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Full text of "Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly, 1917-1919"

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RYN MA WR 
ALUMNAE 



QUARTERLY 



XI 



APRIL, 1917 



No. 1 



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fit 



1 




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Published by the Alumnae Association 

of 
Bryn Mawr College 



Entered at the Post Office, Baltimore, Md., as second class mail matter under the Act of July 16, 1899, 



THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE 
QUARTERLY 

Editor-in-Chief 

Elva Lee, '93 

Randolph, New York 

Campus Editor 

Helen H. Parkhurst, '11 

Bryn Mdwr College, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Advertising Manager 

Elizabeth Brakeley, '16 

Rockefeller Hall, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Twenty-Fifth Annual Report of the Alumnae Association of 

Bryn Mawr College . 1 

With the Alumnae 40 

News from the Campus ;, 44 

In Memoriam .......: 49 

News from the Clubs, ,.'..•>. 51 

News from the Classes 52 

Literary Notes 60 



Contributions to the Quarterly, books for review, and subscriptions should be sent to 
the Editor-in-Chief* Elva Lee, Randolph, New York. Cheques should be drawn payable 
to Jane B. Haines, Cheltenham, Pa. The Quarterly is published in January, April, July, 
and November of each year. The price of subscription is one dollar a year, and single 
copies are sold for twenty-five cents each. Any failure to receive numbers of the Quar- 
terly should be reported promptly to the Editor. Changes of address should be reported 
to the Editor not later than the first day of each month of issue. News items may be 
sent to the Editors. 

Copyright. 1917, by the Alumnae Association of Bryn Mawr College. 



THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE 
QUARTERLY 



VOLUME XI 



APRIL, 1917 



No. 1 



TWENTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 
OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE, 1916-1917 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 
Officers, 1916-1918 

President, Cornelia Halsey Kellogg (Mrs. 
Frederic Rogers Kellogg), '00, Morristown, 
N.J. 

Vice-President, Mary Richardson Walcott 
(Mrs Robert Walcott), '06, 152 Brattle 
Street, Cambridge, Mass. 

Recording Secretary, Hilda Worthington 
Smith, '10, West Park, N. Y. 

Corresponding Secretary, Abigail Camp 
Dimon, '96, 367 Genesee Street, Utica, N. Y. 

Treasurer, Jane Bowne Haines, '91, Chelten- 
ham, Pa. 



OFFICERS OF THE LOCAL BRANCHES 

Philadelphia 
November, 1916 to November, 1917 

Chairman, Elizabeth Bent Clark (Mrs. 
Herbert L. Clark), '95, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

V ice-Chairman, Julia Cope Collins (Mrs. 
William H. Collins), '89, Haverford, Pa. 

Secretary-Treasurer, Agnes M. Irwin, '10, 
830 South 48th Street, Philadelphia. 

Directors, Jacqueline Morris Evans (Mrs. 
Edward W. Evans), '08, 151 East Coulter 
Street, Germantown, Philadelphia. Katha- 
rine W. McCollin, '16, 2049 Upland Way, 
Philadelphia. 

New York 

Chairman, Kathertne Ecob, '09, Flushing, 
Long Island, New York. 

Boston 

The officers of the Boston Bryn Mawr Club 
act also as Branch officers. 



Baltimore 

The officers of the Baltimore Bryn Mawr 
Club act also as Branch officers, 

OFFICERS OF THE BRYN MAWR CLUBS 

New York 

137 East 40th Street 

February, 1917 to February, 1918 

President, Edith Pettit Borie (Mrs. Adol- 
phe Borie, 3rd), '95, 59 East 65th Street, New 
York City. 

Vice-President, Florence Waterbury, 05, 

Secretary, Isabel M. Peters, '04, 33 West 
49th Street, New York City. 

Treasurer, Edith Child, '90. 

Assistant Treasurer, Sophie Boucher, '03. 

Boston 

144 Bowdoin Street 

April, 1916 to April, 1917 

President, Sylvia Knowlton Lee, '01, 42 
Avon Street, Cambridge, Mass. 

Vice-President and Treasurer, Sylvia Scud- 

DER BOWDITCH (MRS. InGERSOLL BOWDITCH), 

'01. 

Recording Secretary, Marion C. Balch, '02. 

Corresponding Secretary, Frances Lord, ex- 
'10, North Street, Plymouth, Mass. 

Director, Susan Walker Fitzgerald (Mrs. 
Richard Y. Fitzgerald), '93. 

Chicago 
February, 1916 to February, 1917. 

President, Margaret Ayer Barnes (Mrs. 
Cecil Farnes), '07, 1153 N. Dearborn Street. 

Secretary, Evelyn Shaw, '14, 1130 Lake 
Shore Drive, Chicago. 



2 The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly [April 

Baltimore COMMITTEES 

January, 1917 to January, 1918 academic committee 

President, Johanna Kroeber Mosenthal terh °* amcs 

(Mrs. Herman Mosenthal), '00, 1501 Mt. Pauline Goldmark, '96, Chairman, 

Royal Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 270 West 94th Street, New York 

Vice-President and Treasurer, Helen Evans, City 1916-1920 

13. Esther Lowenthal, '05 1917-1918 

Secretary, Mildred McCay, '16, Roland Elizabeth Shepley Sergeant, 

Park, Md. '03 1915-1919 

Helen Emerson, '11, 1917-1919 

Pittsburgh Ellen d EllKj , q1> 1916-1920 

May, 1916 to May, 1917 Frances Fincke Hand, '98 1917-1921 

Frances Browne, '09 1917-1921 

President, Sara F. Ellis, '04, 5716 Rippey Cornelia Halsey Kellogg, '00. .. {ex officio) 
Street, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Vice-President, Rose G. Marsh, '09. «««™,««»™^, ™ ~ 

' ' CONFERENCE COMMITTEE 

Secretary, Frances Rush Crawford (Mrs. 

R. L. Crawford), '01, 517 Emerson Street, Leah Tapper Cadbury, '14, Chair- 

Pittsburgh. man, Haverford, Pa 1916-1917 

Treasurer, Elizabeth Baggaley Carroll Anna Scattergood Hoag, '96, 1916-1917 

(Mrs. A. R. Carroll), ex-'03. Marion Edwards Park, '98 1916-1917 

Katharine Williams McCol- 
Washington ltn, '15 1916-1917 

October, 1916 to October, 1917 

, loan fund committee 
President, Aurie Thayer Yoakam (Mrs. M. 

K. Yoakam), '00, 2023 O Street N.W., Wash- Martha G. Thomas, '89, Chairman, 

ington, D. C. Whitford, Pa 1916-1921 

Secretary, Henrietta S. Riggs, '10, 131 Ethel Pew, '06, 1913-191& 

Maryland Avenue N.E., Washington, D. C. Katherine L. Howell, '06 1914-1919 

Maud Lowrey Jenks, '00 1915-1920 

St. Louis Doris Earle, '03 1917-1922 

President, Erma Kingsbacher Stlx (Mrs. 

„ „ r c, N ,a, ri1 « w . . tames e. rhoads scholarships committee 

E. W. Stix), ex- 06, 5112 Waterman Avenue. J 

Lucy Martin Donnelly, '93, Chair- 
China man, Low Buildings, Bryn Mawr, 

Pa 1915-1918 

President, Fanny Sinclair Woods (Mrs. A. _ " ' ' ','' ' ' in1 , <mn 

tt ttt n ,ai ^ n ,. t . V, 1, Julia Cope Collins, '89 1916-1919 

H. Woods), '01, Canton Christian College, \ _ „, , M ir . 1( _ . Mr . 

~ '.' Anne Hampton Todd, '02 1917-1920 

Canton, China. 

Los Angeles health statistics committee 

President, Mrs. J. H. Douglas, Jr., 523 Dr. Katharine Porter, '94; Isabel Maddi- 

South Painter Street, Whittier, Cal. SO n, Ph.D; Eleanor L. Lord, Ph.D. 

Secretary, Ethel Richardson, 277 East 

Bellevue Drive, Pasadena. nominating committee 

Columbus Elizabeth Tappan, '10, Chairman, 

1419 Bolton Street, Baltimore, 
January, 1917 to January, 1918 Md 1915-1919 

President, Grace Latimer Jones, '00, 1175 Marion Edwards Park, '98 1917-1921 

East Broad Street, Columbus, Ohio. Elizabeth Lewis Otey, '01 1917-1921 

Secretary, Adeline Werner, '16, 1640 East Alice Hearne, '13 1917-1921 

Broad Street, Columbus, Ohio. Josephine Niles, '14 1917-1921 



1917] 



Annual Report of Alumnae Association 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Martha G. Thomas, '89, Chairman, 

Whitford, Pa 1916-1921 

Jane Bowne Haines, '91 (ex officio) 

Mary Crawford Dudley, '96 1916-1921 

Elizabeth B. Kirkbride, '96 1916-1921 

Clara Vail Brooks, '97 1916-1921 

Elizabeth Caldwell Fountain, 

'97 1916-1921 

Mary Peirce, '12 1916-1921 

Sibyl Hubbard Darlington, '99. . 1916-1921 

Marion Parris Smith, '01 1916-1921 

Elizabeth Bent Clark, '95 1916-1921 

Caroline McCormick Slade, '96. 1916-1921 
Hilda Worthlngton Smith, '10.. 1916-1921 
Margaret Bontecou, '09 1916-1921 

COMMITTEE on athletics 

Maud Dessau, '13, Chairman 1915-1920 

Esther White, '06 1914-1919 

Eugenia Baker Jessup, '14 1916-1921 

Bertha S. Ehlers, '09 1917-1922 

ALUMNAE MEMBERS OF THE BOARD 

OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR 

COLLEGE 

Elizabeth B. Ktrkbrtde, 
'96, 1406 Spruce Street, Philadelphia 

December, 1915 to December, 1921 
Elizabeth Nields Bancroft 
(Mrs. Wilfred Bancroft), '98 
Slatersville, R. I. 

December, 1915 to December, 1918 



CLASS COLLECTORS 

Mary Hamilton Swindler, Ph.D. 

Anne Taylor Simpson, '89 

Katharine M. Shtpley, '90 

Anna Swift Rupert, '91 

Helen J. Robins, '92 

Margaret Hilles Johnson, '93 

Abby Brayton Durfee, '94 

Elizabeth Bent Clark, '95 

Ruth Furness Porter, '96 

Clara Vail Brooks, '97 

Bertha G. Wood, '98 

Laura Peckham Waring, '99 

Kate Williams, '00 

Marion Parris Smith, '01 

H. Jean Crawford, '02 

Doris Earle, '03 

Margaret Scott, '04 

Margaret Nichols Hardenbergh, '05 

Elizabeth Harrington Brooks, '06 

Alice M. Hawkins, '07 

Jacqueline Morris Evans, '08 

Alta C. Stevens, '09 

Hilda W. Smith, '10 

Helen Tredway Graham, '11 

Jean W. Stirling, '12 

Jessie C. Buchanan, '13 

Mary C. Smith, '14 

Katharine W. Mc Collin, '15 

Mary Garrett Branson, '16 

Agnes Dorothy Shipley, '17 



THE MINUTES OF THE ANNUAL MEETING 



The annual meeting of the Alumnae Associa- 
tion of Bryn Mawr College was held in Taylor 
Hall, on Saturday, February 3, 1917, the Presi- 
dent, Cornelia Halsey Kellogg, presiding. 

As there was no objection, the reading of the 
minutes of the previous annual meeting was 
omitted. 

The President then read the report of the 
Board of Directors. At the end of her report 
she read the names of the following members 
of the Association who had died during the year. 

Helena Chapin McLean (Mrs. A. E. Mc- 
Lean) '96. 

Anna Bedinger, '99. 

Elizabeth Mingus Griffith, '00. 

Constance Lewis, '14. 

Mary Holland Burchenal (Mrs. C. E. Bur- 
chenal) ex- '05. 



Minerva Lepper Greene (Mrs. G. S. Greene), 
'05. 

The following resolutions were adopted by a 
silent, rising vote: 

Whereas, in the deaths of these members 
the Alumnae Association of Bryn Mawr College 
has suffered great loss, be it resolved, That we 
desire formally to express our deep grief and to 
record our sense of bereavement and to express 
our sympathy with their families and be it fur- 
ther resolved, That copies of this resolution be 
sent to their families and inserted in the rec- 
ords of the Alumnae Association. 

The report of the Treasurer was not read, 
but the various balances were given by the 
Treasurer. 

Next came the reports of standing committees. 
It was voted to omit the reading of the follow- 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



ing reports — The Quarterly, the A. C. A. 
Councillor, the Committee on Athletics and the 
Alumnae Supper Committee. 

The report of the Academic Committee was 
read by the Chairman, Elizabeth Sergeant, ex- 
cept the report on the Carola Woerishoffer De- 
partment, which was read by Pauline Goldmark, 
Chairman of the subcommittee. 

The report of the Conference Committee was 
read by the Chairman, Leah Cadbury. 

Next the report of the Loan Fund was given 
by Martha G. Thomas. 

The report of the James E. Rhoads Scholar- 
ships Committee was read by the Recording 
Secretary. 

The report of the Finance Committee was 
given by Caroline McCormick Slade. After 
this report, pledge cards were distributed and 
$8839 in addition to previous pledges was raised. 

At this point the meeting adjourned to 
luncheon. 

The meeting was called together again at 
3 o'clock. 

The report of the Alumnae Directors was 
given by Elizabeth Nields Bancroft, except the 
report on the new plan of government, which 
was given by Elizabeth Kirkbride. 

The only report read from a Local Branch 
was the report of the Philadelphia Branch, 
which was read by the Chairman, Elizabeth 
Bent Clark. 

The report of the Carola Woerishoffer Memo- 
rial Committee was read by Pauline Goldmark. 

The following appointments to committees 
were ratified by the meeting: 

Conference Committee: Leah Cadbury, '14, 
Chairman] Anna Scattergood Hoag, '96, Marion 
Edwards Park, '98; Katharine McCollin, '15. 

Loan Fund Committee: Doris Earle, '03. 

James E. Rhoads Scholarships Committee: 
Anne Hampton Todd, '02. 

Nominating Committee: Elizabeth Tappan, 
'10, Chairman; Marion Edwards Park, '98; 
Elizabeth Lewis Otey, '01; Alice Hearne, '13; 
Josephine Niles, '14; 

Committee on Athletics: Bertha S. Ehlers, '09. 

The next business before the meeting was the 
proposed Amendment to the By-laws to enlarge 
the Academic Committee. Pauline Goldmark 
said that the Committee thought this plan 
advisable eventually, but as they were not 
quite ready, she made a motion that the pro- 
posed Amendment be laid on the table for 
another year. The motion was carried. 



The first new business considered was a mo- 
tion made by Margaret Bontecou and carried; 
that the Board of Directors of the Alumnae 
Association be authorized to appoint, or where 
Branches are organized, request the Branches 
to appoint Alumnae Committees to act as ad- 
visors to the Appointment Bureau. 

Leah Cadbury then offered the following 
resolutions, which were seconded: 

1. That a committee shall be appointed im- 
mediately to organize a unit of Bryn Mawr 
Alumnae to work in one of the belligerent 
countries. 

2. That this committee, after an investiga- 
tion of the various fields of war-relief work, 
which can be opened up to college women, shall 
select the most suitable destination for the unit. 

3. That the committee shall be authorized to 
call for volunteers among the members of the 
Alumnae Association, including all who will be 
members after Commencement, 1917, and to 
organize them into a working unit. 

4. That the unit is to be known as a group 
sent out under the auspices of the Alumnae 
Association. 

5. That each member of the unit shall be 
responsible for her own expenses. 

Elizabeth Nields Bancroft suggested that the 
whole matter should be submitted to the Board 
of Directors of the Alumnae Association, for 
consideration. Anna Rhoads Ladd also ex- 
pressed the feeling that the Board of Directors 
should take up the matter. 

A suggestion was then made that the com- 
mittee mentioned in the original motion be a 
committee for the consideration of the whole 
matter. Eunice Schenck made a motion, which 
was seconded, that a committee be appointed 
to investigate the need for such a unit as that 
described and to make a plan for the possible 
activity of such a unit, this plan to be submitted 
to the Board of Directors of the Alumnae Asso- 
ciation for approval. 

Marion Park offered an alternative amend- 
ment, that Leah Cadbury's original resolutions 
be referred to the Board of Directors of the 
Alumnae Association, with power to act on the 
original motion without reference to the general 
body of the Alumnae Association. This was 
seconded. The first amendment was then put 
to a vote and lost. 

The question was raised as to whether the 
name Bryn Mawr would have more than a 
sentimental value. Leah Cadbury thought 
that it would open the way for workers. 



1917] 



Annual Report of Alumnae Association 



Ruth Welles wished to know if a unit not 
under doctors would have much value. 

The second amendment was then put to a 
vote and carried. Then the original motion 
as amended was carried. 

Lotta Emery Dudley made the suggestion 
that honorary degrees might fittingly be given 
to distinguished Bryn Mawr women. She felt 
that it would strengthen the interest of the 
alumnae in Bryn Mawr. She then made a 
motion, which was seconded and carried, "That 
the Academic Committee consider the advisa- 
bility and possibility of Bryn Mawr conferring 
honorary degrees on distinguished women." 

Dean Schenck then asked for the sense of the 



meeting as to an alumnae vocational rally as an 
inspiration to the students. The motion was 
then made, seconded and carried, "That it be 
recorded as the sense of the meeting that the 
alumnae hold a rally in the spring at the 
College." 

The announcement of elections to the Acad- 
demic Committee was then made by the Secre- 
tary, as follows: 

Frances Fincke Hand, '98, and Frances 
Browne, '09, to serve four years and Helen 
Emerson, '14, to serve two years. 

The meeting then adjourned. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Louise Congdon Francis, 

Recording Secretary. 



SPECIAL MEETING OF DELEGATES AND DIRECTORS 
February 2, 1917 



A special meeting was called by the Board 
of Directors, February 2, 1917, to confer with 
delegates from the Clubs and Branches and 
other interested alumnae, to consider plans 
for local organization. There were thirty-one 
alumnae present. 

The President announced that as Branches 
require twenty-five members, they do not ade- 
quately satisfy our need for organization. She 
said that twenty-three invitations to Clubs and 
individuals had been sent out urging them to 
come to this conference. She said that what 
we need is a chance to unite in small groups. 

Some of the plans of other colleges for lo- 
cal organization were explained. The various 
things that such organizations might do were 
spoken of. They could raise money for the 
college, they could get in touch with schools 
and they could do local concerted work. These 
groups should be very elastic. The Board of 
Directors hopes every year to send some one 
to each of these groups. 

Adeline Werner described the organization 
in Ohio. That is a state organization, with 
sub-committees in various cities throughout 
Ohio. This they felt best suited their local 
conditions. 

Dean Schenck told of her need for informa- 
tion about positions in schools and other posi- 
tions open to Bryn Mawr graduates. 

There was a general feeling expressed that 
people closely in touch with the College should 
go often to the outlying districts. 

Mary Crawford Dudley spoke briefly for the 
Philadelphia Branch. 



It was stated that local organizations ought 
to raise scholarships. Especially do we need 
Freshmen Scholarships, on the basis of need. 
Elizabeth Sergeant spoke very emphatically on 
this point. 

Elizabeth Nields Bancroft made a plea for the 
Trustees. She said that they lived in many 
cities outside of Philadelphia, that they were 
not all old men by any means and that they 
would like to be invited to meet local organiza- 
tions. 

It was thought that the headquarters of every 
organization should be listed in the Quar- 
terly. 

The seniors every year should be instructed 
about the alumnae activities. The Board of 
Directors now circulates among the seniors a 
leaflet, when they are asked to join the Associa- 
tion. It was thought that the seniors should 
be asked to a party and information imparted. 
Representatives of the Branches might be in- 
vited to this meeting and Branches should be 
informed every year of those graduating. 

Suggestions of names of alumnae who would 
undertake this organization were asked for. 

It was reported for the Academic Committee 
that they have discussed the question of pub- 
licity. It was thought that an exhibit of books, 
photographs, films, etc. might be made up and 
loaned to various organizations. 

The circulation of the College News was dis- 
cusseq^and it was decided that it was desirable 
for alumnae to take it, but not preparatory 
schools. It was the sense of the meeting that 
the Academic Committee take up with the 



The Biyn Mawr Alumnae Quarterfy 



[April 



college authorities the system of reporting. 
Vassar has a Student Press Board. A professor 
is the recognized publicity agent. Lucy M. 
Donnelly said that the English Department 
would be very glad to cooperate in forming a 
press bureau. It was felt that Bryn Mawr is 
not sufficiently reported in a dignified way and 



that for this reason very undesirable articles 
are occasionally printed. 

Mary Crawford Dudley for the Finance Com- 
mittee asked for suggestions for raising money. 
Respectfully submitted, 

Louise Congdon Francis, 

Recording Secretary. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



So much has happened of deep interest to all 
Bryn Mawr alumnae since we assembled here 
last January that it seems as though more than 
a year had passed since then. 

The Quarterly, if never before, has proved 
its value to the alumnae by accurately inform- 
ing us of the new organization under which the 
College is now governed. 

During the stress of great excitement last 
spring many things occurred which we all must 
deprecate. Nevertheless it was proved once 
and for all that Bryn Mawr alumnae do love 
their college and have a really earnest desire to 
serve her. 

Sincere gratitude is due to the Alumnae 
Directors and to the Academic Committee for 
their clear grasp of the situation and their 
steady and successful effort to represent a fair 
and broad-minded attitude to all sides of the 
question. 

The Finance Committee has been no less 
untiring and their unflagging and unwearying 
enthusiasm should be an inspiration to the 
whole Association. We must try as individuals 
to respond to their inspiring leadership. 

Although we cannot mention here by name 
each of the other committees, we are very grate- 
ful to them all for their services so freely and 
ungrudgingly given. 

The Directors of the Alumnae Association 
have felt for some time dissatisfied with the 
workings of the present methods of local organ- 
ization. There is undoubtedly a very large 
amount of genuine and deep loyalty and affec- 
tion for Bryn Mawr which is finding little or no 
expression. The present system of Branches 
does not adequately meet this need — for a 
Branch requires 25 members and has to fulfill 
rather rigid requirements. It is proposed to 
institute a system of small groups leaving their 
organization and activities entirely elastic as 
the Board feels that each locality is the best 
judge of its own needs and possibilities. 

The Board will make every effort to see that 
these groups are visited at least once a year by 
an alumna who is in close touch with the College. 



An informal conference was held last night 
with representatives of such groups and other 
interested alumnae. There were many valu- 
able suggestions made. For instance, Dean 
Schenck proposed a scheme for vocational ad- 
visers in various localities in connection with 
the Bureau of Appointments. She stressed the 
fact that this would be of great value to the 
College but even more to the alumnae who wish 
to obtain positions or improve those they al- 
ready have. 

It was the sense of the meeting that the Aca- 
demic Committee should take up with the col- 
lege authorities the question of publicity. The 
members present felt that if Bryn Mawr activi- 
ties were properly reported, undignified and 
undesirable articles would be fewer. 

The Board of Directors wish to emphasize 
the fact that they will be extremely glad to 
receive suggestions from any alumnae in con- 
nection with this new group system. 

At a recent meeting of the Board of Trustees 
the minute given in the following letter was 
passed: 

January 23, 1917. 
Mrs. Richard S. Francis, 

Secretary of the Alumnae Association of Bryn 
Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

My dear Mrs. Francis, 

At a meeting of the Trustees of Bryn Mawr 
College, held December 15, 1916, your letter 
containing a minute passed by the Alumnae 
Association January 29, 1916, suggesting the 
appointment of an alumna as Director-at-large 
was read. 

After discussion the following minute was 
adopted by the Trustees: 

"It is the sense of this meeting that the filling 
of the position of Director-at-large be con- 
sidered an opportunity to strengthen the Board 
of Directors by the appointment of a man or 
woman not otherwise eligible as a member of 
the Society of Friends or an alumna of the 
college, and that in now appointing Miss Marion 
Reilly Director-at-large for the year 1916-17 






1917] Annual Report of Alumnae Association 7 

the Directors have not changed their attitude in During the year the following associates of 

this regard, but as the presence of Miss Reilly the Alumnae Association have been elected: 

on the Board seems to them, as well as to many Grace Shafer Able (Mrs. S. T. Able), ex-' 16; 

members of the Alumnae Association, most Anne Wright Jaggard, ex-'16; Julia Kessel, 

desirable, they have taken this method of secur- Graduate, 1915-16; Lois Goodnow MacMurray 

ing her immediate membership in the Board of (Mrs. J. V. A. MacMurray), ex-'16; Edith 

Directors." Peters, ex-'96; Helen R. Steward, Graduate, 

Very sincerely yours, 1912-14; Clara Colton Worthington (Mrs. 

Anna Rhoads Ladd, Secretary. Union Worthington), ex-'96. 

REPORT OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 
I. Alumnae Academic Endowment Fund or January 15, 1909 

Principal: 

Cash and securities received January IS, 1909 ._ $100,000 . 00 

Net additions because of differences between par value and value at which securities were taken and 

sold 1,721.14 

Transferred from income account 2,235.08 

$103,956.22 

Investments: 

Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Rwy. Co., General Mortgage. 4% $3,000.00 

New York Central and Hudson River R. R. Co. Z\% 5,000.00 

Chicago, Burlington and Quincy R. R. Co., Illinois Division Mtge. 4% 5,000.00 

Standard Steel Works Co., 1st Mtge. 5% 5,000.00 

Cost of certain improvements on the College Grounds assumed as an investment for this Fund as 

agreed upon with the Alumnae Association. 4j% 25,000 .00 

Northern Pacific Railway, General Lien. 3% 3,000.00 

Mortgage No. 7, Lombaert Ave., Bryn Mawr, Pa. 4£% 35,000.00 

Southern Pacific Co. Equipment. 4§% 13,000.00 

Pennsylvania General Freight Equipment. 4§% 3,000.00 

Share in Mortgage No. 8, 1415 South Twenty-first St., Philadelphia. 5^% 750.00 

Pennsylvainia R. R. Co., General Mortgage. 4-J% 5,000.00 

Bryn Mawr College Inn Association, Second Mortgage. 5% 1,000.00 

Uninvested and due from the Trustees '. 206 . 22 

Total Par Value, $103,956.22 

Income: 

Receipts: 

Balance Sept. 30, 1915 $1,761 .38 

Interest on investments Oct. 1, 1915 to Sept. 30, 1916 4,553.67 $6.315.05 

Expenditures: 

Salary of holder of endowed chair ( 3,000 . 00 

Increase in salaries of three full professors who are heads of departments 1,500.00 

Balance 1,815.05 $6.315.05 

Note. — The amount ($3000) which but for this endowment would have been expended for the salary of the holder of 
the endowed chair was used to increase the salaries of six full professors who are heads of departments. 

II. Alumnae Academic Endowment Fund of June 2, 1910 

Principal: 

Received from Alumnae Association $150,000 . 00 

Net additions because of differences between par value and value at which securities were taken 

and sold 6,830.02 

Total par value of Fund $156,830.02 

Investments: 

Chesapeake and Ohio Rwy. Co., General Mortgage. 4$% $25,000.00 

Mortgage No. 1, 12 acres Camden County, N. J. 6% 12,000.00 

Canadian Northern Rwy. Equipment. \\% 5,000.00 

New York Central Lines Equipment. 4|% 10,000.00 

Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Rwy. Equipment. 4£% 1,000.00 

Norfolk and Western Railway Divisional First Lien and General Mortgage. 4% 22,000.00 

Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Rwy. Co., First Refunding Mortgage. 4% 25,000.00 

Reading Company and Philadelphia and Reading Coal and Iron Co., General Mortgage. 4% 15,000 . 00 

Northern Pacific Rwy. Co., General Lien. 3% 2,000.00 

Baltimore & Ohio Equipment Trust. \\% 2,000 . 00 

The Virginian Railway Co., 1st Mortgage. 5% 3,000.00 

New York & Erie R. R. Co. 4% 5,000.00 

Lehigh Valley R. R. Co., General Consol. Mortgage. 4*% 13,000.00 

Pennsylvania General Freight Equipment. 4|% 3,000 . 00 

Mortgage No. 3 (share), 641/653 Buena Ave., Chicago, 111. 5% 1,100.00 

Chicago Union Station Co., First Mortgage. 4£% 2,000.00 

Wabash R. R. Co., Second Mortgage. 5% 6,000.00 

Union Pacific R. R. Co., First Lien Refunding Mortgage. 4% 4,000.00 

Uninvested and due from the Trustees 730.02 

Total par value, T $156.830.02 

Income: 

Receipts: 

Interest October 1, 1915 to September 30, 1916 $6,808.15 

Expenditures: 

Academic salaries $6,808 . 15 



8 The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly [April 

SUMMARY OF INCOME AND EXPENDITURES OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 
For the Year October 1, 1915, to September 30, 1916 

INCOME 

Securities 

Founder's Endowment $20,441 .35 

Alumnae Endowment for Professorships of 
1909 4,500.00 

Alumnae Academic Endowment Fund of 

1910 6,808.15 

General Endowment Fund 10,492 .66 

Justus C. Strawbridge Fund 421.58 

Carola Woerishoffer Endowment Fund. . . . 31,115.36 

Undergraduate May Day, 1914, Endow- 
ment Fund 216.56 

Elizabeth S. Shippen Endowment Fund... 3,950.28 

Interest $1,419.43 

Less net interest received at 

College 117.45 1,301.98 

— $79,247.92 

Productive Real Estate 

Income from Founder's En- 
dowment invested in Mer- 
ion, Radnor, Denbigh, 
Pembroke East and West. . . $52,449.47 

Income from Founder's En- 
dowment invested in Pro- 
fessors' houses 2,718.26 

$55,167.73 

Income from General Endowment Fund In- 
vested in Rockefeller Hall 13,289.06 

68,456.79 

Income from Special Funds: $147,704.71 

Unexpended balances of In- 
come, October 1, 1915: 

A. Scholarship Funds $796.49 

B. Memorial Funds 1,228.97 

C. Other Funds 1,800.39 

3,825.85 

Received during the year: 

a. For undergraduate Me- 

morial Scholarships 
(Hopper, Rhoads, Brooke 
Hall, Powers, Gillespie, 
Stevens, Anthony, Simp- 
son, Hallowell, Long- 
streth) $3,279.33 

b. Other Memorial Funds 

(Ottendorfer Fellowship; 
Ritchie Prize; Rhoads, 
Chamberlain, Wright and 
Stevens Book Funds; 
Swift Planting Fund; 
Woerishoffer Memorial) . 874 .04 



1917] Annual Report of Alumnae Association 

c. Other Funds (1902 Book 
Fund; Alumnae Endow- 
ment Fund, Shippen 
Fund, Fletcher Bequest) $578.88 



$4,732.25 

Unexpended balances October 1, 1916: 

A. Scholarship Funds 1,903.26 

B. Memorial Funds 1,976.97 

C. Other Funds 1,843.89 



$8,558.10 



5,724.12 

Students' Fees: $2,833.98 

A. Added to College Income: 

Tuition $81,236.66 

Laboratory Fees $4,230.57 

Laboratory Supplies 235.15 

Geological Excursions 153.09 

Graduation Fees 813.94 

Changing Rooms Fees. . . . 190.00 

Music Rooms Fees, net. . . 42.50 

Entrance Examination 
Fees, net 1,642.36 



7,307.61 



B. Given to Library for Books: $88,544.27 

Deferred and Condition Examination 

Fees $1,513.00 

Late Registration and Course Book 

Fines 164.00 

1,677.00 



C. Given to Gymnasium for Apparatus: 

Gymnasium Fines 245.50 



90,466.77 

Net receipt from sale of books 26.20 

Interest on College Income invested in 1905 Infirmary, Trefa Aelwyd 

and prepaid insurance, Comptroller's bank balance, etc 802.19 

Net receipts from all other sources 3,336.58 

Donations to Current Income: 

Received during 1915-16 $7,700.52 

Unexpended balance of Donations received 
during previous years 4,045 .90 



$11,746.42 

Less balance unexpended September 30, 

1916 3,273.63 

Ruth Emerson Fletcher Bequest: 

Expended 1915-16 $18. 15 

Less income from investment 11 .31 



8,472.79 



Added to receipts from principal for expenditure 6.84 



Total net receipts from all sources, expended for College running 

expenses, from October 1, 1915, to September 30, 1916 $253,650.06 



10 The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly [April 

EXPENDITURES 
A. ACADEMIC 

Teaching Salaries 

17 Full Professors $50,500.00 

15 Associate Professors $31,760.00 

Donations given for Associate Professors' 

Salaries 1,616.00 

33,376.00 

8 Associates 11,360.00 

2 Lecturers 4,014.00 

11 Readers 10,457 .50 

5 Demonstrators 3,100.00 

Student Laboratory Assistants 191 .67 



Academic Administration Salaries 

(Only the portion of time given to Aca- 
demic work is charged) 
President, Deans, Secretaries and Stenog- 
raphers (part) $14,719 .08 

Comptroller's Office (60%) 2,509.34 

Business Office (60%) 2,603.07 

Proctors and Student Messengers 75.84 



Fellowships and Scholarships 

A. From College Income: 

Fellowships and Gradu- 
ate Scholarships $10,915 . 12 

Foreign Graduate Schol- 
arships 2,025.00 

Undergraduate Scholar- 
ships 4,823.30 

B. From Income of Special Funds: 

Undergraduate Scholar- 
ships $2,622.32 

C. From Donations: 

Fellowships and Gradu- 
ate Scholarships $750.00 

Undergraduate Scholar- 
ships 2,750.00 



$17,763.42 



2,622.32 



3,500.00 



Laboratories 

From College Income: 

Physical 

Chemical 

Physical Chemistry 

Geological 

Biological 

Psychological 

Educational Psychology. 
Social Economy 



$1,421.18 


1,667.64 


260.00 


584.40 


1,194.86 


1,045.12 


363.49 


1,002.29 



$112,999.17 



19,907.33 



23,885.74 



7,538.98 



1917] 



Annual Report of Alumnae Association 



11 



Library 

A. From College Income: 

Maintenance (one-half entire cost), 

Salaries 

New Books Purchased 



$3,572.45 
6,670.56 
5,831.38 



B. From Income of Special Funds: 

New Books Purchased 

C. From Donations: 

New Books Purchased 



Gymnasium 

From College Income: 
Maintenance of Building. 

Salaries 

Apparatus 



Religious Services 

Public Lectures 

From College Income, 
From Donations 



College Entertaining 

Subscriptions to Foreign Schools 

A. Athens 

B. Jerusalem 



Subscription to Wood's Hole Biological Laboratory 

Subscription to College Entrance Examination Board.. 
Subscription to Educational Societies 



$16,074.39 
154.82 
755.55 



$2,935.89 

3,400.00 

440.19 



$680.29 
50.00 



$250.00 
100.00 

$100.00 

100.00 

12.00 



Class Room Supplies 

Modern Art Equipment, from Donations 

Modern Art and Prize from Special Funds 

Publishing Research Monographs 

Bureau of Appointments 

Academic Committee of Alumnae, Travelling Expenses and Entertain- 
ment 

Academic Incidentals 

Travelling Expenses of Candidates for Appointment 

Academic Administration Expenses 

Office Expenses (60%) 

Telephone (60%) 

Publicity 

Printing 

Maintenance of Academic Buildings 

(Taylor Hall, $5,225.35; Dalton Hall, $5,674.32; one- 
half of Library, $3,572.44; Rent of one-half of Cart- 
ref, $1,000.00; Advanced Psychological Laboratory, 
$157.81). 

Maintenance of Grounds and Fire Protection 

Legal Advice 

Other Teaching and Academic Expenses :"! 



$1,911.61 

596.88 

179.59 

5,171.28 



$16,984.76 



6,776.08 
1,620.38 



730.29 
386.56 



350.< 



212.00 

345.07 
247.97 
63.68 
106.71 
200.00 

170.76 

63.07 

516.24 



7,859.36 
15,629.92 



»3,955.17 
50.00 

278.84 



*Note — 60% of the cost of Maintenance of Grounds and 40% of Fire Protection is considered as academic, the balance 
•S non-academic, 



12 The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly [April 

Expenses paid by Treasurer 

Interest 

Printing 

Auditing 

Comptroller's Bond 

Expenses in re Lands in West 

Sundries 

Permanent Improvements 

Dalton plumbing (completed) $2,688.05; Power Plant, 

(part) $317.48; grounds, $338.59; other items, $74.07). . 

Total Academic Expenditures 

B. NON-ACADEMIC ADMINISTRATION 

Salaries 

President's, Dean's, Secretaries' and Ste- 
nographers' (part) $6,198 .66 

Comptroller's Office (40%) 1,672.89 

Business Office (40%) 1,735.39 

Minutes of Directors (full) 300.00 

$9,906.94 



$2,541.58 




46.71 




250.00 




50.00 




67.41 




59.39 


$3,015.09 




3,418.19 




$227,311.36 



Expenses 

Office Expenses (40%) $1,274.40 

Telephone (40%) 397.92 

1,672.32 

Grounds and Fire Protection x 3,054.30 

1905 Infirmary 

Salaries $3,720.00 

Expenses 3,198.26 

Interest on amount loaned to complete 
building 875.56 



Receipts: 

Undergraduate Fees $3,420.00 

Graduate Fees 224.05 

Refunds for extra service 483.75 

All other income 10.00 



$7,793.82 



4,137.30 



3.656.02 



Loss on Non-Productive Real Estate 

Yarrow West $206.35 

Dolgelly 711 .73 

918.08 

Sundry Items of Non-academic Incidentals 216.73 

Christmas Donations 174.76 

Permanent Improvements 

A. From College Income $505.77 

B. From Donations 2,303.27 



2,809.04 



Power plant part of $211.66; Alterations to Buildings, 
$19.00; Grounds, $225.73; other items, $49.38; Ath- 
letic Field, $1,133.80; Infirmary, $269.19; Cartref Al- 
terations, $272.72; Pembroke new rooms, $94.56; Dean- 
ery garage, $427.00; Mary E. Garrett Memorial, $106.00. 
Total Non-Academic Expenditures 22,408.19 

I Note— 60% of the cost of Maintenance of Grounds and 40% of Fire Protection is considered as academic, the balance 
as non-academic. 



1917] Annual Report of Alumnae Association 13 

Total Expenditures for the year $249,719.55 

Total Net Receipts 253,650.06 



Surplus for Year J $3,930.51 



APPENDIX A 

Donations 
donations for scholarships 

Unexpended balances of donations given in previous years and brought forward from 1914-15. 
Composed of: 

Unexpended 
Expended Balance 

Donation from Mrs. Frank L. Wesson, received 1909-10 $500.00 $500.00 

Donation from Mrs. J. Campbell Harris, Thos. H. Powers Memorial 

Scholarship, 1915-1916 200.00 $200.00 

Anonymous Donation, Helen Schaeffer Huff Memorial Research Fellow- 
ship 750.00 750.00 

Donation from Chicago Bryn Mawr Club for scholarship 100.00 100.00 

Donation from Mary R. Norris for the Austin Hull Norris Memorial 

scholarship 200.00 200.00 

Anonymous donations for scholarships 700.00 300.00 400.00 

Total $2,450.00 $1,550.00 $900.00 

Received during 1915-16: 
Scholarships. 

From Alumnae Association of Girls' High and Normal Schools, one scholar- 
ship 100.00 100.00 

From the Board of Education of the City of Philadelphia, nine scholar- 
ships . 900.00 900.00 

From Geo. W. Kendrick, Jr., for the Minnie Murdock Kendrick Memorial 

Scholarship 200.00 200.00 

From Estate of Charles E. Ellis, two scholarships of $200.00 each 400.00 400.00 

From Alexander Simpson, Jr., Special scholarship 200.00 200.00 

Anonymous per Dean Reilly, Special scholarship 300.00 300.00 

Anonymous per Dean Reilly, Special scholarship 200.00 200.00 

Anonymous per Dean Reilly, Special scholarship 500.00 500.00 

From Class 1912 for scholarships. 200.00 200.00 

Anonymous per Dean Reilly, Special scholarship 150.00 150.00 

Total $3,150.00 $1,950.00 $1,200.00 

$5,600.00 $3,500.00 $2,100.00 

Unexpended donations for scholarships 1914-15 $2,450.00 

Donations received for scholarships 1915-16 3,150.00 

Total $5,600.00 

Expended during 1915-16 3,500.00 

Unexpended balance $2,100.00 

OTHER DONATIONS 
[These donations represent only cash donations received at tbe college office. All other gifts may be found enumerated 
under "gifts" in the President's Report for 1915-16.] 
Unexpended balances of donations given in previous years and amounts expended of same during 1915-1916. 

Unexpended 
Balance Expended Balance 
From Justus C. Strawbridge for lantern for service door of Rockefeller 

Hall $25.00 $25.00 

From Elma Loines, Class of 1905, for Physical Laboratory Apparatus 18. 75 18. 75 

From Ruth Putnam for binding Kirk Collection 5 . 00 $5 . 00 

Balance of Donation from Dean Reilly for equipment Mathematical Depart- 
ment 74.20 74.20 

Balance of Donation from Class of 1903 for clock for Library Reading 

Room 23.65 23.65 

Balance of donation from Undergraduate Association for books, in mem- 
ory of Professor J. Edmund Wright 5 . 60 5 . 60 

From Professor De Haan for Spanish Books 100.00 100.00 

From Class 1897, for books in Biology, per Professor J. W. Warren 15.70 15.70 

From Alumnae Association (Boston Branch) for books 101 .56 101 .56 

From Cynthia M. Wesson, for gymnastic apparatus 365 .00 365 .00 

From Dean Marion Reilly for Art Department 15 .95 15 .95 

From Ella Riegel, Class 1889, for Art Department 138.46 138.46 

From Ella Riegel, Class 1889, amount reported as expended but returned 

to Treasurer in 1915-16 46.22 46.22 

Balance of Mary Elizabeth Garrett donation — books for the President's 

office 10.55 7.34 3.21 

Amount returned by Undergraduate Association for amount advanced to 

Music Committee in June 1913, from Mary Elizabeth Garrett gift .... 10. 12 10.12 
From Philadelphia Branch of the Alumnae Association — for Art Depart- 
ment 78.56 78.56 

From Class 1898, for books English Department 100.42 50.48 49.94 

Class 1903, books for Library 317.20 294.59 22.61 

Class 1900, for books in Historv 100.00 85.73 14.27 

From Class 1911, for New Book Room 43.96 43.96 

Total f. $1,595.90 $942.93 $652.97 

2 Note-y-This figure differs from the Treasurer's Summary owing to the fact that the Treasurer has not separated 
the operating expenses of the College proper from the operating expenses of the Phebe Anna Thome Model 
School (see pages 14 and 15). The deficit of the Phebe Anna Thorne Model School is $5,335.96 and the College Surplus 
is $3,930.51. This explains why a deficit for the year of $1,405.45. is shown in the account of the Summary of the 
Treasurer. 



