow architecture, many 
of their buildings showing marked originality as well as beauty of design. 

In addition to his partnership in the Bungalow Finance & Building Company, 
Ltd., Mr. Silcock is also secretary and treasurer of the Lumberman's Trust Com- 
pany, Ltd., of Vancouver, and is secretary of the Canadian Automatic Fender 
Company, Ltd., of this city. 

Mr. Silcock is a conservative in politics, a member of Christ church and 
belongs to the Burrard Cricket Club associations which indicate much of the 
nature of his principles, the rules which govern his conduct and the nature of his 
recreation. Advancement and success have come to him as the merited reward 
and logical result of capability, close application, determination and commend- 
able ambition. 



JOHN EDWARD HAWKSHAW. 

John Edward Hawkshaw, the well known manager of the local branch of the 
Northern Crown Bank, has made banking his profession from his earliest youth 
and has come to be known as an upholder of conservative business principles, 
tempered with a nicely balanced progressiveness. 

Mr. Hawkshaw was born in London, Ontario, on the 9th of October, 1880, 
and is the second eldest son of William Sterne and Eliza Murton (Shore) 
Hawkshaw, the former a native of Dublin, Ireland, and the latter of London, 
Ontario, her father now deceased, being Captain Thomas Shore, formerly of 
Bath, England. 

On the paternal side Mr. Hawkshaw comes of a Danish-Anglo family for 
generations resident in Ireland, his grandfather, the late Hugh Hawkshaw 
having been a naval officer and afterward commander of the Royal Irish Con- 
stabulary. He gave to Britain's service on the high seas, two sons, his elder son 
the late Richard Parry Hawkshaw, R. N., being for years paymaster of the 
fleet on the China station: and the younger son Hugh Benjamin, who retired 
with the rank of commander, now resides at Vevey, Switzerland. The second 
son, father of the subject of this narrative, after receiving his training on the 
good ship Conway, entered the merchant service, resigning as first officer in 
his early youth, when he came to Canada and took up the pursuit of agriculture 
at Glanworth, county of Middlesex, Ontario, where he resided with his family 
for thirty years and during which time he .made twenty-seven voyages across 
the Atlantic, importing thoroughbred Shropshire sheep. 

In 1904 the father removed with his family to British Columbia, locating at 
Chilliwack, where he now resides, having given his time and attention to agri- 
cultural pursuits with such" results as evidenced by the fact that m January, 



10 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

1913, he received the provincial government cup awarded to the owner of the 
best eighty-acre farm in British Columbia. 

John Edward Hawkshaw acquired his education in Huron College school, 
London, Ontario, which at that time was under the management of his cousin, 
Rev. Herbert G. Miller, M. A., late principal of the Huron Divinity College, 
now known as the Western University, and at the Collegiate Institute, London, 
Ontario. He completed his third year at the collegiate on the 3ist of March, 
1899, and on the nth of April, 1899, entered the Canadian Bank of Commerce in 
Dunnville, Ontario, that province, thus beginning a career in banking which has 
brought him continuous advancement and distinction. While in the employ of 
the first institution, which he served for seven years, he was connected with 
eleven different branches in Ontario, Yukon, Alaska and British Columbia. He 
came to this province in January, I9or, and five years later resigned to accept 
a position in the Northern Crown Rank, Vancouver, and in 1909 was placed 
in charge of the New Wesminster branch, one of the leading financial insti- 
tutions in the city. Its affairs have since claimed practically all of his attention 
and he is conducting here a safe and reliable bank, carrying on a general banking 
business along progressive lines tempered with a conservatism which thoroughly 
safeguards the interests of the depositors and which has brought the institution 
a reputation for reliability and trustworthiness. 

In 1909 Mr. Hawkshaw married Miss Mabel Edith Honor McClean, of 
Wexford, Ireland, who came to British Columbia, with her parents in 1903. 
Her father, Washington G. McClean, now deceased, was for many years sub- 
manager of the Provincial Bank of Ireland in Wexford, and was well known 
throughout that part of Ireland. Mr. Hawkshaw is a member of the Church 
of England, and is a devotee of all kinds of outdoor sports, taking a keen interest 
in the Royal City Lacrosse team, known as the Salmonbellies, of whom he is 
always an ardent rooter. During the winter months he is a regular attendant 
at the skating rink in New Westminster, which is one of the finest in British 
Columbia. While in the Yukon he gave a great many leisure hours to this sport 
as well as to curling. 

For three years Mr. Hawkshaw was a member of the Fifth Regiment, 
Canadian Militia, of Victoria, British Columbia, having joined that organization 
shortly after his arrival from eastern Canada in the year 1901. He is well known 
in Vancouver, being a member of various clubs as well as the Westminster 
Club, and holds membership also on the Board of Trade and in the Progressive 
Association in New Westminster. These connections indicate something of 
the scope and variety of his interests though they do not show the full extent 
of his work for his earnest desire since his residence here has been to assist 
in promoting the interests of the Royal City, as he considers her worthy of 
the best work of her friends, lie is ready at all times to cooperate in move- 
ments to advance the city's welfare and to promote its growth, his faith in 
which has been evidenced by himself investing in a home, which is centrally 
located on Pine and Third avenues. 



LEWIS FRANCIS BONSON. 

Lewis Francis Bonson has many claims to honor and distinction, for he is a 
veteran of the Crimean war, was for many years an able member of the English 
Corps of Royal Engineers and came as a pioneer to British Columbia. The re- 
tirement which he is now enjoying in his home in New Westminster is well de- 
served, for it rewards many years of honorable and faithful labor. He has 
reached the advanced age of eighty-two and his life has been upright and honora- 
ble in all its relations, serving as a source of courage and inspiration to all for- 
tunate enough to come within the close circle of his friendship. He was born 
in Peeblesshire, Scotland, on the Tweed river, May 10, 1831, and is a son of 




LEWIS F. BONSON 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 13 

Henry and Marion Bonson, both of whom were representatives of old Scotch 
families, the father having been for many years in the employ of Sir Thomas 
Gibson Carmichael, owner of Castle Craig. 

Lewis F. Bonson acquired his education in the public schools of Kirkurd and 
at the age of fifteen entered upon a period of apprenticeship to the joiner's and 
wheelwright's trade. Having completed it, he went in 1849 to Edinburgh, where 
he worked as a joiner until 1851, when he went to London, remaining in that city 
for three years. In 1854 the joined the Corps of Royal Engineers at Woolwich, 
thus beginning a connection which brought him success and distinction in later 
years. After a short time spent in Chatham he was sent in 1855 to tne seat of 
the Crimean war, serving until peace was declared in 1856, when he was trans- 
ferred to the garrison of Gibraltar for five months. At the end of that time he 
returned to England and two months later was detailed for special service in 
Central America. Returning in 1858, he spent three months in England and then 
started for British Columbia by way of the isthmus of Panama and up the Pacific 
coast. He brought with him a party for the purpose of preparing the barracks 
and quarters for the detachment of engineers who were following by way of Cape 
Horn and who arrived in 1859. Mr. Bonson continued in the engineering service 
until 1863, winning by his ability and his comprehensive kowledge of the profes- 
sion a position of honor and distinction and recognition as a man of superior 
attainments and powers. In 1863 he received his honorable discharge from the 
Royal Corps and retired to private life, turning his attention to contracting and 
building at New Westminster, a city which numbers him among her most honored 
pioneers. He took a great interest in the advancement and growth of the com- 
munity and did able work of reform and improvement during his period of serv- 
ice as road superintendent for the provincial government, a capacity in which he 
acted from 1876 to 1880. He afterward engaged for a short time in the liquor 
business but disposed of this in 1892 and purchased a farm of three hundred and 
seventy acres at Keatsey, nine miles from New Westminster. He continued to 
improve and develop this property along modern lines for a number of years, 
finally disposing of it in 1905, when he retired and returned to New Westminster, 
where he still makes his home. 

On the I2th of July, 1858, Mr. Bonson was united in marriage to Miss Jemima 
Urquhart, a native of Cromarty, Ross-shire, Scotland, and they became the parents 
of six children : Marion ; Robert ; Henry, who passed away ; Charles ; James ; and 
Nellie. 

Mr. Bonson is a conservative in his political beliefs, and his religious views 
are in accord with the doctrines of the Presbyterian church. He is well known 
and widely beloved in this community, where his venerable age, combined with his 
many sterling qualities of mind and character, endear him to all with whom he 
comes in contact. In his earlier years he met the world confidently and courage- 
ously, making his own way upward in it along worthy pathways, and in his old 
age he reaps a just reward in widespread esteem and respect and in the confidence 
and good-will of many friends. 



CHARLES ERNEST KING. 

The firm of Warden & King, real-estate brokers, is well known in Vancouver, 
conducting a successful business with a large and growing clientele. Mr. King 
was born in Wiltshire, England, on the I5th of February, 1876, a son of George 
Peckham and Eliza (Stillman) King, the former a representative of a Hamp- 
shire family, while the mother was a member of the old Stillman family of 
Newbury and Berks. 

Charles E. King pursued his education in public and private schools of his 
native place to the age of thirteen years, when in 1889 he crossed the Atlantic 
to Canada, making his way to Ontario, where he spent three years. In 1892 



14 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

he arrived in British Columbia, where he has since remained. For a number 
of years he was connected with the construction department of the Canadian 
Pacific Railway, remaining in that service until 1900, when he went to boutn 
Africa for active duty in the Boer war with the Canadian Mounted Rifles, 
his return to British Columbia, in 1902, he again took up construction work 
for lar^e contracting firms of Vancouver and remained in that field of business 
until 1909, when he turned his attention to real-estate dealing, organizing the 
Union Real Estate Company, with which he was connected for two years. 
Later he became junior partner in the firm of Maxwell & King, and in 1911 
Mr. Warden joined the firm under the style of Warden, Maxwell & King. In 
1913 Mr. Maxwell withdrew and the present firm name of Warden & King 
was assumed. They largely handle city and suburban property and also conduct 
a loan and insurance business, representing a number of the leading and reliable 
insurance companies. 

On the 26th of April, 1910, Mr. King was united in marriage to Miss Mabel 
Marion Margctson, the eldest daughter of William and Mary Ann Margetson. 
Miss Margetson was visiting her brothers, prominent real-estate men of Van- 
couver, when she met Mr. King, who sought her hand in marriage. They are 
members of the Church of England, and they have gained many friends during 
their residence in Vancouver. 

Mr. King's military record is a most creditable chapter in his life history. 
Going to South Africa at the time of the Boer war, he enlisted as a private and 
his valorous and loyal service won him the Queen's medal and four clasps. 
He remained in Africa during the war, or for about two years, and was after- 
ward commissioned an officer in the Sixth Regiment of the Duke of Connaught's 
Own Rilles, which office he still fills. In politics he is a conservative but never 
an office seeker. The Masonic fraternity numbers him among its exemplary 
representatives. He holds membership in King Solomon lodge, No. 17, A. F. 
& A. M. of New Westminster, and in Vancouver Chapter, No. 30, R. A. M. 
lie also belongs to the United Service Club and the Progress Club, and 
he is interested in all that pertains to the progress and welfare of the city and 
province, cooperating in many movements which have had direct effect upon 
the development and upbuilding of this section of the country. 



JOHN BUTLER TIFFIN. 

John Butler Tiffin, one of the prominent and substantial citizens of Van- 
couver, lives now practically retired from active business, although he still holds 
the position of president of the Red Cedar Lumber Company, Limited. He is 
one of the pioneers of British Columbia, having come here in 1877, and since 
1878 he has been successfully engaged in the lumber business, having done much 
toward building up this industry and bringing to the world's attention the vast re- 
sources of the province. 

John Butler Tiffin was born on November 24, 1848, in Kent county, Ontario, 
and is a son of Thomas and Elizabeth Tiffin. The father was one of the first 
settlers in what was known then as the "old fields" in the southern part of Kent 
county. John B. Tiffin was educated in the public schools of Ontario and for a 
number of years farmed in that province, until in 1877 the spirit of the west 
lured him to British Columbia, and he has never had occasion to regret 
this step, for it proved the corner stone to an active and successful career which 
not only brought him prosperity but proved a valuable part in opening the 
resources of the country to the world. In 1878 Mr. Tiffin engag'ed in the lum- 
ber business and has ever since been engaged in that line, having now for a 
number of years been president of the Red Cedar Lumber Company, Limited, 
although he has practically retired from active business. He is also a stock- 
holder in a number of other important companies here. 




JOHN B. TIFFIN 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 17 

Mr. Tiffin has always taken deep interest in public enterprises of value and 
for a time served as a director in the Vancouver Exhibition Association. He 
gave further evidence of his public spirit by accepting office as license commis- 
sioner for Vancouver in 1908 and is also an ex-president of the Vancouver 
Amateur Driving Association. He is a tory in politics, strong in his views and 
stands for those things that make for the good of the country. His religious 
faith is that of the English church. Fraternally he belongs to Cascade Lodge, 
A. F. & A. M., and he is a member of the Canadian Club. Careful of his own 
interests and considerate of those of others, Mr. Tiffin has attained to prosperity, 
his every action being worthy of the highest commendation. He is greatly 
interested in the upbuilding of his province along various lines, such as the im- 
provement of stock, horses, cattle, etc. He has generous humanitarian princi- 
ples and suffering humanity, especially children, always touch an answering chord 
in his heart. Mr. Tiffin is a loyal and faithful citizen of Vancouver and, as he 
has proven his worth, enjoys the confidence, esteem and respect of all who have 
had occasion to meet him in a social or business way. 



GEORGE RORIE. 

George Rorie is now secretary and treasurer of the old established firm of 
Ceperley, Rounsefell & Company, Ltd., which stands foremost among the represen- 
tatives of insurance interests in British Columbia. A native of Edinburgh, Scot- 
land, he was born September 30, 1868, his parents being ( ieorge L. and Elizabeth 
(Paterson) Rorie. The father was at one time manager of the Town and County 
Bank at Aberdeen, Scotland, and later became secretary of the National Bank 
of Scotland, Limited, at Edinburgh, in which connection be continued until 
he died in 1886. 

George Rorie attended the Edinburgh Academy and the Edinburgh University. 
He started in the business world in 1886 as an apprentice in the office of F. and 
F. W. Carter, chartered accountants of Edinburgh. When his term of indenture 
had expired he continued as an employe of that firm until 1897, having been 
admitted to membership in the Chartered Accountants Society of Edinburgh 
in 1892. Five years later he went to Perth, Scotland, where he was engaged in 
the private practice of his profession until 1905, when he removed to Dundee, 
Scotland, and again followed his profession in a private capacity until 1908. 
That year witnessed his arrival in Canada and in the month of June he reached 
Vancouver. For a year thereafter he followed the private practice of his pro- 
fession in this city but in 1909 became associated with the old established firm 
of Ceperley, Rounsefell & Company, Ltd., of which he was made secretary and 
treasurer and so continues to the present time. This firm is the oldest and 
most important in its line in British Columbia. It was organized in 1886 and 
conducts a general insurance, financial brokerage, real-estate and loan business. 
They~are general agents in British Columbia for the Phoenix Assurance Com- 
pany, Ltd., of London, England ; the Liverpool & London & Globe Insur- 
ance Company, Ltd. ; the British America Assurance Company ; the Thames 
& Mersey Marine Insurance Company, Ltd ; the Canadian Railway Accident 
Insurance Company ; and the National Provincial Plate Glass & General Insur- 
ance Company, Ltd. They have agencies in all the towns of British Columbia 
and the Yukon Territory. They are likewise the Vancouver agents of the 
Canadian Mortgage Association.' The business of this firm is most carefully 
managed and directed. Each feature is familiar to someone in charge and 
no detail is neglected. The officers have been able to surround themselves with 
a capable corps of assistants and today the clientage of the company makes 
their business in excess of all others in their line in the insurance field in Brit- 
ish Columbia. 



18 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

On the 20th of December, 1899, Mr. Rorie was married at Edinburgh, 
Scotland, to Miss Nina Campbell, a daughter of A. D. Campbell, of Edinburgh, 
formerly of Ederline, Argyleshire, Scotland. Their children are Nancy Kath- 
erine and George Livingstone. The parents hold membership in St. John's 
Presbyterian church and Mr. Rorie also belongs to the Masonic fraternity and 
to the University Club associations which indicate something of the nature of 
his interests and the principles which govern his actions. During his residence in 
Perth, Mr. Rorie served for five years in the Fourth V. B. Black Watch (Royal 
Highlanders) retiring with the rank of captain in 1903. His political service 
covers three years as town councillor of Perth, but since coming to Vancouver 
he has preferred to concentrate his energies upon his business affairs, giving 
undivided attention to his duties as secretary and treasurer of Ceperley, Rounse- 
fell & Company. With thorough training as a chartered accountant to serve 
as the foundation upon which to build success, he has gradually promoted his 
knowledge of business conditions. 

Mr. Rorie has made use of his extensive knowledge of companies affairs 
in another way, for he is the joint author of the Manual of British Columbia 
Company Law, published by the well known firm of Burroughs & Company, Lim- 
ited. The Manual of British Columbia Company Law, a practical handbook for 
the legal profession, directors, secretaries and shareholders, on the formation, man- 
agement and winding up of companies, has as its authors, Alexander Harold 
Douglas. LL. B., of the Middle Temple, barrister-at-law and of the bar of British 
Columbia, and George Rorie, our subject. It comprises six parts, as follows: Part 
i, the Formation and Constitution of a Company ; part 2, Management and Conduct 
of the Business of the Company ; part 3, Winding up of Companies ; part 4, Forms 
and Precedents: part 5, the Statute; part 6, comprehensive index. The book 
also contains the text of the Companies Act and leading cases. The index is 
comprehensive and the collection of forms and precedents complete and valuable 
from an instructive point of view. The book should prove of great value to 
the commercial fraternity of the province, as heretofore no authoritative guide 
existed as to the British Columbia Companies Act. The combination of author- 
ship has been a happy one, combining the experience of a well known company 
lawyer, and that of a most experienced chartered accountant, the former treating 
the subject from the legal view, and the latter dealing with the actual and practical 
management of corporations. The high standing of Mr. Douglas as well as 
Mr. Rone insures the editorial excellence of the book and makes its authoritative- 
ness unquestionable. Mr. Rorie has in this manner, in an important way, con- 
tributed toward the very incomplete literature on this subject as far as this prov- 
ince is concerned and his efforts in this respect should meet with a gratifying 
response and a ready reception of this valuable work, the need of which has been 
telt so long. 



CAPTAIN CLARENCE HUNTER DE BECK. 

Captain Clarence Hunter De Beck, one of the leading and representative 
citizens of New Westminster, may be said to have been one of the foremost 
factors in the development of the rich lumber resources of British Columbia. He 
was a pioneer here in the sawmill business and when he began operations, there 
were but two establishments, the old Moodyville and the old Hastings mills, when 
he erected the Brunette Saw Mill, which for years was the largest in the province 
and which still is one of the best paying ones here. Captain De Beck is a native 
ot New Brunswick and was born in Carleton county, August 21, 185=5. He is a 
son of George and Eliza Ann (Dow) De Beck, both natives of New Brunswick, 
whence in 1868 they came to British Columbia among the western settlers. They 
made their way by boat from New York to the isthmus of Panama which they 
crossed, and then again took ship up the coast to Victoria. Two months later 




CLARENCE H. DE BECK 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 21 

they came to New Westminster where the father engaged in logging in Burrard 
Inlet, where he was accidentally killed while engaging in that occupation about 
two years later. The mother is still living and is remarkably hale and hearty and 
in full possession of all her faculties at the age of ninety-nine years. 

Captain Clarence H. De Beck was educated in the public schools and at St. 
Louis College in New Westminster and when only thirteen years of age he secured 
a position to drive stage at a salary of fifty dollars per month and board. After 
coming to New Westminster he continued in school until his father's death, at 
which time he engaged to work in logging camps in various positions, being, 
however, always connected with clerical work. He thus continued for about six 
years when he returned to New Westminster and, buying two teams, engaged 
in teaming, being largely occupied in the construction of the penitentiary and 
asylum. He continued successfully in this line of work for three years and 
made it his principle when going out in the morning never to return without 
earning ten dollars for the day and he remained out until that purpose was 
accomplished. Subsequently he and his three brothers, Howard L., Warren and 
George Ward, built the Brunette Saw Mills in Sapperton which under their able 
management were developed until they were conceded to be the best paying 
lumber mills in the province. In 1889 Captain De Beck sold his interest in these 
mills but although he had already attained a competence, he could not endure 
inactivity and two years later purchased a tugboat and engaged in the towing 
business. In 1894 he sold out and in 1896 engaged in work on the government 
snag boat Sampson, remaining in the federal service for about ten years. When 
the King Edward dredge boat was finished in 1897 he was placed in charge of 
that vessel and so continued until 1906, when he left the government service. 
Following that period he and his son-in-law, C. W. Tate, established and built 
the Fern Ridge Lumber & Shingle Mills in the Langley district, which they 
developed into an important industry. Captain De Beck in 1912 sold his inter- 
est in these mills and on the 1st of January, 1913, bought the Royal City Shingle 
Mills, which he is now operating. 

In February, 1879, Mr. De Beck was united in marriage to Miss Emily Jane 
Edwards, a native of Sapperton and a daughter of William Edwards, who was 
one of the Sapperton miners who came to British Columbia in the early days, in 
advance of civilization. Captain and Mrs. De Beck have two children: Mabel 
Evaline, the wife of N. M. Mattheson, collector of customs at New Westminster; 
and Violet Winifred, who married C. W. Tate, who is in charge of the Fern 
Ridge Lumber Company. It was on May 20, 1912, that the family circle was 
broken by death, when Mrs. De Beck passed away. In his religious affiliations 
Captain De Beck is a Presbyterian and gives stalwart support to that organiza- 
tion. One of the pioneers of this district, he has done important work in pro- 
moting progress and especially in founding a large and prosperous industry 
which has grown to magnificent proportions as the years have passed. All that 
affects the welfare of New Westminster and the province finds in him an inter- 
ested supporter and he is ever ready to give of his time and money in order to 
promote worthy public enterprises of permanent value. It is to such citizens 
as Captain De Beck that the present prosperous conditions in British Columbia 
are largely due, and the honor, esteem and confidence which is given him is tl 
fore well merited. 



WILLIAM McKENZIE McLEAN. 



William McKenzie McLean has for the past sixteen years been in the ser- 
vice of the Hudson's Bay Company, the oldest concern in British Columbia 
and Canada, and has made an enviable record in this connection, being now 
manager of the wholesale department which carries the most complete line 
of liquors, tobacco and cigars in the province. Though still young in years, he 



22 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

has already won recognition among the substantial and successful citizens of 
Vancouver. His birth occurred in Greenock, Scotland, on the 1st of April, 
1884, his parents being Donald and Elizabeth (McKenzie) McLean, who are 
likewise natives of that country. They came to Vancouver in 1890 and are 
among the well known and highly esteemed residents of the city. 

William McKenzie McLean, who was a lad of six years when he accom- 
panied his parents on their emigration to this country, obtained his education in 
the public schools of Vancouver. Before reaching the age of thirteen he had com- 
pleted a course in bookkeeping and shorthand and on the ist of February, 
1897, entered the employ of the Hudson's Bay Company as secretary to the 
manager, Mr. Lockyer. He remained in that capacity until 1908 and during 
the past five years was general assistant to Mr. Lockyer for both the wholesale 
and retail departments. On the ist of January, 1913, he became manager of 
the wholesale department which carries the most complete line of liquors, tobacco 
and cigars in British Columbia and supplies the branch stores of the Hudson's 
Bay Company throughout the province. They have a corps of traveling sales- 
men covering all of British Columbia and making regular trips into the Yukon, 
where the trade is large. Mr. McLean is in charge of all this work and also 
manages the operations of the company with all the liquor and tobacco dealers 
in Vancouver, New 'Westminster and Victoria. He devotes his entire attention 
to his business duties and is widely recognized as a young man of splendid ability 
who has a bright future before him. 



BEXJAMIN TIXGLEY ROGERS. 



Great leaders are few. The mass of men seem content to remain in the position 
in which they are placed by birth, circumstances or environment. Laudable 
ambition, ready adaptability and capacity for hard work are essential elements 
of success, and in none of these requirements has Benjamin T. Rogers been 
found lacking. It is not a matter of marvel, therefore, that he occupies a pre- 
eminent position among the builders of the northwest, for the real promoters of 
a country's growth and greatness are they who found and conduct its prosperous 
business enterprises. In this connection the name of Mr. Rogers is inseparably 
interwoven with the annals of British Columbia. As a sugar manufacturer and 
capitalist he has won not only provincial but national reputation, and moreover is 
entitled to distinction as one whose success has not been allowed to warp his finer 
sensibilities or crush out the kindly impulses of nature. On the contrary his pros- 
perity has been to him the means of enlarged opportunity and endeavor on behalf 
of his fellowmen, and his worth in these particulars is attested by the consensus 
of public opinion. A native of Pennsylvania, Mr. Rogers was born in Philadelphia, 

>ctol>er 21, 1865, and is a son of Samuel B. and Clara Augusta (Uu Puy) Rogers. 
who were also natives of the United States. The father was engaged in the sugar 
refining business in Philadelphia and subsequently went to New Orleans where 

; conducted a large refinery under the name of the Planters Sugar Refining Com- 
pany, remaining m active business in the Crescent city until his death in 1883. His 
witecame to Vancouver some years afterward and made her home with her son 
Benjamin T., until her demise in the year 1910. 

Excellent educational opportunities were accorded' Benjamin T. Rogers, who 
after attending the Philips Academy at Andover, Massachusetts, pursued a tech- 
nical course ,n the plant of the Standard Refinery Company at Boston, Massachu- 
setts where he mastered the subject of sugar chemistry. He then accepted the 
position of chemist in his father's plant in New Orleans, but had been identified 
with the business there for less than a year when his father died. Samuel B. 
oTt P a en? ee " a e T lal fnend f Mn Haveme yer, the sugar king of New York, 
Ne vY^l J T'tJ' , R g er V ntered th e Havemeyer & Elder Sugar Refinery at 
New York with the object of acquainting himself with all departments and every 




BENJAMIN T. ROGERS 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 25 

phase of the business. He began boiling sugar and gained a knowledge of all the 
processes of manufacture, working his way steadily upward until he became assist- 
ant superintendent and eventually superintendent, in which capacity he was serving 
when he withdrew from that company after seven years' connection therewith. He 
was ambitious to engage in business on his own account, prompted by an initiative 
spirit that has been one of the strong elements of his success. In 1890 he came 
to Vancouver and organized the British Columbia Sugar Refining Company, Ltd., 
of which he became the president. The new enterprise was started on a limited 
scale. He built a small plant on the site still occupied and wiih the growth of 
the city has annually enlarged the plant until they now have a capacity of twenty 
times their first annual output. Mr. Rogers has always acted as manager of ti:e 
business. His entire life has been devoted to this industry and his success has 
been phenomenal. The secret, however, is not fai to seek it lies in the thorough- 
ness with which he mastered every phase of the business and in the technical train- 
ing which qualified him for the scientific understanding of the process used, lie 
has ever been watchful of all details pointing to success, has carefully directed 
and guarded his interests and has been seldom if ever at fault in estimating value 
in any one point or condition of the business, so that he has been quick to discard 
the non-essential and at the same utilize the essential to the fullest extent. lie 
has never deviated from the high aim which he set up in connection with the 
trade and he has justly earned the place which he now occupies as one of the 
foremost business men of British Columbia. 

On the ist of June, 1892, Mr. Rogers was married at Victoria to Miss Mary 
Isabella Angus, of Manchester, England, and they have seven children : Blythe Du- 
Puy, Mary Angus, Ernest Theodore, Elsbeth, Phillip Tingley, Margaret and For- 
rest. 

Mr. and Mrs. Rogers are members of St. Paul's Anglican church. Mrs. 
Rogers takes a very active part in its work and is in hearty sympathy with her 
husband in his support of charitable and benevolent projects. He served for 
two or three years as vice president of the Vancouver General Hospital and Mrs. 
Rogers is a member of its Woman's Auxiliary, of which she was the president 
for many years. Mr. Rogers votes with the conservative party, but is never active 
in politics. He finds recreation in shooting and fishing and through his social 
connection with various leading clubs throughout the country, holding member- 
ship in the Vancouver, Terminal City and Royal Vancouver Yacht Clubs of Van- 
couver, the Union Club of Victoria, the Manitoba Club of Winnipeg, and the 
Mount Royal Club of Montreal. He was one of the first members and is now 
commodore of the Royal Vancouver Yacht Club, of which he is an active mem- 
ber. His success now gives him leisure for participating in those things which 
are a matter of interest and recreation. His ability and his personal worth have 
made him widely known throughout the country from eastern to western Canada, 
and he is accorded that tribute of respect which the world instinctively pays to 
the man who controls fate and carves out his own fortune, employing methods 
which never seek nor require disguise. 



MATHEW JOHN BARR. 

Mathew John Barr, a prominent and able business man of Vancouver, con- 
nected since 1899 with the firm of Barr & Anderson, plumbers, was born in 
Abbotsbury, South Wales, November 23, 1875. He is a son of Mathew and 
Hannah (Clancy) Barr, natives of Scotland, the former of whom died in that 
country. His wife afterward came to Canada, settling in Winnipeg in 1881 
and in 1891 removed to Vancouver, where her death occurred in April, 1911. 

The public schools of Winnipeg and the Vancouver high school afforded 
Mathew John Barr his educational opportunities and after laying aside his books 
he was apprenticed to the plumbing and heating trade, serving for five years. 



26 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

At the end of that time, having mastered the work in principle and detail, he 
founded the firm of Mclntyre & Barr in 1897 and he maintained this connection 
until 1899, when the firm "of Barr & Anderson was founded, so continuing to 
the present time. This firm is one of the strong business factors in the city 
and controls an important and growing patronage along >its special line, both 
partners being representative, successful and far-sighted business men. Since 
the foundation of the business Mr. Barr has taken an active and helpful part 
in its upbuilding and development, his energy, discrimination and enterprise 
uniting as elements in its substantial success. The company controls important 
business interests in Vancouver and a more extended mention of its history 
and activities is found on another page in this work. Mr. Barr is a director in 
the Metropolitan Building Company, the Vancouver Investment Guarantee Com- 
pany and the Dominion Glazed Pipe Company, connections which prove the 
variety and scope of his interests and the recognition which his ability has re- 
ceived in business circles. 

On the 26th of November, 1901, in New Westminster, Mr. Barr was united 
in marriage to Miss Evelyn May Dillabough and they have one son, Mathew 
Lyle. All kinds of outdoor sports receive Mr. Barr's enthusiastic support but 
he is especially fond of lacrosse and has played on the Vancouver team for the 
past twelve years. He is past master of Mount Herman Lodge, A. F. & A. M., 
and is master of the Vancouver Masonic lodge. He belongs to the Terminal 
City Club and his religious views are in accord with the doctrines of the Pres- 
byterian church. Mr. Barr is a prominent business man, possessing in his char- 
acter the energy, aggressiveness and enterprise necessary for business success. 
He has been an active factor in the expansion of one of the important business 
houses of Vancouver and his individual success is an element in the city's 
growth and greatness. 



CAPTAIN WILLIAM H. SOULE. 

Perhaps no resident of Vancouver has a more interesting history than that 
of William H. Soule, whose record has been most varied. His history if written 
in detail would present many a chapter more interesting than any to be found in 
fiction. He was born in Eastington, near Stroud, Gloucestershire, England, 
March 16, 1833. This was four years before Queen Victoria ascended the 
throne. For thirty years he sailed the seven seas and then spent between three 
and four decades with the Hastings Mill Company of Vancouver. He was but a 
boy of fifteen when he sailed from Gloucester, as an apprentice to Price & 
Company, lumber dealers of Quebec, on his first ship, the barque Carolina, and 
remained on her two years, making two round trips annually between Glouces- 
ter and Quebec. It was a strange coincidence which brought him on his first 
voyage to the land which many years afterward was to become his place of 
residence. He next went as a common seaman on the barque Resolution, of 
Liverpool, which sailed for a cargo of cotton to Apalachicola, a cotton port in 
the southern United States. In 1855 he was a member of the crew of the Edward 
Bilton, on its voyage from Newcastle to Odessa for wheat, which on the outward 
voyage was loaded with coal for Constantinople. Discharging the cargo there, 
they proceeded on to their destination, and Christmas day of that year was spent 
on the Black Sea. Captain Soule afterward shipped on an American vessel, the 
Massachusetts, which, after loading railway metals at Newport, Wales, sprang 
a leak and would have sunk in the Bristol Channel had the captain not beached 
her at Barrie island, near Cardiff, just in time to save her from going down. 

Captain Soule afterward went to Barcelona and subsequently shipped upon a 
newly built vessel at Belfast bound for Hong Kong. He next changed to an 
American ship which was loaded at tea ports of the Orient, and on the Alba- 
tross went to Calcutta and back to Boston. He next sailed on the Ganges to Cal- 




CAPTAIN WILLIAM H. SOULE 



BRITISH COLUMBIA a 

nit. i. wheic tlio vessel remained during tin- mutiny. A brother who visited him in 
.incomer twenty years ago served throughout that period of hostility helween 
the English and die natives. Captain Soule witnessed lonie wonderful fireworks, 
i epicting one of the hattles, l.ueknow. The COtnbUttiblci, ignited by accident, 
i lade u display so novel to the natives that they were greatly frightened and lied 
i i all directions. The memory of their ludicrous flight causes the t'aptaiu main 
i quiet laugh to this day. 

Nut long afterward Captain Sonic hecaine male upmi a l>art|iic whii-h put urn 
from Singapore for Hangkok and Sinm, for rice, wilh a Chinese crew and a 
upercargo of three boxes, each containing ten thousand Mexican .silver doll. UN 
1 , longing to one of the shipowners, The skipper and male weie the onl\ 
vliites. A day and a half out the vessel sprang a serious leak and al once the 
(Oinpradore, a Chinaman, and all the Chinc.se new \vauird in lake in the Imai-. 
Mid make for the land. The exigencies of the occasion made u necev.ai\ ilui 
Mr. Soule threaten the ('hinamen wilh pistols in make llu-m |nim|>, while lie hm 
\ as helping, in order to keep the vessel atloal i.. reach Singapore, In AII^MI ,i. 
) 36^, he sailed from Liverpool on llie Wild llmiiri, ol llnsion. Tins pmvcil in 
Is the most momentous voyage ul his hie, hei.mse il look linn In .S.ni I'laiur.in. 
. which ]ilace he became a passenger on llie Uiolhci Imiallian, a xe.s.sel bound 
fir Victoria, British Columbia. I'Yom Ilial city Captain Sunle went in llie old 
1 -iiterprise to New Westminster and me) John Mel emi.m, who was pnisei ,.i> 
tie boat and the hrsl man he knew m ibis lomiiiy. Aller one mghl m New 
Westminster Captain Soule proceeded lo llie pild field'., lia\cling by slc.imci 
from New Westminster to l''orl Yale and theme mi bml In Spn//um Iliidge, 
\ here he spent the night on a bed of poles ami boughs, and llie following day 
I lodded on toward Williams creek, a distance ol loin hundred miles, walking all 
tie way save for a short steamer trip Irom Soda creek In the monlh ol llie 
i nial A I that lime Joseph Trnlch was building a pai I ol llie ( ai ibon mail midei 
Jackass mountain; between Itoston liar and l.yllon. This they had In :,khl. 
Captain Soule and his companion, Mr. Mel.emian, fnnnd il a dillniili walk oyci 
t lat four hundred miles, for when they started each was carrying a pack ol one 
1 undred and ten pounds. They saw many men going in and mel many others 
( miing out, each wilh varying stories of success or laihne Captain Sonic was 
tot successful in his search for gold, and although he bail a mimbei nl claims 
.iat timed with no more than he possessed when he entered llie country- Hi-. 
. nibii n in wus lo accumulate monev enough lo buy a ship for use in llie cotton 
t 'adc, At this time John Wheeler had a claim al lloslon li:ir, and Caplain Soule 
i nited with him to work il. The claim was situated on llie old river bolloni ol 
t'ic Frascr. They felled trees and whipsawed the timber for their shafting and 
t i-n sunk a shaft some forty feet, but wilh indifferent success. They bad a 
g*rden and grew their needed vegetables on llie surface, while |il a few feel 
I -II' -alb, m the gravel, they were taking out gold. The precious metal was 
'i. i mi (I niil\ m in. ill i|iianiities but still there was suflicienl to make the labor 
v "it h while. 

K'ehmiing lo Vancouver, Captain Soule went on lo I'ort (iainhle on I'ugrt 
I-onii,] .mil thence i ailed to Honolulu with lumber. Wilh several others he 

i H ;,,|,. a contract to build a wagon road over Donald Highland. They were 

t'>be v>aid per rod, but worked so fast that the contractor cancelled (he contract, 
ileclarinjr d 1( .y were making too much money. In iKo<> Captain Soule returned 
to Vancouver and, as he says, "stuck his stake" and has resided here con- 
i nuoiisly since. In 1871 he established himself in the business of a slevedorc, 
i' 1 connection with the Hastings mill, and carried on that enterprise for about 
i miyVfour years or until he retired to private life about seven years ago. Under 
his management the business had grown to such an extent that lie had agents in 
the I Jnileil Slale 1 , and al'.o in I'lumpe. 

( 'n the 171)1 of January, i8;K, Captain Soule was united in marriage to Mrs, 
1 hen ., I '..Mi-i-.nii, the widow of Caplain Calvin I 'a I lei --on, who a I an eai ly 'l.il' 

I' id come to Vancouver, where he died as the result of an accident. Mrs. Soule 



30 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

was born in Manchester, England, but after the death of her parents came with 
her brother to New York city, where she was educated and grew to womanhood. 
Unto Captain and Mrs. Soule have been born two children: Alfred Hastings, 
who is now a resident of Victoria; and Estelle Budding, the wife of Alexander 
McKelvie. When the great conflagration in 1886 devastated Vancouver and the 
home of Captain Soule was reduced to ashes, he and his family removed to his 
boat, the Robert Kerr, which lay at anchor in the harbor, making their home 
thereon for a year or untif a new house was erected at the corner of Powell and 
Dundee streets. This was then an entirely different residential section than it 
is at present and they made their home there for about twenty years. In 1906 
they removed to their modern and commodious home at No. 1136 Pacific street, 
and here Captain and Mrs. Soule are now spending the evening of their lives in 
honorable retirement and pleasing surroundings. The old barque, Robert Kerr. 
passed from his ownership to the Canadian Pacific Railway and was for years 
used by that corporation as a "coal hulk" but was eventually wrecked on the reef 
near Nanaimo, where her storm-shattered skeleton is now passing into decay. 
It was Captain Soule who owned the first ship of Vancouver. 

When the city of Vancouver was first created Captain Soule was a candidate 
for its first board of aldermen, while his old friend and associate, H. M. Alex- 
ander, was the candidate of the conservative party for the office of mayor. The 
liberals won the day, however, and both Captain Soule and his friend met defeat. 
Captain Soule and his family are of the Episcopal faith. He assisted in the 
erection of the first three churches in Vancouver and hung the bell in the first 
house of worship. He is a valued member of the Commercial Club and also 
belongs to the Progress Club of Vancouver. It has been said that "Captain and 
Mrs. Soule are known for their kind-hearted hospitality and high moral stand- 
ards, and their influence for good will long be felt in British Columbia after 
the final act of life is ended and the curtain has been rung down forever." 



THOMAS KIDD. 

Thomas Kidd, who is now living retired on his beautiful ranch, comprised 
of a hundred and eighty acres of Lulu Island's fertile land, was born in County 
Down, Ireland, on the 23d of February, 1846. He is a son of William and Mar- 
garet (Garrett) Kidd, who were also natives of the Emerald isle, where they 
passed their entire lives. 

The first seventeen years in the life of Thomas Kidd were passed in the 
parental home in the unvaried routine characteristic of rural sections. His ene-r- 
gies were largely devoted to the acquirement of an education until 1863, in wh ich 
year he laid aside his text-books and started out to make his own way in ; the 
world. In common with the majority of youths of his age, he longed to pursue 
his career in the colonies, where life afforded the varying experiences, unusual 
happenings and strange adventures that attract and fill the dreams of e'very 
enterprising and ambitious lad. His desire was gratified and soon after leaving 
school in 1863 he took passage for New Zealand on a sailing vessel, speeding 
a hundred days at sea. Some three months after his arrival he enlistecf as a 
private in the Second Company, Third Regiment of Waikato Volunteers, >rgan- 
ized to put down the natives, who had started a revolution. He remained in 
the service until 1866, being discharged with the rank of corporal. Soon there- 
after he started for California, where he took up his residence in 1867. For 
a time he engaged in ranching in Mendocino county, but he subsequently aban- 
doned this activity and turned his attention to logging, which he followed ir. 1 that 
county for several years. Later with a party of four friends he traveled c'lown 
the coast and across the state to Inyo county, where he remained until 1874. In 
January of that year he returned to San Francisco and took passage for British 
Columbia, arriving at Victoria on the iith of February. A few days lat^r he 




THOMAS KIDD 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 33 

went to New Westminster, and there he formed the acquaintance of a Mr. Brig- 
house. With this gentleman and a Mr. Scratchly he came to Lulu Island, where 
he worked for them for a while, but in the summer he filed on a hundred and 
sixty acres of land and began farming for himself. This tract forms the prin- 
cipal part of his present valuable ranch, the boundaries of which he later extended 
by the purchase of twenty acres, and here he has ever since made his home. His 
early experiences were very similar in every respect to those of other pioneers 
of Lulu Island. He encountered innumerable obstacles and hardships, but he 
possesses the tenacity of purpose and perseverance which invariably lead to the 
goal and zealously applied himself to the achievement of his ambition. His 
energies were devoted to general farming and stock-raising, both of which 
proved profitable under his capable management, and today he is the owner of 
one of the attractive and most valuable farms in this section. As his circum- 
stances permitted he replaced the crude structures first erected on his land with 
more pretentious buildings, and from time to time added various other improve- 
ments. Here he is passing his latter days in well earned ease, surrounded with 
every comfort and enjoying an annual income from his farm which far more 
than supplies the needs of himself and family. 

In September, 1883, Mr. Kidd was married to Miss Letitia Smith, a daugh- 
ter of Peter and Myra Smith, the event occurring at Ladner, and to them have 
been born six children. In order of birth they are as follows : Agnes, the wife 
of G. H. Harris ; Margaret and Gertrude, both of whom are at home ; a daugh- 
ter and son who died in infancy ; and Joseph \V., who was drowned when he 
was twenty-two years of age. 

In his earlier years Mr. Kidd figured prominently in municipal politics, being 
one of the leaders of his party during the pioneer period. He was numbered 
among the progressive and enterprising citizens of the municipality and gave 
efficient service in the council of Richmond, of which body he was a member 
for several years. In 1894, the year the Westminster electoral district was 
divided into four ridings, he was elected to the provincial parliament, where he 
served until 1902. In his political principles Mr. Kidd is a liberal, but at local 
elections he votes for the man he deems best qualified to give the people efficient 
service. Probably no one in the community is more familiar with the early 
events which helped to shape the destiny of the northwest than Mr. Kidd, as 
for practically forty years he has been in close touch with the affairs of the 
district, much of that period having been spent in the public service in various 
capacities. 

HENRY SIMON VAUGHAN. 

While the record of the business man may be less spectacular than that of 
the statesman or military leader it is none the less essential and no less valuable 
a;? a force in advancement. In fact, the stable prosperity and substantial growth 
of every community depends upon its enterprising and able business men who 
give to it its great business institutions, utilizing every means that comes to hand 
not only to advance their own interests but also to promote the public welfare. 
To this class belongs Henry Simon Vaughan, who for twenty-three years -has 
beon connected with what is now the firm of Ceperley, Rounsefell & Company, 
Ltd., and who is, moreover, one of the most reliable, progressive and able 
business men in Vancouver at the present time. He was born in Liverpool, 
England, April 3, 1870, and is a son of Simon and Sarah (de Wolf) Vaughan, 
the former a Canadian and a descendant of an old Loyalist family and head 
of the firm of S. Vaughan & Company, ship owners and brokers of Liverpool, 
England, until his return to Canada in 1882. In the Dominion he settled at 
Wolfville, Nova Scotia, and in 1891 came to Vancouver with his family, where 
he lived retired until his death. His wife was a daughter of William H. de Wolf, 



34 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

of Wolfville, Nova Scotia, and a member of an old Loyalist family from whom 
the town took its name. 

Henry Simon Vaughan acquired his education in the public schools of his 
native city and in Acadia College there, after which he entered the employ of 
Rhodes, Curry & Company of Amherst, Nova Scotia, with whom he remained 
until 1891. In that year he came to Vancouver, British Columbia, and became 
associated with what is now the firm of Ceperley, Rounsefell & Company, 
Ltd., with whom he has continued since that time a period of twenty-three 
years. The firm was founded in, 1886 under the style of Ross & Ceperley, 
its organizer being H. T. Ceperley. It later became Ceperley, Rounsefell & 
Company upon admission to the firm of F. W. Rounsefell and it so continued 
until its incorporation as Ceperley, Rounsefell & Company, Ltd. The present 
officers are H. T. Ceperley, president; F. W. Rounsefell, managing director; 
H. S. Vaughan, vice president; and George Rorie, secretary and treasurer. 
The company does a general insurance, real-estate and financial brokerage 
business and is one of the oldest and largest firms of its kind in British Columbia. 
It is general agent in the province for the Liverpool & London & Globe Insur- 
ance Company, Ltd. ; the Phoenix Assurance Company, Ltd., of London, Eng- 
land ; the British America Assurance Company ; the Thames & Mersey Marine 
Insurance Company, Ltd. ; the Canadian Railway Accident Insurance Company, 
and the National Provincial Plate Glass Company, Ltd. It is also agent in 
Vancouver for the Canadian Mortgage Association. In the development of this 
immense business Henry S. Vaughan has proven an active and helpful factor 
during the twenty-three years of his connection with it and his energy, ability 
and executive power have in an important way influenced its policies and effected 
the character and direction of its development. He gives his full attention to 
the concern and his time is altogether occupied with the manifold duties which 
his ability brings upon him and with those which devolve upon him as one of the 
chief executives of a large and growing business corporation. His associates 
respect him as an able, far-sighted and discriminating man and his record is 
in all respects a gratifying and enviable one. 

On the 2d of October, 1902, Mr. Vaughan was united in marriage to Miss 
Elizabeth J. Sharpies, of Vancouver, a daughter of Isaac and Margaret Sharpies. 
Mr. and Mrs. Vaughan have two children, Kenneth S. and Margaret de Wolf. 
Mr. Vaughan is a member of the Anglican church and is a conservative in his 
political beliefs. He is, however, not active in politics, preferring to spend his 
leisure hours in his home with his wife and children. He is a devoted husband 
and father and in private life a charming and courteous gentleman, qualities 
which have drawn to him a representative and extensive circle of friends. 



JOSEPH DESPARD PEMBERTON. 

No history of British Columbia would be complete or satisfactory without 
prominent reference to the late Joseph Despard Pemberton, so important was the 
part which he played in the development of this section of the country. His name 
is written large in its annals for the work which he accomplished made kno^n 
to the world in considerable measure the possibilities, resources and opportunities 
of the Pacific coast region. After his connection with the preliminary surveys 
he aided in the later material development of the country and also in shaping 
its political history. 

He was born in Dublin, Ireland, in 1821, a son of Joseph Pemberton and a 
grandson of the Rt. Hon. Joseph Pemberton, of Clontarf, Dublin, and Lord 
Mayor of the city in 1806. Joseph Despard Pemberton was educated at Trinity 
College in Dublin, where he was a pupil of Mr. Hemans, M. I. C. E., M. R. I. A- 
Obtaining expert knowledge of the profession in which he wished to engage his 
ability led him into important relations He was assistant engineer of the Gre;at 




JOSKPH D. PEMBERTON 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 37 

Southern & Western Railway and was assistant engineer to Sir John McNeil 
LL. D., F. R. S., M. I/ C. E. and M. R. I. A. Subsequently Mr. Pemberton 
became engineer for the Exeter & Crediton Railway and was also engineer of 
a part of the East Lancashire Railway He made the design for the Crystal 
Palace of London, for which he was awarded a bronze medal. His high stand- 
ing in his profession and the recognition of his ability are further shown by 
the fact that he was professor of engineering and mathematics in the Royal 
Agricultural College of Cirincester, where he remained for two years, resign- 
ing to join the service of the Hudson's Bay Company in British Columbia as 
colonial surveyor and engineer. 

Mr. Pemberton left England early in 1851 and started for the Pacific coast 
by way of the Panama route. He stopped for a time to become engineer of 
the Panama Railroad, which was then being built. The trip which he made 
from the old world to the new was at that time a very perilous and fatiguing one. 
No railway had been built across the isthmus and travel was in open boats up 
the Chagres river, exposed to heat and malaria at all times. Mr. Pemberton 
contracted the fever and almost lost his life but at length succeeded in dispelling 
the fever through the procedure of jumping from shipboard into the salt water. 
At length he reached Victoria in safety and on his arrival quarters were assigned 
him in the old fort. He lost no time in getting to work, being fully determined 
to explore the country which was then almost absolutely unknown. He made 
a somewhat hazardous trip to Cowichan Lake in 1852, being the first white 
man to make that district, his observations made along the journey proving in 
later years invaluable to the early settlers. 

In 1853 Mr. Pemberton went to examine the coal fields reported at Saanich, 
traveling in a canoe with five French Canadian voyageurs as a crew, but on 
reaching his destination he discovered the deposit to be only lignite. The party 
found it necessary to make a hurried departure, owing to the excitable Pen-al- 
ahut Indians under Chief Mook-Mook-Tan, who gave chase and fired their 
guns at the party, but the Indians were soon outdistanced by the white men. 
The old chief later became one of Mr. Pemberton's most faithful friends and 
servants. 

From 1853 until 1855 Mr. Pemberton was engaged upon the trigonometrical 
survey of the island from Sooke to Xanaimo, the result of which work was 
published in 1855 by John Arrowsmith of London. This work was one of great 
difficulty and hardship and was attended at all times with considerable danger. 
The stations were often treetops from which the angles were taken. The diffi- 
culty of transportation, too, was another great hindrance, the territory being 
virgin with no roads across it. The bush and rocks made it a most formidable 
undertaking, but with his undaunted energy and natural love of duty Mr. Pember- 
ton finally accomplished what he undertook. In 1857 the same coast line was 
surveyed by Captain G. H. Richards, later Admiral Sir G. H. Richards, and a 
comparison of the two surveys shows only a difference of fifty feet in one hun- 
dred miles, a fact decidedly complimentary to Mr. Pemberton when one takes 
into consideration the great difficulties under which he labored. In 1852 Mr. 
Pemberton, associated with J. N. McKay of the Indian department, examined the 
coal measures of Nanaimo, out of which sections were made, and a report of the 
work and the surrounding country was sent to London. The result of this report 
was that in the following year a number of miners with machinery and neces- 
sary supplies were dispatched to the field to open and work the mines with Mr. 
McKay as manager. Mr. Pemberton was also one of the first white men to 
cross Vancouver island. In 1857 he was the leader of an expedition to ascer- 
tain whether gold existed on the island and, accompanied by Captain Gooch 
and a party of seven, he traced the Cowichan river to its source; traversed the 
island and reached Nitinat on the shores of the Pacific after many adventures 
and hardships. In 1860 his book on British Columbia and Vancouver island 
was published by Longman and proved of great assistance to intending settlers- 
In 1859 he occupied the position of surveyor general of British Columbia under 



38 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

appointment of Queen Victoria, and the commission is signed by her personally. 
He served until the end of 1864, when he resigned. While hurrying along 
Esquimalt road on government business Mr. Pemberton met with a serious 
accident, being thrown from his horse, and the effects of the fall he felt through- 
out the remainder of his life. It was due to this accident that he resigned his 
position as surveyor general. 

In addition to the important work already mentioned it should be said that 
Mr. Pemberton designed and erected the Race Rocks and Fisgard lighthouses 
and as surveyor general he laid out and constructed the first roads in the city 
and county. He was a member of the commission to consider the question of the 
improvement of Victoria harbor and when the house voted money for dredging 
the spit he went to England and purchased the machinery for a dredge and tug. 
Both the dredge and tug were built after he had resigned his position as sur- 
veyor general but his ideas and plans were carried out by his successor. Mr. 
Pemberton also gave evidence of his genial public spirit when he designed, sur- 
veyed, constructed and presented to the government the present Oak Bay avenue 
extending through Gonzales, Mr. Pemberton's estate, which at that time com- 
prised twelve hundred acres. This is but one instance of his many public bene- 
factions- 

From 1856 until 1859 Mr. Pemberton was a member of the first legislative 
assembly of Vancouver island. He was a member of the executive council 
of the island and surveyor general from September, 1859, to October, 1864, when 
he resigned. He was a member of the legislative council of Vancouver island 
from April. 1864, to October of that year. After the union of Vancouver island 
and British Columbia he was a member of the legislative council of British Col- 
umbia, representing Victoria district during the sessions of 1867 and 1868. 
He surveyed the town of Victoria as first mapped out and had the first roads 
in the city and district constructed. His general knowledge, gained from his 
exploration of the island, in addition to his ready ability to cope with any and 
all emergencies, made him a most valuable official and one upon whom all relia- 
bility could be placed. A man of accurate knowledge of local conditions, he could 
always be depended upon for a ready solution of any perplexing question. He 
was also a man of quick decision and seldom erred in his judgment. 

In 1858 Mr. Pemberton had laid out the town of Derby, the then proposed 
capital of British Columbia, and now a part of Victoria. He had previously 
taken up twelve hundred acres of land, built thereon a fine residence and made 
other improvements. This is now retained by the family. The residence is sur- 
rounded by most beautiful grounds and occupies a splendid location overlooking 
the Pacific ocean. It is a fine type of old English country home and is indeed 
beautiful. It was to this home that Mr- Pemberton retired to lead the quiet 
life of a country gentleman, only to emerge at the call of duty. Passionately 
fond of horses, he had great ability in training them and was a bold and judi- 
cious horseman. He also became an extensive breeder of shorthorn cattle as well 
as Clydesdale horses and was the pioneer in both lines in his part of the province. 
The value of his work in introducing high-grade stock at that time is beyond 
computation. His contribution to the material progress of the province in this 
direction alone would seem to warrant a place for him iq the history of British 
Columbia. 

In 1864 Mr. Pemberton married Miss Theresa Jane Despard Grautoff, a 
native of England but of German lineage. They became the parents of six 
children, all natives of Victoria, namely: Frederick Bernard, who is mentioned 
at length on another page of this work: Joseph D., of Victoria, a surveyor and 
member of the firm of Pemberton & Son; W. P. D., of Victoria; Ada G., 
the wife of H. R. Beaven ; Sophia Theresa, the wife of Canon Beanlands, for 
twenty-five years rector of Christ's church, Victoria; and Susan Harriett, the 
wife of William Curbis Sampson, of Victoria. In 1887 Mr. Pemberton with 
his son Frederick formed the firm of Pemberton & Son. 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 39 

Throughout his life Mr. Pemberton was known as a friend and champion of 
the cause of education, evidence of this being found in the fact that he built the 
first schooihouse in Victoria. His death occurred very suddenly, November n, 
1893, and his funeral was attended by the executive council in a body as well 
as by the mayor and board of aldermen and all the professional and business 
men of the city- His demise caused general grief and regret and his passing has 
been a distinct loss to British Columbia and his beloved Victoria. Many expres- 
sions of sorrow and condolence were received by the family from all parts of 
Canada and high encomiums were pronounced upon him by the press. He 
possessed a cheery, sunshiny nature, always inclined to optimism rather than pes- 
simism. In fact he was polished, gallant and courteous under all circumstances 
a fine type of the Irish gentleman of the old school. His public spirit found ex- 
pression after his death in the terms of his will whereby Pemberton Gymnasium 
was erected and presented to the city. Another of his benefactions was the opera- 
ting theatre of the Jubilee Hospital. His interest in religion was a part of his 
life work for he was always a firm supporter and member of the Anglican church 
and was responsible for the erection of Christ's church. Notwithstanding his 
life was an intensely active and busy one he ever found opportunity to aid in the 
development of British Columbia and his part in the early exploration, growth 
and improvement of the province was a most important one. Too great credit 
cannot be given him for his influence on the social and material development of 
the northwest. He is survived by hi's widow and their family, Mrs. Pemberton 
now occupying the beautiful estate Gonzales, where she spends her days amid 
lovely surroundings, enjoying excellent health and taking a keen interest in all 
movements that have for their object the betterment of the social and moral 
conditions of the people. 



JOHN KYLE, HON. A. R. C. A. 

John Kyle, an artist of wide renown residing in Vancouver, has for the past 
three years held the highest position in art work in the province, having charge 
of drawing in the normal school. He has been a prominent figure in educational 
circles, having organized and served as supervisor of the night schools. His 
birth occurred in Hawick, Scotland, his parents being Andrew and Agnes 
(Waugh) Kyle, of that place. They are still residents of Hawick, and the father 
is now living retired. 

John Kyle obtained his early education in the public schools of his native land 
and subsequently attended the Royal College of Art in London for three years 
and also Julian's Studio at Paris, having won scholarships to both institutions. 
The honors he received include art masters' certificates on groups one and four, 
and almost complete on groups two and three. He was a medalist and prize 
winner in national competition, obtaining fifteen prizes for design, modeling, 
painting, etc. His studies embraced drawing from life, drawing from antique, 
drawing antique from memory, modeling from life, modeling from antique, 
modeling design, anatomy, principles of ornament, painting from still life, paint- 
ing ornament, perspective, architecture, geometry and building construction 
(advanced). For a period of four years he was engaged at Huddersfield, Eng- 
land, as head assistant in the art department of the Technical College. The 
principal writes of him as follows : "I have much pleasure in stating that Mr. J. 
Kyle has been head assistant lecturer in the art department of the college for nearly 
four sessions. He has in all respects acquitted himself admirably of the various 
duties entrusted to him. He has lectured on anatomy, figure drawing, principles of 
ornament, etc., and taught modelling and still life painting, as well as taught in the 
pupil teachers' classes. * * * As a colleague Mr. Kyle will be found most 
courteous, and I recommend him without the slightest hesitation or reserve, feel- 
ing quite certain that you will obtain no better candidate. I should hear of Mr. 



40 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

Kyle's success with even greater pleasure but for the loss which I shall suffer 
here." 

Mr. George Marples, A. R. C. A., says: "Mr. Kyle can maintain discipline 
without being a martinet; the good feeling here among his students was not 
only proof of their appreciation of his efforts as a teacher, but of his tactfulness 
in his general dealings with them. * * *" Mr. Kyle took charge of and organ- 
ized the art work in the public schools and established an art school at 'Alloa, 
Scotland, where he remained for two years. Alexander J. Mullan, convener 
of Alloa Academy and Alloa continuation classes, under date of October 17, 
1904, wrote as follows : "I have pleasure in certifying that Mr. Kyle has been in 
the service of the Alloa burgh school board for the last two years. During 
that time he has acted as organizing art master for all our schools. In this 
capacity he has been particularly successful. He has also had full charge of 
the continuation classes art subjects and there has likewise given entire sat- 
isfaction. Either as an organizer or teacher we could not have, nor do we 
desire, any one better or more enthusiastic. His views on educational ideals 
are sound, and he has the necessary ability to put these ideas into practical- 
shape. While, therefore, I will regret exceedingly his departure from Alloa, 
I have no hesitation in recommending him for the situation organizing art 
master he is now applying for." 

In April, 1906, Mr. Kyle came to Vancouver, British Columbia, as super- 
intendent of drawing in the Vancouver public schools, holding that position 
for four years. On the expiration of that period he took charge of drawing 
in the normal school and this position, which is the most important in art work 
in the province, he has held to the present time. While acting as superintendent 
of drawing in the public schools, in the fall of 1909, he organized the night 
schools on all subjects. The work was begun with four hundred pupils, and 
there are now over two thousand students who attend the evening classes dur- 
ing six months of each year. Mr. Kyle has annually served as supervisor of 
the night schools and his labors in this connection have been far-reaching 
effect and importance. 

Mr. Kyle is financially interested in and a director of the British Pacific 
Trust Company, Limited. He is a director of the Art, Historical and Scientific 
Society of Vancouver, a member of the British Columbia Society of Fine Arts 
and the Young Men's Christian Association. As an artist he has won deserved 
and enviable recognition, and his name has long been an honored one in both 
educational and art circles of British Columbia. 



STEPHEN TINGLEY. 

Among the most notable of the pioneer residents of Yale is numbered Stephen 
Tingley, living retired after thirty years of close identification with the business 
interests of the community. He was born at Fort Cumberland, New Brunswick, 
September 13, 1839, and is a son of Caleb and Deborah Tingley. His education 
was acquired in the public schools of his native city and he remained at home 
until he was nineteen years of age, in which year he started for California, 
journeying by way of the isthmus of Panama to San Francisco and locating in 
the Golden State in 1858, before the construction of an overland railroad. In 
1861 he removed to Yale and began prospecting and mining but engaged in it 
only a short time, later going to the Cariboo. He was obliged to walk the entire 
distance of over six hundred miles from Esquimalt to the Cariboo, his difficulties 
being augmented by the weight of one hundred pounds of provisions which he 
carried. He mined for two seasons and afterward joined F. J. Barnard in the 
operation of the first mail coach between Fort Yale and Richfield. He started 
in this business in 1864 and later purchased his partner's interest, conducting 
the enterprise alone for over thirty years, after which he sold out and" retired, 




STEPHEN TINGLEY 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 43 

making his home in Ashcroft. As a business man he has been conspicuous among 
his associates not only for his success but for his probity and fairness and his 
honorable methods. 

Mr. Tingley has been twice married. By his first union he had two sons, 
Clarence and Fred, both of whom live in Vancouver. In 1877 he married Miss 
Pauline Lewmeister, of Victoria, and they have two daughters: Mrs. Vincent, of 
Calgary, Alberta; and Mrs. E. G. Thompson, of Westminster. Fraternally Mr. 
Tingley is affiliated with the Masonic order. He is numbered among the real 
pioneers in this section of the country and has witnessed its entire growth, expan- 
sion and development. He can remember clearly when the evidences of pioneer 
life were many and he has seen them replaced by those of advanced civilization. 
In this work he has borne an honorable and important part and his active life 
has left a distinct impress upon local history. 



JOHN G. ULLOCK. 

John G. Ullock, controlling important real-estate brokerage interests in Van- 
couver and further connected with the business life of the city as secretary 
of the Great West Sand & Gravel Company, Limited, was born in lilack River, 
New Brunswick, September 17, 1861. He is a son of Jeremiah and Annie 
(McMaster) Ullock, natives of that province, the former the proprietor of a 
large grist and carding mill and an extensive lumber business at I Slack River. 
He had also many other important commercial interests there and was a well 
known and prominent citizen. Both parents have passed away. 

John G. Ullock acquired his education in the public and high schools of his 
native city and remained there until he was nineteen years of age, when he 
went to Winnipeg, Manitoba. Soon afterward he engaged in the mercantile 
business at Jack Fish Bay, on Lake Superior, and later was interested along 
the same line at Schreiber, Ontario. He came in 1898 to British Columbia and 
settled in Golden, where he purchased the Kootenay House, which he operated 
for two years, selling it in order to purchase the Columbia House. This he 
managed from 1900 to 1907 and he made it during that time one of the modern 
and profitable hotels in the city. In the latter year he disposed of his interest 
in it and came to Vancouver, turning his attention to the real-estate brokerage 
business, in which he is still active, having secured a profitable and representa- 
tive patronage 'as his knowledge of land values and his high business integrity 
became generally known and recognized. Xaturally Mr. Ullock has been car- 
ried forward into important relations with business life in this city, for his 
ability commands opportunities of which his energy and resourcefulness make 
the best possible use. In May, 1911, in cooperation with W. H. Meikle and 
Charles Cartwright he aided in the organization of the Great West Sand & 
Gravel Company, Limited, with offices in Vancouver and North Vancouver and 
with docks and bunkers in the latter city. Mr. Ullock is secretary of this 
concern and in this position his excellent demonstrative and organizing ability 
has been called forth, much of the rapid expansion and development of the 
business being due to him. In 1912 the company added a coal department and 
this branch has already proven profitable and important. Since 1907, Mr. 
Ullock has in his private capacity controled large timber interests on the main- 
land and on Vancouver island and he is constantly extending the field of his 
activities, his powers developing with the passing years. 

In January, 1900, Mr. Ullock was united in marriage in Fort William, 
Ontario, to Miss Annie Doyle, of North Bay, that province, and they have two 
children, Alice McMaster and Jack Findlay. Mr. Ullock was captain of the 
Rifle Association at Golden and while a resident of that city did a great deal of 
rifle and trap shooting, being considered one of the best shots in the community, 
and won many valuable medals. Although he is a fine target shot he is espe- 



44 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

cially fond of bear and of all kinds of wild-game hunting and has spent a great 
many of his leisure hours in this sport. He is in addition a noted curler and 
has won many prizes for proficiency in this art. He is one of the officers of the 
Vancouver Curling Club and was an /organizer of the Bonspiel which took 
place in this city in the winter of 1912-13. It proved a great success, two hun- 
dred visitors from outside the municipality making it the largest affair of this 
kind in Canada with the exception of that held in Winnipeg. 

Mr. Ullock is a conservative in his political beliefs and is connected fra- 
ternally with Mountain Lodge, No. 13, A. F. & A. M., of which he is a past 
master. He belongs to the Terminal City Club. A man of broad views, pro- 
gressive ideas and modern standards, his influence has been felt as a construc- 
tive force in the development of the institutions with which he is connected and 
indirectly in the promotion of general business activity in the city. Business 
men respect him for his reliability, his integrity and his enterprising spirit and 
in social relations his sterling traits of character have drawn to him many friends. 



JOHN JARDINE. 

John Jardine, of Esquimalt, Victoria, British Columbia, now lives retired in 
his beautiful home, "Ellerslie," on the water front, enjoying peace and rest after 
an active career and a round of ceaseless activity in the interests of the province 
and his city. Not only did he do valuable work in the provincial parliament, but 
took an active part in settling labor questions as member of the Royal Commission 
of Labor, and did efficient work as member of the Board of Trade in improving 
shipping and harbor conditions at Victoria. John Jardine was born in Lockerbie, 
Dumfriesshire, Scotland, September 24, 1854, a son of John and Janet (Mont- 
gomery) Jardine, botli of that shire. The father was prominent in the indus- 
trial life of his district, where he was engaged in the manufacture of nails. Both 
parents spent their entire lives in Scotland, where they passed away. 

John Jardine was educated in the parish school of Dryfesdale, his head master 
being Alexander Ferguson. Upon leaving the schoolroom he learned the trade of 
house painter under his eldest brother, Thomas, serving an apprenticeship of five 
years. He then followed his trade in his native country for about three years, but 
being impressed with the stories which reached him of opportunities which the 
North American northwest held out, he crossed the Atlantic in July, 1880, going to 
St. Paul and living there until 1884, when he came to Victoria. Here he continued 
to follow his trade continuously until 1907. His implicit faith and confidence in this 
great province is demonstrated by his investments, which are all purely local. He 
has a fine ranch located on the British Columbia electric line, near Langley, at 
Jardine, which station was named in his honor. However, he has never resided 
upon his property, leaving its operation to others. He purchased the ranch not 
many years after his arrival in Victoria from the Hudson's Bay Company. From 
the same company he obtained in May, 1901, the site of his beautiful home, 
"Ellerslie," which he built in the beginning of this century. This site permits of 
a magnificent view, embracing the parliament buildings, the lieutenant governor's 
residence, and places of interest in all parts of Victoria. However, the most last- 
ing impression one receives from this site is the view of Victoria's harbor and the 
ocean, with the ships sailing and steaming to and from practically every port of the 
world, the busy harbor life emphasized by heavily loaded lighters, capacious ten- 
ders, swiftly moving launches and hundreds of pleasure craft. 

On July 5, 1880, Mr. Jardine was married, in Cumberland, England, to Miss 
Jane King Stoddart, of Lockerbie, Scotland. Mr. Jardine has ever taken an active 
and most laudable part in promoting the interests of the province and city. On 
October 3, 1903, he contested the Esquimalt electoral district but was defeated by 
fifteen votes. On February 23, 1907, he again entered the field as a candidate 
and through the combination vote of the liberal and labor parties was carried to 




JOHN JARDINE 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 47 

success. His term in the provincial house was of benefit to his constituents and 
productive of desirable results. Although always inclined toward the liberal party, 
Mr. Tardine is never narrowly partisan but preserves a commendable independence 
of view. He is a stanch supporter of the McBride and present government. Al- 
though the underlying principles of the Christian religion have guided him in all 
his actions, he has never seen fit to ally himself with any denomination and pre- 
serves an equally free and independent thought as regards religious observances. 
Several years ago Mr. Jardine contested for a seat in the city council to represent 
the south ward and at that time drew the attention of the public to the necessity 
for a breakwater from Holland Point to Brochie Edge. For the purpose of fur- 
ther impressing this need upon the minds of the public, he became a member of 
the Board of Trade, in which connection he was more likely to impress his views 
upon prominent men. He is still a member of this organization. He is partic- 
ularly active in all things pertaining to the welfare and judicious development of the 
part of the city in which he resides. He has unshakable confidence in Victoria 
and its future as a residential city, as a commercial center, and as a sreat harbor. 
Moreover, he entertains the same views towards the whole province, and no doubt 
the great empire which he sees in his mind's eye rising in the northwest will be a 
realized fact before many years. Mr. Jardine is also interested in the labor situa- 
tion and has done able work as a member of the Royal Labor Commission. His 
activities from every point of view have been largely beneficial to the province, 
and while he has attained individual success his exertions on behalf of the public 
good cannot be too highly valued. 



GEORGE FREDERICK BALDWIN. 

Vancouver numbers among its most able, efficient and far-sighted public 
servants George Frederick Baldwin, now acting as city comptroller, his election 
to this office following signally able work in various other important capacities 
and a career in the public service extending from the time of the incorporation 
of the city. He was born in New Brunswick, January 10, 1850, and is a son of 
Thomas and Jane (Acheson) Baldwin, the former a native of England and the 
latter of Ireland. In 1850 they removed to Haldimand county, Ontario, and- 
there the father engaged in farming and lumbering, occupations which he fol- 
lowed for the remainder of his life, his death occurring in Ontario. 

In the acquirement of an education George Frederick Baldwin attended 
public school in Ontario and afterward completed the course in Woodstock 
College, that province. After his graduation he became a teacher in the 
public schools of Ontario and Manitoba and followed this occupation until 1884, 
when he went to Victoria, engaging in that city in journalism and becoming 
one of the first reporters on the Times. After one year he moved to Vancouver 
and upon the incorporation of the city was appointed first assessment commis- 
sioner, tax collector and city treasurer, beginning thus a career in public life 
which has been varied in service and faultless in honor. He retained all three 
positions to which he was first appointed until 1905, when a separate department 
was formed for the assessment work. However, Mr. Baldwin continued as 
treasurer and tax collector until 1907, when he was appointed city comptroller, 
which office he still holds, proving his loyalty, public spirit and business ability 
in the able discharge of his important duties. He has been active in the public 
service since the incorporation of the city and is one of the few who have been so 
long connected with municipal affairs. He was elected a member of the 
first school board of Vancouver, serving for seven years, and in that capacity, 
as in all others, proved his executive ability and his civic spirit. He is treasurer 
for 1913 of the Vancouver Exhibition Association and takes a great deal of inter- 
est in this work, as he does in everything tending to promote the best interests 
of the city. 



48 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

In Tacoma, Washington, Mr. Baldwin was united in marriage to Miss Minnie 
L. Higgins, of Wolfville, Nova Scotia, and they are the parents of two sons, 
Harold R., a clerk in the city hall in Vancouver, and Sidney G., who is studying 
medicine at McGill University. Mr. Baldwin is connected with the Ancient 
Order of United Workmen and is a member of the Terminal City Club. He 
is one of the few men who have served the city of Vancouver since its incorpora- 
tion and during the time his work has been able, energetic and of lasting quality 
the work of a public-spirited, able and progressive citizen who is also a 
capable, reliable and far-sighted business man. 



THOMAS McNEELY. 

The loss to the province of Thomas McNeely of Ladner, who died in Septem- 
ber, 1900, in his sixty-fourth year, will long be keenly felt by the many who knew 
him. 

Mr. McXecly was born in Durham county, Ontario, in 1836, and received his 
education in the place of his nativity. His parents were John and Catharine 
(Reid) AFcXeely, of Donegal, Ireland, who came to this country in about 1835, 
settling in Ontario. 

Early in life Thomas McNeely learned the trade of millwright, which he 
followed in Ontario for several years. In 1880 he came to New Westminster and 
started to work in his trade as a builder. He built the old Dominion Saw Mills, 
now the Royal City Planing Mills. He also found employment in connection with 
the big sawmills at Hastings and Moodyville, installing the machinery there. For 
several years he was general manager for Thomas Dean in the then leading lines 
of trade on the site of the business establishment now owned by T. J. Trapp & 
Company. He afterward went into business for himself at Yale, British Colum- 
bia, where he was burned out, after which he returned to Ladner and entered into 
business connections with the late Donald Chisholm, M. P. He subsequently 
opened a hotel at Ladner. Here, his business prospered, and he soon became the 
owner of one of the largest general stores in the whole province. He also added to 
his estate a splendid farm, the Jubilee Ranch, on which he erected a large and well 
appointed residence. With the exception of a short time spent in Yale, he was 
a resident of the Delta for twenty years and was recognized as one of the main- 
stays of the Delta municipality, in the development of which he took an active 
part. 

On September 18, 1893, was celebrated the marriage of Thomas McNeely and 
Miss Annie Chisholm, a daughter of Duncan and Isabelle (Chisholm) Chisholm, 
both natives of Nova Scotia. Mrs. McNeely is a niece of the late Donald Chis- 
holm, M. P. and pioneer, of whom further mention is made in this work. 

Mr. McNeely was a prominent member of the Masonic fraternity and was held 
in high esteem by the brethren of the mystic tie. He was a man of great activity, 
liberal-minded and of a kindly disposition and revered by all with whom he came 
in contact. 



REGINALD JOHN RICKMAN. 

As local manager of the British Columbia Mills at New Westminster Regi- 
nald John Rickman occupies an important position in commercial circles of 
the city, having been connected for thirty years with the same industrial enter- 
prise. Born in Birkenhead, Cheshire, England, on November 9, 1852, he is 
a son of Samuel and Kate (Throp) Rickman. the former a well known mer- 
chant of Liverpool, England, in which city both he and his wife made their 
home until their demise. 




THOMAS McXEELY 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 51 

Reginald J. Rickman was educated at Brewood, in the grammar school, 
in Staffordshire, England, and at about the age of sixteen began his apprentice- 
ship in merchandising in Liverpool, where he served his time and was subse- 
quently employed as salesman until 1882, when he decided to seek the greater 
opportunities of Canada and came to British Columbia. Here he found employ- 
ment with John Hendry in the Royal City Planing Mills at New Westminster, 
which enterprise has since become known as the British Columbia Mills. He 
has been continuously identified with this institution, having risen from a 
minor position to that of cashier, in which capacity he did able work for twenty 
years. In 1906 he was made manager of the Xew Westminster branch of this 
vast concern. His wide experience makes him especially valuable to the firm 
and his long connection with the same concern speaks well for his high per- 
ception of his duties. Representing an important industrial institution, he has 
become one of the foremost men in the business life of Xew Westminster and 
is greatly respected by all who know him and often consulted upon questions 
that involve local industrial or commercial conditions. 

In 1889 Mr: Rickman was married to Miss Anna Wilson Homer, third 
daughter of the late J. A. R. Homer, a member of the first provincial parlia- 
ment and also representing New Westminster in the Dominion house. Mr. and 
Mrs. Rickman became the parents of three children, of whom two survive, 
Alice M. and Vyvian, both at home. Wilfred R. lias passed away. 

Mr. Rickman gives his political allegiance to the conservative party, taking 
a deep interest in all issues that affect the government. He has an interesting 
military record to his credit, having been a member of the Volunteers, the Xew 
Westminster Rifles, and was a lieutenant of his company. He also is musically 
inclined and interested in athletics. Fraternally he is a member of Union Lodge, 
No. 9 A. F. & A. M., the first Masonic lodge on the mainland in British Col- 
umbia, this lodge celebrating its fiftieth anniversary in 1912. He is a member 
of the Church of England and a charter member of the New Westminster Club. 
He has become a forceful element in his community, having participated in its 
growth for thirty years, and is highly respected and regarded by all who 
know him. By masterful effort he has attained to a prominent position and 
there is no one who more justly merits success than Mr. Rickman. 



JAMES HILL LAWSON, JR. 

James Hill Lawson, practicing at the Vancouver bar, a member of the firm- 
Df Bodwell & Lawson, was born in Victoria, September 24, 1875, and the spirit 
of enterprise, which has been the dominant factor in the upbuilding in this 
section of the country, find expression in his professional career. His parents 
were James Hill and Ann Jennet (Macdonald) Lawson, the former a native of 
Dundee, Scotland, and the latter of England. They came to Canada in 1862, 
;oon afterward met and were married in Victoria. For thirty years the father 
was in the employ of the Hudson's Bay Company and spent the greater part of 
.hat time in Victoria. He is now vice president of the firm of R. P. Rithet & 
Company of Victoria. 

In the public schools of his native city and of Winnipeg James H. Lawson, 
fr., pursued his education, and in 1892 was articled to Judge Irving, then a 
nember of the firm of Bodwell & Irving, of Victoria. His thorough and com- 
prehensive preliminary reading qualified him for admission to the bar, to which 
ic was called in 1897. Immediately afterward he engaged in practice and the 
irm is now known as Bodwell & Lawson, a partnership having been formed 
vith Mr. Bodwell, the partner of Mr. Lawson's preceptor. They maintain 
offices in both Victoria and Vancouver and for the past two and a half years 
VIr. Lawson has been in charge of the Vancouver office. The practice is a 
growing one and has already reached extensive proportions, and in the work of 



52 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

the court Mr. Lawson has proven himself able to cope with difficult legal prob- 
lems and find for them a correct solution. 

Mr. Lawson is well known and popular in various social organizations, hold- 
ing membership with the Native Sons of British Columbia, the Vancouver 
Club, the Shaughnessy Heights Golf and Country Club, the Union Club of 
Victoria, and the Victoria Golf and Country Club. He is also a member of 
St. Andrew's Presbyterian church of Victoria. In the two leading cities of the 
province he is well known and has a circle of friends almost coextensive with 
the circle of his acquaintance. 

HON. JAMES DUNSMUIR. 

No name is more inseparably connected with the history of the develop- 
ment of British Columbia than that of Dunsmuir indeed, it would not be too 
much to say that the progress of events in this, the greatest and richest province 
in the Dominion, would have been stayed to a very considerable extent, had not 
fate willed, that one Robert Dunsmuir, now deceased, the revered father of the 
subject of this sketch, should have been called upon to play a very important 
part in shaping its fortunes. What Lord Strathcona has done for Canada on a 
large scale, he accomplished for British Columbia. He it was who inaugurated 
the great coal-mining industry ; and who having amassed great wealth, turned 
his attention in a variety of ways towards the development of the resources of 
the land of his adoption. A Scotsman, possessed of all the sterling traits of 
character which have made his countrymen foremost in all lines of endeavor 
the world over, he applied his energy and his genius to the creation of large 
industries on Vancouver island. Coal mining and lumbering engaged his atten- 
tion to a very considerable extent, and the magnitude which those industries 
have attained at the present time can be set down to his initiative. He it was, 
also, who took the first practical steps towards the opening up of the splendid 
territory of Vancouver island, building a line of railway to connect Victoria with 
the mines at Nanaimo, and this at a time when there was little inducement for 
such an undertaking, which involved vast expenditure. Though he had attained 
a ripe age at the time of his death, there can be no doubt had he lived a short 
time longer he would have accomplished even more for it is well known that in 
his brain there had matured plans for giving Vancouver island direct connection 
by rail with the mainland and that the necessary capital had all been subscribed 
for such enterprise. 

Possessing such a father it is not at all surprising that Hon. James Dunsmuir 
should have so worthily upheld the family tradition. He enjoyed the advantage 
of receiving direct instructions from the founder of the family fortunes; and 
with commendable pluck applied himself to a mastery of all the details of the 
immense business, and with such success that on the death of his father he was 
enabled to conduct all the vast enterprises and bring them to fruition. 

The subject of this sketch was born at Fort Vancouver, Washington, on 
July 8, 1851, his mother also being a woman of sterling Scotch family, Johanna 
White (now deceased). James was educated at Nanaimo, the scene of his father's 
coal-mining operations, and at Hamilton College a military institute at Black- 
burg, Virginia, at the latter point meeting the lady who afterwards became 
his wife, Laura, daughter of W. B. Swales. They were married at Fayettes- 
vilie, North Carolina, in 1876. 

Subsequently, his education having been completed, James returned to -Van- 
couver island, and at once plunged into the management, with his father, of the 
coal-mining business which was beginning to assume huge proportions.' Here 
he gained very valuable practical experience working down in the mines with 
the men who were digging coal. As the years passed the management of the 
business passed more and more into his hands, and ultimately he became the 




HON. JAMES DUNSMU1R 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 55 

directing head of all the vast Dunsmuir interests on the coast, which consisted of 
:oal mines, logging camps, steamships, tow boats, etc. 

Hon. James Dunsmuir has also had a most interesting political career, lie 
;at f or East Yale (Local) Conservative interests from 1898 to 1902; was premier 
>f the province of British Columbia and president of the council from 1900 to 
t9O2;and lieutenant-governor of the province, 1906 to 1909. At a critical period 
n the history of the province, when the management of its public affairs had 
jroved most unsatisfactory, he was summoned by his honor, the lieutenant- 
governor, and asked to form a government in succession to Hon. Joseph Martin, 
.vho had unsuccessfully essayed the attempt of forming a stable administration. 
VEr. Dunsmuir was then the member for East Yale, which he represented from 
1898 until 1902, the year of his relinquishment of the premiership which he had 
accepted two years previously. 

Other phases of Mr. Dunsmuir's career are equally interesting. He built 
he splendid traffic bridge across the Eraser river at New Westminster, and 
icgotiated the transaction which ended in the Esquimalt & Nanaimo Railway 
>eing acquired by the Canadian Pacific Railway. This was in the year 1905. 
Hie is one of the most extensive landowners in the province, is a director of the 
Canadian Pacific Railway and devotes most of his time at present to the man- 
agement of his large private interests. 

Mr. and Mrs. Dunsmuir had the honor of being presented to the present 
Cing and Queen and entertained them in Victoria in 1901. They were again 
presented to Their Majesties in 1902 and were present by invitation at the 
coronation of King Edward and Queen Alexandra in Westminster Abbey in 
August of the same year. They were presented to Their Majesties at Windsor 
Castle in 1908 and later, while cruising abroad, had the pleasure of an exchange 
of visits with His Majesty, the German Emperor, aboard the Imperial and Air. 
Dunsmuir's yachts. 

Mr. Dunsmuir has been a generous contributor to all public and private 
movements of a worthy character. He gave ten thousand dollars to the Sana- 
sorium for Consumptives and added a large sum to the endowment of McGill 
University. He is a member of the Presbyterian church and his clubs are the 
IJnion at Victoria and the Vancouver at Vancouver. 



ALEXANDER JACKSON MAcLACHLAN, M. D., C. M. 

Dr. Alexander Jackson MacLachlan is recognized as one of the rising young 
physicians of Vancouver, having already attained a position of prominence that 
nany an older member of the profession might well envy. He was born at 
Blenheim, Kent county, Ontario, September 30, 1881, and is a son of Donald 
ind Amelia (Jackson) MacLachlan,' the former a native of Argyleshire, Scot- 
land, and the latter of Blenheim, Ontario. The maternal grandfather, John 
Jackson, born in 1799, came from County Armagh, Ireland, to the new world, 
fettling in Kent county, Ontario. He went to Rondeau Harbor in 1816 and 
i little later built the first store and sawmill four miles west of Rondeau Har- 
tor. The town was named Blenheim. The store building which he erected is 
ftill standing there. He was closely and actively associated with the commer- 
cial and industrial development of the little town and lived to witness the greater 
part of its progress and improvement, continuing his residence there until his 
death, in 1890. His daughter was born at Blenheim and was there reared and 
married. Soon after their marriage Mr. and Mrs. MacLachlan went to Water- 
iord, where he established a hardware business which he conducted for two 
years. He afterward went to Windsor where he remained for one year. He 
next went to Blenheim, where he formed a partnership with Thomas R. Jack- 
son, engaging in the private banking business under the name of the Jackson Bank- 
ing House. There he remained until 1896, when he went to Glencoe, where 



56 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

he once more engaged in the hardware business, conducting his store success- 
fully until 1907. He then came to Vancouver where he is now living retired, 
spending his days in the enjoyment of well earned rest. 

Dr. MacLachlan began his education in the public schools of Blenheim and 
afterwards attended the high school at Glencoe, from which he was graduated 
wjth the class of 1899. In 1901 he entered Queen's University and was gradu- 
ated in medicine with the class of 1905. Immediately afterward he went to 
New Ontario as physician for the A. R. MacDonell Construction Company, 
engaged in railroad construction work, and in that connection Dr. MacLachlan 
spent two years. In 1907 he came to Vancouver, where he entered upon ser- 
vice as physician and surgeon on Canadian Pacific Railway steamships running 
between Vancouver and Hong Kong, China. A year later he left that service 
and spent a year in the Vancouver General Hospital. He was for one year in 
St. Paul's Hospital at Vancouver and in August, 1910, entered upon the private 
practice of medicine in which he has actively continued to the present time with 
offices in No. 679 Granville street. 1 fis practice has steadily grown in extent 
and in importance and he now receives a liberal share of the public patronage. 

On the 28th of August, 1911, Dr. MacLachlan was married in Vancouver 
to Miss .Marguerite Ferguson, of Savona, liritish Columbia, and they have one 
daughter, Mary Ellinore Jackson MacLachlan. The Doctor holds membership 
in the Phi Sigma Kappa, a college fraternity, and belongs also to the University 
Club. In politics he is a liberal but not an active partisan. His religious faith 
is that of the Presbyterian church. He possesses most attractive personal 
qualities, is social and congenial and readily appreciates true worth on the 
part of others. In his profession he holds to high standards and is making 
gradual and satisfactory advance therein. 



HARRY BRAITHWAITE ABBOTT, C. E. 

Harry Braithwaite Abbott, civil engineer, has been prominently connected 
with important railway building projects across the continent from Canso to 
Vancouver and is now a retired official of the Canadian Pacific Railway Company. 
He was born in Abbotsford, Quebec, June 14, 1829, a son of the Rev. Joseph 
and Harriet (Bradford) Abbott, the former a native of England and the latter 
of the province of Quebec. The mother was a daughter of the Rev. Richard 
Bradford, one of the pioneer clergymen of that province and at one time chap- 
lain to the British forces at Sorel. The Rev. Joseph Abbott spent his entire life 
in the ministry and passed away at the age of seventy-two years. His memory 
remains as a blessed benediction to all who knew him and is enshrined in the 
hearts of many loyal friends. His wife passed away in her sixty-eighth year. 

Harry B. Abbott was one of a family of seven children, four sons and three 
daughters, and is the only one now living. He began his education in the public 
schools and passed through consecutive grades to the high school in Montreal 
and afterwards became a student in McGill University of that city. He was 
about eighteen years of age when he took up the study of engineering under 
Colonel Gzowski. Gradually he advanced in that connection and in the early 
period of his career was on duty at Island Pond on the St. Lawrence & Atlantic 
Kailroad. He has always been a student of his chosen profession and has deserv- 
edly won the title of expert in civil engineering. In 1857 he resigned his position 
with the St Lawrence & Atlantic Railway Company, which is now a part of 
the Grand Trunk system, and in partnership with C. Freer, also a civil engineer, 
leased the Riviere du Loup section of the Grand Trunk under a lease subject 
to cancellation at a short notice, and operated that division for one year. During 
that period they introduced a system of cheap rates, reducing the price of all 
passenger tickets to one cent per mile. Owing to the large population of that 
district great crowds availed themselves of the opportunity for travel over the 




HARRY B. ABBOTT 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 59 

line . Subsequently the same firm undertook a contract for the maintenance of 
\va of the Grand Trunk Railway from Richmond, Canada, to Gorham in the 
Un ted States, and in 1866 he became chief engineer of a projected railway 
betveen Montreal and Sherbrooke. In 1868 Mr. Abbott became managing direc- 
tor and chief engineer of the Brockville & Ottawa Railway, extending from 
Bn ckville to the Ottawa river, and so continued until 1873. In the meantime, 
or n 1872, he built the Carleton Place and Ottawa branch of the Canada Cen- 
tral Railway, of which he became the president and managing director. In 1875 
he >ecame chief engineer and manager of construction of the Eastern Extension 
Railway Company of Nova Scotia. Mr. Abbott had personally secured the con- 
trai t for the road and transferred it to a company of which Sir Hugh Allen was 
the president. In 1882 he entered the service of the Canadian Pacific as manager 
of construction of the Algona Mills branch to Sudbury, and in 1884 took charge, as 
manager of construction, of the main line of the Canadian Pacific Railway from 
Siu bury westward. In November, 1885, he came on the first train, that ran through 
from Montreal, to Port Moody, which also carried Lord Strathcona. the president, 
Sir William Van Home, Mr. Fleming, civil engineer, together with Mr. Piers, 
nov manager of the Canadian Pacific Railway Steamships. Mr. Abbott was 
present at the laying of the last rail on the 8th of November, 1885, at Craigel- 
Jacl-ie, where the two ends of the rails met, Lord Strathcona driving the last 
spil- e. In January, 1886, he was appointed general superintendent of the Pacific 
division of the Canadian Pacific Railway, filling this position in an admirable 
mai ner until he resigned in 1897. His active connection with the road covered 
the period of the commencement of the operation of the line through to Port 
Moody and subsequently, in 1887, to Vancouver. 

[n March, 1886, Mr. Abbott let the contract for the clearing of the townsite 
ppf Vancouver, which city then had a population of not over five hundred. 

Mr. Abbott had the management of the heavy work involved in the improve- 
mei t of the portion of the Canadian Pacific Railway under his charge as general 
sup :rintendent, under an award of arbitrators, because of faulty construction 
y 'he Dominion government. The Robson and Nelson branch was built under 
his supervision and steamboats were put upon the Columbia river and Kootenay 
and Okanagan lakes. He supervised the replacement of the greater number of 
the larger bridges and trestles and the building of retaining walls and arches, 
whrre "grasshopper" trestles had been, and there are few men more familiar 
than he with the history of railroad construction through the era of pioneer 
development in Canada, and the importance of his labors cannot be overestimated. 
With expert knowledge of the scientific principles underlying his work, he com- 
binid a conscientiousness and industry that resulted in railway building unsur- 
passed in the character of the work done. Since coming to the west he has been 
m inuously connected with the Canadian Pacific, long in an active capacity and 
jlater in more or less of an advisory capacity. Through the many years of his 
ass< ciation with this great corporation he has served as a dominant factor in the 
progress and development, not only of the road, but of the city and province in 
jwhi:h he makes his home. 

n 1894 the mountains were covered with a heavy snow which remained late 
jintc the spring, when a sudden thaw in June caused an enormous flood, the 
jgre; test known in the province, washing away portions of a distance of fifty miles 
iOf ( 'anadian Pacific Railway track between Wonnock and Ruby Creek, and many 
I of the important trestles. To maintain uninterrupted traffic, steamers were put 
ion he Eraser* river to carry the traffic for about a month between those points. 
;Tht rebuilding of the roadbed was under Mr. Abbott's supervision, and thus 
jaga n he took active part in railway construction projects of the far west and 
'the reinstalment of regular trains was quickly accomplished. 

tn 1868 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Abbott and Miss Margaret 
jAmalie Sicotte, a daughter of the late Judge Sicotte and a native of St. Hya- 
|cinthe, Quebec. To them were born three children: John Louis Grahame 
' Abl ott, a barrister ; Harry Hamilton Abbott, formerly agent for the Canadian 



60 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

Pacific at Victoria, and now a wine merchant at Vancouver; and Beatrice 
Amelia, the widow of Osborne Plunkett, a barrister of Vancouver. 

Mr. Abbott is a member of the St. James Club of Montreal and an honorary 
president of the Vancouver Club. He also holds membership in the Union Club 
of Victoria. In politics he has always been a conservative, and at one time was 
a candidate for Brockville and Klizabethtown for the house of commons. In 
1862 he assisted in the formation of the Eleventh Battalion, V. M., Argenteuil 
Rangers, from which he retired with the rank of major. During the Trent 
affair, which arose at the time of the Civil war in the United States in 1862, the 
grenadier guards and other regiments were sent to Canada after the close of 
navigation in the St. Lawrence, on which occasion, owing to Mr. Abbott's thor- 
ough knowledge of the country through which they had to pass on their way 
from St. fohn, New Brunswick, to Quebec and Montreal, his advice was sought 
by the British commandant, Sir Fenwick Williams, and he was sent to Frederic- 
ton to meet them. 

At the time of the second Kiel rebellion Mr. Abbott handled and supplied 
food to the troops over the railroad and roadbed from Sudbury to the Pic river. 
As the line was then unfinished for sixty miles from Dog river, two hundred and 
fifty horses and sleighs from the construction camps were used to haul the 
troops to the other end of the track at the Pic river, and a large number of the 
soldiers were handled and fed in this district under the direction of Mr. Abbott. 
With many events connected with the history of the west, especially with rail- 
road building, Mr. Abbott has been closely associated. A mountain in the Sel- 
kirks and one of the business thoroughfares in the heart of Vancouver have been 
named in his honor. No man stands higher in public esteem or enjoys the regard 
of a wider circle of sincere friends than Mr. Abbott, who has long occupied a 
central and honored place on the stage of activities in British Columbia. 



TURBFRA^LLE THOMAS. 

Turberville Thomas, a veteran of the Kiel rebellion and of the Boer war, 
who has since proven his loyalty and public spirit in an equally effective manner 
by able and conscientious work in the public service, is one of the most progressive 
and representative citizens of Port Coquitlam, where he is discharging the impor- 
tant duties of chief of the city police. He was born in Edgbaston, Birmingham, 
England, on the 26th of October, 1866, and is a son of the late Edward Cory 
Thomas, Chilian consul to Great Britain and who controlled large copper inter- 
ests in South Wales and Chili, South America. The paternal grandfather was 
recorder of the city of Swansea, Wales, for many years and the maternal branch 
of the family is descended directly from Oliver Cromwell. 

In the acquirement of an education Turberville Thomas attended King 
Edward's school in Birmingham, England, and was in later years a student in 
McGill University, Montreal, and in Durham University, England. At the age 
of sixteen and before comoleting his fundamental education he already published 
a small weekly paper in Wales and was very successful in its conduct for a num- 
ber of years. Following the course of empire, he later came to Canada and for 
some time was connected with various survey parties in the northern country, 
later traveling throughout the United States in the interests of eastern Canadian 
and London papers. In 1885 he volunteered .for service in the*Riel rebellion 
but was refused enlistment on account of his youth. Later, however, he suc- 
ceeded in getting on the transport with General Strange's column and went from 
Calgary to Edmonton on the historic forced march, eventually receiving a medal 
for bravery in action. Being in London, England, at the time of the outbreak 
of the Boer war, Mr. Thomas enlisted with the volunteers, serving as a trooper. 
He received his commission on the field and served under Colonel Thornycroft 
as camp quartermaster and intelligence officer. Later he was chosen provost 




CAPTAIN TURBERVILLK THOMAS 






BRITISH COLUMBIA 63 

marshal under General Knox in the Bloemfontein district, in the Orange River 
Colony, after which he was station staff officer at Burghersdorf, Cape Colony. 
Captain Thomas won both the king's and queen's medals and his name was 
mentioned in dispatches for recommendation on account of his distinguished 
and able service. 

Captain Thomas was justice of the peace in and for the Northwest Terri- 
tories and afterward in Alberta, where he resumed his connection with journal- 
ism, becoming editor and proprietor of the Camrose (Alberta) Mail and after- 
ward of the Sedgewick Eagle. It was while in Alberta that Mr. Thomas was 
chosen president of the Eastern British Columbia and Alberta Press Association 
and was its delegate to the Imperial Press Conference in London, England. He 
came from that province to Vancouver, British Columbia, and here founded The 
Mail Publishing Company, which issued the Sunday Mail, the first Sunday 
newspaper in the city. Captain Thomas later associated himself with the secret 
service and proved so capable, reliable and far-sighted that he was detailed to 
special police work throughout British Columbia, gaining during this period a 
thorough knowledge of the work with which he is now so prominently connected. 
He was afterward stationed at Burnaby and from there came to Port Coquitlam, 
as chief of police of this city. 

In 1889 Mr. Thomas was united in marriage to Miss Zoella Foster, who died 
in 1903. He wedded afterward Miss Alice \Yinnifred Pargitter, of Oxford, 
England, a sister of Chief Justice Pargitter of the High Court of India, and a 
daughter of Rev. R. R. Pargitter, the first representative of the Church Mis- 
sionary Society in Ceylon. He is living today at the advanced age of ninety- 
five years. Mrs. Thomas was associated with the celebrated Cheltenham Col- 
lege in England and later with Havergall College in Winnipeg. Captain Thomas 
has two children : a son, Edward, who is married and engaged in trading in the 
South Seas ; and a daughter, Mary Louise. 

Mr. Thomas is a devout member of the Church of England and has served 
as a delegate to the general synod at Quebec, the provincial synod at Winnipeg 
and the diocesan synod at Calgary. He belongs to the South African Veterans 
Association, is secretary of the Imperial Campaigners Association and is a mem- 
ber of the Vancouver executive of the Boy Scout movement. He is connected 
fraternally with the grand lodge of the Knights of Pythias in Alberta and belongs 
to the Loyal Order of Orange. He is well known in conservative politics here 
and in Alberta, where after the Boer war he was one of the organizers of the 
Conservative Association and was nominated a candidate for both the provincial 
and the federal houses. He is progressive, public-spirited and loyal in matters 
of citizenship and in the various cities where he has resided his influence has 
been a tangible force in development and progress. 



ALBERT R. BAKER, D. D. S. 

Through the past decade Dr. Albert R. Baker has engaged in the practice 
of dentistry in Vancouver and his success has resulted from comprehensive 
scientific knowledge as exemplified in the practical work of the profession. 
He was born in Victoria on the I4th of July, 1864, his parents being Michael 
and Johanna (Hatch) Baker. The father was a native of Detroit, Michigan, 
and in 1862 came by way of the isthmus of Panama to British Columbia for 
the Hudson's Bay Company, building the wharves for that company. After 
three years spent in the far west he removed to Ottawa, Ontario, where he 
resided for several years and then returned to British Columbia, continuing to 
make his home in Victoria until his death in 1905. He was of Irish descent, 
as was his wife, who was, however, a native of Ottawa. 

In the schools of his native city Dr. Baker pursued his early education 
and after graduation therefrom entered upon preparation for a professional 

Vol. IV 3 



64 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

career as a student in the dental department of the University of Pennsylvania 
at Philadelphia. He there completed the full course and was graduated in 
1881 with the degree of D. D. S. Following his graduation he traveled through 
the western states and through British Columbia, registering in various local- 
ities and following his profession. In 1887, however, he returned to Phila- 
delphia, where he engaged in active practice for four years, or until 1891, when 
he again came to British Columbia and opened an office in Victoria, there con- 
tinuing until 1895. He next practiced in Portland, Oregon, for about eight 
years, or until 1903, when he again came to this province and took up his abode 
in Vancouver, where he has continued in active practice to the present time. 
His ability is attested by the large practice accorded him. By broad reading 
and thorough research he has kept in touch with the advance work of the pro- 
fession. He possesses the delicate mechanical skill and exactness so necessary 
for the actual dental work and he has a splendidly equipped office, showing 
all modern appliances and devices for the highest class of work. Underlying 
his mechanical skill is his scientific knowledge and at all times he conforms to 
a high standard of professional ethics. 

Aside from this Dr. Baker has varied financial interests. He was the vice 
president of the Canadian Brewing & Malting Company until sold to eastern 
capitalists. He is now director of the Standard Trust Company and director 
of the Metropolitan Building Company, and he owns considerable real estate, 
having made judicious investments in property from which he derives a gratify- 
ing annual income. 

Dr. Baker was married in 1895 to Miss Kthelda Odershaw, a daughter of 
Alfred Odershaw, of Victoria, and their children are Raymond and Albert R. 
Dr. Baker is liberal in politics, without having held or desired public office. 
He belongs to the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and to various social 
organizations, including the Terminal City Club of A'ancouver and Royal Van- 
couver Yacht Club. He is an enthusiastic yachtsman but devotes the greater 
part of his attention to his professional duties, and is a member of the Brit- 
ish Columbia Society of Dental Surgeons. High standing in his chosen calling 
has been won through industry, determination and capability, and he is today 
accounted one of the foremost dentists practicing in Vancouver. 



DONALD CHISHOLM, M. P. 

The career of Donald Chisholm is one of peculiar interest to all British Colum- 
bians, as he lived and worked here since the colony came into being. 

The parents of Mr. Chisholm came from Invernesshire, Scotland, about the 
beginning of the nineteenth century, and settled on the Lower South river, at 
Antigonish, Nova Scotia, and at that place Mr. Chisholm was born in 1822. After 
having received an education he began life as a teacher, but very soon abandoned 
this profession. In 1849 he left his native place and started for the California gold 
fields with a party of twenty-three prospectors, of which W. R. Lewis of New 
Westminster was a member. While in California he helped to frame the mining 
laws which still exist in the Golden state. He met with indifferent success in 
California and after a few years returned to Canada, settling in Ontario, where he 
engaged in the wheat trade. He speculated largely during the Crimean war, and 
with the proclamation of peace, he was left with thousands of bushels on his hands. 
The proclamation came three weeks too soon or he would have gained great wealth 
by this venture. 

In 1858, or immediately after this experience, he came to British Columbia 
and from that time on until his demise there was scarcely a prominent line of 
business, peculiar to this part of the country, that he did not engage in. He first 
settled in Hope and in 1860 was elected by the people of that district as a delegate 
to a convention held in New Westminster to frame and present to the Imperial 




DONALD CHISHOLM 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 67 

government a petition for the establishment of a measure of government for the 
nainland of British Columbia, which was then an outlying territory under Gov- 
;rnor Douglas of Vancouver island. This convention was his first appearance as 
i public man. He was first returned to parliament at the general election of 1887 
is a supporter of the liberal conservative administration of Sir John Macdonald. 
In 1860 Mr. Chisholm was one of a party who went to the Big bend of the 
Columbia river, prospecting for gold and other minerals. During that trip he 
learly lost his life. In crossing the McCullough creek on a snow bridge when the 
nelting of the mountain snow formed a torrent, the bridge gave way and he was 
et down into the torrent and carried by the current half a mile in the ice cold 
^ater and was rescued by a small party of miners, in an unconscious condition, 
tn 1862 he went to Cariboo, where he mined for some time. Afterwards in the 
cCootenay district he was for years engaged in the lumbering and mining industries. 
For some time he was foreman of the famous Cherry Creek mines. 

It was Donald Chisholm who took Major General Selby Smith and staff 
hrough the mountains to Hope on his pack train, when that distinguished officer 
irst visited British Columbia. 

In 1874 he came to New Westminster and from that time until his death, 
.vhich occurred April 3, 1890, he resided on the coast, where his honor and wealth 
ncreased with his years. Shortly after settling in the Royal City he invested in 
he property and business of Fred Woodcock and established a wholesale and 
etail grocery business in connection therewith on Front street. He also purchased 
>roperty at Ladner's Landing and started a hotel and general store, afterwards 
owned and conducted by Thomas McNeely. He also became a partner in the Delta 
Canning Company. He subsequently invested, in company with a Mr. Brewer, 
n a large tract of land in what is now the city of Vancouver and in an estate in 
lastings; also in blocks of property which are now in the center of New West- 
minster. In partnership with Daniel Mills he also owned one of the most beautiful 
'arms on Salt Spring island, if not in the province. For several years Mr. 
Chisholm was president of the New Westminster Board of Trade. 

While mining in California Mr. Chisholm also practiced medicine and many 
;. miner owed his life to "Doe" Chisholm's therapeutic skill. He likewise prac- 
liced during the cholera epidemic in conjunction with Fitz-Stubbs. 

The government early showed its confidence in Mr. Chisholm by appointing 
him a special constable during the trouble at Yale and Hill's Bar in the early 
mining days on the Fraser river. Mr. Chisholm brought the Price brothers to 
New Westminster, to be tried for the wanton murder of an Indian, through whole 
1 ands of hostile red skins and surrounded by almost insuperable difficulties and 
1 rightful dangers. 

Physically Mr. Chisholm was a magnificent specimen of the British Columbia 
pioneer, possessed of herculean strength, and had the reputation of being the 
strongest man in the province. He stood six feet, four and a half inches in his 
stocking feet, with the courage and energy to back his strength and stature. 



ALEXANDER DUNCAN ROSS. 

Alexander Duncan Ross, long considered an authority on mechanical engi- 
i eering and installation projects, has been among the foremost in that field of 
1 ibor, which has led to the development of the northwest and the utilization 
c f its natural resources. His labors, however, have been by no means confined 
tj one section of the country. His professional skill has been employed in 
\arious localities and today important industrial plants all through the Domin- 
ion stand as monuments to his labor and his scientific knowledge. He was born 
i i Glengarry, Ontario, March 13, 1859, and is a son of Daniel and Christie 
(Mowat) Ross, who were also natives of that province. The father was en- 
gaged in farming and in the lumber business, retaining his residence in Ontario 



68 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

until about 1860, when he came to British Columbia. He went to the Cariboo 
over the old trial and made several trips abroad and several times went around 
the world, his extensive journeyings making him familiar with many sections 
of the globe and the people that inhabit it. Both he and his wife are now 
deceased. 

