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Full text of "Bryn Mawr Alumnae Bulletin, 1929"

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vc^l 



BRYN MAWR 
ALUMNAE 
BULLETIN 




•45^ 



THE JUNIOR YEAR IN FRANCE 



February, 1929 



Vol. IX 



No. I 



Entered as second-class matter, January 1, 1921, at the Post Office, Phila., Pa., under Act of March 3, 1879 

COPYRIGHT. 1929 

ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 



OFFICERS OF THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

EXECUTIVE BOARD 

President Louise Fleischmann Maclay, 1906 

Vice-President Natalie McFaden Blanton, 1917 

Recording Secretary Gerthude Hearne Myers, 1919 

Corresponding Secretary May Eqan Stokes, 191 1 

Treasurer Margaret E. Brusstar, 1903 

Chairman of the Finance Committee Dorothy Straus, 1908 

Chairman of the Publicity Committee Caroline Morrow Chad wick-Collins, 1906 

ALUMNAE SECRETARY AND BUSINESS MANAGER OF THE BULLETIN 

Alice M. Hawkins, 1907 

EDITOR OF THE BULLETIN 

Marjorie L. Thompson, 1912 

DISTRICT COUNCILLORS 

District I Helen Evans Lewis, 1913 

District II Julia Langdon Loomis 1895 

District III Mary Tyler Zabriskie, 1919 

District IV Katharine Holliday Daniels, 1918 

District V Frances Porter Adler, 1911 

District VI Erma Kingsbacher 3tix, 1906 

District VII .Helen Brayton Barendt* 1903 

ALUMNAE DIRECTORS 

Ruth Furnebs Porter, 1896 Mary Peirce, 1912 

Frances Fincke Hand. 1897 Margaret Reeve Cary, 1907 

Elizabeth Lewis Otey, 1901 

CHAIRMAN OF THE ALUMNAE FUND 

Dorothy Straus, 1908 

CHAIRMAN OF THE ACADEMIC COMMITTEE 

Pauline Goldmark, 1896 

CHAIRMAN OF THE SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOAN FUND COMMITTEE 

Margaret Reeve Cary, 1907 

CHAIRMAN OF THE COMMITTEE ON HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Dr. Marjorie F. Murray, 1913 

CHAIRMAN OF THE NOMINATING COMMITTEE 

Eleanor Little Aldrich, ,905 



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Bryn Mawr Alumnae 
Bulletin 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF 
THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNA ASSOCIATION 

Marjorie L. Thompson, '12, Editor 
Alice M. Hawkins, '07, Business Manager 

EDITORIAL BOARD 

Edith Pettit Borie, '95 Emily Fox Cheston, '08 

Eleanor Fleisher Riesman, '03 May Egan Stokes, '11 

Caroline Morrow Chadwick-Collins, 05 Ellenor Morris, '27 

Louise Fleischmann Maclay, '06, ex-officio 

Subscription Price j $1.50 a Year Single Copies, 25 Cents 

Checks should be drawn to the order of Bryn Mawr Alumnae Bulletin 
Published monthly, except August, September and October, at 1006 Arch St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Vol. IX February, 1929 No. 1 



Certain cliches illustrate admirably the gradual change that turns a chance 
statement into folklore. "Bryn Mawr Alumnae never write" is one that instantly 
comes to mind. Probably in the days when the Alumnae group was very small, its 
mass of production was also small in comparison with that which could be attributed 
to other colleges. Another popular myth is that the admirable and intensive drill 
in English made us all so finely critical that we were unable ever to look on any 
of our own works and call them good. And who knows; perhaps they weren't. 
Yet the fact remains that Bryn Mawr Alumnae do write as much or perhaps more 
than any other comparatively small group, on a curiously wide range of subjects, and 
their styles vary as definitely as their temperaments. You can with no more truth 
say that all Alumnae have a precious style than you can say that all the people of 
the North are self-contained and that all the people of the South are passionate. And 
yet as a group we continue to deal in these easy empty generalizations. And are we 
very much to blame? All of the Alumnae statistics are presumably on the Question- 
naires that are returned to the Register, but that fact does not fill the Alumnae Book 
Shelf in Miss Reed's office, it does not give the Bulletin current information, or 
copies of the books to put in the hands of potential reviewers. To all of those 
Alumnae who generously send copies of their publications, the Bulletin and the 
Library give their most grateful thanks. To all other Alumnae, until such time as 
an Alumnae Book fund shall be endowed by some fairy god-mother, the Bulletin 
and the Library together make an earnest plea: send your publications as they appear 
and point out to your publishers that they can not afford to miss a public as appre- 
ciative and interested as this group of two thousand or more. Whatever we may 
think of the truth of other generalizations, there is one that stands four square: every 
Alumna is interested in what every other Alumna is doing. 



THE JUNIOR YEAR IN FRANCE 

Five members of the Class of 1930 sailed early in July, 1928, to spend a 
Junior Year of twelve months in France. Upon their return they will be subject 
to examination on the work carried on abroad and the results of these examinations 
will be applied to their regular records for the A.B. degree at Bryn Mawr. In so 
far as the college is concerned, these students are doing merely what has been done 
at various times in the past by other students who chose to absent themselves for a 
part of their undergraduate careers and present for examination, work done elsewhere. 
These Juniors are, however, the first to carry on part of their work for the A.B. 
degree in France. 

Owing to the great differences between the French and American university 
systems, it had never been thought wise to advise an undergraduate student to embark 
on study in France in the hope of finding an organized course that could be applied 
to the requirements of our A.B. degree. A young student, however able, would have 
been lost in Paris or at one of the provincial universities without other guidance than 
her own lecture notes and the card catalogue of a great library. 

Since 1923, however, the French Department has been following with growing 
interest the experiment carried on by the University of Delaware, first with a group 
of its own students and then with an intercollegiate group, to supply American under- 
graduates in France with the supplementary training that they need in order to profit 
by what the French Universities have to offer them. 

The delicacy of the task undertaken by the Delaware Foreign Study Plan can 
scarcely be overestimated. The first objective was to bring the students as fully 
as possible under the normal French educational system, and avoid as completely as 
possible any Americanization of their work in France. It was also highly important 
to make these units of American undergraduates welcome guests at the French 
Universities. The method finally worked out under the very wise direction of 
Professor Raymond W. Kirkbride, provides for a preliminary period, July to October, 
spent in Nancy, where the excellent facilities of the summer courses of the Uni- 
versity are applied to the needs of the American undergraduate group. Here the 
students attend formal lectures by university professors, and work in small sections' 
and individually with tutors especially trained to teach foreigners. In November, 
after a two weeks' holiday in the Alps, the group is transferred to Paris. It is, 
by this time, broken in to French University ways and much better equipped lin* 
guistically than at the beginning of the three months of intensive training at Nancy. 
In Paris, the combination of formal lectures and tutorial instruction is continued, the 
tutors in Paris being professeurs agreges de I'universite, belonging, that is, to the 
grade from which American colleges are most glad to recruit their French Depart- 
ments. 

The successful development of this plan during the years between 1923 and 
1927, together with the admirable material arrangements for the accommodation and 
supervision of students, convinced the French Department and the authorities of 
the college that here was an opportunity that should no longer be withheld from 
Bryn Mawr students majoring in French. Our five Juniors were therefore enrolled 
in the Delaware group, which is now officially sponsored by the Institute of Inter- 
national Education. 

(2) 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 3 

This year's group consists of sixty-seven members, nineteen men and forty-eight 
women, drawn from thirty colleges. They are picked from the upper third of their 
classes and must be recommended by their Deans as possessing qualities that will 
make them creditable representatives of their country abroad and by their French 
Departments as having a natural aptitude for the French language and an adequate 
preparation for the work to be done in France. It has been gratifying to hear that 
in the preliminary test, given upon arrival in Nancy, to divide the group roughly into 
an upper and a lower division, the second and fourth places were won by two Bryn 
Mawr students and all five of our students were placed in the upper division. 

Both in Nancy and in Paris the students live with French families, never more 
than two together, and one of the most difficult and successful accomplishments 
of the Delaware Committee has been to enlist the right sort of French co-operation 
in opening French homes to these students. The general supervision of the students 
is entrusted to a Director and a Dean of Women, who is, this year, a Bryn Mawr 
Alumna, Louise B. Dillingham, 1916, a former student of the Sorbonne and a Doctor 
of Philosophy of Bryn Mawr. Miss Dillingham was granted leave of absence from 
her post in the Wellesley French Department to accept this position in Paris. 

With the advice of the Director, the students choose in Paris the courses for 
which their training and tastes adapt them. The resources of the Faculty of Letters 
of the University and the Ecole Libre des Sciences Politiques as well as the Cours de 
civilisation francaise at the Sorbonne are at their disposal. The Delaware Plan ar- 
ranges regular tutorial instruction in connection with courses in French Literature, 
History of Art, History and Economics. Examinations, written and oral, form part 
of the Cours de civilisation, as administered by the French, and a number of pro- 
fessors giving courses and explications de textes in the Faculte des Lettres for which 
no final examinations are provided, have offered to give special examinations to these 
American students, in order that a complete record of their work in Paris may be 
available for their colleges at home. The interest aroused in some of the most dis- 
tinguished members of the University of Paris by this experiment with a group of 
American undergraduates is a testimony to the wisdom and tact of the Delaware 
organization. 

In addition to the academic arrangements, every attempt has been made to 
give the students the widest possible experience of France and the French. There 
are week-end excursions and longer trips during the holidays to be had at very low 
cost. On the regular programme and included in the regular expenses are some 
twenty performances at the Opera, the Opera Comique, the Comedie Frangaise, etc. 
Museums and collections are visited under the most favorable auspices, the curators 
themselves often serving as guides and lecturers. Not only the educational authorities, 
but many organizations and, as the French would say, personalties, have become 
actively interested in making the sojourn in France of these American students both 
agreeable and significant. 



4 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

The cost of the year, July to July, is about $1600, apportioned as follows: 

TABLE OF EXPENSES 
Item Low Medium High 

(1) Board, room, heat, light, attendance (a)$550 (b)$660 (c)$770 

(2) Incidental expenses, carfare, laundry, etc. (fixed 

allowance of $10 per month) 110 110 110 

(3) Tuition (including private tutoring) 200 200 200 

(4) Textbooks (for regular courses) 50 50 50 

(5) Operas and plays (arranged program) 30 30 30 

(6) Miscellaneous (including group dinners and 

entertainment) 40 40 40 

(7) University Foreign Study Fee r 200 200 200 

(8) Eastbound passage 125 125 125 

(9) Westbound passage 125 125 125 

Optional Extras $1430 $1540 $1650 

Excursions — 

(a) Alps (about 7 days) $45 

(b) Easter trip (about 14 days) $90 

(c) One and two-day trips (6 or 7 days) $25 

Through an arrangement with the Office National des Universites et E coles 
Frangaises and the Compagnie Generale Transatlantique, and also with the Cunard 
and the Canadian Pacific Steamship Lines, all members of Delaware Foreign Study 
groups are granted a rebate of 30% on the cost of ocean passage. On the one-class 
steamer this rebate reduces the price of cabin passage to $110, to which must be 
added $15 for tips, baggage charges, and railroad fare between Havre and Paris. 
This makes the total transportation cost from New York to Paris $125 each way, 
or $250 for the round trip. 

The "Foreign Study Fee" of $200 is charged by the University of Delaware 
for membership in the group. It covers about half of the "overhead" expenses, the 
balance being provided by a subsidy received from Mr. P. S. du Pont, of Wilmington. 

Eight scholarships of $300 each (donated by interested individuals and awarded- 
annually by the Institute of International Education) are already open to students 
unable to meet the full expenses of the year, and it is very much to be hoped that a 
fund may be established in each college so that no well-equipped student may be 
deprived of the chance to go to France for lack of means. 

The potential value of the experience for the individual student is obviously 
incalculable. To the girl who expects to go out of college to teach French, no asset 
is to be compared to a record of residence and study in France. The movement is 
full of hope for the future of teaching French in this country. In a far wider sense, 
it is full of hope, too, for a better understanding of France by Americans and of 
Americans by the French. 

In Bryn Mawr's special case, there could be no more timely moment for the 
introduction of such an experiment. The French Department hopes, next year, to 
establish work for "honors." With the practice and training of the year in France, 
the degree "with honors in French" should connote, in addition to whatever general 
intellectual distinction we may be able to put into it, an actual linguistic achievement 
of real value. Eunice Morgan Schenck, 1907. 

Professor of French. 



THE FORMAL OPENING OF GOODHART HALL 

BY 

THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA 

Leopold Stokowski, Conductor 

PROGRAM 

WAGNER Prelude to "Lohengrin" 

LISZT Concerto in E flat major, for Piano and Orchestra 

Horace Alwyne 
WAGNER Prelude and Love-Death from "Tristan and Isolde" 

INTERMISSION 

BACH From the Second Part of the "Christmas Oratorio" 

1. Break forth, O beauteous, heav'nly light 

2. Within yon gloomy manger 

3. Glory to God 

4. With all Thy hosts 

Bryn Mawr College Chorus 
(Chorus trained by Ernest Willoughby) 

BACH Toccata and Fugue in D Minor 

The Philadelphia Orchestra, under Stokowski's baton, in the Marjorie Walter 
Goodhart Hall, that Hall crowded to its utmost capacity, with the entire student 
body, the complete faculty, and friends of the College occupying every available 
seat; the mood one of radiant anticipation, for the pervading atmosphere had in it 
an electric quality, a festive joyousness. The great tarched roof, the unobtrusive but 
glowing glint of red that colored one's impression of the great Hall, the pleasant 
light, the Orchestra closely packed on the stage, celli and violins across the platform 
in front of the wings, and then tall of it magically translated into the high ecstatic 
prelude from Lohengrin. What a breathless moment it was, transcending all previous 
experience ! 

Much went before it to stimulate one's interest and enhanced the sense of 
instinctive foretaste. President Park's gracious welcome, a welcome so phrased that 
all felt taken by the hand and warmly urged into accord, the recognition of architect 
and builder, of beautifler and developer of the finely proportioned auditorium, the 
tribute to our brilliant conductor and his men, all served to heighten the mood of 
eager confident expectancy. The front rows were occupied by the chorus, in classic 
simplicity of black gown and white collar; their upturned faces sounded another note 
of consecration, of dedication, deepened that intangible quality of perfect rapport 
and appreciation in the assemblage. 

Stokowski was moved by this evidence of sensitive participation to give his utmost 
in interpretation and guidance. That is his great gift, the spiritual renewal, the 
fresh approach to each reading; it is as though he opened his inmost being to th' 
music, to let it flow through him. His own attunement to the composer and his 
achievements, his artistic veneration, his flexibility, his inexhaustible capacity for re- 



6 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

fining, for making more exquisite effects that to some of us had already attained 
superlative expression, were never more marvelously demonstrated than upon this 
occasion. Stokowski's reading of Wagner is imbued with a profound realization of 
the dramatic elements and requirements of the operas; he feels the least sublety of 
musical characterization as well as the broadest assertion; the motifs take on un- 
dreamed-of significance, accents of penetrating poignancy. Probably no two preludes 
could have said more to an audience than the two chosen ; Lohengrin with its heaven- 
scaling mystical transport and Tristan — Vorspiel and Liebestod, intensely rapturous. 

Horace Alwyne played the Liszt E Flat Major Concerto with the Orchestra 
and here, too, new laurels were added to earlier triumphs. Mr. Alwyne produced 
a fine broad tone, contrasting it with most delicate and impeccable runs and trills, 
veritable wizardry of pianistic skill. Liszt's hands were sometimes spoken of as 
"demoniacal," they were the dread and envy of his rivals, in his brilliant, spectacular 
compositions he gave those hands incredible tasks to accomplish. Horace Alwyne 
would not have disappointed his great master; he played with fine freedom, his 
sonorous chords were endowed with dynamic power, the melodic passages were ten- 
derly persuasive and the virtuosity of the performance left nothing to be desired. 
He was recalled many times and the applause had more than approbation in it; one 
could read into the clapping hands praise of all the faithful work done in his depart- 
ment, promise of more fervent co-operation. A new height was disclosed in the 
singing of the chorus in the four Bach Chorales from the second part of the 
Christmas Oratorio; two were sung a cappella, two with orchestral accompaniment 
and the performance elicited high and deserved praise from Mr. Stokowski. The 
chorus was admirably trained by Mr. Willoughby; the taste and intelligence displayed 
in the choice, the fine responsiveness of the fresh voices, the delicate shading and 
phrasing, gave new beauty to these perennially sublime utterances of the great master. 

Probably in no one thing has Bach achieved more superbly than in music written 
for or inspired by the church. His deep religious faith and devotional fervor pour 
forth glorified sound in overwhelming measure and the great D Minor Toccata and 
Fugue (Stokowski's orchestration) was in reality something to make "gods to stoop 
and men to soar." "The steadfast empyrean shook throughout." 

An inspiring, wonderful evening was this formal opening of Marjorie Walter 
Goodhart Hall, remaining in one's memory as an undimmed perfect expression of 
beauty. It set a noble standard for future endeavor; it established and emphasized 
the distinguished role which music and the arts play in the educational plan of Bryn 
Mawr College, furthering that education which we like to believe is the whole soul 
set in the direction of perfection. 

Alice H. Mertz, 
President of the Modern Club of Philadelphia. 

The Editor of the Bulletin wishes to express her gratitude to Mrs. Mertz, 
who, although not an Alumna of the College, out of friendship for the College 
made time to write the delightful musical appreciation. We all feel ourselves very 
happily in her debt. 

Bryn Mawr College wishes to express its gratitude to Mr. Leopold Stokowski 
and to the Board of Directors of the Philadelphia Orchestra, and also to those 
members of the Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College and to those Alumnae of 
Bryn Mawr College who made possible the giving of this concert. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

In line with accepted magazine usage the Bulletin is going to bear on its 
cover hereafter not the name of the month in which it does appear, but that of the 
coming month. You will not receive any January number, but you will observe 
that this number, which in the past would have been the January number, bears 
the name "February." And so it will go through the year. There will be the 
same number of Bulletins, they will appear as they have always done, toward the 
end of the month, the Class Editors will still please have their notes in the Alumnae 
office the twentieth of each month, but the Bulletin will hereafter seem to be early 
instead of late. The next number, which will carry the accounts of the Annual 
Meeting and the Reports, will be out, we hope, before the first of March and will 
be called the March number. The last number this season will be called the July 
number and the one in the Fall that describes the opening of College will be called 
the November number. By that time the Alumnae will have forgotten that there 
is a change — after all it is purely a matter of psychology — and will merely congratu- 
late themselves on the fact that the Bulletin is always on time. 



NOTICES 



The College is glad to announce that, owing to the completion of Goodhart Hail 
with its greatly increased seating capacity, all alumnae and former students may now 
have their names placed on the list of those to whom notices of all College events are 
sent, by sending a request to this effect to the Director of Publicity, Taylor Hall. 



The Bureau of Recommendations of the College wishes to remind the alumnae 
that at this time of year a number of desirable opportunities are always listed in the 
files of the Dean's Office. 



ANNUAL MEETING 

The annual meeting of the Alumnae Association will be held on Saturday, 
February 2, 1929. The morning session will begin at 11 o'clock in the Music 
Room, Goodhart Hall, and will be concerned with the reports of the standing com- 
mittees of the Association, and with a discussion in regard to the financial policy of 
the Association. At 1 o'clock the meeting will adjourn for luncheon, and the business 
will be continued informally in Pembroke dining-room after President Park's speech. 
At this afternoon session, several of the District Councillors, the Chairman of the 
Scholarships and Loan Fund Committee, and the Undergraduate member of the 
Council will repeat their reports as given at the meeting of the Council in New 
Haven in November, and it is hoped that there will be general discussion of prob- 
lems of interest to the College and the Alumnae. 

On Friday, February 1st, at 6.30 P. M., there will be an informal Alumnae 
Dinner in Rockefeller Hall, tickets for which may be obtained from the Alumnae 
Office at $1.50 apiece. After dinner Georgiana Goddard King, 1896, will give an 
illustrated talk on her recent travels: Migrants, Pilgrims, and Tourists. 

(7) 



THE NIGHT OF DECEMBER FOURTH 

We had known that the fourth of December was an important date; and we 
knew that tickets for the concert were to be had by invitation only. Leopold 
Stokowski and the Philadelphia Orchestra were to celebrate the formal opening of 
Goodhart Hall and to be, in a sense, the President's gift to the College. In the end, 
we felt surprisingly that this was not how it turned out. 

The long-desired Students' Building has proved itself a delightful thing, and 
the Great Hall a beautiful one, spacious and seemly. Whoever has spoken there at 
Morning Chapel, standing before the red curtain and looking westward down under 
the grave and ample arches that; carry the strong-pitched roof, must testify with 
thankfulness how much easier it is for the voice than Taylor chapel; and musicians, 
as it appears, find it a happy milieu for the strings. That night the music flowed 
out and filled the expectant air with a rich and fine loveliness never before divined. 
A sort of gracile serenity held the impression through the earlier numbers, till the 
Liebestod itself seemed more exquisite and poignant than memory had recalled, thus 
felt through the sweet complications of sound that hung like a golden mist in the air. 
Stokowski himself, silhouetted like a taller Ariel in the amber light, looked, still, 
when he turned and addressed the Chorus and the College at large, as though ready 
"to dive into the fire or ride on the curl'd clouds." 

The temper of the audience doubtless had something to do with it all. This 
night, if ever, should be permissible the word gala. They came lapped in silks and 
wreathed in smiles. The shining colours, the swaying ear-rings, the changing glances 
of recognition and gratulation, carpeted the hall as with a flower-bed; the sounds 
of movement and of talk were as though blown in fragrant puffs across and about 
the wide space. Then a sort of stir, a dwindling of sound, drew the Whole place 
to focus on a single point, a single voice speaking quietly, clearly. 

We all have learned to watch for that familiar figure and voice, that way of 
speech: that conscious simplicity now warmed with humour, then with a deliberate 
homeliness, humane, alert, not without tension, breaking up into wit, eddying out 
into an understanding deceptively mild or beguilingly dry but always unexpectedly 
wise. Few perhaps remember the words spoken that evening, absorbed as we were 
in the growing awareness that all this enchanted Concert-night, so generously given, 
so gladly acclaimed, was transmuted, none shall ever say how, into something that 
was ours to offer — the French word is the right one, hommage! — and that we were 
giving it to the President. 

Georgiana Goddard King, 1896. 



(8) 



ALUMNAE BOOKS 

Prevailing Winds, by Margaret Ayer Barnes. Houghton Mifflin Co. 

". . . getting to understand a little. That was the fun of being thirty-six. 
That — and knowing how lovely the world could look." 

This reviewer feels congratulatory — exhilarated by Mrs. Barnes' lightness and 
by the good company she offers. She gets into her stories the pride of the pioneers' 
grandchildren in Chicago, whose making they can realize vividly, and in the bleak 
New England, where so many of those pioneers had had root. She hands on, too, 
delight in the blue lake, the bright sunshine, and the wind. Her world is pleasant 
and civilized, and as authentic as the defeated society of Mrs. Wharton's obsession. 

Mrs. Barnes insists that tragedy is apt to look ridiculous, over-emphatic, and 
her bent is to laugh, even when aware of futility and sadness. Lovingness and fun 
in the "domestic duck-pond" can win out, she is sure, over resurgent longings for the 
passion that just escaped, tempestuous, exhausting, running "on the top of the dis- 
hevelled tide." 

Is it a "prevailing wind," that the art of writing is not sacred, but may be used 
light-heartedly for relief, for creating privately one's own spirit? If one creates pub- 
lishable matter, so much the better, — and Mrs. Barnes writes stories with substance 
and form and remarkably good dialogue. Has she, perhaps, been perfecting her kind- 
ness, her relish of living and of thinking? Her liveableness and her humour are — 
platitudinously speaking — her charm and her limitation. She can give young love 
beautifully, and then remark, lowering the pitch: 

"Who had ever done first love, anyway, as she had felt it? Seriously, solemnly. 
There was, of course, William Shakespeare — Romeo and Juliet; but after all a thirty- 
six-year-old sense of humour forced you to admit that you and your young man at 
seventeen had presented more the appearance of something by Booth Tarkington than 
those ill-starred lovers!" 

Is this all merely that "passion for understatement, that was Vermont in its 
essence," shared with her heroine in Perpetual Care? 

Mrs. Barnes perhaps went through with a period of "preciousness" ! This re- 
viewer sniffs a revolting angel, and coming of a "precious" generation herself, often 
feels like pulling on the reins. Why will Mrs. Barnes (at what cost of proof cor- 
recting!) print "'til"? Till and until are alike good words. And her fondness for 
full stops, breaking up the comfortable sentence, looks like a red banner. After all, 
if punctuation has its justification tin easy breathing, too many periods make the 
reader feel he is panting up hill, with a thumping heart, when really the going is level 
enough. — And then, an ancient Reader in English comes round, and acclaims almost 
any way of liberation. Edith Pettit Borie, '95. 

Casper Hauser, by Jacob Wassermann. Translated by Caroline Newton. Horace 
Liveright. New York, 1928. 

If one reads Casper Hauser without first reading the introduction written for 
the English edition, one is likely to group it simply with those amazingly interesting 
historical novels, such as Kristin Lavransdattcr and Jew Siiss, which in the past few 
years have been coming to us from Europe. Perhaps if one had the subtitle of the 

(9) 



10 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

German Edition, Die Tragheit des Herzens, one would not classify so easily. 
Certain it is, however, that one needs some clue to Wassermann's real intention. On 
the face of it he seems to be giving the facts of a cause celebre. 

"In 1828 Caspar Hauser staggered into the City of Niirnberg. He was 17 years 
old, could barely walk and had the vocabulary and mentality of a child of 2. He 
had been imprisoned since infancy and his only phrases were 'Tell me where the 
letter belongs' and 'I should like to become a rider like my father.' He had no 
knowledge of his origin, and all efforts to trace it directly failed. However, Anselm 
von Feurbach, a famous criminologist, in his pamphlet, 'An Example of a Crime 
Against the Soul of a Human Being,' proved that the foundling was 'a legitimate 
prince of the house of Baden, a brother of Queen Karoline of Bavaria, a brother of 
the Duchess of Hamilton, a brother of the Queen of Sweden,' and that his condition 
was the result of an appalling court intrigue. Time has substantiated Feurbach's 
deductions, and in consequence of their accuracy Feurbach was murdered and in 1833 
Caspar was also murdered through the complicity of a degenerate English Lord, Henry 
Stanhope, Earl of Chesterfield. So much for history." 

Yet again and again, one realizes that the quality of Wassermann's indignation, 
his scorn, has something cosmic about it, that it is not leveled merely at those who 
were associated with Casper Hauser, and because of stupidity and dullness of imagina- 
tion quite literally tortured the boy, although as in the case of Daumer, at least, this 
was not their intention. When one turns again to the introduction, the whole temper 
of the book is explained. Wassermann, in speaking of his struggles to weld together 
his material, says: "One can thus see that the actual incidents had thus ceased to be 
of primary importance; they could be brushed aside for what solely charmed me in 
the material : the tragedy of the child, the general tragedy of the child, or differently 
stated, the repeated recurrence of an innocent soul, unspotted by the world, and how 
the world stupidly and uncomprehendingly ignores such a soul. 

"Naturally, I was obliged to retain the historical frame. The more I steeped 
myself in the actual psychological problem, the more carefully was I obliged to nar- 
rate the actual course of events, although artistically speaking they were only a 
pretext." 

And therein lies the difficulty. He has been too good a historian, and in so being 
has obscured his purpose. He intended to write a parable and instead has written a 
historical novel, which judged as such, is admirable in every way. 

Caroline Newton has brought to her difficult task of translation sympathy and 
keen insight, and a sense of the movement of the prose, so that one reads without any 
feeling of struggling with the medium. At times one is conscious of irritation at the 
choice of a word, but when the story becomes drama, the reader, the translator, and the 
author are at one. 



The Wonderful Locomotive, by Cornelia Meigs. The Macmillan Company. New 
York, 1928. 

Because we have not the book itself to review, all we can do is to reprint the 
publisher's notice. 

"Lucky Peter! He lived near a roundhouse and his best friend was the retired 
engineer of the famous old locomotive 44. When Peter wasn't finding out about the 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 11 

new engines, he was helping Sven work on the old one. They were determined it 
would make its great run across the continent again. One day it did — with Peter at 
the throttle. Peter and No. 44 : they pulled the greatest apple train in the history of 
harvests, in to Philadelphia, they took the circus on time to Arbela AND they made 
the record run to San Francisco. 

Here is the railroad story that all small boys have been waiting for. And they 
will be glad to know that Mr. Hader, the illustrator, has done most of the things 
that Peter did. When we heard he had taken engines in and out of San Francisco, 
and had many friends like old Sven, we knew the pictures would be good. 

Miss Meigs has written thrilling tales of Indians and sea captains for older boys 
and girls, including Master Simon s Garden and As the Crow Flies. For younger 
boys and girls, she has written The Kingdom of the Winding Road and many delight- 
ful plays." 

Occupied Haiti, Edited by Emily Greene Balch (1889). The Writers Publishing 
Company, Inc., New York, 1927. 

To one whose imagination is crowded with the sweeping gestures of Vander- 
cook's Black Majesty, (1928), the history of the island of Haiti temporarily loses 
interest after the death, a century ago, of its great King, Henri Christophe. But 
countries do not die with their despots. Occupied Haiti, a book published a year 
before Black Majesty, is so deeply concerned with events of our own decade that 
the reign of Christophe becomes only a small link in the long chain of past upheaval 
and revolt that leads to the state of affairs there today. 

It appears that in 1925 an appeal came from Haiti to the Women s International 
League for Peace and Freedom for an investigation of conditions in that island, which 
has since 1915 been occupied by sailors and marines of the United States. The 
Women's International League responded by selecting a Committee of United States 
citizens to visit Haiti. Accordingly, in February, 1926, five women and one man, 
all educators or economists, or both, set sail to visit and study the island. The book, 
Occupied Haiti, comprises the report of this Committee. Emily Greene Balch, '89, 
represents herself as "its editor and part author," with extreme modesty, since of the 
fifteen chapters which make up the book, she wrote seven entirely and collaborated in 
five others. 

The length of time the Committee spent in Haiti is not stated, although its 
brevity is indicated in the text. Its members make no claim of presenting a thorough 
study of Haitian problems, but believe their information adequate for the type of 
report they present, and sufficient to lend weight to their conviction that a full and 
official study of the situation is imperative. The political history of the island is 
traced, as are the facts leading up to the American Occupation; but the meat of the 
report is found in its exposition of present conditions under the Occupation, and in 
constructive suggestions for amelioration and eventual change. 

The book is strongly sociological in its emphasis. Separate chapters by individual 
members deal concisely with the land situation, education, health and sanitation, the 
courts, the relations between races, etc., and lead up to final "conclusions and recom- 
mendations" signed by the committee as a whole. Agreement is there unanimous 
that the American Occupation is fundamentally wrong, is harmful both to the United 
States and to Haiti, and that it should certainly be ended. The case against it is 



12 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

calmly stated, and credit is duly given to American officials for their good work, but 
the verdict of the Committee appears irrevocable. 

Your reviewer in her ignorance dares offer no opinion on this verdict. She 
confesses that she would like to read the case in favour of the Occupation equally 
well stated by its firm adherents, — and such adherents there must be, since the Occu- 
pation is now in its fourteenth year. She feels, too, that by reason of the personnel 
of the Committee and the organizations represented therein, its members would be 
fundamentally predisposed towards the liberation of Haiti and hence would naturally 
be more deeply impressed by the failures of the Occupation than by its good points. 
Her memory races back to Black Majesty and recalls how one Toussaint l'Ouverture, 
Haitian patriot and governor-general, first ravaged his island fighting for Spain and 
then, in an incredible volte-face, swept back across the same stretches of country 
devastating them anew, fighting against Spain for France. She remembers, too, ex- 
amples of the terrible interracial difficulties among the whites of French and Spanish 
descent, the African blacks and the mulatto affranchis. She wonders if peace and 
the fruits of peace could as yet possibly dwell long among these peoples without the 
restraining arm of a powerful and disassociated neighbour. 

As Miss Balch states in the first chapter, "It is obvious that one's reaction to the 
whole situation will depend on one's basic political ideas, one's entire scale of human 
values. . . ." Whatever the reactions produced upon the reader, Occupied' Haiti 
is recommended as an able presentation, both moving and succinct, of a challenging 

problem - M. E. S., 1911. 



Poems for Peter, by Lysbeth Boyd Borie. J. B. Lippincott & Co. Philadelphia, 1928. 

Poems for Peter is essentially an intimate book; it is full of personal detail of 
Peter's home, and it is amusingly a biography of the singularly delightful little boy 
who characterizes himself for us again and again in the gay poems that make up the 
book. And yet this intimacy of domestic detail has in nearly every instance, by its 
simplicity and candour, been transmuted into something in which the reader, may 
have a part without any sense of intrusion. We, too, have shared Peter's experiences - 
although no one caught for us in dexterous verse our feelings when we had to eat 
our crusts, or woke in the night and made transparent bids for attention, or had to 
be polite to relatives, or loved the sound of "Once upon a time," or gloried in the 
swift motion of' a "run under," or the feeling of sand and sun, or resented the 
bitterness of sea water. These poems are the better ones. The sensations are so 
justly caught, the vocabulary is so nicely limited, that the sense of its being Peter 
himself who tells us these things is very strong. This real Peter makes us no longer 
feel as if we had' wandered into a strange home. Part and parcel of the charm 
of the poems is the quality of the verse. As I said before it is dextrous; it hasi a lilt 
and unexpectedness that gives an added flavour to the humour. 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 13 

"At 
Breakfast time 
I heard them 
Say 

Our church 
Burnt up 
The other 
Day 

Our church 
Burnt up 
In Jenkin 
Town 
My, 

Wasn't it 
Lucky 
It didn't 
Burn 
Down! 

It is hard to choose among the poems because they all have a beguiling quality 
except the very few that seem to conform to the pattern of the conventional "child 
poem." These somehow lack the fresh authenticity of the others. The Scissorcuts 
by Lisl Hummel are the perfect complement for the poems and are so much a part 
of them that one cannot think of the two as separate entities, but together they 
make a little book that has freshness and charm and something very winning about 
it,, although it is unfair to compare it, as the publisher does, with "The Child's 
Garden of Verses." Christopher Robin is Peter's true playmate. 

A Hymn on the Morning of Christ's Nativity, by John Milton. Arranged and 

presented by the Children of the Brush Hill School and their teachers. Published 

by Walter H. Baker Co., Boston. 

Kate Du Val Pitts, who had a share, and one suspects rather a large share, in 
the "arrangement" that puts the poem in the form of one of the Miracle Plays, sent 
with it the following letter, which deserves a kind of immortality of its own: "The 
Editor who accepted the little thing wrote me that he liked it, though he didn't think 
it would make money, 'but there is a certain demand for that sort of thing,' wrote 
he, 'and I think the lines have distinction, if you will allow me to say so.' " 

The arrangement itself is charming, and the Notes on Production are so careful 
and so full, for the setting of the stage, the costuming, the musical background, 
and even for correlating the children's other work with the production of the play, 
that it should prove itself invaluable to many a teacher of young children. And as 
the Editor justly remarked, "the lines have distinction." 

Adventures in the Great Outdoors, by Louise Schorl Ehrman. Printed for private 

circulation by her mother, Mrs. Frederic Schorl. 

These stories, sketches and selections from letters were gathered, the Introduction 
explains, "with the thought that many of the friends of my daughter, Louise Schorl 
Ehrman, would like to know of her life in the West, so full of activity, so rich in 
service. They are not fiction but stories of her own experiences." The fact that 



14 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

the book is intended for private circulation indicates ihow intimate these random selec- 
tions are, but even to one who never knew Mrs. Ehrman they give a vivid picture of 
one who loved life in all its aspects, mountains and towns, people and solitudes, and 
through many of the sketches shines out a gay, intrepid spirit. Certainly this little 
volume succeeds admirably in what it it sets out to do. 

Childbirth, by William G. Lee. University of Chicago Press, 1928. 

In the Introduction, Dr. David S. Hillis says: "The manuscript of this book 
was finished and the revision practically complete at the time of the death of Dr. Lee. 
It was fortunate that the final work of making it ready could be done by his wife, 
Mary A. M. Lee (Maisie Morgan), herself a graduate in medicine, who had watched 
the development of the work from the beginning and to whom the book would have 
undoubtedly have been dedicated. . . . The author presents his subject} in simple 
form, as well adapted to the needs of the beginner as to those of the mature student. 
Indeed, a layman with sufficient interest in the subject would find most of the book 
within his grasp." 



RECENT ALUMNAE ARTICLES AND PAMPHLETS 

Alexander Hamilton, One of Our Greatest American Statesmen, by Isabel M. S. 
Whittier, M.A., printed in the Manufacturer, January, 1928. 

Skill in Case Work, by Helen P. Kempton, printed in the Family, December, 
1928. 

Geological Reconnaissance in the Piedmont of Virginia, by Anna I. Jonas, re- 
printed from the Bulletin of the Geological Society of America. 

Thomas Hughes and His American Rugby, by Marguerite Bartlett Hamer, 
printed in The North Carolina Historical Review. 

Motoring Out from China, by Anna Louise Strong, printed in the September 
Asia. 

The Absorption Spectrum of Caesium, by Irene Maud Mathews, from the Pro- 
ceedings of the Royal Society, 1928. 

Arthur Gorges, Spenser s Alcyon and Raleigh's Friend, by Helen Estabrook 
Sandison, reprinted from the Publications of the Modern Language Association of 
America. 



AN INVITATION FROM THE WASHINGTON 
BRYN MAWR CLUB 

Lucy Lombardi Barber, the new president of the Washington Bryn Mawr Club, 
sends this invitation : "We are very anxious to have all Bryn Mawrters, transient or 
permanent in Washington, attend the meetings. They occur the second Monday of 
each month at the various members' houses and are really very pleasant. The Wash- 
ington Bryn Mawr Club has, in co-operation with the Wellesley Club, engaged the 
distinguished young artist, Augna Enters, in her Dance Episodes for January 11th, 
and is eager to fill the large National Theater with loyal Alumnae and their friends 
for the benefit of our scholarship fund as well as Wellesley's." 



ON THE CAMPUS 

(Reprints from the News.) 

THE COLLEGE COUNCIL 

In chapel on Monday morning, December 10, President Park spoke about the 
College Council, that all-important body about which so little is known by the 
college itself. Miss Park told us how the Council was started during the latter 
years of the war, to arrange some way by which students could keep up in their 
academic work and their war work at the same time. When that need was over 
it sank into obscurity for a while, but it has again become very important. There 
were orginally eight members on the committee, but it has now grown to such 
proportions that it is made up of the President and Dean of the college, the Director 
of Publication, the presidents of the Classes, of the four Associations, of the Graduate 
Club and of the Non-Resident Club, representatives of the Faculty and Wardens, 
the Director of Halls, the Director of Athletics, and the Editor-in-Chief of the 
News. Thus information can be referred to and given by all the organizations 
in the college. 

The Council has a long and informal meeting once a month at which it discusses 
extremely varied subjects. Changes have actually arisen from these discussions, for 
in 1923 a Curriculum Committee was suggested from whose first report our present 
system of less required work and one major subject arose. 

At present cuts and week-ends are being discussed, but the President and the 
Dean and the Faculty are holding back any changes until after the next meeting of 
the Council. The changes in the calendar this year are a result of last year's 
discussion. 

Miss Park then mentioned a few of the other subjects that came up last year. 
Among them were Mental Hygiene, Freshman Week, a separate hall for graduate 
students, all topics pertaining to Goodhart Hall, May Day, and the College Budget, 
so the Council will know just where there are financial limitations, and where 
changes would actually be possible. 

Every kind of student is represented on the Council, Miss Park pointed out, 
every College interest and the administration as well. This body cannot legislate, 
however, but it is in this very lack of power that its real power lies. It gets definite 
action from the reports of its meetings, and though it was created without authority, 
and is still without it, at present it is the core of Bryn Mawr College. 

This Council arbitrates on the conduct of the students, not as right or wrong, 
but in general, and as to academic work. It therefore must have a general basis of 
agreement, not in detail, for this would be impossible, but it must agree as to a 
definition of college; that is to say, who shall come and what can be expected. This 
must be true, because if the ends are different, the means would naturally be quite 
diverse. When the plane is established, there is no part of the immediate question 
that cannot be discussed. 

Fortunately the Council has never failed to arrive at a like decision concerning 
what college is for. President Park deprecated the fact that the numbers must 
necessarily be so limited, but she concluded that its work was decidedly fruitful. 

(15) 



WORK IN THE LONDON RECORD OFFICE 

The struggles of a period of graduate research work in London were briefly 
outlined by Julia Ward, 1923, in chapel on Friday. Last year Miss Ward spent 
her time gathering material on the subject of financial history in Richard the Third's 
reign. 

"The first step in a search for information on such an abstruse subject must 
lead one to obtain a card of admission to the Public Record Office, where innumerable 
records are kept on file. Having thus gained right of access to the building it is 
necessary for you to set about learning the cataloguing system in order to find the 
proper documents. This system is extremely involved, and is additionally trouble- 
some in that numerous mistakes in classification have been made 'here and there; 
for instance, Richard the Third is mistaken for Richard the Second, and there follows 
an exceedingly tangled situation, where tax accounts are found loosely floating in a 
place where no tax accounts should ever be. All Chancery documents of a not suffi- 
ciently definite type are classed together under Chancery Miscellania. Here only a 
Jack Horner method of search will yield any results whatsoever. And yet most of 
the time 'when you pull out a plum' it is impossible to recognize the much-needed 
document. Moreover, there is still trouble when the manuscript does eventually 
come to light. You find that it is written entirely in Latin — abbreviated Latin in 
fifteenth century handwriting — and your first weeks are spent copying a maze of 
dots and dashes. However, with the aid of Martin's Record Interpreter, a book in 
which you can find enough words to give you a start, you soon begin to gain actual 
headway. 

"Particularly for Bryn Mawr students, all the preliminaries and work at the 
Public Record Office are made very easy. Last year there were ten or eleven from 
Bryn Mawr, and this unusually high representation has made our college well known. 
Yet of even more weight than the fact that you were a Bryn Mawr student is the 
mention of Doctor Gray's name as your professor. Immediately you become one of 
'Doctor Gray's young ladies,' and in all the trying search for manuscripts there will 
ever be obliging attendants to help you on your way." 



(16) 



CLASS NOTES 



1897 
Class Editor: Alice Cilley Weist 
Mrs. Harry H. Weist), 
119 East 76th Street, New York. 

The C. E. thanks all those who have 
answered her postal, is glad to have so 
much about 1897 to report, and begs that 
anyone who has had no postal will write 
in just the same, since a card went to 
every name on Maisie's list, but of course 
some addresses must have changed. 

Bessie Sedgwick Shaw — "Anne Law- 
ther spent several days this fall with 
Margaret Nichols Smith, in East Orange. 
May Campbell and I saw her. Anne is 
on the State Board of Education (Iowa), 
and Vice President of the National Asso- 
ciation of Governing Boards of State 
Universities. She ran on the Democratic 
ticket for Auditor of the State of Iowa. 
Margaret Nichols Smith's educational in- 
terests are centered around Boston at 
present; Delia Smith Johnston, '26, is 
teaching in Brookline — Margaret, Jr., is a 
Senior at Radcliffe — William, Jr., is a 
Junior at Harvard, and has won a note- 
worthy Greek scholarship — Marshall is a 
Freshman at Harvard. Mr. Smith was 
Harvard, '95. Content, the youngest, is 
headed for Bryn Mawr." No news of 
you? 

Ida E. GifTord — "My time is divided be- 
tween caring for the sick and digging in 
my gardens. I do 'landscape gardening' 
in a small way on my little strip of land 
at Nonquitt, Mass., and derive much 
peace and contentment thereby. Hoover 
was my choice." 

Anna M. W. Pennypacker — "I was last 
summer in Mexico with a Seminar group 
at the University Summer School. We 
were making a study of the situation in 
Mexico and Central American States. I 
was for Norman Thomas." 

Eliza B. Pennypacker — "I had an hour's 
ride in an airplane in the vicinity of Phil- 
adelphia, reaching a height of 5,500 feet. 
My great interest is in work with insane 
women. I voted for Hoover." 

Mary Campbell — "I went off to Oregon 
for my holiday, and had a wonderful visit 
with Grace and Sydney and their three 
children in the Hood River Valley. Grace, 
Gorham (16) and I had a fine trip to 
Victoria by boat up Puget Sound. One 
Sunday Elizabeth Norcross Esterly and 
her two children (19 and 16) came up 
for the week-end at the ranch. I had 
some fine camping trips, also. Voted for 
Hoover. E. Esterly (in case she has not 
answered) is head of the whole lower 
school at Miss Catlin's in Portland. 



Emma Cadbury — "It was a great pleas- 
ure to have Rebekah Chickering and her 
sister here this summer, and they saw 
quite a little of Vienna. In September I 
had the pleasure of seeing something of 
Pauline and Josephine Goldmark, who 
were here collecting material about the 
revolution of 1848, in which their father 
took a leading part. I met them by 
chance in AmHof. As for my summer — 
I first went in June to Russia for two 
weeks, much shorter time than I wanted, 
but extremely interesting. Most of the 
time I spent in Moscow, but I also visited 
Yasuaya Polyana, and slept in Tolstoy's 
house, and met his daughter Alexandra. 
I had to get back to Warsaw for the In- 
ternational Peace Congress at the end of 
June, and then hurry on to London to 
report to the English branch of our 
Friends' Service Committee. In August 
I had a delightful holiday at Argentiere in 
the Haute Savoie, France, where I met a 
brother and his family on their way back 
to China after a year's furlough. After 
seeing them off at Genoa I had a few 
hours at Pisa, and came on to Cortina 
d'Ampezzo for "two days on my way back 
to Vienna. I hope to stay in Vienna now 
over the winter, continuing our regular, 
but always unexpected work, which is full 
of interest. I may pay a visit at home 
sometime next year, but am not sure 
whether it will include the Reunion." 
Couldn't cut this, but the names are awful 
to spell ! 

1900 

Class Editor: Edith Crane Lanham 
(Mrs. Samuel Tucker Lanham), 485 
Hampton Drive, Spartanburg, N. C. 
(For Helen MacCoy.) 

Through misinformation your Editor 
reported in a previous issue of the Bul- 
letin that Julia Streeter Gardner had 
moved to the middle West. She is living 
in Brookline, Mass. 

Edith Gregson's daughter, Margaret, 
who was European Fellow in 1928, is now 
at the University of Chicago working for 
her M.A., and she expects to take her 
year in Europe after some experience in 
teaching. 

Delia Avery Perkins and her husband 
sail on December 8th for Naples, where 
they expect to spend six months. 

Edna Warkentin Alden writes most in- 
terestingly of having had a few hours' 
visit from Lotta Emory Dudley last win- 
ter, as the latter passed through Kansas 
City on her way to California. Edna's 
oldest son was married last summer. She 



(17) 



18 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



enclosed a snapshot of her younger son, 
Bernhard, who is a Senior at Kansas 
University. He is a fine looking chap, 
sturdy and full of character. 

Johnny Kroeber Mosenthal was kind 
enough to attend the Meeting of Class 
Collectors in New York in October, since 
1900's Collector had to have a substitute 
present. Johnny's hilarious letters are as 
refreshing as the sight of her used to be, 
blank years ago. 

A reward will be paid for information 
leading to the discovery of Hodgie. This 
information will not be used against her 
for extortion. 

1902 
Class Editor: Jean Crawford, 

Ury House, Fox Chase, Phila., Pa. 

Jo Kieffer Foltz writes: 

"1902 has so few items in the Bulletin, 
compared to other classes that I've often 
wondered whether we do nothing or are 
shy — I hope it's the latter ! 

Now I'm not shy, but I never seem to 
do anything worth recording or reading 
about, so I preserve a discreet silence, 
which I'm breaking now because I did 
something this summer that some mem- 
bers of the class might like to try. I'm 
not even making it a class experiment. 

My husband's health had been wretched, 
and the doctor ordered a complete change. 
So he and I and our two sons took the 
family car, a Chrysler touring car, aged 
four years — abroad in June. Really it's 
the easiest and most delightful thing to 
do. 

It only costs $170.00 to ship the car 
there and back (the $70 is for licenses, 
etc.), and it's truly thrilling to get into it 
on the Plymouth dock and drive off to 
explore the narrow winding t roads of 
England and put up at the quaint little 
inns. We had no itinerary and only knew 
that we planned to arrive in London on 
July 7th, and Paris on August 7th. After 
crossing the channel, we crossed France, 
always at our leisure, and making side 
trips whenever anything looked worth- 
while. The country was heavenly, and 
the weather, too — we never had our cur- 
tains up once, and the people lovely to us. 

If anyone thinks of going I'll gladly tell 
them any little thing I can. We had al- 
most four of the most gorgeous months 
any of us ever spent, and so surprisingly 
cheap. Imagine this ! At one little town 
in France we counted up our bill on leav- 
ing and divided it by four and found that 
lovely rooms, delicious food, wine and 
garage amounted to $2.12 per day per 
person ! And my meals were carried up 
for that, and a stream gurgling along un- 



der my window was thrown in free — not 
in the window, you understand ! 

We all came home so enthusiastic that 
some friends of ours are going to try it, 
and I thought some other ^.alumna might 
be ailing or have an ailing husband. We 
can recommend it for sick or well ! 

A lot of you would do it, if I dared 
thrill you with tales of stone-built, rose- 
covered villages, all owned by one man, 
and country churches off the beaten track 
in England and ox markets under your 
window, and in France little chateaux all 
renovated to resume their youth in the 
Middle Ages with callers (not tourists) 
arriving to call while we were alowed to 
view its charms— truly you would ! But 
I'm scared at this long diatribe — some- 
body else tell something now!" 

1904 
Class Editor: Emma O. Thompson, 
320 South 42nd Street, Phila., Pa. 

The New Year brings several interest- 
ing letters from London. Cary sends the 
following message, "I have just received 
the October Bulletin, and I feel moved 
to write you a brief note, in the hope that 
many others may do the same. 

Occupation — I run my house, I study 
Persian and Arabic, I look after the chil- 
dren's books in a small children's hospital, 
I am learning to dance English Country 
Dances. 

Family — My son, Arthur, nearly eleven 
years old, is at a boarding school in 
Shropshire. My husband (who is a busi- 
ness man) has recently published a book 
of stories about Persia. 

Travel — One of the pleasant things 
about living in England is that one is so - 
near to many other countries. We all 
three visited Bruges and Ghent at Eas- 
ter, and went to the Italian Lakes i'n 
August. We see a good deal of England 
itself by motoring during week-ends in 
the summer months. I have some hopes 
of making a short visit to Maine next 
summer. With all best wishes, 

Clara Cary Edwards." 

Alice Waldo was in London in Septem- 
ber and saw Clara at that time, and hopes 
to see her again during the Christmas 
holidays. 

A letter from Katharine Curtis Pierce 
begins with a paragraph that your editor 
has not the courage to omit, and the 
statement concerning contributions per- 
haps may awaken more than one slumber- 
ing classmate. 

"I enjoy our class notes so much and 
look forward to them with such pleasure 
that it seems only fair that I should con- 
tribute something to the cause. We have 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



19 



spent a good many months travelling dur- 
ing the last year. A year ago last October 
my two younger sons and I went to Santa 
Fe for three months, the rest of the 
family joining us there for Christmas. It 
was our first experience in the West and 
we found it quite up to the specifications. 
The rest of the winter was spent in New 
York as usual. Last summer we went to 
Europe and the limits of our trip were the 
English Lakes on the north, and the north 
coast of Spain on the south. We did, and 
saw, a great many interesting things. 
There are few things that are better fun 
than sightseeing with an eleven-year-old 
boy who has studied a little history. We 
came home in time for our sons to start 
at their various institutions of learning, 
all of them in their first year. Curtis at 
Harvard Law School, Henry at Clare 
College, Cambridge, and Ben at Red 
House School, Groton. My husband and 
I are on our way home to New York 
after spending the autumn at the farm in 
Maine. Time does not matter now that 
all the boys are away. 

"Adola Greely Adams and her husband 
sailed for Greece in the early spring. 
They were to be gone six months. Adola 
wrote me during the summer from a little 
place in the Pyrenees but the letter came 
after we had left that part of the world 
and we did not meet. With best wishes 
to you and the class." 

Daisy Ullman wrote this fall saying 
that Evelyn Holliday Patterson and Alice 
Schiedt Clark were with her for luncheon 
in July and that she met Annette Kelley 
Howard and her mother at the Woman's 
World's 'Fair in Chicago in the spring. 
Annette said they were going out to the 
coast for the summer, taking David, her 
youngest son, with them. 

Daisy says that she is losing weight and 
is devoutly thankful. 

Lucy Lombardi Barber is President of 
the Washington Bryn Mawr Club this 
year. 

My last request was so well received 
that I again send you all this message — 
If you enjoyed these letters, make it pos- 
sible for us to enjoy your letter next 
month. 

1905 
Class Editor: Mrs. Talbot Aldrich, 
59 Mt. Vernon Street, Boston. 

Edith Longstreth Wood has been 
abroad since July on a traveling Fellow- 
ship given by the Pennsylvania Academy 
of the Fine Arts, where she has been 
working for the last few years. She spent 
a month painting in Ireland; a long, leis- 
urely time in Sicily and Italy, and now is 



in Paris, having criticism on her work, 
before coming back to the Academy in 
January. She had planned to go to 
Greece, but tales of fever and bandits 
deterred her. 

Emily Cooper Johnson and Helen Grif- 
fith set sail in the autumn for a trip 
around the world. A beautiful picture of 
Coopy and Griffy riding on the fanciest 
elephant in India made a gay Christmas 
card. 

1906 
Class Editor: Mrs. Edward Sturdevant, 
215 Augur Avenue, 
Fort Leavenworth, Kan. 

Out of twelve postals sent out, the Class 
Editor received two replies. Much as she 
would like to make this column inter- 
esting, it is impossible to do so without 
YOUR co-operation. She hopes these 
few remarks bring a proper sense of sin 
to certain parties. 

Mary Collins Kellogg spent last sum- 
mer on an island in Casco Bay. This 
winter she is busy with the College Wom- 
an's Club of Schenectady, of which she 
is President. Her children being not yet 
of college age, she is planning to take 
them abroad in April. 

Ethel deKoven Hudson returned the 
end of November from three months 
abroad and ten thousand miles of motor- 
ing. She had a fascinating, interesting 
trip through France, Spain and England. 

Anna Elfreth also was in France and 
England last summer. She expects to go 
abroad in June to spend a year in Eng- 
land, Scotland and on the Continent. She 
has been teaching Latin for the past two 
years in the High School, Wilmington, 
Delaware. Her address is 913 Washing- 
ton Street. 

1907 
Class Editor: Alice Hawkins, 

Taylor Hall, Bryn Mawr, Penna. 

Elma Daw Miller, who has been seen 
or heard from only at rare intervals, re- 
cently wrote an interesting letter to Helen 
Crane, 1909, whom she had met a few 
years ago crossing the Pacific. She is 
now living in Hollywood, and the Class 
will be glad to know that she is going on 
with her singing. She writes: "This 
fall I have felt that I have made distinct 
strides, as besides singing frequently over 
the radio, I was one of a chorus of 36 
women chosen out of 700 to sing in the 
first comic opera made in sound pictures, 
The Desert Song, made by Warner 
Brothers with Vitaphone. As nearly all 
the singers were soloists, the singing was 
great and the sets and costumes really 
beautiful. Do go see the picture when it 



20 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



comes out and see if you can find me — 
I hardly think so. Sang mezzo, which I 
just ruined my voice singing in the B. M. 
Glee Club years ago — but it wasn't placed 
and I sang too much. I don't know that 
you are at all interested in the movies, 
but of course one is completely out of 
things who isn't here. However, this is 
the first time I ever tried to crash the 
gate at a studio, so was much pleased to 
have made the grade. It is an experience 
similar to having been in the original 
Floradora Sextette. We worked together 
for seven weeks and everyone at the 
studio seemed to like us, for they had 
never dealt with a crowd of really good 
singers before. The experiences were 
many and amusing." 

With Elma forging to the front in the 
movies, and Peggy Barnes' name becom- 
ing an old story on Broadway, 1907's 
fame has indeed spread from coast to 
coast. Peg's success has now taken on 
the importance of a news item, so that an 
account of the Age of Innocence has ap- 
peared elsewhere in these pages. How- 
ever, watch this space for advance infor- 
mation of future triumphs. When the play 
opened at the- Empire Theatre on Novem- 
ber 27, only about fifty tickets were to be 
had at public sale, and at least fifteen 
of these had been secured by enterprising 
classmates, among whom were Julie Ben- 
jamin Howson, Dorothy Forster Miller, 
Ellen Thayer and Eunice Schenck. May 
Ballin and E. B. Wherry went to the first 
matinee, which the Class Editor is in- 
formed on excellent authority broke the 
record of box office receipts for the Em- 
pire. On the first night Peg herself, at- 
tended by her distinguished-looking hus- 
band, was "cowering" in the balcony. Be- 
tween the acts, while the lights were still 
dim, she started to go out to the lobby 
and tripped on the stairs. A kind lady 
sitting on the aisle two rows behind her 
put out a helping hand, and as the lights 
went up, there were Peg and Eunice 
clutching each other. The playwright let 
out a surprised shriek reminiscent of ath- 
letic field sidelines. 

Tink Meigs has two new books out, 
which the shops say were best sellers for 
the Christmas trade: Clearing Weather 
and The Wonderful Locomotive. 

No 1907 notes have appeared in this 
column in the last two issues of the Bul- 
letin partly because the Class Editor in 
her role as Business Manager had to cut 
down expense somehow, and it was easier 
to eliminate her own stuff than it was to 
placate other irate Class Editors whose 
efforts had not appeared. In addition she 
felt that it was not fair to the other 



classes to put them to shame by continu- 
ing to retail 1907's superior achievements. 
However, that burst of enthusiasm re- 
cently in regard to grandchildren led her 
to do a few statistics of another sort of 
offspring. She is willing to bet at long 
odds that 1907 has more members who 
have broken into print than any other 
class. Here is the list so far compiled, 
alphabetically arranged. If any one has 
been left out, please complain loudly. 
Peggy Barnes, Margaret Bailey, Tony 
Cannon, Eleanor Ecob Sawyer, Hortense 
Flexner King, Alice Gerstenberg, Anna 
Haines, Ruth Hammit Kauffman, Grace 
Hutchins, Jeannette Klauder Spencer, 
Tink Meigs, Mabel O'Sullivan. 

Add to these Elma in the movies ; Bux, 
who adorned the Keith Circuit for a time ; 
and Regina Christy, whom Miss Madison 
refused for seven years to classify as Ar- 
tist's Model, although it was perfectly 
true; Gertrude Hill and Adele Brandeis, 
whose pictures as well as their question- 
naires entitle them to be called artists; 
not to mention our doctors and our splen- 
did group of those teaching, and the class 
may well give a complacent chuckle when 
the present-day undergraduate talks so 
scornfully of that "rah rah collegiate" 
period which was ours. 
1908 
Class Editor: Margaret Copeland, 
(Mrs. Nathaniel H. Blatchford), 
844 Auburn Road, Hubbard Woods, 
111. 

Agnes Goldman Sanborn, with a very 
quaint and amusing card, announces the 
"discovery" of Sarah Judith Sanborn on 
August 24, 1928. 

Louise Hyman Pollak spent a delightful 
month last summer in Banff. 

Sarah Sanborne Weaver writes from 
Donna, Texas, that she is Vice-Regent of 
the D. A. R. Chapter and Chairman of the 
Valley Federations of Women's Clubs, an 
organization of 1200 women. At the time 
of her letter she was expecting to desert 
her six children and go to the Democratic 
Convention. 

1909 
Class Editor: Helen Bond Crane, 

• Denbigh Hall, Bryn Mawr. 

The Class wishes to express its sym- 
pathy with Caroline Kamm McKinnon, 
whose mother died last fall after a long 
illness. Caroline herself, after a period 
of rest, has returned to her home in Port- 
land, Oregon. 

Just by way of a Christmas card, Ethel 
Matlson Heald comes out of her long 
silence to say that she is still living in 
Omaha, and that some day in the near 
future, when she can escape from her 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



21 



"three rising young Americans," she 
hopes to come back East for a visit. 

Margaret Ames Wright says: "For 
news I'll just give last year's. We spent 
twelve months abroad, my husband and I 
and our four children — two boys and two 
girls, alternating. My husband writes 
short stories, which gives us an excellent 
excuse for traveling. We had a little 
house in England during the summer, and 
a large and draughty one in Italy for the 
winter. We had a glimpse of Shirley 
Putnam O'Hara and her husband and two 
babies; now, as perhaps you know, they 
are living in Paris." 

A letter from Mary Goodwin Storrs 
and family, dated October 11th, just off 
the coast of India, reports that they* had 
a delightful and interesting trip out, and 
that the prospects for returning to Shao- 
Wu were excellent. "We have been re- 
assured as to the outlook for getting 
twenty cases of newly bought provisions 
safely up the Min river. It seems that 
the bandits are much less likely to be 
regaled on our sugar and cereals than for 
years past." 

Jessie Gilroy Hall has recently married 
the German sculptor, Heinz Warneke. 
"We live about half the time in New 
York, but our permanent address is in 
Paris (9 Rue de Chatillon). I myself 
have become a painter and was lucky 
enough to exhibit twice last winter in 
New York." So we now number at least 
two painters, though no further word can 
be dragged out of Elise Donaldson. 

My typewriter, following an irresistible 
impulse, was about to sign off with 
"Merry Christmas." However, by the 
time this gets into print, the only appro- 
priate slogan will be, "Come to Alumnae 
Meeting," unless that event; too, will be 
a thing of the past. 

1910 
Class Editor: Emily L. Storer, 

Wardman Park Hotel, Washington, 
D. C. 

Mary Ag. Irvine announces "Lots of 
news. I am on my way around the 
world, spending the winter in the Phil- 
ippines and next summer in Europe. I 
stopped in Chicago with Frances and had 
a beautiful time. Saw her three darling- 
youngsters, also Betty and her daughter. 
Spent the summer in the Southwest, main- 
ly New Mexico, and touched Arizona, 
Utah and Colorado, loveliest country I 
ever saw. Indian dances and pueblos 
most interesting. Saw Ruth in S. F., first 
time since she has been married, and she's 
the same old Ruth. She has three lovely 
daughters. Am most impressed by the 



tales of my college friends. Joe Petts, 
with whom I have been living the last ten 
years, is down at B. M. C, taking Miss 
Applebee's place. Return next fall to N. Y. 
and Miss Chapin's. No room for more. 
I also saw K. Branson and her attractive 
school." 

Annie Jones Roseborough — "We had a 
happy three months in the mountains. 
Brown Cabin would welcome any of the 
Class of 1910 who happen to be in Estes 
Park. We are again back in Lincoln. 
Mary Elizabeth is in the 3rd A and Mar- 
garet Annie in the 1st B. They are happy 
and well, and very active. Yes, they both 
love music. Mary Elizabeth plays rather 
well. Margaret is just beginning piano. 
Each day I try to practice. Next Mon- 
day I am playing three compositions by 
ultra-modern German composers for 
members of our Musical Art Club. Wish 
you could hear my husband's choir of 52 
voices. Students of the University. 
Greetings and best wishes to all of 1910." 

Gertrude Kingsbacher S u n s t e i n — 
"About a month ago I returned from a 
summer's tour to the Pacific Coast. We 
took our four children, aged 12 to 6 years, 
through Yellowstone Park to Seattle and 
Mt. Rainier, down the Pacific Coast to 
San Francisco and Los Angeles. Kept 
house at the seashore for six weeks and 
returned home by way of the Grand Can- 
yon and the Indian Detour in New Mex- 
ico. A most thrilling adventure for all 
of us. Now I am enjoying a sabbatical 
year of rest from the arduous labors of 
"bringing up a school" (to use my small 
daughter's description of me), which has 
now, after six years of struggle, grown 
to man's estate. I still play tennis and 
skate and swim, if you must have a record 
of my athletics. Much love. Greetings!" 

Frances Lord Robbins — "I feel as 
though I belonged to the vast middle west 
American crew, for we have left the east- 
ern boundary of civilization in Michigan 
and ventured to unturned Illinois prairie 
regions. Sidney gave up his parish in 
Ann Arbor in September and he is now- 
trying his hand at teaching in Lombard 
College. It's a new venture and I feel a 
distinct change in my contact with people. 
It was hard to leave all our friends of 
nearly nine years, but I think we are find- 
ing an interesting new set in this new 
environment. The children cling to their 
old Michigan loves, and we may go back 
there for the summer. You see, New 
England gets farther and farther away as 
our family grows larger in number and 
years. Anne and John are comfortably 
adjusted to their new school and Dick and 



22 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



Ralph play at home so much, it makes 
little difference what state that's in." 

Lucie Reichenbach Taylor — "My hus- 
band and I had two lovely months abroad 
again this summer, mostly in Stratford- 
upon - Avon, hunting up data about 
Shakespearean festivals for us in public- 
ity work for the Stratford-upon-Avon 
Festival Company, now playing in Can- 
ada and the West. After absorbing as 
much Elizabethan atmosphere as possible 
there, we spent a week in London making 
new literary contacts, then had a fort- 
night's vacation motoring in Belgium and 
Holland, and another in Paris studying 
the Russian Ballet's new work, and doing 
— well, all the things one does in Paris 
and nowhere else. The high spot of the 
tour was a thrilling airplane flight from 
London to Brussels which left us rest- 
lessly air-minded. In September I had a 
week-end in Philadelphia with Mary Root 
and a glimpse of the beautiful new Good- 
hart Hall. At present our chief concern 
is where, when, and whether to send our 
almost-five-year-old daughter to kinder- 
garten — a problem that now seems as 
momentous as if it were to be her only 
alma mater." 

Rosalind Romeyn Everdell — "I am poor 
as a church mouse at the moment because 
we have just built ourselves a new house 
on Shelton Rock Road, Manhasset, Long 
Island, and one room in it is completely 
unfurnished ! We are expecting to move 
in January and at the moment my eye is 
attune to paint samples only ! It is hard 
work, but all-absorbing and great fun — 
this building and decorating a new 
house." 

Kate Rotan Drinker writes: "My news 
debt is, I fear, some two years overdue. 
But here goes to make an honest woman 
of me. Winter before last we spent in 
Copenhagen, where Cecil was taking ad- 
vantage of a sabbatical year to do some 
special work in physiology. In July, 1927, 
after a month in London, we came home. 
Of succeeding events, the following is a 
brief summary: Summer of 1927, whoop- 
ing cough (in which I joined the chil- 
dren) ; winter of 1927-28, spent largely in 
bed or marooned at home, owing to a 
digestion gone amok; summer, 1928, spent 
quietly at the Drinker farm; winter 1928- 
29, began darkly with six weeks in bed, 
owing to a bad back, which, at present 
writing, is still obstinately misbehaving. 
Results: I am still married and still the 
mother of two children, but am no longer 
that prideful object, a married woman 
with a paid occupation." 

Kate has since been in the hospital hav- 



ing X-rays. We all hope for better news 
soon. 

Charlotte Simonds Sage — Charlotte's 
promised history hasn't come, so I'd like 
to report that she has a life-sized job 
with carpenters remaking her house and 
barn and five strenuous children to get to 
the three-miles-off school and back sev- 
eral times a day. She is looking as young 
and nice as ever, though, but I'm glad 
she's a little homesick for Boston, be- 
cause we miss her badly. 

Emily L. Storer — "My present history 
seems to be one of never staying put. 
I went to Europe last summer to Czecho- 
slovakia, the Tyrol and Switzerland. We 
flew from Prague to Munich, taking only 
two hours instead of the eleven hours 
with many bad connections by train. We 
spent a week in Kandersteg with Shirley 
Putnam O'Hara and her nice young fam- 
ily and another week in Geneva with the 
League of Nations and its thrilling meet- 
ings. It has been fun being at home this 
autumn and catching up with my young 
nieces and nephews. I am in Washington 
now, and we are leaving for Honolulu 
the end of January. We'll explore some 
of the Southwest of this country and then 
settle down for a while in that land of 
color, which I have always been crazy to 
see." 

Miriam Hedges Smith — "Phyllis and I 
are on a visit to my sister in Mansfield, 
Ohio. We expect to stay until after 
Christmas and then return to Laguna 
Beach. I hope eventually to come back 
East to live so that Phyllis may attend a 
good school — That's my news." 

1914 
Class Editor: Elizabeth Ayer Inches 
(Mrs. Henderson Inches), 
41 Middlesex Road, Chestnut Hill, 
Mass. 
Helen Shaw has a fourth child, John 
Knox Crosby, born November 23rd — 
weighing 9 pounds, 6 ounces. 

1916 
Class Editor: Catherine S. Godley, 
768 Ridgeway Avenue, Avondale, 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Constance Dowd has moved into a 
brand new apartment which is the last 
word" in efficiency all the way from a dis- 
appearing ironing-board to a plug for the 
radio. Her new address is 3654 Middle- 
ton Avenue, Clifton. Cedy went home for 
Christmas and then to New York for a 
Camp Runoia reunion. 

Margaret Chase Locke's second daugh- 
ter, Elizabeth Chase, was born January 
17, 1928. Jute says she is blonde, blue- 
eyed and just now at an impish age. She 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



23 



is much admired by her sister, Margaret, 
who is four and a half. 

Willie Savage Turner has a son, Con- 
rad, born November 21st. He is her fifth 
child and all are hale and hearty. 

1919 
Class Editor: Mary Ramsey Phelps 
(Mrs. William E. Phelps), 
Guyencourt, Del. 

Here is some belated news about Ade- 
laide Landon, who has been studying 
abroad, and returned on the Homeric in 
September. She wrote then: "First of 
all I want to tell you about Tip and her 
husband and baby. Tip and I met on 
the, boat going home for Christmas — 
Tourist 3rd — and came back together in 
January. About a week ago, just before 
I sailed, I paid a flying visit to them in 
England and made the acquaintance of 
Mary Lee, Jr., all of a little over two 
months old. They have rented the quaint- 
est old cottage, red brick, with timbers 
in the ceilings, a lovely old garden, etc. 
They are out of the army and looking 
around for something else. ... I also 
saw Dorothea Chambers Blaisdell and her 
husband in London in the spring. He was 
writing his thesis for Columbia on the 
Ottoman debt. They had been touring 
Europe beginning with Constantinople, 
and as far as I could gather he'd been 
interviewing heads of banks and foreign 
offices to get his data. 

"I spent the winter at Oxford, or three 
terms — studying theology. I was a spe- 
cial student at Mansfield College — the 
Congregational College for the ministry — 
where Dr. Selbie has been very good 
about taking in women students. There 
were five of us women students, three 
Americans and two English. I was also 
able to attend many of the Oxford Uni- 
versity lectures I wanted to and had a 
most interesting time in every way. Then 
as Oxford ended in June and the German 
Universities continue till about August 
1st, I was able to get in five weeks at the 
University of Gottingen, which was also 
most interesting and enjoyable. As I had 
hardly looked at a German book since 
the Oral days, I floundered considerably 
but managed to get along without too 
many breaks ! Women as ministers seem 
to have more of a chance today in Ger- 
many than do women in the Anglican 
communion. It was all most interesting, 
the whole year, giving one insights into 
and understanding of the English and 
German people and of their point of view, 
methods, and culture, etc., etc., such as 
one can rarely acquire without living in 



those countries. . . . Now I am about to 
take up the work again at Grace Church, 
Broadway and 10th Street, New York 
City, better equipped, I hope, and readier 
to give myself to it more completely. This 
year abroad has convinced me more than 
ever that the only hope, both for indi- 
viduals and for civilization, is to be 
founded on the rock of unselfishness, love 
and service, in faith in God as revealed 
by Christ, and in his present workings in 
the world. I shall love to see any of '19 
who come to New York." 

All honor to Adelaide for her achieve- 
ments in scholarship and devotion. The 
above notes are taken from a letter which 
she wrote to Peggy Rhoads under the 
impression that the latter was still class 
editor, and are now passed on with apol- 
ogies for their late appearance. They 
were received in Tokyo, where Peggy 
was just concluding a most interesting 
visit of three months." Of course the last 
weeks were the busiest. Tokyo was in 
gala array and everything seemed aus- 
picious for the Enthronement. On the 
day of the Emperor's return to Tokyo, as 
the guns fired the Imperial salute, I sailed 
for home on the President Jefferson, to 
reach Philadelphia shortly before Christ- 
mas. My time in Japan was wonderful. 
I enjoyed almost every minute. I spent 
a month in the summer at Takayama, a 
beautiful little seaside place 200 miles 
north of Tokyo, near the famous Mat- 
sushima. Imagine loitering in a sampan 
among pine-clad islands, or swimming in 
a warm smooth sea, with the full moon 
shining down between the pines, and one 
lantern watching on the beach. I was 
also fortunate in being able to see many 
of the famous beautiful places in Japan, 
and to visit some that were utterly un- 
spoiled by the West. For three months I 
made headquarters in Tokyo and took 
trips into the country to visit* the centres 
of Friends' work. I was privileged to 
be entertained in many Japanese homes, 
and their hospitality was marvellous. I 
studied Japanese language and history as 
much as I could during the short and 
interrupted period, and felt with Adelaide 
that I had a new insight into a culture 
that is unique and fascinating, and which 
is being, not merely transformed, I feel, 
but in a marvellous way transmuted by 
the impact of the West. The civilization 
that is being made in Japan is not west- 
ern, although it has been under western 
influence; it is going to be just as truly 
Japanese as was the old feudal culture, 
and is going to be a real contribution to 
the world." 



24 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



1921 
Class Editor: Helen James Rogers, 
99 Poplar Plains Road, 
Toronto, Ontario. 

Dr. Dorothy Lubin Heller is living in 
Englewood, N. J., where her husband is 
practicing Pediatrics. Her son, David, is 
almost two years old. 

Alice Whittier is interning at the Chil- 
dren's Memorial Hospital in Chicago. 

Aileen Weston has been abroad for six 
months, visiting England, Scotland, Spain, 
France and Switzerland. She attended 
the School of International Relations in 
Geneva for\ a month, and then visited 
Marie-Louise Fearey Piatt in her villa 
near Monte Carlo. 

Eleanor Donnelley was married at her 
home in Lake Forest on December 15th 
to Calvin Pardee Erdman, Princeton, 
1915. Darn was an outstandingly lovely 
bride. She wore the dress her mother 
was married in in 1894, of white brocade 
with a long flowing skirt, leg of mutton 
sleeves and high boned collar. Teddy 
Donnelley HafTner was the Matron of 
Honor and Luz Taylor the Maid of 
Honor. They wore dresses of green 
satin, a shade deeper in colour than 
those worn by the three bridesmaids. 
Darn plans to go abroad on her honey- 
moon and on her return to live in Cali- 
fornia. Mr. Erdman is a professor of 
Biblical Literature at Occidental College 
in California. 

Ellen Jay Garrison, Katharine Walker 
Bradford and Helen James Rogers went 
to Lake Forest for Darn's wedding. Kat 
and Jimmy stayed with Lydia Beckwith 
Lee in her new house, an old house which 
has been remodeled most successfully and 
attractively. The interior shows Chickie's 
same deft hands and artistic talent which 
were such a boon to us in our class parties 
and plays. Chickie has two sons, John, 
aged four, and Douglas, aged two and 
a half years. 

1923 
Class Editor: Katharine L. Strauss, 
27 E. 69th St., New York City. 
Dorothy Stewart Pierson writes: I am 
sending you a note for the '23 news. I 
have a daughter, Frances, born June 10th, 
who has red hair and blue eyes and is 
a very entertaining being. She is fed 
just the way I used to feed my prize- 
winning Shepherd puppies, and thrives 
the way they did. 

1924 
Class Editor: Mildred Buchanan, 
515 Baird Ave., Merion, Pa. 
Doris Hawkins was married on Dec. 1 
to Schuyler Baldwin, Haverford '26. They 
had a lovely wedding and Woodie was 
one of the bridesmaids. Martha Fischer 



came down from New Haven to attend 
and others of '24 who were there were 
Dot Litchfield, Chuck Woodworth, Betzy 
Crowell Kaltenthaler and her husband 
and M. Buchanan. Thanks to this meet- 
ing we have a few items to put in the 
Bulletin 'this month. 

Speaking of Betzy — do you all realize 
that our Class Baby, Elizabeth Brooks 
Kaltenthaler, was three years old on the 
8th of December? She is adorable and 
'24 may well be proud to claim her. 

Justine Wise Tulin has a son born 
October 30, 1928. She says he keeps her 
very busy but she is planning to take the 
Connecticut Bar exams in a few weeks. 
Her address is Mrs. Leon Arthur Tulin, 
966 Prospect Street, New Haven. 

Roberte Godefroy has announced her 
engagement to Dr. Herve Chauvel. He 
has done a great deal of research work in 
different hospitals and he is the youngest 
member of the Botanical Institute of 
France. Martha writes, "He comes from 
a very aristocratic old family of St. 
Brieux, Brittany, and was Roberte's pro- 
fessor for a short time at the Pasteur 
Institute. Roberte says she is teaching 
him English and he is very eager to visit 
the United States and to meet all her 
American friends. She will finish up all 
her work this year and when they are 
married (in June) they plan to settle 
down somewhere in France." Twenty- 
four certainly wishes Roberte all happi- 
ness ! 

Mary Cheston Tupper has a daughter, 
Charlotte Elizabeth, who was born some- 
time in the early summer. 

Mary Rodney Brinser (Mrs. Donald 
C), is living in Hillcrest Court, _ 70th 
Street and Broadway, Jackson Heights, 
L. I. 

Elizabeth Ives, '24, is living at home, 
145 East 35th Street, New York City, 
and working in the Publicity Department 
of F. B. Keith's. 

1926 
Class Editor: Harriot Hopkinson, 
70 Beacon Street, Boston. 

Sally McAdoo was married on Novem- 
ber 8th, to Brice Clagget of Washington, 
at a very small ceremony at the house 
of a friend. They have gone to England 
for their honeymoon, but will be in this 
country for the winter, living at George- 
town. 

Another recent bride is Betty Taylor, 
who is now (exact date of transition un- 
known) Mrs. Thomas F. McManus, and 
living in Eastland, Texas. 

Marjorie Falk (Mme. Marcel Levy- 
Falk) may be congratulated at 90 bis 
Avenue Henri Martin, Paris, on the ac- 
quisition of a son, Philip, late in Septem- 
ber. 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



25 



Tweedle has returned from a long stay 
at a dude ranch somewhere out there west 
of the Mississippi, where an excellent 
time seems to have been had by all. This 
was very likely not a continuation of her 
recent nation-wide advertising campaign 
of White Rose Bread; on the other hand, 
one never can tell about E. G. T. ; her 
present occupation is unknown. 

Alice Long (Mrs. John J. Goldsmith) 
is living at 240 West End Avenue, New 
York. August she spent touring Europe, 
principally Paris and Vienna and Biar- 
ritz, and October she spent at the un- 
rewarded toil of attempt to make New 
York safe for Democracy and Al. In 
this she has the sincere sympathy of your 
class editor, a fellow mourner, and a 
cordial invitation to move to Massa- 
chusetts. 

Betty Burroughs reports that her pres- 
ent vocation is teaching English at Miss 
Madeira's at Washington. Her avocation, 
meanwhile, is Art, she having begun this 
summer at Mr. Hawthorne's school at 
Provincetown, Mass., continued at the 
Grand Central School in New York, and 
is now going on with it in Washington. 

Grove is living in Newark, at 297 Mt. 
Prospect Avenue, and while her- husband 
practices law in the same office with B. 
Pitney's brothers, she has a job teaching 
a combination of History of Art and 
Dramatics, with a little landscape garden- 
ing thrown in for practice. 

Charis has been and is, abroad. In 
September she was in Geneva, during the 
Assembly of the League of Nations, and 
at present she is living in London, her 
address being 89 Harley Street. She is 
working in the library of the Council of 
Foreign Relations. 

Miriam Lewis is at the Moravian Sem- 
inary, at Bethlehem, Pa., where she is 
teaching French and Ancient History be- 
tween week-ends in New York. 

Your correspondent, H. H., has re- 
nounced her ways of idleness, and is 
working this winter at the University 
Film Foundation, in Cambridge. This is 
where movies of an educational nature 
are collected, distributed and produced, 
chiefly for the purpose of supplementing 
lecture courses at Harvard and elsewhere, 
and where her work consists of review- 
ing films, helping re-edit them, splice them 
when broken, make maps, and do general 
odd jobs; which is all rather fun. We 
received an eight-foot python the other 
day, alive in a suitcase, and it was quite 
an office pet before it was duly filmed 
and sent back to New York. Very educa- 
tional. 



JOHN HANCOCK SERIES 

THE FIELD 

of SOCIAL 

SERVICE 

is the place where 
many good gradu- 
ates go. 

A high form of Social 
Service, yielding a high- 
er remuneration than 
Settlement Work, lies in 
Selling Life Insurance 
in your own community. 

John Hancock Women 
Agents are very often 
college graduates. 

♦♦ Let us tell you 
more about it. 

Inquiry Bureau 




197 Clarendon St., Boston, Mass. 

Please send me further infor- 
mation about Insurance as a Pro- 
fession for Women. 

Name. 



Address 

*..G. 

- OVER SIXTY-FIVE YEARS IN BUSINESS - 



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The Saint Timothy's School 
for Girls 

CATONSVILLE, MARYLAND 

Founded September 1882 

COLLEGE PREPARATORY 

AND 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

MISS LOUISA McENDREE FOWLER 
Head of the School 

Wykeham Rise 

WASHINGTON, CONNECTICUT 

A COUNTRY SCHOOL 
FOR GIRLS 

FANNY E. DAVIES, LL.A., Headmistress 
Prepares for Bryn Mawr and Other Colleges 

The Ethel Walker School 

SIMSBURY, CONNECTICUT 

Head of School 

ETHEL WALKER SMITH, A.M., Bryn Mawr College 

Head Mistress 

JESSIE GERMAIN HEWITT, A.B., Bryn Mawr College 

UNIVERSITYgTrLs 

BOARDING AND DAY SCHOOL 

Founded 1896 

Thorough and successful Preparation 

for Eastern Colleges for Women as well as 

for Midwestern Colleges and Universities 

Illustrated Catalogue on Request 

ANNA B. HAIRE, A.B., SMITH COLLEGE, Principal 

1106-B Lake Shore Drive Chicago, Illinois 



The Episcopal Academy 

(Founded 1785) 

CITY LINE, OVERBROOK, PA. 

A country day school for boys 

Endorsed by Bryn Mawr Alumnae 



THE HARTRIDGE SCHOOL 
FOR GIRLS 

50 minutes from New York 

A country school with beautiful grounds. 
College Preparatory and General Courses. 
Over fifty girls in leading colleges today. 
Resident Department carefully restricted. 
Special attention to Music and Art. 
Athletics, Dramatics, Riding, 

EMELYN B. HARTRIDGE, Vassar, A.B., Principal 

PlaJnfield, New Jersey 

ROGERS HALL 

Thorough Preparation for College Admission 
Examinations. Graduate Courses. Home Making, 
Secretarial. Art. Two years Advanced Work for 
High School Graduates. 

For Illustrated Catalogue Address the Principa 

MRS. EDITH CHAPIN CRAVEN Bryn Mawr 

Principal Lowell, Mass. 

The Harcum School 

BRYN MAWR, PA. 

Prepares for Bryn Mawr and all leading colleges 

Musical Course prepares lor the Depart- 
ment of Music of Bryn Mawr College 
EDITH H. HARCUM, Head of School 
L. MAY WILLIS, Principal 

THE MISSES KIRK'S 

College Preparatory School 

PREPARATORY TO BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 
Individual Instruction. Athletics. 

Clovercroft, Montgomery Avenue, Rosemont, Pa. 
Mail, telephone and telegraph address: Bryn MavOr, Pa. 



CHOATE SCHOOL 

1600 Beacon Street, Brookline, Mass. 

HOME AND DAY SCHOOL 
FOR GIRLS 

EMPHASIS ON COLLEGE PREPARATION 

Elective Courses for students not preparing 
for College 

AUGUSTA CHOATE, A.M. (Vassar) 

Principal 



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THE AGNES IRWIN SCHOOL 

2009-2011 Delancey Place, Philadelphia 

A College Preparatory 
SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

BERTHA M. LAWS, A.B., Headmistress 



GRAY GABLES 



Complete College Preparatory Course. 
One year course for Board Examination. 

For catalog address: 

Hope Fisheb, Ph.D., Bancroft School 

Wobcesteb, Massachusetts 



MISS BEARD'S SCHOOL 

A Country School near New York 

Orange, New Jersey 
COLLEGE PREPARATION 

Advanced Courses Junior High School 

Music, Art, Domestic Science 

Catalog on Request 

LUCIE C. BEARD, Headmistress 

The Katharine Branson School 

ROSS, CALIFORNIA Across the Bay from San Francisco 

A Country School College Preparatory 

Head: 
Katharine Fleming Branson, A.B., Bryn Mawr 

MISS MADEIRA'S SCHOOL 

1330 19th St., N. W. Washington. D. C. 

A RESIDENT AND DAY SCHOOL FOR 
GIRLS 

LUCY MADEIRA WING, A.B. 

MRS. DAVID LAFOREST WING 

Head Mistress 

MISS WRIGHT'S SCHOOL 

Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Prepares for College Board 
Examination 



FERRY HALL 

A RESIDENT AND DAY SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

On Lake Michigan, near Chicago 

College Preparatory. Genera and Advanced Courses, 
Departments of Music. Expression, and Art. Athletics 
and Swimming Pool. 

Eloise R. Tremain, A.B., Bryn Mawr, Principal 



ROSEMARY HALL 

College Preparatory 
(With supplementary but not alternative courses) 

> Head Misireste* 

GREENWICH - - CONNECTICUT 

The Shipley School 

Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 

Preparatory to Bryn Mawr College 

ALICE G. HOWLAND, ELEANOR 0. BROWNELL 
Principals 

MISS RANSOM and 
MISS BRIDGES' SCHOOL 

PIEDMONT, CALIFORNIA 

(A suburb of San Francisco) 

A RESIDENT AND DAY SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

General and College Preparatory Courses 
Outdoor Life throughout the year 

EDITH BRIDGES, B.L., Principal 

The Baldwin School 

A Country School for Girls 
BRYN MAWR PENNSYLVANIA 

Preparation for Bryn Mawr, Mount Holyoke. Smith. 

Vassar and Wellesley college*. Abundant outdoor life. 

Hockey, basketball, tennis. 

ELIZABETH FORREST JOHNSON. A.B. 

HEAD 

THE LOW AND HEYWOOD SCHOOL 

Emphasizing college preparatory work. 

Also general and special courses. 

One year intensive college preparation. 

Junior school. 

64th year. Catalogue. 

SHIPPAN POINT, STAMFORD, CONN. 



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BRIARCLIFF 

Mrs. Dow's School for Girls 

Margaret Bell Merrill, M.A., Principal 
BRIARCLIFF MANOR NEW YORK 

College Preparatory 
and General Academic Courses 

Post Graduate Department 

Music and Art with New York 
advantages. New Swimming Pool 

Music Dept. Art Dept. 

Jan Sickesz Chas. W. Hawthorne, N. A. 

Director Director 



ThePhebeAnna 
Thome Shool 

UNDER THE DIRECTION OF 

THE 
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



A progressive school preparing 
for all colleges. Open air class 
rooms. Pre-school, Primary, 
Elementary and High School 
Grades. 



BRYN MAWR, PA. 

Agnes L. Rogers, Ph.D., Director 
Frances Browne, A.B., HeadMistress 




Cathedral School of St. Mary 



GARDEN CITY, LONG ISLAND, N. Y. 

A school for Girls 19 miles from New York. College 

preparatory and general courses. Music. Art and 

Domestic Science. Catalogue on request. Box B. 

MIRIAM A. BYTEL, A.B., Radcliffe, Principal 

BERTHA GORDON WOOD, A.B., Bryn Mawr, 

Assistant Principal 



The Traphagen School of Fashion 



I 



Register now for mid-term 
session and save half year 

All phases from elementary to full 
mastery ol costume design and illus- 
tration taught in shortest time com- 
patible with thoroughness. Day and 
Evening classes. Saturday courses for 
Adults and Children. Our Sales De- 
partment disposes of student work. 
Every member of advanced classes 
often placed through our Employment 
Bureau. Write for announcement. 



In Arnold, Constable & Company Costume 
Design Competition, over 100 schools and 
nearly 800 students took part; all prizes 
were awarded to Traphagen pupils with 
exception of one of the five third prizes. 

1680 Broadway (near 52nd St.) New Y< 



that carries the vivacity 

of campus clothes 

into the world 

of fashion 

beyond. 

SAKS-FIFTH AVENUE 

FORTY- NINTH to FIFTIETH STREET 
NEW YORK 



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1896 1929 

BACK LOG CAMP 

THE ADIRONDACK MOUNTAINS 
INDIAN LAKE, NEW YORK 

Why Back Log Camp? 

The heart of a camp is the fire. In a small camp it provides heat and light, 
cooks the food, and is the focus of the evening palaver over the day's adven- 
tures. Of course in a large camp like Back Log Camp the cooking is done in a 
regular kitchen. But every tent has a fireplace, and this fireplace is kept 
supplied with back logs. A back log is a large log against which the fire is built. 
A back log fire is not an accidental heap of burning sticks. It is a scientifically 
constructed fire that focuses the heat and throws it straight into your tent. 

Every evening and on rainy or cold days there is a huge central public back 
log fire before an open camp. After the twilight paddle on the Lake, if you feel 
promiscuously sociable, you spend the evening here or in the newly built Lodge 
with its reading lamps and great stone fireplace. But if you want to be alone 
or with a small group of intimate friends, you start your own fire, collect the 
fellow philosophers, and discourse of life at large in the flickering, warming 
light. And to its dying glow you go to sleep. 

Letters of inquiry should be addressed to Other references 

Mrs. Bertha Brown Lambert (Bryn Mawr, 1904) Mrs ' Anna H ^ h " ne Brown (Bryn Mawr,1912) 

v ' ' ' Westtown, Penna. 

272 Park Avenue 



Takoma Park, D. C. 



Dr. Henry J. Cadbury 

(Head of Biblical Dept., Bryn Mawr) 

Haverford, Penna. 



Learn t® Play 

bridge f 



NOW READY 

AUCTION BRIDGE* 
FOR BEGINNERS 

By MILTON C. WORK 

Now anyone can learn to play sound 
and enjoyable Bridge. Mr. Work's 
new book contains what everyone 
wants to know, needs to know, and 
should know. Average players, too, 
will find this book the key to win- 
ning Bridge. Cloth. 136 Pages. 
Price $1.00 

At all booksellers and stationers 




Wherever Bridge is 
played, at home or 
abroad, Milton C. 
Work is the pre-emi- 
nent authority ^9 out 
of every 10 teachers 
use his system ^ He 
originated the present 
count ^ Has served 
on every committee 
drafting laws ^ Re- 
ferred to by Colliers 
as" the supreme court 
of Bridge." 

THE JOHN C.WINSTON CO. 

PUBLISHERS PHILADELPHIA 



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Chapel, University of Chicago. Bertram Q. Qoodhue Associates, Architects. 
Leonard Construction Co., Builders. 

Beauty that only Natural 
Limestone can give 



FOR such a building as this new Chapel, 
only natural stone could do full justice 
to the architect's design. Indiana Limestone 
was chosen because it was ideal for the 
purpose. It is a fact that the limestones of 
which the great cathedrals of Europe are 
built, are not of so fine and durable a quality 
as this limestone from southern Indiana. 



A vast deposit and improved production 
methods make Indiana Limestone practi- 
cable for every building purpose at moderate 
cost. Let us send you an illustrated book' 
let showing college buildings built of this 
wonderful stone. Or a booklet showing 
residences. Address Dept 849, Service 
Bureau, Bedford, Indiana. 



INDIANA LIMESTONE COMPANY 



Qeneral Offices : Bedford, Indiana 



Executive Offices : Tribune Tower, Chicago 



Name .... 
Address 



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BRYN MAWR 

ALUMNAE 
BULLETIN 




THE ANNUAL MEETING 



March, 1929 



Vol. IX 



No. 2 



Entered as second-class matter, January 1. 1921, at the Post Office. Phiia.. fa., under Act of March 5 J 1879 

COPYRIGHT. 1929 

ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 



OFFICERS OF THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

EXECUTIVE BOARD 

President Louise Fleischmann Maclat, 1906 

Vice-President Natalie McFaden Blanton, 1917 

Recording Secretary Gertrude Hearne Myers, 1919 

Corresponding Secretary Mat Egan Stokes, 1911 

Treasurer Margaret E. Brusstar, 1903 

Chairman of the Finance Committee Caroline Florence Lexow, 1908 

Chairman of the Publicity Committee Caroline Morrow Chadwick-Collins, 1905 

ALUMNAE SECRETARY AND BUSINESS MANAGER OF THE BULLETIN 

Alice M. Hawkins, 1907 

EDITOR OF THE BULLETIN 

Marjorie L. Thompson, 1912 

DISTRICT COUNCILLORS 

District I Helen Evans Lewis, 1913 

District II Julia Langdon Loomis, 1895 

District III Mary Tyler Zabriskie, 1919 

District IV Katharine Holliday Daniels, 1918 

District V Frances Porter Adler, 1911 

District VI Erma Kingsbacher Stix, 1906 

District VII Helen Brayton Barendt, 1903 

ALUMNAE DIRECTORS 

Ruth Furness Porter, 1896 Mary Peirce, 1912 

Frances Fincke Hand, 1897 Margaret Reeve Cary, 1907 

Elizabeth Lewis Otey, 1901 

CHAIRMAN OF THE ALUMNAE FUND 

Caroline Florence Lexow, 1908 

CHAIRMAN OF THE ACADEMIC COMMITTEE 

Pauline Goldmark, 1896 

CHAIRMAN OF THE SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOAN FUND COMMITTEE 

Margaret Gilman, 1919J 

CHAIRMAN OF THE COMMITTEE ON HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Dr. Marjorie F. Murray, 1913 

CHAIRMAN OF THE NOMINATING COMMITTEE 

Eleanor Little Aldrich, 1905 



'Provident "Mutual 

Life Insurance Company of Philadelphia 

Pennsylvania Founded l86j 




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Man Really Need? 



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An exclusive school devoted to 

SECRETARIAL AND BUSINESS TRAINING 

Limited to those with the proper cultural background. ' 
Day and Evening Classes 

Call, write or phone for catalog 
IRVING EDGAR CHASE, Director Vanderbilt 2474 



THE 

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For Insurances on Lives and 
Granting Annuities 

TRUST AND SAFE DEPOSIT 
COMPANY 

Over a Century of Service 

C. S. W. PACKARD, President 

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Bryn Mawr Alumnae 
Bulletin 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF 
THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNA ASSOCIATION 

Marjorie L. Thompson, '12, Editor 
Alice M. Hawkins, '07, Business Manager 

EDITORIAL BOARD 

Eleanor Fleisher Riesman, '03 May Egan Stokes, '11 

Caroline Morrow Chadwick-Collins, 05 Ellenor Morris, '27 

Emily Fox Cheston, '08 Louise Fleischmann Maclay, '06, ex-officio 

Subscription Price, $1.50 a Year Single Copies, 25 Cents 

Checks should be drawn to the order of Bryn Mawr Alumnae Bulletin 
Published monthly, except August, September and October, at 1006 Arch St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Vol. IX March, 1929 No. 2 



It is difficult for the members of the Alumnae Association to bear in mind, 
always, the distinction between the function of the Council, which is purely advisory, 
and that of the Annual Meeting, which is legislative. The attempt to bring over 
into the Annual Meeting something of the subject matter which had made the 
Council this year particularly interesting, was, for that reason, not an unqualified 
success. The interest came, as interest always must, from within. When we come 
prepared to take action and to cast a vote for or against a given motion, material 
on which no action is necessary comes almost as an interruption to a train of thought 
and we are conscious of a slight impatience. This year the discussion on the 
financial questions was close and spirited, and each person present felt that her 
vote would inevitably have a very definite effect in a number of ways on the future 
development of the College. When this sense of responsibility is present, there is 
no necessity for considering ways and means to make a meeting come alive. If in 
the world at large the plea has gone out for an informed electorate, the plea should 
be no less inpassioned here in the Association. Each member of the Association 
should keep herself informed of actual conditions and should not simply depend 
on hearsay. The Alumnae Office is tireless in its efforts to co-operate, Class Col- 
lectors have very complete information, and the Alumnae Directors are the true 
liaison officers between the College and the members of the Association. With all 
these channels of information, no one need feel herself out of touch in any way. 
If one reads the minutes carefully, one can see how interest flared up when there 
was real work to be done and that the part of the meeting that was legislative was 
as successful from the point of view of participation and interest as any meeting 
could be. The interest was a spontaneous thing arising from the situation itself, 
and was not a matter of device or planning; surely with the growing importance of 
the Association such interest can be counted on from year to year. 



THE ANNUAL MEETING 

The Meeting, if one can so term the space of twenty-four hours that the 
Alumnae were gathered together, started very auspiciously in Rockefeller Hall Fri- 
day night. The hallway there is a pleasant place with the fire glowing in the grate 
and the soft colours of evening dresses against the light brown of the woodwork. 
Presently we all trooped in to dinner, and for a moment the writer, at least, found 
herself caught back to undergraduate days, as one of the maids who had waited on 
her then pulled out her chair and eagerly asked for news of the rest of the group. 
Nathalie McFaden Blanton, in her graceful little speech of welcome, in which 
she pictured the Alumnae Association as something to cling to when one comes 
wandering back to College, lest one feel like a ghost in the familiar places, lamented 
that not even the old maids were there any more, but Julia Maxwell and I nodded 
and smiled at each other, and little old Rosa bobbed good will across the room. 

It seemed strange to move out to the fire again so that we might have cigarettes 
with our coffee while the dining room was rearranged with 'the chairs in rows 
for Georgiana Goddard King's illustrated lecture on Migrants, Pilgrims, and Tour- 
ists. She led us inimitably from Paris down through Switzerland and Spain, to 
North Africa. The pictures and the comments were delightful, and by some curious 
flattering magic, even as she exhorted us never to become tourists, she allowed us 
to feel that we all of us, potentially at least, were of the chosen band of pilgrims. 

The next morning — Saturday — the formal meetings started in the Music Room 
of Goodhart Hall. Meeting there was frankly an experiment. To many it seemed 
an eminently successful one; the smallness of the room to them seemed to encourage 
free and rather intimate discussion. To others, of whom the writer is one, the 
irritating proportions of the room, the constant and unavoidable rustle of noise 
made by the many late comers, and the extreme discomfort of the chairs, made the 
great Hall seem very attractive, and the thought of space and quiet and upholstered 
pink seats almost too tantalizing. Surely there one could follow the discussion more 
easily and the discussion as can be seen from the condensed minutes, was exceed- 
ingly worth being followed. 

President Park's luncheon to the Alumnae was served as usual in Pembroke. 
This account seems to concern itself exclusively with seating arrangements, but no 
one, I think, felt that it made for the easy pleasant contacts which are in a way 
as much a part of the Annual Meeting as the business that is transacted, to have 
the chairs placed in long rows, one close behind the other, so that group conversation 
was an impossibility. However, when President Park spoke, and later when the 
business of the meeting continued, one forgot this minor question of chairs. 

President Park spoke briefly on Academic matters, stressing again what the 
introduction — if one may so refer to what has always existed at Bryn Mawr in 
some degree — of Honors Work in the various departments has meant to both the 
students and the Faculty. This really tremendous gain for the students has shown 
itself in the various short cuts that they have been able to take in foreign univer- 
sities, and in the fact that their attitude toward their work is so mature that the 
gap between Graduate and Undergraduate methods practically does not exist. And 

(2) 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 3 

it is significant how many students very quickly attain distinction in their chosen 
fields. In connection with this, President Park read an extract from a letter from 
the Assistant Director of the American Council on Education. He had been col- 
lecting information about students studying abroad, and says: 

"The first reply has been received from Dr. Edwin Deller of the University 
of London. It is very clear from Dr. Deller's report on the American students 
in the University of London from 1925 to 1928 that American universities and 
colleges have been represented by first rate institutions: Brown University, 1; Bryn 
Mawr College, 5 ; University of California, 1 ; University of Chicago, 3 ; Columbia 
University, 7; Cornell, 1; Harvard University, 4; Johns Hopkins University, 1; 
University of Minnesota, 2 ; Princeton University, 2 ; Radclifle College, 1 ; Smith 
College, 1 ; Vassal* College, 1 ; University of Vermont, 1 ; University of Wisconsin, 
1 ; Yale University, 1. 

"'The provost writes 'in all cases their work and progress was satisfactory.' " 

The fact that, with the exception of Columbia, Bryn Mawr sent more students 
than did any other college or university shows very clearly what is happening. An- 
other letter to put side by side with this is one from Mr. Capps, the Chairman of 
the Managing Committee of The American School of Classical Studies at Athens. 

'"There is no question in the mind of any member of the Managing Committee 
of the high standing, I think I may safely say the unique standing, of Bryn Mawr 
in relation to the Athenian School at this time, and personally I should like very 
much to see the dominant position of Bryn Mawr in the field of classical archaeology 
recognized and, if possible, helped by the election of a successor to Professor Car- 
penter to membership in the Committee." 

Delightful as such letters are, they bring home as almost nothing else can the 
ever-present fact of the continual problem of the increase of Academic salaries lest 
Bryn Mawr lose any of the people who have helped to put her in the position which 
she undoubtedly occupies in the Academic world. 

Then turning to other aspects of the College, President Park spoke of her own 
hopes for making the Campus ever more lovely. She read a letter from Margaret 
Henderson Bailie, 1917, who has done such distinguished work at Princeton and 
in connection with the planting around the Harkness Building at Yale. 

"I want at first, at least, to give very much more of my time on the ground 
than the College should by any chance pay for. For example, you spoke of sending 
down the plans and having the men carry them out. Until I get much more used 
to the men, and they to me, I want to use hardly any plans and I should much 
prefer to go down to Bryn Mawr and say, "put it here — and there — and there.' 
This I know seems awfully inefficient, but we have all found here that it is the 
way to get things that we really like. An infinite amount of time can be wasted 
on plans which are not, after all, really clear or satisfactory. I don't, of course, 
mean a general plan, or plans of paths and roads which must, of course, be drawn 
up. I speak only of planting plans." 

And last of all, but certainly not least in the hopes that it holds out and in 
the memories that it calls up, President Park read the following letter: 

"Dear Doctor Park: 

"I have not replied sooner to your letter because I have been for a long time 
out West and have only just returned to Philadelphia. 



4 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

"I enjoyed more than I can express to yon the opening of the auditorium and 
my collaboration with you and the chorus. I was very much struck by the wonderful 
concentration and splendid singing of the chorus of such difficult works of Bach. 
The whole Concert was a delight to me, and I hope some day we can be working 
together again. 

"Wishing Bryn Mawr College still greater development and growth, 

"Always sincerely, 

"Leopold Stokowski." 



All of these, taken together, gave one a sense of something vigorous and grow- 
ing, something curiously alive in all the various corporate parts of the College, and 
made the continued business of the meeting and the reports that followed have a 
fresh significance. 

After President Park had spoken, Rosamond Cross, 1929, gave again the very 
delightful paper which she had presented at the Council. It was significant, how- 
ever, that when Mrs. Loomis was called on to present her Report for District II. 
she said that she felt that the financial discussion which was still pending, left over 
from the morning session, was too important to be put ofl and that she had rather 
defer her Report until after the discussion was finished. At that moment the dis- 
tinction between the Council and the Annual Meeting stood very clear cut. Our 
concern was with legislative matters and it was with them that at that moment 
our interest lay. There was definite work to be done and it was more absorbing 
than even the most stimulating reports. Once the motion was carried, the Reports 
for District II., for District VI., and for the Scholarships and Loan Fund Com- 
mittee were given, and as they had proved to be at the Council were extraordinarily 
interesting, but they lost something by not being followed by the discussion which 
they had aroused at the earlier meeting. Perhaps we had been meeting long enough 
by that time. After some resolutions had been passed, the meeting adjourned, and 
broke up into friendly, animated groups, to wander down across the campus to 
Goodhart Hall once again, to talk and smoke and drink tea by the roaring fire in 
the Commons Room, a gracious charming place in the gathering dusk. Another 
Annual Meeting slowly ended very pleasantly, in much the same way in which it 
had begun. 

M. L. T. 



TWO ALUMNAE SPEAK ABOUT CHINA 

The Executive Committee of the Bryn Mawr Chinese Scholarship Committee 
arranged a supper at the Philadelphia College Club, on Thursday, February 21st. 
The subject to be discussed was "An Educational Experiment in Internationalism." 
The speakers were Jane Ward, 1905, Executive Secretary of the Young Woman's 
Christian Association, Shanghai, and Alice Boring, 1904, Professor of Biology at 
Yenching University, Peking. Miss Martha Thomas presided. 



ANNUAL MEETING 

OF THE 

ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 1929 

(There is on file in the Alumnae Office a stenographic report of the Annual 
Meeting, giving in detail the discussion, amendments, motions carried and lost, etc. 
The following minutes are condensed.) 

MORNING SESSION HELD IN MUSIC ROOM, GOODHART HALL 

The meeting was called to order at 11.05 A. M. by Louise Fleischmann Maclay, 
1906, President of the Alumnae Association. 142 members signed their names, and 
it is estimated tha at least 50 others were present at some part of the meeting. 

It was voted to omit the reading of the minutes of the meeting of the previous 
year. Mrs. Maclay then presented the Report of the Executive Board, which was 
accepted and placed on file. The report in full follows: 



REPORT OF THE EXECUTIVE BOARD 
FOR THE YEAR 1928-29 

The handicap of a confining title and the desire to continue her delightful 
relationship with the members of the Board are two factors which determine for a 
President the content of her Annual Report. It may be her preference to write 
poetically of the many evidences of devotion to the College manifested by her 
colleagues, to become lyric in appreciation of the courtesies to the Alumnae by the 
staff of the College, or to interpret, in terms of energy, intelligence and good will, 
the smooth running machinery of an Alumnae Office; yet these preferences she must 
stifle and write prosaically only of the year's accomplishment. 

That it has been peaceful, pleasant and profitable there is no doubt. To this 
the continuity in the Alumnae Office contributed greatly, for though Florence Irish 
(1913) came to replace Mary Tatnall (1926) as assistant to the Treasurer, her 
quick grasp of detail made an easy transition. Also owing to the generosity of the 
Alumnae, and to the vigilance of Class Collectors there has been no financial pressure. 
All the usual expenditures have been met and payments to the Directors on pledges 
for the furnishing of Goodhart Hall are well ahead. It has been a pleasure also, 
to see the dream of the students of the nineties realized, at last, in the dedication 
and use of Goodhart Hall. The furnishing, for all intents and purposes, is now 
completed, but our Chairman plans to make some further additions when the need 
becomes apparent. 

In the meantime, while we realize that the time is rapidly coming when Good- 
hart, just as Taylor and the Library, will be part of the College well-being and 

(5) 



6 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

so assimilated into its life process that all traces of its origin will have vanished, we 
may still at this time delight in the sensation enjoyed by those Alumnae who were 
present on the occasion of the concert by the Philadelphia Orchestra, a sensation 
of pride and satisfaction in having shared in giving the College, at last, a means for 
pleasant contact with the world, through intercourse, with the community. 

Less altruistic is our pleasure in having in that Hall a room which, when 
desired, can be used as an Alumnae Room — a room used last Commencement and 
greatly enjoyed. This foot-hold on the Campus, together with the large new office in 
Taylor, which Miss Park has so generously given us, adds greatly to our comfort 
and our working capacity. Now our Board has a room in which to meet, ample 
space for records, and privacy for Alumnae who come with one question or another. 
It will be invaluable next Fall when the Presidents and Secretaries of the Alumnae 
Associations of six women's colleges meet here to discuss their various problems. The 
intimacy of this conference provides for this group the same opportunity for dis- 
cussion which our Council meeting provides for us, and which all those of us who 
attended the New Haven Council meeting in November, again appreciated so keenly. 
To reproduce for you a little of the Council we shall give you the privilege of hear- 
ing the Councilors themselves and the undergraduate, who will tell us something 
of the student at College. 

We shall, as usual, have the reports of all Committees, with the exception of 
the Publicity Committee, which has no report to make, and the Committee on 
Health and Physical Education, whose report already has been printed in the 
Bulletin. 

The Nominating Committee also has no report until next year when it will 
present you with a ballot for your vote. You will perhaps recall that a change 
in the By-laws, passed last year, will make this a single slate, unless any group, or 
groups of fifteen Alumnae decide to endorse additional candidates. This is. a priv- 
ilege to be kept in mind, while remembering that the Chairman of the Nominating 
Committee, who we are delighted to announce is to be Eleanor Little Aldrich (1905), 
welcomes suggestions from individuals as well, and hopes they may be sent her before 
May of this year. The newly-appointed members to her Committee are Elizabeth 
Nields Bancroft (1898), Kathleen Johnston Morrison (1921), and Frances ' Childs 
(1923). Margaret Corwin (1912) is the only member of the former Committee 
still serving. 

We regret to report that owing to trouble with her eye-sight Margaret Reeve 
Cary (1907), has resigned as Chairman of the Scholarships Committee. She will, 
however, remain on the Committee as a member. Fortunately Margaret Gilman 
(1919), who has already substituted very successfully for Mrs. Cary, has agreed 
to take the responsibility of being Chairman for two years, and so, with Anne 
Todd (1902) as a new member, the work of the Scholarships Committee is in 
excellent hands. 

Esther Lowenthal (1905) and Elizabeth Lewis Otey (1901) have replaced 
Eleanor Fleisher Riesman (1903) and Grace Jones McClure (1900) on the Aca- 
demic Committee. These four names connote such standards that we wish our 
appointments might all be made by addition only. 

On our Finance Committee, the terms of Julie Benjamin Howson (1907) and 
Louise Watson (1912) will soon end and we shall miss them very much. Their 
business approach and excellent judgment have been most helpful. When Alumnae 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 7 

like Cornelia Halsey Kellogg (1900), Cora Baird Jeanes (1896) and Eleanor Mar- 
quand Forsyth (1919) return to work for the Alumnae Association as they have 
by coming on the Finance Committee, we are encouraged to believe that any one 
who has once served the Association can be depended on to serve whenever her 
particular contribution is most needed. This is the only bright thought we enter- 
tain in connection with the ending of the term of the Chairman of the Committee 
on Finance and Alumnae Fund, for we know it was her devotion to Bryn Mawr 
that made her spare so much of her time from her business for her Committee and 
the deliberations of the Board, and therefore, we hope she will return sooner or 
later, again to give Bryn Mawr the benefit of her rare qualities. Those of us 
who have worked with Dorothy Straus (1908) have admired greatly her searching 
honesty, her clear-sightedness, her constructive view-point and we have profited by 
these as much ast we have enjoyed watching her perfect blending of tenacity of pur- 
pose and evenness of temper — a rare combination. At the beginning of her term 
she studied her dual position as Chairman of Finance and Alumnae Fund and care- 
fully reorganized and co-ordinated her work. She shouldered the responsibility of 
raising the fund for furnishing Goodhart Hall — no small undertaking so soon after 
the drive for the Music Fund, and in spite of complications and perplexities she 
leaves office, we are sure, satisfied and repaid. She feels she has done nothing but 
reorganize certain technicalities of the Alumnae Fund, attributing all her success 
to the amazing generosity of the Alumnae, but though we know better, we will 
not dispute this since she is just another evidence of this same great generosity of 
Alumnae. To find for such a Chairman a worthy successor is not always easy but 
we are glad to be able to announce with confidence in our choice and pleasure in 
her acceptance, the appointment of Caroline Florence Lexow (1908) as Chairman 
of the Committee on Finance and the Alumnae Fund. 

All those who work for the Association look forward with relief and pleasure 
to the use of a new Alumnae register, the need for which has been so great that 
our gratitude to the College, and particularly to the Director of Publications for 
its publication is unbounded. 

You will perhaps remember that at our last Annual Meeting we passed the 
following resolution : 

"The Executive Board recommends that the Alumnae Association request the 
Directors of the College to designate $100,000 of the $200,000 Endowment Fund 
of 1920 as an initial endowment for the Marion Reilly Chair of Mathematics in 
recognition of her devoted enthusiasm for that campaign and her enduring interest 
in the academic growth and development of the College." 

This resolution was adopted and sent to the College Directors, who warmly 
approved of its tenor, but informed us that the Chair of Mathematics had been 
previously named for Professor Charlotte Angus Scott. As Marion Reilly herself, in 
her will, had left a legacy manifesting her interest in Physics it was deemed appro- 
priate to name for her at Bryn Mawr the Chair of Physics, which we are glad to 
report has been done. 

During the year, 123 new members have joined the Association — 47 were dropped 
for non-payment of dues, and various other contingencies reduced the net gain to 65. 
A proportionately greater gain is evident in the change of 45 of our members from 
Annual to Life Members — an excellent and helpful proceeding. 



8 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

Five of our members have died, and today for the first time, the four walls 
of Goodhart Hall witness our rising silent vote in commemoration of the Alumnae 
whom we have lost during the year, and whose death we now record with sorrow: 

Emily Westwood Lewis, former graduate student. 
Mabel Clark Huddleston, 1889. 
Louise Schoff Ehrman, 1902. 
Laura Heisler Lacy, 1918. 
Eleanor Gabell, 1922. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Louise Fleischmann Maclay, President. 



Margaret E. Brusstar, 1903, Treasurer of the Association, presented her report 
for the year, which was accepted and placed on file. This included the official 
auditors' report of the finances of the Association. She then presented the budget 
for the year 1929, which was accepted without change. Miss Brusstar's report, the 
auditors' report, and the budget for 1929, as compared with that adopted for 1928, 
are all printed in full. 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER 

While still teaching, I found an Algebra book which had been lost by one of 
my students. On opening the book to discover the name of the owner, I found this 
verse : 

"If there should be another flood, 
For refuge, hither fly, 
If all the world should be submerged 
This book would still be dry." 

People in general place a treasurer's report in the same category. As the report 
will be published in full in the Bulletin, I will not bore you with many figures, 
but to reassure you that your funds have been properly safe-guarded, I will read 
you the Auditors' letter attached to their report. (See page 11.) 

The year has been a very satisfactory one, from the financial standpoint, as 
our general income showed an increase, and our expenses a decrease over those for 
the preceeding year. The income from dues increased $305.16; from life member- 
ship funds, $109.65; from the Bulletin, $273.86, and from interest on bank 
deposits, $169.73, making a total increase in income from these sources — $858.40. 

Increases of $64.62 in the expenses of publishing the Bulletin; and of $290.83 
in salaries were more than offset by decreases of $440.35 in travelling and local 
expenses, and of $616.24 in emergency and miscellaneous expenses, including office 
supplies, telephone, postage, and printing; with the result that the appropriation 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 9 

necessary from the Alumnae Fund was $1,402.57 less than last year, and $3,490.27 
less than the amount provided for in the budget. 

In addition, the Life membership fund increased $2,026.75. Investment of Life 
Membership funds increased $3,112.50. 

Sufficient income has accrued for the Carola Woerishofler fund to provide a 
$200 scholarship to the Labor School this summer. 

