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Full text of "The Brockton hospital cook book .."

TX 715 
.B849 
Copy 1 




Brockton 
Hospital Cook Book 

910 




Class rX2i5__ 



Copyright N". 



COPYRIGHT DEPOSIT. 



910 EDITION 



The Brockton Hospital 
COOK BOOK 




"Better than the Best." 

CONTAINS OVER SIX HUNDRED VALUABLE LOCAL COOKING 
RECIPES NOT IN THE 1906 EDITION. 

PUBLISHED BY 

The Brockton Hospital Ladies' Aid Association 

1910. 



Copyright, 1909, by Geo. Clarence Holmes. 
All rights reserved. 



^ 



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©CU2o27G8 



Ys EDITOR SAYS 




I HE first part of the Brockton Hospital Cook Book, 
1906 Edition, we believe, was the best publication of 
the kind ever issued in New England. The success of 
that publication has led to the issuance of this 1910 
Edition, which is substantially entirely separate and 
distinct, so far as the recipes are concerned, from the 
first part, and we feel confident that those who pur- 
chase this book will be satisfied that nothing better in the cook book 
line was ever issued in Plymouth County. 

The members of the Ladies' Aid of the Brockton Hospital have 
put in a great deal of work in an endeavor to provide the cooks with a 
book that shall not only be of untold value to them, but shall be of 
financial value to the Brockton Hospital. Every cent received for the 
first thousand books goes directly to the treasury of the Ladies' Aid, 
and that means that every cent goes to the benefit of the Hospital 
itself. 

The Brockton Hospital is an institution established and conducted 
for the benefit of all the people of Brockton, regardless of age, race, 
sex or color, and the sale of this book is meant to help along this phil- 
anthropic object. 

There is not one cent paid to any person who asks you to buy this 
book for the benefit of the Brockton Hospital, and so we ask you to 
remember that the one who is trying to sell you this book is trying to 
help along a good cause, and that the only pay she gets is the con- 
sciousness of a good work for a good cause conscientiously performed. 
We are pleased to be able to assist in the production of so excel- 
cellent a cook book for so worthy a cause, and if anyone purchasing 
this book is not fully satisfied that she gets more than the worth of her 
money, the book can be returned, and the entire amount paid for it 
will be refunded without question. 

It is always a pleasure to help along a good cause, and the Brock- 
ton Hospital is certainly that. What little work the editor has done 
has been to help along the cause, whether it should or should not 
rebound to his personal benefit. 

Ye editor, per G. C. H. 




You will find the above label on 
the outside cover of every new novel 
as soon as it is published. 

We buy all the new fiction. All 
the most popular books we buy in 
liberal quantities, and do not confine 
ourselves to one or two copies. 

We loan our books at a flat rate of 
two cents a day, no book to be kept 
out over twenty days. 

If you want a novel that does not 
happen to be on the shelf, you can 
leave your name for it, and as soon as 
it comes in, we will charge it to you, 
and notify you by telephone or by 
mail. 

We pay a great deal of attention to 
our library business, and mean to run 
the best and most up-to-date circulat- 
ing library in the State. We are al- 
ways open to suggestions for the bene- 
fit of our customers. 

If you want to read all the best and 
latest novels, come and see us at 

58 Main St., Enterprise Building. 



T 

I 

S 

I 

s 

u 
o 

L 
M 
E 



58 Main St. [[ 
Enterprise Bdg. [L 



CONTENTS 



Recipes from the White House, Beacon Hill 




and the City Hall 


9 


Bread ..... 


11 


Breakfast and Tea Cakes 


17 


Eggs ..... 


26 


Soups ..... 


31 


Fish and Shell Fish 


36 


Meat ..... 


45 


Poultry ..... 


54 


Vegetables .... 


59 


Salads ..... 


67 


Sauces for Meats, Fish, etc. . 


84 


Entrees ..... 


89 


Puddings .... 


95 


Pudding Sauces .... 


110 


Cold Desserts .... 


114 


Ices, Ice Cream, etc. 


125 


Pies ..... 


133 


Gingerbread, Doughnuts, Cookies, etc. . 


140 


Cake 


149 


Confectionery .... 


169 


Chafing Dish Dainties 


181 


Pickles, Relishes, and Jellies 


188 


Sandwiches . . . . 


204 


Left-Overs . . . . 


215 


Beverages .... 


222 


Treatment for Emergencies 


226 


Suggestions for the Sick and Convalescent 


231 


Table of Weights and Measures . 


. . 238 




CA SH vs. CREDIT 

EARS ago, when Brockton was a small unpretentious 
town, when all its merchants knew all of their customers 
personally, the size of their families, and their financial 
condition, and their moral characters, such a thing as a 
strictly cash store was practically unknown. At that 
time individual sales were larger, the price was higher, 
and the customer was given practically his own time in 
which to pay the bill. As Brockton has grown larger, its 
population has changed somewhat, until it is practically 
impossible for any large dealer to be well acquainted with 
all of his customers. One result of this has been the 
establishment of cash stores, where the individuality of 
the customer counts but little, where his credit is not questioned, as 
the method of doing business requii'es spot cash. 

The size of these cash stores and the amount of business which 
they do, shows conclusively that the people believe they can get more 
for the same money by paying cash than they can by receiving credit. 
There are reasons for all this, and reasons why a man who sells for 
cash can sell cheaper, or give more for the money than can the man 
who gives credit. Admitting that every customer pays his bill some- 
time, it is plain to every one that the length of time taken in which to 
pay the bill costs just so much interest money, and that interest 
money, generally, in a business the size of the This is Holmes' Coal 
Business would amount to some thousands of dollars in a year. In 
addition to this, giving credit requires additional office help, and addi- 
tional expense in keeping the accounts, so that it is only a fair propo- 
sition that the man who gets credit should pay twenty-five cents a ton 
more for coal than the man who pays spot cash, and this is based on the 
assumption (sometimes incorrect) that every one who gets trusted 
will pay his bill. 

For a great many years we have adhered very closely to the spot 
cash principle of doing the coal business, and for the purpose of expe- 
diting business, we have habitually given some little souvenir to all 
customers who pay cash at the time they order their coal. These 
souvenirs, as a general thing, cost us much less than the actual cost 
would be of opening an account with a customer. Many and useful 
things which we give, or have been giving, are lead pencils, court 
plaster, pocket mirrors, packs of needles, envelope openers and rules, 
book marks, and sometimes even coal hods and cook books. 

On all of these things will be found words of good advice as to the 
proper place to purchase coal. The plan seems to meet with general 
favor, as shown by our steadily increasing trade. Our platform is 
expressed in the words, "A Square Deal." 

We mean to deliver the best coal that money will buy at the low- 
est price at which a fair profit can be obtained, and any coal not per- 
fectly satisfactory^will be promptly takenout [and replaced by other 



coal or the money. 



THIS IS HOLMES', 58 Main St. 



The Brockton Hospital 

Is not a private institution, but belongs equally to all the people, and 
it is managed and directed by a band of public-spirited men and 
women who get absolutely nothing out of it but the satisfaction of 
having done their best to save life and relieve suffering. The more 
liberal the monied people are, the more lives can be saved and more 
suffering relieved. 

The Hospital Ladies' Aid Association is the most valuable single 
adjunct of the Hospital, and every cent that goes into the Associa- 
tion's treasury, whether from the sale of cook books or other sources, 
goes directly to the benefit of the Hospital. The sale of the 1906 
Cook Book netted the treasury over $450, and it is hoped that this, the 
1910 edition, will be still more successful. 

Too much praise cannot be given Mrs. C. C. Merritt and her de- 
voted band of fellow workers on this little book. No one; who has 
not had experience, has any idea of the vast quantity of work 
demanded for the proper production of a work of this kind, and every 
purchaser of this book is helping along the good cause. A public 
institution, privately managed, should be absolutely free of all taint 
of inefficiency, graft, incompetency and favoritism, and if anything 
appearing like that should come to your attention make it your busi- 
ness to report it, and in that way do your part to help along the good 
work that is the only aim and object of 

The Brockton Hospital 



Looking Backward 





N page four of the 1906 Cook Book appeared a fairly 
flattering picture of the man who was the cause of 
the existence of the Brockton Hospital, as well as of 
the Hospital Cook Book, and as he never means to 
turn his back on any friend, worthy object or person, 
the above picture is produced in order that you may 
see the back of his head, whether you see what is in 
or not. TT is an unusual picture, and he does unusual and often 
unpopular things in a way that seems his very own. He sells coal, 
hay, grain, poultry suplies, post cards, stationery, reading matter, 
postage stamps, etc., because he has to live, and these things bring in 
the wherewithal. Confidentially, he is an impractical sort of a chap, 
by nature a theorist and dreamer. He wants money enough to live 
in comfort, but has not the slightest desire to be what is usually 
called rich. He believes in an aristocracy of brains, not of money and 
arrogance. Funny sort of a chap, anyway, but he wants your trade 
in his several lines, and his thousands of customers say that he is a 
good man to tie to. 

8 



The Brockton Hospital Cook Book. 

A White House Recipe. 

GINGERBREAD CAKE. 

Two and one-half pounds flour; two ounces ground ginger; 
one-half pound brown sugar; three-fourths pound orange peel, 
cut small ; two pounds treacle or golden syrup ; 6 eggs, yolks 
and whites ; one pound butter. 

Mix the flour, sugar and spices together. Then melt the 
treacle and beat up the eggs and mix all well together. 
Cream the butter and add to it the other ingredients ; stir in a 
teaspoonful of bi-carbonate of soda, beat all well together for 
a few minutes, put into pan, bake in a moderate oven three 
hours. Half this quantity makes a good sized cake. 

— Mrs. William Howard Tqft. 

A Beacon. Hill Recipe. 

RECIPE FOR COOKING A VIRGINIA OR 
KENTUCKY HAM. 

Select carefully a small Virginia or Kentucky ham. Put 
the ham in cold water and soak all night. In the morning, 
put the ham in a kettle filled with cold water. Place the 
kettle on stove and it will take an hour to boil. Then let it 
simmer five or six hours. Let the ham cool in the water it 
boils in. Then skin the ham and trim off some of the fat. 
Sprinkle with bread crumbs and a little sugar, and stick in a 
dozen or more cloves. . Brown in the oven. 

— Afrs. Eben S. Draper. 

A City Hall Recipe. 

COURTBOUILLON. 

Take three or four nice slices of halibut. Make a sauce by 
putting one tablespoonful of lard into the stew pan, and when 
it is hot, stir in gradually two tablespoonfuls of flour. Add 
one chopped onion, six tomatoes (chopped), one chopped 



bunch of parsley, one clove of garlic, a sprig of sweet basil 
and a sprig- of thyme, all chopped very fine. When it browns 
nicely without burning, pour in about two pints of water, and 
let it come to a boil. Rub the fish well with salt and pepper, 
and pour over it a cup of boiling vinegar. Put the fish, 
slice by slice, into the pan and let it simmer for about half an 
hour, or until the flesh begins to be soft. Then remove from 
the fire, take out of the pan, and lay the slices in a dish. Pour 
the gravy over the fish, and serve with garnishes of sliced 
lemon. — Mrs. John S. Kent. 




^ Our Special Soft Shamo- 
kin Coal is better for the 
cook stove than anything 
in the Brockton market, 
except Franklin. We never 
claimed it to be better than 
Franklin. We never claimed 
anything for our coals but 
the truth, and our lady 
customers say w^e did not 
put it half strong enough. 
^ We have all other kinds 
of coal, and we sell them 
clean and free from stone 
or slate. 

This is Holmes' Corp. 

58 Main St. Enterprise BIdg. , 

} , j 



M- 



Bread. 

WHITE BREAD. 

Grate one medium size raw potato. Pour boiling water over 
it and stir until thoroughly mixed when it will become thick 
and starchy. It will be about one pint. Have one pint of milk 
scalding hot, add to the potato ; to this mixture add one large 
spoonful sugar ; salt, and one-third cup shortening. When suf- 
ficiently cool add two yeast cakes. Sift in bread flour until a 
stiff batter is formed. Cover and place where it is warm. Let 
stand until it is soft and spongy, about three hours. Stir down 
and add flour enough to handle easily. Let rise again, about 
two hours. Then mould in pans. Let stand until light. Bake 
slowly. Two loaves and pan of biscuit. This is a day bread 
mixed at nine o'clock. — Mrs. W. H. Poole. 

Right Coal, Right Price, Right Treatment, or Money Back at Holmes'. 

WHITE BREAD. 
(One Loaf). 
One cup milk, scalded and cooled; one tablespoon butter 
melted in the hot milk ; one-half teaspoon salt, one level table- 
spoon sugar, one-fourth yeast cake, about four cups of flour. 
Measure the milk after scalding; add the butter, sugar and 
salt. When cool add the yeast which has been dissolved in 
one-fourth cup lukewarm water. Then stir in the flour grad- 
ually. When it is well mixed and does not adhere to sides of 
the bowl, turn onto the board lightly floured, and knead until 
small white blisters appear on the surface. Cover closely and 
set it out of a draft. In the morning it should have doubled 
in bulk ; if so, cut through and through and turn with a knife, 
cover and let rise until light. Shape into loaf, put into pan, 
cover and let rise to top of pan. Bake in a hot oven about 
forty-five minutes. 

Right Coal, Right Price, Right Treatment, or Money Back at Holmes'. 



To make one loaf of day bread, mix in the morning same 
quantities as above, but instead of one-fourth dissolve one 
whole yeast cake in one-fourth cup lukewarm water, then pro- 
ceed as above. — Nellie Lyons. 

OAT MEAL BREAD (Good). 

Two and one-half cups rolled oats cooked, 
Two and one-half level tablespoons lard, 
Two and one-half dessertspoons salt. 
One and one-fourth yeast cakes, 
One and one-fourth cups molasses. 
Three-fourths teaspoon baking soda, 
Two and one-half quarts flour. 

G. B. Beattie. 

Best Postcard Views of Brockton at Holmes'. 58 Main St. 

OATMEAL BREAD. 

One cup rolled oats ; add two cups boiling water ; let stand 
one hour. Then add one teaspoon salt, one-half cup molasses, 
one yeast cake, one and one-half cups warm water. Add 
bread flour enough to make it very stiff. Put in quite deep, 
narrow pans. Let rise until light, and bake. — Mrs. Bligh Tel- 
fer. 

GRAHAM BREAD. 

Four cups graham flour ; four cups white flour ; one tea- 
spoon salt ; three tablespoonfuls molasses ; one tablespoonful 
lard; one-half yeast cake dissolved in warm water. Mix 
thoroughly with warm water, not too stiff; let rise; bake in 
a moderate oven about forty minutes. — Mrs. M. F. Twomey. 

GRAHAM BREAD. 

Two cups graham flour ; one cup white flour ; one-half cup 
molasses ; one and one-half cups sour milk ; one teaspoon soda ; 
little salt. Makes one loaf. — Mrs. F. S. Johnson. 

Best Postcard Views of Broci<ton at Holmes', 58 Main St. 
12 



GRAHAM BREAD. 

Two cups scalded milk, one-half cup molasses, two cups 
white flour, four cups graham flour, one-fourth cup lukewarm 
water, one-fourth yeast cake, two teaspoons salt. Mix milk, 
molasses and salt. When lukewarm add dissolved yeast cake ; 
sifted white and graham flour. Beat well and rise to nearly 
double its bulk, beat again and put in buttered bread pans or 
shape like biscuit, let rise and bake in oven cooler than for 
white bread. Loaves, one and one-fourth hours ; biscuit, thirty 
minutes. — Mrs. W. H. Wade. 

Best Postcard Views of Brockton at Holmes', 58 Main St. 

GRAHAM BREAD. 

Sift one quart of graham flour, add one-half teaspoon salt; 
beat one teaspoon soda in one cup molasses until it becomes 
yellow. Then pour on flour; one pint milk, beat well. Cover 
pans with paper while baking. This quantity makes four 
loaves which look like dark cake. — Mrs. Ellen Mullins. 

BROWN BREAD Cand Method of Baking). 

One pint rye meal, one pint fine corn meal, one cup sour 
milk, one small cup molasses, two teaspoonfuls soda, salt. Mix 
quite soft with water or part milk. Butter well a tin such as 
holds one pound coffee. Pour in mixture, set in a lard pail 
of larger size, cover both tightly, filling space between the two 
with hot water, and bake from noon until six o'clock. It will 
need no attention if kept closely covered. — Mrs. L. W. Puffer. 

Best Postcard Views of Broci<ton at Holmes', 58 Main St. 

BROWN BREAD. 

One cup corn meal, one-half cup molasses, two cups sour 
milk, one and one-half teaspoons soda, one cup graham flour, 
one cup rye flour, one and one-half teaspoons salt. Put soda 
through a fine sieve, add to dry ingredients and sift again. 
Add molasses and sour milk. Beat well. Pour in buttered 
mould, steam three hours. — Mrs. W. H. Wade. 

13 



BROWN BREAD. 

Two cupfuls corn meal, one cupful rye meal, three cupfuls 
sour milk, one-half cupful molasses, one tablespoonful soda, a 
pinch of salt. Steam four hours, bake ten minutes. — Mrs. 
Charles Tully. 

If You Want Hay, Grain and Straw Satisfaction, Holmes. 

BROWN BREAD. 

One cup corn meal, two cups shredded wheat crumbs, one- 
half teaspoon salt, one teaspoon soda, dissolved in one tea- 
spoon cold water ; one cup molasses, two cups milk ; steam 
three and one-half hours. — Mrs. M. E. Merritt. 

ENTIRE WHEAT BROWN BREAD. 

Two cups entire wheat, one-half cup boiling water, one cup 
milk, one-half cup molasses, one cup seedless raisins, one tea- 
spoon salt, one teaspoon soda; steam three hours if in a loaf; 
steam two hours if in cups. — Mrs. John W. Simmons. 

NUT BREAD. 

Four cups flour, four teaspoons baking powder, four table- 
spoons sugar, one teaspoon salt, one and one-half cups chopped 
walnuts, one egg well beaten, one and one-half cups milk or 
enough to make a stiff dough. Knead in loaf and let rise one- 
half hour. Bake slowly one hour. Use as other bread. — Mrs. 
R. D. Poole. 

If You Want Hay, Grain and Straw Satisfaction, C Holmes. 



TmSISftOLMES 

STORE- 58 MAIN ST. OFFICE: 



14 



You Can Cook Best with Holmes' Peerless Coal 
Write Your New Recipes Here. 



15 



Who Burns HOLMES' 
Soft Shamokin Coal? 

0r We never sold coal that gave such universal 
^ satisfaction for the cook stove as our Special 

-U Soft Shamokin does, and a customer who 
tries it once is usually more enthusiastic over its 
merits than we dare to be. If we made as strong 
claims for it as our customers do, we might be 
charged with misrepresenting our goods in order to 
make a sale. We positively guarantee our coals 
(all of them) to be exactly as represented or money 
refunded. ^ If you get any coal of us and it does 
not seem to be the right kind to use in your par- 
ticular stove, we will willingly change it for you. 
^ We believe that "a pleased customer is the best 
advertisement," and as we also believe in adver- 
tising, we try our hardest to get "the best adver- 
tisement." ^ Ask any of the hundreds of ladies 
who use our Special Shamokin, or any of the hun- 
dreds of others who have bought other kinds of 
coal of us if they are not "pleased customers." 
^ Take no substitute. There is nothing, at the 
price, "just as good" as our Special Soft Shamo- 
kin Coal. ^ We do not advertise our other coals 
extensively, but we have them, and warrant them 
to be first-class in every respect. ^ We sell for 
cash. It costs nothing to collect our bills. The 
money saved in this way we pay out to make our 
coal clean and free from stone and slate. 

^ Don't you know this from your own 
experience? 




i6 



Breakfast and Tea Cakes. 

PARKER HOUSE ROLLS. 
Two cups scalded milk, three tablespoons butter, two table- 
spoons sugar, one teaspoon salt, yeast cake dissolved in one 
and one-fourth cups lukewarm water, use almost five and one- 
half cups flour. Add butter, sugar and salt to milk; when 
lukewarm add dissolved yeast cake and three cups flour. Beat 
thoroughly, cover and let rise until light, and add enough flour 
to knead (it will take about two and one-half cups). Let 
rise again. Toss on lightly floured board, knead, pat and roll 
out to one-third inch thickness. Shape with a biscuit cutter 
first dipped in flour. Dip the handle of a case knife in flour 
and with it make a crease through the middle of each piece; 
brush over one-half of each piece with melted butter, fold and 
press edges together. Place in a greased pan, one inch apart. 
Cover, let rise and bake in a hot oven twelve to fifteen min- 
uts. — Mrs. Walter Bradford. 

p. O. station 4, 58 Main St., Does More Post Office Business Than Any 
Town in the State. 

SALLY LUNN. 
Scald one cup milk and pour over it two tablespoonfuls each 
of butter and sugar and one-half teaspoon salt. When luke- 
warm, add one-half yeast cake dissolved in lukewarm water, 
three well beaten eggs and enough flour to make a stiflf batter ; 
let rise until very light. Pour into buttered muflin tins, let 
rise again and bake in a hot oven. — Mrs. F. E. Harrison. 

POTATO BISCUIT. 
Two cups flour, three tablespoonfuls lard, a little salt, one 
good cup mashed potato, three teaspoons baking powder. Mix 
with half milk and half water. Bake in a large pan so they 
won't touch one another. — (C.) 

p. O. Station 4, 58 Main St., Does More Post Office Business Than Any 
Town in the State. 

17 



SALAD ROLLS. 

Dissolve three yeast cakes in one cup lukewarm water, add 
one pint milk scalded and cooled, one teaspoon salt, one table- 
spoon butter, two teaspoons sugar. Stir in enough flour to 
make a stiff dough and knead one-half hour, using as little 
flour as possible in kneading. Then without waiting for it to 
rise, divide into equal parts for small rolls and shape into balls 
and then into finger rolls, or press a small knife handle through 
the middle, making cleft rolls ; put the rolls into pan, cover 
with a cloth and let rise about forty-five minutes, then bake 
in a quick oven twenty to forty minutes according to size. Do 
not stop kneading until the time is up or let the dough stand 
before shaping. Do not disturb the dough while rising. The 
idea is to make the dough light quickly. In less than two 
hours you will have nice light rolls, with no trace of yeast. The 
crust will look hard but will be light and tender. — Mrs. C. C. 
Merritt. 

Bring Your Cash With Your Coal Order and Get a Useful Present at 
58 Main St. This is Holmes'. 

HOT CROSS BUNS. 

Scald one and one-half cups milk and place in a mixing 
bowl with one-half cup sugar; when lukewarm (not hot) add 
one-half yeast cake which has been softened in two tablespoons 
warm water ; stir in flour enough to make a thick batter and 
set in a warm place to rise. When the batter is double its bulk, 
cream in two tablespoons sugar, a little nutmeg, one-half cup 
currants, a little salt, and flour enough to knead. Knead five 
minutes and let rise again. Then mould into round biscuits 
and gash a cross on the top of each. When well risen, bake 
twenty-five minutes in a hot oven. This will make twenty 
buns, and they are delicious. In the old countries the "Hot 
Cross Bun" is the favorite bread eaten on Good Friday. — 
Mary Sullivan — Jerusalem. 

Bring Your Cash With Your Coal Order and Get a Useful Present at 
58 Main St. This Is Holmes'. 



FINE BAKING POWDER BISCUIT. 
One quart flour, one pint milk, three teaspoonfuls baking 
powder, three tablespoonfuls lard, even teaspoonful salt. — 
Mrs. W. F. Hyatt. 

Bring Your Cash With Your Coal Order and Get a Useful Present at 
58 Main St. This is Holmes'. 

BAKING POWDER BISCUIT. 
One quart flour, measured after sifting; one even teaspoon- 
ful salt, three rounding teaspoonfuls baking powder; sift all 
together two or three times. Rub in one large tablespoonful 
butter with the tips of the fingers until as fine as meal ; add milk 
gradually to make a soft dough, it will take nearly if not quite 
a pint; when just stiff enough to be handled, turn it on to a 
well floured board; toss with a knife until well floured; pat 
it with a rolling pin but do not roll it, and when about half an 
inch thick, cut into rounds and bake at once in a hot oven. — 
Mrs. J. I. Merritt. 

PUFF BALL MUFFINS. 
One well beaten tgg, one dessertspoonful sugar, pinch of 
salt, one cup milk ; add flour to make a thin batter ; beat until 
bubbles arise; add three level teaspoonfuls baking powder. 
Pour into hot buttered gem pans. — Mrs. H. C. Vining. 

Bring Your Cash With Your Coal Order and Get a Useful Present at 
58 Main St. This is Holmes'. 

MUFFINS. 
One egg, one tablespoonful sugar, two tablespoons melted 
butter, one cup sweet milk, one-half teaspoon soda, one tea- 
spoon cream of tartar sifted into one and one-half cups flour. 
Bake twenty minutes in hot oven. This recipe makes eight 
muffins. — Mrs. P. J. Lynch. 

RYE MUFFINS. 
One rounding cup rye meal, one rounding cup pastry flour, 
one rounding teaspoon baking powder, one egg, one level tea- 
spoon salt, one and one-eighth cups milk. Sift meal, flour, 



baking powder and salt together ; add milk and one egg well 
beaten ; beat all together until light. Put in muffin pans, bake 
in a hot oven. This will make twelve muffins. — Margaret 
Lyons, 

BRAKFAST GEMS. 
One egg, two tablespoons sugar, one teaspoon melted butter, 
two cups flour, two teaspoons baking powder. Beat eggs, add 
sugar, butter and one cup milk ; lastly flour and baking powder 
sifted together; pinch of salt. Bake in a hot oven. — Mrs. 
George M. Hart. 

Rich and Poor, All Used Alike, 58 Main St. This Is Holmes'. 

POPOVERS (fine) 
Beat two eggs without separating whites and yolks, until 
light; add two cups milk, then continue beating with an egg 
beater while two cups of sifted flour sifted again with one-half 
teaspoon salt are gradually beaten into the liquid mixture. 
Butter an iron muffin pan, one with round cups preferred, 
and put a level teaspoonful of butter in each cup. Then turn 
in the batter, filling the cups two-thirds full. Bake in a hot 
oven about thirty-five minutes. This recipe makes about 
twelve large popovers. — Mary Westberg. 

POPOVERS. 
One cup flour, one-fourth teaspoon salt, seven-eighths cup 
milk, two eggs, one-half teaspoon melted butter. Mix salt 
and flour ; add milk gradually ; add egg, beaten until light, and 
butter which has been melted. Then beat two minutes, turn 
into hot gem pans and bake twenty-five to thirty-five minutes 
in hot oven. Iron gem pans are best for popovers. — Mrs. 
H. T. Rhoades. 

Rich and Poor, All Used Alike, 58 Main St. This Is Holmes'. 

CORN BREAD. 
One cup granulated Indian meal, four tablespoonfuls flour, 
two tablespoonfuls sugar, one cup milk, one egg, one teaspoon- 
ful baking powder, a little salt. Bake in a buttered pan. — 
Mrs. Geo. B. Holland. 



BREAKFAST CORN CAKE. 
One cup flour, one-half cup Indian meal, one-fourth cup 
sugar, one cup milk, one egg, one teaspoon soda, two tea- 
spoons cream of tartar, one-half teaspoon salt. Bake in a quick 
oven. — Mrs. Minnie Wade Rogers. 

CORN CAKE. 

One egg, one teaspoon salt, one-half cup melted butter, one 
cup milk, one and one-half cups sugar, one large cup white 
flour, three-fourths cup Indian meal, one full teaspoon baking 
powder. — Mrs. Annie McCarthy. 

Rich and Poor, All Used Alike, 58 Main St. This Is Holmes'. 

JOHNNY CAKE. 

One egg, one-half cup sugar, salt, one cup flour, level tea- 
spoonful baking powder, a very heaping tablespoonful corn 
meal, one-half cup milk. Mix flour, corn meal, sugar, salt and 
baking powder thoroughly ; beat the egg, add the milk and stir 
into dry mixture. Bake in a shallow pan in a quick oven. — 
—Mrs. S. H. Eaton. 

WHITE CORN MEAL CAKES. 

One cup granulated white corn meal, add salt and a Httle 
soda as large as a pea. Then partially scald the meal with boil- 
ing water. Then add one tablespoon sugar and two of flour, 
a small teaspoon of baking powder and wet it up with milk. 
Have your fat about one-half inch deep in the frying pan and 
drop in by spoonfuls, turning quickly and often. Have dough 
rather stiff. — Mrs. Wm. H. Cook-Whitman. 

Rich and Poor, Ail Used Alike, 58 Main St. This Is Holmes'. 

RICE CAKES. 

Two cups cold boiled rice, broken with a fork ; one and one- 
half cups bread crumbs, one-half cup milk or more if bread is 
dry; three unbeaten eggs, one-half teaspoon salt, one dessert- 
spoon sugar. Brown nicely in buttered frying pan. — Mrs. 
H. E. Merritt. 



COFFEE CAKES. 

One-half cup sugar, one-half cup butter, one-half cup mo- 
lasses, one-half cup strong coffee, one cup raisins (chopped), 
two cups pastry flour, one egg, one teaspoon soda, one tea- 
spoon each of nutmeg, clove and cinnamon. Bake in small 
tins. Will make fourteen or sixteen cakes. — Mrs. W. H. 
Poole. 

VIRGINIA WAFFLES. 

One cup white corn meal, two cups boiling water, one cup 
milk, two and one-half cups flour, two eggs, one teaspoon 
salt, one-fourth cup melted butter, one-fourth cup sugar, three 
teaspoons baking powder. — Annie E. Wade. 

Hay, Grain and Poultry Supplies at Holmes' Ames St. Office. 

BUCKWHEAT CAKES. 

One cup buckwheat flour, one level tablespoon sugar, one- 
half level teaspoon salt, two level teaspoons baking powder, 
one and one-fourth cups milk. Small cakes and serve with 
butter (softened) and maple syrup. — Mrs. W. H. Poole. 

CREAM TOAST. 

Take as many slices of bread as required. Toast them light- 
ly and butter; pile on plate. Put one quart of fresh milk in 
spider and heat quite hot. Take each slice of buttered toast, 
dip in hot milk for a minute, removing without breaking to 
dish in which it is to be served. Thicken the remaining milk 
with a little corn starch to the consistency of gravy, add a little 
salt and a piece of butter and pour over toast. If needed add 
a little more milk to the spider after dipping toast. Serve im- 
mediately. — Mrs. E. C. Cahoon. 

Hay, Grain and Poultry Supplies at Holmes' Ames St. Office. 

BROWN BREAD TOAST. 

Cut stale brown bread into slices and toast, taking care not 
to scorch it. Butter liberally and sent hot to table. — Ahina 
Lyons. 



STRAWBERRY SHORTCAKE. 

One full pint pastry flour, one teaspoonful cream of tartar, 
one-half teaspoon soda, two tablespoonfuls shortening well 
rubbed in ; mix with milk ; pinch of salt. Bake in two cakes, 
when done spread over with butter. 

Filling. — Two-thirds cup sugar, one pint strawberries, one 
cup cream. I think the canned strawberries are equally as 
good. — Mrs. T. Gushing. 

Hay, Grain and Poultry Supplies at Holmes' Ames St. Office. 

SHREDDED WHEAT OMELET. 

Crush one shredded wheat biscuit and add to it one egg 
beaten and a little milk, enough to moisten the whole ; a very 
little salt and one-half teaspoon sugar. When thoroughly 
mixed and soft spread on a buttered frying pan and brown 
both sides of the cake. This quantity serves one person. — Mrs. 
L. H. Shaw. 

DAD'S GRIDDLE CAKES. 

One-half cup of Indian meal, pinch of salt, very small pinch 
of soda, one tablespoon of molasses. Pour hot, but not boil- 
ing water in until you get a thin batter, add about two table- 
spoons of flour, thin out with milk to the right consistency 
and fry. — D. C. Holmes. 

Hay, Grain and Poultry Supplies at Holmes' Ames St. Office. 

NANTUCKET CORN MEAL GRIDDLE CAKES. 

Take one cup corn meal and two cups of white flour, and 
add enough sour milk to make a fairly thick batter, add a 
teaspoonful of salt, and a tablespoonful of sugar, and beat until 
very light. Let stand over night. Just before frying, add one 
teaspoonful of baking soda dissolved in sweet milk, and one 
or two eggs ; beat again thoroughly, and if too thick, use 
more sweet milk to thin batter. Rub the griddle with a piece 
of salt pork, when it is hot, and fry at once. 

— Mary B. Nesbitt, Nantucket. 
23 



You Can Cook Best with Holmes' Peerless Coal. 
Write Your New Recipes Here. 



24 



All these are 
Kickers ! 






58 



Most hotel patrons. 

Most school patrons. 

Most railroad patrons. 

Most telegraph patrons. 

All street car patrons. 

All newspaper patrons and reporters. 

All base ball cranks and preachers. 

All traveling men and poets. 

Some cooks. 

Some disappointed politicians and lovers. 

Some labor agitators and women 

suffragists. 
Most old maids and all old bachelors. 
Most drinkers and all "reformed drinkers. " 
All minority parties and reform bodies 

and all those who refuse to reform. 
Most mistresses of hired girls, and all 

hired girls who are not given 

Holmes' Special Soft Shamokin Coal 

to cook with. 



-^r Telephone 

(XI ii uyL» Connection. 

25 



Eggs. 

OMELET. 
Beat the yolks of five eggs and the whites of three together 
with one teaspoon corn starch, a httle salt and pepper, one- 
fourth cup melted butter, one-half cup sweet milk. Put into 
a well buttered frying pan and cook a light brown. When 
ready to take up, beat the whites of the two eggs stiff and 
spread it on, then fold the omelet over and serve at once. — 
Mrs. W. H. Thome. 

Peanut Coal — Holmes' Special — a Money Saver. 

POACHED EGGS. 
Boil one pint milk. While boiling, beat six eggs to a froth ; 
just before milk begins to boil add one-half tablespoon butter 
and one teaspoonful salt and stir into it. Then pour in the 
eggs, stir gently until it thickens, not more than two minutes. 
Take from stove and continue to stir half a minute, then pour 
over two or three slices of toasted bread, which have been pre- 
viously spread with butter. Very nice for breakfast. — Mrs. 
Georgianna Jordan. 

POACHED EGGS WITH CREAMED SALMON. 
Stamp out four rounds of bread an inch thick; remove the 
centers, leaving a case with a narrow rim. Brush over the 
outside of the cases with melted butter and brown them in the 
oven. Fill with canned salmon, flaked and heated in a cupful 
of cream sauce. Dispose a poached tgg about salmon. 
Serve garnished with parsley and slices of lemon. — Mrs. G. F. 
Jordan. 

Peanut Coal — Holmes' Special — a Money Saver. 

HARD BOILED EGGS. 
Put eggs in a sauce pan, cover with boiling water and let 
stand on part of the range where they will keep just below 
boiling point for twenty minutes. This will make the yolk dry 
and mealy. — Mrs. Mae Simpson. 

26 



EGGS A LA SUISSE. 
Cover bottom of a baking dish with two ounces fresh butter. 
Cover with grated cheese. Break eight eggs carefully and put 
little paprika and salt on each. Add a little cream and cover 
eggs with two ounces grated cheese. Brown in hot oven about 
twenty minutes. — Inez M. R. Hill. 

Peanut Coal — Holmes' Special — a Money Saver. 

EGGS A LA CREME. 
Eight hard boiled eggs, one cup white sauce, two table- 
spoonfuls fine crumbs, one tablespoonful butter. Slice six of 
the eggs and put them in a pudding dish with the white sauce. 
Rub the yolks of the other two eggs through a sieve ; mix them 
with the bread crumbs and sprinkle them over the top of the 
dish. Put bits of butter here and there. Garnish the dish 
around the sides with points of buttered toast and the extra 
whites of the eggs cut in rings. Set the dish in the oven until 
browned on top. — Mrs. C. C. Merritt. 

DELICATE EGG. 
Separate white from yolk of a perfectly fresh egg, being 
careful not to break yolk. Salt white and beat very stiff and 
put in a buttered cup ; set cup in hot water in oven ; cover and 
leave until just set, about a minute I think. Turn out on slice 
of thin, hot toast. — Mrs. A. C. Lawrence. 

Peanut Coal — Holmes' Special — a Money Saver. 

BEST OMELET EVER MADE. 
Four eggs, beating yolks separately ; dissolve four teaspoon- 
fuls flour in little milk; stir into egg. Scald one teacup milk, 
adding a small teaspoon butter and mix all together ; then beat 
the whites to a stiff froth and add to whole. Take the milk to 
dissolve flour from the cupful. Butter spider and when edges 
are set and puffed in center, set in oven to brown. Cheese, 
ham, chicken, etc. minced fine to fold in. — Mrs. Minnie Wade 
Rogers. 

27 



PRESERVING EGGS. 

(From the United States Agricultural Department.) 
Fill an earthern or water-tight wooden vessel with eggs. To 
one part of water glass, also known as soluble glass, and sili- 
cate of soda, add ten parts of tepid water, stirring the water 
thoroughly and slowly into the water glass. When the result- 
ant mixture is cold, pour it gently over the eggs, using suffi- 
cient to immerse them. Three pints of water glass and thirty 
pints or fifteen quarts wili generally cover fifty dozen of eggs. 
Keep the vessel well covered and in a cool place. — Copied by 
Mrs. L. H. Shaw. 



Uarnuma 




was thirty feet long, if you let Bamum tell it. When 
called to account, he used to say that the snake 
measured fifteen feet from head to tail, and fifteen 
more from tail back to head. Do not judge the dead 
show man hastily. There are many business men 
today who think that if one-half they tell is the truth, 
they are doing well. 

i[[ We want to talk Stationery to you, and we do not 
claim gold dollars for forty cents. We might claim 
that our 2 5 -cent box papers were worth half-a- 
dollar, but they are simply the best we can possibly 
buy to sell for a quarter. 

^ Our new 1 5-cent paper would be "sold at a great 
sacrifice" if it was in some stores, but we bought it to 
sell for I 5 cents, and when you see it you will see 
the value, h is the best we ever had for the price. 
^ Our 1 0-cent box papers, 24 sheets of paper and 
24 envelopes, are the best in the city. "A pleased 
customer is the best advertisement." We can please 



you at 



58 MAIN ST. 



28 



You Can Cook Best with Holmes' Peerless Coal. 
Write Your New Recipes Here. 



29 




OAL in Paper Bags 
with the hod printed 
on them. 



THIS is the COAL that costs you 
nothing if not perfectly satisfactory. 
Your grocer will take your name 
cind pay you back your money. We 
protect him. 

^ This coal is Holmes' Special Shamo- 
kin, that sells for 75 cents a ton more thein 
other bag coals, and gives better satis- 
faction. This is the coal that is all stove 
size in the bags marked "S"; all No. I 
Shamokin Nut in the bags marked "N"; 
and vs^e have a bag printed in red ink 
and marked "P" that sells for 2 cents less 
and contains our popular Peemut Coal. 
^ We do not mix the sizes to make 
money. Ask your grocer for this coal, 
and you may be sure to get just w^hat 
you pay for. 




3° 



Soups. 

PUREE OF CANNED SALMON. 

Remove the oil, bones and skin from one-half can salmon ; 
chop the salmon very fine. Boil one quart milk; melt one 
tablespoonful butter, stir into it two level tablespoon fuls flour ; 
add the hot milk to this in small quantities blending each time, 
until perfectly smooth ; add the salmon and when heated it is 
ready to serve. — Hannah A. Hale. 

Diaries, Almanacs and All Kinds of Reading Matter at Holmes'. 

CORN PUREE. 

One can corn, one pint boiling water, one pint milk, one slice 
onion, two tablespoons butter, two tablespoons flour, salt, very 
little pepper. Chop the corn, add water and simmer twenty 
minutes ; rub through a sieve ; scald milk with onion, remove 
onion and add milk to corn. Bind with butter and flour cooked 
together. Add salt and pepper. — M. G. Weston. 

TOMATO BISQUE SOUP. 

One pint can of tomato, one pint milk, scalded separately ; 
thicken milk with one teaspoon corn starch ; put together and 
strain; season with butter, salt and pepper; add a little sugar 
if desired. — Mrs. L. F. Gurney. 

Diaries, Almanacs and All Kinds of Reading Matter at Holmes'. 

DELICATE SOUP. 

Cook two onions thinly sliced in one-fourth cup of butter 
ten minutes; add one quart chicken stock, cook slowly thirty 
minutes ; strain ; thicken with two and one-half level table- 
spoonfuls each of butter and flour cooked together. Add one 
cup cream or rich milk ; season with salt and pepper and just 
before sending to table add one tablespoonful finely chopped 
green peppers. — Mrs. C. C. Merritt. 

3.1 



PEANUT SOUP. 
Take two tablespoonfuls peanut butter and one tablespoon 
flour, cream together and pour slowly over this one pint boil- 
ing water; stir constantly to keep smooth. Season with salt 
and pepper. Add to this one pint scalded milk. If too thick 
add more hot water. Serve immediately with croutons or 
crackers. To be made of home made butter. — Mary Packard. 

CREAM OF CELERY SOUP. 
Take two quarts of chicken stock for foundation. Boil one 
pint of milk ; chop one cupful celery fine ; add to chicken stock 
with two onions ; boil thirty minutes. Season with salt, black 
and cayenne pepper to taste. Strain and thicken with Roux. 
To make a Roux, one tablespoonful butter, melt ; then add one 
tablespoonful of flour; add this to the boiling milk, then the 
strained chicken stock. — Mrs. Ellis B. Holmes. 