Alexander D. Ross pursued his education in the public schools of Ontario 
and in April, 1874, when fifteen years of age, started out in the business world, 
being apprenticed to the firm of Robert Gardner & Son of Montreal, engineers 
and machinists, his term of indenture continuing from 1874 until 1881. He 
afterward continued in the employ of the firm for several years as a journey- 
man but later went with The William Rutherford & Sons Company, Limited, 
of Montreal, with whom he continued for two years. He erected for that com- 
pany two mills on the south bank of the St. Lawrence, about two hundred and 
fifty miles below Quebec, for J. & P. Coates, these mills to be used for the 
making of spools for the use of the thread manufacturer. Both mills are still 
in operation. 

As the years passed on Mr. Ross became more and more proficient in every- 
thing pertaining to mechanical engineering and in 1886 he went to Milwaukee, 
Wisconsin, to accept a position as erecting engineer for E. P. Allis, later of 
the Allis-Chalmers Company, with whom he continued for two years. He next 
engaged with the Canadian Pacific Railway and built at Port Arthur the first 
elevator ever owned by the company. This is still in use. He was engaged 
in that work through the winter and in the following spring entered into 
business connections with the Dominion Bridge Company in the capacity of 
master mechanic, having full charge of engines, boilers and machinery in gen- 
eral as well as direct charge of the machine shop department. At that time 
the company had five hundred horse power engines and- boilers, all of which 
were under his supervision. When he became connected with the company 
they were just building their plant outside of Montreal and Mr. Ross installed 
the engines and machinery. Today this is the largest bridge company in Can- 
ada. Mr. Ross remained with them for nine years and during that time had 
charge of the shop work on the building of the first cantalever bridge ever con- 
structed. This was erected at St. John, New Brunswick, and later two were 
built across the St. Lawrence river, one at Lachine. He also built another at 
Sault Sainte Marie, across St. Mary's river, and also the gates and machinery 
in connection with the dry docks at Victoria. All this indicates how impor- 
tant was the nature of the work entrusted to him. In 1894 he became con- 
nected with the Laurie Engine & Machine Company, Limited, of Montreal as 
erecting engineer, general foreman at the works and general superintendent. He 
remained with them until 1909, at which time he had full charge of all matters 
pertaining to the engineering department. Among the large plants which he 
erected for that company are those of the Montreal Street Railway Company, 
the Toronto Street Railway Company, the St. John (N. B.) Street Railway 
Company, the Dominion Iron & Steel Company at Sydney, Cape Breton, the 
Canadian Rubber Company at Montreal, the Winnipeg Street Railway Com- 
pany and the mammoth plant of the Oglivia Flour Mills at Winnipeg. In this 
connection he also built the large pulp mills for the Riordan Company at Hawkes- 
bury, Ontario, and the large mills for the Merchants Cotton Company at Mon- 
treal, together with many other large plants, including sugar refineries, paper 
mills, the King Brothers asbestos mills at Thedford Mines, Quebec, and every 
conceivable kind of a plant where power is used. 

On the ist of May, 1909, Mr. Ross came to Vancouver to become super- 
intendent of the steam plant for the British Columbia Electric Railway Com- 
pany, having installed their old street railway plant in 1899, while with the 
Laurie people. He has letters of recommendation, in which his work is men- 
tioned in the highest terms, from Robert Gardner & Company, with whom he 
served his apprenticeship, from the Dominion Bridge Company, the Laurie 
Engine & Machine Company, William Rutherford & Sons, the Montreal Street 






BRITISH COLUMBIA 69 

Railway Company and the Canadian Rubber Company, testifying to his engi- 
neering* skill and executive ability. His record has been a remarkable one and 
lis opinions have always been received as authority on all mechanical engi- 
neering and installation projects. Before coming to Vancouver he had well 
demonstrated his ability and thus his services were sought in connection with 
;he superintendency of the steam plant for the British Columbia Electric Railway 
Company. He immediately upon assuming his duties here proceeded to remove 
the remainder of the old plant, which had an original capacity of three thousand 
horse power, and replaced it with a new turbine plant of twenty-five thousand 
horse power. The old plant being razed, he removed it to Victoria, where he 
erected it for use as the street railway and lighting plant and it is still in 
operation. The new plant of the British Columbia Electric Railway Company 
at Vancouver is unsurpassed by any in Canada and in equipment there is 
nothing better on the continent. Entirely under the supervision of Mr. Ross 
there was erected in Victoria, in 1912, a fine new plant with a capacity of six 
thousand horse power. It was built in such a way that when necessity demands 
it can be enlarged so that it will have a capacity of twenty-five thousand horse 
power. Mr. Ross went upon the ground in June, when the land was not yet 
cleared, and by November of the same year had the plant running to its present 
capacity. It is an immense modern building, strictly up-to-date in every way, 
and it is an oil burning plant. The structure is beautifully located with a water 
front on Brantwood Bay, which makes possible the unloading of oil direct from 
the steamers to their own fuel tanks in the power house. The foregoing indi- 
cates clearly that Mr. Ross has become one of the foremost mechanical engi- 
neers of the Dominion, the nature of the work which he has executed demanding 
the highest and most efficient skill. 

Like the great majority of Canadians, Mr. Ross has seen military service. 
At the age of eighteen years he joined the Sixth Fusiliers of Montreal, with 
which regiment he was connected for twelve years, lie was an expert rifle 
shot and for eight years represented the Fusiliers in the Dominion meets at 
Ottawa, during which time he won many fine trophies, including seven medals, 
:hree cups and other smaller prizes, all the medals and cups being first prizes. 
He held several championships and was acknowledged one of the finest marks- 
men in eastern Canada. He was afterward for three years with the Fifth. 
Regiment of Royal Scots of Montreal and there did much shooting. 

Mr. Ross was married irV Montreal, February 28, 1881, to Miss Anna 
McArthur, a native of that city, and they have two daughters: Ale.xiana, the 
wife of Dr. E. G. Tunbelle, of Barry, Ontario, and Anita, at home. In poli- 
cies Mr. Ross is a liberal but not an active party worker. He attends St. John's 
Presbyterian church and he is a member of Montreal Lodge, No. i, 
[. O. O. F., and of the British Columbia Electric Social Club and a life member 
of Mount Maria Lodge, No. 38, A. F. & A. M., of Montreal. His career shows 
that ambition and ability constitute a key which unlocks the portals of success. 
He is today a leading figure in engineering circles, having gradually worked 
his way upward, his developing powers gaining him constantly widening recog- 
nition. The judgment of the world concerning him is most favorable and the 
profession, recognizing more fully his talent and power, gives him indeed high 
place in its ranks. 



J. ANDERSON YELLOWLEES. 

}. Anderson Yellowlees, real-estate and financial agent at Vancouver, was 
born in Peebles, Scotland, February 4, 1886, a son of Alexander and Jessie 
Yellowlees. His father is secretary of the Church of Scotland. The son while 
spending his youthful days under the parental roof pursued his education at 
the high school of his native city, and later attended George Watson's College 



70 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

of Edinburgh and on leaving school entered upon a five years' apprenticeship as 
a civil engineer in Edinburgh, during which period he gained extensive knowl- 
edge of the profession. The opportunities of the west, however, attracted 
him and in 1908 he arrived in Vancouver, where he entered the real-estate 
business. After gaining an experience in this line of business he started on his 
own account and in KJH entered into partnership with William Russell and 
Ernest Walter James under the firm style of Russell, James & Yellowlees, 
which partnership still exists. The firm has succeeded in winning a good client- 
age and the amount of business which they handle each year makes the 
undertaking a profitable one. Mr. Yellowlees has also made investments in 
property and his own holdings are advancing in value and are a source of 
gratifying financial return. 

Mr. Yellowlees votes with the conservative party, and while he keeps well 
informed on the questions and issues of the day does not seek nor desire office 
as a reward for party fealty. His religious belief is indicated in his member- 
ship in the Presbyterian church, and something of the nature of his recreative 
interest is shown in the fact that he is a member of both the Vancouver Golf 
and Country and North Vancouver Clubs, serving as a director in the former. 
He has never had occasion to regret his determination to come to the new 
world, for in the freedom and appreciation of this great and growing western 
country he has found the opportunities which he sought, and in their improve- 
ment has made gradual and substantial advancement in the business world. 



ALFRED POSTILL. 

Okanagan valley has mourned the loss of few citizens who have occupied 
so prominent and honorable a position in public regard as did Alfred Postill, who 
was formost in every good work for the district and at the same time carefully 
directed his private business affairs so that he was able to leave his family in 
very comfortable financial circumstances. 

He was born on the 24th of Alay, 1852, in Yorkshire, England, a son of Edward 
and Mary (Dickinson) Postill. He came to Ontario with his parents at the age 
of seven years and at the age of twenty-three he made his way to British 
Columbia, when he and his brothers William and Edward purchased the ranch in 
the Okanagan valley upon which he resided to the time of his death on the 24th 
of September, 1897, when he was forty-five years of age. He at once began the 
development of his property following his arrival here, and as his financial 
resources increased, as the result of his industry and perseverance, he kept adding 
to his holdings until he had large possessions in this region of British Columbia. 
He was not only capable in the management of his ranch interests but also 
possessed ability and ingenuity in many another direction. He constructed and 
installed a telephone on his extensive ranch and there was no work of a mechan- 
ical nature required about his place that he could not do. He was the pioneer 
to engage in fruit raising on an extensive scale in this district and there was no 
one who took a more active and helpful part in the work of the agricultural 
society, doing everything in his power to advance the interests of the farming 
and fruit-raising classes and to promote the development of the country along 
those lines. He was the first man to establish sawmills in the Spallumcheen and 
Okanagan valleys and he was ever on the alert to introduce new and improved 
methods in conducting the business pertaining to his large farming and stock- 
raising operations. As the years passed on he prospered and left a large and 
valuable estate to his family. He enjoyed good health until the last year of his 
life, and then every possible medical aid was rendered him but to no avail. 

Mr. Postill was married January 8, 1890, to Miss Eleanor A. Jamieson, and 
they became the parents of six children, Alfred Edward, Mary, Eleanor Garven, 
Dorothy, Leonard and Alice. 




ALFRED POSTTLL 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 73 

Perhaps no better estimate of the life and character of Mr. Postill can be 
given than by quoting from one of the local papers at the time of his death : "He 
was a man calculated to leave his impress -upon any community in which he lived, 
and both as a private citizen and a gentleman who took an active part in all that 
pertained to the public welfare, he appeared ever to be guided by an earnest 
desire to do his duty in a conscientious and upright manner. What his hand 
found to do was indeed done with all his might. For him to conceive an idea 
likely to benefit the district he so much loved, was to endeavor to put that idea 
into immediate execution. He was foremost in every good work and brought to 
bear on all matters of public interest a combination of unflagging zeal, untiring 
energy and practical knowledge of detail which enabled him to overcome many 
difficulties before which an ordinary man would perhaps have shrunk back with 
dismay. Although not a man of ostentatious piety, he was known far and near 
to possess a firm and abiding religious belief by which his life was ruled and 
governed. He was an implacable enemy to whatever he considered evil and was 
very outspoken in denouncing all forms of vice ; but withal was possessed of a 
broad charity for individual failings and weaknesses. He was a forcible writer 
when occasion required, and many interesting letters have during the past few 
years appeared over his signature in the columns of The News. He was some- 
times criticized for holding opinions rather more narrow on certain subjects 
than those entertained by many in this western land, but if he erred at all in this 
direction, who is there now who will not say that it was on the right side ? And 
even those upon whom fell most severely the weight of his indignation unite 
today in sincerely deploring his loss." 

His life was indeed upright and honorable. He never deviated from a course 
which he believed to be for the best and his integrity was never called into 
question. Those who knew him entertained for him that regard which is ever 
given to noble manhood, and many there were who felt at his passing that 
He was a man. Take him for all in all 
I shall not look upon his like again. 



HENRY DARLING. 

Among the prominent business enterprises of Vancouver, whose trade rela- 
tions are reaching out along constantly ramifying and broadening lines to the 
utmost confines of the province and also into other sections of the country, 
is that conducted by Henry Darling, wholesale dealer in paints, oils and var- 
nishes. He was born February 27, 1863, at Port Chalmers, New Zealand, and 
varied and ofttimes interesting experiences came to him ere he entered into 
active identification with business affairs of this city. His parents were John 
and Mary Jane (Watson) Darling. The former was practically the father of 
the Union Steamship Company of New Zealand, now operating a line of steam- 
ships from Vancouver to New Zealand under the name of the Canadian Aus- 
tralian line. 

In the public schools of London, England, Henry Darling pursued his edu- 
cation and when his text-books were put aside entered upon an apprentice- 
ship to John Henry Gwynnes, Ltd., engineers, of Hammersmith, London, with 
whom he remained for five years. Through the succeeding six or seven years 
he was marine engineer with the British India Steam Navigation Company and 
the British & Burmese Company of British India. In 1891 he came from 
Glasgow, Scotland, to British Columbia in the capacity of superintending engi- 
neer to take charge of the building of three steamships for the Union Steam- 
ship Company. These when completed were launched as the Comox, Capilano 
and the Coquitlam and are still running, after twenty-two years of service. In 
1894 Mr. Darling was made manager of the Union Steamship Company, and 



74 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

then, after several more years spent in connection with that corporation, he 
became general manager of the British Yukon Navigation Company, Ltd., 
organized by the White Pass & Yukon Route. In 1902 he came to Vancouver 
and established his present business as wholesale dealer in paints, oils and 
varnishes. In the intervening period of eleven years his trade has constantly 
grown and his shipments now cover a large part of the province, bringing him 
into trade relations with many of the leading cities of the Canadian northwest. 
He is a director and partner in the Simpson Land & Improvement Company. 
In addition he has made judicious and somewhat extensive investments in 
Vancouver realty and his property holdings are now valuable. Since 1902 he 
has also been surveyor to the .British Corporation Registry and Registro Nazion- 
ala Italiano. 

On the 1 5th of May, 1892, in Montreal, occurred the marriage of Henry 
Darling and Mary Boyle, of Glasgow, Scotland, a daughter of Hugh Boyle. 
The four sons and two daughters of this marriage are Donald, Gordon, John, 
Hugh, Constance and Mary. 

Mr. Darling belongs to the Terminal City Club and is appreciative of the 
social amenities of life. His career has been characterized by continuous 
progress since he started out in an humble apprenticeship when his school days 
were over. Each step in his career has been a forward one, bringing him a 
broader outlook and wider opportunities, and today he occupies an enviable 
and creditable position in the commercial circles of his adopted city. He is, 
moreover, widely known in marine circles, and wherever he is known is held 
in hi<rh regard. 



DONALD McPHADEN. 

Probably no man is more familiar with the Pacific northwest, with its natural 
resources, its business conditions and with the various phases of its settlement 
and development than is Donald McPhaden, pioneer, whose remarkable and 
eventful active career, spent chiefly in the mining camps and cattle ranches of 
British Columbia and neighboring districts, has ended at last in honorable retire- 
ment. He has seen the development of the province and through many honor- 
able and worthy years has assisted in it, his activities touching and influencing 
many important phases of progress and advancement. 

Mr. McPhaden was born in Glengarry county, Ontario, November 16, 1847, 
and is a son of Alexander and Anna McPhaden, the former a native of Scotland 
and the latter of Ontario. Both have passed away. Their son acquired his 
education in the public schools of his native district and for about seven years, 
while he was also going to school, contributed to his own support by working 
in the general store conducted by his brother in Martintown, Glengarry county. 
After laying aside his books, Air. McPhaden went to Bruce county and there 
engaged in various occupations, being the first man to peddle merchandise in 
that section. After two years he left Ontario and came by way of the isthmus 
of Panama to the Pacific coast with the intention of making his way to the mines 
in Boise City, Idaho. However, when he arrived in Portland, Oregon, in June, 
1865, he encountered there a rush of returning gold-seekers, bringing back unfav- 
orable reports from the gold fields. Influenced by these he pushed northward 
to British Columbia, going to Victoria, where he found a comparatively deserted 
city, most of the inhabitants having left for the Cariboo district, where gold had 
been discovered. Houses were deserted, many of the business buildings for 
rent and general conditions extremely unpromising, and therefore Mr. McPhaden 
pushed on to Port Ludlow, searching everywhere for employment. Eventually 
he obtained a position loading ships bound for Europe and for about ten months he 
worked in a mill. Hearing good reports of the new diggings at Big Bend, British 
Columbia, and influenced by tales of gold picked up in the grass, he determined 




DONALD McPHADEN 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 77 

to make his way thither. Accordingly he went to Victoria and thence to New 
Westminster, whence he journeyed up the river as far as Yale, one of a party 
)f five hundred seekers after gold. At Langley, on the way to Yale, he saw 
Mr. York, one of the first white settlers on the Eraser river, and from there 
started to walk to Savona's Ferry. He had as a partner an old California miner 
who impressed upon his mind the importance of being first upon the field. 
Accordingly carrying a load of thirty-three pounds apiece they started to walk 
icross country in the hope of arriving before the other miners but their efforts 
ivailed them nothing as they could secure no transportation and had to wait 
for the boat which carried their former companions. In those days when the 
iager seekers after wealth, far exceeded the number that could be transported, 
the prospector was not only obliged to pay an exorbitant sum for his passage 
)ut was also compelled to take his turn at doing the work while on board. It 
vas under these conditions that Mr. McPhaden traveled, landing finally at the 
lead of Shuswap Lake whence he set out for the Columbia river. Reaching it 
ic proceeded up the river as far as Goklstream where he obtained employment, 
working for some time thereafter, cutting a trail from La Porte to Goklstream. 
For four years afterward he prospected in various localities and in 1870 went 
:o Kamloops and made an entire change in his active interests, purchasing a 
rtock of general merchandise which he brought to Tranquille where he estab- 
lished a store. Afterward he removed his business to Kamloops, but owing to 
:he fact that his chief business competitor was the Hudson's Bay Company he 
vvas only fairly successful and was ready to sell out when news of the great gold 
strike at the Ominica mines reached him. He again took up his search for 
'old but at the end of a year found that Ominica was a poor camp and, returning 
to Kamloops, went into the cattle business. He added to his interests in 1872 
jy building in partnership with James Mclntosh a hotel and store, in the conduct 
)f which he was interested for a number of years. In 1874 however he left 
the city for a time and went to Victoria, where he married Miss Augusta Harri- 
son, a daughter of Eli and Elizabeth Harrison, the former an early settler in 
:hat city. Returning with his bride to Kamloops by way of Yale, he accomplished 
vhat was for that day a prodigious undertaking, distance and roads considered 
bringing with him a piano. Indians who had never before seen nor heard this 
instrument camped along his trail and for hours would sit and listen for the 
iound of the music, their natural love of rhythm combining with their curiosity 
to lend them patience. These Indians afterward became hostile their enmity 
inding vent in the great uprising which took place in Kamloops during Air. 
McPhaden's residence there. 

In 1880 Mr. McPhaden sold out all of his business interests in Kamloops 
where he had been very successful and moved to Victoria where for two years he 
:onducted a butcher business, coming to New Westminster in 1882. Here he 
)pened the first grocery store in the town and managed it with steadily increasing 
success for five years, building up a large patronage which was accorded him in 
ecognition of the fine stock of goods he carried, his honorable business methods 
md his straightforward dealing. When he sold this enterprise he accepted the 
losition of manager of the business controlled by the British Columbia Cattle 
Jompany at Victoria but eventually returned to New Westminster and again 
established himself in business, losing his store and stock in the fire which almost 
lestroyed the city. As said before his life has been an active and eventful one, 
n which has been accorded due recognition to labor, his success coming as a 
result of many years of earnest and undiscouraged effort, rewarded now by rest 
md leisure to enjoy the comforts and luxuries of life. He resides in a pleasant 
md attractive home at No. 83 Eighth street and has made this a center of hos- 
pitality for his many friends. 

Mr. and Mrs. McPhaden became the parents of eight children, two of whom, 
;ons, have passed away. The others are : Mae, who married George Woods, 
of New Westminster ; Charles, who was the second white child born in Kamloops 
md who was called by Lord Dufferin the "bunch grass baby"; Alfred, who is 



78 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

manager of Swift & Company's plant at Prince Rupert; Duncan Eli, connected 
with the registry office in New Westminster; Victor, who is connected with the 
T. J. Trapp Hardware Company, of New Westminster ; and Laura, who is attend- 
ing school at Berkeley, California. 

In politics Mr. McPhaden is a stanch conservative and cast his first vote for 
the party's candidate in the first election after the confederation. He served as 
alderman for two terms in 1884 an< i 1885- H' s religious views are in accord 
with the doctrines of the Presbyterian church. Few men are more honored or 
more widely known in this part of the province than he, who has assisted in its 
development and aided in its upbuilding, and few more richly deserve esteem and 
popularity. 

EDWIN JAMES ROTHWELL, M. D. 

Dr. Edwin James Rothwell, who has displayed notable skill as a surgeon and 
is known as one of the busiest physicians of New Westminster, has for more than 
a decade practiced his profession in partnership with Dr. T. S. Hall under the 
firm name of Hall & Rothwell. His birth occurred in Brantford, Ontario, on the 
I9th of October, 1870, his parents being William and Margaret (Turnbull) Roth- 
well. The father is a native of Perth, Lanark county, Ontario, while the mother 
was born near Gait, Brant county, Ontario. William Rothwell was long identi- 
fie'd with educational work, being for about fifteen years a member of the faculty 
of Brantford Collegiate Institute. In 1890 he removed to Regina, Saskatchewan, 
where for eighteen years he acted in the capacity of inspector of schools. For 
past three years, however, he has lived in honorable retirement. 

Having determined upon the medical profession as his life work, Edwin J. 
Rothwell entered Toronto University, which institution conferred upon him the 
degree of M. D. in 1896. In January, 1897, he came to British Columbia, passed 
the examination before the council of physicians and surgeons of the province 
and began practice at Trail, where he followed his profession continuously until 
1902. In that year he came to New Westminster and formed a partnership with 
Dr. T. S. Hall, with whom he has since been associated under the name of Hall 
& Rothwell, constituting one of the most successful and best known firms of 
surgeons in British Columbia. Dr. Rothwell is a valued member of the British 
Columbia Medical Association and has well earned his reputation as one of the 
most eminent surgeons of the province. 

In November, 1900, Dr. Rothwell was united in marriage to Miss Eva McBee, 
of Pendleton, Oregon, her father being Henry McBee, a prominent stockman 
of that place. Both the Doctor and his wife are consistent members of the Pres- 
byterian church and enjoy the high esteem and regard of all who know them. 



MAJOR WILLIAM B. BARWIS. 

Major William B. Barwis, manager for the Manufacturers Life Insurance 
Company at Vancouver, was born in Megantic, Quebec, June 28, 1863, his 
parents being Thomas Shepard and Adeline Barwis, the former a lieutenant 
colonel in the Fifty-fifth Megantic Rifles. The family dates back to the time 
of the Crusades, many of its members being prominent in the naval world. 
Major Barwis attended St. Francis College at Richmond, Quebec, and Nicolet 
College in the Province of Quebec, and thus with broad liberal educational 
advantages to serve as the foundation of his success he made his way to the 
west in 1881 and started in life on his own account at Calgary, where he 
engaged in ranching for eight years. In 1889 he turned his attention to the 
insurance business, remaining a resident of that district until 1907, when he 




DR. EDWIX J. EOTHWELL 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 81 

came to Vancouver to accept the position of manager with the Manufacturers 
Life Insurance Company, in which capacity he is still serving. As an exe- 
cutive officer of this company he has carefully directed its interests, thoroughly 
systematizing the work in its various departments and so enlarging and devel- 
oping its policy as to produce substantial and desired effect in the annual result. 
During his residence in Vancouver he has made judicial investment in prop- 
erty here and is now the owner of valuable holdings. 

An interesting military chapter constitutes a force in the life record of 
William B. Barwis who from the age of nine years was with his father in the 
Fifty-fifth Megantic Rifles, continuing with that regiment until 1880. He 
afterward spent one year in the Richmond Field Battery and served through 
the Northwest rebellion in 1885 with Colonel Steele's scouts. He subsequently 
organized the First Cavalry in Calgary, G Squadron, in 1901, and was major, 
second in command, of the Fifteenth Light Horse of Calgary. He served as 
major from 1904 until 1908 when, having broken bis leg, he retired with 
that rank on the i4th of September, 1909. 

In Calgary Major Barwis was married to Miss Nora Creina Jones, a 
daughter of the late W. E. Jones, M. A., who was one of the ablest newspaper 
editors in Canada. Major Barwis and wife have two sons: Cuthbert, attending 
Royal Military College at Kingston, Ontario; and Geoffrey, a student at Ashbury 
College, at Ottawa, Ontario. 

The family attend the Anglican church. Major Barwis is an exemplary 
representative of the Masonic fraternity, in which he has attained high rank, 
and is now a Mystic Shriner. He belongs also to the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows and the Sons of England, while in more strictly social lines he is 
'connected with the Vancouver and United Service Clubs. No one who knows 
him doubts his interest in municipal or governmental affairs nor has found 
him remiss in his duties in any relation of life. He is especially active in proj- 
ects for the public good in Vancouver and cooperates in all those movements 
which are a matter of civic virtue and civic pride. 



SPENCER \V. WARREX. 

Extensive experience and thorough training well fit Spencer W. Warren for 
the important position of manager of the Webb & Gifford Automobile & Gasoline 
Works of New Westminster. He is one of the younger business men of the city 
and highly respected by all who know him for the honorable qualities in his 
character and the perseverance he has shown in making his way in the world. 
He was born in W r andsworth, county of Surrey, England, July 18, 1883, a son 
of Samuel William and Sarah Ann (Horwood) Warren, the former a native of 
Somerset and the latter of Biddeford, Devonshire. Samuel William Warren had 
a long official record of faithful service, having been for twenty-six years a 
member of the Metropolitan police of London. Both he and his wife passed 
away in Kent county, England. 

Spencer W. Warren was reared under the parental roof and acquired his edu- 
cation in the Dartford grammar school in Kent county, England, which he left 
at the early age of fifteen in order to apprentice himself to the machinist's trade. 
He served a four years' apprenticeship and subsequently was. employed by the 
London Paper Mills Company as engineer for about three years, after which, 
in March, 1904, he came to Canada. He at first worked three years at his trade 
of machinist for E. Long, of Orillia, Ontario, a manufacturer of sawmill machin- 
ery, and subsequently was connected with the Premier Motor Company of 
Toronto, Ontario, engaged in the building of gasoline engines. With this concern 
he remained for two years and then made his way to the west, working along 
the route and stopping for a short time at Winnipeg, Edmonton and Calgary, 
arriving in Vancouver in August, 1910. In that city he went to work in the shops 



82 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

of Letson & Burpee, manufacturers of canning machinery and gasoline engines. 
On April i, 1912, Mr. Warren came to Xew Westminster and after a period 
with W. R. Jaynes, became identified with Webb & Gifford and was subsequently 
put in charge of the gasoline engine department of their business. His natural 
ability and wide experience well fitted him for this important position and he 
enjoys the full confidence of his employers who give him large leeway as- 
executive of the department, having strong faith in his managerial ability and 
intimate knowledge of the details of the work. 

On June 5, 1912, Mr. Warren married Miss Jessie Imrie Taylor, formerly 
of Dundee, Scotland. Uoth he and his wife are members of the Church of 
England, in the work of which they are actively and helpfully interested. Politi- 
cally Mr. Warren is a conservative, stanchly upholding the principles and can- 
didates of his party, and is always ready to give his support to any worthy public 
enterprise undertaken to benefit the city or province. Since coming to New 
Westminster he has made rapid progress and a continuous rise may be prophesied 
for the future. He is a man of natural ability and has quickly embraced the 
western spirit of agressiveness, being well fitted to undertake even the most 
responsible of positions. In business and social circles he is popular and highly 
esteemed on account of his frankness, his pleasing manner and manly character- 
istics. 



EDWARD HEWETSON HEAPS. 

Edward Hewetson Heaps, of the firm of E. H. Heaps & Co., Limited, is occupy- 
ing a leading position as a lumber manufacturer of the province of British Colum- 
bia, being at the head of one of the enterprises that have in large measure con- 
tributed to the upbuilding, substantial growth and commercial advancement of 
the province. 

Mr. Heaps was born in Westmoreland, England, on the 26th of March, 1851. 
His father, Thomas Heaps, of Yorkshire, was an architect and builder, a devoted 
adherent of the Methodist church, and for fifty years a local preacher. He lived' 
to the age of seventy-five and left behind him an example of sterling integrity, 
rigid uprightness and undeviating adherence to all that is pure and true. He was 
survived by his beloved wife for three years. There were five children of the 
marriage, all today occupying positions of respect and influence. 

Edward H. Heaps, the subject of this sketch, was the youngest of his father's 
family. He was educated at the Egremont Academy, conducted by the Rev. 
Robert Love, and upon completion of his studies was apprenticed to the firm 
of Stead Brothers, cotton brokers of Liverpool, with whom he remained seven 
years. By steady and unremitting application to his duties he earned the respect 
and confidence of his employers. The firm would willingly have retained his 
services, and promotion was offered, but Mr. Heaps had decided to seek his 
fortunes in the new world. He remained in America for three years, learning 
the ways of the country, and engaging variously in farming, storekeeping and' 
lumbering. At the end of this period he returned to England, when his mar- 
riage to Miss Anna Robinson, of Manchester, took place. For eleven years 
thereafter he resided in Manchester, carrying on a profitable business in the 
manufacture of cotton goods, a natural development of his seven years' experi- 
ence in the cotton trade. 

His health failing, and there now being a growing family of children with 
futures to provide for, Mr. Heaps again decided to try fortune in the new world. 
Accordingly, in 1886, the family left England for America. Three years were 
spent in the eastern states and Canada, but believing that the great northwest 
offered still further business opportunities, Mr. Heaps in 1888 brought his fam- 
ily to British Columbia. 




KDWARD H. HEAPS 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 85 

In this province the lumber industry, with its wonderful future, attracted Mr. 
Heaps' attention. He built a sawmill, sash, door and furniture factory on False 
creek. This business was turned into a stock company, but eventually the plant was 
destroyed by fire. Mr. Heaps, however, had previously established a machinery 
and mill supply business, under the style of i. H. Heaps & Company. In the 
course of this business he again became interested in the manufacture of lumber 
.and shingles. The business grew rapidly, and in the year 1896 William Sulley 
became a member of the firm. The business has since kept pace with the growth 
of the city and western Canada, and is now one of 'the large concerns of the 
province. The company operate two large plants, viz : Cedar Cove Mills in 
\ ancouver, including a modern sawmill with a capacity of about one hundred 
thousand feet per day, large sash and door factory, planing mill, box factory, 
also well equipped blacksmith and machine shops ; and Kuskin Mills on the 
Fraser river at the mouth of Stave river, where the company owns the town- 
site and operates saw, shingle and planing mills, general store, etc. Shipments 
are made to the eastern and middle states, to all parts of Canada, and to foreign 
markets. Employment is furnished to a large number of men. Mr. Heaps 
devotes close attention to the business, which is conducted upon modern lines, 
in keeping with the progressive ideas of the day. The business has become a 
stock company with a capital of six million dollars fully paid. Mr. Heaps is 
president and general manager; E. M. Heaps and J. W. Heaps, vice presidents; 
John Heaps, secretary, and A. R. Heaps, treasurer. II. A. Stone, William Sulley 
and A. D. Gurd are directors. 

Mr. Heaps is interested in many other enterprises, and is president of the 
Heaps Timber Company, Ltd., a company dealing in timber and land; the Heaps 
Engineering Company, Ltd.; the Heaps Llrick Company, Ltd.; the A. S. French 
Auto Company, Ltd. ; the Columbia Trust Company, Ltd. ; was one of the 
organizers and one of the first directors of the Bank of Vancouver, and is inter- 
ested in many other companies. He has also served as alderman, police com- 
missioner, and is one of the oldest members of the Board of Trade and a past 
president. His four sons, Edward Moore, James Wilson, John and Arthur 
Robinson, are all engaged with their father in the business. There are besides 
three daughters : Kate Eden, Constance Anna and Elsie Frankland. The fam- 
ily occupy a beautiful home at Cedar Cove, the thriving suburb which has 
sprung into existence as a result of the development of industry at this point. 
They are connected with the Church of England and take an active part in the 
furtherance of affairs of All Saints' church at Cedar Cove. Mr. Heaps has 
many friends. His honorable business methods, his unremitting diligence, his 
intellectual strength and individuality have won him well deserved success, respect 
and esteem. 



EDWIX DIXON CARDER, M. D. 

Dr. Edwin Dixon Carder, successfully engaged in the practice of medicine 
and surgery in Vancouver since 1906 and specializing in the treatment of diseases 
of children and infectious diseases, was born in St. Thomas, Ontario, November 
8, 1875, his parents being Marshall and Eliza Carder. His grandfather was at 
one time a well known and prominent physician of Ontario. The youthful days 
of Dr. Edwin D. Carder were largely devoted to the acquirement of a public- 
school education in his native city, followed by a course in Toronto University, 
from which he was graduated in 1896 with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. He 
then entered upon preparation for a professional career, pursuing his medical 
studies in Toronto University which conferred upon him the M. D. degree in 
1900. He put his theoretical knowledge to the practical test in a year's service 
as surgeon in the Toronto General Hospital and later he spent two years as surgeon 
on the Empress of India, sailing from Vancouver to Hong Kong. In 1903 he 



86 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

went to Port Arthur, Ontario, where he remained in practice until early in the 
year 1905, when he went to England pursuing a post-graduate course at the 
London Hospital. He has remained throughout his entire professional career 
a diligent and discriminating student of the science of medicine and surgery and 
has continuously promoted his knowledge through wide reading and investigation. 
In 1906 he came to Vancouver and in that year was superintendent of the 
General Hospital, but in November withdrew from active connection with that 
institution and opened an office for private practice in which he has met with 
excellent success, the number of his patrons growing year by year. While he 
engages in general practice he makes a specialty of diseases of children and 
infectious diseases and displays notable skill and ability along those lines. 

On the I2th of October, 1909, in Vancouver, Dr. Carder was united in 
marriage to Miss Barbara Maclennan, a daughter of Duncan and Margaret Mac- 
lennan, descendants of an old Highland Scotch family. The only child of Dr. 
and Mrs. Carder has been named for her mother, Margaret. Dr. Carder belongs 
to the Toronto chapter of the Delta L'psilon fraternity. He also has membership 
in Shuniah Lodge, A. F. & A. M., of Port Arthur, Ontario, and Aaron Lodge, 
I. O. O. F. He belongs likewise to the Terminal City Club but regards these 
things but as side issues to an active professional career. He is interested in 
every thing that tends to bring to man the key to the complex mystery which 
we call life and his reading and study have been broad and comprehensive, 
developing his ability along lines which make his service of great usefulness to 
his fellowmen. 



J. G. ANDERSON. 

An initiative spirit, a power of business organization, enterprise, industry 
and ability have carried J. G. Anderson into important relations with business 
interests in Vancouver, where as a member of the firm of Barr & Anderson, 
Ltd., he is identified with the conduct of one of the oldest, largest and most 
important plumbing and heating establishments in the city. He was born in 
Gloucester, Massachusetts, December 21, 1874, and is a son of James L. and 
Elizabeth (Gray) Anderson, natives of Nova Scotia, who went to Massachusetts 
about the year 1866, settling at Gloucester. The father followed the sea as a 
captain on coastwise vessels running out of that city and he there maintained 
his home until 1890, when he came to Vancouver. For about ten years there- 
after he commanded vessels on the Pacific coast and at the end of that time 
retired from active life, being then seventy-two years of age. He and his wife 
still reside in Vancouver and are well known and popular in the city. 

J. G. Anderson acquired his education in the public and high schools of 
Gloucester, Massachusetts, graduating in 1890. During his entire active business 
life he has been in some way connected with the plumbing and heating trade, 
for in 1891, when he came to Vancouver, he began a three years' apprenticeship, 
following this by a similar period of work as a journeyman. On the 1st of 
February, 1898, he joined M. J. Barr in the establishment of a plumbing and 
heating business under the name of Barr & Anderson and their copartnership 
continued until August, 1912, when the business was incorporated as Barr & 
Anderson, Ltd. This is one .of the oldest, strongest and most reliable firms of its 
kind in Vancouver and, although still a young man, Mr. Anderson ranks with 
the pioneers in this line of work in the city, the patronage which his firm con- 
trols having been built up during many years of reliable dealing and straight- 
forward and honorable business methods. Barr & Anderson, Ltd., do all kinds 
of plumbing, heating and ventilating work and have been entrusted with some 
of the largest municipal and private contracts in the province. They have 
installed the heating in the Victoria high school, the new Vancouver Hotel, the 
courthouse and the Rogers building in this city and in some of the largest public 




J. G. ANDERSON 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 89 

1 uildings in the province, their territory extending to all parts of British 
( olumbia. A great deal of the credit for the rapid expansion of the enterprise 
i- due to the energy, ability and progressive spirit of Mr. Anderson, who has 
given practically all of his attention to the business since its organization. He 
possesses in his thorough and comprehensive knowledge of his trade, his general 
business ability and his power of organization and control the elements upon 
v, hich all commercial prosperity is founded, and these qualities, guided by sound 
a id practical judgment, have carried him forward to a place of prominence in 
b isiness circles of Vancouver and made his firm one of the most reliable in 
the city. 

Mr. Anderson was married in Boston on the 29th of August, 1906, to Miss 
Mary Elizabeth Irving, and' both are well known in social circles of Vancouver. 
j\ r. Anderson is a member of the Methodist church and is connected fraternally 
with Mount Herman Lodge, A. F. & A. M., and the Knights of Pythias. He 
it- independent in .politics, voting according to his personal convictions without 
n gard to party lines, and he is interested in everything that pertains to municipal 
development, although he never seeks public office. To its advancement he has 
rrade tangible and substantial contributions during the years he has engaged in 
business here and in Vancouver today he is known as a man of tried integrity 
and substantial worth, to whom success has come as a result of merit and 
al "ility. 

ALBERT ROBERT FANNING. 

Albert Robert Fanning, secretary of the Hopper-Phillips Company, Ltd., 
b; nkers of Vancouver, and therefore prominent in financial circles of the province, 
h; s risen step by step to his present enviable position, the simple weight of his 
d aracter and ability bringing him into important relations. He was born Feb- 
ruary 28, 1858, in Fergus, Ontario, a son of Joseph and Hannah (Clark) Fanning, 
th : former a well known farmer of Ontario. In the public schools near his father's 
he me the son pursued his education and, attracted by the opportunities of the 
west, prompted by laudable ambition and stimulated by a desire to know some- 
th ng of the country, he went to Manitoba in 1878. For five years he was 
engaged in the plastering business at Portage la Prairie, after which he turned 
hit attention to farming, which he followed in Manitoba until 1895. He then 
rei loved to Newdale, Manitoba, where he was appointed postmaster, filling the 
portion acceptably until 1911. During that period he also engaged in the grain 
business and conducted a hardware store at Newdale and then, still further 
ex;ending the scope of his activities, he opened a private bank in 1904, under 
th-: style of Fanning & McGill. The business was successfully established and 
coiducted until 1909, when they sold out to the Union Bank. On disposing of 
hi;; interests in Newdale and retiring from the position of postmaster Mr. Fanning 
came to Vancouver in 1911 and associated himself with Hopper-Phillips Company, 
Lti, bankers. He was appointed secretary and with a financial interest in the 
business is active in control of its affairs, bending his energies to administrative 
diiection. He has already gained a place among the capable financiers of the 
citf, h'is worth being evident to all who have had occasion to know aught of his 
connection with business affairs here. 

On the 24th of February, 1884, at Rapid City, Manitoba, Mr. Fanning was 
united in marriage to Miss Mary Jamieson, a daughter of John and Catherine 
(I wing) Jamieson, who were pioneers of Manitoba. Their children are Edwin 
and Edith. In religious faith the family are Presbyterians. Mr. Fanning belongs 
to the Prince of Wales Lodge, No. 15, A. F. & A. M., of Manitoba. His political 
alhgiance is given to the liberal party and, well informed on the questions and 
issies of the day, he is able to support his position by intelligent argument. He 
was secretary and treasurer of the municipality of Harrison for eighteen years, 



90 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

which municipality was named in honor of the late D. H. Harrison, father of 
George H. Harrison, manager of the Merchants bank of Vancouver. Mr. 
Fanning's long retention in this position is incontrovertible proof of his capability 
and fidelity traits which have characterized his entire life and gained for him the 
honor and respect of his fellowmen. 



HON. CHARLES EDWARD POOLEY. 

On the 28th of March, 1912, Hon. Charles Edward Pooley died in Victoria. 
His death marked the passing of a pioneer in the professional, political, social 
and athletic life of the capital, a man whose force, power and personality were 
dominating elements in shaping the direction of development and whose individual 
success was great enough to place him among the representative men of the city 
and district where for almost a half century he had made his home. During 
that time he controlled an extensive and lucrative private law practice, was for 
twenty-two years a member of the provincial parliament and a constructive force 
in military and athletic affairs, a man of wide interests, forceful personality and 
important accomplishments. He was born in Upwood, England, February 9, 1845, 
and was a son of Thomas Pooley, of Huntingdonshire, England, and Sarah, a 
daughter of Thomas Brighty. He acquired his early education in the Huntingdon 
and Bedford grammar schools. In 1862, attracted by the gold excitement, he came 
to British Columbia via Panama, arriving in Victoria on the 9th of June of that 
year. After a short time spent in prospecting and mining he turned his attention 
to the study of law and by close application and unremitting industry laid the 
foundation for his future successful career at the bar. About 1867 he was gazetted 
as registrar general of the supreme court and he held that position until May I, 
1879, traveling over the country with Sir M. B. Begbie. In 1877 he was called 
to the bar and in 1879 he became a law partner of Hon. A. E. B. Davie, Q. C., 
under the firm style of Davie & Pooley, which relationship was maintained until 
the death of the senior partner in August, 1889. He became a bencher of the 
Law Society in 1884, serving for many years up to the time of his death as 
treasurer of that organization. Mr. Pooley's legal career was a remarkably suc- 
cessful one. In 1887 he was commissioned queen's counsel. In the early days of 
his practice he became known as a strong and able barrister, possessed of keen 
insight, sound judgment and exhaustive legal knowledge, and as his reputation 
grew his patronage extended until he finally controlled an immense volume of 
business, connecting him with some of the most important litigation before the 
courts of the province. He handled the vast amount of legal business of the 
Dunsmuir interests on Vancouver island and other important work of a similar 
nature, his ability in the conduct of these important affairs placing him among 
the prominent barristers in this part of the province. He was active in business 
also, being a large shareholder and a director in the Esquimalt Water Works 
Company and a director in the Colonist Printing & Publishing Company and in 
many other industrial and commercial enterprises. 

A broad-minded and able man, Mr. Pooley's interests extended to many fields 
but he was especially active in the political life of the province, accomplishing 
during his twenty-two years as a member of the British Columbia legislature a 
notable work of public service. He was a member of the fifth parliament, elected 
for Esquimalt in 1882, and acted as president of the council from 1886 to 1890, 
serving as speaker from 1887 until 1889 and also subsequently, from 1902 to 1907. 
He was a member and president of the council from 1889 to 1902 and during 
this time, in July, 1894, a general election under the new Redistribution act, which 
was passed during the fourth session of the sixth parliament, sustained the Davie 
administration and retained Mr. Pooley as president of the council. During the 
Turner, ministry, from 1895 to 1898, he served as president of the council and 
during the Prior administration, from November, 1902, to July, 1905, was a 




HOX. CHARLES E. POOLEY 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 93 

member of parliament, speaker of the house and president of the council and again 
under the McBride administration until 1905. During all of this time he took 
a prominent part in legislation looking toward advancement and reform, proving 
himself a practical, clear-sighted, keen politician, able to cope with existing political 
conditions but never sacrificing ultimate good to present benefit. He twice declined 
the premiership of British Columbia but never refused to give his aid or support 
to movements looking toward the advancement of the province, and he left the 
impress of his great ability and forceful personality upon its political history, 

Mr. Pooley married, in November, 1869, Miss Elizabeth Wilhelmina Fisher, 
only daughter of the late William Fisher, formerly a member of the legislature 
for Esquimalt. Mrs. Pooley survives. Mr. and Mrs. Pooley became the parents 
of six children: Alice; Hon. Mrs. Victor A. Stanley, who was married in 1896, 
her husband, the Rt. Hon. Victor A. Stanley, R. X., being the second son of the late 
Lord Derby, and a brother of the present Lord Derby ; Thomas E., who served 
as a lieutenant in the Strathcona Horse during the South African war and upon 
the close of hostilities secured a commission in the regular army, being stationed 
in Egypt; R. H., the present member of the local legislature for the Esquimalt 
district ; Charles ; and Violet. 

Mr. Pooley served as captain in the Canadian Militia for a number of years 
and was a member of the Union Club of Victoria. In politics he was a conservative, 
while his religious faith was that of the Anglican church. His residence, Fernhill, 
is on Lampson street, Esquimalt. He was a man of magnificent physique, six 
feet two inches in height and with a powerful frame, and he commanded attention 
in any gathering. He died March 28, 1912, and his passing was felt as a keen loss 
in political and professional circles in the province. His name swells the list of 
men who build for all time and who establish standards of attainment to which 
their successors must closely adhere if they will not fail in carrying forward the 
work so well begun. 



JOHN ALEXANDER HINTON. 

The rapid growth of the Hinton Electric Company of Victoria, British 
Columbia, is but representative of the aggressive spirit of the northwest that 
spirit which is typified by such men as John Alexander Hinton, the founder of 
this important manufacturing enterprise. A native of Ottawa, Ontario, he was 
born on August 24, 1873, and is a son of Robert Joseph and Lila (Hyde) Hinton, 
members of the Hinton family being among the first settlers of Ottawa. 

John A. Hinton received his education in the public schools and the Collegiate 
Institute of Ottawa. He then entered business circles as passenger accountant of 
the Canada-Atlantic Railway Company at Ottawa, which is now a part of the 
Grand Trunk system, remaining in that connection for about seven years, and 
after leaving that company came in 1896 to Victoria, where he has been engaged 
in business ever since. He founded upon his arrival an electric supply business 
under the firm name of G. C. Hinton & Company, which so continued until their 
incorporation in 1900, when it was succeeded by the Hinton Electric Company, 
of which our subject was elected president, which office he still holds and also 
acts as managing director. The success of the business must be largely ascribed 
to the progressive policies inaugurated by Mr. Hinton, his business ability and 
his ready understanding of local conditions. As he has grown with the expan- 
sion of his province he has also become a director in different local concerns, 
having a voice in a number of industries which affect the general commercial 
development and advancement. 

On November 16, 1898. Mr. Hinton was united in marriage in Ottawa, 
Ontario, to Clare, a daughter of George C. and Alison H. Holland, the former 
the editor of the Senate Hansard and for many years official stenographer of the 

senate at Ottawa. Mr. and Mrs. Hinton have one son, Lyman Hyde. For several 
vol. rv 4 



94 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

years Mr. Hinton served as treasurer of the Victoria Automobile Association, 
of which he is now president. He is a member of the Pacific Club and the Royal 
Victoria Yacht Club. He takes a great pride in the growth of Victoria and does 
everything in his power to promote its interests. He is a lover of the out-of- 
doors and in communion with nature finds relaxation from his arduous duties. 
A public-spirited man, he recognizes his obligations as a citizen, yet has never 
cared to enter political circles, although he can ever be found in the front ranks 
of those who gladly give their support to any worthy public enterprise. 



HON. AUGUSTUS FREDERICK PEMBERTON. 

The name of Hon. Augustus Frederick Pemberton is closely linked with 
various events which find record on the pages of British Columbia's history, and 
his life record therefore cannot fail to prove of general interest. He was born 
at Clontarf, near Dublin, Ireland, about 1808, and was the youngest son of 
Joseph Pemberton, who was Lord Mayor of the city at one time. Augustus F. 
Pemberton was also an uncle of Joseph Despard Pemberton, who is mentioned 
at length on another page of this work. Augustus F. Pemberton was educated 
for the bar and for several years filled an office in Dublin Castle. 

He arrived at Victoria in December, 1855, having traveled to Central Amer- 
ica by steamer which was fired on by rebel forts during a rebellion which was 
then taking place in the Central American states. Mr. Pemberton joined a 
party who were proceeding overland to the Pacific. On their way they over- 
took a large band of emigrants and the party then divided, some remaining for 
protection with the slow moving larger band, and a few of the more daring 
pushing ahead. The Indians were on the war-path and it was thought very 
risky for the small number. The sequel proved the reverse, for the small party 
got through safely, while the larger, including women and children, were 
massacred. 

Air. Pemberton came from San Francisco to Puget Sound by sailing ship and 
crossed the straits of Fuca from Port Townsend in a trading sloop kept by a 
subsequent notorious smuggler, Captain Jones, landing at Ross Bay and walking 
into the fort at Victoria during divine service on Sunday. 

Mr. Pemberton came to British Columbia to follow agricultural pursuits, but 
a more important career awaited him. Chartres Brew, who later became his 
brother-in-law, had been commissioned by the home government to organize a 
police department on Vancouver island. Mr. Brew, who was an officer of the 
Royal Irish constabulary, was drafted for service with the British army in the 
Crimea during the Crimean war and when that was over was sent out to British 
Columbia to organize a constabulary in that colony. His ship, the Austria, was 
burned in mid-Atlantic. Mr. Brew and a German passenger were picked up 
clinging to wreckage by a passing ship and carried to South America, whence sev- 
eral months later Mr. Brew arrived in British Columbia where he found that, 
being supposed to be lost, Mr. Pemberton had been commissioned by Sir James 
Douglas to organize the police force on Vancouver island (Mr. Brew being com- 
missioned to a similar position on the mainland of British Columbia). In a 
twofold capacity of commissioner of police and police magistrate, Mr. Pember- 
ton was for several years prefect of the city, which up to that time had depended 
for the preservation of its peace on the single constable. 

Mr. Pemberton was a man well qualified to meet the occasion and the de- 
mands made upon him. British Columbia was just upon the threshold of a 
career of broadening development and rapid growth brought about by the gold 
discoveries of 1858. The government required a firm and wise hand to control 
the multitudes which were suddenly landed here. To Mr. Pemberton's conduct 
and prudence was mainly due the good order which obtained when the city was 




HON. AUGUSTUS F. PEMBERTON 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 97 

filled with men to the number of ten thousand who were waiting for the fall of the 
Fraser river, in order to proceed on their quest for gold, the fame of the mineral 
deposits of this district having attracted them to British Columbia. Mr. Pem- 
berton was the sole representative of law and order in Victoria. To secure the 
preservation of peace he appointed a number of colored policemen, with whom the 
miners at once declared war, carrying their enmity so far as to threaten to throw 
one of the objectionable officers into the harbor. The miners were rioting at the 
time and a moment's indecision would have been fatal. It was not shown, how- 
ever. Mr. Pemberton alone entered between the ranks of the rioters and by his 
quiet determination compelled them to release the prisoner. In following cases 
he settled disputes among the Indians for the government, in which position he 
was most zealous and never displayed the slightest fear. It is not too much to 
say that next to Governor Douglas there is no man to whom the country is more 
greatly indebted for the establishment of a law-abiding course than to Mr. Pem- 
berton. As a member of the executive council he retired with the well earned 
title of Honorable and was granted a pension for life at the lime of the confedera- 
tion of the colony with the Dominion. 

Mr. Pemberton was made judge of the county court and was afterwards, in 
1872, police magistrate of Victoria, but resigned both offices, lie also sat as 
magistrate in the house of the assembly during Governor Seymour's term. Dur- 
ing his career as city magistrate he was known to be eminently impartial and 
painstaking, and of his courage and coolness in the hours of extreme danger many 
interesting stories are told by the early settlers. The manner in which Mr. I'em- 
berton dealt with the Indians in early days gives us an idea of his courageous 
spirit. He mastered various Indian languages which greatly assisted him in his 
work. The instance has been recalled that Mr, Pemberton with other gentlemen 
was at one time living in a cabin in an isolated part of the town. Six thousand 
Indians were encamped near and some were firing rifles at the cabin. Mr. 1 'em- , 
berton coolly walked out and told the Indians that if they did not stop he would 
take them to the "skukum"' house, lie was only one against thousands, but the 
way and manner in which he spoke had a good effect upon the Indians, who imme- 
diately stopped firing. This is only one of many such incidents as might be truly 
related of him indicative of his bravery and coolness in hours of danger. 

In 1861 Mr. Pemberton married Miss Jane Augusta ISrew, a sister of Chartres 
Brew, who had been lost at sea, but was later rescued and arrived safely in llritish 
Columbia. Miss Brew had come out from her native home in Tuam. County Gal- 
way, Ireland, to keep house for her brother, making the trip by way of the isthmus 
of Panama and landing at Esquimalt, Vancouver island, whence she walked to 
Victoria. Soon afterward she met Mr. Pemberton and was married. Three chil- 
dren were born of this marriage, of whom Augusta Jane, the eldest, died at the 
age of fourteen years. Chartres Cecil, who was born May 18, 1864, and Evaline 
Mary, now a resident of Halifax, Kova Scotia, survive. 

Mr. Pemberton, though living a quiet life, was an enthusiastic sportsman and 
in his younger days in Ireland was one of the best amateur cross country riders of 
:he Emerald isle. In that country "Pemberton's Leap" was spoken of for many 
years as the greatest ever made. 

Mr. Pemberton was prominent in the establishment of the Reformed Episcopal 
-hurch, of which he was a regular attendant and member until his death. He was 
church warden of the first Christ's church (afterward destroyed by fire) and 
prominently associated with the building of the present cathedral. He was a man 
)f very strong religious views, doing all in his power to advance the cause of 
freedom in religious thought which he championed. Upon resigning as police 
'Magistrate he retired from active life. His death occurred October 18, 1891, when 
ie was eighty-three years of age, and his wife passed away in June, 1889. His 
ion, Chartres Cecil, second child in order of birth and now engaged in the real- 
estate business in Victoria, was born in this city May 18, 1864, and was educated 
n the public schools and grammar school of the Reformed Episcopal church and 
ander the private tuition of his tutor, Robert Williams. 



98 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

He was articled in the office of Drake & Jackson, solicitors, and was called to 
the bar of British Columbia in July, 1889. He began practice as a member of 
the firm of Walker & Pemberton, with which he continued until 1892. He then 
practiced alone until 1899, when he went to the Yukon to enter upon the active 
work of his profession and while there filled the office of postmaster, acting at 
Lake Bennett until that postoffice was abandoned. In the latter part of 1900 he 
returned to Victoria and withdrew from law practice to engage in the real-estate 
business. He first conducted a general agency business, insurance, conveyancing, 
collections, etc., but in more recent years he has been operating a general real- 
estate business, operations being confined largely to Gonzales Hill, which is the 
choicest residence section of the city, and of this section he has handled the 
greater part. He is now managing director of The Gonzales Realty Company, 
Limited, and devotes most of his time to the real-estate business. 

Mr. Pemberton has, however, other important business interests and activities. 
He is a member of the Natural History Society, is a member of the Native Sons 
of British Columbia, a member of the Political Equality League and is a strong 
conservative. His religious faith is that of the Reformed Episcopal church. His 
record is a credit to an honored family name and his position as a business man 
and citizen is alike irreproachable and enviable. 



PERCY BYNG HALL. 

Prominent among the enterprising, progressive and successful business men 
of Victoria is Percy Byng Hall, senior partner in the firm of Hall & Floyer, 
investment brokers and financial agents. He comes of English ancestry and was 
born in Murree, India, June 29, 1880, his parents being General Charles Henry 
and Elizabeth (Goldney) Hall. The parental grandfather, Charles Hall, of 
Basingstoke, England, was in the diplomatic service as attache to the court of 
Wurtemberg. His wife was a native of Austria. The maternal grandfather. 
Colonel Charles Goldney, a native of England, commanded as colonel, a regi- 
ment of English troops in the Indian army. The father, who was a native 
of Basingstoke, England, had a long military record, having served for thirty- 
eight years with an infantry command in India. He retired with the rank of 
general and as commissioner of Lahore, in 1885. Returning to England, his 
death occurred in Germany in 1893, while his wife, surviving him for almost two 
decades, passed away in 1912. 

Percy B. Hall attended Wellington College at Berkshire, England, and after- 
ward entered Sandhurst, the Royal Military College. When eighteen years of 
age he was made a lieutenant in the Thirty-fourth Sikh Pioneers, stationed at 
Punjab, India, where he served for eight and a half years. In China he was a 
lieutenant through the campaign of 1900 and was made a member of the 
Distinguished Service Order. At the present writing he is a captain of the 
Eighty-eighth Victoria Eusiliers of Victoria, British Columbia. 

Captain Hall first came to Canada in August, 1906, settling in the province of 
Alberta, where he operated a ranch for a year. He then came to British 
Columbia in 1907, taking up his abode at Shawnigan, and in 1910 he removed 
to Victoria, where he formed the present partnership of Hall & Floyer. They 
conduct a general real-estate and insurance business and act as financial agents. 
They are specializing in Port Edward property and the Port Edward town site 
in particular. The firm has its office at the corner of View and Douglas streets, 
where they are supplied with all facilities for handling their extensive and grow- 
ing business, having now a large clientele which they represent in real-estate 
transactions and in investments. Mr. Hall is also manager, of the Anglo-British 
Columbian Securities, Limited. He belongs to the Real Estate Exchange and 
to the Stock Exchange and does everything in his power to further business 
activity and promote the development of the northwest. 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 99 

On the ist of November, 1905, in Lahore, India, Mr. Hall married Miss 
Muriel O'Callaghan, a daughter of Sir Francis O'Callaghan, a native of County 
Cork, Ireland. He is one of the world's renowned railway engineers, having 
built the Attock bridge in India and the Khojak tunnel in Baluchistan for 
strategical purposes, connecting India with Afghanistan. He also built the 
Uganda Railway and supervised the construction of many other large under- 
takings in different parts of these countries. His wife was of English lineage. 
Mr. and Mrs. Hall have three children : Percy Byng, who was born on the i/th 
of April, 1907; Maureen, whose birth occurred on the 27th of May, 1910; and 
Desmond, born in December, 1912. 

In politics Mr. Hall is a conservative but not an active party worker. He 
belongs to the Union Club of Victoria and has many warm friends in business 
and social circles. His favorite sports are hunting and boating, yet he never 
allows these to interfere with his business affairs. His success is due to con- 
servative business methods, yet in safeguarding his interests he docs not sacrifice 
the progressiveness essential to success in his particular line of business. He is 
gifted with that quality which for want of a better term has been called personal 
magnetism and he inspires confidence in those with whom he comes in contact. 
Mrs. Hall is much, interested in amateur theatricals and is a great lover of music. 
They occupy an attractive home on St. Patrick's street in the Oak Bay district of 
Victoria and are prominent and popular sociall) in the city. 



WILLIAM H. MEIKLE. 

In a list of notable men who have directed their efforts toward promoting the 
commercial and financial growth of Vancouver and directly and indirectly the 
permanent interests of the Dominion, William H. Meikle occupies a high and 
honored place. As a surveyor and explorer his work has been of immeasurable 
value to Canada, marking a distinct advance in general knowledge of conditions 
in districts before unknown, while as a business man he is today numbered among 
the important factors in promoting in Vancouver that general commercial, finan- 
cial and industrial activity which means growth and development. He was born 
in Fintry, Scotland, on the 29th of March, 1871, and is a son of Matthew and 
Janet (Davidson) Meikle, the former a clergyman, who was educated at Glasgow 
University and afterward removed to Fintry, where he remained until his death 
in 1895. 

William H. Meikle acquired his education at Dollar Academy, a famous 
school in Clackmannanshire, Scotland, and afterward went to Glasgow, where 
he served an apprenticeship to the calico printing business with the firm of 
Guthrie & McArly. After three years he went to Tarbolton, Ayrshire, and was 
for five years on his uncle's farm in that vicinity. In 1897 he came to Canada 
and, settling in Vancouver, was for several months employed at various occupa- 
tions. In the spring of the following year he became connected with the firm of 
Mackenzie & Mann and in their interests became a member of the party which" 
surveyed the Dalton trail in Alaska. This was during the great gold rush to the 
Klondike fields in 1897 and Mr. Meikle spent some time in the Klondike and 
also in the Skagway district, where he witnessed the exciting events incident to 
the gold rush in that vicinity. After six months he returned to Vancouver and 
here in the summer of 1898 became connected with an exploring party which went 
into the Fort George country, then an unknown wilderness. From there they 
made their way into the Peace river country as far north as Fort Graham and 
:hence westward through the northern part of British Columbia to Hazelton, on 
ie Skeena river, and then to the coast and down to Vancouver. This journey was 
accomplished by the end of the year 1898 and was characterized by more than the 
asual hardships and dangers which accompany those who travel through the 
wilderness, blazing the trails for the generations of civilization which follow 



loo BRITISH COLUMBIA 

after. The party compiled much valuable data for their employers and for the 
Dominion government and their work marked the beginning of history in the 
various localities which they entered and explored. 

After returning to Vancouver Mr. Meikle associated himself with his brother, 
John D. Meikle, in the manufacture of aerated water and under the firm name 
of Meikle Brothers they conducted a large and flourishing business of this char- 
acter from 1899 until 1904. In the latter year, again hearing the call of the wild, 
Mr. Meikle of this review joined an exploring and "surveying party in the Bulkley 
valley of British Columbia and becoming impressed with the possibilities of that 
locality, decided to cast his lot there. Accordingly he went to the Upper Eraser 
river, where he began acquiring timber limits for himself and others, also taking 
up land in the vicinity of Fort George. He continued to engage in real-estate 
operations there arid in Quesnel for five years thereafter but in 1910 returned 
to Vancouver, where he has since resided. Here in association with John G. 
Ullock, of whom more extended mention is made on another page of this 
work, he entered the land and timber brokerage business and in May, 1911, they 
organized the Great West Sand & Gravel Company, Limited, with offices in Van- 
couver and North Vancouver and with docks and bunkers in the latter city. Mr. 
Meikle is president of this concern and has evidenced unusual administrative 
ability in the conduct of the important affairs under his charge, being quick in 
decision, prompt in action and fearless in execution. The Great West Sand & 
Gravel Company, Limited, controls a large and important business and is con- 
stantly extending the scope of its activities. In 1912 a coal department was added 
to the enterprise and the company acts as agent for Wellington coal, this branch 
of the concern rapidly proving profitable and important. 

Mr. Meikle is a conservative in his political beliefs and while a resident of 
Scotland was a member of the Royal Naval Artillery Volunteers, stationed on 
the Clyde. He is a lover of life in the open as the record of his career plainly 
shows and his enthusiasm on this subject has resulted in valuable work along 
lines of expansion and development in the Dominion. He is easily among the 
leaders in anything that he desires to undertake and it is men of his class that 
are most important in promoting the progress and securing the permanency of 
any community. 



WALTER GEORGE SCRIM. 

One of the recent additions to the various business enterprises which con- 
stitute the industrial and commercial activity of Vancouver is the W. G. Scrim 
Lumber Company, which was organized in the fall of 1911 by Walter George 
Scrim, who is sole owner. He was attracted to the west by its broadening 
opportunities and has been a resident of British Columbia since the fall of 1906. 
He was born in the city of Quebec, November 10, 1878, a son of Robert and 
Matilda (Davidson) Scrim, both of whom were natives of that city. The father 
was a government sealer of lumber and followed that business throughout his 
entire life. For about fifteen years he was in the employ of McLachlin Broth- 
ers, of Arnprior, Ontario, in which city he passed^away in 1910. His widow 
still survives and is now a resident of Vancouver. 

Walter George Scrim pursued his education in the public and high schools 
of Arnprior, supplemented by a course in the Brockville Business College, which 
trained him for commercial life. Like his father he entered the employ of Mc- 
Lachlin Brothers of Arnprior and his faithfulness, diligence and capability are 
indicated by the fact that he remained with that firm for nine years. On the 
expiration of that period he became connected with the Whitney Lumber Com- 
pany of Whitney, Ontario, with whom he remained for two years, and sub- 
sequently spent two years with the Pigeon River Lumber Company of Port 
Arthur, Ontario. He was next with Lockhart & Company, of Fort Francis, 




WALTER G. SCRIM 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 103 

Ontario, for two years, and with the Rat Portage Lumber Company of Kenora, 
Ontario, for a year, prior to his removal to the coast country. 

In the fall of 1906 Mr. Scrim arrived in Vancouver. Through his previous 
business experience he had gradually worked his way upward and his enter- 
prise and energy, coupled with careful expenditure, brought to him the capital 
that enabled him to engage in business on his own account when he came to 
this province. Immediately after his arrival he organized the Oliver-Scrim 
Lumber Company, of which he is still the vice president, and in the fall of 
1911 he formed the W. G. Scrim Lumber Company, of which he is sole owner. 
He has a large mill at Burnaby which has an output of fifty-live thousand feet 
of finished lumber per day. While supplying the retail trade he ships to Al- 
berta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba. Both business organizations with which 
he is identified have important places in the trade circles of this city and Mr. 
Scrim has therefore become one of the leading business men. Throughout his 
entire life he has been connected with the lumber trade and there is no phase 
of the business with which he is not familiar. His comprehensive knowledge, 
his watchfulness over details and his ability to discriminate between the essen- 
tial and non-essential have been important factors in his growing success. Aside 
from his lumber interests he is the owner of considerable residence property 
in Vancouver. 

On the 3Oth of October, 1912, in Vancouver, Mr. Scrim was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Agnes Lambert, one of the native (laughters of the province, her 
birth having occurred in this city in 1891. Her father, Roland A. Lambert, of 
Klondike fame, was the first man to stake a claim at Atlin, in the Yukon ter- 
ritory. He is still actively engaged in mining, being now interested in the min- 
ing of platinum in the Lillooet district. 

Mr. Scrim's military experience was with the Eighth Royal Rifles of Que- 
bec during a period of two years. He holds membership in St. George's An- 
glican church in which he is rector's warden, and he is deeply interested in all 
the moral forces which work for the development and betterment of the in- 
dividual and the community. No good work of charity or religion seeks his 
aid in vain and he is a liberal contributor to many worthy benevolences. As 
he has prospered he has extended a helping hand to those who are attempting 
to climb upward along the path of industry and honesty and has ever been will- 
ing to share generously with others in his own good fortune. 



HENRY HOY. 

The contracting and building trades of New Westminster are ably represented 
by Henry Hoy, who successfully follows this occupation in his city. He has, 
moreover, actively participated in the public life of the community, serving for 
one term as mayor of the city and for a number of years as a member of the 
council. During his administration as executive much valuable work of far- 
reaching importance was accomplished which has left an indelible impression 
upon the growth of the city. Progressive and public-spirited, Mayor Hoy ever 
took a most advanced step toward impending measures and accomplished things 
upon which the present greatness of the city is largely founded. As a member of 
the council he also did important work in committee room as well as on the floor 
of the chamber and his disinterested public-spiritedness has found wide and 
ready recognition. 

Born on a farm in the parish of Largo, Fifeshire, Scotland, on March 2, 1845, 
he received a public-school education, subsequently apprenticing himself to the 
carpenter's trade. He worked as a journeyman carpenter in London, England, 
but in 1869 he sought the larger opportunities of the new world, coming to 
Canada, where he worked in Toronto for four years, after which period he 
crossed the border to Chicago, where he remained one year. In 1874 and 1875 



104 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

he was engaged at his trade in Winnipeg, but in February, 1876, came to New 
Westminster, where he has ever since made his home. He has branched out and 
gradually become connected with general contracting and building and as the 
years have passed has become one of the substantial men of New Westminster. 
Mr. Hoy was united in marriage to Miss Marion Bonson, a daughter of L. F. 
Bonson, of New Westminster. To them were born three sons and three daugh- 
ters, all of whom are living. He belongs to Union No. 9 of New Westminster 
and is also a member of the Masonic fraternity. Mr. Hoy has attained to an 
important position in his community and is highly respected and esteemed by 
all who know him for what he has accomplished. 



MAJOR W. HART-McHARG. 

William Hart-McHarg, of Vancouver, barrister-at-law, was born in the 
barracks at Kilkenny, Ireland, where his father was at that time stationed with 
his regiment. His natal day was February 16, 1869, and he is descended from 
Scotch ancestry. He is a son of Major William Hart-McHarg, who was in the 
old Forty-fourth, now known as the Essex Regiment for many years. His 
father saw service in the Crimean and Chinese wars, for which he received four 
medals and four clasps. He retired from the army with a special pension, given 
him for meritorious and distinguished service. He married Miss Jane Thomsett, 
a daughter of Captain Thomsett of the same regiment, who also served through 
the Crimean and Chinese campaigns in the Forty-fourth Regiment. 

William Hart-McHarg pursued his education in England and in Belgium, 
but when sixteen years of age he started out in life on his own account. He made 
his way to Manitoba, where he followed farming for five years. When in his 
twenty-first year he removed to Winnipeg and, desirous of entering professional 
life, he devoted five years to the study of law and then successfully passed the 
examinations which secured his admission to the Manitoba bar in 1895. He 
practiced law in that province for two years and in 1897, attracted by the min- 
ing activity in the Kootenay country, he came to British Columbia, and having 
been called to the bar of this province took up the practice of his profession in 
Rossland. 

Always interested in military life, he attached himself to the Winnipeg 
Dragoons while in that city and upon the formation of the Rocky Mountain 
Rangers in the Kootenay he joined that organization as a private and later at- 
tained the rank of lieutenant. Upon the breaking out of the war in South Africa 
he volunteered for the First Contingent, the Royal Canadian Regiment, and 
being unable to obtain commissioned rank he enlisted as a private. During the 
campaign he was promoted to sergeant. The Canadian Militia list gives the 
following record of his war service: "Operations in Orange Free State, Feb- 
ruary-May, 1900, including operations at Paardeberg (18-26 February), and 
actions at Poplar Grove (7 March), Dreifontein (10 March), Hout Nek (i May), 
Zand River (i May) ; operations in the Transvaal in May and June, including 
actions near Johannesburg (29 May), Pretoria (4 June). Operations in Orange 
River Colony and eastern and western Transvaal, June-November, 1900. Medal 
with four clasps." 

On his return to British Columbia he resumed his law practice in Rossland. 
He was reinstated as a lieutenant in the Rocky Mountain Rangers and promoted 
to captain in 1902. In November, 1902, he removed to Vancouver and practiced 
his profession there. He was transferred to the Sixth Regiment, "The Duke of 
Connaught's Own Rifles," and obtained his Majority in that corps in 1910. 

Major Hart-McHarg is well known as a rifle shot. He has been a member 
of the Canadian Bisley team several times and has shot for Canada in the Kola- 
pore (1907-1910), Mackinnon (1907-1910) and Empire (1910) team matches. 
In 1907 he was a member of the Canadian team in the Palma trophy contest at 




MAJOR WILLIAM HART-McHARG 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 107 

Ottawa against British, Australian and American teams. He won the governor 
general's prize at Ottawa in 1908, all the aggregates at the British Columbia rifle 
meeting in 1909, and tied for first place in the Prince of Wales match at Bisley 
in 1910 with a record score. In 1912 he coached the provincial team which won 
the Northwestern International match at Portland in competition with teams 
from the states of Washington, Oregon and Idaho. Major Hart-McHarg again 
won the governor general's prize at Ottawa in 1913 with the record score of 202 
points. At the conclusion of the D. C. R. A. matches he was given a place in 
the all-Canadian team, which was sent to the International matches at Camp 
Perry, Ohio, to shoot for the Palma trophy and for the individual long range 
championship of the world with army rifle. The conditions of this match were 
15 shots at 800, 900 and 1000 yards and Major Hart-McHarg won it with scores 
of 74-72-74, total 220 out of a possible of 225. He was presented with the 
National Guard championship trophy, which he held for a year, and also received 
a gold cup and a gold medal. He subsequently coached the Canadian team in 
the Palma trophy match at Camp Perry. On his return to Vancouver he coached 
the British Columbia team in the North Western International match shot at 
Vancouver when it defeated, under Palma trophy conditions, teams from the 
states of Oregon and Washington. 

Major Hart-McHarg is the author of ''From Quebec to Pretoria/' the story 
of the Royal Canadian Regiment in South Africa, and joint author of an his- 
torical souvenir of the Sixth Regiment, "The Duke of Connaught's Own Rifles." 
He has discussed through the columns of the press themes of general interest 
and his articles on the Waste of Daylight awakened widespread interest. He was 
the first to bring this important matter to the attention of the people of this 
province and to point out that by advancing the clock one hour during the sum- 
mer months an extra hour of daylight would be obtained in the evening, giving 
greater opportunity for more outdoor life and recreation and a saving in the 
expenditure for artificial light. 

When in 1911 the Canadian government at the invitation of the Imperial 
government organized a contingent of seven hundred men and fifty officers to 
be present at the coronation of King George V., Major Hart-McHarg was ap- 
pointed to the command of one of the infantry companies. He proceeded to 
London with the contingent and was present at the various ceremonies. After- 
wards, at Buckingham Palace, he was presented with the Coronation medal by 
His Majesty, the King. 

JOSEPH ROBERT REARDON. 

Joseph Robert Reardon, who died in Vancouver on the I4th of September, 
1907, after a period of activity in the merchant marine service extending over 
:wenty-six years and who previously to his demise had been for three years in 
die Vancouver pilot service, was born in Donegal, Ireland, October 28, 1862. 
His parents, Robert and Catherine Reardon, removed to England when he was 
5till a child and in a Catholic college at Portsmouth he acquired his education, 
laying aside his books at the age of sixteen in order to begin his apprenticeship 
to the merchant marine service. After four years with the firm of T. & J. Brock- 
iebank, of Liverpool, as an apprentice he served with the same firm as mate 
and afterward became connected with the Union Steamship Line, holding the 
jositions of fourth, third and second officer successively and receiving his certifi- 
cate as captain, October 7, 1887. He resigned from this service in order to enter 
the employ of the Canadian Pacific Railroad as chief officer of the steamship 
Tartar, sailing from Southampton to Vancouver and thence to Skagway, Alaska, 
ind back to Vancouver. He was also for some time second officer and then chief 
officer of the Royal Mail Steamer Empress of China. For two years he was 
:hief officer.of the Canadian Pacific Railroad Steamship Athenian whilst under 



108 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

charter to the United States government as transport from Seattle to the Philip- 
pines during the Spanish-American war. He was for about twenty-six years at 
sea, the life engendering in him qualities of self-reliance, independence and ini- 
tiative which remained always prominent and forceful elements in his character. 
Mr. Reardon joined the Vancouver pilot service in November, 1904, and therein 
continued until his death, which occurred on the I4th of September, 1907. He 
was well known in Vancouver, where he made his home, as a public-spirited and 
progressive citizen and a far-sighted and capable business man, his name stand- 
ing for integrity, honor and loyalty in all the relations of life and his death bring- 
ing to a close a career of genuine and unostentatious usefulness. 

On the 29th of July, 1900, Mr. Reardon was united in marriage to Miss Kate 
Walker, a daughter of William and Catherine Walker, the former a squire of 
Huddersfield, Yorkshire, England, and a large mill owner and manufacturer 
of woolen goods. It was he who introduced into England the textile colleges, 
in which young men are educated in everything pertaining to the manufacture 
of woolen goods, and for this service he was made the first professor, being able 
in this way to give the advantage of his own broad knowledge and long experi- 
ence to the other industrial workers following after him. His daughter, Mrs. 
Reardon, is an artist of remarkable attainments and a widespread reputation 
and has displayed her paintings with excellent results on several occasions. She 
painted the portrait of Dr. Helmcken which now hangs in the Parliament build- 
ing at Victoria and she has hung pictures in several galleries in the British isles. 
Mr. and Mrs. Reardon became the parents of two children: Mary Florence, 
who is attending school ; and James Byrne. Mrs. Reardon makes her home at 
No. 1201 Georgia street, Florence court. She is well known in Vancouver, 
where she has resided for many years and where her sterling qualities of mind 
and character have brought her a circle of friends almost coextensive with the 
circle of her acquaintances. 

Mr. Reardon was a devout member of the Catholic church, exemplifying in 
his honorable anl upright life the doctrines in which he believed, and he was 
connected fraternally with the Knights of Columbus. He ever manifested a 
deep and helpful interest in projects for the advancement and growth of the 
community and his cooperation therein was far-reaching and beneficial. His 
course at all times conformed to strict business principles and honorable methods, 
his path never having been strewn with the wreck of other men's fortunes, and 
his business integrity as well as his prosperity forming a fitting crown for his 
well spent life. 



CHARLES EDWIN MAHON. 

It has been said that this is the age of the young man, a fact which finds 
verification especially in the west, for it has been the young men of enterprise 
and ambition who have sought the opportunities of the great and growing west- 
ern country. They have not hesitated to sever the ties which have bound them 
to the districts in which youth has been passed in order to gain the broader 
opportunities offered elsewhere. Of this class Charles Edwin Mahon is a 
representative, and as agent for real estate, insurance, loans and timber lands 
he has built up a business of gratifying proportions. He was born at Paisley, 
Bruce county, Ontario, March i, 1872, and is a son of William and Elizabeth 
Mahon, pioneer settlers of that district, who were well known there. 

Charles E. Mahon spent his early life on his father's farm. His educa- 
tion in the public schools of Bruce county was very limited as he had early to 
depend upon himself. When a boy of only fifteen he had to take full charge 
of the farm as his father was ill, continuing so for three years, and the heavy 
load thus falling upon his shoulders made him resolve as soon a the oppor- 
tunity offered to go into another business fraught with lesser hardships and 




CHARLES E. MAHON 



BRITISH COLUMBIA ill 

to set himself up independently. That the hard school of experience through 
which he passed has, however, had a beneficial effect upon his later life thereof 
his present marked success is the best proof. To prepare for a commercial 
career he underwent training in the Canada Business College of Chatham, 
Ontario, from which he was graduated with the class of 1890, and the follow- 
ing year he went to Seattle, Washington, where he engaged in clerking for 
two years. At that time on account of the illness of his father he returned 
to Paisley, Ontario, where he acted as clerk in a store for two years. His 
desire, however, to engage in business on his own account was ever foremost 
with him and, carefully saving his earnings he was at length enabled to pur- 
chase a stock of groceries, boots and shoes in 1895. Thus he became identi- 
fied with commercial interests in Paisley, where he continued in merchandis- 
ing until 1897, when he removed to Langdon, North Dakota. He was there 
employed in the lumber and hardware business for about ten years, and in 
1907 he came to Vancouver, where he established a real-estate and timber land 
business. In this he is still engaged, having no partner although he still uses 
the style of C. E. Mahon & Company. He handles real estate, insurance, loans 
and timber lands and has built up a business of gratifying proportions, acquaint- 
ing himself thoroughly with property values, both in the city and in the forest 
districts, while he is equally conversant with the various phases of the loan 
and insurance business. His industry, determination and indefatigable energy 
have been salient features in his success. 

On the I7th of January, 1900, Mr. Mahon was united in marriage, in Pais- 
ley, Ontario, to Miss Nellie I. Steele, a daughter of Samuel and Isabella Steele, 
the former a veteran of the Fenian raid. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Mahon have been 
born six children, William S., Gladys Evelyn, Harold Stratton, Lois Jean, 
Charles Norman and Thelma Hall. The last two are twins. 

Mr. Mahon gives his political support to the conservative party and in 
January, 1913, was elected an alderman of Vancouver, in which position he 
is exercising his official prerogatives in support of various projects and move- 
ments which have to do with the upbuilding and welfare of the city. He 
belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Loyal Order of Moose, 
and the Vancouver Commercial Club. He had no especial advantages at the 
outset of his career, but has steadily worked his way upward as the years have 
gone by, and whatever success he has achieved has come to him as the reward 
of ability, intelligently directed. 



MERTON ALLEN MERRILL. 

Merton Allen Merrill, who is engaged in the real-estate business at Van- 
couver, now conducts operations independently under the style of Merrill & 
Merrill, his partner having left the firm in 1912. His birth occurred in Bangor, 
Maine, on the 22d of November, 1880, his parents being Allen and Ann Merrill, 
the former a merchant of Bangor for a number of years. 

Merton A. Merrill obtained his early education in the public schools of his 
native city and subsequently attended the University of Maine at Orono for 
several years. On leaving college he went to Boston and for a number of years 
was there employed in various capacities. In 1908 he came to Vancouver, British 
Columbia, and at the end of a few months made his way to Graham island, where 
he remained for two years. On the 4th of July, 1911, he returned to Vancouver 
and embarked in the real-estate business with his cousin, Orland P. Merrill, under 
the firm style of Merrill & Merrill. The partnership was dissolved in 1912, but 
jur subject still conducts his business under the old firm name. His interests 
are principally in Graham island, where valuable coal deposits are reported. He 
ilso has excellent farming property there and has won recognition as a business 
nan of sound judgment and keen discernment whose knowledge of real-estate 



112 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

values is accurate and who is qualified to give valuable advice to prospective 
investors. 

On the I2th of September, 1911, at Estherville, Iowa, Mr. Merrill was united 
in marriage to Miss Clarissa Converse, a daughter of Palmer Sterry and Martha 
Converse and a representative of one of the earliest families in Iowa. Mr. Merrill 
is a member of the Commercial Club and enjoys an enviable reputation as a young 
business man of much promise and a representative and substantial citizen of 
this province. 



JAMES MARS. 

In the lives of the majority of men the road that leads to success is filled with 
hardships and privations, apparently insurmountable obstacles and innumerable 
disappointments, and in this respect the history of James Mars is no exception 
but it likewise records the victory of unremitting diligence, persistent effort and 
unceasing perseverance. He is a native of Scotland, his birth there occurring on 
the 8th of May, 1870. His parents, Thomas and Mary (Wilson) Mars, were 
born, reared and married in the same country and there the mother died in 1883. 
Subsequently the father with his five sons and two daughters emigrated to Can- 
ada, the family settling in Manitoba. The father is yet living. 

A member of a household of limited means, the early educational advantages 
of James Mars were very meager. At the tender age of eleven years he left 
school and became a wage earner, the succeeding seven years being spent in a 
woolen factory in his native land. When he was a youth of about eighteen the 
family came to Canada, and for two years thereafter he diligently applied him- 
self to assisting his father with the cultivation of the homestead in Manitoba. At 
the expiration of that period he went to Winnipeg and entered the service of 
Lord Strathcona, being employed on his farm until 1892. In the latter year he 
gave up farm work and went to Tacoma, Washington, where he was employed 
in the lumber woods until 1894. His next removal was to Coquitlafn, which has 
ever since been his place of residence. Until 1909 he followed various occupa- 
tions, but each year marked an advance in his business career and he gradually 
became numbered among the enterprising and progressive citizens of the com- 
munity. In the year last named together with his brother he engaged in the mer- 
cantile business, under the firm name of Mars Brothers. As they are both men 
of good judgment as well as energy and determination they have met with 
success in the development of their enterprise and are enjoying a good trade. 
In the conduct of their store they have adopted a policy which commends them 
to the confidence of the people, while they accord their patrons the courteous and 
gracious consideration essential to the permanent upbuilding of any business. 
During the long period of his residence here Mr. Mars has acquired quite ex- 
tensive property interests, which he is now disposing of from time to time. He 
possesses the characteristics of leadership and has for some years figured promi- 
nently in local affairs, the capability he manifests in the direction of his per- 
sonal interests being evidenced in his judicious management of any enterprise 
with which he is connected. Four years ago he was elected president of the 
Agricultural Society, which organization holds an annual fair that is of mutual 
benefit to the farmers and business men and serves to more closely unite the in- 
terests of the town and country. The society was organized in 1890, and at 
that time their only property interest was a lot, donated by Mrs. Beckintsale, of 
Reading, England. During the intervening years, however, they have prospered 
and now own five acres of land, and have a building under construction which is 
thirty by fifty feet. The lower hall will be used for exhibition purposes, while 
the second story will be divided into committee rooms. Mr. Mars has expended 
a great deal of thought and energy in promoting this organization, and it is 
largely due to his enthusiastic efforts that the association has accomplished so 
much. 




JAMES MARS 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 115 

His allegiance in matters politic Mr. Mars gives to the conservative party, 
and he is secretary of the Dewdney Conservative Association. He is the present 
mayor of the city of Coquitlam, and is giving efficient service in this connection. 
He was elected reeve of the municipality in 1911 by acclamation and reelected in 
1912 in the same way. Again in 1913 he was elected reeve by a large majority; 
and soon after the city was incorporated he was made mayor by acclamation. 
His fraternal connections are confined to his membership in the Independent 
Order of Foresters, and he is chief ranger of Camp No. 147. Mr. Mars is not 
affiliated with any church, but he supports all worthy enterprises and generously 
contributes towards the maintenance of various local charities. The hard condi- 
tions of his own early life have served to make him considerate of other lads 
similarly situated and many an ambitious and enterprising youth has found in 
him a stanch friend. 



ETIENNE EDMOND DELA VAULT. 

Prominent among the successful business men of Vancouver is numbered 
Etienne Edmond Delavault, who now devotes his time and attention to his duties 
as managing director of the Canadian Hypothec & Guarantee Company, Ltd., 
and the Vancouver Development Company, Ltd. A man of keen discrimination 
ind sound judgment, his practical business ability and the systematic control of 
lis affairs have brought him a high degree of success and placed him among 
:hose whose activities have affected the growth, progress and welfare of the 
:ity. 

Mr. Delavault was born in Paris, France, in August, 1879, and is a son 
idmond and Elizabeth (Meyer) Delavault, the former of whom conducted 
a large agency business in Paris until his death in 1908. After completing 
his preliminary education, Etienne Delavault entered Paris University, from 
vhic.h he received the degree of Bachelor of Arts. He afterward studied law 
in the Paris Law College, graduating as a licentiate at law. In 1903 he came 
1o Canada. After his arrival in the Dominion he first became connected with 
;i prominent firm of French furriers, Revillon Freres. In their interests lie 
visited a great portion of the northern country, including the Labrador coast 
and Hudson Bay, and he was at one time manager of the Prince Albert dis- 
1rict for his employers. He proved himself capable, far-sighted and energetic, 
but being ambitious for success in his profession resigned his position and 
e ntered the law office of Lucien Dubuc, a barrister at Edmonton, Alberta. He was 
articled as a student and after completing the required term was admitted to the 
Law Society of the Northwest Territories in August, 1907. In the same year 
lie formed a partnership with his former teacher, Mr. Dubuc, under the firm 
i ame of Dubuc & Delavault, but later severed this connection, joining the firm 
<f Bishop, Pratt & Delavault. He remained in Edmonton until 1911, in the 
summer of which year he interested a number of French capitalists in a mort- 
gage company which he organized. He was the leader in the formation of the 
Canadian Hypothec & Guarantee Company, Ltd., and in October, 1911, came to 
Vancouver as its managing director, a position which he has since capably filled. 
He is in addition managing director of the Vancouver Development Company, 
Ltd., of this city, and his energy, his well timed aggressiveness, his force, experi- 
ence and capacity have been notable elements in the rapid growth of both of these 
concerns. Mr. Delavault has become well known in business circles in Van- 
couver, where his signal ability is widely recognized and respected. His interests 
are all carefully managed and capably conducted and have been attended with 
gratifying and well deserved success. 

In February, 1907, Mr. Delavault was united in marriage to Miss Madeleine 
Bouchon, a daughter of C. and C. Gaucher (Besnard) Bouchon. Mr. and Mrs. 
Delavault have become the parents of a son, Robert, who was born at Edmonton, 



116 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

Alberta, in December, 1907. Mr. Delavault is a member of the corps of reserves, 
One Hundred and First Edmonton Fusiliers, of which he has served as lieu- 
tenant. He made a creditable record in law and his prominence in that field 
has been equalled by his success in business a fact indicative of versatility, 
wide interests and effective personality. 



JOHN GARSON JOHNSTON. 

John Garson Johnston, prominently connected with important commercial 
interests of Vancouver as assistant manager of R. Myers, Ltd., and half-owner 
of the large wholesale jewelry business it controls, was born in Edinburgh, Scot- 
land, March 31, 1879, and is a son of William Clouston and Jeannie Renfrew 
(Young) Johnston, both representatives of Scotch families, the father being a 
descendant of Johnstoun, earl of Zetland. 

The public and high schools of Glasgow afforded John Garson Johnston his 
early educational opportunities and he afterward entered the University of 
Glasgow, from which he was graduated M. A. in 1906 and LL. B. in the same 
year, taking honors in all of his classes at the university. Immediately after his 
graduation he began the practice of law, associating himself with the firm of 
Wright, Johnston & Orr in Glasgow, with which his father was also connected. 
This firm is still in existence and is one of the strongest and most reliable in 
the city. Mr. Johnston remained with it for three years but even at this time 
he was active in business, his ability carrying him forward into important rela- 
tions with some of the leading corporations in Scotland, connections which 
developed in him the qualities which are the basis of his commercial success 
today. In 1909 he crossed the Atlantic to Canada and, locating in Vancouver, 
obtained a position in the Royal Bank, remaining for about one year. At the 
end of that time he associated himself with R. Myers, Ltd., wholesale dealers 
in jewelry, purchasing a half interest in the concern and being appointed by the 
board of directors assistant manager. As the incumbent of this position he now 
devotes practically his entire time and attention to the affairs of the corporation, 
his keen business insight, energy and sagacity having been effective factors in 
the later development of the business. 

Mr. Johnston is a member of the Presbyterian church and is a conservative 
in his political beliefs, taking an intelligent interest in community affairs, although 
never active as an office seeker. He holds to high ideals in every relation of life 
and in their attainment is recognized as a man of action rather than of theory. 
His well developed capabilities and powers, his keen insight and sound discrimi- 
nation have been salient elements in his success and have carried him forward 
into important business relations in the city where he makes his home. 



WILLIAM MOORE McKAY. 

A man of broad views, liberal mind and high ideals, guided and controlled by 
sound and practical business judgment, William Moore McKay has won for 
himself a position of precedence at the bar of Vancouver, prominence in politics, 
distinction in military circles and a place among the men of weight and influence 
in the city. In a profession where untiring application, intuitive wisdom and 
the determination to utilize the means at hand are the elements of success, he 
has advanced continuously and rapidly and has, moreover, made his ability and 
public spirit the basis of an important work of public service, the. conservative 
organization in this province finding in him a leader who is at once a capable 
business man and an able politician. 




WILLIAM M. MCKAY 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 119 

Mr. McKay was born in Ottawa, Ontario, August 16, 1868, and is a son of 
Thomas and Isabel (Masson) McKay, the former a native of Perth, Scotland, 
, .nd the latter of Kingston, Ontario. Their marriage occurred in Ottawa, where 
Thomas McKay was at the head of the McKay Milling Company, one of the 
largest industrial enterprises in the city. He continued to conduct this for 
nany years and eventually retired to private life, spending his later years on 
t he beautiful McKay estate, known as Elmbank, which was considered one of the 
i lost attractive and valuable properties in Ottawa. In his home in that city 
' 'homas McKay passed away in 1887 and he was survived by his wife for some 
\ears, her death occurring in 1897. 

In the acquirement of an education William M. McKay attended Dr. Tassie's 
celebrated school at Gait, Ontario, the Montreal high school and Toronto Uni- 
\ersity, from which he was graduated B. A. with high honors in 1888. Having 
( etermined to practice law, he was then articled to (now his honor) D. B. 
McTavish, then a member of the firm of Scott, McTavish & Scott, of which Sir 
Lichard Scott was the senior partner. Owing to his excellent early training 
and his interest in his profession he attained an important and notable degree 
of success in his legal studies and in his first year at Osgoode Hall was entitled 
t write for honors. He completed the course in that institution six months 
before the required time but could not be admitted to the bar and accordingly 
vent to Europe, where he spent one year in travel. Returning at the end of 
that time he was called to the bar of Ontario in 1893 and began his professional 
career in that city as a member of the firm of MacCraken, Henderson & McKay. 
/ fter five years of successful legal work he went to the Klondike, arriving in 
tie Yukon in 1898, at the time of the first rush to the gold fields. He was 
the third qualified barrister in Dawson City and he there formed a partnership 
with W. E. Burritt, now registrar of Prince Rupert, under the firm name of 
Eurritt & McKay. Their association continued for four years and at the end of 
tl at time Mr. McKay engaged in practice with R. W. Shannon, now city solicitor 
o ' Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. The firm of McKay & Shannon had a prosperous 
existence for three years and was recognized as one of the strongest and most 
rt liable in Dawson City. Mr. McKay was carried forward into important rela- 
tions with public life in that community, being alderman from 1903 until his 
term expired the year before the commission plan of government was inaugu- 
rated. After seven years in Dawson Mr. McKay came to Vancouver and he 
h; s since remained an honored and respected resident of this city. Immediately 
after his arrival he formed a partnership with C. N. O'Brian under the. firm name 
ol McKay and O'Brian and three years ago Mr. McKay took over practically 
al the Crown work controlled by the firm and is acting as representative of the 
at:orney general of British Columbia. His success in a professional way affords 
the best evidence of his capability along this line. Much of the success that 
hcS attended him at the bar is undoubtedly due to the fact that in no instance 
w:ll he permit himself to go to court unless he has absolute confidence in the 
justice of his client's cause. The zeal with which he has devoted his energies 
to his profession, the careful regard he evinces for the interests of his clients 
and the assiduous attention which he gives to all the details of his cases have 
br night him a large business and have, made him very successful in its conduct, 
so that he stands today among the representative and prominent barristers of the 
city where he makes his home. 

To say that Mr. McKay has won prominence in the law, however, is to 
mention only one of his many claims to distinction, for his interests are broad 
and his ability great, so that his activities have extended to many fields, in- 
fluencing especially the military and political life of the province. He is one of 
the strongest individual forces in the ranks of the conservative party in British 
Columbia and has always been high in the party's councils, believing firmly in the 
principles and policies for which it stands. One year after his arrival in Van- 
couver he was elected secretary of the Vancouver Conservative Club and rose 
through all the offices in that organization to that of president, to which he was 



120 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

elected in 1910. In 1906 he was made secretary of the British Columbia Con- 
servative Association and served until 1911, when, upon the retirement of Mr. 
M. W. Foster, who became deputy minister of public works, Mr. McKay was 
elected to the position of first vice president. At the convention of the con- 
servative party held at New Westminster, November 23, 1911, he was elected 
president of the British Columbia Conservative Association and at the close of 
his term of able service was succeeded by the late J. A. Lee, ex-mayor of New 
Westminster. Although an active conservative, his public spirit goes beyond 
partisanship and he is interested in everything that pertains to the advancement 
and growth of his city and province, cooperating in all progressive public projects 
and lending the weight of his influence to measures of reform and expansion. 

In military circles, too, Mr. McKay is well known and greatly respected. 
He acquired his preliminary military training in the C school at Stanley barracks, 
Toronto, where he took first class qualifications, and at the age of eighteen 
he entered the Queen's Own Rifles as private. He spent fourteen years in the 
militia, serving for two as private, after which he took a commission in the 
Forty-third Rifles of Ottawa, rising to the rank of senior captain of the regiment. 
This position he held until 1898 and two years afterward became attached to the 
Dawson Rifles as lieutenant. He is now on the Officers Reserve with the rank 
of captain. 

In Victoria, British Columbia, November 28, 1911, Mr. McKay was united 
in marriage to Miss Mary M. Petersen, of Copenhagen, Denmark, and they 
have become the parents of a daughter, Ruth Isabel Mary. Fraternally Mr. 
McKay is connected with Cascade Lodge, No. 12, A. F. & A. M., and with the 
Arctic Brotherhood. His religious views are in accord with the doctrines of 
the Presbyterian church and he is a regular attendant at St. Andrew's church in 
Vancouver. In the Rideau Club of Ottawa and the Vancouver and Western 
Clubs of Vancouver he is well known and his high standing in social circles 
is unassailable. He is indeed entitled to a place among the men of Vancouver 
who represents the highest type of citizenship men who, seeking and attaining 
personal success in business or a profession, have nevertheless extended their 
efforts into fields of public service, making their powers and abilities effective as 
forces in community growth. He is liberal, broad-minded, versatile and able, 
and his career has indicated clearly his possession of these qualities, bringing 
him success, prominence and a place among the makers of legal, military and 
political history in British Columbia. 



CECIL DE COURCY SINCLAIR HOSEASON. 

With a nature that can never be content with mediocrity, Cecil de Courcy 
Sinclair Hoseason has steadily worked his way upward and is identified with 
several corporations which, operating directly or indirectly in the real-estate and 
colonization field, have done much for the upbuilding and improvement of Van- 
couver and the province. A native of India and of Scotch parentage, he was 
born August 12, 1868, his parents being General Henry and Adeline (MacKenzie) 
Hoseason, the former for many years a commander of British troops, in which 
connection he won his title. The son was sent to England to pursue his educa- 
tion and became a student in the public school at Fullneck, Yorkshire. He after- 
ward attended Dover College at Dover, England, and in 1886 was a student in 
Edinburgh University. 

Mr. Hoseason has been a resident of British Columbia since 1899, in which 
year he became the representative at Vancouver of the North American Life 
Assurance Company, so continuing for six years. In 1907 he started in his 
present business as a real-estate, insurance and financial agent under the name 
of Hoseason & Company, which style he still uses although the firm is now 
nominal. He is a financial agent and conducts an insurance and real-estate 




CECIL DE C. S. HOSEASON 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 123 

business, but principally handles local realty. He is conversant with property 
values and has succeeded in winning a large clientage through business methods 
which recognize the opportunities of a situation and utilize them honorably and 
fully. Mr. Hoseason is also chairman of the board of directors of A. M. 
Asancheyev, Ltd., a colonist company, and is managing director of the London 
& British Columbia Investment Corporation, Ltd., of London, England, managing 
their interests in Vancouver. 

On the ist of September, 1909, in Vancouver, Air. Hoseason was married to 
Miss Beatrice Amy Taylor, and they have one child, Cecil Henry Cochrane. In 
religious belief Mr. Hoseason is a Protestant. Politically he is an independent 
conservative, but has never been prominent as a seeker for office, although for 
several years he was a member of the Betchuanaland board of police. He is a 
life member of the Vancouver Exhibition Association and is interested in the 
various plans which seek to exploit the resources of Vancouver and the province 
and to make known the opportunities and advantages here to be enjoyed. Mr. 
Hoseason holds membership in the Canada Lodge, A. F. & A. M., of London, 
England, and the Loyal Orangemen Legion. He is likewise a member of the 
British Isles Public School Club of Vancouver, the Progress Club and the 
Caledonia Club. His influence is always on the side of improvement and, believ- 
ing in the possibilities of the great northwest, he has so directed his efforts as to 
win gratifying success for himself and also to contribute to the upbuilding of the 
:ity and province. 



GEORGE EDWARD McCROSSAN. 

The bar of British Columbia numbers among its representatives many force- 
ful, able and brilliant men whose work along professional lines is of a character 
which will make it necessarily a part of the legal history of the province. Among 
their number is George Edward McCrossan, a prominent barrister in Vancouver 
and one of the great individual forces in local liberal politics, his energy, his 
versatility and his keen and incisive qualities of mind having carried him forward 
to success and eminence in both fields. He was born in Winnipeg, Manitoba, 
September 16, 1879, an d is a son of Thomas and Jennie (MacDonald) McCros- 
san, the former of whom came to Canada from Scotland in pioneer times, the 
parents celebrating their golden wedding anniversary on the 4th of January, 



George E. McCrossan acquired his preliminary education in the public schools 
)f Winnipeg and was afterward graduated from Manitoba University, receiving 
the degree of M. A. from that institution in 1900. He afterward studied law 
in the same university, graduating in 1902 and winning, besides his degree of 
LI,. B., a scholarship and first medal in arts and law. He was called to the bar 
}f Manitoba in 1902, and in 1903 came to Vancouver, British Columbia, winning 
admission to the bar of this province in the following year. He immediately 
began practice in Vancouver as a member of the firm of Bird, Brydon Jack & 
McCrossan and this association continued until 1906, when the firm of McCrossan, 
Schultz & Harper was formed. In 1910 Mr. Schultz retired and the business is 
now conducted under the name of McCrossan & Harper. This is one of the 
strongest and most reliable law firms in the city and its practice is extensive and 
representative, connecting its members with a great deal of notable litigation. 
Mr. McCrossan's rise has been rapid, his ability and proficiency soon making him 
well known throughout the province and carrying him forward into important 
public relations. In 1911 he was chosen by the Dominion government as counsel 
in the investigation into the alleged Chinese frauds and the opium-smuggling 
trade and by his able conduct of this work gained widespread approval and honor. 
He has won admiration by his pleadings before the court and has appeared on 
cases before the supreme court of Canada and the privy council. He has also 

Vol. IV 5 



124 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

been concerned in the editorship of digests on British Columbia cases and on 
Canadian and criminal law. He is a director in the Burrard Publishing Com- 
pany, Limited, publishers of The Sun, a daily newspaper, and The Sunset, a 
weekly publication. 

As is often the case, Mr. McCrossan's success in law has carried with it 
prominence in politics and he is recognized today as a leading spirit in the local 
liberal organization, his loyalty to that party being attested by frank and open 
support of its principles. He is a member of the provincial executive of the Lib- 
eral Association and from 1907 to 1909 was president of the Young Men's Liberal 
Association of Vancouver. From 1909 he was first vice president of the 
Liberal Association of Vancouver but recently resigned in order to give more 
exclusive attention to his professional work. 

On October 31, 1907, in Vancouver, Mr. McCrossan was united in marriage 
to Miss Grace Chrysler Lalande, of Cananoque, Ontario, a daughter of Abraham 
and Alice (Chrysler) Lalande, the latter a member of the old and well known 
Chrysler family. Mr. McCrossan holds membership in the Terminal City Club, 
the Vancouver Hunt Club and the Vancouver Golf Club and is well known in 
social circles of this city. He is a splendid type of the present-day professional 
man, modern in his views, progressive in his ideals and with a spirit active in the 
promotion of projects and measures for community advancement. His personal 
characteristics have gained for him the warm regard and friendship of many, 
while in professional lines he has attained that eminence which comes only in 
recognition of merit. 


ROBERT FRANCIS GREEN, M. P. 

Of the many outstanding facts in connection with the development of west- 
ern Canada none is more interesting or significant to those whose duty it is to 
try and see beneath the surface of things and write accurate history than the 
great part played by a small group of individuals in this work of shaping the 
destiny of a country. To the unthinking it often appears that the solving of 
great problems has been due to "movements'" or the policy of a government or 
popular agitation ; but to him who will do a little quiet investigating it is invari- 
ably disclosed that big results are due to the initiative of one or two strong men, 
who, bolder than their fellows or endowed with greater gifts of insight and 
leadership, have grasped the fundamental necessities of a situation and applied 
that needful stimulus to community effort which has accomplished the desired 
result. 

British Columbia is a great province the greatest in the Dominion of Canada 
and in area and variety of resources an empire. And when one is told that its 
present envious position among the countries of the world is due to a progres- 
sive development which was initiated less than twenty years ago, one is spurred 
to make inquiry as to the manner of men they were who have been instrumental 
in making this marvelous change in such a short space of time. And this brings 
us to the subject of this sketch Robert Francis Green, M. P., for it is but the 
simple truth to say that no man has done more for his adopted country ; and as 
is always the case with men of merit, he has not in the doing of it craved popular 
applause, the public honors which have been thrust upon him having in the main 
been spontaneous and unsolicited tributes to his worth and services. 

One can best, perhaps, convey an idea of the position which Mr. Green occu- 
pies in British Columbia by saying that if anyone came to the province with any 
large enterprise to be launched or on any political mission, he would not be in 
the country twenty-four hours before he would hear of the member for Kootenay. 
No higher tribute can be paid to his worth and position than to add that he enjoys 
to a remarkable degree the close confidence of the large financial and commercial 
interests of the country. But his position is even more powerful than would be 




ROBERT F. GREEN 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 127 

disclosed by that statement, for it is known that the success which has attended 
the federal and provincial conservative parties in British Columbia is attributed 
mairuy to his wise judgment on questions of policy on which their success so 
vitally depends. 

Such then is the position which Mr. Green holds as a citizen of the richest 
and fairest province in the Dominion. Personally, he is of somewhat quiet and 
retiring disposition. A little below the average height, somewhat spare of build, 
a little grey tingeing a closely-cropped beard which lends to his countenance a 
striking resemblance to Sir William Mackenzie, Mr. Green can, when he is in 
Victoria, where he makes his home when the house of commons is not in ses- 
sion, be found at his office premises on the corner of Broughton and Langley 
streets. 

Though somewhat absteminous in his habits, "Bob," as he is known to his 
intimates, is voted a prince of good fellows and the best of companions. Just 
how it came about that he came to occupy such a leading position amongst his 
fellows may be indicated in a few lines. First, he had and has unbounded con- 
fidence in the future greatness of his adopted province ; second, he always backed 
up his faith by action; third, he always stood by his friends and "played the 
game." 