To the $1,000 of the regular President's Fund, we added $20, a special gift 
from one of the Alumnae. You may be interested to hear Miss Park's letter acknowl- 
edging receipt of the cheque for this fund. 



"My dear Miss Brusstar: 

Thank you very much for the cheque for $1,000 as the Alumnae contribution 
to the President's Fund. This Fund sometimes seems to me the most completely 
useful money that is ever given to the college, and every time I put my hand into 
the bag and draw out a sum which solves some vexing problem my thanks rise again 
to the Alumnae Association. Will you convey to the Board my great gratitude? 

Very sincerely yours, 

Marion Park." 



Presentation of the Budget for 1929 

The budget for 1929, which is herewith presented for your approval, shows 
few changes. The income from Life Membership is increased on account of ad- 
ditional securities purchased with a proportionate decrease in the appropriation from 
the Alumnae Fund. 

Salaries have been increased $140, and in addition, a reserve fund of $150 for 
possible further increases in salaries has been introduced. The expense account for 
postage has been decreased $100 as the amount set aside in previous years has not 
been used. The amount for supplies has been increased $50, and that for telephone 
and telegraph decreased $50. On account of our increased membership the cost of 
printing the Bulletin has been increased $100. As the I. C. S. A. Fellowship will 
be discontinued, no provision for it is made in this year's budget. As a result the 
total budget for the year is $16,980, a decrease of $10 from last year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Margaret E. Brusstar, Treasurer. 



BUDGET FOR 1929 
INCOME 

1928 1929 

Dues $6,500.00 $6,500.00 

Income from Life Membership 610.00 725.00 

Bulletin Advertising 1,600.00 1,600.00 

Bank Interest ' 200.00 200.00 

Grant from College for Alumnae Entertainment 300.00 300.00 

Miscellaneous 50.00 50.00 



$9,260.00 $9,375.00 

Appropriation from Alumnae Fund 7,730.00 7,605.00 



Total $16,990.00 $16,980.00 

DISBURSEMENTS 

Salaries $6,210.00 $6,350.00 

Operation — 

Postage $500.00 $400.00 

Printing 550.00 550.00 

Supplies 125.00 175.00 

Telephone and Telegraph 150.00 100.00 

Auditors 200.00 200.00 

Office Equipment 400.00 400.00 

1,925.00~~ 1,825.00 

Bulletin — 

Printing $2,500.00 $2,600.00 

Mailing 275.00 \ 

Miscellaneous 250.00 J 



525.00 



3,025.00 3,125.00 



Travelling — 

Council $1 ,000.00 $1 ,000.00 

Executives 650.00 650.00 

Committees 300.00 300.00 



1,950.00 1,950.00 



Local Expenses — 

District Councillors $350.00 $350.00 

Regional Scholarships Chairmen 250.00 250.00 

Local Branches 350.00 350.00 



950.00 950.00 

Dues in other Associations 170.00 170.00 

Reserve Fund for possible increase of salaries 150.00 

Questionnaire to keep up records 400.00 400.00 

I. C. S. A. Fellowship 300.00 

Increasing Rhoads Scholarships to $500 each 460.00 460.00 

President Park's Fund 1,000.00 1,000.00 

Emergency Fund 600.00 600.00 

Total $16,990.00 $16,980.00 

(10) 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 11 

THE ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

Report Upon Audit of Accounts 
For the Calendar Year 1928 

January 21, 1929. 
Miss Margaret E. Brusstar, Treasurer, 

The Alumnae Association of Bryn Mawr College, 
Bryn Mawr, Penna. 

Dear Madam: 

We have audited the accounts of The Alumnae Association of Bryn Mawr 
College for the calendar year 1928, and found them to be correct. 

We verified the cash in the various funds on deposit at the banks by corre- 
spondence with the depositories. The Pennsylvania Company for Insurances on 
Lives and Granting Annuities confirmed the securities called for by the accounts as 
being in its custody. 

We verified the income securities owned and other receipts as recorded in the 
, books were found to have been duly deposited in the banks. 

Annexed we submit the following statements: 

Balance Sheet, December 31, 1928. 

General Income and Expense Account for the Calendar Year 1928. 

Alumnae Fund for the Calendar Year 1928. 

Loan Fund Receipts and Disbursements for the Calendar Year 1928. 

Life Membership Fund Receipts and Disbursements for the Calendar Year 

1928. 
Life Membership Fund Securities Owned, December 31, 1928, at Cost. 
Carola Woerishofler Fund Securities Owner, December 31, 1928, at Book 

Values. 

Very truly yours, 

Lybrand, Ross Bros. & Montgomery. 

THE ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 
BALANCE SHEET, December 31, 1928 

ASSETS 

Loan Fund: 

Loans to Students: 

Class of 1923 and prior $2,473.00 

Classes since 1923 10,399.77 

$12,872.77 

Cash 1,350.87 

$14,223.64 

Life Membership Fund: 

Investments at cost, as annexed _ $13,953.23 

Cash 1,023.86 

14,977.09 

Carried forward $29,201.73 



12 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

ASSETS— Continued 

Brought forward $29,201.73 

Carola Woerishoffer Fund : 

Investments at book values, as annexed $1,750.00 

Cash 470.18 

2,220.18 

Alumnae Fund, Cash 3,614.00 

General Fund, Cash 500.00 



$35,534.91 



LIABILITIES 
Loan Fund: 

Balance, January 1, 1928 $12,956.22 

Interest received during year 167.42 

Gifts from Parents' Fund 1,000.00 

Gifts from Individuals 1 00.00 



$14,223.64 



Life Membership Fund : 

Balance, January 1, 1928 $12,950.34 

Life Memberships received during year 2,023.00 

Profits from Sales of Securities 3.75 



14,977.09 

Carola Woerishoffer Fund: 

Principal : 

Balance, January 1, 1928 $1,950.00 

Interest: 

Balance, January 1, 1928 $159.30 

Amount received during year 110.88 

270.18 

2,220.18 

Alumnae Fund, as annexed 3,614.00 

General Fund '500.00 



$35,534.91 

GENERAL INCOME AND EXPENSE ACCOUNT 

For the Calendar Year 1928 

INCOME 

Dues ' $6,248.91 

Alumnae Contributions for the Association 4,239.73 

Alumnae Bulletin: 

Advertising $1,935.75 

Miscellaneous I ncome 24.50 



1,960.25 

Income from Life Membership Fund 627.39 

Interest on Bank Account 686.69 

Alumnae Register 35.90 

Gift from Bryn Mawr College for Alumnae Entertainment 300.00 

"$14,098.87 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 13 

Income, forward $14,098.87 

EXPENSES 

Bulletin: 

Printing $2,539.46 

Salary of Editor 540.00 

Mailing 514.96 

$3,594.42 

Salaries: 

Alumnae Secretary $2,600.00 

Assistant to Alumnae Secretary 1,571.83 

Bookkeeper 1,560.49 

5,732.32 

Travelling: 

Council $405.82 

Executives 32 1 .29 

Committees 141.84 

868.95 

Local Expenses: 

District Councilors * $39.83 

Regional Scholarship Chairmen 20.06 

Local Branches 78.75 

138.64 

Emergency Fund : 

Extra Clerical Assistance $ 9.00 

Alumnae Festivities 161.06 

— 170.06 

President's Fund 1,000.00 

James E. Rhoads Scholarships 500.00 

I. C. S. A. Fellowship 300.00 

Postage 298.07 

Printing 386.45 

Office Supplies and Equipment 556.73 

Telephone and Telegraph 63.31 

Committee Expenses 39.50 

Dues in Other Associations 170.00 

Class Collectors' Expenses 32.00 

Miscellaneous 248.42 

$14,098.87 



14 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

ALUMNAE FUND 

For the Calendar Year 1928 

Designated Undesignated Totals 

Balances, January 1, 1928 $23,520.93 $1,148.47 $24,669.40 

Receipts 33,650.78 6,539.66 40,190.44 

$57,171.71 $7,688.13 $64,859.84 

From On account of 
r ^. , Designated Appropriations 

Disbursements : Receipts and Transfers 

Book Club $10.30 

Auditorium of the Students' Building 2,316.36 

Furnishings for Goodhart Hall 31,547.75 $1,099.44 

Katherine Trowbridge Perkins, 1916, 

Memorial 247.00 

Mary Scribner Palmer Memorial 4.00 

Theodosia Haynes Taylor Memorial 40.00 

Reunion Gift, Class of 1901 65.50 

Alumnae Association, transferred to General 

Income and Expense Account 4,239.73 

College Endowment, payable to J. Henry 

Scattergood, Treasurer of Bryn Mawr 

College 500.00 

Local Branch Expenses 49.03 

Library 200.00 

Honors Scholarships 1 ,000.00 

President's Fund 20.00 

Special Scholarships 100.00 

Phebe Anna Thorne School 25.00 

Gifts of Classes of 1929 and 1930 for the 

Goodhart Hall Benches 13,159.18 

Book Shop Scholarships 984.66 

Regional Scholarships 5,637.89 



$55,857.64 $5,388.20 61,245.84 

Balance $3,614.00 

Balances, December 31, 1928: 
Designated : 

James E. Rhoads Scholarships $1,166.00 

Faculty Endowment 50.00 

Class of 1898 Gift for Portrait of President Park... 840.00 

Special Scholarships 200.00 

Gifts of Classes of 1929 and 1930 for the Good- 
hart Hall Benches 155.00 



$2,411.00 
Undesignated Funds, subject to appropriation 2,299.93 

$4,710.93 
Advance Payment to J. Henry Scattergood, Treasurer of 
Bryn Mawr College, for Furnishings for Good- 
hart Hall 1,096.93 



$3,614.00 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 15 

LOAN FUND 
RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 

For the Calendar Year 1928 

Balance, January 1, 1928 $1,532.72 

Receipts : 

Repayment of Loans by Students $1,470.73 

Interest on Loans 130.14 

Interest on Bank Balances 37.28 

Gift from the Parents' Fund, Bryn Mawr College 1,000.00 

Gifts from Individuals 100.00 

2,738.15 



$4,270.87 
Disbursements: 

Loans to Students 2,920.00 



Balance in Girard Trust Co., December 31, 1928 $1,350.87 

LIFE MEMBERSHIP FUND 
RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 

For the Calendar Year 1928 

Balance, January 1, 1928 $2,109.61 

Receipts: 

Life Memberships $2,023.00 

Sales of Securities 3.75 

2,026.75 

$4,136.36 

Disbursements : 

Purchases of Securities 3,1 12.50 



Balance in Western Saving Fund Society of Philadelphia, 

December 31, 1928 $1,023.86 

LIFE MEMBERSHIP FUND 
SECURITIES OWNED 

December 31, 1928, at Cost 

$1,000 Georgia Power Co. l-5s, 1967 $972.50 

1,000 Public Service Electric & Gas Co. l-5s, 1965 1,029.50 

1,000 Southwestern Power & Light Co. l-5s, 1943 990.00 

1,000 Ohio Edison Co. l-5s, 1957 990.00 

1,000 Penna. R. R. Co. 5s, 1964 1,040.75 

1,000 Baltimore & Ohio R. R. Co. Genl. Mtge. 5s, 1995 1,029.50 

500 Indianapolis Water Co. l-5^s, 1953 480.00 

1,000 Penna. Power Co. l-5s, 1956 995.00 

45 shs. Lehigh Coal & Navigation Co., par $50 3,513.48 

2,000 New York Power & Light Corp 4y 2 s, 1967 1,912.50 

1,000 Columbia Gas & Electric 5s, 1952 1,000.00 

$13,953.23 



6 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

CAROLA WOERISHOFFER FUND 

SECURITIES OWNED 

December 31, 1928, at Book Values 

51,000 Ohio State Telephone Co. Cons. & Ref. 5s, 1944 $950.00 

1,000 Chicago Railways Co. l-5s, 1927 \ 800.00 



$1,750.00 



Dorothy Straus, 1908, presented the report of the Alumnae Fund, which was 
accepted and placed on file. Miss Straus made a comparison between the contribu- 
tions received for the Alumnae Fund in 1928 with those for 1927. The report will 
be published later. 

Miss Straus then gave the report of the Finance Committee, which is here 
printed in full. 

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE 

The Finance Committee has had three meetings since the last annual meeting 
of the Association. 

Margaret Brusstar, a member of the Committee, was elected Treasurer upon 
the expiration of Ethel Buckley's term, and Carrie Chadwick-Collins, whose term 
had likewise expired, was not, under the by-laws, eligible for re-election. Her neces- 
sary withdrawal made us realize how much we needed the advice and help of the 
Chairman of the Publicity Committee, and in consequence, Mrs. Collins, as Chair- 
man of such committee, was invited to be a guest of the Finance Committee at all 
of its meetings. We also recommended to the Executive Board a change in the 
by-laws making the Chairman of the Publicity Committee ipso facto a member of 
the Finance Committee, precisely as the president is a member. 

The committee transacted the usual amount of routine business. This included, 
as always, the discussion of the budget prepared by the Treasurer, the approval of 
appointments of collectors to fill vacancies, made by the Chairman of the Alumnae 
Fund in co-operation with the Class Presidents, and the authorization of investments 
and disbursements. 

In addition to these, there came before the Committee various old problems 
heretofore unsolved, which seemed to have reached a stage requiring prompt and 
indeed drastic remedy. What they are, those of you who have read the report of the 
Council in the December Bulletin will already know. I shall not bore you with 
the long discussion contained in my earlier report, to which the Council listened so 
patiently. I should like to attribute its patience to my presentation, but I fear that 
the real cause lay in the charm and comfort of that room where we met in the 
Faculty Club in New Haven. Nor do I mean to insinuate that this room is less 
attractive, but I do know that the chairs are considerably harder. I shall, therefore, 
report to you only the conclusions of the Council and the recommendations of the 
Finance Committee. I might say now, but I shall not repeat, that all these 
recommendations have been approved by the Executive Board. 

The Council moved, seconded, and carried that 

the Finance Committee be requested to outline a scheme of salary 
advances for the salaried positions of the Association, to be presented 
to the Executive Board for such action as it may judge proper. 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 17 

After due consideration, the Committee submits to you the following recom- 
mendation : 

Owing to the constant changes in the demands on the Alumnae 
Office, it is almost impossible to formulate a salary policy. We are 
convinced that regular increases for valuable services are advisable 
whenever the income of the Association justifies them. We therefore 
recommend that the Executive Board at its spring meeting each year 
consider, in connection with reappointments, the question of increas- 
ing the salaries of those in the Alumnae Office. 

The next problem and altogether the most serious one, one indeed which I had 
already mentioned in my report to you last year, was that of memorials and special 
gifts. 

At the Council, it was moved, seconded, and carried that 

It is the sense of the meeting that the Board should continue to 
stress the principle of the single appeal represented by the Alumnae 
Fund; that they treat sympathetically the raising of memorials by 
individuals; that they influence when possible the choice of the object 
for which the memorial is raised, and when the object is in entire 
accord with the most pressing needs of the College, as outlined by the 
Joint Alumnae Fund Committee, the memorial may be sponsored by 
the Association and included among the objects of the Alumnae Fund. 

Last month the Joint Alumnae Fund Committee held its first meeting in several 
years. You will recall that this committee, which consists of the President and three 
Directors of the College, the President and Treasurer of the Alumnae Association, 
the chairman of the Alumnae Fund and three other alumnae members, was organized 
to consider the needs of the College and to recommend to the Association the objects 
for which funds should be collected. 

During the years 1927 and 1928, it was not necessary to call a meeting of the 
Committee because the Association had voted to bend its energies entirely to the 
collection of the Goodhart Hall Furnishings Fund. With the close of 1928, how- 
ever, the allotted time for the payment of class pledges expired for those classes that 
had held their reunions in 1926, and some of them, I am happy to report, have not 
only paid their pledges in full, but overpaid. This leaves them free to contribute for 
other purposes, a situation that warranted the convocation of the Joint Fund Com- 
mittee. I shall presently report the recommendations of this Committee regarding the 
objectives and purposes of the Alumnae Fund for the year 1929. 

I desire now, however, to inform you of its attitude on the question of memorials 
and special gifts. In a spirit of co-operation which indicated clearly that the 
Directors of the College are no less deeply interested in its welfare than are the 
alumnae, the Joint Fund Committee expressed its willingness to meet whenever 
necessary for the purpose of considering proposed memorials and special gifts, so 
that these may take the form most useful to the College. All the alumnae present at 
the meeting were unanimous in their belief that the alumnae desire always to give 
to the College what it most needs, provided they can ascertain this readily and 
quickly, and while the impulse is still warm. We also agreed that practically all of 
the alumnae wish to contribute primarily through the Alumnae Fund. 

After this meeting of the Joint Fund Committee, the Finance Committee met 
again, again considered this problem, and as a result of over a year's serious con- 



18 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

sideration by three committees, I submit the following resolution of the Finance 

Committee : 

We recommend the following procedure for raising memorial 
funds and gifts be adopted: 

All alumnae interested in rajsigg. memorial funds or special gifts 
shall consult with the Finance Committee, who shall promptly confer 
with the Joint Alumnae Fund Committee concerning the proposed 
object of such gift or memorial. If this be approved by the Joint 
Alumnae Fund Committee, the proposed memorial or gift shall forth- 
with be placed on the Alumnae Fund. 

As you have already been told by the Treasurer, the Association this year has a 
surplus which is nearly twice that of last year, despite the fact that the undesignated 
contributions were somewhat less. You will appreciate that this surplus indicates the 
most careful use of your funds and the most zealous supervision of all expenditures. 
We can, I believe, safely assume that the classes will promptly pay in their pledges 
to the Goodhart Hall Furnishings Fund, though individual pledges are still $15,000 
short. The Finance Committee therefore recommends the following disposition of 
our surplus: 

First, it has been reported that the I. C. S. A. Fellowship work may be com- 
pleted this year. We therefore considered that it was unnecessary to carry this item 
in the budget. Inasmuch, however, as some doubt still exists, we regard it as advis- 
able to provide for a possible call upon the Association, and hence moved, seconded 
and carried 

that the Committee recommend to the annual meeting that $299.93 
of the surplus be kept as a reserve to pay for the I. C. S. A. Fellowship 
if it should be awarded again. 

In the second place, having an unexpected balance of substantial amount, the 
time seems particularly propitious to inaugurate the scheme of "living endowment." 
Here, too, the Council advised us. It was the sense of its first session 

that, as the most important need of the College is "living endowment," 
the Alumnae Association be asked to concentrate its efforts for the 
Alumnae Fund for the present on collecting an annual sum of money, 
to be given to the College for Alumnae Grants, that is, additions to 
teaching salaries. 

While we cannot quite achieve Mrs. Hand's high hope of grants in the amount 
of $10,000, we have $2,000 with which to make a beginning. At the Joint Fund 
Committee meeting the alumnae were informed that there were a number of younger 
brilliant men and women in the associate professor group whose work warranted 
recognition which the College budget did not permit. The Finance Committee there- 
fore passed the following resolution: 

That the Committee recommend to the annual meeting that $2,000 
of the surplus for the year 1928 be given to President Park to be 
used as and when she in her discretion shall determine for increases 
in the salaries of Associate Professors. 

If you adopt this recommendation, I trust that we shall have begun what will 
be a continuous program of aid to the College, because you must realize that once 
given, we are practically pledged to maintain these grants. Salaries increased cannot 
later be cut back to former levels. 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 19 

There remain the objectives of the Alumnae Fund for 1929. For those 
classes still indebted for Goodhart Hall Furnishings, the primary object must be the 
liquidation of pledges. For the other classes and those happy individuals who can 
contribute to several things, the Joint Fund Committee suggested and we recommend 
as objects of the Fund 

1. Increases of academic salaries; 

2. Extension of Honours Work; 

3. Needs of the Library. 

We further recommend 

that contributions to the Fund be sent in undesignated and that the 
amounts to be allocated to each of these objects be fixed by the Associa- 
tion at the next annual meeting in accordance with the recommendations 
of the Finance Committee. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Dated February 2nd, 1929. Dorothy Straus, 

For the Finance Committee. 

After the report had been accepted as a whole and ordered placed on file, Mrs. 
Maclay asked the meeting to take up the recommendations one at a time. The first 
recommendation in regard to a salary policy was accepted without comment. The 
second one in regard to raising memorial funds and gifts aroused an animated dis- 
cussion. Ethel Cantlin Buckley, 1901, said that because of the spirit in which 
memorials are raised, she believed it to be very important that alumnae receive 
co-operation rather than dictation from the Finance Committee and from the Execu- 
tive Board. Margaret Reeve Cary, 1907, speaking in favor of the recommendation, 
said that she felt a debt was due the Finance Committee for the formation of this 
clear resolution, which, when looked at unemotionally, should not in any way affect 
the spontaneity of such gifts to the College. Josephine Goldmark, 1898, said that in 
her opinion the wording of the resolution was a trifle too peremptory and did not 
quite reproduce the spirit of the recommendation made at the Council. Marian 
Macintosh, 1890, supported the Finance Committee because she thought that it should 
be made clear to those interested in collecting funds for memorials or gifts that they j 
should consult the Finance Committee before actually starting to collect money. 
Miss Straus then pointed out that one reason for this recommendation was that it 
was necessary to protect the College from gifts which might not be self-sustaining, 
but would be a drain on College resources. Martha Thomas, 1889, expressed her 
approval both of the wording of the resolution and of the principle involved, adding 
that her experience on the Finance Committee, and again quite recently when she 
had been acting as Treasurer for the Memorial for Harriet Randolph, had convinced 
her that it was necessary to concentrate under the Alumnae Fund in this way. 
Susan Walker FitzGerald, 1893, said that she agreed with Miss Thomas, and felt 
that the resolution, instead of being considered discouraging, showed that the best 
way of putting the whole force of the Alumnae Association behind any fund to be 
raised for the College was to have it as a recognized part of the Alumnae Fund. 
Natalie McFaden Blanton, 1917, also endorsed this approved method of procedure, 
since it would enable any one about to start a memorial fund to be certain that the 
College would welcome it at that particular time. It was suggested, in view of the 
fact that several members had desired to change the wording of the resolution, while 



20 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

agreeing with the spirit of it, that the Finance Committee might be asked to qualify 
it by adding a preamble. It was, accordingly, moved, seconded and carried that the 
recommendation of the Finance Committee in regard to raising funds for memorials 
and gifts be adopted, and that the Committee be instructed to append a preamble 
embodying the sense of the discussion. 

The recommendation that $299.93 of the 1928 surplus be kept as a reserve to 
pay for the I. C. S. A. Fellowship was adopted. In answer to a question, Mrs. Chad- 
wick-Collins explained that this Fellowship had been taken over by the Association 
as part of the budgetary obligation to avoid a separate appeal to the Alumnae, but 
that the piece of work for which the Fellowship was awarded is about completed, 
and that it will then no longer be necessary for either the Parent Organization or 
the Alumnae Association to continue their grants for this purpose. 

The next resolution of the Finance Committee to the effect that $2,000 of the 
1928 surplus be given to President Park to be used for increases in the salaries of 
Associate Professors was adopted after a short discussion. In reply to a question, 
Miss Straus explained that, while there is no legal obligation, this recommendation 
does morally bind the Association to continue this amount each year until the College 
receives a much larger endowment, since the salaries must be maintained at the 
increased level. Louise Congdon Francis, 1900, speaking as a member of the Joint 
Alumnae Fund Committee, said that it seemed perfectly safe to commit the Associa- 
tion to so small a sum as $2,000, and that it was hoped that a much larger sum 
could be paid to the College next year. Frances Fincke Hand, 1897, also spoke for 
the recommendation, saying that she hoped this would be only the beginning of much 
greater gifts. She said that her only doubt was whether this money ought not to be 
given to President Park entirely without designation, so that she might be free to 
use it for any emergency. The Chair replied that it was the desire of the Finance 
Committee to have officially only undesignated funds, but that the designation of 
this $2,000 was made at President Park's own request. Both Mrs. Hand and Mrs. 
Chadwick-Collins spoke with feeling of the crises constantly confronting President 
Park in connection with calls to members of the faculty from institutions with greater 
resources. They felt that the acuteness of the danger of incurring these irreparable 
losses in the teaching staff might be lessened if Miss Park had at her disposal an 
emergency fund, to be used at her discretion for salary increases. To this Miss 
Lowenthal added that since other Presidents had such funds, the disadvantage to our 
President in not having this bargaining power was obvious. She urged the impor- 
tance of an emergency fund. 

When the recommendation of the Finance Committee in regard to the objectives 
for the Alumnae Fund for 1929 was considered, a number of varying opinions were 
expressed. Mrs. Hand was strongly in favor of having the Association promise tjhe 
sum of $4,000 to President Park to be used at her discretion to increase academic 
salaries. Some of the members present felt that to promise so large a sum in advance 
would jeopardize the possibility of giving anything to the two other named objects, 
Honours Work and the Library. Some felt that the Association must never give up 
the responsibility of appropriating its own funds. Miss Straus explained that, since 
many of the classes have now completed the payment of their pledges to Goodhart 
Hall, there probably will be available for allocation next year a much larger sum 
than $2,000. Mrs. Francis urged that the recommendation be passed, inasmuch as 
the amounts to be allocated will depend upon the total amount collected. Miss Straus 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 21 

reminded the Association that our fiscal year differs from that of the College, so 
that it will be possible for us to ascertain the needs of the College before we vote 
on allocating the money collected this year. The recommendation was then adopted, 
but was later reconsidered in view of a motion proposed by Mrs. Hand, embodying 
her previous suggestion of voting $4,000 to President Park. 

A long discussion followed, which was interrupted to allow Esther Lowenthal, 
1905, to make a report for the Academic Committee on Honours Work at Smith 
College which will be printed in the April Bulletin. The discussion was continued 
in Pembroke after President Park's speech to the alumnae at luncheon. 

The chief differences in opinion hinged on the naming of a definite sum. Mrs. 
Hand again spoke feelingly of the salary problem, and Mrs. Chadwick-Collins 
stressed the point that if the Association went on record now, Miss Park would be 
free to make commitments to the amount stated beginning September, 1929, knowing 
that she could depend upon the Association to make good its pledge. Miss Straus 
again reminded the Association that these three objectives had been named not by the 
Finance Committee, but by the Joint Alumnae Fund Committee, of which President 
Park and three Directors of the College are members. She said that she did not think 
that the Alumnae should tie strings to the money handed over to the College. The 
Alumnae should be willing to pay in their money absolutely free to be allocated 
according to the recommendations of those who know most about the needs of the 
College. She also made it clear to the Association that it was not proposed to increase 
the budget by adding this $4,000 to the $1,000 carried there for the President's 
Fund, but that this $4,000 is to be taken from the annual contributions, which used 
to be called Class Collections, and which are now called Alumnae Fund. It was 
finally moved, seconded and carried 

that the Alumnae Association pledge itself to a sum of not less than 
$4,000 for 1929 as an undesignated gift to President Park for aca- 
demic salaries. This $4,000 to be the first charge on the Alumnae Fund 
after the regular expenses of the Alumnae Association have been met. 

The Chair called the attention of the meeting to the fact that this motion was 
somewhat in conflict with the recommendation of the Finance Committee. This 
recommendation was then reconsidered, and Miss Straus suggested that it be changed 
to read: 

The Finance Committee recommends that the objects of the 
Alumnae Fund for 1929 be: 1. Increases in Academic Salaries; 
2. Extension of Honours Work; 3. Needs of the Library. We further 
recommend that contributions to the Alumnae Fund be sent in undesig- 
nated, and that the amounts over and above this $4,000 be \alloca\ted 
to each of these three objectives, and that the proportions be fixed I by 
the Association at its next Annual Meeting in accordance with the 
recommendations of the Joint Alumnae Fund Committee as to the needs 
of the College at that time. 

It was moved, seconded, and carried that the recommendation as thus worded 
be adopted. 

Before the close of the morning session, after Miss Lowenthal had spoken for 
the Academic Committee, Mrs. Hand had made a report on behalf of the Alumnae 
Directors, using as a basis of her remarks the report prepared by Ruth Furness 



22 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

Porter, 1896, Senior Alumnae Director, for the Council. She quoted the follow- 
ing from the minutes of the Board of Directors: 

"The Directors of Bryn Mawr College wish to express their deep 
appreciation of the abiding interest in and the devotion of the Alumnae 
to the College, and their thanks to the Alumnae for gifts during the 
past year amounting to more than $30,000 in addition to their inval- 
uable contribution in assuming the financial responsibility for the fur- 
nishings of Good-hart Hall." 

Mrs. Hand announced with regret the resignations of Mrs. Ladd as Secretary 
of the Board and as Trustee of the College, and that of Mr. Arthur Thomas as 
Chairman of the Buildings and Grounds Committee. 

It was moved, seconded and carried that the following resolution be adopted 
and a copy sent to Mr. Thomas: 

"That the Alumnae Association of Bryn Mawr College at this its 
first formal meeting in Goodhart Hall recognizes the great service 
Mr. Arthur H. Thomas,, Chairman of the Building and Grounds 
Committee, has rendered Bryn Mawr College, especially in connection 
with the building of Goodhart Hall, and puts on record its deep feeling 
of gratitude." 

It was moved, seconded and carried that the following resolution be adopted : 
"The Alumnae Association wishes to record its recognition of the 
long, intelligent, and devoted service of Anna Rhoads Ladd as Secre- 
tary of the Board of Trustees and Directors of Bryn Mawr College. 
As an alumna of the College, as the daughter of President Rhoads, 
and as the active and respected Secretary of the Board, Mrs. Ladd is 
so identified with the College that it will be hard to think of the 
Directors' Meetings without her. We extend to her our best wishes for 
her well earned leisure and our grateful thanks for her devoted and 
constant service to the College." 

At 1.15 P. M. the meeting adjourned for luncheon in Pembroke and continued 
its business in Pembroke dining-room after President Park had addressed the Alumnae. 
At 2.45 P. M. Mrs. Maclay called the meeting to order and offered a resolution 
of thanks to President Park for her hospitality. 

Rosamond Cross, of the Class of 1929, was then introduced, and gave a brief 
talk on Undergraduate Problems. This was largely a repetition of her report as 
given at the Council, and was repeated by request and received with enthusiasm. 

After the conclusion of the financial discussion, Julia Langdon Loomis, 1895, 
Councillor for District II, gave a report for her district, and Erma Kingsbacher Stix, 
1906, Councillor for District VI, reported for hers. Helen Evans Lewis, 1913, 
Councillor for District I, was prevented by illness from being present and reporting 
for New England. 

These interesting reports were in great part repetitions of those given at the 
Council in New Haven, and were repeated by request. They dealt largely with the 
activities of the Regional Scholarships committees, and led logically to the report of 
the Scholarships and Loan Fund Committee, which was given by Margaret Reeve 
Cary, 1907, retiring Chairman. This report will be printed in the April Bulletin. 

Miss Martha Thomas then made an announcement about the meeting of the 
A. A. U. W. in Pittsburgh on February 15th, and said that on February 28th the 
local alumnae groups are giving at the Bellevue-Stratford in Philadelphia a luncheon 
in honor of Miss Woolley, National President of the A. A. U. W. 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 23 

Before the close of the meeting Mrs. FitzGerald offered the following resolu- 
tion, which was unanimously adopted: 

"I want to express a vote of thanks to the wardens and to Miss 
Mitchelson for the hospitality so generously extended to the alumnae 
during these days of meetings." 
Mrs. Carey then offered the following resolution, which was unanimously 
adopted: 

I want to offer a resolution of thanks to Miss King for her delightful 
talk last evening. Migrants, Pilgrims, and Tourists is a title to con- 
jure with, and our enjoyment of every moment was intensified by the 
thought that Miss King is one of us." 
The meeting adjourned at 4.30 P. M. After adjournment, tea was served in 
the Common Room, Goodhart Hall. 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Councillors to be Elected 
On the last Thursday in March Councillors are to be elected for Districts III 
and VI. For District III (Maryland, District of Columbia, Virginia, Tennessee, 
North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana) 
the only candidate nominated at this time is Julia Cochran Buck, 1920 (Mrs. George 
Buck), of Baltimore. For District VI (Missouri, Arkansas, Kansas, Texas, Okla- 
homa, Nebraska, Colorado, New Mexico) the candidates are Margaret Nichols 
Hardenbergh, 1905 (Mrs. Clarence M. Hardenbergh), of Kansas City, Missouri, 
and Janet A. Holmes, 1919, of St. Louis. 



THE ALUMNAE REGISTER 

Do you know WHAT THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE ARE DOING? 

Do you know WHAT PERCENTAGE OF BRYN MAWR GRADUATES ARE 

MARRIED, HOW MANY CHILDREN THEY HAVE AND THE 

OCCUPATIONS OF THEIR HUSBANDS? 
Do you know FROM WHAT COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES THE GRADUATE 

SCHOOL DRAWS ITS STUDENTS? 
Do you know THE LATEST INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR FRIENDS? 

ALL OF THIS INFORMATION is contained in the 

REGISTER OF ALUMNAE AND FORMER STUDENTS 

just published by Bryn Mawr College. 

Your application on the attached slip will bring you one immediately. 



To the Director of Publication, 
Taylor Hall, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

copy 
copies 
of the hlumnae Register at two dollars each. 

Cheques should be made payable to Bryn Mawr College. 



Please find enclosed $ for <j 



CLASS NOTES 



Ph.D.'s 
Mrs. J. C. Parjrish, 



Editor 

Vandalia, Mo. 

The editor of the Ph.D. Notes would 
be very grateful to Bryn Mawr Ph.D.'s 
if they would send to her the most recent 
news about themselves and their work at 
the earliest possible date. 

Margaret S. Morriss writes from Pem- 
broke College in Brown University, 
Providence, R. I. 

"I have been at Pembroke College in 
Brown University for six years this Feb- 
ruary, and I am planning to have a half 
year off from February, 1929. I expect 
to travel in the Near East and in Europe 
for about six months, going with Profes- 
sor Dorothy Hahn, Bryn Mawr, 1899. 

"I wish I had more exciting news to 
give, but that seems to be the only thing 
which has happened to me lately." 

1899 

Editor: May Schoneman Sax 
(Mrs. Percival Sax), 
6429 Drexel Road, Overbrook, Pa. 
Dear Emma: 

I hear Mollie is going to Europe in 
order to sail back with Harry, who has 
been over on a short trip, so I am send- 
ing you the list of contributors to our 
class fund, together with the amounts 
promised or paid. 

I am also enclosing the names of our 
classmates who have not yet been heard 
from so that you and Mollie may proceed 
accordingly. 

In reading over the letters of some of 
the class, I am wondering if thirty years 
out of college causes carelessness or 
whether college women cannot under- 
stand plain English. 

It is apparent that the explanatory 
epistle which you and Mollie sent out 
failed to register in a good many cases. 

As usual, '99 is active in a variety of 
ways. Sara Straus Hess is trying to 
raise $50,000 for the Barnard and Bryn 
Mawr Summer Schools, and by this 
time she has doubtless succeeded in col- 
lecting it from philanthropists other than 
Bryn Mawrters. 

Edith Chapin Craven seems to be fill- 
ing all sorts of jobs with the principal- 
ship of Rogers Hall School at Lowell, 
Mass. She writes that she is an expert 
on everything from removing the appen- 
dix to repairing drain pipes, but then I 
suppose there is a connection between 
plumbing and Surgery. 

Margaret Hall's secretary writes that 
Margaret is traveling around the world 



but does not state the time of her return. 
Let us hope she will be back in time for 
the reunion in June. 

Aurie Thayer Yoakam wrote that a 
Porto Rico hurricane destroyed hundreds 
of trees on their cocoanut plantation and 
that it will be some time before the dam- 
age will be overcome. She also writes 
that she and her family expect event- 
ually to settle in the New England coun- 
try permanently. 

Since your last visit I have been to the 
Alumnae Office and arranged dates for 
our reunion activities. The only thing 
left is for you to suggest a costume that 
will be both flattering and suitable for 
the "very finest class" in the reunion 
parade. Yours as always, 

May. 

January 30. 
Dear May: 

I was relieved to get your letter and 
to learn just how much money was on 
hand either in checks or pledges for the 
curtain in Goodhart Hall. On the whole, 
I think we are doing pretty well, and if 
the remaining sixteen members who have 
not been heard from give as generously 
as we hope they will, I believe we can 
raise the full amount of $3,000 by June. 

Half the list of names you sent me 
were immediately handed over to Mollie, 
and I shall write appeals to the remaining 
eight telling them just what we need. I 
can assure you that I shall endeavor to 
be neither "tactless or irritating" in my 
letters, but only be my usual sweet self 
and can't you just see the money rolling 
in! 

Now do not be worried by the fact 
that some of your classmates misread or 
misunderstood the plain English which 
was set before them in the first appeal 
for funds. 

Were such replies as you mention re- 
ceived only from alumnae of our era I 
might think that some of '99 were suffer- 
ing from senile decay, but I assure you 
that very young alumnae send strange re- 
plies to the college. 

On my last visit to Bryn Mawr I 
dropped into the publicity office, where 
I found Mrs. Collins in agony over the 
way some of the alumnae had filled out 
her questionnaires. For example, an 
alumna, who was graduated recently, 
gave the date of her marriage as '24 and 
the birth of two children as occurring 
in '22. 

Can you blame people for remarking 
on the carelessness of the present gener- 
ation ! 



(24) 






BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



25 



No, Mollie did not go to Europe, for 
she waited over for a second great event 
in Buffie's household. Buffie has been tak- 
ing a course on education at the Harvard 
graduate school and wrote a thesis on 
"Essential Factors in the Environment 
of the Pre-School Girl," and to prove 
one of her points has just presented her 
daughter with a nine (9) pound brother 
— Henry T. Dunker, Jr. Thus the world 
do move. 

Sorry to hear about the hurricane doing 
so much damage to Aurie's plantation, 
but will Aurie please tell us why she and 
hers elect to live in chilly New England 
instead of basking under their own palms 
in Porto Rico? 

Marion Ream Vonsiatsky is going 
abroad with her husband very shortly to 
recuperate from a very trying ear oper- 
ation. Do hope she returns in time for 
the reunion. 

Am glad you have settled the dates at 
the alumnae office and hope the plans we 
have made can all be carried out. 

Yes ! I have some ideas as to costumes 
but I shall not write them yet for fear 
some other reuning class might get them 
from the mails. 

Am looking forward to your Troy 
graduates when they come to Pittsburgh 
for their meeting. How proud you all 
must feel that Percy, Sr., has been made 
a life trustee of Rensselaer, but even so, 
we Stevens folk will try not to be jealous 
and do our best with such a distinguished 
person. 

Will let you know how much and how 
rapidly the money comes in for our cur- 
tain, for I know how anxious you are to 
have the debt paid. I wonder if the 
class realizes that the college had to pay 
cash for our curtain, and that the longer 
the delay, the more the college will feel 
it. 

Well, here's hoping! 

As always, 

Guffey. 
1900 
Class Editor: Helen MacCoy, 
Haverford, Pa. 

Mary Kirkbride Peckitt returned to 
America recently to visit her father and 
mother. When Mary was presented at 
Court last spring by Lady Allenby, she 
wore all the decorations which she had 
received for exceptionally distinguished 
service in the Egyptian hospitals during 
the war. 

Reita Levering Brown has just an- 
nounced the engagement of her daughter 
to Horatio Curtis Wood, Jr., of Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 



1902 
Class Editor: Jean Crawford, 

Ury House, Fox Chase, Phila., Pa. 
Kate duVal Pitts is sailing on the S. S. 
Tuscania from New York, July 14th, to 
Havre and will go via Paris to Noirmou- 
tier, where she will act as student ad- 
viser at the delightful Art School which 
Robert Fulton Logan, the internationally 
known painter and etcher, will conduct 
there during July and August. Noir- 
moutier, near Pornic, sounds like a de- 
lightful place, and her whole undertak- 
ing sounds most interesting. 

1903 
Editor: Gertrude Dietrich Smith 
(Mrs. Herbert Knox Smith), 
Farmington, Conn. 

Myra Smartt Kruesi took a very 
prominent part in the Hoover campaign 
in Tennessee. She introduced the man 
who introduced Senator Borah when he 
spoke at Elizabethtown. 

Agnes Sinclair Vincent writes : "Brook- 
line and our little house are proving to 
be a very happy and pleasant home. 
Aside from the delightful opportunities 
in Art and Music and lectures we are 
embracing, we found a splendid group of 
relatives and friends from Bryn Mawr, 
Yenching and Peking. Tech and Runkle 
Public School occupy the children. 
Thanksgiving, we expect a rousing 
house-party of Sinclair and Woods nieces 
and nephews." 

Christina H. Garrett sends the follow- 
ing news: "My school has started so 
prosperously again for the winter that I 
have had the satisfaction of turning away 
pupils for this winter and of inscribing 
others for years ahead. If this winter 
proves a successful one, I think I may 
say that I have 'arrived.' " Christina 
refers to her School of History, 17 Rue 
De Bellechasse (VII), Paris. 

1904 
Class Editor: Emma O. Thompson, 

320 South 42nd Street, Phila., Pa. 
Hermine Ehlers will be director of a 
girls' camp, "Beech Wood," on Lake Ala- 
moosook, Orland, Maine, this summer. 
Her present address is Friends' Semi- 
nary, Rutherford Place, New York City. 

1905 
Class Editor Pro Tan: Edith H. Ashley, 
242 East 19th Street, New York City. 
On February 1, 1929, a great loss be- 
fell the Class of 1905 of Bryn Mawr Col- 
lege. Bertha Seely Dunlop died upon 
this day, leaving in the class a vacancy 
which no one can fill, and which will be 
felt more and more as the days go on. 



26 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



The Class of 1905 has ordered this 
minute spread upon its records, and a 
copy sent to Mr. Dunlop and one sent to 
Mrs. Seely. 

In the death of Bertha Seely Dunlop 
the Class of 1905 has lost a much-loved 
friend, whose loyalty and enthusiasm 
were never known to fail. 

To Mr. Dunlop and to Mrs. Seely the 
Class of 1905 extends its deepest sym- 
pathy. 

Isabel Lynde Dammann, 
February 14, 1929. Secretary. 

A recent issue of the New York Times 
made the following announcement re- 
garding the daughter of Gladys Selig- 
man, ex. '05: "Miss Katherine van 
Heukelom, elder daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Henri van Heukelom, of 52 Rue 
de Bassano, Paris, will be married there 
to the Hon. Charles Winn, of London, on 
February 9th. Mr. Winn and his bride, 
after their wedding trip, will live at 
Nostel Priory, Yorkshire." 

At the time of writing this column, 
Eleanor Little Aldrich and her husband 
have all plans made to sail from New 
York on January 26th to meet their son 
in Cairo and take the trip up the Nile 
with him and his friend. After that they 
will return home by way of Marseilles, 
Paris, and London — a three months' ab- 
sence altogether. Edith Ashley has nobly 
consented to be Class Editor during this 
period, so please be kind to her and send 
in as much news as possible. 

1907 
Class Editor: Alice Hawkins, 
Taylor Hall, 
Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

The Chicago Daily News of December 
20, 1928, carried a whole page about Alice 
Gerstenberg in connection with The Play- 
wrights Theatre of Chicago, of which 
Alice is the "Founder President." This 
organization is described as "A delight- 
ful and informal laboratory where the 
plays of Chicago writers are tested and 
commented on by skilled craftsmen." 
Alice herself writes: "We are doing a 
lot of pioneering out here dramatically, 
which requires much time and effort, 
brings progress but not much remunera- 
tion to those trying to swing a big thing 
for the future." Accompanying the 
article is a good-sized picture of Alice 
looking very serious but charmingly 
youthful. The caption runs: "Alice 
Gerstenberg, although author of two nov- 
els, one re-published in England, is best 
known for her play, 'Overtones,' which 
critics acclaim as a forerunner of modern 
playwriting. She was a pioneer in the 



Little Theatre movement, and her 30 one- 
act plays and several long plays in this 
country and Europe number more than 
3,000 performances, not including vaude- 
ville productions. Her dramatization, 
'Alice in Wonderland,' the established 
version on Broadway, has now been 
added to Henry Jewett's Repertory Art 
Theater in Boston." The italics are the 
class editor's, who has always said that 
"The Great God Brown" reminded her 
of "Overtones." 

We are glad to report that Grace 
Hutchins is well again and is back at 
work in New York. We hear that she 
is writing a book about Silk. Details 
about this and about her job would be 
welcomed. 

Lelia Woodruff Stokes is about to go 
off with her husband and two friends on 
an exciting trip to Mexico City and 
Yucatan; perhaps also to Havana. It is 
always cheering to have the mother of 
five stepping out in this care-free 
fashion. 

Bess Wilson reports that she has an 
absolutely perfect job. She is called 
Assistant Instructor in the Department of 
Pathology at the University of Pennsyl- 
vania, but she spends her whole time 
doing research in Bio-Chemistry with all 
the laboratory equipment she needs and 
no questions asked. 

1908 
Class Editor: Margaret Copeland 
(Mrs. Nathaniel H. Blatchford), 
844 Auburn Road, 
Hubbard Woods, 111. 
The mother of Marjorie Young Gif- 
ford died on December 11th, after a long 
illness. Many members of the class knew 
her, and will be sad to learn of her death. 

1909 
Class Editor: Helen Bond Crane, 
Denbigh Hall, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

It has been a great shock to learn that 
Gertrude Congdon Crampton died in the 
Evanston Hospital on February 6th. In 
addition to the efficient management of 
her home, for many years Gertrude had 
taken an active part in the civic life of 
Evanston. She was president of the Par- 
ent-Teacher Association of the Miller 
school, president of the Central Council 
of Mothers' Club, member of the Evan- 
ston High School board, and secretary- 
treasurer of the MacDowell Club. 

Those of us who worked with her in 
College can appreciate to some extent 
what her whole-hearted interest must 
have meant to all the organizations, and 
how much they have lost by her death. 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



27 



The class wishes to express through the 
Bulletin its sincere sympathy with all 
her family for their great loss. She 
leaves a husband, three children and three 
sisters — Elizabeth Congdon Barron, 
1902; Dorothy Congdon Gates, 1906, and 
Louise Congdon Balmer, 1908. 

1910 
Editor: Emily Storer, 
Waltham, Mass. 

Mary Boyd Shipley Mills writes to the 
class from Nanking, China : 
"Dear 1910: 

"To our own surprise as well as to other 
people's, here we are back in Nanking 
after all. We left Haverford July first 
and after visiting in various places on 
our way West finally sailed from Van- 
couver on the 16th of August. Because 
we knew that no house was yet ready 
for us in Nanking and because Shanghai 
in early September is very hot, we got 
off the boat at Nagasaki and went up to 
Unzen, Japan, for a three weeks' visit 
with friends. For glorious beauty, I have 
never seen anything to equal the drive 
of forty miles from Nagasaki to Unzen, 
along great bluffs and high cliffs above 
the sea, and the last ten miles winding 
back and forth on the mountain side 
climbing steadily, between green rice ter- 
races edged with flaming red amaryllis. 
When we left there, our two older chil- 
dren stayed behind to come over to 
Shanghai and Nanking the middle of 
October. We had two strenuous weeks 
in Shanghai shopping for our new home 
and finally reached Nanking the morning 
of October 6th. You can imagine our 
feelings as we looked out of the train 
windows and saw the Nanking, to which 
we had said so strange a farewell 
through the porthole of an American 
destroyer in March, 1927. 

"The city is little changed except for 
the ruins of the foreign houses, which 
are rather numerous in our part of the 
city. I have got almost used now to pass- 
ing our old house with its dark chimneys 
and two or three corners of wall still 
standing. We now are housed very com- 
fortably in one of the buildings of our 
girls' school, made over for us into a 
very attractive residence. These weeks 
have been spent busily in interviewing 
carpenters, tinsmiths, tailors, etc., and in 
getting done some of the things that 
grow so automatically in America, but 
we are well settled now. 

"My biggest job is teaching my chil- 
dren, for our American school that we 
had was burned and the teachers scat- 
tered. When there are more families of 



children here we can again build up a 
school. The Calvert school course is a 
boon; without it I should flounder in all 
directions. Even with it I find it hard 
to teach second grade, first grade, and 
kindergarten all at the same time, and to 
keep the other two busy while I am 
teaching one. 

"We have had a most cordial and 
friendly welcome from the Chinese, and 
our Chinese friends seem closer than 
ever. We are very happy to be back. 

"Nanking is very much on the map 
these days, so don't let any Bryn Mawr 
globe trotter forget that there is a Bryn 
Mawrtyr here who is always glad to 
welcome a visitor." 

Jane Smith is living at 218 Madison 
Avenue, New York; is Director of the 
Bryn Mawr Summer School for Women 
Workers in Industry, and Chairman of 
a board representing three affiliated Sum- 
mer Schools for Women Workers. This 
movement for workers' resident schools 
is developing rapidly, and it is hoped that 
eventually one such school may be estab- 
lished using empty college buildings in 
each section of the United States. The 
proposed Vineyard Shore School on the 
Hudson expects to open next fall with 
a small group of women workers who 
have attended one of the Summer 
Schools. This new school will offer an 
eight months' course and will experiment 
further with methods of teaching for 
adult industrial workers, and with teach- 
ers' training in this field of education. 

Lillie James sends the following infor- 
mation about herself: Principal of the 
Hebb's School since 1921. Graduate 
work in the School of Education, Har- 
vard, for past three summers. President, 
Delaware Branch of the A. A. U. W., 
1926-1930. Executive Committee of 
Delaware Conference on Cause and Cure 
of War. Two graduates of this school, 
Mary Tatnall and Frances Tatnall, have 
held regional scholarships to Bryn Mawr 
from Eastern Pennsylvania and Dela- 
ware. In 1927 Frances Tatnall received 
the second highest matriculation average 
for New York, New Jersey and Dela- 
ware. 

1911 
Class Editor: Louise S. Russell, 
140 East 52nd Street, 
New York City. 
The class will sympathize with Mollie 
Kilner Wheeler in the death of her father 
on December 29th. 

Ruth Vickery Holmes is spending a 
few weeks in New York at 14 East 60th 
Street in between trips south with her 



2S 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



husband on their boat, on which he is 
making experiments with apparatus. 
Their three children, who are all away at 
boarding school, spent the holidays with 
their father and mother at Stonington, 
Conn. 

Helen Ott Campbell writes an inter- 
esting letter from Kangkei, Korea: 
"Your letter has been tucked away in my 
writing box for months. It went with 
me to Pyeng Yang in June and off to 
the sea in July, but it never got to the 
top of the pile. There isn't any other 
Bryn Mawrtyr in Korea and never has 
been. There is no fear of bandits, 
although we are only forty miles from 
the Yalu, and last spring a band did 
come over from China and shot up a 
little town; but the Japanese are strong 
on law and order and we profit thereby. 
Kangkei means "river bound." We have 
rivers on three sides and back of us a 
pine-covered hill with the old city wall, 
or what is left of it, to remind us that 
once upon a time life in Korea was ex- 
citing. We are now up above the town, 
with a glorious view of the mountains 
and around and far away. Also, we do 
not have to boil our water ! On the hot- 
test day in summer it is too cold to drink 
when it first comes from the well. Not 
that we have much summer. There is 
often killing frost before the middle of 
September and we've had real snow- 
storms in May. Compared to many 
places in China we are isolated, for we 
are only 160 miles from the railroad 
(with Baldwin engines, too), and a stage 
line of Japanized Fords makes the trip 
in two days. (They have three seats 
with only an excuse in the way of up- 
holstery, and after a trip or two their 
insides and outsides are much patched 
up). The road is listed as a "second- 
class auto road," but one is often tempted 
to think it has no class at all. One ad- 
vantage in living so far from the world 
is that I can teach my children. I'd 
never be strong-minded enough to do it 
in America, and it is really the most in- 
teresting thing one can do." 

Helen's friends will be sorry to hear 
that her last baby, a boy, died. 

1912 

Class Editor: Catherine Thompson 

Bell (Mrs. C. Kenneth Bell), 

2700 Chicago Blvd., Detroit, Mich. 

Elizabeth Pinney Hunt's elder boy, 

Dickson, who was thirteen in October, 

entered the Second Form of the Hill 

School in September. Peggy Garrigues 

Lester gave him a warm welcome and 

Christine Hammer's mother is near at 



hand, so Pinney feels he is safe and 
sound in the bosom of 1912. 

Joyeux et gai Noel from the S.S. 
Caronia indicates that Mary Gertrude 
Fendall is home again. . 

Zelda Branch, the editor has heard 
indirectly, is at work on a second book. 

Helen Lautz is in Santa Barbara, in 
the studio of Edward Borein, the etcher, 
"writing his letters, etc., and in between 
selling his really delightful etchings." 
The studio is on the famous "Street in 
Spain," and Helen urges 1912 to direct 
its steps thither. 

Peggy Peck McEwan has a new daugh- 
ter, Priscilla Peck, born on December 
the 5th. 

Dr. Kay Shaw is back in Pittsburgh 
doing pathology with Dr. Willetts and 
liking it immensely. On the side she's 
kept busy doctoring the neighbors and 
her family and Biddy's fiance. 

Catherine Thompson Bell has hung out 
her shingle as literary consultant, manu- 
script adviser, or what you will. She 
has four clients, and more in the offing. 

Louise Watson is President of the 
Women's Bond Club this year. Louise 
insists it isn't particularly impressive, but 
it certainly is very impressive to think 
of her introducing Eminent Financiers 
at monthly meetings. And another nice 
thing has happened to Louise — ownership 
in an old white colonial cottage with an 
acre and a quarter of ground and a 
share in a private bathing beach on the 
Sound at South Norwalk, Conn. Real 
country, Louise reports, and marvelous 
swimming and, since she's going out this 
year as early as April, a vegetable gar- 
den and "more and better" flowers. 

From her desk, conveniently- near the 
door of the Guaranty Trust Company, 
Louise can watch Bryn Mawr shopping 
on Fifth Avenue. The latest, she says, 
was Maysie, "looking very stunning and 
as full of enthusiasm for the work she 
is doing at Chicago for her Ph.D. degree 
as she was when she and Lorle and I 
did Post Major Psychology together." 

Gertrude Elcock has been made Chair- 
man of the Junior School Conference of 
the Private School Teachers' Association, 
and on January the 8th she presided at 
a meeting that had for its discussion the 
imposing topic, "The Laws of Learning." 

1914 
Class Editor: Elizabeth Ayer Inches 
(Mrs. Henderson Inches), 
41 Middlesex Road, 
Chestnut Hill, Mass. 
Eleanor Allen Mitchell has moved to 
100 Locust Street, San Francisco, as her 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



29 



husband refused to commute from Berke- 
ley any more. 

Mary Coolidge has sent her Xmas 
cards from Munich, so we assume that 
she is studying there this winter. 

The McCutcheons now have new 
schemes for the Spring. They wish to 
explore the source of the Amazon and 
expect to cross the Andes in aeroplanes. 

Katherine Angell lunched with Fritz, 
Biz and Lib before Christmas. She is 
one of our busiest classmates, for she 
still has a house, two large children and 
a job to superintend. (She is still on 
the New Yorker.) Every spare moment 
she and Ernest watch the six-day bicycle 
race. She says it is thrilling and no one 
should miss it, especially after 11 at 
night. She is in excellent health and 
spirits in spite of her busy life. 

Anne Lindsay is sailing on her annual 
trip to Paris on the Majestic, January 
19th. 

1916 
Class Editor: Catherine S. Godley, 
768 Ridgeway Avenue, 

Avondale, Cincinnati, O. 

Helen Holmes Carothers' husband left 
right after Christmas for three months 
of work and study in Vienna. 

Margaret Engelhard Phipps, ex-' 16, has 
twins, born on November 27th. The lit- 
tle boy is named John and the little girl 
Barbara Caroline. Margaret celebrated 
their arrival by getting the flu, but she 
is all right now, though a little bewil- 
dered over the size of her family. 

1918 
Class Editor: Helen Walker, 

5516 Everett Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Helen Walker has been having a very 
anxious time over her brother, who is 
slowly recovering from a serious opera- 
tion. She herself may have to have a 
couple of vertebrae put in place shortly, 
so Ruth Cheney is editing the notes for 
this issue and Margaret Timpson has 
promised to get out the Class Book for 
Reunion. We hope Helen will be all 
right soon and able to join us then. 

Members of 1918 will soon begin re- 
ceiving communications about Reunion. 
We must finish collecting our Reunion 
Gift, and there will also be a call for 
Class Dues to pay for the book. After 
that unpleasantness is over, there will be 
nothing to do but get our railway tickets 
and enjoy ourselves. Class Dinner is 
Saturday evening, June 1st, so make your 
plans now and be sure to come. Ar- 
rangements are not yet complete, but I 
have extracted promises from both Vir- 
ginia Kneeland and Helen Alexander that 



. they will try to come and will speak. 
When last heard from, Alec was some- 
where in the State of North Borneo, 
dressed in a diving suit; maybe she plans 
to walk home. 

1919 
Editor: Mary Ramsey Phelps 
(Mrs. William Phelps), 
Guyencourt, Del. 

There is a most interesting article, 
"Benjamin Franklin," by Isabel M. S. 
W T hittier, A.M., in The Manufacturer for 
December, 1928, a magazine published 
monthly by the Manufacturers' Club of 
Philadelphia. Isabel is to congratulated 
on its wealth of information and delight- 
fully readable style. 

Your editor is again the beaming re- 
cipient of a nice long letter — this time 
from Peggy Rhoads. She is back from 
her four months in Japan, the first five 
weeks of which were spent in Takayama, 
a lovely seaside place, 200 miles north of 
Tokyo, then to Tokyo in September, and 
trips from there into the country and 
down to Kyoto and Nara. "Everything 
was very gay for the enthronement" and 
"I was fortunate in being a guest in 
many Japanese homes," sounds fascin- 
ating and cosmopolitan. In February 
Peggy expects to resume work as secre- 
tary of the Mission Board of Friends of 
Philadelphia at 304 Arch Street. 

On her way home from Japan Peggy 
stopped in Santa Fe and visited Beanie 
Dubach, who is very well and planning 
to do some social work this winter. 
Beanie and a friend are living in an 
adobe house they built themselves and 
are very proud of. She spent the fall 
in St. Louis and reports that "Alice 
Rubelman Knight has a charming little 
daughter," and that Frannie Allison has 
become a staid matron, who enjoys living 
in the country because "it's good for the 
children." 

Gertrude Hcarne Myers has a second 
daughter, Gertrude, born October 26th, 
at St. Davids. 

Betty Biddle's first daughter, Nancy 
Hutton Yarnall, was born in June. 

I have been having a wonderful south- 
ern vacation, motoring to Atlanta for 
Thanksgiving. Then some parties in 
Charleston, and lots of hunting deer, 
duck and turkey in the wilds of the San- 
tee River country of South Carolina. 
We expect to be home again soon after 
the middle of January. 

Augusta Blue came home from France 
for Christmas. 

Beckie Reinhardt Craighill was in 
Wilmington for Christmas, and for the 



30 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



debut of her young sister Margie, Bryn 
Mawr, 1932. 

1920 
Class Editor: Mary Hardy, 

518 Cathedral Street,. Baltimore, Md. 

Lillian Davis Philip has a second son, 
born January 9th. The Philips moved 
from Staten Island to New York last 
October, and are living at 755 Park 
Avenue. 

Louise Sloan is living in Boston this 
winter, in an apartment at 79 Revere 
Street, which, she says, possesses a com- 
fortable bed for visitors. She is work- 
ing in the Massachusetts Eye and Ear 
Infirmary in the department of Ophthal- 
mology of the Harvard Medical School. 

K. Townsend spent the summer abroad 
and came back on the "Majestic" with 
M. Hardy's little sister, Clare, B.M., 
1926. K. is President of the Boston 
Field Hockey Association. She also is 
still teaching at the Boston School of 
Physical Education. 

Madeline Brown, M.D., has completed 
her interneship at Ann Arbor, and has 
started another one at the Bellevue Hos- 
pital in New York. 

1921 
Editor: Mrs. J. E. Rogers, 
99 Poplar Plains Road, 
Toronto, Ontario, Canada. 

Margaret Ladd writes from home, 
where she is convalescing from the flu, 
that she has a fellowship in psychology 
this year in the "Institute for Child 
Guidance" in New York. She gives 
mental tests to problem children, and 
attends six hours of lectures a week. 
She lives in a working-girls' home at 94 
MacDougal Street. Last summer she 
went abroad with her mother and stayed 
most of the time in the Italian Lake 
District. 

Eileen Lyons Donovan is living at 282 
Beacon Street and issues a cordial invi- 
tation to all 1921 to drop in to see her. 
She and her husband are making a hobby 
of collecting first editions. 

Luz Taylor is working for the Little 
Rock Junior League, and taking much 
interest in airplanes as a business. For 
exercise she plays golf and basketball, 
the latter on a team known as the 
"Wheezers." 

In a letter received in the Alumnae 
Office Luz writes: "I saw Mary Porter 
just about a year ago when I was en 
route to California through Houston, 
and heard that she was in Louisville at 
Derby time, but missed her entirely. 
. . . Had you been at Darn's wedding 
you would have seen a real Bryn Mawr 



Reunion — Kath Bradford, Jimmie Rogers, 
Ellen Garrison, Rabbit Harvey, Phoebe 
Bentley, Teddy, etc. We even went so 
far as to sit on the steps one night and 
sing. It was a very lovely wedding and 
we had a marvelous time. I only got 
home just before Christmas. . . . My 
plans call for Florida in March." 

Mag Taylor Macintosh is living in 
Haverford and is very busy attending 
school and reading meetings and college 
lectures, looking after her four-year-old 
daughter Gertrude and doing gardening. 
Last summer she and Westie went cruis- 
ing on the St. Lawrence River in a 
twenty-six-foot boat with Mag's husband 
and brother. The trip was such a suc- 
cess, that this summer they are going to 
cruise to Nova Scotia and Prince Edward 
Island. 

Henrietta Baldwin was married on 
February 9th to Pierrepont Sperry and is 
living in Sunbury, Pa. 

Mabel Smith Cowles has a job in New 
Haven, while her husband is there work- 
ing for his Ph.D. 

Many thanks to you who have replied 
so promptly to my letter. If you have 
not received a letter yet, it is due to the 
delay in printing this year's college regis- 
ter. I have your letters all stamped and 
sealed, and am just waiting for your 
latest address. I am off for a month in 
Nassau to try and take germs out of me. 
I hope when I return to find answers 
from every single member of the class. 

1922 
Editor: Serena Hand Savage 
(Mrs. William Savage), 
29 West 12th Street, New York City. 

Anita Dunn Carpenter has a third 
daughter, born November 7th. 

Catherine Rhett was married on the 
7th of December to Mr. Leslie Neville 
Wilmot Woods. 

Lillian WyckofT is teaching at the 
Baldwin School. 

Kay Gardner has gone to Florida for 
the winter. 

1923 
Editor: Katharine Lord Strauss, 

27 East 69th Street, New York City. 

Hellie Wilson Collins has a daughter, 
Cynthia E.mily, born June 1, 1928. Hel- 
lie writes that Virginia Miller visits her 
often "and straightens out my gardening 
difficulties. She seems to be doing in- 
numerable things equally well. I can only 
mention golf, painting, landscaping and 
advertising. The last is her true profes- 
sion, while her hobby is interior deco- 
rating. 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



"Cuckoo Bradley has another son, and 
if he is endeavoring to live up to the 
endearing qualities of Philip, Jr., at four 
months, when I saw him, he must be 
struggling hard." 

Franny Matteson Rathbun writes: 
"After eight weeks in Scandinavia this 
summer, without our daughters, we have 
returned to a new job in Dublin, N. H. 
Larry is busy with forests by day and 
maps by night. Betsy and Ann have 
already enjoyed some coasting and I 
content myself with getting settled in the 
small house we have bought here." 

Bella Goddard Mott is leading a most 
Kiplingesque life in Nagpur, where she 
started a primary school for girls. She 
spent a vacation with a Persian Moham- 
medan family in Simla in October. And 
last summer, to quote directly, "We tried 
our first hill shooting in the Himalayas 
near Kulu. We went with a Major, who 
was more mountain goat than man, and 
I expect that our present state is in part 
due to the thousands of feet we scram- 
bled up and down in a day. We camped 
in the snow and the indefatigable Major 
had us up at three in the morning and 
climbing impossible passes in the most 
biting wind I've ever met. In the end, 
John got a red and a black bear, both 
shot within a day of the starting place." 

Helen Hagen Stagg is in a sanitarium 
in Leysin, from which she expects to be 
discharged entirely cured in May. 

Dorothy Stewart Pierson says that Star 
McDaniel Heimsath's son is fine. The 
Heimsaths have bought a house in 
Bridgeport, where Star is teaching psy- 
chology and German at the Junior 
College. 

Frannie Childs is Instructor in History 
at Hunter College. She has two sections 
in Mediaeval History, and three in the 
History of Europe from 1500-1815. 

Mary Morsman Masters spent Christ- 
mas in Omaha with her family and has 
now returned to her sumptuous new 
apartment at 117 East 72nd Street, New 
York City. 

Dena Humphreys is acting with a com- 
pany which is traveling through Canada 
playing a Shaw repertory. Her costumes 
for Candida are reported to be pictur- 
esque and dazzling. 

Helenka Hoyt is engaged to Byron 
Stookey, a neurological surgeon in New 
York. Lie has studied in Geneva, Vienna 
and Berlin, as well as in this country. 
During the war, he was a Captain in 
the Royal Army M. C. and after 1917, 
a Major in the U. S. M. C. They are 
to be married in May. 



1924 
Class Editor: Mrs. Donald Wilbur, 
Rosemont, Pa. 

The New York Times of January 14th 
says : 

"Mrs. Justine Wise Tulin, daughter of 
Rabbi Stephen Wise, of New York City, 
today received word that she had passed 
the Connecticut bar examinations and, as 
a Connecticut lawyer, could bettter de- 
vote her life to humanitarian work. 

"She took the State examination two 
weeks ago with twenty-five other can- 
didates. She came to New Haven three 
years ago to attend the Yale Law School, 
and later was married to Professor Leon 
Tulin of the faculty. They have one 
child." 1925 

Editor: Mrs. Frederic Conger 
(Blit Mallet Conger), 
325 East 72nd Street, New York. 

Well, here's some news ! Peggy Stew- 
ardson is engaged to Howard Blake, 
Princeton, '24, and minister by profes- 
sion. They will "probably be married in 
April and go abroad for awhile." Noth- 
ing seems definitely planned as yet but 
it is all very exciting and quite a scoop 
for us. 

Taki Fugita writes to Betty Smith: 
"This summer I went to Honolulu and 
attended the Pan-Pacific Women's Con- 
ference there and met Martha Cooke 
then. I wished I could have gone to the 
United States proper, too, but it was im- 
possible. Now again I am back in Japan 
teaching as before. Please send my love 
to my Bryn Mawr friends." 

And a letter from Helen Henshaw, 
6 Douglas Road, Schenectady, described 
a most immobile existence. "I'm a pro- 
fessional musician, because I spend part 
of my time directing the music in a 
school, part playing the organ and direct- 
ing a quartet in a church, part working 
for organ recitals, and part studying for 
a second degree in music. I'm crazy 
about it all, too !" 

Our gay little Carrie is off again to 
St. Moritz and points skyward, all set 
to ski with the Dolly sisters and King 
Albert, of Belgium, and well chaperoned 
by Pamela Coyne Taylor. 

Chissy has been promoted to head of 
stock in the negligee department of R. H. 
Macy. She took the job just before 
Christmas and is evidently "skyrocketing 
to success," as we say in the movies. 

Baldy is doing research work on rats 
as well as her course at P. and S. 

Christine Stolzenbach is teaching 
Spanish at Hampden Institute and loves 
her work. 



32 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



Jeannetta Schoonover is also holding- 
down a teaching job in the Chemistry 
department of Wilson College. 

And Blit Mallett Conger is still teach- 
ing history of Architecture and Painting 
at the Spence School in New York. 

1927 
Editor: Ellenor Morris, 

Berwyn, Pa. 

The editor wishes to offer deepest 
apologies for the long, protracted silence 
and begs the class to believe that it has 
been due only to the unfortunate com- 
bination of the flu and the Christmas 
rush. For all the news which, remark- 
able to relate, has appeared unsolicited 
in the last few weeks, she is extremely 
grateful. 

The headlines of the month seem to 
be due to Louise Blair, who has just 
married a Spanish artist, name uncon- 
tributed; and has had two of her own 
creations accepted by a Paris salon. 

Other sensations are the engagements 
of Elizabeth Winchester and Ruth Rick- 
aby. Winnie is engaged to Randolph 
Brandt, and writes that she is to be mar- 
ried in the spring. Rick's fiance is Louis 
J. Darmstadt, class of '27, Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology. Rick is at pres- 
ent taking courses in Domestic Science 
and music at Columbia. 

Judy Lee, after studying Biology at 
Cambridge at the Harvard Summer 
School, is now pursuing a course at 
Columbia pertaining to the science of 
Forestry. 

Frances Chrystie has a job with the 
new International Encyclopedia in New 
York, and is writing biographies. 

Betsy Gibson has been staying with 
Frances, and is engaged in writing 
"blurbs," doing copy and odds and ends 
of advertising work for Dillon Reed. 

Algy Whiting sailed, with Angela 
Johnston, on the same boat as the present 
Mrs. Tunney, and is now studying 
archeology in Greece. 

K. Adams, Judy Lee, Quita Villard, 
Frances Chrystie, Jane Cheney, Peggy 
Brooks, Marion Leary, Betsy Gibson, 
Marion Smith and Jane Sullivan were in 
Helen Stokes' wedding, and according to 
all accounts looked stunning in peach- 
colored creations. 

Ann Carey Thomas was recently mar- 
ried and is now Mrs. Hazard Clark. 

Jane Sullivan is giving a course in the 
appreciation of music, which is attended 
by numerous alumnae, among whom are 
Helen Stokes, Marion Leary, Julia Lee 
and Frannie Jay. 

Malvina Holcombe was married in 
November to Mr. Kenneth Conarroe 



Trotter. They are living at Berkeley 
Court, Bryn Mawr Avenue and City 
Line, Philadelphia. 

Corinne Chambers has a job in Macy's, 
but is apparently living in Flushing and 
commuting. 

Bee Simcox is living in New York, 
and studying on a joint Fellowship at 
the New York School of Social Work, 
after teaching last year at a school in 
Florida. Her schedule includes active 
work for the Charity Organization Soci- 
ety, as well as lectures in the school. 

Marcia Carter has gone to Europe, 
where she was preceded some months 
ago by Aggie Pearce and Dune. 

Sally Peet has returned from Europe 
and is taking secretarial courses. 

Agnes Mongan is studying practical 
art, and has a part-time job at the Fogg 
Museum. 

The class sympathizes with Frances 
Curtin in the death of her father on 
January 2nd. 

Minna Lee Jones is still at the New 
York School of Social W^ork, and doing 
industrial research work on a survey of 
the industries of Greenwich Village. 

Gabbie Sewall is enjoying herself with 
Junior League Dramatics, and has risen 
from Property Manager to a member of 
the cast. 

Mary Kennedy Nelms has moved to 
New Haven, where her husband is 
studying under Professor Baker. 

K. Harris is teaching French at the 
Gordon Roney School in West Philadel- 
phia. 

Carol Piatt is teaching English and 
History in the Katharine Branson School 
in Ross, California, and writes that she 
is having a marvelous time. 

Ginny Capron is studying History at 
the University of Minnesota. 

Sara Pinkerton is at the Agnes Irwin 
School in Philadelphia teaching Latin. 

Mary Robinson is at the Union Theo- 
logical School in New York, is very busy 
and is enjoying herself immensely. 

Darcy Kellogg has deserted the Guar- 
anty Bond School and is going. to India 
with Lee Austin and her father. 

Crooky is going abroad in March with 
Magdalen Hupfel, and will take in the 
Riviera, Italy, Paris, and England. 

Ellie Morris is doing Junior League 
Work, and has been helping refurnish 
the historical mansion which has become 
the new club house, and is also doing 
Girl Scouting with a troop near Bryn 
Mawr. A good deal of her time, how- 
ever, is taken up with fox hunting and 
training her young horse, much more 
amusing occupations. 



BRIARCLIFF 

Mrs. Dow's School for Girls 

Margaret B£ll Merrill, M.A., Principal 
BRIARCLIFF MANOR NEW YORK 

College Preparatory 
and General Academic Courses 

Post Graduate Department 

Music and Art with New York 
advantages. New Swimming Pool 

Music Dept. Art Dept. 

Jan Sickesz Chai. W. Hawthorne, N. A. 

Director Director 



THE CAMBRIDGE SCHOOL 

DOMESTIC ARCHITECTURE 

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 

A Professional School for College 

Graduates 

The Academic Year for 1929-30 opens 

Monday, October 7, 1929. 

Summer School — Monday, July 1, 

through Saturday, Augtcst 3. 

Henry Atherton Frost — Director 

53 Church Street, Cambridge, Mass. 

At Harvard Square 

Beech Wood 

A Camp for Girls 

On Lake Alamoosook near Bucksport, Me. 

Water sports, athletics and other 
camp interests. Tutoring. 

Conducted by 
HERMINE EHLERS, A.B., Bryn Mawr 

Address: FRIENDS SEMINARY 
Rutherford Place, New York City 

Noirmoutier Art Class 

ROBERT LOGAN, Painter and Etcher 

Forms a Summer Class for 1929 

Island of Noirmoutier - La Vendee, France 

KATE DU VAL PITTS, 1902, Student Adviser 

Write MRS. HENRY PITTS 
1031 Canton Avenue, Mattapan, Massachusetts 




Cathedral School of St. Mary 



GARDEN CITY, LONG ISLAND, N. Y. 

A school for Girls 19 miles from New York. College 

preparatory and general courses. Music Art and 

Domestic Science. Catalogue on request. Box B 

MIRIAM A. BYTEL, A.B., Radcliffe, Principal 

BERTHA GORDON WOOD, A.B., Bryn Mawr, 

Assistant Principal 



The Traphagen School of Fashion 



I 



INTENSIVE WINTER AND 
SUMMER COURSES 

All phases from elementary to full 
mastery of costume design and illus- 
tration taught In shortest time com- 
patible with thoroughness. Day and 
Evening classes. Saturday courses for 
Adults and Children. Our Sales De- 
partment disposes of student work. 
Every member of advanced classes 
often placed through our Employment 
Bureau. Write for announcement. 



In Arnold, Constable A Company Costume 
Design Competition, over 100 schools and 
nearly 800 students took part; all prizes 
were awarded to Traphagen pupils with 
exception of one of the five third prizes. 

1680 Broadway (near 52nd St.) New Y< 



*J)(Ca?iy of the 

AG6£££C9T{I8£ 

that are found at 
Saks-Fifth Avenue 
are to be found only at 

SAKS-FIFTH AVENUE 

FORTY- NINTH to FIFTIETH STREET 
NEW YORK 



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THE AGNES IRWIN SCHOOL 

2009-2011 Delancey Place, Philadelphia 

A College Preparatory 
SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 



BERTHA M. LAWS, A.B., Headmistress 



GRAY GABLES 

THE BOARDING DEPARTMENT OF THE 
BANCROFT SCHOOL OF WORCESTER 

Complete College Preparatory Course. 
One year course for Board Examination. 

For catalog address: 

Hope Fibheb, Ph.D., Bancroft School 

Worcester, Massachusetts 



MISS BEARD'S SCHOOL 

A Country School near New York 

Orange, New Jersey 

COLLEGE PREPARATION 

Advanced Courses Junior High School 

Music, Art, Domestic Science 

Catalog on Request 

LUCIE C. BEARD, Headmistress 

The Katharine Branson School 

ROSS, CALIFORNIA Across the Bay from San Francisco 

A Country School College Preparatory 

Heads 
Katharine Fleming Branson, A.B., Bryn Mawr 

MISS MADEIRA'S SCHOOL 

1330 19th St., N. W. Washington, D. C. 

A RESIDENT AND DAY SCHOOL FOR 
GIRLS 

LUCY MADEIRA WING, A.B. 

MRS. DAVID LAFOREST WING 
Head Mistress 

MISS WRIGHT'S SCHOOL 

Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Prepares for College Board 
Examination 



CAROLINE RUUTZ-REES. Ph.D. 1 
MARY E. LOWNDES. Litt.D 



FERRY HALL 

A RESIDENT AND DAY SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

On Lake Michigan, near Chicago 

College Preparatory, General and Advanced Courses, 
Departments of Music. Expression, and Art. Athletics 
and Swimming Pool. 

Eloise R. Tremain, A.B., Bryn Mawr, Principal 

ROSEMARY HALL 

College Preparatory 
(With supplementary but not alternative course*) 

| Head Mistrusts 

GREENWICH - - CONNECTICUT 

The Shipley School 

Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 

Preparatory to Bryn Mawr College 

ALICE G. HOWLAND, ELEANOR 0. BROWNELL 
Principals 

MISS RANSOM and 
MISS BRIDGES' SCHOOL 

PIEDMONT, CALIFORNIA 
(A suburb of San Francisco) 

A RESIDENT AND DAY SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

General and College Preparatory Courses 
Outdoor Life throughout the year 

EDITH BRIDGES, B.L., Principal 

The Baldwin School 

A Country School for Girls 
BRYN MAWR PENNSYLVANIA 

Preparation for Bryn Mawr. Mount Holyoke, Smith. 

Vassar and Wellesley colleges. Abundant outdoor life. 

Hockey, basketball, tennis. 

ELIZABETH FORREST JOHNSON, A.B. 

HEAD 

THE LOW AND HEYWOOD SCHOOL 

Emphasizing college preparatory work. 

Also general and special courses. 

One year intensive college preparation. 

Junior school. 

64th year. Catalogue. 

SHIPPAN POINT, STAMFORD, CONN. 



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The Saint Timothy's School 
for Girls 

CATONSVILLE, MARYLAND 

Founded September 1882 

COLLEGE PREPARATORY 

AND 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

MISS LOUISA McENDREE FOWLER 
Head of the School 

Wykeham Rise 

WASHINGTON, CONNECTICUT 

A COUNTRY SCHOOL 
FOR GIRLS 

FANNY E. DAVIES, LL.A., Headmistress 
Prepares for Bryn Mawr and Other Colleges 

The Ethel Walker School 

SIMSBURY CONNECTICUT 

Head of School 

ETHEL WALKER SMITH, A.M., Bryn Mawr College 

Head Mistress 

JESSIE GERMAIN HEWITT. A.B.. Bryn Mawr College 

UNIVERSITYgYrIS 

BOARDING AND DAY SCHOOL 

Founded 1896 

Thorough and successful Preparation 

for Eastern Colleges for Women as well as 

for Midwestern Colleges and Universities 

Illustrated Catalogue on Request 

ANNA B. HAIRE, A.B., SMITH COLLEGE, Principal 

1106-B Lake Shore Drive Chicago, Illinois 

The Episcopal Academy 

(Founded 1785) 

CITY LINE, OVERBROOK, PA. 

A country day school for boys 

Endorsed by Bryn Mawr Alumnae 

CAMP MYSTIC 

Miss Jobe's salt water camp for girls 

8-18. Conducted by Mrs. Carl Akeley (Mary 
L. Jobe). Halfway, New York and Boston. 
Land and water sports. Horseback riding 

MARY L JOBE, Room 507. 607 Fifth Ave., N.Y.C. 



THE HARTRIDGE SCHOOL 
FOR GIRLS 

SO minutes from New Yorh 

A country school with beautiful grounds. 
College Preparatory and General Courses. 
Over fifty girls in leading colleges today. 
Resident Department carefully restricted. 
Special attention to Music and Art. 
Athletics, Dramatics, Riding. 
EMELYN B. HARTRIDGE, Vassar, A.B., Principal 
Plainfield, New Jersey 



iOGERSHAIX 

*v4Modern School With New England Tradih'ons 
Thorough Preparation for any College 
One Year Intensive Review 



H^ ^^m General Academic Course with di- 
^&i ^^Fpioma. Junior College Courses — Home 
Economics, Secretarial Training, Music, Art, Dramatic 
Art. 26 Miles from Boston Outdoor Sports Riding. 
Gymnasium Swimming Pool. 

EDITH CHAPIN CRAVEN, A.B., Bryn Mawr 
201 Rogers Street, Lowell, Mass. 

The Harcum School 

BRYN MAWR, PA. 

Prepares for Bryn Mawr and all leading colleges 

Musical Course prepares toi the Depart 

ment of Music of Bryn Mawr College 

EDITH H. HARCUM, Head of School 

L. MAY WILLIS, Principal 

THE MISSES KIRK'S 

College Preparatory School 

PREPARATORY TO BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 
Individual Instruction Athletics 

Clovercroft, Montgomery Avenue, Rosemont, Pa. 
Mail, telephone and telegraph address Bryn MaWr. Pa 



CHOATE SCHOOL 

1600 Beacon Street, Brookline, Mass. 

HOME AND DAY SCHOOL 
FOR GIRLS 

EMPHASIS ON COLLEGE PREPARATION 

Elective Courses for students not preparing 
for College 

AUGUSTA CHOATE, A.M. (Vassar) 

Principal 






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1896 



1929 




BACK LOG CAMP 

THE ADIRONDACK MOUNTAINS 

INDIAN LAKE, NEW YORK 
For the Less Strenuous 

By no means all of our campers are strenuous hikers, swimmers, fishermen, 
or canoeists. There is always a certain amount of a stationary or infrequently 
moving element, made up of several sorts of people. First of all are the men 
and women, with or without relatives, who, while in no sense invalids, are yet 
beyond the age of vigorous activity. Though these do not take in all the trips, 
they greatly enjoy the food, the society, and the open air life which Back 
Log Camp affords. Again there are men and women in active health who find 
the Camp a highly desirable place to write or to carry out a course of reading. 
Finally there are those who, exhausted by the winter's work or by recent 
illness, find at Back Log just the combination of good food, good air, good sleep, 
and good company which sets them on their feet again in a remarkably short time. 

Some of our campers go on all the trips; some go on many of them; some 
go infrequently; and some never go. This more stationary group forms a sort 
of Greek chorus of Athenian elders, always ready with sympathetic appreciation 
of the tragedies and comedies of the energetic populace. 

Letters of inquiry should be addressed to Other references 

Mrs. Bertha Brown Lambert (Bryn Mawr, 1904) Mrs ' Anna "^S^"^^ MaW ' 1912) 



272 Park Avenue 
Takoma Park, D. C. 



Dr. Henry J. Cadbury 
(Head of Biblical Dept., Bryn Mawr) 

Haverford, Penna. 



Learim t© Play 

BRIDGEf 



NOW READY 

AUCTION BRIDGE* 
FOR BEGINNERS 

By MILTON C. WORK 

Now anyone can learn to play sound 
and enjoyable Bridge. Mr. Work's 
new book contains what everyone 
wants to know, needs to know, and 
should know. Average players, too, 
will find this book the key to win- 
ning Bridge. Cloth. 136 Pages. 
Price $1.00 

At all booksellers and stationers 




Wherever Bridge is 
played, at home or 
abroad, Milton C. 
Work is the pre-emi- 
nent authority^ 9 out 
of every 10 teachers 
use his system ^ He 
originated the present 
count ^ Has served 
on every committee 
drafting laws ^ Re- 
ferred to by Colliers 
as "the supreme court 
of Bridge." 

THE JOHN C.WINSTON CO. 

PUBLISHERS PHILADELPHIA 



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- JOHN HANCOCK SERIES - 



THE FIELD 

of SOCIAL 

SERVICE 

is the place where 
many good gradu- 
ates go. 

A high form of Social 
Service, yielding a high- 
er remuneration than 
Settlement Work, lies in 
Selling Life Insurance 
in your own community. 

John Hancock Women 
Agents are very often 
college graduates. 

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more about it 



nquiry Bureau 




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Please send me further infor- 
mation about Insurance as a Pro- 
fession for Women. 

Name 

Address 

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Sixteen ships . . . distinctive in 
appointments and clientele . . . con- 
servative in price . . . Ask those who 
know what going Cabin means to 
them . . . The answer will predomi- 
nantly be Cunard . . . 
Three Cabin sailings weekly to 
Europe . . . the solution to an over- 
night decision to sail . . . and an 
economical one, too . . . On large, 
improved, newly decorated Cunarders 
. . . the result of enormous expendi- 
tures . . . justified because Cunard 
Cabin Crossings have become the 
thing to do . . . 

A satisfying . . . inexpensive . . . 
regular and fast route to England 
and France . . . And all ships have 
remodelled and comfortable 
Tourist Third accommodations . . . 



PLYMOUTH • HAVRE 
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1 84 O-EIGHTYNI NEYEARSOF SERVICE- 1 929 




Bryn Mawr Bulletin 



BRYN MAWR 
ALUMNAE 
BULLETIN 




COLLECTING FOR THE AKELEY 
AFRICAN HALL 



April, 1929 



Vol. IX 



No. 3 



Entered as second-class matter, January 1, 1921. at the Post Office, Phila.. Pa., under Act of March 3, 1879 

COPYRIGHT. 1929 

ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 



OFFICERS OF THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

EXECUTIVE BOARD 

President Louise Fleischmann Maclat, 1906 

Vice-President Natalie McFaden Blanton, 1917 

Recording Secretary Gertrude Hearne Myers, 1919 

Corresponding Secretary May Egan Stokes, 1911 

Treasurer Margaret E. Brusstar, 1903 

Chairman of the Finance Committee Caroline Florence Lexow, 1908 

Chairman of the Publicity Committee Caroline Morrow Chadwick-Collins, 1905 

ALUMNAE SECRETARY AND BUSINESS MANAGER OF THE BULLETIN 

Alice M. Hawkins, 1907 

EDITOR OF THE BULLETIN 

Marjorie L. Thompson, 1912 

DISTRICT COUNCILLORS 

District I Helen Evans Lewis, 1913 

District II Julia Langdon Loomis, 1895 

District III Mary Tyler Zabriskie, 1919 

District IV Katharine Holliday Daniels, 1918 

District V Frances Porter Adler, 1911 

District VI Erma Kingsbacher Stix, 1906 

District VII Helen Brayton Barendt, 1903 

ALUMNAE DIRECTORS 

Ruth Furness Porter, 1896 Mary Peirce, 1912 

Frances Fincke Hand. 1897 Margaret Reeve Cary, 1907 

Elizabeth Lewis Otey, 1901 

CHAIRMAN OF THE ALUMNAE FUND 

Caroline Florence Lexow, 1908 

CHAIRMAN OF THE ACADEMIC COMMITTEE 

Pauline Goldmark, 1896 

CHAIRMAN OF THE SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOAN FUND COMMITTEE 

Margaret Gilman, 1919 

CHAIRMAN OF THE COMMITTEE ON HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Dr. Marjorie F. Murray, 1913 

CHAIRMAN OF THE NOMINATING COMMITTEE 

Eleanor Little Aldrich, 1905 



Vrovident "Mutual 

Life Insurance Company of Philadelphia 

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SECRETARIAL SCHOOL*^ 

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(Harriman National Bank Building) 

An exclusive school devoted to 

SECRETARIAL AND BUSINESS TRAINING 

Limited to those with the proper cultural background. 
Day and Evening Classes 

Call, write or phone for catalog 
IRVING EDGAR CHASE, Director Vanderbilt 2474 



THE 

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For Insurances on Lives and 
Granting Annuities 

TRUST AND SAFE DEPOSIT 
COMPANY 

Over a Century of Service 

C. S. W. PACKARD, President 

Downtown Office: 517 Chestnut Street 

Fifteenth and Chestnut Streets 



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Bryn Mawr Alumnae 
Bulletin 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF 
THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

Marjorie L. Thompson, '12, Editor 
Alice M. Hawkins, '07, Business Manager 

EDITORIAL BOARD 

Eleanor Fleisher Riesman, '03 May Egan Stokes, '11 

Caroline Morrow Chadwick-Collins, 05 Ellenor Morris, '27 

Emily Fox Cheston, '08 Louise Fleischmann Maclay, '06, ex-officio 

Subscription Price, $1.50 a Year Single Copies, 25 Cents 

Checks should be drawn to the order of Bryn Mawr Alumnae Bulletin 
Published monthly, except August, September and October, at 1006 Arch St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Vol. IX APRIL, 1929 No. 3 



This month the Bulletin is delighted to be able to print the article by Mary 
Jobe Akeley in which she describes, very modestly, her part in the Akeley-Eastman- 
Pomeroy African Hall Expedition. The article speaks for itself, and between the 
lines one is able to read a chronicle of human courage and fortitude, of unflagging 
determination and forgetfulness of self, that is extraordinarily moving. It is courage 
that should be told in song; perhaps it is, there in the jungle, for' all we know. 
And yet this is the kind of thing that one might find in a Class Note. "Mary Jobe 
Akeley has just returned from Africa, where, after the death of her husband, she con- 
tinued his work, directing the Expedition." Perhaps immediately after would come a 
note saying that so-and-so had seen so-and-so's new house and that Kat had seen Gig 
as she went through New York. (The names are not authentic, but they serve their 
purpose.) Naturally, it is not given to every one to do such an outstanding piece of 
work as directing an Expedition, but any month in the Class Notes one can find a 
dozen things that have intrinsic interest, and that one longs to know more about. 
Every Class Editor should cultivate the faculty of wonder, and make her classmates 
tell "how" and "why." And yet all this is not entirely the responsibility of the Class 
Editors. . At this very moment some of them are urging classmates to write more 
explicit articles to send to the Bulletin. And the Editor has written to add her 
pleas to theirs. The argument that people would not be interested is absolutely falla- 
cious. Of course people would be interested; how could they fail to be in any 
account of human endeavor? Simply read through the new Register and list the 
people that you wish you knew more about. It is much more stimulating than the 
ordinary book on Occupations for Women. This is in part due to the fact that 
some of the activities recorded are not occupations for women. The age of pioneer- 
ing is not dead. Can we make it live again in the pages of the Bulletin? 



COLLECTING FOR THE AKELEY AFRICAN HALL 

{Introductory Note — Mary L. Jobe Akeley A M.A., F.R.G.S., began her explorations in the 
Selkirks of British Columbia as a graduate student at Bryn Mawr. Since that time she has 
conducted nine independent expeditions to the Northern Canadian Rockies. In recognition of 
her explorations in the region of Mt. Sir Alexander, the Canadian Geographhic Board recently 
named a high peak of the Canadian Rockies "Mt. Jobe" in her honor. She made her first expe- 
dition to Africa as a member of the Akeley-Eastman-Pomeroy African Hall Expedition, con- 
ducted by her husband, Carl Akeley, for the American Museum of Natural History in New 
York City. At her husiband's death, on November 17, 1926, she became leader of that expedi- 
tion. Because of the courageous manner in which she remained in the field and successfully 
carried the expedition program to completion, Albert, King of the Belgians, conferred upon her 
the decoration of the Cross of the Knight of the Order of the Crown.) 

Following our audience with Albert, King of the Belgians, in Brussels in Feb- 
ruary, 1926, M. Jaspar, Premier of Belgium and Minister of the Colonies, entrusted 
my husband, Carl Akeley, with a scientific mission to the Pare National Albert, 
Kivu, Belgian Congo. At Mr. Akeley's suggestion, it was arranged that Dr. J. M. 
Derscheid, Belgian zoologist, should join us in the autumn in Africa to assist with 
the work in the Congo. 

In the intervening months we undertook to accomplish the work for which the 
Akeley-Eastman-Pomeroy African Hall Expedition had been organized — the collect- 
ing of materials for six taxidermic groups for African Hall (of the American 
Museum of Natural History in New York City) , designed by my husband to recreate 
and perpetuate in America the vanishing wild life of the Africa he loved. 

Although climatic conditions and modes of travel differ greatly in British Colum- 
bia and in East Africa, my experiences on expeditions into the unexplored regions of 
the Northern Canadian Rockies proved invaluable on my first African journey. My 
duty, as a member of the expedition, was to act as secretary and paymaster, to employ 
and manage our black boys, to superintend the camp cuisine, to assist with botanical 
and entomological collections, to drive passenger cars and lorries, and to assist 
my husband when he was photographing and hunting big game for his collection. . 

We had seven months in the field together. In the Lukenia Hills, only thirty 
miles from our base in Nairobi, we made studies and collections for a group of klip- 
springer. Then we penetrated to the Northern Frontier of Kenya Colony, a few days' 
trek from the Abyssinian border, where we amassed materials for a waterhole group, 
featuring the northern giraffe. In this country of pig holes and thorns I wore out 
the tires of the small Chevrolet and then had to drive the big lorry for all transpor- 
tation. Traveling southeast to the junction of the Theba and Tana Rivers we hunted 
with Mr. George Eastman for the African buffalo. 

July found us in Tanganyika Territory where Mr. Akeley collected specimens 
of plains animals and fortunately secured a very rare group, a band of wild dogs. 
Here in the heart of the lion country of Western Tanganyika we had the hitherto 
unparalleled experience of finding and observing a family of fourteen peaceful lions 
at home in a hitherto undisturbed and unhunted donga or gully. A lion was the 
only trophy I ever wanted from Africa, but after driving the car while Mr. Akeley 
made motion pictures of lions and being for three weeks closer to them than I had 
ever dreamed of being, I felt that I required nothing more concrete than the photo- 

(2) 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 3 

graphic record to keep my memory fresh. However, Mr. Akeley insisted that I must 
bring at least one natural history specimen to my little Camp Mystic girls. Two 
shots, the only ones I fired in Africa, secured for me a very large and beautiful old 
lion with an impressively dark mane. 

The artists of my husband's staff made background studies for all the taxidermic 
groups I have mentioned, while Mr. Akeley and his preparators recorded the data for 
the plant accessories that would be required for the Museum groups, by taking photo- 
graphs and plaster casts of the various species and by preserving specimens in formalin. 
Mr. Akeley often remarked that in these six months in the field he had accomplished 
more than in any two years previously spent in Africa. To secure one or two groups 
is usually considered a full program for one expedition; we actually secured nine. 
Motor transportation, making it possible to reach remote game fields in a short time, 
hastened our progress, and Mr. Akeley, in his zeal to push forward the work for 
African Hall, began his search for the game at dawn and was often busy developing 
his photographs until late at night. These months in the various game fields, where 
I was my husband's constant companion and assistant, were for me a most compre- 
hensive and exceptional experience in Equatorial Africa. 

At our expedition base in Nairobi, we at last prepared for a nine hundred miles 
safari by motor and on foot to the region Mr. Akeley considered the most beautiful 
in all Africa — the Kivu volcanoes of the Belgian Congo. Here, where Mr. Akeley 
studied and collected gorillas in 1921-22, the Belgian Government, at his suggestion, 
had established the first National Park in Africa. At its heart was a gorilla sanc- 
tuary of more than two hundred square miles. The mission entrusted to Mr. Akeley 
by Minister Jaspar included a survey of this region and the study of its flora and 
fauna, especially the gorilla. Here, also, plant accessories and a background were to 
be secured for the gorilla group of African Hall. 

We reached my husband's last camp on the high slopes of Mt. Mikeno in early 
November. There, after a sudden illness of only three days, brought on by a year 
of extreme overwork, he was called to the Great Beyond. 

I found myself suddenly the leader of a safari of three white men and fifty to 
three hundred black boys. They came to me asking what we were to do. I could 
see but one answer — to remain to complete Carl Akeley's work to the best of our 
ability. My first duties were to prepare my husband's burial plot suitably and to 
hold the camp together in order that the artists and museum preparators could con- 
tinue their work. Dr. Derscheid was free to travel afield and so the topographical 
and geological survey of the volcanoes and the study of live gorillas was carried on 
by him. 

In the weeks that followed, the maximum day-time temperature in our Mikeno 
camp at an altitude of 12,000 feet was 46° F. ; at night the mercury dropped to 
36°. When it was not actually raining, a heavy mist fell or it was cloudy and dark. 
Hail stones lay on the ground about our tent for two days following one prolonged 
storm. Heavy winds that almost constantly eddied off Mt. Mikeno and Mt. Kari- 
simbi, drove dark clouds over us, loosened our tent pegs and almost blew our tents 
down. 

Weather conditions such as these greatly complicated the work in hand. The 
nearly naked black boys, on whom we were absolutely dependent for water, firewood, 
and the transportation of our camp and our collections, suffered acutely in the intense 



4 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

damp cold. I planned their work so that groups of fifteen worked in shifts of two 
hours each, while those not working huddled by the fires in their little grass huts. 
They required constant supervision, so that I was continually in the open, wearing 
all the woolen clothes I possessed to keep me warm. When occasionally my gun- 
boy or cook relieved me, I worked at my records 'in my tent lighted by a lantern 
and heated by a little charcoal brazier. 

Shortage of provisions also added to the discontent of native helpers. I kept 
a group of porters constantly in transit to bring into our camp any food that they 
could buy on the plains below. Even then I was forced to keep our black boys on 
shamefully scanty rations. One day when there were no beans nor rice in camp, 
I had to give them sixty pounds of our own white flour. My gravest problem was 
to keep these natives from returning to their homes before our survey could be com- 
pleted. I promised them relief at the earliest possible moment and made every 
attempt to secure re-enforcements. They seemed to sympathize with the difficulty of 
my position, and only one deserted. Our cook was exceptionally efficient, but pre- 
paring food in our main camp and for the two auxiliary camps was extremely trying 
because it was nearly impossible to keep the open cook fire going in the rain. 

Collecting plant accessories amid such prodigality of vegetation was easy enough, 
but drying two hundred plaster casts of their leaves and stems and making photo- 
graphs was a different matter. There were only three days between November 
eighth and December eighteenth clear enough for photography; nevertheless, I secured 
a complete series of photographs, including stereoscopic negatives of the plant acces- 
sories, as well as views of the gorilla's mountain home. I also made a close study of 
gorilla nests and of their feeding grounds and collected one of the nests entire for the 
museum group. 

After seven weeks in the Mt. Mikeno camp, the artists' work was done, and our 
records and collections completed. We had surmounted Mr. Akeley's grave with a 
great slab of cement that bore his name and the date, and surrounded it with an 
eight-foot stockade of mahogany posts against the encroachment of the jungle. Leav- 
ing his mortal body entombed in the midst of the country he loved, we relayed our 
camp down the slippery trails and began the long trek to Lake Hannington.' 

On the shores of this volcanic lake, where the temperature recorded in my grass 
and canvas banda (shelter) was 116°, we made our last camp in Africa. Here, in 
accordance with my husband's plans, we obtained photographs of the great colonies 
of pink flamingoes and the accessory materials and background studies for a group 
of greater kodoo. 

In fulfillment of the terms of Mr. Akeley's mission and at the request of 
Minister Jaspar, I recently returned to Belgium to collaborate with Dr. Derscheid 
in preparing a formal report of the findings of our expedition. This report was pre- 
sented to Albert, King of the Belgians, in the Palace in Brussels on October 10, 
1928. It includes additional information concerning the habits and numbers of the 
mountain gorilla in the Pare National Albert; notes on other animal species that 
inhabit the Pare; a catalogue of native and scientific names of the flora found there; 
a record of rain-fall and temperature; data necessary to complete the maps of the 
region; notes on local food and water supply; and most important of all, a practical 
plan of administration for the Pare National Albert, and for the establishment of 
a scientific research station therein. Mary L. Jobe Akeley. 



REPORT OF SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOAN FUND 
COMMITTEE, 1928-1929 

The Regional Scholarships activity of the Alumnae Scholarships and Loan Fund 
Committee has been for six years now of ever-increasing interest and importance. 
This brave venture of alumnae, begun so modestly in 1921-22 with the award of 
$3,100 for six students, has in its sixth year broken all previous records by giving to 
the College for the Regional Scholars from seven Districts and twelve local centers, 
$10,209. This is by no means the total sum of alumnae contributions to scholar- 
ships in 1928-29, as more than $2,409 has been raised by alumnae for special scholar- 
ships and grants. Some of this passes directly to students, recorded neither on College 
nor Alumnae Association books, and there is undoubtedly much of which we never 
even hear. 

The following figures will be of interest: 

REGIONAL SCHOLARSHIPS AWARDED 1928-29 

New England $2,700.00 

New York 1,900.00 

New Jersey - 400.00 

Eastern Pennsylvania 1 , 1 00.00 

Washington : 500.00 

Baltimore 300.00 

District IV (Cincinnati, etc.) 300.00 

District VII (California) 209.00 

District V ( Chicago) 1 ,400.00 

District VI ( St. Louis) : 900.00 

Scholarship from the South 500.00 



Total $10,209.00 

To the vision of those who thought out and originated the plan for Regional 
Scholars, to the labor, the brains, and the love which have gone into the selection of 
these students and the raising of funds, the College and all of us who are interested 
in her advancement owe unbounded gratitude. We owe much also to the preceding 
Chairman of this Committee for her clear, far-seeing methods of organization and 
centralization of the work, and to our most efficiently managed Alumnae Office. 
This is one of those rare pieces of work from which can see results, and the records 
of our scholars have more than repaid every effort they have cost. 

In the Alumnae Office is a card catalogue of the Regional Scholars, past and 
present, giving a record for each scholar of the scholarships, grants, and loans, she has 
received, her full academic record, and on the back of the card, her extra-curriculum 
activities, the paid and unpaid positions she has held. To this we hope to add the 
career of each scholar after leaving college. From these cards we find that there have 
been 54 Regional Scholars, 30 of whom are still in College, 22 as full Regional and 
2 as special scholars financed through local committees. 

(5) 



6 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

Of the 24 who have left College, 19 have graduated, and of these 19, 13 received 
their degrees with distinction, 6 cum laude, 4 magna cum laude, and 3 summa cum 
laude. The most important undergraduate scholarship, the Hinchman, given for dis- 
tinction in the student's special field, was held for three successive years, 1925-28, by 
Regional Scholars, and they already count two Eurqpean Fellows among their ranks. 
This distinguished academic record is backed by a goodly number of extra-curriculum 
activities. The Regional Scholars now in College have among their number the 
Lacrosse Manager, the Chairman of the Sunday Service Committee of the Bryn 
Mawr League (who is also Chairman of the Students' Employment Bureau), the 
Chairman of the Bryn Mawr League's Finance Committee, the Treasurer of the 
French Club, the President of the Science Club (who is also advertising manager of 
the Lantern), an Editor of the Lantern, and best of all, the President of the Self- 
Government Association, who was also chosen by the Senior Class as their repre- 
sentative at the Council. 

And now we shall look for a moment to see what our Regional Scholars do after 
leaving College. These records are, of course, incomplete but will serve to show 
that they are still carrying on in outstanding ways. Agnes Newhall, 1927, who was 
awarded a Carnegie Scholarship in 1927-28 for study in Athens, won last March, 
by competitive examination, the Fellowship of the Archaeological Institute, and is 
continuing her work in Athens this year. There were eight competitors in this 
examination, men and women. Miss Newhall has discovered some Hellenistic houses 
in her excavations at Corinth, some fine terra cotta figurines and many minor objects. 
Mary Zelia Pease, 1927, who was also in Athens last year, distinguished herself by 
winning second place in the examinations of the school at Athens, was awarded the 
Fellowship of the school, and is going on with her work there. She has also worked 
at Corinth, and she and Miss Newhall have walked and ridden over the greater part 
of Crete. Elizabeth Pillsbury, 1927, studied mathematics at the Universities of 
Gottingen and Berlin last year, and this year is continuing her work at the Univer- 
sity of California. Margaret Gregson, last year's European Fellow, is working in 
mathematics at the University of Chicago. Katherine Sheppard, 1928, is doing grad- 
uate work in archaeology at Bryn Mawr, as is Barbara Sindall, 1926, who is also 
teaching Latin at the Shipley School. Delia Smith, 1926 (Mrs. Ames Johnston),. is 
Academic and Playground teacher at Beaver Country Day School in Boston; Yildiz 
Phillips, 1928 (Mrs. J. M. C. Van Hulsteyn), has a position in the Classical Depart- 
ment in the Metropolitan Museum of Art as Assistant to the Curator; Mary Tat- 
nall, 1926, is Chemical Research Assistant and Secretary at the Rockefeller Institute 
in New York, and Elizabeth Bethel, 1928, is Assistant Executive Secretary at the 
Madeira School in Washington. Altogether, there is every reason to believe that the 
Regional Committees have the gift of choosing Scholars who will not only do well 
in college, but will also do something after College. 

Although it is a great temptation to dwell at length on these splendid students 
who have been so wisely chosen by the local groups, some, at least, of the human 
interest in this report is to be found in the routine work of these local committees. 

The New England Committee, of which Mrs. Bradley Dewey is Chairman, has 
seven scholars in College. Money was raised by an Easter Flower sale and by a 
reading by Edna St. Vincent Millay. New Haven and Providence raised money 
through the activity of their local groups, and the New England Association raise 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 7 

money every year by a letter sent to every New England alumna. Two alumnae 
have carried one scholarship for all the four years of a student's college life. The 
public and private schools are kept informed of the regional scholarships and New 
England seems to be an especially fertile field for good material. 

District II is, as you know, subdivided, and has four local committees at work. 
The total number of scholars for the district is nine. 

The New York Committee, of which Mrs. Edmund B. Wilson is chairman, 
has five scholars in College. This committee has been especially successful in raising 
money by a letter sent to all alumnae. A copy of this letter is in the Alumnae Office 
and will be of interest to all local chairmen. Money is also raised by entertainments 
when necessary, and part of the proceeds of the Jack Horner Thrift Shop helps to 
swell the fund. One alumna makes herself responsible for one scholar for her whole 
college career. 

Eastern Pennsylvania, with Elizabeth Maguire, Chairman, has three scholars 
and contributes to the Loan Fund for a fourth, who entered as a Regional Scholar. 
An effort has been made to interest in Bryn Mawr a number of schools who have 
hitherto sent no pupils here. Most of the money is raised by flower sales in the 
spring. An informative letter sent to all Alumnae in this district brought in prac- 
tically no return. Although many candidates are reported for the coming year, this 
committee is faced by the fact that a good many full-tuition scholarships are offered 
by the Board of Education of Philadelphia, and so many of the most intellectually 
promising candidates do not even apply for our Regional Scholarships. 

The New Jersey Committee, with Mrs. William Shaw as Chairman, has one 
Scholar in College. Various groups of Alumnae in the Northern part of the State 
have collected $1,598 towards endowing a permanent scholarship fund for New Jer- 
sey. So far, New Jersey, south of Trenton, has shown little interest m the work. 
Most of the scholarship money is raised by bridge parties, though one community 
prefers to contribute directly to the fund. 

Western Pennsylvania, of which Mrs. John Henry is Chairman, has no scholar 
for this year, but some promising candidates for next year. They raise their money 
by benefits, having a large one every two or three years. As all the work for these 
affairs falls heavily on a few people, they are thinking of sending a written appeal 
to their widely scattered Alumnae. 

District III is also divided into centers about their large cities, and has a total 
of three scholars. 

Baltimore, of which Grace Branham is Chairman, has one scholar in College. 
They have raised money by a card party. They find some difficulty in getting a com- 
mittee together, but are working hard to raise the standards of the Public High 
Schools so that they can prepare for colleges like Bryn Mawr. 

Washington, with Elizabeth Eastman as Chairman, has one scholar in College. 
Money is raised by benefits. This year, in a joint effort with Wellesley Alumnae, 
they had the interpretative dancer, Agna Enters, and made $1,200. 

The South, with Mrs. Ralph Catterall as Chairman, has a special scholar this 
year, and Richmond hopes next year to present a scholar called the Virginia Randolph 
Ellett Scholar, in honor of Miss Ellett. 

District IV (Indianapolis, Cincinnati, etc.) has Mrs. John A. MacDonald as 
general scholarships Chairman, with several local Chairmen in different centers. 



8 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

They have one undergraduate scholar, but are also raising funds to help a graduate 
student. There are, in the different cities of this large district, some promising can- 
didates for next year, but money raising for a joint candidate from such widely 
separated cities presents unusually difficult problems. 

In District V (Chicago) Mrs. Francis Howe Straus has been Chairman of this 
Committee, but has just had to resign, and Mrs. Alexander Kirk has been appointed 
in her place. They have three scholars in College. Money for last year was raised 
by a lecture, and they plan a Marionette show for the spring. Interesting personnel 
work has been done by this Committee in connection with telling the better students 
in the three upper classes of Grade A High Schools about the Scholarships. 

In District VI (St. Louis) Mrs. Aaron Rauh is Chairman of this Committee, 
and they have two scholars in College, one of whom is called the Emily Westwood 
Lewis Scholar, in memory of Mrs. Lewis who, for many years, took such an active 
part in the Bryn Mawr activities of St. Louis. Their money is raised by letter, by 
the efforts of the Bryn Mawr Club of St. Louis, and by the generous gifts of the 
father of a student now in College. 

District VII (California) has two Chairmen, Mrs. Hillyer Brown for the 
North, and Mrs. A. M. Marsh for the South. This year, as last, the Bryn Mawr 
group in southern California is helping a graduate student. 

As you will see by comparing these District reports with those of last year, 
the two principal problems are ways and means of raising money, and methods of 
interesting good candidates. In other words, money and good publicity are our 
common needs. 



ACTIVITIES OF CENTRAL SCHOLARSHIPS COMMITTEE 

The Central Scholarships Committee has had this year what has practically 
amounted to a dual chairmanship. Margaret Gilman not only helped Dean Man- 
ning with the student interviews, but acted as Chairman of the Scholarships Com- 
mittee at the Council in New Haven while the Chairman was in Europe. Much 
of this report is taken from Miss Gilman's Report to the Council, and without the 
able assistance of Miss Gilman and the Alumnae Secretary, your Chairman would 
have been unable to complete this year's work* 

In the spring our task, as usual, was to make recommendations for combined 
scholastic ability and financial need. The Committee sent out the usual question- 
naires to the Faculty, and either Miss Gilman or the Chairman, with Dean Manning, 
interviewed a large number of applicants. In arranging all the applicants in their 
respective classes, not only according to grades and honor points, but also according 
to numerical standing in the class, Dean Manning greatly simplified our work and 
gave us more accurate standards of judgment. This enables us to see at a glance • 
which students were making the grade leading to a Cum Laude and we followed the 
principle that named scholarships should be given only to students whose academic 
standing gave promise of their graduating Cum Laude. Students of lower standing 
are in general to be taken care of by grants and loans. The relations of the Com- 
mittee with the Dean's Office, always close, have been cemented even more firmly 
this year by the appointment of Millicent Carey, former Chairman of the Scholar- 
ships Committeee, as Assistant to the Dean. 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 9 

It will interest you to know that 57 students applied for aid; 13 Juniors, 19 
Sophomores, and 23 Freshmen. Scholarships, grants, or loans were given to 54 of 
these. Adding to these the 12 Freshmen Regional and special scholars, we have 66 
students, or 17.34% of the Student Body who are this year receiving financial help. 
Scholarships amounting to $12,675 were awarded in the spring of 1928 and adding 
to this the amount given by the Regional Committees, $10,050 and 3 special scholar- 
ships and several grants not from the Parents' Fund amounting to $2,000, we have a 
total of $24,725 held as Scholarships during the current year. Although the Alumnae 
Scholarships and Loan Fund Committee has nothing to do with the scholarships 
awarded for scholastic ability only, it will be of interest to you to know that these 
scholarships amounted to $1,460. The total amount given in grants from the 
Parents' Fund was $4,440, and there were remissions in tuition amounting to $800. 
$2,970 has been given out as Loans. 

At first sight it looks as though the Committee had been almost too generous 
in alloting the grants, but when a new experiment favored by the College and by 
the Alumnae Scholarships Committee has been explained, the reason for the large 
sum assigned in grants is self-evident. The College felt that it wished to open the 
Scholarships to a group of students of high academic standing, who are not, perhaps, 
in such pressing financial need that they could not return without help, who are not 
in a position to sign an elaborate statement of how much they need and why, but 
whose families would greatly appreciate aid. Dean Manning conveyed this idea by 
having two forms of scholarship application blanks. The plan went into effect and 
naturally increased the number asking for help, so that the named scholarships went 
only to the more able students, and the grants were used by the others. This whole 
question of grants needs studying. The amount of the Parents' Fund fluctuates from 
year to year, according to the wealth or generosity represented in any given student 
body and seems to bear no direct connection to increased cost of tuition, etc. 

Since 1921 the figures are as follows: 

Contribution to Parents' Fund for Excess Cost of Tuition 

1920-21 $1,496.90 

1921-22 2,376.87 Tuition increased from $200 to $300 

1922-23 3,148.50 

1923-24 5,748.40 

1924-25 3,934.76 

1925-26 2,438.00 

1926-27 3,210.00 Tuition increased from $300 to $400 

*1927-28 5,596.38 

*1927-28 includes one gift of $2,084.14 to cover four years, so that real 
total for 1927-28 is $4,036.38. 

In 1926 the Committee gave $1,000 in grants, in 1927, $2,350, and in 1928, 
$4,400, so that the amount awarded in grants is increasing far more rapidly than the 
contributions from the parents are increasing. It certainly looks as though we should 
have a year soon, when we shall either have to go out and solicit scholarship aid 
directly, or deny help to a worthy student. In a year when there is a large sum 



10 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

given by parents, it would seem wise to set aside a little which could be used in a 
lean year. This would not accumulate in any sense as an endowment fund, but 
would serve as a "nest egg" in hard times. Even this, however, is not a solution of 
our problem. Bryn Mawr needs more undergraduate scholarships, and we hope that 
every one will interest herself in securing these. 

This problem, which is likely to be always with us, is only one of many facing 
the Committee in the coming year. Following a proposal at the Council, we are 
trying to get together in a standardized form, for use by the local committees, infor- 
mation needed by them in interesting and selecting candidates. While much of this 
information is in the College Calendar, they would like data about exact expenses, 
voluntary expenses, methods of payment of scholarship money, etc., gathered in a 
folder which could be handed from one Chairman to another. For further infor- 
mation concerning the work of the Alumnae Scholarships and Loan Fund Com- 
mittee we invite you to go to the Alumnae Office, consult the files, and see for your- 
selves the "wheels go round." 

LOAN FUND 

The financial report for 1928 is as follows: 
Balance— January 1, 1928 _ $1,532.72 

Receipts : 

Payments of loans _ 1,520.73 

Interest on loans 130.14 

Interest on bank balances _ 37.28 

Donations 1,100.00 



$4,320.87 
Loans to students 2,970.00 



Balance— January 1, 1929 $1,350.87 

The report of the Loan Fund is, on the face of it, somewhat discouraging. In 
1926 the repayments and loans practically balanced, but for the last two years the 
repayments have fallen far below the amounts loaned. 

Repayments Loans 

1926 $2,938.75 $2,848.00 

1927 _ 1,987.00 2,866.00 

1928 1,520.73 2,970.00 

We are very glad that we are loaning more money than ever before, but we are 
faced with the fact that were it not for President Park's generous donation of $1,000 
from the Parents' Fund for last year, and her promise of the same amount for this 
year, we should be entirely unable to carry on. The outstanding loans, January 
1929, are $12,872.77, in loans to 54 people. Of these 12 are loans outstanding over 
five years. Although very urgent letters have been written to these people few returns 
have come in. 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 11 

What seems to the Committee to be encouraging, however, is the way in which 
the new plan, begun in 1926, under which payments are distributed over the five 
years, is working. Payments are being made much more regularly, and though no 
conclusion can be drawn until the plan has been in operation for at least five years, 
it promises to be a far more satisfactory and business-like arrangement than the old 
plan. 