14 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



Donations received 1915-16 

Unexpended 

Amount Expended Balance 

For Library 

From Philadelphia Alumnae Branch $25.00 $25.00 

From Bryn Mawr Alumnae Club of Baltimore 10.00 3.23 $6.77 

From Class 1904 419.77 17.36 402.41 

For Art Department 

From Several Alumnae 15 .00 15 .00 

From Ella Riegel for Spanish Art 50.00 50.00 

For Improvements 

From Athletic Association— New Field 1,133 .80 1,133 .80 

From Class 1905 for Furniture, Sun Parlor-Infirmary 192 . 22 192 . 22 

From Several Students for Screens for Infirmary Ill .35 76.97 34.38 

From S. A. King for Cartref Alteration 297.82 272.72 25.10 

From Pembroke Alumnae for Pembroke Hall 94 . 56 94 . 56 

From President Thomas for Deanery Garage 427 .00 427 .00 

For Sundry Items 

From President Thomas for Lecture by Dr. Anna Howard Shaw 50.00 50.00 

From President Thomas on account of Mary E. Garrett Memorial Tab- 
let 106.00 106.00 

From Undergraduate Association for expenses of next May Day 2 .00 2 .00 

$2,934.52 $2,413.86 $520.66 

Donations Added to Special Funds by Treasurer 

Student's Building Fund • $140.45 

Student's Building Fund, No. 2 66.39 

Bequest under Will of Elizabeth Swift Shippen, deceased 176,844 .86 

From Albert K. Smiley, deceased 1,000.00 

From Anonymous Donor to found the Helen Schaeffer Huff Memorial Fellowship 

Fund 15,000.00 

Bequest of Geo. W. Kendrick, Jr., to Found the Minnie Murdock Kendrick 

Scholarship. 5,000.00 

From Marion Reilly to reduce the alumnae loan on Penygroes 1,000.00 

$199,051.70 

SPECIAL DONATIONS FOR TEACHING SALARIES 

1915-1916 

Received Expended 

Albert Strauss, Father of student $200.00 $200.00 

Frederick S. Chase, Father of student 50.00 50.00 

E. C. Henderson, Father of student 211.00 211.00 

C. H. Sorchan, Father of student 211.00 211 .00 

James Timpson, Father of student 211 .00 211.00 

George Merck, Father of student 422.00 422.00 

Carleton Mosely, Father of student 211.00 211.00 

Winifred Gatling, Mother of student 100.00 100.00 

$1,616.00 $1,616.00 

SUMMARY OF DONATION ACCOUNT 

Unexpended balance scholarships $2,100 . 00 

Unexpended balance of other Donations previous to 1915-16 652 .97 

Unexpended balance Donations 1915-16 520.66 

From Undergraduates for expenses of next May Day 13 .25 

$3,286.88 



APPENDIX B 

Phebe Anna Thorne Model School 

Operating Expenses 

1915-1916 



Accumulated deficit to October 1, 1915 

Income from Phebe Anna Thorne Fund received 

by Treasurer $5,965.24 

Tuition $7,325.00 

Interest on notes 5 . 36 



$672.71 



1917] 



Annual Report of Alumnae Association 



15 



Books and supplies $250.90 

Pupils' Dress 142 . 75 

Refunds: 

Class Room Supplies 1 .43 

Furniture 1 .92 

Equipment 1 .75 

Incidentals 7.80 $12.90 $7,736.91 

Total income available for operating ex- 
penses $13,702 . 15 

Expenditures: 

Salaries paid by Treasurer $10,082 .34 

Director's living expenses 881 .29 

Appointments — Travelling 106.03 

Books for Library 240.82 

Class Room Books 108.70 

Class Room Supplies 73.23 

Rental of Piano 40.00 

Health Examinations 52 .00 

Office Supplies and Printing 104.48 

Telephone 59.36 

Incidentals 149.03 

Summer Administration and Preparation 

(1915) 121.20 

Entertaining 33 .47 

Pupils' Dress 176.40 

Luncheons '. 2,377.50 

Wages and Board of Maid 449 . 12 

Teacher's Dress 20.00 

Laundry 14.91 

Water Rent 12.57 

Fuel (Gas) 5 . 89 

Rent of Dolgelly 800.00 

Repairs 37.39 

Insurance 38.01 

Heating and Lighting 219.32 

Furnishings 239.28 

Grounds 70.63 

Total Operating Expense $16,512.97 

Excess of Expense over Income for 1915-16 2,810.82 

Deficit on operation of School to September 30, 1916. $3,483.53 

Construction Account 

1915-1916 

Accumulated deficit to October 1, 1915 $5,822.41 

Out-of-Door Class Room No. 3 (completed) 

Construction $2,102.63 

Less refund by F. N. Goble $3 00 $2,099.63 

Alterations to Dolgelley 

Basement Plumbing $31 .26 

Third Floor Alterations ^255.15 286.41 

Equipment $139.10 



16 The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 

Cost of Construction during 1915-16 

Deficit on Construction to September 30th, 
1916 



[April 



$2,525.14 



$8,347.55 



Summary of Accumulated Deficit 
September 30th, 1916 

Deficit to Construction Account $8,347 .55 

Deficit to Operating Account 3,483 . 53 

Total Deficit to September 30th, 1916 $11,831 .08 

AUDITORS' REPORT 

January 8, 1917 
We have audited the accounts of both the Treasurer and Comptroller of Bryn Mawr 
College for the fiscal year ended 30th September, 1916, and found them to be correct, and 
we hereby certify that the receipts and expenditures of the College for the year contained 
in the foregoing Alumnae Financial Report are properly stated from the books of the 
Treasurer and Comptroller. 

Lybrand, Ross Brothers and Montgomery 

Certified Public Accountants. 



REPORT OF THE ALUMNAE DIRECTORS 



The most important and the most interesting 
work of the year that has been done by the 
Board of Directors of course has been the for- 
mulating of the new plan of government for the 
College in cooperation with the faculty of the 
College. Elizabeth Kirkbride, who was a mem- 
ber of the special committee of the Directors 
appointed to confer with the committee of the 
faculty will tell of the work that was accom- 
plished. It is for me to tell of the few other 
matters of special interest to the alumnae that 
came before the Board. 

Early in the year Marion Reilly's resignation 
from the deanship of the College was received 
and accepted with great regret. The following 
minute was unanimously adopted: 

"The Directors of Bryn Mawr College wish 
to place on record the sincere regret with which 
they have accepted the resignation of Marion 
Reilly, as Dean of Bryn Mawr College, a posi- 
tion which she has filled to the entire satisfac- 
tion of this Board for the past nine years, and 
at the same time to express their deep apprecia- 
tion of the devotion and loyalty with which 
Dean Reilly has so successfully performed the 
duties of her office. In the opinion of the 
Directors it is no small service to the College 
to have made the deanship of the College, after 



the office had been permitted to lapse for ten 
years, so important and distinguished a position 
as it has become during her tenure of office. 
As Dean of the College she has steadfastly 
maintained both in the faculty and in the stu- 
dent body those high standards of scholarship 
and learning for which the College has become 
justly known; and the strong influence that she 
has exerted in this and other directions will be 
greatly missed. 

"The Directors also desire to thank Dean 
Reilly for the eminently satisfactory way in 
which she has represented the College on pub- 
lic occasions when the President of the College 
could not be present, and for the many excellent 
and inspiring addresses that she has given. 

"The Directors and the President of the Col- 
lege wish to express to Dean Reilly their grati- 
tude for her services to the College and their 
best wishes for her future success in whatever 
educational or other work she may enter upon 
together with their regrets that she feels that 
she must sever her official connection with the 
College at the end of the current year." 

The personnel of the Board of Directors of 
the College has changed somewhat this year. 
In the autumn the resignation of Mr. James 
Wood, who had been a member of the Board 



1917] 



Annual Report of Alumnae Association 



17 



for twenty-one years and President of the 
Board of Trustees and Chairman of the Board 
of Directors for five years, was received and 
accepted with much regret. Mr. Rufus M. 
Jones has succeeded him and is also Chairman 
of the Executive Committee of the Board. Mr. 
Alexander Wood resigned because of ill-health. 
The two new members of the Board of Trustees 
are Mr. Arthur Perry of Boston, a graduate of 
Harvard University of the Class of '81, and Dr. 
Arthur Chace of New York City. Dr. Chace 
was graduated from Earlham College, B.S., 
1897, Harvard, A.B. 1899, Columbia University, 
M.D. and A.M., 1903. He is Professor of 
Medicine at the New York Post Graduate 
Medical School, Secretary of the Corporation 
and a Life Trustee of the New York Post Gradu- 
ate Medical School and Hospital, and for the 
past fourteen years a Trustee of the Moses 
Brown School in Providence, R. I. 

Marion Reilly was elected Director-at-large 
in December and was immediately appointed a 
member of the Executive Committee. Anna 
Rhoads Ladd and Elizabeth Kirkbride are also 
members of this important committee, so the 
alumnae are well represented there. 

Gifts to the College through alumnae are as 
follows: 

Frances Marion Simpson scholarships. Un- 
used balance of $614.46 given to the Loan Fund. 

Lucy M. Donnelly. $25 for books for the 
New Book Room. 

Pittsburgh Bryn Mawr Club. $200 to be 
awarded to an entering student who has had 



her last two years of college preparation in a 
school in Allegheny County. Through Dean 
Breed, Margaret Morrison School, Pittsburgh. 

Class of 1912. Gift of $420 to be used in re- 
union grants for five students who need finan- 
cial assistance. 

Several Alumnae, through Georgiana G. King, 
gift of $15 to be used in Art Department. 

Mary H. Ingham, '03. Thirty volumes to the 
Library. 

Marion Reilly. $1000 bond of the College 
Inn Association to be applied to reducing the 
investment of the Alumnae Endowment Fund 
on Penygroes from $10,000 to $9,000 and there- 
by decreasing the deduction in the salary of the 
new Dean from $700 to $650 per annum for the 
use of Penygroes. 

Besides the alumnae gifts the College has 
now the use of the money left it by Miss Eliza- 
beth Swift Shippen of Philadelphia. She gave 
$5000 "the income to be applied in assisting 
some worthy student to perfect herself in either 
the study of modern languages or any other 
study the College may approve of where a trip 
to Europe would benefit her in the profession 
in which she contemplates earning her living." 
$5000 for "endowment of a scholarship or to 
help those needing assistance;" Bryn Mawr's 
share of the residue of her estate as "endow- 
ment fund, it being my desire that the income 
thereof be used in assisting needy, deserving 
students to continue their studies, and in and 
about the needs of the Library and Sanitarium." 
Elizabeth Nields Bancroft. 



SPECIAL REPORT OF THE ALUMNAE DIRECTORS 



By far the most important action of the 
year was the adoption of the new "Plan of 
Government" by the Directors of Bryn Mawr 
College. This may have seemed to some 
alumnae a sudden revolution. In reality it 
was part of the general reaction against the tra- 
ditional form of American college government 
that has been going on at Bryn Mawr and 
elsewhere for a number of years. With the 
amazing growth of American colleges, both in 
numbers and resources, had come a complete 
separation of functions between the trustees 
and the faculty. The president remained the 
one link between the two bodies, with the su- 
perhuman task of representing the trustees to 
the faculty, and the faculty to the trustees. 
This tendency had almost reached its culmina- 



tion when Bryn Mawr was founded. Bryn 
Mawr, moreover, tried to free its faculty from 
the mass of administrative detail with which 
faculties were burdened in many other col- 
leges. The tendency to separate administra- 
tion from teaching, so far as it resulted in 
better opportunities for research, was good — 
the weakening in college faculties of a sense of 
responsibility for academic policy was bad. 

The reaction can be traced through a series 
of articles which began to appear in Science and 
other magazines some ten years ago, but the 
movement took more definite form in the 
spring of 1913, when a group of Johns Hopkins 
professors projected the American Association 
of University Professors, which was finally 
organized in January, 1915. The call for the 



18 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



first meeting mentioned among the general 
purposes of the Association "to facilitate a 
more effective cooperation among the members 
of the profession in the discharge of their 
special responsibilities as custodians of the 
interests of higher education and research in 
America; to promote a more general and meth- 
odical discussion of problems relating to ed- 
ucation in higher institutions of learning; to 
create means for the authoritative expression 
of the public opinion of college and university 
teachers; to make collective action possible; and 
to maintain and advance the standards and 
ideals of the profession." Questions of academic 
tenure absorbed the attention of the new asso- 
ciation during its first year, and in January, 
1916, the Committee on Academic Freedom and 
Academic Tenure issued its valuable report. 

At Bryn Mawr meantime there had been 
concerted action on the part of the professors — 
when in the autumn of 1915 it had become 
necessary to revise the form of contracts. 
This called out a request from the full pro- 
fessors that the old form of contract be done 
away with altogether and "letters of appoint- 
ment" be substituted. They collected informa- 
tion as to the forms in use at other colleges, 
and after a number of conferences a satisfactory 
form was adopted in January, 1916. 

At a special meeting of the Directors held 
in March a letter signed by thirteen full pro- 
fessors was presented by the President. Its 
chief points were: (1) that the present method 
of making and terminating appointments was 
unsatisfactory; (2) that the "Practical Propos- 
als" of the Report on Academic Freedom and 
Tenure might be adopted; (3) in particular 
that a standing committee of professors should 
pass on appointments and reappointments; (4) 
that representatives of the faculty be given 
a seat and vote on the Board of Directors. 

The special committee of the Board appointed 
to consider the letter called a conference of pro- 
professors, at which they gave their reasons for 
sending it. They were then asked to draw up 
what they thought would be a satisfactory 
"Constitution" for the faculty. Their original 
draft was published and therefore received wide 
criticism 

It was carefully studied by the committee 
in ;i series of conferences with President 
Thomas, with the full professors, the associate 
professors and associates, and with other mem- 
bers of the staff. Information was secured 
from other colleges and universities by the 



help of President Thomas and of ! he Academic 
Committee. A modification of the first "plan" 
was then drawn up by the Directors' Commit- 
tee, and was further revised in conference with 
the professors. It was finally adopted by the 
Directors on May 19, 1916. There was gen- 
eral agreement that it was best to adopt the 
new plan without more revision and to let 
time and experience show its weak points. 

The plan was pr'nted in full in the Alumnae 
Quarterly of July, 1916, and we trust that 
every alumna has read it carefully. 

Two amendments have already been made 
by joint consent of the Directors and Faculty. 
The first provides that only resident officers of 
instruction shall have a seat on the faculty. 
The second grew out of an ambigous state- 
ment of the functions of the Senate. Article 
IV, Section 6, now reads: "For academic of- 
fenses the Senate shall have sole power to 
impose the more serious penalties, including 
suspension and expulsion from college. In 
all other cases of suspension and expulsion the 
President shall report to the Senate the action 
taken, and in so far as practicable the reasons 
therefor. The Senate by a two-thirds vote 
may ask for a conference with the Board of 
Directors to discuss the principles involved in 
action taken." In order to complete the 
amendment the following was added to the 
second paragraph of Article I: "The President 
shall have power to impose the more serious 
penalties for all non-academic offenses, includ- 
ing suspension and expulsion o{ students." 

The plan begins by emphasizing "the pri- 
mary responsibility of the faculty in academic 
matters, and in the maintenance of high pro- 
fessional standards." 

The President's duties as executive are very 
briefly outlined. 

The faculty's powers are given in greater 
detail. The chief innovations are "Faculty 
representation," giving three members of the 
faculty a seat, though not a vote, on the Board 
of Directors, and the "Committee on Appoint- 
ments," which shall be consulted on all re- 
appointments or refusals to reappoint. The 
faculty shall also be consulted before an aca- 
demic department is established or discontinued 
and it has power to appo'nt committees on 
Library and Laboratories, which shall confer 
with the proper committees of the Directors. 
The informal conferences between committees 
have already proven fruitful of better under- 
standing. The faculty, under its own by-laws, 



1917] 



Annual Report of Alumnae Association 



19 



appoints or elects the committee on Curriculum, 
the committee on Petitions, the committee 
on Entrance Examinations, and any other com- 
mittees which "may be desirable for the conduct 
of its business." 

The Academic Council is practically a large 
committee on graduate work. 

The Senate, which consists of the President, 
Deans and full professors, has divided itself into 
an executive and a judicial committee, and deals 
: argely with the academic conduct of students. 
It has been suggested that the plan might have 
been simplified by treating both council and 
senate as faculty committees. 

In the classification of teaching grades, the 
title of reader is changed to instructor. 

The section on tenure is most important — 
and by establishing a proper procedure for ter- 
minating appointments will be as great a pro- 
tection to the Directors and President as to the 
faculty. It was a satisfaction to hear a member 
of the committee on Academic Freedom and 
Tenure call this section "very broad and fine." 

The alumnae ought to follow with interest the 
practical working, and the future development 
of the plan at Bryn Mawr, and corresponding 
movements in other colleges as well. At Col- 
umbia, for instance, there is joint discussion of 
the budget by the faculty committee on In- 
struction and the Education committee of the 



trustees. There are also informal conferences 
for preliminary discussions of policy. At 
Princeton there is a conference committee of 
faculty and trustees. The constitution of Reed 
College, adopted in 1915, provides for a faculty 
council which passes on the President's recom- 
mendations before they are submitted to the 
Directors, and also for a joint Welfare Com- 
mittee of Directors and faculty. 

The Wellesley and Vassar graduate councils 
are both making special studies of methods of 
"university control," from which we may expect 
valuable information. 

Meanwhile, for our encouragement, let me end 
by quoting another prominent member of the 
Association of University Professors: 

"Though, as you may have gathered, I do 
not feel that the new statutes of the Bryn 
Mawr Trustees should be regarded as quite 
the last word in the matter, they seem to me 
to constitute a decidedly substantial im- 
provement upon what I understand to have 
been the regulations previously in force; and 
I gather that they afford satisfaction to the 
members of the college faculty and are re- 
garded by them as likely to lead to a much 
smoother working of the administrative machin- 
ery in the future. These are results upon which 
your Board of Directors may well congratulate 
itself." Elizabeth Butler Klrkbride. 



REPORT OF THE ACADEMIC COMMITTEE 



The Academic Committee, like all Bryn 
Mawr, has just been through the most stirring 
and the most laborious year in its history. The 
work of the Academic Committee in the last 
two years has, in fact, shown a progressive 
increase in organization, in number of meet- 
ings, in contact with the College (President and 
faculty), and the alumnae Pauline Goldmark 
stated in her report as Chairman for 1915-16 
that we had added an extra regular meeting in 
the spring, which helped the continuity and 
thoroughness of the work. This past year we 
were obliged to add still another regular meet- 
ng the middle of January, preparatory to the 
annual mid-year conferences with President 
Thomas and the faculty. On these three oc- 
casions — spring, fall and January — the Com- 
mittee has met not only all day Saturday but 
half of Sunday. Besides this, we had, last 
spring, two additional formal conferences with 
President Thomas, one called by her, and one 
by us in accordance with our new agreement. 



The alumnae will remember that at the an- 
nual meeting in 1916 the Chairman presented 
a letter from President Thomas urging that the 
Academic Committee act as the agent of the 
alumnae in negotiations with the college author- 
ities on questions relating to the academic 
management of the Colege, it being understood 
that the Academic Committee should be given 
an opportunity to confer with such authorities 
before any individual or group of alumnae 
began public agitation on such questions. The 
President offered, in return, to bring all impor- 
tant academic matters to the attention of the 
Committee before making recommendations to 
the Board of Directors. Now the Academic 
Committee under its agreement made with the 
Trustees in 1893 has always been recognized as 
"the official means of communication between 
the authorities and the Alumnae Association of 
Bryn Mawr College." But its duties in the 
early days were more or less informally exer- 
cised; and even of late years, neither the alum- 



20 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



nae, on their side, nor the President on hers, 
have felt obliged to bring all important matters 
to the attention of the Committee. 

The Association recognized, however, both 
the danger of irresponsible alumnae action, and 
the advantage of having their Committee more 
fully informed on academic policies while such 
policies were still in process of development. 
The agreement proposed by President Thomas 
was accordingly accepted, and the Academic 
Committeee wishes to state that the opportun- 
ities for coooperation and understanding of 
college problems which it has given us during 
the past year have been of very great value to 
our work. President Thomas has generously 
lived up to her side of the contract; and the 
alumnae have come to us with criticisms and 
queries and problems which they have asked 
us to settle, if we could, before they were pub- 
licly discussed. It is in fact significant to find 
that most of the subjects we have studied 
during the past year have been brought to our 
attention by individual alumnae or groups of 
alumnae. 

To continue the list of meetings, we wish to 
mention a very important formal meeting called 
in Philadelphia on April 29, 1916, by the special 
Committee on Reorganization of the Board of 
Directors of the College, to discuss the constitu- 
tional changes which have since gone into effect. 
Add to this a number of informal meetings with 
our Alumnae Trustee and our Alumnae Direc- 
tors, (who have also attended our regular meet- 
ings), a great many small alumnae conferences 
with special groups, many personal interviews 
with the President and members of the faculty 
of the College, and a most voluminous corre- 
spondence, and it will be realized that the Aca- 
demic Committee has been in almost constant 
touch with college affairs. The fact that we 
had fewer formal reports than usual to offer 
to President Thomas and the Alumnae Associa- 
tion is largely due to the fact that our advisory 
work has been so exacting and so continuous 
that there has been little time for special pieces 
of investigation. 

Our mid-year conferences with the President 
and faculty were, as a natural consequence of 
our greater intercourse during the year, of a 
rather more general and informal nature than 
usual. We met all day on January 26, and on 
the afternoon of the 27, with President Thomas 
and Dean Schenck. We met on the morning 



of the 27, from nine until eleven, with the Presi- 
dent, the Dean and a special Faculty commit- 
tee consisting of Profs. Scott, Bascom, Sanders, 
W. R. Smith and Beck. The subjects of this 
conference were: the tentative report on the 
degree with special honors, which is now under 
consideration by the Faculty Curriculum Com- 
mittee; the need of strengthening the organic 
courses and departments of the College; the 
workings of the cut rule; and the possibility 
and need of a more informal and cooperative 
relation between the faculty and the Academic 
Committee. From eleven till one, on the same 
day, according to the custom of the Academic 
Committee to meet with new departments, we 
heard a very interesting report from Professor 
Kingsbury and the other members of the Carola 
Woerishoeffer department. 

The work of the Academic Committee in the 
past year seems to fall naturally under the three 
heads of academic affairs; student affairs; alum- 
nae affairs. Much of the work has been done 
as a committee of the whole, or by correspond- 
ence but we have had five regular sub-com- 
mittees: 

1. Entrance examinations and Tutoring School, con- 
tinued from last year; Susan Franklin, Chairman; Susaa 
Fowler, Gertrude Hartman. 

2. Honors and Methods of teaching, continued from last 
year; Pauline Goldmark, Chairman; Susan Fowler, Eliza- 
beth S. Sergeant. 

This committee did not report except briefly about 
honors. 

3. Cost of living at college; Anna B. Lawther, Chairman; 
Pauline Goldmark, Ellen D. Ellis. 

This Committee made no formal report, but has been 
following student expenditures. 

4. College Re-organization; Ellen D. Ellis, Chairman; 
Elizabeth S. Sergeant. 

This Committee, originally called " Committee on Reap- 
pointments and Dismissals," was formed immediately 
after the alumnae meeting last year (as a result of the 
agitation of certain "cases" at Bryn Mawr), to study 
systems of appointments and dismissals in other colleges. 
In consequence of the re-organization at Bryn Mawr, 
which was shortly thereafter undertaken by the authori- 
ties, it was unnecessary to continue this work; but the 
members of the committee did some investigation at tht 
request of Miss Kirkbride, Alumnae Member of the Direc- 
tor's Committee on Re-organization. 

5. Vocational Placement; Gertrude Hartman, Chairman; 
Susan Fowler, Ellen D. Ellis, Esther Lowenthal. 

It may be noted here that Susan Fowler was unfortu- 
nately obliged to resign from the Committee during the 
summer, her place being filled by Esther Lowenthal, '04; 
and that Anna B. Lawther was unable to attend the Janu- 
ary meetings, her place (a; the Bryn Mawr meetings) 
being filled by Frances S. Browne, '09. 



1917] 



Annual Report of Alumnae Association 



21 



ACADEMIC AFFAIRS 

ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS 

President Thomas asked us last year to drop, 
until the new Tripartite Examination had been 
tried out. the general question of a reform in 
the Bryn Mawr entrance examinations which 
some of us believed to be desirable. The new 
examination system which permits a student to 
take her examinations in three parts, beginning 
two years before entering college, goes into 
effect for the first time this spring. Moreover, 
a new History examination is being offered as 
an alternate for the first time and will be 
finally effective in 1919. After that date, 
Physics will be the only science allowed for 
entrance, and there will be but one examina- 
tion in History — Ancient History, with a stress 
on narrative, rather than constitutional history. 

It was, however, President Thomas who re- 
quested us to study the Bryn Mawr English 
examinations and to form some opinion as to 
the justice of the criticism of that paper 
in a report by the Head-Mistresses' Association; 
which argued that the paper set in grammar and 
punctuation did not furnish a sound test of the 
principles of syntax and analysis, and that there 
was no choice of subjects in the examination 
in English composition. Our sub-committee 
found itself in substantial agreement with this 
criticism, and we are glad to learn that the 
English Department is at work upon the prob- 
lems not only of the examinations., but also of 
the requirements in English for entrance. Be- 
cause of the importance of the changes to be 
made the process is necessarily a slow one; 
but the Department is able to report prog- 
ress even if at this time it is unable defi- 
nitely to forcast the alterations which will in 
all probability be ultimately made. 

To the Department it has been apparent for 
some years that a change was becoming more 
and more desirable, but the alterations in the 
courses in composition, inaugurated last au- 
tumn, have made it seemingly imperative that 
the preparation for college should more closely 
conform to the newer methods and approach 
to composition. The courses in English com- 
position given in 1916-17 are, as a study of the 
Calendar will show the alumnae, far removed 
from the formal work in literary criticism which 
previously had been offered. Preparation in 
English must evidently be so altered as ade- 
quately to meet the newer needs of the college. 
Upon this assumption the Department is pro- 
ceeding. 



TUTORING SCHOOL 

A request was made by our Alumnae Direc- 
tors that we report on the Tutoring School at 
Bryn Mawr. The criticisms of the school that 
have reached us had to do with local difficul- 
ties as to the place for holding the school and 
the living conditions; and with the educational 
disadvantages. 

The school at Cartref in 1914 and 1915, and 
at the Harcum School on Montgomery Avenue 
in 1916, furnished the students with suitable 
chaperonage under one roof and thus avoided 
the inconveniences arising from young girls 
boarding in Bryn Mawr alone. The girls lived 
and worked, however, under crowded conditions, 
in an atmosphere of hurry and excitement, and 
in general discomfort. Long hours of work for 
both students and instructors added to the 
nervous tension. While we see the advantage 
of having girls suitably housed on the college 
grounds, the official sanction given by the 
College to a tutoring school of this character 
seems for other reasons undesirable. 

In the women's colleges from which we heard 
no such school under college authority was advo- 
cated or allowed. Where regularly organized 
tutoring schools do exist in the college towns 
their influence appears to be more detrimental 
than helpful. The travesty on education that 
has resulted from such schools and from the 
tutors associated with them has almost under- 
mined the work of some of the departments of 
the large universities. This is certainly the case 
at Princeton. Susan Franklin who made the 
report to President Thomas pointed out that 
our Committee deplored even insidious begin- 
nings of such methods of preparation at Bryn 
Mawr. 

Reports from other institutions called to our 
attention, further, the undesirability of having 
college instructors tutor in such schools, whether 
or not on college property. Even though the 
honor of the tutor was in no wise questioned, 
the fact that some girls entirely unprepared in 
the subject take a few week's work under col- 
lege instructors and then try the examinations, 
brings criticism even upon perfectly legitimate 
tutoring done in the school, and puts the whole 
system in disrepute 

But what the Academic Committee chiefly 
deplores is the detrimental effect on the college 
work of students entering Bryn Mawr after 
this kind of preparation. The college records 
bear out our objection. Of 16 students enter- 
ing in September 1915 from the tutoring school, 
ten failed to make their merits in February 1916. 



22 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



While it is true that only the weaker students 
are in the tutoring school, experience seems to 
show that it would have been better for the 
College, and kinder to the girls, not to have 
helped them in. This year all but six, we 
believe, of the school candidates failed to enter 
— a fact that not only shows the testing power 
of the examinations, but the very poor type of 
student that patronizes the school. 

This year seemed to us an especially favor- 
able time to urge consideration of the school. 
The three part arrangement for entrance exami- 
nations makes it less necessary than formerly 
for subjects to be "crammed" at the last mo- 
ment. The College moreover is urging atten- 
dance on lectures and trying to discourage cram 
in college work, and to force upon the minds of 
the students higher ideals of intellectual interest 
and effort. Moreover the College has a " model 
school" at its gates and cannot legitimately 
stand for two such contradictory types of 
education. 

In order that the College may not, therefore, 
give its official approval to any tutoring school, 
Susan Franklin recommended for the Commit- 
tee: That college property should not be used 
for a tutoring school; that college instructors 
should not engage in tutoring in connection 
with such a school; and that the college office 
should discourage as far as possible hurried 
tutoring at Bryn Mawr in the weeks immedi- 
ately before ,the autumn examinations. This 
suggestion would in no wise limit the very 
desirable service of the college office in recom- 
mending tutors to work with students during 
the summer as private tutors in their homes; 
it being, of course, understood that no college 
instructor should tutor for an examination in 
the making or correcting of which she had any 
part. 

President Thomas agreed heartily with these 
recommendations and assured the Academic 
Committee not only that college property 
would never again be used for such a school, 
but that we could confidently expect that the 
school would be discouraged in the future. The 
President and the Committee agreed, however, 
that the objections to a tutoring school would 
not apply to a summer camp of six or eight 
weeks duration. 

DATE FOR SCHOLARSHIP AND FELLOWSHIP 
APPOINTMENTS 

The Committee received a letter last spring 
from Professor Ida Ogilvie of Barnard College, 



asking us to take up the question of the date 
on which graduate scholarships and fellowships 
are awarded. In the past, April 15 has been 
the date for application, and May 1 for notifi- 
cation. Professor Ogilvie stated that her own 
students who applied for fellowships often lost 
salaried positions for the next year because of 
the lateness of the date. The Committee has, 
accordingly, taken up the question with Dean 
Maddison, who has it in charge, and the faculty 
has moved to make the date two weeks earlier — 
that is, April 1, for application: April 15, for 
notification. It is understood that these are 
trial dates, and will be set another fortnight 
earlier in the future if the change seems desir- 
able. As a matter of fact, both students and 
their instructors seem to have difficulty in 
making up their minds about applications very 
early in the year and there is a great difference 
of procedure in other colleges: dates vary from 
January 1 to June 1. 

DEGREE WITH SPECIAL HONORS 

This subject was fully discussed at the Aca- 
demic Committee's conference with the faculty 
last year, and fully reported by the chairman. 

The Academic Committe went on record as 
favoring a second basis of honors (in addition 
to the degree with distinction based on general 
averages alone), combining a high average in 
the general course with distinction in special 
work. A Faculty Committee of which Professor 
Carleton Brown was chairman, handed in a 
tentative report to the faculty last spring, 
making certain recommendations: and this re- 
port is now in the hands of the appropriate 
standing committee of the faculty — the Curricu- 
lum Committee. We understand that no final 
action has been taken. The members of the 
Faculty Committee are engaged in working out 
the practical details of the plan as they affect 
different departments and types of work. 
We found very general sympathy with the 
plan among the members of the faculty with 
whom we discussed it at our mid-year confer- 
ence, and hope earnestly to see it carried out 
in some form. 

FUNDAMENTAL COURSES 

Another point of academic interest which we 
have discussed at some length in our meetings 
is the necessity for strengthening the funda- 
mental courses of the college. Further, we 
voted, in November "That the Academic Com- 



1917] 



Annual Report of Alumnae Association 



23 



mittee express its opinion strongly that no new 
departments be added to the college without 
the provision of new and adequate funds, and 
then only after full consideration of the needs 
and purposes of the College as a whole." 

This motion was not intended as a criticism 
of existing departments, but is to be taken as 
an indication that the Academic Committee 
feels that the American tendency to multiply 
superficial courses and scatter academic interest 
is a distinct menace to the cause of liberal edu- 
cation. The chief reason we approve the degree 
with special honors is because we believe it 
will lead to concentration and specialization, to 
work with quality and substance. It is fa- 
tally easy for the American college, as it is 
for the American student, to build a fine super- 
structure on insufficient foundation; it is fatally 
easy to found a department with funds that 
are insufficient for its development. It has 
been suggested, for instance, that a course in 
music might be given to Bryn Mawr by some 
class that feels the lack of music there. Are 
the sponsors of this plan prepared to finance 
and support the practical developments and 
extensions of such a course that are bound to 
come in a few years? And what place would 
such course take in the curriculum? Would 
it become a major, or remain a free elective? 
These are questions to which we draw alumnae 
attention. Under the new plan of government 
all new courses and departments must of course 
be discussed by the Curriculum Committee of 
the faculty. Final action is taken by the 
faculty as a whole, subject to possible review 
by the Board of Directors. 

DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL RESEARCH 

Professor Kingsbury, in her report to the Aca- 
demic Committee, explained that the object of 
the school was to make social work a profession. 
This means that it must give scientific training 
in the principles as well as the methods and prac- 
tice of social work. Moreover, the students 
must receive mental discipline comparable to 
that supplied in other graduate schools. 

The course consists, as is usual in the gradua- 
ate departments, of lectures and seminaries. 
The general scheme of studies for the year in- 
cludes four groups: (1) Social maladjustments 
treating of dependents, delinquents and defec- 
tives; (2) Social and Civic education includ- 
ing neighborhood developments, such as civic 
and social centers, etc.; (3) Industrial welfare 



and betterment, and (4) Research and Investi- 
gation. 

Many of these topics of necessity concern 
abnormal phenomena — what might be called 
the pathology of the subject. Yet it should be 
clearly understood that the standpoint from 
which they are viewed is not that of allevia- 
tion but rather of prevention and cure. 

The work of the department differs from a 
purely academic course in that the students 
carry on their field work or praclicwn under 
the social agencies in Philadelphia. This is 
comparable to laboratory work in science: it 
gives an opportunity to study methods of treat- 
ment at first hand. The seminary which the 
student attends gives the educational theory 
underlying the work she is doing in the field. 
This part of the training is done under the 
joint direction of the institution in question and 
the department. One of the students this 
winter, for instance, is working in the Juvenile 
Court, others under the Organized Charities, 
Placement Bureau, Settlements, etc. 

The praclicwn is to be distinguished from the 
advanced social research and the investigations 
done independently but under the careful super- 
vision of the department by the candidates for 
the higher degrees. Thus, for example, one 
such student is acting as an investigator during 
the current half year for the Massachusetts 
Minimum Wage Commission and will be given 
credit for her work. 

There are at present ten graduate students 
in the department and seven undergraduates 
are taking postmajor courses. Three of the 
students are studying for their doctorates. 

Professor Kingsbury's great success in secur- 
ing the cooperation of the various agencies is 
proof that they appreciate the value of the 
school. Arrangements have lately been made 
with Miss Julia Lathrop, Chief of the Chil- 
dren's Bureau, to have one of the students 
carry on a special inquiry in cooperation with 
her Bureau. It is evident that public interest 
in the new undertaking has been aroused to a 
marked degree. For Bryn Mawr, of course, 
the establishment of a graduate school of this 
character is a departure with which some of the 
alumnae believing strongly in a cultural college 
may not be in entire sympathy. If the work 
is exclusively graduate, however, and if the 
technical character of the work in the school 
is not allowed to influence the nature of the 
undergraduate courses, there should be no dan- 
ger of encroaching on Bryn Mawr's standards. 



24 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



The College has undertaken to give training 
in a field more and more chosen by women 
as their profession. The Academic Committee 
believes that the alumnae should actively in- 
terest themselves in the development of the 
new school and that it should be given every 
opportunity to prove its value. 

STUDENTS' AFFAIRS 

SELF-GOVERNMENT 

The Academic Committee has to report a 
considerable disturbance this year over the 
question of the interpretation of Resolution XI, 
about social engagements with men of the 
faculty. The present Self-Government Board 
had interpreted the rule as meaning not only 
that calling in the halls was not allowed, but 
in one instance that married professors might 
not come to dinner in the halls or be invited 
with their wives to teas in students' studies. 
All sorts of difficulties arose, and there was 
much dissatisfaction in the Association. 

A meeting was finally called by the Executive 
Board of the Self-Government to consider a 
revision of these and other interpretations. 
Whereupon the Association voted to petition 
the Trustees of Bryn Mawr College to strike 
out of the Self-Government Regulations this 
Resolution. Another meeting was, however, 
promptly held, and the motion was rescinded. 
The Board then offered a motion passed by 38 
votes, that Resolution XI be amended to read: 
That students may have no social engage- 
ments with the faculty and staff, except as 
determined by a liberal interpretation of the 
Executive Board, subject to the approval of the 
Association sitting as a legislative body. 

If this is ratified, the interpretation as re- 
gards exceptions to the Resolution will be laid 
before the Self-Government Association after 
mid-year's. 

The Academic Committee wants to go on 
record as approving the most liberal interpreta- 
tion. We hesitate, from a height of years, to 
utter a word of criticism of our dearest Bryn 
Mawr institution — all the more because we 
understand that the President and Dean ap- 
prove of keeping the Resolution in some form 
— but we must in honesty state that to us 
and to many of our alumnae contemporaries 
who have urged us to take up the matter, this 
rule has seemed unwisely stringent. We can- 
not help feeling that a more normal considera- 
tion of the faculty as men, and not as a class 



apart, would do away with the very real evils 
that the Board is so valiantly trying to combat. 
We even dare to hope that before many years 
the Resolution may be rescinded, after all, and 
the chaperon rules altered if necessary to meet 
the situation. But meanwhile, we stand and 
urge the Association to stand for the "most 
liberal" interpretation. 

We wish to add that one step towards libera- 
tion has just been taken by President Thomas 
with the full approval of the Undergraduate 
Association and the Executive Board of the 
Self-Government Association. In the future 
men will be allowed to come to college plays 
and other entertainments if accompanied by 
a lady. 

CUTTING 

We understand that all regulation is now in 
the hands of the students. They have a rather 
elaborate system of reporting, organized by the 
Undergraduate Association, with the results of 
which the President, the Dean and the members 
of the faculty at our conference declared them- 
selves fully satisfied. 

ALUMNAE AFFAIRS 

FRESHMAN SCHOLARSHIPS 

This need, which has been persistently 
brought to the attention of the Academic Com- 
mittee, seems to us a matter which the alumnae 
ought to take up as soon as possible. It will 
be remembered that the Report for 1916 dealt 
with the subject. Bringing it forward again in 
the conference with the President and Dean 
this year, Pauline Goldmark asked whether the 
College could, as suggested last year, contribute 
part of the money if part were raised by the 
alumnae Clubs. The President replied, that 
this was opposed to the policy of the Directors, 
who had refused frequently to supplement 
scholarships, as the money of the College must 
be used for professors' salaries; and that the 
Shippen legacy, which she had thought might 
be used in this manner, was, owing to the word- 
ing of the legacy, not available. It was agreed 
that scholarships, to be awarded to freshmen 
to meet the expenses of their second semester 
on the basis of their first semester's work, would 
be very desirable. It was agreed further that 
scholarships, whenever possible, should cover 
more than tuition and, further, that $200 
should be considered the minimum scholarship. 
The Academic Committee took occasion to point 



1917] 



Annual Report of Alumnae Association 



25 



out again at the January meeting that the 
Branches of the Alumnae Association might be 
urged to provide local scholarships as Harvard 
and Yale do, thereby helping to keep up the 
supply of able students, who are not able to 
meet the expenses of the freshmen year. It 
was noted that the Chicago Club had twice 
contributed $100 towards a scholarship, and 
that Pittsburgh had once given a scholarship. 

VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE AND APPOINTMENT 
BUREAU 

The Academic Committee was, last spring, 
asked to consider the matter of Vocational 
Placement in the colleges, since it was felt that 
this work at Bryn Mawr was not as effective 
as it might be. Soon after this Miss Schenck 
became interested in the question as a part of 
her future work as Dean, and the Committee 
has since that time worked in cooperation with 
her. The chairman, Gertrude Hartman, has 
had conferences with Dean Schenck in which 
her plans for the reorganization of the Appoint- 
ment Bureau and of Vocational Guidance at 
Bryn Mawr have been discussed: with Prof. 
Marion Smith, on the work done at Bryn Mawr 
in the past along the lines of vocational guid- 
ance; and with Miss Florence Jackson on her 
vocational guidance work in the various col- 
leges. As Gertrude Hartman was unable to 
attend the final meetings at Bryn Mawr, Ellen 
Ellis wrote and delivered the Report. 

One especial weakness in the system as it 
had existed at Bryn Mawr in the past seemed 
to have been in the fact that there had been no 
follow-up system there — that the professional 
records of the alumnae had not been kept and 
that alumnae already in positions had not in 
general been approached for other positions. 
Dean Schenck has told us that she began her 
active work during the summer, by visiting 
and investigating the various college bureaus, 
and that in the early autumn the reports from 
them were classified by a student in the Carola 
Woerishoffer School of Social Research. These 
reports covered the main points that the Com- 
mittee had intended to investigate; but at the 
suggestion of Dean Schenck and as supplemen- 
tary to her work, it procured information from 
the colleges on the two following subjects: 

The methods of vocational guidance for 
undergraduates; alumnae participation in the 
work of the Appointment Bureaus, and of 
Vocational Guidance. 



Reports were received from Barnard, Mount 
Holyoke, Radcliffe, Smith, Vassar and Wellesley. 

With regard to vocational guidance for under- 
graduates, the investigation showed that voca- 
tional guidance has become a very definite part 
of the work of the Appointment Bureaus in the 
colleges. In three out of the six colleges inves- 
tigated (Mount Holyoke, Smith, and Wellesley, 
as well as in a number of other colleges not 
here mentioned) Miss Florence Jackson, Direc- 
tor of the Woman's Educational and Industrial 
Union Appointment Bureau, gives lectures on 
vocational opportunities several times each 
year, and holds conferences with individual 
students At these colleges the conferences are 
eagerly sought by the students. At RadclifTe 
this was tried also, but it was felt to be too 
expensive and not sufficiently in demand and 
was therefore discontinued. 