Right Coal, Right Price, Right Treatment, or IVIoney Baci< at Holmes'. 

CELERY SOUP. 

One head celery, one pint water, one pint milk, one table- 
spoonful chopped onion, one tablespoonful butter, one table- 
spoonful flour, one-half teaspoon salt, one-half saltspoon pep- 
per. Wash and scrape celery, cut into half inch pieces, cook 
in one pint boiling salted water until soft. Cook the onion 
with the milk in a double boiler ten minutes, add to the celery. 
Rub all through a strainer and put on to boil again ; cook but- 
ter and flour together and stir into boiling soup. Add salt and 
pepper, boil five minutes, then strain into the tureen. — Inez 
M. R. Hill. 

PARSNIP STEW. 

Boil one-half pound fat and lean pork two hours, having 
plenty of water. Clean three parsnips and cut in quite thin 
slices, one onion of good size; add these to the boiling pork 
and simmer for one hour; add a quart bowl of potatoes cut 
in quite small pieces and cooked until thoroughly done. 
Season with salt and pepper and celery salt. — Mrs. W. H. 
Poole. 

32 



PEA SOUP. 

One cup dried split peas soaked in cold water three hours; 
drain and put on to boil in two and one-half quarts water and 
one onion and a ham bone. Cook until soft and rub through 
sieve. Season with salt and pepper, celery salt also if desired. 
This makes a good porridge. If a soup is desired dilute with 
milk or cream. — Mrs. W. H. Poole. 

Right Coal, Right Price, Right Treatment, or Money Back at Holmes'. 

OATMEAL GRUEL. 

Put in a double boiler one pint of water, two tablespoons 
Scotch oatmeal, scant teaspoon sugar and pinch of salt; let 
it boil together a long time. Take off and strain, add one-half 
cup of milk, a little piece of butter, and it is ready for use. — 
Mrs. Allie V. Packard. 




ZZ 



You Can Cook Best with Holmes' Peerless Coal. 
Write Your New Recipes Here. 



34 



■ 1 • 



ELxpenence 

has demonstrated that our Special Soft Shamo- 
kin Coal in the cook stove is not an 



Experiment. 



It is a fuel of assured value, and has 
the endorsement of 



EiXperts 



in the science of cooking. They agree that its 
qualities as a cooking fuel are something 

Extraordinary 

not merely because it is clean and free 
from stone and slate, but it is also 

Excellent 

coal to kindle quick, and hold 
fire well. The 

Expense 

of housekeeping is reduced by^ buying coal at 
58 MAIN STREET. 



35 



Fish and Shell Fish. 

HADDOCK A LA RAREBIT. 

One cup milk or thin cream, one-half cup flour, two cups 
shredded cheese, two teaspoons mustard, pinch salt, one table- 
spoon butter. Heat the milk, add flour, salt and mustard, sifted 
together. Stir until thick and smooth, then add cheese and but- 
ter. Have haddock (four and one-half or five lbs.) split down 
back, bone removed. Lay on a buttered platter. Spread the 
dressing over and bake until a rich brown in gas oven. Serve 
on same platter. — Eloise D. Harris, Melrose. 

Cribbage Boards, Playing Cards, etc., at Holmes'. 

BAKED HALIBUT. 

Two pounds halibut steaks. Make poultry dressing, put 
between slices, press together in shape of loaf; stand on the 
edge and cover with dressing. Skewer on very thin slices of 
salt pork, with wooden toothpicks, removed when baked ; add 
one-quarter cup water and bake one hour. Take from the 
pan, add one cup cream to contents of pan, stir and cook two 
minutes on top of stove ; pour over the fish when ready to 
serve. — Mrs. E. W. McAllister. 

Cribbage Boards, Playing Cards, etc., at Holmes'. 

BAKED HALIBUT WITH TOMATO SAUCE. 

Clean two pounds halibut, put in baking pan, pour around 
half the sauce, bake forty minutes, basting often. 

Tomato Sauce. — Two cups tomatoes, one cup water, one 
slice onion, three cloves, one-half tablespoon sugar, three table- 
spoons butter, three tablespoons flour, three-fourths teaspoon 
salt, one-eighth teaspoon pepper. Cook tomato, water, onion 
and cloves together for twenty minutes ; then add sugar, but- 
ter, flour, salt and pepper and cook ten minutes more. Strain. — 
Mrs. D. E. Hall. 

36 



BAKED HALIBUT. 
Take two pounds of halibut, fill with stuffing made as fol- 
lows : Three crackers pounded fine, one egg, one pint milk, one 
ounce butter; season with salt and pepper. Bake one hour. — 
Mrs. S. E. Stedman. 

Cribbage Boards, Playing Cards, etc., at Holmes'. 

FILLET OF HALIBUT. 

Dress fish and cut in fillets. Melt one-fourth cup butter, 
add one-eighth teaspoon pepper, one tablespoon lemon juice, 
a few drops of onion juice, one-fourth teaspoon salt. Dip fil- 
lets in mixture, dredge with flour and bake twelve minutes. 
Serve with Allemande Sauce. 

Allemande Sauce. — Melt two tablespoons butter, add two 
tablespoons flour, one cup stock or milk, and season with salt, 
pepper and lemon juice. Just before serving add the beaten 
yolks of two eggs. — Maria W. Howard. 

SALMON LOAF. 

One can salmon (flaked), four tablespoons melted butter, 
three eggs well beaten, one-half cup bread crumbs, dry and 
fine, pepper, salt. Steam one and one-half hours. 

Sauce. — Make a white sauce of milk thickened with corn 
starch; add one well beaten egg and liquor from can of 
salmon. — B. O. G. 

Cribbage Boards, Playing Cards, etc., at Holmes'. 

TURBAN OF FISH. 

Take two pounds of halibut, cod or haddock, boil twenty 
minutes in salted water to which one tablespoonful vinegar 
has been added. Let fish get cold and separate into flakes. 
Into a double boiler put one quart milk and a small onion 
sliced ; scald milk and remove onion ; melt one-half cup butter, 
add one-half cup flour, one level teaspoon salt, one teaspoon 
celery salt and pepper; add hot milk gradually, then add two 
eggs well beaten. Put a layer of fish on buttered dish, sprinkle 

37 



with salt and pepper, cover with sauce ; continue until sauce 
and fish are used, having sauce last; cover with buttered 
cracker crumbs and bake in hot oven until crumbs are brown. 
— Mrs. A. Wesley Stetson. 

BAKED SWORDFISH. 

Take two pounds of fish (have cut in a thick piece). But- 
ter an agate pan and put in the fish, sprinkle with salt and 
flour and little pieces of butter. Bake in a good hot oven 
three-quarters of an hour. Just before taking from the pan, 
pour over one cup nice cream. — Mrs. Orrin Joslyn. 

Coal Promptly Delivered When Promised at Holmes'. 

FRIED EELS, CAPE COD STYLE (Delicious). 

After an eel has been thoroughly cleaned and finned, cut in 
short pieces about one and one-half inches long, so as to hide 
the shape. Fry out two fair-sized slices of fat pork, for an 
ordinary spider, then place the eels in the fat in the spider and 
season with salt and cover closely; let them cook very slowly 
(just simmer) until tender. Then place directly over the fire, 
take the cover off the eels and fry brown quickly. — Mrs. Zenas 
W. Lewis. 

Coal Promptly Delivered When Promised at Holmes'. 

FINNAN HADDIE. 

Choose a thick fish. Put in a saucepan, flesh side down ; 
cover this with cold water and set it to cook on the back of the 
range. After it has set half an hour, draw it to a hotter part 
of range and gradually heat the water to the simmering point. 
Let simmer five or ten minutes, then drain fish carefully. Then 
separate the fish into flakes, discarding skin and bones. For 
each cup of fish prepare one cup cream sauce; i. e., melt two 
tablespoonfuls butter, cook in it two level tablespoons flour, 
one-quarter teaspoon each of salt and pepper, and gradually 
add one cup milk. Reheat the fish in the sauce. Put the fish 

38 



and sauce into a buttered baking dish, in alternate layers, hav- 
ing the last layer of sauce. Cover with cracker crumbs (two- 
thirds a cup to one-quarter cup butter) mixed with melted 
butter, and set into a hot oven to brown the crumbs. — Mrs. W. 
T. Lewis. 

Coal Promptly Delivered When Promised at Holmes'. 

CLAM CHOWDER. 

One-half peck clams or one quart from the shells. Boil them 
in one pint of water until they open easily. Remove heads, 
then separate and chop the hard portion very fine. Fry three 
slices of fat pork, adding when thoroughly fried, one large 
onion cut in slices, being careful not to burn the onion. Peel 
and cut very thin one quart of potatoes (after being sliced) 
and cook in a small quantity of water until quite tender. Take 
the water in which the clams were boiled, put in kettle, add 
potatoes, clams which have been prepared, onion with fat, add- 
ing pepper, salt if necessary. Have broth enough to more than 
cover the whole mixture, then let it simmer slowly. Break 
in some crackers. When about ready to serve, add as much 
milk as you please, one pint at least. — M. G. Weston. 

Coal Promptly Delivered When Promised at Holmes'. 

CLAM CHOWDER. 

One quart raw clams, one quart milk, one quart sliced 
potatoes. Separate the two parts of the clams, chopping the 
rims and squeezing out the black in the stomachs. Fry four 
or five slices of pork and after taking out the crisp slices of 
pork from the fat, add to the fat one quart of hot water, the 
stomachs of the clams and a little salt and pepper. Cook this 
mixture until potatoes are nearly done; then add the chopped 
rims, the quart of milk and what clam water you have. Strain 
the clam water through a cloth and just bring the whole to a 
boil. Dip crackers (in halves) in cold water, then put into the 
chowder before serving. — Mrs. L. H. Shaw. 

39 



SCALLOP CHOWDER. 
Wash one quart of scallops in one-half pint of water. Re- 
move scallops and strain liquor through cheese cloth. Melt 
one-quarter cup butter, add one onion cut in thin slices ; stir 
and cook until well browned ; add one cup water and cook five 
minutes; strain this into the scallop broth and heat to boiling 
point. Add one pint sliced potatoes that have been boiled in 
water to cover five minutes and drained, and cook until the 
potatoes are tender; add the scallops and cook five minutes. 
Cook one-quarter cup flour in one-quarter cup butter, stir this 
into one-quart hot milk; add this to above mixture when scal- 
lops are cooked. — Mrs. T. A. Hopkins. 

Money Back if Not Satisfied, and No Excuses at Holmes'. 

RECIPE FOR TWENTY GALLONS CLAM 
CHOWDER. 
Four pounds fat pork, four quarts onions, five gallons pota- 
toes cut in dice, five gallons water, five gallons milk, three gal- 
lons clams, two pounds butter, salt and pepper to taste. I use 
cayenne pepper. I fry my pork and onions the day before. 
Fry out the pork and then fry the onions until corn color. 
When I make my chowder I put on the five gallons of water; 
when it boils I add potatoes, pork and onions, also all the clam 
water that comes with the clams. When potatoes are half 
done, add the clam rims after being put through the meat 
chopper, and when two-thirds done, add the soft portion of 
the clams. When potatoes are thoroughly done, add milk and 
let it boil up twice. Stir it constantly after milk is added. I 
make mine in a farmer's boiler. When done and removed 
from the fire, add the butter. This is enough for i6o people, 
allowing one pint for each person. — Clara H. Bartlett. 

Money Back if Not Satisfied, and No Excuses at Holmes'. 

FISH CHOWDER. 
Take small pieces of pork, let fry in bottom of kettle ; then 
remove pork scraps and add two or three small onions, letting 
these cook until quite soft. Next add about one-half as much 

40 



water as wanted when done, and potatoes which have been 
previously pared and sHced; when nearly done, add fish which 
has been fixed as follows : Cook the fish in as little water as 
possible, letting the water boil up once ; remove from stove 
and take out all bones ; seasoning with salt, pepper and a small 
piece of butter, and add cream or milk to suit. — Mrs. Richard 
A. Snow. 

CLAM CAKES. 

One quart raw clams, prepare by squeezing out the black 
part of the clam, then chopping the rims. To the clams thus 
prepared, add two cups of wetting (milk and clam water), 
eight butter crackers rolled fine, one egg, one large cup sifted 
flour, two dessertspoons sugar, salt to taste, two full teaspoons 
baking powder. Fry in spider with good supply of fat in shape 
of griddle cakes. — Mrs. L. H. Shaw. 

Money Back If Not Satisfied, and No Excuses at Holmes'. 

QUAHAUG FRITTERS. 

Take twelve good-sized quahaugs, take from the shell and 
chop rather fine. Add two boiled potatoes after mashing fine ; 
two eggs, and flour enough to drop from a spoon. Fry in nice 
fat and drain on paper and serve hot. — Mrs. Julia Joslyn. 

OYSTER COCKTAILS. 

One quart best oysters, one bottle horseradish, four table- 
spoonfuls vinegar, one teaspoonful Halford or Worcestershire 
sauce, juice of two lemons, few drops of Tobasco sauce. Will 
serve six or eight persons. — Mrs. George Howard. 

Money Back if Not Satisfied, and No Excuses at Holmes'. 

FRIED SCALLOPS. 

Pour boiling water over scallops, let stand two minutes, 
drain thoroughly; put between two towels and dry. Season 
fine cracker crumbs with salt and pepper; dip the scallops in 
the crumbs, then in beaten eggs to which has been added one 

41 



tablespoonful of water, and again in crumbs. Cover the bot- 
tom of a frying basket with the scallops (do not heap them), 
fry in deep hot fat until brown. Serve at once. Tartar sauce 
can be served with them. — Mrs. Marcus Hall. 

Diaries, Almanacs and All Kinds of Reading Matter at Holmes'. 

FRIED OYSTERS WITH CREAM HORSERADISH 

SAUCE. 
Free the oysters from all shells, wipe each one carefully 
till it is quite dry, then sprinkle them with pepper and salt and 
set away for an hour or more. Take out, roll in very fine 
cracker Tumbs then in the beaten yolks of eggs, again in fine 
crumbs and drop into boiling fat to brown quickly. 

Horseradish Sauce. — For the horseradish sauce take three 
level tablespoonfuls grated horseradish root, one tablespoonful 
vinegar, one-quarter teaspoon salt, few grains cayenne ; mix 
these ingredients together and add four tablespoonfuls thick 
cream beaten stiff. — Mrs. Addie Joslyn. 

Diaries, Almanacs and All Kinds of Reading Matter at Holmes'. 

ESCALLOPED OYSTERS. 

One pint oysters ; roll the necessary quantity of cracker 
crumbs, soak them in milk until soft. Season to taste with salt 
and pepper. Put a layer of the soft crumbs on bottom of bak- 
ing dish, a layer of mixture until dish is filled, having crumbs 
last ; dot pieces of butter over top. Sprinkle with salt and 
pepper and bake until brown in a hot oven. — Clara H. Bart- 
lett. 



[THIS IS holmes; 

ST. -STORE- 58MAIN ST. OFFICE- SIT 



You Can Cook Best with Holmes' Peerless Coal. 
Write Your New Recipes Here. 



43 



When You are Hungry 
What Do You Eat? 

^ If you are very hungry, you eat anything eatable 
you can reach. You prefer good food well cooked, 
though, don't you? 

When Your Stove Gets Hungry 
What Does It Eat ? 

^ It eats what you put in it, but it can't eat stone 
and dirt. Holmes' Coals are to your stove what 
good, well cooked food is to you, and they will help 
make your own food well cooked. 
^ *'A pleased customer is the best advertisement." 
Holmes' Coals please. 

58 Main St., Enterprise Bldg. 



oooooooooooo ^"^ O ^"^ O """^ o ^^ o 



o o o o o oo o o o o o ^"^ o ^"^ o ^^ o ^^ o 

44 



Meat. 

BOILED MUTTON— CAPER SAUCE. 
Use the upper half of leg of mutton. Put over fire in boil- 
ing water to cover it, with one tablespoon salt and a small red 
pepper ; boil gently two hours, or until tender. Caper sauce is 
made by thickening one pint boiling milk with one tablespoon- 
ful flour dissolved in a little cold water and strained ; add one 
tablespoonful capers ; serve hot over the mutton. Garnish with 
parsley. 

Subscriptions for Any Paper or IVIagazine as Low as the Lowest, at 
Hoimes', 58 iVIain St. 

BEEF TENDERLOIN, MILANAISE. 
Place tenderloin in pan with slice of fat pork over and under 
it ; put into pan one onion peeled, one carrot and one green pep- 
per with enough boiling water to cover all. Bake slowly one 
hour. Meantime boil one-half package spaghetti in salted 
water twelve minutes ; then drain and let stand in cold water. 
For sauce, brown together two teaspoonfuls flour and butter 
and gradually mix with one pint of gravy from the meat, and 
add the spaghetti. Slice the tenderloin, put sauce over it and 
serve immediately. 

Subscriptions for Any Paper or Magazine as Low as the Lowest, at 
Holmes', 58 IVIain St. 

BRAISED FILLET OF BEEF. 
Select a fresh beef tenderloin, large or small according to 
party to be served. Wipe well with dry towel, place in baking 
pan with a little hot water. Chop one onion, one tomato, one 
green pepper and sprinkle over the meat, pinch of white pep- 
per, one teaspoon salt. Roast in medium oven forty-five min- 
utes, keeping a little water in pan to avoid meat becoming too 
dry. Make sauce as follows : Strain liquor from baking pan, 
add one pint stock or water, take ofif grease with ladle ; add 
one can champignons (mushrooms), thicken with one table- 

45 



spoon cornstarch dissolved in little cold water. Slice the fillet 
in portions and turn sauce over same. Serve hot with parsley 
garniture. 

These three recipes were contributed by Herbert L. Aldridge, 
Chef, Atlantic City, New Jersey. 

Poker Chips, Dice and Playing Cards at Holmes'. 

POT ROAST OF BEEF. 

Four to six pounds from the middle or face of the rump, the 
vein or the round. Wipe with a clean, wet cloth. Sear all 
over by placing in a hot frying pan and turning until all the 
surface is browned. Put in a kettle with one cup of water and 
place it where it will keep just below the boiling point. Do 
not let the water boil entirely away, but add only enough to 
keep the meat from burning. Have the cover fit closely to 
keep in the steam. Cook until very tender, but do not let it 
break. Serve hot or cold. The meat when cold is delicious, 
cut in quarter inch slices and sauted in hot butter. — Mrs. W. 
H. Thome. 

POT ROAST OF BEEF. 

A square of beef cut from the round, brown it in some of its 
fat in a frying pan, on all sides. Then add two full cups of 
hot water, cover closely and set in the oven and cook slowly 
until the meat is almost ready to fall apart. There should be 
only enough water for a gravy when the meat is done. Season 
the gravy with salt and pepper, and if desired it may be thick- 
ened a little. This makes tough meat tender and palatable. 
Ham can be used the same way. — Mrs. L. F. Gtirney. 

Poker Chips, Dice and Playing Cards at Holmes'. 

MEAT LOAF. 
Two pounds raw beef (rump or round), one-half pound raw 
pork (chops), two small onions, one-half cup milk, one egg, 
one-half teaspoon salt, pepper, one-half cup rolled crackers, 
two tablespoonfuls tomato. Put meat and onion through meat 
chopper, and add the other ingredients. Mix together into a 
loaf and bake one hour, basting frequently. — Mrs. W. P. Chis- 
holm. 

46 



BEEF LOAF. 
One pound hamburg steak, one-half pound pork sausage, 
one cup bread or cracker crumbs, two eggs, two cups milk, 
one large teaspoonful salt, one-half a nutmeg. Mix all to- 
gether and bake in bread pan half or three-quarters of an hour. 
— Mrs. Clara M. Folger. 

MEAT LOAF. 
Two pounds beef or veal, hamburged; one-quarter pound 
salt pork or suet, hamburged ; two small onions chopped fine, 
one cup crackers rolled very fine; salt; two eggs beaten welt; 
one teaspoonful turkey seasoning; one cup milk; bake three- 
quarters of an hour, — Mrs. G. E. Boiling, Mrs. B. O. Gibbs. 
E. A. F. 

Poker Chips, Dice and Piaying Cards at Holmes'. 

VEAL LOAF. 
Take three and one-half pounds of veal from the leg and 
chop it very fine ; add six powdered crackers, one-half pound 
of salt pork chopped fine and two eggs well beaten. Season- 
ing with one tablespoonful salt, one teaspoonful black pepper, 
one-half teaspoonful allspice, one-half teaspoonful ground 
clove, one-half small onion chopped fine ; sage or sweet mar- 
joram may be used instead of onion if preferred. Knead all 
this together and make into a loaf and place on a tin sheet. 
Beat one tgg and pour it over the loaf; put bits of butter on 
top and sift over it one-half pound of cracker crumbs. Take 
one-half teacup of hot water, add a piece of butter the size of 
a nutmeg, and with this baste the loaf three or four times while 
baking. Bake two hours. When cold cut in thin slices and 
serve for either breakfast or tea. — Mrs. Geo. A. Monk. 

Poker Chips, Dice and Piaying Cards at Holmes'. 

BRAISED BEEF. 

Six thin slices fat pork, one onion, one and one-half 

pounds round steak (cut thick), salt and pepper, one heaping 

tablespoonful flour. Fry out pork, add sliced onion and fry 

a delicate brown. Remove onion. Cut steak into pieces about 

47 



one and one-half inches square and fry a nice brown on all 
sides ; then add salt and pepper to taste, sprinkle over all the 
flour, stir well and pour over boiling water enough to cover, 
and cook slowly until meat is tender (about three hours). 
Add water if it boils away too rapidly. — Mrs. F. A. Sweetland. 

Holmes Has Coal That Will Suit You for All Purposes. 

HAMBURG STEAK. 

One and one-half pounds bottom of round, one-quarter 
pound kidney suet, run through meat grinder (medium knife). 
Add pepper and salt to taste. Make into small cakes and cook 
in hot spider with a little pork fat. Serve with brown gravy, 
tomato or onion sauce. 

Onion Sauce. — Boil until tender three or four onions. Drain 
and pass through sieve ; season with salt and pepper and stir 
in one dessertspoon flour and add to the gravy in the spider 
after removing the cakes to a hot platter. Let sauce come to 
a boil and pour over cakes. — Mrs. W. H. Poole. 

PRESSED VEAL. 
Boil a shin of veal in four quarts of water until the bones 
can be taken out and the water is nearly boiled away. Chop 
meat fine. Season with powdered mace, pepper and salt; add 
two crackers pounded and sifted and parsley cut small. Mix 
well together with the water that remains in the kettle, and put 
into a bowl previously wet with cold water. As you fill the 
bowl add slices of two or three hard boiled eggs ; cover thei' 
bowl with a plate ; set a weight upon it and let stand until next 
day. — Mrs. Geo. A. Monk. 

Holmes Has Ccal That Will Suit You for All Purposes. 

VEAL OYSTERS. 
Take a medium thick slice of veal steak and cut into rounds 
the size of an oyster. Season well and roll in beaten egg, then 
in fine bread crumbs. Place in frying basket and immerse in 
hot fat. The veal may be cooked a little before preparing as 
otherwise the "oysters" may brown before the meat is 
thoroughly cooked. Serve with brown gravy or tomato sauce. 
— Mrs. R. Hogg, Jr. 

48 



LAMB TERRAPIN. 
Two cups cold lamb cut into dice, two tablespoons butter, 
one teaspoon mustard, one tablespoon flour, one tablespoon 
Worcestershire sauce, one cup stock or gravy or meat extract 
or water, one-quarter cup cream, two hard boiled eggs, two 
tablespoonfuls sherry if liked. Make a sauce by blending but- 
ter, flour and mustard, adding the stock, cream and sauce and 
cooking five minutes after it boils. Put in next the yolks of 
eggs rubbed through a sieve and the meat. Heat gently, add 
whites of eggs cut small, season and serve on toast. — Mrs. 
Heman Eldridge. 

Holmes Has Coal That Will Suit You for All Purposes. 

SOUTHERN BAKED TRIPE. 
Cut tripe in squares and spread over with bread and onion 
dressing. Roll up and fasten with toothpicks; dredge with 
flour and spread with a little soft butter. Bake in hot oven 
over one-half hour, basting frequently with butter and hot 
water. Garnish with lemon slices and pass melted butter with 
a dash of paprika added. Fresh tripe should always be used 
as the pickled destroys the delicate flavor. — Mrs. A. L. Garvin. 

FRIED TRIPE. 
Cut cold boiled tripe in pieces three inches square and lay 
them for one-half hour in one tablespoon olive oil, two table- 
spoons vinegar, salt and pepper. Roll in cracker crumbs and 
fry in hot pork fat or butter. — Mrs. M. Smith. 

Holmes Has Coal Tliat Will Suit You for All Purposes. 

SHREWSBURY SAUSAGE. 
Chop fine one-quarter pound beef, same of veal, one-half 
pound lean pork and same of bacon. Season lightly with pep- 
per and salt and a little powdered sage. Press closely in a 
straight-sided pan. Boil two cups of yellow split peas until 
they can be put through a colander. Season with pepper and 
salt and a few drops of lemon juice, and put the mixture in a 
pudding dish buttered. Slice meat mixture in half-inch slices 
and lay over peas. Bake in hot oven three-quarters of an hour. 
Serve with tart apple sauce. — Mrs. A. L. Garvin. 

49 



PORK CHOPS, SOUTHERN STYLE. 

Select nice meaty chops and spread the following dressing 
on them, add a Httle water and bake one hour or more. 

Dressing. — One cup bread crumbs, one tablespoon butter, 
one egg, poultry seasoning, salt and pepper. Veal steak or 
cutlets can be used instead of pork chops if desired. — Mrs. W. 
D. Lockhart. 

BAKED BEEF STEW. 

Two pounds leg beef cut in small pieces, one large carrot, 
one onion, one cup peas, one teaspoonful minute tapioca, one 
teaspoonful bread crumbs, one-half teaspoon vinegar, three 
cloves, pinch of nutmeg, salt and pepper ; slice vegetables, pack 
in layers, cover with cold water, cover tightly and bake two 
and one-half or three hours. — Mrs. W. D. Lockhart. 

Wirt Fountain Pens, Warranted Best on Earth or Money Back, at Holmes' 

BEEFSTEAK PIE. 
Cut up rump or flank steak into strips two inches long and 
about an inch wide. Stew them with the bone in just enough 
water to cover them, until partly cooked. Have one-half 
dozen cold potatoes sliced ; line a baking dish with pie paste ; 
put in a layer of the meat with salt, pepper, sliced onions, then 
sliced potatoes with bits of butter dotted over them, then the 
steak alternated with layers of potatoes until the dish is full. 
Add gravy or broth, having first thickened it with brown flour. 
Cover with a top crust, making a slit in the middle. Brush a 
little beaten egg over it and bake until quite brown. Very nice 
for tea. — Mrs. N. P. Appleton. 

Wirt Fountain Pens, Warranted Best on Earth or IVloney Back, at Holmes' 

TO ROAST BEEF. 
Sprinkle bottom of dripping pan with flour and pepper ; two 
or three thin slices of fat pork, then place meat on the pork; 
sprinkle flour and pepper on top of the meat and spread thin 
slices of pork. Put into a hot oven to sear the outside. Then 
add boiling water and baste and bake. Serve hot. The gravy 
may need a little thickening. — Mrs. W. H. Poole. 

5° 



KIDNEY WITH TOMATO SAUCE. 
Cut in small pieces a fresh kidney and fry in hot lard. When 
almost done add to it a sliced onion, one-half cup tomatoes 
and a slice of ham. Let all fry together and when done add 
teaspoonful flour, piece of red pepper and teaspoonful chopped 
garlic and parsley. Thin with a little water; season with salt 
and let boil a few minutes when it is done. — Mrs. J. S. Kent. 

FRIED RABBIT. 
Soak in salt and water from two to four hours. Parboil un- 
til tender. Fry in butter until brown; add salt and pepper 
while frying. — Mrs. S. E. Keith. 

Wirt Fountain Pens, Warranted Best on Earth or Money Back, at Holmes' 

SPAGHETTI A LA BIG SANDY. 
One pound pork chops, package of spaghetti, three medium 
sized onions, three peppers, green or ripe as you choose. Fry 
the chops after cutting them in small pieces, then add the onion 
sliced, fry until tender but not brown ; add one can tomatoes 
and simmer until the pork is well done. Chop the peppers (re- 
move the seeds) and add to this. Cook the spaghetti in salted 
water until tender ; pour cold water over it and drain well ; 
then add to the other things and stand where it will keep warm, 
but not cook any more. — P. W. H. 

Wirt Fountain Pens, Warranted Best on Earth or iVioney Back, at Holmes' 

AMERICAN CHOP SUEY. 
Have cooked one-half cup macaroni and one-quarter cup 
rice. Fry two slices of fat pork and one large onion sliced; 
then add one pint of tomato, one pound of hamburg steak, the 
cooked rice and macaroni ; mix well and cook until done. 
Serve hot. — Mrs. W. H. Senter. 



MBYpURE riEAN 
^AGSlEERlESStOAL 



51 



You Can Cook Best with Holmes' Peerless Coal. 
Write Your New Recipes Here. 



52 



OUR BOW 

I 

OUR BUSINESS 

I 

OUR BELIEF 

I 

OUR FACILITIES 

I 

OUR Mono 

I 

OUR DESIRE 

I 

OUR SIGNS 

I 



is hereby repeated to the readers 
of the Hospital Cook Book. We 
wish you contiaued prosperity and 



is the sale (and prompt and careful 
delivery) of first-class clean coal 
of all kinds. 



is that people who once give us 
their coal orders will never regret it. 



are of the best for the purchase, 
storing and deliverj' of coal war- 
ranted to be as represented. 



is "a pleased customer is the best 
advertisement," and we please our 
customers. 



is the extension of our business to 
just about double its present 
dimensions. 



are at 58 Main St., 64-70 Ames 
St., a third is on Plain St., and the 
fourth on Perkins Ave., and they 
all read "THIS IS HOLMES'." 



53 



Poultry. 

MOCK TURKEY. 

Have the bone removed from a fresh shoulder of pork. 
Make a stufiing of two cups crumbs (either bread or cracker), 
one teaspoon salt, two teaspoons poultry seasoning, one table- 
spoon butter. Add hot water to make right consistency. Use 
an onion if liked. Fill the cavity with the stuffing ; sew up as 
you would a turkey. Sprinkle flour over it and three table- 
spoons celery salt. Add one and one-half pints of hot water ; 
bake three or four hours according to size. — Mrs. E. W. Mc- 
Allister. 

BRAISED FOWL. 

Draw, singe and prepare the fowl as for roasting. Saute 
(brown) the fowl on all sides in a frying pan containing about 
four tablespoons bacon or salt pork fat; add two cups water, 
a small carrot and an onion sliced, two or three sprigs of pars- 
ley and a bay leaf. Heat to the boiling point, cover and set in 
the oven. When cooked, strain the liquid, remove the fat and 
thicken with flour cooked together (two tablespoonfuls but- 
ter, one and one-half tablespoonfuls flour, one cup of the liquid, 
one-quarter teaspoon salt if needed, few grains pepper) ; a 
little tomato puree improves it. The sauce may be poured over 
the fowl or served separate. The length of time for cooking 
depends on age of fowl. Cook a fowl a year old from two to 
three hours or until tender. — Mrs. IV. B. Baldwin. 

No Order Too Large or Too Small for Prompt and Careful Attention at 

Holmes'. 

JAMBALAYA OF CHICKEN. 
Cut in pieces a young chicken and slices of raw ham. Fry 
the whole in hot lard and set aside. In the same lard fry an 
onion and a tomato ; when nearly done add one cupful rice, the 
chicken and ham and let all fry together, stirring constantly. 
Add enough water to cover the whole and let boil slowly until 
done. Season with strong pepper, bay leaves, chopped pars- 
ley and thyme. When cooked let dry a little and serve hot. — 
Mrs. J. S. Kent. 

54 



CHICKEN TERRAPIN. 

From one well boiled chicken separate all the meat from the 
bones and skin and cut and shred it in small pieces, mincing 
it finely. Season the meat with mace, red pepper and salt and 
cover it with new milk or milk and cream and let it stand and 
simmer before boiling. When at a boil stir in butter the size 
of a walnut or egg in which has been rubbed a little flour and 
just before dishing the yolks of two hard boiled eggs rubbed 
smoothly with a little sherry wine. Add also a glass of wine ; 
serve hot. — Mrs. R. R. Shippen. 

No Order Too Large or Too Small for Prompt and Careful Attention at 

Holmes'. 

CHICKEN FRICASSEE. 

Boil the chicken in just enough water to cover until tender, 
seasoned with salt and pepper. Pour off the liquor, and to one 
pint add three tablespoonfuls flour rubbed smooth with a piece 
of butter the size of a large tgg. When the flour is cooked, 
pour in a gill of cream or milk, and when simmering add yolk 
of one egg well beaten. Pour over chicken on platter. Very 
nice. — Mrs. G. M. Hart. 

No Order Too Large or Too Small for Prompt and Careful Attention at 

Holmes'. 

PRESSED CHICKEN. 

Boil a fowl in as little water as possible, till very tender. 
Remove the skin, pick the meat apart and mix dark and light 
together. Remove the fat from the liquor and season the liquor 
highly with salt, pepper and celery salt. Boil down to one 
cupful and then mix with the chopped meat. Butter a mould 
and decorate the bottom and sides with slices of hard boiled 
eggs ; pack the meat into the mould and set away to cool with 
a weight on the meat. Turn out and slice. — Mrs. N. G. Hunt. 

No Order Too Large or Too Small for Prompt and Careful Attention at 

Holmes'. 

55 



JELLIED FOWL OR CHICKEN. 

Cook until the meat falls from the bone. Chop meat fine. 
Have ready one tablespoonful granulated gelatine softened in 
a little cold water. Dissolve in one pint of the water the fowl 
was boiled in, which must be boiling. Add one-half grated 
onion, pinch of pepper, one-half teaspoon salt or season to 
taste. Pour over the chopped chicken and put in bread pan 
which has been lined with oiled paper. Set aside to become 
cold. Slice thinly and serve. — Mrs. B. J. Fuller. 



<^^ '^^'^rP' •<i?' •<2?="^S^'/S^ •.£7"<i5''^5=' '.27 •<:?7.,:-7.,:2:7 •.i?"^2^"^?^ '^:Z'£^-^ ^^ 



m 
m 
m 
m 
m 
m 
m 
m 
m 
m 
h 
h 



m 



m 
m 
m 



Put It On the Slate. 
What? 

The blame for clinkers, clogged up stoves, 
ashes to sift, etc. 

Have you seen those piles [of slate in 
Holmes' coal yard ? 

There is slate in all coal. 

The man who sells the purest coal will 
have the most slate on hand. We 
carefully pick out the slate by hand 
before we weigh the coal. It costs 
us money, but it saves you more if 
you buy at 58 Main Street. 

THIS IS HOLMES' Corp. 



w 



You Can Cook Best with Holmes' Peerless Coal. 
Write Your New Recipes Here. 



57 




Ask Your 
Grocer for a 
BAG OF COAL 
with the Hod 
on it. 




— ^ HE highest priced coal (ex- 
1 cept Franklin) that is sold 
in Brockton is HOLMES' 
SPECIAL SOFT SHAMO- 
KIN STOVE, and it is as 
high in quality as it is in 
price. It is thoroughly re- 
liable in every way, and warranted 
superior to anything in the market 
(except Franklin), and that is the 
coal we are putting up in paper bags 
for grocers to sell. 

^Your grocer will refund the money for any 
bag of our coal not perfectly satisfactory and as 
represented, and you can keep the coal. 

A Trial Will Convince You. 



58 



Vegetables. 

SPAGHETTI. 
Break spaghetti into boiling salted water, cook thirty min- 
utes, drain in colander. Into a well buttered baking dish, place 
a layer of spaghetti, layer of minced onion, layer of tomatoes, 
over these grated cheese, pieces of butter, dash paprika. Re- 
peat layers until dish is full ; over all scatter buttered cracker 
crumbs, more grated cheese; bake in oven twenty or thirty 
minutes. — Mrs. H. L. Tinkham. 

p. O. station 4, 58 Main St., Does More Post Office Business Tlian Any 
Town in the State. 

SPAGHETTI OR MACARONI WITH TOMATO 
SAUCE. 

One-half pound spaghetti, one can Campbell's tomato soup. 
Take one-half pound spaghetti, put into boiling salted water 
and cook twenty minutes ; put into colander and pour cold 
water over it (drain). Take one can Campbell's tomato soup 
and bring to boiling point, add spaghetti and boil three minutes. 
Put into serving dish and grate over it a little cheese, or serve 
without the cheese if one does not care for it. — Mrs. F. A. 
Sweetland. 

p. O. Station 4, 58 Main St., Does More Post Office Business Than Any 
Town In the State. 

GREEN CORN. 

Cut the corn from six ears of new and tender com, leaving 
as much of the hull on as possible. Chop fine half of green 
pepper, a little grated onion and tomatoes peeled and cut up 
fine ; add these to the com. When the whole has come to the 
boiling point, let simmer about fifteen minutes or until reduced 
somewhat. Add meanwhile one-half teaspoon each of salt and 
sugar and just before removing from the fire, two teaspoonfuls 
butter. — Mrs. Florence Kennedy. 

59 



STUFFED PEPPERS. 

Cut tops of six green peppers nearly off and remove seeds. 
Chop fine three medium sized tomatoes, or use one-half cup 
tomato pulp from can. Add one-half cup finely chopped ham 
and chicken, one-half cup soft bread crumbs, two teaspoonfuls 
finely chopped onion, one teaspoon Worcestershire sauce, salt, 
pepper and cayenne to taste. Heat mixture in one tablespoon- 
ful olive oil and fill peppers. Place peppers closely together in 
baking pan, pour in one cup boiHng water and bake twenty 
minutes. Serve with tomato sauce. — Mrs. C. C. Merritt. 

Have You Tried Shamokin Coal in "The Bag With the Hod On," at Your 

Grocer's? 

CARROTS. 

Scrape and cook in boiling salted water until tender. Peel 
and cut in cubes. For one pint, put one tablespoon butter in 
pan with one-half teaspoon sugar and salt, one teaspoon lemon 
juice and pepper. Toss the carrot in this until hot and the but- 
ter absorbed. — Mrs. E. W. McAllister 

EASY ESCALLOPED TOMATO. 

One can tomato, one package Uneeda biscuit, salt, pepper 
and butter. Roll crackers fine, stir into tomato. Season with 
salt and pepper, and dot with lumps of butter. Bake one-half 
hour in hot oven. — Mrs. E. F. O'Neil. 

Have You Tried Shamokin Coal in "The Bag With the Hod On," at Your 

Grocer's? 

BUTTERED BEETS. 

Boil three or four medium sized beets. When boiled drop 
into cold water and slip off the skins. Put in a wooden tray and 
chop them quite coarse. Return to a hot saucepan, add level 
teaspoon salt, a dash of pepper and one-quarter cup butter. 
Stir the beets over and over in the butter until it is melted. 
Serve in a hot dish. — Mrs. W. H. Senter. 

60 



CREAMED POTATOES. 

For a pint of cold boiled potatoes cut in small pieces, use 
one-half cup milk, a few bread crumbs, one tablespoon butter, 
salt and pepper to taste. Cook until the milk is absorbed and 
thickened by the bread and potatoes. When ready to serve, 
add some finely chopped parsley. — A. M. H. 

DUCHESS POTATOES. 

To two cups hot riced potatoes add two tablespoons butter, 
one-half teaspoon salt and yolks of three eggs slightly beaten. 
Shape, using pastry bag and tube, in forms of pyramids, leaves, 
roses, etc. Brush over with beaten egg diluted with one tea- 
spoon water and brown in hot oven. — Hannah A. Hale. 

Have You Tried Shamokin Coal in "The Bag With the Hod On," at Your 

Grocer's? 

SCALLOPED POTATOES. 

Pare and slice enough potatoes to make three pints. Cover 
with water that is boiling and salted, bring quickly to the boil- 
ing point. After boiling about three minutes, drain, rinse in 
cold water and drain again. Put in a baking dish for serving 
(that has been well buttered) a layer of potatoes and sprinkle 
with salt, add bits of butter here and there, also a few shavings 
of onion and a little finely chopped parsley. Continue the lay- 
ers until the dish is loosely filled ; then pour in milk to come 
to the top of the dish. Bake in a moderate oven. — Mrs. W. B. 
Baldmin. 

Have You Tried ShamoI<in Coal in "The Bag With the Hod On," at Your 

Grocer's? 

BAKED EGG PLANT. 

Remove the interior of a large egg plant with a silver knife, 
leaving a shell about one-quarter inch thick. Mix the pieces 
of egg plant with an onion cut up fine, cover with water and 
cook until tender ; mix with bread crumbs, salt and pepper. 
Fill the shell and bake in quite hot oven. Do not cook until 
the shell shrivels. — Mrs. C. C. E. 

6i 



BERMUDA ONIONS STUFFED. 

Remove the center from the onions after peeling them, leav- 
ing only a sufficiently thick shell to hold the dressing. Fill the 
centers vi^ith minced veal or chicken or combination of meats 
at hand; season the meat highly with salt, pepper and other 
condiments if liked. Cover tops with bread crumbs and put 
a generous piece of butter on each. Place in a buttered baking 
pan and turn in a cup of boiling water. Bake until onion is 
tender. — Mrs. W. H. Poole. 