We are most eager to place more and more emphasis on the Loan Fund and less 
and less on grants from the parents' contributions, as the Parents' Fund is a most 
uncertain quantity, varying from year to year. The number of students in financial 
need is steadily increasing, and this is bound to be the case as the number of our 
Regional Scholars increases, because the amounts given by the local committees are in 
nearly all cases insufficient for the total needs, and most of our splendid regional 
scholars must have recourse to grants or loans from some source. The strain of 
working the way through College, combined with the limited opportunities for doing 
so at Bryn Mawr, make the Committee lean increasingly on the Loan Fund as the 
best way out. Other colleges are coming more and more to the view that with the 
exception of work in the long summer vacations, it is better for students to piece out 
their expenses by borrowing than to carry a large amount of paid work with their 
studies. We need a larger loan fund; can you help us? 

Margaret Reeve Cary, 1907, Chairman. 



ROLL OF HONOR 

On Friday, March 15th, President Park announced the names of the winners of 
the European Fellowships, and of those members of the present Senior Class who will 
graduate with distinction. Various Alumnae daughters appeared on the Roll of 
Honor. Frances Elizabeth Fry, daughter of Hilda Canan Fry, 1904, was Magna 
cum Laude. In the Cum Laude list were Susan FitzGerald, daughter of Susan 
Walker FitzGerald, 1893; Rosamond Cross, daughter of Dorothea Farquhar Cross, 
1900; and Beatrice Shipley, daughter of Caroline Cadbury Shipley, 1897. The 
Regional Scholars have also made distinguished records. Graduating Cum Laude are 
the following students who are either still on Regional Scholarships or who entered 
college originally as Regional Scholars: Elizabeth Flowland Linn, Rosamond Cross, 
Elizabeth Cazenove Gardener Packard, Betty Charter Freeman, Grace Isabel De 
Roo, Frances Louise Putnam and Sarah Louise Bradley. 



COUNCILLOR NOMINATIONS 

The candidates for Councillor of District III are Alletta Van Reypen Korff, 
1900, (Baroness Serge Alexander Korfl), of Washington, D. C, and Julia Cochran 
Buck, 1920, (Mrs. George Buck), of Baltimore. 



REPORT OF THE ALUMNAE FUND 

Funds Contributed by Alumnae Through the Alumnae Association 

Alumnae Fund 
Designated 

1. Faculty Endowment $ 50.00 

2. Special Scholarships 300.00 

3. Rhoads Scholarship 4.00 

4. Book Shop Scholarships 984.66 

5. Regional Scholarships 5,637.89 

6. Special Honors 1 ,000.00 

7. Library 200.00 

8. Book Club 10.30 

9. Portrait of President Park 400.00 

1 0. President's Fund 20.00 

11. Goodhart Hall Furnishings 16,057.33 



$24,664.18 
Undesignated 6,539.66 



$31,203.84 



Pledged in 1925— Collected 1928 

Auditorium : $1,557.50 

Benches — Goodhart Hall 

Contributions from 1929, 1930, and 1931 7,429.10 

8,986.60 

Total Collected $40,190.44 

Through Mr. J. Henry Scattergood 

Book Club $ 101.80 

Books 720.00 

Art Department 43.70 

Special Lectures 425 .00 

Salary Gift 243.75 

Graduate Students 1 50.00 

Professor Bascom's Library 500.00 

Grace Dodge Division, Carola Woerishorler Dept 3,000.00 

Special Scholarships 3 ,800.00 

Regional Scholarships 4,550.00 

Horace White Greek Literature Prize 50.00 

Mary*Keys Parker Memorial for the Music Dept 1,000.00 

President's Fund 1,000.00 

Auditorium 1,865.00 

$17,449.25 



$57,639.69 



(12) 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 13 

In addition, there are outstanding $465 on 1928 Pledges and $4,006.29 have 
been pledged for payment in 1929 and 1930. 

The Association paid to the College from its collections $52,797.39. 

The total number of contributions through the Association this year was 1421, 
of whom 216 were undergraduates, 1 anonymous donor, 66 non-members of the 
Association, and 1141 were members of the Association, the last an increase of 143 
over last year, whereas the membership of the Association increased by but 65. 



COMPARATIVE TABLE 

Collected by Association Paid to College Total 

No. of Alumnae Fund Treasurer 

Contributors Designated Undesignated Balance 

1928 1424 $24,664.18 $6,539.66 $8,986.60 $17,449.25 $57,639.69 

1927 1241 21,395.82 6,790.77 19,942.38 18,390.03 66,519.00 

Alumnae Fund 

1926 $13,608.87 

1927 28,186.59 

1928 31,203.84 

Funds Paid to the College by the Association 

1926 $31,642.60 

1927 39,212.83 

1928 52,797.39 

Dated, February 2, 1929. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Dorothy Straus, 1908, Chairman. 



MOVING WITH THE TIMES 

{Reprinted from the College News) 

Varsity Dramatics, with the approval of the college authorities, has taken a 
considerable step: as it now appears, and as everyone hopes, a step forward. In its 
next production it will collaborate with the Theater Intime of Princeton. This 
means that men can now take the men's parts in plays given at Bryn Mawr, instead 
of their being more or less inadequately represented by girls. In order to make this 
arrangement possible the date of the next Varsity Dramatics production has been set 
for April 13, the Saturday after vacation, instead of the date originally planned, which 
was March 23. Tryouts will begin at the end of this week. The play, which was 
decided upon at a meeting of the committee on Tuesday evening, will be "The 
Admirable Crichton." 



HONORS WORK AT SMITH 

( The Academic Committee presented no formal report, but Esther Lowenthal, 
1905, a member of the Committee, reported on Honors Work at Smith College. 
Honors Work at various ^colleges has been one of the subjects of investigation by the 
Committee. Pauline Goldmark, Chairman, has written for the Bulletin this sum- 
mary of Miss Lowenthal's paper.) 

Realizing the keen interest in the development of Honors Work at Bryn Mawr, 
the Academic Committee continued its inquiries into such courses at other col- 
leges and arranged to have Esther Lowenthal, B.M. '05, report at the Alumnae meet- 
ing on the results of the honor system at Smith. We are very fortunate in having 
Miss Lowenthal give this report as she, as professor of Economics at Smith, has had 
these students under her direction since the new plan was adopted in 1921, and can 
therefore speak from personal experience of many years. 

She is a member of the Special Honors Committee, consisting of six representa- 
tives of the faculty of which the president is chairman, which passes on the eligibility 
of students, assigns them to an advisor and generally supervises the working of the 
plan. 

To be eligible for honors work, a Smith student must have passed off all general 
requirements and must have an average of credit at the end of her sophomore year. 
If she decides to take the honors course, and is accepted by the Honors Committee, 
she is freed from all attendance at lectures and is assigned to a general advisor from 
the department of her major interest. This advisor is in charge of her work for the 
two years, arranging her units of which she will probably teach at least one, and 
supervising the semester in which the long paper is written. 

Miss Lowenthal's description of the methods of study was the most interesting 
part of her talk and showed clearly how fundamentally the plan differs from the 
usual college course. A student has two instructors each semester in her special 
field. She has regular appointments with them alternate weeks or ofteneras need 
arises. She may or may not have the same instructors more than one semester. 

Each department selects a flexible series of subjects from which a student's sub- 
ject is chosen after consultation between student and instructor. The two years are 
divided into 8 units, two units being equivalent to the full work of one semester. 
Juniors and Seniors may work in the same unit. Miss Lowenthal limits her groups 
to 4, because she finds she cannot do justice to more, and finds advantage in having 
both Juniors and Seniors working together. 

The first 6 of these units are distributed among the sub-divisions of the stu- 
dent's chosen study, co-ordinated so far as possible. There are weekly papers, one in 
each unit, followed by discussion. The two units of the last semester of Senior year 
are devoted to a long paper on some subject chosen within the student's field, and 
to a general review preparatory to an examination covering the whole range of study 
of the last two years. This paper and examination are the basis of the degree, which 
is awarded in 3 grades, Honors, High Honors, and Highest Honors. Students who 
do not qualify for any of these grades may be recommended for a degree without 
honors, 

(14) 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 15 

Of the many honors plans now being tried at various colleges, the Smith plan 
is, in Miss Lowenthal's opinion, the most radical, in that the students drop class 
work entirely. The gregarious character of the students and their fear of losing 
their contacts with the undergraduate body through the comparative isolation of their 
work accounts for the small number of students in Honors, though a number of 
them have held important college positions. For 1928-29 there are 42 Honors Stu- 
dents in a student body of just under 2,000 distributed as follows: 

English _. 8 Science 9 

French 6 (Chemistry 4 and 1 each in 

Government 1 Astronomy, Geology, Physics, 

History 8 and Zoology) 

Philosophy 2 Psychology 3 

History, Government and Eco- r: , 

nomics 5 

Honors programs are also offered in the following departments: Biblical Literature 
and Comparative Religion; Botany; Classics; Economics and Sociology; German; 
Mathematics; Music; Spanish, and Special Programs in Art, Education, and Italian. 

One of the important points emphasized in this talk is the fact that honors work 
has been developed at Smith without increasing the size of the faculty. The teach- 
ing staff is chosen by the various departments, an instructor usually teaching only 
one semester during the year. There is no extra compensation for this work. The 
various members of the faculty have been willing to undertake it out of interest in 
the plan. 

According to Miss Lowenthal, it was most significant that while the amount of 
subject matter covered may be less than in undergraduate class work, the grasp of 
subject matter is actually superior to that in average graduate work. The research is 
the students' and not the instructor's, and a more creative attitude towards it is devel- 
oped. Miss Lowenthal illustrated this point by describing an inquiry by one of her 
students into government control of coffee and potash prices in Brazil. This student 
has been granted opportunity to go to Washington to secure data from government 
documents, and her long paper on the subject was so excellent that it is now being 
published in a trade paper. Other students have done work of the same caliber and 
have continued their studies later in universities abroad using for their doctorates 
subjects of research begun at Smith. 

Honors work is a selective process. Miss Lowenthal is enthusiastically in favor 
of it for students of unusual ability, who are, in general, sacrificed in American 
colleges. 



ACKNOWLEDGMENT 

The Bulletin wishes to express its thanks to Elizabeth Gray Vining for a 
copy of her latest book, Tangle Garden, which she has sent for the Alumnae Book 
shelf in answer to a plea, printed in a previous issue, and to Helen Sandison, for 
her article on Three Spenser illusions, printed in Modern Language Notes for 
March, 1929. 



LETTERS FROM ALUMNAE 

Mary Hardy, '20, writes: 

"At last a long and interesting letter from Miriam O'Brien, who, besides being 
the only alumna mentioned by name by President Park in her speech at the opening 
of College this year, has been acclaimed by the French Press on August 11th 'la 
meilleure alpiniste des Etats-Unis,' while by September 1st she had become 'la 
meilleure alpiniste du monde!' To quote Miriam's letter: 'You will be surprised, 
I know, to hear that I spent the summer climbing mountains. This winter I am stay- 
ing in France to get my first taste of alpinism on skis. Skiing as a sport all by itself 
always seemed to me to need something to pep it up, and climbing snow mountains 
is just a little tame, but put the two together and you've got something really worth 
while. I had two weeks at Christmas time learning the rudiments of alpinisme 
hivernale. Bad weather kept us from trying anything big, but added some thrills 
to the smallish mountains we did do. . . . Here in Paris I have given two lectures 
(in French!) to alpine clubs, and another one comes next Friday night. I have just 
been invited to lecture in New York on January 19th, but I doubt if I make that. 
And publications? Oh, yes, lots, although I don't put them down on the question- 
naires I get from the Alumnae Office. A sample title is: U Aiguille de Roc du 
Grepon, Premiere Ascension, Annuaire du G.H.M. (Paris) 1923. Articles have 
likewise been published in British, Italian, and American journals. ... I shall 
not tell you what I am doing in Paris in between climbing and skiing trips because 
you would pounce on it as the only important news, and you would neglect my main 
and absorbing occupation! . . . The Buick is over here with me, and has spent 
most of its time on Alpine passes---it has crossed 22 of them this summer — from the 
Dolomites to the Alpes Maritimes, the Dauphine Alps, Haute Savoie and Switzer- 
land. It has traveled a good many thousand kilometers and has been lots of fun. 

'Monica Healea is also with me, but I don't see so much of her as I should if 
she were an alpinist or skier. I believe she is studying Theoretical Mathematics and 
Physics, especially Quanta and things like that. We did take a trip at the end of 
October in the Buick down through Provence. We made a desperate attempt to 
come back by the Route des Alps, but it was hardly the season for it (the route d?ete, 
not the route d'hiver) and we were driven off two of the passes by avalanches. 

'For two weeks in August I was running the Appalachian Mountain Club's 
alpine climbing party in the Dauphine. Among other things we spent two days on 
the traverse of the Meije taking moving pictures. . . . Well, there you are. This 
is quite a long letter, but it can be summed up quite easily like this — "Miriam O'Brien 
is still interested in climbing mountains !" ' " 

Mary James, '04, writes to her Class Editor : i 

"Dear Emma, 

Of late I have found such interesting reading in the 1904 letters in the 
Bulletin, that I have been meditating for some time sitting down and writing you 
a few lines myself, especially since I want to vote, with all my powers, for the 1930 
reunion. I hope to be on furlough at that time, and hence able to attend, whereas 
June, 1929, is due to find me still right here in Wuchang. I hoipe I am not too 

(16) 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 17 

late with my vote. The Bulletin containing Phyllis' letter reached me only a short 
time ago. Now has come your card, asking me directly for news of myself, so I 
am moved to let more important things go and send you a 'brief report. My last 
letter to you was written, so far as I can recollect, just after the forty-day siege of 
Wuchang, which ended the tenth of October, 1926. Since then it seems to have 
become the fashion to send me Christmas or New Year cards portraying full-sail 
ships ploughing their way through stormy seas. Your card is an example of such, 
though perhaps you did not realize it. Anyhow, such pictures are rather appropriate 
for our hospital these last three years. I wonder whether you have received my 
printed Annual Reports, sent you each year, giving the history of these exciting years 
in detail. 

"When the siege was lifted and we learned what a square meal was again, and 
accustomed ourselves to the absence of bullet showers, cannonades, and air raids, we 
soon found ourselves in the more exciting sea of Red Revolution. Believe me, those 
were some days, that winter of 1926-27. It was a sort of combination of the French 
and the Russian Revolutions, with the whole world here turned upside down, and 
all the old values reversed. Should I attempt here to describe the happenings, the 
Bulletin would have to get out a Supplement in order to print it all, and then I 
would probably get a long refutation from Anna Louise Strong, who wandered 
through these parts in the course of the year and then burst into print to show how 
overdrawn most descriptions of the Revolution were. Most things written were 
distorted, I grant, but truth often was stranger than fiction in those days. I refer 
you to Alice in Wonderland for a better description than I can give. When I 
see you I will talk to you on the subject till you are bored to tears, for we had a 
major crisis about once in two weeks right here at the hospital, holding the insti- 
tution down, not to mention the innumerable minor excitements. But the old place 
came through intact, without either looting or confiscation, and is still running along 
in rather a prosperous way. 

"I stayed on in Wuchang until after the Nanking incident, the end of March, 
1927. Then I had to evacuate with the remaining foreigners, and turned the place 
over to my Chinese staff to run. They did it excellently. Since I did not fancy 
kicking my heels together in Shanghai, and hearing all the mournful laments of 
the crowds of refugees there, nor did I wish to return home and run the risk of 
not getting in on the next act as soon as the curtain began to rise, and since my 
home folks had seen to it that I had the where-with-all for a trip to rest me after 
my strenuous months, I cut loose from everyone I knew and took a trip to Australia 
and New Zealand, looking in on Singapore and Java on the way back. I had a 
beautiful time, with a complete rest, and I heartily commend the friendliness and 
hospitality of our cousins in the Antipodes. By September of the year I was back 
in Shanghai, and ready to take passage on the first boat up River after our Consul 
gave his consent. 

"When I reached here late in September the Red regime was already broken, 
with only the misery of the people to tell the tale of what had been. This misery 
was being augmented by the rule of an unscrupulous militarist, out to get all he 
could, at the expense of everyone else, but in November he had to abdicate, and 
ever since that things have been better. For nearly a year we have enjoyed peace 
in this center, though the same cannot be said of the surrounding country. How- 



18 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

ever, we are moving toward better days, even if some excitement may yet lie between 
us and them. The Chinese people have too much good sense to be carried away 
for long by such extremes of doctrine as the Left Wing represented, and they will 
work out their own salvation if they are given a chance. 

"Next November I am planning to start on furlough, and to go around by the 
Suez this time. My young niece (recently graduated from Vassar, not Bryn Mawr) 
plans to meet me somewhere just west of Suez, and together we hope to ramble 
through Egypt, Palestine, then up the coast of Asia Minor to Constantinople (revo- 
lutions and finances permitting), and across into Europe. Since seeing Harriet 
Wright's cordial invitation to let her play "Cook" for Bryn Martyrs in the old 
Magyar capital, I am thinking of turning my steps that way. Incidentally, I will 
be glad to show the sights of this place to any of you who come to Wu-han (the 
triple cities of Wuchang, Hankow and Hanyang, at the junction of the Han River 
with the Yang-tse). I am afraid, though, that I cannot expect any rush of guests 
just yet. 

"Hoping to see many of you in 1930, and wishing you all an interesting and 

pp y ' Affectionately yours, 

Mary Latimer James." 

Mary Alice Parrish, Ph.D., forwards the following letter: 
"My dear Mrs. Parrish. 

"How can I resist when you put it that way! You see, I never was very con- 
ventional and have gone on doing what I wanted to do, finding out what I wanted 
to know and it landed me in a dirty paper-mill and I did not suppose that Bryn Mawr 
would be especially interested in that sort of thing. But the farther I got into it, 
the more it gripped me and left me little time to think of the outside world. But 
another change in the wheel of Fortune has sent me here to Washington. The com- 
pany with which I was working is the one which has worked with the Bureau of 
Standards in the improvement of the quality of money paper and helped attract atten- 
tion to the permanence quality of papers in general. About the same time the League of 
Nations appointed a committee to co-operate with Governments in a study of how to 
insure the use of permanent papers for permanent records. The next move was from 
the Rag Paper Manufacturers of this country who appointed me to direct the research 
upon paper quality. At present I am working in the Bureau of Standards, but we 
expect soon to enlarge our scope, and then I expect to devote considerable time organ- 
izing our research developments as control methods in the different high-grade mills. 
We have some of our mills in Wisconsin but am sorry to say that there are none in 
Missouri, so I do not see how I can get out there, much as I should like to do so. 

"I have not for several years published anything except controversial technical 
things which always go in Paper Trade Journals, and I am sure that no one outside 
of the field would care for them. 

"Did you know that I no longer have a home in Missouri, as after my father's 
death my mother came to me in Massachusetts, which is now my real home. I am 
just boarding down ihere and expect to go back there soon. 

Very sincerely, 

Jessie E. Minor/' 



CLASS NOTES 



Graduate Notes 
Editor: Mrs. J. C. Parrish, 
Vandalia, Mo. 
Margaret Mead, author of "Coming of 
Age in Samoa," a study made while hold- 
ing a fellowship in the Biological Sci- 
ences of the National Research Council, 
is the daughter of Emily Fogg, Fellow in 
Political Science in 1897-8. 

She is on leave of absence as assistant 
curator in Ethnology of the American 
Museum of Natural History in New 
York, and is conducting an investigation 
among primitive peoples at Pere, Manus, 
Admiralty Islands in Mandated Territory 
of New Guinea. She is now holding a 
Social Science Council Research Fellow- 
ship. 

1895 
Class Editor: Elizabeth Bent Clark 
(Mrs. Herbert Clark), 
Bryn Mawr, Pa. 
Mary Jeffers writes : "I have been lec- 
turing for the Extension Division of the 
University of California, and also doing 
some tutoring as usual." She is living 
with Florence Peebles at 4241^ Monroe 
Street, Los Angeles, Cal. Her list of 
lecture subjects covers travel, the classics, 
readings from literature, and sketches 
from Church History. 
1900 
Class Editor: Helen MacCoy, 
Haverford, Pa. 
There were five members of the class 
at the Alumnae Meeting: Ellen Baltz 
Fultz, Louise Congdon Francis, Lois 
Farnham Horn, Johanna Kroeber Mosen- 
thal, and Hilda Loines. 

Edith Wright sends the following from 
Paris: "Winifred and I came over early 
in October and have been in Paris ever 
since, except for a delightful week I spent 
with Louise Norcross Lucas at their 
chateau near Dijon. You heard probably 
that Mrs. Norcross died in July. We de- 
cided to spend the winter quite lazily, 
just going to a few places. It has been 
lovely to be in Paris, and not feel that 
we had to do sight-seeing this time; the 
things you come on unexpectedly are so 
entertaining. The French are so dra- 
matic, too, that there is almost always a 
procession, or something, to see. The one 
on Armistice Day was of course much 
the most impressive." 

1901 
Class Editor: Jane Righter, 

Dublin Road, Greenwich, Conn. 
We all offer sympathy to Lucia Holli- 
day Macbeth for the loss of her mother 



in January from pneumonia. Lucia says 
of her: "She was very proud to be the 
mother of five Bryn Mawr graduates, and 
had been deeply interested in the College 
ever since she began to consider, thirty- 
five years ago, which college should be 
mine." Lucia has gone to Los Angeles 
to be near her son who is a freshman in 
Leland Stanford. 

Cranford Rogers, 18-year-old son of 
Grace Phillips Rogers, died during the 
Christmas holidays in Boulder, Colo., 
from peritonitis, following an operation 
for appendicitis. He was a freshman in 
the College of Arts and Science at the 
University of Colorado. 

The members of 1901 extend to Grace 
and her husband their profound sym- 
pathy for their tragic loss. 

1903 
Class Editor: Gertrude Dietrich Smith 
(Mrs. Herbert Knox Smith), 
Farmington, Conn. 
Julia Pratt Smith writes : Dear Friends, 
I have bought No. 623 Walnut Lane, 
Haverford, Penna., phone number Ard- 
more 1232. Ethel Girdwood Peirce lived 
here before me and gave me her Frank- 
lin stove which has held all the beauty 
in the house for the past two months. At 
present there is no cookstove except a 
little electric thing loaned me by Miss 
Maddison who is now in Italy, "address 
unknown." Alice Price spent last Fri- 
day and Saturday nights with me. We 
went to various things at College. She 
left this afternoon (Sunday, Feb. 3rd). 
We cooked on the electric contrivance 
and in the Franklin. Part of the time 
two saucepans sat down warmly and com- 
fortably on the wood in the grate. This 
wood was torn out of the house and I 
arranged with the builder to let me have 
it. There is where Edward comes in. 
The first time he came in was after 
knocking and before waiting for an an- 
swer. I went out to the kitchen and 
there he stood. He knew a widow who 
was wondering whether she could have 
some wood. "No, but I want a man to 
work for me." So Edward has come by 
the hour. He has carried and sawed 
wood, cleaned, tidied and scrubbed. As 
for the workmen, there are usually four 
or five, not infrequently ten or eleven. 
I do nothing indoors while they are here. 
I sorted the woodpile, throwing laths, 
boards, etc., as the ancients threw 
spears — shoulder high. After the car- 
penters go home, I gather up shavings 
and odds and ends. Over the weekends 
there are always .very various jobs. This 
week it was smashing up the old linoleum 



(19) 



20 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



from the kitchen, carrying it from cellar 
to yard and piling it neatly. The builder 
has all the junk taken away. I couldn't 
count the number of loads that have gone 
already. Some of my fancy work is done 
with knitting needles, some with a screw 
driver, and some will be done with the 
pen, if conditions ever change. Mean- 
time ideas, like household goods, are 
packed away for future use. Please par- 
don this screed, as lumbering as the yard, 
as disconnected as the plumbing, as 
scrappy as a load of junk, as miscellan- 
eous as the woodpile. The laundry man 
says "It begins to look like a house." 
What do the women say on the subject? 
Stop by and see. 

1904 
Class Editor: Emma O. Thompson, 
320 S. 42nd Street, Phila., Pa. 

Anne Buzby Palmer has announced her 
marriage to Bruce Lloyd. She has prom- 
ised to write us a letter someday. 

Ethel Peck Lombardi was at Bryn 
Mawr for the Alumnae meeting this Feb- 
ruary, and stayed at the Inn for several 
weeks visiting her daughter, who is a 
Freshman at college this year. 

Lucy Lombardi Barber came on from 
Washington for the Alumnae meeting. 
Alice Boring was with us also. Alice 
gave a very interesting talk at the Col- 
lege Club the other evening at the 
Chinese Scholarship dinner. Jane Ward 
spoke, too. They gave us a comprehen- 
sive and many-sided picture of the pres- 
ent situation in China, picturing it as it 
presents itself to each one of them in 
her separate field of work, Jane Ward 
as the head of the Young Women's Chris- 
tian Association and Alice Boring as 
Professor of Biology in the University 
of Yenching, Peking, China. 

Edith McMurtrie won the Mary E. 
Smith award at the Annual Exhibition at 
the Academy of the Fine Arts in Phila- 
delphia. The award is given for the best 
painting by a Philadelphia woman. The 
title of Edith's painting is "Harpooning 
Sword Fish." She tells us that her in- 
spiration came one day when she saw 
the fishermen off the coast of Maine, 
near Orrs Island where her summer home 
is. 

Patty Rockwell Moorhouse and her 
husband have been spending the month 
of February at Nassau in the Bahama 
Islands. 

Maud Elizabeth Temple has an article 
on L'Enfer des Chicaneurs by Louis 
Verin, an early 17th Century precursor 
of Pascal, that is soon to appear in the 
Cambridge Modern Language Review. 



1905 

Class Editor pro tern: Edith H. Ashley, 

242 East 19th Street, N. Y. C. 

Theo Bates is working six days in the 
week (as she has been for the past two 
years) for Bamberger & Co., Newark, 
New Jersey. She writes, "My family 
call it 'bumming for Bams/ — very appro- 
priate as most of my work is outside, 
flivving through my 'District' in which I 
am 'Representative' from Milburn to 
Morristown, making lecture dates with 
schools and clubs, giving a few lectures 
myself, putting on fashion shows, etc., 
etc. Am about to blossom forth in a 
new Ford as 'The Spirit of Summit' 
(S. O. S.) is On its last shoes!" 

The class wishes to extend to Florence 
Waterbury its deepest sympathy in the 
death of her father, Mr. John I. Water- 
bury, on Monday, March 11th. Her 
friends will always have the happiest 
memories of him, for he was a man of 
unusual charm and culture. 

Freddie Le Fevre Bellamy. Last sum- 
mer Freddie took young Frederica 
through Glacier Park on horseback and 
then through the Yellowstone, kodaking 
bears and such. Freddy has been both 
producing and playing in Denver. She 
helped with the Community Chest Pag- 
eant, designing, writing, playing and also 
bringing the amplifier and microphones 
into use for musical settings and spoken 
word. She designed and produced a 
Christmas Eve service, "Venite Adore- 
mus" in St. John's Cathedral, and also 
designed and directed the "Pageant of 
the Paladins" for the National Horse 
Show last January. She is now busy 
putting on her Easter play "Forgive Us 
Our Trespasses" at St. John's Cathedral. 

Helen Read Fox is still farming and 
very busy this winter trying to keep her 
baby daughter "well and safe." 

Alice Heulings writes, "Helen Read 
Fox's baby — ten months old — is adorable, 
and Helen as busy as a bee." Alice her- 
self is working with the Out-Patient De- 
partment of the Penna. Hospital. 

Elma Loines. Dr. George Grant Mc- 
Curdy of Yale was to lecture at Elma's 
house on February 17th on the "Story 
of Pre-History" before the Brooklyn 
Chapter of the Archeological Institute of 
America. Elma had the privilege of 
visiting the prehistoric caves in the 
Pyrenees and the Dordogue Valley with 
Dr. McCurdy last August. Elma has 
just been at the Loines' Camp at Lake 
George for the winter sports and among 
the friends with her was Fanny Cochran 
of 1902. This experience, Elma writes, 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



21 



made her appreciate some of the prob- 
lems of the Ice Age! 

Esther Lowenthal attended the recent 
alumnae meeting at Bryn Mawr and made 
a report on The System of Special 
Honors at Smith College. 

Elizabeth Goodrich Reckitt plans to go 
to Santa Fe and parts of the Southwest 
with her husband the end of February. 
She hopes to see Catherine Utley Hill 
and perhaps Frances Hubbard Flaherty. 
She and her husband did the North Cape 
Cruise last summer. 

Margaret Fulton Spencer is the first 
woman in Pennsylvania to become a 
registered architect by examination. Mar- 
garet says it makes her feel quite young 
and frisky to be taking exams again, and 
as she is the only woman among 1100 
odd males she should certainly feel proud. 

Clara Porter Yarnelle's eldest daugh- 
ter, Alice, is a freshman at Bryn Mawr 
and enjoying it tremendously. 

1906 
Class Editor: Mrs. Edward W. Sturde- 
vant, 215 Augur Ave., 
Fort Leavenworth. 

Evidently 1906 has not become hard- 
boiled with years as they have responded 
with alacrity to the Class Editor's 
pathetic plea for news. Miriam Coffin 
Canaday started the ball rolling by send- 
ing in the story of her life for the last 
two years, beginning with a trip to Banff 
in July, 1927, and ending with a trip to 
Lake Placid, January, 1929. Part of 
their lovely new house burned down a 
year ago last June, and so they went to 
Europe while it was being rebuilt. When 
she is at home her chief interests are the 
League of Women Voters and the A. A. 
U. W., her chief diversions, gardening 
and riding. Her fourteen-year-old daugh- 
ter is at Dongan Hall, Staten Island, 
hoping to be Bryn Mawr, 1936. 

Dorothy Congdon Gates is the busy 
proprietor of two shops at La Jolla, 
where she reports business is flourishing. 
Her son is fifteen, headed probably for 
Stanford or California Tech. She spent 
her last vacation around Seattle and Vic- 
toria with Margaret Vilas Lyle, 1908. 

Edith Durand McColl reports that 
though she feels very far away from her 
old friends she is enjoying life in Winni- 
peg with a congenial new group. She is 
much interested in the University 
Women's Club. Her two oldest girls are 
in high school, and the little one, Frances, 
who was ill the first five years of her 
life is now well and strong and doing- 
well in the sixth grade. 



Alice Ropes Kellogg is at 503 Green- 
wood Avenue, Portland, Oregon. With 
her whole family she spent last summer 
motoring through California, Arizona, 
Kansas, etc., to Bangor and back to Ore- 
gon by a northern route, including 
Niagara Falls. Her husband returned to 
China in September and she hopes to go 
back in the summer of 1930. Two of her 
girls are in high school, two in the 
grades. 

Early in February Anna Louise Strong 
gave a lecture on the position of women 
in Soviet Russia before the Young Men's 
Hebrew Association in Kansas City. The 
Class Editor was very anxious to hear 
her speak but the condition of the roads 
made it impossible. She tried to reach 
her over the telephone but was equally 
unsuccessful. 

1906 will be very sorry to hear of the 
death of Jessie Thomas Bennett's father, 
Mr. Isaac Thomas, in December. 

Anna McClanahan Grenfell was the 
guest of honor at a tea given in San 
Francisco by the Bryn Mawr Club. She 
spoke about her husband's work in 
Labrador. 

1907 
Class Editor: Alice Hawkins, 

Taylor Hall, Bryn Mawr, Penna. 
Elizabeth Pope Behr is much interested 
in the public schools of New York City. 
She has recently been made a member 
of the Joint Education Committee which 
is making a survey of the situation and 
is to make recommendations to better 
conditions. This committee represents all 
the important women's organizations of 
Greater New York. Popie is spokesman 
on this joint committee for the Civitas 
Club of Brooklyn. She is also Chairman 
of the Nursing Committee of the Mater- 
nity Centres for Brooklyn. 

Priscilla Haines is living at home in 
West Haven, Connecticut, and is teach- 
ing French in the High School there. 

Mary Ferguson is running a Nursery 
School at Wynnewood. 

Peggy Ayer Barnes viewed the In- 
augural Parade from the roof of the 
Capitol at Washington, and was among 
the first delegation to be received at the 
White House. Her husband was one of 
Mr. Hoover's chief assistants in the Food 
Administration. 

The rumor about Grace Hutchins' book 
is true. It is called "Labor and Silk"; 
published by the International Publish- 
ing Company. It is the first book on the 
Silk Industry from the workers' side. A 
review of it will appear in a later issue 
of the Bulletin. 



22 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



1908 
Class Editor: Margaret Copeland 
Blatchford (Mrs. N. H. Blatch- 
ford, Jr.), 

844 Auburn Road, Hubbard Woods, 
111. 

Margaret Vilas Lyle (Mrs. Stanley 
Lyle) is living in Seattle at 100 West 
Highland Drive. 

Fanny Passmore Lowe spent a few 
days in Chicago, accompanying her hus- 
band on a business trip. She showed her 
friends in Winnetka some very good pic- 
tures of her fine-looking sons. Speaking 
of sons, it is reported that Hazel McLane 
Clark has a very wonderful son at St. 
Paul's School, also that Louise Cary 
Rosett has a very fascinating son. Now 
is the time for other 1908 mothers to 
speak up for their wonderful sons. 
Mothers of fascinating daughters might, 
too, have a word to say. Don't let Hazel 
and Louise have all the glory. 

Jeannette Griffith has been to Seattle 
and Chicago on a business trip. 

Hazel McLane Clark is now living in 
New York. She is planning a motoring 
trip along the Riviera this spring. 

Anna Dunham Reilly has been on a 
theatre spree to New York. She went 
to eight plays in four days, and also man- 
aged to see many old friends. Her old- 
est son, John, Jr., has gone to California 
to visit Anna's sister for the rest of the 
winter. 

It is reported that Louise Congdon 
Balmer is managing a school in La Jolla, 
Calif. _ 

Louise Cary Rosett spent last summer 
in Scotland and expects to go abroad this 
summer. 

Marjorie Young Gifford's friends will 
be very sorry to hear of the death of her 
mother in December. 

Margaret Copeland Blatchford's father, 
who was a very loyal member of the 
Class of 1908, died in November. 

1909 

Class Editor: Helen Bond Crane, 
Denbigh Hall, Bryn Mawr. 

The editor apologizes for having so 
little to report this month; she had hoped 
to collect some news at the time of the 
Alumnae Meeting, but unfortunately it 
was necessary for her to be away from 
college over that particular week-end. 
However, as only a very few of 1909 
appeared for the meeting, the class notes 
in this issue would not have been in- 
creased much if she had been on the spot. 

During January, Mary Nearing Spring 
suddenly appeared on the campus for a 
few brief moments, in the interstices of 



doing some landscape gardening. (Pro- 
fuse apologies if this isn't the proper 
term.) Sally Webb also arrived on the 
same day, and we three had a surprised 
meeting in Goodhart. Both visitors were 
persuaded to stay for the Gabrilowitsch 
concert that night, but no longer. 

Dorothy North, approached for news 
of herself, wrote that she was spending 
some time in Tucson, Arizona, with her 
mother. She has had some interesting 
motor trips about the country, both east 
and west of Chicago, but they seem to 
have been flitting ones. 

The real piece of news which the editor 
wishes to give to the class at large is 
that the Glee Club is to give Patience, 
on May fourth. Do save that date, all 
you who are anywhere within fair reach, 
and let's have an informal reunion. Our 
orchestra, in the person of Scrap, should 
surely be here; also Alta, who could tell 
them a thing or two on production, not 
to speak of Carlie, the perfect Patience. 
All maidens and heavy dragoons will 
doubtless "yearn" to be supers, but even 
though that is denied us, we shall prob- 
ably be much refreshed by seeing and 
hearing what is sure to be a good per- 
formance, on a stage big enough to hold 
the entire cast at once, without the dan- 
ger of anyone being pushed off into space. 

1912 
Class Editor: Catharine Thompson 
Bell (Mrs. C. Kenneth Bell), 
2700 Chicago Blvd., Detroit, Mich. 

Elizabeth Faries Howe is directing the 
Physical Education for Women at the 
College of the Ozarks where her husband 
is Professor of History. .Week-ends, 
Fairy says, are spent in trips and picnics 
into the foothills and in their new Ford 
the Howes seem to have fully covered the 
western half of Arkansas. 

Mary Peirce is making a grand tour 
of California and the West and rounding 
up 1912 en route. In Seattle she called 
up Alice Brown Martin. After a trip 
abroad this summer Alice expects to come 
East and settle permanently in the vicin- 
ity of New York. 

Mary also found Ada Forman teaching 
French and phonetics in Pasadena. 

Rebecca Lewis is studying at Columbia 
this winter. 

Of late, excellent reviews of "Child 
Birth" by George Lee have been appear- 
ing in the press. This is a book written 
by the husband of Maysie Morgan Lee. 
After his death Maysie spent six months 
getting it ready for publication, working 
out all the details, even to the cuts and 
line drawings. 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



23 



Dorothy Chase Dale announces the 
birth of a young daughter, Dorothy Dale, 
on November 29th, 1928. 

One of the busiest and most enterpris- 
ing members of the class is Margaret 
Thackray Weems. Tack has formed a 
company to give instruction in the Weems 
System of Navigation — the scheme 
evolved by her husband. Lindbergh uses 
it. Byrd, who was a classmate of Van's 
at Annapolis, is using apparatus worked 
out by him. And Lincoln Ellsworth, who 
came for one day to investigate, stayed 
two months to study. Tack has flown, 
she says, and worked navigation in the 
air just as an experiment. She is Presi- 
dent and General Manager of the Com- 
pany, which is the only business of its 
kind at the present time. 

Alice Stratton is now feeling very 
much better and teaching at Abington 
Memorial Hospital, Abington, Pa. 

Clara Francis Dickson who has also 
been quite ill has now recovered and is 
strenuously devoted to golf at the Coun- 
try Club adjacent to her house. 

1913 

Class Editor: Betty Fabian Webster 
(Mrs. Ronald Webster), 
905 Greenwood St., Evanston, 111. 

Katharine Stout Armstrong and family 
have moved recently from Evanston to 
Lake Forest, where they have bought a 
beautiful place on the lake shore. 

Eleanor Elmer Tenney sailed for 
Europe February 23rd. She will motor 
through France with friends and expects 
to be home in six weeks. 

Alice Ames Crothers and husband went 
abroad in November, where they expect 
to remain for six months. 

Marguerite Bartlett Hamer is still at 
the University of Tennessee, in Knox- 
ville, where she is assistant professor of 
history. She is looking forward to hav- 
ing one of her students take graduate 
work at Bryn Mawr next year. She ex- 
pects to motor this summer from Knox- 
ville to Detroit. 

Marion Taylor Hollander and small 
son, aged three, are spending the winter 
at Carson City, Nevada. Her address is 
Box 205. She is very enthusiastic about 
the invigorating quality of the climate, 
and the hospitality of the people. 

All of 1913 who had the good fortune 
to know Gertrude Congdon Crampton, 
1909, will be shocked to hear of her sud- 
den death on February 5th. She took a 
prominent part in parent-teachers Coun- 
cils on the high school board, and in 



musical affairs in Evanston, and filled a 
unique place in the hearts of her many 
friends. 

1917 

Class Editor: Isabella Stevenson 
Diamond, 
1621 T St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

I am particularly anxious to help Nats 
in arousing interest for our reunion in 
June by having Class Notes appear in 
each Bulletin between now and then. 
Ten pleas were dispatched around Feb- 
ruary 1. As a reward I am lucky to 
have a long, interesting letter from Doris 
Bird. Doris writes of her three children, 
Teddy, almost six, who goes to Kinder- 
garten, and who, as Doris says, is getting 
very grown up; Jack, who is nearly three 
and a half, fat and cuddly, a friendly, 
lovable little fellow who attracts attention 
wherever he goes; the baby, Doris, now 
almost eighteen months old, who, her 
mother says, finds more pins, needles, 
hairpins, scissors and tacks than she be- 
lieved there were in the whole world ! 
After the baby came, a larger house was 
necessary, so the family is now installed 
at 233 W. Horter Street, Germantown, 
Philadelphia. 

If anyone wants to help the class pub- 
licity by volunteering a little news about 
herself or anyone else in the class of 
whom she knows, I shall be deeply grate- 
ful. 

1918 

Class Editor: Helen Walker, 

5516 Everett Ave., Chicago, 111. 

The class extends its deepest sympathy 
to Adelaide Shaffer and Judith Hemen- 
way, who both lost their husbands last 
spring; and to Margaret Timpson, whose 
father died this fall. 

Judy is still in Deerfield with her small 
son and daughter, but has sold her hus- 
band's school to one of the teachers, and 
has moved into a different house. 

Buffy: "I am having my portrait 
painted by a local artist an^l helping to 
start a Manuscript Club for aspiring 
amateur writers." 

Irene Loeb: "We have just built a 
really lovely place with everything in it 
we could possibly want at 7200 Wydown 
Blvd., St. Louis. The baby is just fine." 

Peg Bacon : "Our greatest news is the 
arrival of a daughter on June 29th. Her 
three older brothers are almost as pleased 
as her parents at her being a girl." 

Stairy: "My most exciting news is a 
small daughter who is now about 7 



24 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



months old. Her name is Sarah Helen 
Dempwolf." 

Mary Gardner: "I am again at Bryn 
Mawr as Instructor in Biology after a 
summer at the Laboratory at Woods 
Hole. I am feeling quite antiquated as 
our reunion approaches and hope great 
hordes of our patriotic class will appear 
on the campus in June." 

Muggins: "I am very busy working at 
Mass. Institute of Technology. My hus- 
band and I spent most of last year in 
California and are saving up for another 
toot." 

Dot Stevenson: "We are living in the 
real country but only 38 minutes from 
Chicago; new address, Sunset Ridge 
Farm, Northbrook, 111. We and Olive 
Bain and her husband went to the Derby 
together last spring." 

Babe Allen: "I have a little girl three 
years old and a bouncing boy of four 
months, and we still / enjoy living on a 
ranch. I had a stone removed from my 
kidney last fall and it laid me up for 
two months." 

Eleanor Atherton: "My Junior League 
— Bob, 1 year; Ned, 3 years, and Tom, 
5 years — keep me very absorbed and in- 
terested; I think boys must be more 
strenuous and harder on houses and 
mothers than girls are." How about it 
Peg, Harriet and Ruth? 

Sally Morton: "Two of my three 
women started school this year, and the 
youngest is a baby out of a book, always 
fat and pleasing and charming. I've fallen 
in love with the Bryn Mawr Club in New 
York; it is the most delightful place to 
eat in town, not excepting private homes." 

Marjorie MacKenzie: "Am off on a 
fine trip; Christmas in London, New 
Year's in Paris, later Bordeaux and per- 
haps Bayonne and Biar.ritz and home by 
the end of January, when we will be de- 
lighted to see our small son again." 

Alice Kerr: "I haven't any news but 
I run into a Bryn Martyr every now and 
then; if I didn't, I'd think I only dreamed 
Bryn Mawr." 

Annette Gest: "I spent last summer 
milling around British Columbia and 
Alberta with a horse and lots of duffle 
bags. Had a grand time. This winter 
I am back polyglotting at Irwin's, teach- 
ing Spanish, Italian and German." 

Katty Holliday: "I recently attended 
the B. M. Alumnae Council meeting in 
New Haven, being Councillor for District 
IV and I feel more informed about col- 
lege affairs than for 10 years." 

Lucy Evans: "Dr. Chew and I are 
planning a sabbatical year abroad in 



1929-30 and hope this time to reach Egypt 
in our travels." 

Ruth Rhoads: "I am Assistant at the 
Friends' Library in Germantown this 
winter." 

Helen Whitcomb: "I have a son about 
a year old, but he and his sister are pro- 
nounced brunettes; neither of them has 
a trace of red hair or a suspicion of a 
curl !" 

K. Dufourcq: "We like Hastings very ■ 
much and we and our children often see 
Kitty Sharpless and Andy and their chil- 
dren." 

Rebecca Rhoads : "I hope to have some- 
thing to show one of these days for a 
laborious summer spent in the British 
Museum. I also acted as 'Pink' for my 
college during the Oxford Summer 
School for Women Teachers and Gradu- 
ates, and spent a brief but blissful period 
in Dresden and the fastness of Upper 
Bavaria and the Tyrol." 

Dot Kuhn: "Everything the same; no 
news, but very busy." 

Eugenia Lynch: "I am still teaching 
Latin at Roxborough High School but 
have moved to 10 Kathmere Rd., Brook- 
line, Penna." 

Buttie: "Did I tell you that I have a 
second daughter now nearly iy 2 years 
old?" 

Adelaide Shaffer is at the Bertrand 
Russell School in England for the sake 
of her 7-year-old Frances. Her boy, 
about \y 2 years old, is splendid. 

Harriet Hobbs reports that her three 
fine boys keep her very busy and sends 
delightful photographs which we wish we 
could publish. 

Sapphs was in Boston until January 
when the fleet went South for the win- 
ter, but expects her husband to go on 
shore duty in June. 

Ruth Cheney deserted her family last 
May and week-ended in England with 
her husband. They came home on the 
He de France with Posy Fiske and her 
husband, who had been in i Africa and 
France. The food was fine and the com- 
pany finer, so it was a delightful trip. 
Posy is god-mother to Ruth's small 
daughter. 

Veronica Frazier Murray obtained a 
divorce from Cecil Dinmore Murray in 
December. She retains custody of the 
two children, Michael, seven, and Julia, 
four. She is as present practicing psy- 
choanalysis in Cambridge, Massachusetts. 

Louise Hodges Crenshaw and Dr. 
Crenshaw are in Berlin where they are 
spending part of their leave of absence 
for the year. 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



25 



1919 

Class Editor: Mary Morris Ramsay 
Phelps 

(Mrs. William Eliott Phelps), 
Guyencourt, Del. 

"A second daughter, Maud Fuller Sav- 
age, was born February 21, to Mrs. 
Howard J. Savage (Frances Higginson 
Fuller, 1919), of Scarsdale, New York, at 
White Plains." 

Henry Stambaugh's address is 30 East 
10th Street, New York City. 

Marjorie Remington Twitchell's sum- 
mer address is Setauket, L. I. 

1919's Reunion will be on Saturday, 
June 1st, with Denbigh for headquarters. 
It will include a class meeting and a pic- 
nic. Please answer Mary Tyler Zabris- 
kie's postals as soon as possible, so we 
shall know how many to provide food 
and costumes for. I have been very 
lively, having lunch in Alexandria with 
Mary and Gordon in February, and see- 
ing Zav and Mary's two little boys and 
Gordon's girl, and then in March going 
to Princeton for lunch with Eleanor and 
Freddy, and meeting Eleanor's husband 
and adorable little daughter. 

Marj Ewen (Mrs. Milton Simpson) is 
living at 316 West 97th Street, New York 
City, and would be very glad to receive 
the Alumnae Bulletin at that address. 
She has a daughter, Grace, who is two 
years old, and a son who was born in 
January. Marj had chicken pox a few 
weeks before, and when the baby was 
born he had it, which was quite unique. 

Hazel Collins Hainsworth and her 
husband have been in New York. 

The news is that K. T. is coming to 
reunion, all the way from California. 
That certainly ought to be an example 
to everyone else. 

1920 
Class Editor: Mary Hardy 

518 Cathedral St., Baltimore, Md. 

Other foreign news relayed to the edi- 
tor, is that of Helene Zinsser Loening. 
The Loenings have moved into a new 
house in Bremen, Georg-Groningstrasse 
23 — "the duckiest little house with a gar- 
den, dumbwaiter, pantry, open fireplace, 
and two bath-rooms with built-in 
showers." After a gay and merry win- 
ter, being a combination of parties and 
music lessons, dancing and French and 
Spanish, Zin spent the spring with her 
family who went over to visit her, and 
with them she seems to have "toured" 
Italy and Spain and Paris very thor- 
oughly. Her "foreign travel" ended in a 
flourish by flying with her husband from 
Paris to Cologne. 



Marian Frost Willard announces the 
arrival of her second daughter, Evelyn 
Allen, born the twelfth of last August. 
Marian's oldest daughter, Elizabeth, is 
three years old. 

On January 20th Edith Stevens Stev- 
ens's second son and fourth child was 
born, whose name is Benjamin Hazard. 

1922 
Class Editor: Serena Hand Savage 
(Mrs. William Savage), 
29 West 12th St., New York City. 

The "Register of Alumnae and Former 
Students" has been published ! We now 
have items of interest about bashful 
maidens who are too modest to send edi- 
torial news of themselves ! 

Ursula Batchelder was married last 
year to Mr. Raleigh Webster Stone, and 
is living in Chicago. 

Sadie Baron is Resident Physician at 
the Pennsylvania Hospital for Nervous 
and Mental Diseases, in Philadelphia. 

Ethel Brown is secretary at the Col- 
lege of Physicians and Surgeons in New 
York. 

Anna Dom Lester has a daughter. 

Louise Ehlers is a stenographer in the 
firm of Herman Loewenstein, New York 
City. 

Dorothy Ferguson is a tutor. 

Anne Gabel is head of the English De- 
partment of the Moorestown Friends' 
School. 

Marian Garrison is head of the Science 
Department at Miss Low's School, at 
Briarcliffe, Manor. 

Malvina Glasner Bloom has a daughter 
and is now living in Indianapolis. 

Mary Douglas Hay is associated with 
J. P. Morgan and Co. 

Frances Label is head of the Depart- 
ment of Mathematics and Director of 
Curriculum of the Darby High School, 
Darby, Pa. 

Gulielma Melton Kamimer is living in 
Gadsden, S. C. 

1923 
Class Editor: Katharine L. Strauss, 
27 -E. 69th Street, New York City. 

Augusta Howell Love joy, after a brief 
trial of the rural life in Illinois, has 
moved to Detroit, Michigan, (address 
1019 Van Dyke Avenue), where Pat is 
working for the Detroit Edison Company. 
Toward the end of February she is going 
for a visit to her family to the Mid Pines 
Club near Pinehurst. 

Betty Gray was married to Mr. Morgan 
Fisher Vining, on the 31st of January. 
They will live at Chapel Hill, North 
Carolina. 



26 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



Margery Barker is living in Michigan 
City. About once a year she goes abroad 
to buy books, and execute commissions 
for rare books and bindings for her book- 
shop. 

D. M. and Phil Kunhardt have returned 
from their sojourn in England, having 
lost fifteen pounds apiece on the British 
diet of cabbage and cabbage. 

Florence Martin Chase has a son, born 
February 8. He is to be called Martin 
Starkweather Chase. 

1924 
Class Editor: Beth Tuttle Wilbur 
(Mrs. Donald Wilbur), 
Rosemont, Pa. 

Buck was married on December 29 to 
F. Alvin Bassett of Collingwood, On- 
tario. Howdy was Maid of Honor and 
there were many of '24, and of other 
classes as well, among the guests. The 
one thing we don't like about this wed- 
ding is that Buck and Bassie have gone 
to Collingwood to live, and that Buck 
will no longer cheer her namesakes, the 
Buccaneers, to victory. 

We hear that Marge Ferguson Blank 
has a daughter, but have been unable to 
glean any details except that she must be 
quite grown up by this time. Please send 
us news, Marge ! 

Al Anderson McNeely's husband has 
gone to Aden, Arabia, on business, and 
Al plans to leave sometime soon for a 
Mediterranean cruise and then to meet 
him in Paris. 

Eliza Bailey Wright also has a daugh- 
ter, her second child, born last summer, 
about which we'd like to hear more, 
please. 

Ethel Tefft MacAfee, also a daughter, 
Ethel, Jr., born last June. We're sorry 
for the lateness of announcing these 
daughters, but the mothers are so ret- 
icent ! 

Libby Briggs is studying stage dancing 
at the Ned Wayburn School in New 
York. She is planning to do specialty 
work as soon as her course is finished. 

1928 
Class Editor: Helen F. McKelvey, 
Suffern, N. Y. 

The middle west is holding its own 
as far as interesting things to do are 
concerned, all of which we learned from 
this most welcome letter from Bertha 
Ailing: 

"I've just been reading the Bulletin 
and see you are lacking in news of us 
Chicagoans, so here's a contribution that 
may help fill up space: 



"Ruth Holloway is taking painting les- 
sons and planning to have Sally Hoeffer 
visit her sometime toward the end of Jan- 
uary. Hookie is valiantly going to the 
Art Institute and having a glorious time 
on the side. Lee Hollander came up 
here for a few days this vacation; she's 
going to Illinois for her M.A. in Chem. 
or something — and I took them both (Lee 
and Hookie) to lunch. Hookie also had 
a swell dinner dance to which I went 
with great thrills. I saw Peggy Haley 
for one day on her way east. 

"I've been rehearsing frantically the 
past month to be a pirate in the Junior 
League Children's play of 'Treasure 
Island' that we give every Saturday 
morning during January and February. 
Can you beat it? But it's lots of fun, 
especially as I find the treasure and then 
die on the stage. Mother and I are con- 
templating Europe in April, but at pres- 
ent it's rather doubtful. Lenore Brown- 
ing, after going to a secretarial school all 
summer, has got the job she wanted at 
the Carnegie Institute in Pittsburgh. Also 
Alice Bonnewitz is contemplating going 
east for a secretarial course sometime 
soon. And that's all the news I know. 
Oh, yes, Greggie went to New Orleans 
for her Christmas vacation — pretty 
doggy!" 

Many thanks to Bertha. 

And here is a little more detailed news 
of Greggy, gleaned from a letter to Peg 
Barrett. "I'm carrying three quite stiff 
courses in math, and taking an art course 
downtown Saturday mornings, which is 
an awful blight, but really will mean a 
lot, I know, when I finally go abroad. 
I've been taking riding lessons and enjoy- 
ing it immensely. My French is coming 
well, and I hope not to be too hopeless 
by June. I sit on Mademoiselle's right 
hand and even understand her jokes. But 
alas, they lack the je ne sais quoi of 
our Bryn Mawrian jokes." 

Jean Morganstern was married on Oc- 
tober 1st to Mr. William A. Greenebaum, 
and is now living in Bridgeport, N. J. 
She is busily keeping house, and with- 
stands all criticism from novices such as 
Ginny Atmore, who insulted her waffles. 

Ginny is making merry with the mince 
meat, and has been to Chicago on a busi- 
ness convention. She is all puffed up 
with pride over her sister Mollie's 
achievements as a freshman. 

Billy Rhein Bird returned from her 
honeymoon at the beginning of January, 
and has settled down at 137 East 29th, 
N. Y., with her English husband and a 
charming apartment. 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



27 



o 

i 



Of Kate Hepburn's marriage we can 
say very little, except that it has taken 
place. We would like to know her mar- 
ried name and address, please, so that 
we can send her her wedding present 
from the class. If anyone else has got- 
ten married and has not received her 
present, please let me know. 

Al Bruere and Tuttle were back for 
Freshman Show, also Peggy Hayley, who 
is staying at the Barbizon in New York, 
and Mat Fowler, and ourself. There may 
have been others, but we were too excited 
by seeing a Freshman Show in Goodhart, 
to notice. 

Elinor Amram has been flying from 
literary course, to social dinners, and 
even so manages to get out to college 
tea once in a while. There is a rumor 
that she may play the part of Bunthorne 
in the Glee Club's performance of "Pa- 
tience" this spring. 

Jo Young and Polly McElwain have 
gone abroad for an indefinite length of 
time. Their itinerary was also indefinite, 
except that Jo is going to join Mrs. 
Wright in Greece for the Delphic fes- 
tivals. 

Jean Huddleston has been giving Was- 
serman tests at some laboratory in New 
York, which she finds very interesting 
work. 

Mary Fite graduated after midyears, 
and is in New York looking for some sort 
of work in connection with small chil- 
dren; her ideas sound most interesting, 
and we hope we can have something 
definite to say about her soon. 

Yildiz Phillips Van Hulsteyn is also a 
housekeeper, living in Kew Gardens, Long 
Island. Marge Saunders has had a room 
with her this winter. 

For advertising purposes, we will close 
with the note that we are in the book 
business. Our office is on 44th St., and 
we wish more people would drop in to 
see us; you can't miss it, it has Week 
End Book Service, and Helen F. Mc- 
Kelvey in gold letters all over the door. 
Our business address is 341 Madison 
Ave., and we'd love to sell you any book, 
any time. It is great fun, especially as 
it has been practically an independent 
venture. 

We hope these notes have made up for 
our past neglect, and we wish everyone 
were as big hearted as Bertha, and would 
send us long letters about all their friends. 

In the New York Tribune for Decem- 
ber 9th, Mary Dana announced her en- 
gagement to William C. Kopper, Colum- 
bia, '24. 



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what the John Hancock Life Annuity plan has 
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Please send booklet "Life Incomes Through Annuities." 



y>i£ti2^ctif€ 
Millinery 

successfully caps 
the climax of 
fashion and the 
smart ensemble. 

SAKS-FIFTH AVENUE 

FORTY- NINTH to FIFTIETH STREET 
NEW YORK 



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THE AGNES IRWIN SCHOOL 

2009-2011 Delancey Place, Philadelphia 

A College Preparatory 
SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

BERTHA M. LAWS, A.B., Headmistress 




FERRY HALL 

A RESIDENT AND DAY SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

On Lake Michigan, near Chicago 

Junior College; High School Department: College 
Preparatory and General Courses. Special Departments 
of Music, Expression and Art. 

Two new dormitories, including new dining room and 
infirmary, to be opened September 1929. 

Eloise R. Tremain, A.B., Bryn Mawr, Principal 




GRAY GABLES 

THE BOARDING DEPARTMENT OF THE 
BANCROFT SCHOOL OF WORCESTER 

Complete College Preparatory Course. 
One year course for Board Examination. 

For catalog address: 

Hope Fisheb, Ph.D., Bancroft School 

Wobcesteb, Massachusetts 




ROSEMARY HALL 

College Preparatory 

(With supplementary but not alternative courses) 

CAROLINE RUUTZ-REES, Ph.D. \ „ . Mi . 
MARY E. LOWNDES. Litt.D / Heai M* 1 """ 

GREENWICH - - CONNECTICUT 


1 

1 
1 

] 
] 


MISS BEARD'S SCHOOL 

A Country School near New York 

Orange, New Jersey 

COLLEGE PREPARATION 

Advanced Courses Junior High Schoo 

Music, Art, Domestic Science 

Catalog on Request 

LUCIE C. BEARD, Headmistress 




The Shipley School 

Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 

Preparatory to Bryn Mawr College 

ALICE G. HOWLAND, ELEANOR 0. BROWNELL 
Principals 


rhe Katharine Branson Schoo! 

IOSS, CALIFORNIA Across the Bay from San Franciscc 

A Country School College Preparatory 

Head: 
Catharine Fleming Branson, A.B., Bryn Mawi 


MISS RANSOM and 
MISS BRIDGES' SCHOOL 

PIEDMONT, CALIFORNIA 

(A suburb of San Francisco) 

A RESIDENT AND DAY SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

General and College Preparatory Courses 
Outdoor Life throughout the year 

EDITH BRIDGES, B.L., Principal 


MISS MADEIRA'S SCHOOL 

330 19th St., N. W. Washington, D. C 

A RESIDENT AND DAY SCHOOL FOR 
GIRLS 

LUCY MADEIRA WING, A.B. 

MRS. DAVID LAFOREST WING 
Head Mistress 


The Baldwin School 

A Country School for Girls 
BRYN MAWR PENNSYLVANIA 

Preparation for Bryn Mawr. Mount Hoiyoke. Smith. 

Vassar and Wellesley collegea. Abundant outdoor life 

Hockey, basketball, tennis 

ELIZABETH FORREST JOHNSON. A B. 

HEAD 


MISS WRIGHT'S SCHOOL 

Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Prepares for College Board 
Examination 


THE LOW AND HEYWOOD SCHOOL 

Emphasizing college preparatory work. 

Also general and special courses. 

One year intensive college preparation. 

Junior school. 

64th year. Catalogue. 

SHIPPAN POINT, STAMFORD, CONN. 






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The Saint Timothy's School 
for Girls 

CATONSVILLE, MARYLAND 

Founded September 1882 

COLLEGE PREPARATORY 

AND 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

MISS LOUISA McENDREE FOWLER 
Head of the School 

Wykeham Rise 

WASHINGTON, CONNECTICUT 

A COUNTRY SCHOOL 
FOR GIRLS 

FANNY E. DAVIES, LL.A., Headmistress 
Prepares for Bryn Mawr and Other Colleges 

The Ethel Walker School 

SIMSBURY. CONNECTICUT 

Head of School 

ETHEL WALKER SMITH, A.M., Bryn Mawr College 

Head Mistress 

JESSIE GERMAIN HEWITT, A.B., Bryn Mawr College 

UNIVERSITYgTrLS 

BOARDING AND DAY SCHOOL 

Founded 1896 

Thorough and successful Preparation 

for Eastern Colleges for Women as well as 

for Midwestern Colleges and Universities 

Illustrated Catalogue on Request 

ANNA B. HAIRE, A.B., SMITH COLLEGE, Principal 

1106-B Lake Shore Drive Chicago, Illinois 

The Episcopal Academy 

(Founded 1785) 

CITY LINE, OVERBROOK, PA. 

A country day school for boys 

Endorsed by Bryn Mawr Alumnae 

CAMP MYSTIC conTe^Tcut 

Miss Jobe's salt water camp for girls 
8-18. Conducted by Mrs. Carl Akeley (Mary 
L. Jobe) . Halfway, New York and Boston. 
Land and water sports. Horseback riding. 

MARY L JOBE, Room 507. 607 Fifth Ave., N.Y.C. 



THE HARTRIDGE SCHOOL 
FOR GIRLS 

50 minutes jrom New York 

A country school with beautiful grounds. 
College Preparatory and General Courses. 
Over fifty girls in leading colleges today. 
Resident Department carefully restricted. 
Special attention to Music and Art. 
Athletics, Dramatics, Riding, 
EMELYN B. HARTRIDGE, Vassar, A.B., Principal 
Plainfield, New Jersey 



lOGERSHALL 

fv4Modern School with New En^landTradihons 



B^A Thorough Preparation for any College 

■ ^L One Year Intensive Review 

Bi lS^< General Academic Course with dl- 
^■W ^^Fploma. Junior College Courses — Home 
Economics, Secretarial Training, Music, Art, Dramatic 
Art. 26 Miles from Boston. Outdoor Sports. Riding. 
Gymnasium. Swimming Pool. 

EDITH CHAPIN CRAVEN, A.B., Bryn Mawr 
201 Rogers Street, Lowell, Mass. 

The Harcum School 

BRYN MAWR, PA. 

Prepares for Bryn Mawr and all leading colleges 

Musical Course prepares for the Depart- 
ment of Music of Bryn Mawr College 
EDITH H. HARCUM, Head of School 
L. MAY WILLIS, Principal 

THE MISSES KIRK'S 

College Preparatory School 

PREPARATORY TO BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 
Individual Instruction. Athletics. 

Clovercroft, Montgomery Avenue, Rosemont, Pa. 
Mail, telephone and telegraph address: Bryn Mawr. Pa. 



CHOATE SCHOOL 

1600 Beacon Street, Brookline, Mass. 

HOME AND DAY SCHOOL 
FOR GIRLS 

EMPHASIS ON COLLEGE PREPARATION 

Elective Courses for students not preparing 
for College 

AUGUSTA CHOATE, A.M. (Vwsar) 

Principal 



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BRIARCLIFF 

Mrs. Dow*s School for Girls 

Margaret Bell Merrill, M.A., Principal 
BRIARCLIFF MANOR NEW YORK 

College Preparatory 
and General Academic Courses 

Post Graduate Department 

Music and Art with New York 
advantages. New Swimming Pool 

Mu$ic Dept. Art Dept. 

Jan Sickesz Chas. W. Hawthorne, N. A. 

Director Director 



THE CAMBRIDGE SCHOOL 

DOMESTIC ARCHITECTURE 

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 

A Professional School for College 

Graduates 

The Academic Year for 1929-30 opens 

Monday, October 7, 1929. 

Henry Atherton Frost — Director 

53 Church Street, Cambridge, Mass. 

At Harvard Square 

Beech Wood 

A Camp for Girls 

On Lake Alamoosook near Bucksport, Me. 

Water sports, athletics and other 
camp interests. Tutoring. 

Conducted by 

HERMINE EHLERS, A.B., Bryn Mawr 

Address: FRIENDS SEMINARY 

Rutherford Place, New York City 

ThePhebeAnna 
Thome School 

Under the Direction of the 
Department of Education 



A progressive school preparing 
for all colleges. Open air class 
rooms. Pre-school, Primary, 
Elementary and High School 
Grades. 



BRYN MAWR, PA. 

Agnes L. Rogers, Ph.D., Director 
Frances Browne, A.B., HeadMistress 




Cathedral School of St. Mary 



GARDEN CITY, LONG ISLAND, N. Y. 

A school for Girls 19 miles from New York. College 

preparatory and general courses. Music Art and 

Domestic Science. Catalogue on request. Box B 

MIRIAM A. BYTEL, A.B., Radcliffe, Principal 

BERTHA GORDON WOOD, A.B., Bryn Mawr, 

Assistant Principal 



The Traphagen School of Fashion 



I 



INTENSIVE WINTER AND 
SUMMER COURSES 

All phases from elementary to full 
mastery ol costume design and illus- 
tration taught In shortest time com- 
patible with thoroughness. Day and 
Evening classes. Saturday courses tor 
Adults and Children. Our Sales De- 
partment disposes of student work. 
Every member of advanced classes 
often placed through our Employment 
Bureau. Write for announcement. 

In Arnold, Constable & Company Costume 
Design Competition, over 100 schools and 
nearly 800 students took part; all prizes 
were awarded to Traphagen pupils with 
exception of one of the five third prizes. 

1680 Broadway (near 52nd St.) New York 



Katharine Qbbs 

A school of unusual character with a distinctive 
purpose for educated women 
SECRETARIAL ACADEMIC EXECUTIVE 



BOSTON 

SOMarlboroStreet 

Resident and 

Day School 

NEW YORK 
247 Park Avenue 

PROVIDENCE 
155 Angell Street 



Special Course for College 
Women. Selected subjects 
preparing for executive posi- 
tions. Separate classrooms 
and special instructors. 
One-year Course includes tech- 
nical and broad business train- 
ing preparing for positions of 
a preferred character. 
Two-year Course includes six 
college subjects for those not 
desiring college, but wishing 
cultural as well as a business 
education. 
Booklet on request 



After College What? 

THE DREXEL INSTITUTE 
LIBRARY SCHOOL 

Offers a one year course for 
college graduates, and pre- 
pares students for all types 
of library service. 

PHILADELPHIA 



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1896 1929 

BACK LOG CAMP 

THE ADIRONDACK MOUNTAINS 

INDIAN LAKE, NEW YORK 

BRING THE CHILDREN TOO 

Is Back Log Camp a good place for children? For very young children- 
No, not at all, although we occasionally have them. But for active boys 
and girls of eight or ten and over, whose parents want to spend their vaca- 
tion with them, Back Log Camp is an ideal place. Special tent combina- 
tions can be made to suit nearly any family arrangement. 

If you are interested in teaching your children, or in learning with 
them or from them, the arts of canoeing, swimming, mountain climbing, 
trail finding, or trout fishing, you will find that we offer unusual facilities. 
The many beautiful picnicking places near and far on the Lake offer pleas- 
ant objectives for family trips. Our outlying camps give an opportunity 
for small family parties to spend the night out in the woods by themselves. 



Letters of inquiry should be addressed to 

Mrs. Bertha Brown Lambert (Bryn Mawr, 1904) 

272 Park Avenue 

Takoma Park, D. C. 



Other references 

Mrs. Anna Hartshorne Brown (Bryn Mawr, 1912) 

Westtown, Penna. 

Dr. Henry J. Cadbury 

(Head of Biblical Dept., Bryn Mawr) 

Haverford, Penna. 



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THE ALUMNAE REGISTER 

Do you know WHAT THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE ARE DOING? 

Do you know WHAT PERCENTAGE OF BRYN MAWR GRADUATES ARE 

MARRIED, HOW MANY CHILDREN THEY HAVE AND THE 

OCCUPATIONS OF THEIR HUSBANDS? 
Do you know FROM WHAT COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES THE GRADUATE 

SCHOOL DRAWS ITS STUDENTS? 
Do you know THE LATEST INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR FRIENDS? 

ALL OF THIS INFORMATION is contained in the 

REGISTER OF ALUMNAE AND FORMER STUDENTS 

just published by Bryn Mawr College. 

Your application on the attached slip will bring you one immediately. 



1929. 



Name- 



Address.... 



To the Director of Publication, 
Taylor Hall, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

f copy 
Please find enclosed $ for 



of the Alumnae Register at two dollars each. 

Cheques should be made payable to Bryn Mawr College. 



copies 



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building's cost if constructed of Indiana 
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Simply put us in touch with your architect. 

Write for our handsomely illustrated 
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build. Address your communication to Dept. 
849, Service Bureau, Bedford, Indiana. 



INDIANA LIMESTONE COMPANY 

Qeneral Offices: Bedford, Indiana Executive Offices: Tribune Tower, Chicago 



Kindly mention Bryn Mawr Bulletin 



BRYN MAWR 
ALUMNAE 
BULLETIN 




RADNOR AND THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 



May, 1929 



Vol. IX 



No. 4 



Entered as second-class matter, January 1. 1929, ax the rost Omce, fhiia.. Pa.,, under Act of March J, 1879 

COPYRIGHT. 192S 

ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 



OFFICERS OF THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

EXECUTIVE BOARD 

President Louise Fleischmann Maclat, 1906 

Vice-President Natalie McFaden Blanton, 1917 

Recording Secretary Gertrude Hearne Myers, 1919 

Corresponding Secretary May Egan Stokes, 1911 

Treasurer Margaret E. Brusstar, 1903 

Chairman of the Finance Committee Caroline Florence Lexow, 1908 

Chairman of the Publicity Committee Caroline Morrow Chadwick-Collins, 1905 

ALUMNAE SECRETARY AND BUSINESS MANAGER OF THE BULLETIN 

Alice M. Hawkins, 1907 

EDITOR OF THE BULLETIN 

Marjorie L. Thompson, 1912 

DISTRICT COUNCILLORS 

District I Helen Evans Lewis, 1913 

District II Julia Langdon Loomis 1895 

District III Alletta Van Reypen Korff, 1900 

District IV Katharine Holliday Daniels, 1918 

District V Frances Porter Adler, 1911 

District VI Margaret Nichols Hardenbergh, 1905 

District VII Helen Brayton Barendt, 1903 

ALUMNAE DIRECTORS 

Ruth Furness Porter, 1896 Mary Peirce, 1912 

Frances Fincke Hand. 1897 Margaret Reeve Cary, 1907 

Elizabeth Lewis Otey, 1901 

CHAIRMAN OF THE ALUMNAE FUND 

Caroline Florence Lexow, 1908 

CHAIRMAN OF THE ACADEMIC COMMITTEE 

Pauline Goldmark, 1896 

CHAIRMAN OF THE SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOAN FUND COMMITTEE 

Margaret Gilman, 1919 

CHAIRMAN OF THE COMMITTEE ON HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Dr. Marjorie F Murray, 1913 

CHAIRMAN OF THE NOMINATING COMMITTEE 

Eleanor Little Aldrich, ;905 



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Bryn Mawr Alumnae 
Bulletin 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF 
THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

Marjorie L. Thompson, '12, Editor 
Alice M. Hawkins, '07, Business Manager 

EDITORIAL BOARD 

Eleanor Fleisher Riesman, '03 May Egan Stokes, '11 

Caroline Morrow Chadwick-Collins, 05 Ellenor Morris, '27 

Emily Fox Cheston, '08 Louise Fleischmann Maclay, '06, ex-officio 

Subscription Price, $1.50 a Year Single Copies, 25 Cents 

Checks should be drawn to the order of Bryn Mawr Alumnae Bulletin 
Published monthly, except August, September and October, at 1006 Arch St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Vol. IX MAY, 1929 No. 4 



Bryn Mawr has always been concerned about the Graduate School. A school 
of its size and importance in a college as small as Bryn Mawr is almost unique, 
certainly among women's colleges. There has never been any doubt of its value 
to the college or of the stimulus that it has given to the teaching, or of the respect 
that it has inspired in the academic world. And yet always there has been a feeling 
that it has not worked out quite as was hoped in the beginning. That association 
between more mature and younger students, that free interplay of minds that 
Miss Thomas visioned, has never been a reality. Each group has; been absorbed 
in its own interests. With the new plan of turning Radnor into a Graduate 
Hall, with a Dean of Graduate students in residence, the Graduate School, no 
longer so closely knit w r ith the college may, paradoxically, become more integrally 
a part of it. As a complete entity it will take its part in the academic and 
social scheme as it has never before been able to do when it was split into arbi- 
trary units in the various halls. The appointment of Eunice Morgan Schenck, 
'07, as first Dean of the Graduate School, is a particularly happy one. Her associa- 
tion with the Sdhool has been very close. For the last three years she has been 
the President's representative to the Graduate students, and is in touch with the 
authorities here and abroad. Her gift of generous enthusiasm vivifies the whole 
project. The sacrifice that she is making to stay at Bryn Mawr is a genuine one, 
and gives the measure of her belief in the new plan. Such belief is one of the best 
auguries for its complete success. In the article which is printed in this number 
of the Bulletin, the Dean-elect can of course only indicate in barest outline her 
hopes and policies, but in working them out she will have the sympathetic interest 
of every one connected with Bryn Mawr. 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL AND RADNOR 

(On March 25th President Park announced in Chapel two important changes 
in College policy. These changes were both in connection with the Graduate School. 
The first was the appointment of a Dean of the Graduate School, Professor Eunice 
Morgan Schenck, who for the last three years, as the President's Representative, has 
advised the Graduate students. The second change is the establishment of Radnor 
as a Graduate Hall exclusively. The Editors asked Professor Schenck to write some- 
thing about the new plan which is of the greatest interest to every one connected 
with Bryn Mawr.J 

In the autumn of 1929, graduate students returning to Bryn Mawr, and those 
coming for the first time, will find a hall of their own waiting for them. 'Radnor 
is to become the Graduate Hall of the College, and the rooms hitherto assigned to 
graduate students in the other halls will from now on be used by undergraduates. 
The number of rooms for graduate students on the campus is increased by ten and 
the number of undergraduate rooms is maintained. This has been effected, on the 
one hand, by converting the large graduate clubroom in Denbigh into rooms for 
undergraduates, and on the other, by subdividing the larger rooms in Radnor and 
breaking up the single and double suites into single rooms. Radnor was planned 
on so generous a scale that the bedrooms of the present suites, as well as their studies, 
provide entirely satisfactory single rooms, each one of them having two windows 
and enough floor space to permit a closet to be built in cases where there is none. 

The new Radnor will accommodate sixty graduate students of whom one will 
be named by the President of the College as "Senior Resident" and will act as 
liaison officer between the students and the college authorities. There will be a 
manager to attend to the material side of the hall. The Dean of the Graduate 
School will occupy an apartment, to be arranged on the ground floor of the south- 
west wing. 

Radnor has always been fortunate in its drawing-room and large entrance hall 
on the main floor, its students' sitting-room and large central hall on the second 
floor. These should furnish a comfortable and attractive setting for the social life 
of the resident graduate students and give to the non-resident graduate students a 
place to come to during any hours they may wish to spend on the campus outside 
of the library or laboratory. 

In their Denbigh clubroom, the graduate students have always dispensed hos- 
pitality at tea time to faculty and undergraduates. In the larger quarters of Radnor 
the College will be able to entertain both with and for the graduate students and is 
fortunate in having a group of neighbors who, with great generosity, have established 
a fund for this purpose. Some of the distinguished scholars who come to the College 
to lecture can be brought, in the future, under the auspices of the Graduate School, 
and the Graduate Hall may be used for the small reception, or more happily still, 
the intimate discussion that sometimes follows a lecture. The hall teas of the other 
halls, at which class groups act in turn as hostesses with the warden, might well in 
Radnor be converted into teas at which departments or groups of departments would 
like to entertain their faculty and the advanced undergraduates in their fields. It 

(2) 






BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 3 

is thought, too, that the graduate students, with a dining-room and reception-rooms 
all their own, will feel more like entertaining their friends, and the Dean of the 
Graduate School will arrange, from time, to time to entertain in the hall dining-room, 
people both from within and willhout the college whom the students will enjoy 
meeting informally. 

Any such plans, however, are perfunctory beside the as yet intangible reality 
that will be the life which the graduate students will work out for themselves. The 
undergraduates of the country (have pretty satisfactorily established a life that suits 
them. Graduate students have only in the rarest instances, as in the Graduate 
College at Princeton, been given a chance to carry out any thought they might have 
for their community existence. The opening of Radnor as a graduate hall gives to 
a group of highly-picked young women scholars an opportunity for self-determina- 
tion. The establishment of traditions of living within Radnor itself will be the 
pioneer job of the graduate students of 1929-1930. It will be the task of everyone 
in the College to help them establish the best possible conditions of intercourse between 
Radnor and the rest of the College. 

The interest and significance of the graduate group are very striking to anyone 
who watches it being collected year by year from all corners of this country and 
from the ends of the earth. The process of awarding resident fellowships and 
scholarships for next year left us not only with the usual waiting list on which to 
draw, in case any of the successful candidates resigned, but with a waiting-list topped 
by fourteen names that until the last moment were being considered by their respective 
departments as runners-up for the awards. In all cases these fourteen were students 
whom the Faculty would not only have welcomed to their seminaries, but whom 
they would have liked to honor with a fellowship or a scholarship. Such applicants 
are, of course, given first choice of rooms, after the fellows and scholars, in case 
they can afford to come to Bryn Mawr without financial help, but the graduate 
student is only too often apt to be faced with tlhe necessity of giving up studying 
temporarily, if a scholarship is not available. It is a most healthy sign in the Grad- 
uate School for a list of this quality to exist. 

The competition for the scholarships for foreign women is still greater. Last 
year the Faculty Committee found itself faced wiflh the nearly hopeless task of making 
five awards among over fifty candidates. All of these students met our academic 
requirements and almost all were recommended, after a personal interview, by one 
of the foreign correspondents of the Institute of International Education, who now 
co-operate with us in finding suitable candidates for our fellowships. The awards 
for next year will not be made until May, but judging from the number of applica- 
tions that are already in, the Committee will again have the opportunity to clhoose 
among many excellent young women who, having shown their ability in their own 
universities, wish, like the good migrating students of all countries and of all times, 
to see new methods of hunting knowledge. 

With a group, then, that promises to furnish academic distinction and variety 
of experience, Radnor will open its first year as a graduate hall. 

Eunice Morgan Schenck, 1907, Dean-elect of the Graduate School. 



CANDIDATES FOR THE OFFICE OF 
ALUMNAE DIRECTOR 




SUSAN FOLLANSBEE HIBBARD 

Susan Follansbee Hibbard graduated from Bryn Mawr in 1897. She -is a well- 
known, delightful, public-spirited citizen of Chicago. Her activities have been con- 
stant and performed with ease and effectiveness. 

She was made Regional Chairman of the Y. W. C. A. in 1917 and as such 
organized and directed the work of sending young women to France to 'serve in 
the Canteens and Y. W. C. A. Centers. She went abroad (herself to superintend 
this undertaking and did a most thorough and useful piece of work. She has been 
a member of the National Board of the League of Women Voters from 1922-28. 
Her qualities of tact and understanding and industry have made her a most valued 
member of the Board. She is interested in political education and in international 
understanding. She is one of the few women on the Advisory Board of the Insti- 
tute of Pacific 'Relations, a Director of the International Migration Service, also a 
Director of the Wood row Wilson Foundation. 

She has always been a devoted and interested alumna of Bryn Mawr College. 
Her unusual executive ability and her faculty of making people work with her with 
zeal and devotion make her a valuable member of any Board. 



(4) 










VIRGINIA KNEELAND FRANTZ 

Although she is one of the younger alumnae, Virginia Kneeland Frantz has 
already had a career of some distinction. Prepared by the Brearley School, in 1915 
she won the Matriculation Scholarship for New York, New Jersey, and Delaware. 
In 1918 she graduated from College second in her class, with the degree of magna 
cum laude. 

As an undergraduate, she combined with her scholarly pursuits many other 
interests. Her ability as an actress is remembered by those who saw her as Beau 
Brummel, or as Lord Loam in Barrie's Crichton. More notably, as Chairman of 
the College War Council during the war, she filled a position involving the heaviest 
kind of administrative responsibility; and again as president of the Undergraduate 
Association she worked with energy and initiative in behalf of the academic interests 
of the students. In recognition of the many-sidedness of her leadership — her dignity, 
humor, and intelligence — she was awarded the Mary Helen Ritchie Memorial Prize. 

Her decision to study medicine, Mrs. Frantz claims, was adopted in self-defense 
when Miss Thomas questioned her as a Freshman concerning her plans for the 
future. A doctor, ihowever, she was clearly destined to be. She was the Shippen 
Scholar in Science her Senior year, and she is still spoken of in Dalton as one of 
the most brilliant students Bryn Mawr has ever had. In 1918, she entered the 
College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University, from which she gradu- 
ated in 1922, again second in her class. In this field, most difficult for women, her 
ability has been quickly recognized, for she won her interneship at the Presbyterian 
Hospital in New York; and she is at present its Assistant Surgical Pathologist, and 
Instructor in Surgery at the College of Physicians and Surgeons. 

But this is not all. In 1920 she married a fellow medical student, Angus Mac- 
donald Frantz, and she now has two children who are renewing in a very practical 
manner her interest in school and college. In every way, then, breadth of experience, 
sound training, and distinction of mind, it seems that Mrs. Frantz has much to 
give Bryn Mawr. 

(5) 



PROFESSOR JAMES H. BREASTED LECTURES AT 
BRYN MAWR 

The Mary Flexner Lectureship Foundation, one more gesture of friendship 
on the part of the Flexner family toward Bryn Mawr, means that Professor Breasted, 
Director of the Oriental Institute of the University of Ohicago, and one of the 
most eminent Oriental scholars in the world, will be at Bryn Mawr for the next 
four weeks, meeting the students, lecturing in the Seminars, holding informal dis- 
cussions, and giving four lectures for the college at large and for the public. When 
Miss Park spoke at the Council meeting last fall she discussed the problem of 
"variety," and cited the great interest that outside lecturers can. bring to every one 
within the college, and the fact that the very smallness of the college, with its close 
contacts, makes in the end for an essential variety. In Professor Breasted's visit 
to Bryn Mawr one sees the exemplification. The program follows. 

THE NEW CRUSADE 

I. 

Thursday, April 11th 

THE PLACE OF THE NEAR EAST IN HUMAN 

DEVELOPMENT 

II. 

Friday, April 19th 

THE SCIENTIFIC RESPONSIBILITY OF AMERICA IN 

THE NEAR EAST AND THE SALVAGING OF 

THE EVIDENCE 

III. 

Tuesday, May 7th 

THE EVIDENCE AND MAN'S CONQUEST 

OF NATURE 

IV. 

Tuesday, May 14th 

THE EVIDENCE AND THE EMERGENCE OF 

SOCIAL IDEALISM 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

Miss Park has undergone an operation at Johns Hopkins but is doing very well; 
in her absence Mrs. Manning will be Acting-President, and Miss Carey will continue 
to be Acting-Dean. 



COUNCILLORS ELECTED 

The Executive Board announces with pleasure the election of Alletta Van Reypen 
KorfT, 1900 (Baroness Serge Alexander Korff), of Washington, D. C, as Councillor 
for District III; and of Margaret Nichols Hardenbergh, 1905 (Mrs. Clarence Mor- 
gan Hardenbergh), of Kansas City, Missouri, as Councillor for District VI. 

(6) 



THE DEAN-ELECT OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 
IS DECORATED 

Eunice Morgan Schenck has been made an "Officier d'Academie" by the French 
Minister of Public Instruction. This decoration is "destinee a reconnaitre les services 
de ceux qui contribuent au developpement de la culture francaise." 

THE ACTING DEAN IS CALLED TO THE BREARLEY SCHOOL 

Millicent Carey has been appointed Head Mistress of the Brearley School in 
New York, but she does not assume her new position until October, 1930. Last 
Spring she was appointed assistant to the Dean of the College. At the beginning 
of the second semester, when Helen Taft Manning was granted leave of absence, 
she became Acting-Dean. 



DEBATE WITH SWARTHMORE 

The debating team of Bryn Mawr College is meeting Swarthmore at 8 o'clock 
on Thursday evening, April 25, in Goodhart. The affirmative side -of the subject, 
This house deplores the influence of advertising on public welfare, will be upheld 
by the Bryn Mawr representatives. . 



TEA-DANCE TO BE GIVEN BEFORE VARSITY 
DRAMATICS 

"On Wednesday, March 20, the Undergraduate Association held a well-attended 
meeting in Room F. to discuss the question of dancing. 

"The most important decision arrived at was that a tea-dance should be held 
on April 13, from four to seven in the afternoon, before Varsity Dramatics, under 
the auspices of the Undergraduate Association. This will be the first dance ever 
held at Bryn Mawr, but it will be of a very mild and informal character. A sub- 
stantial enough tea will be served to enable the guests to survive witihout dinner, 
it was announced. Rockefeller Hall will be used for the dancing, and an orchestra 
will be provided. The total price for play, supper, and dance for two is six dollars. 
A place will be provided for the gentlemen to dress before the play. Girls are to 
cut in, and may attend without escort." 

The preceding notice gives no indication of the excitement that bubbles on the 
campus. The distinguished guests that have gathered from time to time at Bryn 
Mawr have become mere wraiths compared to the handful of undergraduates from 
Princeton. One bears rumours of diplomatic correspondence with a nearer college 
than Princeton that was not interested, of delicate negotiations, of plans made and 
unmade, but the tangible evidence of a new era is the large truck, backed up to the 
stage entrance of Goodhart. And on its side is writ large so that he who runs may 
also read, "Princeton Students Express." Need one add that the house was sold 
out almost within the hour that the tickets for The Admirable Crichton were put 
on sale? 

(7) 



THE ALUMNAE BOOK CLUB 

The way in which the Library can belong in an especial sense to every Alumna 
is through the Book Club. Being women, and therefore practical, we are all con- 
crete minded. The appeal of the tangible is one that we find hard to resist, although 
we may theoretically feel otherwise. This year the Book Club, for one reason and 
another, has lapsed a little, but that is never true of the needs of the Library. Always 
there are more department books needed than there is money for, alluring items are 
always appearing in Booksellers' Catalogues and should be snapped up at once, were 
the funds on lhand, and new books are appearing in their thousands and in their 
tens of thousands. The dues for the Book Club are a book or the equivalent of a 
book. Miss Reed, the librarian, is only too happy to make the purchase if any one 
wishes to send to her, and it is worth while remembering that she, because of the 
Library discount, can sometimes stretch the price of one book to cover that of two. 
In any case one should communicate with her about the book or books that one 
proposes to give. The following list is by way tof suggesting some of the books 
of general interest that the Library would like to have. Also there is always the 
amusing possibility of giving books along one's own line of interest. One member 
of the Book Club last year gave a book on witchcraft, and this year, after a trip to 
the South-west several books on the American Indian, whidh already have proved 
useful for a new course that is being offered this year for the first time. Certainly 
in the course of a year there is some book that one would like to think of as being 
available for the college community, whether its interest is general or highly 
specialized. Helen MacCoy, '00, is chairman. Her address is Haverford, Pa. 

New books selected from the spring announcements: 

Portrait of Ambrose Bierce, by Alphonse de Castro. Century. $3.50. 

George Borrow, by Samuel Milton Elam. Knopf. $3.00. 

Mid-Channel, by Ludwig Lewisohn. Harper. $3.50. 

Further Correspondence of Samuel Pepys, edited by J. R. Tanner. Harcourt. $7.00. 

Generally Speaking, by G. K. Chesterton. Dodd, Mead. $2.50. 

The Oxford Book of Regency Verse, 1798-1837, edited by H. S. Milford. Oxford 

University. $3.75. 
The Good Estate of Poetry, by Chauncey Brewster Tinker. Little, Brown. $3.50. 
Balloon, by Padraic Colum. Macmillan. $2.00. 
Twenty Plays, by Ferenc Molnar. Vanguard. $5.00. 
Dynamo, by Eugene O'Neill. Liveright. $2.50. 

The Older Woman in Industry, by Johanna Lobsenz. Scribner. $2.50. 
The Useful Art of Economics, by George Soule. Macmillan. $2.50. 
English Poor haw History, Part II. The Last Years, by Sidney and Beatrice Webb. 

Longmans, Green. $14.00. (This has been ordered.) 
The Social World of the Ants, by Auguste Forel. Boni. 2 vols. $15.00. 
The Sexual Life of Savages, by Bronislaw Malinowski. Liveright. 2 vols. $10.00. 
Awake and Rehearse, by Louis Bromfield. Stokes. $2.50. 
Rome Haul, by Walter D. Edmonds. Little, Brown. $2.50. 
Action, by C. E. Montague. Doubleday. $2.50. 

(8) 









BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 9 

Memoirs of a Fox-Hunting Man, by Siegfried Sassoon. Coward-McCann. $2.50. 
Dark Hester, by Anne Douglas Sedgwick. Houghton Mifflin. $2.50. 
The True Heart, by Sylvia Townsend Warner. Viking. $2.50. 
In the Land of Cockaigne, by Heinrich Mann. Macaulay. $2.50. 
The Snake Pit, by Sigrid Undset. Knopf. $3.00. 
Cavender's House, by Edwin Arlington Robinson. Macmillan. $1.50. 
The Heart's Journey, by Siegfried Sassoon. Harper. $2.00. 
Bush-Whacking, by Hugh Clifford. Harper. $3.50. 
Normandy, by Sisley Huddleston. Doubleday. $3.00. 
On Mediterranean Shores, by Emil Ludwig. Little, Brown. $3.50. 
The Magic Island, by W. B. Seabrook. Harcourt. $3.50. 
The Alodern Temper, by J. W. Krutch. Harcourt. $2.50. 
Adepts in Self-Portraiture, by Stefan Zweig. Viking Press. $3.00. 
The Heart of Hawthorne's Journals, by Newton Arvin. Houghton Mifflin. $3.00. 
Letters of the Empress Frederick, edited by Frederick Posonby. Macmillan. $8.50. 
The Letters of the Tsar to the Tsaritza, 1914-1917. Dodd, Mead. $6.00. 
The Exquisite Tragedy: An Intimate Life of John Ruskin, by Amabel Williams- 
Ellis. Doubleday. $3.50. 
Carlyle — To Threescore and Ten, by David Alex Wilson. Dutton. $6.00. 
Hello Towns, by Sherwood Anderson. Liveright. $3.00. 
Proust, by Clive Bell. Harcourt. $1.50. 

Lyrical Poetry in the Nineteenth Century, by H. J. C. Grierson. Harcourt. $1.25. 
Shakespere 's Silences, by Alwin Thaler. Harvard University. $3.50. 
English Comedy, by Ashley H. Thorndike. Macmillan. $4.00. 

Wings Over Europe, by Robert Nichols and Maurice Browne. Covici, Friede. $2.00. 
Jehovah's Day, by Mary Borden. Doubleday. $2.50. 
Hudson River Bracketed, by Edith Wharton. Appleton. $2.50. 
Disarmament, by Salvador de Madariaga. Coward-McCann. $5.00. 
America and Europe , by Alfred Zimmern. Oxford University. $3.00. 
A Preface to Morals, by Walter Lippmann. Macmillan. $3.00. 
Our Knowledge of the External World, by Bertrand Russell. Norton. $3.00. 
The Aims of Education and Other Essays, by Alfred North Whitehead. Macmillan. 

$2.50. 

The following publications by the Pegasus Press are needed by the Art Depart- 
ment. This press aims to combine the finest scholarship with beautiful production 
and offers tlhe highest value at prices which in relation to the quality are moderate. 

German Illumination, by Adolf Goldschmidt. $63.00. 

Vol. I, Carolingian Illumination; Vol. II, Ottoman Illumination. 

2 volumes, about 150 pages of text, 200 plates. 
Giovanni Pisano, by Adolfo Venturi. $42.00. 

The first exhaustive treatise on this famous sculptor. 

64 pages of text, 120 plates. 



RECENT ALUMNAE BOOKS 

The Glorious Company (Lives and Legends* of the Twelve and St. Paul), 
by Tracy D. Mygatt, 1908, and Frances Witherspoon, 1908. Harcourt, Brace & 
Company. $3.00. 

Religious books usually fall into one of two classes; they are either piously 
sentimental or controversial in their scholarship. In neitiher case are they apt to 
awaken much interest in the lay reader. 

"The Glorious Company," already in its second printing, falls into neither 
category. It is the result of much study, much imagination and a profound interest 
in "The Twelve and St. Paul,"' — not as saints but as human beings, who for twenty 
centuries have influenced the world because for three years they themselves were 
deeply influenced. 

Legend and tradition, which are piled so high upon the meagre foundation of 
authentic facts that have come down to us, are wisely incorporated and are made 
to sihow — as no mere statement could ever do — how the lives of these men are 
interwoven in our civilization. 

No description of this book can be better than the -one given in the foreword 
by the authors — where they speak of these thirteen brief biographical essays as 
"mosaics of fact, inference, imagination and interpretation," and again as "partial 
portraits of the heroes of tlhe early Church, conceived in the sincere belief that these 
were dauntless men who led lives of extraordinary interest and value." 

Descriptions of the country-side of Palestine, of the lives and hardships of 
the fishermen, of the Jewish traveler and Roman rule are interwoven, so subtly, 
yet so vividly, that a background is created against which the men stand out as living 
human beings, — strong in their simplicity. 

The twenty pages of notes which close the book add greatly to its value for 
they include an informal bibliography and references to the many conflicting, if 
fascinating, legends and Apocryphal accounts from which the authors had to select 
their material. As the confusion of identities, the many hazy relationships and the 
multiplicity of very early but persistent Church tradition, as well as the absence of 
any definite data are made plain to us, we cannot wonder that heretofore some of 
the less well-known apostles — have been very shadowy figures. We can only be 
glad that an interest in psychology, much study and sifting of material with the 
occasional use of inference have brought forth thirteen human vivid figures. 

The type is good, the paper good and the unusual silhouette-like drawings by 
Charles Naef most effective as illustrations. It is a book that has received sweeping 
praise from the churchmen of many creeds, full of inspiration and without a trace 
of dogma. E. F. C. 

Tangle Garden, by Elizabeth Gray Vinning. Doubleday, Doran & Co. 

"Tangle Garden" is frankly a book for young girls, and to enjoy its charmingly 
simple tale one must approach it in what is best called a "Little Colonel" frame of 
mind. When Annie Fellows Johnston launched upon the school-girl world that im- 
mortal series she unfurled as a banner to all who should follow in her literary foot- 

(10) 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 11 

steps that line of Charles Kingsley's — "Be good, sweet child, and let who will be 
clever." 

Mrs. Vinning has followed nobly in this tradition. Her book is neither clever 
nor sophisticated, but it is refreshingly straightforward, frequently amusing, and 
without question, good. 

The plot is revealed in the first sentence, "Suppose," said Jill Dale, tying an 
apron over her scarlet frock, "suppose somebody died and left us a fortune — somebody 
we'd never known and wouldn't feel sorry about — what would you do with it?" And 
immediately we know that an imminent fortune is suspended like a sword of Damocles 
over the unsuspecting heads of the Dale family, and that the book is going to tell us 
what they did witih it. It is like one of those youthful dreams in which we have all 
indulged, that favorite game of childhood entitled "just suppose." Who has not 
spent innumerable of these fortunes dropped from beneficent skies? Of course one 
always wakes to the stern reality of things as they are, but then so do the Dales. 
Only tihey are more fortunate than the rest of us dreamers, and manage to salvage 
quite material benefits from the shipwreck of their miraculous fortune, but this is 
Anticipating the story. 

The curtain rises on a scene set in a somewhat dilapidated, but still charming 
colonial mansion, surrounded by an old-fashioned garden which gives its name to the 
book. Here we see the Dale family, Ted, Jill, Randy, Susan, Beverley, the little 
brother, and Mr. and Mrs. Dale. Here, although considerably hampered by in- 
adequate means, they enjoy a life of home-made fun and simple jollity. Ted and 
Jill, however, have reached that unfortunate age where one begins to experience the 
first tihroes of champagne tastes and a beer income. Ted, especially has social aspira- 
tions, and it is small wonder that when the champagne income does arrive, it goes 
inevitably to his head. 

In fact each member of the family reacts to the change in fortune, and the cor- 
responding change in the conditions of life, in his or her own characteristic manner. 
The younger children remain much the same, the older ones vary and change as is to 
be expected. Perhaps the most careful work has been done on Jill, the real iheroine 
and central figure of the book, who passes through that trying period of growing up, 
and emerges triumphant and true to form. 

In the end when after an incredibly brief period of only a few montihs, the for- 
tune of the Dales has run its course, and the family finds it necessary to return to 
their old home to live in the old manner, they are all rather glad to go back, to wake 
up and find the glittering dream over, and all as before. E. M. 



THE LILAC 

The Lilac: A Monograph, by Susan Delano McKelvey, '06. MacMillan. $18. 

Of late years as gardening has become a popular pastime, printing presses have 
been busy turning out garden books which to any real horticulturist are far more 
irritating than helpful. Publishers, unwilling to limit their market, instruct authors 
to touch lightly on many aspects of gardening rather than to deal adequately with 



12 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

any one branch. Therefore, the advent of "The Lilac," a thoroughly scientific and 
exhaustive work on one definite species is of interest and encouragement to everyone 
seriously interested in gardening. As might be expected of such a book the reviews 
have been many and widespread, and it is significant that the leading horticultural 
magazine gave it not only prominence but far more actual space than was ever before 
accorded to a book review. 

"The Lilac" deals with a plant much developed abroad although comparatively 
new in the hybridizing work of this country and is the result of scientific observation 
and intensive work in Canada, France and England as well as in this country, of 
research in herbariums, and study of books and pamphlets of four centuries and ten or 
more languages, besides visits to many well-known collections of living plants. More 
than seven years ago, at tihe suggestion of Professor Charles Sargeant, head of the 
Arnold Arboretum, Mrs. McKelvey undertook the writing and preparation of this 
"monumental monograph." Every phase of her subject is covered, history, legend, 
botany, propagation, cultivation, pests and diseases; four leading horticulturists have 
contributed chapters on four specific subjects; the keys are comprehensive but clear; 
the standard color dhart is included; the 172 full-page photographs were taken especi- 
ally for this book; between four and five hundred garden forms of lilacs are described. 
Anyone interested in lilacs may find within the covers of this single book all known 
information on the subject. 

To have collected and classified so much data and to have made it simple enough 
to be available to laymen and scientific enough to be regrded as authoritative by lead- 
ing botanists is an achievement possible only to a highly trained mind, keenly inter- 
ested in the subject and aware of the diverse public by which such a book would be 
welcomed. 

It it necessarily a large book, heavy because of the half-tone photographs, with 
excellent clear type on hig/h-grade paper and in comparison with books on similar 
subjects decidedly inexpensive. E. F. C. 



ACKNOWLEDGMENT 

The Library and the Bulletin are both very grateful for The Bookman's 
Manual, by Bessie Graham, '02, which she has generously sent to the Alumnae Book- 
shelf. The author says: "Bookselling is an ancient calling and an interesting busi- 
ness for which increased training is needed if our present day is to be served ade- 
quately in its rapidly growing need of books. In the field of bookselling education 
this volume is offered as a modest experiment." The Manual, no longer really an 
experiment, is a recognized part of the equipment of nearly all Book Shops. 






LETTERS FROM ALUMNAE 

Abigail Camp Dimon, '96, sent the following letter, which is quoted in part, 
to the Alumnae Secretary: 

March 16, 1929. 

It was good to get your letter while I was in Jerusalem, but the request for 
a few words on Cape to Cairo almost spoiled my pleasure in it. 



I have swung around quite a circle since leaving Cairo, and had some escapes 
from tourists which have kept up my spirits which are quite easily dashed by other 
travellers, because they seem so competent and I feel so casual. I went to Bagdad, 
which was wonderful — romantic, queer, and oriental. Then strayed out into the 
wilderness for three and one half days to see Ur and had one of the most pleasant 
and interesting jaunts of all. Then a ride across the desert to Damascus and a 
very touristy time in motor cars with a dragoman to Baalbeck, and down to Jeru- 
salem via Tiberias and Nazareth. This bit was lovely and interesting, but every 
one (by thousands) does exactly the same thing and also exactly the same things and 
are told exactly the same things — one might almost as well be on a cruise. I got 
away from my dragoman in Jerusalem and almost shut my eyes, I was so sick of being 
good, but did wander aimlessly about and see a little. Then I went down to Petra, 
a week's trip, whiclh was another lovely experience but not so rare as Ur because Cook 
took such good care of our every moment. I do not know why he let me wander off 
all by myself to Ur where I didn't see a w T hite man at all except the Woolleys, but am 
thankful for his unusual negligence. 

Then I made my way up to Beirut where I had a fine time seeing Kate Cham- 
bers Seelye. She has four lovely children, girls of four, ten and twelve, and a boy of 
seven, and all are healthy, happy and very intelligent. Kate is busy every minute 
with family and outside activities. The progress of women in Syria, or at least 
Beirut, I am sure, depends very much on iher. She was starting for Constantinople 
while I was there, to sell Near East handiwork on a cruise boat, which I am sure 
is not an easy or very pleasant job. I am now on a Lloyd Triestino freight steamer 
bound for Athens. Every day we spend at a different port and it is really a lovely 
trip. I have landed and explored places I never heard of before — Alexandretta in 
Syria; Mersine and Adalia in Turkey; and three stops in Cyprus which were lovely 
and gave a cihance for a day's motoring. Now we have Rhodes, Athens, and Brindisi 
to visit before we get to Venice. There are about twenty passengers and quite a 
good lot, and we are already three days behind schedule. 

I expect to join Anna Hoag and the Hoyts again in Italy for a while and 
then will have to think about coming home. There seems to be some kind of a '96 
reunion on hand but I haven't heard much about it, and don't know w r hen it is, so 
I don't know whether I can get there or not. 



(13) 



CAPE TO CAIRO 

It is only very recently that it has become possfble to make the journey through 
Africa from the Gape to Cairo without hundreds of miles of safari on foot. With 
the opening of an easy, comfortable route the appeal of the huge, mysterious con- 
tinent is now heard by a small but increasing number of travellers. Somehow or 
other the call reached me in my remote home and last August I started off, not 
knowing w*hat I might encounter, and, to my surprise, even alone on my adventure. 

I sailed from Southampton for Capetown, a three weeks' voyage, on August 
24th, on a large mail steamer of the Union Castle Line. We changed seasons on 
the way and reached the Cape in early spring. Six weeks or so were spent in making 
leisurely progress through South Africa and Rhodesia w T ith detours and stops at 
various points of interest or entertainment. Mudh as I enjoyed this part it was 
not what I had come so far to see. It was reminiscent of much of our own West 
and Southwest, both in the rapid growth of the towns and in the sage brush and 
contours of the country. South African people were travelling on the comfortable, 
well-appointed trains to view the beauties of their own land, which culminated in 
the wonderful Victoria Falls, a visit to which is as much part of the South African's 
programme as Niagara is of tours. I believe everyone asked me how Victoria Falls 
compared with Niagara, and the only answer I felt capable of making was that of 
course it is three times as high and a mile and a quarter wide, and very beautiful. 

As soon as I passed Victoria Falls on my way northward the stream of tourists 
ran dry and my fellow travellers became people going from place to place for local 
reasons. Here, and all through the South and Central Africa, the most striking 
feature of travel was the throngs of negro natives who use the trains. At every 
station there were crowds of more or less fantastically-clad blacks, carrying on their 
heads all their household or personal goods wrapped in a cotton cloth or tossed into 
a basket, patiently waiting till a train came along, and then hurrying in and bestow- 
ing themselves like sardines in their third-class compartments. The "modern" 
African native has developed conventions in dress which are surprising to our western 
eyes but quite reasonable to theirs. They look as if tlhey had adopted European 
clothes with the idea that they have thereby exorcised the devil of shame, and that 
the- spell is equally effective wlhether the garments are wlorn inside out or upside 
down or jauntily hung to one shoulder. Often would I spy a naked Zulu or Basuto 
looking out of a train window and wait eagerly to see him alight only to find that 
he had wrapped himself comfortably in a large enveloping blanket for his public 
appearance. It was not until Rhodesia that I saw a few full-sized negroes mingling 
nonchalantly with mixed crowds, clothed only with a fringed girdle. Later, in 
Central Africa, the girdle grew smaller and sometimes disappeared, while in the 
Sudan one tribe was clothed simply and inexpensively in ashes. 

Railroads took me from Cape Town to Bukama, a small town in the Belgian 
Congo, where I embarked on a river steamer for a four days' trip down the Lualaba 
River, one of the main confluents of the Congo. Our stern-paddle boat made its way 
through a territory tihinly peopled with blacks and swarming with birds — small, beau- 
tifully colored ones, black storks, fish eagles, vultures, pelicans, ducks, white tick birds, 

(14) 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 15 

and many others whose names we did not know. We saw plenty of crocodiles, 
monkeys here and there in the trees, and large herds of antelopes on the plains. Our 
stops were at small trading posts, where the natives were eternally entertaining in 
their costumes, customs and actions. 

By railroad and lake steamer I reached and crossed Lake Tanganyika, one of the 
beautiful lakes of the world, long, deep and narrow, of clear blue color and surrounded 
by mountains, and travelled to Lake Victoria, where I embarked on another lake 
steamer for a two days' ride to Kisumu in Kenya Colony. For four days at this time 
I saw no other white woman, an experience I repeated for another four days from 
Jinja on Lake Victoria to Rijaf on the White Nile. These unfeminine bits were 
among the pleasantest of the whole journey. 

I marked time in Kenya and Uganda for a month after landing at Kisumu, stay- 
ing at Nairobi, Jinja and Kampala and taking two short motor trips. The first was 
a six-day safari into the Tanganyika game country to see what I could: ostrich, wart 
hogs, hyenas, jackals, plenty of giraffe, great herds of zebra, numberless kinds of 
gazelles, bucks and antelopes, all grazing and sporting peacefully on the great plains of 
the Rift Valley and Tanganyika. The other was to the Ruwenzori mountains, which 
disappointed me by veiling their heights in clouds. I consoled myself by going out to 
see elephants, pushing through the twelve-foot elephant grass with a white 'hunter and 
native tracker. To the chagrin of my guides, the elephants, though we could hear 
them calling and stamping in the distance, did not oome out from the thicket where 
they were hidden. I saw many elephants later, however, on the upper Nile. 

After leaving Uganda I felt as if Africa had been conquered, though there were 
still nearly three thousand miles of travel by rail, boat and lorry down the Nile, and 
they were far from the least interesting part of the trip. Slipping down through the 
Sudan through days of elephant grass and sudd followed by a long sandy stretch with 
occasional native towns and government posts; passing native villages with bazaars 
and markets ever changing with the character of the country but even more rude and 
primitive than those in Central Africa; viewing elephants and watching the eager 
sportsman trying to exterminate the "crocs"; and seeing with interest and delight the 
Sudanese native following witJh hoe and seed the Nile receding day by day, all gave a 
vivid sense of the sweep and variety of the mighty river and after eight days brought 
us to the confluence of the White and Blue Niles at Khartoum, whence it was an easy 
journey to Wadi Haifa, Assuan, Luxor and Cairo. 

The long and varied panorama that passed before me will leave as its lasting im- 
pression not a series of sights, not a list of things accomplished, but a sense of vast- 
ness, of rich possibility, of the world as it came from its Creator's hand, peopled by 
animals too wild to be ferocious and native men oppressed and bewildered by the 
overpowering white intruders but submissive and not unhappy under their control, 
with a handful of white men trying to mold it all to their own ideas and projects. 
In a dozen years the development of social and economic possibilities and transporta- 
tion facilities will 'have wrought great changes and I am glad to have seen Africa now 
before the direction of the future story of the great continent has been too clearly 
indicated. 



CLASSES HOLDING REUNIONS 



CLASS 


HEADQUARTERS 


1889 




1896 


Pembroke East 


1897 


Pembroke West 


1898 


Radnor 


1899 


Pembroke West 


1900 


Wyndham 


1916 


Rockefeller 


1917 


Merion 


1918 


Pembroke East 


1919 


Denbigh 


1927 


Rockefeller 


1928 


Radnor 



MANAGERS 



•Emma Linburg Tobin 
Mary M. Campbell 
Rebecca Foulke Cregar 
Emma Gufley Miller 
Helen MacCoy 
Rebecca Fordyce Gayton 
Natalie McFaden Blanton 
Evelyn Babbitt Hastings 
Gordon Woodbury Dunn 
Lucy T. Shoe 
Virginia Atmore 

All reuning classes are having Class Suppers or Class Picnics on Saturday eve- 
ning, June 1st, except 1889, who are to have a Class Luncheon at the Deanery on 
Tuesday, June 4th; 1899, wlho are having a Class Luncheon at the Inn and a Class 
Supper at Gertrude Ely's on Tuesday; and 1900, who are also having their Class 
Supper on Tuesday. 

The Classes of 1896, 1897, 1898, 1899 and 1900 are planning a Joint Luncheon 
on Monday, June 3rd; and the Classes of 1916, 1917, 1918 and 1919 are to have a 
picnic together at noon, and are giving later in the day a tea to those members of the 
Faculty who were in College during their undergraduate days. 

. The Alumnae Supper will be held on the evening of Monday, June 3rd. Emma 
Guffey Miller, 1899, (Mrs. Carroll Miller), is to be toastmistress. 

Baccalaureate Sermon will be preached in Goodhart Hall on Sunday evening, 
June 2nd, by Dr. Charles E. Park, Pastor of the First Church, Boston. 

Note. — One day has been dropped from Commencement Week, and therefore 
Garden Party is on Tuesday and Commencement on Wednesday. 

Commencement — Wednesday, June 5th, at 11 A. M. — The address' will be 
delivered by Ralph Adams Cram, consulting architect of the College. 



AN OPEN LETTER 

April 9, 1929. 
Dear Alumnae: 

The Fire Captains and the Executive Board of the Self-Government Association 
wish to draw your attention to the fact that smoking in the halls is permitted only 
in the smoking rooms and "show cases." In view of the presence of undergraduates 
during alumnae week, and of the severe fire risks, we know tihat you will co-ioperate 
with us, in abiding by this regulation. 
Sincerely, 
Nancy H. Woodward, Fire Captain, 

Olivia Phelps Stokes, President of Self-Government Association. 
(16) 



CLASS NOTES 



1892 
Class Editor: Edith Wetherill Ives 
(Mrs. Frederick M. Ives), 
145 East 35th Street, New York City. 

Helen Clements Kirk will spend the 
summer traveling with her 'husband, first 
to South America and then to Europe to 
attend dental conferences to which Dr. 
Kirk is a delegate. Their youngest daugh- 
ter, Barbara, now an undergraduate at 
Bryn Mawr, will accompany ihem. 

Helen Robins writes from Siena, March 
3d: "I have no official news for you, as 
my life here is too simple to chronicle 
for such a 'best seller' as the Alumnae 
Bulletin. As a housekeeper you might 
appreciate my domestic experiences — 
most of my traveling friends refuse to 
recognize me in my new occupation and 
to take me seriously in it. They write 
me cordially from all corners of Italy, 
'Now do close the house and come here 
to spend a week with me,' but they never 
suggest what I should do with the cook 
who, I have to assure them, is as precious 
in Siena as at home. I speak feelingly, 
having recently made a change. During 
the interregnum I did close the house and 
go to visit friends in Fiesole, and there I 
was overtaken by the heavy snowstorm 
which amazed all Italy last month, and 
was 'snow bound' for several days. You 
cannot think how odd it was to look down 
on Florence snow covered, with the Arno 
frozen. The cold was intense. I am 
glad to say that it is a little milder now, 
though still very cold. Of course, I have 
time for much more than housekeeping — 
there is a great deal to read in Italian, 
and friends at home have been most 
thoughtful about sending me books, and I 
get the Sunday editions of the New York 
Times and the Philadelphia Ledger, so 
you see I always know the worst !" 

The editor considers this distinctly 
worthy of a best seller. 

1898 

Class Editor: Edith Schoff Boericke 
(Mrs. John J. Boericke), 
Merion Station, Pa. 
31st REUNION IN JUNE, 1929 
Please come, everybody ! Our reunion 
will open with Marion Park's dinner for 
us at her house on Saturday evening, June 
1st, at 7 o'clock; and there will be many 
interesting and delightful gatherings dur- 
ing the three or four days following. 
Please send word to Rebecca Foulke Cre- 
gar (Mrs. Ninian Cregar) whether you 
will come, and bring or send photographs 



of yourselves, your husbands, and your 
children. If you cannot come, Rebecca 
will be personally responsible for the 
photographs, and return them after the 
reunion. You will receive more details 
later. Please come ! 

'98 will be very sorry to hear that Mrs. 
Henry Gannett, Alice's mother, died on 
February 6th, nearly 79 years old. She 
was keen mentally and retained her vivid 
interest in people and movements till the 
end. Although she came to Cleveland 
when she was over 65, she made a real 
place for herself there. Alice was in 
Mexico last July with the Hubert Herring 
Seminar and had a most interesting time. 

Helen Holman Durham's 21-year-old 
son is now established in his niche of the 
business world, and her daughter expects 
to enter Bryn Mawr in the fall. 

Mary Bookstaver Knoblauch and her 
husband have just returned from a trip 
to Africa, "where donkeys and women 
are much worse off than they are here." 

Hannah Carpenter is taking painting 
lessons in Boston, and rinding the process 
full of joy. 

Anna Fry is President of the Girls' 
Friendly Society in the Diocese of Massa- 
chusetts, and is very busy. 

Blanche Harnish Stein has a grand- 
daughter, Priscilla Ann Stein, born June 
26, 1928, in Toledo, Ohio. 

Annie Beals Parker's daughter is to be 
married on June 14th. 

Anna Dean Wilbur has a son and a 
daughter married, and also has a grand- 
child. 

Martha Tracy, formerly at Hannah 
Penn House, 17th and Locust Streets, 
Philadelphia, Pa., has moved to Alden 
Park Manor, Germantown, where her sis- 
ter Emily is living with her. 

Edith Schoff Boericke and her husband 
and daughter went on the North Cape 
cruise last summer, visiting Iceland, Nor- 
way, Sweden, Esthonia, Finland, Den- 
mark, and completing the trip with 18 
days in England, Scotland and Wales. 

"18 Hesketh Street, Chevy Chase, Md. 

"April 1, 1929. 
"My dear Edith: 

"Your letter must have come some time 
ago, if the date is right, and should have 
been answered, but seven months of loaf- 
ing seems to have made me lazy. Last 
July I started off on a wide swing around 
this country, determined to see all of my 
widely separated friends, lots of scenery 
and some cities. I went first to Wilmette, 



(17) 



IS 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



111., where I spent a week in getting fa- 
miliar with that corner of Lake Superior, 
and then went to a little place in Wiscon- 
sin on a lovely chain of five lakes for 
another week. Heat pursued me -and I 
crossed the Rockies on an open observa- 
tion car, in a temperature of 98, with 
snowy peaks all around to mock our mis- 
ery. Three days in Vancouver was 
enough, and I took the boat for Victoria, 
which is a most lovely island. I see the 
typewriter has made me forget Lake 
Louise, where I spent four days in per- 
fect peace, just watching the glacier and 
the lake. 