In some colleges there are also other lecturers 
from outside, usually either representatives of 
the Intercollegiate Bureau of Occupations, or 
women who have been successful along particu- 
lar lines of work and are therefore especially 
qualified to give information and advice. 

In two of the colleges (Barnard and Mount 
Holyoke) the Dean gives special talks to the 
various classes, urging them to plan their 
courses with some reference to the line of work 
that they intend to follow, and giving them 
information about the work of the Appoint- 
ment Bureau and the securing of positions in 
general. 

There is also within the colleges, an increas- 
ing amount of conference between the students 
and the various individuals, and bureaus that 
have the appointment work in charge, as well 
as with the departments of the college that are 
in touch with openings in occupations other 
than teaching. This has been an important 
phase of the work in recent years at Bryn 
Mawr. 

Closely connected with the matter of Voca- 
tional Guidance for Undergraduates, is that of 
alumnae participation in the work of the Ap- 
pointment Bureaus. The alumnae have in 
most of the colleges been interested in the vo- 
cational guidance of the undergraduates. At 
Smith there is every year the Alumnae Rally, 
one feature of which is the addresses by five 
or six alumnae recognized in their respective 
fields, on special points of interest connected 
with their particular work. Such a Rally was 
held also at Mount Holyoke in February of 
this year. At Barnard the movement for an 



26 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



Appointment Bureau started among the alum- 
nae, and the alumnae still give assistance in 
arranging for lectures on vocational subjects 
and in bringing such information to the stu- 
dent body in other ways. It is felt, however, 
at Barnard that the situation of the college, 
in close touch with the many opportunities 
afforded in New York City, makes vocational 
guidance in this college a less imperative need 
than it is in other places. At Radcliffe appar- 
ently all the appointment work, and the voca- 
tional guidance for positions other than teach- 
ing have so far been very largely, if not entirely, 
under the auspices of the Radcliffe Union 
(consisting of former special students, and alum- 
nae) and of the Alumnae Association. 

With other phases of the work of the Appoint- 
ment Bureaus the alumnae have a varying con- 
nection. This can perhaps best be considered 
from the point of view of what the Appointment 
Bureaus do for the alumnae; and from the 
point of view of what the alumnae do for 
the Appointment Bureaus. 

The first touches upon the matter of follow-up 
work. Most of the colleges keep in as close 
touch as possible with their alumnae who hold 
positions, with a view to finding better openings 
for them whenever possible. At Barnard last 
year (1916) out of two hundred and forty-seven 
positions filled, one hundred and thirty-six were 
filled with alumnae, and one hundred and 
eleven with undergraduates. Mount Holyoke, 
Radcliffe, Vassar and Wellesley try to keep 
track of their alumnae and their desires, and 
to recommend them for positions where it seems 
advantageous. For the sake of the college as 
well as of the alumnae this would seem to be 
a most important part of the work of the 
Appointment Bureau, since in this way the 
alumnae are enabled to secure, and the college 
in a sense to control the better positions along 
all lines educational and other. 

The second question, that of what the alum- 
nae do for the Appointment Bureaus, includes 
the matter of general interest and assistance, 
and that of financial support. In connection 
with the placement work, the alumnae of Mount 
Holyoke and Radcliffe are asked to notify the 
Bureau at the college with regard to vacant 
positions of which they know, and at Barnard 
the alumnae committee appointed for that 
purpose, assists in sending out circulars to em- 
ployers, etc. 

With regard to financial support, it has been 
found that in general the work of the Appoint- 



ment Bureaus is supported very largely if not 
entirely by the colleges, and by small fees 
asked of those who register. At Wellesley 
although the Alumnae Association at first sup- 
ported the vocational guidance work, the en- 
tire work of the Appointment Bureau, including 
vocational guidance, is this year being carried 
on by the college. At Radcliffe the Radcliffe 
Union and the Alumnae Association apparently 
support that part of the work that has to do 
with occupations other than teaching — (teach- 
ing positions are here filled by the Dean's 
office) — but this is considered only a temporary 
measure until the college shall assume charge. 
At Barnard also, where the work started among 
the alumnae, the college has taken it over and 
the alumnae now pay only for printing the 
circulars sent to employers and for the postage 
on these circulars. 

The following colleges charge no fees or 
registration, or for the placing of candidates: 
Barnard, Radcliffe and Vassar. Mount Hol- 
yoke charges one dollar at registration, a pay- 
ment never renewed, and one which the col- 
lege would be glad to abolish. Smith College 
charges one dollar at registration, and so far 
this payment has been renewed annually as 
long as the registration stood, but a change is 
now contemplated whereby it shall be made 
only at registration. Beyond this no financial 
support is received from the alumnae of the 
various colleges — and the colleges seem increas- 
ingly to consider the guidance of undergradu- 
ates and the placing of seniors and alumnae as 
a necessary and natural part of the work of the 
college. 

Two further points came out with especial 
clearness in the course of this investigation: 
that in all the colleges this work is only in proc- 
ess of organization and has in no way been 
brought to any sort of final form; that the 
various colleges wish to work in close associa- 
tion with the Intercollegiate Bureau and with 
accredited agencies, and encourage their can- 
didates not to register only with the college 
Bureau. 

After presenting its report the Academic 
Committee heard a very interesting report from 
Dean Schenck as to her plans for the Bureau. 
She first presented a plan for coSperation be- 
tween the Appointment Bureau and the Inter- 
collegiate Bureaus in the various cities, and 
submitted a notice, which she had drawn up 
with the Advisory Committee of the Bryn Mawr 
faculty, to be sent out to members of the Alum- 



1917] 



Annual Report of Alumnae Association 



27 



nae Association who are in paid positions, to a 
prepared list of schools, and to various institu- 
tions doing social service. She also submitted 
new registration blanks and a follow-up letter 
that she proposed to send out. Dean Schenck 
reported to the Committee that the faculty had 
voted to cooperate with the Appointment Bu- 
reau and that the professors had expressed 
themselves as willing to see employers whenever 
it was thought necessary by the Appointment 
Bureau. Dean Schenck recommended that the 
alumnae authorize the appointment of an ad- 
visory committee in each geographical district, 
those districts to be determined later, to coop- 
erate with the Appointment Bureau in getting 
information in regard to positions open to Bryn 
Mawr women in that district, and to advise 
alumnae who wish positions in that district. 
She further mentioned that the information 
that could be obtained through such alumnae 
in regard to schools in certain districts would 
be valuable to the Bureau and to the work of 
the College. 

The Academic Committee recommended to 
the Alumnae Association that a vocational rally 
be held at Easter where groups of alumnae 
should be invited to come and tell their voca- 
tional experiences, conferring with the students 
afterward. The Academic Committee further 
recommended that the Bureau, as outlined by 
Dean Schenck, be supported by the College 
rather than by fees. It appeared that $1000 
would be necessary to run the Bureau satis- 
factorily. The Academic Committee preferred 
to express no opinion as to the relative impor- 
tance of an Appointment Bureau versus other 
college needs but it was of the opinion that if 
the College undertook to maintain such a 
Bureau it should be done so as to be a credit to 
Bryn Mawr. 

Nothing has been said in this report of the 
reorganization of the College under the new 
plan of government though that has been the 
great hope and interest of the Academic Com- 



mittee during this last stormy year. The new 
constitution was printed in the Quarterly for 
July, 1916 and it has been further discussed 
and explained in the present Quarterly in the 
report of the Alumnae Directors. The position 
of the Academic Committee was intended 
throughout to be one of "benevolent neutral- 
ity" and stable equilibrium, but the tides of 
opposing opinion ran high and sometimes 
threatened to swamp us. We had several 
times occasion to point out to groups of special 
pleaders that we had neither authority nor 
competence to pass on special cases. We were, 
and are, in no sense a judicial body. All we 
could do during the re-organization of the Col- 
lege was to welcome information and confidence, 
to keep as closely as possible in touch with all 
groups, and to urge the democratic changes in 
which we heartily believed. We want to thank 
the alumnae officially, for their fine response to 
the difficulties of the situation, for realising that 
however mistaken our action or our attitude 
appeared to them, these were taken in a sincere 
concern for what we felt to be the best interests 
of the College. 

What we wish in the future is to make it 
our function to help all alumnae criticism to be 
constructive, for this is an age of construction 
and high opportunity at Bryn Mawr. The 
responsibility of the Bryn Mawr alumnae to 
their College, in the next few years can scarcely 
be exaggerated. It is they who must chiefly 
interpret the aims and achievements of the 
College to the outside world; and they have, 
therefore, we believe, an inherent interest in 
the academic policies of the College. So in con- 
clusion we beg the alumnae to make the Aca- 
demic Committee a real clearing-house of opin- 
ion; to give us their advice and cooperation 
that we may not be spokes in the wheels of 
progress. 

Elizabeth Shepley Sergeant, 
Chairman. 



REPORT OF THE COUNCILLOR TO THE A. C. A. 



The Council of the A. C. A. met in Chicago 
last Easter. I was unfortunately not able to 
be there. From the reports however the meet- 
ing was very interesting. The most important 
action taken was the definite adoption of a 
list of institutions eligible under certain condi- 
tions to recognition in the Association. Four 
years ago the Association adopted the govern- 



ment list of colleges and universities in Class I. 
Owing to the change in administration this list 
was never officially published, so it became im- 
possible to use it. Dr. Babcock, who was re- 
sponsible for drawing up the government list 
has left <£e service and is now Chairman of the 
Committee of the Association of American 
Universities which has in charge the drawing 



28 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



up of a list of colleges and universities whose 
graduates may be recommended to foreign 
universities for graduate study. The Associa- 
tion of Collegiate Alumnae has now accepted 
this list as its standard in academic work and 
equipment and will admit to membership the 
graduates in Arts and Sciences of any college or 
university in the list provided the institution 
meets the requirements of the Association in 
regard to the recognition of women and proper 
provision for students. Under this new require- 
ment between ten and fifteen institutions will 
probably be added to the list of the Association 
this year. 

A number of new Branches have been organ- 
ized and a great deal of local work is being done. 
The local committees on Volunteer Service have 
been organized in the different Branches and 
are cooperating with the Bureaus of Occupation 
in different centres. The Journal of the Asso- 
ciation, which is sent to every regular member, 
is this year printing the monthly news bulletin 
of the Bureaus. In this way we hope to keep 
a large body of college women constantly in 
touch with the opportunities in both paid and 
volunteer service throughout the country. 

For the regular triennial meeting which will 
be held in Washington this year a number of 
interesting conferences have been organized — a 
conference of women trustees, of deans, of 



women college professors, of heads of prepara- 
tory schools, and of representatives of alumnae 
associations. When the new constitution was 
adopted the provision for the representation of 
alumnae associations was adopted for five years. 
The question of including this form of member- 
ship in the Association permanently will be 
discussed at the meeting this spring. I think 
undoubtedly that the Association will continue 
the membership. It will then be a matter for 
the Bryn Mawr Alumnae Association to discuss 
next year whether it wishes to continue this 
membership. It seems to me a very desirable 
form of membership because it puts behind the 
Association of Collegiate Alumnae a large body 
of college women. It also keeps the allied 
associations informed of the work of a body of 
college women actively engaged in the interests 
of college graduates. We hope also that it 
will have an effect in bringing together the 
numerous and largely unorganized women 
graduates of the big co-educational colleges and 
universities. And through them we hope to 
obtain a greater recognition of women on the 
boards and faculties of these institutions and an 
improvement in the salaried opportunities for 
women who have shown marked ability for 
research and advanced work. 
Respectfully submitted, 

Marion Rellly. 



REPORT OF THE JAMES E. RHOADS SCHOLARSHIPS COMMITTEE 



The twentieth annual meeting of the James 
E. Rhoads Scholarships Committee was held 
in the President's office on Wednesday, April 
12, 1916. There were present on behalf of the 
faculty, Professor Theodore de Laguna, Pro- 
fessor Fenwick and President Thomas, ex- 
officio. On behalf of the Alumnae Association, 
Julia Cope Collins and Marion Parris Smith, 
Chairman. 

The chairman reported that seven sopho- 
mores had applied for the Junior Scholarship 
and ten freshmen for the Sophomore Scholar- 
ship. After careful consideration of the merits 
and needs of the applicants, Jessie Mebane of 
Wilkes Barre, Pa., grade 82.876, was nominated 
for the Junior Scholarship and Helen Prescott 
of Jamaica Plains, Mass., grade 79.600, was 
nominated for the Sophomore Scholarship. 

The chairman then announced that she had 
been given $420 by the Class of 1912, as a 
special Reunion gift, to be dispensed during 
the year 1916-1917, by the Committee in any 
sums it saw fit, to help students meet their 



college expenses. After discussion, it was de- 
cided to make special "1912 Reunion Grants" 
to A. E. Lubar of the Class of 1918 and to E. 
M. Howes, M. A. Lubar and A. A. Reilly of 
the Class of 1919. 

A special meeting of the alumnae members 
of the Committee was called at the request of 
President Thomas on October 2, 1916, to con- 
sider a request from Miss Jessie Mebane, 
James E. Rhoads Junior Scholar, 1916-17. 
Miss Mebane had been ill all summer and had 
undergone in September a serious operation. 
She was forbidden by her doctor to return to 
college for a year, but had every reason to 
believe that after a year's rest, her health would 
be completely restored. After considering the 
details of the case, the Committee voted to 
postpone Miss Mebane's scholarship, until the 
year 1917-18, but it was resolved that the 
action should not be taken as a precedent. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Marion Parris Smith, 

Chairman. 



1917] 



Annual Report of Alumnae Association 



29 



REPORT OF THE CONFERENCE COMMITTEE 



A meeting of the Conference Committee was 
held the afternoon of November 27, 1916, just 
before Thanksgiving vacation, in the room of 
A. Dorothy Shipley, president of the Under- 
graduate Association. 

There were present, for the alumnae: Anna 
Scattergood Hoag, '96, Marion E. Park, '98, 
Katharine W. McCollin, '15, Leah T. Cadbury, 
'14, Chairman; for the graduates: Miss Jones; 
for the undergraduates: Constance Hall, '17, 
Katherine Holliday, '18, M. Ewen, '19, M. 
Hutchinson, '20, A. Dorothy Shipley, president 
of the Undergraduate Association. 

The Committee first discussed subjects of 
interest to all the associations, and then re- 
ceived informal reports of the activities of the 
different college organizations. 

One member of the Committee reported that 
the undergraduates were criticized by Main 
Line citizens because they monopolized the 
sidewalks and loudly discussed intimate college 
matters on the train. Nor were the alumnae 
exempt from the same criticism. The Commit- 
tee suggest that the members of each associa- 
tion be encouraged to practice self-restraint in 
public places. Furthermore, the alumnae espe- 
cially should exercise judicious care in criticiz- 
ing the College before outsiders. 

There was much interesting debate on ques- 
tions concerning Self -Government. The alum- 
nae asked if there was a strong feeling for Self- 
Government among the students, and if the 
Association was fulfilling its proper function. 
The Committee realized that there is difficulty 
in judging the spirit of Self-Government at any 
one time for usually "there is no special atti- 
tude toward Self-Government until some defi- 
nite crisis demands a definite point of view." 
Whenever this situation does arise, however, the 
students give staunch support to the spirit of 
the Self-Government constitution. 

Question was raised regarding an announce- 
ment in the College News that alumnae visiting 
in the halls are under Self-Government rules. 



Constance Hall, a member of the Board, ex- 
plained that the Association had no jurisdiction 
over the alumnae. The College Administration 
had adopted the same rules of conduct for 
visiting alumnae. 

Dorothy Shipley gave an interesting report 
in regard to cutting. The average, at the time 
of the meeting, was two cuts per student, a 
better average than that of last year. Each 
student has a card which she gives to the hall 
representative of her class every wo weeks, 
with all cuts registered. The representatives 
thus have a report to make to the Undergradu- 
ate Board every fortnight. 

The undergraduates expressed a wish that 
cuts necessitated by death, illness in the family, 
and other inevitable interruptions to academic 
work, should be excused. 

The Music Committee of the Undergraduate 
Association is working this year for the endow- 
ment fund. Unfortunately it suffered rather a 
large loss at the first concert. 

There was nothing of special significance to 
report from the Christian Association. 

The Alumnae-Varsity hockey match was a 
very good game. The alumnae were very much 
impressed with the improved quality of hockey 
which Varsity showed. After the game the 
alumnae were lavishly feasted and cheered at 
the Tea-House. One veteran remarked, "It's 
fine to be treated like a human being." 

After a very pleasant meeting the Committee 
adjourned. To calm the fears of any pessi- 
mists among the alumnae, their representatives 
on the Committee wish to report that in their 
judgment the interests of Bryn Mawr are still safe 
in the hands of the undergraduates. It is the 
sincere desire of the whole Committee that 
alumnae, graduates, and undergraduates may 
continue to cooperate ever more disinterestedly 
for the best welfare of Bryn Mawr. 

Leah T. Cadbury, 

Chairman. 



30 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



REPORT OF THE LOAN FUND COMMITTEE 

The Loan Fund Committee reports loans Receipts 

made to eighteen students, amounting to $2685. 

Fourteen alumnae holding loans have made Balance January 1, 1916.' $511.10 

payments amounting to $1375. The unusually Donations: 

large number of loans asked for taxed the Fund Class of 1913. ... $6.00 

to its utmost capacity. At the time payment Class of 1915. ... 30.00 

of loans was required, the treasurer reported Miss Doris Earle . 100.00 

$300 less on hand than the amount authorized Simpson Fund. . . 614.46 

by the Committee; to meet this demand three $750.46 

members of the Committee advanced each Repayments of loans by 

$100. These temporary loans have, during students 1675.00 

the year, been returned from payments made, Interest on loans 82.15 

but the balance left on hand is only $40.62. Interest on deposits 6.91 

The total Loan Fund now stands at $10,583.- 

62. Much of this money has been loaned and __ '. 

repaid many times over. The Loan Fund prof- $3025 . 62 

ited during 1916 by having $614.46, unused or 

unappropriated funds from the Simpson Scholar- Disbursements 

ship, turned into its treasury. 

The Loan Fund continues to be increasingly Lo f ns to students (18 > • • • ■ $2985 .00 

needed, enabling desirable undergraduates to Balance December 31, 1916 40^62 

continue their work, and must be added to each $3025.62 

year by gifts from interested alumnae if it is 

to fill an adequate place in the College. The Martha G. Thomas, 

financial statement for the year follows: Secretary. 

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE 



The work of the Finance Committee for the 
past year has been to carry out the directions 
of the meeting in February, 1916, in promoting 
the efforts of the alumnae to complete the 
Mary E. Garrett Memorial Endowment by 
June, 1917. 

The results so far are most encouraging, and 
the Committee believes that if the alumnae all 
work together for the next four months success 
is in sight. 

The Committee sent out the usual class re- 
ports, and with them a special circular for dis- 
tribution by class collectors. This circular 
mentioned $3000 as the amount which should 
if possible be raised by each class, and we are 
glad to find that many classes are aiming to 
get this amount, while some have already ex- 
ceeded it. 

The total of regular class collections for the 
year 1916 was $14,812.38. The largest amount 
from one class was the re-union gift of 1906 — 
of $5945. The Class of '91 divided its twenty- 
fifth re-union gifts between the Endowment 
Fund and the Fire Protection Study of the first 
four classes. It counts as one of its greatest 



contributions the twenty-five years of service 
given to the Alumnae Association by Jane B. 
Haines as Treasurer. 

1901's re-union gift is to be a portrait of 
Marion Reilly painted by Miss Beaux. 1912's 
re-union gift was a grant of $420 to be spent by 
the James E. Rhoads Scholarships Committee. 

Many classes are making special efforts of 
various kinds. Several of the large classes have 
divided themselves into local groups which are 
working either in making direct collections or 
in getting up plays, concerts, sales, and other 
entertainments. 

The Boston Club is the only Club which, so 
far, has done anything definite for the fund. 
It gave a concert in December, most successful 
in both its artistic and advertising aspects, and 
realized $1200. 

The undergraduates are continuing their 
work for their $10,000 with unabated energy. 
Details of their efforts as well as of the methods 
of various classes will be found in the January 
Quarterly, . which the Finance Committee has 
tried to make an "Endowment Fund number." 
In it also appear the article on Miss Garrett's 



1917] 



Annual Report of Alumnae Association 



31 



gifts to the College, which the collectors have 
been asking for all year, a short summary of 
the alumnae's gifts to the Endowment in the 
past, and a computation of the cost to the 
Co.' lege of educating each student. The Fi- 
nance Committee has called the class collectors 
together four times in the past year — in April, 
on Commencement day, in November, and at 
the usual luncheon in January. It expects to 



meet on the first Friday of every month until 
June and will ask for frequent reports during 
that time. Its members will be glad to go to 
meetings of any Branch, Club, or local group 
to talk about the fund. 

[Signed] For the Committee 

Martha G. Thomas, Chairman, 
Elizabeth B. Kirkbride, Secretary. 



REPORT OF THF: COMMITTEE ON ATHLETICS 



The first event of 1916 for the alumnae re- 
sulted in a disappointment. The water polo 
team arrived to find that the pool had been 
emptied so that the game had to be canceled. 
Instead there was an informal basket-ball game 
with a score of 29-27 in favor of the Varsity. 
Fencing also did not materialize as the under- 
graduates could not get a team. 

Commencement week athletics were very 
good and well supported — especial praise being 
due to 1913 who played with a spirit that won 
the ' hearts of the Committee. The Alumnae- 
Varsity tennis match was won by the alumnae 
for the first time in several years — and will have 
first place on the cup presented to the Athletic 
Association for this match. The team was: 
K. Page Loring, '13; Alice Miller, '14; and M. 
Dessau, '13 — the score, 2-1. 

The basket ball match resulted in a victory 
for the Varsity, but the score of 13-10 shows 
the closeness of the contest — for a good part 
of the game the alumnae were ahead. The 



team was as follows: A. Miller, '14, E. White, 
'06, H. Carey, '14, K. Page Loring, '13, M. 
Dessau, '13, M. Nearing, '09, C. Wesson, '09. 

The alumnae tennis tournament was finished 
also for the first time in years. The winner 
was A. Miller, '14. 

On Wednesday, November 8, the alumnae — 
managed by E. White, '06 — played the Varsity 
in hockey. The game was more evenly played 
than the score of 4-0 seems to indicate. But 
considering the championship nature of the 
Varsity this year, even the score was nothing 
to be ashamed of. 

The team consisted of: H. Kirk, '14, M. 
Nearing, '09, L. Cox Harmon, '14, B. Ehlers, 
'09, E. White, '06, E. Bontecou, '13, M. Kirk, 
'10, E. Brakeley, '16, R. Bixler, '14, A. Hawkins, 
'07, L. Cadbury, '14. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Cynthia Wesson, 

Chairman. 



TREASURER'S REPORT 



December 31, 1916 
BALANCE SHEET 

assets 
Endowment fund assets: 

Investments at Cost: 

1000 Balto. & Ohio 4£% Eq. Tr. 1919 $976.71 

2500 Balto. & Ohio R. R. prior Lien Z\% 1925 2,317 . 50 

5000 Bryn Mawr College Inn Ass'n. 5's 1946 5,000.00 

1000 Central Dist. Tel. Co. 5's 1943 920.00 

2000 Chic, Mil. & St. Paul 4's 1925 1,880.00 

5000 Chicago Railways Co. 1st 5's 1927 5,018.75 

5000 Colorado Springs El. Co. 1st 5's 1920 4,950.00 

1000 Erie R. R. Eq. 5's Series "U" 1920 984.50 

4000 Lansing Fuel & Gas Co. Cons. 5's 1921 3,910.00 

2000 Lake Shore & Mich. So. Ry. 4's 1931 ,, 1,900.00 

2000 New York Central & Hudson River R. R. Deb. 4's 

1934 1,802.50 



32 The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly [April 

1000 Phila. R. T. Co. Eq. Tr. 5's 1923 $992.40 

1000 Phila. Suburban Gas & Elec. Co. 1st Mtge. & Ref. 5's 

1960 1,000.00 

5000 Portland Ry. Co. 1st Ref. 5's 1930 5,000.00 

2000 Schuylkill River East Side R. R. Co. 1st Mtge. 4's 

1925 1,975.00 

1000 Southern Pacific Equipment 4£'s 1920 973.32 

$39,600.68 

Subscriptions 2,333 . 50 

Cash Uninvested 9,770.94 

$51,705.12 

Loan Fund Assets: 

Loans to Students $10,543 . 00 

Cash 40.62 

10,583.62 

Alumnae Fund Assets: 

Investments at Cost: 

37 Shares Lehigh Coal & Navi. Co. Stock $3,113.48 

Cash 2,044.62 

5,158.10 

Dr. J. E. Rhoads Scholarships Fund— Cash 221 .50 

General Fund Assets: 

Cash 21.39 

Total $67,689.73 

LIABILITIES 

Endowment Fund: 

Balance January 1, 1916 $35,203.44 

Contributions and Subscriptions during year 16,501 .68 

$51,705.12 

Loan Fund: 

Balance January 1, 1916 $9,744. 10 

Donations and Interest received during year 839 . 52 

10,583.62 

Alumnae Fund: 

Principal Balance January 1, 1916 $3,374.86 

Life memberships received during year 150.00 

$3,524.86 

Interest Balance January 1, 1916 $1,418.57 

Accretions during year 214 . 67 

1,633.24 

5,158.10 

Dr. J. E. Rhoads Scholarships Fund 221 . 50 

Accumulated Fund for general purposes 21 .39 

Total $67,689.73 

RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS FROM JANUARY 1, 1916, to DECEMBER 31, 1916. 

GENERAL TREASURY 

Receipts 

Balance January 1, 1916 $207 . 76 

Dues $1,955.37 

Interest on deposits 13 . 72 

Alumnae Supper 25 . 75 

Total receipts 1,994.84 

Total $2,202.60 



1917] Annual Report of Alumnae Association S3 

Disbursements 

Dues Associated Collegiate Alumnae $130. 00 

Miscellaneous Expenses 52 .80 

Typewriting and Clerical Services 164. 12 

Printing 95.30 

Postage and Stationery 149 . 53 

Traveling Expenses 70 . 09 

Expenses of Academic Committee 383 . 88 

Quarterly Account 1,043 . 47 

Endowment Fund Expenses 92.02 

Total Disbursements , . $2,181 .21 

Balance December 31, 1916: 21.39 

Total $2,202.60 

LOAN FUND 
Receipts 

Balance January 1, 1916 $511 . 10 

Donations $750.46 

Repayment of loans by students 1,675 .00 

Interest on loans 82 . 15 

Interest on deposits 6.91 

Total Receipts 2,514.52 

Total $3,025.62 

Disbursements 

Loans to Students $2,985.00 

Balance December 31, 1916 40.62 

Total $3,025.62 

ALUMNAE FUND 
Receipts 

Balance January 1, 1916 $1,679.95 

Life Memberships $150 . 00 

Interest on Deposits 66 . 67 

Income from Investments 148 .00 

Total Receipts 364.67 

Total. $2,044.62 

Balance December 31, 1916 $2,044.62 

ENDOWMENT FUND 

Receipts 

Balance January 1, 1916 $7,222.76 

Donations $9,861 .30 

Subscriptions Paid 1 . 50 

Interest on Deposits 145.35 

Interest on Investments 1,572 . 50 

Investment sold: and profit on same 950.00 

Total Receipts \, 12,530.65 

Total $19,753.41 



34 The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly [April 

Disbursements 

Accrued interest and commission on bonds purchased 107.47 

Investments: 

2000 Lake Shore & Mich. So. Ry. 25 yr. Gold Bonds, 

due 1931 $1,900.00 

2000 Schuylkill River East Side R. R. Co. 4% 1st 

Mtge. 1925 1,975 .00 

1000 B. & O. R. R. prior lien l\% Gold Bond, due 

1925 930.00 

1500 B. & O. R. R. prior lien 3|% Gold Bonds, due 

1925 1,387.50 

2000 Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul 4%, due 1925 . . . 1,880.00 
2000 New York Central & Hudson River Deb. 4's, 

due 1934 1,802.50 9,875.00 

Total disbursements 9,982 .47 

Balance December 31, 1916 9,770.94 

Total $19,753.41 

"QUARTERLY" ACCOUNT FOR YEAR 1916 

Receipts 

Subscriptions and Sales $50.50 

Assessments 1 . 00 

Advertising 105 .00 

Refund for alteration in article 10.00 

Total Receipts 166.50 

Balance transferred to General Treasury Acct 1,043.47 

Total $1,209.97 

Disbursements 

Printing (5 numbers) $824.07 

Salaries 322 .50 

Sundries, postage, stationery, etc 63.40 

Total disbursements, $1,209.97 



We have audited the accounts of 

TEE ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

for the year ending December 31, 1916, and have inspected the Endowment Fund securities and 
verified the cash on hand at the close of the year, and we certify that the annexed Balance Sheet 
and relative accounts are properly drawn up so as to exhibit a correct view of the financial position 
of the Association at December 31, 1916, and of the operations for the year ending on that date. 

Price, Waterhouse & Company, 

Certified Public Accountants 



1917] 



Annual Report of Alumnae Association 



35 



REPORT OF THE CAROLA WOERISHOFFER MEMORIAL 
FUND COMMITTEE 



Two years ago your Association voted that 
the income accruing from the Carola Woeris- 
hoffer Memorial Fund was to be expended, in 
accordance with the original purpose of the 
fund, in some work of social welfare or reform 
connected with New York City, and that plans 
for this expenditure were to be devised by your 
Committee. 

The first $50 of the income was used, as you 
know, as a scholarship for Miss Dorothy Wes- 
ton who was working at the New York College 
Settlement. The sum now in our hands (the 
income of the last two years) is $200, and this 
also we intend to use as a contribution towards 
a scholarship, but the scholarship is one of a 
peculiar kind. It is not for a college graduate, 
or even for a college student. It is a scholar- 
ship to enable a New York working girl who 
has already shown ability and promise as a 
leader among her fellows, to obtain a year's 
special training at the school recently estab- 
lished in Chicago by the National Women's 
Trade Union League. The school is called the 
Training School for Active Workers in the 
Labor Movement, and its object is to secure 
for the coming generation of American working 
women more effective, better educated, more 
sane and intelligent leaders than they would 
otherwise have. The real guides of the labor 
movement, both as regards general purposes 
and as regards immediate conduct, will always 
come from the ranks of labor itself; and to in- 
crease, even by a little, the probability of their 
guidance being a wise guidance seems to us an 
object of great importance. The Training 
School is still in an experimental stage, but it 



gives promise of very satisfactory results iri 
this direction, and seems to us most worthy of 
support. 

Each student at the school is given individual 
training and instruction according to her needs, 
generally in such subjects as English, economics, 
public speaking, the history of trade unionism, 
methods of arbitration, laws affecting working 
women, etc. Four months of the year are 
spent in such study, and eight months in active 
field work under the direction of the leading 
trade union women organizers in New York, 
Chicago, and Boston. The year's scholarship 
is of the value of $735, and since we have so 
far only $200, we are simply holding that 
amount for the present, with the intention of 
contributing it towards a scholarship when the 
rest of the money shall be raised by other 
means. It is possible that we shall add the 
coming year's income of $100. 

I might mention that besides $2000 invested 
at 5 per cent, we have $373.57 deposited in a 
national bank. We hope very much that by the 
end of the year this deposit will have been so 
enlarged by further contributions that we shall 
have a third thousand dollars for investment. 
The younger alumnae, who have not been ap- 
pealed to by letter, are particularly requested 
to subscribe. Checks should be drawn payable 
to Bertha Rembaugh, Trustee, and sent to 
Miss Rembaugh at No. 165 Broadway, New 
York City. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Margaret Franklin, 

Chairman. 



QUARTERLY REPORT 



•The April, July, and November numbers of 
the 1916 Quarterly appeared in their due 
order and the January, 1917, number will prob- 
ably be out by the time of the annual meeting. 

It is gratifying to be able to report a steadily, 
even though slowly, increasing interest on the 
part of the alumnae in sending information to 
the Quarterly. The younger alumnae, how- 
ever, are much better in this respect than the 
members of the earlier classes. If each member 
of the Association would send directly to the 
Quarterly a report of her engagement, mar- 



riage, the birth of a child, book published, maga- 
zine article or poem appearing, of social, civic, 
or other activities, it would be possible for each 
number of the Quarterly to give a timely, 
classified list of all such happenings. Too 
many items of interest still come in by chance 
or do not come at all, and our news columns 
often look rather empty beside those of other 
alumnae publications. 

So, tocv in the matter of class secretaries. 
The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly is the 
only one among the quarterlies of the women's 



36 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



colleges that cannot present an unbroken list 
of class secretaries. Does that indicate that 
Bryn Mawr's alumnae are lacking in interest 
in one another and in their alma mater? 



The present number of paid-up subscriptions, 
outside of the Association, is 32. 
Respectfully submitted, 

Elva Lee, 
Editor. 



REPORT OF THE ALUMNAE SUPPER COMMITTEE 



The Alumnae Supper was held in Pembroke 
dining room on the evening of Commencement 
Day, June 1, 1916. 

A large number of alumnae were present, and 
were grouped as usual informally by classes, 
only the speakers and the guests of honor being 
seated at the table. 

Cornelia Halsey Kellogg, '00, as President of 
the Alumnae Association, introduced the toast- 
mistress, Marion Reilly, '01. 

The speakers were President Woolley of Mt. 



Holyoke College, Dr. Rufus Jones of the Board 
of Directors, Dr. James Leuba and Dr. Charles 
G. Fen wick of the faculty and Dr. Ida Ogilvie 
'96, Dr. Helen Sandison, '06 and Kate Cham- 
bers Seelye, '11 representing the reunion classes. 
Last, President Thomas spoke to the alumnae. 
The speeches are given in full in the Quar- 
terly for July, 1916. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Anna Scattergood Hoag, 

Chairman. 



REPORT OF THE PHILADELPHIA BRANCH 



The Philadelphia Branch of the Alumnae 
Association of Bryn Mawr College held its 
annual meeting December 9, 1916, at the Col- 
lege Club. 

The two subjects at present of greatest in- 
terest to all alumnae — the new plan of govern- 
ment at Bryn Mawr College and the Mary 
E. Garrett Memorial Fund, were freely dis- 
cussed. Dr. Wheeler gave a very interesting 
account of the work of the American Associa- 
tion of University Professors. 

The annual election of officers of this Branch 
was held with the following result: Chairman, 
Elizabeth C. Bent Clark, '95; Vice-Chairman, 
Julia Cope Collins, '89; Secretary-Treasurer, 



Agnes M. Irwin, '10; Members of the Executive 
Committee, Jacqueline Morris Evans, '08, 
Katharine W. McCollin, '15. 

The Philadelphia Branch sent its representa- 
tive to the conference held by the New York 
members of the Finance Committee in the first 
week in December. 

On February 17, 1917, the Philadelphia 
Branch gave a concert in Taylor Hall to the 
College and to friends of the College, at which 
Miss Marcia Van Dresser was the soloist. 
Respectfully submitted, 

Elizabeth Bent Clark, 

Chairman. 



REPORT OF THE BOSTON BRANCH 



There is no formal report to be made of the 
Boston Branch, which has not met, as such, 
this year. It has no organization or officers 
separate from the Bryn Mawr Club of Boston; 
the latter sends notices to all members of the 
Branch within reach whenever anything occurs 
of general interest. So, last year, when we 
gave our luncheon, to which we invited Miss 
Thomas, we admitted all alumnae within range 
and this year, when we held our concert for 
the benefit of the Endowment Fund, we sent 



notices to all and appealed to them for assist- 
ance and support. That concert occurred 
December 14, and made about $900 for the 
fund. 

We are trying to have a general Branch meet- 
ing a little later and, with Miss Sergeant's 
help, to learn something about the new con- 
stitution of Bryn Mawr. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Sylvia Lee, 
President. 



1917] 



Annual Report of Alumnae Association 



37 



BY-LAWS 



Article I 



Article IV 



MEMBERSHIP 

Section 1. Any person who has received the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts or of Doctor of Philosophy from Bryn 
Mawr College is entitled to full membership in the Alum- 
nae Association of Bryn Mawr College, and to all privi- 
leges pertaining to such membership. 

Sec. 2. Former students of the College who have not 
received degrees may become Associate Members of the 
Alumnae Association upon unanimous election by the 
Board of Directors. Applications for associate member- 
ship must be made to the Board of Directors at least two 
months before the annual meeting, and the names of the 
applicants elected by the Board of Directors must be pre- 
sented at this meeting. 

To be eligible for associate membership a former stu- 
dent must have pursued courses in the College for at least 
two consecutive semesters, and if a matriculated student, 
at least four academic years must have elapsed since the 
date of her entering the College. A return to the College 
for undergraduate work shall terminate an associate mem- 
bership, and render the student ineligible for re-election 
during the period of this new attendance at the College. 

Associate members are entitled to all the rights and 
privileges of full membership, except the power of voting 
and the right to hold office in the Board of Directors, or 
to serve on standing committees. 

Article II 

MEETINGS 

Section 1. There shall be each year one regular meet- 
ing of the Association. This meeting shall be held at 
Bryn Mawr College, on a date to be fixed annually by 
the Board of Directors, preferably the Saturday of the 
mid-year recess. 

Sec. 2. Two weeks before the annual meeting notices 
of the date and of the business to be brought before the 
meeting shall be sent to each member of the Alumnae 
Association. It it should be necessary to bring before the 
meeting business of which no previous notice could be 
given, action may be taken upon such business only by a 
two-thirds vote of the members present at the meeting. 

Sec. 3. Special meetings of the Association may be 
called at any time by the Corresponding Secretary at the 
request of the President, or of five members of the Associa- 
tion, provided that notice of the meeting and of all busi- 
ness to be brought before it be sent to each member of the 
Association two weeks in advance. 

Sec. 4. In cases demanding immediate action on mat- 
ters clearly not affecting the financial or general policy of 
the Association, special meetings may be called by the 
Corresponding Secretary with less than two weeks' notice 
at the request of the Board of Directors or of ten members 
of the Association. At special meetings called on less than 
two weeks' notice action may be taken only by a two- 
thirds vote of the members present. 

Sec. 5. Fifteen members of the Association shall consti- 
tute a quorum for the transaction of business. 

Article III 

MANAGEMENT 

Section 1. The Officers of the Association shall consti- 
tute a Board of Directors, to which shall be entrusted the 
management of the affairs of the Association in the interim 
of its meetings. 



DUES 

Section 1. The annual dues for each member of the 
Association shall be one dollar and fifty cents, payable to 
the Treasurer at the annual meeting. Associate members 
shall pay the same dues as full members of the Association, 
but shall be exempt from all assessments. 

Sec. 2. The dues for each member that enters the 
Association in June shall be seventy-five cents for the part 
year from June to the following February, payable to the 
Treasurer on graduation from the College. 

Sec. 3. Any member of the Association may become 
a life member of the Association upon payment at any 
time of thirty dollars; and upon such payment she shall 
become exempt from all annual dues and assessments. 

Sec. 4. The names of members who fail to pay the 
annual dues for four successive years shall be stricken from 
the membership list. The Board of Directors may at its 
discretion remit the dues of any member sub silcntio. 

Article V 

BRANCH ORGANIZATIONS 

Section 1. Any 25 or more members of the Bryn 
Mawr College Alumnae Association may form a local 
branch, the geographical limits to be submitted to the 
Board of Directors of the Alumnae Association and to be 
approved by the Board of Directors. 

Sec. 2. Any alumna or former student of Bryn Mawr 
College who is eligible to membership in the Bryn Mawr 
College Alumnae Association may be a member of a 
Branch Organization. 

Sec. 3. Every Branch Organization shall report to the 
Alumnae Association at the annual meeting. 

Article VI 



COMMITTEES 

Section 1. There shall be two Alumnae members of 
the Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College in accord- 
ance with the by-laws of the Trustees of Bryn Mawr 
College. 

Sec. 2. The Standing Committees of the Association 
shall be: an Academic Committee, consisting of seven 
members; a Conference Committee, consisting of four 
members; a Students' Loan Fund Committee, consisting 
of five members; a James E. Rhoads Scholarships Com- 
mittee, consisting of three members; a Nominating Com- 
mittee, consisting of five members; a Finance Committee, 
consisting of three members and the Treasurer ex officio; 
and a Committee on Athletics, consisting of five members. 

Article VII 

ELECTIONS AND APPOINTMENTS 

Section 1 Elections for Officers shall be held bien- 
nially and elections for members of the Academic Com- 
mittee annually, before the regular meeting, and the results 
of the elections shall be announced at that meeting; in 
every case the candidate receiving the greatest number of 
votes shall be declared elected. No ballot shall be valid 
that is not returned in a sealed envelope marked "Ballot." 

Sec. 2. The elections for the nomination of an Alum- 
nae Director shall be held every three years on the last 
Thursday in May. No ballot shall be valid that is not 
signed and returned in a sealed envelope marked "Ballot." 
The alumna receiving the highest number of votes shall 



38 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



be nominated to the Trustees for the office of Alumnae 
Director. At the first election in the year 1906, and at 
other elections when there is a vacancy to be filled, the 
alumna receiving the highest number of votes shall be 
nominated to the Trustees for the regular term of six years, 
and the alumna receiving the second highest number of 
votes for the term of three years. 

Sec. 3. The Officers of the Association shall be nomi- 
nated by the Nominating Committee, and elected by bal 
lot of the whole Association. They shall hold office for 
two years or until others are elected in their places. The 
Board of Directors shall have power to fill any vacancy 
in its own body for an unexpired term. 

Sec. 4. The members of the Academic Committee shall 
be nominated as follows: The Board of Directors shall 
make at least twice as many nominations as there are va- 
cancies in the Committee. Furthermore, any twenty-five 
alumnae may nominate one candidate for any vacancy in 
the Committee; provided that they sign the nomination 
and file it with the Recording Secretary by December 1, 
preceding the annual meetings. The members of the Aca- 
demic Committee shall be elected by a ballot of the whole 
Association and shall each hold office for four years or until 
others are elected in their places. The Board of Directors 
shall have power to fill any vacancy in the Committee, 
such appointment to hold until the next regular election. 

Sec. 5. (a) The Alumnae Directors shall be nominated 
as follows: The Board of Directors of the Alumnae Asso- 
ciation shall make at least three times as many nomina- 
tions as there are vacancies among the Alumnae Directors. 
It may at its discretion include in such nominations names 
proposed in writing by any 25 members of the Alumnae 
Association qualified to vote for Alumnae Directors. 

(b) Every Bachelor of Arts or Doctor of Philosophy of 
Bryn Mawr College shall be qualified to vote for Alumnae 
Directors, provided that at least five years shall have 
elapsed since the Bachelor's degree was conferred upon her, 
and provided that she shall have paid her dues up to and 
including the current year. 