Holmes' Special Soft Shamokin, Best Cook Stove Coal In Brockton at 
Any Price. 58 Main St. 

PEAS AND CARROTS. 

Equal quantities of green peas and carrots. The carrots cut 
in small cubes. Season well with salt, pepper and butter. 
Have quite a little water left in them when done and thicken 
with flour to a thin sauce. — A. M. H. 

STUFFED PEPPERS. 

Cook one-half cup rice in two cups brown stock until tender ; 
add one-quarter cup melted butter, a few drops of onion juice, 
one tablespoon tomato catsup and salt and pepper. Take seeds 
from peppers, fill with mixture, cover with buttered cracker 
crumbs. Bake until crumbs are brown. — Maria W. Howard. 

Holmes' Special Soft Shamokin, Best Cook Stove Coal in Brockton at 
Any Price. 58 Main St. 

STUFFED PEPPERS. 

Select sweet peppers of equal size, cut off the stem end and 
with a teaspoon handle remove the seeds. Put the peppers into 
boiling water and boil for five minutes. Make a stuffing with 
softened bread crumbs, minced meat of any kind, and season 
with salt, pepper, butter and a little onion juice. Put them in a 
baking pan with stock about one inch deep in the pan ; bake 
in a moderate oven half an hour, remove to platter and pour a 
little stock over. — Alice Hamblett. 

62 



SWEET POTATO WITH ORANGE. 

Parboil potatoes, peel and cut in cubes until you have about 
three pints. Put layer in buttered baking dish, add to each 
layer three heaping teaspoons sugar, nutmeg, grated orange 
rind (yellow only) and lumps of butter. Add another layer 
of potato, season; continue until dish is filled. Add juice of 
four oranges. Bake in moderate oven three-quarters of an 
hour. (Note: Pour juice in at one side, using small pitcher, 
so as not to disturb top layer). — Mrs. E. F. O'Neil. 

Holmes' Special Soft Shamokin, Best Cook Stove Coal In Brockton at 
Any Price. 58 Main St. 

A NICE WAY TO PREPARE CABBAGE. 

Take one or two pounds of cabbage, partly cover with water 
and cook until tender, but not too soft. Pour off water and 
add a generous piece of butter, salt and pepper to taste and 
about two tablespoonfuls vinegar. Cut up the cabbage into 
quite small pieces. Serve hot. — Mrs. F. A. Szveetland. 

BROILED TOMATOES. 

Wipe and cut in halves crosswise ; cut off a thin slice from 
rounding part of each half; sprinkle with salt and pepper; dip 
in crumbs, then in beaten egg, then in crumbs again ; put on a 
buttered broiler and broil eight minutes. — Mrs. A. M. Hamb- 
lett. 

Holmes' Special Soft Shamokin, Best Cook Stove Coal in Brockton at 
Any Price. 58 Main St. 

POTATO PUFF. 

Put two cups cold mashed potatoes in a spider, add the yolks 
of two eggs, one tablespoonful butter, three tablespoonfuls 
cream, one teaspoonful salt and one saltspoonful pepper. Stir 
until very hot. Take from fire and stir in carefully the well 
beaten whites of the eggs. Put into a baking dish and brown 
in a quick oven. — Mrs. W. H. Thome. 

63 



BRUSSELS SPROUTS WITH BUTTER. 
Cook the sprouts in salted water until they are tender, then 
drain well, drying them with a clean cloth somewhat. Brown 
in a saucepan two ounces of butter, and into this stir the 
sprouts, letting them heat and brown a little if they will. Put 
them in a dish, when hot sprinkle lightly with grated Parmesan 
cheese and send to table. — Mrs. J. Q. Ford. 

PARISIAN POTATOES. 
Small round balls cut from raw potatoes boiled until done 
and browned in butter in frying pan. — H. L. Aldridge. 






W^\W^ 










mm 



I- ^Mm 
? mm 

f i:r/]> !7/i\ 



mm 
mm 
mm 

■lfA"'l<A\l 



You want of coal is to 
burn, and to burn up 
clean. You don't want 
a lot of ashes and cinders 
to bother over; and the 
coal that goes to ashes 
and cinders does not give WMM.. 
as much heat as the coal 
that burns up clean. 
^ Our Special Soft 
Shamokin is pure coal 
— no slate, no cinders, 
and but a small propor- 
tion goes to ashes. It 
burns up clean. Ask 
anybody but HOLMES 
about it. 



■^^^\''^^\ 

mm\ 

•/^A\'(/i'AI' 









64 



You Can Cook Best with Holmes' Peerless Coal. 
Write Your New Recipes Here. 



65 




The Western Union Tele- 
graph operator who told the 
following story should take a 
position with one of the New 
York papers and talk up its 
circulation : 

"I was out hunting the other 
day and I saw a fine woodpecker 
on a tree, and just as I raised 
my gun to shoot, it rapped on 
the tree, "stop." I lowered 
my gun in astonishment, and 
the bird began to rap again ; 
and, with the precision of an 
old operator, it told me not to 
spend my time tramping 
through the woods in search of 
pleasure, but to go home and 
order some of Holmes' Special 
Soft Shamokin Coal for the 
cook stove and make my wife 
happy. I took the advice ; it 
paid both me and the bird." 

Puck Amended. 



66 



Salads. 

CHICKEN SALAD. 

Two cups chicken meat cut in small pieces, two cups celery 
also cut in small pieces ; marinate with French dressing. Chill. 
Arrange in salad dish and cover with mayonnaise. Decorate 
with hard-cooked eggs cut in slices (capers if you like). — Mrs. 
W. H. Wade. 

LOBSTER SALAD. 

Mix two cups lobster meat with four hard-cooked eggs 
chopped fine. Marinate (or sprinkle) with French dressing; 
drain and add mayonnaise dressing. Serve on lettuce, gar- 
nish with chopped olives and sprinkle with finely chopped 
chives. — Mrs. W. H. Wade. 

Our Coal Keeps Cooks Good-Natured. This Is Holmes'. 

MANHATTAN SALAD. 

Take equal quantities of cold chicken cut fine (not chopped) 
celery, apples, and nuts ; mix and add mayonnaise dressing ; to 
this if liked can be added chopped red peppers, olives or 
capers. The pimentoes that come in tins are best. — Mrs. Alice 
M. Howard. 

PEAR AND NUT SALAD. 

Beat the white of one e^g slightly, add one-half tablespoon 
of lemon juice and one-half tablespoon water. Drain carefully 
canned pears. Take each one and dip into the white of &gg, 
then roll in English walnut meats chopped fine. Serve on let- 
tuce leaves with salad dressing. — Mrs. Mary L. Wade. 

Our Coal Keeps Cooks Good-Natured. This Is Holmes'. 

FRUIT SALAD. 
Cut two bananas into slices crosswise, four oranges cut into 
small pieces, one small pineapple picked into small piecees 
with a fork, one-half cup nut meats. Marinate with three 
tablespoons olive oil, one-half teaspoon salt, a few grains of 
paprika and one tablespoon lemon juice. Serve with cream 
dressing. 

67 



Cream Dressing. — Whip one-half cup heavy cream, add one- 
quarter teaspoon salt and one-half tablespoon sugar; add two 
tablespoons lemon juice very slowly. — Mrs. Mary L. Wade. 

People's Wood Yard Gives Work to the Poor and Wood to Widows. 
Order at 58 Main St. 

FRUIT SALAD. 

One-half pound blanched almonds chopped very fine, four 
oranges pared and sliced, one can pineapple chopped fine, three 
bananas or peaches, pears, French cherries, strawberries or 
other fruit, in Hke proportions; alternate the layers of fruit 
with powdered sugar and reserve the almonds for the top 
layer ; then add the following dressing and chill. 

Dressing. — One-half cup lemon juice, two tablespoons 
sherry and two tablespoons of liquor, preferably, maraschino. 
Cranberries can be used instead of strawberries if stewed until 
quite soft with a good deal of sugar; grated cocoanut can be 
used instead of almonds. — Mrs. Eva Gibbs. 

BANANA SALAD. 

Peel and slice the bananas lengthwise ; roll in finely chopped 
peanuts ; lay on lettuce leaves and pour salad dressing over 
each leaf. — Mrs. I. B. Hallett. 

People's Wood Yard Gives Work to the Poor and Wood to Widows. 
Order at 58 Main St. 

PINEAPPLE AND CELERY SALAD. 

Pare and eye a small pineapple ; cut it in slices almost an 
inch thick, then into dice. Wash and cut fine an equal amount 
of well blanched celery. To one cup of salad dressing add one- 
half cup of stiffly whipped cream and mix lightly together. 
Stir a little more than half of this with the mixed pineapple 
and celery. Heap on a dish, spread the remainder of the dress- 
ing over the top. Garnish with salted pecans and blanched 
celery tips. — Mrs. E. H. Keith. 

68 



ENGLISH WALNUT SALAD. 

Place choice English walnut meats in a salad dish on a bed 
of minced oranges, sprinkle lightly with pure olive oil and set 
aside for several hours. Wash and pick over crisp watercress, 
sprinkle with salt and pepper, add the fruit and nut mixture 
and serve as cold as possible. — Mrs. B. O. Gibbs. 

People's Wood Yard Gives Work to the Poor and Wood to Widows. 
Order at 58 Main St. 

PINEAPPLE SALAD. 

Make ball of chopped walnuts and cream cheese; place on 
slice of "Taka" pineapple ; serve on lettuce leaf with French 
dressing. — Mrs. H. L. Tinkhant. 

BANANA AND NUT SALAD. 

To one-half cup water add one-half cup sugar and boil five 
or six minutes; to this add the juice of one-half lemon and 
boil two or three minutes; choose small, ripe bananas; peel 
them, remove the coarse threads or better still, scrape them 
with a sharp knife. Roll the bananas in the cold syrup and 
then in chopped nuts, covering them completely with the syrup 
and nuts. Use either English walnuts or pecans. Serve on 
crisp lettuce leaves. Put a little dressing on each and 
sprinkle with small pieces of candied cherries. Use (Mrs. 
Mary L. Wade's) Cream Dressing. — Mrs. C. C. Merritt. 

People's Wood Yard Gives Work to the Poor and Wood to Widows. 
Order at 58 Main St. 

GRAPE SALAD. 

Cut large w^hite grapes in halves and remove the seeds. To 
each pint of this allow a pint of the pulp of shaddocks (grape 
fruit) ; cut into halves, and with a spoon take out the pulp in 
good sized pieces ; remove the seeds. Mix this with green 
mayonnaise and serve on lettuce with game. This is also ex- 
ceedingly nice with broiled chicken. — /. M. Appleton. 

69 



FRUIT SALAD. 

Two oranges cut fine, one banana cut fine, one pound white 
grapes (seeded), one cup nuts, three sticks celery cut fine, 
three apples. Serve with boiled dressing. Three or four 
cherries on the dressing makes it very attractive. — Mrs. IV. E. 
Bryant. 

SHRIMP SALAD. 

Wash and drain shrimps and mix with half their bulk of 
cut celery, also olives or capers as desired. Use any good 
dressing and serve in border of tomato jelly. — Mrs. R. W. 
Dow. 

All the New Novels, 2 Cents a Day, at Holmes' Library, at 58 Main St. 

MAYONNAISE OF CELERY AND SHRIMPS. 

Boil two dozens of nice shrimps ; peel when cold and set 
aside. Take the yolks of three boiled eggs, mash them well 
with a spoonful each butter, oil, vinegar, and salt and pepper 
to taste. Add the chopped whites, a bunch of celery cut in 
strips and a spoonful of sliced pickles. Pour the whole on 
the shrimps and set in a cool place until ready to serve. — Mrs. 
John S. Kent. 

TOMATO JELLY SALAD. 

Cook one-half can tomatoes, two cloves, bit of bay leaf, 
one-half teaspoon each of salt and paprika ; cook fifteen min- 
utes, strain; add four teaspoons of dissolved gelatine; pour 
into individual moulds and chill. When cold remove from 
moulds, garnish with lettuce and salad dressing. — Mrs. J. T. 
Bullivant. 

All the New Novels, 2 Cents a Day, at Holmes' Library, at 58 IVIain St. 

TOMATO SALAD. 
Peel and chill six firm tomatoes and cut in halves ; remove 
the seeds. To one cup of whipped cream add two tablespoon- 
fuls each of lemon juice and prepared horseradish ; also sea- 
soning of salt, paprika, and mustard. Place tomatoes on let- 
tuce leaves and heap dressing on each slightly. — Mrs. E. H. 
Keith. 

70 



TOMATO SALAD WITH CREAM. 

Slice the tomatoes in rather thick slices into the salad bowl. 
Sprinkle with salt and white pepper, and set away to chill. 
Just before serving put over them some whipped cream with 
chopped olives stirred through it in place of mayonnaise ; 
serve on crisp lettuce leaves. The change from mayonnaise 
to cream is a pleasant one. — Mrs. Veronica Eldredge. 

All the New Novels, 2 Cents a Day, at Holmes' Library, at 58 Main St. 

HUNGARIAN POTATO SALAD. 

Take small potatoes, slice thin; to every pint of potatoes 
mince one small onion, one pickled beet, one fresh cucumber 
sliced, four sardines, one large spoonful minced boiled ham, 
one Dutch herring. Mix all together and serve with a good 
dressing. — Mrs. H. F. Gibbs. 

POTATO SALAD. 

Chop very fine one-half a small, young and mild onion; 
this should be as fine as if it had been grated. Cut six cold 
boiled potatoes into small cubes of the same size (less than 
one-half inch in diameter). Mix the potato and onion with 
five or six tablespoonfuls of oil. Mix very thoroughly, turning 
the potato over and over, and adding more oil, if needed to 
make each piece of potato glisten with oil. Then add three 
or four tablespoons vinegar, one tablespoon at a time, mixing 
in each before the next is added. Put mixture into a salad 
bowl, shaping it into a firm mound. Then cover or mask with 
mayonnaise dressing (I use Durkee's salad dressings in pref- 
erence to my own). With capers, sliced olives or chopped 
lettuce divide the mound into six sections. Fill in these with 
cooked sifted yolks of eggs, chopped whites of eggs and 
chopped beets. Set a tuft of lettuce hearts in the top. One- 
half a green pepper pod chopped very fine can be mixed with 
the onion. — Mrs. C. C. Merritt. 

All the New Novels, 2 Cents a Day, at Holmes' Library, at 58 Main St. 

71 



POTATO SALAD. 

Chop four cold boiled potatoes, two hard boiled eggs, two 

or three slices of beets, one-half raw onion. Add dressing, — 
Mrs.,]. A.M. 

TOMATO JELLY AND NUT SALAD. 
Soak one-half box gelatine in one-half cup of cold water 
for fifteen minutes. Take one can tomatoes, season highly, 
boil and strain, adding enough hot water if necessary, to make 
three cupfuls. In this, while boiling, dissolve the gelatine. 
Turn out into two small moulds to give a cuplike form. When 
cold place on lettuce leaves, fill with sliced celery and broken 
pecans or walnut meats and serve with salad dressing. — Mrs. 
H. A. Hamhlett. 

You Can Cook Best With Holmes' Coal. 

CHEESE SALAD. 
Rub one-fourth pound Roquefort cheese to a paste, add 
olive oil until the mixture has the consistency of thick cream. 
Thin with a tablespoon of vinegar. Serve on lettuce. — Mrs. 
H. A. Hamhlett. 

CHICKEN AND NUT SALAD. 
Cut into dice enough white meat of chicken to make two 
cupfuls; add two-thirds cup broken English walnut meats, 
moisten with French dressing; let stand one or more hours; 
then drain, add one and one-third cup finely cut celery, mix 
with mayonnaise dressing; serve on bed of lettuce leaves 
and garnish with halves of nut meats. — Lizzie D. Gibbs, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

You Can Cook Best With Holmes' Coal. 

BEET SALAD. 
Boil four medium sized beets. When cold chop fine, add 
half as much chopped cabbage as you have beets and horse- 
radish to make it taste quite hot. Pour a salad dressing over 
the mixture and serve on lettuce leaves. No rule can be given 
for the amount of horseradish as it is much stronger some- 
times than others. — Mrs. Amanda T. Perkins. 

72 



SWISS SALAD. 
Mix one cup cold cooked chicken, cut in cubes, one cucum- 
ber pared and cut in cubes, one cup chopped English walnut 
meats and one cup French peas. Marinate with French dress- 
ing, arrange on serving dish and garnish with mayonnaise 
dressing. — Mrs. H. T. Rhoades. 

SWEETBREAD AND CELERY SALAD. 
Mix equal parts of parboiled sweetbeads cut in one-half 
inch cubes and celery finely cut. Moisten with cream dress- 
ing and arrange on lettuce leaves. — Mrs. H. T. Rhoades. 

You Can Cook Best With Holmes' Coal. 

HAM SALAD. 

One cup chopped ham, two-thirds cup chopped potatoes, 
two large stalks celery cut very fine, two small onions cut 
very fine. Serve on lettuce with any nice dressing. — Maude 
Sisson, Fall River, Mass. 

HAM SALAD. 

Dice one pint cold boiled ham; same quantity of firm white 
cabbage shaved ; chop fine two small cucumber pickles and 
two pickled beets or onions. On salad platter arrange a bed 
of cabbage, put ham in center and sprinkle with cucumber 
and onions ; pour over a good dressing, strong of mustard. — 
Mrs. E. H. Keith. 

SPINACH SALAD. 

Cook one-half peck spinach, drain well and chop fine, sea- 
son with salt, pepper and a little vinegar. Chill and turn out 
on a bed of lettuce. Cover with a nice dressing. — Mrs. Hozv- 
ard M. Dow. 

You Can Cook Best With Holmes' Coal. 

COMBINATION SALAD. 
Mix with a scant cup each of cut celery, cucumber, tomato, 
apple, a few spoonfuls each of green peppers without seeds 
and horseradish and young onions. Serve on lettuce with a 
good dressing. — Mrs. S. Elliott Keith. 

73 



RUSSIAN SALAD. 
Four good sized cold potatoes cut small, two tablespoonfuls 
string beans or more, two tablespoonfuls peas, celery if in 
season, one-half cucumber, one small onion cut fine, two me- 
dium sized tomatoes sliced thin. Mix well with dressing 
spread on lettuce leaves and garnish with beets. Any kind 
of vegetable can be used as you may happen to have. — Mrs. 
B. O. Gibbs. 

Only One Price for Any One Thing at Holmes', 58 Main St. Your Baby 
Can Buy as Cheap as You Can. 

STRING BEAN SALAD. 
Take crisp lettuce leaves (four are plenty), arrange them 
in roses, put one large spoonful of cold string beans in each 
rose. Cover with a cream salad dressing and dot all over 
with little squares of boiled beets. Set on ice until ready to 
serve. — Emma Nolan. 

BREAKFAST SALAD. 
Scald two ripe tomatoes, peel them, put them in cold water 
or fine ice to become cold; drain, and either slice or divide 
into sections ; peel and slice very thin one cucumber ; line a 
salad bowl with crisp lettuce leaves, add the tomatoes and cu- 
cumber and one teaspoonful finely chopped parsley with a few 
blades chives ; if possible add a few green leaves of tarragon ; 
pour over all a plain salad dressing. — Mrs. Henry F. Gibbs, 
Chartley, Mass. 

Only One Price for Any One Thing at Holmes', 58 Main St. Your Baby 
Can Buy as Cheap as You Can. 

HERRING SALAD. 
Soak two salt herrings over night ; wash, remove bones and 
chop; one cup cold meat, two cups mashed potatoes, three 
medium sized apples, two beets, two small onions. Chop not 
too fine, first separately, then together. Mix, add pepper, vin- 
egar and cream to taste ; place in salad dish and ornament the 
top with alternate strips of chopped beets, chopped yolks of 
eggs, chopped whites of eggs, then beets again, etc. — Signi 
Akra. 

74 



INTERSTATE FRUIT SALAD. 

Twelve portions. Three Florida navel oranges, six Dela- 
ware peaches, one-half box Massachusetts strawberries, one- 
half small California pineapple, one-half pint Maine corn. 
To prepare fruit ; peel oranges and slice very thin crosswise ; 
peel and cut in quarters the peaches; hull and wash straw- 
berries ; cut off the outside of pineapple and cut in small cubes 
lengthwise. Whip the cream with a little milk added ; when 
stiff add one cup powdered sugar and one-half teaspoon va- 
nilla extract. Arrange fruit in glass salad bowl artistically 
and turn over same the following sauce ; mix thoroughly to- 
gether one tablespoon cornstarch and one cup granulated 
sugar ; turn over same one-half pint boiling water, and stirring 
one way, cook five minutes ; flavor with wine or extract ; when 
cool turn over salad. Garnish top with whipped cream. Set 
on table with glass service. This salad if carefully made is 
very tasty and pretty. 

Only One Price for Any One Thing at Holmes', 58 Main St. Your Baby 
Can Buy as Ciieap as You Can. 

WALDORF SALAD. 

One-half pound English walnuts, four large sound apples, 
one small bunch white celery, one head lettuce, two table- 
spoons mayonnaise. Wash celery and lettuce thoroughly; 
peel and cut apples into one-fourth inch dice ; cut celery into 
thin slices crosswise; place in bowl and mix well with the 
mayonnaise. Place this portion of salad upon the leaves of 
the heart of the lettuce in salad bowl and sprinkle the walnuts 
(chopped fine) over the top. Serve very cold as soon as 
made with toasted butter thins. This salad turns a reddish 
color if let stand over half a day on account of the apples. All 
salads are more satisfactory if made shortly before wanted for 
table. 

Only One Price for Any One Thing at Holmes', 58 Main St. Your Baby 
Can Buy as Cheap as You Can. 

75 



"MARION" FRUIT SALAD. 

Will serve twelve persons. Four sound bananas, one-half 
pound English walnuts, one-half pint orange mayonnaise, one 
head lettuce. Make orange mayonnaise as follows: yolks of 
two fresh eggs, dust of dry mustard, one-fourth saltspoon 
fine salt, one teaspoon sugar; stir well together with wooden 
spoon ; add one-half pint olive oil, a few drops at a time, as 
fast as it emulsifies (becomes thick) ; add few drops of juice 
from one sour orange ; continue until you have used the oil 
and juice of the orange ; if mayonnaise is too heavy drop in 
few drops of lemon juice or white vinegar. Always stir 
same way in making mayonnaise. 

Chop walnuts very fine; peel and cut bananas into three 
equal portions each ; roll lightly in mayonnaise, then in the 
chopped walnuts. Serve on hearts of lettuce on glass plates. 
Garnish with lovers' knots made from long narrow strips of 
the orange peel. 

Fountain Pen Headquarters. Every Pen Warranted as Represented at 
58 Main St. This Is Holmes'. 

VEGETABLE SALAD— AMERICAN GARDEN 
Will serve twelve people. One head fresh lettuce, six to- 
matoes, three cucumbers, small bunch watercress, one-half 
pint French peas, one-half pint Marinate (French dressing). 
Place enough lettuce leaves to cover sides and bottom of salad 
dish ; alternately place slices of tomatoes and cucumbers 
around the sides, each slice of cucumber half lapping the to- 
mato, etc. ; cut off stems from watercress and place loosely in 
center ; over all thinly strew the peas ; dress all with generous 
portion of Marinate. Make this salad large or small accord- 
ing to number served. The lettuce must be crisp ; an easy way 
to secure same is to wash carefully each leaf in cold water, 
and shake water off; let stand one hour in cool place. Have 
all vegetables cold. 

— These four recipes contributed by Herbert L. Aldridge, 
Chef, Atlantic City, Nezv Jersey. 

Fountain Pen Headquarters. Every Pen Warranted as Represented at 
58 IVIain St. Tliis Is Holmes'. 

76 



SALAD DRESSING. 
One-half cup vinegar, let boil ; two eggs, beaten separately ; 
one-half cup milk; one-half teaspoon salt; two dessertspoons 
sugar; one teaspoon mustard mixed with a little cold water. 
Mix all together and put in boiling vinegar and stir over fire 
until thick as good cream. Remove and add butter size of 
large egg. This makes a pint. — Mrs. Robbins. 

Fountain Pen Headquarters. Every Pen Warranted as Represented at 
58 Main St. Tliis Is Holmes'. 

BOILED SALAD DRESSING. 
Four tablespoons butter, one tablespoon flour, one cup milk, 
three eggs, one tablespoon sugar; one teaspoon mustard, one- 
half cup vinegar, dash of red pepper. Mix butter flour sugar, 
and mustard, cook in double boiler; add milk, then eggs 
and last vinegar; cook until like custard. When cold and 
ready to serve add one cup whipped cream. — M. A. F. 

SALAD DRESSING. 
Three eggs, one-third cup sugar, four tablespoons oil (or 
two of butter and two of oil), one cup milk, one cup vinegar, 
one dessertspoon salt, one tablespoon mustard, pepper to taste. 
Beat all together and cook in a double boiler until it thickens. 
This will keep a long time. The addition of a little whipped 
cream just before using makes it much nicer. 

Fountain Pen Headquarters. Every Pen Warranted as Represented at 
58 Main St. This Is Holmes'. 

SALAD DRESSING. 
One-half cup butter (scant), one-half cup vinegar. Put on 
the stove ; when hot add one-half cup sugar, one teaspoon 
salt, one tablespoon mustard, yolks of four eggs well mixed. 
Then thin with milk as wanted, (good) — Stella Gibbs. 

SALAD DRESSING WITHOUT OIL. 
One-half tablespoon salt, one and one-half tablespoon sugar, 
pinch cayenne, pinch of mustard, one-half tablespoonful 
flour. Mix dry ingredients together first, then add yolks of 

77 



two eggs slightly beaten, one-half tablespoon butter, three- 
fourths cup milk or cream, one-half tablespoon vinegar. Cook 
slowly in double boiler until it thickens. — Sara E. Hatch. 

'Uf You Want the Best, We'll Do the Rest," If You Order Coal at 

58 Main St. 

SALAD DRESSING. 

Cream together one-fourth cup butter or more and three 
large tablespoons sugar ; stir with this the following : one 
heaping teaspoon mustard, one teaspoon salt, one-fourth tea- 
spoon cayenne and one large tablespoon flour. Stir three eggs 
beaten Hght with the above in a double boiler. Then add 
to this one cup vinegar and one cup milk, a little of each alter- 
nately, stirring all the while ; if vinegar is very strong, use 
one-half cup vinegar and one-half cup water instead of one 
cup vinegar. Cook until it thickens. 

Cut raw apples and celery in dice and mix with the dress- 
ing. I often cut up a few walnuts and add to it. If grapes 
are in season, they make a pretty and delicious addition cut 
in halves and laid over the top of each portion after it is 
placed on the lettuce leaves. — Miss L. M. Whitney. 

SALAD DRESSING WITHOUT OIL. 
One tablespoonful sugar, one teaspoonful salt, one table- 
spoonful dry mustard, two teaspoons flour; mix all to- 
gether, add two eggs beaten lightly, five tablespoons melted 
butter, one and one-half cups milk, one-half cup vinegar. Cook 
in a double boiler and stir constantly until as thick as cream. 
— Mrs. Ella Mullins. 

"If You Want the Best, We'll Do the Rest," If You Order Coal at 

58 Main St. 

SMALL SALAD DRESSING (For Three People). 
One-fourth cup vinegar put on stove to heat; add a piece 
of butter size of a walnut; mix two tablespoons sugar and 
one-half teaspoon mustard, a little salt and one tgg together 
and add vinegar slowly. Cook until it thickens. — Mrs. H. A. 
Hamblett. 

78 



SALAD DRESSING. 
Three eggs beaten together, six tablespoons milk, four ta- 
blespoons melted butter, three tablespoons sugar, one teaspoon 
each of salt, pepper and mustard, one cup cider vinegar. Cook 
in a double boiler ten minutes ; will keep six months. — Mrs. 
Fred S. Merrill 

"If You Want the Best, We'll Do the Rest," If You Order Coal at 

58 Main St. 

SALAD DRESSING. 
One tablespoon mustard, one-half tablespoon salt, one table- 
spoon sugar, three eggs, one cup milk, one-half cup melted 
butter, one cup vinegar. First mix together mustard, salt and 
sugar and the yolks of the eggs. Add the butter, beating all 
the time. Next add milk and whites of eggs beaten to a froth ; 
last add the vinegar. Cook in a double boiler until it is as 
thick as cream. — Miss Elisabeth Saxton, Mrs. Heman El- 
dredge, Mrs. J. A. M. 

SALAD DRESSING. 
Two level tablespoons mustard, three level tablespoons 
sugar, one teaspoon salt, one heaping tablespoon cornstarch. 
Dissolve cornstarch in a little cold water, then turn in enough 
boiling water to make thick paste ; pour into this one-third 
cup melted butter, two eggs well beaten, one coffee cup milk, 
one cup vinegar. Boil in double boiler. This will make one 
quart. — Mrs. B. O. Gibbs. 

"if You Want the Best, We'll Do the Rest," if You Order Coal at 

58 Main St. 

POTATO SALAD DRESSING. 
One-half tablespoon salt, one and one-half tablespoonfuls 
sugar, one teaspoon mustard, few grains cayenne, one-half 
tablespoon flour, yolks of two eggs, one and one-half table- 
spoons melted butter, three-fourths cup milk, one-fourth cup 
vinegar; mix dry ingredients, add yolks of eggs slightly beat- 
en, butter, milk, and vinegar very slowly. Cook until it 
thickens and set off to cool. — Mrs. Heman Eldredge. 

79 



FRENCH DRESSING. 
One and one-half teaspoons salt, one-eighth teaspoon pep- 
per, few grains cayenne, one-eighth teaspoon paprika, six 
tablespoons oil, three tablespoons vinegar. Rub bowl with 
onion, mix salt, pepper and cayenne ; add paprika, oil and vin- 
egar; stir with a piece of ice, taking it out after ingredients 
are well blended. — Annie L. Wade. 

MAYONNAISE DRESSING (For Two People). 
Beat the yolk of one raw egg to a froth; add a mustard- 
spoon of mustard and two tablespoons salad oil, pouring in a 
few drops at a time ; add one-half tablespoon vinegar, salt and 
pepper to taste and one teaspoon sugar if liked. — C. F. M. 

MAYONNAISE DRESSING. 
Have utensils and materials cold before commencing to 
make the dressing. Beat the yolks of two eggs until lemon- 
colored and thick; add one-half teaspoonful salt, one-fourth 
teaspoonful paprika, one teaspoonful mustard, one teaspoon- 
ful sugar. Then beat in two tablespoonfuls vinegar, or part 
vinegar and part lemon juice; when this is smooth beat in one- 
half teaspoonful olive oil and continue beating in the oil, in- 
creasing the quantity to a teaspoonful and finally to a table- 
spoonful until a pint has been used. Use a Dover egg beater 
or a silver fork, and beat vigorously all of the time. Cover 
with a saucer and set in a cool place until ready to use. Be 
sure and beat all of the acid into the eggs at first or the oil 
cannot be added in the quantities given. If the directions are 
followed carefully, there can be no failure. Mustard and 
sugar can be omitted. — Mrs. C. C. Mcrritt. 



-STORE- 58 MAIN ST. OFFICE- 



80 



You Can Cook Best with Holmes' Peerless Coal. 
Write Your New Recipes Here. 



You Can Cook Best with Holmes' Peerless Coal. 
Write Your New Recipes Here. 



82 



44^**^% 




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'^**#^ 
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AVE You EVER 

Tried Special Soft 
Shamokin Coal in 
Your Cook Stove? 



.#######%###^%j 



There is no guess work about 
this coal. Customers say it is the 
freest, brightest and best coal sold 
anywhere for the money. 

It isn't easy to judge coal — you 
must burn it and watch it carefully 
before you know it is an economical 
kind — unless you know the man 
you deal with. 

A business that has been running 
for thirty -six years ; a business so 
near to the kitchen as the coal busi- 
ness must have a reputation. 

Do you know the reputation of 
Holmes' coal yard. Did you ever 
hear of any double dealing or de- 
ceit there ? If you did, don't trade 
there If you do trade with Holmes, 
you will get good coal, prompt de- 
livery, and satisfaction or money 

back. 58 MAIN STREET 



83 



Sauces for Meats, FisK, Etc. 

BROWN SAUCE. 

One pint stock, two tablespoonfuls minced onion, two table- 
spoonfuls butter, two heaping tablespoonfuls flour, one-half 
teaspoon salt, one-half saltspoon pepper, one tablespoonful 
lemon juice. 

Fry onion in the butter five minutes, being careful that it 
does not burn ; add the dry flour and stir well ; add the stock 
a little at a time and stir rapidly as it thickens until perfectly 
smooth ; add the salt and pepper, simmer five minutes and 
strain to remove the onion. — E. J. M. 

Right Coal, Quantity, Quality, Price and Delivery, at Holmes'. 

TARTAR SAUCE. 
One cup mayonnaise dressing, one tablespoonful chopped 
pickles, one tablespoonful capers, one tablespoonful chopped 
parsley, one-half teaspoon onion juice. Mix all together care- 
fully with dressing before using. Olives may be used in place 
of pickles. — Mrs. J. M. Crittenden. 

SAUCE FOR CHOPPED BEETS. 
Put into saucepan one-half (scant) cup vinegar (not too 
sour), three tablespoonfuls sugar, good sized piece of butter, 
one teaspoon flour in a little water. Let come to a boil and 
serve hot with the cooked beets. — Mrs. Galen K. Tyler. 

Right Coal, Quantity, Quality, Price and Delivery, at Holmes'. 

RAW CABBAGE SAUCE. 
Two eggs, two teaspoonfuls mustard, one teaspoon salt, 
two teaspoonfuls butter, one tablespoonful sugar, one cup vin- 
egar, one-half cup hot water. Beat eggs and all together ; add 
the hot water. Set it into boiling water and stir until it 
thickens a little. When cold, pour it over a small cabbage 
which has been cut fine. — Mrs. L. B. Cash. 

84 



EGG SAUCE. 
One-third cup butter, three tablespoonfuls flour (level), 
one and one-half cups hot water, one-half teaspoon salt, one- 
eighth teaspoon pepper; add two hard boiled eggs which have 
been cut in one-fourth inch slices. For baked or boiled fish. 
— Mrs. A. W. Stetson. 

THICK WHITE SAUCE FOR CUTLETS OR 
CROQUETTES. 
Four level tablespoonfuls flour, two level tablespoonfuls 
butter, one cup hot milk, one-fourth teaspoon salt, pinch of 
pepper. Melt butter in saucepan until it bubbles; add the 
flour, salt and pepper; mix until smooth; then pour the hot 
milk in gradually, stirring and beating each time. Cook until 
it thickens. — Mrs. Mae Simpson. 

Right Coal, Quantity, Quality, Price and Delivery, at Holmes'. 

FISH SAUCE. 
One cup milk, one tgg, one level tablespoonful cornstarch, 
two level tablespoonfuls butter, one teaspoonful catsup, pinch 
cayenne pepper. Cook over hot water until it thickens, stirr- 
ing constantly. — Mrs. A. O. Smith. 

WHITE SAUCE. 
Two level tablespoonfuls flour, two level tablespoonfuls but- 
ter, one cup hot milk, one-fourth teaspoon salt, pinch pepper. 
Melt butter in saucepan until it bubbles; add the flour, salt 
and pepper. Mix until smooth, then pour the hot milk in 
gradually, stirring and beating each time. Cook until it thick- 
ens. — Mrs. Mary Packard. 

Right Coal, Quantity, Quality, Price and Delivery, at Holmes'. 

VIRGINIA STUFFING FOR ROAST DUCK. 

To two cups mashed potatoes seasoned for table, add one 
cup fine bread crumbs, one cup sausage meat fried lightly and 
broken with a fork, one beaten tgg, one-half onion grated and 
one-half teaspoon sage. 

Before stuffing birds, rub them inside and out with a cut 
lemon. — Mrs. A. L. Garvin. 

85 



BREAD STUFFING FOR FISH. 
Take a quart bowl of stale bread crumbs. Soak in cold 
water, when soft press out water; add one-half cup chopped 
suet, a little salt and pepper, one egg, a small onion chopped 
fine, or if preferred minced parsley. This makes stuffing for 
two small or one large fish. — Mrs. Charles Tully. 




You Can Cook Best with Holmes' Peerless Coal. 
Write Your New Recipes Here. 



87 




M 11 Our Special Soft Shamokin 
^1 Coal is pretty nearly perfect 
^J for the cook stove ; that is, it 
is coal and nothing but coal, good 
coal, without stone or slate; it all 
bums, leaves few ashes, no clinkers. 
^ Franklin Coal is soft, easily melts and 
forms clinkers. Our Soft Shamokin does 
not, and it costs less. Try our Soft Shamo- 
kin and you will be "a pleeised customer," 
and our "best advertisement." 
THIS IS HOLMES' 58 MAIN ST. 



88 



Entrees. 

CHICKEN CROQUETTES. 

One-half pound of chicken chopped fine and seasoned with 
one-half teaspoon salt, one-half teaspoon celery salt, one- 
fourth saltspoon cayenne pepper, one saltspoon white pepper, 
few drops of onion juice, one teaspoon chopped parsley and 
one teaspoon lemon juice. Make one pint very thick cream 
sauce ; when thick add one beaten egg and mix the sauce with 
the chicken, using only enough to make it soft as can be han- 
dled. Spread on a shallow plate to cool; shape in rolls; roll 
in fine crumbs, dip in beaten egg, then in smoking hot fat. 
Drain and serve with a thin cream sauce. — Mrs. Clara H, 
Bartlett 

OYSTER CROQUETTES. 

Chop one pint of oysters fine ; beat one egg and add to 
the oysters, then the liquor. Season with pepper and salt and 
one tablespoon of lemon juice. Thicken with cracker crumbs 
until it can be moulded into cakes. Fry in hot butter a deli- 
cate brown. Garnish with parsley and sliced lemons and serve 
hot.— Mr.y. W. H. Poole. 

stationery, Pens, Pencils, Ink and Postage Stamps at Holmes'. 

MACARONI CROQUETTES. 
Into rapidly boiling salted water, cook one cup of macaroni 
broken into half inch lengths, until tender. Drain and rinse 
in cold water and dry by spreading on a towel. Make a sauce 
of two tablespoonfuls melted butter, three level tablespoonfuls 
flour, one-half teaspoon salt, a dash of paprika, one cup milk 
or tomato puree. Add to this the macaroni, two tablespoon- 
fuls grated cheese (American or Parmesan), and if you have 
it one-fourth cup cooked ham or tongue chopped fine. Mix 
thoroughly and turn into a shallow pan to cool ; when cool 
shape in triangles, roll in grated cheese, dip in beaten egg di- 
luted with one tablespoonful cold water, then roll in sifted 
bread crumbs. Fry in deep fat. These may be served with 
tomato sauce. — Martha Buckley. 

89 



SWEET CORN CROQUETTES. 
Scrape the corn from a dozen ears, season well with pepper 
and salt and into it stir two chopped green peppers that hav^e 
been fried a little in butter. Stir into the corn the beaten yolks 
of three eggs and then enough flour to make it of a consistency 
that will permit of its being shaped into croquettes. Roll these 
in beaten yolk of egg, then in flour and drop into hot fat to 
brown. — Mrs. Addie Joslyn. 

A Big Nickel's Worth, Holmes' Peerless Lead Pencil. 

POTATO CROQUETTES. 

One and one-half pint mashed potato ; season with salt, pep- 
per, celery salt, onion juice; yolks of three eggs. Shape, roll 
in crumbs, then in egg, then in crumbs, and fry. They want 
to stand until cold after they are shaped, before you fry. — 
Mrs. Julia Joslyn. 

CORN FRITTERS. 

One can sweet corn, one cup pastry flour, one teaspoon 
baking powder, one teaspoon salt, one-fourth teaspoon pap- 
rika, two eggs, yolks and whites beaten added separately. 
Drop small spoonfuls of the mixture into deep, hot fat and 
cook until a rich brown. — Mrs. IV. H. Poole. 

APPLE FRITTERS. 
One egg, one-half cup milk, one teaspoon baking powder, 
little salt, one-half cup bread flour, (may need a little more 
flour). Pare apples, cut out cores ; cut apples around in slices ; 
dip in batter, then fry in hot fat as you would doughnuts. To 
be eaten with meat. — A. S. K. 

A Big Nickel's Worth, Holmes' Peerless Lead Pencil. 

LOBSTER CUTLETS. 
Two cups lobster meat, one-half teaspoon salt, few grains 
cayenne, few gratings nutmeg, one teaspoon lemon juice, one 
teaspoon finely chopped parsley. One cup white sauce made 
by melting one teaspoon butter, one tablespoon flour, three- 
fourths cup milk ; stir well. Mix in order given and cool. 
Shape in cutlet form, dip in dried bread crumbs. Fry in deep 
fat until a golden brown. — Mrs. Ralph D. Poole. 



CORN TIMBALLS. 
Two beaten eggs, one teaspoon onion juice, two tablespoon- 
fuls melted butter, one-half teaspoon salt, one cup green corn. 
Pour into buttered cups and set them in a pan of hot water. 
Bake, serve on hot platter. — Mrs. G. M. Hart. 

SCALLOPED CRACKER AND CHEESE. 
Split and butter well, enough crackers to half fill a baking 
dish. Sprinkle each layer with grated cheese and cover with 
cold milk ; let stand over night. In the morning add more 
milk, butter and cheese and one egg well beaten. Bake an 
hour.— Mrs. G. M. Hart. 