It was in the fall of 1885 that Mr. Green first came to British Columbia, 
destined to prove the scene of his future activity. After a strenuous business 
career in the pioneer days in the mining camps of the Kootenay, which will be 
alluded to later, it was, in 1893, that he was first summoned to public life, being; 
chosen first mayor of Kaslo, and, although he was defeated for the next term,, 
was reelected in the elections of 1896 and 1897. In 1898, he was elected to the 
provincial legislature for the Kaslo-Slocan Riding in opposition to the Turner 
government. He was again elected in 1900 as a supporter of the Semlin govern- 
ment, and, in 1903, was elected as a supporter of the McBride administration,. 
accepting under that government the office of minister of mines. He resigned 
this portfolio in November, 1903, and became chief commissioner of lands ami 
works, from which important office he withdrew in December, 1906. His work 
in parliament has been of far-reaching effect, and he has ever well taken care of the 
interests of his constituents. He has done much towards promoting and initiat- 
ing constructive legislation in committee rooms and on the floor of the house, 
and his service in this connection has ever given high satisfaction to those who 
called him to this responsible position. In 1912, Mr. Green was elected to the 
federal parliament by acclamation to represent the Kootenay constituency. This 
was made necessary by the appointment of his predecessor to the railway com- 
mission. 

Mr. Green was born at Peterboro, Ontario, a son of Benjamin and Rebecca 
(Lipsett) Green, his father being a native of County West Meath, and his 
mother of County Donegal, Ireland. They emigrated to Canada about 1835, 
locating near Montreal, where the father engaged in agricultural pursuits. About 
1840 they removed to Toronto, where Benjamin Green became connected with 
the grain and produce business. He later was active in business in Peterboro. 
In 1890, he came to British Columbia, where his death occurred in 1896 at Kaslo,. 
his age being eighty-one years. His wife had preceded him to the Great Beyond,, 
passing away in Ontario in 1889. 

Robert Green, who was one of ten children, was educated in the public schools 
and the collegiate institute in Peterboro. In 1879 he crossed the border to the 
United States, being until 1881 engaged in business in a small way in Pennsyl- 
vania. He then returned to Peterboro, but, in 1882, heeding the call of the west, 
located in Winnipeg, and westward from there, engaging in construction work on 
the Canadian Pacific Railroad until 1884. In the spring of 1885, he went to 
Calgary and joined the commissary department of the forces under General 
Strange, remaining with that contingent throughout the rebellion. After the 
campaign he joined his brothers in Revelstoke. At that time, the Canadian Paci- 
fic tracks extended only six miles west of Beaver, British Columbia, which is. 



128 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

eighty miles from Revelstoke, and he had to walk this distance. Shortly after 
his arrival at that place, he joined his two brothers in the general mercantile 
business in that town, continuing so until 1886, at which time he purchased the 
interest of one of his brothers in the business, the firm then being known as 
Green Brothers. They later also opened a branch store at Illicillewaet, British 
Columbia. Later on they closed up their Revelstoke store and opened a branch 
at Sproats Landing. In 1891, the store at Illicillewaet was abandoned and 
removed to Ainsworth, British Columbia, and the general merchandise business 
of E. S. Wilson & Company of that place was purchased. Upon the completion 
of the railway from Sproats Landing to Nelson, their business at the former 
place was transferred to Ainsworth. 

In 1891 he located in Ainsworth, being Justice of the Peace for that large and 
important district. He served in a similar capacity as a law officer of the Crown 
during his residence in Kaslo from 1894 to 1897, inclusive, and during this period 
he won for himself a reputation for strict integrity as well as for great personal 
courage. Those were strenuous days in the pioneer settlements of the interior of 
the province the days when many undesirable characters flocked thither from 
Idaho, where the advent of the famous "Bull Pen" had struck terror to their hearts 
and many a tale could be told of how Mr. Green with a firm hand at the right 
moment had compelled due observance of law and order from those whose natural 
disposition and inclination was otherwise. 

It is to be recorded also and this in a measure reveals the type of man who 
proved so useful a citizen of the province in the early days of its development that 
Green Brothers marketed the first ore ever shipped out of the Kootenay lake side 
of the famous Slocan camp. This they did under circumstances and con- 
ditions which would have tried the mettle of most men. The owners of the ore 
had men at work mining and sacking it at the Whitewater mines, controlled by 
J. C. Eaton, but neither the packers nor the steamboat people would touch it until 
all charges for freight and smelter treatment had been paid. So Green Brothers, 
realizing that, if the impasse could not be broken, the camp would be given a black 
eye, came to the rescue and guaranteed all charges, which amounted to sixty-five 
dollars per ton. And as a climax to this situation it is on record that within a year 
the production of ore was so great that some eight or ten ore buyers were in the' 
district, representing the smelter people. Thus did Mr. Green give practical evi- 
dence of his faith in the future of British Columbia. 

In 1892, the firm opened the first general store in Kaslo, British Columbia, 
and two years later disposed of their Ainsworth establishment, devoting all of 
their attention to their interests at Kaslo. In 1902, they amalgamated with the 
general merchandise store of H. Giegerich ; the hardware store of H. Byers & 
Company, and the hardware store of A. E. Morris, and the firm then became 
known as The Byers, Giegerich, Green Company, Limited, which firm is still in 
existence. 

Mr. Green first located in Victoria in 1903, and engaged in business in this city 
in 1907 by forming a partnership with Arthur C. Burdick, under the firm name 
of Green Burdick, real-estate and financial agents, with offices in the Bank of 
Montreal building. They later moved to the Law Chambers, and eventually 
secured their present location at the corner of Broughton and Langley streets, 
where they do an extensive and representative business. In 1908, Newton T. 
Burdick a brother of his partner entered the firm, which then became known 
as Green & Burdick Brothers. All three members are well versed in local real- 
estate values, and their judgment in that regard is highly estimated. They handle 
much valuable property, and their business transactions have had a distinct influ- 
ence upon the growth and expansion of the city. The firm also does an extensive 
insurance business, representing both fire and accident, and also bonding com- 
panies. They, moreover, act as financial agents, and their reliability in that respect 
is proverbial. They placed many of the larger subdivisions on the market, doing 
business principally in the northern section of Victoria. Mr. Green is the senior 
member of the firm and acts more or less in an advisory capacity only, as his various 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 129 

business interests require much of his time and attention. He is identified with 
a number of prosperous mining enterprises throughout British Columbia, one of 
which is the well known Slocan Star Mine, located near Sandon, British Columbia. 
He is also interested to some extent in fruit raising, and, along that line, has been 
an important factor in encouraging the fruit-growing industry in those sections of 
the province which are favorable thereto. He is identified with a number of other 
enterprises and industries, too numerous to mention, and is a director of the 
Colonial Trust Company, Limited; the New British. Columbia Lands, Limited; 
and The Slocan Star Mine, Limited. 

In Erie, Pennsylvania, Mr. Green married, on January 31, 1889, Miss Celia 
E. McDannell, a daughter of O. H. P. and Mary A. McDannell, natives of Penn- 
sylvania, where the father was engaged in farming. Both parents have passed 
away. Mr. and Mrs. Green have two children : Robert H., born November 10, 
1889, a graduate of McGill University in 1912, and at present studying law at 
Osgoode Hall, Toronto; and Cecilia R., born November 29, 1890, also a graduate 
of McGill University, and now articled to the firm of Mackay & Miller, of 
Victoria. 

The family residence, one of the attractive homes of Victoria, is located at 
No. 502 Rupert street, but they spend their summers in their home on Beecher 
bay, where Mr. Green indulges in outdoor life, of which he is very fond, finding 
great pleasure in boating and fishing. 

Mr. Green is prominent in the Masonic fraternity, in which he has attained 
high rank and held many offices. He is a member of St. Andrew's Lodge, No. 49, 
of Victoria ; of the Kootenay Royal Arch Chapter ; Vancouver Preceptory ; and 
Gizeh Temple of the Mystic Shrine. He is a past master of the blue lodge, past 
district deputy grand master, past first principal of the chapter and past potentate 
of the shrine. He is well known in club life of the city, being a member of the 
Union and Pacific Clubs of Victoria. His recreations are indicated through his 
membership in the Royal Victoria Yacht Club and the Victoria Golf Club. Mr. 
Green is also a member of the Rideau and the Laurentian Clubs of Ottawa. 



GEORGE McCUAIG. 

George McCuaig, auctioneer and commission merchant of Vancouver, was 
Dorn in Scotland, October 24, 1852, a son of Henry and Janet McCuaig. In 
the year 1857 the family left the land of hills and heather and started for Canada 
on a sailing ship which was nine weeks on the voyage. The son George was 
then a lad of but four years, so that practically his entire life has been passed 
on this side of the water. He was reared in Barrie, Ontario, where he attended 
the public schools and then entered the dry-goods business in Barrie, remaining 
there until 1881, when he made his way westward to Winnipeg. Ten years 
were spent in that city and in the territories and in 1891 he arrived in Van- 
couver. Through the succeeding three years he managed a dry-goods store 
for George I. Wilson, and in 1894 left for Africa, where he spent four years. 
In 1899 he returned to Vancouver, where he established business as an auc- 
tioneer and commission merchant, in which line he still continues. He has a 
well appointed establishment and so conducts his trade as to gain substantial 
and well merited returns. His judgment is sound in placing valuations upon 
any articles which he handles and he has become well known to the purchasing 
public as one whose stock is extensive and whose business integrity is unassail- 
able. 

During the early years of his residence in the west Mr. McCuaig became 
a member of the local military corps at Medicine Hat during the Riel rebellion 
of 1885. When its leader, Louis David Riel, was on the scaffold to be hung 
as a traitor to his country, Mr. McCuaig secured his autograph, which is now 
in the Carnegie library at Vancouver. On the 23d of August, 1900, in this 



130 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

city, Mr. McCuaig was united in marriage to Miss Sarah Campbell, a daughter 
of Rod and Christina Campbell, representatives of a Scotch family originally 
from Glengarry, Ontario. Unto Mr. and Mrs. McCuaig has been born a son, 
Gordon Campbell. The parents are members of the Presbyterian church. 
Mr. McCuaig belongs to Mount Hermon Lodge, A. F. & A. M., and to the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows. His political support is given to the liberal 
party. His interest in public affairs is that of a citizen who seeks the welfare 
and upbuilding of the community in which he lives and is loyal to its best 
interests. His life has had its settings in various scenes, as he has lived at 
different times in Scotland, eastern and western Canada and Africa. Through 
all he has been actuated by a laudable desire to work his way upward, and his 
life history shows what may be accomplished when energy and determina- 
tion point out the way. 

THOMAS L. KENNEDY. 

It is on all sides conceded that the real-estate business, more than any other, 
contributes to the growth and upbuilding of a community, and the advancement 
and expansion of a city is often due to an enterprising real-estate man who will 
stimulate interest in property, will keep alive transfers and transactions and will 
draw outside capital and new settlers to a community. Such a man is Thomas 
L. Kennedy of North Vancouver, who for some time has been one of the leading 
real-estate dealers of this community and also has made an enviable record in a 
public capacity as a member of the city board of aldermen. 

Mr. Kennedy was born in New Brunswick on July i, 1866, a son of Samuel 
and Louisa (McKenzie) Kennedy, the former a native of Ireland and the latter 
of New Brunswick, of Scotch ancestry. The father was brought to Canada by his 
parents when about ten years of age, the latter settling in New Brunswick. There 
he attained manhood and engaged in farming but in 1906 the opportunities of 
British Columbia decided him to locate in North Vancouver, where he and his 
wife are now living retired. 

Thomas L. Kennedy was reared at home and he acquired his education in the 
public schools of New Brunswick, completing the same with a business course in 
the Ontario Business College, which he took in the winter of 1892-3. Mr. Ken- 
nedy spent his young manhood in New Brunswick engaged in farming and lum- 
bering but in 1892 came to Ontario, spending the following winter in Toronto, 
and in the spring of 1893 removed to British Columbia, where he spent the fol- 
lowing year in the lumber woods. In 1894 he located in North Vancouver, being 
among the pioneers of this little city. With the exception of about three and a 
half years spent in the Yukon gold fields he has made his home in North Van- 
couver since that time. In the spring of 1901 Mr. Kennedy with others pro- 
ceeded to the Yukon country, where he remained for about three and a half years, 
but finding nothing that panned out successfully beyond a good salary, he returned 
to North Vancouver and there engaged in general contracting in company with 
P. A. Aikin. For the past three years, however, he has devoted his attention 
to the real-estate business and along this line success has attended his efforts 
and the development and expansion of North Vancouver has been stimulated 
through his labors. 

On February i, 1911, Mr. Kennedy was united in marriage to Miss Mary 
Muriel Bartrem, of Ottawa, and to them has been born one child, Everett Bart- 
rem McKenzie. Politically Mr. Kennedy is independent. He is a member of the 
present board of city aldermen and has been instrumental in instituting or pro- 
moting a number of beneficial measures. In that capacity as well as in his private 
life he has done much to promote worthy enterprises and is recognized as a force- 
ful element in the community. Fraternally he is a member of North Vancouver 
Lodge, No. 40, Knights of Pythias. He is liberal in his support of the churches 




THOMAS L. KENNEDY 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 133 

and charitable institutions and is ever ready to give a helping hand to those in 
need, although his aid is given unostentatiously and often his beneficiaries do not 
even know who was their friend in need. A r/idn true in character, honest in his 
actions, able and vigorous, he is highly respected and esteemed and has many 
friends. 



EDWARD CHARLES HART, M. D., C. M. 

A keen interest in the profession of medicine in its scientific and humanitarian 
aspects, an appreciation of the value of life and its ultimate aims and purposes, 
comprehensive knowledge and a sense of personal responsibility, these are the 
qualities which make Dr. Edward Charles Hart an able and successful physician 
and place him among the foremost representatives of the medical fraternity in 
Victoria, where since 1897 he has been in active and successful practice. Since 
1898 he has been coroner of this district and is connected with the regular 
military service of Canada, being senior medical officer for district IT, compris- 
ing British Columbia and the Yukon, and he has other important connections, 
evidencing his high standing in the profession and the gratifying recognition 
which his ability has received in medical circles. 

Dr. Hart was born on the i6th of June, 1870, in Baddeck, Nova Scotia, and 
is a son of Charles and Ellen (Baxter) Hart, natives of Nova Scotia, the former 
for many years in the general shipping business in that province. During the 
time of the Civil war in the United States he supplied building material in large 
quantities to the United States government but he later abandoned this occupa- 
tion and turned his attention to banking, becoming manager of a branch of the 
Merchants Bank of Halifax located in Baddeck. He retired from active life 
in 1893 and lived quietly until his death, which occurred in December, 1912. 
His parents were also natives of Nova Scotia and their ancestors were of Irish 
descent and Empire Loyalists who left the colonies and settled in that province 
at the time of the Revolutionary war. The mother of the subject of this review 
survives her husband and makes her home in Vancouver. Her parents were 
natives of Scotland who emigrated to Canada about the year 1825, the father 
afterward preaching Presbyterian doctrines in the Dominion for over fifty 
years. 

Dr. Hart acquired his early education in the public schools of Nova Scotia 
and he later entered Pictou Academy, from which he was graduated in 1887. 
In the following year he entered the civil service in the house of commons but 
abandoned this in order to enroll in McGill University. He studied medicine 
and in 1894 was graduated with the degree of M. D. and C. M. Upon leaving 
the university he located in Baddeck, Nova Scotia, and began the practice of his 
profession, remaining there until 1897. At this time, believing that the west 
offered wider opportunities, he moved to Victoria and opened an office on 
Douglas street, near Fort. In the summer of the same year he was placed in 
charge of the Jubilee Hospital and upon leaving that institution formed a part- 
nership with Dr. F. W. Hall, at that time a prominent physician of Victoria, 
now deceased. Their association continued until 1908, when Dr. Hart moved 
to his present location at No. 643 Courtney street, where he has since carried on 
the general practice of medicine and surgery. Dr. Hart has proven careful in 
the diagnosis of cases and successful in the application of remedies, for he keeps 
abreast with the most advanced professional thought and is interested in every- 
thing pertaining to the science of medicine. He has remained always a close 
and earnest student, never considering his medical education complete, and his 
powers have continually developed so that today he is without doubt one of the 
leading physicians and surgeons in Victoria. Since 1898 he has held the office 
of coroner of the Victoria district and has discharged the duties of this office 



134 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

capably and conscientiously, making his superior ability the basis of a useful 
work of public service. 

In Dr. Hart's career there is an interesting military chapter. He is connected 
with the permanent regular military service of Canada, having in 1898 joined 
the Fifth Regiment Canadian Garrison Artillery with the rank of surgeon major. 
He served thus until May I, 1906, when he was made captain in the regular 
service, a position which he held until December n, 1907, when he was promoted 
to his present rank of major. He is also senior medical officer for district No. 
ii, comprising British Columbia and the Yukon. He is a member of the Vic- 
toria Medical Society and was for two years president of that organization 
and for one year secretary. In addition to this he is past president and past 
vice president of the Provincial Medical Society and through his membership in 
these bodies keeps in touch with the trend of modern thought along medical 
lines. 

In Vancouver, in August, 1898, Dr. Hart was united in marriage to Miss 
Margaret McPhee. a native of Nova Scotia and a daughter of Archibald and 
Anne (McLane) McPhee, the former of Scotch ancestry. He for many years 
engaged in farming in Nova Scotia, dying in that province in 1909. The mother 
is of Irish extraction and makes her home with the subject of this review in 
Victoria. Dr. and Mrs. Hart have three children : Ellen, who was born August 
31, 1899; Edward, born July 22, 1902; and Josephine, born June 19, 1909. 

Dr. Hart is a member of the Presbyterian church and fraternally is con- 
nected with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Foresters and the Knights 
of Pythias. His club affiliations are extensive and important for he belongs 
to the L'nion and Pacific Clubs of Victoria, the Victoria Gun Club and the Capital 
Gun Club, of which he is past president. He is, moreover, prominent in the 
affairs of the Victoria Automobile Association, for he has the distinction of hav- 
ing been the first motorist in British Columbia, running the first car in the prov- 
ince in 1900. lie is now vice president of the Automobile Association and has 
kept up his keen and enthusiastic interest in motoring, spending a great many 
of his leisure hours on the beautiful automobile roads in and around Victoria. 
He is an enthusiastic advocate of all kinds of outdoor sports, believing in physical 
efficiency as a factor in success and he is particularly interested in hunting as 
his membership in the most prominent gun clubs in the city indicates. His atten- 
tion, however, is concentrated upon his profession, of which he always remains 
an earnest student, supplementing his already comprehensive knowledge and 
experience by individual research and investigation. During the fifteen years 
he has practiced in this city he has won a large and representative patronage and 
holds the confidence and esteem of his patients as well as a high place in the 
regard of the medical fraternity. 



ISAAC HUDSON. 

Isaac Hudson, a successful and representative business man and substantial 
citizen of New Westminster, has for more than two decades conducted a paint- 
ing and decorating establishment and also deals in wall paper. His birth occurred 
in Grey county, Ontario, on the 6th of July, 1869, his parents being Henry and 
Mary (Brown) Hudson, the former a native of Ontario and the latter of York- 
shire, England. Their marriage was celebrated in Ontario, to which province 
the mother had come as a girl with her parents. In early manhood Henry 
Hudson was identified with the lumber business but subsequently located on a 
farm in Grey county and there devoted his attention to general agricultural pur- 
suits throughout the remainder of his life, passing away at the venerable age 
of eighty-nine years. He served as reeve of the township of Osprey for several 
year's and was one of the influential citizens of his section. 




ISAAC HUDSON 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 137 

Isaac Hudson was reared under the parental roof and attended the public 
schools in the acquirement of his education, but his advantages in that direction 
were somewhat limited, for he was ill during three years of the period usually 
devoted to school work. In his sixteenth year he was apprenticed to the painter's 
and decorator's trade, his term of indenture covering three years. For the first 
year he received thirty dollars and board, while his second year's remuneration 
was forty dollars and his third year's sixty dollars. When his apprenticeship at 
Collingwood was terminated he went to Sault Ste Marie and for about two 
years worked in cities on both the American and Canadian sides. In the fall 
of 1889 he came to British Columbia, locating in New Westminster, where he 
has made his home continuously since. On his arrival here he worked as a 
journeyman for C. F. Pretty and one year later purchased the business from 
his employer, having conducted the same independently to the present time. In 
the fire of 1898 his establishment was wiped out and, being without insurance, 
was a total loss. Within the following week, however, he had erected a shack 
on the old site and was again ready for business. This same spirit of enterprise 
and indomitable energy has characterized all of his efforts, and as the years have 
gone by he has built up an enviable and gratifying patronage. 

In 1896 Mr. Hudson was united in marriage to Miss Helen Pentlane Wood, 
of New Westminster, who came to this city from Guelph, Ontario, with her 
mother, Keith (Sutherland) Wood. Her father, Charles Wood, passed away 
in Ontario. Unto our subject and his wife have been born seven children, five 
of whom are living, namely : Charles Reginald, Iva Kathleen, Bessie Myrtle, 
Ernest Melbourne and William Osborne. Mr. Hudson belongs to the West- 
minster Board of Trade and has fraternal relations with the following orders : 
Amity Lodge, No. 27, I. O. O. F. ; Granite Lodge, No. 16, K. P.; and Court 
Westminster, No. 330, Canadian Order of Foresters. For five years he served 
as manager of the Presbyterian church, of which his wife is also a devoted mem- 
ber. The salient qualities of his life have ever commended him to the confidence, 
good-will and esteem of those with whom he has come in contact and he has 
always enjoyed the high regard of a host of warm friends. 



FRANK LLEWELLYN BUCKLEY. 

A man to whose executive ability, organizing power and progressive spirit, 
Vancouver owes the development and growth of some of her most representa- 
tive business institutions, is Frank Llewellyn Buckley, managing director of the 
British Canadian Lumber Corporation and connected through investment or able 
official services with other equally important corporate interests. A spirit of enter- 
prise actuates him in all that he does, leading him while he is still a young man 
into important business relations and proving a valuable factor in the growth and 
development of the institutions with which he is connected. He was born in 
Cass county, Iowa, on the 26th of July, 1874, and is a son of John R. and Ann 
Elizabeth (Gates) Buckley, the former a native of New York state and the 
latter of the city of New York. Their marriage occurred in Iowa and the father 
engaged in farming in Cass county for many years thereafter, following this 
occupation until his death. His wife survives him and makes her home with 
the subject of this review. 

Frank Llewellyn Buckley acquired his education in the public schools of 
his native section and after laying aside his books turned his attention to teach- 
ing, in which profession he was engaged for three years thereafter. At the 
end of that time he went to Somers in the Flathead valley, Montana, and worked 
in the sawmill controlled by the John O'Brien Lumber Company for four years, 
after which he came to British Columbia, locating in the Okanagan valley. 
Here he acted as manager for the mill at Enderby, the property of the Rogers 
Lumber Company and after remaining three years, came in September, 1908. 



138 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

to Vancouver where he became connected with the Vancouver Lumber Com- 
pany as sales manager. By this time he had mastered the lumber business in 
principle and detail, his many years of experience combining with his natural 
business and executive ability to make him a valuable man in any connection. 
He retained his first business connection in this city until 1910, in March of 
which year he became managing director of the British Canadian Lumber Cor- 
poration, in which position he still continues. He is the only resident official 
of the concern and its remarkable growth in the past three years is due to him 
in large measure, for he has maintained a constant and careful supervision 
over the entire management of the concern. This is one of the largest timber 
holding and lumber manufacturing enterprises in Canada and Mr. Buckley's 
administrative ability aided greatly in its later reorganization and in its estab- 
lishment upon the solid, conservative and reliable financial basis upon which 
it stands today. His responsible duties have made great demands upon his 
tact, efficiency and executive power demands which have been met fully and 
completely, Mr. Buckley's success placing him in the front ranks of business 
men of the city. In addition to his connection with the British Canadian Lum- 
ber Corporation he is connected as a director with the Great Northern Railway 
Company, the Coquitlam Shipbuilding & Marine Railway Company and the 
Hudson Bay Mortgage Corporation ; and he is president and general manager 
of the Iowa Lumber & Timber Company, president of the Vancouver Arena 
Company, vice president and director in the North American Securities, Ltd., 
and a director in the Hazelton Bridge Company, connections which indicate 
something of the scope of his interests and the extent of his ability. 

On the i4th of January, 1900, in Cass county, Iowa, Mr. Buckley was united 
in marriage to Miss Rosa Lindeman and they have become the parents of three 
children, Geneva Anna, Helen Martha and Frank Norman. Mr. Buckley is 
a member of the United Evangelical church and has extensive and important 
fraternal affiliations, belonging to Melrose lodge, A. F. & A. M. ; the Knights 
Templar, and the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He is connected also with the 
Modern Woodmen of America and the Order of Hoo Hoos. He holds mem- 
bership in the Terminal City Club, the Press Club and the Progress Club and 
is well known in social and club circles of Vancouver, where his geniality, 
courtesy and good fellowship have made him widely popular. His political 
allegiance is given to the conservative party and although he never seeks nor 
desires public office, anything relating to municipal development, advancement 
or growth receives his hearty cooperation and active support. He is still a 
young man but his ability has already carried him forward into important rela- 
tions with the general business life of Vancouver and his individual contributions 
towards the city's industrial and commercial progress have been many and 
substantial. 



REV. JOHN MAcKAY, D. D., B. A. 

As principal of Westminster Hall, Vancouver, one of the leading theological 
colleges of British Columbia, Rev. John MacKay occupies a distinguished position 
among the educators of the province. He was born at Kintore, Ontario, June i, 
1870, and is a son of Hector and Christina MacKay, pioneers of Oxford county, 
that province. John MacKay in the acquirement of his education attended both 
the county and high schools at Owen Sound, subsequently entering Toronto Uni- 
versity, from which he was graduated in 1899 with the degree of B. A. After 
leaving high school, however, and prior to attending university, he taught school 
for two years at Holyrood, Ontario, and then went to Detroit, Michigan, where he 
entered the employ of Stanley, Smith & Company, wholesale coal dealers, remain- 
ing with that firm as a traveling salesman until 1895, in which year he matricu- 
lated in the University of Toronto. Upon his graduation in 1899 he was awarded 




REV. .TOHX MAcKAY 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 141 

'-the governor general's gold medal and as the first vice president of the literary 
society was the only man in the entire history of the university to win the highest 
scholastic honors and at the same time to receive the highest elective ones. Rev. 
MacKay subsequently went to Scotland, where he graduated from the Glasgow 
United Free Church College, in Glasgow, in 1902. In 1901 he was one of a party 
of scholars under Professor George Adam Smith to visit Egypt and Palestine and 
spend some time in studying there. In 1908 the honor of D. I), (honoris causa) 
was bestowed upon him by the Presbyterian College of Montreal. From 1902 
until 1908 Mr. MacKay was pastor of Crescent Presbyterian church of Montreal, 
coming in the latter year to Vancouver, British Columbia, to enter upon his present 
position in connection with Westminster Hall. He has done much toward making 
this college one of the foremost in the Dominion and exerts his best powers and 
ability to prepare the young men under his charge for the ministerial profession. 
At Montreal Rev. MacKay was for four years chaplain of the Montreal Curling 
Club, a life governor of the General Hospital and of the MacKay Institution for 
the Blind and since coming to Vancouver has served as chaplain of the Seventy- 
second Highlanders. He is well known in fraternal circles, being a member of Mt. 
Hermon Lodge, A. F. & A. M., of Vancouver, and also holds membership with the 
Delta Upsilon Fraternity, Toronto chapter. Dr. MacKay is the organizer and 
president of Western Residential Schools, Ltd., capital five hundred thousand 
dollars, which conducts Braemar School for Girls and Langara School for Boys, 
both situated on Shaughncssy Heights. He is a member of the International 
Peace Centenary Association and of the Industrial Peace Association of Canada, 
and is president of the Canadian Club of Vancouver. He is also a member of 
the University Club of Vancouver and the Shaughnessy Heights Golf Club. 

On April 3, 1907, Rev. MacKay was married at Toronto, Ontario, to Miss 
Leila Julie Sampson, a daughter of W. A. and Julie Sampson. For many years 
W. A. Sampson was manager of the Bank of Commerce at Woodstock, Ontario. 
Mrs. MacKay passed away in the spring of 1913, leaving one son. Armour 
MacKay, five years of age. A zealous Presbyterian, Rev. John MacKay finds in 
"his position all the opportunity for exercising his strong faith and spreading the 
principles in which he believes, and in this connecton has become one of the most 
able and successful representatives of his church, and yet, while loyal to his 
faith he is catholic in his sympathies and enjoys the respect and confidence of all 
denominations and is active in every form of religious cooperation in the city 
and nation. 

Dr. MacKay has published a volume of sermons, "Religion as Friendship with 
God," and a small volume on Palestine, "Summer Days in the Holy Land," both 
of which have been well received. 



JAMES DILLON BYRNE. 

Among the representative citizens of Vancouver is numbered James Dillon 
Byrne, who in 1889 established himself in the real-estate business in the city. 
He was born in County Wicklow, Ireland, on the i8th of August, 1858, and 
is a son of the late Garrett Michael and Sarah (Dillon) Byrne, both of the 
same section of the Emerald isle. His father was prominent in public affairs, 
serving as a member of the Imperial parliament for County Wexford from 
1880 to 1883 and for the West Wicklow division of County Wicklow from 
1885 to 1889. 

James D. Byrne was educated at Ratcliffe College, Leicestershire, Eng- 
land, and spent his youth and early manhood in Europe, crossing the Atlantic 
in 1889. He settled in August of that year in Vancouver, British Columbia, 
and became associated with C. D. Rand in the real-estate business, their asso- 
ciation continuing from 1889 to 1894. Mr. Byrne was also for many years 
connected with the real-estate department of the firm of Mahon, McFarland 



142 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

& Proctor, Limited, and he became well known in real-estate circles. He has 
handled successfully many of the most important real-estate transactions ever 
completed in this section. 

Mr. Byrne married Miss Florence K. Walker, a daughter of the late 
William and Kate (Boyde) Walker, the former a prominent woolen manu- 
facturer in Yorkshire, England. Mr. Byrne gives his political allegiance to- 
the conservative party and in early days was active in public affairs, serving 
as the first official administrator and as the first assessor for the county of 
Vancouver. He is connected fraternally with the Catholic Mutual Benevolent 
Association and is prominent in the affairs of the Knights of Columbus, being; 
master of the fourth degree for British Columbia and Yukon Territory, hav- 
ing served as first territorial deputy and first state deputy of the Knights of 
Columbus for the province of British Columbia. He is well known in Cath- 
olic circles and is an active religious worker. Throughout a period of resi- 
dence in Vancouver dating from 1889 he has made his influence felt in the 
official and business life of the city, holding the unqualified confidence and good- 
will of all who are in any way associated with him. Mr. Byrne resides at 
Florence Court, Georgia street, Vancouver. 



JAMES PLUMRIDGE. 

The business interests of Mission City find a worthy representative in the 
person of James Plumridge, who is here conducting a successful bakery and 
general mercantile business in connection with which he is also discharging the 
duties of postmaster. He is a native of England, his birth having occurred on the 
i/th of July, 1861, and a son of James and Susan (Dafter) Plumridge. The 
father is deceased but the mother is still living and continues to make her home 
in England. 

James Plumridge was reared in the home of his parents and pursued his edu- 
cation until he had attained the age of thirteen years. His text-books were then 
laid aside and he became a wage earner, his first employment being in a chair 
factory. He was connected with this industry for a year and then went to work 
in a bakery, following this occupation until he was twenty-two years of age. The 
colonies had strongly attracted him from early youth, and feeling assured he would 
here find better opportunities for advancement, he subsequently took passage for 
Canada, locating at Port Arthur, Ontario. He there found employment in the 
bakery of a Mr. Lavery, who is now one of the foremost representatives of this 
line of business in New Westminster. Following the western trend of migration- 
after the completion of the Canadian Pacific Railroad, he later came to British 
Columbia, being one of the early pioneers of Mission City. When he first came 
here Mr. Plumridge erected a little shack on the site of his present location on 
the river front and there established a bakery. As his business developed he 
extended the scope of his activities by adding a stock of general merchandise,, 
enlarging his establishment from time to time to meet the demands of his con- 
stantly increasing trade until he now has the largest enterprise of the kind ira 
the town. His line is carefully chosen to meet the varied needs and circum- 
stances of his patrons, while the quality of his wares is such as to commend 
them to the people, whose confidence he has won through his honorable and 
upright methods of conducting his business. 

At Port Arthur, Ontario, on the I4th of December, 1886, Mr. Plumridge was 
married to Miss Florence Mackenrob, a daughter of A. Mackenrob of Van- 
couver, and to them have been born eight children, as follows : William George ; 
Walter E. ; Fred J. ; Hori, who is deceased ; Clarence A. ; Arthur E. ; Allen V. ; 
and Norman A. 

The family attend the Presbyterian church, and fraternally Mr. Plumridge 
is affiliated with the Masonic order and the Independent Order of Foresters, to 




JAMES PLUIMRIDGE 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 145 

\vhich latter organization he has belonged for eighteen years. He is actively 
interested in all public affairs, belonging to that enterprising class of citizens who 
while engaged in attaining personal success, contribute toward the general welfare 
of the community by cooperating in those movements which are designed to 
promote the general well-being of the residents at large. He has served as a mem- 
ber of the board of school trustees, while for ten years he has been the incum- 
bent of the office of postmaster, and in both capacities has discharged his duties 
capably. 



CHARLES WOODWARD. 

Charles Woodward, as the founder of one of the largest department stores 
of Vancouver which since 1903 has been located at the corner of Abbott and 
Hastings streets, has in a large measure contributed to the metropolitan growth 
of the city and is accounted today one of its foremost merchants. The store 
which he has built up from a small beginning is one of the finest in the whole 
northwest and in it can be found all the requirements to clothe a family and 
to furnish a house from cellar to garret. In the fast developing west Mr. 
Woodward found the field of activity suited to his own ideas of expansion 
and he has grasped the opportunities as they have presented themselves and 
by perseverance, diligence and industry, guided by laudable ambition, he has 
built up an enterprise of which Vancouver is proud and which stands as a monu- 
ment to his achievement. 

Mr. Woodward was born in the county of Wentworth, Ontario, on the igth 
of July, 1852, and is a descendant of old English and Welsh families. His 
father was John W. Woodward, a native of England, who was born on the old 
farm which had been the home of the Woodward family for three centuries 
and is still in the possession of a representative of the name. He married 
Miss May Culham, of Welsh extraction, who lived to the old age of eighty-two 
years. John W. Woodward died aged eighty-four years. They were members 
of the Church of England and people who were highly esteemed for their 
qualities of mind and character. In their family were five children, of whom 
Charles Woodward is the only son who came to British Columbia. Fie received 
his education in his native county and is a graduate of Mono College in Ontario, 
and remained under the parental roof until twenty-two years of age on the 
farm upon which his father had settled after coming to this country. Under 
the able guidance of his father he acquainted himself with all of the details of 
modern farming, learned what methods to pursue and what pitfalls to avoid 
in planting his crops and gathering his harvests, which knowledge stood him 
in good stead in later life. When a young man of about twenty-two years, 
he came with his family, consisting of his wife and two children, to the wilds 
of Algoma and there took up land which he cleared and prepared for cultivation. 
He held to the standard that "where there is a will there is a way," and with 
never faltering patience and characteristic energy had in the next year over 
thirty acres under cultivation which yielded him a large crop. On the little 
back-woods farm he had also built a store and this enterprise represents the 
humble beginning of one who is now considered one of the foremost merchants 
of Vancouver. In his first location he continued in his agricultural pursuits 
and attended to his business for five years, when, selling out, he made a removal 
to Manitoba in 1882 and there engaged as a cattle dealer, a business to which 
he was particularly adapted by his experience along agricultural lines. Returns, 
however, did not come fast enough and he once more went to Algoma where 
he again began business, this time engaging in the lumber business as well as 
in merchandising. It did not take him long to recoup and enjoy a large and 
profitable trade. His growing success, however, was nipped in the bud by a 
disastrous fire, causing him heavy loss. He discontinued the business in the 



146 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

interest of which he had assumed a heavy indebtedness, and although he found' 
difficulty in at once meeting all of his obligations he succeeded in paying off 
his creditors dollar for dollar, so that no one ever could complain of losing 
one cent. Favorable reports concerning British Columbia having reached his 
ears and, perceiving with wise foresight the business opportunities that that 
virgin section offered to a young man of energy and ambition, he came to- 
Vancouver at a time when the city was still in its formative state, in 1891. 
Although at that time there was a prosperous little provincial town people 
hardly dreamed of the wonderful development that would raise the city to- 
metropolitan rank a few years later. Mr. Woodward, however, must have had 
a premonition of what the future had in store for the settlement and built 
a three-story block at the corner of Harris and Westminster streets. Com- 
pleting the building, he was selling in his store in less than three months, gro- 
ceries, boots and shoes, renting out such space in the block as he did not use 
for his own purposes. His trade increased and it was only a short time be- 
fore he needed the whole building. In November, 1903, he deemed it ad- 
visable to remove to more commodious quarters and came to the corner of 
Abbott and Hastings streets where the large emporium which he now owns is. 
located. The business includes about twenty departments and each one is- 
so complete in itself that it may be said to represent an independent store. 
The immense undertaking is ably directed by Mr. Woodward who has made 
it one of the finest department stores of the Canadian northwest. At the 
time when he first began merchandising in Vancouver his store was located 
on the edge of the bush yet such was his faith in the town and its opportunities 
and what the future held in store, that he never faltered in carrying out his 
progressive policies, being one of the leading spirits in making of the town 
what it has become today, and he can now look back upon his dreams as 
having come true, for his highest expectations have been realized. 

In 1873 Mr. Woodward was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Ander- 
son, a native of Arthur township, Ontario, and a daughter of Donald Ander- 
son, who was born in Ayrshire, Scotland. There were nine children in the 
family of Mr. and Mrs. Woodward of whom the following are living: Mary 
C. ; Annie E. : Donald Anderson ; William C., who of late has ably assisted 
his father in his manifold duties in connection with his large business; Cora L. ; 
and Archie P. Mr. Woodward is fraternally connected with the Independent 
Order of Foresters and with the Masonic body as a member of Acacia Lodge^ 
A. F. & A. M. Although most of his attention has been demanded by his 
extensive affairs in connection with the conduct of his business, he has inter- 
ested himself in the welfare and advancement of all public questions, affect- 
ing the city. The history of this section of the province has always been attrac- 
tive to him and has found in him a man who has taken interest in research and 
has given freely of his time and means to preserve valuable records to posterity. 
The life of Mr. Woodward and his business success have been so closely inter- 
woven with the advancement of this city that all three seem to be one, espe- 
cially as his spirit of achievement has not only been evident in his individual; 
interests but in those of the city which he proudly claims as his home. 



WALTER R. DOCKRILL. 

By virtue of his position as president and general manager of the Empire- 
Stevedoring & Contracting Company of Vancouver Walter R. Dockrill holds a 
prominent place in business circles of the city and his prestige has come as a direct 
result of his business ability, his executive power and the initiative spirit which 
has guided and controlled all the activities of his career. He was born at Florence,, 
Ontario, on the 3ist of May, 1878, and is a son of Joseph and Maria Dockrill,. 




WALTER R. DOOKR1LL 






BRITISH COLUMBIA 



the former for many years engaged in agricultural pursuits but now living retired 
at Port Moody, British Columbia. 

The public schools of New Westminster afforded Walter R. Dockrill his early 
educational opportunities and he was afterward a student in the high school of 
that city. After his graduation he served an apprenticeship in the drug business 
under D. S. Curtis, of New Westminster, and upon obtaining his diploma he 
engaged in business for himself at Atlin and afterward at Dawson, Yukon, rc- 
naining in the north four years and building up a large and profitable enterprise. 
Eventually, however, he sold the drug stores and entered the employ of the North- 
western Smelting & Refining Company at Crofton, Vancouver island, as an expert 
malyst, doing efficient and capable work in their interests for four years. He 
esigned in order to again engage in business for himself, recognizing an advan- 
ageous field of which he was quick to make practical and profitable use. He 
engaged in stevedoring, loading lumber at Chemainus, and so rapidly and steadily 
lid his enterprise expand that in 1910 he incorporated it under the name of the 
Empire Stevedoring & Contracting Company, with offices in all the principal ports 
c if British Columbia, of which he is president and general manager. Thus it may 
1 -e seen that one of the large and important business concerns of the city owes its 
loundation, its development and its continued progress to his initiative spirit, his 
practical business judgment, his energy and enterprise, for he has given almost 
ill of his time and attention to the business since its organization and is now in 
tontrol of extensive interests along this line. He is respected in business circles 
c f the city as a man of experience, ability and personality a man to be reckoned 
vith in the development of any business transaction with which he is connected. 

In 1902, Mr. Dockrill was united in marriage to Miss Mabel Palmer, a daughter 
of E. J. and Mary E. Palmer of Chemainus, British Columbia, the former vice 
president and general manager of the Victoria Lumber & Manufacturing Com- 
pany of that city, and also a director in the Canadian Collieries, Ltd., and the Wal- 
ls ce Fisheries, Ltd. Mr. and Mrs. Dockrill have three children, Caroline, Eliza- 
beth and Francis, all of whom are attending school. The family reside on the 
Crescent, Shaughnessy Heights. They are members of the Church of England 
a-id politically Mr. Dockrill gives his allegiance to the conservative party. He is 
a charter member of the Arctic Brotherhood and president of the Marine Associa- 
tijn of British Columbia. He belongs to the Terminal City Club and the Van- 
couver Board of Trade and is always ready to cooperate in any movement to ad- 
vance the city's material prosperity. Although he is devoted to his business af- 
fj irs and able in their conduct, he nevertheless is an ardent advocate of all kinds. 
01 outdoor sports and is an enthusiastic fisherman and hunter. He is fond also 
oi lacrosse and motoring and spends a great number of his leisure hours in these 
recreations. Although still a young man he has already proven himself forceful 
ai d powerful in the world of business and he possesses in his well developed! 
faculties of mind a guarantee of continued progress and ultimate distinction. 



G. EMERSON GILLEY. 

The firm of Gilley Brothers, dealers in building materials and coal, is one 
of the foremost of its kind in New Westminster, G. Emerson Gilley, one of 
thj partners, having been especially active in promoting and expanding its 
imerest, thereby not only encompassing his own prosperity but becoming a 
factor in the general commercial expansion. A native of New Brunswick, 
he was born in Oak Bay, Charlotte county, on October i, 1873, and is a son 

i of Walter and Sarah (Rogers) Gilley, of whom extended mention is made on 

! amther page of this work. 

G. Emerson Gilley was but twelve years of age when he came to New 
Westminster with his father. In this city he attended the public schools and 

! here he reached manhood, being variously engaged for several years until he 



150 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

took up boating, becoming connected with the river and coast trade. For 
seven years he was captain of the tugboat Flyer but in 1908 became a mem- 
ber of the firm of Gilley Brothers, which was formerly composed of Walter 
R. and James R. Gilley. Mr. Gilley has since been identified with this con- 
cern, exerting himself in extending the trade interests of his house. 

Jn 1898 G. Emerson Gilley married Miss Fannie B. Preston, a daughter 
of William Preston, a well known retired lumberman of New Westminster. 
In their family are three children, Frank H., Harold L. and Hazel L. Fra- 
ternally Mr. Gilley is a member of Royal City Lodge, No. 3, I O. O. F. Mrs. 
Gilley is well known in church work in New Westminster as a member of 
the Reformed Episcopal church. Both he and his wife are highly esteemed 
and regarded by their many friends, being popular in the younger social set. 
A man of strong character, he has become recognized as a forceful element in 
the community, being a helpful and cooperant factor in the general advance- 
ment. 



XARCISSE I5ELLEAU GAUYREAU. 

Xarcisse Belleau Gauvreau, born March ~, 1855, ' n t ne parish of Isle Verte, 
county of Temiscouata, province of Quebec, is the third son of Louis Narcisse 
Gauvreau, seigneur of Yilleray, and of his wife Gracieuse (nee) Gauvreau. 

After attending the parish school for some years Mr. Gauvreau was sent to 
Rimouski College where he spent four years, following this up with several terms 
at Thorns School in Quebec. He was articled in 1872 under Charles A. Baillarge, 
city engineer of Quebec, under whom he served four years as provincial land 
surveyor and engineer at the same time following a private technical course at 
Laval University. In 1874 he was employed by the Canadian Pacific Railway 
surveying party under the Dominion government on the north shore of Lake 
Superior and in 1876 he had charge of part of the surveying and construction of 
the Quebec, Montreal & Ottawa Occidental Railway, then being built in Quebec, 
with which railway he remained until 1878. In 1879 Mr. Gauvreau joined the 
Canadian Pacific Railway survey under the Dominion government to explore 
that part of Lake Superior north of Lake Nipigon, and in the spring of 1880 
he was ordered to British Columbia on construction work from Yale to Savonas 
Ferry. On the completion of this work in 1885 Mr. Gauvreau took up his 
residence in New Westminster, following his profession as British Columbia 
land surveyor and engineer but the lure of the wild lands has always made a 
strong appeal to him and in 1892 he was sent by the provincial government to 
explore and report on the country between Quesnel on the Fraser river and 
Hazelton on the Skeena river. In his report Mr. Gauvreau recommended that 
good farming land was to be found in comparatively large areas in the Nechaco 
and Watsonqua or Bulkley valleys. In the following year under orders from the 
same government he made exploration and reports on the country, hitherto 
unreported or mapped, between Telegraph creek, the Stikine river and the 
northern boundary of the province. During two years, following 1894, Mr. 
Gauvreau was employed by a San Francisco syndicate to explore and report on 
coffee lands and mahogany forests in Mexico and central America. He, with 
a companion, started on mules from Oaxaca city, eighty miles south of Mexico 
city and traveled during about fifteen months through the southern part of 
Mexico, Guatamala, Honduras, San Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica and Panama, 
returning to San Francisco in 1896. On his return to New Westminster in the 
following year he was employed on the Crows Nest Pass Railway, then under 
construction by the Canadian Pacific Railway, and on its completion, he went to 
Winnipeg, Manitoba, joining the Canadian Northern Railway engineering staff 
and remaining with that company for six years. In 1906 he returned to settle 
and follow his profession in New Westminster, entering the employ of the 
Dominion government public works as assistant district engineer in 1908. 




NARCISSE B. OAUVREAU 






BRITISH COLUMBIA 153 

Mr. Gauvreau had over five hundred photographic views taken during his 
1 ravels and ranging all the way from the Yukon to Panama, a quite invaluable 
lollection, which was unfortunately destroyed in the New Westminster fire of 
September, 1898. 



CHESTER BENJAMIN MACNEILL, K. C. 

A comprehensive knpwledge of underlying legal principles, a keen mind, a 
forceful personality and a well controlled ambition have brought Chester Ben- 
jamin Macneill prominence and success at the bar of British Columbia, where 
for twenty-one years he has been in active practice. He was born in Cavendish, 
Prince Edward Island, February 23, 1861, and is a son of Alexander AT. and 
I.ucy (Woolner) Macneill, the former a son of William Macneill, a native of 
!: Gotland and a pioneer of Prince Edward Island. William Macneill rose to a 
position of prominence in public life in that province and acted as speaker of 
t ic first legislature. His son, Alexander M. Macneill, was born, reared and 
elucated on the island and there engaged in farming until his death, which 
o:curred when he was seventy-six years of age. His wife lived to the age of 
e ghty-seven. She was a representative of the Woolner family, members of 
v hicli came from the vicinity of London, England, to Prince Edward Island. 

Chester B. Macneill acquired his early education in the grammar schools 
of Cavendish and was afterward a student at the Prince of Wales College at 
C harlottetown, Prince Edward Island. He was then articled for the study of 
1; w to Sir Louis Davis, who is now a member of the supreme court of Canada, 
a id was admitted as a solicitor on the gth of January, 1883. On January 8th, 
o" the following year, he was called to the bar of Prince Edward Island and 
b'-gan practice at Charlottetown in association with Hon. William W. Sullivan, 
now chief justice of Prince Edward Island and then attorney general. The 
fi TII of Sullivan & Macneill was formed and had a prosperous existence until 
i( l; 9O, when Mr. Sullivan was called to the bench, after which Mr. Macneill 
pi acticed alone for some time. Eventually, however, he formed a partnership 
with A. A. Macdonald under the firm name of Macneill & Macdonald. Their 
afsociation continued until 1892, when Mr. Macneill came to Vancouver, where 
h( was admitted as a solicitor and called to the bar of the province on November 
ii.th of that year. He began practice in association with Edward Pease Davis, 
K C., and David Gordon Marshall, under the firm name of Davis, Marshall & 
Macneill, continuing thus until John Silas Wynn Pugh was admitted to the 
fiim, the name then becoming Davis, Marshall, Macneill & Pugh. This is one 
of the foremost legal firms in western Canada and it is connected through a 
la 'ge and important patronage with a great deal of notable litigation. Mr. 
Macneill was appointed a king's counsel in 1904. He has been for twenty-eight 
yesrs, seven on Prince Edward Island and twenty-one in Vancouver, solicitor 
for the Credit Foncier Franco-Canadien, the largest mortgage loan company 
in Canada, with main offices in Montreal and branches throughout the Dominion, 
and he has other important professional connections which indicate clearly the 
pLce in legal circles which his ability has commanded for him. 

On the I7th of December, 1884, Mr. Macneill was united in marriage to 
Miss Hattie Hayden, a daughter of Alexander Hayden, of Charlottetown, Prince 
Edward Island. Mr. and Mrs. Macneill have two children: Vivian H., the wife 
of James J. Hunter, of Vancouver; and Cyril A., who is engaged in the real- 
esiate business in this city. The family is well known socially and Mr. Macneill 
belongs to the Vancouver Club and the Royal Vancouver Yacht Club, having 
been for two years commodore of the latter organization. He is a member 
of the Union Club of Victoria and fraternally is connected with the Masons 
an 1 Odd Fellows, being past master of Cascade Lodge No. 12, A. F. & A. M., 
an 1 past noble grand of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. His political 



154 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

allegiance is given to the conservative party and his religious views are those 
held by the Anglican church. He is one of the foremost barristers in Van- 
couver and since entering upon professional life has made continued and rapid 
advancement, enjoying today a degree of success which has come only in recog- 
nition of superior merit and ability. 



TRUMAN SMITH BAXTER, 

In commercial and political circles of Vancouver the name of Truman Smith 
Baxter is well known. He is now mayor of the city, in which connection he is 
giving to Vancouver a public-spirited and progressive administration looking to 
the present welfare and future development of the city. He was born on a farm 
near Carlingford, in Fullerton township, . Perth county, Ontario, November 24, 
1867, a son of Richard and Elizabeth (Smith) Baxter, the former a native of 
Ontario and the latter of Cornwall, England. The paternal grandfather came 
from New York to Ontario at the time of the Revolutionary war, being numbered 
among the United Empire Loyalists, and settled near Carlingford. The son, 
Richard Baxter, was reared in Perth county and after arriving at years of ma- 
turity took up the occupation of farming, to which he had been reared. He fol- 
lowed that pursuit for many years but eventually sold his property near Carling- 
ford and removed to Alerritton, Ontario, settling near Niagara, where he carried 
on general agricultural pursuits until 1907. In that year he retired and removed 
to Toronto, where he now resides. His wife died when her son Truman was 
but fourteen years of age. 

In the public schools of his native county Truman Smith Baxter began his 
education and afterward attended the high school at Stratford, Ontario. He 
afterward took up the profession of teaching, which he followed for three years 
in his native province, and in the spring of 1890 he came to Vancouver, where 
he has since made his home. His first position in Vancouver was in the old 
Leamy & Kyle mill on False creek, then often spoken of as the Red Mill. After 
a time he went to the Royal City mill and still later was employed in the Heaps 
mill on False creek, which was destroyed by fire soon afterward. During the 
first year of his residence here Mr. Baxter was employed on the grading of streets 
and was also a longshoreman. He then began studying for a first-class teachers' 
certificate in connection with J. A. Eraser, the present member of parliament 
for Cariboo. Upon obtaining his certificate he secured a school and for seven 
years was successfully engaged in teaching in the public schools of Vancouver. 
When he retired from the educational field he was the 'first assistant of the 
Mount Pleasant school. He next took up the study of law and after five years 
was called to the bar. He practiced for nearly three years in partnership with 
L. B. McLellan and William Savage. Turning his attention to commercial pur- 
suits he, in partnership with Peter Wright, purchased the furniture store of G. 
W. Hutchins at Main and Hastings streets, whei* the business is still conducted 
under the name of Baxter & Wright. They carry one of the finest and most 
complete lines of furniture, carpets, etc., in the city, and their trade is large and 
growing. Their business has ever been conducted upon the policy that satisfied 
patrons are the best advertisement, and they have ever held to high standards 
in the personnel of the house, in the line of goods carried and in the character 
of the service rendered to the public. Mr. Baxter has thus gained an enviable 
place in business circles of Vancouver and has d'one not a little to further com- 
mercial activity here. 

In politics Mr. Baxter has always been a liberal and his party, recognizing 
his capability and his fitness for office, has called him to several local positions. 
In 1900 he served in the city council as alderman for ward five and served the 
same ward again in 1905, 1906 and 1912. In January, 1913, he was elected 
mayor of Vancouver regardless of political .allegiance. He holds to the high 




TRUMAN S. BAXTER 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 157 

standard that in municipal offices politics should not figure, and as long as he 
fills the position of mayor political connections will have no bearing upon the 
office or the exercise of his official prerogatives. He seeks ever the public good 
and his methods are practical and beneficial. He works toward high ideals and 
in large measure has achieved the purposes for which he strives. He worked 
most untiringly in his efforts to carry the Canadian Northern agreement re 
False creek and was successful in having it indorsed by a very large majority of 
his fellow citizens. -Many of his acts will stand to his credit and for the good of 
the city. 

At Lulu Island, in 1893, ^ r - Baxter was united in marriage to Miss Sarah 
Whiteside, a daughter of John Whiteside and a sister of Thomas Whiteside, 
who for two years represented ward five in the city council. They have four 
children: Ernest, Fred, Harold and Marguerite. Mr. Baxter is an enthusiastic 
motorist and in his car finds much of his recreation. He belongs to the Loyal 
Orange lodge and to various civic and social clubs. He is a member of the 
Board of Trade and is connected with the Progress, Terminal City, Commercial 
and Automobile Clubs, in all of which he is popular with the membership. His 
energy and his industry, his capability and his public spirit have brought him 
to a prominent position in commercial and political circles, and Vancouver honors 
him as one of her representative men. 



THOMAS LK MESSURIER. 

Thomas Le Messurier engaged in the real-estate business and a large realty 
owner in Vancouver, was born at Hamilton, Ontario, November 23. 1864, a 
son of Daniel and Maria Elizabeth (Langlois) Le Messurier, the' former a 
native of Indian Cove, Gaspe, Quebec, and the latter of Guernsey, in the Eng- 
lish channel. They met and were married in Hamilton, Ontario, and cele- 
brated their golden wedding anniversary in December. 1911. In May of 1912 
the wife passed away but the husband now resides in Hamilton, in his eighty- 
first year. He retired from business in the spring of 1912, at which time he 
was the oldest established painter and paper hanger in Hamilton, having been 
in that business there for half a century. 

Thomas Le Messurier was educated in the public schools of Hamilton and 
in early life learned the upholsterer's trade which he followed in his native 
city for eighteen years. Attracted by the opportunities of the west, he arrived 
in Vancouver on the I5th of March, 1900, and spent nearly five years in the 
employ of the British Columbia Permanent Loan Company, most of which 
time was spent in Victoria. In 1906 he engaged in the real-estate business on 
his own account and has since continued in this field at Vancouver. He handles 
subdivisions in South Vancouver and Point Grey, and also business and resi- 
dential property and has thoroughly acquainted himself with the real-estate mar- 
ket and has so guided and directed his interests as to win substantial suc- 
cess. He is also a large holder of valuable property. His advancement is builded 
upon his wide knowledge of real-estate conditions and values and his enter- 
prising, energetic methods. 

In connection with the development of the outlying districts Mr. Le Mes- 
surier was for a time secretary of the Hastings Townsite Property Owners' 
Association, engaged in the development of Hastings. The company was 
concerned with the problem of taxation without representation or without city 
improvements or facilities. Because of this lack of advantages under which 
they suffered the property owners combined to meet the situation and bring 
about better results. He was also secretary of the Capilano Land Improve- 
ment Association, now known as the West Vancouver Rate Payers' Associa- 
tion, and he has been both directly and indirectly connected with various move- 
ments which have been of substantial benefit in the improvement of different 



158 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

districts. He is a notary public for the province and is a member of the Board 
of Trade. 

On the nth of August, 1890, in Toronto, Ontario, Mr. Le Messurier was 
married to Miss Phoebe L. Baker, of Bakerspoint, Oakville, Ontario. They 
now have five children, Grace, Ernest, May, Thomas and Clara. The mother 
has for the past twelve years been deeply interested in the study of mental 
science and phrenology and has received diplomas in phrenology from Dr. 
Alexander, of Chicago, and Professor M. F. Knox, of Seattle, and has devel- 
oped wonderful electro-magnetic healing powers. 

In politics Mr. Le Messurier is independent, voting as his judgment dic- 
tates. Fraternally he is connected \\ith the Independent Order of Foresters 
and from early boyhood he has been a member of the Royal Templars of 
Temperance, working untiringly and effectively for the cause of temperance. 
He lias the record of never having taken strong alcoholic liquors in his life 
and his adherence to high principles and moral standards has undoubtedly 
been one of the factors in his advancement in public regard and in business 
as well, lie has been very successful in the management of his business 
affairs, his advancement being due to his sound judgment, his keen sagacity 
and his indefatigable energy. He is a man worthy of the highest regard. 



MICHAEL B. WILKINSON. 

Since pioneer times Michael 1!. Wilkinson has been prominent and active 
in business circles of Vancouver and today as manager of the Royal Ice Com- 
pany, which he founded, he controls important and profitable interests, his suc- 
cess having come as a natural result of his ability and industry. He was born 
in Yorkshire, England, in 1864 and acquired his education in the grammar schools 
of Manchester, in his native country. In 1888 he came to Vancouver with his 
uncle, Samuel Brighouse, and here he has since remained a highly esteemed and 
respected resident. His first year was spent as a clerk in the office of Rand 
Brothers and at the end of that period he and another employe of that concern 
engaged in business for themselves, continuing for one year thereafter. Mr. 
Wilkinson then went to Mr. Brighouse's farm on Lulu island and this place 
still continues to be his home. Samuel Brighouse died in England, July 31, 1913. 
The years have brought him prominence and a substantial fortune, success steadily 
attending his well directed and unremitting labors. In 1895 he turned his atten- 
tion to the salmon-canning business, opening in partnership with William Mc- 
Pherson the Dunsmuir Island Cannery, which they continued to operate until 
1902, when they disposed of their business interests to the British Columbia 
Packers' Association. Mr. Wilkinson afterwards became connected with the 
Great Northern Cannery and he is still interested in this concern, in the progress 
of which his business enterprise and commanding ability have been helpful fac- 
tors. In 1905 Mr. Wilkinson built the plant of the Royal Ice Company in Van- 
couver and became manager of the concern, a position which he still fills. Being 
a discriminating, far-sighted and aggressive business man he has proven well 
suited to his difficult and responsible duties and has managed the affairs under 
his charge in a capable manner, making the institution one of the largest and 
best of its kind in the city and province. 

Near Manchester, England, in 1901, Mr. Wilkinson was united in marriage 
to Miss Jane A. G. Holt, of the town of Rhodes, and they have two children, 
John Holt and Jane Holt. Mr. Wilkinson is a member of the Terminal City 
Club and is a stanch conservative in his political beliefs, taking an active and 
intelligent interest in anything that pertains to municipal growth and advance- 
ment. For two years he represented the Richmond municipality as reeve 
and during that time accomplished a great deal of far-sighted and constructive 
work, giving the weight of his influence to measures of reform and advancement. 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 159 

A man of sterling character and high integrity, he has during the course of his 
twenty-five years of residence here influenced the direction of business growth 
and the character of political development and has gained for himself that true 
success which lies in the esteem, respect and confidence of many friends. 



ERNEST ALBERT EARLE. 

Ernest Albert Earle, sole proprietor of the engineering business and the 
manufacturers' agency, conducted under the name of E. A. Earle & Company, 
and recognized as one of the foremost business men of Vancouver, was born 
in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, January 19, 1870. He is a son of 
Samuel N. and Julia Earle, the latter a daughter of William Douse, a promi- 
nent shipbuilder and an active politician on the island. 

Ernest Albert Earle acquired his education under private tutors in his par- 
ents' home and after laying aside his books entered the Royal Bank of Canada 
with which he was connected closely and prominently for eighteen years there- 
after, serving as manager of the important branches at Victoria, British Colum- 
bia, and St. Johns, Xew Brunswick, lie became recognized as an authority 
on finance and discharged his duties capably and with discrimination, winning 
the trust and confidence of his superiors and the esteem and good-will of his 
associates. Resigning from the Royal Bank of Canada in 1906, he came to 
Vancouver and here established himself in business as an engineer and manu- 
facturers' agent. He founded the firm of E. A. Earle & Company, but is the 
sole proprietor of the concern, which under his able management has had a 
gratifyingly rapid growth. 

On the 2ist of October, 1904, in Vancouver, Mr. Earle was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Mary Ethel Salsbury, a daughter of William Ferriman Salsbury, 
a prominent official of the Canadian Pacific Railway and governor of the Van- 
couver General Hospital. Mr. and Mrs. Earle have three children, Ernest 
Salsbury, Audrey Marion and Lillian Noel. 

Mr. Earle is a member of the Anglican church and for several years 
belonged to the Royal Engineers of Prince Edward Island. In addition to the 
business relations above enumerated he is also connected with important inter- 
ests in the city as a director in several local companies and his sound judg- 
ment and keen discrimination have been important factors in directing their 
policies. His affairs are all carefully and systematically managed and con- 
ducted along modern and progressive lines and have brought him a degree of 
success which places him in a high position among Vancouver's representative 
business men. 



HUGH ARCHIBALD YOUDALL. 

One of Vancouver's most able, energetic and progressive young professional 
men and one of her most public-spirited and active citizens is Hugh Archi- 
bald Youdall, British Columbia land surveyor. This province has been his 
abode since his childhood, but his birth occurred in Harbor Grace, Newfound- 
land, in 1877, his parents being Hugh and Bertha M. (Archibald) Youdall. 
His father was a native of Dumfriesshire, Scotland, born in 1845, an d in his 
native, country he spent the early years of his life, going to Newfoundland 
in 1859. In Harbor Grace he remained afterward for twenty years, acting 
for eight years as manager of the branch house of John Munn & Company 
and for twelve years engaging in business fpr himself and becoming during 
that time highly esteemed and respected as a man of strict integrity and honor- 
able and upright life. He came to British Columbia in 1884 and entered the 



160 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

employ of the Dominion government, taking charge of the fishing expedition 
to the west coast of Queen Charlotte Island, to test fishing grounds for black cod. 
He died in Vancouver in 1911, having survived his wife since 1905. 

Hugh A. Youdall was still a child when his parents moved to British Colum- 
bia, where he secured his education. He is interested in all kinds of land, 
mineral and timber survey work and in the planning of subdivisions and his 
patronage is continually increasing as his knowledge and ability become more 
widely known. 

Mr. Youdall married, in Vancouver, in April, 1913, Miss Schwengers, of 
Victoria, and both are well known and popular in social circles. Mr. Youdall 
is a devout member of the Presbyterian church and his political allegiance is 
given to the conservative party. Although he is eminently public-spirited and 
progressive in matters of citizenship and takes a deep interest in the advance- 
ment of the city in which he has so long resided, he is not an active politician, 
preferring to concentrate his attention upon survey work, in which he has been 
signally successful, standing today among the most able representatives of his 
profession in the city. 



FREDERICK JAMES WILLIAMS. 

A spirit of enterprise, progress and initiative, guided always by unbounded 
faith in the future growth and greatness of New Westminster, has actuated 
Frederick James Williams in the important work he has done for the city and in 
all the activities of his career as a real-estate dealer activities which have re- 
sulted in placing him among the most capable and successful business men of 
the city. For the past five years he has been connected with the real-estate 
department of the Dominion Trust Company and his private land holdings are 
likewise extensive. He was born in Grafton, Carleton county, New Brunswick, 
in 1878, and is a son of Hayden and Teresa (Phillips) Ham, both of whom 
died when their son was still an infant. At the age of four he was adopted by 
Lambert and Sarah Williams, whose name he assumed, the former a prosperous 
farmer of Knoxford, Carleton county, New Brunswick. 

Frederick J. Williams acquired the education usual among farmers' children, 
attending the country schools and at an early age dividing his time between his 
books and work upon his adopted father's farm. After reaching maturity, how- 
ever, he felt the lure of the west and came to the Pacific coast, working as a 
common laborer in various parts of the country, drifting from northern Alaska 
to British Columbia and eventually settling in New Westminster, where he took 
up his home shortly before the great fire that wiped out a large section of the 
city. He remained only a short time, however, at this period, for he was obliged 
to return to New Brunswick on account of the illness of his adopted father, 
who shortly afterward passed away. Responsibility for the care and manage- 
ment of the homestead devolved upon Frederick J. Williams who assumed it 
manfully, developing the farm along modern and progressive lines. By the 
exercise of economy and industry he was able to add to his holdings from time 
to time until he finally became the largest landowner in the neighborhood and 
was the proprietor of the best equipped and most highly improved farm in the 
locality. He continued to make his home in Carleton county for eight years 
but at the end of that time sold his holdings and with the proceeds as a starting 
capital returned to New Westminster, where he had in the short period of his 
former residence recognized unusual business opportunities. He invested his 
money in prairie lands and in this way has become identified with the real-estate 
business, in which he has since continued. He is at present engaged in the 
real-estate department of the Dominion Trust Company and as a private dealer 
has engaged extensively in buying property upon which he builds improvements, 




FREDERICK J. WILLIAMS 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 163 

later selling at a substantial profit. At present he is interested with others 
in the development of a tract of land within the city limits upon which a great 
number of modern bungalows have been erected and other improvements made, 
the addition promising to be one of the most attractive in the Royal city. Mr. 
Williams has in addition a half interest in a one thousand acre ranch in the 
northern part of the province, owns one thousand acres of prairie lands and has 
other extensive holdings in all portions of British Columbia. He is a stock- 
holder in the Bank of Vancouver. In New Westminster he is known as a careful, 
able and far-sighted business man whose interests are always capably conducted, 
whose sagacity is far-reaching and whose activities are ever directed first for the 
benefit of the community in which he resides and afterward for the advance- 
ment of his individual prosperity. 

Mr. Williams married Miss Laura Margison, a daughter of Charles T. and 
Elizabeth Margison, the former a wealthy farmer of Knoxford, Carleton county, 
Ontario. Mr. and Mrs. Williams have one daughter, Gladys Winifred, aged 
three years. The family residence is at Xo. 533 Ash street. Mr. Williams 
is a director in the Young Men's Christian Association and takes great delight 
in the facilities which the organization offers for athletics and other indoor 
and outdoor sports. He is president of the Hockey Club of the Young Men's 
Christian Association and is an enthusiastic hunter and motorist, spending a great 
many of his leisure hours in these recreations. He gives his political allegiance 
to the liberal party, and fraternally is connected with the Masonic order, the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Knights of Pythias. A man of 
brains, personality and ambition, he has steadily directed his talents into channels 
of general advancement and his expanding powers have for many years past 
proven elements in growth. No project for the betterment of New Westminster 
lacks his hearty cooperation and intelligent support and his faith in the city, 
in its present opportunities and its future progress is one of its valuable munici- 
oal assets. 



HUME BLAKE ROBINSON. 

Hume Blake Robinson is a successful barrister in Vancouver with a large 
:lientage, and in a profession where success depends entirely upon individual 
merit and ability has made continued and rapid advancement, standing today 
among the able and prominent representatives of the British Columbia bar. 
He is still a young man but has already left the impress of his ability and per- 
sonality upon the legal history of the city, and his many friends do not hesi- 
tate to predict for him continued progress in his chosen field. He was born 
in Orillia, Ontario, December 27, 1874, and is a son of Samuel S. Robinson, 
i barrister in that city. The family is of Irish origin, Mr. Robinson's great- 
grandfather, Dr. Samuel Robinson, having left Dublin about the year 1839 
ind emigrated to Canada, founding the family in the Dominion. In order to 
nake the journey they chartered the vessel Ann of Halifax, and the experi- 
ences which he encountered crossing the Atlantic and the details of his subse- 
juent career are fully described in Irishmen of Canada. 

After acquiring a preliminary education, Hume Blake Robinson entered 
Toronto University and from that institution was graduated B. A., in 1895, 
and LL. B., in the following year. He then attended Osgoode Hall, from which 
le was graduated in 1898, beginning almost immediately afterward the gen- 
eral practice of law in Minnedosa, Manitoba. He remained in that city for ten 
years, three of which were spent as a partner of the present Judge Meyers, 
of Winnipeg. During that time Mr. Robinson became recognized as a strong 
and able practitioner, well versed in underlying legal principles and possessed 
of the incisive and discriminating qualities of mind necessary for success in 
aw. He left Manitoba in 1909 and came to Vancouver, British Columbia, 



164 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

where he engaged in practice as a member of the firm of Russell, Russell & 
Hannington. This association continued until 1911, since which time Mr. 
Robinson has practiced alone. 

Mr. Robinson is a member of the Church of England and is connected 
fraternally with the Masonic lodge. For three years he served in Company K, 
Queen's Own Rifles, in Toronto, and has always been recognized as a public- 
spirited citizen. He holds membership in the Western Club, the Shaughnessy 
Heights Golf Club and the Vancouver Tennis Club, and his political allegiance 
is given to the liberal party, of which he has been a life-long supporter. 



SAMUEL ACHURCH. 

Samuel Achurch, now living retired, his well placed investments having 
brought him to a most gratifying financial position, was born at Dry Drayton, 
Cambridgeshire, England, on the 3Oth of October, 1861, a son of Samuel and 
Emma Elizabeth Achurch, farming people of England but both now deceased. 
The son was educated at Lloyd's Cambridge Academy and after leaving that 
institution assisted his father on the farm. The family removed to Essex and 
in his twenty-fourth year the subject of this review left home in order to make 
his own way in tin- world in the virgin country of Canada. After crossing the 
Atlantic he ventured into the interior as far as Winnipeg and there obtained 
work for two years in connection with the construction of the Canadian Pacific 
Railway. After being employed in various places for the company he returned 
to Winnipeg in the fall, remaining there through the winter. He led the life 
of the typical pioneer, roughing it as was the custom, or at least the necessity, 
often being obliged to go to bed in wet clothing and enduring other hardships 
incident to life on the frontier. In 1887 he arrived in Vancouver, reaching this 
city before the completion of the Canadian Pacific Railway so that he saw the 
first passenger train pull into Vancouver. He also saw the first tea boat arrive, 
the vessel being the Abyssinia. A great crowd taking in consideration the then 
young city preceded him to the wharf and there was the city band to meet the 
incoming ship which should have arrived in the evening but it was delayed and 
docked early the following morning, the crowd being greatly disappointed thereby. 
During all the period of his early residence here Mr. Achurch was in the employ 
of the Canadian Pacific Railway Company. After a time he purchased a shack 
for ten dollars which was located near False creek, the present location of the 
Canadian Pacific yards, but what was his surprise on returning home one day to 
find that his shack and nearly all his worldly possessions had been destroyed by 
fire, a spark from some clearing near by having started the blaze. He spent seven 
years in Vancouver and then made his first trip back to England. When he 
returned he worked for a short time on a milk ranch, milking with the help of 
one other man about thirty cows night and morning. His employer becoming 
bankrupt, Mr. Achurch had to sue for his wages, and when the case was finally 
settled, the lawyer had taken half the amount for fees. In 1895 Mr. Achurch 
was again connected with the Canadian Pacific Railway as book agent, continuing 
with the company for fifteen years, during which period he traveled between 
Vancouver and Winnipeg for ten years and the remainder between Vancouver 
and Calgary. In the meantime he had made judicious investment in property 
which rose rapidly in value until the income secured therefrom made possible 
his retirement. He purchased property where his present beautiful home now 
stands, the dwelling having been erected in 1910. His hopes for future rise in 
the value of his land were realized as the city grew in the direction of his property, 
making all realty in that district more valuable. When the tract came into his 
possession it was part of a vast forest area, covered with the native growth of 
tree's, and many would not have believed that Vancouver, for a long time to 
come, would take in the district as a part of its residential section. Mr. Achurch, 




SAMUEL ACHURCH 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 167 

however, had firm faith in the future and he is a most enthusiastic supporter of 
Vancouver, proud of what the city has accomplished since he came here as a 
pioneer in 1887, and after all his travels Vancover still has chief attractions for 
him. 

In 1906 Mr. Achurch married Miss Harriett Susanna Cock, eldest daughter of 
William Fuller and Harriett Cock, of Essex, England, the former having been 
one of the most highly respected and esteemed farmers in his neighborhood. Mr. 
and Mrs. Achurch reside at No. 2276 Eighth avenue, West. In politics he is a 
conservative and his membership relations are with the Church of England and 
with the Ancient Order of Foresters. In his life he has encountered trials and 
hardships and has met difficulties but these he has overcome as the years have 
gone by and through his earnest efforts and wise investments is today ranked 
among the substantial citizens of Vancouver. 



JOHN COUGHLAX. 

Among the commercial forces of British Columbia, ]ohn Coughlan. founder 
of the firm of J. Coughlan & Sons, stands in a class by himself, for it was lie 
who founded in British Columbia the structural steel industry, retaining thereby 
for this province vast sums of money which otherwise would have had to be 
expended in the east. Since 1907 his firm has erected practically all the steel 
frames for the large buildings erected in Vancouver, Xe\v Westminster and 
Victoria. Great credit is due to Air. Coughlan also for the valuable work which 
he did in rebuilding New Westminster after the memorable fire. His firm 
now operates two plants and their contracts are increasing so fast that a con- 
tinued growth of the business may be predicted. 

John Coughlan was born in Halifax, Nova Scotia, in 1854, and was edu- 
cated in one of the leading colleges of that city, where he subsequently engaged 
in the contracting business from the time he was a very young man until 1878, 
when he made removal to Victoria. There he was closely identified with the 
growth of the city and for many 'years served as a member of the city council, 
doing eminent work in promoting valuable measures that have proven of lasting 
benefit. At Victoria he erected the first steam operated brick manufacturing 
plant in the province and continued in the contracting and brick making busi- 
ness until 1898, when the city of New Westminster was destroyed by fire. He 
removed to that city from Victoria, and there is perhaps no man who took a 
more active part in the actual rebuilding of that city than Mr. Coughlan. His 
brick plant was the first the town ever had and is still in operation, over one 
hundred men being employed in the manufacture of the product. In 1907 
the newly organized firm of J. Coughlan & Sons or, as it was previously known, 
Coughlan & Company, opened a new industry in the province of British Colum- 
bia that of structural steel manufacture. They were the first to attempt the 
making of structural steel in British Columbia or, more correctly, west of 
Winnipeg. Their No. I plant, the first to be operated here, is located at the 
south end of Cambie Street bridge; but in 1913 their business had progressed 
so favorably that it was necessary to erect a second plant, which is located at 
the foot of Columbia avenue, on False creek. In the two plants approximately 
two hundred men find employment, and this fact alone indicates the importance 
of the industry to the province and city, apart from the fact that much money 
would have gone to the east which is now retained and spent in this province. 

Since entering this field in 1907, J. Coughlan & Sons have erected prac- 
tically all of the new steel frame buildings in Vancouver, Victoria and New 
Westminster. Had it not been for the enterprise shown by J. Coughlan & 
Sons in the opening of this great industry, the money for many large contracts 
would have been lost to the west. In the course of their work they have erected 
the frames for the Metropolitan building, the Exchange building, the Provincial 



168 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

Parliament building at Victoria, the Provincial courthouse in Vancouver, the 
World building, the Leigh-Spencer building, the Carter-Cotton building, the 
Holden building, the new Canadian Pacific passenger station, the new addi- 
tions to the Vancouver Hotel, the prison farm buildings at Burnaby, and many 
others of importance. This list, more emphatically than words, signifies the 
importance of their work and its benefit upon the general growth of the province. 

At Halifax Mr. Coughlan was married October 25, 1875, to Miss Margaret 
Colbert, of that city. She passed away in Victoria on March 18, 1892. Of 
this marriage were born nine children, of whom eight are living. The sons 
are Thomas J., John J., Stanley H., George E., and Charles E., all associated 
and taking an active part in the conduct of the business of J. Coughlan & Sons, 
John J. Coughlan being the active manager of the firm. The daughters are: 
Mrs. J. S. Smith and Mrs. F. R. Humber, both of Vancouver; and Grace 
Coughlan, at home. 

Mr. Coughlan gives his adherence to the conservative party but since leav- 
ing Victoria has not been active in politics, his vast business enterprise demand- 
ing most of his time. He was a charter member of the first Knights of Pythias 
lodge in British Columbia, which was established in Victoria in 1883. A man 
of force and character, he occupies a unique position in the commercial life 
of Vancouver and is readily conceded to be one of the most important factors 
in its progress and growth. He has succeeded by the most straightforward 
methods only, and is admired as much for the qualities that have made possible 
his success as for his actual achievements along material lines. 



COLONEL ARTHUR WILLIAM CURRIE. 

The west is essentially the land of big things. It is great in area, in projects 
for development, in opportunities for achievement and it produces big men 
out of the crucible of endeavor. But with all its natural advantages tending 
to make easy of accomplishment that measure of material success which is 
the aim of every ambitious man, it is not a land where the drone will thrive 
No, while there is opportunity in abundance, effort, courage and stamina are 
essentials if anything worth while is to be achieved. 

The career of the subject of this sketch Lieutenant-Colonel Arthur William 
Currie is a striking illustration of the truth of the foregoing. His life and 
achievements in this golden land of promise contain a lesson for the thousands of 
young men who have come and are yet to come from the four corners of the 
earth--a lesson of what pluck and industry may accomplish if backed by an 
imperishable faith in the future greatness of their adopted country. 

It was in 1894 that period of almost world-wide depression that young 
Currie, then only eighteen years of age, a mere stripling, came to British Colum- 
bia, fresh from the refining influences which surrounded him in his simple 
home life on an Ontario farm and unskilled in the ways of the westerner. But 
while thus unsophisticated, and to that extent handicapped, he possessed a rich 
asset, a disposition to cheerfulness, due to his Irish ancestry and unbounded faith 
and hope in the future. 

It was not surprising, therefore, that after a period of "hard grind," in 
teaching the young idea at public schools first at Sidney .and later at Victoria 
the young Ontarian, even then a stanch British Columbian, should cast off 
the shackles which kept him "cribbed, cabined and confined" in a narrow en- 
vironment, and embark in business. This he did in the year 1900, when he 
associated himself with J. S. H. Matson, of the Colonist, now one of the fore- 
most men in British Columbia in commercial enterprises. They engaged in the 
life insurance business. This partnership continued until 1906, and so rapid 
was his success in that particular field of endeavor that Mr. Currie was made 
provincial manager of the National Life Assurance Company. This important 




COLONEL ARTHUR W. CURRIE 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 171 

)ost he held for two years with every credit to himself and profit and advantage 
o the company, but rinding his range of opportunity too narrow for his am- 
)ition, he then joined R. A. Power and formed the partnership which continues 

this day Currie & Power, with commodious office premises on Douglas 
street, dealing in all branches of the insurance business besides having a very 
arge connection in their real estate department handling almost exclusively 
nside and residential property. 

During this period of change and expansion Colonel Currie has of course 
seen Victoria grow out of the swaddling clothes of a mere village and don 
'he more ambitious and better-fitting garments of one of the great commercial 
liorts of the north Pacific, and it was but natural that in the interim the subject 
<>f this sketch should have himself reaped some of the reward which properly 
belongs to those who are so fortunate as "to be in on the ground floor." Hap- 
pily this has proved the case and Colonel Currie possesses much property in 
Victoria and surrounding districts. 

But Colonel Currie's career, aside from success in business, has one other 
phase which should serve as a light and example to the youth of this country. 
"his is a sane Imperialism which early led him to take up military training for 
ihe defense of flag and empire should the occasion ever demand. Joining the 
Fifth Regiment, Canadian Garrison Artillery, as a gunner, in 1897, he displayed 
juch proficiency and aptitude for the pursuit of military tactics that his pro- 
notion was rapid. He received his commission as lieutenant in 1900, and was 
then advanced successively to captain, major and lieutenant-colonel this latter 

1 ost, which he now holds, having been assumed in 1909. Colonel Currie has 
always taken the keenest interest in military affairs and to no small degree he 
1 as stimulated a similar interest not only among his associates in the various 
corps with which he has been identified, but among the youth of the city. During 
1 is command of the regiment it has been first in general proficiency for three 
years. He is now one of the vice presidents of the Canadian Artillery Associa- 
t on. He has always taken the liveliest interest in rifle shooting, and since 1906 
las been president of the B. C. Rifle Association. He is a member of the 
cDimcil of the Dominion Rifle Association. 

In politics Colonel Currie is a liberal. He was formerly president of the 
Young Liberal Club and is at present a member of the executive of the Liberal 
Association. He is a fluent speaker. 

In 1901 Colonel Currie married Miss Lucy Chaworth Musters, a native 
of Comox, Vancouver island, of English parentage; and the union has been 
blessed with two children, Marjorie and Garner. 

'Colonel Currie is a member of the Pacific Club and an adherent of the 
( hurch of England. He is a prominent member of Vancouver and Quadra 
I odge, A. F. & A. M., and is past district deputy grand master. 

If one were writing a mere "Who's Who in Western Canada" it would be 
sufficient to say that the subject of this sketch was born in Napperton, Ontario, 
in 1875, son of William Garner Currie, a native of Ontario and of Irish- 
Scotch parentage, his grandfather having come from Ireland and settled in 
the eastern province in 1830. His father was a successful and prosperous 
farmer and held numerous public offices prior to his death in 1891. His 
n other was Jane Patterson, a native of Ontario, of Scotch parentage and 
siill living at the old home. The Colonel was reared on the farm and edu- 
cated in the common schools and at Strathroy Collegiate Instutute. Later 
h matriculated in Toronto University but attended school only a compara- 
tively short time. At an early age the lure of the west proved too much 
and he answered the call, to what purpose has been set out as above. 

Personally Colonel Currie is a fine type of the stalwart young Canadian. 
Sanding over six feet in height, of commanding presence, with clear steel- 



172 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

blue eyes and fresh complexion, he is a fine specimen of clean, western 
manhood and those who know him best feel that his best days are yet ahead 
of him and that British Columbia will hear more of Colonel Arthur William 
Currie. 



JOSEPH FRANCIS WATSON. 

Joseph Francis Watson, one of the most promising young architects of New 
Westminster, was born in Haltwhistle, England, June 17, 1885, and is a son 
of John and Ann Watson. The father was a prominent building contractor 
in Northumberland and built all the additions to Blenkinsopp Hall and the 
historic Blenkinsopp castle, home of the first Lord Byron, and the modern 
buildings on the Blenkinsopp estate in that part of England. 

Joseph Francis Watson acquired his early education in the grade schools 
of Middlesborough and afterward attended Rutherford College in Newcastle, 
from which he was graduated, i le received from the board of education of South 
Kensington, England, first honors in sculpture and modeling. Having deter- 
mined to make architecture his life work, he took up the study of this profes- 
sion under his brother and was for three years with the East Riding educational 
authority in England. He remained in his native country until 1910, when he 
came to Canada, settling immediately in British Columbia, where he entered 
the office of C. II. Clow, architect of New Westminster. He is now in busi- 
ness for himself in the New Westminster Trust Company's building and has 
already met with a gratifying degree of success, his detailed knowledge of his 
profession and his ability in it having secured for him a large and representa- 
tive clientage. 

-Mr. Watson married, March 14, 1910, Miss Annie Lynam, a daughter of 
T. and S. A. Lynam, of Yorkshire, England. Mr. and Mrs. Watson have two 
children, Nancy and Joseph Francis. Mr. Watson is connected with the Inde- 
pendent Order of ( )dd Fellows and the Knights of Pythias and is well known 
in fraternal circles. He is still a young man but he has already made an envi- 
able place for himself in business and professional circles of the city and has 
the opportunity before him for still further advancement an opportunity of 
which he is certain to make excellent and profitable use. 



ALEXANDER DA VIE. 

The title of self-made man can justly be given Alexander Davie, as his entire 
capital when he arrived in Ladner about nineteen years ago amounted to less 
than twenty dollars, and today he is the owner of four hundred and sixty acres 
of farming land in addition to some property in Vancouver, all won through his 
individual efforts. He was born in Durham county, Ontario, on the I2th of Sep- 
tember, 1868, and is a son of Thomas G. and Mary (Stalker) Davie. The 
mother is deceased and the father is living in Alberta. 

Until he had attained the age of sixteen years the energies of Alexander Davie 
were largely devoted to the acquirement of an education, for which purpose he 
attended the public schools of his native county. Subsequently he turned his 
attention to agricultural pursuits, assisting his father with the operation of the 
home farm until 1894. In the latter year he left the parental roof and came to 
British Columbia to pursue his career, his destination being Ladner. Upon his 
arrival here he had less than twenty dollars, but it sufficed his needs as he im- 
mediately found work with one of the farmers in this vicinity. He engaged as 
a farm hand for two years receiving for his services from twenty to twenty- 
five dollars per month. As he was thrifty and temperate in his habits he man- 




ALEXANDER DA VIE 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 175 

iged to save the greater portion of each month's wages, and gradually accumu- 
ated sufficient capital to enable him to begin farming for himself as a renter. 
\bout 1896, he leased the Skinner farm, which he operated for practically fifteen 
'ears, meeting with a good measure of success. In 1902, he also bought two hun- 
Ired and sixty acres of land, which he cultivated in connection with what he 
vas renting, and in 1910 he further increased his holdings by purchasing the 
"arm where he now lives. He subsequently removed to this place, which is well 
mproved and comprises a hundred and twenty acres of fertile land. As his cir- 
cumstances have permitted Mr. Davie has continued to increase his acreage until 
'ie now holds the title to three hundred and eighty acres in Ladner, eighty acres 
m Lulu island and some property in Vancouver. His fields are largely devoted 
o diversified farming but in connection with this he engages in raising thor- 
oughbred stock. For many years he made a specialty of Clyde and shire horses, 
iolstein cattle and Oxford-Down sheep, his efforts in this direction meeting with 
lucrative returns. He is a man of well organized ideas and systematic methods, 
.:nd anything he undertakes is pursued with the persistence and indefatigable 
<:nergy which invariably bring success. 

The ^ist of December, 1903, was the wedding day of Mr. Davie and Miss 
vlargaret Paterson, of Kincardine, Ontario, and to them have been born two 
;ons, Murray Alexander and Kenneth Paterson. 

Fraternally Mr. Davie is a Master .Mason, and also belongs to the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, in which he has held the office of treasurer for twelve 
;-ears, and to the Foresters. He takes an active interest in local affairs, par- 
licularly those of a political nature, and for ten years was a member of the 
Delta municipal council, executing his duties in this connection in a capable 
manner, as is attested by the length of his incumbency. High qualities of citi- 
;enship have characterized Mr. Davie ever since he located here, and his inllu- 
<nce is ever exerted in favor of every movement which will tend to forward the 
Development of the community, or advance the welfare of its citizens. 



WILLIAM ROBERT MARRIOTT. 

Since the fall of 1906 William Robert Marriott has figured in connection 
with the real-estate, financial brokerage and investment business, and his under- 
standing of land values and the condition of the stock market well qualifies 
1 im to successfully accomplish what he undertakes along these lines. He is a 
i ative of Birmingham, England, born August 16, 1880, and is a son of Thomas 
i nd Caroline (Key) Marriott. The father, a representative of an old Xorthamp- 
tonshire family, spent the last years of his life in Birmingham, where 
lie passed away in 1900. William R. Marriott was a pupil in the public schools 

< f his native city, but was yet comparatively young when he started out in the 
1 usiness world on his own account, being apprenticed to a draper. When his 
term of indenture was completed he was employed in that line of business at 
Birmingham until the spring of 1901, when, attracted by the opportunities of 
the new world, he crossed the Atlantic, making his way to Canada. He settled 
irst in Saskatchewan and engaged in farming near Qu'Appelle until the follow- 
ing fall, when he went to Winnipeg, where he was employed by a wholesale dry- 
|:oods firm for a year. He next went to Prince Albert and Saskatoon, Saskatche- 
wan, making the entire trip overland on horseback a most arduous journey owing 
to the then unsettled condition of the country. From that point he came to 
A ancouver, where he entered into business associations, and then went into 
the Yukon and Mackenzie territory, where for four and a half years he was 
tngaged in prospecting, mining, and fur trading. He went into all parts of the 
frozen north, and after leaving that section of the country traveled down the 
Pacific coast as far as the Panama canal. In fact, he has covered the entire 

< istance from Fort McPherson, at the mouth of the Mackenzie river, reached 



176 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

only by dog team, to the canal zone of Panama. In the fall of 1906 he returned 
to Vancouver and since that time has been actively engaged in business here, 
entering the real-estate, financial brokerage and investment field. In this con- 
nection his business knowledge is extensive and his enterprise unfaltering. In 
March, 1908, he formed the firm of Marriott & Fellows, which conducted a 
very extensive business until 1913, when Mr. Marriott purchased the interest 
of his partner and the firm was dissolved. In the meantime, however, they 
conducted extensive real-estate deals and had built up a big business along 
financial brokerage and investment lines. In fact so extensive was their client- 
age that they established branch offices in various cities of the province. Mr. 
Marriott now has a large and varied personal business and financial interests 
which he superintends. The constructive methods he has followed, his watch- 
fulness over details, and his careful direction of his business policy have been 
salient features in his growing success. 

Mr. Marriott is a member of the Vancouver Exhibition Association and of 
the Vancouver Royal Yacht Club. He has firm faith in the future of this part 
of the country, believing that its opportunities and its resources have been 
scarcely touched, much less exhausted, and that in years to come history will 
chronicle the building of a great empire in this western section of Great Britain's 
interests on the American continent. 



ALBERT DEANS. 

Albert Deans, who owns and operates an eighty-acre ranch in the vicinity of 
Murrayville, has been identified with the agricultural development of British 
Columbia for twenty-four years. He was born in the province of Ontario, his 
natal day being the Kjth of February, 1848, and is a son of John and Eliza (Hud- 
son ) Deans, both of whom are deceased. The father was a native of Scotland 
and the mother of England. 

Reared at home, in the acquirement of an education Albert Deans first at- 
tended the public schools of Wellington county, Ontario. He subsequently sup- 
plemented the knowledge there acquired by a course in the British-American 
Commercial College of Toronto, following which he returned to Wellington 
county, where he began his business career. He was there employed for sev- 
eral years and then went to Pennsylvania and identified himself with the lum- 
ber interests. A few years later he returned to Ontario and turned to farming, 
following this vocation with a fair measure of success for five years. At the 
expiration of that time he again connected himself with the lumber trade, with 
which he was identified for six years thereafter. In 1889, he came to British 
Columbia and took up a homestead at Otter. After proving up on it he sold it 
and came to what is now known as Murrayville and rented a ranch. After 
operating this place for four years he purchased his present holding and here 
he has ever since continued his agricultural pursuits. He is engaging in diversi- 
fied farming and stock-raising, and as his undertakings are capably directed is 
meeting with a good measure of success. The buildings on his ranch are sub- 
stantially constructed and in a good state of repair, his fields are producing 
abundant harvests, and his equipment is fully adequate to his needs, all of which 
are suggestive of his thrift and prosperity. 

In the province of Ontario in February, 1873, Mr. Deans was married to- 
Miss Elizabeth McColm, and to them were born two children : Charles B., who 
married a Miss Shortreed and who died March 9, 1913; and Nellie, who became 
the wife of Fire Chief Watson, of New Westminster, deceased. The mother of 
these children passed away and in January, 1905, Mr. Deans was married to his 
present wife, whose maiden name was Barbara McCay. 

Mr. and Mrs. Deans attend the Presbyterian church and his fraternal rela- 
tions are confined to his membership in the Masonic order and the Ancient Order 




ALBERT DEANS 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 179 

of United Workmen. In politics he is a liberal. Ever since he located in the 
province Mr. Deans has taken an active interest in municipal affairs and is 
justice of the peace and acting police magistrate and license commissioner, lie 
has also held the offices of councilman and assessor. He meets his official re- 
sponsibilities in a capable manner, executing his duties with the same efficiency 
which characterizes him in the discharge of his business affairs. 



ROBERT WILSON HARRIS, K. C. 

Robert Wilson Harris, of Vancouver, a barrister since 1887 and a practi- 
tioner in this city since 1889, was born in 1'ackenham, Ontario, August 18, 1859, 
a son of James and Catherine (Wilson) Harris, the former a son of Robert 
Harris, a native of County Longford, Ireland, who came to Canada about 1830 
and founded the family in the new world, settling in Fitzroy township. Carle- 
ton county, Ontario, and there engaging in farming until his death. He was 
one of the pioneers of that section, arriving there when the district was but 
sparsely settled and when the work of civilization and development seemed 
scarcely begun. As the years passed on his energy and enterprise were mani- 
fested in his carefully managed agricultural pursuits, and he was accounted 
one of the valued and representative citizens of the community. He ranked 
as a man of prominence aside from business affairs, serving for more than 
twenty years as justice of the peace. His son, James Harris, was born on the 
old home farm in Carleton county, was there reared, and after attaining his 
majority removed to Packenham township, Lanark county, Ontario, where he 
engaged in general farming until his demise. 1 le married Catherine Wilson, 
daughter of Thomas Wilson, who was a native of County Cavan, in the north 
of Ireland, and came to Canada and settled in Huntley township, Carleton county. 
He, too, was a pioneer of that district and becoming identified with agricultural 
pursuits continued in that occupation throughout the remainder of his days. 

Robert Wilson Harris pursued his preliminary education in the high school 
of Packenham, Ontario, and afterward attended Victoria College at Coburg, 
where he was graduated with the class of 1884. He then went to Winnipeg, 
Manitoba, and was articled for the study of law to J. A. M. Aikins, K. C, of 
the law firm of Aikins, Culver & Hamilton. He was called to the bar of Mani- 
toba in 1887. He then went to St. Paul, Minnesota, where he entered upon 
practice in partnership with Mr. Hamilton, formerly of the firm of Aikins, 
Culver & Hamilton. There he continued until 1889, when he came to Vancouver 
and entered upon the active practice of law in this city. He was alone for a time 
and then formed a partnership with A. H. Macneill, K. C., under the firm 
name of Harris & Macneill, which relationship continued for a number of years. 
They were then joined by W. S. Deacon under the firm style of Harris, Macneill 
& Deacon, which partnership was maintained until 1897, during which time they 
established a branch office at Rossland, British Columbia. On the dissolution 
of the partnership Mr. Harris entered into professional connections with A. E. 
Bull, practicing as Harris & Bull until 1910, when P. G. Mason was taken into 
the firm under the style of Harris, Bull & Mason. This continued until Janu- 
ary, 1912, when the admission of R. W. Hannington led to the adoption of the 
present firm name of Harris, Bull, Hannington & Mason. Under that style 
the law practice is now conducted. Mr. Harris is a king's counsel, having been 
appointed in 1905. 

On the 20th of April, 1898, Mr. Harris was united in marriage to Miss 
Jessie A. Crosby, a daughter of the Rev. Thomas Crosby, D. D., who came to 
British Columbia as a young man and for fifty years was a missionary to the 
Indians of the province, but he is now living retired in Vancouver. For twenty- 
five years he was stationed at Port Simpson, where his daughter, Mrs. Harris, 
was born, being the first white child born in northwest British Columbia, her 



180 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

mother having been the first white woman that lived at Port Simpson, then a 
Hudson's Bay fort. More extensive mention of Dr. Crosby will be found on 
another page of this work. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Harris has been born a daugh- 
ter, Winnifred Marion, now four and a half years of age. 



SAMUEL ALFRED MOORE. 

Samuel Alfred Moore is engaged in general law practice as senior partner 
of the firm of Moore & Cameron. He has lived continuously in British Colum- 
bia since 1896 and was called to the bar in 1903. His birth occurred at New 
Glasgow, Xova Scotia, October 14, 1877, his parents being Lieutenant Mc- 
Lellan and Christina (Cameron) Moore. He attended public schools in Nova 
Scotia and also spent three years in the Mount Allison University at Sackville, 
New Brunswick. He was a youth of nineteen years when, in 1896, he came 
to liritish Columbia, since which time he has resided in this province. In 1898 
he was articled to the law firm of Russell & Russell and under their direction 
continued his reading until 1903, when he was called to the bar of British 
Columbia. At that time he was admitted to a partnership by his former pre- 
ceptors although the firm name still remained Russell & Russell. For two years 
he practiced as a member of that firm, benefiting by the broadening experiences 
which came to him in that connection. In 1905 he entered into partnership 
with C. X. I laney under the firm name of Haney & Moore, and in 1907 they 
dissolved, after which Mr. Moore remained alone in his law practice until 1912, 
when he was joined by Ceorge F. Cameron in a partnership relation under the 
present firm style of Moore & Cameron. Their practice is general and has 
connected them with much important litigation. Mr. Moore never fails to 
give a thorough preparation and in his presentation of a case it is seen that his 
reasoning is along the most logical line and his conclusions are unusually exact 
and convincing. 

On the 1 2th of July, 1908. in Seattle, Washington, Mr. Moore was united 
in marriage to Miss Matilda Walters, a daughter of Howard C. and Jennie C. 
(Wright) Walters, the former the president of the Brittania Mines of British 
Columbia. The only child of this marriage is a daughter, Elizabeth. Mr. 
Moore's interests largely center in his home and he has connected himself with 
no club organizations. He belongs, however, to the Presbyterian church and 
to Mount Hermon Lodge, A. F. & A. M., of Vancouver, while his political 
allegiance is given to the liberal party. These interests and his law practice 
chiefly constitute his life's activities. His friends and their number is increas- 
ing annually find in him a worthy, reliable gentleman, dependable under all 
circumstances and one ready to meet any emergency of life with a conscientious- 
ness that comes from a right conception of things and an habitual regard for 
what is best in the exercise of human activities. 



JAMES ANDREW McINTYRE. 

James Andrew Mclntyre is proprietor of one of the largest and most popu- 
lar cafes of Vancouver. He has been engaged in the restaurant business here 
since May, 1905, and has made continuous progress, his capable management, 
enterprise and progressive methods resulting in bringing him substantial success. 
He was born in Winnipeg, Manitoba, June 8, 1880, and is a son of James 
Andrew and Mary (Manson) Mclntyre, the former a native of Scotland and 
the latter of Ireland. They were married in Goderich, Ontario, in 1878, and 
in the following year went to Manitoba where the father engaged in the real- 
estate and hotel business, there residing until his death, which occurred in 1893, 




SAMUEL A. MOORE 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 183 

when he was forty-four years of age. He served as a sergeant of the Nine- 
tieth Regiment of Winnipeg Rifles throughout the Northwest rebellion and 
was an excellent rifle shot. He had attended shooting contests at Wemblington, 
now Beazley, England, was active in many sports and was a great huntsman. 
His widow is still a resident of Winnipeg. 

James Andrew Mclntyre pursued his education in public and high schools 
of his native city and upon leaving school at the age of sixteen years entered 
the employ of the Canadian Pacific Railroad Company in the dining car depart- 
ment, continuing in that employ for eleven years. For several years he was 
dining car conductor and for two years acted as inspector of the dining and 
sleeping car service, traveling between Halifax and Vancouver. This acquainted 
him with the west and its opportunities and he resigned from that position 
on the last of April, 1905, with the purpose of engaging in business on his own 
account in Vancouver. On the ist of May he opened a restaurant and has since 
continued as its proprietor. He was first located at No. 439 Granville street 
where he remained until the fall of 1911, in which year he erected a handsome 
building designed for his special purpose at No. 556 Seymour street, where 
he is now conducting one of the popular restaurants of the city. It has the 
largest seating capacity and is one of the finest cafes in Vancouver and Mr. 
Mclntyre does everything in his power to meet the demands of the public in 
attractive service and well prepared viands. The business is steadily growing 
and with the excellent facilities secured in the new building Mr. Mclntyre has 
been enabled to do even more for his patrons, whose number is growing each 
year. He is also interested in business property in this city. 

Mr. Mclntyre is well known in athletics, interested in shooting and all kinds 
of sports. He belongs to the Vancouver Curling, Vancouver Gun and Vancouver 
Bowling Clubs and in 1913 went to Winnipeg with the first curling rink ever 
sent out by Vancouver. He is now treasurer of the Vancouver Bowling Asso- 
ciation and is a member of the executive of the Gun Club. He also belongs 
to the Vancouver Commercial Club and is in hearty sympathy with its purpose 
of promoting the welfare and upbuilding of the city. He votes with the con- 
servative party although never active as a worker in its ranks and he gives loyal 
allegiance to Mount Hermon Lodge, A. F. & A. .M., exemplifying in his life 
the beneficent spirit of the craft. Although a young man he has attained in 
business circles a position which many an older citizen might well envy. This 
is due to his close study of the business in which he has engaged, his earnest 
desire to please his patrons, his straightforward dealing and his enterprising 
methods. 



HOWARD KETCHUM BUTCHER. 

Howard Ketchum Dutcher is a member of one of the foremost engineering 
firms of British Columbia, that of DuCane, Dutcher & Company, specializing 
in municipal and hydro-electric power work, with headquarters at Vancouver. 
He was born at Milltown, New Brunswick, October 5, 1878, and is a son of the 
Rev. Charles W. and Katherine E. (Howatt) Dutcher, the former a son of 
John Dutcher, who came to America from Rotterdam, Holland, settling first 
in the state of New York, whence he crossed the border into Canada, taking 
up his abode in New Brunswick. The Rev. Charles W. Dutcher was born and 
reared in New Brunswick and was educated for the Methodist ministry in Mount 
Allison University. He filled pastorates in various towns in New Brunswick 
to the time of his death in 1894. His wife was a member of the well known 
Howatt family of Prince Edward Island. 

Howard Ketchum Dutcher was educated at Prince of Wales College, from 
which he was graduated in 1896, and in 1898 he entered McGill University, 
specializing in civil and electrical engineering. He continued his studies in that 

Vol. IV 7 



184 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

connection for two years, after which he left the university and was employed 
as -construction engineer on the Boston Elevated Railroad from 1900 to 1902. 
In the fall of the latter year he resumed his studies at McGill and was graduated 
in 1904 with the Bachelor of Science degree. He next entered the employ of 
the Allis-Chalmers-Bullock Company at Cincinnati, Ohio, remaining with them 
until the fall of 1905, when he once more entered McGill, pursuing a post- 
graduate course and at the same time lecturing there on hydraulic engineering. 
He was graduated in 1906 with the degree of Master of Science and in the 
fall of that year he came to Vancouver, British Columbia, to take charge of 
McGill University work in this city, as professor of civil engineering in the 
new McGill University College of British Columbia. He also organized the firm 
of Butcher, Maxwell & Company, consulting engineers, reorganized as DuCane, 
Dutcher & Company in 1912, to admit into partnership Charles G. DuCane, of Sir 
John Wolfe-Barry and partners, and H. B. Fergusson. They are now recognized 
as one of the foremost engineering firms in Canada and undertake as consulting 
engineers, all branches of engineering work, including municipal work for Kam- 
loops, Duncan, Salmon Arm, Merritt and other towns in the west, besides sev- 
eral large power and irrigation projects. Mr. Dutcher also continues his pro- 
fessorship in the McGill University College, and he is financially interested in 
various projects, being president of the Western Engineering Company, Ltd., 
and a director of several land companies of British Columbia. All this, with his 
educational work, indicates his high standing in professional circles. 

On the 3d of September, 1907, Mr. Dutcher was married to Miss Naoma I. 
Snowdon, of Montreal, a daughter of J. J. Snowdon. She was educated at 
Trafalgar College, Montreal, and in the McGill University. The children of 
this marriage are Naoma K., born June 12, 1908, and Howard Norval, born 
May 23, 1910. Mr. Dutcher is not active in politics, but usually supports by 
his ballot the men and measures of the conservative party. He belongs to the 
Western and University Clubs. He is also a member of Western Gate Lodge, 
No. 48, A. F. & A. M., and attends the Presbyterian church, and these associa- 
tions indicate much of the nature of the principles governing his conduct. Along 
more strictly professional lines he is a member of the Canada Society of Civil 
Engineers, and for two years he was secretary of the Vancouver branch of 
that society. His attention is chiefly given to his professional interests, which 
are now of an extensive and important character, and his ability is attested 
in the large number of contracts awarded the firm. He holds to high profes- 
sional ideals and has continuously promoted his knowledge through reading, 
research and experience. 



ARTHUR ELPHINSTONE HEPBURN. 

Arthur Elphinstone Hepburn, a resident of British Columbia since 1898, has 
through the intervening period become recognized as a foremost mining engineer 
of the province and one whose wide knowledge and experience enable him to 
speak with authority upon many of the subjects upon which his profession has 
direct bearing. He was born in Surrey, England, January 21, 1873, and is a 
son of George Wright Hepburn Hepburn, recognized as one of the distinguished 
civil engineers of his time. He was an officer in the Army Works Corps and 
served during the Crimean war. He afterward engaged in important work 
throughout the world, being for seven years on the Punjab & Delhi Railway in 
India and surveying and preparing complete estimates for the building of canals 
along eight hundred miles of the Uruguay river in 1871. He assisted in the 
construction of the Scinde Railway and was afterward connected with important 
railroad work in Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Great Britain. He built 
bridges in Spain and in different parts of the world and a distinguished profes- 
sional career ended at his death in 1880. 