(c) Every Bachelor of Arts or Doctor of Philosophy 
shall be eligible for the office of Alumnae Director, pro- 
vided that at least five years shall have elapsed since the 
Bachelor's degree was conferred upon her, and provided 
that she is not at the time of nomination or during her 
term of office a member or the wife of a member of the 
staff of Bryn Mawr College, nor a member of the staff of 
any other college. 

(d) An Alumnae Director shall serve for six years or 
so much thereof as she may continue to be eligible. When- 
ever a vacancy shall occur among the Alumnae Directors 
a nomination for such vacancy shall be made by the Board 
of Directors of the Alumnae Association to the Trustees. 
An Alumnae Director so nominated shall hold her office 
until her successor has been voted for at the next regular 
election for Alumnae Director and duly elected by the 
Trustees. 

(e) In case by reason of a tie it should be uncertain 
which alumna has received the nomination of the Alumnae 
Association for Alumnae Director, the Board of Directors 
of the Alumnae Associatien shall nominate to the Trustees 
one of the two candidates receiving an equal number of 
votes. 

Sec. 6. The members of the Conference Committee 
shall be appointed annually by the Board of Directors and 
shall each hold office for one year or until others are ap- 
pointed in their places. 

Sec. 7. The members of the Students' Loan Fund Com- 
mittee shall be appointed by the Board of Directors from 
candidates recommended by the Loan Fund Committee. 



They shall each hold office for five years or until others 
are appointed in their places. One new member shall be 
appointed each year to succeed the retiring member, and 
no member, with the exception of the Treasurer, shall be 
eligible for re-election until one year has elapsed after the 
expiration of her term of office. 

Sec. 8. The members of the James E. Rhoads Scholar- 
ships Committee shall be appointed by the Board of Direc- 
tors, and shall each hold office for three years, or until 
others are appointed in their places. One new member 
shall be appointed each year to succeed the retiring mem- 
ber, and no member shall be eligible for re-election until 
one year has elapsed after the expiration of her term of 
office. 

Sec. 9. The Health Statistics Committee shall be a 
permanent committee, appointed by the Board of Direc- 
tors in consultation with the President of Bryn Mawr 
College. The Chairman of this Committee is empowered 
to fill vacancies in the Committee; a vacancy in the chair- 
manship shall be filled by the Board of Directors in consul- 
tation with the President of Bryn Mawr College. 

Sec. 10. The members of the Nominating Committee 
shall be appointed biennially by the Board of Directors, 
and shall each hold office for four years, or until others are 
appointed in their places. Two members of the Commit- 
tee shall be appointed in the year preceding an election 
for officers, and three members in the year preceding the 
next election for officers, and thereafter in the same order 
before alternate elections. 

Sec. 11. The members of the Finance Committee shall 
be appointed by the Board of Directors and shall each 
hold office for four years, or until others are appointed in 
their places. 

Sec. 12. The members of the Committee on Athletics 
shall be appointed by the Board of Directors and shall 
each hold office for five years, or until others are appointed 
in their places. One new member shall be appointed each 
year to succeed the retiring member. 

Sec. 13. The appointments of the Board of Directors 
for the year ensuing shall be made in time to be reported 
by the Board to the annual meeting for ratification by 
the Association. 

Article VIII 

DUTIES 

Section 1. The President shall preside at all meetings 
of the Association and of the Board of Directors, and shall 
perform such other duties as regularly pertain to her office. 
She shall be a member ex officio of all the committees of 
the Association, and shall countersign all vouchers drawn 
by the Treasurer before they are paid. She shall ap- 
point such committees as are not otherwise provided for. 

Sec. 2. The Vice-President shall perform all the duties 
of the President in the absence of the latter. 

Sec. 3. The Recording Secretary shall keep the minutes 
of the Association and of the Board of Directors, and shall 
perform such other duties as regularly pertain to the office 
of clerk. She shall have the custody of all documents and 
records belonging to the Association which do not pertain 
to special or standing committees, and she shall be the 
custodian of the seal of the Association. She shall notify 
committees of all motions in any way affecting them; she 
shall receive all ballots cast for the elections, and with the 
Chairman of the Nominating Committee shall act as teller 
for the same; and she shall be responsible for the publica- 
tion of the Annual Report, which should be mailed to the 
Alumnae within two months after the annual meeting. 

Sec. 4. The Corresponding Secretary shall conduct all 
the necessary correspondence of the Association; she shall 



1917] 



Annual Report of Alumnae Association 



39 



send out all notices, and shall inform officers and commit- 
tees of their election or appointment. 

Sec. 5. The Treasurer shall be the custodian of all 
funds of the Association and shall pay them out only by 
vouchers countersigned by the President; she shall collect 
all dues and assessments, shall file vouchers for all dis- 
bursements, and shall keep an account of all receipts and 
expenditures. She shall report on the finances of the 
Association when called upon, to the Association or to the 
Board of Directors, and she shall make to the Association 
at the annual meeting a full report, the correctness of 
which must be attested by a certified public accountant. 
Sec. 6. The Board of Directors shall prepare all busi- 
ness for the meetings of the Association, and shall have 
full power to transact in the interim of its meetings all 
business not otherwise provided for in these by-laws. It 
shall have control of all funds of the Association; it shall 
supervise the expenditures of committees, and it shall 
have power to levy assessments not exceeding in any one 
year the amount of the annual dues. At least one month 
before each annual meeting it shall send to each member 
of the Association a ballot presenting nominations for the 
Academic Committee in accordance with Art. VI, Sec. 4; 
biennially, at least one month before the annual meeting, 
it shall send to each member of the Association the ballot 
prepared by the Nominating Comittee in accordance 
with Art. VII, Sec. 13. Every three years, at least one 
month before the last Thursday in May, it shall send to 
each member of the Association qualified to vote for Alum- 
nae Directors a ballot presenting nominations for Alumnae 
Directors in accordance with Art. VI, Sec. 5. Through the 
President and Recording Secretary, it shall certify to the 
Trustees the names of persons voted for and the number 
of votes received for each person in elections for Alumnae 
Directors. It shall appoint before each annual meeting the 
members of the Conference Committee, and fill such vacan- 
cies on the Students' Loan Fund Committee, The James 
E. Rhoads Scholarships Committee, the Finance Commit- 
tee, and the Committee on Athletics, as may be necessary 
by reason of expiration of terms of office. It shall also 
appoint, in alternate years before the regular meeting 
preceding the biennial election, the members of the Nomi- 
nating Committee; and in case a vacancy occurs it shall 
appoint, in consultation with the President of Bryn Mawr 
College, the chairman of the Health Statistics Committee. 
It shall report all appointments to the regidar meeting 
next following for ratification by the Association. A ma- 
jority of the Board shall constitute a quorum for the trans- 
action of business. The Board of Directors shall be at 
all times responsible to the Association. 

Sec. 7. The Academic Committee shall hold at least 
one meeting each academic year to confer with the Presi- 
dent of Bryn Mawr College on matters of interest con- 
nected with the College. It shall have full power to ar- 
range the times of its meetings. 

Sec. 8. The Alumnae members of the Board of Direc- 
tors of Bryn Mawr College shall perform such duties as 
are prescribed by the laws of the Trustees and Directors 
of Bryn Mawr College. 

Sec. 9. The Conference Committee shall hold at least 
two meetings each academic year, one in the autumn and 
one in the spring, to confer with committees from the Un- 
der-graduate Association and the Graduate Club at Bryn 
Mawr College, on matters of interest to the three associa- 



tions. It shall have power to call special meetings at its 
discretion. 

Sec. 10 The Students' Loan Fund Committee shall 
have immediate charge of the Loan Fund, and its disburse- 
ments, subiect to the approval of the Board of Directors. 
It shall confer with the President of Bryn Mawr College 
regarding all loans. 

Sec. 11. The James E. Rhoads Scholarships Commit- 
tee shall, with the President of Bryn Mawr College and 
the Committee appointed by the Academic Council of the 
Faculty, nominate annually the candidates for the James 
E. Rhoads Scholarships to be conferred by the Board of 
Trustees of Bryn Mawr College according to the provisions 
contained in the Deed of Gift. 

Sec. 12. The Health Statistics Committee shall collect 
from the members of the Association information that may 
serve as a basis for statistics regarding the health and 
occupation of college women. The Committee, subject to 
the approval of the Board of Directors, shall have power 
to determine the best methods of carrying out the duties 
assigned to it. 

Sec. 13. The Nominating Committee shall biennially 
prepare a ballot presenting alternate nominations for the 
officers of the Association and shall file it with the Record- 
ing Secretary by December 1 preceding the annual meeting. 

Sec. 14. The Finance Committee may, with the ap- 
proval of the Board of Directors of the Alumnae Associa- 
tion, indicate purposes for which money shall be raised by 
the Alumnae Association. It shall devise ways and means, 
and take charge of collecting moneys for such purposes, 
and when authorized by the Alumnae Association shall 
prepare, subject to the approval of the Board of Directors, 
the necessary agreements for the transfer of gifts from the 
Alumnae Association. All collections from the Alumnae 
Association shall be subject to its supervision. The Fi- 
nance Committee shall have power to add to its number. 

Sec. 15. The Committee on Athletics shall try to stimu- 
late an interest in athletics among the members of the 
Alumnae Association, and shall take official charge of all 
contests that are participated in by both alumnae and 
undergraduates. 

Sec. 16. The Board of Directors and all Committees 
shall report to the Association at the annual meeting, and 
the Students' Loan Fund Committee shall report also to 
the Board of Trustees of Bryn Mawr College. 

Article IX 

RULES OF ORDER 

The rules of parliamentary practice as set forth in 
Roberts' "Rules of Order" shall govern the proceedings 
of this Association in so far as they are not inconsistent 
with any provisions of its charter or by-laws. 

Article X 

AMENDMENT OF BY-LAWS 

These by-laws may be amended or new ones framed by 
a two-thirds vote of the members present at any regular 
meeting of the Association, provided that details of pro- 
posed amendments and additions have been given in 
writing at a previous regular meeting of the Association, 
either by the Board of Directors or by five members of the 
Association. 



40 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



WITH THE ALUMNAE 



THE BRYN MAWR UNIT 

Since the annual meeting of the Alum- 
nae Association on February 3 the mat- 
ter of a Bryn Mawr unit for relief work 
in one of the belligerent countries has 
been taken up. The Board of Directors 
of the College has informed the Direc- 
tors of the Association that it sees no 
objection to the use of the name of Bryn 
Mawr College in connection with such 
a unit, and a committee is now being 
appointed to proceed with the plan. 
The committee will investigate the vari- 
ous fields of war relief work, call for 
volunteers among the members of the 
Alumnae Association and organize the 
volunteers into a working unit. 

It will greatly facilitate the work of 
the committee if any members of the 
Association who are willing to volunteer 
their services and pay their own ex- 
penses will write as soon as possible 
stating what kind of relief work they 
would like to do. Since the name of the 
chairman of the committee cannot yet 
be announced, Miss Abigail C. Dimon, 
Bryn Mawr, Pa., the secretary of the 
Association, will be glad to receive any 
such letters and forward them without 
delay. There may be an opportunity 
for rehabilitation work, or relief work in 
devastated districts, or nursing work. 
The character of the arrangements will 
depend largely upon the nature of the 
volunteers. 

Members of the Class of 1917, who 
become members of the Alumnae Asso- 
ciation in June, are eligible to join the 
Bryn Mawr unit, and will be cordially 
welcomed as volunteers. 

RESIGNATION OF MRS. FRANCIS 

Since the alumnae meeting, Louise 
Congdon Francis (Mrs. Richard Stan- 



dish Francis) has resigned as Recording 
Secretary of the Alumnae Association, 
after six years of service. The Board 
feels sure that the Association, will sym- 
pathize with it in the loss of Mrs. Fran- 
cis. She has given her services ungrudg- 
ingly and unceasingly and has never 
been slow to show interest in and give 
careful consideration to all the details 
of the activities of the Association. 

Hilda Worthington Smith, 1910, has 
been appointed by the Board to take the 
place of Mrs. Francis until the next 
regular election of officers. 

WABANAKI 

Wabanaki School is but a little over a year 
old — and "children should be seen and not 
heard." For this reason I have, and do, cor- 
dially invite Bryn Mawrtyrs to visit Wabanaki 
but have never before written of this work 
which lies nearest my heart. The kindly invi- 
tation of your editor is not to be resisted, how- 
ever, since we who are working here look con- 
fidently towards a time when schools of the 
Wabanaki type will be established in many 
communities. "Come over into Macedonia 
and help us." 

Our Macedonia is locally known as "The 
Mesa" and is situated three miles from 
Greenwich, Connecticut, which can be reached 
in about one hour from The Grand Cen- 
tral Station, New York. There are five acres 
of The Mesa, and very varied acres they are, 
traversed by the old deer trail, haunted by birds 
and our little brothers of the woods, the squir- 
rels and cotton-tail rabbits, and starred with 
wild flowers every spring, glorified with gold 
and scarlet leaf drifts in the fall. They com- 
prise the wind-swept, sun-warmed upland from 
which The Mesa derives its name and wheron 
Wabanaki School stands facing the East, while 
tucked away on neighboring hillsides or in 
sheltering hollows, are the Craft Shop, with its 
wide flung windows, Casa Penikese, our science 
laboratory, and Caribou Lodge, the childrens' 
play house. 

Wabanaki is founded upon the premise that 
the school should be a clearing house for the 



1917] 



With the Alumnae 



41 



best any community has to offer. We believe 
that our great men and women should be radi- 
ating their genius in the school. We believe 
that the fine apprentice spirit of the olden time 
should be revived in education and that our 
children should come in their early years under 
the direction and inspiration of those who 
have attained and are attaining. How can 
this be brought to pass? Through the coopera- 
tion of parents. 

We have had cooperation and efficiency in 
our great business enterprises, why should it 
not be operative in the education of our chil- 
dren? We parents of Wabanaki have met to- 
gether in a spirit of practical and whole-hearted 
cooperation to seek and secure the best for our 
children. We are dedicated to this purpose 
alone and are not tied to the apron string of 
any educational cult or fad. We cheerfully sit 
at the feet of any educator who can demon- 
strate the worth of his or her ideas as applica- 
ble to our problems. 

We agreed at the outset that Wabanaki 
should be an open-air school, that our children 
should sleep and study out of doors and that 
our boys and girls should be educated together. 
We also agreed that the mornings of five days 
in the week be given over to earnest work in 
mathematics, history, English, languages and 
all the things parents have the right to expect 
the school efficiently to teach their children who 
are making ready for college. But these sub- 
jects are presented with a background of arts, 
crafts, sciences and ethical instruction, and in 
an intensely interesting and real way. The class 
room is related to life at every point. 

The other day I came upon the Spanish 
class in the dining room, Senor Dominguez, 
a white napkin over his arm, and an imaginary 
bill of fare in hand, was playing waiter and tak- 
ing the orders of members of his class, who 
amid great gaiety were requesting tortillas, 
tamales and what not with a fluency creditable 
to the Cortina method of phonographic instruc- 
tion which is in use here. 

You who throve under Self-Government at 
Bryn Mawr will rejoice that Wabanaki is self- 
governing. We are members of The Wood- 
craft League, founded by Ernest Thompson 
Seton, our next door neighbor, who has called 
Wabanaki "the laboratory of the Woodcraft 
Movement." Every morning Wabanaki opens 
with a half-hour Woodcraft Council wherein 
matters pertaining to the government of the 
school are discussed and administered by 



the children themselves. "In these morning 
Councils teachers and pupils meet on the same 
plane and here all school affairs of importance 
are discussed. Each child has an opportunity 
to express himself and matters of moment 
are settled by vote — it is a true democracy." 
In these Councils are mobilized the noblest 
forces of our community. Here our children 
are apprenticed to the guidance of such master 
craftsmen as Mr. Seton. 

To our children Mr. Seton, magic play- 
master of childhood, is known as "Black Wolf," 
great chief of all Woodcrafters. Often he 
gathers our boys and girls about him to make 
known to them the secrets of the woods, telling 
them wondrous stories and teaching them the 
Indian dances and songs. 

The ardent enthusiasm for nature study 
which Mr. Seton enkindles in the children is 
carried over into exact scientific research by 
Dr. Edward F. Bigelow, President of the Agas- 
siz Association and Naturalist of the Boy Scout 
movement. Led by him, children and teachers 
go trooping through the woods in search of 
treasures which are brought to the laboratory, 
put under the microscope and promptly classi- 
fied. Without being asked to do so the chil- 
dren make many researches on their own ac- 
count. Thus one lad, aged ten, remarked last 
week, "I caught an ant after French class and 
put it under the microscope and made sketches 
of it." 

Bring a child into touch with a great teacher, 
apprentice him in his youth to the high-souled, 
keen-thinking, beauty-loving, gifted ones of this 
earth — let him know the best — he will catch 
the contagion of it and astonish you. We need 
a spacious humanism, and spiritual as well as 
intellectual values in our schools. We need 
pharos-like personalities whose fine standards 
and perceptions of values will guide the frail 
craft of our children's imaginings and longings 
into harbors of justice, peace and attainment. 

Since "mutation is heaven's first law," if one 
is not changing for the better one must neces- 
sarily be changing for the worse. Everyone 
who has the teaching of children should be chang- 
ing for the better — growing. How can you 
help others to grow if you are not growing 
yourself? For this reason when the master 
craftsmen are with us their work is open to 
teachers and children alike and often to parents 
as well. *It is a pleasant thing to see Thompson 
Seton, or Hamlin Garland, or Dr. Bigelow, 
or J. von Wildenrath, the sculptor, at the 



42 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarter y 



[April 



heart of a deeply interested group of young 
and old. 

Wabanaki stands for welding of diverse in- 
terests into unified and joyous endeavour — the 
working with heart and hand — the recognition 
of the typically American right of all to free- 
dom and the pursuit of happiness. Our new 
pioneer log cabin will fittingly typify these 
ideals and ideas of ours. 

The suggestion was made by Hamlin Gar- 
land during one of his talks with the children 
about Fenmore Cooper and other American 
men of letters that we perpetuate the tradi- 
tions of our forefathers by building and fur- 
nishing a pioneer log cabin, since none authen- 
tically furnished is now believed to be extant. 
The Wabanaki responded with hearty good- 
will. A pioneer powder horn, muskets, deers' 
heads, a grizzly bear skin, appeared as if by 
magic, and the work began in earnest. One 
parent produced a fine old English loom; — an- 
other friend, interested in fostering the making 
of tapestries in this country, said that she 
would send her French and Belgian workmen 
twice weekly to teach us to make homespun 
blankets. Patchwork quilts were planned, and 
we find ourselves launched upon an enterprise 
affording scope for the good-will and gifts of 
all. Our cabin is to be complete even to the 
leathern latch string which, needless to say, 
will always be out for Bryn Mawrtyrs and for 
all Wabanaki, which is an ancient word mean- 
ing "Children of the Dawn." 

L. Emery Dudley, '00. 

THE BRYN MAWR BEDS IN THE 
NEUILLY HOSPITAL 

The work done by Constance Lewis, who 
died November 5, 1916, with the object of es- 
tablishing Bryn Mawr beds in the American 
Hospital at Neuilly-sur-Seine, France, has been 
described in the November and January numbers 
of the Quarterly. The completion of this 
work is given in the following letters — one from 
Mrs. Lewis, the mother of Constance, and the 
second from Mr. Hereford to Mrs. Lewis: 

Indianapolis, Indiana, 
February 19, 1917. 
"To subscribers to the fund in name of Bryn Mawr 
College for beds in American Ambulance Hos- 
pital in Paris: 

"The campaign for subscriptions to the fund 
closed with a total of 261 subscribers giving 



$1484.17. An itemized report of collections 
has been sent the college. 

"The letter from the American Committee, 
of which copy follows will surely bring happi- 
ness to all concerned in this noble endeavor 
in behalf of the Great Cause. 

"With congratulations on the fine result 
achieved through your generous giving, I 
remain, 

Sincerely yours, 

Mary P. Lewis." 

Headquarters of the American Committee 

of the American Ambulance Hospital 

ln Paris 

"Mrs. Charles S. Lewis, 
Indianapolis, Indiana. 

"My dear Mrs. Lewis: 

"I beg to acknowledge the receipt of your 
check for $223.17 dated January 29, and signed 
by you as treasurer of the Bryn Mawr Fund 
for the American Ambulance Hospital. 

"This amount has been deposited in the 
name of Bryn Mawr College and makes, to- 
gether with the checks received on November 
11, and December 4 for $600 each, a total of 
$1423.17, which is to be used to endow two 
beds in the Hospital to bear the name of Bryn 
Mawr College. In addition, I wish to acknowl- 
edge checks . . making a grand total of 
$1484.17 for the Bryn Mawr College Fund. 

"The surplus over and above the amount 
forwarded for endowing two beds, that is to 
say, $284.17 will be applied to the general fund 
of the American Ambulance in the name of 
Bryn Mawr College. 

"As the fund is now closed, I understand, 
may I take this occasion again to express the 
deep appreciation of this Committee for the 
generous support of the alumnae of Bryn Mawr 
College. 

"You, who are personally familiar with the 
work that is being done at the American Ambu- 
lance need have no assurance that this money 
could not have been devoted to a nobler or 
more patriotic cause, and I wish you would 
convey to those who have subscribed to the 
fund, the thanks of this Committee and of the 
Committee in Paris. 

"May I add a word of appreciation of your 
own efforts in this behalf. The work that your 
daughter did is known to us all and the reso- 
lutions of our Committee spread upon our 
records are a testimonial of the splendid spirit 



1917] 



With the Alumnae 



43 



your daughter showed in carrying on this plan 
for relieving others while she, herself, was 
fatally stricken. 

"Bryn Mawr College, through her efforts, 
will have a lasting monument in the American 
Ambulance Hospital. 

Sincerely yours, 
[sicned! William R. Hereford." 

The list of contributions is on file in the 
office of the Secretary of the College. 

At the request of Mr. Charles S. Lewis, the 
Committee on the American Ambulance has 
been asked to send any letters that may come 
from occupants of the Bryn Mawr beds to the 
Secretary of Bryn Mawr College. One letter 
has been received and parts of it are as follows: 

Le 18 Janvier, 1917 
Messieurs: 

C'est un petit blesse francais qui a la bonne 
chance d'occuper le Bryn Mawr lit dans la 
salle 67 de PAmbulance Americanine et qui 
vient vous remercier bien sincerement de votre 
offre genereuse en vue de mon prompt estab- 
lissement. 

"Je me fais en meme temps un plaisir de 
vous donner ci-dessous un apercu de ma cam- 
pagne ainsi que de ma blessure qui me tient 
encore actuellement sur mon lit d'hopital depuis 
bientot cinq mois. 

"Je me nomme Maurice Burger. Je suis ne" 
le 8 Janvier 1890 a Besancon ou j'y exerce la 
profession de coiffeur. 

* * * 

"Apres le regiment reformer nous repartons 
pour la Somme ou je prit encore part a plu- 
sieurs attaques. Mais a l'attaque du 14 Sep- 
tembre 1916 a la prise du village de Bouchaves- 
nes je fut blesse par une balle de mitrailleuse 
allemande qui me fractura le tibia et le perone 
de la jambe gauche. Je fut relevi que 10 
heures apres que j'ai fut blesse. Car les al- 
lemandes 6tant devant nous il fallut attendre 
la nuit pour venir me chercher ainsi que quel- 
ques camarades qui etaient blesses comme 
moi. Dans la nuit on vint me chercher et on 
me dirigeat directement dans une ambulance 
a Styneme a quelques kilometres du front. 
Dans cette ambulance on m'y operat aussit6t. 
Le docteur chef de cette ambulance me dit que 
l'amputation de ma jambe etait necessaire 
mais ayant refusS que l'on me coupe la jambe 
il fit une operation pour la conserver qui reussit 
a merveille. Le lendemain ie fut diriger a 



l'ambulance am£ricaine a Neuilly sur Seine, ou 
quelque jours apres mon arriver on m'operat 
une seconde fois ou l'operations reussit aussi a 
merveille. Apres ces operations j'eu le malheur 
de ratrapper une bronchite pneumonie qui me 
fit souffrir beaucoup et dont je manquer de 
mourir. Au moment ou je vous 6crit la sant6 
est asez bonne et ma jambe vas beaucoup, 
mieux et que j'ai espoir de conserver. Je 
remercie beaucoup les docteurs infirmiers et 
infirmieres de l'Amubulance Am6ricaine qui me 
soignerent et qui me soigne encore actuellement. 
Ayant a peu pres fini mon petit recit, je vous 
renouvelle l'expression de mon extreme recon- 
naissance et je vous prie d'agreer Passu ranee 
de ma consideration distinguee. 

Maurice Burger, 
Ambulance Amencaine, Salle 67 

Neuilly-sur-Seine. 

LETTER FROM MADAME CONS 

The following is taken from a letter from 
Madame Cons to her sister, Miss Curtis. 

February 2, 1917. 

"The submarine war is upon us, and I write 
at once to give some instructions as to the 
sending of money for my soldiers. I cannot 
bear to have the work interrupted. It means 
so much to the poor men, especially now, when 
every one must be ready to do his utmost. 

"As you know, my friend, Elizabeth White, 
has done a great deal for me in the last year, 
and has been sending money regularly each 
month for my work. She is careful and trust- 
worthy, and I have arranged with her to re- 
ceive all contributions, and cable the sum total 
to me once a month. She has always sent her 
money through Drexel and Co., Philadelphia. 
(You might tell people that she is a graduate 
of Swarthmore College, Class of 1911, if anyone 
wishes to investigate her character before send- 
ing her money, her father is proprietor of the 
Marlborough-Blenheim in Atlantic City.) 

"As I cannot know by cable how much each 
marraine sends for her particular soldier, ask 
each one to give what she can afford for the 
general fund, and all soldiers will be provided 
for alike. Ask them to make this sacrifice, 
and to trust me to do my very best for them 
and for the men. If correspondence is inter- 
rupted, I will redouble my efforts, and every 
soldier shalrhave his letters regularly. I hope, 
however, that aU the 'godmothers' will continue 
to write, as long as any mail-ships are running. 



44 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



But I am sure the cable will be safer for the 
money, and if all contributions are sent at one 
time the cost will not be great. Ask people 
to adress Miss Elizabeth White, The Marl- 
borough-Blenheim, Atlantic City, N. J." 

BOSTON ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

A Boston Athletic Association of Collegiate 
Alumnae has been organized by Bryn Mawr 
graduates and others on the plan of the New 
York organization. Meetings are held Thurs- 
days in the Sargent School Gymnasium in 
Cambridge. 

A WANT COLUMN IN THE 
QUARTERLY 

The Board of Directors of the Asso- 
ciation has made the suggestion that a 
Want Column for the use of the alum- 
nae be established in the Quarterly. 



There will be a column of this descrip- 
tion in the July number if enough ad- 
vertisments come in to make it worth 
while. The column will advertise at a 
low rate positions and help wanted, 
work to be done for endowment, war 
relief, charity, or for private gain. 

Such an exchange of needs ought to 
prove convenient and advantageous for 
the alumnae, as well as profitable for 
the Quarterly. 

Try to think of all your possible wants 
— either to work or to be worked for — 
and send them in the form of short 
advertisements before the first of June. 
All inquiries as to space, rates, etc. 
will be answered by Miss Elizabeth 
Brakeley, Advertising Manager, Bryn 
Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 



NEWS FROM THE CAMPUS 



NOTE TO THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES 



The following note has been approved 
by vote of the faculties of Vassar, 
Wellesley, Smith, Bryn Mawr, Mount 
Holyoke, Goucher, and Barnard and 
has been signed by their respective 
presidents. It has also been signed by 
President Briggs on behalf of Radcliffe 
College although as Radcliffe has no 
faculty independent of Harvard Uni- 
versity his signature could not be 
authorized by faculty vote. 

The note has been engrossed on parch- 
ment and signed by each college presi- 
dent or dean and will be presented to 
President Wilson on Friday, March 30, 
by his two Goucher College daughters 
as representing the alumnae of the 
signatory colleges. 

It may interest Bryn Mawr College 
Alumnae to know that the idea of the 
note occurred first to President Thomas 
and was written by her and President 



Ellen F. Pendleton of Wellesley and 
President Woolley of Mount Holyoke. 
It passed the Bryn Mawr Faculty with 
only one dissenting vote. 
It is as follows: 

"To the President of the United States, 

We, the undersigned, Presidents and 
Deans of the eight largest Colleges for 
Women in the United States, speaking 
for ourselves and authorized by vote to 
speak also for the Faculties of the Col- 
leges which we represent, hereby respect- 
fully offer you our loyal service. 

Although we believe that the settle- 
ment of international difficulties by war 
is fundamentally wrong we recognize 
that in a world crisis such as this it 
may become our highest duty to defend 
by force the principles upon which 
Christian civilization is founded. 

In this emergency, Mr. President, we 
wish to pledge you our wholehearted 
support in whatever measures you may 
find necessary to uphold these principles. 



1917] 



News from the Campus 



45 



Any service which we and (as far as 
we can speak for them) any service 
which the thousands of trained women 
whom we have sent out from our col- 
leges may be able to render we hereby February 23 
place at the disposal of our country. 

Signed on behalf of the aforesaid 
Colleges." 

The Bryn Mawr College Undergradu- 
ate students have unanimously voted 
to mobilize for preparedness work for 
the five weeks after Easter. Many 
students will select some one special February 24 
kind of preparedness work and give to 
it their free time. The Undergraduate February 25 
Association is organizing various classes 
in different branches of preparedness 
work. 

CALENDAR OF EVENTS February 26 

SEMESTER 11—1916-17 

February 15 Faculty Tea for Graduate Stu- 
dents, Denbigh Hall, 4 to 6 p.m. March 2 

February 16 Address by the Marquis of Aber- 
deen and Temair, formerly 
Lord Lieutenant of Ireland 
and Governor General of 
Canada, in the chapel at 4.30 
p.m. Subject: ''Canada and March 3 
Her Leading Statesmen." 
Lecture by Mr. Charles Theo- 
dore Carruth, of Cambridge, 
Mass., in the chapel at 8 p.m. 
"II Beato Angelico." under March 4 
the auspices of the Depart- 
ment of Art. 

February 17 Concert given by the Philadel- 
phia Branch of the Bryn Mawr 
Alumnae Association in the March 5 
chapel at 8 p.m. Song Recital 
by Miss Marcia Van Dresser March 9 
of the Chicago Grand Opera 
Company. 

February 18 Sunday Evening Service. Ser- 
mon by the Rev. Howard C. 
Robbins, D.D., of the Church 
of the Incarnation, New York 
City. 

February 19 Address by Ian Hay (Captain 
Beith) on "The Human Side of 
Trench Warfare" in the Gym- 
nasium at 8.30 p.m. for the 



benefit of the Mary E. Garrett 
Memorial Endowment Fund 
under the auspices of the 
Class of 1918. 

Vocational Conference, Miss 
Florence Jackson, Taylor Hall, 
3 p.m. Address by Mr. 
George Barr Baker, member of 
the Commission for Relief in 
Belgium on "Relief Work in 
Belgium," illustrated by lan- 
tern slides. Under the aus- 
pices of the Bryn Mawr Col- 
lege Red Cross Committee. 

Freshman Show in the Gym- 
nasium at 8 p.m. 

Sunday Evening Service. Ser- 
mon by the Rev. John T. 
Dallas, D.D., Chaplain of the 
Taft School, Watertown 
Connecticut. 

President Thomas at home to 
the graduate students. Inter- 
class Water Polo Match 
Games begin. 

Concert by the Faculty and 
Staff, assisted by Mrs. Adeline 
Pepper Gibson, for the benefit 
of the Bryn Mawr College 
Red Cross Committee in Tay- 
lor Hall at 8 p.m. 

Bates Camp Party in the Gym- 
nasium at 8 p.m. Dancing 
by Miss Rose Hoffman of the 
Newman School of Dancing, 
Philadelphia. 

Sunday Evening Service. Ser- 
mon by the Rev. Edward A. 
Steiner, Ph.D., Professor of 
Applied Christianity in Grin- 
nell College, Iowa. 

Red Cross First Aid Classes 
begin. 

Lecture by Mr. and Mrs. Joseph 
Lindon Smith, of Boston, 
Mass., in Taylor Hall at 
4.30 p.m. Subject: "The 
Children of the Frontier in 
France." Illustrated with 
lantern slides. On behalf of 
the Franco-American Com- 
mittee for the Protection of 
the Children of the Frontier. 
Meeting of the English Club 
in Rockefeller Hall at 8 p.m. 



46 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



Address by Mr. Francis 
Hackett of the "New Re- 
public" on "Writing for Publi- 
cation." 

March 10 Concert under the auspices of the 
Class of 1920 for the Mary E. 
Garrett Memorial Endowment 
Fund, Song Recital by Mr. 
Rheinhold Warlich, Basso- 
Cantante, a recital of Russian, 
French, German and Shakes- 
perian Songs. 

March 11 Sunday Evening Service. Ser- 
mon by the Rev. James O. 
S. Huntington, of the Church 
of the Holy Cross, West Park, 
New York. 

March 16 Announcement of European 

Fellowships. Gymnasium 

Contest in the Gymnasium at 
4.30 p.m. Fellowship Dinners 
Illustrated Address by La 
Baronne Fluard (Frances 
Wilson Huard), "With Those 
Who Wait," a sequel to her 
book "My Home on the Field 
of Honor," in the Gymnasium 
at 815 p.m., illustrated with 
lantern slides. One-half the 
proceeds to be given to Mad- 
ame Huard's Hospital, one- 
half to the Mary E. Garrett 
Memorial Endowment Fund. 

March' 17 Meeting of the College Settle- 
ment Association. Address by 
Dr. Jane Robbins, formerly 
Head of the Jacob Riis Settle- 
ment in New York City, on 
"Settlement Work in Con- 
nection with Immigration." 
Under the auspices of the 
Bryn Mawr Chapter of the 
College Settlements Associa- 
tion. 

March 18 Sunday Evening Service. Ser- 
mon by the Rev. Charles W. 
Gordon D.D. (Ralph Connor), 
Chaplain in the 43rd Cameron 
Highlanders of Canada. 

March 19 President Thomas at home to 
the Senior Class. 

March 23 Faculty Tea for Graduate Stu- 
dents, Radnor Hall, 4 to 6 p.m. 
Christian Association Con- 
ference. 



March 24 



March 25 



March 
March 



April 
April 
April 



April 



26 



30 



March 31 



April 



4 
12 
13 



14 



Christian Association Confer- 
ence. Alumnae- Varsity Water 
Polo Game. 

Sunday Evening Service. Ser- 
mon by the Rev. John Mc- 
Dowell, D.D., of the Brown 
Memorial Presbyterian Church 
of Baltimore, Maryland. 

President Thomas at home to 
the graduate students. 

Address by Miss Marjorie Dor- 
man on behalf of the Society 
Opposing Woman Suffrage, in 
the chapel at 4.15 p.m. Glee 
Club Concert in the Gym- 
nasium at 8 p.m. Performance 
of W. S. Gilbert's "Patience." 

Glee Club Concert, Performance 
of W. S. Gilbert's "Patience," 
in the Gymnasium at 8 p.m. 

Sunday Evening Service. Ser- 
mon by the Rev. Hugh Black, 
D.D., Professor of Practical 
Theology in Union Theological 
Seminary, New York City. 

Easter vacation begins at 1 p.m. 

Easter vacation ends at 9 a.m. 

Meeting of the Science Club. 
Address by Professor Jacques 
Loeb. Subject: "Regener- 
ation and Correlation in 
Plants." 

Address by Dr. Katherine B. 
Davis, Commissioner of Cor- 
rection, New York City. 



CAMPUS NOTES 

The change of point of view of the Self-Gov- 
ernment Association from more than ordinary 
conservatism to an uncommon liberalism is 
perhaps the most interesting phenomenon of 
the present Bryn Mawr year. After legislating 
with preposterous severity regarding the re- 
lation between the men of the faculty and the 
students, the Self-Government Board has re- 
considered its views and now appears to medi- 
tate improvements even upon former decisions 
of the Association. Every one interested in 
attempts to make the social relation between 
men and women in small college communities 
like Bryn Mawr as normal and sensible as 
possible, is eagerly waiting to see how the 
somewhat complicated details will finally be 
worked out. The admission of men to the 



1917] 



News from the Campus 



47 



audience of 1913's "David Garrick" was a 
tentative practical application of the new point 
of view. On that occasion men of the faculty 
and male relatives and friends enjoyed a privil- 
ege hitherto extended to none but Mr. Samuel 
Arthur King. 

Men were of course likewise welcomed to 
swell the audiences at the moving picture 
performances which were introduced this year 
to aid in raising money for the endowment 
fund. The experiment was found profitable 
for that purpose as well as very enlivening 
both for those members of our community 
who are already addicted to moving pictures, 
and to those to whom movies were a compara- 
tively rare indulgence. Indeed all the enter- 
tainments which have been the outcome of the 
undergraduates' praiseworthy resolve to raise 
$10,000 for the endowment fund have proved 
welcome additions to the gayer side of Bryn 
Mawr life. This is of course with us in any case 
the — relatively — gay season. With freshman 
show, faculty concert, English Club lectures, 
and other functions stil to come, we have 
already pleasant memories of a fair number of 
interesting events in the last weeks. Ian Hay, 
author of The First Hundred Thousand, has told 
us of trench warfare; Marcia Van Dresser has 
sung to us; Mr. Carruth has discoursed, assist- 
ed by colored lantern slides, on Fra Angelico; 
and Mr. Walter de la Mare on magic in poetry; 
and we have had Lord Aberdeen and Mr. 
George Barr Baker in our midst. 

The chief excitement of late days in the 
graduate school has been, not the creation of a 
new learned theory, nor the proving of an old 
one, but the presence and final departure of 
our one German scholar. The fact that her 
German correspondence was profuse and ap- 
parently undisturbed by international com- 
plications served to raise suspicions that she was 
a German spy. The possibility — I might almost 
say hope — that such was her status seemed to 
draw us a little out of our safe and remote 
retirement from public affairs. It put us, if 
not exactly into active participation with 
them, at least, into theoretical and somewhat 
romantic connection. For whether pacifist, 
pro-German, socialist, anti-English, or what- 
ever else its persuasions, all the world, if it 
be honest with itself, and possessed of normal 
human nature, loves a spy. We, being pacific, 
— some of us — and certainly normal and very 
honest with ourselves, gloated over the prospect 
of having possibly sheltered a member of that 



genus. That the Prussian government could 
find us important enough to mark us out for 
such distinction raised us in our own estimation. 
In a confused way, our mediaeval history being 
not altogether clear in our mind, we seemed to 
ourselves to be mixed up with such interesting 
things as int igues, and castles, and duels and 
tournaments and high adventures — not be- 
cause we were ignorant of the fact that one 
can have spies without such attractive acces- 
sories, but because our knowledge of spies came 
mostly from certain books where, happily, the 
attractive accessories have not ceased to be. 

Helen Parkhurst, 1911. 
' David Garrick" 

The College News had the following comments 
on the play "David Garrick" given by 1913 
for the benefit of their class endowment fund: 

"To the stage manager, M. Blaine, a great 
deal of credit is due when the difficulties of 
getting together an alumnae cast and rehearsing 
them with any degree of regularity are consid- 
ered The fascinating rendering of 

the part of David Garrick by Mrs. Churchward 
will not soon be forgotten. In the big scene 
in the second act particularly, her acting was 

powerful An admirable foil to her 

vivid acting was provided by M. V. Tongue as 
the stolid Mr. Simon Ingot, the city merchant. 

. . . . His dinner guests 

were ideally done, Mr. Smith and Miss Ara- 
minta Brown making an especial hit. This 
scene, with its good comedy, was the best in 
the play. E. Bontecou made a humourous 
Squire Chivy, the disappointed bridegroom.';' 

College Athletics 

The undergraduates have challenged the 
alumnae to a fencing tournament. 

Vassar has challenged Bryn Mawr in tennis. 

In The Model School 

"There are four Bryn Mawr babies in the 
Model School: Lois Horn, who is the 1900 
Class baby, daughter of Professor and Mrs. 
Horn (Lois Anna Farnham, '00); Caroline and 
Louise Gucker, daughters of Mr. and Mrs. 
Frank Gucker (Louise O. Fulton, '93), and 
Dorothy "V^aples, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Rufus Waples (Agnes Howson, '97)." — The Col- 
lege News. 



48 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



THE EUROPEAN FELLOWSHIPS 

The whole student body assembled at chapel 
on the morning March 16 to hear President 
Thomas announce the names of the three 
students who have won the highest honours in 
the gift of the College. Each year the College 
gives three fellowships each of the value of 
$500, one to a graduate student who has stud- 
ied for two years in the College, one to a 
graduate student who has studied for one 
year in the College, and one to a member of 
the Senior Class who has received the highest 
average grade on all the courses she has attend- 
ed. The sum of $500 is to be spent in de- 
fraying the expense of one year's study at 
some European L^niversity. In consequence of 
war conditions it is not probable that the 
winners of the scholarships this year will be 
able to go abroad immediately, but after the 
war is over they expect to go to Europe and 
continue their studies. 

Hazel Grant Ormsbee, of Ithaca, New 
York, is the winner this year of the Mary E. 
Garrett, or Second Year, European Fellowship. 
Miss Ormsbee was born in Beacon, Dutchess 
County, New York, and has resided in Ithaca. 
She is a graduate of Cornell University, and 
received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from 
Cornell in 1915. She was then awarded one 
of the Carola Woerishoffer Scholarships in 
Social Economy and Social Research at Bryn 
Mawr College, and has studied at Bryn Mawr 
College for two years in Social Economy, mak- 
ing a special study of labor conditions and the 
choice of vocations. She has also studied 
Psychology and Mental Tests in relation to 
labor problems. She will probably in the 
future attend the London School of Economics 
and make a special study of the labor exchanges 
in Great Britain. Miss Ormsbee makes the 
24th holder of the Mary E. Garrett European 
Fellowship. Fourteen of the previous holders 
are now Doctors of Philosophy; ten of them are 
teaching in colleges, one is employed in college 
administration, three are teaching in schools, 
three are studying, one is a private tutor. 
Only four have no occupation, and of these 
two are married. 

Bird Margaret Turner, of Moundsville, 
West Virginia, is the winner of the President's 
European Fellowship open 10 students who 
have studied for one year in the Bryn Mawr 
College Graduate School. Miss Turner is a 
graduate o' the University of West Virginia, 
1915, where she was student assistant in Math- 



ematics, and she taught in the summer 
school o' this University in the summers of 
1915 and 1916. During the last year she has 
been a graduate scholar in Mathematics at 
Bryn Mawr College and has received the 
scholarship on the excellent work she has done 
in Mathematics and Education. She makes 
the 21st student to receive the President's 
European Fellowship, and of the previous 
twenty, ten are now Doctors of Philosophy; 
eleven are now teaching in colleges, one is 
engaged in college administration, one is study- 
ing, and one is teaching school. Only three 
have no occupation, and of these two are 
married. 