BAKED ONIONS IN RAMEKINS. 
Peel and parboil twelve medium onions, drain, chop. Melt 
two tablespoonfuls butter, add two tablespoonfuls flour, one- 
half teaspoon salt, one and one-fourth cups cream or chicken 
stock, four tablespoonfuls finely chopped parsley, four table- 
spoons soft bread crumbs. Boil five minutes, add one egg 
well beaten and the chopped onion ; cool slightly, add beaten 
whites of two eggs, add more seasoning if needed, and bake 
in buttered ramekins twenty minutes in a moderate oven. 
Serve immediately. — Mrs. W. H. Wade. 

A Big Nickel's Wortln, Holmes' Peerless Lead Pencil. 

TURKISH DOUSMA. 

Cut tender summer squash in half-inch slices, crosswise. 
Place a layer of these in a deep, broad, baking dish ; cover 
each slice with finely chopped beef or lamb, raw, and a sprin- 
kle of salt pork, or any fat preferred ; add to each slice of to- 
mato, season well with chopped onion, red pepper and salt ; 
lastly add another slice of squash. Then pour enough boiling 
water around them to come to the upper layer of squash, start 
boiling on the stove, then bake for two hours. 

Remove the portions of dousma to a large chop plate, slight- 
ly thicken the gravy in the pan, pour over them and serve hot. 

This is very nice for supper or luncheon, and may be pre- 
pared with egg plant or large cucumbers instead of summer 
squash. — Jean R. Puffer. 

9^ 



DEVILED SCALLOPS. 

Pour boiling water over one pint scallops and let them stand 
three minutes, drain, cut into quarters. Make a cup of sauce 
with one-half cup chicken stock, one-half cup thin cream, two 
tablespoons butter, three tablespoons flour, one-half teaspoon 
salt, one tablespoon lemon juice and a generous seasoning of 
cayenne. Add two eggs slightly beaten and the scallops. Pour 
into ramekins or scallop shells, cover with buttered crumbs 
and bake until brown. — Mrs. Mary L. Wade, 

RICE AND CHEESE BALLS. 

Mix well together two cups soft steamed rice, one beaten 
tgg, one-half cup grated cheese, a dash of cayenne pepper, 
one-half teaspoon salt and one-half saltspoon grated nutmeg. 
Form into small cylinders, dip in beaten egg, roll in fine 
crumbs and fry in deep fat. — Mrs. Belle W. Miller. 

f^t/»e^t/»c^t/»«^t/»c^t*f^f»f^l»f^f^ ^ ef/» fv?» cf/» cf/* €$/»€>!/» 
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Holmes I An Expert I 
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' 'There are many kinds of 
coal and several kinds of 
coal dealers, but I have 
found that I can get better 
coal, cleaner coal, and get it 
more promptly of Holmes, 
at 58 Main Street, than any- 
where I ever traded. ' ' 

This is what we mean 
when we say:— "^ pleased 
customer is the best adver- 
tisement. ' ' 






92 



You Can Cook Best with Holmes' Peerless Coal. 
Write Your New Recipes Here. 



93 




me Reporter s 



Id 



ea. 



They were sitting in the parlor, 
Where the light was low and dim ; 

She seemed very well contented, 
And no murmur came from him. 

"George," she asked, "are you reporting 

For that horrid paper yet ? 
It is shameful how they publish 

All the scandal they can get." 

"No, my love," he jinswered softly. 

And he winked unto himself, 
"I have left." (In fact, that morning 

They had laid him on the shelf.) 

"But," he said, as he hugged her closer. 

She returning the caress, 
"Just at present I am working 

For the Associated Press." 

They burn Holmes' Special Soft 
Shamokin Coal now. 




94 



Puddings. 

CHOCOLATE PUDDING. 

Soak one cup bread crumbs in two cups milk ; melt two 
squares chocolate, add three tablespoons sugar and one-half 
cup milk ; cook over steam two minutes ; add bread and milk, 
two eggs, one-fourth cup sugar and one-half teaspoon salt. 
Bake one hour in a moderate oven. 

Creamy Sauce for Same : — Cream one-third cup butter, add 
one cup powdered sugar, two tablespoons cream and one tea- 
spoon extract. — Maria W. Hotvard. 

Subscriptions for Any Paper or Magazine as Low as the Lowest, at 
Holmes', 58 IVIain St. 

SWEET POTATO PUDDING. 

Six medium sized potatoes boiled and pressed through 
sieve, one tablespoonful molasses, one tablespoonful sugar, 
one teaspoonful salt, one teaspoonful ginger, one-half teaspoon 
cinnamon. Heat one quart milk and pour on to the potato 
and spices ; lastly beat three eggs and add to the mixture. 
Butter the dish well and bake one hour. 

Sauce for Same : — One cup sugar rubbed with butter the 
size of an egg to a cream, and one-half lemon, juice and rind 
grated. — R. R. Skippen. 

Subscriptions for Any Paper or Magazine as Low as the Lowest, at 
Holmes', 58 Main St. 

STRAWBERRY PUDDING. 

One-half cup butter, creamed ; one tablespoon sugar, two 
eggs well beaten, one and one-half cups flour, one teaspoon 
saleratus, one cup strawberry preserves. Put in mould and 
steam one and one-half hours. 

Sauce for Same: — Cream one-half cup butter and one cup 
sugar; one egg beaten; one-half cup strawberry preserves.^— 
Mrs. W. P. Chisholm. 

95 



SNOW BALLS. 

Cream one-half cup butter, add one cup sugar, beat well; 
then add beaten whites of four eggs ; mix two tablespoon fuls 
of baking powder with two cupfuls of sifted flour ; add alter- 
nately with one cup milk. Fill cups half full, steam twenty 
or thirty minutes; roll in powdered sugar; serve with creamy 
sauce. — Mrs. Stina Johnson. 

This Is Holmes', 58 Main St., the Sign of the Filled Hod. 

CUP PUDDING. 

One-half cup molasses, one tablespoonful melted butter, 
one-half cup sour milk, one-half teaspoon soda, salt, one-half 
teaspoon cinnamon, one-fourth teaspoon cloves, a grating of 
nutmeg, one-half cup raisins, same of currants, one pint pas- 
try flour. Put soda in molasses, heat until light colored ; 
add butter, sour milk, flour to which spices have been added, 
then fruit. Fill cups half full. Steam one hour. — Mrs. J. I. 
Merritt. 

STEAMED CHOCOLATE PUDDING. 

One ^^g, one-half cup sugar, one teaspoon melted butter, 
one teaspoon baking powder, one-half cup milk, one cup flour, 
one square melted chocolate. Steam one hour. — Mrs. L. F. 
Gurney. 

This Is Holmes', 58 Main St., the Sign of the Filled Hod. 

BAKED INDIAN PUDDING AND METHOD OF 
COOKING. 

Into one cup molasses stir seven tablespoonfuls sifted In- 
dian meal. Fill spider two-thirds full of milk; when it ap- 
proaches boiling, stir in meal and molasses, boil until it thick- 
ens, stirring constantly to prevent burning. Set aside to cool; 
add milk to make two quarts, piece of butter the size of a 
small egg and one egg', one teaspoonful salt. Butter well a 
baking pan, pour in mixture and set it in a similar pan of 
larger size containing hot water. Bake from eight A. M. till 

96 



six P. M., keeping closely covered. After baking half an 
hour, fill pan with cold milk but do not stir. If care is taken 
to keep closely covered and sufficient water is put in, it will 
need no attention till done. — Mrs. L. W. Puffer. 

INDIAN PUDDING. 

One quart milk, three eggs, two-thirds cup molasses, three 
level tablespoons flour, three level tablespoons Indian meal. 
Scald milk in double boiler; mix the other ingredients to- 
gether and add to the milk; stir briskly about two minutes, 
then pour into pudding dish and bake half an hour in a hot 
oven. Serve with whipped cream. — Mrs. N. E. Sullivcm. 

This Is Holmes', 58 Main St., the Sign of the Filled Hod. 

INDIAN PUDDING. 

Two quarts milk, one cup Indian meal, one handful rye 
meal, one and one-half cups molasses, little salt ; scald half 
the milk, mix the other with meal and molasses; stir into the 
scalded milk, let it cook until it thickens, then add two eggs, 
a piece of butter and nutmeg. Bake very slowly from two 
to three hours. — Mrs. Z. G. Marston. 

MOCK INDIAN PUDDING. 

Two slices of white bread, buttered well ; one-half cup 
molasses, one tgg, one quart milk. Bake in a slow fire one 
and one-half hours. To be eaten with cream. Nice. — Mrs. 
D. K. Carpenter. 

This Is Holmes', 58 Main St., the Sign of the Filled Hod. 

DATE PUDDING. 

Two cups flour, salt, two teaspoons baking powder, stoned 
dates chopped ; mix with milk ; boil one and one-half hour. 
To be eaten with a nice warm sauce. — Mrs. D. K. Carpenter. 

97 



FRUIT PUFFS. 

One pint sifted flour, one and one-half teaspoonfuls pure 
baking powder and a little salt ; make into a soft batter, with 
milk. Put into well greased cups a spoonful of batter, then 
one of strawberries (or any other fruit preferred), then an- 
other of batter. Steam twenty minutes. Serve with sauce. 
— Mrs. Belcher Holhrook. 

THE Place to See AM That's New in Postcards, 58 Main St. 

BAKED INDIAN PUDDING. 

One pint milk, and one-half cup meal ; boil until thick. Add 
one cup molasses, one teaspoonful cinnamon, a little salt, one 
pint cold milk. Bake in slow oven for three hours. — Mrs. 
Jennie Ford. 

INDIAN TAPIOCA PUDDING. 

Three tablespoons tapioca soaked over night, one quart 
milk, two tablespoons Indian meal, one &gg, one tablespoon 
butter, one cup molasses, little salt and cinnamon ; cook all 
together until thick; add one cup cold milk; bake one hour. 
— £^^01 Copp. 

CHOCOLATE PUDDING. 

One quart milk, yolks of two eggs, one and one-half squares 
of Baker's chocolate, a little salt, one cup sugar, two table- 
spoonfuls cornstarch ; cook all together in a double boiler ; 
put into a dish. Beat whites of eggs, add one-half cup sugar, 
a little vanilla. Spread over top of pudding. — Mrs. Burton 
Chase. 

THE Place to See All That's New in Postcards, 58 Main St. 

APPLE GINGERBREAD PUDDING. 

Put thick layer of sliced apple in baking pan ; season with 
sugar, cinnamon and salt ; over the apples pour a gingerbread 
made as follows : Three-quarters cup molasses, one and one- 
half mixing spoons melted butter, a little ginger, one saltspoon 

98 



salt, one teaspoonful soda, one-quarter cup boiling water, one- 
quarter cup milk, flour enough to make a thin batter. 

Sauce for Pudding. — One egg, one cup sugar, little salt. 
Beat together. Pour over one cup boiling water. — Mrs. Jen- 
nie Ford. 

THE Place to See All That's New in Postcards, 58 Main St. 

TAPIOCA PUDDING. 

Stir two tablespoonfuls minute tapioca with one quart milk 
and cook fifteen minutes in a double boiler; to the yolks of 
two eggs add one cup sugar and two small tablespoonfuls of 
cornstarch, a little salt and cook until quite thick. Cool and 
beat the whites of the eggs and put over the top. — Mrs. A. C. 
Hayward. 

WHITE HOUSE PUDDING. 

One quart dry cake crumbs, one cup molasses, two eggs, 
one cup raisins, one teaspoonful baking powder, a little salt 
and nutmeg. Steam three hours. — Mrs. D. M. Rycm. 

BREAD PUDDING. 

One quart milk, one pint water, one pint bread crumbs, 
one-third cup molasses, two-thirds cup sugar, salt and spices 
to taste, one cup raisins, butter size of an egg. Put all to- 
gether on stove for a thorough scald, then add two eggs well 
beaten. Bake four or five hours in earthern dish covered. 
This is delicious. — Mrs. W. H. Pooh. 

THE Place to See All That's New in Postcards, 58 Main St. 

CUP CUSTARDS. 

Beat three eggs with a pinch of salt ; add six level table- 
spoonfuls sugar ; beat to a froth ; flavor with orange, vanilla 
or lemon. Stir into this one quart of milk ; fill cups and set 
in pan of hot water. Bake in oven of moderate heat. This 
rule makes six cups custard. — Hilda Johnson. 

99 



SNOW PUDDING. 

Dissolve three tablespoons of cornstarch in a little cold 
water ; pour over it one pint boiling water, one-half cup sugar, 
little salt, then add whites of three eggs beaten to a stiff froth. 
Steam over tea kettle ten minutes. 

Sauce. — Yolks of three eggs, one cup sugar, one cup milk, 
butter size of a walnut ; boil and flavor. — Mrs. F. S. Johnson. 

Please Your Cook V^lth the Best Coal. This Is Holmes'. 

COTTAGE PUDDING. 

One cup sugar, one tablespoonful melted butter, one egg, 
one cup milk, two cups flour, one teaspoonful baking powder, 
salt. 

Chocolate Sauce. — One cup sugar, one teaspoon cocoa, one 
tablespoon cornstarch. Mix all together, dry and stir into 
one and one-half cups of boiling water; boil well, then add 
one tablespoon butter, a little salt and one-half teaspoon 
vanilla. — Mrs. Edith G. O'Hayre. 

ORIGINAL TAPIOCA PUDDING. 
One-half cup pearl tapioca, two cups cold water, one table- 
spoon sugar, salt, nutmeg, one-half egg, one cup milk. Take 
tapioca, add salt, pour over it two cups cold water and soak 
about two hours, then cook slowly until clear. Beat one egg 
thoroughly, take one-half of it, put into tumbler and fill with 
milk. Put into pudding dish, add sugar, and pour the cooked 
tapioca into it ; stir well and grate a little nutmeg over it. Bake 
about an hour. Serve with maple syrup or milk or cream and 
sugar. — Mrs. F. A. Sweetland. 

Please Your Cook With the Best Coal. This Is Holmes'. 

GRAHAM CRACKER PUDDING. 
Four graham crackers soaked in one pint milk; yolks of 
two eggs, cinnamon, nutmeg, salt, piece of butter size of small 
egg. Bake three quarters of an hour; whites of eggs beaten 
to a stiff froth with one-half cup powdered sugar and serve 
as sauce. — B. K. P. 



PEACH PUDDING. 

Have twelve half peaches spread out with sugar in the hol- 
lows. Rub a large tablespoon of butter into one pint flour 
sifted with one teaspoon of baking powder and one-half tea- 
spoon salt. Beat one egg very light, stir into one scant cupful 
milk and mix this gradually with the prepared flour, beating 
well at the last. Pour this into a pan large enough to allow 
the fruit to be spread out and the batter about one inch thick; 
bake half an hour in quick oven; serve with cream. Very 
nice. — Frances Keith. 

Please Your Cook With the Best Coal. This Is Holmes'. 

GRANDMA'S CRACKER PUDDING. 

Soak eight large Boston crackers in three pints of milk; 
boil one-half pound raisins till soft. Beat together three eggs, 
six tablespoonfuls sugar, one-half nutmeg grated and one tea- 
spoonful salt. Butter a paper and place in bottom of a pail; 
put in a layer of crackers, some raisins and two or three 
spoonfuls of the egg mixture and repeat until it is all used; 
pour on top the remainder of the milk, cover and steam three 
hours. 

Foamy Sauce: — Whites of two eggs beaten until foamy, 
but not dry ; add one cup sugar and beat well ; add one cup 
boiling milk and juice of one lemon. — Mrs. Elijah A. Keith. 

Please Your Cook With the Best Coal. This Is Holmes'. 

CRACKER PUDDING. 

Take one-half dozen common crackers, halve them and soak 
in cold water five minutes. Then put in baking pan, not let- 
ting them touch each other, and drop a small piece of butter on 
each. Bake forty minutes in a hot oven. When done drop 
raspberry jam on each and serve with egg sauce. 

Sauce: — One egg, one cup sugar, beaten very light; then 
add two tablespoonfuls hot milk and little vanilla. — Gladys 
W. Tdber. 



DELICIOUS CRACKER PUDDING WITH 
RASPBERRIES. 

One large teacupful cracker crumbs, one quart milk, one 
spoonful flour, pinch of salt, yolks of three eggs, one whole 
egg and one-half cup sugar. Flavor with vanilla, adding a 
little pinch of salt. Bake in a moderate oven. When done 
spread over the top, while hot, one pint well sugared rasp- 
berries ; then beat the whites of the three eggs very stiflf with 
two tablespoonfuls sugar and a little lemon extract or what- 
ever flavor one prefers. Spread this over the berries and bake 
a light brown. Serve with fruit sauce made of raspberries. — 
Mrs. James F. Sullivan. 

If You Want the Best Fountain Pen Satisfaction, C. Holmes, 58 Main St. 

ENGLISH PUDDING. 

Two cups bread crumbs, one cup raisins, one cup molasses, 
one cup milk, one teaspoonful soda, spice to taste ; bread 
should be browned in oven first. 

Sauce : — One cup sugar, one and one-half tablespoons but- 
ter, one egg, three tablespoonfuls boiling water. Rub butter 
and sugar together until creamed and add the yolk of one egg ; 
place the bowl in a basin of hot water, and if sugar does not 
dissolve readily, keep the bowl in a hot place until all 
is smooth, stirring constantly. The sauce should be rich, yel- 
low syrup when finished. Turn it into a serving bowl and 
place on top the beaten white of egg, which must be stirred 
into the sauce after the latter is on the table. Flavor to taste. 
— Mrs. C. H. Spaulding. 

If You Want the Best Fountain Pen Satisfaction, C. Holmes, 58 Main St. 

GRAHAM PUDDING. 

One cup molasses, one cup milk, one tablespoon butter, one 
egg, one teaspoon soda, one teaspoon cinnamon, one teaspoon 
clove, one and one-half cups graham flour, one cup raisins. 
Steam three hours. — iV. B. Caszirll. 



SUET PUDDING. 

One cup chopped suet, two-thirds cup raisins, two-thirds 
cup molasses, one teaspoon soda in molasses, one cup milk, 
one teaspoon cinnamon, one teaspoon clove, one teaspoon salt, 
two and one-half cups flour. Steam two or three hours. — 
Mrs. Jessie Thomas. 

If You Want the Best Fountain Pen Satisfaction, C. Holmes, 58 IN^ain St. 

SUET PUDDING. 

One cup finely chopped raisins, one cup chopped suet, one 
cup molasses, one cup milk, two cups flour, one teaspoon cas- 
sia, one teaspoon clove, little nutmeg, one teaspoon soda dis- 
solved in milk, salt. Steam three hours. Very necessary to 
keep water boiling. 

Sauce for Pudding: — One-half pint cream whipped, two 
eggs beaten light, one-half cup sugar ; mix whipped cream and 
eggs together, flavor with vanilla. — Mrs. Hem an Eldredge. 

STEAMED PUDDING. 

One and one-half cups flour, one-half cup sugar, one-half 
cup milk, one cup berries, one egg, one teaspoon soda, one- 
half teaspoon cream of tartar, one teaspoon butter, one tea- 
spoon vanilla. Steam one-half hour in cups. — Sara E. Hatch. 

If You Want the Best Fountain Pen Satisfaction, C. Holmes, 58 Main St. 

WEDDING PUDDING. 

One cup molasses, one cup sour milk, one-half cup butter, 
four cups flour, one teaspoon soda, one teaspoon cloves, one 
egg, nutmeg, fruit, salt. Steam two hours. 

Sauce : — One pint hot water, one-half cup butter, two table- 
spoons flour, two tablespoons vinegar, one teaspoon lemon. 
Boil until it thickens. 

Hard Sauce: — One cup frosting sugar, one-half cup butter, 
white of one egg. Mix until smooth. — Mrs. Dudley. 

103 



VEGETABLE PLUM PUDDING. 
One cup grated carrot, one cup grated potato, one-half cup 
suet, one and one-half cups flour, one-half cup sugar and one- 
half cup molasses (or one cup molasses in place of molasses 
and sugar), one cup currants, one teaspoon soda, one-half 
teaspoon cinnamon, one-fourth teaspoon clove, one-fourth tea- 
spoon allspice. Steam three hours. — Mrs. A. Thompson. 

Holmes' Trade Mark, the Filled Hod, Stands for Quality and Square 

Dealing, 

STEAMED PUDDING. 

Two-thirds cup pork chopped fine, one cup molasses, one 

cup milk, one cup raisins chopped, two and one-half cups 

flour in which has been mixed one teaspoon saleratus ; spice to 

taste. Steam three hours. — Mrs. J. J. Pratt, E. Bridge-mater. 

STEAMED BREAD PUDDING. 
Two cups chopped bread, one cup raisins, one-half cup milk, 
one-half teaspoon soda in milk, one-half cup molasses, one 
teaspoonful melted buiter, one egg, spice, salt. Steam three 
hours. — vS". Shaw. 

Holmes' Trade IVlartc, the Filled Hod, Stands for Quality and Square 

Dealing. 

FUDGE CAKE WITH WHIPPED CREAM. 
(A Nice Dessert.) 

Beat one-half cup butter to a cream, and gradually beat in — 

One cup sugar. 

The beaten yolks of two eggs, 

Three squares of chocolate melted over hot water. 

One-half cup molasses. 

One-half cup sour milk. 

One-half cup hot water, and then 

Two and one-half cups of sifted pastry flour sifted again 
with one teaspoon of baking soda. 

Bake in a hot, well buttered muffin pan, and serve with 
whipped cream. 

104 



CHOCOLATE CRUMBS. 
Mix together one and one-half cups soft bread crumbs 
(taken from bread about two or three days old), one and one- 
half squares of chocolate cut into small pieces, two tablespoons 
sugar and one-eighth teaspoon salt. Set into a moderate oven, 
stir frequently. When chocolate is melted and the crumbs 
are well covered, set away to cool. Serve with whipped 
cream, sweetened and flavored with vanilla. Sprinkle chopped 
pistachio nuts or almonds on the cream. — Mrs. Mary L. Wade. 

Holmes' Trade Mark, the Filled Hod, Stands for Quality and Square 

Dealing. 

CRACKER PUDDING (Good). 
Nine common crackers, 
Three eggs. 

One and one-fourth cups white sugar, 
One-fourth cup molasses. 
One- fourth cup butter. 
One-half teaspoon salt, 
Two teaspoons mixed spices, 
Two cups raisins, 
One cup currants. 

Three apples chopped, and juice of one lemon, 
About one cup of milk. 

Bake in a moderate oven slowly, stirring occasionally at 
first. — Miss Mary H. Nugent. 

Holmes' Trade Mark, the Filled Hod, Stands for Quality and Square 

Dealing. 

CHOCOLATE PUDDING (Fine). 
Four eggs, 

One and three-fourths cups sugar, 
One and three-fourths cups milk. 
Three and one-half squares chocolate grated, 
Three and one-half cups flour. 
Five and one-fourth teaspoons baking powder. 
Steam two hours. 

— Miss Mary H. Nugent. 

105 



OLD ENGLISH PLUM PUDDING. 

One and one-half pounds best beef suet chopped fine, two 
and one-half pounds dark brown sugar, three pounds raisins 
(seeded), three pounds currants, two pounds citron (do not 
cut too fine), one-half pound blanched almonds (chopped), 
seven teacups flour, two teacups molasses, two teaspoons 
saleratus, two lemons, chop rind fine, squeeze in the juice, 
one dessertspoonful of the following spices: cloves, 
cinnamon, a level desertspoonful of ginger; one small nut- 
meg and ten eggs, one-half pint of brandy; add just enough 
water to have a very stiff dough, one large dessertspoonful of 
salt. 

This quantity will make four very large puddings that will 
take ten hours to boil. Half, or even a quarter, will be enough 
for a small family, but do not diminish the time in boiling. 
Keep pudding covered while boiling. Use plenty of water 
and on no account let water stop boiling while cooking the 
pudding. Serve with any rich sauce. — Mrs. A. Wesley Stet- 
son. 

STEAMED PLUM PUDDING. 

Ten crackers rolled, one cup sugar, one cup raisins, one cup 
water, one teaspoon salt, one-fourth teaspoon each of nutmeg, 
cinnamon and clove, one quart of milk. Soak rolled crackers 
in the cup of water, add spices and salt to sugar. Add this to 
the crackers and mix well ; then stir in the milk. Steam four 
hours in an uncovered dish, stirring often to prevent raisins 
from settling. Bake in a moderate oven one hour. 

Sauce for Above. — Cream together one cup sugar, a scant 
one-half cup of butter, add one well beaten Qgg, and boiling 
water to make quite thin, flavor with one teaspoon of vanilla. 
— Mrs. Sarah Tucker. 



RABYDURE fLEAN 
fteSlEERlESSVOAL 

io6 



You Can Cook Best with Holmes' Peerless Coal. 
Write Your New Recipes Here. 



107 



You Can Cook Best with Holmes' Peerless Coal. 
Write Your New Recipes Here. 



1 08 











The ^ 

Question • 

Is not whether you are doing well 
or badly with the coal you are now 
using, but whether you are doing 
as well as you might. 

The old proverb, "a rolling 
stone gathers no moss," may be 
well off-set with "a setting hen 
never gets fat." 

Perhaps you have never tried 
our Special Soft Shamokin Coal 
for your cook stove. It is a coal 
that was, perhaps, not known when 
you went to housekeeping, but it 
is giving the greatest satisfaction 
here and now. Wouldn't it pay 
you to try some? 

58 MAIN STREET 




****#% 
##*#** 
##*##% 


#* 
** 
#* 








#%*#*%* 
*#**#%* 
#%###*# 


WOLMES/ 

















109 



Pudding Sauces. 

STRAWBERRY SAUCE. 
One cup sugar added to one-half box hulled strawberries; 
add enough water to cover and let come to a boil. Serve in- 
dividual portions of vanilla ice cream in tall-stemmed glasses 
and pour over the sauce from pitcher or bowl. — Mrs. L. F. 
Gurney. 

Get Your P. O. Stamps and Money Orders at 58 Main St. This Is Holmes'. 

FRENCH PUDDING SAUCE. 
Wet two rounding tablespoonfuls of flour in cold water; 
stir until smooth and free from lumps. Stir this into one cup 
boiling water; cook ten minutes; set away until cold. With 
the hand cream one-half cup butter and one cupful sugar until 
light and white. Combine mixtures; mix thoroughly, flavor 
with vanilla. — Nellie Lyons. 

PUDDING SAUCE. 
Blend one large tablespoon butter with one small table- 
spoonful pastry flour; add boiling water to make a thick 
cream ; cool and add stiffly beaten white of one egg and two- 
thirds cup sugar. Flavor to taste. — Mrs. W. H. Poole. 

COLD ORANGE SAUCE. 
Beat to a cream one-half cup of butter and one cup of fine 
granulated sugar; then stir in the grated rind of one-half an 
orange, and the juice of one; stir until all the orange juice 
is absorbed ; sprinkle a little mace over sauce and serve. — 
Mrs. Wallace A. Smith. 

Get Your P. O. Stamps and Money Orders at 58 Main St. This Is Holmes'. 

HARD SAUCE. 
Beat one-half cup butter to a cream ; then slowly beat in 
one cup sugar. When light and white beat in the stiffly beaten 
white of one egg ; add this slowly. Flavor with vanilla. — Mrs. 
T. A. Hopkins. 



SNOWDRIFT SAUCE. 
Rub one-quarter cup butter to a cream in a warm bowl ; add 
gradually one-half cup powdered sugar; then add one-half 
teaspoonful of your favorite extract or a little mace. Pile it 
lightly on a small fancy dish. Set on ice until ready to serve. 
— Mrs. Jennie Jefferson. 

Get Your P. O. Stamps and Money Orders at 58 Main St. This Is Holmes'. 

FOAMY SAUCE. 

Whites of two eggs ; one cup powdered sugar ; one-half cup 
hot milk ; one teaspoonful vanilla. Beat whites until stiff, add 
sugar gradually and continue beating; add milk and vanilla. — 
Mrs. D. E. Hall. 

FOAMY SAUCE. 

Beat the yolks of two eggs until thick and lemon-colored; 
add slowly one-quarter cup sugar; beat until light. Into this 
mixture stir three tablespoonfuls hot milk, a pinch of salt and 
one teaspoonful of your favorite flavor. Now fold in the 
stififly beaten whites of two eggs. — Kittie Connolly. 

PUDDING SAUCE. 
Cream one-half cup butter and one cup powdered or fine 
granulated sugar; add yolks of two eggs, beat. Lastly add 
whites of eggs beaten stiff; flavor. — Mrs. D. W. Field. 

PUDDING SAUCE. 
Two cups milk, one cup boiling water, one teaspoonful but- 
ter, one-half cup sugar, salt; mix above and put in double 
boiler; when heated, add one tablespoonful flour wet with 
milk. Cook and flavor with vanilla. — Mrs. Alfred H aught on. 

Get Your P. O. Stamps and Money Orders at 58 Main St. Tills Is Holmes'. 

CURLED BUTTER. 
Make pyramid or other form of butter. Through coarse 
sieve push small pieces of butter, take them off the under 
side of sieve with knife and cover the form already made. 
Pretty for fairs or festivals. — Ada A. Brewster, Kingston, 
Mass. 



You Can Cook Best with Holmes' Peerless Coal. 
Write Your New Recipes Here. 













D [=][=] C 



What 

Skilled Cooks 
Prefer. 

Ask the woman who does 
her own work, the hired girl, 
or the professional cook, why 
they are now using Shamokin 
Coal. They will tell you that 
it is because it is pure coal, that 
it is clean, that it kindles quickly, 
makes a hot fire, can always be 
depended on, and contains so 
little waste that it doesn't pay 
to sift the ashes. 

It is economical. It takes less 
coal to do the same v/ork, and 
it gives perfect results in the 
kitchen. 

THIS IS HOLMES' Corp. 
58 MAIN ST. 



©' 



□ !=!!: 








113 



Cold Desserts. 

PECHE MELBA. 
Choose large, fair peaches; peel and cut in halves, remov- 
ing the stones. Take as many rounds of sponge cake as there 
are halves of peaches ; cover each round with a rich fruit 
juice, such as pineapple (sugar can be added to canned pine- 
apple juice and cooked down to a syrup) and place a half 
of peach on each round of cake ; fill the cavities of the peaches 
with a rich vanilla ice cream with bits of cherries on top. A 
Melba sauce comes in bottles for Peche Melba. — Mrs. John 
Q. Ford. 

If You Want Your Coal Prompt and When Promised, Buy of Holmes. 

COFFEE SPANISH CREAM. 
Mix one and one-half cups boiled coffee, one-half cup milk, 
one-third cup granulated sugar, one tablespoonful granulated 
gelatine and heat in a double boiler. Beat yolks of three eggs 
and add one-third cup sugar and one-quarter teaspoon salt; 
add to first mixture and cook until thickened. Remove from 
range, add whites of three eggs beaten until stiff and one-half 
teaspoon vanilla; turn into individual moulds, first dipped in 
cold water, and chill. Serve with powdered sugar and thin 
cream. — Mrs. J. P. Stedman. 

If You Want Your Coal Prompt and When Promised, Buy of Holmes. 

STRAWBERRY CREAM CAKES. 
Melt one-half cup butter in one cupful boiling water, with 
one teaspoonful salt added ; then add a rounding cupful sifted 
flour, stirring until the mixture rolls into a ball, leaving the 
sides of the saucepan ; when cool, turn into a mixing bowl and 
beat in, one at a time, four eggs ; when well mixed drop in 
tablespoonfuls on a buttered baking pan, some distance apart. 
Bake thirty minutes in a moderate oven ; the cakes should be 
a pretty golden brown when removed from the oven. Let 
cool and fill with a cream made from strawberries. Press the 

114 



berries through a sieve, add to one cupful of the pulp one cup- 
ful rich cream and one-half cup sugar. Beat until the mix- 
ture is a thick stiff cream and fill the cakes by slitting an 
opening on one side of each cake and filling with the cream. 
The quantity mentioned will fill fourteen cakes. — Mrs. Wal- 
lace Smith. 

If You Want Your Coal Prompt and When Promised, Buy of Holmes. 

TAPIOCA ICE. 

Soak one and one-half cups tapioca over night. Cook in a 
double boiler until transparent ; add one cup sugar ; peel and 
mince fine one juicy pineapple. When cool add together and 
set on ice. Serve with cream flavored with vanilla. — Mrs. D. 
M. Feeney. 

STRAWBERRY DESSERT. 

One-half pound marshmallows cut in fine pieces ; one box 
strawberries mashed and sweetened ; one-half pint cream 
whipped stiff, slightly sweetened. Mix together and set on 
ice until ready to serve. — Mrs. W. H. Poole. 

FLUFFY RUFFLES. 
One package raspberry Jell-O prepared by directions on 
package. When it begins to harden, add one-half pint 
whipped cream and one can (ten cents) cocktail pineapple 
which has been chopped fine and cooked ten minutes with one- 
half cup sugar; put in mould and chill. — Mrs. J. C. Elliott. 

If You Want Your Coal Prompt and When Promised, Buy of Holmes. 

COFFEE CREAM. 
Heat one and one-half cups coffee, one-half cup milk and 
one-half box gelatine in a double boiler. When gelatine is 
dissolved, add two-thirds cup sugar, a little salt, and yolks of 
three eggs beaten together. Cook all together until it thickens, 
then remove from fire and add the whites of three eggs beaten 
stiff and flavor with vanilla. Pour into mould and chill. Serve 
with cream, plain or whipped. The above recipe is very nice 
if water and the juice of a small lemon is used in place of 
coffee, and may be eaten without cream. — Mrs. Kate L. 
Weaver. 

"5 



PINEAPPLE FLIP. 

One can sliced pineapple, one lemon, one-half box Swamp- 
scott gelatine, one cup sugar, one-half pint cream, one tea- 
spoon vanilla, white of one egg. Soak gelatine in one cup 
water five minutes, add juice of pineapple, lemon juice and 
sugar; let come to a boil, strain, set away to jell. Whip cream, 
add vanilla, pinch of salt and beaten white of one egg, and gel- 
atine. Beat thoroughly before adding pineapple; set away 
to chill. Beat again before serving. — M. J. Erskine. 

Holmes Sells Best Horse, Cow and Poultry Feed at Lowest Prices, 

SPANISH CREAM. 

One-third box gelatine, put in two-thirds quart milk; let 
soak one hour. Put into a dish and let come to a boil; then 
add yolks of three eggs and two-thirds cup sugar ; let come to 
a boil. Take off stove and add whites of the eggs beaten to 
a stiff froth ; add a little salt and vanilla. — Mrs. D. E. Feeley. 

MARSHMALLOW PUDDING. 

One-half pound marshmallows cut in quarters, one cup wal- 
nuts cut up ; one-quarter cup sugar, three-quarters cup cream 
and one-quarter cup milk; beat sugar, cream and milk to- 
gether, but not too stiff. Add candied cherries. Arrange 
mixture in layers and chill on ice one hour before serving. 
Pretty served in sherbet glasses with cherries on top. — Mrs. 
Ralph D. Poole. 

Holmes Sells Best Horse, Cow and Poultry Feed at Lowest Prices. 

DISH OF SNOW. 

Soak one-half cup gelatine, add one pint boiling water; 
when cool add the whites of three eggs, two cups sugar, juice 
of one lemon; beat one hour; put it in a mould. Scald one 
pint milk, add the yolks of three eggs, one cup sugar, one tea- 
spoon cornstarch, flavor with vanilla. When cool put the 
snow in a glass dish, put the custard around it. Very nice. 
— Mrs. Dudley. 

ii6 



PINEAPPLE GELATINE. 
One-half box Minute gelatine, three cups boiling water, one 
cup pineapple juice, two cups sugar, one can sliced pineapple 
chopped fine ; one-half pint cream whipped. Beat all together 
when the gelatine is partly set. — Mrs. Delia F. Chamberlain. 

Holmes Sells Best Horse, Cow and Poultry Feed at Lowest Prices. 

RICE BLANC MANGE. 
Into a double boiler put three cupfuls milk, pinch of salt 
and scant one-half cup rice which has been thoroughly 
washed; cook this until the milk is entirely absorbed; then 
add one-third box gelatine which has been dissolved in cold 
water. As the mixture begins to thicken add one-half cup 
sugar, one teaspoonful vanilla and one wine-glass of orange 
juice, with finally one-half pint cream whipped stiff. Turn 
mixture into a wetted mould and set away in a cold place until 
needed. Serve with cream. — Mrs. Will T. Lewis. 

PINEAPPLE PUDDING. 
Fresh soft marshmallows cut in halves; cover bottom of 
dish; then layer of pineapple cut in small pieces, then a layer 
of whipped cream with just a little salt and sugar in it. Re- 
peat until dish is full as you wish. If using fruit in natural 
state, cut up and cover with sugar and let stand a while be- 
fore using. This is a delicious dessert if one likes pineapple. 
— Mrs. J. A. Thurston. 

Holmes Sells Best Horse, Cow and Poultry Feed at Lowest Prices. 

SNOWBALL CUSTARD. 
Soak one-half package gelatine in one teacupful cold water 
one hour; add one pint boiling water, stir until the gelatine is 
all dissolved. Then beat the whites of four eggs to a stiff 
froth, put two teacupfuls sugar into the gelatine water first, 
then the beaten whites of eggs and one teaspoonful vanilla 
extract or the grated rind and juice of one lemon. Whip it 
some time until it is all stiff and cold. Dip some small dishes 
in cold water and fill them and set in a cold place; make a 

117 



boiled custard of yolks of three eggs, one-half cup sugar, one 
pint milk and flavor with vanilla extract. Now after the 
meringue in the glasses has stood about five hours, turn them 
out in a glass dish and pour the custard around the base. — 
Mrs. J. F. Mclntyre. 

A Self-Filling, Non-Leakable Fountain Pen at Holmes'. 

SNOW PUDDING. 

Take one-half box gelatine, soak in one-half pint cold water ; 
when dissolved pour over one-half pint boiling water, add 
juice of two lemons and one-half cup sugar. Beat the whites 
of four eggs to a stifif froth with one-half cup sugar and pour 
into gelatine, stirring a little. Cool in a mould. 

Custard. — Yolks of four eggs, one pint milk, one cup sugar, 
little salt; boil the milk, add eggs, sugar and flavor. — Mrs. 
George B. Holland. 

DATE TORTE (German). 
Two eggs, one cup sugar, one cup walnuts, one cup dates, 
one tablespoon flour, one teaspoon baking powder. Beat eggs 
very light, add sugar; chop nut meats, cut dates in small 
pieces ; bake in a moderate oven. This will rise up very light 
and fall to about half its thickness while in oven. Serve cold 
with cream. — K. L. W. 

A Self-Filling, Non-Leal<abie Fountain Pen at Holmes'. 

COFFEE BAVARIAN CREAM. 
One-half box gelatine, one-half cup cold water, one pint 
cream, one pint milk, four eggs (yolks), four eggs (whites), 
one-half cup sugar, one-half teaspoon salt, one teaspoon 
vanilla, one-quarter cup black coffee. Soak the gelatine in 
the cold water, chill and beat the cream with an egg beate,r 
and set it on ice. Put milk in double boiler and heat to boiling 
point ; beat yolks of eggs, add sugar and salt ; pour hot milk 
on to the mixture, stir thoroughly and return to double boiler 
and cook two or three minutes or just enough to scald the 

ii8 



egg; stir constantly, add the soaked gelatine, and when dis- 
solved pour over the well beaten whites of the eggs; add 
vanilla. Set into a pan of ice water. Stir well and when 
slightly thickened add the cold black coffee and then the 
cream; keep stirring; when stiff enough to drop, pour into a 
mould wet in cold water. One-half the rule will make almost, 
if not quite, a quart mould. Set on ice until cold; unmould 
and put in dish; surround with whipped cream and dot with 
candied cherries cut in bits. — Mrs. C. C. Merritt. 

A Self-Filling, Non-Leakable Fountain Pen at Holmes'. 

MARSHMALLOW PUDDING. 

One-quarter pound marshmallows ; cut them in four pieces ; 
one-half pint cream beaten stiff, one tablespoonful sugar, one- 
half cup chopped nuts, one tablespoonful chopped cherries, 
flavor with vanilla; add marshmallows and chill. "Cherries 
au marasquin" preferred, S. S. Pierce brand. — Mrs. James M. 
Cunningham. 

COFFEE TAPIOCA CREAM. 

Put one pint of breakfast coffee over the fire in a double 
boiler, the coffee left from breakfast will do if it was poured 
from the grounds before it was taken to the breakfast room ; 
when hot add three level tablespoonfuls of Slade's tapioca and 
cook until the tapioca is transparent; beat the yolks of two 
eggs, add one-half cup sugar and one-quarter teaspoon of salt 
and beat again ; dilute with a little of the hot tapioca and stir 
into the contents of the double boiler; when the mixture has 
thickened fold in the stiffly beaten whites of the eggs. Serve 
with cream very cold. — Mrs. J. A. Condon. 

A Self-Filling, Non-Leakable Fountain Pen at Holmes'. 

PINEAPPLE TRIFLE. 
One-half can grated pineapple, two-thirds cup sugar, cook 
together ; dissolve one-half package of any flavor Jell-O in one- 
half pint boiling water ; then add the pineapple, sugar and juice 
of half an orange to the Jell-O and set away to cool. When it 
begins to thicken add one-half pint cream whipped stiff. Stir 
thoroughly and turn into a mould to harden. — E. F. W. 