ARTHUR E. HEPBURN 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 187 

Arthur E. Hepburn acquired his early education under private masters in 
London and New Zealand and afterward qualified for his profession as a min- 
ing engineer. He received thorough training, both theoretical and practical, the 
latter through actual work in the field, and he thus entered upon his duties well 
equipped for the solution of the intricate and important problems which are fre- 
quently met in that field of labor. His work carried him into the mining districts 
of many parts of the world, where he engaged for several years in practical 
underground and surface work, thus further obtaining experience in mining and 
its methods. He early became recognized as an engineer of great ability and has 
attracted a large and important clientage. 

In 1898 Mr. Hepburn came to British Columbia, establishing himself in prac- 
tice at Vancouver, and he has continued to reside in this section of the country 
to the present time. He is now associated with Major William Hussey-Walsh 
of London, England, under the firm name of Arthur E. Hepburn & Hussey- 
Walsh, of Vancouver and London. The intention and reason for the London 
office with its powerful connections and advisory board is to arrange finan- 
cially for British Columbia issues of merit such as industrials, bond issues, and 
hydro-electric plants, railways, docks, etc. Mr. Hepburn considers that Sir Rich- 
ard McBride, K. C. M. G., is truly an empire builder with his broad and far- 
sighted railway policy, having revolutionized conditions in this province, for it 
has only been the lack of proper communication that has kept in check the develop- 
ment of British Columbia's vast resources. Capitalists who will trust men of 
integrity in this province to carry on legitimate investigations along certain lines. 
cannot help but win rich results. Mr. Hepburn through his office connections in 
London has been promised for the Vancouver Harbor & Dock Extension Com- 
pany, Ltd., all the financial support necessary to carry out the great work in 
which it is engaged and which is most desirable and necessary to enable greater- 
Vancouver to hold its own when the Panama canal opens in 1915. This will 
undoubtedly create enormous trade, which will in turn require greater dock ac- 
commodations. The mouth of the Eraser river is ideal for immense industrial' 
enterprises and the promotion and support of these concerns have been endorsed: 
by very able British and New York engineers and financiers. Another large con- 
cern for which Mr. Hepburn has been offered financial assistance is the Pacific 
& Hudson Bay Railway Company, whose line from Bella Coola, running north to 
Fort George and then into the Peace River country, is of vast importance to the 
interior of the province. It is controlled by W. D. Verschoyle and E. C. Harris, 
of Vancouver, who have already spent two hundred and fifty thousand dollars 
in investigations and surveys and who through Mr. Hepburn's London office have 
been promised necessary support. Mr. Hepburn represents also large British 
financial interests and has important connections in London. He has represented 
professionally British capital and has made many exhaustive examinations in 
connection with the coal and iron fields of British Columbia, having been instru- 
mental in placing the investment of this capital in the natural resources of the 
province. He has, moreover, given much thought, attention and research to the 
possibilities for the development of a great British Columbia steel industry and 
has made a very exhaustive report of the same to British financiers, this being 
now under serious consideration. Mr. Hepburn has personally become largely 
interested in coal lands, owning and controlling some twelve thousand acres ia 
this province. These are very valuable, being bituminous and of coking quality,, 
and coal of this character will undoubtedly be in great demand for smelting 
operations. 

Mr. Hepburn believes that greater Vancouver has a magnificent future and 
that when the population increases, as it will upon the opening of the Panama 
canal, labor will become cheaper and this in turn will enable large industrial en- 
terprises to compete with those of eastern Canada and America. Enormous trade 
and markets in grain and other commodities are only waiting proper arrange- 
ments with China, Japan, New Zealand, Australia and Mexico. He believes that 



188 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

the motto of British Columbia should be "export, not import," as thereby more 
industries could be supported and the profits kept in the Dominion. 

On the I4th of February, 1902, Mr. Hepburn was united in marriage to 
Barbara Gilmore Caldwell, a daughter of Captain Fisher Caldwell, of Troon, 
Ayrshire, Scotland. Mr. and Mrs. Hepburn have one daughter, Jean Fisher. 
The parents are members of the Anglican church and Mr. Hepburn gives his 
political allegiance to the conservative party, being a loyal supporter of Premier 
Borden's naval policy, considering that the proposal should have been accepted 
without party debate and the future and broader issues left for more careful 
consideration with the generous advice and cooperation of the imperial naval 
council of London. Mr. Hepburn's motto is "one king, one empire, one flag." 
In Vancouver he is known as a man of wide interests and progressive public 
spirit and his cooperation is always readily and heartily given to movements for 
the municipal advancement. He is a member of the Progress Club and the 
Board of Trade, serving on the mining committee in the latter organization, and 
is also affiliated with the Chamber of Mines and a life member of the American 
Academy of Political and Social Science. He holds membership in the Canadian 
Club, the Vancouver Golf and Country Club and the Terminal City Club and 
is well known in social circles. He is, moreover, a member of the Canadian Min- 
ing Institute, a life member of the American Institute of Mining Engineers, the 
Royal Society of Arts of London, a Fellow of the North British Academy and 
affiliated with the Naval and Military Emigration League of London. He is a 
man of force, experience and capacity, far-sighted in business, loyal in citizenship, 
eminent in his profession, and the influence of his standards and accomplish- 
ments has been felt as a distinct force in the building up and development of 
British Columbia. 



JOHN GILMOUR HAY. 

John Gilmour Hay, city solicitor of Vancouver, who engaged in the private 
practice of law prior to his appointment to his present position, has ever proved 
himself an able and conscientious minister in the temple of justice and the con- 
sensus of public opinion ranks him with Vancouver's leading barristers. He was 
born in Chatham, Ontario, May 17, 1873, a son of John Gilmour and Margaret B. 
(Hawken) Hay, the former a native of Aberdeen, Scotland, and a son of 
Morice Hay, who came from Aberdeen to Canada in 1830 He settled first 
at Montreal but afterward removed to Port Hope, Ontario, where he was 
engaged in the book and stationery business to the time of his death, being 
recognized as one of the leading merchants of that city. He was also one of 
the founders of the first Baptist church established in Montreal, organized by 
the Rev. John Gilmour of Aberdeen, Scotland. John Gilmour Hay, father of 
Mr. Hay of this review, early learned the tinsmith's trade, which he followed 
in connection with the hardware business at Port Hope, Ontario, until he 
removed to Chatham. There he again conducted a hardware and tinsmith busi- 
ness until his death, which occurred in 1873, a few months prior to the birth 
of his son and namesake. He was a veteran of the Fenian war. 

At the usual age John Gilmour Hay, whose name introduces this review, 
was sent to the public schools of Ridgetown, Ontario, and continued his educa- 
tion through consecutive grades until he left the high school and afterward 
entered Osgoode Hall of Toronto in preparation for the practice of law, which 
he had determined to make his life work. He mastered the branches constitut- 
ing the legal course and was graduated in 1894. The same year he was called 
to the Ontario bar and began practice in Toronto as a member of the firm of 
Clute, Macdonald, Macintosh & Hay, so remaining until 1902. In the latter 
year he went to Dawson, Yukon Territory, where he successfully practiced 
until 1907, when he came to Vancouver and for a time was a member of the 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 189 

firm of Martin, Craig, Bourne & Hay. In 1910 he was appointed city solicitor 
of Vancouver and remains in that position, the duties of which he is discharging 
with promptness, capability and fidelity. He has high rank as a barrister and 
is making a splendid record as city solicitor, successfully conducting many 
important cases which have arisen through the rapid growth of Vancouver. 
His preparation of a case is always thorough and exhaustive; he seems to grasp 
every detail and to give every point its due relative prominence, so that his case 
in all of its features is well assembled and his exposition thereof throws the 
strongest possible light upon the point which he intends to prove. 

On the 5th of July, 1902, Mr. Hay was united in marriage to Miss Helen 
J. Bailey, of Toronto, Ontario, a daughter of the late John C. Bailey, C. E., 
M. I. C. E., M. Imp. Inst., one of the foremost civil and constructing engineers 
in Canada. He was the builder of the International bridge at the Soo and has 
beer, engaged on most of the important railway construction work in the Domin- 
ion. In fact he stood prominent among men of note in engineering circles, 
his scientific and practical attainments enabling him to pass beyond the great 
majority of those so engaged. 

Mr. Hay is a liberal in politics, but though he keeps well informed on the 
questions and issues of the day, does not seek nor desire office outside the strict 
path of his profession, preferring to concentrate his energies upon the prompt 
and faithful performance of his duties. He is a member of the Baptist church 
and is popular in the Terminal City and British Columbia Golf Clubs, both of 
which have his name upon their membership rolls. 



JOHN GORDON McLAREN. 

Since 1909 John Gordon McLaren has been engaged in practice in Van- 
couver as a mining engineer and prior to settling here he was professionally 
employed in California, South America and Australia. In 1898 he went to the 
Yukon Territory on behalf of an English company, remaining there until 1909. 
He still retains a large interest in a dredging company operating about sixty 
miles west of Dawson, in the 40 Mile District. He is a member of the Van- 
couver Club. 



NOEL HUMPHRYS. 

Reared as a farm boy to the age of nineteen years, Noel Humphrys, now 
of Vancouver, then came to British Columbia, and in the wise utilization of the 
opportunities which have come to him for education and business advancement 
he has reached a position among the foremost civil engineers of the province. 
He was born at Barrow-In-Furness, England, December 26, 1879, a son of 
James and Jane Emma (Pearson) Humphrys. The father was a marine engi- 
neer and naval architect and as manager had charge of the shipyards at Barrow- 
In-Furness for fifteen years. He afterward removed to London, where he was 
manager for the Brush Electric Light Company until 1887, when he came to 
Canada, settling in Saskatchewan, where he engaged in farming until his death 
in 1902. 

In the acquirement of his education Noel Humphrys attended the public 
schools of Saskatchewan and was instructed by his father in the science of 
engineering. His boyhood and youth were spent upon the home farm and 
when nineteen years of age, wishing to enjoy some of the advantages offered 
by the growing western country, he made his way to British Columbia, settling 
at Revelstoke. There for a year and a half he was in the employ of the engi- 
neering department of the Canadian Pacific Railway and in 1901 he went to 



190 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

Vancouver under articles to W. A. Bauer, civil engineer and British Columbia 
la.nd surveyor, with whom he remained for three years as required by the pro- 
vincial government. In 1904 he qualified for the position of British Columbia 
land surveyor and began the private practice of his profession in the fall of 
that year, with offices in Vancouver. Before the completion of his articles he 
.assisted in the government survey, in 1903-4, up the British Columbia coast 
on Swanson Bay and vicinity. He has enjoyed an excellent practice from the 
start and now has a very extensive business, which is indicative of the promi- 
nent position which he occupies in the profession and the excellence of the 
service rendered. He has done survey and location work in all parts of the 
province and in 1908-9 had charge of the exploration surveys for the British 
Columbia government at Graham island, Queen Charlotte group, while in 1911- 
12 he made extensive surveys in the Peace river country. He is now practicing 
in association with Frank Tupper as senior member of the firm of- Humphrys 
& Tupper, British Columbia land surveyors and civil engineers, with offices in 
the Rogers block in Vancouver. He also has other business interests and his 
sound judgment and enterprising spirit have caused his cooperation to be sought 
along various lines. He is president and director of the Alberta Pacific Grain 
Growing Company, Ltd., is a director of the Grand Prairie Syndicate Com- 
pany, Ltd., which owns a large tract of land on Grand Prairie, and is also 
managing director of the Pacific Coast Automobile & Transportation Company, 
Ltd. 

In Vancouver, on the nth of September, 1904, Mr. Humphrys was married 
to Miss Kathleen Higgins, a daughter of Connell J. Higgins, for many years 
in the government service at Ottawa. Their children are Norah Mary, Noel 
James, Hugh John and Kathleen Elizabeth. .Mr. Humphrys belongs to the 
Anglican church and his wife is a Roman Catholic. Mr. Humphrys is a conserva- 
tive in politics but not an active party worker. He has various club relations, being 
a member of the Corporation of Land Surveyors of British Columbia, the Van- 
couver, Terminal City, Vancouver Automobile and Shaughnessy Heights Golf 
Clubs of Vancouver, and the Union Club of Victoria. Motoring and golf 
form two important features of his recreation. His prominence in his profes- 
sion has its root in the thoroughness with which he qualified, his close applica- 
tion and unfaltering energy with which he has managed his practice. 



RODERICK FINLAYSOX. 

Roderick Finlayson, who for a half century was in the service of the 
Hudson's Bay Company, died January 20, 1892, when in the seventy-fourth 
year of his age. His birth occurred at Loch Alsh, Ross-shire, Scotland, on 
the i6th of March, 1818, his parents being Alexander and Mary (Morrison) 
Finlayson. He pursued his education at the place of his birth while spend- 
ing his boyhood days in the home of his father, who was a sheep and stock- 
raiser. On leaving his native land he sailed from Glasgow for New York in 
July, 1837, as a passenger on one of the old time sailing vessels and 
arrived at his destination after a tedious voyage of forty days. Through the 
influence of a relative in New York city he received an appointment in the 
Hudson's Bay Company's service as apprentice clerk. He proceeded imme- 
diately to the head office of the company, then located at Lachine on the 
St. Lawrence, and spent some time at a desk, but a vacancy occurred whereby 
there came to him the chance of appointment to a station called Fort Coulonge, 
on the Ottawa river. There he spent the winter of 1837-8 and was initiated 
into the mode of trade carried on by the Hudson's Bay Company. In 1838 he was 
placed in charge of the station at'Fort William and there remained until 1839, 
when he was directed to join the men sent to the Columbia district on the west 




RODERICK; FINLAYSON 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 193 

slope of the Rocky mountains in order to take possession of part of the Russian 
territory on the North Pacific for trade purposes. This was leased from the 
Russian-American Fur Company by the Hudson's Bay Company. The party 
proceeded westward by water most of the way and after six months spent en 
route finally reached Fort Vancouver, now in the state of Washington on the 
Columbia river. It was then the head station of the Columbia district. In the 
spring of 1840 the Hudson's Bay Company employes boarded the historic 
Beaver on Puget Sound and proceeded along the coast, Mr. Finlayson thus pass- 
ing Vancouver island, which was to be his future home. The party proceeded 
on up the coast to Fort Stickeen in Russian territory, which by agreement they 
took, and later, under command of Chief Factor Douglas, later Sir James 
Douglas, went to Sitka, the head station of the Russian-American Company. 
Subsequently they proceeded up the Taco river and established Fort Durham, 
erecting a fort and making other necessary arrangements for their stay there. 
Mr. Finlayson was placed second in command of the fort, Chief Factor Douglas 
returning in the Beaver. 

In the autumn of 1841 Mr. Finlayson was relieved and transferred to Fort 
Stickeen, now Wrangel. In 1842 he was sent as relief clerk to Fort Simpson 
and when Forts Stickeen, Durham and McLaughlin were abandoned Mr. Fin- 
layson was ordered south with the party to the southern end of Vancouver 
island, reaching Victoria harbor on the ist of June, 1843. They commenced build- 
ing a fort with the forces of the abandoned forts, having three officers and fifty 
men. C. Ross was placed in charge, with Mr. Finlayson as second in command. 
The two vessels, the Cadboro and Beaver, remained as guard vessels until the 
fort was built. There was nothing but dense forest on the water along the 
harbor. They cleared some land on which to grow vegetables and cereals and the 
work of making a habitable place thus continued. In 1844 Mr. Ross, who was in 
command, died and Mr. Finlayson succeeded him and was placed in charge of 
Victoria. During this period he had many brushes with the Indians but finally 
subdued them and taught them the power and danger of firearms. During this 
period Mr. Finlayson created what became the Indian Reserve, which existed 
until a recent date. The Indians were all taught to respect British justice. 
Three large dairy farms were established at this time and farming operations 
conducted on an extensive scale, so that men-of-war and other vessels could 
purchase supplies. A gristmill was opened at Ksquimalt and also a lumber mill. 
The head depot for the Hudson's Bay Company was established here. About 
this time the forty-ninth parallel was declared the boundary between United 
States and Canada. The fur returns for England cleared from Victoria direct to 
England from that time on. In 1849, when Chief Factor Douglas, later Sir James, 
was sent to Victoria from Fort Vancouver, Washington, Mr. Finlayson was re- 
lieved of his onerous duties to a certain extent. He became head accountant 
and continued to act in that capacity until 1862. In 1851 Mr. Douglas became 
governor of the island of Vancouver and Mr. Finlayson was appointed by him 
as a member of the legislative council, his commission being signed by Queen 
Victoria in that year. In 1850 he had received his commission as chief trader 
and in 1859 received his commission as chief factor of the Hudson's Bay 
Company. 

From 1852 Mr. Finlayson had added extensively to his purchases of land, 
which he cleared, fenced and drained so that he was able to lease his property 
on good terms. In 1861 he returned to his native country for a visit and found 
his parents alive and well, but both passed away the following year. 

Mr. Finlayson at his own request was appointed to superintend the Hud- 
son's Bay Company's affairs in the interior of the island. This was in 1862 
and he continued in that position until he retired from the service and spent 
the remainder of his days looking after his private interests. In 1878 he was 
elected mayor of Victoria, which office he filled for one term, and in that posi- 
tion, as in the other places of public trust which he had filled, he made an excel- 
lent record. 



194 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

In 1849 M f - Finlayson was united in marriage to Miss Sarah Work, a daugh- 
ter of John Work, a Hudson Bay factor and a native of Ireland. Mrs. Finlay- 
son died January 25, 1906, having for fourteen years survived her husband. 
Their family consisted, of seven daughters and four sons. No history of the 
northwest and its development would be complete without reference to Roderick 
Finlayson, who as a representative of the Hudson's Bay Company played a 
most active and important part in the development of this section of the country. 
As the years passed on he embraced his opportunities for judicious investment 
and became one of Victoria's wealthiest and most prominent citizens, having 
accumulated much valuable real estate in and near the city. No man saw more 
of the process by which Victoria and the province grew and developed than 
Mr. Finlayson, whose attachment to the Hudson's Bay Company made him a 
witness of all that pertained to the welfare and upbuilding of the northwest. 
He was beloved and respected by all, so that his death was a blow to the com- 
munity. The news of his demise brought a sense of personal bereavement 
to many of the homes of the city and a flag on the city hall hung at half-mast, 
showing that one of the leading and honored residents of Victoria had passed 
awav. 



GEORGE MEAD. 

George Mead, living in retirement after an honorable and successful business 
career devoted almost entirely to the barber's trade, is numbered among the pio- 
neers in New Westminster, having located in this city when it was a mere village. 
He was born in Devizes, Wiltshire, England, on the 23d of September, 1848, 
and is a son of James and Sarah Mead, both of whom have passed away, the 
father dying when the subject of this review was still an infant. 

George Mead acquired his education in the public schools of his native com- 
munity and after laying aside his books was apprenticed to a barber and hair 
dresser, for whom he worked in England for some time. In 1868, however, 
he crossed the Atlantic and settled in Toronto, whence after one year he went 
to Orillia, where he was engaged for four and one-half years in the barber 
business. In 1875 he came to British Columbia and took up his residence in 
Victoria, where for fifteen months he worked in the old San Francisco baths. 
From Victoria he went to Nanaimo and in 1878 came to New Westminster, 
being accounted one of the earliest residents of the city. For twenty-two years 
he worked at his trade here, his ability and close application to business being 
eventually rewarded by a comfortable competence which enabled him to retire 
from active life. In the early days he purchased twelve acres of land from 
the White estate and upon this engaged for some time in raising fruit. When 
he first made his home upon it the tract was entirely covered with a heavy 
growth of timber which he was obliged to clear before beginning the work of 
cultivation. However, he afterward made it a very valuable property and a 
few years ago sold a portion of it for a large sum and removed to his present 
beautiful home at Mead's Station. 

On July 28, 1872, Mr. Mead married Miss Edwina Louise Mortimer, a 
daughter of Dr. Charles and Jane Mortimer, of Aurora, Ontario. The father 
was a surgeon on one of Nelson's vessels and practiced his profession until 
his death. His wife has also passed away. Mr. and Mrs. Mead became the 
parents of eight children : George Mortimer, who lives in Valdez, Alaska ; 
Fanny Alberta Mortimer, now Mrs. F. S. De Gray, of New Westminster; 
Edwina Louise, who married N. H. McQuarrie; Edith Emily, now Mrs. 
Arnold ; Alice Edna, Charles Frederick and Arthur Gordon, all of whom have 
passed away; and Irene May, who married L. R. Alcock, of New Westminster. 
Mr. and Mrs. Mead are members of the Church of England. 

Mr. Mead is a member of the Masonic order and keenly interested in the 
affairs of that organization. Premier Theodore Davie appointed Mr. Mead 




GEORGE MEAD 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 197 

justice of the peace for Richmond and Dewdney Riding, and after Sir Richard 
became premier he was made justice of the peace for the entire province. Dur- 
ing the long period of his residence here he has gained the respect and esteem 
of all who have been associated with him and he is today regarded as one of 
the representative and deservedly successful citizens of New Westminster, on 
whose list of pioneers his name occupies a prominent and worthy place. 



JOHN BUCKLE JARDINE. 

\ ; ew Westminster numbers among its foremost and valued citizens |ohn 
Buckle Jardine, controlling important property and business interests in the 
city and actively identified with its public life. During the twenty-three years 
of his residence here his interests have extended to many lines and lie has put 
forth effective efforts for the benefit and upbuilding of the city, cooperating 
heartily in movements to advance the general welfare. He was born in Camp- 
bellton, New Brunswick, April 8, 1871, and is a son of John and Catherine 
(McNair) Jardine. the former a native of Campbellton and the latter of Jacquet 
River, New Brunswick. They spent their entire lives in that province, the 
father dying in 1883 at the age of forty-five and the mother in 1895, when she 
was fifty-two years of age. The former was for a number of years employed 
in the customs service. 

John Ruckle Jardine was reared at home and acquired his education in the 
public schools of his native ctiy. In 1890, when he was nineteen years of age, 
he left home and journeyed to the west coast of British Columbia by way of the 
United States. On the way he spent five months touring through the western 
and middle western states, traveling in the latter section when the prairies were 
still unfenced and the cattle industry was in its prime. On the 26th of Novem- 
ber, 1890, he arrived in New Westminster and obtained employment in the 
Royal City Mills, with which he was connected for seventeen years. He be- 
gan in a humble capacity, tallying in the yards, herding the Chinese laborers 
and driving a team, but his ability gained for him rapid advancement and he 
was promoted through the various departments of the concern, severing his 
connection with the company as cashier in the main office. 

In 1900 Mr. Jardine married Miss Adelaide Ewen, a daughter of Alexander 
Ewen, proprietor of the first salmon cannery on the Eraser river, operating a 
plant of this character on the present site of the Windsor Hotel. His wife 
was also a representative of a pioneer family in this city and was born where 
the Russell Hotel now stands. On the death of Mr. Ewen, in 1907, Mr. Jar- 
dine and John Hendry were appointed executors of his will, Mr. Jardine acting 
as manager of the estate, which was closed in 1910. Since that time Mr. Jar- 
dine has devoted his time largely to the supervision of his own and his wife's 
extensive property interests, which he has managed in an able and practical 
way so that they have constantly increased in value. 

New Westminster has profited greatly by Mr. Jardine's well directed efforts 
through the years, not only in the field of business but along political lines as 
well. He is eminently progressive and public-spirited in matters of citizenship 
and an active factor in the promotion of the permanent interests of the com- 
munity. He supports the liberal party and was elected to the city council in 
1904, serving in that capacity for six years thereafter. In 1913 he was again 
made a member of the board and has since served, having accomplished a great 
deal of effective work in the line of reform, progress and upbuilding. He is a 
member of the board of the Royal Agricultural and Industrial Society, and 
belongs also to the Westminster Club. His fraternal connections are with the 
Knights of Pythias, in which he belongs to Royal Lodge No. 6, and with the 
Masons. In this latter order he holds membership in Union Lodge, No. 9, 
A. F. & A. M. ; New Westminster Chapter, No. 124, R. A. M. : Westminster 



198 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

Preceptory, No. 56, K. T. ; and Gizeh Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S., of Victoria. 
He is also a stockholder in the Westminster Trust Company, in the Crystal 
Dairy Company and British Columbia Life Insurance Company, these and many 
other connections indicating something of the scope and variety of his interests. 
He is liberal in his contributions to charity, a leader in all progressive public 
movements, a business man of unusual ability and foresight a worthy repre- 
sentative of the type of citizen upon whom the present stability and the future 
greatness of the city rest, 
inhabitants. 



GEORGE GORDON BUSHBY. 

Vancouver numbers George Gordon Bushby among its most prominent and 
progressive citizens, as he has been the promoter of several of the leading busi- 
ness institutions of the city. He is today Vancouver manager of the British 
Columbia Marine Railways Company and of the British Columbia Salvage Com- 
pany, as well as president of the Compressed Gas Company. His association 
with any enterprise insures a prosperous outcome of the same, for it is in his 
nature to carry forward to successful completion the projects with which he 
is associated. He has earned for himself an enviable reputation as a careful 
man of business and in bis dealings is known for his prompt and honorable 
methods, which have won for him the deserved and unbounded confidence of his 
fellowmen. 

Mr. Bushby is a representative of. one of the most prominent and noted 
families in British Columbia and is himself a native son of the province, born 
in New Westminster, January 24, 1867. His parents were Hon. Arthur Thomas 
and Agnes (Douglas) Bushby, the former born in England and the latter at 
Fort Vancouver, Washington, the old Hudson's Bay fort. The father came to 
British Columbia in 1858, making the journey to Victoria by way of the isthmus 
of Panama. In the early days he served as postmaster general of British Columbia, 
as registrar and as county court judge and at his death in 1874 left behind him a rec- 
ord of public service which was varied in its activities and faultless in honor. His 
wife, who is a daughter of the late Sir James Douglas, now makes her home 
at Cheltenham. 

At the age of four years George G. Bushby went to England with his parents 
and the family remained abroad for six months. At the age of eight he again 
made the journey to Great Britain, going around the Horn on the Hudson's 
Bay Company's ship, Lady Lampson, under command of Captain James Gaudin. 
He entered Christ's College, Finchley, England, and there acquired his edu- 
cation, remaining until 1883, when he returned to America, settling in Cali- 
fornia. He was for one year a student in the State University and at the end 
of that time entered the Union Iron Works in San Francisco, where he served a 
five years' apprenticeship at the engineering trade. At the end of that time 
he returned to British Columbia and here entered the service of the Dominion 
government in the submarine rock-drilling department, doing a great deal of 
valuable work in the improvement of Victoria harbor. At that time he was 
in charge of the construction of the waterworks plant for the Williams Head 
quarantine station and gained a reputation for reliable and capable work in 
his profession. It was during this time that he with others founded the British 
Columbia Marine Railways Company, which was then called the Esquimalt Marine 
Railway Company. In 1892 he went to Esquimalt and there remained until 1900, 
when the company constructed a marine railway in Vancouver. Mr. Bushby 
then came to this city as local manager of the concern, which conducts a gen- 
eral dry-dock, engineering and repairing business. Mr. Bushby's most notable 
business connection at the present time is with the British Columbia Marine Rail- 
ways, of which he is local manager. To his enterprising and energetic manage- 




GEOKGE G. BUSHBY 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 201 

ment is due much of the success of the company. The British Columbia Marine 
Railways are engaged in shipbuilding and have constructed in their Esquimalt 
shipyard the steamers Princess Beatrice, Princess Royal and Lillooet. They 
also built the quarantine station vessel, the Madge and the Casca, the celebrated 
Yukon stern wheeler, Transfer No. 3 for the Canadian Pacific Railroad, and are 
now building Transfer No. 4. They have recently constructed the Princess 
Maquinna, a two hundred and fifty foot steel vessel, for the Canadian Pacific, 
the largest steel vessel built on the Canadian Pacific coast. The British Columbia 
Marine Railways is one of Victoria's most important industries, and since being 
in existence they have done practically all of the large repair jobs on steel ves- 
sels on the coast. The business enjoys a most healthy and steady growth and its 
gigantic undertakings result in gratifying financial returns. Mr. Bushby is also 
salvage manager of the British Columbia Salvage Company, which was organized 
in 1896. This company has salved many vessels from Alaska to Panama, among 
them the Northwestern, wrecked near Valdez ; the Marechien, near Juneau, and 
the Newport, at Balboa, Panama. Its business has expanded rapidly until the 
concern is today the largest ship salvage company on the Pacific coast and the 
fourth largest in the world. It owns the steamers Salvor, William Joliffe and 
Maude, stationed at Esquimalt, always kept under steam, being prepared to 
proceed to the assistance of shipping in distress on a moment's notice. The com- 
pany is in close connection with the ports of the world and controls an immense 
business requiring constant supervision and systematic management. Mr. Bushby 's 
position as a director of its destinies calls for rare tact, administrative ability 
and organizing power, for versatility, keen insight and quickness of decision 
qualities which are elements in his character and upon which his present success 
is founded. He possesses untiring energy, is quick of perception, forms his plans 
readily and is determined in their execution, and his close application to business 
and his excellent management have brought him the high degree of prosperity 
which is his today. In the control and management of a business such as that 
with which he is connected many a man of resolution, courage and industry 
would have failed, and he has demonstrated the truth of the saying that success 
is not the result of chance but the outcome of clear judgment and discrimination. 
Mr. Bushby is also connected with the Compressed Gas Company of Van- 
couver as its president. This concern was founded in the spring of 191 1 and he has 
since that date held executive office. They deal in dissolved acetylene for oxy- 
acetylene welding, automobiles, boats, railway cars, locomotive headlights and 
buoys. They also manufacture oxygen for oxy-acetylene welding, mine rescue 
and medicinal purposes, supplying all the mines in Alberta and liritish Columbia 
and the doctors and drug stores. Their acetylene is also used for cooking and 
heating purposes. They operate the Welding Shop and manfacture autogenous 
welding and cutting appliances. Moreover, they deal in Prest-o-lite tanks, Prest- 
o-tire tanks, Prest-o-tire tubes, Prest-o-starters and automatic lighters. The of- 
ficers of this company are: George G. Bushby, president; William B. Barwis, 
vice president ; James Howard, treasurer ; Harry G. Allen, manager. They con- 
trol an important and growing trade, being located at 571 Howe street, Van- 
couver, with works at 1530 Hastings street, E. 

In Victoria, British Columbia, January 14, 1908, Mr. Bushby was united in 
marriage to Miss Violet Brae, a native of England, but for several years a resident 
of Calgary, Alberta. They are the parents of two children, Audrey Violet Annie 
and John Sinclair. 

Mr. Bushby is a charter and life member of the Royal Vancouver Yacht 
Club and served for two years as official measurer and for a similar period of 
time as captain. He has always taken a great interest in yachting and a great 
many of his leisure hours are spent in this recreation. The possessor of a fine 
tenor voice, he took part in many operatic performances and in concerts given at 
social functions in Vancouver and Victoria in the early days and is an accom- 
plished musician. A man of force, experience and capacity, his energies have 
.been almost entirely directed to the field of business and in this line he has won 



202 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

notable and unusual success. He has gained wealth to some extent, yet it is not 
alone this goal for which he has striven, for he belongs to that class of repre- 
sentative citizens who promote the general prosperity while advancing their indi- 
vidual interests. 



DAVID ALEXANDER McKEE. 

With important reclamation projects David Alexander McKee has been identi- 
fied, and his labors in this direction have been of far-reaching benefit and value. He 
was for a number of years engaged in farming but discontinued the active work of 
the fields in 1899 to give his attention to development projects. He was born at 
Cregagh, Belfast, Ireland, April 3, 1859, an d came to British Columbia by way of 
New York and the overland route to San Francisco with his parents in 1874, when 
about sixteen years of age. His education had been acquired at the Rosetta school in 
County Down, Ireland, and after becoming identified with the northwest he took 
up the occupation of farming, which he followed for a number of years. As time 
passed on he brought his fields under a high state of cultivation, employing such 
modern methods as resulted in making his land productive and valuable. While 
not carrying on farm work at the present time, he has many interests pertaining 
thereto and in addition he purchased in 1911 about eight hundred and forty acres 
of land on Barnston island in the Fraser river. 

The whole island, consisting of about fifteen hundred acres, has been dyked at 
at a cost of over forty thousand dollars, thus bringing into cultivable condition some 
of the finest agricultural lands in British Columbia. Mr. McKee recognizes the 
possibilities along those lines and in his business has looked beyond the exigencies 
of the moment to the opportunities of the future. He has made a close study of the 
best methods of reclaiming the lands, and from 1908 until 1910, inclusive, he was 
the president of the Delta Agricultural Society. He was also president of the 
Farmers' Telephone Company, Limited, for the year 1909-10 and he is a director 
of the Mutual Fire Insurance Company of British Columbia. In 1913 he was 
elected president of the Board of Trade, in which connection he is instituting vari- 
ous new measures and movements for public benefit along the lines of progressive 
development, exploitation and the adaptation of natural resources for the uses of 
mankind. 

On the 5th of September, 1900, at Hamilton. Ontario, Mr. McKee was united 
in marriage to Miss Afargaret Vallance, a daughter of James and Janet Yallance, 
of Hamilton. In politics Mr. McKee is a conservative, but not an active party 
worker or officeseeker. He belongs to the Presbyterian church, in which he has long 
been helpfully interested, serving on its managing board for about eighteeen years. 
He is alert, energetic and resourceful, and as time has passed on has so wisely and 
intelligently directed his efforts that his position among successful and leading busi- 
ness men of his district is assured. 



THOMAS CONNOR. 

Thomas Connor was called to the position of secretary of the Retail Mer- 
chants Association of British Columbia in 1910, in which connection important 
and responsible duties devolved upon him. His long experience in commercial 
fields 'has given him knowledge that splendidly qualifies him for the work which 
he lias undertaken in promoting trade relations of the country and promulgating 
methods and measures which shall add to the commercial greatness of the 
northwest. His residence in Vancouver dates from 1905, previous to which 
time he had spent five years in Manitoba. He was born March 9, 1875, in 
Madoc, Hastings county, Ontario, a son of Thomas and Climena Connor, both 
of whom were descendants of United Empire Loyalist families. 




DAVID A. McKEE 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 205 

In the public and high schools of his native city Thomas Connor pursued 
his education. His family owned and conducted a general store in the northern 
part of Hastings county, Ontario, and for four years after leaving school he 
assisted in the conduct of the business. In 1893 the family removed to Picton, 
Prince Edward county, and there Thomas Connor began learning the contract- 
ing and building business. For twelve years the family home was maintained 
at Picton, during which period Thomas Connor was for some time associated 
with an uncle, Andrew Irving, an architect of Picton. His identification with 
the west dates from 1897, in which year he arrived in Winnipeg, there becom- 
ing associated with the Winnipeg branch of the Canada Cycle Motor Company 
of Toronto, Ontario, as their credit man. He occupied that position for six 
years, when he went to southern California and two years later, in 1905, came to 
Vancouver. For about three and a half years he was credit man in this city 
for the British America Lives:ock Association which has since merged into 
the British Empire Insurance Company following one year as credit clerk 
vvith Walter F. Evans & Company, music dealers. In the fall of 1911 he was 
appointed credit man for the joint Retail Association of Vancouver and the 
province, and six months later was appointed to his present position as secretary 
of the Retail Merchants Association of British Columbia. He is also secretary 
of the Vancouver Retail Grocers Association. He has studied every phase and 
question concerning trade relations in the Pacific coast country, and in his 
present connection is doing much to further mercantile interests in his adopted 
city and the northwest. 

Fraternally Mr. Coynor is connected with the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. He belongs also to the Vancouver Commercial Club and is a director 
of the Progress Club. Enterprising, wide-awake, alert and energetic, he is a 
typical representative of the northwest and one whose labors are constituting 
an effective force in shaping the history of this section of the country. 



ANDREW McCREIGHT CREERY. 

Andrew McCreight Creery, manager of the insurance department of H. 
Bell-Irving & Company, Ltd., and by virtue of this position and the force of 
the ability by which he achieved it a power in business circles of Vancouver, 
was born in County Down, Ireland, in 1863. Pie is a son of Andrew and Alice 
(Tate) Creery, both of whom have passed away, the former being for many 
/ears rector of the parish of Kilmore, in County Down. 

In the acquirement of an education Andrew McCreight Creery attended 
Foyle College, Londonderry, and Trinity College, Dublin, graduating from the 
atter institution in 1886. Two years later he came to Canada, locating near 
lalgary, Alberta, where he lived until 1890, in which year he came to British 
Columbia. He settled in Vancouver and shortly after turned his attention to 
he private banking business, conducting a safe and reliable concern of this 
character under the name of Casement & Creery from 1890 until 1894. At the 
>:nd of that time he engaged in the insurance business, becoming rapidly well 
known and prominent in that field, and in 1900 entered the employ of H. Bell- 
rving & Company, Ltd., as manager of the insurance department, a position 
'vhich he now holds. It calls for a power of control, an executive force and 
;.n initiative spirit and upon his possession of these qualities Mr. Creery has 
based his success, the affairs of his department being in excellent condition and 
proving steadily more profitable and important. He is a far-sighted, discrimi- 
nating and able business man and is giving the best that is in him to the com- 
pany which he serves, the growth of his special department being in a large 
measure due to him. 

In England, in 1891, Mr. Creery was united in marriage to Miss Anna 
Hulbert and they have become the parents of six children, Irene Anna, Kenneth 



206 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

Andrew, Cuthbert John, Ronald Hulbert, Leslie Charles and Wallace Bour- 
chier. Mr. Creery was for a number of years a member of the Vancouver 
Rowing Club and formerly was active and skilful in tennis, football and cricket,. 
sports to which he gave a great deal of time and attention. He is connected 
fraternally with Western Gate. Lodge, No. 48, G. R. B. C., of which he is serv- 
ing as master, and he is a past first principal of Royal Arch Chapter, No. 98, G. R. 
C. He belongs to the Vancouver and the Jericho Country Clubs and his religious 
views are in accord with the doctrines of the Church of England. He is public- 
spirited and progressive in matters of citizenship and gives his hearty coopera- 
tion to every movement which tends to promote the moral, intellectual or mate- 
rial welfare of the community. 






WILLIAM GEORGE GILLETT. 

Since 1910 William George Gillett has made Vancouver the head of his oper- 
ations as general contractor, coming here from Nelson, in which town he was one 
of the greatest forces for development and one of its real builders. Enjoying the 
highest reputation professionally, it is but natural that larger and larger contracts, 
should have come to him, among which may be mentioned the building of the 
largest bridge across the Columbia river at Revelstoke, the building of the Van- 
couver arena and some of the greatest government wharfs. Mr. Gillett is at 
present largely engaged along the last mentioned line m the northern part of 
British Columbia. As high as his reputation stands as a contractor, he is renowned 
for a fact which he values still more highly, and that is that he cares for his men and 
their lives as for his own and he never allows them to take any unnecessary risks. 
It is most notable that in building the Columbia River bridge and the great Van- 
couver Arena not one life was lost from the beginning of the operations until the 
works were completed. This remarkable record of Mr. Gillett throws much light 
upon his humane nature and makes his character one which makes him beloved by- 
all men. 

William George Gillett was born at Twillingate, Newfoundland, December 6, 
1870, a son of George and Ann (Whitehorn) Gillett, both natives of that colony. 
The grandfathers on both sides came, as many of the other settlers there, from the 
western part of England. George Gillett, the father of our subject, still resides 
at Twillingate, where for many years he has been engaged in general merchandising: 
and is highly respected. 

In the acquirement of his education Mr. Gillett attended public school in his- 
native town, beginning his independent career at the age of fifteen while gaining 
some knowledge of the carpenter's trade. He worked along this line of occu- 
pation in Twillingate until nearly twenty-one years of age, when he removed to 
Boston, engaging in carpentering there for two months before coming to Vic- 
toria, where he arrived in January, 1891. In addition to his trade he here en- 
gaged also in fur sealing on the coast, being so occupied during the sealing season 
for three years. In 1895 he made removal to Rossland, British Columbia, being 
there during the boom days, when much building was undertaken. He continued 
following his trade but also began to take on contracts, which he carried to suc- 
cessful completion. It was here that he made his first step into the contracting 
business. In April, 1897, Mr. Gillett went to Nelson, engaging in contracting 
only. He has ever since confined his efforts to that line. While there, however, 
he also operated a sash and door factory. It was in Nelson that he first took an. 
active part in politics. He was and is still today a liberal, but a liberal with some- 
what original and independent ideas who does not blindly indorse every party rec- 
ommendation. In 1901 Mr. Gillett was elected alderman for the east ward and, in- 
1905 again served the same constituents. In the latter part of 1905 John Huston, 
the mayor, suddenly left Nelson and upon his departure the council appointed 




WILLIAM G. GILLETT 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 209 

vlr. Gillett acting mayor for the remainder of the term. At the election of 1906 
he new mayor and entire council were elected and again in 1907. Under the 
;,Tiidance of Mayor Gillett and this council many works of vital importance to 
kelson were executed. The large hydro-electric power plant was built at a cost 
nf three hundred thousand dollars under his regime and it is still the pride of 
i he city. It was in 1906 that Nelson took over the defunct street railway, which 
had permitted its charter to expire, and conducted it as a public utility. This street 
lailway is of particular interest and unusual efforts have been made to maintain 
in because it is the only street railway in the interior of British Columbia. When 
the San Francisco disaster occurred, Mayor Gillett's energies were again tested 
when he and the council, acting on behalf of the city, started a fund for the suf- 
ferers. They worked through all that night, securing large contributions from 
tie citizens and packing a car load of supplies to be shipped at the earliest possible 
i loment. The expense of the shipment was paid out of the large fund made up 
ind a comfortable sum was left which was forwarded in the form of cash. This 
aid from Nelson was the first contribution from Canada to reach the San Fran- 
cisco sufferers. Mr. Gillett also was chairman of the managing committee of the 
i iterior liberal district council and in that capacity had charge of the appointment 
c f the organizer for the district. He was on the executive of the Board of Trade 
and while mayor of the city entertained for five clays His Excellency, Earl Grey, 
governor general of Canada, and his party. 

During his stay in Nelson Mr. Gillett built the beautiful marble courthouse 
aid the handsome marble and granite edifice of the Trinity Methodist church. 
He was a trustee and most active member of that church for several years and 
was also a director of the Kootenay Lake General Hospital for ten years. Dur- 
ing one year of his building operations in Nelson, Mr. Gillett erected twenty-seven 
buildings, which statement gives an idea of the magnitude of his undertakings. 

In August, 1910, seeking a broader field of operation, Mr. Gillett came to Van- 
couver. He built in that same year the Columbia River bridge at Revelstoke for 
the provincial government. This is one of the largest bridges across the Columbia. 
In the same year he also built a railroad approach, six thousand and ten feet long, 
o/erthe mud flats at the head of the Portland canal, for the Northeastern Short 
Line Railroad. At the same place he built a wharf of fifty-three hundred feet 
for the Dominion government. These two works, each more than a mile in length 
a id built entirely of wood, are masterpieces of their kind of construction and 
recognized as such by the profession. Mr. Gillett was the contractor for the 
mammoth Vancouver Arena skating, curling and hockey rink, which is the largest 
and most costly arena built for these uses on the American continent, having a 
stating capacity of ten thousand, five hundred people. The size of the building 
is two hundred by three hundred and thirty feet. It was the first artificial ice rink 
ever built in Canada and is of semi-fireproof construction. Its cost of erection was 
t\ 'o hundred and eighty-fi\e thousand dollars. Actual work was begun August 
1. 1911, and the rink was opened to the public on December aoth of the same year. 
Trierewere two hundred and thirty-two men employed on the work and the build- 
ing was completed without injury to a man. Although the number employed was 
not so large in building the Columbia River bridge, this work was finished with 
the same remarkable record. Mr. Gillett values the lives of his workmen as he 
does his own and never permits them to take risks that can be avoided. He has 
always steadfastly adhered to this rule with the result that it is seldom that an- 
accident occurs in his building operations. Since leaving Nelson in 1910 he has 
made Vancouver his home, and upon completing the arena his work has been 
largely confined to northern British Columbia, where he principally engages in 
the building of wharfs for the Dominion government. Since April, 1913, he has 
been principally engaged with building numerous government wharfs on the Queen 
Charlotte islands. 

On December 7, 1892, at Twillingate, Newfoundland, Mr. Gillett was married 
to Miss Susan Elizabeth Young, who died in Nelson, February 8, 1908. On April 
ic, 1909, Mr. Gillett married, at Rossland, British Columbia, Miss A. Beatrice 



210 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

Hobbs, of Brandon, Manitoba, and to them two daughters have been born, 
Margery Beatrice and Georgia Vivian. 

Mr. Gillett is well known in fraternal circles, being a member of Nelson 
Lodge, No. 23, A. F. & A. M., and a charter member and recording secretary 
of the Loyal Orange Lodge at Nelson. The importance of his work in opening 
the resources of the province to the world can hardly be estimated today, and in 
that relation he must be considered one of the most useful men in British Columbia. 
He is patriotic to the core, ever interested in worthy public enterprises, and consid- 
ers the general welfare as of greater importance than individual prosperity. It is, 
however, but natural that financial independence has come to Mr. Gillett as the 
result of his extensive operations, which were ever guided by extraordinary execu- 
tive ability and good judgment, and it is therefore not surprising that he is to be 
counted today among the most substantial men of the city and province. He en- 
joys to a great extent the good-will and confidence of the public, the government, 
those who employ him and especially those whom he employs and for whose 
safety he feels as responsible as a father. It is this trait of his character which 
stands out above all else and begets general admiration. 



JOSEPH HENLEY. 

Prominent among the older business men of New Westminster is Joseph 
Henley, who for over twenty-five years has been engaged in the manufacture 
of soda water in this city. Moreover, he has held government positions of 
trust and for many years has served as alderman of his city, being connected 
with important committees. Born in the county of Woburn, Bedfordshire, 
England, on March 27, 1855, he is a son of George and Mary Ann (Cook) 
Henley, both natives of that county, where they passed their entire lives. The 
father was head gamekeeper for the duke of Bedford. 

Joseph Henley was reared and educated in London, attending private schools 
until sixteen years of age, when he came to Canada, locating in British Colum- 
bia. He took the water route, going via the West Indies to Aspinwall, pro- 
ceeding from Aspinwall to the isthmus of Panama and thence to the Pacific 
coast, reaching San Francisco on the day following the earthquake of 1871. 
However, he did not stop in that city but proceeded northward, finally reach- 
ing Victoria, which city was destined to be his home for sixteen years. For 
several years of that period he was variously employed but subsequently en- 
gaged in the bakery business independently, his efforts being attended with 
success. In 1887 he came to New Westminster and established himself in the 
soda water business on Front street, subsequently building a factory on Cun- 
ningham street, which was, however, destroyed by the great conflagration of 
1898. He then moved to his present location, building his factory at No. 717 
Princess street, near his residence, which is located at No. 615 Eighth street. 
Mr. Henley has built up a gratifying business, enjoying a steady and profitable 
demand for his goods. During the summer seasons he employs four men and 
even during the winter months keeps three hands at work. The years have 
brought prosperity to him and there is no one in New Westminster who is 
more entitled to the success that has come to him than Joseph Henley. 

In May, 1880, in Victoria, Mr. Henley was united in marriage to Miss 
Mary Field, a native of Oregon, and to this union were born three children: 
Mary Louise, the wife of Thackerous Oddy, of New Westminster; Joseph 
Leonard Jr., who is engaged in the manufacture of shingles in the state of 
Washington; and Mabel, deceased. Mrs. Henley passed away in 1899 and 
in 1903 Mr. Henley was again married, his second union being with Miss 
Jennie Stewart McColm, of New Westminster, but a native of _ Fergus, Ontario. 

When a young man of but eighteen years Mr. Henley joined the Boys' 
Volunteer Fire Department of Victoria and when these youths reached their 




JOSEPH HENLEY 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 213 

twentieth year they were taken into the Men's Volunteer Fire Department. 
Our subject continued in the service for fourteen years, or until he left the city, 
having become second lieutenant of the department in later years. In 1888, 
after the Hyacks (which was the name of the volunteer fire department of 
New Westminster) disbanded, a new company was organized and Mr. Henley 
was chosen as its captain. While in Victoria Mr. Henley also served three years 
in the militia under Captains Vintor and Roscoe. He is also prominent in the 
Masonic order, being a member of King Solomon Lodge, Xo. 17, A. F. & A. 
M., and of the Grand Chapter, R. A. M. For twenty-five years he has been 
connected with the Ancient Order of Foresters and the Westminster Club also 
carries his name on its roster. Among other organizations he belongs to the 
Fraternal Order of Eagles, the Ancient Order of United Workmen, and is a 
member of Royal Lodge, No. 6, K. P., having served as secretary of this lodge 
for the past six years. Both he and his wife are devout members of the Pres- 
oyterian church. Mr. Henley gives his political support to the conservative 
Darty and in 1902 was appointed by the provincial government license commis- 
sioner of New Westminster, serving for two years. Being elected alderman 
it that time, he was then forced to resign the former position, as he could not 
lold two offices, and with the exception of one year has since continuously 
served on the city council for a period of nine years. He has been chairman 
)f the board of public works and for the past two years chairman of the board 
of fire and market and has done valuable work in committee rooms and on the 
open floor in promoting measures which have proven of much benefit to the 
<ity. A man who fully realizes the obligations of citizenship, Joseph Henley 
r,an always be found among those who are not chary in their support of worthy 
public enterprises. A record of twenty-five years of continuous business enter- 
prise stands to his credit and assures him of a foremost place among the busi- 
ness men of New Westminster. 



WILLIAM STEARNE DEACON. 

Public opinion passes favorable judgment upon William Stearne Deacon 
both as barrister and as citizen. Moreover, in Vancouver, the city of his resi- 
< ence, he has gained many friends as well as a liberal clientage. He was born 
ii Bothwell, Ontario, January i, 1871, a son of the Rev. Daniel and Maria 
Helen (Ball) Deacon, both of whom were natives of Ontario. The father, 
c n whom had been conferred the Master of Arts degree, was rector of the 
Anglican church at Bothwell, whence he removed to Stratford, Ontario, where 
he was rector of St. Paul's church for many years. He now resides in Strat- 
ford, but the mother is deceased. 

After attending the Stratford Collegiate Institute at Stratford, Ontario, Wil- 
liam S. Deacon prepared for the practice of law as a student in Osgoode Hall, 
from which he was graduated with the class of 1894. The same year he was 
c died to the bar of Ontario and engaged in practice in Stratford for a short 
t me. In 1895 he came to Vancouver and was admitted to practice in the 
courts of this province in that year. He joined the firm of Harris, Macneill & 
Deacon and within a brief period had given ample demonstration of his ability 
in law practice. In 1896 he opened offices at Rossland, British Columbia, in 
partnership with A. H. Macneill, K. C., continuing in practice there until 1904. 
I i the spring of that year he returned to Vancouver and became a partner in 
the firm of McCaul, Deacon & Deacon. Subsequent changes in the partnership 
lid to the adoption of the firm style of Wade, Deacon & Deacon and since the 
retirement of F. C. Wade, K. C., the firm has been known as Deacon, Deacon 
& Wilson, with William S. Deacon as senior partner. His success has been 
continuous, owing to his developing powers and broadening experience. 



214 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

Mr. Deacon was married at Stratford, Ontario, in 1900, to Miss Caroline 
M. Fraser, eldest daughter of the late Dr. D. M. Eraser, one of the best known 
pioneer physicians of western Ontario. Mr. and Mrs. Deacon have five chil- 
dren, George Stearne, Donald Fraser, William Stearne, Jr., Martin Ledwith 
and Caroline M. The family attend St. Paul's church, in which Mr. Deacon 
holds membership, and he belongs also to the Vancouver Club. In politics he 
is a conservative and has been active for the advancement of the party but has 
never desired office. His ambition has been in the strict path of his profession 
and his close conformity to a high standard of professional ethics has won for 
him the highest regard of his professional brethren. 



HAROLD WORSLEY EBBS CANAVAN. 

Harold Worsley Ebbs Canavan, of the firm of Canavan & Mitchell, consult- 
ing engineers, and one of the best known and most able representatives of his ' 
profession in British Columbia and the Yukon, was born in Toronto, Ontario, 
November 25, 1867, and is a son of William Birch and Elizabeth Blanche (Eas- 
taff) Canavan, of Winnipeg. The father was for many years a prominent bar- 
rister in that city, but is deceased. 

Harold Canavan acquired his education in the pubic schools of Toronto and 
in collegiate institute in that city. During the entire course of his active career 
he has been engaged in civil engineering, each year bringing him increased prom- 
inence in his chosen field. He has done a great deal of important work in Alaska 
and from 1893 to 1896 served as a member of the first Alaska Boundary Com- 
mission. Since 1897 he has been in private professional practice in the Yukon 
territory and in British Columbia, making his home in Victoria, where his ability 
is recognized and honored in business and professional circles. In 1911 he 
entered into partnership with A. K. Mitchell under the firm name of Canavan 
& Mitchell, and they control today an important patronage as consulting engi- 
neers, making a specialty of examinations and reports and all matters pertain- 
ing to irrigation, drainage, hydro-electric development, waterworks, sewerage 
and sewage disposal, besides being also well known as supervisors of construction. 

In Victoria, on the 7th of November, 1904, Mr. Canavan was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Frances Alice Clarke, a daughter of Captain Frank I. and Frances 
A. Clarke, the former of whom took an active part in the Red River expedition 
under General Wolseley and was for a number of years connected with the 
provincial bureau of information. Mr. and Mrs. Canavan have three children: 
Worsley F., Mary F., and Blanche E. 

Mr. Canavan gives his political allegiance to the conservative party and is 
connected fraternally with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the 
Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. He is a member of the Canadian Society 
of Civil Engineers and belongs to the Pacific, the Union and the Canadian 
Clubs, being well known in social and professional circles. 



PETER PEEBLES. 

Peter Peebles, well known as a representative of real-estate activity in New 
Westminster, was born in Dairy, Kirkcudbrightshire, Scotland, October 5, 1860, 
a son of Thomas and Jane McKenzie (Murie) Peebles, both of whom were 
natives of Perthshire. The father was a dealer in wood and an able, capable 
business man who died at the comparatively early age of thirty-six years. 

Peter Peebles was educated in the public schools of Scotland and pursued 
a course in the Dundee Technical School of Dundee, Scotland, where he learned 
the builder's trade. In 1882 he came to Canada and after spending a year in 




HAROLD W. E. CANAVAN 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 217 

Winnipeg made his way westward to British Columbia to work on the Onder- 
donk contract as a sub-contractor of the Canadian Pacific Railway, being con- 
nected with the contracts of that part of the road extending from Kamloops 
to Port Moody. There are today but few men living that worked on that con- 
tract. Following the completion of the road Mr. Peebles continued as a build- 
ing contractor until 1907 and built up a good business in that connection, his 
efforts being an element in general improvement and progress in the districts 
in which he labored. Since that time he has been engaged in the real-estate 
business and is acknowledged an expert as a real-estate valuator and that branch 
of his business is most important and has made him well known. He has also 
negotiated many real-estate transfers and his opinions have largely become 
accepted as authority upon matters pertaining to the real-estate market in New 
Westminster. 

In 1886 Mr. Peebles was united in marriage to Miss Angusta Grant, of New 
Westminster, a daughter of Captain Angus Grant, who was the first captain 
of the government snag boat Sampson. Mr. and Mrs. Peebles have become 
the parents of six children-: Jane Murie, who is a teacher in the city schools; 
Catherine Grant, the wife of Guy D. Cookson, yard foreman of the Fraser 
Mills at Mill Site; Peter Grant, residing in Salem, Oregon; and Mary Evange- 
line, Angusta Brownie and Allan, all at home. 

Mr. Peebles is one of the leaders of the conservative party in this section of 
the province, doing all in his power to promote its growth and insure its 
success. He is a member of King Solomon Lodge, A. F. & A. M. ; Royal Lodge, 
No. 6, K. of P.; and the Loyal Order of Moose. The cause of education also 
finds in him a stanch champion. For six years he has been one of the trustees of 
the Westminster schools and is one of the founders of the School Trustees Asso- 
ciation of British Columbia. He is a past president and life member of the asso- 
ciation and, recognizing education to be one of the bulwarks of the nation, he 
has done everything in his power to promote the cause of public instruction. 



ANDREW THOMPSON BROWN. 

Andrew Thompson Brown, founder and half-owner of the Vulcan Iron Works 
in Vancouver, is numbered among the well known and prominent business men of 
this city, his wise management and the capable control of his interests winning 
him a most gratifying measure of success. He was born in Glasgow, Scotland, 
September 23, 1875, and is a son of John and Mary Brown, representatives of 
old Scotch families. 

The public schools of his native city afforded Andrew T. Brown his educa- 
tional opportunities and he was afterward a student at a normal school at Glas- 
gow for two years, spending at the same time one-half of each day engaged in 
teaching. In 1891 he started in the engineering business in a locomotive shop in 
Glasgow, remaining there until his apprenticeship expired in 1896, when he began 
his independent career as a journeyman engineer. Eventually he sailed out of 
Glasgow as a marine engineer on Patsy Henderson's boats, going to Rangoon, 
Burma, India, and in this connection remained for about two years. At the end 
of that time he obtained employment in the marine engineering shops on the 
Clyde, Scotland. .In 1900 he crossed the Atlantic to Canada, settling in the same 
year in Calgary, Alberta. There he was employed by the Canadian Pacific Rail- 
way as a machinist for about two years, coming in 1902 to Vancouver, British 
Columbia. Immediately afterward he went to sea as a marine engineer on the 
Empress of India and he held this position for two years, after which he returned 
to British Columbia, settling in Surrey, where from 1904 to 1911 he did capable 
and efficient work as foreman in a shingle mill. In the latter year he took up his 
residence in Vancouver and formed a partnership with J. M. McLaren, with 
whom he does business under the name of the Vulcan Iron Works. Their equip- 



218 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

ment is complete and the enterprise has grown rapidly, a great deal of the credit 
for its remarkable prosperity being due to Mr. Brown's ability, initiative spirit 
and excellent management. 

On the ist of December, 1902, in Vancouver, Mr. Brown was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Isa Henderson, a daughter of T. B. and Mary Henderson, the former 
for many years a resident of Chilliwack, British Columbia, who lives now retired. 
Mr. and Mrs. Brown are the parents of one son, Stanley. 

Mr. Brown is a member of the Presbyterian church and is connected frater- 
nally with St. Andrew Lodge, No. 465, F. & A. M., of Glasgow, and with the 
order of Hoo Hoos. In Scotland he was for three years a member of the Medi- 
cal Corps of the Volunteers of Glasgow. He gives his political allegiance to the 
conservative party and is a public-spirited and progressive citizen, although he 
has never sought public office. Early coming to a realization of the fact that 
success in any business must come as the legitimate and logical result of well 
directed effort and intelligently applied labor, he has made perseverance, dili- 
gence and integrity the guiding-posts of his life, which have brought him to the 
creditable place which he now occupies in business circles. 



COLONEL RICHARD WOLFENDEN, I. S. O., V. D. 

Colonel Richard Wolfenden, whose demise occurred in Victoria in 1911, was 
long a prominent and influential citizen of the province, holding the honorable 
position of Queen's and King's printer for British Columbia during nearly a half 
century. 1 le likewise acted as controller of stationery for the province and was 
one of Victoria's honored pioneers, having been identified with the city from the 
time of its incorporation. His birth occurred in Rathmel, Yorkshire, England, 
on the 2Oth of March, 1836, and he was the third son of Robert and Mary (Frank- 
land) Wolfenden, likewise natives of that country. They were farming people 
and their lives were in consistent harmony with their professions as members of 
the Church of England. 

Richard Wolfenden obtained his education in the schools of Lancashire and 
Westmoreland and in 1855 became a member of the Royal Engineers. Three 
years later he was one of the party of one hundred and fifty of the Royal Engi- 
neers who made the voyage around the Horn to British Columbia. There was 
still no settlement on the mainland, and Victoria bore small resemblance to the 
present thriving city, the fort of the Hudson's Bay Company being the principal 
center of activity in the place. They established a post at Sapperton, just outside 
of the present site of the city of New Westminster and engaged in roadmaking, 
surveying, etc. Colonel Wolfenden was stationed at headquarters under Colonel 
Moody, who was in charge of the party. 

In 1863, upon his retirement from the Royal Engineers, Colonel Wolfenden 
was appointed Queen's printer for the province of British Columbia and for 
nearly fifty years, or until the time of his demise, ably discharged the important 
duties devolving upon him in this capacity. He was likewise prominent in public 
affairs of a varied nature and for two years served as a member of the city 
board of school trustees. He was among the first to join the volunteer move- 
ment in British Columbia and acted as ensign in the New Westminster and Vic- 
toria Rifle Volunteers from 1864 until 1874. In the latter year, when the or- 
ganization merged with the Canada Militia, he continued his connection with the 
latter, and in 1878 retired with the rank of lieutenant colonel (V. D.) and was 
created I. S. O. in 1903. 

Colonel Wolfenden was twice married. In 1865 he wedded Miss Kate Cooley, 
of Ashford, England. The seven children born of this union are all natives of 
British Columbia and are all still living. The record is as follows : Nellie, who is 
the wife of George F. Mathews; Francis Cooley; Roberta Elizabeth, who gave 
her hand in marriage to Charles P. Innes; Arthur Richard; Mabel Mary, the 



\ 

: 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 219 

wife of Kenneth R. Streatfield; Walter William, a sketch of whom appears on 
another page of this work ; and Kate Cooley, who is Mrs. Percy B. Fowler. The 
wife and mother passed away in 1878 and the following year Colonel Wolfenden 
was again married, his second union being with Miss Felicite C. Bayley, who was 
born in Philadelphia but came of old English ancestry. The children of this mar- 
riage are Frederick Leslie, Victor Arnold and Madge, all at home with their 
mother. 

When Colonel Wolfenden was called to his final rest in 1911, Victoria lost one 
of its leading and most esteemed citizens as well as early pioneers. His influence 
was ever given on the side of right, truth and progress and his labors proved a 
serviceable factor in the growth and upbuilding of this region. He was a devoted 
member of the Church of England and served in the capacity of warden. At 
one time he held the office of president of the Yorkshire Society, and lie was also 
a valued member of the Ancient Order of United Workmen. His memory is 
:herished by all who knew him, and his name and record are perpetuated on the 
pages of British Columbia's history. 



TAMES GORDON McKAY, M. D., C. M. 

Dr. James Gordon McKay, since November, 1907, assistant medical superin- 
:endent of the Provincial Hospital for the Insane at New Westminster and num- 
bered among the leading and representative physicians and surgeons of the city, 
was born in Morewood, Ontario, March 25, 1876, a son of William and Mary 
McKay. He acquired his early education in the public schools of his native 
own and afterward attended Ottawa Collegiate Institute and high school at 
Xemptville, Ontario. In 1895 he entered McGill University in Montreal and 
n June, 1899, was graduated in medicine, receiving the degrees of M. D., C. M. 
'n the same year he entered upon the active practice of his profession in the state 
of Montana where he remained until 1907, when he came to New Westminster, 
vhere he has since gained prominence and distinction along professional lines, 
casing his success upon a comprehensive and exact knowledge of underlying 
medical principles and a keen sense of the responsibilities which devolve upon the 
physician. He secured a large and representative patronage and was very suc- 
cessful in its conduct until November, 1907, when he entered the Provincial Hos- 
pital for the Insane as assistant medical superintendent. This position he still 
holds and he discharges its duties in a capable and able way, for he is especially 
interested in insanity and its attendant ills and has devoted a great deal of time 
10 study along this line. 

On the 4th of June, 1902, at Russell, Ontario, Dr. McKay was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Florence Eleanor Craig, a daughter of William and Eleanor Craig. 
She was born in Russell, Ontario, and there received her early education, later 
; ttending the collegiate institute at Ottawa and the State University at Madison, 
Wisconsin. Dr. and Mrs. McKay have two children, Dorothy Craig and Jean 
sabei. Dr. McKay has been a member of the Masonic lodge since 1899 and in 
912 he joined the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He is recognized in New West- 
minster as a conscientious, able and reliable physician and stands high in the 
regard of the medical fraternity and the local public. 



ARTHUR BUCHANAN POTTENGER. 

One of the most successful and prominent of the younger representatives of 
the British Columbia bar is Arthur Buchanan Pottenger, of Vancouver, who is 
now serving in an efficient and capable manner as district registrar of the supreme 
< ourt. He was born in Owen Sound, Ontario, November 8, 1872, and is a son of 



220 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

John and Jane Pottenger, the former for many years employed in the Merchants 
Bank of Canada. 

In the public and' high schools of Hamilton, Ontario, Arthur B. Pottenger 
acquired his early education and he afterward attended Trinity University in 
Toronto, from which he was graduated B. A. in 1893 and M. A. in 1895. He 
afterward took the law course at Osgoode Hall in Toronto and was called to the 
Ontario bar in 1896. One year later he came to British Columbia and in 1898 
was called to the bar of this province, spending several years afterward in success- 
ful practice alone. In 1906 he became a member of the firm of Russell, Russell 
& Pottenger of Vancouver and continued with it until November, 1907, gaining 
during that period recognition as a strong and able practitioner, whose knowl- 
edge of underlying legal principles is comprehensive and exact and whose judg- 
ment is at all times acute and logical. Mr. Pottenger severed his connection with 
Russell, Russell & Pottenger in November, 1907, when he was appointed district 
registrar of the supreme court, and this position he now holds, discharging his 
duties in a way which reflects credit upon his ability and his public spirit. 

In Vancouver Mr. Pottenger was united in marriage to Miss Annie Mildred 
Fulton, a daughter of G. N. and Mary L. Fulton, and both are well known in social 
circles of the city. Mr. Pottenger was a charter director of the Vancouver Ath- 
letic Club and his religious views are in accord with the doctrines of the Anglican 
church. His political allegiance is given to the conservative party and he has 
been for some years one of the greatest individual forces in the local organization, 
having been one of the founders of the present Conservative Association. He is 
well known in political, official and professional circles and is justly regarded 
as one of the most representative and valued citizens of Vancouver. 



WILLIAM TEAGUE. 

William Teague, formerly a well known and successful miner, now living 
retired in Yale, was born at St. Day in Cornwall, England, on the 27th of July, 
1835, a son of Josiah and Michel (Cundy-Pentreath) Teague. He acquired his 
education in the public schools and studied until he was twelve years of age, 
after which he left England in 1855 and came to America, traveling to California 
around the isthmus of Panama. He was three months in making the journey and 
was nineteen years and three months of age when he reached the gold fields 
of the western United States. He mined and prospected for three years at 
Chip's Flat; and Monte Christo near Downieville, Sierra county, and then, at 
the time of the general excitement over the gold discoveries on the Fraser river, 
came to British Columbia on the steamer Oregon, which sailed from San Fran- 
cisco July 5, 1858. En route with three other steamers for Victoria the Cortez, 
Orizba and Golden Age the Oregon made the trip in four and a half days and 
was the first steamer landed direct at Victoria from San Francisco. She had 
fifteen hundred passengers on board. He paid for his passage two weeks before 
the steamer sailed and while waiting was obliged to sleep on the floor of the 
hotel the What Cheer House, one of the leading hotels of the city at that 
time. He was a passenger on the first boat to sail from California to Victoria 
and from there he pushed on to Hope and then to Cornish Bar and mined and 
prospected there and in the vicinity of Yale until April, 1864. In that year he 
staked claims in the Cariboo country, walking a distance of six hundred miles 
to locate them, and these he developed until 1873, when he was appointed provin- 
cial government agent of revenue at Yale. He held that. office for twelve years, 
discharging his duties ably, carefully and conscientiously, and upon leaving the 
position resumed mining and continued in that occupation until he retired. He 
is today enjoying in ease and comfort the rewards of his long life of activity 
and toil and he well deserves his rest and freedom from business cares. 




WILLIAM TEAGUE 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 223 

In 1871 Mr. Teague was united in marriage to Miss Alice Michell, of St. Day, 
Cornwall, England, and they became the parents of five children: Mrs. Alice 
Michell Bailey, of Vancouver ; Mrs. Nannie-Prout Mackenrot, of Golden, Brit- 
ish Columbia; Mrs. Minnie Pentreath Nunan, of Seattle, Washington; Mrs. 
Elizabeth Cundy Johnson, of Portland, Oregon; and Gladys, at home. 

Mr. Teague is an honored member of the Pioneer Society of Victoria and 
in his religious faith affiliates with the Church of England. He is a member of 
Tregullow Lodge, No. 1 106, of Cornwall, and in his politics supports the liberal 
party. He has ever been actuated by the principles which govern honorable and 
upright manhood in his private life, and the same high ideals have been manifest 
in his dealings with those with whom he has been connected in a business way. 



HARRY BETTZ. 

Four years' connection with the real-estate business in Vancouver has made 
Harry Bettz well known among those who are handling property interests in this 
city. Like hundreds of other ambitious, energetic young men he turned to the 
northwest as the land of opportunity. He was born in Bay City, Michigan, Sep- 
tember 17, 1880, his parents being William and Mary Bettz. In the paternal line 
he is directly descended from old Puritan stock that came over on the Mayflower, 
making the first settlement on the upper Atlantic coast. With the removal of 
the family to Canada he became a public-school pupil at Owen Sound, Ontario, 
and afterward pursued a course in the collegiate institute there. When his 
school days were over he entered the employ of the Canadian Pacific Railroad 
and continued with that corporation in various capacities for thirteen years, or 
from 1896 until 1909. On the 23d of May of the latter year he opened a real- 
estate office in Vancouver and has since been engaged in this business, enjoying 
a growing clientage and handling each year property interests of great magnitude. 
He has invested to some extent in property in Vancouver and is quite heavily 
interested in the development of Port Coquitlam, British Columbia. 

On the 6th of November, 1906, at Oswego, New York, Mr. Bettz was married 
to Miss Mabel Dumbolton, a daughter of L. B. Dumbolton. The father, of Ger- 
man descent and a representative of an old New York family, is now retired. In 
politics Mr. Bettz is a liberal. He holds membership in the American Club and his 
religious faith is that of the Presbyterian church. He started out in life on his own 
account at the age of sixteen years and has since been dependent upon his 
own resources, therefore deserving much credit for what he has achieved. 
Steadily and persistently he has worked his way upward, knowing that difficul- 
ties and obstacles can usually be overcome by continuous and earnest effort and 
finding in, his laudable ambition the incentive for unfaltering business activity. 



PERCY REGINALD BURR. 

Percy Reginald Burr, a real-estate broker, actively and successfully handling 
property interests in New Westminster, his native city, was born on the 22d of 
February, 1889, his parents being William H. and Minnie E. (Pilow) Burr, both 
of whom were natives of Dublin, Ireland, where they were married. The father 
was one of the pioneer settlers of British Columbia. On crossing the Atlantic to 
the new world he first took up his abode in Ontario where he reared a family of 
children born to his first union. He came with the family to British Columbia 
by way of the Panama route and was engaged in teaching school in Victoria, being 
'one of the first, if not the first teacher there. His wife died in that city and later 
he returned to Ireland, where he wedded Minnie Pilow, who accompanied him as 
he again made the trip to British Columbia. Settling in New Westminster, he 



224 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

became a heavy speculator, owning property the value of which extended into the 
millions. He made heavy investments during the boom here but when it burst he 
lost heavily. He died in 1895 and is still survived by his widow, who now re- 
sides in Ladner. 

Percy R. Burr was reared under the parental roof and acquired his education 
in the rural public schools and at Columbia College in New Westminster. He 
finished his studies in 1906, but even prior to this time had entered upon his 
business career, having during vacation periods, while he was still pursuing his 
college course, worked as a clerk in a general store. After finishing his studies 
he again took a clerkship but soon afterward secured a position at Fraser Mills 
at tallying lumber, it being his intention to thoroughly acquaint himself with the 
lumber business. He found it unsuitable to his taste, however, and again he 
entered upon clerkship in the store of J. H. Harvey, with whom he continued for 
two years. He then turned his attention to the real-estate business in 1908, and 
has since been a prominent factor in that field of labor in New Westminster, 
operating exclusively in property which he has purchased both on his own account 
and for others. He is thoroughly conversant with realty values, and capable man- 
agement and enterprise have brought him to a prominent position among real- 
estate dealers in his city. 

Mr. Burr holds membership with the Native Sons of British Columbia and 
also with King Solomon Lodge, No. 17, A. F. & A. M. He is a member of the Board 
of Trade and the Progressive Association and likewise of the Westminster Club. 
He is popular in these' different organizations, possessing many substantial and 
attractive qualities which have gained for him the warm regard of all with whom 
he has been brought in contact.. 



CHARLES HENRY JONES. 

Charles Henry Jones, late of the firm of C. H. Jones & Son and a pioneer 
of Vancouver who came here in 1886 and for a quarter of a century was con- 
nected with its business interests, was born August 26, 1839, in Carmarthen, 
Wales. He was one of thirteen children, of whom the following are still liv- 
ing: Julia, born June 8, 1836; Alfred Poole, January 21, 1838; Edward, April 
4, 1846; Mary Jane, August 10, 1849; Tom Hamberlin, May 6, 1851; Esther 
Annie, May 17, 1853; and William Rodman, March 9, 1855. 

Mr. Jones' earliest personal recollections are of Gloucester, England, in which 
city he was brought up and where his father was a ship owner and chandler 
and sailmaker, carrying on business along those lines for a number of years. 
His education was obtained in a private school in his native land. Being asso- 
ciated with captains and seafaring people in his younger days, Charles H. Jones 
became fond of the water and interested in ships and at the age of twenty-one 
resolved to take a trip on the sea and, giving his parents but four hours' notice, 
had his hammock lashed and his chest packed and was on his way to Cardiff to 
join his ship, a square rigged brig, The North Star, bound for Hong Kong 
with a load of coal for the Imperial government. Going down the Bristol chan- 
nel and across the bay of Biscay the brig encountered such rough weather that 
she was as much under water as above. They made the long passage through 
light and contrary winds and to add to their discomfort the brig sprang a leak 
in her rudder trunk. They also ran short of water on the trip as at that time 
most ships, particularly small ones, carried all their water in barrels and casks 
instead of tanks and most of these were stowed away on deck. These were 
some of the earliest recollections of Mr. Jones at the outset of his career. 

Some time after coming to North America Mr. Jones settled in St. John, 
New Brunswick, where in partnership with his brother, Alfred Poole Jones, 
he was engaged in the sailmaking business for a number of years until they 
burned out in 1878. Previous to this period the family had farmed for a 







CHARLES H. JONES 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 227 

short time in Nova Scotia, leaving that province in order to remove to New 
Brunswick. Before taking his brother into partnership in St. John our sub- 
ject carried on his business alone for several years. Alfred 1'oole Jones is 
still engaged in the same line of business at Windsor, Nova Scotia. 

In 1882 Mr. Jones went to Manitoba, farming in that province for four 
years before coming to Vancouver, where he arrived in 1886, beginning busi- 
ness under the firm name of C. H. Jones. Success attended his efforts from the 
beginning and the passing years ever increased his annual income. Industrious 
and honest in his dealings and popular in shipping circles, he enjoyed an exten- 
sive trade and became one of the foremost men in his line in the city. In 190 r, 
upon the admission of his son, Frederick S., the lirm name became C. H. [ones 
& Son and upon the death of our subject, on July 8, 10,12, the lirm was incor- 
porated as C. H. Jones & Son, Limited. 

Mr. Jones was twice married and by his union with Anna Stecle Calbraith 
had the following children: Charles Albert Workman; Julia Maude, who is 
now Mrs. Ira Ransom ; and Frederick Stecle, of whom more extended men- 
tion is made in another part of this work. There also is a half-sister, Laurada 
May Jones. In his religious associations Mr. Jones was a Methodist, always 
interested in the cause of his church and Christianity. Politically he gave his 
support to the conservative party and while residing in Manitoba was from 
1882 to 1886 clerk of the county council at Fort Fllis. However, after com- 
ing to Vancouver he did not participate in public life, giving all of his atten- 
tion to his business interests and promoting in a private way the welfare of his 
city. He was highly respected and esteemed by all who knew him as a pioneer 
of Vancouver who had been a forceful element in the upbuilding of the city. 
He traveled the path of usefulness and honor and although his start in life 
was humble, attained a substantial success. His is the story of an honest man 
whose gifts were not only used for the attainment of individual prosperity but 
as much for the betterment of the whole community and his record is one which 
may serve to encourage and inspire others, indicating the possibilities that lie 
before the individual and demonstrating what may be accomplished through 
personal effort and ambition. His memory is dear to the hearts of many who 
admired his rugged qualities of character, who appreciated the humane side 
of his nature and who saw in him a man who was imbued with love and kind- 
ness for his fellows. 



SAMUEL BOWELL. 

Samuel Bowell is numbered among the early settlers in British Columbia, his 
residence in the province dating from 1886. This has covered the period of its 
greatest development, for the Okanagan country was at that time comparatively 
jnsettled and conditions in other parts of the province were equally primitive. 
Throughout the years Mr. Bowell has been an interested witness of the change 
.vhich has revolutionized business conditions and made the section prosperous, 
ind, by his steadily increasing success and his business enterprise, has borne 
in important part in the advancement. He now makes his home in New West- 
ninster where he owns a well equipped undertaking etsablishment. 

Mr. Bowell was born at St. Johns, Newfoundland, January 23, 1865, and is a 
;on of Robert and Catherine Bowell, the former a successful foundryman and 
niller and for twenty-five years a soldier in the British army. Both have passed 
away. Their son, Samuel, acquired his education in the parochial schools of his 
lative city and at the age of fifteen laid aside his books to begin an apprenticeship 
is a carpenter and undertaker. He became proficient in both lines of work and 
after four years' study began as a journeyman, remaining for two years there- 
after in St. Johns. At the end of that time he left Newfoundland and came to 
3ritish Columbia, settling first at Nicola where he worked as a journeyman car- 



228 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

penter for a similar period. From Nicola he went to the Okanagan country, a 
region then almost unknown and almost entirely unsettled. Business activity, 
however, had begun and many opportunities offered for the man of enterprise 
and initiative. Mr. Bowell remained there until the fall of 1899, engaging in 
contracting in Enderby and making full use of the advantages which the develop- 
ing country offered. In the days of the great boom of the Boundary country he 
made his way thither and, settling at Grand Forks, there remained until 1905. In 
that year he came to New Westminster and established himself here as a general 
contractor, an occupation in which he continued for eight years. In 1912 he 
again turned his attention to the undertaking business, purchasing the establish- 
ment owned by Center & Hanna at No. 405 Columbia street, where he now has 
well equipped undertaking parlors. He is known as an honorable and upright 
business man whose sagacity is acknowledged and whose integrity is beyond all 
question. 

In 1899 Mr. Bowell married Miss Sarah Morgan, a daughter of Charles and 
Keziah Morgan, residents of Newfoundland. Mr. and Mrs. Bowell have four chil- 
dren : Mabel Boyd, who married Arthur Young of Claybourne, British Columbia ; 
Bertram M. ; Vera W. M., and Charles Raymond, who are attending school. The 
family occupy a pleasant home at 224 Third avenue. Mr. Bowell is a member of 
the Methodist church and fraternally is connected with the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, the Order of Foresters, the Royal Templars and the Benevolent 
Protective Order of Elks. Although not active as a politician, no man in New 
Westminster is more keenly interested in the growth and progress of the city 
along lines of business, political and social development and no one has done more 
lasting and effective work in promoting advancement. His cooperation can 
always be counted upon to further progressive public measures and his name 
stands high on the list of the city's successful and public-spirited men. 



JOHN W. THORNTON. 

There was a period when a prospective purchaser of real estate sought out its 
owner and the trade was consummated between them; today the real-estate 
business is as well denned, as carefully organized and as thoroughly systematized 
as any industrial, manufacturing or commercial enterprise, and a real-estate 
dealer is as well acquainted with property values as a merchant with the price 
of goods. As a member of the firm of Morden & Thornton, the subject of this 
review is actively and successfully engaged in real-estate dealing in Vancouver. 
He was born in Oxford county, Ontario, June 4, 1863, his parents being William 
B. and Elizabeth Walker (Wilson) Thornton, pioneer settlers of Oxford county. 
In the public schools of Ontario the son began his education and afterward 
attended Woodstock College, a school conducted under the auspices of the Bap- 
tist church at Woodstock, Ontario. His identification with the western country 
dates from 1888, or for a quarter of a century. In that year he made his way 
to Saskatchewan, where he continued for eight years in the general merchan- 
dise business and as postmaster. He then removed to Rossland, British Colum- 
bia, afterward spending a year in the Yukon. He subsequently returned to 
Rossland, where he remained until removing to Vancouver in 1899. In these 
different places he was employed in various capacities, and carefully directing 
his labors, made steady advancement, so that when he came to Vancouver he 
was able to engage in business on his own account, joining William Morden in 
organizing the present real-estate firm of Morden & Thornton. They have had 
charge of important property transfers, and handling much real estate have 
become well known as representatives in their special field. Mr. Thornton's 
principal investments are in real estate, for as he has found favorable oppor- 
tunity he has purchased property. 




JOHN W. THORNTON 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 231 

On the loth of September, 1884, in Woodstock, Ontario, occurred the mar- 
riage of Mr. Thornton and Miss Margaret Anderson, a daughter of John and 
Annie (Reid) Anderson. The father was for many years engaged in the mer- 
chant tailoring business at Woodstock, but subsequently removed to Winnipeg. 
The children of Mr. and Mrs. Thornton are Constance May, Edna Blanche and 
Margaret Beatrice. The family attend the Presbyterian church. 

Mr. Thornton is a liberal in politics but has not sought nor desired public 
office, as his attention has been fully occupied with business duties that are 
making heavy demands upon his time. There has been nothing unusual or spec- 
tacular in his career and it has only been by determined purpose and persistent 
effort that Mr. Thornton has reached the plane of success on which he now stands. 
Beside interests already mentioned he is also president of several local companies. 



WILLIAM CLARENCE BROWN. 

As a representative of professional interests William Clarence Brown is well 
known by reason of his ability in the practice of law. He is also identified with 
various corporate interests and is thus closely associated with the business life 
of Vancouver. Personal interests and activities, however, do not claim his entire 
time and attention, for he is a cooperant factor in many movements which have 
for their primary object the public welfare, his efforts in that direction being 
resultant factors for good. He was born at Stanley Bridge, Prince Edward 
Island, September 22, 1873, and is a son of Samuel Henry and Mary Jane Brown. 
In the public schools of his native isle he pursued his education until he entered 
the Prince of Wales College at Charlottetown. In 1891 he came to British Colum- 
bia and through the succeeding year attended Vancouver College. Subsequent 
to his graduation from that institution he took up the profession of school teach- 
ing, which he followed at Chilliwack, British Columbia, until 1893. He returned 
to Vancouver in that year and attended Vancouver College. In 1895 he began 
the study of law and was called to the bar of British Columbia in 1900. He then 
entered upon the active practice of his profession in Vancouver and so continues 
to the present time, being now a member of the firm of Ellis & Brown. He has 
been very successful from the outset of his career as a barrister. No dreary 
novitiate awaited him. He entered almost immediately upon a large practice 
which has grown in volume and importance. The zeal with which he has devoted 
his energies to his profession, the careful regard evinced for the interests of his 
clients and the assiduous and unrelaxing attention to all the details of his cases 
have brought him a large business and made him very successful in its conduct. 
His arguments have elicited warm attention not only from his associates at the 
bar but also from the bench. 

Mr. Brown has always been greatly interested in the growth and development 
of British Columbia and with faith in her future has acquired large financial 
interests here, something of the nature thereof being indicated by the fact that 
he is now a director of the North American Building, Loan & Trust Company, 
Ltd., and a director of the Canadian Northern Land & Investment Company, Ltd. 
He also has other financial interests and owns considerable realty. 

Aside from those projects which are a source of personal gain he has taken 
active and helpful part in many movements and measures resulting to the benefit 
of the city. Any project which is a matter of civic virtue and civic pride may 
count upon his earnest and zealous support and he is equally loyal to the province. 
He is a director of the Vancouver Exhibition and many other tangible evidences 
of his interest in the general welfare may be cited. In politics he has always been 
a strong liberal and active worker in the party although not an office seeker. He 
belongs to the Vancouver Liberal Association and for two years previous to the 
amalgamation of the Young Liberal Association with the aforementioned or- 
ganization he was its president. He is fond of outdoor sports and is an advocate 



232 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

of lacrosse, acting for four years as president of the West End Lacrosse Club. 
He belongs to the Terminal City and Commercial Clubs and is appreciative of 
the social amenities which these offer, as well as their more serious interests in 
behalf of public welfare. Mr. Brown ranks with Vancouver's popular, prominent 
and valued citizens and the place which he occupies has been won as the result 
of personal merit and ability. 

ARTHUR AXD FRANCES ELIZABETH HERRING. 

Arthur and Frances Elizabeth Herring are well known residents of New 
Westminster. The former was born in Corfu, Greece, in 1848, and the latter 
was born at Kings Lynn, Norfolk, England. Mrs. Herring is descended in the 
maternal line from the Salmons, of Norfolk, of whom Rear Admiral Sir Geof- 
frey Salmon was at one time the head. 

Mr. Herring pursued his education in Heald's College, San Francisco, and 
in the San Francisco pharmacy. Mrs. Herring was educated at Reading, Berk- 
shire, England, and won a first class A certificate in British Columbia in 1876, 
and also the Bishop of Canterbury's prize for bible knowledge and church history. 
Mr. Herring came to the northwest, engaged in business as a chemist and drug- 
gist, and Mrs. Herring, arriving in New Westminster in 1874, became a teacher 
in the school at Fort Langley. 

The school that Mrs. Herring taught, from 1875 to 1878, at the old Hudson's 
Bay post, Fort Langley, was a large one-room frame building with a cottage 
attached and with few exceptions the pupils were Indians and half-breeds. They 
were very apt pupils* and quick to grasp all knowledge and especially the white- 
man's way of doing things. Besides the regular routine of school work she 
taught the girls knitting, crochet and various kinds of needle work. Mrs. Her- 
ring had a piano in the spacious living room of the cottage and it was a treat 
which she often gave them to have them all in her cottage, play for them and 
teach them to sing. Many of them had good voices and all were fond of music. 
Many of the boys of her school have learned trades and others farming and 
are very successful residents of the Langley district and Fraser valley. The 
present Chief Joe and his sister, children of old Chief Casimir of the Langley 
tribe, were among her students. 

Mr. and Mrs. Herring have watched with interest the progress of events 
which have shaped the annals of this province and have been active in con- 
nection with many movements which have had to do with the upbuilding and 
advancement of it. In 1877 ^ r - Herring established at New Westminster the 
only wholesale and retail drug house on the mainland of British Columbia and 
took high rank among the business men of the northwest. The trade supplied 
reached from Plumper Pass to Cariboo and all the goods were of course, in 
that early day, transported by water or pack train. Their stock of goods often 
exceeded thirty thousand dollars in value. All the heavy goods were purchased 
and shipped from England by way of Cape Horn. They therefore had to be 
ordered one year in advance and all these items meant much work and in the 
conduct of this extensive business Mrs. Herring took a most active part. In 
this modern age it is of especial interest to note that the cost of transportation 
of goods all the way from England to Victoria was only equal to the charge 
for carrying from Victoria to New Westminster. 

Mr. Herring was a member of the city council of New Westminster for 
fifteen years and thus aided in shaping the public policy in connection with 
municipal affairs. Mrs. Herring has been very active in the support of equal 
rights for women and is well known as the associate editor of Commonwealth and 
was correspondent to the Toronto Globe when Mr. Willison was manager. 
She has written many stories which have appeared in magazines of England, 
Canada and the United States and is the author of six books. All of her 




MRS. FRANCES E. HERRING 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 235 

first books were written from data collected and preserved by her for many 
years. The settings and people (nearly all of whom actually lived) in some 
of these stories date as far back as fifty years ago, while, of course, some of 
the happenings took place in quite recent years. 

The first of all her books which is entitled Canadian Camp Life was pub- 
lished in London in 1900. It is a well written story of the simple camp life of 
a Canadian family and their interesting experiences at the sea shore with 
just enough romance interwoven to make it captivating. It was well received 
and many readers and critics, not knowing what the author had in store for 
them, urged that she should follow it with another. 

Among the People of British Columbia, (with the red, white, yellow and 
brown) is the appropriate title of the second book which Mrs. Herring issued. 
It is not only a picturesque description of the peoples of this great coast country 
but imparts more good clean knowledge of pioneer life as it actually existed 
in our province for many years than is usually found in a work combining real 
life and fiction. It is in this book that she so beautifully pictures the awe- 
inspiring Passion Play which was given at Chilliwack by the Indians of the coast 
tribes as a thanksgiving. His Lordship, Bishop Dontonwill, O. M. I., a sincere 
friend of Mrs. Herring and to whom she is grateful for many of the authentic 
facts used in her books, was one of the founders of the Passion Play and it 
was owing to the accuracy and beauty of expression with which this book was 
written that his Lordship took one hundred copies which he presented as 
special prizes to the boys of St. Louis College and the girls of the convent. 

In 1904 T. Fisher L'nwin of London, who published her first two books, 
offered to the public a third book by Mrs. Herring. In The Pathless West 
with soldiers, pioneers, miners and savages, is the title of this truly thrilling tale 
of pioneer and Indian life. It vividly describes some of the many cruel prac- 
tices of the Indians, their escapades with the soldiers, miners and pioneers, as 
the title implies, and also brings out the forms of recreation, entertainment and 
pleasure they indulged in and enjoyed in those earliest of early days. 

Xan, and Other Pioneer Women of the West which is just off the pres> 
(1913) is the fourth and last edition of her growing list of successes. Nan, is 
the engrossing story of a family crossing the plains to take their stand with the 
soldiers of fortune in the California gold rush in '49. This volume also includes 
ten interesting short stories of the life of as many other pioneer girls and women 
of that age. One may say there was nothing extraordinary in the life of those 
women but they need only to read this book to be convinced that there were 
many wholesome thrills and happenings and that the way in which the writer 
has framed the sittings and pictured the quaint characters makes the most de- 
lightful reading. 

Ena, in England, a story of English life will be published in 1913, and its 
sequel, Ena in Hawaii, recording her travels in the Hawaiian islands will be 
respectfully submitted to the public in 1914. Remembering the pen-pictures of 
Nan and many others of the characters that Mrs. Herring has so skilfullly por- 
:rayed we are sure that Ena will be equally entrancing. Her last book, The Gold 
Miners, now in the hands of the publisher, is a story of the gold miners in the 
Cariboo country of British Columbia and the gold fields of California and is a 
sequel to her second book, which was accepted with so much favor, In the Path- 
less West. We feel no hesitancy in saying that we believe this will be the crown- 
ing work of Mrs. Herring's life. She takes extreme pleasure in announcing 
that this greatest of all her good stories will contain a charming preface written 
oy one of her warmest friends from the pioneer days to the present, His Honor, 
Judge F. W. Howay. 

Mr. and Mrs. Herring have become the parents of eight children, four of 
ivhom are living: Dr. A. F. C. Herring, who married Miss Emily Margaret 
VtcGuire and has two children, a son and a daughter ; Sidney, who wedded Sarah 
\nn Tidy ; Mabel Harriett Frances, the wife of Dr. G. T. Wilson, a son of James 
\Vilson, who was for many years superintendent of telegraph for the Canadian 



236 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

Pacific Railway, and a grandson of the late Lieutenant Governor Mclnnes of 
British Columbia ; and Victor, a civil engineer with the Great Northern Railway, 
in their New Westminster offices. 

Mrs. Herring is not only a prominent figure in literary circles but has also 
taken an active part in musical development in the northwest. She was a member 
of the Cathedral choir in New Westminster for many years and played the organ 
there on the first Sunday she spent in the northwest. She was much beloved 
by the Indians and half-breed children at Langley among whom her influence 
worked much good. In the early period of their residence in this province 
Mr. and Mrs. Herring found delightful recreation in horseback riding and camp- 
ing trips, continuing the latter to the present time. For twenty-two consecutive 
years they have camped on the shores of Boundary bay. She was also an active 
factor in private theatricals and choral unions. She has ever been noted for her 
tact, displayed in hospitality, and her remarkable devotion to children and young 
people. For some years she taught a bible class of young women and enjoyed 
the fullest extent of their love and confidence. Both Mr. and Mrs. Herring have- 
had much to do with the development of the northwest along the lines leading 
to educational and moral progress and aesthetic culture, and the importance of 
their individuality has been a potent force for good in the province. 



GEORGE TELFORD, D. D. S. 

The advanced and enlightened methods which in the past twenty-five years 
have practically revolutionized dental surgery find a progressive and able exponent 
in Dr. George Telford, who since 1901 has practiced in Vancouver, winning since 
that time a large and representative patronage in recognition of his superior 
merit and ability. He was born in Valens, Wentworth county, Ontario, November 
19, 1876, and is a son of Robert and Mary (Tennant) Telford, the former a 
native of Carlisle, England, and the latter of Ontario, being of Scotch parentage. 
Throughout all his years of activity Mr. Telford has been engaged in farming. 

In the public schools of his native county Dr. Telford acquired his early 
education. Leaving Ontario he came to British Columbia in 1892, locating first 
in Chemainus, where he attended the public school. Later, he moved to Chilli- 
wack, where continuing his studies he took a teacher's certificate. For a time 
he worked on the farm of G. R. Ashwell, after which he turned his attention to- 
bookkeeping, being employed by the Knight Brothers in their lumber mill at 
Popcum. From there he went into the interior as an employe of the Canadian 
Pacific Railway, and from there to Nelson where he was engaged in transfer 
business, being employed by West and Emerson of that place. Following this 
he entered the employ of the Bank of British Columbia as a clerk and worked 
in their institutions at Kaslo and Sandon. Having determined, however, to prac- 
tice dentistry, he entered the dental department of the University of Pennsylvania 
in the fall of 1898 and was graduated in 1901, with the degree of D. D. S. Imme- 
diately after, he came to Vancouver and opened an office there, where he has 
been in active practice since that time. That he has been successful is evidenced 
by the large and representative patronage of which he is now in control, a 
patronage which increases yearly as his reputation grows and his skill and ability 
became more widely known. In addition to being a dentist of great ability and 
prominence Dr. Telford is also a student of his profession from a scientific view- 
point, keeping in touch with its most advanced thought and contributing to it& 
development by his own study and research. His office is equipped with all the 
latest improved appliances and he has accomplished some notable work in den- 
tistry, making his profession a source of benefit to others, as it is an object of 
continuous interest to himself. He .is a director of the Burrard Sanitarium and 
a member of the College of Dental Surgeons of British Columbia and the Van- 
couver Dental Society, and his ability is widely recognized in professional circles. 




DR. GKOBGE TELFOED 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 239 

On the first of July, 1902, Dr. Telford was united in marriage to Miss Ada 
M. Templer of Chilliwack. They have two children, Marion Verona and Harold 
Stuart. Dr. Telford is a member of the First Baptist church and belongs to the 
Commercial Club, taking a deep interest in everything which tends toward the 
further development of the city. Although a stanch liberal he is not an active 
>olitician, his professional duties occupying a great deal of his time, but his 
:ooperation can always be relied upon to further measures of reform and progress. 
His work has marked a distinct advance in methods of dental practice in Van- 
:ouver and in his ability, comprehensive knowledge of his profession and interest 
n it he possesses the guarantees of continued progress and ultimate distinction 
n his chosen field. 



WILLIAM FRANCIS HANSFORD. 

William Francis Hansford, a successful barrister of Xew Wesminster. has 
icre practiced continuously for the past seven years and has gained recognition 
is an able representative of his profession. He was born in Prescott, Ontario, 
i son of Rev. William Hansford, D. D., and Marianne (Reynar) Hansford. The 
'ormer was a native of Dorset county, England, while the latter's birth occurred 
n the city of Quebec, Canada. William Hansford, who was educated for the 
ministry in his native country, came to Canada about 1853 an d f r a period of 
about thirty-five years took a prominent part in church work in Ontario and 
Quebec. For several years he acted as president of the Methodist Conference 
:n Ontario and also served as governor of Stanstead College in Stanstead, Que- 
bec, for several years. His demise occurred in 1891, while his wife was called 
10 her final rest in 1890. They became the parents of seven children, four of 
-vhom survive, as follows: Jeffrey E., who is a barrister of Winnipeg; Marion 
.1., a practicing physician of Montreal; Fannie P., who is a resident of New 
York city; and William Francis, of this review. 

The last named pursued a high-school course in Ontario and continued his 
..tudies in Albert College of Belleville, Ontario, subsequently entering the Uni- 
ersity of Toronto, which institution conferred upon him the degree of B. A. In 
902, immediately following his graduation, he came to British Columbia and 
')egan the study of law, being admitted to the bar of this province in 1906. He 
'ocated in New Westminster for the practice of his chosen profession and in the 
intervening period of seven years has built up a remunerative clientage and gained 
:i reputation at the British Columbia bar. The zeal with which he has devoted 
his energies to his profession, the careful regard evinced for the interests of his 
i lients and an assiduous and unrelaxing attention to all the details of his cases, 
have brought him a large business and made him very successful in its conduct. 
Mr. Hansford is a conservative in his political affiliations and a prominent 
worker in the local ranks of the party. He has served as president of the Young 
Conservative Association and is now acting as secretary of the Conservative Asso- 
riation of New Westminster. Fraternally he is identified with Lodge No. 5093 
of the Loyal Orangemen's Association at New Westminster and New Westmin- 
.'ter Lodge, No. 3, Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. His religious faith is 
ihat of the Anglican church. 



JOHN A. MILLS, M. D. 

Dr. John A. Mills, physician and surgeon of Vancouver, was born in Wood- 
:tock, Ontario, August 22, 1860, a son of William and Eliza (Lafferty) Mills, 
the former a native of Belfast, Ireland, and the latter of Hamilton, Ontario. They 
'vere married in the province of Ontario and for a few years lived at Burford. 



240 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

They next went to Toronto and for many years the father, who was a capitalist, 
continued to reside in that city. He died in 1891, his wife having preceded him in 
1889. They were the parents of six children: William Lennox, bishop of the 
Church of England of the province of Ontario; Eliza; Mrs. Mary Cornwall, the 
wife of Dr. Cornwall, of Omemee, Ontario ; John A., of Vancouver ; James A., 
deceased, who practiced as barrister at Mills, Traverse, Keyes and other places, 
being engaged in the profession for about twenty years ; and one who died in 
infancy. 

After pursuing his early education in the graded and high schools of Toronto, 
Dr. Mills attended Toronto University, matriculating in arts in 1885. He gradu- 
ated in medicine in 1890. After carefully and thoroughly preparing for his pro- 
fession he began practice in Toronto where he remained for a short time. In 
the same year, however, he came to Vancouver and immediately engaged in prac- 
tice. Here he has since continued and in the intervening period, covering almost 
a quarter of a century, he has steadily advanced, being now one of the capable 
physicians of the city. He has been a member of the medical staff of Vancouver 
General Hospital for the past fifteen years and in addition to his hospital work his 
private practice is important. He belongs to the British Columbia Medical Asso- 
ciation and the Vancouver Medical Association and thus keeps in touch with the 
advanced thought and work of the profession. He was medical examiner for the 
New York Life Insurance Company for a number of years and for the Odd Fel- 
lows Society for seventeen years. 

Dr. Mills was married in New Westminster, British Columbia, June 26, 1894, 
to Miss Marguerite Murchie, a daughter of David Murchie, a retired resident of 
New Westminster. They have two children, Lennox A. and Reginald C. The 
former was enrolled as pupil in the King Edward high school at the age of ten 
years and matriculated in McGill University at the age of fourteen, being admitted 
to the college at that time by a special act of the board. It is a rule that no one 
under sixteen years can enter this school and Lennox Mills, being admitted at the 
age of fourteen, thereby holds the record for all of Canada as being the youngest 
student to be admitted to this institution of learning. Dr. Mills holds membership 
in Western Star Lodge, No. 10, I. O. O. F. He is a member of the Church of 
England. He holds to high professional standards and is most careful to con- 
form his practice to the most rigid professional ethics. 



PERCY SEWELL HOWARD. 

Percy Sewell Howard, one of the best known expert accountants in Van- 
couver, with offices in the Dominion Trust building, is a native of Manitoba, 
born in Winnipeg on the 2Oth of April, 1886. He is a son of George R'. and 
Jane Frances (Sewell) Howard, the former a native of Norfolk, England, and 
the latter, of Woodstock, Ontario. In his early days the father took up the 
study of law and after he was admitted to the bar was for many years promi- 
nently identified with a general legal practice, first in Toronto, Ontario, and 
subsequently in Winnipeg, Manitoba, where he was a member of the well known 
firm of Patterson & Howard. He became connected with a great deal of im- 
portant litigation and' left the impress of his work and personality upon the 
legal history of that city, but he eventually laid aside the cares of active pro- 
fessional life and in 1911 moved to Vancouver, where he is now living in 
retirement. 

Percy Sewell Howard was reared at home, acquiring his education in St. 
John's Boys' School at Winnipeg. At the age of seventeen he became a mem- 
ber of the Royal Northwest Mounted Police, serving as a member of that 
body for three years, after which he accepted service with Webb, Read & Hegan, 
the leading firm of accountants in Winnipeg, and with them he remained for 
two years, gaining during that time a thorough and exhaustive training in the 




PKHC'Y S. HOWARD 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 243 

occupation which has since become his life work. When he left Winnipeg he 
>-ame west and located at Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, where he opened an account- 
ng office for himself, displaying such ability in his work that he was subse- 
quently made official auditor for the province of Saskatchewan. This position 
lie filled with credit and distinction until 1910, when he pushed farther west, 
locating in Vancouver, where he has since been prominent among the leading 
expert accountants of the city. His patronage is large and representative and 
is in itself an acknowledgment of his superior ability, his expert skill in his 
.^pecial line, and of his unquestioned business integrity. He is still a young 
man but his career lies far before him and will undoubtedly lead to wealth, 
prominence and well earned distinction in his chosen field. 

On the i6th of December, 1908, Air. Howard was united in marriage to 
[.liss Margaret Elinor Collier, a native of Cornwall, England, and a daugh- 
ter of Captain Eben R. Collier, who was for many years a captain in the 
Indian marine service and who died in India after his retirement. His wife, 
who was in her maidenhood Margaret J. Roberts, survives him and makes her 
1 ome in London. Mr. and Mrs. Howard have two children, Hernard Collier 
; nd Richard Robert. The family are members of the Church of England. 
?Ir. Howard is a member of the Association of Northwest Mounted Police, 
just organized, with Vancouver as headquarters and branch societies in all 
] arts of the Dominion. This association is composed of ex-members of the 
Mounted Police. Although one of the later arrivals in Vancouver, he has 
already established himself as a factor in its business life and he holds the 
confidence, respect and high regard of all who are in any way associated with 
1 im. 



; ALBERT EDWARD BOLTOX, M. D. 

Dr. Albert Edward Bolton, physician and surgeon of Vancouver, with an 
extensive general practice, while his hospital service, too, has been of a most 
important and valuable character, was born September 9, 1862, in Xewboro, 
Ontario, a son of John and Mary Bolton. He supplemented his early education 
bv' a high school course in Athens, Ontario, and his university course was pursued 
in Queen's College of Kingston, Ontario, in which he spent three years. He then 
entered the University of New York, from which he was graduated in 1888 with 
the M. D. degree, and, thus well qualified for professional duties, he came to 
British Columbia in 1889, remaining in active practice in Port Simpson from that 
V'Jar until 1902. After residing there for three years he was appointed in 1892 
t( the position of superintendent of the Port Simpson General Hospital and so 
continued during the following decade. He was thereafter an active practitioner 
o" Victoria until 1905, in which year he came to Vancouver, where he has since 
nmained in general practice. His knowledge of all departments of medical and 
surgical science is broad and his skill has constantly increased by reason of his 
growing experience and his wide reading and research. He is greatly interested 
in anything which tends to bring to man the key to the complex myste'ry which we 
c; 11 life and at all times he conforms his practice to the highest standard of pro- 
fessional ethics. In 1885 he was a member of the Ambulance Corps of the Prin- 
ciss of Wales Own Rifles and remained in connection with that organization for 
stveral years. Aside from his practice he has business interests, being a director 
in the Terminal Press Company, Ltd. 

On the 2d of October, 1889, in Athens, Ontario, Dr. Bolton was married to 
Miss Nellie Bailey Blanchard, a daughter of Amos W. and Isabel Blanchard. 
T ic children of this marriage are Isabel, Grace, Dorothea and Marion. The 
se :ond daughter has graduated from McGill University at Montreal, winning her 
Bachelor of Arts degree in May, 1913. 

Dr. Bolton is a conservative but has never been active in politics. He was 
a member of the school board in Victoria in 1905 and since 1890 has been 

Vol. IV 9 



244 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

a justice of the peace for British Columbia. He and his family attend the Meth- 
odist church, in which he holds membership and acts as local preacher. He also 
serves as vice president of the Vancouver Rescue Mission. His interests and 
activities have always been along lines looking to the betterment of the individual 
and the community and his influence is ever on the side of right, justice, truth and 
improvement. 



CAPTAIN MALCOLM McLEOD. 

The life of Captain Malcolm McLeod furnishes many splendid examples of the 
value of industry, determination and courage in the accomplishment of suc- 
cess, for it has been long and eventful and filled with many hardships and dis- 
couragements, all of which have been faced bravely and finally overcome. For 
thirty-five years he followed the sea in various capacities, although he was gen- 
erally master of a vessel, and during that time he gained a reputation for expert 
seamanship and a thorough and practical knowledge of the science of naviga- 
tion. 

