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BRYN MAWR 
ALUMNAE 
BULLETIN 




THE COUNCIL IN NEW YORK 



January, 1930 



Vol. X 



No. 1 



Entered as second-class matter, January 15, 1921, at the Post Office, Phila., Pa., under Act of March 3,1879 

COPYRIGHT, 1930 

ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 



OFFICERS OF THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

EXECUTIVE BOARD 

President Louise Fleischmann Maclay, 1906 

Vice-President Natalie McFaden Blanton, 1917 

Recording Secretary Gertrf/de Hearne Myers, 1919 

Corresponding Secretary May Egan Stokes, 1911 

Treasurer Margaret E. Brusstar, 1903 

Chairman of the Finance Committee Caroline Florence Lexow, 1908 

Chairman of the Publicity Committee Caroline Morrow Chadwick-Collins, 1905 

ALUMNAE SECRETARY AND BUSINESS MANAGER OF THE BULLETIN 

Alice M. Hawkins, 1907 

EDITOR OF THE BULLETIN 

Marjorie L. Thompson, 1912 

DISTRICT COUNCILLORS 

District I Helen Evans Lewis, 1913 

District II Julia Langdon Loomis. 1895 

District III Alletta Van Reypen Korff, 1900 

District IV Katharine Holliday Daniels, 1918 

District V Frances Porter Adler, 1911 

District VI Edna Warkentin Alden, 1900 

District VII Helen Brayton Barendt, 1903 

ALUMNAE DIRECTORS 
Ruth Furness Porter, 1896 Mary Peirce, 1912 

Frances Fincke Hand. 1897 Margaret Reeve Cary, 1907 

Elizabeth Lewis Otey, 1901 

CHAIRMAN OF THE ALUMNAE FUND 

Caroline Florence Lexow, 1908 

CHAIRMAN OF THE ACADEMIC COMMITTEE 

Pauline Goldmark, 1896 

CHAIRMAN OF THE SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOAN FUND COMMITTEE 

Margaret Gilman, 1919 

CHAIRMAN OF THE COMMITTEE ON HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Dr. Marjorie F. Murray, 1913 

CHAIRMAN OF THE NOMINATING COMMITTEE 

Eleanor Little Aldrich, 1905 







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Kindly mention Bryn Mawr Bulletin 



Bryn Mawr Alumnae 
Bulletin 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF 
THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

Marjorie L. Thompson, '12, Editor 
Alice M. Hawkins, '07, Business Manager 

EDITORIAL BOARD 

Mary Crawford Dudley, '96 Emily Kimbrough Wrench, '21 

Caroline Morrow Chadwick-Collins, '05 Ellenor Morris, '27 
Emily Fox Cheston, '08 Elinor B. Amram, '28 

Louise Fleischmann Maclay, '06, ex-officio 

Subscription Price, $1.50 a Year Single Copies, 25 Cents 

Checks should be drawn to the order of Bryn Mawr Alumnae Bulletin 
Published monthly, except August, September and October, at 1006 Arch St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Vol. X JANUARY, 1930 No. 1 

Next year will be the tenth year that the Alumnae Council has met. That means 
that it is no longer an experiment and that it either has or has not proved its value. 
Originally it was planned as a device to simplify business for the annual meeting and 
as a way of bringing the college before the general public in the different districts. 
The meetings, it was hoped, would stimulate the alumnae in that particular district 
to greater interest and give them a sense of being in close contact with the Associa- 
tion and with the College. Now that the districts are so extraordinarily well organ- 
ized and the Councillors and Scholarship Chairmen keep the schools in touch with 
Bryn Mawr, there is no longer the same need to form the point of contact. 
It was particularly interesting, therefore, at the meetings in New York this fall 
to see the essential value of the Council emerge so clearly. Obviously, in spite of the 
fact that for one heady moment Bryn Mawr motors blocked traffic on Park Avenue, 
the general public was not aware that we existed, and the alumnae there frequently 
know more about the College and are in closer contact with it than are we who live 
next door to it. The thing that was important was that the Council was not a pub- 
licity agent, but was a deliberative body in which all the members were informed and 
which consequently could clarify and simplify issues before it recommended them to 
the legislative body, i. e., the annual meeting. No one who did not sit through the 
long, close discussion of the proposed amendments to the by-laws can have any con- 
ception of the value of such discussion. One felt that only a dedicated group could 
have dealt as devotedly and as conscientiously with detail as did this group. And 
always the point of view was clearly defined: "This is not what we decide but what 
we recommend; the decision is not ours to make." People who question the value of 
the Council have argued that it detracts from the significance and interest of the 
annual meeting; on the contrary, does it not make to it a contribution of inestimable 
value? By foreseeing difficulties, does it not make it possible for that larger and 
unwieldy group to deal with diverse matters easily and intelligently, and so, in spite 
of increased business and ever-growing numbers, continue to function as a legislative 
body and keep the Alumnae Association an essentially democratic organization? 



THE COUNCIL: AN IMPRESSION 

The present writer has attended only three Council meetings, and although they 
all have in common the most delightful and warrn cordiality on the part of the 
District as a whole, and especially on the part of the individual hostesses, each has had 
some distinctive quality about it, something that makes it stand out very distinctly in 
one's mind from all the others. As orre thinks back, one associates with the meeting 
in Richmond much of the charm of the mellow Indian summer days on which it 
was held, and in spite of pressing business, an enchanting sense of leisure. Remem- 
bering New Haven, one remembers endless stimulating discussion of problems of 
education in general and of the specific problems of the College itself, and in connec- 
tion with the New York meetings one is conscious of a mass of difficult and often 
tedious work, extraordinarily well done. 

To have made this possible in perhaps the most distracting city in the world 
was a work of genius on the part of Julia Langdon Loomis, the Councillor for the 
District. All the wheels were so carefully oiled that one was not conscious that they 
turned. She waved her wand and lo! New York was small and friendly and com- 
pact, and instinctively we took off our hats and laid them on the "spare-room" bed. As 
we told her, that was the perfect tribute. And it was only because of this ease and 
pleasantness that the Council was able to accomplish the mass of work that it did. 
Yet even as the typewriter clicks out the word "work" all of the delightful social 
things that happened come to mind. 

The Council opened with a luncheon at the Bryn Mawr Club, a most attrac- 
tive place with a rather intimate charm. It was amusing to see us all, in turn, rise 
rather shyly to our feet, and announce who we were and why we were there, but 
subsequently it was very helpful. Afterwards we all trooped upstairs to the drawing- 
room and the meetings of the Ninth Council started. Elsewhere in this Bulletin, 
in the condensed minutes, you may read what that business was. As dusk settled 
down and our minds worked more and more slowly and chairs grew harder, the 
welcome word "Tea" was spoken. The chance to move about, to discuss in small 
groups for a moment, to have fresh air blow in actually and figuratively, made all 
the discussion afterwards move much more quickly. That first day struck the note 
for the subsequent days when the meetings were held by a blazing fire in Julia 
Langdon Loomis's big living-room. 

The members of the Council dined that night in small groups very delightfully 
with various of the New York Alumnae. For one whose mind does not follow 
easily or happily the intricacies of either Financial Reports or By-Laws, the meeting 
the next morning was outstandingly interesting. Discussion of the various Districts 
and of the Scholarships always gives a picture of an amazingly alive and vigorous 
organization in a way that nothing else can. One feels a certain pride and excite- 
ment at being an integral part of it. At the luncheon at Caroline McCormick Slade's, 
given to meet the New York members of the Board of Trustees and of the Board 
of Directors of Bryn Mawr College, and at the big and very gay dinner given 
that night at the Colony Club in honour of President Park, one had that same sense 
of lively and unflagging interest, this time on the part of those who direct, rather 
than those who work for the College. It was no small thing for a man like Dr. 
Chace to drop everything to come to discuss with us some of the problems confronting 
the Board of Directors. Also, it was no small thing for Mrs. Slade, barely settled 
in her charming new house, to be so hospitable, so delightfully direct and informal, 

(2) 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 3 

that she made such discussion possible. The impromptu speeches made by Mrs. 
Hand, Mrs. Frantz, and Mrs. Leach were in the happiest possible vein. In the 
evening Miss Park spoke very intimately and frankly on various subjects, and, as 
it is her happy gift to be able to do, gave each one of the one hundred and sixty 
Alumnae present a sense of close and actual contact with the College. The dinner 
was really a delightful affair, and one could not help wishing that at such a dinner 
the husbands and fathers could be present. They come with real interest to the 
dinners arranged by the Committee of the Seven Colleges, and so why would not 
this smaller dinner be an excellent opportunity to interest those who already have 
a bond with Bryn Mawr, in the specific needs and problems of Bryn Mawr. I, for 
one, should like to see the experiment tried at the next Council. 

Elsewhere, in the condensed minutes, you will find brief comment on the 
various reports that help to make the Council the absorbingly interesting thing that 
it is, and that help, by giving a picture both of the Association and of the College, 
to give one a sense of relationship, of the interplay between the two organizations, 
that vivifies and gives meaning to the mass of meticulous and detailed discussion; 
otherwise one would sometimes have a sense of not being able to see the forest for 
the trees. After the final and, from this point of view, one of the most interesting 
sessions of the Council, it was delightful to meet the various distinguished Head- 
mistresses whom Mrs. Loomis had invited to the charming and informal buffet 
luncheon in honour of President Park. There were no speeches but a great deal 
of amusing and stimulating conversation in the small and friendly groups that 
gathered in different parts of the room. To come fresh from the Undergraduate 
Reports with their picture of the intellectual life of the college, both vigorous and 
flexible, to a luncheon table conversation with Miss Parkhurst, the head of the 
Dalton School, freshly back from a survey of the schools in Europe, and a lecture 
tour in the Orient where she spoke on Progressive Education, was a more than 
delightful ending to what was, for a number of reasons, a peculiarly interesting 
three days. We found that we had lingered longer than we realized when we 
finally said our regretful and appreciative farewell to our hostess, the Councillor 
of District II. 



AN EXPRESSION OF APPRECIATION 

A cat may look at a king, they say. What the cat would think on the occasion 
of such a visit I had never considered until today, but now I am convinced that he 
would turn away overwhelmed with his opportunity and overpowered with his 
inability to make creditable use of his advantage over other cats. I am sure he 
would feel inadequate, because I stand in that cat's shoes. I, the least occupied 
member of the Council, the only member without portfolio, have been vouchsafed 
the privilege of offering the thanks of this body to the Councillor of District II, 
the most occupied member of the Council, the member with the heaviest portfolio. 
Mrs. Loomis has found for our work in the heart of New York City, space and 
quiet. Is that not a miracle? Would that not be a wonderful gift had we been 
offered nothing else? But Mrs. Loomis has offered more — much more. She has 
offered us comfort, pleasure, sustenance, and best of all, the delight of her own 
gracious presence and words. She has offered us her all. The cat can say no more. 
There is no more to say. Mrs. Loomis's all is a great all, and the Council is deeply 
grateful. Nathalie McFadden Blanton. 



THE COUNCIL MEETING IN NEW YORK 

The Bryn Mawr Club in New York has always occupied a unique place in 
alumnae affairs. Although its function in each of its three incarnations has been 
ostensibly a purely social one, and its governing board has never attempted to plan 
any sort of "program" like that offered by many other College Clubs, there has 
always been the tacit assumption that its plant and its personnel were available 
for any cause which might be of use to the College. Each Drive and each May 
Day have brought an avalanche of workers with their extra typewriters and files, 
crowding out of their own premises, with small show of compunction, the regular and 
legitimate habitues of the Club. It seemed, therefore, the most natural thing in the 
world for the Alumnae Council to hold its opening session in New York at the 
Bryn Mawr Club. Evelyn Holt Lowry, 1909, President of the Club, and Julia 
Langdon Loomis, 1895, Councillor for District II, had left no stone unturned to 
make the members of the Council comfortable, and the graciousness of their welcome 
did much to launch the ninth meeting of the Council under happy auspices. 

At 1.30 P. M. on Wednesday, November 20, 1929, the meeting was called to 
order in the drawing-room of the Club by Louise Fleischmann Maclay, 1906, Presi- 
dent of the Alumnae Association, and Chairman of the Council. Gertrude Hearne 
Myers, 1919, Recording Secretary of the Association, called the roll. Everyone was 
present except Ruth Furness Porter, 1896, retiring Alumnae Director, whose place 
was taken by Virginia Kneeland Frantz, 1918, Director-elect; and two members, 
Dr. Murray and Miss Humphrey, who attended later sessions. At all the meetings 
a number of alumnae from the District, in addition to the 28 Council members, 
appeared and took part in the discussion, the main business of the Council which, 
as Mrs. Maclay reminded the group, has no legislative power, but serves in a purely 
advisory and deliberative capacity. The attendance at these sessions and the fact 
that more than 160 came to the dinner at the Colony Club, given in honour of Presi- 
dent Park, gave gratifying proof of the interest of the New York Alumnae in Bryn 
Mawr affairs. 

Margaret Brusstar, 1903, Treasurer of the Association, and Florence Lexow, 
1908, Chairman of the Finance Committee and of the Alumnae Fund, gave brief 
reports showing that the Association is in excellent financial condition. The balance 
now on hand is more than sufficient to meet the budgeted needs of the Association, 
and there is every indication that enough more contributions will be received for the 
undesignated Alumnae Fund to ensure the payment of the Association's pledge to 
President Park of $6,000 for academic purposes. This flourishing situation may be 
attributed to various causes, such as the fact that most reunion gifts to Goodhart 
Hall have now been paid, and that the alumnae found the objectives of the Alumnae 
Fund for 1929 interesting. Credit must be given to the work of the Class Collectors, 
and especially to the generosity of the Class of 1897. 

Announcement was made that the Furnishings Fund for Goodhart Hall had 
been completely pledged by the classes, and, although a number of individual pledges 
are yet to come due and to be collected, our entire indebtedness to the College has 
been paid except for $3,000 still owing on the Yellin iron work contract, which 
is not due until June, 1930. The alumnae were reminded that the Association has 
no responsibility for the deficit on Goodhart Hall itself, which has been assumed by 
the Trustees of the College. Within a short time, it is planned to use the small 

(4) 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 5 

unexpended balance of the undesignated fund for Goodhart Hall furnishings for the 
immediate needs of the building, since the Furnishings Committee considers it unwise 
to keep on hand any fund for future replacements, and desires to see the books of 
the Goodhart Hall accounts closed. 

In reply to a question as to whether the College would expect the Association 
to give as much as $6,000 each year toward its academic needs, Mrs. Maclay replied 
that the Joint Alumnae Fund Committee, which meets each year, discusses and 
determines the most pressing current needs of the College. Mrs. Hand added that 
she felt all the Alumnae Directors would agree with her that, since the only way 
to meet the present need to increase salaries is from Alumnae aid, there is every reason 
to think that the College would hope for at least that much help from the Alumnae 
each year until a much larger fund shall be available. 

Miss Brusstar presented for the consideration of the Council the tentative budget 
for 1930, amounting to $17,720 as against $16,980 for 1929. The principal reason 
for the increase lies in the addition of an item of $1,000 toward the deficit on the 
Alumnae Register published last year by the College, with the understanding that 
the Association would pay any deficit which might occur. 

Some discussion arose about the amount budgeted for expenses of local organ- 
izations. For several years $350 has been carried for District Councillors, $250 
for Local Scholarships Chairmen, and $350 for Local Branches. The budget for 
1930 reduces this amount to $500 for the three groups. In commenting on this 
change, Miss Brusstar said: "The term 'Local Expenses' has caused some confusion. 
In some instances, the local branches have thought that the amount budgeted to them 
was to be distributed among the various groups pro rata, and irrespective of their 
needs, to be added to their treasuries. It was the feeling of the Board, and, I think, 
of the Association, that the local groups should, so far as possible, finance themselves, 
and should call on the Association only when they were unable to raise by their own 
efforts amounts sufficient to cover their expenses. In actual fact, very little of the 
amount budgeted has even been used. It, therefore, seemed advisable to budget the 
three items under one heading: 'Expenses of Local Organizations,' and reduce the 
amount to $500." 

Various comments were made on this change. Some asked for a definite policy, 
preferring toi have each district treated alike, but on the whole, the sense of the 
meeting was against standardization. Both Mrs. Hand and Mrs. Blanton spoke 
in favor of having each district decide its own problems and make known its own 
needs. Some of the members thought it unethical to use money raised for scholar- 
ships for expenses, but others considered that this is a practice usual in all money 
raising enterprises. In the discussion it was learned that in some districts expenses 
have been paid by gifts from individuals, in some by organized groups. It was made 
clear that the money carried in the budget was to be readily given to any local 
organization actually feeling the need of it, and that money would be available on 
requisition for such legitimate expenses as a Councillor might incur within her 
district, or in connection with a district meeting or with the many needs of the 
Regional Scholarships Committees. Miss Peirce suggested that the situation might 
be clarified if the local organizations could budget their needs in advance, and with 
this solution in mind, it was 

M. S. C. that the Council recommend to the Annual Meeting the accept- 
ance of the budget as presented. 



6 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

The next topic on the program was the matter of the publication of an Alumnae 
Register. Mrs. Chadwick-Collins gave a report on this, making a comparison with 
the Registers published by the other women's colleges, and samples of these publica- 
tions were submitted. The usual practice elsewhere is to publish a biographical 
Register such as ours, only every ten years, and tp publish in between, at intervals 
of about two years, an inexpensive book which contains the names and addresses 
of the/ alumnae — with cross references for married names — together with lists by 
classes and by geographical distribution. These are largely financed by the colleges 
and quite generally prepared for publication by the staff of the Alumnae Offices, and 
either given to the alumnae or sold for a nominal sum. The printing bill for our 
Register compares very favorably with that of the other colleges, but because of the 
small number of our alumnae, who constitute practically our entire buying public, it 
seems impossible to avoid a deficit of about $1500 on the. present Register. This 
might be wiped out if we should publish next year a Supplement, which would often 
be sold in conjunction with the Register since the two volumes must be used together. 
This method was tried in 1926, but was found to be inconvenient. Mrs. Collins 
said that she estimated that it would be possible to cover expenses if an Address List 
were published and sold at $2 a copy or if a full Register were published and sold 
at $3 a copy. She said that she was in favor of charging what any publication would 
cost, although it had been suggested that a nominal sum be set and the deficit made 
up by asking individuals for contributions. It is not likely that the College will be 
willing to budget anything toward the publication of a Register, since the College 
already makes a considerable contribution by giving the services of the Publication 
Department. 

Mrs. Hand said that although she thought the Bryn Mawr Register immeasur- 
ably superior in appearance to that of the other colleges, it was in the nature of a 
luxury, and that the real need is for an up-to-date address list, which should not 
cost more than $2 a copy. She doubted whether many people would wish to pay 
as much as $3 for the more complete information. After further discussion, it was 

M. S. C. that it is the wish of the Council to have an Address List 
published in 1930-31, provided that the College is willing to give the time of 
the Publication D epartment ; and that the price of the book is to be set so that 
it shall cover as nearly as possible the cost of publication. 

The Council then proceeded to the consideration of a general revision of the 
By-Laws of the Association. Dorothy Straus, 1908, who had been appointed Chair- 
man of a special committee for this purpose, presented a report which she and the 
other two members, Bertha Rembaugh, 1897, and Josephine Goldmark, 1898, had 
prepared after most careful study. To facilitate the work of the Council, she had 
provided each member with a copy of the old and the new By-Laws, and an explan- 
atory commentary of the suggested changes. In her Report Miss Straus said in part : 

"You will doubtless think, after glancing at the papers before you, that the 
By-Laws Revision Committee wanted to show it took its assignment seriously and 
therefore made as many changes as possible. But when I tell you that the committee 
consisted of Miss Josephine Goldmark, Miss Bertha Rembaugh and myself you will, 
I hope, immediately conclude, and correctly, that we made this extra job as short 
and easy as our somewhat pre-war consciences permitted. 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 7 

"A good many changes are merely of phraseology; to express the same idea in 
the same words throughout; to clarify an obvious intention, and sometimes too to 
put down a practice or procedure continuously followed but never legislated. 



"We have also transposed some sections. Those concerning the Regional Dis- 
tricts and Councillors were scattered over several articles; we have drawn them 
together, with slight changes here and there, into one. We have done the same for 
nominations and elections. But more of that later. 

"Before taking up the changes that involve principle I want to reassure you that 
the provisions concerning the Alumnae Directors conflict in no way with the By-Laws 
of the Trustees and the Directors of the College. We took the precaution of making 
the necessary inquiries on these points before submitting them in our report. We 
have eliminated the requirement that no one shall vote for Alumnae Director who 
has not been out of College five (5) years because, as Miss Rembaugh wittily 
remarked, 'if she's eligible to vote for President of the United States she ought to 
be able to vote for Alumnae Director, even of Bryn Mawr College.' No one is, 
however, eligible for nomination to this ofHce who has not reached that degree of 
maturity, and, let us hope, wisdom. You will note further that, if you approve 
the insertion, she will also be required to be a paid-up member of the Association. 
Experience teaches; such is the basis of the common law and of amendments of 
by-laws. 

n Oi the two main changes in policy and principle, I shall first discuss the second, 
partly because it is the less important and partly because the committee is unanimous 
in its recommendations on this point. I refer to the new method of nominations — 
new however only in extension and application. In 1928 you voted to have a single 
slate for the officers of the Association prepared by the Nominating Committee. And 
to insure the free spirit and possibility of disagreement so dear to Bryn Mawr 
Alumnae (let me hasten to add only as a preliminary to ultimate enthusiastic co- 
operation) you provide for the publication of this slate and the submission of 
independent nominations, so that the final ballot might contain a complete list of 
nominees of heterogeneous origin. But the nominations for district councillors and 
alumnae directors were still left to the Olympians, the Executive Board. As one 
of the members of the committee had been on that Board for three years, and as 
another had known quite a number of boards rather intimately we were soon able 
to decide that a hard-working Nominating Committee, — and of course the Associa- 
tion has none but hard-working committees, at least in its by-laws — concentrating 
its efforts, could achieve as wise a selection of candidates for these offices as the 
officers to whom it was but one of an ever-growing number of duties and problems. 
Any inspirations germinating in the Board will always be received by the Committee, 
who will, in the future as in the past, welcome suggestions from any source. 

"And now we come to the place where the committee could not make up its 
collective mind and has therefore turned over to you, as the tribunal of the next 
to last guess, the decision on Articles IV, V and XL Before continuing I must share 
with you a horrid discovery — that though our charter of 1897 fixed the number of 
directors of the Association and even named the first ones, our By-Laws never even 
mentioned such functionaries. Our first thought was that Ida Wood, Martha G. 
Thomas, Anna Rhoads Ladd, Elizabeth Butler Kirkbride, and Jane B. Haines had 



8 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

achieved another record for Bryn Mawr alumnae, that of having the longest term 
of office ever enjoyed by directors of a membership corporation, to wit thirty-two 
years. But Alice Hawkins did a little excavating among the early minutes of the 
Association and found that some of the first officers were called directors, so we 
are not so certain now that our first cinqumvirate really is entitled to the palm. But 
we are quite certain that the Board, consisting as it does since 1926, of seven instead 
of five, is irregular and, we feel, illegal. 

* * * * 

"There is one other matter that the committed marched up to and then retired 
from with speed but in perfect order — the Council. * * * * Fortunately we decided 
that the fate of the Council did not come within the jurisdiction of a by-laws revision 
committee. * * * * But as the doubt persisted despite our logic, we agreed to pass 
it on to you on the theory that to share trouble is to relieve it. 

"There is almost nothing in the proposed amendments that the committee will 
bleed and die for; you may reject all; but we have given very serious thought to 
almost every word, and we hope that you will find some of our work, if not blessed, 

at least tolerable." 

* * * * 

The result of Miss Straus' report was to provoke such a flood of arguments 
pro and con in regard to some of the moot points, particularly as to the suggestions 
which represented actual changes of policy, that when the meeting adjourned at 
6.15 P. M. it was felt that only the surface of the question had been scratched. The 
whole of the afternoon session after Mrs. Slade's luncheon the following day was 
devoted to further discussion of the by-laws, and another hour was given to their 
consideration at the beginning of the final session of the Council on Friday morning, 
November 22nd. The entire text of the revised by-laws will be sent to all the mem- 
bers of the Association early in January, and they will be discussed and voted on at 
the Annual Meeting of the Association on February 1st. A very much condensed 
summary of the discussion which took place at the Council follows. 

The first change of any importance was the recommendation that associate mem- 
bers of the Association should be given the right to vote for Alumnae Director. The 
next was the decision that members who fail to pay their dues for two successive years 
should be dropped instead of waiting, as at present, for four years. 

The most spirited discussion of the Council was evoked by the changes suggested 
in regard to the officers of the Association. It was explained that according to Penn- 
sylvania law the governing body of a corporation is called the Board of Directors, 
and that the members of this board must be elected. Our charter provides for a Board 
of Directors of five members, but since 1926 the Chairmen of our Finance and Pub- 
licity Committees have been appointed to our Board with equal voting privilege. To 
have seven instead of five members, two of whom 5 are appointed, not elected, is 
obviously illegal from a dual standpoint. 

Because of the feeling that a liaison officer between the College and the Alumnae 
Association is a valuable member of the Board, the By-law Committee had endeav- 
ored — while providing for future eventualities — to devise a plan whereby the alumna 
already in charge of the College publicity would be the person elected to serve as one 
of the Directors. Mrs. Maclay spoke of the importance to the Board of having just 
such a liaison officer, and it was the sense of the meeting that because of the nature 
of this office it should be an appointive and not an elective one. 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 9 

The By-law Committee had proposed three schemes to remedy these difficulties: 
(1) We could have five Directors, who would be officers as at present, and two 
Directors-at-Large, one of whom, it should be tacitly understood, should always be 
the alumna in charge of the College publicity; and, in that case, that person would 
have to go off the Board after two terms, and could not come back as a voting mem- 
ber until a year had elapsed. (2) We could have two classes of Directors — Class A 
with definite duties and terms of office, and Class B with duties and tenure of office 
to be decided by the Executive Board. This would involve eliminating one of the 
Secretaries, and substituting for her the Chairman of Finance as one of the Class A 
Directors, while the other Secretary and the Chairman of Publicity would be the 
Class B Directors. (3) The other scheme, which is especially approved by Miss 
Rembaugh, would be to keep the present Board of Directors of five members, and to 
have the Chairmen of Finance and Publicity serve without a vote, in the belief that 
their opinions would carry sufficient weight with the Board to influence their decisions 
without the actual vote. This is the only plan of the three which would not necessi- 
tate a change of the charter. 

The first point to be decided was as to the necessity of having a governing board 
with as many as seven members, and it was 

M. S. C. that it is desirable to have seven members of this Board. 

Mrs. Chadwick-Collins was asked to speak to the question and did so at two 
different sessions. On the first day she said that, somewhat reluctantly, she had been 
convinced that it might be advisable to have the Director of Publicity serve without a 
vote. On the second day, however, she said that, after giving the matter great 
thought, she had come to the conclusion that if such a liaison officer is valuable on 
the Board, she should be made as responsible a member of the Board as the other 
members, and that it seemed to her unfair not to let her exercise her responsibility by 
having a vote. She believed that it would be impossible for her herself to argue for her 
convictions and to press her point so hard if she could not vote. After this expression 
of opinion, it was 

M. S. C. that the Chairman of Publicity — or the alumna who serves as a 

liaison officer between the College and the Alumnae Association — should have a 

vote on the Board of Directors of the Association. 

Mrs. Blanton said that although we had decided that the Association needed 
seven officers who could be responsible to the Association and whose deliberations 
would be valuable, she thought that it ought to be possible to have only five of those 
responsible to the State of Pennsylvania, and she asked whether it could not be 
arranged to have one body select the other body. Miss Peirce said that she was sure 
that it is legal for a Board of Directors to invest its power in another body, and that 
the situation in regard to the Trustees and the Directors of the College seemed to her 
analogous. Miss Straus gave as her opinion that if the Association desired a Board 
of Directors with nominal powers, and an Executive Board that transacts most of 
the business, this arrangement could be made, and it was 

M: S. C. that the By-law A mendment Committee be authorized to continue 
its ivork which shall be composed of the elected officers of the Association, and 
of an Executive Board to consist of these officers and the Chairmen of the 
Finance and Publicity Committees, each of which bodies shall have such func- 
tions as may be required by the laivs of the State of Pennsylvania. 



10 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

It was further 

M. S. C. that the number and junctions of the officers of the Association 
should remain as they are at present. 

Another important change in policy, which again caused long discussion, was 
brought out in the Article which puts into the hands of the Nominating Committee 
the nominations for Alumnae Directors and for District Councillors, in addition 
to those for officers of the Association. The committee had been convinced that this 
procedure, together with a plan to have all elections take place at the same time, is 
more orderly and more in accordance with general practice. In reply to a question 
as to whether the Executive Board would be supposed to approve the nominations 
made by the Nominating Committee before they are submitted to the Association, 
as is done at present, Miss Straus said that the plan intended the Nominating Com- 
mittee to act quite independently. It was the general feeling that the Nominating 
Committee would be certain to consult with the Executive Board. 

Some comment was made in regard to the difficulties of having a committee 
whose members would live near enough to each other to have meetings, and who 
would at the same time have a knowledge of the alumnae in all parts of the 
country. It was felt that, especially in making nominations for Alumnae Directors, 
it would be necessary to consult the College. Mrs. Stokes said that she had originally 
been opposed to this change, but that since she had heard the report of the Nominat- 
ing Committee, and had seen how seriously the members took their responsibilities, 
she had changed her mind, and believed that the Nominating Committee should make 
all nominations. To enable the committee to function properly, she wished to recom- 
mend that sufficient funds be given to ensure that the committee be able to meet 
several times a year. Mrs. Aldrich said that she thought it might be practical to 
have a sectional committee, but that the Chairman ought to be financed at least to 
the extent of going to Bryn Mawr once a year to make inquiries and to have con- 
sultations. It was finally 

M. S. C. that the N ominating Committee shall be empowered to make 
nominations for Alumnae Directors and for District Councillors. 

The question of extending to the nominations of Alumnae Directors and of 
District Councillors the principle of the single slate, which is now in operation for. 
officers of the Association, was discussed at some length, and the same arguments for 
and against were brought forth, with the result that it was finally recommended 
that the Nominating Committee in preparing all its ballots present "one or more 
nominations" instead of "at least two nominations," as had been the plan suggested. 
Miss P. Goldmark, who had opposed the single slate, said that she thought the 
machinery of putting up a second candidate too cumbersome to be practical, and 
to meet this objection, it was 

M. S. C. that the number of members necessary to secure additional 
nominations for Alumnae Director be reduced from twenty-five to fifteen. 

A number of minor changes were discussed and approved, including the sug- 
gestion that there shall be two Collectors for the Alumnae Fund appointed, one for 
the Masters of Arts and one for the Doctors of Philosophy, instead of one for 
both these groups. 

At the end it was 

M. S. C. that a vote of thanks be extended to the By-Law Committee for 
its monumental piece of work. 



SECOND SESSION OF THE COUNCIL 

All the remaining sessions of the Council were held at the home of Mrs. 
Loomis, under the happiest conditions possible. At the proper times the members 
were delivered by and returned to their hostesses with the minimum of delay and 
maximum of comfort, while the occasional move for change of air and refreshment 
helped rather than hindered the expedition of the business under consideration, since 
even the best of Council brains grow sluggish after too many hours of continuous 
deliberation. 

The meeting on the morning of November 21st opened with the reports of 
the District Councillors, which were so interesting, and which gave so well a picture 
of a live organization extending from coast to coast, that we are printing them here 
with only slight excisions. 

Following the Councillors' reports Margaret Gilman, 1919, Chairman of the 
Scholarships and Loan Fund Committee, gave the report for her committee. As 
Miss Gilman will report to the Annual Meeting, her report as given then will be 
printed in a later issue of the Bulletin. The previous evening all the Council 
members especially interested in scholarships had dined with Mrs. Maclay, and had 
spent the evening in an informal Scholarship Conference, discussing the many prob- 
lems involved, some of which were again aired at the larger meeting. The question 
was asked as to how the actual financial need of scholarships applicants can be 
determined, and it was found that the practice of the local committees varies. Appli- 
cation blanks, letters from references and sometimes personal calls all bring out 
the facts of the situation. Most of the committees, including New England, New 
York and New Jersey, give their scholarships only to girls who could not possibly 
come to Bryn Mawr otherwise. A few others, including the Pittsburgh committee, 
do not insist on real need. In commenting on this, Miss Gilman said that sometimes 
the offer of a scholarship, even when the need is not absolute, will be the deciding 
factor as to whether an excellent candidate chooses Bryn Mawr or another, college, 
and that it should be remembered that one function of the Regional Scholarships 
is to help the College by bringing to it the right type of girls. 

Following Miss Gilman, Pauline Goldmark, 1896, Chairman of the Academic 
Committee, made a few remarks. She said: "The special work of the Committee 
consists of study of Entrance Examinations and 'Special Honors' at other colleges. 
We hope to report on both subjects at the Annual Meeting of the Association because 
our committee thinks it more suitable to present one well-rounded report than try 
to give any of the results at the present time." 

Marjorie Thompson, 1912, Editor of the Alumnae Bulletin, then spoke 
briefly of her wish to have the Bulletin meet the needs of the Association. Mary 
Peirce said that she had occasionally met some non-members of the Association, living 
far from any organized groups, and that she believed that such persons would appre- 
ciate receiving copies of the Bulletin from time to time. A resolution was passed 
asking the Executive Board to arrange for such a plan. 

Eleanor Little Aldrich, 1905, Chairman of the Nominating Committee, next 
presented the report of hetf committee. The ballot for officers of the Association, 
which resulted from this committee's work, has already been printed in the Bulletin, 
and Mrs. Aldrich will repeat her report at the Annual Meeting. 

(ID 



12 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

This session of the Council was brought to a close after Dr. Marjorie F. Mur- 
ray, 1913, gave a short report as Chairman for the Committee on Health and 
Physical Education. She then introduced Dr. Marjorie Jefferies Wagoner, 1918, 
Resident Physician of the College, who spoke on the Department of Health of the 
College. Her presentation of the subject was received with the keenest interest by 
all the alumnae present, who quite generally considered this one of the most im- 
portant contributions to the Council. Both Dr. Murray's and Dr. Wagoner's papers 
are to be printed in the next issue of the Bulletin. 



THIRD SESSION OF THE COUNCIL 

At the concluding session of the Council on the morning of November 22nd, 
Dr. Wagoner consented to answer some questions which had arisen. In speaking 
about the work in mental hygiene she said that the aim of the Health Department 
is to teach the students, without making them too self-conscious, what constitutes 
normal mental and emotional development. She said that there are no routine 
mental hygiene examinations, and that she disapproves of them. No formal psycho- 
analysis is practised at the Infirmary which is no more equipped for this than it is 
for brain surgery. If a student is so badly adjusted that she needs such attention, 
she must seek it elsewhere. Dr. Earl Bond, who is paid a retaining fee by the 
College, is frequently consulted by Dr. Wagoner and sometimes by parents. Dr. 
Wagoner said that she believes that there is little difference between the attitude of 
college girls from that of their non-college contemporaries; she thinks that the feeling 
that they are "cloistered" is no longer a real problem, since the frequent week-ends 
afford a satisfactory solution. 

"Undergraduate Problems" as a whole were delightfully dealt with by Martha 
Humphrey, 1929, and Elizabeth Perkins, 1930, who presented short papers which 
will be printed in the Bulletin next month. In the discussion which followed these 
reports, mention was made of the Art Club, which is again flourishing. It was 
suggested that an exhibit of some of the work might be held in the Bryn MaWr 
Club. Another active group among the undergraduates is that making up the Cur- 
riculum Committee. This is composed of fourteen members, chosen solely because 
of their keen interest in the academic life of the College. They are now, at the 
request of President Park, considering two problems ; ( 1 ) How best to choose the 
students who shall be admitted to College, and (2) Honours Work. 

Frances Fincke Hand, 1897, next presented two reports prepared for the Council, 
one on behalf of the Alumnae Directors, and one on behalf of the Alumnae Committee 
of the Seven Colleges. Since Mrs. Hand will again speak for the Alumnae Directors 
at the Annual Meeting, no summary will be given now. 

Since the discussions had been so full, there was no time for the consideration 
of New Business. Following out a suggestion made by Miss Straus in her report 
on the By-Laws, Miss Pauline Goldmark offered the following resolution, which 
was accepted: 

Moved that since the Council has now held nine yearly meetings in different 
parts of the country since it was created to carry out more fully the purposes 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 13 

of the Association, it is now appropriate to ask the Executive Board to appoint 
a committee to evaluate the work of the Council, and report fully to the 
Association. 

Elizabeth Caldwell Fountain, 1897, who had been present at several sessions, 
asked to be allowed to address the Council on a matter close to her heart. She 
urged the co-operation of members of the Council in having women present a united 
front against the attempt which is being made by the various manufacturers of corsets 
and of women's dresses to foist upon the public styles which are clearly reactionary, 
and which seriously handicap freedom of movement — a freedom only recently won 
by women after years of struggle. 

Just before the close of the Council Mrs. Blanton moved that a vote of thanks 
be given to Mrs. Loomis for her delightful management of all the Council affairs. 
This was seconded and carried unanimously. 

Mrs. Stokes asked that a vote of thanks for their charming hospitality be given 
also to Mrs. Lowry, Mrs. Slade, Mrs. Dickerman, Mrs. Thorpe, Mrs. Maclay, 
and all the other New York alumnae who had done so much for the comfort and 
pleasure of the members of the Council. This was seconded and carried unanimously. 
Council then adjourned at 1.30 P. M. 



NOMINATED FOR VICE-PRESIDENT 

(The tragic death of Gordon Woodbury Dunn after the slate had been published, 
left the nomination for Vice-President open. Mary Hardy generously consented to 
let her name be presented for the vacant place. — Editor.) 

Mary Hardy took her Bryn Mawr degree in 1920. Since that time she has had 
a varied and interesting experience. She has taught science in two schools: Rosemary 
Hall and the Bryn "Mawr School. For a year she worked in her chosen field of 
Biology at the Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge University. For two years she was 
Warden of Denbigh Hall, at the same time doing graduate work in Biology and 
special research under Professor Tennant. 

In 1925 she was given one of the few Fellowships in the School of Hygiene of 
Johns Hopkins University; and in 1926 she took her Doctor of Science degree. Since 
that time she has held research fellowships in the School of Hygiene, experimenting 
with the effect of ultra-violet rays, at first on normal rabbits, and at present on med- 
ical students who are afflicted with the "Common Cold." 

In addition to her thesis, she has published two papers in the American Journal 
of Hygiene. She combines with a first-hand knowledge of the college and its prob- 
lems the experience of a teacher and the training of a scientist. Her work on the 
Alumnae Committee of Health and Physical Education has brought her into close 
contact with the Alumnae Association. 



The Report of the Alumnae Committee of Seven Colleges and the speech made 
by Charles E. Hughes at the dinner arranged by the Committee in New York will 
appear in the February number of the Bulletin. 



THE COUNCILLORS' REPORTS 

(The Reports are being carried in full except for some omissions of names and 
specific personal information about the holders of the regional Scholarships; obviously 
such information is not to be made public. The" Report of the Scholarships and 
Loan Fund Committee will not be carried until after the Annual Meeting. In that 
Report, however, the general policy of the Central Committee is very definitely 
stated and is interesting in connection with these reports. The question of the 
supervision of extra-curriculum activities, of the quality of work, of personal contacts 
and interests, has inevitably arisen in the cases, and very few they are, in which 
the scholars have not been satisfactory. The Central Committee although it always 
stands ready to help if the initiative comes from the Regional Scholars themselves, 
feels that such supervision is the province of the Dean's Office. "The Central Com- 
mittee has considered the question very seriously and feels strongly that the Regional 
Committees should take no action, direct or indirect, which will in any way tend 
to make their scholars feel less responsible, less independent. . . . This has always 
been true of the holders of any Bryn Mawr Scholarship, and the Regional Scholars 
must surely be no exception." — Editor.) 

DISTRICT I. 

District I. realizes that the success of its ventures and its lack of acute problems 
is due very largely to the fortunes of geography and not to a Superior Intelligence 
Quotient of its alumnae. But it gives due thanks for its compactness and offers 
the following account of its activities during the past year. 

We have three organized groups in the District; the Boston Bryn Mawr Club, 
the Providence Bryn Mawr Club, and the New Haven Bryn Mawr Club. And 
in addition we have a great many isolated alumnae in groups of two to ten in the 
many small towns and villages scattered through New England. Then we have a 
mater familias, the New England Association of Bryn Mawr Alumnae, to which 
all New England Alumnae automatically belong. 

The New England Association had their annual spring meeting and luncheon 
in co-operation with the Boston Bryn Mawr Club at the Hotel Statler in Boston 
last May. Dean Schenck was the guest of honor and told of the new plans for 
the Graduate School, and of the Junior Year in France. Last winter, for the first 
time, the Association sponsored a money-raising project, the Edna St. Vincent Millay 
reading, and raised by this venture $1,141.36. 

Because of this the Boston Bryn Mawr Club did not attempt any money-raising 
activity except their annual Easter flower sale. Their treasury was still in a suffi- 
ciently flourishing condition from the results of past efforts to pay their scholarship 
pledge. Their annual meeting was held at the Republican Club in Boston just 
after the Council meeting last November. Eleanor Aldrich and I spoke about the 
Council meeting. They have regular meetings at members' houses throughout the 
winter, informal social meetings, at which Bryn Mawrtyrs of various vintages spoke 
on such diverse subjects as The Egypt of Today and My Year Abroad with the 
Smith Art Unit. 

The Providence Club had an afternoon meeting last week at the suggestion of 
its member on the Scholarships Committee, Elizabeth Matteson Farnsworth, '21. I 

• (H) 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 15 

spoke about our scholars, past, present and future. The Club has not been meeting 
regularly; this was, I think, its first meeting in two and a half years. Eleven out 
of a possible twenty-nine were present and expressed a real interest. One of the best 
by-products of the Regional Scholars is, I think, the cementing interest that they afford 
for us all in times of peace. The Club plans another meeting in January. 

The New Haven Club has continued its successful monthly luncheons at the 
Faculty Club. This is clearly the plan that best fits our needs, suiting both the 
members in "paid occupations" and those in "ambitious domesticity." Our only 
outside speaker this year was Millicent Carey who gave us a most delightful account 
of present-day life on the campus. We are about to launch forth before the public 
to raise some future scholarship money. Professor Chauncey B. Tinker, who, as 
most of you know, began his teaching career at Bryn Mawr and is now one of the 
most distinguished members of the Yale College Faculty, is giving us a lecture on 
Boswell, on the afternoon of the 16th of January. The University! is giving us 
Sprague Hall. We are overcome by their generosity. Although Mr. Tinker assures 
us that there is no one in the world who will pay more than fifty cents, if that, to 
hear him, we are confidently charging one dollar a seat and expect to fill the 730 
seats in Sprague Hall. 

The New England Regional Scholarships Committee suffered a severe blow in 
the spring from the resignation of its very able chairman of the past six years, 
Marguerite Mellen Dewey, '13. Mrs. Dewey is still a member of the committee, 
but was unable to give to it the time needed as Chairman. Evelyn Walker and 
Susan Walker FitzGerald handled the work during the summer and to our great 
delight, Eleanor Aldrich consented this fall to take the Chairmanship. There have 
been three additions to the Committee during the year: Kathleen Johnston Morrison, 
■21, of Cambridge; Anna Stearns, '11, of Nashua, N. H. ; and Elizabeth Matteson 
Farnsworth, '21, of Providence. Alice Ames Crothers, '13, as President of the New 
England Association of Bryn Mawr Alumnae, takes the place of Elizabeth Corson 
Gallagher. 

We have had a most interesting and a highly successful year. Last spring we 
had seven applicants for the Freshman Scholarship: One from Maine, two from Con- 
necticut, and four from Boston, and its vicinity. One fell by the wayside because she 
bad planned to enter on the Comprehensives and discovered too late that it could not 
be done. But for the one who fell two more arose ;and by June we had eight candi- 
dates, of whom six: were so interesting and promising that we were very anxious 
to help them all. Five of them were daughters of professional men — three of the 
five had widowed mothers with other younger children to educate. One comes of 
a long line of medical missionaries and wants to go into medicine; one, the daughter 
of a Spanish father and a German mother, both scholars, is keenly interested in 
international affairs and wants to prepare for the diplomatic service. (She speaks 
French, Spanish, German and English fluently.) Another from a family of scientific 
research workers plans to go into journalism. Faced with this array the committee 
decided that they had better arise, stretch every nerve and press with vigor on. A 
letter telling of the situation was sent out to the New England Alumnae and the 
Committee racked its brains for outside friends who might be interested if they 
knew the facts. The response of the New England Alumnae and others who were 
interested, was very generous. When the Committee met in Boston on the 24th 
of July there were sufficient funds in the bank to enable them to award three upper 



16 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

class scholarships of $300 each and six Freshman Scholarships of $500 each, making 
a total of $3,900. Then, feeling that we were in the unique position of not wanting 
any money and of having a lot of interesting information to give out, we sent a 
letter to each alumna who had contributed telling what we had done. And to our 
horror had $110 sent in as a result. 

Of this $3,900, $800 came from the Boston Bryn Mawr Club, $75 from the 
Providence Bryn Mawr Club, $250 from the New Haven Bryn Mawr Club. $745 
from other New England Alumnae, and $2,030 from interested outsiders. This is, 
we feel, a demonstration that, given promising candidates, the money will come. 

The candidate who entered with the highest average, 87.73, was awarded the 
regular four-year scholarship. She has also won the Matriculation Scholarship. The 
other five special Freshmen Scholarships were all awarded with the clear understanding 
that further aid from the Committee would be determined from year to year and 
would depend on the maintenance of a satisfactory scholastic record, the continued 
need and on the amount of the fund available for this purpose. 

Our two scholars in the Class of 1929 both graduated cum laude, Rosamond 
Cross with distinction in History, and Grace De Roo with distinction in Biology. 
Of our three Special Freshman Scholars last year, one no longer requires financial 
assistance and the other two are being taken care of by the College. The eight 
scholars who were in College last June had in their final examination marks 47^2 
hours H. C, 53*/2 Credit and 14 hours Merit. And I heard the other day of an 
unsympathetic alumna who complained of regional scholarships methods, and felt 
that the College should select the candidates because in her opinion it was not possible 
for alumnae to pick them successfully. Relen Evans Lewis? 1913> 

Councillor for District I. 

DISTRICT II. 

(The Councillor asked to be allowed to have each of her Scholarships Chair- 
men report.) 

NEW YORK 

The New York Scholarships Committee has three scholars in College this year. 
In addition, there are two others, one of whom we have supported for three years 
and the other for one year, both of whom are now continuing without our help. 

* # * ' * 

The grades of our scholars with one exception have not been very high. That 
is our main difficulty here in New York, for we do not seem to have any applications 
from really first-class scholars. We hardly ever get a girl from any of the public 
high schools in the city and it seems to be hard to arouse interest in the upper parts 
of the State. 

We are convinced of one thing. We are not running a charity and it is not 
our object to give poor girls an education, but to help really first-rate scholars in the 
true sense of the word. As a result we did not send a Freshman this year. 

For the past two years we have raised our budget mainly by sending out a 
short reminder to the alumnae asking for their annual contributions. We have 
received from $1000 to $1200 each year, most of the alumnae giving from $3 to $10 
apiece. We also get four or five contributions of $50 or $100. Besides that we made 
about $200 from the sale of rummage sent by the alumnae to the Jack Horner 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 17 

Thrift Shop. We make no appeal to the general public. We have had no enter- 
tainment for two years, but are planning one this year. 

Our most gratifying experience has been the response received from one alumna 
who unfortunately insists on keeping her identity a secret. She is in no way con- 
nected with our committee and got the notice when she was spending the winter 
away from New York. She was so interested in what she read of the scholarships 
work that she immediately sent us a cheque for $500 to be used to send an extra 
scholar from New York to Bryn Mawr. She agreed to see this scholar through 
her four years of college, paying her $500 the first year and $300 the next three 
years. After that she will start with another girl. * * * * This alumna insists on 
leaving all decisions! to the Committee and wants her scholar treated as if she 
belonged to us. 

We are starting the year with the hope of finding one or two outstanding girls 

to send to Bryn Mawr in the autumn in order to justify the unfailing support of 

the Alumnae of New York. „ n _, 1rt1rt ^. . 

Beatrice Sorchon Binger, 1919, Chairman. 

EASTERN PENNSYLVANIA AND DELAWARE 

We have four scholars now in College of whom we are very proud, two 
Juniors, one Sophomore and one Freshman. The Freshman had an entrance examin- 
ation average in the 80's and did brilliant work at her preparatory school. * * * * 
She was instantly put on the Varsity Hockey team, where, according to the news- 
papers, she is the one bright spot on Bryn Mawr's forward line. * * * * As for 
prospects for next year and the years after, there is one student who has taken 
preliminaries who has the most astounding high marks — 86 is her lowest, and the 
others are 90, 90 and 98 for the four subjects. If she keeps up any such averages 
as that in her finals she will be higher than any candidate we have ever had, and 
we are looking forward to her finals marks with the most intense interest. There 
are other candidates, none of them as good as that one, for 1930, '31 and '32, so 
that it would appear that one of our great difficulties is over — we have felt that 
perhaps our candidates were not of quite as good calibre as those of other districts, 
but no fault can now be found with them. And we are very much pleased with the 
scholars now in College. 

A word about the choosing of scholars in this district. We do write letters 
to all the people whose names are given as references on the application blanks. 
Sometimes the replies are useless, but more often they are most helpful. The com- 
mittee meets three or four times in the early spring to go over the letters, and to 
try to get each candidate's record of school and preliminary marks fixed in our minds. 
Then in the middle of May the candidates are asked to tea at my house to meet 
the committee. 

As to the financial part of this report, we have the greatest difficulty in raising 
our quota in this district. It would appear a perfectly simple thing to do to raise 
$1400 a year in Philadelphia and its vicinity, but this committee is certainly finding 
it most difficult. Of course we will find our money eventually, as we always do, 
but it is quite wrong for us to be in debt to the College for funds which should 
have been in hand on November 1st. This year we have had unusually bad luck 
with our funds, as the flower sales at Easter brought us in about $500 less than 



18 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

usual, and hoping to make up that amount, we had an entertainment, Agna Enters, 
whom the Washington Scholarships Committee had so successfully last year, but 
for us it was not a success. * * * * Everyone has said that if one has good scholars 
the money for them will eventually come in. We have certainly four good scholars 
at present, and I feel sure that we will and can support them. 

Elizabeth Y. Maguire, 1913, Chairman. 



REPORT OF THE NEW JERSEY SCHOLARSHIPS COMMITTEE 

When the Alumnae Regional Scholarships were created, New Jersey was tenta- 
tively divided into two parts, each part to help a neighboring state. Soon it was 
decided to see what New Jersey could do for her own students. We were timid 
about our undertaking but our State pride asserted itself and we sallied forth. The 
Alumnae of Northern New Jersey have had a keen disappointment in that we have 
failed to unite the State, for the southern part has cast its lot this year with Penn- 
sylvania. We obligated ourselves to enter one student every two years, hoping, with 
a united New Jersey, we could enter a student every year. 

At present we have one student, a Sophomore, in College, another one expects 
to enter in 1930. Our two former students have graduated. New Jersey rejoices 
with Illinois because each of them has had a Scholar who was awarded the European 
Fellowship. 

While New Jersey has alumnae scattered throughout the State, some towns 
have enough to form a group. Princeton usually has about 16. Short Hills and 
Summit work together. Montclair, Glen Ridge, Essex Falls, and Caldwell another 
group. In 1922 there were nine alumnae in this district having a radius of seven 
miles, but now we number fourteen, and other groups have become smaller. Thus 
realizing that groups of alumnae are fluctuating as to their residences and that the 
year 1935 may be a lean one for raising money for scholarships, the New Jersey 
alumnae have continued to raise money beyond their present needs. 

One group has an endowment of $500. Another $1,000 and our cash in bank 
is $633.39, credited to the different contributing groups. 

The money has been raised by contributors from the isolated Alumnae; Prince- 
ton alumnae always have dipped into their own pockets for their money. The group 
of the Oranges has had most successful sales of unusual merchandise, all sold on 
commission, conducted by Madeline Edison Sloane, and Elizabeth Bryan Parker. 
This year Short Hills and Summit had a series of musicales, interpreting modern 
operas, given by Mr. Harvey Officer. These were so delightfully received and 
patronized that that group has enough interest for its quota, and now it is turning 
its attention to the summer school. Trenton has an annual contribution of $25.00 
from the Trenton Times as long as we help students residing in New Jersey who 
also have been educated in the State. 

Since the New Jersey Chairman is resigning, this is a unique opportunity to 
speak of the splendid support she has had. 

Mrs. Carroll Miller, Councillor for District II., when the Regional Scholarships 
work began, laid the foundation of the work, and her advice proved good stepping 
stones for further building. Then Mrs. Loomis took up the work of District 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 19 

Councillor and when tangles came and I sought her aid, so logical was her solution 
that each time I left her I would repeat the army slogan, "The first duty of a good 
soldier is to obey orders." And in five years I have not once regretted obeying orders. 

Continually my committee has heartened me, for without their loyalty and 
co-operation the work in New Jersey could not have been done. Each member of 
the committee has in turn had the splendid support of her local alumnae. 

Our Vice President, Mary Peckham Tubby, has served seven years. Our 
Treasurer, Gertrude Hinrichs King, five years. I wish each interested alumna could 
see her accounts and the system of bookkeeping she devised for this peculiar work. 

Marion Whitehead Grafton and Elizabeth Bodine of Trenton, as well as Jean 
Clark Fouilhoux of Short Hills, Mary Campbell of Orange, and Alice Dillingham 
of Englewood have each served seven years; Madeline Edison Sloane, five years; 
Cornelia Halsey Kellogg, three years. At Princeton, Elizabeth Hibben Scoon served 
the first two years, then Grace D. Mitchell has carried on the work with Katharine 
Schmidt Eisenhart substituting this past year. 

To the new chairman and committee, I make one recommendation. Until we 
can assist four students in College, any surplus over our needs for two students 
should be used to assist graduate students. 

Elizabeth Sedgwick Shaw, 1897, 
Chairman. 

WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

After listening to the reports of the other Scholarships Chairmen I am conscious 
of my temerity in having decided merely to talk to you. Pittsburgh seems never to 
do anything according to rule! we are all so different individually, most of us, like 
myself, not being Pittsburghers, so that it is very hard to enforce any rigid form 
of procedure. 

I wish first of alL to express my great pleasure in being a member of this 
meeting. Except for what little work I have done as scholarships chairman for the 
Western District of Pennsylvania I have been very much out of touch with Bryn 
Mawr activities in recent years, and it has given me a renewed interest in both 
college and alumnae problems to be a part of this deliberative body. 

The tangible facts in regard to our scholarships committee are these: we have 
two Freshmen scholars in College this year, one of whom holds our Club Scholar- 
ship, and the other a scholarship awarded by an interested alumna. * * * * Both 
of these girls were prepared by the Peabody High School, and one of them, although 
offering all her examinations in one division this spring, entered with an average 
of about 83. These two girls were our only applicants for this year. Last year 
we had no scholar. Our Club has never felt able to carry more than one scholarship 
at a time and our policy has been to assist throughout her four years any scholar 
we send rather than to send a new scholar each year. 

For 1928-29 we had no applicants or at least none that weathered the scrutiny 
of the committee; and so we come to the year 1929-30, which finds the Pittsburgh 
Bryn Mawr Club the proud possessor of two Freshman scholars; its $500 pledge 
paid, though to the wrong office in spite of my labors with our treasurer, and $1500 
in bonds! This last asset is the result of some high finance and seems great wealth 
to a committee which has to scratch very hard for its money, 



20 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

This fall, with the assistance of Mrs. Loomis's personal appeal, I got the consent 
of the Club to a circularization of Western Pennsylvania. Our region covers the 
western end of the state as far as Johnstown, and in that area by much seeking I 
compiled a list of 95 names, persons who had spent 24 hours or longer at Bryn Mawr 
as students, either graduate or undergraduate. Since, Western Pennsylvania abounds in 
small colleges, a large number of our 95 possible contributors are graduate students 
who in most cases are neither interested nor able to respond to a financial appeal. 
From my 95 letters I have so far received 19 replies with contributions amounting 
to $253, and covering annual pledges to the amount of $110. In Pittsburgh itself 
we have about 40 persons to whom notices of our monthly meetings are sent regularly, 
but 10 is a high average of attendance at these meetings, and in case of drives and 
benefits the work usually falls upon even less than that number of workers. I have 
been in the front-line trenches for two drives and two benefits during my ten years 
in Pittsburgh as well as having been scholarship chairman off and on — mostly on — so 
that I have felt for some time that the whole region should somehow be stimulated 
to share in our activities and responsibilities. This situation of regional activity con- 
centrated in Pittsburgh arose because the Pittsburgh Bryn Mawr Club offered a 
scholarship for many years before regional scholarships were thought of and so far 
we have lacked the ability or initiative to extend our organization. There are 
several persons in the outlying towns who always respond generously to any special 
appeal, but I long to round up all the 95 scattered sheep. 

I am especially glad to have been at this Council meeting since I am resigning 
my chairmanship, at least temporarily, because we are* going to California for six 
months, but I am more than satisfied to leave the work in the young and competent 
hands of Ruth Beardsley Huff, one of our Pittsburgh scholars and one of our most 
loyal and constructive Bryn Mawr alumnae. 

Eugenia Fowler Henry, 1901, Chairman. 

DISTRICT III. 

In comparison with the reports of the Eastern and Northern Districts I am 
afraid that from the Southern District will sound somewhat meager. 

District III. comprises the States of Maryland, Virginia, District of Columbia, 
North and South Carolina, Tennessee, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Florida and 
Louisiana. 

The members of our group are very widely scattered and many of them are 
graduate students, or have attended Bryn Mawr only for one or two years. Thus it 
has been found impossible to organize clubs anywhere but in the three largest centers — 
Washington, Baltimore, and Richmond. 

The Richmond Club is endeavoring to raise a scholarship fund which is to be 
a memorial to Virginia Randolph Ellett, who did so much to arouse and to keep 
alive an interest in the higher education of women, and in the work being done at 
Bryn Mawr. Pending the establishment of this Memorial Fund the Club has very 
generously offered to contribute to the general fund of the District. 

Mrs. George Buck sent me the following report from Baltimore: 

"Our new Chairman is Miss Claire Hardy, 518 Cathedral Avenue, and from 
her I have this information. We give Scholarship help to our candidate for two 
years. Her Freshman year we give her $500 — that being the most expensive year— 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 21 

and her Sophomore year we send her $300. If she has proved her worth it is not 
difficult to get College scholarships for her Junior and Senior years. So that we 
send a new girl every two years, and we must raise a yearly average of $400. 

"We sent a new girl this fall, the daughter of a Bryn Mawr alumna, prepared 
by the Forest Park Public School. We have had few applications from public school 
girls up to now, and they have usually failed their entrance requirements. 

"We have great trouble getting the money each year. We have about 100 names 
on our file but many of them are graduates of other colleges who did a year of more 
graduate work at Bryn Mawr. They feel their financial obligation to the college 
from which they received their A.B., and contribute nothing. We should like to 
know if other clubs fare better from this group." 

The Washington Club has a membership of about 65, with an active member- 
ship of 15 or 20, and has each year raised a scholarship of $500 which has been 
given to a Washington student to help her through the four years of her college 
course - * * * * 

Our Scholarship Fund was raised last year by a book sale, which brought in 
$125, and by a benefit performance in which the Wellesley Club co-operated with us, 
and presented Agna Enters in a series of clever and amusing impersonations. Our 
share of the proceeds was $617. The entertainment proved to be the most successful 
one we ever had. 

From the District at large the sum of $475 was gathered in the last three 
years, and from that fund a grant of $300 has been made to a member of the Class 
of '31, for the year 1929-30. Alletta van Reypen Korff, 1900, 

Councillor for District III. 

DISTRICT IV. 

It seems hardly possible that only a year has been needed to overturn so 
completely the conditions in District IV. When the Council met in New Haven 
I reported ample means and no candidates — today, successful candidates and $3.44 
in the bank! The year shows that the District has achieved contributions of $1600 
to four scholars. 

In the first place we have continued to help our former Cleveland scholar now 
in Paris as one of the eight students selected to take their Junior year at the Sor- 
bonne. In March of last year we were asked to help a Sophomore from Cincinnati, 
* * * * and she is now also at the Sorbonne for her Junior year. 

Until late July the District Scholarship Chairman and I held our breath 
waiting word from our two candidates for Freshman scholarships. Then the news 
came that both (one from Indianapolis and one from Cleveland) had been admitted. 
It was our conviction that admission alone, whatever the average, would entitle both 
girls to consideration on the grounds that their preparation had been in the public 
schools, unaccustomed to Bryn Mawr standards, and that the number of candidates 
was so great that the College would, of necessity, have weeded out the mediocre 
material. * * * * By wire and long distance we decided to give scholarships to 
both, knowing that the Indianapolis alumnae could manage their own scholar, and 
hoping that the rest of the region would rise to the emergency. 

The two students are now in college, and have, I am told, made an excellent 
impression. But before going further I must say a word about our Indianapolis 



22 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

scholar. There had been no one at Bryn Mawr from Indianapolis since 1925, and 
we felt old and out of touch. No member of our Club knew the candidate; she was 
inspired to go to Bryn Mawr simply by the notice of the scholarship posted at her 
High School. She entered on Greek, instead of French or German, and received no 
outside tutoring. 

The ideal for the region of the six organized cities, Columbus, Cleveland, Louis- 
ville, Detroit, Indianapolis, and Cincinnati, each working independently, efficiently, 
and generously, is nearer to realization by one city than a year ago. Columbus made 
its first contribution to the scholarship fund, $100, from the proceeds of a sale of 
old books. Cleveland has given $100, as it did the year before. I believe the 
alumnae there could and should increase this amount, considering that two of our 
scholars come from there, and that, therefore, a very personal and local appeal can 
be made. I hope to go there during the winter and obtain a clearer idea of the 
situation. Louisville has never given as a club to the scholarships fund, but their 
president promised most definitely in September that "something" would be forth- 
coming by December first, and on 'that promise I am relying hopefully, if a trifle 
anxiously. Detroit remains the darkest spot in the District, as word has been 
received from there that the club can give nothing. 

Indianapolis undertook this fall its first money-raising project since the Endow- 
ment Drive. Tickets were to be sold for a series of three morning entertainments, 
two lectures and a musicale, given by local persons, two weeks apart. The last 
one took place this week, so I am not certain of the exact amount cleared, but it 
is between $900 and $950. Of this, $500 has been sent for our scholar. In addition 
$150 was given byj individual subscription toward the other obligations, and we 
expect to be able to keep the remainder for next year's expenses. The Indianapolis 
Club also made a donation of $50 to the local Summer Schools Committee, which 
was formed from the impetus of Hilda Smith's visit a year ago, and has sent girls to 
Wisconsin and Bryn Mawr Summer Schools. Cincinnati gave $100 to the general 
scholarships fund, and in addition collected $150 for one of the Regional Scholars. 

In response to a News Sheet detailing our scholarships situation which I sent 
to everyone in the District, including former graduate students, the sum of $165 
was collected. Of this, $110 came from persons unconnected with any of the 
organized clubs. I plan to repeat this publication within the next few weeks, as 
much to inform as to beg. 

It seems probable that District IV. is now reaching a position comparable to that 
of the eastern sections, where there is no lack of promising candidates, but where 
the choice among the candidates, the raising of funds, and the allotment of respon- 
sibility among the various centers are the chief problems. It will be necessary in 
the future to have, instead of merely the Councillor and her scholarships chairman, 
a genuinely functioning scholarships committee, which can be consulted by letter, 
as the distances are too great for meetings. The members should, of course, be 
informed in advance about the candidates coming up for possible) acceptance or 
rejection so that an intelligent decision can be reached upon short notice. This is, 
naturally, an old story to the New England, New York, and Pennsylvania regions, 
but is a new one to the Middle West. In the pellucid glow of "hindsight" it is 
easy to see that the present situation in which Cleveland is held more or less respon- 
sible for two scholarships amounting to $800 when the club never agreed to 1 give 
more than $100, should have been avoided. However, parenthetically, the affair 
was complicated by the fact that the Indianapolis group was determined to send 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 23 

its candidate to Bryn Mawr, and that the candidate, unluckily, had a lower average 
than her Cleveland competitor. 

Now the District must have a breathing space and should not, I think, offer 
a Freshman scholarship for next year, unless an exceptional case presents itself. We 
have no candidates at present for 1930, but have three for 1931, one of whom is 
the daughter of an alumna. The immediate task ahead is to solidify, make permanent, 
organize the various signs of life that have made their appearance at new spots in 
the District. If this is done, the prospect is bright for keeping the supply of scholars 
and the supply of money in such relation to each other that we can add materially 
to that variety in the student body so sought after by the College authorities. 

Katharine Holliday Daniels, 1918, 
Councillor for District IV. 

DISTRICT V. 

It has been extremely interesting to see how differently each region has solved 
the problems of its organization and its scholarship and the relation of the Regional 
Councillor to the Scholarship Chairman. Much of the time that is one of the 
main problems because the work of these two must so overlap. For instance, it is 
almost impossible for me (let us say) to draw on that much-discussed emergency 
fund and go to Minneapolis to arouse the Bryn Mawr group without some real 
cause. Alumnae organization, as such, is too cold a subject. I realize this will not 
be the case in 1935, but it is in 1929. But the Scholarship Chairman may herself 
want to write for scholarship money because of her warm knowledge of her scholars — 
or again she may have been forced to do so by her feeling of desperate need. We 
have in the fifth district three "centers" to consider — Madison, Milwaukee and 
Minneapolis-St. Paul — all cowering under the sense of their minuteness, as Bryn 
Mawr groups and rather declining to accept any responsibility. So far no one has 
succeeded in persuading them to organize separate scholarships committees — our one 
Madison scholar having come straight from the committee consisting of her own 
mother (a Bryn Mawr Alumna). 

Much of the difference between districts depends on their allocation of respon- 
sibility for raising scholarship funds. One Councillor (living in a city of 7 members) 
tells me she was informed the funds were entirely her job. In the Chicago district 
we have had a rather divided, but at least less overwhelming scheme. Trie Bryn 
Mawr Club years ago voted to hold themselves responsible for the money — which, 
however, was to be raised from the general public by some method other than 
direct appeal, i The result is a sort of triumvirate of the President of the Bryn 
Mawr Club, the Scholarships Chairman, and the Regional Councillor sharing the 
weight of the financial responsibility. Their definite policy is to organize, for the 
benefit of the Scholarships Fund, a series of lectures or something of the kind to 
which the general public is invited in the name of the Bryn Mawr Club. That the 
Bryn Mawr Club takes its share seriously is proven by the fact that when we had 
the money for only one scholar last spring, but two good candidates, the individual 
members of the Club at the Spring Spree loaned the organization the money to 
send the second candidate. 

Miss Gilman may well be thinking that this triumvirate was none too large 
when she recalls the frightful "turnover" of Scholarships Chairmen last year — so 
rapid that sometimes the only responsible person left was the Bryn Mawr Club 



24 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

Chairman — Gladys Spry Augur — but she can never feel it so intensely as I did 
when our second Scholarships Chairman faded out of the picture too late to even ask 
a third to raise money, and Gladys Spry Augur and I (pinning our faith to the 
lecture-going Lenten public) ran the Scholarships lectures at three weeks' notice 
single handed — down to licking the stamps. 

For this coming year, I am delighted to report that we have an excellent organ- 
ization in Chicago — Katharine Adams of the Class of 1927 is President of the 
Bryn Mawr Club, and Nancy Porter Straus of 1921 (Ruth Porter's daughter) has 
undertaken the Scholarship Chairmanship. That means that we have at last found 
two members of the much-sought-after younger generation to arouse the interest of 
their contemporaries. And Gladys Spry Augur of 1912, who has just the interest 
and ability to create enthusiasm, has undertaken to arouse the groups organized in 
other cities. 

In all seriousness, this is rather a subtle problem for the Regional Councillor and 
the Scholarships Chairman to solve between them. It is obviously impossible to 
rouse the very small Bryn Mawr groups in these cities, except for some definite 
"cause," yet ordinarily the only "cause" is the Regional Scholarship. In the desire 
of the Councillor and the Scholarships Chairman to help each other and yet not 
take the wind from one another's sails, it is rather difficult not to have the whole 
matter fall between them. This is especially the case when there is a break in the 
continuity as there was last year. 

The Regional gatherings were good last winter — for President Park came West 
and after a Bryn Mawr Club lunch carried us all back to Bryn Mawr by a per- 
fectly enchanting — apparently casual and gossipy — speech which left us with a 
thrilling impression of real intellectual renaissance at College. 

The other occasion for which I had no responsibility, but which must be men- 
tioned as a feature of the year, was the dinner for "The Seven Presidents." That 
was a marvellous opportunity to get the Bryn Mawr people together and to give them 
a close relation temporarily with the graduates of other colleges — and President 
Vincent's speech on the aims of education was only equalled by President Thomas' 
magnificent one at the opening of the Bryn Mawr Summer School (in 1927). 

Frances Porter Adler, 1911, 
Councillor for District V. 
* * * * 

DISTRICT VI. 

Last March District VI elected as Councillor, Margaret Nichols Hardenbergh 
of Kansas City, to succeed Mrs. Ernest Stix of St. Louis. We were all very happy 
in the thought of having one so well suited to the position when suddenly we 
learned that our Councillor-elect was obliged to change her residence from Kansas 
City to Minneapolis and that she could not serve our district. The Executive 
Committee had to fill her place and in September I had the temerity to accept the 
appointment. It is a difficult task to do what Margaret Hardenbergh might have 
done and equally difficult to follow the precedent set by one so able as Mrs. Stix. 
I am still very, very new and inexperienced and have everything to learn. 

Because of the excellent work of the preceding Councillor and of our Scholarship 
Chairman, Mrs. Aaron Rauh, our district now has two scholars at College. * * * * 
Both girls are Sophomores this year, with excellent records back of them and high 
hopes and ambitions before them. They have both been outstanding in their work, 
as well as in their extra-curricular activities. 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 2S 

We are pleased with these two girls and hope we may have two others ready 
to take their places by the close of their Senior year. The district wants to continue 
to maintain at least two scholars. 

District VI. presents a problem rather peculiar to itself. Within the eight states, 
Arkansas, Colorado, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas, 
there are about two hundred Bryn Mawr Graduates, Former Students and Graduate 
Students. I think I am safe in saying that because of the many intervening miles 
a very large majority of these people have never seen the Bryn Mawr campus since 
the day they left it some years ago, and have had no contact with college affairs 
save through letters. So there is little to stimulate their interest and when a letter 
comes from the Councillor, it is either pigeon-holed until it has outrun the "Statute 
of limitations" or it is immediately tossed into the waste basket. The only organized 
group is in St. Louis. It is the hope of the present Councillor to organize others. 
So you see the difficulties of a Councillor whose duty is to "co-ordinate Alumnae 
activities and further the understanding between the Alumnae and the College." 
From the one hundred and seventy-five letters sent out in October there have been 
not more than fifteen answers. 

The one bright spot on the map of District VI. is St. Louis. It is the Bryn 
Mawr group there that deserves the credit for whatever has been accomplished. Last 
Saturday, on my way here, I stopped off in St. Louis to attend a Bryn Mawr meeting 
at the home of Mrs. Aaron Rauh, our Scholarships Chairman. Only nine of the 
thirty Bryn Mawr women living in or near St. Louis came, but what the meeting 
lacked in numbers it made up in enthusiasm. From the informal discussions that 
took place, I bring a few messages to the Council. Congratulations are extended to 
the College upon the shower baths that have been installed and the suggestion is 
made that dental fountains come next. Congratulations, too, upon the recent reports 
of the Graduate School and upon the Honor Courses now offered. It is hoped that 
it may soon be possible to increase the number of these courses. It was reported 
last year that the experiment of having the Princeton Players come to Bryn Mawr 
was a great success. Cannot this or something similar be done again to bring men 
to Bryn Mawr? It was thought that this may help to solve some of the week-end 
problems. 9 m m # 

I wish at this time to express my pleasure at being present at this Council 
meeting, and my deep appreciation to the Executive Committee for giving me this 
privilege. I hope I may prove myself worthy of the trust. 

Edna Warkentin Alden, 1900, 
Councillor for District VI. 

DISTRICT VII. 

The news that District VII. has an undergraduate regional scholar sent by the 
district as a whole may not seem as epoch making to you as it does to District VII. 's 
Councillor. Our regional scholar was prepared by the Bishop School at La Jolla, 
California, where she had been given a scholarship because of her good citizenship 
and high scholastic standing. She passed her examinations with merit. While 
this is not high, it is certainly good when you take into account that the Bishop 
School was not accustomed to preparing for Bryn Mawr, and that it is some 3000 
miles away. 



26 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

Our district, which comprises Washington, Oregon, California, Idaho, Nevada, 
Utah, Arizona and the Hawaiian Islands, has only two definite groups, one in San 
Francisco, and one in Los Angeles. The Club in San Francisco gave $400 to our 
scholarship fund and the group in Los Angeles gave $300, making $700 of which 
$500 was for the scholarship and $200 for travelling expenses. 

Next year our Northern California Club has a very promising candidate, now 
preparing at the Katharine Branson School in Ross. This girl attempted to take 
the examinations from the public high school in San Francisco, and failed with a 
low average. After a year of proper preparation her surprising marks in her first 
division were: Algebra 100, Geometry 100, French 76, Latin 75. Katharine Branson 
says she has a most original and independent mind. We hope that we will be 
able to give her a scholarship, and at the same time we hope that Southern Cali- 
fornia will be able to carry on the present scholarship. Up until now the problem of 
finding a scholar has been a paramount one; from now on we will have, I foresee, the 
more usual one of how to find the scholarships money. 

Last year I spoke also of the need to do campaigning in the private schools to 
arouse enthusiasm for Bryn Mawr. 

* * * * 

The vast territory covered by District VII. has nine large co-educational univer- 
sities and one well-established woman's college, Mills. I feel that with the very 
small number of students who come East to college, each one who comes is so much 
gain to the better understanding between the East and West. Unless you live out 
there it is difficult to realize that there is a culture, distinctly Western, arising out 
there, and that each student sent to an Eastern college may add something to keeping 
a balance between the Eastern and Western cultures. 

Helen Brayton Barendt, 1903, 
Councillor for District VII. 



ANNUAL MEETING 

The annual meeting of the Alumnae Association will be held on Saturday, Feb- 
ruary 1, 1930. The morning session, which will begin at 10 o'clock, is to be held in 
the Music Room, Goodhart Hall. At 1 o'clock the meeting will adjourn for lunch- 
eon, when the alumnae will be the guests of the College in Pembroke Hall. Acting- 
President Manning will make an address and will be glad to answer any questions 
about the College. After this, the business of the Association will be continued in 
Pembroke dining-room. The regular reports of the Executive Board, of the Treas- 
urer, of the Standing Committees, of the Alumnae Directors, and of the Council, will 
be presented at the morning and afternoon sessions, and in addition there will be a 
most important report from a special committee on the revision of the by-laws, and 
discussion of the publication of an Alumnae Register. President Emeritus Thomas 
will be at home in the Deanery after the meeting. 



THE alumnae book club 

The delinquent officer of the Alumnae Book Club is most happy to greet the 
members; to say how pleasant it is to find, among the reference books of which she 
make.s constant use, many valuable presents from the Club; and also hope very soon 
for a conference on the needs and interests of the library. 



GORDON WOODBURY DUNN : A TRIBUTE 

In the last number of the Bulletin there appeared a notice of the death of 
Gordon Woodbury Dunn and a short account of her life. It would be impossible, 
however, to let an opportunity pass by without paying a more personal tribute to her. 

It is almost impossible to express in words just why all of us who knew Gordon 
loved her as we did. Not only was she a leader in any community in which she 
chanced to be living, seeing issues clearly with rare wisdom far beyond her years, but 
all who touched her felt her quick response to friendship, her ready understanding, 
her charm, her brilliant intelligence, her sense of humor, her whimsicality, gaiety and 
keen enjoyment of life. Those who knew her in college already had a sense of her 
unusual possibilities, and those of us who have gone on with her since, have seen them 
come to brilliant maturity. 

Her marriage was a very rare one, and in it she seemed to find her greatest 
fulfillment. It was around her fireside that the most interesting people gathered, and 
there under her guidance the almost forgotten art of conversation came to life again. 

To us her outstanding quality was perhaps that in this generation of rush she 
made living an art, created an atmosphere of leisure and culture, knew what she was 
driving at and enjoyed every step of the way. Last spring she said: "You know, life 
is more fun every year; we find more things to enjoy and more possibilities in it." 

In the last few years she became extremely interested in progressive education, 
and because of her keen intelligence put her theories into practice. Little Martha 
already has the most precious endowment a child can have — three years of wise and 
serene guidance. The arrival of her son Woodbury, who was only three weeks old 
when she died, was a source of great joy to Gordon. If one's life can be valued by its 
fullness and richness, hers was complete. 

Our loss in Gordon's death is a heart-rending and a lasting one, intensified by 
what it must mean to her family. But even through our sorrow we are grateful for 
the inspiration of her friendship, for her gay spirit and her real enjoyment of life. 

Frances Chase Clarke, 1919; 
Beatrice Sorchan Binger, 1919; 
Lois Kellogg Jessup, 1920. 



THE HARRIET RANDOLPH MEMORIAL FUND 
ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

The Harriet Randolph Memorial Fund started by the Class of '89 in June, 1928, 
and subscribed to by friends and former students of Miss Randolph, has reached the 
amount of $4,564.36 and $5,000 has been promised by an interested friend, thus 
leaving only $435.64 to be raised to complete the $10,000 fund. Trie subscriptions 
have come from 138 persons. 

And to these friends the Class of '89 is most grateful for their co-operation in 
making possible this endowment, the interest of which will be used to purchase books 
and periodicals for the Department of Biology. We wish to complete the fund by 
June, 1930, and earnestly invite those alumnae and former students and friends of 
Miss Randolph who have not yet subscribed and who may be waiting for further 
information to send their gift now to Martha G. Thomas, Treasurer, Whitford P. O., 
Chester County, Pa. 

(27) 



CLASS NOTES 



(Notes from the folloiving classes will 
appear in the next issue: 1903, 1915, 1916, 
1917, 1918, 1923, 1925, 1926, 1928.) 

1896 
Class Editor: Abigail Camp Dimon 
1411 Genesee Street, Utica, N. Y. 

Lucy Baird spent the summer on the 
Pacific coast. She visited various mem- 
bers of her family, stopped at the Grand 
Canyon and at different points along the 
coast from San Diego to San Francisco, 
and was back at Cape Cod in time to 
begin school in September. 

Rebecca Mattson Darlington speaks for 
herself as follows: "We spent the sum- 
mer, as usual, at our old farm house in 
New Hampshire. There we mingled the 
delightful elements of camp life in the 
way of mountain climbing, hiking, swim- 
ming, picknicking and the like, with more 
or less academic pursuits in the way of 
first easy steps toward that most desirable 
accomplishment of 'a reading knowledge 
of German.' There was also, of course, 
much reading, planned or desultory, in 
the region of English literature, and 
always plenty of discussion of every con- 
ceivable subject around our blazing log 
fires. We had our usual stream of sum- 
mer guests, too, and when we wished to 
be really creative we hooked rugs or 
worked in my rather barren garden. All 
summer I kept one ear cocked toward our 
country 'phone, with the hope that I might 
be called by some members of '96 passing 
through our part of New England. But 
not Elsa, not Ab, not May Jewett, no, 
not one passerby came near enough to 
our little corner to give uS a call. Do be 
more sociable next summer, dear '96 ! 

"Perhaps the best part of my summer 
was found in the return of my son Philip 
from South America, after his absence 
of some sixteen months. Then, too, I had 
the laborious task of moving our house- 
hold goods from Brookline to the little 
cozy old house that we now inhabit here 
in Cambridge. It is particularly delight- 
ful for us because this returned wander- 
er, Philip, is studying for his doctorate 
in zoology at Harvard and is for this 
winter living at home. One does get a 
thrill in the process of becoming reac- 
quainted with one's offspring. Our sec- 
ond son is launched in his first 'job,' in 
New York, where he is working in the 
Bell Telephone Research Laboratories. 
And Celia is moving through her junior 
year at Bryn Mawr. 

"I continue with my teaching job at 
Choate School in Brookline, and I find 



that I can accomplish much reading dur- 
ing my commuting hours. I leave home 
five mornings a week at a quarter before 
eight o'clock and return at any hour from 
half past two to six o'clock. It goes with- 
out saying that I love my job and I do 
think that life would be, if not dull, at 
least lacking in much of its present mean- 
ingful joy and interest, if I were a 'lady 
of leisure.' Two evenings a week I am 
studying Italian. And with what may 
read like a heavy schedule, but is in 
reality a well planned and reasonable 
course of life, I still find some time for 
frivolous pursuits — occasional teas, in- 
formal chats with friends, theater and 
concert, and even some reading of mod- 
ern novels." 

Clarrissa Smith Dey writes : "I was in 
Tenants Harbour, Maine, from June 1st 
to October 1st and took entire care of a 
flourishing vegetable garden, fed many 
hungry people, and sold enough to neigh- 
bours to pay for the seeds, plants, etc. 
Since coming home I have been trying to 
get my affairs all straightened out, in- 
cluding my outside work. I am Vice 
Chairman of the City Committee, County 
Committee member of my district, Vice 
President of the Summit Republican Club 
(men and women), Secretary for Union 
County Council of Republican Women, 
so you see I am not idle as far as politics 
go. I am also to be challenger at the 
polls on Tuesday next, Election Day. 

"Then I am President of the Town 
Improvement Association of Summit, and 
as such can do all the work that I want 
to (and more, too, sometimes). I have 
been for two years past (my term is just 
up) a member of the Board of Trustees 
of All Souls Church and Secretary of the 
Board for the same time. 

"I sold my house last March and moved 
to an apartment, no small job." 

Since writing this, with all her affairs 
in order, Clarrissa has undergone a seri- 
ous operation, which has been successful. 
Her present address is 15 Edgar Street, 
Summit, New Jersey. 

May Jewett spent a night with Elsa 
Bowman at Sharon, Conn., in October, 
"seeing the perfectly adorable early 
American house she is building on a hill- 
side near Sharon — the interior of which 
is taken from an old inn she demolished. 
I am much interested, because of my busi- 
ness, in home building and selecting a 
place to live. I was thrilled to see what 
she had done. 

"I went over to the Manor Club in 
Pelham to the Westchester County Re- 



(28) 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



29 



gional Conference of the League of 
Women Voters. Carrie McCormick Slade 
spoke on the meeting of the International 
Woman Suffrage Alliance in Berlin in 
July. She was asked to make a short 
speech in a meeting for peace one Sun- 
day morning in a theater in Berlin. She 
repeated it for us and it was very clever. 

"Now about myself. I am most of the 
time trying to keep in touch with all the 
new houses, all the land and estates that 
might come into the market, following up 
the progress of our wonderful parkways 
— to sell land adjoining before it gets too 
high in price to make it a good invest- 
ment. To keep in touch with people I dip 
a little into politics, the Woman's Club, 
the League of Women Voters, the Gar- 
den Club, attend a bridge party now and 
then — and am never idle. My brother 
lives in White Plains and I try to get 
down there at least once a week — eight 
miles — to see my two nephews, twelve 
and thirteen years old, and my niece, 
twenty." 

Hilda Justice spent July in Manchester, 
Vermont, going from there to Camden, 
Maine, with a stop at Peterboro on the 
way. She then spent a month at South- 
west Harbor and another month at her 
cottage at Buck Hill Falls, before return- 
ing to Germantown for the winter. 

Eleanor Lattimore is substituting this 
year at Bryn Mawr for Dr. Kingsbury. 
She comments on the present college: 
"How Bryn Mawr has improved since our 
undergraduate days! The stripling trees 
have grown up to an exquisitely gracious 
maturity. The students, however, have 
lost neither the vim nor vigor of our day, 
and are probably almost up to the high 
intellectual standard of good old '96!" 

Charlotte McLean gives the following 
account of her activities: "It is very 
good of you to give me an opportunity 
to write myself up for the Bulletin: but 
this is just the wrong year as I am doing 
nothing but taking siestas and naps after 
very restricted activities and naps are not 
material for a Bryn Mawr Bulletin. 

"I am taking in sail in all directions. 
In my quarter of a century or more of 
teaching I have taught in various de- 
nominational colleges every subject I 
studied at Bryn Mawr. My library has 
grown very varied and bulky not to men- 
tion antiquated — very burdensome to 
handle and to dust, so I am reducing it. 
The amenities of book dispersing are not 
less than those of book collecting. My 
precious volumes are being judged by 
ruthless estimates. Leary has taken away 
some, but I enjoy more sending books to 
various colleges in which I have taught. 



Albright, Reading, gets my Modern 
Language publications; St. Genevieve's, 
Asheville, my novels. I had kept the 
Bryn Mawr Lanterns, Quarterlies, Phil- 
istines, all these years. Those I sent to 
the Alumnae Association to complete their 
files. But I looked them over before part- 
ing with them, consequently at the '29 
reunion was delightfully fresh on the 
chronology and achievements of my class 
mates. It made the reunion very interest- 
ing to me. Barrett Wendell's Prose Com- 
position went to the Seamen's Mission. 
I do not know quite what to do with Bal- 
four's Embryology of the Chick published 
in 1890. I read all my books over to 
make them yield up what they have to 
give before I let them go. 

"I live with my sister and bachelor 
brother and two black kittens — at least 
they are supposed to be kittens but they 
are really little black devils. 

"My brother is a lawyer by profession 
but musical by way of diversion. ' My sis- 
ter is musical by profession but lays down 
the law to us, her elders, by way of diver- 
sion. I attend many musical perform- 
ances in which they are interested — Phil- 
adelphia Orchestra, oratorios and operas. 

"My sister is also an ardent Presby- 
terian. Consequently she marshalls me 
off to a number of Presbyterian dinners 
in the cause of Christian Education, Mis- 
sions and so forth. I find that Robert 
Speer and Dr. van Dyke go very well 
with broiled chicken." 

1897 
Class Editor: Alice L. Cilley Weist 
(Mrs. Harry H. Weist) 
174 E. 71st Street, New York City 

Clara Vail Brooks writes: "I am in a 
state of rude health. Brooksie is tired, 
and his resignation takes effect January 
1st. Harry is working for 195 B'way, as 
usual — Peggy is working at Best's, 
Misses' Department, 2nd floor — Tom at 
Yale — Gordon at Buckley. Going West 
via Panama Canal February 13th." 

Alice Cilley Weist's son, Edward Cilley 
Weist, Harvard '30, was elected to Phi 
Beta Kappa this fall. She would be hap- 
pier if her Class items reached her 
promptly. 

1898 
Class Editor: Edith Schoff Boericke 
(Mrs. John J. Boericke) 
328 Brookway, Merion Station, Pa. 
Florence Wardwell has been abroad for 
seven months, — rather different from last 
year when she was one of the delegates 
at large from New York to the National 
Republican Convention and worked all 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



summer for her old friend Herbert Hoo- 
ver. 

Blanche Harnish Stein is president of 
the Women's Missionary Society of Phil- 
adelphia (of the Reformed Church of U. 
S. A.), composed of thirty- four congre- 
gational societies of Philadelphia and 
vicinity, their object being Christian Ed- 
ucation and evangelism. They are work- 
ing for world peace and interracial good 
will. Her granddaughter, Priscilla Ann 
Stein, is about one year and a half old, 
developing personal preferences, and get- 
ting ready to be a college girl. 

Mary Bookstaver Knoblauch gave no 
news of herself, but expressed her ad- 
miration of Marion Park's speech at the 
opening of college. She said it was most 
stimulating and delightful, and she was 
glad that she belonged to the class of '98. 

Alice Hammond is in Europe, but 
where or for how long we do not know. 

Alice Gannett writes: "I was abroad 
for a few weeks last summer with my 
niece, Muriel Gannett. We went to Eng- 
land and France, and I attended the In- 
ternational Conference of Settlements at 
the School of Philosophy near Amster- 
dam in August. When in Paris we met 
Maud Lowry Jenks, and it was very nice 
to see her again." 

Helen Sharpless is librarian at Earl- 
ham College, Richmond, Indiana, a small 
Quaker coeducational college. She says: 
"This is my second year here, and the 
place begins to seem very like home, 
especially as there are many people living 
here whom I have known before. I am 
living with two people who have been 
graduate students at Bryn Mawr, as well 
as with other people. We have a new 
president, William C. Dennis, who was 
formerly a member of the Bryn Mawr 
board. We think he is very fine and is 
going to make a great college of Earl- 
ham." 

Isabel Andrews writes a most entertain- 
ing letter from New York City, where 
she is occupying an apartment with a 
young girl from Pittsburgh, who is study- 
ing music and Dalcroze. Isabel is chap- 
eroning and mothering her and giving her 
an hour of French a day, and going to 
the opera with her occasionally, and en- 
joying it all very much. 

Marion Park sent a few lines from the 
train on her way to her brother's family 
for Thanksgiving dinner, after which she 
was to come back to New York to sail at 
midnight the following day. "Katharine 
Lord and I are taking this journey to- 
gether as we have taken many shorter 
ones before — first to Naples and then to 
Alexandria. After a week in Cairo we 



go up the Nile as far as the second cat- 
aract, stop for a few days at Assouan, a 
little longer at Luxor, and then after an- 
other two days at Cairo, we enter on what 
is still the uncharted part of the journey. 
I think we shall probably go to Jerusalem 
and then to Athens by way of Rhodes 
and as many more of the isles of Greece 
as we can manage. After a month in 
Greece reviewing my youthful memories, 
and a voyage or a flight (which I hear is 
the proper way) to Constantinople, we 
come back to Italy for the spring, and 
the mountains, probably the Tyrol, for 
the summer. I am very well, not at all 
the sad sight you saw in June, and I ex- 
pect to have as vigorous and gay a time 
as any of your sons or daughters could 
have ! I am awfully sorry that I didn't 
see you to tell you all this myself and to 
add my goodby and my affection. Many 
pairs of good American shoes are going 
to see Europe in the Zipper !" 

1900 
Class Editor: Louise Congdon Francis 
(Mrs. Richard S. Francis) 
414 Old Lancaster Road 
Haverford, Pa. 

Delia Avery Perkins and her husband, 
who are always globe trotting, have just 
returned from a tour of Ohio and Ken- 
tucky. Delia writes that she is firmly 
determined to stay in Montclair now for 
a change. 

Elizabeth White Miller has moved into 
a new house. Her address is 70 Hubbard 
Avenue, Stamford, Conn. Her daughter 
is a freshman at Wheaton College. 

Alletta's daughter, Barbara Korff, is a 
freshman at Bryn Mawr. 

Margaretta's oldest, Eleanor Scott,, is a 
Junior at the University of Wisconsin. 
She spent her freshman year at Vassar 
and then went West. No cloistered life 
for Eleanor. 

Edna Warkentin Alden is the new 
Councillor of District VI of the Alumnae 
Association. She attended the meeting of 
the Council in New York in November, 
and then spent Thanksgiving in Cam- 
bridge with her son John. John Alden 
is married and is living in Holden Vil- 
lage, Cambridge, while he attends the 
Harvard Medical School. He will grad- 
uate in June and hopes to spend his (in- 
ternship in San Diego. His specialty is 
to be radiology. 

On her way home Edna visited Bryn 
Mawr and the Alumnae Office, and she 
and Louise Francis and Alice Hawkins, 
Alumnae Secretary, lunched with Helen 
MacCoy in Barnstable Grange. 

Edna Gellhorn spent Thanksgiving in 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



New York with her mother and her chil- 
dren, Walty and Martha. Walter is a 
law student at Columbia and Martha is a 
reporter on an Albany newspaper. After 
Thanksgiving Edna and Mrs. Fischel 
came to Philadelphia for the meeting of 
the Ethical Union, of which Mrs. Fischel 
is President. 

Elise Dean Findley writes as follows: 
"Joseph D. Findley, Jr., will graduate 
from Lafayette in June and hopes to enter 
the Army Flying School in Texas in July. 
Margaret, as you know, is a junior at 
Bryn Mawr, and Anna Martin hopes to 
enter next year." (Incidentally, Elise 
does not tell us that Margaret is President 
of the Science Club.) "Jane is in High 
School and is also headed for Bryn Mawr. 
I spend all the time I can spare from my 
family on politics, being a Central Chair- 
man for the Pennsylvania Council of Re- 
publican Women, an organization num- 
bering 22,000 women. Margaretta is a 
member of the Board of Directors." 

1903 
Class Editor: Gertrude Dietrich Smith 
(Mrs. Herbert Knox Smith) 
Farmington, Conn. 

Louise Atherton Dickey has an eldest 
son working for a Ph.D. in the Graduate 
School of Johns Hopkins. Her second 
son is a sophomore at Swarthmore. She 
spends much time on the Bryn Mawr 
Catalogue, especially the entrance require- 
ment page, and wants Louise Junior to try 
a few exams next spring. After consult- 
ing Martha Boyer on the subject, Louise 
Junior remarked she thought she could 
learn algebra from anyone so nice as that. 

Eva White Kah says everything is as 
usual and that she would be glad to have 
any of 1903 stop to see her. 

Eleanor Deming spent five weeks, last 
February and March, on a Dutch freight- 
er going to Havre by way of South Amer- 
ica, then flew from Paris to London and 
came home on a very rough sea. Since 
camp closed this fall, she has been driving 
with her sister Agatha in her Ford, start- 
ing from Santa Fe and going West, then 
home through Georgia, where they visited 
their sister Constance. 

Mary Peabody Williamson spent the 
summer in the White Mountains and at- 
tended the Bryn Mawr Club fall meeting 
at the Winsor School, where she saw the 
usual good proportion of 1903. 

Rosalie James is recently back from 
Spain and parts adjacent, and is at the 
Hotel Stewart in San Francisco. 

Elizabeth Eastman is still writing for 
Y. W. C. A. publications and similar 
things. 



Agatha Laughlin, who has spent most 
of her time in looking after an unusual 
number of guests, drove to Germantowri 
in May to see Amanda Molinari, who was 
there with her mother for a month, and 
in September spent a week with a friend 
in a bungalow near the Perkiomen Creek. 

Emma D. Roberts is still teaching one 
of Carrie Wagner's nephews and enjoy- 
ing him very much. She lost her father 
on November fourth. 

Doris Earle is still doing the same 
things at the same place. 

Emma Crawford Bechtel has moved to 
6608 Wayne Avenue, Mount Airy, Phila- 
delphia. She is continuing her night 
school teaching "English to Foreigners" 
or what is known as Americanization. 
Her son will be a Junior in the German- 
town High School in February, and her 
daughter is in the Germantown Friends 
School. 

1904 
Class Editor: Emma O. Thompson, 
320 So. 42nd Street, 
Phila., Pa. 

Phyllis Green Anderson sends us a let- 
ter full of news and spicy enough to 
arouse others of the class. 
"Dear Classmates: 

"I wonder if each and every 1904ter 
does exactly what I do, i.e., on finding 
Bulletin in the mail, tear off the en- 
velope and turn right to Class Notes look- 
ing for news of our own class. 

"I was so peeved last month upon find- 
ing no news that I almost sat down and 
wrote you myself. 

"Now what I want to know is where 
were all the rest of 1904 this past sum- 
mer, it's time they gave an account of 
themselves. 

"I saw two members of 1904 this sum- 
mer. Harriet Sutherland Wright with 
whom I spent a day in Nahant, seeing 
her two quite grown-up accomplished 
daughters and hearing all about her in- 
teresting life in the fascinating city of 
Budapest. She was simply fine and just 
the same jolly, talkative person that we 
all knew in College. 

"Then Patty Morehouse, husband and 
child stopped here for lunch on their way 
up to camp to pick up another, not an- 
other husband, but another child. 

"As for the Anderson family — we tried 
the Wild West this year, spent the month 
of July on a beautiful ranch in Montana, 
took in a three-day rodeo in Livingston, 
Montana, on way to ranch, and the Yel- 
lowstone Park and Colorado Springs on 
way home. We loved the ranch life, 
there's a spirit of free-and-easy camara- 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



derie that is alluring, and the other dudes 
were just as nice as we are, so a good 
time was had by all. 

"And now I've done my duty, let all 
the rest of 1904 spread their life history, 
of past season, out in the Bulletin for 
all of us to read and enjoy. 
"Greetings, as ever, 

"Phyllis G. Anderson/' 

Phyllis asks in her letter for an account 
of my summer. I will send that to you 
as a space filler some day if all the rest 
of you are silent. But I will tell you 
that I am sorry that more of you were 
not able to attend the Annual Meeting of 
the Eastern Pennsylvania Division of the 
Alumnae Association which was held at 
Bryn Mawr November 23rd. After the 
meeting Ex-President Thomas received 
the Alumnae in the Deanery. Once again 
we were permitted to enjoy the quiet, 
gracious atmosphere of the Deanery, to 
breath the air of our College home. Our 
hostess looked remarkably well and is as 
vigorous and masterful as ever. It was 
good to have the opportunity to greet her. 

Eloise Tremain sends us an interesting 
account of the celebration of the 60th 
Birthday of Ferry Hall School at Lake 
Forest. The school was opened Septem- 
ber, 1869; at that time Miss Emily M. . 
Noyes was Principal, for some years past 
Eloise has been the Principal. During 
the past year gifts amounting to $600,000 
were given to the school and two dormi- 
tories have been erected. We realize that 
Eloise has been intensely busy. We con- 
gratulate her upon her success. 

1905 
Class Editor: Eleanor Little Aldrich 
(Mrs. Talbot Aldrich), 
59 Mount Vernon Street 
Boston, Massachusetts. 

Margaret Nichols Hardenbergh writes: 
"I have just left a red-headed freshman 
son in Harvard and moved my family 
away from Kansas City. My new 'per- 
manent' address is 1788 Fremont Avenue 
South, Minneapolis, Minnesota." 

Mabry Parks Remington has a daugh- 
ter, Evelyn, in the freshman class at Bryn 
Mawr. 

Elma Loines spent part of last summer 
on Nantucket Island, where she was 
working on variable stars at the Maria 
Mitchell Observatory and using photo- 
graphic plates made by Margaret Har- 
wood, the only Director of a Research 
Observatory for Women. 

An item in the New York Times of 
November 16 is headed GIRL WINS 
ENGLISH PRIZE. (Shades of our 



twenty-fifth anniversary stalking across 
the horizon!) And this is the news it 
conveys about our distinguished class- 
mate: "Miss Hope Emily Allen, of Bryn 
Mawr and Radcliffe Colleges, has re- 
ceived this year's Rose Mary Crawshay 
prize in English Literature from the 
council of the British Academy for her 
work, 'Writings Ascribed to Richard 
Rolle, Hermit of Hampole, and Materials 
for His Biography,' published in 1927 by 
the Modern Language Association of 
America. This prize of $500 is awarded 
annually to a woman of any nationality 
for work connected with English litera- 
ture." 

The dinner given to President Park at 
the Colony Club, New York, in connec- 
tion with the meetings of the Alumnae 
Council, was attended by the following 
members of 1905 : Helen Sturgis, Avis 
Putnam Dethier, Margaret Thurston 
Holt, Elma Loines, Alice Jaynes Tyler, 
Helen Kempton, Theo Bates, Caroline 
Chadwick-Collins, Elsey Henry Redfield, 
Edith Ashley, Katharine Fowler Pettit 
and Eleanor Little Aldrich. 

Frances Hubbard Flaherty and her 
children are spending the winter in Ger- 
many and the children are in school there. 
Her address is Odenwald Schule, Ober- 
hambach, Post Heppenheim, Bergstrasse, 
Germany. 

1906 
Class Editor: Louise Cruice Sturdevant 
(Mrs. Edward W. SturdevantJ, 
Marine Barracks, Quantico, Virginia. 

Elsie Biglow Barber has just been re- 
elected President of the Board of Man- 
agers of the Annapolis Emergency Hos- 
pital. She is still First Vice President 
of the Maryland League of Women 
Voters. She was in Englewood not long 
ago and had a brief glimpse of Ruth 
Archbald Little. 

Margaret Blaisdell saw Lavinia Van 
Voorhis Jackson not long ago. Her 
daughter, Beatrice Jackson, graduates 
from Smith this June. Margaret is plan- 
ning with two friends a Virgilian pil- 
grimage and Aenead cruise for the sum- 
mer of 1930. It sounds glorious ! 

1907 



Letitia Butler Windle 
The death of so rare a person as Letitia 
Windle leaves all who knew her filled 
with a sense of irreparable loss. From 
our earliest recollections of her in Fresh- 
man Year, the characteristic which most 
stood out was her courage — above the 
ordinary then, and through these last 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



33 



years utterly undismayed and dauntless 
before such odds as few people are called 
upon to face. Her loyalty was as fine as 
her courage, and as unostentatious, and, 
as very many know well, the quality of 
her friendship was unselfish, deep and 
abiding. Over and above the feeling of 
our personal loss her friends have the 
enduring sense of the privilege and in- 
spiration it is to have known Letitia. 

1908 
Class Editor: Margaret Copeland 
Blatchford 
(Mrs. Nathaniel H. Blatchford, Jr.) 
3 Kent Road, Hubbard Woods, 111. 
After five years in Constantinople and 
four years in Paris, Anna Welles Brown 
is moving with her husband and four 
little girls to El Paso, Texas. Her ad- 
dress there will be 4501 -Hastings Street. 

Linda Schaefer Castle is such an ex- 
perienced commuter between Honolulu 
and the states that she thinks nothing of 
traveling from Honolulu to Cambridge, 
Mass., to have Thanksgiving dinner with 
her son Alfred, who is a sophomore at 
Harvard. 

1910 
Class Editor: Emily L. Storer 
Wardman Park Hotel 
Washington, D. C. 

Mabel P. Ashley: "First of all, my ad- 
dress is now 242 East 19th Street, New 
York. Second, yes, 'The Other Crowd,' 
Harcourt, Brace & Co., came out in Sep- 
tember. It is a book for girls about a 
fifteen-year-old girl and a summer in 
Maine. My first, I trust not my last, ap- 
pearance in print." 

Dorothy Ashton, M.D., writes a history 
of "The Graduate in Medicine." 

First year — Eats in queer restaurants 
— makes a few acquaintances among traf- 
fic policemen and alley cats. Prowls 
around unsavory neighborhoods at 2 A. 
M. looking for some obscure house num- 
ber and by day sits with her feet in the 
scrap basket longing for the telephone to 
ring. 

Second year — Buys a car and writes a 
paper. 

Third year — Buys a golf stick. 

Fourth year — Has some billheads 
printed. 

Fifth year — Begins cursing the tele- 
phone — but not too often. 

Anita Maris Boggs: "No news. Spent 
first summer in the States for sixteen 
years. Summer in Washington is no joy 
— it is cooler on the Sahara. Spent sum- 
mer translating a French Arabic history 



of the tenth century, Mas'udi. After do- 
ing two volumes of more than 480 pages 
each, I discovered there were seven more. 
Have had a number of articles published 
this summer ranging from philosophy 
through politics to poetry — alliterative if 
nothing else. One long poem was trans- 
lated into Arabic after appearing in Brit- 
ish Journal. Bureau of Commercial Eco- 
nomics is thriving as usual. 

Cabbey is now doing Occupational The- 
rapy work at the Boston State Hospital. 
She is keen about it and feels that there 
is a big future ahead. If anyone wants 
a job she says "Go into that work." 

Hildegarde Hardenbergh Eagle writes 
of her boy with appendicitis, three chil- 
dren with intestinal grip and herself the 
nurse. She admits that when one has 
children life is full of surprises. 

Kate reports the glad news that her 
back is well again. 

Jeanne Kerr Fleischmann had a per- 
fect trip this summer just going to Scot- 
land to shoot on a moor. She has been 
busy gardening this fall and is going to 
Florida for the winter. 

Constance Deming Lewis has a boy of 
fourteen and a half ready for Harvard in 
the fall of 1930, also a girl and a boy in 
High School. Her husband is now Vice- 
president and part owner of the mill 
where he has been 19 years, so their for- 
tunes seem to be definitely in Augusta. 
She says that it is a beautiful winter re- 
sort and she hopes that Bryn Mawrtyrs 
will let her know when they pass through. 
Her leisure is spent in writing — she says 
with only occasional success — but she 
loves it and enjoys the vigorous authors 
club of twelve members of which she is 
Secretary. 

Nelly Bley Pope is still teaching in 
Gunter College. She says: "I am very 
well, very happy and very anxious to 
hear the same from Kate and the rest of 
you." 

Charlotte Simonds Sage says that they 
had a novel and not altogether pleasant 
experience in September when Polly 
started off on the boarding-school road to 
Concord Academy. She expects after 
this that every other year or so will see 
one child or more going off. Another ex- 
perience, not so novel, was when Nat 
parted with his appendix this fall — young 
Nat lost his last spring. Seven sets of 
tonsils and four appendices have now 
gone from the Sage family. She says that 
except for the hospital they have had a 
fine year — had six weeks at Squam and 
acquired a dog and a pony. 

Jane Smith writes that the new school 
at West Park for Women workers in In- 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



dustry is actually open with fourteen stu- 
dents and more expected after Christmas 
— that it's quite exciting- to see them all 
arrive and begin work. She had six 
weeks' vacation in England and Ireland 
attending the first world conference on 
Adult Education in Cambridge and then 
a solid two weeks spent mostly in sleeping 
among Irish meadows near Cork. 

Dorothy Nearing Van Dyne writes: 
"My boy is away at school so we feel 
that our family is dwindling instead of 
increasing as it should. Henry and I are 
planning a trip to the Mediterranean 
starting in January." 

1912 
Class Editor: Elizabeth Pinney Hunt 
(Mrs. Andrew Dickson Hunt) 
Millbrook Lane, Haverford, Pa. 

Carmelita Chase Hinton spent the sum- 
mer with her vigorous trio of youngsters 
at her cottage in the Catskills. She had 
planned to buy four horses and ride to 
Vermont when last heard from, expect- 
ing to sell the horses later and make on 
it, as a result of Hinton care. 

Rosalie Day was at her camp on Lake 
George throughout the summer and re- 
ported a peaceful and healthful vacation. 

She and Gladys Chamberlain saw 
Christine Hammer off for Europe in July. 
Christine sailed with Ida Langdon, and 
had a splendid trip travelling in Italy, 
Austria, thence to England. Christine 
ended up at the home of her relatives in 
Denmark, sailing to America in Septem- 
ber from Sweden. 

Beatrice Howson invited all of Phila- 
delphia 1912 for luncheon at her farm 
late in September. 

Maisie Morgan Lee is reported to be 
teaching this winter at the University of 
Chicago. 

Mary Peirce and Marjorie Thompson 
summered as usual at Deep Haven Camp 
on Squam Lake. They boast of four-day 
hikes in the White Mountains, carrying 
packs to match their years. Ida Pritchett 
was with them. Ethel Dunham and Helen 
Emerson made short visits to Marjorie. 

Elizabeth Pinney Hunt and her boys 
went to a camp on Milford Lake in Nova 
Scotia _ for July and August. Pinney 
found it ideal for young people, especially 
for boys who are interested in the woods 
and trout fishing. 

Jean Stirling Gregory and her husband 
spent a few days in Philadelphia late in 
October to attend a meeting of ornitholo- 
gists. 

Isabel Vincent Harper's boy, Peter, is 
at the Avon Oldfields School in Connec- 
ticut. 



Louise Watson is enjoying her home on 
the sound, and had a delightful summer 
there; she has just been made Treasurer 
of the Bryn Mawr Summer School Com- 
mittee. 

Margaret Garrigues Lester was in 
Geneva for six weeks during the summer, 
working at the Friends' Center. Her 
husband made visits to Denmark and Rus- 
sia. 

Poky Fabian Saunders and her family 
have moved to Providence, where Poky 
reports little Billy flourishing as ever. 

The editor is so hard pressed for news 
she is going back to last Aueust and re- 
porting the eastern tour of Elizabeth 
Faries Howe and her entire family. A 
five-minute stopover in Indianapolis was 
granted Fairy by an indulgent husband 
for the sole purpose of 'phoning Julia 
Haines MacDonald. Julia, too, it may be 
noted in passing, was East for the sum- 
mer. She stopped at B. M. but the clos- 
est she got to 1912 was Jane Smith. 

Kay Shaw (due credit also to Caroline 
Shaw 1917) has succeeded in assembling 
herself and all the family back in Glen- 
shaw, where they live in interesting old 
houses — and one very modern bungalow 
— replete with early American wallpapers, 
Duncan Phyffe tables and Vermont rock- 
ers. Kay's chief thrill this summer 
seemed to be a quite irresistible collie pup. 

Catherine Thompson Bell is still prof- 
fering service as literary critic. A book 
she edited has just been brought out by 
Ginn and Company — "Moccasined Feet," 
a particularly good story for boys and 
girls about eight. 

(Please, 1912, send news. It's dreadful 
to have to use oneself to swell the col- 
umn.) 

1914 
Class Editor: Elizabeth Ayer Inches 
(Mrs. Henderson Inches) 
41 Middlesex Road 
Chestnut Hill, Mass. 

Marion Camp Newberry left in October 
for England where her husband has been 
transferred in business. Before leaving 
they sold the family home in Milwaukee 
as they expect to be gone at least five 
years. Marion's fourth daughter was 
born in the early summer. 

Alice Chester, we hear, is now Fifth 
Vice President of the Girl Scouts. She 
dashes all over the country making 
speeches and seems to enjoy it immensely. 

Lill says that one of the Masters at 
St. Paul's crossed on the steamer with 
Edwina. It never occurred to them that 
they were b. and g., so they must have 
been well behaved! Edwina writes that 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



35 



they had a perfect trip and motored all 
over England from Cornwall to Edin- 
burgh. She loves her new apartment and 
finds everyone at the school very nice 
indeed. She arises at 6.30 to start the 
day and finds herself a good cook. Her 
address if anyone wishes to find out for 
herself is: 

Mrs. Harold W. Wise 
5 Titus Avenue 
Lawrenceville, N. J. 

Lill seems in excellent spirits. She 
took the whole family abroad for the 
summer and they all studied French in 
Saint Raphael. 

Ida Pritchett expects in a few weeks 
to be settled in a tiny and enchanting old 
house that she has been doing over in 
Haverford. Her address will be 523 Old 
Buck Lane. 

1919 
Class Editor: Marjorie Remington 
(Mrs. Pierrepont Twitchell) 
Setauket, L. L, N. Y. 

From Amy Collins Venable: "Our 
daughter is named Lucy Dent, after my 
mother, but looks and acts ever so much 
like her father, Dick. She is all of three 
years old. . . . Our young son is 
named Richard Morton, Jr., but doesn't 
look a bit like Dick except that he is 
trying to be a blonde. Richard is a little 
over eight months now, and a lively little 
rascal for his age. Both children have 
blue-gray eyes and light hair, though I'm 
afraid Lucy Dent's is going to turn dark 
eventually, which is exactly what Dick is 
hoping. . . . We built our house a year 
ago last summer and moved in last Oc- 
tober. It is cream-colored stucco with 
green roof and shutters, rather on the 
Colonial type. We are out in the country 
and have only four neighbors right now, 
none very close. . . . We are about 
four miles by road from town but . . . 
but feel closer, as we have a good view 
of the river and most of the town from 
our house." 

Dorothy Peters Eis writes: "My latest 
undertaking is the leadership of the Par- 
ent-Teacher Association of five rural 
schools in this district, and so far I have 
had practically no backing from the par- 
ents of the community . . . they don't 
know the meaning of the word 'co-opera- 
tion.' . . . Family now consists of 
"Daddy Walt" and Mother "Pete," Martha 
Ann, five and a half years, and Timothy 
Peters, 3 years; "Jess," the airedale-hound 
variety of dog, and "Nanny," the goat. 
We live forty miles from Detroit on an 
old place with an orchard and small lake. 
. . . An old farm house remodeled and 



with additions of sleeping porch, etc., to 
make it comfortable. Though the winter 
looms up with forebodings of bad snows 
and zero weather, we think we shall stay 
here this year rather than go South, for 
Martha Ann is beginning school. . . . 
Besides the weather in the South is not 
all that one could wish for. We had loads 
of rain there last winter, ending up with 
a real flood. We had just started home 
to motor back via Florida, but were 
marooned in Mobile, Ala. . . . went 
to Fairhope across the bay for a week 
while the raging waters subsided, and 
there found a most interesting single-tax 
colony and school. The Organic School 
of Education, started by Marietta John- 
son. If we ever can arrange to have 
Martha Ann and Timmy go to that school 
I feel I shall be giving them a real bene- 
fit, for never have I seen such a wonder- 
ful plan actually worked out. . . . The 
trip down and back by automobile is cer- 
tainly enjoyable — good roads and beau- 
tiful scenerv all the way make the trav- 
eling easy." 

Edith Howes is in New York City 
again this winter, teaching in a pro- 
gressive school on the upper west side. 
She shares an apartment with another 
girl at 160 Claremont Avenue, right op- 
posite the International House. Her tele- 
phone number is Monument 2377. 

Enid Macdonald Winters' present ad- 
dress is 907 Merrick Avenue, Collings- 
wood, N. J. 

Enid Macdonald Winters has our first 
fourth child in the class; Lee Howard, 
her third son, was born October 22. In 
August she and her husband took a motor 
trip to Albany. She writes that she had 
"A characteristic letter from Eleanor 
Marquand Forsyth, aboard the 'Bremen,' 
with her husband, bound for six weeks' 
excavating in France. She had left the 
children in charge of her sister, Mary, 
and a nurse, but expected to be back be- 
fore Princeton opened." Enid has seen 
Ruth Hamilton several times lately. "We 
drove her back Sunday afternoon, to 
realize again how lovely Bryn Mawr is 
in the autumn. . . . She had a motor trip 
through New England in June. . . . Came 
east again for Adelaide's funeral." 

Vera Morgan Thatcher writes "My 
daughter, Lee, is neither fair nor dark, 
just uncompromising mud-color — but has, 
I suppose, a heart of gold. She's at pres- 
ent in school in Switzerland as I was keen 
to have her learn French, and I'm going 
over to collect her this spring. We also 
produced two other female critters, one 
Sally, age five, and one Nancy, age three, 
both very blond and quite bad, and I can't 



36 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



remember any of the searching questions 
about husbands, otherwise I should be 
revelling in revealing the many vices of 
my husband. . . . I'm as useless as 
ever." 