"Victoria is a heaven for gardeners, 
and the hotel has a fine garden of its own, 
where I decided to stay when the papers 
recorded a temperature of 112 in Seattle, 
my next stop. So I spent several lazy 
days in looking at fiords, fisheries and 
flowers, before going on. There were so 
many forest fires near Seattle that Mt. 
Rainier wasn't even a ghost, and I could 
only make the trip around Mt. Hood and 
up the Columbia River, before I went on 
to San Francisco, where I spent several 
days shivering blissfully, and enjoying a 
visit with Elizabeth Lyders. Then I 
struck east to Nevada, where I spent 
three weeks with my sister, broiling by 
day and freezing by night. Then back to 
San Francisco, where my son met me, 
and we went on together after seeing the 
sights there. He was much interested in 
following the trail of the old Missions, 
and so we visited them all down the coast, 
ending at San Diego, with a quick run- 
over to Tia Juana, where we did not 
gamble or get drunk ! A cousin and sev- 
eral friends in San Diego made our stay 
very pleasant, and the hotels all along the 
coast are very comfortable. In Los An- 
geles, Florence Vickers, '98, showed us 
everything there was to be seen, and we 
spent one afternoon in trying to locate 
Katherine Bunnell, but had to give it up 
in the end. I was very much shocked to 
learn, in January, that Florence Vickers 
had died in her sleep. 

"From Los Angeles we went to the 
Grand Canyon, Albuquerque, El Paso, 
and to the ranch which we still hold in 
Texas. We covered in four hours, by car, 
the trail which took my grandfather two 
weeks, sixty years ago. From Dallas I 
came on home and the boy stopped in 
New Orleans and Chattanooga. I found 
my husband determined to have a real 
vacation, and after discussing various 
plans we decided on Spain and Morocco, 
and in just three weeks, having got my 
house in order so that three boys could 



live in it while we were away, we sailed 
October 26 for Cadiz. After a week in 
Granada and Malaga, we crossed to Tan- 
gier, and so to French Morocco, where I 
wish that we had stayed, for it is a most 
wonderful and exciting land and also a 
fine climate. We saw Rabat, Casa, Mara- 
kesch, Meknes Volubulis, Moulay Idris 
and Fez, the Atlas, the Riff, and the 
desert, to say nothing of camels, donkeys, 
palms, Arabs, and Roman ruins, and were 
entertained by an Arab in very fine native 
house, with dinner and Arab tea, and al- 
together had the time of our lives. We 
should have stayed in Morocco, but hav- 
ing made our plans to see Spain, we felt 
bound to do so, and spent two months in 
cold and misery, slightly alleviated by 
what we saw, but not much. A week in 
Majorca was a bright spot in the gloom, 
and we shed our winter coats, at least at 
night, when we went to bed, which we 
could never do in Spain ! Spain is a very 
rough land and the scenery was very fine, 
if you could only stop shivering long 
enough to enjoy it. We couldn't. We 
sailed from Barcelona December 26, and 
had a peaceful time as far as Cadiz, stop- 
ping at Valencia on the way. 

"We sailed out of Cadiz harbor in the 
teeth of a westerly gale, and, except that 
the direction of the wind changed from 
time to time, we kept that gale till we 
landed in New York thirteen days later. 
As I am one of those fortunate people 
who never get sick ( ?), I was so bruised 
and beaten that the bruises were two and 
three deep in places. 

"Well, it's all over now, and I am very 
busy gardening, and have begun to think 
with pleasure of the trip. However, I 
feel that I should like to stay at home for 
a while, and so have not made up my 
mind about the reunion. This is a very 
long letter and, being new at it, Fve typed 
it very badly, but anything is better than 
my long hand. 

"Very sincerely, 
"Elizabeth Holstein Buckingham." 

1899 

March 27th, 1929. 
Dear Mollie: 

Reunion plans are coming on apace, 
and everything looks fine for the very 
best reunion of the very finest class" in 
June. 

Presently every member will receive a 
letter with full "explanationments" con- 
cerning the time, the place and the attrac- 
tions, so that none need make the mistake 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



of going back to college next year instead 
of this. 

The reunion committee consists of May 
No. 1, May No. 2, Elsie, Katie Mid, 
Callie, Alice, Madeline, Gertrude, and 
Peckham. Now if the Alumna who com- 
plains to the Bulletin periodically about 
not liking first names or nicknames used 
in the class notes will only consult the 
new Register, she can find out exactly 
who the above-mentioned are, as this Reg- 
ister is a Bryn Mawr encyclopaedia, di- 
rectory and Who's Who all in one. 

How is the new grandson progressing 
and has his mother snatched any more 
high credits in her Harvard graduate 
course? We all expect this child to be a 
college president, at least. 

'99 still keeps going forward, so if it 
isn't one of ours, it is one of us who gets 
big headlines. 

The latest is Callie, who after ten years 
as fashion and advertising manager for 
the Mallinson Silk Company, has gone 
into business for herself. She has formed 
a partnership with Virginia Chandler 
Hall, under the name of Lewis and Hall, 
as stylist experts. They will furnish man- 
ufacturers, advertising agents and all 
comers with the latest ideas as to style, 
fabrics, colors, merchandising and dec- 
oration, giving advance information direct 
from the continent, with which they are 
in constant touch by frequent trips and 
cable. They will plan and direct fashion 
shows, lectures and displays, and offer a 
continuous fashion service in all lines. 

This is such a new and wonderful idea 
that the staid New York Evening Post 
devoted almost a page to our enterprising 
Callie and her new partner. 

'99 has always felt a bit fearful about 
its wearing apparel when Callie was 
around, but this year we must come to 
reunion not only with the proper raiment, 
but the exact color as to age, figure, and 
pocketbook. Why not have Callie judge 
us, and the most perfectly dressed will re- 
ceive a handsome prize, which this firm 
of fashion experts should donate. That 
idea, I know, will be worth a lot of money 
to them. Well, knowing Callie's success 
in her past positions, it is a safe bet she 
will make good in this new venture. 

A bit of news from Margaret Hall via 
a postcard to Peckham has just come to 
light. When last heard from Margaret 
was in Egypt, and in Cairo had met Miss 
Thomas. Margaret did not mention what 
they had talked about, but I know it had 
to do with the Elder Edda. 

I do hope Margaret and Marion and 
all other traveling '99ers will be home by 



June. The tombs of the French kings and 
the Pharaohs will keep, while our thirtieth 
reunion will not. 

How much money did you receive from 
your last appeal for our reunion gift? 
Had two replies from the eight letters I 
wrote, but both gave generously, so am 
hoping the others will do likewise. If 
only all the class realized the beauty of 
the curtain as well as the need for pay- 
ment, I know we should have on over- 
subscription. Now what is your idea of 
making the tardy ones see it? 

Yours as always for "the very finest 
class." 

GUFFEY, 

Chairman. 

Framingham Centre, Mass. 
April 5, 1929. 
Dear Guff: 

Glad to receive your letter and know 
reunion plans are perfected. Won't it be 
great ? 

Sorry I have not been able to do more, 
but am so busy with all my adorable 
grandchildren that I can think of little 
else, but I'll be on hand for reunion and 
look forward to having a big crowd back. 

Won't it be fun comparing notes, but 
especially grandchildren, or am I the only 
grandmother? 

I have no idea how much my tardy list 
sent in, as I told them to send their 
pledges direct to the Alumnae office, but 
if you will send me the names of those 
not heard from, I'll try my best persuasive 
powers. 

By the way, Mary Churchill need no 
longer be considered among the "address 
unknown" group ; she is living in Newark, 
New Jersey. I'll try to persuade her to 
come back to reunion, as I do not think 
she has ever been back since we left, and 
she should see us once again, if only to 
see how much most of us have improved. 

Isn't Callie a marvel. Think what the 
rest of '99 might be if we all had her 
ability and "pep." 

I hear Dorothy's daughter is studying 
at the American Laboratory Theatre 
School in New York and that Edith Cha- 
pin's son is preparing for the concert 
stage. 

Plenty of ability in the younger gen- 
eration ! 

Now let me know what more you want 
me to do, provided I can do it. And 
here's hoping for the best reunion ever 
for dear old '99. 

As ever, 

» Moll. 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



1900 
Class Editor: Helen MacCoy, 
Haverford, Penna. 

The superb Spring Opening of the 
Class of 1900 will be held June 1-5 of this 
year at Wyndham, and all over the cam- 
pus in general. We are very young and 
sprightly, and expect to have a "wild 
time." Let us now most fervently wel- 
come our Seniors, Juniors and Sopho- 
mores to help us celebrate. Can it be 
thirty-two years since we parted with ex- 
citement and exertion, "helping" '97 in 
their last obsequies of tree planting, and 
sang mournfully as if it were the end of 
the world? And is it all that time since 
the most bloody cap and gown "rush" 
nearly estranged '99 from us forever? 
No — it just isn't all those years ago — 32 
last fall — since dear '98 gave us a political 
rally with peanuts and a hurdy gurdy and 
Marion Park "being" the silver tongued 
orator from his home beside the Platte, 
haranguing us for free silver. 

It is a joyous thought that we can 
still meet on that very campus and con- 
jure up those funny young selves. 

And so — until June ! 

1904 
Class Editor: Emma O. Thompson, 
320 South 42nd Street, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Peggy Hulse, the first 1904 daughter 
to graduate from Bryn Mawr, is doing 
graduate work in History at Columbia. 

1905 
Class Editor pro tern: Edith H. Ashley, 
242 East 19th Street, New York City. 

Helen Kempton is sailing the end of 
March for a three months' European trip. 

Frances Hubbard Flaherty is working 
with her husband in Santa Fe, New Mex- 
ico, on motion pictures of Pueblo Indian 
life. 

Carla Denison Swan writes: "I don't 
know of any news that would (or should, 
it seems to me) interest the class more 
than the fact that our class baby, Carla, 
Jr., is to be graduated from B. M. C. in 
June ! Now laugh that off, those of us 
who are still feeling youngish. Of course, 
I am going on to give her the glad hand 
and I hope that there will be many of 
her 1905 aunts to join me on that festive 
occasion in Goodhart. Think of our Stu- 
dent Building that we worked so hard 
for with grocery shops, etc., being done 
at last in time to launch our child into 
the world. As ever, Curly Swan." 

Anna Allison McCoy has written that 
her mother, who, Anna says, was always 



an interested reader of 1905's class notes, 
died on January 25th, 1929. I am sure all 
1905 extends sympathy to Anna in her 
loss. 

Edith Longstreth Wood. A postal from 
Edith says : "Having been abroad travel- 
ing since June, 1928, I had planned to 
spend the winter months working at 
painting in Paris, but soon after arriv- 
ing there the 'flu' appeared and that pre- 
cious time has gone in the American Hos- 
pital and recuperating, mostly without 
winter sports, in Switzerland, and now, in 
March, we start home, tail between legs." 

Nathalie Fairbanks Bell is president of 
the Vocational Society for Shut-Ins in 
Chicago. During the evenings she is busy 
at present in rehearsing a revival of "The 
Old Homestead" with a mixed quartette 
of farmers and haymakers ! 

1906 
Class Editor: Mrs. Edward Sturdevant, 
215 Augur Ave., Fort Leavenworth. 

Alice Colgan Boomsliter spent her last 
summer vacation building two apartments 
which the tenants have pronounced the 
most desirable in Morgantown. Her old- 
est girl, Alice, has won a scholarship at 
Mt. Holyoke, and hopes to go there next 
year. Peggy is a junior in High School, 
with an eye on Bryn Mawr and a law 
course. Paul, aged thirteen, fiddles and 
reads. Alice herself is educational secre- 
tary for the Council of Social Agencies 
and handles the publicity for the League 
of Women Voters. Ida Garrett Murphy 
and Helen Wyeth Pierce visited her last 
June. 

Phoebe Crosby Allnutt spent two 
months in Paris the summer before last, 
and two weeks in New Hampshire last 
summer. Her latest interest is a Nursery 
School in which the youngest pupil is 
fourteen months ! She does not think, 
however, that everyone of that age should 
go to school. 

Lucia Ford Rutter is still enjoying hef 
lovely place, Pine Forge. 

Ida Garrett Murphy has been chairman 
of her Township League of Women 
Voters, her chief additional problems be- 
ing concerned with feeding, clothing and 
educating the young. Her two older chil- 
dren were at camps in Maine last sum- 
mer, and it was during this intermission 
that she took her youngest and Helen 
Wyeth Pierce and motored to West Vir- 
ginia, where she found "the worst roads 
and the most beautiful mountain scenery 
in the country." 

Beth Harrington Brooks spent Wash- 
ington's Birthday in Maine with a house 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



21 



party of thirty, parents and children. The 
snow was three feet deep, ideal for ski- 
ing and snowshoeing. Her oldest boy is 
at Milton Academy, the other children at 
Shady Hill School in Cambridge. She 
had the pleasure of taking Irma Kings- 
bacher Stix over Shady Hill and Beaver 
Country Day School, and found her ex- 
tremely well informed on Progressive Ed- 
ucation. 

Helen Haughwout Putnam's Bill is a 
freshman at Harvard. Much as he en- 
joyed his winter at Oxford, there is no 
college like Harvard. 

Jessie Hewitt spends her summers 
usually at Marblehead, but last summer 
she motored through England, Scotland 
and Wales, and this summer she is going 
to California. 

Helen Jones Williams writes that her 
chief occupation at present is keeping 
pace with a very active 6-year-old daugh- 
ter. Anne Long Flanagan paid her a sur- 
prise visit last summer. Anne has a new 
home in Cynwyd, where she is very 
happy. 

Though she considers it "too trivial to 
print," it seems unlikely that Josephine 
Katzenstein Blancke's classmates will 
agree with her when they hear that her 
latest adventure was with a burglar who 
entered her room at 4 A. M. and stole 
her engagement ring; she saw him and 
heard him "leap from the second floor to 
the first like a cat." 

See what a splendid budget is here, 
1906. Keep it up! 

1908 
Class Editor: Margaret Copeland 

B LATCH FORD 

(Mrs. Nathaniel H. Blatchford), 

844 Auburn Road, 

Hubbard Woods, 111. 
1908 will be proud to hear of the very 
fine book written by two of its members, 
Tracy Mygatt and Frances Witherspoon. 
The book is called "The Glorious Com- 
pany of the Apostles" and contains strik- 
ing biographies of the Twelve Apostles 
and St. Paul. The Washington Post de- 
clares "The world had to wait nearly 
2000 years to get a readable account of 
the lives of the Apostles. Such a book 
is now available in The Glorious Com- 
pany.' " The New York Times also de- 
votes a long article to description of the 
book, calling it a "resurrection of the 
luminous dead." 

Marjorie Young Gifford gave two very 
interesting lectures in March at the New 
York Bryn Mawr Club. Her subject was 
"Human Material in Current Fiction" and 



was a review of present-day "best sellers,' 
native and foreign, stressing the enor- 
mous vitality expressed in fiction today. 
It makes those of us who could not hear 
her very envious to read the account of 
one of our classmates who enjoyed "not 
only the subject matter," but "just look- 
ing at Marjorie and hearing her lovely 
voice and accent." 

Molly Kingsley Best reports herself as 
not doing anything important enough for 
the Bulletin, but I know her friends are 
all interested to hear that she is "doing 
a little club work, a little school work, a 
little writing, a little housework, quite a 
bit of homemaking, but nothing wonder- 
ful, alas; my doctor husband and three 
boys keep me occupied." 

1910 
Class Editor: Emily Storer, 

Beaver Street, Waltham, Mass. 

I have been in Washington all winter 
and hoped that some of the class would 
turn up for the Inauguration at least. 

I hear that Janet did come on for it — 
also from a big scientist that Janet is 
famous and that her book on "Lighting 
and Public Health" is used extensively, 
also that her ultra-violet light experi- 
ments on white mice at Johns Hopkins 
are making her more famous. 

The last news about Charlotte was that 
young Mattie had the measles, and there 
were four others to go. She had never 
had them herself, the oil burner had 
burst, and the cook had to have an opera- 
tion ! Charlotte always does things thor- 
oughly. Her address is South Dartmouth, 
Mass. 

Florence Wilbur Wyckoff writes from 
810 Ashland Ave., Niagara Falls, that 
her five children range from ten to two, 
and take most of her time and strength. 
The two oldest are swimming in the 
Y. W. C. A. and learning to skate on ice. 
The third had a hernia operation . . . 
"My husband is much interested in the 
higher education for foremen in industry 
and teaches seA-eral groups at the Y. M. 
C. A., etc., though his regular job is a 
metallurgical engineer. We have a splen- 
did Women's College Club here with 
monthly meetings, social and educational. 
There are three Bryn Mawr members." 

Kate Rotan Drinker writes: "Dull news 
this time, Emily. A winter in bed, with 
a tonsilectomy thrown in, as prelude to 
a spinal fixation operation in early Feb- 
ruary. Then more bed, and still more, 
this time with a plaster cast to vary the 
monotony. Which brings the story up to 
date. But I am now promised, if I wait 



22 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



long enough and patiently enough, a fool- 
proof back — so here's hoping" ! Mean- 
while, affectionate greetings to 1910." We 
are dreadfully sorry to hear Kate's news 
and are living in hopes of the speedy 
arrival of her fool-proof back. 

1911 
Class Editor: Louise S. Russell, 

140 East 52 Street, New York City. 

Dorothy Coffin Greeley has a daughter, 
Dorothy, born on January 30. Dorothy 
has been very ill with a ruptured appen- 
dix which had to be removed, but is now 
better. 

Helen Henderson Greene writes that 
she and her whole family were quite sick 
with bronchitis for several weeks shortly 
after Christmas. They recovered in time 
to move to Atlanta the last of January, 
and then Helen had an attack of toxemia, 
which she is just getting over. Her ad- 
dress is 36 South Prado-Ansley Park, 
Atlanta, Georgia. 

1912 
Class Editor: Catharine Thompson 
Bell (Mrs. C. Kenneth Bell), 
2700 Detroit Blvd., Detroit, Mich. 

Agnes Morrow is "helping to run the 
most famous rural health organization in 
the country" — name not specified. But 
it's in Monmouth County which Agnes 
covers pretty thoroughly in her car. Out- 
side of business, she enjoys the ocean and 
her famous Devil dog. Since her hard- 
est work, of course, comes in summer, 
she is taking her vacation now and has 
skipped oft" on a twenty-three day cruise 
to the less-known West Indies, ending up 
at Trinidad. 

Margaret Fabian Saunders and her 
husband are spending the winter in 
Kingston. At Christmas came a vacation 
trip to Evanston where, says Poky, "we 
were fortunate enough to be able to adopt 
a tiny little boy from 'The Cradle.' " 
Poky warns of parental prejudice but I'm 
sure one can take as fact her further 
report that young William Benton "is 
growing beautifully and becoming quite 
handsome." 

Rebecca Lewis has just completed her 
M.A. at Columbia. Her thesis, I have 
gleaned, was on "Maurice Sceve, the head 
of the Lyonese School in the Sixteenth 
Century. He was a most erudite poet 
who wrote in symbols and allegory" an.d 
our Rebecca connected him up with mod- 
ern French symbolism. Honest congratu- 
lations are due for it's been an immense 
amount of work snatched from her press- 
ing household cares. 



1913 

Class Editor: Betty Fabian Webster 
(Mrs. Ronald Webster), 
905 Greenwood St., Evanston, 111. 
The class wishes to express through 
the Bulletin its sympathy with Helen 
Wilson Cresson in the death of her 
father, Mr. Coffin Colbert Wilson, on 
January 23rd. Mr. Wilson was president 
of the Philadelphia, Germantown, and 
Norristown railroad. 

1916 
Class Editor: Catherine S. Godley, 
768 Ridgeway Avenue, Avondale, 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Dear 1916: 

Who is ready for our (technical) 15th 
Reunion this June? All who can and 
have not sent in a contribution for our 
Reunion Gift, please do so — send it to 
Helen Riegel Oliver and she will be more 
than grateful. Next, watch for notices 
about Reunion that will appear shortly 
and answer promptly. Let's make it a 
large and hilarious get-together for we 
won't have another chance for another 
five years. Will see you all soon. 

Your same Con. 

Georgette Moses Gell and her husband 
sailed for England the latter part of De- 
cember and arrived in London just in 
time for the coldest weather that had 
been had in forty years. They expect to 
stay there until the middle of April and 
then go to Paris, Berlin and Vienna, 
reaching their goal, Zagreb, Jugoslavia, 
sometime this summer. Georgette writes : 
"I am quite thrilled with the idea of going- 
there as it offers such opportunity for 
colorful peasant life and I am sure I 
shall find plenty to inspire me to paint." 
While in London they are spending week- 
ends at such places of great interest as 
Cambridge, Oxford, and Stratford. 

Agnes Grabau has adopted a little girl 
nine months old. These are sparse facts 
but the best the class editor could do. 

Dorothy Packard Holt put in a 
wretched winter with that arch enemy, 
the flu. Her husband, two children and 
the maid, all had it at once just before 
Christmas. Early in January Caroline 
and Jane came down with a second and 
severe attack and Dot followed them, 
barely escaping pneumonia. But Dot 
writes in cheerful vein and expresses the 
hope that she will be at Reunion. 

Margaret Russell Kellen's two little 
girls had scarlet fever in March, the re- 
sult of an epidemic in Plymouth. For- 
tunately the cases were light. 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



23 



1917 
Class Editor: Isabella Stevenson Dia- 
mond, 1621 T Street, N. W. 
Washington, D. C. 
Alice Beardwood writes from 8, Nor- 
ham Road, Oxford, England, that she 
has been working there at the University 
for the past two years at mediaeval his- 
tory. She returns to America this sum- 
mer, but she's afraid she will not be in 
time for our reunion. 

Dear 1917: 

It is very exciting to be your reunion 
manager. It makes events of the post- 
man's visits, for he often now has letters 
for me from friends of the long ago who 
haven't been any more faithful in writing 
than I have. More than that, the letters 
often say the writer will meet me on the 
campus on the first day of June, and when 
they say that, the day is utterly made. I 
am quoting from some of these letters 
for you. 

Con: — "I've just come up from Sicily, 
where we drove all about the island to 
all the Greek temples, where the almond 
trees were in bloom and calendulas and 
narcissi were thick along the roadside." 

Dooles : — "The fact that you actually 
knew my address touched me to the point 
of answering your note of this morning. 
I shall try to get hold of my photographs 
of 1917 for the dinner. I should like to 
ask the class here for tea. Bryn Mawr 
is a dream of beauty just now." 

Caroline : — "Was so glad to get the re- 
union letter and I surely am coming. I'll 
do anything I can to help you, and am 
all enthusiastic." 

Hel: — "I expect I'd better accept the 
costume job to square myself for my de- 
lay in answering your letter in the hope 
that Eloise and Hildegarde and Ruth can 
help in the construction. Here at Kings- 
ley House we put on our annual May 
Day Festival on May 18th, several hun- 
dred to be costumed by that date, and 
when it is over I shall be costume mad." 

Romaine : — "This is to let you you know 
that Evy Randall and I are going to be 
rash enough to go back to reunion. As 
we have not been back since 1915, we 
are feeling a little timid about it." 

Fran Curtin: — "I shall certainly be 
there, and it will be marvelous to see you 
all again." 

Scat: — "I am saving the dates and 
looking forward. Cheerio." 

Hodge : — "Always providing that Moth- 
er can take the tribe for the first week 
in June, I shall be at reunion with bells 



Olga: — "This is to accept your invita- 
tion to reunion. I am quite sure it will 
be a fine one, and I am looking forward 
to it." 

Con Wilcox : — "We really do happen to 
plan to be in America just about the time 
of reunion, and I hope I'll be able to 
come. I am bringing over my baby daugh- 
ter (aged one year) and my Italian sister- 
in-law is coming with us this time, so 
complete with British nurse we make 
quite a varied caravan. Do not be 
alarmed — I shall come alone to reunion !" 

Anne Davis, Louise Collins (who is 
on her way home from Pernambuco, 
where her husband is U. S. Consul), Dor- 
othy MacDonald, Greenie, Thale, Dor 
Shipley are all coming, and I hope a great 
many more who have not yet written. 
The great day is almost upon us, so hurry 
up and say you will be with us, all of you 
Ten-o-'Clock Scholars. 'Come with a 
whoop, come with a call, come with a 
good will,' says Mother Goose. In the 
old days, before I was a mother, I would 
have said, 'Go on, mighty Seventeen, we'll 
never give way, the Red is on the war- 
path for glory today.' The spirit is the 
same, though the words are different ! 

Affectionately your friend, 

Nats. 

1918 
Class Editor: Helen Walker, 

5516 Everett Ave., Chicago. 
Dear Helen: 

Your card asking for my news reached 
me in Singapore and I am only too 
pleased to say hello to '18. But where to 
start? I seem to be in more or less of 
a travel daze, but it would appear that 
I am on my way around the world and 
that I have almost reached the last lap. 
All of which isn't so vague as I feel ! 

In other words I was never made to 
be a tourist. The past month or so I have 
turned into one; the first part of the trip 
was more leisurely inasmuch as I settled 
down quite blissfully and enjoyed myself. 
But since leaving the Philippines life has 
been pretty much of a rush. A week for 
China — breath ! A few clays for French 
Indo-China — breath ! breath ! Four days 
in Singapore — Sniff! Snort! On to 
India, Colombo, and now a bit of Africa. 
Tonight I motor from Suez across the 
moonlit desert to Cairo ; tomorrow the 
pyramids and Sphinx. More rush . . . 
to the train, catch this same boat at Port 
Said. Now you have my pitiful tale. 

Have had some entertaining adven- 
tures. I think '18 would have been 
amused when I broke into the palace of 



24 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



H. H. the Sultan of Johorc while the 
armed guards marched below innocent as 
babes. Since robbery was not my motive 
I probably should have escaped the guil- 
lotine had I been caught and got off with 
life imprisonment. A disappointing ad- 
venture . . . saw not a single member of 
the harem. Good Queen Victoria's photo- 
graph sat on a table and there were dance 
cards proclaiming that "I Want to be 
Alone with Mary Brown," and "My In- 
spiration is You" were to be played that 
night. We hear the Sulton wants to go 
to America next month. Beware ! 

As there probably isn't room for even 
this much chatter I'd better say farewell, 
but it does seem a shame not to mention 
the monkeys that came toppling out of 
the trees in Singapore, the tiger cubs I 
played with near Siam, the good time I 
had in Borneo, and the fact that some 
day I simply must go back to India where 
there are butlers, sweepers and dog boys 
to be had for the proverbial song, and 
where tales of tigers and elephants — to 
say nothing of cobras and spooks — arc 
washed down with the morning coffee. 
But best of all, I'm looking forward to 
seeing THE CLASS at reunion. 

With all sorts of good luck and in 
anticipation for our bang-up celebration 
in June, 

Helen Alexander. 

P. S. — Congratulations to '18 on buying 
the lamps for the Common room ! 

1919 
Class Editor: Mary Morris Ramsay 

Phelps (Mrs. William Eliott Phelps), 
Guyencourt, Delaware. 

Dorothy Peters Eis and her husband 
and children have been in Olean Springs, 
Mississippi, since December. They are 
motoring home to Michigan by way of 
Florida. 

1920 
Class Editor: Mary Hardy, 

518 Cathedral Street, Baltimore, Md. 

K. Cauldwell Scott has a second daugh- 
ter, Janet McPherson, who was born on 
October 8th, at Nyack amid a "domestic 
revolution." For, K. writes, she was try- 
ing to move down from Buffalo, find a 
house to live in, collect all her furniture 
from Mexico, Canada, New York, Balti- 
more, Nyack and Buffalo, when Janet 
arrived to interrupt things a good deal. 
The Scotts are now settled, more or less 
permanently, at 6 Corsa Terrace, Ridge- 
wood, New Jersey. 

Dorothy Rogers Lyman and her hus- 
band, after a sojourn in Florida, have 



returned to New York, where Dr. Lyman 
has opened his office for the practice of 
Medicine, at 114 East 54th Street. 

A good long letter from Virginia Park 
Shook brought news of herself and her 
two sons. The elder, Jack, will be six in 
May, and Dick will be five in June. So 
sorry the cunning snap-shot of Ginger 
and the boys can't be reproduced. No one 
would have any trouble identifying them 
as Ginger's sons ! 

Mary Hoag Lawrence writes that they 
still live in Groton, in the same house 
they first moved into five years ago. 
Mary's "extra-domesticity" occupations 
sound very strenuous. She is President 
of the Groton Woman's Club, a club of 
two hundred women of all creeds and 
classes, and she is also a Trustee of the 
Lowthorpe School of Landscape Archi- 
tecture. 

Martha Chase, Mary Hoag writes, is 
enthralled by a course in Interior Decor- 
ating, which she is studying in Boston 
this year. 

1921 
Class Editor: Mrs. J. E. Rogers, 
99 Poplar Plains Road, 
Toronto, Ont, Canada. 

The members of the Class of 1921 wish 
to extend their sincere sympathy to 
Eleanor Donnelley Erdman, whose father, 
Mr. R. H. Donnelley, died on February 
25, 1929. 

Kash Woodward, M.D., opened her of- 
fice in Worcester last November. We 
are proud of our practicing classmate and 
wish her great success as a child special- 
ist. She writes that her chief hobby is 
singing (much to the regret of the neigh- 
bors), and that she gets her exercise 
riding around in her Ford, playing golf, 
tennis, basketball, and by skiing. Our 
swimming star underlines the fact that 
she never swims anymore. 

Mary Baldwin Goddard has entered the 
ranks of those interested in Nursery 
Schools. She plans to send her 16 months 
old daughter, Mary Frances, to one this 
fall. When visiting at the Home School, 
Mary was told that Priscilla Bradford 
was an extremely bright child. Three 
cheers for 1921's class baby. Mary moved 
her household five times last year and is 
looking forward to a year abroad as soon 
as her present lease is up. 

Jane Brown has a job in the Spring- 
field Welfare Association as Visitor. Her 
last vacation she went to England for a 
while, then on to Paris where she at- 
tended the International Conference of 
Social Work. 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



25 



Laura Ward Sweany, whose -husband is 
a Graduate of West Point, has moved 
from Fort Sill, Okla., to Schoficld Bar- 
racks, Hawaii. Before sailing Laura and 
family spent three months motoring on 
to New York, then west again to Wash- 
ington State and California. Laura has 
a three-year-old daughter, Jean Carol, 
but finds time to play tennis, golf, swim, 
to weave on a hand loom and to paint 
portraits. 

Katharine Ward was married July 25, 
1928, to Robert Seitz, Yale, 1919. She 
is living in New Haven and teaching at 
Miss Foote's School. 

Aileen Weston has a job as Volunteer 
Secretary for the League of Nations As- 
sociation. She is studying French and 
Spanish on the side. 

Cecile Bolton Hewson is teaching Gen- 
eral Mathematics at the Charlottesville 
High School which is a practice school 
for the University, and making a statis- 
tical study of transfer of training in High 
School subjects. She also works in her 
garden, plays golf, hunts partridges, and 
trains dogs. 

Elizabeth Mills Persem lives in Buffalo 
in the winters and Geneva, N. Y., in the 
summers. She has seven dogs and spends 
her spare time exercising them. 

Jean Flexner is trying the experiment 
of keeping her maiden name. At present 
she has two part-time jobs; teaching 
Economics at Ohio State University, and 
doing research on population problems. 
The latter involves excursions into the 
field of birth rates, primitive religions, 
mythology, and future fuel supplies. Jean 
completed all the requirements for her 
Ph.D. at the Robert Brookings School in 
Washington. Her husband, Paul Lewin- 
son, got his degree there two years ago 
and has just been awarded a Social Sci- 
ence Research Fellowship on which he 
plans to complete a book called "Race, 
Class and Party," a history of negro suf- 
frage and white politics in the South. 
Jean and her husband go in for scientific 
housekeeping and are prepared to give 
half hour courses on Economic Interior 
Decorating and Marketing. In their home 
they offer a choice or a mixture of Ger- 
man, Armenian, Italian and French 
cooking. Their vacations are spent camp- 
ing with tent, canoe, and typewriter as 
equipment. 

Helen Rubel has a job observing at the 
Aubrey Nursery School at Germantown. 
Her spare time is used in reading and 
traveling. 

Flossy Billstein Whitman has a 22 
months old daughter, Eleanor Lee, who 



is already attending a nursery school in 
Cambridge, Mass. Flossy is interested in 
corrective training for cross-eyed chil- 
dren and is getting exercise by gardening. 

Elizabeth Matteson Farnsworth writes 
a newsy letter of her doings. She went 
to England in 1927 on her honeymoon, 
caught flu on the homeward trip and had 
to be removed from the steamer via 
stretcher and ambulance. She is living 
in Providence in a house of her own, has 
a 9 months old son who is being brought 
up scientifically and is getting her exer- 
cise by running up and down stairs. Her 
husband is in the cotton cloth business 
and is keenly interested in amateur dra- 
matics as is Matt herself. 

Frances Jones Tytus lives in Columbus, 
Ohio, and spends her vacations in Florida 
and Michigan. She is keen about horses 
and rides and jumps them all year round. 
Her other hobbies are golf and bridge. 
She has two boys and one girl ; John 7, 
Alice Joan 4, and William l l / 2 years old. 

Roxanna Murphy Beebe-Center is liv- 
ing in Cambridge, Mass. Her husband 
got his A.B. and Ph.D. from Harvard 
and writes books which Roxanna types 
for him. She is also doing some experi- 
menting in Psychology. 

Mary McClennen Knollenberg is living 
in New York City. She has a 4-year-old 
son named Bernhard Walter. Her vaca- 
tions are spent in Europe or on Cape 
Cod. In her spare time she indulges in 
dancing. 

Biffy Worcester Stevenson lives in 
Croton-on-Hudson. Her son Eric is 2 l / 2 
years old. She says she never exercises, 
but has lost 35 lbs., which, I believe, is 
the class record for reducing. 

1922 

Class Editor: Serena Hand Savage 
(Mrs. William L. Savage), 
29 West 12th Street, New York City. 

Emily Burns Brown has just been in 
New York en route to Spain. 

Eleanor Brush Cochran has also bright- 
ened our city by a flying visit. 

Dorothy Wells is living in Los Angeles. 

Martha Tucker was married last year 
to Mustapha Husni Bey. Her address is 
c/o the University of Cairo, Cairo, Egypt. 

It may interest 1922 to know that "The 
Lady from the Sea," our famous Senior 
Play, has just been produced in New 
York. The comment of the N. Y. Times, 
we feel is significant: "'The Lady from 
the Sea' requires persuasive magic. 
Played literally, it is a confusing drama, 
and a dull one !" 



26 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



1923 
Class Editor: Katharine Lord Strauss, 
27 E. 69th Street, New York City. 

Harriet Scribner Abbott has a second 
child, Harriet Alice, born on March 4th. 

Laura Crease Bunch is continuing her 
work at the Guaranty Trust in the In- 
vestment Advisory Department. This 
means that the Stock Market leaps and 
ducks at Laura Crease's whim. 

Wang Spalding has returned from a 
flying trip to Europe where she bought 
furniture for her new house. Rumor hath 
it that she concealed several tables and 
chairs about her person and completely 
diddled the Customs. 

Pudd'n Rice returned on March 15th 
from an extensive trip through Jugo- 
slavia, where she visited the Rhys Car- 
penters in Athens, and included Sicily, 
Italy, France and way-stations. 

Dusty forwards a letter from Margaret 
Hussey from which we quote. 

"My life history since last we met 
many years ago — four at least — has been 
composed of many and varied activities 
along the same lines. Just at present I 
am in Brookline, Massachusetts, as full- 
time Girl Scout Director with a nice 
office all my own, pleasant people to work 
with and as much time to myself as my 
conscience will allow me to take. My 
summers have all been spent at camp and 
this year when I planned to take a com- 
plete change, I find I'm to be head of a 
new camp the State is starting for 12^- 
13^-year-old scouts. So it goes !" 

Pick McAneny Loud is running a shop 
at 205 East 68 Street, N. Y. C, which 
rejoices in the pungent name of Bitter 
& Loud. 

The following chronicle is plagiarized 
direct from a most satisfactory letter of 
Roz Raley's: 

"I was married two months ago (Jan- 
uary 19th to be exact) to Donald Pierce 
Braley, A.B., Clarkson Tech. '21, and 
M.A., Harvard Business School, '23. Helen 
George and Ruth Geyer Hocker were my 
bridesmaids. I'm living as you see in 
Lititz, which is a little Pennsylvania- 
Dutch town near Lancaster. 

"I'm terribly happy — Don is just per- 
fect — and I heartily recommend married 
life to all the other members of '23. 

"In case you haven't heard, Jinks 
Brokaw Collins was in a serious motor 
accident in Florida about three weeks ago 
and had her skull practured in two places 
and her arm broken. She's getting along 
fine now though. 

"That's all the news I know except 
that Helen George is taking a business 



course in Richmond. Julia Ward is 
Warden of Rock, again this year and 
Ruth Geyer Hocker's two little boys are 
the smartest, dearest children I've ever 
seen. By the way, Ruth and her husband 
are moving in April from Harrisburg to 
Johnstown, Pennsylvania. 

"Paddy Hay Schlipf has a darling red- 
haired baby boy and has just built a new 
house near her mother and father's in 
Springfield, Illinois." 

H.H.C. Roz ! 

1924 
Class Editor: Beth Tuttle Wilbur 
(Mrs. Donald Wilbur), 
Bryn Mawr, Penna. 

Pamela Coyne was married to Mr. 
Francis H. Taylor on November third in 
New York, and is now living at 1928 
Delancey Place, Philadelphia. 

Marie Louise Freeman has been study- 
ing art in New York for the past few 
months, but has given it up temporarily 
in favor of a trip to Arizona with her 
family. 

Sue Leewitz has come over from Paris, 
where she is living, and is planning to 
stay until June. When last seen she was 
staying with Al Anderson McNeely in 
Bryn Mawr. 

We hear that Marion Russell is now 
Mrs. Frank Morris. Can you tell us any 
more news about yourself than that, 
Russ ? 

Please note editor's change of address 
from Rosemont to Bryn Mawr. The con- 
tributions to the Bulletin are so few 
and far between that we don't want any 
to get mislaid. 

1925 
Class Editor: Elizabeth Mallett 
Conger (Mrs. Frederic Conger), 
325 East 72nd St., New York City. 

Now for our spring brides ! Peggy 
Stewardson was married to Howard 
Blake on April 12th. Of course it was a 
lovely wedding. Peg's sister Rosamond, 
as maid of honor, wore two shades of 
orchid and Nan Hough and Chissy wore 
lovely chiffon dresses of two shades of 
blue. Peggy was a most charming bride. 

Kay Mordock Adams writes in a de- 
lightful letter that she has a little daugh- 
ter, Katharine, born on January nine- 
teenth. Her two-year-old son, Douglass, 
sounds most beguiling, light hair, rosy 
cheeks and the physique of a potential 
football player. Why do people have to 
live so far away? (Kay's address, by 
the way, is 235 El Camino Del Mar, San 
Francisco.) We know how to read 
French and German at sight so we bet 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



that address means something like this: 
235 (that's easy — same in every country) 
El ("the" or "a" an indefinite article) 
Camino ("street" or "room") del Mar 
(something to do with the sea or just 
wet.) See, it's easy when you get the 
hang of it and no end useful. 

H. D. Potts has been appointed interne 
at the Philadelphia General Hospital 
next year. She finishes her four years 
at P. and S. this spring. 

Nana Bonnell Davenport and her hus- 
band are going to live in New York after 
all ! Their address is 71 Washington 
Square, South. 

1926 
Class Editor: Harriot Hopkinson, 
70 Beacon St.* Boston. 

To begin with engagements, which are 
always of course the most important, we 
have Sophie Sturm's, which is just an- 
nounced, to Kenneth Brown, a graduate 
of Yale, and now living in New York. 
Plans for the wedding date, we hear, are 
not yet definite. 

There don't seem to be any other en- 
gagements just at the moment, at least 
none reported here. Is '27 getting ahead 
of us? 

Nicky (Mrs. Lincoln Fitzell) has a 
baby named Jean, born in January, and 
called on very formally by M. Parker 
and H. Hopkinson when it was two weeks 
old. The Fitzells are living in Cambridge 
this year, where he is studying literature 
at Harvard. 

Clare is at the Bryn Mawr School in 
Baltimore, where she is head of the 
Science Department, which she says is 
very hard, but very interesting. 

Miggy Arnold is studying at the 
Museum School in Boston. 

Peg Harris is studying law at Penn. 

K. Morse is reported to have been 
seen around Overbrook, in company with 
Linns, but any other winter occupation 
of hers is unknown here. As for the 
aforementioned Linns, Benjy is studying 
in the graduate school at B. M., and Algy 
is believed to be teaching English and 
Math to little children. 

It was most exciting to get a letter the 
other day, with a little blue Japanese 
stamp on it, and to find it was from Bud 
Borton, nee Wilbur. She is full of assur- 
ances that neither she nor her husband 
is a missionary, but are representing the 
Friends Service Committee in the Orient, 
with a chief interest in international rela- 
tions. We must all go out there and 
visit, for they have a guest room, as well 
as a Buddhist temple in their back yard. 



Remember the address, 14 Daimachi, 
Mita, Shiba, Tokyo, Japan. 

Deirdre is working very hard with The 
Foundation Company. The importance of 
her position can only be deduced from 
the fact that she writes personal letters 
on the office stationery. 

Helen Coolidge is a great boon to this 
department, because she never does any- 
thing for too long, and can almost always 
come under the heading of News. Just 
now she is sleeping by day, and by night 
writing all the fascinating little bits of 
society gwssip we all read in the Boston 
American. 

This is about all we know. Isn't it 
astonishing how many people seem to 
be easily able to resist the temptation to 
rush into print? We cannot sympathize 
with such reticence. Pray tell on each 
other, if not on yourselves; anything is 
ethical to an editor. 

1928 

Edit or: Helen McKelvey, 

341 Madison Avenue, New York. 

With the co-operation of Ginny Atmore 
we were able to glean quite a number of 
brief notes. She sends the following: 

"Bertha Ailing wrote that she will not 
be at reunion, as she is going over soon 
to Germany and other points in Europe. 
Next year she is going to try for a job 
at the new Sak's, in Chicago. That's about 
all from her. 

"Al Bruere writes that she is working 
in a more or less normal way, and she 
saw Billy Rhein Bird at the F. P. A. 
luncheon, 'but mostly life is one day after 
the other.' 

"Cay Field Cherry says that she is still 
willing to cook, fixing up her home, 'inci- 
dentally she has 4 or 5 extra beds in each 
of which she plans to sleep 4 or 5 people, 
if we ever come to Albany,' and in her 
spare time she is doing Red Cross Motor 
Corps and scenery work for the Albany 
Players. 

"Mary Johnston is to be married on 
May 4th. 

"Alice Palache had her appendix out 
and says that she has missed so much 
time from her job that she can do noth- 
ing more for a year. 

"Babs Rose says that Betty Brown mar- 
ried Fred Field ; T think the middle name 
is Vanderbilt, or Van Renssaluer, or per- 
haps even Fish.' She can be reached at 
645 Fifth Avenue, New York. 

"Barby Lyons Dreier and Yildiz Van 
Hulsteyn are racing for Class Baby. 

"Edith Morgan Whitaker will live in 
the East next year." 



The Saint Timothy's School 
for Girls 

CATONSVILLE, MARYLAND 

Founded September 1882 

COLLEGE PREPARATORY 

AND 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

MISS LOUISA McENDREE FOWLER 
Head of the School 

Wykeham Rise 

WASHINGTON, CONNECTICUT 

A COUNTRY SCHOOL 
FOR GIRLS 

FANNY E. DAVIES, LL.A., Headmistress 
Prepares for Bryn Mawr and Other Colleges 

The Episcopal Academy 

(Founded 1785) 

CITY LINE, OVERBROOK, PA. 

A country day school for boys 

Endorsed by Bryn Mawr Alumnae 

UNIVERSITYSiTiS 

BOARDING AND DAY SCHOOL 

Founded 1896 

Thorough and successful Preparation 

for Eastern Colleges for Women as well as 

for Midwestern Colleges and Universities 

Illustrated Catalogue on Request 

ANNA B. HAIRE, A.B., SMITH COLLEGE, Principal 

1106-B Lake Shore Drive Chicago, Illinois 

Oarrison Forest 
A Modern Country School in the 
Green Spring Valley near Balti- 
more. Excellent Equipment. All Sports. 
Special Emphasis on Horseback Riding. 

Garrison Forest Girls who are going to college 
are thoroughly prepared for any institution. 

Other girls take courses with special emphasis 
on Music and Art. Younger girls live in a 
separate Junior House. 



Mild Climate. Nation-wide Clientel 



Principals 

MISS JEAN G. MARSHALL 

MISS NANCY OFFUTT, 

Bryn Mawr, ex '20 

Box B, Garrison, Maryland 




The Ethel Walker School 

SIMSBURY, CONNECTICUT 

Head of School 

ETHEL WALKER SMITH, A.M., 
Bryn Mawr College 

Head Mistress 

JESSIE GERMAIN HEWITT, A.B., 
Bryn Mawr College 






OGERSHAIX 

'^Modern School with New England Traditions 



JB ^mV General Academic Course with di- 
rfflb ^H^ploma. Junior College Courses — Home 
Economics, Secretarial Training, Music, Art, Dramatic 
Art. 26 Miles from Boston. Outdoor Sports. Riding. 
Gymnasium. Swimming Pool. 

EDITH CHAPIN CRAVEN, A.B., Bryn Mawr 
201 Rogers Street, Lowell, Mass. 

/iarcuav scm>h 

BRYN MAWR, PA. 
Prepares for Bryn Mavvr and 

mmti a11 leading col ! e s es 

Musical Course prepares for the Depart- 
ment of Music of Bryn Mawr College 
L. MAY WILLIS, Principal 
EDITH HARCUM, Head of School 

THE MISSES KIRK'S 

College Preparatory School 

PREPARATORY TO BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 
Individual Instruction. Athletics. 

Clovercroft, Montgomery Avenue, Rosemont, Pa. 
Mail, telephone and telegraph address: Bryn Mawr. Pa. 



CHOATE SCHOOL 

1600 Beacon Street, Brookline, Mass. 

HOME AND DAY SCHOOL 
FOR GIRLS 

EMPHASIS ON COLLEGE PREPARATION 

Elective Courses for students not preparing 
for College 

AUGUSTA CHOATE, A.M. (Vastar) 

Principal 



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THE AGNES IRWIN SCHOOL 

2009-2011 Delancey Place, Philadelphia 

A College Preparatory 
SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 



BERTHA M. LAWS, A.B., Headmistress 



GRAY GABLES 

THE BOARDING DEPARTMENT OF THE 
BANCROFT SCHOOL OF WORCESTER 

Complete College Preparatory Course. 
One year course for Board Examination. 

For catalog address: 

Hope Fisheb, Ph.D., Bancroft School 

Worcester, Massachusetts 



MISS BEARD'S SCHOOL 

A Country School near New York 

Orange, New Jersey 
COLLEGE PREPARATION 

Advanced Courses Junior High School 

Music, Art, Domestic Science 

Catalog on Request 

LUCIE C. BEARD, Headmistress 

The Katharine Branson School 

ROSS, CALIFORNIA Across the Bay from San Francisco 

A Country School College Preparatory 

Heads 

Katharine Fleming Branson, A.B., Bryn Mawr 

MISS MADEIRA'S SCHOOL 

1330 19th St., N. W. Washington. D. C. 

A RESIDENT AND DAY SCHOOL FOR 
GIRLS 

LUCY MADEIRA WING, A.B. 

MRS. DAVID LAFOREST WING 

Head Mistress 

MISS WRIGHT'S SCHOOL 

Bryn Mawr, Pa. 
Prepares for College Board 
Examination 



FERRY HALL 

A RESIDENT AND DAY SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

On Lake Michigan, near Chicago 

Junior College; High School Department: College 
Preparatory and General Courses. Special Departments 
of Music, Expression and Art. 

Two new dormitories, including new dining room and 
infirmary, to be opened September 1929. 

Eloise R. Tremain, A.B., Bryn Mawr, Principal 

ROSEMARY HALL 

College Preparatory 

(With supplementary but not alternative courses) 

CAROLINE RUUTZ-REES. Ph.D. \ „ . M] , 
MARY E. LOWNDES. Litt.D J HiaJ MMrtuu 



GREENWICH 



CONNECTICUT 



The Shipley School 

Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 

Preparatory to Bryn Mawr College 

ALICE G. HOWLAND, ELEANOR 0. BROWNELL 
Principals 

MISS RANSOM and 
MISS BRIDGES' SCHOOL 

PIEDMONT, CALIFORNIA 

(A suburb of San Francisco) 

A RESIDENT AND DAY SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

General and College Preparatory Courses 
Outdoor Life throughout the year 

EDITH BRIDGES, B.L., Principal 

The Baldwin School 

A Country School for Girls 
BRYN MAWR PENNSYLVANIA 

Preparation for Bryn Mawr. Mount Holyoke. Smith, 

Vassar and Wellesley college*. Abundant outdoor life. 

Hockey, basketball, tennis. 

ELIZABETH FORREST JOHNSON, A.B. 

HEAD 

THE LOW AND HEYWOOD SCHOOL 

Emphasizing college preparatory work. 

Also general and special courses. 

One year intensive college preparation. 

Junior school. 

64th year. Catalogue. 

SHIPPAN POINT, STAMFORD, CONN. 



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BRIARCLIFF 

Mrs. Dow's School for Girls 

Margaret Bell Merrill, M. A., Principal 
BRIARCLIFF MANOR NEW YORK 

College Preparatory 
and General Academic Courses 

Post Graduate Department 

Music and Art with New York 
advantages. New Swimming Pool 



Music Dept. 

Jan Sickest 

Director 



Art Dept. 
Cha«. W. Hawthorne, N. A. 

Director 



THE CAMBRIDGE SCHOOL 

DOMESTIC ARCHITECTURE 

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 

A Professional School for College 

Graduates 

The Academic Year for 1929-30 opens 

Monday, October 7, 1929. 

Henry Atherton Frost — Director 

53 Church Street, Cambridge, Mass. 

At Harvard Square 



All the smart world 
walks in 

Sak^-Fifth Avenue 

created by 'Paris 
or 

SAKS-FIFTH AVENUE 

FORTY- NINTH to FIFTIETH STREET 
NEW YORK 




Cathedral School of St. Mary 

GARDEN CITY, LONG ISLAND, N. Y. 

A school for Girls 19 miles from New York. College 

preparatory and general courses. Music Art and 

Domestic Science. Catalogue on request. Box B. 

MIRIAM A. BYTEL, A.B., Radcliffe, Principal 

BERTHA GORDON WOOD, A.B., Bryn Mawr, 

Assistant Principal 



The Traphagen School of Fashion 



I 



INTENSIVE WINTER AND 
SUMMER COURSES 

All phases from elementary to full 
mastery ol costume design and Illus- 
tration taught In shortest time com- 
patible with thoroughness. Day and 
Evening classes. Saturday courses for 
Adults and Children. Our Sales De- 
partment disposes of student work. 
Every member of advanced classes 
often placed through our Employment 
Bureau. Write for announcement. 



In Arnold, Constable & Company Costume 
Design Competition, over 100 schools and 
nearly 800 students took part; all prizes 
were awarded to Traphagen pupils with 
exception of one of the five third prizes. 

1680 Broadway (near 52nd St.) New Y< 



Katharine Gibbs 

A school of unusual character with a distinctive 
purpose for educated women 
SECRETARIAL ACADEMIC EXECUTIVE 
BOSTON Special Course for College 

.... ., c , , Women. Selected subjects 
UOMarlboroMreet preparing for executive posi- 
tions. Separate classrooms 
and special instructors. 
One-year Course includes tech- 
nical and broad business train- 
ing preparing for positions of 
a preferred character. 
Two-year Course includes six 
college subjects for those not 
PROVIDENCE desiring college, but wishing 

cultural as well as a business 
155 Angell Street education. 

Booklet on request 



Resident and 
Day School 



NEW YORK 
247 Park Avenue 



After College What? 

THE DREXEL INSTITUTE 
LIBRARY SCHOOL 

Offers a one year course for 
college graduates, and pre- 
pares students for all types 
of library service. 

PHILADELPHIA 



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The Phebe Anna 
Thome School 



Under the Direction of the 
Department of Education 



A progressive school preparing 
for all colleges. Open air class 
rooms. Pre-school, Primary, 
Elementary and High School 
Grades. 



BRYN MAWR, PA. 

Agnes L. Rogers, Ph.D., Director 
Frances Browne, A.B., HeadMistress 



THE HARTRIDGE SCHOOL 
FOR GIRLS 

SO minutes from New York 

A country school with beautiful grounds. 
College Preparatory and General Courses. 
Over fifty girls in leading colleges today. 
Resident Department carefully restricted. 
Special attention to Music and Art. 
Athletics, Dramatics, Riding, 

EMELYN B. HARTRIDGE, Vassar, A.B., Principal 
Plainfield, New Jersey 



JOHN HANCOCK SERIES 

EVERY WOMAN 

Who Manages Her 
Own Home 

appreciates what Ben Franklin 

taught: 
Income $1000 ) Tr LL . 
Expenses 9 9 9 j ~ Happiness 

Income $1000),,.. 

Expenses 1001 \~ Misery 

T^"0 home can be a happy home 
•** ^ if the expenses are greater 
than income. No woman likes to 
run behind in her expenses and 
generally it isn't her fault. It is 
simply because money has to be 
spent that wasn't planned for. 

Here is a "life saver" — 
The John Hancock Home Budget 
Sheet will help you to plan your Fam- 
ily Expenses in a simple, sensible way. 

There are lots of other benefits from 
this method. Send for your copy today. 
—IT IS FREE 

INQUIRY BUREAU 




HLlFE Insurance Company^ 

of Boston. Massachusetts 

197 Clarendon St., Boston, Mass. 

Please send me a FREE copy of the 
John Hancock Home Budget Sheet. 1 
enclose 2c to cover postage. 



Name , 

Address... 



Beech Wood 

A Camp for Girls 

On Lake Alamoosook near Bucksport, Me. 

Water sports, athletics and other 
camp interests. Tutoring. 

Conducted by 

HERMINE EHLERS, A.B., Bryn Mawr 

Address: FRIENDS SEMINARY 

Rutherford Place, New York City 

CAMP MYSTIC co N m n y e s c t tTcut 

Miss Jobe's salt water camp for girls 
8-18. Conducted by Mrs. Carl Akeley (Mary 
L. Jobe). Halfway, New York and Boston. 
Land and water sports. Horseback riding. 

MARY L JOBE, Room 507. 607 Fifth Ave., N.Y.C. 



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1896 1929 

BACK LOG CAMP 

THE ADIRONDACK MOUNTAINS 
INDIAN LAKE, NEW YORK 

QUESTIONNAIRE 

Where is Indian Lake? 

In a wild part of the Adirondack Mountains, one hundred and forty 
miles from Albany. 

Who runs Back Log Camp? 

A large family of Philadelphia Quakers : Browns, Cadburys, Lamberts. 

Who goes to it? 

Doctors, lawyers, merchants, teachers, social workers, ministers, with 
their wives, husbands, children, and friends. 

What do they do there? 

Eat, sleep, talk, rest, read, write, walk, swim, boat, fish, climb moun- 
tains, see beaver and deer, botanize, and go birding. 

Is the food good? 

Absolutely. 

What had I better do about it? 

Write at once for descriptive literature. 

Letters of inquiry should be addressed to Other references 

Mrs. Bertha Brown Lambert (Bryn Mawr, 1904) MrS ' Anna ^^w^iSZ" MaWr ' 1912) 

272 Park Avenue Dr Henry j' Cadbury 

Takoma Park, D. C. (Head of Biblical Dept., Bryn Mawr) 

Haverford, Penna. 



Q. 

A. 

Q. 

A. 

Q. 

A. 

Q. 

A. 

Q. 

A. 

Q. 

A. 



Learn to Play 

BRIDGE/ 



NOW READY 

AUCTION BRIDGE* 
FOR BEGINNERS 

By MILTON C. WORK 

Now anyone can learn to play sound 
and enjoyable Bridge. Mr. Work's 
new book contains what everyone 
wants to know, needs to know, and 
should know. Average players, too, 
will find this book the key to win- 
ning Bridge. Cloth. 136 Pages. 
Price $1.00 
At all booksellers and stationers 




Wherever 
played, at home or 
abroad, Milton C. 
Work is the pre-emi- 
nent authority^9 out 
of every 10 teachers 
use his system ^ He 
originated the present 
count ^ Has served 
on every committee 
drafting laws ^ Re- 
ferred to by Colliers 
as' 'the supreme court 
of Bridge." 

THE JOHN C.WINSTON CO. 

PUBLISHERS PHILADELPHIA 



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THE ALUMNAE REGISTER 

Do you know WHAT THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE ARE DOING? 

Do you know WHAT PERCENTAGE OF BRYN MAWR GRADUATES ARE 

MARR ED, HOW MANY CHILDREN THEY HAVE AND THE 

OCCUPATIONS OF THEIR HUSBANDS? 
Do you know FROM WHAT COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES THE GRADUATE 

SCHOOL DRAWS ITS STUDENTS? 
Do you know THE LATEST INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR FRIENDS? 

ALL OF THIS INFORMATION is contained in the 

REGISTER OF ALUMNAE AND FORMER STUDENTS 
just published by Bryn Mawr College. 

Your application on the attached slip will bring you one immediately. 



Name 

Address... 



To the Director of Publication, 
Taylor Hall, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Please find enclosed $ for 



of the Alumnae Register at two dollars each. 

Cheques should be made payable to Bryn Mawr College. 



copies 



IHay avc 
fake you ^ 

this summei^f 





clip and 

mail 

coupon 




iscrimina tine/ 
travelers 

HARVEYCAR 
MOTOR CRUISES 

hold the key to the carefree 
enjoyment of the ionthwest 
frontier wonderland ^^^ 

c4 day - a Week or a month 

TRAINED couriers — hostesses as well as guides ac- 
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thought for detail* Specially equipped cruisers are 
used and limited to four guests to a single car. 

The Santa Fe-Harvey Company Courier Service 
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Please send me Harveycar Motor Cruise booklet and map. 



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BRYN MAWR 
ALUMNAE 
BULLETIN 




BRYN MAWR IN 1895 



June, 1929 



Vol. IX 



No. 5 



Entered as second-class matter, January 1, 1929, at the Post Office, Phila., fa., under Act of March 3, 1879 

COPYRIGHT. 1929 

ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 



OFFICERS OF THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

EXECUTIVE BOARD 

President Louise Fleischmann Maclay, 1906 

Vice-President Natalie McFaden Blanton, 1917 

Recording Secretary Gertrude Hearne Myers, 1919 

Corresponding Secretary May Egan Stokes, 1911 

Treasurer Margaret E. Brusstar, 1903 

Chairman of the Finance Committee Caroline Florence Lexow, 1908 

Chairman of the Publicity Committee Caroline Morrow Chadwick-Collins, 1905 

ALUMNAE SECRETARY AND BUSINESS MANAGER OF THE BULLETIN 

Alice M. Hawkins, 1907 

EDITOR OF THE BULLETIN 

Marjorie L. Thompson, 1912 

DISTRICT COUNCILLORS 

District I Helen Evans Lewis, 1913 

District II Julia Langdon Loomis 1895 

District III Alletta Van Reypen Korff, 1900 

District IV Katharine Holliday Daniels, 1918 

District V Frances Porter Adler. 1911 

District VI Margaret Nichols Hardenbergh, 1905 

District VII Helen Brayton Barendt, 1903 

ALUMNAE DIRECTORS 

Ruth Furness Porter, 1896 Mary Peirce, 1912 

Frances Fincke Hand, 1897 Margaret Reeve Cary, 1907 

Elizabeth Lewis Otey, 1901 

CHAIRMAN OF THE ALUMNAE FUND 

Caroline Florence Lexow, 1908 

CHAIRMAN OF THE ACADEMIC COMMITTEE 

Pauline Goldmark, 1896 

CHAIRMAN OF THE SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOAN FUND COMMITTEE 

Margaret Gilman, 1919 

CHAIRMAN OF THE COMMITTEE ON HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Dr. Marjorie F Murray, 1913 

CHAIRMAN OF THE NOMINATING COMMITTEE 

Eleanor Little Aldrich, 905 



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Bryn Mawr Alumnae 
Bulletin 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF 
THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNA ASSOCIATION 

Marjorie L. Thompson, '12, Editor 
Alice M. Hawkins, '07, Business Manager 

EDITORIAL BOARD 

Eleanor Fleisher Riesman, '03 May Egan Stokes, '11 

Caroline Morrow Chadwick-Collins, 05 Ellenor Morris, '27 

Emily Fox Cheston, '08 Louise Fleischmann Maclay, '06, ex-officio 

Subscription Price, $1.50 a Year Single Copies, 25 Cents 

Checks should be drawn to the order of Bryn Mawr Alumnae Bulletin 
Published monthly, except August, September and October, at 1006 Arch St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Vol. IX JUNE, 1929 No 5 



In the Godey's Magazine for May, 1895, there is an article, reprinted in part 
in this issue of the Bulletin, on "work and recreation at one of the leading colleges 
for women" by Madeline Abbott Bushnell, 1893. Having first read in the same 
magazine a fashion note which started : "The sweet simplicity of white muslin is 
insisted upon for graduation gowns .... The waists usually hook in the back and 
have full fronts drooping slightly on the belt .... A smooth collar of white satin 
three inches wide has a narrow turn-over collar of the muslin edged with lace .... 
The waist is encircled with a sash of white satin ribbon, tied in a bow and loops at 
the back, the ends reaching to the hem of the skirt which is about five yards wide, 
and hangs from the belt over a silk foundation about four yards wide, well gored," — 
I turned to the article on Bryn Mawr, expecting to find an account just as far 
removed from our habits of present day thought and manners, but the founders of 
the college had built too well for that. Essentially the college then was as the 
college is today. The accounts of student activities have a suggestion of the "sweet 
simplicity of white muslin" about them, but the intellectual foundations of the 
college suggest nothing "four yards wide, well gored." One is amazed to realize 
how inevitable and natural the development of the college has been. It has wisely 
adapted itself to changing conditions, it has added here and taken away there, it has 
enlarged and enriched the curriculum, it has established more varied intellectual 
contacts, but never has it had to go back and undo things already done, or radically 
change the whole trend of its affairs. At a time when fashions in women's education 
had the same stiffness and restricting qualities as the fashions in their clothes, Bryn 
Mawr managed to have a quality that was of no period. 



BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

(Reprinted from Godey's Magazine of May, 1895) 

By Madeline Vaughan Abbott 

The ordinary visitor, who comes to Bryn Mawr College only by way of the 
train from Philadelphia, will always question the fitness of the name to the place, 
and will wonder where those early Welsh settlers found the "high hill" which has 
left its name to the station and to the college. It is not until this visitor is fairly 
in the centre of the college campusi that he can see how the country falls away 
toward the west and north into lowlands, and that the college buildings crown the 
crest of a hill. From the west, one can obtain a clear impression of the rolling, 
wooded country that makes Bryn Mawr one of the most beautiful of the Philadelphia 
suburbs; and from the west, too, can be gained the most satisfactory view of the 
gray stone buildings of the college halls, brightened by the touch of color in the red 
brick gymnasium and by the picturesque houses of the faculty. 

From the Bryn Mawr station a boardwalk, which sometimes proves full of 
pitfalls for the unsuspecting stranger, leads along a level road, past attractive houses, 
and up a gentle slope, to the beginning of the college grounds, scarcely more than 
five minutes from the station. If you are of an exploring turn of mind, leave the 
boardwalk where it turns into the college grounds, at the sign "Private Road," and 
go up the side street to the state entrance of the college under the tower of Pem- 
broke Hall, and you will find reward for the somewhat longer walk in the prospect 
of distant hillsides framed in the stone archway. On either side of the tower stretch 




THE OLD ENTRANCE TO BRYN MAWR 
(2) 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 3 

the east and west wings of Pembroke Hall, and beyond, the driveway passes Taylor 
Hall and winds between Denbigh and Merion, and then beyond Radnor Hall sweeps 
around the campus and joins itself again in front of Taylor Hall. 

Dr. Taylor was wiser than other people thought when he chose the site for the 
college that he founded; and now that the ground has been improved and careful 
landscape-gardening has smoothed away the original roughness it seems that no other 
site could have been half so fit. Although Wellesley is richer in the stretch of her 
acres and her far-famed lake, and the Bryn Mawr campus cannot yet boast of the 
stately trees that add so much to the beauty of Smith, we are proud of our west- 
ward prospect, and glory in our valleys and hillsides and in our sunsets. 

The real beauty of Bryn Mawr is best seen in the early spring-time, when 
the cherry trees on the lawn and the dogwood in the shrubbery are in bloom, and 
the whole air is filled with the sounds and scents of coming summer. It is then, 
too, that the college life of the year seems most unified in the Bryn Mawr spirit; 
for then the freshmen are no longer strangers, and the near departure of the seniors 
makes all feel how strong, in spite of differences of birthplace and early training, is 
the bond made by a common life for a common purpose. 

Bryn Mawr College was founded by Dr. Joseph W. Taylor, of Burlington, 
N. J., a physician, merchant, and member of the Society of Friends, who purposed 
founding an institution of learning which should offer to young women the same 
advantages so freely offered to young men in colleges. The charter of the college, 
with the power to confer degrees, was granted in the year 1880, and in the autumn 
of that year work was begun on an academic building which was to be the first of 
a future group. 

Before this building was finished, however, Dr. Taylor died, and left the work 
which had been so near to his heart to be finished by the friends whom he named 
in his will as the trustees of the endowment fund. Under the direction of these 
trustees, the work was carried on according to the plans and purposes of the 
founder. A gymnasium was added to the original buildings, and later, residence 
halls and a science hall were built to meet the need of the increasing number of 
students. Today, instead of the two halls with which the college opened in 1885, 
there are seven; and the thirty students of the first year have increased to the two 
hundred and seventy of the tenth. 

The academic building, which was the first to be finished, was named after 
the founder, and above the side windows in the chapel, on the second floor of Taylor 
Hall, are stone tablets, whose simple inscriptions in memory of Dr. Taylor are 
supplemented by the college buildings, which are the best expression of the bounty 
and service of the founder's plan. Besides the chapel, Taylor Hall contains half 
a dozen lecture rooms, four or five seminary rooms for small classes in advanced 
work, the reading-rooms and reference libraries of the various departments, and 
the general college library. 

3£ jfc 3i$ {£ 

Besides Taylor and Dalton Halls, there are five halls of residence — Merion, 
Radnor, Denbigh, Pembroke East and Pembroke West, all named after Welsh 
counties. Each hall, with the exception of Pembroke East and West, which have 
a common dining room in the connecting tower, has its own dining room, and the 
domestic arrangements of the different halls are quite distinct. 



4 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

Each hall accommodates sixty students, and the rooms occupied by the students 
are of three kinds — single rooms; sets of three rooms, comprising each two bed- 
rooms and a study, to be occupied by two students; and single suites, comprising 
bed-room and study, for one student. All the larger single rooms and all the 
studies have open fire-places, as an added touch of' comfort; and on a cold winter 
day I know no more attractive place to linger than a college study with the open 
coal-fire glowing warm and bright, and the tea-table drawn up into a cozy corner. 

In each hall is a resident mistress who is the head of the household, and ready 
at all times to fulfil any of the miscellaneous duties of such a position. Over the 
individual conduct of the students, in so far as it does not affect the actual running 
of the house, the mistress has no control. The students are free to come and go 
as they like, for the college authorities felt from the beginning that if the girls were 
mature enough to enter on a life of advanced study, they were old enough to be 
treated as women of discretion and good sense. 

In the early days of the college, public opinion was most potent to regulate 
the routine of college life and to reduce friction; but, as the college grew in size 
and numbers, it was found necessary to have a more formal code of manners and 
morals, that would express in definite form the rulings of precedent and tradition, 
and the students were given permission to organize themselves into a society for 
self-government. The legal name of this society is the Bryn Mawr Students' Asso- 
ciation for Self-Government, and the Association has been granted a charter from 
the trustees with full power to legislate in all affairs of college life that are not 
purely academic, or concerned solely with the domestic arrangements of the halls. 

For the three years that the Self-Government Association has been in power, 
it has been uniformly successful, and has proved to the satisfaction of the author- 
ities that the students are still capable of governing themselves. The meetings of 
the association are held at irregular intervals, and can be called at any time at the 
request of ten members. By the Association are decided all questions of student 
etiquette, matters of chaperonage, of college entertainments, of the conduct of the 
students at college and abroad. The motto seems to be Individual Liberty and the 
Good Name of Bryn Mawr. 

The Bryn Mawr rooms never see quite such wild scenes as are reported to 
me by friends of Harvard and Yale and Princeton, but they have been the scene 
of many a mild revel and merry party, and they hold just as serious meetings over 
class and college matters, and even over athletics, for Bryn Mawr believes in brawn 
as well as brain. 

The principal features of Bryn Mawr social life are teas and of these there 
are two sorts, "tea" and "a tea." To the uninitiated the difference is slight, but it 
exists nevertheless. 

"Tea" may be had any hour of the day or night, for at Bryn Mawr that most 
comforting institution of life has developed into morning and evening tea as well 
as afternoon, in a spirit that had expression in that saying from "Alice in Wonder- 
land" embroidered on the tea cloth of one of the most popular "tea" rooms: "It is 
always tea-time, and there is no time to wash the dishes between whiles." As the 
only conditions for "tea" are two congenial souls and the wherewithal to manu- 
facture the beverage, and as the motto of Bryn Mawr life is "What you haven't, 
borrow from your neighbor," "tea" is always possible. 






BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 5 

I shall never forget the many pleasant hours spent with one of my friends, 
who had a cozy room under the eaves of Merion Hall, and who made tea regularly 
every morning after the eleven o'clock lectures and served us with the unwonted 
luxury of real cream. After the tea-pot was emptied and the alcohol burned from 
the lamp beneath the kettle, we used to spend the time till luncheon talking of 
things that were not Greek nor mathematics, or reading to each other what we 
loved best in the bookcase that stood conveniently near the comfortable couch. It 
may not have been the most profitable way of spending spare hours, but it was 
pleasant; and now, when I open a copy of Lanier or of Marston, or of Browning, 
or wander through the verses of Omar Khayyam, I see again that long, low, cozy 
room where I first learned to love them. 




A COLLEGE ROOM 






So fond are my recollections of "tea" that all charms of- "a tea" fade beside 
them. For "a tea" -means some formality, all that is possible in college, and an 
elaborate preparation for food that sometimes reaches the heights of salads and 
ices. One is always invited especially to "a tea", and if the hostess wishes to be 
very fashionable, she sends out her invitations as early as three days beforehand. 
The excuses for "a tea" are manifold — a welcome to the freshmen, a visiting relative, 
a friend from town, a birthday, a holiday, a box from home, an unwary young 
man who comes to call and finds himself the guest at a tea and the only man 
among perhaps thirty girls. The tea-table, next to the window seat and the study 
table, is the prominent article in a college room, and proves the popular belief that 
studying is hungry work. 



6 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

Besides teas, college playtime is occupied with entertainments, given usually by 
the different classes, with basketball, tennis, golf, and, indeed, all out-door sports. 
In the early autumn the sophomores welcome the freshmen with more or less elab- 
orate entertainment and at this time takes place the ceremony of the Presentation 
of Lanterns at which to each member of the freshman class is presented a lantern, 
the college symbol, to light her on her way through college. One of these enter- 
tainments took the form of a parody of the story of Siegfried, in which Brynhilda 
slew the Dragon of Public Opinion with the pen, which is mightier than the sword, 
and released Siegfried, rolled a huge diploma, from his enchanted sleep; and the 
lanterns were presented to the freshmen by a chorus of the Valkyrs grouped in the 
hall of Walhalla. 

As soon as possible after the sophomore entertainment the freshmen return 
the compliment with something of a less ambitious nature, but try their best to 
respond to all the sophomore jests and gibes. Later in the year the juniors dis- 
tinguish themselves by a farewell supper to the seniors, at which toasts are made 
and songs sung, and the remains of the feast are handed through the windows to 
the lower classmen without, who have climbed on tables and chairs to see the fun 
and have serenaded their elders until they are hoarse. 

The last general social event of the college year is the college breakfast, which 
is given by all the college in honor of the seniors. Long tables are spread in the 
gymnasium, and once in the year, on the day before commencement, all the students 
sit down at table together. 

Commencement day itself is very simply kept at Bryn Mawr. The day is 
always the first Thursday in June, and the festivities begin the evening before with 
the reception given by the senior class to their friends. The commencement exer- 
cises are very simple and the seniors take no active part in them. The principal 
features are the entrance in procession of the students of the college in cap and 
gown, and the address by some speaker of note. Although the seniors are the 
principal figures of the day, the alumnae of the college have their share of it also, 
for on the morning of commencement is held one of the two regular meetings of 
the Alumnae Association, and in the evening is the annual alumnae supper, at which 
the seniors are formally welcomed into the Association. 

The only honors conferred by the College upon any member of the senior 
class with the exception of the possible award of resident fellowships, are the 
award of the George W. Childs Essay Prize, and the Bryn Mawr European Fellow- 
ship. This fellowship is awarded to a member of the graduating class on the score 
of excellence in scholarship, and the value of it is to be used to defray the expense 
of a year's study at some foreign university. 

In spite of occasional severe storms and the high winds that have won for Bryn 
Mawr the nickname of "Windy Ilium," the comparatively mild climate of South- 
eastern Pennsylvania makes it possible for out-door sports to be carried on late into 
the autumn and begun early in the spring. At present one of the requirements for 
all resident candidates for a degree is an amount of outdoor exercise averaging each 
month four hours a week. Of this time one hour must be spent in the gymnasium 
at systematic work under the direction of the gymnasium director, and the other 
three may be spent, at the choice of the student, either in the gymnasium or in any 
active out-door exercise that is approved by the director. 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 7 

In the autumn and spring basketball and tennis arouse the most enthusiasm, 
although golf has a few devotees; and iri the winter there are long walks across 
country, and, when the weather provides it, skating and "bobbing." 

On any afternoon about four o'clock, after laboratory and afternoon lectures 
are over, the visitor to the college will see a large proportion of the students 
swarming out of the halls, ready for basketball or tennis, or a long tramp, or with 
their skates in hand, all starting for the exercise or recreation that will send them 
in two hours later starving for dinner and with heads clear for an evening's work. 

I have often been asked what proportion of girls break down in college. To 
this question I can only say that the college life furnishes ample opportunity for 
physical development, as well as for mental, and that invariably, except in case of 
accident, the student who has to give up work on account of her health, has worn 
herself out before entering by too hurried preparation, or has failed to live her col- 
lege life rationally and regularly. 

Although there is no schedule of hours set by the College beyond those of 
recitations and meal times, most of the students work from eight or nine to one in 
the morning, from two to four in the afternoon, and from half past seven to half 
past nine in the evening; and these are quiet hours established by the Self-Govern- 
ment Association. Eight hours a day, including recitations, is the average working 
time, although, of course, some students spend less and some much more; but no 
undergraduate student is allowed to have more than fifteen hours a week of recita- 
tions and lectures. 

The college day begins regularly with morning chapel, at nine o'clock — although 
there are two or three eight o'clock classes, and the work continues through the 
day. The majority of the classes are held in the morning, but there is always 
laboratory work in the afternoon, and small advanced classes meet in the afternoon 
or evening for the convenience of the professor or students. 

The work, so far as possible, is conducted by means of lectures, supplemented 
by outside reading and occasional quizzes, written and oral. In the German and 
French courses, and in the graduate. Latin exercises, the lectures are delivered in 
the language of the course, and the students are given an opportunity to gain a 
speaking as well as reading and writing knowledge. Besides German, French, and 
Latin, the College offers full graduate and undergraduate courses in Greek, English 
history and political economy, philosophy, mathematics, physics, chemistry, and biology, 
and partial courses in Sanskrit and biblical literature, Hebrew, Spanish, Italian, 
and the Slavonic languages. 



The final requirement of all candidates for a degree is the oral examination in 
German and French; and no students will be graduated who do not possess a read- 
ing knowledge of these languages. The Senior Orals, as they are called, are usually 
held in the last semester of the senior year, and for weeks, even months beforehand, 
the seniors inflict their friends with forebodings of these examinations, and spend 
all their spare time over little red dictionaries and German and French books, and 
do their best to learn long lists of impossible words to increase their vocabularies. 

Besides the A.B. degree, the College confers the A.M. degree on its own 
graduates only, and the Ph.D. degree upon graduates of Bryn Mawr College and 



8 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

of other colleges and universities in good and regular standing; and the good of 
the graduate department, as of the undergraduate, is consulted in the choice of pro- 
fessors and of instructors. The requirements for the Ph.D. degree are three years' 
study in allied major and minor subjects, and in addition a thesis, and of the three 
years, two at least must be spent at Bryn Mawr College. In the nine years that 
Bryn Mawr has been established she has conferred the degree of A.B. upon one 
hundred candidates, that of A.M. upon seven, and that of Ph.D. upon five. 



Bryn Mawr is, I believe, the only college exclusively for women that has a 
carefully-organized graduate department; and the Graduate Club, formed to promote 
social relations and a knowledge of graduate work in other colleges, has been a 
great factor during the year of its existence in unifying the graduate department of 
the College. 

The Bryn Mawr energy, which is shown in play and in work, is not wanting 
in the religious life of the college; and it is a source of deep satisfaction to those 
of us who know the real state of spiritual thought, that we can deny, heartily and 
truthfully, the charges of carelessness in all religious matters which are so often 
brought against the College. It was the earnest desire of the founder that an 
earnest, quiet, and practical Christianity should pervade the College, and this wish 
is being carried out by the students themselves. Although the founder of the col- 
lege, the trustees, and some of the faculty are members of the Society of Friends, 
no demand it made of the students to meet the requirements of this society. 

Every morning except on Saturday and Sunday, there is a brief and simple 
service in the chapel, and on Wednesday evening, there is a somewhat longer, but 
equally simple service at half-past seven. The presence of the students at these 
services is asked but not required. Attendance at church on Sunday is also not 
compulsory, but the numbers of students to be seen at the services of the various 
churches in the town show the spirit of the students. 

The missionary and temperance societies, the early Sunday morning service, and 
the Christian Union, all have their earnest supporters, but perhaps the most estab- 
lished expression of the religious feelingj of the students is found in the Sunday 
evening meetings. These meetings are held in the gymnasium and are conducted 
entirely by the students. The meetings are in charge of a committee who select 
a leader for each meeting, and the service is very simple, with one or two prayers, 
plenty of singing, a short address from the leader on some biblical topic or text, 
and an opportunity for anyone else to add her word. Anyone who could be present 
at one of these meetings would see that the earnestness was not wanting; and in 
the every-day life of the College are many instances of the practical Christianity, 
that after all is the test. It has been said that college life is a selfish one, and it 
may be so, but it is not possible to overlook the innumerable, unvaunted, little kind- 
nesses that make up the sum of the day's happiness. 

Bryn Mawr College has doubtless made many mistakes in the ten years of her 
life, and perhaps has justly laid herself open to severe criticism, but she has tried 
toi be honest in her work, and to open to women another opportunity to gain the 
greatest and best of intellectual life. The future alone will show whether the desire 
of the founder is fulfilled, and whether the "institution of learning" which he founded 
is made a recognized power for good. 



HEALTH AND HYGIENE AT BRYN MAWR 

Somewhat removed from the centre of the more active and noisier campus life 
in a spot selected, I am sure, for its beauty and quiet, is the college Infirmary, a 
building which is a constant reminder of the- interest of Bryn Mawr alumnae in the 
health and hygiene of college students. The building is attractive, artistic, well- 
equipped, on the whole, to accomplish its purpose and capable of arousing in those 
who work in it a feeling of affection and contentment in spite of certain troublesome 
idiosyncrasies. Its gray walls covered with ivy, its oneness with the hillside around 
it, its delightful sun room and porches, its completely equipped isolation wards 
for the treatment of contagious diseases, are admirable features. Its single stair- 
way, innumerable doors apparently leading nowhere, its dearth of closets and scarcity 
of bathrooms, its long corridors and sharp turns that forbid the passage of a 
stretcher, doorways that will not accommodate the beds that have been equipped 
with casters so that they can be rolled out on to the flat sun-bathed roofs; these 
are the traits that evoke impatience, fatigue, ingenuity and such an amused tolerance 
as one would develop toward the endearing shortcomings of a unique and individual- 
istic friend. Infinitely more important than these details, however, is the fact that 
the Infirmary exists; that the college maintains the building and its staff of three 
day nurses and (next year) a night nurse, a part-time technician, a full-time asso- 
ciate physician, an active experienced physician-in-chief who constantly serves the 
college as consultant, a psychiatrist, to guard the health of a student body numbering 
all told, less than five hundred students. 

Obviously, the expense of such an equipment is great and as a matter of fact 
the department is not self-supporting in spite of a high Infirmary fee charged each 
student every year and a high daily rate for Infirmary care beyond what the fee 
entitles her to. 

It is the privilege and duty of the college and the alumnae to inquire whether 
or not the greatest possible service is rendered the students and the college com- 
munity by this expensive department. What does the health department do to justify 
its existence and what are its potentialities for further service? The work as a 
whole falls under two general headings: medical (treatment and prophylaxis) and 
educational. 

The Infirmary aspires to be the health centre of the college community. Its 
greatest point of contact with the community is through the medical dispensary which 
is open practically all day. The associate physician is in her office from 8.30 to 
12.30 in the morning and from 3.30 to 5.30 P. M. daily. Students, wardens, and 
resident employees, may apply for medical treatment or service during these hours. 
Such office visits average about 4000 during the academic year. 

Admission to the Infirmary for treatment is usually through the dispensary, 
though frequently at irregular hours, as the occasion demands. The total admissions 
for the year average about 250 to 300 cases, most of them minor ills, some more 
complicated, a few serious. The average stay in the Infirmary is about four days. 
It is fairly common to have the same student admitted a great number of times. 
It is not very rare to have students graduate without ever having been admitted to 
the Infirmary. 

(9) 



10 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

The medical office asks to be informed of all medical treatment the students may 
be receiving under the supervision of home physicians or specialists. In such cases, 
it is often possible to co-operate with great saving of the student's time; for instance, 
vaccine treatments, surgical dressings, iron or arsenic injections and so forth, are 
given routinely in the dispensary, following the, instructions of home physicians. 
Only by knowing of the necessity for treatment can this office be fully appreciative 
of any physical handicaps under which students may be laboring. A medical inter- 
pretation of infirmities that make a lightened schedule advisable is often necessary 
to gain proper consideration for the student. 

Routine physical examination of all students every year, the supervision of 
students with physical equipment below the average, of convalescent patients, restric- 
tion of athletic activities, examination of household employees, checking of menus, 
investigation of milk and water supply, quarantine regulations, are additional duties 
of the medical office. 

Such a report indicates that the medical facilities of the health department 
are utilized by the community. Greater use of our medical and surgical dispensary 
might be made by home physicians. I have known home physicians who insisted that 
a student go into Philadelphia daily to an eminent surgeon for simple surgical dress- 
ings such as internes do routinely in the hospitals. This sort of thing would be 
less likely if the medical facilities of the college were better known. 

From the educational standpoint, however, the resources of the department are, 
I hesitate to say wasted, but at least undeveloped. It is of course always a mooted 
question how much hygiene and preventive medicine should be taught in an academic 
college. My conviction is, the more academic the school, the greater the need for 
emphasis upon the needs and care of the body, not as an end in itself, but to gain 
freedom whenever possible from the physical and emotional deterrents to achieve- 
ment and success. 

Hygiene, as a general course in the academic college, must of necessity be 
informative, scientific but non-technical, with emphasis always on the normal body 
and mind, practical, planned to give all students a working knowledge of the tools 
at hand for the prevention of disease and the maintenance of health. It should form 
a basis for appreciation of the achievements and progress of scientific medicine, an 
appreciation which can be as stirring to the imagination and as inspiring as a study 
of the achievements of man in other fields of endeavor. 

The history of the teaching of Hygiene at Bryn Mawr indicates an increasing 
realization of the wisdom of including instruction in Hygiene in the college cur- 
riculum. From year to year greater opportunity for effective teaching has been 
provided. At present the arrangement is, I believe, better than at any time in the 
past but it is still unsatisfactory. Hygiene at present is considered a part of the 
program of physical education and the students have been required to pass examina- 
tions in its several branches. A course of 13 hours in Body Mechanics has been 
given to Freshmen by Miss Petts, Director of Physical Education. A course of 
eight lectures in general hygiene to the sophomores by Dr. Wagoner; and five 
lectures in mental hygiene by outside speakers. The chief obstacles to the success of 
the program as it stands seem to be as follows: 

First, that although the courses are required and examinations given, they are 
considered extra-curriculum subjects and no credit given for them. 






BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 11 

Second, the instructors in the sciences of Body Mechanics, Personal Hygiene, 
Public Health and Preventive Medicine, have no academic standing. 

Third j the time granted for these courses is insufficient to cover the subject 
material adequately. 

Filling a crowded college curriculum with required courses considered by various 
educators as indispensable to a well-rounded education, is a thankless job at best, 
from the students' standpoint. Requiring courses and giving no credit for them adds 
insult to injury and the grudge is transferred to the subject itself. Failing to give 
instructors in this field academic appointments detracts from the dignity of the 
Department and puts a greater burden upon those who are endeavoring to develop 
its educational phase. The time allotted the Hygiene course should be increased 
from 18 hours as will be given next year, to two hours a week throughout the 
sophomore year — a total of about 50 hours. If it is granted that Hygiene should 
be taught college students, enough time should be given for teaching in sufficient 
detail to insure interest and a grasp of the subject. 

We expect much of college students in the way of sensible behavior. We forget 
that much of their knowledge of physical and mental hygiene is in the nature of 
parental precepts against which unfortunately they may be rebelling, or which they 
may be questioning, or possibly simply waiving temporarily while the more exciting 
phases of college life consume all time and energy. However sound the parental 
admonitions may be, college students need a new basis upon which to build up 
their own principles of living, self-conceived from new scientific knowledge and 
self-applied. 

The practical results of the teaching of hygiene always repay the efforts ex- 
pended, often not as immediately as one would like, but frequently in an unexpectedly 
far-reaching manner. The only discipline worth developing is self-discipline and it 
is the aim of the Health Department to create in students the desire and ability to 
govern themselves in matters of health and hygiene as they do socially and civilly. 

Emotional guidance and training as a protection against the development of 
neurotic tendencies and social maladjustment are receiving much attention in the 
field of education at present. Medicine has a great responsibility in this direction 
which it cannot escape if it would. The physical components of emotional dis- 
turbances bring many students to the dispensary. Giving these students insight into 
the nature of their malady, be it insomnia, excessive smoking, irritability or nervous- 
ness, indigestion, palpitation of the heart, or what not, as well as constructive advice 
as to how to deal with it, is one of the ways in which the Health Department con- 
tributes to mental hygiene. That it has a monopoly over the factors tending to 
create wholesome mental states and a satisfactory adjustment to life, is of course 
as ridiculous as the notion that mental hygiene is some sort of concentrated pill 
which can be administered in one interview or even in five doses of one lecture each. 
How to teach the principles of mental hygiene effectively and help students 
apply them are problems to which the Health Department is giving much thought. 
The observations of a student writing on this subject in an examination in hygiene 
are delightfully in point: "The objection has been put forward in regard to under- 
taking mental hygiene in college or anywhere that the victims, so to speak, are aware 
of it and it is therefore harmful because it leads to introspection. This, it seems to 
me, is a foolish objection since the people who have a healthy objectivity already 



\2 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

either pay no attention or have a good time applying the principles to their friends. 
Those who are given already to introspection had better be given some knowledge 
to judge themselves and their queer twists than go on in a fog. Certainly there 
is narrow subjectivity, usually accompanied by egotism of a defensive hurt sort, in 
college — everywhere in fact, but how to approach it is a difficult matter. Those 
who need such discussion most are often left out of it in the general pow-wows. 
The best, in fact, the only way to reach them without offense is through a lecture 
course on the subject." 

A lecture course was tried this year. Five well-qualified psychiatrists gave talks 
on topics included under the heading Mental Hygiene. Next year, Dr. Earl Bond, 
Director of the new Institute for Mental Hygiene of the Pennsylvania Hospital, 
has consented to give the series himself, giving greater continuity to the course and 
a greater opportunity for developing topics of local and contemporary importance. 
It is hoped that these lectures will inform students as to what constitutes a mental 
hygiene problem and what are the symptoms of maladjustment. Given an increas- 
ing insight into personality difficulties it is hoped that students will learn to seek 
advice in respect to them in proper channels. Medical interviews in mental hygiene 
problems are part of the Student Health Service. The associate physician works 
in consultation with Dr. Bond and under his supervision. 

To the alumnae then, I am anxious to express on behalf of the Infirmary staff 
gratitude and appreciation of their great part in developing the Student Health 
Service at Bryn Mawr. I am equally anxious to interest them in the further de- 
velopment of its educational possibilities and the creation of a Department so organ- 
ized that it will be more likely to succeed in producing college graduates able and 
anxious to guard their physical and mental well-being; and, at the same time, a 
Department offering opportunity for constructive creative work on the part of those 
serving it. 

Marjorie Jefferies Wagoner, 1918, Associate Physician. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

President Park is making a very rapid and successful recovery. She is back 
again in her own house but it not taking any part as yet in College affairs. 



the next council meeting 

The Alumnae Council will meet in November in New York City where the 
sessions will be in charge of Julia Langdon Loomis, 1895, Councillor for District II. 



CHANGE IN COMMENCEMENT SPEAKER 

Due to the fact that Mr. Ralph Adams Cram has been unavoidably detained in 
Europe, the Commencement Address will be delivered by Professor James H. Breasted, 
Director of the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago, who will speak on 
"The Origins of Social Idealism." 



DR SCHENCK GIVEN OVATION; RECEIVES DIPLOMA 

FOR WORK 

(Reprinted from The College News) 

On Monday afternoon, April 29, the French Club entertained at tea in honor 
of Dr. Eunice Morgan Schenck, who has been made an "officier d'Academie." The 
tea, which was followed by the ceremony of presenting the diploma and a medal, 
was given to Dr. Schenck by the members, of the French Club. 

Mile. Parde* was the first to speak and welcomed the French consul of Phila- 
delphia, Mr. Weiller, who was present in honor of the occasion. She congratulated 
Dr. Schenck on the well-merited acknowledgment she was receiving for her work 
in acquainting the students at Bryn Mawr with the French language and literature. 
She expressed her great pleasure in collaborating with such an intelligent and inter- 
ested French scholar, and her pride in the honor paid her friend. 

Mile. Parde was followed by Mr. Weiller, who said he had had the pleasure 
of collaborating with Dr. Schenck frequently and wished to voice his gratitude for 
the great service she had rendered France by helping American students to understand 
and love his country. He mentioned the union which sentiment has always made 
between the two countries. When America was young, France helped her in her 
struggle for liberty, and in the Great War America returned the service in a spirit of 
love and friendship. Dr. Schenck is one of those who are helping to bind America 
and France still more closely together. Then Mr. Weiller presented to Dr. Schenck 
the diploma granted by Monsieur le Ministre d'Instruction et des Beaux Arts. Mrs. 
Schenck pinned the medal, known as "palmes academique," on her daughter's dress. 

Dr. Schenck responded to her ovation in attributing much of her success to 
the collaboration of her intelligent and devoted colleagues, and ended with an 
expression of her great pride in the honor which she had received. 



THE ALUMNAE ROOM 

A transformation has taken place on the top floor of Taylor. The magic was 
made possible through the generosity of two of the alumnae, and the energy and 
taste of the Alumnae Secretary. One sees the office as usual at the top of the 
stairs, but once inside the door one goes down a little corridor that leads into 
what used to be the Economics room. Now it has become a strangely restful and 
gracious place, whose preposterous height of ceiling has been made somehow part of 
its charm. Thin gold-coloured curtains hang at the windows, the soft deep brown of 
the rug tones admirably with the maple table and the Windsor chairs, drawn around 
it. Chintz-covered easy chairs and cushioned window-seats take away any hint of 
austerity. Over the mantel hangs a section of the frieze from the Mausoleum of 
Halicarnassus which used to be in the Chapel, but which now adds its beauty and 
dignity to the lofty, quiet room that has been created. It is very satisfying there. In 
the north window where the sill is so high that there is no glimpse of the hills, is a 
long box of ferns. The business-like touch is given by the Secretary's own desk, 
broad and solid and very dignified, but in wood and tone in harmony with the rest 
of the room. But most significant of all is the new atmosphere of restfulness. Space 
and beauty seem to have a very definite relation to the ease and quickness with which 
business can be transacted. Alumnae returning to college, either in the middle of 
the year, or at reunion time, will find a very welcoming and charming place all 
their own. 

(13) 



MAY DAY AWARDS 



,May first dawned with the usual drizzle, but however wet the grass must 
have been, the spirits of the gambolers on the green appeared undampened, and 
the class Maypoles were wound in fine style. May baskets and songs were offered 
at the President's house, and an especially rousing cheer went up when Miss Park 
herself came to the window to express her thanks. 

Dean Manning presided at chapel, which was held in the Auditorium of Good- 
hart Hall. The student body, clad in white, with the sashes of the Class colours, 
made a brave showing in the gay pink velvet chairs. Among the many announce- 
ments the following will be of especial interest to readers of the Bulletin. 



Scholarship 

New England Regional 

and 
Shippen-Science 

Kilroy-English 

New England Regional 

and 
Mary E. Stevens 

E. Penna. & Del. Regional 

and 
Anna Powers 



Daughter Mother 

Dorothea Cross, 1930 Dorothea Farquhar, 1900 

Constance Hand, 1930 Frances Fincke, 1897 

Celia Darlington, 1931 Rebecca Mattson, 1896 

Frances Tatnall, 1931 Frances Swift, 1895 



As may be seen the Regional Scholars continue to give a good account of 
themselves. In addition to those mentioned above, awards were made to three of 
the Freshmen Regional Scholars. Alice Rider from New England and Anne Bur- 
nett from St. Louis, were both given Bookshop Scholarships. Margaret Bradley, 
sent by the Chicago Committee, has won the Hopkins Music Scholarship. Virginia 
Burdick, 1931, who entered as a Regional Scholar from New England, has been 
awarded the Constance Lewis Memorial Scholarship. 

At the close of the announcement of undergraduate honours, Dean Manning 
read a list of the students whose work seems to indicate that they will graduate cum 
laude. Among those, in addition to all the scholarships holders already mentioned 
are Phyllis Wiegand and Dorothea Perkins, Regional Scholars from New York, and 
Lucy Sanborn and Agnes Knopf from New England. Additional Alumnae Daugh- 
ters on the Roll of Honour are: Martha Gellhorn, 1930, daughter of Edna 
Fischell, 1900; Elizabeth Stix, 1930, daughter of Erma Kingsbacher, 1906; Helen 
Bell, 1931, daughter of Natalie Fairbank, 1905; Alice Hardenbergh, 1932, daughter 
of Margaret Nichols, 1905; and Harriet Moore, 1932, daughter of Caroline 
Daniels, 1901. 

Announcement was made that a new Scholarship had just been given to the 
College by the classmates and other friends of Leila Houghteling of the Class of 
1911, to be called the Leila Houghteling Memorial Scholarship. This is to be 

(14) 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 15 

awarded, probably every three years, by the Alumnae Scholarships Committee, to 
a member of the sophomore class who is of good academic standing, and who shows 
such qualities of leadership and character that she may be considered a valuable 
member of the College community. At the discretion of the Committee this scholar- 
ship will be held for three years. The first holder of the Leila Houghteling Scholar- 
ship is to be Charlotte Tyler, 1932, a sister of Mary Tyler Zabriskie, 1919, and 
of Margaret Tyler Paul, 1922. 

The following alumnae have won fellowships or graduate scholarships for the 
year 1929-30: 

Esther L. 'Rhoads, 1924 Mary E. Garrett European Fellowship. 

Virginia Grace, 1922 Resident Fellowship in Archaeology. 

Grace Rhoads, 1922 Resident Fellowship in Economics and Politics. 

Elizabeth Henderson, 1924 Resident Fellowship in History. 

Ruth Peters, 1928 Graduate Scholarship in Archaeology. 

Katharine Shepard, 1928 Graduate Scholarship in Archaeology. 



THE WOMEN'S UNIVERSITY GLEE CLUB 

To the Editor, the Alumnae Bulletin: 

Elizabeth Baldwin, '14, (Mrs Philip Stimson) ; Katherine Conner, '24; Chris- 
tine Hayes, '28; Evelyn Holt, '09, (Mrs. Holt Lowry) ; Margaret Morton, '21, 
(Mrs. James Creese); Estelle Neville, '24; Catherine Robinson, '20; Mary Robin- 
son, '27; Dorothy Stewart, '23, (Mrs. Richard N. Pierson) ; Suzette Stuart, '07; 
and Carlotta Welles, '12, (Mrs. J. Elmer Briggs), have been members this year of 
The Women's University Glee Club which gave its twelfth concert in the Town 
Hall, New York, on May first, to a large and enthusiastic audience. 

These members of the Club want to say to all Bryn Mawr Alumnae in New 
York who like to sing, that if they wish to have a grand time exercising their lungs 
one evening a week through the winter under an inspiring conductor, they should 
join the Club. 

Note: The Women's University Glee Club, led by Gerald Reynolds, was 
founded in 1922. It has just over 100 members, and sings two concerts each season, 
rehearsing one evening a week. Dues are $15.00 a year. The work it accomplishes 
is important and really good. Tryouts are held in early October and in January. 
For more information write to Mrs. C. Burns Craig, Chairman Membership Com- 
mittee, 129 East 69th St., New York City, or Mary Robinson, '27, 99 Claremont 
Ave., New York City, or Mrs. James Creese, '21, 1 Lexington Ave., New York 
City, who are the Bryn Mawr members of the board. 



ALUMNAE BOOKS 

Labor and Silk, by Grace Hutchins, 1907. International Publishers. $2.00. 

The "nightmare" of the worker in the silk industry has been interestingly 
described by Miss; Hutchins, Bryn Mawr, 1907, in her recent book, Labor and Silk. 
"The crashing, shattering noise of the looms," the fumes and poisons of the dye- 
house, long hours, low wages, and child labor form a forceful indictment against 
an industry which has been growing prosperous and powerful in the last ten years. 
Miss Hutchins adds together the different abuses, and balances them against the 
secrecy, paternalism and autocratic control of the employer, diluted in some cases 
by an uncertain charity. 

The illustrations and incidents cited in this book are most convincing. It is 
evident that Miss Hutchins has a thorough first-hand knowledge of the industry 
both in America and in other countries. It is no less obvious that she criticizes the 
industry in particular and the system under which it has grown up. She is pleading 
the cause of the workers and she makes it clear that they need a defender. She 
offers suggestions as to how organization should be undertaken in the present and 
urges that all efforts must fall far short unless the more fundamental changes in 
the control of production are undertaken. Because of this admitted bias there is 
less stress on the manner in which slow progress can be carried out. There is com- 
paratively little light thrown on how to handle the present situation, and very little 
to help those who might work for immediate changes. The student of labor strategy 
is somewhat disappointed in the lack of interpretation of present union tactics. 

As a background for the outstanding instances of oppression, Miss Hutchins 
has pictured the actual conditions of certain of the large concerns. She has tried 
to investigate the financial situations of the main companies in order to contrast 
profits with wages. Here she has met with obstacles since many of the important 
companies do not publish balance sheets. She has gathered together what facts 
are available, indicating in the case of New Bedford that dividends have been paid 
while wages were cut, in the case of Mallinson high profits and high salaries, in the 
instances of Cortecelli, Cheney and others, evident signs of prosperity. She arrives 
at the conclusion that the industry is moving forward with reasonable prosperity 
despite the claims that lower wages were necessary. Although many of the smaller 
firms are on the verge of bankruptcy, those that dominate production, give, as she 
describes them, a sleek appearance which in no way justifies their labor policy. 

The value of the book lies to a considerable extent in the particular instances 
cited and the "close-ups" which are a characteristic of her manner of treatment. 
In general the discussion is carried along by the use of cases, though there is sum- 
mary of statistical form of the growth of the industry and other measurable facts. 
It is the more vivid statement of instances which carry conviction, however, rather 
than the generalization. As a result of this method of treament the book is broken 
up into small sections, the transitions are abrupt and the interruptions frequent. This 
precludes monotony on the one hand, but it interferes with a cumulative effect. One 
gets no sense of a sure and steady progress from one point of analysis to another, 

(16) 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 17 

but rather a series of snapshots which illustrate the conclusion, evident in the early 
pages, that the worker has been exploited shamelessly. 

The accounts of the strikes, many of them stirring and dramatic, police club- 
bing, picketing and violence, form a narrative of bitter struggle, particuarly in Pat- 
erson, iNew Jersey. The account fails somewhat on the side of criticism of strategy 
and appraisal of results. There is no doubt, however, that every bit of evidence 
here given is of value to those who fear that" the increase of welfare capitalism is 
bewildering the worker and staying the progress of real industrial equality. It is 
possible that Miss Hutchins will go further in her interpretation of union policies 
in some later article or book. It is evident that she has a real knowledge of her 
material and could contribute much to this question. 

Silk has made remarkable progress. Raw silk has been first or second in the 
value of American imports for the last ten years. The improved technique of 
machine production and the development of artificial silk have been accompanied 
by large increases in consumption. Rapid development such as this is usually accom- 
panied by exploitation. The silk industry has a "larger percentage of workers under 
sixteen than in any other manufacturing or mechanical industry." It is well to 
contrast prosperity and oppression. The facts which Miss Hutchins presents are 
worthy of careful consideration. 

Eleanor Lansing Dulles, 1917. 



ACKNOWLEDGMENT 

The latest addition to the Alumnae Book Shelf is Labor and Silk, by Grace 
Hutchins, 1907, the International Publishers Co., New York. Fannie Teller, 1918, 
sent a pamphlet, reprinted from Hospital Social Service, XIX, 1929, entitled A 
Case Record. Marguerite Bartlett Hamer, 1913, sent a pamphlet, reprinted from 
the Georgia Historical Quarterly, March, 1929, on Edmund Gray and His Settle- 
ment at New Hanover. 



LETTERS FROM ALUMNAE 

Elizabeth Mallett Conger, 1925, writes as follows: 

Ah Ha! So the good old Bulletin has gone adventurous! Domesticity is no 
longer at a premium, eh? Well, that's all right. We must admit that, as glamorous 
news, just plain addresses were beginning to pall. We thought we couldn't bear 
another freshly painted house in our class and we frankly preferred Bad Girl to 25 's 
pink and blue version of life. But when it comes to adventure, we can say 
"Goddam" and spit a curve in the wind with the best of them. Kay Fowler, who is 
getting her Ph.D. in Geology at Columbia this spring, has written of her jaunt 
West with a Ford, a Colt, a razor blade and potassium permanganate (vs. rattle- 
snakes.) "Read it for yourself. It's a human document." 

Dear Blit: My long silence doesn't mean that I have forgotten '25, but that 
I have been too busy using my little hammer on rocks in so many different states 



18 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

since I left Bryn Mawr, that my words have been confined to theses rather than 
friends. My first individual field work three summers ago almost ended in disaster. 
While mapping in Glacier Park with a small group from Northwestern University, 
I was sent out to explore in an unknown section, and got caught in a forest 
fire. My experience as Fire Captain should have been of use to me, but there were 
no fire escapes except an icy lake. I reached the shore, somehow avoiding the 
blazing branches that fell around me, and spent an uncomfortable four hours pour- 
ing water over my flannel shirt, and breathing smoky air through my wet bandana. 
Rescuers were meantime combing the lake shore from a motor boat, but refused 
to come near, until, just as darkness was forcing them to give me up, they spied my 
frantic waving. (Not daring to come too close to the sparks, they signaled that I 
was to swim.) Jumping into the waves, high boots and all, and still clinging to my 
precious notebook and hammer, I was finally dragged aboard in a half-drowned 
condition. 

After that experience I spent the next summer in more barren country in 
Wyoming, Colorado, and Utah, joining with a group from the University of 
Wyoming on an auto-camping trip to Bryce Canyon, North Rim of the Grand 
Canyon, and Lion Park. I was on the lookout for a suitable thesis area, since I 
was through with library theses after doing an "indoor" one at Wisconsin. I finally 
chose Wyoming, not because I like Wyoming better than any other state, but because 
I found a fairly accessible territory forty miles by twelve miles containing some 
rocks which interested me, and which had never been mapped or studied before. 
After acquiring a second-hand Ford, I persuaded Baldie to drive out with me on her 
way to "sightsee" in some of the Western Parks. We almost finished ourselves 
and the flivver by skidding in gravel somewhere in Iowa, but reassembled the pieces 
and continued westward. After Baldie was safely on a train in Laramie, I hit for 
the Laramie mountains in the southeastern part of Wyoming, and spent the summer 
dodging rattlesnakes and range cattle as well as horses — all of which proved more 
curious than dangerous, so that I had no need of using my Colt automatic except 
once, to scare away a bob-cat that disturbed my sleep. 

My work consisted in walking about fifteen miles a day, returning to the 
Flivver and tepee tent to cook a belated supper, somehow timing my evening meal 
to coincide with the thunderstorm which usually came up just as I was scouring 
around for sage brush for a fire. Life was far from monotonous, for I broke camp 
every few days, had troubles with the Flivver, and was more than busy with note- 
taking and mapping. 

I adopted a bedraggled collie whom I discovered in a half-starved condition in 
Laramie one day when getting my weekly supplies, and found him most useful as 
a companion, protection, and garbage can. He bumped around on the back seat 
for the two thousand miles return trip, quite enjoying seeing the world, but has 
now settled down to a sedate Eastern life, while I am here at Columbia struggling 
with the final polishings of thesis, getting impatient to hit the trail again for more 
knowledge and adventure. 

Kay Fowler, 1925. 

From India comes the following sketch: 

Once upon a time, about ten years ago, there were two little girls in Kinder- 
garten together. One was delicate and pale with great dark eyes, and soft black 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 19 

curls. She was very quiet and shy, and was always dressed in silk and lace. The 
other was fat and pink, with yellow curls, and she was very lively. 

The first little girl was Sita, the daughter of an Indian chief, and the other 
was our little Melanie. The two children were great friends. When they were 
about ten years old, Sita was having her wedding at Pindar. She was marrying 
the heir-apparent, and it was a great day for her family, because the Raja of Pindar 
was paying a tremendous price for the little girl for his son. She was unusually 
fair and beautiful and a fair skin in this country has a very high market value. 

Our little girl, at this time, was in school, in the hills of South India, having a 
good time with all the other children, swimming in the lake, going on long hikes, 
having Hallowe'en parties and all sorts of fun. 

Ever since those by-gone days I have been interested in watching the affairs of 
the Pindar State, and there have been plenty to watch. All sorts of affairs — mur- 
ders, deposings, weddings with Miss Fancy Frillers, and scandals galore. They seem 
to be a particularly notorious lot. 

Sita's father-in-law is now the Ex-Raja of Pindar and her young husband is 
the Raja. As a rule, native princes are allowed to live out their checkered careers 
in peace and power. Their subjects are long-suffering; also the British Government. 
However, there are times when even the tolerance of the Government is tried 
beyond endurance and then a Raja becomes an Ex-Raja, and his son, if he has one, 
not too bad, succeeds him. 

The present Ex-Raja of Pindar received his Ex only for a few injudicious 
murders. It takes far less, I am sure, to depose a Raja now than it did years 
ago. Moral standards do seem to be rising, even in native states. In the old 
days, plain, ordinary crimes, such as murder, etc., were passed by un-noticed. Only 
something unduly terrible and spectacular caught the attention of Government. 

Such was the case regarding our little friend's grand-father-in-law, who also 
became an Ex-Raja. He was watching a circus one day (so the story runs) and 
became exceedingly bored. Native princes do. Ennui is one of their greatest prob- 
lems. What to do! A bright idea struck him — it would be an excellent joke. He'd 
just order the trapeze ropes cut where the acrobats were performing. He did so 
and the careers of the acrobats came to an end, as did also his own — as a Raja, 
that is. He was speedily reprimanded by the Viceroy and given an "Ex." He 
did not like being deposed at all and felt very bitterly on the subject. 

A few years later, when Lord Curzon and Lord Kitchener had their famous 
differences, and the latter was upheld, the Viceroy felt forced to resign. As he was 
sailing from India, among his many telegrams of farewell, there was one which 
read as follows: "To the Ex-Viceroy of India, from the Ex-Raja of Pindar: 
Sympathy." 

The present young Raja, they say, is a chip of all the old blocks before him, 
so his chances of receiving his "Ex" seem good, and some day our little friend, Sita, 
may be the Ex-Rani of Pindar. We might send her a message of sympathy then, 
or even now, but the sort of sympathy we feel for her is not the sort that she 
would understand quite so easily as that expressed by her old grand-father-in-law to 
the Ex-Viceroy. 

Melanie Atherton Updegraff, 1908. 



CLASS NOTES 



1894 
Class Editor: Abby Brayton Durfee 
(Mrs. Randall N. Durfee), 
Fall River, Mass. 
Emma Bailey Speer had a delightful 
visit this spring at the home of Eliza- 
beth Hench's sister in Laurel, Miss. 

Laurette Potts Pease's daughter, Mary 
Zelia, '27, has been awarded a second 
scholarship for further study at the 
American School in Athens, Greece. 

Blanche Follansbee Caldwell's address 
is P. O. Box 571, Santa Barbara, Calif. 

Fay MacCracken Stockwell is now at 
1031 Clinton St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Abby Brayton Durfee plans to sail on 
the "Augustus," June 1st, for Italy, tak- 
ing with her Mary, '30, and meeting her 
other daughter, Caroline, who is study- 
ing in Geneva at the Ecole des Beaux 
Arts. She would love to hear from any 
'94, and do send some news, so the 
autumn Bulletins will have the summer 
reports of everyone. 

Mary Breed has resigned her position 
as Director of the Margaret Morrison 
Carnegie College, and will retire on July 
1st from active educational work. She 
will continue to spend the greater part 
of the year with her mother at their home 
in Pittsburgh. 

1898 
Class Editor: Edith G. Boericke 
(Mrs. John J. Boericke), 
Merion Station, Pa. 
Marion Park is recovering from an 
operation and is back in Bryn Mawr. 

Alice Hammond writes that she is be- 
tween two events of professional interest 
to her, one, her summer of study at the 
American Academy in Rome in 1927, 
where there was quite a group of Bryn 
Mawrters, and her hope of celebrating 
the Bimillenium Vergilianum in 1930 by 
going on a Vergil Cruise. She hopes to 
go back from our reunion to spend the 
summer in California with Catharine 
Bunnell Mitchell. 

Louise Warren writes: "Your note of 
March 15th greeted me on my return 
April 9 from an Italian winter with side 
trips to Vienna and Dalmatia, where we 
missed the fearful weather they had later, 
but had much more cold than we wanted. 
Hope to come to reunion in June." 

Can anyone tell us where Margie De- 
Armond or Margaret Coughlin are? 

Grace Clarke Wright has just sailed to 
Spain with her husband, but will return 
in time for reunion. 



Frances Brooks Ackermann's oldest 
daughter was married in September, 1927. 

Edith Schoff Boericke's daughter grad- 
uates from Miss Wright's School early in 
June, and her oldest son from Cornell a 
little later. Her second son was the only 
Sophomore this year at Cornell to be 
elected to Al Djebar, the Honorary So- 
ciety in Chemistry. 

All of '98 who can come are looking 
forward to reunion in June. 

1901 
Class Editor: Jane Righter, 

Dublin Road, Greenwich, Conn. 

We record with sorrow and regret the 
loss of another classmate, Anne Gerhard 
Maris, on April 9th, in Philadelphia. Save 
for some family heirlooms, Anne has 
willed all of her estate eventually to local 
charities. 

1904 
Class Editor: Emma O. Thompson, 
320 S. 42nd Street, Philadelphia. 

I have been striving to gather news 
that would give you real pleasure, this 
June, '29, whisper it, our quarter of a 
century mark. If we could meet this 
spring we would all look exactly as we 
did when we were in college — to each 
other, perhaps not to our undergraduate 
daughters. 

I asked Patty to let us have word from 
her, with the following result: 

"111 Wister Road, Ardmore, Pa., 

"April 28th, 1929. 
"My dear Classmates : 

"It is good to have this opportunity of 
getting in touch with all the members of 
1904. 

"As you all know, the class voted 50-2 
in favor of holding our reunion in 1930 
instead of 1929, and one of these two 
said that the date was really immaterial 
to her. 

"It was unfortunate that we were un- 
able to get in touch with all our members 
in foreign countries, but there was no 
doubt as to which date the majority pre- 
ferred, and I have heard from a good 
many distant members who say that they 
plan sabbatical years or trips home in 
1930. Among these are Mary James and 
Harriet Southerland Wright. 

"We must start making our reunion plans 
right away. I am hoping soon to have a 
tea for Alice Boring, at which the, Phila- 
delphia girls can appoint committees to 
prepare for the great event. Any sugges- 
tions as to costumes, sorts of entertain- 



(20) 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



21 



ments, and so forth, will be very welcome. 
As 1901, '02 and '03 will be reuning with 
us, perhaps some joint party can be 
arranged. 

"Through the noble efforts of our class 
collector our Goodhart pledge has been 
completed, and we can face the college 
with a clear conscience — at least, the • 
seven underwriters of the pledge can 
breathe freely once more. 

"It would be very lovely if we could 
have an informal reunion to celebrate our 
twenty-fifth anniversary. Perhaps some- 
thing can be done, but the really impor- 
tant thing is for every member of 1904, 
wherever she may be or whatever she 
may be or whatever she may be doing, to 
plan to be in Bryn Mawr without fail, in 
June, 1930. We will consort with all our 
good old friends of 1901, '02 and '03, 
learn all the things about each other 
which we have been longing to hear, and 
altogether have the time of our lives. 
"Faithfully yours, 

"Patty Moorhouse." 

Alice Boring has been enjoying her 
sabbatical year in Philadelphia spending 
the time with her sister Lydia and see- 
ing old friends and old haunts. She gives 
us a glimpse into the present: 

"Dear 1904: 

"This year in America has included 
some pleasant visits with Bryn Mawrtyrs. 
In December I spent a week with Bert 
Brown and her husband in Washington, 
while I was working at the National Mu- 
seum. They have built their own com- 
fortable house in one of the suburbs. 
After I left, Bert took her father down 
to Florida, where he owns a house in 
some secluded spot, where the Brown 
family can enjoy outdoor life in winter 
just as they do in the Adirondacks in 
summer. 

"In the spring vacation I made a tour of 
the New England colleges, visiting friends 
and inspecting Biology Departments. At 
Smith College I stayed with Margaret 
Scott. Edna Shearer and Esther Lowen- 
thal, her housemates, were both away on 
a trip to New Mexico, recuperating from 
the flu. Their apartment is delightful, 
occupying the entire third floor of an 
old house on a hillside in Northampton, 
with mountain views in all directions. 
The rooms are large and charmingly fur- 
nished, so that with a model maid these 
three American college faculty women 
seem almost as comfortable as I am in 
China. 

"At Mt. Holyoke College I was so busy 
with Biology that the only Bryn Mawrtyr 



I encountered was Ellie Ellis, 1901, who 
was engaged in the interesting task of 
planning the League of Nations meeting 
which a group of students from various 
colleges were staging the next week. 

"At Wellesley I had dinner with Mr. 
and Mrs. Henry Mussey, whose Forum 
suppers used to be a great attraction on 
Sunday nights in our day at Bryn Mawr. 
He is again giving up teaching sociology 
to become Managing Editor of the Nation 
at the end of the academic year. Welles- 
ley regrets losing him as much as Bryn 
Mawr once did. 