Captain McLeod was born on Prince Edward Island, in October, 1836, a son 
of Roderick and Catherine McLeod, who came from the north of Scotland in the 
early part of the year 1800, settling on Prince Edward Island, where the father 
engaged in farming until his death. Captain McLeod acquired his education in 
the public schools of his native province but at a very early age was obliged to 
lay aside his books in order to assist with the operation of the homestead. He 
also employed part of his time learning the shipbuilding business and he con- 
tinued thus until he was twenty-two years of age. He then joined the govern- 
ment survey party that was making a survey of the Newfoundland and Nova 
Scotia coast in order to finish Bayfield's chart. He remained with this party, 
which was under the command of Captain Orlebar, until its work was com- 
pleted a period of two years. Determining then to become more proficient in 
seamanship, he went to England, where he engaged in the merchant marine 
service, making several voyages across the Atlantic, principally as chief officer. 
He afterward followed the sea before the mast for four years in order to get the 
benefit of a wide experience and eventually he returned to his old home on Prince 
Edward Island. However, he remained only a short time, embarking soon after- 
ward as master of a vessel, which he sailed for one year. While in New York 
a merchant of his acquaintance, recognizing Captain McLeod's sterling qualities 
and his ability as a seaman, formed a partnership with him, buying the vessel, of 
which he made Captain McLeod half owner and master. The latter sailed this 
ship for four years, making a great deal of money during that time both for him- 
self and his partner. Eventually, however, he sold the ship in Glasgow and 
bought the Solario, of which he became sole owner. Captain McLeod sailed this 
himself for two years but finally the great increase in the volume of his business 
made it necessary for him to remain on land. He put the vessel in charge of a 
new master, who proved very incompetent, and it was wrecked on the rocks of 
Jamaica, Captain McLeod sustaining a heavy loss. After this misfortune he 
retired from the seafaring life and made his residence in Charlottetown, Prince 
Edward Island, placing the greater portion of his fortune in the Prince Edward 
Island Bank. This institution soon afterward failed and Captain McLeod's sav- 
ings were lost with the rest. With characteristic courage and determination he 
made up his mind to start anew in the west and accordingly, in 1887, came with 
his family to British Columbia, where he first engaged in the real-estate business 




CAPTATX MALCOLM MrLEOD 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 247 

and later contracted to build the dykes on Lulu island, Maple Ridge and Coquit- 
lam. He carried this work forward to successful completion and in 1892 was 
appointed harbor master at Vancouver. He proved very capable in this office 
and filled it creditably and ably for fourteen years thereafter, being especially 
well fitted for its duties because of his long training in seamanship and his thorough 
acquaintance with the laws and regulations governing shipping. It was not because 
of any lack of ability or official integrity but rather through the schemes of polit- 
ical enemies whose disfavor Captain McLeod had incurred in the faithful discharge 
of his duties that he was finally compelled to leave this position. His enemies 
made serious charges against him in the Ottawa office and in order to dis- 
prove them Captain McLeod made a personal visit to the minister, taking with 
him letters which were given him by the men controlling large shipping inter- 
ests in Vancouver, with whom he had had dealings for so many years. 
After reading these and studying the charges made the minister thoroughly ex- 
onerated Captain McLeod, saying that he was convinced that he had done only 
his duty. Since that time Captain McLeod has lived a comparatively retired 
life in his home in Vancouver, having through successful real-estate investments 
in property in and about the city accumulated a substantial fortune, which enables 
him to spend his declining years in ease and comfort. 

Captain McLeod married Miss Abigail Cogswell, of Prince Edward Island, 
and they have become the parents of three children, one son and two (laughters. 
The Captain is independent in his political beliefs and is connected fraternally 
with the Masonic lodge and the Loyal Orange lodge, of which he is the oldest 
member in British Columbia. In this connection it is of interest to state that 
Captain McLeod, when but ten years of age, was a witness to the famous polit- 
ical riot at Belfast, Prince Edward Island, in which the Catholic and Protestant 
voters participated. They battled at the voting place for precedence with clubs 
md sticks, and a number were killed. His father and brothers took part in that 
nemorable fight for right and justice, and the former was injured and as a 
-esult made ill for three months. The Protestants had been induced to lay aside 
:heir sticks, but their good faith was misplaced and the first voter was beaten 
o death. To see that justice maintained at subsequent elections, the military 
was always called out, but the independence and tolerance of the ballot was 
gained by this riot. Our subject viewed the desperate struggle from a distant 
lill. The home of Captain McLeod is situated at 1155 Burnaby street and bears 
he name of Schelma, the same as the hall used in the early times by the Highl- 
anders as a place of refuge during their struggles with the Scandinavians. Cap- 
ain McLeod belongs to the Presbyterian church and is known as a man of 
exemplary character and unblemished integrity upright, straightforward and 
honorable in all the relations of life. 



THOMAS JOSEPH JONES, L. D. S. 

Dr. Thomas Joseph Jones, actively engaged in dental practice in Victoria, is 
regarded as one of the eminent representatives of the profession in the province. 
Moreover, his efforts have been of direct value to the profession inasmuch as he 
was instrumental in having the first dental law passed in British Columbia, while 
:.t all times he has upheld the highest professional standards. Dr. Jones was born 
November 4, 1844, in Toronto, Ontario, and comes of Irish ancestry, his parents, 
' n homas and Sarah (Conway) Jones, having been natives of County Cork, Ireland. 
The father was a plasterer and building contractor, learning and following his 
trades on the Emerald isle until the early '403, when he emigrated with his wife 
to Canada, settling in Toronto, then Upper Canada, now Ontario. There he con- 
tinued in his line of business for a few years or until the time of his death, which 
resulted from an accident while he was engaged in the building contracting business 
in that city. His widow continued to make Toronto her place of residence until 



248 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

she was called to her final rest in 1887. Both the paternal and maternal grand- 
parents of Dr. Jones were also natives of Ireland and in that land spent their 
entire lives. 

Dr. Jones' early education consisted of a course in the normal school in To- 
ronto, Upper Canada, followed by preparation for the practice of dentistry as a 
student in the office and under the direction of Dr. G. L. Elliott, of Toronto, who 
at that time was the most eminent representative of the profession in Canada. 
There were no colleges or schools of dentistry in the Dominion until some years 
later. Having qualified to practice his profession, Dr. Jones left the office of his 
preceptor and in 1863 located in Bowmanville, Upper Canada, where he remained 
in the active practice of dentistry until 1872. Just prior to that date he secured 
his L. D. S. degree in the Royal College of Dental Surgeons. It was conferred 
upon him on the 2d of June, 1868. The lure of the west was upon him and in 
1872 he removed to St. Catharines, Ontario, where he formed a partnership with 
Dr. Klotz. This connection was maintained continuously until 1883, at which 
time Dr. Jones sold out to his partner. He had won substantial success during his 
residence at that place but disposed of his interests in order to carry out his 
desire of moving farther west a desire prompted considerably by ill health. 
1 le was advised to investigate opportunities in Oregon and made his way to that 
state but remained only a short time, for his health did not improve there. He 
heard that Victoria offered excellent climatic conditions and also exceptional 
opportunities for the practice of his profession and in the latter part of 1883 he 
arrived in this city, lie opened offices at the corner of Yates and Broad streets 
and in a comparatively short time regained his health and met with substantial 
success. In 1885 his practice had increased to such an extent that it became 
necessary to secure larger quarters and upon the completion of the new bank 
building at the corner of Government and Fort streets he removed to that loca- 
tion, where he has remained to the present time. His laboratory and office 
ap]x>intments are all that are essential to the successful practice of his profes- 
sion and added thereto are the skill and ingenuity which he displays in the actual 
work of his calling. He is now the senior practicing dentist of British Columbia, 
having remained in Victoria for thirty years. He owes his unusual success to 
his unfaltering ambition, to his progressive spirit and his devotion to his chosen 
calling and although now well advanced in years, his ability has never diminished 
and his long and valuable experience has qualified him for expert work in his 
chosen profession. He has at all times stood for advancement and for the up- 
holding of high ideals. He believes that an advanced standard should be main- 
tained, and with that end in view he labored untiringly to secure the passage 
of the first dental law of the province. As he has prospered he has invested in 
real estate and is the owner of considerable property, both business and resi- 
dential, in the city of Victoria. On the organization of the first street railway 
company of Victoria, two of its principal promoters being D. W. Higgins and 
Captain Warren, Dr. Jones was elected to the vice presidency of the company. 

While a resident of St. Catharines, Dr. Jones was elected alderman and served 
for eight years, being the choice of the people for eight consecutive terms. He 
has always been a strong liberalist and has taken an active interest in the politi- 
cal welfare of the Dominion as well as in matters of local significance and 
importance. He is a member of the Canadian Club and served as its president in 
1910. His religious faith is that of the Church of England and for nine years he 
served as church warden under the late Bishop Hill. 

In December, 1864, Dr. Jones was united in marriage in Bowmanville, Upper 
Canada, to Miss Susana George, who died in 1908, survived by their only son, 
Thomas Harry Jones. Mrs. Jones was the daughter of Thomas and Ann (Har- 
vey) George and came of English lineage, her ancestors emigrating from Corn- 
wall, England, to Canada in the early '405, at which time a location was made 
in Bowmanville, Upper Canada. Mr. George was a landowner, farmer and 
stock-raiser. He passed away in 1872, while his wife survived until 1881. On 
the 25th of August, 1912, Dr. Jones was married in Vancouver to Miss Annie 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 249 

Webster, of English parentage, a daughter of Thomas Webster, a mining in- 
spector of Cornwall, England, who emigrated from that country and settled in 
Port Hope, Upper Canada. Thomas Harry Jones, only son and child of the 
Doctor, was born in 1865, in Bowmanville, Upper Canada, and is now associated 
with his father in the practice of dentistry. He began study for his professional 
career in his father's office and won the D. D. S. degree in the Philadelphia Den- 
tal College of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

In early life Dr. Thomas J. Jones was an enthusiastic cricketer, but having 
met with an accident in the pursuit of his favorite sport, he was obliged to give 
up what has been his only hobby. The Jones residence, known as Dundalk, stands 
in the midst of beautiful grounds at the southwest corner of Linden and Rockland 
avenues in Victoria. Here Dr. Jones still makes his home and, although now well 
advanced in years, he is yet in robust health, is distinguished in appearance and 
seems in spirit and in interests a man of much younger age. He is ever courteous 
and considerate of the welfare of others and his many admirable qualities have 
won him the warm friendship and high regard of those with whom he has come 
in contact. It is a matter of great pleasure to him to continue actively in the 
practice of his profession assisted by his son, and the dental fraternity of British 
Columbia honors him as its dean and as one who throughout all the passing years 
has kept in the foremost rank, thoroughly conversant with the latest discoveries 
and improvements known to dental science. 



FREDERICK JAMES FIELDS. 

Frederick James Fields has made for himself a creditable position among 
those who are acting as financial, real-estate and insurance agents in Vancouver. 
He established a business in 1910 and in the intervening period it has steadily 
grown so that he now has a gratifying patronage. He was born in Hamilton, 
Ontario, August 8, 1862, and is a son of Philip and Mary Fields, both of whom 
are deceased. He pursued his education in the public schools of Hamilton to the 
age of seventeen years, when he put aside his text-books and accepted a position 
as commercial traveler, in which connection he traveled through Canada and the 
United States for various houses through the succeeding nineteen years. His 
ability in that direction was widely acknowledged and he secured large business 
for different houses with which he was connected. In 1897, however, he left 
he road and went to the Maritime provinces, landing at St. John, New Bruns- 
wick, on the date of the Queen's Jubilee. He remained there for five years and 
engaged in the brokerage business, but the opportunities of the northwest attracted 
aim and in 1904 he went to Edmonton, Alberta, where he was engaged in the real- 
istate business until 1910. He then came to Vancouver, British Columbia, and 
las since been engaged in the real-estate, financial agent and insurance business, 
n which connection he has made continuous progress. He is thoroughly versed 
n property values and has not only negotiated various important real-estate trans- 
: ers but as financial agent has also made many investments for others. He like- 
.vise writes a considerable amount of insurance annually, representing a number 
)f the old-line companies. He is a director of the Alberta Financial Corporation, 
Limited. 

On the 8th of October, 1903, in Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, Mr. Fields was 
united in marriage to Miss Minnie Morrison, a daughter of John and Mary Jane 
(Ivey) Morrison, the latter a sister of John Ivey, a wholesale milliner of Toronto. 
Vlr. Fields has been identified with the Masonic fraternity since his residence 
n New Brunswick, having there joined Hibernia Lodge No. 3, A. F. & A. M., at 
St. John. He was one of the originators and charter members of Melrose 
^odge of Vancouver and is an exemplary representative of the craft, to the 
1 cachings and purposes of which he is always loyal. In club circles he is well 
known as a member of the Progress Club and a director of the Amateur Driv- 



250 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

ing Club and the Vancouver Exhibition Association. His identification with 
the first and last named organizations indicates his interest in all that pertains 
to Vancouver's welfare and upbuilding, for he cooperates in the various move- 
ments put forth for public good. 



ROBERT TELFORD, M. D., C. M.; F. R. C. S. (E.). 

A thorough and comprehensive knowledge of the underlying principles of 
medicine, a realization and an appreciation of the true meaning of life and its 
ultimate purposes, the interest of the scientist and the conscientiousness of the 
true physician, form the basis of the success of Dr. Robert Telford and have 
made him one of the most able and prominent members of the medical profes- 
sion in Vancouver. Specializing in surgery, he controls an important practice 
in the city and the high regard in which he is held by the local public and his 
professional associates testifies to his skill and ability which are further evidenced 
in the excellent results which have attended his labors. He was born in Beverly 
township, Wentworth county, Ontario, on the I3th of June, 1869, a son of Robert 
and Mary (Tennant) Telford, the former a native of Carlisle, England, and the 
latter of Ontario, of Scotch parentage. Throughout his entire active career the 
father followed farming in Wentworth county and he and his wife still make 
their home in that section. 

The public schools of his native region afforded Dr. Telford his early edu- 
cational opportunities and he afterward attended collegiate institute in Hamil- 
ton, Ontario. Following this he came in 1891 to British Columbia where, after 
taking a teacher's certificate, he taught in the public schools on Vancouver 
island for three years. At the end of that time he entered McGill University 
in Montreal and in the spring of 1898 graduated in medicine from that institu- 
tion, immediately afterward taking up the practice of his profession in Nanaimo, 
British Columbia. Here he remained for one year after which he went to Che- 
mainus where he did able work as physician at the mills of the Chemainus Lum- 
ber Company for three years. During the summer and fall of 1902 he spent five 
months at post-graduate work in Chicago and Montreal and he has never con- 
sidered his medical education complete, remaining always a close and earnest 
student of the underlying principles of medicine and keeping constantly in touch 
with the most advanced and progressive professional thought. In 1902 he re- 
turned to British Columbia and settled in Vancouver where he again turned 
his attention to general practice, building up in two years a large and representa- 
tive patronage and winning a high and honored place in medical circles of the 
city. With Dr. Telford as with all true scientists, increasing knowledge brought 
with it the desire to go still further into fields of medical research, the desire to ad- 
vance in his profession and to exhaust its utmost possibilities, for he believed that 
with his selection of medicine as a life work he had assumed responsibilities which 
could be fulfilled only by constant study, individual research and the exhaustive de- 
velopment of his best powers and talents. With a view therefore to increasing his 
proficiency in his chosen field he went to Edinburgh, Scotland, where he entered 
the Royal College of Surgeons, taking a special course in surgery and obtaining 
from the institution the degree of F. R. C. S. Since that time, while maintain- 
ing a general practice, he has specialized in surgery, and has accomplished some 
remarkable results along this line, combining with his exhaustive knowledge of 
the principles which underlie successsful surgical operations, the delicacy of 
touch, the steady hand, the clear head, the self-confidence and the courage which 
are indispensable elements in the surgeon's equipment. With his increasing repu- 
tation his practice has grown steadily and it has reached extensive and important 
proportions at the present time. He is undoubtedly one of the most brilliant, 
able and successful professional men in Vancouver and his prominence is the 
mere outward sign of superior merit and accomplishments. 




DR. ROBERT TELFORD 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 253 

Dr. Telford is the proprietor of Burrard Sanitarium, an institution which he 
erected in 1903 and which he has since successfully conducted, finding here a 
place where his own medical theories may be followed and their value demon- 
strated and filling also a long-felt want in the city. He has other valuable prop- 
erty in Vancouver and upon a portion of it is erecting a modern, ten-story, 
reinforced concrete apartment house, which when completed will contain one 
hundred and twenty furnished apartments. It is his intention later to carry the 
building through to Georgia street and this will double the size of the original 
structure, making a total of two hundred and forty apartments. 

On the agth of July, 1902, Dr. Telford was united in marriage in St. Andrew's 
Presbyterian church, Vancouver, to Miss Ella Maude Monroe, a daughter of 
Daniel Monroe of the British Canadian Lumber Corporation of this city. They 
have become the parents of four children: Gordon Donald, Douglas, Jean Rob- 
erta and Kenneth Monroe. The family are members of the Presbyterian church. 
Dr. Telford is connected fraternally with Temple Lodge, A. F. & A. M., of 
Duncan, British Columbia, and belongs to the Loyal Orange lodge and the Order 
of Foresters. Although not active as an office seeker he takes an intelligent in- 
terest in politics and gives his hearty and ready cooperation to all projects and 
measures for community advancement. His attention is, however, largely cen- 
tered upon his profession, of which he is one of the most able representatives 
in the city, his close conformity to high standards of medical ethics gaining him 
:he regard of his professional brethren and his important accomplishments in 
:he field of medicine and surgery winning for him a high .standing with the local 
jublic. 



PERCIVAL GARRET SILLS. 

Percival Garret Sills, since 1899 a resident of British Columbia and since 
1907 manager of the Western Lumber & Shingle Company at Vancouver, was 
x>rn in Winchester, Ontario, August n, 1885, a son of George Percival and 
Vlyra (Green) Sills, the former now a resident of Sperling, British Columbia, 
#here he is manager of the mills of the Salmon River Lumber & Shingle Com- 
pany, an enterprise owned by him and his son Percival, as are a number of 
}ther mills in the province. G. P. Sills is a native of Ontario and a descendant 
)f the loyalist family of Sills, who, with other United Empire Loyalists came 
nto Canada at the time of the American Revolutionary war, settling along the 
3ay of Quinte in Ontario. Throughout his entire life G. P. Sills has been 
engaged in the sawmilling and lumber business, and since 1898 has resided con- 
inuously in British Columbia, where he has operated extensively in the manu- 
'acture and sale of lumber. 

Percival G. Sills pursued his education in the public schools of Ottawa, after 
vhich he engaged in newspaper reportorial work on the Ottawa Citizen until 1899, 
vhen he came to British Columbia, joining his father at Barnett. After arriving 
:n this province he became interested in the sawmilling and lumber business 
;ind in 1907 associated with his father, established the Western Lumber & 
Shingle Company at Vancouver, since which time he has shaped its policy and 
controlled its interests as manager. The company in which he and his father 
:ire the leading partners have important industrial interests at various parts of 
ihe province, as is indicated in the fact that Percival G. Sills is a director of the 
Mitchell Lumber Company, a director of the Banner Shingle Company, with 
mills at Crescent, British Columbia; and a director of the Salmon River Lum- 
ber & Shingle Company at Sterling, British Columbia; and a director of the 
Melrose Shingle Company at Melrose, British Columbia. The above companies 
control fifteen hundred acres of timber, containing about thirty-five million feet 
of lumber, showing a cruise of twenty-five thousand feet to the acre, the various 
tracts being adjacent to the different mills. The output of these mills is fifty 



254 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

carloads per month, or from twenty-five to thirty thousand feet of lumber. This 
entire output is handled by the Western Lumber & Shingle Company and has 
agents for outside mills that handle from fifty to seventy carloads of timber per 
month. The enterprise and progressiveness of P. G. Sills has been one of the 
salient features in the substantial and continuous growth of the business, and as 
manager of the Vancouver Company, which is the real sales department of the 
business, he has shown himself equal to the mastery of important commercial 
problems and situations. 

On the 2-).th of August, 1911, Mr. Sills was married in Vancouver to Miss 
Sophie L. Deane, a daughter of Evan li. and Sophia C. Deane of this city. Their 
only child is Percival Deane Sills. The parents hold membership in the Anglican 
church and the name of Mr. Sills is found on the membership rolls of the 
Canadian and Royal Vancouver Yacht Clubs. He is a young man of notable 
business ability to whom opportunity has spelled success. He seems to easily 
discriminate between the essential and nonessential in business affairs, and 
keeping abreast with the progressive spirit of the times, he has so directed his 
efforts as to produce the most gratifying and substantial results. 



CHRISTOPHER J. LOAT. 

Although but thirty-two years of age, Christopher J. Loat is the proprietor 
of the Fair, one of the* foremost mercantile establishments of Xew Westminster, 
and his success stands in proof of the fact that this is the age of the young 
man's achievement. A native son of British Columbia, he was born in Departure 
Bay on August 15, 1881, a son of Christopher and Katherine (Mackie) Loat, 
the father a native of London, England, and the mother of Lanarkshire, Scot- 
land. Both were pioneers of British Columbia, the father locating in this prov- 
ince in 1866. With heart and soul he was a free trader, and on the event of 
confederation demonstrated his feelings so far that he flew his flag at half- 
mast on account of the event. Mrs. Loat came to British Columbia about 1871. 
For a number of years the father was accountant for the Hastings Mills and 
subsequently served in the same capacity for R. Dunsmuir & Sons at Departure 
Bay, where his death occurred in April, 1888. He was a member of the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows and the Knights of Pythias and was well known 
and highly respected in his section of the province. The mother passed away 
May 3, 1913, in Vancouver. 

Christopher J. Loat was reared amid the influences of a cultured home and 
educated in the public and high schools of Victoria, being graduated from the 
latter institution. Following his graduation he accepted a position with 
the Wellington Colliery Company in Victoria, with whom he remained as an 
accountant for fourteen years, giving evidence of his high sense of honor, his 
faithfulness, his stability, capacity for hard work and ready understanding of 
commercial conditions. In 1908 Mr. Loat came to New Westminster in company 
with A. R. Daniels and established his present business, of which he is now 
sole proprietor. The Fair has become one of the important mercantile houses 
in New Westminster, handling to a large extent crockery and fancy-goods. 
They carry most up-to-date and complete lines, Mr. Loat being an experienced 
buyer, and the business in all its departments is directed with such ability that 
a steady growth may be prophesied for it in the future. Not even the smallest 
detail Mr. Loat considers unworthy of his closest attention and he has built 
up a service and a spirit among his employes which make it a pleasure to trade 
at his store. 

In 1906 Mr. Loat married Miss Ada Daniels, a daughter of the late Richard 
Daniels, of Victoria, British Columbia, and to this marriage were born two chil- 
dren, one of whom survives, A. Winifred. Both Mr. and Mrs. Loat are devoted 
members of the Church of England, to which organization they give their earnest 




CHRISTOPHER J. LOAT 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 257 

and helpful support. A man of experience and ability, Mr. Loat is a valuable 
factor in the commercial life of New Westminster, having by the upbuilding 
of his private enterprise largely contributed to the commercial growth of the 
city. Every movement undertaken to promote the growth of the community 
along material, moral or intellectual lines finds his ardent support and many 
measures which have benefited the public must be credited to his initiative. The 
rapid development of the great northwest is largely due to just such men as Chris- 
topher J. Loat, who in their virile and aggressive policy of achievement are typi- 
cal and representative of the western spirit. 



JAMES GORDON" McADAM. 

James Gordon McAdam is one of the progressive and representative business 
men of Vancouver, being a member of the grocery firm of Mills & McAdam. 
He was born in Toronto, Ontario, on the I2th of November, 1855, and is a 
son of James and Agnes McAdam, the former a prominent farmer in that 
province. 

The public schools of Morrow afforded James Gordon McAdam his educa- 
tional opportunities and after he had laid aside his books he turned his attention 
to farming, engaging in that occupation in Ontario until 1875. 1 tnat vear ne 
came to British Columbia and purchased land in the vicinity of Langley, develop- 
ing there a profitable farm. This land is still in his possession, but in 1910 
Mr. McAdam moved from the farm and came to Vancouver where in partner- 
ship with his son-in-law, A. Mills, he entered the grocery business, the firm 
being known as Mills & McAdam. 

Mr. McAdam married on the 1st of Eebruary, 1882, in Mare township, 
Ontario county, Ontario, Miss Martha Thompson, a daughter of Xoah and Mary 
Thompson, the former a prominent farmer in that locality. Mr. and Mrs. 
McAdam became the parents of six children, of whom only one, a daughter, 
Agnes, now Mrs. A. Mills, survives. Mr. McAdam is a member of the Presby- 
terian church and is a liberal in his political views, taking an intelligent interest 
in community affairs without being active as an office seeker. He is well known 
among the leading and substantial merchants of Vancouver and in the private 
relations of life has an extensive circle of warm friends. 



HENRY HARCUS LEXNIE. 

Henry Harcus Lennie, controlling important interests in New Westminster 
as an insurance agent and a dealer in real estate, was born in Edinburgh, Scot- 
land, on the i gth of October, 1869, a son of Rev. Robert and Catherine (Harcus) 
Lennie, natives of the Orkney Islands. The father was reared in the Presby- 
terian faith but on reaching manhood espoused the Baptist religion and was 
educated for the ministry under Rev. Spurgeon, a noted Scottish divine. He 
was subsequently ordained and for many years afterward filled a pulpit in 
Scotland, coming to Canada in 1871. He located first in Ontario and there 
remained until 1884 or 1885 when he went to Bellingham (then known as 
\\hatcom), Washington, whence one year later he came to British Columbia. 
Locating in New Westminster, he preached for a time in the old courthouse, 
subsequently building a church of his own on Agnes street, a structure which 
was entirely destroyed in the great fire of 1898. Mr. Lennie preached in it for 
a number of years, but in the late '8os went to California where for two years 
he filled the pulpit of the Baptist church of Xevada City. Eventually he returned 
to British Columbia and after a short time in New Westminster, went east, 
spending six years in Mount Forest, Ontario, and Sherbrooke, Quebec. At the 



258 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

end of that period he came again to New Westminster and divided his time 
between his duties as a member of the school board and those which devolved 
upon him as substitute in the pulpits of various ministers during the absence 
of the regular incumbent. Afterward he was made minister to the asylum in 
New Westminster and in this capacity he is still capably serving, being widely 
recognized as an important factor in the spread of religious doctrines in this 
part of the province. 

Henry Harcus Lennie was reared in the home of his parents, and acquired 
his education in the public schools of Ontario and New Westminster. At the 
early age of sixteen he began earning his own livelihood, securing a position as 
clerk in a mercantile establishment. This place he held for four or five years and 
at the end of that time accompanied his father to Nevada City, California, where 
he engaged in the book and stationery business for himself. He was very suc- 
cessful in this venture and was soon in control of a growing trade, taking his 
place with the progressive business men of that community. In 1890 he returned 
to New Westminster and here established a similar enterprise, developing a 
large book and stationery business which he conducted successfully until his 
building was destroyed in the fire of 1898. Mr. Lennie lost his home as well 
as his business and was left in straitened circumstances which, however, he did 
not allow to discourage him. He went to Vancouver and there obtained a posi- 
tion as clerk in the stationery store operated by Clark & Stuart with whom he 
remained for one year or until he was again able to embark in business for him- 
self. He established a piano and music concern in New Westminster and con- 
ducted it sucessfully for six years after which he disposed of his stock and turned 
his attention to the real-estate and insurance business with which he has since 
been identified. His concern has expanded rapidly and he today controls a large 
clientage, his business increasing as his skill, business discrimination and sound 
judgment become more widely known. 

On the i6th of February, 1898, Mr. Lennie was united in marriage to Miss 
Laura Henrietta Eickhoff, a native of New Westminster and a daughter of 
Frederick Eickhoff, a prominent merchant of that city and one of its earliest 
settlers. Mr. Lennie gives his political allegiance to the conservative party, 
taking an intelligent interest in public affairs, and he is connected fraternally 
with the Independent Order of Foresters, of the local lodge of which he has 
served for some time as financial secretary. He is one of the most progressive 
and successful business men in the city and in the development of his enterprise 
has met with a gratifying degree of success, his industry and sound judgment 
constituting important factors in his prosperity. He occupies a high place in 
business and social circles of the city where the greater part of his life has 
been spent, and he commands and holds the confidence and high regard of all 
who are in any way associated with him. 



WILLIAM THWAITES WILLIAMS. 

William Thwaites Williams, one of the foremost merchants of Victoria, 
British Columbia, and otherwise prominent in commercial and real-estate circles, 
is widely known in this city in connection with J. N. Harvey, Ltd., of which he 
serves as vice president, and as the president of the City Land Company. A native 
of England, he was born in Leeds, February 6, 1869, a son of Benjamin and Eliza- 
beth Williams, of Welsh extraction. The Williams are direct descendants of Roger 
Williams, the historic settler who came to Rhode Island in Puritan days. Mrs. 
Elizabeth Williams was a sister of David Spencer, of Spencer's Ltd., the foremost 
dry-goods house of the Canadian west. 

William Thwaites Williams was brought to British Columbia at the age of 
ten years, the family making their way via Panama to Victoria, where he 
received his primary education in the public schools, graduating in due time 




WILLIAM T. WILLIAMS 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 261 

from the high school. After laying aside his text-books he became connected 
with his father's clothing and furnishing establishment, the latter having em- 
barked in that business in 1882. Mr. Williams worked his way from a humble 
position to one of large responsibility. Although the father had started out in a 
small way the store subsequently became, under the management of William T. 
Williams, one of the largest in Victoria and in 1911 was sold to J. N. Harvey, 
Ltd., our subject becoming a director and the vice president of this corporation. 
J. N. Harvey, Ltd., also maintain a large clothing establishment at Vancouver. 
As the years have passed Mr. Williams has extended his interests to other fields 
and he is now also president of the City Land Company of Victoria which con- 
ducts a large real-estate business. One of the substantial men of the town, Mr. 
Williams enjoys the confidence and respect of all who know him and through his 
business ability has not only attained personal prosperity but has contributed 
in no mean measure to the general growth and advancement. He is a member 
of the Victoria Board of Trade and has been connected with this organization 
for a number of years. 

On April 17, 1912, Mr. Williams was united in marriage to Miss Jean Orr. 
the wedding taking place at Duncan, British Columbia. Her father, the late 
Oscar Orr, was for many years Indian agent at Battleford, Saskatchewan. 
Politically Mr. Williams is a conservative, stanchly advocating the principles of 
that party. He has always taken an interest in military affairs and for some 
years served as a member of the old Fifth Regiment of Volunteers, in Company 
No. 4, commanded by the late Captain Smallfield. His fraternal relations are 
with Victoria-Columbia Lodge, No. i, A. F. & A. M., while he cultivates social 
relationships and indulges in sports and outdoor life through the Pacific Club, 
the Victoria Hunt Club, Victoria Yacht Club, Victoria Cricket Club, \ ictoria 
Golf Club, Victoria Tennis Club, and Arion Club, the latter connections giving 
indication of his means of recreation. A resident of Victoria during a period 
comprising nearly thirty- four years, Mr. Williams has witnessed the wonderful 
changes that have taken place here as primitive conditions have given way to the 
onward march of civilization and has not only been an interested witness of, but a 
cooperant and helpful factor in bringing about, this transformation. 



JOHN DENNIS O'NEILL. 

Various activities engage the attention of John Dennis O'Neill, who for 
more than twenty years has been identified with the interests of -Steveston, 
during ten of which he has been chief of the fire department. He was born in 
Bruce county, Ontario, on the 24th of December, 1862, and is a son of William 
and Agnes D. (Wells) O'Neill, natives of Prince Edward Island. The father 
is now deceased but the mother is still living. 

The early advantages of John Dennis O'Neill were very limited, his school 
days being terminated at the age of eleven years, when he accompanied his 
parents on their removal to Manitoba. During the first two years they resided 
at Pirt DuChane, but at the expiration of that time he went to Plympton, Mani- 
toba, where he worked on a farm until 1881. In the latter year he entered the 
employ of the Canadian Pacific Railroad Company, with whom he remained 
until 1885, assisting in the construction of .their lines to Revelstoke, British Colum- 
bia. Next he aided in quelling the rebellion in that vicinity, following which 
he went to Winnipeg and engaged in farming. In 1891, he came to Steveston 
and established a dairy ranch, in the development of which he has ever since 
been successfully engaged. Later he extended the scope of his activities by 
establishing a wood and coal yard and he also does a general real-estate and 
brokerage business, in all of which he is meeting with a fair measure of success. 

At Vancouver in December, 1902, Mr. O'Neill was married to Miss Merione 
G. Simpson, a daughter of Alexander Simpson of Aberdeen, Scotland. 



262 , BRITISH COLUMBIA 

Mr. and Mrs. O'Neill are members of the Church of England, and politically 
he is a conservative. He is one of the enterprising, public-spirited citizens of 
the town and is an enthusiastic member of the Progress Club, and is now serving; 
on its executive committee. 



HAROLD GORDON WARRINGTON. 

Harold Gordon Warrington, of the firm of Warrington & Johnson, merchants 
and importers of builders' supplies and specialties at Vancouver, was born May 
2, 1884, in Liverpool, England, a son of John T. and Margaret E. (Stretch) 
Warrington. His father was for thirty years a large importer of Canadian 
produce to England. He had offices in London and Liverpool, England, and in 
Montreal and Belleville, Canada, and also in New York citv He was continu- 
ously engaged in that business until about five years previous to his death in 
1911. 

Harold Gordon Warrington was educated at The Leys School, Cambridge, 
and afterward was apprenticed to Edmunds, Taylor & Company, timber mer- 
chants of Liverpool, with whom he continued until 1909. He then came to 
Canada and entered the employ of the W. C. Edwards Lumber Company of 
Ottawa, with whom he remained for a year. On the expiration of that period 
he removed to Vancouver and entered the employ of T. R. Nickson & Company, 
Ltd., general contractors. In 1911 he commenced business on his own account, 
forming the firm of Warrington & Johnson, merchants and importers of build- 
ers' supplies and specialties. In this business he still continues. 



ROBERT WALTER CROMPTON. 

Robert Walter Crompton, engaged in the general brokerage business in Vic- 
toria as senior partner in the firm of Crompton & Barton, was born in Liver- 
pool, England, September 15, 1885, and comes of an old English family, his 
parents being William and Rebecca Louise Crompton. For several years he was 
a student in a private college at Liverpool and when his text-books were put 
aside, the time having arrived for him to make his initial start in life on his own 
account, he turned his attention to Manitoba, for the reports which had reached 
him concerning the western country were favorable and convinced him that he 
would there find the opportunities which he sought. When the long voyage 
across the Atlantic was completed he continued his journey into the interior of 
the country and for a time was engaged in farming in that province, but subse- 
quently turned his attention to the banking business, filling the position of 
accountant. He resigned there in 1910 in order to come to Victoria, after which 
he spent nine months in the employ of Pemberton & Son, large real-estate deal- 
ers and investors. On the expiration of that period he embarked in business on 
his own account, being joined by William S. Barton under the firm style of 
Crompton & Barton, general brokers. They have since been associated in the 
conduct of a business of growing importance. They have been found thoroughly 
reliable as well as enterprising and the firm today enjoys an enviable reputation 
by reason of the progressive methods and unfaltering industry of the partners. 
They are also agents for the Union Bank building, in which they have their 
office. Their clientage is large in their real-estate department and their insur- 
ance business has also reached extensive and profitable proportions. Their busi- 
ness methods are such as will ever bear close investigation and scrutiny, there 
being not a single esoteric phase in all their dealings. Mr. Crompton also has 
other business interests, being one of the directors and the secretary of the New 
Method Laundry. 




ROBERT W. CROMPTON 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 265 

On the 4th of September, 1912, in Victoria, Mr. Crompton was married to 
Miss Eleanor S. Robson, a daughter of G. R. and Martha Robson. Her father 
was identified with the Hudson's Bay Company for about a quarter of a cen- 
tury and is now retired upon a pension. Mr. Crompton has at all times been 
interested in measures for the general good wherever he has lived and is a public- 
spirited citizen. For several years while in Manitoba he was a member of the 
Board of Trade. He now belongs to the Progressive Club of Victoria, of which 
he is one of the directors. His political views are in accord with the principles 
af the conservative party and he is a member of the Church of England, in which 
lie is serving as warden. His interests in life are thus varied and his activities 
:over a wide scope but are always found on the side of progress and improve- 
nent. 



OSCAR EDWIX DARLIXG. 

Oscar Edwin Darling, who is extensively and successfully engaged in diversi- 
fied farming at Steveston, was born at Rothesay, Xc\v Brunswick, on the ijth 
of September, 1864. He is a son of Major John and Mary (Prince) Darling, 
ihe father an officer in the Princess Louise Hussars. 

The boyhood and youth of Oscar Edwin Darling were passed in the home 
where he was born, his education being obtained in the schools of New Bruns- 
wick. Upon terminating his student days he came to New Westminster. British 
< Columbia, where for eight years he was employed in the postoffice. At the expi- 
lation of that time he entered the railway mail service, and after following this 
occupation for three years turned his attention to agricultural pursuits. He has 
i let with success in the development of his interests along this line, and owns 
< ne of the well improved and highly cultivated properties in this section. 

Mr. Darling was married on the 12th of Xovember, 1890, at New \Yest- 
riinster to Miss Virginia English. He supports the conservative party in poli- 
t cs and takes an active interest in local affairs. In matters of citizenship he is 
I ublic-spirited, taking an interest in all things pertaining to the welfare or 
I rogress of the community and for four years he was a member of the New 
Westminster Volunteers. Early in 1913 he was appointed a justice of the. peace. 
- Ir. Darling is numbered among the prosperous citizens and highly efficient and 
c ipable agriculturists of this vicinity, toward the progress and development of 
v hich he has contributed in large measure. 



LAW A. SOONG. 

Law A. Soong, prominently connected with the general mercantile interests 
of New Westminster as manager of the firm of Ying, Tai & Company, was 
born in Canton, China, January 2, 1880, and is a son of Law Wing Leong. a 
n erchant of that city. He acquired his education in the public schools of his 
n.itive city and studied English after locating in New Westminster in 1899, 
attending a school here for six years. At the end of that time he became 
connected with the firm of Ying, Tai & Company as secretary and soon proved 
himself a man of excellent business and executive ability. After three years 
ir this position he was made manager of the concern and is today one of its 
most trusted and esteemed representatives. The firm of Ying, Tai & Company 
controls one of the largest and most important Chinese mercantile houses in the 
ci:y and has secured an extensive and growing patronage, for its officials have 
at all times adhered to high and honorable business policies and have conducted 
the business along modern and progressive lines. As manager Mr. Soong has 
taken an important part in promoting the growth of the concern and has secured 



266 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

an enviable reputation for reliability and integrity, not only among people of his 
own race but in general business circles of the city where he makes his home. 
In 1904 Mr. Soong was united in marriage to Miss Chow She, and they have 
become the parents of three daughters who are attending school. Mr. Soong 
is a member of the Presbyterian church and is interested in the work of the 
Young Men's Christian Association, to which he belongs. He is a popular and 
able business man and in his adopted city commands and holds the confidence 
and high regard of all who are associated with him. 



WILLIAM HENRY QUIGGAN ELSON. 

William Henry Ouiggan Elson, superintendent of districts I and 4 and the 
New Westminster lines of the British Columbia Electric Railway, was born in 
London, Ontario, on the i8th of August, 1862. a son of John and Margaret A. 
(Quiggan) Elson, the former a native of Devonshire and the latter of the Isle 
of Man. Originally the Elson family came from Kent. Coming to Canada in 
early life, the parents were married in London, Ontario, and in 1880 they removed 
to southern Manitoba, where the mother passed away in 1883. The father is 
still living there upon his farm at the age of seventy-eight years. 

The youthful experiences of William Elson were those which usually fall to 
the lot of the lad who has good home guidance and who depends upon the public 
schools for his educational opportunities. He received thorough training in the 
schools of London, Ontario, and in 1879 made his home in that city with an uncle, 
J. D. Saunby, who was proprietor of the Black Friars flour mills there. It was 
his intention to learn the milling business but two years convinced him that it 
was not a congenial occupation and in 1881 he joined his parents in southern 
Manitoba, spending three years at home. In 1884 he went to western Alberta 
and on to eastern British Columbia and became identified with the construction 
of the Canadian Pacific Railway over the western slope of the mountains, working 
westward from Laggan to Beaver Mouth. Through this district is found some of 
the most difficult engineering work over the line. In the fall of 1884 he returned 
to Manitoba and the following spring enlisted in Winnipeg as a member of the 
Moose Mountain Scouts under Captain George White. With that command he 
took part in the Riel rebellion and in recognition of his services received from 
the government a half section of county land and a medal. In August of the same 
year he entered the employ of the Northwest Coal & Navigation Company as brake- 
man, running on a train from Dunmore to Lethbridge. In January, 1886, he was 
promoted to the position of conductor and thus served until June 7, 1887, when 
he left the employ of the company and again came west, entering the service of 
the Canadian Pacific Railway at Donald on the I7th of June as a brakeman. in 
November, 1889, he was promoted to freight conductor and in January, 1891, 
was made passenger conductor. He was on the run from Sproats Landing to 
Nelson in the Kootenay country from June, 1890, until July, 1892, and on the 
I9th or July of the latter year, when he left there, he was presented with a gold 
watch, chain and charm by the citizens of Nelson in recognition of his popularity, 
his genial good nature and his efficient service, all this being indicative of the 
friendship entertained for him. At that time he returned to the main line, being 
on the run from Kamloops to Donald and from Kamloops to Field and Laggan, 
the divisional points of the road being changed at different times. In April, 1903, 
he was promoted to the important position of train master at Revelstoke, filling 
that place until March, 1910, when he resigned and entered the service of the 
British Columbia Electric Company as train master. In May, 1911, he was 
appointed superintendent, in which important capacity he is now serving. His 
long experience in railway circles qualified him highly for the important duties 
that now devolve upon him. New Westminster claims him as a representative and 




WILLIAM H. Q. ELSON 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 269 

valued citizen and he has many friends not only there but in the different localities 
in which he has lived and through the districts in which he has traveled. 

On the 25th of June, 1900 Mr. Elson was married to Mrs. Margaret Ann 
Nelles, nee Richardson, of Dorchester, Ontario. Mrs. Elson is a member of the 
Church of England and Mr. Elson attends its services and contributes to its sup- 
port. In politics he is a liberal and he is fraternally well known as a Mason and 
Odd Fellow, his membership being in Mountain Lodge, No. 11, A. F. & A. M., at 
Golden, British Columbia, and in the Selkirk Lodge, Xo. 12, 1. O. O. F., at Revel- 
stoke. He is a most democratic man, genial and kindly in spirit, and' is one of 
the most capable men on the operating staff of the British Columbia Electric. His 
smile is contagious and he sheds around him much of the sunshine of life. 



WILLIAM ARTHUR WARD. 

"A worthy son of a worthy sire" may be written over the life record of William 
Arthur Ward, a native of British Columbia, who in an important way is con- 
nected with the commercial history of the province. Not only is he well known 
as manager of the General Agency Corporation of Vancouver, British Columbia, 
but in other business lines has stimulated growth and expansion. Born in Vic- 
toria on June 29, 1867, he is a son of William Curtis and Lydia Ward, both 
natives of England, who were married in January, 1864, and had four sons and 
live daughters. One brother and one sister of our subject are living in British 
Columbia and another brother has a command in the British Channel Squadron. 
William Curtis Ward came to British Columbia in 1863. one of its foremost 
pioneers, and upon his arrival assumed management of the Bank of British 
Columbia. For many years this institution and the Bank of British North Amer- 
ica were the only banks in the province, and the former was for a number of 
years the only one in New Westminster and Nanaimo. He established and is 
now the sole owner of the Douglas Lake Cattle Company, the foremost stock 
enterprise of the province, operating a ranch comprising one hundred and eight 
thousand acres, it being the largest stock ranch in the province. This business 
and its property interests were established in the '705 by Mr. Ward and his part- 
ners in the transaction were C. W. R. Thompson and J. B. Greaves. In this ' 
connection it may be mentioned that Mr. Ward, Sr., is today the largest indi- 
vidual landowner in the province. While residing here he was widely known 
as a friend of all newcomers and pioneers, having been one of the first to locate 
here, and as the capitalists of the early days were necessarily few, he was con- 
nected with all financial enterprises of any magnitude. In 1897 he returned to 
England as general manager of the Bank of British Columbia in London and 
in a short time arranged for an amalgamation with the Canadian Bank of Com- 
merce. He then became a director in the Canadian Bank of Commerce, still 
holding that office, and makes his residence in High Holden, Kent. 

William A. Ward was educated at the collegiate school of Victoria, Trinity 
College of Port Hope, Ontario, and the United Services College, Westward 
Ho, North Devon, England. Following college he spent the next year at Rouen, 
France, for the purpose of acquiring the French language. In the fall of 1885 
he returned to British Columbia and entered upon a position as clerk in the 
office of his uncle, head of the firm of Robert Ward & Company, which is now 
R. V. Winch & Company. In 1890 William A. Ward became a member of 
the firm of Robert Ward & Company and continued in this connection for nine 
years or until 1899, when he withdrew in order to engage in the general broker- 
ige business, giving particular attention to the export of salmon and lumber. Inci- 
ientally it may be mentioned that he arranged the shipment for the first cargo 
)f wheat which was ever sent out from British Columbia. This shipment was 
made in 1895, the consignment being designated to London. At one time 
Mr. Ward was financing seven salmon canneries on the Fraser, Skeena and 



270 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

Nass rivers and he still has interests in the salmon and lumber business. More- 
over, he is a director in the British Columbia General Development Syndicate, 
an organization which controls large timber and land holdings in the Kootenay 
and Columbia river districts and which owns the Stepney ranch at Enderby, 
comprising thirteen hundred acres. This property is considered the finest ranch 
in the province. As manager of the General Agency Corporation Mr. Ward 
has given ample evidence of his executive ability, his ready understanding of 
commercial situations and his sound judgment of men and conditions, all of 
which qualities have combined with his perseverance and industry to gain for 
him one of the leading positions in the commercial world of the Canadian north- 
west. 

In Victoria, British Columbia, in July, 1905, Mr. Ward was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Beatrice Snider, a native of that city. She is prominent in the 
social life of Vancouver, occupying a leading position in the exclusive circles 
of society, and is a member of the King's Daughters Club and connected with 
other ladies' societies which largely have for their object charitable purposes. 
Mr. and Mrs. Ward have two sons, Curtis and Kenneth. 

Realizing that the character of a man's recreation is almost as important as 
that of his work, Mr. Ward maintains through 'periods of .relaxation that even 
balance which is so necessary to success and has always taken an active part 
in athletics. He arranged the first football match between Vancouver, Vic- 
toria and New Westminster and was captain of the Victoria team. For many 
years he played also on the cricket team of that city. The health-giving exer- 
cise of rowing gives him much pleasure and while in Victoria he was also a 
member of the Polo Club of that city. There he also served as president of the 
Board of Trade for two years, from 1899 until 1901, having for a two-year 
period previous to that time, from 1897 to 1898, served as vice president. He 
was the first chairman of the Native Sons Society of British Columbia. He is 
a conservative along political lines but public office has never appealed to him, 
as he believes that he can serve the interests of his province and city to greater 
advantage along lines in which he has the greatest experience and which are 
connected with commercial development. In that connection he is a member of 
the Vancouver Board of Trade and Chamber of Commerce, doing pioneer work 
in both institutions in the promotion of feasible plans to further trade interests 
He is a member of the Vancouver Golf & Country Club and was one of the 
founders of the Victoria Golf Club and a member of the Union Club of that 
city. He also is a member of the Vancouver Club and the Progress Club of 
Vancouver. His faith is that of the Church of England. A man of estimable 
qualities of mind and character, of decided ability and of manly principles, 
Mr. Ward enjoys the trust of all who have business relations with him and is 
generally acknowledged to be one of the foremost factors in promulgating the 
greatness of his native province. 



GEORGE TURNER. 

Although in his seventy-sixth year George Turner is still active in the serv- 
ice of the government of the Dominion, being connected with the public works 
department as assistant engineer in the British Columbia district. Coming here 
in 1859, his life record covers a period from the earliest history of the region 
to the present state of high civilization and advancement. When in 1859 he 
reached New Westminster there was not a tree felled in the virgin forest and 
primeval conditions still prevailed. Born in London, England, on September 
17, 1836, he is a son of George and Helena (Wright) Turner, both natives of 
the world's metropolis. The mother there passed away but the father died in 
India while he was serving his country in the army. 




GEORGE TURNER 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 273 

George Turner was reared at home and educated in private schools in Lon- 
ion, joining in 1855, at the age of nineteen, the Royal Engineers Corps, serv- 
ng in the ordnance survey. In 1859 he came with a detachment of the Royal 
Engineers to British Columbia, serving in that connection until their disband- 
nent in 1863. He then found employment in private survey work but in 1889 
:ntered the Dominion government service, with which he has since been identi- 
ied. He is one of the well known pioneers of British Columbia, New West- 
minster having been his headquarters since 1859. In his official capacity he has 
endered eminent service to his government and as the years have passed has 
established himself in the hearts of his countrymen, who esteem in him 
one who has worthily served the cause of the public for over five decades. Nor 
does his connection with the Imperial government constitute all of his public 
;.ervice, for he has also done valuable work in the early years of the history 
of development as a member of the board of aldermen of New Westminster 
:ind as a member of the school board has furthered the cause of education, lay- 
:ng the foundation for the splendid system prevailing in his community. 

In July, 1869, Mr. Turner was united in marriage to Mrs. Ann McColl, the 
widow of Sergeant William McColl, and formerly Miss Ann Baseley, a native 
<if England. To this union were born three children: Frederick George, a 
real-estate man of Vancouver; Maudeline Hester, the wife of Herbert Appleby, 
(if Burnaby; and Annie Helena, who married Joseph R. Grant, an attorney of 
New Westminster. 

Mr. Turner is prominent in fraternal circles, being a member of Royal 
City Lodge, No. 3, I. O. O. F., of which he is a charter member and the oldest 
member at the present writing. He also belongs to the Ancient Order of United 
Workmen, being a member of Frazer Lodge, No. 3. His religious adherence 
is given to the Church of England. On February 15, 1912, Mr. Turner suf- 
fered an irreparable loss in the death of his wife, who after nearly forty-three 
}ears of a happy domestic life was called to her eternal rest. Not only has Mr. 
' 'urner been an interested witness of the changes that have marked the trans- 
formation of this region but he has also been a helpful and cooperant factor 
i i bringing about the present prosperous conditions. He is highly respected 
jnd honored by all who know him, venerated as a pioneer and beloved on 
account of his many sterling qualities of mind and character. 



JOHN W. WILSON. 

John W. Wilson, a well known and important figure in insurance circles in 
Vancouver, w as born in Montreal, Quebec, July 24, 1882, a son of James Wilson, 
i native of the province of Quebec, who is the sole owner of a large printing 
establishment of Montreal, conducted under the firm name of Mitchell & Wilson. 
He is still a resident of that city. 

In the acquirement of his education John W. Wilson attended the public 
and high schools of Montreal, and after putting aside his text-books entered the 
lusiness field as a clerk in Montreal, in 1899. He so continued until 1905, when 
re went to Winnipeg to become chief clerk in that city for the Liverpool and 
London and Globe Insurance Company and the Liverpool-Manitoba Assurance 
Company. Six months later he was promoted to the position of special agent 
for that company. In 1907 he came to Vancouver as manager of the insurance 
('epartment of B. B. Johnston, Howe & Company, continuing with them until 
tie ist of February, 1909, when he purchased the insurance department, which 
he has since conducted under his own name, with offices in the Winch building. 
Mr. Wilson now covers extended risks in fire, accident, employers' liability, 
bonding, plate glass, burglary, marine, automobile and life insurance, and in 
fact practically every risk to which human beings and their property are liable. 
He is resident agent for the Liverpool-Manitoba Assurance Company, the 

Vol. IV 10 



274 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

Acadia Fire Insurance Company, the North Empire Fire Insurance Company, 
and the Western Canada Accident & Guarantee Insurance Company. He repre- 
sents only well established and strictly reliable companies, and as the years have 
passed his clientage has steadily grown and the volume of business now trans- 
acted through his office is large. 

In politics Mr. Wilson is independent, voting as his judgment dictates rather 
than according to party ties. For eighteen years he was a member of the Mon- 
treal Swimming Club, and in that connection won numerous medals and prizes. 
His fraternal relations are with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the 
Knights of the Maccabees of the World, and his religious faith is that of the 
Presbyterian church. A young man, he has made continuous progress in busi- 
ness circles and upon the foundation of energy, enterprise and capability is 
building his success. 



ERNEST HENRY BEAZLEY. 

Ernest Henry Beazley, managing director at Vancouver for the Union Steam- 
ship Company, was born in Birkenhead, Cheshire, England, in 1876, a son of 
James Henry Beazley, a ship owner of Liverpool and a resident of Cheshire. 
In the public schools of England he pursued his education and afterward spent 
one year in Germany. He then returned to his native land and made his initial 
step in the business world. He was, as it were, "to the manner born," for 
throughout his life he had heard discussions on marine interests and when he 
started in business it was as an employe of the firm of Gracie, Beazley & Com- 
pany, large ship owners of Liverpool, with whom he continued for several years. 
He then entered the firm of J. H. Wellsford & Company, Ltd., also ship 
owners of Liverpool, and for ten years was manager of their outside business. 
His increasing responsibilities and broadening experience gave him knowledge 
and ability that has constituted the basis of his later success. In August, 1911, 
he came to Vancouver as managing director of the Union Steamship Company, 
which owns the Boscowitz Steamship Company and which has other interests 
here. The Union operates ships to every point on the Pacific coast between 
Vancouver and the Alaskan border. On coming to the province Mr. Beazley 
made it his purpose to thoroughly acquaint himself with every feature of shipping 
interests along the Pacific and this, combined with his previous experience, well 
qualifies him for the responsible duties devolving upon him in his present con- 
nection which has won him recognition as one of the representative business men 
of the city. He is also Canadian agent for J. H. Wellsford & Company, of 
Liverpool, who have extensive interests on the coast. He serves at present as 
president of the Ship Owners Association of British Columbia. 

In England, in April, 1911, Mr. Beazley was united in marriage to Miss Elsie 
Braithwaite, a native of Liverpool, and they have one son, Philip Henry. Their 
religious connection is with the Church of England and Mr. Beazley belongs to 
the Terminal City Club. He was captain of the ist volunteer battalion of the 
Cheshire Regiment for seven years and this and other experiences of his life 
have been of a broadening character, making him a well informed, resourceful 
and capable man whose career has been marked by steady progress. 



RT. REV. ALEXANDER MAcDONALD. 

Rt. Rev. Alexander MacDonald, bishop of Victoria, author, educator, orator 
and able propagandist, as well as one of the greatest individual forces in the spread 
of the Catholic religion on Vancouver and adjacent islands, was born in Inverness 
county, Cape Breton Island, February 18, 1858. He is a son of Finlay and 




RT. REV. ALEXANDER MACBOXALI) 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 277 

Catherine (Beaton) MacDonald, both natives of that island, the paternal and 
maternal grandparents having been born in Scotland. 

Alexander MacDonald acquired his education in the common schools of his 
native county and later attended St. Francis Xavier's College at Antigonish, Nova 
Scotia. Subsequently he went to Rome, arriving in that city in 1879, and studied 
at the Propaganda College, where he took his course in philosophy and theology, 
pursuing his studies there for five years. On the 8th of March, 1884, the same year 
in which he took his degree, he was ordained to the Catholic priesthood in St. 
John Lateran church in Rome, by Cardinal Parocchi. and in the following July 
returned to Canada, settling in Nova Scotia, where he was appointed teacher of 
Latin and philosophy, at St. Francis Xavier College, serving in that capacity for 
nineteen years and gaining during that time a wide reputation for ability as an 
educator. In 1900 he was appointed vicar general of his diocese and three years 
later was given charge of St. Andrew's parish in Antigonish county, Nova Scotia. 
Over this congregation he presided until October i, 1908. when he was appointed 
bishop of Victoria with jurisdiction over Vancouver and adjacent islands. Tn 
this high position his work has become more and more notable with the passing 
years and has. been fruitful of great good to the cause of Catholicity, for Bishop 
MacDonald possesses talents which make his activities more than usually effective 
and which give his ability a more than ordinary scope. He reaches many people 
through his powerful sermons, for he is known as one of the most able pulpit 
orators in British Columbia and his field is .still farther extended owing to the 
wide circulation of the excellent religious books of which he is the author. Among 
these may be mentioned: "The Symbol of the Apostles," a history of the Apostles 
creed, which has attracted the attention and interest not only of the Catholic world 
but of the Protestant as well; "The Symbol in Sermons," a course of sermons 
Dn the creed ; "The Sacrifice of the Mass''; "Religious Questions of the Day." a 
work in four volumes, treating on various subjects; "The Sacraments"; and 
''The Mercies of the Sacred Heart." He possesses a simple, direct and telling 
style and the faculty of making his message reach the hearts of the people as well 
is satisfy scholars and doctrinists. Bishop MacDonald is a man great in his 
-simplicity, his unselfish spirit and his kindliness of heart, qualities which are rarely 
found in men of this period, especially when combined with scholarly attainments 
ind executive ability. They have endeared him greatly to his people, among whom 
he has accomplished so much consecrated work, and he holds their love in large 
neasure as he does also the respect and confidence of people of all denominations. 



S. G. CHURCHILL. 

S. G. Churchill, who is now engaged in the real-estate business, has been a 
resident of Eburne for nearly twenty years, during which period he has been 
identified with various activities. He was born in Goodrich, Huron county, 
Ontario, on the 25th of September, 1867, and is a son of William and Elizabeth 
(Gibbons) Churchill. The father is now deceased. 

The first sixteen years in the life of S. G. Churchill were largely devoted 
to the acquiring of an education in the public schools of Clinton, Ontario. He 
subsequently turned his attention to agricultural pursuits, assisting his father 
with the cultivation of the home farm from that period until 1890. In the latter 
year he left the parental roof and started out for himself, coming to British 
Columbia to pursue his career. He first located in Vancouver, whence he later 
came to Eburne, where he resumed farming. After following this vocation 
for a year he went into the cattle business, but three years later turned his atten- 
tion to commercial activities. His energies were entirely concentrated upon 
the development of a general mercantile business until 1901, when he engaged 
in the canning business and became one of the incorporators and a director of 
the Greenwood Canning Company, so continuing for five years and then sold 



278 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

out to the British Columbia Packers Association, following which he entered 
their employ. Three years later he resigned his position and went into the 
lumber business, in which he continued until 1908. In the latter year he with- 
drew from business and lived retired until 1910, when he became identified 
with the real-estate firm of J. W. Fairhall & Company, a connection lasting until 
July, 1913. 

At Vancouver, in May, 1901, Mr. Churchill was united in marriage to Miss 
Eleanor Drenay, a daughter of George Drenay, and to them have been born 
three children, Evelyn, Lylas and William Harold. 

Mr. Churchill is the only remaining charter member of Eburne Lodge, No. 
34, I. O. O. F., in which he has passed through all of the chairs. He is also 
affiliated with the Independent Order of Foresters. His political support he 
accords to the conservative party, and for three years, 1909-10-11, he was a 
member of the Point Grey council. He was also chairman of the Board of Trade 
and chairman of the board of public works for two years. In January, 1912, 
he ran for the office of reeve of Point Grey, the street railway question form- 
ing the main plank in his platform, but he was defeated. However, he was 
nominated in 1913, and elected by a good majority, indicating that many who 
formerly opposed the improvements he advocated regretted the attitude they 
took in the matter, and realized that their adoption would have substantially 
forwarded the general welfare and interests of the community. 



WILLIAM PRESCOTT OGILVIE. 

William Prescott Ogilvie, engaged in the general practice of law in Vancou- 
ver, is one of the younger members of the bar of this city, but already his ability 
has gained him rank with able practitioners. Moreover, he is well known in 
business circles through hjs active connection with, or invested interest in, vari- 
ous corporations. He was born in Grenville, Quebec, March 9, 1878, and was 
but ten years of age when in 1888 he was brought to British Columbia by his 
parents, John and Mary Ogilvie, the former of Scotch and the latter of English 
lineage. His grandfather, Samuel Ogilvie, was the first settler of Grenville and 
the family was long connected with the pioneer development of that part of the 
province of Quebec. 

William Prescott Ogilvie, following the removal of the family to the west, 
continued his education in the public and high schools of British Columbia and 
afterward took up the profession of teaching, which he followed for six years, 
or until 1900, when, desirous of improving his own education in order to enter 
upon other professional labors, he matriculated in McGill University at Mon- 
treal, in 1900, and was there graduated in 1904 with the degree of B. C. L. From 
1906 until 1909 he studied law under Sir Charles Tupper and a number of other 
notable barristers, and in 1909 was called to the bar of British Columbia. He 
practiced alone for about a year and in 1910 entered into partnership with E. W. 
Brown under the firm style of Ogilvie & Brown. This connection still exists 
and they engage in general law practice, in which they have won a gratifying 
clientage. Mr. Ogilvie is well versed in all branches of the law and is a wide 
and discriminating student of his profession, and in the preparation of his cases 
displays the utmost care, so that he is well prepared for defense as well as for 
attack. In addition to his law practice he has various other business interests, 
being now president of the Muscovite Mica Company, president of the Royal 
Theater Company, and a director of the Great West Land Company and of the 
United Securities Company. 

On the 8th of August, 1907, in Astoria, Oregon, Mr. Ogilvie was united in 
marriage to Miss Caroline Young. They are Presbyterians in religious faith 
and Mr. Ogilvie is a conservative in politics. In commercial and club circles he is 
well known, being a director of the Commercial Club and a member of the Van- 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 279 

couver Athletic Club. He is also an ex-president of the Pacific Northwest Ath- 
letic Association, and was an active athlete until 1907, when he retired, being 
the recognized all-round champion of British Columbia. At the Pacific coast 
champion meet in 1907 he won five first prizes. He is still very fond of athletics 
and all outdoor sports and recognizes how important a part these play in main- 
taining a healthful development in the business man who must need spend hours 
at a time in concentrated effort along a single line of activity. 



GEORGE KIDD. 

George Kidd has been a resident of Vancouver for only a brief period, occupy- 
ing the position of comptroller of the British Columbia Electric Railway Com- 
pany, Limited. He was born in Sheffield, England, on March 9, 1874, and is a 
son of John W. and Thirza Elizabeth Kidd. 

In the acquirement of his education George Kidd attended the grammar school 
of Lincoln, England, after leaving which he was articled to his father. Sub- 
sequently he went to London, England, where he entered the employ of Deloitte, 
Plender, Griffiths & Company, a well known firm of chartered accountants. His 
connection with them continued until 1907, when he was appointed secretary to 
the London Board of the British Columbia Electric Company, the headquarters 
of which are in London. He first saw Vancouver in 1910 when he came to the 
province on a visit. He then returned to London but the following year again 
visited Vancouver and, pleased with the western city and its prospects and desir- 
ous of remaining, he was appointed to his present position as comptroller for the 
British Columbia Electric Railway Company, Limited. As the years have passed 
on, since he started out in the business world, his progress has been continuous 
and he now occupies an enviable position in the business circles of his adopted 
city. He is a member of the English Institute of Chartered Accounts, as was 
his father before him. 

On the 4th of April, 1900, Mr. Kidd was married to Miss Blanche Huth- 
waite, a daughter of Dr. Charles and Ann Huthwaite, the former a prominent 
physician of Nottingham, England. 



HARRY P. LATHAM. 

Since 1911 Harry P. Latham has been engaged in the real-estate, insurance 
and loan business in New Westminster, and, although he . has been connected 
with this line but two years, has already built up an extensive and representative 
patronage, his trade connections continually increasing in importance and scope. 
He has long been in the service of the city, holding important positions with the 
municipal government, and in a public and private way his activities have proven 
of benefit to his community. Born in Toronto, Ontario, on June 17, 1877, he 
is a son of Peter and Elizabeth Latham, the former a native of Middlewich, 
Cheshire, England, and the latter of Dublin, Ireland. Their marriage took place 
in Toronto. The father was by occupation a landscape gardener and florist and 
was engaged in the floral business in Toronto. He was the landscape gardener 
who laid out the parliament grounds there and enjoyed a wide reputation as one 
of the foremost men in his profession. In 1881 he penetrated into the Saskatoon 
country with the Temperance Colony, being accompanied by his sons, of whom 
three were old enough to take up land. The government had at that time in- 
augurated a colonization policy and the wife was also allowed to take up one 
hundred and sixty acres, so that the family came into possession of five quarter 
sections at the time. The agricultural enterprise, however, was not successful, 
as their crops proved a failure, and after about six years of hard struggles and 



280 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

labors the family left that country and came to New Westminster. Here the 
father engaged in his old business as florist and landscape gardener, being suc- 
cessful along that line. He was one of the organizers of the Royal Agricultural 
Society, in which he remained prominent until the time of his death. As a mon- 
ument to his work can be seen today the grounds of Queens Park, which he 
laid out, and he also designed many of the gardens and parks surrounding the 
residences of the wealthy in Victoria and Vancouver. He died in 1912 but the 
mother is still living in the old home on Third avenue and Fourth street. 

Harry P. Latham was reared under the parental roof and acquired his educa- 
tion in the Westminster public and high schools, graduating from the latter with 
the class of 1893. Upon leaving school he entered the service of the city as 
messenger boy and for seventeen years remained with the municipal government, 
climbing during that time from position to position until the former messenger 
boy had become city treasurer. In that capacity he did efficient work deserving 
of the highest commendation. In 1910 he severed his connection with the muni- 
cipality and for the next following year acted as manager of the National Finance 
Company, but in 1911 engaged independently in the real-estate and insurance 
business. He formed a company on January i, 1913, by admitting W. N. Clarke 
to partnership and buying out the business of A. W. McLeod, one of the oldest 
and best known real-estate and insurance concerns in British Columbia. Well 
acquainted with the realty valuation in the city and surrounding country, Mr. 
Latham has quickly become an important man in his professional circles, his busi- 
ness increasing by leaps and bounds under his able management. 

In 1907 Mr. Latham was united in marriage to Miss Molly Fletcher, a daugh- 
ter of S. A. Fletcher, who is a government agent and resides in New Westmin- 
ster. To this union were born two children, Gerald E. A. and Marian. 

Mr. and Mrs. Latham are devoted members of the Church of England, in 
the work of which they take an active and helpful interest. Fraternally he is con- 
nected with the Masons, being a member of Union Lodge, No. 9, A. F. & A. M., 
and the Royal Arch chapter. He is also a Knight Templar, belonging to West- 
minster Commandery, No. 56. In the Independent Order of Odd Fellows he 
holds membership with Amity Lodge, No. 27, of New Westminster. Knowing 
that the character of a man's recreation is almost as important as that of his 
work and that through periods of relaxation that even balance is maintained 
which is so necessary to success, he gives much attention to outdoor sports. In 
1899 and 1900 he was a member of the Westminster lacrosse team, which won 
the world's championship in both years, and was with them on their eastern trip 
in 1900, when they returned undefeated. He is the proud owner of a gold watch 
which was presented by the citizens in 1899 and a charm which was given him in 
1900. He still takes an active interest in the game, finding thereby rest after a day 
of hard work. He is interested in all projects undertaken to benefit the city and, 
while he is on the highroad to prosperity, never loses sight of public interests, 
readily championing every worthy enterprise and not sparing of time and money 
to promote the public welfare. 



WILLIAM BAYLIS. 

William Baylis is prominently connected with mercantile interests of Victoria 
as the proprietor of the Hollywood Grocery, a profitable enterprise which he 
founded and which by his energy and ability he built up to its present gratifying 
proportions. He was born in Bagington Hall, Warwickshire, England, December 
8, 1862, the second of four sons in a family of seven children born to John and 
Sarah (Commander) Baylis, natives of that locality. The father followed the 
nursery business there until his death which occurred in 1900 when he was sixty- 
nine years of age. His wife survived him until 1904, dying at the age of sixty- nine. 




WILLIAM BAYLIS 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 283 

William Baylis acquired his education in the public schools of Wolverhampton, 
England, and after laying aside his books joined the Twentieth Hussars, serving 
for twelve years as a non-commissioned officer and retiring as sergeant major in 
September, 1889. In that year he came to Canada and located at Lake Dauphin, 
Manitoba, where he engaged in farming until 1896, when he moved to Winnipeg, 
becoming manager of the Manitoba Club. This position he retained until 1900 
when he was made manager of the Canadian Pacific Railway Hotel at Moose ]aw, 
resigning this position in 1901 and moving to Victoria where he has since remained. 
Upon his arrival he became manager of the Badmington Club and he held this 
position until 1904 when he purchased the Queens Hotel, managing this until 1909. 
At this time he disposed of his interest in the enterprise and turned his attention 
to the grocery business, his establishment at the corner of Fairlield road and Lillian 
street being situated on a portion of ten acres which he had formerly operated as 
a poultry farm. Mr. Baylis is practically the founder of intensive poultry raising 
in this section and is a recognized authority upon this subject. For several years 
he lectured all over British Columbia at Farmers' Institutes as a representative 
of the provincial government and he edited the liritish Columbia Poultry Journal 
for a long period. His own farm has now been subdivided into high class resi- 
dential lots but he has not by any means abandoned his interests in scientific poultry 
raising and is regarded as one of the most able authorities upon this subject in 
the province. A great deal of his attention is, however, given to the development 
of the Hollywood Grocery of which he is proprietor, and the business has con- 
stantly increased in volume and importance, its growth necessitating an enlarge- 
ment of quarters from time to time. 

In September, 1884, Mr. Baylis was united in marriage in Cork. Ireland, to 
Miss Theresa Willis, a daughter of John and Eleanor (Synan) Willis, natives of 
that locality where the father engaged in merchandising. The mother was a 
descendant of the Synans of Doneraile, whose ancestors date back to 1077 A. D. 
Mr. and Mrs. Baylis have three children : Frank, who is a partner in and acts as 
manager of his father's grocery business; Mary, who married Lieutenant J. fl. 
Nankivell of the English Royal Navy ; and Charles, a surveyor who makes his 
home in Victoria. The Baylis residence is called Adare Lodge and is an attractive 
and well improved home on Fairfield road. 

Mr. Baylis is well known in social circles being a courteous and affable gentle- 
man, fond of all kinds of outdoor sports such as hunting, fishing, boating and 
horseback riding. His sterling personal worth has gained him many friends in 
Victoria and his name is recognized and respected in business circles as a synonym 
for integrity and straightforward dealing. 



A. ERNEST HENDERSON. 

The rapid upbuilding of the west furnishes an excellent field to the architect, 
the contractor and those engaged in allied business affairs. In the first mentioned 
field of labor A. Ernest Henderson has gained recognition as one whose skill 
and ability have placed him far beyond the ranks of mediocrity until he now stands 
among the more successful few, practicing his profession as a partner in the firm 
of Grant, Henderson & Cook. He was born in Orangeville, Ontario, July 13, 
1873, an d is a son of Rev. Canon and Martha (Taylor) Henderson, both of 
whom are natives of Ontario. The father was for forty years rector of the 
parish of Orangeville but is now living retired and makes his home in Toronto. 

Mr. Henderson was educated at Trinity College at Port Hope, and studied 
architecture in both Toronto and Buffalo, New York, later spending some time 
abroad. He afterward went to Montreal where he followed his profession for 
a year and a half in the employ of others and in 1898 came to British Columbia, 
where he entered the employ of the well known architect G. W. Grant in con- 
nection with work that was being conducted at New Westminster. He after- 



284 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

ward started out independently, practicing his profession at that place for two 
years. In 1903 his former employer, Mr. Grant, admitted him to a partnership 
under the firm style of Grant & Henderson, which connection has since been 
maintained. In 1912 they were joined by H. T. Cook, the third partner being 
taken in because of their growing business, and the firm name is now Grant, 
Henderson & Cook. The time of all three is fully occupied with the manage- 
ment and control of a business which is constantly growing in volume and im- 
portance. Like his partners Mr. Henderson is acquainted with every phase of 
the profession and various fine structures, including public and private buildings 
of Vancouver, stand in evidence of his knowledge and skill as an architect. 

In October, 1905, in Vancouver, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Hender- 
son and Miss Mildred Pentreath, a daughter of the late Ven. Archdeacon Pen- 
treath. They have three children, Aileen Vivian Constance, Isobel Martha and 
Eleanor Mabel. Mr. Henderson is a member of Acacia Lodge, A. F. & A. M., 
and also the Scottish Rite. A believer in the doctrines of the Church of Eng- 
land, he has his membership in St. Paul's. In politics he is a conservative and 
while taking an active interest in political questions is not a worker in party 
ranks nor does he seek the honors and emoluments of office. On the contrary 
he feels that his time is sufficiently occupied by his growing business cares and 
his ambition is rather in the path of his profession than in the line of office hold- 
ing. Recognizing the eternal principle that industry wins, he has made that the 
foundation upon which he is building his success and well earned reputation. 



JOHN DOUGLAS MATHER. 

Among the well known representatives of brokerage interests in Vancouver 
is John Douglas Mather, who has been engaged in his present line of business 
since the 1st of January, 1909, being a partner in the corporation of Mather 
& Noble, Ltd. He was born in Ottawa, April 18, 1882, his parents being Robert 
Addison and Maud (Cameron) Mather. The father, a native of Montrose, 
Scotland, is now prominent in business circles of Vancouver, being president 
of the firm of Mather & Noble, Ltd. 

John D. Mather was a pupil in the schools of Kenora, Ontario, and after- 
ward entered the employ of the Bank of Ottawa in the city of Ottawa in a cler- 
ical position. His ability and fidelity soon won recognition and he was rapidly 
promoted through various grades until he became accountant in the Regina 
branch of the bank. He resigned from that position to become associated with 
G. W. Murray, Ltd., of Winnipeg, and there remained until the latter part of 
1907, when he came to Vancouver to accept the position of secretary of the 
Dominion Trust Company. In that position he remained until January r, 1909, 
when he resigned to enter upon his present business connections. In associa- 
tion with his father, Robert A. Mather, and J. Fred Noble he formed the cor- 
poration of Mather & Noble, Ltd., of which he became a director, so continu- 
ing to the present time. The firm are financial agents and real-estate and stock 
brokers, occupying a large suite of rooms in the Bank of Ottawa building. 
They conduct an extensive business, being now accorded a large and growing 
clientage, and Mr. Mather, although one of the young men of Vancouver, is 
recognized as one of the representative business men energetic, determined 
and persistent. What he undertakes he carries forward to successful completion 
and, making wise use of his opportunities, he has gained for himself a well 
deserved reputation as a factor in the financial circles of Vancouver. He is 
also a member of the Vancouver Stock Exchange. 

On the 2d qf September, 1908, Mr. Mather was united in marriage, in Win- 
nipeg, Ontario, to Miss Beatrice Champion, a daughter of H. T. Champion, of 
Winnipeg, and they have two children, Mary Evelyn and Robert Addison. 
The parents belong to St. John's Presbyterian church. Mr. Mather holds mem- 




JOHN D. MATHER 



-BRITISH COLUMBIA 287 

bership in Western Gate Lodge, No. 48, F. & A. M., and also in the Van- 
couver Club. He is a typical young man of the west, possessing energy and 
enterprise which have been the dominant factors in the upbuilding of this sec- 
tion of the country, and is imbued with that unconquerable spirit which knows 
no such word as fail and which finds in difficulties and obstacles incentive for 
renewed efforts, resulting in successful accomplishment. 



DAVID MCGREGOR ROGERS. 

David AIcGregor Rogers, a well known barrister and solicitor of Victoria^ 
also occupies a prominent place in business circles as managing director of the 
firm of Rogers & Co., Limited, real-estate, insurance and financial agents, with 
offices in the Times building. His birth occurred in Peterboro, Ontario, Canada, 
on the 4th of May, 1874, his parents being Henry Cassicly and Maria (Burritt) 
Rogers, likewise natives of Ontario, Canada. The family is of Scotch-English 
origin. The first members of the family to emigrate to America came from 
Ireland and settled in the English colony of New 1 lampshire in 1740. David 
McGregor Rogers, the paternal great-grandfather of our subject, was born in 
Vermont in 1772 and came to Upper Canada with the United Empire Loyalists 
in 1784. In 1796 he was elected to represent Prince Edward county in the leg- 
islature. In 1800 he was reelected for the same county and during three suc- 
ceeding parliaments was returned for the county of Northumberland, to which 
he had removed. He declined to be a candidate in 1816 but was elected in 1820 
and would again have been the successful candidate in 1824, had he not died 
while the election was in progress. During the war of 1812-14 he was actively 
engaged as a commissariat officer, his place being one of the principal depots 
between Kingston and Toronto. James G. Rogers, the paternal grandfather of 
Mr. Rogers of this review, was a native of Brighton, Ontario, and had a long 
and interesting military career. In 1833 he assumed command of Northumber- 
land Troop of Volunteer Cavalry, remaining at its head for a period of twenty 
years. During the rebellion of 1837-8 his cavalry was engaged in active service. 
His demise occurred in November, 1874. His son, Henry Cassidy Rogers, was 
appointed postmaster at Peterboro in 1871 and held that office for forty years. 
At the age of sixteen he joined the Peterboro Rifle Company and during the 
Fenian raids in 1866 was in command of that corps on the frontier. In 1872 he 
organized and took command of the First Peterboro Troop of Cavalry, which 
low forms C Troop of the Third Prince of Wales Canadian Dragoons. He 
vvas married in 1863 and became the father of seven children, five sons and two 
laughters, our subject being the second youngest of the sons. 

David McGregor Rogers, whose name introduces this review, received his 
earlier education in the public schools of Peterboro and the collegiate institute 
it that place. In January, 1888, he entered Trinity College School of Port Hope, 
Dntario, and was graduated from that institution in June, 1892. In October, 
1893, he became a student in Trinity University of Toronto, which conferred 
ipon him the degree of B. A. in 1897 and that of M. A. in 1904. Believing that 
he west offered better opportunities, he came to British Columbia in 1897 and 
ocated in Victoria, where he entered the office of McPhillips, Wootton & Barn- 
ird, solicitors. He remained with that firm until June, 1901, at which time 
le was called to the bar and immediately began the practice of his profession in 
rartnership with F. T. Cornwall, under the name of Cornwall & Rogers, with 
offices in the Law Chambers in Victoria. This partnership was terminated in 
903, Mr. Rogers continuing practice alone in the same offices until 1904, when 
he became associated with G. H. Barnard under the firm name of Barnard & 
iiogers. He retired from general practice in 1906 but continued doing legal work 
i'or various corporations until 1911. From 1901 until 1912 he was a member of 
the examining: board of the Law Society of British Columbia, resigning in the 



288 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

latter year. During the period in which he was engaged in actual practice he 
_ acted as solicitor for different banks and many of the larger concerns of Victoria. 
In 1911 he entered the real-estate and insurance business by negotiating the sale 
of the extensive tract of land now known as "Uplands" and comprising about 
four hundred and sixty-five acres, to a French syndicate operating under the 
name of Uplands, Limited. Mr. Rogers, who is chairman of the board of 
directors of Uplands, Limited, devotes the greater part of his time to the manage- 
ment and development of this place, which is conceded to be the most beautiful 
piece of suburban natural park property and the most attractively and effectively 
designed residential district to be found in any city of the Pacific northwest, 
having been designed by John C. Olmsted, the famous landscapist of Brookline, 
Massachusetts, and regarded as one of his noteworthy masterpieces. Although 
he gives most of his attention to his real-estate, and especially Uplands, Mr. 
Rogers continues his membership of the legal profession, accepting no cases in 
court, however, and declining general practice. He was formerly solicitor for 
The International Coal & Coke Company, Limited, and served as vice president 
and as a director of this concern. He likewise acted as solicitor and a director 
of The Hastings Shingle Manufacturing Company, Limited, the British-Amer- 
ican Trust Company, Limited, and the Canada Western Chartered Corporation. 
His splendid business ability and keen discernment are also manifest in the dis- 
charge of his important duties as managing director of the firm of Rogers & Co., 
Limited, real-estate, insurance and financial agents. 

On the 2oth of July, 1904, at Tacoma, Washington, Mr. Rogers was joined 
in wedlock to Miss Mary Ferriss, her parents being John M. and Maria Ferriss, 
the former a native of New York. In politics Mr. Rogers is a conservative, 
having served as secretary of the Conservative Association in 1901-2 and as a 
member of its executive committee for several years. He holds membership 
relations with the Union Club of Victoria, the Pacific Club of Victoria, the 
Victoria Golf Club, the Victoria Cricket Club, the Royal Victoria Yacht Club, 
and the British Columbia Hockey League, being the founder and a former sec- 
retary of the last named. He likewise belongs to the Victoria Tennis Club and 
the Progessive Club, while his religious faith is that of the Anglican church. 
Mr. Rogers enjoys an enviable reputation among his professional brethren and 
business associates and is widely recognized as a public-spirited and enterprising 
citizen, his efforts having been an important factor in the promotion of Victoria's 
welfare and progress. 

HON. MONTAGUE WILLIAM TYRWHITT-DRAKE. 

One of the most memorable figures in the politial, professional and general pub- 
lic life of the province of British Columbia was Hon. Montague William Tyrwhitt- 
Drake, who came to the province in 1859, an d wno f rom that time until his death 
left the impress of his ability upon provincial history. He was for many years 
connected with official life as a member of the legislature and in other capacities, 
proving himself a capable, progressive and far-sighted statesman. In the profession 
of law he gained a position of eminence among the leading barristers of the prov- 
ince and his work in this field he also made the basis of public service through the 
successful conduct of a great deal of important government litigation. He was 
raised to the bench of the supreme court in 1889, serving capably and conscien- 
tiously until 1904. 

Judge Tyrwhitt-Drake was born at Kings Walden, Hertfordshire, England, 
January 20, 1830, and was the second son of the Rev. George Tyrwhitt-Drake, a 
representative of an old country family of Shardeloes, Buckinghamshire, but 
descended originally from a brother of Sir Francis Drake, the famous seaman of 
the days of Queen Elizabeth. 

Hon. Montague Tyrwhitt-Drake acquired his education in Charterhouse school, 
London, and was subsequently admitted as a solicitor in England in 1851. Eight 




HON. MONTAGUE WILLIAM TYRWHITT-DRAKE 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 291 

years later he came to British Columbia, making the journey by way of the isthmus 
of Panama and arriving as a pioneer in the province in 1859. For a short time he 
tried placer mining in the Cariboo country, but, meeting with little success, he came 
to Victoria and resumed the practice of his profession, in which each year brought 
him increasing prominence. .He was for two years in partnership with Attorney 
General Carey, and from the beginning of his career was connected with notable 
litigation. His ability in law brought him prominently before the people of Victoria 
and he soon became very active in public affairs, serving .from 1868 to 1870 as a 
member of the legislative council for the city. Two years later he became a mem- 
ber of the board of education and in 1877 was elected mayor of the city, his adminis- 
tration being still remembered on account of the constructive, businesslike and pro- 
gressive policy by which it was characterized. In 1873 Judge Tyrwhitt-Drake was 
made a member of the British Columbia bar and ten years later was made queen's 
counsel. In the same year he represented Victoria as a member of the legislative 
assembly, holding his seat in that body until 1886 and serving from 1883 to 1884 as 
president of the executive council. During all of this time his prominence in law 
had kept pace with his advancement in public life. He was known as a strong, able 
ind forceful practitioner, learned in his profession, practical in the application of his 
<nowledge and possessed of incisive, keen and analytical powers of mind. His prac- 
tice reached extensive proportions, connecting him with a number of important 
cases, and in 1887 he was employed by the Dominion government as its counsel in 
the matter of the first seizure of the Canadian sealing schooners. He laid out the 
lines on which the case should be fought and these were followed throughout the 
:ontroversy, the report of the arbitration committee at Paris sustaining the Cana- 
dian representatives. Judge Tyrwhitt-Drake was elevated to the bench of the 
supreme court of British Columbia in 1889, retiring in 1904 after an honorable and 
vvorthy judicial career. 

In 1862 Judge Tyrwhitt-Drake was united in marriage to Miss Joanna Tolmie, 
i daughter of James Tolmie, of Ardersier, Scotland. Mrs. Tyrwhitt-Drake passed 
iway in 1901 and is survived by four daughters and a son, the latter, Brian H. 
Tyrwhitt-Drake, being registrar of the supreme court. A more extended mention 
of his career appears on another page in this work. Judge Montague Tyrwhitt- 
Drake died in Victoria April 19, 1908, his death marking the passing of one of 
British Columbia's most honored pioneer citizens and a man whose career forms an 
: mportant chapter in the legislative, judicial and professional history of the prov- 
nce. 



H. J. BUTTERFIELD. 

One of the important wholesale establishments of New Westminster is that 
of H. J. Butterfield, wholesale dealer in fish. He was born in the Hawaiian 
islands while his parents were on a trip to Honolulu, on September 5, 1874, and 
is a son of James T. and Jessie (Holt) Butterfield, the father a native of Maine 
;.nd the mother of Nova Scotia. In 1856 the father went to California, locating 
in Nevada county, where for a number of years he was engaged in mining but 
subsequently became connected with the sheep and goat industry, importing into 
California the first Angora goats ever brought into that state. He later intro- 
duced that breed also into Oregon and Washington. He was married in San 
Francisco, where the parents of his bride, Samuel and Caroline Holt, were then 
living. Subsequently, however, Mr. and Mrs. Holt moved to British Columbia 
t3 make it their home, locating in New Westminster, where the grandfather 
< f our subject is still living, the grandmother having passed away on February 
12, 1913. James T. Butterfield, the father, moved with his family from San 
Jose, California, where he was then living, to British Columbia in 1888, locating 
ii New Westminster, where he still makes his home, although he spends the 
\ 'inter months in California. 

H. J. Butterfield was reared at home, acquiring his education in the public 
and private schools and the San Jose Academy of that city. Discontinuing his 



292 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

lessons, he subsequently, in 1893, engaged in fruit culture and the nursery busi- 
ness, with which he was successfully identified for about eight years before he 
came in 1901 to British Columbia, locating in New Westminster. He has since 
that time engaged in the wholesale fish business and has an extensive trade, sup- 
plying the markets in Alberta and Saskatchewan, also Vancouver and Victoria. 
His business ability leads him continually to increase his trade connections and 
the business is growing from year to year, his annual returns increasing in a most 
gratifying manner. 

On December 24, 1897, Mr. Butterfield was married to Miss Lillian Still- 
wagon, of Flushing, Long Island, and to this union were born seven children, 
Lilly 1., Hope J., Chester C., Theodore, Wesley, Pearl and Ammon. Both Mr. 
and Mrs. Butterfield are members of the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ 
Latter Day Saints and his political affiliations are with the liberal party. Com- 
mercial life in Xe\v Westminster has distinctly profited by the arrival of Mr. 
Butterfield, who not only has promoted his own interests since locating here but 
has proven a factor in general commercial expansion. A man of wide outlook 
and shrewd judgment, he is continually improving his opportunities and by tak- 
ing care of advantages as they have come in his way has attained to a prominent 
and substantial position. 






CAPTAIN M. NEELIN GARLAND. 

Captain M. Neelin Garland, of Vancouver, has various business interests, in 
the management and control of which he displays sound judgment and unfaltering 
perseverance. He was born in Carleton county, Ontario, and is a son of Edward 
and Mary Ann (Neelin) Garland, the former a native of Surrey, England, and the 
latter of the north of Ireland. In early life they became residents of Carleton 
county, Ontario, where they were among the pioneer settlers and lived there 
throughout their remaining days. Carleton county has nearly always been repre- 
sented in the Dominion parliament by some member of this family, and, there is a 
most creditable public record associated with the family name. 

After attending the public schools Captain M. Neelin Garland continued his edu- 
cation at Belleville College in Belleville, Ontario, from which he was graduated. He 
was engaged in mining in Ontario until 1894, when he came to British Columbia. 
He mined on the Eraser river from 1894 to 1898, when he went to the Yukon on 
his own initiative and there staked what was known as the Bed Rock flume con- 
cession. The following year he was appointed superintendent of the British Amer- 
ican Corporation and located and opened their copper properties at White Horse, 
Yukon Territory. His experiences were those which usually came in connection 
with mine development and brought him intimate knowledge of that great depart- 
ment of industry. He resigned in 1900 and retired to Vancouver, since which time 
he has been engaged in the timber and lumber business and has assisted in organizing 
several successful ventures. He is managing director of the Nimkish Lake Log- 
ging Company, Limited, being also largely interested in British Columbia farm 
lands, in which he made extensive investments. Whatever success is his is attribu- 
table entirely to his own labors, as he early recognized the truth that there is no 
royal road to wealth and that there is no excellence without effort. Thus it was 
that he bent his energies to accomplishment of the tasks assigned him, and with the 
passing years has advanced step by step .to the goal of prosperity. His invest- 
ments in business affairs cover a wide scope and he is connected with many impor- 
tant business projects. Varied are the interests which have claimed his attention, 
having to do with business affairs, the duties of citizenship and public obligations. 
His support of any movement has ever been prompted by a conscientious belief 
in its advisibility and he attacks everything in which he is interested with a con- 
tagious enthusiasm. 

Captain Garland served with the Princess Louise Dragoon Guards at Ottawa 
and won the rank of captain in C School, Toronto, his commission dating from the 




CAPTAIN M. NEELIN GARLAND 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 295 

3 ist of October, 1889. He votes the conservative ticket and is keenly interested 
in Dominion and provincial politics. Every measure that goes to the upbuilding or 
development of the country, and particularly British Columbia, is sure of his 
earnest and hearty support. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and also 
belongs to the Vancouver Club ; the Jericho Country Club ; the Royal Vancouver 
Yacht Club, and the Canadian Military Institute, at Toronto. His religious faith 
is that of the Anglican church. 

Captain Garland was married in 19x39 to Miss Mary Agnes Lyons, only daughter 
af John R. Lyons, J. P., of Rochdale, Lancashire, England. 



FRANK ALEXIS PATRICK. 

An eminent philosopher has said that few men recognize the fact that play- 
ing well is only of secondary importance to working well that relaxation and 
entertainment maintain in nature an even balance to business activity. There is 
in all Vancouver no more attractive place of recreation than the Arena, of which 
Frank Alexis Patrick is manager. Well defined plans, carefully executed, not- 
ible business ability and discernment combined with systematic management have 
)een the features which have made this the splendid institution which it is today, 
[ts existence is due to the Patrick family with the subject of this review as one 
>f the promoters and directors. He is yet a young man, his birth having occurred 
n Ottawa, Ontario, December 21, 1885, his parents being Joseph and Grace 
'Nelson) Patrick. The father was a son of Thomas Patrick, who came from 
County Tyrone, Ireland, and settled in one of the eastern townships of Quebec, 
liis home being near Sherbrooke, where he engaged in farming. His son Joseph 
^atrick was reared there upon the homestead farm and after reaching manhood 
mgaged in the timber business in Quebec, with headquarters and residence in 
Vfontreal. His business grew to extensive proportions and he carried on his 
operations in Quebec until 1906, when he acquired large timber limits in British 
1 Columbia and removed to Nelson. There he continued in the timber and lumber 
business under the name of the Patrick Lumber Company until 1911, when he 
disposed of his interests to the British Canadian Lumber Corporation and retired 
from active commercial pursuits. He then removed to Victoria where he now 
icsides, enjoying the fruits of his former labor in a well earned and well merited 
rest, his activities in former years being productive of a handsome competence 
ihat now supplies him with all of the comforts of life. He married Grace Nelson, 
;i daughter of R. V. Nelson, a well known and prominent railroad contractor 
of Ontario and the maritime provinces. 

In the pursuit of his education Frank A. Patrick attended the grammar and 
high schools of Montreal and McGill University in that city, from which insti- 
gation he was graduated in 1908 with the degree of B. A. Following his grad- 
ration he joined his father at Nelson, British Columbia, and became associated 
with him in the timber and lumber business as superintendent of the Patrick 
Lumber Company. He continued to act in that capacity until the business was 
sold in 1911, when he came to Vancouver and organized the Vancouver Arena 
Company, Ltd., of which he became managing director and so continues. In this 
t ndertaking he is associated with his father and brother Lester. The company 

< rected the Vancouver Arena, one of the largest, finest and most imposing of its 
Vind in the world, constructed at a cost of more than three hundred thousand 

< ollars. It contains an artificial ice rink with an ice surface eighty-five feet wide 

l>y two hundred and ten feet in length and having a seating capacity for ten 
thousand, five hundred people. This artificial ice rink was the first to be built 

ii Canada and is the finest on the American continent. The Arena contains the 
most up-to-date refrigerating plant in the country from the viewpoint of fur- 
nishing ice surfaces for skating purposes, hockey and curling, as well as ice for 

domestic consumption. The ice for the rink is manufactured by the gravity 



296 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 



brine system, a process invented and patented by Mr. Patrick. Unlike other 
systems there are no series of coils, but all the pipes, which are operated inde- 
pendently, are fed by one large pipe, which in turn is absolutely controlled. The 
ice so manufactured has proven to be superior to natural ice for skating pur- 
poses. In the basement of the building provision is made for the curlers, where 
there are four fine sheets of ice. For a building of such great size its seating 
capacity is so arranged as to afford the spectators a perfect view of the entire 
ice surface from any point of the building. The lighting system is superior to 
that of any ice skating rink in the country. The building contains four entrances 
and fourteen exits and can be emptied in three minutes, even when full to its 
capacity. The primary object of the Arena is to provide a rink in which to 
stage the game of hockey, the great Canadian winter sport. The rink was opened 
for skating on the 2Oth of December, 1911, and soon afterward the hockey sea- 
son was inaugurated with three teams, representing Vancouver, New West- 
minster and Victoria, comprising the Pacific Hockey Association. The games 
have attracted great public interest during the two seasons in which the league 
has been active and have been liberally patronized. Mr. Patrick is a fine hockey 
player and occupies the point position on the Vancouver team as well as being 
manager of the team. He is a splendid athlete in many directions and is a cham- 
pion of all kinds of athletics and of manly outdoor sports. During the summer 
months the Vancouver Arena is used for the purpose of holding shows of various 
kinds and for all attractions requiring a large seating capacity, while the 
basement is utilized for the manufacture of artificial ice for domestic use and for 
cold storage purposes. The Patricks, father and sons, also built and own the 
Victoria Arena, erected on the same lines as the Vancouver rink but with only 
half the seating capacity. The Victoria rink is under the management of Lester 
Patrick, while the father is only financially interested in the business. 

Frank A. Patrick is a liberal in politics but not an active party worker. He 
belongs to the University and Canadian Clubs and to the Methodist church. His 
has been an active and well spent life, his labors reaching achievement in well 
earned success. That he possesses splendid business ability is evidenced in the 
establishment and control of the mammoth rink of which he is in charge and 
which meets a need for public entertainment that makes it a valuable adjunct 
to Vancouver. 



VICTOR ALEXANDER GEORGE ELIOT. 

Victor Alexander George Eliot is managing director at Victoria of the West- 
ern Dominion Land & Investment Company, Limited, in which connection he is 
doing much as a city builder and developer of property. A young man imbued 
with the progressive spirit of the west, he is taking an active part in the work 
of general improvement and advancement, and with him each year chronicles 
successful achievement. He was born in London, England, June 2, 1884, a son 
of Philip Eliot, who was dean of Windsor and chaplain to the late Queen Victoria, 
to the late King Edward and now to King George. The mother, Mary Emma 
Eliot, who died in October, 1901, was a daughter of the fifth Baron Rivers and 
was maid of honor to Queen Victoria. 

Victor A. G. Eliot pursued his education in Maryborough College of England 
from 1898 until 1902 and then became a student at Trinity College, Oxford, 
where he spent two years. He made his initial step in the business circles of 
the northwest as a clerk in the Bank of Montreal at Victoria and afterward occu- 
pied a clerical position with the British American Trust Company, Limited, in 
that city. He turned his attention to the brokerage business as senior partner 
in the firm of Eliot & Bronley, of Victoria, and afterward became a partner in 
the firm of Bevan, Gore & Eliot, which is affiliated with the Western Dominion 
Land & Investment Company. He is now managing director of the latter and 




VICTOR A. G. ELIOT 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 299 

also a director of the British Investments. Limited. The Western Dominion 
Land & Investment Company, Limited, is interested in three hundred acres of 
land on Tod Inlet, on the south side of the Saanich peninsula, about eleven miles 
from Victoria. This property is being subdivided into small blocks suitable for 
settlers who intend to engage in market gardening or mixed farming. The com- 
pany also handles a considerable amount of English capital for investment in 
mortgages, agreements of sale, real estate and industrial concerns. They hold 
seats on the Victoria, Vancouver and Spokane stock exchanges and are in 
close touch with the real-estate and money market of the province. The main 
office of the company is located in Vancouver, under the management of C. H. 
Gore, while the Victoria office is under the management of Victor A. G. Eliot. 
The company's London address is u Haymarket and the office in the metropolis 
is in charge of Gerald C. Torrens, while a branch office is located at Sidney, on 
Vancouver island, and is in charge of Mr. Oldfield, at which point he is handling 
a large tract of land that has been subdivided into business and residential lots, 
known as the Brethour subdivision. A portion of this is industrial property, 
having water frontage facilities, and the remainder is high class residential prop- 
erty, all being handled on the easy payment plan. The company has also acquired 
large interests in the Bulkley Valley and Fort George districts, which they are 
subdividing into small blocks suitable for gardening and mixed farming. The 
company also has large holdings of inside business property in Victoria and 
Vancouver. Their efforts have been a most important factor in the upbuilding of 
the town of Sidney, which has been termed "the town with a future." It is 
fast becoming a great manufacturing and industrial center. Another notable 
work which is being accomplished by the Western Dominion Land & Investment 
Company, Limited, is the development of Brentwood, an attractive residential 
suburb situated on the British Columbia electric line, within eleven miles of the 
:enter of Victoria. With its splendid water front and rolling ground, it offers 
excellent advantages to builders of beautiful homes who desire an ideal climate 
is well as building sites. In all of his work in connection with the company Mr. 
Eliot manifests a most progressive spirit and his labors have been an important 
element in the success of the corporation with which he is connected. 

Mr. Eliot was united in marriage to Miss Grace Edith Langley, a daughter of 
Walter Langley, of Basque Ranche, Ashcroft, British Columbia. Their mar- 
riage was celebrated in London, England, May 6, 1907. They are members of 
the Church of England and Mr. Eliot gives his political allegiance to the con- 
servative party but is not an active party worker. He is a member of the Board 
of Trade and is interested in every movement not only for the benefit and upbuild- 
ing of Victoria but of the entire province. The social activities of his life feature 
argely in connection with the Union Club, the Victoria Golf Club, the Victoria 
Lawn Tennis Club and the Cowichan Country Club. 



FRED ALLEN. 

Among the men who from pioneer times have taken a prominent part in 
Business affairs in Vancouver and who, in ably advancing their own interests, 
have become forces in general development is numbered Fred Allen, a feed mer- 
chant on Water street. The years have brought him wealth, business prominence 
and a place among the representative men of the city where he is now living in 
practical retirement although still supervising the management of his store. He 
was born November 20, 1861, at Charfield, Gloucestershire, England, and is a 
son of George and Ann Allen, the former for many years active as a shoemaker. 
Both have passed away. 

Fred Allen is in all essential respects a self-made man, for at the early age 
of nine years he was obliged to leave the public schools of his native city and 
jegin earning his own livelihood. He worked first in his father's shoe shop, 



300 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

where he continued for seven years, after which he obtained a clerical position 
in a grocery store in the Birmingham district. Resigning this and leaving his 
native country, he emigrated to Canada, settling first in Toronto, Ontario, where 
he followed railroading, working in various positions for about five years there- 
after. In 1884 he came to British Columbia and after a short stay in Victoria 
moved to Yale, where he was employed by J. B. Lovell in a general store for 
about three years. In the fall of 1887, after the Vancouver fire, he came to this 
city, where he is now numbered among the early settlers. For three years he 
worked in a feed store conducted by H. Arkell and then established himself in 
this line, his place of business being the old Methodist church on Water street, 
now one of the landmarks of the city. For twenty-two years he has conducted 
his store in that locality and during all of that time has not been absent from 
the store for two weeks. In the interval his business has developed and ex- 
panded into one of the largest of its kind in the city and he himself has taken 
his place among the substantial merchants and progressive business men. From 
time to time he has invested judiciously in city property and the rise in land values 
has brought him an independent income upon which he is living practically 
retired. 

Mr. Allen married Miss Mary McLeod, a daughter of George and Mary 
McLeod, of Prince Edward Island, both of whom have passed away. Mr. and 
Mrs. Allen have three children, Percy, Gordon and Muriel, all of whom are 
attending school. Mr. Allen is independent in his political views. He belongs 
to the Pioneer Association of Vancouver as one of the early settlers in the city 
which at the time of his arrival was a small village whose business district cen- 
tered about his store. He has witnessed its development into one of the most 
important cities on the Pacific coast and has seen its institutions founded and 
its business relations extended, bearing to the best of his ability and opportu- 
nities an active and honorable part in the work of progress and advancement. 
His present period of leisure is well deserved, rewarding many years of untir- 
ing industry and well directed labor in the past. 



RUSSELL SMITHER. 

For thirty-five years Russell Smither has lived upon his farm at New West- 
minster, and his activities have been a force in the general development and 
progress as well as in the attainment of individual success. At the present 
writing he is living retired, enjoying the fruits of his earnest and intelligently 
directed effort in former years. He is numbered among the honored pioneer 
settlers of British Columbia but is a native of England, his birth having oc- 
curred in London on the 28th of February, 1846, his parents being John and 
Emma Smither, both of whom have passed away. The father's business was 
that of car man and agent. 

Russell Smither was educated mainly in The City of London School at 
Cheapside and when sixteen years of age .was apprenticed to a contractor and 
builder, with whom he served for five years. About this time he attained his 
majority and leaving England in 1867, he crossed the Atlantic to the United 
States, working for two years thereafter at the carpenter's trade in connection 
with a railroad in Illinois. Subsequently he went to Franklin county, Kansas, 
where he purchased two hundred and forty acres of land and there carried 
on general farming for six years, but owing to the grasshopper scourge and 
drouth he determined to make a change and in 1875 went to San Francisco, 
California, where for nearly three years he was employed at his trade in con- 
nection with the building of the Palace and Baldwin Hotels. 

In September, 1877, Mr. Smither came to British Columbia and has since 
been a resident of New Westminster. He was among the first to homestead 
one hundred and sixty acres on the Hall's Prairie road, but on account of the 




RUSSELL SMITHER 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 303 

bad condition of the roads, the difficulty of clearing the land and lack of means 
he afterward sold that property. In those days a row boat was the only ferry 
and was quite sufficient for the few who then crossed the river. For many 
years Mr. Smither worked for the firm of John Hendry, McNair & Company, 
afterward called the Royal City Planing Mills Company, his long continuance 
in their service indicating clearly his fidelity and capability. In 1879 he pur- 
chased seven acres of land on the north arm on the Fraser river, for which 
he paid one hundred and seventy-five dollars and on which the taxes for a num- 
ber of years were only fifty cents. After clearing this land he planted an 
orchard and also began raising chickens, meeting with considerable success in 
that undertaking. 

Upon the tract he established his home and in 1883 he wedded Mary K. 
Holt, a daughter of S. F. and Caroline Holt, natives of Nova Scotia, who came 
to British Columbia in 1877. They have become the parents of five children: 
Emma M., now the wife of W. M. Kerr ; William P.; fohn S .; Cara 11. and 
Russell H. 

Fraternally Mr. Smither is connected with the Masonic fraternity and the 
\ncient Order of United Workmen. He belongs to the Church of England 
ind in politics votes independently, placing the genera! good above partisanship. 
In 1892 he was elected and served as alderman of the city council and in 1893 
filled the position of school trustee. He has always been greatly interested in 
gardening and music and has found therein recreation and pleasure. He is now 
practically living retired, enjoying the rest which crowns earnest, persistent and 
lonorable effort. 



WILLIAM WALMSLEY. 

Since 1911 William Walmsley has efficiently filled the important position of 
issistant sanitary inspector in New Westminster, doing work which largely 
esults in the betterment of sanitary conditions in the city and which is a factor 
n the prevention of disease and epidemics. He was born in County Fermanagh, 
Ireland, in 1868 and is a son of Edward and Mary J. (Sheridan) Walmsley, 
latives of that county, who came to Canada in 1885, locating in Ottawa. In 
[891 they crossed the continent to New Westminster, British Columbia, where 
he mother still lives, the father having passed away. During the greater part 
)f his active life he was engaged as a stationary engineer and was highly esteemed 
md respected in the communities in which he made his home. 