Win Kaufmann Whitehead moved just 
before Thanksgiving to 110 Summit Ave., 
Upper Montclair, N. J. They bought a 
house "farmhouse style," which means 
that it is built low to the ground with a 
porch across the front. It is about a 
half mile from where they have been 
living so that John, who is seven, and 
Margaret, who is six, continue to go to 
the same school. The Whiteheads spent 
their vacation this summer at Sconset on 
Nantucket Island. 

t (Pi) Driver Rock: "Our third 
child, as usual, was a girl, Barbara Joan, 
born August 25, 1925. We seem to run 
to girls in this family; though all are 
equally charming in our eyes, they are 
quite different in temperament, appear- 
ances, ability. Can you believe I have 
a daughter twelve years old ? I can when 
I look at her long, thin legs and have to 
buy clothes for her. . . . This summer we 
lived as much as possible at our beach 
cottage, camping out on cots at night on 
the porch for ten days. . . . We went off 
to the Grand Canyon for a rest and 
change. Jack had the thrill of his life- 
time flying over the Canyon in a tri- 
motored Ford while I, who am not a bit 
air-minded, sat on the ground — expecting 
the plane to crash any minute. We have 
two ranches now, and grow lemons, 
oranges, avocados, lima beans and wal- 
nuts. Some day I shall simply have to 
come to a reunion and show you all how 
your 'first married* is still very much mar^ 
ried . . . bobbed hair (getting grey in 
front but it can still be tucked under), a 
Chevrolet sedan to cart my family in, a 
grand, new surf board, and a fine sun 
tan. You would still recognize me I am 
sure. My only activities outside of strug- 
gling to bring up my offspring in the 
way they should go and managing my 
household, have been a membership in 
the Parent-Teachers' Association and 
acting as judge of the cat class in the 
local 'pet show.' " 

1920 

Editor: Margaret Ballou Hitchcock 
(Mrs. David I. Hitchcock) 
45 Mill Rock Rd., New Haven, Conn. 
Agnes Johnston Pennington has a son, 
S. Charles Pennypacker, 3rd, born in 
Baltimore on September 18th. 

Ann Sanford Werner writes a long let- 
ter, the first in nine years. Ann taught 
school, married and is now keeping house 



for her husband and three-year-old daugh- 
ter, Nancy. They are living in Cos Cob, 
where they have recently bought a house. 
Mr. Werner is teaching in the Brunswick 
School in Greenwich. Last winter Ann 
took over her husband's job while he went 
to Italy for six weeks to tutor a boy who 
was a cousin of Mussolini. It was then 
that Ann felt that her Bryn Mawr educa- 
tion had not been in vain. 

1922 
Class Editor: Serena Hand Savage 
(Mrs. Wm. L. Savage) 
29 W. 12th St., New York. 

Apologies are due to 1922 for the lack 
of class items in the Bulletin in the last 
two numbers. Illness of the class editor 
has been the cause of this, and as she is 
now fully restored to health there will be 
no further lapses. 

Custis Bennett was married on Wednes- 
day, the ninth of October, to the Rev. 
John R. McGrory at Overbrook. 

Serena Hand Savage has a daughter, 
Susan, born August 1st. 

Mary Douglass Hay is working in J. P. 
Morgan's, and studying ground aviation in 
the evening. 

Nancy Jay Harvey has a daughter, 
Dereka, born August 3rd. 

Peggy Kennard and Evelyn Rogers sub- 
stituted for internes at Bellevue Hospital, 
in New York, for a month this summer. 

Alice Nicoll motored to the coast and 
back in her Chrysler this summer. 

Jeannette Palache, after spending the 
winter in California, is now in Cambridge, 
teaching English at the Buckingham 
School. 

Orlie Pell is assistant professor of 
Philosophy at Rollins College. 

Cornelia Skinner Rogers appeared in 
London this summer in her character 
sketches. The accounts of her per- 
formances were very favorable. This 
autumn she is appearing in a New York 
theatre, and the newspapers were enthus- 
iastic over her "scintillating" acting. 

Marnie Speer is coming home from 
China next year, we learn from Mrs. 
Speer. 

1924 

Editor: Beth Tuttle Wilbur 
(Mrs. Donald Wilbur) 
1518^ E. 59th St., Chicago, 111. 
The interesting addition to the ranks of 
'24 babies, as hinted in the November 
Bulletin, has arrived, and he (another 
boy) is none other than Francis Andrew 
Bassett, Buck's heir, who was born on 
Armistice Day, in Collingwood, Ontario, 
where Buck and her husband are living. 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



37 



We very much appreciate the absolute- 
ly unsolicited news submitted by Lou 
San ford, and urge all to follow her ex- 
ample. Lou writes: 

"May I extend to you my deepest sym- 
pathy in your job as Editor? And have 
you any theories as to why '24 is deter- 
mined to waste its sweetness on the desert 
air — beyond the obviously reserved and 
aristocratic (not to say perverse) delicacy 
about seeing its name in print ? Anyway, 
in the hope that news will attract more 
news, I submit the following: 

"The whole town's talking about Mary 
Lou White's appearance with Grant 
Mitchell in the play of that name, and 
also in the Tailor Made Man. When they 
went on the road, .Bryn Mawrtyrs in all 
principal cities of the East saw our ac- 
complished Sacrapant transforming him- 
self into a flapper and an efficient secre- 
tary with equal felicity. 

"Anne Shiras, also snared by the bright 
lights, seems to be playing the part of 
efficient secretary in real earnest. She has 
a job with a producer named Shumlin. 

"Betty Ives is working on a financial 
paper under the auspices of Time. Before 
that she wrote publicity notes for Keith 
Vaudeville and movie stars, and before 
that an art column on a Cambridge news- 
paper; so would seem to be equipped to 
pass even a Senior Oral in Journalese. 

"Sylvia Saunders is in New York 
sleuthing a job which will let her draw 
modernistic advertisements. We gather 
that they do not include speaking to the 
waiter in French, or using Pond's cream. 
More power to her ! 

"Roz Pearce continues to lighten the 
darkness of those bewildered by the stock 
market in these troublous times. Consult 
her at Shaw, Loomis, and Sayles, Bureau 
of Investment Counsel, before you do 
anything rash. 

"Becca Tatham is no longer (as the last 
Bulletin stated) at the Fogg Museum. She 
is studying landscape gardening at Co- 
lumbia. 

"Dog Connor Brackitt, now residing in 
Boston, is reported to have gone athletic 
since marriage; sailing a 50- ft. yawl, deer- 
stalking, and tap-dancing being her prin- 
cipal activities. 

"Eleanor Sullivan Hendrick has a 
daughter, Alice, born in August. All at- 
tempts to interest her in hockey sticks, 
however, have proved abortive. 

"As for moi qui parle, all my interest is 
centered at the moment upon a rope, an 
ice axe, and a glacier. I spent four 
months in Switzerland, and assure you 
that if you want emotional experience on 
a grand scale, try mountain climbing." 



1925 
Editor: Elizabeth Mallett Conger 
(Mrs. Frederic Conger) 
325 E. 72nd St., New York City. 

Last July Brownie announced her en- 
gagement to George Vanderveer. That is 
all we know about that for the present. 

And Mary Hale was married this fall 
to Mr. Howland Chase and is still living 
in Washington. 

Connie Miller Douglass has a very 
young son, Archie Douglass III, and 
Etheline Hinkley Van Kleek has a daugh- 
ter, Elsie. 

This summer Dorry Fiske journeyed 
around Europe, but now she is back at 
Harper's working in the religious books 
department. 

May Morrill Dunn is also working at 
Harper's and is living with Virginia 
Lomas who is studying singing. Elaine 
Lomas has just come back from Europe. 

Emily Watts is still at Harper's, too. 
The rest of Radnor is somewhat scattered. 

Libby Boy Borie is still our greatest 
poet. She writes for several magazines 
including the Forum and the Junior 
League Magazine and has recently col- 
lected her poems in a volume called 
"Poems for Peter." 

Laura Garrison Hillyard and her sister 
have built at Westtown, Pa., a little house 
which was described and praised by an 
architect in the October number of Better 
Homes and Gardens. It sounds charming 
and is very near Bryn Mawr. Laura may 
find all of '25 accepting her hospitable in- 
vitation and camping on her doorstep next 
reunion. 

Errata 

And now about last month's class notes. 
Better just call it practice work and start 
over. To begin with the Bulletin foxed 
us and appeared on November second in- 
stead of the thirtieth, so our description 
of Christy's wedding on the twelfth turned 
out to be a forecast, causing considerable 
confusion to avid Bulletin readers. (You 
can just imagine how you'd feel if you 
thought for a moment that you couldn't 
trust your Bulletin!) 

And then there was that scintillating- 
little item about Mary Lytle. In line 426 
read "Lytle" not "Lytell," in line 427 read 
"director" not "warden," and in line 428 
read "M.A." not "Ph.D." (And, as the 
New Yorker says, "Now are you sure you 
have the right article?") Outside of those 
few little inaccuracies, we were right. 
Mary did go west this summer and she is 
doing full time work at the University of 
Michigan as director of the Betsy Bar- 
bour House, and she is working for an 
M.A. degree. 



The Saint Timothys School 
for Girls 

CATONSVILLE, MARYLAND 

FotmJtJ Stplemier IS82 

COLLEGE PREPARATORY 

AND 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

MISS LOUISA McENDREE FOWLER 
Head of the School 

Wykeham Rise 

WASHINGTON, CONNECTICUT 

A COUNTRY SCHOOL 
FOR GIRLS 

FANNY E. DAVIES, LL.A., Headmistress 
Prepares for Bryn Mawr and Other Colleges 

The Episcopal Academy 

(Founded 1785) 

CITY LINE, OVERBROOK, PA. 

A country day school for boys 

MODERN AND WELL EQUIPPED 
Endorsed by Bryn Mawr Alumnae 

UNIVERSITY^rLS 

BOARDING AND DAY SCHOOL 

Founded 1896 

Thorough and successful Preparation 

for Eastern Colleges for Women as well as 

for Midwestern Colleges and Universities 

Illustrated Catalogue on Request 

ANNA B. HAIRE, A.B., SMITH COLLEGE, Principal 

1106-B Lake Shore Drive Chicago, Illinois 

THE LOW AND 
HEYWOOD SCHOOL 

Emphasizing college preparatory work. 

Also general and special courses. 

One year intensive college preparation. 

Junior school. 

65th year. Catalogue. 

SHIPPAN POINT, 
STAMFORD, CONN. 



The Ethel Walker School 

SIMSBURY, CONNECTICUT 

Head of School 

ETHEL WALKER SMITH, A.M., 
Bryn Mawr College 



Head Mistress 

JESSIE GERMAIN HEWITT, A.B., 
Bryn Mawr College 



lO&mSHAI/L 

P\4Modern School with New EngldndTradihoAs 



MWako< 

M lUk " Thorough Preparation for any College 

B ^&. One Year Intensive Review 

^9 ^^^^ General Academic Course with di- 
^■b* ^^Fploma. Junior College Courses — Home 
Economics, Secretarial Training, Music, Art, Dramatic 
Art. 26 Miles from Boston. Outdoor Sports. Riding. 
Gymnasium. Swimming Pool. 

EDITH CHAPIN CRAVEN, A.B., Bryn Mawr 
201 Rogers Street, Lowell, Mass. 

/1ARCUAV SCH^L 

BRYN MAWR, PA. 
Prepares for Bryn Mawr and 
all leading colleges 

Musical Course prepares for the Depart- 
ment of Music of Bryn Mawr College 
EDITH HARCUM, Head of School 
L. May Willis, Principal 

THE MISSES KIRK'S 

College Preparatory School 

PREPARATORY TO BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 
Individual Instruction. Athletics. 

Clovercroft, Montgomery Avenue, Rosemont, Pa. 
Mail, telephone and telegraph address: Bryn Mawr, Pa. 



CHOATE SCHOOL 

1600 Beacon Street, Brookline, Mass. 

HOME AND DAY SCHOOL 
FOR GIRLS 

EMPHASIS ON COLLEGE PREPARATION 

Elective Courses for students not preparing 
for College 

AUGUSTA CHOATE, A.M. (Vassar) 

Principal 



Kindly mention Bryn Maws Bulletin 



THE AGNES IRWIN SCHOOL 

2009-2011 Delancey Place, Philadelphia 

A College Preparatory 
SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 



BERTHA M. LAWS, A.B., Headmistress 

The Baldwin School 

A Country School for Girls 
BRYN MAWR PENNSYLVANIA 

Preparation for Bryn Mawr, Mount Holyoke, Smith, 

Vassar and Wellesley college*. Abundant outdoor life. 

Hockey, basketball, tennis. 

ELIZABETH FORREST JOHNSON, A.B. 

HEAD 

MISS BEARD'S SCHOOL 

A Country School near New York 

Orange, New Jersey 

COLLEGE PREPARATION 

Advanced Courses Junior High School 

Music, Art, Domestic Science 

Catalog on Request 

LUCIE C. BEARD, Headmistress 

The Katharine Branson School 

ROSS, CALIFORNIA Across the Bay from San Francisco 

A Country School College Preparatory 

Head: 
Katharine Fleming Branson, A.B., Bryn Mawr 

MISS MADEIRA'S SCHOOL 

1330 19th St., N. W. Washington, D. C. 

A RESIDENT AND DAY SCHOOL FOR 
GIRLS 

LUCY MADEIRA WING, A.B. 

MRS. DAVID LAFOREST WING 

Head Mistress 

MISS WRIGHT'S SCHOOL 

Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Prepares for College Board 
Examination 



FERRY HALL 

A RESIDENT AND DAY SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

On Lake Michigan, near Chicago 

Junior College; High School Department: College 
Preparatory and General Courses. Special Departments 
of Music, Expression and Art. 

Two new dormitories, including new dining room and 
infirmary, to be opened September 1 929. 

Eloise R. Tremain, A.B., Bryn Mawr, Principal 

ROSEMARY HALL 

College Preparatory 

(With supplementary but not alternative courses) 

CAROLINE RUUTZ-REES, Ph.D. \ „ M , Mu , 

MARY E. LOWNDES. Litt.D / Head Mi ' tr »>» 



GREENWICH 



CONNECTICUT 



The Shipley School 

Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 

Preparatory to Bryn Mawr College 

ALICE G. HOWLAND, ELEANOR 0. BROWNELL 
Principals 

MISS RANSOM and 
MISS BRIDGES' SCHOOL 

PIEDMONT, CALIFORNIA 

(A suburb of San Francisco) 

A RESIDENT AND DAY SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

General and College Preparatory Courses 
Outdoor Life throughout the year 

EDITH BRIDGES, B.L., Principal 



Katharine Gibbs 

A school of unusual character with a distinctive 
purpose for educated women 
SECRETARIAL ACADEMIC EXECUTIVE 

BOSTON Special Course for College 

nnrni il c. . Women. Selected subjects 
90MarlboroMreet preparing for executive posi- 
tions. Separate classrooms 
and special instructors. 
One-year Course includes tech- 
nical and broad business train- 
ing preparing for positions of 
a preferred character. 
Two-year Course for prepara- 
tory and high school gradu- 
PROVinFNCF ates. First year includes six 

... . T- college subjects. Second year 

155 Angell Street intensive secretarial training. 
Booklet on request 



Resident and 
Day School 



NEW YORK 
247 Park Avenue 



Kindly mention Bsyk Maws Buxxxtin 



1 carrison. Forest 




^^^ A Country School in the Green 
Spring Valley near Baltimore. 
Modern Equipment. 

All Sports. Special Emphasis on Horse- 
back Riding. Mild Climate. 
Garrison Forest Girls who are going to college 
are thoroughly prepared for any institution. 
Other girls take courses with special emphasis 
on Music and Art. Younger girls live in a 
separate Junior House. 

Principals 

MISS JEAN G. MARSHALL 

MISS NANCY OFFUTT, 
Bryn Mawr, ex '20 

Box B, Garrison, Maryland 



BANCROFT SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

30th Year. Complete College Preparation. 

Individual Attention to carefully selected group in 
Boarding Department of Progressive Day School. 
Summer and Winter Sports. Dramatics, Art, 
Music. Address 

Hope Fisher, Principal, Worcester, Mass. 



ThePhebeAnna 
Thome School 

Under the Direction of the 
Department of Education 



A progressive school preparing 
for all colleges. Open air class 
rooms. Pre-school, Primary, 
Elementary and High School 
Grades. 



BRYN MAWR, PA. 

Agnes L. Rogers, Ph.D., Director 
Frances Browne, A.B., HeadMistress 




Cathedral School of St. Mary 

GARDEN CITY, LONG ISLAND, N. Y. 

A school for Girls 19 miles from New York. College 

preparatory and general courses. Music. Art and 

Domestic Science. Catalogue on request. Box B. 

MIRIAM A. BYTEL, A.B., Radcliffe, Principal 

BERTHA GORDON WOOD, A.B., Bryn Mawr, 

Assistant Principal 



The Traphagen School of Fashion 



I 



MID-TERM STARTING 
JANUARY 20th 

All phases from elementary to full 
mastery ol costume design and illus- 
tration taught In shortest time con- 
sistent with thoroughness. Day and 
Evening classes. Saturday courses for 
Adults and Children. Our Sales De- 
partment disposes of student work. 
Every member of advanced classes 
often placed through our Employment 
Bureau. Write for announcement. 



In Arnold, Constable & Company Costume 
Design Competition, over 100 schools and 
nearly 800 students took part; all prizes 
were awarded to Traphagen pupils with 
exception of one of the five third prizes. 



1680 Broadway 



<»< 



r 52nd St.) 



All the smart world 
walks in 

$jk^s-Fif?h Avenue 

created by 'Paris 
or 

SAKS-FIFTH AVENUE 

FORTY- NINTH to FIFTIETH STREET 
NEW YORK 



Kindly mention Bryn Mawb Bulletin 



1896 1930 

BACK LOG CAMP 

INDIAN LAKE, NEW YORK 
INTRODUCING THE FAMILY 

Since Back Log Camp is very much of a family affair, it seems only proper 
to tell something about the group that runs it. Nearly everybody on the list 
below is at the Camp part of every summer. 

RICHARD CADBURY BROWN, A.B. Haverford; A.M. Harvard. In business. Two daughters. 
ANNIE BROWNING BROWN. one at Wheaton, one at Bryn Mawr, 





Coast and Geodetic Survey Department, 
Washington, D. C. 
Expert Weavers. A daughter at Bryn Mawr; 
a son to enter Haverford fall of 1930. 

Asst. Professor of German, Univ. 
of Penna Two boys in school. 
Head of English Department, Westtown 
School. A daughter and son at school. 



WALTER D. LAMBERT, A.B. , A.M. Harvard. 

BERTHA BROWN LAMBERT, A.B. Bryn Mawr. 

SHIPLEY BROWN, S.B. Haverford. 

LUCY HAINES BROWN. 

THOMAS KITE BROWN, A.B. Haverford; Ph.D. Harvard 

HELEN W. BARNES BROWN, A.B. Wells. 

CARROLL T. BROWN, A.B., A.M. Haverford. 

ANNA HARTSHORNE BROWN, A.B. Bryn Mawr. 

HENRY J. CADBURY, A.B. Haverford; Ph.D. Harvard Head of Biblical Department, Bryn Mawr 
LYDIA CAROLINE (BROWN) CADBURY, A.B. Wellesley. College. Four young children. 

Letters of inquiry should be addressed tc Other references 

n/i d it d i u * /d iv/i inn/« \ Mrs. Anna Hartshorne Brown (Bryn Mawr,1912) 

Mrs. Bertha Brown Lambert (Bryn Mawr, 1904) Westtown Penna 

272 Park Avenue Dr Henry j Cadbury 

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BRYN MAWR 
ALUMNAE 
BULLETIN 




THE WORK OF THE HEALTH 
DEPARTMENT 



February, 1930 



Vol. X 



No. 2 



Entered as second-class matter, January 15, 1921, at the Post Office, Phila., Pa., under Act of March 3, 1879 

COPYRIGHT, 1930 

ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 



OFFICERS OF THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

EXECUTIVE BOARD 

President Louise Fleischmann Maclat, 1906 

Vice-President Natalie McFaden Blanton, 1917 

Recording Secretary Gertrude Hearne Myers, 1919 

Corresponding Secretary Mat Egan Stokes, 1911 

Treasurer Margaret E. Brusstar, 1903 

Chairman of the Finance Committee Caroline Florence Lexow, 1908 

Chairman of the Publicity Committee Caroline Morrow Chadwick-Collins, 1906 

ALUMNAE SECRETARY AND BUSINESS MANAGER OF THE BULLETIN 

Alice M. Hawkins, 1907 

EDITOR OF THE BULLETIN 

Marjorie L. Thompson, 1912 

DISTRICT COUNCILLORS 

District I Helen Evans Lewis, 1913 

District II. Julia Langdon Loomis. 1895 

District III Alletta Van Reypen Korff, 1900 

District TV Katharine Holliday Daniels, 1918 

District V .......... '. Gladys Spry Augur, 1912 

District VI ........... ,. Edna Warkentin Alden, 1900 

District VII Helen Brayton Barendt, 1903 

ALUMNAE DIRECTORS 

Frances Fincke Hand, 1897 Margaret Reeve Gary. 1907 

Mary Peirce, 1912 Elizabeth Lewis Otey, 1901 

Virginia Kneeland Frantz, 1918 

CHAIRMAN OF THE ALUMNAE FUND 

Caroline Florence Lexow, 1908 

CHAIRMAN OF THE ACADEMIC COMMITTEE 

Pauline Goldmark, 1896 

CHAIRMAN OF THE SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOAN FUND COMMITTEE 

Margaret Gilman, 1919 

CHAIRMAN OF THE COMMITTEE ON HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Dr. Marjorie F. Murray, 1913 

CHAIRMAN OF THE NOMINATING COMMITTEE 

Eleanor Little Aldrich, 1905 



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Bryn Mawr Alumnae 
Bulletin 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF 

THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNA ASSOCIATION 

Marjorie L. Thompson, '12, Editor 
Alice M. Hawkins, '07, Business Manager 

EDITORIAL BOARD 

Mary Crawford Dudley, '96 Emily Kimbrough Wrench, '21 

Caroline Morrow Chadwick-Collins, '05 Ellenor Morris, '27 
Emily Fox Cheston, '08 Elinor B. Amram, '28 

Louise Fleischmann Maclay, '06, ex-oficio 

Subscription Price, $1.50 a Year Single Copies, 25 Cents 

Checks should be drawn to the order of Bryn Mawr Alumnae Bulletin 
Published monthly, except August, September and October, at 1006 Arch St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Vol. X FEBRUARY, 1930 No. 2 



The College repeats itself in cycles as far as its manners and customs go. Anyone 
walking across the campus after a certain lapse of time has had the experience of 
seeing on the path ahead of her some one of the present undergraduates who for a 
moment seemed so startlingly familiar that she felt time had swung back. One has 
this same sensation of time swinging back as one reads the Report of the present 
Undergraduate given at the Council, but again it is the space of a moment that one 
has this illusion. However, something awakens in the minds of all but a very small 
group at the phrase, "long country walks with interesting talks and chosen com- 
panions." Games -are watched and cheered, groups gather Sunday afternoon, dis- 
cussion is still one of the most absorbing activities, so the Undergraduate report 
tells us. All the more simple, fundamental things that make up the charm of the 
human relationships of those four years seem oddly unchanged. Some of the forms of 
expression are different, but the impulses are the same. Occasionally an Alumna comes 
back after a fairly long absence and asks about the undergraduates and the life of the 
College as curiously as if the campus were populated by inhabitants of Mars. And 
at times it is difficult to convince her that the present undergraduates are extraordi- 
narily like the people she knew and worked and played with. When one turns to the 
report on the Work of the Health Department, one is conscious of a very distinct 
development; one cannot exactly call it change, because it has, after all, been a matter 
of growth and adaptation. The new detailed organization bears much the same rela- 
tion to the old organization that the new Infirmary bears to the old one, the small, 
shed-like building behind Merion. It is in such matters as these that the College 
marches step by step with the times. Advances in the different fields of knowledge, as 
always has been the case, are very sensitively recorded in the organization of the 
College. The change is that now contacts are each year closer and closer in every way 
with what we used to call the "outside world" ; what formerly came merely as an 
echo now comes as a direct impact that drives forward. 



WORK OF THE HEALTH DEPARTMENT 

The work of the Health Department at Bryn Mawr, like the work of Student 
Health Services in general, is sharply divided into two types of medical practice, 
preventive medicine and care of the sick, the one a discouraging commentary on the 
limitations of the other. Care of the sick, the negative phase of the health work in a 
large community, I am not going to talk about this afternoon, except to discuss very 
briefly, from the medical standpoint, our general system of managing illness. This is, 
as you know, for you have been so influential in creating it, a closed medical service, 
organized as a department of the college equipped to manage with the help of its 
consultants, the medical affairs of the College. The Dean acts as head of the Health 
Department — which seems to me a necessary arrangement if the closed system is 
elected. In general the policy, I believe, is a good one. It makes for the greatest 
possible protection of the community and student body as a whole. It makes for cen- 
tralization and a greater degree of consistency than would otherwise obtain. On the 
other hand, it is a difficult system to enforce; -in fact, one is never sure how com- 
pletely it is in force; it frequently necessitates elaborate explanations to students who 
are accustomed to taking their medical problems where they please, rather than where 
they are asked to or expected to ; it therefore means the College physician must often 
take care of unwilling victims, and every one knows how fatal it is to speedy cure to 
spoil the rapport between doctor and physician. But much more important than all 
this is the fact that the system places the greatest possible responsibility for good medical 
care upon the College itself — a degree of responsibility, by the way, which many institu- 
tions are unwilling to take. On the whole, however, I repeat, I think the system is a 
good one, open to criticisms, which may or may not be met as conditions change. It 
should be allowed to continue as long, and only as long, as it works well, and the pos- 
sibility and advisability of minor or major changes should be kept in mind. I am sure 
you are much more interested in hearing what we are doing in the larger, more con- 
structive field of preventive medicine, and what evidence, if any, we have of the 
success of our methods. 

The first piece of work of this nature is done in the fall before the students 
arrive, and consists of complete medical and physical examination of resident employees, 
cooks, waitresses, porters, kitchen boys, chambermaids. Their occupation, medical 
history, height, weight, and physical findings are recorded for permanent record. I 
try to make them feel that the examination is not to our advantage alone, and call 
their attention to existing defects, offering to help them if I can, or referring them 
to proper sources for care of teeth, eyes, tonsils. They have the privilege of coming 
to the dispensary for office consultations at any time, and if they are ill and have no 
place to go, we have a little room on the first floor of the infirmary where we can 
take care of them in an emergency. There is no doubt whatever that this work is 
worth while. The occasional infectious case or serious condition picked up as a result 
of the routine examination, as well as the improvement in personal cleanliness, mouth 
hygiene and general condition proves the task of value both to College and employee. 
Active tuberculosis, pregnancy, epilepsy, abdominal tumors, have received medical or 
surgical care as a result of the work and have been prevented from becoming com- 

(2) 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 3 

plications in dormitory life. The next step is the medical and physical examination of 
Freshmen and upper classmen. All students are examined yearly. Physical examination 
is done with a number of things in mind — to estimate the physical condition and 
endurance of each student in order to determine whether any restrictions in work, 
exercise, total activity are necessary or advisable; to discover any physical defects 
amenable to correction by physical education or requiring medical supervision; to 
acquire knowledge of the details of medical treatment being undertaken by home 
physicians in order to cooperate with them to the students' advantage; and to antici- 
pate, when possible, difficulties in social adjustment. 

The results of these examinations are always interesting, and form a basis for 
much of the constructive work of the year. Rarely is any serious condition found — I 
can list only six cases in which I believe serious disaster to have been averted as a 
result of these routine examinations during the past six years. There is no doubt 
about the value of the procedure to me. It is the one great contact I have with the 
whole student body. 

Restriction in work or exercise is necessary only in a small percentage of students. 
For instance, of 121 Freshmen this year, 16 were restricted in sports; of 280 upper 
classmen, 28 were restricted. It is interesting to note that of the 16 Freshmen re- 
stricted, 8 were because of old athletic injuries to knees, a fact suggesting that the 
predisposition to injury of women's knees for anatomical reasons is not always taken 
into account in planning athletics for girls. Restriction in sports may amount only 
to special selection with the advice of the physical director of suitable sports. In two 
or three cases only has it been necessary or advisable to restrict activity to the point 
of prescribing rest or sun baths as a substitute for exercise. 

The unrestricted chose their sports from the great variety available — hockey, 
tennis, lacrosse, swimming, clogging, archery, natural dancing, fencing, basketball, etc. 

Track, I am glad to say, has died a natural death — it seems to me quite unsuited 
to women's needs and temperament. Water polo lives, but doesn't flourish. While 
mentioning sports, I might list the aspects of the new regime that strikes me most 
favorably : 

(1) Variety of exercise available. 

(2) Evident enjoyment of students in their chosen type of activity. 

(3) The fact that coaching and instruction is available to every student in 
every period — her interest increases with her skill. 

(4) The concomitant instruction in anatomy of movement and theory of phy- 
sical exercise. 

As a result of the physical examination, one always has three long lists about 
which something should be and is done — the underweights, the overweights and the 
menstrual irregularities. 

The underweights are reweighed in the gymnasium at intervals through the year, 
and if they fail to gain are referred to the infirmary for further study. The extreme 
underweights I see personally in the fall and try to discover the reason for their 
variation from average, and start each student on a schedule adapted to her needs. 
After that first interview she reports to the head nurse monthly for reweighing, and 
if she loses and fails to improve she is referred back to me. 

The system does not get hold of the student who starts out with normal weight 
and loses during the year. For those cases we trust to the students themselves, the 
observation of wardens, or interested members of the faculty, who frequently report 



4 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

their observations to the infirmary. Since the general trend of weight during college 
is downward, and the overweights acquire too much momentum if they begin to 
descend, I leave them strictly alone except to caution them not to entertain notions 
of reducing in college. As a matter of fact, I believe most of them would lose weight 
on regular exercise and three meals a day. In this connection it is interesting to note 
that the present Freshman class is my first experience with an overweight class. I 
don't know what it means, but there are the facts — 8. underweight, 22 overweight 
(according to our arbitrary scale), and the class average is above ideal rather than 
below. Perhaps it is a coincidence. Could it be an indication of the end of the cult 
of the almost invisible silhouette, or is it an admission of defeat in attaining the goal 
in an age of good appetite stimulated by living out of doors and worshipping the sun? 
Although this is the first overweight class I have known, the majority of the student 
body, since I have known it, has always been well within the limits of "normal 
weight." Body weight, by the way, is not a reliable index of that complex something 
which we call general resistance to disease, about which we would like to know so 
much and have no complete objective methods of measuring. Many of the extreme 
underweights have excellent health records, and some very robust-looking individuals 
have very poor ones. 

Menstrual abnormalities create more difficult problems. The only one that needs 
to be discussed here is that of painful menstruation, which, in this age that thinks in 
terms of economic and intellectual freedom for women, is a distinct challenge both to 
conscientious physicians and women themselves. I believe that both doctors and women 
as patients are responsible for the fact that more complete progress has not been made 
in this field. And yet the situation is far from discouraging. Here is an interesting 
fact — painful menstruation rarely develops in college, except in one instance — that is, 
following abdominal operations, and then, of course, not always. This means the 
menstrual characteristics which may or may not include pain are established before 
college age — and the usual change in college is for the better or not at all. 

The most comprehensive measure in the field of preventive medicine is, of course, 
the teaching of hygiene. This is done as part of the required work in physical educa- 
tion. Miss Petts gives the freshman course of about thirteen hours under the heading 
of Body Mechanics, which is applied anatomy and physiology of movement. The 
Sophomores are taught general hygiene one hour a week, sixteen hours. This course 
varies from year to year, as I see their particular needs varying. I try to deal with 
subjects of public and national and racial importance, endeavoring not to repeat the 
personal hygiene they have heard all their lives, but trying to give them a conception 
of the scope and importance of public health measures, fitting individual health prob- 
lems into a background worthy of the time and attention of college students. I occa- 
sionally slip in lectures on menstruation, on anatomy and physiology of the reproduc- 
tive organs, on purely personal hygiene. They need more instruction ; I want to give 
them more, but how to do so is the problem. 

I know you want to hear about Mental Hygiene, but I don't see how I can discuss 
the subject in the short time I have without running the risk of misunderstanding that 
comes from insufficient description. In general, we are trying to do in this field what 
we are attempting to do in the field of general health work. That is, to give the 
student by means of lectures an appreciation of what constitute normal, mental and 
emotional growth and development, without over-emphasis and without entering into 
the field of the abnormal. 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 5 

In addition, we are trying to equip the Medical Department to recognize the 
existence and significance of behavior abnormalities — to bring it about that such cases 
come to the knowledge and care of the Health Department, and that they receive the 
proper kind and degree of medical or psychiatric treatment indicated in the individual 
case. The resident physician is to act as diagnostician in these cases, as in other fields, 
sorting them out and, with the help of our active consultant in psychiatry, Dr. Earl 
Bond, Director of Pennsylvania Hospital for Nervous and Mental Diseases and 
Director of the Institute for Mental Hygiene, estimate their needs. 

There are an additional number of disconnected activities of the Health Depart- 
ment, having the common objective of protecting the community. Such are frequent 
investigation of the milk supply, criticism of menus, inquiry into the incidence of 
disease in and about Philadelphia, regulation of student contacts with communicable 
diseases, levying of campus quarantine, if necessary; instruction in the proper use of 
vaccines and antitoxin, with administration upon request. The policy of giving medical 
excuses to students with common colds, urging or insisting that they stay in their 
rooms during the acute stage, falls under this group. The last step in the routine work 
is group interviewing of seniors just before graduation, with a view to seeing what all 
this is accomplishing and where it is leading. From these interviews I am gradually 
wrestling facts and statistics from which I am forming opinions such as I pass on to 
you today. 

In all of this, I have spoken only of undergraduates. The Graduate School is not 
neglected — it couldn't be, for its demands upon the Health Department are great. 
Work for and with the graduates is being extended very much as a result of Dean 
Schenck's appreciation about the grouping of graduates in a hall of their own, making 
them women of property. I think already I can see the experiment making for in- 
creased health and happiness. A graduate told me yesterday it would be very difficult 
to persuade the group to go back to the old system. I can't tell you how grateful I am 
for the opportunity of talking to you. Preparing this paper has led to clarifying my 
notions in a dozen different directions, and I go back to my work with new interest 
and energy because of it. 

Marjorie Jefferies Wagoner, 1918, 

Physician of the College. 



The three reports that appear in this number — the report on the work that is 
being done by the Health Department, the Report of the Committee on Health and 
Physical Education, and the report on the college itself as the president of the Under- 
graduate Association sees it, were all presented at the Council in New York. They 
seemed to the members of the Council very valuable because of the picture that they 
gave of the college. 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON HEALTH 
AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

The committee has been inactive this year until the last month, when the Chair- 
man met with Dr. Wagoner and President Park for an informal conference. The 
committee was asked to consider one or two specific problems about which its advice 
was asked. Chief among these was the Hygiene Course. What it should consist of, 
whether or not it should be required, whether or not it should receive academic 
recognition? These questions are at present under consideration by the members of 
the committee, and suggestions would be welcomed by the Chairman from any mem- 
bers of the Alumnae Association who would like to express their views. The ques- 
tion also arose of carrying on in the college a study of the factors that increase or 
decrease the occurrence of the Common Cold. It is hoped that such a study might be 
carried on under the Medical Commission now working on this subject at the School 
of Hygiene of Johns Hopkins University. 

The Chairman met with Dr. Mary Hardy, the only member of the committee 
able to attend a hastily called meeting in Baltimore. She is working under this 
Commission. Doctor Doull, the chief of the work on the Common Cold there, met 
with them and felt that a study of this kind at the College would be worth while 
from his standpoint. Both Dr. Wagoner and President Park agreed with the com- 
mittee that such a study would be of benefit to the College in directing attention to 
methods of preventing colds and in bringing into the College community some one 
especially assigned to this work. The matter is not yet concluded, but if a suitable 
Fellow can be found to undertake the work a fellowship will probably be available 
for financing it.* 

It was a great satisfaction to the Chairman to find how carefully the. health of 
the College was being supervised, through regular examination of students and of 
employees, through supervision of the athletic activity of the individual student, and 
through control of the general food supply and dietary of the College. 

*Since the Council Meeting the Commission has decided against undertaking the study this 

y ear - Marjorie F. Murray, 1913. 



THE MEMORIAL GARDEN 

The work on the Katrina Ely Tiffany Memorial Garden was started this fall. 
The grading was completed, the retaining walls and garden seat built and a large 
part of the shrubs and trees planted. Mr. Theodore Havemeyer, from whose nurseries 
on Long Island Katrina Tiffany found the lilacs for her own garden, has contributed 
the nineteen lilacs required in the same colors which, as he said, she would choose if 
she were with us. Mr. John Scheepers, of New York, is giving his choicest bulbs 
and says that each year he will send a collection. 

Mrs. William Hutcheson and Mrs. Margaret Bailie, under whose able and 
interested direction the garden is developing, have had their final conference on detail. 

There is to be a memorial with an inscription in the centre of the main room of 
the garden, but the form has not yet been decided on. 

About ten thousand dollars has already been received, and further contributions 
continue to come from friends who have heard of the garden and want to have a share 
in increasing the possibilities of beauty and upkeep. 



THE UNDERGRADUATE REPORT 

The trend of individualism, which has been increasing rapidly during the past 
few years, seems to me to have reached its crisis and to be on the wane. I am not sure 
to what this is due. It may, perhaps, be to the absence of the Class of '29, which 
from its very entrance had reacted against any community feeling which they considered 
subordinated the individual, or perhaps due only to this trend having reached its 
turning point. At any rate, during the summer the general attitude has changed 
and manifests itself in various ways. 

There is already a noticeable increase of interest in athletics, even among the upper 
classmen, who are not required to take them. Where formerly there were not enough 
hockey players for class teams, there are now plenty. The numbers of those watching 
games between varsity and outsiders have increased. The best tennis courts are not 
adequate for the players. Girls wait in line for them on the two mornings when the 
tennis coach comes out from Philadelphia. Fencing, as well, has become very popular, 
partly because it is good exercise which can be accomplished in a few minutes, and 
partly because, like tennis, it can be continued easily after college. It is true that both 
these sports are in a way individualistic, but the numbers interested in them show that 
undergraduates now do not mind doing the same things that everyone else is doing. 

There has been more interest this year, as well, in class meetings and chapel. So 
far there has been only one instance where a class could not get its quorum and that, 
strangely enough, was the freshman, who only needed ten more members. Their trouble 
probably arose from the fact that the several non-resident students found it inconvenient 
to come to six o'clock meetings. The members attending chapel have also increased this 
year, both at the morning and Sunday evening services. It is very pleasant to see that 
many of those present are upper classmen, since freshmen have a dread of showing 
interest where their models do not. The change from three to two mornings a week 
of chapel may be responsible for this. The music room is always more than half filled 
and sometimes overflowing. So far there have been five Sunday evening services, and 
the officers of the league have been agreeably surprised with the attendance both for 
speakers and the musical services. 

There is another sign which I think is significant of the growing feeling for the 
college as a whole. There is a decided interest and pride in it, whereas formerly what 
the College was and did hardly mattered. You probably remember the two or three 
magazine articles on Bryn Mawr which appeared last spring. I have heard girls dis- 
cussing them and upholding points that were criticized in them and being pleased when 
the writers' impressions were favorable. 

Besides these tendencies which I have mentioned, I believe that there is a more 
general intermingling of classes than previously. Of course, the Freshmen still remain 
fairly separate, but the upper classmen do not confine themselves to the same old sets. 
This may easily be a result of individualism, but it tends towards a consolidation of 
classes. By all that I have said I do not mean to imply that the undergraduates have 
overnight become what is called "collegiate," that they go about the campus arm in 
arm singing college songs, or that they shout, "Right or wrong, our Alma Mater." 
Nor do I mean to imply that we ever will reach that stage, but I do believe that the 
tendency towards individuality has reached its height and is on the decline. 

(7) 



8 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

There have been a few innovations and changes this year which I think would be 
of interest to you. The Undergraduate Association has invested in a radio for the 
Common Room, so that we may enjoy particularly the Sunday afternoon concerts. 
Last Sunday was the first one, and the enthusiasm on the part of the students was 
very gratifying. We have invited the graduates and faculty to join us on Sunday after- 
noons. The invitation was in a way selfish, as we welcome every chance of meeting 
the faculty informally. The Undergraduate Association feels that every contact with 
them is a benefit to us, so if the Association can manage to save a few pennies they will 
be spent on teas to be served after the concerts. Food apparently never fails as an 
indirect means of accomplishing a purpose which might otherwise fail. We hope that 
the girls, besides deriving pleasure from the radio, will take the opportunity of estab- 
lishing closer contacts with students from other halls. It is very easy to find the girls 
of one's own hall sufficient and to forget that there are many others whom one would 
find equally congenial if one took the trouble to pay more attention to them. Since 
the Common Room will now be used more generally, a greater intermingling of halls 
should be the natural result. 

Then there is the eternal interest in dramatics. Although almost everyone goes to 
see the varsity plays and many try out, those chosen for parts are usually practically 
the same girls for each production. This is unavoidable because of the size of the 
College and the lack of many even fairly able actresses. Last spring Varsity Dramatics 
asked if it might be allowed to separate from the Undergraduate Association, since 
it considered itself an organization large enough to stand alone. The Association 
agreed, since it thought that its officers were often not competent to help elect those 
for Varsity Dramatics because they had no adequate way of observing how efficiently 
the various candidates worked behind the scenes. The banking accounts would be 
simpler and the Association could also concentrate its efforts in other fields, where its 
attention was more needed. Varsity Dramatics has not yet given either of its sched- 
uled productions, but has revived the so-called "Players," which died out two or three 
years ago when the leaders graduated. These "Players" used to present one-act plays, 
which they worked up and produced within a week. This fall, under the supervision 
of Varsity Dramatics, two one-act plays have been given with great success. They 
were "Riders to the Sea" and "Aria da Capo." Even though a great many girls do 
not take part in these productions, they at least give rise to a common interest among 
the undergraduates. 

The "Players" are equaled in popularity by the outside speakers and Goodhart 
series. The speakers, whether at College during the week or on the week-end, gen- 
erally fill about half the house, although of course there are faculty and outsiders as 
well in the audience. The Goodhart series are a great joy, as it is very pleasant to be 
able to saunter across the campus to an evening's entertainment instead of rushing 
desperately to the train. We realize that among these we can see performances which 
do not appear in Philadelphia and which we might otherwise miss entirely. Every- 
thing of this nature, whether play or speech, interests the undergraduate. It seems 
to me that she is awake and eager for any new aspects on an old problem or for 
anything new in itself. She does not let affairs of the moment slide by too rapidly 
just because she is studying, for the most part, things of the past. Dr. Fenwick's cur- 
rent event talks are more popular this year than last, although it may only be due 
to one's energies stored up in the summer or to the Freshmen who are still discovering 
and trying things out. Of course, listening to Dr. Fenwick for half an hour you 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 9 

might say is a lazy way of learning what important affairs have been going on during 
the past week. Nevertheless the papers are read. I know of one hall which takes 
three New York and one Philadelphia paper daily. It also subscribes to the New 
Yorker and Vanity Fair, since neither is in the Periodical Room. This room is not 
used very much by the average undergraduate, as the New Book Room across the 
aisle tempts her more. The new books, especially fiction and biography, are extremely 
popular. Very often there is some one curled up reading in every chair and a great 
gap on the shelf because of the number of books out. 

There is still one important aspect of the undergraduates which I have not 
mentioned, namely, their attitude toward self-government. Until recently, as you 
probably know, there has been a general misapprehension about the relation between 
self-government and the authorities of the College. I can remember when I was 
on the board three years ago that the President once said, "We cannot possibly put 
that through because the authorities would object." If the board was under the illu- 
sion that it was controlled in its major moves, naturally the undergraduates as a 
whole were also. Some, of course, wondered why we should then be called self- 
governing, but the question was never made clear to all until Miss Park's speech in 
chapel a week ago. The realization that we, and only we, control our rules and 
regulations should increase our pride and respect towards the conception of self-gov- 
ernment. Frequently one hears girls saying that self-government is ideal in theory, 
but not successful in practice because it is so difficult for a board to enforce the rules. 
They forget that it is not only the board which is self-governing, but they themselves. 
This attitude should change, it seems to me, along with the decline in individualism, 
since honor is not only a question of self-respect, but also of a sense of responsibility. 
If we begin to feel more as one body, we shall become more aware of the necessities 
of considering what others think of the College. That, together with our individual 
self-respect, should create a feeling of self-government as a whole, not limited to the 
board, and of pride in standing by the rules which we have made for ourselves. This 
will come about, I think, and will in part be due, to the present decline in 
individualism. 

Elizabeth Perkins, 1930. 



AGAIN THE SEVEN COLLEGES 

The third article in the Pictorial Review series on the seven colleges is in the 
February number. It deals with Radclifle and Barnard. The author is Miss Jeanette 
Eaton, who has written the others of the series. 

On January 27th the Century Quarterly will be on the news-stands, and in it 
is an article by Dean Gildersleeve, of Barnard, on "Citizens of the World — Inter- 
national Work in the Women's Colleges." 



REPORT OF THE ALUMNAE COMMITTEE OF 
SEVEN COLLEGES 

The Committee has met regularly since the last report, often each week. The 
first event was a luncheon last March given at the Cosmopolitan Club for the 
Alumnae writers of the Seven Colleges. About forty writers were present, and a 
spirited appeal was made to them by Mrs. Josephine Daskam Bacon (Smith) to 
remember to set forth the situation of the higher education of women. In May a 
dinner was arranged by the Chicago Committee appointed by the Central Committee. 
This dinner was attended by the Seven Presidents. Mrs. Manning went in place of 
President Park. The dinner was described by Miss Gildersleeve as "a magnificent, 
brilliant, representative assemblage." There were seven hundred and fifty present. 
Mrs. William Hibbard (Susan Follansbee, 1897,) was the Bryn Mawr representative. 
The chief address was given by Dr. George Vincent of the Rockefeller Foundation 
and each of the Presidents spoke briefly. Here is a list of articles published at the 
instigation of the Committee: 

"The Fourth R for Women" — by President Ada Comstock, Century, February, 
1929. 

"Some Dangers of Co-education"- — by Rebecca Hooper Eastman, Woman's 
Journal, January 1929. 

"The Women's Colleges Reply" — by President Neilson, Atlantic, January, 1929. 
"In Pursuit of Immorality"' — by Rita Halle, Herald Tribune, March 10 (in 
which Mrs. Halle, a Wellesley graduate, went back into sources of rumors of 
immorality and found them groundless). 

Under the auspices of Charm magazine: 

College Teas given at which President Neilson and President McCracken spoke 
and their addresses were broadcast over WOR. 

October Pictorial — Article on Bryn Mawr College, Miss Eaton. 
In November Good Housekeeping — An article, "Rehearsal for Life," Ida Tarbell. 
"To My Daughter Safe at College," September Good Housekeeping, by Mrs. 
Halle. 

"Delineator?' September, "Clothes for the College Girl," with signed statement 
of two deans. 

"The Foreign Student," by Dean Gildersleeve, will appear in January Century. 
Seven Radio Talks were arranged for the following dates: 
Oct. 3 President Pendleton, "The National and International Character of our 
Colleges." 
President Neilson, "Which Girl Should Go to College?" 
President Woolly, "Individualizing the College Student." 
Dean Gildersleeve, "The Education of Mothers and Citizens." 
President Park, "Scholarly Research for Women." 
President McCracken, "Are College Women Exclusive?" 
President Comstock, "Educating the Modern Woman." 

The Committee appointed a Dinner Committee to take charge of a dinner in 
New York City. The Dinner Committee were: Mrs. Thomas Lamont, Smith; 
Mrs. Owen Young (Chairman), RadclifTe; Mrs. Chellis Austin, Vassar; Mrs. 

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Oct. 


10 


Oct. 


17 


Oct. 


24 


Oct. 


31 


Nov. 


7 


Nov. 


14 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 11 

Bruce Barton, Wellesley; Mrs. F. Louis Slade, Bryn Mawr; Mrs. John Reid, Jr., 
Mount Holyoke. 

The dinner was held at the Astor Hotel on November 13th with Mr. Charles 
Evans Hughes as the chief speaker. Miss Comstock made the other formal speech 
and each of the Presidents spoke briefly as did Mrs. Franklin Roosevelt, who 
represented the Governor of New York. All the speeches were broadcast, nine 
hundred and fifty sat down to eat as one, and the dinner ended at 10.17, a triumph 
of successful management. The Presidents, Mrs. Roosevelt, and Mr. Hughes, were 
photographed and Mr. Hughes recited parts of his speech for the sound pictures which 
will be shown in the Paramount theatres. The publicity is extraordinary. Every New 
York morning paper carried long descriptions of the Dinner, as did every evening 
paper — and also excellent editorials — one in the New York Times was especially good. 
The Committee is hoping to continue its efforts unabated during 1930. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Frances Hand, 

Bryn Mawr Representative. 



AS MR. HUGHES SEES THE SITUATION 

Education for women is an acquired taste. It was not the tradition, here or 
elsewhere. Draper reminds us that the older American college tradition was estab- 
lished before Mrs. John Adams wrote: "Female education in the best families goes 
no further than writing and arithmetic, and in some instances music and dancing." 
Even the first high schools were for boys alone. The women's colleges are new. 
They, in truth, were the prophecies of the new era — our era. Their prophecies 
have already been fulfilled bej^ond the expectations of founders. We greet tonight 
the executive chiefs who represent this most effective leadership. It is no disparage- 
ment of the labors of men in this field to say that the women presidents of women's 
colleges and their predecessors have shown in the dignity and success of their service 
both what education can do for women and what women can do for education. 
Once again, in this sphere of educational housekeeping, women have made the most 
of slender resources. How meagre, indeed, have been these resources in comparison 
with those of their most favored brothers! Mr. Lamont pointed out last year the 
contrast in endowment between seven large colleges for men and these seven women's 
colleges. He found that for the men's institutions the endowments of the seven 
amounted to $318,500,000 and that of these seven colleges for women to $36,000,000. 
There are several men's institutions, each of which has a greater endowment than all 
these women's colleges together. After making every allowance, this is a dispropor- 
tion which gives striking emphasis to your appeal. Your need is indeed urgent. It will 
be described to you in detail by those who know your problems intimately. The 
alumnae of women's colleges rarely make fortunes to give to their alma mater. The 
women's colleges, like the men's colleges, must depend upon man's intelligent appre- 
ciation and man's beneficence. They can rely on these, if the need is understood. But 
here, as in other efforts, women themselves must furnish the inspiration. What the 
women of America earnestly desire and should have, the men of America will give. 



THE BUREAU OF RECOMMENDATIONS 

During the period between Christmas and May, the Bureau of Recommendations 
receives a relatively large number of calls for Bryn Mawr graduates in various lines 
of work. Most of these openings are for teachers in secondary schools, but there are 
demands for teachers of every subject, ranging from primary school to college work. 

There are also a number of opportunities outside the field of teaching. A partial 
list of the openings that have come to the Bureau during the past year gives some idea 
of the variety of positions available: secretary to a College President; registrar in a 
medical school; research assistant in a law office; commercial research worker in a 
publishing house; economic research workers in investment houses; docents in museums; 
economic technicians in chemistry and biology; assistant in a library demanding a 
person with wide range of background and experience; manager for a book shop. 
There have also been several secretarial positions that promised to lead to positions of 
responsibility; one in the editorial department of a publishing house; another in the 
psychological department of a university which publishes psychological Journals; one 
in a school; one in a large business concern. In addition there have been openings in 
different types of social work, and executive positions in various organizations of 
national and international significance. 

Most of these calls the Bureau was not able to fill, one obvious reason being that 
the demand so far exceeded the number of registrants in its active file. We take this 
opportunity to urge all Alumnae who are interested in positions of any kind to register 
with the Bureau ; and to ask those who have already registered to keep us informed as 
to their permanent addresses and their present jobs; and to indicate whether they wish 
their names to be kept on the active or the inactive files of the Bureau. 

THE COOPERATIVE BUREAU FOR WOMEN TEACHERS 

1776 Broadway, New York City 

This bureau is sponsored by thirteen colleges and six associations of school execu- 
tives and teachers. Its purpose is stated in a recent news-letter, which the Bureau 
sends out twice a year: 

"Selective placement, as the Director's report shows, is our chief aim. Incident- 
ally there are other kinds of service, we can offer the teacher or the school : statistical 
information on salaries and salary ranges, information as to practice in schools, voca- 
tional information in regard to opportunities and training. The Bureau is the answer 
to the need felt by the women's colleges, by the headmistresses' associations, and by the 
association of private school teachers for a non-commercial agency which should be 
more than a placement bureau. Each year we hope to justify more completely the 
faith of our members. 

"More well-equipped teachers of Science, Mathematics, Grades, and Primary are 
needed. We are searching far afield for such candidates, and we are advising some 
of the young teachers of English and History, to whom there are far too many, to 
consider apprentice positions in the intermediate grades. 

'Already we are beginning to have calls for young executives for 1930. Teachers 
between thirty and forty years of age who have executive ability should get in touch 
with us." 

Bryn Mawr Alumnae interested in teaching may receive further information and 
valuable help by writing to Miss Ruth Stratton, Director of the Bureau, at the address 
given above. Helen B. Crane, 1909. 

Director of Bureau of Recommendations. 
<12) 



ALUMNAE BOOKS 

ANCIENT PAINTING, by Mary Hamilton Swindler, Yale University Press, 1929. 

Because of an unavoidable delay it has been found impossible to print in this num- 
ber of the Bulletin an adequate criticism of Miss Swindler's eagerly awaited book. 
Edith Hall Dohan (Mrs. Joseph M. Dohan), Ph.D. 1908, has promised to review 
it for the March issue, but meantime the Editorial Board feels that the alumnae would 
be interested in some of the comments on the book which have been made by dis- 
tinguished scholars in Miss Swindler's field. 

"Ancient Painting is a monumental volume in every sense of the word. Its 
range is enormous and the work, in so far as I am able to judge of it, well done. It 
will be the standard in its field for a long time." George A. Barton, 

University of Pennsylvania. 

"This contribution ... is going to be of immense service to the study of 
ancient art, not only in schools and colleges, but likewise to students of art every- 
where. ... I did not realize the magnitude of the production. It is a real 
credit to American Archaeology and one of which we shall all be very proud." 

James H. Breasted, 
Oriental Institute, University of Chicago. 

"Ancient Painting is a masterpiece. It fills what has been a troublesome hole in 
art literature. . . . It is easy and pleasurable to read and yet is astonishingly 
compact with information. The bibliography is tremendously valuable. The plates 
constitute a full and clear history of the subject. The book is beautiful to look at 
and gives the impression of being one of those books that will have to be in every 
Library as a classic." Rossiter Howard, 

Cleveland Museum of Art. 

"It is a most erudite and scholarly performance. It is a beautiful volume." 

D. M. Robinson, 
Johns Hopkins University. 

" A majestic book which will no doubt be extensively used by everybody who is 
interested in the history of ancient art. The book is very exciting and requires some 
time to study it carefully. . . ." m Rostovtzeff, 

Yale University. 

"A magnificent volume on ancient painting. Our Junior departmental students 
are simply eating it up, and here it fills an extremely aching void." 

C. R. Morey, 
Princeton University. 

(Other Princeton impressions from Eleanor Marquand Forsyth, 1919). 

"The Department are all much impressed. First, they admired the illustrations, 
then, grudging it to a lady, admitted the text was good, then, as they read further, 
began talking about 'Mary Swindler' as if they had known her from the cradle." 

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14 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

CARL AKELEY'S AFRICA, by Mary L. Jobc Akcley, Dodd, Mead &' Co., New York, 1929. 

No book was ever more fitly named. Mrs. Akeley herself is so raptly conscious 
of the fact that she is seeing what she calls the "Bright Continent" through her hus- 
band's eyes that the reader insensibly has the same, feeling. The Africa that Carl 
Akeley remembers, with its natives uncorrupted and its great herds of wild animals 
unafraid, is the Africa that so stirs one's imagination that one understands the strange 
impelling force that made him give his very life to preserving the record of it. He 
wrote somewhere : "The forthcoming expedition means more to me than any that has 
gone before, not merely because it enables me to return to the country that I love, but 
especially because it is the actual beginning of African Hall — the realization of my 
fondest dream. I am always dreaming dreams, many of them have been forgotten. 
But the dream of African Hall — of a great Museum exhibition, artistic in form, 
permanent in construction, faithful to the scenery and the wild life of the continent 
that it portrays — that dream has lived to become the unifying purpose of my work." 
And it was that dream that drove the Akeleys with a dreadful sense of urgency. Always 
the time seemed so short. One cannot help feeling that some sort of premonition, added 
to the ever-present knowledge that the Africa that Carl Akeley knew and reverenced, 
the old, primitive, magical Africa, was changing almost before their eyes, gave a 
poignancy to all of their experiences. And it was this knowledge, too, that made 
their mission from the Belgian Government, in connection with the Pare National 
Albert, such joy to them. By means of National Parks some of the old Africa would 
be preserved, and by means of the Museum Groups, it would be commemorated. 

Much of the old Africa was still there, however, .for one who knew where to look 
for it. All through the book one is conscious of Mrs. Akeley's keen and sensitive pleas- 
ure in the pageantry of a gorgeous land, and that her pleasure is intensified, tenfold 
because her husband is leading her into it and giving her the freedom of it. Even in 
the midst of the most cruel hardship she never sees it, to use her own phrase "in the 
flat light of high noon." When they were encamped on the veldt, collecting the 
animals for the "Water-hole Group," she describes it in the enchantment of early 
dawn, — "the mountains take on amazing colours. The atmosphere becomes prismatic 
in hue, while the veldt glows white as if covered with hoar-frost. ... A little bird 
sings softly in the acacia sheltering my tent. Other lustier voices follow. The steel blue 
dawn is upon us." At night sometimes she hears the sound of drums. "At that instant, 
filling the semi-stillness, came a deep booming sound from a Wakamba manyatta a mile 
below us. It was followed as if by the softer overtones of a giant 'cello. From across the 
hills arose an answering echo, continuous and distinct." The flowering of the desert 
with the coming of the rains, the cloud masses at sunset, the green magic of the Kivu 
forests, Mt. Kenya "seen on rare days gleaming bright in the southern sky" — all are 
elements in the spell under which she falls more and more deeply, and yet, as is the 
case in the museum groups which they are collecting, the animals, not the background, 
are the main interest, no matter how beautiful and significant the background is. And 
always through the book, giving essential unity to what at times might be a rather 
rambling narrative, is the drama of the conscious and unconscious race against time. 
One is always aware of it in some degree. It gives the sense of tragic fate, of 
short-lived happiness and beauty, that permeates the whole book. 

In all of her descriptions of the animals that they watched day after day, Mrs. 
Akeley makes one feel this same inescapable fate that hangs over them. So soon they 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 15 

will all be destroyed. Yet when the expedition penetrated a remote valley in the Tan- 
ganyika country, they found the animals unafraid, "lions at peace with the world" as 
they are depicted in the Group. It was this that they had come to find. ". . . a big, 
dark-coloured lioness suddenly appeared. She came up the slope of the donga and 
through the tall grass, traveling straight toward us. When she reached the edge of 
the deep grass, where it abruptly joined the burned veldt, the big cat lifted her paws 
high, stepping out into the open with the grace and assurance of a queen." That clay 
they saw all the game that was fast disappearing in the country more easily pene- 
trated by the safari routes, but even here, in a kind of African garden of Eden, they 
realized how short a time was needed for unscrupulous hunters to work havoc. 

That day with the lions stands out as a thing apart. Already one has a sense of 
fate moving more and more swiftly, fate in the form of over-work and exhaustion 
under tropic suns. The end came finally with dramatic suddeness, and dramatic fit- 
ness in the Congo, in the high volcanic country that Carl Akeley had been planning for 
and dreaming of for so long. They struggled on foot, sick and weary, over hideously 
difficult muddy mountain trails, but courage never flagged and their joy in the beauty 
about them was never blunted. The beauty of great ferns and "pink begonia-like 
flowers and white fuchsias and yellow hibiscus and lovely orchids," of great trees and 
plunging waterfalls and strange bird notes, and even the magic of swirling fog, in the 
mountain country, moved them strangely. But finally they saw what they had been 
watching for, a "clump of bamboos, twisted and torn and pulled up by the roots, the 
succulent pinkish greyish green shoots eaten and the tough canes discarded where a band 
of gorillas had taken their morning meal." It meant they had reached their goal. The 
Gorilla Group, was, in the minds of the expedition, the most important of all, and Carl 
Akeley had described this Kivu country, the habitat of the gorillas, with the two great 
peaks of Mikeno and Karasimbi, rising snow-capped above the Equator, as "the most 
beautiful spot in all Africa." This was the spot where he had persuaded the Belgian 
government to establish the Pare National Albert, as a game preserve for all wild 
animals but more especially as a gorilla sanctuary. 

It was here that Carl Akeley died; it was here in the "cold forests," in the rain 
and fog, that his wife and his associates carried his work to completion, as the most 
fitting memorial to him. Not until all the specimens had been collected, all the back- 
grounds painted, all the notes made for this, the Group nearest to his heart, did the 
long trek towards the coast start, six weeks later. It was a heartbreaking, difficult 
journey, but Mrs. Akeley, as she had done for ten months, managed all the details of 
the safari, complicated this time by the problem of getting adequate porters to carry 
out the specimens they had so carefully collected and prepared. Between the lines one 
can read an extraordinary tale of human courage and fortitude. Yet when one finally 
finishes what is really an epic, one finds that one remembers just as she did, not the 
hardships and difficulties and heartbreaks but the strange enchantment, the "flower-' 
filled meadows, circling the rocky kopjes high above the Athi and the graceful, leaping 
antelope that linger there; the northern desert red with dawn," the great herds of 
zebra and giraffe, "the golden, far-extending swales below Mt. Kenya's icy peak," 
silvery herons and wild cattle, and "the rolling plains and shaded dongas . . . 
where peaceful lions play," and in the very heart of the land the strange beauty of 
the Sanctuary which Carl Akeley had worked so hard to have established and for 
which he had in very truth given his life. The book with its scientific contributions 
and its romantic colour is a fitting memorial. M. L. T., '12. 



CLASS NOTES 



1896 
Class Editor: Abigail Camp Dimon 
1411 Genesee Street, Utica, N. Y. 



It is with great regret that we learn of 
the death of Edith Peters, on January 
10th, from pneumonia. Edith was born 
in Atlanta, Georgia, the daughter of 
Richard Peters, the organizer and first 
president of the Chester Street Railway 
Company. Since she left Bryn Mawr she 
has been an interested member of the 
Emergency Aid, the Art Alliance, the 
Cosmopolitan Club, the Pennsylvania So- 
ciety of the Colonial Dames of America 
and the First Unitarian Church. She 
took an active interest in the Home for 
Training in Speech of Deaf Children, and 
was appointed a trustee of the institution 
by Governor Pinchot. She was a sister- 
in-law of General Smedley D. Butler. 



'96 came together 22 strong for a mid- 
winter reunion dinner at Carrie McCor- 
mick Slade's on December 8th. All that 
was needed was a postal card from 
Pauline naming a time and a place, and 
Elizabeth Hopkins Johnson packed her 
trunk in Wisconsin, Rebecca Mattson 
Darlington in Cambridge crowded her 
busy schedule for the week a little more 
closely, E. B. K. cut short a meeting in 
Albany to arrive late but not too late, and 
Abba Dimon came gladly dashing down 
from Utica. From Philadelphia and Bryn 
Mawr came Mary Dudley, Cora Jeanes, 
Hilda Justice, Georgiana King, and Mary 
Woolman; Emma Linburg Tobin and 
Marion Whitehead Grafton came from 
Trenton ; Elsa from Sharon ; and the New 
York contingent were Louise Davis 
Brooks, Leonie Gilmour, Pauline Gold- 
mark, Mary Hopkins, Josephine Holman 
Boross, May Jewett, Florence King, Ida 
Ogilvie, Carrie Slade, Mary Hill Swope. 
Of the twenty-two, four were not able to 
be at the June reunion — Ida Ogilvie, Jo- 
sephine Boross, Louise Brooks and Mary 
Dudley. 

Carrie Slade built an addition to her 
hospitable table and gave us one of the 
best of good times. After dinner we 
gathered in a circle and heard accounts 
of the doings of some of those present. 
Carrie herself told of her experiences at 
the Congress of the International Wom- 
en's Suffrage Alliance, and of her peace 
speech at the meeting in connection with 
the Congress. Ida Ogilvie told of her 
farm in Bedford, where she has 40 collie 



dogs, 50 cows, 600 chickens, and all the 
labor is done by eight farmerettes. 
Georgiana King told of her travels in 
Italy last summer and her expenditure of 
the '96 gift for the Art Department. Abba 
Dimon showed some slides of her African 
photographs, and Mary Hopkins gave an 
account of the extension students of Co- 
lumbia, especially the interesting and 
gifted students of poetry. 

News of '96 seemed largely to be the 
achievements of their children. Ruth Por- 
ter's second son, Edward, is engaged to 
Beth Fountain's oldest daughter, Audrey, 
and is to be married in January and bring 
Audrey to Chicago to live. Elizabeth 
Johnson's Stanley traveled in Indo-China 
and other countries in Asia; Mary 
Boude's son crossed Manchuria on what 
they supposed would be the last train run 
on the railway, then visited Japan, Manila, 
Indo-China, Ceylon, and India, where, at 
Darjeeling, he had a fine view of Mt. 
Everest. Mary and her husband expect to 
sail early in' January to meet him in 
Naples and travel in Europe with him. 
Mary Swope's family is away from home : 
Henrietta, Gerard and John have an 
apartment together in Cambridge, where 
all are studying; Isaac is in the employ 
of the Electric Light Company in Phila- 
delphia; David, who is in North Dakota 
selling International Harvesters, will go 
with his father and mother to Italy in 
January. Marion Grafton has one son, 
19 years old, in Lehigh University, one in 
high school deciding upon his college, and 
a daughter of twenty-one at home. 

Clara Colton Worthington met Pauline 
and Abba for lunch, but could not come to 
the dinner. Her son Billy had just been 
married and is to return to Salt Lake 
City, where he has a position in the Na- 
tional City Bank. 

Helen Saunders Holmes attended a tea 
at the Bryn Mawr Club in the afternoon, 
but was also unable to come to the dinner. 
She says she is still occupied with bring- 
ing up her two children of thirteen and 
seventeen, and when they are off her 
mind she cherishes the ambition to con- 
tinue her own education and get an M.A. 

1897 
Class Editor: Mrs. Harry H. Weist 
174 East 71st St., New York. 
Anna Lawther: "I hope to sail for 
Italy on the Satumia February 15th, to 
stay abroad until September." 

Aimee Leffingwell McKenzie: "Kenneth 
and I took a short motor trip through 



(16) 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



17 



New England to Mt. Desert, and tried to 
find you in two Greenfields, but you were 
in Europe." 

May Levering Robinson: "Spent sum- 
mer traveling with her family in Europe 
— great time ! Moved from East Orange, 
N. J., because her husband had to give up 
his church on account of his health, and 
is now living at 1185 Park Avenue, New 
York City." 

May Miller Buckminster: "We shall 
not sail this year until February 12th, on 
the France." 

Molly Peckham Tubby: "Gardening 
daily, tutoring nightly, pushing the re- 
stricted billboard campaign via the State 
Federation of Garden Clubs (of which I 
am President, having succeeded Cornelia 
Halsey Kellogg), and basking in Ruth's 
promotion to Superintendent of the Chil- 
dren's Department of Montclair libraries; 
giving lots of garden talks — on the side — 
and publishing a gardening article now 
an' agin." 

Bertha Rembaugh: "Still arid. The 
18th Amendment can be enforced in cities 
and rural districts. It should not be 
changed, nor should the Volstead Act. 
That's that. (Of course, I am interested 
in some other things.)" 

1898 
Class Editor: Edith Schoff Boericke 
(Mrs. John J. Boericke) 
328 Brookway, Merion Station, Pa. 

Copenhagen, Sept. 18th, 1929. 
Dear Betty Bancroft: 

Your letter was certainly a very pleas- 
ant surprise for me, showing as it does, 
that after more than thirty years of sep- 
aration the class heart still embraces even 
the most-far-away and least-seen of its 
members, together with her "baby." I 
have already handed over to the class 
baby the generous gift of '98, and Char- 
lotte Luria, as her name is now, was de- 
lighted to know of the interest shown her 
in such unexpected quarters. For the 
money you sent her she will try to buy 
something for her home that is worthy 
of the donors, and then you may expect 
a letter from herself, together with some 
pictures. I know that just at present she 
is out of photographs and she is also very 
busy, as you will be able to understand 
when I have told you some more about 
her. 

> She has gone in for the study of medi- 
cine, and in the several examinations she 
has taken so far she has received the 
highest credits obtainable. But like the 
very up-to-date young woman that she 



is, she is now trying to combine science 
and matrimony. Just about a half a year 
before the final examination for her de- 
gree, which she hopes to take in January, 
she was married on May 15th to a news- 
paperman, assistant editor of one of our 
biggest dailies. He is twenty-nine and 
she was twenty-five in June, and because 
life seemed to them too short to postpone 
their happiness any longer, they used the 
summer vacation for their wedding and 
honeymoon. They took a wedding trip to 
the United States, and I am sorry now 
that the thought never entered my head 
that I might send the class baby to the 
reunion, even if I was not able to come 
myself. Unfortunately I have always 
had to take my trips home to Amer- 
ica at seasons outside of reunion time, 
either in the fall or mostly in the sum- 
mer time when vacation permitted me to 
take members of my family along. How- 
ever, I hope some day to see '98 again. 
In the meantime why don't more of you 
on your many peregrinations around Eu- 
rope turn up in Copenhagen, truly a 
charming city — visitors always say so. I 
should be happy to see any of the old 
Bryn Mawrtyrs here. If summer visitors 
cannot find me in my Copenhagen home, 
they can look me up or telephone to me 
at our seaside cottage, which is only \y 2 
hours' motor ride from Copenhagen. Just 
about a couple of weeks ago Mary and 
Jenny Brown called on me with fresh 
news from the '98 reunion. 

When I last wrote to you a couple of 
years ago, I told you that my husband's 
health was failing. Fortunately after 
that time he was recuperated to some 
extent, so that although he has had de- 
finitely to give up his administrative posi- 
tion, he is able to do some work in Schol- 
arship without over-exerting his weak 
heart. 

My son, twenty-three, is still at his law 
course. My youngest daughter, fifteen, is 
at school. 

Now, in closing, let me ask you in any 
way you think best to thank '98 very 
kindly for their loving gift to the class 
baby, which is much appreciated not only 
by her, but also by her mother. I don't 
object to your letting these lines cir- 
culate if you like. 

Again thanking you for your letter, I 
am 

Affectionately yours, 

Sophia Y. O. Bertelsen. 

The announcement has recently been 
made of the engagement of Miss Theo- 
dora Agnes Linn, a cousin of Bettina and 
Anne Linn, Bryn Mawr 1926 and 1927, 



18 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



to Mr. Nelson Carter Wilbur, son of 
Anna Dean Wilbur, '98. 

Julia Fuller de Ricon writes: "Mar- 
ried twenty-four years and not a bit sorry 
— my husband I still find frightfully nice, 
and that thought is mutual. My two sons 
are good fellows. Both have their French 
baccalaureates, and one has his Oxford 
degree, while the younger is in his sec- 
ond year, as they call sophomores up 
there. I wish I had known your ad- 
dress when he went to Merion and played 
in the Oxford-Cambridge Tennis Team 
last summer. They went all around and 
returned victorious. He is Junior cham- 
pion of France, and sports at Oxford 
count a lot, you know! He is not es- 
pecially a student, so was rather pleased 
when one of the questions asked by the 
Tutorial Board at entrance exams was 
'What is your standing in tennis ?' " 

1899 

Class Editor: Ellen P. Kilpatrick 

1027 St. Paul Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Mary Foulke Morrisson's daughter, 
Rosemary (B.M.C. 1931), was married on 
September 10th to Mr. John Waddell 
Chase. 

Gertrude Ely was in Pittsburgh in 
November for the convention of the 
Pennsylvania League of Women Voters, 
of which she is President. We are told 
that she not only arrived on time but 
kept every appointment on time. She 
says it is all due to the engagement book 
presented to her by the class at our 
famous dinner at her house last June. 

Charlotte Hubbard Goodell is back in 
Houghton after spending the greater part 
of the last year abroad. Her two older 
daughters are studying abroad and her 
son is at the University of Michigan. Her 
youngest daughter, Frances, is at the 
Howe-Marot School at Thompson, and 
"Marion Vonsiatsky is being sweet to 
her." 

Will every member of the class please 
send some item of news about somebody 
to the Class Editor? If you are too mod- 
est to tell what you are doing yourselves, 
surely you won't mind telling what some 
of your classmates are doing. 

1900 

Class Editor: Mrs. Richard Standish 
Francis (Louise Congdon Francis) 
Haverford, Pa. 
Jessie Tatlock is sailing January 15 to 
continue her historical research. Her ad- 
dress for the winter is: Care of The 
American Express Co., Palermo. She 
gives us a new permanent address as: 



Women's University Club, 106 East 52nd 
Street, New York City. 

Myra Frank Roseman announces the 
arrival of her granddaughter, Florence 
Myra Ilfield, on December 19, 1929. The 
baby is the daughter of 1900's class baby, 
Bertha Roseman, Bryn Mawr 1926. 

Grace Campbell Babson writes that her 
second son, Gorham, is a freshman at 
Reed College in Portland and working 
very hard. The older son, Arthur, has 
transferred from Reed to the school of 
business administration at the University 
of Oregon. Grace writes that he loves 
being at the larger seat of learning, fra- 
ternity life and the things that go with it. 
She writes further of her daughter: 
"Mary Hague is so busy with school, bas- 
ketball, operetta practice, and piano les- 
sons in Hood River on Saturday that we 
see very little of her." 

Christmas postals from Catherine Bar- 
ton Childs tell us that her three girls are 
in school at Mont Choisi, and Barton in 
another school near Geneva. When last 
heard from, Catherine herself and her 
husband were in Rome. 

Helen MacCoy spent Christmas in Am- 
herst with Jean. 

1902 
Class Editor: Anne Rotan Howe 
(Mrs. Thorndike Howe) 
77 Revere St., Boston, Mass. 



Ellen Ropes Horn (Mrs. Gottfried M. 
Horn) died in Germany last May after a 
long and painful illness. She is buried in 
Grossharthan near the church where her 
husband still preaches. This bri-ef state; 
ment was sent in very recently by her 
sister, Alice Ropes Kellogg. Though it 
has been many years since we have seen 
her, the Class of 1902 cherishes Ropey's 
memory warmly and feels a real sense of 
loss in her death. 

Eleanor Wood Hoppin (Mrs. Joseph 
Clark Hoppin) was married in New York 
in October to Mr. John Jay Whitehead, 
Jr., of Putnam, Conn. Woody described 
this event as "a very small and casual 
wedding," and claims to have gone to 
Niagara Falls for the honeymoon — be- 
cause she'd already been everywhere else, 
we conclude. She and Mr. Whitehead are 
officially spending the winter at the Ben 
Grosvenor Inn, Pomfret Centre, Conn., 
what time they are not in New York, 
where Eleanor still keeps her apartment 
at 157 East 75th Street. They plan a trip 
to the West Indies in March. Mr. White- 
head's business is the Patriot Press in 
Putnam. 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



19 



1903 

Class Editor: Gertrude Dietrich Smith 
(Mrs. Herbert Knox Smith) 
Farmington, Conn. 

Betty Martin Breed and her husband 
are busy with a school of 315 boys. Eliza- 
beth Breed graduated from Smith College 
in June, 1929, cum laude. Henry is a 
freshman at Princeton. 

Dorothea Day Watkins is Secretary of 
the School Community League and very 
much interested in public schools in Vir- 
ginia. She has two children, Asa and 
Judy, in first-year high school, and teaches 
a few children of neighbors two hours 
each morning. 

Mabel H. Norton is back in Pasadena 
after a winter in Italy and summer in 
France and England with her niece, who 
is a Junior at Smith. Her nephew, just 
returned from South America, is at home 
with her. She speaks of a delightful visit 
with May Guild and her talented and at- 
tractive children, and has also seen Flor- 
ence Hay. 

Harriet Spencer Pierce Kendall (Mrs. 
Edwin L. Kendall) admits a largish 
grandson — already in short clothes when 
we saw his picture recently — named Spen- 
cer Pierce, Jr. 

Elizabeth Lyon Belknap (Mrs. Robert 
E. Belknap) and Mr. Belknap sailed from 
New York on January 11th on the Fran- 
conia for a five months* trip around the 
world. 

Constance L. Todd is living in a tene- 
ment in Georgetown, Washington's near- 
Greenwich Village, while her boys are in 
boarding school. Next year they will be 
back for day school until they are ready 
for college, so they will all return to their 
house in Chevy Chase in October. Con- 
stance expects surely to get to the reunion 
this year. 

Marianna Taylor now works in the 
Nerve Clinic at the Massachusetts Gen- 
eral Hospital two mornings a week. She 
hopes that all of 1903 will be heard from. 

Ida Langdon is still teaching English 
Literature in Elmira College. Last sum- 
mer she went to Italy, cruised the Medi- 
terranean, landed in Venice, spent several 
weeks in the Dolomite valleys, had some 
music in Munich, and some days in the 
lanes and moors of Somerset, but saw no 
one of 1903 in her travels. 

Charlotte Morton Lanagan is still living 
in Schenectady with no permanent ad- 
dress in a furnished house taken by the 
month, and still owns her house in Al- 
bany. ^ M. Norton was in Schenectady a 
few minutes on her way back to Pasadena 
from eight months in Europe. Her 



nephew is back from two years in 
Venezuela. 

Anna Bourne Beals is living in Old 
Emerson House, 41 Turkey Shore Road, 
Ipswich, Massachusetts — in one of the 
oldest houses in town, built by an ances- 
tor of Ralph Waldo Emerson. Her 
daughter, Mary, graduated from Wheaton 
in June with honors in Latin, and hopes 
to take a graduate year at Bryn Mawr 
some time. Ruth is a Junior in High 
School and a Girl Scout. The boys, ten 
and twelve, are very enthusiastic over 
airplanes. 

Ruth Whitney Lyman has a daughter, 
Ruth, in the Freshman Class. 

Mary Burns Bransby took her first trip 
East in five years last summer to visit 
relatives, but saw no classmates. 

Elizabeth Bryan Parker went to North 
Carolina last summer and met Agnes 
Austin there. She also saw Betty Mar- 
tin Breed at Exeter last June, where they 
both had sons in the graduating class. 
Her son John is in the Freshman Class at 
Yale now, and her daughter Elizabeth is 
at school at Mount Choisi in Lausanne 
studying French and music, while the 
youngest boy is preparing to enter Exeter 
next year. 

Eleanor Burnett Hornby is back in 
California after six weeks in the East, 
where she had been putting young Elea- 
nor in Miss Porter's School, and staying 
with her sister who was ill. She passed 
the summer at Pebble Beach, where she 
watched the Amateur National Golf 
Tournament. Raymond, Jr., is back at 
Cate's, and David and Joan are at home. 

Alice Lovell Kellogg has left Carmel, 
California, for Palo Alto, and is living 
this winter on the Stanford campus, ad- 
dress 586 Foothill Road, Stanford Univer- 
sity, California, and wishes all visiting 
classmates would please call her up. She 
attended a meeting of the Bryn Mawr 
Club in Berkeley at the home of Ethel 
Peck Lombardi, 1902, at which there were 
nineteen present, though she was the only 
one of 1903. 

Martha R. White continues to oscillate 
between New York and New Mexico. 

Helen Calder Wallower has moved East 
to live, and would be glad to welcome any 
1903 Bryn Mawrters who care to journey 
to Jericho, Long Island. 

Marjorie Green Mulock writes : "Here 
it is nearly two years since our last re- 
union and nearly time for another. I 
hope a lot of you are coming on for it. 
We had such fun last time, and I decided 
that everyone had grown distinctly hand- 
somer since the last time I'd seen them, 
and I can hardly wait to see the improve- 



20 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



ments of the last two years! I've just 
been writing to Gertrude about plans for 
costumes, but that's all a secret until I 
get her approval, or otherwise. I spent 
last summer in Jamestown, Rhode Island. 
Took a cottage there, and had both the 
boys there all summer, and had a won- 
derful time. John is a Senior at Prince- 
ton now, and nearly twenty, and Mac has 
another year at Hackley School, Tarry- 
town, before he goes to Princeton. Here's 
hoping you will all come to our reunion 
next June, and help make it as fine as our 
last one." 

Maude Spencer Corbett toured in 
France and Switzerland again last sum- 
mer for the fourth time, with her whole 
family. Her eldest has just celebrated his 
twenty-first birthday, is a sub-lieutenant 
in the Navy, at present at Greenwich Col- 
lege, but later to go into the aviation de- 
partment. 

Myra Smartt Kruesi has just intro- 
duced her second daughter to society, has 
two children away at school, one married 
and two at home, and is planning a fish- 
ing trip on the Saint John's River in 
Florida for January. She and her family 
motored through New England, Nova 
Scotia, New Brunswick and Canada for 
six weeks last summer and took a cottage 
in Digby, N. S., with fishing and camping 
with an Indian guide. 

1904 
Class Editor: Emma O. Thompson 
320 South 42nd Street 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Dear Classmates: 

At last we have some interesting news 
to delight you with. Patty Rockwell 
Moorhouse gave an informal tea at the 
College Club to the Philadelphia mem- 
bers, in December, and there we started 
the plans that will develop into our great 
and, perhaps, most interesting reunion 
that will take place the first week-end in 
June. Our headquarters will be Rocke- 
feller and we plan to have the dinner so 
that we can all stay over for Garden 
Party and Commencement. Agnes Gil- 
lender Carson has consented to be the 
chairman of the committee. Agnes must 
be very proud these days, for her daugh- 
ter, Martha Gillender Carson, is Pres- 
ident of the Junior Class at Hood Col- 
lege, and E. Margaret Carson is a Fresh- 
man at Bryn Mawr, living in Rockefeller 
Hall. 

Dr. Anna Jonas and Dr. Eleanor Bliss 
Knopf attended the meetings of the Geo- 
logical Society of America in Washing- 
ton during the Christmas Holidays. Dr. 
Bascom was also at the meetings, having 



returned from her European trip. Dr. 
Patsey Gardner is in London. She has 
been there since November, working with 
some collections in the British Museum. 

A delightful letter written by Leslie 
Clark to Alice Boring after visiting Alice 
in Peking has come into my possession 
and I am sending it on to you. It gives 
us an interesting picture of traveling in 
China. 

"On the Yangtse, 
"Oct. 25, 1929. 

"Although we now seem very far away 
from Peking, the memory of some very 
delightful times remains, especially those 
spent at Yuching or thereabout. 

"We were astonished the day after we 
left you to have the American Express 
Company so dubious about our going 
south by train. Only the Embassy gave 
us encouragement. But once started we 
found the rumors more concentrated in 
Peking — the skies in Nanking quite free 
from clouds. 

"We had a most comfortable trip to 
Taian, then had a splendid day up the 
mountains, another interesting one prowl- 
ing about the countryside, before leaving 
for Chufou. Our side experiences there, 
such as Peking carts, the interests of the 
populace in us, were more entertaining 
than the Trub or the Temple. Two Amer- 
ican artists, Miss Crawford and Miss 
Mulligan, joined us there. We nearly em- 
braced them, since they had a servant 
who could get us tea. We couldn't make 
any one else understand. 

"Back to Taian we went to start for 
Nanking, and on that train met Mrs. Ful- 
ler and Mrs. Wallace, who were at Tan- 
ju-s'su and remembered meeting us there. 
Mrs. Crawford and Miss Mulligan had 
been so upset by the news we had given 
them at Chufou that they gave up their 
plan of staying there several days to 
paint, to take the same express we did. 
So it was a most pleasant and quiet trip 
down except for a rat in my bed that 
night ! 

"At Nanking we were well taken care of 
at the Mills, though it was a Ginling serv- 
ant who met us at Pukow, and received 
us from the wolves clothed in coolie cos- 
tume. We had tea that day with Dr. Wu, 
who was delightful in showing us every- 
thing, and heard your praises sung by 
Miss Reeves. The faculty there seems, as 
at Nanking, to be a very nice one. Sev- 
eral came to the Mills to dinner that 
night, including Miss Sharp and Miss 
Moffat, and we had a most enjoyable 
time. The next day we went to hunt the 
famous stone lions out in the fields and 
villages beyond Nanking, and while we 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



21 



traveled afoot through the Middle Ages, 
or even earlier, the Shanghai-Hankow 
passenger plane flew over our heads. 
That emphasized the great contrasts here 
even more than the tomb of Sun Yat Sen, 
next to that of the Ming Emperor. 

"The political atmosphere there was al- 
together different from that at Peking — 
great confidence in the present govern- 
ment and the ability, if not the character, 
of Chiang-Kai-Shek. They felt they had 
the situation well in hand, in spite of the 
rather bad mutiny at Wu-Hu. And they 
hardly mention the war, though we saw 
plenty of troops going, but all were 
clothed, splendidly equipped. And we 
were told that they have quite a fine air 
force. 

"Also everyone looked extremely sur- 
prised that we had been warned away 
from Hankow. Apparently business is 
going on there as usual. Mr. and Mrs. 
Fuller are going up today by plane. The 
boats are running on schedule. So here 
we are, looking at as calm and peaceful a 
scene as one could wish. Of course, now 
we have little time and so are simply 
making a round trip on this most com- 
fortable boat, which will still allow about 
36 hours for Hankow and Wuchang. 

"Having just put in a very busy week 
in which H. F. has developed a most 
healthy cold, we are enjoying our sail 
immensely. The sun is warm, and on the 
lee side it is as pleasant as one could 
wish. Our passengers are few — and a 
mixed lot, but quite pleasant. One nice 
Englishman who rescued us from the 
hungry ravens at Nanking left us at Wu 
Hu to our regret. He was a mine of in- 
teresting knowledge and gossip. The cap- 
tain is a nice-looking, but disgruntled 
Englishman who thinks he must have 
done something very bad in a former ex- 
istence to be doomed to ten years on this 
river in this existence. He wanted to 
know why we didn't go to some nice place 
like Hongkong instead of this 'God- for- 
saken' country. 

"But the interest of the new hasn't 
made us forget the Western Hills. That 
was a permanent subject of conversation 
on the train down and stands out on our 
horizon as probably our most enchanting 
experience." 

A pleasant Christmas message came 
from Alice Schiedt Clark, headed Amer- 
ican Express, Florence, Italy. She says: 
"Dr. Clark, the children and I came over 
last August and after a month's lovely 
vacation, Brittany, Paris and Swiss walk- 
ing trip, Paul returned to Madison and 
I hope he will rejoin me in mid-April in 
Naples and we'll proceed to England. 
The children are settled in school near 



Lausanne, where I join them this week 
for Christmas vacation, after six weeks 
in Florence and a month in Spain. In 
February I take them to the interesting 
Odenwaldschule in Germany, and I re- 
turn to Italy where I have not yet had 
enough, although I found Spain most in- 
teresting, too." 

I think we all agree with Alice that 
it is difficult to get enough of Florence. 
I was fortunate in being able to spend 
about ten days there last summer, and 
left it most reluctantly, only because the 
Schwartzwald was beckoning to me. 

1905 
Class Editor: Mrs. Talbot Aldrich 

59 Mount Vernon St., Boston, Mass. 

Emily Cooper Johnson was called to 
Paris in September by the very serious 
illness of a cousin. She sailed for home 
December 7th. 

Marion Cuthbert Walker has had two 
articles on Cape Breton hooked rugs ac- 
cepted by Good Housekeeping. 

Carla Denison Swan took all her fam- 
ily to Bermuda for the Christmas holi- 
days. Our class baby has a job, but as 
she is now a full-fledged alumna belong- 
ing to the Class of 1929, professional eti- 
quette forbids us to disclose its nature. 

Brenda Fenollosa Biddle writes: "I 
have two sons at Groton and am myself 
trying to develop a talent, but don't know 
yet what it is. Meanwhile we live in a 
heavenly spot in Valley Forge, ride a lot 
and never go to Philadelphia if we can 
avoid it." 

Anne Greene Bates and her daughter 
visited England, France and Switzerland 
last summer and spent several days at 
Geneva attending meetings of the League 
of Nations. 

Alice Heulings is enthusiastic over her 
social service work at the Pennsylvania 
Hospital. 

Alice Howland spent the summer near 
Santa Fe, New Mexico, and saw Frances 
Hubbard. She rode ten miles a day with 
her adopted children, now five and six 
years old. She says that it is a center for 
B.M., and she and Eleanor Brownell want 
to buy a bit of land and put up an adobe 
house. Alice is back at work, which in- 
cludes the Shipley School and the farm 
where they produce most of the vegetables 
and fruit, all the poultry, pork products 
and Guernsey milk used by the school. 

Louise Johnston Baker's son is studying 
for his M.A. at Columbia, having grad- 
uated last year from Rutgers. Her elder 
daughter is a sophomore at Wellesley and 
an honor student. 

Edith Longstreth Wood writes: "The 
'girl-friend' with whom I traveled last 



22 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



year joined with me in May to hold an 
exhibition of paintings we had made in 
Ireland, Scotland, England, France and 
Sicily. Happily we sold most of them. 
Now we have taken together a delightful, 
cheery studio at 34 South 17th Street, 
Philadelphia, where the possession of two 
banks of windows and four skylights 
makes me feel like a real professional. 
And I wish I could paint all my interest- 
ing and handsome classmates." 

Helen Read Fox writes: "The young 
Fox flourishes and the parents are still 
farming and selling Jersey cows for the 
Meridale Farms. I am doing one little 
bit of outside work, being County Chair- 
man of the League of Women Voters, 
and have just finished trying to get voting 
machines installed in the county. Got 
badly beaten, but learned a lot." 

Edith Sharpless sailed for Japan 
August 24th and is now at her home in 
Mita, about 80 miles north of Tokyo. 

Katrin Southwick Vietor's son, South- 
wick, is a freshman at Yale, and her elder 
daughter is at Foxcroft. Katrin describes 
herself as "all gray, but full of wim and 
wigor." 

Elsie Tattersfield Banes and her hus- 
band have bought land opposite Louise 
Marshall Mallery in Chestnut Hill and 
are considering building there in the near 
future. 

Repeated requests launched at Helen 
Griffith to tell us something of her Sab- 
batical year have finally yielded fruit and 
brought the following letter: "I was pos- 
itively ashamed of myself in Minneapolis 
last spring, for I babbled on about my 
travels at the slightest pretext. A return 
to a college community where everyone 
is always just coming back from some- 
where provided salutary correction. Col- 
eridge, I decided, had had experience with 
returned travelers before ever he de- 
scribed 'The Ancient Mariner." That in- 
sistence upon telling all about it, the de- 
taining hand, the glittering eye, are 
sketched from the life ! But don't be 
alarmed, I am always more restrained on 
paper. I'll only remark in passing that in 
our two months in India — which we 
wished were twenty-two — we went up and 
down the land and back and forth, as our 
desire dictated. We were traveling alone, 
Coopy and I, and on our own, and a little 
ahead of the regular tourist season. Of 
course, that amazing country cast its spell 
on us as it seems to on everyone. The 
color and. movement of what meets the 
eye, the strange currents of thought and 
feeling that flow below the surface, the 
conflict between the past and the future, 
the English and the Indians, the welter 
of races and religions, the Taj and the 



blistering deserts, the great peak of Nan- 
ga Parbat, which you see from Gulmarg 
in the Vale of Kashmin, the mountains 
about Darjeeling, the palaces of Udaipur, 
Ahmedabad, Allahabad, Benares, the tem- 
ple at Madura — I'm reduced to a catalog 
of names that evoke much to me but must 
read to you like a timetable gone quite 
mad. After India came Ceylon, a mag- 
nificent motor trip across the mountains 
of Northern Sumatra, several weeks in 
Java, only a few days, alas ! on the exotic 
Island of Bali, a day at Macassar in the 
Celibes, and then the Western World 
again — first Australia and then New Zea- 
land. . . . Next to India, New Zea- 
land was our second great excitement, as 
it must be for anyone who likes out-of- 
doors, and Scenery spelled exclusively in 
capitals. We were there six weeks in the 
middle of their summer, and we went 
from the top of the North Island almost 
to the toe of the South, growing more 
exclamatory every minute. Half way 
down we stopped off for a good visit with 
Esther Mary White Riggs, '06, who lives 
just out of Nelson. She has a nice hus- 
band and a darling daughter, and since 
we were there another daughter has been 
added to the family group. . . . The 
trip across the Pacific, with a stop at 
Tahiti, and a leisurely journey across the 
States, with glimpses of Freddy, Curly 
and Meggy en route, brought me at last 
to Minneapolis and thence for a summer 
of work at Ann Arbor. I published a 
monograph in the Psychological Review 
Series on Time Patterns in Prose, a study 
of Prose Rhythm, and carried through to 
its negative conclusions some experiments 
on a method for the approximate deter- 
mination of stress in prose and verse. 
. . . Now I am back at the old stand, 
teaching at Mount Holyoke, my life at 
the moment centering upon a house I 
expect to build next spring. It looks as 
though the Griffiths would move their 
household goods from Minneapolis and 
settle down here in South Hadley for 
their declining years." 

The Editor is grateful for the response 
she received to the requests for news and 
hopes there are still more postcards plan- 
ning to be returned. As one 1905-er ex- 
pressed it, "One does feel foolish writing 
things about oneself, but I do like to read 
the doings of others, so here goes, and 
if this sounds piffling, trifling and silly, 
please edit or cut entirely." Needless to 
add that what she wrote was none of 
these things and that we wish more would 
profit by her noble example ! 

After a year of strenuous travel with 
her niece, Hope Allen spent a quiet sum- 
mer in Norwich, England. 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



23 



Alice Matless' eldest daughter was mar- 
ried a year ago. 

M. N. Hardenbergh's son, Collis, is a 
freshman at Harvard. 

1906 
Class Editor: Louise Cruice Sturdevant 
(Mrs. Edward O. Sturdevant) 
Marine Barracks, Quantico, Virginia. 
Esther White Riggs has a daughter, 
Helen, born in September in New Zea- 
land. 

1907 
Class Editor: Alice Hawkins 
Taylor Hall, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Our hardy perennial news item, Peggy 
Barnes, has been less obliging about her- 
self lately, so that we have had to depend 
upon the public press and upon gossip 
that has reached us from those who have 
sat within earshot of Peg's voice during 
dinner at the Bryn Mawr Club. From 
these sources we have gleaned that some 
time very soon her third play is to be 
produced by Gilbert Miller, with Kath- 
arine Cornell as the star. The title was 
announced as "The Dishonoured Lady," 
and this with rumors of strong language, 
padlocking and what-not, so alarmed the 
New York Regional Scholarships Com- 
mittee, who had been all set to stage 
a benefit performance soon after the play 
should open, that they decided to consult 
the playwright as to the advisability of 
such an undertaking. By telegraph they 
were warned that the play would be un- 
suitable. Wouldn't that situation have 
made a perfect subject for discussion in 
David Irons' ethics class? 

Tink Meigs goes right ahead turning 
out delightful books for children. Her 
latest, "The Crooked Apple Tree," solved 
many a Christmas gift problem. 

Julie Benjamin Howson has taken a 
job with the Birth Control League in 
New York. David is spending the winter 
in the South, and both the other children 
are at school so much of the day that she 
finds it quite feasible to manage a job 
and a family. 

Berniece Stewart L'Espinard and her 
husband paid a flying visit East, returning 
to California in time to spend the Christ- 
mas holidays with her younger son, who 
is a sophomore at Leland Stanford. 

Genevieve Thompson Smith is Presi- 
dent of the Bryn Mawr Club of Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

Calvert Myers Beasley and her daugh- 
ter paid a short visit to the Editor during 
the Christmas holidays. Calvert was 
anxious to show the campus to young 
Annette, and was disappointed at finding 



the halls closed. She managed to effect 
an entrance to Radnor through the 
kitchen and was warmly welcomed by 
Eunice's maid, who, on hearing that she 
was a member of 1907, insisted upon 
showing off every inch of Eunice's apart- 
ment, and called particular attention to 
the copy of Mary Swindler's grand book, 
"Ancient Painting," which was lying on 
a table. Such is the intellectual interest 
of all who come under the influence of 
Dean Schenck ! 

1910 
Class Editor: Emily L. Storer 
Wardman Park Hotel, 
Washington, D. C. 

New York in December is the place to 
find 1910. Jeanne was there just starting 
off for her Florida plantation to raise 
and study camelias, to ride and hunt, and 
to look after all the negro inhabitants. 
She reported that Squee was out in New 
Mexico last summer camping out and 
visiting the Indian villages. 

Stevie is still at the Hotel Holley, and 
she is planning to have her attractive 
daughter, Laura, come out in Cincinnati 
next year. 

Mary Ag had a tea for Elsie Deems in 
her fascinating apartment at Eightieth 
Street, overlooking the East River, with 
its boats and bridges. Mary Ag was still 
thrilled with her sixteen months' tour of 
the world, but now she is hard at work 
again teaching arithmetic to Miss Cha- 
pin's nine-year-olds. 

Mabel was there, having had her book, 
"The Other Crowd," published, and is 
now Assistant Secretary for the New 
York School of Social Work. 

Madeline was absorbed in the new 
house that she is building at Llewelyn 
Park, and in the landscaping and garden- 
ing of it. The oldest of her three sons is 
13 and has just put on long trousers, and 
Madeline herself is planning to do some 
writing. She told of the great anniver- 
sary electric celebration for Mr. Edison 
at Detroit, and of how they all went out 
there and how Mr. Edison, although 
seventy-six years old, was not daunted by 
a terrible storm, but stood out on the plat- 
form and talked to all the country over 
the radio. He is now off to the South for 
fields of new discovery in rubber. 

Elsie Deems Neilson looks as young as 
ever after all these years of absence. She 
is on here with her eleven-year-old Nancy 
and sixteen-month Caroline — the last was 
supposed to be a boy, she says, but they 
are just crazy about her as she is. Elsie's 
father died last summer, so she is staying 
in New Brighton with her mother until 



24 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



February. She says they are still growing 
the peaches that go into the Del Monte 
cans out in California, and they love it. 
They also have orchards of thousands of 
apricot trees. 

Ruth Babcock Deems, after ages of si- 
lence, writes from San Francisco of her 
family. "Margaret is in high school. I am 
thoroughly enjoying being able to look 
intelligent over her home work, as I never 
could in geography and arithmetic. Betsy 
is hitting the high spots all along the line 
and Ruth is still the baby at eight. My 
husband has a D.D., and he's just com- 
pleted a year's absence from his church to 
be in charge of the building fund of the 
great cathedral here. 

"There are occasional Bryn Mawrtyrs 
hereabouts. Helen Barendt keeps in 
touch with them all in a marvelous way. 
Elinor Allen Mitchum has moved into the 
big city, and I hear Lacy Van Wagnen 
is coming to show Katherine Branson 
and me how to be fair, sweet and forty. 
Katherine's school, by the way, is simply 
booming, and a credit to Bryn Mawr and 
the West Coast. In-between times I try 
to 'religious educate' the Episcopal 
Church in this diocese with Adelaide Case 
as my far-off boss in New York. Twenty- 
three years ago I used to go to her Bible 
Class of Isaiah in Rockefeller. Everyone 
goes through our house to the Orient, so 
1910 had better join the bandwagon." 

Peggy James Porter: "We have had a 
beautiful summer fishing and climbing in 
the high Sierras, with delicious air and 
wild flowers, and motored back through 
the Bret Harte country. Dry weather 
here now, and all the family down with 
bronchitis." 

Nina DeAngelis, after having vanished 
for years, writes: "Time has just raced 
by since I saw you in Westminster Ab- 
bey. I was then head of the Lending De- 
partment of the Free Public Library in 
East Orange, N. J. I went abroad with 
the International Art Students Tour, a 
very interesting group. We met Musso- 
lini at a reception in Rome. Six of us 
flew from Brussels to Amsterdam. This 
gave me time to see the "Llenre Jogense," 
a fascinating little library in Brussels. 

"For two years I was Chairman of the 
Jay Street Junior League Day Nursery. 
Four years ago this autumn I was elected 
to the Board of Almoners of St. Luke's 
Hospital here, which is to me very inter- 
esting. Then I was on the Costume Com- 
mittee of the Players -Club for two years 
here, which was fun too. 

"Now I have a Sunday School class of 
lively 6-year-old boys." 



Henrietta Sharp writes that she lives 
at home, keeps house and does substitute 
teaching — she leads a Mission Study class 
for six weeks each year. 

Susanne Allinson Emery has married 
Frederich R. Wulsin, Harvard, 1915. 
They have now gone to Southern Europe. 

Frances Lord Robbins, although still 
living in the wild and woolly West at 
Galesburg, 111., has bought a farm in New 
Hampshire, so that her children won't 
forget that they belong in the East. 

Rosalind has moved into her new house 
at Manhasset, L. I., and has been hard 
bitten by the gardening bug — the first time 
she has ever learned about gardens. Her 
other new experience is having her oldest 
child, Billy, aged fourteen, go away to 
boarding school — St. Paul's — and he loves 
it. 

Edith Klett Cunning writes : "We have 
lived in Klamath Falls, Ore., for the past 
four years. Our preference is Portland, 
but this part of the state is much busier, 
and is growing very fast. Klamath Falls 
bids fair to become a real city, but with 
the various railroads making it such an 
important spot on the map, we are sitting 
tight and smiling like so many Cheshire 
cats — trusting that the powers who dis- 
pense railroad franchises will continue to 
do so. 

"Tom, our child, is now nineteen, and a 
sophomore at Oregon State College. He is 
preparing to be a sales manager — has ex- 
cellent salesmanship ability and quite a 
bit of the necessary personality that 
should go-along-with. 

"We are known, in our business capac- 
ity, as 'The Cunning Book and Stationery 
Company/ and like it as well as the drug: 
business. It would be such fun to -know 
more about the girls in 1910, especially 
in Radnor." 

1911 
Class Editor: Louise S. Russell 

140 East 52nd St., New York City. 

Anna Stearns sailed for Italy on De- 
cember 3. She is visiting a friend in Nice 
for a few weeks. After that her plans 
are uncertain, but she will probably not 
return until spring. 

Helen Emerson Chase was in New 
York for a week in December seeing 
Anna off to Europe, looking up old 
friends and going to theatres. 

Charlotte Claflin writes that she spent 
part of August in the Massachusetts Gen- 
eral Hospital having treatment for an eye 
ailment. She writes most enthusiastically 
of the beauties of Catherine Delano 
Grant's new baby, whose neighbor she 
was in the hospital, and whom she saw 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



25 



and admired again at the age of three 
months. 

Virginia Jones writes: "I received the 
latest Bryn Mawr Bulletin a couple of 
days ago and read it right through. I 
would like so much to see all of you again 
and I wondered if I might see someone 
from Bryn Mawr in St. Petersburg, Fla., 
this winter. If you would, please put in 
the Bulletin that I'd love to see them 
and that I can't tell my address yet, but a 
card sent here to my home would reach 
me in short order." Virginia's address is 
Highland Falls, North East, Pa. 

Esther Cornell is back at her job at the 
New School for Social Research after 
spending the summer and fall in Cali- 
fornia. Her mother returned with her to 
spend the winter in New York. 

Ruth Vickery Holmes writes that in 
October she and her husband went to 
Washington, cruising for a time on the 
Chesapeake. After that they spent a few 
weeks in Boston, where her husband was 
preparing his steering device for the Mo- 
tor Boat Show. Shortly after the middle 
of January they will be in New York for 
a time at 14 East 60th Street again. 

Ethel Richardson Allen sent me the fol- 
lowing rather sketchy postcard, for which 
I am very grateful, but which I hope that 
she will amplify later: "Here is news for 
the Editor. I came to Japan as a delegate 
to the Institute of Pacific Relations in 
Kyoto. I have had a good time being 
entertained by Ai Hoshino, and of the 
four American women delegates two were 
from Bryn Mawr College. This delegate 
did not shine in the midst of the brilliant 
galaxy, but had a liberal education." 

1912 

Class Editor: Elizabeth Pinney Hunt 
(Mrs. Andrew D. Hunt) 
Millbrook Lane, Haverford, Pa. 

Carlotta Welles Briggs with her hus- 
band and young son are settled in Paris 
at 31 bis Boulevard Suchet. 

Phyllis Goodhart, the class baby, spent 
the summer in Europe with her father. 

Betty Lester, the only daughter of 
Peggy Garrigues Lester, is at the Hart- 
ridge School, in Plainfield. 

Margaret Fabian Sanders has moved 
to 12 Taber Avenue, Providence, R. I. 

Gertrude Elcock, who is shining as head 
of the Junior Department of Springside 
School, traveled in Europe during the 
summer. She expected to get as far East 
as Greece. 

Mary Peirce gave a tea early in De- 
cember to introduce Ida Pritchett and her 
beautiful photography to the Main Line. 

A letter to Zelda Branch was returned 



to the Class Editor, marked "Address un- 
known." Please, Zelda, let us know of 
your whereabouts. Also, where is Mar- 
garet Montgomery? 

1914 
Class Editor: Elizabeth Ayer Inches 
(Mrs. Henderson Inches) 
41 Middlesex Road, 
Chestnut Hill, Mass. 
K Sergeant will certainly give the class 
a thrill when they read that she has re- 
cently married Mr. E. B. (Andy) White, 
of New York. Like K., he is on the 
staff of the New Yorker. Besides that 
he has published some poetry and a recent 
book with Mr. Furber entitled, "Is Sex 
Necessary?" K. is to continue her job 
and we hear that she looks radiant. 

1915 
Class Editor: Emily Noyes Knight 
(Mrs. Clinton P. Knight, Jr.) 
Windy Meadows, Wakefield, R. I. 

It would seem that once a class editor, 
always a class editor. I thought, two 
years ago, that I was a stop gap and so 
fabricated news quite diligently — I hope 
every one will remember — for one winter. 
Since then, I have been resting comfort- 
ably on my laurels. Now it appears, that 
Helen Irvin Bordman having gone out to 
the Philippines to spend Christmas with 
her husband, I am again the class editor, 
this, in spite of the fact that Helen Taft 
Manning did say, 1 was singularly ill- 
fitted by nature for the task. 

It remains to be seen what I can do 
with the aid of art. Ruth Tinker Morse 
was in Chicago in November for a few 
days. Unfortunately, it was the Novem- 
ber of 1928 ! A postal has recently been 
received from her by Harriet Bradford 
with a Washington post mark. Think 
the worst. 

Marjorie Fyfe may be found in London 
in the company of her aunt and uncle, Dr. 
and Mrs. Carey A. Wood at Queen 
Anne's Mansions, St. James Park, 
S. W. 1. 

Isabel Foster is on her way across Rus- 
sia to Japan and writes to Harriet Brad- 
ford from a Finnish seaport — interesting 
geographically. Harriet omits to say 
what Isabel is in quest of, but no doubt 
every one, except myself, knows. 

Liz Smith Wilson has a new son, Per- 
kins Wilson. Liz believes in doing Christ- 
mas shopping early and in November, 
this November, bought toys for her chil- 
dren at Marshall Fields. She was, I 
gather, in Chicago with her husband, the 
Hon. Russell Wilson, who was speaking 
to the National Association for the Im- 



26 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



provement of Municipal Government. 
Harriet and she had luncheon and dinner 
together. "Liz is beautiful and lovely 
and slender!" I do not pretend this is 
news. 

Susan Nichols Pulsifer and her hus- 
band have bought a farm in Maine, where 
they look forward to spending some of 
their summers. 

Mary Gertrude Brownell Murphy is on 
Mount Airy Road, Croton-on-the-Hudson, 
a near neighbor of Frances Hunter El- 
wyn, with Floyd Dell next door. 

Any complaints about this column had 
best be addressed to my attorney, Miss 
Harriet Bradford, 134 South La Salle 
Street, Chicago. I hope to be unmolested 
until January, when I shall be out of the 
country and safe in the little island of 
Bermuda. 

Isabel Fothergill Smith has resigned 
from Smith College, where she was Asso- 
ciate Professor of Geology and Dean of 
the Class of 1932, in order to become 
Dean and Professor of Geology at Scripps 
College in Claremont, California. Scripps 
College for women is the second unit of 
The Claremont Colleges, Pomona College 
(coeducational) being the first unit. 

Joan Lowell has nothing on Helen Irvin 
Bordman, who on a journey to the Phil- 
ippines, has been studying navigation with 
the chief officer and learning to tie knots 
with the sailors and getting pointers on 
fan-tan from the Chinese. One of seven 
passengers from Honolulu out, Hezzie 
managed to keep her sea-legs under her, 
which is more than I expect to do this 
week only going over to the little island 
of Bermuda. Does any one know a cure 
for seasickness? 

Rachel Ash is a pediatrician, with an 
office in Kitty's house several days a week, 
probably with the idea of practicing on 
Kitty's children. 

Zena Blanc Lowenberg has a son, Leo- 
pold Samuel, born September 11th. 

Frances Boyer lives at the Swarthmore* 
22nd and Walnut Streets, tutors private 
pupils in French and goes out to the Bald- 
win School for the same purpose. 

Laura Branson is Executive Secretary 
of the Teachers' Union of New York. 
Kitty, with an eye to the future, has made 
her godmother to her youngest. 

Marguerite Darkow is teaching math- 
ematics in Hunter College, N. Y. 

Kitty McCollin Arnett has a daughter, 
Alice Frances, now about 6 months old. 
The Arnetts spent this last summer in 
Dr. De Laguna's house in Bryn Mawr. 

Helen McFarland Woodbridge, with 
four children to her credit, teaches at the 
Women's Medical College. 



Myra Richards Jessen has passed her 
Ph.D. orals. Last winter Myra studied in 
Berlin, while little Ingeborg went to a 
German school. 

Helen Taft Manning is Acting Presi- 
dent of the College during President 
Park's leave of absence. 

Jeannette Tomkins, who was seriously 
injured by an automobile last winter, is 
quite recovered. 

Gertrude Emery, who has a half year's 
leave of absence, is going around the 
world with her mother in January. 

Vashti McCreery has a secretarial po- 
sition at Harvard Medical. 

Dora Levinson Kramer is most enthu- 
siastic about the nursery school at Tem- 
ple University, where she has sent her 
daughter, aged three. 

The Editor thinks this page of news 
should last the class for the winter, but if 
anyone feels otherwise, she is privileged 
to write "news" to the Editor at "Wood- 
croft," Hamilton, Bermuda, who will send 
it on to the Bulletin, for after all, the 
Editor, like the Bryn Mawr scene-shifters, 
is only a melancholy slave. 

1916 

Class Editor: Catherine S. Godley 
768 Ridgeway Avenue 
Avondale, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Constance Dowd gives a course in sta- 
tistics at the University of Cincinnati. 
Twenty-five are taking it this year and 
you should see her marking quizzes ! This 
is just one of Cedy's pastimes while she 
runs a job in the winter and a girls' camp 
in the summer. 

Charlotte Harding's Profession took 
place in September. She is Sister Car- 
lotta, St. Mary's Convent (Episcopal), 
Peekskill, N. Y. 

Elizabeth Holliday Hitz went to New 
York for the Council meetings in No- 
vember and had reunions on the side with 
Alice VanHorn, Aline Burt, Elizabeth 
Stark and others. 

Elizabeth Washburn spent two months 
in Europe this summer, mostly in the 
Basque country. She is in Minneapolis 
now and has a half-time job with the 
county tuberculosis sanitarium looking 
out for children with positive von Pirquet 
tests. 

Georgette Moses Gell writes from Za- 
greb, Jugoslavia, of the birth of a son, 
Jonathan Morris Gell, on September 16th. 
In spite of his distant birthplace, he is a 
real American citizen, and she saw to it 
that he was duly registered as such in 
Washington, D. C. The Gells are in Za- 
greb, due to Mr. Gell's connection with 
the Fox Film Company, and Georgette is 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



27 



leading an amusing and interesting life in 
a place where she can't even read the 
names of the streets. Since the languages 
of the vicinity are Croatian, Slovanian, 
Serbian, Italian, German, Hungarian, 
Montenegrin, Greek, and Albanian, she 
found it hopeless to do more than learn 
to count and to make herself understood 
to the nurse and the cook so that they 
needn't lack the comforts of a home. 

Margaret Engelhard Phipps has moved 
her family from Chicago to Winnetka, 
111., where her address is 326 Ridge Ave- 
nue. The twins, from all accounts, are 
well worth seeing. 

1917 
Class Editor: Bertha C. Greenough 
203 Blackstone Boulevard 
Providence, R. I. 

The Class Editor is glad to announce 
that she moved back to her house on 
Blackstone Boulevard the day before 
Thanksgiving and that she would be only 
too thrilled to receive a line from each of 
you with news of yourself or someone 
else for the Bulletin ! 

Nats McFaden, Mary Andrews .and 
Helen Zimmerman were at the New York 
Alumnae dinner on November 23rd. 

A note from Kitty Barrette (Mrs. 
Maurice P. Chadwick), which followed 
devious paths before reaching me, says 
that West Point, N. Y., will always reach 
her and please write. She is quite busy 
with her three daughters under four. 

A paper by Janet Grace's husband en- 
titled, "Tuberculosis in Childhood and 
Adolescence," was read at the 25th An- 
nual Meeting of the National Tubercu- 
losis Association last May. 

In September I spent a couple of days 
with Thalia Smith on her chicken farm 
just outside of Pittsfield, Mass. They 
had been having a bad time because a 
fox had stolen and killed a great many 
chickens. The marauder was eventually 
discovered and shot by Thale's husband. 
Diana, her bewitching red-haired daugh- 
ter, who is almost ten, is doing extremely 
well in school. Incidentally the location 
of the place is delightful. They have a 
gorgeous view of the Berkshires and par- 
ticularly Greylock. 

A line from Nats recently says that she 
is learning to play the mandolin with her 
eleven-year-old son Wyndham. 

Caroline Stevens has a daughter, born 
November 14th. She has three other chil- 
dren under six, Samuel, Lucia and Hora- 
tio, Jr. 

Janet Pauling is living in Boston. She 
has a daughter about a year old. 

Mary Andrews and her husband are 



going out to a ranch in Arizona for two 
months. 

Nats writes that Dor and her husband 
spent a night with her in December en 
route for Somerville. They were motor- 
ing through the Valley of Virginia. 