119 



BANANA AND TAPIOCA CHARLOTTE. 
Cook one-third cup Slade's tapioca in one pint boiling water 
until the mixture is smooth and transparent; add one cup 
banana pulp (three or four bananas peeled and pressed 
through a potato ricer or sieve), one-quarter cup lemon juice 
and one cup sugar ; when the mixture is thoroughly scalded 
remove it from the fire and fold into it the stiffly beaten whites 
of three eggs. Line a glass serving dish with lady fingers or 
macaroons and turn the mixture into it; take one-quarter cup 
milk and two tablespoonfuls of powdered sugar, one cup thick 
cream and beat until stiff, with an egg beater. Use the cream 
as a garnish for the top of the charlotte. A pastry bag and 
rose tube will be found convenient in garnishing with whip- 
ped cream. — Mrs. J. A. Condon. 

Holmes' Peerless Coal Pleases Particular People. 

AMBER CLEAR COFFEE JELLY. 
Soak one envelope "Plymouth Rock White Phosphated Gel- 
atine" in one cup cold water for five minutes ; then add one 
and one-half cups sugar and one and one-half pints of hot 
coffee made in this way: — Break one egg into a cup, hold it 
under cold water faucet and beat, letting water drop until there 
is about as much water as tgg. Then measure three large 
tablespoonfuls coffee and mix with enough of the tgg to 
moisten thoroughly and let stand a few minutes; then pour 
enough boiling water on for the desired quantity. Let boil 
three minutes ; then shake a tiny bit of salt in the pot and dash 
in a little cold water, and after standing ten minutes pour 
through a bit of cheesecloth on to the gelatine and sugar. 
Cool in a mould. Serve with cream and sugar. — Kate L. 
Weaver. 

Holmes' Peerless Coal Pleases Particular People. 

ORANGE CHARLOTTE. 
One-third box gelatine, one-third cup cold water, one-third 
cup boiling water, one cup sugar, juice of one lemon, one cup 
orange juice and pulp, whites of three eggs. Soak the gelatine 



in cold water until soft; add the boiling water, sugar and 
lemon juice; strain and add the orange juice and pulp and a 
little of the grated rind. Cool in a pan of ice water and when 
it begins to harden, beat in the stiffly beaten whites of the 
eggs and beat together till stiff enough to drop. Pour into the 
mould. Whipped cream may be piled on the top after remov- 
ing from the mould. One cup chopped nut meats added with 
juice and pulp of the orange is very nice. — Mrs. Lucius Leach, 

Holmes' Peerless Coal Pleases Particular People. 

PINEAPPLE SOUFFLE. 
To one large cup grated pineapple add three-quarters cup 
sugar, the juice of one-half a lemon and cook until reduced 
and thick. To the whites of five eggs add one-quarter tea- 
spoon cream of tartar, beat until dry, then beat gradually into 
the cold pineapple mixture. Turn into a two quart melon 
mould that has been well buttered and dredged with sugar. Set 
into a dish on several folds of paper, surround with boiling 
water and let cook about one-half hour. The water must not 
boil during the cooking. Turn from the mould, serve with 
cream and sugar. — Mrs. F. E. Harrison. 

STRAWBERRY WHIP. 
Take one and one-quarter cups strawberries and one cup 
white sugar (powdered is best) and the white of one egg. 
Mash or squeeze the berries through one of the wire potato 
mashers. Then beat the berries, sugar and white of egg until 
stiff enough to hold in shape. — Nellie Lyons. 

Holmes' Peerless Coal Pleases Particular People. 

CODDLED APPLES. 
Pare and core a dozen best apples. Set in kettle not 
crowded. Add two teaspoonfuls cold water, one tablespoon- 
ful butter, one teacup sugar, juice of a lemon and a little nut- 
meg. Stew until tender. Let remain in kettle until cold. 
Serve with cream. — Mrs. Charles Tully. 



LEMON JELLY.' 

Soak one-half box gelatine in one-half cup cold water 
twenty minutes ; pour over two and one-half cups boiling 
water; add one cup sugar and one-hdf cup lemon juice; strain 
and pour into mould. — Mrs. A. C. Gibbs. 





e 



What a virtue there 
is in pure COAL. 
~^ There should be 
nothing in coal but coal. 
Coal should burn, resolve 
itself into heat and ashes. 
Our Special Soft Shamo- 
kin Coal bums; kindles 
quickly ; makes a hot fire ; 
holds fire well, and all 
burns to ashes. It doesn't 
pay to sift the ashes, be- 
cause there is no coal in 
them. This saves time and 
money and avoids a dirty, 
disagreeable job. 






You Can Cook Best with Holmes' Peerless Coal. 
Write Your New Recipes Here. 



123 



R' 

n 



ABYDURE riEAN 
'AGSIEERLESSLOAL 



31 



tm thncntmn rnttatata 



in knntutng fn^rg- 
tl|ttt5 about BomFtl|tnj9 
unh Homjftlytng about 
?tt^rytt|tuj5. 

The something that you need to 
know about coal for the cook stove 
(if you haven't already learned it) is 
that our Special Soft Shamokin Stove 
Coal cannot be excelled as a fuel for 
cooking stoves. Ask the opinion of 
any lady who ever used it. 

THIS IS HOLMES' Corp. 

58 MAIN ST. ENTERPRISE BLDG. 



t ABYDURE riEAN 
AGSlEERlESStOAL 



124 



Ices, Ice Cream, E^tc. 

PLAIN ICE CREAM. 
One pint milk, one pint cream, one cup sugar, two eggs, two 
scant tablespoons flour, one saltspoonful salt, two tablespoon- 
fuls flavoring. Boil the milk and cream, reserving one-quarter 
cup milk. Mix the sugar, flour and salt thoroughly. Beat the 
eggs until light, add the cold milk and sugar mixture, and 
when well mixed add the boiling milk. Turn back into the 
double boiler and cook twenty minutes. Stir constantly until 
smooth, and after that occasionally. Strain through a gravy 
strainer, add more sugar if needed, and when cold add the 
flavoring. Freeze as usual. To above add just before freez- 
ing, from one to two tablespoonfuls vanilla according to 
strength, and you have vanilla ice cream. — Mrs. B. L. Simp- 
son. 

Postcard Albums, All Prices, at Holmes'. 

STRAWBERRY MOUSSE. 
Mash one box strawberries through a fine sieve ; add one 
cup powdered sugar. Stir on ice until very cold ; add one pint 
thick cream beaten with a Dover egg beater ; put in mould, set 
in pail of ice and salt (equal quantities) and stand three hours 
without stirring. Serve in slices or in pretty glasses. — Mrs. 
C. C. Merritt. 

Postcard Albums, Ail Prices, at Holmes'. 

COFFEE MOUSSE. 
One pint thick cream, two-thirds cup powdered sugar, one- 
half cup black coffee ; beat this mixture until it is solid to the 
bottom of the bowl. Turn into a mould lined with paper; fill 
the mould to overflow. Spread a paper over the top of the 
cream ; fit the cover in place, and pack in equal measures of 
ice and salt. Let stand between two and three hours. Serve 
in slices or in tall glasses with a spoonful of whipped cream on 
top. — Mrs. Walter Bradford. 

I2S 



MAPLE PARFAIT. 
One pint thick cream, one-half pint maple syrup. Beat stiff 
and put in mould. Pack in ice and salt of equal quantities, for 
three hours. — Jennie Jefferson. 

LEMON SHERBET. 
One quart milk, one pint sugar, juice of three lemeons. Mix 
sugar and lemon juice; add milk, and freeze at once. — M. 
A. C. 

Holmes Doesn't Claim His Coal to Be the Best on Earth. H^s Customers 
Make the Claim, and He Admits It's True. 

ORANGE SHERBET. 
Boil one quart water and one pint sugar rapidly for twenty 
minutes, add one teaspoon granulated gelatine that has been 
dissolved in one-quarter cup of cold water and strain into a 
large pitcher. When cold add one scant pint of orange juice, 
also juice of one lemon, and freeze. If the freezer is turned 
rapidly and continuously until the mixture is hard, the result 
will be a smooth ice, creamy in texture. — Mrs. Nora Buckley. 

PINEAPPLE SHERBET. 
One can pineapple or one pint of fresh fruit, one pint sugar 
(scant), one pint boiling water turned on the sugar to dis- 
solve it; one tablespoonful gelatine dissolved in one-half cup 
boiling water. When dissolved add this to the sugar and 
water. Cut the eyes from the fruit and chop it very fine ; add 
this to the juice from the can. If fresh pineapple is used, it 
must be chopped and covered with sugar over night to extract 
the juice. — Mrs. Granfville Hunt. 

Holmes Doesn't Claim His Coal to Be the Best on Earth. His Customers 
Make the Claim, and He Admits It's True. 

MAPLE ICE CREAM. 
One cup thick maple syrup, add the beaten yolks of four 
eggs ; cook in double boiler until it boils ; strain and set to 
cool ; beat one pint of cream, add the beaten whites of four 
eggs ; add the syrup and freeze. — E. F. IV. 

126 



BANANA ICE CREAM. 
Peel six ripe bananas, split and remove the seeds and dark 
portion in the centre ; rub the pulp through a sieve ; add to it 
two tablespoonfuls lemon juice, one saltspoonful salt. Heat 
one quart of thin cream in a double boiler until scalding hot; 
melt one cup sugar in it, and when cold combine mixtures and 
freeze. — Mrs. W. B. Baldwin, Jr. 

Holmes Doesn't Claim His Coal to Be the Best on Earth. His Customers 
Make the Claim, and He Admits It's True. 

STRAWBERRY ICE CREAM. 
Sprinkle two cups sugar over two quarts of strawberries; 
mash them and let them stand half an hour or until the sugar 
is dissolved. Turn the berries into a large square of cheese 
cloth which has been placed over a bowl. Gather up the edges 
of the cloth, twist them and squeeze as long as any juice or 
pulp will come. Then empty the pulp and seeds left in the 
cloth into a pan and pour on gradually about one pint milk; 
mix it well with the pulp, until the pulp is separated from the 
seeds. Squeeze again until perfectly dry. There should be 
nothing left in the cloth save a ball of seeds. The pulp will 
thicken the milk, and it is much nicer than the juice alone. 
Add to this pulpy juice as much cream as you may have, from 
one cup to three pints, and sugar to make it very sweet. This 
cream should be scalded and cooled. Freeze as usual. This 
is a great improvement over that made by simply mashing the 
fruit, where the presence of the seeds is objectionable. — Mrs. 
F. A. Besse. 

Holmes Doesn't Claim His Coal to Be the Best on Earth. His Customers 
Mal<e the Claim, and He Admits It's True. 

FROZEN PUDDING (Excellent). 
Two teaspoonfuls cornstarch boiled in one quart of milk in 
double boiler one hour; before taking from the stove add one 
pint sugar, four eggs well beaten. When cold add one quart 
milk and a jar of cream ; ten cents' worth candied cherries and 
ten cents' worth candied pineapple soaked in rum over night. 
Freeze. — Mrs. W. E. Bryant. 

127 



ICED BISCUITS. 

Boil together one cup sugar and one-quarter cup water five 
minutes. Pour onto the well beaten yolks of six eggs, and 
cook until thickened. Beat until cold, add one pint stiffly 
beaten cream, one tablespoonful vanilla, one teaspoon almond 
extract, and color pale green ; then add one-quarter pound 
chopped pistachio nuts. Beat until stiff one cup cream, add 
one-half cup powdered sugar, one teaspoon vanilla and one 
cup strawberry puree. Half fill a brick mould with first mix- 
ture, completely fill with second mixture, cover with buttered 
paper, pack in equal parts, salt and ice, and let stand three 
hours. Remove from mould and serve with sugar wafers. — 
Mrs. J. Q. Ford, 

Free Lead Pencils to All Cash With Order Coal Customers at 58 Main St 

COFFEE FRAPPE. 

To one quart of strong and very clear coffee chilled, add 
three-quarters cup sugar and turn into a freezer packed as for 
ice cream. Turn the crank until the mixture is half frozen. 
Serve in sherbet cups, either with or without whipped cream. 
— Ada S. Lewis. 

CAFE FRAPPE. 

Three cups coffee, one cup sugar, one cup cream, one- 
quarter teaspoon salt. Freeze to consistency of mush. Serve 
in glasses with whipped cream on top. — Ruth Rogers. 

Free Lead Pencils to All Cash With Order Coal Customers at 58 Main St. 

BISCUIT TORTONI. 

To fill three quart freezer, allow one quart cream, two eggs, 
one-half cup sugar, one-half cup boiling water, one teaspoon 
vanilla, one-half pound French cherries or candied, one 
dozen macaroons chopped, one cup almonds chopped after 
being blanched. Whip cream and stand on ice until 
needed ; separate eggs and beat whites to a stiff froth and yolks 
to smooth cream ; boil sugar and water together until syrup 

128 



will form a hair ; pour syrup slowly over beaten whites, whisk- 
ing rapidly all of the time ; add yolks and cook in double boiler 
for ten minutes, stirring. Stand aside to become cool. Soak 
cherries in sherry wine ; add cherries, almonds and macaroons 
to cold mixture, which should be thick; then stir in whipped 
cream and lastly vanilla. Put in melon mould and pack in ice 
and salt from four to six hours. — Mrs. Heman Eldredge. 

Free Lead Pencils to All Cash With Order Coal Customers at 553 Main St. 

PISTACHIO ICE CREAM. 
One quart thin cream, three-quarters cup sugar, one table- 
spoonful vanilla, one teaspoon almond extract ; color Burnett's 
Leaf Green or Spinach. 

SULTANA ROLL. 

Line one pound baking powder boxes with pistachio ice 
cream ; sprinkle with sultana raisins which have been soaked 
in brandy one hour. Fill centres with beaten cream, sweetened 
and flavored with vanilla; cover with pistachio cream; pack 
in equal quantities of ice and salt for one and one-half hours. 
Serve with 

Claret Sauce. — Boil one cupful sugar with one-quarter cup- 
ful water eight minutes ; cool slightly and add one-third cup 
claret. — Clara H. Bartlett. 

Free Lead Pencils to All Cash With Order Coal Customers at 58 Main St. 

FLUFFY RUFFLES ICE CREAM. 
For twenty-four portions. One quart milk, one pint heavy 
cream, two pounds granulated sugar, one teaspoon vanilla ex- 
tract, one-half teaspoon lemon extract, two teaspoons 
powdered gelatine. Scald the milk in double boiler with the 
sugar and gelatine ; then stir fifteen minutes ; take from fire, 
add extracts, cool, then add well beaten whites of eggs and 
cream ; freeze as usual for any ice cream ; serve in cone shapes 
with, a crushed strawberry on the top. Accompany with lady 
fingers. Use glass service. — Herbert L. Aldridge. 

129 



GRAPE FRUIT SHERBET— GOLF CLUB. 
For thirty-two portions or two gallons. One gallon boil- 
ing water, sixteen small, smooth grape fruit, six pounds gran- 
ulated sugar, whites of eight eggs. Cut fruit in equal halves, 
being careful to preserve the shells ; scoop out the pulp and 
juice into colander, set over bowl and squeeze or press all juice 
into bowl. Add the sugar to boiling water, boil thirty minutes, 
cool and add the fruit juice and well beaten whites of eggs. 
Freeze as for any ice cream, twenty to thirty minutes, accord- 
ing to freezer used, and let stand at least two hours before 
serving. Serve in the half shells accompanied by Nabisco 
wafers. Orange sherbet may be made same way with twelve 
oranges and four lemons instead of grape fruit. Serve in 
oransfe shells. — Herbert L. Aldrido-e. 




130 



You Can Cook Best with Holmes' Peerless Coal. 
Write Your New Recipes Here. 



131 



ai> 



^ 




aD 



^ 




A Pound of 

According to some statistically inclined 
person, has within it dynamic power 
equivalent to the work of one man for 
one day — three tons representing 20 
years of hard work. The coal must, 
of course, be skilfully used. 

You cannot throw any kind of coal 
into any kind of a stove and get the 
greatest benefit. The woman who 
gets the best results out of a ton of 
coal can save money by using Holmes' 
Special Soft Shamokin for cooking. 
Have you tried it? jg jyj^jpj gj^ 





C|?^ 





^ 



132 



Pies. 

TARTS. 
Beat one-half cup butter, one-half cup lard, white of one 
egg, one teaspoon sugar together until creamy; then add 
five tablespoonfuls cold water; into one cup flour mix one 
good teaspoonful baking powder and one teaspoonful salt ; add 
this to first mixture and as much more flour as it requires to 
knead. Pat and roll into a sheet and cut into rounds with a 
small cookie cutter. With a thimble or small end of a pastry 
tube, cut out six small rounds from half of the rounds. Put 
the rounds with holes in them on the plain rounds and bake. 
When cold separate and spread plain rounds with raspberry 
jam (or any other jam or jelly) and replace round with the 
holes. — Clara H. Bartlett. 

A Better, Purer Coal for the Cook Stove Than Holmes' Special Soft 
Shamokin Never Came Out of the Ground. 

CRANBERRY PIE. 

Pastry: — One cup flour, two tablespoonfuls lard, one level 
teaspoon baking powder, a little salt and enough cold water to 
make a stiff dough. 

Filling: — One quart cranberries, cook and strain; add two 
cups sugar and a little salt. Line plate as for custard pie ; bake 
with one crust. 

Frosting. — Beat whites of two eggs to a stiff froth; add 
two tablespoons of fine sugar, put in oven and brown. — Mrs. 
Alice O. Hamblett. 

A Better, Purer Coal for the Cook Stove Than Holmes' Special Soft 
Shamokin Never Came Out of the Ground. 

FIG PIES. 
One pound figs chopped fine and boiled in enough water 
to cover until soft; one-half pound raisins, chopped, one-half 
cup sugar, one egg, butter size of an egg. This makes three 
pies. — Mrs. W. E. Bryant. 



FIG PIE. 
Chop one pound figs and stew until soft in enough cold 
water to cover; chop one-half pound raisins, add juice and 
grated rind of one lemon, one and one-half cups sugar, one 
egg, butter the size of an egg. Bake in two crusts. This 
makes three pies. — Mrs. D. K. Carpenter. 

Best Self- Filling Fountain Pen at Holmes', 58 IMaIn St. 

SQUASH PIE. 
Cream together one tablespoonful butter and four table- 
spoonfuls sugar ; add two eggs beaten light, one tablespoonful 
maple syrup, one-half cup sifted squash, cinnamon and ginger 
to taste ; one pint rich milk. — Mrs. Marcus Hall. 

SQUASH PIE. 

One can squash, one-half teaspoon cinnamon 'beaten to- 
gether ; pinch of salt, four eggs, one quart and one-half pint 
milk, one-half tablespoon flour; beat up in a little milk one 
cracker rolled fine. This makes four pies. — Mrs. Margaret 
Doherty. 

MOCK MINCE PIE. 

One cup cranberries, one-half cup raisins, one-half cup 
sugar, one cup boiling water, one teaspoon vanilla, piece of 
butter.— Mr.y. 7. N. Ellis. 

Best Self-Filling Fountain Pen at Holmes', 58 IVIain St. 

CREAM PIE. 
Line a deep plate with a good paste, pricking it in several 
places with a fork to let the air out and prevent blisters. Bake 
a delicate brown. Put one cup milk in a double boiler to scald. 
Stir together one-half cup sugar, piece of butter size of a wal- 
nut, small half cup of flour, one teaspoon cold milk and the 
yolks of two well beaten eggs. Add the mixture to the milk 
when it boils. Stir until it thickens and cook for a few min- 
utes ; then flavor with vanilla. Fill crust with mixture. Beat 
the whites of the eggs, add two tablespoonfuls powdered 
sugar and spread on top of the pie, then brown in oven. — Mrs. 
F. B. Leonard. 

134 



RHUBARB PIE. 
Mix two cups of rhubarb cut in small pieces with one 
cup sugar, one tablespoonful flour and yolks of two eggs. Use 
whites of eggs for frosting. — Mrs. G. R. Washburn. 

LEMON PIE. 
One cup sugar and two tablespoonfuls flour mixed together 
dry; juice and grated rind of one lemon; yolks of two eggs, 
one cup water, one tablespoonful milk in the water. Bake with 
one crust and frost with the whites of two eggs and two table- 
spoonfuls sugar. — Mrs. J. E. Skinner. 

Best Self-Filling Fountain Pen at Holmes', 58 Main St. 

LEMON PIE. 
Cut a slice of bread one inch thick from a loaf of bread and 
trim off the crust, using only the soft part. Place this in a 
bowl, add a pinch of salt, a piece of butter about the size of 
a small o^gg and one cup of boiUng water. Beat until smooth, 
then add one cup sugar, the juice and grated rind of one lem- 
on, and the yolks of two eggs well beaten. Stir all together 
and pour into deep pie plate lined with a rich crust. When 
done, cool and cover with a meringue made of the whites of 
two eggs. Put them on a large dinner plate, beat with a silver 
knife until stiflf and dry; beat in one-half tablespoon lemon 
juice, add slowly three level tablespoonfuls granulated sugar 
(powdered is better) ; beat until stiff, flavor with a few drops 
of lemon or vanilla. Pour over top of pie. Set in a moderate 
oven on an inverted pan and let it brown, which will be in ten 
minutes. — Mrs. C. C. Merritt. 

Best Self-Filling Fountain Pen at Holmes', 58 Main St. 

EXCELLENT LEMON PIE. 
Rind and juice of one lemon, yolks of two eggs, three- 
fourths cup sugar, one and one-half cups of water, two large 
dessertspoonfuls of cornstarch or two large tablespoonfuls 
flour. Bake crust first, then cook the lemon mixture in dou- 
ble boiler. When cold put into the crust ; then beat the whites 
with two spoonfuls sugar and put on top of pie and brown in 
the oven. — Mrs. E. J. Fletcher. 

^3S 



LEMON PIE. 
One cup sugar, one tablespoonful flour stirred well together ; 
pour over one and one-half cups boiling water, stirring con- 
stantly until the lumps disappear; add butter the size of a 
walnut, grated rind and juice of one large or two small lemons, 
three eggs well beaten. To be made with two crusts. This 
is excellent. — Mrs. James P. Donovan. 

Length of Public Service Is the Best Guarantee of Good Faith and 
Business Integrity, This Is Holmes' Coal Business; Has Been Under 
the Present Management Since 1873. 

LEMON PIE. 
Juice and grated rind of one lemon, one cup sugar, yolks of 
two eggs, one heaping tablespoonful flour, one teaspoon melted 
butter, one cup milk, whites of eggs beaten stiff and added 
last. Bake with one crust in rather slow oven. — Mrs. Wm. H. 
Cook, Whitman, Mrs. Margaret Doherty. 

LEMON CUSTARD PIE. 

Yolks of four eggs, reserving whites for frosting; two 
tablespoonfuls corn starch, one and one-third cups sugar, 
juice and grated rind of one lemon, two cups milk, pinch of 
salt. Bake with one rich crust. 

Frosting: — Whites of four eggs beaten very stiff, two 
tablespoonfuls sugar; after pie is baked, cover with frosting 
and bake a light brown. — Mrs. T. Gushing. 

Length of Public Service Is the Best Guarantee of Good Faith and 
Business Integrity. This Is Holmes' Coal Business; Has Been Under 
the Present Management Since 1873. 

GREEN TOMATO PIE. 
Two quarts tomatoes, chopped fine; scald and drain off; 
one cup suet chopped, one pound brown sugar, one half cup 
vinegar, one-fourth pound citron, one-half pound raisins, one- 
half teaspoon clove, cinnamon and allspice, one teaspoon salt. 
Put on stove and cook. This makes four pies. — Mrs. Allie V. 
Packard. 

136 



PRUNE PIE. 

Line a plate with a rich paste ; turn into it one pint of 
stewed and sifted prunes, sweetened slightly. Beat a piece of 
butter the size of an egg with two tablespoonfuls of fine sugar, 
two tablespoonfuls fine soft bread crumbs and the yolks of 
two eggs, well beaten. Add the whites whipped to a stiff 
froth. Spread this mixture over the prunes and bake in a mod- 
erate oven. — Mrs. Mae E. Simpson. 

Length of Public Service Is the Best Guarantee of Good Faith and 
Business Integrity. This Is Holmes' Coal Business; Has Been Under 
the Present Management Since 1873. 

MINCE MEAT. 

Three bowls of chopped meat, six bowls of chopped apples ; 
if there is a little more apple, put it in, it will no no harm; 
two bowls of sugar, one bowl molasses, one bowl boiled cider 
or vinegar, one bowl of good strong coffee and be sure and 
put in the liquor the meat was boiled in, and most if not all of 
the fat ; also one level dessertspoon each of ground cloves, all- 
spice, cinnamon and mace; grate one whole nutmeg; juice and 
rind of one lemon or one tablespoon of essence of lemon ; one 
bowl each of currants and seeded raisins. — Mrs. S. H. Eaton. 

Length of Public Service Is the Best Guarantee of Good Faith and 
Business Integiity. This Is Holmes' Coal Business; Has Been Under 
the Present Management Since 1873. 

MINCE MEAT. 

Four pounds lean corned beef, one peck of apples, two 
pounds raisins, one pound currants, one-half pound citron, 
one teaspoon nutmeg, one teaspoon cinnamon, one teaspoon 
cloves, one teaspoon salt, three cups sugar, one quart sweet 
cider, one small piece of orange peel, one small piece of lemon 
peel ; add two cups chopped apple to one cup chopped meat 
and chop raisins, currants, citron, lemon and orange peel; 
adding the spices. Cook slowly four or five hours and bottle. 
This meat will keep for years. — Mrs. Catherine Hayes. 

137 



You Can Cook Best with Holmes' Peerless Coal. 
Write Your New Recipes Here. 



138 




2^11? n ftgfi Qvnm 
Jtltl 0tt tljtatte all 
Oloal tutu bt nixkt ! 

^ A good appearance counts 
for something. 

^ Good performance counts 
for more. 

^ Bright clean coal that bums 
splendidly will make any 
cook happy. 

^ We try to make people 
happy. 

^ Our Special Soft Shamo- 
kin Coal will help do it. 
^ No sifting of ashes, little 
dirt, and less slate. 




139 



Gingerbread, Doughnuts, Cookies, £tc. 

DELICIOUS GINGERBREAD. 
One cup granulated sugar, two tablespoonfuls molasses, 
four tablespoonfuls melted butter, one even teaspoon salt, one 
dessertspoonful cinnamon, and one teaspoon of mixed spices. 
Stir and rub well together, then add one egg well beaten and 
one cup real sour milk. Then sift one even teaspoon of soda 
with two cups flour and sift it into the other mixture and beat 
about two minutes. Turn it into a nine by nine inch tin, sprin- 
kle sugar over the top and bake forty minutes in a moderate 
oven. This makes a nice dessert served with cottage or cream 
cheese, unsalted butter balls or thick cream. — Mrs. M. E. 
Mowry. 

Husbands Never Make Mistakes When They Order Their Coal of Holmes, 
Regardless of Their Wife's Opinion of Them on Other Matters. 

SOFT GINGERBREAD. 
Two cups sugar, two-thirds cup butter, two eggs, one cup 
milk, one-half teaspoon soda, one teaspoon cream of tartar, 
sifted into three cups flour ; one tablespoon yellow ginger, 
salt. Bake in a quick oven. After it is removed from the 
oven, sift sugar on top. — Mrs. M. E. Gray. 

SOFT GINGERBREAD. 
Stir to a cream one-half cup butter or lard, one-fourth cup 
brown sugar, one cup cooking molasses, one-half cup sweet 
milk, one-half teaspoon ginger, one-half teaspoon cinnamon. 
Beat all thoroughly together, then add two small eggs or one 
large one, the whites and yolks beaten separately. Beat into 
this one cup sifted flour, then add one-half teaspoon of soda 
dissolved in a little water, one more cup sifted flour. Bake in 
a moderate oven for about fifty minutes. Sour milk makes it 
lighter. — Mrs. L. Crocker. 

Husbands Never Make Mistakes When They Order Their Coal of Holmes, 
Regardless of Their Wife's Opinion of Them on Other Matters. 

140 



GINGERBREAD. 

One Qgg, one cup molasses, one teaspoon ginger, one tea- 
spoon cinnamon (scant), one teaspoon soda, one-half cup hot 
water, pinch of salt, butter size of an egg and flour to make a 
batter. — Mrs. Lena M. Shcmf. 

MOLASSES DROP CAKES. 

One cup molasses, one-half cup melted butter, one cup 
sugar, two teaspoonfuls soda, one cup hot water, one egg, two 
teaspoonfuls ginger, one-half teaspoon salt, four cups flour. 
Makes twenty-four. — Mrs. E. M. Wood. 

Hus bands Never Make Mistakes When They Order Their Coal of Holmes 
Regardless of Their Wife's Opinion of Them on Other Matters. 

EASY COOKIES. 
Two cups sugar, three-fourths cup butter, seven-eighths 
cup sour milk, four cups flour, two eggs, two-thirds teaspoon 
soda, two teaspoonfuls baking powder, one nutmeg, one cup 
chopped raisins, one cup walnuts. Mix as for cookies and 
spread in a large cooking pan in one sheet ; sprinkle with sugar 
and cinnamon and bake in quite a quick oven ; let the cake cool 
and cut in small squares. Fine for children. — Mrs. E. H. 
Keith. 

SOUR CREAM COOKIES. 

One cup butter, two cups sugar, three eggs, one-half cup 
sour milk, one level teaspoonful soda, pinch of salt, vanilla 
and orange extract. — Mrs. I. B. Shaw. 

Husbands Never Make Mistakes When They Order Their Coal of Holmes, 
Regardless of Their Wife's Opinion of Them on Other Matters. 

SUGAR COOKIES. 

One and one-half cups sugar, one and one-half cups butter, 
three cups pastry flour, four eggs, mace, vanilla, one teaspoon- 
ful cream of tartar, one-half teaspoon soda ; add more flour 
and roll very thin. Very nice. — Mrs. W. H. French. 

141 



SUGAR COOKIES. 
One-half cup butter, one cup sugar, two eggs, one and one- 
half teaspoonfuls baking powder, two and one-half cups flour. 
— Mrs. D. K. Carpenter. 

SUGAR COOKIES. 
One-half cup butter and one-half cup sugar creamed; two 
tablespoons milk, one-half teaspoon cream of tartar, one- 
fourth teaspoon soda, one egg, one teaspoon lemon extract, 
one teaspoon carraway seeds; flour to roll very thin. Pastry 
flour is used. — Mrs. M. E. Gray. 

If You Want Anything to Write With or On, Holmes, 58 Main St. 

RICH JUMBLES. 
One and one-half cups butter, one and one-half cups sugar, 
three eggs, two tablespoonfuls milk, a little mace, one-half 
teaspoon soda, flour to make into a soft dough; roll out and 
cut with a small doughnut cutter, not too thin ; delicious ; will 
keep indefinitely. — Eloise D. Harris, Melrose. 

SURPRISE COOKIES. 

One-half cup butter, one cup sugar, one tablespoonful milk, 
two eggs, one heaping teaspoonful baking powder, flour to 
roll. 

One cup raisins, one-half cup water, one-half cup sugar; 
cook these until soft; then chop and let cool. 

Cut out the cookies and spread thinly with the raisins, then 
put one on top ; pinch together ; bake in a quick oven. — Mrs. 
George Howard. 

If You Want Anything to Write With or On, C Holmes, 58 Main St. 

CREAM COOKIES. 
Two-thirds cup sour cream, add one and one-half teaspoons 
soda to cream ; one-half cup butter, one large cup sugar, one 
tgg, a little salt, pastry flour. Mix thick enough to roll. 
Vanilla if liked. — Mrs. Jessie Thomas. 

142 



HERMITS. 

One and one-half cups sugar, one cup butter, one cup 
chopped raisins, two eggs, two teaspoonfuls cream of tartar, 
one teaspoon saleratus, one teaspoon clove, cinnamon and nut- 
meg; dissolve soda in one-half cup milk. Flour to handle; 
after rolling sprinkle with sugar. Hot oven. — Mrs. George 
A. Monk. 

HERMITS (Very Nice). 

One and one-half cups sugar, one cup butter, three eggs, 
one teaspoon soda, one teaspoon cinnamon, one-half teaspoon 
clove, one-half teaspoon nutmeg, two cups raisins chopped 
very fine. Flour to roll. — Mrs. Galen K. Tyler. 

If You Want Anything to Write With or On, Holmes, 58 Main St. 

SURPRISE COOKIES. 

One egg, one cup sugar, one-half cup lard mixed with salt, 
nutmeg and extract, one-half cup sour milk in which dissolve 
one-half teaspoon soda. Flour not too stiff. 

Filling: — One cup chopped raisins (seeded), one-half cup 
cold water, one-half cup sugar, one tablespoon flour, salt. Boil 
until smooth and thick. — Mrs. Bertram F. Fales, Attleboro. 

SUGAR COOKIES. 
One cup sugar, one egg, one-half cup butter, four table- 
spoonfuls sweet milk, two teaspoonfuls cream of tartar, one 
teaspoonful soda, one teasponful vanilla, a little salt and flour 
enough to roll thin. — Mrs. Wm. H. Cook, Whitman. 

If You Want Anything to Write With or On, C Holmes, 58 Main St. 

SUGAR COOKIES. 
One and one-third cups sugar, two-thirds cup butter, one- 
third cup lard, one egg, one-half cup milk, two teaspoons 
cream of tartar (level), one full teaspoon soda, salt, vanilla 
or any flavor you like ; flour to make stiff enough to roll ; car- 
raway seeds in a part if you like. — Mrs. Fred Park. 

143 



MOLASSES COOKIES. 
One egg, one cup molasses, one-half cup sugar, one cup 
shortening (one-half butter and one-half lard), salt, one tea- 
spoonful ginger, one teaspoonful soda, flour to roll ; roll thin. 
— Mrs. Fred Park. 

FINE MOLASSES COOKIES. 
Two cups molasses, one heaping teaspoon soda beaten into 
molasses; one cup soft lard, one teaspoonful ginger, one-half 
teaspoon salt, six cups pastry flour; use all the flour. Roll 
very thin and bake quickly. — Marion Thatcher Rankin. 

The Husband Should Be a Silent Partner in the Domestic Firm. The 
Wife Uses the Coai, Wants the Best, and This Is Holmes'. 

CHOCOLATE COOKIES. 
Cream together one-half cup butter and one tablespoonful 
lard; add one cup sugar, one-fourth teaspoon salt, one tea- 
spoon cinnamon, two ounces chocolate melted ; then add one 
well beaten egg and one-half teaspoon soda dissolved in two 
tablespoonfuls milk; stir in two and one-half cups flour; roll 
thin and bake quickly. — Mrs. Edith G. O'Hayre. 

OATMEAL WAFERS. 
Two cups quaker oats, one cup sugar, two eggs, well beaten, 
one teaspoon melted butter, one teaspoon baking powder, one- 
half teaspoon almond flavoring. Bake on buttered and floured 
tins in a moderate oven, one small teaspoon to a cooky. — 
Jennie L. Palmer. 

The Husband Should Be a Silent Partner in the Domestic Firm. The 
Wife Uses the Coal, Wants the Best, and This Is Holmes'. 

FRUIT COOKIES. 
One and one-half cups sugar, three eggs, one cup butter, 
one-half cup molasses, one teaspoon each of soda, cinnamon, 
allspice and ginger ; one-half cup raisins, one cup currants. 
Mix soft as can be rolled. Will keep several months. — Eleanor 
Belcher, Holhrook. 

144 



POTATO DOUGHNUTS. 

Three large potatoes mashed, butter the size of an egg, one 
cup sugar, one-half teaspoon ginger, a little salt, two eggs 
beat in a cup, then fill cup with milk; one heaping teaspoon 
baking powder. Flour enough to roll. — "C." 

GRANDMA MINZY'S DOUGHNUTS. 

One egg, one scant cup flour, three-fourths cup milk, one 
heaping teaspoon baking powder, a little salt and nutmeg, 
bread flour enough to handle. — Ella Minzy. 

The Husband Should Be a Silent Partner in the Domestic Firm. The 
Wife Uses the Coal, Wants the Best, and This Is Holmes'. 

DOUGHNUTS (Fine). 

Dissolve one cup sugar in one cup rich milk (I use the top 
of a jar) ; now add one egg well beaten, one level teaspoonful 
salt; into a teacup of flour mix two level teaspoonfuls baking 
powder; add this to first mixture, then add enough more flour 
to roll. — Mrs. Florence Kennedy. 

DOUGHNUTS. 

Two eggs, one cup sugar, a little butter, one cup milk, one 
teaspoon soda, two teaspoons cream of tartar, one and one-half 
teaspoons salt, a few gratings of nutmeg. Bread flour enough 
to roll. — Mrs. Walter Bradford. 

DOUGHNUTS. 

Two eggs well beaten, add one cup sugar, one-half teaspoon 
vanilla, a little nutmeg and salt, beat well ; one cup sweet milk, 
two heaping teaspoons baking powder sifted with the flour. 
I use one-half pastry and one-half bread flour, from three to 
four cups. Do not mix too stiff. — Mrs. A. W. Knight. 

The Husband Should Be a Silent Partner in the Domestic Firm. The 
Wife Uses the Coal, Wants the Best, and This Is Holmes'. 



LADY FINGERS. 

Beat to a cream yolks of six eggs, one-half pound powdered 
sugar; beat whites to a stiff froth; lightly mix in one-fourth 
pound sifted flour; quickly mix these two batters together. 
Place in heavy paper cone and squeeze out upon buttered tin 
in four-inch lengths. Bake until a light brown in moderate 
oven. Dust with powdered sugar. This recipe makes good 
sponge cake if baked in thin cakes. — Herbert L. Aldridge. 

WAUWINET CAKES. 

Two and one-half cups light brown sugar, one scant cup of 
butter, two eggs beaten ; scant teaspoon of soda dissolved in 
one-third cup of boiling water, two cups flour, one cup chop- 
ped raisins, one cup crushed nuts. Bake in regular cookie 
pans. — James Backus, Nantucket. 



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146 



You Can Cook Best with Holmes' Peerless Coal. 
Write Your New Recipes Here. 



M7 



Do You Buy 
Coal of Holmes? 

If you don't, read what we 
have to say: 

^ Coal is worth more clean than dirty, 
for there is less for the ash heap. 
^ Coal handled by underpaiid, over- 
worked men will be full of dirt, stone 
and slate. 

^ Good men, well treated and well 
paid, will deliver clean coal in a satis- 
factory manner. 

^ Regular Shamokin Coal is very 
liable to be slaty, and needs careful 
picking before delivery. Our Special 
Soft Shamokin is all hand picked. 
^ Our men work for our interest (and 
yours) and are careful to pick out the 
slate and refuse matter. 
^ If you buy coal of us and are not 
suited, let us know, and we will ex- 
change it for other coal or money. 
We want your trade and will try to 
please you, for we believe in adver- 
tising, and "a pleased customer is the 
best advertisement." 




Cake. 

LADY BALTIMORE CAKE. 

Two-thirds cup butter, two cups sugar, five eggs, one-half 
cup milk, four cups flour, two level teaspoons soda, four level 
teaspoons cream of tartar. 

Cream half the sugar with butter ; beat the remaining sugar 
with yolks of eggs and sift the cream of tartar and soda twice 
through the flour. Beat yolks and sugar together with butter 
and sugar. Add milk and flour, then the whites of eggs beaten 
stiflf. Flavor half the mixture with rose. Into the other half 
add one teaspoon cinnamon and clove each, one grated nut- 
meg, flavor with vanilla, lemon or almond. Bake in four 
layers, two white and two dark. 

Makes Cooking Easy, and the Cook Happy. Holmes' Coal. 

Filling : — One cup raisins, chopped fine ; one-half of a citron 
shredded thin ; one small cocoanut grated, three-fourths pound 
almonds blanched. Make an ordinary boiled icing and into it 
beat the first three and spread between layers. Have the top 
layer of cake a white one, sprinkle with powdered sugar and 
stick the almonds in porcupine style. 

The cup for measuring is an ordinary coffee cup. 

(This recipe came from Baltimore and is said to be the 
original Lady Baltimore Cake.) — Mrs. M. E. Merritt. 

Makes Cooking Easy, and the Cook Happy. Holmes' Coal. 

LADY BALTIMORE CAKE (Owen Wister). 

Eight eggs, whites only ; four cups flour, two cups sugar, 
one-half cup butter, one-half pint milk, two teaspoons baking 
powder, two teaspoons almond extract; bake in three layers. 

Icing to put Between: — Three cups granulated sugar, one 
and one-half gills boiling water. Boil ten minutes ; add one- 
half teaspoon tartaric acid to the beaten whites of four eggs; 

149 



pour the boiling syrup over and beat hard. Add two cups 
chopped raisins, and two cups walnuts. Duplicate the above 
for frosting top and sides, leaving out raisins and nuts. — Mrs. 
Pro dor, Newtonville. 

LADY BALTIMORE CAKE. 

One cup butter, two cups sugar, three and one-half cups 
flour, one cup milk, whites of six eggs, two level teaspoons 
baking powder, one teaspoon rose water. 

Filling : — Three cups granulated sugar, one cup boiling 
water; cook until threads; pour on to beaten whites of three 
eggs; then add one cup chopped raisins, one cup pecan nuts, 
five figs cut into thin strips. — Mrs. H. E. Merritt, N ewtonville. 

A Square Deal and a Living Profit at 53 Main St. This Is Holmes'. 

GOLD AND SILVER CAKE. 

Silver Cake: — Two cups sugar, one-half cup butter, whites 
of eight eggs, three-fourths cup sweet milk, one-half teaspoon 
saleratus (dissolve in milk), one teaspoon cream of tartar, two 
and one-half cups pastry flour, salt and almond flavoring. 