William Walmsley was reared under the parental roof, remaining in his 
lative island until he was seventeen years of age, when he removed with his 
>arents to Canada. He was educated in the common schools and upon discon- 
inuing his lessons served an apprenticeship at the blacksmith's trade in Ottawa, 
vorking at his trade as a journeyman before coming to New Westminster. 
Arriving here in 1891, he remained but a year, proceeding in 1892 to the Koot- 
onay country, engaging in the hotel business and operating an establishment of 
hat kind in Kaslo for four years, subsequent to which period he continued in 
he same line in Whitewater for six years and in Sandon for one year. He then 
eturned to New Westminster, turning his attention to agricultural pursuits for 
he next three years and giving his time to contracting for the next two years, 
loing work for the Emerson Lumber Company. His next position was as con- 
ductor for the British Columbia Electric Company, in which relationship he re- 
nained for two years, but in 1911 he was made assistant sanitary inspector of 
'he city of New Westminster. He gives his undivided attention to this impor- 
ant work, promoting health conditions in every possible way. The position is 
;in important one, as it directly affects the people, and Mr. Walmsley conscien- 
iously recognizes the seriousness of his duties, which he fulfills with the great- 
est punctiliousness and faithfulness, 
vol. rv 1 1 



304 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

Mr. Walmsley married Miss Alary Tappan, of Manitoba, and to them were 
born three children, Arthur William, Elva Gladys and George Laverne. His 
political allegiance is given to the conservative party and, although he keeps well 
informed upon all questions of the' day, he takes no active part in the public life 
of the city or province, his important duties precluding activity along other 
lines. He is well known and popular in New Westminster and to a large extent 
enjoys the confidence and good-will of the populace, who not only esteem him as 
an efficient public official but also as a man who is distinguished for many high 
qualities of mind and character. 



ALBERT EDWARD PLANTA. 

Among the public-spirited citizens of Nanaimo to whose energy and enter- 
prise must be attributed the excellent progress and stable development of the 
city is numbered Albert Edward Planta. For many years he has been ranked 
among the foremost business men of the town, the interests of which he has most 
ably served by his efficient discharge of various official duties, ranking from a 
member of the school board to that of mayor. He is a native of South Australia, 
his birth having occurred at Adelaide on the nth of September, 1868, and his 
parents being Joseph Phrys and Margaret (Stacy) Planta. The father came to 
British Columbia in 1870, locating in New Westminster, where he engaged in 
teaching school. Among his pupils were many who have since figured promi- 
nently in the public and official life of British Columbia, including such men as 
the Honorable Sir Richard McBride, premier, and Judge Mclnnis. Later he was 
appointed to the faculty of the collegiate school at Victoria, where he remained 
for several years, removing from there to Nanaimo. Here he became associated 
with the Vancouver Coal Company, being identified with this enterprise until 
appointed to the office of stipendiary magistrate, in which capacity he served until 
his death, in 1904. The mother is also deceased, her demise having occurred in 
1906. 

Albert Edward Planta, who with his mother and other members of the 
family moved to British Columbia in 1879, was eleven years of age when brought 
to the province and acquired his education in the public schools of Nanaimo. 
Having early decided upon a commercial career, he terminated his student days 
at the age of fifteen and obtained a position in a drug store. At the expiration 
of an apprenticeship of two years, he entered the employ of Dr. Cluness, the 
colliery surgeon of Nanaimo. He entered upon the duties of the latter posi- 
tion some three years prior to the doctor's death, following which he identified 
himself with insurance and real-estate interests of the city. This proved to be 
a very profitable venture and he became the head of a large and thriving business 
which he successfully conducted until 1911, when he sold his interests to the 
Dominion Trust Company, of which he is manager. He has been entrusted with 
the handling of extensive property interests and has negotiated many of the most 
important transfers effected of recent years. His long connection with the busi- 
ness has made him not only thoroughly familiar with local realty interests and 
property values but he is widely informed on northwestern lands generally, his 
opinion in this particular field being regarded as that of an authority. 

On the 3d of June, 1890, Mr. Planta was united in marriage to Miss Amy 
Gordon, a daughter of the late Hon. D. W. Gordon, M. P., and Emma (Webb) 
Gordon. Of this marriage have been born four children: Edward S. L., a civil 
engineer in the survey corps of the Western Fuel Company; and Clive M., 
Albert Murray and Robin, all yet at home. 

The family hold membership in the Church of England, and fraternally Mr. 
Planta is a member of the Knights of Pythias, Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows and the Foresters. Politically he is a conservative and takes an active 
interest in all public affairs, particularly those of a local nature. He first became 




ALBERT E. PLANTA 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 307 

dentified with public life in 1894, when he was elected to the office of alderman, 

n which capacity he served for eight years. During that time he took an active 

interest in the water system, then in course of construction, and enthusiastically 

< ooperated in forwarding various other progressive movements. At the expiration 
of his period of office he was elected mayor, and during the six years of his 
incumbency the present sewerage system was installed. The more important 

treets of the city were paved at that time, cement sidewalks were laid, and many 
minor improvements inaugurated, which not only enhanced the appearance of the 
c ity, but greatly augmented property values. At the present time he is chairman 
of the school board, on which he has served for many years, giving the same effi- 

< ient and capable service here as has characterized him in the discharge of his 
Carious other official duties. His reputation has spread beyond his immediate 
vicinity and he has been called to offices of more than local importance, having 
served in 1910 as president of the Association of Trustees of the Schools of British 
Columbia, and for two years was president of the Union of Municipalities of 
] British Columbia. In addition to his other services he has for years been dis- 
charging the duties of justice of the peace and he is also a notary public. Mr. 
Planta stands high in the esteem of his fellow citizens, both as a business man and 
1 ublic official, possessing those qualities which win him the confidence of those 
with whom> he has dealings and he so meets his responsibilities and discharges 
1 is obligations as to retain the respect of all honorable and upright men. 



JAMES CRAIG. 

Since December, 1910, James Craig has efficiently filled the position of city 
I lumbing inspector of New Westminster, performing important duties in that 
connection. Yet a young man, he has taken the right steps in the direction of 
P access and stands on the threshold of a career that promises well for the future. 
I'.orn in Winnipeg, Manitoba, May 21, 1884, he is a son of George and Jessie 
(Wilson) Craig, natives of Aberdeen, Scotland. Roth came in their youth to 
( anada from their native country, locating in Winnipeg, Manitoba, where they 
were married in 1883. In 1885 they removed to the province of Saskatchewan, 
where the father homesteaded a piece of land, but two years later, in 1887, he 
made another step westward, going to Vancouver, where he engaged in con- 
tracting. On account of asthmatic troubles, however, he had to seek a change 
of climate and in 1892 returned to Scotland, where he has since resided. He is 
n>w holding the position of overseer of the Ellis estate, in the Scottish highlands. 

James Craig was reared at home, enjoying the educational advantages of the 
\ ancouver public schools, and subsequently attended Peter Head Academy in 
Scotland for a short time. Following the completion of his studies he was em- 
p oyed in a clerical capacity in a dry-goods store, this position being followed by 
one in a grocery establishment. In 1898 he apprenticed himself to the plumbing 
trade, serving thus for six years and nine months. He received four cents 
less than a dollar a week for the first year of his service and a twenty-four cent 
n ise per week each year following, of his apprenticeship. In the spring of 1905 
ft'.r. Craig returned to Canada, being for six or seven months employed in Mon- 
treal, but in December of the same year came west to British Columbia, locating 
ai;ain in Vancouver. A few months later, however, the firm with which he was 
connected transferred him to New Westminster, which he has since made his- 
home. In the intervening years he served as government plumber for two years 
and four months and for one year following this service was engaged in busi- 
ness for himself. His thorough apprenticeship and subsequent wide experience 
wall fitted him for the position of plumbing inspector of New Westminster, to 
wiich office he was appointed in December, 1910, and in which position he is 
still serving, discharging his duties faithfully and efficiently. His work in that 
cc nnection is of the utmost importance to the city as the state of health of the 



308 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

inhabitants largely depends upon the system which is under his control and 
inspection. 

In 1908 Mr. Craig married Miss Margaret Isabelle Dailey, of Bangor, County 
Down, Ireland, and to this union were born two children, Cecil Eaton and Cecilia 
Victoria. Mr. and Mrs. Craig are members of the Presbyterian church, in the 
work of which they take an active and helpful interest. His only fraternal con- 
nection is with King Solomon Lodge, Xo. 17, A. F. & A. M., of the Masonic 
order. An ambitious young man of progressive tendencies, Mr. Craig is fast 
forging to the front, being highly esteemed and respected by all who know him 
for his faithfulness in office, his manly qualities and his pleasant, warm-hearted 
ways which make for him friends wherever he goes. He is a young man with 
an ambition and there is no doubt that his ambition will lead him to positions 
which will result in his own financial independence and also make him a service- 
able factor in the cause of general advancement and development. 



GEORGE ALEXANDER SUTHERLAND, M. D. 

Port Coquitlam numbers among its most distinguished, able and public- 
spirited citizens Dr. George Alexander Sutherland, pioneer physician and sur- 
geon in the city and for years a great individual force in the upbuilding of muni- 
cipal institutions along professional and other lines. His labors since his arrival 
here have emboided and exemplified the highest ideals of public service and dur- 
ing the years he has made his comprehensive professional knowledge, his ability 
and his prominence factors in a work of humanitarianism which places him in 
the front ranks of public benefactors. He was born in Oxford county, Ontario, 
on the 2ist of June, 1872. and is a son of John S. and Mary (Cameron) Suther- 
land, the former for many years a prominent farmer, now living retired in Inger- 
soll. Ontario. 

Dr. Sutherland is in all essential respects a self-made man, for after acquir- 
ing a preliminary education in the collegiate institute of Ingersoll he turned his 
attention to teaching, following that occupation in his native county for five years 
in order to gain the money to pursue his professional studies. Having at length 
saved a sum sufficient for his expenses, he entered the University of Toronto 
and was graduated in 1899, with the first silver medal and first-class honors, 
thus giving evidence even at this early period of preeminence in his chosen field. 
From 1898 to 1899 he served as house surgeon in the Toronto General Hospital 
and from 1899 to 1900 was ship surgeon on the Pacific for the Canadian Pacific 
Railroad Company. He afterward engaged in the general practice of his pro- 
fession in his native town until 1911, when he came to British Columbia and after 
passing the required examinations settled in Port Coquitlam as the first physician 
in the city. His life since that time has been one of continuous advancement 
and uninterrupted service. His private practice has grown and expanded con- 
tinuously, for it is well known that he possesses a scientific and comprehensive 
knowledge of the underlying principles of medicine, the broad learning, the deep 
sympathy and the appreciation of the ultimate ends and purposes of life, neces- 
sary to succeed in this most difficult profession. He has made his ability the 
basis also of constructive work in the public service, as a record of his activities 
will plainly show. He has done more than any other one man to improve san- 
itary conditions in Port Coquitlam and with their improvement to check the 
ravages of disease and prevent its recurrence. He has been instrumental in 
founding a private hospital and in securing for the city a beautiful site on St. 
Mary's Hill for the city hospital, thus making possible here the growth and 
development of two badly needed institutions of this character. At the present 
time he is serving as health officer and medical school inspector and is surgeon 
of the construction work for the Canadian Pacific Railroad, with a contract 
to serve nearly all of the Canadian Pacific construction camps. His activities 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 309 

;.long such lines as these are fully equalled, if not surpassed, by the quiet, unosten- 
tatious but effective work which he has done as a private practitioner, for he is 
;. physician who not only loves his profession but is actuated at all times by an 
.-.biding sense of the responsibilities which it entails upon him. No weather is too 
,'evere, no distance too great for him to travel to the bedside of a patient and his 

< onstant and willing sympathy has made him an ever welcome visitor to the 
Mck and suffering. The men in the construction camps around Port Coquitlam 
; re devoted to him, for they have seen continued evidences of his self-sacrificing 
work, his care and unremitting energy, his devotion to the sick under his charge, 
;.nd they regard him with reason as the embodiment of all that is highest and 
l*st in the physician's calling. 

Dr. Sutherland married on the 26th of July, 1906, Miss Jeanette Munro, a 
daughter of Colonel James and Agnes Munro, the former a private banker 
;.nd a well known army officer. He was the organizer of the Twenty-second 
Oxford Rifles and saw service in the Trent affair. He was also a member of 
(he contingent from Canada, as paymaster, at the queen's jubilee. Dr. and Mrs. 
Sutherland have one son, Bruce .Munro, named in honor of Herbert A. Bruce, 

< ne of the foremost surgeons in the city of Toronto and an intimate personal 
mend of the subject of this review. Dr. Sutherland is a member of the 
Presbyterian church and is connected fraternally with the Masonic order and the 
Independent Order of Foresters. He takes great delight in all kinds of outdoor 
sports and is especially fond of motoring, in which he spends a great many of 
1 is leisure hours. He was one of the first physicians in Port Coquitlam and 
ij today one of the most honored and respected ones, his many years of earnest 
and capable work having gained for him the respect and high regard of his 
trethren of the medical fraternity and the confidence and good-will of all who 
come in contact with him. 



STANLEY E. EDWARDS. 

In the short period of about three years Stanley E. Edwards has become 
one of the leading jewelers of New Westminster. British Columbia, establishing 
himself independently in September, 1910, in this city. He was born in County 
Haldimand, Ontario, on March 18, 1879, ar >d is a son of Edward and Maria 
(Harris) Edwards, the former a native of Halifax, Nova Scotia, whose parents 
cime from Wales to that province. The mother was born in Ontario and her 
pirents were natives of Wales. The father in early life engaged as contractor 
f )r a number of years but later became connected with agricultural pursuits. 
I oth he and his wife are still living, the former at the age of eighty-two and the 
1; tter having passed the seventy-sixth birthday. They are parents of eight 
c lildren and there has never been a death in the family. 

Stanley E. Edwards was reared on the home farm and educated in the country 
schools and at the Caledonia high school, from which he graduated in 1897. The 
s )irit of the west then took possession of him and he shortly afterward removed 
to Minnesota, locating in Crookston, where he served an apprenticeship at the 
jeweler's trade. In 1900 he moved northward to Winnipeg, Manitoba, where 
he worked as a journeyman jeweler for several years, being most of that time 
e nployed by the house of Henry Birk & Sons. In October, 1906, Air. Edwards 
cime to British Columbia, locating in Victoria, where he worked at his trade, 
aid in March, 1909, came to New Westminster, accepting a position with W. C. 
Chamberlain, with whom he remained for about eighteen months. At the end 
of that period, in September, 1910, he established his present business, which 
under his able management has become one of the important concerns of its 
kind in New Westminster. Thoroughly experienced in his line, Mr. Edwards 
gives his personal attention to all work entrusted to his care and has built up a 



310 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

reputation for reliability which assures his customers of the fairest treatment 
obtainable. 

In March, 1908, Mr. Edwards was united in marriage to Miss Jennie Little- 
wood, of Victoria, and to them have been born two children, Gwynneth Audrey 
Mabel and Elsworth. In his political affiliations Mr. Edwards gives his support 
to the conservative party and fraternally he is affiliated with Westminster Lodge, 
No. 842, Loyal Order of Moose, and the Canadian Order of Foresters. Both 
he and his wife are devout members of the Church of England. A man of 
enterprise and action, Mr. Edwards contributes by his activities to general com- 
mercial expansion and beside attaining individual prosperity has become an 
important factor in the growth of his city. He takes a deep interest in all that 
affects the. public and is ever ready to bear his share of time and money in the 
promotion of public enterprises. 



GEORGE LAW SON MILNE, M. D., C. M. 

An exact and comprehensive knowledge of the underlying principles of medi- 
cine, a broad humanitarianism, a sense of personal responsibility, and a keen 
realization of the value of life and its ultimate purposes make Dr. George Lawson 
Milne, of Victoria, a very able and successful physician. He has practiced in 
the city since 1880 and during the intervening years has become not only a leader 
in his profession but a power in politics as well, his interests extending to many 
fields of public service. He has been a member of the provincial legislature and 
is at present Dominion medical officer, immigration agent and controller of Chinese 
immigration, his work in this office being recognized as unusually valuable and 
able. He was born in Garmouth, Scotland, April 19, 1850, and is a son of Alex- 
ander and Isabella (Ingils) Milne, natives of Scotland, the father having been 
for man) years a merchant in Garmouth. In 1857 he came with his family to 
Canada and settled in Meaford, Ontario, where he followed the general mer- 
chandise business until his death, which occurred in 1894, when he was eighty- 
one years of age. His parents were also natives of Scotland, his father following 
the sea as captain of a ship and meeting death by drowning while in command 
of his vessel. The maternal grandparents of the subject of this review were 
born in Scotland and the grandfather was a farmer and landowner. 

Dr. George Lawson Milne came with his parents to Canada in 1857, being 
at that time seven years of age. He acquired his early education in the public 
schools of Meaford, Ontario, and later entered the medical department of Toronto 
University. He received his degree of M. D., C. M., in 1880 from Victoria Uni- 
versity, and in 1890 Toronto University also conferred upon him the medical 
degree of Doctor. In 1880 Dr. Milne began to practice his profession in Victoria, 
British Columbia, and here he has continuously resided since that time, for many 
years tending to one of the largest practices in the city. He has since given up 
private business entirely and now devotes his whole time to official duties as 
Dominion medical officer, immigration agent and controller of Chinese immigra- 
tion. He keeps in touch with the most advanced medical thought and science, 
remaining a close and earnest student of his profession, and his knowledge has 
been continually developed through experience, investigation and research. 

Dr. Milne has held many responsible .public offices along the line of his pro- 
fession, serving from 1884 to 1890 as health officer of Victoria. From 1886 to 
1897 he was registrar and secretary of the medical council and a member of the 
examining board, and in 1906 he was appointed Dominion government inspector 
and immigration agent at Victoria, serving six years. At the end of that time 
he \vas made immigration agent and controller of Chinese at this point, and these 
positions he still holds, discharging his duties in a far-sighted, capable and pro- 
gressive way. Aside from his profession Dr. Milne is well known in general public 
life, for his citizenship is of that high order which finds it best exemplification 




DR. GEORGE L. MILNE 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 313 

in public service. He was a member of the Victoria public school board from 1887 
to 1890, and from 1890 to 1894 served as a member of the British Columbia legis- 
lature, his influence during that time being always on the side of right, reform 
and progress. He was an unsuccessful candidate for a seat in the Dominion 
house of commons in 1896. He has important business connections, being presi- 
dent of the West Coast Fishing Company and honorary president of the Ramsay 
Manufacturing Company of Vancouver. 

On the 6th of December, 1882, Dr. Milne was united in marriage to Miss Ellen 
Catharine Kinsman, a daughter of the late John Kinsman, alderman of Victoria 
for many years, and Christina (Hunter) Kinsman. The father was a native 
of England and when he was a young man came to Canada, locating first in 
Ontario and afterward moving to Victoria, where he engaged in the contracting 
business until his death, which occurred October 24, 1906. His wife, who is a 
native of Ontario, survives him and makes her home in Victoria. The Milne 
residence, at No. 618 Dallas road, known as "Pinehurst," is one of the most beau- 
tiful homes in Victoria. It is set in the midst of over two acres of land, beautified 
with artistic gardens, and it overlooks the sea and the Olympic mountains in the 
distance. Dr. Milne has also an attractive summer residence at Becher bay, known 
as "Speyside." Here he has all the facilities to enable him to enjoy life in the 
open, in which he takes such great delight. Launches and boats of all kinds are 
always at hand, as well as a great variety of fishing and hunting equipment. Both 
Dr. and Mrs. Milne are very fond of outdoor life and spend many of their leisure 
hours in the open. They are well known in social circles and Mrs. Milne is a 
member of the Alexandra Club. Dr. Milne served from 1878 to 1880 in the 
Queens' Own Rifles of Toronto and is a member of the Morayshire Club, of 
London, England. He belongs also to the Pacific Club of Vict'oria and along 
professional lines is identified with the British Columbia Medical Association 
and the Victoria Medical Society, his ability being widely recognized in medical 
circles. Dr. Milne is very prominent in Masonry, being a member of Victoria- 
Columbia Lodge, No. i, A. F. & A. M.; Scotland Lodge, No. 120, R. A. M., 
while he is also a Knight Templar and member of Gizeh Temple of the Mystic 
Shrine. He is deputy district grand master for district No. i, British Columbia. 
He is a Presbyterian and a member of St. Andrews church of Victoria. His 
political indorsement is given to the liberal party. Those who know him personally 
find him an affable and courteous gentleman, well informed, broad-minded and 
well worthy of the position which he holds in the official and professional world 
of the province and in the regard of the general public. 



JOHN SMITH. 

John Smith, who is filling the position of city clerk at Port Coquitlam, was 
the first and has been the only incumbent in the office. In May, 1859, at Crown- 
thorpe, Norfolk, England, his birth occurred, his parents being John and Mary 
Smith. His father was a farmer under the late earl of Kimberly and both parents 
are now deceased. The son had a grammar-school and college education and after 
leaving school took up the study of chemistry and became a qualified English 
chemist. He was thus engaged until thirty-three years of age, when he decided 
to leave his native land and seek a home in the new world. He sailed from 
England for Canada, and making his way to British Columbia settled at Port 
Coquitlam in 1892. This district was then largely undeveloped end he began 
farming, which he followed continuously and successfully for fifteen years. He 
homesteaded a tract of land north of Port Coquitlam and sold it for eight dollars 
per acre property that is now worth four hundred and fifty dollars per acre. 

In April, 1887, Mr. Smith was united in marriage to Miss Frances Rose 
Middleton, of Fakenham, Norfolk, a daughter of Francis B. Middleton, who for 



314 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

forty-nine years was cashier, in the Gurney Bank. Both he and his wife are 
now deceased. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Smith have been born a son and two 
daughters, Douglas John, Lucy M. and Olga M. 

Called to public office, Mr. Smith has proved capable, efficient and faithful 
in the various positions which he has filled. In 1897 he was councillor, which 
position he filled until 1898 and then resigned in order to go to the Yukon. In 
1899 he returned and was appointed clerk of the municipality. When the city 
was incorporated he became the first city clerk, and he was police magistrate 
for three years, was justice of the peace for nine years and license commissioner 
for nine years. The record which he has made is a commendable one because 
of his capability, his efficiency and his trustworthiness. 

Mr. Smith belongs to the Church of England. In politics he is a conserv- 
ative and always keeps well informed concerning the questions and issues of the 
day. He is fond of hunting and indulging therein finds his chief source of recre- 
ation. He has witnessed many changes during his residence in the northwest 
as the district has become more thickly settled and the work of improvement 
and progress has been carried forward. 



SID\ 7 EY J. PEARCE. 

New Westminster has been singularly fortunate in having able and sterling 
men as its public servants, and Sidney J. Pearce, the oldest city employe on the 
coast, who has continuously served for twenty-eight years in the interest of his 
community, is no exception to the rule but on the contrary has increased the 
prestige of officialdom by his faithful service and honest devotion to the public 
cause. As chief sanitary inspector and license inspector of New Westminster 
he does service which has an important and far-reaching influence upon the wel- 
fare of the community and discharges his duties in such a manner as to be 
worthy of the highest commendation. He was born in Somersetshire, England, 
on December i 1848, his parents being Isaac and Keziah (Smith) Pearce, both 
natives of Bath, Somersetshire. They lived and died in that region, where the 
father during his active life held the commission of high constable. 

Sidney J. Pearce was reared at home and attended the national school at 
Weston-super-Mare until his fifteenth year, when in 1863 he came to Canada 
to enjoy the greater opportunities offered by a new country, yet in the state 
of development. Upon reaching America he landed in Portland, Maine, mak- 
ing the sea journey on board the vessel Xova Scotia, the trip consuming eigh- 
teen days. From Portland he removed to Richmond, Quebec, where he made 
his first settlement, there spending a period of about three or four years, engag- 
ing in farm work. He subsequently entered the service of the Grand Trunk 
Railway, continuing in that connection for fifteen years, working as fireman and 
engineer, and then allied himself with the interests of the Canadian Pacific (dur- 
ing the construction days of that road) as engineer and was engaged in that 
capacity in the construction of the road between Sudbury and Fort William. He 
remained with the Canadian Pacific until after the completion of this line and 
it was he who after the rebellion hauled the train which brought back from the 
northwest the soldiers, a number of the stations between Port Arthur and Bis- 
cotasing being named after the officers of the regiment. In 1884 Mr. Pearce 
severed his connections with the road in order to move to a place where better 
advantages alpng educational lines could be secured for his children and, leav- 
ing Chapleau, where he was then located, came with his family to New West- 
minster. After his arrival here he was appointed on July i, 1885, to the city 
police force and two years later, on account of ability, raised to the rank of 
chief of police, in which capacity he served until 1891. During these years ho 
also held the offices of chief sanitary inspector and license inspector, but in 1891 
the growth of the city made it imperative that the positions should be divided 




SIDNEY .T. PEAKCE 



BRITISH COLUMBIA :n? 

and in order to bring this about he resigned his position as police chief and 
gave his entire attention to his two other offices. He has held these continuously 
for over a quarter of a century, becoming sanitary and license inspector in 1887, 
and is now for twenty-eight years connected with the city service, being one of 
the oldest city employes on the Canadian coast. He is always moved by the 
highest sense of duty and in the many years in which he has held office there 
has hardly ever been raised a complaint against him. 

On November 6, 1877, Mr. Pearce was united in marriage to Miss Ida Mary 
Lee, of Richmond, Quebec, and to this union were born five children: Annie 
Maud, the wife of W. H. Clarke, a real-estate man of Vancouver; Sidney Arthur. 
foreman of the Columbia Cold Storage Company of \ T ew Westminster ; Charles 
Isaac, of New Westminster; George Herbert, also of this <^ty ; and Howard 
Stanley, who attends school. Both Charles and Herbert operate automobiles 
commercially. 

Mr. and Mrs. Pearce and their family are members of the Church of England. 
taking a helpful interest in that organization. Politically he gives his support 
to the conservative party and fraternally is connected with the Masons, being a 
life member of St. Francis Lodge, No. 15, A. F. & A. M., of Quebec. He also 
holds membership in Royal City Lodge, No. 3, I. O. O. F., and in the Royal 
Templars of Temperance. A man of sterling qualities of mind and' character, 
lie enjoys the confidence and high regard of all who know him and has become 
recognized as a forceful element in his community. For many years part of the 
mblic service has safely rested in his hands and it may be said that there is 
lardly a man more ably qualified to fill the positions to which Mr. Pearce now 
.jives his attention with such good results. 



EDGAR GEORGE BAYNES 

Ranking with the foremost contractors and builders of Vancouver, British 
Columbia, and being identified with other important interests of the city, Edgar 
George Baynes has done much toward promoting growth and expansion and has 
>een connected with the erection of some of the most pretentious structures in 
he city. His life work has not only resulted in his own prosperity but has 
i>een of general benefit and he has ever directed his affairs in such a manner as 
10 invite the closest scrutiny, his actions being above the slighest reproach. Born 
m Bocking, Essex, England, on September 13. 1870, Mr. Baynes is a son of _ 
George and Harriett Amelia (Staines) Baynes, both natives of Essex. The 
ather follows agricultural pursuits in that county, and both he and his wife 
have lived for over twenty years at Broxted Hall, Dunmow, Essex. The family 
on both sides have made their home in Essex for many generations. 

Edgar G. Baynes attended the Braintree school of Essex in the acquirement 
< >f his education, early leaving school in order to enter the office of his uncle, who 
was a member of the firm of J. & A. Franklin, -contractors and builders, with 
whom he learned the trade, in the spring of 1889 Mr. Baynes came to Van- 
couver with his uncle. ]. L. Franklin. They engaged together in contracting 
work for a couple of years and then our subject took up a ranch in Squamish 
valley, where he lived for two winters. Returning to Vancouver, he has since 
made his home here. About this time he became associated with William 
-McLeod Horie and they soon thereafter formed a partnership, which has now 
ixisted for more than twenty years. Their work has been largely for the 
municipality and they also have erected a number of important business blocks, 
"hey built the present home of the Vancouver office of the British Columbia 
"elephone Company, which was the first fireproof structure erected in Van- 
i ouver. They also erected the Davis Chambers, the, D. A. Smith building and 
numerous other edifices which mark the early growth of the city. In recent 
}ears they have built no less than ten of Vancouver's public schools and during 



318 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

the past few years have made a specialty of warehouse buildings, having erected 
many of the largest and most costly structures of this kind in Vancouver and 
the vicinity. Mr. Baynes is now building on his own account a modern and 
up-to-date private hotel on Howe street, near Robson. He is president of the 
Port Haney Brick Company, Limited, which was organized in 1907 and now is 
housed in a large plant at Port Haney. This firm are the only manufacturers 
of partition blocks in the province and make and supply by far the greater part of 
all field tile used in and around Vancouver. Mr. Baynes is also vice president 
of the British Pacific Trust Company, which he assisted in founding in 1909. 
This corporation conducts a general loan and trust business. In association 
with his cousin, Harry Franklin, he owns very valuable centrally located busi- 
ness property. He is also a stockholder in the Western Plate Glass Company, 
Limited. 

In Vancouver, on the I5th of April, 1899, Mr. Baynes married Miss Mar- 
garet Anderson McAlpine, a native of Ontario, and they have four children, 
Doris Lillian, Jean Hetty, George Edgar and Margaret Anderson. 

Mr. Baynes is a member of the Board of Trade and in that connection exerts 
his best eft'orts toward growth and expansion. In 1909 and 1910 he was president 
of the Vancouver Builders' Exchange a fact which indicates the high position 
which is readily conceded by men occupied in the same line of business. He 
is a member of Holy Trinity church and serves on its executive board. His mili- 
tary experience includes service in the Second Regiment of the Essex Rifle 
Brigade, which he joined while in England and in which he served until he 
came to Vancouver, where he enlisted in the first company of volunteers which 
was formed here. He is a member of the Sons of England and of the Terminal 
City, Progress and Canadian Clubs and a member of the executive board of the 
Vancouver Automobile Club, which office he has held since the inception of this 
organization in 1910. The citizenship of Edgar George Baynes is truly public- 
spirited and aggressive, and while he has attained to a position of distinction and 
financial independence, he has done as valuable service for the general good. 
This is readily recognized on every hand and he therefore enjoys the high regard 
and esteem of the general public. 



W. DENHAM VERSCHOYLE. 

W. Denham Verschoyle, a Vancouver capitalist whose advancement to his 
present prominent position in business circles has been the direct result of the 
wise use of time, talent and opportunities, was born in County Sligo, Ireland, 
August 7, 1869, his parents being Richard John and Mary Verschoyle, the former 
a land owner of Ireland. 

In private schools of England, W. Denham Verschoyle pursued his educatior 
and attended Kingsley College in north Devonshire. On putting aside his text-booh 
in 1886 he went to Australia and afterward to New Zealand where he practiced 
his profession of mining engineer until 1891. In that year he went to South 
America where he remained for a short time and about 1892 arrived in British 
Columbia. For several years he continued his professional labors here, employed 
as a consulting engineer, and in 1895 he went to China where he was general 
manager of the Wei-,Hai-Wei Gold Mining Company for a number of years. 
He then resigned his position and returned to England where he engaged in 
scientific work in the field of chemistry and general physics until 1910, when he 
came to Vancouver. His interests and his activities have been of constantly 
growing value and importance and he now has large holdings in British Columbia 
realty and is connected with various important corporations, being president of 
the Pacific & Hudson's Bay Railroad and general manager of the Port of Bella 
Coola, Ltd., a company which was organized for the purpose of developing the 
port at that place. 




W. DEXHAM VERSCHOYLE 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 321 

On the 27th of September, 1910, in Sligo, Ireland, Mr. Verschoyle was united 
in marriage to Miss lole, a daughter of Dr. Hercules and Fannie MacDonnell, 
of Dundalk, Ireland. Her father was connected with the Dundalk Hospital and 
in addition had a large and lucrative private practice. Mr. and Mrs. Verschoyle 
have one son, Derek. Mr. Verschoyle is not interested in politics except in the 
very broadest manner, having always preferred to concentrate his energies upon 
the business interests and duties which have claimed his time and attention. At 
.any one point in his career he seems to have reached the possibility for successful 
accomplishment at that point. Upon the basis of scientific knowledge and broad 
practical experience he has builded his success, becoming an acknowledged author- 
ity upon many professional problems and gradually advancing until he ranks with 
Vancouver's capitalists. His position in professional circles is indicated by the 
fact that he is fellow of the Chemical Society of London, a fellow of the Royal 
Geographical Society, a member of the Institute of Mining Engineers and a 
member of the American Institute of Mining Engineers. 



HUGH WILSON GIFFORD. 

Among the well known young men of New Westminster there is none who is 
more popular or better liked than Hugh Wilson Gifford, a native of this city, 
where he was born on May 29, 1893, a son of Thomas and Annie (Stoddard) 
Gifford, the former being extensively mentioned in another part of this work. 

Hugh W. Gifford was reared at home and acquired his education in the public 
schools of Columbia College in New Westminster. In 1907, after laying aside 
his books, he apprenticed himself to the plumber's trade, to which occupation he 
gives his time during the winter months. He is making fast and steady progress 
along this line and all who know him appreciate his sterling characteristics and 
unite in prophesying a splendid future for him. Mr. Gifford is also deeply 
interested in athletics and for the past three years has been a member of the 
Westminster lacrosse team which has won the world's championship for the 
past seven years, with the exception of 1911, when it was lost to Vancouver. 
Mr. Gifford has always heartily participated in all affairs tending to promote the 
sport and is loyal to the team and its interests. 



WALTER A. THURSBY. 

Walter A. Thursby, president of the Coquitlam Financial Corporation and 
an active and successful dealer in real estate in Port Coquitlam, was born in 
Bristol, England, January 18, 1883, a son of Rev. John and Lilly (Batchelor) 
Fhursby, the former a minister of the Church of England, residing in Vancouver. 
Walter A. Thursby began his education in the public schools of his native 
xmntry and continued it in the United States, completing his school days in a 
Canadian high school. After laying aside his books he entered the employ 
of the Canadian Pacific Railroad in Port Arthur and afterward was connected 
with this corporation in Port William, acting in its interests in a clerical capacity 
for five years. At the end of that time he entered the Canadian Bank of Com- 
merce in Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, and was afterward connected with the same 
institution in London, in the same province, severing his connection with it in 
order to go to the Cobalt district, where he spent three years engaged in mining. 
He was afterward for two years in the insurance business in Los Angeles, Cali- 
fornia, and at the end of that period came to British Columbia, settling in Port 
Coquitlam and turning his attention to the real-estate business, handling all kinds 
if Port Coquitlam and Vancouver property. He here organized the Coquitlam 
Financial Corporation, of which he has since been the president, and his important 



322 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

interests are all carefully and capably managed, bringing him a gratifying degree 
of success. 

On the ist of October, 1910, Mr. Thursby was united in marriage to Miss 
Lizzie Marie Townsend, of Devvsbury, England, by whom he has two daughters, 
Barbara and Margaret, twins. He belongs to the Church of England and is a 
conservative in his political beliefs, taking an intelligent interest in public affairs, 
although he never seeks public office. He belongs to the Coquitlam Agricultural 
Society and to the Port Coquitlam Board of Trade and does everything in his 
power to advance the interests of the community along constructive and progres- 
sive lines. He is a devoted husband and father and spends all of his leisure 
hours with his family. He is fond of gardening, as the grounds around his 
home bear evidence, and in manner is always courteous and genial. Although 
still a young man he is a recognized business factor in Port Coquitlam and his 
many friends do not hesitate to predict for him continued progress in his chosen, 
field. 



E. JAMES ENTHOVEN. 

To see practically the outcome from the beginning, to recognize possibili- 
ties and utilize them, to discriminate between the essential and the non-essen- 
tial and to temper progressiveness with a safe conservatism these are the 
indispensable qualities in the financier who guards not only his own but also 
the moneyed interests of others and, largely through his activities, estab- 
lishes and maintains the healthfulness of trade. In this connection, as a well 1 
known and thoroughly reliable representative of financial interests, stands E. 
James Enthoven, who since 1908 has been the secretary and treasurer and one 
of the directors of the Vancouver Financial Corporation, Ltd. a company hav- 
ing large connections in Scotland as well as in British Columbia. 

Mr. Enthoven was born at Arrow Hall, Cheshire, England, January 3, 1865, 
and is a son of John and Sophia (Mozley) Enthoven, the former of whom was 
engaged in business in Liverpool for a number of years, while later he removed 
to London, where he conducted important mercantile interests. 

E. J. Enthoven was educated at Harrow, the famous boy's school, and 
after leaving there became a clerk for Lataste, Aubanel & Cie. at Paris in 1882, 
there remaining until 1885, when ill health compelled him to abandon the mer- 
cantile career which he had mapped out for himself. He then returned to 
England. The following year he went to Austrailia, where for three years he 
"roughed it" in the bush, on a large sheep station. He next went to New 
Zealand, where for a time he was in charge of a sheep and cattle station. In 
1890 he again went to Australia, settling at Melbourne, where he founded the 
firm of Enthoven & Mills, engaging in the mercantile and import business, thus 
continuing until 1903, when he again went to England, where he entered actively 
into the business of calico printing at Manchester and London. Though start- 
ing on a comparatively small scale and in competition with old-established houses 
in that line he made a success ; but his residence in Australia, with its broad 
opportunities, and the freer, fuller life of that country, caused him to feel dis- 
satisfied with the close and crowded conditions of London and, seeing a favor- 
able opportunity to dispose of his business, he decided to close out and leave. 
In 1908 he came to British Columbia, settling in Vancouver, where in associa- 
tion with C. R. Drayton, he organized the Vancouver Financial Corporation, 
Ltd., remaining in that connection to the present time. In the organization of 
this company he again entered upon what has been a difficult task of systematiz- 
ing the work, developing the business to its present condition and standing: 
On its organization the company occupied a small room and something of the 
growth and success of the undertaking is indicated in the fact that the Van- 
couver Financial Corporation, Ltd., has today a splendidly appointed and com- 




E. JAMES ENTHOVEN 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 325 

modious suite in the London building. Difficulties and obstacles have been 
encountered in bringing about this result, but the same spirit of determination 
and energy which has always characterized Mr. Enthoven has been manifest 
in this connection and the firm has won its place among the most prominent 
representatives of financial interests in the Pacific northwest. On the organi- 
zation of the Vancouver Financial Corporation, Ltd., in 1908, its capital was 
small and its resources limited, but the business is now capitalized for two hundred 
and ten thousand dollars and has a reserve of two hundred thousand dollars. Its 
officers are: H. Abbott, chairman; C. R. Drayton, manager; and E. J. Entroven, 
secretary-treasurer. The company has large connections in Scotland and is 
represented by agents in both Glasgow and Edinburgh. They conduct a general 
financial business and have invested large sums for clients. They have been 
exceptionally successful in this line, their investments being safe, sound and 
lucrative. The company also manages several large business and office buildings 
in Vancouver and conduct a large fire and casualty insurance business, being 
general agents for the General Eire Insurance Company of Perth, Scotland; the 
Aetna Insurance Company of Hartford, Connecticut; the General Accident 
Assurance Company of Toronto; and the Canadian Casualty & Boiler Insurance 
Company. Mr. Enthoven also has other financial interests and is managing direc- 
tor of the London & Vancouver Investment Company, Ltd. 

On the I2th of October, 1892, at .Melbourne, Australia, occurred the marriage 
of Mr. Enthoven and Miss Anna Georgiana Rudall, a daughter of James Thomas 
Rudall, F. R. C. S., of Melbourne. Her father was a surgeon, was commissioned 
in the navy of Great Britain, and served on the expedition to the Arctic regions 
on H. M. S. Talbott in search of Sir John Franklin. Later he resigned his com- 
mission in the navy and in 1858 went to Australia, settling in Melbourne, where 
he took up the practice of his profession and so continued until his death in 1907. 
He was a very prominent and distinguished physician and surgeon, known to the 
profession not only in Australia but in England and other lands as well. For 
years he was surgeon to the Melbourne Hospital, the Alfred Hospital, Blind 
Asylum and the Deaf and Dumb Institute at Melbourne, and was a member of 
the Victoria Medical Board. He was likewise a delegate to the International 
Medical Congress in London in 1881 and was the author of medical writings 
of considerable note. He also translated several medical works from the Ger- 
man into English. His wife was Georgiana Gordon Scot, a daughter of Alex- 
ander Scot, of Trinity, Midlothian, Scotland. 

Mr. Enthoven exercises his right of franchise in support of the conservative 
party and its policy, but his onerous business duties have left him no time for 
activity in political affairs. He belongs to the Vancouver Club and Anglican 
church. Gradually and steadily he has worked his way upward. Obstacles and 
difficulties have seemed to serve as impetus for renewed effort on his part, and 
when one avenue of opportunity has seemed closed he has sought out another 
path by which to reach the desired goal. He is resourceful and expedient and 
:he years have marked his constantly developing powers, so that at the present 
writing he is regarded as one of the strong and able business men of British 
Jolumbia, his strength and ability being proven in his splendid achievements. 



WILLIAM N. CLARKE. 

Among the real-estate, insurance and loan firms of New Westminster there 
is none which enjoys a greater prestige than that of Latham & Clarke, whose 
nisiness connections are extensive and important. William N. Clarke, the junior 
nember of the firm, was born in New Westminster on September 21,1875, a son 
)f James A. and Katherine (Magowan) Clarke, the former a native of St. 
indrews; New Brunswick, and the latter of London, England. The father has 
he distinction of being numbered among the pioneers of British Columbia, 



326 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

coming here some time in the early '6os, and has spent his subsequent year* 
in Vancouver, New Westminster and Port Moody, where he now resides. He at 
one time was the owner of the present town site of Port Moody. 

William N. Clarke was reared under the parental roof amid the western, 
conditions which called for enterprise, industry and energy. His education was- 
acquired in the public schools of New Westminster and Port Moody and in the 
New Westminster high school. In about 1895 Mr. Clarke entered the office 
of Howay & Reid, barristers, remaining, however, but a short time in that con- 
nection. He at present occupies these very same offices for his business transac- 
tions. Leaving his position with Howay & Reid, he then became an employe in 
the real-estate office of Turner & Hart, but upon the dissolution of the partner- 
ship between these gentlemen, in 1898, remained with Mr.. Turner until he 
entered upon a position with F. J. Hart, whom he left in 1902 to enter the offices- 
of the Mainland Underwriters Association. In that connection he rose to be 
chief examiner, remaining for eight years with this corporation. Returning to. 
New Westminster, he then engaged in business for himself in association with 
E. G. McBride, under the firm name of McBride & Clarke, operating in real estate 
and insurance. This partnership continued for the year 1911 but later Mr. Clarke 
became sole proprietor and on January i, 1913, formed his present association 
when he and Mr. Latham purchased the real-estate and insurance business 
of A. W. McLeod and established themselves as Latham & Clarke. Although the 
business has been in operation under this firm style for only a few months, the 
firm enjoys a distinct reputation and high prestige on account of the former 
important connections of Mr. Clarke and his wide and varied experience. He is 
a well informed man on local real-estate values and there is no phase of the 
insurance and loan business with which he is not thoroughly acquainted. 

In 1904 William N. Clarke was united in marriage to Miss Annetta F.. 
McDonald, a native of New Westminster. They have one daughter, Doris 
Evelyn, a precocious child of remarkable talents and a natural-born musician, 
being able to play the piano at the age of but two and a half years. ' Public- 
spirited and progressive, Mr. Clarke has become recognized as a forceful element 
in New Westminster, always standing for progress and advancement along 
material and intellectual lines. He enjoys the highest reputation among men of 
his profession as well as with the general public and enjoys the confidence and 
good-will of all who have occasion to enter with him into business or social 
relations. 



HON. ALEXANDER EDMUND BATSON DAVIE. 

Hon. Alexander Edmund Batson Davie, Q. C., was born November 24, 1847, 
at Wookey Hole, Wells, Somersetshire, England. His father, Dr. John Chapman 
Davie, M. R. C. S., L. S. A., a pioneer physician, came in 1862, with four of his 
sons, to Vancouver island. Theodore, the youngest son, who eventually became 
chief justice of British Columbia, followed his father to this country a few years 
later. 

Dr. John Chapman Davie wedded Anne Collard Waldron, of Wellington Somer- 
setshire, England. Of Dr. Davie's large family, his three sons, Dr. J. C., the 
Hon. A. E. B., and the Hon. Theodore, all rose to positions of prominence in 
connection with the public life and development of British Columbia. 

Hon. Alexander E. B. Davie, Q. C., pursued his education in Silcoate's College, 
near Wakefield, Yorkshire, and in 1862 came to British Columbia with his father, 
being then a youth of fifteen years. Desiring to make the practice of law his life 
work, he was articled as a clerk, August 29, 1862, to Robert Bishop, a well known 
barrister. He afterwards was articled to Robert E. Jackson, June 23, 1865, a 
celebrated lawyer in Victoria in those days. He was enrolled as a barrister and 
solicitor of the supreme court of civil justice of Vancouver island, November 25, 
1868, by John Needham, chief justice, and was enrolled on the mainland as a 




HON. ALEXANDER E. B. DAVJK 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 329 

b irrister and solicitor of the supreme court of British Columbia by Sir Matthew 
1 aillie Begbie in 1869. He decided to practice in Victoria, traveling much on 
c rcuit through Cariboo. He was law clerk to the legislative assembly from 
i $72 until 1874, and in 1875, ne was elected a member for the Cariboo district. 

In May, 1877, he became a member of the executive council of the Elliott 
g )vernment, but met defeat on standing for reelection. In 1879 his enforced 
a >sence from his law office led him to take into law partnership the late Hon. 
L . E. Pooley, K. C., sometime speaker of the legislature, the firm being Davie & 
I'ooley, and this connection was maintained to the time of Mr. Davie's death. 
At the general provincial election, in 1882, Mr. Davie successfully contested 
Lillooet, and when W. Smithe, deceased, was called upon to form a ministry in 
1:583, he selected Mr. Davie as his attorney general. On the 2ist of September, 
o the same year, Mr. Davie was made queen's counsel, and upon the death of 
Premier Smithe, in March, 1887, he succeeded to the office of prime minister, 
"t coming also president of the council and attorney general, which public offices 
hi: occupied until his life's labors were ended in death. He maintained and enjoyed 
tre confidence of a large majority of the members of the provincial legislature, 
ai d he manifested the utmost loyalty and public-spirited devotion to the general 
good, exercising his official prerogatives in support of various measures which 
h;.d to do with the welfare and advancement of the province. Close application 
to his duties and to his law practice so undermined his health in the fall of 1887, 
that he never recovered, and a gradual decline brought him to the end of life's 
journey on the 1st of August, 1889. On the 3d of December, 1874, Mr. Davie 
w is married to Constance Langford, a daughter of Thomas and Mary Skinner 
of Maple Bay, Cowichan. Her father, like his own, was a pioneer settler on 
Vancouver island. The death of Mrs. Davie occurred in 1904. By this mar- 
riage there were five children who reached adult age, while two passed away in 
in : ancy. Sophie became the wife of Hon. A. E. McPhillips, K. C., and judge 
of the court of appeal, of Victoria. Ethel Bremmer is now matron of St. 
\\ inifred's Sanitarium at San Francisco, California. Winifred Mary is the 
wife of F. J. Fulton, K. C., of Kamloops, British Columbia. Cyril Francis is a 
barrister of Victoria, and Constance Mary Claire is a resident of Victoria and 
unmarried. 

Mr. Davie became a convert to the Roman Catholic faith and was an ardent 
rm mber of the church. In Dominion politics he was always a stanch conservative, 
unfaltering in his advocacy of the principles of the party. Party politics were 
no'; then in issue in British Columbia. He was attorney general at the time the 
seHlement act of 1883 was drafted and successfully carried through the house, 
an 1 he was successful in managing the disputes between the two governments. 
Ht; was instrumental in securing an important decision which was rendered in 
fa /or of the province in regard to the ownership of the minerals in the railway 
be t. 

A contemporary biographer wrote of him as follows : 

"In the death of Hon. Mr. Davie the province loses one of its most gifted 
m<m one who leaves behind him a brilliant record untarnished by any questionable 
ac.. In public and private life he was held in the highest respect and esteem. 
H s conduct in all matters was such that he won the confidence of both followers 
and opponents, and in his intercourse with all men he was ever courteous and 
considerate. In the local parliament, when he addressed the house, he was listened 
to with the strictest attention, and his opinions on all matters were valued by 
frend and foe, for all believed that but one motive the desire to do what was 
fa r and honorable guided his conduct. As a member of the bar, he occupied 
aliigh place in the estimation of his fellows, and was a bencher of the law society 
One month prior to his death he declined an appointment to the honorable position 
of judge of the supreme court of the province. An editorial in one of the local 
; papers, published August I, 1889, reads as follows: 

' 'British Columbia lost an able and upright public man and exemplary and 
i us ef ul citizen when the Honorable Alexander E. B. Davie died. He was a model 



330 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

man in every relation of life and he was so happy as to be appreciated at his 
true value by all with whom he came in contact. He possessed the art of inspiring 
confidence and winning esteem. He was genial and gentle in his demeanor, and 
although an active politician who stood steadfast for his principles and worked 
hard for his party, he made no enemies and attained a high position, both in pro- 
fessional and political life. 

" 'The honors he won he deserved, and he performed faithfully and effectively 
every duty he undertook. He more than fulfilled the hopes entertained by his 
warmest friends and his most partial admirers. As a public servant no man called 
in question his ability or his integrity, and his private life runs without even the 
suspicion of a stain. It is the lot of but few men to leave behind them so clean 
a record as Alexander E. B. Davie. His memory will always be honored by 
British Columbians, who, while they mourn his early death, look back with pride 
on the works he did and the virtues he exhibited during his short but well-spent 
life.' " 



ARCHIBALD McNAUGHTON. 

A notable fig'ure on the stage of business activity in British Columbia was 
Archibald McNaughton, whose pioneer work along various lines stimulated 
progress in such a way that its far-reaching and effective results can still be 
felt. Such was the place he had won in public regard and in social circles that 
his death was the occasion of deep and widespread regret when he passed away, 
Tune 21, 1900. It was especially the Cariboo district which benefited by his 
labors and it was there that he did important work as representative of the Hud- 
son's Bay Company and exerted himself successfully in promoting the gold 
mining industry. There he was known as a wise counselor to old settler and 
newcomer, and as friend to all those in need. Fortunes he made and fortunes he 
lost, yet his indomitable spirit of enterprise never abated, and out of adversities 
which engulfed him he came stronger for the combat and, making use of the 
lessons learned, finally succeeeded in achieving the goal, being numbered among 
the substantial men of the province at the time of his demise. 

The eldest of three sons, he was born in Montreal, Canada, March 16, 1843, 
a son of Archibald McXaughton. who was highly respected and prominent as 
one of the pioneer merchants of that city. He was a public-spirited citizen who 
took a deep and helpful interest in all matters pertaining to the public welfare. 
He spent practically his entire life in the Dominion, for he was brought to Can- 
ada by his parents when a child of only three months. The paternal great- 
grandfather of our subject was Baron McNaughton, of Stirling Castle, Perth- 
shire, Scotland. 

Archibald McNaughton was reared amid the refining influences of a cultured 
home and \\as early grounded in the virtues of honesty and industry. He received 
his education at the Phillips school of Montreal and the Lower Canada College 
of that city. The stories of the west and its opportunities exerted a powerful 
influence upon his plastic and adventurous mind and its advantages made a 
strong appeal to him. He became more and more imbued with the idea of seek- 
ing his fortune in those vast western lands which yet awaited development. His 
plans taking on practical form, he assisted in organizing the Montreal party 
which was bound for the west and which left that city to join the overland 
expedition, May 5, 1862. Arriving in the Cariboo district, he familiarized himself 
with local conditions and, like many of the western pioneers, first became con- 
nected with mining, in which occupation he was engaged for a number of years 
with varying success. Perceiving that more stable advancement lay along com- 
mercial lines, he subsequently followed commercial pursuits in that section, his 
straightforward business policy readily gaining him patronage and making for 
his financial success. He was always true and loyal to his friends and many 
there were who came to him for assistance and advice- 




MRS. MARGARET McNAUGHTON MANSON 




ARCHIBALD ilrXAUGHTOX 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 335 

Official appointment came to him, March 2, 1884, when he was chosen for 

he office of assessor and collector for the district of Cariboo, which 

Difficult position he filled with such circumspection and ability that he received 

ihe highest commendation from the government. In October, 1884, he entered 

upon a period of service with the Hudson's Ray Company and, his exceptional 

business ability soon becoming recognized, he was in 1887 appointed manager 

or that company in the Cariboo district, severing his connection with that great 

corporation in the month of October, 1894, when he was stricken with paralysis 

nd was for seven years an invalid, nursed by his devoted, wife. In 1887 another 

ifficial appointment came to him, when he was chosen for the office of postmaster 

if Quesnel. The duties of his position were largely taken care of by his able 

vife, as Mr. McNaughton was incapaciated by paralysis for years preceding his 

iemise. He was connected with practically all gold mining enterprises of the 

Cariboo district, where he organized or preempted most of the historic mines, 

being engaged in both quartz and placer mining. In these ventures he made 

; nd lost two fortunes but his spirit remained undaunted and, like all true miners, 

1 is courage never failed. He was a man well known and highly respected in 

the district. Having enjoyed superior educational opportunities in his youth, he 

1 iter acquainted himself with various phases of the law and during the '6os and 

'"OS often pleaded successfully before the judges who visited the district. Kind 

A/orks and deeds characterized his entire life and he was beloved and honored 

1 y all who knew him. 

In 1885 Mr. McNaughton was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Mc- 
( iregor, of Montreal, who was his cousin. She passed away in 1887. He subse- 
c uently wedded Miss Margaret Peebles, of New Westminster, British Columbia, 
t. daughter of the late Thomas Peebles and his wife, Jane (Murie) Peebles. 
Mrs. McNaughton was born in Kirkcudbrightshire, Scotland, and came to New 
Westminster in 1888, where she was married to .Mr. McNaughton on the I7th 
cf September, 1890, in Holy Trinity cathedral, by the Yen. Archdeacon Woods, 
Henry B. Irving, better known as "Father Pat," assisting. Mrs. McNaughton 
i ; a woman of decided ability along literary lines and of rare accomplishments, 
teing popular in the best social circles of Vancouver. Deeply interested in the 
vork of her church, she is allied with numerous movements which are intended 
t } better humanity and alleviate the trials of the poor and afflicted, being widely 
known for her charity and womanly helpfulness in this city. Mrs. McNaughton 
has been elected a lady associate of the Royal Colonial Institute of London, 
England, a quite unusual honor, and she is also a vice regent of the Pauline 
J jhnston Chapter of the Daughters of the Empire. She is a member of the 
Canadian Women's Press Club, a director of the Scientific, Art and Historical 
Association, a member of the Woman's Canadian Club and other institutions 
of like prominence. She has written several works of note dealing with the 
history of the province of British Columbia and was the first woman to publish 
a book of this character in the province. Through her literary efforts she has 
brought the Cariboo district to the notice of the whole of Canada, has written 
for the press since 1890 and was presented by the government of British Col- 
u ubia with an honorarium for preserving this history for future generations. 
Mr. and Mrs. 'McNaughton had one son, who died in childhood. 

Mr. McNaughton passed away June 21, 1900, his demise being deeply 
regretted by a large circie of friends who esteemed him for his many high quali- 
ties of heart and mind. He found his last resting place at Quesnel in the Cariboo 
district, a region to the development of which he had given most of his life. A 
nian of decisive views on public questions, Mr. McNaughton stanchly supported 
the conservative party and, being public-spirited and of progressive tendencies, 
give his indorsement to all measures and movements intended to improve the 
conditions of the country and its people. He was connected with the Church 
of England, being a licensed lay reader under the late Bishop Silitoe of that 
c lurch and taking a vital and helpful interest in all matters affecting the organi- 
zation. Gifted with qualities far beyond those possessed by the majority and, 

Vol. IV 12 



336 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

never discouraged or disheartened, he always pushed on, never losing sight of 
his purpose, never forgetting for a moment the goal before him, conscious that 
his aim was justifiable and his course honorable. The years have proven the 
worth, of his labors and his life record reflects credit and honor upon British 
Columbia, which honors his memory. His life was indeed of great use- 
fulness, touching many lines of activity and proving of great worth along the 
path of permanent progress and advancement in his adopted province. 



EDWARD ODLUM, B. A., B. Sc., M. A. 

The life work of Professor Edward Odium, scientist and educator and now 
a prominent representative of real-estate and other important business interests 
in Vancouver and British Columbia, has contributed in an extraordinary degree 
to the development and progress of Canada, for as lecturer and writer he has 
awakened among the inhabitants of other lands an interest in this country that 
has resulted in bringing about an influx of population leading to the development 
and upbuilding of the country. His efforts have been untiring and resultant in the 
advancement of Vancouver's welfare along material, social, political and intel- 
lectual lines. Possessing a mind of extraordinary fertility, he early recognized 
the splendid opportunities offered by this section and with firm faith in the future 
of the country became a cooperant factor in the utilization of the advantages and 
resources here offered. 

Born in Tullamore, Peel county, Ontario, November 27, 1850, Edward Odium 
is a descendant of an old Irish family that authentically traces its ancestry back to 
1690, in which year existing records give account of four brothers of the Odium 
family, officers of the British army, who went to Ireland in the train of King 
William when that monarch undertook to quell the turbulent element which would 
not submit to the British crown. Abraham Odium, grandfather of Professor 
Odium, was born on the Emerald isle and added luster to the family name by 
his military record as an officer in the army of the great Duke of Wellington. 
Subsequently he made a home on the beautiful channel island of Guernsey, but 
in 1820 his ever ambitious spirit led him to charter a ship in which he sailed with 
his family for America, with Quebec as his destination. His son John Odium, 
who was a member of that party, participated in the war of 1837, as did Abraham 
Odium. 

In this country John Odium followed agricultural pursuits and led an upright, 
honorable life, consistent with the tenets of the Church of England, of which 
he was a devoted member. His wife. Margaret McKenzie, was of Scotch extrac- 
tion but a native of County Tyrone, Ireland. They were the parents of nine 
children. The mother passed away in 1892, in her seventieth year, while the 
father lived to the remarkable age of eighty-six, making his home in Lucknow, 
Bruce county, Ontario. He was not only venerated because of his advanced 
years but also highly honored for his many admirable qualities of heart and mind. 

Professor Odium spent his early boyhood on the home farm and acquired 
his preliminary education in the neighborhood schools, while later he attended the 
collegiate institute at Cobourg, Ontario. Subsequently he matriculated in Vic- 
toria University, which conferred upon him the degrees of Bachelor and Master 
of Arts and Bachelor of Science. Distinguished for his profound learning and 
deep insight into sociological and political problems, he early recognized the need 
of bringing emigration to the provinces that the natural resources and advantages 
of the country might be utilized and developed. The government, recognizing his 
ability, sent him to England, Wales, Scotland. Ireland and the Orkney islands 
and through his ability as a lecturer he presented vivid pictures to the people of 
Great Britain concerning the advantages of the country across the water, his efforts 
resulting in a substantial increase in immigration. After two years devoted to 
that work he returned to Canada and, imbued with the western spirit of which he 




EDWARD ODLUM 






BRITISH COLUMBIA 339 

had spoken in the old world, he made his way to the Cariboo district, where he 
took charge of the affairs of a company largely engaged in gold mining. After 
some time devoted to that work he advised that the company abstain from further 
development, as the output of the mine was not sufficient to cover the heavy 
expenses of their operation. The British Columbia government, desiring a report 
:o be forwarded to the botanical section of the World's Columbian Exposition in 
Chicago in 1893 on the economic value of the woods within the confines of the 
jrovince, selected Professor Odium for that purpose and he prepared a lucid and 
comprehensive paper on the subject. A man of wide learning and well acquainted 
vvith the problems of education, he was chosen as representative of the government 
o make a study of the educational systems employed in Manitoba and the older 
provinces of Canada and report thereon and also prepared a paper to induce the 
government to set aside lands to be used for the benefit of the schools. The gov- 
ernment of the day, Hon. Colonel Baker being minister of education, decided to 
follow the suggestion and took the initial steps toward its adoption. The proposi- 
ion to set aside lands for public educational purposes, however, was not adopted, 
'or unfortunately at this time the sudden death of the premier, the Hon. John 
Robinson, in Great Britain changed certain portions of the policy. A convocation 
vas assembled at Victoria and much time spent in discussing and investigating an 
ict previously passed. Much adverse criticism came from many and further action 
.vas postponed to the following year. The death of the premier, as stated, defeated 
he proposition. Had it passed the schools of British Columbia would have been 
inanced abundantly and forever by the wonderful increase of land values. 

Professor Odium, who came to British Columbia in 1889, has devoted much 
i>f his life to public instruction as teacher, lecturer and writer and in an ecluca- 
ional capacity was called to Japan to accept the position of president of a college 
n Tokio, having six hundred students and fourteen professors and tutors under 
lis direction. In his study of the Japanese and who they are Professor Odium's 
indings are that the race are either .Assyrians or else one of the lost tribes of 
srael. He is probably the only man in America who has studied the origin of the 
apanese and his logic and his proof on this subject are convincing. 

Throughout his entire life Professor Odium has been connected with much 
scientific research and experimentation. He, under the direction of Dr. E. Haanel, 
built the first electric light, a big arc light, used in Canada. Dr. E. Haanel, now 
superintendent of mines for Canada, was science professor of Victoria University 
;it Cobourg, Ontario, at that time and the electric light was used on the occasion 
<>f a football tournament, in which five prominent teams participated the Vies 
< if Victoria, the teams from Queens and Toronto Universities, the Trins of Trinity 
College, Toronto, and the team from Knox College, Toronto, all playing at 
Cobourg. It is said that Dr. Haanel and Professor Odium built the first tele- 
phone used in Canada for public purposes. Later these same telephones were 
taken by Professor Odium to Japan 'and installed in the college there. Professor 
Tyndall, experimenting with electricity in a lecture in the old country, accident- 
; lly took a charge through his body and was somewhat injured. Professor Odium 
was explaining this to a large class in Japan and was operating a machine four 
times as powerful as Tyndall's. He warned his class of the danger of experi- 
menting and at the very time, by a slight movement, his hand came .into contact 
with the live wire and the charge passed through his body, but there were no 
serious results. Professor Odium has always been a leader in experimental work, 
seeking truth and scientific fact wherever they are to be found, going far beyond 
the knowledge to be gleaned from books as a result of the researches of others. 

When a freshman in the university he read much concerning materialistic 
evolution and encountered the statement made by an eminent scientist that the 
! 'Ushmen of Australia were but a degree above the orang-outang. He then deter- 
i lined to visit Australia and make investigation for himself. After some years 
1 e carried out his purpose and made careful examination among many tribes. In 
cne instance he had opportunity to examine forty boys and girls in one of the 
i lissionary public schools, the parents of whom at that time were living in the 



340 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

forest wilds. These boys and girls he examined in reading, writing, spelling, 
arithmetic, grammar and history and found them as ready and intelligent in answer 
as the average farmer's children of Canada, among whom he had taught for several 
years. He was thus forced to conclude that the Australian bushmen were more 
than one degree above the orang-outang. 

In his science course it was necessary to pass specific examinations in surveying 
and navigation and in order to master the latter Professor Odium spent several 
months on a sailing vessel on the Pacific, giving many hours to practical work 
each day. In order to gain thorough knowledge of surveying he worked volun- 
tarily with surveyors on different occasions and thus added practical to scientific 
training. He has ever greatly enjoyed making experiments in order to solve 
scientific problems and on one occasion, when with two others he was experi- 
menting on a dangerous gas in a small and perfectly enclosed room, an explosion 
took place and the Leyden jar which they were using was shattered into invisibility, 
no fragments being left. This led Professor Odium to further examinations. A 
series of jars filled with gas were afterward exploded at once with a like result. 
the glass being completely pulverized. A third experiment was made in Japan 
with a similar result and these three trials made by Professor Odium made clear 
to him a remarkable accident and result which occurred when he was a boy of 
seventeen years. He was at that time an apprentice at cabinet-making and one 
Sunday morning, with another boy, was experimenting on a large horn of powder. 
He held the horn in one hand and poured the powder on the bench, touching a 
match to it. In the explosion that followed the brass ring on top and the heavy 
brass lacks holding the bottom of the horn were all that remained, not a particle 
of the horn being found. 

Another most interesting scientific occurrence with which Professor Odium 
was connected constitutes a part of the scientific history of Japan. He was in 
that country when Dr. John Milne was at the head of the seismological department 
of Japan. One summer morning a large portion of a high mountain was blown 
off by a volcanic explosion. Several towns and villages were wiped out of exist- 
ence and many killed. Nearly one thousand acres were covered with volcanic ash 
and the government sent Professor Seikya, head of the geological department, 
with many men to survey and give an exact report as to the extent of damage and 
effects of the explosion. On the mountain and in the adjoining valley were count- 
less thousands of cone shaped holes noticed by Professor Seikya. These led to 
an extensive and heated discussion, the Professor claiming that the holes were 
formed by falling stones, while all the foreign educators opposed this conclusion. 
With no knowledge of the discussion Professor Odium visited the mountain of 
Bandisan and with much cost and labor made a careful examination. His con- 
clusions he noted in his book on the spot and later on his arrival at Tokio he learned 
of the heated discussion and that his conclusion was the same as that of Professor 
Seikya. He found that the foreign educators had all taken sides against the finding 
of the Japanese professor. Professor Odium then set off for north Japan, again 
hired seven or eight men and went to the mountain. He dug into the holes and is 
each case found stones and volcanic ash and beneath the stones found mountain 
weeds, palm leaves and branches. On his return to Tokio he learned that Professor 
Seikya, in order to save his position with the government, was forced to defend 
his theory in public, undertaking the task in a large hall in Yokahama, Rear 
Admiral Palmer, of the British navy, presiding over the meeting. Professor 
Odium went to hear the address, after which the foreign educators attacked Pro- 
fessor Seikya's theory. Professor Odium asked permission to speak and a few 
moments' time was accorded him. He went forward, reached for a large pointer 
and explained to the meeting the many diagrams on the wall, to which no speaker 
had as yet referred. Having covered the ground and given facts, he finally 
announced his conclusion to be that of Professor Seikya. The entire audience 
applauded with great enthusiasm, for all Japan had become interested in the 
discussion. Not a single reply was made by any of the opposition. When the 
meeting was closed the members of the Scientific Society immediately held a 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 341 

meeting and decided to ask "the stranger" to prepare a paper on the subject and 
read it before the society. He was made a member of that society for the express 
purpose of presenting his paper, which was acknowledged to be final and con- 
clusive on the subject. At government expense large numbers of pamphlets were 
published containing Professor Odium's paper and were freely distributed in many 
educational centers throughout the world. 

While in Japan Professor Odium lost his wife, her death resulting from malaria 
and pneumonia. This decided him to leave the country, after which he traveled 
extensively in Australia, New Zealand, and the United States, studying conditions 
and weighing in his mind the advantages for settlement offered in various coun- 
tries. He considered Vancouver, however, most attractive for residence and 
for investment and upon his arrival here made extensive purchases of city property, 
:he value of which has greatly increased with the rapid development of the city. 
He purchased and sold valuable city tracts, built houses both for sale and rent 
mcl through his activities greatly promoted the growth of the town. 1 le is still 
he owner of extensive holdings. After twenty years of activity in educational 
ircles he decided to abandon that profession, although he received various highly 
lattering offers of college professorships. He now gives his attention largely 
o the supervision of his real-estate interests and to other business affairs and 
investments. He is a director of the Trustee Company, the Terminal City Press 
Company, the Orange Hall Association, the British Columbia Oil Refining Coni- 
>any, president of the Grand Trunk British Columbia Coal Company, connected 
vith the National Finance Company, a director of the Thompson Stationery Com- 
>any, a stockholder in the Canadian Pacific Oil Company of California, and the 
3 acific Coast Fire Insurance Company. 

It is but natural that a man of Professor Odium's intense mental activity 
should use literature as a means of expression. He has contributed valuable 
articles to newspapers on various subjects, writing not only upon the question 
"Who are the Japanese," to which previous reference has been made, but also 
upon the subject ''Who are the Saxons." These papers show marked literary 
ability, wide research and a profound understanding of the nature of the peoples 
vith whom he has dealt. His progress and patriotism have found expression in 
many ways. In 1892 he was elected a member of the board of aldermen of Yan- 
t ouver, being honored with the largest vote ever cast up to that time in the city 
or a candidate for that office. It was on the expiration of his term of service 
i hat he undertook his two year trip to Great Britain in the interests of emigration 
; nd upon his return in January, 1904, he was again elected to the aldermanic 
board a vote of confidence given by the people which should be highly satisfactory 
1o the Professor. His decided public spirit has been strongly manifest in his 
service as an official, for he has always stood for the promotion of any measure 
that would result in benefits to the city or tend to elevate mankind, and he has 
not only helped in bringing about the acceptance of favorable proposals but has 
; Iso been the champion of many progressive movements. He has been president 
of the Central Executive Rate Payers Association and chairman of the Carnegie 
Public Library Board of Vancouver. He is likewise connected with the Central 
City Mission. He served with the Thirty-sixth Regiment from Peel county, 
Ontario, during the Fenian raid of 1866 to 1870 and received one hundred and 
Hxty acres of land in Ontario in recognition of the aid which he rendered. 

In 1877 Professor Odium was married to Miss Mary Elvira Powell, a native 
<>f Ontario and a descendant of a distinguished family of United Empire Loyalists 
of English extraction. The first of the name in America had located in the United 
States, but when the American Revolutionary war begun they crossed the border 
into Canada. Having lost his first wife, Professor Odium was married to Miss 
-vlartha M. Thomas, of Toronto. Professor Odium has four sons by his first 
wife. Edward Farady, the eldest, was for a time head bookkeeper and part owner 
in Thomson Brothers Stationery Company, Ltd. The second is Victor Wentworth, 
of Vancouver, who has a controlling interest in the Clapp, Anderson & Odium, 
Limited, insurance brokers. The third, Garnet McKenzie, died in South Africa 



342 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

after the Boer war, and the fourth son, Joseph Wellesley, holds a position in one 
of the stores of Vancouver. Three of these sons offered their services in the 
Boer war, the youngest being then but sixteen years of age and the eldest twenty- 
one. These two, after participating unscathed in many battles, returned to Canada, 
entering the army here as lieutenants. The record of Professor Odium and his 
father as soldiers in the Fenian war, together with the record of his sons, establishes 
the valor and loyalty of the family. Professor Odium has two sons by his second 
wife, Arthur George, and Oswald Britson. 

Professor Odium is connected with a number of organizations founded for 
intellectual advancement and scientific research. For some time he belonged to 
the Australian Science Association and the Asiatic Society of Japan, and was a 
member of the British Science Association in Canada and also of its main body 
in Great Britain. He is a fellow of the Royal Colonial Institute. He has prepared 
and read before these societies valuable and instructive papers which have brought 
him wide recognition. 

Professor Odium spent the year 1905 in central and northern Europe, con- 
tinuing a comparative study of ethnology, botany and geology, which for many 
years have been his chief scientific pursuits. He made sojourn in western Russia 
and the far north beyond the Arctic Circle, where he had a rare chance to study 
the Finlanders and Laplanders and their lives and habits in their homes and villages. 

Toward the end of this year, or early in 1914, Professor Odium intends to 
set out on a long trip around the world, .during which he will study ancient Egypt, 
Persia, Babylonia and Assyria by the help of the modern races now representing 
the ancients in those countries and the works of specialists, including those of the 
noted excavators of those regions. Apart from the continued study of comparative 
botany and geology, he will give special attention to and make a close examination 
of ethnology, especially as bearing upon the origin of the British peoples who 
inhabited in early times -the "Isles of the Blessed" in the north Atlantic ocean. 
The theory forming the basis of this historic research is that the early British 
passed in part through Europe and also the south of Spain from the regions 
formerly known as Assyria, Babylonia and Armenia. 

The work to which Professor Odium has given much attention for thirty-five 
years and which may justly be said to be the chief effort of his life is an investi- 
gation along the line of theistic science, the study of God in nature. The estimate 
which his scientific colleagues place on the value of his labors is manifest to some 
degree in his election as president of the Arts and Science Association of Van- 
couver, which position he filled for many years. It might well be said of him, as 
it was said of an eminent man of old, that "he has done things worthy to be 
"written and has written things worthy to be read, and by his life has contributed 
to the welfare of his province and the happiness of mankind." 



SAM BRIGHOUSE. 

Sam Brighouse, son of Samuel and Hannah Brighouse, was born at Lindley, 
Huddersfield, Yorkshire, England, January 13, 1836. His paternal ancestors 
were for generations residents of Huddersfield and filled important offices in the 
gift of the crown and the people. His great-grandfather was sheriff of that 
county and his father, who was a large farmer, was parish overseer and occupied 
a position on the board of poor-law guardians. His mother's family, the Mor- 
tons, originally Scotch, had, in the latter part of the sixteenth century settled at 
Lindley, where they subsequently established the pottery industry, for which 
that place is so well known, and which the family still control. Our subject was 
educated in his native town and -at the age of eighteen years took charge of his 
father's farm, which he continued to manage until he left England. He had 
not himself formed any definite plan of coming to America, as for a young man 
he was prospering well at home, but in consequence of a promise previously 




SAM BEIGHOUSE 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 345 

made to his cousin, John Morton, he decided to try his fortune in the new world. 
At this time the fame of British Columbia was being sounded throughout Eng- 
land and the cousins determined to come to this country. On May 8, 1862, they 
sailed from Milford Haven for New York on the Great Eastern. From New 
York they went to San Francisco via Panama, and from there came to British 
Columbia, going direct to New Westminster, which they reached late in June of 
the same year. After remaining there a few days they went to the Cariboo region, 
by the Harrison-Lillooet route. They remained at the mines only one month owing 
to the inclement character of the season and the fact that all the best claims were 
taken up. They returned to New Westminster in October, having completed the 
round trip on foot. On the 4th of November they came to the shores of Burrard 
Inlet, where the city of Vancouver now stands and where they had, in conjunc- 
tion with William Hailstone, purchased rive hundred and fifty acres of land. 
Here the three partners passed the winter, having erected a log house and a small 
barn. During the wet season they worked hard at clearing the land. The parcel 
of land they then purchased is known now on the plan of Vancouver townsite 
as No. 185. Their house was the first white habitation erected on the shores of 
Burrard Inlet, and Mr. Brighouse had therefore a clear claim to the title of the 
"oldest inhabitant." They lived on good terms with the Indians and only once, 
and that shortly after they came, was there any attempt on the part of the Indians 
to commit theft. On this occasion they complained to Colonel Moody, who sent 
for Chief Capilano, who caused the stolen articles to be returned. Air. Brig- 
house brought the first cook stove to the shores of the Inlet, carrying it on his 
back. Shortly after settling in their log house he and Mr. Hailstone began the 
work of cutting a trail across the peninsula from the site of the old Sunnyside 
Hotel to False creek, and this they completed before the beginning of the next 
summer. In the spring of 1863 the partners put in a crop of vegetables. During 
the same year they leased a large parcel of land on the Fraser river, where the 
McLaren-Ross mill later stood and farmed this in conjunction with their own tract. 
In the autumn of 1864 Mr. Brighouse. who had examined the farming country in 
the Fraser valley and had foreseen how valuable it must become, purchased six 
hundred and ninety-seven acres on Lulu island, in what is now some of the most 
valuable agricultural land in the province. His land included the site on which 
the town hall now stands. At the time he acquired this estate there were no 
white settlers on the island. In 1864 he and his partners in the Burrard Inlet 
property leased their farm and Messrs. Morton and Hailstone went to California 
Mr. Brighouse, however, remained in British Columbia and continued his farm- 
ing pursuits with ever increasing success. In 1866 he bought another property 
:alled Rose Hill, near New Westminster, and this he made into a dairy farm. 
This and the Lulu island farm he continued to operate simultaneously from that 
;ime until 1881. In 1867 his lease of the land where the McLaren-Ross mill 
stood expired and he did not renew it owing to the fact that he then had all the 
and of his own he could handle. He found that the dairy farm at Rose Hill 
ind his Lulu island farm were working together admirably so he invested heavily 
n them. In 1870 his barn on Lulu island, the largest on the river, burned with 
:he entire crop. When he got the land well under cultivation he started raising 
stock on a large scale and was especially anxious to improve the quality of farm 
:attle in this country, and through the purchase and introduction of some thorough- 
bred stock he was very successful in this direction. He served in the second 
:ouncil of Lulu island, having been appointed by that body to take the place of 
i member who had left the province. He had been requested previously to stand 
for the council but had always declined and now only accepted at the urgent 
solicitation of the councillors. During 1869 and 1870 Mr. Brighouse was one 
of the active workers for the confederation with the Dominion but opposed the 
idoption of the Dominion tariff. In 1881 he leased his farms on the Fraser and 
returned to his property on the Inlet. He found that the persons to whom the 
and had been leased had departed some time before, the Indians having burned 
their barns and stables. Shortly prior to this two hundred acres of this property 



346 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

had been sold, so that there now remained among the three partners three 
hundred and fifty acres. Mr. Brighouse immediately began the work of clearing 
the land and let contracts for that purpose. He felt confident that the Canadian 
Pacific Railway would be extended from Port Moody and he realized how valu- 
able the property had become. When the extension of the line was decided 
upon, they gave one third of their land to the company, according to agreement, 
and the work of cutting the balance into lots and building streets through it was 
at once proceeded with. Mr. Brighouse was ever keenly interested in Van- 
couver's progress and welfare. He was one of the most active workers in secur- 
ing the first charter, and in 1887 he was elected by acclamation to represent Ward 
I in the city council and accepted the position of acting chairman of the board 
of works. He also sat in the council during the following year and filled the 
chairmanships on the same committees as in the previous year. He was recog- 
nized as one of the most energetic and broadest-minded members of the council, 
and it was largely through his efforts as chairman of the board of works that the 
affairs of the city were so well conducted. Mr. Brighouse made two visits to 
England and in November, 1911, made his final trip, going to his birthplace, 
Huddersfield, where amid the environment of his childhood and many cherished 
friends he passed quietly from this life, July 31, 1913. 



ALFRED EDWIN GOODMAN. 

Varied interests have claimed the attention of Alfred Edwin Goodman of 
Vancouver, British Columbia, and at all times his efforts have been put forth 
along conservative and progressive lines activities toward intellectual progress, 
for political welfare in amateur athletics, in literary pursuits and in military life, 
and in addition towards his material welfare. He is at this time manager of The 
Land Agencies Limited, and has been engaged through the assistance of this com- 
pany and through other sources in the settling of enormous tracts of government 
land. "Back to the land'' has been his slogan and in three years nearly one thou- 
sand persons, mostly young men, have been thus induced to take up more than 
half a million acres of land. 

He was born in St. Catharines, Ontario, November 2, 1860, son of Edwin 
Goodman, M. IX, and Elizabeth Caroline (Cross) Goodman and was educated at 
the collegiate institute at that city, under the head mastership of the father of 
Chief Justice Hunter of British Columbia, the chief justice being a fellow student. 
This fact was mentioned to this eminent jurist recently and he was also reminded 
that although his father was one of the leading educationalists of that day, he 
was severe with the boys. The chief justice in assenting to this statement said in 
effect, that he used to think sometimes that some of the lickings he got were not 
so much meant as a punishment for offences committed as an example to other 
boys of what they would get if they did not behave themselves. 

Mr. Goodman, like his father and grandfather before him, had been intended 
for the medical profession and spent several years fitting himself to take up 
the practice of that profession. His inclinations toward commercial and literary 
pursuits, however, were overpowering, and he compromised with his parents 
by entering the services of the Imperial Bank, where he spent five years in dif- 
ferent capacities and in several cities, in the meantime acting as correspondent 
for newspapers. He subsequently entered actively into the mercantile business 
and became a partner in the wholesale and retail grocery firm of John Nay & 
Company, St. Catharines, Ontario, a partner with Maxim & Company, the senior 
partner being a brother of the famous inventor of that name, in the book pub- 
lishing business, and an active partner of W. Goodman & Warner in the stock- 
broking business with offices at Hamilton and St. Catharines, Ontario. 

Every spare moment of Mr. Goodman's time, however, was devoted to news- 
paper work, owing to his love of writing, and he gained local fame by his versifi- 




ALFRED E. GOODMAN 



8 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 

cation. One work in particular which brought him more than local fame being 
dedicated to the newsboys as a New Year's address, reviewing the world's hap- 
penings of the year in verse with illustrations. This was placed on sale for 
the benetit of the newsboys and realized a handsome sum for them. In looking 
over a large scrap book in which his early efforts have been kept in the form 
of clippings, it is noticed that these verses, mostly comical and topical, were 
copied in papers all over the continent. 

In 1891 he decided to devote all his energies to his chosen calling and for 
that purpose he left the old homestead forever and sought his fortune in the 
far west, arriving in Vancouver Ocfober 2y of that year, thus becoming eligible 
for the Pioneers Club, of which he is a member. 

He sought and obtained employment with the Vancouver Province and 
Victoria Colonist and as a correspondent reached as high a standard as in those 
days it was possible to attain, representing at one time practically every leadin_ 
daily in Canada and the United States, while at the same time writing editorially 
for several trade journals in Winnipeg, Toronto, New York and San Francisco. 

He has always taken a keen interest in amateur sport. In his home town 
lie organized The Amateur Athletic Association of St. Catharines, Ontario, an 
institution fostered and encouraged by every adult male citizen, and which 
lead to such deep interest being taken in athletics that for many years St. Cath- 
irines has been famous for her regattas and amateur lacrosse clubs, lie \vas 
ilso one of the number instrumental in organizing the Vancouver Athletic Club 
ind served for some time on the executive. 1 le assisted in the early 'cjos in 
irranging successful athletic entertainments to financially assist the Vancouver 
^acrosse Club, then champions of the province. He boosted amateur sport in 
Vancouver in all the newspapers which would allow him space and materially 
issisted in upholding the good name of the city as a place famed for good clean 
imateur sport in every form. 

In military matters he took considerable interest having served with the 
Twenty-second Oxford Rifles and later as an officer in the Nineteenth Battalion 
Jncoln Volunteer militia. In politics he got his baptism as press agent for a 
politician, at the time a cabinet minister, and later as being chiefly instrumental 
; n the election of his father to the office of mayor of St. Catharines, a political 
ight in which he was campaign manager. His father was at the time president 
<>f the Conservative Association, and, although he always declined to run for 
parliament, was in the habit of going to Ottawa on calls from Sir John McDonald 
; nd his colleagues. Thus the subject of our sketch has been an ardent conserva- 
tive all his life, and in Vancouver took a prominent part in several elections. Per- 
haps when it came his turn to run for office his experience in campaigning may 
have stood him in good stead, for when he stood for alderman for Ward i in 1909 
he was accorded the largest vote at that time ever given to any alderman in the 
city. In the following year instead of again running for office as his friends 
urgently desired him to do, he accepted the position of librarian of the Public 
Free Library. He has been a director of the Art Historical and Scientific Asso- 
< iation ; the Free Library ; the Canadian Club and several business concerns. 

The real-estate business presented opportunities for big ventures and allur- 
ing propositions and he is now devoting almost his entire time to business 
enterprises. 

He is a prominent Free Mason, having been chiefly instrumental in organiz- 
ing Western Gate Lodge, A. F. & A. M., having been its third master. He is 
; thirty-second degree Scottish Rite Mason, being a past presiding officer of the 
] -odge of Perfection and also of the Rose Croix Chapter, and an officer in the 
Consistory of that body, as well as a member of the Pacific Chapter of Royal Arch 
Masons. He is thus a worthy exponent of the basic principles of Masonry, and 
ii much interested in the work of organization. His religious faith is that 
(i the Episcopal church. 

On the I5th of April, 1895, m Victoria, British Columbia, Mr. Goodman 
was united in marriage to Miss Rose Ellis, daughter of Abraham and Catharine 



350 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

Ellis. Mr. Ellis is a member of the family of prominent bridge contractors of 
England and Canada. Mr. and Mrs. Goodman have one child, Edwin Ellis 
Goodman. 

Thus it may be said that during twenty-two years Mr. Goodman has been 
a resident of Vancouver he has been active along lines leading to intellectual 
progress and improvement, ever standing for those things which contribute most 
to the betterment of the individual and the community at large. 



GEORGE BAILEY MILNE. 

It is significant of the trend of modern times that more and more important 
enterprises are entrusted to the care of young men who are proving their 
ability by the excellent results which they obtain. Mr. Milne is one of the prom- 
inent younger business men of this class in New Westminster, having done 
much by his quick rise and rapid success to justify the modern idea. As man- 
ager for G. B. Milne & Company he occupies an important position in financial 
circles of the city, his work closely identifying him with growth and expan- 
sion. He was born in Thornbury, Ontario, March i, 1886, a son of George 
Wilson and Helen Jane (Brown) Milne, the former a native of Paisley, Scotland, 
and the latter of County Sligo, Ireland. Both came to eastern Canada when 
children with their respective parents, their families being among the very first 
settlers in the Georgian Bay district. The father of our subject was a farmer 
in eastern Canada but in February, 1893, made his way westward to British 
Columbia, where for many years he was employed by the British Columbia 
Electric Company. He died in 1911, being survived by his wife, who still resides 
in Vancouver. 

George 15. Milne was but seven years of age when his parents removed to 
Vancouver, in which city he received his education, graduating in 1905 from the 
Vancouver high school. Discontinuing his lessons, he then engaged in work for 
Nichol Thompson in his machine shop, where he was employed for about 
eighteen months. At the end of that time he was offered a position in the engin- 
eering department of the Canadian Pacific Railway, which he accepted and in 
which capacity he served until 1910, when he secured employment in the city 
engineer's office in New Westminster, continuing in that connection until October, 
1912. At that time he became manager of G. B. Milne & Company, which import- 
ant position he now occupies. Earnest, capable and conscientious in the perform- 
ance of his duties, he has already demonstrated his ability and exerts his 
capabilities to extend the connections of. his firm. One of the progressive and 
successful young business men of New Westminster, he stands on the threshold 
of a career which will not only bring him individual prosperity but which will 
doubtless play an important part in the development of the city and prove of 
benefit to the general public as well. 



DUNCAN M. MACFARLANE. 

Among the men of ability and substantial worth in Vancouver is numbered 
Duncan M. Macfarlane, who, in association with his brother, controls a large 
business as a timber broker in this city and owns vast timber tracts on the main- 
land and the island, their holdings aggregating thirty-three thousand acres. He 
was born in Renfrew county, Ontario, in 1866, and is a representative of a fam- 
ily which has been known and honored in that locality since pioneer times, his 
father, Duncan Macfarlane, having received a land grant from the government 
in 1825. The elder Mr. Macfarlane had nineteen thousand acres of timber land 
in Bagot township, Renfrew county, on the Madawaska river, and this he held 




DtnSTCAN M. MACFARLANE 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 353 

for forty-four years. During that time he cut and manufactured forty-four 
'afts of square timber, one raft each year and each raft containing from seventy- 
ive to one hundred thousand cubic feet of timber, which he floated down the 
Madawaska to the point where it empties into the Ottawa at Arnprior and thence 

the Quebec market by way of the Ottawa and St. Lawrence rivers. He owned 
ilso eight hundred acres of land in Bagot and McNab townships, and this he 
cultivated for many years, having received it as a government grant in 1825. 
The land is still in possession of members of his family. . 

Duncan M. Macfarlane began his independent career as an associate of his 

father and during the five years which he maintained this connection became 

:horoughly familiar with the lumber business in principle and detail. He then 

: ormed an association with his brother, J. W. Macfarlane, and they turned their 

. ittention to lumber contracting on the Sturgeon river, continuing there for about 

'ourteen years, after which, in 1905, they moved their interests to Vancouver, 

vhere they have since remained. They have secured a large and representative 

;>atronage in recognition of their fair and honorable methods, and their business 

las increased rapidly as their reputation for reliability and integrity became 

more widely known. The year after their arrival in Vancouver they began buy- 

ng timber lots on the mainland and the island and they now own thirty-three 

ihousand acres in different parts of the province. They have not cut any of this 

as yet, but contemplate erecting a fine mill in the near future. Both are reliable, 

ar-sighted and able men, and their business interests, being carefully and capably 

< onducted, have brought them a gratifying measure of success. 

Mr. Alacfarlane is married and has two sons, John Lome and Allan Ross. 
He attends St. Andrew's Presbyterian church, is connected fraternally with the 
Sturgeon Falls Lodge, No. 447, A. F. & A. M., and belongs to the Vancouver 
Commercial Club. His political allegiance is given to the liberal party, to which 
i members of his family have belonged for the past one hundred years. In Van- 
touver he is recognized as a man of progressive public spirit, interested in the 
Development of the city and anxious to do his part in promoting progress. His 

1 usiness record also deserves commendation, for in this field he has displayed 
tare aptitude and ability in achieving results, and has at all times employed 
i lethods which will bear the closest investigation and scrutiny. 



SOLOMON ALEXANDER. 

Vancouver is fortunate in the class of men who have represented her legal 
i iterests. On the whole they have held to high professional standards, recog- 
i izing the fact that they represent a profession which is the conservator and 
safeguard of individual rights and liberties, life and property. Among those 
vho meet high professional requirements and whose course sustains the majesty 
of the law is Solomon Alexander, who was born September 2, 1886, in Cape 
Town, South Africa. His parents were Abraham and Flora Alexander, the 
f )rmer one of the first to go into Johannesburg in the Transvaal following the 
discovery of gold there in 1885. The family is one conspicuous for strong 
intellectual force. He is one of four brothers, all of whom are barristers. The 
eldest, Morris Alexander, LL.B., is a representative of Cape Town in the 
federal parliament and one of the leading members of the bar of that city. The 
youngest brother, Aaron Alexander, has recently graduated from Cambridge 
University, securing every honor conferred in scholarships at Cambridge, and 
has just been appointed by the British government as inspector of the native 
courts in Egypt. His cousins, A. and B. Alexander, are among the most prom- 
inent barristers of Johannesburg, South Africa, and they have four brothers 
s x in all who are barristers. 

In the public schools of his native city Solomon Alexander pursued his early 
education and later entered the South African College at Cape Town, from which 



354 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

he was graduated and won his law degree in 1906. The same year he was 
admitted as solicitor of the supreme court of Cape Colony and practiced law at 
Stellenbosch, Cape Colony, until 1910, when he came to Vancouver. The follow- 
ing year he was called to the bar of Alberta and later in the same year to the bar 
ot British Columbia. In July, 1911, he entered upon the practice of law in Van- 
couver with J. Edward Sears under the style of Alexander & Sears, and the firm , 
is now extensively engaged in general law practice. 

Mr. Alexander possesses the Queen's medal for services during the Boer 
war in 1899 until 1902. While in South Africa he held membership in a number 
of secret orders. His political faith is that of the conservative party and in. 
religious belief he is a Hebrew. He possesses a laudable ambition and the 
energy and perseverance which should accompany it. He is making gradual 
and substantial advancement and already has gained creditable recognition at the 
Vancouver bar. 

HENRY D. BENSON. 

A life of xealous effort and well directed business activity now enables Henry 
D. Benson to live retired on his valuable farm of eighty acres, comprising some 
of the best land on the Delta, which he purchased in the spring of 1913 and which 
was known as the Vasie farm. Prior to that time he had resided on a beautiful 
property embracing six hundred and forty acres of fertile Delta land in the 
vicinity of l.adner, but disposed of the place in the fall of 1912. Marked success 
has attended the endeavors of Mr. Benson, who in connection with diversified 
farming engaged in dairying and the raising of registered horses and cattle. Not 
only is he one of the highly prosperous agriculturists of the community, but he 
lias figured prominently in local political activities and has for many years been 
reeve of Delta municipality. His birth occurred at St. John, New Brunswick, 
on )une 22, 1842, his parents being John and Charlotte (Vance) Benson. He was. 
there reared and pursued his education in the public schools until he was a youth 
of fifteen years. During the succeeding three years his energies were devoted 
to farm work, following which, in 1860, he went to Nova Scotia. There he was 
employed in the mines, being one of the first to follow this vocation on the 
peninsula, until 1864. In that year he made his way to Council Bluffs, Iowa, and 
there obtained an opportunity to drive a bull team across the plains to Denver, 
Colorado. He spent three years in the latter state, engaging in mining, and then 
went by horseback to Wyoming, thence to Idaho and later to British Columbia, 
covering the journey by horseback and bull team. The year 1869 marked his 
arrival, and for a time thereafter he resided in the inland districts but later 
engaged in logging in Howe Sound and Burrard Inlet. He followed this voca- 
tion for three years but at the expiration of that time, in 1874, preempted one 
hundred and sixty acres of wild land, on which he remained for thirty-eight 
years. During at least six months of the year his tract was under water, but 
he knew the soil to be highly fertile and diligently began the construction of 
dikes. In the summer he plowed a portion of his tract and planted it, continung 
to increase the amount each year until he had his entire acreage under cultivation. 
His entire section of six hundred and forty acres was inundated wild land 
and demanded arduous toil before it could be made cultivable. Mr. Benson 
directed his operations in a practical and systematic manner, and each year 
marked a decided improvement in his farm. He added to its value as well 
as its appearance by the erection of an attractive residence, substantial barns, 
ample sheds and outbuildings for the protection of his stock and grain, and 
at various times installed about his premises different modern conveniences. 
His fields were brought under high cultivation and kept in that state by a 
systematic rotation of crops best adapted to the soil. In connection with di- 
versified farming he did some dairying and also raised thoroughbred Clyde 




HENRY D. BENSON 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 357 

horses and registered Holstein cattle. In the fall of 1912 he disposed of his 
property and in the following spring purchased the tract of eighty acres on 
which he resides at the present time, now erecting thereon a handsome residence 
it a cost of eight thousand dollars and also constructing barns and other build- 
ings. Reliable business methods diligently pursued have brought the desired 
esults and he is now enjoying the evening of life in honorable retirement. 

Mr. Benson has been twice married. His first union was with Miss Sarah 
Fisher, of Nova Scotia, who passed away in 1901, leaving a family of six chil- 
dren, as follows: Elsie; Alice, whose demise occurred in October, 1906; Norman 
-lenry ; Leroy ; Lottie, who died on the I5th of June, 1913; and Sadie. In 1902, 
Vlr. Benson was married to his present wife, who in her maidenhood was Miss 
"arrie Fisher, also of Nova Scotia, and they have become the parents of one 
i laughter, Gladys. 

Community affairs have always engaged much of the attention of Mr. Benson, 
vho is public-spirited in matters of citizenship and is ever ready to contribute 
iiis quota toward forwarding the local interests or in advancing the country's 
development. He has figured prominently in the political life of his immediate 
district since pioneer days, having been a member of the first council of the 
Delta, while he has been the incumbent of the office of reeve almost continually 
; ince that time. That he has given satisfactory service to his constituency and 
the community at large in this connection is evidenced by the length if his term. 
.Jr. Benson has attended the Presbyterian church since his boyhood. He has 
i ow attained the venerable age of seventy-one years and is living practically 
letired, enjoying in the latter period of his life the ease and comfort purchased 
.1 y a life of thrift and labor. 



ALBERT WILLIAM CRUISE. 

The name of Albert William Cruise is a well known one in business circles 
i i Vancouver. He is now president of the Consolidated Motor Company, the 
Archibald Oarage Company and the Western Tire Company. His executive ability 
i-i manifest in the successful conduct of each, and throughout the years of his 
connection with the northwest the public has recognized in him a man whose enter- 
j rise and business ability enable him to conquer obstacles, overcome difficulties 
.; nd press steadily forward to the goal of success. He was born at Buctonuche, 
New Brunswick, August 4, 1874, a son of Dr. William and Margaret M. (Smith) 
Cruise. The father a graduate of the medical department of Harvard University 
at Cambridge, Massachusetts, practiced his profession at Moncton, New Bruns- 
wick, for many years, or until 1907, when he came to Vancouver, where he has 
5 ince lived retired. 

When he had completed the course of study taught in the grammar and high 
.schools of Moncton, New Brunswick, Albert \Y. Cruise started out in the business 
\/orld as an employe in the engineering department of the Canadian government 
railway system at Moncton, where he remained until 1900. He next went to 
New York city, where he was employed in the engineering department ol the 
New York Central Railroad Company, and subsequently was connected with the 
Consolidated Gas Company of New York. He left that employ in 1902 in order 
t > return to Canada, after which he engaged in the theatrical business in eastern 
Canada until 1907, when he came to Vancouver, where he has since resided. On 
1 is arrival here he engaged in the general real-estate and financial brokerage 
business under the name of A. W. Cruise & Company, being continually and 
actively identified with that line of activity until 1912. His interests were care- 
fally systematized and he did an extensive business, winning a large clientage, 
conducting many important realty transfers, and making judicious investments 
for himself and others. While now retired from active business in that line, 
he still owns a large amount of realty in city, suburban and farm lands. In 1912 



358 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

he organized the Archibald Motor Company, of which he became the president. 
The following year this company was succeeded by the Consolidated Motor Com- 
pany, the Archibald Garage Company and the Western Tire Company, the prov- 
ince of the first named company being to look after the sales department, the 
second after the garage business, and the last, the tire and accessory interests. 
The second company has one of the largest and best equipped garages in Van- 
couver. Mr. Cruise is president of all three companies and has been the strong 
factor in the careful organization and systematization of the business thus con- 
ducted. He early realized the fact that success is the maximum result secured 
with minimum effort, and that this can only be achieved through careful manage- 
ment and wise direction. He readily discriminates between the essential and non- 
essential and in discarding the latter and utilizing the former he has made his 
business interests prominent factors in commercial and industrial activity in 
Vancouver and has won thereby gratifying returns. 

On the 1 7th of June, 1905, Mr. Cruise was married to Miss Isabel Chis- 
holm, a daughter of Colin C. Chisholm, of Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, a member 
of parliament from his county. The children of this marriage are Kenneth A., 
Margaret E. and Audrey. The family home is at Point Grey and Mr. Cruise was 
councillor of that municipality in 1910. In politics he is a conservative, but while 
interested in the public welfare he has not been a politician in the usually accepted 
sense of the term. He feels that his business interests are more important and 
his duty to his family more imperative, and his success shows that his time has 
been well and wisely spent. 



JOHN K. HICKAIAN. 

One of the more recent acquisitions to the commercial fraternity of Nanaimo 
is John K. Hickman, who on March TO, 1911, established a crockery and hard- 
ware store, in the conduct of which he is meeting with a fair measure of success. 
He was born in Staffordshire. England, on the I3th of October, 1859, and is a 
son of Tohn and Caroline (Pearson) Hickman, who late in life emigrated to 
British Columbia, passing their latter days in Nanaimo. 

The early life of John K. Hickman was passed in the vicinity of his birth, 
his education having been pursued in the schools there until he had attained the 
age of ten years. His text-books were then put aside and he became a wage 
earner, remaining a resident of England until 1888. In the latter year together 
with his wife and family he took passage for America with Nanaimo as his 
destination. Twenty-one days were consumed by the journey, which was made 
by way of Montreal. Upon his arrival here Mr. Hickman obtained employment 
as a locomotive engineer with the Vancouver Coal Company. That he was 
reliable and trustworthy and discharged his duties with efficiency is manifested 
by the long period of his connection with the company, which continued until 
his resignation in 1910. While employed in this capacity he established a 
world's record by loading the steamship Titania, which has a capacity of five 
thousand eight hundred tons of coal in ten, eleven and twelve days. _ It is a task 
which would engage the services of ten Chinamen, under ordinary circumstances, 
three days, and its achievement in record time was only made possible through 
the efforts of S. L. Robbins, through whose intervention he was able to 
increase the efficiency of the methods ' used. Mr. Hickman also hauled the 
ballast to fill in what is now the main street of Nanaimo. For a time after 
resigning his position he took a vacation, but early in the year 1911, he began 
making preparations to engage in business and on the loth of March, opened 
the doors of his store to trade. His patronage has shown a substantial increase 
during the past year and a half, and he has every reason to feel very well satis- 
fied with the development of his business. 






y > <r jiXT \ 




BRITISH COLUMBIA 361 



In the Old Crooked Spire church at Chesterfield, England, on the 22d of 

September, 1884, Mr. Hickman was married to Miss Elizabeth Stead, and to 

hem have been born six children. In order of birth they are as follows : John 

Ubert, who is twenty-four years of age, now in charge of the engine his father 

operated for so many years for the Vancouver Coal Company; Reginald, who is 

wenty-two years old and engaged in the express business ; Herbert, who has 

passed the twentieth anniversary of his birth, in business with his brother 

Reginald ; Lillian, who is sixteen and at home ; Joseph, who has passed his 

thirteenth birthday, attending school; Caroline Gertrude, who has attained the 

; ge of eleven years. 

Fraternally Mr. Hickman is a member of Nanaimo Lodge, Xo. 5886, 
]. O. F., of which he is past chief ranger. He has acquired quite a reputa- 
tion locally as a singer, and was a member of the choir of the Methodist church 
irom 1888 to 1-891, while for five years he sang in the Church of England and for 
four in St. Paul's. He has also taken part in a number of amateur operatic per- 
formances, his voice in range and quality being well adapted to work of this 
i ature. Like the majority of his fellow countrymen he delights in outdoor 
sports of all kinds, but has a decided preference for cricket in which he takes 
a keen delight. Civic affairs engage his interest, and for three years he served 
en the city council, having been a member of that body when the present water 
system was installed and various other improvements promoted. Mr. Hick- 
nan is accorded the respect and esteem of his neighbors and fellow townsmen, 
as he is a man of sound principles and high standards, which qualities he has 
manifested both as a public official and as a private citizen. 



WILLIAM SAVAGE. 

William Savage is a practicing barrister and solicitor of the city of Vancouver, 
a member of the law firm of McLellan, Savage & White. He was born in Greens 
Forton, Northamptonshire, England, January 4. 1876. and is a son of Josiah and 
Ann (Foster) Savage, natives of the same locality. The parents came to 
I ritish Columbia in 1889 and settled in Kamloops, where the father engaged as 
a merchant tailor until 1905, when the family moved to Vancouver. Here he 
resumed his former occupation, following it for five years, after which he 
retired from active business life. He still makes his home in the city, where he 
h numbered among the prominent and respected residents. 

William Savage acquired his early education in the public schools of North- 
amptonshire and later attended Columbian College at X T ew Westminster. For 
two and a half years thereafter he studied law under E. P. Davis, K. C., and spent 
a similar period under the preceptorship of Hon. Joseph Martin, K. C. He was 
c.-'lled to the bar of British Columbia under the regulations of the Law Society 
o the province both as a solicitor and barrister in 1906 and immediately after 
engaged in practice in Vancouver. For six months he remained alone but at 
tl e end of that time formed a partnership with T. S. Baxter, now mayor of the 
ci:y, and L. B. McLellan. After a time Mr. McLellan and Mr. Savage purchased 
R r. Baxter's interests in the firm, later organizing the present firm of McLellan, 
S wage & White. This is one of the strongest and most reliable legal firms in 
Vancouver and controls a large and growing patronage connecting it with a great 
deal of important litigation. Mr. Savage has made rapid advancement in his 
cl osen profession and has now the firm confidence of a large clientele. 

In Salmon Arm, British Columbia, in September, 1905, Mr. Savage was united 
in marriage to Miss M. L. Palmer and they have three children, Helen Gertrude, 
William Frederick and John Palmer. Mr. Savage is a member of the Sixth 
Avenue Methodist church and is an active religious worker, having been for the 
p; st twelve years local preacher. His political allegiance is given to the liberal 
ptrty and he is an active worker in the ranks of the local organization, aiding 



362 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

in the cause in all campaigns and at all elections but never seeking office for him- 
self. He has made an excellent professional record, is interested and active in 
matters of public moment and, above all, a courteous and upright gentleman, 
combining in his character all of the qualities of a desirable and useful citizen. 



GEORGE R. SPECK. 

There is much that is creditable in the life record of George R. Speck, who 
is one of the foremost business men of New Westminster, British Columbia, for 
at the age of ten years he was not only thrown practically upon his own resources 
but became the main support of his widowed mother, being the breadwinner 
of the family by giving at that tender age all of his time to the operation of the 
home farm, his father having previously died. He is a self-made man in the 
truest and most flattering sense of the word and that he has attained success in 
business must largely be accredited to the fact that he has always made it his 
motto to give his whole attention to the nearest duty at hand and strictly and 
everlastingly pursued his efforts in the attainment of the goal. 

Born in Grey county, Ontario, February 2, 1877, Mr. Speck is a son of William 
and Mary (Milson) Speck, natives of Yorkshire, England. The father came 
to Canada as a young man, while the mother was brought to this country by 
her parents. Both families settled in Grey county, Ontario, where "the father 
and mother subsequently married and continued their residence. The mother 
is still living in Grey county but the father passed away in 1887. 

George R. Speck was reared under the parental roof and early grounded in 
the old-fashioned virtues of honesty and industry. When he was ten years of 
age, however, heavy responsibilities descended upon his shoulders, his father 
dying at that period, and he became at that early age the mainstay of his widowed 
mother and the family. Soon after his father's demise he took charge of the 
operation of the farm, subsequently taking over the whole management of the 
place and continuing in the operation and cultivation of the homestead until 
1904, which year marks his removal to British Columbia. Locating in New 
Westminster, lie accepted a position with his brother Alexander, who was there 
engaged in the mercantile business, remaining in that connection for two and 
one-half years. Not content, however, to remain in a dependent position, he 
in 1906 set out for himself and established himself independently although he 
had a capital of but one hundred and twenty dollars. The confidence reposed 
in him by others, however, enabled him to borrow four hundred dollars and he 
then purchased of Thomas Mobray a bicycle business for twenty-eight hundred 
dollars, paying five hundred dollars down as the first cash payment. The 
shrewdness of his judgment and his ability and industry, however, won the day 
and within the short period of fourteen months he had paid for his business 
in full and had returned the four hundred dollars which he had borrowed. He 
has since added a full and complete line of sporting goods and by giving his 
whole attention to his affairs has built up an extensive and profitable enterprise. 
His is one of the leading concerns of the kind in New Westminster, which is 
steadily increasing in representative patronage. His success is the. more credita- 
ble to him as it can be ascribed to no advantageous circumstances but is due 
only to his own indefatigable efforts. 