The remaining honors are those of the Class 
of 1917. Students who have received a grade 
between 85 and 90 receive their degree "magna 
cum laude." These students are: 

Thalia Howard Smith, Katharine Bun 
Blodgett, Marjorie Josephine Milne, Mary 
Robinson Hodge. 

The degree "cum laude" has been won by 
the following students with a grade between 80 
and 85 on all their college work: 

Marian Rhoads, Janet Randolph Grace, 
Esther Johnson, Agnes Dorothy Shipley, Mary 
Sylvester Cline, Henrietta Amelia Dixon, 
Elizabeth Emerson, Ada Frances Johnson, 
Amelia Kellogg MacMaster, Ruth Juliette 
Levy, Margaret Scattergood, Monica Barry 
O'Shea, Eugenie Donchian, Alice Beardwood, 
Dorothy Macdonald. 

The highest honor given in the class; that is, 
the Bryn Mawr European Fellowship, has been 
awarded to Thalia Howard Smith, of New 
York City, who has the high grade of 88.4 on 
all her college work, and has held the Bryn 
Mawr Matriculation Scholarship for New York, 
New Jersey and Delaware, the James E. 
Rhoads Junior Scholarship, and the Maria L. 
Eastman Brooke Hall Memorial Scholarship 
She makes the twenty-ninth holder of the 
Bryn Mawr European Fellowship. 

SUPPORT OF BELGIAN CHILDREN 

To The Alumnae and Former Students of Bryn 
Mawr College: 

The Undergraduates, Graduate students and 
acuity of Bryn Mawr college have pledged to 
the American Commission for Relief in Belgium 
the support of a Belgian village of 400 children 
for one year. This support inc udes the pay- 
ment of $400 a month through March, 1918, 
and provides for the supplementary meal 



1917] 



In Memoriam 



49 



(costing 3 cents a day or $1 a month per child) 
consisting of cocoa and white biscuit which 
the Commission cannot afford to give, besides 
the regular rations, unless contributions are 
made especially for that purpose. 

The usual rations provided by the Commis- 
sion, although keeping the children alive, are 
not sufficient to prevent an alarming spread of 
tuberculosis nor to give them strength to grow. 
There are one and a quarter million children 
dependent on the Commission, who have 
stopped growing owing to the lack of sufficient 
food. What hope is there for a country whose 
youth cannot reach a healthful maturity? 

Because Bryn Mawr is the first college or 
university in America to work as a community 
for the Belgians, we feel that every one con- 
nected with Bryn Mawr ought to have an 
opportunity to share in this work. The Com- 
mittee for Belgian Relief of Bryn Mawr College 
does not feel thai $400 a month represents the 
entire resources of the College. It feels further 
that for such an end, for the future of a nation, 
all resources should be employed to their ut- 



most. Already Bryn Mawr is taking care of 
400 children for one year — a mere beginning. 
With your aid that number can be increased. 

We are appealing to you as to one who has 
had a share in the activities of Bryn Mawr to 
help us in this work. A dollar a month, or $12 a 
year, payable now, will take care of one child. 
Whatever you give goes directly to the Belgians 
through the American Commission for Relief in 
Belgium as the expenses of this committee are 
privately paid. By your generous response to 
this appeal may we feel that the Undergrad- 
uates have the support of those who have 
gone before them in this effort, and that Bryn 
Mawr is working as a whole. 

[Signed| Elisabeth S. Granger, '17, 

Chairman. 
Fredrica B. Howell, '19, 
Elizabeth Houghton, '18, 
Millicent Carey, '20, 
Helen Fuller, Graduate. 

Checks payable to Elizabeth Houghton, 
Rockefeller Hall, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 



IN MEMORIAM 



ELIZABETH MINGUS GRIFFITH 

The sudden death of Elizabeth Mingus 
Griffith on September 29, 1916, came as a great 
shock to her many friends, and in it the cause 
of secondary education for girls has suffered a 
real loss. She had been associated with the 
work of girls' preparatory schools since her 
graduation from Bryn Mawr in 1900, having 
taught successively in the Bryn Mawr School 
of Baltimore, Darlington Seminary, the East 
Orange Collegiate School, and Miss Church's 
School, Boston, of which she had been since 
1909 Assistant Principal. She was also a 
member of the Headmistresses' Association. 
It was her constant purpose to maintain in all 
her work the uncompromising standards of 
broad and sound scholarship for which Bryn 
Mawr stands, and she succeeded to an unusual 
degree not only in attaching her students to 
her personally, but in arousing in them a 
desire for worthy achievement and an enthus- 
iasm for knowledge for its own sake. 

She was unsparing in the demands she made 
opon herself, was active in suffrage work in 
Boston and New York, and was constantly 
studying. She held the degrees of A.M. and 
Pd.M. from Columbia, and at the time of her 



death had nearly completed the requirements 
for her Ph.D. 

To those of us whose privilege it was to 
enjoy her close personal friendship, her loss 
means more than we can say, and to the large 
circle of students and teachers with whom she 
came in contact her memory will always be an 
inspiration toward high ideals and ungrudging 
service. 

DR. JOSEPH W. WARREN 

The news of the death of Dr. Joseph W. 
Warren, former professor of physiology at 
Bryn Mawr, will be deeply felt amongst a 
wide circle of the alumnae. Dr. Warren came 
to Bryn Mawr in the autumn of 1891, when the 
biological department underwent its first great 
change, and for more than twenty years he was 
closely associated with the affairs of the Col- 
lege, both at home and abroad. Those who 
worked under Dr. Warren in the early days of 
his life at Bryn Mawr know that he came there 
without any great enthusiasm for the higher 
education of women, but they can also testify 
that as time went on, he became increasingly 
convinced of women's capacity to profit by the 
educational advantages then being opened to 
them on all sides and also to entertain a gen- 



50 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



uine respect for their activities in the work of 
the world. 

As the years passed by, Dr. Warren entered 
more and more fully into the life of the Col- 
lege and identified himself more and more 
completely with its interests and pursuits. He 
was a man, who, whatever his hand found to 
to, did it with his might, and having once 
made the interests of the College his own, he 
spared no time nor effort in her service. Bryn 
Mawr owes him a great deal, more, it may be, 
than she has altogether realized, for his social 
gifts, the wit and humor that made him such 
good company and such a successful public 
speaker, as well as his liberal education and 
knowledge of the world, were all valuable as- 
sets in her outside intercourse, while his gift 
for organization and his thoroughness in 
execution made his services invaluable in her 
interna] administration. I think few persons 
are aware, for instance, that at the time Dalton 
Hall was completed, Dr. Warren gave up his 
Christmas holidays and devoted all his time 
during the period assigned to them to over- 
seeing the establishment of the biological 
department in its new quarters. 

But the greatest service that Dr. Warren 
rendered to the College lay in his relations with 
the students, both individually and collectively. 
One of his salient characteristics was his inter- 
est in human nature; moreover, he was fortunate 
in possessing that rare and choice gift, a genuine 
interest in the individual, which, together with 
his natural kindness of heart, made him as the 
years went by, above all else, the students' 
friend. No finer tribute can be paid to a man 
than an abiding confidence in his will to help 
others, and it is just this tribute that Bryn 
Mawr students paid to Dr. Warren, uncon- 
sciously, while he lived amongst them and that 
Bryn Mawr alumnae will continue to pay to 
his memory, with deliberate intention, in the 
years to come. The means of help at Dr. 
Warren's command increased, of course, as time 
went on, and each year made the students 
more secure in the knowledge that whenever 
it was within his power to aid, he might be 
relied upon to do so. One of them once said 
to me when speaking of certain difficulties en- 
countered at one period of her college life: 
"If I had only gone to Dr. Warren in the be- 
ginning, he would have helped me through." 



Nor did his interest in the students cease 
with the close of their life on the campus. An 
alumna who published a little article soon after 
her graduation was gratified to find a favorable 
review of it soon afterwards in a prominent 
magazine, but it was not until years later 
that she discovered the review in question had 
been written by Dr. Warren, who thus quietly 
lent a hand to help her on her way into the 
world. 

One side of Dr. Warren's life, namely, his 
work as a physician, which he carried on dur- 
ing the summers at the Isle of Shoals, was 
necessarily little known at Bryn Mawr. 
Nevertheless, I feel that it is due to him not 
to pass it by unnoticed, for he dearly loved his 
profession and was one of those who stood for 
all that is finest and most progressive in it. I 
ought not to conclude this brief memorial, 
therefore, without speaking of the respect in 
which he was held by other physicians and of 
the confidence reposed in him by his patients, 
as well as of their warm regard for him. On 
two occasions within the last year relatives of 
his former patients at the Isle of Shoals have 
spoken to me with deep feeling of his skill as a 
practitioner and his personal kindness in illness 
and sorrow. 

Bryn Mawr sustained a great loss when Dr. 
Warren severed his connection with it, though 
it is pleasant for his friends to know that he 
found his new activities interesting and congen- 
ial. Those who knew something of his abil- 
ities in original work hoped that the increased 
opportunities and facilities at his command 
might enable him to take up the investigation 
of some scientific problem, and if he had lived 
a few years longer the field of such research 
might have been the richer by some contri- 
bution at his hands. This hope, alas, can 
never be fulfilled. Dr. Warren's work among 
us is over, but he has left behind him a far 
more valuable memorial in a life-work well done 
in high ideals steadfastly maintained, and in 
innumerable acts of personal kindness, the 
memory of which lies warm at many hearts. 
The recording angel may surely 

"write him as one who loved his fellow men" 

and so call him to the highest room. 

Caroline Wormeley Latimer, '96. 



1917] 



News from the Clubs 



51 



NEWS FROM THE CLUBS 



NEW YORK 

137 East 40th Street 

Secretary, Isabel Peters, 33 West 49th Street. 

The January gathering at the Club was 
turned into a luncheon and meeting of the 
New York Branch of the Alumnae Association. 
It was a very interesting occasion, for Miss 
Kirkbride spoke on the Reorganization of the 
College, Miss Goldmark on the work of the 
Social Center at Bryn Mawr, and Mrs. Charles 
Dudley reported on the Endowment Fund. 

In February the Club held its annual meeting 
and elected the officers for the year. When 
the business was over, Frances Browne, who 
represented the Club at the annual meeting of 
the Board of Directors of the Alumnae As- 
sociation, made her report. It was interesting 
that the Club as a body was able to be repre- 
sented in the Alumnae Association. The 
meeting was followed by a lively tea. 

Plans are being made for the annual din- 
ner in March at which it is hoped that Presi- 
dent Thomas will be the guest of honor. 

OHIO 

To Alumnae and Former Students of Bryn Mawr 
College: 

On January 22, 1917, a second meeting of 
alumnae and former students of Bryn Mawr 
College, resident in Columbus, Ohio, was 
called at the Columbus School for Girls, by 
Miss Grace Latimer Jones (B.M. 1900), to 
consider the formation of an Ohio Bryn Mawr 
Club. A 1 this meeting temporary officers were 
elected a follows: 

Chairman, Miss Grace Latimer Jones, Col- 
umbus School fo • Girls. 

Secretary, Miss Adeline Werner, (B.M. 1916) 
1640 E. Broad Street. 

The following resolutions were unanimously 
passed : 

Resolved That: 

1. The women at this meeting form the 
nucleus of an Ohio Bryn Mawr Club, to which 
all Alumnae and Former Students of the Col- 
lege shall be eligible. 

2. The immediate object of this organiza- 
tion shall be: 

a To afford such alumna;- and former stu- 
dents an opportunity to become better acquaint- 
ed with one other. 



b To make more widely known throughout 
Ohio the exceptional advantages offered in the 
undergraduate courses of Bryn Mawr College. 

c To stimulate interest in the Bryn Mawr 
Graduate School by informing women now 
studying in the colleges of Ohio, of the unusual 
number of scholarships and fellowships open 
to advanced and research students. 

3. The officers be empowered to call and 
arrange a meeting of all such alumnae and 
former students in April, such meeting to be 
held at the Columbus School for Girls. 

4. The Secretary be empowered to send a 
newspaper notice of this meeting, and a copy 
of these resolutions to every alumna and former 
student of Bryn Mawr College who is now 
resident in Ohio, and to notify these, by letter 
or personal interview, a reasonable time before 
the date set for the April meeting. 

5. The Secretary be empowered to send a 
copy of these resolutions to the President and 
to the Secretary of the Alumnae Association 
of Bryn Mawr College, and that she in person 
present these resolutions for approval at the 
February meeting of said Association. 

Adeline Werner, 
Temporary Secretary. 

The following extracts from a letter from 
Grace Latimer Jones are of interest in this 
connection: 

"My idea of an Ohio Club would be some- 
thing like this: We could have members en- 
rolled throughout the state, paying each a 
small annual fee to meet printing expenses. 
The first effort would be to enroll all who are 
eligible, and to make all feel an enthusiasm in 
belonging to the organization. We should have 
an annual meeting, in Columbus the first time, 
because that is the city most centrally located. 
This would be an all-day meeting; and unless 
great numbers come, I will be glad to bear 
the expense of the first luncheon, and to "put 
up" the members. Some few might have to 
stay all night. You see the expense to each 
member would then be only her railroad fare, 
this would seem to me to be a good way to 
start the organization. 

Of course the real purpose of such clubs is 
to stir Bsyn Mawr interest, not only in those 
who have been members of the college, but 
also in those who might later become students. 



52 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



Bryn Mawr is little known in this state; and so 
a well-defined, dignified publicity policy would 
be desirable. The newspapers in Columbus 
will give meetings all the space we can wish to 
have. In Columbus itself a meeting will ac- 
complish a great deal. I will see to it that in 
the newspapers of every town in which there 
is a Bryn Mawrtyr, a notice appears stating 
that the meeting is to be held; and I think we 
can have a notice of the meeting later. In 
this way hundreds of persons who have never 
heard of the college will have it brought to 
their attention. 

Local alumnae can do a good deal, if they 
care to, to gain the interest of girls in various 
schools. I mean to send to each of the local 
college clubs in Columbus an invitation to 
present to our pupils the attractions of the 
several colleges. We mean to appoint a day 
when there will be an exhibit of the college. 
In the case of Bryn Mawr, we can have a 
lantern slide talk at the end of the morning 
service. I rather hope that you have lantern 



slides to send on application — as some other 
colleges have. At any rate good postcards 
can be used in our projector. Then we can 
have a small exhibit of lanterns, of calendars, 
of magazines, and of good photographs, and 
etchings. It would be very helpful if the 
college might have an interesting exhibit to 
send about to clubs or schools — an exhibit that 
the alumnae might use to make people under- 
stand what the nature of the college life and 
work is. I am constantly asked to tell what 
the particular attractions and excellences of 
Bryn Mawr are; and this would be a tangible 
way of reaching our pupils with information 
that really they want. I have real hope of 
creating more Bryn Mawr enthusiasm in Ohio, 
now that examinations are to be insisted upon 
in all the women's colleges. In our public 
schools there are now no examinations of any 
sort given; and so you can see that in the past 
it has been difficult to rouse girls to enter a 
college where there is no other method of ad- 



NEWS FROM THE CLASSES 

The news of this department is compiled from information furnished by class secretaries, Bryn Mawr Clubs, and 
irom other reliable sources for which the Editor is responsible. Acknowledgment is also due to the Bryn Mawr Coll*&« 
News for items of news. 

Alumnae and former students of Bryn Mawr College are earnestly requested to 
send directly to the Quarterly — or if they prefer, to their Class Secretaries — for 
use in these columns, items of news concerning themselves. There is a constant 
demand, on the part of Quarterly readers, for abundant class news. But the 
class news can be complete, accurate, and timely only if each one will take the 
trouble to send in promptly information concerning herself. And the Classes that 
have not secretaries willing to act as correspondents for the Quarterly are urged 
to appoint such officers. 



1889 

Secretary, Mrs. Frank H. Simpson, Over- 
look, College Hill, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Ella Riegel, Legislative Chairman of the 
Pennsylvania Branch of the Congressional 
Union, was one of the delegates to the White 
House to present the Boissevain memorials to 
President Wilson. 

1892 

Secretary, Mrs. F. M. Ives, 318 West 75th 
Street, New Y^rk City. 



1893 

Secretary, Mrs. J. E. Johnson, Jr., 8 Oak 
Way, Hartsdale, N. Y. 

Dr. Simon Flexner, husband of Helen Thomas 
Flexner, has been elected Foreign Associate Mem- 
ber of the French Academy of Medicine. 

The College News has the following to say of 
Um6 Tsuda: "In speaking to several students 
after Chapel Sunday night, Bishop Lloyd, the 
head of the Episcopal Board for Foreign Mis- 
sions, said of Miss Tsuda,' 'There is nothing 
in Japan more astonishing than Miss Tsuda. 
Her steady push upwards in her little school 
is an immeasurable influence for fT ood.' " 



1917] 



News from the Classes 



53 






1894 

Secretary, Mrs. R. N. Durfee, 19 High- 
land Avenue, Fall River, Mass. 

1896 

"The Cultural College" was the subject of 
Professor Georgiana Goddard King's address 
at the luncheon of the Montclair College 
Women's Club in January in which she advo- 
cated the four year under-graduate course as 
typified at Bryn Mawr. The vocational col- 
lege was the subject of another speech, but 
Miss King said that the place for vocational 
work is after, not instead of, an academic 
education. 

"If a student wants to go into paid work, 
Miss King pointed out, a cultural course gives 
a fundamental training which enables her to 
accomplish more and advance further in the 
line she chooses; if she either does not want a 
paid position or is unable to leave home on 
account of responsibilities there it gives her 
invaluable resources and wide fields of interest 
to which to turn." — The College News. 

The marriage of Dora Keen to George W. 
Handy was briefly mentioned in the Quarter- 
ly for July, 1916. The marriage took place 
at McCarthy, Alaska, in the virgin forest, 
within sight of Mt. Blackburn. Mr. and Mrs. 
Handy left at once for a nine weeks' camping 
trip through the wilds. They returned to 
Philadelphia in October and are now living at 
Beulah Farm, West Hartford, Vt. Mrs. Handy 
has given lectures this winter and expects to 
continue her lecturing and writing. She had 
an article on climbing in the Alps in the Oc- 
tober Scribner. Mr. Handy is the son of a 
German army officer. He left Germany at the 
age of seventeen, traveled extensively, and 
has been in Alaska most of the time for the 
past twelve years. Being fond of adventure, 
he offered himself to be one of the second ex- 
pedition to attempt Mt. Blackburn, in April, 
1912, and alone out of seven men reached the 
top with Miss Keen, on May 19, in an expedi- 
tion that required thirty-three days continu- 
ously on dangerous glaciers. 

1897 

Anne Lawther spoke in chapel at College 
recently. 

The College News of March 7, has the follow- 
ing to say of Corinna Putnam Smith (Mrs. 
Joseph Lindon Smith): 



"In the first onrush of the war, when fighting 
raged about Mons and the Marne and the 
Aisne, hundreds of villages of the French 
frontier were swept away and the people left 
homeless; the suffering of the refugee children 
of these villages, whose families if not killed 
are often lost from them, will be described by 
Mrs. Joseph Lindon Smith, ex-'97, Friday 
afternoon at four o'clock in Taylor. Mrs. 
Lindon Smith came back two months ago from 
France, where she went to investigate the 
condition of the children on behalf of the 
Franco-American Committee for the Protec- 
tion of Children of the Frontier. 

Her appeal is not connected with the fund for 
the "Fatherless Children of France," which is 
in part supported by the government. In the 
case of these children their fathers have been 
soldiers killed in battle while those of the 
'frontier' children may have been civilians lost 
in the destruction of their villages. 

"Mrs. Lindon Smith has the distinction of 
being the only Christian ever admitted to a cer- 
tain Egyptian mosque. The perfect recitation 
of a chapter of the Koran in Arabic gained her 
this privilege. Mr. Joseph Lindon Smith is 
well known as a landscape painter. Some 
bas-reliefs, copied by him from the Egyptian, 
are now in the Boston Museum." 

1899 

Secretary, Mrs. E. H. Waring, 325 Washing- 
ton Street, Glen Ridge, N. J. 

Mary F. Hoyt, ex-'99, and Ellen Kilpatrick, 
ex-'99, spent two weeks last summer at the 
National Service School studying wireless and 
signal work, and house nursing. 

Amy Steiner, Mary Thurber Dennison (Mrs. 
H. S. Dennison), and Sibyl Hubbard Darling- 
ton (Mrs. H. S. Darlington) are acting as sub- 
collectors for the Endowment Fund for Balti- 
more, Boston, and Philadelphia respectively, 
under Laura Peckham Waring (Mrs. E. H. 
Waring) who has undertaken the collectorship 
in place of Emma Guffey Miller (Mrs. Carroll 
Miller), resigned. 

Every one will be glad to hear that Mrs. 
Miller's little boy, Joseph, is making a fine 
recovery from his attack of infantile paralysis, 
and that one of the Miller twins, John, who 
was hurt seriously in a coasting accident in 
December, *has also recovered. 

Margaret Hall spent February in Cuba and 
the Isle of Pines. 



54 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



Frances Keay Ballard (Mrs. T. P. Ballard), 
45 Hastings Avenue, East Cleveland, Ohio, has 
issued a circular with a list of interesting sub- 
jects on which she talks. She calls it "Lec- 
tures on Questions of Public Interest," and the 
topics include Single Tax, the new Seaman's 
Law, Suffrage and Social Service, Legal Status 
of Women, Municipal Government, etc. 

1900 

On January 22, Robert Darrah Jenks, hus- 
band of Maud Lowrey Jenks, died suddenly of 
pneumonia. 

Grace Latimer Jones went to Buffalo on 
January 23 as a delegate from the Columbus, 
Ohio, Parents' League, to the first general 
Conference of the Parents' Leagues of America. 

Hilda Loines is general secretary of the 
Woman's National Farm and Garden Associa- 
tion and has an office at 600 Lexington Avenue, 
New York City. 

Elsie Dean Findley (Mrs. J. D. Findley) 
has a third daughter, Jane Dean Findley, born 
April 17, 1916. 

Clara Seymour St. John (Mrs. George C. 
St. John) has a son, Francis, born July 31, 
1916. 

Renee Mitchell Righter (Mrs. Thomas M. 
Righter) has a daughter, Gertrude, born Nov- 
ember 5, 1916. 

Leslie Knowles Blake (Mrs. Arthur Blake) 
has a son, born last July. 

A memorial to Elizabeth Griffith appears in 
another part of this number of the Quarterly, 
but the following notice has been sent in and 
should not be omitted: 

"It is with very heartfelt sorrow that the 
Class of 1900 will learn of the tragic death of 
Bessie Griffith on September 29. She fell 
from an upper window of the school where she 
was teaching and was instantly killed. Her 
life was a singularly gifted one and such an 
ending to its great usefulness and inspiration 
is very pitiful. Elizabeth Griffith had been for 
several years vice-principal of Miss Church's 
School in Boston. In addition she studied 
several summers at Columbia and took her 
M.A. there two or three years ago. One year 
ago she resigned from Miss Church's School 
and spent last year studying in the School of 
Pedagogy at Columbia, taking her Pd.M. in 
June. Last summer she did literary work, and 
this fall she had taken a position in a school in 
New York." 

Gertrude Ely, ex-'OO, was instrumental in 



starting a pageant, given in the Philadelphia 
Opera House, to rouse Philadelphia's interest in 
mission work. The pageant was a religious 
mask showing in allegorical form the yearning 
of primitive peoples for the unknown. 

1903 

Secretary, Mrs. H. K. Smith, Farmington, 
Conn. 

Rosalie James is studying at the New York 
School of Philanthropy. 

1904 

Secretary, Emma O. Thompson, 213 South 
50th Street, Philadelphia. 

Bertha C. Norris read a paper before the 
Annual Meeting of the Tennessee Philological 
Association at Marys ville, Tenn., February 23. 

Edna Aston Shearer has been made assist- 
ant professor of education at Smith College. 

Bertha Brown has announced her engage- 
ment to Walter D. Lambert, who is in the 
Coast and Geodetic Survey of the Department 
of Commerce Washington, D. C. 

Virginia Chauvenet, ex-'04, is playing with 
Mrs. Fiske's company in "Erstwhile Susan." 

Clara Woodruff Hull (Mrs. R. A. Hull) has a 
second son, Lewis Woodruff Hull, born October 
16, at Scran ton, Pa. Her husband has been 
stationed at El Paso with the Thirteenth 
Pennsylvania Infantry. 

Anna Jonas had a paper " Pre-Cambrian and 
Triassic Diabase in Eastern Pennsylvania" in 
the Bulletin of the American Museum of Nat- 
ural History for January 1917. 

Esther Sinn has been appointed director of 
Social Service at Gramercy Park Center, New 
York City. 

Maria Albee Uhl (Mrs. Charles Uhl), has a 
daughter, Mary Hawes Uhl, born February 
28, 1917, at New Haven, Conn. 

1905 

Secretary, Mrs. C. M. Hardenbergh, 3824 
Warwick Boulevard, Kansas City, Mo. 

Alberta Warner has announced her engage- 
ment to Harold Aiken of Berwyn, Pa. 

Isabel Lynde Dammann (Mrs. J. F. Dam- 
mann, Jr.) has a second son. 

1906 

Secretary, Maria Smith, St. Davids, Pa. 

Helen Lowengrund Jacoby (Mrs. George W. 
Jacoby), has a daughter, Kathryn Moss Jacoby, 
born September 6, 1916. 



1917] 



News from the Classes 



55 






Helen Smith Brown (Mrs. Sanger Brown, 
2nd ) is bringing out a book of poems, "Elan 
Vital," published by Richard G. Badger of 
Boston. 

Ethel De Koven Hudson (Mrs. H. K. Hud- 
son) has been canvassing New York offices for 
signatures to be sent to President Wilson urg- 
ing compulsory military service. 

A Philadelphia newspaper commented as 
follows on Adelaide Neall's speech at the 
conference on Journalism and Publishing 
House Work: 

"Miss Neall is an admirable speaker. Her 
voice is strong and carries her point. Her 
enunciation is clear. She held her audience 
and knew when to stop. Indeed she seemed 
to represent the modern finished product — 
self-reliant, clever, resourceful, successful; 
above all, unafraid. There is nothing of the 
'twining vine' of our old-fashioned youth about 
her." 

Alice Lauterbach has announced her engage- 
ment to Roger Flint of Cambridge, Mass. 
They expect to be married in June and will 
live in Newtonville. 

1907 

Secretary, Mrs. Robert East Apthorp, 
Roundy's Hill, Marblehead, Mass. 

Julia Benjamin Howson (Mrs. Roger S. 
Howson), has a daughter. 

1908 

Secretary, Mrs. Dudley Montomery, 25 
Langdon Street, Madison, Wis. 

Margaret Morris was married on February 
20 to Elmer Ray Haskins. 

Myra Elliot Vauclain (Mrs. Jacques Vau- 
clain) has a third child, born in November. 

Louise Congdon Balmer (Mrs. J. P. Balmer) 
spent a few days in January in Madison with 
Josephine Proudfit Montgomery (Mrs. Dudley 
Montgomery). 

Margaret Jones Turnbull (Mrs. Bayard 
Turnbull) has a daughter, Francis Litchfield, 
born Jan. 27. 

1909 

Secretary, Frances Browne, 15 East 10th 
Street, New York City. 

Margaret Ames, ex-'09, has announced her 
engagement to Cushing Wright of St. Paul, 
Minn. Miss Ames returned just before Christ- 
mas from France, where she had been working 



for six months with the American Red Cross, 
helping to distribute supplies. 

Pleasaunce Baker has been in Zellwood all 
winter, except for a visit of a few weeks in 
Baltimore at the end of February. 

Fannie Barber has been living in New York 
this winter, after three years spent in the Phil- 
ippine Islands. 

Marie Belleville, educational and membership 
secretary of the West Side Branch of the Y. 
W. C. A. in New York City, has been par- 
ticularly busy of late organizing classes in 
Home Care of the Sick, Camp Cooking, Food 
Conservation, etc., for which there has been 
great demand. 

Margaret Bontecou has been working under 
Dr. Smith during her three years as warden at 
Bryn Mawr, and will come up for her M.A. 
this spring. 

Katharine Ecob has been in Portland, Oregon, 
since Christmas, visiting her sister. 

Katharine Branson is teaching in Miss 
Beard's School, Orange. 

Bertha Ehlers is warden of Radnor. 
Helen Irey is teaching in the Dearborn- 
Morgan School in Orange. 

Emily Maurice Dall (Mrs. C. W. Dall), ex-'09, 
has been spending a part of the winter on 
Jekyl Island, Ga., with her two small boys. 

Alice Miller, ex-'09, has announced her en- 
gagement to Dr. Adam Bissell. Dr. Bissell is 
a graduate of Cornell Medical School and is 
now doing hospital service in the New York 
Hospital. 

Marianne Moore is living in Chatham, N. J., 
where her brother is minister of the Presby- 
terian church. 

Catharine Goodale Warren (Mrs. Rawson 
Warren) is, as she expresses it, 'Somewhere 
in Texas, lost in a wilderness of mesquite and 
Mexicans." Lieut. Warren has been stationed 
there since last summer. 
Mary Nearing is warden of Rockefeller. 
Anna Piatt is studying medicine at Johns 
Hopkins. 

May Putnam finishes her service at the 
Royal Hospital for Sick Children in Glasgow, 
Scotland, in April and will probably go to 
either London or Paris for war relief service. 
Shirley Putnam was to have sailed for Paris 
and war relief work on the day that diplomatic 
relations between Germany and the United 
States were broken off. She refused to be a 
party to the "overt act" and is therefore still 
in New York. 



56 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



Mary Rand Birch (Mrs. Stephen Birch), 
ex-'09, is living in New York City at 12 East 
87th Street. 

Gladys Stout was married on February 20 
to Robert B. Bowler. Mr. Bowler is in busi- 
ness in New York, where they have taken an 
apartment on East 40th Street. 

Lacy Van Wagenen is studying photography 
at the White School of Photography in New 
York. She has already had one of her pictures 
in an exhibition held at the Ehrich Galleries in 
February. 

Margaret Vickery, ex-'09, is very successful 
in her work in the Colored Industrial School 
at Calhoune, Ala. 

Cynthia Wesson is in Somersetshire, Eng- 
land, where she says they hear hardly any 
more news of the war than we do. She is 
playing golf assiduously. 

Marnette Wood Chesnutt (Mrs. J. H. Ches- 
nutt), has a son, James Wood Chesnutt, born 
in the early part of December. 

Mary Skinner is studying economics at Co- 
lumbia. 

1910 

Secretary, Mrs. H. B. Van Dyne, Troy, Pa. 

Bessie Cox Wolstenholme (Mrs. Hollis Wol- 
stenholme) has a daughter, Anne, born October 
18, 1916. 

- Elsie Deems has announced her engagement 
to Carol Kane Neilson, of New York and 
Paonia, Col. 

Charlotte Simonds Sage (Mrs. Nathaniel 
Sage) spent some time in New York on the 
way to Pomfret, Conn. 

Alice Whittemore is teaching at the Stevens 
School in Germantown. 

1911 

Secretary, Mrs. Samuel Greeley, Winnetka, 
III ' 

Class Correspondent, Margaret J. IIobart, 
Sommariva, Easthampton, N. Y. 

Margery Hoffman is spending the winter in 
New York studying art. She is staying with 
the family of Mollie Kilner. 

Mollie Kilner is in Portland, Ore., continuing 
her nursing course at the Multomah Hospital. 

Amy Walker Field (Mrs. James A. Field) has 
been spending several weeks in New York with 
her mother at the Hotel Brevoort. 

Marion Scott is editing the Music Page of 
the New York Evening Mail and is living at 
24 East 38th Street. 



Helen Henderson is engaged to Sidney Green, 
of Petersburg, Va. 

Marion Crane was married on April 9 to 
Charles Carroll, instructor in English at Cornell. 

Catherine Delano Grant (Mrs. Alexander G. 
Grant) has a second son, Frederick Adams 
Grant, born on Christmas day, 1916. 

Margaret Prussing Le Vino (Mrs. A. S. Le 
Vino) has a baby boy, Shelby, born in New 
York on January 31. Mrs. Le Vino's address 
is now 43 West 83rd Street. 

Norvelle Browne,, ex-'ll, is spending the 
spring in Boston. 

Lois Lehman, ex-'ll, received her A.B. degree 
from the University of California last spring, 
and is now working for her A.M. 

Agnes Wood was married on February 14 to 
David Rupp, 3rd., at Wayne, Pa. 

Henrietta Magoffin has gone to Pittsburgh 
to live. She is acting as office assistant for 
her brother who is a physician, and is studying 
at the University. 

Frances Porter was married on March 17 to 
Dr. Herman Adler of New York. Dr. Adler is 
head of the Psychopathic Institute of the Chi- 
cago Juvenile Court, where Miss Porter had 
been working since 1914. 

Virginia Canan Smith (Mrs. John Harold 
Smith) has a son, Caspar Howriet Smith, born 
on February 22. 

1912 

Secretary: Mrs. John Alexander Mac- 
Donald, 3227 N. Pennsylvania Avenue, Indian- 
apolis, Ind. 

Sadie Beliekowsky studied at the University 
of Pennsylvania during the first semester of 
this year and took her teacher's certificate in 
West Virginia on credit. In January she went 
to Hinton, West Virginia, to teach in the same 
school in which she taught last year. 

Carmelita Chase Hinton (Mrs. Sebastian 
Flinton) has a daughter, born February 14, 
1917. She has named the baby Jean for Jean 
Stirling. 

Elizabeth Pinney Hunt (Mrs. Andrew Dick- 
son Hunt) has taken a house in Haverford, Pa., 
and moved to Haverford from Staten Island on 
March 24. Mr. Hunt has a position with the 
Westinghouse Electric Company, and has been 
transferred to the Philadelphia office of that 
company. 

Helen Marsh, ex-'12, is Assistant Librarian 
in the New York Public Library at Fifth Ave-' 
nue and Forty-second St. 






1917] 



News from the Classes 



57 



Rebecca Lewis is a graduate student in Latin 
and Old French at Johns Hopkins University. 

Marion Brown MacLean (Mrs. Malcolm 
Shaw MacLean), ex-' 12, and her husband are 
both on the staff of the Correct English Maga- 
zine. Mr. MacLean is teaching in the English 
department of Northwestern University and 
Mrs. MacLean is doing tutoring in English. 
Recently they have signed up for some in absen- 
tia work in Browning with Ann Arbor. In 
addition they are studying Russian as they 
expect to go to Petrograd to study as soon as 
the war is over. 

Agnes Morrow has left the Carnegie Founda- 
tion and has taken a position with the Charles 
E. Merrill Co. in New York. She is secretary 
of the Intercollegiate Alumnae Athletic Associa- 
tion of New York. 

Rachel Marshall Cogswell (Mrs. Daniel 
Cogswell), ex-'12, has moved from Sedro 
Wooley, Washington, to Lincoln, Kansas. 

Jean Stirling spent February in Tampa, 
Florida, and went from there to Miami early 
in March. She expects to be married in Wash- 
ington about the middle of April. 

Marjorie Thompson is teaching English at 
the Baldwin School in Bryn Mawr. 

Irma Shloss, ex-'12, has announced her en- 
gagement to Rabbi Eugene Mannheimer of 
Des Moines. 

Mary Alden Lane (Mrs Edwin Selden Lane) 
has gone to Rochester to visit her mother for 
some time. Her father died very suddenly 
on February 27. 

Ruth Akers, ex-'12, has bought a store in 
Los Angeles, Cal., opposite the University of 
Southern California. 

Lorle Stecher is teaching psychology at 
Temple University, Philadelphia. 

Pauline Clarke has gone to Washington to 
work with the Congressional Union. She is 
editing the Suffragist, the magazine of that 
organization. 

Norah Cam has left the aero-engine factory 
in Dumfries, Scotland and is Assistant Fitter 
in an Aeroplane works near Towcester, England. 

Ethel Thomas is Secretary of the Pennsyl- 
vania School for Social Service. 

Mary Peirce is helping to manage the Bryn 
Mawr Community Savings Fund which has 
recently been started for the children. 

Mary Gertrude Fendall is Chairman of Litera- 
ture for the Congressional Union. She is 
making an analysis of the last ejection in the 
suffrage states and is preparing the bi-annual 



report of the Congressional Union. She acted 
one week as Sergeant of the Guard for the suf- 
fragists who have been picketing the White 
House. 

1913 

Secretary, Nathalie Swift, 20 West 55th 
Street, New York City. 

Marjorie Murray is teaching at the Brearley 
School. 

Frances Ross has announced her engagement 
to Irvin C. Poley, of Germantown. 

Mary Sheldon has entered the Sisterhood of 
St. Anne's, Boston. 

1914 

Secretary, Ida W. Pritchett, 22 East 91st 
Street, New York City. 

Elizabeth Colt sailed on January 8 for Europe 
on the Espagne. She goes to Paris, where she 
is to be secretary to Mr. H. A. Gibbons. Her 
address is care of H. A- Gibbons, Esq., 120 
Boulevard Montparnasse. 

Isabel Benedict is inspecting factories in 
New York for the Y. W. C. A. 

Eleanor Allen is teaching at Miss Harker's 
School in Palo Alto, Cal. 

Margaret Blanchard is assistant warden of 
Pembroke. 

Rose Brandon has announced her engagement 
to Ole Todderud, of Butler, Pa. 

Katherine Shippen is studying at the New 
York School of Philanthropy. 

Katherine Dodd is living in New York and 
is the County Organizer for the Women's 
Suffrage party of Green County, N. Y. 

Evelyn Shaw was married in Chicago on 
January 26 to John McCutcheon, the cartoonist 
for the Chicago Tribune. 

Alice Miller has announced her engagement 
to William Chester, of New York. 

Caroline Allport, ex-' 14, has announced her 
engagement to Malcolm Fleming, of New York. 

"Mr. and Mrs. Frederic A. Delano, of this 
city and Washington, D. C, announce the en- 
gagement of their daughter, Miss Laura Delano 
to James L. Houghteling, of Chicago. Miss 
Delano was presented to society here several 
winters ago. Mr. Houghteling is at present at 
Petrograd, where he is acting as a special assis- 
tant secretary to the American Ambassador. 
He is a son of the late James L. Houghteling, 
and was graduated from Yale in 1905. No 
date has been arranged for the wedding — The 
New York Evening Post, March 16." 



58 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



Josephine Niles was married on April 14 to 
W. S. McClellan of Spring Grove, Pa. 

1915 

Secretary, Katharine W. McCollin, 2049 
Upland Way, Philadelphia. 

Florence Abernethy is working for the Bap- 
tist Publication Company in Philadelphia. 

Marjorie Fyfe is doing graduate work at 
Leland Stanford University. 

Harriet Bradford is Dean of Women at Le- 
land Stanford University. 

Ruth Hopkinson is working in Shreveport, 
La. 

Frances MacDonald is working in the Social 
Service Department of the University Hospital, 
Philadelphia. 

Cecilia Sargent is teaching in the high school 
at Cape May Court House, N. J. 

Katherine Sheafer is taking a course at the 
Jefferson Hospital, Philadelphia. 

Elizabeth Channing Fuller (Mrs. W. P. 
Fuller), ex-' 15, has a son, Thomas, born Novem- 
ber 1, 1916. 

Harriet Sheldon is assistant in Latin in the 
Columbus School for Girls. 

Marguerite Darkow is studying at Johns 
Hopkins. 

Eleanor Freer Wilson (Mrs. R. Wilson) has 
a daughter, born in March. 

Anne Hardon is working in the hospital at 
St. Valery-en-Caux in Normandy. 

Eleanor Dougherty, ex-'15, who sailed for 
France in December, expects to give dancing 
programs in the hospitals to entertain the 
wounded. 

1916 

Secretary, Adeline Werner, 1640 East 
Broad Street, Columbus, Ohio. 

Constance Kellen and Constance Dowd are 
traveling together in the West. 

Lois Goodnow MacMurray (Mrs. John V. A. 
MacMurray), ex-' 16, who is living in Pekin, 
China, has a daughter, born January 26. 

Lilla Worthington is studying at the Sargeant 
School of Dramatics, New York. 

Margaret Russell has announced her engage- 
ment to Roger Sturtevant Kellen. Mr. Kellen 
is a brother of Constance Kellen. Miss Russell 
met him last summer while visiting the Kellens 
on their ranch in the West. 

Jessie Adams has announced her engagement 
to Mr. MacDougald of Atlanta, Ga. 

Katharine Trowbridge, ex-' 16, is studying at 
the New York School of Philanthropy. 



Nannie Gail was married to J. Reaney Wolfe, 
of Baltimore, on April 10. 

Margaret Mabon, ex-' 16, has announced her 
engagement to Dr. David Kennedy Henderson. 
Dr. Henderson is serving in the R. A. M. C. 
and is at the present time at Lord Derby's war 
hospital in London, 

Ex-1918 

Margery Smith is secretary for Houghton, 
Mifflin Company. 

The wedding of Elizabeth Downs to Rowland 
Evans took place on April 10 at Fordhook 
Farms, Three Tuns, Pa. 

Elinor Lindley has announced her engage- 
ment to Ward Burton, of Minneapolis. The 
wedding will take place in April. 

Lydia Mark Saville (Mrs. J. K. Savilie) has 
a son, John Kimball Saville, born December 3, 
1916. 



The following names were registered at the 
alumnae meeting in February: 

Ph.D's 
Isabel Maddison, Mary Hamilton Swindler. 

1889 

Lina Lawrence, Julia Cope Collins, M. G. 
Thomas, Ella Riegel, Josephine Carey Thomas, 
Mary Grace Worthington, Margaret Thomas 
Carey, Anna Rhoads Ladd, Susan Braley Frank- 
lin. Sophia Weygandt Harris. 

1890 
Katharine M. Shipley. 

1891 
Emily L. Bull, Jane B. Haines 

1892 



Abbv Kirk. 



1893 



Lucy Martin Donnelly, Lucy Lewis, Jane 
L. Brownell. 

1895 

Marianna Janney, Elizabeth Conway Clark. 

1896 

Eleanor Larrabee Lattimore, Lydia T. Boring, 
Elizabeth B. Jones, Hilda Justice, Tirzah L. 
Nichols, Ida II. Ogilvie, Rebecca T. M. Dar- 
lington, Anna Scattergood Hoag, Katharine 
Innes Cook, Clara E. Farr, Hannah Cadbury 



1917] 



News from the Classes 



59 



Pyle, Gertrude Heritage Green, Georgiana 
Goddard King, Pauline Goldmark, Abigail 
Camp Dimon, E. B. Kirkbride, Caroline Mc- 
Cormick Slade, Mary Crawford Dudley. 