Gold Cake : — Beat yolks of eight eggs, one cup sugar, three- 
fourths cup butter, one-half cup milk, one-half teaspoon sal- 
eratus (dissolve in milk), one teaspoon cream of tartar, two 
cups pastry flour, pinch of salt and orange flavoring. — Mrs. 
George A. Monk. 

A Square Deal and a Living Profit at 58 Main St. This Is Holmes'. 

POUND CAKE. 
Two-thirds cup butter and one cup sugar creamed together; 
add yolks of four eggs, beat until light ; one and one-half cups 
flour, one scant teaspoon of baking powder, sifted together; 
add little of sifted flour to mixture, beat ; then one tablespoon 
of milk ; add alternately the beaten whites of the eggs and the 
flour, part at a time. Bake in a moderate oven thirty-five or 
forty minutes. Frost with chocolate. — Mrs. Charles Fuller. 

150 



RANDOLPH POUND CAKE. 
Beat one cup butter with one and one-half cups sugar to a 
cream ; add the well beaten yolks of four eggs ; sift together 
two cups flour and one level teaspoon of baking powder; add 
to the cake mixture alternately with one-half cup milk; then 
add the well beaten whites of the four eggs and beat thor- 
oughly. — Mrs. Allie V. Packard. 

A Square Deal and a Living Profit at 58 Main St. This Is Holmes'. 

RELIABLE CAKE. 
Five eggs, two cups sugar, four cups flour, one cup butter, 
one teaspoonful cream of tartar, one-half teaspoon soda, one 
cup milk. — Mrs. D. K. Carpenter. 

SPONGE CAKE. 

Six eggs, one cup fine granulated sugar, one level cup 
pastry flour measured before sifting ; then sift four times ; 
grated rind of one-half lemon, two tablespoonfuls lemon juice. 
Break eggs carefully, yolks in the mixing bowl, whites in a 
deep pint bowl ; first, without fail, add a pinch of salt and beat 
whites until stiff enough to invert bowl ; then beat one-half 
cup sugar, little by little, in the whites and set away in a cool 
place. 

Next beat the yolks until thick and lemon-colored (ten min- 
utes) ; add one-half cup sugar slowly, stir into yolks the grated 
lemon peel and lemon juice; toss white with yellow and cut 
and fold until blended. Add one-half of flour, cut and fold 
it in as quickly as possible ; then the other half in the same 
way; do not beat; Bake in a large tube pan or shallow tin; 
bake in a moderate oven ; bake twenty minutes before opening 
door. If baked in a gas range, as soon as you are ready to 
beat the eggs, turn on one oven burner ; when cake is ready to 
put in, turn off nearly one-half of gas and put asbestos under 
the pan ; as soon as cake shows the slightest sign of shrinking 
from pan it is done. Time, from fifty to sixty minutes. 

A Square Deal and a Living Profit at 58 IVIain St. This Is Holmes'. 



For a smaller cake, use four eggs, one level cup flour, 
measured after sifting, and sift four times more ; one cup 
sugar, grated rind of one-half lemon, one large spoonful juice, 
one tablespoonful water; proceed as above. Bake about one- 
half hour. 

I use egg whips for beating eggs and a wooden spoon for 
cutting and folding. — Mrs. C. C. Merritt. 

Satisfaction or Money Back on Anything Bought at Hotines'. 

SPONGE CAKE. 
Five eggs, yolks beaten first; then one cup sugar; beat the 
five whites stiflf and beat in with yolks ; one even cup flour 
folded in, salt and flavor to suit taste. — Mrs. J. E. Skinner. 

CREAM SPONGE CAKE. 
Beat the yolks of four eggs until stiff, add gradually one 
cup sugar and beat well; add three tablespoonfuls cold water, 
one teaspoon extract ; mix one scant cup flour with one and 
one-half teaspoons cornstarch (measured level), one teaspoon 
baking powder; add to the first mixture; add the well beaten 
whites of four eggs. Bake in a shallow tin. 

SPONGE CAKE, 
One cup sugar, three eggs; beat sugar and yolks together; 
then add one-fourth cup boiling water and one teaspoon lem- 
on extract; beat well, then add one cup flour, one-half tea- 
spoon baking powder, and lastly the whites well beaten. Bake 
three-quarters of an hour. — Mrs. E. J. Fletcher, Mrs. Rufus 
P. Keith. 

Satisfaction or Money Back on Anything Bought at Holmes' 

ANGEL CAKE. 
The whites of six eggs beaten stiff ; then beat in three- 
fourths cup sugar. Give a good beating; then fold in just 
one-fourth cup of potato flour and one-half teaspoon of cream 
of tartar sifted together; one teaspoonful vanilla. Bake in an 
angel cake tin, without greasing the tin, about thirty minutes. 
— Mrs. J. P. Donovan. 



SPONGE CAKE, 

Take the yolks of the six eggs left from the angel cake and 
one whole egg; beat well; then add one cup sugar and beat 
again. One-fourth teaspoon salt, one-half teaspoon lemon ex- 
tract; then add one-fourth cup potato flour and three-fourths 
cup flour, one teaspoonful cream of tartar, one-half teaspoon 
soda, all sifted together. Last add three-fourths cup of new 
milk and bake about thirty minutes. Do not have oven too 
hot. — Mrs. James P. Donovan. 

Satisfaction or Money Back on Anything Bought at Ho'mes' 

POTATO SPONGE CAKE. 

Four eggs, beat half an hour; add one cup sugar, beat a 
little more; flavor with vanilla; add a pinch of salt; sift in 
one-half cup potato flour and scant teaspoonful baking powder. 
Bake slowly twenty-five or thirty minutes. Do not flour the 
pan. — Mrs. S. Elliot Keith. 

SPONGE CAKE, 

One cup sugar, one cup flour, two eggs, one teaspoon bak- 
ing powder, one-half cup scalded milk, one teaspoon extract; 
add scalded milk just before putting into pan. Bake one-half 
hour. — Mrs. D. E. Feeley. 

Satisfaction or Money Back on Anything Bought at Holmes'. 

ORANGE CAKE. 

Cream one-half cup butter, beat in gradually one and one- 
half cups granulated sugar, add the beaten yolks of four eggs, 
the grated rind of one orange and one-half cup of juice. Mix 
together one and one-half cups sifted pastry flour, one-half cup 
cornstarch and two rounded teaspoons of baking powder. Stir 
this into first mixture, fold in the stiffly beaten whites, sprinkle 
with chopped nut meats (blanched almonds are fine), and bake 
in a moderate oven. — Mrs. J. I. Merritt. 

153 



ORANGE CAKE. 

Yolks of five eggs and two cups sugar beaten together, one- 
half cup cold water, juice and rind of one orange, two cups 
flour, two teaspoons baking powder, whites of four eggs beaten 
stiff; bake in square pans and layers. 

Filling. — Beat white of one tgg, add juice and rind of one 
orange and confectionery sugar to make stiff as desirable. — 
Mrs. F. B. Gardner. 

Watches Free to New Coal Customers When They Have Paid for Three 
Tons of Coal at Holmes'. 

ORANGE LAYER CAKE. 

Cream one cup sugar, one-quarter cup butter, add two eggs, 
one-half cup milk, one and one-half cups flour, one teaspoon- 
ful baking powder. Bake in two layers and fill with white 
frosting; put frosting on top and cover with pieces of orange. 
— Mrs. F. Ernest Mackie. 

COFFEE CAKE. 

One-half cup butter, one cup sugar, one-half cup molasses, 
one-half cup cold coffee, two eggs, two and one-half cups 
flour, one teaspoon each of soda, mace, cloves and one table- 
spoon cinnamon. — Mrs. N. E. Sullivan. 

Watches Free to New Coal Customers When They Have Paid for Three 
Tons of Coal at Holmes'. 

COFFEE CAKE. 

One cup sugar, two eggs, one-half cup molasses, one-half 
cup coffee, one-half cup butter, three cups flour, one teaspoon- 
ful soda, one teaspoonful cassia, one cup raisins, one cup cur- 
rants. Rub the butter and sugar to a cream, stir in the molas- 
ses, first warming it slightly, and the spices ; beat these very 
hard until light, stir in the whipped yolks, coffee, flour and the 
whites, then the saleratus, water, and last stir in the fruit 
dredged in flour. — Mrs. Granville Hunt. 

154 



SPICE CAKE. 

One cup sugar, one-half cup butter, one and one-half cups 
flour, one-third cup milk, two eggs, two tablespoonfuls molas- 
ses, one teaspoon cream of tartar, sifted in the flour, one-half 
teaspoon soda dissolved in milk, one-half teaspoon each of 
clove, cinnamon and nutmeg. Beat the sugar and butter to 
a cream, then beat in the yolks, then the whites and spices, add 
the molasses, flour, cream of tartar and beat well ; add one-half 
cup chopped raisins or other fruit if wanted. — Mrs. Annie L. 
Tryon. 

Watches Free to New Coal Customers When They Have Paid for Three 
Tons of Coal at Holmes'. 

RIBBON CAKE. 

Three eggs, one and one-quarter cups sugar, one-half cup 
butter, one-half cup milk, two cups flour, one teaspoon cream 
of tartar, one-half teaspoon soda. To one-third of this mixture 
add one tablespoonful molasses, one teaspoonful spices and 
one cup fruit. — Miss Sadie Connor. 

NONQUIT CAKE. 

Two cups sugar, four eggs, one cup butter, one teaspoon 
saleratus, two teaspoons cream tartar, three cups flour, one 
cup milk. — Mrs. J. E. Skinner. 

Watches Free to New Coal Customers When They Have Paid for Three 
Tons of Coal at Holmes'. 

NUT CAKE. 

Two cups of sugar, three-quarters cup butter, three eggs, 
one cup milk, three cups flour (pastry), one teaspoon soda, 
two teaspoons cream of tartar, one teaspoon vanilla, one cup 
chopped nuts. One very large cake or two small ones. — Mrs. 
W. E. Bryant. 

I5S 



WALNUT CAKE. 

One-half cup butter, two cups sugar, yolks of four eggs, one 
cup milk, three and one-quarter cups flour, three level tea- 
spoons baking powder, three-quarters cup walnuts, chopped 
fine, whites of four eggs ; mix ingredients in order given and 
bake in deep cake pans. 

Frosting. — One and one-half cups confectioners' sugar^ 
sifted, butter size of walnut, one teaspoon vanilla extract, 
enough hot milk to make of consistency to spread, crease in 
squares and put one walnut on each square. — Mrs. Minnie 
Daley. 

Douglas Lehigh Coal, "Best by Any Test." This Is Holmes'. 

WALNUT CAKE. 

One-half cup butter, one cup sugar, three egg yolks and two 
whites, one-half cup milk, one and one-half cups flour, one 
and one-half level teaspoons baking powder, three-quarters cup 
broken walnuts. Bake in a sheet forty-five minutes and cover 
the top with frosting. 

Frosting. — One cup sugar, one-half cup water, one egg 
white, one-half teaspoon vanilla ; boil sugar and water till it 
threads, then pour slowly into beaten white of egg. Beat till 
cool, flavor and spread. — Mrs. J. V. Richards. 

NUT CAKE. 
Three eggs, one and one-half cups sugar, one-half cup but- 
ter, one-half cup milk, two and one-half cups flour, one and 
one-half teaspoonfuls baking powder, one cup meats of any 
kind of nuts. — Miss Elizabeth Saxton. 

Douglas Lehigh Coal, "Best by Any Test." This Is Holmes'. 

BROWNSTONE FRONT CAKE. 
Two squares chocolate grated, one-half cup milk, yolk of 
one egg', stir and cook until the consistency of custard, stir- 
ring constantly; add one tablespoonful butter; when cool, add 

156 



one-half cup milk with one teaspoon soda dissolved in it, one 
and one-half cups of sifted pastry flour, one teaspoonful va- 
nilla and a pinch of salt. 

Frosting. — One and one-half cups confectioners' sugar and 
one-half cup butter creamed; add one tablespoonful milk and 
flavor with vanilla. — Mrs. L. F. Gurney. 

Douglas Lehigh Coal, "Best by Any Test." This Is Holmes'. 

CHOCOLATE CAKE. 

One cup milk, two cups sugar, two cups flour, three eggs, 
butter size of a large egg, one teaspoon cream of tartar, one- 
half teaspoon soda. Beat sugar and butter to a cream, add 
eggs, yolks and whites beaten separately, save the whites until 
last thing and add after flour is mixed in, then milk with soda 
and cream of tartar dissolved in the milk, then flour. 

Chocolate Filling for Cake. — Two and one-half or three 
lengths of chocolate, one cup powdered sugar, one egg well 
beaten, two tablespoons milk. Melt chocolate, add sugar, milk 
and egg. Bake in two tins and spread while hot. — Mrs. E. C. 
Brady. 

WALNUT CAKE. 

Two eggs, one cup sugar, one-half cup butter, one-half cup 
milk, two cups flour, one cup raisins, one cup walnut meats, 
one teaspoonful cream of tartar, one-half teaspoon soda. — Mrs. 
Jennie Ford. 

Douglas Lehigh Coal, "Best by Any Test." This Is Holmes'. 

BROWNSTONE FRONT CAKE. 

One egg beaten light, one-half cup milk, one square choco- 
late, cook in saucepan until it thickens ; when cool add one cup 
sugar and one-half cup milk; add one-half teaspoon soda to 
milk and one and one-half cups flour after it is sifted and one 
tablespoon melted butter, flavor with vanilla. Bake in two 
round tins. 

Filling. — Two cups of powdered sugar, one-half cup butter ; 
cream together; add two tablespoonfuls milk and flavor to 
taste. — M. A. F. 

157 



BLACK CHOCOLATE CAKE. 
One-half cup milk, one cup brown sugar, two tablespoons 
cocoa (or two squares chocolate) ; beat the above mixture to- 
gether five minutes and set aside to cool. Cream one-half cup 
butter and one cup brown sugar, two egg yolks well beaten, 
then add boiled mixture, beat, then alternately add one-half 
cup milk and two cups flour, one teaspoonful soda dissolved 
in milk, salt and vanilla. Then add whites of two eggs beaten 
stiff. Bake forty minutes. — Mrs. A. W. Knight. 

All the Latest and Best In Postcards at Holmes', 58 Main St. 

CHOCOLATE CAKE. 
One-half cup milk, one-half cup sugar, two squares choco- 
late (or three tablespoons cocoa), yolk of one egg; cook until 
creamy, then remove and beat a little, then cool. When cool 
add one cup sugar, one-half cup butter (creamed), one-half 
cup milk, two eggs, one teaspoon soda, one and one-half cups 
flour. Flavor with vanilla. — Mrs. W. H. French. 

WELLESLEY FUDGE CAKE. 

Cream together two-thirds cup butter with one cup sugar, 
then add one cup milk, one-quarter cup grated chocolate, one- 
half cup chopped walnuts, two beaten eggs, two and one-half 
cups flour sifted with one heaping teaspoonful baking powder. 
Bake in good oven. When cold, cover with frosting made as 
follows : 

Frosting. — Put into a saucepan one-half tablespoon butter, 
one-half cup unsweetened chocolate, one and one-quarter cups 
powdered sugar, one-quarter cup milk, one and one-half tea- 
spoons vanilla. Boil eight minutes. — Grace B. Beattie. 

All the Latest and Best In Postcards at Holmes', 58 Main St. 

CHOCOLATE CAKE. 
One and one-half squares chocolate (melted), one-half cup 
butter creamed with one cup sugar and chocolate, two eggs, 
one-half cup sour milk, one-half teaspoon saleratus, one and 
one-half cups flour. — Mrs. W. C. Laztrence. 



CHOCOLATE CAKE. 

One and one-half cups sugar, one-half cup butter, one cup 
sour milk into which dissolve one teaspoon soda, two cups 
pastry flour, three squares melted chocolate, three eggs. — Mrs. 
F. B. Gardner. 

CHOCOLATE CAKE. 

Two eggs, one cup sugar, one good teaspoon ful baking 
powder, one-half cup milk, one cup flour sifted three times, one 
teaspoonful butter, two squares chocolate ; melt butter and 
chocolate together. — Mrs. Donald C. Blair. 

All the Latest and Best in Postcards at Holmes', 58 Main St. 

DEVIL'S FOOD. 

Two cups brown sugar, one-half cup butter creamed, two 
well beaten eggs, and add three squares melted chocolate, one 
cup sour milk and one teaspoonful soda in two cups pastry 
flour, one teaspoonful vanilla. 

Frosting. — One cup granulated sugar, one and one-quarter 
cups water; boil until it threads; beat the white of one egg 
with one-quarter teaspoon cream of tartar until stiff, then 
pour the syrup over the egg, beating all the while. — Mrs. W. 
E. Bryant. 

All the Latest and Best in Postcards at Holmes', 58 Main St. 

POTATO TORTE CAKE (German). 
One cup butter, two cups sugar, one riced potato, two cups 
flour, one-half cup milk, one cup grated chocolate, four eggs, 
one-half pound sweet almonds. Put cold boiled potato through 
a ricer, pour boiling water over almonds, let stand a few 
moments, then remove the skins and chop fine. Measure flour 
after sifting and sift again with the baking powder. Cream 
butter and gradually beat in sugar, then chocolate, then beaten 
yolks of eggs, next the milk, flour mixture, almonds and last 
the beaten whites dry. Bake two hours in a medium oven. 
Boil potatoes day before. One-half this recipe makes a good- 
sized cake. Other nuts can be used. This cake will keep for 
a long time and should not be used as soon as baked. — Mrs. 
Kate L. Weaver. 

1 59 



TOM AND JERRY CAKE. 

Two cups sugar, one cup butter, one cup milk, three cups 
flour, three eggs, one tablespoonful baking powder ; flavor with 
with vanilla, divide in two portions. To one half add one cup 
raisins, one cup currants, one teaspoon each of clove, cinna- 
mon, nutmeg and salt, two tablespoonfuls molasses. This 
makes two loaves. Put fruit part on the bottom of the pan and 
light on top ; bake together in oven for about an hour. — Han- 
nah A. Hale. 

About 100 Grocers Sell Holmes' Special Soft Shamokin Coai in the 
Paper "Bag With the Hod On." 

DARK FRUIT CAKE. 

Three pounds seeded raisins, two pounds currants, one pound 
citron, two cups butter, three cups white sugar, one cup molas- 
ses, one cup milk, six eggs, one teaspoon soda, two teaspoons 
cream of tartar, one teaspoon each of salt, nutmeg, clove, cin- 
namon, five cups sifted flour. Makes three large loaves. Bake 
slowly one and one-half hours. — Mrs. W. H. Poole. 

DARK CAKE. 

One-half cup butter, two cups brown sugar, one cup raisins 
(seeded and chopped), one cup currants, one-half cup citron 
thinly sliced and cut in strips, one-half cup molasses, two eggs, 
one cup milk, three cups flour, one-half teaspoon soda, one 
teaspoon cream of tartar, one-half teaspoon allspice, one tea- 
spoon cinnamon, one-quarter teaspoon mace, one-half teaspoon 
cloves. Cream butter, add sugar and cream together, add 
molasses, then eggs well beaten. Mix well with flour the 
cream of tartar and spices, dissolve soda in a very little water, 
add to first mixture, then add milk and flour alternately, and 
lastly add fruit, stirring in well. — Mrs. J. V. Richards. 

About 100 Grocers Sell Holmes' Special Soft Shamokin Coal In the 
Paper "Bag With the Hod On." 

l6o 



VIRGINIA FRUIT CAKE. 
One-half cup butter, three-quarters cup sugar, three eggs, 
one cup flour, one teaspoon baking powder, one teaspoon nut- 
meg, one tablespoon lemon juice, one cup currants, one cup 
raisins, one-half cup citron, one teaspoon cinnamon, one-half 
teaspoon cloves, two tablespoonfuls brandy, one-half table- 
spoon grated lemon rind. Cream butter, add sugar when 
creamy, add eggs and other ingredients. Bake in angel cake 
pan about two hours. — Annie E. Wade. 

About 100 Grocers Sell Holmes' Special Soft Shamokin Coal in the 
Paper "Bag With the Hod On." 

FRUIT CAKE. 
One cup sugar, not quite a cup molasses, one cup shortening, 
two eggs, little salt, one teaspoonful each of cloves, cinnamon, 
allspice and soda, three-quarters cup wetting (milk and 
water), one cup chopped raisins, one cup currants, small piece 
chopped citron. Flour enough to make thick. This makes two 
loaves. — Mrs. John Stewart. 

FRUIT CAKE. 
One cup sugar, one-half cup butter, three eggs, one-half 
cup milk, three tablespoons molasses, one teaspoon soda, two 
teaspoons cream of tartar, one-half teaspoon mace, one tea- 
spoon cinnamon, one-half teaspoon allspice, one cup currants, 
one and one-half cups raisins, two and one-half cups flour. — 
Joan L. Clifford. 

About 100 Grocers Sell Holmes' Special Soft Shamokin Coal In ihe 
Paper "Bag With the Hod On." 

EXCELLENT FRUIT CAKE. 
One cup butter, one cup brown sugar, one cup molasses, one 
cup sweet milk, three cups flour, four eggs, two teaspoonfuls 
baking powder, two pounds raisins, one-half pound currants, 
one-quarter pound citron, one nutmeg. Will keep moist two 
months. Makes two loaves. — Mrs. E. H. Keith. 

i6i 



FRUIT CAKE. 

One-half cup each of brown sugar, butter, molasses and 
milk, one egg, two cupfuls flour, two cups raisins, one-quarter 
pound citron, one-half teaspoon soda, one-half teaspoon cin- 
namon, cloves and nutmeg. — Mrs. S. Elliott Keith. 

The Sign of the Filled Hod Means Coal Satisfaction. 

FAVORITE CAKE. 

One-half cup butter, two cups sugar, three eggs, one cup 
milk, three cups flour (sift flour before measuring), two tea- 
spoons Cleveland's baking powder; beat hard five minutes, 
flavor. — Mrs. E. C. Brady. 

TEDDY'S CAKE (Good). 

Cream together one cup sugar and one-half cup butter, break 
into this one egg and beat all together ; sift one cup flour, then 
add pinch of salt and good full teaspoon baking powder, and 
one-third cup cornstarch, and sift all together again. Use one- 
half cup milk and another egg; now add a little milk, a little 
of the flour and the other egg, beating each in thoroughly as 
you use them until all is gone. Bake in a loaf about forty or 
forty-five minutes, in a moderate oven. — Pauline Beveridge. 

The Sign of the Filled Hod l^eans Coal Satisfaction. 

BLUEBERRY CAKE (Good). 

One cup sugar, one tablespoon butter, one egg, three cups 
blueberries, one cup milk, two and one-half cups sifted flour, 
three teaspoons baking powder, a little grated nutmeg. Rub 
butter and sugar together. Break egg upon the mixture and 
beat thoroughly, then add the milk, next the flour in which has 
been mixed the nutmeg and baking powder. Beat quickly and 
stir in the berries very gently. Bake in rather hot oven for 
thirty-five minutes. — Miss Mary H. Nugent. 

162 



HOT MILK CAKE. 
Two eggs (yolks and whites beaten separately, then to- 
gether), add one cup sugar and beat with a spoon five minutes, 
one cup flour with one teaspoon baking powder sifted in it, salt 
and a few drops lemon extract, one-half cup quite hot milk 
with a piece of butter the size of a walnut melted in it added 
last ; mix well and bake in a slow oven. Nice with ice cream. — 
Mrs. Fred Park. 

The Sign of the Filled Hod Means Coal Satisfaction. 

SURPRISE CAKE. 

Take one cup sugar, one cup pastry flour and one teaspoon 
baking powder and sift together into mixing bowl ; melt one- 
quarter cup butter and break into it two eggs, then fill cup with 
milk and add this to the flour mixture ; beat well. This makes 
a fine Washington pie. — Mrs. Allie V. Packard, Mrs. Annie 
McCarthy. 

CHEAP PLAIN CAKE. 

One-half cup butter, two cups sugar, three eggs well beaten, 
one cup sweet milk, three cups flour, three teaspoons baking 
powder, pinch of salt, lemon flavoring. This makes a nice jelly 
cake, two layers. — Mrs. J. E. Skinner. 

TUMBLER CAKE. 
One-quarter tumbler butter melted, two eggs, fill tumbler 
with milk, pour into one and one-quarter tumblers flour, one 
tumbler sugar, two teaspoonfuls baking powder; mix all to- 
gether and bake in a moderate oven. — G. M. Brooks. 

The Sign of the Filled Hod Means Coal Satisfaction. 

SOUR MILK CAKE. 
One tablespoonful butter, one-half cup sugar (creamed with 
butter), one-half cup molasses, one teaspoonful cinnamon, one- 
half teaspoon clove, one-half teaspoon saleratus dissolved in 
one cup sour milk, two cups flour (entire wheat), one-half cup 
raisins (cut in two), one-half cup chopped English walnuts. — 
Mrs. H. E. Merritt. 

163 



PLAIN CAKE WITHOUT MILK. 

One-half cup butter, one cup sugar, two eggs, one-half cup 
water, one and three-quarters cups flour, three even teaspoon- 
fuls baking powder, one-quarter teaspoon salt, one teaspoonful 
of any flavor desired. — Mrs. J. P. Stedmcm. 

If You Want Anything to Read, C Holmes, 58 Main St. 

EGOLESS LAYER CAKE OR WASHINGTON PIE. 

One cup sugar, one tablespoon butter, pinch salt, one cup 
sour milk, one teaspoon soda, two cups flour, a little of all 
kinds of spices (spices can be omitted). Bake in two layers 
in hot oven. 

Cocoa Frosting. — Add to one cup powdered sugar three 
tablespoons of sweet cream (or milk) and mix well ; add one 
tablespoon cocoa and one-half teaspoon vanilla extract, then 
spread. This frosting will not crack when cut. — Mrs. Mary 
Packard. 

RAISIN CAKE. 

Two eggs, one and three-quarters cups sugar, one cup but- 
ter, one cup sweet milk, one and one-half cups raisins chopped 
fine, three cups pastry flour, one teaspoonful cinnamon, one- 
half teaspoon cloves, one-half teaspoon soda. This makes one 
large cake or two small ones. — Mrs. Donald C. Blair. 

CORA BELLE'S WHITE CAKE. 

One-half cup butter (scant), two cups sugar, one cup milk, 
two and three-quarters cups flour, whites of three eggs, two 
teaspoons baking powder. — Mrs. J. E. Sullivan. 

If You Want Anything to Read, Holmes, 58 Main St. 

SAUSAGE CAKE. 

Scant one-half cup sausage fat, one cup sugar, one cup sour 
milk, one teaspoon soda, one cup raisins, one-half cup currants 
(citron if you like it), one teaspoon cinnamon, one-half tea- 

164 



spoon nutmeg, one-quarter teaspoon clove, two cups pastry 
flour ; mix well the fat and sugar, then add sour milk, then the 
soda dissolved in one teaspoon of warm water, then the flour 
and lastly the fruit well floured. — Mrs. Z. G. Marston. 

If You Want Anything to Read, C Holmes, 58 Main St. 

ORANGE CREAM PIE. 

One orange grated, butter one-half size of an ^gg, one cup 
sugar, two eggs, one-half cup milk, one and one-half cups 
flour, two teaspoons baking powder. 

Cream. — Two cups milk, two tablespoon fuls flour, two eggs, 
two-thirds cup sugar, a little salt; stir the flour and sugar to- 
gether dry, add the eggs and stir into the milk when it comes 
to a boil ; cook a little and then add the juice of the orange. — 
Mrs. J. A. Condon. 

LEMON ICING. 

One-half pound pulverized sugar, the juice and grated rind 
of one-half lemon, three teaspoonfuls sweet cream; stir the 
sugar in lemon, then add cream and stir until smooth. — Mrs. 
N. P. Appleton. 

If You Want Anything to Read, C Holmes, 58 Main St. 

CAKE FILLING. 

One-quarter pound walnuts chopped, one-half cup sultana 
raisins, one-quarter pound figs ; cover figs with boiling water, 
let stand five minutes, drain. To one coffee cup confectioners' 
sugar add three tablespoons milk ; beat thoroughly, add to first 
mixture. A rich moist filling that will keep well. — Mrs. A. C. 
Gibbs. 



[Abydure: tlean 

MGSICERLESStOAL 



■65 



You Can Cook Best with Holmes' Peerless Coal. 
Write Your New Recipes Here. 



1 66 



You Can Cook Best with Holmes' Peerless Coal. 



Write Your New Recipes Here. 



167 




\a/E want your trade 
" ^ and tKink we can 
suil: you. ^ The best"^ 
pure, clean COALS^*^ 
prompt]/ delivered at 
low prices should do it. 




D 



•ABYpURE fLEAN 
lAGSlEERLESSvOAL 




ENTERPRISE BUILDING 
58 MAIN ST. 



1 68 



Confectionery. 

"All that's sweet was made but to be lost 
when sweetest." — Moore. 

The whole "trick" of candy making depends upon the boil- 
ing of the syrup. The directions here given are absolutely re- 
liable, but you may fail of results the first time in following 
them. Select only clear days for candy making, dampness be- 
ing fatal to the best results. 

If You Want Hay, Grain and Straw Satisfactloi., C Holmes. 

FONDANT. 
Into a porcelain-lined saucepan put one pound granulated 
sugar, one cup water and one-third teaspoon cream of tartar; 
stir until sugar is dissolved, then touch not, only to carefully 
wipe off the crystals as they form on the sides of the pan, or to 
very gently remove any scum that may collect. At the end of 
ten minutes begin testing by dipping a spoon into a bowl of 
ice water, then gently taking out a little syrup and returning 
to the water. As soon as you can form a soft ball it is done. 
Remove from fire and turn on to a buttered platter to cool. 
As soon as you can bear your finger in it, with comfort, begin 
to stir with a wooden cake beater, until a milk white creamy 
mass is formed too thick to stir. Now knead until it is pliable 
and smooth, when it can be put into a bowl and covered with 
a damp cloth for future use. As you use it, work in any flavor 
you like. — Mrs. Proctor, N ewtonville ; Mrs. A. W. Knight. 

If You Want Hay, Grain and Straw Satisfaction, C Holmes. 

SULTANA CANDY. 
One-quarter cup butter melted in saucepan; when melted 
add one-quarter cup molasses, one-half cup milk, two cups 
sugar. Boil seven minutes, add two squares chocolate, stir un- 
til melted, boil five minutes longer; do not stir while boiling. 
Beat until creamy, add one-half cup broken walnut meats, one- 
quarter cup sultana raisins, and one teaspoon vanilla. Cut 
in squares. — Mrs. Kenneth McLeod. 

169 



COCOANUT CANDY. 
Two cups white sugar, one cup water ; boil six minutes over 
quick fire. Stir in grated or dessicated cocoanut and remove 
from fire ; turn in to pan and mark in bars when partly cooled. 
— Mrs. Kenneth McLcod. 

COCOANUT CANDY. 

Two cups white sugar, three-quarters cup milk; boil until 
sugars on side of pan ; when nearly done, add one cup grated 
cocoanut and one teaspoon vanilla. Remove from fire and beat 
until creamy. Turn into buttered pan and mark into squares 
when partly cold. — Anna H. Haviland. 

We Please Customers at Holmes', 58 Main St. 

ALMOND CANDY. 

Boil one cup sugar, one-third cup water, without stirring, 
until amber color; just before taking from stove, add one- 
quarter teaspoon cream of tartar and one cup almonds. Pour 
in buttered pan and cut in squares. — Anna H. Haviland. 

PEANUT CANDY. 

Pour one cup white sugar into a spider and stir constantly 
until it turns brown and lumps, then melt to a syrup. When 
in this state, turn in a quart of peanuts, chopped fine, and 
poiT into buttered pan. Cut in squares. — Mrs. Norman W. 
Sampson. 

KISSES. 

Beat the whites of four eggs until very stiff, fold in one cup 
confectioners' sugar, drop on oiled paper and bake in moderate 
oven. — Mrs. A. W. Knight. 

V^e Please Customers at Holmes', 58 Main St. 

CHOCOLATE CARAMELS. 
Boil one cup brown sugar and two cups molasses for ten 
minutes, add one tablespoonful flour, one-quarter cup butter 
and one-half pound of grated chocolate. Boil twenty minutes 
longer, pour into buttered tins and mark in squares when cool. 
— Mrs. A. W. Knight. 

170 



DIVINITY CANDY. 
Two cups granulated sugar, one-half cup maple syrup, one- 
half cup hot water, one-quarter pound English walnuts 
chopped, whites of two eggs beaten stiff. Boil sugar, syrup 
and water until you can pinch it into a ball when dropped in 
cold water, then set it back on stove until the bubbling stops. 
Pour over the eggs, stirring. When it begins to stiffen, put 
nuts in and stir until it can be dropped from a spoon without 
spreading. Drop on buttered tins or waxed paper. — Mrs. 
Norman W. Sampson. 

We Please Customers at Holmes', 58 Main St. 

DIVINITY FUDGE. 
Two cups granulated sugar, one-half cup water, one-half 
cup Karo syrup. Boil until it will spin a thread that is brittle, 
about fifteen minutes. Beat into it the stiffly beaten whites of 
two eggs. Add one pound English walnuts or three-quarters 
cup will do (cut up), just before it is ready to turn into pans. 
— Mrs. Richard Holmes, Plymouth; Mrs. M. Ella Merritt, 
Newtonville; Mrs. Joseph A. Webber. 

DOUBLE FUDGE. 

First Layer. — ^Two cups granulated sugar, one-half cup rich 
milk, two squares chocolate, one teaspoonful butter, one tea- 
spoon vanilla. Cook until it forms a soft ball in cold water; 
take off the fire and beat until it grains ; turn into pan. 

Second Layer. — Two cups brown sugar, one cup milk; boil 
to the soft ball stage, add one teaspoon butter, one cup nut 
meats, one teaspoon vanilla ; beat until creamy and turn over 
the first layer. — Mrs. H. E. Merritt. 

We Please Customers at Holmes', 58 Main St. 

WHITE FRUIT FUDGE. 

Two cups granulated sugar, one cup rich milk; boil to the 
soft ball stage ; take off fire ; add one teaspoon butter and the 
fruit; beat and turn into pans. 

Fruit Mixture. — Nut meats, dates, figs, raisins ; one cup in 
all, chopped fine. — Mrs. Proctor, Newtonville. 

171 



FRUIT FUDGE. 
Two cups confectioners' sugar, one-half cup water ; boil five 
minutes, pour into platter and let stand until it begins to 
thicken, then stir with spoon until stiff ; knead with hands into 
loaf. Mix well into the above fondant, chopped raisins, figs, 
dates and candied cherries; chopped walnuts and pecans may 
be used in place of the fruits. Grated cocoanut is also nice 
added to the fondant. — Nettie L. Haviland. 

The Cook Stove Will Suit You if You Burn Holmes' Goal. 

HARLEQUIN FUDGE. 
Two cups confectioners' sugar, one-half cup water ; boil five 
minutes; pour into a platter and let stand until it begins to 
thicken ; stir with spoon until stiff ; knead with hands into loaf. 
To one-third of the above, add pink sugar and flavor with 
strawberry, chocolate to another portion, leaving the other 
third white. Place one on top of other, roll out in layers, cut 
through in cubes. — Nettie L. Haviland. 

FUDGE. 
Two cups sugar, butter size of tgg, not quite one cup milk, 
two and one-half squares chocolate ; boil about fifteen minutes 
or until it crumbles around the edge of pan; one teaspoonful 
vanilla ; stir some minutes until it begins to harden. Pour in a 
buttered pan and cool. — Helen Mclntyre. 

The Cook Stove Will Suit You if You Burn Holmes' Coal. 

MAPLE FUDGE. 
Into a saucepan put one cup maple sugar, one cup granu- 
lated sugar and one cup cream or top of bottle of milk; put 
over fire, let stand on cool part of range until sugar dissolves, 
then stir gently occasionally and cook rapidly until a soft ball 
is formed in cold water. Let stand without disturbing it until 
the heat has almost left it, then beat until it thickens and 
grains slightly. — Lena B. Kennedy. 

172 



WALNUT FUDGE. 
One cup brown sugar, one-half cup white sugar, one-quarter 
cup sweet milk, one small teaspoon butter, one small pinch 
cream of tartar, one small teaspoon lemon or vanilla flavoring. 
Boil sugar, milk, butter together for six minutes, then add the 
cream of tartar and flavoring, adding the last thing, one and 
one-half cups chopped walnuts. Stir about eight minutes and 
put in pan. Mark into squares before it hardens. — Mrs. J. T. 
Clifford. 

The Cook Stove Will Suit You if You Burn Holmes' Coal. 

FRUIT CANDY. 

Two cups light brown sugar, one-half cup granulated sugar, 
one-half cup milk, one tablespoonful butter; boil eight to ten 
minutes; take from fire and add one cup walnut meats, one- 
half cup sultana raisins; flavor with vanilla. — Mrs. H. R. 
Prouty. 

ORANGE CREAMS. 

Two and one-half cups graulated sugar, one-half cup milk; 
boil two or three minutes ; take from fire, add grated rind of 
orange, one teaspoonful orange extract, beat until creamy; 
drop a teaspoonful at a time on paraffine paper, with running, 
— Mrs. H. R. Prouty. 

The Cook Stove Will Suit You if You Burn Holmes' Coal. 

SEA FOAM CANDY. 
Put three cupfuls of light brown sugar, one cupful water 
and one tablespoonful vinegar into a saucepan. Heat gradu- 
ally to boiling, stirring only until sugar is dissolved ; then boil 
without stirring until it forms a hard ball when tested in cold 
water. Remove at once from fire, and when the syrup stops 
bubbling, pour gradually into the stiffly beaten whites of two 
eggs, beating constantly. Continue the beating until the mix- 
ture will hold its shape, then add one teaspoonful vanilla, and 
one cupful walnuts cut in pieces. Drop in small rough shaped 
mounds on buttered paper. It is nice for icing for cake also. 
— Mrs. Allie V. Packard. 

173 



CREAM PEPPERMINTS. 
One cup white sugar, one-eighth cup milk and water mixed, 
one teaspoon extract peppermint, one small pinch cream of 
tartar, one teaspoon butter. Boil sugar, butter, milk and water 
together for five minutes, then add the cream of tartar and 
flavoring, stir about ten minutes and drop quickly on buttered 
paper. — Mrs. J. T. Clifford. 

For Satisfactory Fountain Pen Ink, C. Holmes, 58 Main St. 

PEPPERMINTS. 

Boil together one cup water and two cups sugar for ten 
minutes. Then drop a little in ice water ; if it will form a soft 
ball when rolled between the fingers, it is cooked enough ; stir 
in one teaspoon extract of peppermint ; when cool pour in bowl 
and beat ; then drop on buttered plates. Flavor. — Mrs. W. A. 
Deane. 

BALTIMORE CARAMELS. 

Two and one-half pounds brown sugar, one-half pound 
Baker's chocolate broken in bits, one cup milk, one tablespoon 
butter ; mix together and stir constantly until it grains and 
hardens, usually twenty or thirty minutes. — Mrs. W. A. Deane. 

LEMON DROPS. 
One cup powdered sugar, two teaspoonfuls extract of lemon, 
water enough to dissolve ; boil until crisp when dropped in 
water. Drop in buttered plates. — Mrs. Etta Deane. 

For Satisfactory Fountain Pen Ink, 0. Holmes, 58 Main St. 

NUT TAFFY. 
Three cups sugar, one-half cup butter, one cup milk, one- 
quarter cup molasses, one cup cocoanut or walnuts, two heap- 
ing dessertspoonfuls of cocoa, one-half teaspoonful salt, two 
teaspoons vanilla stirred in when taken from the fire. Boil 
fifteen or eighteen minutes, stirring all the time. — Mrs. H. C. 
Vining. 

174 



HEAVENLY HASH. 

This candy is made in three layers. 

First Layer. — Two cups granulated sugar, three-quarters 
cup milk ; boil until it hardens in cold water, stir in a piece of 
butter as large as an English walnut (after removing from the 
fire), a little vanilla, three-quarters cup walnuts cut fine; stir 
about three minutes, pour into tin. 

Second Layer. — Two cups sugar, three-quarters cup milk, 
two squares Baker's chocolate. Boil until it hardens in cold 
water, butter and vanilla as above, stir three minutes and pour 
on to the first layer. 

Third Layer. — Third layer is like the first, except add 
candied cherries to mixture instead of nuts. Cut in bars when 
cool. — Mrs. Proctor, Newtonville. 

For Satisfactory Fountain Pen Ink, C. Holmes, 58 Main St. 

CREAM CANDY. 
One pound powdered sugar, one-third cup melted butter, 
two tablespoons milk, two tablespoons cocoa, vanilla; roll out 
with rolling pin and cut in sugar. — Elsie K. Fanning. 

SALTED ALMONDS. 
Blanch one-half pound dry and spread on a pan, put a large 
spoon butter with them and stir them up until all are a little 
greasy, then put them in the oven until they are pale yellow, 
not brown; then sift a spoonful of fine salt over them while 
hot; shake well; when cold, gently sift the superfluous salt 
from them. If they are not very dry when put in oven they 
will not be crisp. — Rosella Bohian. 

For Satisfactory Fountain Pen Ink, C. Holmes, 58 Main St. 

MARSHMALLOWS. 