In October, 1899, Mr. Speck was united in marriage to Miss Ethel Hewitt, 
of Grey county, Ontario, and to this union were born two children, Stanley 
Lloyd and Nola Blanche. The family reside in a handsome home at No. 109 
Third avenue, in New Westminster, which is the property of Mr. Speck. A 
public-spirited and progressive man, he takes an active interest in all measures and 
movements undertaken to benefit the city or to promulgate its commercial expan- 
sion, although he has never cared to accept public positions. He gives his sup- 
port to the conservative party, the platform and principles of which appeal to 




GEORGE R. SPECK 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 365 

! im as the best form of government for the majority. Fraternally he is a mem- 
1 er of Amity Lodge, No. 27, I. O. O. F. ; of Westminster Lodge, No. 630, C. O. 
!'. ; and Westminster Lodge, No. 6380, L. O. O. M. The career of Mr. Speck 
j-hould be an inspiration to others for it is proof of the fact that opportunity waits 
for all who know how to embrace her and that success is but ambition's answer. 



ARTHUR JULIUS BIRD. 

Arthur Julius Bird, an architect actively engaged in practice in Vancouver, 
A r as born in Bradford, Yorkshire, England, July 25, 1875, a son of Charles Bird, 
I'.. A., F. G. S., and Margaret Wrightson Bird. The father, a graduate of 
t ic London University, with the degree of Bachelor of Arts, has long been 
recognized as an English educator of prominence and was a former head master 
<; f Sir Joseph Williamson's school at Rochester, England. He was an authority 
<n geology, the author of a number of geological works, and was a fellow of the 
Geological Society of England. 

Arthur Julius Bird pursued his education in Sir Joseph Williamson's school 
at Rochester and in 1892 was articled to Edward Burgess, a prominent architect 
t f London, England, serving until 1896, when he became assistant to Air. Burgess 
and so continued until 1903. In that year he became assistant to J. A. (lotch, F. 
l\. I,, B. A., and as such remained until 1906, when he entered upon an inde- 
pendent practice at Rochester and was thus engaged until 1907, the year of his 
arrival in British Columbia. He settled at Vancouver, opened an otlice and 
entered upon the practice of his profession, in which he has continued to the 
present time. He has been eminently successful, gaining a large clientage, and 
s >mething of the nature of his business is indicated in the fact that among other 
buildings designed by him is Blenheim Court, Washington Mansions, Trafalgar 
Mansions, the Lotus Hotel and others. 

On the 2Oth of December, 1906, Mr. Bird was united in marriage to Miss 
/lice Edith Wills, of Kettering, Northamptonshire. In politics he is independent, 
nor does he take active part in political work. He holds membership in the 
I ress Club and the Vancouver Automobile Club, and has pleasant association 
v ith representatives of his chosen profession through his membership in the 
I ritish Columbia Society of Architects. At all times prompted by a laudable 
a nbition, he has so developed his native powers and talents through continuous 
s'udy and experience that he is now occupying an enviable position among the 
a 'chitects of Vancouver. 



KILBURN K. REID. 

Kilburn K. Reid, who since September, 1919, has held the position of account- 
ant with the firm of H. A. Belyea & Company of New Westminster, was born 
ii Centreville, New Brunswick, on the iSth of May, 1887. His parents were 
Gaorge and Elizabeth (Starrett) Reid, both natives of Williamstown, New 
Brunswick. The father, who successfully followed general agricultural pursuits 
tl roughout his active business career, is now living retired at Centreville, New 
Brunswick. The mother is deceased, having there passed away on the iSth of 
August, 1912, at the age of sixty-two years. 

Kilburn K. Reid was reared under the parental roof and in the acquirement 
o: an education attended the public schools of Centreville and Mount Allison 
Academy at Sackville, New Brunswick. After putting aside his text-books he 
was offered and accepted a position as accountant with D. Fraser & Sons, lumber 
manufacturers of Plaster Rock, New Brunswick, remaining with that firm for 
about three and a half years, when he resigned. In December, 1909, he came 

Vol. IV 13 



366 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

to British Columbia, locating in New Westminster, and for about eight months 
was in the employ of the British Columbia Electric Company. In September, 
1910, he accepted a position as accountant with H. A. Belyea & Company, by 
whom he had been employed for a month after his arrival in New Westminster 
and in the service of which concern he has remained to the present time. He has 
proved himself an able and valued employe of the company and is recognized 
as a young man of ability and promise. 

On the I2th of February, 1913, Mr. Reid was united in marriage to Miss Mil- 
dred O'Connor, a daughter of Arthur O'Connor, who is deceased. Fraternally 
he is identified with the following organizations : Carleton Lodge, No. 35, A- F. 
& A. M., of East Florenceville, New Brunswick; Westminster Chapter, No. 124, 
R. A. M. ; Rockwood Lodge, No. 96, I. O. O. F., of Plaster Rock, New Bruns- 
wick, of which he is past grand ; Waawena Rebekah Lodge, No. 54, of Plaster 
Rock, New Brunswick, of which he is a charter member, and Harmony Encamp- 
ment, No. 2, I. O. O. F., of New Westminster. His religious faith is indicated 
by his membership in the Methodist church, to which his wife also belongs. The 
young couple are well known in social circles and have many friends in tha 
community where they reside. 



ROBERT RUBIE JONES. 

Robert Rubie Jones, architect and builder, real-estate and financial agent in 
Victoria, is numbered among the young men of the city whose energy, enterprise 
and progressive spirit are important factors in the general business growth and 
expansion. He was born at Goodwich, Pembrokeshire, South Wales, March 5, 
1883, being one of eight children born to Richard and Jane Elizabeth (Rubie) 
Jones. The father is a native of South Wales and at one time was employed by 
the English government as a surveyor on the west coast of Africa and on the 
Japanese coast. In later years he was connected with the customs service in 
south Wales, retiring in 1900 and moving to Hastings, Sussex, where he now 
resides with his wife, who is a native of that locality. On the paternal side 
Mr. Jones' grandparents were natives of South Wales and there the grandfather 
passed away as the result of an accident, in the ninety-fifth year of his age. 
The grandmother has now reached the age of ninety-five and still makes her 
home in her native country. On the maternal side Mr. Jones is of English ex- 
traction, his grandparents having been born in Sussex, that country. 

Robert R. Jones acquired his education in the public schools of Devonshire, 
England, and in Connaught, County Mayo, Ireland. He later took a three years' 
course under a private tutor in Devonshire, England, and also in Sussex, as his 
ambition at that time was to qualify as a school teacher. Owing, however, to 
the scarcity of desirable positions in this field he decided to prepare himself for 
another line of work and accordingly entered upon four years' course of train- 
ing in draughtsmanship, studying in Eastbourne, England, under the engineer 
and surveyor of that city. This course he completed in 1902, receiving an honor 
certificate and a gold medal which is given only to those with the highest qualifi- 
cations. This entitled him to become an architect and he spent a short time at 
this profession, in which he became so proficient that in 1903 he was sent to 
Ireland in the capacity of manager of a war department contractor engaged in 
the erection of government barracks and other structures in Limerick, Tipperary 
and other places in that country. After eighteen months, or in the early part 
of 1905, he emigrated to Canada, locating in Moose Jaw, where for two years 
thereafter he conducted a large and important contracting and building business. 
However, the severe winters in Moose Jaw affecting his wife's health, he dis- 
posed of his business interests in that community and hearing of the mild climate 
of Victoria and the excellent business opportunities there existing, he came to 
the city, where he has since remained an honored and highly esteemed resident. 




ROBERT R. JONES 



' BRITISH COLUMBIA 369 

A. short time after his arrival he engaged in the real-estate business, opening 
offices in the Five Sisters block and remaining there until the building was de- 
stroyed by fire. He then returned to England on a business and pleasure trip, 
eturning to Victoria at the end of six months and resuming his former occupa- 
ion, to which he added that of contracting and building. He made his head- 
[uarters in the Sayward building and here he is at present located. He makes 
i specialty of building homes which he sells at medium prices on easy install- 
nents, but he has also designed and built many of the larger residences and 
Business houses in Victoria. His buildings are all convenient and adequate, 
-epresenting the best in workmanship and material consistent with the prices 
charged. In addition to this he makes it a definite object to have them artistic 
in design, for, being an architect as well as a builder, he draws his own plans 
^vhich he makes always attractive and pleasing. He has secured a large and 
i epresentative patronage and this is continually increasing as his business in- 
1 crests are carefully and conservatively managed and his skill and ability have 
1 ecome widely known. His motto is "No misrepresentation, many sales, reason- 
; ble profits, satisfied purchasers," and his adherence to these standards has been 
i lade possible by his close application to business, his thorough knowledge of 
tie building trade and his ability to design according to original and practical 
i leas and to erect houses that strongly appeal to people of fair means who de- 
sire to own their own homes. His own residence, known as Ellesmere, is located 
at No. 1755 Monterey, North, and is one of the most attractive homes in Victoria. 

On the nth of October, 1905, in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, Mr. Jones was 
united in marriage to Miss Edith Wickham, a native of Seven Oaks, Kent, Eng- 
land. Her parents were natives of London and their deaths occurred when she 
vas still an infant. Mr. and Mrs. Jones have five children, Robert Richard and 
I 'orothy Edith, twins ; and Owen Victor, Edgar Desmond and Evan Roy. 

Mr. Jones is connected with the Masonic fraternity and the Canadian Order 
of Foresters. He also belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, being 
a past chief patriarch in the encampment and also a member of the Patriarchs 
Militant. His religious associations are with the Church of England and his 
ujright and honorable life has been consistently in harmony with his professions. 
A lover of all kinds of outdoor sports, he is especially active in cricket and foot- 
ball and takes keen delight in yachting and motoring. His pet hobby is horticul- 
ture and he spends a great many of his leisure hours among his plants, in the cul- 
tivation of which he has met with remarkable success because he has studied the 
one for, judging by his past, it will be characterized by earnest, persistent and 
scientific details connected with the work and made practical application of 
modern ideas along this line. He is a young man of force, ability and capacity, 
interested in his profession and anxious to excel in it and governed always by 
tfe highest and most honorable business standards. His future is a promising 
wall directed work and crowned by definite and important attainment. 



DENNIS E. WELCHER. 

Dennis E. Welcher, fortunate in his real-estate investments and thus able 
to live retired, makes his home at Port Coquitlam and is numbered among the 
v; lued and representative residents there. He was born on the I2th of March, 
1^59, in the state of Michigan, and is a son of Nelson and Serepta Welcher, who 
were farming people of Michigan. Following the outbreak of the Civil war in 
the United States, the father enlisted for service in the Union army and was killed 
in battle, thus laying down his life as a sacrifice on the altar of his country. 

Dennis E. Welcher was but four years of age at the time of his father's death. 
H ; was educated in the public schools of his native state and after leaving 
sc 100! engaged in farming in the Dakotas and in the state of Washington, contin- 
ui ig his residence in the United States until April, 1896, when he came to British 



370 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

Columbia. He settled first at Elgin, later in Surrey, and in 1897 came to Port 
Coquitlam. He afterward spent a short time in South Vancouver, but then 
again came to Port Coquitlam. For seven or eight years he engaged in logging 
and at the end of that time made investments in land and began farming. This 
property, because of the development work in that locality, became very valuable. 
It is situated three and a half miles north of Port Coquitlam and when the price 
obtainable was satisfactory Mr. \Yelcher sold, realizing a handsome return on his 
investment. He then purchased town property and again the wisdom of his 
choice of a location was shown in the rise in values, which also brought him a 
good financial return. 

On the 1 8th of February, 1894, Mr. Welcher was married to Miss Adelaide 
Simpson, a daughter of Matthew and Alice Simpson, farming people. The chil- 
dren of this marriage are Alice May, Edith Pearl and Gordon Nelson Eugene. 
In politics Mr. Wclcher is a liberal. For two years he was councillor of the 
municipality of Port Coquitlam and also filled the position of reeve, discharging 
his duties with promptness, capability and fidelity. At the present time he is one 
of the aldermen for Port Coquitlam and in this office is carefully safeguarding 
the interests of the town. He was likewise president of the Coquitlam Agricul- 
tural Society and for ten years was one of its directors, during which period he 
put forth earnest effort to advance the interests of the organization and the cause 
for which it stood. Mr. Welcher belongs to the Independent Order of Foresters 
and his family attend the Presbyterian church. His life is actuated by high and 
honorable principles and he manifests a progressive and public-spirited citizenship 
which has made his life work a valuable force in the development, improvement \ 
and upbuilding of the section in which he lives. 



CHARLES BENSON WORSNOP. 

Charles Benson Worsnop, engaged in the real-estate and mining brokerage 
business in Vancouver, was born in the United States although the reater part 
of his life has been spent on this side of the border. His birth occurred at Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania, August 5, 1879, his parents being Lieutenant Colonel 
Charles Arthur and Mary (Benson) Worsnop. His father, who is the present 
customs surveyor of Vancouver, was born in Lancashire, England, October 18, 
18^8, and is a son of Charles Barnett and Martha (Bellhouse) Worsnop, both of 
whom were natives of England. The former was for many years connected with 
the department of science and art in the South Kensington Museum. 

Charles Arthur Worsnop was educated in London and in 1876 went to Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania, to take charge of the exhibition for the museum of science 
and art at the Centennial exhibition held in that city. He became a resident of 
Philadelphia and remained there until 1881, when he removed to Winnipeg, Man- 
itoba, and later came to Vancouver. He entered business circles here as city 
editor of the Daily News Advertiser and was thus connected until he secured 
a position in the Dominion civil service. He became connected with the Van- 
couver customs house in 1889 and later was appointed Dominion customs sur- 
veyor at Vancouver, in which capacity he has since continued. He became a 
member of the militia in 1881, joining the Winnipeg Field Battery of Artillery, 
and in 1883 he became lieutenant of the Ninetieth Battalion of Winnipeg Rifles 
on the formation of that organization. In 1885 he was with his regiment in the 
Northwest rebellion and participated in the engagements of Fish Creek and 
Batoche. He was also in the operations against Big Bear's band and was 
awarded a medal and clasp. On the formation of the Garrison Artillery in Van- 
couver in 1894 he became captain and subsequently was promoted to major, while 
in 1897 he became lieutenant colonel, commanding the second battalion of the 
Fifth Regiment of Garrison Artillery. In 1899 the battalion became the Sixth 
Regiment, Duke of Connaught's Own Rifles, and on the expiration of his term 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 371 

Colonel Worsnop was transferred to the corps reserve. He wedded Mary Ben- 
son, a daughter of Colonel Benson of Petersboro, Ontario. 

Charles Benson Worsnop pursued his education in the public and high schools 
>f Vancouver and at the old Whetham College of that city. He afterward 
entered the employ of the Canadian Pacific Railway in the passenger department 
is assistant purser of the steamship Empress of China, since wrecked in Japanese 
vaters. This position took him several times to China. In 1898 he became junior 
i lerk in the Imperial Bank of Canada at Vancouver, continuing in that capacity 
'intil 1902, when he resigned, having been advanced to paying and receiving teller, 
n that year he became bookkeeper for the Vancouver Breweries, Ltd., and was 
apidly advanced, becoming a director and finally managing director, in which 
i apacity he continued until 1910 and then resigned. In that year he formed a 
partnership with C. Elting Merritt, of whom more extended mention is made on 
another page of this work. Under the firm style of Merritt & Worsnop they en- 
gaged in the real-estate and mining brokerage business, and in this connection 
they gained a liberal clientage. They conduct an extensive real-estate business 
; nd are thoroughly conversant with property values. Both members of the firm 
; re young men, wide-awake, alert, energetic, who recognize the possibilities in the 
business situation here, and are ever ready to utilize and improve them. 

The record of .Mr. Worsnop is a verification of the old adage : "Like father 
like son," for he has always been active in military service. He joined the Fifth 
Canadian Garrison Artillery in 1895 and was one of the representatives of British 
Columbia and sergeant in charge of the Garrison Artillery at the Queen's diamond 
jubilee celebration. In 1897 he passed the necessary examinations and was pro- 
i loted to second lieutenant of artillery. He served as lieutenant in the Fifth 
(western) Regiment of Canadian Mounted Rifles in the South African war, 
returning to Vancouver on the declaration of peace in 1902. He was promoted 
t > captain and served with that rank in the Sixth Regiment, Duke of Connaught's 
( >wn Rifles, until he became a member of the corps of reserve. 

Since his boyhood Mr. Worsnop has been active in athletics. He rowed as 
j inior and senior of the crews of the Vancouver Rowing Club, taking part in 
many of the shell and barge races in which that club participated. He is also a 
Kugby football player of more than local reputation, having played for a long 
period of years. He was a member of the British Columbia rugby team which 
played a series of matches with the famous New Zealand All Blacks on its trip 
to America. After Mr. Worsnop ceased to take an active part in the play he 
c mtinued his interest in rugby as a coach and has been especially helpful to the 
younger players, and during the past year has had forty boys under his direction. 
/ side from this he is a member of the Western Club, Shaughnessy Heights Golf 
Club, and the Vancouver Golf and Country Clubs. He is also a life member of 
the Vancouver Rowing Club. 

On the 5th of March, 1909, Mr. Worsnop was married to Marion Coburn, of 
Seattle, Washington. He stands at all times for progress and improvement and 
h.s efforts have tended toward perfection in the sports in which he is interested, 
in his military activities and in his business career. 



ARTHUR M. INSLEY. 

Among the most progressive, enterprising and successful of the younger 
generation of business men in New Westminster is Arthur M. Insley, manu- 
facturer of rubber stamps, self-inking stamps, notary seals, etc., with head- 
q larters in the Ginchon block. He is a native son of the city, born August 6, 
1^78. His mother, who was in her maidenhood Miss Marina Morey, was born 
a >oard ship near the Falkland islands while her parents were voyaging from 
E ngland to Canada. Her father, Jonathan Morey, was a member of the royal 
engineering corps sent out by England to colonize British Columbia and he aided 



372 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

in the construction of the five hundred miles of road into the Cariboo country. 
After two years of able service he resigned from the corps and for a number 
of years thereafter was a guard at the penitentiary. His daughter, the mother of 
the subject of this review, makes her home in Berkeley, California. 

Arthur M. Insley was reared at home and acquired his education in the 
public and high schools of New Westminster. In 1893 he laid aside his books 
and became connected with the stationery and book store conducted by H. Morey 
& Company, with whom he was identified for twenty years thereafter. In the 
spring of 1913, however, he resigned his position and on May I established his 
present business concern. He manufacturers all kinds of rubber stamps, self- 
inking stamps and notary seals and has developed a large business along this 
line, the basis of his success lying in his organizing ability, his sound and practical 
judgment and his modern and progressive business ideas. 

On the 4th of June, 1912, Mr. Insley was united in marriage to Miss A. 
Marion Eraser, a daughter of the late Captain Alexander M. Fraser, in his earlier 
years captain on deep sea vessels and later marine engineer, residing in New 
Westminster. He was well known in fraternal circles as the founder of King Sol- 
omon Lodge, A. F. & A. M., and was prominent and active in the affairs of the 
Masonic organization. Airs. Insley is a descendant of Captain Simon Fraser, the 
discoverer and first navigator of the Fraser river, which has been named in his 
honor. His bust stands in Albert Crescent, New Westminster. Mr. and Mrs. 
Insley are members of the Church of England and Mr. Insley is well known in 
religious circles, being sidesman in St. Helen's church, this city. He belongs to 
the Sons of England and the Native Sons of British Columbia and he is well 
known in this city, where he is respected by his business associates and held in 
high regard by all who come in contact with him. 



WILLIAM ATKINSON LEWTHWAITE. 

Among the active business men of Victoria is numbered William A. Lewth- 
waite. dealer in farm lands. He was born September 2, 1867, in Cumberland, 
England, and is the second eldest of eight sons in a family of twelve children, his 
parents being George and Margaret (Atkinson) Lewthwaite, who were also 
natives of Cumberland. The father was a landowner there and, his death occurred 
in June, 1912, when he had reached the age of seventy-six years. His wife sur- 
vives and is now residing in London. 

W. A. Lewthwaite was educated in the Gigleswick grammar school in York- 
shire, England, and came to Canada in June, 1884, at which time he took up his 
abode at Indian Head, Saskatchewan. He was then a young man of seventeen 
years. For about a year after his arrival he was engaged in agricultural pursuits 
and subsequently followed various occupations until 1893. He next located in 
Vancouver and his previous success in his undertakings enabled him to engage 
in the wholesale produce business. He also took over the boarding contract of the 
Pacific division of the Canadian Pacific Railway, which he held from 1894 until 
1902. Returning to Saskatchewan, Mr. Lewthwaite then engaged in the coloniza- 
tion of the lands of that province, with headquarters at Minneapolis, until 1906. 
He followed practical methods in bringing to the people of the States a knowledge 
of the value, worth and possibilities- of the Saskatchewan lands and his efforts 
were an important element in advancing the settlement of that part of the country. 
In 1906 he promoted the Nechaco Valley Land Company, Ltd., of which he is 
still managing director. The company specializes in farm lands in the central 
valleys of British Columbia, its object being to acquire the lands and in many 
cases improve them so that they can be utilized at once for farming purposes 
by incoming settlers. Mr. Lewthwaite was also prominently identified with the 
Luse Land Company, of St. Paul, from 1904 until 1906, that company doing 
colonization work on a very extensive scale, their chief points of operation being 




WILLIAM A. LEWTHWAITE 




GEORGE W. LEDIXGIIAH 




s>H > tyJ ^ 

BRITISH COLUMBIA 383 

.Steele, until 1901, when he returned to Vancouver, remaining for a year. In 
1902 he reenlisted in the Fifth Canadian Mounted Rifles and served until the 
-end of the war, receiving his honorable discharge as senior sergeant of D Troop. 
He participated in many hard-fought battles, enduring many hardships, and could 
-ever be found in the front ranks of those brave and courageous boys who had 
gone forth to preserve the unity of South Africa and to maintain the prestige of 
the empire. Mr. Ledingham then returned to Vancouver, occupying himself 
.along various lines and waiting for the right chance to present itself for a suc- 
cessful career. In 1905 he entered the employ of the city government as fore- 
man of concrete construction work and continued in that capacity for two years, 
when he formed a partnership with Thomas Scott, city superintendent of con- 
crete construction work. They not only engaged merely as home builders, how- 
ever, but early recognizing the possibilities of the cement business, followed it 
in this city, which then entered upon a term of development which has lasted 
to this day and has by no means reached its end. For some time Mr. Scott and Mr. 
Ledingham were familiar figures on work undertaken for the city, but after four 
or five years devoted to hard work Mr. Scott, having turned his earnings into real 
estate, retired and prepared for a trip to Kngland. During those four or five 
years the firm laid the foundation of their present extensive business. 

Mr. Ledingham did not follow the example of his partner, having other am- 
bitions for himself. For two seasons he carried on the work alone and then 
.admitted to a partnership C. K. Cooper, A. M. C. S., C. K., who had served the 
city for several years and also acted as consulting engineer in South Vancouver. 
Ever since the firm of Ledingham & Cooper has been in business, and as time 
has passed, its contracts have grown in size and importance. They successfully 
handled a sewer contract in Point Grey, necessitating an expenditure of one hun- 
dred thousand dollars, and a contract of the same value on Hastings street. Van- 
couver. They also had a large contract on Keefer street, this city, and one 
exceeding fifty thousand dollars on Hornby street. Ledingham & Cooper have laid 
many miles of concrete sidewalk in the past years. During the time that he was 
alone he put down something like one hundred miles, besides carrying out other 
important projects. They also have the railroad contract for eleven miles on 
Cowichan Lake for the Canadian Northern Railway. Ledingham & Cooper 
employ a large number of men and always make efforts to obtain the best which 
can be possibly secured. Their equipment is most up-to-date and their machin- 
ery of the latest pattern. The enormous and profitable business which they now 
conduct has come to them on merit alone, and the prosperous condition of the 
firm is largely due to the efforts and the ability of Mr. Ledingham. The busi- 
ness office of the firm is maintained at 16-17 Inns of Court building. The firm 
of Ledingham & Cooper is keeping its foremost place amid a healthy yet severe 
competition, and that it maintains its place is largely due to the experience of 
Mr. Ledingham, which he gained as a capable foreman, and the knowledge of 
Mr. Cooper as a civil engineer. There could be no men more fit than these 
two in executing any, even the most intricate or extensive contract. The reputa- 
tion which both enjoy is also evidence of the high opinion in which both men 
are held by those who are able to judge. There has never been a time when 
cement work, as put down by Ledingham & Cooper, has been so much in demand 
in Vancouver as now, and there is every assurance that the present demand will 
not only continue but increase. The demand for cement sidewalks and cement- 
paved streets is growing with the development of the province and with the in- 
crease of traffic in the city streets, and good streets, well paved, are absolutely 
essential to take care of the increased traffic. That Mr. Ledingham's work, there- 
fore, is not only accruing to his own benefit but is of vast importance to the city, 
and a factor in its growth, is self-evident. 

At Chesley, Ontario, on Christmas day of 1903, Mr. Ledingham was united 
in marriage to Miss Helen Maud Reavely, a daughter of James G. and Margaret 
(Grant) Reavely, the former a native of the lowlands, having been born at 
Berwick. Scotland, and the latter at Aberdeen. They came to Canada with their 



384 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

respective parents, the father's parents settling near Dundas, Beverly township, 
Ontario, while the parents of the mother made location where the city of Hamil- 
ton now stands. Mr. and Mrs. Reavely were married in 1870. The father in 
the beginning of his career was engaged in farming at Beverley, Ontario, as a 
boy and in 1857, at the age of seventeen, moved to Gray county, that province, 
where he continued along agricultural lines until 1886, when he moved to Ches- 
ley, where he engaged in the woolen mill business for ten years. He then en- 
gaged in the furniture and undertaking business, being so profitably occupied 
until 1912, when he retired from active work. The mother of Mrs. Ledingham 
passed away in 1911. 

Mrs. Ledingham, after completing her education, engaged for some time in 
school teaching and then became assistant to her father in the furniture and 
undertaking business. She holds two diplomas for a commercial course and has 
the unique distinction of holding a diploma for embalming having assisted her 
father in that work up to the time of her marriage. She has decided business 
qualifications and is a great help to her husband, who discusses with her often 
his business transactions and profits by her sound advice. An excellent wife and 
mother, she has created a home atmosphere which is happy in every respect and 
she hospitably c'ntertains the many friends of the family. She is popular in social 
circles on account of her many accomplishments and is a favorite in the best 
homes of the city. She is also active in charitable work and in connection with 
the Presbyterian church does much toward alleviating the needs of the poor 
and unfortunate. She is a member of the Canadian Order of Chosen Friends. 
Mr. and Mrs. Ledingham have three children, Eula Winifred, Bruce Reavely 
and lilen Wallace. 

It is but natural that a man who is so closely connected with the upbuilding 
of the city as Mr. Ledingham should have branched out, and he is today con- 
nected with various important financial interests which not only are important 
as to the profits they return to the stockholders but in the growth and expansion 
of the city. Jn politics Mr. Ledingham is a liberal and, although he has never 
found time to actively participate in the affairs of the government, is ever inter- 
ested in matters that affect the public welfare. He is a member of the Imperial 
Life Association and an ex-treasurer and member of Vancouver Lodge, No. 
1328, Independent Order of Foresters. He has always shown a marked fond- 
ness for, and has appreciated, the value of athletic exercise and is president of 
the Mount Pleasant Presbyterian Athletic Club. Like his wife, he is a member 
of the Presbyterian church. A man of wide experience in business, thoroughly 
familiar with local conditions, and of that progressive western type of the Cana- 
dian empire builder, Mr. Ledingham has become one of the commanding figures 
in the life of Vancouver and has made for himself a name which is inseparably 
interwoven with the growth of the Terminal City. 



SIMON JOHN TUNSTALL, B. A, M. D., C. M. 

Exacting are the requirements of the medical profession. If a lawyer be 
brusque and crabbed we are apt to regard it as the result of keen application 
to professional duties; if a minister holds himself aloof we feel it is because he 
is engaged in the contemplation of things beyond the common ken, but a 
practitioner of medicine must, according to public demand, be ever genial and 
sympathetic as well as learned in the science which forms the basis of his profes- 
sional service. Dr. Simon John Tunstall is one who fully meets the requirements 
of the profession, and comprehensive study, careful analysis and broad experi- 
ence have placed him with the eminent practitioners of the northwest, his ability 
being attested by colleagues and contemporaries. For more than thirty years 
he has been active in practice in British Columbia, and since 1892 he has been 
permanently located in Vancouver. 




SIMON J. TUNSTALL 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 

A native of Quebec, Dr. Tunstall was born at St. Anne de Bellevue, Septem- 
ber 19, 1852, and is a son of Gabriel Christie and Jessie (Eraser) Tunstall, 
both of whom were natives of Montreal and were descended from pioneer fam- 
ilies identified with the early history of the province. In the paternal line the 
ancestry can be traced to the Rev. Mr. Tunstall, one of the first rectors of Christ 
church, Montreal, and chaplain to the military forces in Canada in the early part 
of the nineteenth century He is also descended from General Gabriel Christie 
whose daughter became the wife of the Rev. Mr. Tunstall. General Gabriel 
Christie was colonel of the Royal Americans and was second in command for 
General Amherst when Yaudreuil surrendered Canada to the Hritish Empire. 
Through General Christie, Dr. Tunstall was a co-seignior of the seigniory of 
Lacolle and de Beaujeu. On the maternal side his great-grandfathers were 
Major Eraser, who as major of the Eraser Highlanders was present at the cap- 
ture of Quebec under Wolfe; and Donald McKay, one of the United Empire 
Loyalists who left estates in Albany. New York, to follow the flag in Canada. 
The maternal grandfather, Simon Eraser, was one of the chief factors of the 
Honorable Northwest Company and bis brother, Thomas Eraser, was an officer 
in the Royals and acted as aide-de-camp to the Duke of Kent when lie was in 
command of the forces in Canada. Thomas Eraser rose to prominence in mili- 
tary circles and died while serving as a major general in India. 

After attending the high school at Montreal Dr. Tunstall prepared for the 
practical of medicine at McGill University, Montreal, lie first pursued the 
classical course in that institution, winning his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1873 
and in 1875 the degree of M. D. and C. M. During bis scholastic career he gained 
numerous honors, having won the Davidson gold medal at the high school, taken 
the Bachelor of Arts degree with first rank honors, and during his medical course 
received a prize for his primary year, while the Holmes gold medal was conferred 
upon him as the first of his year in his graduating class. 

Dr. Tunstall located for practice at Papineauville, Quebec, where he remained 
for four years, subsequently spending a year in Montreal before coming to Brit- 
ish Columbia in 1881. He practiced for two years in Lytton and for nine years 
was at Kamloops, where he was in charge as medical attendant, of a large num- 
ber of men during the construction of the Canadian Pacific Railroad. In 1892 
he came to Vancouver and has since enjoyed a distinctively representative and 
remunerative practice. His ability has gained him recognition as one of the 
ablest representatives of the profession of the northwest. Aside from private 
practice he has participated actively in a wide range of professional and public 
affairs. He has served as president of the College of Physicians and Surgeons 
)f British Colurnbia, is a past president of the Canadian Medical Association, and 
for a number of years was director and also served on the building committee 
jf the new Vancouver General Hospital. He is a past president of the Caledon- 
ian and St. Andrew's Society and is past president of the Veterans' Association 
}f Vancouver. 

On the 22d of September, 1885, Dr. Tunstall was married to Miss Marianne 
t.awson Innes, a daughter of James B. Innes, for many years a crown navy 
)fficer, located at Esquimalt. The five daughters of this marriage are : Janet 
Vlarianne, the wife .of P. A. O. Samkey, a prominent wholesale merchant and 
mporter of Vancouver; Marjorie Katharine, the wife of J. Browne, of the firm 
)f Evans, Coleman & Evans, Ltd. ; Dorothy Ella, the wife of Clarence O'Brien, 
a prominent barrister of Vancouver; Gwendoline Louise and Ruth Elizabeth 
7 raser, both at home. 

The family attend the Church of England and Dr. Tunstall, active in its 
membership, has at various times served as church warden and lay delegate to 
the synod. He is well known in Masonic circles, having for many years been 
identified with the craft, while in the lodges of his local connections he has 
passed all the chairs. He still retains his membership in Kamloops Lodge, No. 
; o, and in the Royal Arch Chapter, of Kamloops. He is a past provincial prior 
of the Knights Templar and a member of the Shrine. He has membership in 



388 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

the Vancouver, Jericho Country and United Service Clubs. He has recently- 
returned from a several months' trip abroad. This was his first trip to the old 
home in England and Scotland. He was welcomed royally in every home, which 
added greatly to the impressiveness of the trip, which was a most enjoyable one r 
comprising visits to many of the old historic points as well as all the art centers 
and the scenes of the modern interests throughout Europe. He is a gentleman 
of broad culture and scholarly attainments and his companionship is an inspira- 
tion to deeper interest in the better things of life. 



JOHN GORDON. 

One of the progressive and ambitious young men of New Westminster is- 
John Gordon, a son of George and Isabella (Grant) Gordon, of whom more 
extended mention is made in another part of this work, and a native of Petrolia, 
Ontario, where he was born December 8, 1874. Although Mr. Gordon has given 
much of his time to agricultural pursuits he has of late considered a legal career 
and at present entertains plans for pursuing a law course and establishing himself 
along that line. He was educated in the public schools of Middlesex and Bruce- 
counties, Ontario, and at the Port Elgin high school, completing his education. 
with a business course at Owen Sound at the early age of sixteen years, a fact 
which stamps him as a man of more than ordinary mental powers and ready per- 
ception, lie began to earn his first wages in connection with farm work and, his 
father being a miller and merchant, he subsequently worked in the latter's store 
in Southampton, Ontario, becoming well acquainted with commercial conditions. 
In 1895 he came with the family to British Columbia and for one year lived in 
Victoria and worked for a short time in a sawmill and in a grocery store. In 
1896 his father and his brother Sutherland took up land in Surrey municipality,, 
each proving title to one hundred and sixty acres, which they still own and which 
is now operated by our subject and his brother. An ambitious young man of 
progressive tendencies, Mr. Gordon of late has considered a professional career 
and entertains ideas of embracing the legal profession. There is no doubt that 
a brilliant future is in store for him if he should follow out his plans and it may 
be safely prophesied that his adopted city and British Columbia will hear more 
of him in the near future. 



CLARENCE HENRY ROGERS. 

A continually growing business, capably managed and wisely directed has 
made Clarence Henry Rogers well known in real-estate circles in Vancouver. 
He was born in Winnipeg, August 18, 1886, and although yet a young man has 
attained an enviable position in business circles. His parents were James Henry 
and Emma (Carter) Rogers, who in the year 1895 removed with their family 
to Victoria, British Columbia. Their son Clarence, then a lad of about nine 
years, continued his education in the public and high schools of Victoria and- 
after putting aside his text-books went to the Yukon, where for several years 
he acted as cashier of the White Pass & Yukon Railway. Returning to British 
Columbia, he has since 1908 been a resident of Vancouver. In that year he 
opened a real-estate office and was in business alone until 1910, when he was 
joined in a partnership relation by Charles B. Black under the firm name of 
Rogers & Black. In 1911 Frank McAlpine was admitted and the firm is now 
Rogers, Black & McAlpine. They have been largely instrumental in settling 
the Eraser valley, where they own valuable tracts. Their business consists 
entirely of buying up large areas of farm land, which they divide into farms, 
selling the same to new settlers. That their business has been of great importance 




CLARENCE H. ROGERS 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 391 

o the district is evident from the fact that they have been 4 able to induce one 
hundred and fifty families to settle on these farms, bringing to the Fraser valley 
,. reliable, thrifty and constant element of good agriculturists. The firm has, 
besides large real-estate investments, other business interests and Mr. Rogers is 
:. stockholder in the Vancouver Colonization Company, Limited, of which he was 
formerly a director, and secretary and treasurer of the Fire Valley Land Com- 
pany, Limited, of Vancouver. These companies are valuable supplemental in- 
terests to his real-estate activity and are proving important elements in the de- 
\elopment, colonization and upbuilding of the province. 

On the i8th of October, 1911, in Vancouver, Mr. Rogers was united in mar- 
liage to Miss Mary Dixon, a daughter of J. C. and Ada Dixon, who were Van- 
couver pioneers and representatives of old English families. Mr. and Mrs. 
Rogers have a daughter, Gyneth. Air. Rogers exercises his right of franchise 
i i support of men and measures of the conservative party, and by financial sup- 
f ort and attendance he upholds the Baptist church, in which he has membership. 
He belongs to the Progress Club and is also a member of the Arctic Brother- 
hood. Through these connections, as well as in business, he has become widely 
and favorably known and has a growing circle of warm friends in the city. 



ALEXANDER L. DEWAR. 

Alexander L. Dewar, prominently known in Vancouver as a partner in the 
firm of Dewar & Springer, financial agents, was born August 6, 1852, and is a 
son of Plummer and Eliza Kemp (Pew) Dewar. Private schools in Hamilton, 
Ontario, afforded him his educational opportunities and in 1868 he laid aside 
his books in order to take a position as clerk in the Bank of British North 
/ merica at Hamilton. He remained with this concern in various capacities, 
b:ing stationed at Hamilton, Montreal, Quebec and New York city until 1874, 
becoming during that time a far-sighted, discriminating and resourceful business 
n an and an expert in all matters pertaining to modern finance. In the latter 
y<:ar he became associated with the Canadian Bank of Commerce and was man- 
ager for this institution in their banks at Montreal, Toronto, St. Catharines, 
^ A^ oodstock and Chicago, rendering the institution able and efficient service for 
twenty years and rising during that time to a place of importance in financial 
circles of the various communities where he made his home. During the 
fourteen years between 1894 and 1908 Mr. Dewar developed his ability as a 
p 'omoter and organizer, establishing large and important business concerns in 
various cities of the United States and Canada and dealing in large affairs, among 
tl e most important of his enterprises being the financing of the street railways 
ii Chicago and the promotion of the Central London Tube Railway in London, 
England. During all of this time his powers were continually developing and 
h;s reputation, based on notable accomplishments, had extended to various parts 
oi America and England, his ability as a financier carrying him forward into 
important relations with business life. In 1908 he came to Vancouver, British 
C )lumbia, and here two years later he organized the Bank of Vancouver, of 
w'.iich he was elected general manager. In this position his splendid executive 
and organizing ability was called forth and the success of the institution and its 
n.pid progress was in a large measure due to him. He supervised the details 
01 its management, inaugurated the policies by which its affairs were directed and 
g; ve much of his time, talents and energies to placing it upon a solid and safe 
financial basis and to making it one of the conservative and strong moneyed 
institutions in this part of the province. He resigned as general manager on the 
ift of January, 1912, and since that time he has been in partnership with H. E. 
Springer under the firm name of Dewar & Springer, financial agents. They con- 
trol an important and representative patronage and their business is continually 



392 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

increasing, Mr. Dewar giving a great deal of his time to its further development. 
In Vancouver he is known as an able business man, capable of controlling large 
affairs and at his best in handling intricate financial problems. Since his arrival 
here his influence has been felt as a force for good in business circles and his suc- 
cess has come as a direct result of an energy that is untiring and an ability which 
commands opportunities. 

On the 8th of September, 1875, in Hamilton, Ontario, Mr. Dewar was united 
in marriage to Miss Grace Mackenzie, a daughter of John I. and Margaret (Phe- 
lan) Mackenzie and a representative of the well known Mackenzie family of 
Hamilton, whose genealogy and a record of the lives of the most important mem- 
bers has been printed and published in book form. Mr. and Mrs. Dewar are 
the parents of seven children: Fred, who is connected with the Wcstinghouse 
Company of Vancouver; Harold, employed by the British Columbia Leather 
Company; John, a member of the Carter, Dewar, Crowe Company, Limited, of 
this city; Arthur, with Bentley & Company of Vancouver; and Elsie, now Mrs. 
R. C. Cook, Maude, viow Mrs. J. G. Patterson, and Nellie, now Mrs. Tom Lord, 
all residents of Chicago. 

Mr. Dewar is a member of the Church of England. He gives his political 
allegiance to the conservative party but is not active as a politician, although 
interested in the advancement of the city's business and public interests. He is 
modern in his views, progressive in his standards, high in his ideals, a splendid 
type of the modern business man and a valuable addition to the ranks of Van- 
couver's able citizens. 



HUGH BURR. 

Hugh Burr is one of the most venerable as well as one of the best known 
citizens of New Westminster, and receives the high respect which should ever 
be accorded one of his years whose life has been well spent. He is now living 
retired, but his interest in the questions and events of the day has never abated. 
He was born in Ireland on the 8th of June, 1829, and is a son of Benjamin 
and Eliza Burr, both long since deceased. The father held several government 
positions and was a well known resident of his locality. Hugh Burr is a descend- 
ant of General Burr, one of King William's military leaders, who fought at the 
battle of the Boyne in 1690. General Burr owned a castle and large estates in 
County Carlow and Hugh Burr, when a boy, saw the ancestral seat, it being 
pointed out to him by his father, who told him that the estate had at one time 
belonged to the family but had passed away from them before the father's time. 
The son was educated in the public schools of County Carlow and in the Kildare 
Street school of Dublin. Obtaining a teacher's certificate, he left Ireland for 
Canada and after teaching for a time in the eastern part of Canada returned 
to his native land, where he pursued a course of study in the normal school. He 
then engaged in teaching in Ireland for six years, after which he once more came 
to Canada, his destination at that time being British Columbia. He made his 
way across the isthmus of Panama and up the Atlantic coast, arriving at Victoria 
in 1860. For a short time he remained in that city and then went to Fort Alex- 
ander, where he had charge of the store of the Hudson's Bay Company for a 
time. He next came to New Westminster, where he again taught school for 
two years. On the expiration of that period he was fortunate enough to make 
some judicious real-estate investments which laid the foundation for a sub- 
stantial little fortune. Becoming dissatisfied with the conditions under which 
he was teaching, he purchased some property at Burrard Inlet and turned his 
attention to agricultural pursuits, developing the first dairy and fruit farm on 
the inlet. He made it a model property and supplied the ships with butter, milk 
and vegetables. After twelve years of farming he sold his holdings on the inlet 
and again returned to New Westminster, since which time he has made the Royal 




HUGH BURR 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 395 

3ity his home. He is still active for a man of his age, although now in his 
ighty-fifth year. He is a splendid type of the old country gentleman, in whom 
ourtesyand hospitality are pronounced characteristics. Through an active busi- 
less career his affairs were well managed and his enterprise and energy, com- 
bined with sound business judgment, made him one of the successful residents 
>f this part of the province. 

In 1860 Mr. Burr was united in marriage to Miss Margaret Hill, a daughter 
nf Alexander and Jane Hill, who were natives of County Wicklow, Ireland, 
born near Dublin. Mr. and Mrs. Burr became the parents of six children, of 
whom Martha Jane, Sarah Frances and Emmeline are deceased. The others 
;re: Elizabeth, the wife of Joseph Burr; Adaline, the wife of E. Chidell ; and 
jlarriet, at home. The family are members of the Reformed Episcopal church, 
'"hey reside at No. 809 Queen's avenue, and theirs is a hospitable home, over 
which Mrs. Burr graciously presides. She is a lady of many excellent traits of 
character, sharing in the warm regard always extended her husband. In politics 
~*JLr. Burr has always been a conservative, supporting the party, yet not seeking 
political honors or office for himself. He has always been fond of lacrosse and 
ii still an enthusiastic advocate of the game. There is no couple more worthy 
t f high esteem in all New Westminster than Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Burr, who have 
i ow traveled life's journey together for fifty-three years, their mutual love and 
confidence increasing as the years have gone by. 



THO.MAS GIFFORD, M. P. P. 

Thomas Gifford, for eleven years member of parliament, is one of the most 
I ublic-spirited of the citizens of New Westminster, standing at all times for that 
vhich looks to the welfare, development and upbuilding of the country and the 
s laping of its policy along beneficial lines. He is, moreover, well known as a 
Lading merchant of New Westminster, owning and conducting a jewelry store, 
vhich during his absence on parliament duties is managed by his son. 

Mr. Gifford was born in Lockerbie, Dumfriesshire, Scotland, on the ist of 
June, 1854, his parents being William and Margaret (Stewart) Gifford, both of 
\\hom were natives of that country, where their entire lives were passed. The 
f ither conducted a grocery business in the town of Lockerbie, and in the Free 
C hurch grammar school his son Thomas pursued his education to his fourteenth 
y;ar, when, desirous of entering the business world and providing for his own 
S'ipport, he apprenticed himself to a. jeweler of Lockerbie, with whom he com- 
p eted a seven years' term of indenture. For several years following he worked 
a ; a journeyman and during that period, prompted by laudable ambition, he care- 
fully saved his earnings until he was able to engage in business on his own 
a> -count. He opened a jewelry store in Lockerbie and conducted it for about four 
y :ars. In 1880 he left his native country and came to the United States, settling 
ii St. Paul, where he remained for six years. He there worked as a journey- 
n an for a time and later spent three years in business on his own account. 
Later he came to British Columbia, settling in New Westminster, and immediately 
a 'terward established himself in the jewelry business, his store being the oldest 
jewelry house on the mainland of British Columbia. Two years after his arrival 
h:re he was elected to the board of aldermen and served continuously in that 
position for twelve years, exercising his official prerogatives in support of various 
n easures and projects for the public good. He also acted for seven or eight 
y :ars as a member of the school board, and the cause of education found in him 
a stalwart champion. About the same time he was a member of the hospital 
board and thus was closely connected with various features of local significance. 
S:ill higher professional honors, however, awaited him, for in 1902 he was 
elected to the provincial legislature and by reelection has been continued in the 
Oifice to the present time, covering a period of eleven years. In this connection 
voi. n r 14 



396 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

he has performed many acts directly beneficial to the province, has been connected 
with much important legislation, and is at present chairman of the railway com- 
mittee. 

In 1877 Mr. Gifford was united in marriage to Miss Annie A. Stoddart, of 
Lockerbie, Scotland, and they have become the parents of the following children : 
William, who manages his father's jewelry business; Thomas Stoddart, superin- 
tendent of the Westminster bridge; Margaret, the wife of Gowan McGowan; 
Bursar, of the asylum at New Westminster ; James Stoddart, who is engaged in 
the machinery business ; and Julia Stewart, Hugh Wilson and John Jardine, at 
home. 

Mr. Gifford and his family are members of the Presbyterian church, and he 
is prominently known in fraternal circles as a member of King Solomon Lodge, 
No. 19, A. F. & A. M. ; Royal Lodge, No. 9, K. P., of which he became a charter 
member; the Ancient Order of United Workmen; the Canadian Order of Forest- 
ers ; and the Sons of Scotland. He is likewise a member of the Westminster 
Board of Trade and cooperates in its various projects for the general good. 
He belongs to the Westminster Club, to the Westminster Progressive Club and 
the Westminster Publicity Club, his connection with and activities in these organ- 
izations indicating his deep interest in all matters relating to the welfare, up- 
building and substantial development of the city. By a consensus of public opinion 
he is termed one of the foremost men of New Westminster and his life work is 
indicative of his devotion and loyalty to adopted city and province. His life, 
honorable in its purpose and fruitful in its results, has indeed been a beneficial 
force in the community in which he lives. 









SAMUEL FRED MUNSON. 



By way of his activities in the real-estate and insurance business Samuel F. 
Munson has contributed in a large measure to growth and development in Van- 
couver. 

He was born at North Branch, Michigan, June 24, 1876, and is a son of 
Almon and Jeanette (Scrimgeour) Munson. The father is a veteran of the Civil 
war, having been a member of the First Regiment, Michigan Cavalry, in the 
contest between the northern and southern states. 

Mr. Munson, the subject of this review, acquired his early education by 
attending the public schools of his native town, this being followed by a course 
in the high school at Mayville, Tuscola county, Michigan. Later he entered the 
Albion Methodist College at Albion, Michigan. On leaving college he entered 
insurance work in connection with the Ancient Order of Gleaners, at Caro, 
Michigan. He was associated with that organization until 1902, when, deciding 
to come to Canada, he went to Edmonton, Alberta. There he engaged in busi- 
ness on his own resources, combining insurance with real-estate operations. In 
1909 he came to Vancouver and established himself in the real-estate business 
and since that time he has specialized wholly in subdivisions. He purchased a 
tract of one hundred and sixty acres in North Burnaby and founded the town 
site of Hastings Grove and Hastings Grove Addition. He put into operation 
a motor-bus system between these properties and the terminus of the Van- 
couver street car line. He personally made many improvements on the property, 
among others being the erection of a spacious store building and a large room- 
ing house, containing more than thirty rooms, both of which are rented. In 
addition to this he has built five fine houses and there is also a Methodist church 
in the town. The streets are all graded and all the improvements of the highest 
order. The town is connected with the city of Vancouver by way of the street 
railway and from that terminus over a stretch of beautiful macadam- 
ized road by the big auto-buses, which make an ideal trip and form the 
most rapid means of transportation. His appreciation for what the future 




SAMUEL FRED MUXSOX 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 399 

has in store for this growing western country led him to enter the business in 
which he is now engaged, and Vancouver's marvelous growth furnishes him 
an excellent field in which to put forth labor that is productive of good results, 
not only for himself, but for the upbuilding of the city as well. 

On the 7th of February, 1901, Mr. Munson was united in marriage at Grove- 
land, Oakland county, Michigan, to Miss Laura Honert, a daughter of Christo- 
pher and Mary Honert, who are prominent farming people in the locality in 
which they live. Mr. and Mrs. Munson have two daughters, Dorothy and 
Phoebe. In religious faith the parents are Presbyterians and Mr. Munson 
belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He is a member of the Van- 
couver Board of Trade and is interested in all efforts put forth by that organi- 
zation for the benefit of the city. Socially, he is a member of the American Club. 
Throughout his life he has been actuated by a spirit of enterprise that has led 
him to such a position in commercial life that he is now regarded as one of the 
prominent factors in the building of the "Last Great West." 



THOMAS KENNEDY. 

Among the most successful, enterprising and prominent of Xew Westmins- 
er's native sons is Thomas Kennedy, now connected with the sheet metal, plumb- 
ng and heating business as a member of the firm of Mahony & Kennedy, pro- 
prietors of the largest concern of this kind in this section of the province. His 
)irth occurred in 1863 and he is a son of James and Carolina (Stone) Kennedy, 
of whom extended mention is made in another part of this work. 

Thomas Kennedy was reared at home and acquired his education in the public 
schools of his native city. After laying aside his books he served an apprentice- 
ship as a sheet metal worker and became proficient and expert at this line of 
vork. At the end of his term he established himself in business and continued 
alone for ten years, securing during this, time a large trade and building up an 
(extensive and profitable business. In 1910 he formed a partnership with Mr. 
vtahony under the firm name of Mahony & Kennedy. They now control the 
'argest sheet metal, plumbing and heating establishment in this locality and their 
business is increasing owing to the progressive methods which they employ and 
the honorable standards to which they steadily adhere. Mr. Kennedy since be- 
ginning his active career has gained an enviable reputation in New Westminster 
ior high integrity, enterprise and discrimination. 

On the loth of March, 1896, Mr. Kennedy married Miss Elizabeth Allanson, 
daughter of James Allanson, a native of England. Mr. and Mrs. Kennedy have 
teven children, Caroline, Emily, Thomas, William, Katherine, Marshall and Noal, 
; 11 of whom with the exception of the two youngest are attending school. The 
iamily residence is at No. 229 Queensborough street. Mr. Kennedy has lived 
in New Westminster all his life and the fact that many of his stanchest friends 
; re numbered among those who have known him from childhood is an indication 
that his life has been an upright and honorable one. Business men respect him 
lor his high integrity, his enterprise and his initiative spirit and in the course of 
years he has made substantial contributions to the development of his native city. 



ROBERT KEAM CHAPMAN. 

As secretary of F. J. Hart & Company, Ltd., of New Westminster, and one 
( f the representative business men of this city, Robert Keam Chapman needs 
i'0 introduction to the readers of this volume. His attainments are visible to all 
;snd his success is the more creditable as it has been brought about by his own 
efforts, unaided by favorable circumstances or financial help. A native of 



400 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

England, Mr. Chapman was born near Birmingham, in the town of Dudley, on 
November 15, 1873, an d is a son of Edward and Sarah J. H. (Isbell) Chapman, 
the former a native of Birmingham and the latter of Cornwall, England. The 
father came to New Westminster in 1899 and died here in 1907. He had spent 
most of his active life as hardware merchant in St. John, Newfoundland. The 
mother is still living. 

Robert Keam Chapman received his education in the common schools of St. 
John's, Newfoundland, and in laying aside his textbooks served an apprenticeship 
at the dry-goods trade in that city. He then removed to Boston, Massachusetts, 
where he was for four years employed along similar lines, largely augmenting his 
knowledge, and in 1897 came to New Westminster. Soon thereafter he became 
secretary of S. J. Hart & Company, Ltd., with whom he has since been identified. 
His experience and thorough methods have in a large measure contributed to the 
growth of that firm and he has become recognized as one of the able business 
men of the city. 

In New Westminster Mr. Chapman was united in marriage to Miss Mary M. 
Jennings, a daughter of John F. Jennings, of Yorkshire, England, the cememony 
being performed on November 20; 1901. To them have been born three children, 
Mary I., Edward Fawcett and Robert Jennings. Mr. Chapman has an interest- 
ing military record to his credit, having served seven or eight years as a member 
of the Sixth Regiment, Duke of Connaught's Own Rifles. For the past ten or 
twelve years he has been auditor of the municipality of Langley and has ever 
demonstrated his public spirit by stanchly upholding the measures and candi- 
dates of the conservative party. He is very prominent in Masonic circles and 
highly thought of therein, having received most of the honors which that bro- 
therhood may bestow. He is a member of Union Lodge, No. 9, A. F. & A. M., 
and since 1905 has been past master. He is past principal of Westminster Chap- 
ter, R. A. M., of which he was a charter member, and a member of Westminster 
Preceptory, No. 56, K. T., in which he is constable. He also belongs to Gizeh 
Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S. Mr. Chapman also holds membership in the West- 
minster Club, where he associates with men who, like himself, are interested 
in the growth and progress of the city and where many measures are fathered 
which have proven of permanent value to the community. The success which 
Mr. Chapman has attained is twofold, as it not only means his financial inde- 
pendence but lies as much in the accomplishment of something that has proven 
of benefit to the public at large. A watchfulness over all the details of his 
business, a comprehension of what is most essential and the ability to combine 
and coordinate elements into a harmonious and unified whole have been ele- 
ments in winning him a place among the leaders of commerce in New West- 
minster. 



BEAUMONT THOMAS FREDERICK WILLIAM BOGGS. 

Beaumont T. F. W. Boggs, widely known as a prosperous and prominent 
representative of business interests in Victoria, is a member of the firm of R. S. 
Day & Beaumont Boggs, real-estate, insurance and financial agents, having offices 
at No. 620 Fort street and constituting one of the oldest established real-estate 
firms in the city. His birth occurred at Halifax, Nova Scotia, on the 5th of 
August, 1863, his parents being Thomas and Charlotte F. (Bullock) Boggs, the 
former a native of Halifax, Nova Scotia, and the latter of Trinity Bay, New- 
foundland. The ancestors of Thomas Boggs were United Empire Loyalists. 
He was the senior partner in the firm of Thomas Boggs & Company, which was 
established in 1790, conducting a general wholesale hardware business in Hal- 
ifax, Nova Scotia. In the conduct of that enterprise he remained an active 
factor until his death. For several years he was likewise a member of the Nova 
Scotia volunteer forces. His demise occurred on the 27th of March, 1873, when 
he had attained the age of sixty-three years. 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 401 

Beaumont Boggs obtained his education in the grammar and high schools 
of Halifax, Nova Scotia, completing his studies in 1877. In that year he entered 
the establishment of his uncle, who conducted business under the firm style of 
Brown & Webb, wholesale druggists of Halifax, Nova Scotia, in whose service 
he remained until 1885. In 1879 ne na d joined the Sixty-sixth Battalion, 
Princess Louise Fusiliers, and received his commission as lieutenant in 1883, 
having passed the long course at the .Military School of Instruction, his sword 
being forwarded to him by Sir Garnet Wolseley. Upon, the call for volunteers 
for service in the Northvvest territories he was appointed assistant adjutant of 
:he Halifax Provisional Battalion. In July, 1885, he returned from service and 
igain entered the employ of the firm of Brown & Webb in the capacity of travel- 
ing salesman, remaining in that position until the call of the west prevailed. In 
fanuary, 1886, he made his way to Victoria, British Columbia, and established 
limself as manufacturer's agent. Soon afterward the lure of the gold fields 
n the Similkameen valley took him to Granite creek and he crossed the I lope 
nountains in .March, 1886. He met with but poor success and returned to 
Vancouver three days before the fire, his total resources at this time amounting 
o seventy-five cents. He obtained employment in the Royal City .Mills of Van- 
ouver and remained there for about nine months, at the end of that time coni- 
ng to Victoria and entering the service of the Standard newspaper as a re- 
porter under the late Amore De Cosmos. At the end of a year he secured a 
position with the Dominion Goverment Bank as teller, having received a civil 
^ervice certificate before leaving Halifax, \\hen a year had passed he resigned 
his position to join F. G. Richards in the real-estate business under the linn name 
of F. G. Richards & Company, the partnership being formed in 1888. This 
; ssociation was severed in 1889 and Mr. Boggs then became a member of the 
newly organized firm known as Crane, McGregor & Boggs, with offices near the 
( orner of Broad and View streets in Victoria. At this time the firm opened up 
the Oak Bay district and placed other large subdivisions upon the market. 
' 'hey also built the Oak Bay Hotel, which was later destroyed by fire. They 
1 kewise opened up the Gordon Head district, where fruit growing was intro- 
cuced and encouraged, the venture proving very successful. In 1892 Mr. 
Hoggs disposed of his interest in this concern and began devoting his attention 
to insurance and the sealing business, conducting operations under the name 
cf Beaumont Boggs & Company. Subsequently he joined R. S. Day, and the 
firm style of R. S. Day & Beaumont Boggs has been retained to the present 
time. Mr. Boggs was issued a commission as notary public in 1890 and was 
made commissioner for the province of Nova Scotia in British Columbia in 
the same year. His firm carries on a general real-estate and insurance business, 
specializing principally in farm lands on Vancouver island, and acts as agent 
for English as well as local capital. The company also handles large estates 
aid acts as agent for large properties. Mr. Boggs' prominence in real-estate 
circles is indicated in the fact that he is the president of the Victoria Real 
Estate Exchange, having held that office since its organization. His able coop- 
eration has been sought in the management and control of several business 
enterprises and he is now president of The Shore Hardware Company, Limited; 
tie Canada Mosaic Tile Company, Limited; and vice president of the British 
Campaigners Association. 

On the 23d of June, 1890, in Victoria, Mr. Boggs was united in marriage 
tc Miss Louise Mary Richardson, her father being George Richardson, a native 
o Kent, England, who came to Canada in the service of the Hudson's Bay 
Company in 1858. Mr. and Mrs. Boggs have four children. Arthur Beau- 
mont, who was born on the 28th of July, 1891, and was graduated with honors 
from the Royal Military College at Kingston, now holds a commission in His 
A ajesty's Indian cavalry service, being stationed at Dalhousie, Punjab, India. 
Herbert Beaumont, born July 28, 1892, is studying law in Victoria, British 
Columbia. Mary Charlotte Beaumont was born November 4, 1893, while the 
birth of Dorothy Louise Beaumont occurred October 17, 1899. The family 



402 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

home is a comfortable and attractive residence known as Maplewood, which 
is located at No. 1133 Catherine street in Victoria. 

In politics Mr. Boggs is a conservative and has always taken an active interest 
in the work of the party. He acted as chairman of the public school board in 
1906 and 1907 and was instrumental in the introduction of the cadet movement 
in the public schools. He has been connected with the Board of Trade since 
1890 and is now a member of its council. Mr. Boggs is likewise vice president 
of the Victoria Development League and belongs to the Pacific Club, the Royal 
Victoria Yacht Club, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Independ- 
ent Order of Foresters. His religious faith is indicated by his membership in 
the Anglican church, and he is one of the governers of the Anglican Theological 
College of British Columbia. Since 1887 he has been a member of the synod 
of the diocese of British Columbia. He is fond of athletic sports, hunting and 
fishing, and is an ardent advocate of military training for young men. He has 
always had a thorough belief in the eventual prosperity of Vancouver island and 
Victoria in particular, and this, together with his conservative and just business 
methods, has had much to do with his present success. His life is exemplary 
in all respects and he has ever supported those interests which are calculated 
to uplift and benefit humanity, while his own high moral worth is deserving of 
highest commendation. 



GEORGE WARD DE BECK. 

George Ward De Beck, who is now prominently identified with the timber 
and mining interests of British Columbia, was born in Carleton county, New 
Brunswick, on the 27th of September, 1849, and is a son of George and Eliza- 
beth (Dow) De Beck. On both the paternal and maternal sides he is directly 
descended from loyalist stock and most of his ancestors have lived to a ripe 
old age. His great-grandfather, John Ludwig De Beck, was lieutenant in the 
Third New York Volunteers a loyalist regiment in the Revolutionary war 
and was present at the surrender of Lord Cornwallis at Yorktown, Virginia. 
He was taken prisoner by the American army on the igth of October, 1781, 
and our subject has in his possession a muster roll under the charge of Lieu- 
tenant De Beck dated on the 2ist of October of that year. The Lieutenant mar- 
ried Elizabeth Althause and to them were born two children : George and one 
who died in early life. The family settled in St. John, New Brunswick, after 
the Revolutionary war. George De Beck wedded Mary Green and made his 
home in New Brunswick. To them were born seven children, of whom George, 
Jr., was the father of our subject. He is now deceased but the mother, who 
was one of the pioneers of British Columbia, having located here in 1868, is 
still living, hale and hearty, at the extreme old age of ninety-nine years. 

George Ward De Beck remained at home and pursued his education in the 
public schools of New Brunswick until he was sixteen years of age. Believ- 
ing he was fully qualified to assume the duties of manhood, he then laid aside 
his text-books and started out to make his own way in the world. He subse- 
quently went to the Redwoods of California, where he engaged in the saw- 
mill business for two and a half years, and then came to British Columbia and 
followed the same occupation at Burrard Inlet for seven years. Next he built 
and operated the Brunett sawmill on the Fraser river above New Westminster 
for a year and then sold out. His next removal was to Yale, where he engaged 
in the hotel business for eighteen months, following which he went to the United 
States and spent five years in the states of Washington, Oregon and Idaho in 
the lumbering business. He returned to British Columbia in 1886 and engaged 
in logging until 1891, when he went to timber cruising. After following this 
latter occupation for four years he engaged in mining until 1902. In the latter 
year he received the appointment as Indian agent at Alert Bay, where he was 




GEORGE W. ])E BECK 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 405 

stationed until 1906. He next drifted back to timber cruising and logging and 
has since been thus engaged, though he is still interested in several mines. 

Mr. De Beck married Miss E. M. Keary, a daughter of James and Maria 
Keary, of New Westminster, the event being celebrated on the I7th of March, 
1887. Of this marriage there have been born six children : Edna, now the wife 
of T. A. Livesley ; Edward K., who married a Miss Foster and is engaged in 
the practice of law at Vancouver ; Leonora, who is at home ; Ward and Viola, 
who are attending school ; and George, who is deceased. 

Fraternally Mr. De Beck is identified with the Masonic order and holds 
membership in Cascade Chapter, No. 7, R. A. M. 



W. RUSSELL JAYNES. 

Among the successful younger business men of New Westminster is W. 
Russell Jaynes, located at 741 Front street, where he is engaged as dealer in 
gasoline engines and boat accessories, also handling oxyacetylene and also en- 
gaged in the welding and brazing of metals. He was born in Orono, Ontario, 
on August 22, 1884, and is a son of Thomas and Jane (Dodd) Jaynes, both 
natives of Ontario, where the father passed away in 1906 and the mother still 
resides. 

W. Russell Jaynes was reared at home and educated in the common schools. 
In 1904 he bade farewell to parents and home and came west to British Columbia 
to put to test the stories he had heard of the wonderful opportunities held out 
'to enterprising young men -who would but seek them. He temporarily located 
in Vancouver but after a few months came to New Westminster, which he has 
since made his home. Having learned the trade of machinist in Toronto prior 
to his coming to British Columbia, he engaged at that occupation after locating 
in New Westminster, working in the Schaake Iron Works and subsequently 
in the Nelson Iron Works and the John Reid shops and also in the Van Stones 
works. Not content with remaining in a salaried position, Mr. Jaynes in 1910 
engaged in business for himself by establishing the firm under which he now 
operates at 741 Front street, the business under his skilful management having 
become one of the important enterprises of New Westminster. 

Mr. Jaynes is well known in social and fraternal circles of New Westmin- 
ster, being a member of Royal City Lodge, No. 3, I. O. O. F., and a member of 
the Rebekahs. He is an enthusiastic boatsman, owning five motor boats from 
which he derives a considerable additional revenue. His strict adherence to fair 
methods of dealing and his manly and stalwart qualities of character have made 
for him many friends and he is considered one of the rising young business men 
of the city. He is public-spirited and progressive and ever stands ready to break 
a lance for the advancement of his city and province. 



CLARENCE EARL MACLEAN. 

Clarence Earl MacLean, a young man of excellent business ability, whose 
clear insight and ready appreciation of opportunities have enabled him to work 
his way upward to success, is now part owner of the MacLean-Burr Automobile 
Garage, and numbered among the most enterprising and progressive business 
men of New Westminster. He is a native of Nova Scotia, born March 13, 1885, 
and is a son of James Thomas and Jessie MacLean, the former of whom was 
a successful mining engineer. 

Clarence E. MacLean acquired his early education in the public schools of 
his native country. He later studied steam and electrical engineering with the 
International Correspondence School and after receiving his degree went to Daw- 



406 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

son, Alaska, where he was placed in charge of the steam pumps of the Detroit- 
Yukon Mining Company, gaining in this way invaluable practical experience in 
his profession. When he left Alaska he came to New Westminster and for a 
time was superintendent of the gasoline department of the Schaake Machine 
Works. He remained in this position for six years, during which time he de- 
signed the famous Yale engine which this concern makes a specialty of manu- 
facturing. In the spring of 1912 Mr. MacLean severed his connection with 
the Schaake Machine Works, and forming a partnership with Mr. Burr, opened 
the MacLean-Burr Automobile Garage, now one of the important enterprises of 
its kind in the city. The partners have secured a large and representative pat- 
ronage and their business is constantly increasing in volume and importance. 
Mr. MacLean has made for himself a most creditable business standing and his 
enterprising spirit, perserverance, and determination have been the foundation 
of his success. 

Mr. MacLean married Miss Edith Cowper, a daughter of Jesse and Susan 
Cowper of Victoria, British Columbia. Mr. and Mrs. MacLean reside in their 
new and attractive home on Ninth street and they have made this the center 
of hospitality for an extensive circle of friends. Mr. MacLean is an athlete 
with an enviable local reputation, having won the championship in the trap 
shoot of iQo8 and a gold medal for the three mile swimming contest held in 
Spokane in 1903. He is an enthusiast upon the subject of out-door sport and is 
especially fond of automobiling, boating and fishing, spending many of his leisure 
hours in these recreations. He is a member of the Presbyterian church and his 
life is in all its relations an upright and exemplary one. He manifests sterling 
qualities not only in his business activities but also in his social and citizenship 
relations and is justly accounted one of the valued residents of the community. 



HERBERT EDWIN WELCHEL. 

Although a comparatively recent arrival in Vancouver, Herbert Edwin 
Welchel has already established his right to rank among the enterprising busi- 
ness men of the city, having made for himself a creditable name and place as 
a real-estate broker. He was born in Syracuse, New York, December 28, 1870, 
and is a son of Charles R. and Noma (Gushing) Welchel, the former a native 
of Germany and the latter of the Empire state. The parents never came to 
Canada and both passed away many years ago. 

During the boyhood of Herbert E. Welchel a removal was made to Decatur, 
Illinois, and there in the public schools he pursued his education. He after- 
ward learned telegraphy in that state and was an operator on the Chicago, Burling- 
ton & Quincy Railroad for three years. Later he learned the machinist's trade, 
which he followed in Nebraska. Still the west called him and in 1899 ne 
made his way to Seattle, where he resided for a decade. During his resi- 
dence in that city he engaged in the real-estate business, although much of 
this time was spent in travel and in the east. In 1909 he arrived in Vancouver 
and entered the real-estate brokerage business, establishing an office in this 
city. He makes a specialty of handling large tracts of farm and timber lands 
on the mainland of British Columbia and on Vancouver island and also in 
the state of Washington. He still has interests in Seattle and in Chicago. He 
was for two years engaged in chicken ranching on the Eraser river, along which 
line he was very successful, hatching fourteen hundred chickens each year. It 
proved a profitable venture but required too much time from his real-estate 
business, to which he now gives his undivided attention. He has thoroughly 
acquainted himself with property values in the line of real estate which he 
handles, knows what is upon the market and, as the years have gone by, has 
made f9r himself a creditable place in business circles, having now a large 
and gratifying clientele. 




HERBERT E. WELCHES 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 400 

On the I3th of May, 1907, at La Grande, Oregon, Mr. Welchel was united 
in marriage to Miss Iva 13. Roberts, of Kansas City, Missouri, who was a 
government nurse in the southern states for several years. They have one 
daughter, Eleanor Leone. Mr. Welchel has been both the architect and builder 
(f his own fortunes. Starting out in life without any special advantages at 
l lie outset of his career, he has worked his way steadily upward and by his 
( etermination and energy has overcome all difficulties and obstacles and reached 
; prominent place in business circles. His life record proves that the path 
c f opportunity is open to all who have the courage to persevere therein. 



CHARLES M1LTOX \Y< )( )I )\Y< )RTH. 

The consensus of opinion accords Charles .Milton \Voodworth high rank as a 
1 arrister, and history bears testimony to his activity in politics, his public spirit 
and his many tangible efforts for the general good, lie was born in Kings 
ounty, Nova Scotia, July 11. 1868, and is a son of Aimer and Susan (Self- 
ridge) Woodworth, who are also natives of Kings country. The father made 
firming his life work but is now living retired in Middletown. 

In his early boyhood Charles M. Woodworth worked upon the home farm, 
vith opportunity to attend school for only a few months of each year. Me was 
ambitious, however, to secure a good education and when fourteen years of age 
made arrangements to supplement his early school training by an academic 
c mrse. lie entered the Kentville Academy, where he spent eight months, com- 
pleting two and a half years work in that time, lie then returned home and the 
s icceeding year attended the Provincial normal school at Truro, Nova Scotia. 
1 hrough the succeeding year he engaged in teaching in a country school, after 
vhich he went to Aeadia College at Wolfville, Nova Scotia, from which he was 
graduated as a member of the class of 1890. lie then made his way to Halifax 
aid became a student in the Dalhousie Law School. He had opportunity to 
article to the now Hon. Robert L. Borden and he was a classmate of R. B. Ben- 
nett, K. C., M. P., of Calgary, Alberta. He was the first graduate of Aeadia 
College to receive the degree of Bachelor of Arts in course. He was admitted 
to practice in the courts of Nova Scotia after being articled for only two years 
a id nine months, and a year after his graduation he was elected one of the 
governors of the Aeadia College. 

In 1893 Mr. Woodworth became a resident of Edmonton, where he opened 
a law office and entered upon active practice, being there associated with such 
n en as S. S. Taylor, of Vancouver, and Judge Beck, of the Alberta bench. He 
practiced there until 1896, when he went to the Kootenay country, where he 
remained for six months. In 1898 he went to the Yukon, settling at Dawson, 
where he remained for six and a half years in the active practice of law. He was 
successful there, being accorded a large clientele, his practice having chiefly to 
d ) with mining litigation. He was largely interested in public questions, im- 
p 'ovements and interests of the day, and while in that country organized the cit- 
izen's committee in opposition to the liberal government and prepared the memorial 
t( the governor general and represented the opposition in entertaining the party 
o : the governor general while in the Yukon. 

In 1904 Mr. Woodworth came to Vancouver, where he opened a law office 
and has since engaged in practice. From 1907 until 1909 he was in partnership 
with A. G. Smith, now land registrar, and from 1910 until 1913 he was in part- 
nership with A. R. Creagh. In January, 1913, the present firm of Woodworth, 
Creagh, Benton & Fisher was organized. Their practice is extensive and con- 
nects them with much. of the important litigation tried in the courts of this part 
o the province. Aside from his practice he has large timber holdings on the 
coast, together with fruit ranches at Summerland, British Columbia, and farm 
lands on the prairie. 



410 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

While in Dawson Mr. Woodworth decided that he would do his utmost 
upon coming to Vancouver to prevent the liberal party from getting into power 
in British Columbia and following his arrival here he immediately became a 
factor in shaping the political situation, of which he secured full control. In 
1906 he was made president of the Vancouver Conservative Club and filled that 
position for two years, following which time he served a like period as president 
of the Provincial Conservative Association. When he was chosen president of 
the former they had ten officers, less than one hundred members and no ward 
organization. When he retired two years later they had one hundred and forty- 
one ward officers, six ward associations and over one thousand members. In 
1908 Mr. Woodworth organized the Provincial Conservative Association and the 
constitutions of both societies, in all essentials, remain exactly as when he made 
them. Since Mr. Woodworth was elected president of the Vancouver Conserv- 
ative Club there has never been a liberal elected to a city office, and the con- 
servative organization has been made so substantial that the party has been 
victorious throughout the province. To his political service Mr. Woodworth has 
brought powers of organization, combined with executive ability. He has made 
a close study of the vital problems and questions of the day and is ever ready 
to support these by intelligent, clear and convincing argument. 

In Calgary, on the 26th of June, 1902, Mr. Woodworth was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Alberta Beatrice Hart, a native of Cape Breton. They have five 
children, Sydney Michael, Charles Albert, Jessie Hart, Susan Dorothy and Mar- 
garet Evelyn. Mr. Woodworth belongs to the Terminal City Club and in the 
midst of his manifold professional and political interests is appreciative of the 
social amenities of life, and is well known to a large circle of warm friends. 
He belongs to the Kitsilano Baptist church, and something of his activity in 
religious work is indicated in the fact that he is vice president of the Provincial 
Baptist Association. Any cause with which he is allied finds him an earnest, 
zealous, active worker. Following his removal to the north, when Dawson was 
yet in a comparatively formative stage, he manifested public-spirited interest in 
her welfare that resulted in tangible effort for her progress and improvement. 
Since coming to Vancouver a spirit of fearlessness and loyalty has made him a 
leader in political circles and his opinions count for much in every line of activ- 
ity in which he is engaged. 



JOHN GATLEY. 

John Gatley, living retired in Port Coquitlam, was born in Cheshire, Eng- 
land, April 4, 1849, and is a son of Robert and Martha Gatley, natives of that 
section, where the father engaged in farming and in work at the wheelwright's 
trade. In the acquirement of an education John Gatley attended public school 
in Cheshire and after laying aside his books at an early age was apprenticed to 
a carpenter, learning and following the carpenter's trade for a number of years. 
He is in all essential respects a self-made man for his father died when he was 
still very young. The independence and self-reliance developed in him by com- 
ing thus in contact with the responsibilities of life remain a dominating influence 
in his character to the present time and form the basis of the substantial success 
which he has achieved. 

In Cheshire, England, in 1875, Mr. Gatley married Miss Jane E. Fletcher and 
her death occurred in 1881. Because of his deep sorrow at this loss he came 
two years later to Canada and settled in Manitoba, where he remained until 1885. 
In that year he became connected with an industrial school as instructor in the 
carpenter's trade, holding this position for a number of years and filling it in a 
creditable and able manner. In 1894 he arrived in Vancouver and then went 
on with the gold seekers to the Yukon Territory, arriving in Alaska on June 
14, 1897. He returned in 1901 and located at Pitt Meadows and he has remained 




JOHN GATLEY 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 413 

a resident of this part of the province since that time. Foreseeing the develop- 
ment of the locality, he purchased a great deal of property here and the invest- 
ment has proven extremely fortunate, bringing him an income on which he is 
able to live retired, resting after the labors of a long, useful and active life. 

Mr. Gatley is a member of the Church of England and belongs to the Inde- 
pendent Order of Foresters. In all matters of citizenship he is eminently loyal 
and public-spirited, interested in the development of this section and eager to 
do his part in promoting its advancement and growth. His life has been one of 
genuine usefulness and his retirement rewards many years of earnest and faithful 
labor. 



DAVID W. BRAY, JK. 

There is no citizen in New Westminster more widely known or more prom- 
inent than David W. Bray, Jr., owner of the City Theater, which house he 
opened in June, 1902, and which already has become one of the best patronized 
pleasure resorts in the city. Mr. Bray is a native of Granby, Quebec, born 
April 8, 1870, a son of David W. and Elizabeth (Carty) Bray, both natives of 
that province. They came from Richmond, Quebec, to British Columbia, about 
1889, locating in New Westminster, where both are now living. During his 
active life the father was well known as a contractor and builder, but is now 
living retired. He participated in the Fenian raid and in recognition of his 
valuable service received a medal as well as a pension. 

David W. Bray, Jr., received his education in the public schools of Rich- 
mond, Quebec, and upon laying aside his text-books learned the carpenter's 
trade and for ten years was identified with that work and building. He entered 
upon his apprenticeship when about sixteen years of age. In New Westminster 
he became connected with the show business upon the building of the New 
Westminster Opera House, with which institution he was connected as stage 
carpenter for two years. Subsequently he secured the lease of that house. In 
1908 he engaged in the picture show business, establishing the Edison Theater 
in partnership with F. L. Kerr. In June, 1912, he sold his interest in this con- 
cern and opened the City Theater, of which he is now proprietor. His long and 
varied experience in the theatrical business and his ready understanding of local 
conditions enable him to put on such entertainments as meet with the greatest 
popular favor and the success of the new house is already assured. 

Mr. Bray in religious matters affiliates with the Church of England and 
fraternally is a popular member of the Eagles. He is one of the most public- 
spirited citizens of New Westminster, foremost in all matters of improvement 
and ever ready to do his share along lines of advancement and progress. He 
endeavors along business lines not only to promote entertaining spectacles but 
sees to their educational value and maintains views in regard to the stage which 
ire most highly commendable. 



JOHN MUSGRAVE. 

John Musgrave, who has worked his way steadily upward in the business 
world to a position of prominence and prosperity, has since the spring of 1909 
been the junior member of the firm of Swinerton & Musgrave, real-estate and 
inancial agents, with offices at the Winch building, at No. 640 Fort street, Vic- 
'.oria, constituting one of the most extensive and important concerns of its kind 
n the city. The period of his residence in British Columbia covers almost three 
decades. His birth occurred in Argentine Republic, South America, on the 2d of 
Tune, 1868, his parents being Edward and Anastasia Letitia (Gee) Musgrave, 
mtives of County Waterford, Ireland. His parental grandfather was Sir Rich- 
ard Musgrave, baronet. Edward Musgrave, a younger son, went to Argentine 



414 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

Republic in early manhood and there engaged in ranching on an extensive scale, 
devoting his attention to the raising of stock. In 1874 he returned 1 *! his native 
land, residing in Dublin until 1885, in which year he brought his family to British 
Columbia. Here he purchased a large sheep ranch of seven thousand acres on 
Salt Spring island, about forty miles from Victoria, operating the same success- 
fully until 1892. In that year he established his home in the Cowichan district 
on Vancouver island, purchased a farm and devoted his attention to its oper- 
ation until called to his final rest in January, 1911. He had been a resident of 
this province for a quarter of a century and had won an enviable reputation as 
a substantial and esteemed citizen. The demise of his wife occurred in the year 
1902. 

John Musgrave spent the first six years of his life in Argentina and was then 
brought by his parents to Dublin, Ireland, obtaining his education in the Corrig 
School near that city, at Kingston. In 1885, when a youth of seventeen, he came 
to British Columbia with his parents, five brothers and two sisters, the family 
residing on a ranch on Salt Spring island until 1892, when they took up their 
abode on a farm in the Cowichan district. John Musgrave carried on agricultural 
pursuits in association with his father until 1902, when, feeling that his oppor- 
tunities in that direction were but limited, he tame to Victoria and immediately 
embarked in the real-estate business. Despite the fact that he entered the busi- 
ness at an exceptionally quiet period, success attended his efforts from the start, 
though his only assets were a good name and the benefits of excellent home train- 
ing and environment. He soon mastered the details and intricacies of real-estate 
operations and built up a very formidable clientele. In the spring of 1909 he 
bought out the interest of B. S. Oddy of the firm of Swinerton & Oddy, real- 
estate and financial agents, a well known and established concern. From that 
time to the present he has remained a member of the firm of Swinerton & 
Musgrave, which has grown to be one of the most extensive and important of 
its character in Victoria. In addition to their very extensive real-estate business 
they manage many large estates and represent much English capital. Their real- 
estate transactions extend only to the highest class residential and inside prop- 
erty. Mr. Musgrave is also a director in the Esquimalt Water Works Company, 
Limited, but devotes most of his time to the development and management of 
the business of the firm of Swinerton & Musgrave, which has been growing 
rapidly year by year. The remarkable success which he has enjoyed may be 
directly attributed to his natural qualifications, perserverance and close applica- 
tion to business. 

Mr. Musgrave belongs to the Union Club of Victoria and is likewise a mem- 
ber and commodore of the Royal Victoria Yacht Club, in the affairs of which 
he has been decidedly active and interested and which owes its remarkable suc- 
cess in large measure to his efforts. He is also very fond of hunting and golf. 
In religious faith he is an Anglican. He has attained an enviable position in 
business circles, and the salient characteristics of his manhood are such as have 
brought him the warm regard of those with whom he has been otherwise asso- 
ciated. 



DONALD EDWARD McKAY. 

Donald Edward McKay is the owner of an attractive farm of forty acres 
located on the River road, Lulu island, where for several years he has been 
successfully engaged in general agricultural pursuits. He was born in Oxford 
county, Ontario, on the 2ist of February, 1866, and is a son of John and Helen 
(McKay) McKay, both of whom are now deceased. They located in Oxford 




DOXALD E. McKAY 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 417 

county in 1835, and there the father subsequently filed on a homestead, devot- 
ing the remainder of his active life to its further improvement and cultivation. 

The first eighteen years in the life of Donald Edward McKay were passed 
in his native county, his education being acquired in the local schools. The son 
of a farmer, his energies were early directed along agricultural lines, and before 
attaining his majority he was thoroughly familiar with the practical methods 
of tilling the fields and caring for the crops. In 1884, he left home and started 
out to make his own way in the world, coming direct to British Columbia. He 
first located at Steveston and there he subsequently leased some land from 
Monah Steves, who first settled that portion of the island. He engaged in farm- 
ing for four years, but at the expiration of that time turned his attention to 
commercial activities and coming to Eburne engaged in the mercantile business. 
He conducted this enterprise for eleven years, meeting with a fair measure of 
success. Deeming it advisable, owing to the state of his health, to seek outdoor 
employment, he later disposed of his store and resumed his agricultural pursuits. 
He first rented one hundred and twenty acres of land and after cultivating this 
for several years, purchased forty acres on the island and has ever since been 
engaged in its further development. Mr. McKay has exercised intelligence and 
good judgment in the operation of his farm, which is one of the most attractive 
and valuable on the island. 

At Mount Pleasant Mr. McKay was married to Miss Letitia Draney, a 
daughter of George and Helen Draney of Goderich, Ontario, who later removed 
to Bella Coola, British Columbia, where the father still resides. The mother is 
deceased. To Mr. and Mrs. McKay have been born four children, as follows : 
Pearl, who is fourteen years of age ; Irene, who has passed the tenth anniversary 
of her birth; Donald, who is eight years old; and Gordon, who has passed his 
second birthday. 

Mr. and Mrs. McKay are members of the Presbyterian church, and for many 
years he was affiliated with the Odd Fellows fraternity. He has for some time 
oeen president of the Richmond Agricultural and Industrial Association and 
nolds the same office in connection with the Richmond Dairy & Produce Com- 
pany and the Holstein-Friesian Association. He is a practical man of systematic 
nethods and progressive ideas as is evidenced by the general appearance and 
:ondition of his farm, which stands in proof of the exercise of capable man- 
igement and good judgment in its operation. 



HENRY WALKER SANGSTER. 

It is significant of the trend of modern times that more and more important 
business affairs are entrusted to young men, who are proving their ability by 
ihe excellent results which they obtain by the progressive policies which they 
advocate. Mr. Sangster is one of the prominent men of this class in New 
Westminster and has done much by his quick rise to justify the modern idea. A 
native of the United States, he was born in Argyle, Minnesota, on February 26, 
886, and was brought to British Columbia by his parents when but two years 
of age. They are Alexander and Elizabeth Davidson (Christie) Sangster, 
natives of Scotland, the former going to the United States as a young man, 
successfully engaging in farming. In 1888 the father removed to British 
Columbia, locating in Victoria, and in 1895 came to New Westminster. Here 
both parents still make their home, the father holding the position of miller 
^vith the Brachman-Ker Milling Company. They are highly respected and 
< steemed and both are widely and favorably known in this city. 

Henry W. Sangster in the acquirement of his education attended the public 
schools in Victoria and New Westminster, being enrolled as a high-school stu- 
dent in the latter city. Ever since entering upon his career he has made for- 
ward steps in the right direction, giving proof of his natural business ability and 



418 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

his capacity of readily judging business conditions and situations. Laying aside 
his text-books at the age of fourteen, he was connected with a dry-goods house 
until eighteen years of age, taking three years of high school at the end of that 
period. Upon completing his school course, he worked for a year and a half in< 
lumber mills at Chemainus in Vancouver, at the end of which time he became 
associated with the Brachman-Ker Milling Company, in whose service he has 
since risen rapidly to an important position. He is acquainted not only with the 
details of the work under his charge but has a ready understanding of all the 
transactions in which his firm engages, and enjoys the full confidence and good- 
will of the officers of the organization. Capable, earnest and conscientious, he 
gives his undivided attention to his duties, and' the position he holds in the mill-, 
ing company is but the natural result of well applied energy, experience and. 
business understanding. 

The religious faith of Mr. Sangster is that of the Baptist church, and fra- 
ternally he is a member of Amity Lodge No. 27, of New Westminster, I. O. 
O. F., serving since July i, 1912, as financial secretary of the local organization. 
He is thoroughly in accord with the brotherly principles this order stands for and. 
professes them in all his life's actions. Mr. Sangster has also to his credit a mili- 
tary record covering a period of eleven years. Five years of that time he was 
associated with the Sixth Regiment, Duke of Connaught's Own Rifles, and for the 
past three years has been part of the One Hundred Fourth Regiment o-f New 
Westminster. In March, 1912, he received in that organization his commission, 
of lieutenant. Mr. Sangster finds recreation from his onerous and confining 
business duties by outdoor exercises, along which line he gives preference to 
lacrosse, having been officially connected with the New Westminster Senior 
Amateur Lacrosse Club since 1911 in the capacity of secretary-treasurer. Al- 
though yet a young man, Mr. Sangster has already made himself felt in business 
life in New Westminster and a bright future may be prophesied for him. It is 
to just such young men as he that the community looks forward for its further 
development, and that Mr. Sangster ever conscientiously executes his citizen's 
duties and will do so in the future to the advancement and upbuilding of this city, 
there can be no doubt. He has always a cheery word for his friends or a pleasant 
smile, yet there is in him a depth of character that goes beyond mere sociability 
and no doubt will lead him into still more important relations. 



JOHN McKEE. 

John McKee, one of the distinguished citizens of Ladner, is now living retired' 
on his beautiful homestead, "Rosetta." For many years he was actively con- 
nected with the agricultural development of this section and was also for some 
time prominent in commercial life, being engaged in the meat and farm pro- 
duce business in Ladner. Mr. McKee is a native of Ireland, where his birth occur- 
red in County Down on the I7th of June, 1855. His parents were John and 
Margaret McKee, who in the fall of 1874, with their family, came to British 
Columbia via San Francisco, spending the winter of that year at Sapperton. In 
the spring the family came to East Delta, purchasing land in what is now known 
as the McKee Settlement, and there engaged in farming. The father died in 
1900 and the mother in 1911. More extended mention is made of the father and 
mother on other pages of this work. 

The education of John McKee was acquired in the schools of County Down 
and Belfast. When nineteen years of age he accompanied his parents on their 
emigration to the American continent, and after they had located their farm 
in the spring of 1875 he assisted his father in the cultivation of the land. At 
that time this section of the country was during a large portion of the year under 
water, which made it practically impossible to obtain results during the remainder 
of the time, the land being subject to inundation from the salt water of Boundary 




JOHN McKEE 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 421 

1 ay. '1 he farmers were compelled during that time to wear rubber boots all the 
j ear around and the horses had to be shod with wooden shoes to keep them 
from sinking into the marshy places while being put to the cultivation of the land. 
The McKees, father and sons, immediately began the construction of dykes after 
t icy had located their farm, and, when they had a small tract so protected against 
i mndation, they began to prepare it for planting. Thus they gradually succeeded 
i i placing their entire holding under cultivation. In the earlier years their crops 
vere naturally small, but as they extended their operations, harvests were more 
remunerative and returns more gratifying. Air. McKee 'also assisted with the 
luilding of the residence and barns, being associated with his father in the opera- 
t on of the farm until the property came into his possession. He withdrew from 
a:tive farming in 1889 and for nearly ten years thereafter engaged in the meat 
a id general produce business with gratifying success. In 1912 he rebuilt the old 
home, "Rosetta,"' providing it with all modern conveniences and making other 
improvements. He continued to reside there, enjoying the leisure which his for- 
mer labors have made possible, and without doubt finds his greatest: satisfaction 
in the thought that his attainments are the well merited reward of his own efforts. 

In October, 1903, Mr. McKee was united in marriage to Miss Margaret Lilla 
McNeill, a daughter of William and Margaret McNeill, of Dublin, Ireland, and 
granddaughter of Daniel and Mary (Peele) Dewar, the former of Perthshire, 
Scotland, and the latter of Durham, England. A brother of Mrs. McKee is Judge 
McNeill, of Macleod, Alberta. 

Mr. McKee has always taken an active interest in local politics and has been 
a member of the municipal council practically since Delta municipality was estab- 
liihed. He also has the distinction of having served as reeve for three terms. At 
present he is discharging the duties of magistrate of Delta municipality and has 
a so been honored by appointment to the position of justice of the peace, filling 
b->th offices in a most creditable manner. He is a charter member of the Delta 
Board of Trade. Mr. McKee takes a deep interest in religious and educational 
n atters, serving at present as elder in the Presbyterian church and member of the 
board of Westminster Hall Theological College, Vancouver. He is one of the 
foremost citizens of his district, worthily perpetuating a name which has long 
b<'en honored on this side of the Atlantic as well as in the Emerald isle. 



ANGUS EVAN McCOLL. 

Angus Evan McColl, barrister and solicitor, practicing as a member of the 
firm of Corbould, Grant & McColl, of New Westminster, his native city, came 
01 ancestry honorable and distinguished, and is fortunate in that his lines of life 
h; ve been cast in harmony therewith. In person, in talents and in character 
hi is a worthy scion of his race and the name of McColl has figured prominently 
in connection with the history of the legal profession in New Westminster and 
the northwest. His birth occurred in this city, August 2, 1888, his parents being 
Aigus John and Helen Janet (Barlow) McColl. The father was chief justice of 
B "itish Columbia for a number of years and extended mention of him is made 
el ;ewhere in this work. 

The son was accorded liberal educational privileges. He attended St. Andrews' 
College at Toronto and the Columbian College at New Westminster, where he 
p; ssed the senior matriculation and began the study of law in September, 1906, 
in the office of the law firm of Corbould & Grant. His preliminary course of 
reading was thorough and he was called to the bar in January, 1912. He then 
ei tered into partnership with his preceptors and is now an active member of the 
fiim of Corbould, Grant & McColl. 

Mr. McColl votes with the conservative party and he holds membership with 
the Native Sons of British Columbia. His religious faith is that of the Anglican 
church. He is well known in the city where he makes his home and the fact that 



422 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

many of his stanchest friends are those who have been acquainted with him 
from his boyhood indicates that his has been an upright, useful, honorable life. 
He is yet a young man with his life work probably largely before him, and 
owing to his native ability and laudable ambition it is not difficult for one to 
predict for him success. 



SAMUEL DAWE. 

Samuel Dawe, who as manager of the Westminster Marine Realty, builders 
of boats and scows, occupies a foremost position in shipbuilding circles of New 
Westminster and British Columbia, is a man who has grown up amid sur- 
roundings which have connected him with the sea and seafaring life from a 
tender age. He was born in Newfoundland on May 25, 1860, a son of Samuel 
and Mary (Dawe) Dawe, natives of Newfoundland, who followed our sub- 
ject to British Columbia about five years after he had made settlement here. 
The father was a seafaring man and for over forty years was master of his 
vessel. He died in New Westminster about 1905, his wife surviving him for 
about two years. 

Samuel Dawe was reared at home and at the early age of twelve years went 
aboard his father's vessel and from that time until 1890 was identified with the 
sea. At the early age of nineteen he was made captain of his vessel but in 
1890 decided to give up this occupation and came to New Westminster, British 
Columbia. In his native land he had spent many of the winter months in the 
shipyards, as the boats were laid up during the winter, and after coming to 
New Westminster he engaged in shipbuilding, with which occupation he has 
since been connected. In 1908 he organized, with four other gentlemen, the 
Westminster Marine Realty, becoming manager of the firm, which is one of 
the leading boatbuilding enterprises of the province. In the few years of its 
existence the business has grown by leaps and bounds and its success must be 
largely ascribed to the ability of Mr. Dawe. 

In 1890 Samuel Dawe was united in marriage to Miss Emma Dawe, a 
native of Newfoundland, who came to New Westminster a few months after 
the arrival of her husband. Of this union were born six children: Selina F. ; 
Arthur W., who holds a position as clerk in the Royal Bank of Canada ; and 
Ernest L., Charles S., Eveline M. and Harold J. F. All of the children are 
yet at home. Politically Mr. Dawe is a conservative and fraternally is con- 
nected with Royal Lodge, No. 6, Knights of Pythias, and Lodge No. 1150, 
Loyal Orangemen. He is one of the successful men of New Westminster and 
on the high road to prosperity. As manager of an important commercial enter- 
prise he takes part in all movements undertaken to promote trade expansion 
and is always glad and willing to contribute his share in time and money toward 
such a purpose. 



WILLIAM JAMES McMANUS. 

In life insurance circles of Vancouver William James McManus has taken 
a prominent place as manager of the life insurance department of the Canadian 
Financiers, Limited, his vast experience and profound knowledge in this line en- 
abling him to intelligently manage an important branch of the great corporation 
that he represents. His work has, ever since he has taken charge, been of vast 
benefit to the concern. Although he now gives his time almost exclusively to his 
business, he has been for many years connected with military affairs, having 
always been deeply interested in such matters, which have been a tradition in 
his family. The son of a soldier, he himself has been connected with military 




SAMUEL DAWK 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 425 

] fe since 1887 and during his long career in Ontario and British Columbia has 
( one much toward upbuilding bugle bands, having practically created these in- 
stitutions in this province. Of late he has been in command of H Company, 
t'.ie Duke of Connaught's Own Rifles. 

William J. McManus was born in Kilkenny, Ireland, April 9, 1870, a son of 
Daniel and Jane (Bruce-Harwood) McManus, the former of whom was con- 
i ected with the English army since twelve years of age. He was later band- 
r laster of the famous Essex Regiment and was a veteran of the Crimean war. 
He went through that entire conflict, taking part in the campaigns of Alma, 
Inkerman and Sebastopol. He received from his queen the long-service medal 
(granted for twenty years of consecutive service) and also had the Turkish 
medal. After coming to Canada he took over the bandmastership of the Nine- 
teenth Regiment at St. Catharines, Ontario, and retired several years prior to 
I is death. 

William J. McManus received his education in the schools of Ireland, Scot- 
l;.nd and England and came to Canada in 1892, locating in St. Catharines, On- 
tario. He was variously engaged in that and in other cities in Canada and the 
United States until 1901, when he became associated with the York County 
I oan & Savings Company, Limited, of Toronto as selling agent. He later was 
in charge of the branch office of this company at Belleville, Ontario, and also 
hid charge of the Montreal and Winnipeg offices and of the business in the 
western provinces. He later became inspector of the life insurance and loan 
.departments for the Dominion and so continued until the company liquidated in 
I K>6. In 1907 he came to Vancouver, British Columbia, and engaged in the 
life-insurance business, representing various companies until 1910, when he be- 
came manager of the casualty and life insurance department of the Canadian 
Financiers, Limited. His wide and varied experience and deep knowledge of 
ii surance and financial interests serve him in good stead in his present impor- 
ts nt position and he has demonstrated his ability to handle this part of the busi- 
ness as is shown by a constant and healthy increase in the insurance handled 
annually. He is considered an authority along his line and his knowledge is 
p -oving a valuable asset to the financial institution which he represents. 

Military life has always had a deep attraction for Mr. McManus, which 
is but natural for one grown up in a military atmosphere. Following in the 
footsteps of his father, he has devoted much of his time to the army, and army 
li r e has been dear to him ever since he was a boy. He began his military career 
ir the volunteer service in 1887 and was at Aldershot, taking part in Queen 
Victoria's Golden Jubilee as a member of the Essex Rifles, during which cele- 
biation he was bugler to General (later Field-marshal) Sir Evelyn Wood. He 
then went to Woolidge and then to Colchester, returning from there to Wool- 
icige and was lastly stationed at Worley, taking in each of these places a course 
01 instruction each more advanced than that taken at the preceding place. He 
remained at Worley in the Volunteer service until he came to Canada in 1892. 
He obtained the bugle major's certificate, the sergeant drummer's certificate and 
the sergeant trumpeter's certificate. On coming to Canada he became bugle 
tnijor of the Ninetenth Regiment at St. Catharines, Ontario. On his removal 
to Belleville, that province, he organized and trained the bugle band of the Fif- 
teenth Regiment, Argyle Light Infantry, and was bugle major of the same 
until December, 1902, when he was commissioned second lieutenant of the Sixth 
Company of that regiment. He took the bugle band of the Fifteenth Regiment 
to the Pan-American Exposition at Buffalo in 1901. Their musical efforts were 
the sensation of the day and to Mr. McManus is due much credit for their 
accomplishments. Mr. McManus also took the bugle band of the Fifteenth Reg- 
iment to the military review on the occasion of the visit to Canada of their Royal 
Highnesses the Duke and Duchess of Cornwall and York, the present king and 
qi een, and had command of the massed bands on that occason. On the as- 
sumption of his business duties which compelled him to discontinue his residence 
in Belleville, he continued as an officer of the Fifteenth Regiment and was 

Vol. IV 1 5 



426 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

presented by his fellow officers with a fine timepiece, suitably engraved in com- 
memoration of his work done in establishing and perfecting the bugle band. On 
coming to Vancouver he became first lieutenant of the Sixth Regiment, Duke 
of Connaught's Own Rifles, and at the present time is in command of H Com- 
pany. He organized and trained the bugle band of the Sixth Regiment which 
secured an engagement of one week at the Alaska- Yukon Exposition at Seattle, 
Washington, in 1906. The band, however, became so popular that it was re- 
engaged for a second week, this being the only time on record that a bugle 
band had been engaged as a feature at a world's exposition. During this time 
the band of the Sixth played with Liberati's band. During this exposition Mr. 
McManus in conjunction with Dr. Elliot Rowe was largely responsible for 
making the 1st of July Canadian Day such a big success, an occasion which 
brought Vancouver strongly before the eyes of the public. This proved of dis- 
tinct benefit to the city, advertising its advantages and resources in an effective 
way. Mr. McManus has organized bugle bands in various other cities of the 
Dominion, including Halifax, Montreal, Winnipeg, Toronto and London. The 
founding of all the bugle bands of Vancouver is due to him either directly or 
to instructors who receive their training from him. He has also done valuable 
work in organizing numerous boys' brigade bugle bands. 

Mr. McManus was united in marriage to Miss Hattie Benn, a daughter of 
Charles Benn, of Napanee, Ontario, the latter a carriage builder of that city, 
and they have one daughter, Margaret Ethel, who was born in Vancouver. Mr. 
McManus is a conservative in politics. Fraternally he is a Mason, holding mem- 
bership in Moria Lodge, No. n, A. F. & A. M. His religious belief is that of 
the Presbyterian church, being a member of St. Andrew's. Public-spirited and 
progressive, Mr. McManus takes a deep interest in the welfare of the city and 
is ever ready to support public measures of value. He is as enthusiastic and 
loyal in promulgating the military spirit as he is in his business affairs, recogniz- 
ing the important part which volunteer forces may have to play some day in 
preserving the prestige and the unity of the empire. 



THOMAS NEIL PHILLIPS. 

A young man of energy, resource and capacity, Thomas Neil Phillips has 
made these qualities the basis of an enviable success, bringing him to a promi- 
nent position in business circles of Vancouver, where he is well known as vice 
president of Timms, Phillips & Company, Ltd., lumber brokers. He has had 
experience in every branch of the lumber industry, having worked in logging 
camps and in manufacturing houses and offices, learning the administrative 
branches of the business as manager of an important concern and mastering 
everything connected with lumbering and lumber manufacturing in principle 
and detail. He has based 'his success upon experience and ability and is num- 
bered today among the young men of enterprise and substantial worth in Van- 
couver. He was born in Kenora, Ontario, May 22, 1883, and is a son of James 
and Mecaline (Bourasse) Phillips, the former a native of Dunblane, Scotland, 
who came to Canada as a young man and became identified with railroad con- 
struction work. He continued at this line of occupation until his retirement 
fifteen years before his death, which occurred in 1904. He gained well deserved 
success in his chosen field of labor and was perhaps one of the foremost con- 
tractors on stone and masonry work and railroad bridge building in the Dominion. 

Thomas Neil Phillips acquired his early education in public schools of Kenora, 
Ontario, and afterward entered McGill University in Montreal, attending that 
institution for two years. At the end of that time he entered the employ of D. 
L. Mather and in his interests worked in the logging camps at Eagle lake, 
Ontario. After one year he resigned this position and became connected with 
the Rat Portage Lumber Company at Kenora, going first into a sawmill and 




THOMAS X. PHILLIPS 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 429 

then into the office, thus gaining experience in two important branches of the 
work. He remained with the Rat Portage Lumber Company until 1907 and 
n that year came to Vancouver as manager of the Burley Lumber Company, 
icting in that capacity until 1912, when he assumed the management of the sales 
department of the Imperial Timber & Trading Company of Vancouver. He 
:ontinued in charge of this until January i, 1913, when in association with Her- 
>ert Timms and D. M. Colquhoun he assisted in the organization of Timms, 
Phillips & Company, Ltd., of which he became vice president, an office which 
ic has creditably and ably filled since that time. In the one year of its existence 
his company has secured a large and important trade and controls an extensive 
umber brokerage business, the territory extending to all parts of Canada. Mr. 
r'hillips' energy, resourcefulness and business ability and his detailed knowledge 
>f the lumber business have been helpful factors in the growth of the institu- 
ion which is now one of the largest and most important of its kind in this part 
of the Dominion. His associates are all young men and they manage the busi- 
ness along modern and progressive lines, recognizing that the present-day busi- 
ness world demands aggressiveness, keen insight, courage and resourcefulness. 

On the 4th of January, 1911, Mr. Phillips was united in marriage to Miss 
Ella Gertrude Kilgour, a daughter of James Kilgour, of Hamilton, Ontario. Mr. 
; nd Mrs. Phillips have become the parents of a daughter, Marjorie M. Mr. 
Phillips was one of the foremost hockey players in Canada and his ability was 
1 nown and recognized throughout the entire Dominion. He was a member 
i f the Montreal team when they held the Stanley cup, emblematic of the world's 
championship in this sport, and he played with the Toronto Marlboros when 
they were champions of the Ontario Hockey Association. He captained the 
Kenora Thistles when that team held the Stanley cup, has played with the 
Ottawa team, and his ability along this line makes his name well known in athletic 
circles throughout Canada. Fraternally he is connected with Mount Hermon 
] x)dge, No. 7, A. F. & A. M., and he belongs to the Concatenated Order of Hoo- 
Hoos. His political allegiance is given to the liberal party, and his religious 
A iews are in accord with the doctrines of the Presbyterian church. Mr. Phillips 
i> still a young man, but has already attained a distinct and substantial success 
and his future, judged by his past, will be marked by continuous progress and 
i nportant accomplishments. 



FRANCIS VERE AGNEW, M. D. 

The advanced and enlightened methods of medical practice which have practi- 
c illy revolutionized the profession in the past have found an able exponent in Dr. 
Prancis Vere Agnew, who since 1912 has been numbered among the prominent 
a ad progressive physicians and surgeons in New Westminster, his ability being 
e/idenced in a large and increasing patronage. He was born in Belfast, Ireland, 
en the 2ist of November, 1886, and is a son of Robert and Elizabeth (Gregg) 
Agnew, the former a native of Ballymena, County Antrim, and the latter of 
I.elfast, Ireland. The father died in London, England, while on a journey, and 
t ic mother passed away in Bangor. The former had for many years held the 
office of general inspector of the local government board of Ireland in Belfast 
and was a man of considerable power and influence in political circles. 

Dr. Francis Vere Agnew was reared at home, acquiring his early education 
in Clanrye School in Belfast and at Leadhall House, Harrogate, England. He 
was afterward a student in Cheltenham College at Cheltenham, England, and in 
1906 entered the medical department of the Dublin University, from which he 
vas graduated in the class of 1912, after a six years' course. He received the 
degrees of M. D., M.. B., B. Ch. and B. A. O., having in 1907 been given the 
degree of B. A. from the.same institution. Following his graduation Dr. Agnew 
came to British Columbia and settled in New Westminster, where he opened 



430 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

offices in the Bank of Commerce building, and has since been in the active practice 
of his profession. Always a close and earnest student of underlying medical 
principles, he is in touch with the most advanced thought of his profession and 
is today one of its most able representatives in New Westminster. Although he 
has been here but a short time he has already secured a large and representative 
patronage and this is steadily increasing as his ability and skill become more 
widely known. 