"I sail from Seattle for China on 
August 10th, and my address for the next 
five years will again be Yenching Univer- 
sity, Peking, China. I am sorry that re- 
union does not come this year, but you 
will have Mary James with you next year 
to represent China, and she has had more 
thrilling experiences than I have. 
"Cordially, 

"Alice M. Boring." 

Several of the class are planning to 
spend the summer abroad. Emma Fries 
sails May 4th on the Italian steamer 
"Vulcania" for Naples and plans to enjoy 
the early summer in Italy. Rebecca Ball 
will also cross on the "Vulcania," but 
she saids to Italy in June. Leslie Clark 
leaves in July for San Francisco and sails 
to Japan and China. She plans to spend 
a year traveling in the Orient and will 
circle the globe before she returns. No 
doubt many others are going to interest- 
ing places, but they have not sent any 
message to you. 

1907 
Class Editor: Alice Hawkins, 

Taylor Hall, Bryn Mawr, Penna. 

The class will be grieved to hear of 
the death of Peggy Putnam Morse (Mrs. 
Max Withrow Morse), who died in the 
Jefferson Hospital in Philadelphia, on 
May 12th, after an illness of many 
months. She leaves three children. The 
class wishes to express its sympathy to 
Dr. Morse and to her family. 

As has been true so often of late, the 
doings of 1907 have figured in the news 
columns to such an extent that it 'seemed 
old stuff to repeat them in the Bulletin, 
but in case you may have missed these 
items elsewhere, please note: 

Margaret Bailey has a poem in the May 
Harpers. We understand that she has 
forsaken prose and intends to use verse 
entirely as her medium hereafter, and 
that this is only one of many poems which 
are to appear shortly in the leading 
magazines. 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



The New York World is our authority 
for the statement that Jane Cowl is now 
rehearsing a play called "Jennie," the 
joint work of Margaret Ayer Barnes and 
Edward Sheldon, and expects to open in 
Boston this spring. 

Grace Hutchins' book, "Labor and 
Silk," has been published, and is reviewed 
elsewhere in this issue. Eleanor Dulles, 
1917, says that she intends to use this as 
a text book for her students in the Social 
Economy Department. 

The real event of the season was the 
ceremony when Eunice was decorated by 
the French Government, described in de- 
tail elsewhere. In spite of the efforts of 
the French Club to have a young and 
exclusive audience, one or two contem- 
poraries of the star managed to be pres- 
ent. It was a truly impressive and mov- 
ing occasion. The beautifully expressed 
tributes of Mile. Parde, who has been 
Eunice's colleague for many years, and 
of M. Weiller, the French consul in Phil- 
adelphia, the imposing diploma and the 
graceful little decoration itself — all helped 
to make the day memorable, and the de- 
lightful idea of having Mrs. Schenck pin 
the medal on Eunice's dress added a truly 
Gallic touch. The Editor, who was, of 
course, educated to recognize the mean- 
ing by the sound as well as to read 
French at sight, may have been mistaken, 
but she certainly understood the Consul 
to say that alongside of Eunice's Amer- 
ican heart there beats also a French 
heart. The anatomical picture presented 
may seem odd at first, but all who know 
Eunice's devotion to her work will agree 
with the thought. Double-hearted she 
may be, but not two-faced. As we listened 
proudly, a memory came back of an 
autumn evening in 1906, when the pres- 
ent head of the French Department gen- 
erously offered to read French with us as 
a preparation for the Orals. Sitting cross- 
legged on her bed in East, we stumbled 
through the suggested passages, fully con- 
scious of our inferiority and of our privi- 
lege. No interruptions were made, either 
to help or to hinder progress, but at the 
end our mentor dismissed us saying, 
"Well, you'll probably get through, but 
your accent is terrible." M. Foulet and 
his compatriots have never been so frank, 
but several times in later years, as we 
were talking fluently to a cabman or a 
shopkeeper, a look in their eyes reminded 
us of that scene. Anyhow, we were aw- 
fully set up at being present at this affair, 
and knew just what Eunice means when 
she closed her enchanting little speech of 
thanks by saying, "Je suis fiere et ravie." 



1908 
Class Editor: Margaret Copeland 

B LATCH FORD 

(Mrs. Nathaniel H. Blatchford), 
844 Auburn Rd., Hubbard Woods, 111. 

Here's news from Melanie at Nipani, 
Belgaum District! She writes: "We 
live in a place that is 5 miles from any 
other European (white people). We have 
four children, three girls, one boy (we 
lost an older little boy). The eldest in 
the family is Melanie, 13, and the young- 
est Richard, 5 months. The two older 
children are in a boarding school in the 
hills. 

"We come home in 1930. Then I hope 
my very bad eyes and inefficient liver will 
be so bucked up that I can really tell 
people the interesting things about our 
work in Nipani." 

Melanie enclosed some delightful 
sketches she had written for a paper in 
India. The one printed under "Letters 
from Alumnae" brings home to us, in the 
comparison of little Melanie's childhood 
with that of an Indian child friend, the 
wholly foreign conditions of life with 
which she is surrounded. 

Alice Sachs Plaut has gone abroad to 
pick up her eldest son, who graduated 
from Taft School and has been studying 
in Dresden all winter. They are now in 
Italy. Alice's daughter is at Miss Bald- 
win's, preparing for Bryn Mawr. 

Louise Hyman Pollak is planning a 
trip with her family to Iceland, Norway 
and Sweden. 

Elizabeth Foster writes: I am still at 
Smith. This year I've left the dormitory 
where I have been living for nine years, 
and am keeping house with 'a friend of 
mine in a nice little apartment with all 
the modern conveniences and a magnifi- 
cent view. Keeping house, riding horse- 
back and driving a Ford keep me in a 
chronic state of bankruptcy. However, I 
enjoy them. Incidentally, I still teach 
Spanish and enjoy that, too." 



1909 

Class Editor: Helen Bond Crane, 
Denbigh Hall, Bryn Mawr, Penna. 

We really did succeed in having an in- 
formal reunion over the week-end of May 
4th, when the Glee Club gave its per- 
formance of Patience. Those who came 
back for it were Fannie Barber Berry, 
Scrap Ecob, Sally Jacobs, Dorothy Child, 
May Putnam, Gene Miltenberger Ustick, 
Sally Webb and Anne Whitney. Anna 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



23 



Piatt also appeared, but as she was 
with a friend and a parent, she spent 
only part of her time with us. We 
had our class baby to tea, dined at 
the Inn, and then proceeded to the per- 
formance, where we were joined ' by 
Frances Ferris and Bertha Ehlers, the 
latter with her sub-Freshman niece, who 
expects to be here next year. Frances 
Browne was also in the audience, near 
us, but with some guests of her own. We 
were undoubtedly the most enthusiastic 
group in a highly appreciative audience, 
but judiciously refrained from joining in 
the choruses. 

In odd moments on Saturday and Sun- 
day we had time for talk and tea and sit- 
ting on the campus — when the rain held 
off. Never before have we realized how 
much 1909 is responsible for the health 
of these United States! Platty is Presi- 
dent of the Women's Medical Association 
of. New York City, and is enthusiastic 
over the prospects of a new hospital to 
be built by the organization on Central 
Park West, staffed by both men and wom- 
en physicians. 

D. Child is special assistant in the divi- 
sion of medical inspection of schools in 
Philadelphia; she has recently added to 
her labors the job of supervising 96 school 
nurses in the city. 

May Putnam is medical adviser for the 
New York Commission on Ventilation, in 
Schools, we think; at any rate, she has 
been making special examinations of chil- 
dren in a study of colds, their cause and 
cure. We move that she sends us all 
copies of her findings ! 

Anne Whitney keeps a-climbin' in her 
job. She is now Educational Director of 
Health Education for the American Child 
Health Association. This organization 
has been making a study of school health 
work in seventy cities, and one of Anne's 
jobs is to take the result of all this re- 
search and make it available for use in 
specific schools. She moves in high po- 
litical circles, which, however, are not to 
be mentioned in print. Incidentally she 
has just come back from a trip to Ber- 
muda, with a most becoming coat of tan. 
Scrap was in her usual good form and 
regaled us with new tales of her experi- 
ences as a lecturer in mental hygiene for 
the State Charities Aid Association in 
New York. She also told us that Eleanor 
Clifton is in the child-placing department 
of the same organization and is very keen 
about her work. 

The class wishes to express its sym- 
pathy with Catherine Goodale Warren, 
whose father died in New York in April. 



1910 
Class Editor: Emily L. Storer, 

Beaver Street, Waltham, Mass. 

Katherine Liddell had some of her work 
exhibited at the New York Society of 
Women Artists in February and March. 

Emily Storer had a delightful visit from 
Jane when she came to Washington to 
attend the Workers' Education Confer- 
ence in March. 

Juliet Lit Stern writes: "Dear 1910: 
Last August my husband bought the 
Philadelphia Record, at which time I took 
over the Literary Editorship, and since 
then have been busily trying to build up 
a timely, readable, stimulating, character- 
ful Book Page. 

"Members of the faculty of Bryn Mawr 
and all the other colleges around here, 
including Haverford, the University of 
Pennsylvania, Swarthmore and Drexel, 
contribute regularly to the page and cover 
all our books dealing with special topics. 
We are trying to review all important 
books the very week they appear, and we 
have many of the lighter works of fiction 
reviewed in rhyme. 

"If any of 1910 would like a copy of 
the Book Page, I shall be glad to send 
it on. If any of you would like to try 
your hand at reviewing, I am always 
looking for brilliant additions to my staff. 

"As for the rest of my life, I spend 
almost every minute playing with my 
baby. Little Meredith is a year and a half 
old and is an adorable little, curly haired, 
blue-eyed sunbeam. Little Jill is 13 and 
still determined to be an actress. Tom is 
19 and is at the University of Pennsyl- 
vania, where his first concern seems to be 
making the track team. 

"I have enjoyed having lunch with 
Kirkie several times, and would love to 
see other members of 1910 when they 
happen to be in Philadelphia, either at my 
office, Walnut 2300, or my home in Had- 
donfield, Haddonfield 267." 

1911 
Class Editor: Louise S. Russell, 

140 East 52nd Street, New York City.' 

The friends of Anna Stearns will be 
sorry to hear of the death of her mother, 
which occurred in February. 

Helen Emerson Chase and her husband 
took their annual winter sports trip the 
latter part of January up to Pinkham 
Notch. In February Helen spent some 
time with Anna Stearns in Nashua, after 
the death of Anna's mother. 

Marion Scott Soames and her daughter 
are spending a few weeks in Chicago with 
Marion's family. 



24 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



1914 
Class Editor: Elizabeth Ayer Inches 
(Mrs. Henderson Inches), 
41 Middlesex Rd., Chestnut Hill., Mass. 

Elizabeth Reynolds Hapgood leaves in 
April for several years abroad, so that 
her three children will learn French and 
German and also appreciate nationalities 
other than their own. 

Katharine Dodd is Assistant Professor 
of Pediatrics in Vanderbilt Hospital, 
Nashville, Tenn. Besides, she runs the 
dispensary, oversees the wards and 
teaches Southern boys all day and evening 
to care for babies. She shares a house 
in winter with the social worker and finds 
herself excellent as a furnace man. In 
summer they share a camp beside a muddy 
stream where they enjoy (?) swimming. 
It certainly sounds strenuous, and K. says 
she likes the South. 

Emily Brownback was married on April 
8th to Walter Olcott Smith in St. Peters- 
burg, Fla. 

Mary Haines says she is supposed to 
be a lady of leisure, but that she can't 
find the leisure. She cares for her Sy 2 - 
year-old nephew through the week so 
that he can attend the Friends' School in 
Moorestown, N. J. 

Ida Pritchett has a leave of absence 
from the Rockefeller Institute for next 
year and expects to spend the winter in 
Haverford. She says that Cad appeared 
in New York for a textile conference, 
stayed at the Cosmopolitan Club and pro- 
ceeded to buy out the town when not at 
the theatre. She is still enthusiastic about 
her shop in Keene, N. H. 

Dorothy Skerrett sounds much inter- 
ested in her job. She manages the only 
Woman's Board Room in Philadelphia, 
and since September they have outgrown 
their original room and taken a whole 
floor. She is anxious to help anyone to 
make investments. Her address is c/o de 
St. Phalle & Co., 1604 Walnut Street. 

Frank Capel Smith reports that her 
household is very large, for besides her 
two children she has two horses, a pony 
and many cats. She went to England in 
September and hopes to go in May. 

Margaret Richmond MacMullen writes 
that she is grayer and leaner than she 
used to be, and that in addition to the 
customary husband she has two small 
boys, aged 4 and 1, named Sandy and 
Ramsey. 

Catherine Carr moved into her new 
house in November, the third in a year, 
in Biltmore Forest, N. C. She sounds 
very domestic with her new garden, her 
chow puppy, and last, but not least, her 
small son. 



Isabel Benedict is still working at the 
Bell Telephone Laboratories in New 
York. She works long hours and has 165 
girls and 40 boys to supervise. 

1915 
Class Editor: Emily Noyes Knight 
(Mrs. Clinton Prescott Knight), 
97 Angell Street, Providence, R. I. 
Word has just been received of the 
death of Elizabeth Wolf Blitzen at Roch- 
ester, Minn., on January 30, 1929. She 
had done valuable work in the Depart- 
ment of Pathology, University of Chi- 
cago, and more recently had been en- 
gaged in research work at the Michael 
Reese Hospital, Chicago. The class 
wishes to extend its sympathy to her hus- 
band and family. 

1916 
Class Editor: Catherine S. Godley, 
768 Ridgeway Avenue, Avondale, 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Larie Klein Boas came out of the West 
in April, and her first stop was in Cin- 
cinnati to visit Charlotte Westheimer To- 
bias. Charlotte, like the lady she is, 
shared her with her classmates and con- 
temporaries and we found her the same 
old Larie, only more so, much more so. 
In her brief stay she shook us out of our 
staid and sober state into a riot of mirth, 
and we recommend her as the best spring 
tonic on the market. We tried our hardest 
to persuade her to stay East until reunion, 
but we had a husband and a son on the 
Pacific Coast pulling against us. 

Elizabeth Brakeley, M. D., put out her 
sign at 16 Forest Street, Montclair, N. J., 
on Lincoln's Birthday. She finished her 
interneship at Bellevue Hospital in May 
of 1928, took a last fling in Europe in the 
summer and came back to a temporary 
job in the public schools of Pelham, N. Y., 
while making up her mind where to settle. 
She now has an apartment in Montclair, 
where she combines office and housekeep- 
ing, and although her practice is not yet 
so extensive that it will keep her from 
reunion, she has done better than she ex- 
pected. She is doing general practice, 
although she is making a particular point 
of pediatrics, in which she had a special 
interneship at Bellevue. She works in 
two clinics in the Montclair Hospital and 
two in New York, but she still has so 
much time on her hands that she has taken 
to dressmaking, cooking, and painting the 
furniture. We wonder how many hours 
Brakeley calls a day ! 

Joanna Ross Chism and her family are 
going East for a visit in May. This is 
very opportune, for Jo will be able to 






BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



25 



take in at least a part of reunion. Her 
two sons are now 3 and 8, and she still 
lives in Webster Groves, a pleasant sub- 
urb of St. Louis. 

The class extends its sincere sympathy 
to Caroline Crowell, whose father died in 
March. Caroline went home for a 
month's leave of absence at that time. 
She has been physician to the women 
students at the University of Texas for 
three years. 

1919 
Class Editor: Mary Morris Ramsay 
Phelps (Mrs. William Eliott Phelps) 
Guyencourt, Del. 

Edith Rondinella announced her en- 
gagement to Dr. Jay Bessen Rudolphy on 
April 2nd. Dr. Rudolphy is an eye 
specialist in Philadelphia. He received 
his M. D. at Columbia and then did his 
graduate work in ophthalmology at the 
medical school of the University of Penn- 
sylvania. Edith is teaching History of 
Music at the Agnes Irwin School and 
studying piano with Mr. Alwyne at Bryn 
Mawr. She now has a manager for her 
lecture recitals. 

Elizabeth Hurlock is still teaching at 
Columbia and has just completed a book 
which is on the press at present. The 
subject is the Psychology of Fashion. 

Emily Matz Boyd writes that her fam- 
ily are all thriving after having had a 
siege of flu at Christmas time. Her twin 
boys keep things lively helping each other 
to get into mischief. 

Announcement has been made of the 
engagement of Adelaide Landon to the 
Rev. C. H. Roddy, Pastor of the First 
Presbyterian Church in North Arlington, 
N. J. Mr. Roddy is a graduate of Yale 
in the class of 1922, and of Union Theo- 
logical Seminary. 

1920 
Class Editor: Mary Hardy, 

518 Cathedral Street, Baltimore, Md. 

The class wishes to extend to Dorothy 
Griggs Murray its deepest sympathy in 
the death of her husband, Francis King 
Murray. 

Miriam Brown Hibbitts announces the 
arrival of a son, Josiah Benjamin, III, 
on the 26th of March, in Nashville, Tenn. 

Teresa James Morris writes that she is 
still alive and living in Washington, but 
that she has no news. 

Lois Kellogg Jessup, after a summer 
abroad with her husband and 2-year-old 
son and his nurse, returned to their house 
in Croton for the winter. Lois started and 
runs a nursery school, which is connected 
with the Hessian Hill School, a country 



school in Croton. To make her experi- 
ment a complete one, she has had living 
with her this winter two other 2-year-olds, 
one a boy and the other a girl. The Jes- 
sups are planning another summer in 
France, Central Europe and Holland, 
where Mr. Jessup, who has just been 
abroad with Mr. Elihu Root, will give a 
series of lectures in July at the Hague. 

This is to inform you that my office as 
Class Editor expires with this contribu- 
tion, and that Margaret Ballou Hitchcock 
(Mrs. David I.) succeeds me, or, rather, 
resumes the job that was temporarily 
thrust into my hands. 

Millicent Carey has accepted the post 
of Head Mistress of the Brearley School, 
in New York. She will not go to the 
Brearley until the autumn of 1930, as 
next year she will be Acting Dean at 
Bryn Mawr. 

Nancy Offutt will also be a Head Mis- 
tress, taking up her "job" next winter. 
Her school is the Garrison Forest School 
for Girls, a boarding and country day- 
school a few miles outside of Baltimore. 
This winter Nancy has been teaching the 
fourth primary class at the Bryn Mawr 
School. 

Mary Hardy has been working and will 
continue to work next year, under the 
J. J. Abel Fund for the Investigation of 
Common Colds, at Johns Hopkins School 
of Hygiene and Public Health. As a re- 
tiring Class Editor she wishes to extend 
her thanks to everyone who has sent news 
for the Bulleitn, and to urge everyone 
and more than everyone to continue send- 
ing news to Margaret Ballou Hitchcock, 
who will resume the editorship for next 
year. Ballou's mailing name and address 
are: Mrs. David I. Hitchcock, 45 Mill 
Road, New Haven, Conn. 

1921 

Class Editor: Mrs. J. E. Rogers, 

99 Poplar Plains Road, Toronto, 
Ontario, Canada. 

Jean Spurney, or Jean Inness, as she 
is known on the stage, was married De- 
cember, 1927, to Victor Jory, her leading 
man, in Denver. Jean has been the lead- 
ing woman in stocks for three years now, 
playing mostly in the middle west. The 
plays in which she is now acting are "The 
Last of Mrs. Cheney," "The Green Hat" 
and "The Scarlet Woman." She and her 
husband like to play all winter in stocks 
and then take a long vacation in the sum- 
mer. In another year they hope to have 
their own company in some Western 
town. 

Silvine Marbury Harrold, who is living 
in Macon, Ga., writes that she is becom- 






26 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



ing thoroughly Georgian. Her daughter, 
Silvine, was born on December 17, 1928. 

Francesca Moffat Frazier has two 
sons : Gordon, aged 6, and Donald, 4. Her 
hobbies are archaeology, horses and 
people. 

Sidney Donaldson has been sick for 
several months. We hope to hear of her 
complete recovery soon. 

Helen Bennett is a concert dancer and 
has a ballet school of 100 pupils in Pitts- 
burgh. She is very interested in every- 
thing connected with the stage and does 
a good deal of costume designing. 

Ida Lauer Darrow's second daughter, 
Constance, was born in March. Ida spends 
her spare time working in her garden and 
for the College Club. 

Agnes Hollingsworth Spaeth does her 
own housework and takes complete charge 
of her two sons, David, A l / 2 , and Stanley, 
2y 2 . Her husband is working for his 
M. A. at Penn. 

Helen Hill Miller has been living since 
her marriage in 1927 in Geneva, Switzer- 
land. She writes book reviews and ar- 
ticles for the Nation, Survey, Saturday 
Review of Literature, and is a member 
of "Amer. Labor Publishing Associates." 
This month the Atlantic is publishing part 
of a book of her essays. Last spring 
Helen made a flying trip home to receive 
her Ph.D. in Political Science at the Uni- 
versity of Chicago. She plans to come 
back to this country permanently in an- 
other year. This summer she and her 
husband are traveling over Europe get- 
ting material for a book which they are 
planning to write together. 

Eugenia Sheppard Black is as petite as 
ever, weighing only 90 pounds. She has 
an 18-months-old son, Samuel L. Black, 
3rd. Her husband is a lawyer in Colum- 
bus, Ohio. 

Ann Taylor is living in Greenwich and 
teaching in the Senior English Depart- 
ment at Rosemary. She writes that she 
has tried rigorous dieting and plays 
squash and tennis, but does not lose 
weight. Her hobby is international affairs. 

Nancy Porter Straus is living in Win- 
netka. Her husband is Assistant City Edi- 
tor on the Chicago Evening Post, and 
writes Chicago news for the New York 
Evening Post. She has two daughters, 
Lucy, aged 3, who attends nursery school, 
and Margaret, aged 1. This winter Nancy 
and her husband took a 5 weeks' vacation 
in the Caribbean. They arrived in Gua- 
temala while a revolution was going on 
and found sightseeing difficult but excit- 
ing. One day while motoring on a very 
poor, narrow road to Atitlan Lake, which 



is up some 10,000 feet, they were told 
that 100 men had just been killed there 
by bandits. The chauffeur got panicky, 
but was made to go on. This story later 
boiled down to one automobile which had 
been 'held up the night before by bandits 
and for whom 100 soldiers were search- 
ing the mountains. 

Marion Walton Putnam, who is living 
at 71 West 12th St., New York, has a 
son, born April 1st. 

1922 
Class Editor: Serena Hand Savage 
(Mrs. Wm. L. Savage), 
29 W. 12th Street, New York City. 
Missy Crosby has varied her career in 
Vienna by an excursion into Greece. 

Liz Hall has a new job as secretary to 
an architect in New York. 

Jeannette Palache has been spending the 
winter in Carmel, Calif. 

Marion Rawson has sailed for Greece 
to do archaeology. 

Julia Shearer is farming in Virginia. 

1923 
Class Editor: Katharine Lord Strauss, 
Oyster Bay, Long Island. 

Aggie Clement Robinson has a second 
daughter, Ellen Farr, about three months 
old. 

Louise Affelder has announced her "en- 
gagement to a Baltimore attorney, Eman- 
uel Davidore, who is also interested in the 
Little Movie movement (Fifth Avenue 
and Carnegie Playhouses in New York, 
etc.) He is 32, and a graduate of George 
Washington University, and lots more 
things, which I won't describe now. We 
have no definite plans as yet " 

Dusty Rhoads is engaged to Walter H. 
Houghton, a graduate of Yale, now in- 
structor at Andover School, Massachu- 
setts. They plan to be married in June of 
1930. Dusty has won the Mary E. Garrett 
Fellowship for European travel. 

Bella Goddard Mott has returned from 
India to spend the summer in this 
country. 

Dena Humphreys is back from a very 
successful tour of Canada, playing leading 
roles in "Candida," "You Can Never 
Tell," "Fanny's First Play," and "John 
Bull's Other Island." She sails for 
Europe on the 15th of May. 

1924 
Class Editor: Beth Tuttle Wilbur 
(Mrs. Donald Wilbur), 
Bryn Mawr, Penna. 
Betty Ives, who is now living at home, 
145 E. 35th Street, New York, has re- 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



27 



cently returned from a three weeks' stay- 
in Bermuda. 

Doris Hawkins Baldwin writes from 
the Hotel Carlton, Binghamton, N." Y., 
where she is living: "We haven't done 
anything famous nor exciting, but enjoy 
everything. The church choir thought we 
could sing — and so we're doing that and 
liking it. There's, of course, a bridge 
club, and a rather active College Club, 
which is putting on a convention in May 
for the district." 

The following letter from Bing will fill 
in a great gap for most of us: "In com- 
pany with most of '24 I seem to have been 
a bit reticent as to my whereabouts since 
going out into the wide, wide world. In 
the first place, I got me a job on the 
Rochester, N. Y., Democrat and Chron- 
icle, and for nearly three years covered 
everything from orphans' outings to sui- 
cides, with movie reviewing as a side- 
line. Meanwhile I dashed around the 
country to horse shows, riding and re- 
porting them for my paper and various 
magazines, and in the fall spent my morn- 
ings fox hunting in the Genesee Valley. 
My working hours were 2 P. M. till I 
was through, generally after midnight. 

"Winter before last I gave up all this 
to get married to Philip A. Hevenor, and 
we moved to Dayton, O. We now have 
a 7-months-old boy, Richard Kerry, and 
have again moved, this time to Indian- 
apolis. 

"Wish I could give, you more news, but 
I haven't seen or heard from anybody in 
many moons. Kay Brauns was married 
last spring to Rolf M. Eskil, and went to 
Carmel-by-the-Sea, California, to live." 

Found! The perfect mother! She 
doesn't hide her baby under a bushel ! 
Elsa Molitor Vanderbilt had a daughter 
born on April 19th, and the very next 
mail brought news thereof. Elsa and 
Spence are living at 2415 Robinwood Ave- 
nue, Toledo, with Elsa Molitor, Jr., and 
urge any of '24 in the neighborhood to 
come and see them. 

Dorothy Litchfield, who is librarian at 
the Botanical Library of the University 
of Pennsylvania, has been working after 
hours with a committee of the four Gar- 
den Clubs of Philadelphia over an exhi- 
bition of Herbals and old Garden Books, 
arranged in honor of the annual meeting 
of the Garden Clubs of America at the 
Free Library of Philadelphia. Emily Fox 
Cheston, 1908, one of the committee, is 
emphatic in praise of her knowledge and 
ability and untiring work. 



1928 
Class Editor: Helen McKelvey 
341 Madison Avenue, 
New York. 

"Gaillard and Lib Rhett were traveling 
about Italy and the Riviera together, hav- 
ing run across each other in Rome, but I 
think they have split now and Lib is show- 
ing C. Smith and Bozo, Florence, while 
Gaillard is having tea with the Youngs 
in Paris. 

"Joe and Polly are still abroad. 

"A long note came from Hope Yandell, 
saying that though she couldn't possibly 
come to reunion, she would furnish news. 
Here it is: 

"Kate Hepburn is now Mrs. Ludlow 
Ogden Smith and is still understudying 
Hope Williams. She is living at 146 East 
39th Street, New York. 

"Peggy Miller is doing extremely well 
with her art and is going on with it 
seriously. 

"Anne Petrasch was married to Blythe 
Emmons on February 9th and is living in 
New York. 

"Cal Crosby went to Vienna with Betty 
Brown in January and is now somewhere. 

"Hope has been in Mexico for two 
months and has just returned from the 
Revolution to Greenwich after several 
adventures. 

"Sylvia Brewster was married to Lt. 
Edward Frederick Maude, of the Royal 
Horse Artillery, and has now gone to 
India with him." 

Helen Hook paid us a fleeting visit on 
her way, as far as we could gather, from 
Chicago to Chicago. She had been in 
Bryn Mawr for the week-end, and was 
altogether having a gay time. Her tales 
of Art School in Chicago were most 
amusing. 

Mary Fite has been working in the toy 
department of Macy's, and lunched occa- 
sionally with Mat Fowler, also of Macy's. 
Mary was planning, when last we saw 
her, to share an apartment with Marg 
Saunders and Emma Gillinder. Marg is 
still doing social service work, and Emma 
has a wonderful job, requiring a reading 
knowledge of French and German (show- 
ing that there is some good in orals after 
all). 

Our book business is as much fun as 
ever. Lately I have been making speeches 
on modern novels before local women's 
clubs; I look back gratefully to oral re- 
ports every time I find myself standing 
before groups of women. 

Every one is hoping to see every one 
at reunion. Let's all appear in Whoopee 
socks and make it a good time. 






The Saint Timothys School 
for Girls 

CATONSVILLE, MARYLAND 

FrnnJcJ Stpttmia ISS2 

COLLEGE PREPARATORY 

AND 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

MISS LOUISA McENDREE FOWLER 
Head of the School 

Wykeham Rise 

WASHINGTON, CONNECTICUT 

A COUNTRY SCHOOL 
FOR GIRLS 

FANNY E. DAVIES, LL.A., Headmistress 
Prepares for Bryn Mawr and Other Colleges 

The Episcopal Academy 

(Founded 1785) 

CITY LINE, OVERBROOK, PA. 

A country day school for boys 

MODERN AND WELL EQUIPPED 
Endorsed by Bryn Mawr Alumnae 

UNIVERSITYgTrls 

BOARDING AND DAY SCHOOL 

Founded 1896 

Thorough and successful Preparation 

for Eastern Colleges for Women as well as 

for Midwestern Colleges and Universities 

Illustrated Catalogue on Request 

ANNA B. HAIRE, A.B., SMITH COLLEGE, Principal 

1106-B Lake Shore Drive Chicago, Illinois 

THE HARTRIDGE SCHOOL 
FOR GIRLS 

SO minutes from New York 

A country school with beautiful grounds. 
College Preparatory and General Courses. 
Over fifty girls in leading colleges today. 
Resident Department carefully restricted. 
Special attention to Music and Art. 
Athletics, Dramatics, Riding, 

EMELYN B. HARTRIDGE, Vassar, A.B., Principal 
Plainfield, New Jersey 



The Ethel Walker School 

SIMSBURY, CONNECTICUT 

Head of School 

ETHEL WALKER SMITH, A.M., 
Bryn Mawr College 



Head Mistress 

JESSIE GERMAIN HEWITT, A.B., 
Bryn Mawr College 



lOGEHSHAlX 

"v4Modcrn School with New England Traditions 



H Jp^iMo< 

H T tm r Thorough Preparation for any College 
H ^alk One Year Intensive Review 

JraL ^»rf General Academic Course with dl- 
JHb ^^^ploma. Junior College Courses — Home 
Economics, Secretarial Training, Music, Art, Dramatic 
Art. 26 Miles from Boston. Outdoor Sports. Riding. 
Gymnasium. Swimming Pool. 

EDITH CHAPIN CRAVEN, A.B., Bryn Mawr 
201 Rogers Street, Lowell, Mass. 

HARCUM SCH^L 

BRYN MAWR, PA. 
Prepares for Bryn Mawr and 
all leading colleges 

Musical Course prepares for the Depart- 
ment of Music of Bryn Mawr College 
L. MAY WILLIS, Principal 
EDITH HARCUM, Head of School 

THE MISSES KIRK'S 

College Preparatory School 

PREPARATORY TO BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

Individual Instruction. Athletics. 

Clovercroft, Montgomery Avenue, Rosemont, Pa. 

Mail, telephone and telegraph address: Bryn Mawr. Pa. 



CHOATE SCHOOL 

1600 Beacon Street, Brookline, Mass. 

HOME AND DAY SCHOOL 
FOR GIRLS 

EMPHASIS ON COLLEGE PREPARATION 

Elective Courses for students not preparing 
for College 

AUGUSTA CHOATE, A.M. (Vassar) 

Principal 



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THE AGNES IRWIN SCHOOL 

2009-2011 Delancey Place, Philadelphia 

A College Preparatory 
SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

BERTHA M. LAWS, A.B., Headmistress 



GRAY GABLES 

THE BOARDING DEPARTMENT OF THE 
BANCROFT SCHOOL OF WORCESTER 

Complete College Preparatory Course. 
One year course for Board Examination. 

For catalog address: 

Hope Fisheb, Ph.D., Bancroft School 

Woecesteb, Massachusetts 



MISS BEARD'S SCHOOL 

A Country School near New York 

Orange, New Jersey 

COLLEGE PREPARATION 

Advanced Courses Junior High School 

Music, Art, Domestic Science 

Catalog on Request 

LUCIE C. BEARD, Headmistress 

The Katharine Branson School 

ROSS, CALIFORNIA Across the Bay from San Francisco 

A Country School College Preparatory 

Head: 
Katharine Fleming Branson, A.B., Bryn Mawr 

MISS MADEIRA'S SCHOOL 

1330 19th St., N. W. Washington, D. C. 

A RESIDENT AND DAY SCHOOL FOR 
GIRLS 

LUCY MADEIRA WING, A.B. 

MRS. DAVID LAFOREST WING 
Head Mistress 

MISS WRIGHT'S SCHOOL 

Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Prepares for College Board 
Examination 



CAROLINE RUUTZ-REES. Ph.D. \ 
MARY E. LOWNDES. Litt.D 



FERRY HALL 

A RESIDENT AND DAY SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

On Lake Michigan, near Chicago 

Junior College; High School Department: College 
Preparatory and General Courses. Special Departments 
of Music. Expression and Art. 

Two new dormitories, including new dining room and 
infirmary, to be opened September 1929. 

Eloise R. Tremain, A.B., Bryn Mawr, Principal 

ROSEMARY HALL 

College Preparatory 
(With supplementary but not alternative courses) 

> Head Mistresses 

GREENWICH - - CONNECTICUT 

The Shipley School 

Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 

Preparatory to Bryn Mawr College 

ALICE G. HOWLAND, ELEANOR 0. BROWNELL 
Principals 

MISS RANSOM and 
MISS BRIDGES' SCHOOL 

PIEDMONT, CALIFORNIA 
(A suburb of San Francisco) 

A RESIDENT AND DAY SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

General and College Preparatory Courses 
Outdoor Life throughout the year 

EDITH BRIDGES, B.L., Principal 

The Baldwin School 

A Country School for Girls 
BRYN MAWR PENNSYLVANIA 

Preparation for Bryn Mawr. Mount Holyoke. Smith. 

Vassar and Wellesley college*. Abundant outdoor life. 

Hockey, basketball, tennis. 

ELIZABETH FORREST JOHNSON, A.B. 

HEAD 

THE LOW AND HEYWOOD SCHOOL 

Emphasizing college preparatory work. 

Also general and special courses. 

One year intensive college preparation. 

Junior school. 

64th year. Catalogue. 

SHIPPAN POINT, STAMFORD, CONN. 



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i orrison Tor-esi 



^ W A Modern Country School in the 
Green Spring Valley near Balti- 
more. Excellent Equipment. All Sports. 
Special Emphasis on Horseback Riding. 

Garrison Forest Girls who are going to college 
are thoroughly prepared for any institution. 

Other girls take courses with special emphasis 
on Music and Art. Younger girls live in a 
separate Junior House. 

Mild Climate. Nation-wide Clientele* 



Principals 

MISS JEAN G. MARSHALL 

MISS NANCY OFFUTT, 

Bryn Mawr, ex '20 

Box B, Garrison, Maryland 



THE CAMBRIDGE SCHOOL 

DOMESTIC ARCHITECTURE 

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 

A Professional School for College 

Graduates 

The Academic Year for 1929-30 opens 

Monday, October 7, 1929. 

Henry Atherton Frost — Director 

53 Church Street, Cambridge, Mass. 

At Harvard Square 




BRIARCLIFF 

Mrs. Dow's School for Girls 

Margaret Bell Merrill, M.A., Principal 
BRIARCLIFF MANOR NEW YORK 

College Preparatory 
and General Academic Courses 

Post Graduate Department 

Music and Art with New York 
advantages. New Swimming Pool 



Music Dept. 
Jan Sickesz 



Art Dept. 
Chas. W. Hawthorne, N. A. 

Director 



BEECH WOOD 

A CAMP FOR GIRLS 

On Lake Alamoosook near Bucksport, Me. 

Water sports, athletics and other 

camp interests. Tutoring. 

Conducted by 

HERMINE EHLERS, A.B., Bryn Mawr 

Address: FRIENDS SEMINARY, Rutherford Place, N. Y. City 



CAMP MYSTIC 



MYSTIC 
CONNECTICUT 

Miss Jobe's salt water camp for girls 
8-18. Conducted by Mrs. Carl Akeley (Mary 
L. Jobe). Halfway, New York and Boston. 
Land and water sports. Horseback riding. 

MARY L JOBE, Room 507. 607 Fifth Ave., N.Y.C. 






The Traphagen School of Fashion 



I 



INTENSIVE WINTER AND 
SUMMER COURSES 

All phases from elementary to full 
mastery of costume design and illus- 
tration taught in shortest time com- 
patible with thoroughness. Day and 
Evening classes. Saturday courses for 
Adults and Children. Our Sales De- 
partment disposes of student work. 
Every member of advanced classes 
often placed through our Employment 
Bureau. Write for announcement. 



In Arnold, Constable & Company Costume 
Design Competition, over 100 schools and 
nearly 800 students took part; all prizes 
were awarded to Traphagen pupils with 
exception of one of the five third prizes. 

1680 Broadway (near 52nd St.) New Y< 



Katharine Gibbs 

A school of unusual character with a distinctive 
■pur-pose for educated women 
SECRETARIAL ACADEMIC EXECUTIVE 
BOSTON 



90 Marlboro Street 
Resident and 
Day School 

NEW YORK 
247 Park Avenue 

PROVIDENCE 
155 Angell Street 



Special Course for College 
Women. Selected subjects 
preparing for executive posi- 
tions. Separate classrooms 
and special instructors. 
One-year Course includes tech- 
nical and broad business train- 
ing preparing for positions of 
a preferred character. 
Two-year Course, for prepara- 
tory and high school gradu- 
ates. First year includes six 
college subjects. Second year 
intensive secretarial training 
Booklet on request 



After College What? 

THE DREXEL INSTITUTE 
LIBRARY SCHOOL 

Offers a one year course for 
college graduates, and pre- 
pares students for all types 
of library service. 

PHILADELPHIA 



Cathedral School of St. Mary 

GARDEN CITY, LONG ISLAND, N. Y. 

A school for Girls 19 miles from New York. College 

preparatory and general courses. Music Art and 

Domestic Science. Catalogue on request. Box B. 

MIRIAM A. BYTEL, A.B., Radcliffe, Principal 

BERTHA GORDON WOOD, A.B., Bryn Mawr, 

Assistant Principal 



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The Phebe Anna Thorne School 

Under the Direction of the Department 
of Education 



A progressive school preparing for all colleges. 

Open air class rooms. 

Pre-school, Primary, Elementary and High 
School Grades. 



BRYN MAWR, PA. 

AGNES L. ROGERS, Ph.D., Director 
FRANCES BROWNE, A.B., Head Mistress 



Learnt t© Play 

WEJBGEf 



NOW READY 

AUCTION BRIDGE" 
FOR BEGINNERS 

By MILTON C. WORK 

Now anyone can learn to play sound 
and enjoyable Bridge. Mr. Work's 
new book contains what everyone 
wants to know, needs to know, and 
should know. Average players, too, 
will And this book the key to win- 
ning Bridge. Cloth. 136 Pages. 
Price $1.00 
At all booksellers and stationers 




Wherever Bridge is 
played, at home or 
abroad, Milton C. 
Work is the pre-emi- 
nent authority^9 out 
of every 10 teachers 
use his system ^ He 
originated the present 
count ^> Has served 
on every committee 
drafting laws ^ Re- 
ferred to by Colliers 
as" the supreme court 
of Bridge." 

THE JOHN C.WINSTON CO. 

PUBLISHERS PHILADELPHIA 



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4 golden days that cost 
you nothing! 

Cross by oneof Canard's seventeen Cabin 
steamers . . . the largest Cabin Fleet 
afloat ... 2 extra days over, 2 extra days 
back . . . days of invigorating ocean air 
that builds up bodies . . . smoothes 
wrinkles and reddens cheeks. More rest, 
more "tonic", more leisure, more recre- 
ation, animating contact with congenial 
companions, and not one whit less of 
wholesome gayety. For $145 up ... a bed 
or a berth in a charming stateroom, 
flawless service, delicious meals, Morn- 
ing Broth, Afternoon Tea, Deck Games, 
Concerts, Dances . . . every form of 
delightful ship life. There are also very 
attractive and surprisingly comfortable 
Tourist Third Cabin accommodations 
available from $102.50 up, one way; 
$184.50 up, round trip. 

Visit Europe in the Fall and know 
Europe as Europe actually is 

Autumn is the Season when the social 
activities of every European Capital are 
at their height; operas, carnivals, fetes, 
pageants . . . everywhere the real native 
kaleidoscope. You will see all that the 
Summer Tourists see and a great deal 
more . . . and see it unhurried. 

THREE SAILINGS A WEEK 

CUNARD LINE 



See Your Local Agent 



THE SHORTEST BRIDGE TO EUROPE I 



- JOHN HANCOCK SERIES - 



A PROBLEM for 
HOME MAKERS 

Is the management of 
The Family Income. 

OUR HOME BUDGET SHEET is 
designed to cover one month's 
record of income and outgo. 

It is an Account Sheet for both the 
Beginner and the Budget-wise. 

Sent FREE on request. 
Inquiry Bureau 



Life Insurance Company^ 

Boston. Massachusetts 

197 Clarendon St., Boston, Mass. 

Please send me FREE copy of the John 
Hancock Home Budget Sheet. (I enclose 
2c. to cover postage.) 

Name 

Address 

— - OVER SIXTY-SIX YEARS IN BUSINESS 



Y>I£Tiy{CTIF£ 

Millinery 

successfully caps 
the climax of 
fashion and the 
smart ensemble. 

SAKS-FIFTH AVENUE 

FORTY- NINTH to FIFTIETH STREET 
NEW YORK 



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Warner Public Library, Tarrytown, N. Y. Walter D. Blair, Architect. Ernest 
L. Smith Construction Co., Builders. Built of Select Qray Indiana Limestone 

Buildings to be Proud of 



THE all-stone exterior, so much ad- 
mired, is not prohibitively expensive. 
New methods and large scale production 
of Indiana Limestone make this beautiful, 
light-colored natural stone so moderate in 
cost that there is usually no reason why it 
cannot be used. 

Let us send you our illustrated booklet 
showing examples of school and collegiate 
buildings of the better type. Many trim 
as well as all-stone buildings are shown in 
its pages. A reading of this booklet will 
give you a clear picture of what is being 
done the country over in college buildings. 
For the booklet, address Dept. 849, Ser- 
vice Bureau, Bedford, Indiana. 




Detail, New York Academy of Medicine, 

New York City. 

York & Sawyer, Architects. 



INDIANA LIMESTONE COMPANY 

Qeneral Offices: Bedford, Indiana Executive Offices: Tribune Tower* Chicago 



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Go-sec the un- 
spoiled scenic 
regions of 
the FaT West 
and the weird 
ceremonies 
of real Indians 



ve^^ises 



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/ VV V >•>•>• V^ >•%•>• V "V V V/ \/ \/ V >•>/>•>• V >• V N/ V V N/VVV 

Santa Fe-Harvey Co., 970- A, Santa Fe, New Mexico 

Please send me Harveycar Motor Cruise booklet and map. 



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BRYN MAWR 
ALUMNAE 
BULLETIN 




COMMENCEMENT 



July, 1929 



Vol. IX 



No. 6 



Entered as second-class matter, Jm 



1, 1920, at the Post Office, Phila., Pa., under Act of March 5, 1879 



COPYRIGHT. 192S 

ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 



OFFICERS OF THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

EXECUTIVE BOARD 

President Louise Fleischmann Maclat, 1906 

Vice-President Natalie McFaden Blanton, 1917 

Recording Secretary Gertrude Hearne Myers, 1919 

Corresponding Secretary Mat Egan Stokes, 1911 

Treasurer Margaret E. Brusstar, 1903 

Chairman of the Finance Committee Caroline Florence Lexow, 1908 

Chairman of the Publicity Committee Caroline Morrow Chadwick-Collins, 1905 

ALUMNAE SECRETARY AND BUSINESS MANAGER OF THE BULLETIN 

Alice M. Hawkins, 1907 

EDITOR OF THE BULLETIN 

Marjorie L. Thompson, 1912 

DISTRICT COUNCILLORS 

District I Helen Evans Lewis, 1913 

District II Julia Langdon Loomis. 1895 

District III Alletta Van Reypen Korff, 1900 

District IV Katharine Holliday Daniels, 1918 

District V Frances Porter Adler, 1911 

District VI Margaret Nichols Hardenbergh, 1905 

District VII Helen Brayton Barendt, 1903 

ALUMNAE DIRECTORS 

Ruth Furness Porter, 1896 Mary Peirce, 1912 

Frances Fincke Hand. 1897 Margaret Reeve Cary, 1907 

Elizabeth Lewis Otey, 1901 

CHAIRMAN OF THE ALUMNAE FUND 

Caroline Florence Lexow, 1908 

CHAIRMAN OF THE ACADEMIC COMMITTEE 

Pauline Goldmark, 1896 

CHAIRMAN OF THE SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOAN FUND COMMITTEE 

Margaret Gilman, 1919 

CHAIRMAN OF THE COMMITTEE ON HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Dr. Marjorie F Murray, 1913 

CHAIRMAN OF THE NOMINATING COMMITTEE 

Eleanor Little Aldrich, 1905 



Vrovident "Mutual 

Life Insurance Company of Philadelphia 

"Pennsylvania Founded l86$ 




How Much Life 
Insurance Does a 
Man Really Need? 



u 



NITED STATEC 

SECRETARIAL SCHOOL^ 

Twenty-seventh Year 
527 5th Ave. at 44th St. New York, N. Y. 

(Harriman National Bank Building) 

An exclusive school devoted to 

SECRETARIAL AND BUSINESS TRAINING 

Limited to those with the proper cultural background.' 
Day and Evening Classes 

Call, write or phone for catalog 
IRVING EDGAR CHASE, Director Vanderbilt 2474 



THE 

Pennsylvania Company 

For Insurances on Lives and 
Granting Annuities 

TRUST AND SAFE DEPOSIT 
COMPANY 

Over a Century of Service 

C. S. W. PACKARD, President 

Downtown Office: 517 Chestnut Street 

Fifteenth and Chestnut Streets 



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Bryn Mawr Alumnae 
Bulletin 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF 
THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

Marjorie L. Thompson, '12, Editor 
Alice M. Hawkins, '07, Business Manager 

EDITORIAL BOARD 

Caroline Morrow Chadwick-Collins, '05 Emily Kimbrough Wrench, '21 

Emily Fox Cheston, '08 Ellenor Morris, '27 

May Egan Stokes, '11 Elinor B. Amram, '28 

Louise Fleischmann Maclay, '06, ex-officio 

Subscription Price, $1.50 a Year Single Copies, 25 Cents 

Checks should be drawn to the order of Bryn Mawr Alumnae Bulletin 
Published monthly, except August, September and October, at 1006 Arch St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Vol. IX JULY, 1929 No. 6 



In view of the interest that is centered on the Graduate School just at this 
time, all announcements about the graduate scholars have a very especial interest. 
The fact that a college of the size of Bryn Mawr should have ten candidates for the 
Doctor's Degree, is, when one stops to think of it, an extraordinary achievement. The 
subjects of the theses themselves also reveal something of the scope of the school: 
Francisco Ribalta and his School; Higher Benzologues of Phenanthrenequinone and 
Anthraquinone; Skill and Specialization: A Comparative Study of Four Manufactur- 
ing Plants in the Metal Trades in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Mothers' Assistance in 
Philadelphia: Actual and Potential Costs; The British Administration of the Southern 
Indians, 1756-1783 ; The Dating and Localization of the "Proverbs of Alfred/' The 
Great Duke of Florence; Whewell's Philosophy of Induction; The delation of 
Carlyle to Kant and Fichte; The Colonial Agency in Pennsylvania. The giving of. 
such a list as this in this space is only justified if the Alumnae deduce something 
from it for themselves. In her Alumnae Supper speech, Eunice Schenck, Dean- 
elect of the School, urged that each Alumna should have a sense of responsibility 
about interesting able students in the Graduate work at Bryn Mawr. The Alumnae 
have been so successful in attracting the most desirable type of Undergraduate 
students by means of the work of the Regional Scholarship Committees, that one 
feels no doubt of the success that they would have in interesting more advanced 
students. The school has always been well known abroad, and each year, when 
the Foreign Students holding Bryn Mawr Fellowships return to their own countries, 
they spread information about it. Here we seem to take it more for granted and 
the able student does not so frequently try to interest other students in her own 
field. Hence the Alumnae, scattered up and down the country, find yet another 
activity open to them. 



THE ORIGINS OF SOCIAL IDEALISMS 



COMMENCEMENT ADDRESS 
By Professor James H. Breasted 

It is narrated of the philosopher Haeckel that some one once put to him this 
unusually suggestive question : 

"If in some way you could be unfailingly assured of a truthful answer to any 
question of the many you might wish to have answered, what question would you 
ask?" 

Haeckel remained for some moments absorbed in thought, and then he said, 
"The question I would most like to see answered is this: 'Is the Universe friendly f '" 
Here was a great biologist of philosophic leanings revealing himself all at once as a 
very human soul environed in an illimitable universe looking out upon it all with a 
chilling sense of loneliness, oppressed with a stifling realization of being helplessly 
enmeshed in its cruel inexorabilities, and involuntarily asking the wistful question' 
"Is the Universe friendly?" 

It should be noted at once that the man who raised this question was a natural 
scientist — a biologist and paleontologist, — acquainted with the history of life on our 
planet from its earliest and lowliest forms through stage after stage of advancement 
until the appearance of physical man, but obviously little acquainted with the experi- 
ence of man since his physical form emerged so many ages ago. For Professor Haeckel 
accepts the word friendly as a matter of course, just as the natural scientist accepts 
matter as a given factor, for which he is not called upon to account. But the word 
friendly is not a matter of course. Its very appearance in Professor Haeckel's question 
really answers the question itself, and he should be called upon to account for the 
word. Hence, if Professor Haeckel had not long since passed on, it would have been 
interesting to ask him another question: "Where did you get that word friendly?" 

His only response would obviously have been: "Why, it is a word common to 
all the modern languages of civilization." But language is far more than merely 
a vehicle for the expression of thought. It is a vehicle built up out of man's experi- 
ence, and therefore, historically speaking, language is a record of human experience 
and human experience, has of course a vast number of aspects, social, industrial, 
scientific, mechanical, artistic, religious or governmental. Turning, for example, to 
an important aspect of our mechanical experience, we find that the words: "garage," 
"chauffeur," "chassis," "tonneau," and the like, form a little group which began to 
be common in English speech about a generation ago. The appearance and the 
foreign source of this little group of words will for thousands of years continue to 
demonstrate two historical facts in our experience: first, the introduction of the 
automobile late in the nineteenth century and second, its origin and earliest use as a 
practical device in France. 

If we push further back in human life we find that at some time before 500 B. C. 
the word "byblos" appeared in Europe, and entered Greek speech as the word for 
"papyrus paper.!' The earliest emergence of this work in Greek, probably several 
centuries before 500 B. C, is indication of the first introduction of paper into Europe; 
and its non-Greek, foreign name (from which came our word "Bible") is an unmis- 

(2) 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 3 

takable evidence that the immediate source of the earliest paper in Europe was the 
Phoenician city of Byblos on the north Syrian coast. 

Buried thus in the constituents of language we find the evidence for the intro- 
duction of two very tangible human devices: the automobile introduced among us 
in our own time, and papyrus paper introduced into Europe over twenty-five hundred 
years ago. Now what is true of these two words for new mechanical devices is 
equally true of the less tangible qualities of advancing human life as it rose from 
savagery or barbarism to the attainment of those inner values which would give 
rise to such words as friend, frie?idly, friendliness. If so, then when Professor Haeckel 
asks his question: "Is the Universe friendly?", he has overlooked the significance of 
the very existence of the word friendly. An examination of the records of the 
Ancient Near East discloses in its speech and its history the emergency and early 
development of those humane qualities suggested by the word "friendly." 

Let us see whether we are taking an unfair advantage of Professor Haeckel in 
that we are giving him no opportunity for rejoinder. The most effective rejoinder he 
could make would seem to be along this line: "How does your historic use of the 
word friendly answer my original question? Granted that the existence of this 
word is historic evidence, demonstrating that human experience has developed friend- 
liness, you are talking of human experience; whereas I asked my question about 
the universe. What has human experience to do with the universe?" 

That is a fair question to which our modern philosophers have long since fur- 
nished what they consider a satisfactory reply. It is nevertheless a question to 
which only the historian is entitled to reply, for it is historical investigation alone 
which can furnish the final answer. The stoiy of human beginnings as recently 
disclosed by research in the Ancient Near East, is showing quite clearly that human 
experience, not philosophically speaking, but historically speaking, is the latest stage 
of the history of the universe. Human experience is therefore the outcome of the 
history of the universe, as far as it is discernible to us. 

* * * 

* * * Like a great social laboratory with its human life reaching back 
into those remote secular processes which have formed the present surface of the 
globe, the Nile Valley is the only arena where the struggle of the advancing life of 
man may be surveyed from the appearance of physical man, through all the succeed- 
ing conquests of his rising career until we see him catching the vision of human 
brotherhood and friendliness. 

Professor Haeckel's objection then (if we may assume that he would have made 
it), that human experience is not a stage of the development of the universe, receives 
for the first time a historical refutation in early Egypt. We are now to undertake 
the examination of a milestone or two marking the long road by which man has 
passed from his conquest of the material world to the amazing discovery of inner 
values, the victory over self and the vision of social responsibility. As we trace 
this development we should realize that we are following a process which not only 
belongs to the history of the universe, but is furthermore the most tremendous 
transformation in that history in so far as it is known to us. 

About 3000 B. C. the former hunters of Northeast Africa had left the Stone 
Age far behind. A thousand years earlier, they had discovered metal, and the 
response of a gifted people to this priceless possession was an advance along the whole 
front of material conquest. Their gods were gods of physical forces in the visible 



4 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

world and their conception of life here and hereafter was purely materialistic. Their 
whole life here moved in a world of material things, and they pictured life here- 
after in the same terms. If they could preserve the body of the dead indefinitely 
long, and ensure it an unceasing supply of food, drink, and clothing, they believed 
that the life of the dead might go on forever. Hence embalmment, and the protection 
of the embalmed body in a seemingly indestructible tomb of mighty blocks of masonry. 
Proudly conscious of their newly-gained and sovereign command over the material 
resources of their valley home, they transformed the very rock-ribbed hills them- 
selves into mountainous tombs for their royal dead. The pyramids, the greatest 
feats of architecture and engineering ever achieved by ancient man, are simply royal 
tombs. They are a colossal expression of a supreme endeavor to ensure survival 
after death by the agencies of sheer physical force. As we look upon them today 
they disclose to us in gigantic terms the titanic struggle of an ancient society to 
ensure the survival of the king's physical body by enveloping it in a vast and im- 
perishable husk of masonry. 

Beginning after 3000 B. C. the struggle with the irresistible force of physical 
decay went on for more than a thousand years. Not long after 2000 B. C. the 
men of four thousand years ago looked over upon them as we do today, and beheld 
a rampart of pyramids sweeping along the margin of the Sahara for sixty miles. 
There they stretched like a line of silent outposts on the frontiers of death. Robbed 
and plundered by man, wrecked and desolated by the ravages of time, they were a 
colossal demonstration of the futility of reliance on material agencies for the attain- 
ment of survival after death. The pyramids stand today as the imposing wreckage 
surviving from the first great age of material achievement, — the earliest demonstra- 
tion of the bankruptcy of materialism. 

Looking back upon the Pyramid Builders of a thousand years earlier, as we look 
back upon the age of Charlemagne, the Egyptians of 2000 B. C. were the first men 
to catch the brooding melancholy that hangs like a sombre cloud over the decaying 
monuments of a long bygone age, — the first men to be conscious of a distant past. 
In the earliest-known age of disillusionment, therefore, the Egyptians themselves 
looked out upon the vast pyramid cemetery and voiced the chilling sense of scepticism 
that doubted all, in an extraordinary song, which we call the "Song of the Harper" 
and which they sang at their feasts. Here is the earliest picture of disillusioned man 
facing death with the admonition, "Eat, drink and be merry, for tomorrow we die." 

Still deeper is the despair of a nameless sufferer, an unjustly afflicted soul, an 
Egyptian Job, fifteen hundred years older than the Hebrew Job. He has lost family, 
friends and wealth, and afflicted by disease, he finds himself unjustly an outcast from 
society, which he scathingly condemns as universally corrupt. Under these circum- 
stances life is impossible and death preferable. In a papyrus preserved at Berlin 
we read this misanthrope's long dialogue with his own soul whom at last he per- 
suades to undertake the great adventure of death. 



For ages man had undauntedly faced the adverse forces of the physical world 
and he had marched on to make triumphant conquest of that world. Suddenly he 
was no longer opposing the adversary from without; man's whole future was trans- 
formed as he thus became aware of himself as his worst enemy, the adversary from 
within, the unworthiness of man himself. That fundamental transformation took 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 5 

place about 2000 B. C, some four thousand years ago. It was the earliest intellectual 
and spiritual revolution of which we have any record, and it is revealed to us in 
a series of unique documents of absorbing human interest. 

The first of these documents is nothing less than the somber musings of the 
king himself, Amenemhet I., one of the ablest sovereigns of the Ancient East, as he 
gives instruction to his son, the crown prince, the future ruler of Egypt. In 
unrelieved pessimism regarding men he charges his son to trust no man and never 
to make a friend. 

This spirit of gloomy pessimism pervades the writings of a whole group of 
these earliest known social thinkers. One of them, in a long denunciation of social 
and official corruption, says: "Righteousness is cast out; iniquity is in the midst of 
the council-hall." That was not said in Chicago or Philadelphia in 1900 A. D. 
It was uttered by a social thinker on the Nile about 1900 B. C. ! 

They all paint the same dark picture of social and official corruption and for 
the first time in human history we hear men denouncing social injustice. "Nobody 
is free from evil ; all men alike do it. The poor man has no strength to save 

himself from him who is stronger than he." Thus four thousand years ago arose 
the first cry for social justice. 

* * * * 

So began the Age of Conscience and Character, the outgrowth of man's 
earliest social experience, over a thousand years before the advent of what the 
theologians of by-gone days called the Age of Revelation. 

From that dim and distant day when a human creature struck out the first 
flint implement through all the ages until now when he belts the globe with the 
radio or annihilates whole cities with poison gas bombs from the sky, man's dominat- 
ing aim has made the course of human life prevailingly a career of material conquest. 
For several hundred thousand years this Age of Material Conquest has gone on and 
still goes on. But yesterday, as it were through the dust of an engrossing conflict, 
our Father Man began to catch the veiled glory of the moral vison, and to hear a 
new voice within responding to a thousand promptings, old and new. It was inter- 
fused of love of home, of wife and children, of love of friends and love of neighbors, 
of love of the poor and lonely and oppressed, of love of State and nation; and all 
these which were new mingling with an older reverence, the love of cloud and hill- 
top, of forest and stream, of earth and sea and sky. 

Thus the old nature-gods were shifted into a new world of Social forces and 
were thus fused into one with a god of human needs and human aspirations, a 
Universal Father in whom man began to see all the highest values that his own 
social experience had revealed to him. 

What is the significance of all this for us of today, for you young women who, 
in the traditional phrase of Commencement addresses, are "about to assume the 
serious responsibilities of life"? To this question I think the answer is obvious. We 
are the first generation of men and women who are able to look back and survey 
the vast length of the entire human career. Ours are the first minds, therefore, so 
placed as to realize that the emergence of conscience and a sense of social responsi- 
bility after 3000 B. C. was an event of yesterday. That event marked our Father 
Man's approach to the frontiers of a new country. 



6 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

The devastating spiritual depression caused by the World War has sadly darkened 
the youth of the world and destroyed the old values without putting anything positive 
in their place. I believe that this unhappy result will fade, transformed by new 
courage and new vision, when we gain knowledge of the facts which will enable us, 
as it were, to stand on a high place and view the human career as a whole. 

I remember one day not long after the Armistice of 1918, that I was sitting 
with the Governor of Palestine, Sir Herbert Samuels, in the beautiful gardens of 
the British Residency on the Mount of Olives. Behind us toward the setting sun, 
lay Jerusalem, the Holy City, while before us was the tremendous rift of the Jordan 
Valley and the Dead Sea, with the blue and purple mountains of Moab behind 
them. The depression of the mighty chasm before us had recently been vividly 
illustrated to me by a tale which Lord Allenby had told me of his campaign in 
Palestine. He sent a dispatch to the War Office one day, which read : 

"This morning our bombing planes, flying six hundred feet below the sea, bombed 
the Turkish positions in the Jordan Valley." Seven hundred feel below these planes 
were the mouth of Jordan and the surface of the Dead Sea. That is the surface 
of the Dead Sea is thirteen! hundred feet below sea level, and its bottom is thirteen 
hundred feet below the surface of its salt waters. With its bottom, therefore, 
twenty-six hundred feet below sea level, it is the lowest chasm in the surface of 
our globe. Viewed from the summit of the Mount of Olives, it is an appalling 
picture of the inexorable forces which wrought it, as if some giant hand, thrusting 
in its titanic fingers, had rent the very earth in twain — a fearful demonstration of 
the operations of that Universe to which Professor Haeckel would have addressed his 
question. But as Sir Herbert Samuels and I sat contemplating this terrific result 
of the forces of nature, we looked just a few miles north and there, nestling on the 
slopes of the Judean hills we saw the little village of Anath, the birth-place of 
the prophet Jeremiah who had looked down on this same tremendous exhibition 
of natural laws and yet had said of human life: "I will write my laws upon the 
table of the heart." Involuntarily our thoughts moved a few miles further north- 
ward to the village of Nazareth, the boyhood home of the Prince of Peace. It looks 
down from the Galilean hills upon the Plain of Armageddon, the battlefield of the 
ages. As Jeremiah looked down from his little village upon the eruptive forces 
of nature and still clung to his faith in the inner values, so the youthful prophet 
of Nazareth, having grown up with the traditional scene of the brutal forces of 
human conquest daily before his eyes, nevertheless clung to his vision of the new 
kingdom within. Today in the lands of the Ancient East we too look out upon 
the works of Nature and the works of man, and in a New Crusade of scientific 
endeavor, we are striving to recover the story of both. 

But already we have discerned enough to realize that they are one, that the 
processes of nature and the unfolding life of man are but chapters of the same great 
story; and looking down into that appalling chasm of the Dead Sea which so terribly 
confronts us with Professor Haeckel's question, as the final answer to that wistful 
question, we can point to human experience and to the hills of Nazareth. 



MISS PARK'S COMMENCEMENT ADDRESS 



With seven years of Bryn Mawr behind me and a year of absence ahead, my 
mind boils with easy reminiscence and equally easy prophecy, but to this audience 
I owe something more real. It has, I think, a right to know very briefly my seven- 
year-old impression of Bryn Mawr's policy. * * * * 

President Rhoads' college of 1885 was born into a different America. To the 
minds of the great body of intelligent men and women two things in which the 
human race has been immemorially confident still formed its framework, — first, a 
belief that man had a sure and comprehensible relation to great spiritual forces, 
and second, an underlying respect for "the landmark," — for the tradition, the experi- 
ence of the past. These two confidences were only confirmed by scientific discoveries 
apparently encouraging a faith that the human mind could grasp the knowledge of 
the universe, and could codify successively, even though the succession might be 
endless, its laws. It had, therefore, definite goals religiously, politically, socially, 
and the individual could lead or could follow in the progress toward them. In 
this America, about fifty years ago, a few people were beginning to see that a 
weakness lay in the exclusion of women from political and intellectual affairs; they 
determined that women should play a part with men, as intelligent, as constructive, 
as responsible, and to that movement in America the founding of Bryn Mawr College 
made an acknowledged contribution. Once it was established the college was definite, 
vigorous, excellent in meeting the demands of that American community. In its 
four years' go at the problem it tried to train the minds of its students well, to make 
sure they could discriminate between good, better, and best, that they could put 
ideas into effect. It presumed the interested student and put into her hand the 
sharpened spearpoint. She built her house, not on the sands of a loose elective system, 
but the rock of a curriculum practically required but with her major interests fully 
represented. To a degree she became hardened to combat, through the practice of 
constant testing and the unremitting standard in every detail of routine which barely 
recognized human failings! The student came out from Bryn Mawr with every 
reason for self confidence. The friendly critic said that she knew a difficulty when 
she saw it and could tackle it ; the unfriendly critic, that she liked to boss. 

For an increasing number of Americans the world now is a changed one. The 
change has come so suddenly that we sometimes feel as though we had lived our 
busy lives in a sleep and waked to find old attitudes gone. Beliefs have changed 
into disbeliefs, assurances into doubts, the steady direction of life into hesitation. If 
we wandered early in a labyrinth, it had an architect, so to speak, and find it or not, 
a clue existed. Now we feel ourselves in the region cloud which essentially has no 
boundaries, no orderliness, no intelligible goals, "no object worth our constancy." 
Yet in all our confusion most of us honest and commonplace individuals ardently 
desire to live well, if not in harmony with the universe, at least in harmony with 
what makes for human happiness. The present generation are without our baffling 
sense of change; they are born with the same range of indifference, mere curiosity 
as fo the outcome, or cautious but resolute feeling of the way toward it. 

(7) 



8 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

Now in a world whose progress seemed almost visible, to be .mentioned in 
Thanksgiving proclamations and summed up in newspaper editorials, a college could 
have an accurate aim, and Bryn Mawr had, its record shows, an extraordinarily 
accurate one. The world around the college has changed, the America from which 
its freshmen come, into which its graduates go. Do the gradual readjustments the 
college has made in forty years go as far as is wise? Certainly no one of our old 
sources of strength can be abandoned, soundness of training, standard of excellence, 
vigorous practicality, but to those qualities of an older Bryn Mawr we must add 
I believe, in order to make ready for a far less assured world, a world that seeks 
rather than knows its goal, something more, something that develops the genuinely 
exploring mind. My generation in part, the next perhaps wholly, must be content 
to work in the field and laboratory, to search, to test, and to wander and recover. 
That the merely well-trained, well-stocked mind can ipso facto adapt itself to any 
new condition is no longer entirely convincing. Knowledge has become too com- 
plicated, a picture of the world no longer forms itself easily. Back of the curriculum, 
back of the whole plan of the college, must lie the ideal not only of the well-trained 
mind but specifically of the mind well trained to experiment. 

Now how practically can this be carried out? I believe that the technique of 
the so-called honours work points the way to the solution for the college curriculum. 
In the honours work we find almost invariably the curiosity, the independence, the 
willingness to do tedious things in order to learn interesting things, which the new 
world seeks. And I have come to believe these attitudes so necessary throughout 
all college work that to disregard their cultivation is fatal to the individual and 
to the institution. The technique of honours work can certainly not wisely be applied 
to the conduct of many elementary and foundation courses, but equally certainly it 
can be put in operation in many courses which do not fall officially within its range, 
and certainly also it can apply to the plan of the whole curriculum. Like the honours 
courses the curriculum as a whole should rest on a close understanding and co-opera- 
tion between teacher and student, on a serious (which is not a priggish) purpose on 
either side to arrive at some genuine intellectual result. It demands that teacher 
and student alike work in accord with a plan which they understand; a plan which 
is capable of adjustment. Ideally, I think a looser general arrangement as to required 
subjects and required hours as a background for a compact between the excellent 
teacher working intelligently with the excellent student to arrive at some little 
mastery of a field and method, all under the oversight of an alert Curriculum Com- 
mittee, would see us on our way. I welcome the fresh impetus given to the graduate 
school by the appointment of a Dean and by the new arrangement for residence, for 
its own sake. My confidence in Miss Schenck's guidance of the future of the 
school is high. But secondarily I rejoice to have strengthened in the college that 
intellectual work which brings and keeps able teachers and which keeps fresh in 
practice the methods of research and exploration which mutatis mutandis can be 
applied to lower ranges of the same field. 

I believe that department barriers in the use of material must come down, and 
that contact in the great current of American life can never be dropped. 



GIFTS TO THE COLLEGE 

The gifts to the college through the year are, as always, interestingly varied. 
"Toward Goodhart Hall something more than $80,000 has been paid in, $40,000 
by Mr. Howard Goodhart and his father, and a second $40,000 by Alumnae for 
the most part, with a smaller amount from Undergraduates and friends of the 
college." Mr. Goodhart also gave two rare tapestries, one of which hangs in the 
foyer and the other in the Common Room. A check from an Alumna made pos- 
sible the permanent stage-set, which was first used for "the concert of the Philadel- 
phia Orchestra, one of the great gifts of the year from Mr. Stokowski, the Orchestra 
board, and several of the Directors and Alumnae of the College." 

Miss Park then said: "The all too small appropriation for the library, $12,000, 
has been increased by gifts for books amounting to $1,600, including a sum from 
a classmate in memory of Marion Reilly, and by Marion Reilly's own bequest one 
thousand dollars comes to each of the Departments of Physics and Mathematics. 

"For scholarships, graduate and undergraduate, the generous gifts of the past 
must be extended by a large appropriation for the college income, $35,000, which 
hits the budget hard! The graduate stipends must never drop but I constantly hope 
that the annual college appropriation may be lessened by the giving of resident or 
foreign fellowships as memorials bearing the name of someone interested in some 
special field or study, or in advanced work for women in general, or in the safe, 
if slow, way of building up international relations through interchange of scholars. 
And with the new rights, dignities, and privileges of the graduate school I trust such 
a gift may suggest itself to someone. The ever anxious problem of undergraduate 
scholarships is also met in several ways. Fewer are included in the yearly budget, 
many more memorial scholarships exist, and from two sources come yearly sums, 
essentially steady though occasionally inconveniently irregular in amount. The mag- 
nificent Regional Scholarships given by the Alumnae of various districts amount 
altogether this year to about $10,000 — and the gifts of fifteen parents of students 
who have paid the college all or part of the full cost of their daughters' tuition, more 
than half of which the college carries from its own funds, reach more than $5,000, 
a fund to be used in grants to students next year. The devoted Chinese Scholarship 
Committee, which since 1918 has sent a Chinese student to Bryn Mawr, has this 
year turned over to the college $21,000 as the endowment fund for such a scholar- 
ship in the future. Two new scholarships have been given. The Alumnae Association 
of the Kirk School in appreciation of Miss Abby and Miss Sophie Kirk, the heads 
of the school, are founding a scholarship of $100 to be awarded annually for the 
freshman year at Bryn Mawr College to a student entering from the school. The 
award is to be made on the recommendation of the Misses Kirk to a candidate who, 
in her college preparation, has shown scholastic ability, character, and backbone, and 
who is also in need of financial assistance. Every alumna of Bryn Mawr will 
rejoice in having the names of these two, the friends of us all, personally connected 
with the Bryn Mawr they love. 

"Ten thousand dollars as an endowment for a second scholarship is given by 
the family of Leila Houghteling of the Class of 1911 together with a group of 
her contemporaries in college. The Leila Houghteling Memorial Scholar, a member 

(9) 



10 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

of the freshman class, is to hold the scholarship for her remaining three years and 
in choosing her the givers hope we may find a girl who has a certain likeness to 
Leila Houghteling herself, something of her steadiness and sanity, her easy leader- 
ship, her hatred of privilege and injustice, her faith which clothed itself so readily 
in works. This scholarship is a rich addition to our list. 

"The Carola WoerishofTer Department has been given by Mrs. Anna Woeris- 
hofFer and by five alumnae of the college for annual expenses more than $5,000; 
and a second $5,000 has been given for a special piece of research. To the President's 
Fund the alumnae have given $1,300, and never was spending money more appreciated. 

"But the gifts that have brought me the most personal pleasure because they 
reach the core of Bryn Mawr's problem, are those which affect the coming and 
staying of the good teacher and the coming and staying of the good student, the 
endowments to make possible the increase of the teacher's salary and the arrange- 
ment of hours of instruction for the specially interested student. Gifts endowing 
four annual grants of $1,000 each to full professors and additional instruction in the 
Departments of English and History allowing .time for honours work were announced 
last June. One similar grant, that given first of all, by Mary Hill Swope, I allowed 
to remain as a nest egg. I should now like to announce that the Mary Hill Swope 
grant of $1,000 annually is made to Professor Chew of the Department of English. 
A gift of $50,000 in honour of their fiftieth wedding anniversary from Julius and 
Sarah Goldman of New York, parents of three alumnae of the college, enables me 
to create two more grants which will carry the names of the donors. These will be 
given to Professor Leuba of the Department of Psychology and on his return to 
Bryn Mawr to Professor Carpenter of the Department of Archaeology. I have 
already mentioned gifts from the alumnae for Goodhart Hall, for the Regional 
Scholarships, for the President's Fund. They inaugurate in the coming year a note- 
worthy policy. From their annual Alumnae Fund they offer to the college a sum 
which gives Professor Schenck, the new Dean of the Graduate School, an annual 
grant of $1,000, which adds hours of instruction in French sufficient to free her time 
from department routine so that she can assume the deanship of the Graduate School 
and still continue as active head of her department, and opens honours courses in 
French in October. But they go on to make possible another step in the long pro- 
gramme I have set for Bryn Mawr. They have recognized the priceless value of the 
able associate professor, young, strong, and willing, full of meat and keen to make 
his name. Through an annual gift from them, with one special gift added, and with 
an additional readjustment of college funds, it has been found possible permanently to 
increase the maximum associate professors' salary and immediately to bring a number 
of salaries to that maximum or nearer it. 

"For the coming year twenty-five resident graduate scholarships have been 
awarded and twenty resident fellowships. Out of more than fifty applications, many 
of them countersigned by the Institute of International Education, from South Amer- 
ica, India, South Africa as well as from many European countries, five scholarships 
for foreign women have been awarded — to a Swiss who will present herself for 
the doctorate in Latin, an Austrian who comes to study Spanish Art under Professor 
King, an Agregee of the Lycee at Sevres and a student from the University of 
Berlin both to work in English, and a Scotch woman from St. Andrews University 
and Girton College, Cambridge, to sample Bryn Mawr Classics and Philosophy. 

"The four Bryn Mawr fellowships, which yearly send hand-picked students from 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 11 

its graduate school to Europe for study, go to Ruth Hofrichter, who will work in 
German Philology at the University of Munich; to Ruth Fairman, who will work 
in Latin at the University of Munich; to Katharine Jeflers, who will do research 
in Biology at the University of Berlin; and to Esther Rhoads, who will work on 
Balzac material in Paris. Special travelling fellowships given through the college 
will send Mary Katharine Woodworth to London University, Margaret Rawlings 
to Cornell, and Margaretta Salinger to see the world of European museums and 
collections. Outside honours falling to the graduate school can not be officially 
announced by Bryn Mawr, but I can not forbear reporting that Lucy Shoe has 
won one of three competitive fellowships of the American School at Athens in a 
competition open to men and women of a wide range of American colleges and 
universities. Gertrude Malz, who will also study at the American School at Athens, 
has fellowships given her by Swarthmore, where she was an undergraduate, and the 
University of Wisconsin, where she was a graduate student. Edith Katharine Cum- 
ings has been awarded a scholarship by the Institute of International Education for 
study at the Sorbonne, with residence at the Maison des Etudiantes. Dorothy 
WyckofI, last year's Workman Fellow who has studied geology at the University 
of Oslo this winter, is the only woman to be given a fellowship by the American 
Scandinavian Foundation, and consequently will keep Bryn Mawr warm to the 
north another winter, for this summer we are protected by Frederica de Laguna, 
European Fellow of 1927, who goes to Northern Greenland on the invitation of 
Dr. Matthiesen, Danish expert on Esquimaux Archaeology, to excavate a primitive 
Esquimaux kitchen midden. 

"The European Fellow from the present senior class is Barbara Channing, one 
of the fourteen graduates of Bryn Mawr College out of* twenty-four hundred pos- 
sibilities who have taken the Bryn Mawr degree summa cum laude. And I am 
empowered to announce this morning that a gift of $1,000 has been given to Bryn 
Mawr for a travelling fellowship for a member of the senior class and is awarded 
to Frances Elizabeth Fry who graduates with distinction in History. 

And so for many students, and for Bryn Mawr itself, open fresh fields and 
pastures new. The vigorous graduate experiment under way, the demand for admis- 
sion to the entering class, surpassing anything we have ever known before, the faith 
and the works of the graduates of the college — all these will stir the laborers in the 
vineyards, now perhaps a little hot and weary, to new vigor and new delight." 



PRESIDENT PARK ANNOUNCES ADDITIONAL 
GRANT 

President Park has great pleasure in announcing that an anonymous gift of 
one thousand dollars a year until 1935 has been promised her to be called the Lucy 
Martin Donnelly Grant. It is given to Professor Lucy Martin Donnelly of the 
English Department in recognition of her many years of invaluable service to her 
department and to the college. 



THE ALUMNAE SUPPER 

Before turning the evening over to the toast-mistress, Mrs. Maclay read a 
cablegram just received from Venice: "To the ever loyal Alumnae from their Presi- 
dent Emeritus seeing the world at seventy-two." 

Emma Guffey Miller, 1899, turned the annual Supper into a delightful gather- 
ing of eminent Victorians. She started the Supper by saying: 

"Recently when reading the list of classes holding reunions this year, I was 
struck by the fact that with two exceptions, '27 and '28, the others all belonged to 
the same age, the Victorian, and might be classified in the three distinct periods 
used to describe that era, as Early Victorians, Mid-Victorians and Later Victorians 
of Bryn Mawr. 

"Of course I realize that certain classes represented here tonight hotly resent 
such a classification, but I am confident that future English historians will say that 
the Victorian age lasted through the World War, and therefore we are justified 
in using this classification for the classes of Bryn Mawr from '89 to 1920." 

Margaret Thomas Carey, of the Class of 1889, spoke for the early Victorians. 
She had nobly flung herself into the breach at the last moment, and by the gaiety 
and humour of her speech laid her audience in ruins of laughter. Obviously the 
connotation of the phrase "Early Victorian" is not in the case of '89 what it is 
commonly supposed to be. We shall not soon forget her spirited account of the play 
of Adam and Eve, or of the horrified firmness of the young Dean. 

Enlarging on her theme of the Victorians, Mrs. Miller then went on to say that 
"to those of us who acknowledge half a century, the history of England means the 
last days of Queen Victoria and the years of the World War. 

"After the World War the face of the globe not only changed, but the ideas, 
customs and intentions of the Anglo-Saxon the world over, seemed to take on a 
different hue due, I suppose, to the mingling of the old colors with the new. 

"That is why classes which were in college just preceding and during the World 
War seem a part of the past age as well as the van of another. If the classes 
from '89 to '95 constitute the Peels and the Palmerstons of Bryn Mawr; and those 
from '95 to 1905 represent the Disraelis and the Gladstones, then those from 1905 
to 1920 portray the Baldwins and the MacDonalds whose political youth began in the 
later nineties and whose climax is now before us." It was for these late Victorians 
that Natalie McFaden Blanton, '17, spoke. 

THE LAST OF THE VICTORIANS 

"Last of the Victorians — melancholy sound ! The last of the Fathers, the last of 
the Goths, the last of the Greeks, the last of the Knights, the last of the Mohicans, 
the last of the Romans, the last of the Tribunes, the last of the troubadours, — sole 
survivors of departed days, final bursts of brilliance before sunset. 

"Is it possible that my Class of 1917 was the last of the Victorians? The thought 
was a surprise. But hard thinking brings many hard convictions and I am prepared 
to prove that we were heroes making a last stand for a dying civilization. For in 
all our College life in 1917, it seems to me now, we were holding forts, blazing no 

(12) 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 13 

new trails. (If I lengthen a line or stiffen a stay in my picture, put it down to 
the exigencies of the moment — there are many exigencies in an after-dinner speech.) 

"We were holding forts. The Christian Association was continuing in the 
strength of the union effected years before when Liberals and Conservatives buried 
hatchets to the tune of 'Onward Christian Soldiers.' It was concerned not with 
restatements of purpose and reorganizations but with getting work done, and unhesi- 
tatingly took over the support of everything that offered from a settlement to a 
war village. We refused to let morning chapel go, though Dr. Barton spoke to 
pale chairs and Con Hall, chief mute, stern daughter of the voice of Duty, alone 
helped the choir sing the hymn. We clung to the formal Sunday evening service, 
though the faithful few must needs rush panting through abandoned halls to tumble 
sinners from their study chairs lest the minister remember an empty chapel. 

"Our Self Government Association also was inherited and its rules for years 
had stood unchanged. Cubebs alone were allowed on our stages, and talcum powder 
pipes. (That talcum powder pipe! you remember Jinx inhaled by mistake. 'Sub- 
stitutes are dangerous.') More than one student was sacrificed to the time-honored 
belief that Milady Nicotine was no lady. In those days there was more than a 
'cough in a carload' — there was an explosion in a package. Heated meetings rocked 
the campus with their fury, and cries of 'tyranny,' 'dishonesty,' 'espionage,' rent the 
air, but unshaken the conservatives held their ground and staved off this and every 
other encroachment of the dreaded modernism. 

"Our chaperon rules were stuffy and drove so many of our Big Beautifuls so 
often beyond the twenty-five mile limit that the Powers said 'No more Cuts' and we 
said 'Death but not the dishonor of a change' and the Undergraduate Association 
was precipitated into turmoil. Who remembers the tense night when President 
Thomas, arrayed in black lace and a conviction of right on one side and the then- 
undergraduate Helen Taft, clad in blue jersey and an equal conviction of right on 
the other side, met in open combat on the lists of Taylor? Can you question that 
you looked upon a battle of the giants? Can you doubt that great souls trod the 
boards of our late Victorian stage? For the most part our Undergraduate Associa- 
tion was unruffled. Our little 'Big May Day' was inherited, likewise the rain that 
fell upon it. In our spare moments we sold shoe polish on commission for the 
benefit of the nebulous Students Building, which. was too far away for us to feel 
"the poosh of the flesh or the teeckle and teengle of the esthetic expeerience of her 
towers." 

"To that eminent Victorian, Dr. Arnold, has been ascribed the honor of being 
the founder of the worship of athletics. We were his true children. Everybody 
played everything. We had to. We made first team if we could; if not, second; 
if not, third; if not, fourth; if not, fifth. If we hadn't we would have been called 
names far worse than Miss Applebee's 'cock-roach' and 'mashed potato' by our loving 
class-mates. And if we had weak legs or a broken back and couldn't run, we were 
made to sit on the bank and shriek and cheer our little friends to victory against 
their foes, hating even our sister class with lusty hate. The most triumphant 
moment of our life was the moment on the Gym tower when we untied another 
class's banner and dropped it down into their tear-dimmed faces and strung ours up 
in its stead. Varsity costumes were handsome and we were glad of the honor, but 
class games were the real thing. The individual was offered on the altar of class. 

"So much for our collective life. What of our personal dress and way of life? 



14 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

We were not Gibson Girls. We were not flappers. If we were far from the mutton- 
leg sleeves and dust-sweeping ruffles of the gay nineties so also were we far from 
bobbed hair and bare legs. There was no bobbed hair, and no bare legs except in 
bed or bath. By Senior year our skirts were shorter and we could run for the 
two-fifteen without danger of coming a cropper, but I am sure there were some 
trains missed during our career because of the elegant draped broadcloth hobble 
skirts that flourished for a little day. We may not have had wasp waists but I 
am sure we wore whale-bone garments except on the hockey field, and I have known 
Miss Applebee to poke an inquiring finger into one's ribs as if she feared to find 
them there. We did not wear large creations of feathers and flowers and lace upon 
our heads, but hats were still hats and we needed hat-pins though of an emasculated 
sort. Bathing suits were bathing suits. Ah, no! not as in the good old ruffled 
bound and braided days, but the tail came well down for a skirt and there were cap 
sleeves and the trousers reached to the knee. I am quite sure we were characterized 
by a becoming modesty. Men were not allowed at our plays. Sometimes we chafed 
at this. Lord Goring was heard to remark as she admired her 'figger' in Mr. 
Granger's trousers, 'I think they might let fathers come, married fathers, at least!' 
We played tennis in full skirts that reached an inch or two above high sneakers and 
when we were done we put on hand-knit coat sweaters that had as much fit as you 
would expect in the first parents of the army sweaters. We played hockey in gored 
skirts of corduroy and were proud when the nap wore off. If any layer of the 
present hockey costume wears off it is probably cause for consternation and a screen. 
We ran our races in full bloomers, and to throw the javelin put on our skirts again. 
Hockey skirts were allowed in the dining rooms only on Saturdays, bloomers never. 
I suppose our most characteristic costume was the demure ruffled shirt waist and the 
pearl-buttoned skirt belted at the natural waist line, flaring at the ankles, the whole 
set off with the inevitable pastel coat sweater. 

"I do not think; our souls were dead as to the Arts, but Mr. Stokowski would 
never have complimented the singing of our glee club, and the choir was paid, I 
suspect, more for their trouble in regularly snatching on caps and gowns than for 
the music they made. We had no art class though we certainly had artists. Our 
furniture merited no attention and received little. If we did not have artificial 
flowers in glass cases, or little mats and antimacassars, we did not have maple day 
beds and early American chairs. 'Students Third' travel Was not in vogue and we 
did not know the world at first hand. We were still psychologically unselfconscious. 
We knew of Freud, but Dr. Leuba seemed less concerned with him than with the 
monkey and lock problem. There was no mental hygiene department, and we were 
without the healthy idea that our behavior might be abnormal and need correcting. 
We were too busy to think. 

"Perhaps it is in our feverish busy ways that we see best our relation to the 
moderns. We were women of affairs, Florence Nightingales of the Strachey pic- 
ture, at work from early morn till late at night, on Committees and Interviews, 
Commissions and Investigations, from the library to the Gym, to Taylor to Radnor 
and back again, to Philadelphia, New York and all points north, never at rest, 
always in a hurry. Speed was upon us. Electric engines were put on the Main 
Line tracks. Fords were plentiful though they were still of the all-black touring 
car variety and had to be cranked at intervals. An aeroplane (whose owner later 
won international fame) flew over us each afternoon to dip and salute our Carrie. 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 15 

We considered a greased pole from the fourth floor of Merion to the dining room 
door. 

"Perhaps the germs of all modern developments were there. White stockings 
presaged the nude, knitting the return to handicrafts, Libby's posing for Emmy the 
beginning of the art class; the increasing squeaks of the maple organ in Taylor, the 
groans of travail that gave birth to the organ in Goodhart; our grumbling the seed 
of your reforms ; our death at orals your release from death. Evidences of independent 
thinkers there were in plenty. Some bolshevism raised its ugly head in Freshman 
year when the bell rope of Taylor was cut and the curfew did not ring that night, 
when Jove and Socrates were given red noses and tam-o-shanters. (This was put 
into an audacious song which the censor's heavy hand may have prevented your hear- 
ing.) Communism there must have been, for President Thomas found it necessary 
to institute an anti-borrowing club to curb the whaMs-mine-is-thine point of view 
that was besetting Rock. 

"But the other germs of modernism you must seek for yourself — perhaps with 
a microscope. Time flies and I must face the war and the end of an era as abruptly 
as it faced us in reality that spring day in 1917. Twelve years have passed and we 
are changed. Time wrought a miracle. The last of the Victorians feel closer to the 
new age than to their own. In, spite of the laughing memories my class-mates have 
revived at this reunion, I speak not in praise of the past but of the present. 

'I play for seasons, not eternities, 
Says nature laughing on her way. So must 
All those whose stake is nothing more than dust.' 
1917, last of the Victorians, gladly greets the true apostles of this brave new day." 

Helen Fairchild McKelvey, '28, then took as her topic: "What were the Vic- 
torians?" Somehow she managed to bridge the gap between the specific answer to 
that question, and the amusing group of parodies that one felt were not the 
answer. It does not do, however, to follow a train of thought too closely at 
Alumnae Supper. She read extracts from a book by E. W. Seabrook, whose ob- 
servations of native customs among savage tribes is unusually sympathetic. The 
book is called "The Magic Campus" and tells of his visits among the Bryn Mawrians, 
and how he witnessed some of their sacred customs. 

"It was through my house girl, Smith (all the Bryn Mawrians have odd names, 
usually derived from ancestral gods, — names like Jonesy, Johnson, Peters, etc.) that 
I was allowed to take part in the ceremonial sacred bon-fire rites, which are held 
twice yearly. These are offerings to the vegetation deities, and are held in Spring 
and Fall. One it was my privilege to attend. Early in the evening set aside for 
the ceremony, the Bryn Mawrians began a furtive and restless activity. There was 
an undercurrent of suppressed excitement, a speculation as to whether the god would 
manifest himself, whispers of 'Do they know?' 'Have they got it?' The air was 
electric with suspense. Certain of the youngest members of the tribe draped them- 
selves in strange garments composed of bright-coloured rags. Then from the distance 
came the muffled beat of a drum, sounding its eerie note across the dark village, or 
campus, as it is called in, their language. The music grew; torch-bearers took their 
places, and then began the wild chanting or singing, over and over, of the hymns 
to the gods. Throwing themselves wildly about the torch-bearers, the crowd seemed 
seized by a demon, which swept them away in an orgy of frenzy. I understand that 



16 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

the Spring Festival, at which the bonfire is actually lighted and into which offerings 
are thrown — all first fruits — is an even more spectacular exhibition of auto-intoxica- 
tion. Some of the natives reach such a pitch that they throw their very garments 
to the gods to be devoured by the flames." Thej account of the very esoteric rite of 
"Eying the Sheepskin" Miss McKelvey improvised then and there and so it is lost 
to us. 

Millicent Carey and Eunice Schenck, acting Dean, and Dean-elect, then spoke 
for the college, giving the Alumnae, by their discussion of Honors Work and of 
the new plan for the Graduate School, a sense of being again closely in touch with 
what was happening in the college. 

Finally Mrs. Miller herself spoke for the Mid Victorians, touching on various 
of the characteristics of the period: 

"Ours was a parental age, for fathers and mothers kept in such close touch 
with the college that once, when a charming graduate from England declared that 
young people of sixteen should be given latch keys, so shocked were the parents that 
a few days later Miss Thomas had to explain in chapel that latch key had merely 
been used in an allegorical sense. 

"Ours was a misunderstood age for though it was all right for Merion, Radnor 
and Pembroke to have mistresses but when Rockefeller acquired one, the name was 
changed to Warden. 

"When the Boston Public Library was opened, the Knights of the Holy Grail 
descended on Bryn Mawr in great numbers." 

She closed with a sincere tribute to President Park, whom she claimed proudly 
as the greatest Mid-Victorian. "Thou Gracious Inspiration" was sung with more 
vigor than usual, and a very pleasant and amusing supper was at an end. 



HONORARY DEGREE CONFERRED ON MISS PARK 

In recognition of "the fine tact and educational wisdom" with which she has 
"carried forward in new and progressive ways the work of a great college," Swarth- 
more conferred on President Park this June, at their Commencement, the Degree 
of Doctor of Laws. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

As a result of the ballots cast, Virginia Kneeland Frantz, 1918, (Mrs. Angus 
MacDcnald Frantz) of New York City, has been nominated to the Board of Directors 
of the College as an Alumnae Director. Mrs. Frantz will take the place of Ruth 
Furness Porter, 1896, (Mrs. James F. Porter) of Chicago, and will serve until 1934. 



NOTICE 



The plans for the Garden at Wyndham are progressing, and will probably be 
given more in detail in one of the Fall numbers of the Bulletin. A cutting garden 
for the wardens, so that they may have Spring and Fall flowers to decorate the 
Halls, is also being established. 



ALUMNAE ATHLETICS 

The alumnae athletic activities may be said to have begun with the Parade 
which started from Pembroke Arch some time after ten on Monday morning, June 
third. When the familiar strains of the Bryn Mawr band were heard about 9.45, 
a commotion equal to that of May Day itself arose in most of the reunion head- 
quarters. Costumes were constructed, torn asunder, and rehabilitated in the twinkling 
of an eye. The Class of 1917 discarded those already prepared for them, and 
hastily collected a few ideas, plus red sashes and daggers, and breathlessly joined the 
procession as Vandals. The Class of 1928 were obliged to grab their costumes 
from the delivery truck, and then donned them in the road to the edification of all 
by-standers. 

All these well-meant efforts were in vain, however, because no one else was in 
the running after the judges had taken one look at '97's red curls and red-checked 
gingham smocks. The prize was awarded to them, with no dissenting voice, when 
all gathered in the gymnasium after the Parade. There many hoary songs enter- 
. tained both the alumnae and the undergraduates, and after the athletic awards for 
the past year had been made by Helen Taylor, 1930, President of the Athletic Asso- 
ciation, the annual Alumnae- Varsity Basketball game was played. This resulted in 
a victory for the Varsity by the score of 38 to 10. The game was fast and interesting 
to watch. Those playing on the Alumnae team were Helen Alexander, 1918; Eliza- 
beth Lanier Boiling, 1919; Jeannette Peabody Cannon, 1919; Janet Seeley, 1927; 
Alice Bruere, 1928; and Jean Huddleston, 1928. 

Monday afternoon the Varsity again beat the Alumnae, this time at Water 
Polo, by the very respectable score of 7 to 4. The Alumnae team consisted of Janet 
Seeley, 1927, and of Helen Tuttle, Catherine Field Cherry, Mary Gaillard, Alice 
Bruere, and Jean Huddleston, all of 1928. 

On Tuesday morning the Varsity triumphed over the Alumnae at tennis by 
four matches to one. Millicent Carey, 1920, won her match in singles, but lost in 
doubles when playing with Mary Gardiner, 1918. Jean Clark Fouilhoux, 1899, 
Susan Follansbee Hibbard, 1897, and Bertha Greenough, 1917, were all defeated 
by members of the Varsity team. 

Although victory steadfastly eluded the alumnae athletes, they seemed to enjoy 
themselves, and vastly diverted their friends on the sidelines by their agile antics. 
As usual, an added note of hilarity was added by the appearance of the traditional 
alumnae basketball costumes, with their chaste linen long gored skirts and very full 
bloomers. Janet Seeley, as Manager of Games, was indefatigable both as an executive 
and as a participant in alumnae athletics. 



NOTICE 



At the last class meeting held in Denbigh on June 3rd, the following perma- 
nent class officers were elected: Rosamond Cross, President; Katharine Collins, 
Secretary; Elizabeth Ufford, Treasurer. Ruth Biddle was appointed as Class 
Collector. Nancy Woodward was chosen to represent the Class at the meeting of 
the Alumnae Council in New York in November. Elizabeth H. Linn, 1357 E. 56th 
Street, Chicago, 111., is Class Editor. 

(17) 



CLASS NOTES 



Class Editor: Sophia Weygandt Harris. 

The first class of Bryn Mawr College, 
through the courtesy of its one-time 
Dean, had luncheon on the porch of the 
Deanery, Tuesday, June 4th, to celebrate 
its fortieth anniversary. 

Fourteen of the class came to the re- 
union — Catharine Bean Cox, on her way 
from Europe to her home in Honolulu; 
Emily Balch and Alice Anthony; Mary 
Blanchard, Elizabeth Blanchard Beech, 
Margaret Thomas Carey, and Zoe Carey 
Thomas, in addition to those that live 
near Bryn Mawr, made up the number. 
The nearby ones were: Anna Rhoads 
Ladd, Martha Thomas, Sophia Weygandt 
Harris, Julia Cope Collins, Caroline Law- 
rence, Leah Goff Johnson, and Gertrude 
Allinson Taylor. 

It was an interesting and satisfactory 
occasion and those there decided the only 
improvement would have been the pres- 
ence of the absent members of the class 
and the presence of their old teachers. 

Each and every one was so glad to see 
the others, that it was unanimously de- 
cided to meet again in three, and in four 
years. This is recorded here in the hope 
that some of the absent '89ers may read 
and plan to come back to College on those 
dates. Supper together at a tea room, 
the distance of a pleasant drive ended a 
day, called by all "good." 

1896 
REUNION OF CLASS OF '96 
Class Editor: Mary Jewett, 
Pleasantville, N. Y. 

From East, West, North and South, 
thirty-three members of the Class of '96 
met in the hollow back of Radnor on the 
cool green afternoon of June 1st. Besides 
the drama and excitement of meeting each 
other, we enjoyed keenly seeing photo- 
graphs of the class's family life, pictures 
of houses and husbands, children and 
grandchildren. 

In the evening we sat in Elizabeth 
Kirkbride's and Emma Linburg Tobin's 
room and had some fascinating glimpses 
of Abba Dimon's travels in Africa, of 
Elsa Bowman's night in a tent within 
stone's throw of hyenas and lions, of 
Lydia Boring's remarkable journey 
through Siberia, of a wonderful and pic- 
turesque Franco-American story told to 
Ruth Furness Porter at El Golea, of Effie 
Whittredge's international adventures 
with her nephew in Italy, of Elizabeth 



Hopkins Johnson's flight over the Grand 
Canyon of the Colorado, of Anna Scatter- 
good Hoag's call from Miss M. Carey 
Thomas at her camp near the Pyramids, 
and of Pauline Goldmark's trip to Vienna, 
accompanied by her sister Josephine, to 
study archives connected with her father 
and the revolution of '48. 

Edith Wyatt described the adventures 
of Gilbert Imlay, the author of the first 
American novel, about whom she has 
written an article soon to appear in the 
Atlantic. 

The domestic tales of our classmates 
were so exciting that only a few of us 
slept well that night. We were further 
stimulated on the next morning by driving 
over the Conestoga Road — the old west- 
ward, pioneer road — to Cora Baird 
Jeanes' stone house with its setting of 
stone-walled garden of iris, lavender, and 
"Pink Radiance" and Claude de Pernet 
roses, where we found Helen Haines 
Greening and Mary Brown Waite, and 
lunched and gossiped and applauded our 
President's feat of standing on her 
head and saw Cora's beautiful grand- 
children. 

Later we drove on to the historic house 
of Mary Boude Woolman, the headquar- 
ters of General du Portail, the engineer 
of the Valley Forge encampment, a house 
built in 1732 with the huge fireplaces, 
beamed ceiling and exquisitely grooved 
woodwork, and all the charm and romance 
of the great American period this lovely 
old place seems to express. Mary enter- 
tained us by an outdoor supper at her 
fragrant pine-wood cabin on the wooded 
slope of Valley Creek, and we drove back 
through the twilight to the baccalaureate 
address in wonderful Goodhart Hall. 

In these first two days, too, some of us 
heard the interesting story of Harriet 
Brownell's adventures at the Pyramids 
and saw the fascinating importations 
Leonie Gilmour has brought from Japan, 
and met three husbands, Mr. Henry Wool- 
man, Mr. Rufus Jones, and Mr. Gerard 
Swope; Rebecca Mattson's daughter, a 
student at Bryn Mawr; Marian White- 
head's son, Clarissa Smith Dey's Louise, 
and the daughter and two sons of Mary 
Hill Swope. 

Monday's luncheon with '97, '98, '99 
and '00 on the sunny slope of Wyndham's 
lawn was a new and very interesting way 
of meeting and greeting the classes we 
knew best in college. There was no for- 
mality, but groups of friends gathered 
about the small tables and were aug- 



(18) 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



merited from time to time by fresh ar- 
rivals, or friends wandered about seeking 
other friends. 

Reluctantly leaving this beautiful addi- 
tion to the college of our days, 12 of us 
motored to Hilda Justice's new home in 
Chestnut Hill, driving for miles along the 
cool and wooded Wissahickon to find the 
house and terraced garden looking as if 
it had stood for years in its beautiful set- 
ting, so hard had loving hands worked to 
its completion. 

Evening found us with depleted num- 
bers seated in the gymnasium to listen to 
Emma Guffey Miller as toastmaster lead 
our thoughts and laughter among the 
memories of the "Victorian Days" of 
Bryn Mawr. Some of us stayed on for 
the Garden Party and Commencement, 
but our real reunion was over and thirty- 
eight had been with us at some time or 
other. They were Anna Green Annan, 
Lydia Boring, Elsa Bowman, Harriet 
Brownell, Katherine Cook, Rebecca Matt- 
son Darlington, Clarissa Smith Dey, 
Abba Dimon, Clara Farr, Leonie Gilmour, 
Pauline Goldmark, Marian Whitehead 
Grafton, Gertrude Heritage Green, Helen 
Haines Greening, Anna Scattergood 
Hoag, Mary Hopkins, Cora Baird Jeanes, 
Mary Jewett, Elizabeth Hopkins Johnson, 
Elizabeth Cadbury Jones, Hilda Justice, 
Florence King, Georgiana King, Eliza- 
beth Kirkbride, Charlotte McLean, Mary 
Mendinhall Mullin, Tirzah Nichols, Edith 
Peters, Ruth Furness Porter, Hannah 
Cadbury Pyle, Mary Hill Swope, Emma 
Linburg Tobin, Mary Brown Waite, 
Sophie Reynolds Wakeman, Grace Bald- 
win White, Effie Whittredge, Mary Boude 
Woolman and Edith Wyatt. 

This is not half of what we heard, saw 
and felt. This record cannot give the 
shadows of our meeting after thirty-three 
years and this is not the place for men- 
tioning our losses — though those who 
were absent were part of the deeper mem- 
ories and unspoken poetry of our days 
together — days we shall always remem- 
ber. 

Among the messages from absent mem- 
bers was a cablegram from Masa Dogura 
Uchida — "Sorry cannot attend '96 Re- 
union. Love to all. Masa." 

1897 
Class Editor: Alice Cilley Weist 
(Mrs. Harry H. Weist), 
174 East 71st Street, New York City. 
Corinna Putnam Smith was the speaker 
at a meeting of the Bryn Mawr Club of 
Boston on the evening of Monday, April 
22nd, at the home of Mrs. Robert E. Bel- 
knap, of 112 Beacon Street. Susan Walk- 



er FitzGerald, '93, President of the club, 
introduced Cron, who gave a vivid and 
illuminating talk on "The Egypt of To- 
day," listened to by a goodly number of 
'97 and others. 

Elizabeth Higginson Jackson is making- 
six sets of summer plans (practically) to 
take care of her four delightful children, 
her husband, and herself, though she will 
undoubtedly go wherever Jim, her young- 
est, goes. 

Beth Caldwell Fountain says she enjoys 
being on the board of the Henry Street 
Settlement, because she sees Mary Hill 
Swope, '96, thus. 

Caroline Gait is very important in 
Archeological circles, being on the Com- 
mittee of Management of the Classical 
School (American) at Athens. 

Mary Campbell's father has been very 
ill, but is much better, over which every 
one rejoices. 

Clara Vail Brooks took her husband 
and three children to Arizona again this 
spring. She has been enlarging her Ards- 
ley house. 

Reunion will be reported by some one 
who can stay through the whole affair. 

REUNION 

These reunions are an extraordinary 
experience, aren't they? To be permitted 
to sit and recall the most vivid days of 
one's life with the very people who still 
most enjoy those same memories is ex- 
hilarating. With '96 on one side and '98 
on the other, '97 was surrounded by 
friendly faces. The plan of having sev- 
eral classes hold reunions at the same time 
is a delightful success. 

As 'you know very well, not one of us 
would think of doing a thing without con- 
sulting Maysie, and therefore led by our 
beloved President we went from one fes- 
tivity to another. The supper at Wynd- 
ham sent us back to Freshman year. 
Maysie and Clara Brooks — Mary Fay and 
Beth Angel gave the chorus of "Tea ! 
Tea ! All the students say — Won't you 
drink it up, dear !" 

One could taste the potted ham and 
water crackers of our first parties — 
where, so Maysie remarked — she enter- 
tained 47 people for $1.50. Many thanks 
to Freddy and Sue Blake for that pleas- 
ant meal. Frances Hand was cheered 
when Maysie said that Frances had col- 
lected $1300 from 17 people and expected 
some money still. 

Later on at Gertrude Ely's, Sue Hib- 
bard told us about the Wyndham Garden, 
which is to be beautiful in memory of 
Katrina. Sue is Treasurer and is per- 



20 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



mitting us all to give something — however 
little — towards this fund. 

The next day we lunched at the Old 
Forge Inn — another inspiration of Fred- 
dy's, and through Mary Converse saw the 
Old Anthony Wayne House on the way 
home. 

All the time our excitement and pleas- 
ure mounted until the climax came on 
Monday morning, and out of Pembroke 
West we marched in red and white 
checked dusters, with red berets on our 
heads, and red curls bobbing over our 
ears. It was then that '97 lost its head 
and returned to its cheerful and idiotic 
youth, for we just couldn't get over those 
checks and marched behind the '97 ban- 
ner singing lustily, as we came along the 
private road. (O, you people who took 
the photographs, please don't forget to 
let us see them ! 

In all this warm current of enthusiasm 
we hardly did more than expand, but I 
did assemble a few facts with the aid of 
Margaret Nichols Smith. In the first 
place we nearly have 1J/2 children apiece, 
since '97 has 54 — to carry on. And we all 
seem to have some interesting enterprise 
on hand. Anna Pennypacker has studied 
nursing and so has Ida Gifford. Annie 
Thomas is a physician of the Women's 
Medical College. Clara Landsberg is go- 
ing to the International Peace Conference 
at Prague. Corinna is organizing wom- 
en's clubs in every state of the Union to 
help the Indians. Margaret Nichols Smith 
is Adviser of Mothers' Clubs in the 
Oranges. Sue Hibbard has been one of 
the Regional Directors of the League of 
Women Voters. Cornelia Greene King is 
going to Spain, and Alice Weist to Italy. 
Anne Lawther has just had eight weeks 
in Europe and is still lame from an acci- 
dent which occurred in England. We all 
know that Frances Hand is a Trustee of 
the Brearley, a Director at Bryn Mawr 
and has a child graduating this year at 
Bryn Mawr. Freddy is retiring as a war- 
den. She has welcomed us back so often 
she will be greatly missed. Bertha Rem- 
baugh is practicing law. As for Bessie — 
I can't suggest her career better than to 
tell you that when Maysie thought the 
P. W. bath tub was grimy one morning, 
Bessie offered the College a new one that 
same afternoon. 

It is refreshing even to think of all the 
nice things '97 is doing. 

So begin to get ready for the 1933 
Reunion, '97. It can't be better than this 
one, but it may be as satisfactory if we 
all get together again. 

Marion Taber. 



Written on the occasion of our thirty- 
second reunion at Wyndham. 

The golden sunlight shining on the grass, 
A sunlit vista bound by memories 
That flit as wind-rocked shadows pass 
From tree to tree, 
Or dance with sunbeams sifted through 

the leaves 
Among the gentle foldings of the hills. 
More rich we come for this one treasured 

thought, 
A golden vista crowned by vision 
Of miracles the years have wrought 
From Spring to Spring 
In stone and tree and in each others' 

minds 
Along the climbing of the hills of time. 
S. A. B. 



Class Editor: Edith Schoff Boericke 
(Mrs. John T. Boericke), 
Merion Station, Pa. 

Our 31st Reunion is past, but what a 
wonderful success it was under the capa- 
ble and delightful management of Rebec- 
ca Foulke Cregar. Everything went so 
smoothly, with plans carried out perfectly, 
even to the cars to carry us from Bryn 
Mawr to Radnor, to Merion, and to Hav- 
erford, and always in plenty of time, and 
without a thought on the part of the 
guests from a distance. Twenty-five were 
present out of our class of 49 on Satur- 
day night at the very delightful dinner 
that Marion Park gave us at her home. 
After the delectable feast at little tables 
on the terrace, we went inside for a .roll 
call, where each told something of herself 
or of one not present. When Marion's 
name was read, a beautiful pigskin zipper 
bag full of peonies was presented to her 
as a gift from the class, and she made a 
most gracious speech of thanks. Then 
followed pictures of us taken at various 
times during the last thirty-one years, and 
they were greeted with much laughter. 

Sunday noon found us gathered at Re- 
becca Foulke Cregar's "Happy Hill" in 
Radnor for an outdoor picnic, but what a 
glorified picnic ! There were two built-up 
fireplaces with iron bars built in for broil- 
ing chops. Huge kettles of soup and peas 
and potatoes were being kept warm on 
them. A juicy boiled ham invited some 
one to slice it, and ice cream and coffee 
followed. The most unusual part was 
having husbands and children present to 
enjoy it with us — nine husbands, nine 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



children, and one grandchild of Anna 
Dean Wilbur, a fascinating little fair- 
haired girl of two. 

Several went to the baccalaureate ser- 
mon that evening. 

Monday was still a busier day, begin- 
ning witth the procession where '98 
dressed in dark blue smocks and carried 
long paint brushes and palettes bearing 
the label, "President Park's Portrait 
Painters." This chalked label led a re- 
porter to call us "demure 'little girls' in 
blue smocks carrying slates." We joined 
'96, '97, '99 and 1900 for a very enjoyable 
luncheon on the grass in front of Wynd- 
ham, where we saw many old friends and 
recognized some of them immediately. 
Then we were taken in several cars to 
Edith Schofr Boericke's rose garden and 
to see her nieces from Japan give two 
charming Japanese dances in costume. 
Back to Bryn Mawr again for the Alum- 
nae Banquet that evening. Tuesday 
Esther Willits Thomas had a lovely lunch- 
eon for us, and Wednesday those who 
were still here went to Commencement. 
All who came enjoyed it thoroughly. 

Those present were: Isabel Andrews, 
Mary Bright, Frances Brooks Acker- 
mann, Jennie Browne, Grace Clark 
Wright, Anna Dean Wilbur, Rebecca 
Foulke Cregar, Anna Fry, Alice Gannett, 
Mary Githens, Josephine Goldmark, Anna 
Haas, Blanche Harnish Stein, Elizabeth 
Holstein Buckingham, Elizabeth Nields 
Bancroft, Ullericka Oberge, Marion Park, 
Sarah Ridgway Bruce, Edith Schoff 
Boericke, Mary Sheppard, Martha Tracy, 
Louise Warren, Esther Willits Thomas, 
Helen Williams Woodall, Bertha Wood. 

At the Alumnae Banquet Elizabeth 
Nields Bancroft announced that we had 
sufficient money collected or promised, to 
have Marion Park's portrait painted as 
soon as she is ready. This will be pre- 
sented to Bryn Mawr College from the 
Class of 1898. 

1899 
Class Editor: Ellen P. Kilpatrick, 

1027 St. Paul Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Dear '99: 

It is hard for a new and untried Class 
Editor to have for her first assignment 
the writing up of a wonderful reunion. 
We should like to make all the stay-at- 
homes green with envy — they would be 
if they knew what a joyous occasion our 
thirtieth reunion was and would deter- 
mine that, come what might, they would 
. never miss another. The weather was 
heavenly and the campus was never 
lovelier. Besides twenty-six of our own 



class there were goodly numbers of '96, 
'97, '98 and '00. We saw people we had 
not seen for twenty or thirty years and, 
after the first shock of seeing white hair 
instead of a more youthful color, we 
found that that was the only change; 
otherwise they were the same. 

It was a bitter blow to everyone not 
to be able to carry out the grand plan 
of the committee. The clothes of the 
Gay Nineties were all ready to be worn 
and the carriages had all been engaged, 
but not a horse could be found to draw 
them. Polo ponies there were in plenty 
and riding horses, but driving horses ap- 
parently do not exist any more. The de- 
cision was not made until the very last 
minute, and then our Class Costumer, 
Callie Lewis, in response to a telegram, 
with all the wholesale houses in New 
York closed for Decoration Day, man- 
aged to get Japanese parasols and fans 
for us which arrived at our headquarters 
on Sunday afternoon, exactly forty-eight 
hours after she got the telegram. We 
did not make our usual sensation in the 
Alumnae Parade Monday morning, but 
at least we had something resembling a 
costume for the occasion. 

You all know what a perfect program 
had been planned by our Reunion Com- 
mittee, consisting of Emma Miller, May 
Sax, Gertrude Ely, Callie Lewis and 
Elsie Andrews, so all we need say is that 
everything moved without a hitch. The 
luncheon on the lawn back of Wyndham 
with the four other classes of our day 
and generation was a most lovely party. 
So was the trip to the new Art Museum 
and the tea at May Sax's, where we had 
the great pleasure of seeing her mother 
and her charming children, Jimmie, and 
little five-year-old Mary. 

At the Alumnae Supper on Monday 
evening our own Guffey covered herself 
with glory as Toastmaster. 

Tuesday morning we had our regular 
reunion class meeting, presided over by 
Callie as Vice-President. Mollie Denni- 
son could not come at the last minute on 
account of the serious illness of our 
Class Baby and we had been most anxious 
until that morning when Mollie wired 
that she seemed to be out of danger and 
on the road to recovery, so we all re- 
joiced with her at the good news. May 
Sax reported that the money for the 
curtain, our gift to Goodhart Hall, had 
all been subscribed, with enough addi- 
tional to pay the College interest on the 
money advanced to pay the bill. 

The meeting adjourned for luncheon on 
the veranda of the College Inn. We had 
hoped to have Joy Dickerman and Rose- 



22 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



mary Morrison as our guests of honor but 
they could not come. Emma read letters 
from some of our absent members, all of 
whom had good alibis. There were ap- 
propriate (?) gifts for everyone, pre- 
sented with a few well-chosen words by 
Callie Lewis. 

Then we realised that though our 
hearts were young and our spirits gay, 
our bodies were a bit weary and most of 
the class assumed a more or less hori- 
zontal position until time to dress for the 
Garden Party. It was a lovely Garden 
Party and we all enjoyed it, but the best 
was still to come and that was our class 
dinner as Gertrude Ely's guests in her 
charming walled garden. Gertrude re- 
ceived us in a blue "Liberty" creation of 
the early nineteen hundreds, with a short 
waist and a long trailing skirt, a thing of 
beauty in itself and most becoming. Af- 
ter a delicious dinner there were charades 
on names of college celebrities. Those 
who took part and who showed marked 
histrionic ability were G. Ely, E. GufTey, 
D. Fronheiser, E. Hooper, M. Palmer, 
Aurie Thayer, C. Nichols, M. Towle and 
M. Hoyt. The class editor "also ran." 
We could hardly tear ourselves away, but 
finally had pity on our hostess and left 
after a wonderful party which was a fit- 
ting close to a wonderful reunion. 

Those who were back were: GufTey, 
Schoneman, Ely, Andrews, C. Brown, 
Boyer, Clarke, Davis, Fronheiser, Hall, 
Hooper, Hoyt, Jeffers, Kilpatrick, Lever- 
ing, Middendorf, Nichols, Palmer, Peck- 
ham, Ream, Scudder, Sipe, Stirling, Thay- 
er, Towle and Walker. 

Eighteen others had excellent reasons 
for not being back. What is the matter 
with the remaining sixteen? 



1900 

Class Editor: Helen MacCoy, 
Haverford, Pa. 
The Class of 1900 had a most success- 
ful Reunion. There were present: Edna 
Floersheim Bamberger, Reita Levering 
Brown, Daisy Browne, Grace Campbell 
Babson, Frances Ruth Crawford, Doro- 
thea Farquhar Cross, Evelyn Hills Dav- 
enport, Susan Dewees, Helena Emerson, 
Edith Fell, Elise Dean Findley, Louise 
Congdon Francis, Ellen Baltz Fultz, Julia 
Streeter Gardner, Lois Farnham Horn, 
Aletta Van Reypen KorfT, Mary Kilpat- 
rick, Cornelia Halsey Kellogg, Marie Si- 
chel Linburn, Helen MacCoy, Marian 
Hickman Quattrone, R e n e e Mitchell 
Righter, Ruth Rockwopd, Myra Frank 
Rosenau, Margaretta Morris Scott, Amy 



Sharplcss, Clara Seymour St. John, Jessie 
Tatlock, Edith Wright. 