Betty Lacey's father-in-law died in 
September, and I understand that Tom- 
my, Betty's oldest son, went out to Chi- 
cago with his grandmother for two or 
three weeks in December. 

I received a delightful Christmas card 
from Amie Dixon which told me for the 
first time that she has four children, Pete, 
Barbara, Amie Clare, and Tommy. 

1918 
Class Editor: Helen E. Walker 

5516 Everett Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

Helen Alexander writes that she is oc- 
cupied with "pecking away at my type- 
writer, a course at Columbia, lectures 
and shows, my old apartment, and wel- 
come on the mat for '18 after four!" 

Mary Allen Sherman has to tell us 
"nothing new. Two children, healthy at 
present. Whole family healthy! Praise 
be to the gods !" 

Evelyn Babbitt can tell us "nothing of 
great importance. A brief summer vaca- 
tion on the New England coast, and pleas- 
ant memories of 1918's Reunion." 

Peg Bacon Carey feels as we all do, at 
least the 50 per cent of us who were at 
Reunion, "as though Reunion were only 
just over and that I have no fresh news. 
We spent the summer at our bungalow in 
the Pocono Mountains. We have just 
built a tiny house there to use in winter 
(when it is 15 degrees below !) and watch 
deer, etc., playing about our salt lick. Rex 
and I took a motor trip this summer in 
New England and spent one night with 
Ruth Streeter. She showed us the Re- 
union movies, which were very entertain- 
ing, though somewhat too revealing!" 

Marie Chandler Foyles also bewails 
that she has "nothing new to write about." 
Still living in Rochester and connected 
with the University here. Two daughters, 
Jean and Mary (aged seven and six re- 
spectively) keep me occupied a good share 
of the time. 

Ruth Cheney Streeter writes that she 
and her family "had a fine summer, spend- 
ing half the time in New Hampshire and 
the other half in the Adirondacks. I still 
enjoy camping, but find it increasingly 
difficult to hoist my added years (and 
pounds) up mountains. I have only seen 
an occasional class-mate since Reunion, 
but had a fine note from Virginia Knee- 
land thanking the class for its congratu- 
lations on her election as Trustee." 



28 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



Molly Cordingley Stevens sent a chatty 
postal, but forbade me to include any of 
it in this column because she considered 
it was not sufficiently interesting. I obey 
with loud grumbles ! 

Anna Booth's card was returned. Her 
correct address will be appreciated. 

Virginia Anderton, Eleanor Atherton, 
Martha Bailey, Olive Bain, Gladys Bar- 
nett, Sidney Belville, Therese Born, 
Frances Buffum, Helen Butterfield, Gladys 
Cassel, Charlotte Dodge and Bessie 
Downs have not replied to the first group 
of postals. 

1919 
Class Editor: Marjorie Remington 

Twitch ell 

(Mrs. Pierrepont Twitchell) 

Satauket, Long Island 
Jinkie Holmes is to be married on Jan- 
uary 23rd. Further details are unknown. 
Louise Wood writes from 16 Rue Cas- 
sette, Paris VI, France: 

"All my friends have me fixed in 
Florence for life, and here I am spend- 
ing the winter in Paris! ... I dis- 
covered that my relation to the Flo- 
rentine School wasn't working out as 
I had hoped, and on one fatal day in 
June the last word was said, and I found 
myself out of a job. All I knew was that 
I was going to keep my little apartment 
at Fiesole. (My rent is $14.75 per 
month.) A friend laid in my lap, as it 
were, four girls and asked if Helen An- 
derson-Smith, with whom I have been as- 
sociated these last two years, and I would 
take them to Paris for six months and 
Italy for two. Almost before I knew it, I 
had set sail for France, engaged three 
servants, rented an apartment to put them 
in, gone to Florence and brought back my 
belongings, and was welcoming Helen and 
the girls ! . . . We have an apartment 
just around the corner from the Luxem- 
bourg Gardens, on the edge of the Latin 
Quarter. It belongs to the architect, Mr. 
Carroll Greenough, who collaborated with 
Mr. Warren in building the library at 
Louvain. Our balcony overlooks the gar- 
dens of the Carmine Convent, where the 
priests were murdered during the Revo- 
lution, and where Josephine de Beauhar- 
nais was imprisoned. We are taking 
courses at the Sorbonne. We go to Switz- 
erland for winter sports two weeks in 
December, and the middle of March shall 
be off for Sunny Italy. I saw Helene 
Johnson at the American Cathedral on 
Sunday." 

Marguerite Krantz Iverson and her 
husband went to Mexico for a two 
months' vacation last summer: "I spent 



nine-tenths of the time in the hospital or 
in bed recovering from a major opera- 
tion. Since then I have been trying with- 
out success to make my life more languid. 
But m'y zeal for curtain-hanging and ra- 
diator painting is all too great. I live 
along most placidly with minor thrills 
and excitements. I do nothing but in- 
terior decorating and dressmaking to my 
own majesty. If I've given a successful 
dinner party, I consider I have passed 
another milestone in my life. Margaret 
Fay Howard and her husband left their 
young son long enough to spend about 
five days in Princeton opening the Chem- 
ical Building and with me last September. 
Margaret Stambaugh and I drove up one 
day in October and spent a few hours 
with Virginia Anderton Lee." 

Beany Dubach writes: "I am spending 
the winter in Boulder, Colo., taking- 
courses at the University of Colorado. 
The friend I have been living with in 
Santa Fe is here with me and we are 
keeping house. We might just as well 
have picked out the North Pole as a 
pleasant place to winter, as far as weather 
is concerned." 

1920 
Class Editor: Margaret Ballou Hitch- 
cock (Mrs. David Hitchcock) 
45 Mill Rock Road, New Haven. 

Frances von Hofsten Price has a 
daughter, Mary Louise, born on Decem- 
ber 6. Frances' husband is head of the 
Lower School of the Country Day School 
for boys at Kansas City. 

K. Clifford Flowell has a son (third 
child), born on November 17. He is 
named William Howell, 2nd. 

Dorothy Smith McAllister has a second 
daughter, born on November 25. Dot is 
President of the Grand Rapids Junior 
League. 

Miriam Brown Hibbitts is Chairman of 
the new Nashville Junior League Home 
for Convalescents, built at a cost of $90,- 
000, much of which was raised by our 
own Martha Lindsey. 

Jule Cochran Buck served as councilor- 
at-large at the meeting of the Alumnae 
Council in New York in November. 

Please, won't you send news of your- 
selves to the Editor? The only news I 
ever get unsolicited belongs in the births 
or marriage columns. That kind is un- 
doubtedly the most exciting, but news of 
your jobs, your travels, your husband's 
jobs, is interesting to your classmates if 
not to you. 

Marian Gregg King has a second son 
(third child), Clarence H. King, Jr., born 
December 20th. 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



29 



1921 

Class Editor: Mrs. J. E. Rogers 

99 Poplar Plains Road, Toronto, Can. 

Announcing more babies not heretofore 
entered in our statistics, though born this 
summer: Biffy Worcester Stevenson, a 
son; Mary Baldwin Goddard, a son; Anne 
Page Johns, a daughter. 

Alice Whittier, M. D., went as Assist- 
ant Physician to the Hospital Cottages 
for Children in Baldwinville, Mass., last 
July. She has over 100 children under 
her care. Next autumn Alice hopes to 
start her practice in Pediatrics at Port- 
land, Me. 

Dot McBride went to California this 
summer and planned to get a job and live 
there, but it was the hottest summer in 
California history, so she packed up and 
came back to her native heath, Phila- 
delphia. 

Ann Taylor has given up teaching at 
Rosemary and embarked on a career with 
an investment house. Her job is to build 
up a Woman's Department. 

Marion Piatt Jacob has been ill for 
seven months and under the care of doc- 
tors in San Francisco. She is able to be 
up and around now, and plans to move 
to New York City, where her husband's 
business is now located. 

Eleanor Boswell has returned to Eng- 
land to continue her work. 

Marion Fette is teaching Spanish in a 
high school in Hannibal, Miss. She is 
planning to study next summer at the 
University of Mexico, located in Mexico 
City. 

Aileen Weston spent the summer and 
fall in Europe. Her trip included a three 
weeks' course of study at the Zimmene 
School in Geneva. She has returned to 
her voluntary job at the Greater N. Y. 
Branch of the League of Nations Asso- 
ciation. This association is celebrating 
its tenth anniversary in January and will 
have as guest General Smuts, who comes 
to this country for the first time. 

1923 

Editor: Dorothy Meserve Kunhardt 
(Mrs. Philip C. Kunhardt) 
Mt. Kemble Ave., Morristown, N. J. 
Katharine Shumway is to be married 
on November 30th to Dr. Howard Freas, 
member of the medical staff of the Belgian 
Congo Mission. She and Dr. Freas are 
sailing on December 12th on the George 
Washington at four o'clock from Hobo- 
ken and going straight to London for two 
months, Dr. Freas to study at the School 
of Tropical Diseases, and K to brush up 
on French, the official language of the 



Congo. They expect to travel a bit on 
the continent before starting southward — 
they are going to Palestine, Cairo, up the 
Nile, via the Cape-to-Cairo route to the 
eastern Congo, then down the Congo 
River to their new home, K's new home, 
that is, for she writes: "Howard has al- 
ready been there three years and kept 
house. We shall then be 300 miles south 
of the equator, 200 miles inland, and 1500 
feet high. Because of the elevation there 
is always a breeze, though the climate is 
tropical and I shall have to wear a helmet. 
I am hoping and planning to continue my 
teaching there in some measure. So with 
that, and learning the language, training 
in native boys as servants and finding out 
how to serve tropical foods, besides social 
and religious activities, life will be full of 
variety. So there's nothing now for you 
all to do but to buy yourselves airplanes 
and come visit us." 

Ann Fraser Brewer and Florence Mar- 
tin Chase remark that they cannot remem- 
ber having seen their sons mentioned in 
the Bulletin, and the sons are now quite 
old. As a matter of fact, they were an- 
nounced with due ceremony, but as all 
sons should be spoken of at least every 
six months, let me say that Martin Stark- 
weather Chase and Michael Brewer are 
very well and very handsome and very 
good babies. Their respective sisters are 
also well. 

1924 
Class Editor: Beth Tuttle Wilbur 

(Mrs. Donald Wilbur) 

5048 Queen Ave. S. 

Minneapolis, Minn. 
The class extends its deepest sympathy 
to Betsy Crowell Kaltenthaler, whose 
father, Samuel Babcock Crowell, died on 
December 9th, after a short illness follow- 
ing an operation. 

Martha Fischer writes from New 
Haven that she is holding down two jobs 
which she erroneously supposes could not 
compare in interest with our avalanche 
of babies. One of them is "editing the 
Senior Helper, a Sunday School Quarter- 
ly for young people ; the other is teaching 
History of Education, Bible and Psychol- 
ogy at Miss Lannie Smith's Training 
School for Kindergarten Teachers in 
Bridgeport. The latter job was most kind- 
ly bequeathed to me by Star McDaniel 
Heimsath who had it last year." 

Martha also forwards the following 
concerning Chuck, who has become very 
careful about writing to us for fear we'll 
print her letters. She writes to Martha: 
"I am far from lonely. Who could be 
dreary when he has a regular set piece of 



30 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



work and finds himself in a city like 
London? I read the Times very carefully 
to see when there is going to be a cele- 
bration or a show. Then I drop every- 
thing and run to the sight. For instance, 
I rushed to see the procession before and 
after the election of the Lord Mayor. I 
stood with the mob for an hour or more 
to see the brilliant regalia, the city 
marshall, heart-thrilling trumpeters in 
gold maces; footmen; wigs, and gold car- 
riages. Then yesterday we saw the law 
courts opened. Here was a very splendid 
show. First there was a service in the 
Abbey, and then a procession to the 
Houses of Parliament that would thrill 
any old Puritan or Socialist. The Lord 
Chancellor and Chief Justice looked the 
very embodiment of the law and of every- 
thing that is learned and wise. There fol- 
lowed a number of judges in bright scar- 
let robes with ermine capes. They had 
wigs, satin breeches, lace ruffs, white kid 
gloves and train bearers, and humble at- 
tending clerks carrying top hats. Next 
came some very dignified men of law in 
purple robes, also with knee breeches and 
thin, buckled patent leather pumps. I 
must confess that I recognized the very 
last in line; the younger and somewhat 
gayer K. C.'s. Their wigs are very en- 
viable because they are tight to the head 
and have two tiny pig-tails going down 
at the neck." 

1925 
Class Editor: Elizabeth Mallet Conger 
(Mrs. Frederic Conger) 
325 East 72nd St., New York City 



It is with real sorrow that we report 
the death of Eleanor C. Bell, which oc- 
curred in New York on November 15th. 
She was not with us all of our four years 
at college, but we recall her continued 
interest in class events, her frequent visits 
to the campus and her delightful newsy 
letters to the Bulletin. The class wishes 
to extend deepest sympathy to her family 
and her friends. 

Betty Smith, who is a bright and glow- 
ing example for all '25, has written us a 
letter! (True, she did murmur something 
about money in it.) She goes on, how- 
ever, to say, "1 spent August in Cali- 
fornia . . . stopped at the Grand Can- 
yon on the way out, and went down it on 
a mule, as advised by Baldie and Kay 
Fowler. It was quite a trip, but worth the 
exertion. Talked with Kay Mordock 
Adams on the telephone in San Francisco; 
she's very busy taking care of the two- 
year-old son and six-month-old daughter. 



"Sort of got promoted myself, to be 
chief field agent for the N. Y. State De- 
partment of Mental Hygiene — still do 
mental testing and propaganda in small 
communities of the state, and moved to 
Schenectady to be nearer the main office 
in Albany. Have seen Helen Henshaw, 
who is teaching music at a girls' school 
here and playing the organ in church in 
her spare time." 

Betty Smith also writes: "I received the 
announcement of Kay Fowler's marriage 
to James Watson Lunn, in London on 
December 14th, and a week later had a 
letter from Kay telling about it. She got 
her Ph.D. in geology from Columbia last 
June, and immediately sailed for South 
Africa to go to the meetings of the Inter- 
national Geological Association (or some- 
thing like that). Her husband is a Scotch 
geologist. 

" 'We first met way back in Cape Town 
climbing Table Mountain. Jock is a Ph.D. 
from Edinburgh, and is Geologist Officer 
on the Anglo-Belgian Boundary Commis- 
sion, which is establishing a permanent 
boundary between the Congo and North- 
ern Rhodesia. Anyhow, it looks as if 
Africa is going to be my home, as I'm 
going back with him in the spring, and 
right out in the field with him. It's fas- 
cinating work and just what I'm inter- 
ested in. I went out to their Base Camp 
near Elizabethville, Belgian Congo, and 
saw the conditions under which they live. 
The natives fascinate me, and I'll soon 
begin learning their lingo. . . . Have 
been to the consul about retaining my 
American citizenship, and shall use both 
names (maiden and married) conse- 
quently, as I shall have two nationalities 
and two passports. I can always be 
reached in care of my brother, William 
Fowler, 60 State Street, Boston. 

" 'Have had all sorts of interesting ex- 
periences up through Africa, especially 
when getting off* the beaten track. Saw 
giraffe, elephants, hippos, crocodile, etc., 
though animals are rather scarce. Egypt 
was fascinating, and Jerusalem exciting, 
with all the upheavals. I liked Damascus 
especially, as it was so much more Ori- 
ental than Constantinople. Greece was 
beautiful, as were the ruins all through 
Italy and Sicily. I took a peep into "Hell" 
up Vesuvius, and was lucky enough to 
get right up to the edge of the latest 
inner cone. . . . Do give my best to 
all my '25 friends.' 

"I had a delightful letter from Libby 
Boyd Borie, who says that Peter, now 4^, 
was presented with a brother, David 
Boyd Borie, on June 6th. T guess this 
means that another small volume will 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



31 



have to be produced — "Ditties for David" 
— or something on that order. 

"Alys and Eugenia Boross are both en- 
gaged, Alys to the Rev. J. Herbert Smith, 
an assistant at Calvary Episcopal Church 
in New York, and Gene to Mr. John Pot- 
ter Cuyler, Jr., who is at the Episcopal 
Theological Seminary in Alexandria, 
Va." 

1926 

Class Editor: Harriot Hopkinson 
70 Beacon St., Boston/Mass. 

This month there is a trifle more news 
than usual, due to some slight perigrina- 
tion on the part of this department. Hav- 
ing learned through bitter experience that 
all things except news comes to him or 
her who waits, we suggest that a travel- 
ing fellowship be awarded to all class 
editors, to the end that the illiterate and 
reticent classes may be more successfully 
kept in the public eye. 

Let us begin by catching up with the 
past. We hear that Jane Homer was 
married, last April, in Baltimore, to Dr. 
Ferdinand Christian Lee. Moving north, 
we announce that Tatty was married in 
Wilmington, on August 24, to Gordon 
Colby, and is now living in Cambridge, 
Mass., at 215 Holden Green. Stubby was 
maid of honor, and Nick was also a 
bridesmaid. 

Those now in the teaching profession 
include Algy Linn, who is instructing the 
young in the Cours Francais, in Philadel- 
phia. Also Betty Burroughs, whom we 
saw in the very process of waiting behind 
her desk for her 9 o'clock English class to 
assemble, at Miss Madeira's, in Washing- 
ton, last month. 

Ginny Norris is a social secretary at 
present for a lady in Philadelphia, or pos- 
sibly on the Main Line. 

Sophie, or as we now say, Mrs. Kenneth 
Brown, is living in New York, and re- 
ported to be taking courses at Columbia. 

Why will people be so vague? Porter 
is working in a hospital, but why am I 
given the choice of placing her in Sewick- 
ley or Pittsburgh ? They don't seem much 
alike to me. 

Gert Macy is assistant stage manager 
to who but Miss Katharine Cornell, and 
has been on tour with her in The Age of 
Innocence. 

Jane Abbott Pratt has recently sailed 
for Europe for the winter, with her hus- 
band and two children. 

Charis is on her way 'round the world, 
reading from left to right, as it were, but 
took a slight detour the other day, on foot, 
around Fujiyama. She also sits upon the 



floor and uses chop-sticks with the best, 
dressed in a neat but becoming kimono. 

Ellie Clinch Melcher has a son, born 
in August, named George. He and his 
parents are living in Manteno, Illinois, 
where his father is the minister of the 
Presbyterian Church. 

Angela has abandoned Greece and 
Archeology, and is in Chicago for the 
winter, where she has a job. At Marshall 
Field's? 

Franny Jay is coming home to New 
York in December. She is believed to 
have been doing things in Paris with 
Pussy Leewitz. 

Kay Morse is writing for a weekly 
paper that we all read, but as she hides 
her light under a pseudonym, who am I 
to lift the veil? Guesses should be sent 
to this department in writing not later 
than the Fourth of July. 

Jean Whitehill is working with her hus- 
band in the business of designing, manu- 
facturing and selling advertising displays 
for stores. Pick up the next good one you 
see (you know, those papier mache 
things) and see if it hasn't got Sculptron 
written on the bottom. 

And then of course there ought to be a 
special department with the heading Un- 
employed for those who toil not, neither 
do they wed. We shall close this column 
with a list of those fit, when last heard 
from, for this assignation, arranged 
strictly in the order of their intensity of 
concentration in this field. 

H. Hopkinson. 

E. Tweddell (she was talking about go- 
ing to live on a boat in the East River, 
but we can't seem to do much about 
that.) 

B. Linn (who is only here in this list 
through courtesy of the editor. She be- 
longs elsewhere and shall be heard of 
later.) 

Contributions earnestly solicited. 

1927 
Editor: Ellenor Morris 
Berwyn, Pa. 

Hard on the heels of the news of Miss 
Reimer came a letter from Helen Stokes 
Merrill telling of the arrival of her daugh- 
ter, Edith Minturn Merrill, on September 
tenth. We are sure that she is already a 
most attractive young lady as she has 
large blue eyes and dark hair, a devastat- 
ing combination. 

1929 has gotten in ahead of us (for 
which your editor is overcome with 
shame) in announcing the engagement of 
Virginia Newbold to Samuel Gibbon. 
Ginny, of course, is awfully busy with all 
the attendant functions, but she appears 



II 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



on campus now and again for German 
tutoring, as she was sick at the time of 
the Oral this fall. However, if all goes 
well she will take her exam in a short time 
now. This all proves that she belongs un- 
disputably to our class. We claim all 
records in the German department. 

Betsy Gibson DuBois was married in 
October, with Marion Leary Twachtman, 
Frances Chrystie, and Barbara SchiefTelin 
attending. Her husband is a rising young 
lawyer, and they are to live in or near 
New York 

The engagement of Elsie Nachman to 
Dr. Samuel Alter has just been an- 
nounced. 

Jan Seeley is being warden of Pern. 
West, and is also continuing in the Ath- 
letic department. She spends most of her 
time in the gym, but appears at meals en- 
throned at one end of a freshman table. 

Ellenor Morris is working three days 
a week in the History of Art department, 
reading quizzes for Miss King's Italian 
Renaissance painting, and taking a couple 
of courses on the side. It is very amusing 
to be able to read other people's papers, 
but less diverting when it comes to writ- 
ing them on one's account after the beau- 
tifully idle gap of two years. On alternate 
days time is spent very pleasurably hunt- 
ing the fox and raising a pony colt. 

1928 

Class Editor: Cornelia B. Rose 

333 East 68th St., New York City. 

1928 seems to be beating other classes 
all hollow. No sooner does the Editor 
announce the advent of a class baby, but 
another aspirant with a prior claim is 
brought to light. Now is the time for all 
other candidates to make known their 
qualifications ! 

Evelyn Wenrich Smadel, Jr., was born 
on August 26th, and to her, therefore, in- 
stead of Nancy Morgan Whitaker, goes 
the crown. The Editor is sorry for the 
misinformation she has disseminated, but 
feels that the moral lesson is a good one 
and hopes the class will take it to heart. 

Evelyn, Sr., reports that she was in 
Reading last year working in a bookstore, 
and then with the Philadelphia Bell Tele- 
phone Co. in the Medical Department, 
having simultaneously acquired a husband 
and an apartment. 

She further reports that Aggie Haw- 
kins, ex-'28, is now in Denver, running 
her father's house. Peggy Young, who 
is Evelyn, Jr.'s, godmother, was in New- 
ark taking some courses at the museum 
last year, but is now leading a gay social 
life. 



One of the first callers on Nancy Mor- 
gan Whitaker, our erstwhile class baby, 
was Jonesy, who has left Cornell and is 
continuing the study of architecture at 
the, Cambridge School for Landscape 
Architecture and Domestic Architecture. 

Ginny Atmore writes in that she is still 
with her father and is having a good time 
and shouldering some responsibility. Cossy 
is doing all sorts of interesting things: 
working at the Centaur Book Shop in 
Philadelphia and is to be managing editor 
of a new magazine which they are bringing 
out in February to be called The United 
States. As a side line she giving lectures 
at Irwin's on poets and drama. Pam Burr 
is living in a new house down by the 
stream below college and off Morris Ave- 
nue. She's looking for some remunerative 
but not hampering position that will leave 
her time for her writing. 

Nancy Prichett is still in Wilmington 
with the du Ponts and is reported to be 
blooming. 

Jo Young is being social and is prob- 
ably going to Arizona again this winter. 

Billy Rhein Bird is in Washington now 
and is, we believe, doing some work with 
her husband. 

Maud Hupfel is visiting Crooky in Pan- 
ama but exjects to be back in January to 
finish the course at the Guaranty Bond 
School. 

Another wanderer is Mat Fowler, who 
has temporarily deserted Macy's and is 
now in England whence she leaves for the 
Continent and a Christmas at St. Moritz. 

Gaillard has joined the ranks of the 
"woiking goils" with a very interesting 
job in the laboratory of the Fifth Avenue 
Hospital. She is doing pediatric research 
on tonsils and epilepsy and learning 
laboratory technic. 

1929 
Class Editor: Elizabeth Linn 
1357 E. 56th St., Chicago, 111. 
More news comes from Paris than from 
any other one place. There were at least 
seven members of the Class of 1929 re- 
siding in the capital of wine, women and 
song at the beginning of December. Claire 
Parker, Ella Poe and Franny Hand have 
an apartment somewhere, and when last 
heard of were enjoying a visit from Bar- 
bara Humphreys, just up from Italy. We 
received a delightful Quaker Oatsy note 
from Mr. Poe in Cedar Rapids, inform- 
ing us that Ella and Franny were playing 
tennis every morning in addition to the 
pursuit of culture. It ought to be good 
tennis. Betty Fry is staying with a fam- 
ily named Jullien on the Rue Vaugirard, 
taking courses at the Alliance Franchise, 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



33 



and attending lectures at the Sorbonne. 
She spent Christmas in England with her 
aunt. Eccy Moran, who stayed behind 
when Kit Collins and Barbara Channing 
returned from their joint European sum- 
mer, is also in Paris, "learning French 
from the ground up, and studying the 
Russian Ballet" — from the ground up, we 
suppose. Finally, Jean Becket is there, 
too, keeping house for a brother and en- 
joying life. 

This is our exotic number. We re- 
ceived an alluring letter from Susan Fitz- 
gerald in Bermuda, where she is acting 
as tutor to two girls and basking in the 
tropical delights of swimming and sailing. 
She added that Ducky Swan was ex- 
pected down there for Christmas. 

Packard is at home in Baltimore, com- 
bining a business course with one or two 
graduate courses in Archaeology at Johns 
Hopkins, and no doubt expects to land a 
job deciphering Egyptian shorthand from 
the tombs. K. Balch is still in New York, 
and now has some sort of a job with the 
Johns-Manville Roofing Company. Bar- 
bara Channing wrote that she was neither 
playing, studying nor working, and added, 
"I write a little, sing a little with the 
Bach Cantate Club in Cambridge, and the 
rest of the time I spend on small homely 
chores about the house." If you ask me, 
I should say that included all three. 



Alumnae Register 
FOR SALE 

$2.00 a copy 

Make cheques payable to 

Bryn Mawr College and 

send order to the Director 

of Publication. 

TAYLOR HALL 
Bryn Mawr, Pa. 



3 Low Rate — Low Cost 




Which Road to 
Knowledge 

Would He Choose Today? 

There's immortality in store 
for the man who can gain knowl- 
edge by the light of the cabin 
fireside. 

But there are few parents, 
indeed, who would care to have 
their children follow the same 
route today. Many prefer to 
make education a certainty for 
their children by a Provident 
Educational Policy. 

Just send the coupon for full 
particulars. 

Trovident 'Mutual 

life Insurance Company of Philadelphia 

Pennsylvania Founded /86j 

Paul Loder, Manager 

123 South Broad Street 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



You may send me full information about 
the Provident Educational Policy. 



My Date of Birth . 



The Saint Timothy's School 
for Girls 

CATONSVILLE, MARYLAND 

FoimJtl Seplemhr 1882 

COLLEGE PREPARATORY 

AND 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

MISS LOUISA McENDREE FOWLER 
Head of the School 

Wykeham Rise 

WASHINGTON, CONNECTICUT 

A COUNTRY SCHOOL 
FOR GIRLS 

FANNY E. DAVIES, LL.A., Headmistress 
Prepares for Bryn Mawr and Other Colleges 

The Episcopal Academy 

(Founded 1785) 

CITY LINE, OVERBROOK, PA. 

A country day school for boys 

MODERN AND WELL EQUIPPED 
Endorsed by Bryn Mawr Alumnae 

UNIVERSITY»S 

BOARDING AND DAY SCHOOL 

Founded 1896 

Thorough and successful Preparation 

for Eastern Colleges for Women as well as 

for Midwestern Colleges and Universities 

Illustrated Catalogue on Request 

ANNA B. HAIRE, A.B., SMITH COLLEGE, Principal 

1106-B Lake Shore Drive Chicago, Illinois 

THE LOW AND 
HEYWOOD SCHOOL 

Emphasizing college preparatory work. 

Also general and special courses. 

One year intensive college preparation. 

Junior school. 

65th year. Catalogue. 

SHIPPAN POINT, 
STAMFORD, CONN. 



The Ethel Walker School 

SIMSBURY, CONNECTICUT 

Head of School 

ETHEL WALKER SMITH, A.M., 
Bryn Mawr College 



Head Mistress 

JESSIE GERMAIN HEWITT, A.B., 
Bryn Mawr College 



tOGERSHALL 

",4Modern School with New England Traditions 



T|0< 

wdz AHoi 

B| \fk Thorough Preparation for any College 

I !«, One Year Intensive Review 

Hi ^»*a General Academic Course with dl- 
JBi VIW ploma. Junior College Courses — Home 
Economics, Secretarial Training, Music, Art, Dramatic 
Art. 26 Miles from Boston. Outdoor Sports. Riding. 
Gymnasium. Swimming Pool. 

EDITH CHAPIN CRAVEN, A.B., Bryn Mawr 
201 Rogers Street, Lowell, Mass. 

/iarcum scmh 

BRYN MAWR, PA. 
Prepares for Bryn Mawr and 
all leading colleges 

Musical Course prepares for the Depart- 
ment of Music of Bryn Mawr College 
EDITH HARCUM, Head of School 
L. May Willis, Principal 

THE MISSES KIRK'S 

College Preparatory School 

PREPARATORY TO BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 
Individual Instruction. Athletics. 

Clovercroft, Montgomery Avenue, Rosemont, Pa. 
Mail, telephone and telegraph address: Bryn Mawr. Pa. 



CHOATE SCHOOL 

1600 Beacon Street, Brookline, Mass. 

HOME AND DAY SCHOOL 
FOR GIRLS 

EMPHASIS ON COLLEGE PREPARATION 

Elective Courses for students not preparing 
for College 

AUGUSTA CHOATE, A.M. (Vassar) 

Principal 



Kindly mention Bkyn Mawk Bulletin 



THE AGNES IRWIN SCHOOL 

2009-2011 Delancey Place, Philadelphia 

A College Preparatory 
SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 



BERTHA M. LAWS, A.B., Headmistress 



The Baldwin School 

A Country School for Girls 
BRYN MAWR PENNSYLVANIA 

Preparation for Bryn Mawr. Mount Holyoke. Smith. 

Vassar and Welfesley college*. Abundant outdoor life. 

Hockey, basketball, tennis. 

ELIZABETH FORREST JOHNSON, A.B. 

HEAD 

MISS BEARD'S SCHOOL 

A Country School near New York 

Orange, New Jersey 

COLLEGE PREPARATION 

Advanced Courses Junior High School 

Music, Art, Domestic Science 

Catalog on Request 

LUCIE C. BEARD, Headmistress 

The Katharine Branson School 

ROSS, CALIFORNIA Across the Bay from San Francisco 

A Country School College Preparatory 

Heads 
Katharine Fleming Branson, A.B., Bryn Mawr 

MISS MADEIRA'S SCHOOL 

1330 19th St., N W. Washington, D. C. 

A RESIDENT AND DAY SCHOOL FOR 
GIRLS 

LUCY MADEIRA WING, A.B. 

MRS. DAVID LAFOREST WING 

Head Mistress 

MISS WRIGHT'S SCHOOL 

Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Prepares for College Board 
Examination 



FERRY HALL 

A RESIDENT AND DAY SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

On Lake Michigan, near Chicago 

Junior College; High School Department: College 
Preparatory and General Courses. Special Departments 
of Music, Expression and Art. 

Two new dormitories, including new dining room and 
infirmary. 

Eloise R. Tremain, A.B., Bryn Mawr, Principal 

ROSEMARY HALL 

College Preparatory 
(With supplementary but not alternative courses) 

Head Mistrutu 

GREENWICH - - CONNECTICUT 

The Shipley School 

Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 

Preparatory to Bryn Mawr College 

ALICE G. HOWLAND, ELEANOR 0. BROWNELL 
Principals 

MISS RANSOM and 
MISS BRIDGES' SCHOOL 

PIEDMONT, CALIFORNIA 
(A suburb of San Francisco) 

A RESIDENT AND DAY SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

General and College Preparatory Courses 
Outdoor Life throughout the year 

EDITH BRIDGES, B.L., Principal 



CAROLINE RUUTZ-REES. Ph.D. 
MARY E. LOWNDES. M.A., Litt.D 



Katharine Gibbs 

A school of unusual character with a distinctive 
purpose for educated women 
SECRETARIAL ACADEMIC EXECUTIVE 

BOSTON Special Course for College 

nnnn il c, , Women. Selected subjects 
90 Marlboro Mreet preparing for executive posi- 
tions. Separate classrooms 
and special Instructors. 
One-year Course Includes tech- 
nical and broad businesstrain- 
ing preparing for positions of 
a preferred character. 
Two-year Course for prepara- 
tory and high school gradu- 
PROVIDENCE ates - Firsl vear Includes six 
,_, college subjects. Second year 

155 Angell street intensive secretarial training. 
Booklet on request 



Resident and 
Day School 



NEW YORK 
247 Park Avenue 



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1 cirrisoBi forest 



\/~E7 A Country School in the Green 
^~^^ Spring v alley near Baltimore. 
Modern Equipment. 

All Sports. Special Emphasis on Horse- 
back Riding. Mild Climate. 
Garrison Forest Girls who are going to college 
are thoroughly prepared for any institution. 
Other girls take courses with special emphasis 
on Music and Art. Younger girls live in a 
separate Junior House. 



Principals 

MISS JEAN G. MARSHALL 

MISS NANCY OFFUTT, 

Bryn Mawr, ex '20 

Box B, Garrison, Maryland 



1LJ1 



BANCROFT SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

30th Year. Complete College Preparation. 

Individual Attention to carefully selected group in 
Boarding Department of Progressive Day School. 
Summer and "Winter Sports. Dramatics, Art, 
Music. Address 

Hope Fisher, Principal, Worcester, Mass. 



The Phebe Anna 
Thome School 

Under the Direction of the 
Department of Education 



A progressive school preparing 
for all colleges. Open air class 
rooms. P re-school, Primary, 
Elementary and High School 
Grades. 



BRYN MAWR, PA. 

Agnes L. Rogers, Ph.D., Director 
Frances Browne, A.B., HeadMistress 



For children whose parents are traveling abroad. 

ROSEMARY CAMP 

St. Tropez, Var, France 

Ten Hours From Paris 
GIRLS 4-20 BOYS 4-12 

JUNE 15-SEPTEMBER 15, 1930 

Limited enrollment permits individual attention. 

Healthful, attractive location. Sandy beaches. 
Mountains. Pine Woods. Milk from a tested 
herd. Outdoor sleeping porches. French sur- 
roundings. American hygiene. 

Children may be called for in Paris if requested. 

Director, MME. MARCEL JOURDAN 

Women's City Club, 22 Park Avenue, New York City 
after June 6th, "Villa Sigurd," St. Tropez, Var, France 

1st chaperoned group sails June 6 
2nd chaperoned group sails June 21 




Cathedral School of St. Mary 



GARDEN CITY, LONG ISLAND, N. Y. 

A school for Girls 1 9 miles from New York. College 

preparatory and general courses. Music Art and 

Domestic Science. Catalogue on request. Box B 

MIRIAM A. BYTEL, A.B., Radcliffe, Principal 

BERTHA GORDON WOOD, A.B., Bryn Mawr, 

Assistant Principal 



The Traphagen School of Fashion 

MID-TERM STARTING 
JANUARY 20th 

All phases from elementary to full 
mastery of costume design and illus- 
tration taught In shortest time con- 
sistent with thoroughness. Day and 
Evening classes. Saturday courses for 
Adults and Children. Our Sales De- 
partment disposes of student work. 
Every member of advanced classes 
often placed through our Employment 
Bureau. Write for announcement. 

In Arnold, Constable & Company Costume 
Design Competition, over 100 schools and 
nearly 800 students took part; all prizes 
were awarded to Traphagen pupils with 
exception of one of the five third prizes. 

1680 Broadway (near 52nd St.) New York 




SPEND THE SPRING 

IN 
NORTH CAROLINA 

For rent in a University town, one hour 
by motor from Pinehurst, in the midst 
of educational and recreational facilities, 
large modern house, fully furnished, in 
best location, sleeping and sun porches, 
from March 12th to either early June or 
middle of September. 

For further details apply to 
MRS. E. W. ZIMMERMAN 

(Margaret Hoff, '17) P. O. Box 29 
CHAPEL HILL, NORTH CAROLINA 



Kindly mention Bryn Mawb Bulletin 





1896 1930 

BACK LOG CAMP 

THE ADIRONDACK MOUNTAINS 
INDIAN LAKE, NEW YORK 

WHAT PRICE ROAD? 

There is no road to Back Log Camp. A mile and a quarter away, through 
thick forest, there is a dirt road kept in good condition, soon to be made into a 
concrete highway. A few persons, staying a short time, park their cars here in 
the open (it is quite safe) and walk in over the trail (sometimes in the rain). 
The others who come in cars house them at various more or less convenient 
places at the lower end of the Lake, and come to the Camp by motor boat. 

It is a moot point whether we shall ever cut a road to the Camp. The per- 
mits are obtained, and it is the obvious and sensible thing to connect the Camp 
with the new motor highway. But nineteen out of twenty campers hold up their 
hands in horror at the thought. Back Log is like Venice in the striking absence 
of all vehicles, horse or motor. In that lies undoubtedly one of the chief 
charms of the Camp. The change may come. It is now on the lap of the Gods, 
and things have a way of staying on that capacious lap a long time. It is nearly 
impossible to combine isolation, rest, and absolute change, with complete con- 
venience and its accompanying bustle. 



Letters of inquiry should be addressed to 

Mrs. Bertha Brown Lambert (Bryn Mawr, 1904) 

272 Park Avenue 

Takoma Park, D. C. 



Other references 

Mrs. Anna Hartshorne Brown (Bryn Mawr, 1912) 

Westtown, Penna. 

Dr. Henry J. Cadbury 

(Head of Biblical Dept., Bryn Mawr) 

Haverford, Penna. 



Who is 
Kagawa ? 

He is the outstand- 
ing Japanese Chris- 
tian in Asia.^What 
has he done? ^ 
Preached in the 
streets, lived in the 
slums, built schools 
and now is conduct- 
ing his "Million 
Souls for Jesus" 
campaign. 




Research. 



•c 



■& 



v#" 



■*& 



v°* 



**&>' 



V 1 



It belongs to the literature both 
of power and knowledge; it 
might be called wisdom 
literature. — Galen M. 
Fisher, Executive 
Secretary, Institute 
of Social and 
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BRYN MAWR 
ALUMNAE 
BULLETIN 




THE PROPOSED CHANGE IN POLICY 



March, 1930 



Vol. X 



No. 3 



Entered as second-class matter, January 15, 1921, at the Post Office, Phila., Pa., under Act of March 3, 1879 

COPYRIGHT, 1930 

ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 



OFFICERS OF THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

EXECUTIVE BOARD 

President Anne Kidder Wilson, 1903 

Vice-President Mary Hardy, 1920 

Recording Secretary Gertrude Hearne Myers, 1919 

Corresponding Secretary May "Egan Stokes, 1911 

Treasurer Margaret E. Brusbtar, 1903 

Chairman of the Finance Committee Caroline Florence Lexow, 1908 

Chairman of the Publicity Committee Caroline Morrow Chadwick-Collinb, 1905 

ALUMNAE SECRETARY AND BUSINESS MANAGER OF THE BULLETIN 

Alice M. Hawkins, 1907 

EDITOR OF THE BULLETIN 

Marjorie L. Thompson, 1912 

DISTRICT COUNCILLORS 

District I Helen Evans Lewis, 1913 

District II Julia Langdon Loomis. 1895 

District III Alletta Van Reypen Korff, 1900 

District IV Katharine Holliday Daniels, 1918 

District V Gladys Spry Augur, 1912 

District VI Edna Warkentin Alden, 1900 

District VII Helen Brayton Barendt, 1903 

ALUMNAE DIRECTORS 

Frances Fincke Hand, 1897 Margaret Reeve Cary, 1907 

Mary Peirce, 1912 Elizabeth Lewis Otey, 1901 

Virginia Kneeland Frantz, 1918 

CHAIRMAN OF THE ALUMNAE FUND 

Caroline Florence Lexow, 1908 

CHAIRMAN OF THE ACADEMIC COMMITTEE 

Pauline Goldmark, 1896 

CHAIRMAN OF THE SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOAN FUND COMMITTEE 

Margaret Gilman, 1919 

CHAIRMAN OF THE COMMITTEE ON HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Dr. Marjorie F. Murray, 1913 

CHAIRMAN OF THE NOMINATING COMMITTEE 

Eleanor Little Aldrich, 1905 



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Bryn Mawr Alumnae 
Bulletin 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF 
THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

Marjorie L. Thompson, '12, Editor 
Alice M. Hawkins, '07, Business Manager 

EDITORIAL BOARD 

Mary Crawford Dudley, '96 Emily Kimbrough Wrench, '21 

Caroline Morrow Chadwick-Collins, '05 Ellenor Morris, '27 
Emily Fox Cheston, '08 Elinor B. Amram, '28 

Anne Kidder Wilson, '03, ex-officio 

Subscription Price, $1.50 a Year Single Copies, 25 Cents 

Checks should be drawn to the order of Bryn Mawr Alumnae Bulletin 
Published monthly, except August, September and October, at 1006 Arch St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Vol. X MARCH, 1930 No. 3 



With the Fiftieth Anniversary almost within sight — 1935 seems much nearer to 
1930 than it did to 1929 — plans for increasing the Endowment and for spending 
that increase become more and more important. There is almost no question as to 
how it must be spent. The academic needs of the college are the ones that first of 
all must be satisfied. A glance at the designated objects of the Alumnae Fund shows 
that they are three sides of the same thing. And what is true of that smaller 
fund will be true of a larger one. Yet academic needs are diverse and the problem 
is one of wise apportionment. As always the Alumnae will inevitably and gladly 
bear the brunt of collecting the money, but the appointment of a committee of Alumnae 
"to confer with the Executive Committee of the Board of Directors of the College 
on a general financial policy, with a view to commemorating the Fiftieth Anniversary 
of the founding of the College" is an entirely new departure. Naturally the work 
of mapping such a financial policy will be done in constant consultation with the 
Directors, and the deciding vote is theirs, but the Alumnae will be responsible as 
never before. It will be possible, if financial stringency can be relieved by increased 
income, to turn back again for instance, to the Halls and buildings, money that should 
be used on them and to have a Depreciation Fund so that water pipes and roofs will 
not, when they need renewing, have to seem more important, because of the per- 
versity of their natures, than laboratory equipment or books for the Library. The 
work of the Committee will be more than a mere budgeting, however. It will be 
both a survey and the outlining of a policy that stretches far into the future and that 
attempts to estimate what the periodic needs are going to be and how they are to 
be met when they arise. The proposed plan, which Acting-President Manning out- 
lined in her speech, for gradually increasing tuition, and the correlated plan of 
raising a fund to make possible an adjustment of tuition for any students unable 
to meet the increased costs, is very definitely part of this whole policy of putting the 
finances of the college on a more business-like basis. 



ACTING-PRESIDENT MANNING DISCUSSES THE 
PROPOSED CHANGE IN POLICY 

It is with the greatest pleasure that I welcome the Alumnae here, acting in Miss 
Park's place for this one year, and I am delighted to say that the messages from her — 
we have been receiving many of them within the last few days — have all expressed 
the affection she feels for us, together with her entire willingness to be parted from 
us for another eight months. But I know that she is thinking of you today and 
wishing that she could be present, though I have no doubt she is wholly willing to 
let me bear the burden of imparting information on behalf of the college. 

When I first looked forward to this meeting I took pleasure in the thought that 
since I am admittedly ignorant on the subject of the college finances I could not be 
expected to make them the central theme of my remarks today. But when Miss 
Parks was preparing to leave us last fall this very subject took on special prominence 
and she broached the question, not only to me and to the Directors, but to some of 
the Alumnae, of a possible change in our financial policy for the future. I must, there- 
fore, make her responsible for the matters I am going to put before you today, and 
I shall present it as far as I can as she presented it to us in the fall, trying to make it 
clear why she reached the decision she did; for it involves questions of fundamental 
policy which must be worked out under the leadership of Miss Park, and on which 
she will welcome frank expressions of opinion from the Alumnae as a whole. Her 
own decision was reached as a result of her recent experiences in making a com- 
parative study of our finances with that of the six other women's colleges which have 
co-operated with us in the general attempt to convince the country at large of the 
importance of women's education. As a result of that study she found that there 
were factors in Bryn Mawr's present situation different from those of the other col- 
leges which make it necessary for us to think out our own policy clearly, not with 
any idea of separating ourselves from the joint movement to strengthen the position of 
the women's institutions, but in order that we may be able to meet our own peculiar 
needs and to safeguard the unique advantages which Bryn Mawr has always enjoyed. 

In comparing our general financial situation with that of the other women's 
colleges it is immediately clear that we have already a larger endowment per student 
than any of the others, and that we are so much smaller in numbers that our needs 
are on rather a different scale. Although there is a striking resemblance in the objects 
for which all the women's colleges are asking money at the present time, we have 
to be to some extent on the defensive in order to explain why with a larger endow- 
ment per student we should be as much in need of additional annual income as are 
any of the other women's institutions. There are three reasons which will naturally 
occur to all of you as explanations for our present situation: 

First, it is, of course, more expensive to educate students in smaller groups ; 

Second, a Graduate School is of necessity a heavy drain on the resources of any 
college or university, not because the actual teaching of graduate students is any more 
expensive — our figures show that the cost of tuition for the graduate student is about 
the same as for the undergraduate student — but because graduate work on the whole 
must be much more heavily subsidized than undergraduate work. 

Finally, the location of Bryn Mawr in the most fashionable residential dis- 
trict around Philadelphia. This latter condition makes it inevitable that our cost of 

(2) 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 3 

living per person should be high, and that the members of the faculty should be in 
greater need of adequate salaries than in any of the other women's colleges except 
Barnard. (The situation in New York City is of course unique.) 

I think if you keep these three factors in mind it is easy to meet the possible 
charge that we have not used our funds to the same advantage as the other women's 
colleges. I should like to say particularly that from the point of view of running the 
halls of residence, maintaining the college grounds, supplying the students with food, 
and the other expenditure on material objects, that Bryn Mawr is certainly as 
economical as any college could well be. The net income actually received from our 
five halls of residence with their dining halls is something between $75,000 and 
$100,000 annually. Perhaps two-thirds of this amount goes into the business admin- 
istration of the college and the maintenance of grounds, and the rest of this income 
has gone to meet what we regarded as the crying need on the academic side. Of course 
it is very pleasant to show in our Comptroller's Report that we are receiving each 
year an income of 10% on the investment in Pembroke Hall, and that a part of this 
income can be used for academic purposes; but, as you can easily see if you look above 
your heads, such a use of the money has resulted in a very leaky roof which will 
have to be renewed within a few years unless great damage is to result. And in the 
same way the income from Radnor and Rockefeller will soon have to be used to renew 
the plumbing, which at present breaks down periodically. In other words, we must 
have a very much larger share of the college income, whether from the students' room 
fees, or from general endowment, to serve as a general depreciation fund of the col- 
lege plant. That means that from the present sources we cannot look forward even 
to a steady maintenance of the funds which now cover the expense of teaching of 
the students. 

I believe that any of you who have made even a superficial study of the present 
condition of the college plant will agree that if we have any luxuries at Bryn Mawr 
they are academic in character. I know that there is still the burden of proof on us 
to show that it is necessary for us to spend as much as we do in order to teach the 
five hundred students on the Bryn Mawr campus — that we actually need to use 
$926 (or whatever the latest calculation shows) in order to teach each undergraduate 
student, and that what we give them is worth the difference between that sum and 
the cost of tuition at some of the colleges which appear to be more economical. 

I have said that one of the principal reasons for the high cost of education at 
Bryn Mawr is the comparatively small number of students educated. Every Bryn 
Mawr Alumna, I believe, cherishes affection for the small college as an institution, 
and it is worth remembering also that our size is not altogether a matter of choice, 
since we have literally no available ground on which to expand beyond one or two 
more buildings; but I should like to tell you briefly what seem to me the concrete 
advantages from the educational standpoint of a unit as small as ours, leaving out of 
consideration for the moment the social and personal advantages. I have lived and 
studied at a large university, and I know that it is easy to put one's finger at once 
on the things that one must give up as a result of the mere size of the institution 
when one is dealing with students in the thousands instead of students in the hundreds. 
It has always been possible at Bryn Mawr to treat girls as soon as they arrive as col- 
lege students, to avoid any waste of time in introducing them to what we regard as 
truly collegiate work. I don't believe this is true in any of the great universities 



4 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

in the country. At Yale it was considered necessary to organize a separate freshman 
year, and I believe that in almost all the other institutions of the same size the fresh- 
man year is made a period of preparation for what is regarded as work of a really 
collegiate character. At Bryn Mawr the freshmen and sophomores have always been 
taught by the most distinguished and the most experienced members of the faculty. 
They have studied in the same classes with juniors and seniors. They have learned 
without any interval or gap what kind of work is expected of them as college students. 
I can remember reading in the periodicals of larger universities the complaints, which 
I believe entirely justified, that the instruction in the freshman, and to a lesser extent 
in the sophomore, year is less good than that of preparatory schools. Such a result 
is inevitable where huge freshman classes must be divided between large numbers of 
untried instructors with perhaps only a year or two of graduate work behind them, 
and where the student body has no opportunity to know the more distinguished scholars 
on the faculty even by sight until their junior or senior year. I believe that this more 
rapid absorption of the freshman class in the work of a truly collegiate character has 
made it possible for students to go further in undergraduate work at Bryn Mawr 
than has in the past been possible in any other college in the country. I know that 
it has made possible the introduction of advanced and independent work for students 
in their last two years at Bryn Mawr with less reorganization of courses than in 
any other institution I am familiar with. There are, of course, other luxuries, if you 
wish to call them that, which we enjoy in the kind of work that we give. In the 
old days we regarded music as a luxury, but it has become so vital a part of the 
college curriculum that it is hard for us to think of Bryn Mawr without it. Archaeology 
in many colleges is not taught as a part of the undergraduate work, but you all know 
how successfully it has been taught on the Bryn Mawr campus, and that our students 
who have taken prizes in Athens and Rome are among the brightest feathers in our 
scholastic cap. We hardly think of such things as luxuries, but they explain that gap 
between the $400 which is the tuition fee at Bryn Mawr (as it is at most of the 
other first-rate institutions in the country) and the actual amount of money which is 
expended annually to teach each of the Bryn Mawr students. 

As Miss Park has viewed the matter, the question was not "Can we economize 
here and there and change the character of the work to make it less expensive?" but 
rather, "What is the best work that we can give at Bryn Mawr; and when we have 
made our budget accordingly, where are we going to get the money to make it pos- 
sible?" Money which might have been used for the material upkeep of the college 
has gone into teaching salaries and to meet the needs of the undergraduate body in the 
classroom and library. But after every possible economy has been made it has become 
apparent that we cannot accomplish what we wish to accomplish in our academic 
work unless we can look forward to a substantial increase in our annual income. 

When Miss Park recognized last September that our case was not entirely 
parallel with that of the other women's colleges, she made up her mind that we must 
acknowledge frankly that the type of education we offer is more expensive than 
that of the other institutions but that the very reasons which make it costly are the 
reasons for its success in the past, and will without question continue to underlie 
whatever success we may have in the future. We have a large endowment, practical- 
ly all of which has gone to meet the teaching salaries and the actual academic costs, 
but there is still an ever-widening gap between the income available and the income 
necessary to make the college what we think it should be. 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 5 

Now a solution which has often been suggested, and which until this fall had 
never seemed a possible or a necessary one, is that of asking the students who can do so 
to pay more nearly what it costs the college to educate them. The objections to the 
plan are of course obvious; we have all of us stated them when we were begging 
for endowment in the past. But there are advantages in a well-conceived plan of this 
kind which we hope may prove greater than the objections; and at present it seems 
that only by some such plan can we prevent Bryn Mawr from losing the position 
which it has always held in the academic world. The plan as worked out by Miss 
Park and presented to the Directors and to the Alumnae Council in New York has 
two sides: 

First, the increase in the tuition fee to a point where the additional income per 
student will provide the increase in income which is essential ; and on the other hand, 
the development of a better-organized machinery in the college to secure students of 
outstanding excellence in all parts of the country, whether or not they are able to 
meet our new scale of fees. While we should make increased use of the machinery 
of the Regional Scholarship Committees, it will be necessary also to appoint a new 
officer of the college to visit the schools, to bring them information about the college, 
and to let them know that we are looking for able and active minded girls, and that 
money will be available to meet a part of the expenses of those girls, if it is necessary, 
in order to enable them to come to Bryn Mawr. These two parts of the new policy 
are inter-related in a very vital way. It is impossible to think of any general policy for 
the increase in tuition which is not accompanied by a comprehensive policy for the 
giving of financial aid in one form or another to many able students. On the other 
hand, this wider policy of scholarships and grants is tied up to the plan of asking our 
students who are able to do so to play a larger share of the actual cost of tuition at 
Bryn Mawr. This new plan was, as you already know from Mrs. Otey's report, 
embodied in the resolutions of the Directors, which read substantially as follows: 

first, that it should be the policy of the college that students shall pay a larger 
share of the cost of tuition ; 

.second, that a new officer of the college shall be appointed who shall see to 
it that the new policy does not prevent the type of student we want from coming to 
Bryn Mawr College. 

third, that there shall be an increase of $100 in the tuition fee for undergraduates 
for next year and $50 for graduate students, and that sufficient allowance shall be 
made in the budget so that the students who can not aflord to meet the increase shall 
have it remitted to them out of the college funds. Never to lose good students is the 
essential factor of the whole plan. v 

Now the question that naturally arises is: how far will this policy have to 
be carried in order to meet the situation. I am sorry to say that it has not been 
possible to make as yet the accurate studies which will be necessary in order to allow 
us to suggest any figure for our tuition fee, let us say ten or fifteen years hence. We 
are all determined that further increases shall not go into effect too rapidly. Miss 
Park had thought that there should perhaps be an increase similar to the one next year 
($100) made once in four years until the figure aimed at was reached. It is plain, 
however, that the present increase will do little more than take care of the deficit 
which the college was facing last spring and which was only met by very ruthless 
cutting of the budget of the Buildings and Grounds Committee and by the gifts 
made by the Alumnae Association and by individuals to cover a part of the budget 



6 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

for teaching salaries. We count on an increase in income of perhaps twenty-five thou- 
sand dollars to relieve the financial stringency of the moment and possibly admit of 
one or two small appropriations for the extension of Honours work. I do not see, 
therefore, how this first one-hundred-dollar raise can be regarded as meeting our out- 
standing needs in any sense of the word. In making a very rough estimate of those 
needs, including a small general increase in the salary scale, it has appeared that an 
increase in the college income of $300 per student was the very least which could be 
expected to meet the situation at all. I wish to make it clear, however, that this 
calculation and these figures are my own, and that the Directors are not ready to 
commit themselves as to future increases without having made a careful survey of the 
whole situation. 

Looking at the plan as a whole, I know that it will be easy for the Alumnae to 
bring forward intelligent criticisms and that we must expect to meet a certain amount 
of very sincere dissent. I myself recognize the possible dangers and disadvantages 
of the new policy, but I should like to speak, nevertheless, of the advantages which it 
seems to me may be expected from it and which will, I hope, in the long run win for 
it the support of this whole body. It will bring us in closer contact with the schools, 
and that is something which has long been needed. The appointment of a ' person 
whose first interest it will be to find out more about the girls who are expecting to 
come to Bryn Mawr — to size them up a little beforehand — is going to be of the 
greatest advantage to us in the future. Anyone who has sat on the Entrance Commit- 
tee in the summer realizes how great is the need of further information, of a more 
intimate knowledge of the candidates. We should know not only entrance averages 
but what those marks stand for, and what place the girl really held in school. The 
new policy should also make possible a more business-like arrangement of our finances 
as a whole, a general restatement of the needs of the colleges over a long period; a 
looking ahead rather than a hand-to-mouth existence from day to day. I wish to make 
it absolutely clear, however, that one of the advantages which does not pertain to the 
plan is that of relieving us of the burden of raising money. It is an essential part of 
the success of the whole policy that we have a large and very flexible fund for 
scholarships and for the adjustment of tuition wherever necessary, in order that we 
may feel entirely free to select students who seem to us most likely to benefit by what 
we have to offer. Good students are every bit as essential to a college as a good 
faculty, and from one point of view our change in policy will result in our begging 
for funds in order to secure the best available students instead of begging in order 
to secure the best possible faculty. 

In making our calculations we have assumed that we should not ask the Regional 
Scholarship Committees to attempt to cover the expected increases, and that we 
should prefer rather to have them increase the number of their scholars. We must, 
therefore, have college funds available to assist students who are already on scholar- 
ships, as well as the students who could meet our present charges but will not be able 
to meet the increase in the fees. Such a fund must, I believe, be not less than a million 
dollars if we are to have an income sufficient for the purposes outlined. Since all 
our calculations have been made on the assumption that the college will be relieved 
of debt through the efforts of the Alumnae and the interest of individual donors it 
will be seen that I am not really outlining a program which is likely to relieve the 
Alumnae of the financial burdens which they have borne in the past. I have no time. 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 7 

nor have I the full information necessary to speak of the other college needs, such 
as the new science building, towards which we look forward hopefully; and the addi- 
tion to the Library, the need of which our Librarian bewails whenever I meet her. 
But I have faith myself that if we can adopt a well-thought-out and business-like 
policy along the lines which I have outlined, our other needs will in the course 
of time be met by donors who are sincerely impressed by the excellence of what we 
have to offer. 

In conclusion I must emphasize with all the force I can that the purpose of this 
new policy is, above everything else, to keep Bryn Mawr in the front rank among 
the educational institutions of the country. To do this two things are essential: 

First, that we increase our present salary scale sufficiently to compete with other 
colleges and universities for those successful teachers and scholars who are the educa- 
tional dynamos necessary to supply intellectual power. I believe I am right in saying 
that competition has never before been so keen for the men and women who have 
shown themselves at once productive in scholarship and stimulating to their students. 
We can not afford to fall behind the great universities in the salaries we offer to rising 
young men and women, and we must hold out to them as well some prospect of 
advancement. There are, of course, certain inducements offered by the large univer- 
sities which a small college like Bryn Mawr cannot hope to duplicate; but, on the 
other hand, as we all know, there are men and women who prefer the comparative 
seclusion and peace of a campus like ours and who will be held to us by ties of con- 
venience and affection, if only we can make it possible for them to stay without 
sacrificing their own interests and those of their families. 

Our second need today is for funds which will permit us to take part in the 
teaching experiments and the educational progress of our own era. To us at the 
moment the most promising development of many years is the type of independent 
work now being carried on by many of our advanced undergraduate students. 
Whether such work receives its stimulus from group meetings and discussion or from 
personal conference with the instructors, it has given a meaning and impetus to the 
work of the last two years which I know was lacking when I was an undergraduate. 
"Honours Work" is being interpreted in a variety of ways in this country, but the 
effect at which most colleges are aiming is the same — to give greater scope for the 
initiative and energy of the abler students. The success of the experiment here at 
Bryn Mawr, handicapped as our departments have been for lack of additional teach- 
ing force, has really astonished me. None of the fears which I must confess at one 
time I felt, that a certain demoralization might follow the lack of regular class meet- 
ings and more formal supervision, have been justified. The enthusiasm with which 
students and faculty now approach "Advanced Work" — the term which has been 
substituted for our old "post-Majors" — shows how great a transformation has taken 
place in the character of that work, even in those departments which have as yet no 
fully organized honours courses. 

But honours work, like many other innovations in teaching, requires a larger staff 
of teachers, and its success will naturally depend on the quality of the teaching and 
the quality of the students taught. It is in order to meet the needs of the various 
departments and to maintain the quality of the work that the new financial policy 
has been proposed. Whatever objections may be raised to it, it does enable us to look 
ahead with every confidence that we shall be able to give at Bryn Mawr the best 
and the most vital kind of education to be had anywhere today. 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 




Anne Kidder Wilson, 1903 
President of the Alumnae Association 



ANNUAL MEETING OF THE ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 
OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 1930 

(There is on file in the Alumnae Office a stenographic report of the Annual 
Meeting, giving in detail the discussion^, motions carried and lost, amendments, etc. 
The following minutes are condensed.) 

The morning session was held in the Music Room, Goodhart Hall, where the 
meeting was called to order at 10.15 A. M. by Louise Fleischmann Maclay, 1906, 
President of the Association. It is estimated that about 200 members attended the 
meeting during the course of the day. 

It was voted to omit the reading of the minutes of the meeting of the previous 
year. Mrs. Maclay then presented the Report of the Executive Board for the year 
1929, which was accepted and placed on file. (See page 13.) 

The reports of the Treasurer, Margaret E. Brusstar, 1903, and of Caroline 
Florence Lexow, 1908, Chairman of the Finance Committee and of the Alumnae 
Fund, were accepted and placed on file (pages \6' to 25). Miss Brusstar presented 
for the consideration of the Association the budget for 1930, which was approved 
without change (page 16). 

The various recommendations of the Finance Committee were discussed in turn. 

Moved, seconded, carried, that the Treasurer by authorized to pay over to 
the College the $6,000 promised to President Park last year. 

Moved, seconded, carried, that the surplus of $1,037.45 over and above the 
$6,000 be given to the Library. 

Moved, seconded, carried, that the Marion Reilly Memoiral Fund be added 
to the^ list of objectives of the Alumnae Fund for 1930. 

Moved, seconded, carried, that all moneys to be collected for objects of the 
Alumnae Fund of the Association be handled by its representatives. 

In answer to a question as to the purpose of the Marion Reilly Memorial Fund, 
Ethel Cantlin Buckley, 1901, explained that the object is to raise a principal sum of 
$25,000, the interest of which shall be used to add $1,000 a year to the salary of 
the professor who holds the Chair of Physics which has been been named by the 
College the Marion Reilly Chair of Physics. Since Miss Reilly's connection with 
the College had been so close, it was felt that the Association in general would be 
interested in the Fund and that it might properly be made one of the objects of the 
Alumnae Fund. Until now the Class of 1901 has been in charge of collections for 
the fund which already amounts to $14,400 in cash and pledges. 

Moved, seconded, carried, that the objects of the Alumnae Fund for 1930 be: 

1. Increase in Academic salaries. 

2. Honours work. 

3. The Marion Reilly Memorial Fund. 

In answer to a question it was pointed out that, though the Library was not 
among the objects for 1930, any one who wished especially to make it a giff might 
send the contribution through the Alumnae Fund designating the purpose for which 
it was to be used. 

Moved, seconded, carried, that the Association pledge itself to raisf $7,000 
for academic purposes in 1930 over and above the budget. 

(9) 



10 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

Moved, seconded, carried, that the Association approves the appointment of 
a committee of alumnae to confer with the Executive Committee of the Board of 
Directors of the College on a general financial policy, with a view to the com- 
memoration of the 50th anniversary of the founding of the College. 

After the adoption of these recommendations Josephine Goldmark, 1898, asked 
for 5 a vote of thanks to Miss Brusstar, Miss Lexow, and the Class Collectors, for 
their splendid work in enabling the Association to meet the obligations which had 
been undertaken last year with so many misgivings. 

Following the discussion on the financial reports, Elizabeth Otey Lewis, 1901, 
read a short statement from Pauline Goldmark, 1896, Chairman of the Academic 
Committee, saying that the committee had been working on the question of entrance 
requirements, and that it is planned to print its full report in the April number 
of the Alumnae Bulletin. 

Margaret Gilman, 1919, Chairman of the Scholarships and Loan Fund Com- 
mitee, presented a most interesting and gratifying account of the activities of the 
Committee during the past year. This report also will be printed in the April 
Bulletin. 

Natalie McFaden Blanton, 1917, Vice-President of the Association, gave a re- 
port on the Council in New York, which is printed on page 26. 

Moved, seconded, carried, that the recommendation of the Council in regard to 
the publication of an Address List be carried out. 

Following Mrs. Blanton's account of the reasons why the Executive Board had 
agreed with the Committee on the Revision of the By-Laws that it would be imprac- 
tical to carry out the recommendation of the Council and had therefore accepted the 
By-Laws as now drawn up by the committee, Dorothy Straus, 1908, Chairman of 
this special committee, presented, as the report of the Committee, the By-Laws in the 
form under which they had been sent to all the members of the Association two 
weeks before. The Chair then asked the will of the meeting in regard to the manner 
of considering the By-Laws; asking whether it was desired to have them read through 
in their entirety or whether they should be taken up section by section.. 

Moved, seconded, carried, that the By-Laws as thus revised and presented be 
accepted as a whole. 

Several minor corrections were then made. Miss Straus said that in two places, 
in Articles IV. and XL, the word "majority" should be used instead of "plurality"; 
and that in Article VIII. Section 2 the word "Directors" should be used instead of 
"Officers." 

Eleanor Little Aldrich, 1905, called attention to the fact that in the revised 
By-Laws the President is an ex officio member of all Committees. She said that in 
her opinion this is inadvisable for the Nominating Committee. The meeting agreed. 
By vote of the Association it was decided to incorporate these changes in the By-Laws. 

A short discussion took place in regard to the position of the Director of Pub- 
licity. Mrs. Buckley said that under the plan adopted it will be necessary for a 
year to elapse before she will be eligible to re-election after she has served two terms, 
and since there had been complete agreement that this officer is an invaluable member 
of the Executive Board, it would mean a great loss to the Board. Miss Straus 
said that her Committee had realized this difficulty, but had felt that it would 
be an even greater mistake to elect such an officer in perpetuity, which was the only 
alternative. As a solution of the problem they had suggested that during the period 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 11 

of her ineligibility for re-election this officer be invited to attend all meetings of the 
Executive Board in an advisory capacity. Even though she would at such times have 
no vote, and there would still be seven elected Directors on the Board, it was felt 
that her opinions would be of paramount importance. The present Director of 
Publicity had indicated her approval of this scheme as the best workable plan. 

After the adoption of the By-Laws as a whole, Miss Straus explained that it 
would be necessary to amend the Charter of the Association to conform with the new 
By-Laws. She offered the following resolutions: 

That Articles VI. and VIII. of the Charter be amended to read: 
VI. The number of Directors of said Corporation is fixed at seven. 

VIII. The officers of the Corporation shall be a President, a Vice-President, a 
Secretary and a Treasurer. 

Miss Straus presented other formal resolutions to authorize the officers of the 
Association to take the necessary legal steps to amend the Charter; to arrange for the 
proper date when various sections of the By-Laws dealing with elections shall take 
effect; and to make the present membership of the Executive Board conform with 
the new By-Laws. These resolutions were accepted unanimously. 

The Chair again asked whether it was the will of the meeting to hear the By- 
Laws, but by formal motion it was agreed that they be adopted without further reading. 

Ann Taylor, 1921, asked whether it would be possible to indicate briefly the 
principal changes made in the By-Laws. Mrs. Maclay gave a summary of these, 
mentioning especially the fact that all nominations are now to be made by the 
Nominating Committee, whereas formerly the Executive Board made the nomina- 
tions for District Councillors and Alumnae Directors. Another important change is 
in regard to the Directors of the Association, who are now to be seven in number 
instead of five. Included in this change are the provisions in regard to the Director 
of Publicity which had been discussed. Other changes that represent real differences 
are those w T hich arrange for elections of District Councillors and of Alumnae Directors 
to take place at the same time of year as the election of officers. The fact that it 
will now be possible to present a single slate for Councillors and for Alumnae 
Directors as well as for officers should be mentioned. Another change is that mem- 
bers will now be dropped for non-payment of dues after two years instead of after 
four as at present. Miss Hawkins said that this change is necessary in order that 
we may avail ourselves of the privilege of mailing the Bulletin as third-class 
matter, since the Postal Regulations allow this only for paid-up subscriptions. 

Miss Hawkins also commented on the working of the single slate as seen in 
this first election of officers under this plan. She said that the net result had been 
that as many people had indicated their approval of the choice of the Nominating 
Committee as had voted for any successful candidate in any recent election under the 
old plan which offered a choice of candidates. 

As the business scheduled for the morning session had been completed earlier 
than anticipated, it was voted to continue with the afternoon program. Elizabeth 
Lewis Otey, 1901, presented a report on behalf of the Alumnae Directors and 
Eleanor Little Aldrich, 1905, gave the report of the Nominating Committee. Both 
of these reports were accepted and placed on file. (For Mrs. Otey's report, see page 28.) 

The Chair suggested that the meeting might consider under the head of New T 
Business a subject which has been much discussed at other colleges, "Continued 
Education after Graduation." In reply to a question Miss Hawkins gave a short 



12 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

account of some of these projects now being carried on at Vassar, Smith, Radcliffe, 
Mount Holyoke, and Lafayette. These were all started in response to requests from 
their .alumnae, and do not attempt in any way to take the place of advanced work 
which would naturally be done at a college or university near at hand, but represent 
a way for the Alumnae to make first-hand contacts with the faculty of the college 
where their undergraduate work was done. 

At 12.45 the meeting adjourned for luncheon in Pembroke, where the Alumnae 
were the guests of Acting-President Manning, who there made an address on the 
financial situation of the College and the plans proposed to meet the present crisis. 

After Mrs. Manning's speech a long discussion followed on the change in policy 
involved. At the close of this the resolutions of the Board of Directors, as incor- 
porated in Mrs. Otey's report on behalf of the Alumnae Directors, were read again, 
and the Association voted its approval. 

Resolutions of thanks were passed to Acting-President Manning, to President 
Emeritus Thomas, and to all the other College officials who had extended to the 
Alumnae the hospitality of the College. 

The Recording Secretary then read the result of the election of officers as 
follows : 

President, Anne Kidder Wilson, 1903. 

Vice-President, Mary Hardy, 1920. 

Recording Secretary, Gertrude Hearne Myers. 

Corresponding Secretary, May Egan Stokes, 1911. 

Treasurer, Margaret E. Brusstar, 1903. 

Mrs. Maclay offered her congratulations to Mrs. Wilson, the new President, and 
asked her to preside over the rest of the meeting. 

Mrs. Buckley proposed a vote of thanks to the retiring officers, which was sec- 
onded by Mrs. Loomis and carried unanimously. 

The meeting adjourned at 4 P. M., and the Alumnae then went to the tea 
given at the Deanery by President Emeritus M. Carey Thomas. 

A. M. H. 



"A LETTER TO THE TIMES" 

Various questions will inevitably arise in the minds of the Alumnae in regard 
to the new policy of increasing the tuition. The matter is still being discussed. 
The Editor would be very glad to have letters from Alumnae on this subject, and 
when possible will print the letters and endeavor to have answered the questions that 
they raise. Would this not perhaps start that Department in the Bulletin of 
which the Editorial Board fondly dreams — a type of Open Forum? 



REPORT OF THE EXECUTIVE BOARD 

Though it is a matter of record that the Alumnae Association was granted its 
charter on December 7th, 1897 — to many of us, who still look upon the organization 
as a rather young child, it is almost a shock to realize that we are beginning our 
thirty-third year. Like the highest form of life, we may be slow in the early stages 
of our development but like it, will no doubt have all the greater opportunities for 
the growth of our inherent capacities and powers. 

It is good, nevertheless, to feel that our structure is sound — our co-ordination 
smooth, our activities valuable though perhaps restricted. We recognize that our 
interests must ripen and widen in scope, our purpose must deepen in order to reach 
full maturity — such growth may well come by 1935 as\ result of the effort of plan- 
ning and preparing a suitable celebration for the commemoration of the fiftieth anni- 
versary of the founding of the College. 

A part taken in the movement for "Education after Graduation," may also be 
profitable. Wilfred B. Shaw, director of Alumni relations in the University of 
Michigan, sponsored by the American Association for Adult Education, has just 
published a preliminary survey, showing what Colleges and Alumnae Associations are 
doing to provide intellectual stimulus and help for Alumnae. 

Our conference with the Presidents and Secretaries of five women's Colleges 
who met with us at Bryn Mawr last October showed that we are the only College 
of that group which takes no part in this movement. This makes us wonder whether 
it is our Association which is unprogressive or whether our Alumnae are so truly 
cultured that their intellectual life continues spontaneously. This latter is a pleasing 
thought, the written corroboration or disavowal of which would be interesting and 
advantageous to us all, for there is no reason for the Alumnae of Bryn Mawr not 
to have the same opportunities which other Associations and Colleges offer — provided 
and this is the crux of the matter — that they need and desire them. 

Last Summer our Executive Secretary, Alice Hawkins, not only represented us 
at the American Alumni Council in Toronto, but took an active part, speaking at one 
meeting and presiding at the round-table conference of another. Her gift in remem- 
bering people and of making contacts, it is hoped may gradually help to remove the 
stigma of our "superiority" and "snobbishness." 

She reports that we now have 2823 members of the Association — 82 new mem- 
bers joined in 1929, 3 of whom became life members, but since 43 were dropped 
for non-payment of dues and there were five resignations — our increase for the year 
totals 34. 

The interest in life membership continues as shown by the fact that 51 members 
changed their status to life membership during the year, making the number of new 
life members 54. 

After one short year in which she had already proved herself valuable in the 
position of assistant to the Treasurer — Florence Irish (1913) left our office to return 
to teaching. Various vicissitudes which have arisen in trying to replace her are not 
yet overcome but our Secretary with Miss Broome's efficient help has managed to 
override obstacles and continue Alumnae business without interruption. 

We are fortunate, indeed, to have with us still as our Editor, Marjorie Thompson 
(1912) who has added to her Editorial Board, a number of young Alumnae. Their 
effect on the Bulletin will be interesting to observe. 

(13) 



14 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

Our standing Committees have as usual worked hard and well, and except for 
the Committees on Publicity, and Health and Physical Education, the principal func- 
tions of which have of late been confined to consultation, they will themselves report. 

There have been a few changes in personnel, .Anne Hampton Todd (1902), is 
again serving on the Scholarship Committee; Eleanor Marquand Forsyth (1919), 
not long since an officer of the Association, has been appointed a member of the 
Finance Committee; so has Caroline Morrow Chadwick-Collins (1905) who, it 
seems, can never be spared from any committee on which she has once served. Her 
many remarkable personal qualities, together with her intimate knowledge of both 
Alumnae and College matters, make her invaluable. To the President herself, in 
the four years they have served together on the Executive Board, she has been the 
greatest help and inspiration. Mary Hardy (1920) and Gertrude Emery (1915) 
are both members of the Committee on Health and Physical Education; Frances 
Ohilds (1923) and Elizabeth Nields Bancroft, '98, on the Nominating Committee. 

The death of Gordon Woodbury Dunn (1919) is a sorrow to us all and a 
very special loss to the Academic Committee of which she was a member. Had she 
lived, she would, no doubt, have made to us and to the College a signal contribution. 

The Furnishings Committee of Goodhart Hall of which Edith Pettit Borie, '95, 
is chairman; Elizabeth Bent Clark, '95; Eleanor Marquand Forsyth (1919) ; Frances 
Fincke Hand, '97; Caroline Chadwick-Collins (1905), members, has been function- 
ing as a Special Committee for four years. They had hoped to complete their work 
by this February but were delayed, principally because of the Book which will com- 
memorate the Class gifts and the Memorials. "We have a contract," reports Mrs. 
Borie, "with Mr. Edwin) Fetterolf, who does ornamental lettering for many archi- 
tects here — and who has made such books for the subscribers to historic houses and 
like memorials — We shall have a large folio," she continues — "with a tooled leather 
binding and ornamental lettering to be chained to a desk and stand in the lobby. 
This book has been delayed, because it has seemed wise to get from each Class Presi- 
dent a statement about the purpose of her class — As soon as we can get out data 
verified, the Book will be begun, and if we are not kept waiting too long, should 
be in place at Commencement." 

For those of us who had the pleasure of asking Mrs. Borie to serve as chairman 
of this Committee and of watching her take command of a situation involving many 
difficulties, as well as tedious and painstaking hours of work, it has been a source of 
satisfaction to see with what graciousness and ability she has solved her problems. We 
cannot fully express to her our admiring appreciation and we hope she will accept 
from our Board, our most hearty and cordial thanks. 

Another special committee which we appointed last Spring will report to you 
on the Revision of the By-Laws. At various times in the past we had found in them 
discrepancies and contradictions and so decided upon a complete and expert revision. 
Dorothy Straus (1908) who had only just been released as chairman of the Finance 
Committee, accepted our appointment and formed her Committee. You will see for 
yourselves today, how generously she has given us of her time, her energy and her 
expert knowledge. Our debt to her can only be measured in terms of the affection 
she bears to Bryn Mawr. 

You will hear later, in the report on the Council, of a recommendation that we 
form a Committee "to evaluate the Council." For the chairman of this Committee, 
we are most fortunate in having secured Louise Hyman Pollak (1908). 



1 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 15 

It has fallen to our lot this year also to appoint two Councillors. In District 
VI. Margaret Nichols Hardenbergh (1905), moved out of her district quite shortly 
after her election, almost as much to her concern as to ours. Though we had had 
great hopes of her as a Councillor, we were delighted to find Edna Warkentin Alden 
(1900) of Kansas City, willing to assume the responsibility for the three-year term. 
Mrs. Alden came to the Council and gave us all confidence in the future prospects 
of her district. 

Shortly after the Council, also, Frances Porter Adler (1911) Councillor for 
District V., who had served two years of her term, asked to be released. In her 
place we appointed Gladys Spry Auger (1912), who had already taken part in the 
work of the local Scholarships Committee and whose enviable reputation gives great 
promise for new developments in the "Corn Belt." 

So the year has passed pleasantly with growing interest, we hope, on the part of 
the Alumnae — certainly with great and increasing interest and application on the part 
of all those taking part in the work of Alumnae Association. But to one group in 
particular — rarely spoken of, and yet best known to most, working year after year with 
quiet persistence and excellent effect, — our class collectors, — to them we pay our 
profoundest homage. 

In the same spirit of appreciation, your President, in her fourth and last annual 
report, asks you to bear with her a moment longer that she may tell you how much 
she has enjoyed the privilege of working for you and with you. 

She will remember always with pleasure and affection, the loyalty and support 
of the members of the Board — the interplay of their varied and attractive personalities 
in moments of discussion — their vivid interest in Bryn Mawr; and last though certainly 
not least — the marks of confidence and esteem shown her as an officer of your Associa- 
tion by the President of the College herself. 

In closing, while deeply sensible of our loss, we bring before you for your silent 
recognition, the list of those who have died this year — both our members and our 
friends. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Louise Fleischmann Maclay, 1906, President. 



Mary McMurtrie, (1889) Letitia B. Windle, (1907) 

Katharine M. Shipley, (1890) Gertrude Congdon Crampton, (1909) 
Margaret Patterson Campbell, (1890) (Mrs. Richard L. Crampton) 

(Mrs. Richard C. Campbell) Dr. Elizabeth P. Wolf Blitzen, (1915) 
Ume Tsuda, (1893) (Mrs. U. Lionel Blitzen) 

Marianna Janney, (1895) Adelaide Landon Roddy, (1919) 
Edith M. Peters, (1896) (Mrs. Clyde Harper Roddy) 

Florence Vickers McAllister, (1898) Gordon Woodbury Dunn, (1919) 

(Mrs. Franklin A. McAllister) (Mrs. Frederick S. Dunn) 

Anne G. Maris, (1901) Gulielma Melton Kaminer, (1922) 
Bertha Seely Dunlop, (1905) (Mrs. Harry G. Kaminer) 

(Mrs. George Q. Dunlop) Eleanor C. Bell, (1925) 
. Susan Carey, (1925) 



BUDGET FOR 1930 
INCOME 

1929 1930 

Dues $ 6,500.00 $ 6,650.00 

Income from Life Membership 725.00 900.00 

Bulletin Advertising i, 600.00 1,600.00 

Bank Interest 200.00 250.00 

Grant from College for Committee Enter- 
tainment 300.00 

Miscellaneous 50.00 50.00 



$ 9,375.00 $ 9,450.00 

Appropriation from Alumnae Fund 7,605.00 8 270.00 



$16,980.00 $17,720.00 

DISBURSEMENTS 

Salaries $ 6,350.00 $ 6,650.00 

Operation — 

Postage $ 400.00 $ 400.00 

Printing 550.00 500.00 

Supplies 1 75.00 1 75.00 

Telephone and Telegraph 100.00 100.00 

Auditors 200.00 200.00 

Office Equipment 400.00 400.00 

Miscellaneous 50.00 



$ 1,825.00 $ 1,825.00 

Bulletin — 

Salary of Editor ($600 included in salaries above) 

Printing $2,600.00 $2,600.00 

Mailing and Miscellaneous 525.00 525.00 

$ 3,125.00 $3,125.00 

Traveling — 

Council $1,000.00 $1,000,00 

Executives '.' 650.00 650.00 

Committees 300.00 300.00 



1,950.00 1,950.00 

Expenses of Local Organizations 950.00 500.00 

Other Expenditures — 

Dues in other Associations : 170.00 170.00 

Reserve Fund for possible increase in salaries 150.00 150.00 

Questionnaire to keep up records 400.00 400.00 

Increasing Rhoads Scholarships to $500 each 460.00 450.00 

President Park's Fund 1,000.00 1,000.00 

Deficit on Register 1,000.00 

Emergency Fund 1: 600.00 500.00 



$16,980.00 $17,720.00 

(16) 






REPORT OF THE TREASURER 

The Association has had a most satisfactory year from the financial point of view. 
Our total income of $21,162.40 exceeded that for 1928 by more than $4,730. As our 
expenses increased less than $28 we have a balance of more than $7,000, to be allocated 
by vote of the Association today. 

Our income from dues increased nearly $500, partly as a result of increased 
membership, partly from the collection of back dues. Both advertising in the 
Bulletin and the expense of issuing fell off slightly, with the result that the net 
cost of $1,641.05 differed from that of last year by less than $7.00. Interest on bank 
balances was somewhat smaller, as funds received for Goodhart Hall had been handed 
over to the College. Salaries increased $122.40, operating expenses decreased $186.78. 
The Life Membership Fund grew sufficeintly to enable us to invest $3,000, thereby 
increasing our annual income $160. But the most gratifying increase was shown 
in the contributions to the Undesignated Alumnae Fund, which amounted to the 
splendid total of $11,304.80, an increase of $4,765 over 1928. 

In our budget for 1929, we had estimated that we should have to draw from 
this fund $7,605, but our expenses were limited sufficiently to require only $4,267.35. 
This includes $1,000 for President Park's fund, $500 for supplementing the Rhoads 
Scholarships, and $600 towards the deficit in the Register which the Association had 
assumed. This means that only a little more than $2,000 was drawn from the 
Undesignated Fund for actual expenses. 

At our last Annual Meeting, we had pledged to the College $6,000 for the 
increase of professors' salaries. We have on hand not only this $6,000, but an addi- 
tional $1,037.45 to be applied to the other objectives of the Alumnae Fund. 

In addition to the undesignated contributions; $42,897.36 was paid in to the 
Association for special purposes. This included the furnishings for Goodhart Hall, 
Regional, Book-shop and Special Scholarships, Art Department, Library and an 
anonymous gift of $1,000 from an Alumna to be devoted to Honours Work. 

The designated and undesignated fund together amount to the grand total of 
$54,202.23. This amount from an association numbering about 2,800 members speaks 
more eloquently than words of the generous spirit of the Alumnae, their keen interest 
in the college, and their never-failing willingness to provide for the needs as they arise. 

Margaret E. Brusstar, 1903. 



Report Upon Audit of Accounts 

January 21, 1930. 
We have audited the accounts of The Alumnae Association of Bryn Mawr 
College for the calendar year 1929, and found them to be correct. 

We verified the cash in the various funds on deposit at the banks by corre- 
spondence with the depositories. The Pennsylvania Company for Insurances on Lives 
and Granting Annuities confirmed the securities called for by the accounts as being 
in its custody. 

We verified the income from securities owned and other receipts as recorded in 
the books were found to have been duly deposited in the banks. 

Lybrand, Ross Bros. & Montgomery. 

(17) 



18 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

BALANCE SHEET, December 31, 1929 
ASSETS 
Loan Fund: 

Loans to Students : 

Class of 1924 and prior .'. $3,098.00 

Classes since 1924 11,673.02 

$14,771.02 

Cash 1, 163.4*8 

$15,934.50 

Life Membership Fund: 

Investments at cost, as annexed $16,901.73 

Cash 176.18 

■ 17,077.91 

Carola WoerishofTer Fund: 

Investments at book value, as annexed $1,650.00 

Cash 421.99 

2,071.99 

Alumnae Fund: 

$1,000 Missouri Pacific l-5s, 1965 (Rhoads Fund) $995.75 

Cash 14,341.13 

15,336.88 

General Fund, cash 500.00 

$50,921.28 
LIABILITIES 
Loan Fund: 

Balance, January 1, 1929 $14,223.64 

Interest received during year 210.86 

Gifts from Parents' Fund 500.00 

Gifts from Individuals 1 ,000.00 

$15,934.50 

Life Membership Fund: 

Balance, January 1, 1929 $14,977.09 

Life Memberships received during year 2,100.82 

17,077.91 

Carola Woerishofler Fund: 

Principal : 

Balance, January 1, 1929 $1,950.00 

Interest: 

Balance, January 1, 1929 $270.18 

Amount received during year 101.81 

$371.99 

Less: Summer School Scholarship 250.00 

121.99 

— 2,071.99 

Alumnae Fund, as annexed 15,336.88 

General Fund 500.00 

$50,921.28 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 19 

GENERAL INCOME AND EXPENSE ACCOUNT 
INCOME 

Dues $6,718.26 

Alumnae Contributions for the Association 4,267.35 

Alumnae Bulletin : 

Advertising $1,71 2.00 

Miscellaneous Income 31.50 

1,743.50 

Income from Life Membership Fund 724.16 

Interest on Bank Account 393.37 

Gift from Bryn Mawr College for Alumnae Entertainment 300.00 



$14,146.64 



EXPENSES 
Bulletin: 

Printing $2,383.85 

Salary of Editor 540.00 

Mailing 460.70 

$3,384.55 

Salaries: 

Alumnae Secretary $2,666.64 

Assistant to Alumnae Secretary 1,683.28 

Bookkeeper 1,504.80 

5,854.72 

Traveling: 

Council , $472.10 

Executives 294.84 

Committees 133.46 

900.40 

Local Expenses: 

Regional Scholarship Chairmen 19.46 

Emergency Fund : 

Extra Clerical Assistance $28.13 

Alumnae Festivities 108.08 

Alumnae Register Deficit 600.00 

736.21 

President's Fund 1,000.00 

James E. Rhoads Scholarship 500.00 

Alumnae Register 4.55 

Postage 337.25 

Printing 536.50 

Questionnaire 97.50 

Office Supplies and Equipment 168.22 

Telephone and Telegraph 73.60 

Committee Expenses 43.54 

Dues in Other Associations 170.00 

Class Collectors' Expenses 41.00 

Miscellaneous „ 279.14 



$14,146.64 



20 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

ALUMNAE FUND 

Designated Undesignated Totals 

Balances, January 1, 1929 $1,314.07 $2,299.93 $3,614.00 

Receipts 42,897.36 1 1 ,304.87 54,202.23 



$44,211.43 $13,604.80 $57,816.23 

From On account of 

Disbursements: Designated Appropriations 

Receipts and Transfers 
Alumnae Association, transferred to general 

income and expense account $4,267.35 

I. C. S. A. Fellowship 300.00 

Br}^n Mawr College for increases in salaries 

of Associate Professors 2,000.00 

Furnishings for Goodhart Hall $7,318.81 

Regional Scholarships 1 2,059.48 

Leila Houghteling Memorial Scholarship 10,000.00 

Auditorium of the Students' Building 1,407.25 

Book Shop Scholarships 1,262.08 

Honours Work 1 ,000.00 

Special Scholarships 875.00 

Gifts of Classes of 1929 and 1930 for the 

Goodhart Hall Benches 734.30 

Art Department 695.50 

Library Books 250.00 

Pembroke West, Plumbing 189.25 

Faculty Endowment 50.00 

Class of 1897 43.33 

President's Fund 22.00 

Book Club 5.00 



$35,912.00 $6,567.35 $42,479.35 
Balances, December 31, 1929: 
Designated : 

Furnishings for Goodhart Hall $3,045.45 

James E. Rhoads: 

$1,000 Missouri Pacific l-5s, 1965 $995.75 

Cash 191.56 

1,187.31 

Class of 1889, Harriet Randolph Memorial 195.00 

Class of 1 893 60.00 

Class of 1898, gift for portrait of President Park 3,840.00 

Radnor Dining Room 15.00 



$8,342.76 
Less advances for account of the Class of 1897... 43.33 



$8,299.43 

Undesignated Funds, subject to appropriation 7,037.45 

$15,336.88 



LOAN FUND 

Balance, January 1, 1929 $1,350.87 

Receipts : 

Repayment of Loans by Students $2,275.50 

Interest on Loans 165.18 

Interest on Bank Balances 45.68 

Gift from the Parents' Fund, Bryn Mawr College 500.00 

Gifts from Individuals 1 ,000.00 

3,986.36 



$5,337.23 



Disbursements : 

Loans to Students 4,173.75 

Balance in Girard Trust Co., December 31, 1929 $1,163.48 

LIFE MEMBERSHIP FUND 

Balance, January 1, 1929 $1,023.86 

Receipts: 

Life Memberships '. 2,100.82 



$3,124.68 
Disbursements: 

Purchases of Securities 2,948.50 



Balance in Western Saving Fund Society of Phila., Dec. 31, 1929 $176.18 

LIFE MEMBERSHIP FUND 
Securities Owned, December 31, 1929, at Cost 

$1,000 Alleghany Corp., 5s, 1944 $997.00 

1,000 American Gas & Electric Co. 5s, 2028 - 964.50 

1,000 Georgia Power Co. l-5s, 1967 972.50 

1,000 Argentine Nation 6s, 1960 987.00 

1,000 Public Service Electric & Gas Co. 1-5/s, 1965 1,029.50 

1,000 Southwestern Power & Light Co. l-5s, 1943 .: 990.00 

1,000 Ohio Edison Co. l-5s, 1957 990.00 

1,000 Penna. R. «R. Co. 5s, 1964 : 1,040.75 

1,000 Baltimore & Ohio R. R. Co. Genl. Mtge. 5s, 1995 1,029.50 

500 Indianapolis Water Co. l-5^s, 1953 480.00 

1,000 Penna. Power Co. l-5s, 1956 995.00 

45 shs. Lehigh Coal & Navigation Co., par $50 3,513.48 

2,000 New York Power & Light Corp. 4>^s, 1967 1,912.50 

1,000 Columbia Gas & Electric 5s, 1952 1,000.00 



$16,901.73 



CAROLA WOERISHOFFER FUND 
Securities Owned, December 31, 1929, at Book Values 

$1,000 Ohio State Telephone Co. Cons. & Ref. 5s, 1944 $950.00 

1,000 Chicago Railways Co. l-5s, 1927 700.00 



$1,650.00 



(211 



REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Madam Chairman, Members of the Alumnae Association: 

Since the last Annual Meeting of this Association, two changes have been made 
in the membership of the Finance Committee, Eleanor Marquand Forsyth, 1919, 
taking the place of Julie Benjamin Howson, and the present Chairman that of 
Dorothy Straus, 1908, who had to our great regret finished her term of office and 
was not eligible for reappointment. But she handed over to her successor a com- 
mittee thoroughly well organized, with a clearly defined policy. 
We have met three times. Our business has been: 

The raising of the Budget, and of funds voted to President Park. 

The discussion of Memorials. 

The supervision of the Goodhart Hall accounts. 

The recommendation of disbursements and investments. 

Meeting with the Joint Alumnae Fund Committee to consider the needs 

of the College. 
Discussion of the Budget for next year. 
Meeting the Class Collectors. 
In regard to the raising of the Budget, we have no comment to make except 
that the increase in dues received was undoubtedly owing to the fact that bills were 
mailed four time to delinquents, as against twice in other years. 

Miss Park's Fund: At its first meeting, the Committee accepted the interpreta- 
tion of the Executive Committee as to the commitments of the Association for 1929: 
namely, that we were legally bound to give to the College in February, 1930, the 
sum of $4,000.00, to be used by President Park for academic salaries; and that we 
were morally bound to give an additional $2,000.00 to enable the College to con- 
tinue the increases in the salaries of associate professors which will have been made, 
beginning with September, 1929, with the $2,000.00 of the 1928 surplus, voted 
for this purpose at the last Annual Meeting. These obligations, therefore, were 
emphasized in the Spring publicity material sent to the Class Collectors. 

Memorials: At the last Annual Meeting the recommendation of the Finance 
Committee in regard to Memorials was accepted, and the Committee was instructed 
to add a preamble embodying the sense of the discussion. This preamble reads: 
"In order that those who intend to raise memorial funds or to make gifts to the 
College should know what the needs of the College are, and should be so informed 
that their gifts may be in harmony with College policies, both academic and admin- 
istrative, the Alumnae Association passed the following motion" : 

All alumnae interested in raising memorial funds or special gifts 
shall consult with the Finance Committee, who shall promptly confer 
with the Joint Alumnae Fund Committee concerning the proposed 
object of such gift or memorial. If this he approved by the Jotrit 
Alumnae Fund Committee, the proposed memorial or gift shall forth- 
with be placed on the Alumnae Fund. 
The question of Memorials, discussed at the last Annual Meeting, when a 
form of procedure was set up, was brought before your committee in January by 
Ethel Cantlin Buckley, 1901, Chairman of the Marion Reilly Memorial Fund. The 
proposal that this fund be included among the objectives of the Alumnae Fund for 
1930, was laid before the Joint Alumnae Fund Committee, which gave its approval, 
in accordance with which the Finance Committee recommends toi this meeting that 
the Fund mentioned be added to our list. 

(22) 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 23 

The Finance Committee feels it timely to define a policy for the custody of 
such funds during their collection, and recommends to the Alumnae Association 
that all moneys to be collected for the objects of the Alumnae Fund of the Associa- 
tion should be handled by its representatives. 

Goodhart Hall Accounts: The Association now owes the College only $3,000.00 
more on the Yellin iron contract, and has already $1,000.00 on hand toward the 
payment of it. As there are pledges due in the Spring which will more than cover 
the remainder, we are confident that this account will soon be closed. 

The Finance Committee recommended to the Executive Board that the un- 
expended balance of the undesignated fund for the furnishings of Goodhart Hall be 
used for the immediate needs of the building, in order that the books of the Good- 
hart Hall accounts be closed. We are informed that this will shortly be done. 

The Finance Committee takes this opportunity of reminding the Alumnae that 
the Trustees have assumed the responsibility of the deficit of Goodhart Hall, and 
that with the settling of the Yellin contract our obligations are at an end. 

The Investments of the Association have been entrusted to a sub-committee of 
the Finance Committee and their report is filed herewith. 

As we had reached the close of our fiscal year without any large demand on 
the Emergency Fund of $600.00, budgeted last year, it was voted by the Committee 
to pay with it some of the deficit on the Register. 

The Joint Alumnae Fund Committee: A meeting of the Joint Alumnae Fund 
Committee was called on January 21st, 1930, by Acting-President Manning. The 
Chairman of the Alumnae Fund reported a surplus for the year 1929, of $7,037.45, of 
which amount $6,000.00 had been promised President Park for increases in professors' 
salaries and Honours work, leaving $1,037.45 to be appropriated. Acting-President 
Manning stated that there was no particular need of increase in the salary budget for 
1929-30, but that there would be considerable need in 1930-31. The $6,000.00 given 
this year was used as follows: $1,000.00 for Honours work in English, $2,000.00 for 
increase in salaries of five associate professors, $2,700.00 to cover the salary of the 
new appointment in the French Department, made necessary by the appointment of 
Dean Schenck to the Graduate School. This new appointment in the French 
Department has also enabled that department to give Honours work for eight stu- 
dents so that the increased expenditure might properly be divided between the Grad- 
uate School and Honours work. $300.00 is still to be appropriated, and if it is not 
used during the current year will be added to other money for the increase in salaries 
in 1930-31. 

The Committee recommends that the Treasurer be authorized to pay to the 
College the $6,000.00 promised to President Park. 

As the third object of the Alumnae Fund this year has been the Library, it was 
recommended by the Joint Committee that the surplus over and above $6,000.00 be 
given to it. This recommendation the Finance Committee brings to the Association. 

A discussion of the needs of the College for the coming year followed, and 
these objects of the Alumnae Fund for 1930 were recommended: 

1. Academic salary increases. 

2. Honours work. 

3. Marion Reilly Memorial Fund. 

The sum of $6,000.00 was suggested, with the hope that an additional $1,000.00 
might be raised to increase the salary of a full professor. The Committee recom- 
mends that the amount to be raised for academic purposes in 1930 be $7,000.00. 

A general discussion in regard to raising money for the College resulted in a recom- 
mendation that a committee of Alumnae be appointed to confer with the Executive 
Committee of the Board of Directors of the College on a general financial policy, 
this program to be presented to the Alumnae at the Annual Meeting in 1931. 



24 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

The Finance Committee therefore recommends to this Meeting the appoint- 
ment of a committee of Alumnae. 

A meeting of the Class Collectors was held in New York City on November 
9th, at which eighteen representatives were present. The situation in the various 
classes was gone over in some detail, although it; was too early for the final reports 
of the second mailing of publicity material to the members of the classes to have 
come in. A number of new Collectors have been appointed by the Committee in 
conference with the Presidents of the classes concerned, and I am filing a complete 
list with this report. 

I am herewith filing the report of the Alumnae Fund, and of funds contributed 
by the Alumnae through Mr. Scattergood, Treasurer of the College. 

In closing this report, the Finance Committee further recommends as it did last 
year, that contributions to the Fund be sent in undesignated, and that the amounts 
to be allocated to each of the objectives be fixed by the Association at its next Annual 
Meeting, in accordance with the recommendations of the Finance Committee. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Caroline Florence Lexow, 1908, 
Chairman. 



REPORT OF THE ALUMNAE FUND 

Funds Contributed by Alumnae Through The Alumnae Association 
ALUMNAE FUND 
Designated : 

1. Leila Houghteling Memorial Scholarship _ $10,000.00 

2. Radnor Dining Room (Painting) 15.00 

3. Plumbing (Pembroke West) 189.25 

4. Harriet Randolph Memorial 195.00 

5. Class of 1893, to be designated later 60.00 

6. Art Department ! 695.50 

7. Interest on Rhoads Scholarships Investment 21.31 

8. Special Scholarships 675.00 

9. Book Shop Scholarships 1,262.08 

10. Regional Scholarships • 12,059.48 

1 1 . Special Honors 1 ,000.00 

12. Library 250.00 

13. Book Club 5.00 

14. Portrait of President Park 3,000.00 

15. President's Fund : 22.00 

16. Goodhart Hall Furnishings 11,461.19 

$40,910.81 
Undesignated 11,304.87 

$52,215.68 
Pledged in 1925— Collected, 1929: 

Auditorium $1,407.25 

Benches — Goodhart Hall : 

Contributions from 1930 and 1931 579.30 

1,986.55 

Total collected $54,202.23 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 25 

ALUMNAE FUND (Continued) 

Forward : $54,202.23 

Through Mr. J. Henry Scattergood, Treasurer of the College: 

Book Club $13.25 

Books _ 1,047.50 

Art Department 337.50 

Salary Gift . 1,238.75 

Grace Dodge Division Carola Woerishoffer Dept 2,260.81 

Special Scholarships and Fellowships 3,488.20 

Regional Scholarships 2,650.00 

Horace White Greek Literature Prize 50.00 

Auditorium 1,537.50 

Charlotte Angus Scott Fund 90.00 

Bath Tubs for Pembroke West 1,000.00 

Harriet Randolph Fund \ 3,385.00 

Special Honours 3,000,00 

Stage Set for Goodhart Hall 1,662.62 






$21,761.13 
Received from Marion Reilly Estate for Departments of Physics and 

Mathematics 2,000.00 



Grand Total $77,963.36 

In addition there are outstanding $930.00 on 1929 pledges, and $1,655.22 
have been pledged for the payment in 1930 and 1931. 

The Association paid to the College from its collections $37,163.67. 

The total number of contributors through the Association this year was 1,075, 

of whom 29 were undergraduates. 

* 

COMPARATIVE TABLE 

No. of Alumnae Fund Paid to College 

Contributors Designated Undesignated Balance Treasurer Total 

1929 1075 $40,910.81 $11,304.87 $1,986.55 $23,761.13 $77,963.36 

1928 1424 24,664.18 6,539.66 8,986.60 17,449.25 57,639.69 

Alumnae Fund 

1926 : $13,608.87 

1927 28,186.59 

1928 31,203.84 

1929 52,215.68 

Funds Paid to the College by^ the Association 

1926 $31,642.60 

1927 39,212.83 

1928 52,797.39 

1929 37,163.67 

Respectfully submitted, 

Caroline Florence Lexow, 1908, Chairman. 



THE VICE-PRESIDENTS REPORT ON THE COUNCIL 

Madame President: 

I am told that the Annual Meeting likes nice gossipy reports of the Council 
Meetings, but since the usefulness of the Council is now under fire, and I am an 
ardent supporter of the Council, I do not want to add one word that might lead 
anyone to believe that the Council had a good time in New York or that we enjoyed 
one gay leisure moment. I shall not, therefore, mention the luncheons at the Bryn 
Mawr Club, Mrs. Slade's and Mrs. Loomis's, the dinners at Mrs. Dickerman's, Mrs. 
Thorpe's and Mrs. Maclay's. They .were delightful, and we have expressed our 
thanks individually and collectively to our hostesses, but. in this official report, I 
shall not mention them. You) will then be free to conclude that we ate our meals 
in haste at Child's Restaurant and returned in haste to our business. Least of all 
shall I mention the dinner at the Colony Club, when 160 apostles of the new-molded 
silhouette and the long skirt swished and rustled, admiring and to be admired. You 
will then be free to concludq that our bodies as well as our minds were at all times 
free and unhampered to do business. 

We were very busy. The first afternoon we were plunged into a budget dis- 
cussion. We bore up under that and were able to recommend that the budget be 
accepted as presented. A discussion of the Register followed. The Council felt 
strongly that it wanted the kind of register we have always had, which is so superior 
to that published by most colleges. But} since we cannot afford to pay for such a 
Register often — the Council voiced the need of an address book in the interim of the 
Register's publication. It might be wiser to face the deficit of $1,000 on the last 
issue of the Register than to try to sell the remaining copies by the issue of a supple- 
ment — which has proved unsatisfactory. The Council therefore recommended that 
an Address List be published in 1930-31, provided the College is willing to give the 
time of the Publication^ Department, and that the price of the book be set so that 
it shall cover as nearly as possible the cost of publication. Having fought and con- 
quered the Register question, to its own satisfaction, and desiring more worlds to 
subdue the Council fell with avidity upon the By-Laws, and struggled till after six 
o'clock. We could not have lasted so long at it if a truce had not been called for 
tea, — but being human we were not sufficiently revived to come to a definite decision 
on any of the moot points and signed an armistice till the next afternoon. Oh, I 
don't mean that we didn't work any the next morning! The reports of the District 
Councillors, the reports of the Scholarships and Loan Fund Committee, the Academic 
Committee, the Alumnae Bulletin, the Nominating Committee and the Committee 
on Health and Physical Education, the talk given by the Resident Physician of the 
College, brought out discussion and elicited much interest and approval, but it was 
only when we got back on the By-Laws that we really warmed up. To make a long 
story short, the Council, after a seemly interval, deserted in a body to all the By-Laws 
Committee's recommendations, except those dealing with the Executive Board. The 
By-Laws Committee had discovered that the Association's charter required a Board 
of Five Directors. These we have not had for many years but have been working 
with an Executive Board of Seven members. The By-Laws Committee recommended 
that the charter be changed to permit seven Directors, these Directors to be the 
President, Vice-President, a Secretary, the Treasurer, and two Directors-at-Large, 

(26) 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 27 

one of whom might perform the duties of our Corresponding Secretary, — the other, 
by a gentleman's agreement, would be the Director of Publicity. If she were not, 
she would have no vote. Frankly, the Council did not like this plan. It wanted 
seven members on its governing body, it had proved it needed that many, but felt 
it to be only fair that the Director of Publicity should be secured a vote and be one 
of the seven. In an effort to get a simpler plan, the Council recommended that the 
By-Laws Committee be asked to work out changes in the wording of the Consti- 
tution, necessary to give us the required Board of Directors, to be composed of five 
elected officers of our Association, and our present executive board — President, 
Vice-President, two Secretaries, Treasurer, Finance Chairman, and Publicity Director, 
each body to have whatever function might be required by the laws of Pennsylvania. 
The members of the By-Laws Committee were unimpressed. Now I was one of the 
drafters of that resolution, and I have had it proved to me since, and I believe the 
other drafters and "aye-voters" will see when it is called to their attention, that 
although our plan was legally correct, it was cumbersome in that it created two 
governing boards, the smaller of which could reverse at will any action of the 
larger board — which of course would take away the Director of Publicity's real vote, 
and the real vote of anybody else on the larger board and so not accomplish what we 
struggled for — simplicity and a vote for the Publicity Director. The Executive 
Board, which has met several times since the Council, is now in complete harmony 
with the By-Laws Committee and sees nothing for us to do but accept the present 
plan of the By-Laws Committee which recommends a change in our charter providing 
for seven elected members of the Executive Board: President, Vice-President, Secre- 
tary, Treasurer, Chairman of Finance, and two Directors-at-Large, one to be the 
Corresponding Secretary, one to be the Director of Publicity. It is not a perfect 
plan, for the Publicity Director, when elected for a regular term of office, will be 
ineligible for re-election for a year after her term, but it is possible to invite her to 
sit on the Board that year, and thus have one person continually in that office when 
that is desirable (as it will be as long as Mrs. Collins is Director of Publicity), 
without making her term subject to conditions which obtain in no other office. I 
have been asked to make this statement in detail so that any of the Council members 
who are here, but who are not on the Executive Board, will understand why the 
Board has agreed with the By-Laws Committee that it was not feasible to carry out 
the recommendations of the Council in this matter. 

May I say that I do not think this proves at all that the Council's work on 
the By-Laws has been in vain? On the contrary, I have hopes that because of the 
Council's exhaustive consideration of the By-Laws, this body will be able to accept 
the work of the By-Laws Committee with a great deal of thanks and not too much 
discussion. If it accomplishes that who shall say, abolish the Council? 

Natalie McFaden Blanton, 1917. 



REPORT OF THE ALUMNAE DIRECTORS 

The most important work of the Board of Directors from the Alumnae point 
of view is the change in the charter and By-Laws of the trustees of the College by 
which the Alumnae Directors have a larger participation in the government of the 
Board. This came about last spring through the appointment of a Committee on 
which Mrs. Hand and Mrs. Slade sat "to consider possible revision of the By-Laws, 
the method of administration of the business of the Board and any other questions 
concerning organization and procedure of the Board. The report of the Committee 
was adopted and as a* result the Charter of the Trustees of Bryn Mawr was changed 
to increase the number of Directors from 21 to 25. It was thought the addition of 
more persons would be advantageous to the College. The By-Laws were amended 
to enable the Board of Directors, and not exclusively the Trustees, to nominate persons 
to fill vacancies in the Membership of the Board of Trustees, which nominees shall 
be reported to the Board of Trustees before an election. The number of meetings 
of the Board were reduced from 8 to 4, but with the five standing committees 
meeting in the interval whenever necessary. Copies of the Minutes of these Com- 
mittees are furnished to all members of the Board for information. Any matter 
which any committee or member considers of sufficient importance to be discussed 
by the Board of Directors shall be reported by the Chairman of such Committee to 
the Board for action. 

The officers of the Board of Directors shall be nominated and elected by a vote 
of the Directors; before this change the President, Vice-President, and Secretary of 
the Trustees were similar officers of the Board of Directors. 

As the Board of Directors; is now constituted it consists of the thirteen Trustees 
of Bryn Mawr College, 5 Alumnae Directors and 6 Directors-at-Large. 

During the past year, Mr. Abram F. Huston, a Trustee since 1911 died, and 
Mr. William C. Dennis, a Trustee since 1922, resigned to become President of 
Earlham College; Mrs. Agnes Brown Leach, a former Director-at-Large, and Mr. 
Samuel Emlen were elected Trustees. 

Ruth Furness Porter's term as Alumnae Director ended in December, and the 
Board lost a wise Counsellor but we are fortunate in having so distinguished a suc- 
cessor in Virginia Kneeland Frantz. 

Four new Directors-at-Large have accepted appointment: Mrs. William Hib- 
bard, of Chicago, Class of '97; Mr. Parker S. Williams, and Mr. J. Stogdell Stokes, 
both of Philadelphia, and Mr. Owen D. Young of New York. The Directors are 
to hold office for ten years, in the case of Mr. Young, five years. These selections 
were the work of a committee to suggest names for the vacancies. With Mrs. 
Slade there are at present five Directors-at-Large. The Chairmen of the Committees 
are: Mr. Thomas Raeburn White, Executive Committee; Mr. Charles J. Rhoads, 
Finance Committee; Mr. Frederic Strawbridge, Acting Chairman of the Building 
and Grounds Committee; Dr. Richard Gummere, Chairman of the Library Com- 
mittee; Dr. Rufus M. Jones, Chairman of the Committee on Religious Life. 

An innovation in the past year was the authorization of a graduate hall. Rad- 
nor was selected with the new dean of the graduate school, Miss Eunice Schenck, in 
residence. 

Other academic changes were the promotion of Mrs. Grace deLaguna to a full 
professorship in philosophy, Dr. Joseph Gillet to a full professorship in Spanish with 

(28) 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 29 

salaries of $5,200, and the appointment of Dr. Earl Bond as consulting psychiatrist 
of the College. 

Honors work in English, Latin and History was put into operation in 1929. 

A list of gifts to the College is read in every meeting of the Directors mani- 
festing the interest and appreciation of Alumnae and friends. Among the more 
important gifts are the following: 

$25,000 from Mr. Goodhart, completing his pledge of $100,000 to Goodhart 
Hall made in 1925. 

$1,000 bequest from Marion Reilly to the department of physics, used for 
the purchase of apparatus. 

$1,000 bequest from Marion Reilly to the department of mathematics, used for 
books. 

$1,000 bequest from Marion Reilly to the Chinese Scholarship Fund. 

$21,000 (including $1,000 from Marion Reilly's estate) constituting the 
Chinese Scholarship Fund of which Marjorie Thompson was Chairman and Marion 
Parris Smith, Treasurer. This fund provides a scholarship of $1,000 a year. 

$11,000 addition of capital to the Anna Howard Shaw Fund. 

$5,000, the Ellis D. Williams Endowment Fund. 

$10,000, Leila Houghteling Memorial Scholarship Fund, to establish a scholar- 
ship to be awarded every three years to a freshman needing assistance. 

From the Treasurer's Report for 1928-29 — "The total donations to Scholarships 
amounted to $28,807.12 of which the Alumnae Association for Regional Scholarships 
contributed the impressive sum of $10,109.48." 

Last year when the budget for 1929-30 was finally adopted, after having been 
pared down to the uttermost limit, it showed a deficit of $1,052.57. This was met 
by a resolution to use that part of the Sage Fund not already pledged for pension 
account for general account. In addition there were expenditures for changing 
Radnor and Denbigh and putting in curbing required by the Township Commissioners 
amounting to nearly $10,000. A Committee of Trustees raised the necessary sum 
to cover this expenditure. 

The Treasurer's report shows an actual operating loss for the year ending 
July, 1929, of $18,970.72. In view of the financial outlook the Board voted to 
approve the recommendation of the Executive Committee. 

( 1 ) "That the students should in the future pay a larger share of the cost of the 
tuition, and that it is proposed to make studies immediately of what that share 
should be. 

(2) That in conjunction with this change of policy the College should raise 
such an endowment for scholarships that it will not be cut ofl from the kind of 
students it desires, and that it is proposed to add to the staff of the College a new 
officer who will undertake to find the best candidates from all parts of the country 
for such scholarships. 

(3) That there should be an increase of $100 in undergraduate tuition next 
year, and a $50 increase in graduate tuition (sufficient allowance to be made in next 
year's budget to remit this increase in the case of students now at the College who 
are unable to meet it)." 

Respectfully submitted, 

Elizabeth Lewis Otey, 1901, 

(For the Alumnae Directors.) 



30 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



CLASS NOTES 

1898 
Class Editor: Edith Schoff Boericke 
(Mrs. John J. Boericke), 
328 Brookway, Merion Station, Pa. 

It is with deep regret that we must 
record the death last August of Helen 
Holman Durham's husband, Dr. Roger 
Durham, of Brooklyn, N. Y. Helen and 
her son, Roger, Jr., and her daughter 
Helen have moved from their big house 
into a lovely apartment at 50 Plaza street, 
Brooklyn, and Roger, Jr., is in business 
and Helen, Jr., studying in New York. 
She gave up going to Bryn Mawr so as to 
be with her mother this winter. We ex- 
tend our deepest sympathy to Helen and 
her family. 

Frances Brooks Ackermann writes : 
"My principal work outside is with Mar- 
garet Sanger for Birth Control. It seems 
to be so fundamental and underlies so 
many of our troubles that I consider it 
very worth while." Fannie's daughter is 
very happily married. 

Sarah Ridgway Bruce, Mary Sheppard 
and Bertha Wood invited seven members 
of '98 from Philadelphia and one other 
from New York to lunch at the Town 
Hall Club in New York and a matinee on 
Saturday, January 18th, and we had a 
wonderful time together. In spite of snow 
and rain and ice, we all turned up for the 
10 o'clock train. Rebecca Foulke Cregar, 
Mary Bright and Mary Githens Calvert, 
from Wayne; Esther Willetts Thomas, 
from Haverford; Edith Schoff Boericke, 
from Merion, and Martha Tracy, from 
Philadelphia, and Helen Williams Wood- 
all, from Jenkintown. Our visit began on 
the train, and continued when we joined 
the others, including Isabel Andrews, at 
the Town Hall Club. We saw A. A. 
Milne's charming play, "Michael and 
Mary," at the fascinating Punch and Judy 
Playhouse, and visited some more between 
acts — then scattered, some to go home and 
some to visit other friends. It was a de- 
lightful little reunion. 

Catharine Bunnell Mitchell writes us 
some details about Florence Vickers Mac- 
Allister's illness and death from flu Janu- 
ary 30th, 1929. Her oldest daughter 
Elizabeth was called home from the Uni- 
versity of Colorado, and she and the 
other daughter and son are keeping house 
at Beverly Hills, John going to Southern 
Branch of the University of California, 
and Florence to the Wisttah School. Mr. 
MacAllister travels a good deal, and is 
only occasionally with them. 

Alice Hammond had a bad nervous 
collapse last spring, and Catharine Mit- 
chell took her back West with her in June 



after school closed, but after a few weeks 
there Alice decided to take a year off, and 
spend it in England and Italy, sailing Oc- 
tober 3rd. She is in Florence now and 
will wind up the year with the Virgil Bi- 
millennial Tour. 