In July, 1911, Dr. Agnew married Mrs. Aumond, a resident of Vancouver but 
a native of Ireland. She was in her maidenhood Miss Maida Lloyd-Hamilton 
and after her first marriage lived in Vancouver, Dr. Agnew making his first 
journey to British Columbia in 1911 in order to wed her. To their union have 
been born two sons, Cecil John and Desmond Robert, twins. Mrs. Agnew is a 
member of the Church of England and the Doctor attends services and is a 
liberal contributor to the support of the church. In professional circles he is 
honored and esteemed for his excellent professional record and his close conform- 
ity to high standards of medical ethics and wherever he is known his excellent 
qualities and genuine personal worth have gained him wide and well deserved 
popularity. 



CYRIL TWEEDALE. 

A man who has made it the purpose of his life to make his native talents 
subserve the demands which the conditions of society impose at the present 
day and in so doing has won prominence in business, distinction in military circles 
and a position of power in public life is Cyril Tweedale, founder and managing 
director of the London and Western Canada Investment Company, Limited. 
Although he is still a young man a mature judgment has at all time characterized 
his actions so that he stands today an excellent representative of all that is best 
and most progressive in modern citizenship. He was born in Lancashire, 
England, June 23, iSSi, and is a son of Samuel J. and Fanny (Aitken) 
Tweedale, the former a member of an old county family and himself one of the 
leading country gentlemen of his native shire. His wife was a daughter of Cap- 
tain Thomas Aitken, J. P., senior county magistrate of Lancashire. 

Cyril Tweedale acquired his education in the Portsmouth grammar school 
and at King's College University, after which in 1896 he entered the London & 
Westminster Bank in London, with which he remained connected until 1903. In 
that year he came to Canada and located in Lloydminster, Saskatchewan, where 
he engaged in ranching for three years, coming to Vancouver at the end of that 
period. In this city he entered the employ of Richards & Akroyd, insurance, 
financial and real-estate agents, and one of the oldest and most prominent firms 
in that line of work in Vancouver. Mr. Tweedale's advancement was rapid. He 
rose through the various departments of the business, becoming recognized as an 
able, far-sighted and progressive man, and was finally made manager of the real- 
estate department, acting in that capacity until 1910. He then determined to en- 
gage in business for himself and accordingly established an independent insurance 
and real-estate concern which he operated for a short time, eventually organizing 
the London and Western Canada Investment Company, Limited, which took 
over his former business. This concern was capitalized at two hundred and 
fifty thousand dollars and Mr. Tweedale was appointed managing director, a 
position which he fills at the present time. The London and Western Canada 
Investment Company was formed with the purpose of carrying on the business 
of financial agents, lending money on mortgage and other security on landed 
property, acting as agents for insurance companies and interesting capital for 
investment in the best class of real estate, either vacant or revenue producing, and 
to take over and carry on the established business and connection of C. Tweedale, 
notary public, financial and insurance agent, who has the principal interest in the 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 431 

roncern. Mr. Tweedale has had long experience in the financial business, includ- 
ing insurance and conveyancing, and, having been a resident of the country for the 
ast ten years, is in every way well qualified to give expert advice in all kinds of 
investments, particularly revenue producing real estate in the inside business 
.- action and first-class residential apartment house districts. The company is 
making a special feature of investing money for clients living in England and in 
i ither parts of the world and is prepared on behalf of investors to purchase vacant 
liusiness property and have erected thereon for clients blocks of offices, stores 
; nd apartment houses and it will complete the investment by finding the tenants, 
collecting the rents, etc. The directorate of this company is comprised of men 
df experience in the financial and commercial world and its affairs are conducted 
; long safe, reliable and conservative lines. The energy with which Mr. Tweedale 
1 as applied himself to the direction of the concern, his enterprising spirit and his 
lorce of personality have been important elements in its rapid expansion and are 
( onsidered today among its most valuable assets. 

On the i8th of September, 1906, Mr. Tweedale was united in marriage to Miss 
< lara Wood, a daughter of William 11. Wood, of Montreal, and they have 
t iree children, Phyllis, Cyril Dudley and Esme Josephine. 

A public-spirited and progressive citizen, Mr. Tweedale has always taken an 
active interest in community affairs and has evidenced that hearty cooperation in 
j regressive movements and that eagerness to promote the permanent interests 
c f the city which are embodied in the truest idea of public service. He belongs 
t > the Vancouver Horse Show Association and is a member and director of the 
I'.ritish (Isles) Public Schools Association. He belongs also to the Canadian 
I [ighway Association and the Progress Club of Vancouver and is at present acting 
as sub district intelligence officer for the district extending to Queen Charlotte's 
Sound. He is well known in military circles and is a qualified officer in the 
infantry, cavalry and corps of guides, holding four certificates. While in London 
hj served three years with the Civil Service Rifles and after coming to Canada 
was officer of the Brittania Rifles of Saskatchewan for the same period of time. 
I .e is at present officer commanding the Vancouver Troop, Corps of Guides, of 
Canada. Mr. Tweedale is a member of the Canadian Club, the Vancouver 
Royal Yacht Club, a director of the Vancouver Hunt Club and a member of the 
Vancouver Automobile Club and the Brockton Point Athletic Club, connections 
indicating something of the scope of his interests and his standing in social cir- 
c es. The period of his residence in Vancouver has brought him a wide acquaint- 
ance and his sterling personal qualities have won him high regard. A man of 
b -oad views, of varied interest, of modern standards and ideas, he has gained a 
h gh degree of success and laudable ambition prompting him to further effort, 
v\ill undoubtedly bring him continued progress and greater prominence. 



GEORGE EDWARD WINTER. 

George Edward Winter, chartered accountant, practicing his profession as a 
n ember of the firm of Riddle, Stead, Hodges & Winter, chartered accountants of 
Vancouver, Winnipeg and Montreal, was born in Prescott, Ontario, November 9, 
1875. He is a son of William Bottomley and Jane (McFarlane) Winter, the 
f < >rmer a representative of an old English family, who came to Canada at the age 
of twenty years, settling first in Montreal, and afterward in Prescott, Ontario. 
He married Jane McFarlane, a daughter of Francis McFarlane, of a highland 
Scotch family who came to Canada in 1842, and of Sara Browne, a daughter 
of an old north of Ireland family. 

George E. Winter pursued his studies in the public schools and high school 
at Prescott, later taking a commercial course at Ogdensburg, New York and 
afterward at Montreal. After engaging in several businesses in a clerical capac- 
ity, he went in 1896 to the West Indies, taking charge of the business manage- 
ment of a commission and fruit exporting house. He then went to Halifax and 



432 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

next to Montreal and later became accountant for the Gurney-Massey Company. 
In 1905 he became associated with Montreal and Toronto financial interests in 
the Alaska Central Railway Company, as its representative in the official capacity 
of assistant auditor and later auditor until the end of the year 1907. After 
spending some little time in public accounting work he became associated with 
his present firm in 1910. Mr. Winter has other business interests which are 
bringing to him substantial success. He is a member of the Institute of Char- 
tered Accountants of British Columbia and also of the Dominion Association of 
Chartered Accountants. 

On the 29th of June, 1905, at Victoria, British Columbia, Mr. Winter was 
united in marriage to Miss Edythe Anne Wilson, a daughter of Robert Wilson, 
of Montreal. Their children are Edythe Wilson and Wilson McFarlane. 

While residing in Montreal, Mr. Winter was an active member of the 
militia, belonging to the Third Field Battery of that city for three years. He 
was also active in the work of the Young Men's Christian Association, espe- 
cially in the physical department, being on many committees at different times 
in that department. He was secretary of Mount Royal Lodge, A. F. & A. M., 
in Montreal for two years and was also a member of Carnarvon Chapter there. 
He is a member of the Vancouver Board of Trade, the Progress Club, the Can- 
adian Club and other organizations. His religious faith is indicated in his 
membership in St. John's Presbyterian church. 



JAMES THOMPSON. 

Unqualified commendation is ever deserved by the man who through his 
own honest effort rises from an impecunious position to one of comparative 
affluence. Such a one is James Thompson, who arrived in British Columbia 
with a capital of fifty dollars, and now owns a farm of one hundred and twenty- 
five acres, free of encumbrance and valued at a thousand or more dollars per 
acre. He is a native of County Derry, Ireland, his birth having there occurred 
in the month of September, 1868, and a son of John and Jennie (Smith) Thomp- 
son. The parents passed their entire lives in the Emerald isle, where the father 
devoted his energies to agricultural pursuits. 

The education of James Thompson was acquired in his native land, where 
he passed the first thirteen years of his life. Laying aside his school books he 
then started out in the world to make his own way, coming to the American 
continent to seek his fortune. At Campbellford he joined a brother with whom 
he engaged in farming until he was twenty years of age, when he resolved to 
try his luck in British Columbia. He crossed the continent soon after the 
Canadian Pacific opened its lines to transportation, coming directly to Lulu island. 
Soon after his arrival he obtained work with a Mr. Mitchell, with whom he 
remained for six months. At the expiration of that time he entered the employ 
of a Mr. Shaw, remaining in his service for three years. His diligent habits 
and reliable methods brought him the offer of the management of the Milligan 
farm, which he accepted. It is comprised of six hundred and forty acres and for 
three years thereafter Mr. Thompson applied himself to supervising its operation. 
Subsequently he leased the property and engaged in diversified farming on his 
own account for twelve years. This undertaking proved to be so lucrative that 
he was then able to buy his present farm. During the intervening years he has 
worked systematically and tirelessly in his effort to develop his place. He has 
erected substantial buildings, introduced many modern conveniences including 
a fresh water system, and brought the fields under high cultivation, thus con- 
verting his land into one of the most attractive and valuable properties in that 
vicinity. 




MR. AND MRS. JAMES THOMPSON" 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 435 

For his wife Mr. Thompson chose Miss Esther Abercrombie, a daughter 
of John and Elizabeth Abercrombie, and to them have been born seven children : 
Elizabeth Jane, who is seventeen years of age; Esther Letitia, who has passed 
her fifteenth birthday ; John James, who is thirteen years ; Jessie Mildred, who has 
attained the age of eleven years; David William, who is anticipating his tenth 
birthday; Mary Leona, who is six years of age; and Violet Beatrice, who is 
three. All but the last named are attending school. 

The family attend the Methodist church of which the parents are earnest 
members. Mr. Thompson takes an active interest in all public affairs and has 
for the past six years been serving as school trustee, being at present chairman 
of the school board of Richmond. He is a man of earnest purpose, honorable 
business methods and upright standards of conduct, all of which he has mani- 
fested during the long period of his residence in this vicinity, where he has won 
and retained the respect and esteem of a large circle of friends. " 



WILLIAM ARCHIBALD DUNCAN. 

William Archibald Duncan, city clerk of New Westminster, has been identified 
with various business projects which have left their impress beneficially upon the 
history of the northwest. He was called to his present position by appointment 
on the ist of January, 1902, and his record in this office is most commendable, 
being characterized by capability and unquestioned fidelity to duty. Mr. Duncan 
was born December 13, 1845, a t Castle Baldwin, County Sligo, Ireland, his 
parents being James Stewart Moore and Jane (Shaw) Duncan. The parents 
were also natives of the Emerald isle and are both mainly of Scotch descent, with 
a slight intermixture in the mother's family of English blood. James S. M. 
Duncan was born in Ballycastle, County Antrim, Ireland, and both he and his 
father were either in the military or civil service of the British government and 
jvere retired on pensions. On account of the frequent changes of residence caused 
)y the promotions and transfers in the service, the family lived at many places. 
The mother was born in the town of Sligo, Ireland, and was a daughter of John 
Shaw, also in the service of the government. 

William A. Duncan was educated at various schools in Ireland until he reached 
:he age of sixteen years. He was first employed as a clerk in Trenton, New Jer- 
sey, having emigrated to the United States irf 1863. At the request of his father, 
lowever, he removed to Ontario in 1864 and lived in or near Toronto for a 
ime but returned to the United States in 1865. On the 2d of March of that year 
ic joined the One Hundredth New York Infantry for service in the Civil war, 
)eing with that regiment until the loth of September, 1865, when he was hon- 
orably discharged. He took part in the Appomattox campaign under General 
jrant, was present at the capture of Fort Gregg near Petersburg, Virginia, on 
he 2d of April, 1865, and was present at the surrender of General Lee on the 
')th of April, which practically put an end to the war. He continued to make 
lis home in the United States until 1870, when he became a resident of northern 
Ontario, settling in the Parry Sound district, where he was employed by the 
Guelph Lumber Company as clerk and bookkeeper. In June, 1879, he made his 
-,vay westward to New Westminster, British Columbia, and was employed as 
lxx>kkeeper at the salmon canneries, while later he served in the same capacity in 
the Royal City Planing Mills until February, 1890. He was then instrumental 
in organizing a company under the name of Duncan, Batchelor & Company and 
built the Britannia cannery at Steveson, British Columbia. This was sold to 
vhe A. B. C. Canning Company in 1891, after which Mr. Duncan engaged in the 
real-estate business in New Westminster until 1895. In that year he removed 
1o San Francisco but after a year returned to New Westminster, where he has 
since resided. He was manager of canneries from 1897 until 1901 inclusive 



436 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

and in 1900 he became the first secretary of the Canners' Association, with office 
at Vancouver. 

Mr. Duncan's military experience in Canada covers five years' service in the 
volunteer artillery of the. New Westminster militia. He has taken no very active 
interest in politics, especially as a partisan. He was reared in the faith of the 
conservative party but since coming to British Columbia has voted with the 
liberals and conservatives, as his judgment has dictated, so that he may well be 
called an independent. He was a member of the city council of New Westminster 
in 1887 and was one of the three water commissioners that brought the water from 
Coquitlam lake to New Westminster to supply the first water system, his serv- 
ice in that connection covering the years 1890, 1891 and 1892. He was alder- 
man for New Westminster in 1894 and on the 1st of January, 1902, was appointed 
city clerk, in which capacity he is still serving, his eleven years' record in this 
connection being a most commendable one, characterized by thorough under- 
standing and faithful performance of the duties of the office. 

On the 5th of December, 1895, at Vancouver, Mr. Duncan was married to 
Miss Donalda Annie Sutherland, a daughter of John and Christina Sutherland, 
of Caithness, Scotland. Her eldest brother went to central Africa as a medical 
missionary and is still there. Another brother died in Edinburgh, Scotland, while 
completing his college course, and her youngest brother is in charge of the 
business of S. Leiser & Company, Limited, at Cumberland, British Columbia. 
One sister is a teacher at Edinburgh ; one is married and lives in Wales ; and the 
youngest resides with her parents in the highlands of Scotland. Mr. and Mrs. 
Duncan have a family of four children: Alexander Sutherland, aged sixteen; 
Lily Eleanor, fifteen years of age ; Annie Christine, thirteen ; and William Archi- 
bald, nine years of age. The parents hold membership in St. Stephen's Presby- 
terian church and Mr. Duncan is serving on the board of management and session. 
He has been a member of the Masonic fraternity since 1882, when he joined 
Union Lodge, No. 9, A. F. & A. M., in which he has filled the offices of junior 
warden, senior warden and worshipful master. He became a member of the 
Royal Templars of Temperance in 1897 and his influence is always on the side 
of sobriety, truth, justice and improvement. 



ALBERT JAMES DA WE. 

Albert James Dawe is a member of the Westminster Marine Realty, one of 
the foremost shipbuilding firms in British Columbia. He was born in Newfound- 
land on August 31, 1867, and is a son of Samuel and Mary A. (Dawe) Dawe, 
the former for forty years a sea captain who subsequently gave up his occupa- 
tion and came to New Westminster, where he passed away in 1905, his wife 
following him in death two years later. 

Albert J. Dawe was reared at home and when about twelve years old took 
up the life of a sailor on his father's vessel and from that time until coming to 
British Columbia followed the sea. He became first mate of the ship and for 
one year served as master. The year 1891 marks his arrival in New Westminster 
and here he followed for several years salmon fishing during the summer months, 
while in the winter time he worked as carpenter and boatbuilder. In 1908, upon 
the organization of the Westminster Marine Realty, he became one of the 
organizers of that concern and has since been identified with its expansion. His 
practical knowledge and experience have stood him in good stead and he has 
largely been instrumental in producing boats which have earned him a high 
reputation and have brought increased business to his firm. 

In 1897 Mr. Dawe was united in marriage to Miss Clara M. Dawe, a sister 
of the wife of his brother Samuel. His marriage was the outcome of a school 
romance, Mrs. Dawe coming to New Westminster in the year of her marriage. 
They became the parents of six children, of whom three survive : John Reginald, 




ALBERT J. DAWE 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 439 

Henry Albert R. and Fannie Alexander. Mrs. Dawe is a daughter of Captain 
Samuel Dawe, of the same name as the father of our subject, both captains living 
in the same town and being widely and favorably known at Bay Roberts, New- 
foundland, which was their home port. Albert J. Dawe and his wife are devoted 
members of the Church of England, to which they give their moral and material 
support. He is independent in politics and fraternally affiliates with Royal Lodge, 
No. 6, Knights of Pythias. That the business fraternity of New Westminster 
has benefited by the arrival of Mr. Dawe there is no doubt, for he has been 
instrumental in founding a business which fills an important place in the com- 
mercial life of the city and makes for expansion and advancement. Mr. Dawe 
is popular both in social and business life and highly regarded by all who know 
him on account of his honorable manhood and high qualities of character. 



JOHN WESLEY SEXSMITH. 

John Wesley Sexsmith, who is living retired on his beautiful homestead 
located on the River road near Eburne, was for many years actively and suc- 
cessfully identified with the agricultural development of this section, where he 
acquired extensive property interests. His birth occurred in Lennox, Ontario, 
on the loth of May, 1830, his parents being Simon and Margaret (Holcomb) 
Sexsmith, both deceased. 

The early life of John Wesley Sexsmith was passed on his father's farm, 
his education being acquired in the common schools of Lennox. After leaving 
school he engaged in farming, giving his undivided attention to this vocation 
until he had attained the age of twenty-five years. Deciding that commercial 
pursuits offered more lucrative returns at the expenditure of less effort than 
farming, he subsequently identified himself with the mercantile activities of 
Lennox, where he was engaged in business for twenty years. During that 
oeriod he also participated to some extent in public affairs, and for eighteen 
years held the office of treasurer in Richmond county. At the age of forty- 
iight years, he resolved to try his luck in the northwest and started for 
British Columbia. As this was prior to the building of the Canadian transcon- 
tinental railroad lines, he made the journey by way of San Francisco, spending 
jleven days en route. He landed at Victoria, going from there to New West- 
ninster, whence he continued his journey by rowboat to his present farm. It 
:omprises a hundred and seventy acres of land for which he agreed to pay 
: our thousand dollars, his first payment consisting of a hundred dollars, his 
entire capital. He immediately established a factory and engaged in cheese 
naking. Not having the necessary money with which to buy an equipment he 
>vas compelled to make all of the appliances necessary for the operation of his 
)lant. Despite the fact that they were very crude, they met all practical 
equirements, his venture proving so successful that at the expiration of two 
/ears he was able to pay off the mortgage and secure a clear title to his farm. 
\s time passed he enhanced the value of his property by the addition of many 
mprovements, subsequently increasing his holdings by the purchase of another 
.ract of land consisting of six hundred and forty acres and afterward bought 
enough to make up nineteen hundred acres in all. He also owned at one time 
ive hundred acres at Pitt Meadow, which he has also divided with his family. 
vVhen Mr. Sexsmith came here there were no schools and he started the first 
educational institution in British Columbia and was the first school trustee. 
He also established mail service in this section and built and ran the first daily 
steamer between Eburne and New Westminster. He also erected and operated 
a large cannery for several years. He still has a large interest in the Ester- 
'>rook Milling Company, of which he was one of the organizers. He engaged in 
he cultivation of his farms with his sons until 1908, when he divided his land 
among his children and more or less withdrew from active work. 



440 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

Mr. Sexsmith has been twice married. His first union was with Miss 
Amanda Boyce Henderson, of New York, and to them were born five children, 
as follows: Charles Garrett, who married Miss Burrows, of Napanee, Ontario; 
Addie, who became the wife of A. B. Wintermute, of New Westminster; and 
three who have passed away. They are : Alida, who= married David Milligan 
and who died on July 29, 1891, at the age of thirty-four years; Lansing, who 
died on June 21, 1877, at the age of twenty-one; and a daughter who died in 
infancy. The mother of these children passed away on December 6, 1870, and 
in July, 1873, Mr. Sexsmith married Miss Alice M. Tuttle, a daughter of 
James and Mary Ann Tuttle, of Acldington, Ontario. Five children have 
been born of this marriage: James Tuttle; Frances Louise, the wife of J. W. 
Foster, of Vancouver; George Ansley, a resident of Alberta, who married 
Miss Alice Kerr; and Anna May and Myrtle, both of whom are liviing at 
home. 

Despite the many exactions of his extensive private interests, Mr. Sexsmith 
found time in his earlier life to participate in local politics and in the early 
'Sos served for six years as reeve of Richmond municipality. He has always 
been a conservative in his political views and stanchly supports the men and 
measures of that body. Although he had practically reached the half century 
mark when he came to British Columbia, and had very little capital, Mr. Sex- 
smith had absolute confidence in his powers to retrieve his fortunes. That he 
succeeded in his efforts is evidenced by the beautiful farm he now owns and a 
competence which more than meets the needs of himself and family. 



HERBERT TIMMS. 

Herbert Timms, a young man of forceful individuality and marked business 
ability, has in the course of an active life constantly worked his way upward 
and each step in his career has brought him a broader outlook and wider oppor- 
tunities. He has carefully noted and used his advantages for progress and is 
today one of the successful business men of Vancouver, where as president of 
Timms, Phillips & Company, Ltd., he is in control of the affairs of one of the 
important commercial concerns of the city. He was born in Montreal, Quebec, 
February 8, 1885, and is a son of William and Harriet (Meldrum) fimms, the 
former a native of Yorkshire, England, who emigrated to the United States 
at the age of eighteen and located in Baltimore, Maryland. He remained there 
for several years and then removed to Montreal, where he followed engineering 
to which line he devoted his entire active life. He died in Montreal in 1909. 

Herbert Timms acquired his education in the public schools of his native 
city and after laying aside his books was variously employed in different parts 
of Canada and the United States until 1907, when he became a stenographer in 
the offices of the Imperial Timber & Trading Company, Ltd., of Vancouver, 
British Columbia. Here his ability, energy and industry gained him rapid and 
steady advancement and he rose through department after department until he 
finally became one of the most important officials of the concern, serving credit- 
ably and ably as general manager. This position he resigned December 31, 
1912, and on the ist of January of the following year joined T. N. Phillips and 
D. M. Colquhoun in the organization of Timms, Phillips & Company, Ltd., of 
which he has since been president. The company does a general lumber broker- 
age business and their trade extends all over Canada. Although the enterprise 
has existed barely one year, it has become an established business factor in Van- 
couver and is counted among the most important commercial establishments of 
the city. The men at its head are young, ambitious and progressive, alive to 
modern business conditions and capable of coping with them men of resource, 
energy and personality who have made these qualities factors in the attainment 
of a distinct and substantial business success. Mr. Timms gives practically all 




HERBERT TIMMS 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 443 

of his attention to the affairs of the company and his duties as its president are 
discharged in a capable and far-sighted way. 

On the I5th of May, 1912, in Vancouver, Mr. Timms was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Alice V. Kendall, a daughter of John N. Kendall, of this city. Mr. 
Timms is a member of Mount Hermon Lodge, No. 7, A. F. & A. M., and of the 
Concatenated Order of Hoo-Hoos. In business he is progressive and energetic, 
carrying forward to successful completion whatever he undertakes and utilizing 
the opportunities which are presented for advancement. His own well directed 
efforts, his diligence and integrity are the qualities upon which his success is 
founded, and they have brought him to the creditable place which he now occupies 
in business circles. 



A. W. HARRIS. 

A. W. Harris is the owner of a well improved and attractive farm of ten 
and a half acres located in the vicinity of Steveston, which he has been cultivat- 
ing for more than twenty years. He was born in Oxford county, Ontario, on 
the 8th of September, 1849, an< i ' s a son f George PL and Mary A. (Secorcl) 
Harris, both of whom are now deceased. 

The early life of A. W. Harris was passed in his native county, his education 
being obtained in the public schools, which he attended until he was nineteen 
years of age. His energies during the succecdng ten years were devoted to the 
cultivation of the home farm, where he resided until 1878. In the latter year 
he went to Huron county and there continued his agricultural pursuits for one 
year, at the expiration of which time he moved to Algoma, where he remained 
thirteen years with the exception of -two years spent in Michigan. He then 
came to Steveston, where he has ever since resided. His farm comprises ten 
and a half acres of land, for which he paid eighty-five dollars per acre, and it 
is now valued at fifteen hundred dollars per acre. 

In Ontario on the 3d of May, 1876, Mr. Harris was married to Miss Lois 
E. Knight, a daughter of Benjamin Knight, and to them have been born two 
sons: Austin M., who married a Miss Bodwell; and Goldwin H., whose wife 
was formerly Miss Kidd. Mrs. Harris is president of the Richmond branch of 
the Victorian Order of Nurses. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harris attend the Methodist church and he also belongs to 
the Good Templars Lodge. In politics he supports the conservative ticket. Mr. 
and Mrs. Harris are people of many estimable qualities and are held in high 
regard by their neighbors, the majority of whom arc acquaintances of long 
years standing. 



JOHN EDWARD TUCKER. 

John Edward Tucker needs no introduction to the readers of this volume, 
for as president of the Vancouver Lumber Company he is well known. During 
his residence here he has been a powerful factor in the building up of this 
concern, and has been active in cooperating with many movements for the 
public good, his business affairs being largely of the kind which contribute to 
the general development and improvement. 

Mr. Tucker was born in Danville, Texas, October 10, 1857, and is a son 
of Henry and Tennessee Tucker. He acquired his education in the grammar 
and high schools of his native state and after completing it turned his attention 
to the lumber business, in which he has since continued active, each year adding 
to his knowledge of the business and developing his insight, his natural admin- 
istrative ability and his ready grasp of detail. Mr. Tucker left his native state 



444 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

in 1903 and came to British Columbia, settling in Vancouver, where he pur- 
chased with A. L. Clark the lumber business now operated under the name 
of the Vancouver Lumber Company. This plant was operated as it stood 
until 1905, when a much larger mill was erected. This is situated on twelve 
acres of land, in the heart of the city, and the company controls over one 
thousand feet of water frontage on False creek. The annual output reaches 
forty-five million feet of lumber and this goes to the prairie provinces and to 
foreign ports with the exception of that which is used locally. There is now in 
course of construction a new mill, which will double the capacity of the plant, 
which is supplied from the thirty-three thousand acres of fine timber land in 
British Columbia controlled by the operating company. The present concern 
was incorporated under the name of the Vancouver Lumber Company, Limited, 
in 1911. .Mr. Tucker has had over forty years experience in the lumber busi- 
ness and understands it in principle and detail, and it is mainly through his well 
directed efforts that the present concern has been built up. He is a wide- 
awake, progressive and energetic business man, who usually carries forward 
to successful completion whatever he undertakes, and he has made the concern 
with which he is now connected widely known throughout this part of Canada. 
Manufacturing only the best lumber, the company controls a trade which has 
now reached extensive proportions, this being largely due to the reliable and 
progressive business methods to which its members have steadily adhered. 

In 1879 Mr. Tucker was united in marriage to Miss Mary Gillespie Blaine. 
and they have become the parents of one daughter, lone, who married E. C. 
Knight, managing director of the Vancouver Lumber Company. Mr. Tucker 
is an elder in St. John's Presbyterian church in Vancouver and he is connected 
with the Vancouver Club, the Shaughnessy Heights Golf Club, the Vancouver 
Golf Club, the Vancouver Automobile Club, the Commercial Club and the 
Progress Club. He belongs also to the Masonic order. He is popular in both 
business and social circles and is regarded as one of the leading citizens of his 
adopted city. 






HENRY CHARLES ERASER. 

Henry Charles Eraser has been a resident of Salmon Arm since 1885 and is, 
therefore, numbered among its earliest settlers and has witnessed almost its 
entire growth and development, for few settlements had been made within its 
borders at the time of his arrival and all the evidences of pioneer life were to be 
seen. Mr. Eraser was born in 1837 and has, therefore, reached the age of sev- 
enty-five years. He is a self-made man, who owes his prosperity and progress 
to his own well directed labors and unfaltering determination and to the sub- 
stantial qualities upon which he based his efforts. His birth occurred in the isle 
of Ceylon in the East Indies, where his father, Captain Hugh Eraser, of the 
Seventy-eighth Highlanders, was stationed. He later returned to his native coun- 
try of Scotland and afterward came to eastern Canada, locating in the Dominion 
in 1850. The mother of our subject was in her maidenhood Miss Caroline 
Cavendish, a native of Devonshire, England. 

Henry C. Eraser acquired his education in the public schools of Perth, near 
Stratford, Ontario, and he remained at home for a number of years. He came 
to Salmon Arm in 1885. He walked the distance from Regina to this city and 
took up a homestead claim of one hundred and twenty-seven acres. It was still 
a frontier district and all around him stretched wild forest lands, his own tract 
being covered with a dense growth of timber. In the winter Mr. Eraser hunted 
and trapped in the woods and during the summers carried forward steadily the 
work of development, cutting down trees, building roadways by hand and gradu- 
ally getting the unbroken soil under the plow. He built his own log cabin and not 
only developed his fields and fenced the place but also put up substantial build- 




HENRY C. FRASER 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 447 

ings. He carried on general farming and dairying until the city was founded 
and laid out, at which time he subdivided much of his property into town lots. 
Of late years he has lived retired from active life, having earned rest and com- 
fort by worthy work in the past. 

Mr. Fraser married in 1900 Mrs. Alice (Letts) Jirard, of London, England, 
and they have two children : Pearl, aged eleven ; and Wilhelmine, aged two. For 
twenty-seven years Mr. Fraser has lived in Salmon Arm and is one of the few who 
have so long witnessed its growth and development. He has set aside the site of 
his first cabin, a lot fifty by one hundred feet, to go to the Historical Society at 
his death. He also will leave that institution a number of valuable relics of his- 
toric interest. He is interested in the uplift of humanity and active in his sup- 
port of church work. This section owes its wealth and progress to a large extent 
to men who dared to face the hardships of pioneer life and who have reclaimed 
this region for purposes of civilization. Among these is Mr. Fraser, who has 
been a resident of Salmon Arm for over a quarter of a century. 



EDGAR BURTON PFOST. 

A native of the United States, in which country he was honored with im- 
portant public positions and where for a number of years he w,as particularly 
successful in mining in the state of Missouri, Mr. Pfost has since November, 
1911, sought the business opportunities of Vancouver, in which city he is engaged 
in the real-estate and investment business. His prominence in the American 
colony is evident from the fact that he at present serves as president of the 
American Club. Born at Ravenswood, West Virginia, May 14, 1863, he is a 
son of La Fayette and Martha Olive Pfost, the former of German descent, his 
father having come to America from that country, first settling in Pennsylvania 
md later removing to Ripley, Jackson county, Virginia (now West Virginia) 
Adhere his son, La Fayette Pfost, was born. The latter was reared and edu- 
:ated in Ripley and after reaching manhood engaged successfully in live-stock 
lealing at that place and later in Ravenswood. There he remained until 18/6, 
vhen he removed to Henry county, Missouri, where he engaged in farming, and 
here he still resides, highly respected and esteemed by all who know him. 

Edgar B. Pfost received his education in the schools of Ravenswood, West 
Virginia, and at Montrose, Henry county, Missouri. After completing his edu- 
cation he went to Medicine Lodge, Kansas, where for four years he engaged in 
'arming, and then removed to Topeka, that state, where he became first officer 
of the Kansas City Reform School for Boys. He continued in that important 
]>osition, discharging his duties with rare efficiency, until 1895, when another 
removal brought him to Kansas City, Kansas, where he engaged in the fraternal 
life-insurance business and also took up the study of law, being admitted to the 
bar of the state of Kansas in 1897. In the same year he took charge of the North- 
side city court of Kansas City, upon which bench he sat for two years, taking 
up private practice at the end of that time in the same place. At the same time, 
however, he continued in the insurance business. In 1901 Mr. Pfost removed 
1o Kansas City, Missouri, where he continued in fraternal insurance, represent- 
ing the Ancient Order of Pyramids until 1906. In that year he became interested 
in mining in the lead fields at Joplin, Missouri, along which line he was success- 
lul from the start, taking out one hundred and twenty-two thousand dollars 
worth of metal in the first year. He continued in that district, operating five 
mines, but the slump of 1907 severely crippled operations and in 1910 he dis- 
posed of his interests, entering in January, 1911, into a five-year contract with 
the Seitz Truck Company as general sales manager for their entire output in the 
United States and Canada. In October, 1911, he cancelled his contract and in 
the following month came to Vancouver, British Columbia, where he has since 
teen engaged in the real-estate and investment business, having quickly proven 



448 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

his worth as a reliable dealer and already enjoying an important clientage. His 
varied experience stands him in good stead and he is considered to be one of the 
most shrewd men in his line. 

Mr. Pfost was twice married. His first union to Miss Jean Walton, of Deer- 
head, Kansas, took place in 1886. She was a daughter of Thomas Walton and 
to them were born two children: Alfred, of Vinita, Oklahoma; and Gladys, of 
Knowles, that state. Mrs. Pfost died in 1900 and on September i, 1902, Mr. 
Pfost married Miss Josephine Zeleny, of Kansas City, Missouri. 

While in Kansas Mr. Pfost was active along political lines, in the ranks of 
the people's party, for four years and served as chairman of the finance com- 
mittee. He was also prominent in .Masonic circles in that state, being a thirty- 
second degree Mason and as such a member of the Kansas City lodge, chapter, 
commandcry and shrine. He is a life member of Kansas City Lodge, No. 440, 
B. P. O. E., and also a member of the Woodmen of the World, the Modern 
Woodmen of America and the Fraternal Aid Society. Since coming to Van- 
couver he has joined the Progress Club, in which organization he has taken his 
place with those who ever support worthy public enterprises. He has also been 
honored by election to the office of president of the American Club of Vancouver. 
Although one of the later arrivals in this city Mr. Pfost has already firmly estab- 
lished himself in business circles and has become known as a reliable man of 
affairs. Personally he is popular and is fast making friends, his genial disposi- 
tion and pleasant manner finding ready response among those whom he meets. 



JOSEPH SCOTT. 

Joseph Scott has been a resident of Chilliwack since 1890 and during the 
greater portion of the intervening period has been in some way connected with 
official life, gaining for himself an enviable reputation for integrity, conscien- 
tiousness and ability in the public service. He was born in Oxford county, On- 
tario, on the loth of February, 1861, a son of Joseph and Elizabeth (Bell) Scott, 
both deceased. The father was during his active life engaged in general agri- 
cultural pursuits. 

Joseph Scott acquired his education in the grammar and high schools of his 
native province and after laying aside his books came to the western coast, locat- 
ing in Chilliwack in 1890. He first secured a position as a clerk, but in 1895 
was appointed clerk of the municipality of Chilliwack and he held this office 
continuously until 1901. During this period he served also, in 1899, as provin- 
cial assessor and collector and in 1904 was appointed deputy sheriff, a position 
which he still occupies and the duties of which he discharges in a capable and 
able way. 

Mr. Scott is a conservative in his political views and is a member of the 
Church of England. He is connected fraternally with Ionic Lodge, No. 19, 
A. F. & A. M.; the Westminster Chapter and the Mystic Shrine; and is also a 
member of Excelsior Lodge, No. 7, I. O. O. F. ; and Lodge No. 1470, L. O. L. 
His has been an excellent official record and in the private relations of life also 
he has been found upright and reliable, so that he commands the respect and con- 
fidence of his fellow citizens. 



BERTRAM EWART TUCKER. 

Foremost in business and foremost in his loyalty to his adopted city, Bertram 
Ewart Tucker occupies an enviable position in the business life of Edmonds, 
British Columbia, where he is widely and favorably known in connection with 
the firm of Disney & Tucker, contractors and builders and dealers in lumber 




JOSEPH SCOTT 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 451 

and builders' supplies. A native of Devonshire, England, he was born on the 
2ist of February, 1883, a son of William and Elizabeth (Knight) Tucker, both 
natives of Cornwall, that country. After their marriage the parents located in 
Devonshire, where they still reside. The father, until his retirement about four 
years ago, was for many years station agent in the employ of the Great Western 
Railway, serving at different points. 

Bertram E. Tucker was educated at the Newton Abbott grammar school in 
Devonshire but as early as in his fourteenth year secured a position in the engi- 
leering department of the Great Western Railroad, specializing in carpentering 
md building. He remained in the employ of this corporation for seven years 
md upon leaving them in 1903 came to Canada, where he spent about four years 
n various provinces, making his headquarters successively in Ontario, Manitoba 
md Saskatchewan. In 1907 he came to British Columbia, where he worked at 
lis trade in New Westminster and vicinity for about a year, after which time 
ic engaged in contracting and building and in 1911 associated himself with 
iarold Disney, establishing their present business. Although the firm has been 
n existence but two years, their connections are important and their business 
lias become one of the foremost of its kind in the city, its flourishing condition 
being largely due to the efforts of Mr. Tucker, whose wide experience and innate 
business ability are important factors therein. 

In 1908 Mr. Tucker was united in marriage to Miss Melissa Phillips, of.Mis- 
; ion City, British Columbia, and to them have been born two children, Ethel 
Mildred and John Leonard. Mr. and Mrs. Tucker attend the Church of Eng- 
land. Politically the former is independent, giving his support to the candidates 
lie considers best qualified for the position to which they aspire, irrespective of 
party lines. Fraternally he is a member of the Sons of England and of King 
Solomon Lodge, No. 17, A. F. & A. M. Yet a young man, Mr. Tucker has 
leadily acquired the enterprising spirit of the west and guards and helps along 
the public interests of his adopted city. He is public-spirited and progressive 
; nd stands ever ready to give his indorsement to any measure undertaken to 
1 enefit this community. He has become a forceful element in Edmonds, where 
1 e is highly regarded and enjoys the confidence and good-will of all who know 
; nd have met him in a business or social way. 



WILLIAM JAMES SCRATCHLEY. 

William James Scratchley, who owns a well improved farm of a hundred and 
sixty acres located on the River road, Eburne, built the first house on Lulu 
i ;land, having located here over forty-eight years ago. He is a native of Eng- 
land, having been born in Wiltshire on the 2Oth of November, 1843, and a son 
of Job and Matilda (Parriot) Scratchley. The parents passed their entire lives 
i:i the mother country and were laid to rest in the cemetery near their home in 
Wiltshire. 

The education of William James Scratchley was acquired in Keevill. Upon 
fie completion of his course of study, he joined Major Harrison as mail agent 
on the line of the West Indies Steamship Company. He continued in the mail 
service until he had attained the age of nineteen years when he crossed the 
Isthmus to San Francisco, whence he took passage for Victoria and New West- 
minster, his arrival antedating the extension of the railroad lines to western 
Canada. The year 1864 marked his arrival in British Columbia, where he sub- 
sequently obtained employment with C. W. Franks, who was treasurer of the 
mainland when the capital was removed to Victoria. Eighteen months later he 
resigned his position and purchasing the farm of Mr. McGee at Rose Hill entered 
into partnership with a Mr. Brighouse, with whom he was associated for six- 
teen years. Disposing of his interest in the property in 1882 he purchased his 
p r esent farm in the cultivation of which he has now been engaged for thirty 



452 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

years. He has dyked and cleared his place, erected thereon substantial buildings 
and brought the fields to a high state of productivity, making it one of the most 
desirable estates on the island. Mr. Scratchley was one of the early pioneers 
of this section and was the first settler on the island, where he has ever since 
resided. All the stock he had on his place at that time were brought here from 
Westminster on a scow, that being the mode of handling all freight traffic in 
pioneer days. During the long period of his residence here Mr. Scratchley has 
witnessed the fulfillment of his early prophecy regarding the agricultural 
development of the island, which has been transformed from a wilderness int 
one of the richest farming districts of British Columbia. Land which could 
be purchased for ten dollars or less per acre when he arrived here, is now valued 
at from a thousand to fifteen hundred dollars. 

At Norfolk, England, on the ist of July, 1892, Mr. Scratchley was united in 
marriage to Miss Matilda Frost, a daughter of Samuel and Susanna Frost. Of 
this marriage there have been born five children, Laura, Myrtle, William James, 
Jr., Ernest Alfred and Gilbert Edward, all of whom are at home. 

The family manifest their religious faith through their connection with the 
Church of England. Mr. Scratchley has always taken an active and helpful 
interest in all local affairs and is known as one of the public-spirited men of 
his community. When the New Westminster volunteers were organized in 
1864, he enlisted, serving for three years under Captain Pritchard. Later he 
became identified with political affairs and was a member of the first council 
of Richmond municipality, discharging the duties of this office for three years. 
He is widely known on the island, where he has made his home continuously for 
nearly half a century and has many friends, who hold him in high regard by 
reason of his many estimable qualities and the fine principles he has always 
manifested in his business transactions. 



PETER LEO KING. 

Peter Leo King, prominently connected with business interests of Vancouver 
as proprietor of the business controlled by the King Warehousing Company, was 
born on the 3d of November, 1881, in Montreal, Quebec, and is a son of Atwell 
Charles and Edith Lucy King, both representatives of old English families. The 
father was a commander in the British navy for many years and three of his 
brothers, who have now passed away, were admirals in the English naval service. 

Peter L. King acquired his education in the public schools of California and 
British Columbia and upon laying aside his books went in search of adventure 
to the far east, traveling through all the Oriental countries, principally in China, 
for about two years. At the end of that time he came to the United States and 
the war with Spain having just been declared, he enlisted in the Forty-first New 
York Volunteers and saw a great deal of active service in the Philippines. Of 
the thirty-six members which comprised his troop he and his chum were the 
only ones who returned to the United States, half of their companions having 
been killed in battle and the remainder having died of disease. Upon his return 
Mr. King went to California, where he secured employment as a telegraph 
operator, later moving to Milwaukee and taking a position as a traveling sales- 
man in that city. He came to Vancouver in 1903 and has since been numbered 
among the active, enterprising and prominent young business men of the city. 
At first he formed a partnership with George H. Cotterill in the forwarding 
business here. He had entire management and control of the business and 
developed it ably along progressive modern lines. The partnership was dis- 
solved in 1912 and on the I5th of April, in that year, Mr. King started in the 
storage and warehouse business for himself, operating under the name of the 
King Warehousing Company. His concern has expanded rapidly under his 




PETER L. KIXG 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 455 

able management and has now assumed extensive proportions, being one of the 
largest and most profitable of its kind in the city. 

Mr. King gives his political allegiance to the conservative party and has 
served the local organization as delegate to various political conventions. He 
is a devout member of the Roman Catholic church and is well known in fraternal 
circles, holding membership in the Knights of Pythias; Vancouver Lodge, No. 
284, U. C. T. ; the Woodmen of the World; and the Masonic order. In this 
latter organization he belongs to Cascade Lodge of Vancouver and is the youngest 
member to attain the office which he now holds. He talces an active part in the 
affairs of the Vancouver Board of Trade and has extensive and representative 
:lub affiliations, belonging to the Terminal City Club, the Vancouver Country 
Club, the Hunt Club, the Business Science Club, the Vancouver Rowing Club and 
:he Vancouver Athletic Club connections indicating the scope and variety of 
lis interests. He is a splendid type of the modern business man progressive and 
iberal in his views, up-to-date in his standards and possessed of that executive 
md administrative ability necessary to success in any business pursuit. He is 
altogether a man to be reckoned with in business circles of Vancouver and, 
although still a young man, occupies a place of honor and prominence in the city 
vhere he makes his home. 



ANGUS JOHN McCOLL. 

Angus John McColl, an eminent member of the British Columbia bar and 
;. peer of the ablest men who have sat upon the supreme court bench of the 
province, is one whose career reflects credit and honor upon the people who 
1 onored him. His life was, indeed, one of signal usefulness in molding the 
judicial history of the northwest and in upholding the legal status of this section 
cf the country. He was born in Toronto, Ontario, November 3, 1854, a son of 
t le Rev. Angus McColl, D. D., a graduate of Queen's University and for many 
}ears a prominent Presbyterian minister. The mother was Mrs. Alice McColl, 
nee Ross, of Toronto. The son was educated by private tutors and at the high 
school of Chatham, Ontario, where his parents resided. He afterward matric- 
ulated and studied law in the office of Sir Oliver Mowat, in Toronto, and after 
thorough preliminary preparation was called to the bar of Ontario in 1875, 
vhen about twenty-one years of age. The same year he entered into partnership 
vith J. W. Squire, afterward a county court judge in Ontario, under the firm 
n ime of Squire & McColl. They practiced in the cities of Goderich and STUB- 
S' :lls, Ontario, for about a year, when Mr. Squire was appointed a judge and Mr. 
McColl continued the firm's practice alone. To an understanding of uncommon 
a<:uteness and vigor he added a thorough and conscientious preliminary training, 
while he exemplified in his practice all the higher elements of the truly great 
h wyer. He was constantly inspired by an intense, inflexible love of justice and 
a delicate sense of honor which controlled him in all his personal relations. His 
fi lelity to the interests of his clients was proverbial, yet he never forgot that he 
o-ved a higher allegiance to the majesty of the law. His diligence and energy 
ii the preparation of his cases as well as the earnestness, tenacity and courage 
with which he defended the right as he understood it challenged the high admir- 
al ion of his associates. He invariably sought to present his argument in the 
strong, clear light of common sense and sound logical principles. 

In 1878 Judge McColl went to Winnipeg and entered the firm of Bain & 
Blanchard as junior partner. For four years he practiced in Manitoba and in 
iS82 came to British Columbia, where he formed a partnership with Gordon 
E Corbould, afterward king's counsel, at New Westminster. This partnership 
was continued until 1896, when Judge McColl left the firm and removed to Ross- 
land. He there formed a partnership with C. R. Hamilton, afterward king's 
ccunsel, under the firm name of McColl & Hamilton. Their practice was of an 

Vol. IV 1 6 



456 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

important character, and throughout the years of his active connection with the 
bar Judge McColl showed constantly increasing ability and power in solving 
the most intricate and involved problems of the law. 

In 1892 he was appointed queen's counsel by the Dominion government and 
on the I3th of October, 1896, was appointed a justice of the supreme court of 
British Columbia. On the 23d of August, 1898, he succeeded the Hon. Theodore 
Davis as chief justice of British Columbia. His decisions indicate strong mental- 
ity, careful analysis, a thorough knowledge of the law and an unbiased judg- 
ment, and he wrote his name high on the keystone of the legal arch. 

In 1884 Judge McColl was married to Miss Helen Janet Barlow, a daughter 
of John Valkhard and Helen (Burns) Barlow of Toronto. The death of Judge 
McColl occurred January 16, 1902, and in his passing British Columbia lost a 
prominent citizen and- eminent jurist. He was a vigilant and attentive observer 
of men and measures and this, added to his thorough familiarity with the prin- 
ciples of jurisprudence, enabled him to cope with the most intricate legal ques- 
tions. His reported opinions are monuments to his profound legal learning 
and superior ability. They show a thorough mastery of the questions involved, 
a rare simplicity of style and an admirable terseness and clearness in the state- 
ments upon which the opinions rest. 



SAMUEL DAVIES SCHULTZ. 

While the practice of law is the vocation of Samuel Davies Schultz, he has 
also been connected with varied activities and interests, journalism, music and 
outdoor sports all making claim upon his time and energies. His, therefore, is a 
well rounded character and his broad knowledge permits of the intelligent discus- 
sion of the many problems of general moment. Mr. Schultz is not only entitled 
to representation in this volume as a representative citizen but also as one of the 
native sons of British Columbia. At a period when the northwest was just being 
opened up to civilization he started upon life's journey in Victoria, his natal day 
being October 21, 1865. His parents were Herman and Elizabeth (Davies) 
Schultz, the former a native of Prussia, whence he emigrated to California in 
the '503 and in 1863 came to British Columbia, continuing a resident of this 
province until his death in 1877. Following his arrival here he was for a time 
engaged in mining but later became a partner of the firm of Schultz & Tricke, 
one of the best known freight-carrying firms of the early days, operating pack 
trains. He married Elizabeth Davies, a daughter of Judah Philip and Maria 
Davies, who were pioneers of British Columbia, having come to this province in 
1862. The former was one of the leading citizens not only in business connec- 
tions but also by reason of his prominence in political circles. He at one time 
contested the seat in the Dominion house of commons with Sir John A. Mac- 
donald and A. de Cosmos, but was defeated by the latter by a few votes. 

Samuel D. Schultz was educated in the schools of Victoria and in Toronto 
University, from which he was graduated with the B. A. degree in 1888. Fol- 
lowing his graduation he returned to his native city but later again went to Tor- 
onto to prepare for the bar and at the time attended lectures at Osgoode Hall, 
in that city. He was called to the Ontario bar in 1893 and went to Nelson, Brit- 
ish Columbia, where he entered upon the active practice of his profession. After 
several months there he again went to Victoria, where he practiced until 1902, 
when he came to Vancouver, where he has since remained as a follower of 
the profession, being now senior partner of the firm of Schultz, Scott & Good- 
stone. He has always manifested marked aptitude for journalistic work. He 
has a temperamental disposition which finds enjoyment in music and the drama. 
During his college days he was reporter for the Mail and Empire and the World 
of Toronto upon music, the drama and sports. After entering upon his profes- 
sional career he continued his newspaper writing upon those subjects for the 




SAMUEL D. SCHULTX 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 459 

Colonist at Victoria and for the Province and the World in Vancouver. He is 
c ne of the few local composers and has published several successful compositions, 
especially "The Charge at Dawn," a military march dedicated to the Canadian 
1 eroes who fell at Paardeberg. He was a member of the first British Columbia 
Amateur Military Band and played clarinet in the Victoria and Vancouver Ama- 
t our Orchestras. 

He has always displayed keen interest in sports and particularly in baseball, 
f Dr many years being one of the most prominent pitchers in Canada, having fig- 
ured in many intercollegiate contests in the east. He was the first pitcher in 
British Columbia to retire a team without a run. 

On the 5th of January, 1904, Mr. Schultz was united in marriage to Miss 
Maude Dunwell Squarebriggs, a daughter of J. C. Squarebriggs, of a well known 
1'rince Edward Island family. The children of this marriage are Carl Joshua 
Davies and William A. In 1909-1910 Mr. Schultz was alderman of the city of 
North Vancouver, where he maintains his home. He is a charter member of the 
Native Sons of British Columbia, belongs to the Horticultural Society of North 
Vancouver, having won many prizes for horticulture, and is a member of the 
University and Commercial Clubs of Vancouver. He has been a consistent and 
e ithusiastic worker in the ranks of the conservative party for the past eighteen 
jears, during which time he has served on the executive of various associations 
in Victoria and North Vancouver. He was president of the North \ ancouver 
/ ssociation in 1912. Mr. Schultz has been more concerned with promoting the 
bast and highest interests of the conservative party than in seeking personal re- 
v ard and recognition. Few residents of the city have for a more extended period 
baen witnesses of the growth and development of British Columbia and none 
rejoices more heartily in what has been accomplished than this native son of the 
p-ovince. His record is equally creditable and honorable to the district ihat has 
h Miored him. 



COLIN F. JACKSON. 

Colin F. Jackson, who is engaged in the logging and contracting business and 
it a dealer in mining supplies at Vancouver, has been identified with the industrial 
aid commercial interests of this city since 1901. He was born at Sale, Cheshire, 
England, January 10, 1864, his parents being Frederick James and Mary Anne 
Jackson. The father was a leading merchant of Manchester, England, in the 
'(os and 'jos and made extensive shipments to South America and Africa. 

The son, Colin F. Jackson, pursued his education in the Uppingham school 
o England and in 1882, when eighteen years of age, started out in the business 
world in the employ of Brazilian merchants, friends of his father, with whom 
ho remained for two years. During the succeeding four years he was engaged 
ii manufacturing in Manchester, England, and the decade that followed was 
spent in Liverpool, England, in the employ of Theo. H. Davies, of Honolulu, 
who had a branch in Liverpool. During that period of ten years he thoroughly 
n astered the business in its various phases and on the expiration of the period 
was admitted to partnership, becoming sole owner on the death of Mr. Davies 
a few years later. He is still owner of that business in Liverpool although 
for twelve years he has been actively connected with commercial and industrial 
affairs in Vancouver. He arrived in this city in 1901 and founded the Van- 
couver Engineering Works, Ltd., of which he remained president and manag- 
irg director for six years and then resigned. Subsequently he organized the 
present firm of Colin F. Jackson & Company, general importers. He is still 
engaged in this business of which he is sole proprietor. He deals extensively 
ii mining supplies and in connection therewith conducts a logging and con- 
tracting supply business. His activities have been varied since he started out 
ii life on his own account thirty years ago. At all times he has been found 



460 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

resourceful, his efforts and knowledge being adequate to the demands of the 
situation, and in the guidance and control of his business interests he has met 
with well merited and growing success which has placed him among the sub- 
stantial residents of Vancouver. 

In military circles Mr. Jackson has a record of five years' service as a 
member of the volunteer army in England. His interest in municipal and 
provincial affairs is deep and helpful and along political and other lines he has 
contributed in substantial measure to the work of public progress and improve- 
ment. He is a conservative and for one year was chairman of the conservative 
campaign of North Vancouver. For two years, beginning in 1910, he held 
the office of police commissioner of North Vancouver and he has been presi- 
dent of the Vancouver Electoral Union. He was also president of the North 
Vancouver Rate Payers Association. That his interests are broad and that 
he is studying the important sociological, labor and economic problems of the 
community is further attested by the fact that he was vice president of the 
Employers Association and his spirit of broad humanitarianism found tangible 
evidence in his service as vice president of the Children's Aid Society at Van- 
couver. 

Mr. Jackson has been married twice. In 1892 he wedded Gertrude Long- 
son, who passed away in January, 1906. On the loth of July, 1907, he married 
Nella Longson, a daughter of James Edward and Annie Longson, the former 
a prominent merchant of Manchester, England. His children are Frederick Ivor, 
Edward Carol, Dorothy Mary and Eric Whitcliffe. The religious faith of the 
family is that of the Anglican church. Mr. Jackson belongs to the Conserva- 
tive Club of Liverpool and to the Vancouver Club, and he is likewise a member 
of the Vancouver Kennel Club, of which he has twice been president. 



EMERY COE -JONES, D. D. S. 

Liberal educational opportunities qualified Dr. Emery Coe Jones for the 
practice of dentistry which he has successfully followed since 1906, being now 
a partner of the firm of Holmes, McSween, Jones & Hacking, of Ne\y West- 
minster. He was born at Lynden, Ontario, June 20, 1879, and is a son of 
Amos R. and Mary A. Jones, the former of whom passed away in 1906. Fol- 
lowing his graduation from the high school at Waterdown, Ontario, with the 
class of 1898, Dr. Jones began preparation for the practice of dentistry and 
won his D. D. S. degree from the University of Toronto in 1906. He is also 
a licentiate of dental surgery from the Royal College of Dental Surgeons of 
Toronto (1906), and the same year was granted the Dominion dental license 
by the Dominion Dental Council. In 1912 the degree of L. D. S. was con- 
ferred upon him by the College of Dental Surgeons of British Columbia. Like 
many who have attained success in various professional lines, Dr. Jones devoted 
a period of his early manhood to school teaching, being thus engaged in Ontario 
for four years, but following the completion of his dental course at the Uni- 
versity of Toronto in 1906 he entered upon active practice in Dundas, Ontario, 
where he remained until 1912. During the period of his residence there he was 
also active in public affairs bearing upon the welfare and upbuilding of the 
city and the advancement of its best interests. He served as a director and 
secretary of the Dundas public library board from 1906 until 1910, and was 
secretary of the Ontario Dental Society in 1911-12. On leaving his native 
province he came to British Columbia and, joining the firm of Holmes, McSween, 
Jones & Hacking, is now well established in the practice of his profession in 
New Westminster. 

In Cleveland, Ohio, on the ist of June, 1912, Dr. Jones was married to 
Miss Jessie May Fulton, a daughter of Humphry F. and Elizabeth Fulton, of 
Cleveland. Their religious faith is that of the Methodist church and Dr. Jones 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 461 

; Iso belongs to the Masonic fraternity, in which he has attained the fourteenth 
degree of the Scottish Rite. He is yet a comparatively young man, but the 
iccord which he has made would be creditable to one connected with the pro- 
fession for a much longer period than Dr. Jones has been. He is a close and 
c iscriminating student and his broad reading has kept him in touch with the 
; dvanced work being done by the profession while his own investigation, research 
;>nd practice have brought him knowledge and skill that have won for him the 
1 igh position which he occupies in public regard. 



ROBERT SCOTT DAY. 

Robert Scott Day is prominently connected with business interests of Vic- 
toria as a member of the firm of Robert S. Day & Beaumont Boggs, real-estate, 
i isurance and financial agents. He is known also as a leader in community 
affairs and as a man whose cooperation can always be relied upon in the support 
cf measures to promote the social, economic or business advancement of the 
city and he is, moreover, president of the Victoria branch of the Archaeological 
Institute of America, in the affairs of which he has taken a prominent and active 
fart for a number of years. He is therefore a man of wide interests, each of 
vhich he has made a force in progress, and he stands among the men of marked 
ability and substantial worth in the city where he makes his home. 

Robert S. Day was born in the city of Cork, Ireland, November 8, 1858, and 
i; a son of Robert and Rebecca (Scott) Day, both natives of that city, the 
former actively engaged in the merchandising and manufacturing business there 
a: the present time. He is a man of scholarly attainments and especially inter- 
ested in the science of archaeology, of which he has always remained a close 
aid earnest student. He is a member of the Royal Irish Academy and a fellow 
of the Society of Antiquaries and belongs to other archaeaologic?! societies, his 
o ttn collection of antiques, known as the Robert Day Collection of Irish Antiques, 
b^ing the finest private collection in the world. 

Robert S. Day acquired his education in private schools in Cork and in 
(jueen's College, receiving from that institution the degree of B. E. on October 
1 3, 1877. He afterward studied architecture, serving his time in the offices of 
Sir Thomas Drew, of Dublin, who was a member of the Royal Hibernian Acad- 
emy. At the end of two years Mr. Day went to London and there followed his 
p "ofession for a similar period of time, after which he moved to South Africa, 
k eating in Kimberley. After five years of successful professional work in that 
city he came to Canada, locating in Victoria early in 1891. He opened offices 
a ; an architect in this city but at the end of one year purchased the real-estate 
b isiness controlled by H. E. Croasdail & Company and established it under 
tl.e name of R. S. Day. In 1907 he made an arrangement with Beaumont Boggs 
aid the business underwent a complete reorganization, Mr. Boggs becoming 
connected with it and the name being changed to Robert S. Day & Beaumont 
Boggs. They have offices at No. 620 Fort street and there carry on a general 
rial-estate and insurance business, acting also as financial agents, loaning money 
o i mortgages and agreements of sale both as principal and agent. The firm 
acts as agent for fire, life and accident insurance companies, and Mr. Day repre- 
sints such concerns as the Law Union & Rock Insurance Company, Limited, of 
London, England, and the Guardian Assurance Company, Limited, of the same 
city, being general agent for these two concerns for British Columbia. Mr. 
Day represents also the London Guarantee & Accident Company, Limited, of 
London, England, and the Prudential Life Insurance Company of Winnipeg. In 
tl e upbuilding of their business Mr. Day has taken a prominent and active part 
and, being a man of energy, resource and capacity, has directed its development 
along practical and modern lines, so that the business has increased steadily 
ir volume and importance. Today the firm controls a representative patronage 



462 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

and is considered one of the strongest and most reliable of its kind in the city. 

On the 1 6th of April, 1888, at Cape Town, South Africa, Mr. Day was 
united in marriage to Miss Patience Swanton, a daughter of Rev. William and 
Keziah (Collins) Swanton, both of whom have passed away. The father was a 
native of Ireland and the mother was born in England. Mr. and Mrs. Day 
became the parents of seven children, six of whom are living. Aline Dorothy 
Wynne married Captain L. W. S. Cockburn, of the Royal Canadian Artillery, 
stationed in Quebec. Olive Mary became the wife of Ronald George Dundas, 
who is in the Dominion government wireless service and is stationed at Alert 
Bay, British Columbia. William Swanton is associated with his father in the 
firm of Day & Boggs. Richard Welsted is a pupil with James & James, archi- 
tects in Victoria. Amy Leota is a student in the schools of this city. Robert, , 
the youngest member of the family, is also attending school. The family occupy 
a beautiful home at No. 1606 Rockland avenue. It is known as Derreen and is 
situated in the midst of two acres of grounds of great natural beauty. During 
the twenty-one years he has lived here Mr. Day has continuously improved and 
beautified his home, and the results of his efforts are seen today in its attractive 
appearance. Mrs. Day takes a prominent part in the promotion of all move- 
ments tending to the moral and social uplift of the community and is identified 
with the work of the local Council of Women, the Children's Aid Society and 
other associations of a similar nature. She takes a very active interest in church 
affairs, is a regent of Coronation Day Chapter of the Daughters of the Empire 
and is well known in social circles of the city, where her cultured mind and her 
many charming qualities have gained her an honored place. 

Aside from business Mr. Day's interests have extended to many fields and 
have all been along lines of progress and improvement. He is honorary treasurer 
of the Provincial Royal Jubilee Hospital, of which he has been a director for 
many years, and he is a member of the Victoria Board of Trade. He takes a 
prominent part in the work of the Reformed Episcopal church and for several 
years past has been warden. Amateur photography and horticulture are hobbies 
with him and form two of his chief sources of recreation. He is a student of 
historical and scientific works, and has become imbued with much of his father's 
interest in archaeology, being today very active in the affairs of the Victoria 
branch of the Archaeological Institute, of America, of which he is president. A 
man of wide interests, forceful personality and modern ideas, he has made 
steady progress since the beginning of his active career and is today accounted 
one of the most able business men and prominent and representative citizens of 
Victoria. 



ALGERNON JUDSON PALMER. 

Algernon Judson Palmer, who died in 1900, will long be remembered as one 
of the notable pioneers of British Columbia and as one of the real founders and 
upbuilders of Salmon Arm, to which he came among the first settlers. He was 
a man of great determination, clear perception and stalwart character and upon 
this firm foundation built up a prosperity which placed him in a high position 
among the leading and representative citizens. He was born, May 3, 1853, in 
Brant county, Ontario, where his father, a descendant of old United Empire 
Loyalist stock, settled more than one hundred years ago. 

Algernon J. Palmer acquired his education in the public schools of his native 
section and there remained until he came to British Columbia in 1889 and took 
up a tract of one hundred and sixty acres covered with a dense growth of scrub and 
timber. Undaunted by the obstacles in his path, Mr. Palmer set about to clear 
the property, cutting down the trees and hauling them away by hand, for this 
was long before there were any horses or oxen in this part of the province. By 
hard work and unremitting industry he put his property acre by acre under the 




ALGERNON J. PALMER 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 465 

ilow, building with the timber cut down a log cabin, barns and outbuildings, and 
then commenced the work of cultivating the fields. He carried on general farm- 
jig on a small scale, later adding stock-raising to his activities. The evidences 
if his labor were soon seen in the highly cultivated fields, which brought forth 
a;ood harvests, and in the attractive and excellent condition of the entire farm. 
Mr. Palmer steadily carried forward the work of improvement and development 
ind at his death had one of the finest agricultural properties in this locality. It 
is now being operated by his son William, who has continued in the stock-raising 
business and has recently added to his interests a butcher shop in Salmon Arm, 
where he is one of the most successful business men. He is well known in the 
Masonic order, of which he is a member. 

On October 8, 1878, Mr. Palmer was united in marriage to Miss Emma Shaw, 
Df Glanford, Ontario, a daughter of Thomas and Maria Jane (Choate) Shaw 
ind the first white woman in this locality. To this union were born four chil- 
dren : William ; Mamie, who married William Savage, of Vancouver ; Mrs. Ger- 
:rude Kerr, of Vancouver ; and Thomas Hedley. In his wife Mr. Palmer found 
i worthy helpmate who at all times has proven a blessing to the household and 
)y her counsel and wise management has forwarded the best interests of the 
iamily. 

Mr. Palmer was a liberal in politics and for a number of years was president 
)f the local association. He also served as president of the Agricultural Asso- 
:iation. Interested in politics, he ran for parliament at the time the Hon. Joseph 
Martin was premier. He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church and 
ierved for many years as its recording secretary. He was president of the Farm- 
;rs Cooperative Society and although a flour miller by trade gave most of his 
efforts to agricultural pursuits. He deserved great credit for what he accom- 
plished in this community and his life record should serve as a source of inspira- 
ion and encouragement. He was one of the first settlers in this part of British 
Columbia and, continuously connected with its development and upbuilding, he 
matched its progress from pioneer times. He took an active and helpful interest 
n all that pertained to the general good and to the substantial upbuilding of Sal- 
non Arm, where he remained throughout his life an esteemed and highly hon- 
ored resident. 



ERNEST HENRY ROOME. 

Twenty-four years of active and close connection with real-estate interests 
n Vancouver has brought Ernest Henry Roome a gratifying measure of suc- 
cess, a large and representative patronage and a secure place among men of 
narked ability and substantial worth in the city. He is in addition serving as 
lotary public for the province of British Columbia and connected through 
nvestment or official service with many of the most important corporate con- 
oerns in the province a man of varied interests, all of which he has made 
constructive forces in progress. He was born in Lindfield, Sussex, England, 
July 7, 1866, and is a son of Rev. W. J. B. Roome, F. R. A. S., who was pastor 
of a Presbyterian church in Sussex for many years. 

Ernest Henry Roome acquired his education at Mill Hill, Middlesex, Eng- 
and, and upon laying aside his text-books became connected with the Capital 
>i Counties Bank in Aldershot, rising through various positions of responsibility 
and importance to a place of trust in the main office on Threadneedle street, 
.Condon. He maintained his connection with this concern for five years, resign- 
ng in 1889 in order to come to Canada. He settled in Vancouver and almost 
immediately afterward engaged in the real-estate brokerage business here, an 
occupation in which he has since continued. For almost a quarter of a century 
he has been one of the leading real-estate men in the city, and he today con- 
irols a large and important patronage which has been built up as the result of 



466 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

many years of reliable work and straightforward business dealings. On the 
23d of July, 1903, Mr. Roome was appointed notary public for the province 
of British Columbia and he has since filled that office, discharging his duties 
in a capable, far-sighted and able way. In addition to this and his individual 
business interests he is also secretary of Interior Lands of British Columbia, 
Ltd., and president of Central British Columbia Lands, Ltd., both dealing in 
British Columbia farming property, and his force, experience and capacity 
have carried him forward into important business relations. 

In Vancouver, in August, 1900, Mr. Roome was united in marriage to Miss 
Amy E. Herbert, a native of England, and both are well known in social circles 
of Vancouver. Mr. Roome belongs to the Presbyterian church and his life has 
always been in harmony with his professions as a member of that organization. 
He has proved himself always public-spirited and a loyal citizen, and through- 
out the years of his residence in Vancouver few men have contributed more 
materially to the permanent welfare of the community. 



SAMUEL H. THOMPSON. 

One of the substantial citizens of New Westminster is Samuel H. Thompson, 
who since April, 1912, has lived retired in the enjoyment of a comfortable com- 
petence after a long and active business career, in which he has been connected 
for many years with the commercial expansion of New Westminster. Born in 
Colchester county, Nova Scotia, he is a son of Samuel and Ruth (Burning) 
Thompson, both of whom passed away in Nova Scotia. 

Mr. Thompson was reared at home, enjoying the limited educational advan- 
tages the neighborhood afforded at the time of his youth. He came to the United 
States in 1887 and for one year worked in Boston, Massachusetts, in the service 
of the Jamaica Pond Ice Company. In 1888 he came to British Columbia, find- 
ing employment in a logging camp at Pitt Lake, but a few months later removed 
to New Westminster and engaged in work at brush slashing for John Kirkland, 
being so occupied for nine or ten years. Subsequent to his connection with the 
lumber trade he spent one year in the fire department of New Westminster, after 
which he engaged in the livery business, being very successful along that line. 
The exact period of his identification with this occupation was eleven years, 
one month and four days, selling out his interests on April 12, 1912. 

Fraternally Mr. Thompson is a member of Union Lodge, No. 9, A. F. & 
A. M. ; of Royal City Lodge, No. 3, I. O. O. F. ; and of Royal Lodge, No. 6, 
K. P. For a quarter of a century he has made his home in New Westminster 
and, having thrown in his fortune with that city, has grown to prosperity and 
become as loyal to the interests of his adopted city as he has been industrious to 
promote his own success. He is a well known figure on the streets of New 
Westminster and highly respected by all who know him on account of what he 
has achieved through continuous years of steadfast application to work. 



ALEXANDER LACHLAN McQUARRIE, M. D. 

Dr. Alexander Lachlan McQuarrie, physician and surgeon, engaged in active 
practice in New Westminster, was born in Ottawa, Canada, August n, 1879, 
a son of Lachlan and Mary (MacKinnon) McQuarrie, the former a native of 
Orangeville, Ontario, and the latter of Streetsville. In 1886 the father removed 
westward to Revelstoke. He was a contractor and came to British Columbia 
in connection with the construction of the Canadian Pacific Railroad. In 1887 
or 1888 he arrived at New Westminster and took a contract on the New 
Westminster Southern Railway, now a part of the Great Northern system. 




SAMUEL H. THOMPSON 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 469 

.Vith the completion of that work he engaged in contracting in New West- 
minster but is now living retired and spends the winter seasons in California, 
ihe success which he achieved in former years making it possible for him to rest 

;rom further labor and enjoy life's comforts and many of its luxuries. 

Dr. McQuarrie was reared under the parental roof with opportunity for 
ihe acquirement of an education in the graded and high schools of New West- 
i linster. He left the high school when about eighteen years of age to enter 
the service of the Canadian Pacific Railroad and for three years worked as 
;i brakeman. Subsequently he was for five years in the railway mail service 

I ut during the last year took a vacation, covering eight and a half months, 
( uring which period he entered upon the study of medicine. Believing that he 
\ 'Otild find it a congenial life work, he matriculated in the medical department 
c f the University of St. Louis and completed the full course by graduation 
vith the class of 1909. He then returned to New Westminster and in the fol- 
lowing November took his examination before the medical board, being admitted 
to practice in British Columbia. He then opened an office in New Westminster 
and has since enjoyed a remunerative practice. He has the confidence and 
t-ust of the public and the high regard of his brethren of the medical fraternity 
because of his close conformity to the highest standards of professional ethics. 

I 1 addition to his private practice he is serving as medical health officer and 
i, 1 the present coroner of New Westminster. 

On the 22d of May, 1910, Dr. McQuarrie was united in marriage to 
Miss Florence Alaud Morrison, a daughter of John Morrison, of New West- 
minster, and unto them has been born a son, Lachlan. For two years Dr. 
McQuarrie played on the lacrosse team of New Westminster, which won the 
world's championship. He is well known in Masonic circles as a member of 
Union Uodge, No. 9, A. F. & A. M., and of New Westminster Chapter, 
>* o. 1.24, R. A. M. He also has membership with the Modern Woodmen of 
.America and with the Westminster Club and the Westminster Progressive Club, 
ii terested not only in their social features but also in the efforts being made to 
advance the welfare, upbuilding and progress of the city. His standing as a 
n an and citizen equals the position which he occupies in his profession, which is 
that of a capable and leading physician and surgeon. 



DUNCAN MCDONALD. 

One of the most attractive and valuable farms in the vicinity of Eburne is 
tl at of Duncan McDonald, which is located on Sea isle. Here in connection 
\vith diversified farming and dairying he makes a specialty of raising Clyde 
horses and is the owner of one of the finest stables in this section. He was 
burn in Glengarry, Ontario, on the 2d of May, 1850, and is a son of Donald 
and Sarah (Duer) McDonald, both of whom lived to attain a ripe old age, the 
f; ther being eighty-six at the time of his demise while the mother was ninety- 
tfree when she passed away. They made their home on the old McDonald 
homestead in Ontario, which was taken up by the grandfather in 1811 and cul- 
tivated by him until his death. To this worthy couple there were born seven 
sens, four of whom are now deceased, two having died at about the age of 
tventy-five years, and the others somewhat later in life. Of the two who are 
lining beside our subject Hugh resides on Sea isle, while Thomas makes his 
home in Glengarry. 

The early life of Duncan McDonald was passed on the old farm in Glengarry, 
his education being obtained in the common schools of that vicinity. At the 
ape of eighteen years he left home and started out to make his own way in the 
world. For three years thereafter he worked in the Canadian woods during 
the winter and on the Ottawa river in the summer months. He subsequently 
crassed the border into the United States and after spending two years in the 



470 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

woods of Wisconsin returned to Glengarry. The year 1875 marked his arrival 
in British Columbia, the journey having been made by way of San Francisco, 
as this was prior to the building of the Canadian transcontinental railway. Here 
he and his brother Hugh, who was also one of the early pioneers of this section, 
worked in the lumber woods for six years and then they turned their attention 
to agricultural pursuits. Between them they purchased four hundred and forty 
acres of land on Sea isle, which they industriously set about dyking, clearing 
and placing under cultivation. 

Their holding is one of the most desirable in this vicinity, and its value has 
been greatly enhanced by the capable and intelligent manner in which they have 
developed it. Mr. McDonald has built a large attractive residence on his 
place, provided with all modern appointments, and has erected commodious 
barns and sheds for the protection of his stock and grain. During the first 
ten or twelve years of his residence here in connection with diversified farming 
he engaged in dairying, keeping a large herd of graded Holsteins. Later he 
began breeding Clyde horses, of which he still makes a specialty. Mr. McDonald 
possesses the fine business instincts which characterize the Scotch people gen- 
erally, directing his undertakings with the foresight and sagacity, which invari- 
ably bring success. 

The lady who now bears the name of Mrs. McDonald was known in her 
maindenhood as Miss Catherine Isabella McDowell. She is a daughter of Samuel 
and Mary (Harrison) McDowell, of Shawville, Quebec, where the mother 
still lives at the venerable age of eighty-three years. The father is deceased. 
Mr. and Mrs. McDonald were married on the I4th of April, 1886, and to them 
have been born the following children, Mary Arabella, Donald Samuel, Thomas 
Harold, Gordon Kilgour, Duncan Gladstone and Hugh Ralph, all of whom 
are residing at home. 

The family affiliate with the Presbyterian church, of which Mr. McDonald 
is an elder, while his fraternal relations are confined to his membership in the 
Independent Order of Foresters. He takes an active interest in public affairs, 
particularly those of a political nature, and served for three years as councillor 
in Richmond. Mr. McDonald is one of the substantial agriculturists of his 
community, where his prosperity is recognized as the result of thrifty and 
diligent habits. 



EDWARD OSCAR WESTON. 

Edward Oscar Weston, a well known business man of Victoria, connected 
with the firm of Stinson, Weston & Pearce, real estate and investments, is a na- 
tive of London, Ontario, born January 16, 1870, a son of Peter and Emma (By- 
field) Weston, the former born in Nottingham and the latter in London, England. 
Both the paternal and maternal grandparents were natives of England and the 
paternal grandfather was a prominent lace manufacturer in Nottingham. Peter 
Weston emigrated to Canada in 1842, and located in London, Ontario, where he 
followed the woodworkers' trade in a business carried on by himself. He did 
all the pillar and baluster work in St. Paul's cathedral and filled a number of 
other important contracts. He retired from active life in 1892 and his death 
occurred in 1896. He had survived his wife, who passed aw^ in 1885. 

Edward Oscar Wetson acquired his education in the public schools of Lon- 
don, Ontario, and at the age of sixteen years laid aside his books, entering the 
service of a hardware concern with which he remained identified for two years. 
In 1888 he moved to Chicago, Illinois, and there worked in various capacities for 
the Chicago & Northwestern Railway Company until 1891, when he became asso- 
ciated with the Deering Harvester Company in charge of the sales accounting 
department. This responsible position he held until the reorganization of the 
company in 1901, when the concern became the International Harvester Com- 




EDWARD 0. WESTON 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 473 

pany. Mr. Weston remained with this company in an executive capacity until 
1908, resigning in order to become associated with the real-estate firm of Baird 
4 Warner of Chicago. On the ist of January, 1910, he removed to Victoria and 
resumed his connection with the real-estate business, entering the employ of 
fracksell, Anderson & Company. At the end of one year he established himself 
is an independent real-estate dealer and on the ist of January following formed 
i partnership with J. O. Stinson and M. R. Pearce, organizing the firm of Stin- 
ion, Weston & Pearce. Their offices are located at 214-215 Say ward building 
ind there a general real-estate business is carried on, the firm acting both as agent 
md principal. A specialty is made of dealing in inside properties and handling 
nortgages and conservative investments and the firm also writes a great deal of 
nsurance, acting as a.gent for the German American Insurance Company of New 
fork. In 1911 Mr. Weston was instrumental in negotiating what was from a 
inancial standpoint perhaps the largest transfer of timber land ever completed 
m Vancouver island. It represented a consideration of approximately two and 
one quarter million dollars, the property being purchased by a German syndicate. 
The firm is one of the best and most favorably known of its kind in Victoria and 
:t controls a representative and growing patronage. Mr. Weston has extensive 
mdividual real-estate holdings and is interested in several financial enterprises 
in British Columbia. He is recognized as a far-sighted and discriminating busi- 
ness man whose sagacity is far-reaching and whose integrity is beyond question. 

In Belleville, Ontario, in 1888, Mr. Weston married Miss Rebecca Spear, 
;. daughter of John and Mary Spear. The father was a native of Corn- 
wall, England, and emigrated to Canada in 1852, locating in Belleville where he 
tngaged in agricultural pursuits and where he has since resided. Mr. and Mrs. 
Weston have three children: Mary Olive, who married W. S. Nason, of Victoria; 
Leonard Spear, associated with the Times Publishing Company of Victoria; and 
Rebecca Louise, who is attending school in Victoria. The family residence is at 
Ho. 19, Highland drive, Oak Bay, and is a comfortable and attractive home over- 
1 >oking the sea and the Olympic mountains in the distance. Mrs. Weston is 
; ctive in church organization work and is president of the Ladies' Guild of the 
Metropolitan Methodist church. 

Mr. Weston was a member of the Field Battery at London, Ontario, having 
tnlisted for the purpose of going to the Northwest Territories at the time of the 
Riel rebellion. However, the Field Battery was not called out and he saw no 
active service. He is a charter member of Camosun Lodge, No. 60, A. F. & A. 
M., and belongs to the Pacific and Progress Clubs of Victoria. He holds mem- 
l ership in the Board of Trade and although he has always taken an active inter- 
est in politics is independent, voting for the man on account of qualifications 
rather than for mere party's sake. His religious views are in accord with the 
coctrines of the Methodist church. Ability, integrity and industry have brought 
I im success in business and his excellent personal qualities have won for him the 
esteem and regard of all who have met him in a business or social way. 



WILLIAM JOHN LUTLEY. 

Among the younger set of able business men of Vancouver is William John 
Lutley, who as secretary of Williams & Murdoflf, Limited, of Vancouver, occu- 
pies an important position in the commercial life of the city. He is yet a 
young man and his career is another proof of the fact that this is the age of the 
ymng man's business success, the young man who by his successful policies 
proves the value of modern methods. Born in Exeter, England, on January 
25, 1880, Mr. Lutley is a son of Samuel Baker and Mary Ann (Hayden) Lutley, 
the father also a native of that city. He was a well known construction engineer, 
a man of ability with more than local renown, and among other projects of 
importance he built in part the Bombay and Thana canal in British East India. 



474 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

William John Lutley was reared amid the surroundings of a cultured home 
and in the acquirement of his education attended Wellington College, in Somer- 
setshire, entering upon a position in a wholesale drygoods house in London 
after leaving school. He remained in the world's metropolis until 1904 and no 
doubt its hastening life and overcrowdedness largely induced him to turn his 
thoughts towards the favoring conditions prevailing in the great Canadian west. 
A man of action, he soon transformed his ideas into reality and came to Arcola, 
Saskatchewan, ready to engage in any work that his hands might be able to 
perform and selecting farming as the most likely to bring the quickest success. 
Conditions, however, did not come quite up to expectations and he concluded 
that in the fast developing British Columbia there were still greater chances 
for young men of his brains and ability and he therefore came to Vancouver, 
where he located, becoming connected with the firm of Williams & Murdoff. 
Soon gaining the confidence and commendation of those in charge because of 
the ready adaptability with which he performed his duties he made himself 
master of business procedures and details of operation. Upon the incorpora- 
tion of the firm, in 1908, as Williams & Murdoff, Limited, Mr. Lutley became 
secretary of the company and has since continued in that important office. 
The firm largely carries on a general real-estate business and they are also 
financial brokers. They are very heavy investors in realty, being especially 
interested in farm properties in the interior. An optimist in the best sense of 
the word, yet a man of logical mind and sound judgment, Mr. Lutley has largely 
contributed to the success of the firm and has himself become an acknowledged 
judge of real-estate conditions and values in this region. He firmly believes in 
the great future of Vancouver and British Columbia and that property values 
will yet rise to unprecedented heights. He gives proof of his firm belief in a 
number of judicious investments which he has personally made in the city as 
well as the province and his aggressive activities are not only leading him to pros- 
perity but are a force in general advancement and development. 

On August 30, 1906, Mr. Lutley was united in marriage at Washington, to 
Miss Lucile Hopkins, of Michelston. County Meath, Ireland, youngest daughter 
of the Rev. Francis Hopkins, chaplain to the bishop of Dublin. Mr. and Mrs. 
Lutley have one son, Hayden. Both he and his wife are members of the Church 
of England. Mr. Lutley is essentially a home man and is at his best at his own 
fireside. However, he is popular in the business world on account of his open- 
heartedness and frankness and the friends he has made in Vancouver are 
numerous. Wherever known he enjoys the highest regard and confidence and 
considered from every viewpoint must be counted a valuable addition to the 
best class of citizenship of Vancouver. 



JAMES WILSON. 

The importance of his previous service in connection with interests of vital 
worth and significance to the general welfare, well entitles James Wilson to enjoy 
rest from further labor. It was ill health, however, that forced his retirement, 
for he is a man of marked energy and enterprise, never happier than when 
engaged upon the solution of some important professional problem. He was 
born July 12, 1856, in Ontario, and is a son of James and Mary Ann Wilson, the 
latter a daughter of Theophilus Smith, who came to Canada in 1809 from Woed- 
enbeck, in Northamptonshire, England. He was a son of Captain Thomas Smith, 
who was one of the advisors of the governor general of Western Canada at the 
time of the War of 1812. 

James Wilson, Sr., became a resident of Canada in 1855. He was a native 
of Alnwick, Northumberlandshire, and a son of the Rev. Ralph Wilson, of Eng- 
land, who died during the early childhood of his son, James Wilson, Sr. The 
latter settled in Elora, Ontario, where his remaining clays were passed, and his 




JAMES WILSON 



B'RITISH COLUMBIA 477 

wife also departed this life in that province. In their family were seven children: 
James, of Vancouver ; Ralph and Hugh, who are residents of New Westminster ; 
Theophilus, of Manitoba; Phyllis, of Ontario; Janet, wife of A. C. Fraser, whose 
home is in Moose Jaw, he being inspector of the Canadian Pacific telegraph 
system ; and a boy who died in infancy. 

James Wilson remained in the province of Ontario until 1876, or until he 
reached the age of twenty-one years. His educational opportunities had been 
somewhat meagre, but in the school of experience he has learned many valuable 
lessons, making him a well informed, efficient and resourceful man. In 1872 
he took up the study of telegraphy in his native town and in 1873 moved to 
Toronto. In 1876 he went to Nova Scotia, where he was placed in charge of 
the cable office at Torbay Station for the Dominion Telegraph Company, contin- 
uing there until 1878. He was then made inspector of construction for the com- 
pany for Nova Scotia and New Brunswick, and in 1879 was superintendent of 
construction for the same district for the company. In May, 1880, he was sent 
to British Columbia as district superintendent of the Dominion Government 
Telegraph System and thus continued until October, 1886, when the major por- 
tion of the government lines were transferred to the Canadian Pacific Railroad. 
He was then appointed superintendent of the Pacific division of the Canadian 
Pacific Railway lines and remained in that position of responsibility and honor 
until he was forced to retire because of ill health on the 3Oth of June, 1910. He 
had gradually worked his way upward, advancing step by step, the exercise of 
effort developing his latent talents and ability until he was qualified to superin- 
tend most important interests. 

In July, 1884, Mr. Wilson was united in marriage to Miss Jennie Webster, 
a daughter of George and Martha Elinor Webster, of Dresden, Ontario. George 
Webster, who died at Dresden, was a native of Aberdeen, Scotland. After his 
death Mrs. Webster was married to Hon. T. R. Mclnnes, of British Columbia. 
Mr. and Mrs. Wilson have one child, Dr. George T. Wilson, who is a graduate of 
the arts and medical departments of McGill University and is now practicing 
in New Westminster. 

Mr. Wilson and his family are members of the Presbyterian church, and in 
his fraternal connection he is a Mason, having been affiliated with the order since 
1878, his membership being now in Cascade Lodge of Vancouver. Mr. Wilson 
has lived to see notable changes since coming to Vancouver. He was the first 
Canadian Pacific Railroad telegraph superintendent to take up his abode in Van- 
couver and when he took charge everything was in a crude condition, the com- 
pany then having but one transcontinental wire. During his incumbency in the 
office the system was developed until he was in charge of six transcontinental lines 
in addition to operating nearly all the telegraph lines in British Columbia. The 
steps in Mr. Wilson's orderly progression are easily discernible. From the out- 
set of his business career he mastered every task that devolved upon him, and 
from the faithful performance of his daily duties found strength and inspiration 
for the labors of the succeeding day. Each forward step brought him a broader 
outlook and wider opportunities, and he at length gained a position of prominence 
in connection with the management of a telegraphic system of the northwest. 



ARTHUR BRYAN WILLIAMS, B. A., J. P. 

Arthur Bryan Williams is numbered among the representative and valued 
citizens of Vancouver, where since 1905 he has ably and efficiently discharged 
his duties as game warden of British Columbia and as justice of the peace for 
the province. He has resided in British Columbia since 1888 but was born in 
Lismany, County Galway, Ireland, December 8, 1866, his parents being David 
Arthur and Mary S. (Cocksedge) Williams, natives of England, who after- 
ward moved to Ireland, where the mother still resides. 



478 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

A. Bryan Williams acquired his education in the public schools of his native 
city and at Cambridge University, from which he received the degree of B. A. 
In 1888 he came to Canada and settled in British Columbia, where for fifteen 
years thereafter he engaged in prospecting and mining in the interior, visiting 
during that time practically every portion of the province and becoming familiar 
with the different kinds of game and with the laws governing the hunting of 
the same. His comprehensive knowledge along this line received official recog- 
nition in June, 1905, when he was appointed provincial game warden, an office 
which he has most acceptably and creditably filled since that time. He con- 
ducts the affairs of his department in a businesslike way, studying conditions 
and seeking to improve them, and he has accumulated some valuable statistics 
concerning game destruction and preservation in British Columbia. In the 
same year in which he received his appointment as game warden Mr. Williams 
was made justice of the peace of the province and he still retains this position, 
his services reflecting credit upon his ability and his public spirit. 

In Vancouver, on the 2ist of January, 1902, Mr. Williams was united in 
marriage to .Miss Alice Moens, of Blackheath, England, and they have become 
the parents of a daughter, Mary Adeline. While at Cambridge Mr. Williams 
served for two years as a private in the University volunteers and during that 
time also became interested in athletics, an interest which he has carried for- 
ward into his later life. In the early days in Vancouver he held an important 
position on the local football team and was a member of the rowing crew. He 
belongs to the Western Club of Vancouver and to the Union Club of Victoria 
and he is well and favorably known in both cities, having during the twenty- 
five years of his residence in the province gained an extensive circle of warm 
friends. 



ROBERT BLACKSTOCK. 

Robert Blackstock, who was engaged in farming in the vicinity of Hammond, 
was one of the well known residents of Maple Ridge municipality, where he held 
the official position of both reeve and councillor. He was born at Lake Simcoe, 
Perth county, Ontario, on the i6th of July, 1849, and was a son of Thomas and 
Mary Anne (Strong) Blackstock, both of whom are deceased. George Black- 
stock, a brother of our subject, is a well known resident of Haney, British 
Columbia. 

The son of a pioneer agriculturist of limited means, the early advantages 
of Robert Blackstock were very meagre. Such education as he received was 
acquired in the common schools of Essex and Listowel counties, Ontario, prior 
to the age of nine years. His service being needed at home he then laid aside 
his text-books and began assisting his father with the work of the farm. This 
was before the advent of the modern agricultural implements, when the various 
processes connected with the cultivation of the fields involved long and laborious 
hours of toil, farm work being little less than drudgery from dawn to dark 
during the growing season, and naturally the duties of Robert Blackstock were 
many, and oftentimes taxed the endurance of the lad. Long before he had 
attained his majority he was thoroughly familiar with the practical duties of the 
agriculturist and was taking the place of a man about the farm. He remained 
at home until he was twenty-five and then started out for himself. For a time 
he traveled through different portions of the United States and Canada looking 
over the country, and finally settled in the state of Washington. He took up his 
residence there in 1874, and after engaging in lumbering for. four years came 
to British Columbia. His destination was Victoria, but from there he later 
went to Granville, now Vancouver, where he remained for a year. In the autumn 
of 1879 he located in the vicinity of Hammond and there he engaged in lumber- 
ing for ten years. At the expiration of that time he turned his attention to agri- 




g 



K 



PC 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 481 

cultural pursuits and for twenty years was actively engaged in farming, meeting 
with a good measure of success in his undertaking. 

On the 5th of July, 1883, Mr. Blackstock was married to Miss Mary Isaac, a 
< aughter of William and Elmira Isaac, the ceremony occurring at New West- 
i linster. Of this marriage there were born four children, as follows : Robert 
I larold, Albert George, Nora M. and Tereca M. 

Fraternally Mr. Blackstock was formerly affiliated with the Independent Order 
c f Odd Fellows. His political support he gave to the conservative party and 
f )r three years he served as reeve in the municipality of Maple Ridge, while for 
several years he held the office of councillor. Mr. Blackstock worked hard from 
eirly childhood and well merits such success as attended his efforts. He was 
a man of good principles, honest and upright in his transactions, diligent and 
e iterprising in his business methods, and enjoyed the respect and esteem of his 
njighbors and fellow citizens. He died July 8, 1913, and his many friends felt 
the deepest regret at his death because his was a well spent life worthy the 
r :gard of all. 



WILLIAM JAMES WHITESIDE, K. C. 

The consensus of public opinion places William James Whiteside in the 
f -ont rank among the barristers of New Westminster. He is practicing as a 
n ember of the firm of Whiteside & Edmonds and the extensive clientage 
accorded them is indicative of the ability which they display in handling intri- 
cate and involved legal problems. Mr. Whiteside was yet a young man of 
twenty-two years when he came to British Columbia in 1886, his birth having 
occurred in the county of York, Ontario, on the i5th of January, 1864, his 
parents being Thomas and Jane (McCowan) Whiteside. The father was also 
a native of the county of York, while the paternal grandfather came from Ire- 
It nd to the new world, settling in Ontario. The mother was a native of Scot- 
land and in her girlhood accompanied her parents to Canada. The marriage 
o Thomas Whiteside and Jane .McCowan was celebrated in Ontario and they 
continued to reside for a number of years in York county, removing thence to 
Oxford county, near Woodstock, where the latter passed away in 1911. The 
f; ther, who made farming his life work, is now living retired in the village 

Inniskip. In politics he is a conservative. 

William James Whiteside was reared at home, acquiring his education in 
the Toronto Collegiate Institute, following which he engaged in teaching school 
fc r two and one half years. He regarded this, however, merely as the initial 
stap to other professional labor, and with a desire to become a member of the 
b; r he entered the law office of G. W. Badgerow, of Toronto, who was a mem- 
hx-r of the local legislature from east York. Mr. Whiteside pursued his studies 
under the direction of Mr. Badgerow for a year and then in 1886 came west 
to British Columbia. Settling in New Westminster, he entered the law office 

01 T. C. Atkinson, with whom he remained for three years and then finished 
hi; studies with Armstrong, Eckstein & Gsynor. In 1890 he was called to the 
b; r, after which he entered at once upon the active practice of law. He remained 
alone for a year and then formed a partnership with Judge F. W. Howay, with 
w iom he was associated for two years. He was next associated with the firm 
of Corbould, McColl, Wilson & Campbell, for two years, after which Mr. White- 
sMe entered upon active practice in partnership with the present premier, Sir 
R chard McBride. A year later, attracted by the gold discoveries, he went to 
Rossland and in that mining district practiced law for six years. In 1902, how- 
e-\er, he returned to New Westminster and became one of the organizers of 
ths firm of Morrison, Whiteside & McQuarrie, the senior partner being now 
a member of the supreme bench. In 1905 Mr. Whiteside became a partner of 
H. L. Edmonds, who is his present associate. For eight years they have con- 



482 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

tinued active at the New Westminster bar, the firm being recognized as one 
of the strongest among the barristers of New Westminster. Mr. Whiteside 
has always been a close and discriminating student of law and his knowledge 
of legal principles is comprehensive and exact. Moreover, he is seldom if ever 
at fault in the application of a legal principle and his reasoning is clear, con- 
cise and convincing. 

On the 3ist of October, 1893, Mr. Whiteside, was united in marriage to Miss 
Margaret Dalglish, a daughter of James Dalglish, a business man of Ottawa, 
and they have become the parents of seven children : Isabelle Marjorie, William 
Gordon, Jean Kennedy, Margaret Eleanor, James McCowan, John Dalglish 
and Mary Beatrice, all yet at home. 

Mr. Whiteside is a liberal in his political views. He is well known fra- 
ternally, holding membership in King Solomon's Lodge, No. 17, A. F. & A. M., 
and in the Royal Arch Chapter. He is likewise a member of Royal City Lodge, 
No. 3, I. O. O. F. He belongs to the Westminster Progressive Association 
and to the Burnaby Lake Country Club. Appreciative of the social amenities 
of life, yet he never allows these to interfere with his professional duties. He 
gives to his client the service of great talent, unwearied industry and rare learn- 
ing, yet he never forgets that there are certain things due the court, to his own 
self-respect, and above all to justice and a righteous administration of the 
law, which neither the zeal of an advocate nor the pleasure of success will per- 
mit him to disregard. He is able and faithful, and conscientiously ministers 
in the temple of justice. 



WILBER STANLEY SMITH. 

The term of self-made man is truly applicable to Wilber Stanley Smith, who 
from a humble position has raised himself to one of importance through his 
own efforts based upon industry, energy and self-denial. Mr. Smith occupies 
a foremost position among the business men of New Westminster, where he is 
engaged in teaming and also deals extensively in coal and wood. He was born 
in St. Stephen, New Brunswick, March 29, 1866, his parents being George F. and 
Mary E. (Dean) Smith, both natives of that province. There the mother passed 
away. The father came to British Columbia about 1870 and engaged in logging, 
with which occupation he was identified for several years. He also spent a 
year or more in the Cassiar mining district during the gold excitement there. 
He died in Victoria in 1878, about eight years after coming to British Columbia. 
Wherever known he was highly respected and was a member of the Masonic 
lodge. 

Wilber S. Smith was reared at home and received a meager education until 
his twelfth year, when he went to work as a farm hand in his native province. 
Three years later he crossed the border into the United States, spending four 
years in various parts, and in 1888 came to British Columbia, where for nearly 
two years he found employment in the lumber districts, after which he came to 
New Westminster. After driving a' team for two months for another man he 
bought a team and engaged in that business for himself. For the past twenty- 
three years he has been prominently identified therewith, his trade connections 
and annual income increasing as the years have passed. He has also since 
engaged as a dealer in coal and wood and his various interests result to him in 
gratifying financial returns. 

On February 24, 1892, Mr. Smith was married to Miss Minnie Smith, of 
St. Stephen, New Brunswick, and to them were born eight children, of whom six- 
survive, namely : Hazel Mildred, Beryl Estelle, Wilber Gordon, Percy Raymond 
and Kenneth Graham and Clyde MacKenzie, twins. 

Since making his home in New Westminster, Mr. Smith has always actively 
participated in all matters of public importance and has been a member of the 




WILBER S. SMITH 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 485 

< ouncil of New Westminster for one term in 1907. Not only has he witnessed 
i he city grow from a small provincial town into one of the metropolitan 

< enters of the Canadian west, but has been an active and cooperant factor in 
] ringing about the transformation. Fraternally he is a member of Union Lodge, 

>Io. $, A. F. & A. M.j and Royal City Lodge, No. 3, I. O. O. F., being also a 
member of the encampment and canton of the latter organization. Moreover, 
1 e is affiliated with Granite Lodge, No. 16, K. P. Mrs. Smith is a member of the 
JJaptist church, to which organization she gives her ready support, and is also 

< onnected with charitable and other beneficent work in connection with that 
institution. Highly respected and honored, both Mr. and Mrs. Smith are popular 
ia social circles of New Westminster and enjoy the friendship of many. 



ALEXANDER ROBERT MOWAT. 

There is no more trusted, capable and reliable man in the employ of the 
Canadian Pacific Railroad Company than Alexander Robert Mowat, of Van- 
couver, who throughout forty years of earnest, conscientious and able service 
i s an engineer has seen railroad history develop in Canada and has taken a 
j rominent part in its making. During that time he has gained the trust and 
1 igh regard of the officials of the company he serves and the confidence and 
good-will of his associates and today there is no better known nor more widely 
1 eloved resident of the city where he makes his home. He was born in Gait, 
( Jntario, April 3, 1854, and is a son of A. H. and Barbara Mowat, distinguished 
descendants of a noble Scotch family and for a number of years residents of 
t le Shetland islands. The father served as deputy attorney of Wellington 
cDunty, Ontario, and did a great deal of important and notable work in this 
capacity. He and his wife have passed away. 

Alexander R. Mowat acquired his education in the public schools of Merlin. 
< >ntario, and after laying aside his books learned the carpenter's trade, at which 
he worked for four years, becoming afterward an employe of the Grand Trunk 
Railroad at Toronto, serving in the capacity of fireman from 1873 to 1880. He 
vas afterward for three years on the run between Toronto and Stratford on 
the Grand Trunk Railroad and he resigned in the spring of 1883 in order to 
iter the service of the Canadian Pacific Railroad as engineer, remaining active 
ii this capacity since that time. As the rails were laid and the territory covered 
b/ the road extended Mr. Mowat followed with his engine, running for two 
y>:ars between Fort William and Calgary, Alberta, and finally becoming con- 
n :cted with the Rocky Mountain division under James Ross, chief engineer of 
construction. In charge of his engine he continued to follow up the work of 
construction and was in charge of the engine which pulled the train carrying 
tioops to quell the Riel rebellion. In the summer of 1885 the line was finished 
t(> Port Moody. In 1886 he went to Montreal and brought an engine from that 
city across the continent to Port Moody. The same year he ran an engine from 
Port Moody to Kamloops and the next year the line was extended to Revel- 
stoke. When the local train on the branch road from Seattle to Vancouver was 
pit on Mr. Mowat was placed in charge of the engine and he continued in this 
capacity for twenty years thereafter, years of hard and often dangerous work 
and of conscientious and earnest service. In his day he has pulled trains carry- 
it g many members of the nobility and notable personages in all ranks of life, 
Lord Aberdeen being a frequent passenger, and at present, although Mr. Mowat 
h is been forty years in the service, he is still active and hearty and always alert at 
the throttle of the engine he loves. His present run is between Vancouver and 
Agassiz. 

Mr. Mowat married Mrs. Z. Alice Middlemas, a daughter of James and 
Wary Dunlap, the former a prosperous farmer of Grinnell, Iowa. Mr. and 
Mrs. Mowat have one daughter, Ruth Helen, who is attending school. They 

Vol. IV 1 7 



486 BRITISH COLUMBIA 

occupy a handsome home at No. 1212 Davie street, Vancouver. In 1900, when 
Mr. Mowat purchased the lot, it was entirely unimproved and the street had not 
yet been opened, only a path was running where handsome Davie street now is. 
In politics Mr. Mowat pays little attention to party lines, voting always for 
the man whom he considers best fitted for the position. Although he tak'es an 
active and intelligent interest in the growth of the proving to which he came in 
early times he is not active in public life, concentrating his attention upon his 
duties as .an engineer. He is an enthusiastic gardener and a lover of all kinds 
of outdoor sports, being especially fond of fishing and baseball. He has many 
interesting recollections of pioneer railroad days in Canada, days when the 
engineer's duty was never done, when he slept, ate and practically lived at the 
throttle, responsible for the lives of the people in his charge. In those early 
times Mr. Mowat knew many notable people and had friends among the Indians, 
often conversing with Chief Crowfoot, of whom Ralph Connor makes mention 
in one of his stories. His life is a record of daily duties conscientiously per- 
formed, the years bringing him a high place in the confidence of his superiors and 
the true success which lies in the consciousness of work well done. 



FRANCIS KERMODE. 

Francis Kermode, curator of the Provincial Museum of British Columbia at 
Victoria and a naturalist of more than ordinary reputation and unusual ability, 
was born in Liverpool, England, June 26, 1874. He is a son of Edward George 
and Elizabeth (Newby) Kermode, natives of Liverpool, the paternal ancestors, 
however, having come originally from the Isle of Man. Edward G. Kermode 
was a shipwright by trade and for many years engaged in shipbuilding in his 
native city. In 1881 he came to British Columbia, leaving his family in Liver- 
pool, and a short time afterward moved to China, where he remained until 1883. 
In that year he returned to this province and, locating in Victoria, decided to 
make his permanent home in the city. He therefore sent for his family and they 
arrived in this city November second of the same year. The mother passed away 
in Victoria in 1892 but the father survives, living retired at the age of sixty-nine 
years. 

Francis Kermode was nine years of age when he arrived in Victoria and he 
completed an education, begun in the parochial school of the Anglican church 
in Liverpool, in the public schools of this city. At the age of fifteen he secured 
a clerkship in one of Victoria's mercantile establishments, where he was employed 
for about eighteen months. In September, 1890, he was appointed assistant 
curator of the British Columbia Provincial Museum and here found work well 
suited to his tastes and abilities and became a student of natural history. He 
carried his researches far into the fields of this science and his work soon gained 
for him wide recognition and a place among men of superior attainments in this 
field. In February, 1904, he was made curator of the museum and has since 
held this important position, his scientific knowledge and his interest in his 
work making him reliable, accurate and painstaking in the discharge of his duties. 
He is a member of the American Ornithologists Union, a charter member of 
the American Museums Association, a member of the Natural History Society 
of British Columbia, the National Geographical Society and the Cooper Ornitholo- 
gists Club, and his ability is recognized and respected in scientific circles. His 
research work in the field of natural history has added greatly to present-day 
knowledge of this branch. He spends a great deal of time on shooting and hunt- 
ing trips through the mountains of the province and has brought back many 
specimens to the museum and was instrumental in the discovery of a new species 
of bear named in his honor Ursus Kermodei. Professor Hornaday in his account 
of the circumstances surrounding the finding of this species says : "In November, 
1900, while making an examination of the skins of North America bears that were 




FRANCIS KERMODE 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 489 

:o be found in Victoria, British Columbia, the writer found a very strange speci- 
nen in the possession of Mr. J. Boscowitz, a dealer in raw furs. The skin was of 
i creamy white color and very small. Mr. Boscowitz reported that it had come 
o him from the Nass River country and that he had previously received four 
)r five similar skins from the same locality. Although this skin was of small 
;ize and had been worn by an animal no larger than a grizzly cub one year old, 
he well worn teeth indicated a fully adult animal. Believing that the specimen 
night really represent a new ursine form, it was purchased and held for corrob- 
jrative evidence. In view of the multiplicity of new species and sub-species of 
Morth American bears that have been brought out during the past ten years, it 
s not desirable to add to the grand total without the best of reasons for doing 
:,o. Four years have elapsed without the appearance of a zoological collector 
nthe region drained by the Nass and Skeena rivers, and further evidence regard- 
ng the White Bear of British Columbia was slow in coming. At last, however, 
ihe efforts of Mr. Francis Kermode, curator of the Provincial Museum at Vic- 
loria, have been crowned with success, in the form of three skins in a good 
: tate of preservation. They represent two localities about forty miles apart. The 
our specimens now in hand are supplemented by the statements of reliable per- 
. i ons regarding other white bear skins which have been handled or seen by them, 
; nd were known to have come from the same region. Following the route that 
; polar bear would naturally be obliged to travel from its most southern haunt 
in Behring sea to the Nass river, the distance is about twenty-three hundred 
i liles. But the teeth of these specimens show unmistakably that they are not polar 
1 ears. There is not the slightest probability that albinism is rampant among any 
c f the known species of bears of North America; and it is safe to assume that 
these specimens do not owe their color to a continuous series of freaks of nature. 
' 'here is no escape from the conclusion that a hitherto unknown species of white 
I ear, of very small size, inhabits the west-central portion of British Columbia, 
;.nd that it is rep