The Joint Luncheon was held on the 
porch and lawn of Wyndham, with '96, 
'97, '98 and '99 on Monday, June 3rd. 
The Class had a tea that afternoon just 
for themselves and Marion Parris Smith, 
who talked to them about the changes in 
college since their era. This was a par- 
ticularly interesting and delightful occa- 
sion and they are very grateful for the 
time and kindness given them by Marion 
Smith. On Tuesday was held a class pic- 
nic, where Grace Babson told about her 
apple orchards and. Ruth Rockwood about 
her library work, its growth and scope; 
on that night was the class dinner in 
Wyndham with toasts by Dorothea Cross, 
Myra Rosenau and Marie Sichel. After 
the dinner a play was given by Nina 
Kellogg, Ellen Baltz, Renee Mitchell, 
Mary Kilpatrick and Helen MacCoy 
called "The Bathroom Door." The audi- 
ence sat on the stairs and was most en- 
thusiastic. The weather was sunny and 
cool all the time and all the omens were 
propitious. 

1904 

Class Editor: Emma Q. Thompson, 
340 S. 42nd St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

The most interesting news concerns our 
"Class Baby," Frances Elizabeth Fry, 
who graduated with the Class of '29 re- 
ceiving her degree "Magna Cum Laude" 
and a Fellowship in History. She sailed 
June 8th, on .the Vollendam for England, 
where she will spend the summer with her 
father's sister. She will use the Fellow- 
ship next winter studying at- a Foreign 
University. Betty was delighted with the 
watch that we, the class, gave her as a 
garduation present. It is a tiny Swiss 
watch and I am sure you would all think 
it as pretty and useful as the Committee 
did. 

Patty gave a tea at the College Club 
for Alice Boring in May, a number of the 
Philadelphia members of '04 enjoyed the 
afternoon together. At present Leslie 
Clark is visiting Patty. 

Agnes Gillinder Carson could not come 
to Patty's tea because she went down to 
Hood College in Maryland to help her 
daughter Martha celebrate May Day. 

Marion Knox Palmer, Buz's eldest 
daughter graduated from the University 
of Maryland in the class of '29. She com- 
pleted her College work in three years. 

Hilda's married daughter, Amelie Vau- 
clain Tatnall, was at the Garden Party 
celebrating with her class. 

The Annual Report from the Church 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



23 



L 



Hospital, Wuchang, has just reached me. 
Mary James is again enjoying her busy 
life in her beloved hospital. It is sad to 
know that Evelyn Holliday Patterson has 
lost her mother. Mrs. Holliday was a 
good friend whom many of the class 
knew, and I know they desire to express 
their sympathy to Evelyn. 

This is the year we should be together 
to renew old friendships, but we hesitate 
to admit the truth, and for one more year 
we prefer to enjoy delusions. Since we 
were all brought up in the good old- 
fashioned way, i. e., on statistics, I have 
gathered a few to refresh you. Can you 
recall the healthy, happy, hopeful Fresh- 
men saddened by the Chapel speeches 
sounding forth the victorious 17 per cent 
— wondering who were predestined for 
matrimony? Do you realize that the fa- 
mous 17 per cent cast no spell upon us, 
for 57 of the class have married and only 
39 are single? Our ranks are broken by 
the loss of only six beloved classmates, 
few indeed during the twenty-nine years 
we have been friends. Our children do 
us great credit. We number about one 
hundred; six have already entered Bryn 
Mawr; one, Peggy Reynolds Hulse's 
daughter, is an alumna; another, Betty 
Fry, our class baby, graduates this June; 
another daughter of Marjorie Canan's is 
in college. You recall that Sue Swindell's 
Sophomore daughter was "Queen of the 
May" last year. Ethel Peck Lombardi 
and Eleanor Bliss Knopf both have 
daughters in the Freshman class. Two of 
our class married during the past year, 
Buz and Jane. 

We are widely scattered — one in Japan, 
three in China, one in Armenia, one in 
Budapest, one in London, the rest of us 
stay at home, home from Bangor, Maine, 
to Portland, Oregon , via Sault-Saint 
Marie and Texas, but few of us favor 
the South. Most are energetic North- 
erners. Are we occupied? Yes; listen: 
Twenty-three teach, four in colleges, two 
teachers of art or, rather, artists, dec- 
orate our shield, two authoresses, one 
doctor, one psychiatric worker are among 
us. 

I write you every month; won't you 
write to me, so that the class may have 
news from a wider group? 

1905 
Class Editor pro tern: Edith H. Ashley, 
242 East 19th Street, New York City. 
Alice Day McLaren and her husband 
have just started on a second motor trip 
across the continent. This time they ex- 
pect to leave the car in California and 



continue around the world, touching all 
the high spots and being away at least 
a year. 

Jane Ward is in New York, taking a 
course at the New York School of Social 
Work. 

When this number of the Bulletin 
reaches the class, your bona fide editor 
will be back on the job again. Eleanor 
writes that they have had a delightful 
trip, met Bailey successfully in Egypt, 
and the only complaint seems to be that 
it was all too short. Lit had lunch with 
Helen Kempton in Paris and also a 
glimpse of Margaret Thurston Holt. 



1906 

Class Editor: Mrs. Edward W. Sturde- 
vant, 

215 Augur Ave., Fort Leavenworth, 
Kan. 

Helen Gibbons writes from Paris that 
Lloyd is graduating from the Taft School 
fourth in his class. He hopes to go to 
Princeton next year where he is planning 
to room with Katharine Fullerton 
Gerould's son, Christopher. Mimi is in 
the first year of Jacques Dalcroze's pro- 
fessional course, and Christine has been 
studying singing, piano and Italian. Her- 
bert is busy on a new book. They will 
spend the summer all together at Pornic, 
near St. Nazaire. 

Augusta French Wallace's daughter, 
Augusta, graduates from Margaret Hall, 
Versailles, Kentucky, on the third of 
June. 

Beth Harrington Brooks with her two 
older boys spent four .days of the Spring 
vacation in Washington, saw all the 
sights, even shook hands with the Presi- 
dent. They visited Adelaide Neall on the 
way down, and Beth talked to Lucia on 
the telephone. Lucia's daughter, Eliza- 
beth, was just recovering from an opera- 
tion for appendicitis. 

Alice Lauterbach Flint's latest adven- 
ture was a trip to New York with her 
four-year-old daughter, from which she 
returned in fine shape but her mother ex- 
hausted. While there Alice saw Louise 
Maclay and her two lovely children. 
Laura Boyer is planning a trip abroad 
this summer. Alice will spend the sum- 
mer in Marshfield. 

By some mistake Anne Long Flana- 
gan's correct address was left out of the 
Register. It is: Mrs. Arthur Flanagan, 
11 East Newfield Way, Bala-Cynwyd, Pa. 

Mary Lee sees a great deal of Jose- 
phine Katzenstein Blancke, as they teach 
in the same school. Josephine has en- 



24 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



deared herself to the students by her ex- 
cellent teaching and her rare combination 
of justice and kindness. Mary is plan- 
ning to spend most of the summer in New 
Haven, where she will see Nan Pratt and 
Mary Withington. 

Ruth McNaughton in the Winter 
teaches at the Unquowa School, Fairfield, 
Conn., while in summer she is still in 
charge of the Fresh Air work at Hudson 
Guild, New York. 

Marion Mudge Prichard's daughter, 
Katherine, is to be married in October, 
and will live in Marblehead, in her 
great-grandmother's old-fashioned house. 
Charles, her oldest boy, is in Tech, and is 
to be married next year. 

Mary Quimby Shumway is still tutor- 
ing at Bryn Mawr and teaching at the 
Kirk School. Her husband will be teach- 
ing at Columbia this summer, so they plan 
to spend July and August at Sound Beach, 
with possibly a motor trip to Gloucester, 
Mass., in September. 

Caroline Richards McKnight is still on 
her lemon ranch in Chula Vista and 
hasn't been farther East than Chicago 
since 1907. Her two boys are in their 
sophomore year in High School, and very 
athletically inclined, having won sweaters 
in basketball and cups and prizes in golf. 
She herself is inclined to less strenuous 
pastimes, such as BRIDGE. 

1906 can now boast of another PH.D., 
Maria Smith took her degree in Indo- 
European Philology at the University of 
Pennsylvania last year. Congratulations, 
Maria ! In the winter she is Instructor in 
Latin at Temple University, and in the 
summer she helps to run the Marionette 
Tea Room at Lake George. Her hobby is 
Zoroastrian literature. 

Kitty Stone Grant has three daughters 
all preparing for Bryn Mawr, a proud 
record! Mary Elizabeth graduates from 
Miss Madeira's on June 4th, Katrina is at 
Rosemary, Jean Anne is going to Emma 
Willard in the Fall. Her boy, George, is 
at Mohonk School. Kitty herself is in 
Saginaw. 

Helen Wyeth Pierce is occupied in 
training two choruses, playing a Church 
organ, and private music, to say nothing 
of her housekeeping and gardening. One 
of her choruses has just won a prize in a 
State contest. She sees Mary Lee, Peggy 
Coyle Rahilly and Ida Murphy at least 
once a month. They were all to have a 
twilight supper in her garden. 

Louise Cruice Sturdevant is going to 
spend the summer in Nantucket. Her 
husband has been ordered to Quantico, 
where they will go in September. 



1909 
Class Editor: Helen Bond Crane, 
Denbigh Hall, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Sally Jacobs is an impressive head mis- 
tress; the Seiler School is flourishing, 
and Sally has just acquired thirty acres 
of land for recreational purposes. She re- 
ports having seen a picture of Elise Don- 
aldson's on exhibition at the Philadelphia 
Academy of Fine Arts this spring. 

Gene Ustick had had a card from 
Pleasaunce, indicating that Pleas is living 
at Northway, Golders Green, London, but 
giving no further news of herself. 

Shirley is living outside of Paris with 
her two children, while her husband is 
having most successful exhibitions of his 
pictures in London. He expects to go to 
Russia this summer and continue his 
painting. 

Lillian Laser Strauss could not join us, 
as she has been ill since she returned 
from Europe in February. 

D. I. Smith Chamberlin wrote that she 
wished she might be collected for Pa- 
tience, but that the best she could do 
would be to attend the Chicago dinner for 
the "Seven College Presidents." She ex- 
pects to take the three children to Asquam 
Lake, Holderness, N. H. for the summer. 
Meanwhile her husband will be traveling 
to South Africa to attend the Interna- 
tional Geological Congress. 

1910 
Editor: Emily L. Storer, 
Waltham, Mass. 

Rosalind Romeyn Everdell writes : "In- 
deed, I have a lot of news for you, for 
we have built and moved into a new 
house, and we are wrapped up in the in- 
terior and exterior decoration of the 
same. It is a brick house painted white 
with a slate roof and casement windows 
in the English style on the outside, but 
Everdell on the inside! We all love it 
and are busy now with planting of all 
kinds. I ordered my flower beds dug 
eight feet deep!! but fortunately discov- 
ered my mistake before the garden wall 
and house caved into them. Live and 
learn. You see I had never even seen a 
spring in the country until I went to 
B. M. C. I do so wish all 1910ers would 
stop and see us — we are only 20 miles 
from 46th St. and Park Ave. Much love 
to all." 

Frances Hearne Brown: "My husband, 
children and pets are the same. My two 
oldest are Sophomore and Freshman at 
the interesting North Shore Country Day 
School here in Winnetka and my two 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



25 



youngest in the famed Winnetka public 
school system. I'm President of the 
Parent-Teacher Association of the Public 
Schools for another year — so shall con- 
tinue to be busy. We have just had here 
in Chicago the meeting of the Alumnae 
of seven colleges which was very stimulat- 
ing and enjoyable. Annette is beginning 
to take practice College Board examina- 
tions and hopes to be B.M. 1935." Good 
for our class baby and great great great 
grand niece! 

Charlotte Simonds Sage: "We're all 
fine even if Nattie, Jr., is still in the hos- 
pital. It is seven weeks and we are 
thoroughly tired of it, but he ought to be 
home soon (he was frightfully sick after 
a ruptured appendix). The rest of us 
flourish and the house is getting to look 
like something." 



1912 

Class Editor: Catharine Thompson 
Bell (Mrs. C. Kenneth Bell), 
2700 Chicago Blvd., Detroit, Mich. 

The class wishes to express through the 
Bulletin its sympathy with Cynthia 
Stevens in the death of her sister, Sarah 
Eccleston Stevens. 

Gladys Edgerton had an article in "The 
New Adelphi," Dec. 28-Feb. 29 number, 
entitled "Christmas Eve" with sub-title, 
"A Sketch of 1899." Since no less than 
Mr. Santayana and J. D. Beresford are 
among Edgie's fellow contributors, we are 
really very much thrilled. 

Elizabeth Faries Howe announces the 
birth of her youngest son, James Lynn 
Howe, on February 13. 

Florence Glenn Zipf took almost all the 
prizes in sight with her tulips at a Bryn 
Mawr Flower Show. 

Marjorie Thompson and Mary Peirce 
have been amusing themselves with a 
course in "Floriculture" at the Ambler 
School of Horticulture. Amusing is just 
the word, Mary says, for there is some- 
thing quite ridiculous in paying for the 
privilege of weeding some one else's gar- 
den. She admits acquiring valuable infor- 
mation between weeds. Of course that's 
just one of Mary's activities. She's taken 
on the chairmanship of the Finance Com- 
mittee of the Philadelphia Chamber String 
Simfonietta and is pushing the annual bulb 
sale for the Woman's Club Scholarship 
Fund. Marjorie, too, we hear is doing 
pottery at the School of Industrial Art. 
She had two really lovely pots in their 
Exhibit. 



1913 
Class Editor: Betty Fabian Webster, 
(Mrs. Ronald Webster), 
905 Greenwood Blvd., Evanston, 111. 

Margaret Scruggs Carruth writes from 
Dallas: "Come on and go to Norway 
with me this summer, Mother, Dad and I 
leave here the 18th of May, sailing on 
the "Empress of Australia" from Quebec, 
and after briefly touring Southern and 
Western England and Wales, up into 
Southern Scotland, will sail from New- 
castle on the "Prince Olav" the middle of 
June to visit the fjords of Norway and 
see the land of the Midnight Sun. Later 
we will go to Germany and Austria, 
Budapest, Vienna and Lucerne. We'll fly 
over from Brussels to London, and see a 
bit of the Shakespeare and Dickens coun- 
try before coming home. Doesn't it sound 
alluring? 

"Every time I'm anywhere near B. M., 
I get a tremendous urge to try to get in 
touch with the girls. I've just come back 
from a fascinating visit in Washington, 
D. C, where all sorts of interesting things 
happened. I met a girl there who lived 
in Trenton and knew the Buchanans." 

I am sorry to miss Margaret's boat by 
a few days. Ronald, the children and I 
are sailing May 15 from Montreal for 
France. We are taking a car and expect 
to stay perhaps a year. We have no defi- 
nite plans beyond a stay at the seashore 
in the St. Jean de Luz region this sum- 
mer, and possibly Grenoble, because of 
schools and the University, next winter. 
If any of you are going over, please let 
me know, care of the American Express 
Co., 7 Rue Scribe, Paris. 

My best wishes go with the next class 
editor, and a hope that she may have a 
large correspondence. 

The class wishes to extend its deepest 
sympathy to Grace Bartholomew Clayton 
in the loss of her husband. He was ill 
only a short time, dying in April of 
streptococcic pneumonia. 

1916 
Editor: Catherine S. Godley, 
768 Ridgeway Avenue, 
Avondale, Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Mr. Van der Water, who condemns 
men's class reunions in the June Harpers, 
really should have seen ours. I will ad- 
mit that there are a few points of simi- 
larity and that we did say, "Gosh, it's 
good to see you again. Married? Any 
kids?" But did our conversation languish 
at this point? Oh, no, that was only the 
signal for the start of all-day debates on 
Are Progressive Schools Progressive or 



26 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



Expensive, Shall we Spank the Baby or 
Feed Him Spinach, Is Life Richer or 
Fuller, if so, of What. Al Van Horn, 
our toastmistress, led the Parent Group 
discussions, cleverly drawing out each 
parent to tell significant details and to 
show pictures of off-spring. 

Not one of us broke any furniture or 
got arrested and nobody brought even a 
pocket flask, at least nobody showed me 
any although Mr. Ad Werner Vorys was 
worried for fear Ad would be quite out 
of it unless she brought a little snort. 

We really didn't sing shoulder-to- 
shoulder about the battle of life, we were 
too busy taking sun-baths. The new col- 
lege rule that you can't take your dress 
off on upper campus unless you are 25 
feet above ground rather cramped our 
style, but our absent members will be de- 
lighted to hear that as we sprawled upon 
the grass in our shorts and bare legs, we 
were taken for Model School children. 

Our manager, R. Fordyce Gayton, 
member emeritus of the Grand Jury, man- 
aged us as efficiently as she handles her 
red-headed child. H. Riegel Oliver put 
the Paris touch to our smock and beret 
costumes with many colored painters' 
palettes and 16's made of adhesive plaster. 
Our Permanent President, C. Kellen 
Branham, fulfilled her official duties by 
running our tubs each morning and hold- 
ing open the dining room door while we 
ran down the hall. C. McKeefrey Usis, 
who donned a new dress three times each 
day, appeared at Baccalaureate sermon 
with hat, fur and gloves instead of the 
customary tennis shoes. She has moved 
13 times in 8 years so is used to changes. 
A. Burt, who agrees with Mr. Van der 
Water about prancing through the parade 
in bizarre raiment, repressed her true 
temperament and followed the mob. Jute 
Chase Locke and M. Dodd Sangree were 
slightly delayed by some of their six 
daughters but arrived smiling as usual. 
Buckie Kirk Hollingsworth has an artist 
husband and a city-bred child who has 
never seen a blade of grass. Bobby Rob- 
ertson brought news of our foreign mem- 
bers. Betty Holliday Hitz also told of 
how to handle a red-headed child. J. 
Greenewald Gordon likewise boasts of a 
red-headed child. Among those present 
was Kith Godley, who boasts of no child 
red-headed or otherwise. Juliet Branham 
Williams seems to have three children 
under four years of age. Annis Thomp- 
son has seven assistants. 

M. Kleps invited us all to visit the 
Holmquist School. V. de. Macedo Raacke 
told of keeping house and teaching at the 
same time. Ruth Lautz is still a statisti- 



cian. H. Tyson took one look at us and 
fled before class supper. Anna Lee had 
to leave our Baby Clinic for her High 
School. Eva Bryne is taking a corre- 
spondence course and' thinks but is not 
sure tljat she has a Ph.D. J. Ross Chism 
came all the way from St. Louis to our 
midst. Emilie Wagner Baird left her chil- 
dren to help transport her old classmates. 
Jute and Anna Lee were also very handy 
with their cars. 

Advertisement: Dr. Eliz. Brakeley, D. 
D. T., Specializes in Children's Disease 
but will take Others. Drunks peremptor- 
ily cared for. D. O. A. Patients charged 
according to What they have. Telephone 
calls five dollars extra. 

Cre Garfield Comer is compiling sta- 
tistics of Who's Who and Why and if you 
want to know anything that is omitted 
herein ASK MRS. COMER. Cedy. 

1917 
Editor: Bertha Greenough, 

203 Blackstone Blvd., Providence, R. I. 

Even the weather conspired to make 
1917's biggest and best reunion a success, 
for the sun was shining as we gathered 
on Saturday, June 1st, and continued 
throughout our three days of festivities. 
It was almost emblematic of the warm de- 
light we all felt at the realization that 
our class spirit was still a very strong and 
binding emotion, and at the opportunity 
of seeing each other, and picking up again 
all the dropped threads. As a result of 
Nat's enthusiastic management thirty- 
eight of us gathered for the class dinner. 
Blodgie as toastmistress in a patriotic red 
dress, was as sparkling as the electricity 
in which she does such brilliant research 
work. The main speeches were made by 
Nats, Caroline, Carrie Shaw, and Dooles, 
but all of us joined in with impromptu 
talks giving what news we could of those 
who were not present, over coffee and 
cigarettes in the living room. We gos- 
sipped until the early hours, and discussed 
almost everything from the raising of 
babies to social customs in Italy. 

Sunday was a perfectly glorious day, 
and in an imposing procession of seven 
cars we all drove out to Dorothy Ship- 
ley's beautiful home where we had a great 
time lunching outdoors, getting delicious- 
ly sunburned and merry sitting on the 
porch, and walking under the trees 
through the lovely garden. After an in- 
spiring class meeting at which much busi- 
ness was done and Caroline read a fine 
letter from Con Hall telling of the sab- 
batical year she is spending in Italy, we 
adjourned to the College Inn for supper, 
and later to the Baccalaureate Sermon in 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



27 



Goodhart Hall, which many of us had 
never seen. 

Both Sunday night and Monday morn- 
ing were spent in a mad scramble to get 
our costumes ready. We carried on our 
tradition of being the Vandal class, and 
turned out at the Alumnae parade as bold, 
bad pirates, in which dresses with red 
bandanas and sashes, and enormous hoop 
earrings and wicked-looking crimson 
dirks, to say nothing of red-bordered 
socks, 1917 certainly proved it hadn't lost 
its pristine pep by the way it marched in 
the procession to the gym and sang our 
scandalous Vandal song, and helped cheer 
the athletic awards and the basketball 
game which followed. 

This alumnae day was certainly crowded 
with events, a picnic in Wyndham Garden 
with 1916, '18 and '19, a Tea for the 
Seniors in the charming Common Room 
of Goodhart Hall, and another in Merion 
for the members of the faculty who knew 
us in college, and Alumnae Supper in the 
gym at night, and always throughout our 
three days were the good talks, and the 
questions asked and answered, and the 
really thrilling explorations into the va- 
ried busy spheres we are each living in. 
I don't think a single member of our class 
was forgotten in the interested enquiries, 
and the only way it could possibly have 
been a better reunion would have been to 
have everyone actually present instead of 
just in our thoughts. Well, we're still 
going on, mighty '17, and with memories 
like this behind us, we'll certainly never 
give way ! 

We had a grand reunion with the fol- 
lowing people: 

Mary Andrews is living in Englewood, 
and she brought with her two darling 
pictures of her nine and six-year-old 
daughters. 

Blodgie left her research job with Gen- 
eral Electric Company long enough to be 
our toastmaster. 

Doris Bird nobly deserted her husband 

and three children for the entire reunion. 

Louise Collins was on a short trip 

home from Pernambuco, Brazil, where 

her husband is the American Consul. 

Mary Frances Colter came all the way 
from Cincinnati. She is married and has 
two boys. 

We were awfully glad to have Fran 
Curtin back from West Virginia, but 
were sorry she didn't bring any snap- 
shots of her three children. 

Anne Davis Swift motored over from 
Princeton. 

Izzie Diamond dashed up from her 
government job in Washington for dinner 
Saturday night. 



Dooles having obtained her Ph.D. from 
Harvard and published a most valuable 
book on the French franc, is living at 
Yarrow and teaching at Bryn Mawr 
where she expects to be found next year. 
Skipper Emerson Gardner was able to 
desert her small daughter in Washing- 
ton and get away from the clinics she is 
holding there, for the weekend. 

Betty Faulkner Lacy had a glorious 
time in purope with her husband last 
fall, and was thrilled to get back to her 
four children, of whom she had a lovely 
picture with her. 

Mary Glenn is teaching in a school in 
Pennsylvania. 

Jane Grace McPhedran came over from 
Germantown where she has been living 
for several years. 

Mary Hodge Urban brought her three 
children down from New Haven to stay 
with her family so that she could reune 
with us. She did some admirable work 
in painting cutlasses red for our vandal- 
istic costumes. 

Nell Hammill Gorman was there look- 
ing very slender. 

Frances Johnson was able to get away 
from Rockford College where she is pro- 
fessor of mathematics and physics. She 
taught in Constantinople for three years 
and this summer is planning to do some 
interesting research in Rochester. 

Nats McFaden Blanton was the most 
wonderful reunion manager imaginable. 
We were all very proud of her at the 
Alumnae Banquet when she spoke on 
"The Last of the Victorians." As you 
probably know she married a doctor, has 
four children and is still living in Rich- 
mond, Virginia. 

Marian Rhoads is working in the ad- 
vertising department of Ginn and Co., 
in Boston. 

Ruth Richards Magin drove over from 
Collingswood, New Jersey, where she is 
living. 

Dor Shipley White spent a large part 
of the time with us on the campus. She 
also entertained us most royally at her 
delightful house in Penllyn. It was a 
great joy to all of us to meet her charm- 
ing husband and see her two darling 
children. 

Carrie Shaw Tatom was the life of the 
party with her ready repartee. She is in 
the office of Hornblower and Weeks in 
Pittsburgh where she has been for two 
years. 

Caroline Stevens Rogers was back 
looking as lovely as ever. She and a 
friend of hers have started a combined 
kindergarten and nursery school for 
about ten children in Newton Centre 



28 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



where she lives. One of her own three 
is in this school. 

Lid Steuart dashed up from Virginia 
where she is doing public health work, 
and living on Dunsale Mountain. 

Scat was there in full force in her 
bobbed hair. She has an extremely in- 
teresting job with the American Federa- 
tion of Labor in Washington. 

Olga Tattersfield came out and spent 
the weekend in Merion with us. She is 
doing social work. 

Marion Tuttle was able to leave her 
job at Wheaton College where she is 
teaching English and to be with us for the 
entire reunion. 

Millie Willard Gardiner came over to 
our class dinner. It was great to see her 
again still psychologically enthusiastic. 
She has a darling son only a few months 
old. She tells us that she has not yet 
tried mental tests on it. 

Mart Willett is working in Boston in 
the Girl Scout Headquarters. 

Sunday night Con Wilcox Pignatelli ar- 
rived. After Baccalaureate she enter- 
tained quite a group of us in the front 
smoking room in Merion with tales of the 
life of an Italian Princess in Florence. 

It was nice to see Mary Worley Strick- 
land looking very well. 

Thalia Smith Dole, looking as young 
and charming as when she was in college, 
although she has a daughter who is al- 
most ten, was with us for the entire re- 
union. She deserted her husband and his 
1200 chickens and brought with her tales 
of her delightful house near Pittsfield, 
Mass. 

Reba Joachim is working in a lawyer's 
office in Philadelphia. 

The following news about absent mem- 
bers was gleaned by the new editor: 

Mollie Boyd, who is married and living 
in New York, disappointed us all by not 
arriving at the class dinner. 

Giddle Bryant is running a tea room in 
New Haven in the winter. In the sum- 
mer she is running a camp and tea room 
at Smugglers' Notch in Stowe, Vermont, 
where she would be delighted to see any 
of '17. m 

Heloise Carroll Handcock is running a 
gift shop called The Red Quill in Pitts- 
burgh. 

Caddy Casselberry Templeton spent this 
winter in a hospital and then in Florida 
recovering from a severe motor accident. 
It was reported that she was the loveliest 
looking invalid in any hospital. 

Lucia Chase Ewing has just returned 
from a. trip to Europe with her husband 
after celebrating the arrival a few months 
ago of her son. 



Anna Coulter Parsons has a daughter, 
Nancy Anne, born in May. 

Con Hall has been having a sabbatical 
in Europe. At last accounts she was in 
Florence having a marvelous time. 

Hel' Harris is the head of Kingsley 
House in Pittsburgh. 

Margaret Henderson Bailie is the land- 
scape architect for the college. 

Margaret Hoff Zimmerman was unable 
to get away from Chapel Hill, N. C, 
where her husband is teaching. We un- 
derstand, however, that Erika stands at 
the head of her class. 

Sally Hinde was in bed with the 
measles in May! 

The following excerpt from Sylvia Jel- 
liffe Stragnell's letter may be of interest: 

"The major occupation, next to running 
the house and the kids, seems to be feed- 
ing livestock. Barbara, my seven-year- 
old, really does all the work herself, but I 
have to hang around to pluck her out 
from under the horses' hoofs, or inter- 
pose myself in time if Rascal, our husky 
ram, gets playful. We have two ponies 
and a colt, four sheep and two lambs, 
chickens, pigeons, ducks, full size, and 
countless baby chicks and ducklings that 
have to be taken out each day for an air- 
ing. To say nothing of the spring batch 
of puppies. Robert, the five-year-old, 
manages the ducks and Barbara has be- 
come quite proficient in counting her 
chickens before they are hatched." 

Ginger Litchfield was seen by a few 
members of the class en route from Cali- 
fornia to Europe via Philadelphia just 
about reunion time. 

Eleanora Wilson Peacock, who is living 
in Cynwyd, brought her three children 
over to see us Sunday afternoon, but. un- 
fortunately could locate nobody. We did 
get a glimpse of her on Monday, looking 
as young and charming as ever. 

Tommy Wahl Barber is now stationed 
at Fort Sheridan outside Chicago. She 
writes that Gertie Malone is in the Phil- 
ippines. 

Monica O'Shea sailed for Europe the 
end of May. 

The editor, on her way back from re- 
union stopped at Manhasset, Long Island, 
for dinner with Lovey Brown Lamarche 
and her husband in their cunning house. 
She has an adorable son fifteen months 
old. 

1918 
Editor: Helen Edward Walker, 

5515 Everett Ave., Chicago, Illinois. 
1918's class dinner was held at eight 
o'clock, Saturday, June 1st, in Denbigh, 
with Sydney Belyille Coale as a very 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



29 



charming toastmistress. It was a most 
successful affair, the largest dinner on the 
campus, 49 of the class being present. Be- 
ginning by candle-light, due to a blown- 
out fuse, our spirits rose with the lights. 
Speeches were made by Mary Gardiner, 
who gave side-lights on the New Regime ; 
Marjorie Strauss spoke on "Women in 
Medicine" most interestingly; Lucy Evans 
Chew was most entertaining on the sub- 
ject of "Sales Resistance Stiffens, or the 
Shrewing of the Tame"; Helen Butter- 
field Williams, the mother of the Class 
baby, spoke about "our child"; Helen 
Alexander told of her experience in odd 
spots of the globe; Helen Walker spoke 
on the Trials of a Secretary; and Ruth 
Cheney Streeter, our President, made the 
closing speech, after which 1916 appro- 
priately appeared outside the windows. 
Following the exchange of Junior Fresh- 
man songs, cheers and civilities, the din- 
ner was brought to an end. 

1919 
Class Editor: Mary Morris Ramsay 
Phelps (Mrs. William Phelps), 
Guyencourt, Del. 

TENTH REUNION 

1919's Class Reunion started properly 
with a class meeting. Modernistic dis- 
sonances of all the village fire engines 
joined to the siren on the power house 
drowned out Gordon's well-bred knuckled 
rappings and we fled. When we returned 
Helen Huntting and her five months 
daughter proved as seductive as fire en- 
gines. Something was said about class 
dues or alumnae funds or scholarships or 
something. Frannie Day seemed to know 
all about it so we gladly left it at that, 
and talked about how young we looked. 

Followed a picnic in the hollow, the 
happiest inspiration ever to brighten the 
brain of a reunion director. Clad in our 
delightful and practical green sleeveless 
tennis frocks, lolling on the grass, eating 
a wonderful picnic, reading our "Green 
Shirt" (full of our own wit and our 
husbands'), singing when we felt like it, 
and talking ! 

Others may chase the errant pea at 
banquets — may we always picnic ! 

We had the great pleasure of having 
K. T. give part of her San Francisco 
concert in Goodhart, and Sunday morning 
Adelaide Landon held a lovely service 
there for us. Gertie Hearne had us all 
to tea in her garden where we saw Mr. 
and Mrs. Hearne again, and met her 
husband and children. Besides hers and 
Helen's we also saw Liebe Lanier's 
Frances Branson's and Frannie Day's 



children. From those we saw and from 
the snapshots, it was self-evident that in 
quality and quantity of progeny 1919 sets 
the pace. 

Baccalaureate, the parade, the picnic 
with '16, '17 and '18, tea with the faculty, 
alumnae supper, can only be catalogued, 
not described. Nor can we do more than 
mention hours of talk — keen, stimulating, 
exciting talk — hours of laughter, hours of 
library browsing, friendships grown 
stronger, personalities grown bigger. At 
least one doubting diffident reuner was 
changed to one who will never miss an- 
other — who has once more "followed the 
gleam" and will be happier always for 
the inspiration renewed and for Bryn 
Mawr. 

Marjorie Martin Johnson. 

1920 
Class Editor: Mary Hardy, 

518 Cathedral St., Baltimore, Md. 
Alice Harrison Scott has a second 
daughter, who was born in Baltimore on 
the 13th of April. The baby's name is 
Caroline Preston Thorton Scott. 

1921 
Editor: Mr. J. E. Rogers, 

99 Poplar Plains Road, Toronto, 
Ontario, Canada. 

Nora Newell Burry's second son was 
born on March 27th. He has red hair 
and will probably be named Michael. 
Nora has taken another house in Beth- 
esda, Maryland, for the summer but plans 
in the fall to move back to Lake Forest. 

Dot Klenke has been practicing medi- 
cine since last summer. She specialized 
during her Interneship in Neurology and 
in Neurosurgery and now plans to do only 
the latter, which means operating on the 
brain spinal cord and nerves. She is As- 
sistant Visiting Surgeon in the Neurolog- 
ical Departments of Bellevue Hospital, of 
the Neurological Institute, and of the 
Hospital for Ruptured and Crippled. She 
is Assistant Neurological Surgeon at the 
Post Graduate Hospital and Instructor in 
Neuro-anatomy at Columbia and in Neu- 
rology at the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons. All of which sounds like a 
brilliant record and achievement. 

Passya Ostroff Reefer and her husband 
are back in White Plains after a seven 
weeks' trip to the Coast. The Reefers 
have three adopted daughters aged 9, 12 
and 16. Passya writes that Bickie lives 
in the winter in a delightful studio over 
an old wagon house on a Wynnewood 
estate and in the summer in a woodsy 
cabin nearby. 



30 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



Victoria Evans Knutson's twins, a boy 
and a girl, were born in March. She now 
has three children under three years of 
age. 

Margaret Morton Creese supplied us 
with this last item and also gave us wel- 
come news of herself and family. She is 
a member of the Women's University 
Glee Club of 100 voices which gives two 
concerts yearly in New York City. Her 
son Jimmie at the age of two knows half 
his alphabet and can count up to five. 
Her husband is a Trustee of the Amer- 
ican-Scandinavian Foundation and Vice 
President and Treasurer of Stevens Insti- 
tute. 

Lilley Ireson Pickard writes us from 
"The Old Backbone," Charlwood, Surrey, 
where she and her husband have been liv- 
ing for the past two years. They have a 
15th Century house surrounded by 3 y 2 
acres which are devoted to livestock, gar- 
dens, pools and a tennis court. The Pick- 
ards make frequent trips to the Continent 
and will come over here in July for six 
weeks. She wishes me to announce that 
she would be delighted to see any mem- 
bers of the Class who are in England. 

Jane Lattimer Stevens has a second son 
born in April. George, her eldest, will be 
three in July. 

Thelma Williams Kleinau has moved to 
Chattanooga with her family of two sons, 
aged four years and eight months, re- 
spectively, and her one daughter, three 
years old. She acts as chief bottle wash- 
er and nurse but still finds time to do a 
lot of reading and to "tend the army." 
Smart girl. 

Dot McBride says she is pounding a 
typewriter into passive submission and do- 
ing a certain amount of shorthand, get- 
ting a great kick when she can read her 
own notes. 

Beatrice Spinelli is teaching English 
and coaching Dramatics at the Overbrook 
High School. Her pupils have just pre- 
sented "Come Out of the Kitchen." 

Julia Peyton Phillips has just moved to 
Otter Rock Drive, Greenwich, and wishes 
me to broadcast that she'd receive with 
open arms and a grand new car all mem- 
bers of the class who happen to be in her 
neighborhood. 

Marjorie Warren Whitman is living in 
Needham, Mass. She has a five-year 
daughter and two sons, aged two and 
three years. 

Eleanor Collins is working in a Settle- 
ment House in Wilmington. Last sum- 
mer she took a Kindergarten Course at 
Teachers College. 

Betty Llewellyn Warner, who lives in 
Winnetka, has a seven-year-old daughter 



named Barbara and a five-year-old son 
Silas. She is taking French and English 
Courses by correspondence from Colum- 
bia. 

Ruth Karns Chapman has a four-year- 
old daughter named Coreene. 

Dorothy Walter Baruch has already 
had published two very well-written chil- 
dren's books. Her third one is being 
brought out this fall by Harpers. 

Helen Weist is Director of extra- 
curricular Activities at the Dalton School 
in New York City. 

1922 

Class Editor: Serena Hand Savage, 
(Mrs. William L. Savage), 
29 W. 12th St., New York. 

Cornelia Baird Voorhis has been mak- 
ing a flying trip to Denver and Chicago 
with her husband whose business makes a 
transcontinental traveller of him. 

Curtis Bennett writes of her engage- 
ment to the Rev. John R. McGrory, rec- 
tor of St. Bartholomew's Episcopal 
Church, Wissinoming, Philadelphia. He 
is a graduate of the University of Penn- 
sylvania and the Philadelphia Divinity 
School of 1921. Curtis also adds that she 
saw Vinton Liddell Pickens at Varsity 
Dramatics this spring, and had heard 
from Henrietta Jennings, who is "happy 
and hecticly busy as the Economics De- 
partment of Wilson College." Henrietta 
is going abroad for the summer. 

Ikey Coleman is leaving her Cooper 
Union responsibilities and is sailing for a 
summer in Europe. 

Liz Hall has left the Charity Organiza- 
tion Society and is now secretary to an 
architect. 

A delightful letter from Octavia How- 
ard Price describing her community at 
Shantung Christian University. She says : 
"Because we are such a large community 
there is a great deal of social life, and 
many clubs have been organized, literary, 
choral, folk-dancing, dramatic, etc. — I 
used to think there would be nothing to 
take a missionary's time but the routine 
of his work, but life is just as difficult to 
live in the mission field as at home." 

Peggy Kennard is going to do some 
substituting for an interne in the Bellevue 
Hospital Tuberculosis service for a short 
period this summer. She is going to Alas- 
ka on her vacation. 

Katherine Peek is going to work in 
New York for a short time this sum- 
mer, doing research in libraries for her 
Ph.D. thesis. 

Harriet Stevens Robey has a third son. 

Jane Yeatman Savage has a daughter 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



born May 30th, she now has a boy and 
two girls. 

Cornelia Skinner Blodget is going to 
have a series of monologue recitals in 
London this summer at one of the large 
theatres. 



1923 

Editor: Katharine Lord Strauss, 
Oyster Bay, New York. 

Our Class Baby has a brother ! On 
May 9th Ann Fraser Brewer presented 
her two daughters with a brother, Michael 
Brewer. 

Helenka Hoyt was married on May 
11th to Dr. Byron Stookey at Rowayton, 
Conn. A unique feature was the fact 
that the bride had written the marriage 
service herself. The wedding breakfast 
was served on the lawn, where hundreds 
of spring flowers had bloomed especially 
for the occasion. Helenka wore a dress 
of silver brocade and her grandmother's 
wedding veil. She and Byron afterwards 
made a dramatic departure on a launch 
which plunged through a rather high sea 
on Long Island Sound. Hi Price and 
Kay Strauss were bridesmaids, and '23 
was further represented by Franny 
Childs, Dos Stewart Pierson, D. M. Kun- 
hardt, and Flippit Martin Chase. 

Flippit and her husband have just gone 
to California, taking their daughter, Ann, 
to visit Mr. and Mrs. Martin. 

Nancy FitzGerald is still working at 
Fogg Museum, but is going abroad in July 
on the Shady Hill Research Fellowship. 
On the side she still raises dogs — Minia- 
ture Schnauzers — and has been winning 
prizes steadily with them. 

Nancy reports that the New England 
Association of Bryn Mawr Alumnae re- 
cently had their annual luncheon at which 
Miss Schenck spoke. Among those pres- 
ent were Cucu Bradley Stevens and Mari- 
on Lawrence. The latter has had several 
articles published in the Art Bulletin, on 
Early Christian Sarcophagi, on which 
subject she is considered an authority. 

Delphine Fitz hopes to get her Ph.D. 
in June. 

Dina Worcester left on the 12th of May 
for a year's medical interneship at Johns 
Hopkins. 

Readers will be glad to learn that D. M. 
will resume the editorship of '23's column 
in the Bulletin next autumn. Notes 
should be sent to Mrs. Philip B. Kun- 
hardt, Mt. Kemble Avenue, Morristown, 
New Jersey. 



1924 
Class Editor: Beth Tuttle Wilbur 
(Mrs. Donald Wilbur), 
Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Dog Conner was married in the early 
spring to Anthony Hicks Brackett we 
learn from the Times Rotogravure. We'd 
like very much to hear the details and 
any other doings of interest that Dog 
has been indulging in. 

Jean Palmer is now secretary to Em 
Anderson, '22, who is, in turn, secretary 
of the Junior League in the Bryn Mawr 
Club of New York. 

Betty Hale, whose engagement to Bob 
Laidlaw has been announced, graduated 
from the School of Physicians and Sur- 
geons in May and will begin her interne- 
ship at the Bellevue Hospital in the fall. 

Chuck Woodworth has been awarded a 
European Fellowship in the Graduate 
School at B. M. and will sail sometime in 
July to study either at Oxford, or the 
University of London. 

We learn from the Alumnae Register, 
recently published, that a great many of 
'24 have been putting things over on the 
editor and on their class by having in- 
numerable interesting jobs, husbands, 
children, and what not, and remaining 
perfectly mum about them. Please re- 
member that if the Alumnae notes are 
several years old and common parlance 
before published, it's nobody's fault — but 
everybody's. 

1925 
Class Editor: Blit Mallett Conger 
(Mrs. Frederic Conger), 
325 E. 72d St., New York City. 

Dot Lee Haslam has a son born May 
7th. He will be named for Greville. 
Nana Bonnell Davenport says he is a fine 
baby with lots of hair. 

On May 31st Betty Voorhees was 
married to Charles K. Kimball. Betty 
Philbrick, '23, and Carry Remak were 
bridesmaids. Mr. Kimball went to Prince- 
ton and the Law School of Washington, 
St. Louis. After the wedding trip Betty's 
new address will be 447 E. 57th St., New 
York. 

And more spring brides ! Beth Comer 
writes: "I announced my engagement 
when I was at home at Easter. His name 
is Richard Walther Rapp. He was born 
in Strassburg and has had quite a hectic 
time with the matter of his nationality. 
The United States insisting that he is 
French, while really he is German to the 
core. Richard has solved the problem by 
becoming American. He is an artist by 
profession." 



32 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



This summer Beth will travel with her 
father in the mountains of Germany look- 
ing at glass factories, and next winter she 
will have a position co-ordinating the 
Economics, History and Government of 
the Boston Branch of the Katharine 
Gibbs School of Secretarial Training for 
Educated Women. She will be married 
next June. 

Tibby Lawrence as usual is bringing 
glory to '25. She has won a Carnegie 
European Scholarship at Barnard and 
will study art in Paris next winter — (I 
think). 

And Kathy McBride will be Warden of 
Wyndham and do graduate work in 
Psych. 

Briggy and Clarence Leuba and Rich- 
ard and Roger will also ornament the 
campus next winter when Clarence will 
teach some of the Psych. 

Chissy has been made head of stock in 
the bathing suit department of Macy's — 
and this being the rush season, has about 
120 young things under her to break in. 

And now for the European exodus — 
Nan Hough (with six weeks vacation 
from Ginn & Co.) and Sue Carey and 
Crit Coney will tramp and bicycle through 
England in July and August. 

Adelaide Eicks and Caroline Quarles 
are already gallivanting abroad. 

And Blit and Fred Conger start for 
England in August. But by the way, you 
probably saw in '28's class notes that 
Bobby Loines Dreier and Yildiz Phillips 
Van Hulsteyn are racing for Class Baby. 
Well that's very exciting because Bobby 
is our niece and so here we are — Fred 
and Blit — racing against untold odds 
(who knows how many Aunts and Uncles 
Yildiz has?) to be Class Great Uncle and 
Great Aunt. I tell you the responsibilities 
certainly begin young nowadays. 

1927 
Class Editor: Ellenor Morris, 
Berwyn, Pa. 
Being an unofficial gathering, the re- 
union was not attended by many of the 
class, which was unfortunate as Lucy 
Shoe made a very efficient manager and 
could have handled hordes. 
. A picnic was held on Saturday night, 
and was attended by Valinda Hill Du 
Bose, who contributed a very excellent 
cake (just think what married life can do 
for one!); and by Sara Pinkerton, Mad 
Pierce Lemmon, Billy Holcombe Trotter, 
Florence Day, Hazel Fitz, Helen Klopfer, 
Gertrude Richman, Elise Nachman and 
Lucy. 

The class wishes to extend to Ellen 
Haines its deepest sympathy on the death 



of her brother. He was carried over a 
dam in a stream near Richmond, where 
he was at school, and drowned. Ellen has 
been studying medicine this winter in 
Philadelphia. 

Eleanor Wooley is married to Cedric 
Fowler, a Canadian, who is living in New 
York and writing a book which, according 
to Minna Lee Jones, will certainly be 
banned. 

On April 20th Winnie Winchester was 
married to Randolph Brandt. Among the 
bridesmaids were Ursula Squier Reimers, 
Ruth Rickaby and Eliza Boyd. 

It was doubtless a fine rehearsal for 
Rick, who on May 18th became Mrs. 
Louis J. Damstadt, with a wedding recep- 
tion a,t Sherry's as Winnie had. 

Marion Leary is married to Godfrey 
Twachtman and K. Simonds is engaged 
to Lovell Thompson. Unfortunately no 
further details on either of these events 
have penetrated to the class editor. This 
is considered particularly cruel in the case 
of the latter considering the volume of 
correspondence which used to pass be- 
tween our two pens during the hours 
spent on Europe since 1870. 

Connie Jones is teaching at Baldwins, 
and appears regularly at the functions in 
Goodhart. 

Nan Bowman is still at Medical School 
in Pittsburgh, although she was very ill 
this winter. Reports vary as to the exact 
malady, but so far the three favorites are 
appendicitis, pneumonia and typhoid 
fever. She is going on a tour of Central 
Europe this summer with Jinny Atmore 
and a number of others. 

Jan is going to Summer School at 
Columbia to take courses in physical 
education, and will return in the fall as 
an important member of Bryn Mawr's 
athletic staff. 

And speaking of returns to the campus 
— a few weeks ago a member of '27 was 
seated before Miss King in her all too 
familiar study listening to the prospective 
duties of a reader for the first-year class 
in history of art. At the end of which 
she murmured: 

"Is the position like Miss Barber's?" 
"No, Miss Morris, like Miss Ling's!" 
Thereupon that trembling aspirant sank 
gracefully, if only mentally, through the 
floor of the lib, but has nevertheless ac- 
cepted the position. 

Jessie Hendrick is still studying law at 
Oxford, where she is to take her final 
exams this spring. She writes, "we are 
still dining at the Middle Temple every 
term, but won't have qualified for the 
English bar until about next Christmas, 
and then only if we successfully pass our 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



33 



final bar exam which unfortunately are 
quite apart from the University exams, 
and even include different subjects. The 
Temple is a great thrill, studying in the 
library and lunching in the little shops 
near the courts. This winter, I had some 
rather interesting visits to local assizes, 
and to the Law Courts on Fleet Street, 
and one day I heard a murder trial from 
beginning to end." 

Dot Irwin Headley has a little boy 
born on the first of June. He arrived 
just in time for reunion, but for some 
strange reason his mother did not see fit 
to bring him to the picnic. 

Freddie deLaguna is going on an ex- 
pedition to Greenland this summer to help 
excavate a prehistoric Eskimo kitchen- 
midden. Thus ako our intellectuals go 
domestic ! 

Agnes Newhall has been awarded a 
Special Fellowship at the School of 
Athens, and Lucy Shoe has won in com- 
petitive examinations another of their 
fellowships. They will be there together 
next year. Tommy Wyckoff", by the way, 
is official artist and photographer at the 
same school. 

Mary Zelia Pease has a scholarship at 
Yale. 

Ellen Haines is going to be the nurse 
at Bates House this summer. 

"Gabbie" Sewall is at home in Port- 
land, Oregon, very much engrossed with 
Junior League activities, and the scenery 
end of a theatre guild — the Portland Civic 
Players. 



1928 

Class Editor: Helen McKelvey, 
341 Madison Ave., New York. 

REUNION 

Christobel Robin is going to College, 

A wee little slip of a lass, 
She hopes to acquire superflous knowledge 

By lying in her shirt on the grass. 
Christobel Robin can't walk without 
hopping, 

She blames that on May Day here, 
She wears a band and won't wear a 
stocking, 

She's just gone collegiate, I fear. 

This was one of Puppie's comments in 
her delightful speech at Alumnae Ban- 
quet. Twenty-eight of 1928 met very 
informally and successfully in Radnor. 
Our reunion began with supper in the 
Common Room on Saturday, where we 
voted to meet in Denbigh next year, and 
in Goodhart for dinner forever and ever. 
Sunday was scattered, some to Ginny's 



for supper (Ginny was a perfect reunion 
manager), and others to the surrounding 
country. 

Our Alice-in-Wonderland Pinafores 
drove Peg Haley and Tuttle to send 
frantic calls to Philadelphia, and then 
didn't come till the music played on Mon- 
day morning. We flung them over our 
print dresses and flowing hair and 
marched off with Kay carrying a large 
yellow cat washed in Lux. It behaved 
very well until the band began to play 
and then became convulsive. 

'98 was very kind to us on Monday 
evening after we had given up hope of 
food, they fed us chicken, cakes, and 
lumos of sugar from their end of the 
table. 

Puppie covered herself with glory in 
Doetry and prose: 

What is the matter with Mary Jane? 
She has no exams and she hasn't a pain. 
There's lovely stewed peaches for dinner 

again — 
What is the matter with Mary Jane? 

Quite a few more came in for the Ban- 
quet and Garden Party, and so as Ginny 
said, we got collegiate after all. 

Peggy Hess has been reporting for the 
Evening World, and has her name signed 
to long interviews with celebrities. The 
last one we saw was a most amusing 
write-up of Marion Tally's departure 
from opera. 

Jo Stetson dropped in on her way to 
lunch with Stewy. We like having people 
drop in here, as we have said before, and 
want to encourage every one to do so. 
It's only a step from the Grand Central 
Station — Week End Book Service, 341 
Madison Avenue ; now don't forget it ! 

Edith Morgan Whitaker writes from 
Leland Stanford, Calif., that she likes the 
West very much, but will be glad to be 
East again next year, as is their present 
plan. 

Our book business is as much fun as 
ever. Lately I have been making speeches 
on modern novels before local women's 
clubs; I look back gracefully to oral re- 
ports every time I find myself standing 
before groups of women. 



CAMP MYSTIC 

Miss Jobe's salt water camp for girls 
8-18 Conducted by Mrs Carl Akeley < Mary 
L. Jobe) . Halfway, New York and Boston. 
Land and water sports. Horseback riding. 

MARY L JOBE, Room 507. 607 Fifth Ave., N.Y.C. 



The Saint Timothys School 
for Girls 

CATONSVILLE, MARYLAND 

Founded September 1882 

COLLEGE PREPARATORY 

AND 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

MISS LOUISA McENDREE FOWLER 
Head of the School 

Wykeham Rise 

WASHINGTON, CONNECTICUT 

A COUNTRY SCHOOL 
FOR GIRLS 

FANNY E. DAVIES, LL.A., Headmistress 
Prepares for Bryn Mawr and Other Colleges 

The Episcopal Academy 

(Founded 1785) 

CITY LINE, OVERBROOK, PA. 

A country day school for boys 

MODERN AND WELL EQUIPPED 
Endorsed by Bryn Mawr Alumnae 

UNIVERSITYgTrLS 

BOARDING AND DAY SCHOOL 

Founded 1896 

Thorough and successful Preparation 

for Eastern Colleges for Women as well as 

for Midwestern Colleges and Universities 

Illustrated Catalogue on Request 

ANNA B. HAIRE, A.B., SMITH COLLEGE, Principal 

1106-B Lake Shore Drive Chicago, Illinois 

THE HARTRIDGE SCHOOL 
FOR GIRLS 

SO minutes from New York 

A country school with beautiful grounds. 
College Preparatory and General Courses. 
Over fifty girls in leading colleges today. 
Resident Department carefully restricted. 
Special attention to Music and Art. 
Athletics, Dramatics, Riding, 

EMELYN B. HARTRIDGE, Vassar, A.B., Principal 
Plainfield, New Jersey 



The Ethel Walker School 

SIMSBURY, CONNECTICUT 

Head of School 

ETHEL WALKER SMITH, A.M., 
Bryn Mawr College 



Head Mistress 

JESSIE GERMAIN HEWITT, A.B. 
Bryn Mawr College 



mdr AHi 



OGERSHALI, 

TlModern School with New England Traditions 

OT^HL r Thorough Preparation for any College 

B ^Ml One Year Intensive Review 

■H ^B^^ Oeneral Academic Course with di- 
^Bh ^^^ploma. Junior College Courses — Home 
kcuiiomics, secretarial Training, Music, Art, Dramatic 
Art. 26 Miles from Boston Outdoor Sports. Riding. 
Gymnasium. Swimming Pool. 

EDITH CHAPIN CRAVEN, A.B., Bryn Mawr 
201 Rogers Street, Lowell, Mass. 

/1ARCUAV SCHQ)L 

BRYN MAWR, PA. 
Prepares for Bryn Mavwr and 
all leading colleges 

Musical Course prepares tor the Depart- 
ment of Music of Bryn Mawr College 
L. MAY WILLIS, Principal 
EDITH HARCUM, Head of School 

THE MISSES KIRK'S 

College Preparatory School . 

PREPARATORY TO BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

Individual Instruction. Athletics. 

Clovercroft, Montgomery Avenue, Rosemont, Pa 

Mail, telephone and telegraph address: Bryn MaWr, Pa. 



CHOATE SCHOOL 

1600 Beacon Street, Brookline, Mass. 

HOME AND DAY SCHOOL 
FOR GIRLS 

EMPHASIS ON COLLEGE PREPARATION 

Elective Courses for students not preparing 
for College 

AUGUSTA CHOATE, A.M. (Vassar) 

Principal 



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THE AGNES IRWIN SCHOOL 

2009-2011 Delancey Place, Philadelphia 

A College Preparatory 
SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

BERTHA M. LAWS, A.B., Headmistress 



GRAY GABLES 



Complete College Preparatory Course. 
One year course for Board Examination. 

For catalog address: 

Hope Fisher, Ph.D., Bancroft School 

Worcester, Massachusetts 



MISS BEARD'S SCHOOL 

A Country School near New York 

Orange, New Jersey 
COLLEGE PREPARATION 

Advanced Courses Junior High School 

Music, Art, Domestic Science 

Catalog on Request 

LUCIE C. BEARD, Headmistress 

The Katharine Branson School 

ROSS, CALIFORNIA Across the Bay from San Francisco 

A Country School College Preparatory 

Head: 
Katharine Fleming Branson, A.B., Bryn Mawr 

MISS MADEIRA'S SCHOOL 

1330 19th St., N. W. Washington, D. C. 

A RESIDENT AND DAY SCHOOL FOR 
GIRLS 

LUCY MADEIRA WING, A.B. 

MRS. DAVID LAFOREST WING 

Head Mistress 

MISS WRIGHT'S SCHOOL 

Bryn Mawr, Pa. 
Prepares for College Board 
Examination 



FERRY HALL 

A RESIDENT AND DAY SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

On Lake Michigan, near Chicago 

Junior College; High School Department: College 
Preparatory and General Courses. Special Departments 
of Music. Expression and Art. 

Two new dormitories, including new dining room and 
infirmary, to be opened September 1929. 

Eloise R. Tremain, A.B., Bryn Mawr, Principal 

ROSEMARY HALL 

College Preparatory 
(With supplementary but not alternative courses) 

J Heed Mistresses 

GREENWICH - - CONNECTICUT 

The Shipley School 

Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 

Preparatory to Bryn Mawr College 

ALICE G. HOWLAND, ELEANOR 0. BROWNELL 
Principals 

MISS RANSOM and 
MISS BRIDGES' SCHOOL 

PIEDMONT, CALIFORNIA 

(A suburb of San Francisco) 

A RESIDENT AND DAY SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

General and College Preparatory Courses 
Outdoor Life throughout the year 

EDITH BRIDGES, B.L., Principal 

The Baldwin School 

A Country School for Girls 
BRYN MAWR PENNSYLVANIA 

Preparation for Bryn Mawr. Mount Holyoke. Smith. 

Vassar and Wellesley colleges. Abundant outdoor life. 

Hockey, basketball, tennis. 

ELIZABETH FORREST JOHNSON, A.B. 

HEAD 

THE LOW AND HEYWOOD SCHOOL 

Emphasizing college preparatory work. 

Also general and special courses. 

One year intensive college preparation. 

Junior school. 

64th year. Catalogue. 

SHIPPAN POINT, STAMFORD, CONN. 



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' carrison forest 



^ pr A Modern Country School in the 
Green Spring Valley near Balti- 
more. Excellent Equipment. All Sports. 
Special Emphasis on Horseback Riding. 

Garrison Forest Girls who are going to college 
are thoroughly prepared for any institution. 

Other girls take courses with special emphasis 
on Music and Art. Younger girls live in a 
separate Junior House. 

Mild Climate. Nation-wide Clientele. 



Principals 

MISS JEAN G. MARSHALL 

MISS NANCY OFFUTT, 

Bryn Mawr, ex '20 

Box B, Garrison, Maryland 



THE CAMBRIDGE SCHOOL 

DOMESTIC ARCHITECTURE 

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 

A Professional School for College 

Graduates 

The Academic Year for 1929-30 opens 

Monday, October 7, 1929. 

Henry Atherton Frost — Director 

53 Church Street, Cambridge, Mass. 

At Harvard Square 




Helen F. McKelvey 

Bryn Mawr, 1928 

AND 

Caroline Schauffler 

Smith, 1928 
wish to remind you that 

BOOKS 

Are the perfect all-year round gift 
for your friends and yourself. 

We deliver to any steamer sailing 
from the port of New York. 

Our de luxe wrapping makes gifts 
from the Week End Book Service 
a special treat. 

Books mailed anywhere with no 
extra charge for postage. 

WEEK END BOOK SERVICE 

341 Madison Avenue, New York 

TELEPHONE: Lexington 7484 




Cathedral School of St. Mary 



GARDEN CITY, LONG ISLAND, N. Y. 

A school for Girls 19 miles from New York. College 

preparatory and general courses. Music Art and 

Domestic Science. Catalogue on request. Box B. 

MIRIAM A. BYTEL, A.B., Radcliffe, Principal 

BERTHA GORDON WOOD, A.B., Bryn Mawr, 

Assistant Principal 



The Traphagen School of Fashion 



I 



INTENSIVE WINTER AND 
SUMMER COURSES 

All phases from elementary to full 
mastery of costume design and illus- 
tration taught In shortest time com- 
patible with thoroughness. Day and 
Evening classes. Saturday courses for 
Adults and Children. Our Sales De- 
partment disposes of student work. 
Every member of advanced classes 
often placed through our Employment 
Bureau. Write for announcement. 



In Arnold, Constable &, Company Costume 
Design Competition, over 100 schools and 
nearly 800 students took part; all prizes 
were awarded to Traphagen pupils with 
exception of one of the five third prizes. 

1680 Broadway (near 52nd St.) New Y< 



Katharine Qbbs 

A school of unusual character with a distinctive 
purpose for educated women 
SECRETARIAL ACADEMIC EXECUTIVE 
BOSTON 



90 Marlboro Street 
Resident and 
Day School 

NEW YORK 
247 Park Avenue 

PROVIDENCE 
155 Angeli Street 



Special Course for College 
Women. Selected subjects 
preparing for executive posi- 
tions. Separate classrooms 
and special instructors. 
One-year Course includes tech- 
nical and broad businesstrain- 
ing preparing for'positions of 
a preferred character. 
Two-year Course for prepara 
tory and high school gradu 
ates. First year includes si . 
college subjects. Second yea 
intensive secretarial training 



Booklet on request 



After College What? 

THE DREXEL INSTITUTE 
LIBRARY SCHOOL 

Offers a one year course for 
college graduates, and pre- 
pares students for all types 
of library service. 

PHILADELPHIA 



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Stoics 

that carries the vivacity 

of campus clothes 

into the world 

of fashion 

beyond. 

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BRYN MAWR 
ALUMNAE 
BULLETIN 




October, 1929 



Vol. IX 



No. 7 



Entered as second-class matter, January 1, 1929, at the Post Office, Phila., Pa., under Act of March 3, 1879 

COPYRIGHT. 1929 

ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 



OFFICERS OF THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

EXECUTIVE BOARD 

President Louise Fleischmann Maclat, 1906 

Vice-President Natalie McFaden Blanton, 1917 

Recording Secretary Gertrude Hearne Myers, 1919 

Corresponding Secretary Mat F^gan Stokes, 1911 

Treasurer Margaret E. Brusbtar, 1903 

Chairman of the Finance Committee Caroline Florence Lexow, 1908 

Chairman of the Publicity Committee Caroline Morrow Chadwick-Collins, 1905 

ALUMNAE SECRETARY AND BUSINESS MANAGER OF THE BULLETIN 

Alice M. Hawkins, 1907 

EDITOR OF THE BULLETIN 

Marjorie L. Thompson, 1912 

DISTRICT COUNCILLORS 

District I Helen Evans Lewis, 1913 

District II Julia Langdon Loomis. 1895 

District III Alletta Van Reypen Korff, 1900 

District IV Katharine Holliday Daniels, 1918 

District V Frances Porter Adler, 1911 

District VI Edna Warkentin Alden, 1900 

District VII Helen Brayton Barendt, 1903 

ALUMNAE DIRECTORS 

Ruth Furness Porter, 1896 Mary Peirce, 1912 

Frances Fincke Hand. 1897 Margaret Reeve Cart, 1907 

Elizabeth Lewis Otey, 1901 

CHAIRMAN OF THE ALUMNAE FUND 

Caroline Florence Lexow. 1908 

CHAIRMAN OF THE ACADEMIC COMMITTEE 

Pauline Goldmark, 1896 

CHAIRMAN OF THE SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOAN FUND COMMITTEE 

Margaret Gilman, 1919 

CHAIRMAN OF THE COMMITTEE ON HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Dr. Marjorie F. Murray, 1913 

CHAIRMAN OF THE NOMINATING COMMITTEE 

Eleanor Little Aldrtch, 1905 




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Bryn Mawr Alumnae 
Bulletin 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF 
THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

Marjorie L. Thompson, '12, Editor 
Alice M. Hawkins, '07, Business Manager 

EDITORIAL BOARD 

Caroline Morrow Chadwick-Collins, '05 Emily Kimbrough Wrench, '21 

Emily Fox Cheston, '08 Ellenor Morris, '27 

May Egan Stokes, '11 Elinor B. Amram, '28 

Louise Fleischmann Maclay, '06, ex-officio 

Subscription Price, $1.50 a Year Single Copies, 25 Cents 

Checks should be drawn to the order of Bryn Mawr Alurnnse Bulletin 
Published monthly, except August, September and October, at 1006 Arch St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Vol. IX OCTOBER, 1929 No. 7 



What Miss Park will say to the entering Freshmen, that chosen band, we do 
not yet know at the time this goes to print. Certainly it will be something that is 
pertinent to their life in the college, and something that will give them a conception 
of the cultural pattern of which they are to form a part. Religion in School and 
College, an address given almost a year ago by Rufus Jones before the Association 
of Colleges and Secondary Schools, makes one stop to think about this pattern. No 
one with even the slightest knowledge of Anthropology can fail to realize how closely 
the thread of the inner life, call it spiritual, religious, philosophic, — what you will, is 
woven into the group life. The college has always felt that its concern witih the 
inner life was primarily on the intellectual side, that the young student "more par- 
ticularly needs interpretations of great literature and interpretations of the universe 
and of life that will carry him beyond the visible and the tangible and will make 
unseen realities real to him." Some of us interpreted these realities in one term, some 
in another, we put our faith in organization, and had what was quite literally a 
passion for good works. That was the general outline of the pattern that we wove 
for ourselves. But our pattern is evidently not the one best suited to the present 
college generation. When the undergraduates last year reorganized the Christian asso- 
ciation their desire was not merely to change the old but to change it into something 
that would meet their needs and would help to complete their lives. One cannot help 
wishing that the Address could have been made to the students as well as to the 
faculties. One may or may not like the pattern, but the thing that is important is 
that when it is made by the students themselves, it is an essential part of the whole 
design of the group life. 



RELIGION IN SCHOOL AND COLLEGE TODAY* 

Reprinted from Independent Education, December, 1928 
By Rufus M. Jones 

The Jewish Talmud tells us that one of the Pharaohs of Egypt once had a strange 
dream. He was seated on his throne and, lifting up his eyes, he saw two fingers 
come out of the darkness. Between these fingers there shone a rod longer than a 
sunbeam. From this rod there hung the two pans of a pair of weighing scales; one, 
which was below, was of gold and vast as a continent. The other, which was high 
up, was of plaited straw and little as a bird's nest. On the pan of gold he saw what 
looked like a river; and going up from this river were harvests and harvesters, warriors 
and chariots, cities and pyramids, kings and queens. Then he saw a little child put 
on the pan of straw and, behold ! the pan of gold with the river and the harvests and 
the cities and pyramids and kings and queens rose as the balance-pan with the little 
child in it pulled them down. This vision might mean many things. To the pious 
talmudist the little child no doubt was Moses, but here in America, where little babies 
who are to be great prophets are not often set afloat in arks of bulrushes, it may stand 
for something else. 

The pan of gold as big as a continent, filled with commerce and wealth, with 
success and prosperity, may well stand for the triumph of our present type of educa- 
tion, occupied as it is with the conquest of the outside world in which we live and 
work and prosper. The other little bird's nest pan, hung high in the air and almost 
empty, waiting for the child to arrive and shift the balance, will then represent the 
coming type of education, which will be more concerned to fashion the moral and 
spiritual character of those who fill our schools and colleges than merely to discover 
and to know the facts of a world in space. 

It is obvious to most thoughtful observers that the rightly fashioned, home is the 
best nursery of religion that there is. The spiritual gains of the race can be- trans- 
mitted from the family-group to the new-born child more easily and more naturally 
in the small social circle of the home than anywhere else. But the first requisite for 
this important business is the actual existence of such rightly-fashioned homes. There 
are some such centers of life but they are none too common in our busy and material 
world. The big pan with its secular content too often tilts downward and lifts the 
little child in the bird's nest above the reach of the kind of nurture that he needs for 
the formation of a well-organized moral and spiritual character. 

Then, too, even when this sort of nurture is furnished in the home, the child 
often finds the method and atmosphere, and especially the emphasis,, so wholly different 
in school that there soon arises within him a stern collision between the new stage of 
culture and the faith and ideals which the home had slowly built up in him. To a 
certain extent this collision, which comes with growth and expansion, is inevitable, 
and perhaps desirable, but it is more disastrous under our present educational system 
than it legitimately ought to be. 

I will say in passing that the Church and the Sunday School ought to become 
much more effective than they now are in what we call the culture of the spirit, 
and the formation of character. But the failure at that crucial point is hardly less 

(2) 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 3 

tragic than the failure in the present-day home. Even if the Church and the Sunday 
School, however, were a hundred times as successful as they now are in building the 
inner life of their young people, we should still have a serious collision of emphasis 
and of method between our systems of secular education and our centers of religious 
culture. 

I am bold to maintain that religious centers operating one day in the week will 
always be at a disadvantage in competition with forces working all the other days, 
and will usually be more or less annulled by the careful, systematic methods which 
mould and organize the mind. I see no sound hope for a deep and genuine culture 
of the religious spirit in our children and our young people unless that business is 
made a serious part of the entire educational process from the kindergarten days to 
the end of the college period. 

I am, of course, not thinking in the very least degree in terms of sectarian or 
denominational religion. That is certainly not a function of general educational 
culture. My old Harvard friend, Professor Charles Carroll Everett, heard when 
he was a little boy that there was to be an eclipse of the sun, and with a Scottish 
zeal he sold tickets to his boy friends for ten cents apiece to see the eclipse in the 
back yard of the Everett home. The boys came and paid their good money for the 
tickets, but soon found to their surprise that they could have seen the eclipse just as 
well outside the fence as inside it! 

The fundamentals of religion, the spiritualizing process of the religious attitude, 
is what inherently belongs to any genuine culture, and the peculiar aspects that attach 
to the specific denominational group can be left, and should be left, to the care of 
each such branch of organized religion. We are concerned as educators only with 
those aspects of religion which belong essentially to all genuine human culture and 
which have to do with the formation of personal life and character. 

These basic aspects of the spiritual life should be an inherent part of everyday 
culture in school and college. One reason for the widespread loss of interest in chapel 
exercises, amounting in some institutions almost to a revolt against them, is the fact 
that they often seem "foreign" to the occupations and concerns of the rest of the day 
or of the rest of the week, something of another order injected, as it were, into the 
student's life from the outside. He fails in many cases to see the worth of the chapel 
exercise or its function in his settled plan of life. There is no quick or easy remedy 
for the existing situation. More impressive chapels, more effective chaplains, will do 
something temporarily to change the attitude, but the ultimate solution lies deeper. 
It involves the creation of a profounder spiritual culture of the entire life of the child 
and the youth through all the grades of his education, and a much clearer recognition 
of the fact that the potential spiritual nature of a child is one of the most precious 
assets that has been committed to our keeping. 

Our present education is comparatively far too heavily weighted with the 
material and secular interests of life. It is, of course, perfectly natural that it should 
be so. The world crowds in on us. It bombards us through every sense. We are 
abundantly supplied with instincts and emotions that urge us to get adjusted to our 
physical environment. In fact, our very survival depends on such adjustment. Educa- 
tion has, therefore, naturally taken the line of least resistance. It has endeavored to 
achieve a mastery over the forces and energies of nature, to discover and formulate 
the laws of the visible universe. Stars and plants, birds and beasts, tides and weather 
are interesting things and they rightly get into the focus of attention in early training. 



4 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

There is a fascination about the inevitable character of mathematical numbers, and 
the processes of mathematics underlie all our co-operative efforts to explain our facts 
and to live together in a common world, so that we are bound to learn how to add, 
subtract, multiply and divide. Education naturally follows the main lines of human 
interest and these lines of interest are tied up with the visible, the tangible, and with 
the practical. We have done what was easiest to do in our educational achievements, 
and we have built our general systems of education to fit the obvious instinctive drives 
of the race. 

But now we know, or at least some of us do, that we have been making very 
incomplete persons, one-sided and warped individuals, even where they have not been 
dwarfed and stunted, as they sometimes have been, and, what is perhaps more 
ominous, we have been unconsciously shaping a cultural civilization that is loaded 
with dangers and that is pointed toward imminent disasters. We have unearthed 
tremendous secrets of life and death. We know how to control birth processes and 
how to kill at a distance in ways that baffle pursuit and discovery. Our wars are no 
longer training grounds for heroism and chivalry. They have become nightmares of 
horror, and they threaten to bring the actual collapse of civilization in their train. 

The capacity to use the forces of control and the enginery of destruction are not 
confined to scientific laboratories ; they have filtered down and have become the prop- 
erty of the rank and file of our people. The common man of the street has them to 
use, but he is not morally trained to use them. We have flung wide open the doors 
of freedom to persons of every class and every walk of life. We are living in an age 
marked by the invasion of the common man, not to speak of the common woman, into 
the possession of every right and the enjoyment of every privilege that once belonged 
only to the aristocrats and the elites of society. We have "leveled up" in the domain 
of rights and privileges, but we have done very little to supply moral discipline and 
spiritual insight to the masses or even to those who hold the leadership of the world. 
We have not raised in any corresponding way the moral and spiritual side of life 
without which the world cannot be made safe for democracy, or for any other issues 
of responsibility. 

There are two characteristically different types of education. One of them 
puts the emphasis on information ; the other puts the main emphasis on the formation 
of life and character. The two types cannot, of course, be sharply divided asunder, 
but the aim and focus in the one case will be quite unlike the aim and focus in the 
other. Our educational systems for the last hundred years have been primarily 
concerned with information, instruction in reference to objective facts, and with prac- 
tical results. They have been keyed to produce persons who could find the resources 
of nature and who could do the things that needed to be done in our world. This 
educational policy has been subtly and unconsciously preparing the way for the theory 
that man's specific "behavior" is the matter of real importance about him. His interior 
life is more or less negligible and may be shelved without being seriously missed. 
The emphasis in education has been acutely, even thumpingly, objective and scientific. 
The laboratories have been busy with the conquest and control of the external world. 
They have "cashed in" immense results 

Meantime, the little child in the bird's nest pan of our educational scales is high 
up in the air and almost overlooked in our busy absorption with tangible and practical 
things. We have hardly realized in any proper degree that genuine culture involves 
the training and development of all those aspects and attitudes of the inner life which 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 5 

are essential to religion, and we have in any case neglected to create any adequate 
technique for this fundamental type of education. Compare, for instance, the marvelous 
laboratory equipment, and the elaborate, and at the same time accurate, technique, 
provided for the study of the atomic structure of matter as over against the feeble 
preparation which any institution, of any grade whatever, makes to insure the forma- 
tion and development of moral insight or the training and discipline of a rightly 
fashioned will, or the appreciation of those spiritual values of life which are essential 
to religion. 

Up to a certain point, I am in sympathy with the "behaviorists." They have at 
least insisted that behavior is a very important feature of life and that it is something 
which can be systematically and scientifically trained. They declare, and to a certain 
extent they prove, that the lives of little children can be remoulded and refashioned 
by principles and methods which they have discovered in their laboratories and have 
demonstrated in actual practice. Primitive fears and hampering complexes can, 
within limits, be either eliminated or at least so transformed and sublimated that they 
will become constructive forces rather than "defeative" ones. What we usually call 
"disposition" can be profoundly altered and can be taken from the devil's column 
of liabilities and carried over to the column of assets on the angel's side of the account. 
I am willing to be included in the behaviorist ranks so far as they can help in this 
laudable educational adventure. 

I part from them when we come to an interpretation of the deeper, inner nature 
of the self. I see no way to talk intelligently about any realities of intrinsic value 
by which we can live, and actually do live, unless we presuppose a spiritual nature 
within us of a wholly different order from physiological brain paths, or neural processes, 
or muscle-jerks, or gland-secretions. I take no stand for the old-fashioned concept 
of an abstract soul-entity, operating at the peak of the pineal gland, or in some other 
mysterious region of the brain. I insist only that there is some abiding reality essential 
to us, that dominates, organizes, and integrates all human experience, that anticipates, 
sorts and selects all our events and happenings and that controls conduct in the light 
of, and for the sake of, ideal ends, and that makes us unique and creative beings. 

The inadequacy of medieval theories of the soul have naturally produced a revolt 
from the crude conceptions of it, as the inadequacy of the Ptolemaic theory of the 
heavens produced the Copernical revolt from it. The only difference is that in the 
latter case scientists took pains to form a new theory of planetary revolutions which 
fits all the facts, whereas in the former case we have thrown overboard an antiquated 
theory of the soul without taking much pains to reconstruct the inner life of man 
in the light of all the facts of experience. We are consequently floundering about with 
inadequate psychological foundations and with pitiably slender technique for the 
culture of the human spirit. 

The educational achievement which we need most at the present moment is, I 
think, a truer comprehension of the immense potential spiritual nature of the child. 
If we assume that his behavior is all that matters, or if we are bent solely on preparing 
him to be an efficient instrument or tool for the work of a material civilization, our 
entire educational method will be very different from the one we should propose if we 
approached our problem with a vivid sense that we were engaged in the creative work 
of developing a person with inexhaustible capacities for the appreciation and enjoyment 
of beauty, truth, love and goodness, and for fellowship with a Great Companion who 
is the source of these inward riches of life. I want to sec educators turn to this task 



6 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

with the same seriousness of intention that has characterized the investigation of 
the nature of the atom! Then it will be conquered! 

We already know enough to be sure that there is vast sub-soil wealth within the 
inner deeps below the surface currents of the mind. All our thoughts and feelings and 
decisions spring from the submerged life within us and any methods and processes 
that fertilize and enrich this sub-soil of the soul are of great importance for spiritual 
culture. It is a well-tested fact that short periods of hush and silent meditation 
increase the interior depth and generate strength and power. I am convinced that we 
could learn much in this direction from the methods of quiet meditation which form 
an essential part of the earliest education of little children in India. The practice 
ministers both to physical and to spiritual health. 

Religion is born in its elemental stages out of attitudes of surprise, wonder, awe, 
reverence and those unanalyzable intimations of a Larger Life impinging on our own, 
which almost all children experience. Professor Rudolf Otto in his unique study of 
religion points out what he calls "the consciousness of the numinous" is as funda- 
mental and as unique an experience as is beauty, or love. It is, he says, a hushed and 
trembling attitude of the soul, often attended with the consciousness of something 
overbrimming and inflooding, which gives a sense of divine presence. Everything in 
early education which cultivates the sense of wonder, everything that stimulates and 
trains imagination, helps forward the processes of life that feed these unique traits 
of the soul. 

In the later and more developed stages of education, a young student more par- 
ticularly needs interpretations of great literature and interpretations of the universe 
and of life that will carry him beyond the visible and the tangible and will make 
unseen realities real to him. The cultivation of his appreciation of music and art, 
and of beauty in life and nature, will minister directly to the formation of a sense 
of the reality of spiritual values. The moment ihe asks himself what is the ground of 
any intrinsic value which he had learned to appreciate, he is pretty sure to be carried 
back to some underlying and transcending Reality. 

Finally, in his wisely directed attempts to fathom the mysteries of life and death, 
to interpret the august authority of conscience and moral obligation, to explain the 
spiritual grandeur of the personality and mission of Christ and to account for the 
unfolding and progressive character of this evolving world, he is bound to reach out 
beyond his tiny, finite self and to make his connections with that deeper world within 
the world we see, with which his own spiritual nature is kindred. 



* Address given at the recent Annual Convention of the Association of Colleges and Sec- 
ondary Schools of the Middle States and Maryland, held at Atlantic City, N. J. 



NOTICE 



The slight change in the date of publication announced last year has made 
necessary this extra copy in order to fulfill our obligations to our subscribers and to 
our advertisers. Hereafter the first number to appear in the Fall will be the Novem- 
ber number. Because this number has been done on rather short notice, there are 
various articles which ought by rights to have appeared in it but which, for one 
reason or another, have been of necessity held over for the November number. 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

President Park, looking remarkably well and rested, has returned from a summer 
spent in Nova Scotia. She plans to sail for Egypt on November 30th with Katharine 
Lord, '01, and does not expect to return to Bryn Mawr until the following Sep- 
tember. Dean Manning, who has been spending the summer working in the record 
office in London, is back at Bryn Mawr but she will continue to be on leave of absence, 
in order to work on her book, until President Park sails. After November 30th Dean 
Manning will be for the rest of the year Acting President. Millicent Carey, '20, who 
was Acting Dean for the second semester of last year will be the Acting Dean this year. 



ALUMNAE GIFTS TO BRYN MAWR 

Two legacies have been received by Bryn Mawr College this summer which are 
of special interest not on account of the sums of money involved but on account of 
what they connote. One is a bequest of ten thousand dollars to be used to establish 
two scholarships by Mrs. Eva Ramsay Hunt, the mother of Evelyn Hunt, of the class 
of 1898, who died in 1916. These scholarships are to be named in memory of her 
daughter. Wishing to honor her son's name, Mrs. Hunt made a like grant to the 
University Hospital, but for her daughter she chose her college. 

The other is a legacy from Mary E. Trueman, of the class of 1905. After making 
two bequests of five thousands dollars each to two religious institutions she divided the 
residue of her twenty-one-thousand-dollar estate into five parts and left two parts to 
her church and three parts to Bryn Mawr College for the Department of English 
or History. 

Such legacies as well as the many other gifts made to Bryn Mawr show that the 
Alumnae and those close to them realize the great need of the college for money. 
They show, too, the place which Bryn Mawr holds in their hearts. 



Florence C. Irish, 1913, has resigned her position in the Alumnae Office to teach 
history at the Agnes Irwin School in Philadelphia. She worked for the Association 
only one year, but her brief connection with the office was sufficient to make her 
absence keenly felt. We wish her success in her new work. 

NEW COUNCILLOR 

The Executive Board announces regretfully the resignation of Margaret Nichols 
Hardenbergh, 1905, as Councillor for District VI. Mrs. Hardenbergh is moving 
very unexpectedly from Kansas City to Minneapolis, and will no longer be a resident 
of District VI. The Board has appointed as her successor Edna Warkentin Alden, 
1900, (Mrs. Maurice L. Alden) of Kansas City. Mrs. Alden has been active in 
organization work for the American Association of University Women. 



COUNCIL MEETING 

The Alumnae Council will meet in New York City on November 20th, 21st 
and 22nd. Julia Langdon Loomis, 1895 (Mrs. Edward E. Loomis), Councillor for 
District II, will be in charge. 

(7) 



ELECTION OF OFFICERS 

It will be remembered that at the annual meeting of the Association held on 
February 4, 1928, a change in the By-laws was adopted in regard to the method of 
preparing a ballot for the officers of the Association. Article X, Section 8 (b) now 
reads : 

Section 8 (b). The Nominating Committee shall biennially prepare a ballot 
presenting one or more nominations for each officer of the Association. This ballot 
shall be published in the October issue of the Alumnae Bulletin. Additional 
nominations may be made for any office, provided that each nomination be signed by 
fifteen members of the Association and be accompanied by the written consent of 
the Nominee. All nominations must be filed with the Recording Secretary by Decem- 
ber first, preceding the Annual Meeting. 

In accordance with this procedure, Mrs. Talbot Aldrich, the Chairman of the 
Nominating Committee, has presented to the Executive Board the following ballot as 
prepared by the Nominating Committee. The Executive Board has accepted the 
ballot, and here presents it for the consideration of the Association. 



PRESIDENT 

Anne Kidder Wilson, 1903 

(Mrs. Edmund B. Wilson) 

New York City 



VICE-PRESIDENT 

Gordon Woodbury Dunn, 1919 

(Mrs. Frederick S. Dunn) 

Washington, D. C. 

RECORDING SECRETARY 

Gertrude Hearne Myers, 1919 

(Mrs. Charles Myers) 

St. Davids, Pennsylvania 

CORRESPONDING SECRETARY 

May Egan Stokes, 1911 

(Mrs. J. Stogdell Stokes) 

Huntingdon Valley, Pennsylvania 

TREASURER 

Margaret E. Brusstar, 1903 
Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 

(8) 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES OF THE BRYN MAWR 
ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION, 1929 

EXECUTIVE BOARD 

President — Louise Fleischmann Maclay, 1906 1926-30 

(Mrs. Alfred B. Maclay) 
Vice-President— Natalie McFaden Blanton, 1917 1928-30 

(Mrs. Wyndham B. Blanton) 
Corresponding Secretary — May Egan Stokes, 1911 1928-30 

(Mrs. J. Stogdell Stokes) 
Recording Secretary — Gertrude Hearne Myers, 1919 1928-30 

(Mrs. Charles Myers) 

Treasurer— Margaret E. Brusstar, 1903 1928-30 

Chairman of the Finance Committee — Florence Lexow, 1908 1929-32 

Chairman of the Publicity Committee — Caroline Morrow Chadwick- 
Collins, 1905 (Mrs. J. Chadwick-Collins) 

ALUMNAE SECRETARY 

Alice M. Hawkins, 1907 

EDITOR OF THE BULLETIN 
Marjorie L. Thompson, 1912 

CHAIRMAN OF THE ALUMNAE FUND 

Florence Lexow, 1908 1929-32 

DISTRICT COUNCILLORS 

District I— Helen Evans Lewis, 1913 1928-31 

(Mrs. Robert M. Lewis) 
District II— Julia Langdon Loomis, 1895 1927-30 

(Mrs. Edward E. Loomis) 
District III— Alletta Van Reypen Korff, 1900 1929-32 

(Baroness Serge Alexander Korff) 
District IV— Katharine Holliday Daniels, 1918 1928-31 

(Mrs. Joseph J. Daniels) 
District V— Frances Porter Adler, 1911 1927-30 

(Mrs. Herman Adler) 
District VI— Edna Warkentin Alden, 1900 1929-32 

(Mrs. Maurice L. Alden) 
District VII— Helen Brayton Barendt, 1903 1928-31 

(Mrs. Arthur H. Barendt) 
(9) 



10 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

ALUMNAE DIRECTORS 

Ruth Furness Porter, 18% (Retiring Director) 1925-29 

(Mrs. James F. Porter) 
Frances Fincke Hand, 1897 '. 1925-30 

(Mrs. Learned Hand) 

Mary Peirce, 1912 1926-31 

Margaret Reeve Cary, 1907 .". 1927-32 

(Mrs. C. Reed Cary) 
Elizabeth Lewis Otey, 1901 _ 1928-33 

(Mrs. Dexter Otey) 
Virginia Kneeland Frantz, 1918 (Director-elect) 1929-34 

(Mrs. Angus Macdonald Frantz) 

STANDING COMMITTEES 

Academic Committee 

Pauline Goldmark, 1896, Chairman 1927-32 

Louise Fleischmann Maclay, 1906 ex-officio 

(Mrs. Alfred B. Maclay) 
Marion Parris Smith, 1901 1927-30 

(Mrs. William Roy Smith) 
Virginia McKenney Claiborne, 1908 1927-30 

(Mrs. Robert Claiborne) 
Gordon Woodbury Dunn, 1919 1927-32 

(Mrs. Frederick Dunn) 

Frances Browne, 1909 1927-32 

Esther Lowenthal, 1905 1928-31 

Elizabeth Lewis Otey, 1901 1928-31 

(Mrs. Dexter Otey) 

Finance Committee 

Florence Lexow, 1908, Chairman 1929-32 

Louise Fleischmann Maclay, 1 906 ex-officio 

(Mrs. Alfred B. Maclay) 

Margaret E. Brusstar, 1 903 ex-officio 

Caroline Morrow Chadwick-Collins, 1905 ex-officio 

(Mrs. J. Chadwick-Collins) 

Florence King, 1896 1927-30 

Cornelia Halsey Kellogg, 1900 1928-31 

(Mrs. Frederic R. Kellogg) 
Cora Baird Jeanes, 1896 1928-31 

(Mrs. Henry S. Jeanes) 
Eleanor Marquand Forsyth, 1919 1929-32 

(Mrs. George Forsyth) 






BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 11 

Scholarships Committee 

Margaret Gilman, 1919, Chairman 1928-33 

Louise Fleischmann Maclay, 1906 ex-officio 

(Mrs. Alfred B. Maclay) 

Frances Arnold, 1897 1925-30 

Emma O. Thompson, 1904 1927-32 

Margaret Reeve Gary, 1907 1928-33 

(Mrs. C. Reed Cary) 
Anne H. Todd, 1902 1929-34 

Committee on Health and Physical Education 

Dr. Marjorie Murray, 1913, Chairman 1926-31 

Louise Fleischmann Maclay, 1906 ex-officio 

(Mrs. Alfred B. Maclay) 
Marion Moseley Sniffen, 1919 1927-32 

(Mrs. Stewart B. Sniff en) 

Ida W. Pritchett, 1914 1927-32 

Mary Hardy, 1920 1929-34 

Gertrude Emery, 1915 1929-34 

Publicity Committee 

Caroline Morrow Chadwick-Collins, 1905, Chairman 

(Mrs. J. Chadwick-Collins) 
Louise Fleischmann Maclay, 1 906 ex-officio 

(Mrs. Alfred B. Maclay) 

Alice M. Hawkins, 1907 ex-officio 

Adelaide W. Neall, 1906 _ 1925-31 

Elizabeth Bent Clark, 1895 1927-33 

(Mrs. Herbert Lincoln Clark) 

N ominating Committee 

Eleanor Little Aldrich, 1905, Chairman 1928-32 

(Mrs. Talbot Aldrich) 
Louise Fleischmann Maclay, 1906 ex-officio 

(Mrs. Alfred B. Maclay) 

Margaret Corwin, 1912 1926-30 

Kathleen Johnston Morrison, 1921 1928-32 

(Mrs. Theodore Morrison) 

Frances Childs, 1923 1929-33 

Elizabeth Nields Bancroft, 1898 „ „ 1929-33 

(Mrs. Wilfred T. Bancroft) 



12 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

Furnishing Committee 

Edith Pettit Borie, 1&95, Chairman 1926 

(Mrs. Adolphe Borie) 

Louise Fleischmann Maclay, 1906 , ex-officio 

(Mrs. Alfred B. Maclay) 
Eleanor Marquand Forsyth, 1919 1926 

(Mrs. George Forsyth) 
Frances Fincke Hand, 1897 1927 

(Mrs. Learned Hand) 
Elizabeth Bent Clark, 1895 1927 

(Mrs. Herbert Lincoln Clark) 

BULLETIN BOARD 

Marjorie L. Thompson, 1912, Editor 

Louise Fleischmann Maclay, 1906 ex-officio 

(Mrs. Alfred B. Maclay) 

Alice M. Hawkins, 1 907 ex-officio 

Caroline Morrow Chad wick-Collins, 1905 

(Mrs. J. Chad wick-Collins) 
May Egan Stokes, 1911 

(Mrs. J. Stogdell Stokes) 
Emily Fox Cheston, 1908 

(Mrs. Edward M. Cheston) 
Ellenor Morris, 1927 
Emily Kimbrough Wrench, 1921 

(Mrs. John Wrench) 
Elinor Amram, 1928 



CONFERENCE OF ALUMNAE PRESIDENTS AND 
SECRETARIES 

On October 31st a three-day conference of Alumnae Presidents and Secretaries 
is to be held at Bryn Mawr. The Presidents and Secretaries of the Alumnae Associa- 
tions of Mount Holyoke, Radcliffe, Smith, Vassar and Wellesley have accepted the 
invitation of the Bryn Mawr Alumnae Association. They will be entertained by the 
College and by the local alumnae. The business meeting will deal with subjects 
which are of common interest to the six colleges for women represented at the con- 
ference. 



YEAR OF REUNION 



Class 
1889~ 


1980 


1931 


1932 


1983 


1934 


1935 


1930 


1937 


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. - 



* 25th Reunion — by arrangement. 



1890 

Katharine Morris Shipley graduated with the Class of 1890 and was awarded 
the European Fellowship of that year. She entered College with the first class in 
1885 and was so identified with it that she asked to be included in '89's fortieth 
reunion last June. When the day came, she was too ill to be present and she passed 
away a week later, June 11, 1929. 

Katharine Shipley spent the year 1890-91 studying in the University of Leipzig, 
Germany, and in the Sorbonne, Paris. In 1894 with her two sisters, Miss Hannah 
L. Shipley and Miss Elizabeth Shipley, she founded the Shipley School and with them 
continued to develop it until 1916, when it passed into the hands of their niece, Alice 
Howland, Bryn Mawr, 1905, and Eleanor Brownell, Class of '97. The school con- 
tinues to bear the name, The Shipley School, and is a living reminder of the educa- 
tional interests of its founders. In later years, Katharine Shipley traveled and lived 
in places that enabled her to keep in close touch with her sisters. Several winters 
were spent at Chapel Hill, where she attended lectures at the University of North 
Carolina. 

The Classes of 1889 and 1890 are one in their deep appreciation of her life 
and attainments. 



Ume Tsuda, who died August 16 at Kamakura, Japan, was a great teacher, a 
great organizer and a power in the education of women. The work she did was 
unique, for it implied not only the success of an institution, but the development of 
the women of a country in which their whole status was undergoing a change. 

She began early as a pioneer, coming here at seven years old, with a small group 
of girls, the first Japanese of their sex to be educated in America. She remained here 
for ten years, then returned to Japan, where she later became teacher of English in 
the Peeresses' School. In 1889 she obtained a four years' leave of absence from the 
school for the purpose of study and entered Bryn Mawr as a special student in 
philosophy and biology, doing some investigation with Dr. Morgan. While at college, 
1889-92, she interested some American friends in founding the Japanese scholarship 
which has sent so many excellent Japanese students to Bryn Mawr. Her last year 
over here was devoted, by appointment of the Japanese government, to an investigation 
of American schools. 

In 1899 Ume Tsuda resigned from the Peeresses' School to establish a school of 
her own for the teaching of English. A committee was formed over here for its 
support which is still active. There is no space here to tell of the work of the school 
which is now Tsuda College, with one of the Japanese scholars of Bryn Mawr as 
president, Ai Hoshino, 1912. Ume Tsuda's robust health had given way and for 
some years she had lived an invalid life, but she was still a power and a personality, 
the recipient of many honors from the Japanese Government, of the deep gratitude 
of her students and fellow-workers, and the affection of many friends in the college 
which she loved as her Alma Mater. For she had worked and lived, not only with 
energy but with heart and soul. She was a woman of great charm and spontaneity; 
her conversation was delightful, her English of the purest, without a trace of foreign 
accent or idiom. 



(H) 



CLASS NOTES 



Ph. D's 
Editor: Mary Alice Hanna Parrish 
(Mrs. J. C. Parrish) 
Vandalia, Mo. 

Rosemary Hall, 
Greenwich, Connecticut. 
May 19, 1929. 

My dear Mrs. Parrish: 

As regards news of myself for the Ph. 
D. notes, I don't believe I have written 
you that I read a paper on December 27, 
1928, at the annual meeting of the Lin- 
guistic Society of America in New York 
City. The title of the paper was "The 
Diathesis of the So-called Aorist Passive 
with th Suffix." Diathesis, by the way, is 
the Greek (and German) technical term 
for the "voice" of a verb. My thesis was 
that the so-called Aorist Passive in Greek, 
especially of the earlier period, is not 
really passive at all, but "middle," or re- 
flexive. The paper was discussed and my 
theory, I am glad to say, concurred in, by 
no less a person than Professor G. M. 
Boiling, who is, I suppose, our leading 
American scholar in the language of the 
Homeric poems. What added to the inter- 
est in this Christmas meeting was the fact 
that it was held in conjunction with the 
convention of the American Association 
for the Advancement of Science, which 
brought to New York distinguished men 
of science from all over this country and 
also from Europe. The meeting at which 
I read my paper, for instance, was held 
at the Columbia School of Mines! This 
brought home to us very concretely that 
linguistics is now recognized as a science, 
as much as chemistry or biology. 

On April 19, 1929, at the annual meet- 
ing of the Classical Association of New 
England at Boston University I read a 
paper on "Latin Syntax Illustrated from 
English Poetry." 

With kind regards, 

Sincerely yours, 
Edith Frances Claflin. 

P. S. — If you want some really per- 
sonal news — the other day on Rosemary 
athletic field I shot an arrow sixty-three 
yards! — an unusual feat, I am told, for a 
beginner in archery. Doubtless this news 
is not serious enough for the Ph. D. notes, 
but it cannot be denied that it is classical. 
In fact, I think Homer helped me with his 
accurate description of how Pandaros 
handled his bow and arrow when he shot 
Menelaos (See Iliad, Book IV, 116-126). 



1890 

Word has been received of the death 
of Margaret Patterson Campbell (Mrs. 
Richard C Campbell) of Denver, Colo., in 
June. imiiiywiMu 

1896 
Class Editor: Abigail Camp Dimon 
1411 Genesee Street, Utica, N. Y. 

Katharine Cook has been granted a sab- 
batical year from Miss Chapin's School, 
and on June 26th sailed on the Dollar 
Line steamer, President Wilson, for the 
first stage of a leisurely trip around the 
world with her friend Leslie Hopkinson, 
of Cambridge. She writes enthusiastical- 
ly that the Panama Canal was not only in- 
teresting, but comfortably cool, and that 
they reached Hawaii at the time of erup- 
tions of the volcano of Kileuea. 

Anna Scattergood Hoag was traveling 
from January to April in Egypt and Italy 
with Florence Hoyt, '97, and her sister 
Margaret. They were joined in Italy by 
Abba Dimon and Emma Cadbury, '97. A 
daughter, Katharine Van Alen, was born 
to Anna's son, Gilbert, on June 7th, and 
Garrett, her second son, is successfully 
studying law at Yale in the winters and 
conducting a hotel in Saybrook, Conn., 
in the summers. Anna spent six weeks 
this summer at Eaglesmere. 

Faith Mathewson Huizinga spent last 
winter, as she usually does, in Paris with 
her daughter "Kim." She writes, "Last 
winter we had an unusually interesting 
time. . . . Through a Dutch anthro- 
pologist we knew, we joined an Interna- 
tional Club where we had dinner once a 
week, and where we met the Count and 
Countess Karolyi Rappaport, ex-Premier 
Nitti, Mme. Nitti, M. Barbusse, and many 
other famous people. We went to studio 
teas where we met sculptors and artists, 
among them M. Aronson, the sculptor, 
and Mme. Lucie Madrus. Kim and I had 
a delightful afternoon in the wonderful 
home of M. Van Dangen, the painter. We 
also went to receptions in the homes of 
some of the old French aristocrats, like 
Mme. Menard-Dorian. It was a very de- 
lightful experience. We got to know the 
American Indian, White Horse Chief, 107 
years old, and went to his birthday party 
January 1st. Dr. Molus, an anthropolo- 
gist, is especially interested in the mixed 
races and he went to many inter-racial 
parties and many negro festivities, social- 
ly high and low." 

Elizabeth Kirkbride retired in the 



(15) 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



spring from the presidency of the College 
Club of Philadelphia, which she had held 
for twenty years. The only active public 
position she now holds is that of Sectional 
Director for the North Atlantic Section 
of the American Association of Univer- 
sity Women. 

Hannah Cadbury Pyle's husband, Rob- 
ert Pyle, is one of the nine members of 
the National Arboretum Advisory Coun- 
cil. This council is to confer with a com- 
mittee of five from the Department of 
Agriculture in regard to establishing a 
national arboretum. 

Caroline McCormick Slade was one of 
twenty-five members of the National 
League of Women Voters to attend the 
twenty-fifth anniversary Congress of the 
International Alliance of Women for 
Suffrage and Equal Citizenship opening in 
Berlin on June 17th. She made the pres- 
entation of forty-three flags, one for each 
nation in the Alliance, on behalf of the 
Leslie Woman Suffrage Commission of 
the United States. "In the old days," says 
the Woman's Journal, "when the Con- 
gress convened, the nation which had a 
victory to celebrate came forward bearing 
its flag to receive the homage of the com- 
rades in battle. But this time it was the 
nations of the world which were to be 
honored. And as Mrs. Slade finished her 
speech the orchestra struck up a soul- 
stirring march and from the back of the 
hall there came two long lines of girls in 
pale yellow frocks . . . holding the 
flags." In connection with the Congress 
there was held at the Workers' Theatre in 
Berlin a peace demonstration at which 
Caroline Slade was one of the representa- 
tive women speaking for their countries. 

Stella Bass Tilt, who was unable to at- 
tend the reunion, writes: "Last year I 
built a little house in Santa Barbara and 
I use it as a haven and escape when life 
gets too hectic or dull at home. I can 
cook and scrub or loaf to my heart's con- 
tent and the children, when invited, have 
to help me do it. Katharine with four 
children and Ned with a Joseph II who 
will shortly have his first birthday, live 
close by us in Pasadena, and Judy, an 
amusing and delightful person, is at home 
and we have many good times together. 
Last year, when Mr. Tilt was 85 he 
started an art gallery of old and modern 
paintings and he spends all his time buy- 
ing and selling and trading and seems to 
have a grand time doing it." 

Two poems by Edith Wyatt have ap- 
peared within the past year: one on 
Amundsen in the North American Review 
for October, 1928, and "Peace Pipe," in 
the Saturday Evening Post for August 



10, 1929. Edith has written, but not yet 
published, a critical article on Prescott, 
and one on Gilbert Imlay, the author of 
the first American novel and one-time 
lover of Mary Wollstonecraft. One of 
Edith's "poems, "To F. W.," was trans- 
lated into French by Eugene Jolas and 
included in his "Anthologie de la Neuvelle 
Poesie Americaine." 

Among members of '96 traveling abroad 
this summer were Josephine Holman 
Boross, Elizabeth Cadbury Jones, Emma 
Linburg Tobin and Clara Colton Worth- 
ington. 

1900 

Editor: Louise Congdon Francis 
(Mrs. Richard S. Francis) 
Haverford, Pa. 

The new Class Editor journeyed to 
Maine and back this summer by automo- 
bile, and visited members of the class on 
both trips. In the course of the summer 
she gleaned the following bits of news. 
What have the rest of you gleaned? 

Dorothea Cross was found efficiently 
holding down an overtime job with the 
help of Rosamond, Bryn Mawr, 1929, 
while Dorothea, 1930, was at the Bryn 
Mawr Summer School. 

Cornelia Kellogg was also discovered 
running a delightful and complicated 
household most graciously. Darcy, B. M., 
1927, was at home after a trip to India, 
and little Cornelia, a prospective Bryn 
Mawrtyr, was so like her mother it was 
hard to tell them apart. 

Jessie Tatlock was part of the summer 
in her cottage at South West Harbor, and 
part of the time at the Harvard Summer 
School. She is specializing in Medieval 
History, chiefly in Sicily. This winter she 
expects to be in Cambridge until Christ- 
mas and then go to Naples and Sicily to 
study archives. She is perfecting her 
Italian. 

Constance Rulison is in this country and 
in August was at Annisquam, Mass., with 
her sister, Mrs. Coleman. 

After the reunion Grace Babson re- 
turned to Oregon by the Panama Canal 
with her daughter Mary and her son 
Graham. At that time Graham was plan- 
ning to go this fall to Leland-Stanford. 
Did he go? 

Mary Kilpatrick and her brother and 
Ellen, '99, spent the summer at Ogunquit, 
Maine. Mary has become an art student 
and after a summer of diligent and happy 
work produced what her instructor called 
"the perfect procharde for a beginner." 
As Jessie became a college professor 
"after some years," so we expect Mary to 
become our most distinguished artist. 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



17 



Julia Gardner spent the summer mostly 
in Brookline while all four of her children 
went to various camps in various capaci- 
ties. Her daughter Rosamond, B. M., 
1930, is to be married this fall to Ensign 
John William Schmidt, Annapolis, 1927. 

Louise Francis' son Richard is a fresh- 
man at Harvard. Where are all the other 
1900 boys and girls at college? 

Alletta KorfY's daughter Barbara is a 
freshman at Bryn Mawr. 

Edna Gellhorn spent the summer in 
Germany with her husband. Her daugh- 
ter Martha, 1930, has left college and has 
a job with The New Republic. 

1905 

Class Editor: Eleanor Little Aldrich 
(Mrs. Talbot Aldrich) 
59 Mount Vernon Street 
Boston, Massachusetts. 

. We have learned with sorrow of the 
death of our class-mate, Mary Emmoline 
Trueman, which occurred in July. 

Helen Kempton is to live at the New 
York Bryn Mawr Club this winter. 

Alice Day McLaren and her husband 
have been in Santa Barbara all summer 
and plan to stay through the autumn. 

Katharine Fowler Pettit was called 
home from her trip to California in July 
by the sudden death of her mother. The 
Pettits have just moved into another 
apartment next door to their former one. 
Her address now. is 30 Jones Street, New 
York. 

Caroline Chadwick-Collins and her fam- 
ily spent her vacation in a cottage rented 
from Alice Jaynes Tyler on the latter's 
farm at Wakefield, Rhode Island. Eloise 
and Mary Tyler became great chums. 

Jane Ward was in New York last year, 
taking a course at the New York School 
of Social Work. 

When this number of the Bulletin 
reaches the class, your bona fide editor 
will be back on the job again. Eleanor 
writes that they have had a delightful 
trip, met Bailey successfully in Egypt, 
and the only complaint seems to be that 
it was all too short. Lit had lunch with 
Helen Kempton in Paris and also a 
glimpse of Margaret Thurston Holt. 

1907 
Class Editor: Alice Hawkins 

Taylor Hall, Bryn Mawr, Penna. 

Berniece Stewart Mackenzie was mar- 
ried in August to David A. L'Esperance. 
They went to Vancouver on their honey- 
moon, and expect to live in Los Angeles. 
Her younger son is now a sophomore at 
Leland-Stanford. 



Antoinette Cannon took advantage of 
the fact that the National Association of 
Social Workers met in San Francisco, to 
combine business with pleasure, and was 
able to attend the convention, have an 
extensive and extended vacation, and all 
in time to return to New York to go on 
with her teaching at the second term of 
the summer session of the School of So- 
cial Work. 

Katharine Harley is now Secretary and 
• Registrar of the Woman's Medical Col- 
lege of Pennsylvania. 

Mabel O'Sullivan spent the greater 
part of her summer at Orono, Maine, 
where she was teaching English at the 
Summer School of the University of 
Maine. 

Hortense Flexner King will again give 
courses in Poetry at the College this year. 
I wonder if the class realizes that those 
delightful drawings that appear practical- 
ly every week in the Saturday Evening 
Post, illustrating articles by Don Marquis, 
Will Rogers, and other humorists, are the 
work of Hortense's distinguished' husband, 
Wyncie King. His studio on the top floor 
of the College Inn is a favorite meeting 
place for undergraduates. When he had 
the grip last winter, Hortense had great 
difficulty protecting him from the bedside 
attentions of his young friends. 

Peggy Barnes' latest play, "Jenny," 
made a great hit in Boston in June with 
Jane Cowl as the star. After reading the 
enthusiastic reviews of the opening per- 
formance, Katharine Cornell telegraphed 
Peg: "May I play in your next success?" 
"Jenny" has been running in Detroit and 
Pittsburgh in September, and is slated to 
reach Broadway early in October. Miss 
Cornell expects to take "The Age of Inno- 
cence" on the road this autumn. Harriot 
Houghteling Curtis attended the opening 
night of "Jenny" with her husband and 
Margaret Augur. 

Esther Williams Apthorp and her 
brother have recently been given a small 
island off the coast of Maine, near Haven. 
Esther and her husband spent an exciting 
vacation looking over their new posses- 
sion, and plan to build a camp there for 
future holidays. 

The editor spent her vacation driving 
around New England in her recently ac- 
quired Ford. She and May Ballin made a 
grand tour of Cape Cod, stopping in to 
see Edna Brown Wherry, at West Fal- 
mouth, where her husband has been con- 
valescing after a serious illness which has 
kept him away from his law office since 
March. Later the editor called upon Mar- 
garet Augur at Bradford Academy to 
make arrangements in connection with 



18 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



"Mamie," Peggy Putnam Morse's eldest 
child, who is to go there to school this 
year under Augur's wing. 

Minnie List Chalf ant's daughter Elea- 
nor is the Freshman Regional Scholar 
from Pittsburgh this year. Another mem- 
ber of the class of 1933, Bryn Mawr, is 
Bux's niece, daughter of her sister, Caro 
Buxton Edwards, '01. 

1908 
Editor: Margaret Copeland Blatchford , 
(Mrs. Nathaniel Blatchford) 
3 Kent Road, Hubbard Woods, 111. 

It is indeed good to have news of Made- 
line Fauvre Wiles. She writes, "I am 
more than busy just now preparing to 
spend my vacation in a hasty trip to Spain 
and France. 

"We had moved to Boston just before 
Mr. Wiles passed away. Then after that 
I didn't want to go back to Hingham to 
live, so decided it would be easier if I 
busied myself with a 'job/ so I have been 
managing a little department store in 
Newton ! It's a lot of work but really it 
has been loads of fun. I have been at it 
nearly a year now and my employers are 
giving me a six weeks' vacation. You may 
believe me I am going to enjoy it." 

Emily Fox Cheston, in the midst of the 
"whirl" in which Rosie reports her to be 
living, read a paper on "Philadelphia 
Gardens" at a meeting of all the garden 
clubs of Illinois held in Lake Forest, in 
August. After the paper, she whirled up 
to visit Margaret Copeland Blatchford in 
the north woods of Wisconsin. 

The editor wishes to correct a mistake 
in the notes of a few months ago which 
stated that Melani Updegraff lived "five 
miles from civilization." It should have 
read "twenty-five miles from civiliza- 
tion." Melanie expects to come to this 
country in the spring of 1930 and will 
certainly be warmly welcomed by her 
classmates. 

For the following notes, most hearty 
thanks are due Rosie Marsh Payton, who 
sends them from a lovely island in the 
Muskokas where she is visiting her 
mother and father: 

Ethel Vick — "We decided on Spain in- 
stead of Italy and had a fascinating win- 
ter with a short time in Paris, then 
Madrid, Escorial, Toledo, and a month in 
Seville arriving in time for Holy Week." 

D. Straus was a delegate for the Na- 
tional League of Women Voters to the 
Congress for the International Alliance 
for Suffrage and Equal Citizenship held 
in Berlin in June. 

Florence Lexow is still President of the 
Women's University Club and is also D. 



Straus' successor as Alumnae Fund Chair- 
man. 

Agnes Goldman Sanborn is very much 
interested in the problem of child raising, 
though not entirely to the exclusion of 
her bacteriological work. 

Lou Hyman Pollak is spending the sum- 
mer traveling in Scandinavia accompanied 
by her mother, one husband and three 
children. 

Jackie Morris is quite happy and con- 
tented "feeding and swimming the fam- 
ily" at their camp at Manset, Maine. 

Caroline McCook Morgan is spending 
some time at Wildwood Crest before re- 
turning to Southern Pines, North Caro- 
lina. 

Cad writes that she is very busy "bend- 
ing her young twigs" and is ready for an- 
other reunion any time. 

Mary Cockrell Cockrell motored with 
her husband and three daughters to 
Boulder, Colorado, from Dallas in July. 

Margaret Maynard has a new Ford. 
She and her mother are touring Canada 
therein in September! 

Louise Pettibone Smith sailed for Ger- 
many in June for a year's study and 
travel. 

Margaret Duncan Miller's husband is 
doing educational work among the In- 
dians at Billings, Montana. Margaret 
writes that she is pretty well occupied 
with her own four "Indians" and that the 
work is decidedly "educational" — mostly 
to her! 

Linda Schaefer Castle's daughter Gwen- 
dolyn will probably enter Bryn Mawr in 
two years and then Linda will feel more 
tied than ever to her Alma Mater. She 
sends lots of good wishes to the class and 
ends with "Aloha." 

Ann (Ann wishes the abbreviated and 
modern form) Carrere deserted her 
fascinating Georgetown house and garden 
and also her profession of landscaping 
for a short time this summer and took a 
five weeks' vacation in England. 

Lucy Carner is awfully important in 
Y. W. C. A. circles, though she won't ad- 
mit it. During a recent conference in 
Pittsburgh her picture was on the front 
page of the newspaper ! 

Helen Schmidt has discontinued her 
Tea Room and Candy Shop in one of the 
office buildings of Pittsburgh. By fall no 
doubt Schmidtie will have another iron in 
the fire, for she has made a very en- 
viable business record. 

Nan Welles Brown writes welcome 
news: "Before the end of 1929, there is 
a strong probability that this Brown fam- 
ily will have moved to the United States, 
somewhere in the Rocky Mountain re- 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



gion." She and Mr. Brown and the four 
little girls are still in Paris, but as always 
spent some time this summer at Bourre, 
Cher et Loir, where her parents have had 
a summer home for years. 

Rose writes of herself: "Do come 
through Pittsburgh on your way to any- 
where next time you travel arfd come and 
see me. I have a really fascinating city 
apartment — high up on the side of a hill 
like a cave dweller — with a view of miles 
in three directions. We watch the much- 
advertised 'Cathedral of Learning' mount 
its forty stories to the sky and we often 
mistake the riveters on it for the wood- 
peckers in our pear tree !" 

1909 
Editor: Helen Bond Cra-ne 
Denbigh Hall, Bryn Mawr. 

The summer has been a most productive 
season for news. Pleasaunce writes from 
London: "I find that a year is about the 
limit, for me, of comfortable silence to- 
ward a class editor. After that I begin to 
feel uncomfortable — so much so, as time 
goes on, that I take up my pen as the only 
means of escape. Our season at Wood- 
brooke (an educational settlement near 
Birmingham, backed by the Society of 
Friends and patronized by fifty students 
of some fifteen nationalities) came to an 
end over a year ago, and we spent last 
summer in London, rooming on one of 
the green squares of Bloomsbury. Time 
was largely devoted to tennis and to 
tentative investigations of the regulations 
governing employment of foreigners in 
England. Last winter we took a little 
house in the 'Garden Suburb' near Hamp- 
stead Heath, whence my husband com- 
muted to work and I enlisted in the drab 
and serried ranks of alumnae housekeep- 
ers. The visible high spots of my job 
were when I learned to cook 'spatzle,' and 
again during the 'Great Frost' of Febru- 
ary, when I tackled freezing water pipes 
by day and by night slept with one ear 
cocked for any cessation of the trickling 
refill to the cistern, which, we were told, 
might end in a boiler explosion. We came 
through with very slight damage — for- 
tunately, as there were 500 suburbanites 
ahead of us on the plumber's waiting 
list !" She does not know just how much 
longer they will be in England, but gives 
her address as Friends' House, Euston 
Road, London N. W. 1. 

In spite of her reference to Bulletin 
News as "Those avidly read but grudging- 
ly written bits of information," Mary 
Herr sends a long and delightful letter, 
which we regretfully cut, about her trip 
abroad. She and Cynthia sailed in De- 



cember: "Cynthia took over a little car 
into which we packed ourselves at Cher- 
bourg and set off in the rain for Bayeux. 
From there we wandered about leisurely 
for four blessed but very cold months," 
over a good deal of southern France, in- 
cluding "those thrilling prehistoric caves 
(and I heartily recommend the Dordogne 
region — very beautiful and, in winter at 
any rate, quite untouristed). Then St. 
Jean de Luz, where Cynthia played golf 
and I also ran." After more of France 
and some of Italy they went to England 
for a month, "where we pretty w 7 ell went 
from top to toe (or the other way round) 
and played golf again at N. Berwick and 
St. Andrew's (shades of all blessed golf- 
ers!). It was marvelous, but just as well 
for me that it was out of season." She 
also spent a week in Brittany with Shir- 
ley, whose family flourish greatly. Her 
husband carried out his plan of going to 
Russia to paint, and Shirley expected to 
spend some time in Switzerland with her 
sister Brenda and Maisie Put. Since her 
return Mary has accepted the position of 
Executive Secretary at the Girls' Latin 
School in Chicago. 

Cynthia, after getting back from Eu- 
rope, parted with her appendix, made a 
speedy recovery, returned to her golf, and 
is taking a position this fall in the de- 
partment of Physical Education at the 
University of Wisconsin. 

Frances Ferris sailed in July, expecting 
to spend most of her sabbatical year 
abroad. She attended the International 
Progressive Education Congress at El- 
sinore, expected to go from there to Rus- 
sia, and later to spend several months 
studying in Geneva. Her address is c/o 
Brown, Shipley & Co., 123 Pall Mall, Lon- 
don. 

Frances Browne sailed on the Samaria 
October 11, for the beginning of her sab- 
batical year. She expects to visit Euro- 
pean schools, especially in England, 
Germany and Austria. She is going with 
her sister Norvelle and a friend; they ex- 
pect to be in Italy later on, and may also 
go to Greece. Her address, too is c/o 
Brown, Shipley & Co. 

When last heard from, Lacy was in 
Santa Fe, having a very gay time indeed. 
A newspaper, reporting the projected pro- 
duction of "Cake," by the Santa Fe Play- 
ers, directed by the author, Witter Bynner, 
says in part: 

"The long and difficult role of The Lady 
is taken by Miss Lacy Van Wagenen, a 
summer visitor here from New York. 
Those who have attended rehearsals say 
that Miss Van Wagenen's interpretation 
of The Lady who wanted to eat her cake 



20 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



and keep it too, is better than the profes- 
sional actress who took this lead when 
the play was produced in Pasadena and 
San Francisco." 