1904 
Class Editor: Emma O. Thompson, 

320 S. 42nd Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Edith McMurtrie has a picture in the 
annual exhibition at the Academy of the 
Fine Arts. It is entitled the "First Spot- 
light." 

Rebecca Ball enjoyed her trip abroad 
immensely — she spent part of the time in 
Italy. 

Ruth Wood Smith's husband passed 
away in the early part of January. 

Nineteen hundred and four has decided 
to have its Reunion Dinner in Rockefeller 
on the night of Tuesday, June 3rd. It is 
planned to hold the dinner on Tuesday 
instead of Saturday as formerly so that 
it will be possible for members of the 
class to attend Commencement Wednes- 
day morning. An informal luncheon with 
1901, 1902 and 1903 will be held at Wynd- 
ham on Monday, June 2nd. 

1905 
Class Editor: Eleanor Little Aldrich 
(Mrs. Talbot Aldrich), 
59 Mt. Vernon St., Boston, Mass. 

Leslie Farwell Hill sends the following : 
"I had hardly mailed my last post-card to 
you when Ned called me up from Wash- 
ington to ask whether I had any objection 
to moving to San Francisco to live. He 
is going as vice-president of the Bethle- 
hem. Ship and Steel interests, out there. 
As yet we have no house but we expect 
to live outside of the city in Ross. Ned 
is already there and I leave on February 
5th. The children are remaining at West- 
over and Yale." 

Alice Bartlett Stoddard is principal of 
the Cathedral School, at Orlando, Florida. 
This is a boarding and day school for 
girls. 

Carla Denison Swan did not spend the 
Christmas holidays in Bermuda as was 
previously reported. The Swan family had 
set sail on the steamer Fort Victoria and 
when this craft was rammed and sunk 
not far from New York they lost all their 
luggage with Carla's famous wardrobe. 
She said her one anxiety after they were 
all safe themselves in the lifeboats was 
lest her glasses fall overboard and she 
reach land unable to see anything! They 
stayed two days in New York shopping 
and then traveled to Pinehurst and spent 
a happy vacation, like the best sports 
imaginable. 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 






The engagement is announced of Ada- 
line Havemeyer Frelinghuysen's daughter 
Frederica to Richard High Carleton, Jr., 
of New York City. 

Florance Waterbury had a "two-man" 
exhibition of her work in New York dur- 
ing January, which was very well spoken 
of by the critics. 

Elizabeth Henry Redfield sailed Janu- 
ary 15th for Egypt, Palestine, Constanti- 
nople, Greece, Italy and Sicily. She plans 
to be home early in May. Her address is 
c/o Thomas Cook and Son, London. 

The class will be interested to hear that 
Lydia Moore's husband, Henry Tatnall 
Bush, has married again after these many 
years. 

Margaret Nichols Hardenbergh's 
daughter Alice is president of the class of 
1932 at Bryn Mawr. 

Edith Longstreth Wood has a picture 
very well hung in the annual exhibition 
of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine 
Arts. 

1906 

Class Editor: Louise Cruice Sturdevant 

(Mrs. Edward W. Sturdevant), 

Marine Barracks, Quantico, Va. 

Ruth Archbald Little writes that lecture 
programs for the Englewood Woman's 
Club and working for the hospital fills 
her time to say nothing of keeping up 
with Halstead who wishes to spend his 
spare time dancing and playing contract. 

Ethel Bullock Beecher has just sent 
her baby off to boarding school, Hopkins 
Grammar School, outside of New Haven. 
Carol, the oldest girl, is enjoying her jun- 
ior year at Bryn Mawr. They spent part 
of last summer at Wallop's Island just 
off of Cape Charles. She also sent a 
postal from Helen Gibbons at Yokohama, 
on her way to China, where they expect 
to spend some months before returning 
to the girls in Paris. 

Mary Collins Kellogg spent a delightful 
summer abroad. At Easter she went to 
southern France with her boy and girl 
and in June they met Mr. Kellogg at 
Naples. A month in Italy, two weeks in 
Zermatt, and a final week in Paris be- 
fore returning in late August gave them 
many refreshing experiences. 

Alice Colgan Boomsliter's eldest girl 
is a sophomore at Mt. Holyoke. Peggy 
will graduate from high school in June 
and Paul the following June. 

Alice's major activities outside of 
housekeeping are the League of Women 
Voters and the Council of Social Agen- 
cies, _ which she was instrumental in 
creating. 



1909 
Class Editor: Helen Bond Crane, 
Denbigh Hall, Bryn Mawr. 

D. Child, who is still in the Division 
of Medical Inspection of Public Schools 
in Philadelphia, in her leisure moments 
is taking two courses in Education at the 
U. of P., in order to acquire the technique 
for teaching nurses to teach health edu- 
cation in the schools. She has been having 
mid-years, just like any young thing 
on this campus; lately she has devised 
and copyrighted a series of health-teach- 
ing sheets for young children, called 
"Health and Color in Silent Reading." 

The class wishes to extend sincere 
sympathy to Alta Stevens Cameron, 
whose mother died in December after 
some months of illness. 

1912 
Editor: Elizabeth Pinney Hunt 
(Mrs. Andrew Dickson Hunt), 
Haverford, Pa. 
Mary Peirce is recuperating from an 
operation performed early in January at 
the Bryn Mawr Hospital. 

Helen Colter Pierson has a second 
daughter, Polly, born in October. This is 
her sixth child. Helen's eldest boy will 
enter the engineering college of Cincin- 
nati University next fall. She writes that 
her time is fully occupied with her large 
family, and that she actually begins to 
feel a bit old. 

1914 
Class Editor: Elizabeth Ayer Inches 

(Mrs. Henderson Inches), 
41 Middlesex Road. Chestnut Hill, Mass. 



It is with deep regret that we learn of 
the sudden death of Emily Brownback 
Smith at Bryn Mawr on February 7th, 
when her daughter was born. Emily's 
comradeship and understanding and her 
most generous hospitality to 1914 will 
never be forgotten. We wish to extend 
our very real sympathy to her husband 
and family for their .great loss. 

We shall all feel dreadfully to hear 
that Braley was in a bad automobile ac- 
cident in December and that gangrene set 
in which necessitated the amputation of 
one foot. We hear that she is a wonder- 
ful sport about it, and we all wish her a 
very speedy recovery. She is at the hos- 
pital in Mineola, Long Island. 

Nan Bulkley's husband was also in an 
accident which injured his ribs and collar 
bone but we hear that he is getting on 
nicely. 

Alice's third son, John Chapman Ches- 
ter, was born January 2nd. 



32 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



1922 
Class Editor: Serena Hand Savage, 
(Mrs. Wra. L. Savage), 
29 West Twelfth Street, New York 



Gulielma Melton Kaminer died sudden- 
ly on the 21st of October at Charlotte, 
North Carolina. She was ill only three 
days with an acute streptococcus of the 
throat. To her husband and little five- 
month-old son we send our deep sym- 
pathy for their tragic loss. 

After college Gulie lived in Columbia, 
South Carolina. She was one of the 
charter members and first officers of the 
Junior League there, and to this organi- 
zation she contributed her enthusiasm and 
ability. She was married five years ago, 
but had only recently moved to Charlotte. 

In our sorrow for her untimely death, 
we can be glad of the memory of such 
a happy personality, for she will be re- 
membered even by those who knew her 
least, for her friendliness and spontaneous 
gaity. 



Suzanne Aldrich Drinker has a second 
daughter, Mary Eliza, born on the 13th 
of November. 

Audrey Fountain was married to Mr. 
Edward Clark Porter, on Friday, the 3rd 
of January, in Scarsdale. Audrey's hus- 
band is a brother of Nancy Porter, '21, 
and the happy pair will live in Chicago. 
Peggy Kennard says the wedding was one 
of the nicest she'd ever attended. 

Marian Garrison is teaching the Sci- 
ence at Rosemary Hall. 

Constance LaBoiteaux Sangree was 
married on Friday, the 11th of October, 
to Mr. Charles Buttrick, at Bryn Mawr. 

Ursula Batchelder Stone lives in Chi- 
cago. She and her husband are study- 
ing History, Economics, and Sociology. 
They live near the University where her 
husband teaches. 

Vinton Liddell Pickens, with her hus- 
band and two children, expects to spend 
the summer in Europe. 

Betty Titcomb is living in Hartford 
and doing interior decorating as a pro- 
fession. 

1923 
Class Editor: Mrs. Philip B. Kunhardt, 
Mt. Kemble Ave., Morristown, N. J. 

Florence Martin Chase and her hus- 
band are sailing for a six weeks' trip in 
Europe, the main objective being the 
wedding of a cousin in Poland, after 
which they will drift back to this country 
by way of Paris. 

Rosamond Raley Braley has a daugh- 



ter, born December 2nd, in the Lancaster 
General Hospital and named Mary Rosa- 
mond Braley. 

Mary Morsman Masters has a son who 
is now several months old and whose 
name is Francis Robert Masters, Jr. 

Helen Rice has taken up woodcarving 
— has produced several masterpieces, I 
hear, and divides her time between that 
and the violin. 

Dorothy Meserve Kunhardt has a third 
child, a second son, born January 5th. 

Helen Hoyt Stookey has a son, born 
at Sloane Hospital, on January twenty- 
ninth. 

1924 
Class Editor: Beth Tuttle Wilbur, 
(Mrs. Donald Wilbur), 
5048 Queen St., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Monkey Smith Davison is living in 
Danville, Pa., where her husband is asso- 
ciated with the eye, ear, nose and throat 
department of the hospital. She says 
that any of '24 with a view either to 
tea or tonsils are welcome, and promises 
more news in the near future. 

Priscilla Fansler Hobson was married 
on December 11th to M. R. Alger Hiss, 
of Washington, D. C. 

Molly Angell McAlpin writes: "I'm 
not much on news, for I've been too busy 
the last six months having flu, tonsils re- 
moved, and a nose operation, to have time 
to catch up on myself. My only personal 
news is old, being one daughter, aged 
twenty-one months; blue eyes, curly yel- 
low hair, a sense of humor, and a deter- 
mined disposition. I hope she will want 
to go to Bryn Mawr, but have hesitated 
to suggest it to her as yet." 

Mary Lou White sends us the latest 
from the stage: "The job, alas, is no 
more ! We died after ten weeks on the 
road and nothing turned up since. Plays 
like "Journey's End" and "Wings Over 
Europe," make life almost impossible for 
the aspirant actress. One more non- 
feminine drama, and I join the Salva- 
tion Army ! But you know — how about 
some Wilbur news for the '24 column ?" 

The latest Wilbur news is that we are 
again transplanted — this time to Minne- 
apolis, where we have a small house 
which is a great improvement over our 
Chicago four-room apartment. The fam- 
ily thrives, and it takes at least one Pull- 
man journey weekly to keep the children 
happy. I pass my time when not en 
route, or being mater familias, between 
a piano, a horse, and a hockey stick, not 
to mention a book now and then. 

Anna Pratt Abbott has a son, Henry 
David Abbott, who was born on Christ- 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



mas Day. She says that he is a paragon 
among babies, and that henceforth she 
will forgive all other boasting mothers 
if she may be forgiven now ! 

1925 
Class Editor: Elizabeth Mallett 
Conger (Mrs. Frederic Conger), 
325 E. 72nd St., New York City 

The Editor having departed for_ the 
hospital on the very day she was writing 
these class notes, we beg to report that 
mother and son are both doing nicely. 
One boy, almost 9 pounds, born February 
2nd, name as yet unsettled, according to 
the modest Mr. Conger. (We had heard 
rumors of Frederic, Jr.) 

Crit Coney has announced her engage- 
ment to Edward Francis D'Arms, of the 
Classics Department at Princeton. He 
graduated from Princeton in 1925, was 
a Rhodes Scholar, and is teaching at 
Princeton this year. Next year he ex- 
pects to pursue a PhD. there. 

Another addition to the Princeton fac- 
ulty wives: Nan Hough is engaged to 
Baldwin Smith, Professor of Art and 
Archaeology there. He graduated from 
Bowdoin in 1911. They expect to be 
married in June. 

1927 
Class Editor: Ellenor Morris, 
Berwyn, Pa. 

On December twenty-first "Nanette" 
Chester was married to Mr. Chard 
Powers Smith. They are, according to 
reports, now living in Greenwich Vil- 
lage. 

A few days later, December twenty- 
sixth to be exact, Jane Sullivan became 
Mrs. Lewis Curtis Perry. Mr. and Mrs. 
Perry have, so I hear, taken up their resi- 
dence in New Haven, exact address un- 
known. 

On the eighth of February, Beatrice 
Pitney was married in Washington to Mr. 
Horace R. Lamb. No further details 
have been forthcoming. 

Mary Cruikshank has returned from 
Panama and is at the moment in Wash- 
ington with her grandmother. As usual 
with Crooky, however, it is here today, 
and gone tomorrow. General Cruikshank 
has been moved to Oklahoma and the 
family leaves for there in a short time. 

"Sylly" Walker is engaged to Jerry 
Dillon, of New York, and Val writes 
that the wedding is set for June. We 
hope "Syl" will forward further details 
in due time. At any rate she gave us 
warning of impending events some time 
back, but I don't think we sang to Mr. 
Dillon on the memorable evening of that 
class dinner. Well, here's to him now! 



i Low Rate — Low Cost 




Which Road to 
Knowledge 

Would He Choose Today? 

There's immortality in store 
for the man who can gain knowl- 
edge by the light of the cabin 
fireside. 

But there are few parents, 
indeed, who would care to have 
their children follow the same 
route today. Many prefer to 
make education a certainty for 
their children by a Provident 
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Just send the coupon for full 
particulars. 

Trovident 'Mutual 

Life Insurance Company of 'Philadelphia 

Pennsylvania Founded /86j 

Paul Loder, Manager 

123 South Broad Street 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



You may send me full information about 
the Provident Educational Policy. 



My Date of Birth . 



The Saint Timothys School 
for Girls 

CATONSVILLE, MARYLAND 

Founded September 1882 

COLLEGE PREPARATORY 

AND 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

MISS LOUISA McENDREE FOWLER 
Head of the School 

Wykeham Rise 

WASHINGTON, CONNECTICUT 

A COUNTRY SCHOOL 
FOR GIRLS 

FANNY E. DAVIES, LL.A., Headmistress 
Prepares for Bryn Mawr and Other Colleges 

The Episcopal Academy 

{Founded 1785) 

CITY LINE, OVERBROOK, PA. 

A country day school for boys 

MODERN AND WELL EQUIPPED 
Endorsed by Bryn Mawr Alumnae 

UN1VERSITY£.r{S 

BOARDING AND DAY SCHOOL 

Founded 1896 

Thorough and successful Preparation 

for Eastern Colleges for Women as well as 

for Midwestern Colleges and Universities 

Illustrated Catalogue on Request 

ANNA B. HAIRE, A.B., SMITH COLLEGE, Principal 

1106-B Lake Shore Drive Chicago, Illinois 

THE LOW AND » 
HEYWOOD SCHOOL 

Emphasizing college preparatory work. 

Also general and special courses. 

One year intensive college preparation. 

Junior school. 

65th year. Catalogue. 

SHIPPAN POINT, 
STAMFORD, CONN. 



The Ethel Walker School 

SIMSBURY, CONNECTICUT 

Head of School 

ETHEL WALKER SMITH, A.M., 
Bryn Mawr College 



Head Mistress 

JESSIE GERMAIN HEWITT, A.B., 
Bryn Mawr College 



kOGERSHAIX/ 

fA Modern School wilh New England Traditions 



T|0< 

m^AHoi 

HI^Sr Thorough Preparation for any College 

Eg ^^ One Year Intensive Review 

jifi ^^L^ General Academic Course with dl- 
•JMb ^^Tploma. Junior College Courses — Home 
Economics, Secretarial Training, Music, Art, Dramatic 
Art. 26 Miles from Boston Outdoor Sports. Riding. 
Gymnasium. Swimming Pool. 

EDITH CHAPIN CRAVEN, A.B., Bryn Mawr 
201 Rogers Street, Lowell, Mass. 

/1ARCUAV SCHQ>L 

BRYN MAWR, PA. 
Prepares for Bryn Mawr and 
EiiiilfJ all leading colleges 

Musical Course prepares for the Depart- 
ment of Music of Bryn Mawr College 
EDITH HARCUM, Head of School 
L. May Willis, Principal 

THE MISSES KIRK'S 

College Preparatory School 

PREPARATORY TO BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

Individual Instruction. Athletics. 

Clovercroft, Montgomery Avenue, Rosemont, Pa. 

Mail, telephone and telegraph address: Bryn MavOr, Pa. 



CHOATE SCHOOL 

1600 Beacon Street, Brookline, Mass. 

HOME AND DAY SCHOOL 
FOR GIRLS 

EMPHASIS ON COLLEGE PREPARATION 

Elective Courses for students not preparing 
for College 

AUGUSTA CHOATE, A.M. (Vassar) 

Principal 



Kindly mention B»yn Maws Bulletin 



THE AGNES IRWIN SCHOOL 

2009-2011 Delancey Place, Philadelphia 

A College Preparatory 
SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 



BERTHA M. LAWS, A.6., Headmistress 



The Baldwin School 

A Country School for Girls 
BRYN MAWR PENNSYLVANIA 

Preparation for Bryn Mawr, Mount Holyoke. Smith. 

Vassar and Wellesley college*. Abundant outdoor life 

Hockey, basketball, tennis. 

ELIZABETH FORREST JOHNSON. A.B. 
HEAD 

BANCROFT SCHOOL 
FOR GIRLS 

30th Year. Complete College Preparation. 

Individual Attention to carefully selected group in 
Boarding Department of Progressive Day School. 
Summer and Winter Sports. Dramatics, Art, 
Music. Address 
HOPE FISHER, Principal, Worcester, Mass. 

The Katharine Branson School 

ROSS, CALIFORNIA Across the Bay from San Francisco 

A Country School College Preparatory 

Head: 
Katharine Fleming Branson, A.B., Bryn Mawr 

MISS MADEIRA'S SCHOOL 

1330 19th St., N W. Washington, D. C. 

A RESIDENT AND DAY SCHOOL FOR 
GIRLS 

LUCY MADEIRA WING, A.B. 

MRS. DAVID LAFOREST WING 

Head Mistress 

MISS WRIGHT'S SCHOOL 

Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Prepares for College Board 
Examination 



FERRY HALL 

A RESIDENT AND DAY SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

On Lake Michigan, near Chicago 

Junior College; High School Department: College 
Preparatory and General Courses. Special Departments 
of Music, Expression and Art. 

Two new dormitories, including new dining room and 
infirmary. 

Eloise R. Tremain, A.B., Bryn Mawr, Principal 

ROSEMARY HALL 

College Preparatory 
(With supplementary but not alternative courses) 



CAROLINE RUUTZ-REES. PhD 
MARY E. LOWNDES. M.A., Litt.D 



Head Mislruiu 



GREENWICH 



CONNECTICUT 



The Shipley School 

Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 

Preparatory to Bryn Mawr College 

ALICE G. HOWLAND, ELEANOR 0. BROWNELL 
Principals 

MISS RANSOM and 
MISS BRIDGES' SCHOOL 

PIEDMONT, CALIFORNIA 

(A suburb of San Francisco) 

A RESIDENT AND DAY SCHOOL FOR GIRL8 

General and College Preparatory Courses 
Outdoor Life throughout the year 

EDITH BRIDGES, B.L., Principal 



1 arrison Forest 



^[ y A Country School in the Green 
Spring Valley near Baltimore. 
Modern Equipment. 

All Sports. Special Emphasis on Horse- 
back Riding. Mild Climate. 
Garrison Forest Girls who are going to college 
are thoroughly prepared for any institution. 
Other girls take courses with special emphasis 
on Music and Art. Younger girls live in a 
separate Junior House. 

Principals 

MISS JEAN G. MARSHALL 

MISS NANCY OFFUTT, 
Bryn Mawr, ex '20 

Box B, Garrison, Maryland 



Kindly mention Bsyn Mawr Bulletin 













MISS BEARD'S SCHOOL 




1 *s* :-■% ;-M 




A Country School near New York 




: ' 




Orange, New Jersey 




r ■■■ 




COLLEGE PREPARATION 

Advanced Courses Junior High School 

Music, Art, Domestic Science 




!■' ■■,:: - : ':''-:,-■-■■• ^ ; 




Cathedral School of St. Mary 

GARDEN CITY, LONG ISLAND, N. Y. 


Catalog on Request 
LUCIE C. BEARD, Headmistress 




A school for Girls 19 miles from New York. College 

preparatory and general courses. Music Art and 

Domestic Science. Catalogue on request. Box B. 

MIRIAM A. BYTEL, A.B., RaddifTe, Principal 

BERTHA GORDON WOOD, A.B., Bryn Mawr, 

Assistant Principal 






The Traphagen School of Fashion 


The Phebe Anna 


• v INTENSIVE SIX WEEKS 
i%k SUMMER COURSE 


Thorne School 


I Gjk. I All phases from elementary to full 

V#2B^I mastery ol costume design and illus- 

JRflkl tration taught In shortest time con- 

f|Ht sistent with thoroughness. Day and 

vjl«l| Evening classes. Saturday courses for 

J raES^H Adults and Children. Our Sales De- 

&9gHP partment disposes of student work. 

^BSmML Every member of advanced classes 

^BBm^^ often placed through our Employment 

Bureau. Write for announcement. 


of BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

UNDER THE DIRECTION OF THE 
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 

A progressive school preparing for all colleges. Open 
air class rooms. Pre-school, Primary, Elementary 


In Arnold, Constable & Company Costume 
Design Competition, over 100 schools and 
nearly 800 students took part; all prizes 
were awarded to Traphagen pupils with 
exception of one of the five third prizes. 

1680 Broadway (near 52nd Si.) New York 


and High School Grades. 

BRYN MAWR, PA. 

AGNES L. ROGERS, Ph.D., Director 
FRANCES BROWNE, A.B., Head Mistress 


I 




Escondido 


T>iSTi^(criF£ 




Riding in the 


Millinery 




New Mexico Rockies 










Motoring in the 


< 

successfully caps 
the climax of 




Indian Country 




JUNE 26 - AUGUST 6 


fashion and the < 




Trip for a Small Group 


smart ensemble. I 




of College Girls 
Write for Booklet 


SAKS-FIFTH AVENUE 

FORTY- NINTH to FIFTIETH STREET 




AGATHE DEMING, Director 
924 West End Avenue 


NEW YORK 1 




New York City 





Kindly mention Bryn Mawb Bullktih 





1896 1930 

BACK LOG CAMP 

THE ADIRONDACK MOUNTAINS 
INDIAN LAKE, NEW YORK 

TROUT FISHING 

/ said in my haste, All men are liars — Ps. 1 16 : 11. 

Despite the Psalmist's gloomy observation, in making which he was doubtless 
thinking of his fishermen friends, the following remarks on the trout fishing offered 
by Back Log Camp can be relied on. 

Trout fishing is an old tradition in the family. To the practiced fisherman we 
guarantee trout, fifteen to thirty at a catch; not huge Canadian trout, but gamy 
seven to (rarely) twelve inch trout that eat divinely. 

For a day's trip we catch them from a tiny canoe on beaver dams in the Miami 
river (except a prolonged warm spell). Over the first ridge lies Little Squaw Brook 
with our fishing camp on it, always good for some trout, usually for one to two 
hundred to four rods on a two-night trip. 

Somewhat harder to get to but not beyond the reach of a man in fair condi- 
tion, lies Cedar river, on which we have as pretty a camp as you will care to see. 
Here, according to the weather, trout are or are not caught. Beyond Cedar river, 
a hard eight-hour walk from Back Log, we have a third fishing camp on Otter Brook. 
Here trout can be promised to the veriest greenhorn. Last summer a boy of 
twelve caught twelve in an hour, fly-fishing. 

Letters of inquiry should be addressed to Other references 



Mrs. Bertha Brown Lambert (Bryn Mawr, 1904) 

272 Park Avenue 
Takoma Park, D. C. 



Mrs. Anna Hartshorne Brown (Bryn Mawr, 1912) 

Westtown, Penna. 

Dr. Henry J. Cadbury 
(Head of Biblical Dept., Bryn Mawr) 

Haverford, Penna. 



Who is 
Kagawa? 

He is the outstand- 
ing Japanese Chris- 
tian in Asia.^What 
has he done? ^ 
Preached in the 
streets, lived in the 
slums, built schools 
and now is conduct- 
ing his "Million 
Souls for Jesus" 
campaign. 




It belongs to the literature both 
of power and knowledge; it 
might be called wisdom 
literature. — Galen M. , 
Fisher, Executive 
Secretary, Institute 
of Social and 

Religious ^^^ ^O^ 
lust arch. f »\ vN* 



vO^ 



*&>' 



<&* 



Y$" 






THE JOHN C. 
WINSTON COMPANY 

PHILADELPHIA 



^ o* Every 
$&* Christian 

should read his book for 
its inspirational message 
and its profound philoso- 
phy. ^ It is a challenge to 
try the Way of Love. ^ 
Kagawa's first book went 
through 180 editions in 
Japan ; now he has written 
for English readers his 
views of lif e and the world. 
At all bookstores. $2.00 



Kindly mention Bsyn Mawb Bullitin 





Where Children Shine 

ON THE RHODE ISLAND SEASHORE AT MATUNUCK 

Twenty Miles East of Watch Hill 

GIRLS 8 to 16 YEARS COUNSELORED GIRLS 16 YEARS AND OVER CHAPERONED 

The Play Spirit — Wise Supervision — Simplicity of Living — Co-ordination of Mind and Body 
Rhythmic Dancing— Guarded Surf Bathing— Horseback Riding — Outdoor Life 
Recreational Facilities— Private Beach— Woods — Fields— Ponds — Streams 

ALSO THE COMET'S TAIL FARM FOR BOYS, GREEN HILL, RHODE ISLAND 
TERMS BY SEASON OR WEEK— SEND FOR CAMP BOOKLETS 

Director: MRS. ALICE JAYNES TYLER, Bryn Mawr, B.A., 34 Edgehill Road, New Haven, Connecticut 
Kindly mention Bryn Maw* Bulletin 



BRYN MAWR 
ALUMNAE 
BULLETIN 




r «e THufrtis^ 



THE ACADEMIC COMMITTEE 

AND 

THE SCHOLARSHIPS COMMITTEE 

REPORTS 



April, 1930 



Vol. X 



No. 4 



Entered as second-class matter, January 15, 1921, at the Post Office, Phiia., Pa., under Act of March 3, 1879 

COPYRIGHT, 1930 

ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 



OFFICERS OF THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

EXECUTIVE BOARD 

President Anne Kiddiok Wilson, 1903 

Vice-President Mary Hardy, 1920 

Recording Secretary Gertrude Heahne Myers, 1919 

Corresponding Secretary May Egan Stokes, 1911 

Treasurer Margaret E. Brusbtar, 1903 

Chairman of the Finance Committee Caroline Florence Lexow, 1908 

Chairman of the Publicity Committee Caroline Morrow Chadwick-Collins, 1905 

ALUMNAE SECRETARY AND BUSINESS MANAGER OF THE BULLETIN 

Alice M. Hawkins, 1907 

EDITOR OF THE BULLETIN 

Marjorie L. Thompson, 1912 

DISTRICT COUNCILLORS 

District 1 Helen Evans Lewis, 1913 

District II Jeanne Kerr Fleischmann, 1910 

District III Alletta Van Reypen Korff, 19 i() 

District IV Katharine Holliday Daniels. 1918 

District V Gladys Spry- Augur, 1912 

District VI Edna Warkentin Alden, 1900 

District VII Helen Brayton B arendt, 1 903 

ALUMNAE DIRECTORS 

Frances Fincke Hand, 1897 Margaret Reeve Gary. 1907 

Mary Peirce, 1912 Elizabeth Lewis Otey, 1901 

Virginia Kneeland Frantz, 191S 

CHAIRMAN OF THE ALUMNAE FUND 

Caroline Florence Lexow. 1908 

CHAIRMAN OF THE ACADEMIC COMMITTEE 

Pauline Goldmark, 1896 

CHAIRMAN OF THE SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOAN FUND COMMITTEE 

Margaret Gilman, 1919 

CHAIRMAN OF THE COMMITTEE ON HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Dr. Marjorie F Murray, 1913 

CHAIRMAN OF THE NOMINATING COMMITTEE 

Eleanor Little Aldrjch, 1905 



Katharine Gibbs 

A school of unusual character with a distinctive 
purpose for educated women 
SECRETARIAL ACADEMIC EXECUTIVE 

BOSTON Special Course for College 

... „ c Women. Selected subjects 

90MarlboroMreet preparing for executive posi- 
tions. Separate classrooms 
and special instructors 
One-year Course includes tech- 
nical and broad businesstrain- 
ing preparing for positions of 
a preferred character. 
Two-year Course for prepara- 
tory and high school gradu- 
ates. First year includes six 
college subjects. Second year 
intensive secretarial training 
Booklet on request 



Resident and 
Day School 



NEW YORK 
247 Park Avenue 



PROVIDENCE 
155 Angell Street 



For children whose parents are traveling abroad 

ROSEMARY CAMP 

St. Tropez, Var, France 

Ten Hours From Paris 
GIRLS 4-20 BOYS 4-12 

JUNE 15-SEPTEMBER 15, 1930 

Limited enrollment permits individual attention. 

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herd. Outdoor sleeping porches. French sur- 
roundings. American hygiene 

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Director, MME. MARCEL JOURDAN 

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after June 6th, "Villa Sigurd," St. Tropez, Var, France 

1st chaperoned group sails June 6 
2nd chaperoned group sails June 21 



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Kindly mention Bryn Mawb Bulletin 



Bryn Mawr Alumnae 
Bulletin 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF 
THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

Marjorie L. Thompson, '12, Editor 
Alice M. Hawkins, '07, Business Manager 

EDITORIAL BOARD 
Mary Crawford Dudley, '96 Emily Kimbrough Wrench, '21 

Caroline Morrow Chadwick-Collins, '05 Ellenor Morris, '27 
Emily Fox Cheston, '08 Elinor B. Amram, '28 

Anne Kidder Wilson, '03, ex-officio 



Subscription Price, $1.50 a Year Single Copies, 25 Cents 

Checks should be drawn to the order of Bryn Mawr Alumnae Bulletin 
Published monthly, except August, September and October, at 1006 Arch St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Vol. X APRIL, 1930 No. 4 

In the Report of the Scholarships and Loan Fund Committee there is a com- 
ment on the attitude of the students toward the Loan Fund that may have a very 
definite bearing on the whole working out of the proposed change in policy, i. e., 
raising the costs- of tuition. In her speech, Acting-President Manning discussed 
not loans but grants. The scholarships committee handles both in caring for its 
scholars, and the Report does not leave one in much doubt as to which method the 
Committee considers preferable. The third method, that of doing odd jobs, neither 
of them discusses. Long since the old theory that there was some inherent virtue 
ia a student's working his way through college was disproved. A student succeeded 
not because he earned his way but in spite of the fact that he did. And suitable and 
available jobs are few and far between. In this same connection The Cornell Alumni 
News says: "This is aside from the broader question of whether an undergraduate 
can afford to waste the precious hours when his mind and body are maturing by 
working for twenty-five to fifty cents an hour. It is usually a real extravagance and 
should be resorted to only under the most urgent pressure." In certain cases grants 
are wise and necessary, but all the discussion in both the college and current maga- 
zines about putting education on a more business-like basis brings one face to face 
with the necessity for adopting business methods. Borrowing is one of them. Miss 
Oilman in her Report quotes from an article in The New Republic which says: "If 
it is proper for the student to pay something approaching the cost of his college 
education, in view of its pecuniary value to him in later life, it is proper also for 
him to borrow against these prospects." When the proposed raise in tuition goes 
into effect Bryn Mawr will be faced by two problems: the one is not to let any 
able student feel that she cannot afford to come to Bryn Mawr and the other is not 
to have students coming who will value too lightly what is offered to them simply 
because it is given to them too easily. One cannot help wondering whether one of 
the ways out might not be a larger Loan Fund on which students could draw more 
freely. Such Funds have already been established by gift in many other colleges. 
Is it not something to think of in connection with the 1935 Endowment? 



REPORT OF THE SCHOLARSHIPS AND 
LOAN FUND COMMITTEE 

(Full accounts of the scholarships activities^ in each district were included in 
the reports of the District Councillors, given at the Council in Neiv York in 
November and published in the January Bulletin, and are therefore omitted from 
this report.) 

This year, even more than ever before, the report of the Central Scholarships 
Committee must begin with an expression of our admiration and gratitude to the 
Regional Committees for all they are doing for their scholars and for the College. 
There are 33 Regional Scholars in college this year, fifteen of them freshmen, and 
the Regional Committees are contributing a total of $13,400.00 for the Academic 
year 1929-30. It is a great satisfaction to note that in addition to sending more 
scholars and contributing more money than ever before, the Regional Committees 
are making a very great contribution to a more varied make-up of the student body. 
The fifteen freshmen scholars come from ten different states : Maine, Massachusetts, 
Connecticut, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Wisconsin and Cali- 
fornia. Even more interesting is the fact that ten of the fifteen were prepared 
entirely by public schools, and one more received part of her preparation at a public 
high school. It is encouraging indeed to see that the Regional Committees are thus 
holding up the hands of the Admissions Committee in their attempt to make our 
student body more representative and varied. 

With all this development — more scholars, more money to be handled — the 
machinery has become more complicated and the necessity for a uniform procedure 
for the Regional Committees has made itself felt. Last year at the Council the New 
England Committee suggested that a "primer" be prepared for the use of the local 
committees, containing information in regard to applications, entrance requirements, 
expenses, payments, and general procedure. The New England Committee sent us 
most helpful suggestions for such a primer, and with these as a basis, Mrs. Chadwick- 
Collins, Miss Hawkins and I drew up a primer to be used in connection with the 
College Calendar for the current year. This was read and discussed at the meeting 
of the Regional Chairmen, in June, and was then mimeographed and sent with a 
copy of the College Calendar to the Chairman of each of the Regional Committees. 

Meetings of the Regional Chairmen with the Central Committee were held in 
February and in June, and brought forth much interesting and provocative discussion. 
The Chairman of the Central Committee, and in her absence the Alumnae Secretary 
is in constant correspondence with the Regional Chairmen. I cannot express too 
warmly the gratitude which the Central Committee, and very specially its chairman, 
feels to the Alumnae Secretary for all she has done and is constantly doing for 
Scholarships work, for the very great amount of her time and thought that daily goes 
into it. We are grateful indeed, both to her and to Mrs. Chadwick-Collins, for their 
unfailing interest in scholarships work, and their understanding of its problems. 

To come now to the Regional Scholars themselves: in last year's graduating 
class there were nine students who had entered as Regional Scholars, and three of 
these had been continued as Regional Scholars for the four years of their course. 
These three all received their degrees cum laude, two of them with distinction in 
special subjects as well. They are all doing interesting things this year; one is teach- 
ing, one is a church worker and one is doing graduate work in Biology. 

(2) 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 3 

The Regional Scholars now in college are in general maintaining a high standard. 
Nine of them were awarded last spring college scholarships in addition to their 
Regional Scholarships, and two were among the seven students chosen to spend their 
Junior year in France. The first of New England's six freshman scholars has the 
second highest entrance average in the freshman class, and is the holder of the New 
England Matriculation Scholarship. Of the fifteen freshman scholars, five have 
entrance averages above 80, and seven between 75 and 80. 

The Regional Scholars in their extra-curricular activities present a pleasant cross- 
section of College life. They have among them the President of the Bryn Mawr 
League, members of the editorial and business boards of the College News and the 
Lantern, the Chairman of the Summer School Committee and the Haverford Com- 
munity Centre Committee, a member of the Varsity Dramatics advisory committee, 
the lacrosse, swimming and w T ater-polo managers, fire-captains, post mistresses and 
pay-day mistresses. The Students' Employment Bureau is composed entirely of 
Regional Scholars. It is to me a great pleasure to see that the Regional Scholars are 
taking so active and normal a part in College activities. 

The mention of extra-curricular activities brings me to a question which was 
brought up for the first time at the Council in New Haven a year ago, and which 
has been a good deal discussed since then; the question of the supervision, direct or 
indirect, of the Regional Scholars by the Regional Committees. At that time several 
members of the Council said that frequently the Regional Scholars had not done as 
good work as had been hoped, and that this w T as, in their opinion, due to too many 
interests outside their academic work. They suggested that the Central Committee 
should supervise the Regional Scholars informally and advise them when necessary 
against too many extra-curricular activities. There was very strong opposition to 
this suggestion at the time, and when the question was brought up at the meeting of 
the Central Committee last January our opinion was unanimous. We feel very 
strongly that such supervision is the business of the Dean of the College and is 
entirely outside the province both of the local committees and of the Central Com- 
mittee. It is entirely contrary to the policy of the Committee to take any steps 
which would tend to make the Regional Scholars feel that they were being treated 
differently from other students. The Central Committee believes that the holder 
of a Scholarship should feel the responsibility for doing creditable work, but that 
she should not be constantly reminded of that responsibility. On the other hand, 
we should be very glad to have the Regional Chairmen say to their scholars that 
the chairman and any available members of the Central Committee will always be 
glad to see the Regional Scholars and talk over their work or any other questions 
with them, but we are convinced that the initiative should come from the Regional 
Scholars themselves, and not from the Central Committee. 

As we have discussed this question we have come to see very clearly that it was 
only one aspect of a larger question, that of the whole relationship of the Regional 
Committees to their scholars; whether they should supervise the work and activities 
of their scholars in any way, what their personal contact with them should be, and 
what use the Regional Committees should make of the information which is sent them 
in regard to their Scholars. The Central Committee has considered the question 
very seriously, and before the Council discussed it with President Park and Acting- 
Dean Carey, and feels strongly as they do, that the Regional Committee should take 
no action, direct or indirect, which will tend in any way to make their scholars feel 



4 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

less responsible, less independent and less self-respecting than any other students of 
the College. This has always been true of the holders of any Bryn Mawr Scholarship, 
and the Regional Scholars must surely be no exception. The question was discussed 
in detail at the Scholarship Conference, held . at the Council in November, and, 
while there was some disagreement over details, the members of the Council who 
were present were practically unanimous in their approval of the policy of the 
Central Committee. 

Another Regional question that has been raised by several committees is that of 
the advisability, when there are several outstanding candidates in the same year, of 
raising special scholarships to get them into college, even though there is little possi- 
bility of the region being able to continue the support of them. The Regional Chair- 
men at their meeting in June were unanimous in feeling that every effort should 
be made to get a really good student into College. Once such a student is in College, 
scholarship help is always available, and we hope that the Regional Committees will 
always make an effort to secure special scholarships for first-rate students. This is 
what New England has done so magnificently this year, sending us six freshman 
scholars. As I watch the Regional Scholars and their work, it seems to me that 
in choosing their scholars the Regional Committees are most wisely stressing more 
and more the primary importance of intellectual ability. The feeling of the Central 
Committee is that on the one hand the Regional Committees should hesitate a long 
time before sending scholars of questionable ability, and that on the other hand every 
possible effort should be made not to turn away any outstanding candidate. We have 
often said with pride that no able student has ever had to leave Bryn Mawr for 
lack of money. I should like to think that before long we shall be able to say that, 
thanks to our Regional Committees, no first-rate candidate has had to sacrifice the 
hope of Bryn Mawr. 

The Central Scholarships Committee itself has twice met with the Regional 
Chairmen, and has had three separate meetings, one an November and one in January 
for the discussion of general problems, and one all-day session in April to make 
recommendations to the Faculty Scholarships Committee for the undergraduate 
Scholarships awarded for combined scholastic ability and financial need.' The Com- 
mittee sent out the usual questionnaires to the faculty, and the Chairman of the 
Committee, with the Dean of the College, interviewed a large number of the appli- 
cants. Fifty-nine students (17 Juniors, 18 Sophomores and 24 Freshmen) applied 
for aid, and scholarships, grants, or loans were given to fifty-five of these. When 
we add to these the holders of scholarships which are automatically renewed, and 
the freshman scholars, we have a total of 82 students (almost exactly 20% of the 
undergraduate body) who are receiving financial aid of some kind this year. Schol- 
arships amounting to $18,560.00 were awarded for 1929-30 and adding to this the 
amount given by the Regional Committees, $13,400.00, we have a total of scholar- 
ships amounting to $31,960.00 held during the current year. $2,190.00 was given 
in grants and $3,666.25 in loans, making a grand total of $37,816.25 given as financial 
aid to undergraduates. 

The Committee had the pleasure last spring of awarding for the first time the 
Leila Houghteling Memorial Scholarship, given in memory of Leila Houghteling 
of the Class of 1911, by members of her family, and a group of her contemporaries 
in College. The scholarship, consisting of the income of $10,000 is to be awarded 
every three years, on the recommendation of the Alumnae Scholarships Committee, to 






BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 5 

a member of the freshman class, to be held for the following three years. It is 
the hope of the donors that in choosing the holder of this scholarship we may, as 
President Park said at Commencement, "find a girl who has a certain likeness to 
Leila Houghteling herself, something of her steadiness and sanity, her easy leadership, 
her hatred of privilege and injustice, her faith which clothed itself so readily in 
works." 

Last year at this time the report of the Loan Fund seemed to me rather dis- 
couraging and I am happy to say that this year it seems distinctly brighter. Although 
more money was given out in loans than ever before, the difference between the 
repayments and the loans given out is slightly less than last year. 

Repayments Loans 

1928 $1,520.00 $2,970.00 

1929 2,275.50 3,666.25 



The Loan Fund at present has a balance of $1,163.48, a comfortable state of 
affairs, due entirely to two gifts, $500.00 given by President Park from the Parents' 
Fund, and another $500.00 most delightfully and generously given by an alumna. 
It is also a tradition that each graduating class should give $100 to the Loan Fund. 

The outstanding loans amount to $14,771.02 in loans to 52 people. The num- 
ber of loans outstanding over five years has been slightly reduced since last year; 
there are now ten of them, totalling $1,725.00. The way in which the New Plan 
is working is very encouraging; the plan has been in operation since 1926, and 
there are only four people who are behind in their payments. 

One of the most satisfying things about the situation is the steadily-increasing 
number of people who are borrowing. Little by little we are overcoming the rooted 
objection to borrowing on the part of the students, and especially on the part of 
students' families. It is interesting to note that the idea of Loan Funds for students 
is becoming widespread. Recently a national organization, the Lincoln Scholarship 
Fund, Inc., has been formed, which plans to create a revolving fund of $1,200,000, 
to be issued in loans to students. An editorial in the New Republic last autumn, 
inspired by this new foundation and entitled "Financing the Student," comments 
interestingly on the general change in attitude as to the relative value of borrowing 
and "working one's way through" and concludes: "If it is proper for the student 
to pay something approaching the cost of his college education, in view of its pecuni- 
ary value to him in later life, it is proper also for him to borrow against these 
prospects. The old fashioned approval of the student who "worked his way through" 
had its correlative in horror of debt. But today neither idea is valid. Civilization 
is supported on credit. As separate members of the state and other organizations we 
are all in debt; and the individual practice of installment buying has received the 
approval of conservative economists. If it is sound economy to buy an automobile on 
time, it is certainly sound for the student to buy his education on time." All this is 
certainly a most encouraging reinforcement of our efforts to induce students to make 
more use of our own Loan Fund. 

The whole scholarships situation seems to me essentially encouraging. A glance 
at the figures for scholarships, grants and loans for the last three years brings out 
some interesting points. 



6 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

1927 1928 1929 

Scholarships $24,165.00 $23,635.00 $31,960.00 

Grants 2,350.00 4,790.00 2,190.00 

Loans 2,866.25 * 2,970.00 3,666.25 



$29,381.25 $31,395.00 $37,816.25 

Trie two most striking things about these figures are the large increase in scholar- 
ships this year, due almost entirely to Regional Scholarships; and the fact that the total 
amount of loans is well above the total for grants. The policy of the committee 
seems at last to have borne fruit. 

It seems to me, however, that there is a distinct need for more scholarships. 
Regularly each year there are more applicants of scholarship calibre than there are 
scholarships and the Central Committee is obliged either to raise special scholarships 
or to draw on the Parents' Fund for grants. The number of students in need of 
financial aid seems to be increasing steadily. If we urge the Regional Committees, 
as I think we must do, to make a special effort to send a first-rate candidate, even 
if they cannot support her beyond her freshman year, we must have College Scholar- 
ships for these students. The number of unsuccessful applicants for Regional 
Scholarships who manage to come to College, hoping to prove themselves Scholarship 
material, is also increasing; there are twelve of them in the present freshman class. 
The Regional Committees are doing so much for the College that it must not fail 
to keep its end up. What we especially need, I think, are Scholarships of $200 
and $300. More and more students are applying for scholarships of about this 
amount, and the supply we have is entirely inadequate to the demand. If we are 
to keep our student body as varied, as many-sided as we wish to have it, we must 
have more scholarships. 

Margaret Gilman, 1919, Chairman. 



MESSAGE FROM PRESIDENT PARK 

"Just as we started for eight days in the desert on January 30th, I tried to send 
a telegram for the Alumnae meeting. The guide came back from the Assouan tele- 
graph office saying the operator had said there was no 'Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania,' 
only 'Bryn Mawr, Penn.' ! ! and I had no time to rectify his error." 



BRYN MAWR ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS 

Report of the Academic Committee 

Until quite recently the Bryn Mawr entrance requirements were to the main 
body of alumnae a matter of theoretical interest only. They were a technical matter 
which the alumnae were quite content to leave to the College and to the heads of 
preparatory schools. Today a large percentage of the alumnae are directly concerned 
with the College entrance question at one point or another. Many are meeting it 
quite concretely in relation to their own children ; others are aware of it through the 
regional scholarships and the questions which they raise as to the chances of girls 
from schools which have never before prepared for Bryn Mawr. Others still — 
parents, teachers, headmistresses — think of it in terms of changing concepts of edu- 
cation and are looking ahead in an effort to effect a harmony between Bryn Mawr 
College entrance examinations and the newer educational values. 

This past year another factor has come into the situation. Last autumn out of 
185 candidates that successfully met the entrance requirements the College could admit 
only 101 freshmen as resident students and 19 as non-residents. Within the year the 
College has reaffirmed its belief in the wisdom of maintaining the small undergraduate 
student body and it is only fair to expect that the problem of wise selection of freshmen 
will call for greater nicety year by year. Upon the technique of selection applied from 
now on, will depend more than ever before the quality and character of the large 
body of the alumnae of the future. 

Practically all the large eastern colleges for women have had to meet the same 
situation to a greater or less degree in the past seven years, and it has tended to 
throw into relief that need for adjustment and change which might not otherwise 
have claimed attention. Their approach has been frankly experimental. The newer 
methods have been evolved from the old, step by step. The same is true of Bryn 
Mawr though it is only when we actually list the changes in the entrance examina- 
tions since 1923, that we realize the extent of Bryn Mawr's progress from her more 
rigid requirements of the past toward greater flexibility. 

In 1923 the number of units required for entrance was reduced from the classic 
twenty, which ruled the destiny of so many of us, to fifteen — the number required 
by all eastern colleges. To accomplish this, the point value of mathematics and 
science was reduced and certain substitutes were permitted for the third language, 
known in technical terms as the "second two-point language." That is, the candidate 
need present in addition to Latin, only one language (French, German or Greek) 
substituting for the second language additional units in other prescribed subjects. 
The result was a greater possibility of preparing students in public schools and schools 
which have not made a practice of preparing students for Bryn Mawr. 

By 1928 the difficulties of dealing with a larger number of successful candidates 
than the college could accommodate forced the decision to abandon the examinations 
set by the College in favor of the College Entrance Board examinations, which had 
become the choice of a growing number of candidates. It seemed only fair in view 
of the close discrimination called for in selecting the required number of freshmen, 
that all should be judged on the basis of the same examinations. A contributory 
factor was the decrease in the number of colleges accepting the Bryn Mawr examina- 
tions for entrance credit with resulting disadvantage to students refused by Bryn 
Mawr. 

. (7) 



8 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

In 1928 also came a further important move. The requirements in French and 
German were reduced from the College Entrance Board's 4 year examinations to its 
3 year examination, their unit value remaining the same, and an option was given 
between physics and chemistry and between ancient and American history. 

It is thus clear that, far from standing on the college's past record, Bryn Mawr's 
President and Faculty have been continuously studying the changes in the educational 
field and the need of fairly meeting them. So far as the examination plan based 
on 15 units — or Unit Plan is concerned, there is now practically no important 
difference between our requirements and those of other colleges. Only eight of 
Bryn Mawr's units are prescribed (English, Latin, Mathematics) and there is 
restricted choice in the other seven. It is to be noted that the Unit plan is still in 
use in all the Women's Colleges except Vassar. At RadclifTe, in 1927-28 (the last 
year for which printed figures are available) 41% of entering students chose this 
plan and at Smith in 1928, 34% came in by this method. 

While Bryn Mawr has been seeking greater flexibility within its examination 
plan, and in certain units reducing its requirements, the other eastern colleges have 
experimented with other plans. Barnard will admit on the basis of a psychological 
examination as the only test, when certain requirements made of the schools and the 
individual are duly met. Radclifle is still experimenting with the "Without Examina- 
tion Method" for girls who have in the last two years of their school course ranked 
among the highest seventh of the girls in a graduating class containing at least seven 
girls. All the eastern colleges except Bryn Mawr are using the Comprehensive Plan 
(now called the New Plan) under which the student is examined in four subjects only 
and all four examinations must be taken at one time instead of in the two divisions 
allowed under the Unit Plan. The college depends on the school reports and estimate 
of the student's work for evidence of satisfactory completion of other subjects making 
up the total requirement. This plan calls for the comprehensive type of examination 
divided into parts, each one of which corresponds to one year's preparation. Within 
this system there are varying degrees of option. Vassar permits choices in all four 
examinations and includes among the subjects that may be chosen: Music (theoretical) 
and Bible, Mediaeval and Modern European History and under certain restrictions 
Practical Art and Music. Most of the other colleges have similar options. At 
Radclifle, on the other hand, the three prescribed subjects almost exactly correspond 
with the eight required units at Bryn Mawr and the option for the fourth examina- 
tion must also come from the subjects which are allowed with us. While Bryn Mawr 
does not accept the Comprehensive Plan, it insists on the comprehensive type of 
examination in English, French and Latin for candidates entering under the Unit Plan. 

With all these varieties of experience there is a strong feeling at the other 
colleges in favor of the Comprehensive Plan. It is generally believed that "This new 
type of admission combines the best elements of the former certificate system, and of 
the examination system in that it requires the school record and estimate of character, 
and also demands examinations designed to test the candidate's intellectual power, not 
alone her memory of prescribed facts. Furthermore, the method offers the applicant 
the fullest opportunity to show her ability in subjects in which she believes herself 
best qualified." This comment brings to the fore very clearly that while Bryn Mawr 
has been making its readjustments under the Unit System, the other colleges in their 
evolution have moved much nearer the examination method. It is not long since 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 9 

the other women's colleges admitted by certificate and without examination. Today, 
with the exception of Radclifte, they are admitting by examination only. 

Returning now to the situation at Bryn Mawr it behooves us to remember that 
the 1928 changes are barely a year old and that the validity of any experiment in 
entrance method cannot be tested in less than four years — the life of a class. Deduc- 
tions from freshman records often do not correspond to deductions made on the basis 
of the full four years. Moreover at Bryn Mawr where the classes are only about 
half the size of those at the other large eastern colleges, the record for a single class 
does not necessarily provide sufficient basis for generalization. 

One of the advantages of the present system to the College undoubtedly lies in 
the more uniform preparation of its students. In a small college a great diversity 
of courses is not possible, nor many sections of the same course, and complications in 
organization, in some degree involving the standards of the courses, must follow a 
wide leeway in entrance requirements. Up to the present time the unit system in its 
modified form has served Bryn, Mawr well, and certainly the college has always 
avoided the problem of weeding out the students during the college course better 
than most of the other colleges. 

The unit system still remains in favor with a number of head mistresses pre- 
paring students for all the colleges on the ground that the division of the examination 
into two parts gives a less crowded senior year at school, with more opportunity for 
a creative approach to college. On the other hand there are those who believe that 
the unit system tends to restrict the type of student applying and makes it well-nigh 
impossible for good students at a distance, growing up with no thought of Eastern 
College requirements, to qualify under the unit examination plan. 

One of the chief objections to the adoption of the New Plan is due to the use 
of the school report as the only basis for judgment on the assets of the student and 
her school work in subjects not covered by examinations. Bryn Mawr has found 
extreme variation in the reliability of the school's estimate of the students applying 
for entrance, even where these estimates have merely collateral significance. On 
this account there is a natural reluctance on the part of the College to move toward 
a system where these estimates weigh more heavily, until such time as more satis- 
factory reports can be looked for from all the schools. At the present time the 
Admissions Committee of the Faculty is studying ways to develop a better technique 
of school reports, so that a clearer picture of its candidates may be obtained. A few 
schools are sending excellent reports and these have been of such value that every effort 
is now being made to obtain this information from all schools for use in selecting 
students under our present plan. Members of the Academic Committee were much 
interested in helping to formulate with the Faculty Committee a new questionnaire 
to be sent to the schools this year. 

Since 1928 candidates for Bryn Mawr entrance have taken the College Entrance 
Board's scholastic aptitude test, as an aid in further evaluation of their mental ability. 
The Dean's office is studying closely the entrance records as related to the student's 
performance in college and is comparing this data with a similar comparison between 
the results of the scholastic aptitude test of the College Entrance Board and college 
performance. In this way it is hoped we shall be able to judge more accurately of 
the value of the abstract test as an aid to selection. 

Other colleges are finding that their experience in using some of the alternate 
plans has not been entirely satisfactory. Radcliffe permits a "Without Examination" 



10 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

Plan, which has been referred to above. In 1926-27 the number entering under 
this system rose to 126 in a total of 230, or 54% of the whole, with a resulting 
restriction of this privilege "to students outside of New England and from schools 
not ordinarily preparing students for the College Entrance Board examinations." "It 
was evident," sa)'s the President's report for 1926-27 "that if this method of admission 
was not somewhat restricted, there would soon be no room left for well-prepared 
examination students." In 1927-28, only 10% of the class came in by this method. 

In seven years Bryn Mawr has moved a long distance and there is marked open- 
mindedness on the part of the college toward the whole question of choice of students. 
It realizes, perhaps more keenly than ever before, the intricacies of the problem of 
securing the best quality of student in mind and character, and is experimenting to 
arrive at an adequate solution. 

The Academic Committee offers these comments on the subject, so that the 
Alumnae may have a glimpse of some of the problems involved and how the College 
is dealing with them. 

Pauline Goldmark, 1896 
Virginia McKenney Claiborne, 1908 
For the Academic Committee. 



GUGGENHEIM FELLOWSHIP AWARDS OF 
INTEREST TO BRYN MAWR 

Miss Eleanor Boswell, of Philadelphia: The preparation of a history of the 
English stage during the period of restoration. Miss Boswell is a member of 1921. 

Miss Katherine Snodgrass, Research Associate, Food Research Institute, Stanford 
University : A study of the dietary fats of Northern Europe, with particular reference 
to the displacement of a dairy fats by vegetable fats; a study in the economics of 
food substitution. Miss Snodgrass belongs to the Class of 1915. 

Dr. Henri Maurice Peyre, Assistant Professor of French, Yale University: A 
study of Louis Menard, a French man of letters of the 19th Century. M. Peyre is a 
former member of the Bryn Mawr faculty. 



NEW COUNCILLOR 

The Executive Board is glad to announce the appointment of Jeanne Kerr 
Fleischmann, 1910 (Mrs. Udo Fleischmann), of New York City, as Councillor for 
District II of the Alumnae Association. Mrs. Fleischmann, who succeeds Julia 
Langdon Loomis, 1895 (Mrs. Edward E. Loomis), will serve for a term of three 
years. 



IN MEMORY OF WILLIAM HOWARD TAFT 

(Reprinted from College News of March 12, 1930) 

A service in memory of former President Taft was held in Goodhart auditorium, 
Tuesday morning, March 11. It was led by Professor Rufus Jones, president of the 
Board of Directors. President Emeritus M. Carey Thomas attended the service. 
The service was opened by the hymn "O God, Our Help in Ages Past," and an 
arrangement of the Twenty-third Psalm, sung by the choir. Professor Jones read a 
passage from Ecclesiasticus, "Praise of Famous Men," in introduction to his address. 

"It is most fitting that we at Bryn Mawr should meet to show our reverence and 
respect for the memory and the life of ex-President Taft. 

"Next to his own beloved Alma Mater at New Haven, I think he loved this 
institution best. He chose it for his daughter, and so learned to know it intimately. 
In the midst of his duties as President he came here to give one of the most inspiring 
commencement addresses in our history, and he has watched with intense interest every 
step of the progress and development of the college during these later years. 

"He was, I think, the best loved man in the United States. He has held the 
two highest and most responsible offices this nation has to offer, and he is the only 
person who has ever held them both. 

"He was the champion of many great causes. Besides his great services to the 
nation at home and abroad, he was a noble and a notable citizen. He has always 
had a sense of honor, a brave wisdom of sincerity, a spirit of fidelity and rugged 
honesty. His character was unsullied and his name is untouched by any suspicion 
of low motives. His whole public career has been marked by unselfish devotion, un- 
wearied industry and purity of purpose. There was a unique quality of distinction 
to his patriotism, and his long service to the country was characterized by magnanimous 
disinterestedness. 

"He has borne a clear testimony that truth is the highest thing a man may keep. 
He has been tender and sensitive for the rights and privileges of the most humble 
persons in the land. He has been, with all his other distinctions, one of the foremost 
American leaders of education for colored people. One can imagine what is happen- 
ing this morning at Hampton Institute. 

"None of us who knew him can ever forget his humor. No other President, 
except Lincoln, has had such a rich fund of it. His smile, his chuckle and his 
radiance were an inherent part of his personality. 

"I should like to appropriate for him the words that George Fox used for one 
of his noblest friends: 'He was faithful to God, and the immortal seed of life is his 



(11) 



ALUMNAE BOOKS 

Ancient Painting from the Earliest Times to the Period of Christian Art, by Mary Hamil- 
ton Swindler, Ph.D. New Haven, Yale University Press. 1929. $10.00. 

Bryn Mawr Alumnae will welcome with pleasure and pride this handsome 
volume, comprising the lectures which Miss Swindler has been giving for many years 
in her course in Ancient Painting, and containing an account of the entire history of 
European painting from the time of the earliest cave-paintings in France down to the 
Christian era. The format of the book is admirable and the price extraordinarily low; 
in fact, it w T ould be hard to cite any book comparable to this which sells as so reason- 
able a figure. The book contains 431 pages of text and 640 small illustrations in addi- 
tion to sixteen plates, of which five are colored. The bibliography which immediately 
follows the text occupies thirty-seven pages and is a veritable mine of information. 

There is, of course, no inherent unity in the subject-matter of the book; the 
caves of France are further removed from the vases of Brygos or even from the tombs 
of Egypt, or the tiled walls of Khorsabad than Chinese frescoes are from the snow 
scenes of Mr. Redfield. The justification of bringing all these various and mutually 
remote manifestations of art into the compass of a single volume is, as Miss Swindler 
states in her preface, that students of art have felt the need of such a book. Each 
chapter, moreover, serves as a competent introduction to the category of art which it 
describes. "The plan of the book is relatively simple; beginning with the earliest 
attempts at painting in prehistoric times, the chapters following chronological order 
the development of Egyptian, Oriental, Cretan, and Greek work, and range in time 
down through Etruscan, Pompeian, Graeco-Roman, and Roman painting." 

Miss Swindler has a faculty for apt summaries. The question of the purpose 
of the animal paintings in the caves of France, the intricacies of Mesopotamian 
chronology are excellently stated. But, like a motor passing from slippery places to 
dry ground, Miss Swindler enters with more assurance on the discussion of her own 
particular field of Greek paintings. Here, both in the chapter on the primitives and 
the archaic schools and in her discussion of red-figured vases, she speaks with authority, 
and her descriptive style grows more incisive, for she has observed both widely and 
carefully. These chapters have profited by the brilliant and epoch-making work of 
Mr. J. T. Beazley, of Oxford, who revised for Miss Swindler the very valuable 
list of vase-painters and of Kalos names. (Where, by the way, is the love name, 
Epilykos?) 

The choice of illustrations is excellent. Particularly are we grateful for the 
reproduction in color of the lovely Flora from Stabiae and for the portrait of 
Hermione, "Reader of the Classics," which proves so perfectly that school-teachers 
have been the same since time began. It is a pleasure to think that such works of 
art will become more widely known by the publication of this book, and a still greater 
pleasure that a book of such solid and wide scholarship should be the outgrowth of a 
course at Bryn Mawr College. 

Edith Hall Dohan, Ph.D., 1908. 

City Gate Sarcophagi, A Gothic Reworking of an Early Christian Sarcophagus, and a 
Sarcophagus at Lanuvium, by Marion Lawrence, '23. 

These three articles by Marion Lawrence are of interest, as the scholarly work 
of not only one of our alumnae, but of a one-time member of the Bryn Mawr Faculty. 
When Miss King took her well-earned sabbatical in 1927-28 her place was ably filled 

(12) 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 13 

by Miss Lawrence, an alumna of but recent vintage. Her ability as a critic and 
scholar in the field of art is apparent before one has turned many pages of her articles. 

To take them up in order of publication the "City Gate Sarcophagi" was pub- 
lished in the Art Bulletin for September, 1927. It is also reprinted in pamphlet 
form. It is illustrated by reproductions of a number of important sarcophagi of 
which Miss Lawrence has occasion to treat. Her style is clear and direct. She 
writes, of course, not for the uninitiated but for the student, yet the trend of her 
argument which she sets forth in the first paragraph is so logically and intelligently 
developed that it can be followed successfully by the layman. Her purpose is to 
attempt a classification of styles in the fourth century, and to throw some light on the 
problem of Italian art in this period, whether it is homogeneous or composed of dif- 
ferent styles, partly foreign, partly native. As they offer a great number of examples, 
and a fairly continuous line of development, she has chosen to investigate the problem 
of Christian sarcophagi. 

Next in date comes a shorter pamphlet reprinted from the American Journal of 
Archaeology in 1928. Its subject is "A Sarcophagus at Lanuvium." This treats not 
of a whole movement, but of an isolated example which seems up to this time to have 
been passed over by archaeologists. Miss Lawrence begins with a description of its 
appearance, and then taking it detail by detail attempts to date and to classify it by 
comparing it with other monuments. Her work is most thorough, and she leaves no 
point untouched, or uninvestigated. A plentiful number of illustrations make it 
possible to follow her in every step and deduction. 

The third article, "A Gothic Reworking of an Early Christian Sarcophagus," is 
reprinted from "Art Studies/' 1929. This is, tx> me, the most interesting of all, and 
seems a real contribution to artistic research. A fine white marble sarcophagus in 
Mantua Cathedral drew the attention of Miss Lawrence as having various details 
inconsistent with its classification as Early Christian. In her usual direct and scholar- 
ly manner, she sets about to investigate the evidence, and after drawing upon numerous 
pertinent examples in not only Italy, but also France and Germany, she comes to the 
conclusion that this sarcophagus was done over in the thirteenth century for the occa- 
sion of the interment of one Johannus Bonus, whose inscription gives the exact date, 
1249. Its similarity with Gothic works beyond the Alps- is extremely interesting, as the 
whole question of Italian Gothic and its exact relation with that form in northern 
Europe is rather a troubled one. Any new evidence of connecting links such as this 
is both welcome and enlightening. 

Ellenor Morris, 1927. 

The Other Crowd, by Mabel Pierce Ashley, Harcourt, Brace and Co. 1929. 

Although this is a story for girls from 12 to 18, it kept me reading one night 
until two o'clock, so interested in the charming heroine that I had to find out which 
choice she finally made between the two kinds of companionship offered to her during 
a summer in Maine. For a review of the book, however, it seems to me more fitting 
that an opinion should come from one for whom the book was written. I am, there- 
fore, leaving the field in favor of my daughter (aged 14) who wrote what follows 
as part of her English work at school. 

"My first impression of 'The Other Crowd' was that it was different from the 
usual story for girls, different mostly in the natural, fresh way it was written; they 



14 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

do the same things you would do. In short, they are alive. The happenings in the 
book are probable, realistic, and interesting; the incidents glow with life. Instead of 
spending their time finding an orphan's rich parents or a hidden treasure, as the 
characters in many books for girls do, these boys and' girls do all the things you would 
do if you were spending a gay summer by the ocean. 

"The plot is not dramatic, just a fascinatingly written history of Sally Hunter's 
vacation at her cousin's house in Maine. There she is initiated into the gay doings 
of the 'gang,' a group of boys and girls who dance, eat, go to the movies, and dash 
all over the country in automobiles. How Sally learns about the existence of another 
crowd who do more than that, is told in the most delightful way. The 'other crowd' 
sail, play tennis, go fishing and on picnics while the 'gang' is having wild escapades, 
racing around the countryside in cars. Sally finds herself wanting to be with the crowd 
more than ever while the gang try to persuade her that she is as bored as they are by 
these more athletic pastimes. 

"Sally is torn between two forces. She is fond of all her friends, no matter to 
what group they may belong. As autumn draws near she is worried still more by 
third-hand reports of what is happening at home. Of course at the end this difficulty 
is straightened out and Sally makes her choice between the 'gang' and 'the other 
crowd.' 

"I think any girl would like this book. I enjoyed reading it all the way through; 
and then I turned back and read it all over again. 

"Elsa Voorhees." 

In addition, I would like to speak of the very lovely feeling for the sea which 
pervades the book and acts as a central, steadying force for Sally during her experiences. 
I, too, think any girl would enjoy this book, and any mother of girls. 

Elsa Denison Voorhees, 1910. 



WHERE THERE'S A WILL THERE'S A WAY 

On February 6th, the Alumnae Committee of Seven Colleges, with the assist- 
ance of the New York Dinner Committee, was hostess to forty prominent lawyers in 
New York City, gathered by invitation for luncheon at The Downtown Association, 
60 Pine Street, New York. President William Allan Neilson, of Smith, presided, 
and Judge Learned Hand addressed the lawyers. The purpose of the Committee in 
calling this legal group together was to point out to them how much they could assist 
the higher education of women if they would suggest the women's colleges to clients 
asking for advice on bequests. President Neilson made a short and brilliant appeal 
to them, concluding, "You are called here for two of the most delightful of human 
occupations, to give advice and to dispose of someone else's money. I only ask you 
to remember 'Where there's a will, there's a way.' " Judge Hand reviewed the situ- 
ation of the women's colleges as to endowment, the habits and traditions back of this 
plight, and emphasized again the chief way this predicament could be met by men 
in the legal profession, 



CLASS NOTES 



(The feeling of both the Executive 
Board and the Bulletin Board is very 
definite that nicknames alone should not 
be used. The admirable practice of most 
of the Class Editors is to use both the 
nickname and the last name. There arc, 
however, certain ones who forget class 
notes have a larger audience than the 
members of a particular class and that 
they should be thought of as giving a 
cross-section of Alumnae activities. With 
this in mind the Alumnae Secretary and 
the Editor tried to decode nicknames and 
did a little mild editing. If in so doing we 
cut a cherished note we crave your in- 
dulgence, and assure you that we did not 



do it to annoy. The question of what con- 
stitutes news has never been satisfactorily 
answered. If the Class Editors have any 
theories on the subject, the Editor would 
be delighted not only to hear from them, 
but to publish their letters. Perhaps it 
would be interesting at Commencement 
time for the Bulletin Board and the Class 
Editors to meet together, to formulate a 
definite policy. That class notes arc of the 
utmost importance to the Bidletin there is 
no question, but in view of the fact that 
each Commencement adds a possible hun- 
dred new sources of news and that the 
Bulletin stays the same sice, certain prob- 
lems arise.) 



1894 

Editor: Abby Brayton Durfee 
(Mrs. Randall N. Durfee) 
19 Highland Ave., Fall River, Mass. 

Emma Bailey Speer with her daughter, 
Constance, '30, spent the Christmas holi- 
days in Edinburgh, Scotland, visiting Dr. 
Robert Barbour, to whom Constance is 
engaged. 

Ethel Walker Smith is in Havana for 
the winter. She and Dr. Smith are build- 
ing a house there. 

Fay MacCracken Stockwell boasts of 
another granddaughter, as does Abby 
Brayton Durfee. 

If you want any news of other mem- 
bers of '94, write me and tell me some- 
thing of your doings, and of your chil- 
dren. 

1896 

Class Editor: Abigail Camp Dimon, 
1411 Genesee Street, Utica, N. Y. 

Helen Haines Greening has been devot- 
ing herself to the care of her husband and 
mother, who have been in ill health. At 
her last report both of them were improv- 
ing. For two years before leaving New 
York she had been interested in foreign 
adult education, having a few private 
pupils. 

Robert Pyle, husband of Hannah Cad- 
bury, has recently issued a seventeenth 
and enlarged edition of "Hoiv to Grow 
Roses." This book is of great value to 
amateur gardeners. 

Virginia Ragsdale resigned her position 
as head of the Department of Mathe- 
matics at North Carolina College for 
Women two years ago, on account of her 
mother's failing health. She writes : "My 
chief recreation aside from reading is a 
hardy garden with iris and roses as special 
hobbies. Just recently I have been much 



interested in looking up some of the very 
old records in North Carolina." 

Mary Northrop Spear says: "I keep 
busy here at home where my mother, who 
will soon be 87, is recovering from a bad- 
ly fractured hip, and my grandchildren 
now number five ! I don't plan very far 
ahead, but expect to go South for a few 
weeks early in the year. I am trying to 
shift my outside responsibilities on to 
younger shoulders ; have resigned from 
the Library Board but am still working 
for a county library. It would be a fine 
thing to get the right kind of reading to 
our foreign and rural population, but 
Marquette County is nearly as large as the 
state of Delaware, so it is quite a prob- 
lem." 

1897 

Class Editor: Alice. Cilley Weist 
(Mrs. Harry H. Weist) 
174 East 71st St., New York. 



The friends of Edith Lawrence will 
learn with profound sadness of her death, 
which occurred on December 17th. 

The class of '97 extends to her sisters, 
Mrs. Charles C. Burlingham, of New 
York, and Mrs. Robert L. Taylor, of Wil- 
liamstown, as well as to their families, its 
very deep sympathy. 



EDITH LAWRENCE: A TRIBUTE 

On a hill-top pasture in Cornish, New 
Hampshire, Edith Lawrence's little house, 
white with green shutters, stands looking 
out through low sweeping boughs of aged 
pine trees, upon the Connecticut valley 
meadows and the lone mountain, Ascut- 
ney. 

Between this house and the mill where 
years ago she loved to drive after oats, 
there is a dip in the road where the brown 



(15) 



16 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



earth becomes a deeper brown and where 
the moist woodsy smell of ferns and pine, 
rain-drenched or sun-soaked, fills the hol- 
low. 

Going through this bit of woods, her 
shining little black mare always slowed 
up. Perhaps it was only to give the Irish 
terrier that had been on the trail of a 
chipmunk in the thicket, a chance to catch 
up; or perhaps she knew that this was a 
loved spot where one took deep breaths of 
delicious air, and paused to let the pine 
fragrance flood the senses. 

Again and again since hearing of Edith 
Lawrence's death, I have thought of this 
little dip in the road and have paused 
there while thoughts of her have filled my 
mind and heart. With deep reverence I 
pause now: — Before the thought of her 
courage during the long and valiant fight 
with illness when she who had found her 
greatest happiness, perhaps, in out-of- 
door life, could no longer ride or walk 
over her loved hills, — before such hero- 
ism one must pause long, and in silence. 

Through the mist of our sadness come 
sun flashes of her charm and power; of 
her refreshing frankness and individual- 
ity; of her sparkling humor that made her 
unique bits of philosophy unforgettable. 

Flashes of joy there are, and of thank- 
fulness, because she was our friend. The 
note of sincerity in her friendship rings 
so clear, so true! Her interest in her 
friends was genuine. Between Edith 
Lawrence and her neighbors in Cornish — 
the farmer, the sculptor, the blacksmith, 
the musician — as between her family, her 
college friends, her loved animals, there 
was a warmth of understanding that was 
verv real and very rare. 

Through tht midst of our sorrow come 
reflected flashes of a beauty that has long 
since become a part of our lives because 
in our college days she opened for us the 
gateway to so much that is beautiful in 
life. 

Her love for the truly great things, in 
nature, in art, in music, in literature; her 
sensitiveness to ugly things, often caus- 
ing her real pain; her hatred of sham in 
everv form ; her sheer delight in the sim- 
ple little joys of everv-day life, — all of 
these things come back to me with the 
freshness of the morning air as I pause 
in the pine-filled hollow. But it is the 
radiancy of her spirit, the nobility and 
warmth of her nature that I shall alwavs 
see and feel in the sunlight and cloud- 
shadows drifting over the wooded slopes 
of the mountain she loved. 

F. M. H. 

Euphemia Mann says she has nothing 
interesting to insert in our notes: she is 



still at her old work, teaching in the 
Philadelphia High School for Girls. 

The class extends its deepest sympathy 
to Mary Campbell and Frieda Heyl, who 
lost their dear mothers in January. 

'96 stole a little of our thunder by an- 
nouncing in the February number of the 
Bulletin that Ruth Porter's son was en- 
gaged to Beth Caldwell's daughter; we 
can report that they were married on 
January 3rd. 

Cora Marsh writes that she never feels 
important enough to hand in items, and 
then says she has been motoring along 
the coast of Brittany, and spend- 
ing a month in Paris, enjoying operas and 
plays. She adds, "I usually spend the win- 
ter at Miami Beach, where my brother 
builds residences — 'Tropical Homes, 
Inc.' " 

Edith Edwards writes, "I am putting 
over the Washington's Birthday musicale 
of the Woonsocket Chapter, D. A. R., of 
which I am Regent, and its money-making 
bridge party!" 

The class wishes to send to Elizabeth 
Higginson Jackson their love and great 
sympathy in the loss of her brother, 
James Jackson Higginson, who died on 
February 24th. 

1898 
Editor: Edith Schoff Boericke 
(Mrs. John Boericke) 
Merion, Penna. 

Mary Sheppard's classmates will be 
very sorry to hear of the death of her 
father in February. Mary's friends were 
always welcomed warmly by her father 
and mother during college days, and send 
sympathy and love to Mary and her sis- 
ters. 

On February 21st Mr. and Mrs. James 
Murdoch Ferguson, of Gray's Lane. 
Haver ford, announced the engagement of 
their daughter, Margaret Maybin Fergu- 
son, and Ralph Boericke. Ralph gradu- 
ated from Cornell in 1929 as a civil engi- 
neer, and is in Mr. C. Clothier Jones' 
broker's office. 

1899 

Class Editor: Ellen P. Kilpatrick 
1027 St. Paul St., Baltimore, Md. 
Jean Clark Fouilhoux writes: 
"Last summer I took Anita (Jean's 
daughter, aged sixteen) to Europe, also 
three of her friends, Honour Dickerman 
(Alice Carter's child) and Harriette and 
Leslie Blake (Leslie Knowles' two 
daughters, Henriette being a month 
vounger than Anita). The four girls and 
I had a wonderful trip. We climbed 
mountains in Switzerland; we attended 
music festivals in Salzburg and Munich; 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



we flew when we got tired of motoring or 
going by train; and finally we had a shop- 
ping orgy in Paris, where I saw Sara 
Strauss Hess and her husband. 

"Anita and Honour go to Bryn Mawr 
next year. Honour is trying to make the 
grade from Miss Walker's School and 
Anita from Kent Place School. She is 
the senior class president and the cheer 
leader, but makes no basketball teams and 
plays no tennis." 

Sibyl Hubbard Darlington is still 
abroad with her two children, but rumor 
has it that she will be back in La Jolla 
next winter. Her son is at one of the 
English universities and they spend the 
vacations together. 

Charlotte Hubbard Goodell is in Brad- 
enton, Florida, for the winter. 

1900 

Editor: Louis? Congdon Francis 
(Mrs. Richard Francis) 
Haverford, Penna. 

Lois Farnham Horn's eldest daughter, 
Lois, who is a graduate of Dickinson Col- 
lege, is following in the footsteps of her 
cousin, Elizabeth White Miller, by going 
into business. She is assistant buyer of 
junior and misses dresses at Strawbridge 
and Clothier's in Philadelphia. She has 
just been in New York for a three weeks' 
training course in "markets," sent by the 
firm. Her mother, Lois, has just been to 
Stamford to witness the opening of the 
C. O. Miller Co.'s new store, a fine five- 
story building, in which Elizabeth has 
more than doubled the square feet of sell- 
ing space. Be sure to call when in Stam- 
ford on our distinguished classmate, 
where she sits enthroned at 15 Bank 
Street. Besides the new store Elizabeth 
has built a new house within the past 
year. 

Marie Sichel Linburn is always on the 
wing (sometimes literally), but after a 
summer tour of the Yellowstone and the 
Grand Tetons with her husband and son 
Jim she is staying at home for a time. 
Jim is studying law at Harvard and the 
older son is in Wall Street. 

In spite of the fact that Myra Rosenau 
says that the only news about her is the 
arrival of her granddaughter, the Class 
Editor has learned through Julia Gardner 
that Myra has many pursuits, such as the 
following: She is Chairman of the Finance 
Committee of the New England Summer 
School Committee. She is on the Publicity 
Committee of the Judge Baker Founda- 
tion, and on the Social Service Committee 
of the City Hospital, and she is Director- 
at-large of the Massachusetts League of 
Women Voters. 



1902 

Editor: Anne Rotan Howe 
(Mrs. Thorndike Howe) 
77 Revere St., Boston, Mass. 

Harriett Spencer Pierce Kendall (Mrs. 
Edwin L. Kendall) admits a largish 
grandson — already in short clothes when 
we saw his picture recently — named Spen- 
cer Pierce, Jr. 

Elizabeth Lyon Belknap (Mrs. Robert 
E. Belknap) and Mr. Belknap sailed from 
New York on January 11th on the Fran- 
conia for a five months' trip around the 
world. 

Frances Morris Orr (Mrs. John B. 
Orr) after fifteen years' intense devotion 
to the Arts — painting, making jewelry, 
designing stage settings and finally model- 
ing, carving, dressing and staging puppets, 
suffered "a grand smash," as she de- 
scribed it, last fall and has been incom- 
municado ever since. She is now happily 
much better and on the road to health 
again. Her daughter Charlotte, after two 
years at Bryn Mawr, signed up with 
Boleslavsky's Laboratory Theatre in New 
York for one winter, followed by stock 
in Ann Arbor and Pittsburgh, and now, 
this winter, second woman and leads in 
Utica. Her son, John, is a freshman at 
Yale. 

1905 

Class Editor: Eleanor Little Aldrich 
(Mrs. Talbot Aldrich) 
59 Mt. Vernon St., Boston, Mass. 

Margaret Hall writes: "In November 
I attended the State Convention of the 
International Federation of Catholic 
Alumnae (of which I am honorary mem- 
ber) at Cresson. We visited the historic 
chapel of the pioneer priest, Prince Gal- 
litzin — near the Wm. Penn Highway, and 
the gorgeous garden of Mr. Schwab, at 
Loretto, Pa. I am now busy as usual with 
students, studies, and sundries, such as the 
A. A. U. W., Modern and Classical Lan- 
guage Associations and any extras for 
which there is time. 

Eleanor Little Aldrich and her husband 
sailed February 22nd from New York for 
San Francisco. After two or three weeks 
in California thev expect to return by 
land, visiting the Grand Canyon en route. 

Nan Hill is still at the Lowthorpe 
School of Landscape Gardening in 
Groton, Massachusetts. She says that she 
is studving harder than she ever did at 
Bryn Mawr. She passes nearly every 
week-end in Cambridge with Margaret 
Blodgett, '07. 

Katherine Howell writes: "My father's 
long, painful illness ended last April. In 



IS 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



July I left for California where I re- 
mained until the last of October. Now I 
am back at school again and spending the 
winter with a friend in her apartment at 
Concord Hall, 45th and Spruce streets 
(Philadelphia). I had a fleeting glimpse 
of Clara Porter Yarnelle in the Fort 
Wayne Station on the way home instead 
of the visit I had expected to make her." 
Clara is busy coaching one of her boys 
in Latin as, without it, he cannot enter 
the eastern college for which they have 
always planned. Clara says that the little 
she has learned of child psychology makes 
her hesitate to force the Latin rather than 
find and cultivate the boy's own abilities 
and she feels herself up against quite a 
problem. 

Louise Marshall Mallery and her fam- 
ily are to be in Washington for about 
three months beginning February 1st as 
Mr. Mallery has business there. 

Grace Weldin has resigned the position 
she had held for several years and is tak- 
ing a course in short story writing at 
Columbia. 

1906 

Class Editor: Louise Cruice Sturdevant 
(Mrs. Edward W. Sturdevant) 
Marine Barracks, Quantico, Va. 

Mariam Coffin Canaday's husband 
smashed his glasses in his eye last sum- 
mer and had a bad time for a while, but 
has recovered. They took a trip to Lake 
Placid in September to help him recuper- 
ate. There is a delightful article in the 
February number of Arts and Decoration 
on Mariam's new house. When you see 
the pictures of it you will all hunt at once 
for excuses to visit Toledo. 

Phebe Crosby Allnutt writes that she 
may go to Germany next summer, and 
that Virginia Robinson is publishing a 
book and getting a Ph.D. "Hasn't she told 
you about it?" Not a WORD. 

Edith Durand McColl and her husband 
took a trip last summer to the northern 
end of Lake Manitoba. They visited Hud- 
son Bay posts and Indian Reserves, and 
the C. E. would like to hear more details 
of the trip. The two older girls go to 
Manitoba University next year, while the 
younger one has just entered high school. 

Louise Fleischmann Maclay recom- 
mends the job of president of the Alum- 
nae Association to her classmates. She 
says it is a very pleasant one. She is just 
oft for a month in Tallahassee with her 
husband. Her little girl is at the Brearley, 
but the boy does not yet go regularly to 
school. 

Augusta French Wallace's daughter is 
a Freshman at Sweet Briar. In the re- 



cent mid-years she made a grade of A, the 
equivalent of high credit, in every sub- 
ject but one, and in that she got B. I sh?ll 
probably get a bomb in the mail for tell- 
ing this. 

Here is a story with a moral ! The 
other day a letter came via air mail, evi- 
dently an important business communica- 
tion, for Helen Brown Gibbons. The C. 
E. had no idea of her address, but a few 
days later a bulletin came from Helen 
herself giving her address, and her im- 
portant letter is on the way to her. Talk 
about virtue having her reward ! Helen, 
Herbert, and Hope are settled in Shang- 
hai to stay until May, while Herbert is 
finishing his text-book on Contemporary 
World History. Hope goes to school, the 
College Municipal, in the French Conces- 
sion. 

1907 

Class Editor: Alice Hawkins 
Taylor Hall, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Alice Gerstenberg has gained new 
laurels for herself by a dramatization of 
The Water Babies, which was performed 
at the Repertory Theatre in Boston dur- 
ing the Christmas holidays. The Boston 
Globe said: "Miss Gerstenberg in the 
dramatizing has done well what probably 
was a pleasant task. The homely precepts 
of the village rector are presented in her 
version as gently as they were in the book, 
and too, with a certain humor which had 
for its effect upon the adult members of 
yesterday's audience, both smiles and 
heartv chuckles. From the first scene in 
the Kingsley home to the closing lines on 
the roof where Grimes is held prisoner, 
a certain charm is maintained. And from 
Tom's first appearance, to the end of the 
play, there is sustained the atmosphere of 
pleasant fantasy." 

Alice has also just edited, under the 
name of Seigel's Playwright Series, a 
group of one-act plays, which she herself 
has seen successfully produced, so that her 
recommendations as to staging and acting- 
have especial value. 

No one must miss reading in the March 
Harper Margaret Bailey's wholly delight- 
ful poem on St. Anthony of Padua. It is 
the charter member of the Poem of the 
Month Club, and we prophesy that it will 
have more than an ephemeral interest. 

Try to get good seats for Peggy Ayer 
Barnes' "Dishonored Lady," and you will 
realize that she has another Broadway 
success to her credit. Her interest in 
charming criminals, starting with that 
famous production of "Baffles" in the 
spring of 1904, still persists. 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



19 



1908 
Class Editor: Margaret Copeland 
Blatchford 
(Mrs. Nathaniel H. Blatchford) 

3 Kent Road, Hubbard Woods, 111. 

Collection of class dues has a very 
pleasant side in that it brings to the 
Bulletin news of many of our classmates. 
We are indebted to Lou Hyman Pollak 
for the following- items : 

From Anna King: "The same delight- 
ful job — psychiatric social work with the 
Austin Riggs Foundation at Stockbridge, 
Mass. I've bought and made over a 
house, the best toy I ever had." 

From Mabel Freehafer: "I'm still 
initiating the Goucher girls into the mys- 
tery of physics — what with Eddington and 
Einstein, physics is getting almost popu- 
lar — with adults, but the girls are just as 
much afraid of physics as ever. I greatly 
enjoy giving my course in the Physical 
Basis of Music but wish the class were 
larger. 

"Last summer I attended the conference 
of the 'International Association of Uni- 
versity "Women' at Geneva. It was very 
pleasant to see Shirley Putnam O'Hara 
there. We were a bit surprised not to find 
any other Bryn Mawr women there." 

Adelaide Case writes: "I haven't any 
news about myself. I am still teaching 
at Teachers College, the school of educa- 
tion at Columbia, where I am associate 
professor of education. Mary is teaching 
in a very interesting progressive public 
school in Brownville and we are both 
living with our mother and an unmarried 
brother in the same house on the west 
side where we lived when we were in col- 
lege. Agnes Goldman is in New York, 
living in her mother's house. Mr. and 
Mrs. Goldman and Agnes' husband are on 
a wonderful trip in Egypt. Agnes' young 
daughter, Sarah, is a very clever and at- 
tractive child. We expected Edith Rhoads 
and Edgar for this week-end, but they 
cannot come after all. Their eldest son, 
Joseph, is engaged." 

Jack Morris Evans reports that both 
children have been ill this winter. 

Louise Hyman Pollak's husband is a 
member of the City Council of Cincinnati 
.now; a fine reform movement. Another 
B. M. husband is Mayor; so B. M. is well 
represented. Lou is still on the Library 
Board and the League of Women Voters. 

Margaret Duncan Miller is still living 
in Belknap, Mont. Last summer she spent 
getting acquainted with the Yellowstone 
Park and the Black Hills of South Da- 
kota. "We packed the four children, our- 
selves and our baggage in our car and 
started out. We would drive till we felt 



like stopping either for beauty of country, 
interest in food, or lodging." 

Mary Cockrell writes from Dallas: "We 
have no B. M. club but we have a 300 
membership American Association of 
University Women of which I am the 
tired president. But I am getting ready 
to retire from everything and have al- 
ready resigned from the Board of the Y. 
W. C. A., on which I have been serving 
for four years. Last summer my husband, 
the girls and I had a most delightful trip 
to Boulder, Col., Estes Park and home 
via Taos and Sante Fe." 

This word comes from Emily Fox 
Cheston on her farm at Ambler: "Even a 
small farm well populated with livestock 
demands constant attention, family ac- 
counts for more time, and a few not very 
numerous committees take the rest ; Horti- 
cultural Society, Bryn Mawr Summer 
School, Community House." 

The following letter from Myra Elliot 
Vauclain is quoted almost in full. I hope 
that the class will read her criticism of 
class notes with as much regret as does 
the class editor: "My life continues to be 
about the same. My post office is now 
Haverford but I have not moved. Eagles 
Mere, Pa., in summer. My committee 
work remains about the same and I have 
served on the Social Service Committee 
of the University of Pennsylvania Hos- 
pital for twenty-one years, and am keep- 
ing right on, I am also a member of the 
Japanese Scholarship Committee. Our 
scholar, Hannah Ban, graduates in June 
and a new girl arrives in the fall to spend 
one year at Miss Kirk's before entering 
Bryn Mawr. I am still secretary of the 
Woman's Auxiliary of the Church of the 
Redeemer and enjoy the work. Also I 
work very hard for the Bryn Mawr Hos- 
pital. Not to overlook my children, Louise 
(16 in March) is preparing for B. M. ; 
Sam (14) is at Haverford School and so 
is Bill (10); Jim (7) and Charlie (5) are 
at Haverford Friends' and the baby (2) 
is ready for a nursery school if Frances 
Ferris opens one. Our class is either the 
most modest in the Alumnae Association 
or the most uninteresting, for I look 
eagerly at every Bulletin to read the class 
notes and never even see the numerals. 
Why don't you put a class letter in the 
Bulletin yourself about the class dues, 
etc., and plans? It would show we 
existed and I think every 1908 would be 
glad to read it. I help Louise Francis 
with an annual pansy sale. We have the 
biggest flowers grown for sale the first 
spring day that growers say it is safe to 
put them in the ground and have done it 
very successfully for some years." 



20 



BRYN MAWK BULLETIN 



Margaret Copeland Blatchford's hus- 
band says: "I am forwarding these notes 
to you from Margaret, as she is to go to- 
day to the Passavant Memorial Hospital 
here in Chicago for an operation. She will 
be in the hospital for three weeks, I ex- 
pect." 

1909 
Class Editor: Helen Bond Crane 
Denbigh Hall, Bryn Mawr. 

Asked for news of herself, Marianne 
Moore says: "Despite vicissitudes I was 
not asking for, I am discovering that such 
experience can still surprise one with hap- 
piness; I refer to the leisure for com- 
panionship that illness brings; and to en- 
joyment I have had in delightful retro- 
spect of work at The Dial, now possibly 
the greater for not being mingled with 
responsibility. The Dial was discontinued 
last July. My mother was ill at the time 
and did not recover till long afterward; 
and my brother has been ill at the Brook- 
lyn Naval Hospital. In the autumn my 
mother and I came here — to 260 Cumber- 
land Street, Brooklyn — from an apartment 
in New York to which we had become 
much attached. This removal, however, 
was opportune in many ways, the chief 
being our nearness to my brother." 

Kate Branson, who has been surveying 
the East for paragons in the way of teach- 
ers, spent some time in New York. She 
looked the flourishing and imposing head- 
mistress. 

Lucy Van Wagenen is off to fresh fields 
of adventure. She sailed February 27th 
with her mother on a Mediterranean 
cruise. She may stay on in Europe in- 
definitely. Her address is care of Morgan 
et Cie, Paris. 

Lillian Laser Strauss was ill all last 
spring and summer, but is now on Presi- 
dent Hoover's Commission on Child Wel- 
fare (though that probably is not its 
name), and is making all sorts of surveys 
and investigations in Philadelphia. 

From Frances Boyer we learned that 
Judith had recently broken her leg. She 
is still wearing a cast. 

A letter recently received from Shirley 
Putnam O'Hara says: "Frances Browne 
and Norvelle spent December with us, 
making a gala Christmas for Desmond, 4, 
and Nancy, 2. . . . We eontinue to 
enioy our suburban visits to Charles Car- 
rolls'-Marion Crane and their two blond 
and brilliant boys, Charles and Stephen. 

"Eliot is off for London this week to 
chaperon his second one-man show there, 
this time at Walker's Galleries. In Bos- 
ton, almost simultaneously his water 
colors from 'Russia, Transcaucasia and 
Elsf where.' and on April 15th the Mac- 



beth Gallery in New York is holding his 
one 'All-Russian' exhibition, the result of 
his summer there. A thrilling and reas- 
suring experience, that trip of three 
months — to Moscow, down the Volga to 
Astrakhan into the' Caucasus Mountains, 
north to Ararat in Armenia, then around 
by the Black Sea and Odessa to Kiev. 
Everywhere the warmest welcome and 
generous hospitality. In Tiflis the art au- 
thorities even staged a one-man show 
for him, the first ever held by an Amer- 
ican in Transcaucasia. 

Meanwhile, after our two and half 
years of Europe, we expect to come home 
in June, when I hope Desmond won't too 
quickly lose the small French he's picked 
up in the 'Jardin d'Enfants' of the Ecole 
Alsacienne." 

Anna Harlan says that her adopted 11- 
year-old is busy in the sixth grade, and 
that she is refreshing her history and 
geography accordingly. As president and 
chairman of the building committee of 
the Coatesville Y. W. C. A., she has been 
getting a liberal education during the 
erection of the new building. 

Hono Goodale-Warren sailed February 
27th for an indefinite stay abroad. Her 
address will be care of the Guaranty Trust 
Company, 50 Pall Mall, England. 

Ethel Mattson Heald wrote at Christ- 
mas time that her oldest son was at Grin- 
nell College, Iowa, where he. is doing fine 
work in mathematics and chemistry. His 
first vacation had the effect of making her 
feel like a freshman again. 

Speaking of children, the class baby, 
Grace Dewes, has been coming out in 
Chicago this winter, but is returning to 
college for the second semester. 

Caroline Kamm McKinnon, famous for 
her gardens, is adding fauna to her well- 
known flora. She writes: "My pools 
which I put in last year, are losing the 
new look, but goldfish have a distressing 
habit of hiding. This summer I got 
several eating frogs from a friend who 
raises them. It takes them three years to 
develop to eating size. Though I'm not 
really planning to eat them, if they are a 
pet dish of yours perhaps I can give it to 
you if you will come out. They are asleep 
now for the winter, but I am eagerly 
awaiting their spring song; I'm not so 
sure the neighbors will appreciate it." 

Frances Ferris had a vacation at Men- 
ton during the winter holidavs. She re- 
turned to Geneva to find that Frances and 
Norvelle Browne were in the city for 
twentv-four hours. They had a wonder- 
ful time; "we talked shop the while 
we hupped ourselves for having sabbati- 
cals. The League and the Bureau Inter- 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



21 



national de Travail came in for a share 
of interest, but it was secondary perforce 
as we had great difficulty in getting in. 
. . . An interesting coal conference was 
going on, but our Quaker correspondent 
was unable to get three females into the 
press gallery as either wives or reporters, 
so we left. . . . Frances had seen Shir- 
ley in Paris and reports her children 
charming. I discovered that I had come 
out of Russia on the same train with her 
husband, who had been on a painting trip 
all through the Caucasus quite alone. He 
had a lot of his paintings taken from him 
at the Polish border, but was to get them 
back at the western border. He left the 
rest of them in our compartment while 
he went into the diner, but I never knew 
his name." 

1910 
Editor: Emily Storer 

Wardman Park Hotel, 
Washington, D. C. 

Ruth Collins Desch is spending the win- 
ter in Florida where her husband is 
painting. 

Frances Stewart Rhodes had a tea at 
the Bryn Mawr Club, in New York, for 
Elsie Deems Neilson. Elsie is now on her 
way back to California. 

Margaret Shearer Smith is taking a 
two months' vacation with her husband in 
the south of France. 

Janet Howell Clark and her growing-up 
daughter were in Washington lately. She 
has left the white mice and is concentrat- 
ing on students in Johns Hopkins. 

Ruth George has at last gone off on her 
long-hoped-for trip abroad. She went 
with her brother and is now in Paris. 

1912 
Editor: Elizabeth Pinney Hunt 
(Mrs. A. D. Hunt) 
Mill Brook Lane, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Laura Byrne Hickok is the proud pos- 
sessor of a small daughter, Laura, whose 
godmother is Gertrude Elcock. 

Elizabeth Faries Howe reports that in 
spite of whooping cough and chicken pox 
in her household of three small children, 
she is carrying on her work successfully 
as physical education director of the Col- 
lege of the Ozarks, where her husband 
teaches history. She runs hockey, basket- 
ball, folk dancing and normal classes. 
Dorothy Wolf Douglas presented a silver 
cup to the winning hockey team to stimu- 
late interest in this sport. They have 
bought a bungalow. The family hopes to 
spend the summer near the University of 
Chicago, where Mr. Howe will work on 
his Ph.D. 

It will delight 1912 to learn that Car- 
melita did not sell her four horses at the 



close of the 'summer, but has them all 
parked in a barn in her back yard ! The 
children ride the ponies to school and take 
entire care of these greatly prized pets. 

Florence Glen Zipf has a boy and girl 
in school, and finds supervising their les- 
sons at home a full-time teaching job. 

Fanny Crenshaw was a councillor last 
summer at Mrs. Gulick's camp in New 
Hampshire. 

Peggy Lester has been giving talks on 
the League of Nations to various small 
groups about Philadelphia and Pottstown 
during the fall. 

Mary Wilmarth Brown reports that she 
is leading a quiet suburban life in 
Winnetka. Her two little girls are old 
enough now to go to school and Mary is 
wondering what to do with the few extra 
hours each day. She motored to Mackinac 
with the children last summer. 

Nora Cam is living in Montreal with 
her sister, and seems to be a lagly of leis- 
ure who skiis and grows bulbs, according 
to season. She will be in England this 
summer at 1 Keble Road, Oxford, and 
hopes to see any of 1912 who should hap- 
pen to be near. 

The class extends its sympathy to 
Rebecca Lewis, whose mother died in De- 
cember after a short illness. 

1914 
Class Editor: Elizabeth Ayer Inches 
(Mrs. Henderson Inches) 
Middlesex Rd., Chestnut Hill, Mass. 

Harriet Sheldon sounds very busy. She 
directed the summer school of the Colum- 
^bus School for Girls for six weeks and 
taught a summer class in speed writing 
and typewriting. In August she was in 
Asheville, so called on Catharine Creigh- 
ton Carr. She says that her house is love- 
ly and in the midst of thick woods. 

In October she attended a meeting of 
the Head Mistresses' Association of the 
Middle West in Louisville. They had a 
most successful visit, chiefly sightseeing 
and eating! 

Eleanore Gale is staying in France in- 
definitely. She and a friend motored 
6,000 miles in six weeks in England with- 
out a single puncture ! 

Isabel Bering is studying for a master's 
degree at the University of Chicago. 

Margaret Blanchard Smith's new ad- 
dress is 27 West St. Joe street, Indian- 
apolis, Ind. She is running the camera 
department of the leading department 
store. 

Ida Pritchett had a very successful 
"one-man show" of her photographs at 
the Woman's City Club in Philadelphia. 
By means of her camera she is keeping 
the wolf from her new green door. 



21 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



Julia Tappan directs the "education de- 
partment of the Cleanliness Institute in 
New York. She has charge of much of 
the printing- and gets out booklets that are 
original and artistic. 

Jean Davis has left Agnes Scott Col- 
lege and is now teaching at Wells Col- 
lege. 

Fritz and Biz Baldwin are taking a 
course of highbrow lectures at the Junior 
League this winter and enjoy them im- 
mensely. 

1915 

Class Editor: Emily Noyes Knight 
(Mrs. C. P. Knight, Jr.) 
Woodcroft, Pembroke, Bermuda. 

The old adage about the prophet not be- 
ing appreciated in his own land must be 
true, for now that the editor is on foreign 
soil in this diminutive semi-tropical island 
of the Atlantic, she receives news. 

Ruth Tuttle and her husband (will cor- 
respondents in writing occasionally men- 
tion last names) the latter with a beard, 
are the world's champion croquet players. 
They live on Lake Manitou, Canada, and 
visited this last Christmas Anne Hardon 
Pearce in East Palatka, the place from 
which, incidentally, delicious grapefruit 
and oranges come. Anne's boxes have 
been the editor's short-cut to Christmas 
shopping for two years. Now, word is re- 
ceived that Mr. Pearce has put out the 
only canned "new potato." If it tastes 
anything like the Bermuda potatoes, it 
will be hailed with delight by all of Irish 
descent. Anne's own existence sounds 
busy with gladioli bulbs and a new 
"green" and the usual oranges and grape- 
fruit 

Perhaps as a class we are becoming 
agricultural, for Olga Erbsloh Muller 
writes of "beasts of the field and fruits" 
from Sellanra, as well as of a husband 
and two children. She is taking an exten- 
sion course in Greek to familiarize herself 
with English words of Greek origin with 
an eye to her own poetry. Last winter 
she was where the editor now is, and last 
summer she was in Europe. 

Isabel Forster writes in the Monitor 
and travels with her sister and brother-in- 
law and children and instructs the children 
in arithmetic and spelling. 

Carlotta Taber, according to Laura 
Branson, designs silk material and runs 
a tea room in the summer. 

Ruth Newman is directing child wel- 
fare in Long Island. 

Ruth Hubbard is with the International 
Institute, working like a "slave," but lik- 
ing it. 

Laura Branson is with the Teachers' 
Union, which is a part of the A. F. L. 



Isabel Smith, after an illness from 
which she recovered, resigned from Smith 
College, where she was Associate Pro- 
fessor of Geology (shades of the Idalia 
and-little hammers) and one of the class 
Deans. She has become Dean of Scripps 
College in Claremont, California, a new 
college for women with an enrollment 
limited to two hundred. 

The editor herself at a luncheon for Sir 
Baden-Powell, between toasts to King and 
country, saw Helen Kirk, 1914, but was 
not recognized by her and so gained no 
news. Perhaps, with advancing years, 
class editors should be pictured from time 
to time in the Bulletin so that their faces 
should be quite as familiar to all Bulle- 
tin readers as those of the ladies who 
habitually use Pond's cold cream. 

1916 
Class Editor: Catherine S. Godley 
768 Ridgeway Avenue, 
Avondale, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Charlotte Westheimer Tobias has a 
third son, born in January. 

Dorothy Packard Holt writes that her 
days are busy with her children and her 
evenings with the Village Players, of 
which she is the vice-president in charge 
of production. She says that this is more 
fun than anything she has ever done but 
lots of work, for they put on either a 
series of three one-act plays or a three- 
act play every month. 

1917 
Class Editor: Bertha Clark Greenough 
203 Blackstone Boulevard, 
Providence, R. I. 

Janet Hollis is living at 985 Memorial 
Drive, Cambridge, Mass., this year. She 
returned to this country just too late for 
reunion last June after having spent seven 
months in France and Italy. 

Helen Zimmerman is teaching at the 
Low and Heywood School at Stamford, 
Conn., this winter and it is to her that I 
am indebted for the following news: 

Margaret Hoff Zimmerman with her 
husband and Erika left Chapel Hill on 
March 12th in their new Ford town car 
for New York and sailed on the 15th for 
Europe. They are quite pleased to have 
been able to rent their house during their 
absence. They are returning in Septem- 
ber. Their address will be care of Herrn 
Hafendirektor a. d. Wilhelm Zimmerman, 
Lichtenberg, Odenwald, Germany. 

1918 
Class Editor: Helen Edward Walker 
5516 Everett Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Helen Walker had miniatures accepted 
for exhibition both in the Art Institute of 
Chicago and in the Baltimore Museum of 
Art during the month of March. 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



23 



Louise Hodges Crenshaw writes that 
her occupation is "secretary-so-called of 
the Model School," and that she "came 
back last September from fifteen months 
scattered over Belgium, France, Germany, 
Austria, Greece, Holland, and England. 
Plan to spend next summer in France. 
Hope visitors to Bryn Mawr during win- 
ter seasons will remember 217 Roberts 
Road." 

Mary Gardiner says "I am still in Bryn 
Mawr, teaching Biology and assisting the 
Acting Dean, Millicent Carey." 

K. Dufourcq Kelley writes, "We are 
busy and well. Bobby is five and in kin- 
dergarten, and seems to be quite musical. 
Wonders will never cease ! I was a 
'mute' ! 

"Helen Wilson Merrill's mother wrote 
me a note at Christmas, telling me that 
Billy is well and happy and doing nicely 
in school. He will be nine in April. 

"I saw Virginia Anderson Lee just be- 
fore Christmas. Now that winter is al- 
most over we hope to visit back and forth 
oftener. Kitty I see frequently. I had 
luncheon last week with Helen Whitcomb 
Barss. As she was not at reunion we had 
lots of news to exchange. 

"I am doing lots of club work, civic and 
philanthropic, which is enjoyable but 
time-consuming." 

Helen Hammer Link says, "My latest 
news is that we have moved from Balti- 
more to near Pittsburgh. Instead of being 
Dean of the Gilman Country School my 
husband is now headmaster of the Se'wick- 
ley Academy, a co-educational school 
which covers the grades from kindergar- 
ten to college preparatory. We are much 
interested in the new job and new home. 
Anyone coming anywhere near 311 Hazel 
Lane, Sewickley, Pa., do come see us." 

Leslie Richardson: "It's a long time, 
and I am a very guilty person about 1918, 
the Bulletin, and everything. However, 
this postal found me pen in hand, so I 
go right on writing, as it were. In case 
it is of interest to anyone, I have pursued 
my museum career almost uninterruptedly 
for the last six years ; four in the Oriental 
Department of the Boston Museum, two 
at Yale starting their new Art Gallery, 
and now at the Metropolitan Museum as 
Assistant in the Far Eastern Division. It 
seems to be quite a nice place." 

Marion Smith says she is "still at the 
same old business of trying to put Latin 
and Greek into students' heads" at Hol- 
lins College. 

Charlotte Dodge Devine, too, has at last 
succumbed to the persistent postals : "Like 
all the other backsliders who send no an- 
swers to your postals I am more than 



delighted when I find any of 1918 men- 
tioned in the Bulletin. My existence is 
thoroughly absorbing to myself, but 
would not, I fear, make very racy reading 
for anyone else. I can exhibit a very 
energetic boy and a placid daughter. I live 
in hopes of seeing the campus again some 
spring day, with Goodhart Hall and Mar- 
garet Henderson's improvements in plant- 
ing adding to its appearance. Also a few 
of '18 scattered about to make me feel at 
home." 

Now that we have discovered, Char- 
lotte, that a request for a check to cover 
expenses is sure to bring a reply from 
you, we shall invariably so arrange it that 
the annual postal is accompanied by a 
most business-like appeal ! 

Margaret Worch Holsinger is "still at 
the same old job, Director of Social 
Work, Good Hope Hospital Association. 
Likely to be forever, and certainly hope 
to be. Hope to get on to the east this 
spring, but maybe no further than Chi- 
cago." 

Margery Smith Van Dorn has been 
quite ill for some time with a nervous 
breakdown caused by a sinus infection, but 
has quite recovered now. Her husband is 
designing for a Chicago firm and they are 
hoping to go on to Maine for the summer 
as his work does not keep them in one 
locality. They "went on a lovely trip last 
summer. The boys and Bill and I and our 
car all went up from Los Angeles to Van- 
couver on a German freighter. We drove 
all over Vancouver Island and then drove 
home down the coast. The freighter was 
lots of fun. There were cabins for fifty 
passengers, but there was no one but our 
family and a man and his wife from Pasa- 
dena from San Francisco on. All the 
Germans got off in the U. S. A. and we 
had a regular private yacht with beer 
galore, not to mention champagne. The 
boys had a whirl, never having been on a 
ship before. How they ever reached Van- 
couver without falling overboard, I'm sure 
I don't know. They were always being 
caught and dragged down from the most 
awful places !" 

Judy Hemenway Gibbs writes : "There 
is not much news, as my existence con- 
tinues much the same from day to day. I 
am living here in Deerfield with my two 
children, Julian (five years old last June) 
and Nancy (three years old). I was aw- 
fully sorry not to have gotten to reunion 
last June, but hope to be there for the 
next one." 

Margaret Timpson, no doubt, has lots 
and lots of news, yet she sends this ex- 
asperating postal : "Dear Squawky, Sorry 
I have no news at all. Have been spend- 



24 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



ing the winter in town and expect to go 
back to Woodmere about the first of 
April. Why don't you put in some news 
about yourself?" I put it in the first item, 
Timmie, so that nobody would miss it ! 

Mary Stair Dempwolf says: "The only 
exciting thing I can think of is that last 
summer my husband and I went off on a 
two weeks' cruise with two of our friends 
on their boat. We sailed from Portland, 
Me., to St. John, New Brunswick, and 
back in a 56- foot sloop with no auxiliary 
motor." 

1919 
Editor: Marjorie Remington Twitchell 
(Mrs. Pierrepont Twitchell) 
Setauket, L. I., N. Y. 

Alexander Clinton Zabriskie, Jr., ar- 
rived on January 27th, to augment Tige's 
family of boys, making her third son. 

Hazel Collins Hainsworth and her five- 
year-old daughter Joletta, joined Mr. 
Hainsworth in New York for a few 
weeks, and Joletta and Remington 
Twitchell made each other's acquaintance. 

Willard Shepherd Johnson was born on 
January 28th and named for his grand- 
father, Willard Shepherd Martin, because 
it was his birthday, too. Marjorie Martin 
Johnson seems to approve of Montreal in 
winter: "It's lovely here just now — 10 
degrees below and sunny. It's a great 
place to bring up a family !' ' 

Buster Ramsay Phelps writes: "After 
we came home from South Carolina in 
August, my husband went, down to Johns 
Hopkins for a series of operations. We 
are now Guyencourt Nurseries, Inc., of 
which I am president, my husband is sec- 
retary and treasurer, and the sales man- 
ager is Guy Nearing, brother of Mary 
Nearing, 1909, who was warden of Rock 
our freshman year. Our specialty is hol- 
lies and hybrid rhododendrons grown 
from cuttings." During the holidays they 
went to South Carolina again for shoot- 
ing. 

Helen Spalding has been in Milwaukee 
for four years "trying to help build up a 
child placing department in a children's 
agency. 

Mary Scott Spiller: "I hesitate to di- 
vulge my job after Green Shirt's com- 
ment on nursery schools. ... I have 
charge of the four and five year old chil- 
dren in a new school started by a group 
of enlightened young parents in Rose 
Valley, two miles from Swarthmore. 
Billy, five last May, goes with me, and 
Constance, almost three, goes to a play 
group across the street from us. . . . 
Our family has never been healthier or 
happier than right now when we all leave 
home each morning for our various 



schools and colleges and come home to 
lunch at noon all fresh and interesting to 
each other. I think this family life busi- 
ness is a bit overdone." 

From Win Perkins Raven: "We have 
lived for ten years in Hanover, N. H., 
where my husband is a member of the 
English Department of Dartmouth Col- 
lege. We like living in the country. We 
have our summers free, usually for trips 
to Europe, and in February of this year 
we are going abroad for seven months. 
We plan to spend most of the time in 
Munich, Germany." 

1920 
Editor: Margaret Ballou Hitchcock 
(Mrs. David Hitchcock) 
45 Mill Rock Rd., New Haven, Conn. 

Tenth Reunion plans are on. We are 
to have our dinner Saturday night, May 
31st. The committee is: Edith Stevens, 
Josephine Herrick, Marguerite Eilers, 
Phoebe Helmer Wadsworth, Margaret 
Littell Piatt, Lilian Davis Philip, Polly 
Porritt Green. They are at work, and you 
will hear from them soon. In the mean- 
time, make your plans to come. 

Millicent Carey. 

Katharine Thomas Stallman has twins, 
Christopher and Charlotte, born January 
4, 1930, at Columbus, Ohio. 

Marjorie Canby Taylor writes: "We 
spent last summer on the Jersey coast. 

Peggy Dent Daudon had the cottage 
next to us and our youngsters had lots 
of fun together. Peggy's husband is teach- 
ing French at the Curtis Institute of 
Music this winter and they are living at 
Bryn Mawr as Peggy is teaching at col- 
lege and at one of the schools.' 

I saw Isabel Arnold Blodgett several 
times. She has a most attractive house 
in Cambridge and is very busy taking 
care of her two children. Her father died 
very suddenly about ten days before 
Christmas. Before I left Boston I went 
to supper at Miriam O'Brien's at Ded- 
ham. Miriam and her mother had spent 
Washington's Birthday climbing Mt. 
Washington with Edith Stevens and her 
husband. People tell us that Miriam is 
one of the leading women Alpinists. She 
is sailing in a week for France and Swit- 
zerland where she is going to do some 
ascents on skis." 

1921 
Editor: Helen James Rogers 
(Mrs. J. E. Rogers) 
99 Poplar Plains Road, 
Toronto, Ontario, Canada. 

Mary Baldwin Goddard has written me 
such a nice letter from St. Marguerite, 
Quebec, where she and her husband are 
taking a skiing vacation. Her two-year- 






BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



old daughter, Mary Frances, who already 
knows numerous nursery rhymes, started 
at the Dalton School this year, but because 
of ear trouble had to give it up for the 
present. Her son, William Cullen Bryant, 
now six months old, is very well behaved 
and healthy. Mary and her husband 
motored down to Asheville in the fall. 
She has recently seen Kath Ward Seitz, 
"who is as beautiful and nice as ever," 
and Schurmy (Barbara Schurman), who 
has just embarked for China. 

Chickie Beckwith Lee has just an- 
nounced that she is opening a Lake For- 
est shop for a Chicago Interior Decorator. 

Eugenia Sheppard Black has written a 
dramatization of Cinderella. 

Betty Kellogg, when she was abroad 
last year, explored Devon and Cornwall 
in the spring and then went on to the 
Continent for the summer. She stayed a 
month in the mountains outside Munich 
where she went to the Saturday night 
square dances and with picturesque part- 
ners in embroidered costumes and plumed 
hats learned to yip and prance like one of 
them. She has seen Bickie (Catherine 
Bickley), who is in New York, being a 
very efficient bond saleswoman. 

Emily Kimbrough Wrench has sent 
me a picture of her twin daughters. She 
has moved from the country and her 
seventeen acres to Bryn Mawr and a 
front yard and ping-pong table. 

1922 
Editor: Serena Hand Savage 
(Mrs. William Savage), 
29 West 12th Street, New York City. 

Reunion's coming, girls! '20, '21, '22 
and '23 will all meet together for the 
Commencement of 1930, to see how fat or 
thin we've each become, to hear about 
children or careers and to become re- 
trospective and sentimental by moonlight 
in P. T.'s garden. Soon you'll receive 
postal cards with questions about your 
waist measure — which means we're plan- 
ning costumes. Probably these will con- 
sist of some attractive and modish model 
that will later be useful in our summer's 
wardrobe. Any suggestions will be of 
deep interest to your editor, who hopes 
you will enthusiastically plan to join our 
frolic. Dates and further information will 
be forthcoming on the aforementioned 
postal card. 

Barbara Clarke is president of the 
Bryn Mawr Club. She also is lecturing 
from time to time on various subjects con- 
nected with landscape gardening. 

A very nice long letter from E. Will- 
iams Clark, who lives in Dallas, Pennsyl- 
vania: "My history is brief and not un- 
usual; taught school four years after 



graduation, coached basketball, etc. Have 
been married three years to Peter Doug- 
las Clark who sells securities for J. and 
W. Seligman, in Wilkes-Barre. Have a 
sturdy blonde Peter Jr., nineteen months 
old." 

Lillian Wyckoff is working at Yale on 
Organic Chemistry. 