1897 

Anna M. W. Pennypacker, Sue Avis Blake, 
Euphemia M. Mann, Laura Niles, Mary L. 
Fay, Mary E. Converse, Elizabeth W. Towle. 

1898 

Marion Park, Elizabeth Nields Bancroft, 
Helen Williams Woodall, Mary De Haven 
Bright, Rebeca Mulford Foulke Cregar, Emma 
Cadbury, Jr. 

1899 

J. Rosalie Pooley, C. F. McLean. 

1900 

Edith Newlin Fell. Elise Dean Findley, Lois 
Farnham Horn, Susan J. Dewees, L. Emery 
Dudley, Ellen Duncan Fultz, Louise C. Francis, 
Cornelia H. Kellogg. 

1901 

Corinne Sickel Farley, Sylvia Lee, Annie 
Malcolm Slade, Eugenia Fowler Neale, Florence 
J. Corbus, Marion Parris Smith, Ethel Cantlin 
Buckley. 

1902 

Anne Hampton Todd, H. Jean Crawford, 
Helen B. Trimble, Frances B. Seth, Josephine 
Kieffer Foltz, Elizabeth D. Bodine. 

1903 
Elizabeth Snyder, Elsie Thomas McGinley. 

1904 

Bertha Brown, Margaret Scott, Martha 
Rockwell Moorhouse, Hermine Ehlers, Emma 
Fries, Miriam Frederick Holtzinger, Emma 
Thompson. 

1905 

Elma Loines, Marcia B ready, Edith Long- 
streth Wood, Alberta Warner, Theodora Bates, 
Elsie Tattersfield Banes. 

1906 

Mary Richardson Walcott, Helen Smith 
Brown, Louise Fleischmann, Helen Sandison, 



1907 

Alice Martin Hawkins, Marie H. Ballin, 
Lelia Woodruff Stokes, Emily Cooper Johnson, 
Annie A. Gendell, Ellen Thayer, Eunice Morgan 
Schenck,Letitia B. Windle, Katharine Harley, 
Miriam V. Ristine, Mary R. Ferguson. 

1908 

C. Jeannette Griffith, Mary Kinsley Best, 
Helen North Hunter, Mary C. Case. 

1909 

Mildred P. Durand, Emma White Mitchell, 
Margaret Bontecou, Frances Browne, Anna 
Elizabeth Harlan, Bertha S. Ehlers, Mary 
Frances Nearing, M. Georgina Biddle. 

1910 
Mary B. Wesner, Hilda W. Smith. 

1911 

Helen Emerson, Ellen E. Pottberg, Helen 
M. Ramsey, Mary M. W. Taylor, Margery 
Hoffman, Ruth Wells. 

1912 

Anna Hartshorne Brown, Lorle Stecher, 
Christine Hammer, Louise Watson, Beatrice 
Howson, Marjorie La Monte Thompson, Mary 
Peirce. 

1913 

Grace Turner, Agathe Deming, Florence C. 
Irish, R. Beatrice Miller, E. T. Shipley, Emma 
S. Robertson. 

1914 

Ruth Wallerstein, Leah T. Cadbury, Marjorie 
Childs, Margaret S. Williams, Janet Baird, 
Helen R. Kirk, Dorothy Weston. 

1915 
Olga Erbsloh, Zena J. Blanc. 

1916 

Marian Kleps, Agnes W. Grabau, Louise 

B. Dillingham, Adeline A. Werner, Kathryne 

C. Batchelder, Joanna Ross. 

1917 

Elizabeth Emerson, Mary Robinson Hodge, 
Helen Marie Harris, Eleanor Lansing Dulles. 



LITERARY NOTES 



All publications received will be acknowledged in this column. The editor begs that copies of books or articles by or 
about the Bryn Mawr Faculty and Bryn Mawr students, or book reviews written by alumnae, will be sent to the 
Quarterly for review, notice, or printing. 



BOOKS REVIEWED 

Greek and Roman Mythology. By Jessie 
M. Tatlock. New York: The Century Com- 
pany, 1917. $1.50. 

The author of this new text-book has shown 
singleness of purpose and an excellent sense of 
proportion. While covering the range of Greek 
and Roman mythology from the stories of the 
creation to the founding of Rome, she has omit- 
ted the less important myths and avoided all 
superfluous detail. The result is a clear and 
well-told account of the whole system, of which 
no essential part is lacking but which can be 
readily comprehended as a whole. 

Part I deals with the origin and characteris- 
tics of the greater and lesser gods of Olympus, 
of the earth and the sea, and of the lower world. 
Part II is devoted to stories of the heroes, and 
to the tales of the Trojan War and the founding 
of Rome. There is a thread of continuity 
running through it, and it is all so well arranged 
that the book can be easily used for reference; 
for looking up, for instance, the kinship of one 
of the heroes with the gods, or with another 
hero. 

The author states clearly that one object of 
the book is to prove that "what is known as 
classical mythology is a product of Greece," 
and has tried by her treatment to give an 
honest impression of the mind of the Greeks. 
She has wisely omitted all modern treat- 
ment of the stories, though she has given 
in the appendix an excellent list of modern 
interpretations which might be very useful. 
In choosing her illustrations she has for the 
most part been true to her purpose, avoiding 
all the modern statues and pictures of Greek 
gods and heroes — so far from the classic spirit — 
which disfigure so many of the works on myth- 
ology. Some of the weaker Greek productions 
of a late period might better have been omitted, 
and it is a pity to have included any of the 
inferior Roman wall-paintings. On the whole, 
however, her choice has been good; and her 
beautiful reproductions of the vase-paintings 
add much to the charm of the book. 



Altogether the book seems well adapted for 
use in classes; limited in extent but sufficient 
in compass, clear in style and arrangement, 
it will give the pupil a good understanding of 
all the Greek and Latin poetry he is likely to 
read, and an excellent foundation for the study 
of Greek art. 

Sylvia Lee. 

The Belief in God and Immortality. By 
Professor James A. Leuba. Sherman, French 
and Company; Boston, 1916, pp. xvii, 340. 

Professor Leuba's latest book, The Belief in 
God and Immortality, is an anthropological, psy- 
chological, and statistical study. It is divided 
into three parts: the first part is a consideration 
of two conceptions of immortality — the belief of 
non-civilized men, which Professor Leuba calls 
the primary belief, and the modern belief; the 
second part is a statistical study of the beliefs 
in a personal God and in personal immortality 
as they prevail in the United States; and the 
third part is a discussion of the present utility 
of these beliefs. 

The first three chapters of Part 1 deal with 
the beliefs of the non-civilized under various 
headings, such as, when the primary belief in 
continuation appeared, the savage's idea of soul 
and ghost, survival after death and immortality, 
the life of ghosts and their relations to the liv- 
ing, the primary paradise, fear of ghosts, and 
the relation of morality to continuation after 
death. The above are the topics of chapter 1. 
Chapter 2 discusses the origin of the ghost idea 
in the exteriorizing of memory images under 
the influence of emotion, in the "sense of pres- 
ence," in dreams, and in visions. In this con- 
nection are considered myths presupposing the 
natural endlessness of man, reflections and 
echoes, and vegetation and insect metamor- 
phoses. This chapter also shows a differentia- 
tion among savages of a ghost-idea and a soul- 
idea; and discusses several theories concerning 
the origin of the soul, such as those of Durk- 
heim, Crawley, and Feuerbach. Chapter 3 
describes the primary belief in continuation 
after death at the beginning of the historical 



1917] 



Literary Notes 



61 



period; and chapter four traces the origin of 
the modern conception of immortality through 
the belief in translation to a land of immortality, 
the Messianic prophecies, the recognition of 
the insufficiency of national hopes, and the 
consequent establishment of individual relations 
with the gods. The remainder of Part 1 deals 
with various attempts to demonstrate immor- 
tality by deduction and by direct sensory evi- 
dence and scientific induction. 

In connection with all of the foregoing topics, 
Professor Leuba has given most interesting and 
significant explanations and generalizations, 
accompanying them with many illustrative 
citations from anthropological literature. In a 
very general way, these may be summed up as 
follows: Two conceptions of immortality have 
been successively but independently elaborated, 
which differ radically from each other in origin, 
nature, and function. The primary belief was 
forced upon men, irrespective of their wishes, 
as an unavoidable interpretation of such facts 
as the apparition of deceased persons in dreams 
and visions: while the modern belief grew out 
of a desire for the attainment of ideals. The 
first is devoid of any moral significance; while 
the latter is very largely the outcome of yearn- 
ing for the realization of moral values. The 
first came to point exclusively to a wretched 
and painful existence and kept men continually 
trying to avoid the dangers which ghosts might 
aim against them; the second came to look for- 
ward to a state of increased or completed per- 
fection in endless continuation; and incited the 
living to ceaseless efforts to secure to them- 
selves the joys of paradise. Many endeavors 
have been made to rationalize the modern 
belief; but they have failed. In fact the more 
it has been attempted, the more general has 
become the conviction that though immortality 
cannot be disproved, it cannot be proved. 
When metaphysics failed, psychical research 
took up the problem of demonstration. How- 
ever spirit manifestations have been tested in 
various ways and are now almost totally dis- 
credited. 

Part II describes three investigations, setting 
forth the results verbally and graphically. 
First personal gods are defined as those beings 
who hold direct personal, that is, intellectual 
and affective relations with man; personal im- 
mortality is defined as the continuation after 
death of the conscious individual together with 
the continuation of the sense of one's identity. 
To prevent misunderstanding, Professor Leuba 



emphasizes that he is investigating beliefs in 
personal gods and in personal immortality only. 

Investigation A deals with the belief in God 
among American college students. P'our ques- 
tions were answered by all of the students of 
a number of classes of non-technical depart- 
ments of nine colleges of high rank and by two 
classes of a normal school. Approximately one 
thousand answers were received, of which 97 per 
cent were from students between eighteen and 
twenty years of age. Professor Leuba quotes 
at length many answers, each of which is repre- 
sentative of a large number of others. Investi- 
gation B deals with the belief in immortality 
in one college of high rank and of moderate 
size, whose students include members of all 
the Protestant denominations and a few Roman 
Catholics. Ninety per cent of these students 
answered the set of questions presented to 
them. Finally investigation C deals with the 
belief in God and immortality among American 
scientists, sociologists, historians, and psychol- 
ogists. For example, one thousand persons 
were chosen by a rule of chance from American 
Men of Science; these are divided into two 
groups of five hundred each, and these again 
into two subdivisions, including three hundred 
persons of lesser, and two hundred, of greater 
distinction. All the other groups of the inves- 
tigation are also divided into lesser and greater 
men. In one division of the scientists, the 
answers of the biologists and the physicists are 
kept separate so as to show the influence which 
training in the biological and physical sciences 
have upon the beliefs investigated. 

It is most unfortunate that the limited space 
of a review does not permit a detailed descrip- 
tion of the statistical methods employed, a state- 
ment of the questions asked and the results ob- 
tained; for it is difficult without them to indicate 
the full significance of these investigations. In 
general, however, the conclusions drawn are as 
follows. First the statistics are reliable; the 
fractions of whole groups upon which the several 
investigations bear are sufficient to make the re- 
sults representative of the entire groups. Not 
only do statisticians confirm this claim; but the 
fact of securing similar results by taking two 
chance lists of five hundred each of American 
Scientists also confirms the claim. The results 
shown are that, in every class of persons inves- 
tigated, the number of believers in God is less, 
and in most- classes very much less, than the 
number of non-believers; that the number of 
believers in immortality is somewhat larger 



62 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



than the number of believers in God; that 
among the more distinguished, disbelief is very 
much more frequent than among the less dis- 
tinguished; and finally that not only the degree 
of ability but also the kind of knowledge pos- 
sessed is significantly related to the rejection 
of these beliefs, for example, the historical and 
physical sciences furnish the knowledge which 
less greatly favors disbelief; the psychological, 
sociological, and biological sciences furnish the 
knowledge which more greatly favors disbelief. 
As to students, the statistics show that they 
enter college possessed of the beliefs perfunc- 
torily accepted in the average home; that, as 
their mental powers develop, a large percen- 
tage of them lose these beliefs, so that on leav- 
ing college, from 40 to 45 per cent deny or 
doubt the fundamental Christian tenets. As 
the cause of the increasing rejection of these 
traditional beliefs, Professor Leuba assigns the 
gain in independence, the individualism, that 
results normally from growth and education. 
Whether as a secondary sex difference or merely 
as the product of education and social posi- 
tion, women are more conservative than men. 
Again the tendency of the more eminent to 
have a greater per cent of disbelievers among 
them is due not entirely or chiefly to greater 
knowledge, but to intellectual and moral inde- 
pendence, to those qualities which make for 
eminence, such as activity, tenacity, initiative, 
and self-reliance — qualities which tend to in- 
crease knowledge and to resist the forces of 
tradition, authority and prestige. 

Part 3 shows that inasmuch as the modern 
belief in immortality does not rest upon estab- 
lished fact or convincing argument but upon its 
seeming usefulness, so faith in the hereafter 
must justify itself by its utility. Is humanity 
better off with or without such a faith? The 
statistics would show that in the United States 
and in other equally civilized countries, the 
enormous practical importance customarily as- 
cribed to this belief no longer corresponds to 
reality. And as to apprehension of moral dis- 
aster as the outcome of the loss of belief in God 
and immortality, Professor Leuba holds that 
the real danger lies in a misunderstanding of 
the origin of moral ideas and energy. These 
have their source in social experience; they are 
independent of these two beliefs. Part I has 
indicated the separate origin of moral and re- 
ligious ideas; Part II, instead of showing that 
the morally better men are those constituting 
the believing minority, discloses a correlation 



between disbelief and eminence. And finally 
the facts of the moral life as observed in the 
family and in wider social groups illustrates 
the fundamental independence of morality and 
religion. 

The general significance of Professor Leuba's 
book lies in the fact that it to a very consider- 
able extent substitutes definite information 
regarding beliefs in God and Immortality among 
civilized nations for the most divergent and 
purely conjectural opinions which have pre- 
vailed heretofore. The investigations have been 
conducted in accordance with scientific prin- 
ciples; instead of being empty, theoretical and 
dogmatic as are most discussions of religion, 
they provide the data for a scientific considera- 
tion of the factors of belief and the causes of 
disbelief. Constructively, by revealing the 
sources from which the various religious tenets 
have arisen, the book brings about a three-fold 
good: "the deliverance of man from a devitaliz- 
ing fear of imaginary disastrous consequences 
that are to attend the loss of these beliefs; his 
inspiration with renewed confidence in the relia- 
ability of the forces by which he feels himself 
urged onward, however ignorant of their nature 
he may otherwise be; and his enrichment with 
information useful for the guidance of his 
efforts at reconstruction when reconstruction 
shall have appeared necessary." 

It is greatly to be regretted that these gener- 
alizations have to be stated apart from their 
richly illustrative and explanatory context; for 
their full significance cannot be otherwise dis- 
closed. 

Angie L. Kellogg. 

The Red Rugs of Tarsus. By Helen Dav- 
enport Gibbons. New York: The Century 
Company. 1917. $1.25. 

Even in these days of wearied emotions one 
is thrilled by this straightforward recital of an 
earlier chapter of the Armenian horrors — the 
Adana massacres of 1909. 

The title prepares the reader for what is 
coming, but at first one puzzles over it a little, 
as the opening pages lead on pleasantly with 
descriptions of Tarsus and the neighboring 
country, of the Mission, of an American college 
girl's reaction to a new life and experience. 
The lively epistolary form, intimate and per- 
sonal, accounts in part for the charm of the 
narrative, but there is an added charm due to 
the presence of the little details that make up 
the reality of the picture. Mrs. Gibbons tells 






1917] 



Literary Notes 



63 



the things one always wants to know — that 
so many writers leave out — about the cedar 
wardrobes, the big stone fireplace that smoked, 
the japanned medicine case, how the bath 
water was heated and the Christmas dinner 
cooked. And, packed in with the entertaining 
narrative, are valuable observations on Armen- 
ian and Turkish character, the position of 
women in Turkey, and, chiefly, on the great 
fact of the treatment of Armenians by the 
European nations and the United States. 

Suddenly red flashes out and then it is a 
glowing band across all the following pages — 
the red of human blood, of injustice, wrong, 
murder. So vividly are those terrible days 
set forth that we seem to be, not reading of 
them, but liv:"ng through them. 

The Red Rugs of Tarsus, with its realistic 
and poignant personal touches, supplements 
the writing that Dr. Gibbons has been doing 
in behalf of the remnant of the Armenians. 
Of the origin of this book the preface says: 
"The appeal on my sympathies made by the 
sufferings of the Armenians of today required 
that something should be done. For this 
reason I have resurrected the old and yellowed 



letters which I wrote to my mother during 

that agonizing time in Tarsus I now 

send them out in the hope that the plain story 
of one American woman's experiences will 
bring home to other American women and to 
American men the reality and the awfulness of 
these massacres and the heroism of the Ameri- 
can missionaries, who, in many cases, have laid 
down their lives in defense of their Armenian 
friends and fellow Christians." 

NOTES 

"A Literary Forerunner of Freud/' by Helen 
Williston Brown, appeared in the Psychoana- 
lytic Review, Vol. IV, No. 1, January, 1917. 
This article is an ingenious development of the 
theory that Matthew Arnold was a forerunner 
of Freud. 

The Masefield prize story, by M. B. O'Shea, 
1917, "The Crown of Bells," was published in 
the second number of The Forge. 

The Gorham Press has published a book of 
verse, Songs of Inexperience, by Beatrice Daw, 
Fellow in English, 1914-15. 




g$BB&&&^^^^ 




RYN MAWR 

ALUMNAE 

QUARTERLY 



. XI 



JULY, 1917 



No. 2 




'-tmm*** ' 



Published by the Alumnae Association 

of 
Bryn Mawr College 



I 



.<> 



Entered at the Post Office, Baltimore, Md., aa second class mail matter under the Act of July 16, 1899. 



THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE 
QUARTERLY 

Editor -in-Ch ief 

Elva Lee, '93 

Randolph, New York 

Campus Editor 

Helen H. Parkhurst, 11 

Englewood, N. J. 

Advertising Manager 
Elizabeth Brakeley, '16 

Freehold, N. J. 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Address by President M. Carey Thomas 65 

Address by Mr. Thomas Raeburn White. 68 

With the Alumnae . . . . ' 71 

News erom the Campus 78 

Reunions and Class Histories 84 

In Memoriam 92 

News from the Clubs 92 

News from the Classes 94 

Literary Notes 103 

Letter to Class Collectors 103 



Contributions to the Quarterly, books for review, and subscriptions should be sent to 
the Editor-in-Chief, Elva Lee, Randolph, New York. Cheques should be drawn payable 
to Jane B. Haines, Cheltenham, Pa. The Quarterly is published in January, April, July, 
and November of each year. The price of subscription is one dollar a year, and single 
copies are sold for twenty-five cents each. Any failure to receive numbers of the Quar- 
terly should be reported promptly to the Editor. Changes of address should be reported 
to the Editor not later than the first day of each month of issue. News items may be 
sent to the Editors. 

Copyright. 1917, by the Alumnae Association of Bryn Mawr College. 



THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE 
QUARTERLY 



VOLUME XI 



JULY, 1917 



No. 2 



ADDRESS OF PRESIDENT M. CAREY THOMAS AT THE TWENTY- 
EIGHTH COMMENCEMENT OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 
IN THE GYMNASIUM, JUNE 7, 1917 



It is my pleasant duty on behalf of 
the Directors and Faculty to welcome 
our friends and neighbors and the rela- 
tives and friends of our graduating 
class to the twenty-eighth commence- 
ment of Bryn Mawr College which 
marks the close of the thirty-second 
year of our academic work. As was 
the case at the commencements of 
1915 and 1916 we meet today in the 
shadow of the great war which is now 
nearing the close of its third year. But 
in spite of its horror and suffering it 
has seemed to us best to hold our com- 
mencement exercises because at such a 
time as this it is the supreme duty of 
colleges for women, superseding in im- 
portance everything else, to carry on 
their academic work as usual. Through- 
out the civilized world it is only women 
students who can continue their studies 
uninterruptedly. It is women scholars 
who must keep burning for the next 
generation the sacred fires of learning. 
It argues well for the future of American 
scholarship that the five leading eastern 
colleges for women have not relaxed in 
any way their academic standards 
during the past year and will not do so 
however long the war may last. The 
preparedness work in these colleges is 
done in the leisure time of the students 
and represents genuine personal self- 
sacrifice on their part. 



But although we are holding our 
commencement as usual, this does not 
mean, and cannot mean, that our minds 
and hearts are not at this hour, as at all 
hours, with the millions of our allies 
on all the battle fronts who are dying 
by hundreds even as I speak. Yet 
today, unlike the last two commence- 
ments, we can hold up our heads and 
look in each others faces unashamed. 
In this time of terrible stress we shall 
not be found wanting. The flower of 
the youth of our country, 10,000,000 
strong, stand registered and counted 
ready to take their places beside the 
marching millions of the golden youth 
of Great Britain, France, Italy, and 
Belgium, many of whom are already 
dead, many of whom must yet die, for a 
cause greater than human life itself. 

Clear as a bugle on the night 

The call has come to peoples free 
* * * * 

We will not live if freedom die 
And freedom dies not while we live 

The young women of America also 
are ready and eager to do all that the 
women of England and France have 
done — and, if possible, even more than 
this. Nobly have college women in 
colleges and out of colleges responded to 
the call fo> service. Even before Pres- 
ident Wilson's great war message, the 
presidents of the seven largest colleges for 



65 



THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE QUARTERLY, VOL. XI, NO. 2 



66 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[July 



women in the United States, authorized 
by the vote of their respective faculties, 
united in a patriotic note to the Presi- 
dent of the United States offering the 
services of their colleges and alumnae 
and containing the ringing words, — 
" Although we believe that the settle- 
ment of international difficulties by war 
is fundamentally wrong, yet it may be- 
come our highest duty to defend by 
force the principles upon which Chris- 
tian civilization is founded." 

There is no more loyal and patriotic 
body of women to be found anywhere 
than in Bryn Mawr College. Our 
students have been untiring in giving, 
raising, and making money for war 
relief work and in working for the 
Red Cross. In addition the College has 
mobilized itself for preparedness work 
of all kinds — and when the students 
had undertaken to do almost more than 
they could do they were so carried away 
by listening to the story of the suffer- 
ings of Belgium that they assumed the 
support and reconstruction of a whole 
Belgian village at $400 a month until 
the end of the war. Will you let me 
say on this somewhat public occasion, 
because we may not have a more private 
opportunity for some time, that I think 
that I have never been so proud of our 
student body as during this past year 
and that I have never been more con- 
vinced than I am now by your sacri- 
fices and steady enthusiasm that a col- 
lege education makes women as patri- 
otic and as efficient to serve their 
country as it does men; and furthermore 
that it enlarges and heightens women's 
natural sympathy with suffering and 
makes more ardent their desire to alle- 
viate it. 

At a time like this those of us who 
belong to the older generation realize 
with joy and sorrow that the burden of 



defending the civilization and culture 
which we have tried to hand on to you 
must fall primarily on you and not on us. 
We realize it with sorrow because we 
have found from bitter experience that 
we cannot keep pace with you in the 
trenches, or on the sea, or in the air, or 
nursing in the base hospitals or driving 
ambulances or building anew the towns 
and villages of devastated France and 
Belgium. We realize it with joy be- 
cause you are so passionately eager, so 
strong, so brave, so young, so gay, so 
gallant that we are filled with joy that 
you are there to defend all that makes 
life worth while. We give you gladly 
to your country's service — although if 
this war ends right as we believe it will 
and brings a lasting peace, you will 
happily never know what it has cost 
us to see you go. 

Many of our Bryn Mawr undergradu- 
ates are going to continue their patriotic 
work throughout the summer. This is 
made possible by the generosity of Mr. 
and Mrs. Philip M. Sharpies of West 
Chester who have placed at the disposal 
of the college twenty ploughed, fertilized 
acres of some of the richest farming 
land in Chester County. Relays of stu- 
dents will work there during the sum- 
mer months with the help of the wardens 
and other members of the staff of the 
College and will can all the vegetables 
that cannot be otherwise kept. We ex- 
pect to supply from this patriotic farm 
all the vegetables used by the College 
throughout next year. Many of our 
professors are also farming on the col- 
lege campus and elsewhere and will 
raise enough vegetables for the faculty. 
Bryn Mawr College hopes then to pro- 
duce the vegetables it consumes next 
year. 

Through the generosity of other 
donors who wish for the present to re- 



1917] 



Address of President Thomas 



67 



main anonymous, Bryn Mawr College 
is also able to do its share in investing 
in the Patriotic Loan. Within a few 
days $100,000 in Liberty Bonds will be 
handed to the Treasurer of the College 
to found a chair in English Composi- 
tion. Bryn Mawr has long been noted 
for the attention it gives to the teaching 
of English. In successive years many 
freshmen and their parents tell me that 
they have selected Bryn Mawr because 
of its good English course. It is there- 
fore peculiarly gratifying and appro- 
priate to have one of the few chairs in 
English Composition in the United 
States founded at Bryn Mawr. By re- 
quest of the donors any surplus income 
on this foundation will be used for grad- 
uate scholarships in English Composi- 
tion without the requirement of formal 
academic work. It is hoped that in the 
leisure of our quiet and beautiful cam- 
pus the gentle art of literary composi- 
tion may be fostered here by these 
Liberty scholarships. 

The College has been very happy in 
having received gifts of other scholar- 
ships during the past year — one, of the 
value of $500 a year from the children 
of the late Charles S. Hinchman, to be 
known as the Charles S. Hinchman 
Memorial Scholarship, is our most 
valuable undergraduate scholarship and 
will be awarded for excellence in scholar- 
ship to a junior to be held during the 
senior year. 

Mrs. Frank W. Hallowell of Chestnut 
Hill, Massachusetts, has given a grad- 
uate scholarship in Social Economy and 
Social Research to be known as the 
Robert G. Valentine Scholarship, in 
memory of Robert G. Valentine, to 
whose expert work on the relations be- 
tween capital and labor all social work- 
ers owe such a great debt. 

Also the three Elizabeth S. Shippen 



Scholarships founded under her will 
which left Bryn Mawr College a legacy 
of $176,844 have come into operation 
this year and are awarded today for the 
first time. 

Endowment of Professors' Chairs and 
gifts of Scholarship and gifts to en- 
dowment are almost infinitely valuable 
but the value of devoted service given 
to a college like Bryn Mawr is even 
more inestimable. Bryn Mawr has 
been served by a long line of splendid 
men and women beginning with her 
founder, Joseph W. Taylor, who left 
the College his entire fortune; the first 
president of the Board of Trustees, 
Francis T. King, to whom the liberal 
organization of the College is in great 
part due; the first president of the Col- 
lege, James E. Rhoads, who shared with 
Mr. King the responsibility of organiz- 
ing the College as a great undenomina- 
tional institution of learning, and many 
others, but the service of no one person 
has extended over as many years as that 
of the late John G. Johnson, the hon- 
ored counsel of the College. It is im- 
possible to allow the first commence- 
ment after his death to pass without 
putting on record the high esteem and 
admiration in which the Trustees and 
Directors held his great qualities of 
mind and heart which have been gen- 
erously devoted to the service of the 
College throughout the past 35 years. 
At the organization of the College, 
John G. Johnson was consulted by its 
founder, Joseph W. Taylor. He drew 
the first Charter of the College in 1880, 
the Amendment to the Charter in 1896, 
the new By-Laws of the Trustees in 
1912 creating the Board of Directors 
of the Trustees of Bryn Mawr College 
giving recognition to the Bryn Mawr 
College Alumnae Association and the 
accompanying By-Laws of the Board 



68 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[July 



of Directors under which the Boards 
of Trustees and Directors are now 
operating. 

He drew up the pledges used by the 
President and Alumnae of the College 
in obtaining subscriptions for the Li- 
brary in 1900 and for the endowment 
in 1910, by means of which the College 
was secured against loss; he organized 
the Low Buildings Association and the 
College Inn Association and by his 
legal advice and encouragement made 
it possible to obtain the necessary bond- 
holders. He was consulted in regard 
to every legal matter that arose in con- 
nection with the College and was al- 
ways ready to use his great authority 
and extraordinary legal skill to support 
the Students' Association for Self- 
Go vernment, the President of the Col- 
lege and the Trustees and Directors. 
Throughout this long period of time 
covering more than a generation his 
lucid intelligence, his accumulated stores 



of legal wisdom and his lofty standards 
of justice and right were always placed 
at the disposal of the College as a free 
gift, the value of which it is impossible 
to estimate. 

We cannot all serve Bryn Mawr College 
like John G. Johnson; we cannot all en- 
dow chairs; but each alumna and student 
and each Bryn Mawr father and mother, 
brother and husband can do his or her 
part. At this commencement I wish to 
ask as I have asked at other commence- 
ments those who approve of the work of 
Bryn Mawr College and wish to help 
the College to continue its work, who 
perhaps cannot give service or money 
during their life time, to remember the 
college in their wills. It will cost 
nothing while you are living and nothing 
while you are dead, but you will have 
the satisfaction of knowing that your 
legacy, however small, will help to give 
the next generation of girls what we 
hope is the right kind of education. 



ADDRESS OF MR. THOMAS RAEBURN WHITE, OF PHILADELPHIA, ON 
"INTERNATIONAL REORGANIZATION AFTER THE WAR" 



Mr. W T hite spoke in part as follows: 

As we meet amid these beautiful 
surroundings, dedicated to the Arts of 
Peace, and take part in this happy 
occasion with its bright promise for the 
future, it is hard to remember that we 
are at war. 

And yet, this fact is always in the 
background of our consciousness and it 
is right that we should remember it and 
give thought to it even here, for the 
issues of this great conflict will have a 
vital influence upon the future of the 
Human Race. 

America has suffered in common with 
the rest of the world. If, as yet, we 
have not felt the shock of conflict, we 
have felt the shock of disillusionment. 



We had believed that treaties entered 
into by great nations would be honor- 
ably observed; we had hoped that in 
case of disputes international courts 
would be made use of to settle them 
peaceably; we had thought that even in 
war men would be merciful to the weak 
and helpless. 

But, alas, what have we found? We 
have seen treaties disregarded, arbitra- 
tion spurned, neutral countries in- 
vaded, civilians, including women and 
children, slain in their own homes or on 
peaceful errands, and all those restraints 
of international law, so painfully built 
up by centuries of effort, so solemnly 
agreed to in conventions, swept aside 
to make way for the rule of violence. 



1917] 



Address of Thomas Raeburn White 



69 



We have found the world about to be 
thrust back into a condition of anarchy, 
and America has felt it her duty to join 
with those who, in this great struggle, 
stand internationally for liberty under 
law. We have taken this step not only 
to aid in the restraint of an aggressor, 
but that we may assist in laying the 
foundations of a society of nations, 
which shall preserve better world order 
in future. And we can do this only if 
an enlightened and intelligent public 
opinion shall support the President in 
his declared purpose to this end. It is, 
therefore, necessary that the American 
people — such as are here gathered — 
shall give serious thought to the ques- 
tion: How shall these foundations be 
laid? 

Plans designed to accomplish this pur- 
pose, similar, if not identical, in outline 
have been proposed independently in 
America, and in several European coun- 
tries. Their similarity is explained by 
the fact that they are the product of 
events. Institutions competent to settle 
international disputes had already been 
devised and were in successful operation, 
but the refusal of Austria to arbitrate, 
when arbitration might have averted 
the war, brought sharply to the atten- 
tion of the world the necessity for 
evolving some means of compelling a 
nation to submit its quarrel to the judg- 
ment of an international tribunal. This 
is the central thought of all the plans 
which have recently been proposed — the 
enforced submission of international dis- 
putes to such tribunals. 

The League to Enforce Peace is the 
American Society which has proposed 
such a scheme for world organization. 
All the other plans are similar in general 
outline. They have been endorsed by 
the principal statesmen of the world. 

The proposal is that the powers join- 



ing the League shall agree that if any 
member commences hostilities against 
another, before having submitted its 
dispute and given time for decision, it 
shall be forthwith opposed by all the 
other members, first, with economic 
pressure, and, if that does not suffice, 
then with their united military strength. 

No international army is contem- 
plated; merely the joint use of eco- 
nomic, military and naval power, as 
these are now being used by the allied 
powers. 

This method of enforcing the treaty, 
calling for the possible use of military 
force, is opposed by some very conscien- 
tious, high-minded people, who believe 
that the use of force internationally, 
even for suppressing disorder, is essen- 
tially wrong and cannot be defended 
because it involves the taking of human 
life. 

This objection, in view of the char- 
acter of those who advance it, deserves 
a thoughtful and considerate discussion. 

When the objection is analyzed it is 
seen to rest upon the premise that the 
use of physical force to control human 
conduct is wrong. This must be so, for 
even the use of force by the government 
of a state to preserve order necessarily 
results in the destruction of human life. 

A distinction is sought to be drawn 
between the use of force to restrain indi- 
vidual wrong-doers, which those who 
object to military force generally ap- 
prove, and the use of force against na- 
tional wrong-doers, which they disap- 
prove. 

What is this distinction? 

The individual wrong-doer may be 
restrained without killing him by the 
use of handcuffs or prison bars, the 
national wjong-doer cannot be hand- 
cuffed or imprisoned, but must be re- 
strained, if at all, by military force which 



70 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[July 



necessarily involves the taking of human 
life. 

But suppose the individual wrong- 
doer refuses to be handcuffed or im- 
prisoned, and resists the officer with 
murderous weapons! What is to be 
done with him? He cannot be allowed 
to roam at large, committing further 
crimes. He must, therefore, be taken 
by force, and if otherwise he cannot be 
taken, he must lose his life. 

That most prisoners submit to arrest 
does not change the principle. The 
fact is, and cannot be avoided, that the 
use of force against individual wrong- 
doers may, and sometimes does, result 
in their deaths. 

It is said that the operations of an 
army result in the taking of more lives 
and are more directly intended for that 
purpose. This is true: the difference, 
however, is not in principle but only 
in degree. 

The position of the non-resistant who 
does not believe in the force underlying 
the government of a state, and who would 
not oppose the taking of his goods or 
his life or the life of his wife or child, is 
clear and consistent. But he who be- 
lieves in the preservation of order by 
government must believe in the pres- 
ervation of world order by cooperative 
force, as did William Penn, the Quaker 
and great founder of Pennsylvania, who 
proposed a world parliament, whose de- 
crees should be enforced by all the 
nations " united as one strength." 

But these are not the controlling 
reasons why the United States should 
join a League of Nations to Enforce 
Peace. We should place our action on 
higher grounds. 

With this great opportunity before 
us to institute legal relations between 



states, to lighten the burden of man- 
kind, to make possible the beginning 
of a new era, and the dawning of a 
brighter day — an opportunity which if 
not embraced may never return, and 
which without our aid will be lost alto- 
gether — shall America be faithless to 
her duty? Shall we withdraw when we 
have secured a satisfactory arrange- 
ment of our own grievances and refuse 
to cooperate in the reorganization of 
the world on the basis of justice and 
right? 

Through President Wilson we have 
already announced our intention to 
cooperate, and it is for us to sustain his 
efforts and his declared purpose to this 
end. 

All the principal belligerents on both 
sides have declared the main purpose 
of the war to be that guarantees against 
future wars may be secured. Whatever 
the attitude of others may be, the 
United States will be ready to make 
peace the moment such guarantees have 
been secured, and they can be secured 
much earlier if we pledge ourselves to 
assist in maintaining them. 

If we declared we should withdraw 
and have no hand in maintaining peace 
after the war, the great tragedy would 
go on much longer, and many more 
thousands of young lives with their 
promise for the future would go out in 
darkness. 

If this course seems to involve a sacri- 
fice on our part, if it seems to endanger 
our safety or even to imperil our na- 
tional existence, let it be so. 

What greater legacy should we leave 
to mankind than a noble example of a 
nation willing to sacrifice even its life, if 
need be, that in future all nations might 
live in security and in peace? 



1917] 



With the Alumnae 



71 



WITH THE ALUMNAE 



OFFICERS 
1916-1918 

President, Cornelia Halsey Kellogg (Mrs. Fred- 
eric Rogers Kellogg), '00, Morristown, N. J. 

Vice President, Mary Richardson Walcott (Mrs. 
Robert Walcott), '06, 152 Brattle Street, Cambridge, 
Mass. 

Recording Secretary, Louise Congdon Francis (Mrs. 
Richard Standish Francis), '00, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Corresponding Secretary, Abigail Camp Dimon, '96, 
367 Genesee Street, Utica, N. Y. 

Treasurer, Jane Bowne Haines, '91, Cheltenham, Pa. 

ALUMNAE MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN 
MAWR COLLEGE 

Elizabeth B. Kirkbrtde, '96, 1406 Spruce Street, 
Philadelphia. 

Elizabeth Nields Bancroft, '98 (Mrs. Wilfred 
Bancroft), 29 St. Paul's Road, Ardmore, Pa. 

ACADEMIC COMMITTEE 

Pauline Goldmark, Chairman, 270 West 94th Street, 
New York City. 

Esther Lowenthal, Smith College, Northampton, 
Mass. 

Elizabeth Shepley Sergeant, 4 Hawthorn Road, 
Brookline, Mass. 

Helen Emerson, 162 Blackstone Boulevard, Provi- 
dence, R. I. 

Ellen D. Ellis, Mt. Holyoke College, South Hadley, 
Mass. 

Frances Fincke Hand (Mrs. Learned Hand), 142 
East 65th Street, New York City. 

Frances Browne, 15 East 10th Street, New York 
City. 

Cornelia Halsey Kellogg (Mrs. F. R. Kellogg), 
Morristown, N. J. 

WAR WORK FOR COLLEGE WOMEN 

At the annual meeting of the Boston Branch 
of the Association of Collegiate Alumnae on 
May 14, 1917, Mrs. Percy G. Bolster was ap- 
pointed chairman of a committee to be com- 
posed of five alumnae chosen by her from dif- 
ferent colleges, the object being the inauguration 
of a movement to establish homes and home- 
like club-houses in the vicinity of camp sites 
and naval bases that a wholesome atmosphere 
might be brought to the enlisted men when 
off duty. The following committee was chosen: 
Mrs. Talbot Aldrich (Eleanor Little, A.B., 
Bryn Mawr College); Miss Florence Cushing, 
A.B., Vassar College; Miss Caroline L. Hum- 
phrey, A.B., Radcliffe College; Mrs. William 
Noyes (Lucia Clapp, B.S., Smith College; A.M., 
Brown University); Mrs. W. Morton Wheeler 
(Dora Emerson, S.B., Wellesley College; A.M., 
Columbia University); Mrs. Percy G. Bolster 



(Edith Rebecca Lynch, A.B., Boston Univer' 

sity), (Chairman). 

Members of the Committee are already in- 
vestigating possible locations near the proposed 
camp sites and naval bases in New England. 
A club-house need not be palatial in appearance 
or expensive in maintenance. It may be merely 
a cottage, provided that unoccupied land is ad- 
jacent and the surroundings restful. It may be 
a portable house or a portable pavilion to be 
used as a central social gathering place, financed 
and managed by alumnae of different colleges 
working together. In addition to a club- 
house near each camp site it is hoped that the 
alumnae of each of the women's colleges will be 
able to find some building, however small, 
which it can maintain as a home for enlisted 
men, financed and supervised by its members 
and presided over by one of its alumnae mothers. 

To carry on this work the Committee asks 
for pledges of money. In addition to money, 
there will be needed for the club-houses and 
homes household furniture and furnishings of 
all kinds — beds, bedding, towels, tables, chairs, 
china, table-ware, etc., writing materials, 
games, new books, current magazines, pianos, 
victrolas, automobiles (given or lent for periods 
stated by the owners). There will also" be 
needed the personal services of college grad- 
uates approved by the superintendents of the 
clubs and homes who will assist for certain 
periods of time, long or short, in keeping the 
buildings and grounds wholesome and attrac- 
tive, furnishing different kinds of amusement 
and entertainment, preparing and serving re- 
freshments — in short, giving the visible touches 
which create that intangible thing known as a 
"home-like atmosphere." This is peculiarly 
woman's work and seems in every sense fitting 
for college graduates to undertake. A great 
opportunity is before us to show what we, as 
intelligent trained women, can accomplish. 
We are offered a specified task, a definite chan- 
nel into which to pour our energy and enthu- 
siasm and desire to serve. If we can help in 
keeping the men who are to fight for us happy, 
healthy and clean-souled we shall render a 
real and worth-while service to our country. 
Through the existing alumnae associations we 
have organization and means for cooperation and 
no other body is doing the work we intend to do. 
The Y. M. C. A. activities are entirely within 
the camp lines, the Y. W. C. A. work is for 



72 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[July 



women near the camps and the Special Aid 
Society's plans in no way conflict with ours. 
Our plan, as outlined, has received the endorse- 
ment of the Boston Branch of the Association 
of Collegiate Alumnae, of the national secre- 
tary of the National Association of Collegiate 
Alumnae, of the Boston representative of the 
Commission on Training Camp Activities ap- 
pointed by the War Department at Washing- 
ton, and of various individuals prominent in 
other organizations. 

This subject has been presented to the alum- 
nae of Vassar, Wellesley, Smith and Radcliffe 
at meetings in connection with their respective 
college commencements but as the Committee 
was organized too late to do this at the Bryn 
Mawr Commencement the columns of the 
Quarterly must do duty for the spoken word 
to Bryn Mawr alumnae. We are younger and 
fewer in number than the alumnae of other 
colleges but let us make up for that in added 
enthusiasm and let the response from Bryn 
Mawr be generous in what is hoped will become 
a nation-wide movement among college women. 
Money or pledges of money may be sent at 
once to the undersigned and any sum, large or 
small, will be gratefully received. Articles 
can be promised now but sent later when the 
homes are ready. Correspondence, sugges- 
tions and offers of service are solicited. Register 
your interest now! 

[signed] Eleanor L. Aldrich, '05. 

Address: Mrs. Talbot Aldrich, 34 Fairfield 
Street, Boston. 

THE NATIONAL SERVICE COMMIT- 
TEE OF BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE 
OF NEW YORK CITY 

The National Service Committee of the Bryn 
Mawr Alumnae of New York City is an infor- 
mal organization formed in May, 1917, at a 
meeting held at the Bryn Mawr Club, to which 
as many Bryn Mawr women living in or near 
New York had been invited as were suggested 
by the available lists. At this meeting a small 
subscription for printing and postage was col- 
lected, and this subscription constitutes the 
only fund so far available. In view of the ex- 
treme looseness of the organization — the only 
form then possible — the members present voted 
to work through a small executive committee ap- 
pointed at once by the chairman, Edith Pettit 
Borie. The present duty of this Committee 
is to keep the Bryn Mawr Women in the neigh- 



borhood of New York City informed of possible 
local patriotic service. So far effort has been 
concentrated upon assistance in the census 
taking, and in the advertisement and sale of 
Liberty Bonds. 