Lacy expected to join Kate Branson 
later in California. 

Speaking personally as well as editorial- 
ly, we have had a great summer. After 
visiting Lydia Sharpless Perry, '08, in 
Rhode Island, and coming across B. M. 
people of many different eras, we went to 
see Sally Webb in Maine. We drove up 
to see Anna Piatt, who has a most charm- 
ing old farm house at Friendship, swam 
in her cove, and went out in her stunning 
motor boat; later we spent several days 
with Mary Case, '08, in Paris Hill. After 
that we went to Annisquam, Mass., and 
stayed with Gene Miltenberger Ustick. 
One day we coralled for tea Frances 
Browne, Miss Swindler and Margaret 
Morison, '07, all of whom we discovered 
in the vicinity. 

Efforts to see Mary Allen have resulted 
so far in the information that she is mov- 
ing to a new apartment at 52 Garden 
Street, Cambridge. Later we hope to find 
out her present occupation. 

The class extends its sincere sympathy 
to Dorothy North, whose mother died 
early in September, after a long period 
of illness. We have heard nothing of 
Dorothy's plans, but so far as we know 
she is still at 60 Scott Street, Chicago. 

Sally Jacobs is an impressive head mis- 
tress; the Seiler School is flourishing, 
and Sally has just acquired thirty acres 
of land for recreational purposes. She re- 
ports having seen a picture of Elise Don- 
aldson's on exhibition at the Philadelphia 
Academy of Fine Arts this spring. 

Lillian Laser Strauss could not join us, 
as she had been ill since she returned 
from Europe in February; she hopes to 
see some of us later this spring. 

D. I. Smith Chamberlain wrote that she 
wished she might be collected for Pa- 
tience, but that the best she could do 
would be to attend the Chicago dinner for 
the "Seven College Presidents." She ex- 
pects to take the three children to Asquam 
Lake, Holderness, N. H., for the summer. 
Meanwhile her husband will be traveling 
to South Africa to attend the Interna- 
tional Geological Congress. 

1912 

Class Editor: Catharine Thompson Bell 
(Mrs. C. Kenneth Bell) 
2700 Chicago Blvd., Detroit, Mich. 
Carlotta Welles Briggs (Mrs. James 
Elmer Briggs, Jr.), has a son, James 
Welles B. Briggs, born August 19th. 



Carlotta's husband, who is with the 
National City Bank, has been transferred 
to Paris. They will sail November 1st. 
Until then her address is Wilson's Point, 
South 'Norwalk, Conn. 

1913 

Class Editor: Betty Fabian Webster, 
(Mrs. Ronald Webster), 
905 Greenwood Blvd., Evanston, 111. 

Margaret Scruggs Carruth writes from 
Dallas: "Come on and go to Norway 
with me this summer. Mother, Dad and I 
leave here the 18th of May, sailing on 
the 'Empress of Australia' from Quebec, 
and after briefly touring Southern and 
Western England and Wales, up into 
Southern Scotland, will sail from New- 
castle on the 'Prince Olav' the middle of 
June to visit the fjords of Norway and 
see the Land of the Midnight Sun. Later 
we will go to Germany and Austria, 
Budapest, Vienna and Lucerne. We'll fly 
over from Brussels to London, and see a 
bit of the Shakespeare and Dickens coun- 
try before coming home. Doesn't it sound 
alluring? 

"Every time I'm anywhere near B. M., 
I get a tremendous urge to try to get in 
touch with the girls. Eve just come back 
from a fascinating visit in Washington, 
D. C, where all sorts of interesting 
things happened. I met a girl there who 
lived in Trenton and knew the Buchan- 
ans." 

I was sorry to miss Margaret's boat by 
a few days. Ronald, the children and I, 
sailed May 15 from Montreal for 
France. We are taking a car and expect 
to stay perhaps a year. We have no defi- 
nite plans beyond a stay at the seashore 
in the St. Jean de Luz region this sum- 
mer, and possibly Grenoble, because of 
schools and the University, next winter. 
If any of you are going over, please let 
me know, care of the American Express 
Co., 7 Rue Scribe, Paris. 

My best wishes go with the next class 
editor, and a hope that she may have a 
large correspondence. 

The class wishes to extend its deepest 
sympathy to Grace Bartholomew Clayton 
in the loss of her husband. He was ill 
only a short time, dying in April of 
streptococcic pneumonia. 

1917 
Editor: Bertha C. Greenough 

203 Blackstone Blvd., Providence, R. I. 

Amie Dixon's mother, Mrs. Henrietta 

F. Dixon, was married on August 15th to 

Mr. William J. Baer, of New York, a 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



miniature painter, at Amie's house in East 
Orange, N. J. 

The class editor regrets exceedingly to 
have to announce that all the 1917 records 
in her possession were burned in a dis- 
astrous fire which swept the second floor 
of her house in Providence on the seventh 
of August. Among them was a delightful 
letter to the class from Erika Zimmerman 
which would have been printed in full in 
the October issue of the Bulletin. It ar- 
rived shortly after reunion. 

1919 
Editor: Marjorie Remington Twitchell 
(Mrs. Pierrepont Twitchell) 
Setauket, L. I., N. Y. 

The class extends its deepest sympathy 
to the husband and family of Adelaide 
Landon, whose tragic death on her honey- 
moon is a source of great grief to us all. 
Her beautiful spiritual development in the 
past ten years was manifested to us at 
reunion, and we shall always remember 
the radiance that seemed to emanate from 
her. She was married on June 21st to 
Rev. Clyde H. Roddy. She was stricken 
with meningitis and died at Vancouver in 

August. TTftTMm-l 

Fritz Beatty is going to teach English 
Literature to freshmen and sophomores 
at Hunter College for Women in New 
York City this winter. She expects also, 
to study for her Ph. D. at Columbia. Her 
address is to be 145 East 32nd Street, New 
York City. 

Dorothea Chambers Blaisdell spent the 
summer at Winsted, Conn. Her hus- 
band is working at Columbia on his thesis 
on the Ottoman debt. 

Chuck Coombs Evans is back at 20 
Wayside Lane, Scarsdale, N. Y., after 
having rented it and spent last winter in 
Bronxville. Augusta Blue visited her on 
her return from Paris last spring. Franny 
Day Lukens after reunion motored with 
her mother and some friends through the 
Shenandoah Valley to Charlottesville. She 
spent a night with Marion Moseley Snif- 
fen in Baltimore on her return trip. The 
rest of the summer she spent in Vermont, 
fifteen miles from where Marjorie Martin 
Johnson spends the summers. 

Beany Dubach last spring gathered 
statistics for the Kansas City Provident 
Association about the experience her so- 
cial service agency had "with the automo- 
bile tourists" or "gasoline hoboes," who 
give out of gas and food on their door- 
step and demand to be financed so that 
they can continue their trip. 

"You would be surprised how many 
families with six or eight children get 



blithely into a fourth-hand Ford and start 
out for California." 

Dot Hall has been traveling in Sicily, 
Greece, and to Budapest with her father 
and Con Hall, '17. She teaches and raises 
calves and lambs — just where I don't 
know — on her travels. 

Ruth Hamilton has been teaching his- 
tory at Baldwin for the past two years. 

Jinkie Holmes has been hopping off to 
Europe every year or so between investi- 
gating the private life of microbes. She 
had a story published in the August 
Scribner. 

Eleanor Marquand Forsyth has a 
daughter, Mary Blakie, born May 29, 1929. 
Eleanor is treasurer of the local Women's 
College Club in Princeton. 

Jean Wright received her Ph. D. degree 
in French at Bryn Mawr this June. She 
sailed for Constantinople in July with her 
father. 

Dorothy Peters Eis was in Mississippi 
last spring and motored home to Michigan 
via Florida. 

Peggy Rhoads did editorial work this 
past summer on "The Friend" in Philadel- 
phia. 

Edith Rondinella teaches music at 
Agnes Irwin School and is studying piano 
with Mr. Alwyne at Bryn Mawr. She now 
has a manager for her lecture recitals. 

The class wishes to express sympathy 
to Annette Stiles for the passing on of 
her brother in May. 

"K. T." Wessels spent the summer in 
the family cottage at Eastern Point, 
Conn., with her two sisters and their fam- 
ilies. She returned to San Francisco Aug- 
ust 15th. On May 23rd she held a piano 
recital in San Francisco, playing works 
of Scarlatti-Taussig, Bach, Mozart, Schu- 
man, Brahms, Debussy, DeFalla and Cho- 
pin. She is a pupil of Austin Conradi, 
Philipp-Siloti and Bloch. Knowing our 
K. T., we envy all those who heard her 
play. We who had the privilege at re- 
union will long remember the happiness 
she gave us. 

Isabel Whittier is to teach modern 
European History at Hunter College, New 
York .City. Her address is American 
Women's Home Association, 353 West 
57th Street. She took a short trip this 
summer through Nova Scotia. She re- 
ceived her M. A. from the University of 
Pennsylvania in 1922, taught English and 
History in Senior High School in Hazle- 
ton, Pa. (1922-27), then taught near Phil- 
adelphia, and last winter at Chevy Chase 
School in Washington. She hopes to get 
her Ph. D. from the University of Penn- 
sylvania in 1930. Her thesis is "Benning 
Wentworth, Royal Governor of New 



22 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



Hampshire, 1741-67." She lias had three 
articles published, "Alexander Hamilton" 
and "Benjamin Franklin" in The Manu- 
facturer, and "The Sons of Brunswick. 
Maine," published in The Forward, April 
27, 1929. 

Buster Ramsay Phelps had an operation 
for appendicitis early in May. In August 
she went to South Carolina with her hus- 
band for boating, swimming and off-shore 
fishing. 

Roberta Ray Mills spent last winter in 
Florida, her husband having to go there 
because of acute neuritis. She says her 
"boy and tom-boy . . . are still hand- 
some like their daddy, but developing ap- 
petites and figures like their mother." 
They bought a Spanish bungalow in Mi- 
ami, and with the help of one nurse — the 
other having left, Bert did all the work — 
"Mary Ann alternately ate sand and the 
contents of the dog's pans" — until it be- 
came "a question of a maid or a divorce, 
and we thought a maid would be cheaper." 
They hope to spend every winter's vaca- 
tion in Florida. 

1920 

Editor: Margaret Ballou Hitchcock 
(Mrs. David I. Hitchcock) 
45 Mill Rock Rd., New Haven, Conn. 

Alice Quan Rood was married on June 
12 to Archibald Van Deusen at Evanston, 
Illinois. 

Phoebe Helmer Wadsworth has a 
daughter, Katharine de Koven, born June 
14, in New York City. Phoebe spent the 
summer in the house of her husband's 
parents at Middletown, Conn. 

Lois Kellogg Jessup will be assistant 
head of the Brearley School beginning- 
September, 1930. 

Millicent Carey went to England in July 
to spend six weeks with some English 
friends. In September she will return to 
Bryn Mawr as assistant professor of Eng- 
lish. She will be Acting Dean of the Col- 
lege this year. 

Teresa James Morris has recently re- 
turned from a trip to Mackinac Island, 
Mich., where she and her husband spent 
their vacation. In winter she works for 
the Junior League. 

Helen Kingsbury Zirkle has been run- 
ning Alford Lake Camp, which, she says. 
is in a flourishing condition. Next winter 
Helen will take courses in American lit- 
erature at Harvard, hoping eventually to 
take a Ph. D. in the subject. 

Betty Weaver will continue to teach 
Latin at Dongan Hall, Dongan Hills, 
Staten Island, New York, next winter. 
This last summer she took a "sabbatical" 



and had a real vacation at Belgrade 
Lakes, Maine. 

K. Cauldwell Scott recovered fully from 
a serious operation last spring and this 
summer, played in tennis tournaments 
with hdr husband. Her two little girls, 
Kay Junior, aged three, and Janet, aged 
one, are very cunning. Kay herself is a 
model parent and housekeeper. 

Margaret Ballou Hitchcock will teach 
the second grade at Mrs. Foote's School 
in New Haven next winter. Mary, aged 
four, her oldest child, will go to nursery 
school. 

The class editor is depressed by the 
fact that she sent out forty postcards urg- 
ing her classmates to send in news, and 
has received five answers to date. If you 
want this news column to be long and 
interesting, 1920, you know what you can 
do about it ! 

1921 
Editor: Helen James Rogers 
(Mrs. J. E. Rogers) 
99 Poplar Plains Road 
Toronto, Ontario, Canada. 

Grace Trotter Johnson has a 33/2-year- 
old daughter who attends a nursery school 
in East Orange. Grace herself teaches 
college prep history in a country day 
school in Stamford. This summer she 
has been taking courses at Columbia. 

Emily Kimbrough Wrench celebrated 
Labor Day by having twin daughters. 

Now for a few statistics which I have 
compiled from your cards and the Regis- 
ter. They are not complete, as I have 
had only 64 replies from the 133 letters 
sent out. I hope the delinquents will re- 
pent and send me some news of them- 
selves soon, so that this remarkable rec- 
ord can be brought up to date. 

So far we have: 

Eighty-seven married classmates. 61 of 
these have a total of 97 children, 46 girls 
and 51 boys. 

Twenty-one members with other de- 
grees: 9 M. A., 4 Ph. D., 6 M. D., 1 A. B. 
in Architecture, 1 Ds. C. 

Thirteen teachers: 3 teach in colleges, 
7 teach in private schools, 3 teach in pub- 
lic schools. 

Nine medical workers, 5 research work- 
ers, 4 secretaries, 3 psychologists, 2 social 
workers, 2 authors, 1 sculptor, 1 actress, 
1 ballet dancer and teacher, 1 librarian. 

1923 

Class Editor: Dorothy Meserve Kun- 

HARDT 

(Mrs. Philip B. Kunhardt) 
Mount Kemble Ave., Morristown, N. J. 
Haroldine Humphreys was married on 
July 18th to Carl Muschenheim. No 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



23 



longer will the footlights cast their purple 
and orange shadows upon our Dena, be- 
cause she abides in the flickering glow of 
her own hearth, waiting for her husband 
to come back from his day's work at the 
College of Physicians and Surgeons in 
New York. Mr. Muschenheim is espe- 
cially pursuing the biological side of medi- 
cine, which seems to mean taking a bird 
and making five beaks grow where only 
one intended to — or manipulating a frog 
so that one leg comes forth from the neck 
instead of the hip. 

Katharine Strauss has announced her 
engagement to Henry J. Mali, of Groton, 
Yale, and the woolen business. He is tall, 
with gray eyes, and is terrifically nice, 
and they will be married in Oyster Bay 
on October 12th and live at 14 East 75th 
Street, New York City. " 

Harriet Scribner Abbott was seen for 
a fleeting moment. She was at Cornwall- 
on-the-Hudson and was surrounded by 
her son and her very sweet daughter 
Alice (the son was sweet, too). 

As your long-lost and unworthy editor 
was motoring through Glens Falls, she 
called on Rosamond Raley Braley, who 
was up there on a visit, her own home 
being now in Littits, Pa. From Ros came 
reassuring news of Virginia Brokaw Col- 
lins, who was so terribly hurt in an auto- 
mobile accident in Florida. Ginney is 
really getting, better, after long weeks in 
a hospital. 

Helen Dunbar has done probably the 
most extraordinary things of any member 
of 1923 since our graduation. She has not 
only brilliantly graduated from the Yale 
Medical School, but she has super-bril- 
liantly graduated from Union Theological 
Seminary — and now is abroad on a schol- 
arship from Union, writing a thesis on 
her great interest — the relationship — the 
very warm relationship — of Medicine and 
Religion. 

Please, 1923, send me news of your- 
selves — anything ranging from the most 
casual tidbits to the most pulsing secrets 
will be divulged if mailed to Morristown. 
I have hung my green lantern as a symbol 
of hope, from my mail box, which is the 
kind that sits on a pole, and I'm going to 
camp alongside, disproving the saying 
that a watched mailbox never plumps out. 

1925 

Susan Carey died of peritonitis after 
an operation for appendicitis in the hos- 
pital at Littleton, New Hampshire, near 
her summer home in Sugar Hill, on Sep- 
tember 5th. She returned from England 
in August, where she had been visiting 



relatives for two months, apparently in 
perfect health, and developed acute ap- 
pendicitis soon after reaching home. 

We, of the class, will count it an espe- 
cial privilege to have spent four years 
with her, and will remember with lasting 
afTection her unique and charming per- 
sonality, her spontaneity and unfailing 
graciousness, and her rare gift for people 
of all kinds. In the absence of the edi- 
tor, I am writing this note in her memory, 
and I know the class will join in sending 
their deepest sympathy to the family of 
the most lovable and loved member of 
1925. 

Nancy Hough. 

1926 AND 1927 

Members of 1926 and 1927 will be inter- 
ested in the piece of news which appeared 
in the form of an Associated Press dis- 
patch to the New York World, dated July 
24th: 

2 NEW YORK GIRLS GET 

OXFORD LAW DEGREES 

First Americans of Sex to Obtain 

Them, Sisters Will Be Admitted 

as Barristers in November 

OXFORD, England, July 24 (A. P.)— 
Two American girls, the Misses Jessie 
E. and Katherine M. Hendrick, sisters, 
have gained law degrees in the final honor 
class of jurisprudence at Oxford Univer- 
sity. They are the daughters of Mr. and 
Mrs. Frank Hendrick, of New York City. 

Both girls are graduates of Erasmus 
Hall High School, Brooklyn, and Bryn 
Mawr College. They also are members of 
the Middle Temple, London, and will be 
admitted as barristers in November. They 
are the first American girls to take Ox- 
ford law degrees. 

Jessie was elected President of the Ox- 
ford Society of Home Students, and is the 
first American student so honored. Kath- 
erine is at Lady Margaret Hall. 

1926 
Class Editor: Harriot Hopkinson 
Manchester, Mass. 

Dot Lefferts Moore (Mrs. Lawrence 
Moore, of Wilton, Conn.) has a son, born 
in or about the middle of September. His 
name is Peter, and he is reported to have 
looked sophisticated ever since his birth. 
His mother, meanwhile, is a contributing 
editor to The Arts. 

Benjy Linn is now an M. A., and was 
last seen by me being a bridesmaid in New 
Hampshire for K. Simonds, '27 (now Mrs. 
Lovell Thompson). This wedding should 
appear in many columns of the Bulletin. 



HRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



there were such a multitude of classes 
represented thereat. 

Ibby Bostock was married in June to 
the Rev. Aaron Charles Bennett, rector 
of St. Mary's Protestant Episcopal 
Church, St. Mary's, Pa. They are "at 
home" at St. Mary's after September 1st. 

Tommy Tomkins Villard is living in 
New York, and is working as an editor 
of the Junior League Bulletin. 

Janet Sabine was married on Septem- 
ber 7th to Mr. Frederick A. Ley, of New 
York. 

The usual number of people have been 
going abroad and returning from abroad, 
and sending dateless postcards here and 
there, so it is all very difficult not to get 
confused and unauthentic impressions of 
their wanderings. Alice Wilt has been 
abroad all summer; Delia Johnston and 
her husband have gone to Germany for a 
year; Frances Henderson has gone, or is 
shortly going, to Greece; Franny Jay has 
been in Berlin all summer. 

1928 

Class Editor: Cornelia B. Rose, Jr. 
1 Lexington Ave., New York City 
(Until further notice.) 

Now that Babs Rose has taken over the 
management of 1928's Gossip Exchange, 
she is eagerly awaiting some merchandise. 
Just to start things off she will display 
the following information in hopes that 
it may tempt some return in kind. 

Cay Field Cherry writes from Albany 
that "Barby Loines Dreier has been at 
Lake George all summer, so I haven't 
seen her since the grand arrival. But she 
was mighty funny talking about her 'ugly 
brat.' It was a homely little devil, but 
had lots of character in its face at the 
start — having Barby's nose and a flat but- 
ton of a chin. Pol Pettit's here getting 
ready for college again with dentists and 
innoculations. (Ed. Note. — Pol came out 
very well at medical school last year, we 
hear; fifth in her class or something ex- 
citing like that, with an average of about 
90, and Skee McKee did equally well at 
P. & S.) We're trying to get hold of 
Gaillard to go up and see her. (Ed. Note. 
— M. S. B. G. seems to have vanished into 
the wilds of Onteora, no trace of her hav- 
ing been reported by anyone.) For my 
summer I've just been doing Red Cross 
Motor Corps and being initiated into the 
chores of Junior League work (which I 
was invited to join in June). In the fall 
I expect to go back to the scenery work 
with the Albany Players, too. Otherwise 
it's a trip here and there: Lake Mohawk 
for our anniversary, Nantucket for a va- 



cation from housework, Lake George on 
a visit." 

Other items garnered: Al Bruere and 
Babs Rose spent their two weeks together 
sunning and sleeping on Cape Cod. They 
paid a visit to Woods Hole, where Edith 
Morgan Whitaker was visiting her fam- 
ily en route from California to set up an 
establishment for the winter in Cam- 
bridge. It is expected that the Whitaker 
family will be augmented this Autumn. 
Edith was well and very happy. 

Peg Barrett seems to have struggled 
through her appendectomy with great suc- 
cess last June and is still carrying on in 
the income tax department of the Girard 
Trust Co. in Philadelphia. At least, there 
have been no reports to the contrary. 

Ginny Atmore seems to have had a 
very good summer with the N. S. F. A. 
in the Balkans and Austria, and threatens 
to do it again next summer. It's becoming 
chronic, Ginny. Nan Bowman, '27, and 
Betty Freeman, '29, were with her. 

Mat Fowler has left millinery at 
Macy's and is assistant to an assistant to 
some one high up, as we understand it. 
Likes it better than assuring ugly — usual- 
ly — females — certainly — that certain hats 
become them — or don't. 

Bertha Ailing spent a night with Al 
Bruere on her way from some place to 
some place else, and seemed very full of 
social engagements. 

When last heard from, Betty Brown 
Field was returning from a trip abroad 
so that she might start out for Japan by 
way of Russia. Going to attend the Pan- 
Pacific conference. Some people have all 
the luck. 

Others doing exciting things include 
Nancy Wilson, ex-'28, who is ' in Spain 
studying 'cello with Casals and cutting a 
swathe in high Spanish society. 






FOR RENT 

NEAR BRYN MAWR 

HOUSE OF 12 ROOMS AND 4 BATHS 

FURNISHED OR UNFURNISHED 

619 Walnut Lane, Haverford 

MRS. C. G. HOAG 

(Anna Scattergood, '96) 

HAVERFORD, PA. Telephone, Ardmore 38 



CAMP MYSTIC 



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8-18. Conducted by Mrs. Carl Akeley (Mary 
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Ixesolved by fhe Cunard Line . . 
that Winter is entirely too long 




Ten Cunard West Indies Cruises . . . cleverly 
planned, romantically scheduled ... 9, 12, 16, 
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just when harassed northern America needs it 
...Nerves built up and tension let down... Big 
executives cannot always leave their desks lorthe 
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Duration of 


Minimum 


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Rates 


Dec. 3, 1929 s 


s. Franconia 


16 days 


$200 


Dec. 18, " s 


s. Carinthia 


16 days 


200 


Dec. 21, " s 


s. Franconia 


16 days 


200 


Dec. 26, " s 


s. Caronia 


8 days 


175 


Dec. 27, " s 


s. Carmania 


9 days 


175 


Jan. 6, 1930 s 


s. Carinthia 


16 days 


200 


Jan. 16, " s 


s. Caledonia 


26 days 


275 


Feb. 15, " s 


s. Caledonia 


26 days 


275 


Mar. 15, " s 


s. Caledonia 


18 days 


200 


Apr. 12, " s 


s. Samaria 


12 days 


175 



See Your Local Agent 



CUNARD-ANCHOR 

WEST INDIES CRUISES 



R*yn Mawu Bulletin 



The Saint Timothys School 
for Girls 

CATONSVILLE, MARYLAND 

Founded September 1882 

COLLEGE PREPARATORY 

AND 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

MISS LOUISA McENDREE FOWLER 
Head of the School 

Wykeham Rise 

WASHINGTON, CONNECTICUT 

A COUNTRY SCHOOL 
FOR GIRLS 

FANNY E. DAVIES, LL.A., Headmistress 
Prepares for Bryn Mawr and Other Colleges 

The Episcopal Academy 

(Founded 1785) 

CITY LINE, OVERBROOK, PA. 
A country dav school for boys 

MODERN AND WELL EQUIPPED 
Endorsed by Bryn Mawr Alumnae 

UNIVERSITYgTrLS 

BOARDING AND DAY SCHOOL 

Founded 1896 

Thorough and successful Preparation 

for Eastern Colleges for Women as well as 

for Midwestern Colleges and Universities 

Illustrated Catalogue on Request 

ANNA B. HAIRE, A.B., SMITH COLLEGE, Principal 

1106-B Lake Shore Drive Chicago, Illinois 

THE HARTRIDGE SCHOOL 
FOR GIRLS 

50 minutes from New York 

A country school with beautiful grounds. 
College Preparatory and General Courses. 
Over fifty girls in leading colleges today. 
Resident Department carefully restricted. 
Special attention to Music and Art. 
Athletics, Dramatics, Riding, 

EMELYN B. HARTRIDGE, Vassar, ' .B., Principal 
Plainfield, New Jersey 



The Ethel Walker School 

SIMSBURY, CONNECTICUT 

Head of School 

ETHEL WALKER SMITH, A.M., 
Bryn Mawr College 



Head Mistress 

JESSIE GERMAIN HEWITT, A.B., 
Bryn Mawr College 



fcOGERSHAI/L 

fAModern School With New England Tradihons 



TV* 

H^m ' Thorough Preparation tor any College 

I ^^ One Year Intensive Review 

I ^^^ General Academic Course with di- 
JHfe ^r,)loma. Junior College Courses — Home 
ki^iiwiincs, oecretarial Training, Music, Art, Dramatic 
Art. 26 Miles from Boston Outdoor Sports. Riding 
Gymnasium. Swimming Pool. 

EDITH CHAP IN CRAVEN, A.B., Bryn Mawr 
201 Rogers Street, Lowell, Mass. 

/1ARCUAV SCmL 

BRYN MAWR, PA. 
Prepares for Bryn Mawr and 
all leading colleges 

Musical Course prepares tor the Depart 
ment of Music of Bryn Mawr College 
EDITH HARCUM, Head of School 
L. May Willis, Principal 

THE MISSES KIRK'S 

College Preparatory School 

PREPARATORY TO BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 
Individual Instruction. Athletics. 

Clovercroft, Montgomery Avenue, Rosemont, Pa 

Mail, telephone and telegraph address: Bryn Mawr. Pa 






CHOATE SCHOOL 

1600 Beacon Street, Brookline, Mass. 

HOME AND DAY SCHOOL 
FOR GIRLS 

EMPHASIS ON COLLEGE PREPARATION 

Elective Courses for students not preparing 
for College 

AUGUSTA CHOATE, A.M. (Vassar) 

Principal 



Kindly mention Bryn Mawr Bulletii 



THE AGNES IRWIN SCHOOL 

2009-2011 Delancey Place, Philadelphia 

A College Preparatory 
SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 



BERTHA M. LAWS, A.B., Headmistress 



GRAY GABLES 



Complete College Preparatory Course. 
One year course for Board Examination. 

For catalog address: 

Hope Fisheb, Ph.D., Bancroft School 

Wobcesteb, Massachusetts 



MISS BEARD'S SCHOOL 

A Country School near New York 

Orange, New Jersey 
COLLEGE PREPARATION 

Advanced Courses Junior High School 

Music, Art, Domestic Science 

Catalog on Request 

LUCIE C. BEARD, Headmistress 

The Katharine Branson School 

ROSS, CALIFORNIA Across the Bay from San Francisco 

A Country School College Preparatory 

Head: 
Katharine Fleming Branson, A.B., Bryn Mawr 

MISS MADEIRA'S SCHOOL 

1330 19th St., N. W. Washington, D. C. 

A RESIDENT AND DAY SCHOOL FOR 
GIRLS 

LUCY MADEIRA WING, A.B. 

MRS. DAVID LAFOREST WING 

Head Mistress 

MISS WRIGHT'S SCHOOL 

Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Prepares for College Board 
Examination 



FERRY HALL 

A RESIDENT AND DAY SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

On Lake Michigan, near Chicago 

Junior College: High School Department: College 
Preparatory and General Courses. Special Departments 
of Music. Expression and Art. 

Two new dormitories, including new dining room and 
infirmary, to be opened September 1929. 

Eloise R. Tremain, A.B., Bryn Mawr, Principal 



ROSEMARY HALL 

College Preparatory 
(With supplementary but not alternative courses) 



GREENWICH 



CONNECTICUT 



The Shipley School 

Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 

Preparatory to Bryn Mawr College 

ALICE G. HOWLAND, ELEANOR 0. BROWNELL 
Principals 

MISS RANSOM and 
MISS BRIDGES' SCHOOL 

PIEDMONT, CALIFORNIA 

(A suburb of San Francisco) 

A RESIDENT AND DAY SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

General and College Preparatory Courses 
Outdoor Life throughout the year 

EDITH BRIDGES, B.L., Principal 

The Baldwin School 

A Country School for Girls 
BRYN MAWR PENNSYLVANIA 

Preparation for Bryn Mawr. Mount Holyoke. Smith. 

Vassar and Wellesley college*. Abundant outdoor life. 

Hockey, basketball, tennis. 

ELIZABETH FORREST JOHNSON, A.B. 

HEAD 

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Emphasizing college preparatory work. 

Also general and special courses. 

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^ y A Country School in the Green 
Spring Valley near Baltimore. 
Modern Equipment. 

All Sports. Special Emphasis on Horse- 
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Garrison Forest Girls who are going to college 
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on Music and Art. Younger girls live in a 
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Principals 

MISS JEAN G. MARSHALL 

MISS NANCY OFFUTT, 
Bryn Mawr, ex '20 

Box B, Garrison, Maryland 



Katharine Gibbs 

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preparatory and general courses. Music Art and 

Domestic Science. Catalogue on request. Box B. 

MIRIAM A. BYTEL, A.B., Radclifte, Principal 

BERTHA GORDON WOOD, A.B., Bryn Mawr, 

Assistant Principal 



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BRYN MAWR 
ALUMNAE 
BULLETIN 




THE OPENING OF COLLEGE 



November, 1929 



Vol. IX 



No. 8 



Entered as second-class matter, January 1, 1929 , at the Post Office, Phila., Pa., under Act of March i t 1879 

COPYRIGHT, 1929 

ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 



OFFICERS OF THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

EXECUTIVE BOARD 

President Louise Fleischmann Maclat, 1906 

Vice-President Natalie McFaden Blanton, 1917 

Recording Secretary Gertrude Hearne Myers, 1919 

Corresponding Secretary Mat Egan Stokes, 1911 

Treasurer Margaret E. Brusstar, 1903 

Chairman of the Finance Committee Caroline Florence Lexow, 1908 

Chairman of the Publicity Committee Caroline Morrow Chadwick-Collins, 1905 

ALUMNAE SECRETARY AND BUSINESS MANAGER OF THE BULLETIN 

Alice M. Hawkins, 1907 

EDITOR OF THE BULLETIN 

Marjorie L. Thompson, 1912 

DISTRICT COUNCILLORS 

District I Helen Evans Lewis, 1913 

District II Julia Langdon Loomis 1895 

District III Alletta Van Reypen Korff, 1900 

District IV Katharine Holliday Daniels, 1918 

District V Frances Porter Adler, 1911 

District VI Edna Warkentin Alden, 1900 

District VII Helen Brayton Barendt, 1903 

ALUMNAE DIRECTORS 

Ruth Furness Porter, 1896 Mary Peirce, 1912 

Frances Fincke Hand. 1897 Margaret Reeve Cary, 1907 

Elizabeth Lewis Otey, 1901 

CHAIRMAN OF THE ALUMNAE FUND 

Caroline Florence Lexow, 1908 

CHAIRMAN OF THE ACADEMIC COMMITTEE 

Pauline Goldmark, 1896 

CHAIRMAN OF THE SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOAN FUND COMMITTEE 

Margaret Gilman, 1919 

CHAIRMAN OF THE COMMITTEE ON HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Dr. Marjorie F Murray, 1913 

CHAIRMAN OF THE NOMINATING COMMITTEE 

Eleanor Little Aldrich, 1905 



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Bryn Mawr Alumnae 
Bulletin 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF 
THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNA ASSOCIATION 

Marjorie L. Thompson, '12, Editor 
Alice M. Hawkins, '07, Business Manager 

EDITORIAL BOARD 

Caroline Morrow Chadwick-Collins, '05 Ellenor Morris, '27 

Emily Fox Cheston, '08 Elinor B. Amram, '28 

Emily Kimbrough Wrench, '21 Louise Fleischmann Maclay, '06, ex-officio 

Subscription Price, $1.50 a Year Single Copies, 25 Cents 

Checks should be drawn to the order of Bryn Mawr Alumnae Bulletin 
Published monthly, except August, September and October, at 1006 Arch St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Vol. IX NOVEMBER, 1929 No. 8 



In one of the current magazines an article on "The Convention of Going to 
College" starts out trenchantly: "Our passion for well-rounded education is such 
that we are in danger of manufacturing a nation of billiard balls. . . . On the 
whole it is a good thing that he (the student) should be well rounded; at least he 
will now be able to roll smoothly and comfortably through life. . . . But occa- 
sionally there appear students with outstanding abilities and independent interests 
who ought not to be made spherical ; who should be left as they are, — eleptical, oblong, 
or triangular." Miss Park's opening speech to the Freshmen makes one feel in spite 
of their almost alarming uniformity of excellence that nevertheless one need not 
fear lest the mould in every case be round. This present class has a greater variety 
of preparation than has been true of entering classes in the past ten years or so ; more 
come from the public schools; a quarter of them enter with a credit average; and there 
is a greater range in age. Other colleges report a "country-wide decline in numbers of 
college applicants," but we are confronted with the problems arising from a steady 
increase in numbers. The fact that there were approximately, in the best Bryn 
Mawr tradition of statistics, two and one-half girls for every place available, means 
that coming to Bryn Mawr is certainly not following the line of least resistance. 
That in itself should insure something of the point of view of an earlier time when 
entering college was both an adventure and an achievement, and the successful student 
felt that being there placed upon her an intellectual obligation. And as the present 
student progresses she will find that the educational processes are tending, — in the honors 
work, in the opportunities for following her own line of interest, if the greater leisure 
for reading develop, as the faculty, as the students, as the alumnae hope they will, — not 
to mould her into a spherical mass, but to give her an ever-widening space in which to 
grow. 



PRESIDENT PARK'S. SPEECH 

It is hard to believe that only today the college year begins. A few weeks ago 
I was -looking at Cape Breton bays set like sapphires in their gray rocks or the clear 
pools of rivers filling and emptying with the tide, and watching eagerly, laid in against 
its northern background, a life which disappeared from New England fifty years ago, 
laborious enough but uncomplicated and leisurely. I thought of Mrs. Chad wick-Collins 
thirty-two times as I drove for three hours between Annapolis and Yarmouth, for I 
passed thirty-two teams of oxen on the road! With a sudden understanding of why 
my grandmother was a better woman than I but not being able to use the revelation 
profitably, I came back to the machine age. In an instant, in the twinkling of an eye, 
we were again slaves to the telephone, to the post box collection, and the power house 
siren. The noise of the grass cutter without and the vacuum cleaner within has 
filled our heads; eleventh-hour bath-tubs have clanked into Pembroke, freshmen's 
trunks and telegrams, finally the freshmen themselves have come and somehow dis- 
tributed themselves and the time of the college offices has already for a week been 
bent twenty-four hours a day on the freshman registration. I am driven to remember 
my old Ford. There has been such a clatter of everything's beginning at once that 
it is hard to be reminded the college year has not moved officially, that so far we have 
heard only the noise of the starter and that the journey is not brilliantly begun! It is 
with this minute finally that we launch on the official year's round and from now on 
the entering class takes its own place and only its own place in the pattern of 
the year. 

The really new figure in that pattern is the Graduate School in its new hall, 
with its new officer — its individuality about to form. In separating graduate and 
undergraduate students a tradition well pedigreed from Cambridge and Oxford and 
long cherished was broken and in no Bryn Mawr breast was there a unanimous 
vote in favor of the change — or rather perhaps our sentiment voted mutinously 
against our sense. For undeniably the good of the Graduate School is the good of 
each member of the college, and undeniably for the good of the school a well-considered 
and a resolute step has been taken. Where all education of graduate and professional 
students is expensive, such education in a small college is overwhelmingly expensive; 
it cabbages a large sum for fellowship and scholarships (at Bryn Mawr the income 
of $700,000) ; precious class-room space is devoted to relatively few students; it sends 
up the bills for teaching, for books, for equipment. 

If I should paint Bryn Mawr as Atlas, the world on his shoulders would at 
different times bear different labels but sometimes and especially when I was in 
financial depression it would be labelled The Graduate School. And it is true that 
it is possible now as it was not once for women to study in the advanced courses of 
American and foreign universities. Why then with this year is the Graduate School 
made still more important? With honorable reasons for giving it up, for closing its 
excellent record of preparing women for professional teaching, and research, the 
college has chosen to establish it more firmly, to underline, as it were, its position in 
Bryn Mawr. On its altar we have laid the admired Miss Schenck, the much-loved 
Radnor. 

(2) 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 3 

There is a double answer. First, the college has acted because of the Graduate 
School itself and has based its confidence on such conclusions as were put together in 
the 1927 report to the Alumnae of the Academic Committee and on such concrete 
facts as, say, the giving of the doctor's degree last June to ten women and the master's 
to seventeen more, the recurring award of fellowships at universities in America and 
abroad to recent members of the school, and the appointment to teaching and research 
positions of Bryn Mawr graduate students fresh minted in the last ten years by the 
Universities of Michigan, Nebraska and West Virginia, Western Reserve, Rochester, 
by Yale, Swarthmore, Earlham, the Johns Hopkins and the Harvard Medical Schools, 
the University of Delaware's Foreign Section in Paris, the Metropolitan Museum, 
besides each one of the large and many of the small colleges for women. And second, 
because the Graduate School educates not only its hundred or more students yearly. 
It educates also the four hundred undergraduates w r ho share the faculty and the 
library and the college. It colors for the freshmen the elementary classroom work and 
sets the standard for the honors work of the juniors and seniors. It sends the faculty 
willy nilly to their own research. Mr. Gray and Mr. Gray's young ladies crowd, we 
hear, the London Record Office, and Miss Swindler's young ladies must crowd 
Greece. There are doubtless faculty and students who sit in darkness but that the 
undergraduate work at Bryn Mawr is shot through by a graduate attitude of mind 
is, I believe, the reason why, to say nothing of others, such recent undergraduates as 
Katharine and Jessie Hendrick at Oxford, Rebecca FitzGerald at Vienna, Elizabeth 
Pillsbury at Berlin, Agnes Newhall and Mary Zelia Pease at Athens, Frederica 
de Laguna in London and Copenhagen have won excellent comment and award. 

I believe, in short, there is a wholly defensible foundation for the verdict of our 
sense and that the sentiment of the conservative undergraduate or graduate student 
can and should be easily untwined from its old object and curled around the new tree. 
The experiment of June is at any rate the commonplace of September. Upwards of a 
hundred graduate students have already registered — and the full registration always 
comes late — and sixty are establishing themselves in a remade Radnor Hall. Resident 
F.ellow^s in seventeen departments and scholars in twelve, foreign scholars from Austria, 
France, Scotland, Switzerland and Germany, the newly named Scholar of the Society 
of Pennsylvania Women in New York, Ruth Peters, of North Cumberland, Bryn 
Mawr, 1928 — these will all frame the customs of the first Bryn Mawr Graduate hall. 

To the Graduate School, the new Radnor and to Dean Schenck we offer honest 
felicitations and warm good wishes. 

The undergraduate students entering Bryn Mawr this year interest me very much 
and the history of their selection is more dramatic than usual. It is as unhandy for a 
college to enroll one small class every four years as it would be for a coach to have 
out of its four one small wheel. And, it is readily calculable, the small class tends 
to perpetuate itself. In ordinary years about one hundred places are vacant in the 
halls for the incomers, and the number of applicants is not over 140. This summer 
when the Committee on Entrance Examinations met it found an almost insoluble 
problem. Seventy places only were vacant, 185 applicants were completely ready to 
enter. One might say that for each bed, each knife and plate in the dining room two 
and a half girls presented themselves. The difficult details of the Committee work 
I do not need to go into. At its advice without giving up the residence requirement the 
number of places in residence was pushed beyond the original seventy, first by dividing 



4 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

a few more large college rooms between two, we hope amicable, owners, then by 
accepting the offer of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Hill Collins to let the college place 
eleven students and a warden in their house (which has one valuable by-product in that 
at least twelve Americans will learn to spell Bettws-y-Coed) and finally by borrow- 
ing temporarily three rooms in the faculty houses oil Roberts Road. Fifteen students 
have chosen to be non-residents rather than to forego entrance to Bryn Mawr entirely. 

Thanks to these various small increases the college opens with 102 freshmen in 
residence and a class of 121, an unexpectedly successful breaking up of the small class 
cycle, although even so something not far under a third of the qualified applicants 
had to be refused. The problem of selection of a freshman class appears this year 
in I trust an unusually spectacular way, and it was attacked by a remarkably con- 
scientious and hard-working committee. This committee, however, reports that the 
information to be drawn from examination averages, scholastic aptitude tests, school 
records and school statements fell short in giving an adequate picture of the potential 
value of the candidates. The committee itself has made several suggestions for another 
year, heads of schools may make others, and I should like to ask the Curriculum Com- 
mittee of the Undergraduate Association, its members only two or three years out 
of the schools, to make any comment it cares to on the possibility of increasing the 
chances (I put it cautiously for omniscience alone could solve the problem fully) of a 
juster estimate of the girls who wish to enter Bryn Mawr. It is trite to say that such 
choice is all-important. There is a kind of applicant who like the cup of tea described 
by a Cape Breton man this summer is "filling but not, so to say, enriching." The 
college is full or empty, good or poor, adequate or inadequate as its students vary. 
I should like to feel that our barometer was constantly rising. 

In regard to the actual freshman class admitted this year the choosers feel, I 
gather, tremendously exultant, and they have passed on their satisfaction to me, the 
wardens and the committee of the Self-Government Association who took no part 
in their high-tension labor in July. I shall expect, when I have time, to tell you 
more at length of the records of the 121 new students and to pass on the satisfaction 
to you. I must say at once that the examination average of the composite 1933 is. a 
high Merit, her scholastic aptitude test a high B, her school report Good- — in the 
technical not the moral sense — and her recommendation judicious but warm. Thirty- 
two enter with a Credit average compared with thirteen in 1926, nineteen in 
1927 and twenty in 1928. Fourteen of the thirty-two have also the highest 
scholastic aptitude test, and seven of the thirty-two are sixteen or barely seventeen 
years old. Eighteen per cent have been entirely prepared by public schools as com- 
pared with eight per cent in 1926, eleven per cent in 1927 and 1928 — a consummation 
long devoutly wished by all who prize variety over monotony in the Bryn Mawr 
student today. If we are right in our judgment, the Class of 1933 should somewhat 
earlier than usual put away childish things academically and demand for the work 
the flavor of real scholarship. They should take from us the possibility of vacant 
rooms through scholarship exclusion and they should press us hard in two years' time 
to increase the honors work in all the departments. As I said in speaking at Commence- 
ment in June, I believe the next task before Bryn Mawr is to provide a curriculum 
which should be the equivalent in length, breadth, and height of any curriculum of 
the past but should be somewhat more elastic as it relates to the individual, and it is 
surely an excellent time to begin the combined thinking which must precede such 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 5 

an experiment when a hundred and twenty interesting individuals have come to the 
campus. To co-operate genuinely in any such change or indeed in any important 
college matter it is necessary that the various interested classes — faculty, students, 
alumnae — should act as it were in the same plane. They should use the same coinage. 
And this mutual coinage should include not only curriculum jargon, "course," "credit," 
"pre-requisite," but also fundamental agreements as to the use of intellectual training, 
the limitations of the term research, the contribution of present-day psychology and 
so on. Differ as we may on any of these, we must agree enough to argue profitably — 
not merely as has often happened in the past throw down successively each other's 
straw man. Faculties I believe often need to revamp decidedly their own general ideas; 
each strains past the last milestone of knowledge on his own road, but the sum of a 
dozen such progresses of individuals in Chemistry or Spanish or Philosophy or whatnot 
does not appear as an equally progressive whole, nor does the specialist reach there 
by a general viewpoint. Students on the other hand need to learn more of the duller 
intellectual virtues — persistence, patience and grubbing. They are all for escalators 
and miracles. "The harvest is past, the summer is ended and we are not saved," they 
. cry each autumn. They complain again that all races set them are obstacle races, 
and can't bear to believe that the hurdle is part of the pleasure of the course — it is 
something, rather, shoved into the curriculum by aged mischief makers. As for Presi- 
dents, they need Sabbaticals, camels, pyramids, Girgenti temples in April grass, high 
Alpine walks, to clear their heads and restore them from the melancholy madness 
into which the non-intellectual life of a central office makes them fall. I am setting 
about to cure my faults and when I come back I shall expect to see the dust and the 
tumult of progress. For one of the unexpected by-products of the increased advanced 
work has been a recognition by the faculty and the students working in those courses 
each of the other's "language," of the truth of his contentions, of his handicaps and 
assets. I have noticed this again and again in conversation, and it will, I am con- 
vinced, begin to pervade separate faculty and student discussions. And joint confer- 
ences which take place in future will be increasingly fruitful if without wasting time 
we understand one another. We are after all, all intellectual beings and anxious alike 
to have the good prevail. 

Our mid-summer gifts have been well directed. With a somewhat reckless hand 
Dean Manning and I arranged last year for an increase in the honors work in Latin 
completely without the support of any funds. An anonymous gift of $1,000 from an 
alumna for use in honors work this year seems to justify our plunge. Another 
anonymous gift of $1,000 from an alumna to the President's Fund helps the honors 
work of several other departments. A third anonymous gift of $1,000 from an alumna 
is at the moment at work replacing the bath-tubs in Pembroke West and building 
in, at Christmas time if possible and if not, next summer, three shower baths on each 
floor. I trust that this wide range in use of these anonymous thousands may tempt 
some one of you to add still others which I promise will be as judiciously and as 
immediately spent. A larger anonymous gift, and from an alumna, which will be veil' 
particularly appreciated by both undergraduates and graduates makes possible in 
accordance with the plan for increasing the faculty salaries of which I have many times 
spoken, a grant of $1,000 a year to Professor Donnelly, head of the Department of 
English. The grant further is to be called the Lucy Martin Donnelly grant and will 
be continued until 1935. After that I trust that it will turn into a Lucy Martin 



6 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

Donnelly Professorship of English in honor of a member of the faculty who from my 
own undergraduate days to the present has trained every generation in distinction of 
taste and stirred in each delight in scholarship. Three bequests have been made to the 
college which interest me specially because each comes from a giver whose interest 
we had not guessed. Mrs. Eva Ramsey Hunt has bequeathed to the college $16,000 
for the establishment of two scholarships" in memory of her daughter, Evelyn Hunt, 
a graduate of the college in 1898, who died thirteen years ago. Mary E. Trueman, 
of the class of 1905, after making two bequests of five thousand dollars each to two 
religious institutions, divided the residue of her twenty-one-thousand-dollar estate into 
five parts and left two parts to her church and three parts to Bryn Mawr College for 
the Department of English or History. Miss Jennie E. Ireson, the aunt of Lilley 
Ireson (Mrs. John Coleman Pickard), of the class of 1922, of Boston, has left to 
Bryn Mawr and to Vassar $5,000 each to endow a scholarship in her mother's 
memory, "in recognition," the will runs, "of the excellence of their standards." 

Such gifts are as heartening as if we could buy Wyndham with them or endow 
a professorship, for they represent just as fully the thought and the approbation of 
generous friends. 

This first day, sombre in its cold light over the gray stone and the vines beginning 
to turn rusty from their mid-summer green, is nevertheless of pleasant augury, for 
Miss Thomas comes back today from two full years or more of travelling and opens 
the Deanery for a long Bryn Mawr stay. Her working life spans the college from 
the first hazy plan in Dr. Taylor's mind to the leaf picked off the grass by the grounds- 
man this morning. We rejoice whenever she returns to receive the fruit of her hands 
and to let her own works praise her in the gates. 

And so at half-past nine this morning the forty-fifth year of Bryn Mawr College 
begins. Bonum annum, faustum, felicem ! 



SCHOOLS WHICH FOR THE FIRST TIME HAVE 
PREPARED ENTERING STUDENTS 

*t Batavia High School, Batavia, New York. 

t Cheltenham, Pa., High School. 

t Collingswood, New Jersey, High School. 

f Forest Park High School, Baltimore, Md. 
*t Great Neck, New York, High School. 
Miss Hockaday's School, Dallas, Texas. 

f Morgan Park High School, Chicago, Illinois. 
Randell Tutoring School, Denver, Colorado. 

f William Penn High School, York, Pennsylvania. 

t Haverford High School, South Ardmore, Pa. 



* Schools which have given final preparatory work. 
t Public schools. 



REGIONAL SCHOLARS 

Each year the list of Regional Scholars grows longer, and the achievements of 
the group continue to justify the interest shown in them. This autumn the College 
has enrolled thirty-three undergraduates whose presence there is due in large part 
to the efforts of the various Regional Scholarships Committees in their behalf. 

The New England committee, as usual, leads the way with nine Scholars to its 
credit. These include Dorothea Cross, 1930; Celia Darlington, 1931; Alice Rider, 
1932, and six in the class of 1933. Of these Freshmen Scholars, the first one, Alice 
Brues, is the youngest girl in her class — just sixteen — and she enters with an average 
of 87.73, the second highest of all the Freshmen, and is the holder of the Matricula- 
tion Scholarship for New England. She and two of the others, Rosamond Robert 
and Felicitas de Varon, were prepared by the Girls' Latin School in Boston. The 
other Scholars from this Region are Susan Torrance, of Norwalk, Connecticut, pre- 
pared by Dana Hall; Harriet Flagg, of Bangor, Maine, prepared by the Bangor 
High School and the Baldwin School, and Tirzah Clarke, sent by the Cambridge- 
Haskell School. 

New York has no Freshmen Scholars, but is still responsible for Phyllis Wiegand, 
1930; Margaret Nuckols, 1931, and Dorothea Perkins, 1932. New Jersey's Scholar, 
Yvonne Cameron, is a Sophomore. 

The Eastern Pennsylvania and Delaware Committee is sending as its new 
Scholar, Gertrude Longacre, prepared by the Irwin School. Two Juniors, Frances 
Tatnall and Angelyn Burrows; and Elizabeth Barker, Sophomore, are still under 
the wing of this committee. 

The Western Pennsylvania Committee is sending two Freshmen. One of these, 
Eleanor Yeakel, comes as a special Scholar; and the other, Eleanor Chalfant, daughter 
of Minnie List, 1907, is the regular Regional Scholar from that district. Both were 
prepared by the Peabody High School of Pittsburgh. 

The Baltimore Committee has a new Freshman Scholar, Eva Levin, daughter of 
Bertha Szold, 1895; prepared by the Forest Park High School. The Washington 
Committee continues its interest in Elinor Totten, now a Junior, and, with the Rich- 
mond Committee, has raised a special scholarship for Ella Rutledge, 1932, of Charles- 
ton, South Carolina. 

District IV. is sending two Freshmen Scholars, Jeannette Le Saulnier, prepared 
by the Indianapolis High School, and Elizabeth Sixt, prepared by the Cleveland High 
School. This Committee is also continuing to help its Scholar, Katharine Sixt, and 
has added to its list Marianna Jenkins, both of whom are spending their Junior year 
in France. 

The Chicago Committee has four Scholars, Margaret Bradley and Hester 
Thomas, of the class of 1932, and two Freshmen, Cecilia Candee, prepared by the 
Evanston High School, and Caroline Lloyd-Jones, daughter of Caroline Schock, 1908, 
prepared by high schools in Washington, D. C, and Madison, Wisconsin. 

District VI. has two Scholars, both Sophomores, Anne Burnett, the regular 
Regional Scholar; and Melody Byerley, holder of the Emily Westwood Lewis 
Memorial Scholarship. 

(7) 



8 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

The Scholarships Committees of Northern and Southern California have united 
in sending the first Regional Scholar from District VII., Louise Balmer, daughter of 
Louise Congdon, 1908, prepared by the Bishop's School, La Jolla. 

It is interesting to note that the average age of the fifteen new Scholars is slightly 
under eighteen years, while the average for the entire entering class is eighteen years 
and one month. Ten of the fifteen were prepared by public schools entirely, and 
one more received part of her preparation at a public high school. This record is a 
distinct indication that some of the ideas of the founders of the Regional Scholars are 
bearing fruit, and that this group will do much to add to the variety of the student 
body drawn so largely from the private schools of the country. 



CHANGES IN THE FACULTY 1929-30 

An unusually large number of members of the faculty are on leave of absence 
this year. In the Department of English Dr. Chew is absent and his work has been 
taken over by Miss Garvin. Dr. Leuba is on leave and his son Clarence, the newly 
appointed Lecturer in Psychology, is substituting for him. Miss Lattimore, a new 
Lecturer in Social Economy, is carrying Miss Kingsbury's work in the latter's absence. 
Doctor and Mrs. Smith are abroad and Julian Smith Duncan is the newly appointed 
Lecturer in Economics who is acting as substitute for Mrs. Smith. Mr. Duell, Asso- 
ciate Professor of Archaeology, has been awarded a Guggenheim Foundation Fellow- 
ship "to study Etruscan painting of the Fifth Century B. C. at Tarquinia and to make 
archaeologically accurate copies in color of the wall paintings in the best preserved 
tombs of this period." Charles Morgan has been appointed Lecturer in Archaeology 
to substitute for him. The following appointments have also been made: Robert 
Elson Turner, from the University of Pennsylvania, Associate in French; Dr. Ralph 
Stewart, of Johns Hopkins University, Associate in Geology; Dr. Enid Glen, of 
Loughborough College (University of Nottingham, England), Associate in English; 
Dr. Camillo P. Merlino, from the University of California, Associate in Italian, and 
Miss Madeleine Soubeiran, who since 1927 has been teaching at the Lycee de Jeunes 
Filles at Aix-en-Provence, France, Associate in French. 

Dr. Crenshaw, Dr. Wright and Dr. Ballou have returned from leave of absence 
and are taking up their work again. 

The following promotions on the Faculty have been made: Dr. Grace de Laguna 
has been promoted from Associate Professor to Professor of Philosophy; Dr. Joseph 
E. Gillet from Associate Professor to Professor of Spanish; Dr. Marland Billings 
from Associate to Associate Professor of Geology; Dr. Mary Summerfield Gardiner 
has been promoted from Instructor to Associate in Biology; Dr. Marguerite Lehr 
from Instructor to Associate in Mathematics; Dr. Dorothea Egleston Smith from 
Lecturer to Associate in Biology; and Mr. Ernest Willoughby from Instructor to 
Associate in Music. 

The greatest change is the appointment of Eunice Morgan Schenk as Dean of 
the Graduate School. She is, however, still head of the French Department. 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE AND FORMER STUDENTS 
WHO HAVE DAUGHTERS IN THE CLASS OF 1933 

Daughter s Name Mother s Name Class 

Louise Congdon Balmer Louise Congdon 1908 

Janet Barton Barber Lucy Lombardi 1904 

Sylvia Church Bowditch Sylvia C. Scudder 1899 

Emmeline Margaret Carson Agnes Gillinder 1904 

Eleanor Murdoch Chalfant Minnie Kendrick List 1907 

Elizabeth Stuart Edwards Caro F. Buxton 1901 

Louise Jackson Esterly Elizabeth Norcross 1897 

Mary Elizabeth Grant Kittie L. Stone 1906 

Elizabeth Bethune Jackson Elizabeth Bethune Higginson 1897 

Barbara Korff Alletta L. Van Reypen 1900 

Eva Leah Levin Bertha Szold 1 895 

Caroline Lloyd-Jones Caroline Franck Schock 1908 

Ruth Bowman Lyman Ruth B. Whitney 1903 

Ellen Shepard Nichols Marjorie Newton Wallace 1908 

Evelyn Waring Remington Georgiana Mabry Parks 1905 



NON-RESIDENCY 

(Reprinted from The College News) 

Fifteen non-resident Freshmen enter college this year. An ample opportunity to 
examine the non-residents in a body is at last given, and we may now begin to realize 
the relationship of the student who lives away from the campus, to the students who live 
in the halls and are drawn closely together by interests centered wholly upon college. 
Perhaps now we can discover just how necessary are the contacts with what may 
sometimes be considered the more trivial side of college — the halls. 

In a way, the slight separation between students in one hall and those in another 
gives an inkling of the wide separation between the non-resident student and hall 
activity. It is partly because of laziness on our account that the halls are not more 
closely linked, but at least, we may mingle our interests before ten-thirty P. M. Mag- 
nify many times the strong negative effect that the distance across campus seems to 
have upon our physical and mental state, and an idea of the state of the non-resident 
student is obtained. 

Those fifteen Freshmen will virtually set non-residency to test ; through them we 
may come to see that the hall is not necessarily so intrinsic a part of college life as we 
permit it to be. 



(9) 



"THE FIRST YEAR" 

The Alumnae Committee of Seven Colleges wishes to report to the alumnae 
of the seven colleges an outline of the work it has done during its first year. It is 
impossible to go into the thousand and one minor actions that have preceded each 
major action, so that only results usually regarded as tangible will be listed, though 
the Committee wishes to emphasize its opinion that often the intangible result is the 
most worthwhile in the long run. However, the intangible furnishes nothing to make 
a report upon, and the tangible does. At least one of the magazine articles here an- 
nounced has come about from the spontaneous interest of editors on learning that this 
Committee was established to furnish information on the eastern colleges for women. 

Century Magazine will publish in the fall an article by Dean Gildersleeve, of 
Barnard College, on the foreign student in the women's colleges. Miss Gildersleeve 
was president of the International Federation of University Women from 1924 to 
1926, and is a member of the council of the Federation. 

Good Housekeeping Magazine will publish in an early autumn number a major 
feature article interpreting the seven colleges. It will be written by Miss Ida M. 
Tarbell, who has visited each of the colleges this spring to gather material and im- 
pressions. 

Between the months of October and April, Pictorial Review will publish seven 
articles, each a "thumb-nail sketch" of one of the colleges. They are being written 
by Miss Jeannette Eaton, a Vassar graduate who is a contributor to many periodicals 
and is author of a biography of Madame Roland, titled "A Daughter of the Seine," 
which has just been accepted by the Junior Literary Guild as their book of the month 
for July. 

The college woman from every type of educational institution in her relation 
to marriage will be discussed in a late summer number of the new Smart Set. The 
article has been written by D. E. Wheeler, former editor of McClures. 

The North American Review will publish an article by Mrs. Eunice Fuller 
Barnard, a Smith graduate and frequent contributor to the magazine of the New 
York Times, on the new ventures in the women's colleges. 

An interpretation of "The Seven Presidents at Home" has been written by 
Mrs. Rebecca Hooper Eastman, the Radcliffe member of the Committee, to appear 
in the Ladies' Home Journal. 

Arrangements are under way for our seven presidents to broadcast on a series of 
Thursday nights beginning the last week in September over WJZ, at the invitation 
of the National Broadcasting Company. College clubs will be definitely informed 
of the dates and subjects when the plan is complete so that a national hook-up will 
be made. 

On March 27th, the Committee entertained at the Cosmopolitan Club in New 
York the alumnae writers of the seven colleges living in New York. Mrs. Josephine 
Daskam Bacon, a Smith alumnae, made an appeal to those present, forty well-known 
article and fiction writers, to remember the colleges as a source of copy. Miss Gilder- 
sleeve presided and explained the appointment of the Committee by the President. 

On May 2nd, a Chicago group chosen by this Committee gave a dinner in honor 
of the seven presidents at the Palmer House. There were 750 guests present, and 
the affair is said to have been one of the most brilliant given in Chicago this past 

(10) 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 11 

season. The Presidents each spoke briefly, and Dr. George Vincent of the Rocke- 
feller Foundation, gave the chief address. As at the dinner given in Philadelphia on 
November 2nd, the purpose was to acquaint a new public with the achievements and 
needs of the seven colleges. 

A New York dinner is planned for the fall, and will be held on November 13th 
at the Hotel Astor. This will be in charge of a special committee selected by the 
Alumnae Committee; the members will be announced later. 

Previous announcement has been made of other articles and activities furthered 
by the Committee during the past year; the series of four articles in the New 
York Times magazine in May, 1928; "The Fourth R for Women" in the February, 
1929, Century, by President Comstock, of Radclifle; "Some Dangers of Coeduca- 
tion," by Rebecca Hooper Eastman, in the January, 1929, Woman's Journal; "The 
Women's Colleges Reply," by President Neilson, of Smith, in the January, 1929, 
Atlantic; "Is There a College Crisis?" by Rebecca Hooper Eastman, in the September, 
1928, issue of Charm; "In Pursuit of Immorality," by Rita Halle, in the March 
10th issue of the New York Herald-Tribune, in which Mrs. Halle, a Wellesley 
graduate, went back to the source of rumors of immorality in the colleges and found 
them groundless. A discussion by three of the deans of our colleges on the place of 
clothes in the college girl's scheme of things will be published by The Delineator. 
There have been a number of short newspaper articles also, and numberless conversa- 
tions with writers and editors, building, we hope, toward the future. 

Under the auspices of Charm magazine college teas have been given during 
the winter and spring, at two of which President Neilson and President MacCracken 
spoke, with their addresses broadcast over WOR. 

It is the plan of the Committee to announce to all the college clubs throughout 
the country the actual date of the above articles when they are definitely scheduled by 
the editors. Any alumnae or their friends who request it will also be individually 
put on this mailing list and will receive a post-card in advance of the appearance of 
the article. 

Frances Hand, 1897. 



In the Pictorial Review for October the first of the series of articles by Miss Eaton 
appeared — the one on Bryn Mawr. She came to Bryn Mawr for forty-eight hours, 
explored the campus, met members of the faculty and of the student body, discussed 
all aspects of the intricate and close-knit life of the College, and then evaluated us in 
a very sympathetic article. Her delighted appreciation of Miss Park is perhaps the 
outstanding thing. "One cannot talk with her for five minutes without realizing both 
her force and her selfless imagination for others." Each department is discussed in 
some detail, extra-curriculum activities are put in a very just relation to academic 
interests, and the weight is thrown on the academic. Of the part that the Graduate 
School plays in the general college scheme, she says, "It is readily seen that when one- 
fifth of the college is working for higher degrees the accent on learning is greatly 
stressed." The article brings out, too, the essential quality of Bryn Mawr. Miss 
Eaton speaks of the beauty of the campus and then continues: "Here, if anywhere, 
can youth be imbued with the joys and rewards of the intellectual life." For both the 
setting and the conception she pays her tribute to "the vision of its great leader, 
Miss M. Carey Thomas." 



THE LINGUISTIC INSTITUTE 

A summer school where not infrequently the professors are also pupils, and in 
which, of thirty-seven registrants for courses or research, eighteen already hold the 
Ph.D. degree, has just had its second session at New Haven. A school where the 
ideal of a university as a place for the common pursuit of knowledge by teachers and 
students alike is so nearly realized that a professor of Greek, a member of the 
Faculty, takes a course in Old French Phonology with a colleague, and a professor 
of comparative philology, himself a teacher of Avestan, embraces the opportunity 
to attend his colleague's Introduction to the Avestan Language and Literature and 
see how another scholar presents the subject; where the atmosphere is vibrant at all 
times with the keenest interest in the study of languages of all kinds and periods 
from Hittite and Old Norse to Modern Chinese and Tagalog — such is the summer 
session of the Linguistic Institute. 

The Institute is a project of the Linguistic Society of America, which was 
founded in December, 1924, for the advancement of the scientific study of language 
in all its aspects. "Toward this end," to quote from a bulletin of the Society, "it 
has held annual meetings for personal contacts and the reading of papers; it has estab- 
lished new media of publication for the fruits of linguistic research; it is constantly 
co-operating with other agencies interested in linguistic study." In the midst of a 
scientific age the study of the science of language has in this country been somewhat 
neglected. It was to remedy this situation and encourage research and study in 
linguistic science that the Linguistic Society of America was organized by a group 
of scholars who were especially interested in this important field of knowledge, and 
that the Society in turn founded the Linguistic Institute. Of particular interest to 
Bryn Mawr alumnae is the fact that the first president of the Linguistic Society 
of America was Hermann Collitz, a former member of the faculty of Bryn Mawr 
College. 

The intention of the Institute is to provide for students of linguistic science 
facilities similar to those afforded biologists at Woods Hole. To the linguist "words 
are things" (as Byron tells us) and take the place of the fishes and other marine 
animals which nature supplies so abundantly at the Massachusetts resort. Accordingly 
the generosity of Yale University in placing at the disposal of the members of the 
Institute its library, as well as dormitories and classrooms, has given the project a 
pou sto. Financial support for the novel enterprise has been secured from the same 
university and also from the Carnegie Corporation at the instance of the American 
Council of Learned Societies. 

Among the distinctive characteristics of the Institute are the wide variety and 
unusual excellence of the courses — embracing some twenty languages — made possible 
by the presence of a strong faculty, drawn this year from fifteen different colleges and 
universities; the atmosphere of scholarship and disinterested enthusiasm and, if I may 
paraphrase Spinoza, of the intellectual love of languages; the free interplay of ideas 
among keen intelligences and kindred minds, especially at the vigorous discussions 
which followed the public lectures, on topics connected with linguistic science, held on 
Tuesday and Friday evenings throughout the session ; and the exceptional opportunity 

(12) 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 13 

for advanced students to pursue certain courses in languages rarely given in any 
American university at any time. 

Perhaps an apergu of the unique nature of the Institute can best be afforded by 
mention of the most popular courses in the present session. These were — if we except 
certain courses in phonetics and in speech articulation, of especial interest to teachers 
of the deaf — Sanskrit, Psychology of Language, Historical Syntax of the German 
Language, and Introduction to Linguistic Science. The last-mentioned course, by the 
way, was given by Professor Prokosch, one of the "Bryn Mavvr men," of whom, as 
President Emeritus Thomas has said, Bryn Mawr is justly proud. Due credit is 
given by the graduate schools of American universities and colleges for work done 
in any of the courses of the Linguistic Institute toward the M.A. or the Ph.D. 
degree, and it is greatly to be hoped that a larger number of students, perhaps some 
of them from the graduate school of Bryn Mawr, may avail themselves of this 
unparalleled opportunity to receive instruction in so stimulating an environment from 
eminent scholars in linguistics. 

For one who like the ancient Athenians loves either to tell or to hear some new 
thing, one of the most delightful features of the Institute is the sense of being in 
touch with the very latest discoveries of linguistic science, whether of the very old or 
the very new. So for example there was no small thrill in being permitted at an 
open meeting of the class in Philological Phonetics to look down the throat of the 
inventor himself of the "fonolaryngoskop" (the newest device for studying the 
organs of articulation) and see the vocal cords themselves vibrate as the professor 
articulated the vowels from a to u. On the other hand, my own personal interests led 
me to delve among ancient Egyptian papyri in an effort to gain new evidence on the 
Homeric text tradition, and, above all, to make the acquaintance of one of the oldest 
and most prized of Yale's possessions — the Yale Hittite Tablet. 

This ancient brick, which is undoubtedly older than three thousand years by 
several centuries, is covered with clearly incised cuneiform characters. The language, 
however, is not Semitic, but Hittite, which was till lately undecipherable, but has 
recently been discovered to be one of the Indo-European languages, or at the least, 
of Indo-European affinities. My own researches in the Latin passive had brought 
me into contact with Hittite, and it was in order to deepen my acquaintance with the 
language, now so important to the Indo-Europeanist, that I studied cuneiform writing 
and Hittite at the Institute this summer. 

"The words of Anniwiyani, mother of Armati, the bird-maker" ... so 
begins the ancient ritual tablet. Across the millennia the words of this antique 
Hittite dame came to me, as I sat beneath one of the venerable elms of the historic 
Yale yard, and were alive again ! The bright sunshine slanted across the green 
grass. Theodore Dwight Woolsey, Professor of Greek and President of Yale Col- 
lege, looked benignly down from his high pedestal. "Words, words, words," cried 
Hamlet. Can there be anything more wonderful than words ? 

Edith Frances Claflin, Ph.D., 1906. 



SYRIA 

By Kate Chambers Seelye, '11 

(Reprinted from the Christian Herald) 

This is the season of social calls in Beirut. In' the United States they say the 
custom has practically died out, but here we practice it in full force and from Novem- 
ber to May ladies of all nationalities and faiths may be seen "doing their rounds." 
There are those just come from America, who are rather scornful of the rest of us. 
When they see us consulting our printed lists of "days at home," they laugh, but as a 
matter of fact, they don't know what they miss! Ours is not the custom of merely 
leaving cards at the door. We like to see our friends, and every one has her "day." 

One thing hard for the occidental to understand is that a constant buzz of con- 
versation is not essential to social comfort. A group of oriental friends may sit silent 
for some time with no feeling of embarrassment whatever, punctuating the silence now 
and then with that delightful Arabic phrase of welcome, "ahlan wa sahlan" (the 
translation is difficult, perhaps best "You are welcome to our home!") and receiving 
its reply "bil mitahal" ("The newcomer is welcome!") On the other hand, we occi- 
dentals, the moment there is a pause, feel we must fill the breach with chatter. 

Home from an afternoon of such calls one brings all sorts of interesting experi- 
ences. The other day I was calling on a Greek friend. She is remarkably clever at 
adapting her Greek embroideries into table covers and cushion covers, so that a caller's 
eye is constantly wandering from one bit of rich embroidery to another. As we sat 
there drinking tea she told me of the engagement ceremony that had taken place in 
her house that week. Her maid was an Armenian orphan, without a relative in the 
world. There was an Armenian man of good family who, in spite of holding a 
steady secretarial position, could not win a wife in his own group on account of his 
wooden leg! His friends had suggested this orphan, thinking she might overlook the 
missing limb. For her it was an excellent "catch," in spite of the wooden leg, and her 
mistress was so pleased that she offered her house for the engagement ceremony. A 
few days later I met my Greek friend in our cactus lane, and she told me that the 
wooden leg had proved too much for the girl. In spite of all protests she had .broken 
the engagement. 

Another day I was calling on one of our leading educationalists, principal of a 
girl's school, who told me how a very poor Moslem woman came asking to enroll her 
child. The teacher realized that the tuition would be high for such a woman and 
suggested another school, less expensive. But the mother was firm. "We have saved 
some money, here it is," she said producing it, and continued, "You see, our neigh- 
bors' children come to your school, and they have such good manners, we decided 
that our child should go to no school but yours." The money was enough for one 
term, and my friend had not the heart to refuse such faith and eagerness. At the 
end of the term, the child was doing so well that one of the Moslem women's clubs 
was persuaded to raise the tuition for the rest of the year. 

As we are a polyglot country, a hostess must often use three or four languages 
in an afternoon, and think nothing of slipping back and forth from one tongue to 
another. Arabic, French, English, Turkish and Armenian are the languages one meets 
most often. To the American brought up in a land of one language this is tantalizing; 
and it fills the newcomer with the envious wish that she knew at least one other lan- 
guage than her own. . 

(14) 



REDACTED: p. 14 



The following material has been removed 
from this volume: Vol. 9, no. 8, p. 14: 

Syria by Kate Chambers Seeyle, BMC Class 
of 1911, reprinted from the Christian 
Herald. 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 15 

It is interesting to see how steadily the number of unveiled Moslems and Druses 
is increasing. As I watch them with eager interest I remember a conversation when I 
returned to the Near East nine years ago. A Moslem student at the American Uni- 
versity had put me in touch with one of the more progressive men in his community, 
a man who had been mayor of the city for some time. The latter had invited me to 
visit a club for Moslem girls in which he was interested. During our conversation I 
naturally brought up the subject of the veil, claiming that very little could be done 
for the progress of the Moslem women till the men helped them to do away with the 
veil. My host, knowing that the girls understood French, was rather worried over my 
sowing such radical seed in their minds, and hastened to assure me that, although 
the veil should and would disappear in time, the change must come very slowly. There 
were far too many conservatives opposing such a step to make haste possible or desir- 
able. "It will take about twelve years," he told me. On that day this seemed a 
terribly long time to wait, and I groaned inwardly. It is nine years today since then, 
and I heard some one remark recently that in another two or three years he thought 
the veil would be a thing of the past. My friend apparently knew whereof he 
. prophesied. 

Turkey is moving fast. A government order did away with the veil; a govern- 
ment order did away with the fez ; and now a government order has done away with 
the old Arabic alphabet. Some ignorantly say that this move may weaken the position 
of the Arabic alphabet in Syria . . . forgetting that when the Turks came to the 
Near East, they had no alphabet of their own, and consequently adopted the Arabic 
letters. They are merely changing garments, neither of which was woven on their 
own loom of culture. In the case of the Arabic language, their alphabet is their own, 
an integral part of their history and civilization. 



REID HALL 

THE AMERICAN UNIVERSITY WOMEN'S PARIS CENTER 

One of the sights of Paris which is becoming better known to American univer- 
sity travelers and more frequently visited by them is Reid Hall, the American Uni- 
versity Women's Paris Center. The Club occupies an old picturesque sixteenth 
century house in the Rue de Chevreuse, and boasts one of the loveliest gardens in the 
Latin Quarter. The house was built by the Due de Chevreuse for his hunting box, 
and was a part of the extensive Luxembourg Park. The secret underground passage- 
way from the Club courtyard to the Luxembourg Palace still exists. The property 
passed through many hands, and was finally acquired by Mrs. Whitelaw Reid for 
her American Girls' Club. During the war Mrs. Reid turned the buildings into a 
hospital for American officers, and later it became the headquarters of the American 
Red Cross. 

In June, 1922, Mrs. Reid loaned the property for a period of five years to Miss 
Gildersleeve and a group of university women to establish a center for American 
university students in Paris. The Club flourished during these years to such an extent 
that at the end of the period Mrs. Reid very generously turned the property over to 
the Board of Directors of the Club. The name of the Club was changed to Reid 
Hall, in appreciation of Mrs. Reid's gift and of the services of Mr. Whitelaw Reid 
when he was American Minister to France, 



16 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

The purpose of the Center is to provide a residence for American university 
women who are in Paris attending classes at the Sorbonne, the College de France and 
other academic institutions of high standing, and to bring them in touch with French 
life and thought and with university men and women of other nations. 

University women traveling in Europe will be welcomed as transients during the 
summer months and the winter and spring vacations. 

Reid Hall is one of the headquarters of the International Federation of Univer- 
sity Women and a center for university women of all nations. During the academic 
season there are in residence at least five French university students who conduct the 
French tables. French is the language of the House, and French customs are followed 
wherever possible so that students may live in the atmosphere of their adopted country 
and yet keep their American comforts. There are also students of other nationalities 
in residence, and the warm and lasting friendships which develop must help inter- 
national relations. 

During the academic season the Center arranges a program of dinners and teas 
so that the members may meet university men and women of other nations. The Club 
is "at home" the first and third Wednesday of every month, when members may 
entertain guests or meet an invited guest of honor. Every month the Club gives two 
special dinners with distinguished international speakers. I remember particularly a 
dinner when Andre Siegfried gave an interesting resume of his book on America, and 
afterwards discussed informally with the students all the points which were questions 
in their minds. I remember, too, the delightful occasion when John Erskine spoke, 
when the Hall could not possibly hold all Paris who wished to come. Then there 
was the charming dinner when Abbe Dimnet outlined his "Art of Thinking," and 
another when Marcel Bouteron, the librarian of the Institut de France, spoke on 
Balzac and brought all the Balzac treasures from the library of the Institut to show 
our students. There have been countless other dinners of interest when Frenchmen 
and Englishmen addressed the students — Andre Maurois, Alfred Zimmern, Sisley 
Huddleston, etc., etc. In addition to these more formal occasions, small dinners are 
arranged for students who wish to meet foreign professors or students in their own 
field of work. 

The Club also maintains a Bureau of Information which introduces our American 
students to individuals or organizations in Paris interested in a particular study. The 
Bureau also gives information in regard to excursions for the holidays and week-ends, 
addresses of language teachers and French families, shopping and positions in France. 

We receive a great many demands from college graduates in America for situa- 
tions in Paris, but there are practically no openings for American women. In the 
schools English women are preferred, and in business houses and banks, French and 
English girls can afford to work for much smaller salaries. 

Reid Hall is well equipped to take care of the various needs of the students. 
There is a well-stocked library with English and French books, a large hall for con- 
certs and dances, three attractive salons, a sun porch, dining rooms and a delightful 
garden. The Club is well known for its delicious table, and the chef with his tall 
white cap and spotless apron lends more than atmosphere to the cheerful home. There 
are accommodations for sixty students, and six studios for art students. 

Dorothy F. Leet, 

Director, Reid Hall, 



CLASS NOTES 



1892 
Class Editor: Edith Wetiierill Ives 
(Mrs. Frederick M. Ives) 
145 E. 35th St., New York City. 

After welcoming a new grandson in 
July, Helen Clements Kirk went abroad 
with her husband and youngest daughter 
for a short trip. 

Edith Hall expects to spend the winter 
with her mother and sister at Bryn Mawr 
Court, Bryn Mawr. 

Elizabeth Winsor Pearson and her hus- 
band spent the early part of the summer 
in a club cottage at Staten Island to be 
within reach of their eldest son who is in 
a law firm in New York. On their way 
home they stopped over with Edith 
Wetherill Ives and her husband at their 
farm near Brewster, N. Y. 

Bessie Stephens Montgomery has five 
grandchildren, the children of her son and 
daughter. Last summer she and her hus- 
band took an extensive motor trip through 
France. Last winter they spent, as usual, 
in Florida and this summer they expect to 
be in their cottage at Buck Hill Falls, Pa. 

Jane and Mary Mason have twin great- 
nieces, one of whom is named Mary Jane. 

1895 



Marianna Janney, '95 

Her class in college wishes to add a 
word to the regret of the whole Bryn 
Mawr community for its loss of Marianna 
Janney, who died in her house on Elliott 
Avenue on Saturday, October 12th, after 
an illness of a few weeks. She felt al- 
ways much loving gratitude for the Bryn 
Mawr College of our youth and early ef- 
forts, and kept a rare warmth of fellow- 
feeling for her class. She was generous 
always in contributing to any of our class 
undertakings, giving not only money, but 
also her influence and enthusiasm. For 
twenty years she had so directed the Eng- 
lish department of Miss Wright's School 
at Bryn Mawr that she had had a marked 
effect on the teaching of English in pre- 
paratory schools. She was an innovator, 
too, in the use of dramatics by her depart- 
ment. Into young, developing life, her in- 
sight was rarely fine. The class of '95 
commemorates lovingly a member of 
whom it is justly so proud. 



1901 
Class Editor: Jane Righter 

Dublin Road, Greenwich, Conn. 

Ethel Buckley and her husband motored 
to Pecketts on Sugar Hill in New Hamp- 
shire, where they spent the summer en- 
joying the interesting walks and motor 
trips through the White Mountains. 

May Southgate Brewster — "My oldest 
son graduated from Harvard two years 
ago. He is now flying and wants no other 
pursuit in life. The second boy graduated 
from West Virginia University this year. 
He was a valuable member of the football 
team, and how he hated to leave it. Bay- 
lies, the youngest, is a Junior at Vassar 
and carried the daisy chain — or helped to 
— at commencement. I always search 
eagerly and in vain in the Alumnae Bul- 
letin for news of our contemporaries. Do 
all of our class mates share my reluctance 
to furnish publicity items about them- 
selves? I do hope to be at Bryn Mawr 
next June." 

Emily Cross, on July 1st — "I am just off 
for Europe, but will be home about Sep- 
tember 1st and am looking forward to the 
reunion next year." 

Genie Fowler Henry wrote from Mus- 
koka, Canada, that she was spending sev- 
eral delightful weeks there with friends. 
Her latest college activity had been enter- 
taining the Pittsburgh Bryn Mawr Club 
at a picnic luncheon. She adds "1901 is 
surely non-communicative about its activi- 
ties and I feel very much out of touch 
with my classmates, so will especially wel- 
come a reunion next year." 

May Brayton Marvell judged the roses 
in the Newport Flower Show last sum- 
mer. She sent me a picture of her garden 
clipped from a newspaper which I regret 
cannot go into the class notes. The fol- 
lowing is the description below the pic- 
ture : "This interesting old-fashioned gar- 
den leads up to the stone house which may 
be seen behind the tree at the back of the 
picture. It is on the estate of Mr. and 
Mrs. Edward I. Marvell in Tiverton and 
was built as a cook house early in the 18th 
century. The wall which surrounds the 
garden was also built then to keep the 
cattle out of the garden. The wide fire- 
place and the old cooking utensils may 
still be seen in the house and the fine old 
wall makes an ideal enclosure for the 
flowers, most of which are annuals, the 
sorts which bloomed in the gardens of 



(V) 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



long ago. Hollyhocks, snapdragons, soft 
pink mallows, fragrant stocks, lilies, all 
blend together, a lovely combination of 
pink, lavender and bine." 

Lucia Holliday Macbeth — "I have taken 
the presidency of our small and scattered 
Bryn Mawr Club in Los Angeles. I am 
expecting to go east next spring and am 
counting on seeing all of 1901 at the re- 
union." 

Caroline Daniels Moore wrote from the 
Horseshoe Ranch, Dayton, Wyoming", on 
August 7th. "I know no news of 1901. I 
should be very pleased if any 1901ers 
motoring across Wyoming would look me 
up. I am here all of July and August and 
the early part of September. I am writ- 
ing to Ethel about the reunion." 

Jessie Pelton writes that she spent the 
summer in Watch Hill, R. I., and that she 
is expecting to come on for reunion. 

Mary Ayer Rousmaniere — "I flew with 
my daughters twice this summer from 
Paris to Frankfort and from Amsterdam 
to London. We had a fine trip through 
France, Holland, Belgium, England and 
Scotland. Polly is a sophomore at Vassar. 
Frances has just passed her preliminaries 
for Bryn Mawr. I am now Chairman of 
the Fifteenth District League of Women 
Voters." 

Marion Parris Smith spent her vacation 
in London, where she and her husband did 
research work in the British Museum. 
They enjoyed the "season" of theatres and 
opera and in August left for a cruise of 
the Greek islands. 

Louise Thomas wrote that she spent the 
summer in Nantucket. 



1902 
In Memoriam 

Helen Slocum (Nichols) Estabrook, 
ex 1902 

For one who knew her intimately, life 
may always appear a little differently 
moulded, if ever so slightly, by her un- 
conventionality, the quick eagerness of 
her spirit, her rare and spicy humor, by a 
variable whimsicality. Even as the sur- 
face of a meadow changes in an instant, 
bent, rippled and colored by the passing 
of the lightest summer air. 

In the great city, where in her young 
enthusiastic days as a volunteer social 
worker, she came to know so well the in- 
most secrets and conditions of the 
crowded, complex life of the tenements, 
we struggle still with those same eternal 
problems of human life and nature, which 
she faced with such high heart and humor 
twenty-five years ago. In those days her 



attitude was also somewhat in advance 
of the methods of her day: for it was al- 
ways the "human," what present-day 
workers call the psychological aspect of 
social service work, that appealed to her, 
and in dealing with which she showed 
remarkable insight and understanding. 
She did far more "visiting" than was re- 
quired of her. For, if the truth be known, 
the visits had their especial appeal to her, 
just as interesting" or enjoyable social ex- 
perience. These people whom she met in 
New York's slums were not to her "cases" 
but personalities; and they in turn looked 
upon her not as a visitor from the forbid- 
ding, if helpful Charity Organization So- 
ciety, but simply as a kind or entertaining 
friend. It is interesting to note that, these 
many years afterward, all large Charity 
Organizations have abolished regular 
"visiting," while the few visits that are 
essential, are paid on this social basis. 

Helen's stories of these visits were in- 
imitable. Pity they cannot all be known, 
for they would make a volume of the 
most entertaining reading. One of them 
may be briefly mentioned: 

She went, one day, to see a workman 
with a weakness for drink, who was giv- 
ing his family and the other visitors of 
the organization a good deal of trouble. 
He was known to be a good workman, 
but no one had been able to persuade him 
to stick to his job. In response to her 
urging him to make another trial, he re- 
plied, "But I am not working, just ask any 
of your other visitors, they know I won't 
work !" 

"Have you ever thought of fooling 
them?" and this argument seemed to ap- 
peal to him when nothing else would, and 
he did get a steady job. Several months 
later, when his "visitor" was walking 
through the middle of the street, in ac- 
cordance with her custom of choosing this 
as the safest place to walk in rough dis- 
tricts, a man called to her from the side- 
walk, "Don't you think I've fooled them 
long enough?" 

"I think I'd fool 'em anyway for a few 
days longer," she replied, remembering 
with her characteristic quickness that the 
next day would be St. Patrick's Day. 

Perhaps the most concrete way in which 
to recapture something of Helen's indi- 
vidual viewpoint is to read from her 
diaries, kept for years in the good old 
New England fashion, during the times of 
her extensive travels abroad. For during 
many summers, subsequent to her leaving 
college, it was her good fortune to travel 
pretty much all over the pre-war conti- 
nent. 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



19 



These travels took her to many unusual 
places, and into many entertaining en- 
counters : 

At Molde, Norway, in the summer of 
1903, she went aboard the German Em- 
peror's private yacht. "We went up at 
the stern, walked the length of it and 
down at the bow. A rope running from 
bow to stern divided the deck in half. We 
passed on one side of the rope and the 
Emperor was walking' up and down on 
the other, transacting business with the 
Admiral and saluting mechanically. We 
had been told we should not sec him so I 
could hardly believe my eyes when I saw 
some Germans courtesying to the ground. 
Just then he turned and I saw him not 
more than ten feet away. I suppose my 
courtesy stood out as not the proper 
court one, for I got an extra smile all to 
myself. . . . The Emperor has a much 
stronger and also a pleasanter look than 
in his photos. He is also older and shorter 
than I expected. His knees have that 
sprung look that goes with age. . . ." 

In France she visited as a friend some 
% of the oldest French country seats. At 
an ancient chateau in Chambery, which 
datgs back to the twelfth century, "It 
seemed very strange to go up the winding- 
stone stairway to a comfortable room with 
adjoining bath . . ." and later "lunch- 
eon was served to fourteen of us who sat 
around a big table. I sat on the marquis' 
left. . . . Everything w T as delicious and 
served on very impressive silver, while 
they kept their forks between courses. A 
little girl of fourteen had a tray placed in 
front of her with coffee and so forth. She 
started making it about the fish course. 
After lunch she walked all round the table 
and served everyone. Two other children 
followed, one with cream, one with sugar. 

"From our visits here to three house- 
holds, it seems to be the fashion to serve 
breakfasts on red table-cloths. A huge 
tureen of soup, boiled eggs, coffee, boiled 
milk, etc., are placed on the table. You 
all sit down at the same time and help 
each other." 

From her visit to the chateau she rode 
away on a quaint mail-coach. "A mail- 
box was fastened to its side and into this 
the peasants dropped their letters." 

In Turkey she and her father were 
guests in the house of Hadji Hassein, a 
business friend of her father. She visited 
the ladies of the household, the harem, 
frequently: "They received us most 
cordially and we all sat on chairs out of 
deference to me. The women wore Euro- 
pean dresses of no especial fashion but 
of beautiful materials. They had strings 
of coins about their necks, on their heads 



were little gold crowns, and from these 
came soft white veils that fell down be- 
hind. Their hair was cut like Buster 
Brown's on the sides and braided behind." 

The Turkey visited in 1906 was, we arc 
constantly reminded, the older Turkey, 
where women still went heavily veiled, 
where packs of half-wild "sacred" dogs 
ran the streets and where inhabitants and 
tourists alike were haunted by the fear of 
spies and bandits. But there was a certain 
spy who turned out to be very human, 
after all, and a delightful companion at 
tea-time ! 

The diary is not lacking in charming 
descriptions of nature and the historical 
interest of places, — but, after all, the most 
delightful descriptive bits are purest 
whimsy such as these : 

Brindisi was only "a very dirty place. 
No sooner got settled than I saw two fleas 
hopping about on my suit-case. On my 
way saw an ancient Corinthian column, 
so ancient of course that the guide-books 
tell different tales of its origin. We saw a 
little girl asleep on an ash-heap, and an 
electric light bulb over a medieval carved 
stone fountain at which women were fill- 
ing their water jugs. So much for the 
town Horace sung odes about and Virgil 
died in. . . ." 

Again, "Between eight and nine we 
rounded the North Cape. It is a horrid 
place if the rest of it is like the bottom 
fringe I saw ! The ship pitched so I could 
hardly keep my feet. The Captain said it 
was neither safe to land anyone nor to 
stay near it. . . . But we waited long 
enough for two men to come out in a row- 
boat and take our mail. The advantage of 
this is that it is stamped North Cape. It 
reaches its destination some time later 
than if kept on the steamer !" 

On her last foreign trip in the summer 
of 1927, Helen Estabrook was the gay 
companion and fellow-adventurer of her 
three children. Arrived, with a sigh of 
relief in Paris, where she rejoiced to find 
that all four of them could ride in a taxi- 
cab for the same price as the subway, she 
suddenly discovered that, boylike, her son 
yearned for the underground. Quickly 
sensing the youthful viewpoint, she turned 
to her own calls and interests in the city, 
and encouraged the children to sight-see 
for themselves. So while the eldest of 
fifteen went on a tour of the battle-fields, 
the younger children complacently sur- 
veyed Paris together from the top of the 
Eifel Tower. 

Of course the main object of the trip 
was that the children should learn French. 
But instead of searching for teachers, a 
nice French boy was engaged as com- 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



panion. It was also arranged that her son 
should go on a camping trip with a group 
of French Boy Scouts and a Catholic 
priest. Spending a night at the Convent 
of Tamie, the boys were given a place to 
sleep in the barn, next the pigs, who, by 
the way, snored most disturbingly all 
night ! But at the same convent Jim had 
his first experience of hearing the monks 
chant the Gregorian chant in Latin, — and 
"it all turned out to be most interesting." 

From these latter-day adventures I look 
back twenty years or so, to those summers 
in the Adirondack woods, when classmates 
of 1902 were her companions of camp 
and trail and mountain-top. I remember 
her as an energetic climber, always, — pos- 
sibly a little impatient of the trail, — eager 
for the summits. Of one of our expedi- 
tions she has written: 

"The trail was quite blind at first . . . 
then level for some time and went through 
tall grass, around the south side of tiny 
'Lake Clear o' the Clouds/ lying between 
the peak of Marcy and Skylight ... A 
cloud came across the sun just 
then . . ." 

With her characteristic eagerness, she 
seems still a few quick steps ahead of us, 
— seeing, adventuring, on the upward 
trail ! 

1904 

Class Editor: Emma O. Thompson 
340 S. 42nd St., Philadelphia. 
When I returned from Europe I found 
a letter from Katherine Pierce dated July 
6th. You see my mail was held for me 
since I traveled so unscheduled and freely 
that I feared it would be lost. Katherine 
says, "It may interest the class to know 
that my eldest son, William Curtis Pierce, 
was married at Saint George's Church, 
New York, June 19th, to Elizabeth Neall 
Jay, Barnard 1929. Eleanor Silkman Gil- 
man represented 1904 at the wedding ac- 
companied by her daughter. Curtis is at 
the Harvard Law School." Katherine also 
says that Harriet Southerland Wright was 
in the States with her family for a short 
visit this summer. 

Nineteen four seems to have spent its 
summer upon the ocean. Alice Boring 
sailed August 10th from Seattle for China. 
She has returned to her professorship at 
Yenching University, Peking. Leslie Clark 
also crossed the Pacific, sailing from 
Seattle July 26th on a ship of the Dollar 
Line. She plans to be away until Septem- 
ber, 1930, visiting friends in the Orient 
and traveling around the world. Several 
of the class preferred the Atlantic. Cary 
Case Edwards deserted London this sum- 



mer and visited her family in Maine, 
stopping over with Isabel Peters at Oyster 
Bay. Emma Fries traveled in Europe 
from May until September, enjoying 
Naples, Budapest, Paris, London and other 
interesting places. 

Margaret Ullman writes that Alice 
Schiedt Clark is going abroad this winter 
with her husband and family. It is Dr. 
Clark's Sabbatical. Daisy is kept busy 
with her bees and her garden. 

Eleanor Bliss Knoff and Anna Jonas 
have recently published Bulletin No. 799 
of the U. S. G. S. entitled "Geology of 
the McCall Ferry-Quarryville District, 
Pennsylvania." It is a splendid piece of 
work. Do look it up and see how fine 
it is. 

Fifty members of the class contributed 
to the commencement present for Betty 
Fry. Betty was very happy about her trip 
to Europe and the opportunity to study at 
a foreign university. 

Please send news and numerous letters 
to the class column this winter and make 
it intensely interesting. 

1905 

Class Editor: Eleanor Little Aldmcii 
(Mrs. Talbot Aldrich) 
59 Mt. Vernon St., Boston, Mass. 

Frances Eleanor Mason, by her mar- 
riage to Mr. Trowbridge last year, ac- 
quired a ready-made family of three 
daughters, aged 9, 16 and 18, respectively. 
We hear that she is devoted to them and 
that they thoroughly appreciate our 
"Gozey." , 

Rachel Brewer Huntington sends the 
following letter with the remark, "I don't 
think plans make very good reading so 
delete this as much as you like for the 
Bulletin." (The Editor believes that 1905 
will not share this opinion.) "We had a 
fine summer in Princeton, Massachusetts 
— a very large household through July 
with nine or ten children around the table 
so that I felt quite like the Old Woman in 
the Shoe. Summer over, we came to be 
with my family until we start on our trip. 
We are in the thick of preparation now as 
we sail on September 8th from Boston 
to Havre. We go first to Paris and then 
plan to motor through France until we 
find the right spot in Southern France 
where the children and I will settle down 
while Ellsworth 'does' Spain and Portugal. 
He will pick us up later and continue our 
way across the continent by automobile as 
far as we can go comfortably at that sea- 
son (December). I hope we can get to 
Budapest. From there we shall take the 
Oriental Express for Constantinople 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



where we shall spend Christmas with 
Ellsworth's brother and sister, both of 
whom live there. I expect to put the chil- 
dren in the Community School and we 
may stay several months. It is still an 
open question whether I shall accompany 
Ellsworth to Palestine and Egypt and 
down as far as Uganda. In June we are 
going to the Oberammergau Play and 
later into Scandinavia. We shall end up 
in England and sail from there about a 
year hence. That, in brief, is our present 
plan. We all have different ambitions to 
fulfill in making this trip. Ellsworth's 
is to visit every country in Europe and he 
hopes to return replete with geographical 
knowledge. Charles dreams of meeting a 
lion in his native habitat. George expects 
to spend his time on the boat riding the 
rocking horse in the nursery. I am not 
sure what Anna's chief wish is but per- 
haps it is to leave her pig-tails behind her. 
I hope we shall all add a few dozen words 
to our French vocabulary." 

1911 
Class Editor: Louise S. Russell 
140 E. 52d St., New York City. 

Norvelle Browne spent some time last 
summer with Dorothy Coffin Greeley and 
made the acquaintance of Dorothy's new 
daughter. Norvelle sails October 11 to 
spend the winter in Europe. 

Virginia Canan Smith writes that she 
has a daughter, Virginia Custer, born 
February 27. Her other children are boys, 
ten and twelve years, and Virginia says 
that now "with the arrival of a girl she 
expects to renew her interest in things 
feminine and of Bryn Mawr." 
. Charlotte Claflin wrote a fine, long let- 
ter last spring too late for the July issue, 
but I am quoting from it now, assuming 
that it still holds: "I feel as if 1911 must 
by this time be so wholly vague as to 
what, if anything, and where, if anywhere, 
I have been this long while, that I am 
going back a bit to get a running start. 
In 1924, then, I completed three years 
with the Girls' Service League of New 
York City. In the ensuing five years I 
have (1) reorganized the Community 
Home of Rochester, N. Y. — a maternity 
home doing casework with unmarried 
mothers; (2) reorganized the casework of 
the Infants' Home of Toronto, Ontario — 
also working on the illegitimacy problem ; 
(3) reorganized and opened the Gumbert 
School, Perrysville, Pa. — a school for de- 
linquent girls; (4) started the casework 
department of the State Cancer Hospital, 
Pondville, Mass.; (5) done child-placing 
and home-finding for the Nursery and 



Child's Hospital of New York City; and 
(6) am now, I hope, at rest for a good 
spell to come, on the staff of the Chil- 
dren's Aid Society of Buffalo, N. Y. The 
'rest' does not consist in any letting up of 
work, but in the satisfaction of being 
with an organization so fine in its ideals 
and spirit as that justly noted C. A. S. 

"Between whiles 1 have tutored at 
Rosemary Hall, Greenwich, Conn., in the 
springs of 1927 and 1928. An article of 
mine, 'Squatter Rights in Case Work,' ap- 
peared in The Survey of May 15, 1928. 
My article, 'The Martyrs of Massachu- 
setts,' was reprinted by the Sacco-Vanzetti 
Defense Committee as part of its memor- 
ial leaflet in August, 1928. And the 
archaeological hypothesis put forward in 
my note 'The Inscription of Dvenos' 
(Classical Philology, October, 1927) was 
favorably noticed both by Professor Kent, 
of the University of Pennsylvania, to 
whose hypothesis mine was an emenda- 
tion, and also by Mrs. Harriet Boyd 
Hawes, one of the most eminent of living 
classical archaeologists, who wrote me 
succinctly, T think you are right.' 

"May this summary — or as much of it 
as you think worth passing on — tell 1911 
that I have tried to do them a little credit 
by not merely cumbering the earth these 
few years past. By another reunion I 
hope to have something more consecutive 
to report. And if any of them come to 
Buffalo, I want to know it." 

(The Class Editor would appreciate it 
if some of the rest of you would follow 
Charlotte's example ! ) 

In September, Mary Case Pevear and 
her elder daughter drove out to the Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin where Catherine is 
entering the freshman class. 

Anita Stearns spent a week in New 
York the last part of September. 

Louise Russell spent the summer in 
Santa Fe, New Mexico, and had the good 
fortune to run across several Bryn Mawr 
people (though 1911 was sadly missing). 

1916 
Class Editor: Catherine S. Godley 
768 Ridgeway Avenue 
Avondale, Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Anna Sears Davis and her family 
spent their vacation at Ely, Vermont, 
which Anna considers a summer haven 
for those with young children. 

Constance Dowd varied her vacation 
program by dashing off to New Haven as 
soon as Camp Runoia closed. She spent 
the first week in September there attend- 
ing the International Congress of Psy- 
chology. Cedy's account of reunion has 



22 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



been greatly admired and even called a 
classic, which shows that she has not lost 
the light touch with which she wrote our 
songs in the undergraduate days. 

Margaret Mabon Henderson writes 
from Glasgow that her family will have 
to grow up and go to Bryn Mawr if she 
is ever to get back to renew the old ties. 
The family to date consists of Elizabeth, 
nine ; Margaret, seven, and Agnes, five. 
Mig says they are all so Scotch that one 
would never guess they had any American 
blood in them. 

Florence Hitchcock could not come to 
reunion because she was to be in France 
on those dates. Was that the beginning 
or the end of the trip and was it business 
or pleasure? Flo is one of our reticent 
members, so we ask these questions pub- 
licly. 

Maki Hitotsuyanagi Vories spent the 
summer in the United States. She arrived 
just too late for reunion, but sent her 
greetings and a copy of A Mustard Seed 
in Japan so that the class might read of 
her husband's work, in which she has a 
part, in Omi-Hachiman, Japan. 

1919 
Editor: Marjorie Remington Twitchell 
(Mrs. Pierrepont Twitchell) 
Setauket, Long Island, N. Y. 

Tip has a son ! His name and other 
details are as yet unascertained by the 
editor. He is the fifty-third boy of the 
class, not counting the children in the class 
files, unnamed and undesignated as to sex. 

Mary Scott Spiller is home again in 
Swarthmore after a year abroad. She 
spent most of the time in England, her 
husband studying there during his Sab- 
batical year. But she also took a beauti- 
ful trip with him on the continent. 

Peggy Rhoads is back with the Mission 
Board now. She found her three months 
this summer with "The Friend" very in- 
teresting. "It has been published by the 
same printers for 102 years. The head of 
the firm is a woman, but I am the first 
woman ever to be editor-in-chief." Con- 
gratulations ! 

Hazel Collins Hainsworth, having 
majored in math at College, is now pursu- 
ing the lighter arts — she is taking courses 
in French history, art and literature, and 
has to write papers of weight on those 
subjects. 

Jinkie Holmes' story "Aunt Emmeline 
Takes an Interest" was published in the 
August Scribner's. If anyone wishes the 
thrill of reading a classmate's fiction, don't 
neglect to send for the August Scribner's. 



Your new editor has a little news of her 
own. I have ten children ! For I am turn- 
ing my hand for the first time to teaching, 
contrary to all my preconceived plans, for 
I've always sworn I'd never teach ; but 
it's fascinating ! We are staying all year 
'round in our new home sixty miles from 
New York on the sound. It is real coun- 
try, four miles to the station, two to a 
post office. A country day school of 
twenty-six children has just been started 
near us, and to keep my days occupied, I 
am teaching the children ranging from 
eight to eleven, history, geography, com- 
position, spelling, reading, art, history and 
poetry — that's all. 

1923 
Class Editor: Dorothy Meserve Kun- 
hardt (Mrs. Philip B. Kunhardt) 
Mount Kemble Avenue 
Morristown, N. J. 
Clara McLaughlin MacDowell has a 
son, William Wallace MacDowell, Jr., 
born June 29th. 

1924 
Editor: Beth Tuttle Wilbur 
(Mrs. Donald Wilbur) 
1518^ E. 59th Street, Chicago, 111. 

The job of editing seems to be looking 
up ! The Editor is still waiting, however, 
for the avalanche of letters which is to 
reply to her recent inquiries regarding 
'24's summer activities. A most generous 
letter from Kay Neilson was enough to 
make up for the other deficiencies ! 

Kay writes: "If, as you suggest, the 
class is more stingy with its reputations 
that with its money, I should think we'd 
have no Bulletin column at all — that is, 
if Chuck's lamentations as to our finan- 
cial status be justified! 

"Don't tell me you missed the picture, 
in the Sunday Times some weeks ago, of 
Professor and Mrs. Weld Arnold record- 
ing the eclipse somewhere in the Straits 
Settlements? Because the lady in the case 
was none other than Ailing Armstrong, 
who was married in Boston last January, 
after spending three semesters studying 
the Fine Arts at Harvard. 

"Another member of our class who 
used to pop up occasionally was Helen 
Walker Parsons; she's been living in 
Cambridge and doing economics on the 
side, to such purpose that she took her 
M.A. a year ago at the same time I did. 
We used to meet during distraught 
marathons from the sub-basement to the 
sixth floor of the Widener stacks. 

"Ruth Tubby, who is back at her old 
job in the Brownsville Children's Library, 
tells us that Martha Hammond has be- 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



23 



come a full-fledged nun in a convent in 
Peekskill, and now, I believe, goes by the 
name of Sister Frideswide. 

"Bobby Murray Fansler has a highly 
talented and delightful daughter, Ruth 
Murray, now about two and a half. 
Priscilla's son, Timothy, no less charm- 
ing than his cousin, was visiting while 
I was there, Priscilla being engaged in 
tutoring at the Bryn Mawr Summer 
School. 

"Goodness! I was forgetting; Bobby, 
having adorned the Metropolitan Museum 
of Fine Arts for some time as itinerant 
instructor, is now taking on a full time 
job there with regular lecture courses. 

"And Becca Tatham is the chief guide 
and prop of the Fogg Museum Staff in 
Cambridge. 

"As for me — I seem to be on the point 
of sailing for Europe in the fall, in the 
forlorn hope of scratching up something 
. new and startling about the Italian renais- 
sance of sufficient interest to induce Har- 
vard to give me a Ph.D." 
- A very impressive document arrived 
recently from France revealing the mar- 
riage of Roberte Godefroy and Mr. Herve 
Chauvel, Docteur en Pharmacie, Assist- 
ant a la Faculte de Pharmacie de Paris, 
le Jeudi, 11 Juillet 1929, a midi precis, 
en l'Eglise Notre Dame des Champs. 

And as for '24 babies ! Beside our own 
son, D. E. W., Jr., who was born on 
August 22, three others have been added 
to the list during the summer, and an- 
other very interesting one is scheduled 
for the near future. The three who have 
already arrived, in chronological order, 
are Frank R. Morris, Jr., Russ's son, who 
was born on July first, John Head Kal- 
tenthaler, another brother for our class 
baby, on August 24th, and Gordon Brew- 
ster Baldwin, Doris Hawkins' son, born 
on September third. We certainly seem 
to be running to boys. 

Bess Pearson called up the other day 
to inquire where class pledges were to be 
paid, and we were certainly surprised and 
pleased to hear from her again. She re- 
vealed her whereabouts for the last three 
years, which has been the Pennsylvania 
Museum, in the capacity of assistant in 
charge of prints. Last April she took 
time off for a five months' trip to Eu- 
rope, but is now back on the job again 
at the Museum. We couldn't answer her 
inquiry about the pledges as Chuck, our 
collector, is in England for the winter. 
We would suggest that, for Bess's ben- 
efit, and for that of others who have 
inquired, she let us know where all this 
money is to be sent. 

Please note Editor's change of address. 



We moved out here to Chicago some 
weeks ago to join our husband who has 
been located here since the spring. As 
we are now far from the center of B. M. 
gossip, we would appreciate getting a 
great deal of news ! 

1925 
Class Editor : Elizabeth Mallett Conger 
(Mrs. Frederic Conger) 
325 E. 72nd St., New York City. 

Fall and the poor working girls are 
back at their jobs. Beth Deafi is teaching 
at the Florence Nightingale School and 
living with Betty Stewart. 

Via Saunders is working long hours 
at the Weyhe Galleries on Lexington Ave- 
nue and hobnobbing with celebrities. 

Libby Wilson is still at the Citizens' 
National Bank in Trenton, Tennessee. 

Mary Lytell is warden of the Betsy 
Barbour House at Ann Arbor, Mich. She 
traveled in the west this summer, around 
Banff and Lake Louise, and hopes to get 
her Ph.D. this winter. 

Leila Barbour is going abroad in No- 
vember with her mother and Kay Nielson 
to work on her "obscure little Spanish 
painter." 

May Morrill Dunn is job-hunting in 
New York. That doesn't sound very 
definite, but we're on her track. 

And Brownie is up to something im- 
portant. We're on her track, too ! 

And of course, there are hordes of fall 
brides ! On September fourteenth Brad 
was married to George Whitman Hol- 
brook in Wellsville. She and Mr. Hol- 
brook are now living in Bradford, Penn- 
sylvania. 

Billy Dunn is now Mrs. David 
Buchanan, residing for the moment in 
Akron, Ohio, but on December first she 
and her husband leave for India for three 
years ! And speaking of India, Chissy is 
married. She and Calvin Tomkins were 
married on November twelfth in Grace 
Church with Frances Chisolm and Tommy 
Tomkins Villard as bridesmaids. Chissy 
and her husband have sailed for England 
and France, and later from Venice to 
Bombay. They may be back in May. 

And now for the younger generation. 
Nana Bonnell Davenport and Rachel Fos- 
ter Manierre have both had sons, accord- 
ing to the good 1925 custom. Henry Bon- 
nell Davenport was born early in Septem- 
ber (He is living with his parents but 
we don't know just where because they 
seem to have moved), and John Foster 
Manierre, Jr., arrived toward the end of 
July. Both babies, we hear, (not from 
their mothers) are exceptionally good and 
healthy and charming. 



24 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



1927 
Class Editor: Ellenor Morris, 
Berwyn, Pa. 

Liz Nelson Tate has a son, Robert 
Wood Tate, born July 13th, weighing 8 
pounds 5 ounces. This is all very fine 
for the Tate family, but where, oh where, 
is that class baby? 

Billy Holcombe Trotter also produced 
a boy on August 22nd. With Dot Irwin 
Headley's son this make three gentlemen 
within a few months. 

The fall brings almost as many brides 
as the traditional June. 

On September 2nd, K. Simonds became 
Mrs. Lowell Thompson. Corinne Cham- 
bers and several members of '28 were 
bridesmaids. Corinne found the wedding 
ring in the cake, so please watch this col- 
umn carefully for future developments. 

Eleanor Waddell on September 14th 
was married to George Stephens. 

On October 12th two more of us fol- 
lowed in their footsteps. Betsy Gibson 
was married to Mr. John Delafield 
Du Bois, and Ruth Miller to Mr. Otto 
Henry Spillman. 

Sara Pinkerton has been writing a 
paper for her M.A. at the University of 
Pennsylvania during the summer. 

Mad Pierce Lemmon has moved into 
a new house in Ardmore, and writes that 
she is quite domestic. 

In the following letter Eleanor Maria 
Chamberlain writes of her doings in 
Panama: "There wasn't anything about 
'27 in the last two numbers of the Bul- 
letin. I didn't know whether it was no 
material, or merely because you didn't 
feel that way. I don't know whether 
any of my doings may constitute material 
or not, but as no one has loved me enough 
to tell you anything about me, I decided 
I'd better do it myself — then on the other 
hand — you mayn't want it. 

"This last year has been quite varied. 
I went back to the laboratory work till 
they changed doctors. The new man had 
a different range of interests and also 
found that the job was one of those 
where the tail wagged the dog. So I 
stopped that. About the middle of Aug- 
ust I sold three of my orchid pictures to 
Oakes Ames, for a book on Panaman 
Orchids. I also came out in print as 
having been assistant in research work 
on the behavior of malarial parasites, es- 
pecially the sexual forms, under treat- 
ment with quinine and plasmodine. 

"After stopping lab work I concen- 
trated on painting and had a lot of fun 
with it. 

"At the end of December, Mother and 



I went to Peru for a jaunt. 1 had to 
use the Spanish that I'd been studying 
religiously twice a week for the last year 
and a half. I regretted not a minute of 
those lessons. 

"Pcnr was perfectly fascinating. The 
scenery was the most beautiful and 
amazing, I have ever seen. We had 
three days in Lima and saw among an 
orgy of gorgeous Spanish churches, the 
Palace of La Pericholle (see Bridge of 
San Luis Rey), which was charming. 

"We debarked at Mollendo and went up 
to Puno where we took a boat across 
Lake Titicaca. The . lake is perfectly 
marvelously beautiful. We spent two 
days in La Paz (Bolivia) where the 
main stunt is the Cholo and Indio cos- 
tumes which are very brilliant — clear, 
pure colors, with geranium pink pre- 
dominating. We also saw our first llamas 
here ! 

"From La Paz we recrossed the lake 
and went up to Cuzco, crossing the divide, 
which was fun. There are gorgeous 
glaciers and snow mountains there. 

"Cuzco was fascinating. Besides the 
very splendid Spanish things, there were 
the amazing Inca Walls all through the 
city as well as a huge fortress above it. 
We also visited another, even finer one 
on the bank of the Urubamba river. 

"Another lovely thing about Cuzco, and 
the country around there, was the pro- 
fusion of wildflowers — lupin, calcilaria, 
dahlias ( !), geraniums, poppies and 
broom. 

"We had a lot of fun sketching all 
along the trip. Usually when we did we 
had a crowd of little Indio children 
around us making remarks and asking 
questions in Quichna and Spanish. They 
were a lot of fun. 

"When we got back the fleet was in, 
much excitement. Our tour here is 
over and we sail for Europe on June 
15th, having four months leave due and 
granted. Our new station is Washing- 
ton, where Daddy goes to the Surgeon 
General's Office. 

"There !" 

1928 
Class Editor: Cornelia B. Rose, Jr. 

1 Lexington Avenue, New York City. 

Elizabeth Bethel has a position as re- 
search assistant to the head of the His- 
tory Department at Yale this year and is 
now staying at No. 8 Englewood Avenue, 
New Haven, Conn. 

Puppy McKelvey writes that "Amram 
is taking a business course this fall and 
will work in her father's office for a 
while, in order, she says, to get a good 
reference." 



' carrison forest 



^*£^ A Country School in the Green 
Spring Valley near Baltimore. 
Modern Equipment. 

All Sports. Special Emphasis on Horse- 
back Riding. Mild Climate. 
Garrison Forest Girls who are going to college 
are thoroughly prepared for any institution. 
Other girls take courses with special emphasis 
on Music and Art. Younger girls live in a 
separate Junior House. 

Principals 

MISS JEAN G. MARSHALL 

MISS NANCY OFFUTT, 
Bryn Mawr, ex '20 

Box B, Garrison, Maryland 



THE LOW AND 
HEYWOOD SCHOOL 

Emphasizing college preparatory work. 

Also general and special courses. 

One year intensive college preparation. 

Junior school. 

65 th year. Catalogue. 

SHIPPAN POINT, 
STAMFORD, CONN. 



Katharine Gibbs 

A school of unusual character with a distinctive 
purpose for educated women 
SECRETARIAL ACADEMIC EXECUTIVE 

BOSTON 
90 Marlboro Street 



Resident and 
Day School 



NEW YORK 
247 Park Avenue 



PROVIDENCE 
155 Angell Street 



Special Course for College 
Women. Selected subjects 
preparing for executive posi- 
tions. Separate classrooms 
and special instructors. 
One-year Course includes tech- 
nical and broad businesstrain- 
ing preparing for positions of 
a preferred character. 
Two-year Course for prepara- 
tory and high school gradu- 
ates. First year includes six 
college subjects. Second year 
intensive secretarial training. 
Booklet on request 



WINTER ACCOMMODATIONS ON 
BRYN MAWR COLLEGE CAMPUS 

LOW BUILDINGS: Three furnished suites 
(bedroom and sitting room) now vacant will 
be rented by the month or College year to 
alumnae or other well recommended women. 

Inclusive price with table board, heat and 
light $22.50 to $27.00 per week. 

APPLY TO MANAGER— TELEPHONE 
BRYN MAWR 1578 




Cathedral School of St. Mary 

GARDEN CITY, LONG ISLAND, N. Y. 

A school for Girls 19 miles from New York. College 

preparatory and general courses. Music Art and 

Domestic Science. Catalogue on request. Box B. 

MIRIAM A. BYTEL, A.B., Raddiffe, Principal 

BERTHA GORDON WOOD, A.B., Bryn Mawr, 

Assistant Principal 



The Traphagen School of Fashion 



I 



INTENSIVE WINTER AND 
SUMMER COURSES 

All phases from elementary to full 
mastery of costume design and Illus- 
tration taught in shortest time con- 
sistent with thoroughness. Day and 
Evening classes. Saturday courses for 
Adults and Children. Our Sales De- 
partment disposes of student work. 
Every member of advanced classes 
often placed through our Employment 
Bureau. Write for announcement. 

In Arnold, Constable & Company Costume 
Design Competition, over 100 schools and 
nearly 800 students took part; all prizes 
were awarded to Traphagen pupils with 
exception of one of the five third prizes. 

1680 Broadway (near 52nd St.) New York 



t>i£tij^ctif£ 
Millinery 

successfully caps 
the climax of 
fashion and the 
smart ensemble. 