Four tablespoons gelatine (even) and sixteen tablespoons 

water ; put gelatine in the water to dissolve ; when dissolved 

place on front of the stove until hot, but not boiling ; when hot 

dissolve three cups sugar in gelatine, one cup at a time ; be sure 

»7S 



that it is thoroughly dissolved ; remove from fire and beat until 
it is white and creamy; beat as long as possible (usually it re- 
quires thirty minutes) with a spoon; then add one cup nut 
meats and one teaspoon vanilla ; then beat as long as pos- 
sible with a fork. Pour into pans, place near fire and a crust 
will form, or let stand over night and cut in squares ; do not 
attempt to cut until the crust is formed. After crust is formed, 
turn candy crust-side down and let crust on other side. — K. 
L. W. 

Nothing Better Than Holmes' Coal at Any Price. 

ICE CREAM CANDY. 

One coffee cup white sugar, one-half cup water, one large 
spoonful vinegar, two-thirds teaspoon cream of tartar; boil 
twenty-five minutes without stirring ; flavor with vanilla ; when 
almost cold pull it near the stove and it will be white. — Corinne 
E. Broimie. 

SUGAR CANDY. 

Three-quarters cup vinegar and water, equal parts, one cup 
sugar; let it boil gently in a shallow pan until brittle when 
tried in water. Do not stir while boiling. Pull as soon as it 
can be worked. — Corinne E. Broimve. 

SOUR CREAM CANDY. 

One cup sour cream, two cups brown sugar, piece of butter, 
one cup walnuts chopped ; boil eight minutes and stir a long 
time after taking from stove. — Elsie K. Fanning. 

Nothing Better Than Holmes' Coal at Any Price. 

PENUCHIE. 

Two cups white sugar, three-quarters cup milk, butter size 
of an tgg; cook until when dropped in water it will form a soft 
ball; a little vanilla, one quart peanuts, three-quarters cup 
seeded raisins, chop in meat chopper, stir in quickly. — Mrs. 
Marcus Russell, West Hanover. 

176 



PUFFED RICE BRITTLE. 
Boil one cup granulated sugar, one-half cup water, one tea- 
spoon vinegar; boil five minutes, add two tablespoons mo- 
lasses, butter size of a walnut ; boil until it becomes hard when 
dropped in cold water; stir in one-half package puffed rice 
previously warmed; spread on dish to cool. — Ada L. Poole. 

Nothing Better Than Holmes' Coal at Any Price. 

WALNUT CREAMS. 
Two and one-half cups coffee sugar, one-half cup cream, 
butter size of a walnut ; cook it until it strings ; take from fire 
and stir in one-half pound chopped walnuts. — Elsie M. Orcutt. 

WALNUT CREAMS No. 2. 
One and one-half cups confectioners' sugar sifted, white of 
one egg and an equal quantity of water ; stir sugar into water 
and white of egg until it is stiff enough to mould ; put a little 
ball of cream on half a walnut, place other half on the other 
side, roll in sugar. — Elsie M. Orcutt. 




No great business can be built 
that has not for its foundation 
what Lincoln called the Common 
People. Mr. Dana says there 
are no classes in this free Repub- 
lic, yet everybody knows what is 
meant by the Middle Class. 

It means about nine persons 
in every ten — yes, ninety-nine in 
every hundred. 

That is where our special Soft 
Shamokin Coal gets its support. 
It is in touch with the popular 
heart. It pleases the common 
people. We know this and so 
we advertise it, for "a pleased 
customer is the best advertise- 
ment" for This is Holmes' Corp. 



177 



You Can Cook Best with Holmes' Peerless Coal. 
Write Your New Recipes Here. 



178 



You Can Cook Best with Holmes' Peerless Coal. 
Write Your New Recipes Here. 



179 






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CKafing Dish Dainties. 

DEVILLED OYSTERS. 

One pint oysters, one cup cream, two tablespoons butter, two 
tablespoons flour, yolks of two eggs, one tablespoon chopped 
parsley, one teaspoon salt, one-half saltspoon pepper. Drain 
and slightly chop the oysters. Melt butter, add flour, stir 
quickly until well mixed, add hot cream, yolks of eggs and 
seasoning, and add to the oysters. — Inez M. R. Hill. 

Free Use of Tables and Writing l^aterlals for Postcard Customers at 
58 Main St. You Can Get Your Stamps Here as Cheap as Elsewliere. 

RAREBIT. 

Grate or cut into small pieces one pound of rich cream 
cheese. Add to this one even cupful of milk (or milk and 
cream combined), one small teaspoonful of mustard dissolved 
in a little of the milk, one-half teaspoon salt and a good pinch 
of cayenne. Stir this together in the chafing dish or double 
boiler until the cheese is melted. Then add one tablespoon 
butter, and one rounding teaspoonful flour which has been 
thoroughly dissolved in one-quarter cup of milk. When the 
rarebit has commenced to thicken a little, add one egg beaten 
well. Do not cook too long after the egg is added. Stir all 
the time rarebit is over the fire. This is also very good made 
of sage cheese. — Sue E. Baldwin. 

Free Use of Tables and Writing Materials for Postcard Customers zt 
58 Mai/i St. You Can Get Your Stamps Here as Cheap as Elsewhere. 

SCOTCH WOOD-COCK. 

One can asparagus tips, drained ; six hard boiled eggs, cut 
up ; one pint milk, one tablespoon butter, dash red pepper, salt, 
one tablespoon cornstarch, made into a cream gravy in double 
boiler. Add asparagus and hard boiled eggs. Heat thoroughly 
and serve on toasted bread (toast on one side). — Mrs. Ralph 
Poole. 



OYSTERS A LA POULETTE. 

Thirty oysters, one pint cream, one tablespoonful butter, 
one tablespoonful flour, one-half teaspoon salt, one saltspoon- 
ful white pepper, three grates of nutmeg. Cook together the 
butter and flour; add the cream, stirring constantly; when it 
boils put in the oysters and cook about four minutes, when 
they are plump, season and serve on toast or crackers. — Ada 
S. Lewis. 

Coal In Paper Bags "With the Hod On," Sold by Grocers, Is Warranted 
Satisfactory by This Is Holmes. 

CREAMED LOBSTER. 

One cup milk, one-half cup cream, meat of a large lobster, 
two tablespoonfuls butter, one tablespoonful flour, salt and 
cayenne pepper to taste, juice of a lemon. Heat the milk to 
boiling and thicken with the flour and butter. Mince the 
lobster with a sharp knife, never chop it; stir it into the milk 
and let it become well heated, add to it the raw cream, stir it 
up once and take from the fire; season, add lemon juice and 
serve. — Mrs W. T. Lewis. 

Coal In Paper Bags "With the Hod On," Sold by Grocers, Is Warranted 
Satisfactory by This Is Holmes. 

SHRIMP A LA NEWBURG. 

Fresh or canned shrimp may be used. If canned, one can. 
Cook in one tablespoonful butter three minutes, adding one- 
half teasponful salt, a few grains cayenne, and a teaspoonful 
lemon juice. Set this one side and make a sauce by melting 
one-half tablespoon of butter, adding to this one-half teaspoon 
flour, one-half cup cream stirred into the yolks of two eggs. 
Return the shrimp for a moment to the sauce and flavor with 
two tablespoonfuls sherry and a sprinkling of nutmeg, if this 
is liked. Serve with toast points or points of pastry. Lob- 
sters, oysters and clams are all excellent cooked this way. — 
Miss Elisabeth Saxton. 

182 



CREAMED SHRIMPS. 

One can shrimp, two tablespoonfuls butter, one tablespoon- 
ful flour, one pint milk, one scant teaspoonful salt, a little 
cayenne. Cook together the butter and flour, add the milk and 
cook until the sauce is smooth ; put in the shrimps and simmer 
until they are heated through. Season and serve. — Mary L. 
Buckley. 

Coal In Paper Bags "With the Hod On," Sold by Grocers, Is Warranted 
Satisfactory by This Is Holmes. 

BEEF MINCE. 

Have a pound of beef from the round minced very fine and 
free it from all sinews and stringy bits. Heat in the blazer two 
tablespoonfuls butter, put in the meat and one tablespoonful 
onion juice. Stir for three or four minutes or until the meat 
is heated through, add salt, pepper and the juice of half a 
lemon and serve. — Mrs. Mae Simpson. 

CREAMED SALMON. 
Two hours before it is needed turn the contents of a can of 
salmon out upon a platter, pick it to pieces with a fork, remove 
all bits of bone or skin and drain off the liquid. When you are 
ready to prepare the dish, cook together in the chafing dish 
over hot water one tablespoonful flour and one tablespoonful 
butter, when they bubble put in one cupful milk and stir until 
you have a smooth white sauce. To this add the salmon, stir- 
ring constantly; season with a scant teaspoonful of salt and 
three dashes of red pepper ; when the fish is thoroughly heated, 
add to it the juice of half a lemon. Any kind of fish may be 
used the same way. — Mrs. F. A. Besse. 

Coal In Paper Bags "With the Hod On," Sold by Grocers, Is Warranted 
Satisfactory by This Is Holmes. 

EGGS WITH CHEESE. 

Five eggs, two heaping tablespoonfuls dry grated cheese. 
Parmesan or old English cheese is best for this. One table- 
spoonful butter, one-half teaspoon salt, a dash of cayenne pep- 

183 



per. Beat the eggs light, add the cheese, the salt and pepper; 
have the butter melted in the blazer; turn in the eggs and stir 
until thick and smooth. Serve on toast or crackers. — Martha 
Buckley. 

TOMATO RAREBIT. 

Two tablespoons butter, two tablespoons flour, three- 
quarters cup thin cream, three-quarters cup stewed and 
strained tomatoes, one-eighth teaspoon soda, two cups finely 
cut cheese, two eggs slightly beaten, salt, mustard, cayenne. 
Put butter in chafing dish ; when melted add flour, pour on 
gradually cream, and as soon as mixture thickens add toma- 
toes mixed with soda, then add cheese, eggs and seasoning to 
taste. Serve on toast. — Sue E. Baldwin. 

Anything You Vy/ant to Read You Can Get at 58 Main St. If We Haven't 
Got It, We'll Get It, and Be Glad to. 

ENGLISH MONKEY. 

One cup stale bread crumbs, one cup milk, one tablespoon 
butter, one-half cup soft mild cheese cut in small pieces, one 
egg, one-half teaspoon salt, a little cayenne. Soak bread 
crumbs fifteen minutes in milk; melt butter, add cheese, and 
wnen melted add soaked crumbs, the egg shghtly beat(n ard 
seasonmgs. Cook three minutes and pour over toasted crack- 
ers spread with butter. — Mrs. H. T. Rhodes. 

Anything You Want to Read You Can Get at 58 Main St. If We Haven't 
Got It, We'll Get It, and Be Glad to. 

SAVORY LOBSTER. 

Put into the chafing dish one heaping tablespoonful butter, 
one saltspoonful dry mustard, as much salt, and a couple of 
dashes of pepper ; stir in the lobster next. The meat of one 
large or two small ones may be used, or the contents of a can. 
When it is smoking hot, add the juice of half a lemon. Cook 
a minute longer and serve. — Mrs. C. C. Merritt. 

184 



CREAMED OYSTERS. 

One pint oysters, one cup milk, one-half cup cream, one and 
one-half tablespoon butter, one and one-half tablespoon entire 
wheat flour, one-half teaspoon salt, one-half teaspoon pap- 
rika. Remove all bits of shell. Prepare a sauce by blend- 
ing in the blazer the butter, flour, salt and paprika ; then add 
the milk and cream and stir until thick and smooth ; then cook 
the oysters until plump ; add to sauce and serve at once. — Mrs. 
Joseph Belcher, Holbrook. 

Anything You Want to Read You Can Get at 58 Main St. If We Haven't 
Got It, We'll Get It, and Be Glad to. 

VENETIAN EGG. 

One tablespoon butter, two tablespoons chopped onion, one 
pint can tomato, one level teaspoon salt, three tablespoons 
cheese cut fine, very little cayenne pepper, three eggs. Fry 
onion in butter, then add other ingredients in order men- 
tioned. Break the yolks of eggs, but do not beat ; drop them 
in and cook a minute with cover on before stirring. Serve on 
crackers. — Mrs. W. P. Chisholm. 

CHEESE FONDU. 

One tablespoon butter, one cup fresh milk, one cup fine 
bread crumbs, two cups grated cheese, one saltspoon dry must- 
ard, cayenne, two eggs. Put butter in chafing dish ; when 
melted add milk, bread crumbs, cheese and mustard ; season 
with cayenne. Stir constantly and add, just before serving, the 
two eggs beaten light. — Eleanor Belcher, Holbrook. 

Anything You Want to Read You Cart Get at 58 Main St. If We Haven't 
Got It, We'll Get It, and Be Glad to. 



TmsisnoLinES 

STORE- 58 MAIN ST. OFFICE: 

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You Can Cook Best with Holmes' Peerless Coal. 
Write Your New Recipes Here. 



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Some 
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Make people believe that gold dollars 
can be bought for 90 cents, but we 
haven't that faculty. 
^ OUR object is to attract trade 
and have our goods and prices prove 
the truth of every claim we make. 
^ We buy the best coal that is 
mined. We take special pains to 
pick out by hand all the slate we can 
find. We deliver it promptly, and 
just when promised. We sell at the 
lowest cash price. We want your 
trade, and will do our level best to 
deserve it. 

ENTERPRISE BLDG. 



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187 



Pickles, Relishes and Jellies. 

WINTER PICKLE. 
One quart raw cabbage chopped, one pint cooked beets 
chopped, one cup horse radish, one cup sugar, four teaspoons 
salt, one-half teaspoon pepper. Cover with hot vinegar. — Mrs. 
Lena I, Hoyt. 

You Will Find the Best There is In Postcards at Holmes', 58 Main St. 

PEPPER RELISH. 
Four quarts green tomatoes, four large onions, three red 
peppers, three green peppers, chop very fine, a large handful 
salt ; drain very dry, then add one pound brown sugar, one tea- 
spoon black pepper, one teaspoon ground cloves, one teaspoon 
ground allspice, one-half pint mustard seed, one-quarter pint 
celery seed. Pour over this three pints boiling vinegar. Then 
put in jar or bottle (I boil the clove and allspice in a cheese- 
cloth bag). — Grace Tribou. 

A RELISH. 
Eighteen green tomatoes chopped not too fine, twelve pickled 
limes chopped, two pounds granulated sugar, a little salt, one 
cup vinegar, one piece stick cinnamon, ten whole cloves. Sim- 
mer four hours, then bottle. — Mrs. E. W. Wood. 

You Will Find the Best There Is In Postcards at Holmes', 58 Main St. 

CHOW-CHOW. 

Chop fine six onions, six cucumbers, one head cauliflower, 
one-half a small cabbage, one-half peck green tomatoes and 
two small red peppers from which remove the seeds; sprinkle 
with a scant one-half cup salt and let stand over night. In the 
morning, drain, add one teaspoon cinnamon, one teaspoon 
mustard seed, two teaspoons celery seed, two cups white sugar, 
one teaspoon pepper and cider vinegar enough to cover the 
whole. Put in agate or porcelain lined kettle, boil about half 
an hour. Seal while hot in glass jars. — Mrs. D. C. Holmes. 

i88 



DUTCH CHOW-CHOW. 
Two quarts green tomatoes sliced and sprinkled with salt; 
let them set over night. In the morning chop them with six 
green peppers, one quart silver onions (whole), one quart 
cucumber pickles sliced, one head cauliflower broken and 
scalded three minutes, two quarts vinegar, one cup sugar, four 
tablespoons mustard seed. Mix one-half cup mustard and two 
tablespoons flour with cold vinegar and stir into the pickle. 
Cook until done. — Mrs. W. T. Cottle. 

You Will Find the Best There Is in Postcards at Holmes', 58 IVIain St. 

GERMAN CHOW-CHOW. 

One quart onions, one quart green peppers, one quart green 
tomatoes, one cabbage (four pounds), one cauliflower, one 
quart pickles (do not cook the pickles). Chop fine, add one 
cup salt, cover with cold water and boil half an hour, drain dry. 

Paste. — One tablespoon mustard, two and one-half cups 
sugar, one cup flour, one tablespoon tumeric ; take one cup of 
vinegar and mix with paste ; boil two quarts of vinegar and 
add to paste ; stir well, but do not let it thicken, pour over dry 
mixture and bottle. — Annie Mitchell. 

PICALILLI. 
One peck green tomatoes chopped fine, add one cup salt; 
stand over night and drain in the morning; two ounces mus- 
tard seed, one ouncf. clove, one ounce allspice (clove and all- 
spice in a bag), one-half dozen green peppers, one-half dozen 
onions, one pound brown sugar, two quarts vinegar. Cook 
two hours. — Grace Trihou. 

You Will Find the Best There Is in Postcards at Holmes', 58 IVIain St. 

PICALILLI. 

To every two pecks of green tomatoes use the following: 
One quart onions, three large peppers, one gallon vinegar, one 
pound sugar, two ounces whole clove, two ounces allspice, two 
ounces stick cinnamon (tie up in a cloth the clove, allspice and 

189 



cinnamon), two ounces mustard seed, two ounces celery seed. 
Dice the tomatoes and onions. Salt them and let stand over 
night; in the morning drain and cook. — Stella Gibbs. 

SWEET PICKLE. 
One peck green tomatoes sliced, one small cup salt ; sprinkle 
and let set over night. In the morning drain and chop ; add 
one quart vinegar and cook fifteen minutes. Drain and add 
three pints vinegar, one tablespoon cinnamon, one tablespoon 
allspice, one tablespoon clove, one tablespoon ginger, two 
pounds sugar, one-half pound white mustard seed. Boil all 
together for half an hour. — Mrs. W. T. Cottle. 

Holmes' Peanut Coal In Paper Bags "With the Hod On," Only 12 cents, 
at Your Grocer's. 

SWEET TOMATO PICKLE. 
One pint green tomatoes, cut in one inch thick squares ; 
sprinkle with one cup salt and let stand over night. Drain in 
the morning and add two quarts of water and one quart vine- 
gar; boil fifteen minutes, drain and throw vinegar and water 
away. Take two and one-half pounds sugar, two and one-half 
quarts vinegar (not too sour), two quarts celery cut fine, two 
quarts small onions, six red peppers cut fine, two tablespoons 
each of whole cloves, allspice, white mustard seed, celery seed 
and cassia buds or bark. Put on fire and let come to boil, then 
add the tomato and cook fifteen minutes ; be careful and not 
cook too much. — Mrs. Galen K. Tyler. 

Holmes' Peanut Coal in Paper Bags "With the Hod On," Only 12 cents, 
at Your Grocer's. 

CHUTNEY SAUCE. 
Six pounds apples, peel, core and chop fine ; six green to- 
matoes, three-quarters pound onions, one-half pound raisins, 
six green peppers, all chopped fine, two pounds brown sugar, 
one quart vinegar, two tablespoonfuls salt, three tablespoon- 
fuls mustard seed. Simmer until soft. — Mrs. Ella Foley. 

igo 



TOMATO SOY. 
Peel and slice one peck ripe tomatoes and eight onions; 
sprinkle one cup salt over it and let stand over night. In the 
morning drain and add two quarts vinegar, one tablespoon- 
ful each of ginger, ground mustard, clove and allspice, one- 
quarter tablespoon cayenne. Boil slowly two hours. When 
nearly done, add one pound brown sugar, one-quarter pound 
mustard seed. Bottle hot. Serve with cold meat. — Mrs. H. 
C. Vining. 

Holmes' Peanut Coal In Paper Bags "With the Hod On," Only 12 cents, 
at Your Grocer's. 

WHITE HOUSE MUSTARD. 

One egg, one cup vinegar, three level tablespoonfuls mus- 
tard, one level tablespoon sugar, one tablespoon flour, one tea- 
spoon salt ; mix the dry ingredients together ; then add the well 
beaten egg, and when well blended, add to the vinegar while 
hot, stirring all the time until it thickens. — Mrs. Carrie E. 
Harlow. 

TOMATO CATSUP. 

Wash and cut up two quarts tomatoes; boil until tender, 
then strain and add two tablespoonfuls mustard, one table- 
spoon salt, two cups vinegar, two-thirds cup sugar, one-quarter 
teaspoon red pepper. Boil until as thick as you like it. — Adrs. 
Etta O. Randall. 

PICKLED RED PEPPER. 

Cut up pepper after removing seeds, into strips, put in quart 
jars, then add one dessertspoon salt, one-half cup sugar ; then 
fill jar with cold vinegar and seal. — Mrs. Heman Eldredge. 

Holmes' Peanut Coal in Paper Bags "With the Hod On," Only 12 cents, 
at Your Grocer's. 

PICKLED PRUNES. 

Wash two pounds of prunes in two waters and then soak 

in clean fresh water for twelve hours. Turn off all the water 

except about one-half cup, put this with the prunes into a 

crock, cover and set in a pot of cold water; bring the water to 

191 



a boil slowly and keep this up until the prunes are smoking 
hot and soft, but not broken. A pint of vinegar in which has 
been dissolved one pound of sugar ; put over the fire with one- 
half ounce each of whole cloves and stick cinnamon broken 
into bits ; some think the pickle improved by the addition of 
one-half teaspoon ginger ; this is a matter of taste. Let the 
vinegar boil up once ; put in the prunes and cook gently for 
five minutes after the boil begins again and seal in hot jars. 
They will be eatable in about a month. — M. E. Mowry. 

If We Do Not Back Up Every One of Our Claims, Kick, at 58 Main St. 

SPICED PICKLED PRUNES. 

Four pounds prunes soaked twenty- four hours ; two pounds 
sugar, one pint vinegar, one ounce each of cloves and cinna- 
mon, one-quarter ounce ginger. Boil vinegar, sugar and 
spices together for ten minutes ; add prunes ; boil all together 
until syrup is clear and prunes are tender. — Mrs. E. W. 
Wood. 

SPICED CURRANTS. 

Five pounds currants, four pounds sugar, two tablespoons 
clove and cinnamon, one pint vinegar. Boil two hours, then 
put in jars. — Mrs. S. A. Sampson, Mrs. W. H. Poole. 

PICKLED ONIONS. 
Make quite a salt brine and let the onions stand in it over 
night. In the morning take out the onions and cover with 
white vinegar. Let it come to a boil. Put in a little white pep- 
per. Bottle while hot. — Susie A. Sampson. 

If We Do Not Back Up Every One of Our Claims, Kick, at 58 Mai" St. 

CHILI SAUCE. 
Twelve large ripe tomatoes, two large onions, two ripe pep- 
pers, two tablespoons salt, one teaspoon cinnamon, one-half 
teaspoon clove, one-half teaspoon allspice, four cups vinegar, 
two cups sugar. Boil slowly two hours. — Mrs. Leon Little- 
Held, Annie Mitchell, Mrs. A. E. Packard, Mrs. Kate L. 
Weaver. 

192 



RIPE TOMATO PICKLE. 

Place a layer of grape leaves and twigs in the bottom 
of stone jar, then a layer of very ripe and hard tomatoes ; con- 
tinue until required amount is obtained ; tomatoes may be add- 
ed each day as they ripen. Make a weak brine of one table- 
spoon salt to one gallon water; cover with plate to keep them 
well under water. In four weeks a fine pickle will be ready 
which will keep all winter. — Mrs. A. E. Packard. 

If We Do Not Back Up Every One of Our Claims, Kick, at 58 Main St. 

SPICED PEARS. 

One-half peck pears, one quart vinegar, two pounds sugar, 
two teaspoons cinnamon, one teaspoon ground clove, one nut- 
meg. Cook until a broom corn will go through them. Put 
spice in a bag, as it looks much nicer. — Grace Tribou. 

CITRON SWEET PICKLE. 

Cut and pare the citron, discard the soft center and cut into 
slices one-half to three-quarters inch thick. Boil one ounce 
alum in one gallon water; pour on the citron and allow it to 
stand several hours on the back of stove. Drain and put into 
cold water; when cold, drain and cook one-half hour (or until 
tender) in the following syrup which you have already pre- 
pared. To eight pounds of fruit allow four pounds best 
brown sugar, one quart vinegar, one cup whole mixed spices ; 
allspice, cloves and stick cinnamon (less of the cloves than of 
others). Put spices in a bag and boil with vinegar and sugar 
and skim well. — Mrs. E. A. Keith. 

If We Do Not Back Up Every One of Our Giaims, Kick, at 58 r\/iain St. 

PICKLED BEETS. 

One quart vinegar, two cups sugar; have it boiling hot; fill 
jar with hot boiled beets (small ones are the best) ; then pour 
in the hot vinegar and seal tight. — Lizzie Hunt, Short Falls, 
N.H. 

193 



CHILI SAUCE WITHOUT SPICE. 
Six large ripe tomatoes, one good sized onion, two green 
peppers chopped, three tablespoons sugar, one tablespoon salt, 
one cup vinegar, one-half cup water ; boil slowly one and one- 
half hours. — Mrs. C. E. Burns, Plymouth. 

Do You Use Holmes' Kitchen Racks? 

SWEET PICKLED CHERRIES. 
Choose large, firm cherries, and wipe each one carefully; 
remove the stems. For ten pounds of cherries allow seven 
pounds granulated sugar, three pints vinegar and three gills 
of water. Put sugar, vinegar and water in a preserving kettle 
and bring to a boil. Skim this syrup and drop in the cherries. 
Cook very slowly until the cherries are very tender, but not 
broken. Remove the fruit with a perforated spoon and pack 
in heated jars; then boil the syrup for fifteen minutes, or until 
thick; fill the jars with this and seal. — Anna L. Mozv^ry. 

SPICED PEACHES. 
Seven pounds peaches, four pounds sugar, one quart vin- 
egar ; stick two cloves in each peach ; boil vinegar and sugar 
with a few sticks of cinnamon ; add fruit and cook until tender ; 
remove fruit and boil syrup down one-half. Can. — Mrs. A. C. 
Gibbs. 

Do You Use Holmes' Kitchen Racks? 

MUSTARD PICKLE. 
One quart pickles cut in cubes ; one quart small green to- 
matoes, one quart small onions, one head cauliflower, four 
green peppers cut fine. Make a brine of four quarts of water 
and one pint salt; let soak twenty-four hours; then heat just 
enough to scald ; turn into a colander to drain. Mix one cup 
flour, six tablespoons ground mustard and one tablespoon 
tumeric with enough cold vinegar to make a smooth paste; 
add one cup sugar and enough vinegar to make two quarts in 
all ; boil until it thickens, stirring all the time. Add the pickles 
and cook until heated through. — Stella Gibbs. 

194 



MUSTARD PICKLE. 

One cauliflower, two large bunches of celery, one quart 
silver skin onions, one quart green tomatoes, one white cab- 
bage, three green peppers, two quarts vinegar, one-quarter 
pound mustard, one cup flour, one coffee cup sugar, one-half 
teacup salt, one ounce celery seed and one-quarter ounce of 
tumeric. Chop cabbage and onions ; cut the tops off the cauli- 
flower and chop the stalks fine ; boil the tomatoes, stalks of 
cauliflower and peppers in a little water until tender; drain 
oft' water and mix with cabbage, etc. Chop the tomatoes and 
peppers and cut celery in small pieces. Boil vinegar, mix flour, 
mustard, tumeric, sugar and salt with water like thin griddle 
cakes ; mix into the boiling vinegar, cooking until thick. Then 
put in vegetables and boil ten minutes. Put in jars. This is 
fine. — Mrs. Carrie E. Harlow. 

Do You Use Holmes' Kitchen Racks? 

MUSTARD PICKLE. 

Five quarts vinegar, four level cups sugar, one level cup 
mustard, one heaping cupful flour, two ounces tumeric. Mix 
dry ingredients and moisten with cold vinegar. Stir this into 
boiling vinegar, and boil until thick (about five minutes). Stir 
constantly. Use any vegetable except cabbage ; onions, 
cucumbers, green tomatoes, cauliflower, green peppers, string 
beans, limes, etc. Prepare vegetables and let stand in weak 
brine twenty-four hours. Cook a little in same brine, drain, 
add paste and pack in jars or pots. — Mrs. E. F. O'Neill. 

Do You Use Holmes' Kitchen Ractcs? 

TOMATO CATSUP. 

One and one-half pecks ripe tomatoes, two cups vinegar, 
three tablespoons salt, one cup sugar, one level teaspoon mus- 
tard, one-quarter teaspoon cayenne pepper. Boil three hours. 
— Grace Tribou. 

195 



FRED McLAUTHLEN'S TARTAR SAUCE. 
Yolks of two eggs, one-half teaspoon mustard, pinch of pep- 
per, pinch of salt, one teaspoon sugar, juice of one lemon, one 
pint of salad oil, pickles. Mix mustard, pepper, and yolks of 
eggs, and then turn in slowly the oil, and beat to a paste. 
Then beat in sugar, salt, and lemon juice, also. Cut up 
pickles last. 

TO TEST JELLIES. 

A good and quick way to test jelly to see if it is done, is to 
drop a little into a glass of cold water (ice water if possible), 
and if it falls to the bottom immediately the jelly is done. — 
Mrs. A. Morton Packard. 

Over 4,000 People Buy Their Coal of Holmes, 58 Main St. Why? 

CURRANT JELLY. 
Bruise and squeeze the currants until all the juice is out of 
them, and strain through flannel. Put the juice on to boil for 
fifteen minutes; strain again and measure, allowing the same 
measure of sugar. Put juice on to boil again and when it 
thickens, add sugar and boil live minutes. Remove scum and 
pour into glasses. — Annie Mitchell. 

SPICED CRAB APPLE JELLY. 
Quarter and wash the apples ; cover them with water ; cook 
until tender; strain through a cheesecloth. Put back into 
kettle, add vinegar to taste, a small handful of cloves and stick 
of cinnamon tied in a piece of cheesecloth. Boil twenty min- 
utes ; to each cup of juice add one cup sugar that has been 
heated in oven; add this to juice and boil five minutes; skim 
and pour into tumblers. — Mrs. Mae E. Simpson. 

Over 4,000 People Buy Their Coal of Holmes, 58 Main St. Why? 

BEACH PLUM JELLY. 
Wash plums, put in kettle and cover with water. Cook until 
very tender; drain through jelly bag; add a bowl of sugar to 
each bowl of juice and cook until it will jelly when cool, which 
can be determined only by trying in small quantity. — C. E. 
Byrnes, Plymouth. 

196 



PINEAPPLE PRESERVE. 

Shred pineapple with silver fork; to one bowl of apple add 
two-thirds bowl sugar; sprinkle in layers and let stand over 
night ; add one cup water and cook ten minutes. — Mrs. Mabel 
H. Fisher. 

Over 4,000 People Buy Their Coal of Holmes, 58 Main St. Why? 

CONSERVE. 

Eight quarts grapes after being picked from stem ; prepare 
as for jelly; to three and one-half pints juice add four oranges; 
chop pulp and rind; add sugar to equal amounts of both; two 
pounds seedless raisins steamed twenty minutes. Boil grape 
juice and oranges twenty minutes ; add sugar and raisins ; boil 
all together five minutes. — Frances M. Gibbs. 

CANNED PEACHES. 

Put in jars one cup sugar, then fill jars with peaches which 
have skins removed, leaving a few to each jar with stones in ; 
fill jars with cold water and set in boiler with cold water cover- 
ing one-half of jar; let come to a boil and cook twenty min- 
utes ; remove covers and fill with boiling water. Seal. — Mrs. 
Mabel H. Fisher. 

Over 4,000 People Buy Their Coal of Holmes, 58 Main St. Why? 

GRAPE PRESERVE. 

Pick over and mash grapes ; slip pulp from skin ; cook skins 
in water to cover and pulp in its own juice in another kettle, 
until soft and free from seeds. Rub pulp through a fine sieve 
and when skins are boiled nearly dry, add to pulp. Measure 
and allow equal measure of sugar ; put the fruit on to boil and 
cook twenty minutes, stirring often ; then add one-quarter of 
sugar and boil five minutes longer ; add rest of sugar and boil 
again until skins are tender. — Annie Mitchell. 

197 



PINEAPPLE MARMALADE. 
After removing the skin and eyes from the pineapple, grate 
the pulp from the core ; weigh pulp and juice and to each 
pound allow from three-quarters to one pound of sugar and 
the juice of one lemon; let the pineapple simmer over the fire 
until thoroughly scalded ; then add the sugar which has been 
heated in the oven, and the lemon juice, and cook until when 
tried on a cold saucer no watery liquid separates from it. Put 
in tumblers and cover as jelly. — Mrs. C. C. Merritt. 

Get Your Diary at Holmes' Before You Keep It, and Then Keep It After 

You Get It. 

QUINCE JELLY. 
One peck quince parings and four whole quinces cut up 
small; cover with water and let stand over night; in morning 
cook slowly until soft, but not mushy; drain in jelly bag; to 
one cup syrup add one cup sugar ; boil slowly twenty minutes ; 
skim and put in glasses. — Mrs. A. H. 

TRANSPARENT ORANGE MARMALADE. 
Six California oranges, three lemons; cut the oranges in 
very thin slices, but do not peel them; peel the lemons, cut 
them in wheels and mix with the oranges. Measure and add 
three times as much cold water as fruit ; then let stand till next 
day. The next day cook until the bits of orange peel feel soft 
between the thumb and finger; let stand until another day. 
The third day measure again ; add equal amount of sugar and 
boil until the juice jellies. Put in tumblers. — Jennie Howard. 

Get Your Diary at Holmes' Before You Keep It, and Then Keep It After 

You Get It. 

ORANGE MARMALADE. 
Six oranges and three lemons ; slice very thin ; soak thirty- 
six hours in three quarts water ; let simmer two hours ; add six 
pounds sugar and cook one hour. — Mrs. Arthur Morse, 
Plymouth. 

198 



ORANGE MARMALADE. 

One dozen oranges, six lemons ; cut the peel into shreds 
(with shears) ; cover peel with water and let stand all night; 
pour off water in the morning, add pulp and peel to seven pints 
water, and boil down to half quantity ; add eight pounds sugar 
and boil fifteen to twenty minutes. — Mrs. Francis H. Erskine. 

Get Your Diary at Holmes' Before You Keep It, and Then Keep It After 

You Get It. 

MARMALADE. 

Slice very fine one grape fruit, one orange, one lemon. Take 
three times as much water as you have fruit; let stand over 
night; in the morning put on the stove, let boil hard for ten 
minutes ; let stand over another night ; in the morning take as 
much sugar as you have water and fruit; cook until it jellies, 
or two and one-half hours. Dip into tumblers. — Mrs. Galen 
K. Tyler. 

APPLE AND CRANBERRY JELLY. 

Quarter and wash the apples, leaving in cores ; add one- 
third as much cranberies as you have apple ; add the juice of 
one or two lemons, according to quantity ; some thin shav- 
ings of lemon peel ; cok all together until tender. Strain 
through a cheese cloth or jelly bag, letting it drip over 
night. To each cup of juice allow one cup sugar. Put juice 
on range ; let boil twenty minutes ; add sugar which has 
been heated in the oven, and boil five minutes. This makes 
a delicate jelly. — Mrs. R. R. Ship pen. 

Get Your Diary at Holmes' Before You Keep It, and Then Keep It After 

You Get It. 

CURRANT AND RASPBERRY PRESERVE. 

Use one-third currants and two-thirds raspberries; about 
three-quarters pound of sugar to one pound of fruit; cook a 
few moments. Very nice with meat. — Mrs. Abby Savage. 

199 



CURRANT JELLY. 
Put currants in kettle with one cup water ; cook gently until 
fruit turns white; strain carefully; to one pint juice add one 
pound sugar ; cook thirty minutes ; strain and set in sun. — Mrs. 
F. M. Gibbs. 

stationery, Pens, Pencils, Ink and Postage Stamps at Holmes'. 

CRAB APPLE JELLY. 
Wash the apples and remove the blossom end ; cut in small 
pieces, but do not peel or core as the skins and seeds improve 
the quality and color of jelly. Cover with cold water and cook 
gently until soft. When apples are soft and liquid red. pour 
into jelly bag and let drip over night ; in morning boil juice ten 
minutes, then strain again and measure. Allow one-half pound 
sugar to one pint juice ; boil again until it thickens ; skim and 
pour into glasses. — A. H. Mitchell. 

CURRANT PRESERVE. 
Five pounds stemmed currants, five pounds sugar, five large 
oranges peeled and cut into bits ; two and one-half pounds 
seedless raisins; mix; boil thirty minutes. Seal while hot. — 
Mrs. W. H. Poole. 

LEMON CHEESE CAKE. 
To one-quarter pound butter add one pound loaf sugar 
broken in small bits, six eggs (leaving out two whites), juice 
of three lemons with their rinds grated ; put in pan, simmer 
till sugar is dissolved and begins to thicken like honey. When 
cool put in jars. Will keep seven years. — Ada A. Brewster, 
Kingston, Mass. 

stationery, Pens, Pencils, Ink and Postage Stamps at Holmes'. 

QUINCE HONEY. 
One generous cup sugar, one scant cup water; boil briskly 
twenty minutes ; pare and grate one large quince ; add to syrup 
and boil five minutes more ; this makes two glasses. Delicious 
with griddle cakes. — Mary J. Erskine. 



You Can Cook Best with Holmes' Peerless Coal. 
Write Your New Recipes Here. 



You Can Cook Best with Holmes' Peerless Coal. 
Write Your New Recipes Here. 



202 




y» 



IF 



«!>£. 



t^ Ij IF drenching rains, gusty 
^J showers and dribbling squalls 

-li were airy myths; if the jovial 
sun and spright[x winds would fra- 
ternize with our coal piles by day 
and night; if a scarcity of coal in the 
busiest season of the year was an 
imaginary grievance and not a pitiless 
reality; if evolution was the tap-root 
of our coal mines, and coal developed 
into just the grades and sizes most 
in demand; if customers would art- 
lessly surrender their opinion of what 
they think they must have — their 
undoubted right — and accept what 
we can make the best profit on, then 
could 

"We eat the lotus of the Nile 
And drink the poppies of Cathay 

^ As it is, we try hard to sell the 

best coal in the market for the lowest 

price, and suit all tastes. We believe 

a pleased customer is the best ad- 





203 



Sandwiches. 

SARDINE CANAPES. 

Six sardines, remove skins, bones, heads and tails. Yolks 
of two hard boiled eggs. Rub sardines and egg yolks to a 
paste, adding gradually one tablespoonful Worcestershire 
sauce and one tablespoon lemon juice. Spread on crackers 
or rounds of bread for canapes. — Mrs. F. A. Hoyt. 

Holmes' Special Soft Shamokin Suits. Money Back If Not as Repre- 
sented, at 58 Main St. 

CHEESE CANAPES. 

Allow three eggs to remain in water at boiling point for 
forty-five minutes. When cold, remove yolks and cream with 
three Neufchatel cheeses, one tablespoon softened butter and 
three tablespoonfuls cream or rich milk; add paprika and salt 
to taste while creaming. Chop twelve olives and the whites 
of three eggs. Add to the mixture. Spread on crackers as 
canapes. This mixture is very nice used as filling for brown 
bread sandwiches. — Mrs. F. A. Hoyt. 

PRUNE CANAPES. 

Saute rounds of bread in butter ; add one cup of prune puree 
and one tablespoon lemon juice. Serve on bread and garnish 
with beaten cream. — Mrs. J. T. Bidlivant. 

Holmes' Special Soft Shamokin Suits. Money Back if Not as Repre- 
sented, at 58 Main St. 

PEANUT SANDWICHES. 

With a cake cutter, cut slices of bread round ; cover with 
unsweetened cream ; mash some peanuts fine and sprinkle 
thickly over the cream. — Mrs. Anna L. Mowry. 

204 



LETTUCE SANDWICHES. 
Take the white part of lettuce, wash and wipe perfectly dry 
and chill. Have ready three hard boiled eggs, remove the 
yolks, put them through sieve and rub to perfectly smooth 
paste with four tablespoonfuls very thick cream. Add one- 
half tablespoonful lemon juice and stir in about four table- 
spoonfuls whipped cream. Season with a little red pepper; 
add one teaspoonful salt; cover slices of bread with leaves of 
lettuce ; then put on a goodly quantity of dressing ; cover with 
another slice of bread. This may be served in squares or long 
narrow pieces. — Mary L. Buckley. 

Holmes' Special Soft Shamokin Suits. Money Back If Not as Repre- 
sented, at 58 Main St. 

RUSSIAN SANDWICHES. 

Spread slices of bread with Neufchatel cheese. Free olives 
from stones and chop quite fine. Make a boiled dressing as 
follows : Into a double boiler put one teaspoon sugar, two tea- 
spoons butter, one teaspoon salt, six teaspoons vinegar, one 
heaping teaspoon of mustard, yolks of two eggs ; stir this to- 
gether, add beaten whites of eggs and cook until it thickens; 
add as much of the chopped olives to this dressing as you de- 
sire and put this filling between the slices of bread and cheese. 
Each slice of bread is spread with the cheese. — Mrs. Geo. R. 
Washburn. 

EGG SANDWICHES. 

Butter slices of bread, spread with yolks of hard boiled eggs 
mixed with chutney, sprinkled with the chopped whites of hard 
boiled eggs, and cut into fancy shapes. — Martha Buckley. 

Holmes' Special Soft Sliamokin Suits. IVIoney Back if Not as Repre- 
sented, at 58 IVlain St. 