The Bryn Mawr Committee has manned with 
Bryn Mawr volunteers two census booths in 
the districts organized by the Woman's Suf- 
frage Party, and has turned over to that organ- 
ization for shifts in other booths a number of 
surplus recruits; at the request of the Woman's 
Committee of the Liberty Loan, it has mailed 
to its own membership the statements of facts 
and figures furnished by the Loan Committee 
and called for volunteers to sell the Bonds at 
designated booths; and it has offered the use 
of the first floor of the Bryn Mawr Club dur- 
ing July and August to the Red Cross Associa- 
tion as extra space for clerical work, or for the 
rest and refreshment of relays of nurses passing 
through the city. 

Only a beginning has, however, been made 
towards completing what is contemplated after 
the interruptions of the summer — a permanent 
working unit of the New York Bryn Mawr women 
operating for the greater part under the direc- 
tion of established organizations such as the Red 
Cross and the Mayor's Committee of Women; 
and thus immediately and constantly available 
for definite service in the varied tasks of civilian 
and war relief imposed by the necessities of the 
day. 

Julia Langdon Loomis, 

Chairman 

Frances Arnold, 

Edith Pettit Borte, 

ex officio 

Louise Fleischmann 

Florence King, 

Marjorie Murray 

Edna Rapallo. 

THE STUDENTS' LOAN FUND 

What do you know about the Students 
Loan Fund? Probably you know that such a 
fund exists, but do you realize what a vital 
factor it is in the life of the College, and for 
how many girls it has made college-training 
possible? In my own undergraduate days I 
had never heard of it, and many alumnae, 
to whom I have spoken of it, were quite ignor- 
ant of its needs and work. 

The purpose of the Students' Loan Fund is 
to assist deserving undergraduates to meet their 



The Executive 
Committee 



1917 



With the Alumnae 



73 



living expenses while at Bryn Mawr. It 
stands ready to supply to a student that 
comparatively small sum of money — rarely 
exceeding $300 in any one year — which, in 
many instances, spells the difference between 
staying at college and going home. The ap- 
plications for these loans are made in writing to 
the Secretary of the Committee, and these 
applications, after previous investigation, are 
acted upon at the annual meeting of the Com- 
mittee held early in May, after the announce- 
ment of scholarships and honors for the com- 
ing year. This time is chosen in order that the 
students may know just what their needs will 
be for the ensuing semester. The Committee 
consists of President Thomas, the Dean of the 
College, and four alumnae from four different 
classes. Each application is read and carefully 
discussed, and the loans are made or occa- 
sionally refused at the discretion of the Com- 
mittee, all such loans being kept, of course, in 
strict confidence. Invariably more money is 
lent than is in the treasury in May, because 
invariably the money needed materializes be- 
fore the fall loans are made. This year, with 
the increased cost of living, the demands of the 
Committee are larger than ever, so we shall 
need your help to meet them! 

The fund is maintained wholly by contribu- 
tions, by repayments by students, and usually 
by a gift from the graduating class. The con- 
tributions frequently come from members of 
the Faculty, from interested alumnae, and from 
former students who themselves have been 
helped by the Fund, and are now self-sustaining. 

In 1892 a little group of people met in Pres- 
ident Rhoads' office for the first meeting of the 
Loan Fund Committee. That year two or 
three students were helped, but the next year, 
with only $92 in the treasury, all work had to 
cease until more funds could be raised. With 
the growth of the College, the work of this 
Committee has increased until this year's report 
shows an aggregate loan of $10,583.62, and some 
130 students have been helped. This past 
year the loans have amounted to $2985. 

One splendid aspect of the work is the sense 
of honorable responsibility shown by our girls. 
Not a single student has ever failed to repay 
something of her debt, and most of them, 
within a very short time after leaving College, 
have completely reimbursed the fund. 

And now, dear alumnae, each and everyone 
of you, here is another chance for you to "do 
your bit." Your College is asking of you a 



girl to the liberty of knowledge and inspiration 
which you found at Bryn Mawr. What you 
give will revert again and again to the fund, 
and you will be helping, not one girl but many. 
Any contribution, small or large, will be grate- 
fully received by the Secretary of the Com- 
mittee, Miss Martha G. Thomas, Whitford, 
Pa. 

K. L. H., 1905. 

WORK FOR FRENCH BABIES 

A message from Mrs. Herbert Adams Gib- 
bons (Helen Davenport Brown) came too late 
to be printed in the April Quarterly. But 
as the need for the help she asks must still con- 
tinue, this message is given here: 

"One of the tragedies of the war is the large 
number of babies born fatherless, for whom the 
mothers are unable to provide. The hope of 
the world today is the new generation. Will 
you help to continue the Baby Relief Work 
I have been doing in my studio in the heart of 
the Latin Quarter since August, 1914? Money 
is the best gift. It can come by personal check 
made out to my order. Better exchange can 
be secured on checks than on postal money 
orders. Six dollars clothes a baby." Mrs. 
Gibbons' address is: 120 Boulevard du Mont- 
parnasse, Paris. She writes: 

"Read in my last College News that B. M. C. 
has two beds in the American Ambulance. 
Elizabeth Colt, '14, is with us as Dr. Gibbons' 
secretary. She and I were talking this morn- 
ing in my husband's studio about the Bryn 
Mawr beds. We will go very soon to see the 
soldiers now being cared for by Bryn Mawr 
and will write you about them. I knew Con- 
stance Lewis and have been interested in the 
scheme she loved so dearly. 

"Through me, Bryn Mawr is caring for sol- 
diers' babies. I have clothed thirteen hundred 
babies since August 2, 1914. When I "get 
round to it" you shall have a wee article on my 
Baby Work. No use sending supplies now till 
the submarines are destroyed — but money is a 
fine gift and there is great need among the babies 
of France." 

A LONDON LETTER 

I am glad and proud to send a London letter 
for the Quarterly if you think the very 
matter-of-fact and obvious things which I can 
tell you will be of interest. Most of my friends 



74 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[July 



are busy in really engrossing war work, but I 
must confine my energies to what I can do at 
home with my eyes on my own little household, 
young irresponsible servants and an active 
small son, and I have become expert in nothing 
more exciting than hospital slippers and "com- 
fort bags." My time is short too, for I want 
to send this by tomorrow's post, and the five 
days since your letter came have been devoted 
to an old friend who was staying with me. She 
is a woman who has lost three sons and her 
husband in the war and has two sons still 
serving. 

Will you be interested in the mere external 
changes — the hour of extra daylight these sum- 
mer evenings and the intense darkness of our 
winter evenings? From a picturesque point of 
view, we shall miss this darkness when the war is 
over, for the Thames has become as beautiful 
by night as it must have been half a century 
ago and we appreciate the stars and moon. 
There is a superstition that Zeppelins never 
come when there is moonlight, so people plan 
accordingly for theater or dinners with friends! 
A really dark evening has the inconveniences 
and somewhat the same excitement as a fog; 
I have had to hold my hand before me near 
Burlington House at six o'clock in December 
to save myself from being jostled by other 
passers-by. Regulations for darkening the 
windows are strict, and passengers in railway 
carriages were directed to keep the blinds 
drawn after sunset. This is no longer neces- 
sary, for the lights of a train are to be extin- 
guished in case of danger. One notices the 
absence of newspaper posters recently brought 
about because of the paper shortage, and the 
almost complete absence of any sort of adver- 
tisements. There are, however, many posters 
with appeals to all sorts and conditions. In the 
first year of the war splendid extracts from 
Pericles' funeral oration were posted in the 
carriages of the Underground. One is re- 
minded not to discuss public matters lest one 
give information to the enemy, and on every 
side one is exhorted to help the War Loan and 
National Service and to be economical. Such 
legends as these meet one's eye: "What is the 
value of one of your arms?" "Hands wanted 
. . . National Service." "Defend your island 
against the greatest danger that ever menaced it." 
"Yes! Complete victory if you eat less bread." 
"Extravagance in dress is bad form." A pop- 
ular National Service poster shows a small boy 
defended from a German who was attacking his 



basket of apples, and the words, "Germany 
wants to starve us." 

The most constant reminder of the war how- 
ever is the men — both the bronzed ones in 
khaki and the feebler men in hospital blue suits 
with red ties. One must grow accustomed to 
many sad sights — empty sleeves and trousers 
and disfigured faces, and, saddest of all, the 
blind men. The best known hostel for them, 
St. Dunstan's, is in Regent's Park near us. 
They row on the lake or ride on the back seats 
of tandem bicycles or walk; some seem full of 
courage and even happiness, but the only 
really despairing look I have seen here is on the 
faces of some of these men. One learns to 
recognize the peculiar listening poise of the 
head. Wounded men are treated with re- 
spect, never allowed to stand in 'buses, etc., 
but there is not so emotional a sympathy for 
them as there was at first. This is so natural 
that it hardly deserves comment. 

When I came to London, just before the war, 
the big meadow on the western side of Primrose 
Hill was used for nurses and babies and cricket; 
then it became the drilling ground for recruits — 
first the very new and awkward ones, then the 
signalling squad, and then artillery cadets with 
magnificent horses. The ground was beauti- 
fully torn up in this way, and this spring it is 
divided into allotments for growing vegetables. 
There must be — a guess — 150 to 200 of these 
small plots, enthusiastically dug up and sown 
by men, women and children. Women come 
with their babies in perambulators, and spades, 
etc., tied underneath the perambulators. Many 
of the men, I am told, are policemen, so that 
they are working there at any hour. This 
allotment system is carried out in many parts 
of London, especially on bits of land that have 
been wasted near the railways. A spade is a 
far commoner thing for a man to carry now than 
golf clubs! Other parts of Primrose Hill are 
busy with drilling now. The artillery horses 
have to go to Regent's Park and Hampstead 
Heath, but the cadets practice loading and firing 
on the hill. And other men are drilled in less 
formal fashion, trained for advancing unseen, 
with a great deal of wriggling on the ground. 

Housekeeping is changed from its old routine. 
Servants are rare; girls of that class go into 
munitions, serve in restaurants, as ticket-col- 
lectors on the Underground, 'bus conductors, 
carpenters, cobblers, farm hands, window- 
cleaners, etc. Some of our friends have given 
up trying to replace their servants, and have 



1917] 



With the Alumnae 



75 



moved with nurse and children into lodgings 
in some small town or into the country. This 
is easier, because few men of military age are at 
home. Others use vacuum cleaners and "get 
along" with a daily cook. In large houses, 
many rooms are shut up and in smaller ones, 
since coal has been so difficult to get, the dining 
room is often used as a sitting room too. Instead 
of having the local tradesmen call every day for 
orders and return later with what we want, we 
must plan days ahead or bring home our fare 
ourselves. And instead of feeling that one's 
grocer is pleased with a large order, one meets 
with the request, "Could you manage with 
only one pound of rice and half a pound of 
sugar this week?" This, I believe, is due to 
inequality of distribution and not to as great 
shortage as his words seem to imply. Another 
week our own man has no cheese and no oats for 
porridge, and we must hunt them up elsewhere. 
Except for certain unusual things which the 
little shops cannot supply, I have rather eiven 
up dealing at the big stores, partly because I 
like to support the small places, which are 
badly handicapped now, and partly because I 
think we shall be served more easily by a man 
who knows our needs if tickets for various foods 
come into use. I am suffering sadly for this 
principle now with regard to sugar, for half a 
pound a week is all he can sell me and it does 
not go far! If the Germans have pictures of 
our potato and margarine and sugar queues, 
with the distorted impressions they give, they 
probably gloat over our shortage of food. I 
have often seen several hundred women waiting 
by twos, ordered by a policeman, before a tiny 
street stall for potatoes. This, when rice is 
equally cheap and more available, seems like 
a sacrifice of common sense to dramatic! In 
these cases, only one pound of potatoes is sold 
to each person and for a time, at least, chil- 
dren were not served at all. Each woman takes 
her own bag; one has to pay a half-penny extra 
for a paper one. Everyone whom I know has 
given up potatoes entirely, since we can do so 
well on substitutes. But the substitutes have 
to reckon with another factor than the mistress 
who orders them. The English cook is not 
used to innovations. Maize (cornmeal) seems 
to her a "chicken food," and though she may 
make scones and cakes of it, she is reluctant 
to eat them herself. In fact the maize which 
was first sold here in the winter was too coarse 
to be palatable. Rice flour, barley flour, and fine 
oatmeal are other new materials to help out 



wheat flour in pastry and cakes. Everyone is 
learning new recipes and devices for doing 
without sugar and flour, and if a cook is inex- 
perienced this means many failures and then 
patient eating of failures or going without until 
it is fair to start afresh on new materials. It 
is quite good form to discuss both food and serv- 
ants! — and it is bad form to take sugar in your 
tea and to eat more than one thin half slice 
of bread and butter at tea. And the butter is 
likely to be margarine. Our household does very 
well with bread, for we take barely half as much 
as we used to, and so are far below the rations 
and may have two pounds of flour a week and 
still leave a margin. It was a little hard at 
first and meant not only strict economy in 
cutting, but some self-denial; but I think we 
are quite satisfied with it now. I find no more 
crusts heaped up in the bread box, and we 
never can have bread pudding! The meat 
limitations work well enough if there are young 
children to eat less than the ration and so allow 
more for the elders, but even so one must help 
out with fish and there is seldom bacon for 
breakfast. The tea regulations in shops and 
restaurants are quite reasonable. One may 
have one piece of bread and butter or one 
scone or one piece of cake — but not two of 
these. A more elaborate tea may be made up by 
having fruit or ices or jelly. It is a satisfaction 
to see that the bakers' windows have no more 
unsubstantial pretty things. 

As to the spirit one feels everywhere, in 
meeting inconveniences and even hardships and 
dangers, one is constantly impressed by the 
courage which seems prepared for any emer- 
gency. There are no heroics, but the attitude 
well known as characteristic of the British 
Tommy. It is not mere easy good-nature with 
no thought for the morrow, but a combination of 
good sense, free from hysteria, with unselfish- 
ness. There is also a strong and pleasurable 
thrill in having difficulties to surmount. I 
notice how many women, for whom until now 
the future has seemed as secure as any future 
could be, are stimulated by our present un- 
certainties. Proportions have altered. Little 
conveniences and pleasantnesses, holidays and 
amusements, no longer seem necessary. As far 
as I can judge, most women are living far more 
vitally than ever before, and are really happier. 
Even those who are sad and anxious can be 
busy. „ One of my friends, the widow of an 
officer killed more than two years ago, is an 
unpaid parlor-maid in a small hospital. An- 



76 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[July 



other, with about fifty more of her own kind, 
gives her week ends to munition work so as to 
set free some of the tired girls who are working 
all the week. After a few months she was pro- 
moted to be forewoman of the room where she 
worked and though she is thin and says she gets 
so dirty that she always dreads visitors, she 
says too that she has never been so happy. 
In Cambridge I saw, driving a milk cart, a girl 
who is, I was told, the daughter of one of the 
University dons. Other friends make papier 
mache" splints — a disagreeable task entailing 
long soaking of one's hands and arms in water, 
or they teach embroidery (!) and knitting to 
convalescent soldiers, or they work in canteens 
or war hospital depots. In Scotland and in 
Ireland other friends of mine spend the sum- 
mer gathering and drying the moss which 
proves so useful for surgical dressings. We 
hope — and believe — that after the war this 
broader spirit will persist and that no one will 
feel that any kind of work is " beneath" her. 
Extremely conventional women take pride now 
in telling how they scrubbed the bricks of their 
garden path or stained and waxed the studio 
floor. And the most humdrum task of order- 
ing a simple household has a dignity now that 
food stores are limited. Housekeeping be- 
comes a problem and the interest dispels the 
old monotony. Small economies that used to 
seem too trivial to notice, have their part in 
the general scheme for complete efficiency — like 
the captain in Punch directed to attend to the 
bones and dripping! The king's proclamation 
about food, read in every church in the kingdom 
through this month, is not only most impressive 
to hear, but is having a distinct effect on people's 
appreciation of the need of economy. 

The attitude toward Zeppelins is akin to that 
toward the inconveniences and uncertainties 
of our food arrangements. It is inevitable 
that the menace should "get on one's nerves" 
to a certain extent. If one has experienced 
the din and horror of a raid, with the helpless, 
entrapped feeling accompanying it, any sound 
like bombs or guns in the night awakes one with 
a start — but after the first start, one's impulse 
is to hurry to window or door to see all one can. 
We don't really want Zeppelins to come, but 
if they come, we don't want to miss anything. 
A small boy, asked if he hadn't been afraid at 
such a time, said, "I was frightened when I 
thought it was a thunder-storm, but when I 
found it was only the Germans, it was fun." 
In early September I saw the first Zeppelin that 



was brought down, to the north of us. The 
firing had been loud but had almost died down 
when we saw the creature pursued by search- 
lights, and then flames burst out and it grad- 
ually sank to earth. The sight was a wonder- 
ful one, but the sound that rose when we all 
understood what was happening was more 
wonderful. Each little group of us had felt 
as if we were quite alone in the blackness of the 
unlighted city, until such a cheer as never could 
have been heard before made us all one. A 
fortnight later we were waked by the same sort 
of cheer — recognizable at once — but we had 
slept through the raid (which hadn't come near 
us) and were too late to see the Zeppelin falling. 
You must know that the enthusiasm over 
America's coming into the war is very great, 
but perhaps you cannot appreciate the change 
of feeling here in the last few months. My own 
English friends were too courteous to criticize 
the country on its policy with any intensity, 
but my dentist, when he had me firmly im- 
prisoned in his chair, gave me a distressing half 
hour! And I often overheard comments that 
hurt, when people did not know that an Amer- 
ican was present. There was a constant sense 
of friction and impatience; and the great miracle 
was that this disappeared, converted into en- 
thusiasm, instantly after the declaration that 
the state of war existed. One expected to meet 
American enthusiasm — as in the meeting at 
Queen's Hall on April 5, where nothing formal 
was done but an opportunity was given for 
expressing enthusiasm — but it is a delight to 
hear applause from the English too. For in- 
stance the Scala theater is showing already 
pictures of the United States destroyers ar- 
riving at Queenstown, and these are greeted with 
cheers by the English spectators. You know 
more about the great service at St. Paul's than 
I could tell you. The streets were filled with 
people, many wearing small American flags, 
and large flags hung from most business build- 
ings and with the Union Jack from the Houses 
of Parliament. America was most delightfully 
treated as an honored guest. Overhead the 
air was patrolled by two aeroplanes, circling 
over St. Paul's while the service lasted. You 
know of course that "Royalty" was at the 
service, and diplomats and statemen, that 
Bishop Brent preached and that we sang 
the "Star-spangled Banner" and the "Battle 
Hymn of the Republic." We miss "America" 
for in England of course the words must be 
"God Save the King." 



1917] 



With the Alumnae 



77 



Will you forgive me for having to send such 
a hastily-written letter .... I hope its 
very concreteness will help to give an idea as 
to what London is like now, for it is only from 
a multiplicity of such matter-of-fact impres- 
sions that one can form for oneself a general 
conception. 

Elizabeth Day Seymour Angel. 

A LETTER TO THE QUARTERLY 

Newark, New Jersey. 

June 5, 1917. 
My Dear Miss Lee, 

I have little doubt that mine is not the first 
protest to reach you in regard to the publica- 
tion, in the April number of the Alumnae 
Quarterly, of Miss Kellogg's review of Dr. 
Leuba's book. There must be others who, like 
myself, seriously question the advisability of 
the Quarterly's admitting to its pages mate- 
rial of so controversial a character. The harm 
that the book itself will undoubtedly do to the 
good name of the College can only be increased 
by the countenance thus given to a review so 
favorable as to be rather propaganda than crit- 
icism; and the evil effect is still further height- 
ened by the reluctance you will naturally feel 
to give space to such discussion as, in an ordi- 
nary periodical, would be certain to follow a 
bold attack on beliefs dear to many readers. 
On the chance, however, that you may think 
it possible to give both sides a hearing, I send 
the enclosed brief comment . . . : 

As summarized on pages 60 to 62 of the April 
Quarterly, Professor Leuba's recent book, 
The Belief in God and Immortality, cannot fail 
to startle many. Closer reading of the article, 
it is true, softens somewhat the first sharp im- 
pression. Thus the statement that "in every 
class of persons investigated the number of 
believers in God is less .... than the 
number of non-believers" is contradicted by 
the statement, in relation to the group of col- 
lege students investigated, that "on leaving 
college" only "from 40 to 45 per cent deny 
or doubt the fundamental Christian tenets." 
Again, without questioning the accuracy of the 
figures themselves, it is possible to suggest for 
some of them a different interpretation. For 
example, should it be true that, as seems likely, 
the persons classified as of lesser distinction 
in their respective groups average a lower age 
than those of greater distinction, the difference 
between these two classes might be an index 



of age rather than of mental power. If so 
taken in connection with the figures found for 
college students, it would bear out the widely 
prevailing impression that religious faith is on 
the increase. Leaving figures behind and pass- 
ing to judgments, it is not a little surprising to 
read that "Part II, instead of showing that the 
morally better men are those constituting the 
believing minority, discloses a correlation be- 
tween disbelief and eminence." At least since 
August, 1914, one would have thought it im- 
possible to treat scientific eminence as an index 
of moral superiority. 

All discounts made, however, the gravity of 
the situation portrayed by Professor Leuba 
cannot be denied. It gives color to all that 
has been said against "godless education" and 
exposes the fatuity of expecting religion to 
emerge successfully from the educational mill 
as a by-product. Left without training and 
exercise, while the energy of the developing 
life is drawn into other channels, the spiritual 
function of man's nature will atrophy as will 
other functions under the same conditions. In 
emphasizing this truth Professor Leuba's book 
has done .... Christianity a service. 
Charlotte Isabel Claflin. 

INTERCOLLEGIATE ALUMNAE 
ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

Many Bryn Mawr alumnae living in or near 
New York or planning to spend a winter in 
New York would be glad of a game of basket- 
ball or a swim once a week, and will therefore 
be interested in hearing about the Intercol- 
legiate Alumnae Athletic Association. 

This Association is the result of the work of 
the Committee on Athletics of the Barnard 
Alumnae Association. Four years ago a group 
of Barnard girls, missing the exercise of under- 
graduate days, met once a week in the Teachers 
College gymnasium and played basket-ball. 
Other college girls heard of their fun and asked 
to join them. By the next year — thanks to 
the effective publicity work of the Barnard 
Alumnae Committee — enough college alumnae 
joined the project to permit the renting of the 
whole Thompson Gymnasium (Teachers Col- 
lege) for one night a week. This meant ample 
room for basket-ball, dancing, gymnastics, 
swimming, and bowling. This committee also 
inaugurated a class in horse-back riding at the 
Central Park Academy. These classes became 
so popular that the work of managing them be- 



78 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[July 



came too much for the original committee of 
three and, largely because there were so many 
graduates of so many colleges taking part in 
them, it was decided to form an Intercollegiate 
Alumnae Athletic Association. 

The Association was formed a little more 
than a year ago — in April, 1916 — and in its 
membership of four hundred fifty-six colleges 
are represented. Its purpose is to provide for 
college women in and near New York the op- 
portunity to exercise under healthful and con- 
genial conditions at rates as low as possible. 
To be eligible to membership one must be a 
graduate of a recognized college or university. 
Women who have had two years college train- 
ing, however, may be admitted to associate 
membership — with all the privileges of mem- 
bership except that of holding office. 

The activities are all held in the evening or 
during week-ends, so that those of the members 
who are working during the day time can take 
part. Last winter under the management of the 
Indoor Athletic Committee, classes were given 
every Monday night at the Thompson Gym- 
nasium in basket-ball, swimming, dancing, and 
gymnastics. There are also hand-ball courts and 
bowling alleys that have become very popular. 
During the fall and spring and summer the 
Outdoor Athletic Committee arranged hockey 
practice — hikes to nearby places — and this 
year week-end trips are being contemplated. 
The Riding Committee during the past year 



successfully carried on four riding classes at 
two New York academies and at one in Brook- 
lyn. These classes included work for begin- 
ners, for intermediate grades, and for advanced 
horsewomen. Those who were most ambitious 
even rode bare-back. 

Next year we want to reach every college 
woman in New York. We want to have classes 
in many different places and at many different 
times. We want to give you just what you 
want. We can do this only with your coop- 
eration — and I therefore urge all of you who 
live in or near New York to join the Associa- 
tion. The dues are only $2.00 a year; this 
covers the running expenses of the Associa- 
tion. The fees for the various activities are the 
actual cost prices, and they are the lowest that 
can be had in New York. 

At this time we are all, of course, giving as 
much time and energy as we can to the cause 
of our country and for that very reason we 
should take every precaution to keep ourselves 
in good physical condition, to increase our en- 
ergy and our ability to work. The Intercol- 
legiate Alumnae Athletic Association will give 
you the best opportunity to keep fit. 

Miss Charlotte Hand of Vassar, 373 Wash- 
ington Avenue, Brooklyn, the executive secre- 
tary of the Association, will be glad to give you 
any further information or to forward to you 
membership application blanks. 

Agnes Morrow, 1912. 



NEWS FROM THE CAMPUS 



COMMENCEMENT 

The thirty-second year of Bryn Mawr Col- 
lege closed on the morning of June 7 with the 
conferring of degrees. Sixty-eight students 
received the degree of Bachelor of Arts, ten the 
degree of Master of Arts, and eight the degree 
of Doctor of Philosophy. 

The gymnasium was crowded by the friends 
of the College and friends and relatives of the 
Seniors. 

After the exercises closed luncheon of 160 
covers was served for the friends of the Senior 
Class in Radnor Hall. 

The Directors and Faculty and friends of the 
College were invited to luncheon at the Deanery 
by President Thomas to meet Mr. and Mrs. 
Thomas Raeburn White and the new Dean of 
the College, Miss Helen Herron Taft. 



CHANGES IN THE FACULTY AND 
STAFF 

Professor Tenney Frank, Professor of Latin, 
returns after one year's leave of absence spent t 
as visiting professor in the American Academy 
in Rome. Dr. Thomas DeCoursey Ruth has 
acted as his substitute during the year 1916-17. 

Professor Carleton Fairchild Brown, who has 
spent the year 1916-17 at the University of 
Minnesota on leave of absence from Bryn Mawr 
College, has accepted a full professorship in 
English at the University of Minnesota. 

Dr. Howard Rollin Patch, who has acted as 
substitute for Professor Brown during his ab- 
sence for the year 1916-17, has been promoted 
to be Associate in English Philology. 

Professor James Barnes, Associate Professor 
of Physics, has been promoted to be Full Pro- 
fessor of Physics. 



1917] 



News from the Campus 



79 



Professor Clarence Errol Ferree, Associate 
Professor of Experimental Psychology and Di- 
rector of the Psychological Laboratory, has 
been promoted to be Full Professor of Experi- 
mental Psychology. 

Dr. Regina Katharine Crandall, Associate in 
English, has been promoted to be Associate 
Professor of English Philology. 

Miss Edith Orlady will return after one year's 
leave of absence to be Secretary and Registrar 
of the College. 

Professor Thomas Clachar Brown has re- 
signed as Associate Professor of Geology. 

Dr. Frank J. Wright, M.A., University of 
Virginia, 1911, of Bridgewater College, Bridge- 
water, Virginia, has been appointed Associate 
in Geology. 

Dr. Roger Frederic Brunei, Associate Profes- 
sor of Chemistry, has been promoted to be Full 
Professor of Chemistry. 

Professor Matilde Castro, Phebe Anna 
Thome Associate Professor of Education and 
Director of the Phebe Anna Thorne Model 
School, has been promoted to be Phebe Anna 
Thorne Professor of Education and will devote 
her time to lecturing in the Department of 
Education. 

Dean Eunice Morgan Schenck has resigned 
the deanship of the College and will be Asso- 
ciate Professor of Modern French Literature. 

Dr. Albert Edwin Avey, Associate in Philos- 
ophy, has resigned. 

Dr. Ethel E. Sabin has been appointed Asso- 
ciate in Philosophy. Dr. Sabin received the 
degree of Doctor of Philosophy from the Uni- 
versity of Illinois in 1916. 

Dr. James Miller Leake, Associate in History, 
has resigned to accept the Full Professorship 
in History in Allegheny College, Pennsylvania. 

Dr. Edward Carroll Day, who came to Bryn 
Mawr as Lecturer in Physiology for one year, 
will not return. His position has not yet been 
filled. 

Dr. Edward Henry Sehrt, Lecturer in Teu- 
tonic Philology during the absence of Professor 
Agathe Lasch, will remain at Bryn Mawr Col- 
lege for 1917-18. 

Dr. Ada Hart Arlitt has been appointed As- 
sociate in Educational Psychology. Dr. Arlitt 
received the degree of Doctor of Philosophy 
from the University of Chicago in 1917. 

Miss Esther Cloudman Dunn, Instructor in 
English, has resigned to accept the Fellowship 



in English at Bryn Mawr College for the year 
1917-18. 

Mrs. Edith Chapin Craven, Instructor in 
English, has resigned. 

Miss Emily Gifford Noyes, A.B., Bryn Mawr 
College, 1915, student in the School of Jour- 
nalism, Columbia University, 1915-16, and 
graduate student in English, Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1916-17, has accepted a half time In- 
structorship in English. 

Miss Eva Alice Worrall Bryne, A.B., Bryn 
Mawr College, 1916, and A.M., 1917, has been 
appointed Reader in English. 

Miss Helen McGregor Noyes, A.B., Rad- 
cliffe College, 1915, and Teacher in Dana Hall, 
Wellesley, Mass., 1916-17, has been appointed 
Instructor in English. 

Miss Ellen Thayer, who has been Reader in 
French and Teacher of French in the Phebe 
Anna Thorne Model School, has resigned in 
order to study for the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy at Cornell University during the 
year 1917-18. 

Miss Helen Huss Parkhurst, Reader and 
Demonstrator in the History of Art for 1916-17, 
has resigned to accept an appointment as 
Instructor in Logic in Barnard College. 

Miss Jane Marion Earle, Reader in Mathe- 
matics, has resigned to take up war work in 
England. 

Miss Marian Clementine Kleps, A.B., Bryn 
Mawr College, 1916, and Bryn Mawr European 
Fellow, 1916, who has been Assistant to the 
Recording Secretary for the year 1916-17, will 
succeed Miss Earle as Reader in Mathematics. 

Miss Mary Edith Pinney, Demonstrator in 
Biology, has resigned to accept a position at 
Wellesley College. 

Miss Sara Wooster Eno, Circulation and 
Reference Librarian, has been appointed Head 
of the Circulation Department in the Univer- 
sity of Minnesota Library. 

Miss Mary Minor Watson Taylor, who has 
been Secretary to the Dean of the College dur- 
ing 1916-17, has resigned to take a business 
position in New York. 

Miss Jean M. Wylie, who has been Manager 
of Low Buildings for six years, has resigned to 
take up farming. Her position will be filled 
by Miss Juliet B. Lee. 

Miss Sarita Crawford has been appointed 
Manager of the College Inn, and Miss Frances 
G. Whitney will continue as Manager of the 
Tea Room. 



80 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[July 



THE NEW DEAN OF BRYN MAWR 

Helen Taft, 1915, is to be Dean of the College 
next year. In making the announcement, Presi- 
dent Thomas said in part: 

"I have to make both a sad announcement 
and one which I hope may be happy. Dean 
Schenck has decided to resign as Dean of the 
College and continue her work as Associate 
Professor of French. I am sure you will all re- 
gret as deeply as I do this decision 

It is at the same time pleasant to remember 
that the great loss to the Dean's office and to 
the executive work of the College will be the 
great gain of our French Department. I am 
sure that those of you who have taken, or who 
expect to take, French, will feel, as I do, that 
the French Department is much to be con- 
gratulated. 

"Now for my happy announcement. The 
Board of Directors has unanimously elected as 
Dean of the College Miss Helen Herron Taft, 
who is known to many of you. It seems to us 
very desirable to have in the Dean's office one of 
our younger alumnae, who will develop with the 
College and will help the College to keep close 
to modern conditions of education .... 

"Miss Taft is, I think, a genuine student with 
very high scholarly ideals in education. After 
graduating from Bryn Mawr she entered the 
graduate department of Yale University and 
has been studying for two years in the depart- 
ment of history, her group here having been 
history and economics. She has completed all 
her formal work for the degree of Ph.D. at Yale, 
her thesis only remaining to be written of which 
she has already presented two important chap- 
ters for the degree of M.A. at Yale 

"There have been four Deans of Bryn Mawr 
College. I served as Dean and Professor of 
English for nine years from 1885 to 1894, when 
I became President. After an interval of 
fourteen years Dean Reilly was elected Dean 
in 1908 and served for eight years and now is a 
member of our Board of Directors. Miss Taft 
will succeed Dean Eunice Morgan Schenck, 
Associate Professor of French, who had held 
the office during the present year, but prefers 
teaching to executive work and has resigned to 
continue her teaching of French. 

"Let us hope that Miss Taft may find she 
can do more for scholarship and true learning as 
Dean of Bryn Mawr College than in any other 
position; and that she may become a perma- 
nent Dean and worthy successor to Marion 
Reilly, who was Dean of the College for eight 



years and is now a member of our Board of 
Directors." 

CAMPUS NOTES 

It cannot be said that, this semester at least 
Bryn Mawr College has persisted apart, un- 
touched by the events of the great world. Proba- 
bly never before in its history had it come so close 
to surrendering some of its precious and peculiar 
privileges of maintaining academic standards 
regardless of non-academic occurrences. It 
was on the point of adopting, for a few last 
weeks of the year, an abbreviated curriculum 
to make way for work of preparedness. 
Fortunately the students reconsidered their 
views and voted against the contemplated 
change. But they instituted preparedness 
work just the same. Taylor Hall has been 
populated by the patriotic at unaccustomed 
hours of the morning, and been illuminated 
nightly for the further instruction of the young 
in first aid to the injured. 

Activities induced by the alignment of the 
United States with the Entente extended for 
Bryn Mawr students beyond the confines of the 
campus. But their Saturday labors on the 
Bryn Mawr farm situated near West Chester 
were designed to aid the college financially 
rather than to assist in the work of belligerency. 
Their continued occupation in this direction 
during the summer bids fair to provide a hun- 
gry college next year with a goodly supply of 
turnips and potatoes. 

In an even more intimate and convincing 
way Bryn Mawr did its early share in giving 
aid to its country. It yielded up for the officers' 
training camp two professors, Dr. Savage and 
Dr. Gray. To be able to send from its midst two 
individuals clothed in khaki gave it a pleasing 
sense of being picturesquely militaristic. 

But other and more traditional activities 
have gone on much as usual, though with a little 
of that element of experimentation which seems 
appropriate now in all things, in conformity 
with the changes in the nation. It tried out 
Amy Lowell as a lecturer for English Club, 
and introduced a Russian pianist under an 
improvised sounding board to play the piano 
in the cloisters. Miss Lowell proved to be 
quite as astonishing and entertaining as we 
had anticipated. And Mr. Gabrilovitch gave 
us some music that suffered only a little from 
the bad acoustics and the distraction of black 
birds feeding their young, not quietly, in the 
shelter of the ivied buttresses of the library. In 






1917] 



News from the Campus 



81 



one way or another those cloisters were put to 
considerable use this year, in spite of the fact 
that it was not the year of a big May Day. 
The classes in fancy dancing one windy night, 
cold like all nights this spring at Bryn Mawr, 
gave an exhibition under colored lights. And 
every preparation was made to present the 
plays given as part of the Garden Party enter- 
tainment, under the same open sky. That 
time, rain defeated the plans, however, and the 
audience and caste retreated to the gymnasium. 

The rain continued for commencement day, 
stopping just in time to permit the academic 
procession to form in the library instead of in 
the swimming pool. Though the line wound 
down past Merion on the sidewalk, instead of 
between the trees of Senior Row, it was a nice 
procession, giving the customary thrill to 
everyone responsive to academic ceremonial 
with its complex associations and its panoply. 
The baccalaureate sermon had been preached 
by the Rev. Anna Shaw; the very interesting 
commencement address on the subject of re- 
construction after the war was given by Mr. 
White, of the Board of Directors. President 
Thomas, as usual, gave a luncheon afterward at 
the Deanery. The usual alumnae supper in the 
evening was replaced by a tea. 

The full extent of the changes contemplated 
in the academic side of Bryn Mawr has not yet 
been fully determined. But at least the French 
and German orals have been abolished, to be 
replaced by some other less nerve-racking test 
of linguistic attainment. Also the entrance 
examination requirements have, in a number of 
respects, already been altered and improved. 
The year to come will show how many changes 
there will prove to be, and how radically Bryn 
Mawr in one way and another, is breaking with 
some of its old, but not necessarily unimprov- 
able traditions. The year that is past has been 
a busy and full one, with work on the endow- 
ment fund as well as on the war. President 
Thomas was happily able to announce on Com- 
mencement day that the fund had been com- 
pleted. She also made the pleasant announce- 
ment that a $100,000 fund for a Professorship 
in English Composition had been donated to the 
College. The chair will be occupied by Miss 
Crandall. 

Helen H. Parkhurst. 

FACULTY NOTES 

Dr. Susan Myra Kingsbury has been elected 
president of the Intercollegiate Community 
Sendee Association. 



FELLOWSHIPS AND SCHOLARSHIP 
FOR 1917-18 

EUROPEAN FELLOWSHIPS 

Mary E. Garrett European Fellowship: Hazel 
Grant Ormsbee. 

President's European Fellowship: Bird Mar- 
garet Turner. 

Bryn Maivr European Fellowship and Ship- 
pen Foreign Scholarship: Thalia Howard Smith. 

RESIDENT FELLOWSHIPS 

Greek: Lucy Reed Powell; Latin: Louise Eliz- 
abeth Whetonhall Adams; English: Esther 
Cloudman Dunn; German: Olga Marx; Semitic 
Languages: Beatrice Allard; Education: Nellie 
Boyd Drake; History: Margaret Woodbury; 
Economics: Helen Adair; Social Economy: 
Carola Woerishoffer Fellows in Social Economy 
and Social Research: Agnes M. H. Byrnes, 
Georgia L. Baxter; Philosophy: Marguerite Wit- 
mer Kehr; Psychology: Mary Ruth Almack; 
Archaeology: Janet Malcolm MacDcnald; Chem- 
istry: Elise Tobin; Geology: Eleanor Mary 
Lorenz; Biology: Dorothy A. Sewell. 

FOREIGN SCHOLARSHIPS 

British: Dorothy Everett, Mabel Vaughan 
Kitson, Margaret Russell Clarke, Francesca 
Helen Stead, Marguerite Muriel Culpepper Pol- 
lard, Ellen Mary Sanders; French: M. Schoell, 
Juliette Pade, Madeleine Pouresy, M. Fabin, 
Aline Chalufour. 

GRADUATE SCHOLARSHIPS 

Greek: Marjorie Josephine Milne; Latin: 
Geneva H. Drinkwater; English: Eva Alice 
Worrall Bryne, Beryl Griffin Hart, Grace Ethel 
Hawk; German: Mary Martha Bausch; Ro- 
mance Languages: Helen Elizabeth Patch; 
History: Leona Christine Gabel; Economics: 
Bertha Clark Greenough; Social Economy 
and Social Research: Eleanor Lansing Dulles, 
Gladys Louise Palmer, Leah Hannah Feder; 
Philosophy: Amelia Kellogg MacMaster, Mar- 
garet Georgiana Melvin; Psychology: Istar Alida 
Haupt, Mildred McCreary Willard; History of 
Art: Alice Dare Franklin; Mathematics: Nora 
May Mohler; Geology: Isabel F. Smith; Chem- 
istry: Ryu Sato. 

Susan B. Anthony Memorial Scholarship in 
Social Economy and Social Research: Helen 
Ross. 

Robert G. Valentine Scholarship in Social 
Economy and Social Research: Clare Wilhelmina 
Butler. 



THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE QUARTERLY, VOL. XI, NO. 2 



82 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[July 



UNDERGRADUATE SCHOLARSHIPS 

Charles S. Hinchman Memorial Scholarship, 
value $500, awarded for the first time this 
year, to a member of the Senior Class next in 
grade to the winner of the Bryn Mawr Euro- 
pean Fellowship: Katharine Burr Blodgett. 

Shippen European Scholarship, value $200, 
awarded for the first time this year, to the 
senior winning the Bryn Mawr European Fel-*> 
lowship; Thalia Howard Smith. 

Maria L. Eastman Brooke Hall Memorial 
Scholarship: Margaret Catherine Timpson. 

Shippen Scholarship in Science, value $200, 
awarded for the first time this year, to the mem- 
ber of the Junior Class with majors in science 
who has received the highest average grade on 
courses in science: Virginia Kneeland. 

Shippen Scholarship in Languages, value 
$200, awarded for the first time this year, to 
the member of the Junior Class with majors 
in languages who has received the highest aver- 
age grade on courses in languages: Therese 
Mathilde Born. 

Anna H. Powers Memorial Scholarship: 
Marian O'Connor; James E. Rhoads Junior 
Scholarship: Helen Prescott; Anna Hallowell 
Junior Scholarship: Helen Coreene Karns; 
Thomas H. Powers Junior Scholarship: Enid 
Schurman Macdonald; Mary E. Stevens Junior 
Scholarship: Alice Miriam Snavely; Special 
Maria Hopper Scholarship: Edith Mary Howes; 
James E. Rhoads Sophomore Scholarship: 
Marie Litzinger; Maria Hopper Scholarships: 
Julia Newton Cochran, Margaret Miller Dent; 
Mary Anna Longs treth Scholarship: Arline 
Fearon Preston; Elizabeth Duane Gillespie 
Scholarship in American History: Katharine 
Truman Sharpless; George W. Childs Essay 
Prize: Monica Barry O'Shea; Second Prize: 
Janet Randolph Grace; Mary Helen Ritchie 
Memorial Prize: Constance Sidney Hall. 

FOUNDATION OF NEW 
SCHOLARSHIPS 

Bryn Mawr College, 
June 18, 1917. 
The Robert G. Valentine Memorial Scholar- 
ship in Social Economy and Social Research 
of the value of $200, has been given by Mrs. 
Frank W. Hallowell of Chestnut Hill, Mass., 
to be awarded by the President and Faculty of 
Bryn Mawr College on the recommendation of 
the Director of the Carola Woerishoffer Depart- 
ment of Social Economy and Social Research to 



a candidate approved by the donor. It is open 
to graduates of Bryn Mawr College or of any 
other college of good standing who desire to 
work in the Department of Social Economy and 
Social Research. 