SAKS-FIFTH AVENUE 

FORTY- NINTH to FIFTIETH STREET 
NEW YORK 



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The Saint Timothy's School 
for Girls 

CATONSVILLE, MARYLAND 

Founded September 1882 

COLLEGE PREPARATORY 

AND 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

MISS LOUISA McENDREE FOWLER 
Head of the School 

Wykeham Rise 

WASHINGTON, CONNECTICUT 

A COUNTRY SCHOOL 
FOR GIRLS 

FANNY E. DAVIES, LL.A., Headmistress 
Prepares for Bryn Mawr and Other Colleges 

The Episcopal Academy 

(Founded 178S) 

CITY LINE, OVERBROOK, PA. 

A country day school for boys 

MODERN AND WELL EQUIPPED 
Endorsed by Bryn Mawr Alumnae 

UNIVERSITY^TrLS 

BOARDING AND DAY SCHOOL 

Founded 1896 

Thorough and successful Preparation 

for Eastern Colleges for Women as well as 

for Midwestern Colleges and Universities 

Illustrated Catalogue on Request 

ANNA B. HAIRE, A.B., SMITH COLLEGE, Principal 

1106-B Lake Shore Drive Chicago, Illinois 

THE HARTRIDGE SCHOOL 
FOR GIRLS 

SO minutes from New York 

A country school with beautiful grounds. 
College Preparatory and General Courses. 
Over fifty girls in leading colleges today. 
Resident Department carefully restricted. 
Special attention to Music and Art. 
Athletics, Dramatics, Riding, 

EMELYN B. HARTRIDGE, Vassar, I.E., Principal 
Plainfield, New Jersey 



The Ethel Walker School 

SIMSBURY, CONNECTICUT 

Head of School 

ETHEL WALKER SMITH, A.M., 
Bryn Mawr College 



Head Mistress 

JESSIE GERMAIN HEWITT, A.B., 
Bryn Mawr College 



tOGERSHAIX 

f ,4 Modern School with New England Tradih'ons 



■ JJAMot 

M \8k ' Thorough Preparation for any College 
■ ^^ One Year Intensive Review 

JB ^^^ General Academic Course with dl- 
^^■ki ^^Fploma. Junior College Courses — Home 
Economics, Secretarial Training, Music, Art, Dramatic 
Art. 26 Miles from Boston Outdoor Sports. Riding. 
Gymnasium. Swimming Pool. 

EDITH CHAP IN CRAVEN, A.B., Bryn Mawr 
201 Rogers Street, Lowell, Mass. 

/1ARCUAV SCH<&L 

BRYN MAWR, PA. 
Prepares for Bryn Mawr and 
all leading colleges 

Musical Course prepares for the Depart- 
ment of Music of Bryn Mawr College 
EDITH HARCUM, Head of School 
L. May Willis, Principal 

THE MISSES KIRK'S 

College Preparatory School 

PREPARATORY TO BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

Individual Instruction. Athletics. 

Clovercroft, Montgomery Avenue, Rosemont, Pa. 

Mail, telephone and telegraph address: Bryn Mawr. Pa. 



CHOATE SCHOOL 

1600 Beacon Street, Brookline, Mass. 

HOME AND DAY SCHOOL 
FOR GIRLS 

EMPHASIS ON COLLEGE PREPARATION 

Elective Courses for students not preparing 
for College 

AUGUSTA CHOATE, A.M. (Vassar) 

Principal 



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THE AGNES IRWIN SCHOOL 

2009-2011 Delancey Place, Philadelphia 

A College Preparatory 
SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 



BERTHA M. LAWS, A.B., Headmistress 



GRAY GABLES 

THE BOARDING DEPARTMENT OF THE 

BANCROFT SCHOOL OF WORCESTER 

Complete College Preparatory Course. 

One year course for Board Examination. 

For catalog addrest: 

Hope Fisher, Ph.D., Bakchoft School 

Worcester, Massachusetts 



MISS BEARD'S SCHOOL 

A Country School near New York 

Orange, New Jersey 
COLLEGE PREPARATION 

Advanced Courses Junior High School 

Music, Art, Domestic Science 

Catalog on Request 

LUCIE C. BEARD, Headmistress 

The Katharine Branson School 

ROSS, CALIFORNIA Across the Bay from San Francisco 

A Country School College Preparatory 

Head: 
Katharine Fleming Branson, A.B., Bryn Mawr 

MISS MADEIRA'S SCHOOL 

1330 19th St., N. W. Washington, D. C. 

A RESIDENT AND DAY SCHOOL FOR 
GIRLS 

LUCY MADEIRA WING, A.B. 

MRS. DAVID LAFOREST WING 

Head Mistress 

MISS WRIGHT'S SCHOOL 

Bryn Mawr, Pa. 
Prepares for College Board 
Examination 



FERRY HALL 

A RESIDENT AND DAY SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

On Lake Michigan, near Chicago 

Junior College: High School Department: College 
Preparatory and General Cour»es. Special Departments 
of Music. Expression and Art. 

Two new dormitories, including new dining room and 
infirmary, to be opened September 1929. 

Eloise R. Tremain, A.B., Bryn Mawr, Principal 

ROSEMARY HALL 

College Preparatory 

(With supplementary but not alternative courses) 

CAROLINE RUUTZ-REES. Ph.D. \ „ . M . . m , 
MARY E. LOWNDES. Litt.D / Heai Mlrimm 



GREENWICH 



CONNECTICUT 



The Shipley School 

Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 

Preparatory to Bryn Mawr College 

ALICE G. HOWLAND, ELEANOR 0. BROWNELL 
Principals 

MISS RANSOM and 
MISS BRIDGES' SCHOOL 

PIEDMONT, CALIFORNIA 

(A suburb of San Francisco) 

A RESIDENT AND DAY SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

General and College Preparatory Courses 
Outdoor Life throughout the year 

EDITH BRIDGES, B.L., Principal 

The Baldwin School 

A Country School for Girls 
BRYN MAWR PENNSYLVANIA 

Preparation for Bryn Mawr. Mount Holyoke. Smith. 

Vassar and Wellesley college*. Abundant outdoor life. 

Hockey, basketball, tennis 

ELIZABETH FORREST JOHNSON. A.B. 

HEAD 

CAMP MYSTIC con m n y eI t tTcut 

Miss Jobe's salt water camp for girls 
8-18. Conducted by Mrs. Carl Akeley (Mary 
L. Jobe). Halfway, New York and Boston. 
Land and water sports. Horseback riding. 
MARY L JOBE, 
Room 507. 607 Fifth Aye., N. Y. C. 



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The Phebe Anna Thome School 

Under the Direction of the Department 
of Education 



A progressive school preparing for all colleges. 

Open air class rooms. 

Pre-school, Primary, Elementary and High 
School Grades. 



BRYN MAWR, PA. 

AGNES L. ROGERS, Ph.D., Director 
FRANCES BROWNE, A.B., Head Mistress 



Who is 
Kagawa? 

He is the outstand- 
ing Japanese Chris- 
tian in Asia.^What 
has he done? ^ 
Preached in the 
streets, lived in the 
slums, built schools 
and now is conduct- 
ing his "Million 
Souls for Jesus" 
campaign. 




Research. 



V 



O 



$> 



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N#» 



a# 



It belongs to the literature both 
of power and knowledge; it 
might be called wisdom 
literature. — Galen M. 
Fisher, Executive 
Secretary, Institute 
of Social and 
Religious ^^^^ ^O^* 

^ o* Every 
$SP Christian 

should read his book for 
its inspirational message 
and its profound philoso- 
phy. ^ It is a challenge to 
try the Way of Love. ^ 
Kagawa's first book went 
through 180 editions in 
Japan ; now he has written 
for English readers his 
views of life and the world. 
At all bookstores, $2.00 



THE JOHN C. 
WINSTON COMPANY 

PHILADELPHIA 



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at the End of the Old Santa le 
Trail in Santa Fe, New Mexico 



lafbnda 

JHLhh* finest of Harvey hotels 



1A FONDA is an all-year resort hotel, 
^ created for the most discriminating 
of travelers. It is uniquely distinctive, 
within and without. Crystalizing the 
elusive charm of New Mexico's ancient 
Spanish capital, its life centers about a 
sunny, restful patio; its fawn-colored pile 
sweeps back from Santa Fe's historic plaza 
in the lifting terraces of an ancient Indian 
pueblo. 

At La Fonda the cuisine is of the highest 
Fred Harvey standard. The spacious guest 
rooms, individually treated, reflect the 
influence of the fascinating Spanish- 
Pueblo region roundabout. Electric eleva- 
tors serve the balconied upper floors, 



where suites with cheery sitting rooms 
and open fire places command magnificent 
panoramas of the foothills and snowcrests 
of the Sangre de Cristos. 

La Fonda's hospitable doors swing wide 
winter and summer. Here fog or protracted 
storms are alike almost unknown. The 
sparkle of Santa Fe's dry and healthful 
climate holds throughout the changing 
seasons. 

La Fonda's native orchestra is from Old 
Mexico, with dancing in the New Mexican 
Room during luncheon, dinner, and in 
the evening. Afternoon tea is served in the 
broad patio lounge, and unusual enter- 
tainment features are numerous. 



Harveycar Motor Cruises 



Guests of La Fonda will find it more than simply 
a charmingly different resort hotel. As headquarters 
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the hotel itself, — La Fonda holds the key to in- 
formative and delightful exploration of the entire 
Southwest. From La Fonda intriguing roads thread 
away through the least-known and most scenic 



region of America— to primitive Mexican hill 
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0r 



^ Santa Fe-Harvey Co., 1208-A. Santa Fe, New Mexico 

iV _ Please send me new LaFonda brochure, Harveycar Motor Cruise and Indian-detout 




Interior, St. Qeorge's School, Chapel, Newport, R. I. Cram & Ferguson, Architects. 
L. D. Willcutt, & Sons Co., Builders. Built of Indiana Limestone. 

Architecture's Ideal Medium 
Is Natural Stone 



THE architect's finest work practically 
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BRYN MAWR 
ALUMNAE 
BULLETIN 




SCHOOLS FOR WOMEN WORKERS 



December, 1929 



Vol. IX 



No. 9 



Entered as second-class matter. January 1. 1929. at the fosi Office. Phiia., Pa., under Act of March 3 t 1879 

COPYRIGHT. 192S 

ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 



OFFICERS OF THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

EXECUTIVE BOARD 

President Louise Fleischmann Maclat, 1906 

Vice-President Natalie McFaden Blanton, 1917 

Recording Secretary Gertrude Hearne Myers, 1919 

Corresponding Secretary Mat Egan Stokes, 1911 

Treasurer Margaret E. Brusstar, 1903 

Chairman of the Finance Committee Caroline Florence Lexow, 1908 

Chairman of the Publicity Committee Caroline Morrow Chadwick-Collins, 1905 

ALUMNAE SECRETARY AND BUSINESS MANAGER OF THE BULLETIN 

Alice M. Hawkins, 1907 

EDITOR OF THE BULLETIN 

Marjorie L. Thompson, 1912 

DISTRICT COUNCILLORS 

District I Helen Evans Lewis, 1913 

District II Julia Langdon Loomis. 1895 

District III Alletta Van Reypen Korff, 1900 

District IV Katharine Hollida y Daniels, 1918 

District V Frances Porter Adler, 1911 

District VI Edna Wakkentin Alden, 1900 

District VII Helen Brayton Barendt, 1903 

ALUMNAE DIRECTORS 

Ruth Furness Porter, 1896 Mary Peirce, 1912 

Frances Fincke Hand, 1897 Margaret Reeve Cary, 1907 

Elizabeth Lewis Otey, 1901 

CHAIRMAN OF THE ALUMNAE FUND 

Caroline Florence Lexow, 1908 

CHAIRMAN OF THE ACADEMIC COMMITTEE 

Pauline Goldmark, 1896 

CHAIRMAN OF THE SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOAN FUND COMMITTEE 

Margaret Gilman, 1919 

CHAIRMAN OF THE COMMITTEE ON HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Dr. Marjorie F. Murray, 1913 

CHAIRMAN OF THE NOMINATING COMMITTEE 

Eleanor Little Aldrich, 1905 




through 

<Pr^oident 'Mutual 

The woman who invests in a Provident 
Mutual Endowment policy is not only 
saving money for future enjoyment but 
she is protecting those dear to her from 
: loss. 



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Life Insurance Company oj Philadelphia 

TmituUd.1865 



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NITED STATEC 

SECRETARIAL SCHOOL^ 

Twenty -seventh Year 
527 5th Ave. at 44th St. New York, N. Y. 

(Harriman National Bank Building) 

An exclusive school devoted to 

SECRETARIAL AND BUSINESS TRAINING 

Limited to those with the proper cultural background 
Day and Evening Classes 

Call, write or phone tor catalog 
IRVING EDGAR CHASE, Director Vanderbilt 2474 



THE 

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For Insurances on Lives and 
Granting Annuities 

TRUST AND SAFE DEPOSIT 
COMPANY 

Over a Century of Service 

C. S. W. PACKARD, President 

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Bryn Mawr Alumnae 
Bulletin 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF 
THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

Marjorie L. Thompson, '12, Editor 
Alice M. Hawkins, '07, Business Manager 

EDITORIAL BOARD 

Mary Crawford Dudley, '96 Emily Kimbrough Wrench, '21 

Caroline Morrow Chadwick-Collins, '05 Ellenor Morris, '27 
Emily Fox Cheston, '08 Elinor B. Amram, '28 

Louise Fleischmann Maclay, '06, ex-officio 

Subscription Price, $1.50 a Year Single Copies, 25 Cents 

Checks should be drawn to the order of Bryn Mawr Alumnae Bulletin 
Published monthly, except August, September and October, at 1006 Arch St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Vol. IX DECEMBER, 1929 No. 9 



The Bryn Mawr Summer School has become for many of us almost a common- 
place; we forget that it marked, in this country, an epoch in the education of women 
in the same way that Bryn Mawr itself did. But any one who was in Taylor Hall 
that June morning in 1922 and heard President Emeritus Thomas greet the students 
who were gathered for the second Summer School cannot think of it without a stirring 
of the blood. One remembers her saying to them: "It is an adventure for us and 
for you, an adventure that may have the happiest results. You and your teachers 
are beginning here something that may help bring about industrial peace. Nothing 
ought to be impossible in the new world in which you will live the greater part 
of your lives." She went on to challenge that group of women and girls to leadership 
as she had challenged each college generation. "As in a vision I saw that out of the 
hideous world war might come as a glorious aftermath international industrial justice 
and industrial peace, if your generation had the courage to work as hard for them 
as my generation had worked for woman suffrage. . . . It is not enough to think. 
We must act. But we must keep our minds continually open to new ideas. We must 
all of us be willing to revise our opinions until we die." Her hope that other col- 
leges "would turn over for eight weeks every summer their buildings and equipment" 
is slowly being fulfilled. Bryn Mawr is now no longer a pioneer but a corporate 
member, one of the joint Committee of the Affiliated Summer Schools. In her article 
in this number Hilda Smith says, "Each school is still an independent unit as far as 
its own policies are concerned, but new strength has come into the national organiza- 
tion through the knowledge that three schools together are interested in the same 
problems." Now besides these Summer Schools there has been another outcome, an- 
other step in women's education, — the Vineyard Shore School started by Hilda 
Smith, — the first Winter School exclusively for women workers. It grew out of 
"the long-realized need of the Summer School students." 



SCHOOLS FOR WOMEN WORKERS IN INDUSTRY 

On the Bryn Mawr campus some five years ago a little group of shoe workers, 
electrical workers, 9ilk weavers, and garment workers were discussing one hot July 
day what might be for them the next steps in education. The Summer School term of 
two months had meant for every student a sacrifice of wages, increased family 
responsibility and in many cases the loss of a job. On the other hand, the summer had 
brought to each of these factory workers a glimpse of new knowledge, a wider under- 
standing of the problems of industry, and renewed determination that the results of the 
school term should in some way be applied at home for the benefit of the whole 
industrial group. "We have just begun to learn!" exclaimed one girl, "now that 
we have found out how to study, why can't we go on a little longer?" 

Every year in the Bryn Mawr Summer School there have been girls of great 
mental ability, with a desire to "go on a little longer" and a serious interest in industrial 
questions. Some of these women workers are so eager to pursue their studies once 
they have acquired the tools of learning that they are willing to give up wages and 
risk losing a job for a few months more after the Summer term, if only a suitable 
opportunity were offered for this longer period of education. 

At intervals during the nine years of Bryn Mawr Summer School history, an 
experiment has been tried; sending to college on specially contributed scholarships 
certain industrial workers who have shown marked ability in their School classes. 
This experiment has not been entirely successful, not for any lack of serious purpose 
on the part of the student, but rather because the conditions of college training have 
made the effort seem insuperably difficult, at times futile. An industrial worker with 
no high school preparation cannot face entrance examinations, although qualified by 
a mature mind for college courses once the entrance barrier is passed. Moreover, the 
financial burden of four years of college expenses, even with the aid of a scholarship, 
is almost too great to be borne. Required college courses often include subjects which 
the industrial worker considers useless to her and perhaps an entire waste of time. 
College students younger in age and less serious in interest seem almost like children 
to such an experienced woman, and the genial atmosphere of campus activities she 
finds hard to understand. As one student from Bryn Mawr, a glove worker, wrote 
during her first year in a university, "I can't understand the scramble for marks 
and credits. Why not study just for the sake of learning things and not for a degree?" 
Methods of teaching in most colleges and universities prove confusing to the indus- 
trial worker, who comes from the Summer School's small, informal classes to great 
lecture rooms, and to an instruction method which often deprives the student of any 
opportunity for discussion. "They don't like you to talk back here or ask a ques- 
tion," wrote another industrial worker from a university, "they just want to pour 
it in." And the reflection of college atmosphere given in the letter of a textile worker 
struggling through her Freshman year is typical. "I know lots of girls back in the 
mills who would be more interested in these courses than most of the Freshmen I 
meet around the campus. I thought they had come here to study but apparently not." 
In spite of these difficulties, however, the Bryn Mawr students who have gone on to 
colleges or universities have acquitted themselves with credit, passing entrance exami- 

(2) 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 3 

nations after one year of preparation, into which was packed four years of high 
school work; winning prizes for English essaj^s, rated as among the best students in 
economic classes, and contributing from practical experience, in the direct, fearless 
fashion characteristic of this group, to every part of the academic program. 

To the question of eager students every summer "Is there any place I could go 
after the Summer School to learn a little more?" a new answer has been given this 
fall with the opening of the Vineyard Shore School for Women Workers in Industry. 
Up to the present, a small group of students from Bryn Mawr has been enrolled 
each year in Brookwood Workers' School at Katonah, New York, a school for men 
and women from industry which offers a two-year course emphasizing training for 
active work in the labor movement. While of proved value to many Summer School 
students, the course at Brookwood is too advanced for others. To those who have 
known the Summer School students individually there has seemed a need for a resident 
school for a longer period than two months, following the liberal traditions of the 
Summer School, and with a similar method of teaching, offering to women workers 
a chance to study their own industrial problems, and at the same time to explore a 
little farther other fields of knowledge associated with the industrial field, or offering 
new resources for creative work and for the use of leisure time. The plan for the 
Vineyard Shore School has grown out of this long-realized need of the Summer 
School students. After four years of preparation and finance work, the school opened 
on October 15th with fourteen students. 

The Vineyard Shore property includes sixty-six acres of land and two large 
furnished houses on the hilly slopes above the Hudson river, about eighty miles from 
New York. Below the houses the land descends in a series of terraces, partly wooded, 
to the rocks and beaches of the river shore. Across the state highroad which skirts 
the School grounds is the little village street of West Park, winding up into the 
wooded hills. These woods, with their trails and rushing streams, extend thirty 
miles or more without a town or village. The School locality then combines advan- 
tages of accessibility by train, boat, or automobile with the; seclusion and quiet of the 
country. North about twenty miles the Catskill range begins, and to the east on clear 
days one sees the far mountain tops of the Berkshires. The district takes its character 
from the river and the wooded hills, with the large vineyards along the river slope. 
The community itself is one of about 300 working people, of Dutch or Huguenot 
descent, with a fair-sized Italian population, employed for the most part in farming, 
on the railroad, or on large estates, many now empty or given over to ecclesiastical 
institutions. 

Entrance requirements for the Vineyard Shore School are practically the same 
as for Bryn Mawr or the other Summer Schools; three years' factory experience, ability 
to use the English language, ages between 20 and 35, and good health. Industrial 
workers, those employed in the labor movement and other women workers if organized 
are eligible. 

The first group of industrial workers arrived at West Park by boat or train up 
the Hudson River on October 15th. Cool, clear weather, a blue river and vivid 
autumn coloring on the hills, combined to give the students a first impression of over- 
whelming beauty. Most of these workers had been employed the day before in some 
factory workroom, or else were exhausted from fruitless search for a job. As with 
the Summer School students during the past three years, unemployment has been a 



4 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

serious handicap! in enrollment. Girls who have been out of work for the best part 
of the last two years find at the last moment that they cannot give up even the 
chance of a busy season this winter, in order to come to school. Illness in families 
has been another deterring factor, so that although three times the number of students 
applied for the School, only this small group could actually come when the School 
started. Continued recruiting up till Christmas it is hoped may increase the number 
of students to twenty or more, the capacity of the School buildings this first year. 

In the first group of students, there are four garment workers, two textile workers, 
two electrical workers, a multigraph operator, two shoe workers, a rubber worker, 
a leather belt maker and a worker on Fairbank Scales. The states represented are 
Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New York, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin and California. 
One student comes from the Wisconsin Summer School, two from the Barnard 
School, ten after one or two summers at Bryn Mawr, and one has never attended 
any of the Summer Schools, but is ready for fairly advanced work through attendance 
in evening classes. The group is about equally divided between union and non-union 
workers, and nationalities include American-born, Hungarian, Russian, German, 
Italian. 

The work will be of comparatively advanced character, emphasizing current 
social and industrial problems, including the study of economics, history, science, Eng- 
lish literature, composition, public speaking, with related work in music, art and 
dramatics. A number of students who applied for the School were not accepted 
because it was believed that they could not maintain the proposed standard of work, 
so that the selected group although small is able to carry a fairly advanced program. 

It has been surprising to see how quickly during the first week the students made 
the adjustment to new surroundings and settled down to regular work. This work 
includes for each girl an hour a day of household "chores," cleaning or dusting, wash- 
ing dishes, waiting on the tables. Two girls are assigned duty as chauffeurs for the 
School truck and one who has had a little library experience, takes care of books. 
Two or three girls share the large bedrooms, in both houses. Dining rooms and 
kitchen, and a classroom for economics and history occupy one house, while in the 
other are held the science and the English classes. Large living rooms with open fire- 
places are used in both houses, and the long porches overlooking vineyards and river. 

For three hours every morning, after the housework is done, the students devote 
themselves to one subject, without the physical and mental confusion involved in 
changing classes. This solid period under the direction of one teacher may include 
discussion, independent or supervised reading, writing papers, or any other activity 
connected with the subject. For the science class this sometimes means a mid-morning 
walk down the lane to the river to identify trees; or a visit to the study of John Bur- 
roughs, for many years a next-door neighbor and now remembered in every corner 
of the orchard and at each turn of the woods trail to "Slabsides" ; in economics it 
may mean chart or poster making, work on a statistical study, the dramatization of 
an arbitration court, or the processes of some trade; in English part of the three 
hours may be given to practice in public speaking, to reading aloud, to a forum, or 
to some venture in writing poetry. 

After dinner, with its before and after periods of setting tables, serving, and 
washing dishes, the students have a free period from two to four, in order to enjoy 
out-of-doors during the sunniest part of winter days ; classes or conferences again from 






BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 5 

4.00-5.30, and an early supper at the usual countryside hour of six. In the evening 
there is an informal period, current events, or literature, and the last hour at 8.30 is 
reserved on clear nights for star study on the upper porch, where a wide sweep of sky 
shows the constellations north and south, and all the eastern horizon. Saturdays are 
free for hikes and picnics, and already the students have been exploring back roads 
through the woods, charting old trails along the river and blazing new ones, and on the 
first Saturday taking a picnic expedition to the great Ashokan reservoir in the Catskills, 
a series of lakes set in the mountains, providing water for New York City. 

There are limitless possibilities ahead, with a small group of undoubtedly able 
students, with mature minds and a strong social spirit, studying together for as long 
a term as eight months under almost ideal conditions. In time it is possible that 
talents may be released and that art in its various forms may take its place in relation 
to the other subjects of the curriculum. For it is the belief of the faculty and students 
of the School that no subject should stand alone, but that each one may be taught 
in its fullest significance in relation to other fields of knowledge. Thus, for this 
first term the study of Social Science will give the background of American history and 
economic development, the English courses will deal with American literature and 
the possibilities of creative writing for American workers, the Science will trace the 
development of invention and the machine as related to industry in this country, 
with the broader background of astronomy, the story of the earth, and of life on the 
earth. The central theme of all the courses was discussed the first day of the School, 
and will be the theme of other discussions from time to time, in the light of new 
knowledge. "On what factors does human well-being depend?" — a subject broad 
enough to give scope for many explorations, and of deep enough significance to satisfy 
the social instincts of these industrial workers. 

The organization of the School has been in the hands of a Joint Committee 
similar to that controlling the Affiliated Summer School, -made up of teachers and 
others interested in workers' education, together with an equal number of industrial 
workers, former students of the Bryn Mawr Summer School. From now on the 
faculty and students of the new school will elect representatives to a reorganized 
committee, to control policies. Within the School community, an executive committee 
of students and faculty are in charge, with a New England textile worker who has 
attended Bryn Mawr for two summers as chairman, and subcommittees to consider 
the problems of the study program, of house administration and of recreation. 

Although plans for the School were begun four years ago, the difficulty of financ- 
ing such an enterprise has meant a long delay in actually putting plans into operation. 
The task in finance work has been to discover a group of liberally minded people 
who would believe in such an adventure in workers' education, and whose assistance 
would not mean any less support for Bryn Mawr or any of the other Summer Schools. 
After three years of tedious work, such a group was finally organized. With the 
help of this new committee almost the entire budget for the first year of the Vineyard 
Shore School was raised last winter, a budget covering all costs of tuition, and also 
annual expenses of administration and upkeep of the property. Every student is 
making herself responsible for $200 covering her board and lodging expenses for the 
eight-month term. This amount if not paid in full during the year, will be loaned 
to the students by the School, and repaid in small amounts when the student goes 
back to work. The students are taking this financial responsibility very seriously, and 



6 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

the fees which have already been paid to the School are the result of several years of 
saving for this purpose. In addition to the students' fees, a scholarship of $700 has 
been raised in the budget for each girl, covering all other expenses of maintaining 
the School. 

In time it is hoped certain enterprises may be launched which will make the 
School at least partially self-supporting. Several such projects have already been 
discussed ; the possibility of raising young trees, spruce and pine, for the Christmas 
tree market, an idea encouraged by the state forestry department in order to save 
the forests; a co-operative jam kitchen where the waste fruit in the surrounding 
country might be utilized and some use of the school buildings in summer for a 
group of interested people who might pay their share of running expenses for the 
vacation period. 

To turn from this new venture at Vineyard Shore to recent developments in the 
Summer School movement, this past year has brought new impetus to this movement 
through the affiliation plan put into operation last year by Bryn Mawr, Barnard and 
Wisconsin. According to this plan, representatives from all three schools meet on a 
joint committee to confer on problems affecting the whole movement, and in each 
district these schools have joined forces for district work, in finding students, prepar- 
ing applicants, and in raising a scholarship fund. Each school is still an independent 
unit as far as its own policies are concerned, but new strength has come into the 
national organization through the knowledge that three schools together are interested 
in the same problems. A special committee to study the question of new schools for 
women workers has been appointed, in the hope that such schools may be started 
only where needed, and when the right conditions for democratic organization and 
freedom of teaching can be secured. Sixty people met last spring in the Ohio dis- 
trict to discuss workers' education, especially in relation at some future time to a 
resident school in that section of the country. Through the central office of the 
Affiliated Schools, teaching problems in this field of education are being studied by the 
faculty of the three Schools, in order to find suitable material for classroom work, 
the best preparation for applicants, and to help former students in using what they 
have learned for the benefit of their own communities. 

Last winter brought much new interest in the Summer School movement, which 
for the first time since the Bryn Mawr School was started in 1921 bids fair to become 
almost too popular. Never have there been so many demands for talks or articles, 
never so many people applying for teaching positions. The Summer term at Bryn 
Mawr opened with 105 industrial workers, the largest number ever enrolled, for the 
most part well-prepared and able students. 

As usual, the statistics of enrollment showed a wide diversity of trades, nationali- 
ties and sections of the country. Five places were assigned to students from Europe: 
two Danish workers, a photograph engraver, and a cotton mill operator; two women 
from England, an organizer and a garment worker; and one German girl, a textile 
worker. These foreign students, well acquainted with the industrial conditions and 
the labor movements of their own countries, brought to the School a sense of interna- 
tionalism, emphasized also by the mixed character of the group assembled from every 
part of the United States. 

The School was fortunate in having Miss Frances Perkins, the Commissioner 
of Labor in New York State, as the speaker on the opening day. Her subject, the 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 7 

"Progress of Women in Industry," caught the interest of every student present, and 
made the School feel the common problems facing the women workers. This interest 
was made more vivid by the Trade Party the following week, where the trades rep- 
resented in the School were dramatized in historical sequence. The "Ladies of 
Lowell," reading their dramatic announcement that the "Ladies of this country will 
never be slaves" ; the early days in the millinery and the garment trades when women 
in flowered skirts and picturesque bonnets came to work in the shops; and the scenes 
in the modern shop under union and non-union conditions were all dramatically por- 
trayed and enthusiastically received by the School. 

The unit plan, tried last year with success in the classroom work, was continued 
this year. By this arrangement of classes, the students were grouped in six units of 
about eighteen girls, on the basis of psychological tests, industrial background, and 
interest in one subject or another of the elective courses offered in each unit. Three 
instructors taught in each unit, planning their courses together in order to give each 
student a unified program of study. Economics and English (Literature, Composi- 
tion and Public Speaking) were required, and an elective course, Science, Psychology 
or History, was given as the third subject in each unit. 

One day in July was devoted to an institute held by the Philadelphia Women's 
Trade Union League on the Bryn Mawr campus. Problems of the textile industry 
were discussed, with students of the School from various parts of the country describ- 
ing their own processes in hosiery, cotton, silk or rayon. After a program of outside 
speakers, the students again took an active part in the program, staging a legislative 
hearing on the forty-four-hour week, and with spontaneous dramatic effect giving the 
views of the trade unionist, the employer, the efficiency expert, and the unorganized 
worker. Another phase of the educational program was carried out through a series 
of factory trips in connection with the classroom work of the units. Groups of girls 
visited the Ford assembly plant, a steel mill, a hosiery mill and an upholstery factory. 
The visits were reflected in the English classes the next week, bringing out interesting 
talks and articles full of vivid impressions. 

Of special interest this summer was the work in corrective gymnastics, a system 
which it is hoped may do much to relieve the strain and fatigue of the industrial 
worker, through more relaxation and bodily control. Thirty students took part in 
these exercises every day, while others joined the natural dancing classes, or played 
tennis. Many students as usual, had learned to swim before the summer was over. 
This systematic work on the part of the health department resulted in steady physical 
improvement for many girls during the two months' term. Medical examinations and 
preventive work in discovering early symptoms of diseases have been of the greatest 
benefit to the whole School. 

Certain events which have become School traditions mark the progress of the 
summer. The International Peace Festival with its vivid costumes of all nations, 
and its program of folk songs and dances; the picnics arranged by various units, 
combined sometimes with an informal forum, to discuss the use of leisure time, or the 
community life of every section of the United States; the beautiful concert of harp 
and cello music; and the final Lantern Ceremony held in the cloisters at dusk around 
the symbolic altar of wisdom, where the workers lighted their lanterns and went off 
in the darkness singing to carry on the light. 

As one looks back on the summer one has an impression of a high standard of 



8 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

classroom work, and genuine progress in teaching and in learning. This impression 
is confirmed by the reports of the faculty, who consider tthat from this viewpoint the 
summer has been unusually successful. On the other hand, the teaching is much 
hampered by the lack of suitable material for reading, and a very limited fund for 
books. Pamphlets growing out of the actual work of the classroom and recording 
some of the most significant discussions might be one answer. More graphic material 
maps, charts, diagrams and moving pictures are also much needed. 

As in every summer, the School faced a serious problem in creating unity among 
a group of people whose antagonisms at first are more apparent than their sense of 
common problems. Girls from the textile industry of the North and the South; gar- 
ment workers from the large industrial centers, whose union ranks have been broken 
by struggles and controversies; workers from the far west, with an atmosphere of 
out-of-door living and better industrial conditions; American-born and foreign-born 
workers, organized and unorganized, how in this brief two months can the School 
develop a program which is educational in the deepest sense of the word, not only in 
the classrooms, but also in the every-day life of the School community? 

That the industrial workers who have attended Bryn Mawr have benefited by 
the classes, by this constant mingling of different groups and their free expression of 
all shades of opinion is shown in the following extracts, taken from articles written 
by students this past summer: 

"A world of knowledge has opened its doors to me. I had no idea before this 
how to study, how to get the most out of what I did read and what to read." 

"I have learned one thing that I would not take anything for. That is to try 
and understand people that I don't like." 

"Bryn Mawr has opened a door for me and I am going through it by going on 
with these courses." 

"I intend to observe what happens in my community and factory and do what I 
can to help solve the great problem of industry." 

"I can more easily concentrate my mind on textbooks and grasp the substance 
of what I am studying. I have also advanced in the power to attack a problem." 

"My mind seems like a day after a night of rain." 

The winter work begins with district conferences of former students held as 
usual each year; conferences leading it is hoped to enrollment in evening classes, a 
greater sense of responsibility for industrial problems, and new activity on the part 
of former students in discovering well-qualified applicants for all the Summer Schools. 
These Alumnae groups now represent the Affiliated Schools, for all through the middle 
west girls from Wisconsin and Bryn Mawr are working together and in New York 
City Bryn Mawr and Barnard students have one Alumnae Association. The Southern 
Summer School, while not affiliated, is co-operating with Bryn Mawr in district work. 

New developments in New York City are indicative of new interest throughout 
the country in workers' education and for that reason may be briefly described here. 
A workers' Morning Class was initiated last year by Bryn Mawr Summer School 
students to provide special work on Saturday mornings for girls who were unem- 
ployed or on a five-day week with fifteen students who maintained a high standard 
of work in American Economic History. An interesting feature of this class was its 
control by a co-operating group of four organizations. The Women's Trade Union 
League which offered classrooms, the Museum of Art, giving a related course in the 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 9 

history of art, the Summer Schools of Barnard and Bryn Mawr, responsible for 
organization and publicity, and Columbia University Extension Department, which 
contributed the teacher's salary. This small beginning in a new sort of class for 
workers has led Columbia University to take the class officially this year into its 
Extension Department, with the same arrangements for classrooms and the same joint 
committee as an advisory body. The small art class has also led to a workers class 
at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, "What Workers have Wrought through the 
Ages," with Roberta Fansler, a Bryn Mawr alumna, as the teacher. It is significant 
that, as one more result of the Summer School, these two great educational institu- 
tions, with all their resources, have committed themselves to a new program of 
workers' education, carrying on with a teaching method adapted to the needs of an 
industrial group. 

One more experiment this year has grown out of the needs of these workers, 
through the reorganization of the College Settlement in New York for a new program 
of work. This settlement, dear to many college women in the early days of settle- 
ment work, has always held to its original purpose of bringing together college women 
and women wage earners for better understanding. So it was quite natural that when 
neighborhood needs changed, and a settlement in the Rivington Street district seemed 
no longer necessary, the committee of the Settlement should welcome a new plan in 
the field of education, still in line with settlement purposes. This plan, which is about 
to be carried out, is for the establishment of an Art Workshop for Industrial Workers 
and College Women, a corner where both groups can meet and study the creative 
use of leisure time through various forms of art. With the coming of the shorter 
workday in industry, a margin of leisure will give to industrial workers more oppor- 
tunity to explore the possibilities of music, drama, literature and other forms of art, 
and perhaps to discover in themselves new and hidden talent in creative work. Col- 
lege Alumnae too might welcome the opportunity to use leisure time in testing them- 
selves in those arts, the theoretical background of which many alumnae have studied 
in college classrooms. A new committee carrying out in its organization the Summer 
School plan of co-operation between college women and industrial workers, has been 
formed, with one Alumna from each of the women's colleges, and an equal number 
of industrial workers. These artists, musicians, writers and sculptors who have an 
understanding of the educational needs of an industrial group will be consulted as to 
the program of classes and the choice of teachers. Rooms have been engaged for the 
Workshop and Miss Mabel Leslie, formerly an electrical worker, and with long 
experience in organizing evening classes for workers through the Women's Trade 
Union League has been appointed as the Director. The first classes selected by the 
new committee are to be in the study of color, in plastic work, the appreciation of 
music and in creative writing, either poetry or labor drama. Any College Alumnae 
living in New York City who may be interested in enrolling as a student or giving 
help as a teacher in the Art Workshop should apply to Miss Mabel Leslie, at 14 East 
37th Street, New York City. 

The stated purpose of this new venture is "to develop opportunities for industrial 
workers and college women to study various forms of creative art, to discover through 
such study possibilities of creative work for leisure time and to apply the results of 
study to social and industrial situations." In other words, while the Art Workshop 
may point the way to new and delightful fields of creative work for both groups con- 



10 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

cerned, part of its purpose is to develop through this industrial group in its association 
with college women those forms of art which express the spirit of our industrial 
civilization, and which can be applied to make that civilization more significant and 
more beautiful. 

This summary of new plans afoot in the world of the Summer School would not 
be complete without mentioning that next year will be the tenth anniversary of the 
Bryn Mawr Summer School, and that various interesting suggestions have been made 
for a fitting celebration. The Summer School during its ten years of existence has 
found a place in the minds and hearts of many people, industrial workers, teachers, 
and active members of many widely scattered committees. Could some reunion take 
place next year at Bryn Mawr of former students and teachers? Could a small group 
of industrial workers be sent to Europe, as exchange students in one of the workers' 
schools abroad? Could future support of the School become more assured through 
some plan of endowment? These and other suggestions are under discussion, for all 
those associated with the School are eager to mark this tenth memorable year in 
School history. 



STUDENTS OF BRYN MAWR SUMMER SCHOOL, 
BY INDUSTRY, TRADE OR OCCUPATION 



1929 



Cigarettes 2 

Clothing 3 5 

Men's 12 

Women's 23 

Electrical Supplies 3 

Laundry Work 2 

Leather Goods 2 

M iscellaneous 22 

Cans 1 

Carburetors 1 

Corsets 1 

Cosmetics 1 

Flowers 1 

Food — Pretzels 1 

Hair — Artificial 1 

Ink, Paste, Etc 1 

Maid in Millinery Dept 1 

Nurse, Children's 1 

Optical Goods 1 

Photo-Engraver 1 

Railroad Clerk 1 

Rubber Goods 1 



Shore Polish Dauber 1 



Stencils, Addressograph 

Telephone Operator 

Waitress 

Washing Machines 

Watches 



. 1 
. 1 
. 1 

; i 
. i 

Wire Springs 1 

Woodwork, Veneer 1 

Mercantile Establishments : 

Millinery 

Neckwear 

Textiles 

Cotton 3 

Hosiery 5 

Jute 1 

Rayon 2 

Silk 2 

Woolen 2 



Total 



2 
11 

4 
15 



Trade Union Staff Work 3 

Upholstery _ 4 



105 



CONFERENCE OF ALUMNAE EXECUTIVES 

On the last three days of October the Alumnae Association acted as host to the 
Presidents and Executive Secretaries of the Alumnae Associations of Mount Holyoke, 
Radcliffe, Smith, Vassar and Wellesley. It was especially fortunate that the new 
Alumnae Office could present so good an impression, since no ray of sun, moon or 
stars deigned to lend lustre to the gathering, but a steady rain made pulp of the 
campus, and a thick mist completely blotted out the view on which we always rely 
when acting as guide to visitors from other campuses with greater acreage than our 
own. However, the new furniture and the Yellin iron work, the swimming pool and 
the cloister, all received most gratifying favorable mention, along with great interest 
in the new organization of the Graduate School. Dean Schenck's kitchenette also 
aroused much enthusiasm. 

The first event on the program was a dinner given at Wyndham by President 
Park, followed by a reception to meet the graduate students and a few other local 
alumnae from the five colleges represented. Mrs. Chadwick-Collins gave a luncheon 
the following day, inviting the members of the Executive Board of the Alumnae Asso- 
ciation and the Bryn Mawr alumnae on the faculty to meet the delegates. On the 
second evening the group adjourned after dinner to have coffee with President- 
Emeritus Thomas at the Deanery. They sat in a half circle around the fire in the big 
room and, over marrons glaces and cigarettes, talked of the reasons that justify the 
existence of the separate woman's college, and except for the smoke and a few new 
terms like "inferiority complex," it might have been one of the well-remembered 
Senior receptions. 

Three business sessions were held, at which many problems common to these six 
colleges and associations were discussed. The group was found to be evenly divided 
in the methods used for financing the various associations. Mount Holyoke, Radcliffe 
and Wellesley have given up the system of dues to the association, and make their 
Alumnae Fund appeal cover all needs. A contributor to the fund is a member of the 
association for the year in which the contribution is received. Smith and Vassar still 
ask for dues in addition to contributions, but are considering the advisability of chang- 
ing their system. In no case are the members treated as leniently as at Bryn Mawr, 
where, according to the by-laws, members are carried four years before being dropped 
for non-payment of dues. In most of the other cases, one year's delinquency means 
forfeiture of membership. 

Bryn Mawr was shown to be more liberal in its attitude toward associate mem- 
bers. In no other association are they allowed to vote or to hold office of any impor- 
tance. Their names are printed either in different type from those of full members 
in the Alumnae Register, or they are put together at the end of the book, or, some- 
times, their names are not carried at all. Much difference of opinion was expressed on 
this topic, but in general the feeling seemed to be that the distinction between A. B.'s 
and those who had left college without securing degrees was gradually breaking down, 
although in some cases "the rights and privileges" of an A. B. are still to be jeal- 
ously guarded. 

There are so many differences of organization in connection with clubs and local 
branches that comparisons were found to be difficult. The relation of the local groups 

(ID 



12 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

to the central associations of the other colleges is usually closer than in the case of 
Bryn Mawr, although in no case do they expect financial support, and sometimes even 
make regular group contributions toward the expenses of the Alumnae Office. Most 
of the Alumnae Councils have representatives from their various clubs, and many of 
them have a definite yearly program of work arranged through consultation with the 
central associations, which assume a certain responsibility for their activities. There 
was some evidence of a feeling that this is a phase which is passing, and that the 
function is purely social, except where the existence of an organization can be of 
practical use to the college, as in the case of any money-raising enterprise. 

The most interesting part of the conference dealt with the part now being taken 
by the Alumnae Associations of the country in regard to Alumnae Study Groups and 
Educational Conferences for Alumnae. Many evidences were given to show that 
there is gradually crystallizing a demand on the part of college men and women for 
guidance from the college of their undergraduate days along the line of continued 
education. In this movement Bryn Mawr was shown to be far behind. In fact, not 
even a gesture has been made, but that the demand exists may be shown by the fact 
that the Carnegie Foundation is now financing an inquiry into the matter, and has 
engaged for this purpose the services of Mr. Wilfred Shaw, for many years the 
Alumni Secretary of the University of Michigan. Mr. Shaw has already published 
two short articles on this subject in Scribners, and his report on the situation is to be 
printed within a few months. 

Vassar has done the most in this line and plans to go even farther. About three 
times a year week-end conferences have been held to which alumnae and their friends 
are invited. A fee of three dollars has met all the expenses entailed in securing speakers, 
who are drawn largely from the faculty and the alumnae. Among the subjects treated 
at conferences already held have been Poetry, Writing Courses, Religious Education, 
Reading for Children, Public Health, and Gardening, and one on Music has been 
planned for January. The attendance has been as high as 150. 

Radclifle has held two successful conferences, one on Vocationad and Part-Time 
Work and one on Modern Contemporary Literature. At the latter, 125 were expected 
and 400 came. Mount Holyoke is having a similar meeting this month, with Emily 
Dickinson as the subject for discussion. Wellesley is planning a three-day conference 
to take place immediately after Commencement. The subjects discussed will be 
Psychology and Religious Education. For several years Smith has conducted an 
alumnae week-end in the early Autumn. Alumnae visit classes, and round-table dis- 
cussions on two or three subjects, conducted by members of the faculty, are arranged. 
This year 350 alumnae attended. 

In addition to these conferences, many of the alumnae associations, with the 
co-operation of the faculty, stand ready to supply reading lists on many topics. At 
Smith some progress has been made along the line of "graduate projects," which 
includes some guidance by the faculty of lines of thought and study as desired by 
individual alumnae. 

In his article on Educating the Alumni in the November Scribners Wilfred B. 
Shaw describes what our colleges are doing: "Significant experiments are already under 
way to continue the education of those who, under the old system, considered them- 
selves educated. Some institutions are already sending out reading lists, some are hold- 
ing alumni conferences, while others are seeking to establish a more personal contact 






BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 13 

with their graduates. Smith College is reaching nearly a third of her alumnae through 
reading lists. . . . Dartmouth is sending out similar lists to all her graduates and 
President Hopkins finds from his wide contact with Dartmouth men that these 
pamphlets are greatly appreciated. Lafayette College has followed the same practice 
for two years and it can safely be assumed that the success of the first session of its 
Alumni College was in some measure due to the interest aroused by the twelve book- 
lists prepared by different members of the Faculty and widely distributed among the 
alumni. Vassar has held a long series of alumnae conferences in fields as widely varied 
as child education, gardening, and poetry; RadclifTe had three hundred alumnae back 
last March for a conference on modern literature; while the University of Michigan 
has definitely set up an Alumni University and has appointed an officer to stimulate 
and develop the relationship between the institution and its graduates implied in the 
project." 



ALUMNAE PRESIDENTS AND SECRETARIES 
WHO MET AT BRYN MAWR 

October 29, 30, and 31, 1929 

SMITH 

President: Miss Ruth H. French, 60 Pinckney Street, Boston, Mass. 
Secretary: Miss Florence H. Snow, Alumnae Office, Northampton, Mass. 

WELLESLEY 

President: Mrs. Walter S. Church, 6413 Jackson Street, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Secretary: Miss Laura M. Dwight, Alumnae Office, Wellesley, Mass. 

RADCLIFFE 

President: Miss Emilie Everett, 266 Chestnut Hill Avenue, Boston, Mass. (Not 

present.) 
Secretary: Miss Elizabeth W. Munroe, Cambridge 38, Mass. 

VASSAR 

President: Mrs. A. Ross Hill, 800 West 52nd Street, Kansas City, Mo. (Not 

present.) 
Vice-President: Mrs. John T. Gillespie, Morristown, N. J. 
Secretary: Miss Harriet Sawyer, Alumnae House, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

MOUNT HOLY ORE 

President: Mrs. Andrew C. Vauclain, 2416 North 54th Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Secretary: Miss Mary C. J. Higley, Alumnae Office, South Hadley, Mass. (Not 

present.) 
Former Secretary: Miss Florence Clement, for Miss Higley. 

BRYN MAWR 

President: Mrs. Alfred B. Maclay, 16 East 84th Street, New York City. 
Secretary: Miss Alice M. Hawkins, Bryn Mawr, Penna. 



NOMINATED FOR PRESIDENT 

Anne Maynard (Kidder) Wilson, 1903 (Mrs. Edmund Beecher Wilson) 

Anne Maynard Wilson was prepared for college by the Baldwin School and 
entered Bryn Mawr from there in 1899. She majored in mathematics, but eagerly 
entered into all undergraduate activities that gave scope to her artistic or creative 
gifts. She was particularly interested in dramatics and took a leading part in all the 
plays. She was one of the assistant managers of the first May Day Fete held at 
Bryn Mawr, although she was only a Freshman at the time. She contributed fre- 
quently to the various college publications. 

In 1904 she married Dr. Edmund Beecher Wilson, of Columbia University, 
now Da Osta Professor of Zoology Emeritus in Residence. Her only child, Nancy, 
a talented 'cellist, was a former student at Bryn Mawr. 

Some one who was in College spoke of her as standing out from her group because 
of her extraordinary social charm. With her it amounted to a gift. With this charm, 
indeed, as a very integral part of it, she had a "fine open-mindedness, combined with 
an ability to hold her own course without arousing contention in others. She could 
work with others as well as lead them." 

In view of her social and executive ability one can understand why in the early 
days of her membership in the Cosmopolitan Club in New York she soon was chosen 
to help govern it. From 1916 to 1919 she was Secretary, and from 1922 to 1925 she 
was its President. Since her Presidency she has been Chairman of several of the club's 
committees. For the two years following 1920 she was President of the Columbia 
University Teas Association. All of these demands on her time have in no way 
lessened her interest in Bryn Mawr. 

For the last four years (from 1925) she has been Chairman of the Bryn Mawr 
Regional Scholarship Committee of New York State. Every one who has followed 
the work of the regional committees knows how exacting have been the demands of 
the position and how eminently successful her work is. She has given freely to it all 
her gifts of intellect and personality. 



NOMINATED FOR VICE-PRESIDENT 

Gordon Woodbury Dunn, 1919 (Mrs. Frederick Sherwood Dunn) 

Gordon Woodbury Dunn was prepared for college by Bradford Academy and 
entered Bryn Mawr in 1915. From the first she took an active part in college affairs. 
She was President of her class her Junior year and was a member of the War Council 
Board, and in her Senior year she was President of the War Council until it dis- 
banded a few months after the Armistice. As President her task was so to direct its 
activities that each graduate and undergraduate student could contribute weekly a 
definite number of hours to war service without slighting academic work. That her 
own interest in academic work was not lessened is clearly indicated by the fact that 
she was that year also President of the English Club and won the George W. Childs 
Essay Prize. After she graduated she was elected permanent Vice-President and 
Treasurer of her class. Since 1927 she has been a member of the Academic Committee. 

(14) 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 15 

The year after she left college she went to France as a member of the American 
Committee for Devastated France, and worked in the Aisne section, with headquarters 
at Soissons. When she returned to this country she took a position as assistant in the 
Children's Room at the New York Public Library. 

In 1922 she married Frederick Sherwood Dunn and moved to Washington, where 
her husband was a member of the Mexican Claims Commission. She taught Greek 
in Miss Madeira's School the Winter of 1925-6, and it was the following year that 
she became a member of the Academic Committee. During her residence in Washing- 
ton she has been very active in the work of the Washington Bryn Mawr Club. The 
fact that one year she was in Baltimore while her husband studied at Johns Hopkins 
and the next in Geneva made no break in the continuity of her interest. 

For the people who knew her in College, no comment is necessary, but to those 
who came before her or after her, it might be interesting to speak of her keen interest 
in the whole subject of education, of her versatility and wide range, of her marked 
ability as an organizer, and of the humor and charm with which she presided at any 
meeting. 

The news of her sudden death was received November 22nd, at the close of the 
Council meeting. It is a shock and a grief to the Association. 



PROGRAM FOR THE COUNCIL MEETING IN 
NEW YORK 

Wednesday, November 20, 1929 
12.30 P. M. 

Buffet Luncheon at the Bryn Mawr Club. 

1.30 P. M. 

Business Session at the Bryn Mawr Club. 

Welcome — by Julia Langdon Loomis, 1895, Councillor for District II. 

Opening of the Business Session — by Louise Fleischmann Maclay, 1906, Presi- 
dent of the Alumnae Association of Bryn Mawr College. 

Report of the Treasurer and Presentation of the Budget for the Year 1930 — by 
Margaret E. Brusstar, 1903. 

Report of the Finance Committee and of the Alumnae Fund — by Caroline Flor- 
ence Lexow, 1908, Chairman. 

Discussion of Publication of Alumnae Register. 

Report on Revision of By-Laws — by Dorothy Straus, 1908, Chairman of Special 
Committee. 

8.00 P. M. 

Dinner for the District Councillors, the President of the Alumnae Association, the 
Chairmen of the Scholarships, Finance and Publicity Committees; the 
Chairmen of the Local Scholarships Committees and the Alumnae Secre- 
tary, at the home of Mrs. Alfred B. Maclay, 16 East 84th Street, fol- 
lowed by a conference on scholarships and other District problems. 

Dinner for all other members of the Council at the homes of New York Alumnae. 



16 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

Thursday, November 21, 1929 
9.30 A. M.-1.00 P. M. 

Business Session at the home of Mrs. Edward E. Loomis. 
Reports frojn District Councillors 

District I. — Helen Evans Lewis, 1913. 
District II. — Julia Langdon Loomis, 1895. 
District III. — Alletta Van Reypen Korff, 1900. 
District IV. — Katharine Holliday Daniels, 1918. 
District V. — Frances Porter Adler, 1911. 
District VI.— Edna Warkentin Alden, 1900. 
District VII. — Helen Brayton Barendt, 1903. 
Report of the Scholarship and Loan Fund Committee — by Margaret Gilman, 
1919, Chairman. 

Report of the Academic Committee — by Pauline Goldmark, 1896, 
Chairman. 

1.30 P. M. 

Luncheon at the home of Caroline McCormick Slade, 1896, Director of Bryn 
Mawr College, to meet the New York members of the Board of Trus- 
tees, and of the Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College. 

3.00 P. M. 

Business Session at the home of Mrs. Loomis. 

Report of the Committee on Health and Physical Education — by Dr. Marjorie 
F. Murray, 1913, Chairman, introducing Dr. Marjorie Jefleries Wagoner, 
1918, Resident Physician of the College, who will speak on the Depart- 
ment of Health of the College. 
Report on Behalf of the Alumnae Directors — by Frances Fincke Hand, 1897. 

8.00 P. M. 

Dinner in honor of President Park in the ball room of the Colony Club, by courtesy 
of Clara Vail Brooks, 1897. 

Friday, November 22, 1929 
9.30 A. M. 

Business Session at the home of Mrs. Edward E. Loomis. 

Undergraduate Problems as presented by Martha Humphrey, 1929, and Eliza- 
beth Perkins, 1930. 
Report of Alumnae Committee of Seven Colleges — by Frances Fincke Hand, 

1897. 
Report of Bulletin — by Marjorie Thompson, 1912, Editor. 
Report of the Nominating Committee — by Eleanor Little Aldrich, 1905, Chair- 
man. 
New Business. 

1.00 P.M. 

Luncheon for President Park and the Council, to meet the headmistress of New 
York City College Preparatory Schools at the home of Mrs. Loomis. 






MEETING OF CLASS COLLECTORS 

On Saturday, November 9th, a meeting of Class Collectors was held in New York 
City at the Bryn Mawr Club. Eighteen persons were present, including representatives 
from the Ph. D.'s and M. A.'s and from the classes of 1892, 1897, 1899, 1900, 1901, 
1905, 1907, 1908, 1912, 1913, 1916, 1920, 1922, 1923, 1925, 1926 and 1928. After 
the meeting the collectors were the guests at luncheon of Florence Lexow, 1908, 
Chairman of the Finance Committee and of the Alumnae Fund. 

Miss Lexow gave a general report, making a comparison between the Alumnae 
Fund contributions for 1928 and 1929. This showed a falling-off for the first ten 
months of 1929 both in the number of contributors and in the amount of money 
received. The explanation given for this was that every class had made a special effort 
during the last few years to raise the sum pledged for Goodhart Hall furnishings, and 
that a natural reaction was being felt. On the other hand, it was pointed out that the 
amount of the contributions which have been sent in to the Alumnae Fund undesig- 
nated is more than $3,000 greater than it was at this time last year. This means that 
enough money is already on hand to meet all the budgeted expenses of the Alumnae 
Association, including the $1,000 for the President's Fund and the $500 given 
annually to increase the Rhoads Scholarships, and the fiscal year will undoubtedly 
close with a surplus, to be disposed of according to the vote of the association at the 
next annual meeting. 

With this encouragement, all the collectors were urged to make forceful appeals, 
- since the goal of $6,000 promised to President Park for academic purposes is still fai 
off, and it is hoped that there will also be available considerable sums which can be 
given to the Honours Work and to the Needs of the Library, the two other stated 
objectives of the Alumnae Fund for 1929. Mrs. Hand spoke of the great desirability 
of creating a fund which can be given to the President without any restrictions, so 
that when she is confronted suddenly with such an emergency as the possible loss of 
valuable members of the faculty, who receive calls to other colleges, she may use it 
absolutely at her own discretion. Several of the other colleges have such funds, which 
have proved to be most valuable aids in crises of this kind, which arise rather fre- 
quently, and which usually must be met immediately. 

In the discussion which followed Mrs. Hand's plea, the question was asked as to 
whether the association would be expected by the College to continue such support 
indefinitely. While no positive answer could be given to this, it was the general feeling 
that until the College has a larger endowment, it will naturally lean upon the alumnae 
to supply its needs each year. Since the sum of $2,000 was voted by the association last 
February to increase the salaries of Associate Professors, obviously a like sum must 
be forthcoming from some source each year for this same purpose, so that it seems fair 
to assume that the association has a moral obligation to continue at least this amount 
each year until 1935, and that it is likely that the members of the association will feel 
that there can be no more appealing cause than such academic needs as the Alumnae 
Fund objectives for this year, and will, therefore, be ready and willing to pledge their 
continued support. In this way the idea of "Living Endowment" will be carried out. 

Miss Lexow asked each representative present to give her opinion as to how 
much more money might be expected from her class this year, especially with a view 
toward estimating how nearly the promised $6,000 is in sight. At present more than 
half of the classes are still making payments on their pledges to the Goodhart Hall 
Furnishings Fund, which makes it difficult to count on any considerable sum toward 

(17) 



18 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

any other purpose. It was reported that these payments had been coming in so well 
that at present there remains only $3,000 of indebtedness to the College for the 
money advanced to pay for the iron work, which must all be paid by June 15, 1930. 
The group of classes who hold reunions in June, 1930, will have to concentrate 
entirely on raising the amounts pledged for their reunion gifts, but those who held 
reunions in previous years have so nearly completed their payments in nearly every 
case that many of their members can be counted on to help swell the total desired for 
the fund for academic purposes. 

Most of the collectors present agreed that it was well to make an annual appeal 
even when a class had just finished making a special gift, believing that every encour- 
agement should be given to form the habit of regular contributions to the Alumnae 
Fund, however much the amounts given may vary. Mrs. Ives, Collector for 1892, 
read a letter from a classmate saying that although she had received within the last 
few weeks four different requests for money, which had come to her directly or 
indirectly as a result of her college connections, she had made it a principle never to 
refuse any Bryn Mawr appeal. With this tangible evidence of the triumph of loyalty 
to an ideal, over a most natural and well-founded irritation at the constant demands 
emanating from what is bound to appear to be the same aching void, these lineal 
descendants of the daughters of the horse leech went away. 



ALUMNAE BOOKS 

Short as Any Dream, by Elizabeth Shepley Sergeant. Harper & Brothers, 
1929. 

Miss Sergeant presents her record of a Maine family, beginning when Maine 
was still The Wilderness, against New York today. "My great-great-grandfathers 
built their Maine houses with their own hands. My great-grandfathers and my grand- 
fathers inherited from them. Yet here am I, with all this atavistic attachment to a 
sacred dwelling, home of the race, deriving from some forgotten Beeckman. My 
janitor is a Norwegian sailor. My maid a Sicilian peasant. My landlord a Viennese 
art dealer who may at any minute sell out to the Jewish real estate interests." She 
writes her story "suspended between a subway and a skyscraper." She has been at the 
front, in the great war, has been wounded, and treated as though a soldier in Front 
Line hospitals. So it is with a consciousness deeply modified by the present that she 
sets herself to record the family past, a task bequeathed her, a weight she must be 
rid of by writing down, a Myth of Creation. But, "you'll be so disappointed," she 
insists to the old cousin, last worshipper of The Family, who has been the force 
impelling her, "so little about Verona — the people — the way they felt crowded out 
the rest," — all the mere furniture of the altars. 

She revisits the ancestral places and finds the automobile has done its work. 
Greek fruiterers and Olde Shoppes spot the wide avenues bordered by elms, where 
the great frame houses still stand set back from the thoroughfare, austere, legendary. 
Indeed it is one of the delights of Miss Sergeant's record that she restores laughter 
and love to what our imaginations have over-puritanized. Nancy Penton, in 1820, 
knows she loves the young doctor who is engaged to her sister, and when her sister 
is carried off by congestion of the lungs, she marries him, and they then are happy in 
the timeless, undogmatic way of lovers. Her daughter, Mary Bumstead, wide- 
mouthed, dimpled, supremely charming always to all men — and to her own children — 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 19 

marries with passionate love a sensitive dreamer. He takes her to Minnesota to claim 
land. The terror of the Indian uprising, that in Minnesota was a closer matter than 
the Civil War just starting, is beautifully felt and given, along with the roughness 
of frontier life. Mary has a radiance and a laugh her granddaughter has handed 
to us for our delight — and greater courage. Mary's husband too seems to this reviewer 
a successful re-creation, reviving sympathy for our Frontier story. 

We have tacked grimness to the independence of family life on the Frontier, 
whether in Maine or Minnesota, and yet any such self-confidence today suggests light- 
heartedness, generosity, laughter. Miss Sergeant has persuaded us that our Yankee 
pioneers were no sterner than we are. Is it their language that has misled us? Their 
words have become stilted and dour to our ears. The helpless users were not so 
perpetually serious as their vocabulary has come to seem. 

It is a fine inheritance Miss Sergeant has now put in its place — a matter for 
pride and not fear. Her book is richly human, and often beautiful in a strictly 
American fashion. Edith Pettit Borie, '95. 

The French Fmnc, by Eleanor Lansing Dulles. Macmillan Co., New York, 
1929. 

This is a valuable book from several points of view: it is of interest to the 
historian for a phase of French war history as obscure as it is important; to the 
economist as an attempt at the verification and qualification of the classical theories of 
money and foreign trade; and to the general reader as an accurate record of matters 
much distorted by propaganda and national passions. With its excellent equipment 
of analytical digest, index, bibliography, statistical tables, and abundant footnotes 
it may well serve as a standard book of reference not only for the financial history 
of the French nation from 1914 to 1928, but for the currents of opinion, so important 
to understanding and so soon lost with the ephemeral leaflets in which they are, to a 
large extent, expressed. 

The construction of the record, the mere fact gathering, out of government pub- 
lications, occasionally incomplete and certainly unfamiliar, from commercial publica- 
tions, newspapers, bank records, and similar material must have presented numerous 
occasions for patience and ingenuity. It is to Miss Dulles' great credit that the 
intrinsic difficulty of this task did not deflect her interest from the large issues. Her 
book conveys a vivid sense of the interaction of economic forces and their close relation 
to the environing political and cultural conditions of French life. She pauses to 
point out that the changes in the value of the franc may alter the French habits of 
saving, the size of industrial establishments, and the types of business leadership. It 
may be a new, a less sympathetic, and a less contrasting France to which the American 
tourist of the future is destined. 

The theoretical portion of the work may be taken as typical of the newer de- 
velopment in economic studies. It is an attempt to use statistics to test the validity of 
economic reasoning. Never before have such attempts had so rich a chance of success, 
for never before have facts been gathered on such a scale nor have statistical methods 
been sufficiently developed. With abundant material and with sharpened weapons, 
the economists of today have the means to measure short-time fluctuations where 
Ricardo and his contemporaries, facing the same problems as the result of the 
Napoleonic wars, could deal only with long-time effects. It is likely that we face a 
change in emphasis in the theories under consideration comparable to that wrought 



20 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

in the theory of value when attention turned to market as apart from natural value 
i. e., included deviations as well as equilibria. Miss Dulles gives one a lively impres- 
sion of current controversy; of the conflicts of opinion over such issues as gold and 
credit; a managed currency, the purchasing power parity doctrine. One may recom- 
mend this book as a most convenient answer to the question: what are economists 
thinking about? 

The reviewer cannot refrain from noting that Miss Dulles has habits of writing 
which give the reader an unnecessarily hard task. Over and over again, for example, 
she gives the end of the sentence to a merely qualifying phrase and so prevents the 
focus of attention. The too frequent use of loose qualifications as "to a considerable 
extent" is irritating in a study largely quantitative. And the use of bulky phrases 
caught from heavy journalese — "the retail price situation" instead of merely retail 

Esther Lowenthal, 1905, 
Professor of Economics, Smith College. 



LETTERS FROM ALUMNAE 

The following extracts from a letter from Frances Ferris, 1909, are of interest: 
"I went to Copenhagen expecting to have a day or two there before the opening of 
the Progressive Education Association Conference at Elsinore. But the town was 
simply jam full and I had to make my way on out to Elsinore that night. It was a 
journey I shan't soon forget for I had never been in a country where I couldn't 
speak the language, and this late at night, into the bargain. But, by dint of jumping 
up at every station and inquiring 'Espergjaerde' in a hopeful tone of voice, I arrived. 
Espergjaerde is a little watering place about five miles down the coast from Elsinore, 
charming if one wanted to stay there, but desperately inconvenient considering I 
wanted to attend conferences in Elsinore three times a day. I finally rented, a bicycle 
and got into action again after ten years, so that I managed to attend two at least. 

* * * 

"I adored Denmark and the Danes and had a few days in Copenhagen after- 
ward, waiting to go to Russia. . . . From Copenhagen we went, a party of 
eight teachers from the conference, by boat to Helsingfors, Finland, a two-day voyage 
in the cleanest and most compact of little boats. But both the Baltic and the North 
Sea are quite as rough as the Atlantic, I find. Helsingfors is a very thriving, modern 
city. Perhaps I don't need to tell you that, but I have always thought of it as an 
outpost of civilization on the edge of the Arctic Circle, the inhabitants of which were 
largely Esquimaux living in igloos. How utterly ignorant and provincial we are — or I 
am at any rate. We spent only one day there and left at midnight for Leningrad. 
Next morning about nine we crossed the border. . . . The alphabet broke into 
bits like a kaleidescope and you couldn't even read the names of the stations. I felt 
exactly like Alice stepping through the looking glass. I spent the next two weeks in 
topsey turvey land. Russia is the most contradictory country you can ever imagine. 
It has at once the extremes of the good and the bad that make you feel quite crazy 
at times. But at all times it is so stimulating, so vital, that everything else seems flat, 
stale and unprofitable by comparison. It certainly makes you stand and deliver. No 
ready-made opinions and convictions stand a minute. Everything is questioned, 
religion, marriage, government. Every social and economic institution you have ever 
thought of as approximately permanent, simply rocks beneath your feet. 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 21 

"Leningrad made me frightfully melancholy, for it reminded me of nothing so 
much as the war zone in 1917 with its streets all torn up, its houses falling into dis- 
repair or being wrecked, its dirt and deserted aspect. A million people have left it, 
and so, though it isn't really deserted — as one quickly found out, if one boarded a tram 
— the great wide boulevards with only here and there a dilapidated droshky or ram- 
shackle Ford gave that impression. The tide is running out of Leningrad and run- 
ning into Moscow. There the overcrowding is as bad as the desertion in Leningrad. 

* *• * 

"They are building apartment houses as fast as they can, but there are not half 
enough. They have a curious system of rents, two families occupying the same kind 
of apartment pay different rents, according to their number, income, age, etc. This, 
taking circumstances into consideration is universal, even in prison sentences. Their 
maximum sentence is ten years except for treason, for which capital punishment is 
the penalty. . . . The prisoners are paid for their labor. In one prison we 
visited there was a textile factory, and there they buy their own clothing — ordinary 
clothes and supplementary food if they want it. I got a cake of chocolate that was 
very good but very expensive. One-third of their earnings are withheld to form a 
fund to help them start fresh when they leave prison. They are allowed to go from 
cell to cell and visit when not on the shift that is working in the factory, and each 
cell has its radio. The farmers even are allowed to go home for harvest if the 
Commune will pledge itself that they will return to prison afterward. 

* « * 

"I was in Russia only two weeks and in only two cities, so it's silly to try to 
form any real opinion anyhow, much less hand it out to other people. 

"From Russia I came by way to Warsaw, where I stopped a couple of days, to 
Vienna, which I simply loved. The city is so enticing with its shops, operas, cafes, 
concerts, etc., the surrounding country so lovely, and the people so charming. I did a 
good deal of school and clinic visiting, and if my German had only been better, I 
should have certainly stayed on to work there. Both Adler and Freud have clinics 
for the schools which are entirely free to visitors and which interested me enormously. 
The people seemed to avail themselves of them very freely and I was curious to know 
what the effect will be on the next generation. Even what resources we have in 
America of that kind, people will not use. If only the idea of preventive medicine 
will carry along with it the idea of preventive measures in mental diseases, we ought 
to get a much better balanced and better developed generation than this has been. 

* * * 

"From Vienna, I went off on a ten-day toot through the Tyrol all on my own. 
. . . I should of course have preferred having a companion, but I wasn't going to 
waste that golden opportunity for the want of one. So off I started with a German 
dictionary in my pocket and a Baedeker in my bag, and had a heavenly time. 
I took a marvelous motor trip through the Dolomites to Cortina d'Ampezzo. That 
was the best yet, for aside from the scenery, its historic interest was very great as that 
whole country was the Austro-Italian 'front' during the war. Such a contrast to 
what I had known in France and Belgium. Of course it was impossible absolutely 
to level such mountains and fill up such vallej^s as those were, but imagine the battles 
that raged in those narrow defiles and the devastation of country when every gun 
shot loosened an avalanche. A nice German, who spoke French very well as he had 



22 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

been on the French front all through the war, and had been twice wounded, once by 
the Americans, got to talking with me apropos of the war about pacifism and though 
we of course had very different fundamental ideas on the subject, I found, as so often 
I found in the soldiers in France, more understanding and sympathy than from any- 
one else. 

* * * 

"From Innsbruck, I came to Lucerne, but it was too late. The weather had 
broken and after waiting three days to go up the Rigi, I left and came on to Geneva, 
where I have been settling in and getting ready to stop my flitting about and do some 
serious work at the Jean Jacques Rousseau Institute." 
October 16, 1929. 

MISS KINGSBURY'S IMPRESSIONS OF RUSSIA 

Miss Kingsbury has been spending six months in Russia to study the position of 
women under the Soviet government. The New York Times of November 9th car- 
ried the following interview: 

" 'We were immensely struck by the eagerness of local authorities to help our 
investigation. There was no attempt at concealment or obstruction. On the contrary, 
they showed naive pride at what sometimes seemed only moderate achievement. On the 
other hand, everywhere there was an atmosphere of intense activity and of much 
being done, which compares favorably with the United States. 

'For instance, the metallurgic works at Nizhni Novgorod has buildings of real 
beauty and a magnificent 'House of Culture' for the workers with a theatre and club 
rooms. The agricultural and machine plant at Rostoff has one of the finest factory 
buildings to be seen anywhere, with an arched roof and an arrangement of glass panels 
providing diffused light. It is admittedly more expensive than the typical modern 
American factory being erected by the Kahn firm at Stalingrad for tractors, but 
it is more effective and I imagine more satisfactory to work in. 

'Stalingrad is a town of extraordinary interest because it is being rebuilt almost 
from the ground up. No American 'boosters' could surpass the Stalingraders in civic 
enthusiasm. Situated at the junction of the projected Volga-Don canal, Stalingrad 
will be the 'Soviet's Detroit,' the residents assert proudly, and the huge new com- 
mercial buildings for the workers are already in the course of construction.' 

The American engineer Calder in charge of the tractor plant found the Russians 
good and energetic workmen, although, he said, one had to show them everything, 
but that, once they understood, they remembered, and the buildings are advancing even 
faster than was projected, the American educators reported. 

From Samara Saratof the American women visited villages and collective farms. 
They saw no signs of 'class war,' but noticed everywhere along the trip the better 
appearance of collective farms, with their wide and regular fields, as compared with 
the narrow 'strip farming' of individual peasants, still common in Russia though 
it has been obsolete in Western Europe for hundreds of years. 

'It is impossible to draw a conclusion from so hurried a trip,' Professor Kings- 
bury concluded, 'but we saw enough to prove the absurdity of the stories that the 
Russian economic effort is largely wasted or confined to limited areas for "show win- 
dow" purposes. Nor can one fail to be impressed by the genuine energy and enthus- 
iasm of the local authorities who are not only trying to transform Russia, but seem to 
believe it can be done.' " 



CLASS NOTES 



1897 



Class Editor: Alice Cilley Weist 
(Mrs. Harry H. Weist) 
174 E. 71st St., New York City. 

The class extends to Edith Edwards 
sincerest sympathy over the loss of her 
brother, Mr. Daniel Mann Edwards, Har- 
vard '04, who died on June 25th, at Woon- 
socket, R. I. As we grow older it is hard- 
er to lose our close relatives. 

Maisie Campbell says she has no news, 
but she went to the sea somewhere for 
three weeks. The new Brearley, with its 
afternoon session, will fill her time more 
than ever this year. She greatly enjoyed 
Grace Campbell Babson's visit, and Grace's 
two children, Gorham (17) and Mary 
(14), and hated to have them sail away 
for the West, via the Panama Canal. 

Frances Hand went abroad with all her 
family, but they separated over there. She 
and her husband took a hasty but delight- 
ful trip through the Black Forest, Tyrol, 
Vienna, Budapest, over the Carpathians 
into Poland, back to Berlin and Paris and 
home. 

Elizabeth Angel went to Petersham, 
Mass., and enjoyed every moment in the 
quaint farmhouse they have rented twice. 
The boys had a fine time, and but for 
Henry's having his tonsils out the summer 
would have been a complete success. 

Alice Weist went to France to see small 
Mary Weist, a most adorable, doll-like 
person who speaks only French. Inci- 
dentally, it was good to see Mary's par- 
ents ! We spent most of the time at the 
seashore near Dinard, usually too cold to 
swim, but with enough bathing to find 
that Mary loves it, as well as dogs. My 
younger son, Edward, went over and came 
back with me, and Helen joined us at 
Dinard from the Progressive Education 
Conference at Elsinore, and came back 
with us, S. T. C. A. on the Holland Amer- 
ica Line. Edward and I had a thrilling 
visit to Mont St. Michel. 

It would be so pleasant if more would 
write in their news without having postals 
sent them, and pleasanter still if the re- 
turn postals came back at once. 

1899 

Class Editor: Ellen P. Kilpatrick 
1027 St. Paul St., Baltimore, Md. 

Susanne Blackwell, the second daughter 
of Katherine Middendorf Blackwell, has 
announced her engagement to John 
Thompson, of Trenton. 

Dorothy Fronheiser Meredith and her 
daughter spent the greater part of the 



summer motoring in the Southwest. Doro- 
thy is most enthusiastic about Colorado. 

Emma Guffey Miller has sent in the 
following note. The whole class joins with 
her in extending its deep sympathy to 
Dorothy Bradley. 

"Members of '99 as well as those of the 
class of 1929 will learn with sorrow of 
the death of Elizabeth Bradley, for one 
year a student at Bryn Mawr. 

"Elizabeth, who was the daughter of 
Dorothy Sipe Bradley, of '99, entered 
college with the class of '29 but was 
forced to give up her work owing to the 
development of spinal trouble which was 
the result of an injury several years pre- 
vious. 

"She underwent several operations and 
was hopeful of recovery and to hasten it 
went to Tucson, Arizona, last September 
so she might benefit by a better climate. 

"She began to study in the University 
there and was doing excellent work in 
Archaeology when she was attacked by a 
severe form of enteric fever from which 
she died three weeks later. 

"To the Members of the Bryn Mawr 
Club of Pittsburgh, Elizabeth Bradley 
represented something more than a former 
student, for her brave struggle with ill- 
ness made us feel that she possessed a 
fineness of spirit and endeavor which is 
given to few, and our deepest sympathy is 
extended to the members of her family." 

1900 
Class Editor: Louise Congdon Francis 
(Mrs. Richard Francis) 
Haverford, Penna. 

Edith Wright visited Bryn Mawr in Oc- 
tober and Margaret Findley (1931), 
Elise's daughter, had a tea for her in Den- 
bigh. On November 9 Reggie represented 
1900 at the meeting of Class Collectors 
in New York. 

Barbara Mosenthal is a freshman at 
Vassar. Johnny writes that she is still 
hoping to send Joan to Bryn Mawr. She 
writes further of her summer in Europe, 
which cost her the reunion, as follows: 
"We had a wonderful three months' trip 
in Sweden and Norway — all of us except 
Barb. We went 'way north into Holland 
and had an interesting stay on the Lafoten 
Islands. It's a marvelous stretch of coast 
up there, but pretty dangerous. The boat 
we came down from the North on, the 
end of August, struck a rock a few weeks 
later and sank in three minutes." 

Susan Dewees has rented her house for 
the winter and is entertaining suggestions 
as to how best to spend a thoroughly foot- 
free winter. 



(23) 



24 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



1906 

Class Editor: Mrs. Edw. W. Sturdevant 
Marine Barracks, Quantico, Va. 

As far as her duty to her class is con- 
cerned the Editor has not been exactly 
active, but two moves, settling two 
houses, one to rent and one to live in, 
with the final addition of a very severe 
cold has made editing simply beyond her. 
She has a collection of news, however, 
that reached her too late for the July 
number. The class is doing wonderfully in 
responding to post cards, but — will they 
try to send them in some days before the 
end of the month, as the Editor must 
have her notes in the Alumnae Office by 
the first of each month. 

She leads off proudly this time with a 
letter from a husband ! Herbert Gibbons 
wrote last summer that they were in Por- 
nic, Brittany, where they had a house. 
They had a series of illnesses all winter 
culminating in Christine's being operated 
on for appendicitis. Christine spent last 
winter studying singing with Mme. 
Abramoff in Paris; Mimi studying profes- 
sional dancing with Jacques Dalcroze in 
Geneva; Hope sharing a governess with 
the little Frieseke girl in Normandy, while 
Lloyd graduated from Taft School in 
June and is now a freshman in Prince- 
ton. Herbert himself has lately published 
another book: The New Map of South 
America. A letter from Helen completes 
the chronicle. Christine and Mimi are to 
spend the winter in Paris, Hope goes back 
to Miss Fine's School, and — most thrill- 
ing of all — Herbert and Helen sail from 
Los Angeles on December 9th for a trip 
around the world, landing in Marseilles in 
the spring. The trip is being financed by 
a Mr. Albert Kahn, a Frenchman who es- 
tablished a foundation to give this trip 
to writers and professors. 

Lucia Ford Rutter and her family spent 
two months on a ranch in New Mexico 
last summer and came home by way of 
California and the Grand Canyon. Her 
oldest boy entered the Mohonk School 
this autumn and her daughter Elizabeth 
is with Jessie at the Walker School. 

Katherine McCauley Fearing spent a 
delightful six weeks at Seabreeze, Fla., 
last winter. She spent July and August 
at East Gloucester, Mass. Her principal 
occupation and interest is her small daugh- 
ter, now six years old and well and happy. 

Mary Richardson Walcott's most excit- 
ing news is that Molly has been chosen at 
Smith to spend her junior year in France. 
1906 is proud of her and send her their 
congratulations and best wishes for a 
happy and successful year. The two old- 



er boys spent the summer as wranglers on 
ranches in the West. Robert is in Har- 
vard, writing and illustrating jokes for 
the Lampoon. John graduates from St. 
Paul's this year. He has made the crew 
and won the school short story contest, a 
good combination. Maurice, the youngest, 
is only fourteen and may go to boarding 
school this year. 

Elizabeth Townsend Torbert had a fine 
summer at Squam Lake, N. H. 

Grace Wade Levering and Jessie 
Thomas Bennett with Rosanne sailed for 
Antwerp on June 21st. Jessie took her 
roadster and planned to conduct them over 
Europe. The husbands followed the end 
of July. Perhaps next time the C. E. can 
tell you how the trip turned out, she con- 
fesses to a burning curiosity. 

Mary Withington wrote in July, much 
excited over a proposed month in Eng- 
land to be followed by a week in Paris 
before her return. She spent a very busy 
winter helping to install the library in its 
beautiful new building, varied by trips to 
various other libraries to study their 
equipment, lighting, etc. Nan Pratt and 
her sister spent their vacation at a camp 
in the Adirondacks run by Bertha Brown, 
'04. Helen Sandison went to the Pacific 
Coast. 

Augusta French Wallace's brother, 
Clayton, died in September. The class 
send her their deepest sympathy. 

1907 
Class Editor: Alice Hawkins 
Taylor Hall, Bryn Mawr. 



The news has just been received of the 
death of Letitia Butler Windle on Novem- 
ber 22nd at the University Hospital, ' 
Philadelphia, where she had been for six 
weeks under the care of Dr. Charles 
Frazier. 

The class wishes to extend its sincere 
sympathy to Margaret Ayer Barnes on 
the death of her mother, Mrs. Benjamin 
Ayer, who died in Chicago in September 
after a long illness. 

May Ballin won the New Jersey State 
Golf Tournament for Women this au- 
tumn. May seems to be one of those re- 
markable people who can play both golf 
and tennis well, and positively clutters up 
her family's apartment with the prizes she 
is always winning. She has the additional 
reward of retaining her girlish figure. It 
was a great sight to watch her bare brown 
legs running around the tennis courts of 
Nantucket last summer. 

Mabel O'Sullivan made such an impres- 
sion on the inhabitants of Maine by her 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



25 






teaching of English at the University of 
Maine last summer that she was recently 
induced to go all the way to Portland 
for a week-end to make a speech. 

Since Bess Wilson's year in England 
she has become a most enthusiastic gar- 
dener and has done wonders with her 
place at Malvern. She threatens to retire 
from medical research and devote herself 
to delphinium, perhaps raising Scotch 
puppies as a side issue. Some people ad- 
vise her to take up real estate, as she has 
been so successful in buying disreputable 
looking houses and turning them quickly 
into delightful dwelling places. Not satis- 
fied with a house in town in addition to 
her country place, she has just bought a 
seashore cottage at Spray Beach, N. J., 
and is making that over. The extraordi- 
nary part of all this activity is that she 
seems to manage to be in three places at 
once in addition to holding down a full- 
time job which demands great scientific 
concentration. We are glad to say that 
she still sings and plays her own accom- 
paniments, and insists upon having a 
piano wherever she is living at the mo- 
ment. 

1909 
Class Editor: Helen Bond Crane 
Denbigh Hall, Bryn Mawr. 
When the Editor should have been 
sending in a column for the November 
Bulletin, she was immersed in Freshman 
Week, and hence did nothing else. A red 
class entered this year, distinguished by 
an unusually high average, the ability to 
sing, and the wit to keep the Sophomores 
from getting their Parade Song. Inci- 
dentally, when the classes gathered in 
Pern Arch after the parade and the Jun- 
iors sang "Side by Side," the Freshmen 
greeted it with cheers and applause and 
thought it had been written for the occa- 
sion. One of them said to us afterwards, 
"Did you hear that song? That was a 
good one!" (Please page D. Child, or 
Cliffy — or both.) Two weeks later the 
Freshmen distinguished themselves at 
Lantern Night by their remarkable sing- 
ing of the Freshmen Lantern Hymn, 
"Sophias philai paromen." As we sat on 
the cloister roof listening to "Pallas" and 
"Sophias" and waxing somewhat senti- 
mental over the red lanterns, we were glad, 
once again, that 1909 had braved the pro- 
tests of the entire college and the damp 
and dismal early morning practices, in or- 
der to start so lovely a tradition as 
Lantern Night in the cloister. (If you 
have forgotten those painful weeks, read 
Frances Browne's reminiscences in the 
class book.) Well, now we belong to the 



ages — though the ages are quite unaware 
of it, or us. 

During the past few weeks we have had 
several fleeting glimpses of "classe." 
Bertha Ehlers has been entering her niece 
in college and bringing her to various 
functions. Bertha is president of the 
Philadelphia College Club and eats com- 
mittee luncheons there almost daily. Club 
affairs almost threaten to obscure insur- 
ance for her. 

Julia Doe Shero is teaching at the 
Thorne School; she drives over daily 
from Swarthmore with her three daugh- 
ters, who are in the school, and seems to 
thrive on her somewhat strenuous living. 

Hilda Spraguesmith and her mother are 
living in President Park's house for this 
year, as Miss Park is leaving for her sab- 
batical year, after Thanksgiving. They 
have just returned from a perfect year 
abroad, judging by Hilda's account of it; 
they motored in their own car, at their 
own pace, through most of France. "Mr. 
Emile F. Williams' Undiscovered France 
became our constant guide, always to be 
relied on and always leading us to new 
enchantments." We only wish we had 
space to give some of her impressions of 
Chartres, Angers, Poitiers, Angouleme 
and Periguex; the prehistoric caves of 
Les Eyzies; Toulouse, Carcassonne and 
other alluring spots. After hibernating in 
Italy, they took to the car again; "retrac- 
ing our steps across the mountains, we 
visited Avignon and its far-famed 'pont' ; 
then on to Nimes and to Millau to rejoin 
'Mr. Williams.' Twisting and turning on 
a narrow road high above a great chasm, 
the world lost in heavy clouds and driz- 
zling rains, we were thankful that the 
roads of France belong so often to you 
alone. From Millau we followed the gorge 
of the Tarn, so frequently compared to 
our own Grand Canyon — but it is greatly 
in miniature. We regretted that we could 
not stop over night at a perfect little 
mediaeval chateau, drawbridge and port- 
cullis included, but we had to push on. 
From Mondes we climbed rapidly into the 
snow fields, 4200 feet up, crossed the di- 
vide, and came down to Le Puy. With 
the cathedral an aerial church and the 
little chapel of San Michel perched high 
on top of the Rocher d'Aiguille, we found 
Le Puy a most fascinating place." If any 
of you are going to France, see Hilda 
first. 

Dorothy North sailed on the Saturnia, 
October 16th. "We saw the lovely 
Azores, and after gazing on those rocks 
and cliffs and substantial hills with real 
woods and terraces like ruled lines, and 
houses of all sorts of colors, it seemed as 



26 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



if we were almost ashore, and I had 
imagined the Atlantic would consider it- 
self a lake, and a tame one, for the rest 
of the way. Now I question the Mediter- 
ranean, which we tackle next, and vague 
recollections of Vergil and somebody's 
shaken locks and mangled wreckage of 
Latin come to mind, all suggestive of 
storms. ... I hope to put in some 
months over here, playing around the 
Mediterranean, wherever it's warm and 
interesting; then in the spring to go back 
to Chicago." Until then her address will 
be care Morgan & Co., 14 Place Vendome, 
Paris. 

Catherine Goodale Warren returned to 
Honolulu with her mother last spring, 
and gardened strenuously all summer, 
"much to the astonishment of the Japa- 
nese servants." She returned to her 
Haverford apartment early in November; 
and in February she and her mother will 
sail for Europe "to be gone a year, if we 
can keep warm in winter and be content." 

Mary Goodwin Storrs got back to 
China last winter, and had the novel ex- 
perience of going up the Min River in a 
motor boat. With three days at the end 
in the usual "sparrow boat" (poled by 
boatmen) they made a record trip of a 
week and an hour from Foochow to Shao- 
wu; without the motor boat the journey 
used to take some three weeks. In addi- 
tion to her many other duties, Mary is 
teaching three grades of Calvert School 
lessons to her three oldest children and 
some others in the station. 

1911 
Class Editor: Louise S. Russell 

140 E. 52nd Street, New York City. 

Harriet Couch Coombs has a fifth son, 
Arthur, born April 28. 

Margaret Dulles Edwards has moved 
from Bronxville to Radburn, N. J. 

Molly Kilner Wheeler has a son, born 
in August. 

Margaret Hobart Myers and her family 
spent the summer in Easthampton with 
her father. She went back to Sewanee 
in September, accompanied by six chil- 
dren, aged two to sixteen years, and 
twelve pieces of luggage (three of them 
being dogs, one with a broken leg). 

Catherine Delano Grant has a son, 
Christopher, born in July. He is Cath- 
erine's fifth son and sixth child. 

On her way back from the White 
Mountains this summer, Betty Taylor 
Russell spent a night with Ruth Wells, 
and found her happy and busy in her job 
as Director of the New Bedford Branch 
of the Massachusetts S. P. C. A. Ruth 
spent her vacation in Michigan. 



Mary Taylor spent a week in New York 
in October getting Norvelle Browne off 
for Europe. Mary has given up the 
thought of mere jobs and is devoting her- 
self to her family. 

During Norvelle Browne's stay in Eu- 
rope Blanche Cole Lowenthal will take 
over the job of class collector. Norvelle 
sailed on October 11th and is planning to 
stay until next fall. Her address is care 
of Brown, Shipley, London. 

1914 
Class Editor: Elizabeth Ayer Inches 

(Mrs. Henderson Inches) 

41 Middlesex. Road, 

Chestnut Hill, Mass. 
On June 26th past, Deborah Kirk Welsh 
was born to Mr. and Mrs. George A. 
Welsh at Lima, Pa. "Nine days later, we 
sailed, with Deborah in a market basket, 
for Bermuda where we spent the summer. 
We are leaving in December again and 1 
hope if any Bryn Mawrter is visiting Ber- 
muda this winter, she will take time to 
look me up and have a cup of tea with 
me." 

1917 
Class Editor: Bertha C. Greenough 

203 Blackstone Blvd., 

Providence, R. I. 
Josephine Ranlet Swift was married on 
October 22nd to Nathaniel Holmes, 2nd, 
at Old Lyme, Connecticut. She will be at 
home after the first of December at 2900 
Cleveland Avenue, Washington, D. C. 

1918 
Class Editor: Helen E. Walker 
5516 Everett Ave., Chicago, 111. 
Molly Cordingley Stevens has a second 
son, Samuel Abbott, born in May. 

Margaret Timpson and her mother 
• spent the month of August seeing Amer- 
ica, and in particular the American and 
Canadian Rockies. As they passed 
through Chicago, Helen Walker and Tim- 
mie twice held a private reunion and did 
their best to out-talk each other. 

1919 

Class Editor: Marjorie Remington 
Twitchell 

(Mrs. Pierrepont Twitchell), 
Setauket, L. L, N. Y. 



Gordon Woodbury Dunn died Novem- 
ber 22nd. Her son, Woodbury Dunn, was 
born November 1st. 



Fran Fuller Savage writes, "We have 
two very remarkable daughters, Cordelia 
Fuller, born May 12, 1926 — two days too 
late tojbe [a ^birthday present for her 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



27 



proud father, and Maud Fuller, born Feb- 
ruary 21, 1929, a day too soon to be called 
George after the father of his country, 
even if she had been a boy. They are 
both very wonderful. ... I am so ab- 
sorbed in them I have literally time for 
nothing else." Dr. Savage is "no longer 
teaching but a staff member of the Car- 
negie Foundation for the advancement of 
Teaching. He has just completed a sur- 
vey of 'Athletics and Sports in American 
Colleges and Universities,' published in 
October. Previous to this he wrote . . . 
similarly of English schools and univer- 
sities and we were over there in 1925 
(collecting material) for several months." 
From Marie Lubar: "My job to me is 
highly exciting. I am a case worker with 
the Children's Aid of Pennsylvania, which 
places dependent children in need of homes 
with private families. My job is supervising 
these children after they are placed " 

1920 
Class Editor: Margaret Ballou Hitch- 
cock (Mrs. David Hitchcock), 
45 Mill Rock Road, 
New Haven, Conn. 

Louise Sloan is instructor in Research 
Ophthalmology at Wilmer Institute which 
is connected with the Johns Hopkins Hos- 
pital. She is working with Dr. Ferree 
who is Resident Lecturer in Ophthalmol- 
ogy and Director of the Laboratory of 
Physiological Optics. 

Kitty Robinson is at Bryn Mawr this 
winter living in Radnor as Senior Grad- 
uate Student and as Secretary to Miss 
Schenck (Miss Schenck is Dean of the 
Graduate School and Radnor is entirely 
for Graduate Students). 

Dorothy Jenkins is part-time demon- 
strator in Physics at Bryn Mawr. 

Lilian Davis Philip has moved from 
New York to Staten Island. Her ad- 
dress is Benedict Avenue, Dongan Hills. 

K. Townsend is achieving quite a repu- 
tation for her knowledge of and skill in 
athletics. She is president of the Boston 
Field Hockey Association which means a 
busy autumn as the intersectional matches 
will be held in Boston this year. K. has 
moved to 135 Beaconfield Road, Brook- 
line, where she has an apartment. 

1921 
Class Editor: Helen James Rogers 
(Mrs. J. E. Rogers) 
99 Poplar Plains Rd., Toronto, Can. 
Julia Peyton Phillips' second daughter, 
named Betsy, was born August 21st. She 
is a distinguished baby, having been born 
with two large crooked teeth. Tooth 
brushes of every make and color have 



been showered upon her and Julia is 
thinking of making a fortune by going 
into the testimonial game. Two months 
old Betsy pictured flourishing a Dr. 
West's tooth brush and lapping up Ipana 
tooth paste in the red and yellow striped 
tube. 

This piece of news upsets my carefully 
compiled statistics but so does another 
fact that I have just learned: that Marg 
Archibald and Goggin are in New York 
holding down secretarial jobs. 

I can't resist one more plea addressed 
to the delinquents who are not listed in 
the statistics. Please crash through with 
news so that my data will be up to date 
at reunion this June. 

I have just been in New York, and 
while there saw Schurmy. She has said 
farewell to her gay social life on the 
Continent and come back to get a job, 
preferably along merchandising lines. I 
found Ellen Garrison very busy being 
Primary Assistant at the Dalton School. 
She says that Cloey is settled in London 
at present but plans to come back to this 
country bag and baggage in February. 
Kat Bradford is continuing with her 
course in Horticulture at Columbia. When 
last seen she and Fanny Riker Duncombe 
were off to New Canaan to plant spring- 
bulbs. A moth ball was to be put beside 
each bulb to ward off nibbling mice. Pig- 
let Morton Creese is leaving New York 
and moving- to Hoboken. Her husband is 
Vice President and Treasurer of Stevens 
Institute which is located there. 

1923 
Class Editor: Dorothy Meserve Kun- 
hardt (Mrs. Philip B. Kunhardt), 
Mt. Kemble Ave., Morristown, N. J. 
Grace. Carson deserves our many thanks 
— she has written a letter to the editor 
giving news — a thing no one else has done 
for untold stretches of time — gratefully 
we read some of her own words: "To- 
gether with Mother, I spent the summer 
on the West Coast — from Victoria south 
to San Diego. We went by way of the 
Panama Canal, a charming and exotic 
place, which had the grace to be cool in 
our honor, — and returned through New 
Orleans, the quaintness and fascination 
of which are not exaggerated. In Santa 
Barbara I saw Margaret Dunn Kamper. 
She has a most attractive young daughter, 
and is soon taking her Bar examinations. 
The latter part of this month a friend and 
I are sailing for six weeks motoring in 
Scotland and England, and finally, I am 
planning to marry early in January. Just 
one more remembered note: Ratz and I 
bade farewell to Eric one day in June. 



28 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



She sailed on the Majestic to do various 
diplomatic things ! in Geneva." 

Helen Dunbar is abroad for a year on 
a fellowship. She will be in Vienna this 
fall, Paris this winter, and London next 
spring. She has had her Ph.D. from 
Columbia a year now. 

Star McDaniel Heimsath is the new 
president of the College Club in Bridge- 
port, Connecticut — there are about three 
hundred members of this club. 

Augusta Howell Love joy has a daugh- 
ter, Cynthia Jane Love joy, born on the 
20th of September. 

Celestine Goddard Mott has a son, 
whom she is planning to take back to 
India very soon. 

Dorothy Stewart Pierson has a son, 
Richard N. Pierson, Jr. 

Katharine Shumway has announced 
her engagement to Dr. Howard Freas. 
He has spent the last three years in the 
Belgian Congo, experimenting with sleep- 
ing sickness and has received recognition 
for his brilliant work by the Belgian 
government. 

1924 
Class Editor: Beth Tuttle Wilbur 
(Mrs. Donald Wilbur), 
1518^ East 59th St, Chicago, 111. 

Very little news of '24 has as yet been 
received in Chicago. We eagerly sought 
out the Alumnae Register to find the '24 
colony here — and find that it practically 
isn't; and that a large proportion of those 
who are supposed to be here, namely Lois 
Coffin Lund has recently moved away ! 
So, as usual, '24, if you want to see your 
names in print, you know how to go about 
it. 

A letter from Howdy reveals that her 
"offending worm" was successfully re- 
moved during the summer, and that she 
has now acquired, in addition to teaching 
English at the Scranton Junior High 
School, the job of Dramatic Coach of 
the Senior High School. She modestly 
asserts that her only qualification is the 
fact that she once directed a Christmas 
play! 

1927 
Class Editor: Ellenor Morris, 
Berwyn, Penna. 

At last we have a class baby ! Ursula 
Squier Reimer appeared on the scene on 
August 28th, and although her advent 
should have been heralded some months 
ago, it is not yet too late for rejoicing. 
If there are any other claimants to this 
exalted position, they should make them- 
selves known at once. At any rate many 
congratulations to the Ursula Squier 
Reimers, mere et fille. 

Kitty Harris writes that she is teaching 



French this year at Springside School in 
Chestnut Hill. 

We are indebted to her for news of Dot 
Pearce's wedding to Dr. Robert Kenneth 
Gustav.eson this fall. She and Gordon 
Schoff were bridesmaids, and she reports 
that Dot and her husband have departed 
to Pasadena to live. 

She also tells of the christening of Dot 
Irwin Headly's son, Jonathan, a most at- 
tractive young man ; and of Ruth Rickaby 
Darmstatd's charming New York apart- 
ment. 

Gordon Schoff is at Art School. 

. 1928 
Class Editor: Cornelia B. Rose, Jr., 
333 E. 68th St., New York City. 

Three cheers for 1928's Class Baby ! 
Edith Morgan Whitaker is the proud 
mother of a baby girl, born on October 
22. Doug writes that "Eda is exception- 
ally well." Their address in Cambridge, 
Mass., is 204 Holden Green. 

Yildiz Phillips van Hulstuyn's eight- 
pound boy was born at 6 P. M. on Oc- 
tober 18th. John van Hulstuyn writes 
that "Both Yildiz and the baby are doing 
even better than could be expected. She 
is at the Booth Hospital. But if her 
progress continues it won't be long before 
she is at home in Jackson Heights, L. I, 
3339 70th Street. "The baby has dark 
hair and a wide smile even at the age of 
two hours." The name is to be John 
Carey v. H. 1928 sends you hearty con- 
gratulations, Yildez. 

The class seems to be doing itself proud 
not only in the way of babies. Word 
comes that "The Week End Book Service 
has been incorporated under the same 
name with Puppy McKelvey as President ; 
Caroline Smith, Vice-President, and Car- 
oline SchaufBer (from Smith) as Secre- 
tary and Treasurer. We are opening a 
store at 959 Madison Avenue and hope 
all our little friends and classmates will 
drop in at frequent intervals. The store 
is most attractive, has a fireplace and easy 
chairs, so we recommend that they come 
in to pass away the time in comfort and 
joy. We will be open evenings until 
Christmas." 

From this it appears that C. Smith has 
forsaken the idle life and is devoting her- 
self to good works. 

Frances Bethel Rowan writes that 
"Elizabeth Bethel has a position as Sec- 
retary for the History Department at 
Yale. She is living at 8 Edgewood Ave- 
nue, New Haven, and is crazy about her 
work and New Haven. I am not doing 
much of anything except a little Junior 
League work and some work for the Bryn 
Mawr Club of Washington of which I 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



am treasurer and very much interested 
in." 

Please note that the peregrinations of 
the Editor have finally landed her at 333 
East 68th Street. 

1929 
Class Editor: Elizabeth Linn 
1357 E. 56th St., Chicago, 111. 

The arrival of an Alumnae Bulletin in 
which the class of 1929 was distinguished 
by its absence caused your editor to blush 
with shame. An extensive campaign to 
make up for lost time has now resulted in 
the accumulation of quite a number of 
scraps from the feast, as follows : 

Nancy Woodward, who comes first 
though her name begins with W, says 
she's going to begin selling books in the 
Doubleday Doran Bookshop at McCreery's 
about the middle of November; but only 
temporarily because "as soon as the mar- 
ket gets on its feet" a kind friend is going 
to give her a chance in the banking busi- 
ness. For her sake and our own we hope 
this will be soon. Nancy also says she 
saw Peggy Haley who is in New York 
job-hunting. 

Others have also been lured to the 
bright lights. K. Balch is sharing an 
apartment at 13 Christopher street with 
Jimmy Bunn, with an eye to a journalistic 
career. Sounds like a swell menage. 
Ginny Fain is in New York, too, working 
on the "Inquiry" and helping to write a 
book on the racial factors in industry. We 
suppose she learns about them as she goes 
along. Mary McDermott is in the Ad- 
vertising Department of Time, and Viccy 
Buel is a "literary Scout" for the Century 
Company, eager to read your latest manu- 
script and discover your genius. Bobby 
Yerkes has also entered the publishing 
field and is with the Yale Press in New 
Haven. Sally Bradley is doing volunteer 
work at Calvary Church and taking a 
course at N. Y. U., and Bobs Mercer is 
living at International House, and study- 
ing Psychology at Columbia. She seems 
to be doing intensive research on the 
feeble-minded and the abnormal. 

Annabel Learned has hooked a history 
of Art Scholarship and departed for Flor- 
ence to study. Ella Poe and Barbara 
Humphreys were also in Italy when last 
heard of, staying at a titled villa. Doughy 
Purcell, who is at home living a gay life 
and dabbling in cookery, says that they 
(Ella and Barbara) are rather depressed 
over the length of time their families 
want them to stay in Europe. This seems 
to us pathetic. 

We have heard only echoes of Pussy 
Lambert, from Italian tunnels and Bavar- 



ian beer-halls. But she seems to have re- 
turned safely from the farther shores, ac- 
companied by Mess Hamman, who went 
back to college after all. 

Concerning those in more distant parts : 
Carla Swan is part-time Examiner in the 
Research Department of the public 
schools, and seems to bear the load with 
great good cheer. Bettie Freeman, on her 
return from Central Europe, embarked on 
a business course. Marion Park is teach- 
ing little boys, and Ros Cross is teaching 
girls, not so little. Ella Horton is "not 
doing a thing but going to parties," and 
not even political parties at that. 

We only wheedled two engagements 
out of our class-mates, and we scarcely 
dare claim credit for one of them. Ginny 
Newbold has been hand-in-glove with too 
many classes to belong to any one. How- 
ever, she is going to marry a red-headed 
young broker named Samuel Gibbon. We 
can, however, lay undisputed claim to Jane 
Barth, who is going to marry Richard 
Sloss on the 26th of December. Mr. Sloss 
is a lawyer, and they are going to live in 
San Francisco. Think of that. 

Betty Fry, just recovered from an un- 
timely attack of jaundice, has left Eng- 
land for Paris, where she is going to 
study history at the Sorbonne. We have 
laid a small bet that she is destined to 
become one of "Dr. Gray's young ladies." 

Ruth Biddle is taking a course in In- 
dustrial Relations at Bryn Mawr. and 
working for the Philadelphia Summer 
School Committee and a variety of other 
causes. Bea Shipley is Assistant Girl 
Reserve Secretary at the Germantown 
Y. M. C. A., but does not wish to be 
thought militaristic. Clover Henry is 
bringing up some children in a French 
chateau, "Le Pin," Champtoie, Maine-et- 
Loire. Grace DeRoo, Doris Blumenthal 
and Elizabeth Ufford are settled in an 
apartment in Cambridge, pursuing the 
delights of science. Ruth Kitchen is a 
graduate student at Bryn Mawr; Becky 
Bryant is studying at the Columbia 
School of Architecture, and so on. 

As for our young matrons, Mary Gess- 
ner Park and Becky Wills Hetzel, they 
are wedded to domesticity. Becky has an 
apartment in Haverford, where she is 
said to cook divinely. Kit Collins is also 
keeping house, across the street from 
Rock. Tony Shallcross is an assistant 
buyer in the sportswear department of 
Gimbels in Philadelphia, and seems to be 
the only one of the flock who has been 
working long enough to be promoted. 

As for your editor, she is safe at home, 
studying economics at the University of 
Chicago and teaching her small niece to 
play ball. 



The Saint Timothy's School 
for Girls 

CATONSVILLE, MARYLAND 

Founded September 1882 

COLLEGE PREPARATORY 

AND 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

MISS LOUISA McENDREE FOWLER 
Head of the School 

Wykeham Rise 

WASHINGTON, CONNECTICUT 

A COUNTRY SCHOOL 
FOR GIRLS 

FANNY E. DAVIES, LL.A., Headmistress 
Prepares for Bryn Mawr and Other Colleges 

The Episcopal Academy 

(Founded 1785) 

CITY LINE, OVERBROOK, PA. 

A country day school for boys 

MODERN AND WELL EQUIPPED 
Endorsed by Bryn Mawr Alumnae 

UNIVERSITYgTrls 

BOARDING AND DAY SCHOOL 

Founded 1896 

Thorough and successful Preparation 

for Eastern Colleges for Women as well as 

for Midwestern Colleges and Universities 

Illustrated Catalogue on Request 

ANNA B. HAIRE, A.B., SMITH COLLEGE, Principal 

1106-B Lake Shore Drive Chicago, Illinois 

THE LOW AND 
HEYWOOD SCHOOL 

Emphasizing college preparatory work. 

Also general and special courses. 

One year intensive college preparation. 

Junior school. 

65th year. Catalogue. 

SHIPPAN POINT, 
STAMFORD, CONN. 



The Ethel Walker School 

SIMSBURY, CONNECTICUT 

Head of School 

ETHEL WALKER SMITH, A.M., 
Bryn Mawr College 



Head Mistress 

JESSIE GERMAIN HEWITT, A.B., 
Bryn Mawr College 



fcOGERSHAI/I/ 

"v4Modern School with New England Traditions 



TfcO< 

MMamoi 

B^m r Thorough Preparation for any College 
«H ^^k One Year Intensive Review 

'Pj, ^|^^ General Academic Course with di- 
JBimm ^^^ploma. Junior College Courses — Home 
Economics, Secretarial Training. Music, Art, Dramatic 
Art. 26 Miles from Boston. Outdoor Sports. Riding. 
Gymnasium. Swimming Pool. 

EDITH CHAP1N CRAVEN, A.B., Bryn Mawr 
201 Rogers Street, Lowell, Mass. 

/1ARCUAV SCH<£>L 

BRYN MAWR, PA. 
Prepares for Bryn Mawr. and 
all leading colleges 

Musical Course prepares for the Depart- 
ment of Music of Bryn Mawr College 
EDITH HARCUM, Head of School 
L. May Willis, Principal 

THE MISSES KIRK'S 

College Preparatory School 

PREPARATORY TO BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

Individual Instruction. Athletics. 

Clovercroft, Montgomery Avenue, Rosemont, Pa. 

Mail, telephone and telegraph address: Bryn Mawr. Pa. 



CHOATE SCHOOL 

1600 Beacon Street, Brookline, Mass. 

HOME AND DAY SCHOOL 
FOR GIRLS 

EMPHASIS ON COLLEGE PREPARATION 

Elective Courses for students not preparing 
for College 

AUGUSTA CHOATE, A.M. (Vasaar) 

Principal 



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THE AGNES IRWIN SCHOOL 

2009-2011 Delancey Place, Philadelphia 

A College Preparatory 
SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 



BERTHA M. LAWS, A.B., Headmistress 



GRAY GABLES 



Complete College Preparatory Course. 
One year course for Board Examination. 

For catalog address: 

Hope Fisheb, Ph.D., Bancroft School 

Wobcesteb, Massachusetts 



MISS BEARD'S SCHOOL 

A Country School near New York 

Orange, New Jersey 

COLLEGE PREPARATION 

Advanced Courses Junior High School 

Music, Art, Domestic Science 

Catalog on Request 

LUCIE C. BEARD, Headmistress 

The Katharine Branson School 

ROSS, CALIFORNIA Across the Bay from San Francisco 

A Country School College Preparatory 

Head: 

Katharine Fleming Branson, A.B., Bryn Mawr 

MISS MADEIRA'S SCHOOL 

1330 19th St., N W. Washington, D. C. 

A RESIDENT AND DAY SCHOOL FOR 
GIRLS 

LUCY MADEIRA WING, A.B. 

MRS. DAVID LAFOREST WING 

Head Mistress 

MISS WRIGHT'S SCHOOL 

Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Prepares for College Board 
Examination 



FERRY HALL 

A RESIDENT AND DAY SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

On Lake Michigan, near Chicago 

Junior College; High School Department: College 
Preparatory and General Cour»es. Special Departments 
of Music, Expression and Art. 

Two new dormitories, including new dining room and 
infirmary, to be opened September 1929. 

Eloise R. Tremain, A.B., Bryn Mawr, Principal 

ROSEMARY HALL 

College Preparatory 

(With supplementary but not alternative courses) 

CAROLINE RUUTZ-REES. Ph.D. \ „ . Mj . 
MARY E. LOWNDES. Litt.D / Head MMmm 



GREENWICH 



CONNECTICUT 



The Shipley School 

Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 

Preparatory to Bryn Mawr College 

ALICE G. HOWLAND, ELEANOR 0. BROWNELL 
Principals 

MISS RANSOM and 
MISS BRIDGES' SCHOOL 

PIEDMONT, CALIFORNIA 

(A suburb of San Francisco) 

A RESIDENT AND DAY SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

General and College Preparatory Courses 
Outdoor Life throughout the year 

EDITH BRIDGES, B.L., Principal 

The Baldwin School 

A Country School for Girls 
BRYN MAWR PENNSYLVANIA 

Preparation for Bryn Mawr. Mount Holyoke, Smith, 

Vassar and Wellesley college*. Abundant outdoor life. 

Hockey, basketball, tennis 

ELIZABETH FORREST JOHNSON, A.B. 

HEAD 

CAMP MYSTIC coSSSrW 

Miss Jobe's salt water camp for girls 
8-18. Conducted by Mrs. Carl Akeley (Mary 
L. Jobe). Halfway, New York and Boston. 
Land and water sports. Horseback riding. 
MARY L JOBE, 
Room 507. 607 Fifth Are., N. Y. C. 



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1 arrisoit forest 



^*~p^ A Country School in the Green 
Spring Valley near Baltimore. 
Modern Equipment. 

All Sports. Special Emphasis on Horse- 
back Riding. Mild Climate. 
Garrison Forest Girls who are going to college 
are thoroughly prepared for any institution. 
Other girls take courses with special emphasis 
on Music and Art. Younger girls live in a 
separate Junior House. 

[Principals 

MISS JEAN G. MARSHALL 

MISS NANCY OFFUTT, 
Bryn Mawr, ex '20 

Box B, Garrison, Maryland 




Katharine Gibbs 

A school of unusual character with a distinctive 
purpose for educated women 
SECRETARIAL ACADEMIC EXECUTIVE 
BOSTON 



90MarlboroStreet 
Resident and 
Day School 

NEW YORK 
247 Park Avenue 

PROVIDENCE 
155 Angell Street 



Special Course for College 
Women. Selected subjects 
preparing for executive posi- 
tions. Separate classrooms 
and special instructors. 
One-year Course includes tech- 
nical and broad business train- 
ing preparing for positions of 
a preferred character. 
Two-year Course for prepara- 
tory and high school gradu- 
ates. First year includes six 
college subjects. Second year 
intensive secretarial training. 
Booklet on request 



No Losses 
Income Fixed 
and Certain 




J. he income from a John N 
Hancock Life Annuity is absolutely^ 
assured. You need fear no losses- 
no reduced income. Your declining 
years can be freed from financial worries 
as they should be. $1,000 or more will create 
a life income of unshrinkable character. For 
persons of limited capital, there is no safer way 
of providing a secure income for old age. Our 
book, "Life Incomes Through Annuities," tells 
what the John Hancock Life Annuity plan has 
done for others— what it will do for you. 

Send for this Book! 

►INQUIRY BUREAU 




Life Insurance Company^ 

or Boston. Massachusetts 

197 Clarendon St., Boston 
Please send booklet"Life Incomes Through Annuities." 

Name , 

Address . 




Cathedral School of St. Mary 

GARDEN CITY, LONG ISLAND, N. Y. 

A school for Girls 19 miles from New York. College 

preparatory and general courses. Music Art and 

Domestic Science. Catalogue on request. Box B. 

MIRIAM A. BYTEL, A.B., Radcliffe, Principal 

BERTHA GORDON WOOD, A.B., Bryn Mawr, 

Assistant Principal 



The Traphagen School of Fashion 



I 



MID-TERM STARTING 
JANUARY 20th 

All phases from elementary to full 
mastery of costume design and Illus- 
tration taught In shortest time con- 
sistent with thoroughness. Day and 
Evening classes. Saturday courses for 
Adults and Children. Our Sales De- 
partment disposes of student work. 
Every member of advanced classes 
often placed through our Employment 
Bureau. Write for announcement. 

In Arnold, Constable & Company Costume 
Design Competition, over 100 schools and 
nearly 800 students took part; all prizes 
were awarded to Traphagen pupils with 
exception of one of the five third prizes. 

1680 Broadway (near 52nd St.) Now York 



All the smart world 
walks in 

Sj^s-Fifth Avenue 

created by "Tarts 
or 



SAKS-FIFTH AVENUE 

FORTY- NINTH to FIFTIETH STREET 
NEW YORK 



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1896 



1929 




BACK LOG CAMP 

THE ADIRONDACK MOUNTAINS 
INDIAN LAKE, NEW YORK 



Back Log Camp completed last September its thirty-fourth season : one 
of the most successful in its history. This means much more than a rea- 
sonable cash return for the capital and labor invested. Without this the 
Camp could not run. It means that many of our old friends (numerous 
Bryn Mawr women among them) and many new ones entered into the fel- 
lowship of the Camp. They found there a pervading friendly spirit, peace, 
good company, excellent food, and as much as they wanted of wilderness 
adventure under the expert personal guidance of a large family, themselves 
college graduates born and bred in the art of making a wild section of the 
Adirondack Wilderness accessible to persons of moderate income and 
cultivated taste. 

The bustle and glamour of a fashionable summer resort, so indispensa- 
ble to the happiness of some persons and so distasteful to others, is wholly 
absent from the absolutely simple life of the Camp. 



Letters of inquiry should be addressed to 

Mrs. Bertha Brown Lambert (Bryn Mawr, 1904) 

272 Park Avenue 

Takoma Park, D. C. 



Other references 

Mrs. Anna Hartshorne Brown (Bryn Mawr,1912) 

Westtown, Penna. 

Dr. Henry J. Cadbury 

(Head of Biblical Dept., Bryn Mawr) 

Haverford, Penna. 



Who is 
Kagawa? 

He is the outstand- 
ing Japanese Chris- 
tian in Asia.^What 
has he done? ^ 
Preached in the 
streets, lived in the 
slums, built schools 
and now is conduct- 
ing his "Million 
Souls for Jesus" 
campaign. 




K 



\P1 



$&* 






Research. 



ot w 



It belongs to the literature both 
of power and knowledge; 
might be called wisdom 
literature. — Galen M. 
Fisher, Executive 
Secretary, Institute 
of Social and 
Religious ^^^^ ^O^" 

. o* Every 
^P Christian 

should read his book for 
its inspirational message 
and its profound philoso- 
phy. ^ It is a challenge to 
try the Way of Love. ^ 
Kagawa's first book went 
through 180 editions in 
Japan ; now he has written 
for English readers his 
views of life and the world. 
At all bookstores. $2.00 



^ 



THE JOHN C. 
WINSTON COMPANY 

PHILADELPHIA 



Kindly mention Bryn Mawr Bulletin 








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