1923 
Editor: Dorothy Meserve Kunhardt 
(Mrs. Philip Kunhardt) 
Mt. Kemble Road, Morristown, N. J. 

Nancy FitzGerald writes from Rome 
that she ran into Bryn Mawrtyrs all 
through her travels last summer, seeing 
Julia Ward in London, who had been 
working on Richard III in the Record 
Office, bumping into Dr. Gray at Hamp- 
ton Court, and teaing with Julia Henning, 
who had been in France and was on her 
way home via Scotland and Cornwall. In 
Paris, Nancy met Miss Thomas in Ste. 
Chapelle and spent a delightful evening 
at Boris Godunoff on her opera tickets, 
obtained via Miss King. I quote from 
her letter itself, which is well worth 
hearing, word for word : "I met my sister 
in Innsbruck. From there we went up to 
Grinzens, a tiny place in the Inn Valley 
at the end of the bus line, and spent our 
time tramping over the mountains with 
a rucksack. We wore peasant shoes and 
Dirndlkleider, and our hair a la Deutsch, 
and as long as I kept my mouth shut, 
we passed beautifully, Rex being capable 
of sustained conversational flights after 
two years in Vienna. We ended by a 
four-day hike, by foot paths from valley 
to valley, across the ridges, to the Bren- 
ner Pass and a bit this side, and then by 
train to Vienna, where we arrived hat- 
less, with sticks and rucksack, but no 
Italian (I lost the dictionary out of the 
train window), and couldn't get our bags. 
I reached Rome on the day before the 
Academy opened, to find we were to start 
in two days for a fortnight in Pompeii 
and Naples. The excavations were tre- 
mendously interesting, and we certainly 
did them thoroughly. Now I am settled 
here for the winter, taking courses here 
at the Academy (though, of course, I 
don't properly belong in classics) and do- 
ing as much research on Italian painting 
as possible." 

Louise Affelder was married on Febru- 
ary 13th to Mr. Emanuel Maurice Davi- 
dove and after the first of April she and 
her husband will live at 2753 Hampshire 
Road, Cleveland Heights, Ohio. 

Ally Smith Hackney sends us the first 
welcome news of our class reunion in 
June : "It's our seventh reunion and most 



26 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



of us haven't seen each other for five 
years (appalling!) and I want to obliter- 
ate just as many excuses for not coming 
as possible. After she reads this no one 
will be able to say she didn't know when 
it was in time to make plans. Don't any- 
one make any dates for May 31st, June 
1st and 2nd. Our class supper is May 
31st, Baccalaureate is June 1st and 
Alumnae and Athletic Day with parades, 
costumes, etc., is June 2nd. Garden Party 
is the 3rd and Commencement the 4th. 
There is a possibility that our class sup- 
per may be June 3rd, but it will be decided 
definitely very soon. This is just the first 
gun in the campaign for 100 per cent at- 
tendance at reunion, to be followed short- 
ly by heavy shrapnel in the form of cards 
to be remailed at once giving yes or no 
for an answer and measurements for cos- 
tumes." 

Elizabeth Ericson is secretary to a pro- 
fessor of psychology at Boston Univer- 
sity. 

Lucy Kate Bowers Blanchard's twin 
sons are old enough to ski ! 

We have just had the very sorrowful 
news of the death on November 28th of 
Marion Bradley Stevens' little son, Philip 
Ellis Stevens, Jr. He was two and a half 
years old and died very suddenly of men- 
ingitis. We send our love and a very great 
deal of sympathy to Cuckoo and her other 
baby boy, Edwin Bradley Stevens. 

1926 

Editor (temporarily) : Edith Tweddell 

Plandome, Long Island, N. Y. 

This is just a preliminary warning that 
we are going to reune informally this 
June so we shall be in good practice for 
a bang-up fifth reunion next year. The 
central feature will be a picnic at noon 
on Sunday, June 1st, so make your plans 
accordingly and don't miss the fun, food 
and friends. Personal notices will be sent 
out later but obey that impulse and send 
an acceptance at once to Peg Harris West 
(Mrs._ Nelson West), Wynnewood, Pa. 
The picnic will only set you back a dollar 
and nights on the campus the usual rate. 

Janet Wiles was married in St. Mark's 
Church in London on January 3rd to Mr. 
Austen Trevor Boyd, of Belfast. She 
wore a graceful frock of ivory ring vel- 
vet, carried lilies of the valley and freesias 
and looked too beautiful. After the Bene- 
diction a Salutation was sung, the music 
of which was written specially for her 
wedding by Sir George Henschel. Lady 
Henschel received the guests at Claridge's 
after the ceremony. K. Woodworth ('24) 
and Anne Tierney were the only Bryn 
Mawr people there. Janet and her hus- 



band are living in Belfast where they plan 
to build their own house. 

Illness forced Anne Tierney to give up 
her teaching a year ago, so she went for 
a six. months' rest to Dorset, where she 
received the erstwhile Janet Wiles, Barbie 
Sindall, Peggy Brooks, Jo Young, and 
Polly McElvain. When they went to 
Dartmoor last August Mr. Tierney had a 
serious riding accident from which he is 
just now recovering. Anne is now living 
at 76 Holland Park, London W. 11. 

Pussy Leewitz married a French sur- 
geon last November 14th, and is living 
happily in her native city of Paris. He is 
Dr. Marc Isel'in, and a fellow of Johns 
Hopkins University. Betty Cushman and 
Fanny Jay were her bridesmaids. Felici- 
tations should be addressed to : 71 Avenue 
Marceau, Paris 16, France. 

Last summer, before all this happened, 
Pussy motored with her parents through 
Yugoslavia and Greece, where in Old 
Corinth they visited the American School 
of Archaeology and met Mary Zelia 
Pease. Early one morning they were 
strolling along the shores of Brionia when 
lo ! Elaine Lomas swam in from the sea. 

1927 
Class Editor: Ellenor Morris 
Berwyn, Penna. 

Elinor Parker has a scholarship at the 
Institute of Musical Art, and is working 
very hard on her singing. 

Aggie Pearce and Marcia" Carter are 
studying stenography, and Elizabeth Dun- 
can has a job with the Rockefeller Foun- 
dation and is living in New York. Eliza- 
beth Norton is spending the winter in 
Lausanne with her mother. 

Carol Piatt is still teaching in San 
Francisco. 

Maria Chamberlain writes that she had 
a very interesting summer in Europe and 
is now at 401 Park Towers, 2440 Six- 
teenth St.. N. W., Washington, D. C, 
and is going to art school and cooking 
school. 

1928 
Class Editor: Cornelia B. Rose, Jr. 

333 E. 68th Street, New York City. 

Louise Gucker has announced her en- 
gagement to Robert Alan Page, of Win- 
chester, Mass. She writes that "he is 
quite distinguished looking — six feet three 
with red hair. He's a Harvard man and 
before that he went to Choate. I hope 
you'll all come to the wedding though 
heaven knows when it will be." In the 
meantime she is teaching Latin and Math 
at the Gordon-Rooney School and seeing 
a great deal of Diza Steck, who is teach- 
ing Math at the Agnes Irwin. Diza plans 
to go to Europe this summer. 



Only Indiana 

Limestone Could Give 

Such Beauty! 




Detail, Temple Emanu-El, New York City. Kohn, Butler 
& Stein, Architects. Mayers, Murray & Phillip, Associ- 
ates. Cauldwell Wingate Company , Builders. 



THE architect's vision of 
beauty and dignity needs 
an ideal medium of expres- 
sion if the result is to be 
noteworthy. Knowing this, 
the architect usually prefers 
to use Indiana Limestone for 
his design. 

This fine-grained, light- 
colored natural stone gives 
results both for exterior and 
interior use that no other 
building material can dupli- 
cate. In cost it compares 
favorably with the cost of 
local stone and is but little 
higher than what you would 
have to pay for a substitute. 

No matter what sort of 
building project you are in- 
terested in, you will find it 
practicable to build of Indi- 
ana Limestone. And you will 
secure a building that will 
give permanent satisfaction 
because of the unchanging 
beauty of its exterior. 

Booklet free 

We will gladly cd-operate 
with your architect in show- 
ing exactly what our stone 
will cost for the building you 
are planning. We have illus- 
trated booklets showing va- 
rious kinds of buildings. Tell 
us what type interests you 
most. Write Box 849, Service 
Bureau, Bedford, Indiana. 



INDIANA LIMESTONE COMPANY 



Qeneral Offices: Bedford, Indiana 



Executive Offices: Tribune Tower, Chicago 



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The Saint Timothy's School 
for Girls 

CATONSVILLE, MARYLAND 

Founded September 1882 

COLLEGE PREPARATORY 

AND 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

MISS LOUISA McENDREE FOWLER 
Head of the School 

Wykeham Rise 

WASHINGTON, CONNECTICUT 

A COUNTRY SCHOOL 
FOR GIRLS 

FANNY E. DAVIES, LL.A., Headmistress 
Prepares for Bryn Mawr and Other Colleges 

The Episcopal Academy 

(Founded 1785) 

CITY LINE, OVERBROOK, PA. 

A country day school for boys 

MODERN AND WELL EQUIPPED 
Endorsed by Bryn Mawr Alumnae 

UNIVERSITYg« 

BOARDING AND DAY SCHOOL 

Founded 1896 

Thorough and successful Preparation 

for Eastern Colleges for Women as well as 

for Midwestern Colleges and Universities 

Illustrated Catalogue on Request 

ANNA B. HAIRE, A.B., SMITH COLLEGE, Principal 

1106-B Lake Shore Drive Chicago, Illinois 

THE LOW AND 
HEYWOOD SCHOOL 

Emphasizing college preparatory work. 

Also general and special courses. 

One year intensive college preparation. 

Junior school. 

65 th year. Catalogue. 

SHIPPAN POINT, 
STAMFORD, CONN. 



The Ethel Walker School 

SIMSBURY, CONNECTICUT 

Head of School 

ETHEL WALKER SMITH, A.M., 
Bryn Mawr College 



Head Mistress 

JESSIE GERMAIN HEWITT, A.B., 
Bryn Mawr College 



fl» g^EAtl&SJC H€€L 



College Preparation. Cultural 

and Special Courses. City and 

Country Advantages. 

Lucie C Beard, Headmistress 

Box M, Orange, N. J. 




/1ARCUAV scmh 

BRYN MAWR, PA. 
Prepares for Bryn Mawr and 
all leading colleges 

Musical Course prepares for the Depart 
ment of Music of Bryn Mawr College 
EDITH HARCUM, Head of School 
L. May Willis, Principal 

THE MISSES KIRK'S 

College Preparatory School 

PREPARATORY TO BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 
Individual Instruction. Athletics. 

Clovercroft, Montgomery Avenue, Rosemont, Pa. 
Mail, telephone and telegraph address: Bryn Mavor, Pa. 



CHOATE S r rl00l 

1600 Beacon Street, Brookline, Mass. 

HOME AND DAY SCHOOL 
FOR GIRLS 

EMPHASIS ON COLLEGE PREPARATION 

Elective Courses for students not preparing 
for College 

AUGUSTA CHOATE, A.M. (Vassar) 

Principal 



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THE AGNES IRWIN SCHOOL 

2009-2011 Delancey Place, Philadelphia 

A College Preparatory 
SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 



BERTHA M. LAWS, A.B., Headmistress 

MISS WRIGHT'S SCHOOL 

Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Prepares for College Board 
Examination 

BANCROFT SCHOOL 
FOR GIRLS 

30th Year. Complete College Preparation. 

Individual Attention to carefully selected group in 
Boarding Department of Progressive Day School. 
Summer and Winter Sports. Dramatics, Art, 
Music. Address 

HOPE FISHER, Principal, Worcester, Mass. 

The Katharine Branson School 

ROSS, CALIFORNIA Across the Bay from San Francisco 

A Country School College Preparatory 

Heads 

Katharine Fleming Branson, A.B., Bryn Mawr 



MISS MADEIRA'S SCHOOL 

1330 19th St., N. W. Washington, D. C. 

A RESIDENT AND DAY SCHOOL FOR 
GIRLS 

LUCY MADEIRA WING, A.B. 

MRS. DAVID LAFOREST WING 

Head Mistress 



FERRY HALL 

A RESIDENT AND DAY SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

On Lake Michigan, near Chicago 

Junior College; High School Department: College 
Preparatory and General Courses. Special Departments 
of Music, Expression and Art. 

Two new dormitories, including new dining room and 
infirmary. 

Eloise R. Tremain, A.B., Bryn Mawr, Principal 

ROSEMARY HALL 

College Preparatory 
(With supplementary but not alternative courses) 

Head Mistrust* 

GREENWICH - - CONNECTICUT 

The Shipley School 

Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 

Preparatory to Bryn Mawr College 

ALICE G. HOWLAND, ELEANOR 0. BROWNELL 
Principals ^^^ 

MISS RANSOM and 
MISS BRIDGES' SCHOOL 

PIEDMONT, CALIFORNIA 

(A suburb of San Francisco) 

A RESIDENT AND DAY SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

General and College Preparatory Courses 
Outdoor Life throughout the year 

EDITH BRIDGES, B.L., Principal 



The Baldwin School 

A Country School for Girls 
BRYN MAWR PENNSYLVANIA 

Preparation for Bryn Mawr, Mount 
Holyoke, Smith, Vassar and Wellesley 
Colleges. Abundant Outdoor Life. 
Hockey, Basketball, Tennis, Indoor 
Swimming Pool. 



ELIZABETH FORREST JOHNSON. A.B. 

HEAD 



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' carrison Forest 



^_^ A Country School in the Green 
Spring Valley near Baltimore. 
Modern Equipment. 

All Sports. Special Emphasis on Horse- 
back Riding. Mild Climate. 
Garrison Forest Girls who are going to college 
are thoroughly prepared for any institution. 
Other girls take courses with special emphasis 
on Music and Art. Younger girls live in a 
separate Junior House. 

Principals 

MISS JEAN G. MARSHALL 

MISS NANCY OFFUTT, 
Bryn Mawr, ex '20 

Box B, Garrison, Maryland 



The Traphagen School of Fashion 



I 



INTENSIVE SIX WEEKS 
SUMMER COURSE 

All phases from elementary to full 
mastery ol costume design and illus- 
tration taught In shortest time con- 
sistent with thoroughness. Day and 
Evening classes. Saturday courses for 
Adults and Children. Our Sales De- 
partment disposes of student work. 
Every member of advanced classes 
often placed through our Employment 
Bureau. Write for announcement. 



In Arnold. Constable & Company Costume 
Design Competition, over 100 schools and 
nearly 800 students took part; all prizes 
were awarded to Traphagen pupils with 
exception of one of the five third prizes. 

1680 Broadway (near 52nd St.) New Y< 



All the smart world 
walks in 

S^ks-Fifth Avenue 

created by "Paris 
or 

SAKS-FIFTH AVENUE 

FORTY- NINTH to FIFTIETH STREET 
NEW YORK 




Cathedral School of St. Mary 

GARDEN CITY, LONG ISLAND, N. Y. 

A school for Girls 19 miles from New York. College 

preparatory and general courses. Music Art and 

Domestic Science. Catalogue on request. Boj B 

MIRIAM A. BYTEL, A.B., Radcliffe, Principa 

BERTHA GORDON WOOD, A.B., Bryn Mawr 

Assistant Principal 



The Phebe Anna 
Thome School 

Under the Direction of the 
Department of Education 



A progressive school preparing 
for all colleges. Open air class 
rooms. Pre-school, Primary, 
Elementary and High School 
Grades. 



BRYN MAWR, PA. 

Agnes L. Rogers, Ph.D., Director 
Frances Browne, A.B., HeadMistress 



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1896 1930 

BACK LOG CAMP 

THE ADIRONDACK MOUNTAINS 

INDIAN LAKE, NEW YORK 

QUESTIONNAIRE 




Ques. Where is Indian Lake? 
Ans. About 150 miles from Albany, in a 
real wilderness. 

Ques. Can you drive to it? 
Ans. To the lower end of the Lake; not 
to the Camp. 

Ques. What do the Campers live in? 
Ans. Mostly in tents very comfortably 
equipped. There are two cottages. 

Ques. Who goes to the Camp? 
An*. People like yourself. Single men 
and women; whole families. 

Letters of inquiry should be addressed to 

Mrs. Bertha Brown Lambert (Bryn Mawr, 1904) 

272 Park Avenue 

Takoma Park, D. C. 



Ques. Who runs the Camp? 
Ans. A large family of Philadelphia 
Quakers, college graduates. 

Ques. What sort of life does the Camp 

offer? 
Ans. Terribly boring to the sort who 

never come; fascinating to those who 

love the woods. 

Ques. Is the food good? 
Ans. Absolutely. 



Other references 

Mrs. Anna Hartshorne Brown (Bryn Mawr,1912) 

Westtown, Penna. 

Dr. Henry J. Cadbury 
(Head of Biblical Dept, Bryn Mawr) 

Haverford, Penna. 



Who is 
Kagawa ? 

He is the outstand- 
ing Japanese Chris- 
tian in Asia. ^ What 
has he done? ^ 
Preached in the 
streets, lived in the 
slums, built schools 
and now is conduct- 
ing his "Million 
Souls for Jesus" 
campaign. 



vo 




It belongs to the literature both 
of power and knowledge; it 
might be called wisdom 
literature. — Galen M. 
Fisher, Executive 
Secretary, Institute 
of Social and 
Religious ^^^^ TTo^ 



THE JOHN C. 
WINSTON COMPANY 

PHILADELPHIA 



i ^ vA*\ 

v„y d* Every 
jjP Christian 

should read his book for 
its inspirational message 
and its profound philoso- 
phy. ^ It is a challenge to 
try the Way of Love. ^ 
Kagawa' s first book went 
through 180 editions in 
Japan ; now he has written 
for English readers his 
views of life and the world. 
At all bookstores. $2.00 



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. 






-^^"x 




A SURGEON 


/C§f^\\ 




A UNIVERSITY 


iP^-^^Vj 




A TRUST COMPANY 


jHjjPl 1 ^ \ |P 




are selected with discrimination. Travel 


Ik ^ l^jfettk* 




plans should be made with equal care. 


^y^^wi 




University Travel, directed by Dr.H. H. 


V/yT 




Powers for more than thirty years, has 
built up a staff of trained experts. 

Motor Trips are offered in England, 
France, Germany. 

The Vergilian Cruise in the comfortable 


Your Baby 




City of Paris will follow the route of 
Aeneas with many of the best known 
classical scholars. 


a/ou love your youngster, of 
•^ course. You'd do anything 




Diversified Tours under scholarly lead- 
ership include places of both usual and 




unusual interest in Europe and the far 


in the world to see that your 




corners of the world. 


baby gets the best of attention, 




Announcements sent on request 


care and education. 




THE BUREAU OF UNIVERSITY TRAVEL 


Have you stopped to think that 
a few dollars a year invested in 






126 BOYD STREET NEWTON, MASS. 


=^^^=^^^^=== 


a Provident Mutual Policy will 
guarantee funds for care and 












education in case you are called 
away by death ? 






Escondido 


This matter is worthy of your 








attention NOW. Send us the 








coupon. There is no obligation. 






Riding in the 


Your baby takes the risk 






New Mexico Rockies 


if you delay 






Motoring in the 


President Mutual 






Indian Country 


Life Insurance Company of Philadelphia 








Founded 1865 






JUNE 26 - AUGUST 6 


Paul Loder, Manager 








123 South Broad Street 






Trip for a Small Group 


Philadelphia, Pa. 






of College Girls 
Write for Booklet 


You may send me the facts about your 
Educational Plan, including rate at my 
age. 


Name 






AGATHE DEMING, Director 


Address 






924 West End Avenue 


Date of Birth v 






New York City 





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Indian - 
detours 

^Most distinctive motor 
cruise service in the uJortd 



THE DE LUXE WAY— by Cadillac 
Harveycar — of visiting the hidden 
primitive Spanish Missions, old Mexican 
villages, colorful Indian pueblos, prehis- 
toric cliff-dwellings— all set in the match- 
less scenery and climate of the Southern 
Rockies. 

Service is the equivalent of motoring 
with the finest of private facilities. Spe- 
cially equipped Cadillac Cruisers are used. 
Driver-mechanicians are Harvey trained, 
and a private courier accompanies each 
party, limited to four guests to a single car. 

The Frijoles-Puy'e Indian-detour 

TWO DAYS FORTY DOLLARS 

Old Santa Fe with nights at unique La Fonda. Primitive 
Mexican settlements in Pojoaque Valley, Santa Clara and 
San lldefonso Indian pueblos. Frijoles Canyon and the 
cliff-dwelling ruins of Puye. 

The Taos Indian-detour 

THREE DAYS SIXTY-FIVE DOLLARS 

The Frijoles-Puye Indian-detour in full, with luncheon 
under the Puye cliffs on second day — thence to Taos 
Indian pueblo, overnight at famous Taos town, and the 
Rio Grande gorge on the return. 

There are a score of other Indian-detours, form- 
erly known as Harveycar Motor Cruises, to every 
out-of-the-way corner of NewMexico and Arizona. 

A DAY IN OLD SANTA FE 

24-hours, train to train, Tesuque Indian pueblo and 
60 miles by Harveycoach. $12.50 all-inclusive. 

The iatliritlaal rate includes every 
expense en route— motor tram <*#*«#•- 
nil hiii hit Ifarreijear. courier ser- 
vices meals, hotel accom- 
modations with hath. 



Eastbound or westbound, these dis- 
tinctively new Indian-detours will 
commence and end at La my , New 
Mexico, on your Santa Fe way 
to California. 



HARVEYCAR INDIAN-DETOURS, 

12 79-A Santa Fe, New Mexico. 

Please send free copy of Indian-detours booklet and map. 
Name Address 




Kindly 



Bryn Mavvr Bulletin 




Where Children Shine 

On the Rhode Island Seashore at Matunuck 
Twenty Miles East of Watch Hill 



Girls 8 to 16 Years Counselored 



Girls 16 Years and Over Chaperoned 



Rhythmic Dancing — Guarded Surf Bathing — Horseback Riding 

The Play Spirit — Wise Supervision — Simplicity of Living 

Private Beach — Woods — Fields — Ponds — Streams 

Outdoor Life — Recreational Facilities 

Also the Comet's Tail Farm for Boys, Green Hill, Rhode Island 

Terms by Season or Week Send for Camp Booklets 

Director Mrs. Leonard Sanford Tyler (Alice Jaynes, Bryn Mawr, B. A.) 

Associate Director Mrs. Robert Flaherty (Frances Hubbard, Bryn Mawr, B. A.) 

34 Edgehill Road, New Haven, Connecticut 



BRYN MAWR 
ALUMNAE 
BULLETIN 




THE NEW CURRICULUM 



May, 1930 



Vol. X 



No. 5 



Entered as second-class matter, January 15, 1921, at the Post Office, Phila., Pa., under Act of March 3, 1879 

COPYRIGHT, 1930 

ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 



OFFICERS OF THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

EXECUTIVE BOARD 
President Anne Kiddkh Wilson, 1903 

vice-President'.';::::'.::::; mary hardy, 1920 

Recording Secretary Gertrude Hearne Myers, 1919 

Corresponding Secretary May Egan Stokes, 191 1 

Treasurer Margaret E. Brusstar, 1903 

Chairman of the Finance Committee Caroline Florence Lexow, 1908 

Chairman of the Publicity Committee Caroline Morrow Chadwick-Collinb, 1905 

ALUMNAE SECRETARY AND BUSINESS MANAGER OF THE BULLETIN 

Alice M. Hawkins, 1907 

EDITOR OF THE BULLETIN 

Marjorie L. Thompson, 1912 

DISTRICT COUNCILLORS 

District 1 Helen Evans Lewis, 1913 

District 11. Jeanne Kerr Fleischmann, 1910 

District III Alletta Van Reypen Korff, 1900 

District I\ Katharine Holliday Daniels, 1918 

District V Isabel Lynde Dammann, 1905 

District VI Edna Warkentin Alden, 1900 

District VII Helen Brayton Barendt, 1903 

ALUMNAE DIRECTORS 

Frances Fincke Hand, 1897 Margaret Reeve Cary, 1907 

Mary Peirce, 1912 Elizabeth Lewis Otey, 1901 

Virginia Kneeland Frantz, 1918 

CHAIRMAN OF THE ALUMNAE FUND 

Caroline Florence Lexow, 1908 

CHAIRMAN OF THE ACADEMIC COMMITTEE 

Pauline Goldmark, 1896 

CHAIRMAN OF THE SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOAN FUND COMMITTEE 

Margaret Gilman, 1919 

CHAIRMAN OF THE COMMITTEE ON HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Dr. Marjorie F. Murray, 1913 

CHAIRMAN OF THE NOMINATING COMMITTEE 

Eleanor Little Aldrich, 1905 



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For Catalogue address Director, College Dept. 



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Kindly mention Bryn Mawb Bulletin 



Bryn Mawr Alumnae 
Bulletin 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF 
THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNA ASSOCIATION 

Marjorie L. Thompson, '12, Editor 
Alice M. Hawkins, '07, Business Manager 

EDITORIAL BOARD 
Mary Crawford Dudley, '96 Emily Kimbrough Wrench, '21 

Caroline Morrow Chadwick-Collins, '05 Ellenor Morris, '27 
Emily Fox Cheston, '08 Elinor B. Amram, '28 

Anne Kidder Wilson, '03, ex-cfficio 

Subscription Price, $1.50 a Year Single Copies, 25 Cents 

Checks should be drawn to the order of Bryn Mawr Alumnae Bulletin 
Published monthly, except August, September and October, at 1006 Arch St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Vol. X MAY, 1930 No. 5 

Over long periods of time, those of us among the Alumnae who care deeply for 
the college but who are not in its inner Councils, play the part of anxious Marthas 
who concern themselves endlessly with what are really household details; we talk 
busily among ourselves about this and that — the acoustics of Goodhart, the plumbing 
of Radnor, the wisps of honey-suckle lining Pembroke drive, the exultant week- 
day untidiness of the Undergraduates, the cars piled up outside the Denbigh 
kitchen door of a Sunday afternoon, perilously backing, as a result of the effort 
to make the campus less hazardous — all these things we feel are our passionate 
concern. We forget that the college moves continually and placidly on its way, 
absorbed with its true business which, when we occasionally get a glimpse of it, 
puts these other things into a different and less conspicuous place than we usually 
give them. Perhaps the trouble is that we are told more about method than theory. 
Or perhaps it as merely that we ourselves are more interested in the one than in the 
other and that the fault lies there. When, however, we have it vouchsafed us to 
see both means and end combining to make the true pattern of the educational 
process as it is conceived at Bryn Mawr, we experience the pleasure that one always 
experiences from good design. Last month the report of the Academic Committee 
threw real light on the Entrance Requirements, and showed the reasons behind the 
changes that have been made; this month Miss Carey's article on the curriculum 
changes very illuminatingly presents both the end which the Faculty wish to attain 
and the means which they think will prove the surest way to that end. And most 
significant of all, perhaps, in giving one this strange and exciting sense of seeing 
things whole even though it be but for a moment, is the speech which Esther Cloud- 
man Dunn made at the dinner given in Radnor Hall in honour of the four Graduate 
European Fellows. She discusses "that something new" which is "in the wind of 
scholarship in America today." Whether you consider it new or old, you must 
decide for yourself if you are interested in education, but there are few who will not 

t exclaim with a pleasurable shock of recognition, "But this is precisely what is behind 
all the Academic changes," and with that sense of recognition comes a warm sense 



THE GOODLY FELLOWSHIP 

(This speech was made Friday, March 21st, at a dinner in Radnor Hall, given in 
honour of the four Graduate European Fellows, by Dr. Esther Cloudman Dunn, 
former member of the English Department at (Bryn Mawr, Holder of the Rubel 
Fellowship in 1923, Ph.D. University of London, and now Professor of English at 
Smith College.) 

I feel particularly 'of )^our fellowship' this evening; for I recall a certain 
ecstatic day when I, too, was made a Bryn Mawr Foreign Fellow and my imagination 
went prancing down the bright avenues of the future. I rejoice to think what a potent 
and picturesque word 'fellow' is: how it meant originally a partner in business and 
down the long centuries of academic tradition has stood for partnership with the col- 
lege in that very special and glorious business of scholarship — a spiritual business yet 
not entirely so; for the term fellowship has always carried with it a sense of a very 
tangible place, some ancient college hall, where the Fellow lived more or less at the 
bounty of his fostering mother, and enjoyed in his leisure hours the warming spirit 
of Common Room conversation and the mellow glow of old port. 

And now Bryn Mawr has been hospitable to both sides of this ancient tradition: 
you not only have Fellows but you have a hall, a college in the English sense, in which 
they may reside. I am sure there is wit in the Common Room and I am warmed by 
the spirit of the occasion almost to the point of believing in the old port. And to 
speak directly for a moment to your new Radnor College, hear this wise comment 
of James Russell Lowell, made on the occasion of the 250th Anniversary of Harvard 
in 1886: 

"The friends of university training can do nothing that would forward it more 
than the founding of post-graduate fellowships and the building and endowing of a 
hall where the holders of them might be Commensals, remembering that when Car- 
dinal Wolsey built Christ Church at Oxford his first care was the kitchen. Nothing 
is so great a quickener of the faculties, or so likely to prevent their being narrowed 
to a single groove, as the frequent social commingling of men who are aiming at one 
goal by different paths." 

Lowell's advice is still valid and the Bryn Mawr Graduate School is twice 
blessed, first for its fellowship and secondly, for the new living quarters which make 
possible the commensality — delicious, pedantic word — of its fellows. 

But these Fellows are partners in the business of scholarship, we said. Now 
something new, I think, is in the wind of scholarship in America today and as business 
associates I want to talk with you for a little this evening about that new thing. 

Of late there has been a great hue and cry raised for a new attitude toward life 
and art in America. The sponsors of it have chosen for their cult the very old name 
of humanism. People who could not possibly know what the word humanism imports, 
bandy it about lightly and wisely. A man in New York told me the other day that 
Mr. Harry Hansen of The New York World found humanism excellent "column" 
stuff. There is something intoxicating to us of the cloister about having our shib- 
boleths brought into the market place, even if they are strangely distorted by the light 
of common day. Having spent a good part of the last ten years in trying to make 
clear in my own mind just what humanism is and what were its manifestations in 
sixteenth century England, I am not to be blamed, I think, for a certain elation, a 
certain sense of being at last 'in the know/ when I find three leading weeklies in 

(2) 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 3 

the past fortnight devoting columns to humanism. If the contents of these columns is 
news to me so much the worse for me. I shift uneasily and conceal my confusion with 
what grace I may. 

Yet seriously, underlying much nonsense, a stand has been taken, a criticism of 
various modern ways of thought, which is likely to be far-reaching in its effect on 
art in America in general, and more particularly on the art of scholarship. The 
modern humanists object to a view of man and his world which is purely scientific 
or purely naturistic. They feel that a faith in facts, machinery, organization, the 
outwardness of life has gone too far; that at its best it leaves that precious thing, homo 
sapiens or humanus, unexplained or even worse, denied a real existence. On the other 
hand, when it does consider man, it considers him not as distinct from nature and 
the physical universe. Modern thought, they say, takes no cognizance of that mystical 
quality, that blend of spirit and reason, which presented man to the eye of the psalmist 
as 'a little lower than the angels' or to the mind of Aristotle or Shakespeare as a 
separate entity, a precious essence to be revered and studied according to the laws of 
his own nature. This modern way of thought, judges his emotional ebb and flow, his 
aesthetic sense, his capacity for beauty and goodness by the scientific laws applied to 
other phenomena of the universe. 

All sorts of culprits are arraigned at the bar of humanism as responsible for this 
falling away from the great vision of man: such as the loss in the sense of faith, the 
increased feeling of science that the evidence of things not seen is not evidence, the 
distrust of imponderables and intangibles, the glorification of natural man against 
cultivated man, the seeming invulnerability of materialism and, in the realm of study, 
the stability of facts compared with the instability of ideas. This anti-humanistic 
point of view is probably as old as the humanists' approach to life. It was already 
making fresh headway by the end of the sixteenth century. You remember how Lafeu 
in All's Well says: 

"They say miracles are past: and we have our philosophical (i. e. scientific) per- 
sons, to make modern and familiar, things supernatural and causeless." 

Every kind of movement has been belabored and charged with producing this 
state of mind about man and life and art. Seventeenth century philosophy did some- 
thing for it, and the Age of Reason and Romanticism and the Industrial Era. 

In its modern manifestations Matthew Arnold was already in the lists against it 
in the 1860's, raising a battle cry of 'Sweetness and Light' as he charged 'faith in 
machinery' and the outwardness of the Philistines' point of view; chanting) softly 
to his followers of the inwardness of culture, the reality and stability of human stand- 
ards, of what is 'beautiful, graceful, becoming.' And men like John Bright and 
Frederic Harrison were shouting back at him that he and his ilk were unequalled for 
'want of good sense.' They found the unreality and impracticability of his point of 
view insupportable. They almost shouted him down and it is interesting that just 
fifty years later another concerted effort to defend the faith against Philistia is being 
made. 

Among these modern humanists, Norman Foerster has taken up the cudgels in 
the field of graduate study. He has just published a little book, which you have 
doubtless seen, with the title The American Scholar, A Study in Litterae Inhuman- 
iores. His Latin prefix flings down the challenge. The greater part of graduate 
study in America he says, is concerned with amassing facts. Students and professors 
alike are afraid of a spiritual approach to their study, are uncertain that there are any 



4 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

standards of taste, any sure critical judgment, which they are able to apply. In other 
words, Foerster charges that American scholarship does not run along humanistic lines 
but along scientific lines; it feels safe with facts but decidedly unsafe with criticism 
of those facts. 

This charge that graduate study in America has become the pursuit of 'litterae 
inhumaniores' is, I think, not always well founded. The point of view of Foerster 
and his modern group of self-appointed humanists is likely to be extreme: they have 
in fact laid down their principles; so firmly that they are in danger of forsaking that 
exquisite detachment from any platform which made Erasmus, the typical Renaissance 
humanist, the despair of both Pope and Luther in his own day. Yet the extreme 
earnestness of their attack has already moved American scholarship to set about con- 
sidering its position and justifying it. 

The President of the Modern Language Association of America, Professor W. 
H. Nitze, on December 30th last, entitled his welcoming address to the annual meeting 
of the Association, Horizons. In it he attempted to make a re-valuation of American 
scholarship. "Scholarship is an adventure in seeking fresh horizons," he says. In 
the course of his address he uses the phrase 'humanistic scholarship' and admits the 
interplay of humanistic scholarship and literary criticism. So far so good. But as a 
scholar he is on guard against literary criticism, and excludes the critic from the field 
of the scholar saying that the primary function of the critic is "to evaluate (in terms 
of personality)" whereas the primary function of the scholar is "to know (in terms 
of fact)." He does grant that Modern Language Scholarship "primarily consists in 
being sensitive to fact." And for this 'sensitive,' much thanks. It implies at least 
some quality in the collector of the facts which is inward and which goes near to those 
alluring quicksands of criticism which Mr. Nitze fears. For this fluttering of the 
dovecotes of Modern Language Scholarship one is grateful, even though there is not 
much of soaring or far horizons. 

Why are Mr. Nitze and others so afraid of the critical side of scholarship, so 
sure that it is mere whimsy, with more manner than matter in it, more gossamer than 
sinew? The reason is not obscure. In the first place, our study of trends, of devel- 
opments, of evolution or outright change in taste, which has gone on now for more 
than a century among scholars has led us to forget a thing which the classical world 
and the early Renaissance profoundly believed ; that there are certain universal, eternal 
laws of taste which lie at the heart of all art. 

It was Longinus who said : 

"That is truly great which gives much food for fresh reflection; which it is hard, 
nay impossible to resist ; of which the memory is strong and indelible . . . When 
men of different habits, lives, ambitions, ages, all take one and the same view about 
the same writings, the verdict and pronouncement of such dissimilar individuals gives 
a powerful assurance, beyond all gainsaying, in favor of that which they admire." 

Here stand the verities of artistic interpretation, true so long as the category of 
homo sapiens maintains its distinction from animal nature on the one hand or mechan- 
ism on the other. This body of artistic principles is a rockj, beaten upon and corroded 
by the winds of time and circumstance but never demolished utterly or turned com- 
pletely into something else. With what pure joy the Renaissance realized the glory 
of this heritage to them from the great human beings of antiquity, and called them- 
selves humanists and wrote orations on the Dignity of Man, as did Pico della 
Mirandola. 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 5 

For reasons too intricate to describe at the moment, too well-known to you to 
need recalling, the vision faded, grew wizened; laws of human taste became rules 
of thumb; and then came a great revolution which threw humanism out of the window 
and began all over again. It would solve the riddle of the universe by observing it 
in its natural state, collecting facts about it and glorifying these facts. Not that 
they were necessarily the whole truth but they were certainly nearer the truth than 
that combination of human thought and intuition brooding on eternity which had 
seemed so glorious an arbiter to the Renaissance world. 

Aside from this historical reason for the exaltation of fact over criticism of fact 
in modern scholarship, there is another reason for the strong hold of this point of 
view in America. We are a new country of doers and pioneers. We understand 
facts but we do not understand civilized taste. We suspect that standards of taste 
cannot be profound as we suspect that manners cannot consort with true worth. We 
have almost the Western rancher's idea that a dude or a tenderfoot can hardly be 
a real man. 

All these reasons for the triumph of fact are natural ones: they lie in history 
and environment; they are perhaps inevitable. But our country is now swinging 
away from them. The relentless, often unillumined toil in material for thought has 
not been without its advantages. We have by our long period of servitude won a 
certain freedom. We shall not throw aside meticulousness or painful accuracy but we 
shall, I think, use these increasingly in the service of more humanistic scholarship. 

In creative writing just now in America as well as in scholarship there is, 
especially among the youngest authors, a turn toward the artistic canons which long 
centuries of experiment and long accumulation of critical judgment have made canons. 
Young Harlan Hatcher speaking for American writers of fiction under thirty, in the 
pages of the Saturday Review of Literature two months ago says: 

"..."... We would (not) be blind to the beauties of a five-hundred-year old 
tradition .... Like the woman's fashions for the present season we are old- 
fashioned but we are new. . . . We are eager to blue pencil Fielding, George 
Eliot, Jane Austen, Walter Scott, and to cut away all the dead wood of a bygone 
age: but what remains is the stuff of literature in every age." 

Here is a group of young American writers who are willing to consider con- 
stants in literary tradition. I think they might be called the "trente immorteV/ for 
there is a spring of immortality in the beliefs they hold at thirty or under. 

To match them there should go forth a troupe of young American scholars, sure 
of the importance of facts, convinced of the value of accuracy, bearing necessarily 
the pains and weariness of exhaustive research, but having the courage to weigh their 
facts, their precious matter in the scales of taste, having fortified themselves first by 
an arduous study of aesthetic standards leading to a discovery of the inwardness and 
truth of criticism in its enduring phases. 

Two men who have done a good deal for scholarship in America in the past 
thirty years have within this very year made interesting comment on the direction 
which American scholarship should take. Felix Schelling of Pennsylvania, speaking 
of graduate study, says: 

"I cannot but feel that it is far wiser to regard the whole educational process as 
far less a garnering of knowledge than a method of bringing about a contact with 
facts scientific, with truths ascertained, together with the ordering and arranging 
of them by manipulation of the mind to discover both facts and truth: in a new 
relation.'" 



6 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

And Carleton Brown, speaking before the Modern Humanities Research Associa- 
tion in London last year, said : 

"The final goal of our research ... is to understand and interpret the life 
of man. This you, no doubt, are saying to yourselves, may be good philosophy, but 
it does not sound much like research. I am not sure it is not both." 

This is a significant statement before a society devoted to the humanities by a 
distinguished veteran in the field of American scholarly research. Even Mr. Nitze, 
you recall, maintains that the prime requisite of the scholar is his sensitivity to his 
facts. 

Leaders in training young scholars all over America are undoubtedly con- 
sidering anew this whole artistic problem. Equally important with this reconsidera- 
tion by the professors is a consideration by graduate students themselves of their intent. 
You need to know what you are doing and why you are doing it before you embark 
upon graduate study. I know of no graduate group in the country more advantage- 
ously placed than yours here at Bryn Mawi< for becoming leaders in this kind. Bryn 
Mawr has always stood firm against the advances of Philistia, Long before other 
colleges had students from foreign countries working and contributing an old-world 
point of view to the American problem, Bryn Mawr had a carefully selected group 
of young 1 women from Britain and the Continent, like the so-called 'nations' of 
foreign students who lent color and stimulus to the intellectual life of the great 
Renaissance universities in Italy. Your library from the beginning has been built 
with emphasis upon facilities for research. And the best of all things is that your 
group is small. 

This new scholarship upon which our hopes are set in America, cannot grow in 
graduate schools where potential doctors are instructed in groups of a hundred. The 
individual must have a chance for expert attention, both from himself and from his 
professor. The individual has this opportunity here at Bryn Mawr. Upon it you 
are to be profoundly congratulated. 

As I begin by saying, you not only are a perfect size but you have a perfect 
habitation, a college of your own in the English sense, a society of 'commensals.' 
Charles Lamb knew a thing or two indeed when, on a summer's day in Oxford, he 
took "a peep in by the way at the butteries land sculleries, redolent of antique hos- 
pitality .... ovens whose first pies were baked four centuries ago; and spits 
which had cooked for Chaucer." As he sniffed and dreamed he knew that here was 
the very heart of Oxford, the thing that would make originality of thought and 
research possible. And having sat at your gala table and enjoyed the savor of your 
kitchens and celebrated the glory of your Fellows, I heartily agree with him. 



THE NEW CURRICULUM 

(Reprinted in part from the College News) 

A complete revision of the present curriculum of the College has passed two 
meetings of the Faculty and will go into effect next year. For a number of years, an 
increasing dissatisfaction with the curriculum has been in the College air. President 
Park, before she left for Europe, expressed her opinion very strongly on the subject 
and urged the Faculty and Curriculum Committee to do everything they could to 
bring about a change. Dean Manning has for some time thought that with the 
breaking up of the five-hour block into two and three-hour courses, students have been 
forced to work for too many instructors with a consequent dissipation of energy. The 
Faculty, especially those who teach advanced courses or who give Honors work, have 
felt that the quality of their best students' work has been affected by the fact that their 
schedules are over-crowded. The students themselves have complained more and more 
about their numerous reports and quizzes. 

Because of these facts, the Faculty Committee set itself thoroughly to investigate 
the whole situation. It conferred formally with the Undergraduate Curriculum Com- 
mittee and talked informally with various individuals on the committee. It found 
practically a unanimity of opinion as to the drawbacks of the present curriculum, and 
ample evidence to support the general dissatisfaction. 

It was discovered that the majority of students take a large number of courses. 
Last year, in the Class of 1929, one person had nine courses, one took eight, and 
74.2% took five or six. In the Junior Class 14.9% had seven courses. When one 
considers the number of quizzes, reports, and examinations involved in such schedules, 
one wonders how the undergraduate has survived. 

A second difficulty was brought to light in connection with our evaluation of 
courses, not by the proportion of the student's time required, but by the number of 
lectures given. This plan is at variance with the development of honors or independent 
work. Moreover, as it stands now, the evaluation is often inaccurate. Some two 
and three-hour courses require as much outside work as is asked for many five-hour 
courses. The result is that students are often overworked because each of several 
instructors is exacting more than the normal amount of preparation. 

A final difficulty was discovered in connection with planning courses and selecting 
a major. With our present allotment of five hours to first-year work, and our numer- 
ous required subjects, a Freshman or Sophomore has no opportunity to discover quickly 
the subject in which she wishes to specialize. By the time she has provided for her 
required work and has (taken her German (which is no longer required for entrance 
and so usually has to be learned in College), she has time left for only one other 
subject in each of the first two years. Consequently, unless she knows at entrance 
what she wishes to major in, she often cannot decide on a major in time to do 
advanced work. 

With these facts in mind, the Undergraduate Curriculum Committee submitted 
to the Faculty Committee a plan worked out by Elizabeth Perkins and Agnes Lake, 
both of the present Senior Class. This plan recommended a graduated system of 
credit in the major subject, and the requirement for every student of at least one 
advanced course. As it will be seen, these two principles are included in the plan 
which has passed the Faculty. 

(7) 



8 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

The new curriculum involves the following general principles: 

A. A substitution of the unit for the hour system, each unit to represent a certain 
proportion of the student's time for one year. 

B. A re-evaluation of courses in terms of the unit and a limitation of the num- 
ber of short courses a student can take. 

C. A re-organization of the major work to allow for an increasing amount of 
time as the work becomes more advanced. 

The unit is equal to a quarter of the student's time or approximately a four-hour 
course. Thus a student's normal program will be four units of work. On the basis 
of a forty-hour week, a one-unit course will require at least ten hours a week, including 
the class meetings. The normal schedule for a unit course will be three lectures, 
so that seven hours of outside work will be required. 

A half-unit will be roughly equivalent to the present two-hour course. Two lec- 
tures can be given a week, and three hours of outside work. Many courses at present 
counting as two hours will probably be re-evaluated as one unit. One-hour courses 
will either be dropped or be expanded to one-half unit. 

All first-year work is to count as one unit, and is to be given as a single subject. 
If two subjects must be given, they will be offered in different semesters. This change 
will involve cutting down the number of lectures in first-year courses from five to 
three; but the time for preparation will be approximately the same as it is now 
(seven hours as opposed to the present seven and one-half). The amount of time 
lost in the first year will more than be made up in the second year. It is hoped 
that under this plan students who are uncertain of their major can experiment with 
several subjects, and that many students will be able to elect first-year courses for 
which they have formerly had no time. Everyone should have an opportunity to take 
solid electives like First Year History; and many people will perhaps take two 
sciences instead of one. 

The second-year work will count as either one and one-half or two units. It 
can be given in three different ways: in a heavy one and one-half unit course (this 
will be the case in the sciences) ; in two unequal courses of one unit and one-half unit 
each (this will be used in the languages) ; or in two equal courses of one unit each 
(History, Mathematics, History of Art, and English will probably use this plan). 

Advanced work will normally be given in unit courses, but any advanced course 
may be expanded to one and one-half units for an especially equipped student who 
wishes to do independent work in connection with the course. All students will be 
required to take at least one unit of advanced work, and most students will take two 
or more. 

Elementary language courses will probably meet five times a week, but in that 
case they can require only five hours of preparation. Elementary Greek, because of 
the difficulty of the subject, will be evaluated as one and one-half units. 

Because this plan cuts down the number of free electives a student may take, a 
plan for visiting classes has been approved. Students who wish to attend a course 
regularly without being formally registered may do so by obtaining permission from 
the Dean. No one may attend a course for which she is not eligible as a regular 
student. The Dean is expected to limit the number of courses a student may visit; 
and any instructor may notify the Dean that his courses are not open to such students. 

The Schedule Committee of the Faculty is working on a new organization of 
the schedule which was devised by Mary Gardiner, 1918, Assistant to the Dean. The 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 9 

"unit plan" lends itself to a more flexible schedule in which many of the existing evils 
will be remedied. Since first-year courses will normally have only three class meetings 
a week, all first-year and other one-unit courses can be scheduled in double three-hour 
blocks, making it possible for a student to take two such courses at the same hour. 

In order to find room for these double three-hour blocks, the Faculty have 
approved the utilization of Wednesday afternoon from two until six o'clock for 
scheduled meetings of classes. This change will make possible the elimination of eight 
o'clock classes which the Faculty consider most undesirable from the point of view 
of the teacher; the holding of chapel at 8.30 A. M.; and scheduling classes again on 
the hour, with a ten-minute interval between. 

Eight groups of classes meeting three hours a week and four groups of classes 
meeting five hours a week are made possible by the arrangement. For convenience 
the following terminology is used: 

Groups A. B. C. D. E. F. G. H. denote classes meeting three times a week. 

Group AB, CD, EF, GH, denote classes meeting five or six times a week. 

Two-hour courses will be scheduled in any of the three-hour groups. 

The various groups will be scheduled as follows: 

9 

10 

11 

12 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 



M. 


T. 


W. 


Th. 


F. 


A 


B 


A 


A 


B 


C 


D 


C 


C 


D 


E 


F 


E 


E 


F 


G 


H 


G 
B 


G 


H 


Lab. 


Lab. 


D 
F 
H 


Lab. 


Lai 



Conclusion 

It will be seen that this plan emphasizes two important principles: first, it gives 
a wider opportunity for specialization; and second, it shifts our credit system from 
the number of lectures in a course to the amount of time required for that course. 
It will be possible under the new curriculum for a good student to use almost all of 
her last two years for her major subject, and it will be possible for an instructor to 
give as few lectures as seems advisable, provided he accounts for his quota of the 
student's time by substituting conferences or discussions or extra work for the lectures 
omitted. 

The Faculty Curriculum Committee expects to consider this spring the whole 
question of required work, and to make recommendations to the Faculty in regard 
to cutting down the number of subjects required. They have already presented a 
plan, whereby midyear examinations shall wherever possible be omitted, and in such 
courses, in order to provide for a reading period, lectures shall be suspended during 
the last two weeks before the final examinations. 

The whole plan seems to those who have worked on it to allow for extensive 
experimentation while safeguarding our traditional educational standards. The unit 
system through its flexibility gives opportunities for conference work, discussion, inde- 
pendent and Honors Work, which have been impossible in the past. As Alumnae we 
can rejoice at this important step taken by the Faculty, and look forward with 

confidence to the future. , .. , , ^ -,^™ 

M. Millicent Carey, 1920, 

Acting-Dean of the College. 



FELLOWSHIP ANNOUNCEMENTS 

On March 22nd Acting-President Manning had the pleasure of announcing the 
Fellowship awards and academic records of members of the Class of 1930. Her 
introductory speech will long be remembered by her audience, Who even forgot their 
impatience for the names of the winners as they listened eagerly to her really thralling 
picture of the joys of research and of the scholarly life. 

The Class of 1930, Which is the largest class to graduate in the history of the 
College, has the second highest percentage of those graduating with honours, 34.8% 
of the class. They are outranked only by 1904 whose roll of honour comprised 35%, 
but Whose actual numbers were fewer. This year's winner of the Bryn Mawr Euro- 
pean Fellowship, Sarah Stanley Gordon, is graduating with the second highest record 
of all the previous Fellows, that is, since the present system of honour points has been 
in effect, Frederica de Laguna, 1927, still leading the list. Another feather in the 
cap of this distinguished class is the fact that both Miss Gordon and Constance Hand 
(daughter of Frances Fiincke Hand, 1897), who is second, will receive their degrees 
summa cum laude. 

Fourteen other members of the class will receive their degrees magna cum laude. 
Among these of special interest to alumnae are Gertrude Bancroft (daughter of Eliza- 
beth Nields Bancroft, 1898), who ranks tenth in the class; and Dorothea Cross 
(daughter of Dorothea Farquhar, 1900), eleventh. Elizabeth Stix (daughter of 
Erma Kingsbacher Stix, 1906), is taking her degree cum laude; while Joy Dickerman 
(daughter of Alice Carter Dickerman, 1899), and Mary Durfee (daughter of Abby 
Brayton Durfee, 1894), are well up in the upper half of the class. 

It is interesting to notice that Dorothea Cross is a Regional Scholar from New 
England; Phyllis Wiegand, one of the New York Regional Scholars, is graduating 
cum laude } and Imogen Richards, who also entered as a Regional Scholar from New 
York, is an the upper half of the class. 

Announcement was made of the awards of four other European Fellowships in 
addition to that won by Miss Gordon. The Helen and Cecil Rubel Fellowship was 
won by Edith Fishtine, A.B., Boston University, 1925; Fellow in Spanish at Bryn 
Mawr, 1928-29, and at present teaching Spanish at the College. The Fanny Bullock 
Workman Fellowship was awarded to Virginia Grace, A.B., Bryn Mawr, 1923; 
Fellow in Greek at Bryn Mawr, 1928-29, and in Archaeology, 1929-30. The Mary 
Elizabeth Garrett European Fellowship was awarded to Pauline S. Relyea, A.B., 
Smith College, 1924; Fellow in History at Bryn Mawr, 1929-30. The Anna Otten- 
dorfer Memorial Research Fellowship was awarded to Margaret Jeffrey, A.B., 
Wellesley, 1927; Fellow in German at Bryn Mawr, 1929-30. 



STUDENTS WHO SPEND THE JUNIOR YEAR IN 
FRANCE WIN HONOURS 

The four members of 1930 who spent their Junior year in France and will be 
graduated at Bryn Mawr are: Marina Kwai, magna cum laude and third in her 
class; Elizabeth Wilson, magna cum laude; Louise Littlehale, cum laude; and Jane 
Bradley, in the upper half of her class. 

Of the five Juniors now in France, Louise Howland and Silvia Markley were 
first and third in the final examinations of the group of sixty-seven American students 
at the close of the summer's work at Nancy. 

(10) 



CAMPUS DRAMATIC ACTIVITIES 

Dramatics always have been, and probably always will be, one of the leading 
extra-curricular interests, but never has such enthusiasm been shown for them as 
during this winter. The academic year had scarcely begun when Varsity Players pro- 
duced "Riders to the Sea." Such w T as the eagerness of those who had taken part 
in it and of those who wished to act, that shortly afterwards they produced "Aria 
DaCapo." After a brief breathing space Varsity Players announced tryouts for the 
scheduled production of the semester, two old English Morality plays. A few weeks 
after midyear vacation, the group produced "Sparkin'," another one-act play of very 
different temper. In the meantime the germ had been caught by the graduates, who 
were one day found tacking up posters announcing a presentation of Barrie's "Shall 
We Join The Ladies?" Their production over, Varsity Players claimed the stage 
for rehearsals of "The Constant Nymph," which they put on the week-end after 
spring vacation in conjunction with the Theatre Intime of Princeton. In order 
that the two colleges might work together on week-ends, Varsity Players announced 
rehearsals during vacation. Nevertheless, the number trying out for parts exceeded 
that of any other time. 

This enthusiasm for dramatics has been intensified during the year by the students 
meeting informally with the many professional actors and actresses who have come 
out to the college. Opportunity ito meet several of them resulted from the recent 
Philadelphia organization entitled "The Professional Players." Their intention is 
to present in Philadelphia leading actors of this country and Europe in noteworthy 
Continental and American plays. In order to bring the plays to the attention of 
Bryn Mawr students, a director, Mrs. Fitzwilliam Sargent, arranged with Mrs. Chad- 
wick-Collins to introduce the leading actors informally at teas. Consequently, when 
in November, Mrs. Sargent arrived with her first prize, Philip Merrivale, the Com- 
mon Room was overflowing. With typical English charm he talked on the stage 
and its vicissitudes. When he had finished one suddenly realized that he had said 
nothing pertinent, but that it didn't matter anyway. His description of his stage 
debut as Ophelia at the age of ten had carried the day. 

Next Mrs. Sargent brought out both Helen Mencken and Leslie Banks who were 
playing together in "The Infinite Shoeblack," and its author, Norman Macgowan. 
All three were most patient and interesting as they answered innumerable questions 
on how to get one's first professional part, whom to approach, or the best methods of 
directing. Despite their rather pessimistic points of view on the actor's life, they were 
unable to dissuade those who had made up their minds from their intention to try their 
luck on the stage. About this same time a tea was given for Alexander Kirkland 
who had been playing the young man in "Wings Over Europe." The man connected 
vith the theatre to come most recently was Mr. Chang, director of Mr. Mei and the 
Chinese theatre now playing in New York. He came under the auspices of the 
Chinese Scholarship Committee and spoke not primarily of the theatre, but of present 
cultural transformations in China. At the end of his speech, however, he gave the 
Easterner's interpretation of drama as an art which has been so often misunderstood 
in the West. 

Better even than these opportunities to meet individual actors was that afforded by 
the arrival of the entire cast of "Pygmalion." Owing to the efforts of Mrs. Chadwick- 

(11) 



12 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

Collins and Miss Theresa Helburn, executive director of the Theatre Guild, the 
Bryn Mawr Series included a matinee of "Pygmalion." The cast was given luncheon 
in the Common Room >to which as many students as possible were invited. They had, 
therefore, the unusual opportunity of talking with .Dudley Digges, Frieda Innescort, 
and the ten or twelve other well-known actors and actresses. The architect, Mr. 
Meigs, who was at the luncheon, was asked more than once how long he had been 
with the Theatre Guild and what part he was to play that afternoon. 

Whether or not these contacts with professional actors served as a stimulus 
to students to try out for college plays, thereby adding to the number of fairly able 
actresses, is a question ; but it is obvious that they have been greatly enjoyed, and 
appreciated as among the most 'pleasant events of the year. 

Elizabeth Perkins, 1930. 



UNE REPRESENTATION "d'HERNANI" 

Reprinted from Le Courrier de Philadelphie 

(Notre abonne et ami de la premiere heure, M. Louis Cons, professeur de lite- 
rature franchise au College de Swartmore, a bien voulu ecrire pour le "Courrier" le 
compte-rendu de la representation "d'Hernani" a Bryn Mawr College. Nos lecteurs 
lui seront reconnaissants de son spirituel et delicat article.) 

"HERNANI" A BRYN MAWR 

En France meme, a Paris meme le Centenaire de la grande bataille autour 
"d'Hernani", le 25 fevrier 1830, a-t-il ete celebre avec autant d'eclat, avec autant de 
spirituel enthousiasme qu'il le fut il y a quelques jours a Bryn Mawr? Je me 
permets d'en douter. C'etait en tout cas pour un Frangais convie le 25 fevrier dernier 
a Goodhart Hall une impression infmiment touchante que cette fidelite americaine a 
un souvenir si fran^ais et si lointain. 

En toute sincerite on doit louer presque sans reserves la facon dont les jeunes 
filles du Cercle franQais et leurs guides et inspiratrices ont compris leurs roles. Le 
sens de la mesure, le gout et le tact jusque dans le dechainement lyrique, l'absence de 
"charge" et en meme temps l'aipparente conviction dont elles faisaient preuve et aussi 
le gentil heroisme avec lequel elles recevaient sans flechir les injures et les oranges que 
leur prodiguaient les Classiques exasperes, tout cela enfin leur valaient plus que ma 
sympathie: mon admiration. II est impossible de dire la douce et splendide beaute de 
la Dona Sol que Miss Clarissa Compton incarnait, la pure fierte de Miss Caroline 
Lloyd Jones en Hernani, la majeste guillerette de Miss Lena Lois Mandell en Don 
Carlos ni le pathetique chevrotant de ce pauvre et sinistre Don Ruy Gomez pour lequel! 
Miss Mary Duke Wight avait consenti a abdiquer sa grace et sa souriante jeunesse. 

Dans la salle meme ou la bataille entre les Classiques chauves et les Romantiques; 
chevelus faisak rage on pouvait admirer la verve endiablee des cohortes inspirees par 
Miss Fishtine (unique celle-la et merveilleusement cocasse!) et Miss Goodell. 

Costumes et decors, jeux de scene et effets de lumiere, tout etait d'un gout, d'une 
verite dans la splendeur vraiment exquis et rares. Dans l'ensemble on sentait une 
incomparable "meneuse de jeu" qui etait, parait-il, Mademoiselle M. Rey. Et on 
sentait aussi que Inspiration de 1'erudite et charmante doyenne Miss Eunice M. 
Schenck avait ipasse par la. Louis Cons. 






BRYN MAWR AND PRINCETON PRESENT 
"THE CONSTANT NYMPH" 

(Written for the College News by Dr. Herben, of the Department of English) 

It was a beautiful performance. One wondered just how it could have been 
brought about, considering how little opportunity there had been for the cast to 
rehearse together. But the production should not be judged with the mental reserva- 
tions that it was an amateur company working under difficulties: no such special 
consideration is necessary. From any critical standards but one decision can be 
reached, that it was a splendid accomplishment and a credit to everyone who took 
part in it. 

It is the pleasant but difficult duty of the reviewer to express appreciation of the 
competent playing of the cast. The parts were numerous and various and performed 
with almost uniform excellence. It is scarcely fair to emphasize the work of some 
lest it imply less consideration of others. Quite obviously, the big parts are those of 
Lewis Dodd, Tessa, and Florence Churchill, and the roles are as requiring as they 
are long. Miss Rieser's Tessa was singularly appealing, at once child-like and mature, 
nicely restrained, well considered, and completely convincing. Miss Drake's role was 
of equal difficulty though, of course, totally different in nature. ... Her last 
sentence in scene one, act three, wherein she returns for Dodd's baton was as fine and 
intelligent a feat of pantomime as one could hope for. . . . Mr. Borgerhoff as Lewis 
contributed his share with liberality. Perhaps the most treacherous scene in the play 
and the one that requires the greatest skill to avoid overdramatizing is the very last, 
and it was played with the greatest art. 

* * * 

If there was one thing above another that made its impression upon the audience, 
it was the skill with which the parts were cast. There was no case in which the per- 
son seemed inadequate for the role and few indeed where the part did not seem 
especially devised for the actor's peculiar talents. This was noticeable in the way 
that some of the less important roles fixed themselves in the memory. Linda who 
appeared only in the first act, Roberto whose patomime was singularly impressive, 
Susan who was shockingly realistic, these and a half dozen others will serve to 
illustrate, but perhaps the clearest case was the scene for the theatrical employees in 
the first scene of the last act. One does not expect stage cockney to be in the least 
convincing. It was. # ^ # 

It is futile to discuss the acting of the play in greater detail. One is tempted to 
pull out all the superlatives, but this is not needful. All who saw the performance 
know that the acting was in every w T ay satisfying and are still busily engaged telling 
those who did not. The direction was no less adequate than the most requiring 
would desire. It showed restraint and competence. There was a noteworthy and 
anticipated absence of theatricality, no sensationalism and no needless striving to 
impress the audience. So similarly the scenery. Too much credit can not be given 
to those who designed and constructed the sets. They must realize that part of the 
applause was theirs, though their contribution was less spectacular than that of the cast. 

In retrospect one impression remains firmly fixed and sums up remarks often heard 
during the intermissions and since the performance, it was a fine evening of adult 
entertainment and one whose repetition will be eagerly awaited. 

(13) 



ALUMNAE ACTIVITIES 

The following magazine clipping explains itself. 

During the past year Frederica Le Fevre Bellamy (1905) has written and pro- 
duced two religious dramas as director of St. John's Cathedral Religious Drama De- 
partment. The first, a special Christmas Eve Service, called "Venite Adoremus," 
consisting of Bible readings, carols, solos and tableaux given in the Cathedral on a 
specially constructed stage, which resembled a curtained Gothic chapel at one side of 
the chancel. The second, an Easter drama, was divided in three episodes of what might 
have happened in Pontius Pilate's palace during those three tense days when a new era 
for humanity dawned. It deals with the feelings of Roman, Greek, Jew, of children, 
slaves and rulers, and is a companion play to an earlier one of Mrs. Bellamy's "Dark- 
ness and Dawn." The latter has been given all over the country in many churches. 
Of larger productions, Mrs. Bellamy designed the musical scores, lighting effects and 
directed two; the first one was the "Pageant of the Paladins" for National Stock 
Show week, a vast affair for the stock show arena, with 160 horsemen and 90 actors 
on foot participating. Orchestral records were used with a large amplifier and a 
brass band. Army, police, civilians and high schools furnished performers. The second 
affair was smaller, a stage production, celebrating a State D. A. R. anniversary. 
Tableaux, pantomimes and readings gave history of shawls of succeeding races and gen- 
erations of women of the West who wore them. 

Mrs. Bellamy finds the new departure in programs, namely, readings set to 
music, capable of much variety. A poem fitted to a classic like Saint Saens' "The 
Swan," and again the epic of Tennyson's "Idylls of the King," on which MacDowell 
based his "Eroica Sonata," visualizes the tonal picture to an audience. 

While some music for pianologues is merely an accompaniment, other composers 
make the score an integral part, carrying out each incident or phase of the story, 
thereby illustrating the action. For the reader, there is much the same work as for 
the singer, except that there is more memorizing than the usual song recital. The 
text is longer and the piano score fuller and more complicated. Where the singer 
has to do more to keep the voice in condition, more rest, more practice, the reader 
must consider facial and bodily expressions. Costume also is a vital part. Therefore, 
a whole field of acting is opened up. Rhythm and pitch, shading and variety are 
equally necessary for both singer and reader. The designing of musical scores and 
lighting effects is Mrs. Bellamy's chief interest, but often to cany these out, it is 
necessary to design the continuity and direct the entire production. 

* -* * 

Mary Boyd Shipley Mills, 1910, American Presbyterian Mission, Nanking, 
China, writes: 

I wish all of you could be here to see the changes in this old city, which is in a 
stage of such transition that we rub our eyes and feel as if transformations happened 
over night. The new roads make a great difference — wide automobile boulevards 
brightly lighted at night; they entirely change one's idea of the geography of the 
city as they cut diagonally through former vegetable gardens and put all the old 
landmarks in the wrong position. As one goes through the city one sees all the stages 
of the process, the finished road constantly humming with automobiles. . . . One 
amazing development is an auto road all around Purple Mountain, a beautiful drive 
There is a great deal of house building also. Two-story foreign or semi-foreign 
houses look out from behind old walls. . . . 

(14) 



_ 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 15 

We have not only long-distance telephone to Shanghai and radio service cheaper 
than the telegraph, but regular air service for passengers and mail. It is quite usual 
now to meet old friends who say, "Yes, I flew up from Shanghai this morning." And 
the trip, which takes seven hours by train, takes only an hour and a half by plane. 
This seems quite ordinary to you at home, but to us in China it is like a miracle. 
The air mail service between Shanghai and Hankow started a few weeks ago, the trip 
taking six hours instead of the ordinary four days by boat. . . . 

Ming Deh School has opened again this fall, but not as a middle school. This 
year we have taken in a class of nine girls, graduates of junior high schools, for 
normal training with the special idea of training them for country schools. To give 
them opportunities for observation as well as for practice teaching, there is a very 
flourishing primary school of about one hundred pupils, which keeps the compound full 
of life. Miss Null and Miss Wright who are training the normal class do all their 
teaching in Chinese, which means a great deal of preparatory work with their Chinese 
teacher. The demand of the Educational Bureau of the Government that no religion 
shall be taught at all in primary schools is making many problems for all those in 
charge of Christian education. . . . The Episcopal and Methodist mission represen- 
tatives are to meet with some of our mission this week to decide upon some concerted 
action on this question. 

During the last two weeks there has been a most interesting institute here for 
country women— not for Christian workers, but for the ordinary women of the 
church. Forty or more came, some of whom, I imagine, had never been out of 
their villages before. There were classes in reading and Bible study, and talks by 
experts on care of babies, home sanitation, food, etc. It was most inspiring to see the 
eager faces of these women as I met them one afternoon at tea at Miss Drummond's — 
so bright and responsive and so happy. Several had with them their little babies, who 
looked beautifully clean, so different from the ordinary babies one sees on the street. 

My work this year is very largely in our little American school where I teach 
all morning every school day. We are so grateful to have the school for our children 
that I am more than glad to give what time I can to it. It is going very well under 
the direction of our one professional teacher, who helps us all in planning our work 
in addition to doing her own teaching. 

Our political situation goes up and down. Just after having written home that 
everything seemed very peaceful and settled this fall in contrast with last year, the 
war with the north in Honan became very serious, and my husband was called to the 
American consulate with representatives from other districts in the city to plan for 
a hasty evacuation of all American women and children in case of sudden need. It 
made me feel that we had dropped right back into the fall of 1926 or 1928. Then 
Loyang fell, the Central Government seemed to have weathered another storm, and 
now Chiang Kai-shek has come back to town — a sign that this crisis is past. But 
there are at least three wars going on in different parts of the country, any one of 
which means nothing at all or may suddenly flare up and become serious. In the 
meantime we are thankful for every day's peaceful living. 
January 12, 1930 

This should have gone off over a month ago, but a sudden evacuation of all 
Americans was ordered by the consul on December 8th and we were in Shanghai over 
Christmas. The government didn't collapse as it was feared, and now we are at 



16 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

home again, and calm and quiet; our only concern at present being to keep warm, as 
we are having an extremely cold and prolonged winter. 

One of her classmates sends the following account of Michi Kawai: 
Michi Kawai's school for girls has just finished its first year. For twenty years 
Michi had been secretary of the Japanese National Y. W. C. A., but she had the 
cause of girls' education much at heart, and since her. resignation three years ago she 
had been struggling to start a school. The economic situation in Japan is at a low 
ebb and her difficulties were almost insuperable. She finally succeeded in interesting 
an imposing list of patrons, beginning with Dr. Inazo Nitobe; obtained the necessary 
governmental permission after yards of red tape were unwound; rented a small "for- 
eign," i. e. American-looking house in the same compound in which she has so long 
lived; engaged her teachers, and on April 10, 1929, opened her school. Ten girls, 
thirteen years of age, gathered at nine o'clock in the morning with their mothers or 
sisters and eight teachers. These children are of the middle class; in seven cases one 
of the parents is a Christian. They had finished their elementary education, a six- 
year course, in Japan, and were ready for their secondary education, which corresponds 
somewhat to our junior high school. Photographs show these youngsters, dressed 
precisely like American children, planting bulbs in front of the school building. 

As the Japanese school year closes in March and opens in April, the second year 
of the school is now beginning. Thirty-one new girls were expected, while the ten 
move up to the next grade. At last accounts Michi was hunting new and larger 
quarters. 



NOTICES 



FOUND 



In the Deanery, after the Alumnae tea, February 1st, a brown fur scarf. Apply 
to the Alumnae Secretary, Taylor Hall. 



POSITION WANTED 

Bryn Mawr Senior wishes position as tutor or companion for summer. Apply 
to Hilda Wright, Pembroke West or Inquire at Alumnae Office. 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 17 

NEW COUNCILLOR 

The Executive Board announces with pleasure the appointment of Isabel Lynde 
Dammann, 1905, (Mrs. John Francis Dammann, Jr.), of Winnetka, Illinois, as 
Councillor for District V. Mrs. Dammann, who succeeds Gladys Spry Augur, 1912, 
(Mrs. Wheaton Augur), will serve until P'ebruary, 1933. 



PLANS FOR REUNION AND COMMENCEMENT WEEK 



Class 


Reunion Headquarters 


Reunion Manager 


1901 


Pembroke East 


Ethel Cantlin Buckley 


1903 


Wyndham 


Agnes Austin 


1904 


Rockefeller 


Agnes Gillinder Carson 


1920 


Pembroke East 


Lilian Davis Philip 


1921 


Pembroke West 


Serena Hand Savage 


1922 


Pembroke West 


Margaret Taylor Macintosh 


1923 


Denbigh 


Alice Smith Hackney 


1926 


(Informal) 


Edith Harris West 


1928 


Rockefeller 


Virginia Atmore 


1929 


Merion 


Katharine Collins 



The Classes of 1901 and 1904 are having their Class Suppers on Tuesday eve- 
ning, June 3rd, while all the others are to be held on Saturday evening, May 31st. 
The Class of 1926 is planning an informal reunion, if there is room for them on the 
campus, and expects to have a Class Picnic sometime on Sunday, June 1st. The 
Classes of 1901, 1903 and 1904 are to have luncheon together at Wyndham on Mon- 
day, June 2nd, and the Classes of 1920, 1921, 1922, and 1923 will have a tea on 
Sunday. 

On Monday afternoon, June 2nd, the Alumnae Association is giving a tea in 
the Common Room, Goodhart Hall, in honor of the Senior Class. That evening 
the Alumnae Supper will be held at which Edith Houghton Hooker, 1901, will act 
as toastmistress. 

President Emeritus Thomas will be at home part of every day during Com- 
mencement Week, from Saturday, May 31st, to Wednesday, June 4th, inclusive, and 
the Deanery Gardens will be lighted each evening. Baccalaureate Sermon will be 
preached in Goodhart Hall, on Sunday, June 1st, by Willard Learoyd Sperry, Dean 
of the Harvard Theological School. The Commencement address will be delivered 
on Wednesday, June 4th, by Dean Roscoe Pound of the Harvard Law School. 



BRYN MAVVR BULLETIN 



CLASS NOTES 

1898 
Class Editor: Edith Schoff Boericke 
(Mrs. John J. Boericke), 
328 Brookway, Merion Station, Pa. 
Louise Warren and her father spent 
Christmas in Florida, and sailed in Jan- 
uary for the Balearic Islands and Spain. 
Sophie Olsen Bertelsen writes from 
Copenhagen that the class baby, her 
daughter, has taken her M.D., and is now 
an interne in a maternity hospital. After 
a period there, she is booked for a posi- 
tion in the Neurological department of 
their City Hospital. 

1899 
Class Editor: Ellen P. Kilpatrick, 
1027 St. Paul St., Baltimore, Md. 

One compensation in being Class Edi- 
tor is that occasionally one hears from 
some classmate. One could wish these 
letters came oftener than once in six 
weeks as, frequently, they are just too 
late for the next month's Bulletin, and 
some items which would be interesting if 
gotten hot off the griddle are a bit flat 
and stale when two months late. Please 
remember, dear classmates, that news for 
the Class Notes must be in the hands of 
the Class Editor by the last week of, 
let us say, March, in order to be in the 
Bulletin office by April first in order to 
appear in the May number. 

This month we had a long letter from 
May Schoneman Sax, so we hasten to 
pass on the news. Molly Thurber Den- 
nison was in Philadelphia in March with 
her husband, who was there to speak at 
both the Academy of Social and Political 
Science and Swarthmore College. The 
class will be interested to know that our 
Class Baby has presented Molly with her 
fourth grandchild. Also, that Molly and 
her husband plan to sail for Europe on 
May 16th to be present at conferences in 
London and Geneva, Mr. Dennison being, 
as- might be expected, an expert on In- 
dustrial Problems. 

Dorothy Fronheiser Meredith, while 
visiting in Overbrook, had tea and a dish 
of gossip with May one afternoon. Dor- 
othy's son Dick is a Junior at Yale and 
her daughter, Catherine, is in New York 
studying for the stage. 

Elsie Andrews lunched with May one 
day. Elsie is busier than ever this year 
owing to Miss Wright's death, as, in ad- 
dition to teaching, she has been Academic 
Director. 

Marion Ream Vonsiatsky has been in 
Thompson all winter, but that does not 
mean that she has not been on the jump. 
She is keenly interested in "The Russian 



Bear," a delightful tea room which her 
sister-in-law runs in a charmingly re- 
modeled old house very near Marion's 
own house, and what with flying trips to 
New York, "quite a lot of new building," 
having guests, and helping with charity 
affairs, including an American Legion en- 
tertainment, she has not been idle. "Alec" 
is joining the Reserve Officers' Training 
Corps and Marion is hoping to fit in a 
month on a friend's ranch in Arizona 
while Alec is in camp. 

1900 
Class Editor: Louise Congdon Francis 
(Mrs. Richard Standish Francis), 
414 Old Lancaster Road, 
Haverford, Pa. 

Louise Francis represented 1900 at the 
meeting of Class Collectors in New York 
on March 29th. She learned there that 
1900's pledge to Goodhart Hall was prac- 
tically complete. 1900's only contempor- 
aries at the meeting were Mary Hoyt for 
'99 and Anne Kidder Wilson for 1903 and 
also as President of the Alumnae Asso- 
ciation. From Pauline Goldmark who rep- 
resented '95, however, it was learned 
that Fannie Wehle was arriving that day 
in New York. She has come over to 
visit her father in Louisville and the class 
will be rejoiced to know that Pauline 
reports Fannie as recovered from her 
arthritis and walking miles every day. 

On March 6, Mrs. Frank died at Myra's 
house in Brookline. The class extends 
sincere sympathy to Myra in the loss of 
her very remarkable mother. The Boston 
Transcript said: "Throughout her life she 
was active in social service and she was 
president of the Hebrew Widows' and 
Orphans Society of Detroit, a founder of 
the Pittsburgh section, Council of Jewish 
Women, and a director of- the Boston 
section. During the war she was chair- 
man of Auxiliary 13, Metropolitan Chap- 
ter, American Red Cross, and was a 
member of the New England Women's 
Press Association." 

The St. Louis Post Dispatch has been 
publishing a series of illustrated articles 
on "Interesting St. Louisans." Sunday, 
January 26th, there was a full page about 
Edna Fischel Gellhorn with two pictures 
of her as she looked in 1903, and we hope 
she doesn't look today, and a third one of 
her standing beside the Governor of Mis- 
souri when he signed the Woman Suf- 
frage Amendment. The article tells of 
Edna's family life and of her many pub- 
lic occupations. It ends with an account 
of her latest venture, a class in political 
education at the John Burroughs School. 
Here is the final paragraph: "So she is 
working on the very youngest generation. 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



19 



And she is not in any way discouraged 
over the phenomenon of the post-war 
generation. As a matter of fact it would 
be difficult to imagine her really discour- 
aged over anything. Perhaps that is why 
her name is being added to the National 
Roll of Honor beside those of Dr. Shaw, 
Susan B. Anthony, Carrie Chapman Catt 
and others who have labored long and 
faithfully in the service of their fellow- 
women." 

Katharine sends the latest news of the 
Childs family on a postal from Lausanne. 
"Three girls in Mont Choisi, one son at 
La Chataigneraie, Coppet, myself in a 
school, working on French, my husband, 
after seven months of travel, back in 
Chicago. Had a fine visit with Maud and 
Mrs. Lowrey in Paris. We have seen 
many marvelous places, but from every 
point of view I think Sicily has been the 
most perfect. Greetings to the class. I 
hope not to miss another reunion." 
14 Ave. des Alpes, Lausanne, Switzerland. 

1901 
Class Editor: Jane Righter, 

Dublin Road, Greenwich, Conn. 
Dear 1901: 

We shall make no effort to get news 
items for the Bulletin this Spring, for 
with Reunion just ahead of us our slogan 
is "Come and see." If you think we 
never publish sufficient news, whose fault 
is that? Our Class' first grandmother is 
to speak at the Reunion Supper, but not 
about her grandchildren. Can she do it? 
Rumor says the Alumnae Supper Toast- 
mistress is from 1901. Revelations galore 
that you cannot afford to miss will be 
made daily on the Campus. Realize your 
opportunities in time and let your families 
try life without the homemaker. A final 
letter from me will reach you soon. 
Yours hopefully, 

Ethel Buckley. 

1904 
Class Editor: Emma O. Thompson, 
320 S. 42nd Street, Phila., Pa. 
Dear Classmates: 

A letter reached me a few days ago 
from Clara Wade, on behalf of the New 
York Committee asking for a class letter 
for the Reunion book. If perchance any 
one of you has failed to send a letter to 
Katherine Curtis Pierce, 9 East 94th St., 
New York, go to your desk this very day. 

Recently I received an interesting pro- 
spectus from Minnie Ehlers, describing 
Beechwood, her attractive camp for girls 
at Lake Alamoosook, Orland, Maine, five 
miles from Bucksport. The camp com- 
prises twenty-six acres of woodland. A 
barn is now an Arts and Crafts Shop, 



the upper story serving as a little the- 
atre. 

Dr. Mary James has come back to 
Philadelphia. What a wealth of first-hand 
impressions she will bring us of the Rev- 
olution in China ! Agnes Gillinder Car- 
son has told me about some of her plans 
and Lucy Lombardi Barber has asked 
some jolly people to speak to us. There 
are all sorts of surprises awaiting you, 
not only intimate class events, but college 
events also. Imagine going to commence- 
ment in Goodhart Hall ! No daisy chains 
are needed, to decorate it and take away 
from its simplicity. The coloring is lovely, 
and the Commons ! 

Lucy's daughter, Janet Barber, is an 
enthusiastic college student and is Secre- 
tary of the Freshman Class. 

Good news comes from Bertha Brown 
Lambert concerning Michi Kawai. 

1906 
Class Editor: Mrs. Edward W. Sturde- 
vant, Marines Barracks, 
Quantico, Va. 

Catherine Anderson's mother died sud- 
denly in Paris early in March. 1906 sends 
her their sincerest sympathy. 

Sue Delano McKelvey has won the 
Massachusetts Horticultural S o c i e t y's 
Centennial Medal for her monograph, 
"The Lilac." 

Annie Clauder had a delightful trip to 
Florida in December. "At Lake Wales 
we found the Singing Tower with its re- 
flections in its deep pools a veritable place 
of enchantment." On February 15th she 
received her Ph.D. degree from the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania. Our most en- 
thusiastic congratulations ! 

Helen Fleck is still living at Rosemont. 
Gardening is her hobby. 

Lucia Ford Rutter is spending the win- 
ter in Miami, Fla., where her two 
younger children are at school. She 
writes that Anna McAnulty Stevens 
sailed on March 11th with her husband 
to spend two weeks each in England, 
Germany, and Paris. 

Ida Garrett Murphy's daughter, Mercet, 
had an appendix operation last July 4th 
and afterwards they motored to Little 
Deer Isle for the rest of the summer. 
Ida is still much interested in the League 
of Women Voters and has been Chairman 
of the Child Welfare work in both the 
State and the Delaware County branches. 

Beth Harrington Brooks and Mary 
Walcott had lunch with Jessie Thomas 
Bennett at the Copley Plaza in Boston 
early in March. Jessie was intent on cul- 
ture as they all went to the art exhibition 
after lunch and then they left her at the 
Gardner Palace "to view more art." Beth 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



Harrington Brooks is an officer in some 
Dry Enforcement League in Cambridge. 

Jessie Hewitt spent last summer at La 
Jolla and saw a lot of Dot Congdon. They 
flew into Mexico and on the way home 
Jessie flew accross the Grand Canyon. 
She is going to Italy, Greece and Dal- 
matia this summer. Last year she had 
an article in the Education of the Modern 
Girl, published by Houghton Mifflin. 

Josephine Katzenstein Blancke writes 
that she is still teaching in the West Phil- 
adelphia High School and is still an en- 
thusiastic tennis player. 

Helen Lowengrund Jacoby's daughter 
hopes to enter Bryn Mawr in the fall of 
1933. They went to the Alumnae Meet- 
ing and young Kathryn was enthusiastic 
about it. 

Ruth MacNaughton.'s address is 1074 
Iraniston Ave., Bridgeport, Conn. 

Anne MacClanahan Grenfell has been 
with her husband on a lecture tour this 
winter through the eastern and southern 
part of America. Next winter they ex- 
pect to be in England for six months. 
Their older son goes to New College, 
Oxford, next October. 

Marion Mudge Prichard's daughter, 
Katherine, is married and living in her 
great grandmother's house in Marblehead. 
Marion's oldest son is to be married after 
his graduation from Technology in June. 
Marion and her husband visited Ethel 
Pew in Florida this winter, and Marion 
has just discovered that Helen Waldron 
Wells and her daughter are living near 
her. 

The Class Editor sails for St. Thomas, 
Virgin Islands, on May 20th, to be gone 
two years. Wanted: A Class Editor! 

1907 
Class Editor: Alice Hawkins, 

Taylor Hall, Bryn Mawr, Penna. 

The Class Editor is often depressed by 
the accounts of illness and disasters which 
afflict the members of other classes and 
their families. There are many signs 
which come to her that 1907 too is crack- 
ing up, but somehow she is inclined to 
conceal them from the world. Let the 
other classes have their operations and 
their earthquakes, but let us continue to 
boast of our literary lights. 

Peggy Ayer Barnes' novel, "Years of 
Grace," is to be published in May by 
Houghton Mifflin. I have the author's 
word for it that it is well worth reading, 
and her advance publicity makes us eager 
for the book. It is "the story of a 
woman's life, beginning in Chicago in 
1892 when she is fourteen and ending in 
Paris in 1929, where at fifty-one she is 
chaperoning her daughter through her 



divorce proceedings. The point of the 
title is that of contrasting values — my 
heroine's life compared with the modern 
age of jazz and sin that she lives to 
marvel at and deplore. 

"Its main claim on Bryn Mawr atten- 
tion is that it contains a Bryn Mawr 
chapter. My heroine is a member of the 
class of 1898. I have described the col- 
lege and attempted a sketch of President 
Thomas — rather the Miss Thomas of the 
Sargent portrait — as seen through the 
eyes of an undergraduate. ... It is a 
rather romantic picture of Miss Thomas 
— Miss Thomas, the great and persuasive 
feminist, standing in the pulpit of the old 
Taylor chapel ! . . . That sketch of Miss 
Thomas was really a labour of love on 
my part — a very small tribute toward a 
very great woman." 

Mrs. Borie has promised to review the 
book for us for the first possible number 
of the Bulletin 

The Macmillan Company are publishing 
in the autumn a volume of poems by Hor- 
tense Flexner King, entitled This Stub- 
born Root. This author is so modest that 
reprisals may ensue as a result of an- 
nouncement in this column, and it may be 
in order to report of a sudden accident to 
the Class Editor, but the poems are worth 
the personal risk involved. 

1909 
Class Editor: Helen Bond Crane, 
Denbigh Hall, Bryn Mawr, Penna. 

Leone Robinson Morgan died on March 
15th, at Pasadena, where she had been 
living for some years. A newspaper ac- 
count says in part: "Mrs. Morgan who 
was distinguished among St. Louis Club 
women for her energy and organizing 
capacity, was President of the College 
Club in 1916 and 1917. In 1915 she led 
the College Club group which participated 
in the child welfare exposition at the 
Coliseum and presented a display at a 
local department store which was instru- 
mental in awakening the city to the need 
of useful employment for the blind. She 
was in charge of organizing chapters 
throughout the Southwestern Division of 
the Red Cross in the World War. 

Surviving Mrs. Morgan are her hus- 
band, three young children, Mary, Her- 
bert, Jr., and Samuel Morgan, and two 
brothers, Thomas and Charles Robinson 
of Shreveport , La." 

Judith Boyer Sprenger and her family 
had a most delightful six months abroad, 
and returned to Buffalo early in January. 
"In February I slipped on an innocent- 
looking piece of ice and broke my leg and 
ankle — always my idea of the beginning 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



f 



of senility ! However, here I am in my 
wheeled chair, sending you all much love." 

One bit of news that should renew our 
youth is that Gene Miltenberger Ustick 
has a new daughter, Eugenie Eliot, born 
early in March. She has been busily 
gaining ever since, and both she and her 
mother are apparently flourishing. 

For some time Esther Maddux Tennent 
has been teaching at a branch of the 
Philadelphia Conservatory of Music, in 
Ardmore; this keeps here so busy that 
she has little time to come to the campus. 
She writes: "Next year our small family 
will be in Japan; Dr. Tennent is being 
sent by the Rockefeller Foundation as 
visiting professor to Japan and we shall 
have another year there — this time, I 
hope, with no earthquake. We hope to 
make the trip around the world." 

Lacy Van Wagenen and Hono Goodale 
Warren quite inadvertently turned up on 
the same steamer and discovered each 
other before they got out of the Hudson. 
They seem to have won a "high-brow" 
prize in one of the ship's contests — "to 
the glory of Bryn Mawr." Later they 
hope to see some of the rest of us in 
Italy, Greece, or Egypt. 

1911 
Class Editor: Louise S. Russell, 

140 East 52d Street, New York City. 

It is with sadness that I report the 
death of Alice Eichberg Shohl on Decem- 
ber 22 after a long and severe illness. 
Those of us who have known her only 
in college and at reunions will remember 
gratefully her cheerful and unfailing co- 
operation and readiness to carry on. Mar- 
garet Friend Low writes: "Those of us 
who knew how wonderfully happy Alice 
was with her family and how remarkably 
brave and self-forgetful throughout her 
long illness feel that hers was a tragedy. 
Her mother, who was so ill while Alice 
was in college and with whom Alice spent 
every afternoon for nearly two years, 
survives her, though in anything but good 
health. She leaves besides her husband, 
who is an associate professor on the 
medical staff of Western Reserve Univer- 
sity, a splendid girl of eleven, a boy of 
nine and a tiny baby girl." Her family 
have the sympathy of 1911 in their loss. 



Margaret Friend Low writes about her- 
self as follows : "I haven't anything to 
say about myself except that I'm having a 
marvelous time with my large and flour- 
"shing family — a girl and three boys. For 
five years we had wonderful summers on 
a ranch in Montana. Now the children 



go to camp and we stay at home. But 
we did have a wonderful little jaunt in 
Europe this winter, which would carry 
us over untold dull spells — if life were 
ever dull nowadays." Can't I persuade 
others to follow Margaret's fine example? 

Kate Chambers Seelye has a daughter, 
Kathcrine Laurens, born January 15. She 
has three other daughters and a son. 

Elizabeth Taylor Russell and her hus- 
band spent two weeks at Pinehurst the 
latter part of February, where she reports 
that they had a good time playing bad 
golf. 

The friends of Marion Scott Soames 
were shocked by the news of the death 
of her husband at their home in Dinard, 
France, on March 7 as the result of a 
cerebral hemorrhage. Those of us who 
had had the opportunity to meet him feel 
a personal loss. 

Anna Stearns wrote in February from 
the south of France that, after spending 
two weeks completely entangled in French 
red tape, she emerged with a "permis de 
conduire" and was then driving an infini- 
tesimal French car over hair-raising 
roads. She proved her point by writing 
on a postcard picturing terrifying curves. 

Margaret Prussing spent a week in 
New York in March in search of a prin- 
cipal for the Hollywood day school of 
which she is president of the board of 
directors. She stopped in Chicago for her 
brother's wedding on the way east and 
paid a flying visit to Bryn Mawr on the 
way back. 

Frances Porter Adler was in Boston in 
February where her husband had a thy- 
roid gland operation. They have now 
gone to California. 

Norvelle Browne spent the fall and 
early winter in England and France. She 
enjoyed seeing Marion Crane Carroll and 
her nice family — her husband and two fine 
boys, one quite talented in painting. She 
went to Italy for January and part of 
February and then sailed for Egypt, of 
whose fascinations she writes ecstatically : 
"There's no place like it ! We spent yes- 
terday afternoon at the bazaars buying 
silver and perfumes, being offered coffee, 
Turkish Delights and amber - scented 
cigarettes, while we bargained. Then we 
had tea at Shepheard's with Miss Park 
and Miss Lord." 

1911 will sympathize with Margaret 
Hobart Myers in the death of her father 
on March 27th after a two months' illness, 
at her home in Sewanee. Margaret's; 
classmates who had the privilege of know- 
ing him will always remember and appre- 
ciate his genial interest and cordial spirit.. 
The class has lost a friend. 



22 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



1912 
Class Editor: Elizabeth Pinney Hunt 
(Mrs. Andrew D. Hunt), 
Millbrook Lane, Haverford, Penna. 

Nan Hartshorne Brown writes from 
Westtown, "I have no news, We jog 
along interestingly but uneventful. Our 
last trip was a summer in England two 
years ago. ... I continue my mild job 
as Westtown Alumni Secretary, and edi- 
tor of the Westonian . . . but I've been 
doing that for three years and do not 
want it mentioned now." Nevertheless it 
is news to the editor, and so she passes 
it on. 

Jean Stirling Gregory took her small 
daughter, Alice, to Florida soon after 
Christmas for six weeks. 

Gladys Spry Augur is renting her house 
in Winnetka, and plans to spend some 
time in Santa Fe to be near her husband, 
who is ill there. 

Isabel Vincent Harper was East in Feb- 
ruary, and spent a night in Haverford. 

Clara Francis Dickson reports that a 
bad attack of pneumonia has forced her 
to give up various community activities 
and attend strictly to health. Her chief 
interest is the education of a daughter 
twelve years old, whom she plans to send 
to Bryn Mawr in 1935. 

Elizabeth Johnson Sneed has decided 
that Betty, who is three years old is "sev- 
eral hands and brains full," and requires, 
therefore, most of her time. However, 
Elizabeth finds odd moments in which to 
write for a church paper, the Southwest- 
ern Episcopalian, and to be treasurer of 
the Pulaski Woman's Club. She says 
that she is consumed with a desire to have 
news about Edgie: so Edge, it is clearly 
up to you to write the editor a letter. 

1915 
Class Editor: Emily Noyes Knight 

(Mrs. Clinton Prescott Knight, Jr.), 
Woodcroft, Bermuda. 

The class extends sympathy to Helen 
Taft Manning on the death of her father, 
to Ruth Tinker Morse on the death of her 
father, and to Esther Pugh Tommacelli on 
the death of her mother. 

Esther Pugh Tommacelli (Countess 
Tommacelli) is in Bermuda. Also in Ber- 
muda is Marguerite Jones, who is man- 
aging Huntley Towers, a delightful place, 
one hears, with a view of this Lilliputian 
land. 

Harriet Bradford has changed her ad- 
dress to Hotel Windermere West, Chi- 
cago, her old "hostelry" having been torn 
down, but her present place she describes 
as "equally ancient and more pleasant." 

Helen Irvin Bordman has returned to 



Concord, after crossing the Pacific twice*. 

Mary Gertrude Brownell Murphy was 
married on March 8th to Mr. Clyde 
Stroud Wilson of Charleston, S. C. 

Isabel Foster is wanted. Will some 
one, please, stop her on her world cruise 
and convey to her the word that she 
should communicate directly with Harriet 
Bradford? 

Mary Goodhue Cary expects to go to 
Berlin with her family for three years, 
her husband having been asked to head 
the Friends' centre in Berlin. Mary writes 
of the possibility of changing from Cairns 
to Dachshunds. 

1916 
Class Editor: Catherine S. Godley, 
768 Ridgeway Avenue, 
Avondale, Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Dorothy Belleville Hill writes from 
Willows, California, that her husband 
and three children, books, music and gar- 
den fill her time. She is interested in 
her husband's work of bees in summer 
and fowls in winter. 

1917 
Class Editor : Bertha Clark Greenough, 

203 Blackstone Boulevard, 

Providence, R. I. 
Your Class Editor dashed down to New 
York for the opera one afternoon late in 
March. The next day she went out to 
Manhasset for a glimpse of Lovey Brown 
Lamarche and family. Her two-year-old 
son is adorable. Lovey was in fine form 
as always. 

A note from E. Dulles just received 
states that she has resigned from Bryn 
Mawr, with regret that she can't da two 
things at once, to devote her full time for 
the next two years to her- work for the 
Harvard and Radcliffe Bureau of Inter- 
national Research. She is writing a book 
for them on the Bank for International 
Settlements and Certain Aspects of <he 
Reparations Problem. She expects to be 
abroad, mainly in Germany, for the next 
two years and will be glad to see any '17 
over there. 

1918 
Class Editor: Helen Edward Walker, 
5516 Everett Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

Annette Gest says: "Last summer I 
studied Italian at the University of Peru- 
gia and had a very good time. There were 
forty nationalities and all the races of 
students there, including one red and one 
black ! Next summer expect to go to 
Spain, mostly Santander." 

The delinquent list will be postponed till 
the next Bulletin. Veronica Frazier 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



23 



Murray's card was returned by the post- 
office. Anyone knowing it please send her 
correct address. 

1919 
Class Editor: Marjorie Remington 
Twitchell 

(Mrs. P. E. Twitchell), 
Setauket, Long Island. 

Edith Howes is doing very interesting 
work at the Jewish Center School, 131 
West 86th Street, New York City. One 
of her main interests is the editing of a 
school magazine. 

Lukey Peters Beazley's permanent ad- 
dress is 31 Huart Road, Gillingham, Kent, 
England. She writes: "Gerald (my hus- 
band) has been stationed in China for the 
last twenty months, so the children and I 
took the opportunity of going to America, 
my first visit since I married nearly nine 
years ago. We arrived home a year ago 
last November, and went right off to Ari- 
zona, where my brother has a boys' ranch 
school. The twins and Peter had a glor- 
ious time and became regular cowboys. 
In May we went to the family place in 
New Jersey. My family being English, 
had never experienced country life on a 
lake and just thought heaven had come 
to earth. .They took to water like ducks. 

"We arrived back in England at the 
heart of holiday time. I am hoping to 
procure a maid in a day or two, so that I 
can go over to Gillingham and open up 
my house. I thought that the children 
would hate returning to England, but a 
bountiful Christmas has removed all re- 
grets and the three of them seem as happy 
as larks. 

"I teach my three and helped with 
tutoring at the ranch. . . . Gerald seems 
likely to be away another year. ... I sit 
here and curse my fate." 

1920 
Editor: Margaret Ballou Hitchcock 
(Mrs. David Hitchcock), 
45 Mill Rock Rd., New Haven, Conn. 

Is everyone coming back to Reunion? 
I do hope so. Make plans now to check 
your babies during the first week of June 
and come. It can only be a successful 
reunion if everyone comes back. Per- 
sonally, nothing short of pestilence and 
famine could keep me from coming. 

Dorothy Rogers Lyman has a son, born 
on March 10th in New York City. Alex- 
ander Victor Lyman, Jr., weighed 9 lb. 
10 oz. Dot says she does not think the 
class would be interested in his weight, 
but I think anything over 9 pounds is 
news. 

Alice Harrison Scott, according to 



Polly Porritt, is . in Sao Paulo, Brazil, 
with her husband and two daughters. 

Miriam Ormsby Annan was married to 
Cyrus Mark some time in February, I 
think. I have lost the announcement and 
cannot remember the details. 

Phoebe Helmer Wadsworth is in Hot 
Springs recuperating from a scries of 
misfortunes, including the illness of her 
daughter, mother-in-law and husband who 
was hit in the head with a bottle by a 
communist, during the riot in Union 
Square. 

K. Townsend has been playing golf and 
tennis in Bermuda where she has been 
sojourning for the last few weeks. 

Marjorie Canby Taylor in her last letter 
said: "Recently I visited Martha Chase at 
Concord. She is busy taking her second 
year at Miss Sacker's School of Design 
and is most enthusiastic about her work. 
At the end of next year she hopes to be a 
full-fledged interior decorator. 

Anne Coolidge is teaching school in 
Cambridge, doing special work with diffi- 
cult children and being very successful. 

When I have a few spare moments I 
work on the Regional Scholarship Com- 
mittee and I am Vice-President of the 
Germantown Mothers' Club." 

1921 
Class Editor: Helen W. James Rogers 
(Mrs. J. Ellsworth Rogers), 
99 Poplar Plains Road, Toronto. 

Marynia Farnham is now living in New 
York City. Her young son, of three, is 
attending nursery school and Marynia is 
going ahead with her medical work. She 
writes that she has seen Kash Woodward, 
who is taking a year's residence in 
Pediatrics at Nursery and Child's Hos- 
pital. 

I hear that Ida Lauer Darrow, Teddy 
Donnelley Haffner and Nora Newell 
Burry are going through the throes of 
house building. Ida's house is to be 
near Chestnut Hill and the other two are 
in Lake Forest. 

Luz Taylor has spent the fall hunting 
and has had two quail for breakfast every 
morning. She has recently come north 
and gone to Lake Placid with Kat Brad- 
ford for winter sports. 
1922 
Class Editor: Serena Hand Savage 
(Mrs. William Savage), 
29 W. 12th St., New York City. 

Marnie Speer has written us a long 
letter from Yenching University, in 
Peking. She says: "I have an uneasy 
feeling that a letter from China should 
be full of thrilling news, and I can think 
of nothing thrilling that has happened in 



24 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



the last four and a half years I've been 
here. University routine is much the 
same here as in any university at home. 
We felt ourselves the center of the uni- 
verse for a week in October when we had 
our formal opening — the dedication of 
buildings on our new campus. But that 
mild academic event is not the sort of 
excitement people at home expect to hear 
of. We have had no looting, no sieges, 
no 'incidents/ no strikes, — nothing but an 
undisturbed succession of semesters, ex- 
aminations, and Commencements. 

"As for me, I teach English. ... I 
have learned to explain the difference be- 
tween the definite and the indefinite ar- 
ticle. . . . 

"I am coming home this summer, but I 
don't leave here till the end of June, so 
there is no possibility of being at re- 
union. . . . 

"Isn't it ridiculous that I haven't seen 
Tavie since she came to China ? I have 
tried to get to Tsinan every spring for 
the last three years, but the railroads al- 
ways stop running the day before spring 
vacation." 

Polly Willcox has come home from Eu- 
rope where she spent some time. She 
has completed a Life of Miss Bennett, the 
Head-Mistress of the Bennett School, and 
this is to be published by the school alum- 
nae. Polly is now working in the Child 
Study Association of America. 

1923 
Class Editor: Dorothy Meserve Kun- 
hardt 

(Mrs. Philip Kunhardt), 
Mt. Kemble Ave., Morristown, N. J. 
Ruth Geyer Hocker has a third son, 
"born on the last day of the old year. 

Evelyn Page's book, 'The Beacon Hill 
Murders" (the public is to believe that 
one Roger Scarlett is the author), is out 
and is being read and shuddered at by 
thousands upon thousands. 

Elizabeth Vincent Foster has a son, 
very young, and as yet unnamed. 

Frances Matteson Rathbun has a third 
•child, a son. 

1924 
Class Editor: Beth Tuttle Wilbur 

(Mrs. Donald Wilbur), 

5048 Queen Ave., So., 

Minneapolis, Minn. 
Kay VanBibber writes "I am still teach- 
ing - at the Brearley School in New York, 
and have signed up for next year, too, 
and I keep house with M. Darkow, '15, 
in the wilds of Astoria. Rebecca Tatham 
had a delightfully collegiate supper party 
about a month ago which included E 



Neville, C. Lewis, L. Ford, B. Ives, S. 
Leewitz and a number of others. I am 
spending this week-end with Martha 
Hammond, now Sister Frideswide, C.S.M., 
at her convent in Peekskill." 

Monkey Smith Davison writes that a 
daughter, Joan Dudley Davison, arrived 
on March 7th "with a speed and ease 
which promise well for Varsity teams of 
B. M. C. class of about 1950. I have to 
assume she will be very bright in order 
to make a light blue class!" 

Ellie Requa, after apologizing for lack 
of news, proceeds to the telling of a num- 
ber of experiences which sound to us like 
news anyhow! Writing from Rome: "I 
came over in June to go to the Geneva 
School of International Studies — and 
stayed through September for the League 
meetings. October and November, Mother 
and I stayed at the Villa Christina in 
Florence, with its lovely gardens and view 
over the city. In December we came to 
Rome and sailed to Egypt on the same 
boat as Miss Park and Miss Lord. It 
was such fun seeing them! After Cairo 
we met again in Assuan, and I am hoping 
that they will come up to Rome before 
we leave." 

1925 
Class Editor: Elizabeth Mallett Con- 
ger (Mrs. Frederic Conger), 
325 E. 72nd St., New York City. 

"Tibby Lawrence is engaged to Clar- 
ence Whittlesey Mendell who teaches 
Latin and Greek at Yale and presides as 
dean over the goings-on of the under- 
graduates. He and Tibby have known 
each other for a long time, four or five 
years. The idea is a small wedding in 
Paris in July, as soon as Clare can get 
there, and of course they'll stay abroad 
for part of the summer and then come 
back to live in New Haven." 

So writes Beth Dean. Beth is still 
teaching at the Nightingale School in 
New York. At Christmas she went all 
the way to Paris and spent a week with 
Tibby. (Beth must be a good sailor.) 

Briggy Leuba has a third little son, 
Edward Russell Leuba. He was born 
March 28th, and is a splendid baby from 
all accounts. 

Rachel Foster Manierre writes that her 
son, Johnny, is a "most satisfactory child" 
and weighs at the moment well over nine- 
teen pounds. The Manierres are having a 
wonderful time decorating their new 
house which is to be finished by May first. 

Peggv Boyden Magoun came to New 
York for a few days in January. The 
Magouns are planning a nice little jaunt 
this summer to a Parliament celebration 



i 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



25 



in Iceland. Peggy says her husband is a 
rusty in his Icelandic because there are 
so few people to talk to here, (you know 
how it is with your Icelandic) but he 
expects to brush it up in a short time 
when he gets there. The language, it 
seems, is the closest today to the old 
Norse sagas and Peg says the school 
children of Iceland can read the sagas 
with very little difficulty. 

Smithy (Elizabeth Lane Smith) is 
doing something psychological to children 
in New Haven. We do seem a little vague 
but after all there has been a slight flurry 
in our household and the Bulletin has 
been neglected. As a matter of fact, even 
our aquarium caught the spirit. We had 
two perfectly nice snails but the day we 
went to the hospital, they got so per- 
turbed that they had thirty-six babies in 
four days, sensitive creatures, snails. Oh 
yes, and our baby is named Frederic. He 
sucks his thumb and doesn't look like any- 
body. 

1926 
Class Editor: Edith Tweddell, 
Plandome, Long Island, N. Y. 

A letter from Rome informs us that 
Molly Hamill has been Mrs. Donald Ord- 
way for a year or more. Her husband is 
a writer and journalist, so they "lived 
nine months in the island of Sicily, which 
we explored from the rocks that the Cy- 
clops hurled across to Scylla and Charyb- 
dis and all the towns in between. It was 
marvellous fun. We stayed on after all 
foreigners had left and were almost 
adopted. We saw all their festas and 
fairs, their grain harvest and vendemenia, 
their fishing towns and mountain villages. 
. . . Now we are in Rome for the winter, 
to gather a little music and books and 
cafes and things by way of contrast." 
After April they can be reached in care of 
American Express Co., Rome. 

Alice Parmelee has been busy teaching 
this winter at Miss Hewitt's school in 
New York City, and likes it very much. 

Betty Jeffries is studying French in 
Paris, staying with a French family, and 
having a beautiful time. 

Tommy Rodgcrs Chubbuck bemoans the 
moving of Virginia Cooke Fitts et al. to 
Plainfield, where the latter is very busy 
in the Junior League. Tommy herself is 
now obliged to amuse her daughter of an 
afternoon besides grooming it of a morn- 
ing. Young Helen Louise is, roughly 
speaking, ten months old, and what with 
a dog of her own and a house she keeps 
her mother busy. Their address, in case 
you don't know, is 2305 Belmont Avenue, 
Ardmore, Pa. 

Kat Hendrick and her sister returned 



from England just before Christmas. 
Though they have achieved the right to 
wear the wig and gown of English attor- 
neys, they were lately seen at the opera 
clad in the simple evening garb of lay- 
men. Owing to their mother's recent ill- 
ness they have been staying at the La 
Salle Hotel in New York City, but they 
expect to return this spring to their home 
in Mountain Lakes, N. J. 

Jack and Alice Goldsmith have moved 
to Larchmont, N. Y. (4 Caerleon Avenue,, 
Howell Park) where a house with fur- 
nace and Ford keeps them highly amused 
after apartment life. They say Jack can 
hardly wait to cut the lawn ! 

Sophie Sturm Brown and her husband 
are living at the Brittany, 55 East 10th 
Street, New York City, from which very 
modern citadel they daily emerge to wage 
war with Macy's stove department. Be- 
tween times, Sophie dashes up to Colum- 
bia with a French book in each dimpled 
fist. 

The firm of Hanschka and Bennett has 
taken an office and hung a sign in Mont- 
clair, N. J., where Grove's husband and 
one Mr. Bennett will practice law. The 
Hanschkas will continue to live in New- 
ark for the present (297 Mt. Prospect 
Avenue). 

Jenny Green is teaching Chemistry at 
the Foxcroft School in Virginia, where 
Brownie ('25) is also a member of the 
faculty. Every day when school is out 
they climb aboard their thoroughbreds 
and canter round the country. 

Liddy Nowell was seen recently in the 
New York Public Library, where she 
came armed with one of these jaunty little 
muffs to peruse a weather map for the 
Scribner Publishing House. (Why should 
they care about the weather?) 

Deirdre O'Shea leaves shortly for 
Paris, where she has been offered a swell 
job with Bettina Bedwell, Fashion Editor 
of the Herald-Tribune. It is known that 
Miss Bedwell once accompanied our 
Deirdre on a little shopping trip. When 
that lady observed our classmate unhesi- 
tantly pick out the snappiest costume from 
a rack of gowns and procure it for a song- 
she knew her man. O'Shea was hired. 
Unfortunately Mrs. O'Shea has been ill 
this winter, which put off Deirdre's trip, 
but we hear that she is better of late. 

As you all know, Delia Smith Johnston 
and her husband sailed last June for 
Vienna, where they are living at I Schul- 
erstrasse, 20, III. Ames is studying Ger- 
man and history of art, Dee took up 
dancing and is using her European Fel- 
lowship to study "The Teaching of His- 
tory, Social Sciences, and Racial Under- 



26 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



standing in the Progressive Schools of 
Austria and Germany." This she does by 
visiting and experimenting in the schools 
themselves, under the supervision of a 
Viennese professor. Dee is thoroughly 
enjoying life in Vienna with its facili- 
ties for amusement and its concerts. She 
comments: "God save us . . . from 
ever losing the amiable sense of the rela- 
tive unimportance of time which is over- 
abundant in Vienna and almost entirely 
wanting at home !" 

1927 
Class Editor: Ellenor Morris, 
Berwyn, Penna. 

Elinor Parker has a scholarship at the 
Institute of Musical Art, and is working 
very hard on her singing. 

Aggie Pearce and Marcia Carter are 
studying stenography, and Elizabeth Dun- 
can has a job with the Rockefeller Foun- 
dation and is living in New York. Eliza- 
beth Norton is spending the winter in 
Lausanne with her mother. 

Carol Piatt is still teaching in San 
Francisco. 

Maria Chamberlain writes that she had 
a very interesting summer in Europe and 
is now at 401 Park Towers, 2440 Six- 
teenth St., N. W., Washington, D. C, 
and is going to art school and cooking 
school. 192g 

Class Editor: Cornelia B. Rose, Jr., 
333 East 68th St., New York City. 

The class deserves a palm for nobility! 
We only wish that it had been possible 
to send out the questionnaires before be- 
cause now there may not be time to get 
all the news in the Bulletin this year. 
Here goes for a try. 

Evelyn Brooks is a wage slave in the 
Research Department of J. Walter 
Thompson Advertising Agency in the 
Graybar Building in New York. She has 
been living this winter with Frances 
Chisolm, '29, and finding the "bachelor 
life" thoroughly pleasant. She says she 
caught a glimpse of Nancy Mitchell on 
her way to Europe — chaperoning a Bal- 
timore girl on a trip through Italy. 

Louise Wray is Cataloguer of Paint- 
ings in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, 
compiling and writing up critical and 
biographical material for a catalogue 
which is to appear in three or four years. 
Last summer she traveled abroad and, 
among other things, studied at the Zim- 
mern School for International Study in 
Geneva, and danced with the late Primo 
de Rivera. 

Margaretta Salinger is back from 
Munich and looking for a job in New 
York. 



Nina Perera has lately distinguished 
herself by building and "decorating in- 
teriorly" a new house for her family. 

Another cataloguer is Lenore Browning 
who is ' working with slides and photo- 
graphs in the Fine Arts Department of 
the University of Pittsburgh. 

Eliza Funk writes that "I have a secre- 
tarial position with Dr. Frazer, head of 
the Department of Chemistry at Johns 
Hopkins University, who has recently 
perfected a catalyst which will do away 
with carbon monoxide from automobile 
exhausts. All that remains now to be 
done is to make the device simple and 
practical for general use on cars. It is 
with much anticipation and interest that 
I am waiting to see how this will turn 
out, for we are expecting great things 
from this, and I am awfully glad to be 
connected with this project, even though 
I am only the "stenog'." 

Mary Adams is finishing a book on 
stage design which she has been putting 
together for Norman Bel-Geddes, the 
producer of The Miracle, Fifty Million 
Frenchmen and numerous other things. 
In August she expects to undertake the 
cataloguing of their next exhibition for 
the American Federation of Art and in 
between jobs, plans to go abroad with 
Pat Humphrey, '29. Mary says that Hope 
Yandell has a studio in New York and is 
illustrating books among other things and 
that Alita Davis is with her uncle in the 
Philippines, where — according to her own 
account — she is the Mrs. Gann of Manila. 

Alice Bonnewitz was married in Oc- 
tober to Earl Stevens Caldwell, Lieuten- 
ant (j.g.) of the United States Navy. 
All winter, from November, she lived at 
Pensacola, Fla., on aviation duty and is 
now waiting in Quincy Mass., for the 
U. S. S. Northampton to be completed. 
Previous to her marriage she drove, with 
her father, on the Pacific Coast from 
Tia Juana to Vancouver and became an 
ardent California booster. 

Lucille Meyer took a secretarial course 
at Carnegie Tech last year and since 
June has been student adviser in the 
School of Education at the University of 
Pittsburgh. 

Dot Miller, Peggy Perry, and Peggy 
Hulse are all teaching, the second at the 
Choate School, Brookline, following her 
year at Cambridge, the last at Rosemary 
Hall after getting her M.A. at Columbia. 
Dot fails to specify where she is at pres- 
ent but says she expects to study at Bryn 
Mawr next year. 

E. Stewart is still at her job of raising 
money for the Foreign Policy Associa- 
tion, making occasional speeches at their 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



27 



Saturday luncheons. She indulged in an 
appendicitis operation this winter and 
found it so delightful an experience that 
— in all sincerity — she urges everyone to 
try it. 

Bertha Ailing' s job turns out to be 
managing for Dudley Crafts Watson, 
Membership Lecturer at the Chicago Art 
Institute. She manages his lecture en- 
gagements and European tours and may 
have to take fifty school teachers to Eng- 
land, France, and Italy in July. She is 
also giving gallery talks at the Art Insti- 
tute, is Secretary and Treasurer of the 
Chicago Bryn Mawr Club and travel edi- 
tor of the Junior League magazine. She 
reports that Edwina Litsinger, ex-'28, is 
to be married to Wilbur Smith on April 
30 and that after honeymoon in Italy, 
is going to live in Lake Forest, 111. But, 
Bertha, we don't know "all the news" 
about M. Gregson and Ruth Holloway. 
We wish either you or they wouldn't be 
so secretive. 

Nancy Pritchett is going to chaperon 
her young tutee and a friend to Italy, 
France, and England this summer. When 
they were in Florida this winter they 
lunched with Mr. and Mrs. Gene Tunney. 

Jo Stetson has foregone the life of ease 
and is doing some special work at Miss 
Flyde's School in New York. She seems 
to be teaching a small group in all their 
subjects and enjoying it very much. 

Another teacher is Leonore Hollander 
who is interesting Freshmen in addition 
to studying Organic Chemistry under 
Roger Adams; she fails to specify where, 
which is a little hard on those of us who 
don't know our scientific luminaries. She 
got her Master's degree last June and is 
going in for a Doctor's in physiological 
chem. 

Barby Loines Dreier spent Christmas 
in New York with her baby. The editor 
caught a fleeting glimpse of them in the 
station and is able to report that "both 
mother and baby are doing well." 

Helen Tuttle is lost in the studios of 
Paris but the rumors that trickle out have 
it that she is very happy at her work. She 
has made several expeditions into the 
provinces and is living with Tibby Law- 
rence, '25, at 10 Boulevard de Part Royal, 
Paris V. 

Helen Hook is another of those abroad, 
living in Italy with her mother and study- 
ing at the Academy in Rome. 

Mary Fite has a story-telling class at 
the Dalton School in New York. 