MUTTON CLUB SANDWICH. 
With a cake cutter, cut brown bread into rounds. Chop 
one-half pound cold boiled mutton quite fine; add two table- 
spoonfuls olive oil, one-half teaspoon salt, one saltspoonful 

205 



paprika. Peel four or five quite solid tomatoes ; cut them into 
slices and push out seeds. Put a slice of tomato on top of a 
round of bread ; fill the space from which you have taken the 
seeds with the mutton mixture ; put on top of the tomato a 
lettuce leaf and in the centre of that one teaspoonful mayon- 
naise dressing. Good for lunch on a warm day. — Mary West- 
berg. 

Brockton Souvenir Postcards. Over 200 Views at Holmes'. 

HOME MADE PEANUT BUTTER. 
Take three quarts of good roasted peanuts, which can be 
bought at the stands for twenty-five cents. Remove the out- 
side shell and skin, using only the white part and nothing else. 
First put them through the coarsest then through the finest 
chopper. It heats, and requires patience to get it through the 
second time. Press it firmly into tumblers immediately before 
it gets cold. It will be as smooth as any butter and tastes un- 
like that which you buy, also more expensive. Fine on butter 
thins or Uneeda biscuit. I use the "New Connecticut Food 
Chopper." — Mary Packard. 

SARDINE AND HERB BUTTER FOR SANDWICHES. 
Wash six or eight Norwegian sardines, split, remove the 
bones and mash fine. Cream two tablespoonfuls butter, add 
one teaspoon chopped parsley, one-half teaspoon minced tara- 
gon, one teaspoon lemon juice, a few grains of cayenne and 
the sardines. Rub together until thoroughly blended. — Mrs. 
Mary L. Wade. 

Brockton Souvenir Postcards. Over 200 View^s at Holmes'. 

LOBSTER MAYONNAISE SANDWICH. 

Into one-half cupful of finely minced lobster, stir two table- 
spoonfuls mayonnaise dressing; season to taste with cayenne 
and salt, and a little lemon juice if it seems to be needed. Se- 
lect bread a day old for the purpose, butter it light on the loaf 
and cut very thin. — S. Edna Baldzvin. 

206 



PEANUT SANDWICHES. 
Reduce peanuts to a powder and stir in mayonnaise mixed 
with cream cheese and spread between crackers or slices of 
thin buttered brown bread. — Mrs. D. C. Holmes. 

Brockton Souvenir Postcards. Over 200 Views at Holmes'. 

CELERY SALAD SANDWICHES. 
Put four eggs into warm water; bring to the boiling point, 
and keep there without boiling for fifteen minutes. Take the 
white portion from one head of celery, wash and chop it very 
fine. Remove the shells from the hard boiled eggs and either 
chop them very fine or put through a vegetable press, and 
mix with them the celery ; add one-half teaspoonful salt and 
a dash of pepper. Butter the bread before you cut it from the 
loaf. After you have a sufficient quantity cut, put over each 
slice a layer of the mixed egg and celery; put right in the 
centre of this one teaspoonful mayonnaise dressing. Put two 
slices together and press them lightly. Trim off the crusts, 
and cut the sandwiches into pieces about two inches wide and 
the length of the slices. — Mrs. F. A. Besse. 

CELERY SANDWICHES. 
Mix one cup of tender celery stalks, one-quarter cup each of 
English walnuts and olives chopped fine ; moisten with mayon- 
naise dressing and spread between slices of brown bread cut 
in rounds with a cooky cutter. — Mrs. A. Wesley Stetson. 

MACAROON SANDWICH. 
Press together two very fresh macaroons with a liberal layer 
of cream cheese between. A nice five-o'clock-tea sandwich. — 
Mrs. W. H. Senter. 

Brockcton Souvenir Postcards. Over 200 Views at Holmes'. 

BAKED BEAN SANDWICH. 
Press one-half cup cold baked beans through a sieve, add one 
tablespoon tomato catsup, one-half teaspoon made mustard, 
and a few drops of onion juice. Place between slices of brown 
bread or whole wheat bread. — Mrs. E. F. O'Neil. 

207 



ONION SANDWICH. 

One cup finely cut onion; cover with strong salt water for 
three hours ; drain and mix with a good mayonnaise dressing. 
Butter thin slices of bread and spread with a generous supply 
of the mixture between. Very delicious. — Mrs. C. E. Taylor. 

All North- Bound Cars Stop In Front of 58 Main St. 

GERMAN SANDWICHES. 

Cut thin slices of rye bread, butter before you take them 
from the loaf. Spread each slice with a thin layer of limburger 
cheese ; cut bologna sausage into the thinnest possible slices ; 
cover the cheese with the sliced sausage ; then cover with an- 
other slice of bread ; press the two together ; do not remove 
the crusts. Rye bread can be bought at the Swedish bakeries. 
— Mrs. Walter Bradford. 

DEVILLED SANDWICH. 

Chop one-quarter pound of cold boiled tongue very fine ; 
add to it two tablespoonfuls olive oil, a dash of red pepper, 
one teaspoonful Worcestershire sauce and one saltspoonful 
of paprika ; mix and add the hard boiled yolks of three eggs 
that have been pressed through a sieve. Put this between thin 
slices of bread and butter. — Mrs. M. E. Mowry. 

All North- Bound Cars Stop In Front of 58 Main St. 

CREAM OF CHICKEN SANDWICHES. 

Take sufficient white meat of chicken to make one-half cup ; 
chop and pound it; reduce it to a paste. Put one teaspoonful 
granulated gelatine in two tablespoonfuls cold water; then 
stand it over the fire until it has dissolved. Whip one-half pint 
cream to a stiff froth ; add the gelatine to the chicken ; add one 
teaspoonful grated horse-radish and one-half teaspoon salt. 
Stir this until it begins to thicken, then add carefully the cream 
and stand it away until very cold. When ready to make the 
sandwiches, butter the bread and cut the slices a little thicker 

208 



than the usual slices for sandwiches. Cover each slice with 
this cream mixture ; trim off the crusts or cut sandwiches into 
fancy shapes. Garnish the top with olives cut into rings. In 
the centre of each sandwich make just a little mound of capers ; 
each sandwich may be garnished in a different way. Little 
pieces of celery, with the white top attached, also make a pretty 
garnish. These sandwiches are not covered with a second slice 
of bread. — Mrs. Veronica Eldredge. 

All North- Bound Cars Stop In Front of 58 Main St. 

COLD BEEF SANDWICH. 

Take the remains of cold roasted beef and chop very fine; 
put it into a bowl. For each one-half pint of meat take one 
teaspoonful salt, one tablespoonful tomato catsup, one tea- 
spoonful Worcestershire sauce and one teaspoonful melted 
butter. Mix this well together and put between slices of bread 
thinly buttered. Whole wheat bread may be used. — Mrs. 
Stina Johnson. 

CHEESE SANDWICHES. 

Chop fine one-quarter pound soft American cheese, put into 
a saucepan ; add the yolk of one ^gg beaten with two table- 
spoonfuls cream; one saltspoon salt, a dash of red pepper and 
one-half teaspoon Worcestershire sauce. Stir the cheese over 
the fire until it is thoroughly melted ; take from fire and when 
cool spread it between the slices of bread. — Ada S. Lezms. 

All North- Bound Cars Stop in Front of 58 Main St. 

CHEESE AND NUT SANDWICH FILLING. 

Mix to a paste one-half cupful of pot cheese, one teaspoon- 
ful soft butter, two tablespoonfuls thick cream and a seasoning 
of salt and pepper. Add two heaping tablespoonfuls finely 
chopped English walnut meats. — Mrs. J. I. Merritt. 

209 



WORKMAN'S CHEESE SANDWICH. 
Cut slices of brown bread about half an inch thick. Do not 
remove the crusts. Take one-half pint cottage cheese, press 
it through a sieve ; add to it two tablespoonfuls of melted but- 
ter, one-half teaspoon salt and two tablespoonfuls thick cream. 
Beat until smooth and light. Spread each slice of bread 
thickly with the cheese mixture ; then put a very thin slice of 
white bread on top of the cheese and put the sandwich to- 
gether. Have the outside brown bread, with a layer of cheese 
on each, and between the layers of cheese a slice of white 
bread. — Mrs. C. C. Merritt. 

Holmes' Peanut Coal. Nothing Like It for Economy. 58 Main St. 

SPANISH PEPPERS AND CREAM CHEESE 
SANDWICH. 
One cheese, two Spanish peppers finely chopped; add 
enough of the liquid to moisten. Spread between thin layers 
of bread or crackers. — Miss Elizabeth Biddlccome. 

CELERY SANDWICHES. 
■ Mix together one cup finely chopped celery and two table- 
spoonfuls chopped apples. Moisten with mayonnaise and 
spread on thin slices of buttered white bread. — Mrs. E. F. 
O'Ncil. 

SANDWICH MIXTURE. 
A nice sandwich mixture calls for chopped preserved ginger 
and pecan nut meats, finely cut orange peel, ginger syrup and 
vinegar; spread between slices of buttered bread or thin 
crackers. — Rosa L. Minor. 

Holmes' Peanut Coal. Nothing Like It for Economy. 58 IVlain St. 

DRESSING FOR SANDWICHES. 
One-half pound melted butter, one tablespoonful of dry mus- 
tard mixed with one tablespoonful of sugar and the yolk of 
one tgg\ mix all together and when cold spread on the bread 
like butter, before adding the meat. Enough for thirty sand- 
wiches. — Mrs. E. Clinton Andrews. 



FRUIT CHEESE FOR SANDWICHES. 

One pound figs, one pound dates, one pound raisins, one-half 
pound walnut meats, one-half pound pecan meats, one-half 
pound almond meats one-fourth pound Brazilian nut meats. 
Grind fine and add a little salt. Pack in glass. This makes a 
large quantity. — Mrs. W. H. Poole. 

Holmes' Peanut Coal. Nothing Like It for Economy. 58 Main St. 

BROWN BREAD SANDWICHES. 

Take thin slices of brown bread and spread with the follow- 
ing mixture : Roquefort cheese, a piece as large as a good 
sized egg; to that add a teaspoon butter, beat until creamy; 
then add one teaspoon of Halford sauce and one tablespoon 
port wine. Beat the whole well. — Mrs. Alice M. Hozvard. 

BRIDGE SANDWICHES. 

Cut brown bread a quarter of an inch thick. Spread very 
thinly with butter and sprinkle with chopped nuts. Cut cream 
cheese in slices the same thickness as the bread and put be- 
tween it. The sandwiches can be cut in any form desired. — 
Mrs. F. E. Harrison. 

Holmes' Peanut Coal. Nothing Like It for Economy. 58 Main St. 

EGG SANDWICHES. 

Eight eggs boiled fifteen minutes ; when cool, shell and chop 
fine ; then add one-fourth pound melted butter, salad dressing 
enough to make the mixture soft and moist ; salt and pepper to 
taste. 

Salad Dressing: — Four eggs well beaten, one tablespoon 
mixed mustard, one tablespoon melted butter, eight table- 
spoons sharp vinegar, one teaspoon salt, pepper, one table- 
spoon sugar; cook until it thickens. Thin with cream when 
cool. — Mrs. F. W. Park. 



HAM SANDWICHES. 

One egg, one-fourth saltspoon cayenne pepper, one small 
teaspoon mustard, two teaspoons sugar, one tablespoon butter, 
four tablespoons vinegar, one teaspoon salt ; beat tgg 
thoroughly, add pepper, mustard and sugar; melt butter and 
add that with the vinegar. Stir thoroughly together, put in 
small double boiler and cook until it thickens ; cool it, and if 
too thick to run add a little milk until it is of the consistency 
of cream. Chop ham fine and mix with the dressing. — Mrs. 
R. B. Grover. 





What is a Sr*^ 
^ Syllogism ? 

A syllogism is a logical state- 
ment, divided into these parts; 
major premise, minor premise 
and conclusion. 

here: is one: 

Major Premise.— The best coal 
is the cheapest. 

Minor Premise. — Holmes' coals, 
being pure and clean, are "best." 
Conclusion. — Buying Holmes' 
coals is profitable and"cheapest." 
"A pleased customer is the best 
advertisement," and Holmes' 
customers are pleased. 

58 MAIN STREET 



^^S^^^^S^B^^^^^* 



You Can Cook Best with Holmes' Peerless Coal. 
Write Your New Recipes Here. 



213 




214 



Left-Overs. 

JAPANESE ROLL. 
Make a rich baking powder biscuit dough and roll out one- 
fourth inch in thickness. Chop cold cooked beef and spread 
on the dough ; put bits of butter, salt, pepper and a sprinkling 
of flour in the meat. Roll up and bake in a rather quick oven. 
— Mrs. Abby Savage. 

Good Luck With Your Cooking If You Use Hoimes' Coal. 

BEAN LOAF. 

One pint baked beans, one cup bread crumbs, pepper and 
salt, small piece of butter, one cup stewed tomatoes. Butter 
bread tin and line with crumbs, pour in mixture and bake one 
hour. 

Tomato Sauce : — Two tablespoonfuls butter, one tablespoon 
flour, one tablespoon sugar, one pint strained tomatoes; melt 
butter, add flour, then sugar and last tomato juice ; let it come 
to a boil. Pour over loaf. — Mrs. G. M. Hart. 

HAM NEWBURG. 
Slice bread one-fourth inch thick and cut a circular piece 
from each slice ; toast a nice brown on both sides. Mix finely 
minced ham with enough hot milk to moisten ; season with 
cayenne and mustard and spread on toast. Cover thickly with 
grated cheese and place in hot oven until the cheese is melted. 
Serve at once on a platter. — Mrs. L. R. R. 

Good Luck With Your Cooking If You Use Holmes' Coal. 

BAKED HAM AND POTATO MINCE. 
Mix one pint cold mashed potatoes with one-half pint new 
milk and one beaten tgg ; then one-half pint cold minced ham. 
Bake in a buttered baking dish until just beginning to brown; 
then sprinkle the top with a little grated cheese and return to 
the oven for five or ten minutes. — Mrs. Savage. 

215 



LEFT OVERS. 

Bacon and eggs that have been left from a previous meal 
may be chopped fine, adding a little cold potato and a little of 
the bacon gravy if any is left. Mix and m.ake in small balls, 
roll in raw eggs and cracker crumbs and fry in spider. Fry a 
light brown on both sides. Serve hot. Very appetizing. — 
M. E. E. 

Wirt Fountain Pens, Warranted Best on Earth or Money Back, at Holmes' 

POLATINA. 

One cup stewed tomatoes and the gravy left from roast 
beef. Let them boil and season with pepper and salt. Slice 
two onions, fry in butter until soft and yellow. Cut cold roast 
beef in very thin slices. Have a platter hot : lay beef on it, 
pour over the sauce and garnish with the onions. — E. A. F. 

REMNANT OF ROAST BEEF. 

Have thin slices of beef; lay in a deep dish and sprinkle 
with flour, pepper and salt. Then a layer of raw potatoes 
sprinkled with flour, pepper and salt. Cover with gravy or 
stock and small pieces of butter scattered on top. Bake in hot 
oven from one and one-half to two hours. Cover with plate 
the last hour in oven. — Mrs. P. J. Lynch. 

Wirt Fountain Pens, Warranted Best on Earth or Money Back, at Holmes' 

TONGUE TOAST. 

Cold boiled tongue, mince fine, mix with cream. To every 
one-half pint of the mixture allow the well beaten yolks of two 
eggs. Place over fire, simmer a minute or two. Have ready 
toasted bread buttered — on hot dish — pour mixture over, serve 
hot. 

Caledonian Cream : — Whites of two eggs, two spoons loaf 
sugar, two spoons raspberry jam, two spoons currant jelly ; 
beat together with silver spoon till spoon stands upright. Serve 
with tongue toast. — Ada A. Breivster, Kingston. 

2 i6 



LEFT OVERS. 

A nice way to use odd bits of meat of any kind. Cut small, 
put in a buttered dish with a layer of cracker crumbs, layer of 
meat, layer of tomato ; salt, pepper and bits of butter. Moisten 
with water or gravy. Bake until crumbs are brown. — E. A. F. 

Wirt Fountain Pens, Warranted Best on Earth or Money Back, at Holmes' 

ESCALLOPED TURKEY. 

Line a buttered baking dish with crumbs; put alternate 
layers of half-inch bits of cold turkey, stuffing and gravy; 
cover with crumbs and bake fifteen minutes or use white sauce 
and crumbs in place of gravy and stuffing. Chicken with 
cooked rice ; veal with spaghetti ; mutton with oysters ; any of 
above combinations may be prepared in like manner. — Mrs. 
E. W. McAllister. 

ESCALLOPED HAM. 

Two cups cracker crumbs, one-half cup ham, chopped fine; 
three cups milk, butter, pepper, a very little salt. Butter a bak- 
ing dish, put in layer of crumbs, then add bits of butter, salt, 
plenty of pepper; then a layer of the ham and continue until 
dish is full, having last layer of crumbs. Pour over all the 
milk and let stand an hour or longer to moisten. The success 
of this depends on its being moist, and very highly seasoned 
with butter and pepper. Have ham about two parts lean to 
one of fat. Bake about an hour. — Mrs. F. A. Sweetland. 

Wirt Fountain Pens, Warranted Best on Eartli or IVIoney Bacl<, at Hoimes' 

BEEF SMOTHERED IN TOMATO. 

Cut an onion fine and fry slowly in one tablespoonful butter. 
Add one pint strained tomato, one teaspoon salt, one saltspoon 
pepper, one tablespoon vinegar and one pound of beef (either 
cooked or uncooked) cut in small pieces. Simmer very slowly 
until beef is tender. — E. A. F. 

217 



LEFT OVERS OF VEAL. 

Mince fine small bits of cold veal ; season with salt, a bit of 
butter and pepper ; mix cold mashed potatoes with flour enough 
to roll; roll half an inch thick and cut with a cooky cutter; 
put a spoonful of veal on each round and brown in hot oven. 
— Mrs. G. IV. Fearing. 

All the New Novels, 2 Cents a Day, at Holmes' Library, at 58 Main St. 

' MEAT SOUFFLE. 

Melt two tablespoonfuls butter in a saucepan ; add two table- 
spoonfuls flour, one-half teaspoon salt, two dashes of white 
pepper and gradually one pint milk, stirring steadily; when 
boiling after the milk has been added, stir in one-half cupful 
stale bread crumbs, one tablespoonful chopped parsley and one- 
half teaspoon onion juice; remove from the fire and stir in one 
pint cold meat chopped fine and the yolks of three eggs well 
beaten. Then fold in the whites of three eggs beaten dry ; 
pour the mixture into a buttered pudding dish and bake in a 
moderate oven, in a dish of hot water, about twenty-five min- 
utes. Serve immediately with tomato sauce. — Florence Ken- 
nedy. 

All the New Novels, 2 Cents a Day, at Holmes' Library, at 58 Main St. 

MEAT SOUFFLE. 

Make one cup of cream sauce and season with chopped pars- 
ley and onion juice. Stir one cup of chopped meat (chicken, 
veal or lamb) into the sauce. When hot, add the beaten yolks 
of two eggs ; cook one minute and set away to cool. When 
cool stir in the whites beaten stiff. Bake in a buttered dish 
about twenty minutes. If for lunch, serve with mushroom 
sauce. 

Mushroom Sauce: — To one cup brown sauce add one- 
fourth can mushrooms, drained, rinsed and cut in small slices. 
— Mrs. Charles Bragdon. 

2l8 



HOT SPICED BEEF. 
Cut dried beef into small pieces (any shape), prepare spiced 
vinegar as for fruit. Steam the beef in the vinegar about one 
hour. Serve hot on wafers. This is fine. — Mrs. G. W. Fear- 
ing. 



If You 
Want Me 

to, I can show you or any 
other lady, a positive and 
successful way to 

Increase Your 
Spending Money. 

"A penny saved is a 
penny earned," and if I 
can sell you a dollar's 
worth of coal that will go 
farther than any dollar's 
worth you ever had, you 
should give me a chance. 
Our Special Soft Shamo- 
kin COAL is above all 
things an economical, sat- 
isfactory coal for the cook 



stove. 



Holmes' 



58 Main St. Enterprise BIdg. 




HOLMES' 




You Can Cook Best with Holmes' Peerless Coal. 
Write Your New Recipes Here. 



Do You 
Subscribes^^?^> 

for any Papers or Magazines? 

If you do, we would like to have a 
chance to do business with you. We 
think we can save you money. 

We mean in every instance to have 
our prices the lowest you can get any- 
where, whether for single publications 
or combinations. 

Give us a chance to quote prices, 
and so keep your trade at home with 
people you know. 

Our News Stand was started in 
1 878, and there is nothing published 
that we will not willingly supply. 

This Is Holmes* Corp. 

ENTERPRISE BUILDING 
58 MAIN STREET 




A 










^'Sip 





Beverages. 

COFFEE. 

Break one egg into a cup and beat into it its own bulk of cold 
water, dripping slowly from faucet. Beat rapidly and it will 
be smooth and creamy. Use coffee of medium fineness, not 
pulverized, allowing one rounding tablespoonful for each per- 
son. Moisten thoroughly with egg mixture and put in coffee 
pot. Pour freshly boiled water on coffee and set pot on stove 
where it will steep and come to a boil very gradually, 
letting it boil one or two minutes. Remove from stove and 
settle with a slight shake of salt bottle and a dash of cold 
water. Place where it will keep hot until wanted. — W. R. 
Worthing. 

We Please Particular People. This Is Holmes', 58 Main St. 

RASPBERRY SHRUB. 

Pick over three quarts of berries ; put half in jar, add one 
pint cider vinegar, cover and let stand twenty-four hours. 
Strain through double thickness of cheesecloth ; pour liquor 
thus obtained over remaining berries, cover and let stand the 
same as before. Again strain through a double cheesecloth. 
To each cup of juice add one-half pound sugar. Heat grad- 
ually until sugar is dissolved, then boil twenty minutes; bottle 
and cork. Dilute with iced water for serving. — Mrs. Kate L. 
Weaver. 

We Please Particular People. This Is Holmes', 58 Main St. 

WILD CHERRY JUICE. 

Cook wild cherries in water to cover until soft; strain 
through cheesecloth ; sweeten to taste ; heat to boiling point 
and bottle. Good in sickness. — Mrs. H. M. Bartlett. 



GRAPE JUICE. 

Take nice grapes (Concord preferred), stem them and put 
in an earthen jar or agate pot, with enough water to cover 
them. Heat slowly until the grapes are thoroughly cooked; 
then drain through a jelly bag for several hours; do not 
squeeze. To every gallon of juice add one pound granulated 
sugar. Then heat until hot, but do not boil. Can or bottle 
while hot and seal. — Mrs. J. P. Stedman. 

We Please Particular People. This Is Holmes', 58 Main St. 

EXCELLENT LEMONADE. 

Two quarts water, three cups sugar (boiled twenty min- 
utes) ; when cold add one-half can grated pineapple, two 
bananas, three oranges, eight lemons; let stand five or six 
hours; then strain and serve with chopped ice. — Mrs. W. E. 
Bryant. 




TtW/lTw'J/: 
Ti\'J/lTtvM 




AVE Been in the COAL wm^ 
Business 36 Years — 



Should know something about it. Believe we do. Constant 
study, a watchful eye for any improvements in coal or methods of 
handling it, a good name, made years ago, and a determination to 
keep it.-THlS IS HOLMES', Enterprise Bldg., 58 Main St. 

We hire the best men to do our work, and pay the highest 
prices — we buy the best coal in the market at bottom prices. 
Good labor, well paid, produces better and cleaner coal than can 
be obtained in any other way. We believe that 
"a plecised customer is the best advertisement." Any 
and all mistakes or complciints are promptly attended 
to. If you don't know about our coals, perhaps it 
would pay you to try a little of our Special Soft 
Shamokin Coal for the cook stove. 



iW'yl.lW'^li 







223 



You Can Cook Best with Holmes' Peerless Coal. 
Write Your New Recipes Here. 



224 



J|J;|*'l5JiJJj||J;*|**jJ|J\JJ*|^ 



iJJJ 



*** 









YV/E thought we were doing it when 
'' we advertised our Special Soft 
Shamokin Coal, but when we com- 
menced to hear from the ladies who were 
using that excellent coal, we found we had 
not half told it. We never cleiimed it to be 
superior to Franklin, although we know it 
has some advantages. Our lady customers 
seem to be unanimous in thinking it is 
pretty nearly perfect for the cook stove, 
and it is almost slateless too. If you have 
never used our coal, ask some of these 
ladies about it, for "a pleased customer is 
the best advertisement" for 

This Is Holmes' 

5S Main St. Enterprise BIdg. 




i Tell the Truth || 




115 
.51.5 
1.55 






?^^*J??*^*^*?^?*?***J*55;**** 



225 



Treatment for £mergencies. 

BURNS. 

Treatment: If your own clothes catch fire lie down on the 
floor and roll, keeping your mouth shut. If you see another 
person in danger, throw her down (it is usually a woman), 
wrapping her in shawl, rug, or any woolen thing at hand, to 
stifle the flames, keeping the fire from the face. The great 
danger is that of inhaling the flames. 

In the treatment of burns or scalds the first object is to 
exclude the air. A simple method of doing this is to apply 
a wet cloth, and sprinkle freely with common baking soda. 
If burns are severe, send for a doctor at once. Burns by 
strong acids are treated the same, further action of the acid 
being prevented by bathing with alkaline solution, as of soda, 
ammonia, or common earth. 

The Best in Brockton View Postcards at Holmes', 58 Main St. 

CONVULSIONS. 
Place patient on back with head slightly raised. Loosen 
any tight clothing and allow free supply of air. See that he 
does not hurt himself. Place something (a piece of wood, 
lead pencil or handkerchief) between teeth, keeping him from 
biting his tongue. If a child, place in a warm bath with cold 
applications to head. 

ERUPTION FROM POISON IVY, OAK, ETC 
Sooth by applications of Listerine or solution of common 
baking soda. 

The Best in Brocl<ton View Postcards at Holmes', 58 IVIain St. 

FAINTING. 
Fainting is caused by insufficient supply of blood to the 
brain. Treatment : Place patient flat on back, head lower than 
feet. Loosen clothing around throat and upper part of body, 
allowing free access of air. Sprinkle water on face or apply 
smelling salts to stimulate breathing. 

226 



FOREIGN BODY IN WINDPIPE. 
This will usually be dislodged by the coughing which its 
presence excites. A blow on the back between the shoulders, 
will be of use if a person is choking. A child may be held up 
by the feet, head down, while a succession of blows are ad- 
ministered between the shoulders. This will seldom fail to dis- 
lodge the foreign body unless it has been sucked below the air 
passages. 

The Best in Brockton View Postcards at Holmes', 58 Main St. 

HEMORRHAGE FROM NOSE. 
If bleeding is severe, a doctor should be sent for at once. 
In the meantime, open windows and undo tight clothing from 
neck. Do not allow patient to hang head over basin, but place 
patient on chair or couch in position of repose. Raise arms, 
stretching to full extent above and rather behind head. Apply 
cold wet sponge or towel, or lump of ice, to back of neck, and 
also another sponge, towel or piece of ice over forehead at root 
of nose. If this does not stop bleeding and the doctor has not 
arrived, take a piece of handkerchief or soft cloth and, wrap- 
ping it up tightly, push it into the bleeding nostril. 

HEMORRHAGE OR RUPTURE OF VARICOSE 
VEINS. 
Pressure should be made below the bleeding point; cold or 
heat applied and limb elevated. 

Tfie Best In Broci<ton View Postcards at Holmes', 58 i\^ain St. 

POISONS. 
Treatment: On all occasions send for a doctor at once. An 
emetic always on hand is a teaspoonful of salt or mustard in 
a cup of warm water, repeated every fifteen minutes until vom- 
iting occurs. Do not give an emetic when there are stains on 
the lips. These are caused by acids whose action is so rapid 
that the tissues would be injured long before an emetic could 
be given. Give instead, castor or salad oil, 

227 



In carbolic acid poisoning give one or two tablespoonfuls 
of epsom salts or plenty of milk or milk and lime water. 
Keep quiet. 

In corrosive poisoning give white of egg or plenty of milk, 
followed by an emetic. 

SPRAINS. 

Soak injured part in water as hot as can be borne for one- 
half hour ; then apply moist bandage, keeping the part elevated 
and at rest. 

We Please Particular People. This Is Holmes', 58 Main St. 

FOR SIMPLE CUTS OR BRUISES. 

Cleanse parts with soap and water, and irrigate with clean, 
warm water, or it may be soaked in creolin solution made by 
adding one teaspoon of creolin to one quart of water. Wrap 
in clean linen or cotton cloth. If inflammation follows go to 
the doctor at once. 

— Compiled at the Brockton Hospital. — 




228 



You Can Cook Best with Holmes' Peerless Coal. 
Write Your New Recipes Here. 



229 









Why Holmes Sells 




For CASH 






We propose to show you in a few 
words why we can sell you your coal for 
cash and sell you for less money than any- 




#*#*#%- 


#*#%%# 
#*#### 


one can who gives you credit, even amount- 
mg to one week. In the first place — any 
sale that has to go on the book requires a 




*##%*% 
##*### 


new leaf or a new card in our loose leeif 
or card ledger. This leaf or card costs 
something over a cent; clerical help costs 




*%*### 
♦##**# 


in the vicinity of two cents, while 30 days' 
interest on a ton of coal, costing, we will 
say, $8.00, would be 4 cents A statement 




#%###* 
##***%' 
##**#% 
**#*%% 


sent the first of the month, under a two-cent 
stamp, would cost 3 cents more, a total of 
ten cents. On the assumption that one 
person in a hundred should fail to pay his 
bill; that would be a loss of $8.00, or 
substantially 8 cents to be added to the 




** 

** 


#%**#^ 
##***% 


cost of the coal sold to every credit 
customer, thus making an expense of 18 
cents a ton, without taking into considera- 


** 
** 


####** 
#*###% 


tion the additional interest on the account 
run over 30 days, or the cost of the col- 
lector to look after the account. 


** 
** 


*%##** 
#*#*** 


This being true, it is very easy to see 
why anyone selling coal on credit would 
be obliged to charge you at least 25 cents 


** 

** 


#*#%*# 
##**#* 


a ton more for coal than the cash price, in 
order to receive coal of somewhere near 
equal value, and in order for the dealer to 


** 
** 


****** 


receive a living profit. 

Moral of this is, buy your coal for 
CASH, and buy it from 


** 
** 


****** 
****** 


HOLMES 


** 


****** 
****** 




** 
** 


************** 


****** 


************** 


** 


■ 



230 



Suggestions for the Sick and 
Convalescent. 

LIQUID DIET. 

Liquid diet consists entirely of liquids, viz: — milk, malted 
milk, meat broths, beef tea, beef juice, oyster broth, clam 
water, albumen water, albuminized milk, orange albumen, bar- 
ley water, rice water, eggnog, tea and coffee. Of these, milk 
is the most valuable. 

The taste of milk may be altered by heating, or by the addi- 
tion of salt, pepper, ginger ale, coffee, chocolate or seltzer. 

For making cold beverages the water should be freshly 
drawn ; for hot, freshly boiled. 

Fruit beverages should be served ice cold. Syrup is a bet- 
ter sweetener than sugar. It is made of sugar one cup, water 
one cup. Mix and stir until dissolved. Boil twelve minutes. 
Bottle and cool. 

The change from liquids to light diet should be made grad- 
ually. Wine or fruit jellies are palatable and nutritious. After 
jellies, a bit of water or milk toast, then an egg, a little soup 
or pudding until the person is able to take anything in the list. 

All the New Novels, 2 Cents a Day, at Holmes' Library, at 58 Main St 

LIGHT DIET. 

Light diet consists of all the liquid diets, and in addition 
fruits, as grapes, oranges or grape fruit; porridge of farina, 
wheat germ or white com meal ; soft-boiled or poached eggs ; 
dry, water, milk or cream toast; soups as celery, mock bisque 
and chicken; light puddings, custards, jellies, ices and creams. 
For dinner a meat ball or a small bit of beef steak or chop and 
baked potato. 

All the New Novels, 2 Cents a Day, at Holmes' Library, at 58 Main St. 

231 



CONVALESCENT DIET. 

Convalescent diet includes the liquid and light diet, and in 
addition all easily digested and nutritious food. Game, veni- 
son, beef, mutton and chicken ; eggs in all ways, as soft cooked, 
scrambled, etc. ; well baked or creamed potatoes, celery, gra- 
ham bread, gems, and all well made bread, and good cake. 

Some foods to avoid are: Pastry, badly made cake, pork, 
veal, any highly seasoned meat dishes made with gravy ; all 
kinds of fried foods and heavy puddings. 

Liquid Diet. 

BEEF JUICE 

Place half a pound of lean, juicy beef on a broiler over a 
clear, hot fire and heat it through. Press out the juice with 
a lemon sqeezer into a hot cup, add salt, and serve with toast 
or crackers. 

In making beef tea or beef juice the best cuts are the top 
of the round, the back and middle of the rump, as they contain 
the most and best flavored juice. 

This Is Holmes' Main Office, 58 Main St. 

BEEF TEA. 
Take a pound of round steak, remove all the fat and cut 
into small pieces. Put into a jar and fill with cold water. 
Cover closely and let it stand in a warm place for an hour. 
Place jar in a pan of cold water and simmer gently two hours. 
Strain, season with salt and pepper. 

This is Holmes' IVlaIn Office, 58 (Vlain St. 

CLAM BROTH. 
Wash and scrub one dozen clams. Cook in a covered ket- 
tle with one tablespoonful of water until shells open. Remove 
clams from shells also sacks and heads from clams. Chop 
fine. Add clam juice and one-half pint of water. Let simmer 
thirty minutes. Strain through two thicknesses of cheese 
cloth. Reheat and add walnut of butter (this may be omit- 
ted). One-half cup of hot milk. Strain and serve. 

232 



ALBUMENIZED MILK. 

White of one egg, one cup milk. Place the egg and milk in 
a covered glass jar and shake until the ingredients are thor- 
oughly blended. Sweeten and flavor to taste. Serve imme- 
diately. The juice of an orange or lemon, with cracked ice, 
may be used instead of milk. 

This Is Holmes' Main Office, 58 Main St. 

EGGNOG. 

One egg, two-thirds cup milk, one tablespoonful sugar, few 
grains of salt, a few drops of vanilla, or a slight grating of 
nutmeg. Separate egg ; beat yolk well. Add salt ; add flavor- 
ing and half of sugar. Beat until light. Beat white until stiff ; 
then add other half of sugar. Beat one-half of beaten white 
into yolk. Mix with milk. Put in a glass. Put remaining 
half of white on the top and serve. (Add as flavoring, coffee 
or fruit juices.) 

BARLEY WATER. 

Wash thoroughly two tablespoons of pearl barley in cold 
w^ater. Add two quarts boiling water, boil until reduced to 
one quart, stirring frequently. Strain, add juice of lemon 
and sweeten if desired. 

Barley contains mucilage, and is soothing and refreshing 
in fevers and gastric inflammations. 

Rice water made in the same manner is easily digested and 
almost wholly assimilated. 

This Is Holmes' Main Office, 58 Main St. 

FLOUR BALL. 

(For use in Diarrhoea and Dysentery.) 
Boil a quantity of flour in a bag twelve hours ; take from 
water and remove cloth ; dry in a warm oven. Grate the flour 
and use in making gruel. 

233 



Light Diet. 

TOMATO JELLY. 

Gelatin, one teaspoon ; cold water, one tablespoon ; toma- 
toes, three-fourths cup scant ; small piece onion ; small piece 
bay leaf; one clove; one-eighth teaspoon salt. 

Cook tomatoes with seasoning ten minutes. Soak the gel- 
atin in the cold water. Strain the tomatoes. Add eight table- 
spoons of the liquid to the gelatin. Stir until dissolved. Pour 
into a mould. When set, turn out on a lettuce leaf. Serve 
with any salad dressing. 

Established In 1873 and Doing More Business Every Year. Do You 
Know Why? Try, and C. 

MINT ICE. 
Bruise one or two sprigs of fresh mint and steep fifteen 
minutes in one-half cup of lemon juice. Strain. Boil together 
one cup water and one cup of sugar ten minutes, and add to 
lemon juice with three cups cold water. Freeze to a mush. 

COOKED EGG FOR AN INVALID 
Take one pint of boiling water, drop egg in water and set 

on back of stove (where water will not even simmer) from 

seven to ten minutes. 

An egg cooked in this way is easily digested, as the white 

is not cooked too much and the yolk is also cooked. 

Established In 1873 and Doing More Business Every Year. Do You 
Know Why? Try, and C. 

CREAM OF TOMATO SOUP (Individual) 
Three-eighths cup strained tomatoes (one-eighth can) ;soda; 
one-half tablespoon butter ; one tablespoon flour ; salt and pep- 
per (to taste) ; one-half cup milk (heated). 

When the strained tomato is hot add to it a very small 
amount of soda, and when the effervesence ceases, the tomato 
may be added to the white sauce, which has been prepared in 
the usual manner. Season and serve immediately with crou- 
tons or crisped crackers. 

234 



BROTH WITH EGG. 
Beat egg in bowl. Pour on gradually three-fourths cup of 
hot broth. Serve at once, or after adding egg cook over hot 
water until it thickens. Serve immediately or it will curdle. 

MILK SHERBET. 
One cup milk; one-half cup sugar; juice of one lemon. 
Freeze the milk and sugar ; add strained lemon juice and freeze 
again. 

Established In 1873 and Doing More Business Every Year. Do You 
Know Why? Try, and C. 

RAW BEEF SANDWICHES. 
Prepare bread as for bread and butter sandwiches. Spread 
one-half the pieces with scraped beef generously seasoned with 
salt and a small amount of pepper. Serve on a doily. 
— Compiled at the Brockton Hospital for the Ladies' Aid 
Association. 

Dainties for Diabetics. 

CHEESE CUSTARD. 

One egg; two tablespoons cold water; four tablespoons 
cream ; one tablespoon butter ; one tablespoon grated cheese ; 
salt and pepper to taste. 

Beat egg slightly; add other ingredients in order named. 
Pour into mould and bake ; set in pan of hot water in moder- 
ate oven until firm. 

Established In 1873 and Doing More Business Every Year. Do You 
Know Why? Try, and C. 

GLUTEN WAFERS 

Cream, four tablespoons; gluten flour, one-half cup; salt, 
one-half teaspoon. 

Make stiff dough of flour, cream and salt. Knead well. 
Roll until as thin as paper. Cut into desired shape and bake 
in moderate oven six minutes. If desired two tablespoons of 
chopped nuts may be added. 



NUT AND LETTUCE SALAD. 
Mix Neufdiatel cheese with small quantity of cream. Add 
salt and pepper to taste. Roll in balls the size of a robin's 
egg. Press one-half a walnut on opposite sides of ball. Serve 
on lettuce leaves. 

— Compiled at the Brockton Hospital for the Ladies' Aid 
Association. 




"Dear Mary, do tell me how 
you manage to keep such a 
nice fire in your cook stove all 
the time on a single hod of 
coal a day ? " 

"Why, Alice, I simply use 
Holmes' Special Soft Shamo- 
kin Coal, and, as it is all coal, 
there is but a small quantity of 
ashes to throw away, and no 
dirt and stone, or clinkers. 
Why don't you try it? They 
sell it at 

58 MAIN ST. 







236 



You Can Cook Best with Holmes' Peerless Coal. 
Write Your New Recipes Here. 



237 



Table of Weights and 


Measures. 

1 tablespoonful 


4 teaspoonfuls of liquid, . 


3 teaspoonfuls of dry material, 


1 tablespoonful 


4 tablespoonfuls of liquid, . 1 


wine-glass, or J cup 


16 tablespoonfuls of liquid. 


1 cup 


12 tablespoonfuls of dry material. 


1 cup 


4 cups of liquid. 


. 1 quart 


4 cups of flour, .... 


1 pound, or 1 quart 


1 cup of butter. 


. J pound 


2 cups of granulated dry sugar. 


. 1 pound 


2J cups of pulverized dry sugar. 


. 1 pound 


1 round tablespoonful of butter. 


. 1 ounce 


1 heaping tablespoonfuls of butter, 


2 oz., or J cup 


Butter the size of an egg, 


. 2 ounces 


1 heaping tablespoonful of dry sugar, . . 1 ounce 


2 round tablespoonfuls of flour. 


. 1 ounce 


1 pint of granulated dry sugar, 


. 1 pound 



238 




H 



OLMES' Recipe for 
Good Business. 



After more than a third of a century in the 
retail coal business in Brockton, we feel qualified 
to offer a good recipe for conducting a more or 
less successful business ; but in trying this recipe 
you must use judgment as you would in the others 
in this book. 

Take a liberal quantity of honesty, industry, 
courage, chstfacter, experience, and determination; 
mix them thoroughly, and add such money as 
you happen to have. It is not advisable to de- 
pend too much upon the money, but the others 
are essential. Get a good location, and let your 
prospective customers know all about it. Be 
honest in all your dealings — don't try to be sharp 
— it may take longer to arrive, but it is sure to pay 
eventually. Make your word as good as your 
bond. if you make a mistake, acknowledge it 
like a man, and people will have confidence in 
you when you correct it. Put enough profit in 
your sales to give you an honest living ; treat all 
people alike, and as you would like to be treated 
were the conditions reversed. Don't put in any 
lying, under any circumstances — it won't pay in 
the end. Treat those who work for you like 
human beings, and pay them such wages as you 
would need if conditions were reversed ; then 
they will work for your interest, and make friends 
for you. If you don't have success in following 
this recipe, it is not the fault of 
Yours truly, 





This is one of the few recipes that is practi- 
cally duplicated from the 1906 edition, but we 
believe it cannot be improved upon. 



239 



DEC 8 



DEC, b ,1309