Eleanor Cohoe is being very social, 
judging from the number of times we re- 
ceive reports of her appearance at dances. 

Neal Fowler visited New York for a 



brief time a while ago on her way from 
Europe to California. 

Jean Huddleston is working hard at P. 
and S. and living in the Bronx. 

Mr. Moreau Brown, Jr., was born on 
March 10. His mother is Allie Barbour, 
ex-'28, who is living in Orange, N. J. The 
child undoubtedly will be brought up on 
"Mother Goose." 

Elizabeth Chesnut writes that she is 
studying vocal and ear-training at the 
Peabody Institute, Italian at Johns Hop- 
kins, is acting as advisor to the magazine 
staff of the Girl Reserves of the Balti- 
more Y. W. C. A., all of this besides 
keeping house, teaching Sunday School 
and "having a good time generally, 
socially as well as academically." It 
sounds like a rather full life and a very 
strenuous way to "absorb a little culture" 
which she says is her intention. 

Al Bruere is engaged to Mr. Richard 
C. Lounsbury of New York, Yale, '25, 
where he sang on the Glee Club and 
rowed. At present he is with the Pan- 
American Airways. He is a Psi U. Al 
plans to go home to Partland, Ore. this 
summer and be married out there in the 
fall, returning to New York to live. 

Frances Bethel Rowan has been teach- 
ing this winter, doing individual tutoring 
in History and Latin at Miss Madeira's 
and also carrying a regular job teaching 
an elementary algebra class at Mt. Ver- 
non Seminary. She reports that she is 
seeing quite a bit of Billy Rhein Bird. 

Peggy Haley, who is at present in New 
York studying art, is planning to go to 
South America this summer. 

Mat Fowler, who returned from Europe 
in January to spend a couple of weeks in 
New York before departing for Cali- 
fornia, threatens to return and go to work 
again this Spring. The poison's in your 
blood, Matty; you'll never settle down. 

All these people flying about from one 
place to another while we stay firmly tied 
clown ! Margaret Coss says she expects 
to spend the summer in England and 
France and Diza Steck announces her 
sailing on June 13 for Italy, France, Eng- 
land and Scotland. Jo Stetson is fleeting 
off to Georgia this Spring vacation and 
again in June. We think we'll go to 
Azerbaijan some time soon. 

Maud Hupfel has been in New York 
for a while completing the course in the 
bond school at the Guaranty Trust Com- 
pany. Her plans for the future are as 
yet a bit nebulous. 

Eleanor Schottland is reported as "Not 
Found" at Morristown, N. J. Anybody 
know her address? 



The Saint Timothys School 
for Girls 

CATONSVILLE, MARYLAND 

Founded September 1882 

COLLEGE PREPARATORY 

AND 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

IMISS LOUISA McENDREE FOWLER 
Head of th e School 

Wykeham Rise 

WASHINGTON, CONNECTICUT 

A COUNTRY SCHOOL 
FOR GIRLS 

FANNY E. DAVIES, LL.A., Headmistress 
Prepares for Bryn Mawr and Other Colleges 

The Episcopal Academy 

(Founded 1785) 

CITY LINE, OVERBROOK, PA. 

A country day school for boys 

MODERN AND WELL EQUIPPED 
Endorsed by Bryn Mawr Alumnae 

UNIVERSITY^ 

BOARDING AND DAY SCHOOL 

Founded 1896 

Thorough and successful Preparation 

for Eastern Colleges for Women as well as 

for Midwestern Colleges and Universities 

Illustrated Catalogue on Request 

ANNA B. HAIRE, A.B., SMITH COLLEGE, Principal 

1106-B Lake Shore Drive Chicago, Illinois 

THE LOW AND 
HEYWOOD SCHOOL 

Emphasizing college preparatory work. 

Also general and special courses. 

One year intensive college preparation. 

Junior school. 

65th year. Catalogue. 

SHIPPAN POINT, 
STAMFORD, CONN. 



The Ethel Walker School 

SIMSBURY, CONNECTICUT 

Head of School 

ETHEL WALKER SMITH, A.M., 
Bryn Mawr College 



Head Mistress 

JESSIE GERMAIN HEWITT, A.B., 
Bryn Mawr College 



yi» £EAW&$CflOQl, 

College Preparation. Cultural , 
and Special Courses. City and £ 
Country Advantages. 
Lucie C. Beard, Headmistress 
Box M, Orange, N. J. 




/1ARCUAV SCH<&L 

SFTR^S BRYN MAWR, PA. 

L~-^£r*| Prepares for Bryn Mawr and 

fjfSg al1 leadin S colleges 

I^NjWM Musical Course prepares for the Depart - 

^"Sp**^ ment of Music of Bryn Mawr College 

EDITH HARCUM, Head of School 

L. May Willis, Principal 

THE MISSES KIRK'S 

College Preparatory School 

PREPARATORY TO BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 
Individual Instruction. Athletics. 

Clovercroft, Montgomery Avenue, Rosemont, Pa. 
Mail, telephone and telegraph address: Bryn Mawr. Pa. 



CHOATE SCHOOL 

1600 Beacon Street, Brookline, Mass. 

HOME AND DAY SCHOOL 
FOR GIRLS 

EMPHASIS ON COLLEGE PREPARATION 

Elective Courses for students not preparing 
for College 

AUGUSTA CHOATE, A.M. (Vasaar) 

Principal 



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THE AGNES IRWIN SCHOOL 

2009-2011 Delancey Place, Philadelphia 

A College Preparatory 
SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 



BERTHA M. LAWS, A.B., Headmistress 

MISS WRIGHT'S SCHOOL 

Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Prepares for College Board 
Examination 

BANCROFT SCHOOL 
FOR GIRLS 

30th Year. Complete College Preparation. 

Individual Attention to carefully selected group in 
Boarding Department of Progressive Day School. 
• Summer and Winter Sports. Dramatics, Art, 
Music. Address 

HOPE FISHER, Principal, Worcester, Mass. 

The Katharine Branson School 

ROSS, CALIFORNIA Across the Bay from San Francisco 

A Country School College Preparatory 

Heads 

Katharine Fleming Branson, A.B., Bryn Mawr 



MISS MADEIRA'S SCHOOL 

11330 19th St., N. W. Washington, D. C. 

A RESIDENT AND DAY SCHOOL FOR 
GIRLS 

LUCY MADEIRA WING, A.B. 

MRS. DAVID LAFOREST WING 

Head Mistress 



FERRY HALL 

A RESIDENT AND DAY SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

On Lake Michigan, near Chicago 

Junior College: High School Department: College 
Preparatory and General Courses. Special Departments 
of Music. Expression and Art. 

Two new dormitories, including new dining room and 
infirmary. 

Eloise R. Tremain, A.B., Bryn Mawr, Principal 

ROSEMARY HALL 

College Preparatory 

(With supplementary but net alternative courses) 

CAROLINE RUUTZ-REES. Ph.D. \ „ , -,, . 
MARY E. LOWNDES. MA.. Liu D / Head Miitra *» 



GREENWICH 



CONNECTICUT 



The Shipley School 

Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 

Preparatory to Bryn Mawr College 

ALICE G. HOWLANP, ELEANOR 0. BROWNELL 
Principals 

MISS RANSOM and 
MISS BRIDGES' SCHOOL 

PIEDMONT, CALIFORNIA 

(A suburb of San Francisco) 

A RESIDENT AND DAY SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

General and College Preparatory Courses 
Outdoor Life throughout the year 

EDITH BRIDGES, B.L., Principal 



The Baldwin School 

A Country School for Girls 
BRYN MAWR PENNSYLVANIA 

Preparation for Bryn Mawr, Mount 

Holyoke, Smith, Vassar and Wellesley 

Colleges. Abundant Outdoor Life. 

Hockey, Basketball, Tennis, 

Indoor Swimming Pool. 



ELIZABETH FORREST JOHNSON, A.B. 

HEAD 



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Garrison forest 

Modern, well-equipped country school for 
girls. In the Green Spring Valley near 
Baltimore. Thorough college preparation. 
General Courses with excellent opportu- 
nities in Music and Art. Separate Junior 
School. All sports including riding. 

Catalogue on request 

Jean G. Marshall and Nancy Offutt, Principals 
BOX M GARRISON MARYLAND 



The Traphagen School of Fashion 



I 



INTENSIVE SIX WEEKS 
SUMMER COURSE 

All phases from elementary to full 
mastery ol costume design and illus- 
tration taught In shortest time con- 
sistent with thoroughness. Day and 
Evening classes. Saturday courses for 
Adults and Children. Our Sales De- 
partment disposes of student work. 
Every member of advanced classes 
often placed through our Employment 
Bureau. Write for announcement-M. 



In Arnold, Constable & Company Costume 
Design Competition, over 100 schools and 
nearly 800 students took part; all prizes 
were awarded to Traphagen pupils with 
exception of one of the five third prizes. 

1680 Broadway (near 52nd St.) New Y< 



Millinery 

successfully caps 
the climax of 
fashion and the 
smart ensemble. 

SAKS-FIFTH AVENUE 

FORTY- NINTH to FIFTIETH STREET 
NEW YORK 




Cathedral School of St. Mary 

GARDEN CITY, LONG ISLAND, N. Y. 

A school for Girls 19 miles from New York. College 

preparatory and general courses. Music Art and 

Domestic Science. Catalogue on request. Bos B. 

MIRIAM A. BYTEL, A.B., Radcliffe, Principa 

BERTHA GORDON WOOD, A.B., Bryn Mawr 

Assistant Principal 

THE CAMBRIDGE SCHOOL 

DOMESTIC ARCHITECTURE 
LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 
A Professional School for College 

Graduates 

The Academic Year for 1930-31 opens 

Monday, September 29, 1930 

Summer School, June 23 to Aug. 2, 1930. 

Henry Atherton Frost — Director 

53 Church Street, Cambridge, Mass. 

At Harvard Square 






A Study-Year 
in Europe 

FIVE MONTHS IN PARIS 
THREE MONTHS IN ROME 

(October to June) 

Especially for girls wishing 
a year's study abroad before 
entering college, or a year's 
work of college standing in 
Europe. Four months' 
courses at the Sorbonne; 
Italian history and Art in 
Rome. 



Directors: Miss Helen Anderson-Smith 
Miss Louise H. Wood 

(A. B. Bryn Mawr 1919) 



FOR INFORMATION: 
MRS. OLIVE HASBROUGK 

ELIOT HALL, CAMBRIDGE, MASS. 



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1SS6 1930 

BACK LOG CAMP 

THE ADIRONDACK MOUNTAINS 
INDIAN LAKE, NEW YORK 

THE FLEET 

Back Log Camp prides itself particularly on the fleet of boats and canoes 
which, without any extra charge, are always at the service of its guests. At the 
bottom end of the list are the ''water babies," tiny 30 pound canoes used on bea- 
ver dams and small adjacent lakes. Next come a dozen or so ordinary canoes; 
above them a few canoes specially fitted for four paddlers and a passenger. King 
of all is the huge Polypody (ask your classical or botanical friends what that means), 
carrying its load of ten paddlers and the steersman. 

In addition is a fine fleet of rowboats, made by the family — not heavy mill- 
pond tubs, but built on the Adirondack model, for lightness and speed. Some have 
one pair of oars, some have two pairs, and the great Tupper carries three oarsmen 
and six passengers. 

It's a great sight when ten or fifteen of these boats pull out from Camp for a 
day's trip. 

Letters of inquiry should be addressed to Other references 

Mrs. Bertha Brown Lambert (Bryn Mawr, 1904) MrS ' Anna "^t^n, PeinZ" MaW ' 1912) 

272 Park Avenue Dr Henry J Cadbury 

Takoma Park, D. C. (Head of Biblical Dept, Bryn Mawr) 

Haverford, Penna. 



Who is 
Kagawa? 

He is the outstand- 
ing Japanese Chris- 
tian in Asia.^What 
has he done? ^ 
Preached in the 
streets, lived in the 
slums, built schools 
and now is conduct- 
ing his "Million 
Souls for Jesus" 
campaign. 




Research. 



v°2 



*&> 



<?& 



\# 



cfc w 



It belongs to the literature both 
of power and knowledge; it 
might be called wisdom 
literature. — Galen M. 
Fisher, Executive 
Secretary, Institute 
of Social and 
Religious -^^^^ ^O^ 

. o* Every 
^S^ Christian 

should read his book for 
its inspirational message 
and its profound philoso- 
phy. ^ It is a challenge to 
try the Way of Love. ^ 
Kagawa's first book went 
through 180 editions in 
Japan ; now he has written 
for English readers his 
views of life and the world. 
At all bookstores. $2.00 



THE JOHN C. 
WINSTON COMPANY 

PHILADELPHIA 



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— | 


i i Low Rates — Low Cost^==sm 




y^^P^s. 




ADULT EDUCATION 


/Cf4^\\ 




POSTGRADUATE TRAVEL 


Jiv * '~ vVVj 




After college should come thoughtful 


gjg^l^L ""*" ^ */©*>■ \\ Afl 




travel pegging down the results of un- 


JbhH^^^ ' \ '%r 




dergraduate studies . . . not desultory 


m^.J^te 




wandering. 




Most discriminating travelers recognize 




the need of expert assistance in the me- 


^KL/gr/t W 




chanics of travel. Intellectual leadership 
is equally important. A tour of Europe 


^firf P 




intelligently planned and un d er the guid- 




ance of specialists will crystallize and 




supplement your entire college course. 


Your Baby 




The Bureau of University lr?vel, incor- 
porated as an educational institution 
without stock, dividends or commercial 


a/ou love your youngster, of 
<J course. You'd do anything 




profit, offers such an opportunity. 

The leaders are scholars and gentlemen 
who hold or have held important aca- 


in the world to see that your 




demic positions. 


baby gets the best of attention, 




Send for announcements. 


care and education. 




BUREAU OF UNIVERSITY TRAVEL 


Have you stopped to think that 
a few dollars a year invested in 
a Provident Mutual Policy will 
guarantee funds for care and 






126 BOYD STREET NEWTON, MASS. 










education in case you are called 








away by death ? 






Escondido 


This matter is worthy of your 








attention NOW. Send us the 








coupon. There is no obligation. 






Riding in the 


Your baby takes the risk 






New Mexico Rockies 


if you delay 






Motoring in the 


Provident Mutual 






Indian Country 


Life Insurance Company of Philadelphia 








Founded 1665 






JUNE 26 - AUGUST 6 


Paul Loder, Manager 








123 South Broad Street 






Trip for a Small Group 


Philadelphia, Pa. 






of College Girls 
Write for Booklet 


You may send me the facts about your 
Educational Plan, including rate at my 
age. 








AGATHE DEMING, Director 


Address 






924 West End Avenue 


Date of Birth 






New York City 







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X" 



/ 



& Imflian-delmiis 



3^ 



Mo»t distinctive 
motor cruise service 
in the world 



THE DE LUXE WAY— by Cadillac Harveycar — of visiting the hid- 
den primitive Spanish Missions, Old Mexican villages, colorful Indian 
pueblos, prehistoric cliff-dwellings and buried cities— all set in the match- 
less scenery and climate of the Southern Rockies. 

Service is the equivalent of motoring with the finest of private facilities. 
Specially equipped Cadillac Cruisers are used. Driver- mechanicians are 
Harvey trained, and a private courier accompanies each party, limited to 
four guests to a single car. 

The Frijoles-Puye Indian-detour 

Old Santa Fe with nights at unique 
TWO DAYS Ld Fonda. Primitive Mexican settle- 
FORTY m ents in Pojoaque Valle< 
DOLLARS 



Clara and San lldefonso Indian 
pueblos. Frijoles Canyon and the 
cliff-dwelling ruins of Puye. 



The Taos Indian-detour 

The Frijoles-Puye Indian-detour in 
THREE DAYS full, with luncheon under the Puye 
SIXTY-FIVE c ''^ s on second day — thence to 
DOLLARS Taos Indian pueblo, overnight at 
famous Taos town, and the Rio 
Grande gorge on the return. 




ferwvjom 



clip and mail 



The infiiridual rnte includes ereri/ expense en route 
— motor transport ation lug iiurrei/enr. vonrier serv- 
iee 9 meuls 9 hotel uecommodntions with both. 

There are a score of other Indian-detours, formerly 
known as Ilarvoycar Motor Cruises, to every onf-of- 
tho-way corner of New Mexico and Arizona. 

A Day in Old Santa Fe 
24-hours, train to train, Tesuque Indian pueblo and 60 miles by Harvey- 
coach. $12.50 all-inclusive. 
Eastbound or westbound, these distinctively new Indian-detours will com- 
mence and end at Lamy. New Mexico, on your Santa Fe way to California. 



HARVEYCAR INDIAN-DETOURS, Santa Fe, New Mexico 

Please send free copy of Indian-detours booklet and map. 

Name Address 



Kindly mention Bryn Mawr Bulletin 




The Brook which Meanders through Just-Star-Dust's Fields and Woodlands 

Where Children Shine 

On the Rhode Island Seashore at Matunuck 
Twenty Miles East of Watch Hill 

Girls 8 to 16 Years Counselored Girls 16 Years and Over Chaperone 

Rhythmic Dancing — Guarded Surf Bathing — Horseback Riding 

The Play Spirit — Wise Supervision — Simplicity of Living 

Private Beach — Woods — Fields — Ponds — Streams 

Outdoor Life — Recreational Facilities 

Also the Comet's Tail Farm for Boys, Green Hill, Rhode Island 

Terms by Season or Week Send for Camp Booklets 

Director Mrs. Leonard Sanford Tyler (Alice Jaynes, Bryn Mawr, B. A.) 

Associate Director Mrs. Robert Flaherty (Frances Hubbard, Bryn Mawr, B. A.) 

34 Edgehill Road, New Haven, Connecticut 



BRYN MAWR 
ALUMNAE 
BULLETIN 




THE JUNIOR YEAR IN FRANCE 



June, 1930 



Vol. X 



No. 6 



Entered as second-class matter, January 15, 1921, at the Post Office, Phila., Pa., under Act of March 3, 1879 

COPYRIGHT, 1930 

ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 



OFFICERS OF THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

EXECUTIVE BOARD 

President Anne Kiddkk Wilson, 1903 

Vice-President Mary Hardy, 1920 

Recording Secretary Gertrude Hearne Myers, 1919 

Corresponding Secretary May Egan Stokes, 1911 

Treasurer Margaret E. Brusstar, 1903 

Chairman of the Finance Committee Caroline Florence Lexow, 1908 

Chairman of the Publicity Committee Caroline Morrow Chadwick-Collins, 1905 

ALUMNAE SECRETARY AND BUSINESS MANAGER OF THE BULLETIN 

Alice M. Hawkins, 1907 

EDITOR OF THE BULLETIN 

Marjorie L. Thompson, 1912 

DISTRICT COUNCILLORS 

District 1 Helen Evans Lewis, 1913 

District II Jeanne Kerr Fleischmann, 1910 

District III Alletta Van Reypen Korff, 1900 

District IV Katharine Holliday Daniels, 1918 

District V Isabel Lynde Dammann, 1905 

District VI Edna Warkentin Alden, 1900 

District VII Helen Brayton Barendt, 1903 

ALUMNAE DIRECTORS 

Frances Fincke Hand, 1897 Margaret Reeve Cary, 1907 

Mary Peirce, 1912 Elizabeth Lewis Otey, 1901 

Virginia Kneeland Frantz, 1918 

CHAIRMAN OF THE ALUMNAE FUND 

Caroline Florence Lexow, 1908 

CHAIRMAN OF THE ACADEMIC COMMITTEE 

Pauline Goldmark, 1896 

VAN OF THE SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOAN FUND COMMITTEE 

Margaret Gilman, 1919 

OF THE COMMITTEE ON HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Dr. Marjorie F. Murray, 1913 

CHAIRMAN OF THE NOMINATING COMMITTEE 

Eleanor Little Aldrich, 1905 



R-DUST 

.ren Shine 
Seashore at Matunuck 
east of Watch Hill 

rid Surf Bathing 
oing Horseback Riding 

GIRLS 

_/Ounselored 16 and over Chaperoned 

TERMS BY SEASON OR WEEK 

Send for booklet 

Director, Mrs. Leonard Sanford Tyler, Biyn Mawr, B.A. 

Associate Director, Mrs. Robt. Flaherty, Bryn Mawr, B.A. 

34 Edgehill Road, New Haven. Conn. 



Katharine Gibbs 

A school of unusual character with a distinctive 
purpose for educated women 
SECRETARIAL EXECUTIVE ACADEMIC 



NEW YORK 

247 Park Avenue 

Resident and 

Day 

BOSTON 

90MarlboroStreet 

Resident and 

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155 Angell Street 



For College Women in addition 
to Special Course. Selected sub- 
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positions. Separate class- 
rooms and special instructors. 
One-year Course includes tech- 
nical and broad businesstrain- 
ing preparing for positions of 
a preferred character. 
Two-year Course for prepara- 
tory and high school gradu- 
ates. First year includes six 
college subjects. Second year 
intensive secretarial training. 
For Catalogue address Director , College Department 



COMET'S TAIL FARM FOR BOYS 

Ages 9 to 16 

At Green Hill, Rhode Island 

Sixteen miles east of Watch Hill 

One hundred and twenty-five Acres of Fields, Woods, 
Meadows, dotted with Fresh Water Ponds and 
Streams, and bordering on Ninigret Salt Pond, with 
access to Beach. 
With parent's consent every boy will be given 

eld '';uy '..'.nut nit I'ninv in a\ ia( ion at I lie < 'hai i<\-- 

town Aviation School. 

Swimming, Boating, Fishing, Crabbing, Camping, 

Archery, Nature Study, Bird Banding, Sports. 

Horseback riding optional 

TERMS BY WEEK OR SEASON 

Send for booklet 
Director, Mrs. Leonard Sanford Tyler, Bryn Mawr, B.A. 
Associate Director, Mrs. Robt. Flaherty, Bryn Mawr, B.A. 

34 Edgehill Road, New Haven, Conn. 



THE 

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For Insurances on Lives and 
Granting Annuities 

TRUST AND SAFE DEPOSIT 
COMPANY 

Over a Century of Service 

C. S. W. PACKARD, President 

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Kindly mention Bryn Mawb Bulletin 



Bryn Mawr Alumnae 
Bulletin 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF 
THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNA ASSOCIATION 

Marjorie L. Thompson, '12, Editor 
Alice M. Hawkins, '07, Business Manager 

EDITORIAL BOARD 
Mary Crawford Dudley, '96 Emily Kimbrough Wrench, '21 

Caroline Morrow Chadwick-Collins, '05 Ellenor Morris, '27 

Emily Fox Cheston, '08 Elinor B. Amram, '28 

Anne Kidder Wilson, '03, ex-officio 

Subscription Price, $1.50 a Year Single Copies, 25 Cents 

Checks should be drawn to the order of Bryn Mawr Alumnae Bulletin 

Published monthly, except August, September and October, at 1006 Arch St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Vol. X JUNE, 1930 No. 6 

The average undergraduate, and, I dare say, the average alumna is most loyal 
to her college. She and her fellow students are, or were, mostly Americans of 
American-born parents. We forget, for the moment, the exact figures on this point 
for President Park's fall presentation of vital statistics is too far away, lost in the 
cloudy remembrance of the season of mists and mellow fruitfulness. Certain it is 
that Bryn Mawr is an American college, that its student body is composed primarily 
of Americans and that its attitude in every-day matters is an American attitude. But, 
in spite of our fundamental Americanism, — a term by the way as variable in meaning 
as may suit the fancy of its commonly oratorical user, — we of Bryn Mawr endeavor 
to keep informed of what is going on in the world, even though our little campus 
world is closely bounded by its ivied walls. Among the reasons for what we may 
hope is our freedom from provincialism is the fact that we come from different home 
towns, from different states, and a few of us even from different lands. It is par- 
ticularly the presence among us of students from foreign countries who jog us into an 
awareness that ours is not the only world of thought, the only language, the only na- 
tional point of view, that "God's own country" stretches far beyond our national 
boundaries, even to the uttermost ends of Cathay. And in the last few years we have 
been brave enough to send our own students forth, even while still undergraduates, 
into at least one foreign land and they return to us after their year abroad enriched by 
contact with other worlds of thought and life. 

"Hands across the sea" has become a hackneyed phrase, yet, as with most phrases 
often in the public mind, it has changed from its original meaning. No longer does 
it signify mere Anglo-American alliance. There is the hope in it of something of 
greater significance. Bryn Mawr is a very small state indeed, yet she too has felt 
the world pull for common effort towards a great common purpose and she endeavors 
to cultivate in her children an open mind and a friendly sympathetic feeling toward 
all the world and its affairs. 

This seems a rather formal and perhaps over solemn introduction to the articles 
in this number of the Bulletin. But it can do no harm surely, to remind ourselves, 



2 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

even solemnly, that Montgomery County is not the centre of the Alumnae conscious- 
ness. In one of these articles we are looked at curiously by eyes not so accustomed 
to what we blandly take for granted, and we in turn in another of them venture out 
and look with eager curiosity at education in another land. Curiosity may have killed 
the cat, but any professor will tell you that it is the surest sign of mental alertness. 

E. B. A. 



JUNIOR YEAR ABROAD 

The idea of spending one's junior year in France and getting full credit for it 
at Bryn Mawr is captivating. However, no one wishes to decide so important a 
question without first weighing all the pros and cons. Our class was the first one 
to be given this delightful opportunity, and about April, those girls whom the college 
regarded as capable, were notified that they might go abroad if they wished. We 
were seven in number, and all of us reacted to this offer in different ways. Several 
knew that, for one reason or another, they could not go. Several had already decided 
to go. I was completely undecided up to the very last moment, but in the end I went. 
Never have I once regretted my decision; on the contrary, that year I spent abroad has 
been one of the greatest experiences of my life. For the benefit of those who are 
interested in this plan, I should like to state a few of the problems that confronted me 
and explain why I believe the year abroad to be so advantageous. 

All my life I have been interested in French, and when I first was told that I 
might go abroad, I was thrilled. Thinking it over, however, I didn't think that 1 
ought to leave my family for a whole year, since the plan included three months at 
Nancy and nine at Paris. Moreover this plan did not appeal particularly to my 
family. They told me that, as I had already been in Europe several times, I knew 
Paris pretty well, and that if I wanted to know it better, I could go after graduation 
and stay as long as I liked. I should then be free to travel and to study as I chose. 
After carefully considering this idea, I rejected it, because I knew that no matter 
how hard I tried I would not get as much out of my life there later, either socially or 
academically. My friends would always be turning up, and I would probably find 
myself speaking English more than half the time, and my studies would undoubtedly 
be left by the wayside. And so, as it had been left to me to make the final decision, 
I resolved to go. 

The tenth of July I met in New York the other boys and girls who were to 
make up the sixth Delaware Foreign Study Group. We numbered sixty-seven, 
and about all of us sailed July 12th on the S. S. Rochambeau, as had previously been 
arranged. Nine days later we landed at Havre, where we were met by Mr. Brinton 
who heads the group abroad, and by Miss Louise Dillingham, his assistant, who by 
the way is a Bryn Mawr graduate. I remember that we didn't reach Paris until 
quite late that night, and we were immediately taken to a small hotel on the left bank. 
Then we went to Nancy where we were placed in private families. As most of the 
people leave Nancy for the summer months, the group usually has some trouble in 
finding a sufficient number of right families in which to place the students. Con- 
sequently "pensions" have occasionally to be resorted to, and frequently two students 






BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 3 

who might prefer to be alone, have to be put together. In the end, however, every- 
thing is usually arranged satisfactorily for all concerned. 

We had classes in the morning at the Universite de Nancy from 8:30-12. Then 
in the afternoon, we each had a private lesson in conversation and diction, which 
lasted an hour. Next year the plan is to be altered somewhat in order to allow 
the more advanced students to follow the regular summer courses given at the 
University, and not just those of the Delaware group. This system will be much 
better, for it will allow the Americans to come into contact with men and women 
of all nationalities, thus affording them many interesting opportunities. 

In such a highly centralized country as France, where everything radiates from 
Paris, all provincial towns are bound to be very narrow-minded and countrified. 
Nancy is exceptionally so, for the people of Lorraine consider themselves quite "elite." 
They are the Bostonians of France. I do not mean this as a thrust either at Boston 
or at Nancy, but both of these cities have traditions and customs that are so old, 
that the people have unconsciously been affected by them, and only strangers can 
see it. However, a stay in such a provincial town as Nancy is by no means unprofit- 
able. The town itself has some beautiful squares, and boasts of not a few historical 
spots. Beautiful trips can be taken from there, and one that I recommend highly 
is that to Domremy. When one sees that glorious spot, one no longer wonders that 
Jeanne heard voices, it is all so beautiful. And, marvelous to say, tourists have not 
yet spoiled it. For amusements there are tennis, swimming, bicycling, and I even 
heard rumors about the construction of a golf course. But in spite of these distrac- 
tions, one needs, by the middle of the summer term, a real vacation. So w T e w r ere 
taken on a trip to Grenoble, Mont Blanc, and Geneva. Of course those are only 
the main places we visited. The nice thing about it all was that we were not herded 
around like cattle. Mr. Brinton and Miss Dillingham expected us to be able to look 
out for ourselves, and while they saw to the tickets and arranged about the trans- 
portation, we were allowed to do what we pleased in each city, and to go with the 
group or not as we chose. Moreover, the hotels we stopped at were always very 
comfortable and thoroughly good. 

After the rest of a week or more, we were better fitted to bear up under the 
strain of the rest of the summer, and at the end of the term we had another vacation 
of about three or four days when we could do what we wanted. If our parents were 
willing to let us travel alone, w r e could go wherever we wished, provided, of course, 
that we told Mr. Brinton or Miss Dillingham our plans. Having this written per- 
mission from our families, another girl and I went to Strasbourg and then on into 
Germany where we had some extremely amusing times struggling to make ourselves 
understood. This I am sure is to be explained by the fact that I had not then taken 
my German oral. 

It was toward the first of November when the weather at Nancy was frigid, 
that we left for Paris. All of us were glad, for after all Paris was our goal and 
the three months spent at Nancy had been merely preparatory for the wonderful 
winter to follow. We already knew the names of the people with whom we were 
to stay and they all were so nice that when Miss Dillingham introduced us to our 
new "families," we felt right at home almost immediately. Of course, as it is bound 
to happen, some of the girls and boys did not like or did not get on very well with 
the French families where they were first put. These were immediately placed else- 



4 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

where, until every one was, as far as possible, satisfied. We spent some time getting 
settled and orientated in our new quarters, as we had several days before classes began. 

I should have said to begin with that the group was divided into two sections, 
according to the ability of the students: the Groupe Superieur and the Groupe Moy- 
en. Those in the first section were allowed to take the " cours de faculte" which are 
the regular courses at the Sorbonne taken by the French students in order to get their 
"licence." This is a degree that comes between our A.B. and M.A., I should say. 
The other courses that everyone could take were the "cours de civilisation" which are 
courses for strangers only. Needless to say, the former are much more interesting, 
although several of the latter are well worth taking. I should like to recommend 
the course in French history of art given by M. Schneider as well as that on the 
literature of middle ages given by M. Chamard. These civilization courses come three 
times a week, and are therefore worth more in points than the faculty ones which 
are only held once a week. It is in the latter, nevertheless, that one really learns 
the French methods. To get any seat at all, one often has to wait outside the 
amphitheatre for at least half an hour before the lecture is to begin, as the doors are 
only opened about ten minutes before the appointed hour. But just having a seat 
is hardly sufficient, as the professor really lectures only to the first ten rows or so, 
and only down front is there a convenient place to write. So when the attendant 
finally opens the doors, there is a terrific shove, and, when once safely inside, a great 
scramble for front seats. Sometimes some obliging student will save a whole row 
for his friends. Naturally the better the professor is liked, the greater the throng 
and the stronger the shoving. Once, when M. Maurois spoke in a course given by 
M. Strowski, so terribly did the students push trying to get through the narrow 
door, that they almost broke it down. And the students who got there only fifteen 
minutes late couldn't get into' the amphitheatre at all. That is part of the fun of 
these lectures, which are in themselves far from dull. They generally inspire one to 
tremendous individual efforts, which one does or does not complete. It is literally 
impossible to do all the reading suggested, but so much is mentioned that one can 
pick and choose according to one's temperament. The examinations are both written 
and oral. The written ones are given first and consist of a theme on one very 
general subject. If these are passed — and the passing grade is what we would call 
fifty — one takes the orals. Here the student is questioned in the details of the course. 

We didn't, however, go to Paris only to study. We went to find out as much 
as we could and to understand as well as possible, the French people, their ways of 
thinking, and their life in general. In this, I think, we succeeded pretty well. At 
least we discovered how little the tourist does know of those things, and how much 
we still had to learn — which, in itself, is a great step forward. Of course we all 
went about it in different ways. I became a real member of the family with whom 
I was living, and the little girl, aged nine, considered me as her elder sister. Then 
I made other French friends, and went as often as possible to the theatre. Contrary 
to the general opinion about a large group and to what I myself expected, the chaperon- 
age rules were not very strict. As a matter of fact we reduced their severity a great 
deal, and I presume that, as the French girls emancipate themselves, the American 
students need not fear shocking their hostesses, should they be living with slightly 
old-fashioned people. We were allowed to go out two by two in the evening, either 
two girls or a boy and a girl of the group. 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 5 

In this way we acquired a knowledge of France, as well as a new view of the 
United States. This was given us not only by the foreigners with whom we came 
in contact, but also to a certain extent, by the other members of the group who came 
from twenty-eight different universities and colleges all over the country — from Wel- 
lesley, Cornell, Michigan, Vassar, Wisconsin and other colleges. Smith is the only 
college which has its own group, as the others join the Delaware Foreign Study plan, 
which makes it all the more interesting. 

When the time finally came for us to return home, it was with great sorrow that 
we did so. We brought back with us, however, to the various corners of America, 
a new conception of France, and a great liking for the French people. If a group 
such as the Delaware one could be enlarged, and an exchange of students provided for, 
it would be a tremendous factor in the elimination of any misunderstanding between 
these two nations. 

As for our attitude toward our last year of college — well, we resumed our life 
there, as though it had never been interrupted. Bryn Mawr is small enough so that 
being away a year makes no difference in regard to one's friends. One knows almost 
everyone anyway. Moreover, practically the only change that could be seen in us 
was the more mature judgment we had acquired. I am sure that all of us loved 
the year abroad and that all are strong advocates of the Delaware Foreign Study plan. 

Louise E. Littlehale, 1930. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

The following awards, made by the American Council of learned Societies are 
of especial interest to Bryn Mawr: 

Melvin, Margaret Georgiana, Ph.D., 1921, Associate Professor of Philosophy, 
Mills College, was awarded a Fellowship for studies in English empiricism, at Har- 
vard and Oxford. Grants were given to a present and to a former member of the 
Faculty: to Joseph E. Gillet, Professor of Spanish, Bryn Mawr College, for an 
edition of Bartholome de Torres Naharro; and to Arthur L. Wheeler, Professor of 
Latin, Princeton University, for photographs of Mss. of Plautus. 

The following alumnae were also given grants : Louise E. Brown, Associate 
Professor of History, Vassar College, for a study of the ideas of the first Earl of 
Shaftesbury; Bertha H. Putnam, Professor of History, Mount Holyoke College, for 
a study of proceedings before justices of the peace, 1327-1485; Edith Marion Smith, 
1918, Professor of Greek and Latin, Hollins College, for a study of the relations 
of the Phocean colony Massilia with the peoples of Gaul; and Charlotte D'Evelyn, 
Ph.D., 1917, Associate Professor of English Literature, Mount Holyoke College, 
for an edition of Peter Idle's Instructions to His Son. 



THE FLEXNER LECTURER FOR 1930-31 

Bryn Mawr has been fortunate in securing as Lecturer on the Flexner Founda- 
tion for 1930-31 one of the most delightful, as well as one of the most distinguished 
of French scholars and teachers, Mr. Paul Hazard, professor at the College de France. 
He has announced as his subject, "L'evolution de la poesie franchise, de 1815 a 1914." 

Mr. Hazard's special field is comparative literature, which he has himself defined 
as "1' effort de saisir les echanges intellectuels qui s'operent entre les peuples." His 
thesis was on La Revolution frangaise et les lettres italiennes, and he rapidly became 
one of the leaders in the field. In 1921, with Mr. Fernand Baldensperger, he founded 
the Revue de litterature comparee, with its accompanying Bibliotheque, to which schol- 
ars from all parts of the world are contributors. His Vie de Stendhal has been trans- 
lated into English and widely read in England and America. He is joint editor, with 
Mr. Joseph Bedier, of the Histoire illustree de Id litterature frangaise. In 1927 the 
French Academy awarded him the Grand Prix Broquette-Gonin "pour 1' ensemble de 
ses oeuvres." 

In speaking of his teaching Mr. Hazard once said that if he were to write a 
book on pedagogy he would include a chapter entitled "De l'influence des eleves sur 
le professeur." In his teaching he has added to the charm and vividness of his pres- 
entation of carefully documented material, a most lively and generous interest in his 
students and their work. To foreign students especially his kindness has been un- 
bounded. His teaching at the University of Lyons was interrupted by the war, in 
which he won the Croix de Guerre, with the citation, "Officier de haute valeur intel- 
leetuelle et morale qui a rendu de brillants services. . . . Plein d'entrain et anime d'un 
sentiment du devoir tres eleve, s'est a maintes reprises offert spontanement pour ac- 
complir des missions dangereuses en premiere ligne." At the close of the war he was 
appointed to the Sorbonne where bis class-rooms were filled to overflowing with en- 
thusiastic students In 1925 he was called to the College de France — the highest 
honour which can come to a French professor. He has already been . exchange pro- 
fessor in America, at Harvard, Columbia and the University of Chicago. 

In writing to Miss Schenck about the Bryn Mawr plans, Mr. Hazard says: 
"Parlons du grand projet. Je resterai done a Bryn Mawr du 6 octobre au 7 novem- 
bre, voila qui est parfait. Un cours public de dix lecons — e'est entendu; a publier 
par la Flexner Foundation. Je vous proposais comme sujet: L'evolution de la poesie 
frangaise, de 1815 a 1914. Vous me demandez, d'autre part, si je veux, une fois 
par semaine, rencontrer un groupe de graduate students, avec lesquelles vous contin- 
uerez ensuite un cours sur les theories du romantisme frangais: bien volontiers! Je 
pourrais leur faire, par exemple, cinq lemons sur le preromantisme; qu'en diriez-vous? 
Enfin je compte bien etre, au moins un jour par semaine, a la disposition de celles qui 
voudraient me consulter individuellement, sur tout sujet qui les interesserait. . . . Tout 
ce que je demande e'est de servir de mon mieux Bryn Mawr." 



(6) 



THE PAUL HAZARD SCHOLARSHIPS 

Through the kindness of members of the Alumnae Association two special gradu- 
ate scholarships have been given to the French Department in honor of Mr. Hazard's 
visit, to be known as Paul Hazard Scholarships. Miss Schenck wrote to Mr. Hazard 
asking if he would permit his name to be used, and he sent the delightful reply: "Si 
je le permets! Mais j'en suis ravi ; et j'en suis fier." These scholarships have been 
awarded to Edna Fredrick, A.B. Mount Holyoke 1927, and to Lena Lois Mandell, 
A.B. Boston University 1928. Both Miss Fredrick and Miss Mandell have been 
scholar in French at Bryn Mawr this year. Both are candidates for the degree of 
Doctor of Philosophy. Miss Fredrick's undergraduate French was done at Mount 
Holyoke under Professor Helen Patch, Ph.D. Bryn Mawr 1921, who was the first 
Bryn Mawr student to study under Mr. Hazard in Paris. 



MAY DAY ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Little May Day was celebrated with the traditional songs and Maypole dances, 
and Agnes Howell, President of the Senior Class, was crowned Queen of the May. 
Among the announcements made in chapel that morning the following will be of 
especial interest to alumnae. The Resident Fellowship in Archaeology has been 
awarded to Mary Zelia Pease, 1927, daughter of Laurette Potts Pease, 1894. Miss 
Pease has already done distinguished work in her field while she has been working 
as a Fellow at the American School of Classical Studies in Athens. The Resident 
Fellowship in Geology ihas been awarded to Dorothy Wyckoff, 1921, former holder 
of the Workman Fellowship, and now Fellow of the American Scandinavian Foun- 
dation at Oslo. Graduate Scholarships have been granted to Agnes Lake, 1930, in 
the Department of Biblical Literature, and to Anne Nicholson, 1930, in the Depart- 
ment of Physics. 

Eleanor Renner, 1932, was awarded the James E. Rhoads Junior Scholarship, 
and Cecelia Candee, 1933, holder of the Regional Scholarship from District V., is 
to hold the Rhoads Sophomore Scholarship. In general the Regional Scholars estab- 
lished excellent records, many of them winning additional scholarships. These include 
Elizabeth Sixt, 1933, of Cleveland and Alice Brues, 1933, of New England, who have 
each won a Maria Hopper Scholarship; Jeannette Le Saulnier, 1933, of Indianapolis, 
who has been given both a Bookshop Scholarship and the Hayt Award; Felicitas de 
Varon, 1933, of New England, who has been awarded the Longstreth Scholarship' ; 
Lucy Sanborn, 1932, of New England, who is to hold the Hallowell Scholarship; 
Alice Rider, 1932, of New England, winner of the Durfee Scholarship; Margaret 
Bradley, 1932, from District V., who has been awarded the Hopkins Music Scholar- 
ship; Celia Darlington, 1931, (daughter of Rebecca Mattson, 1896), who has been 
awarded the Kilroy Scholarship in English; Frances Tatnall, 1931, (daughter of 
Frances Swift Tatnall, 1895), who is to hold the White Memorial Scholarship. 

Louise Estterley, 1933, (daughter of Elizabeth Norcross, 1897), has been awarded 
a special scholarship given by the Class of 1897. Eleanor Chalfant, 1933, Regional 
Scholar from Pittsburgh, has been given the Minnie Murdoch Kendrick Memorial 
Scholarship. Miss Chalfant is the daughter of Minnie List Chalfant, 1907, who was 
the first holder of the Kendrick Scholarship. 

(7) 



BRYN MAWR AS SEEN BY AN ITALIAN 

Extracts from Arnaldo Fraccaroli's New York-Cidone di Genti (Milano, Treves, 1928) 
translated by Elizabeth Perkins '30 with the cooperation of Dr. C. P. Merlino of the Faculty. — 
Signor Fraccaroli is an Italian journalist who visited the United States a few years ago and 
shortly after recorded his impressions in the above-mentioned book. The following passages 
are taken from the chapter entitled "American Girls." 

Bryn Mawr. 

I suppose you will ask: what is Bryn Mawr? It is a most curious little city 
among the hills of Pennsylvania near Philadelphia, amid gardens, fields, and woods; 
with massive buildings that look like castles ; with graceful country estates and cottages 
made lovely by climbing rose vines; with dignified cloisters and beautiful walks, and 
a huge archway which recalls the portals of an ancient town, — and flowers every- 
where. 

The inhabitants of this little city are the most delightful imaginable. They are 
all young ladies between the ages of sixteen and twenty, at most twenty-two. And 
they are all charming. Those not so, if there are any, must live a retired life, for 
they are not to be seen. 

Lightly clad according to the dictates of a fashion which finds an ally in the 
dolce stagione, their little legs in evidence, their hair to the wind. . . . youthful 
faces brightened by ready smiles. . . . they stroll about in groups or stretch themselves 
out on the grass to enjoy the caressing warmth of the sun. Some disappear in the 
hall of some building; others are seen among the slender columns of the cloister; still 
others are sitting on the benches with open books and there comes one on a bicycle. . . . 

Five or six dressed in male attire go by: light blouse, soft collar with a man's 
tie, and bloomers. They are going to a field where other young ladies are playing 
tennis. Nearby, basket-ball is being played. The game is noisy and exciting and 
all round friends spur the players on by comic songs with happy rhythms. 

And what about that building not far away? 

Entering this curious city with its austere archway, I left behind my. discretion 
which would have embarrassed me by blocking the way to my curiosity. I thus enter 
everywhere, led by a warden who is kind and blonde. . . . gentlemen prefer blondes 
.... who smiles at every question of mine. She smiles but answers. 

We enter a large hall with beautiful divans, most comfortable leather easy-chairs, 
little tables, a picture or two, and spotless curtains hung from high and narrow win- 
dows. The young ladies are sitting down or are stretched out or crouched in such 
a position as to make an artist fall in love. . . . Some are reading and smoking; others 
are drinking tea and smoking or simply chattering and smoking; still others are 
sitting alone thinking and dreaming and smoking. Smoking is the symphonic theme; 
the rest are variations. 

The smiling warden accompanies me to a corridor and opens a door. Within 
are two young ladies munching sweets. They laugh, the warden laughs, and they 
invite us to join in the assault on the sweets. The cella is a rather large room, 
furnished with taste and embellished with a thousand little personal things belonging 
to the occupants: little pictures, photographs, a Japanese kimono nailed on the wall 
with wings opened out like those of a butterfly; multicolored cushions on the bed, 
which serves by day as a couch, three big funny rag dolls, two large chairs with the 

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BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 9 

backs varnished in colors, a banjo hanging from the wall, flower pots on the window- 
sill and between them luscious apples and oranges from California. 

In one little apartment we run into a reception. A phonograph serves as the 
jazz band. Girls in couples are dancing, rubbing against one another in the narrow 
quarters. Now and then they stop; a cookie, a sip of tea. From below come the 
joyous shouts from the girls who were not invited and who are protesting. The 
hostess then takes a handful of almonds and sweets, goes to the window and throws 
them down to the crowd. The rebels below laugh and express their thanks and the 
rebellion is quieted. 

I forgot to say that Bryn Mawr is a college: Bryn Mawr College. ... A uni- 
versity for young women, one of the most important as well as aristocratic in the 
United States. It is not one of the largest, for there are others which have two 
thousand students and even more, and Bryn Mawr has only four hundred and fifty. 
But it is one of the most characteristic. 

We have just seen it in the afternoon hours, a time of rest and recreation. But 
in the morning one studies hard and seriously. 

On the day before, I had the organization of the College explained to me by 
the President Emerita. Miss M. Carey Thomas, Ph.D., L.L.D., L.H.D. (letters 
which may be puzzling to the uninitiated, but which are of the greatest importance 
for they indicate academic degrees), an impressive lady with white hair, most in- 
telligent eyes and quick and exact of speech. With that expression of cheerful gra- 
ciousness which is common to many American women, she told me the history and 
characteristics of the institution. . . . 

In America, many universities do not accept women, and he (the founder) 
wanted to establish one expressly for them. In the course of time the "University" 
has developed so as to become a little city. And it has established for itself a great 
renown. 

One feature of modern education, especially in America, is to have the students 
specialize in a single subject. Very proficient in this, they are completely ignorant 
of anything else. . . . Bryn Mawr is opposed to this system. The students do spe- 
cialize in the field of their choice, but they must also have notions of other subjects. 
The plan of study is so arranged that two-thirds of the scholastic year are given over 
to the chosen field, the other third to other studies. . . . Much attention is given to 
athletics, but not to the point that they are allowed to interfere with intellectual 
development. Indeed, athletics are intended to aid this. Sports serve as a generator; 
they furnish every day the energy to be used in study. 

The teaching is done so as to make study pleasant. In many school systems 
(we also are acquainted with some, alas) study is inflicted as a punishment. Here 
it is sought to make it a joy, to inspire in the girls a passion for knowledge and 
culture. 

In these schools of higher learning, an effort is also made to encourage scholarly 
investigations. But the primary aim is to equip woman for life. The ideal of the 
American woman is to be sufficient unto herself, to be independent. Very few of 
these four hundred and fifty girls need to earn their livelihood but they all want to 
know. Later when launched into life they do not want to be inferior to men. A 
large measure of the disinvoltura of the American women is due to this ideal which 
is instilled in them from childhood. 



10 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

Study hours alternate with play hours, with athletic exercises and dancing. The 
discipline may seem to be a little elastic, for the girls enjoy an unusual degree of 
freedom. But every young woman is held responsible for herself. Now don't com- 
ment maliciously. Here it is believed that the consciousness of one's personal liberty 
will act as a restraint. 

Thus there is no real supervision. The students may go out freely, alone, to go 
to the theatre in the neighboring city, stay out until ten o'clock at night (after that 
they must be accompanied). They may receive guests in special rooms (there is a 
room called sola dei fidanzati, but young men may be seen in others) ; they dress 
as they please and spend as much as they please. They stay here four years. Occa- 
sionally, before the end of this period, some one graduates from philology into mar- 
riage, but later nearly always returns to see her friends and the College, because they 
become attached to it. 

What surprises a foreign visitor most is the complete freedom granted the young 
ladies. But American women see no reason why in a College they should have less 
freedom than at home; and at home they have absolute freedom. Then we must 
also remember that there is being prepared the tlpo of the American woman; and 
since the national trait of the feminine product is freedom, the tipo must be fash- 
ioned after that ideal. 



THE SEVEN WOMEN'S COLLEGES 

The May number of The Woman s Journal carried an article by Jeanette Eaton, 
whose series on the Seven Colleges in Pictorial Review has just been concluded. This 
article in The Woman's Journal is titled, "Chats on the Campuses of Seven Leading 
Eastern Colleges Reveal a New Model of Student Combines Feminine Charm With 
Real Respect and Desire for Learning." In the Review of Reviews for June is a 
discussion of the College Girl and the Department Store. 



EVIDENCE 

(Reprinted from The Lantern) 
Anne Burnett, '32 

Susan, see the cherry tree 
Popcorn-pink beyond the brook! 
Susan, look! 

Near that bunch of blossoms, see, 
The grackle contemplates a hymn, 
And on that limb, 

Over the bush of bayberry, 
An oriole's about to sing. 
Susan, it's spring! 

(Miss Burnett is a Regional Scholar from District VI.) 



ALUMNAE DIRECTOR 

The Executive Board takes pleasure in announcing that Virginia McKenney 
Claiborne (Mrs. Robert Watson Claiborne), 1908, of Connecticut, has been nom- 
inated to the Board of Directors of the College for the term of years 1930-1935. 

Mrs. Claiborne was born in 1887 in Petersburg, Virginia. She was prepared 
at the Southern College, Petersburg, and took her degree at Bryn Mawr in 1908, 
majoring in History and Economics. For seven years she worked without salary on 
various educational endeavors in Virginia, promoting in the Legislature and through- 
out the state measures to improve the Public Schools, especially the rural schools, and 
helping to lead a six-year legislative battle to admit women to the University of 
Virginia, resulting in 1917 in admission of women to the Graduate and Professional 
Schools. In 1914 she joined Dr. Orie Latham Hatcher (head of the Department of 
Comparative Literature at Bryn Mawr) in founding the Southern Women's Educa- 
tional Alliance, and has been a member of the Executive Committee ever since. 

Since marrying Robert W. Claiborne in 1918, she has lived chiefly in and near 
New York. She has a son, eleven, and a daughter, six. Her first work on a pro- 
fessional basis was during the 1920 Bryn Mawr Endowment Campaign where she 
filled a place unexpectedly vacant. Ever since she has worked in money raising and 
in general educational promotion, being for the past ten years Organization Secretary 
of the Vocational Service for Juniors. This organization demonstrates to the adoles- 
cent boy and girl the value of a wise choice of high school courses and of future work 
by means of vocational counselling, a model employment bureau, and high school 
Scholarships, its secretary's job being anything from collecting the budget to lobbying 
in Albany. 

During these past ten years her active association with the Southern Women's 
Educational Alliance in its work to help Southern girls find themselves in the changing 
condition of modern life, and the education of her own children have completed her 
chain of educational contacts from nursery school through college. 

Since last September her professional time has been divided between the Voca- 
tional Service and the Alliance, which after five years of research is launching a dem- 
onstration in rural, educational and vocational guidance. Co-operation with her 
husband in furthering a new type of musical education has brought numerous contacts 
with private schools and their problems during the last five years. 

She has served on the Nominating Committee of the Alumnae Association, and 
is at present a member of the Academic Committee. 



NEXT COUNCIL MEETING 

The next meeting of the Alumnae Council will be held in Indianapolis on 
November 11th, 12th and 13th. Katharine Holliday Daniels, 1918, (Mrs. Joseph 
J. Daniels), Councillor for District IV., will be in charge. 

(ID 



MEETING OF AMERICAN ALUMNI COUNCIL 

During the first three days of May, the seventeenth annual conference of the 
American Alumni Council was held at Amherst, Massachusetts. Amherst, Mount 
Holyoke, Smith, and Massachusetts Agricultural College acted as hosts to more than 
two hundred delegates from the executive offices of the alumni organizations of the 
American colleges and universities. (Almost every state in the Union was repre- 
sented, as well as several of the Canadian provinces.) State universities, privately 
endowed colleges, sectarian institutions — every variety, large or small, young or old, 
co-educational or carefully segregated — all had members there, and so well was the 
program planned that each person could select the sessions suited to the needs of his 
own Alma Mater. 

In addition to the many reports and discussions on such vital matters as Alumni 
Funds, Alumni Magazines, and Alumni Organizations, made by veterans in these 
fields, a perfect galaxy of College Presidents made (during the course of the confer- 
ence) a series of remarkably stirring speeches, all dealing with the relation of the 
alumni to the college, and all treating the subject from different angles. Mr. John 
McKee of Wooster, President of the Council, in his opening address struck the key- 
note of the conference by saying that the alumni program without a definite relation 
to the College is now definitely outmoded, and that the officers of both organizations 
realize that the best results can be obtained only by "a mutual belief in their common 
good." He was succeeded by Mr. Lucius Eastman, President of the Amherst Alumni 
Association, an internationally known economist, at present working on the Repara- 
tions problem for the League of Nations. He spoke of the present weariness and 
distrust in Europe of organizations, and made a strong plea that alumni associations 
would avoid some of the many pitfalls. Realizing that the American colleges have 
in the watchful interest of their alumni a problem new to the scholastic world, he 
urged the Alumni Council to consider its great work to be the endeavor to make this 
emotional loyalty intelligent. President Hopkins of Dartmouth concluded the first 
session by a really thrilling speech, which followed Mr. Eastman's line of thought. 
He said that if the alumni are not working with a college, this may be taken as a 
sign that the college has been in some ways remiss, either in the teaching of these 
alumni as undergraduates or because the college fails to keep the alumni informed 
as to its policy. In spite of some rumors to the contrary, alumni usually ask only 
reasonable questions, and it should be the object of the college to produce in its 
students the habit of mind which will make it possible for the two groups to under- 
stand each other. Dartmouth is at present issuing weekly bulletins to alumni groups 
and the President meets and talks confidentially with the Class Agents (Class Col- 
lectors) at the College several times a year, and by these methods the alumni are kept 
informed of the educational policy of the college, of its financial needs, and of the 
type of student desired. 

At a dinner given at Mount Holyoke Miss Woolley spoke of the great service 
which can be done by organized alumni, not only by the great financial support which 
they furnish, and on which all college executives frankly count, hut on the part they can 
play in interpreting to the world in general the aspirations of the colleges, which are so 
frequently misrepresented. President Neilson in 'his own inimitable fashion made an 
impassioned plea for alumni support in urging "teachers to think and thinkers to teach." 

(12) 






ALUMNAE BOOKS 

The Gypsy Trail; an Anthology for Campers, Vol. II., by Pauline Goldmark and Mary 
Hopkins, Doublcday, Doran and Co., Garden City, N. Y. 

Good taste makes a good anthology. The recipe is almost as simple as that. 
But the mass of recent verse is so great that good taste must go armed with a seeing 
eye and a sharp sword, if it is to be free to act, and to produce a book as full of 
delight for the reader, as is the second volume of "The Gypsy Trail," an anthology 
for campers compiled by Pauline Goldmark and Mary Hopkins, both well known to 
Bryn Mawr. 

This little volume, published by Doubleday, Doran is a book of poems, not poets. 
There has been no attempt to present the "representative poets." But the pages sing 
for their supper, and are fresh with work entitled to reprinting, yet not generally 
reprinted. By means of a sensitive, almost personal selective faculty Miss Goldmark 
and Miss Hopkins have brought together a rare collection of nature poetry and in 
doing so they have swerved widely from the trail of other anthologists. The inclusion 
of an occasional lyric in French or German, a bit of prose that is more than descrip- 
tion, is an indication of the freedom with which they have worked. 

When the first volume of "The Gypsy Trail" was published sixteen years ago 
it was, says the editor's note, "an act of faith" on the part of editors and publishers. 
This act of faith has been abundantly justified and the increasing demand for the first 
volume has been responsible for the second one. The camper's anthology is dedicated 
to "the new comrades of the trail, as well as to those who have packed and treked 
with us of old." 

And yet, there is much in the anthology that those who are not campers will 
wish to read. The very divisions of the book are suggestive, for not only do they 
follow the sequence of hours and seasons in the natural world, but include certain 
new groups of poems such as "Bird Notes," "Earth-Folk" and "Winds." Winter 
poems although not properly a part of the camping season have also been included. 
And here as elsewhere in the collection the choice seems to have been peculiarly indi- 
vidual and satisfying. 

In pages that range so widely it is almost impossible to discuss single poems. 
"Hesperus" of Sappho is a near neighbor to "Home-Coming" by Leonie Adams, and 
Li-Po and Lew Sarett are unusual but agreeable neighbors. Goethe, Conrad and 
Hudson rub shoulders with Miillay, Wiley and David Morton. Poetry is the pass- 
word to the volume and date and language are barriers for once happily vanished. 
Miss Goldmark and Miss Hopkins have taken what they wanted where they found 
it, and it is a pleasant thing for the reader to find his mood so naturally coinciding 
with theirs at the very moment when he is discovering something they are showing him 
for the first time. 

Hortense Flexner King, 1907. 

The Beacon Hill Murders, by Roger Scarlett* (Published for the Crime Club, Inc.). Double- 
day, Doran & Co., Garden City, N. Y. Price $2. 

I am very particular about Detective Stories. I loved them for so long before 
they became fashionable that I am inclined to be rather scornful of the recent 

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1+ BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

slapping on of lurid covers to any kind of "thriller" and calling it a detective story 
in order to meet the present undiscriminating demand. 

Now any conservative detective story reader will agree that there are certain 
well-established principles to be observed. There 1 must be a murder — mere theft of 
Lady Someone's necklace makes pretty puny reading. Moreover, it must be the 
murder of a very important person, a spectacular figure, prominent in his community, 
and in the public eye. The people involved must be extraordinarily nice. The mur- 
der must, in short, come right into the midst of a perfectly charming group of people 
and ''create havoc." The fact that the solution of the murder is impossible for the 
reader, conservative or careless modern, to solve, goes without saying. 

"The Beacon Hill Murders" should delight the old guard and appeal enormously 
even to the less selective public. Frederick Sutton, who has risen from obscurity to 
a very conspicuous position in the "world of finance" and now has social ambitions, 
is murdered one night in bis upstairs study where he has gone during a dinner party 
with Mrs. Anceny, the guest of honor. Mrs. Anceny is of course at once suspected, 
but refuses to make any statement until she has seen her lawyer. While she is wait- 
ing for him to arrive, and a policeman stands guard outside her door, she, too, is 
murdered. A thoroughly satisfactory beginning. 

The story is very well told, the suspense, never let down, and the solution un- 
expected but quite logical. The Crime Club, in selecting The Beacon Hill Murders, 
has made an excellent choice. 

Emily Kimbrough Wrench, 1921. 

* Roger Scarlett is Evelyn Page, B.M. 1923, and Dorothy Blair, Vassar 1924. 



ACKNOWLEDGMENT 

Laura H. Martin, Fellow in Geology 1912-13, sent in a Pamphlet with a very 
immediate interest in view of Byrd's explorations, — "Sovereignty in Antarctica." She 
sums up the problem: "Unless penguin eggs become the one delicacy necessary for 
famishing millions, or penguin oil can be burned in Fords, or unless some material 
small in bulk and of great value, like diamonds or radium ore should be discovered, 
there would be little chance of conflict between nations, no matter what their claims 
might be." 

LETTERS FROM ALUMNAE 

Leah Goff Johnson, 1889, sends a delightful note: 

"Last year we were so thrilled by our visit to Spain that we decided to repeat 
that experience but changing our itinerary somewhat. 

"We landed at Gibraltar on March fifteenth, motored to Cadiz, where we spent 
the week-end, moving on to Seville on Monday. We had spent Holy Week there 
last year. This year we saw more of people than of things. At the Exposition there 
is a wonderful collection of Columbus documents ranging in interest from the con- 
cession granted to Columbus by Ferdinand and Isabella, and his own worn copy of 
the same, written on vellum which he carried with him everywhere and which shows 
the signs of wear, to the various reports which he made of his discoveries. 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 15 

Something was said questioning a point in his career and we were told that "Miss 
Gould" knew more about Columbus than any one else and she only could answer 
that question. I remembered then that Alice Gould was working in Spain and on 
inquiry found that she had gone to Valladolid. 

We were at Valladolid on Thursday and were taken out to Simancas, a castle 
about seven miles from the city, where since the time of Charles V. state archives 
have been kept — now there are thirty-three millions done up in eighty thousand pack- 
ages and filling fifty-four rooms ! ! The custodian told us that there were three for- 
eigners working there, an Austrian, a Swiss and an American lady, Miss Gould. Then 
I remembered that this was where I was told that Alice Gould had gone from Seville 
and hoped that we might meet at last, but, alas, she had gone to Madrid for a short 
time. I wrote my name in the visitors' book where the signature of the King, Prince 
Jaime and other celebrities figured and the custodian told me that he would show 
it to Miss Gould when she returned. Do you remember Alice's article in the At- 
lantic Monthly on the three lost days in Charles V.'s life which she was the first to 
account for ! ! She must have found the material here in Simancas. There is cer- 
tainly an abundance of it. 

Now I am told that Alice is working on the life histories of the sailors who went 
with Columbus on his first voyage. 

I have thought often of Harriet Randolph who lived in Spain for some time 
and was so interested in the language and people. Thinking of Harriet I have won- 
dered how the fund in her memory is progressing. I had so hoped that it would have 
reached ten thousand dollars long ago for we thought that no one would be remem- 
bered so affectionately by so many Bryn Mawr Alumnae. 

Mary James, 1904, sends the following letter: 

"This time I write to the Bulletin not from the turmoil of a revolution in 
China (I have not been through a war since last April) but from the repose (?) of 
well-regulated America. For I am on furlough once more and have already had a 
wonderful vacation trip around from Shanghai via the Suez Canal, to the Near East 
and Europe, where I spent several months indulging my wanderlust. 

After a first-hand acquaintance with the social as well as the political revolution 
in China, I have found it most interesting to observe the Nationalist Movement in 
Egypt, Palestine, and Turkey. In these countries I sensed the same spirit of awaken- 
ing to new possibilities that has been so real to part of our atmosphere in China these 
last five years — a naive, earnest desire to make one's country better, which has made 
it possible for me to keep my optimism even in the darkest and most chaotic times. 
There is something in it akin to the delightful pride of places so evident along the 
Pacific seaboard and in the young cities of Australia. Whatever errors these people 
may make, their obvious love of country and their evident desire for you to share in 
their admiration, are certainly refreshing. It is distinctly vibrant with the breath of 
youth and hence, in these ancient lands of Far and Near East, it is particularly sur- 
prising and fascinating. 

On the train from Jerusalem to Cairo I fell into conversation — a little habit of 
mine — with the Egyptian medical inspector, an enthusiastic young doctor more than 
ready to discuss with an interested foreigner the efforts his country is making to 
stamp out disease. Nor did he try to pretend they had more than just begun their 



16 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

huge task. Before the journey was over he was our fast friend, and personally saw 
us through the customs with real Oriental courtesy. 

In Palestine I was equally charmed by the enthusiasm and pride with which we 
were shown around Telaviv, that beautiful modern city which the Jews have reared 
in the last twenty years on the sand wastes just north of Jaffa (the ancient Joppa 
where St. Peter had his house-top dream of the beasts and crawling things let down 
in a sheet from heaven). Of the agricultural Jewish Colonies, though we passed 
several, I had no intimate view, but what I was told led me to fear they were less of 
an improvement over the previous Arab efforts than I had been brought to believe. 
In character they seemed to be the result almost entirely of a naturalistic rather than 
a religious enthusiasm. 

As for priority rights to the land, there are those who insist the Jews have 
nothing over these indigenous so-called Arabs who, it is claimed, are the descendants 
of the Canaanites whom Joshua drove out, and of the Philistines who figured so promi- 
nently in Saul's and David's wars. Though the wandering Arabs of the surrounding 
deserts appear to be a somewhat different proposition, these native settlers of the "land 
of milk and honey" who till their stony hillsides and wander about within certain 
limits to get pasturage for their flocks and herds — these men are no modern impos- 
tors. Little about them seems to have changed since the days of Abraham though 
some of the city dwellers have caught the new spirit. 

In spite of rumors to the contrary we found the country quiet, if tense, and we 
were able to stroll freely about, never meeting anything but friendly rejoinders to our 
greetings. 

One day, with two other women doctors, I took a cross-country tramp over 
the deserts south-east of Bethlehem and climbed Frank Mountain — the highest hill in 
the region. From it we had a splendid view over the Dead Sea and up the Jordan 
Valley. I had already wandered along the shores of that brackish lake, and dipped 
my fingers into its waters. That had been on the day on which we had driven to 
Jericho, climbed about its ruined walls, with portions that are supposed to go back 
to Joshua's time, and then eaten a picnic lunch on the shores of the Jordan where 
John was baptized. One day we also tramped over to the hillside village of Ain- 
Karin, the birthplace and childhood of John the Baptist. Another day we climbed 
the hills south-east of Jerusalem, to Anathoth the home of brave old Jeremiah. 

Nor did we confine our attention to the region around Jerusalem. Twice I 
stayed in a flower-clad hospice on the shores of the Sea of Galilee and wandered about 
in that now sparsely settled region, once the site of a chain of flourishing towns. 

Many tell us that the Holy Land is spoiled and that we had better not visit it. 
Man certainly has done his worst in many places and guides take away the last vestige 
of joy and solemnity if they are allowed to conduct one about the holy places. A 
rapid "conducted tour" through Palestine would indeed be a thing of horror, I should 
think. But for those who can stay long enough to browse about this land of deep 
associations, I should certainly recommend a visit. 

I must mention beautiful, historic Budapest for here we saw Harriet Southerland 
Wright and her husband and children. What a welcome they did give us, and how 
good it was to see Harriet again! 



GRADUATE NOTES 



Edith Frances Claflin writes from 
Rosemary Hall: 

At the Christmas meeting of the Amer- 
ican Philological Association at Boston 
University I presented a paper called 
"Portrait of a Boeotian Lady." It was 
an imaginative portrayal of the character 
and appearance of a Greek lady of the 
Third Century before Christ, a citizen of 
Boeotian Thespias. For her character I 
drew my material from an important in- 
scription in the Boetian dialect — (my doc- 
tor's dissertation was on the Syntax of 
the Boeotian Dialect Inscriptions, so in 
this I was harking back to an early in- 
terest in Greek dialects, awakened by 
Professor Herbert Weir Smyth, formerly 
of Bryn Mawr College and now of Har- 
vard University.) To describe her ap- 
pearance I made use of the contemporary 
Boeotian art of the celebrated Tanagra 
figurines, with the aid of which I showed 
her as a quite fashionable and modern 
figure, with her red hat, red shoes, and 
golden earrings ! 

My paper on "The Hypothesis of the 
Italo-Celtic Impersonal Passive in -r" 
was published in the December number 
of Language, the journal of the Linguis- 
tic Society of America. It is my impres- 
sion that this is the first long article to 
be published in this journal by a woman. 
Not many women are working in Lin- 
guistics, though it is a fascinating field. 

At the present time I am taking a most 
interesting course at Columbia University 
on Histoire de la langue latine with An- 
toine Meillet of L'Universite de Paris. 
M. Meillet is probably the greatest living- 
scholar in the science of language. 

You asked me about my plans for the 
summer. I have not yet made any defi- 
nite plans, but I hope to continue to some 
extent at least my researches in Hittite. 
And since this is the year, or one of the 
years, of the Bimillennium Vergilianum 
(scholars seem not to be quite agreed as 
to whether 1930 or 1931 is the proper 
year to celebrate), I shall probably take 
up again a Virgilian study (on the use 
of frequentatives in the Aeneid) which 
I began several years ago. 

Edith Hall Dohan says: 

The chief item of news about me is 
that I am taking on Mary Swindler's 
work at Bryn Mawr during her Sab- 
batical half-year in Europe. 



Florence Donnell White sends the 
following letter: 

I fear that there is no news of me — 
beyond this fact that I am still Chairman 
of the Department of French in Vassar 
College and have acquired the agreeable 
habit of spending all my summers in 
France — I have the pleasure of going 
back to Bryn Mawr from time to time to 
visit friends or for Committee Meetings 
and find it a very lovely and a very hos- 
pitable place. 

I must learn more about the proposed 
new policy before I can in any way dis- 
cuss it. I am afraid the last Bulletin 
is still more or less unread. This seldom 
happens for I find the Bulletin very 
interesting. 

Grace Potter Rice sends this note 
about herself: 

My winter has been spent, as all my 
winters are spent, teaching Organic 
Chemistry in Barnard College. Along 
with my teaching I do research in Or- 
ganic Chemistry and publish my results 
in a Journal of the American Chemical 
Society. I run a real home in Stamford, 
Connecticut, and commute to it daily; 
therefore, I can assure you that my life 
is an exceedingly busy one and also an 
extremely interesting one. 

Margaret U. Smith writes: 
There has been no news because things 
have been running along without change. 
A new one took most of the summer and 
fall — a new home has occupied most of 
our time this winter. 

I am still doing perimetry in the pri- 
vate hospital of which my husband is 
one of the staff, and that's about all. 

Dear Mrs. Parrish: 

Since last writing to you I have pub- 
lished the following paper, in the prep- 
aration of which I had the collaboration 
of Dr. David K. Wenrich, Associate Pro- 
fessor of Protozoology at the University 
of Pennsylvania: 

"Binary fission in the amoeboid and 
flagellate phases of Tetramitus rostratus" 
(Protozoa). Jour. Morph. and Physiol. 
V. 49—1929. 

This past year I have been engaged in 
research of some eminent members of 
the "Religious Society of Friends." His- 
tory has always claimed much of my time, 
I have studied much along this line, and 



(17) 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



the last year of my teaching in Wadleigh 
High School a class in history was as- 
signed to me in addition to my work in 
Biology. 

When studying for my Ph.D. at Bryn 
Mawr, I suggested to Dr. Morgan that 
I should like to take American Colonial 
History as one of my Minors, but he 
asked me whether I was broad or narrow 
in my studies. On receiving the reply 
that I was broad, he said "very well then, 
we will narrow down and have only 
studies along Biological Lines." 

Next year I am planning to go back 
to the Univ. of Penna. and take up some 
Experimental Studies with Tetramitus. 
Very sincerely, 

Martha Bunting, Ph.D., 1895. 

P. S. — My permanent address after 
September 15th will be 4304 Chestnut St. 

Jessie E. Minor, Ph.D., 1917, writes: 
"You know that during the war I went 
into papermaking and have stayed with 
it ever since. For some years I was in 
a mill but two years ago I changed to 
the Association of Rag Paper Manufac- 
turers. For six months I worked for 
them at the Bureau of Standards in 
Washington but conditions were not 
satisfactory so they built me a laboratory 
in Springfield in connection with the gen- 
eral offices. My work is to serve as 
guide and central clearing house for the 
chemists in our thirty mills and to direct 
the research work on the factors which 
determine whether a paper will keep well 
or get brittle with age. That sounds like 
a simple matter, but the chemistry of 
paper is so closely woven with the plant 
life from which the fibers come and with 
the forces of light rays and traces of 
poisons that it is about as difficult to 
interpret as is the chemistry of the human 
body and far less is known of it. Of 
course, I work in the Papermakers Asso- 
ciation and attend the American Chemical 
Society. . . . 

"You want to know what interesting 
plans I have for the summer. Here is 
part of it. Prepare the program for the 
Rag Chemist meeting in June ; give a 
paper before the Interstate Technical 
Club in Kalamazoo, Michigan, in June; 
prepare a program for the Fine Paper 
Committee of the National Papermakers 
meeting in September, and take my vaca- 
tions a few days at the time so as not 
to interrupt the work of research in my 
laboratory." 

My dear Mrs. Parrish: 

I expect to spend next winter in Bos- 
ton, as Mr. Wilson has been granted leave 



o£ absence from Syracuse University in 
order that he may occupy the Bowne 
chair of philosophy in Boston University 
for 1930-31. 

Sincerely yours, 
Winifred Warren Wilson, Ph.D, 1898. 

Mrs. Raymond H. Carpenter, Ph.D., 
1924 (Mary Ruth Almack), is still teach- 
ing in Iola, Kansas, Junior College. 

Dear Mrs. Parrish : 

My teaching and executive work are 
both interesting and experimental as the 
College is putting in an entirely new 
curriculum next year, by means of which 
we are endeavoring to develop the four 
sides of the student — namely, the physical, 
the social, the intellectual, and the spirit- 
ual. 

The first two years of College life are 
devoted to this special training, the third 
and fourth to electives and major studies. 
Many eyes are on us at present watching 
to see if we can succeed with such a 
program. 

In June, Mary and I expect to go 
abroad again, first to Oberammergau, 
then to Italy to help celebrate the Virgil 
Bimillennium. If possible we shall include 
a short motor trip in Spain. In August 
I shall attend the International Botanical 
Congress and afterwards visit my family 
in Ireland and sail from Queenstown 
Sept. 1st, reach New York, the seventh, 
and begin teaching in Los Angeles Sept. 
13th. 

We are always glad to see our friends 
in our little cottage at 2920 N. Raymond 
Ave., Altadena. Elizabeth Van Wagenen 
Landis lives across the road, from us in 
her beautiful Spanish home. She is a 
delightful neighbor. 
Yours sincerely, 

Florence Peebles, Ph.D., 1900. 

Dr. Maria Castellani writes in a letter 
to the President: 

I was in your College and never for- 
get the happy time I spent there. 

On the contrary, I remember that 
period as one of the happiest in my life, 
and which enabled me to make a brilliant 
and quick career. 

In fact, I have a very good position in 
Rome, and have just won an International 
competition, having consequently been ap- 
pointed "Actuary of International Labor 
Office" at the League of Nations in 
Geneva. 

I am also the President of Italian Pro- 
fessional Women Organization, which I 
have started in Italy, having studied the 
American organization of business and 
Professional Women in the States. 



CLASS NOTES 



(In the April number the Editor put a 
note saying that the feeling was so strong 
that nick-names alone should not be used, 
that she and the Alumnae Secretary had 
tried to decode the ones that did appear. 
The follozving letter points a moral, not, 
I may state, to the Editor and the Alum- 
nae Secretary, but to the Class Editors: 
"As it happens, I am not doing psycho- 
logical zvork in New Haven as the 1925 



Class Notes in the May Bulletin state. 
"Smithy" refers to Helen Lord Smith, 
who received her degree in 1926 but was 
originally in our class. Since she is doing 
the work, would it be possible to insert 
a note in the next Bulletin, giving her 
the credit for it? 

Very sincerely yours, 

Elizabeth Lane Smith/') 



1892 
Class Editor: Edith Wetherill Ives 
(Mrs. F. M. Ives), 
145 East 35th St., New York City. 

The class will learn with regret of the 
death of Harriet Stevenson Pinney. She 
contracted tuberculosis some years ago 
and spent several years in California in 
a brave and cheerful struggle to regain 
health. The last months were spent at 
Asheville, N. C, where she died on May 
19th. She leaves a husband, the brother 
of Grace Pinney Stewart, and three sons 
and a daughter to all of whom, on behalf 
of the class, the editor offers deepest 
sympathy. — — — 

Helen Clements Kirk is a grandmother 
for the fourth time. Her new grand- 
child is the son of her daughter, Marcella, 
and was born early last summer. Helen 
and Dr. Kirk, who has retired as Vice- 
President of the S. S. White Co., expect 
to spend the summer on their farm in 
New England. 

Grace Pinney Stewart is active in the 
Travel Section of the Social Service De- 
partment of the Woman's Club at Scars- 
dale, New York. She was also chairman 
of the committee which organized a din- 
ner given in honor of the authors of 
Scarsdale to which about one hundred 
authors were invited, a large proportion 
of whom attended. 

Bessie Stephens Montgomery and 
Frances Hunt both report themselves 
well and busy. 

Edith Wetherill Ives' second son, Jack, 
was married to Lois M. Hawley on Jan- 
uary 24th, at Seattle, Washington, where 
they are making their home. 

The class editor and her husband ex- 
pect to spend the summer on their farm 
near Brewster, Putnam County, New 
York, where travelling Bryn Mawrtyrs 
will be warmly welcomed. 

1896 
Class Editor: Abigail Camp Dimon, 
1411 Genesee Street, Utica, N. Y. 

On May 2-5 Anna Hoag had a house 



party at her camp on the banks of the 
Rancocas at New Lisbon, New Jersey, 
For the past seven years this has been 
an annual spring event, interrupted last 
year by Anna's travels in Italy. This 
spring, therefore, was an especially grati- 
fying resumption of a cherished occasion. 

The members of '96 present were 
Anna, Pauline Goldmark, Mary Hopkins 
and Abba Dimon, with Beth Fountain, 
Josephine Goldmark and Harriet Daniels 
as close relatives of the '96 family. 
Elizabeth Kirkbride for the first time was 
absent, because, as Sectional Director of 
the North Atlantic Section of the A. A. 
U. W., she was presiding over a sectional 
conference in Rochester. 

The week-end fell most happily in the 
period between blizzards and black flies. 
The sun shone warm, the stream ran 
smooth and amber past the cabin door, 
the pine trees waved against a blue sky, 
and the bushes and pixie moss bloomed 
to perfection for Pauline's camera. The 
time passed quickly in loafing in the sun, 
walking, talking and devouring the boun- 
teous fare provided by our hostess. The 
guests parted with regret tempered with 
hopeful anticipations of another like 
party next year. 

Katherine Cook on her way around the 
world has reached more accessible re- 
gions in Europe, and is to be joined for 
the summer by her sister and nieces. 

Rebecca Darlington is going abroad 
this summer with her daughter Celia, 
Bryn Mawr '31, and hopes to visit Mrs. 
Giles, Ellen's mother in Sardinia. 

This winter Leonie Gilmour's son, 
Isamo Noguchi, held an exhibition of 
portrait heads at the Marie Sterner Gal- 
lery, which was very favorably noticed 
by the press. 

The second volume of "The Gypsy 
Trail" by Pauline Goldmark and Mary 
Hopkins has come out this spring. This 
anthology of out-door life supplements 
the first volume, choosing as its field 
writers of the present century. Of spe- 
cial personal interest to us are poems by 
19) 



20 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



Edith Wyatt, Frieda Heyl, Susan Gold- 
mark and Hortense Flexner King. 

Anna and Clarence Hoag spent the 
winter with Anna's stepmother, Mrs. 
Thomas Scattergood at 3515 Powelton 
Avenue, where Anna lived during her 
childhood. Their son, John, the only un- 
married child, has been spending the year 
studying French at the Universities of 
Grenoble and the Sorbonne with a view 
of teaching in secondary schools. Gil- 
bert, their oldest son, has been teaching 
for two years as Instructor in English at 
Amherst. He has built a house and has 
a daughter a year old. Garrett expects 
to receive his degree from the Yale Law 
School in June and will spend the sum- 
mer as usual at the delightful Riversea 
Inn at Saybrook, Conn., where he and 
his wife are owners and managers. They 
have two babies, Nancy and Margaret. 
Garrett will begin his legal practice with 
the firm of Ropes, Gray, Boy den and 
Perkins of Boston. To complete the ac- 
count of Anna's children, Mary Hoag 
Lawrence is still living at Groton, where 
among many other activities she is a 
Trustee and Manager of the Lowthorpe 
School of Landscape Gardening and 
Horticulture. 

Ruth and James Porter went abroad 
in January. They went to Sicily and 
sailed from Syracuse to Alexandria for 
a trip in Egypt, then went up the Nile 
in a private dahabeeyah, the Scarab, as 
far as the Second Cataract. Returning 
to Italy in April they received the tragic 
news of the deaths of two grandchildren 
within ten days, Lucy Straus, Nancy's 
daughter, and Meredith Porter, Eliot's 
daughter. They came home at once. 

Mary Swope took her first Italian trip 
this winter with her husband and her son 
David. Her daughter, Henrietta, later 
joined Frances and Norvelle Browne for 
a trip in Greece. 

Elizabeth Kirkbride knows that the 
class will regret to learn that Mrs. 
George D. Dimon, Abba Dimon's mother 
and beloved friend of all Abba's friends, 
died suddenly on January 16th after a 
few days' illness. 

1897 

Class Editor: Mrs. Harry H. Weist 

(Alice L. Cilley), 

174 E. 71st St., New York. 
The class sends to Corinna Putnam 
Smith love and deep sympathy in the loss 
of her delightful and distinguished father, 
Major George Haven Putnam. Corinna 
has been out in New Mexico with her 
daughter Frances, while her older daugh- 



ter, Rebecca, was having an exhibit here 
of her charming pencil sketches. All 
three daughters are talented — why 
shouldn't they be? 

'97 can well congratulate itself on its 
connection with the two highest graduates 
in the Class of '30. The European Fel- 
low was prepared by the Shipley School 
and may be called Eleanor Brownell's 
step-daughter, while Connie Hand, also 
summa cum laude, is Fanny Fincke 
Hand's real daughter. 

Mary Converse says she is planning a 
trip to Paris this summer to see a girl 
she is educating there as a singer. Mary 
is working now especially for the world 
work of the Y. W. C. A. and for the 
League of Women Voters, with a num- 
ber of other "side issues." 

Edith Edwards is not only Regent of 
the Woonsocket Chapter, D. A. R., but 
she is also President for Rhode Island 
of a big new patriotic society, the name 
of which has slipped my mind, and Vice- 
President of the "Castelian Club" in Bos- 
ton. Edith has a delightful apartment on 
Beacon Hill, Boston, where the C. E. 
spent a night in February, and anyone 
of '97 will be cordially welcomed if Edith 
is not flying about the country on her 
various errands ! You may not only be 
put up for the night but be dined at the 
Woman's Reception Club, and taken to 
hear someone like Gigli next day: I was. 
Edith thinks B. M. women "mellow" de- 
lightfully, and accomplish so much with 
simplicity, even if they seem a bit hard- 
headed at times. 

Mary Fay is still at teaching at the 
Misses Kirk's School, and is going this 
summer to Southport, Me., "a little place 
on the Maine coast of which I am very 
fond, and where I lead an out-door life 
as much as possible, and where I find 
great pleasure in studying the birds." 

Caroline Gait spent last summer mainly 
in Italy and Dalmatia: this summer she 
will be quietly at home in Maryland with 
her family. It will be hot, but she will 
have time for much reading and some 
writing. She is doing fine work at Mt. 
Holyoke, where she would be glad to see 
any of '97. 

Cornelia Greene King's son was mar- 
ried last June, and they all took a trip 
from Paris through the Chateau country 
into Brittany, having the thrill of Mont 
St. Michel. She and her husband spent 
five weeks in Concarneau painting, then 
went to London and to Oxford where Mr. 
King had a commission for a painting of 
Tom Tower for an Oxford graduate. He 
had earlier oainted in Spain and North- 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



21 



ern Africa. Cornelia lives in Troy still 
"while our children finish their educa- 
tion — modern but satisfactory." 

Sue Follansbee Hibbard is busy with 
the League of Women Voters, and serves 
on the boards of the Woodrow Wilson 
Foundation, of the International Migra- 
tion Service, and of Bryn Mawr College. 
She is handsome as ever: maybe more so. 
Elizabeth Higginson Jackson says Bet- 
sey is so happy at B. M. C. that she will 
never want to return to Boston ! "Mother 
took three children for their spring va- 
cations by motor from Charleston, S. C, 
to Bryn Mawr." 

Florence Hoyt still teaches English at 
the Bryn Mawr School in Baltimore, 
where she has been since 1903. Last year 
she had a sabbatical, so she and her sister 
spent the two summers in England and 
France, and most of the winter on the 
island of Majorca and in Egypt. "We 
travel slowly, and stop long at interest- 
ing places, to read about the place on 
the spot. We went to Greece for the sec- 
ond time: I love it best of all. I am 
rested now and ready for more of my 
interesting work." 

Mary Kirk plans to have three weeks 
of the American School in Rome this 
summer, and the rest of the time on the 
Aeneid Cruise, following Aeneas from 
Troy to Italy, but hoping to omit his 
shipwreck ! 

Clara Landsberg went to Chicago to 
the 40th anniversary of Hull House in 
May. She lived there for twenty years, 
and thinks it is the most interesting place 
in the world. She and Margaret Hamil- 
ton expect to spend the summer as usual 
at Hadlyme, Connecticut. 

Marion Taber writes: "The event of 
my year was the final possession of a 
little house and woodlot at Sharon, Conn., 
where I can plan and plant for delightful 
peaceful days. If one needs £500 a year 
and a room of one's own, well ! here are 
4 rooms for '97 ! so please don't stay too 
long at Elsa's but come on down the 
road!" Sometime the C. E. hopes Marion 
will write up her remarkable work which 
she has been doing since we all left B. 
M. C. 

Elizabeth Towle says she spent last 
summer visiting her friends, ending with 
three heavenly weeks in Martha Tracy's 
lovely camp, and now is off for Europe 
this time, via S. S. "Europa," tourist 
third. She only ( ! ) plans to roam around 
Holland, Belgium and Germany, seeing 
the Passion Play of course, and "Tristan 
and Isolde" at Bayreuth, if possible. If 



luck is with her she will go as far as 
Vienna, Budapest and Prague, and hunt 
up Emma Cadbury, whom she last saw 
in Geneva in 1927. 

Helen Zebley went to France last sum- 
mer, and to the Educational Conference 
at Elsinore, Denmark. She is still at 
the same old job of teaching Latin at the 
Germantown Friends' School, "but I hope 
not quite in the same old way." 

Elizabeth Seymour Angel's husband is 
to make a statue of Saint Paul for St. 
Paul's School in Concord, N. H. He is 
tremendously busy, and both boys are to 
go to camps for July so that Beth can 
stay in town with him. In August they 
go to Petersham again, but they are try- 
ing to find a place near enough to New 
York where they can buy a house to use 
for week-ends and for summers. 

Alice Cilley Weist is interested in a 
house Helen is buying near New Mil ford, 
Conn., where she digs or cooks or cleans 
house with a vengeance. Her chief 
pleasure is the affairs of her offspring. 
The Harvard son, '30, has been appointed 
the Charles Eliot Norton Fellow from 
Harvard University to the American 
School at Athens, so she feels quite inter- 
national, with the prospect of both sons 
in Europe. Helen, after eleven years at 
the Dalton School, is planning to take 
next year off; perhaps to travel, perhaps 
to study, perhaps to do some other kind 
of work. 

Also, if some one is overlooked in the 
course of the year that is because either 
she has not answered my postal or has 
returned it blank, as some one did from 
Philadelphia ! Postals have been re- 
turned from Mary Waddington and 
Emily Brown as being incorrectly ad- 
dressed — help ! It is such fun to read 
what people are doing that I urge more 
and more co-operation on the part of '97. 

1899 
Class Editor: Ellen P. Kilpatrick, 

1027 St. Paul Street, Baltimore, Md. 
Dear '99: 

This was to have been a joyful letter 
to the class full of gossipy news about 
the wedding of Susanne Blackwell, the 
second daughter of Katherine Midden- 
dorf Blackwell, but so much sorrow has 
followed so closely on the joy of that 
occasion that I shall give just the bare 
details. 

Susanne was married to John Wallace 
Thompson, Jr., of Trenton, in St. Mich- 
ael's Church, on April 25th, at half past 
four in the afternoon. The wedding, 
which was lovely, was followed by a 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



reception at the Blaekwells' big old-fash- 
ioned house. Members of '99 present 
were Mary Hoyt, Jean Clark Fouilhonx 
and Ellen Kilpatrick, the godmother of 
the bride. Other Bryn Mawrtyrs present 
were Emma Linberg Tobin, '96; Mand 
Lowrey Jenks, 1900; Jane Righter, 1901; 
Elizabeth Bodine, 1902, and Marjorie 
Thompson, '12, a cousin of the groom. 
After the reception the young couple left 
by motor, followed, though they did not 
know it, by the bride's older sister, Kath- 
erine and her husband, Ulric Dahlgren, 
Jr. At a bad grade crossing near Tren- 
ton the Dahlgrens' car was struck by a 
train. Ulric was killed instantly and 
Katherine was seriously injured. The 
bride and groom, not knowing anything 
had happened, kept on to New York. As 
this goes to press, Katherine is slowly 
improving in Mercer Hospital. On the 
insistence of the family, Susanne and 
John sailed for Bermuda as planned, but 
on the day after they sailed John's mother 
died of a heart attack, so they will re- 
turn immediately after landing. 

The N. Y. Times of April 26, which 
had accounts of both wedding and acci- 
dent, had, on still another page, a letter 
from New Haven telling of the news, 
just received, of the death of Bradley 
Bakewell, the seventeen-year-old son of 
Madeline Palmer Bakewell. He gradu- 
ated last June from Groton and was to 
have entered Yale in the Fall. As Pro- 
fessor Bakewell is having a sabbatical 
year the whole family is abroad. No de- 
tails were given except that the family 
had reached Morocco in their travels and 
that Bradley had been taken ill and died 
there. 

I know that the whole class joins with 
me in sending our love and very deep 
sympathy to both Madeline and Katie 
in their great sorrow. 

1900 
Class Editor: Louise Congdon Francis 
(Mrs. Richard S. Francis), 
Haverford, Pennsylvania. 

Sometimes the task of Class Collector 
is arduous, but when the task is rewarded 
by letters like the following from Mira 
Culin Saunders then the Class Collector 
is to be envied. This is the first word 
from Mira in several years. She sounds 
fully occupied. 

"It has been on my mind for some time 
to make a little thank offering to Bryn 
Mawr for our pleasure in the friendship 
of Florence Peebles and Mary Jeffers 
which has been a particular joy to my 
husband and me ever since they came to 



Pasadena, some three years ago, and if 
it had not been for my connection with 
Bryn Mawr we should not have known 
them. 

As to a line in regard to myself. For 
the past six years I have given the best 
part of my time and thought to the peace 
movement. Over five years ago, I or- 
ganized an International Relations and 
World Peace Section in our College 
Women's Club and was Chairman of it 
for five years. It now continues very 
successfully under another Chairman. 
The past year I have been Chairman of 
the International Relations Committee 
of the Woman's Civic League of Pasa- 
dena, a large organization, and am also 
a member of the Southern California 
World Court Committee. I also helped 
organize and I write the publicity for 
Pasadena Town Meeting, an experiment 
in adult education which meets every 
Tuesday night in one of our schools 
under the leadership of Dr. Frederick W. 
Roman. I have always a great interest 
in gardens and gardening, and in my hus- 
band's literary work." 

The class will be deeply grieved to 
learn of the death in March of Eleanor 
Anderson Campbell's only child, Eliza- 
beth Milbank Ashforth. Mrs. Ashforth 
had only a two weeks' illness and leaves 
two little children, two and . four years 
old. More than ever Eleanor is devoting 
herself to the Judson Health Center in 
New York. 

Grace Campbell Babson has had a very 
hard winter, but the Class will be re- 
joiced to know that she is now- quite well 
again. She had pneumonia at the time 
of Mrs. Campbell's death in January. 
Grace reports an early spring and many 
guests on the ranch in Oregon. 

Cornelia Halsey Kellogg was elected in 
April to the Office of Acting-President 
of the National Council of the State 
Garden Club Federation. 

1904 
Class Editor: Emma O. Thompson, 
320 South 42nd St., 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



It is with deep regret that we learn 
of the passing of our classmate, Bertha 
Pearson, who died on April 25th at New- 
ton Center, Mass., after an eight weeks' 
illness. She never increased the slender 
store of strength that she had in College, 
but she sustained her gallant power to 
force success from physical weakness — 
she kept her deep devotion to her home 
ties, cared for her father till his death 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



23 



a year ago at the age of 99, and was 
closely knit in the lives of her brothers 
and their families. Her friendship was 
so understanding and so liberating that 
she takes with her a distinctive part of 
the lives of those who loved her. She 
kept to the very end, her lovely charm, 
her quick responsiveness to all beauty 
and humor, and her keen appreciation of 
the least service rendered her. 



1905 
Class Editor: Mrs. Talbot Aldrich, 
59 Mount Vernon Street, 
Boston, Massachusetts. 

Leslie Farwell Hill's address after 
June first will be Ross, Marin County, 
California. They have leased a house for 
a year until they can decide where they 
want to settle "permanently." 

Rachel Brewer Huntington wrote some 
time ago: "The children are in the south 
of France with a very charming Irish 
girl who has lived in France so much 
that she is perfectly at home with every 
phase of the life. They go to school in 
their little black aprons and Anna has a 
"uniform" — a beret with a monogram and 
a brass-buttoned blue coat — which she 
dons proudly on Sunday and attends mass 
with the rest of the school. Ellsworth 
and I have been to Spain and are just 
leaving Italy — a much too-hurried trip." 
Now comes the following from Elsey 
Henry Redfield: "Rachel came to lunch 
with us in Constantinople and we went 
out to Roberts College and had tea with 
her in-laws. Ellsworth was still off 
traveling. They hope to leave the chil- 
dren in France and go to Norway and 
Sweden this summer. Charles (aged 
about ten) is an authority on Egypt and 
knew more than older heads at every 
turn." 

1907 
Class Editor: Alice Hawkins, 

Taylor Hall, Bryn Mawr, Penna. 

Apologies are herewith humbly offered 
to our most celebrated and our most pro- 
lific literary light, Mrs. Cecil Barnes. 
Let Peg speak for herself: "I wish to 
PROTEST against the misprint in my 
views on my novel in the last Bulletin, 
to wit, 'the modern age of jazz and SIN', 
that my heroine lives to deplore. My 
word, dearie, was GIN. I do not think 
the modern age is sinful, but I defy any 
dispassionate observer to deny that it is 
GINFUL ! . . . The book will not be out 
until June — worse luck." 

The Class Editor had the pleasure of 
conducting Esther Williams Apthorp and 



husband on a tour of the campus last 
month. Later we held a committee meet- 
ing of two and decided that our next re- 
union had better take place next year 
instead of waiting for our actual twenty- 
fifth anniversary in 1932. Accommoda- 
tions at Commencement time are at a 
premium nowadays, and the College much 
prefers to have reuning classes adhere to 
the Dix plan, which is the best solution 
so far found for an even distribution of 
the hordes of alumnae who descend upon 
the halls at this period. For this same 
reason 1905 decided to come back next 
year instead of this year, and they po- 
litely said that one reason for their 
change was that they looked forward to 
seeing 1907. We think that a picnic at- 
tended by 1905, 1906, 1907, and 1908 has 
points in its favor. 

1908 
Class Editor: Margaret Blatchford 
(Mrs. N. H. Blatchford), 
3 Kent Road, Hubbard Woods, 111. 

The class will be interested to hear 
that Tracy Mygatt and Frances Wither- 
spoon have written a new book called 
"Armor of Light." This, like the "Glori- 
ous Company," is a religious book and 
makes the early Christian days real and 
vivid to the imagination. A great clergy- 
man compares it to Ben Hur. 

Tracy writes that a year ago "the little 
house in the country Fanny May built 
at Croton Falls burnt to the ground 
through the carelessness of a usually im- 
peccable workman who was painting 
floors a cheerful canary yellow, just for 
a last touch ! Well, it was ! However, 
that's rebuilt now, and when we go there 
now and then, we wish 1908 would drop 
in for tea." 

Tracy is on the reviewing committee 
of the Church and Drama Bulletin and 
she and Fanny May care deeply about 
the work of the Women's Peace Union 
which is trying to pass an amendment 
which Frazier of North Dakota intro- 
duced, making war impossible by abolish- 
ing the Army and Navy. 

Helen Greeley is living at 2106 High- 
land Avenue, Hollywood, California. 

The class sends its warmest sympathy 
to Helen Schmidt and Louise Milligan 
Herron. Helen's father who was 86 
years old, died in February, and Milly's 
mother, who had been ill for a year, died 
in the same month. Milly has been living 
in Indianapolis to take care of her mother 
while her husband is stationed at Fort 
Sheridan, Illinois. Her son, Billy, and 
daughter, Louise, are in school in Indian- 



24 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



apolis. Her husband expects to be re- 
lieved at Fort Sheridan in June and does 
not know where he will be stationed next. 
Milly is a true army officer's wife and 
does not seem at all concerned about 
where she will next establish her family. 

Florence Lexow is very busy as chair- 
man of the Alumnae Fund. 

Jeannette Griffith spent a week visiting- 
Rose Marsh Payton in Pittsburgh. 

Grace Woodelton Smith is living at 
Waco, Texas, where her husband is as- 
sociated with another osteopath. Last 
fall, after a sickness, she and her hus- 
band motored through Virginia, North 
Carolina, Kentucky and Tennessee and 
then spent three months in Kansas City. 

Henrietta Bryan Baldwin moved into 
a new house at Ortega, Florida a year 
ago, and urges that any 1908 who come 
by will come to see her. Her only daugh- 
ter, Henrietta, who is now at Rosemary 
Hall, is entered at Bryn Mawr for 1933. 

Sarah Sanborne Weaver writes from 
Donna, Texas, that the Donna Skeet team 
of which her husband is a member won 
the National Skeet Shooting Champion- 
ship. (Skeet is the latest thing in trap 
shooting.) As Sarah says, "Texans have 
always been known as the 'outshootenest 
shooters.' " 

Lucy Carver is Industrial Secretary of 
the Y. W. C. A. 'The most 'stylish' 
thing about it," she writes, "is that the 
Industrial Department of the Association 
is being recognized as a factor in the 
Workers' Education Movement. At the 
other end is our job with the 'middle 
classes,' trying to keep them reminded 
of industrial issues. This winter, natur- 
ally, we have been mostly concerned with 
the South and the struggles and suffer- 
- ing among textile workers there. I've 
just joined the 'League for Independent 
Political Action' and would like to know 
how many 1908 are in the same boat." 

Marjorie Young Gifford says that she 
still is a mother and a lecturer. "Some- 
times the two jobs are combined in the 
home and then I am at my worst, I fear. 

I have aspirations toward speaking 
French glibly before I die, and in prep- 
aration have joined a class in discussion 
in French. 

"I tried making doughnuts yesterday, 
which is something I have always longed 
to do with sang froid. They were not 
altogether successful. I am next going 
to tackle papering a room, which is an- 
other bit of handicraft I have always 
yearned to shine in. You see, having 
mastered the art of laundering frilly cur- 



tains and replacing burnt-out fuses, sci- 
entifically feeding gold fish, etc., I am 
looking for new fields to conquer. Of 
course there is always golf. You know 
how that is. I do hope my game will be 
infallible this year of years." 

Nellie Seeds is Secretary-Treasurer of 
the Manumit School at Pawling, New 
York. She writes: "Life is never dull 
as the Director of an experimental school. 
But 51 active young boys and girls give 
one little time for correspondence. My 
winter has been broken up by a month's 
trip in the West, 'Manumitting/ as one 
of my friends called it. I find that Bryn 
Mawr people everywhere are interested 
in progressive or creative education, May- 
one Lewis sufficiently so to entrust her 
little niece to our course. The Interna- 
tional Education Conference at Elsinore, 
Denmark, furnished a good reason for a 
two months' trip abroad, into which I 
managed to include Russia, Sweden, Ber- 
lin and Paris. This summer my lot will 
be cast at the Manumit Farm and Sum- 
mer School. All or any Bryn Mawrers 
who may pass by are cordially invited to 
visit and inspect. We always have an 
extra paint brush for the artistically in- 
clined, a hay fork or trowel for the 
would-be farmer, or a dish towel or drum 
for those whose interests and tastes may 
be elsewhere." The Manumit School is 
a co-educational school for children and 
student teachers where the entire life is 
conceived of as an educative process. 

1909 
Class Editor: Helen Bond Crane, 
Denbigh Hall, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

A recent letter from Pleasaunce Baker 
von Gaisberg says that they are still in 
London. "There's really no news since 
I last wrote, except that we've been 
translating a little book from German 
into English, and have had an Indian 
student staying in our vacant room. As 
we're more than likely to be in London 
through the summer, I hope any class- 
mates who happen this way will have 
time to look us up. They'll always know 
an address at Friends' House, opposite 
Euston Station." 

On April 11th Edwin Peter Dewes, 
husband of Grace Wooldridge Dewes, died 
after a short illness. Our deepest sym- 
pathy goes to Grace and her family in 
their great and unexpected sorrow. 

1910 
Class Editor: Emily L. Storer 

Beaver Street, Waltham, Mass. 
Beth Hibben Scoon sets a fine example. 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



25 



She writes: "I am sending you a check 
by return mail (please note) for the 
Alumnae Fund. You never would have 
heard from me if your letter hadn't been 
such a diplomatic triumph with its sug- 
gestions of happy emotions being harmful 
unless converted into action. We went 
abroad last summer to attend the reunion 
of the Rhodes Scholars at Oxford and 
lingered on for the rest of the summer, 
mostly in England. We enjoyed every- 
thing so thoroughly that we found it hard 
to settle down after our return. I attend- 
ed the 1910 reunion in New York in Jan- 
uary. Elsie Deems, Frances Stewart, 
Mary Ag., Jane Smith and Alice Whitte- 
more were all present." 

Marion S. Kirk: "I expect to be in 
Washington from the 7th to the 11th of 
May for the Annual meeting of the Amer- 
ican Law Institute and our department of 
the Institute is presenting the entire pro- 
posed Code of Criminal Procedure for 
discussion. I am looking forward with 
much pleasure to the consummation of 
four years' work." 

Pat Murphy: "I was in Washington 
last week at a meeting but didn't catch 
a glimpse of you. I have been in the 
Agnes Irwin School in Philadelphia for 
nine years and at present have an in- 
teresting job as assistant to the Head- 
mistress." 

Charlotte Simonds Sage, most unfor- 
tunately followed Kate's example and got 
a bad back and other things. However, 
she's the good sport that she always is 
and writes: "We're all fine — only two 
weeks to go for my rest cure. Don't 
worry. I've learned to lie still and let 
everything roll over and around me and 
find I'm not necessary at all. Everyone 
manages excellently without me. I even 
experimented and sent Pally and Betsy 
to Boston for the day. They shopped, 
theatred and home again in the train by 
themselves — . It's good to realize how 
capable they all are — except in getting to 
breakfast and to bed on time. We are 
going to Squam Lake for August and 
would like to rent this house and bath- 
house for that month — (S. Dartmouth, 
Mass.)" 

Frances Stewart Rhodes writes that 
Margaret Vickery was there before sail- 
ing and she and Laura had tea with her 
at Ruth Vickery's. Adele Brandeis was 
also there, as amusing as ever. Betty 
Tenney and her husband also came to 
New York for a few days. 

Dorothy Nearing VanDyne: "Yes, in- 
deed, we had a lively time on our trip. 



It was a Mediterranean cruise, you know, 
and of course everything was new and 
wonderful to me. It brought back a 
great deal that I thought I had forgotten 
which I suppose is one of the best things 
about travelling. In Egypt I was sur- 
prised to meet Frances Browne who was 
there for a longer stay than were we. 
How I envied her. My son was away 
in boarding school this year so our fam- 
ily has started to grow smaller. Mary 
Nearing is thirteen and a big girl now. 
She is already looking forward to col- 
lege. Pat Murphy was here last summer 
and I saw Kirkie in Philadelphia in the 
fall and also Jane. I should like to see 
more of 1910 up this way." 

Kate writes: "Dear 1910: My tale is 
a short one and soon told; another winter 
in the house, mostly in a big chair by 
my window, on account of a back that 
doesn't behave properly. But I am get- 
ting used to substituting a head for legs, 
and find it not so bad. Between rests 
and looking out of the window I have 
darned stockings, sewed on buttons, 
watched with amusement the rate at 
which my children grow, and edited a 
college textbook of physiology translated 
from the Danish. Soon, I'll be well 
again — all the experts promise it. Mean- 
while, Alice's reflections on the jam keep 
running in my head. Love to you all." 

1911 

Class Editor: Louise S. Russell 

140 East 52 Street, New York City. 

Mary Chase Pevear and her family 
have given up their house in Larchmont 
and have taken an apartment in New 
York. Her address is 355 East 50 Street. 

This month there is another sad piece 
of news from the class. Margaret Prus- 
sing LeVino lost her older boy, Shelby, 
after a malignant attack of rheumatic 
fever, ending in double pneumonia. Those 
of us who knew Shelby found him a boy 
of great charm and promise and Margaret 
has the deep sympathy of all her class- 
mates and friends. Her address is 1600 
North Fairfax Avenue, Hollywood, Calif. 

Louise Russell spent her Easter vaca- 
tion at Atlanta, Ga., visiting Helen Hen- 
derson Green and getting acquainted 
again with her fine family. 

1912 
Editor: Elizabeth Pinney Hunt 
(Mrs. Andrew Jackson Hunt) 
Haverford, Pennsylvania. 
Gladys Jones Markle writes that she is 
occupied at home with two sons and a 
daughter, while the eldest boy, eleven 



26 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



years, is at the Fay School in Southboro, 
Massachusetts. 

Carmelita Chase Hinton is taking her 
children to England this summer, where 
she will join her cousin's yacht to sail to 
Stockholm via the Gota Canal. 

Christine Hammer with her mother and 
niece, Helen, are sailing for Denmark via 
Ireland, early in the summer. They ex- 
pect to travel in Germany, France, Eng- 
land and Ireland, returning home on the 
steamer with Carmelita. 

Rosalie Day spent several weeks in 
Virginia during February and March, 
having motored to Hampden from her 
home in Catskill. 

Frances Hunter Elwyn has been illus- 
trating her husband's recently published 
book, "Yourself, Inc., The Story of the 
Human Body." Also, she is doing draw- 
ings for Dr. Dickinson for the Committee 
on Maternal Health at the Academy of 
Medicine in New York. Her children 
are at the Hessian Hills School in Croton. 

Elizabeth Pinney Hunt with her sons 
who have arrived at the companionable 
ages of fourteen and twelve, is departing 
in June to spend three months in France. 
They will divide their time between the 
Pyrenees, Bourre, Paris, Brittany, where 
Christine will meet them, and perhaps 
Jersey. Pinney's elder boy, Dickson, who 
has been at the Solebury School this year 
expects to join the headmaster of the 
school to hike with another lad through 
the Chateau country. 

Winifred Scripture Fleming's son and 
daughter captured first prizes in riding 
at the Pinehurst horse show in March. 

Gladys Chamberlain is to sail on the 
same steamer as Christine in June, for 
a five weeks' trip to Scandinavia. 

1914 
Class Editor: Elizabeth Ayer Inches 
(Mrs. Henderson Inches) 
Middlesex Rd., Chestnut Hill, Mass. 

Not satisfied with another trip to the 
West Indies, our usually industrious 
Laura with her husband stopped off for 
a few days' frivolity in Bermuda where 
she had a moment to write of her ad- 
ventures. They visited Evelyn on her 
island near Nassau and to their surprise 
found Nan and Knick with their hus- 
bands. All had apparently invited them- 
selves ! It was all a great success. The 
moon was full and the husbands got on 
well. Nan said that no one seemed to 
have changed at all. (I wonder if she 
looked for gray hairs.) 

The McCutcheons are planning to visit 



Mr. Davis in the Embassy in London for 
two weeks in May. Evelyn refuses to be 
presented at Court, but we fear it will 
be hard to avoid it. 

We read that Norman Hapgood, Eliz- 
abeth Reynold's husband, is about to pub- 
lish his reminiscences reported as "not 
a formal biography so much as a record 
of adventures of the mind stressing the 
development of Mr. Hapgood's creed both 
in life and politics." The whole family 
is living in Italy. 

Dorothy Weston was reported to be in 
New York for several weeks looking thin 
and beautiful. She was so thrilled with 
the big city that she applied for a job 
with her old firm, but when they accepted 
her, she decided to return home to Wes- 
ton Mills after all! 

Mary Lowell Coolidge is now assistant 
professor of philosophy at Vassar. 

1915 
Class Editor: Emily Noyes Knight 
(Mrs. Clinton Prescott Knight) 
Windy Meadows, R. I. 

The marriage of Emily Ellison Van 
Horn, to John Paret Rockwood, Pawling, 
New York, took place April 8th at her 
house at Scarsdale, New York. 

Ruth Hubbard writes: "I expect to be 
abroad from June 1st to September 1st 
and am very anxious to get in touch with 
any of my class who may be travelling 
then. In connection with my work as 
Secretary of the American German Stu- 
dent Exchange (which arranges for the 
exchange of approximately one hundred 
students each year) I shall be in Europe, 
and can be reached in care of the Akad- 
emischer Austauschdienst, Schloss, Por- 
tal III., Berlin. I should love to get in 
touch with anyone who will be there." 

The following extract from the News 
Bulletin of the Institute of International 
Education is interesting: 

In order to effect a more complete un- 
derstanding of the work of administering 
exchange fellowships between German 
and American universities, the Akad- 
emischer Austauschdienst of Berlin, the 
office with which the Institute arranges 
student exchanges with Germany, has 
sent a representative, Miss Ingrid Dyb- 
wad, to the office of the Institute to fa- 
miliarize herself with the work as carried 
on in the United States. During her stay 
she will visit a number of colleges and 
universities in which German students 
have been placed. Later in the spring, 
Miss Ruth Hubbard, Secretary of the 
American-German Student Exchange of 
the Institute, will visit the Akademischer 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



27 



Austauschdienst, to learn the work from 
the German viewpoint. Miss Hubbard 
will visit a number of German universi- 
ties and other institutions of learning dur- 
ing the summer. 

1916 
Class Editor: Catherine S. Godley 

768 Ridgeway Avenue, Avondale, 

Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Ruth Alden Lester moved to Orlando, 
Florida, this spring. Her husband's bus- 
iness has taken them there to live. 

Dorothy Evans Nichol writes that she 
is living in Miami, Florida. Her husband 
is a physician. She has two daughters, 
Nancy Evans, aged almost four, and Dor- 
othy Patricia, who is almost two, and her 
pet hobby during the past year has been 
a back-yard play group consisting of her 
own and neighborhood children. She 
says: "In our ignorance we call it a 
- nursery school." 

' 1917 
Class Editor: Bertha Clark Greenough 

203 Blackstone Boulevard, 

Providence, R. I. 
Frances Colter Stuart writes: "I was 
stricken with a severe neuritis in the fall 
and temporarily lost the use of both legs 
and am now for the first time (April 
14th) getting abroad a few blocks by my- 
self. The second item is cheerful. After 
returning from reunion, my husband and 
I went house-hunting, and in August 
bought a house that exceeded all our 
expectations in the village of Glendale, 
about twelve miles out from Cincinnati. 
Just now our yard is a vision of spring- 
loveliness. My address is now Glendale, 
Ohio. I hope someone will make use of 
it. I might also add that Archie, our 
older boy, has started school this year." 
The marriage of Mr. Kunita Oyaizu 
and Miss Ryu Sato took place in Tokio, 
Japan, on the Third Month 21, 1930. It 
was arranged and conducted according to 
Japanese custom, by Dr. Inazo Nitobe. A 
number of friends attended the reception, 
held afterwards at the Tokyo Kwaikan. 
Ryu Sato Oyaizu is a member of Hiji- 
rizaka Monthly Meeting, Tokyo. For 
seven years she made her home with the 
late David and Margaretta Alsop, at 
Haverford. She is a graduate of Friends' 
Girls' School, Tokyo, and of Bryn Mawr 
College, where she received the degree of 
M. A., in 1918. Returning to Japan, she 
became a teacher in Friends' Girls' 
School, and was one of the first women 
to be permitted to carry on chemical re- 
search in the laboratory of the Imperial 
University, in Tokyo. Later she became 



research assistant to Dr. Tadokoro, mak- 
ing a study of chemistry of foods in the 
Imperial University, at Sapporo, Hok- 
kaido. She thus contributed to the solu- 
tion of Japan's problem of food supply. 
Kunita Oyaizu has been closely connected 
with the Nitobe family, and is said to be 
an earnest student of literature and phil- 
osophy. They are living at 112 Hayashi- 
cho, Komagome, Tokyo, Japan. 

1918 
Class Editor: Helen Edward Walker 
5516 Everett Ave., 
Chicago, 111. 

Mary Scott writes: "Am spending a 
year or so in France, with much family. 
Have an apartment here in Paris, going 
to a few classes, mostly on art, at the 
Sorbonne, trying to finish my thesis for 
the University of Chicago. It's a great 
life once you discover how much to tip 
everybody ! That's a real science ! Last 
summer we had a fine time bicycling in 
Poitou (including Johnny, aged four, who 
was the sight of the country-side on his 
two-wheeled bike). I haven't published 
anything, gotten married or acquired any 
more children !" 

Marie Willard Newell says: "Some 
real news at last. Our long-awaited 
daughter arrived on August 13, 1929, and 
now weighs almost 20 pounds, and is the 
most adorable pink and white cherub you 
ever saw. We named her Mary Louise, 
but call her Mary Lou for short. I could 
go on and on for pages, but must leave 
room to tell you about our new house 
which we have been planning and build- 
ing for the last two years. It is a brick, 
English Georgian type and has lots of 
room and lots of trees around it. We 
moved in last November and I am still 
trying to get all the hundred cupboards 
in shape. You can well imagine this has 
been a very exciting year for me. Any- 
one going through Cleveland, please let 
me know." 

Ella Lindley Burton spent February in 
Bermuda with her sister. 

Jcannette Ridlon Piccard tells the fol- 
lowing tale of woe: "I went to Roose- 
velt Hospital in New York City in Jan- 
uary for a rather serious operation. For 
about ten days I convalesced in Newport 
where Father and Mother had fixed the 
house last fall for winter living. I had 
no idea the ocean could be so beautiful 
under winter snow and sun. Less than a 
week after I reached home we received 
news of the sudden death in Switzerland 
of my much-beloved mother-in-law. A 



28 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



week later my mother was called to the 
bedside of her old aunt in Brittany and 
sailed within a week. That night John, 
my eldest, came down with mumps and 
now I have tonsilitis. If tragedy and 
tragi-comedy make good reading, the 
above should be interesting !" 

1919 
Editor: Marjorie Remington Twitchell 
(Mrs. P. E. Twitchell) 
Setauket, L. I., New York. 

A correction in regard to the news 
about Jinkie Holmes' wedding: She was 
married on December 23rd instead of 
January to Dr. Harry Alexander, under 
whom she had worked for two years in 
asthma research. They had an informal 
wedding at the home of Jinkie's sister, 
Maud Young, and are now living at 310 
Skinker Road, St. Louis (if her hand- 
writing was correctly read). She says of 
her husband: "next to a passion for sci- 
ence, he would rather be amused than 
anything on earth." They will be in Lon- 
don in September. The news of Jinkie 
came through Peggy Rhoads who in Jan- 
uary, had a "short but refreshing trip to 
Florida." Before her ten days' trip she 
had luncheon with Mary Scott Spiller at 
Swarthmore. "The children, Billy and 
Constance, are adorable and very well 
brought up. Mary is quite a specialist 
now in progressive education and espe- 
cially in nursery schools and is teaching 
in a new school at Moylan, Pennsylvania. 
She looks perfectly fine and her home is 
lovely." 

Chuck Coombs Evans writes : "We are 
leading the typical suburban life of a fam- 
ily with two small children, the only 
break this winter being an excursion to 
the hospital to have my tonsils out. Hilda 
and David, four and almost two, respect- 
ively, are thriving. Hilda is tall and 
thin, dark hair, blue eyes, never still a 
minute, conversationally or otherwise. 
David is just as wide as he is tall, has 
red hair, blue eyes, a very firm will, and 
a placid disposition." 

Tip Thurman Fletcher and her two 
children have been at Low Buildings since 
January first. She is one of the princi- 
pals at Miss Shirley's School this year. 
Her husband has been sent on a mission 
(to an indecipherable place) by the Eng- 
lish government. 

Edith Rondinella was married to Dr. 
Jay Besson Rudolphy on February twen- 
tieth. 

Marjorie Remington Twitchell has been 
a substitute soloist in a little church on 
Long Island. 



1920 
Editor: Margaret Ballou Hitchcock 
(Mrs. David Hitchcock) 
45 Mill Rock Rd., New Haven, Conn. 

The Class wishes to extend its sympa- 
thy to Millicent Carey on the death of 
her father, Mr. Anthony Morris Carey, 
who died in Baltimore, on May 14th. 

1921 

Class Editor: Mrs. J. E. Rogers, 
99 Poplar Plains Road, 
Toronto, Ontario, Canada. 

Eleanor Donnelly Erdman's daughter, 
Laura Thorne Erdman, was born in Jan- 
uary. According to reports she is a very 
sweet and healthy baby and is going to 
allow her mother to come to reunion. 

Chloe Garrison Binger has a second 
child, born in April in New York City. 

Ellen Jay Garrison and her husband 
sailed the end of March for Italy. They 
will be away several months but Ellen 
hopes she will be back in time for re- 
union. 

Elinor West Cary writes from Dresher, 
Penna., that she and her husband are liv- 
ing in the country and managing a flour- 
ishing evergreen nursery. She is keen 
about gardening and her outdoor life, 
which includes daily horse-back rides. 
Westy sailed April first for three months 
abroad so she won't be with us in June. 
She has recently seen Mag Taylor Mc- 
intosh who is quite bucked up over the 
number of 21 who are coming back. 

Eleanore Boswell sends us a fine, long 
letter from England, where she has been 
living for the past few years, while pur- 
suing a Ph.D. at the University of Lon- 
don. Her Magnum Opus is "The Court 
Stage from 1660-1702," and as it is about 
completed she expects to be having her 
viva on it just when we are all rallying 
together on the campus. Next year El- 
eanore has a Guggenheim Fellowship 
which will keep her on in London collect- 
ing material for a history of the Restora- 
tion Stage. Her address is care of 
Brown Shipley and Co., 123 Pall Mall, 
London, S. W. 1, where she hopes mem- 
bers of the class will look her up when 
they are in England. 

Louise Wilson Dawson has been visit- 
ing in Toronto and I had the opportun- 
ity of seeing her and her chubby, curly- 
haired daughter, Barbara Ann, who at 
the age of 18 months walks and talks. 
Louise has just moved into a house in 
Westmount, Montreal. 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



29 



1922 
Class Editor: Serena Hand Savage 
(Mrs. William Savage) 
29 West 12th Street, New York City. 

Cornelia Baird Voorhis has a second 
son, Henry Martyn Baird Voorhis, born 
on St. Patrick's Day. 

Eleanor Bush Cocoran has been in New 
York as a delegate from Chicago to the 
National Conference of the Junior 
League. 

Missy Crosby has been at Yale this 
winter, studying archaeology. 

Dougie Hay has given up her job at 
J. P. Morgan's, finished her course in 
Ground Aviation, and is now very much 
"air-minded." She is about to start her 
training for a pilot's license. 

1924 
Class Editor: Beth Tuttle Wilbur 
(Mrs. Donald Wilbur) 
Willis J. Walker Cottage, 
Wayzata, Minn. 

Kitty Prewitt, after a long absence 
from the pages of The Bulletin, writes: 
"I was married last November. Am now 
Mrs. E. D. Ward Dabney, and my ad- 
dress is 423 W. Second Street, Lexington, 
Ky. That's all the dope I have on my- 
self." 

From Betty Price Richards: "I don't 
deserve notice in The Bulletin because 
I haven't yet paid my dues ! I am living 
at 103 E. 86th St., New York City, and 
have two bouncing children, Peter, aged 
four — Betsy, aged two." 

1925 
Editor: Elizabeth Mallett Conger 
(Mrs. Frederic Conger) 
325 E. 72nd Street, New York City. 

This month our class is hounded and 
tracked day and night by photographers 
panting to use our bridal pictures for 
beauty contests. Miss Clark (the lady 
with the throaty voice) will feel person- 
ally aggrieved if we miss the purely phil- 
anthropic offer of the Ader-Hill Studio. 
Vanity Fair, Vogue and The Spur are 
languishing without us and The Herald- 
Tribune just won't come out at all next 
Sunday unless we grace its rotogravure 
section. 1925 is simply buried under 
mountains of rice and rose leaves. ("Rice 
and Roseleaves" sounds like "Sesame and 
— " but "now I am lapsing into the Rus- 
keenian. Can anyone complete the quo- 
tation?") 

To begin with, Brownie (Miriam Grubb 
Brown) is marrying George Vanderveer 
on June 4th. The wedding will be a small 



one at Brownie's home in Norristown. 
Next winter the Vanderveers will live in 
Baltimore and Brownie will teach Italian 
in some School there. 

And on the same day, June fourth, the 
Borosses arc having a double wedding at 
Calvary Church with a reception after 
in Calvary Iiouse. May Morrill Dunn 
and Lucylle Austin will be among the 
bridesmaids and will wear flowered chif- 
fons with a blue background. (By the 
way, Helene Beaudrais is a great help 
to Bryn Mawr brides. She is at the head 
of the bridal salon of Lord and Taylor.) 
Alys is marrying J. Herbert Smith, the 
Senior Curate of Calvary Church and 
Gene is marrying John Potter Cuyler, Jr., 
who will study for the ministry one more 
year before joining the staff of Calvary. 
Gene expects to continue her job as Di- 
rector of Adult Religious Education and 
next winter both families will live at Cal- 
vary House. 

The next wedding on the calendar is 
that of Nan Hough and Baldwin Smith 
on June 19th. This will be held in the 
chapel of St. Bartholomew's Church and 
will be followed by a small reception at 
the Cosmopolitan Club. The Smiths will 
live in a most charming little faculty 
house at Princeton where Mr. Smith is 
Professor of Art and Archaeology. 

On June 24th Crit Coney and Edward 
Francis D'Arms will be married at the 
Coney home. They will live in Prince- 
ton and Mr. D'Arms will continue his 
work in the Classics Department. 

Now that we're all in the swing of it, 
aren't there any more weddings? Not 
even a nice little elopement — or some- 
thing? 

Peggy Stewardson Blake and her hus- 
band have bought a delightful house in 
Washington — eight rooms, sleeping porch 
and there is a park right behind. The 
address is 1527 44th St., N. W. 

Alice Parker, although still hoping to 
move to New York again, has been hon- 
ored by a good job in the Library of 
Congress — a place where the great male 
creature is kept on a pedestal and ladies 
are rarely permitted to work. 

1927 
Class Editor: Ellenor Morris, 
Berwyn, Pennsylvania. 

Madeleine Pierce Lemon has twin 
daughters, Nancy and Jane, born on Feb- 
ruary 23rd. They certainly hold the 
record for the Double Event. 

Ann Carey Thomas Clarke has a young- 
son, Charles McClellan Clarke II., born 
December first. 



The Saint Timothy's School 
for Girls 

CATONSVILLE, MARYLAND 

FomJeJ Sipltmltr I8S2 

COLLEGE PREPARATORY 

AND 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

MISS LOUISA McENDREE FOWLER 
Head of the School 

Wykeham Rise 

WASHINGTON, CONNECTICUT 

A COUNTRY SCHOOL 
FOR GIRLS 

FANNY E. DAVIES, LL.A., Headmistress 
Prepares for Bryn Mawr and Other Colleges 

The Episcopal Academy 

(Founded 1785) 

CITY LINE, OVERBROOK, PA. 

A country day school for boys 

MODERN AND WELL EQUIPPED 
Endorsed by Bryn Motor Alumnae 

UNIVERSITYgTrLS 

BOARDING AND DAY SCHOOL 

Founded 1896 

Thorough and successful Preparation 

for Eastern Colleges for Women as well as 

for Midwestern Colleges and Universities 

Illustrated Catalogue on Request 

ANNA B. HAIRE, A.B., SMITH COLLEGE, Principal 

1106-B Lake Shore Drive Chicago, Illinois 

THE LOW AND 
HEYWOOD SCHOOL 

Emphasizing college preparatory work. 

Also general and special courses. 

One year intensive college preparation. 

Junior school. 

65th year. Catalogue. 

SHIPPAN POINT, 
STAMFORD, CONN. 



The Ethel Walker School 

SIMSBURY, CONNECTICUT 

Head of School 

ETHEL WALKER SMITH, A.M., 
Bryn Mawr College 



Head Mistress 

JESSIE GERMAIN HEWITT, A.B., 
Bryn Mawr College 



College Preparation. Cultural 

and Special Courses. City and 

Country Advantages. 

Lucie C. Beard, Headmistress 

Box M, Orange, N. J. 




/1ARCUM SCH<&L 

BRYN MAWR, PA. 
Prepares for Bryn Mawr and 
all leading colleges 

Musical Course prepares for the Depart- 
ment of Music of Bryn Mawr College 
EDITH HARCUM, Head of School 
L. May Willis, Principal 

THE MISSES KIRK'S 

College Preparatory School 

PREPARATORY TO BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 
Individual Instruction. Athletics. 

Clovercroft, Montgomery Avenue, Rosemont, Pa. 
Mail, telephone and telegraph address: Bryn Mawr. Pa. 



CHOATE SCHOOL 

1600 Beacon Street. Brookline, Mass. 

HOME AND DAY SCHOOL 
FOR GIRLS 

EMPHASIS ON COLLEGE PREPARATION 

Elective Courses for students not preparing 
for College 

AUGUSTA CHOATE, A.M. (Va*««r) 

Principal 



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THE AGNES IRWIN SCHOOL 

2009-2011 Delancey Place, Philadelphia 

A College Preparatory 
SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 



BERTHA M. LAWS, A.B., Headmistress 

MISS WRIGHT'S SCHOOL 

Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Prepares for College Board 
Examination 

BANCROFT SCHOOL 
FOR GIRLS 

30th Year. Complete College Preparation. 

Individual Attention to carefully selected group in 
Boarding Department of Progressive Day School. 
Summer and Winter Sports. Dramatics, Art, 
Music. Address 

HOPE FISHER, Principal, Worcester, Mass. 

The Katharine Branson School 

ROSS, CALIFORNIA Across the Bay (rem San Francisco 

A Country School College Preparatory 

Head: 
Katharine Fleming Branson, A.B., Bryn Mawr 



MISS MADEIRA'S SCHOOL 

1330 19th St., N. W. Washington, D. C. 

A RESIDENT AND DAY SCHOOL FOR 
GIRLS 

LUCY MADEIRA WING, A.B. 

MRS. DAVID LAFOREST WING 
Head Mistress 



FERRY HALL 

A RESIDENT AND DAY SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

On Lake Michigan, near Chicago 

Junior College: High School Department: College 
Preparatory and General Courses. Special Departments 
of Music, Expression and Art. 

Two new dormitories, including new dining room and 
infirmary. 

Eloise R. Tremain, A.B., Bryn Mawr, Principal 

ROSEMARY HALL 

College Preparatory 
(With supplementary but not alternative courses) 

} Head Mistress** 

GREENWICH - CONNECTICUT 

The Shipley School 

Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 

Preparatory to Bryn Mawr College 

ALICE G. HOWLAND, ELEANOR 0. BROWNELL 
Principals 

MISS RANSOM and 
MISS BRIDGES' SCHOOL 

PIEDMONT, CALIFORNIA 

(A suburb of San Francisco) 

A RESIDENT AND DAY SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

General and College Preparatory Course* 

KATHERINE TOWLE, A.B., Head 



The Baldwin School 

A Country School for Girls 
BRYN MAWR PENNSYLVANIA 

Preparation for Bryn Mawr, Mount 

Holyoke, Smith, Vassar and Wellesley 

Colleges. Abundant Outdoor Life. 

Hockey, Basketball, Tennis, 

Indoor Swimming Pool. 

ELIZABETH FORREST JOHNSON. A.B. 

HEAD 



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Garrison Forest 

Modern, well-equipped country school for 
girls. In the Green Spring Valley near 
Baltimore. Thorough college preparation. 
General Courses with excellent opportu- 
nities in Music and Art. Separate Junior 
School. All sports including riding. 
Catalogue on request 

Jean G. Marshall \ D . . , 
Nancy J. Offutt ) P"nc.pals 

Bryn Mawr, IQ20 

BOX M GARRISON MARYLAND 








Cathedral School of St. Mary 

GARDEN CITY, LONG ISLAND, N. Y. 

A school for Girls 1 9 miles from New York. College 

preparatory and general courses. Music Art and 

Domestic Science. Catalogue on request. Box B. 

MIRIAM A. BYTEL, A.B., RadclirTe, Principal 

BERTHA GORDON WOOD, A.B., Bryn Mawr, 




Assistant Principal 


TheTraphagen School of Fashion 

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nearly 800 students took part; all prizes 
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exception of one of the jive third prizes. 

1680 Broadway (near 52nd St.) New York 


THE CAMBRIDGE SCHOOL 

DOMESTIC ARCHITECTURE 
LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 
A Professional School for College 
\ Graduates 

The Academic Year for 1930-31 opens 

Monday, September 29, 1930 

Summer School, June 23 to Aug. 2, 1930. 

Henry Atherton Frost — Director 

53 Church Street, Cambridge, Mass. 

At Harvard Square 










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Especially for girls wishing 
a year's study abroad before 
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Europe. Four months' 
courses at the Sorbonne; 
Italian history and Art in 
Rome. 

Directors: Miss Helen Anderson-Smith 
Miss Louise H. Wood 
(A. B. Bryn Mawr 1919) 

FOR INFORMATION: 

MRS. OLIVE HASBROUCK 

ELIOT HALL, CAMBRIDGE, MASS. 





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BRYN MAWR 
ALUMNAE 
BULLETIN 




COMMENCEMENT 



July, 1930 



Vol. X 



No. 7 



Entered as second-class matter, January 15, 1921, at the Post Office, Phila., Pa., under Act of March 3, 1879 

COPYRIGHT. 1930 

ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 



OFFICERS OF THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

EXECUTIVE BOARD 

President Anne Kidder Wilson, 1903 

Vice-President Mary Hardy, 1920 

Recording Secretary Gertrude Hearne Myers, 1919 

Corresponding Secretary May Egan Stokes, 1911 

Treasurer Margaret E. Brusstar, 1903 

Chairman of the Finance Committee Caroline Florence Lexow, 1908 

Chairman of the Publicity Committee Caroline Morrow Chadwick-Collins, 1905 

ALUMNAE SECRETARY AND BUSINESS MANAGER OF THE BULLETIN 

Alice M. Hawkins, 1907 

EDITOR OF THE BULLETIN 

Marjorie L. Thompson. 1912 

DISTRICT COUNCILLORS 

District 1 Helen Evans Lewis, 1913 

District II Jeanne Kerr Fleischmann, 1910 

District III Alletta Van Reypen Korff, 1900 

District IV Katharine Holliday Daniels, 1918 

District V , Isabel Lynde Dammann, 1905 

District VI Edna Warkentin Alden, 1900 

District VII Helen Brayton Barendt, 1903 

ALUMNAE DIRECTORS 

Frances Fincke Hand, 1897 Margaret Reeve Cary. 1907 

Mary Peirce, 1912 Elizabeth Lewis Otey, 1901 

Virginia Kneeland Frantz, 1918 

CHAIRMAN OF THE ALUMNAE FUND 

Caroline Florence Lexow. 1908 

CHAIRMAN OF THE ACADEMIC COMMITTEE 

Pauline Goldmark, 1896 

CHAIRMAN OF THE SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOAN FUND COMMITTEE 

Margaret Gilman. 1919 

CHAIRMAN OF THE COMMITTEE ON HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Dr. Marjorie F Murray, 1913 

CHAIRMAN OF THE NOMINATING COMMITTEE 

Eleanor Little Aldrtch. 1905 



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NEW YORK For College Women in addition 

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college subjects. Second year 
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90 Marlboro Street 

Resident and 

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PROVIDENCE 
155 Angell Street 

For Catalogue address Director, College Departmen t 



The Phebe Anna 
Thome School 

Under the Direction of the 
Department of Education 



A progressive school preparing 
for all colleges. Open air class 
rooms. Pre-school, Primary, 
Elementary and High School 
Grades. 



BRYN MAWR, PA. 

Agnes L. Rogers, Ph.D., Director 
Frances Browne, A.B., HeadMistress 



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Bryn Mawr Alumnae 
Bulletin 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF 
THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNA ASSOCIATION 

Marjorie L. Thompson, '12, Editor 
Alice M. Hawkins, '07, Business Manager 

EDITORIAL BOARD 
Mary Crawford Dudley, '96 Emily Kimbrough Wrench, '21 

Caroline Morrow Chadwick-Collins, '05 Ellenor Morris, '27 

Emily Fox Cheston, '08 Elinor B. Amram, '28 

Anne Kidder Wilson, '03, ex-officio 

Subscription Price, $1.50 a Year Single Copies, 25 Cents 

Checks should be drawn to the order of Bryn Mawr Alumnae Bulletin 

Published monthly, except August, September and October, at 1006 Arch St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Vol. X JULY, 1930 No. 7 

Everything that one reads, dealing with education, gives one a very definite 
sense of ferment, of unrest, of discontent. Every one is questioning, is analysing, is 
discarding. Education has for so long been the panacea for all evils, and faith in it, 
as it existed, has been so absolute, that although this questioning to some seems inop- 
portune at a time when a consideration of financial ways and means of promoting 
education is pressing in on every side, it is nevertheless extraordinarily exhilarating 
to see what really lies under the surface disturbance. Dean Pound for his Com- 
mencement Address chose the very illuminating title, "Information and Learning." 
He said in conclusion, "Wisdom is futile except as it has its basis in information 
grasped and transmuted into knowledge and selected and organized into learning." 
And complementing this as Baccalaureate sermons rarely complement Commence- 
ment speeches was Dr. Sperry's address based on the text from Ecclesiasticus : "I 
awaked up last of all as one that gleaneth after the gatherers. ... I laboured not 
for myself alone, but for all of them that seek learning." In developing his thesis 
he quoted, stressing the analogy with a college, the singularly stirring passage from 
Burke which describes the nature of the state: ". . . it is not a partnership 
in things of a temporary and perishable nature. It is a partnership in all science, 
a partnership in all art, a partnership in every virtue and in all perfection. As the 
ends of such a partnership cannot be obtained in many generations, it becomes a 
partnership not only between those who are living, but between those who are living, 
those who are dead, and those who are to be born." With education once again cele- 
brated for us as a high adventure, one realizes that the questioning of education 
as a panacea, the discontent with it as it is, is not a lack of faith in it, but rather 
so genuine a conviction of its good that obviously every device and means to the 
desired end must be scrutinized, and in what seems often destructive, are constructive 
ideas. And this burning belief illumines all discussions of how the student is to 
obtain the final guerdon, whether the discussions are of material ways and means 
of paying for his education, or whether the discussions are of what that education 
shall consist and what methods the student shall pursue so that as he looks back 
he shall feel that he has laboured not for himself alone, but to increase the sum 
of human knowledge, and has gained not information but learning. 



INFORMATION AND LEARNING 

(Commencement address given June 4th by, Dean Roscoe Pound, of the 
Harvard Law School) 

One of the things relativity has taught us, or should have taught us, is that we 
cannot speak of the spirit of the time absolutely and confidently as we were wont 
to do a generation ago. From certain points of view, for certain purposes, we may 
select certain phenomena, and, putting the stress upon them for the given purpose, 
may discover a spirit of the age relative thereto. But from other points of view and 
for other purposes, we shall select other phenomena, and putting the stress upon 
them, for these other purposes, discern a very different spirit for the same time. Nor 
do we seem equal today to the broad generalizations, unifying the different stand- 
points and different purposes, which in the nineteenth century gave us great systems 
of philosophy, embracing all things, by means of some single decisive fundamental. 
Thus what strikes the thoughtful observer of today is likely to be the reign of paradox. 
When one takes a position, surveys things from it, and pronounces a judgment, he is 
speedily confronted with another possible and equally valid judgment inconsistent 
therewith. It all depends on where one starts; and there are no universally conceded 
criteria of starting points whereby we may say he must begin here rather than there. 
Nor does this trouble the present age. It has lost faith in logical consistency and 
has something very like faith in inconsistency. . . . 

As one looks back over a generation of teaching, he cannot but feel how thor- 
oughly the attitude of the student has changed. The student of the past generation 
believed in simplicity, generosity, unification, categories and absolute validities. The 
teacher sought for these things and strove to select and arrange and give shape to the 
materials of study so as to bring them out. The student of the present sees complexity, 
particularity, disconnection, unique phenomena, and relative and conditional validities. 
The teacher emphasizes these things and selects and arranges and gives shape to the 
materials of study so as to bring them out. Possibly we know so much more than we 
did forty years ago that things which seemed simple have come to appear complex, 
that particulars have multiplied beyond our powers of effective generalizing, and 
hence beyond our powers for the time being of unification, classification, and reasoned 
valuation. Ytet I suspect there is another and more effective cause. Our thinking 
tends to reflect the outward circumstances of the life we live. We set up an order 
of the universe to the model of the social order about us. The transition all over 
the world from individual production, in which one may see the whole as well as the 
parts, to mass production wherein he has only to do with details, the transition 
from a handful of significant political phenomena to a welter of details, the transition 
from simple and intelligible standards of conduct in a rural, agricultural society to 
the mass of detailed rule called for in an urban industrial society — such things have 
been leading us to set up an intellectual order to the model of the economic order 
which we see about us. 

Not the least of the characteristics of the last century was confidence. It was 
a confident century. It was the heir of the Renaissance, of the Reformation, of the 
Enlightenment. The Renaissance had unbounded confidence in reason. The Reforma- 
tion had no less confidence in the individual conscience. If the Enlightenment was 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 3 

an era of skepticism, yet it was a confident skepticism, skeptical rather as to authorita- 
tive and traditional limitations upon its thinking than as to its power to achieve 
things by unfettered creative thought. . . . We were confident of the quality 
of the information, confident of its validity, confident of its utility, and confident of 
the modes of imparting it. 

Under this confident program of the nineteenth century, information, awareness 
of disconnected items of fact, was the foundation. Upon it was built knowledge, that 
is, a grasp of the items so as to be able to discriminate and hold fast to those which 
were of value. A higher term was learning, that is, knowledge put in intelligible 
compass and made available for use by selection and organization. Thus the raw 
materials of information were prepared to be acted on by wisdom; that is, by the 
power of putting knowledge to work so as to make it do things. The whole system 
presupposed the validity of information. It assumed that there were "facts," and 
that once a fact, always a fact. We could discover and appraise facts with assurance, 
and when established as facts they were true for all purposes and in all connections. 
It assumed the efficacy of reason and the validity of logical method. It assumed a 
body of laws governing all phenomena and a universe in which cause and effect was a 
necessary and inexorable relation. 

If the nineteenth century was a confident century, the present is by comparison 
an era of doubt and disillusion. We are as uncertain of ourselves today as we were 
certain of ourselves in the last generation. Note what has happened to the things 
of which we were so sure in the last century. 

As to reason, psychology has utterly undermined our faith in it. Nowadays, men 
conceive that reasons come after action, not before. They are not the springs or 
causes of action. They come after action to satisfy a human feeling of need to give 
a rational appearance to what follows from very different premises. As men see it 
now, reasoning is hopelessly adulterated by desires and prejudices and fears. So far 
from being something fundamental, to which we may tie our understanding of human 
behavior and social phenomena, it but sicklies over with a pale cast of orderliness 
actions which spring in the event from wholly unrational sources. 

Progress has fared no better. (Men now feel that nineteenth-century concep- 
tions of progress were outgrowths of what might be called the Euclidian, straight- 
line thinking of that time. The newer physics, the newer mathematics, and, above 
all the newer philosophy have shaken our faith in it. We suspect that we have been 
thinking in terms of straight lines because to the limited vision of humanity things 
seem to be so constructed, whereas we now take space to be curved rather than laid 
out in planes. We suspect we have been thinking in terms of the three dimensions 
of our experience, whereas mathematics and physics now suggest a differently laid out 
universe.) We perceive that the straight lines of descent and ancestry, portrayed 
in the books of the last generation, are shown to be illusory by the philosophy of 
today. Evolution may go by jumps, not by slow progress in straight lines. There is 
not of necessity a straight-line progress from organism A to organism B. B may very 
well result from a convergent development out of C and D and E. Moreover, 
relativity has taught us that forward and onward and upward are not absolute 
terms. Forward and upward are always relative to something. Thus evolution 
may be in any direction or in many directions. About all that is left is an idea of 
change. In the last century things progressed. In the twentieth century they change. 



4 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

The difference is significant, since it leaves out the order, the direction, the assurance 
which were characteristic in the learning of a generation ago. 

Our political thinking is going the same way. Here too psychology and philosophy 
have undermined the confident faith of the last century. The idealistic philosophy, 
which saw in legal and political institutions the unfolding of a single, simple idea, 
has been fighting a losing rear-guard action. Today even idealisms are likely to be 
pluralist or to postulate a complex idea. Also in the complicated social and economic 
order of today, freedom can not be the simple solving idea which sufficed for the less 
differentiated, less specialized orders of yesterday. Most of all, however, psychology 
has dealt heavy blows at the central conception of free will. A psychological deter- 
mination, generally gaining ground in recent thought, strikes at the root of the political 
theory and legal philosophy of the immediate past. But as he looks outside of the 
social sciences, as he turns his eyes to the physical sciences, the scholar of today must 
be confused. As the former seem running toward determinism, the latter seem run- 
ning away from it. The teacher must feel with Lewis Carroll's helmsman — 

"When he said Tut her to starboard, but keep her head larboard,' 
Pray what was the helmsman to do?" 

Changes no less profound have been going on with respect to science and scientific 
method. As we have seen; in the nineteenth century, science — meaning the physical 
and biological sciences, but especially the former — held its head high and with a 
mouth speaking great things sought to take over all knowledge for its province. 
Positivism was its prevailing creed. There were laws governing all phenomena, 
discoverable by observation, to be formulated by induction, and to be verified by 
further observation. ' Research was the one curving of information, to be observed 
and used in further and more accurate plottings of the orbits of the inevitable opera- 
tions of nature's laws. Nothing happened by chance. Nothing resulted from the 
free play of a free will. A physical and physical-physiological determination — as it 
has been called, a scientific Calvinism — was finding a mechanically fixed place for 
everything in a universe ordered by mechanical laws. Even the limits and not a 
little of the contents of the unknowable were taken to be known. Social laws 
exactly analogous to the laws of the physical universe were discoverable, and by the 
same methods. There was no place in the social sciences for creative effort. Things 
were not made. They happened inevitably. Deliberate effort to fashion or refashion 
institutions was futile. It was not done. The jurist who flattered himself that he 
was creating something, put himself in the category of the seeker for perpetual 
motion. Our discovery of social laws could do no more for us than enable some 
degree of prediction. At most we could, as it were, sit upon the fence and observe 
the inevitable operation of social laws shape and reshape social institutions. No 
amount of thought or of inventive activity upon our part could have any more effect 
upon the operation of those laws than upon the phases of the moon. 

But while the physical sciences thus were seeming to reduce the whole universe 
to a comfortable and intelligible order, physics itself had a change of heart, and 
all the sciences have been breaking loose in their turn. Today scientists are not so 
sure about the absolute and universal sequence of phenomena according to laws of 
undeviating operation. The laws they now recognize are quite different from the 
definite and detailed legislation imposed on the universe by Herbert Spencer. 
Physicists are quite willing to recognize a "random" element in nature. They 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 5 

recognize that things may and do happen by jumps. They concede that at most they 
are dealing with probabilities. They are not so sure that they are competent to lay 
out the inevitable lines of the social sciences to the patterns of physics. Most of all, 
physics itself has become involved in metaphysics, and it has come to pass that a 
treatise by a biological chemist, dealing with physiology, begins with a preliminary 
consideration of epistemology. There is no longer a conceded absolute succession 
from one cause to one effect. Conceivably, as scientists now think, one event may 
be connected with many antecedents. Conceivably it may have behind it different 
antecedents at different times or under different conditions. Perhaps nothing has 
done so much to set the thinking of the time adrift as the change of front, the change 
of attitude of modern physics. For the thoroughly ordered universe of the last 
century, it has given us one on the model of Artemas Ward's military company in 
which every member was an officer and the superior of every other. 

Logic has had a like fate. It has been affected or infected by metaphysics, by 
mathematics, and by psychology. Pragmatism has shaken our old faith in logic as 
an instrument of arriving at truth. Truth, we are now taught, depends on the 
purpose for which we seek it; on the problem for which it is to be used. . . . Use- 
fulness is not absolute. It is relative to some problems. What is useful for one may 
not be for another. What we draw out for one purpose cannot of necessity be made to 
serve all purposes; and the selection of what we draw it from is governed, not by 
any infallible mechanical process, but by the exigencies of the task for which we do 
the drawing. 

Mathematics and logic have been coming together, and mathematics too has 
been coming to be involved with the metaphysics of uncertainty. It too has been 
losing its simple, straight, absolute lines. An element of "more or less" has been 
creeping in. We see that when the formula comes to be applied, no one risks going 
to the very edge of the theoretically mathematically possible. He keeps safely to a 
cautious middle ground, within the limits of the prescribed formula. But in the 
supposedly unscientific social sciences, most of our difficulties come from the pressure 
of desires, leading men to push out to the extreme limits of the political or ethical or 
legal formula, and so compelling us to an acute consciousness of how hard it is to fix 
limits to correspond with realities, no matter how clear we are as to the central core. 
In other words, the formulas in which the scientist expresses observation and experi- 
ence and those in which the political scientist or moralist or jurist expresses what 
he observes and governments and peoples and courts have experienced, are not so 
different as the confident assurance of nineteenth-century science had led us to assume. 
It is only the difference of attitude in those who have recourse to them which has 
made the one appear fixed and steadfast and the other hazy and unstable. But note 
that more certainty has not been imparted into the latter. Instead the former, on 
closer scrutiny, have proved to be hazy at the edges when applied to reality. 

Most of all, however, psychology has undermined the confident logic of the 
last generation. Given premises, we may prove anything. But the premises, as we 
now think, are chosen with reference to the conclusion desired. It is not that the 
premises sustain the conclusion. Men are saying, in the light of psychology, that it 
is the conclusion which sustains the premises. And whence comes the conclusion. 
That, too, we are told, is chosen because of desires or prejudices, or complexes or 



6 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

fears, which thus may control the whole process of what was formerly accounted 
severe thinking, leading to an inevitable end. 

Economics is in the same class. What has not psychology done to its "economic 
man"? True his selfishness and self-interest are there, though very likely called by 
quite different names. But the reason which guided his selfishness and enabled us to 
predict its course and reach conclusions of general value, applicable to the man in 
the street, has become a matter of desires and complexes and fears, and the enlighten- 
ment, which gave direction to his self interest — well perhaps that has become a 
matter of endocrine glands. 

Historians have been busy of late putting history in the same order of uncertainty, 
complexity and disorder. We know the so-called facts of history from the narratives 
of actors or eye witnesses or contemporaries and the pages of historians derived from 
their testimonies. But psychology tells us that the actors colored their narratives to 
give an appearance of rational design to what they did on quite another basis; that 
the eye witnesses saw through the spectacles of their individual desires or prejudices 
or complexes or fears; that what the contemporaries believed and handed down 
depended on unique conditions of personality of which we can hardly judge; and that 
what the historians chose, from the mass of testimony at their disposal, and selected 
as the material of their tale, depended on subjective pictures in their individual 
minds, as to what a history ought to tell and why, and as to what should have 
happened and how, which grew out of their unique personalities and unique sur- 
roundings and can often no more than be guessed at. Beyond certain limits soon 
reached, our facts of history prove to be illusory. . . . 

It is no wonder that just now we are very much troubled about education. The 
presuppositions of the educational system in the last century are insecure, and we 
have nothing clearly pointed out to take their place. If the unique individual is the 
significant thing, can there be any such thing as organized education, at least for any 
useful purpose? Even if we reduced teaching to a one-teacher-one-pupil relation, 
modern philosophy would have us think that the one could never in very truth 
understand the other. It would have us think that the two could never agree. Hence 
it casts doubt even on that impracticable possibility. And if we come to the actual 
situation and work at it with the utmost conservatism, it must be apparent that 
teaching today is very much more of a task than it was a generation ago, when the 
teacher could make assured dogmatic statements on the great majority of the ques- 
tions he encountered and the student could confidently put down those statements 
in his note-book. Lewis Carroll's remark, "Is this a statement that I see before me?" 
must occur to many a student of today when he reads the hesitating, endlessly quali- 
fied, indefinite pronouncements which have so often replaced the confident assertions 
of the nineteenth-century texts. . . . 

If principles and classifications and categories are not absolute, in the sense that 
they were not set up by the Creator in their final form on the sixth day, yet they may 
be significant for our mastery of nature, and reality itself is not absolute. When we 
speak of reality we mean significance; and these things may be very significant for 
the purpose for which we have employed them. Well, in spite of the doubt and 
confusion in recent thought and apparently studied disorder of recent knowledge, 
when one looks attentively below the surface, he cannot help feeling that there are 
such things as system and order, that there are principles and) classifications and 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 7 

categories after all. Relativity has so far disturbed our settled notions that we have 
not thought to apply it to itself. Not even relativity is absolute. Hence our disil- 
lusionment should be no more than relative. For some purpose it is significant to see 
that each individual man is in some degree unique. For many other :purposes it is 
significant to see the common qualities, the general characteristics, the broad aspects 
of personality and behavior, which make it possible to deal with human conduct in 
the gross in a crowded world. If we pressed the connection and inter-relation of 
things too hard in the last century, we may easily press disconnection too far in the 
present. By the test of usefulness for our understanding of nature and harnessing 
it to human purposes, the nineteenth-century ordered and systematized universe is 
just as true as the disconnected universe of the twentieth century. . . . 

For a season we have eaten more of the fruit of the tree of knowledge than we 
can digest. But we need not on that account pronounce it intrinsically indigestible. 
In institutions of learning, all over the world, the work of digestion is going forward, 
to the end that human powers be developed to their highest possible unfolding. The 
task of the scholar is not to deny the mass of information which has been overwhelm- 
ing us, but to organize it and make it intelligible and useful. We are waiting for 
another Aristotle to take a survey of it in its length and breadth and put it in the 
order of reason. Wisdom is futile except as it has its basis in information grasped and 
transmuted into knowledge and selected and organized into learning. 



BRYN MAWR SERIES 

The Music Department of Bryn Mawr College takes pleasure in announcing 
its Series of Concerts for the season 1930-31. The series will consist of four con- 
certs of a very varied character, the programs ranging from Elizabethan music to 
the present day. 

Only course tickets are sold in advance, which are transferable but not redeem- 
able. Single tickets will be sold one week in advance of each performance. Tickets 
for the series are $7.50. 

Wednesday, October 29, 1930, at 8.20 o'clock: "The English Singers" of Lon- 
don — Flora Mann, Nellie Carson, Lilian Berger, Norman Stone, Norman Notley, 
Cuthbert Kelly. 

Monday, December 8, 1930, at 8.20 o'clock: The Philadelphia Chamber String 
Simfonietta, conducted by Fabien Sevitzky and Madame Maria Koussevitzky, soprano; 
Horace Alwyne, pianist. 

Wednesday, January 14, 1931, at 8.20 o'clock: Pianoforte recital by Harold 
Bauer. 

Monday, February 9, 1931, at 8.20 o'clock: The New York String Quartet 
and another artist to be announced later. 

Subscribers to this series of concerts will receive an invitation to attend the 
concert given by the orchestra of the Curtis Institute of Music, conducted by Emil 
Mlynarski. This concert has been generously donated to the college by Mrs. Mary 
Louise Curtis Bok. 



FINANCING A COLLEGE EDUCATION 

By Margaret Gilman 

Chairman, Scholarships and Loan Cojnmittee, Bryn Mawr College. 

(The following article appeared in the SAVINGS BANK JOURNAL of March, 1930, with this 

editorial comment 
An interesting possibility is opened up by the writer as regards the place of the 
bank in the student loan movement. In administering loans to worthy students, col- 
leges and universities have had to develop business departments of considerable size, 
duplicating in a small way machinery already set up in banks. The question is asked 
whether it would not be a more intelligent plan for banks to take over the making of 
loans to students. 

Educational studies seem to indicate that the student is a good risk, for those 
institutions which have a systematic program for the collection of loans made for 
educational purposes, have found results satisfactory to a high degree.) 

When college education was in its younger days the student who worked his 
way through college was the object of unstinted admiration. The more time he 
spent on odd jobs of one sort or another, the more admirable he was considered, and 
effort was made to find him still more small jobs to add a few more dollars to his 
income and to take away a few more hours from his academic pursuits. On the 
other hand, the student who presumed to borrow money in order to spend long 
hours in the library or the laboratory over his own work instead of other people's 
was an object of distrust to college authorities. For the student who had not the 
money to pay cash for an education, the only respectable thing was to set to work to 
earn that education. 

All this has changed. The ideal of the worthy hard-working student has fallen 
into disrepute, and the stigma has been removed from the idea of student borrowing. 
The reason, I think, is two-fold. The first reason chronologically is that educational 
authorities have come to realize no student whose days are crowded with other 
occupations, who waits on table and hurriedly swallows his own lunch, who works 
long hours in some office or library, who fills every moment with odd jobs, almost 
invariably poorly paid, does his best work. It has become evident that some measure 
of tranquillity and a modicum of leisure are essential for the student who is to do his 
best intellectual work. There has been a steadily increasing tendency on the part of 
college authorities to urge students who must earn part of their expenses to do so in 
the summer holidays and not to crowd the college year with alien and wearing activi- 
ties, and above all, not to hesitate to borrow. 

In accordance with this policy, student loan funds have been established in a 
large number of colleges and universities. The most recent study of student loan 
funds (W. J. Greenleaf, "Student Loan Funds," U. S. Bureau of Education Bul- 
letin, 1929, No. 2) states that in 282 colleges and universities funds amounting to 
almost $4,000,000 are loaned annually. These loan funds have been growing stead- 
ily in number and importance, and have been the object of increasing interest. In 
1925 the Student Loan Information Bureau was founded, under the auspices of the 
Association of University and College Business Officers of the Eastern States. The 
study made by L. G. Chassee under the supervision of this bureau and published by 



REDACTED: p. 8 



The following material has been removed 
from this volume for copyright reasons: 

Vol. 10, no. 8, pp. 8-10: Financing a College 
Education by Margaret Gilman, Chairman, 
Scholarship and Loan Committee, Bryn 
Mawr College, appeared in Savings Bank 
Journal of March, 1930. 



REDACTED: p. 9 



The following material has been removed 
from this volume for copyright reasons: 

Vol. 10, no, 8, pp. 8-10: Financing a College 
Education by Margaret Gilman, Chairman, 
Scholarship and Loan Committee, Bryn 
Mawr College, appeared in Savings Bank 
Journal of March, 1930. 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 9 

the Harmon Foundation in 1926, "A Study of Student Loans and Their Relation to 
Higher Educational Finance," to date is the most complete study of the whole sub- 
ject of loans to students. One of the most striking points in this study is the entire 
lack of uniformity in the administration of the student loans in various colleges and 
universities, as regards size of loan, rate of interest (ranging from none to eight per 
cent.), security, methods of repayment and collections. In addition to the funds 
maintained by the individual institutions, there are a large number of foundations 
and organizations which make loans to students. 

In considering these loan funds and their history, one is struck by the great 
impetus they have received in the last few years. In the beginning they were founded 
by the colleges in the hope that students would be willing to borrow at least part of 
the money they needed rather than attempt to earn it immediately. But everywhere, 
I believe, administrators of loan funds for a long time found a decided objection to 
borrowing on the part of students, and even more so on the part of students' families. 
They had a horror of debt, and a feeling that borrowing was the last of last resorts. 
This attitude has changed greatly, doubtless due somewhat to the constant plea of 
the colleges that in the end the student who works his way through is the loser. But 
it is due much more to a general change in attitude towards borrowing. Our civiliza- 
tion is based on credit; we buy everything on the installment plan. And if we accept 
the idea of buying a house, an automobile, a radio on the installment plan, why 
balk at the idea of buying an education on the installment plan? This point of 
view, so generally accepted in modern life, has penetrated to the educational world, 
and the idea of student borrowing is looked on with increasing favor. Parents who 
are buying an automobile on time scarcely can object to their children's buying an 
education on time. 

It is becoming the generally accepted conclusion that it is wise and right for the 
student to borrow. Moreover, we have every reason to suppose that the demand 
for loans will increase rapidly. There is little doubt the cost of higher education 
will increase, and the individual student be called upon to pay for a larger share 
of the cost of his education. Happily this increase comes at a time when the willing- 
ness to borrow is greatly increasing. The conclusion of the Harmon Foundation 
study on this point is interesting: "A higher price for higher education may be justi- 
fied by the fact that in so far as it is deemed theoretically right for the 'consumer 
to pay the freight,' it is right for the educated to pay for his education. The adoption 
of a sound student loan plan would permit colleges to increase fees to meet costs, 
except where state institutions are strongly competitive, and in time they will have 
to follow the trend of fairness to their tax-paying constituency. When the consumer 
is not able to 'pay the freight' in cash, the costs are not written off against him, but 
an agreement is entered into for payment when the goods have enabled him to secure 
the necessary funds. So, too, in education the services should not be given away 
simply because the consumer is unable to pay at the time, but they should be extended 
to him on a definite credit basis which should consist of well-administered student 
loans." 

With this certainty of increasing future demands for loans to students, it seems 
essential to ascertain what is the best possible machinery for making these loans. The 
student loan fund administered by the college or university generally has been so con- 
sidered, but I believe that not enough attention has been given to the possibility of 



10 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

banks taking over a large part of the burden. One of the main points studies of 
student loans have brought out is that the more business-like the method employed, 
the more successful the loan fund has been. The inevitable conclusion is that the 
college or university, in addition to raising money to meet demands on the loan fund, 
which are increasing so rapidly that even a 100 per cent efficient system of repayments 
and interest would be inadequate, must also develop an administrative machinery 
which closely follows current business methods. Is not this really a waste of time and 
effort? Would it not be a more intelligent plan for the banks which already have 
funds and the machinery for administering loans to take over the making of loans 
to students? Is it not really an economic waste for the colleges to duplicate existing 
machinery? 

If the question is answered in the affirmative from the point of view of the 
colleges, there remains of course the banks' opinion to be considered. Would banks 
be justified in following the procedure of the majority of student loan funds and 
lending money to students with no security except the student's personal note (backed 
up, if necessary, by an endorsement from the college), as is really necessary in the 
case of the majority of student borrowers? Here it seems the banks might well be 
encouraged by the experience of the existing student loan funds. All the figures, all 
the studies, prove that education has a cash value, and one which not only warrants 
the loans now being made to students, but loans on a much larger scale. Again I 
quote the Harmon Foundation Study: "It is not possible to conclude what the exact 
cash value of an education is, but it can be accepted with certainty that education has 
some cash value. ... If acquiring a higher education is the securing of a product 
(training) which the student will later be able to 'cash in' on, then there is as 
justifiable reason to secure this training on credit as there is to buy land, stocks, 
bonds, or any other form of investment on credit. Higher education is truly an invest- 
ment for the individual and as beneficial to the public as the buying of a farm; 
taking part in a co-operative apartment plan; or the securing of any other form of 
property on the installment plan. The difference lies in the analysis of the basis of 
credit, and the method of payment and term of credit." 

Moreover the experience of student loan funds goes to show that the student 
is a good risk. On this point the Harmon Foundation Study concludes: "It is true 
that some funds in the past have greatly diminished or disappeared entirely when the 
principal was loaned out. This was due, almost always, to the method of administra- 
tion and not to the dishonesty of students. Students, as all individuals, are honest 
if they are made to be. The trouble has arisen because of the lack of a definite 
agreement with the student when he first secures a loan — the 'pay when you can' 
attitude, and lack of collection system. Those who administer students loans can well 
afford to borrow some of the principles from the business world that make lending 
in small sums successful. . . . Colleges and universities that have tried these ele- 
mentary principles of business lending have been remarkably successful in administer- 
ing student loans. Even where the selection of the risk was not made with any great 
degree of care, but where the collection of the loans was undertaken systematically, 
the results have been most satisfactory." 

With these facts before them, it would seem the banks might well try the 
experiment of making loans to students, even though the basis must be somewhat 
different from that of commercial loans. As the Harmon Foundation Study puts it: 



REDACTED: p. 10 



The following material has been removed 
from this volume for copyright reasons: 

Vol. 10, no. 8, pp. 8-10: Financing a College 
Education by Margaret Gilman, Chairman, 
Scholarship and Loan Committee, Bryn 
Mawr College, appeared in Savings Bank 
Journal of March, 1930. 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 11 

"The student does not have a fixed line of credit, but has possibilities which are 
difficult to evaluate. He can get endorsements, but not always bankable endorsements; 
he has no collateral, and his character is not yet definitely formed. Though these are 
the fundamentals of credit, still the very foundation of credit is faith in another and 
this is the very element upon which the student can claim credit and upon which credit 
must be extended to him. This is the one security which he has to offer — a promise 
to make good and not to break the trust placed in him." 

The experiment of having banks make loans to students already has been tried 
in some communities, and tried successfully. It seems to me the time is ripe for 
trying it on a much larger scale. I do not believe the student loan funds of the 
different institutions could or should entirely be done away with; in many cases 
funds are so tied up that provision must be made to administer them at the college. 
Even if this is not the case, it would seem an excellent thing for the college to have a 
small fund on which students could draw in emergency, and from which loans also 
might be made to students whom the college would not recommend to the bank, but to 
whom it might be willing to make a loan for private reasons or sometimes purely as 
an educational experiment. I believe that the administration of the majority of student 
loans gradually could be taken over by the banks with no loss to themselves and with 
very great advantages to the universities and colleges of the country. 



SELECTION AND TUITION 

(From the Journal of the American Association of University Women for June.) 

"The March and April numbers of the Bryn Mawr Bulletin are full of discus- 
sion of the two storm centers of the educational world — entrance requirements and 
finance. How shall the students be selected? And how much shall they pay toward 
the cost of their education?" 

The article first quotes from the academic report at some length, bringing out 
the point that "So far as the examination plan based on fifteen units — or the Unit 
Plan — is concerned, there is now practically no important difference between our 
requirements and those of other colleges." 

The article then gives extracts from the speech Acting-President Manning made 
at the alumnae meeting: "From one point of view our change of policy will result 
in our begging for funds to secure the best available students instead of begging in 
order to secure the best possible faculty." In conclusion it makes the following 
comment: 

"All signs point at present toward the prospect that education, like medical care, 
will be increasingly paid for by the well-to-do beneficiary, who will perforce pay his 
own charges and a portion of his less fortunate brothers' or sisters'. It is of course 
inevitable that somebody besides the teacher and doctor should pay for these vital 
necessities. Even from motives of self-interest society must provide both education 
and health for its members; but the policy of making the rich patient pay for himself 
and another has its pitfalls and dangers, with which the medical profession is now 
greatly concerned." 



ALUMNAE BOOKS 

Blow, Whistles, Blow! by Sarah Atherton, Brewer & Walker, Inc., Payson & Clarke, Ltd., 
New York City. 

The whistles that blow for Sarah Atherton call the operatives living in a Pennsyl- 
vania valley to their work in mines or factories, or warn them of disaster, or send 
them home after a weary and dangerous day. This valley and its people she must 
know well, or she could never make us see its loveliness under the changing seasons, 
with its glow of furnaces and its great plumes of smoke against the painted sky; nor 
the sweetness of the relations among neighbors and families in the town. She knows 
their code, simple and direct enough, death to the scab, confusion to the oppressor; 
and gives the dreary progress of the strike without sentimentality but with much effect. 
Something far more difficult than description of fair country side or the thoughts of 
miners' women folk she has been able to show; and that is the conviction of the 
heroine's great beauty and real goodness. Sophie, with her splendid hair glowing 
against the dingy walls of the mill or the whitewash of the hospital, with her husky 
voice declaring her faith in the man she loves and the sister she protects, walks 
simply and superbly over difficult paths to the happiness that awaits her. 

For a first novel, "Blow, Whistles, Blow!" is quite amazing. It is sophisticated 
without being cynical, swiftly moving yet not in the least shallow. It makes the 
reader look with interest for more and more books, whether the author twitches her 
mantle blue and ventures to fresh fields, or whether she stays in her beautiful valley. 

Beatrice McGeorge, 1901. 



Beauty, an Interpretation of Art and the Imaginative Life, by Helen Huss Parkhurst. 
Harcourt, Brace and Company, 1930. $4.50. 

(Reprinted from The College News) 

Apart from the fact of its intrinsic merits, Miss Parkhurst's book as the work 
of an alumna has a particular interest for us at Bryn Mawr. Miss- Parkhurst 
graduated in 1911, taking her A.M. two years later, and her Ph.D. in 1917. Mean- 
while, she was graduate scholar, and again resident fellow, in philosophy, and later 
reader in history of art. As President's Fellow she studied at Cambridge and the 
Sorbonne, and was also honorary fellow at Johns Hopkins. She is now assistant pro- 
fessor of philosophy in Barnard College. 

In a short review it is impossible to do justice to Miss Parkhurst's book. She 
offers abstract ideas for our consideration; she writes, besides, in a fine, at times a 
precious, style, upon a background of aesthetic experience and of wide acquaintance 
with and deep appreciation of all forms of art. Almost no problem arising for aesthetics 
is left untouched, and nothing is mentioned without significant comment. Though 
not here concerned with the origins of art, she gives an excellent summary of the 
results and implications of the work of anthropologists. On the other hand, she 
speculates about the future of art. Finally the book leaves us free to make up our 
minds with regard to particular points of theory, while it has singularly persuaded us 
in a way not easily described. 

Miss Parkhurst's interest centers round the individual and the "characteristics 
. . . that cause him to indulge in superfluous and emotionally gratifying activities." 

12 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 13 

Man as he is becomes the convenient object for study, and the conscious life of man 
is seen, above all, to be in conflict. "Consciousness . . . reveals itself essentially 
under the semblance of a stupendous battle-ground across which opposing forces sweep 
and on which they come to grips and are alternately victorious and vanquished." Now 
there are various human activities that serve to resolve this sort of strife, but the 
aesthetic experience offers the supreme synthesis: "Uniquely in the making and in the 
contemplating of art are the discord and turmoil by which the human heart is beset 
somehow transcended, but without forfeiture of any richness of emotional content." 

Man and his needs then is our starting point — man with his human organism 
generally symmetrical, but who, as the regularity of his actions and functions increases, 
suffers a corresponding decrease in conscious attention. Hence, we should expect to 
find art, which stimulates consciousness, exhibit an offset of the rhythmic by the 
arrhythmic. To establish this thesis Miss Parkhurst cites examples always apt and 
adequate, from all the arts. 

In her contention that art involves the resolution of conflicting feelings or ideas 
the author finds ultimately the key to beauty itself. She has suggested that poetry 
in its essence is metaphor — "a startling juxtaposition of unlike regions or orders of 
reality thrown into sudden relief by a momentary illumination like sharp lightning 
that guides us across the seemingly untraversable gulf between." The analogy is then 
widened to embrace all art; the dramatist, like Pirandello, may show us the trans- 
formation of the unreal into the real ; Piero della Francesca may write the vision of 
Hell in the countenance of the resurrected Christ; the three queens of Chartres may 
reveal their spiritual habitation. In fact, "this is the secret of their compelling beauty, 
as of that of all people and all places that the painter or sculptor may depict; that 
what it alights upon belongs not to a single order of things but partakes of the life 
and ways of two realms, alien and removed. . . . It needs the imagination of the 
artist to detect the two-fold nature. ... It needs his skill to elicit from the seem- 
ingly simple object the effect of the metaphorical." 

Important also in Miss Parkhurst's discussion of art is her theory of aesthetic 
substance. The artist deals not only with the particular and the revelation of its 
uniqueness, but through this he exploits the very essence of temporality as in music, 
or as in architecture, the inmost nature of space itself. Similarly, the catagories of 
motion, material, light, etc., and their negations, afford, singly or combined, the 
partial subject-matter of the arts. 

But it is not the development of ideas that provides the main interest of the 
book. There is no real development of ideas. There is the statement and elaboration 
of certain themes — most important, those I have outlined. The book is descriptive 
rather than adventurously theoretical, offering a wealth of illustration in the course 
of detailed examinations of the nature of prose and poetry, of painting and sculpture, 
of architecture and music. (Like Schopenhauer, whom she calls to mind several 
times, Miss Parkhurst considers music "more than any other form of human crea- 
tion . . . the reconciler and healer of human conflict.") And, before art is 
specifically dealt with, comes a chapter on "Sensuous Qualities," an extraordinary 
collection of "raw materials of the world," which might have as its motto: "Not 
the fruit of experience, but experience itself, is the end." The author would survey 
"the rich welter of sensory qualities which, be we creative artist or only mortal, await 
us in the world for our delight." "To the humblest places," she continues, "come 



14 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

sunshine and frost, wind and rain and starlight. Certain particularly rich and signifi- 
cant complexes of sensation are of course procurable only by the specially circum- 
stanced. . . . But all of us who choose may witness the shining length of the 
day unroll at least somewhere on land or sea, and after that share in the watches 
of the sombre and glittering night." Sounds and odors, feels and flavors and colors, 
are detailed for delectation. The sensuous qualities of words themselves are described, 
and "the ultimate elements of the world — earth and air, fire and water — that utterly 
suffice us apart from any enhancement through language." 

Miss Parkhurst would hold that art is not so far removed from the experiences 
of daily living as is ordinarily supposed, and again, that the capacities of all of us 
for aesthetic enjoyment can be increased. Art, in this connection, becomes a demon- 
strator of varieties of delights to be found in nature; the artist becomes the tutor 
of our perceptions. Before concluding, let us note that in the very act of reading Miss 
Parkhurst's book we are led to a greater appreciation of nature and art. Whether a 
book of aesthetics ought to embody and lead one persuasively to beauty is a contended 
question. The faot remains that this is an "interpretation of art and the imaginative 
life." And in the careful, serious writing, with its rhythmic qualities of style; in the 
general constiuction and progression of the chapters; in the amazingly sympathetic 
discussion of happy examples (not to speak of the many beautiful photographs and 
reproductions throughout the book) ; in the generous treatment of rival theories along 
with its own ideas — we cannot but find Miss Parkhurst's book an inspiration. 

Myrtle de Vaux, '30. 



Years of Grace, by Margaret Ayer Barnes. Hougliton Miffli?i Co., Boston and New York. 

To render society in its narrow sense, Mrs. Barnes has an achieved ability in 
weaving a thick and patterned web. She creates the ways of living decently for three 
generations of "nice people." This reviewer chooses a Bryn Mawr slant for Bryn 
Mawr alumnae readers, watching the warp and the woof of love, marriage, and 
divorce. There are many other threads, and the web is wide. There are threads 
of laughter, and of inevitable pain. The web is thick. 

Entering her heroine, Jane Ward, ten years ahead of her own career there, Mrs. 
Barnes has taken advantage of the Bryn Mawr of the nineties, when to us now it 
seems to have preached clear doctrines. To that always small group of students 
whose spirits are re-born in college, Matthew Arnold's "enduring power, not our- 
selves, which makes for righteousness" seemed to sum up religion, Pater's "to burn 
always with this hard, gem-like flame, to maintain this ecstasy, is success in life" 
made a rallying point for the criticism of art no less than of life; the Romantic Poets 
of the Nineteenth Century interpreted by Miss Thomas, reinforced Pater, and Miss 
Thomas herself, the young president, with her ardent faith in young women, gave a 
sense of significance to every girl's career. A number of reflexes are fixed in Jane. 
The book leaves her at fifty-two, the mother of three, the grandmother of three, still 
discussing with herself matters of the soul in society, using still what have been 
always sufficient phrases. 

Jane at seventeen had given up her first warm, happy, unquestioning love for a 
boy. She had felt helplessly that her parents were "inevitably right." Her daughter, 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 15 

Cicily, at about the same age, has to listen to almost the same objections. But she 
acts quite differently: "No trace even of anxiety in Cicily's amused smile. 'Anyway, 
I'm going to. We're not asking you, Mumsy, we're telling you.' " 

Jane, at thirty-six, feels the love that is desire for Jimmy, the husband of her 
best Bryn Mawr friend. He begs her to run away with him. She refuses. "I'm 
in love with you, but I love you too." She loves her husband, her children, his wife. 
"I won't do anything, Jimmy, if I can possibly help it, that will keep me from look- 
ing anyone I love in the eye." A few years later, Cicily, ten years married, with 
three children, having forced her husband to give up a costly preparation for his 
heart's desire, engineering, and to enter her father's bank and live comfortably and 
gaily, is in love with her sister-in-law's husband and wishes to divorce all round and 
begin again, "happy and free and wild." Trying to stop her, Jane tells her — not very 
clearly! — of Jimmy, and insists she has no regrets and has been happy, "happier 
than if — " 

"But that's what you don't know, Mumsy!" said Cicily, smiling. "And what 
I'll never know either. You have to choose in life!" 

This kindly meant, light touch the young people keep up, responsible, efficient, 
determined to have always what they want, — the excitement of fresh starts. 

Jimmy had once called Cicily a hedonist and quoted Pater to her. "You'll 
never read Pater if you don't go to Bryn Mawr, and you probably wouldn't like 
him if you did. He doesn't speak the language of your generation. Nevertheless, he 
is your true prophet." Jane had protested against the "immoral doctrine," and Jimmy 
had asked her if at Bryn Mawr she had not found it "swell." "Yes, I did," said 
Jane honestly, "but I was too young to know what it meant." 

Jane is left recognizing how she is the product of her experience. "She had 
made her sacrifices in agony of spirit. . . . But to what end? For Cicily had 
been right about another thing. You did not know, you could not ever tell, just 
where the path you had not taken would have led you. . . . Jane could not 
conscientiously claim that the world was any worse for Cicily's bad behaviour. 
To what end, then, did you struggle to live with dignity and decency and decorum? 
. . . Was it only to cultivate in your own character that intangible quality that 
Jane, for want of a better word, had defined as grace? Was grace a quality to be 
felt in quite another form by the new generation? "Did you not always think a 
little too tenderly of the kind of person you had turned out to be?" 

May Mrs. Barnes live to turn her attention to Cicily at fifty-two! 

Edith Pettit Borie, '95. 



OPENING OF THE SUMMER SCHOOL 

The tenth year of the Bryn Mawr Summer School for Women Workers in 
Industry opened on June 14th. The exercises were held in Goodhart Hall, where 
speeches were made by Mrs. F. Louis Slade and Miss Elisabeth Christman, Executive 
Secretary of the Women's National Trade Union League. 



THE ROUND TABLE DISCUSSION 

The most significant event of Commencement week at Bryn Mawr for the 
visiting alumnae took place on Sunday morning, the first of June, beside the pool in 
Miss Thomas' garden. A semicircle of alumnae that widened constantly during the 
two hours from ten to twelve sat under the trees, with Miss Thomas in the center, 
the presiding spirit of the scene and the leader of our discussion. With the opening 
question the old stir and excitement of her talk came back to us from undergraduate 
days; we felt again the fire of her imagination, her keen understanding of people 
and the conviction of how much the Bryn Mawr training has counted for in our lives. 

Miss Thomas proposed to us first the following topic: Does the universe, as at 
present constituted, reward virtue and courage; does the modern "morality" confirm 
our inner ideals? She quoted some recent authorities who have attempted to expound 
the universe, with these questions in mind: The Universe Around Us, by Sir James 
Hopwood Jeans, A Preface to Morals, by Walter Lippmann, and The Modern 
Temper, a Study and a Confession, by Joseph Wood Krutch. 

A lively discussion followed, optimistic, on the whole, expressing agreement with 
the humanistic principles of self understanding and disinterestedness and the belief 
that, whether or not virtue is rewarded, the final message of the modern physical 
world is of hope to the race and of responsibility to the individual. Miss Thomas 
reminded the younger alumnae of the great liberty they enjoy, freed from the terrible 
prejudices against women's careers which were active in her generation. In spite, 
however, of the new opportunities opened to women, there is still an inferiority com- 
plex to overcome. As Miss Thomas said, when men are present at discussions women 
rarely take their full part. It was suggested that women hitherto have hesitated to 
share as completely as they might in professional life, because of their lack of expert 
training. Mrs. Chadwick-Collins said that women's too-passive part was due not to 
lack of individual training but of opportunity. This touched a responsive chord. 
Miss Thomas spoke of the "gentlemen's agreement" among archeologists notj to 
appoint women upon museum boards and of the reluctance of university trustees to 
accord them full professorships. She urged once more the hope that in offering this 
opportunity Bryn Mawr might lead the way. 

Miss Thomas is convinced that every woman should have her own work, out- 
side of the routine duties of her household, that the friendship of mother and chil- 
dren is infinitely better under these conditions. Preferably this should be with pay, 
because nowadays the unpaid woman, as a rule, is not the skilled worker. A com- 
petent Bryn Mawr woman should be able to make more than the cost of wages and 
board of two servants which she estimated at about $2200 a year, thus freeing herself 
to utilize her training. Mrs. Herbert Knox Smith spoke eloquently of the important 
unpaid jobs and the real need for competent women who can afford to take them. 
Miss Thomas suggested that in general the problems of work may be solved by the 
overpopulation of the world and the lessening of hours of labor for both men and 
women through the use of new machinery. 

She then asked us what quality above all one should wish to be born with. 
We answered variously, — with love of truth, love of beauty, vitality, imagination 
and curiosity. Miss Thomas said that to her mind love of freedom was perhaps best 

16 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 17 

of all, freedom to make the best of one's life. Her experience had convinced her that 
women could not really be free until, as a sex, they became self-supporting. 

The second subject of discussion, asked for by Mrs. Bancroft, was the proposed 
increase of tuition. Miss Thomas introduced the topic by saying that Bryn Mawr 
had been so desperately poor in the beginning that she could not bear to think of how 
much it might have done for education if only it had been adequately endowed. Bryn 
Mawr is still unable to give its students what they ought to have, — more and better 
paid teachers, more honor instructors, better laboratory equipment. Many lines of 
study, especially in scientific work, must be left untouched. All of these urgent 
needs could be met if the students paid what it costs to teach them. At present Bryn 
Mawr students pay less than one-half of the cost. It is only fair that parents who can 
afford it should pay the full cost, that other parents who cannot afford the whole 
cost should pay as much as they feel they can and that for the able children of parents 
who can afford to pay little or nothing many more scholarships than at present should 
be available. The problem is what will happen to Bryn Mawr and to other privately 
endowed colleges, if they do not increase their tuition? 

Miss Carey explained that the sliding scale of tuition which is now being tried 
and the increase in the number of entrance scholarships which is contemplated and 
which will be administered by a new official, the Director of Scholarships, already 
appointed, will help to meet whatever difficulties may arise. People are always more 
interested in providing new scholarships than in increasing faculty salaries and the 
number of scholarships has so far grown in proportion to the increase in tuition. 
Miss Thomas said that the coming economic stress will increase the number of candi- 
dates unable to go to college, unless scholarships are provided for them, which cannot 
be done without radical increases in the tuition fee. Miss Thomas believes that 
Bryn Mawr must either pursue this plan which is now being considered by many 
other colleges and disregard the prejudices of a few people who do not understand 
the situation, or else must fail to give its students the teaching to which they are 
entitled. 

The next topic that was called for was the new system of Honors work and in 
connection with this subject the separation of students in classes in regard to their 
ability was discussed, — whether the system was less stimulating to the teachers who 
must work with the inferior students. There were teachers present who spoke from 
their own experience of the plan. Miss Taylor said that it was difficult to teach 
able students in the same classes with those less brilliant, that the latter, with the 
oppressive example of the former removed, often did better work and received the 
appreciation that was due them. Miss Carey, at Miss Thomas' request, then gave 
us an illuminating account of the new evaluation of courses which greatly interested 
the alumnae and which had direct bearing upon the above question. By this system 
the exceptional student may take special Honors work when she comes to her Junior 
year and the students who are not taking Honors may expand their courses and thus 
secure additional credit. The unit system by which the courses are now to be 
evaluated is based on the consideration that the work of the average student should 
be divided into four solid courses, — or four units. The unit course offers fewer 
lectures but comprises the same amount of work as did the old five-hour course and 
although there is gradation in the amounts of first year, second year and advanced 



18 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

work, the unit system permits the students to take no more than one or two really 
short courses. 

At twelve o'clock the hour struck and the discussion was ended. As we 
wandered off slowly, reluctantly, did we feel that 'the wand had been waved, that the 
magic had vanished with the hour? It was truly an enchanted morning that we had 
spent by the garden pool, but as I try to translate the magic into words I appreciate 
how much of it was concentrated in our hostess. The visions of our youth had been 
brought back to us, the conviction that to woman's aspirations there is no boundary 
but the stars. When we look backwards on the charming scene, as we must very often, 
we shall see always Miss Thomas in her white dress, directing and inspiring our talk 
in the old way and we shall remember again who first provided us with these aspira- 
tions and stirred us with the thrilling consciousness of our own power to achieve them. 

Anne Kidder Wilson, 1903. 



ALUMNAE ATHLETICS 

In spite of the fact that most of the members of the younger and more agile 
of the reuning classes had returned to their jobs or their children, a few valiant 
spirits were collected to make up the scheduled teams to play against the Varsity. 
The first of these great contests, the basketball game on Monday morning in Com- 
mencement Week, was won by the Varsity, 49 to 19. On the Alumnae team at 
different stages of the game were Fanny Sinclair Woods, 1901; Alice Nicoll, 1922; 
Florence Martin Chase, 1923; Helen Rice, 1923; Agnes Clement Robinson, 1923; 
Janet Seeley, 1927; Jean Huddleston, 1928. 

That same afternoon, Ann Taylor, 1921 ; Alice Nicoll, 1922; Helen Rice, 1923; 
and Janet Seeley, 1927, borrowed three undergraduates, and with their help defeated 
the Varsity water polo team by the score of 5 to 4. 

The following morning a small band of loyal alumnae rooters watched the 
Varsity tennis team rise finally triumphant only after a real struggle. Helen Rice, 
1923, defeated the first Varsity player, Olivia Stokes, 1930, by the score of 6-4, 6-2; 
Alice Hawkins, 1907, lost to Alice Hardenbergh, 1932, by 4-6, 5-7; Fanny Sinclair 
Woods, 1901, defeated Sylvia Bowditch, 1933, in an exciting three-set match, 
refereed by one of the Woods twins, 7-5, 3-6, 7-5; Millicent Carey, 1920, lost to 
Margaret Collier, 1933, by the score of 7-5, 6-2. The fifth and deciding match was 
won by the doubles team of Elizabeth Perkins, 1930, and Eliza Boyd, 1930, over 
Alice Hawkins, 1907, and Mary Gardiner, 1918, by the score of 6-2, 6-0. 



THE ALUMNAE SUPPER 

The Alumnae Supper was characterized by various pleasant departures from 
custom. In the first place it was held in Pembroke. The charm of the setting was 
a very real factor in one's enjoyment. The menu was simple and really delicious, 
and the speeches were only three in number. One cannot help hoping that all three 
of these things presage something for the future. 

The toastmistress, Edith Houghton Hooker, 1901, had chosen as her subject 
for the evening "The Relation of Professions to Education." The first speaker of 
the evening was Hetty Goldman, and naturally her subject was Archaeology. She 
remarked engagingly that at least her education had done her no harm. Her speech 
was all too brief, and she told just enough of the actual work in the field to make 
one long to hear more. 

Emily Kimbrough Wrench, 1921, then made very clear the inestimable value 
of a college education if one wishes to gain both eminence and salary in the merch- 
andizing world. 

"I feel very presuming to claim Mrs. Hooker's generous recommendation that I 
have held men's jobs, and yet her final qualification, that I am the mother of twins, 
I must emphatically deny as a man's job. I look upon that as my only "specialite de 
la maison," so to speak. However, I am so conscious of the tremendous importance 
to me of Bryn Mawr, both in the advertising and editorial jobs which I have held, 
that I am delighted at this opportunity to give some small expression of my appre- 
ciation." 

The final speech of the evening was made by Acting President Manning. She 
discussed with characteristic and pleasantly ironic wit the various demands that are 
made on the college to fit the students to meet all situations in life. Much that is 
demanded of the college should by rights be the function of the parents. The college 
feels that its role is to attempt to teach the students to use their intellectual faculties, 
and to create an atmosphere in which modern problems can be freely and easily dis- 
cussed, ethical as well as intellectual. The students themselves are eager for all 
points of view and respond to the stimulus of outside contacts, the Flexner lectures and 
proposed new courses, such as that to be given in playwriting next year by Hatcher 
Hughes, a Pulitzer prize winner. The students too are demanding closer contact 
with the Faculty. The real attempt to co-ordinate and stimulate all these intellectual 
needs is made, however, in the new plan for the Curriculum. The new system which 
has already been outlined in the Bulletin, and which has been worked out in con- 
sultation with the students themselves, it is hoped will develop scholarship and 
enable a student to know her field and to know it well. Her own department 
will advise her of the ramifications of her subject, so that she can see it in its true 
relation. What the students themselves are seeking, and what this new plan will 
give in the way of real intellectual training, is what will in the end fit them for life, 
whether they devote themselves to Archaeology or department stores. 

Mrs. Hooker then made an apipeal, with very genuine emotion, that we bear 
always in mind the pioneer women, what they endured and what they have made 
possible for all of us. And so the evening closed with "Thou Gracious Inspiration," 

19 



CLASS NOTES 



(A very informal meeting of the Class Editors zvas held in the Alumnae Room on 
Sunday, June 1st, so that the Bulletin Board might discuss with them some of the 
problems of the Bulletin and ask their advice. The ever-present question of class 
notes zvas taken up first of all. One of the delightful and unique things about our 
class notes is their individuality,, and every one agreed that this must not be sacrificed; 
on the other hand, the problem of space each year grows more acute. The Editors 
decided that one zvay of meeting the situation was to limit the news more strictly to 
members of the class themselves. If we are to have all the details about grandchildren, 
fascinating as they are, the Bulletin would have to be expanded indefinitely. That our 
budget does not allow for. It zvas also suggested that details of illness be omitted; 
there are some months when the columns of class notes sound very like those of a 
medical journal. The Class Editor also very generously gave the Editor permission 
to cut more drastically than she had felt she could before the matter had been dis- 
cussed. There zvas not one dissenting voice about abolishing the use of nick-names 
alone. If nick-names are used, the last name must be used as well. The question of 
obituary notices zvas then gone into very carefully, and the Editors finally decided 
that such notices should not exceed a hundred words. In the case of any other than 
the members of the class, only a simple statement would be made. In discussing all 
these points, both the Class Editors and the Bulletin Board agreed that class notes 
had a double purpose: to keep members of the class in touch with one another and 
to give a composite picture of the interests and activities of the Alumnae as a whole. 
That almost automatically rules out the type of note: (C So-and-so sazv So-and-so for a 
few hours last week!' 

In connection with the Bulletin giving a composite picture of the activities and 
interests of the Alumnae, the Board asked the Class Editors to co-operate with them 
in getting articles of especial interest from alumnae who have something to contribute 
to a discussion in a certain field. For instance, one number of the Bulletin might be 
devoted to a discussion of Progressive Education, pro and con; another to the 
Theatre; another to Achaeology, etc. The Editors agreed to send into the Alumnae 
office the names of any class-mates that they felt could and would do articles of 
general interest, but to have the request for such articles come from the Editor of 
the Bulletin. 

Both the Board and the Editors felt that the general discussion had been 
sufficiently helpful and interesting — the Editor herself found it of the greatest value — 
to make it worth while to have such a meeting an annual event, and that if a Class 
Editor were unable to be present, she ask some one to come to represent her.) 



1892 Lucy Chase Putnam spent the winter 

Editor: Edith Wetherill Ives with her two sisters in the mountains of 

145 E. 35th St., New York City. Southern California. 

Nan Emery Allinson and Mr. Allinson, Bessie Carroll writes: "I think I wrote 

who has retired from the Department of you last year that a friend had invited 

Latin at Brown University, expect to me to go abroad with her. The School 

spend the early part of the summer at (Ogontz) gave me leave of absence and 

their place at Hancock Point, Maine, and I was away fourteen months, three of 

the last part in England. which I spent in Egypt, Sicily, Spain, 

Kate Claghorn sails the middle of June France, Italy, Switzerland and England, 

for a summer holiday in Europe. It was a most wonderful trip as we took 

Margaret Kellum is spending a year a very leisurely course and learned to 

traveling in out-of-the-way parts of Eu- know some places quite intimately. We 

rope, sometimes alone and sometimes went up the Nile in the same boat as Miss 

with friends. Carey Thomas, 

20 






BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



21 






1893 

S. Frances Van Kirk, Secretary 
1333 Pine St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Lillian Moser writes: Every time the 
Alumnae Bulletin is published, I look for 
news of '93, but never find any. Either 
we are the most modest of all the 
alumnae or the most indifferent: which 
is it? 

I am sailing on May 23rd for England 
to stay until September. I wonder if any 
of you remember Elizabeth Harrison, 
who was one of our brilliant Fellows in 
Greek in 1907? She is now Mrs. Percy 
F. Kipling. I expect to spend a week 
with her in August at her country home 
in Windermere. Most of my summer will 
be passed in England, but the itinerary 
includes a month on the Continent, with 
a trip to the North Cape, Stockholm, 
Copenhagen, and a few days in Germany 
and in Belgium. 

Jane Brownell writes: "I am greatly 
interested in International Affairs and in 
the work of the Foreign Policy Associa- 
tion; and I firmly believe in law ob- 
servance, whether it be in regard to pro- 
hibition or customs duties." 

A note from Nellie Neilson: "My do- 
ings are not very exciting. I published a 
book a year ago — "The Chartulary of Bil- 
sington, British Academy," in Records of 
Social and Economic History. At present 
I am reading proof sheets of "The Year 
Book of Edward IV." Selden So- 
ciety. It should appear next Autumn. 

"I shall be abroad this summer, at 
work in the Record office and shall stay 
for a while with my sister, Grace La- 
Coste, Bryn Mawr, 1906, who lives in 
Headley, Hampshire." 

Bertha Haven Putnam is expecting to 
spend the summer in England, working 
on her subject, the Justices of the Peace. 
She has received from the American 
Council of Learned Societies a grant to 
be used for a research assistant, and is 
very happy at having secured a Somer- 
ville College student, with a B.A. in his- 
tory, who will come to Mount Holyoke 
next year as a candidate for an A.M. 

Mary Atkinson Watson sends best 
wishes and adds: "One of my especial in- 
terests is the leadership of a group of 
forty-four children, the Junior Nature 
Club of Doylestown. We take walks and 
observe trees, birds, and wild flowers. The 
children have gardens at their homes. An- 
other interest is a little country Friends' 
School at Lahaska, Penna. 



Elizabeth F. Hopkins' avocation is her 
work for the wild flower display in the 
Thomasville Annual Rose Show. This 
spring she and two others arranged "a 
most lovely segment of the wildwood" — 
so the Thomasville Chronicle called it — 
blooming with iris, fly-catcher lilies and 
other woodland flowers. 

1894 
Editor: Abby Brayton Durfee 
(Mrs. Randall N. Durfee) 
19 Highland Ave., Fall River, Mass. 

Mary Breed writes: I have spent three 
months in Sicily, Florence and Paris, and 
am leaving Pittsburgh now, and going to 
my summer home in East Randolph, New 
York. I have a quaint old house there 
and a number of old and tried friends. I 
intend to spend half the year there, us- 
ing the winters for travel. 

Blanche Follansbee Caldwell, is living 
in Santa Barbara, California, P. O. 
Box 57. 

Emilie Martin is chairman of the 
Mathematics Department at Mt. Holyoke 
College. She is planning to spend the 
summer with Mary, her sister, in the old 
home in Montreat, North Carolina. She 
has promised to run the village library, 
and incidentally, is on the Board of Ad- 
missions of College Boards and attends 
summer meetings of Mathematical So- 
cieties. 

1898 
Class Editor: Edith Schoff Boericke 
328 Brookway, Merion Station, Pa. 

Mary Bright is sailing June 6th for a 
summer abroad with the University 
Tours. 

Edith Schoff Boericke's oldest son 
Ralph was married on June 7th to Mar- 
garet Maybin Ferguson. 

1900 
Editor: Louise Congdon Francis 
(Mrs. Richard Francis) 
Haverford, Pennsylvania. 



It is with the deepest sorrow that we 
record the death of our dearly loved 
classmate, Reita Levering Brown, who 
died very suddenly at her home in the 
evening of June 4th. Our very sincere 
sympathy goes to her husband and family ; 
we realize that in her death each of the 
class has suffered a keen personal loss. 
Our memories will always keep enshrined 
her sweetness and gayety and loveliness. 



22 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



The New York Herald Tribune of May 
25th published some very beautiful pic- 
tures of the recent Delphic Festival at 
Delphi. Eva Palmer Sikelianos has 
brought to light this ancient festival 
after a lapse of seventeen centuries. The 
play given was Prometheus Bound, by 
Aeschylus. 

On May 25th a very interesting party 
was given in Saint Louis by Edna 
Fischel Gellhorn and her brothers. It 
was a celebration of their mother's eigh- 
tieth birthday. The party was held at the 
Hotel Chase and Vachel Lindsay read 
from his poems to a large and enthusi- 
astic audience. "To be eighty years young 
is sometimes more cheerful, more hopeful 
than to be forty years old." 

Hilda Loines writes that the League of 
Women Voters keeps her very busy. She 
is Chairman of the First A. D. in Brook- 
lyn. She also gives garden talks. She is 
planning to go to Seattle in July for the 
annual meeting of the Garden Club of 
America. 

Evelyn Hills Davenport's son gradu- 
ated from Dartmouth a year ago with 
a Phi Beta Key and special distinction 
in English. This year he has a fellow- 
ship at Tufts College, where he has 
taught English to Freshmen, while work- 
ing for his M.A. Incidentally, he is 
an accomplished musician. Evelyn's 
daughter also is musical and has decided 
to devote all her time to the piano and 
French and German, giving up all 
thought of college for the sake of her 
music. 

Edna Florsheim Bamberger has been 
strenuously at work this past year trying 
to help the employment situation in Phila- 
delphia. She works under the Jewish 
Welfare Society, of which she is a mem- 
ber of the Board. She is also on the Ad- 
visory Committee of the Federation of 
Jewish Charities and on the Board of the 
Neighborhood Centre and the National 
Farm School. She writes as follows: 
"And besides all this I am a very impor- 
tant member of my own domestic com- 
mittee (and confidentially the last named 
activity irks me for I find myself proving 
less and less domestic as I find less and 
less co-operation from the new 1930 
model of domestic servant.) To break the 
monotony, last summer my sister and I 
went abroad — just two more American 
dumb-bells. And in Deauville, where the 
French have made dressing a fine art, we 
looked like the Spirit of 76." Remember- 
ing Edna's hat worn in the 1900 parade 
in 1925, it is hard to believe that she was 



anything but fashionable even in France. 

On June 6th Leslie Knowles Blake gave 
a the dansante for her debutante daugh- 
ter Harriette at the Dedham Country and 
Polo Club. Among the dancing Harvard 
undergraduates was Louise Francis' son, 
Dick. It seems that Leslie is still "look- 
ing after Kambridge." 

Dorothea Farquhar Cross' daughter, 
Dorothea, graduated in June magna cum 
laude. Congratulations from 1900. 

1901 
Class Editor: Jane Righter 

Dublin Road, Greenwich, Conn. 
REUNION 

Nineteen-one's twenty-ninth reunion 
brought back twenty members of the class 
to rejuvenate at the source, Mary Allis, 
Mary Ayer Rousmaniere, Ethel Cantlin 
Buckley, Gertrude Smythe Buell, Alice 
Dillingham, Caro Buxton Edwards, Mari- 
anna Buffum Hill, Edith Houghton Hook- 
er, Eleanor Jones, Bertha Laws, Beatrice 
McGeorge, Marian Wright Messimer 
Jessie Miller, Lucia Holliday Macbeth, 
Ella Sealy Newell, Elizabeth Lewis Otey, 
Jane Righter, Grace Phillips Rogers, 
Helen Converse Thorpe and Fannie Sin- 
clair Woods. 

Gaieties opened on Monday, June 2nd, 
at a joint luncheon on Wyndham Lawn 
with the reuning classes of 1903 and 
1904. We were honored to have as our 
guests five daughters of the class, Eliza- 
beth Gutman, Elizabeth Edwards, Harriet 
Moore, Janet and Margaret Woods, all 
students in Bryn Mawr. To complete the 
sense of en rapport, letters from ab- 
sent classmates were read. 

Edith Houghton Hooker as toastmist- 
ress at the Alumnae dinner acquitted her- 
self with distinction and struck a note 
of high responsibility in recalling our 
debt to pioneer women. May one say it, 
in the bosom of the family? As one's 
eyes scanned the class of half centenar- 
ians at the dinner one was struck by its up 
and coming quality. None of us were 
out of breath to paraphrase, and not one 
was fat. There is an affidavit to this 
effect and not by a member of 1901. 

Speaking of wind, Fannie Sinclair 
Woods won her tennis match over an 
undergraduate opponent with third rank 
in the College tournament. For the nother 
of twins who can deny her prowess? 

At the class meeting Fannie Woods and 
Ethel Buckley reported that $20,000 of 
the Marion Reilly Memorial Fund of 
$25,000 due in 1935 had been pledged. 
This fund will yield $1,000 as an annual 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



23 






increase of salary for the holder of the 
Marion Reilly Chair of Physics. 

Beatrice McGeorge presided at the 
Class dinner and called on individual 
members of the Class to explain not 
themselves but other members. Ethel 
Cantlin Buckley read from the letters of 
the wanderings of Marion and Billy 
Smith over Africa, Fannie Sinclair re- 
counted the interesting experiments in 
infant feeding of Dr. Clara Davis at her 
clinic in Chicago where the spinster 
mothers 10 children. The 9 months in- 
fants show an amazing canniness in 
selecting the foods their systems require. 
Marianna Buffum related Marion 
Wright's activities in bringing good 
music to Detroit while Marion parried 
with a picture of Buffy's civic interests 
and achievements. Helen Converse and 
Mary Ayer did a dialogue of their trip 
on horseback to the mountains of Ken- 
tucky to visit the frontier nursing service, 
a pet interest of theirs. Both as a pre- 
lude took a correspondence course in 
riding; college habits do persist. Betty 
McGeorge closed with an intimate view 
of College as an undergraduate. Except 
for a lack of Biblical knowledge — some 
thing to rejoice a Mencken — the under- 
graduates of today are the same as in 
our day with a delightful friendliness to 
an alumna taking their courses. 

Breakfast in B. McGeorge's apartment 
in the Vaux Woods closed the Reunion. 
Nineteen-one left with grateful hearts to 
Ethel Cantlin and the neighboring 
alumnae for a happy two days of youth 
again. 

Elizabeth Lewis Otey. 

1902 

Class Editor: Mrs. Thorndike Howe 
77 Revere St., Boston, Mass. 

Claris Crane, who has charge of riding 
at the Greenwood School near Timonium, 
Maryland, sent us the entry blank for a 
horse show she was getting up on May 
31st for the benefit of the Humane So- 
ciety of Baltimore County. Claris wrote 
that Jo KiefTer Foltz stopped with her on 
her way home from the Pimlico races 
early in May. 

Lucia Davis is still teaching at the 
Girls' Latin School in Roland Park, 
Baltimore. 

Frances Seth lost her mother last fall, 
after a lone - period of invalidism, during 
which Frances gave her the most devoted 
care. 



Marion Balch spent the winter in Cali- 
fornia. 

So, too, did Jane Brown, who has gone 
back to her home in Deposit, N. Y., after 
spending a number of months in and 
around Los Angeles. 

Harriett Spencer Kendall has bought 
the business of Clary's, 525 South War- 
ren St., Syracuse, and formally opened 
her shop on May 5th under the same 
name. There one can buy smart frocks, 
sports wear and dresses and wraps of all 
sorts in a most becoming setting of gray 
walls and rose-colored hangings. No 
charge, Harriett. 

Elizabeth Lyon Belknap (Mrs. R. E. 
Belknap) has a grandson, Duncan Scott, 
born April 29th, while she and Mr. Bel- 
knap were on the last leg of a trip around 
the world. They landed in New York 
May 29th and returned at once to Boston, 
collected their family and went to Dux- 
bury, Mass., where they have an 18th 
century Cape Cod house, fringed by a 
20th century peach orchard. 

Ethel Clinton Russell (Mrs. N. G. Rus- 
sell) has a son studying medicine at Mc- 
Gill University, Montreal, another at the 
University of Buffalo and a daughter go- 
ing to Sweetbriar, Virginia, next fall. 

1903 

Class Editor: Gertrude Dietrich Smith 
(Mrs. Herbert Knox Smith) 
Farmington, Conn. 

Emotion is now recognized as almost 
the most important factor in any given 
situation. This report of the informal re- 
union of 1903 will therefore be an ac- 
count of my emotional reactions to sur- 
roundings and individuals. 

From the moment I arrived at Wyn- 
dam until the moment I left, the constant 
thoughtfulness of the Warden, Miss Mc- 
Bride, and the charm of the place put and 
kept me in a glow of general well-being. 
Periodic waves of sadness and exaspera- 
tion swept over me because so few of the 
class were there to join us as we sat 
comfortably in the sunshine on the cool 
days, and withdrew into the shade of the 
old trees on the Ely lawn when the usual 
Commencement heat arrived. 

By chance I met Margaret Brusstar 
Saturday morning. I accompanied her on 
her week-end marketing expedition. This 
homely occupation did much to temper 
the awe which I have always had for her 
as a member of Bonbright & Company. 



24 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



Luncheon with Ethel Girdwood Peirce 
and three of her boys gave me a riot of 
emotions. I met Ethel in the front yard 
trying to solve the problem of picking- 
something where there was nothing for 
table decorations for the class supper. 
Her youngest son — a prominent citizen — 
had with laudable patriotic zeal cut a 
wheelbarrow full from the garden to 
decorate the graves of the soldiers on 
Memorial Day. Her second son made me 
realize how dull and without initiative I 
had been as a child. He sold me without 
a moment's hesitation the April, May, and 
June numbers of the Peirce Monthly. It 
is written and printed by members of the 
Peirce family — meaning Ethel and her 
boys — Ethel's contribution is a serial tale 
of adventure called "Gone but not For- 
gotten." The boys supply the rest of the 
material, including jokes, garden hints, 
and "Peeps at the News." 

As though printers, editors and astute 
salesmen were not enough for one mother 
to have, I discovered as soon as I got my 
nose inside his door that there was also 
an eminent chemist in the making. He 
had assembled the wherewithal to gener- 
ate hydrogen. Balloons were being filled. 

Saturdays, Sundays, evenings, and sum- 
mers Ethel devotes to her boys. Days 
she spends in Philadelphia as a profes- 
sional woman. She is working with Dr. 
Pemberton. They are specializing in 
arthritis. Ethel is making an enviable 
reputation for herself. 

After lunch Ethel and I walked over to 
Haverford to call on Julia Pratt Smith. 
As we talked along, Ethel happened to 
mention the patriotism of her youngest 
son in the matter of supplying decorations 
for Memorial Day. Julia immediately be- 
came her generous and loyal 1903 self. 
She offered blooms from her garden. 
She supplied us with scissors and com- 
missioned us to cut practically clean. Such 
unselfishness on the part of a working 
gardener filled my own gardener's heart 
with admiration and my 1903 heart with 
gratitude. Julia resisted all pleas to fol- 
low the flowers to the supper. That pro- 
duced one of those waves of sadness and 
exasperation. 

There were twelve of us at supper, Nan 
Kidder Wilson, Doris Earle, Agnes Aus- 
tin, Martha Boyer, Margaret Brusstar, 
Constance Leupp Todd, Edith Clothier 
Sanderson, Marianna Taylor, Ethel Gird- 
wood Peirce, Charlotte Morton Lanagan, 
Carrie Wagner and myself. Marvelous to 



relate, it was actually cool. After supper 
we gathered about an open fire. 

The class meeting was hectic as usual. 
From % it Carrie Wagner emerged as Class 
Collector. Our next reunion is in 1935. 
Denbigh has been engaged as headquar- 
ters and for the supper. 

Business over, we settled into an eve- 
ning of interesting discussion. Each time 
we meet — the few of us who can be the 
chorus, as it were — recognize afresh what 
solidly worthwhile people there are in our 
class. 

Nan Kidder Wilson, our very own 
President of the Alumnae Association, 
made intelligible to us "Working for 
Honors." Constance Leupp Todd braved 
the medical authorities present to tell us 
how she was expanding her article on 
"Easier Motherhood" into a book on the 
same subject. The book will appear in 
the fall. Margaret Brusstar restored our 
confidence in bonds. Ethel Girdwood 
Peirce gave us hope that our ageing 
joints need not be hopelessly stiff. Doris 
Earle, by comment and question, showed 
an astounding grasp of welfare work, 
finance, and an appreciation of what Dr. 
Pemberton and Ethel are doing about 
this annoying and obscure subject of 
arthritis. 

Carrie Wagner, who by the way, main- 
tains her popularity year after year with 
large groups of girls in "The Girls' 
Friendly," had to leave at eleven o'clock. 
She took with her several others. This 
halted the discussion before we could hear 
from Marianna Taylor. There were the 
educators also unheard — Agnes Austin, 
who teaches at the Holman School, and 
Martha Boyer, at the Baldwin School. As 
she was leaving, Martha managed to give 
me a tantalizing idea of how differently 
a subject, even like mathematics, is taught 
now. She is exposing those in the sev- 
enth grade to geometry. We didn't have 
time to hear a word from Edith Clothier 
Sanderson, who is in charge of the Gren- 
fell shop in Philadelphia. 

That Charlotte Morton Lanagan's hus- 
band is the right kind of public servant as 
City Engineer of Schenectady was 
proved. When she and Nan and Con- 
stance and I retired upstairs for further 
discussion and then exhausted fell upon 
our beds, Charlotte couldn't give up the 
hope of stopping a leaking faucet. You 
could see her husband's training. She did 
want to prevent any waste of water. 

Sunday morning was a priceless experi- 
ence in the way of emotion. Alumnae 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



25 



gathered in the beautiful Deanery gar- 
den. Miss Thomas and Nan sat facing us 
— we had a thrilling discussion on the 
universe and virtue and morality, leading 
surely and inevitably to woman's place in 
the universe. Then we discussed the pros 
and cons of raising the tuition and off- 
setting any possible hardships by raising 
more money for scholarships. Constance 
Leupp prefaced a question with the ex- 
planation that there was no personal 
bearing because she had only boys. Miss 
Thomas' instant retort was, "Of course, 
you are the wrong kind of an Alumna." 

The Baccalaureate sermon, without be- 
ing emotional in the least, left one with 
a strong emotion of being part of a con- 
tinuing fellowship. 

The Deanery garden at night is a place 
of enchantment. It mellowed the talk 
which Constance and Margaret had about 
Russia. 

Being few in number had just one ad- 
vantage — a closer association at the table 
with the Seniors. Whether we were at 
the age that arouses the protective in- 
stincts of the young, or whether it was 
just general friendliness, we were made 
to feel that they really wanted to talk 
with us. The emotion that caused you 
can all guess. The president of the class 
is a niece of Florence Wattson. 

Hetty Goldman and Louise Atherton 
turned up for the 1901-1902, 1903-1904 
buffet luncheon at Wyndham. What with 
Nan presiding at the alumnae dinner, 
Hetty one of the speakers, and knowing 
that Margaret is the Treasurer, 1903 was 
bursting with pride. 

Gone is the singing of class songs — 
costumes and seniors present at the 
alumnae supper. A group of Seniors did 
make a spirited dash in and around, sing- 
ing "Soon we will be one of you," and 
then rushed on to the Senior bonfire to 
burn undesirable accumulations — which 
is probably what you would like to do 
with this unsatisfactory account of an 
emotionally satisfying reunion. 

News notes from Florence Watson 
Hay: 

"Mabel Norton had a luncheon party 
for Philena Winslow when she was here 
several weeks ago, and there were five 
1903 people present: Philena, Mabel, May 
Guild, Doris Hornby and myself. Mabel 
has a charming home in Pasadena, and 
we all enjoyed getting together there. 

May is busier than ever, with a son and 
a daughter in the university here. Her 
house in Hollywood seems to be the head- 



quarters for the entire undergraduate 
body. 

We are planning to move to San Pedro 
in May, because we find Los Angeles ex- 
ceedingly hot in summer, and because it 
will eliminate the long drive there and 
back that Muller now has to make every 
day when his ship is here. 

Helen Barendt and her husband were 
down here several weeks ago. 

The Class of 1903 extends sympathy to 
Philena Winslow, who lost her sister, 
Elizabeth, and to Dorothea Day Watkins, 
who has lost her father. 

1904 
Editor: Emma O. Thompson 

320 S. 42nd St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Leda White and Clara Wade are going 
on one of the Vergillian Cruises this 
summer. 

Patty Rockwell's daughter Martha goes 
to Westover — Leslie Clark's School — 
next fall. 

Anne Selleck goes to California this 
summer. 

Emma Fries is going to Iceland this 
summer for its millennial celebration. 

Phyllis Green Anderson has been visit- 
ing Harriet Southerland Wright at the 
United States Embassy in Buda Pesth, 
during May. 

Marguerite Gribi Kreutzberg went on a 
six weeks' trip to Ireland, but was back 
by June 1st. 

Virginia Chauvenet has a good part in 
Aristophanes' "Lysistrata." 

REUNION 

The first two of us to arrive at col- 
lege were Emma Thompson and Margaret 
Ross Garner. They came Saturday to 
avoid the rush ! The other 30 straggled 
in on Monday and Tuesday. Twenty-one 
of us, including four daughters, arrived 
in time for the 1901, 1903, and 1904 pic- 
nic at Wyndham on Monday. It was a 
most informal and happy occasion and the 
lunch furnished by the College at small 
expense was fine. 

Some of us spent the afternoon at Val- 
ley Forge, the Deanery Garden, or the 
alumnae tea in Goodhart, ending up at 
the alumnae supper at 8 o'clock, and a 
viewing of the Deanery Garden with its 
fairyland lights. 

Tuesday there was an impromptu pic- 
nic lunch at Patty's for the sixteen who 
were available. From there we ad- 
journed to the Garden Party on the 
Wyndham lawn. 



26 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



At seven o'clock we met in the music 
room of Goodhart for a class meeting 
and showing of family pictures — the heat 
of the lantern almost killed our Emma. 
At 8.30 thirty-two of us sat down to din- 
ner, the table being beautifully decorated 
and arrangements made by Gertrude and 
Hilda; there we stayed until the wee 
small hours, enjoying the wit and charm 
of Lucy Lombardi, our toastmistress, and 
other members of 1904, all clever and 
worthwhile in their various ways. 

Alice Waldo came all the way from 
Stamford to make a speech, spend a few 
hours, and return on the midnight train. 
It was wonderful to hear first hand about 
China from Mary James. Most people 
had to go home Wednesday morning, but 
a few stayed for Commencement, and the 
very last festivity, which was a jolly pic- 
nic at Margaret Garner's fascinating- 
camp back of Valley Forge. 

Our only regret was that so many of 
our loyal friends couldn't be with us, but 
the wonderful collection of letters which 
Katharine has presented to us will be a 
real joy to all. Start right now saving up 
for a trip to Bryn Mawr in 1935. 

Eleanor Gilman. 

1906 
Editor: Mrs. Edward W. Sturdevant 
Marine Barracks, 
St. Thomas, Virgin Islands. 

Mary Lee writes briefly that she is in 
the hospital, ill. She says that Alice Col- 
gan Boomsliter's mother died recently. 
"She was one of the bravest, sweetest, 
strongest persons I have ever known." 
Our deepest sympathy goes to Alice. 

Katharine Macauley Fearing toured 
Florida from the middle of January till 
April. On the way home she stopped in 
Charleston to see the Magnolia Gardens 
and there she met Ruth Archbald Little. 
She adds that Katharine, Jr., is now seven 
and "quite a handful." 

Mary Quimby Shumway has just com- 
pleted a most interesting year as in- 
structor in German at the Curtis Insti- 
tute. On the sixth of June she and her 
husband sail for France where they will 
motor for a while, then on to southern 
Germany and Austria, returning by the 
end of September. 

Virginia Robinson will spend the first 
week of July teaching in an institute of 
public school teachers in Pittsburgh on 
the relation of social work and education. 
Then she sails July 9th for two months 
in France and Germany. Phoebe's and 



Virginia's oldest adopted son graduates 
from the Germantown Friends' School in 
June and goes to Carnegie Tech in Sep- 
tember. 

Because of the very thoughtful secre- 
tary of Margaret Scribner Grant's hus- 
band, 1906 may know that the Grant fam- 
ily sailed on the Conte Grande from New 
York on April 19th for a trip to Italy, 
Switzerland and a week in Paris, whence 
they will return about June 10th. 

Helen Sandison, with her sister Lois, 
joins the exodus to Europe on June 21st 
— -"some work in England, but chiefly 
traveling for pleasure in England and 
France." She has enjoyed her work as 
Chairman of the Committee on Admis- 
sions, and it brought her in contact with 
Bryn Mawr mothers, notably Marion 
Mudge and Helen Waldron. Helen Wal- 
dron Wells' daughter Kathryn was mar- 
ried on April 26th to Frederick Fenton. 

Jessie Thomas Bennett and Grace 
Wade Levering had such a successful 
trip last year that they are going to try 
it again, though this time not together. 
Last year they landed at Antwerp, mo- 
tored through Holland and Belgium, Nor- 
mandy, Brittany, and the Chateau coun- 
try, ending without a mishap in Paris, 
where their respective husbands joined 
them. This time Grace is taking Wade 
for a little intensive French and Jessie 
is motoring with another friend. 

Augusta Wallace may go, too, though 
she is not sure as yet. If her plans work 
out, she sails for Londonderry on July 
2d with Augusta, Jr., does Ireland, Edin- 
borough, and England, crosses to Paris 
for a few weeks, and comes home from 
Bordeaux September 15th. 

And so, farewell. We land tomorrow, 
June 2nd. May my successor find vol- 
umes of news. 

1909 

Class Editor: Helen Crane, 

Denbigh Hall, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 
We have just received a letter from 
Frances Browne, part of which we 
quote: "I am having a perfectly won- 
derful trip and really feel well now. It 
was nice seeing Frances Ferris in 
Geneva. I have just had cards from her 
and Hono in Rome. Lacy is there, too, 
and I missed a Bryn Mawr luncheon 
they had planned for the 16th. We went 
from Egypt to Palestine . and Syria. It 
was most interesting. In Beirut we stayed 
three days with Kate Chambers Seelye 
(1911). She has the nicest family you 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



27 



ever saw, ranging from 2 l / 2 months to 
twelve or fourteen years. We enjoyed 
them and all the people we met there. 
Then we took a freight steamer, stopping 
at many Asia Minor ports, Cyprus and 
Rhodes, and finally reached Athens about 
April 1st. We have taken a beauti- 
ful trip to the south — Sparta, Arcadia, 
Mycenae, Corinth, and Olympia. I never 
knew how beautiful Greece was. Every 
day was different and more beautiful 
than the last. You come so unexpectedly 
from a high mountain, pass on to the 
blue, blue water of the sea, there are so 
many inlets and islands. You realize as 
never before why the pastoral life was 
considered enviable. The flocks of lambs 
and goats on the hillsides under a blue 
sky with snow-clad mountains above, 
fields of wheat, olive groves and flower- 
bedecked meadows in the foreground and 
the blue sea in the distance make a pic- 
ture hard to equal, and you want to stay 
in every spot you pass ! 

"Norvelle leaves for Paris to join a 
friend there this week. Mary Swindler 
and I stay on here, perhaps going to 
Delos and Crete and even Constanti- 
nople ! Towards the end of May I go to 
Vienna and summer plans are vague." 

Dorothy Smith Chamberlin took a va- 
cation for the first time since she was 
married, and came East with her hus- 
band early in May. Leaving him to the 
delights of geological meetings in Wash- 
ington, Dorothy came up to B. M., quite 
by chance, for the week-end on which 
the Glee Club was giving "The Pirates of 
Penzance." Nellie Shippen came down 
from New York, and we all had a very 
gay time. In addition to taking in the 
Pirates, we had a beautiful drive with, 
Hilda, and sat in the cloisters and on the 
campus gossiping very satisfactorily. 
Dorothy has most delightful pictures of 
her family, of which we approve most 
heartily. 

1910 

Class Editor: Emily L. Storer, 

17 Beaver Street, Waltham, Mass. 



Word has just been received of the 
death on May 2nd of Bessie Cox Wol- 
stenholme (Mrs. Hollis Wolstenholme). 
The Class wishes to extend its sympathy 
to her husband and family. 



Marion Kirk writes : 
"The Code is finished ! Around the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania Law School that 



remark needs no explaining, but for those 
members of the Class who haven't read 
of the work of the American Law Insti- 
tute, which has just had its eighth annual 
meeting in Washington, I shall have to 
say a little more. Our work in the Insti- 
tute has been the drafting of a Code of 
Criminal Procedure, embodying the best 
features of the criminal procedure in the 
forty-eight states, which after being ap- 
proved by the Institute is to be put be- 
fore the various state legislatures for 
adoption in whole or in part ! The draft- 
ing of the code has been done by William 
E. Mikell, former dean of the Law 
School of the University of Pennsylvania, 
and Edwin R. Keedy, one of the pro- 
fessors. My work has been digging into 
the statutes of the forty-eight states to 
find out what is the practice. The code 
has received very good criticism and I 
am immensely proud of being part of the 
work. As a special honor, we legal assist- 
ants, two of us, had our names printed 
on the cover of the finished code. 

Anita Maris Boggs: "Did I tell you 
that last November I was elected a mem- 
ber of the Royal Geographic Society? I 
think I am the tenth American woman in 
its one hundred three years of existence 
to be so honored. It was given in recog- 
nition of my explorations and the dis- 
semination of Geographic information 
through the Bureau of Commercial Eco- 
nomics." 

Gertrude Kingsbacher Sunstein writes 
from 5506 Aylesboro Avenue, Pittsburgh : 

"We spent five months of the past year 
in California, returning East at the end 
of last November. We drove West in our 
car, and enjoyed the adventure of the 
Fiesta at Santa Barbara last August. I 
came upon Peggy James Porter, dressed 
in elegant Spanish attire, selling pink 
lemonade to the perspiring populace. In 
between sales we chatted a bit, and I got 
some excellent moving pictures of her. 

"Since our return, I have been busy 
getting my children readjusted to school 
and music and dancing. My oldest child, 
Ann, is a Sophomore in high school, and 
my oldest boy, Dick, has just started to 
a boys' country day school. The two 
younger children are in Community 
School, Pittsburgh's one attempt at Pro- 
gressive Education, which I have helped 
to foster for eight years now. My labors 
have just been rewarded by a recent gift 
of $325,000 to the University of Pitts- 
burgh given for a progressive elementary 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



school which is to include pupils, staff 
and board of Community School." 

1911 
Class Editor: Louise S. Russell, 
140 East 52nd Street, New York. 

Florence Wood Winship and her fam- 
ily have had a year of sickness. 

Kate Chambers Seelye is again sending 
back home her long newsy letters. After 
the birth of her fifth child, Katherine, on 
January 9th, she resumed her full life of 
calls and visitors and concerts and Y. W. 
exhibits and family birthday parties. 
Among her visitors was Margaret Doo- 
little, on her way back from Sidon to 
Tripoli, where Kate packed up her baby 
and accompanied her for the week-end. 
Other guests were Frances and Norvelle 
Browne and Miss Swindler, with whom 
Kate gathered in Mme. Marmillet (Jean 
Sattler, 1915), making a record of five 
Bryn Mawrters at once. 

Louise Russell is sailing on June 27th 
for a summer in Europe, going to 
Oberammergau by way of France and 
Switzerland, and ending up in England 
in August. 

1912 

Class Editor: Elizabeth Pinney Hunt 
(Mrs. Andrew D. Hunt), 
Haverford, Pennsylvania. 

Adele Guggenheimer Lehman (Mrs. 
Albert C. Lehman) is living at the Schen- 
ly Apartments in Pittsburgh. 

Irma Schloss Manheimer is busy with 
two sons, aged eleven and five. 

Marjorie Thompson and Mary Peirce 
are spending the summer at Squam Lake 
in New Hampshire. 

1912 would like the addresses of 
Marion Brown McClean and Helen 
Marsh Martin. 

Florence Glenn Zipf has recently been 
elected President of the Bryn Mawr 
Women's Club. 

Gladys Spry Augur is in Santa Fe 
with her husband and plans to train to 
be a Harvey courier. 

Mary Brown and her children will be 
in Nantucket for the summer. 

Karin Costello Stephen is a practicing 
nerve specialist, and keen about her work. 

The class extends its sympathy to Julia 
Haines MacDonald, whose mother died 
suddenly in January following an oper- 
ation. 

1915 
Class Editor: Emily Noyes Knight, 
Windy Meadows, Wakefield, R. I. 

Frances Boyer has sailed for France 



for a summer abroad. Kitty McCollin 
Arnett will be again in the DeLaguna 
house on the Bryn Mawr campus for the 
summer. 

The Editor would like to inquire if 
Mary Goodhue has gone to Berlin, as 
she announced. Change of plan is al- 
ways welcome. It makes copy. 

1916 

Class Editor: Catherine S. Godley, 
768 Ridgeway Avenue, Avondale, 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Constance Kellen Branham wants the 
class to know of the appreciation Kath- 
arine Trowbridge Perkins' family ex- 
pressed on learning of the 1916 memorial 
to Trow in Goodhart Hall. Con has had 
letters from both Mrs. Trowbridge and 
Mr. Perkins. The former wrote: "Please 
express to the members of the Class of 
1916 our deep appreciation of this beau- 
tiful thing that they have done in Kath- 
arine's memory and our happiness in 
knowing that she still lives in their re- 
membrance." Mr. Perkins said: "Noth- 
ing could please Katharine more than 
what you and your classmates have 
done." 

Referring to her own family, Con 
writes that they have survived the win- 
ter very well. The family has been in- 
creased by a canary, two turtles and a 
white English bull terrier pup. Judy, the 
pup, was on a four-hour feeding schedule 
at first and Con felt as if she had a new 
baby in the home. 

Fredrika Kellogg Jouett .has at last 
settled down and is calling New Orleans 
home. Her husband has resigned from 
, the army air service. He is to be sales 
manager of all aviation products of the 
Standard Oil Company of Louisiana and 
have charge of all their air activities. 

Margaret Chase Locke spends consid- 
erable time motoring with her husband 
when business calls him away. A recent 
trip took them through Virginia. 

Lois Goodnow MacMurray and her 
family have returned to the United States 
to live and expect to make Baltimore 
their permanent home. Her husband has 
been made Director of the Page School 
of International Relations at Johns Hop- 
kins. In June Punky and he will go to 
Europe for four months. 

Margaret Dodd Sangree's oldest daugh- 
ter, Joyce, is going to Camp Runoia this 
summer. That is Constance Dowd's fa- 
mous camp at Belgrade Lakes, Maine. 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



29 



1917 
Class Editor: Bertha Clark Greenough 
203 Blackstone Blvd., 
Providence, R. I. 

Elisabeth Emerson Gardner has a son, 
Emerson Gardner, born May 22nd. She 
will probably spend some time this sum- 
mer at Matunuck, R. I., where the Gard- 
ners have a delightful summer place. 

Connie Morss Fiske showed two horses 
at the Jacobs Hill Horse Show, in Rhode 
Island, in May. I believe they got a first 
in pair jumping and that she took second 
in the hunter class on All A'Drift. 

Anna Coulter Parsons moved down to 
her summer home at Warwick, R. I., in 
June. I saw her with her son in the 
Junior League shop not long ago. He 
is getting quite grown up and I under- 
stand that her young daughter is ador- 
able. 

1919 

Editor: Marjorie Remington Twitchell 
(Mrs. Pierrepont Twitchell), 
Setauket, L. I. 

Fritz Beatty has been working for a 
Ph.D. at Columbia as well as teaching 
at Hunter College, New York, this 
winter. 

Millie Peacock Haerther says since 
leaving college her time has been occu- 
pied "chasing two sons, a golf ball, and 
a nice husband about." They live in 
Chicago just eight months of the year, 
so the "boys can get a fair education, 
and unlike mother and, I might add, 
father, they are quite intelligent, I am 
told." Bill, Jr., is in fourth grade; Dan, 
age five, is in kindergarten. "He is too 
full of the devil to take school very 
seriously. . . . We have a real country 
place eight miles from here. . . . Billie, 
Sr., stock broker, commutes. . . . For the 
last few years I have been first Vice- 
President of the Women's Western Golf 
Association besides Chairman of the 
Board of the Woman's Chicago District 
Association. . . . Also some work for the 
Children's Memorial Hospital. ... I 
sailed a week before reunion for Eng- 
land . . . took the next boat back. 
Mother died very suddenly. ... I see 
Clara Hollis Kirk occasionally. Elizabeth 
Carus is studying at the University here. 
In the summer she owns and runs a 
large orchard over in Michigan. Mil- 
lie's new address is 3920 Lake Shore 
Drive, Chicago. 

Helen Prescott Churchward's husband 
is in business for himself. She is still 



doing social work, but plans to take two 
months leave this summer and do the 
painting and the re-decoration of their 
house. 

Marjorie Ewen Simpson, Jr., arrived 
May fifth. 

Marjorie Remington Twitchell's hus- 
band has just been made a partner in 
the law firm of her father, Remington 
and Meeker, in New York. 

Isabel Whittier, teaching at Hunter 
College and in "various activities at the 
5th Ave. Presbyterian Church," has be- 
come a ping pong enthusiast. She wrote 
an article on "Marblehead, Mass." for 
"The Forward." 

Nanine Iddings spent a day with Sarah 
Taylor Vernon in Morgantown, not long 
ago. Sarah is "such a model mother and 
housekeeper . . . splendid looking boys." 
Nanine is "teaching A B C's to six-year- 
olds . . . have taught illiterates in the 
Moonlight Schools, a kindergarten, and 
girls in a Normal School in Atlanta. Two 
years ago ... to Norway and cruised 
luxuriously on King George's ex-yacht to 
North Cape to see the midnight sun . . . 
later to Stockholm and Copenhagen." 

Ruth Woodruff is at Cambridge study- 
ing for her Ph.D. in Economics. 

Louise Wood, now at the Bryn Mawr 
Club in New York, conducts "a study year 
in Europe" for girls during the winter. 
She and Miss Helen Anderson-Smith get 
together a small group of girls who are 
ready for college and wish to spend a 
winter in Europe, and girls who wish to 
supplement their college work in Europe. 
Peter Hayman Dam writes that the 
reason she missed reunion was that she 
sailed June 1st for Europe on two weeks' 
notice, since her husband had to get 
back. "The high spot . . . the last few 
years has been the travel — all over Italy, 
France, England, Ireland, and into the 
East — Syria, Palestine and Egypt . . . 
the Museum (of the University of Penn- 
sylvania) is excavating in Palestine and 
Egypt . . . grand time with excavators 
and Museum people 'in loco'. . . . My 
husband continues to amuse me as much 
as when I married him . . . have ... a 
very badly spoiled airedale. . . . Ruth 
Wheeler's 'Tony' is my god-son, so I 
have twice made the pilgrimage to Carn- 
forth, England, to see him . . . most 
wholly English youngster. My house is 
Normandy style, gradually being fur- 
nished with French antiques. My job, 
Curator of Public Relations, publicity 
of all kinds, writing for newspapers and 



30 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



magazines, editing the museum's own 
publications, lecturing on museum work, 
supervising work with schools, for which 
I have three assistants. . . . Story hour 
for children of members . . . this year I 
discovered a magic casement through 
which you could look into China or 
Egypt, or times of long ago, by the art 
of a magic lantern — but though the chil- 
dren realized it, the lambs, you would 
never have guessed . . . that they did 
not think it the most miraculous per- 
formance. . . . Also I'm now a radio 
performer — broadcasting every Friday 
afternoon all spring — fun at first, but 
now a monotonous nuisance \" 

1920 

Class Editor: Mary Porritt Green 
(Mrs. Valentine J. Green), 
419 East 57th St., New York City. 

Elizabeth Luetkemeyer Howard, Te- 
resa James Morris, Marian Gregg King, 
Zella Boynton Selden, Mary Hardy, Milli- 
cent Carey, Marguerite Eilers, Mary 
Hoag Lawrence, Phoebe Helmer Wads- 
worth, Katherine Cauldwell Scott, Dor- 
othy Jenkins, Julia Conklin, Josephine 
Herrick, Helen Wortman Russell, Made- 
line Brown, Louise Sloan, Julia Cochran 
Buck, Katherine Townsend, Marjorie 
Canby Taylor and Edith Taylor (1920's 
class baby), Margaret Ballou Hitchcock, 
Margaret Dent Dandon, Agnes Rose, 
Jean Justice, Catherine Robinson, Mary 
Porritt Green appeared for Reunion din- 
ner which was held on Saturday night in 
Pembroke. It was a great success, at least 
all those present thought so. 

Millicent was the toastmistress and the 
first speaker was Ballou, who read ex- 
cerpts from a diary she kept during her 
freshman year. It is a classic and she 
really ought to mimeograph it and send 
us all copies to cheer us up when the 
cook leaves or we get fired. She be- 
moans the conduct of two of us who did 
not behave according to the standards 
of those days, but comforts herself with 
the thought that of course you couldn't 
expect much from people who didn't be- 
long to the C. A. She makes frequent 
references to prison reforming which she 
intended to make her career because it 
was so unattractive. (Two children and 
a husband must have interfered with 
this, for we have heard no more about it.) 

Madeline Brown talked about the med- 
ical experiences of hers and others in 
Bellevue. K. Cauldwell Scott talked 
about Mexico, having lived there for three 



and a half years. Louise Sloan was asked 
to tell what she was doing in the Wilmer 
Clinic — but of course she just didn't man- 
age, to say anything about herself. How- 
ever, a lot of other people volunteered 
information about her and from that we 
gathered she was a most remarkable 
person. 

Zella Boynton Selden told us how she 
had started a progressive school in Erie, 
Pa. That may sound simple, but it isn't 
in a town averse to private schools. But 
that didn't bother Zella. She induced 
one man to give up acres of his land 
(and he didn't even have any children 
to attend the school) and others to part 
with so much money that they have built 
a very superior building. All this was 
done last summer and when the school 
opened it was filled to its capacity of 
fifty. And it ended the school year with- 
out a debt ! 

Catherine Robinson gave a brief ac- 
count of the Graduate Hall and what she 
was doing there. 

Then Millicent told about the present 
conditions in college and the reasons for 
raising the tuition. 

On Sunday morning most of those 
present went to the round table discus- 
sion in President Thomas' garden. After- 
wards the pictures sent in by various 
members of the class were shown by a 
magic lantern in Goodhart Hall and the 
letters from those who were not able to 
come were read. (You can read about 
those in the next Bulletin.) Then there 
was a picnic lunch. Darthela Clarke and 
Elizabeth Williams Sykes came over for 
this. 

Later in the afternoon there was a tea 
at Millicent Carey's house for '20, '21, 
'22 and '23. On Monday afternoon Mar- 
jorie Canby Taylor asked the class to tea 
at her house. 

1921 

Class Editor: Helen M. Rogers 
(Mrs. J. Ellsworth Rogers) 
99 Poplar Plains, Toronto, Canada. 

TENTH REUNION 

The amazing thing about this pseudo- 
Tenth Reunion was that there seemed to 
be no connection between it and that 
red, gregarious, whooping, overpowering 
(though, of course, charming) mass who 
went forth from Bryn Mawr nine years 
ago. This I attribute not to the weak- 
ness of age, but to the spirit of the times: 
Individualism has struck us, and not the 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



31 



smallest red ribbon appeared on a 1921 
arm. 

One by one, beginning on Friday, 
members of the class straggled into head- 
quarters in Pern West, until by the time 
of the banquet in Denbigh Saturday 
night, about 35 souls had assembled for 
feasting and song, with Marynia Foot 
Farnham as toastmistress. Luckily for the 
hungry, the feasting was better than the 
singing, which consisted literally of one 
song ("Go on, Mighty Seniors," I think 
it was). Louise Reinhardt had become 
Mrs. Charles Francis the day before, and 
had sailed for Europe, so Marynia and 
Mabel Smith Cowles felt that they were 
not adequately supported, and we sang 
no more. Not even the war whoop. How- 
ever, we had some sprightly speakers: 
Emily Kimbrough Wrench told anecdotes 
incidental to the birth of twin daughters 
-last Labor Day; Kat Walker Bradford 
described the class baby's phenomenal 
mental development, and Eleanor Don- 
nelley Erdman spoke in a philosophical 
way of the changes at the Ranch, due to 
the insidious introduction of, first, boys, 
and then men. 

The banquet adjourned in a Class 
Meeting, with Marynia — full of biting 
comment, and as energetic as ever — pre- 
siding. That did make us feel like Fresh- 
•men again, but even so our behaviour was 
remarkably restrained. 

On Sunday everyone went off in small 
groups — to Emily's, to Mag Taylor's, to 
Margaret Ladd's, etc. — but a good many 
met at Millicent Carey's for tea, with 
some of 1920, 1922 and 1923. That morn- 
ing the more energetic attended a dis- 
cussion group at the Deanery, led by ex- 
President Thomas, and the less energetic 
are still regretting that they slept instead. 
The economic independence of women 
was of course discussed. Probably the 
most talked-of subject during the whole 
week-end was the question of "Careers 
Plus Children." Naturally, it wasn't set- 
tled. 

The endless conversation was, of 
course, the most exciting part of reunion. 
A number of facts came to light. There 
seems to be a great quantity of babies, 
both here and en route; and other inter- 
esting things are being done. Here are 
a few that I remember: 

Helen Hill and her husband have just 
finished a book (now at the publisher's) 
on post-war relations between America 
and Europe. They have also bought a 
farm in Virginia, near Washington. 



Marynia is practising medicine in New 
York and doing some research for the 
Red Cross on causes of death in child- 
birth. Her husband is also doing re- 
search, and they have one son. 

Biffy (Winifred Worcester Steven- 
son) has two children, is interested in 
progressive schools, and has taken up real 
estate as a sideline. 

Eleanor Bliss is a Doctor of Science 
from Johns Hopkins, and will spend next 
year working on the "Common Cold." 

Marion Walton Putnam exhibited at 
the Academy of the Fine Arts of Phila- 
delphia this spring. She has a son, John 
Christopher Walton Putnam who was one 
year old the first of April. She and her 
husband and baby will spend the summer 
in a cottage on her mother's place at 
Westport, Conn. 

The following list of those at reunion 
is made from a very poor memory, and 
I can't even try to remember the hus- 
bands, so only maiden names are given, 
with the married ladies in italics for the 
benefit of anyone interested in statistics: 

M. Archbald, H. Baldwin, M. Baldwin, 
C. Bickley, E. Bliss, L. Cadot, E. Cope, 
C. Donnelley, E. Donnelley, M. Foot, H. 
Hill, H. James, E. Kimbrough, E. Kel- 
logg, M. Ladd, /. Latter, I. McGinnis, R. 
Marshall, M. Morton, C. Mottu, E. 
Nezvell, P. Ostrof, M. Smith, A. Taylor, 
M. Taylor, M. Thompson, K. Walker, W. 
Worcester. The absent ones were re- 
membered and missed. 

The Class learned with sorrow of the 
death of Elizabeth Cecil Scott's husband, 
and of Nancy Porter Straus's oldest 
child. 

1922 

Class Editor: Serena Hand Savage, 
29 W. 12th St., New York City. 

REUNION 

All those who could not come to Bryn 
Mawr for the week-end of the first of 
June missed one of the most delightful 
and surprising of gatherings. We sus- 
pect that most of the people who daring- 
ly made up their minds to return to past 
haunts, did so with mixed feelings of 
curiosity and dread. They were repaid 
by the most satisfying of reactions. We 
seemed thoroughly attractive, having ac- 
quired at ^ thirty years a pleasing poise 
and ^ sophistication which was entirely 
lacking at twenty. 

Saturday afternoon our Constance 
Ludington invited us to a picnic in a 
studio at Ardmore. There we feasted 






32 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



sumptuously, waited on by two Admirable 
Crichtons (N. B. This is the only kind 
of picnic worth having.) Cornelia Skin- 
ner Blodget did two monologues for us, 
and a new moon, climbing to a small win- 
dow near the roof, looked in on an en- 
wrapt group of old collegians, clad in 
costumes of white beach coats with Blue 
Tigers rampant, designed by E. Ander- 
son. Sunday afternoon Jane Yeatman 
Savage hospitably entertained us in 
Chestnut Hill at supper time. Most of 
us left on Monday. Picoll stayed to 
stand by the alumnae in basketball and 
water polo. 

To all of 1922, may it now be said, 
never forego a reunion for fear of what 
you'll see ! There is nothing so fascinat- 
ing as an older woman. 

Patriotic reunioners were as follows: 
E. Anderson, C. Baird Voorhis, Custis 
Bennett McGrory, E. Brown, C. Cameron 
Ludington, B. Clarke, I. Coleman, M. 
Crosby, E. Finch, J. Fisher, V. Grace, 
S. Hand Savage, E. Hall, M. D. Hay, 
Byrd Cremora Hazelton, N. Jay Harvey, 
M. Kennard, A. Nicoll, P. Norcross 
Bentley, K. Peek, C. Rhett Woods, G. 
Rhoads, C. Skinner Blodget, K. Stiles 
Harrington, M. Tyler Paul, M. Voorhees, 
J. Yeatman Savage. 

1923 

Editor: Dorothy Meserve Kunhardt 
(Mrs. Philip Kunhardt) 

REUNION 
Mt. Kemble Road, Morristown, N. J. 
The seventh reunion of the class of 
1923 suffered, in all but one respect, from 
an over abundance of delicacy. In the 
first place, too many members felt that 
they never would be missed, and stayed 
away. In the second place, those who 
did come sadly underestimated their 
powers of entertainment or even of after- 
dinner speaking, and that, coupled with 
the fact that, as usual, only those who 
had never been allowed to sing could 
remember the words of our songs, made 
the class dinner on Saturday evening a 
rather placid affair. The "class meeting," 
held immediately afterward, was undis- 
tinguished by the "executive ability" 
usually associated with such occasions, as 
the minutes had apparently departed for 
points unknown. It was gratifying to 
find, however, that the seven years had 
effected no important changes — we still 
found it so difficult to agree on any of 
the subjects brought up for discussion, 
that we left our affairs in charming dis- 



array upon the table. But there were dis- 
tinctly high spots. Our reunion gift for 
Goodhart Hall was gathered to its fath- 
ers. And Dorothy Burr gave us an 
amusing, interesting and informing ac- 
count of her excavations in Greece to the 
glory of Bryn Mawr and of D. B. 

As to the athletics, in which the 
alumnae were, as usual, more sinned 
against than sinning, one again felt that 
a certain delicacy and restraint some- 
what lessened our chances at achieve- 
ment. Julia Ward was so reluctant 
where she should have plunged, that the 
alumnae had to eke out with their under- 
graduates before they could defeat Var- 
sity at water polo. Helen Rice won her 
singles tennis match, but she seemed loath 
to thrust herself into the doubles as well, 
and the alumnae lost, two matches to 
three. With Aggie Clement and Flo- 
rence Martin, she also played in the 
basketball, but again the world was too 
much with us. 

All of which is relatively unimportant. 
The pleasure of again seeing many of 
the people with whom we shared our un- 
dergraduate enthusiasms; Miss Thomas' 
hospitality in the Deanery garden, and 
the unchanging beauty of the campus and 
the college, made us profoundly grateful 
to our reunion manager for so largely 
making these things possible for us. We 
found a great many changes after seven 
years, but — again with delicacy and re- 
straint — who are we to maintain they are 
not for the better? Essentially the col- 
lege never lets us down — how firm a 
foundation—. RuTH McAneny Loud. 

1925 
Class Editor: Elizabeth Mallet Conger 
(Mrs. Frederick Conger), 
325 E. 7nd St., New York. 
Natalie duPont was married to George 
Phippen Edmonds on May twenty-second. 
The wedding took place at six-thirty in 
the evening at Nat's home. After their 
wedding trip the Edmonds will "live in 
Wilmington. 

1926 
Class Editor: Edith Tweddell, 
Plandome, L. I. 

We had a grand reunion picnic down 
on the lower hockey field. We made 
plans for our formal reunion next year 
and all left determined not to miss it and 
to bring along everyone we can lay hands 
on if physical persuasion is necessary. 
Molly Parker was there on a flying trip 
from a job in Boston. Winnie Dodd 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



33 



and Martha Talcott Blankarn motored 
over from New York. Mats has an 
eighteen-month daughter that must be a 
credit to twenty-six. Mildred Bach was 
there with Frank King, who is teaching 
high school French. Peg Huber simply 
awed us with the technicalities of avia- 
tion. Alice Wilt has seen all of the world 
that lies between the Pacific and Mont- 
martre. K. Hendrick is studying to take 
her New York bar examinations. Stubby 
is tutoring two young pupils and Peg 
Harris West was in the midst of her sec- 
ond year law exams. 

We gleaned various bits of news about 
those who weren't there. Margin Wylie 
will marry an Englishman, a clergyman, 
if I'm not mistaken, early in June, and 
Anna Adams is also to be married soon. 
Jazzie Preston and her family are sail- 
ing for Scotland on the 21st of June. 
Shutz is planning a gorgeous motor trip 
to California this summer. Jenny Green 
has been teaching at Foxcroft this win- 
ter. 

I warn you, you will miss a lot if you 
don't all come back next year, so put it 
on your date-book now. 

1927 
Class Editor: Ellenor Morris, 
Berwyn, Pa. 

On Thursday, June 5th, Sylvia Walker 
was married to Mr. Jeremiah Vincent 
Dillon. Her future address will be 64 
Sagamore Road, Bronxville, New York. 

On Saturday, May 17th, Maria Cham- 
berlain was married to Ensign Earl 
Chamberlain Swearingen, of the United 
States Navy. She writes of the wedding 
that it was a full dress uniform affair 
with an arch of swords. Her brides- 
maids were Bina Deneen, Mary Virginia 
Carey, '26; Ruth Gardner, '28, and Phyl- 
lis Wiegand, '30. She gives her address 
as c/o Ensign E. K. Swearingen, U. S. S. 
Colorado, c/o Postmaster, San Francisco. 

Mary Hand is engaged to John Dwight 
Winston Churchill, the son of the 
novelist, Winston Churchill. She is to be 
married on June 14th in Cornish, N. H. 

Grace Hays is engaged to Henry 
Stehli, of New York. 

Sara Pinkerton's engagement to James 
L. Irwin is also announced. He is a 
graduate of Penn, where he is now teach- 
ing Latin. 

Alberta Sanson Adams has a son, John 
Curtis, Jr. Her present home is in San 
Antonio, Texas. 

Nanette Chester's husband has just 
published a book, "Hamilton," and is 



writing another which is due to appear 
in the fall. 

Dot Meeker has been working all win- 
ter in a laboratory at Johns Hopkins. 
She appeared at Garden Party with Con- 
nie Jones, who has this year been teach- 
ing at the Baldwin School. 

Darcy Kellogg also turned up at the 
same function. She has been working 
at a children's clinic in New York sev- 
eral days a week. 

Nan Bowman is well on the way to- 
wards becoming a doctor and is awfully 
pleased with the work. 

Jan Seeley having been warden of Pern 
West as well as a very busy member of 
his athletic department, expects to spend 
part of her summer at Columbia studying 
for an M.A. in Physical Education. 

Elizabeth Norton is coming to Bryn 
Mawr next year to read papers for Miss 
King, and to give part of the course in 
Modern Painting. 

Ellenor Morris, who has been doing 
the former part of that job, wishes her 
the very best of luck. At the moment of 
this writing she is nearly exhausted from 
the strain of correcting finals. She will 
be at home recuperating till the end of 
July when she is going abroad for a 
couple of months with her family. 

Ginny Newbold was married on April 
29th to Sam Gibbon of Philadelphia. She 
looked very beautiful as usual and had 
a heavenly spring day for the wedding. 

Mary Robinson's engagement is an- 
nounced to George Gordon Cameron, D.D. 
No further data has reached the editor. 

A great many people turned up at Bryn 
Mawr the first week-end in May to see 
Glee Club give the Pirates of Penzance. 
Among those present from '27 were Frank 
Thayer, Elinor Parker, and Agnes Mon- 
gan. Agnes has been studying art abroad 
and is at present occupied in cataloguing 
pictures in the Fogg Museum. Her sis- 
ter, Betty, now at College, is doing Hon- 
ors work in History of Art here. 

1930 

Class Editor: Olivia Stokes 
2408 Massachusetts Ave., 
Washington, D. C. 

At the last class meeting 1930 elected 
the following officers: Agnes Howell, 
President; Content Peckham, Secretary 
and Treasurer ; Dorothea Cross, Class Col- 
lector; Olivia Stokes, Class Editor. Vir- 
ginia Loomis was elected to be the repre- 
sentative of the class at the meeting of 
the Alumnae Council, which is to be held 
in Indianapolis in November. 



The Saint Timothys School 
for Girls 

CATONSVILLE, MARYLAND 

Founded September 1882 

COLLEGE PREPARATORY 

AND 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

MISS LOUISA McENDREE FOWLER 
Head of the School 

Wykeham Rise 

WASHINGTON, CONNECTICUT 

A COUNTRY SCHOOL 
FOR GIRLS 

FANNY E. DAVIES, LL.A., Headmistress 
Prepares for Bryn Mawr and Other Colleges 

The Episcopal Academy 

(Founded 178S) 

CITY LINE, OVERBROOK, PA. 

A country day school for boys 

MODERN AND WELL EQUIPPED 
Endorsed by Bryn Mawr Alumnae 

UN1VERSITY«S 

BOARDING AND DAY SCHOOL 

Founded 1896 

Thorough and successful Preparation 

for Eastern Colleges for Women as well as 

for Midwestern Colleges and Universities 

Illustrated Catalogue on Request 

ANNA B. HAIRE, A.B., SMITH COLLEGE, Principal 

1106-B Lake Shore Drive Chicago, Illinois 

THE LOW AND 
HEYWOOD SCHOOL 



Emphasizing college preparatory work. 

Also general and special courses. 

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65 th year. Catalogue. 

SHIPPAN POINT, 
STAMFORD, CONN. 



The Ethel Walker School 

SIMSBURY, CONNECTICUT 

Head of School 

ETHEL WALKER SMITH, A.M., 
Bryn Mawr College 



Head Mistress 

JESSIE GERMAIN HEWITT, A.B., 
Bryn Mawr College 



y l» |jlAtOD*S^C1IH€€L 

College Preparation. Cultural /F" > 
and Special Courses. City and § JlVcfe 
Country Advantages. 
Lucie C. Beard, Headmistress 
Box M, Orange, N. J. 




/1ARCUAV SCHQ>L 

BRYN MAWR, PA. 
Prepares for Bryn Mawr and 
all leading colleges 

Musical Course prepares for the Depart 
ment of Music of Bryn Mawr College 
EDITH HARCUM, Head of School 
L. May Willis, Principal 

THE MISSES KIRK'S 

College Preparatory School 

PREPARATORY TO BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 
Individual Instruction. Athletics. 

Clovercroft, Montgomery Avenue, Rosemont, Pa 
Mail, telephone and telegraph address: Bryn MaWr. Pa. 



CHOATE SCHOOL 

1600 Beacon Street, Brookline, Mass. 

HOME AND DAY SCHOOL 
FOR GIRLS 

EMPHASIS ON COLLEGE PREPARATION 

Elective Courses for students not preparing 
for College 

AUGUSTA CHOATE, A.M. (Vuiir) 

Principal 



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THE AGNES IRWIN SCHOOL 

2009-2011 Delancey Place, Philadelphia 

A College Preparatory 
SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

BERTHA M. LAWS, A.B., Headmistress 


FERRY HALL 

A RESIDENT AND DAY SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

On Lake Michigan, near Chicago 

Junior College; High School Department: College 
Preparatory and General Courses. Special Departments 
of Music, Expression and Art. 

Two new dormitories, including new dining room and 
infirmary. 

Eloise R. Tremain, A.B., Bryn Mawr, Principal 


MISS WRIGHT'S SCHOOL 

Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Prepares for College Board 
Examination 


ROSEMARY HALL 

College Preparatory 

(With supplementary but not alternative courses) 

CAROLINE RUUTZ-REES. Ph.D. \ „. M .. _ 

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30th Year. Complete College Preparation, 

individual Attention to carefully selected group in 
Boarding Department of Progressive Day School. 
Summer and Winter Sports. Dramatics, Art, 
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HOPE FISHER, Principal, Worcester, Mass. 


The Shipley School 

Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 

Preparatory to Bryn Mawr College 

ALICE G. HOWLANP, ELEANOR 0. BROWNELL 
Principals 


The Katharine Branson School 

ROSS, CALIFORNIA Across the Bay from San Francisco 

A Country School College Preparatory 

Head: 
Katharine Fleming Branson, A.B., Bryn Mawr 


MISS RANSOM and 
MISS BRIDGES' SCHOOL 

PIEDMONT, CALIFORNIA 

(A suburb of San Francisco) 

A RESIDENT AND DAY SCHOOL FOR GIRL8 

General and College Preparatory Courses 

KATHERINE TOWLE, A.B., Head 


MISS MADEIRA'S SCHOOL 

1330 19th St., N W. Washington, D. C. 

A RESIDENT AND DAY SCHOOL FOR 
GIRLS 

LUCY MADEIRA WING, A.B. 

MRS. DAVID LAFOREST WING 

Head Mistress 


The Baldwin School 

A Country School for Girls 
BRYN MAWR PENNSYLVANIA 

Preparation for Bryn Mawr, Mount 

Holyoke, Smith, Vassar and Wellesley 

Colleges. Abundant Outdoor Life. 

Hockey, Basketball, Tennis, 

Indoor Swimming Pool. 

ELIZABETH FORREST JOHNSON. A.B. 

HEAD 



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Garrison forest 

Modern, well-equipped country school for 
girls. In the Green Spring Valley near 
Baltimore. Thorough college preparation. 
General Courses with excellent opportu- 
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School. All sports including riding. 

Catalogue on request 

Bryn Mawr, 1020 
BOX M GARRISON MARYLAND 



TheTraphagen School of Fashion 



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INTENSIVE SIX WEEKS' 
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All phases from elementary to full 
mastery of costume design and illus- 
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Every member of advanced classes 
often placed through our Employment 
Bureau. Write for announcement-M 



In Arnold, Constable & Company Costume 
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nearly 800 students took part; all prizes 
were awarded to Traphagen pupils with 
exception of one of the five third prizes. 

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Cathedral School of St. Mary 

GARDEN CITY, LONG ISLAND, N. Y. 

A school for Girls 1 9 miles from New York. College 

preparatory and general courses. Music Art and 

Domestic Science. Catalogue on request. Box B 

MIRIAM A. BYTEL, A.B., Radcliffe, Principal 

BERTHA GORDON WOOD, A.B., Bryn Mawr„ 

Assistant Principal 



PRIVATE SECRETARIAL and 
FINISHING COURSES 

Intensive training in stenography, touch type- 
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A Study-Year 
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FIVE MONTHS IN PARIS 
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Directors: Miss Helen Anderson-Smith 
Miss Louise H Wood 
(A. B. Bryn Mawr 1919) 

FOR INFORMATION: 

MRS. OLIVE HASBROUGK 

ELIOT HALL, CAMBRIDGE, MASS. 



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BRYN MAWR 
ALUMNAE 
BULLETIN 




THE OPENING OF COLLEGE 



November, 1930 



Vol. X 



No. 8 



Entered as second-class matter, January 15, 1921, at the Post Office, Phila., Pa., under Act of March 3, 1879 

COPYRIGHT, 1930 

ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 



OFFICERS OF THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE ASSOCIATlOxN 

EXECUTIVE BOARD 

President Anne Kidder Wilson, 1903 

Vice-President Mary Hardy, 1920 

Recording Secretary Gertrude Hearne Myers, 1919 

Corresponding Secretary May Egan Stokes, 1911 

Treasurer Margaret E. Brusstar, 1903 

Chairman of the Finance Committee ^Caroline Florence Lexow, 1908 

Chairman of the Publicity Committee Caroline Morrow Chadwick-Colunb. 1905 

ALUMNAE SECRETARY AND BUSINESS MANAGER OF THE BULLETIN 

Alice M. Hawkins, 1907 

EDITOR OF THE BULLETIN 

Marjorie L. Thompson, 1912 

DISTRICT COUNCILLORS 

District 1 Helen Evans Lewis. 1913 

District II Jeanne Kerr Fleischmawn, 1910 

District III Alletta Van Reypen Korff, 1900 

District IV , Katharine Holliday Daniels, 1918 

District V Isabel Lynde Dammann, 190& 

District VI Edna Warkbntin Alden, 1900 

District VII Helen Brayton Barendt, 1903 

ALUMNAE DIRECTORS 

Frances Fincke Hand, 1897 Margaret Reeve Cary, 1907 

Mary Peirce, 1912 Elizabeth Lewis Otey, 1901 

Virginia Kneeland Frantz, 1918 

CHAIRMAN OF THE ALUMNAE FUND 

Caroline Florence Lexow, 1908 

CHAIRMAN OF THE ACADEMIC COMMITTEE 

Pauline Goldmark, 1896 

CHAIRMAN OF THE SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOAN FUND COMMITTEE 

Margaret Gilman, 1919 

CHAIRMAN OF THE COMMITTEE ON HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Dr. Marjorie F. Murray, 1913 

CHAIRMAN OF THE NOMINATING COMMITTEE 

Eleanor Little Aldrich, 1905 



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tions of a preferred character. 
Two-year Course for pre- 
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uates. First year includes six 
college subjects. Second year 
intensive secretarial training. 

For Catalogue address Director, College Departmen I 



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Resident and Day 

BOSTON 
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PROVIDENCE 
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SAKS-FIFTH AVENUE 

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Kindly mention Brtn Mawr Bulletin 






Bryn Mawr Alumnae 
Bulletin 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF 
THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

Marjorie L. Thompson, '12, Editor 
Alice M. Hawkins, '07, Business Manager 

EDITORIAL BOARD 
Mary Crawford Dudley, '96 Emily Kimbrough Wrench, '21 

Caroline Morrow Chadwick-Collins, '05 Ellenor Morris, '27 
Emily Fox Cheston, '08 Elinor B. Amram, '28 

Anne Kidder Wilson, '03, ex-officio 

Subscription Price, $1.50 a Year Single Copies, 25 Cents 

Checks should be drawn to the order of Bryn Mawr Alumnae Bulletin 

Published monthly, except August, September and October, at 1006 Arch St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Vol. X NOVEMBER, 1930 No. 8 

The summer interlude brings us all back with something that approximates the 
fresh vision of a returned traveler. We have that slight detachment, that sense of 
distance, that makes all discussions so much more dispassionate than they are later 
in the year when everyone is caught back again into the mid-current. Changes, no 
matter how drastic, seem interesting rather than revolutionary. We are all in a position 
to co-operate more sympathetically with the college because of this summer freshness 
of point of view. At the moment there are a number of experiments to be watched with 
this slight detachment that in the end is more helpful than violent partisanship. This is 
the first year the increase in tuition has gone into effect, not wholly, it is true, but 
in part, and there are other things perhaps even more important that Miss Park 
touches on in her opening speech ". . . the completion of the new curriculum 
. . . the position which Bryn Mawr is to take in relation to the Negro, the 
relation of the life of the student to her life outside." It inevitably happens some- 
times that, when Alumnae are a little out of touch with the college, for one reason 
or another, and yet their interest is unabated, they seize eagerly on what may be 
merely a matter of opinion on the part of some one not very fully informed, and that 
personal opinion assumes the importance of an authentic fact, and is told to the next 
person as such. All this is an elaborate way, of course, of describing gossip which 
has nothing to do with those searchings of heart and mind that are necessary before 
arriving at a conclusion. If somehow the detached attitude that enables one to sift fact 
from fiction, and keep the experimental attitude toward experiments, could be main- 
tained throughout the year, it would be a valuable alumnae gift to the college. And 
the Alumnae Association is itself going to have to face a problem that is going to be 
very important for it in a number of ways, — the evaluation of the Council. It was 
started as an experiment; it now no longer is one. The arguments for and against 
its continuance need to be balanced very dispassionately, and with a summer clearness 
of vision. 



MISS PARK'S SPEECH AT THE OPENING OF COLLEGE 

Though I have not outstripped the rest of you by much I have at least been 
here long enough already to welcome the faculty and students, graduate and under- 
graduate, on this final day of September which begins the 46th year of Bryn Mawr — 
to welcome you with warmth. For the Bryn Mawr which I have thought of in these 
nine months of absence has not been the silent buildings, disposed picturesquely on 
empty greensward to which I actually came back two weeks ago, but the livelier, 
noisier, and more gayly colored place which half woke when the freshman class 
arrived on Wednesday and came to itself entirely this morning. To this Bryn Mawr 
I rejoice to return. In the folder of one of the Zermatt hotels appears a sentence, — 
"In the Alpine heights of Zermatt the weary and the pessimist may assuage their 
moral lassitude." And back to Bryn Mawr I have come to assuage mine. But it is 
the only lassitude I need to cure! That "dying lady lean and pale" who tottered 
forth among you last year has gone forever. 

A good part of the light-hearted pleasure which filled all my holiday to over- 
flowing is due to the combined kindness and competence of many people, faculty, 
staff and students, above all, to the Acting President and Dean of last year who not 
only attended to all college affairs to my complete satisfaction but who were generous 
enough to carry through the business of the year with hardly a cable to disturb my 
peace. It was not until I came back to my desk that I realized with what complicated 
and long pieces of business they had dealt. My only alarm is that having been 
necessarily away from the elementary instruction on the schedule which was admin- 
istered, I hear, to the faculty and the students, I shall never understand it ! I thought 
of them with insufficient but still deep gratitude through the year and that gratitude 
is more instructed and deeper now. 

The college opens formally this morning with 397 undergraduate students, as 
contrasted with the 409 of last year's opening day. Every room again is filled, but 
happily there are fewer non-residents awaiting residence and watching for a vacant 
room. The freshman class numbers 107 as contrasted with 120 last year and 127 
the year before. This twice repeated decrease in the freshman class is due to a 
healthy and reassuring fact: namely, that in the last two years there are fewer rooms 
left vacant by the upperclass students, despite the fact that this year in June an 
unusually large senior class was graduated. It is a more profitable piece of work 
for the college to carry its students through four years of training, of which the last 
two are the most interesting to both parties concerned, than to accept a large number 
of first-year students each autumn and find a considerable fraction leaving after one 
year or two with no experience of or profit from advanced work. The small number 
of vacant rooms, however, made the problem of admission difficult and again a large 
number of girls who had completed all requirements of entrance had to be refused 
admission. With such pressure on the college it seemed impossible to give up the 
use of Bettws-y-Coed and the house is established again this year with its quota of 
freshmen and Miss Mary Duke Wight, fellow in Romance Languages last year, as 
warden. 

The college regarded the entering class of 1929 with pride, and again in 1930 
about a quarter of the whole freshman class have been admitted with a Credit aver- 
age and only a few with an average below Merit. The Admissions Committee of 

(2) 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 3 

the year which passed the hottest of all days of the hottest of all summers at their 
task report the greatly increased value of the statements made by the heads of schools 
in response to a new set of questions formulated last year. These statements 
with the examination and school records and the scholastic aptitude tests, the 
committee carefully considered in the case of every student, and it sometimes disre- 
garded a low examination average when the ability of the student was underwritten 
by one or more of the other tests. The committee believes that the college has this 
year again accepted an excellent entering class. Half of the students whose exami- 
nation averages are highest appear also among the youngest students presenting them- 
selves — again a repetition of the record of last year. Later on I shall give my 
detail-loving mind an opportunity to report on the pedigree, physical, mental, and 
moral — if I can thus refer to the denominational affiliation — of the freshman class. 
At this moment I should like at least to say that the increased proportion of girls 
prepared in public schools, which I mentioned with satisfaction last year, is noteworthy 
again in this year's class. 

In increasing the amount of tuition for undergraduate students this year the 
Directors of the college and in particular those directors who are also alumnae felt 
great anxiety lest the college lose out of its student body and even out of its lists of 
inquirers the daughters of families on whom the cost of college training already bore 
heavily but who earlier and now have given the college some of its best and most 
representative students. The directors have tried to send broadcast over the country 
their eagerness to combine with the family in such cases and carry off the daughter. 
As you know, Miss Julia Ward, Assistant to the Dean, has been appointed to carry 
out this plan, and with this in mind, she has been promised so large a part of the travel- 
ing fund that I doubt whether Mrs. Manning and I can do more than get to Philadel- 
phia occasionally. We trust that in the near future Miss Ward's hands and those 
of the alumnae everywhere will be upheld by a larger scholarship fund, so that such 
students as the thirty-four now sent to Bryn Mawr on the regional scholarships 
may be multiplied. A few years ago Alice Day Jackson, of the Class of 1902, 
left to the college a large part of her estate, the bequest to be available on her hus- 
band's death. Mr. Jackson has now given to the college $10,000 interest on funds 
which he generously affects to hold in trust for Bryn Mawr, with the suggestion 
that the amount be used as the beginning of such a scholarship fund, to be known 
as the Alice Day Jackson Memorial Fund. He believes as we do that it is worth 
while at any effort to bring to Bryn Mawr the student who can profit to the full 
from what the college can give the fine flower of the schools. 

The graduate school numbers at the present time 98 as compared w r ith 98 last 
year at this time, and the registration of part-time graduate students will go on 
slowly for the next week, especially among the teachers, and the academic wives and 
mothers who will I doubt not treat themselves as they have often done to a fling in 
some favorite seminary. There are twenty-two resident fellows among the students — 
in the departments of archaeology, Biblical literature, chemistry, economics and 
politics, education, English, geology, German, Greek, Latin, mathematics, philosophy, 
psychology, romance languages, and social economy — and twenty-seven scholars. Five 
foreign scholars have been appointed — Mary Margaret Allen, B.Sc, of the London 
School of Economics, Friedel M. Bohme, from the University of Cologne, and Martho 
M. A. Miskolczy, from the University of Budapest, to work in social economy, 
Diederika Liesveld, from the University of Amsterdam, to work under Professor 



4 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

Chew In the Department of English, and Odette Thireau, from the University of 
Nancy, to work in Chemistry. 

It is only by thinking myself back into the situation at the beginning of last 
year that I can realize how recently a graduate hall has been established. What I 
left last year as an experiment I find as an established institution, already with its 
infant traditions. Long discussed and even dreaded changes establish themselves in 
college so quickly that one generation of students hardly knows the exasperating 
problems of the last and I must actually hurry to make my comment while the present 
graduate school knows what I am talking about. The graduate students of Bryn 
Mawr have from the beginning been its pride. Through them we have made some 
contribution to scholarship in America and they form our most direct connection 
with the great universities in America and Europe. I believe that the quality of the 
graduate school will be more easily maintained or raised now that it is to stand an 
integrated whole. And the increased comfort and quiet which Radnor offers is not 
only pleasant but important. To repair the long, heavy hours of concentrated study 
which research work demands, flowery beds of ease or their equivalent should be 
provided by any college or university which has a graduate school, and the arrange- 
ments to which Bryn Mawr has come after many years of another plan are parallel 
to those which Columbia and Radcliffe have within a few years inaugurated on a 
larger scale. One out of the many college problems which took to itself much time 
and many a discussion has now been settled. And literally side by side with this 
spiritual victory a material victory has been won. Never again will the Radnor 
plumbing nor the sound of its water floods disturb Mr. Foley's dreams or mine. 
Every ancient pipe and tile has been removed. A nightmare has become a thing of 
beauty (though with my knowledge of plumbing I can not say a joy forever) and I 
wish that all givers to the college whose taste lies along the lines of bath tubs, paint 
and shower baths could be invited into the shiny Radnor bathrooms. 

As last year an unusual number of the members of the faculty were away on year 
or half-year leave, so this autumn there are a corresponding number of returns. 
Professor Leuba, Professor William Roy Smith, Professor Marion Parris Smith, Pro- 
fessor Chew, Professor Kingsbury, Professor Swindler, all begin their work again 
this morning and though I have not been elected their spokesman I think I can say 
that there is audible a great sound of creaking of wheels — as loud as any shaduf on the 
Nile. But give us time! 

The new appointments for the year and the list of this year's travellers are to 
be found in the calendar. There should be added to them the name of Dr. Valentine 
Mueller, Ausserordentlich Professor of the University of Berlin, who comesi in 
February as Associate Professor of Archaeology. Professor Mueller has carried over his 
interest to include oriental archaeology and has published on that subject. And I am 
delighted that to Professor Carpenter, who is soon to return, and to Professor Swind- 
ler, so able a colleague should be added who will give instruction in a field in 
which the great work of the next fifty years in archaeology will probably 
be done. In the first semester the Seminary in Ancient Architecture will be given 
by Professor William B. Dinsmoor, Professor of Achaeology at Columbia, and the 
undergraduate course by Mr. Donald Egbert, Instructor in Art and Archaeology at 
Princeton University. 

The college has received a gift from Dr. George Woodward which makes it 
possible to offer this year a course of one hour a week in Public Discussion and Debate. 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 5 

The course will be given by Mr. Dayton McKean, who conducts a similar course 
in Princeton University. Dean Manning and I believe this course will be of value 
to many students who are interested in public speaking or who ought to be interested 
in public speaking, and we hope it may in the end feed some upright Bryn Mawr 
statesmen into the government. 

The Alumnae Association has again and surprisingly increased its gifts to the 
college and has made it possible to offer another grant of $1000 a year to a full 
professor of the college in recognition of work as a scholar. This award I have made 
to Professor Georgiana Goddard King, of the Department of the History of Art, 
whose published research has won her an excellent place in her own field in America 
and Europe, one of which Bryn Mawr has long been rightly proud. 

A returning traveller has for a little while an extra faculty. He walks in two 
worlds. I have said enough perhaps to show you that one part of me picks up readily 
the threads dropped at Thanksgiving. She can talk of plumbing, and graduate schools 
and entrance examinations. She settles into the same chair back of the same desk, 
watches from the same window the same hurrying student and the same industrious 
bird, both, she observes, walking on the grass as of old. I think, that is, you will 
find me normal.* But a second person looking through the same eyes finds familiar 
things strange and new. I can pick up> the grayish Bryn Mawr calendar, for example, 
and, with a mind like a freshly washed slate, see it for the first time. That calendar 
can excite me as much as a palaeolithic drawing of fighting elephants in the heart 
of the Nubian Desert or the first edelweiss of a Swiss summer up to its knees in 
water on a high, wet hillside. When I opened my eyes the first morning on my 
sleeping porch I saw on the quiet hill opposite a little compact walled town with 
its battlemented towers rising out of the trees! But this power blesses the returned 
traveller only briefly. My second self has survived freshman week, but it can hardly 
live long into the college year and I should like to make use of it while it lasts. 

In contrast with the European the ordinary American in America sees I think 
a singularly indefinite picture of his country. He feels a vague, sometimes a chaotic 
background for his life and interests and those of other individuals, and it is only 
some phase of it which occasionally becomes distinct, touched by the spotlight of a 
contemporary event. I don't need to name the reasons for this — our broad, continental 
geography, our composite population, our varied economic stresses and strains. But for 
the American who contemplates America from Europe just now there is no indistinct- 
ness, and certainly no pleasant haze. Trie newspapers, the man and the woman who 
are deeply concerned about international affairs and the man in the street see in' sharp 
black and white an America which they regard with fear or scorn or detestation as the 
case may be. They find us at once fearful and aggressive, careless of the end to which 
our acts lead and in a quick panic over any contretemps, lavish except to the gifted of 
whom we are suspicious, ignorant of distinction or beauty, boasting that education is 
widespread and contented that it should be inaccurate, thin and unfruitful. I am bound 
to say the returned American, seeing with the fresh eye of the traveller, though he 
can correct his critics in many details, is constrained to find much of that comment 
true. The dirty streets and the billboards, the vulgar movies, no less than the 
municipal scandals and the new tariff law (I should perhaps acknowledge that I am 
a Free Trader) are hard for the most genuine American of us all to explain away. 

To explain away or to bear. We at Bryn Mawr can at least, I have come to 
think, try to set our own house in order with more attention than ever before. We 



6 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

are altogether upwards of 600 people, a faculty of various ages, education, interests, 
all turned into the same profession, a student body homogeneous in sex, age, prove- 
nance, all walking along the same road. We inherit a tradition which is a valuable 
one for a democracy. We recognize standards. Whether we like them or not, we 
are used to living with them; — indeed we have all barked our shins on them many 
a time. And we have been directed toward accurate and courageous thinking, accurate 
thinking over any area exploredj courageous thinking taking us over our old boundaries 
into new areas. We should not be afraid of either distinguishing or choosing between 
better and best, we should not be afraid of recognition of our limitations nor of the 
adjustment which follows. There are various problems coming before us as a 
community this year, the important completion of the new curriculum, the further 
course of that revival of learning — if I may call it so — which some of us believe 
and all of us hope is in its vigorous beginnings, the position which Bryn Mawr is to 
take in relation to the Negro, the relation of the life of the student in college to her 
life outside. Is it not a time when such questions must be met with determination 
certainly but also with searchings of heart and still more searchings of mind, with 
an attitude, in short, which can be transferred profitably when it becomes necessary 
to more important and wider reaching questions which touch not our small college 
only but all America? 

I have left until the end any mention of the great loss which the college has 
suffered because I feel sure that Dr. de Laguna himself would have protested against 
any darkening of this day on his account. But many of you know it and must have 
had in mind all through this hour. Dr. Theodore de Laguna, professor of philosophy 
at Bryn Mawr since 1907, that is for twenty-three years this month, died suddenly 
at Hardwick, Vermont, near his summer home in Greensboro, on Monday the 22nd 
day of September. This is not the time to sum up Bryn Mawr's debt to him. That 
I leave to a special occasion when more competent speakers than I can make an effort 
to appraise it and at the same time his contribution to his profession in America, 
But I cannot forbear to speak of his excellent scholarship, his devotion to his teaching, 
his loyalty to the college, the honesty and charm of his mind. It is for those of us 
who have known and worked with him a heavy blow. 

With the classes of the nine o'clock hour, this year of the college formally begins. 



The Alumnae Association joins with Miss Park, the Faculty, and the student 
body in expressing its sorrow at the death of Dr. Theodore de Laguna. So many 
college generations have studied under him that for many of the alumnae the loss is a 
personal one. 



"WOMEN IN FINANCE" 

Louise Watson, 1912 

(Reprinted by the courtesy of Equal Rights, Vol. XVI, No. 3, February 22, 1930) 
Women have been in the investment banking field for less than twenty years 
and it was the war that gave them their first real opportunity through the sale of 
Liberty bonds. Then they were looked upon as something of a curiosity and more 
than once were granted an interview by a busy man because he was interested in 
seeing what kind of woman was engaged in selling bonds and what arguments she 
used in presenting her case. Along in 1920, a New York evening paper reported 
that "women were not a success in the bond business for they soon exhausted the list 
of their friends and did not have the courage to stand hard work and small results 
until success came to them." At that time there were very few women from which 
to generalize but most of them, it may be stated authoritatively, are still successfully 
engaged in that business today and their ranks have been augmented slowly until 
at the present time there are about fifty women in the investment business in New 
York City and a few more in big cities such as Philadelphia, Washington, and 
Chicago. I know of no women in the investment business in the South or the far 
West unless they have gone into it very recently. I remember being told on a visit 
to Los Angeles a few years ago that there was practically no opening for women 
salesmen with the large investment houses, but in that great pioneer part of the 
country, there may be more freedom for women in this line at the present time. The 
great land of opportunity for women in business is New York City and, therefore, 
in my discussion of what women are doing in the investment business and what they 
may look forward to, I shall be speaking of those I know in New York. 

There are a number who are distinctly outstanding. One of the pioneers in this 
field is now head of the Women's Department for one of the large public utility 
houses and has eleven women salesmen under her, another is practically sales manager 
for her concern in which there are some sixty salesmen, but is minus the title, while 
a third is head of the statistical department of her house and often takes a trip to 
inspect the plant of a company for which her house is considering doing some financing. 
There is one woman who was hailed in a recent newspaper article as a "maker of 
millionaires." There are also a few women who for years have been at the top 
or near the top in organizations in which most of the salesmen are men. The women 
who are in this particular division of Wall Street do well and their success has 
encouraged others to come into this field and has made the investment houses that 
employ women interested in increasing the number of their women salesmen. These 
women go in on the same basis as the men, but it is still generally conceded by 
their employers that they operate under some handicap and have to be at least ten 
per cent better than men to achieve the same results. They sell to both men and 
women, and by and large, meet little prejudice but are helped and encouraged by the 
trust they seem to inspire. Their customers range from small investors to multi- 
millionaires, banks, insurance companies, and corporations and their contacts are 
varied and interesting. The biggest producers sell from four to ten millions of 
dollars worth of bonds annually and it is said that there are several whose salary or 
commission, as the case may be, exceeds $25,000 a year, while the average return for 

(7) 



8 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

a good salesman is probably somewhere between five and ten thousand dollars. In 
this respect there is no difference between men and women salesmen, for in this field 
they work under the same plan of compensation. A man may and sometimes does 
have a superior advantage in obtaining an important prospect which merely means 
that the woman has to work a little harder to achieve the same results. 

That she will and has achieved this result many times in the last twelve years 
is an undisputed fact and she has come to stay. While it is still true in almost every 
line of banking and business as Katharine Fullerton Gerald once said, that "the 
extraordinary practical achievements of women are still only the ordinary practical 
achievements of men" twelve years is, after all, a comparatively short time by which 
to judge results and perhaps women have only just proved their worth and are at 
the threshold of a real career in investment banking, that tremendous field that offers 
so many thrilling and satisfying opportunities to men of broad intelligence and inter- 
national vision. 

I say men advisedly for no woman has yet been invited to leave the threshold 
and sit in those conferences where decisions are made which may affect a corporation, 
an entire industry, a country in South America, or a European nation. In the big 
banks in New York where decisions of international importance are made, a number 
of women have attained the rank of junior officers but there are no senior officers 
among them, while in the investment banking field no woman has attained the rank 
of a junior officer. Why is this? One hears many explanations. Women are too new 
in this field — but many men entering this business within the last decade now occupy 
positions of great importance; if women were made executives, men would have to 
work under them and men would not like that; if women were in the buying depart- 
ment of a bond house they would have to be sent out on company business occasionally 
and what corporation would talk seriously with a woman if it wanted to borrow ten 
or twenty million dollars; then, worse than that, they would occasionally have to be 
sent abroad, perhaps, and what South American or Japanese or European government 
would understand such a strange situation, so foreign to their ideas of the way in 
which business should be conducted? 

Of course, there are women in politics both in this country and abroad and the 
world has rapidly become used to them ; there are some outstanding women in business 
where the business has been started by the woman or where it has been left to her as 
with Lady Rhonda in Great Britain, but business in general is still exceptionally 
conservative in its attitude toward women and there is still less open-mindedness in 
its attitude toward her than there is in the professions. The liberal-minded executives 
who believe in employing women and who think it is unfair to the woman, once 
having employed her, to stunt her growth by not promoting her when her work 
entitles her to such promotion are so largely in the minority in most organizations 
that they know that they would not advance their cause by overpleading. Until the 
desire to get ahead comes so overwhelmingly from the women themselves that business 
is forced to recognize it and to deal with it, it will never be a great problem. 

While this is true of all business, it is true of the investment banking business in 
particular. More women with capital need to come into this business with the 
definite idea of learning it from A to Z and of establishing their own firms or of 
becoming partners in a stock or bond firm. A few women of ability, influence and 
wealth to whom finance would prove as fascinating and worth-while a field as to 
their brothers would do more to establish the "open door" for women in this line 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 9 

than years of hard work without capital could accomplish. I do not mean that they 
should establish or go into firms where all the partners are women, for their constant 
effort must be to prove themselves so able that they will be judged on merit and not 
disqualified because of their sex. The chief executive of the largest public utility 
corporation in New York expressed a typical sentiment when he said recently at a 
woman's club that in his opinion a woman could not go to the top in his kind of 
business because she could not act as a man would and was therefore automatically 
disqualified. But we should bear in mind that she might have a contribution to 
make that would be individual and conceivably as valuable as that of a man. Perhaps 
the point of view that women need to instil in their masculine colleagues is that of the 
postman who was the only man in a college class given to thirty-five workers in 
industry. When asked if he minded being the only man in a class of thirty-four 
women he said, "Oh, no! You see these girls are different. They are so intelligent 
that they don't seem like women at all." It will be a great step forward in business 
when women are considered simply as human beings and judged purely on the ground 
of their ability. 

Their second great step forward would be a change of attitude, an overcoming 
of the inferiority complex, so to speak. It is only by the best kind of cooperation 
with men that women can succeed and the attitude of greatest liberality toward their 
ambitions is usually found in the biggest executives, those who have least reason to 
fear their success. Women in business, as a class, however, are too content with this 
kind of appreciation and consequently too willing to remain submissively in subordi- 
nate positions and accept the estimate put upon their so-called limitations. It is when 
they begin to be more ambitious, to have more courage and a larger vision, to think the 
"game worth the candle," that they will begin to succeed in business, not in comparison 
with other women, but with men and women. They are not sufficiently aggressive — 
but it may be said that some few who have been too aggressive have failed, and that 
is true. They have gone about it the wrong way, demanded instead of coooperating, 
fixed their attention on small grievances and instilled in men the feeling that they 
were fighting a woman. As Virginia Wolff says, "it is fatal for a woman to lay 
the least stress on any grievance, to plead with justice any cause; in any way to 
speak consciously as a woman." To do one's best work, as she adds, "there must be 
freedom and there must be peace." The chief contribution that a woman can make 
in the business world is, through her best efforts to contribute a point of view that is 
individual, that does not ape that of a man but may be worth while in adding some- 
thing to his point of view and in illuminating from a different angle the subject 
under discussion. 

It would not be worth taking time to discuss woman's place in business, and in 
the investment banking business in particular, if the investment banking business 
were not one of the most important businesses in the world and did not vitally 
concern all men and women, whether they realize it or not. Through this business 
unemployed capital becomes a productive force and is used to contribute directly to 
the creation of other wealth. Since the war, as you know, New York has become 
the money center of the world. This means that we hold great potential power, 
both national and international, and upon the wisdom with which it is used depends 
our future prosperity or destruction, not only from a material point of view. Every 
woman in this country desires peace throughout the world and the sentiment in our 
big financial corporations will be of incalculable importance in making that peace 



10 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

possible and permanent. The general establishment of that sentiment will be the 
most constructive step ever taken by business. Recently it was announced that "there 
is no group of men in the world more anxious for the success of the London Arms 
Conference than the business men of America." This was the view of both Mr. 
Pierre du Pont, chairman of the board of the du Pont Co., and of Mr. Thomas W. 
Lamont, of J. P. Morgan & Co. The speaker added that "among American business 
men there is no desire so strong as that which they cherish for permanent peace." As 
the financial business is at present constituted, American women will have very little 
to do directly with making that sentiment so strong that war will be impossible, but 
the financial world affords them one of the biggest and most worth-while fields for 
human effort, and, if in another decade they forge ahead as rapidly as in the last, it is 
both possible and probable that a few exceptionally able and intrepid individuals may 
be climbing toward the top. 

I cannot close without urging more women everywhere to manage their own 
investments. An investment banker recently estimated that 41% of the nation's 
wealth is controlled by women, but the potential financial power which they have 
within their grasp has not begun to be even dimly realized by them. Their financial 
viewpoint is so untramelled that, whether they inherit money or make it themselves, 
the keen zest which they show in attacking the investment problem and the serious- 
ness with which they set out to master it, may change the whole financial and social 
order. Not so very many years ago women pioneered to gain the vote that they 
might have political equality, and they continue to work for equality before the law. 
It is predicted that the influence which they will have through recognition of their 
potential financial power may be more speedily effective in securing that equality 
than any influence has ever been heretofore. 

(Reprinted by the courtesy of Equal Rights, Vol. XVI, No. 3, February 22, 1930) 

MONSIEUR PAUL HAZARD 

Flexner Lecturer, 1930-1931 

Monsieur Paul Hazard, who is to be the Flexner lecturer at Bryn Mawr this 
year, is recognized in France and throughout Europe and the two Americas as one of 
the authorities in the field of Comparative Literature. He is what the French call 
"un vrai maitre," a master in his domain and an incomparable teacher. It is a great 
scholar that the Flexner Foundation is bringing among us. Monsieur Hazard has 
already shown his characteristic kindness and generosity to Bryn Mawr students who 
have worked under his direction in Paris. He closes a recent letter with these words: 
"Tout ce que je demande c'est de servir de mom mieux Bryn Mawr." 



COUNCIL 

The Alumnae Council will meet this year in Indianapolis on November 13th, 
14th and 15th. Arrangements are in charge of Katharine Holliday Daniels, 1918, 
Councillor for District IV. 



GOODHART HALL INJURED BY FIRE 

(Reprinted in part from The College News) 

"On Monday night, October seventh, the college was roused by the ringing of 
Taylor bell and the shriek of the powerhouse siren, followed by the clatter of fire 
engines to Goodhart Hall, where smoke was rolling up in thick clouds. The fire was 
discovered by the night watchman, Mr. Graham, and it was already well under way 
beneath the platform of the stage when the alarm was sounded. Mr. Graham's only 
key was to the service entrance, where the smoke was thickest, making entry impossible. 
A side door of the auditorium was forced to make a passage for one of the hose lines, 
which was dragged at great risk across the stage and played through a hole in the floor 
(on the flames). A second line was led through the window at the service entrance. 
The firemen were materially aided by Mr. Willoughby, who made his way, through 
smoke so thick that lanterns were extinguished, to open the doors of the auditorium 
and investigate the switchboard back stage. 

The dangerous section of the stage, where the foundations had been charred, was 
roped off, and the debris was to a large extent removed by Chapel time, when Presi- 
dent Park spoke of the fire as already in the past tense." 

Mr. Arthur Thomas, of the Building and Grounds Committee, sent the follow- 
ing report to the Bulletin: 

"The fire started about 1.00 A. M. in the stage pit, i. e., the space immediately 
underneath the wooden stage floor. 

"The structural damage was restricted to this floor, which was largely consumed 
and will have to be entirely replaced. The storage battery and the emergency lighting 
system, located in the stage pit, is a total loss, and there was some damage to the 
heating system, duct work and domestic water piping. The total cost of restoring 
these items of structural and mechanical equipment will be approximately $7,577.00, 
which amount has been agreed to by the insurance adjusters. 

"Some of the stage equipment was entirely consumed and most of it damaged 
by smoke and water. This loss has not been finally determined, but is not expected to 
exceed $4,000.00 to $5,000.00, even if the textile curtain across the proscenium arch 
is entirely replaced. 

"The total amount of our restoration expense is, therefore, not expected to 
exceed $13,000.00. 

"It is evident that the fire did not occur from electrical wiring or from the 
emergency lighting system, since it was observed that when the lights on the regular 
power house circuit went out during the fire they immediately went on again through 
the normal and automatic operation of the emergency lighting system. This lasted, 
however, only a few minutes before the storage batteries or the switch board panel 
of the emergency lighting system were reached by the fire. 

"Once started, the fire found fuel in the scenery stored in the pit beneath the 
stage and in the wooden construction of the stage itself, in addition to certain wooden 
fittings of the room, i. e., a closet, a stairway enclosure, etc. 

"The watchman discovered the fire promptly, and the Bryn Mawr Fire Com- 
pany responded within a few minutes. High praise is due the Bryn Mawr Fire 
Company, the college faculty and employees, as the fire was very intense and, had it 
not been fought with bravery and skill, might have caused far greater damage." 

(11) 



NOMINATIONS 

BALLOT 

Extract from Article XII of the By-laws of the Association as adopted at the 
Annual Meeting of February 1, 1930: 

Section 2. The Nominating Committee shall annually prepare a proposed ballot presenting 
one or more nominations for the office of Alumnae Director. 

Section 3. If in any year there shall be a vacancy in the office of District Councillor of 
any district by reason of the expiration of a term, the Nominating Committee shall prepare a 
proposed ballot presenting one or more names for each such office about to become 'vacant. 

Section 4. All proposed ballots shall be published in the November issue of the Alumnae 
Bulletin. 

Section 5. Any fifteen members of the Association may in writing present additional nom- 
inations for the office of Director or Officer or Alumnae Director of the Association. 

Any ten members belonging to a District may in writing present additional nominations for 
the office of District Councillor of such District. 

Each such nomination, shall, however, be accompanied by the written consent of the nominee. 

All nominations must be filed with the Alumnae Secretary of the Association by December 
1st preceding the annual meeting of the Association. 

In accordance with this procedure the Nominating Committee has prepared the following 
ballot, which has tbecn approved by the Executive Board, and is here presented for the considera- 
tion of the Association. 



COUNCILLOR FOR DISTRICT VII. 
(For Term of Years 1931-34) 

Jere Bensberg Johnson, 1924 

(Mrs. Arthur F. Johnson) 

Hollywood, California 

Secretary in Bureau of Vocational Service, and 
in office of president of Bureau of Occupations, 
1925-26. Secretary to president of Western States 
Publishing Company, Inc., 1929. 



ALUMNAE DIRECTOR 
(For Term of Years 1931-36) 

Florance Waterbury, 1905 
New York City 

A. B., Bryn Mawr College, 1905. Student of 
Painting with Charles Hawthorne in New York 
City, 1911-12, and in Paris, 1913-14; student of 
Drawing with the late Georges Noel in Rome, 
1912-13; Red Cross Worker in France, 1918-19; stu- 
dent of Portrait Painting with Cecelia Beaux, 1919- 
20; student of the Chinese Method or Painting with 
the late Kung Pah King in Peking, 1922-23. Some- 
time student of Astronomy, Italian, Spanish, Rus- 
sian Art, Indo-Chinese Art, Hindu Art and Tex- 
tiles at Columbia University; student of Play- 
writing, Barnard, and graduate student in Chinese 
Painting at Columbia University, 1929-31. 



COUNCILLOR FOR DISTRICT I. 

(For Term of Years 1931-34) 

Marguerite Mellon Dewey, 1913 
(Mrs. Bradley Dewey) 
Boston, Massachusetts 

Chairman, Bryn Mawr New England Regional 
Scholarship Committee, 1922-27; 1928-29. President, 
Bryn Mawr Club of Boston, 1922-23. Secretary, 
Mothers' Thursday Club of Cambridge, 1921-24. 
Member Board of Overseers, Shady Hill School, 
Cambridge, 1923-25. Executive Board, Cambridge 
League of Women Voters, 1928-29. Corresponding 
Secretary, Saturday Morning Club of Boston, 1928- 
30. Director, College Club, Boston, 1930. 



COUNCILLOR FOR DISTRICT IV. 
(For Term of Years 1931-34) 

Adeline Werner Vorys, 1916 

(Mrs. Webb I. Vorys) 

Columbus, Ohio 

President of Class and President of Undergrad- 
uate Association, 1915-16; Teacher of English, Co- 
lumbus School for Girls, 1916-18. Warden of 
Rockefeller Hall, 1918-19. President, Pleasure Guild 
of Children's Hospital, Columbus, 1919-20. Record- 
ing Secretary of Columbus Junior League, 1923-26, 
and City Editor of League, 1926-27. President, Big 
Sister Association, 1927-28. Chairman, Academic 
Committee of Columbus School for Girls and mem- 
ber of Board of Trustees of School. 



(12) 



REGIONAL SCHOLARS 

It has now become the accepted procedure for the first Bulletin of the autumn 
to boast of the Regional Scholars, and this year is no exception to the rule. The 
College opened with thirty-four Regional Scholars on its lists, an increase of one 
beyond last year's record. There are, however, only thirteen Freshmen Scholars this 
year as compared with fifteen last year. Eight of these thirteen entered with credit 
averages, while only five of last year's fifteen attained those heights. Three of the 
Freshmen Scholars won the matriculation scholarships for their districts, Catherine 
Bredt for Pennsylvania, Betty Hannan for New York and Dorothy Haviland Nelson, 
of San Francisco, for the Western States. 

As a group the new scholars are a trifle older than last year's. They range in 
age from 16 years 7 months to 19 years 5 months, the average age being less than a 
month over 18, while the average age for the class is 18 years 2.5 months. Eight of 
the thirteen were prepared entirely by private schools ; three entirely by public schools, 
and the other two attended both public and private schools. 

The geographical distribution of the scholars is about as usual. The New Eng- 
land Committee, as always, has the distinction of sending the greatest number, and is 
now responsible for ten. These include one Senior, Celia Darlington; one Junior, 
Alice Rider; three Sophomores, Alice Brues, Tirzah Clark and Susan Torrance; and 
five Freshmen. These Freshmen are Caroline Wright, of New Milford, Connecticut, 
prepared by Wykeham Rise; Lillian Russell and Anita de Varon, both prepared by 
the Boston Latin School; Suzanne Halstead, of Norwalk, Connecticut, prepared by 
the Hillside School, and Frances Pleasanton, of Roslindale, Massachusetts, prepared 
by the Lee School. 

District II. is sending fourteen scholars from its four committees. New York has 
a Junior scholar, Dorothea Perkins, and three Freshmen — Betty Hannan, of Albany, 
prepared by the Albany Academy; Betti Goldwasser and Emily Davis, of New York, 
and of Riverdale, both prepared by the Fieldston School of Ethical Culture. New 
Jersey still has Yvonne Cameron, now in her Junior year. 

The committee with Philadelphia for its centre now has six scholars in college — 
two Seniors, Frances Tatnall and Angelyn Burrows; one Junior, Elizabeth Barker; 
one Sophomore, Gertrude Longacre; and two Freshmen, Catherine Bredt, of Llewel- 
lyn Park, Orange, New Jersey, prepared by the Shipley School, and Marianne Gate- 
son, of Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, prepared by the Bethlehem High School and the 
Moravian Seminary. 

The Western Pennsylvania Committee continues to send two Sophomore Scholars, 
Eleanor Chalfant and Eleanor Yeakel, and has now added a Freshman, Elizabeth 
Mackenzie, of Pittsburgh, whose preparation began at the famous Girls' High School 
of Aberdeen, Scotland, and finished at the Allegheny High School, Pittsburgh. 

District III. has only one scholar in college, Elinor Totten, a Senior, from 
Washington. Eva Levin, Baltimore's Sophomore scholar, was taken ill shortly before 
College opened and will not be able to return this year. 

District IV. has a Senior scholar, Katharine Sixt, who spent her Junior year in 
France; and two Sophomores, Elizabeth Sixt and Jeannette Le Saulnier. 

District V. is represented by four Scholars — Margaret Bradley, a Junior, and 
Hester Anne Thomas, who is spending this year in France; Caroline Lloyd-Jones, a 

(13) 



14 BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 

Sophomore; and Dorothy Gerhard, a Freshman from Winnetka, prepared by the 
North Shore Country Day School. 

District VI. has no scholar this year, but District VII. is sending two. Southern 
California is represented by a Sophomore, Louise Balmer, and Northern California by 
a Freshman, Dorothy Haviland Nelson, of San Francisco, prepared by the public 
schools and by the Katharine Branson School. 

Much can be expected from these "hand-picked" students — to quote President 
Park — and with the record of achievement of their predecessors to spur them on, they 
can well be left to make a place for themselves. 

ALUMNAE DAUGHTERS IN THE CLASS OF 1934 

Daughter's Name Mother s Name Class 

Helen E. Baldwin Helen Smitheman 1907 

Gabriel Church Brook Peters 1907 

Susan Daniels Grace Brownell 1907 

Margaret Dannenbaum Gertrude Gimbel 1911 

Honour Dickerman Alice Carter 1899 

Anna Martin Findley Elisa Dean 1900 

Anita Fouilhoux Jean Clark 1899 

Julia G. Gardner Julia Streeter 1900 

Katharine E. Gribbel Margaret Latta 1909 

Olivia H. Jarrett Cora Hardy 1899 

Evelyn M. Patterson Evelyn Holliday 1904 

Margaret M. Righter Renee Mitchell 1900 

Letitia Yoakam Aurie Thayer 1899 

BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE IN LONDON 

Martha G. Thomas, '89, and Anna B. Lawther, '97, gave an informal tea on 
July 23rd at Crosby Hall, Cheyne Walk, Chelsea, for the alumnae and former stu- 
dents of Bryn Mawr College who were living in London or spending the summer 
there. 

The guests were taken to see the large dining hall and the room furnished by 
President Emeritus Thomas in honor of Dame Millicent Fawcett and the room 
furnished by Bryn Mawr alumnae in honor of President Emeritus Thomas. 

The following alumnae and former students were able to be present: Anabel 
Douglas, '93; Bertha H. Putnam, '93; Mary Kirkbride Peckitt, 1900; Marion Parris 
Smith, '01; Virginia T. Stoddard, '03; Maud Spencer Corbett, '03; Clara Case 
Edwards, '04; Katharine Peek, '22; Mary Woodworth, '24; Kathleen Johnston, 
British Graduate Scholar, '26-'27 ; Ethel Bright Ashford, British Graduate Scholar, 
'10-'ll; Marjorie Rackstraw, British Graduate Scholar, '12-'13; Ellen Mary Sanders, 
British Graduate Scholar, '17-' 18. 

Several of the alumnae who reside in London were out of town' for the summer 
and regretted missing the opportunity of seeing friends from America. 

FOUND 

In Denbigh Hall after Commencement Week last June, a white coat. Inquire 
at the Alumnae Office, 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



ETHEL CANTLIN BUCKLEY 

The news of Ethel Cantlin Buckley's death comes with a sense of personal loss not only 
to the members of her own class of 1901 but to everyone who had had any contact with her. 
It was just last spring that she put aside all thought of herself and her own pressing anxieties 
to act as Manager for her thirtieth Reunion. Her whole relation to the college and to her 
friends has always been characterized by that same absolute selflessness. She did the difficult 
things, the tedious things, with gaiety and humor and devotion and an exquisite meticulousness, 
but when anyone wished to give her full credit or to place her in a position in which she 
would have the honor as well as the responsibility, she refused the honor but cheerfully assumed 
even more responsibility. It was under great protest that she allowed herself to be made 
permanent president of her class. 

The number of Alumnae who knew her in one way or another is amazingly large. She 
welcomed with warm hospitality the daughters and younger sisters of her friends and class- 
mates, and delighted in having them at her house. There is no one who had anything to do 
with the Endowment Drive of 1920 who does not remember her, in the office of the College 
Club, voluntarily doing the herculean task of keeping the accounts, but everyone who went 
into that office remembers, too, with quick affection, her gay friendliness and laughter. Later, 
in 1925, when money was being rased for Goodhart Hall, she gave the same type of invaluable 
service. The permanent records are a lasting memorial to her devotion. But she herself w ? ould 
have been the first to disclaim any credit for what she did, although its value is inestimable. 
Later, when she served two terms as Treasurer of the Alumnae Association at a particularly 
difficult time when the knotty problems of the Alumnae Fund were being thrashed out, her 
firmest opponent on the Board became one of her warmest friends. She fought always for 
principles, not personalities, and was fired only by her honest conviction. Day after day she 
worked over the books in the Alumnae office and those who worked with her will be among 
those who will miss her warm spontaneous friendliness. The same thing is true of her service 
to the Chinese Scholarship Committee and the Marion Reilly Memorial Fund. 

She gave unstintingly of time and interest and made many things possible, but she refused 
to come forward in any way and maintained that she was better dealing with facts and figures 
than with people. Perhaps it was this very quality that made her become a part of the design 
of the lives of so many of the people with whom she came in contact, and they remember 
gratefully her kindliness, her loyalty and generosity, her essential honesty and integrity of 
mind, the warmth and unfaltering quality of her friendship, and the spontaneous gaiety of her 
laughter. All of these, as well as her devoted service, were her gifts to the college and to 
the Alumnae. 



The Alumnae Association wishes to express its sense of loss and to extend its 
sympathy to the families of the following alumnae and former students who have 
died since the last number of the Bulletin was published. 

Gertrude A. Goff 1897 

Elizabeth Holstein Buckingham 1 898 

Ethel Cantlin Buckley 1901 

Sophie Boucher 1903 

Mary Lee 1906 

Mary Rand Birch 1909 

Katharine Snodgrass 1915 

Elizabeth C. Dean 1925 

Kitty Gage Fellow in Greek, 1885-86 

Katharine Seabury Hearer, 1897-98 

Rebecca Shapiro Strauss ...Fellow in Romance Languages, 1900-01 



GRADUATE NOTES 



Editor: Mary Alice Hanna Parrish, 
(Mrs. T. C. Parrish), 
Vandalia, Mo. 

Zora Schaupp writes: 

"I spent last summer traveling in France 
and Switzerland. During the autumn 
and winter I lived in the school of Bert- 
rand Russell near Persfield, England, ob- 
serving the practical application of his 
educational theories. This spring I have 
been investigating nursery schools in Bel- 
gium, France, Italy, Austria and Ger- 
many. 

"Late in the summer I will return to 
the University of Nebraska, where I am 
assistant professor in philosophy and 
psychology." 

Louise Dudley gives this news of her- 
self: 

"Several years ago the North Central 
Association of Colleges and Secondary 
Schools authorized Stephens College to 
conduct an experiment with the four-year 
junior college. There are two main ob- 
jectives in this experiment. The first is 
to determine whether work on the college 
level can be given to the students in the 
junior year of the high school. The sec- 
ond is to work out a currriculum for such 
a school. 

"As a part of the revision of curriculum, 
we have organized three orientation 



courses which are to be given in the first 
year, one in the Humanities, one in sci- 
ence and one in social sciences. We have, 
as I said, been working on these courses 
at Stephens for several years but we 
have felt that the courses should be given 
in other schools in order to test ade- 
quately the validity of the experiment. 
The public schools of Long Beach were 
anxious to introduce these courses and the 
exchange for this year was therefore 
effected. 

"Next year I shall be at Stephens as 
dean of the faculty." 

Miss Ethel Bright Ashford, a British 
Scholar of 1910-11, is now a barrister in 
London. She was one of the first group 
of women admitted to the English Bar. 

"On the morning of July 25th she gave 
great pleasure to Anna B. Lawther, '97, 
and Virginia T. Stoddard, '03, by taking 
them into the Law Courts. She met them 
in the great Hall and took them to visit 
the court of the Lord Chief Justice where 
the three justices, wearing their historic 
robes, grey wigs and red gowns, were 
having an appealed criminal case. 

"From that highest court Miss Ashford 
took her visitors to several other courts 
and to the old library in the Temple and 
showed them her office in New Court, 
Middle Temple." 



CLASS NOTES 



1892 
Class Editor: Edith Wetherill Ives, 
(Mrs. Frederick M. Ives), 
145 East 35th St., New York City. 
The Class will learn with regret of the 
death, on June 29th, of Mr. James M. 
Stewart, husband of Grace Pinney, and 
will unite, scattered as we are, in sending 
Grace our deepest sympathy. She is at 
present with her son at 1425 Vine St., 
Park Ridge, 111. 

1896 
Class Editor: Abigail Camp Dimon, 
1411 Genesee Street, Utica, N. Y. 

Katharine Cook, when she comes back 
this fall from her long journey around 
the world will not return to her post at 
Miss Chapin's School. She says she may 
let herself down gradually to a life of 
unemployment by doing some tutoring. 

Elizabeth Cadbury Jones gives the fol- 
lowing account of herself for the past 



year: "We sailed the end of July, 1929, 
for England, where we spent three 
months, a good part of that in London, 
where I was helping my husband in hunt- 
ing out material in regard to early demo- 
cratic movements in the Church and in 
the State. He has been working this over 
this summer into lectures to be given at 
Harvard next winter. 

Our other three months abroad we 
spent in Greece, Sicily and Italy, ending 
up with a week each in Geneva and Paris 
visiting the Quaker centers. 

After coming home in February life 
seemed to be more hectic than ever. I 
am Chairman of the Committee of Man- 
agement of the International Institute of 
the Y. W. C. A., a piece of work that 
seems to me very worth while in trying 
to interpret the best of the foreigner to 
America and of America to the foreigner 
in a city that is more than half foreign. 

There are also many things to do at 
Haver ford in connection with the Meet- 



(16) 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



17 



ing, our Friends' School, etc., not to men- 
tion keeping house for a family full of 
engagements that have to be remem- 
bered." 

Hilda Justice sailed in June for a sum- 
mer's trip to Ireland, Scotland, England, 
France and Switzerland. She expects to 
come home in September. 

Erne Whittredge has taken a "Student 
Pilot's License," which means that she 
has passed the physical tests required by 
the Department of Commerce before tak- 
ing up aviation. She wrote in August 
that she had become interested in it 
through the keen enthusiasm of her 
friend, Mr. Nathan Newberry Prentiss, 
and had just started to handle the stick 
herself, that she loves it and hopes to fly 
a ship before the year is over. 

All this in spite of a tragic accident on 
August first, in which Mr. Prentiss, while 
he was flying to spend a week-end with 
Erne lost his life by crashing into a moun- 
tainside near her home. In accordance 
with his wish to be buried near the spot 
if he were killed while flying, he was in- 
terred on Erne's property in Woodstock, 
N. Y. 

1897 
Class Editor: Friedrika Heyl 
Merion Hall, Bryn Mawr. 

The Class of 1897 is deeply grieved 
and shocked by the news of the death of 
Gertrude Goff, who was killed in a motor 
accident in August. To her sisters, Leah 
Goff Johnson and Louise and Ethel Goff, 
the Class sends its heartfelt sympathy in 
their great sorrow. 

Delayed news from Clara Colton 
Worthington's trip in 1929 tells of her 
driving with a friend up the hillside be- 
hind Pompeii the day of the eruption, 
through deserted villages to the creeping, 
tumbling lava flow, and being scorched 
inside and out. 

1899 
Class Editor: Ellen P. Kilpatrick, 

1027 St. Paul Street, Baltimore, Md. 
The class will be sorry to hear that Mr. 
Edward M. Sutliff, the husband of May 
Lautz Sutlifr, died at Hartsdale, N. Y., 
on August 11th. To quote from the New 
York Times, "Mr. Sutlifr was a leader in 
the development of Oriental trade and in 
1921 was decorated by the Japanese Gov- 
ernment with the Third Order of the 
Rising Sun in recognition of his twenty- 
four years of service in the promotion of 
trade between the United States and 
Japan." All '99 joins in sending our sin- 
cere sympathy to May. 



Emma Guffey Miller has been speaking 
up and down the land at State Conven- 
tions and meetings of the Women's Or- 
ganization for National Prohibition Re- 
form. As this goes to press she is the 
guest of Dorothy Fronheiser Meredith in 
Harrisburg where, on October 8th, she 
(Emma) is to make a speech at the con- 
vention of the Pennsylvania organization. 
Dorothy sent a cordial invitation "to all 
'99, whether wet or dry," to stay with her 
at that time, but unfortunately the Bul- 
letin will not appear in time for us to 
avail ourselves of it. 

Members of the class who were at 
Ogunquit, Maine, during the summer and 
had frequent reunions were Dorothy 
Meredith, May Blakey Ross, Marion 
Ream Vonsiatsky, Katherine Middendorf 
Blackwell and Ellen Kilpatrick. The 
class may be interested to know that Ellen 
Kilpatrick had pictures in the two exhibi- 
tions of the Ogunquit Art Association. 

1900 
Class Editor: Louise Congdon Francis, 
(Mrs. Richard S. Francis) 
Haverford, Pa. 

In August the Class Editor motored to 
Maine, where she saw three classmates, 
Helen MacCoy at Hancock Point, Jessie 
Tatlock at Seal Harbor and Mary Kil- 
patrick at Ogunquit. From Mary she 
learned that Daisy Browne has been help- 
ing all summer in a Girl Scout Camp near 
Washington. From Jessie Tatlock she ex- 
tracted the following account of our for- 
eign classmates: 

"The class will, I know, like to have 
the most recent news of our distant mem- 
bers. I had in July the great satisfaction 
of visiting Louise Norcross Lucas and 
Fannie Wehle deHaas. It was an un- 
adulterated joy to see Louise, becomingly 
increased in girth with French charms (I 
pray that she may not see these personal- 
ities) added to her innate American ones, 
graciously, genially, happily and efficient- 
ly acting as Chatelaine in the tiny French 
village of Oisilly. 

"There I had a few days as a member 
of her happy household in the beautiful 
chateau, which she is gradually restoring 
from its deplorable post-war condition — a 
household containing numberless bunnies, 
cats, peacocks and a violently gamboling 
puppy. Louise has the art of gracious liv- 
ing as few people have it. But it is even 
more unusual to see our friend as the 
friend, adviser, 'first-aid' helper of a 
French village, and to attend mass, and, . 
heretics as we are, share the pain benit 
in the old church where the little choir 



18 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



excellently renders the ancient chants, 
trained therein by our versatile classmate. 

"To jump from the Cote d'Or to Rot- 
terdam. There I was with Fannie and 
her very enlivening Karel in their new 
house and garden. Fannie is very much 
better than she has been in years. She 
recently returned from a visit to her 
father in Louisville. 

"It takes but two hours to fly from Rot- 
terdam to London — perhaps our foreign 
members can fly over to our thirty-fifth 
reunion. 

"Lest any of my classmates accuse me 
of becoming a butterfly, may I say that 
these sprees were a holiday after some 
months spent in Italian archives and 
libraries, trying to get a little definiteness 
into the bright fog of conditions in Sicily 
in the thirteenth century — the subject I 
should like to make mine. If any of you 
in motoring pass near to South Hadley, 
come and see me and the many Bryn 
Mawr people at Mt. Holyoke." 

The following letter came from Emily 
Palmer to the class collector, in response 
to the annual appeal : 

"It is hard to put into a few sentences 
just what my work is, since it includes a 
little of everything, from 'Happy Hour' for 
little children to night classes for the men 
who work in the great steel mills, and 
from going with a terrified foreign 
mother to have little Tony's tonsils out, 
to advising a disillusioned young wife 
about her divorce. The job of head resi- 
dent in a busy settlement is no bed of 
roses, but I wouldn't do anything else for 
the world." 

Grace Jones McClure writes as follows 
of her busy life: 

"There isn't much news of me, though 
I keep going all the time — perhaps like a 
squirrel in a cage ! The only thing Bryn 
Mawr would recognize as 'Anything' — 
and .even this is doubtful — is that I have 
had a series of education articles in 
Charm, and am contributing unimportant 
articles to various educational magazines 
all the while. I write entire the Colum- 
bus School for Girls Bulletin four times 
a year — or almost entire." 

There are three 1900 daughters in the 
Freshman class: Julia Gardner, Anna 
Findley and Margaret Righter. Margaret 
Findley is a Senior and Barbara Korff is 
a Sophomore. 

Jessie McBride Walsh has not been to 
a reunion for many years but her interest 
in the class and College never flags. She 
writes now of a long holiday — six or 
eight months — which she and her hus- 
band are taking motoring in the west. 



They spent two months in the spring in 
Arizona and New Mexico, then went to 
Colorado, Wyoming, Idaho and Washing- 
ton, finishing their trip in the beautiful 
Puget Sound region. 

1901 
Class Editor: Helen Converse Thorpe, 
(Mrs. Warren Thorpe), 
15 E. 64th St., New York City. 

With deep sorrow and sense of irrep- 
arable loss, the Class of 1901 have to 
announce the death of their chairman, 
Ethel Cantlin Buckley, on September 
30th after a serious operation. 

Knowing of her years of faithful work 
for the Alumnae Association, we con- 
sidered ourselves fortunate in getting her 
consent to be our chairman in 1928, and 
for two years she had not spared herself 
in working for the Class and for the 
Marion Reilly Memorial Fund. 

As one of us has expressed it, she 
spent her life in doing things for other 
people without thinking of herself, and 
her death leaves an empty place that it 
will be hard to fill. 

We wish to extend our deep sympathy 
to her husband and the members of her 
family in their great loss. Her husband 
is at 86 Riverside Drive, Saranac Lake, 
New York. 

1902 
Class Editor: Anne Rotan Howe 
(Mrs. Thorndike Howe) 
77 Revere Street, Boston, Mass. 

In an excess of zeal, the above named 
editor sent a circular letter to her class- 
mates on September 1st demanding news 
for this column with the following re- 
sults : 

Virginia Willits Burton writes of 
China and the Orient, quoting from notes 
she made when her husband, Col. Nor- 
man Burton, was stationed there. They 
are back now in this country, living at 
628 Overhill Road, Ardmore, Pa. 

Ethel Goff and her sisters, Louise and 
Gertrude, were in a serious motor acci- 
dent the end of August, in which Gert- 
rude was killed and the other two in- 
jured. Ethel suffered a broken arm and 
great nervous shock. This news came 
through the fourth sister, Mrs. Johnson. 

Anne Shearer Lafore's own phrase is 
too graphic to condense. She writes: 
"We have four young people from thir- 
teen to twenty-five, and the only swim- 
ming pool for miles around. Fifteen is 
a conservative estimate of swimmers and 
most of those who come to swim remain 
to eat," — by which token we may know 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



19 






Anne's beat this summer has been pool to 
kitchen to laundry to pool again. One 
boy is an engineer, one flies, the third is 
writing a book on Cathedrals at the age 
of thirteen. 

Elizabeth Plunkett Paddock, all her life 
treading floor boards eighteen inches 
wide ; sleeping in a canopied bed, feeding 
off Lowestoft china, — born, brought up 
and dwelling in the rarefied atmosphere 
of the family heirlooms, has suddenly 
gone modern and built herself a brand- 
new house which she described in one 
sentence: "It has an oil heater which 
heats the hot water and the house with- 
out being told which to do." She adds 
that the High School got the site of the 
old house, but doesn't say who got the 
fourposter and the Lowestoft. 

Lucile Porter Weaver writes she is the 
"mother of seven active heathens" and so 
busy keeping up with the quickstep of her 
own offspring, she hasn't time for any- 
thing else. She says she and May Yeats 
Howson, who holds a record with eight, 
compared notes recently, — notes edifying, 
instructive and illuminating, but omitted, 
alas ! because unfit for publication. 

Jo Kieffer Foltz dismisses her own ac- 
tivities with a newly done over kitchen 
and the summer preserving, but sends the 
next two items: 

Elizabeth Bodine spent the summer in 
Japan with a friend. She went west 
through the Canadian Rockies, stopping 
at Banff and Lake Louise on the way. 

Frances Seth spent the summer in 
Europe and was very keen about Norway 
and Sweden, at last accounts. 

Miriam Strong Sladen writes that her 
occupation is "to feed, nag, encourage 
and solace one husband and two children." 

Grace Douglas Johnston, after the sum- 
mer in Lake Forest, came East the mid- 
dle of September on a round of visits, 
amongst them a couple of days with Anne 
Rotan Howe, but was called home on the 
23rd by the sudden death of her brother- 
in-law, Hugh Johnston. 

Florence Clark Morrison writes from 
Onawa, Iowa, breaking "the silence of 
twenty years" she says, with a substantial 
claim to the class baby — the last, not the 
first born! Her daughter, Abigail, is just 
starting kindergarten, which certainly 
compares favorably with the educational 
qualifications of some of our grandchil- 
dren. Florence says this is a case of 
"arrested arrival, not development." 

Frances Adams Johnson writes from 
Geneva to say she has left home and 
children for a year and is on her way 
round the world with her husband, who 



is Director of the International Investi- 
gation of Traffic in Women and Protec- 
tion of Children for the League of Na- 
tions. They are going to Persia, India, 
Siam, Indo-China, Dutch East Indies, 
Philippines, China and Japan, where 
Frances plans to leave Mr. Johnson, 
whose work will keep him away two 
years, and return home by way of Cali- 
fornia next summer. She asks if anyone 
knows of Bryn Mawrters in those remote 
spots, please send her name and address 
through Mr. Johnson's office, — 370 Sev- 
enth Avenue, New York. 

Eleanor Wood Whitehead spent the 
greater part of the summer abroad. 

Amy Sussman Steinhart writes from 
her country place at Los Altos, Califor- 
nia, saying she "does what every other 
person of her age does" and then men- 
tions that she has taken up the study of 
Chinese ! This to occupy herself during 
a rather protracted period of ill health. 
She is a Director in the Institute of 
Pacific Relations and hopes to go to the 
Conference in China next year, mean- 
while using her Chinese conversation at 
every opportunity. She says she is so 
politically minded that she is plunged 
every two years into an emotional crisis 
which she swears never to suffer again — 
and then does, every time an election 
comes round. She has a daughter en- 
tered at Bryn Mawr and a son headed 
for Stanford. Speaking editorially, we 
should say the study of Chinese compares 
favorably with the making of apple jelly, 
our own present activity. 

Letters to Jane Cragin Kay, Mary 
Ingham, Eleanor Jones and Caroline Mc- 
Manus Dickey were returned to sender, 
stamped "Unknown here"; the Editor 
will be grateful for the correct addresses 
of these roving classmates. 

1904 
Class Editor: Emma O. Thompson; 
320 S. 42nd St., Philadelphia. 
As usual many '04's passed the summer 
in Europe. Patty Moorhouse, her hus- 
band and her oldest daughter, Martha, 
went to Paris and then motored in the 
Pyrenees and along the southern coast of 
France and Italy. Leslie Clark has re- 
turned from her trip to the Orient with 
fascinating experience waiting to be un- 
folded to us. Martha Moorhouse has en- 
tered Westover, the school where Leslie 
teaches. Hilda Canan Vauclain and her 
daughter, Patricia, spent the summer in 
Europe. Clara Wade and Leda White, 
much to their mutual surprise, met on the 
Virgilian Cruise. It was published in the 



20 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



papers that Harriet Southerland's hus- 
band, Butler Wright, has been transferred 
from Budapest to Uruguay. We hope to 
hear from Phyllis soon about her delight- 
ful visit with Harriet last spring. Emma 
Fries journeyed to the North Cape and 
was most fortunate in seeing the mid- 
night sun during all the nights they were 
within its range. 

Evelyn Holliday's daughter, Evelyn 
Patterson, is a happy Bryn Mawr fresh- 
man living in Pembroke East. Eleanor 
Bliss' daughter, Agnes Knopf, one of the 
cleverest members of the class of '32, has 
left college and is attending a secretarial 
school in Washington. Buz's oldest 
daughter, Marion Palmer, is very enthu- 
siastic about her library position. 

Virginia Chauvenet is now in New 
York still playing in Lysistrata, which 
has had an unusually long and successful 
run. 

During the summer your Editor mo- 
tored to Montreal, visting a number of 
colleges on the return trip, among them 
Mount Holyoke, and was most fortunate 
in finding Dorothy Foster at home. She 
was busy in the garden of her delightful 
house, built on a secluded lane close to 
the college campus. Like the majority 
of the class she has gained not only in 
knowledge but in weight. A new house 
is being built on the grounds neighbour- 
ing hers that belongs to Ellen Ellis, also 
a member of the Holyoke Faculty. Doro- 
thy was eager to hear about the Reunion 
and all of you. 

Alice Boring writes: I look over the 
formidable array of questions I am sup- 
posed to answer, and see that for children 
I must substitute a growing group of 
seniors and graduate students who are 
beginning to help me solve some of the 
problems about Chinese Amphibia and 
Reptiles, and perhaps also the whole 
group of Premedical students to whom I 
am official Advisor. They come to me 
with their financial and love affairs as 
well as their academic problems. I have 
been a member of the Graduate Commit- 
tee ever since I first came to Yenching 
in 1923; this should interest Bryn Mawr- 
tyrs, as we are a small institution, trying 
to build up a graduate school of distinc- 
tion, through which we shall train many 
future professors in Chinese universities. 
My future plans are to stay with this job 
as long as there is a place in it where I 
am useful, and to get out the minute I 
feel that I am not wanted. So far, my 
Chinese colleagues treat me like one of 
them, so that race differences scarcely 
enter into my daily consciousness. Liv- 



ing day by day among a different race, 
is a very broadening and enlightening ex- 
perience, more interesting to me than 
talkies and good roads ! My chief pet is 
my little Monoglian pony, named Feng 
Shui (wind and water), on whom I roam 
over the countryside of this lovely region, 
full of ruins of the old magnificent age 
of emperors. 

1905 
Class Editor: Eleanor Little Aldrich, 
(Mrs. Talbot Aldrich), 
59 Mt. Vernon St., Boston, Mass. 

Elizabeth Goodrich Reckitt writes: "I 
have before me your postal begging me 
to tell of my 'singing' ! It cannot be 
called singing. It is only that I have had 
great fun taking singing lessons and have 
found it more worth while and promising, 
so to speak, than many of my bitter ene- 
mies in the class of 1905 would have 
though possible ! The joke was that I 
went to be tested and tried out on the tip 
of a numerologist, I meanwhile protest- 
ing that she was crazy and she — an old 
acquaintance — insisting upon my doing it. 
Have you ever been numerologized? It 
is great fun. It seems my name should 
have been Lissa ! 

My husband and I went to California 
last February and returned in April. I 
had a fine afternoon with Sara Barney 
Brady, and her husband, and I. met Cath- 
erine Utley Hill at the Breakfast Club in 
Los Angeles, the day after I had received 
a postal card from her written in Naples." 

Margaret Nichols Hardenbergh reports 
her summer as follows: "I had my 
brothers' boys here as well as- my own 
family, and we all had a glorious trip in 
the Canadian Rockies — everything new to 
me. Our climax was a birthday celebra- 
tion here for my father's 80th, when we 
mustered as many Nichols as we could. 
This move to the Northwest has given 
me a varied and very full year." 

1906 
Class Editor: Josephine K. Blancke 
(Mrs. Wilton W. Blancke), 
3411 Powelton Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Mary Lee died June 16 after a serious 
operation. Dc mortuis nihil niH bonutn 
is a superfluous admonition as far as our 
rare classmate is concerned. Her life 
was an open book of conscientious en- 
deavor. She countenanced no compro- 
mise toward herself but was most liberal 
to others. 

Study was the recreation of her bril- 
liant mind. She had begun the thesis for 
her Ph.D. when illness overtook her. 






BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



21 



Though she had no close relatives, she 
was rich in friends and deservedly; for 
she "kept her friendships in repair." 

She leaves a beautiful memory and a 
void that cannot be filled. 

1907 
Class Editor: Alice Hawkins: 
Taylor Hall, Bryn Mawr. 

Alice Baird's daughter, Phoebe Alice 
Roesler, ex-1931, was married on August 
18th to Mr. Ernest Hamlin Abbott, Jr. 
This is the first 1907 child to be married 
according to our records. Corrections are 
in order. 

Three 1907 daughters are members of 
the Class of 1934 — Grace Brownell Dan- 
iels' Susan, Helen Smitheman Baldwin's 
Helen Elizabeth, and Brook Peters 
Church's Gabriel. 

In literary production 1907 still leads 
all other classes. Margaret Bailey's name 
appears almost every month, usually in 
Scribner's or in Harper's, as the author 
of thought-provoking articles on educa- 
tion and of poems of high merit. Hor- 
tense Flexner King's book of poems, This 
Stubborn Root, just published by Mac- 
millan, will surely attract attention. (To 
be reviewed in the Bulletin next 
month.) By the way, we hope you did 
not miss her husband's illustrations to 
Henry Ford's articles in the Saturday 
Evening Post. As for Peggy Barnes' 
novel, Years of Grace, just look at any 
week's list of best sellers, and see what 
usually stands at the top. Rumours about 
Hollywood contracts have been rife, but 
have not yet been authenticated. 

Mabel O'Sullivan taught English at the 
University of West Virginia Summer 
School. 

The Class will be interested to learn 
that the Class Baby, Elizabeth Reming- 
ton, graduated from the University of 
Pennsylvania in June, and is now teach- 
ing English in the High School at Mor- 
risville, Pa. 

1909 
Class Editor: Helen Bond Crane, 
Timonium, Maryland. 

The class will be very sorry to learn 
of the death of Mary Rand Birch (Mrs. 
Stephen Birch), which occurred in 
August in Minneapolis, Minn. 

After getting several bulletins this year 
from our world travelers we feel very 
cosmopolitan indeed. 

Barbara Spofford Morgan writes: "We 
got back in April, after being in France 
for a year and in Berlin from the begin- 
ning to the end of the Dawes Plan, seven 



years in all. It was an interesting and 
varied period to live in and work at, and 
the Germans, in spite of our unpopular 
mission, were invariably courteous and 
hospitable." This summer Barbara saw 
Isabel Goodnow Gillett in Norfolk, Conn., 
and was most impressed by her "growing, 
handsome and active children." 

Frances Browne landed September 7, 
after having been through most of Eu- 
rope, Egypt, Palestine and Syria (stop- 
ping in Beirut for three days with Kate 
Chambers Seelye, 1911), Greece and 
Constantinople. She says, in part: "My 
year was so full of interest and refresh- 
ment that I can never tell about it all. 
My travels were exceedingly interesting, 
the high spots being Egypt and Greece. 
In Greece we stayed longest and had the 
great privilege of living at the American 
School of Classical Studies, because we 
were with Mary Swindler. We were in 
much closer touch with all the interesting 
work in excavating than would have been 
possible otherwise, and learned to appre- 
ciate the remarkable work that is being 
done all over the world by archaeologists 
in retrieving the past for us, the hardship 
and privation as well as the thrill and ad- 
venture that there is in their work. My 
six weeks in Austria and Germany visit- 
ing schools and school people were 
thoroughly rewarding. I find the same 
problems and ideals everywhere. It is 
stimulating and hopeful to compare notes 
and find out how others are solving their 
problems." 

Frances Ferris is also back at her job, 
equally enthusiastic over her year abroad, 
and busily enlarging her school. She has 
acquired an annex, a house very near the 
school, and has a charming apartment for 
herself on the top floor. The address is 
Oakley Road, Haverford. 

Lacy, who has been in San Moritz, but 
was leaving for fresh fields, sends the 
following effusion: 

"When I consider how my time is spent 
O'er half the map of Europe, far and 

wide, 
And that in San Moritz I must abide 
Though to a lowlier clime my soul more 

bent! 
Alassio, Florence, Venice, all have sent 
Patients to swell my ebbing purse's side, 
And Roman partner of J. P. Morgan's 

pride 
Here waves his legs in early morning 
stent. 
(Absconding tenant, then non-pay- 
ing guest 
Set economic matters o'er the rest.) 



22 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



I surely know what ails me as I queen 
'em — 
Mine, stasis of the brain; theirs, duode- 
num. 

My weird doth wear a Revolution's 
crown — • 

I turn the folk of Europe upside down !" 

A second sonnet received later, which 
we regretfully cut, says that her "march 
on Rome" depends on whether or not she 
can sublet her apartment at 142 East 37th 
Street, N. Y. C. 

Alta Stevens Cameron has been having 
a fine summer at Delavan, Wis., marred 
only by the illness of her father, who is 
now better. Her niece has gone to the 
Katharine Branson School for her first 
year away from home. 

Efforts to get details of her life and 
works from Cynthia Wesson resulted in 
a prompt but brief post card saying that 
after a week in hockey camp she expected 
to return to the University of Wisconsin, 
where she is in charge of hockey "and 
other interesting things." 

Carlie Minor Ely spent the summer in 
her almost-new house in Alexandria, 
"looking down on the Potomac and 
watching the thermometer cavort. I just 
bring up three children and do nothing 
spectacular." 

The editor has gone domestic for a 
time, at least. Until further notice please 
use the address given above. 

1911 
Class Editor: Mary Case Pevear, 
(Mrs. C Keith Pevear), 
355 E. 50th Street, New York City. 

Margaret Doolittle has recently re- 
turned from Tripoli, Syria, where she has 
been principal of the Tripoli School for 
the past eleven years. 

Elizabeth Taylor Russell and her fam- 
ily spent the summer at Sugar Hill, N. H. 

Margaret Hobart Myers has a new son 
born the first of June. His full name is 
Elois Lucas, but please call him Lucas. 
As usual Margaret spent the summer at 
Sommariva, Easthampton, Long Island. 

Louise Russell reports that she missed 
Lois Lehman at Vevey, Switzerland, but 
succeeded in having a little telephone 
chat with her at Crans, where she was 
spending a month at the top of a funicu- 
lar playing golf. Lois said that she and 
her aunt plan to remain in Vevey in- 
definitely. 



1912 
Class Editor: Elizabeth Pinney Hunt, 
(Mrs. Andrew D. Hunt), 
Millbrook Lane, Haverford, Pa. 

The editor has news this month only 
of the members of 1912 who were in 
Europe for the summer. She hopes that 
letters from the class will soon appear 
in her mail. 

Carmelita Hinton and the children 
walked 250 miles in Norway, and lived 
to tell the tale of their adventures to 
Christine who returned with them from 
Scotland in September. 

Christine Plammer describes her sum- 
mer as "three generations through eight 
countries without a scrap." 

Gladys Chamberlain and Margaret 
Corwin were with the Hammers in Ice- 
land for the great fete in June. They 
occupied a tent together on the plains 
where the festivities were held. 

Elizabeth Pinney Hunt and her boys 
spent an invigorating month in the high 
Pyrenees, another at Concarneau in Brit- 
tany and a delightful fortnight near Car- 
lotta in Bourre, with a busy week in 
Paris late in September. 

Carlotta Briggs' baby, Jimmie, is fine, 
fat and vigorous — a decided handful for 
his mother. Pinney found Carlotta very 
well, and much engrossed in the novelty 
of taking care of an infant. 

The class extends its sympathy to 
Rosalie Day, whose father died in the 
spring. 

1916 
Class Editor: Catherine S. Godley, 
768 Ridgeway Avenue, Avondale, 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 

The class extends its sincere sympathy 
to Anna Lee whose mother died in June. 

Constance Dowd is secretary of the 
Cincinnati Bryn Mawr Club. 

Rebecca Fordyce Gayton writes that 
she is busy trying to keep up with her 
nine-year-old daughter, Louise, who al- 
ready rides and swims better than she 
does. All three of her children are now 
in school, the youngest entering the first 
grade this fall. For. has gone back to 
her old war job of cutting surgical dress- 
ings with an electric .knife. She is help- 
ing to organize a Junior League in 
Youngstown and cuts all the dressings 
they make for the hospital. 

Chloe McKeefrey and her family are 
now living in Berkeley, California. They 
went west last January. 

Adeline Werner Vorys and her chil- 
dren spent the summer on an island in 
Georgian Bay. 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



1917 

Class Editor: Bertha Clark Greenough, 
203 Blackstone Boulevard, 
Providence, R. I. 

Nats McFaden Blanton writes of a de- 
lightful trip this summer. She and her 
husband sailed from New York on the 
second of July stopping at Naples, Lis- 
bon, Palermo, Syracuse, Athens, disem- 
barking at Alexandria for five days in 
Egypt and two weeks in Palestine and 
Syria, and reaching home on the twenty- 
sixth of August. They found their four 
children well and happy and "so count 
the trip a complete success. We had been 
working awfully hard on Wyndham's 
book on Medicine in Virginia in the 
Seventeenth Century, and the rest did us 
lots of good. The book came off the 
press just before we left and in my 
humble judgment I believe he did a good 
job." Caroline Stevens Rogers and her 
husband visited them in May and Betty 
Faulkner Lacey just before that. 

Mary Worley Strickland has a son, 
born August 31st, and he's adorable, ac- 
cording to Nell Hammill Gorman. She 
incidentally says that her time is entire- 
ly filled by trying to keep up with her 
three-year-old daughter. 

Dr. Elizabeth Wright was married 
at her house in Lexington, Mass., to 
Benjamin Hubbard, of England and New 
York, on September 6th. He is an ad- 
visory dean at Columbia University and 
they will live in New York. Liz, how- 
ever, plans to spend two days a week in 
Boston continuing her medical practice. 

Caroline Stevens Rogers spent the 
summer with her children at North 
Chatham where she was visited for al- 
most three weeks by Con Hall, who had 
been having a hard summer at her farm 
because of the drought. Con apparently 
enjoyed herself, according to all reports 
despite a really terrific sunburn. Caro- 
line herself had a glorious time. She was 
particularly proud of the prowess of her 
four and a half-year-old daughter who 
swims even under water and dives ex- 
pertly. The Nursery School which she 
started two years ago has grown into a 
kindergarten admitting three-year-olds 
for one hour a day and a salaried teacher. 
It is in her next door neighbor's playroom 
and so is grand for Caroline. It has 
turned out to be a financial success and 
there are about a dozen pupils. 

As for your editor she has been fright- 
fully busy because of the wedding of her 
sister on the 29th of August. She did 
spend the week-end with Thalia Smith 



Dole at her house in Richmond. The 
foliage near Pittsfield was unbelievably 
beautiful. Thale's farm is flourishing 
and she herself didn't look a day older 
than in 1917. 

1918 
Class Editor: Helen E. Walker, 
5516 Everett Ave., Chicago, 111. 
Annette Gest was maried to Mr. Sam- 
uel R. T. Very on June fourteenth. 

Gladys Barnett is managing Lossing 
Manor at Dover Plains, N. Y. 

1919 
Class Editor: Marjorie R. Twitchell, 
(Mrs. Pierrepont Twitchell), 
Setauket, Long Island. 

Mary Tyler Zabriskie spent the sum- 
mer at St. James, Long Island, in a 
lovely low long house in the woods 
built by her mother-in-law. For a while 
she left her three boys there while she 
and her husband went to Elizabethtown 
in the Adirondacks. 

Marjorie Ewen Simpson and her three 
children went to Pine Orchard during 
the summer. She and her husband also 
took several unexpected week-end trips. 
She has flown in a hydroplane. 

Dorothy Chambers Blaisdell took her 
boy to Turkey to see his grandparents. 
She is now settled at Williamstown 
where her husband is connected with 
Williams College. 

Liebe Lanier Boiling's family of two 
boys was augmented on August 9, by 
Betsy Cawthorne. Liebe spent the sum- 
mer in Nantucket and the baby was born 
in Boston. 

Winifred Kaufmann Whitehead's 
mother was very seriously ill in June. 
Win is still being nurse as well as house- 
keeper in their new home. 

Edith Rondinella Rudolphy and her 
husband are living in an apartment on 
the third floor of her family's house 
(4043 Walnut St., Philadelphia). Eliza- 
beth Hurlock was a bridesmaid at her 
wedding in February. Edith is continu- 
ing with her music at the Irwin School. 

Edith Howes spent July and August at 
Narragansett Pier tutoring a little girl 
for three hours a day and spending the 
rest of the time on the beach. 

1921 
Editor: Katharine Walker Bradford 
(Mrs. Lindsay Bradford) 
47 E. 88th Street, New York City. 
A letter dated May 7th from Louise 
Reinhardt tells of her engagement to 



24 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



Charles Francis. She was married on 
May 30th and sailed immediately to Eng- 
land. They expect to spend winters in 
New York. She says: "The gentleman in 
question is an Englishman, an actor by 
profession. . . . I'm sure I don't know 
why fate ever destined me to be the wife 
of an actor, however, I shall try to play 
the part." 

Elizabeth Taylor has received a pilot's 
license and now travels east and west by 
air. We are proud indeed to claim an 
aviatrix as our own. 

Clarinda Garrison Binger, we hear, 
has purchased a spacious house in New 
York with a real growing tree in the 
back yard. 

Barbara Ackerman and Grace Hendrick 
Patterson set sail for China in the spring- 
to visit Barbara's sisters in Peking. No 
word has been heard of their return. 

Emily Kimbrough Wrench had an un- 
fortunate smash-up in her car in Bryn 
Mawr. She collided with a truck, injur- 
ing her back and slightly loosening her 
front teeth. 

Frances Riker Duncombe has gone into 
the Christmas card business with two 
friends. Anyone in or near New York 
may order her original designs. 

I urge every member of 1921 to write 
me of her doings that they may be pub- 
lished for all to see. 

1922 
Class Editor: Serena Hand Savage 
(Mrs. William L. Savage), 
106 E. 85th Street, New York City. 

The summer has gone by, and the first 
autumn news seems to be of fiances, 
weddings, and babies. 

Em Anderson is engaged to Mr. James 
Farr, 3rd, of New York. They say that 
they will be married some time soon, but 
as yet they are not specific. Em is 
working at her job as Executive Secre- 
tary of the National Junior Leagues of 
America. 

Marian Garrison was married on the 
6th of August to Mr. Byron King. Garry 
and her husband are living in Philadel- 
phia at 6119 N. 11th Street. 

Malvina Glasner, whose married name 
is Mrs. Allan Bloom, is living in 
Indianapolis. Her husband is in charge 
of the Jewish Community Center Asso- 
ciation. Malvina for a time had a job 
with the Council of Social Agencies. 
Since the birth of her daughter Lucille, 
two years ago, she says "I have been a 
pretty stodgy hausfrau with many inter- 
ests but no accomplishments." 



Octavia Howard Price writes on July 
22nd from Mokanshan, China: "We have 
not lacked for variety to spice our life 
this past year. A student and workmen's 
strike in our University caused all de- 
partments except the Medical School to 
close down for two months. This took 
place in the coldest weather of a very cold 
winter, and gave the men at least, plenty 
to do, stoking furnaces and mending burst 
water pipes. . . . This past winter I 
taught my first class in Chinese to the 
nurses: A course in surgical nursing, and 
found it took hours of preparation each 
week to get ready for a one-hour lecture. 
I wonder if I will ever become fluent in 
this language !" The end of May Tavy's 
husband was sent for, to help out in a 
hospital down the line from Tsinan, in 
the midst of the fighting. After two 
weeks he returned home to find that his 
family had been forced to leave Tsinan 
for Tsingtao. Here the crowds of refu- 
gees became so great that they were 
forced to move four times in three weeks. 
Since then Tavy and the baby have been 
in Mokashan, which is on the sea; her 
husband in Tsinan, cut off from them 
even by mail. "Both the railroad lines 
out of Tsinan are blocked by fighting." 

Sylva Thurlow Harrison writes from 
Sheffield, Eng. : "I am on the staff of 
Sheffield University, and am doing re- 
search work on Cancer. Douglas has a 
laboratory next door to mine, and we 
help each other a great deal, although we 
are working on different problems. . . . 
We live on the edge of the Yorkshire 
Moors and have become enthusiastic 
walkers, scorning anything less "than fif- 
teen miles at a time. We have walked all 
through the Lake District,- and visited 
most of the cathedral towns, and have 
roamed over both Yorkshire and Devon- 
shire Moors. We have been to France 
twice and are planning our next trip on 
the Continent to be to Germany." 

E. Williams Clark has a daughter, 
Barbara Williams, born on the 13th of 
June. 

Cornelia Skinner Blodget has a son, 
born the last of August. 

Lin Fung Kei writes: 

"Something happened last April which 
was a great blow to me. The Portuguese 
government here suddenly enforced the 
long suspended rule of abolishing co-ed- 
ucation. To meet the requirement I had 
to move the upper class boys to a sep- 
arate building and to conduct classes from 
6.30 A. M. to 4 P. M. daily. 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



"Now I have come to a compromise 
which is to have a girls' grade school ad- 
mitting boys up to the age of twelve, as 
is permitted, and to have separate junior 
middle schools for girls and for boys. 
Financially it would be much easier if I 
keep the boys' school alone. But the few 
girls, especially those in the second-year 
class, are bright, ambitious, and most 
willing to learn. I remember how hard a 
time I had, when I was rejected in the 
Lignan University high school because 
they didn't take girls. Parents are not 
willing to send their girls to school for 
higher work. It is hard to get a good 
number to start a girls' school separate- 
ly. If those few were not cared for, it 
would be almost impossible for them to 
get any higher education anywhere. As 
to the boys, they are bright, teachable, 
but rather young. The parents entrusted 
them to me because they felt dangerous 
for their boys in most schools where are 
so much explored by politicians and op- 
portunists. Not many years ago parents 
considered it an insult to have their boys 
study with girls even. Now so many send 
their high-school boys to me ! It is a 
triumph. You can see how I venture to 
the present compromise." 

1923 
Class Editor: Ruth McAneny Loud 
(Mrs. Sherman Loud), 
325 E. 72nd Street, New York City. 

Commencing with this issue, a new 
voice will be heard in the land. This must 
necessarily be a still small voice if the 
class does not give it substance. Verbum 
sap. 

Helen George was married to Mr. Elie 
Weeks on September 13th, in Richmond, 
Virginia. 

Haroldine Humphreys Muschenheim 
has a daughter, Linda. We apologize to 
the young woman for an announcement 
which should have been made some four 
months ago. 

The class wishes to extend to Kath- 
erine Raht its very sincere sympathy on 
the death of her father. 

Helen Rice has been working and play- 
ing at the Summer School. Since then 
she has been involved in the business end 
of the Women's National Tennis at For- 
est Hills, and more recently still she won 
a tournament at Pittsfield. 

Katherine Shumway Freas sends us an 
interesting account of their journey: from 
London across Europe and through the 
Holy Land; to Cairo in time to catch a 
glimpse of Marie of Roumania; the last 
seven hundred miles, chiefly by truck, 



along the Congo River, brought them 
home to Banza Manteke in Belgian Con- 
go. There they are showing movies of 
civilization to the natives and making 
savage pictures to send to us. 

Florence Martin Chase and Dorothy 
Meserve Kunhardt are pillars of the new- 
ly founded nursery schools of Watertown 
and Morristown, respectively. 

Agnes Clement Robinson has moved to 
Groton, where her husband is teaching- 
English and coaching football. 

1924 
Editor: Beth Tuttle Wilbur 
(Mrs. Donald E. Wilbur), 
15 Shaler Lane, Cambridge, Mass. 

Assuming that no news is good news, 
we want to congratulate 1924 on its pros- 
perity. Of twenty-five requests for news 
to swell this issue, only one, Al Ander- 
son McNeely, replied. The list of de- 
linquents is too long to mention, but we 
are certainly going to give up this job for 
a more fruitful one if things don't begin 
to look up. 

Roberte Godefroy (Madame Herve 
Chauvel) has a son, Robert, born at 
Rostrenen, France, on the 6th of May. 

Elsa Molitor Vanderbilt announces with 
pride that the Vanderbilt family shows 
increase in spite of the general depres- 
sion ! Another daughter, Nancy Spencer, 
was born on July 18th, in Toledo. 

Margaret Starr Compton was married 
to Mr. James Lyle Macfadden, of Sher- 
burn, Minn., on July 1st. They will live 
at 2649 Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco, 
and Margaret wants to see any of '24 who 
are in the vicinity. 

The Editor and family have this week 
moved from Minneapolis to Cambridge, 
' where our husband is attending the Har- 
vard Business School. 

1925 
Editor: Blit Mallett Conger 
(Mrs. Frederick Conger) 
325 E. 72nd Street, New York City. 

On August 31st Beth Dean died. She 
had gone to Paris for Tibby Lawrence's 
wedding and somehow she caught a kind 
of aplastic anaemia — a disease for which 
it seems that little could be done. She 
was brought back to the New York Hos- 
pital and there for a month she fought 
a losing battle with all her strength and 
courage. 

Beth had so many gifts — her art, her 
verse-making, her teaching — but one of 
her greatest was her sense of values. She 
saw things clearly and always seemed 



26 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



level-headed and serene. She was easy to 
talk to and to trust. Probably Tibby has 
expressed it best by "a realness and a 
goodness in her relations to people." 

We wish to send our deepest sympathy 
to Beth's family. 

Emily Watts was married on August 
30th to Ernest Bell Tracy. Mr. Tracy 
is a graduate of Yale. After a wedding 
trip in Europe the Tracys expect to settle 
at 1010 Fifth Avenue. 

In July Beth Comer was married to 
Mr. Richard Walter Rapp. We don't 
know her present address. 

And speaking of addresses, Nan Hough 
(Mrs. E. Baldwin Smith) resides in a 
lovely house with a green kitchen and a 
just faintly green cook at 120 Broadmead, 
Princeton. 

And Tibby (Mrs. Clarence W. Mendell) 
lives at 204 Prospect Street, New Haven. 

Olive Sears Taliaferro has a daughter 
Betsy, born on June 26. (Wonderful — we 
mothers must all get together and talk 
spinach.) 

Betty Smith has crashed through again 
with a fine newsy letter: ''Brownie (Mir- 
iam Brown) was married on June 4th to 
George Vanderveer and is living- in St. 
Thomas lane, Owings Mills, Maryland. 
She is teaching at Garrison Forest and 
seems to have a garden ! 

"Bugsie Carr Howell was in New 
York in May for the Junior League Con- 
vention. 

"Nate duPont Edmonds is living in 
Wilmington and having difficulty finding 
things for her maid to do around her 
apartment. (That was in June, maybe 
there's more to be done now.) 

"Kay Fowler Lunn spent the summer in 
London in a flat in the most approved 
style. I gather from her that Baldie 
(Eleanor Baldwin) went over to take a 
neurology course and that they were to 
travel on the Continent in July and Au- 
gust. Kay and her husband made a flying 
visit to America in February and, accord- 
ing to last spring's plans, are leaving for 
the Congo this fall. 

"Dot Sollers has been covering ground 
very rapidly with a trip to Colombia, 
South America, in the spring and, less 
than a month after she returned, a jaunt 
to Europe for two months. She saw a 
great deal of Kay Fowler Lunn in Lon- 
don and 'encouraged her domesticity by 
helping her hang pictures and arrange the 
furniture in her flat in Roland Gardens.' 
Dot says her job keeps her pretty busy, 
but she was able to see the tennis matches 
in Newport in August. Her address is 



Harrison House, Harrison Avenue, New- 
port. 

"Libby Wilson was married on Janu- 
ary 20th to James Jackson, Jr., and is 
Hving.at 847 Adams Avenue, Memphis, 
Tennessee." 

And as for Betty Smith herself: "I'm 
still trying to tell parents how to bring 
up their children — with more or less suc- 
cess. I've never learned just how to act 
when they ask me, 'Just what do you 
know about it anyhow?' Can always be 
reached at Lee, Massachusetts. Business 
address, in case anyone is ever in Al- 
bany, is care of the New York State 
Department of Mental Hygiene, State Of- 
fice Building, Albany. Herewith is an 
earnest invitation to any traveler to let 
me know when they're in Albany and I'll 
take them to the top of our thirty-one 
story skyscraper and show them the view ! 
Spent the month of August on the golf 
course and actually managed to win the 
women's tournament in Lee." 

1926 
Class Editor (pro tan) : E. Tweddell 
Plandome, L. I. 

Alice Good is engaged to Gerald Staf- 
ford Smith, of Brooklyn, who is well 
known as an indoor polo player. They 
will be married in November, assisted to 
the altar by Algie Linn and Nancy Mit- 
chell ('28) among others. 

E. Musselmen has been West all sum- 
mer with Phoebe Brown. They recently 
sailed for Tahiti on a Swedish freighter 
for purposes of pleasure and relaxation. 

Delia Smith Johnston and her husband 
will be in Philadelphia this winter while 
Ames studies at Temple and Delia teaches 
at the Friends' Central School at Over- 
brook. 

Betty Cushman, of Paris, France, came 
back to the old country and visited her 
pet camp this summer. She has returned 
to Paris for the winter, where she will 
teach again in an American school. She 
says that she and her mother will return 
here for good next year. 

Has anyone seen Lysistrata and Fanny 
Waite's name on the program "in charge 
of the costumes"? She does scenery too 
for Mr. Bel-Geddes. 

Benjy Linn spent six weeks of her sum- 
mer at the Summer School for Industrial 
Workers at the University of Wisconsin 
at Madison, where she taught history and 
had an interesting time. 

Algy Linn, au contraire, idled all sum- 
mer. Now she is teaching small children 
in a little French school in Philadelphia- 



BRYN MAWR BULLETIN 



27 



The al