The Charles S. Hinchman Memorial Scholar- 
ship : This scholarship, of the value of $500, has 
been given in memory of Charles S. Hinchman 
of Philadelphia, by his children. It will be 
awarded for special rather than general ability 
on the nomination of the Undergraduate Schol- 
arship Committee of the Faculty. The Com- 
mittee in making the nomination will be guided 
by (1) The student's record in her group 
subjects. (2) Written recommendations from 
the instructors in those subjects. (3) Evi- 
dence of the student's ability as shown by writ- 
ten work in her group subject, together with a 
written estimate of the same by the instructor 
most directly concerned. This work to be sub- 
mitted not later than March 15th of the year 
preceding that in which the scholarship will be 
held. The scholarship is open to Freshmen, 
Sophomores or Juniors, but for the year 1917-18 
the Committee of the Faculty recommended 
that it should be given to a member of the class 
of 1917 to be used in graduate work in Bryn 
Mawr College. 

The Elizabeth S. Shippen Scholarships: 
Founded as part of the legacy of Elizabeth S. 
Shippen to Bryn Mawr College, will be given 
as follows: 

A scholarship of $200 shall be awarded each 
year to the member of the senior class who is 
elected to the Bryn Mawr European Fellow- 
ship, and the holder of the award shall have the 
title both of Bryn Mawr European Fellow and 
of the Shippen Foreign Scholar. 

The second bequest of $200 annually shall 
be divided into two scholarships of $100 each, 
to be known as the Shippen Scholarship in 
Science, and the Shippen Scholarship in For- 
eign Languages, respectively. 

The Shippen Scholarship in Science shall be 
awarded annually to the member of the Junior 
class, one or both of whose major subjects shall 
lie in one of the Scientific Departments, viz., 
Physics, Chemistry, Geology, Biology, who 
among those of her class so majoring shall have 
attained the highest average grade in courses 
taken in these departments. 

The Shippen .Scholarship in Foreign Lan- 
guages shall similarly be awarded annually to 
the member of the Junior Class, one or both of 
whose major subjects shall lie in one of the 



1917] 



News from the Campus 



83 



Departments of Foreign Languages, viz.. Greek, 
Latin, German, French, Italian, Spanish, who 
among those of the class so majoring shall have 
attained the highest average grade in courses 
taken in these departments. 

The computation of the average grades in 
the Shippen Scholarship in Science and the 
Shippen Scholarship in Foreign Languages shall 
be based on the grades received during Fresh- 
man, Sophomore, and the first semester of the 
Junior years. Grades in matriculation courses 
shall not be included. No student shall be 
considered eligible for the Science or Foreign 
Language Scholarship who has not completed 
at least fifteen hours of work in these subjects 
on which the computation is based. The win- 
ner of the $500 scholarship shall not be eligible 
for the Science or Foreign Language Scholar- 
ship. 

The Pittsburgh Bryn Ma wr Club Scholarship, 
of the value of $200, will be awarded each year as 
an entrance scholarship to the candidate pre- 
pared by a school in Allegheny County, Penna ; , 
for the last two years before taking her exam- 
inations for matriculation who receives the 
highest average grade in these examinations. 

CHANGES IN ENTRANCE AND 
A. B. REQUIREMENTS 

The senior oral examinations having been 
abolished by the faculty, written examinations 
will be given next year in their place at the 
time scheduled for the oral examinations and 
will be conducted by two committees of three 
each elected in French and in German by the 
faculty, one member of the department con- 
cerned being elected to act as chairman. 

NEW ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 

Many changes have been made in the en- 
trance requirements of Bryn Mawr College 
which will be optional in 1918 and following 
years, and obligatory from 1912. The exam- 
ination in the fourth language will be done away 
with. Candidates will be required to offer as 
at present Mathematics, Latin, English, 4 
points each; an examination in either Greek, 
French, or German, counting 3 points, some- 
what more difficult than the present Greek, 
French, and German, the examinations being 
equivalent to French A and B or German A and 
B of the College Entrance Examination Board; 
Ancient History, counting one point in and after 



1919; Physics, counting 2 points, in and after 
1919; English History, about equivalent to 
four periods a week for one year, counting 
1 point; American History, being permitted to 
be substituted, if schools can furnish proof 
that English History cannot be taught in the 
school courses, optional in 1918 and following 
years, obligatory in 1921; Physiology and Hy- 
giene, or Chemistry, or Physical Geography, or 
Botany, equivalent to about 3 periods a week 
for one year, counting 1 point, optional in 1918 
and following years, obligatory in 1921. 

It is hoped by the faculty that by reducing 
the amount of language work required for prepa- 
ration and by requiring subjects like history 
and science, students may enter Bryn Mawr 
better prepared than at present for their college 
work. 

CHANGES IN A. B. CURRICULUM 

Important changes have also been made in 
the courses required for an A. B. degree, these 
changes being in great part a consequence of 
dropping the oral examinations in French and 
German for seniors. 

On the first Saturday of each college year 
every undergraduate student must take an 
hour's written examination in the foreign lan- 
guage, Greek or French, or German, which she 
offered at entrance. This examination must 
be taken in every year of the college course until 
graduation. Students entering with Greek 
will be excused from the written examination 
in Greek at the beginning of the year follow- 
ing the year in which they have elected and 
passed a minor or major course in Greek. 

On the second Saturday of the junior year, 
every junior must take an examination in a 
language which she did not offer at entrance, 
Greek, or French, or German, or Spanish, stu- 
dents entering with Greek being required to 
take French or German. This examination 
will be elementary in character, about equiva- 
lent to 5 periods a week for one year in prepara- 
tory schools or to elementary Greek, French, or 
German in the college, provided that only about 
an hour and a half of outside preparation is 
required for each hour of lecture. 

Juniors who fail to pass this examination 
will be required to go into tutoring classes and 
pay for them at the present rates. They will 
not have another opportunity to be examined 
until the «econd Saturday of their senior year. 
If they fail to pass this examination they must 
wait over for their degree and try the same 



84 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[July 



examination again at the beginning of the next passed the written examination in one year will 



college year, this rule requiring them to defer 
their degrees admitting of no exception. 

Students failing to pass any one of the four 
written examinations in the language offered 
for entrance will in like manner be required to 
go into tutoring classes and the fact of having 



not save them from being put into a tutoring 
class in the next year if they fail to pass. As 
in the former oral examinations, eternal vigi- 
lance is the price of safety. — The College News, 
June 6, 1917. 



REUNIONS AND CLASS HISTORIES 



1892 

Annie Crosby Emery (Mrs. Francis 
Greenleaf Allinson): 163 George Street, 
Providence, R. I. 

1892-96: Graduate work at Bryn Mawr and 
in Leipsic; 1895-96: Secretary to the President 
of Bryn Mawr College; 1896: Ph.D., Bryn 
Mawr; 1896-97: Year at home; 1897-1900: 
Dean of Women, University of Wisconsin; 
1900-05: Dean of the Women's College in 
Brown University; 1905: Married Francis 
Greenleaf Allinson, professor at Brown Uni- 
versity, whose daughter, Susanne, A.B., Bryn 
Mawr, '10, was for two years Warden of Rad- 
nor; 1906-09: On Board of Directors, Bryn 
Mawr College. 

1909: Published (with husband) Greek Lands 
and Letters; 1913: Published Roads from Rome. 
Since 1905 has contributed to the Atlantic 
Monthly, Yale Review, Unpopular Review, and 
The Nation. 

Spent two years abroad since 1905 — espe- 
cially winters in Greece. Has done the usual 
riff-raff of community chores. Just now is 
president of a new club, Providence Planta- 
tions Club, consisting of some 1200 members 
drawn from almost as many occupations and 
interests. 

Helen Bartlett: Vermejo Park, Colfax 
County, N. M. 

1892-95 : Specialized in English and Teutonic; 
Ph.D. in January, 1896; 1893-94: English Fel- 
low at Bryn Mawr; 1894-95: American Fellow 
of the A. C. A.; 1896-97: Head of the Modern 
Language Department in Portland Academy, 
Ore.; 1897-1907: Dean of Women and Head 
of the Modern Language Department at Brad- 
ley Polytechnic Institute, Peoria, 111. This 
school was endowed with about two and a half 
million dollars, was affiliated with the Univer- 
sity of Chicago, and its graduates were admitted 
without examination to the third year of the 
leading colleges and universities. While teach- 
ing there, she delivered several public lectures 



on such topics as Cambridge University, Berlin, 
Travel in Alaska, a series of three on the Ar- 
thurian Legends; also addresses before various 
clubs and associations. In 1906, on the cele- 
bration of the tenth Founder's Day of the Insti- 
tute, she was appointed to deliver the address 
for the faculty, which was made up largely of 
men. 

Was one of the founders and the first president 
of the Peoria Woman's College Club, of which 
the requirements of admission are similar to 
those of the A. C. A. Is a life member of the 
A. C. A., and a member of the Bryn Mawr 
Alumnae Association. 

Her published thesis for her Ph.D. was on 
the "Metrical Division of theJParis Psalter." 

Greatest pleasure: travel and the study of 
modern languages. Since graduation has trav- 
eled in Canada and Alaska, has spent three 
winters in California and one in the South. In 
March, 1905, was given vacation with full 
salary and studied at the University of Berlin 
in the German literature courses of Professors 
Richard Meyer and Erich Schmidt, and was 
admitted to advanced seminar courses. 1907: 
Again given leave of absence and traveled and 
studied abroad until October, 1910. Visited 
all European countries except Russia, and gave 
special attention to the study of Italian, Span- 
ish, and French. 1910: Resigned position and 
went to live on her brother's large ranch in 
the mountains of New Mexico. 1913: Went 
abroad and was obliged by the war to return in 
October, 1914. Is again living in the Rockies. 
Her greatest pleasure there is study of birds 
and flowers. As the altitude of the ranch 
ranges from 7500 to 12,000 feet, the flowers are 
often rare and always very beautiful. Much 
interested in the cause of the Allies and has 
worked for relief organizations. She embraces 
every opportunity to hear good music and in 
1913, spent seven months in Munich to enjoy 
the opera and concerts. 



1917] 



Reunions and Class Histories 



85 



Alice Belin (Mrs. Pierre S. du Pont): 
"Longwood," Kennett Square, Pa. 

Married, October 6, 1915, to Pierre S. du 
Pont, president of the E. T. du Pont de Ne- 
mours Co. 

Elizabeth Maxwell Carroll: 212 E. 
Eager Street, Baltimore, Md. 

1892-1900: Teacher of Classics in the Ran- 
dolph-Harrison School, Baltimore; 1900-16: 
Head Mistress of the Arundell School; 1916-17: 
Teacher of Latin in the Ogontz School, Ogontz, 
Pa. 

Member of the Executive Committee of the 
Consumers' League of Maryland, 1904-08; 
Vice President, 1907-08; Corresponding Sec- 
retary, 1910-15; Recording Secretary, 1915-16. 
Member of the Board of Directors of the 
Arundell Club of Baltimore, 1914-16; Vice 
President of the College Club of Baltimore, 
1909-10. 

Kate Holladay Claghorn: 15 Cranberry 
Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

1912-17: Lecturer on Social Research, New 
York School of Philanthropy. 

Helen Theodora Clements (Mrs. Ed- 
ward Cameron Kirk): 554 S. Lansdowne 
Avenue, Lansdowne, Pa. 

1904: M.A., University of Pennsylvania; 
Married, October 6, 1892, to Dr. Edward C. 
Kirk, Dean of the Dental School, University of 
Pennsylvania, and Editor of the Dental Cosmos. 

Children: Dorothy Clements Kirk, born July 
5, 1893, married November 2, 1916, to Clarence 
Hall Eppelsheimer; Marcella Cameron Kirk, 
born December 6, 1905; Barbara Kirk, born 
April 22, 1909. 

Mrs. Kirk has taken an active part in the life 
of Lansdowne and has traveled abroad a num- 
ber of times with Dr. Kirk. 

Edith Rockwell Hall: 35 West 82nd 
Street, New York City. 

"During the first fifteen years after leaving 
Bryn Mawr I made teaching my business, and 
I collected in the course of my 'career' many 
interesting and varied experiences — as private 
tutor (this took me to Washington and to Cali- 
fornia) ; as teacher of history in one or two large 
private schools; and for eight years, part of the 
time in partnership with Louise Brownell 
Saunders, as head of the Balliol School, Utica, 
N. Y., which we reorganized and developed 
from a moribund 'young ladies' seminary' into 
one of the recognized college preparatory schools 
for girls. To this day I lament the social mis- 
fortune that so real a success as the school was 



achieving in its academic and human develop- 
ment could have been balked by so paltry a 
consideration as finances! But so it was, and 
the enterprise had to be abandoned as a luxury 
greater than we could afford. 

"Aside from the satisfaction derived from work 
itself, and from its many incidental enjoyments, 
much of the pleasure of these years came in the 
long summer vacations that happily fall to the 
lot of teachers. Several of these I spent de- 
lightfully in trips abroad, the memories of 
which I cherish doubly now since certain ex- 
periences can never be renewed. 

"But in spite of its many rewards, the life of a 
teacher did not seem to me just the one I 
wanted, and since 1912 I have given up teach- 
ing and have been engaged in social work, part 
of the time as student — first in the Training 
School of the New York Bureau of Municipal 
Research, and later in the School of Philan- 
thropy — and part of the time in paid executive 
positions. For three years I was field secre- 
tary of the Civic Committee of the Woman's 
Club of Orange, where I made several inter- 
esting community investigations, the findings 
of which were published in three reports: one 
on the Milk Supply of the Oranges, one on the 
Baby Saving Work of the community, and one 
on its Housing Conditions. Last year I re- 
turned to New York, and after serving for a 
very interesting month as volunteer manager 
of one of the branches of the Municipal Em- 
ployment Bureau, I began work in August 
as Registrar of the Committee on After Care 
of Infantile Paralysis Cases. An article which 
I was asked to write on the work of the Com- 
mittee was recently published in the Journal 
of Crippled Children. 

"I am aware that this is a tame recital. 
I send it forth that I may with a clearer con- 
science enjoy other reports that will come from 
college mates of whose more brilliant achieve- 
ments I hear from time to time with pride and 
congratulation." 

Frances Brodhead Harris (Mrs. Rey- 
nolds Driver Brown): The Oak Road, Sta- 
tion Z, Philadelphia. 

Married, June 4, 1895, to Reynolds D. 
Brown, class of '90, Harvard, lawyer, and pro- 
fessor in the Law School of the University of 
Pennsylvania. 

"I have lived in Germantown during the 
winters sigjce graduation and during the sum- 
mers since 1900 in Manchester, Vt. In 1905 
we bought a farm in Manchester, which we run 



86 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[July 



as a milk farm. As Mr. Brown's legal work 
keeps him in Philadelphia a greater part of the 
summer, I have to run the farm, which grows 
increasingly difficult as the years go on, for the 
labor question is more serious. 

"Have served as: Secretary for the Ladies 
Committee, Manheim Cricket Club; Secretary 
and Treasurer of the Manheim Whist Club; 
Secretary and Treasurer of the Junior Auxiliary 
of Calvary Church, German town; at four sepa- 
rate times — Secretary and Treasurer of the 
Study Class of Germantown; 1916-17, Assistant 
Recording Secretary of Mothers in Council, 
Germantown; 1917-18, Recording Secretary, 
Mothers in Council, Germantown. 

" Children: Joseph Harris Brown, born Feb- 
ruary 23, 1897, died March 22, 1899; Reynolds 
Driver Brown, Jr., born November 14, 1903; 
Delia Brodhead Brown, born October 27, 1905. 
"Mr. Brown and I spent the summer of 1899 
on a bicycle trip through rural England read- 
ing the novels whose scenes v are laid in the 
places we rode through. In the summer of 
1914 we walked for 300 miles through the Aus- 
trian Tyrol and the Bavarian Highlands over 
the passes and valleys through which the 
Italians and Austrians have recently been drag- 
ging their machine guns. We found it enough 
to drag ourselves but it will be a life-long pos- 
session to have seen this country as we did. 
At some of the little inns we were the only 
Americans that had ever stopped over night 
and now we should not be welcome even for 
that time." 

Frances Elizabeth Hunt: 1015 Gibson 
Street, Scranton, Pa. 

Margaret Dutton Kellum: 163 Joralemon 
Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Librarian for a firm of corporation lawyers in 
New York City. 

Abby Kirk: The Misses Kirk's School, Bryn 
Mawr, Pa. 

"My 'life' is easily told. Draw a circle 
round Bryn Mawr — and you will find me in- 
side — every year but one of the twenty-five 
since '92. Six years Reader of English — then a 
year away as Miss Garrett's secretary; and 
from 1899 on, I've been at my present job — 
putting girls into college. So you see, for 
really interesting history you'll have to go to 
other members of the class whose careers have 
taken them farther afield. I always feel 
ashamed each year when the college record 
blank comes — and I've nothing to put on it — 
no magazine articles — no offices in societies. 



To be sure, I've managed with the help of 
Emily Bull to write a Latin First- Year Book, 
and we've found ourselves introduced some- 
times to sub-freshmen as 'Kirk and Bull.' 
This one child of ours has made its way in a 
humble fashion — thanks to our friends' exer- 
tions. But that is all." 

Mary Elizabeth Miles, ex-'92 : 5138 Wayne 
Avenue, Germantown, Pa. 

1889-92, taught in private schools in Phila- 
delphia; 1892-97: conducted a small school in 
Germantown; 1897-1902, taught in Madison 
Institute, Richmond, Ky., first in the Prepara- 
tory Department, later in the Department of 
Higher English; 1902-13, teacher of English in 
the Stevens School; 1911-14, student in the 
University of Pennsylvania; 1913-14, in resi- 
dence at the University on leave of absence from 
the Stevens School. A.B., University of Penn- 
sylvania, 1914; Teacher of English and Asso- 
ciate Principal of the Stevens School, 1914-17. 
Grace Pinney (Mrs. James M. Stewart): 
120 Riverside Drive, New York City. 

1893: Special course at Columbia; 1894: 
College settlement. 

Married, April 17, 1895, to James M. Stew- 
art. One child, William Robert Stewart, 2nd., 
born June 15, 1898. 

"Special interests have been Social and Civic 
work (unpaid). For the last five years have 
worked particularly for Parks and Playgrounds, 
as chairman in the Riverside Branch of the 
Woman's Municipal League, and as Vice Pres- 
ident of the Woman's League for the Protec- 
tion of Riverside Park. In the interest of the 
latter, a number of articles and letters have been 
published in various newspapers. I have also 
spoken before many clubs, the Board of Esti- 
mate of New York City, and presided at a 
number of public meetings on the topic of 
Riverside." 

Eliza Stevens (Mrs. N. R. Montgomery), 
ex- '92: 185 Greenwood Avenue, Trenton, N. J. 
Married, May 26, 1897, to Neil Robert 
Montgomery. 

Children: James Stevens Montgomery, born 
March 22, 1898, entered Princeton October, 
1916; Margaret Kernochan Montgomery, born 
May 22, 1902, a student at St. Mary's Hall, 
Burlington, N. J. 

Served on Board of Managers of the Society of 
Colonial Dames of New Jersey from 1901 to 1904. 
At one time Treasurer of the Buff and Blue 
Chapter, D. A. R. Member: of the Trenton 



1917 



Reunions and Class Histories 



87 



Chapter, D. A.R.; of the Old Barracks Associa- 
tion of Trenton; of the College Club of Phila- 
delphia; of the College Club of Trenton. 

Harriet Stevenson (Mrs. Edward G. 
Pinney): 112 Riverside Drive, New York City. 
"My oldest son, Edward Stevenson Pinney, 
is at Plattsburgh and will receive his degree 
from Yale University this month [June]. The 
second, Alexander, is finishing his sophomore 
year at Yale and will attend the Harvard R. 
C. T. Camp this summer. The other children 
are still in preparatory schools. So much for 
my real professional work. I have been in- 
terested in and am a member of certain social 
and civic organizations, but the most serious 
work that I have done is in connection with the 
Women's Prison Association and the Isaac T. 
Hopper Home of which I am treasurer. This is 
all I have to show for those years since our 
happy college days." 

Mary Lewis Taylor (Mrs. Arthur Stan- 
ley Mackenzie). 

Married, 1895, Professor Arthur Stanley 
Mackenzie. Died, 1896. 

One daughter, Marjorie Taylor Mackenzie, 
is now at Bryn Mawr, class of 1918. 

Annie de Benneville Wagner (Mrs. 
F. C. Dickey), ex-'92: 6002 Greene Street, 
Germantown, Pa. 

Married, 1904, to Franklin C. Dickey. 

Children: Eleanor de Benneville, born 1906; 
Franklin C, Jr., born 1907; Annie W., born 
1911. 

"The girls are surely going to Bryn Mawr and 
the boy says he is going to be a farmer." 

Mathilde Weil: 9 Livingston Place, New 
York City. 

Had an editorial position with the Macmillan 
Company 1892-95. When she returned to her 
home in Philadelphia, the Company offered to 
send her mss. to read and have continued send- 
ing them. While living in Philadelphia, she 
built up a large and successful business in 
photography, specializing in portraits of people 
at their homes. Last winter she returned to 
New York and to the work of reading for pub- 
lishers, which she has always most enjoyed. 
She reports on the manuscripts sent her by a 
number of firms and occasionally does expert 
revision. 

She has always had her summers free and 
has usually spent them on the Maine coast 
where she has gone in especially for swimming, 
canoeing, and sailing. Has been abroad often; 
spent one winter in Italy. Of her summers 



abroad the pleasantest were those devoted 
to a coaching trip through Cornwall and 
Devon, and to a walking and climbing trip 
through the Dolomites and the Tyrol. 

Edith Wetherill (Mrs. Frederick Mer- 
win Ives): 318 West 75th Street, New York 
City. 

Traveled abroad in the summer of 1894 — 
part of the time with Frances Harris and Alice 
Belin — and with her own family for a year from 
the fall of 1895-96. Did volunteer work as 
Recording Secretary o{ the Civic Club of Phila- 
delphia from October 1896-97; Corresponding 
Secretary, 1897-1900. Elected Honorary Mem- 
ber on her resignation. Married Dr. Frederick 
Merwin Ives, November 15, 1900, and moved 
to New York. She has five children all born 
in New York City: Elizabeth Ives, born October 
17, 1901. Gerard Merrick Ives, born January 
7, 1903. John Wetherill Ives, born October 

25, 1904. Chauncey Bradley Ives, born March 
16, 1907. Margaret Newbold Ives, born June 

26, 1909. Elizabeth is preparing to enter 
Bryn Mawr College in the fall of 1919. Gerard 
is at Groton School. 

After her marriage, she spent her winters in 
New York City and her summers near South- 
ampton, L. I., until 1911, and since then, on a 
farm near Brewster, Putnam County, N. Y., 
which she and her husband own. 

For the past five years she has been Secre- 
tary of the Knickerbocker Greys, a private 
military drill class for boys; and for two years 
a members of a Visiting Committee of the 
Social Service Department at Bellevue Hos- 
pital. 

She has also the proud distinction of being 
the only Secreta-ry '92 has had in its long and 
eventful career! 

She has done what little War Relief Work has 
been possible with her other duties. As Dr. 
Ives holds a Commission as Captain in the 
Army Medical Reserve Corps and expects to 
be called out in the near future, she feels she 
will be doing her "bit" both directly and by 
proxy. 

Elizabeth Ware Winsor (Mrs. Henry 
Greenleaf Pearson) : 140 Dudley Road, New- 
ton Center, Mass. 

"November 10, 1912, was born my third 
son, Henry Greenleaf Pearson, Jr. Since then 
I have become deeply interested in the new 
conception of education as having for its chief 
object the development of initiative, and in 
the Montessori method as the best way of 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[July 



starting such education. I have worked in the 
New England Montessori Association, and 
have used the method with my own little bo)^s 
and a few of their friends." 

1902 

The following account of the Class of 1902 is 
in no way complete or formal. The extracts 
from the letters of the forty-nine members who 
replied are given in the words of the writers 
as far as space would allow. From the letters 
and the 1917 Register, it is possible to give the 
following statistics as approximately correct. 

Total number in class 90 

Married 56 

Married since 1912 5 

Number with children 45 

Total number of children 117 

Children born since 1912 30 

Number of boys 64 

Number of girls 53 

Number with paid occupation since 1912 ... 21 

Number now having paid occupations 18 

Number with Ph.D 1 

Frances Adams (Mrs. Bascom Johnson) 
lived in New York where her husband was as- 
sistant counsel for the American Social Hy- 
giene Association and where in 1913 her third 
child, Joseph Taber Johnson, 2nd, was born. 
In 1915 her husband's work took the family to 
California, but they expect to return to New 
York this summer. She was for three years a 
director of the National Board of Camp Fire 
Girls. Athletics are still her outside interest. 

Alice Albertson has continued to teach in 
Philadelphia. In summer she lives in Nan- 
tucket, Mass., where her family are interested 
in the founding and development of the Maria 
Mitchell Association. The house where Maria 
Mitchell was born has been made a Museum 
where, besides Mitchelliana, there are collec- 
tions of the flora and fauna of Nantucket and 
an observatory. Alice Albertson is now curator 
of the Museum. 

Marguerite Allen has been for five years 
visitor for the Associated Charities of Cleve- 
land, Ohio. 

Marion Balch took the first year's work at 
the Boston School for Social Workers from 
January, 1913 to January, 1914. She has no 
professional position at present but many 
interests. 

Helen Billmeyer is still housemistress at 
the Baldwin School. Her outside interests at 
present are in war relief. 



Corinne Blose (Mrs. H. C. Wright) lives 
on Long Island and has four children. Collier 
and Ann, twins, were born in 1913. Her hus- 
band is connected with the Charities for the 
City of New York. 

Elizabeth Bodine taught from 1913 to 1916. 
Now she is keeping house for her brother in 
Trenton and taking active interest in many 
things. She is a vice-president of the Girls' 
Friendly Society in New Jersey. 

Paxton Boyd (Mrs. R. M. Day) with her 
husband and one child, lives in Denver, Colo- 
rado. 

May Brown has been keeping house for her 
family in Marblehead. Next year she expects 
to be housemistress at Miss Baldwin's School. 

Jane Brown writes that this year she is to 
do more gardening than usual and has a little 
house fitted up as a canning kitchen where four 
gross of jars are waiting to be filled with the sur- 
plus from the garden. She is private secretary 
in Boston in winter; in Petersham, N. H., in 
summer. 

Elizabeth Chandlee (Mrs. H. B. Forman) 
was in France and Italy in 1913 and 1914. For 
the first six weeks of the war she was marooned 
in Austria where her husband found her with 
thirty cents in her pocket book and two hungry 
children. She spent five months in Italy be- 
fore coming home. She has been writing poems 
which have appeared in the London Nation, the 
Forum and the Living Age, but she writes that 
she is prouder of being the author of the lead- 
ing article in Modern Language Notes (Johns 
Hopkins) for May, 1917. She has been work- 
ing for two years on a book she is composing 
in Italian. Her eldest son (her husband's boy) 
is working near Verdun in the American Am- 
bulance Field Service. 

Florence Clark (Mrs. H. L. Morrison) 
married in 1915 Mr. Henry Lawrence Morrison 
and lives in Onawa, Iowa. 

Fanny Cochran with Miss Sanville directed 
the "Bryn Mawr Fire Prevention Study," which 
the first four classes graduated from Bryn Mawr 
gave the state of Pennsylvania a year ago and 
which is printed as a report of the Industrial 
Board of the Department of Labor and In- 
dustry. She is at present living on a farm 
near Westtown, Pa., where she has ten cows 
and has planted two acres of potatoes and eleven 
of corn beside other crops. Each summer she 
has a group of school boys come out to assist 
with the farm work. They are directed by a 



1917] 



Reunions and Class Histories 



89 



student from the State College of Agriculture 
and the experiment seems a success. 

Elizabeth Congdon (Mrs. A. J. Barron) 
writes that her interests are in her garden in 
summer and in music and the Sewickley 
Woman's Club in winter. Her husband is a 
lawyer in Pittsburgh. 

Elizabeth Corson (Mrs. Percival Galla- 
gher) whose husband is a landscape architect, 
lives in Brookline, Mass. Richard, the young- 
est of ther three children was born in January, 
1915. Her household and war relief work fill 
her time. 

Jane Cragin's (Mrs. D'Arcy H. Kay) 
second daughter, Eleanor Violet, was born in 
July, 1914, on the farm in Canada on which 
the Kays lived until the outbreak of the war. 
When war was declared, Jane's husband, for- 
merly an officer in the English army, returned 
at once to England and through the first 
winter of the war drilled troops on Salisbury 
Plain. He then went to the front for six 
months as a staff officer. At present Jane is 
with him at Grantham, England, where he is 
teaching gunnery. He has the rank of Lieu- 
tenant Colonel. 

Claris Crane is in charge of her uncle's 
farm at Timonium, Maryland. 

Jean Crawford is Junior Bursar at the 
College. 

Lucia Davis is now in Y. W. C. A. work in 
Baltimore. 

Elinor Dodge has no regular occupation but 
takes an active part in many local activities. 

Emily Dungan (Mrs. G. W. Moore, Jr.) 
lives in Woodbury, an old New Jersey town. 
Her husband practices osteopathy in Philadel- 
phia. She has been studying singing since 
1904 and has met with considerable success. 

Kate Du Val (Mrs. H. "S. Pitts), whose 
husband is an architect, has been taken by his 
work this year to Pittsburgh and to Mobile, 
Alabama, where she is at present. She writes 
that she finds Mobile like the south of France 
in climate, vegetation, and even in the build- 
ings. She feels almost as if she were abroad. 
Her permanent address is 620 Hope Street, 
Bristol, R. I. 

Marion Haines (Mrs. Samuel Emlen, Jr.) 
has three more daughters, Elizabeth, born in 
1913, Frances born in 1915 and Marion born 
in 1916. This makes a family of five children 
and she writes that trying to keep a peaceful 
happy home and healthy children, though it 
sounds easy has at times been exciting and all 



she could attempt. Her husband gives most 
of his time to a farm near Railway, N. J., where 
Marion herself goes in summer. This year 
they are going to take over six or seven boys 
from the Germantown Friends School to do 
extra work. They will be under the leader- 
ship of an older boy and will live somewhat 
according to camping rules. 

Kate Fletcher has moved to Milwaukee. 
She has no definite occupation but many in- 
terests. 

Ethel Goff writes that though her time has 
been very full it has not been so occupied as 
to be of interest to the class. 

Bessie Graham has been teaching for two 
years at the Willian Penn High School a sub- 
ject never taught before on land or sea — Book 
Salesmanship. Not the training of book 
agents, she writes (Heaven defend!), but of 
book clerks for stores. Any one who has had 
an experience similar to asking for "Leaves of 
Grass" and being sent to books on gardening 
will agree there is a field for her pioneer work. 
Her class this year numbered thirty-five from 
all the stores in Philadelphia and Earl Barnes 
wrote an account of it in the Atlantic Monthly, 
August, 1914, as "A New Profession for 
Women." 

Mary Ingham was absorbed by the Progres- 
sive Party in 1912. In 1914 she joined a group 
of students of social and industrial conditions 
and visited with them German, French and 
British cities. This party was broken up by 
the war and she was interned in Switzerland 
for some weeks. The next winter she helped 
organize the Monday Conference which dis- 
cusses matters of government. She also worked 
with the Equal Franchise Society of Philadel- 
phia. In June, 1915, she became manager of 
the Women's Department of Wm. P. Bonbright 
& Co., an Investment Banking House. This is 
pioneer work, no other house having put women 
in control of work with women investors. She 
says that though this record may seem to show 
scattering of energies each part has been of 
service in educating her for the rest. 

Eleanor James, who is teaching at Rye 
Seminary, writes that her life history from the 
outside point of view can be found in the Reg- 
ister. She is much interested in the Church 
General Hospital at Wuchang, China, where her 
sister is a medical missionary. 

Josephine Kieffer (Mrs. C. S. Foltz) 
writes that her achievements in the last five 
years have consisted in learning to cook better 



90 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[July 



than the average through the ill wind of scarce 
cooks; in learning to run an automobile and to 
swim; in becoming more intimate with the 
genus committee and in helping with war 
work. 

Ruth Miles' (Mrs. C. R. Witherspoon) 
youngest, Robert, was born in 1914. She 
writes that her four children and her household 
which includes the office of her husband, a 
doctor, take most of her time. She is, however, 
on the Board of the Social Settlement of Roches- 
ter. The last five years have been full of 
health and happiness for her family. Sum- 
mers are spent at their country home on Lake 
Ontario. 

Sara Montenegro's (Mrs. C. B. Blakey) 
husband is a lawyer in Louisville, Ky. She has 
two little girls, Carlotta and Sara, aged four 
and one. 

Frances Morris (Mrs. J. B. Orr) writes 
that in the two years following our last re- 
union she worked hard for suffrage. Coin- 
cidently she was learning to handle oil paints 
and coming to the conclusion that her two 
children were better with her than with a nurse. 
Running the three together resulted in a break- 
down of health so that she had to give up out- 
side activities. She recognizes her children 
as her profession and finds painting a happy 
avocation. Canvasses of hers have been hung 
in the New Haven Paint and Clay Club, in club 
exhibitions in Pittsburgh and in the Connecti- 
cut Academy. 

Edna Nebeker (Mrs. H. J. Livingston), 
ex-'02, has been in Florida this winter with her 
mother. 

Lucy Rawson (Mrs. W. R. Collins), whose 
husband is a lawyer, lives in Cincinnati and 
has two children. 

Elizabeth Reinhardt has continued to 
teach in Philadelphia. 

Anne Rotan (Mrs. T. D. Howe) had a 
second son, Spencer Douglas, born in 1914. 
She writes the class will appreciate that with 
her predilection for the male sex she instinc- 
tively has only boys! In 1916 she was bitten 
by the preparedness bug and has been educat- 
ing the people of Lawrence along those lines. 
In the summer of 1916, her husband was in 
command of a Battalion of Massachusetts Field 
Artillery. He left her on fifteen minutes 
notice with no instruction as to his business 
(manufacturing) other than to say "I suppose 
you'll have to sell out." Armed with a power 
of attorney, she did not sell out, but in October 



showed the best month's business the firm had 
ever had. At the same time she tackled relief 
work for soldiers' dependents. She had an 
office in the State Armory and a payroll of 
$500 a week, no money being disbursed with- 
out her recommendation. At the same time 
she supervised the making of surgical dressings, 
etc., in the Armory and felt when the troops 
returned as if an earthquake had gone over her. 
Since then she has become Chairman of the 
Lawrence Red Cross. She writes that though 
she has taken so violently to uplift, she feels 
herself to have had an overdose and yearns 
for a frivolous existence. 

Louise Schoff (Mrs. G. E. Ehrman) is 
now settled on a cattle ranch at Woodland 
Park, Colorado, eighteen miles from Denver 
and is enthusiastic over the life there. Her 
third child, Robert Falcon Scott, was born in 
March, 1917. 

Frances Seth's time at present is largely 
occupied in managing the estate belonging to 
her family at Windsor and in farming. She 
was president of the College Club in Balti- 
more for several winters and took an active 
part in the Sunday campaign in that city, 

Anne Shearer (Mrs. J. A. Lafore) writes 
that for the last twelve years she has been 
homemaking and trying to bring up her three 
children to be a credit to the American Nation. 
Her husband is a manufacturer. She is going 
to live on a farm near Wynnewood and is 
having great fun planning highly scientific 
crops! She does some outside work mainly for 
suffrage. 

Helen Stevens (Mrs. G. D. Gregory) was 
married in 1914 to George Dudley Gregory, 
who is connected with the Carnegie Endowment 
for International Peace. They live in Wash- 
ington and Helen is instructor in English in 
Miss Madeira's School and loves the work. 
She has sold the farm she had at the time of 
the last reunion. Though she got a great deal 
of interest and amusement and some money 
out of it, her summer vacations are now too 
brief for farming. 

Helen Stewart (Mrs. P. E. Huyler), 
ex- '02, moved in 1914 from Syracuse to Rhine- 
beck, N. Y. Her daughter, Mary Elizabeth, 
was born in 1914 and died in 1915. She writes 
that whatever malcontents may say of the 
trials of a minister's wife, she has met noth- 
ing but kindness and consideration. She does 
much parish calling and finds it anything but 
humdrum. She has done Red Cross and local 



1917] 



Reunions and Class Histories 



91 



relief work. Every summer she and her hus- 
band get away into the woods. Rhinebeck is 
on the old post road from New York to Albany 
and the latch string is always out for members 
of 1902. 

Amy Sussman (Mrs. J. H. Stienhart) did 
graduate work in Education at the University 
of California in 1913. In the fall of that year 
she became president of the Collegiate Alumnae 
Association of California and actively engaged 
in a campaign of school reform which culmi- 
nated in a Federal Survey of the San Fran- 
cisco Schools. In 1913 she married Jesse Henry 
Steinhart, a lawyer. She has two children. 
Louise Emily, born in 1915 and John Henry in 
1917. She has continued her interest in edu- 
cational reform and in the care of dependent 
children; is a good progressive and is profoundly 
convinced that suffrage or rather active par- 
ticipation in public life is the best thing for 
women. Bryn Mawr is very dear to her and 
she hopes Emily Louise may some day enjoy 
the advantages she had herself. 

Miriam Thomas has been teaching in Hav- 
erford. 

Anne Todd writes there are no new facts to 
add to her history. 

Helen Tremble took her Ph.D. in Latin and 
History at the University of Pennsylvania in 
1912, her dissertation being on "Juvenal and 
the Roman Emperors." From 1912 to 1915 
she taught at Beaver College, Beaver, Pa. 
In 1915 she went home to live, teaching in or 
near Philadelphia until her family moved to 
Edgewater, N. J., and she took a position to 
teach Latin in a high school near by. She 
expects to remain there next year also. 

Harriet Vaille, ex-'02, writes that the list 
of offices she held from 1912 to 1915 would give 
the impression of a modern and detestable 
Mrs. Jellaby! They were all in civic and phil- 
anthropic activities. In 1915 she broke down 
and has since been gripped by love of the Colo- 
rado mountains. She belongs to the Colorado 
Mountain Club and has been helping spread the 
gospel of the Rockies. With others she brought 
three Arapahoe Indians from Wyoming to Colo- 
rado, where they had lived fifty years ago, in 
order that their recollections might not be lost 
forever. Some Washington officials want her 
to write a book about this. For a year she 
has been busy with a very ill mother and 
the domestic cares appertaining thereto. Like 
everyone she is interested in contributing to 
relief across the sea. 



Beatrice Weaver (Mrs. A. Reese) married 
Albert Reese, a lawyer, in 1914, and has one 
daughter, Margery, born in 1916. She lives 
in Newburgh, N. Y., and is much interested in 
suffrage. 

Eleanor Wood (Mrs. J. C. Hoppin) wound 
up her milh'nery business in 1912. In 1914 
she went abroad with her sister; was caught 
by the war in Paris and was there during 
mobilization "a time so tense and exalted it 
seemed almost sacramental." She expected to 
work in the American Ambulance at Neuilly 
but was called home by the illness of her father. 
He died in March, 1915, and in April she mar- 
ried Joseph Clark Hoppin, former professor of 
archeology at Bryn Mawr. In March, 1916, 
she went abroad with her husband. Since this 
trip she has lived tamely in Boston, doing work 
for Anti-Suffrage and for war charities. This 
winter she had a surgical operation which she 
enjoyed! 

May Yeatts (Mrs. C. H. Howson) writes 
that her interest and time are demanded by 
her large family of eight. The three born since 
1912 are Walter, 1913, May, 1914, and Mar- 
garet, 1917. Time never hangs heavily on her 
hands. 

1907 

1907 held its decennial reunion dinner on 
Saturday, June 2, in Pembroke. Fifty-eight 
members were present. Antoinette Cannon was 
toast mistress. After the toasts Margaret 
Ayer Barnes showed photographs with a lan- 
tern. There were pictures of husbands and 
children, of class members, both absent and 
present, and some of their vocations and in- 
terests. 

On Saturday afternoon Eunice Schenck in- 
vited the class to tea at Pen-y-groes. Part of 
the class left before the final events of Com- 
mencement week. Ellen Thayer spoke at the 
College Breakfast and Mabel Foster Spinney 
at the Alumnae Tea. On Wednesday, Betty 
Remington, the Class Baby, came out for the 
morning festivities. 

1912 

The Class of 1912 held their fifth reunion in 
Pembroke West from Saturday, June 2 to 
Thursday, June 7. At some time during the 
reunion the following members of the Class 
were present: 

Rosalie Day, Gladys Edgerton, Emerson 
Lamb, Lorle Stecher, Margaret Warner Smith, 



92 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[July 



Dorothy Wolff Douglas, Catherine Thompson, 
Mary Gertrude Fendall, Mary Peirce, Beatrice 
Howson, Gladys Chamberlain, Martha Sheldon 
Hartford, Marjorie Walter Goodhart, Marjorie 
Thompson, Margaret Garrigues Lester, Mary 
Alden Lane, Margaret Corwin, Anna Harts- 
horne Brown, Leonora Lucas, Pearl Mitchell, 
Agnes Morrow, W T inifred Scripture Fleming, 
Katharine Shaw, Louise Watson, Carlotta 
Welles, Clara Francis Dickson, Anna Heffern 
Groton, Mary McKelvey Barbour, Elizabeth 
Faries, Loraine Mead Schwable, Dorothy 
Chase, Christine Flammer, Helen Lautz. 

Class supper was held in Radnor Saturday 
night; Mary Alden Lane was toast mistress. 
The speeches were very informal, and were 
made, for the most part, not by the speakers 
themselves but by the whole class who blithely 
argued any point that caught their fancy. 
Later in the evening, by means of a magic 
lantern, pictures of husbands and babies were 
thrown on the screen. The class was enchanted 



by its blond babies and admired the husbands 
discreetly but in silence until an eager voice 
in the back of the room exhorted: "Speak up 
and claim your own." 

The whole reunion was as informal as the 
supper. Some pale blue wings were discovered 
in the property room, and these, pinned pre- 
cariously between j our shoulders, became our 
costume. Most of the class left Monday or 
Tuesday, so that by the time of the parade 
there were so few of us that we did not try to 
make our limp blue wings a feature. To be 
back at Bryn Mawr — and to be a reunion — 
seemed to be all that was necessary for our 
happiness, and so we made no attempt to be 
glorious. 

At the alumnae tea, given this year instead 
of the alumnae supper, Mary Gertrude Fen- 
dall spoke for 1912, telling some of her experi- 
ences while working under the Congressional 
Union for the Federal amendment for woman 
suffrage. 

Marjorie La Monte Thompson. 



IN MEMORIAM 



JESSIE KELLOGG HENRY 

The Class of 1903 records with great regret 
the death of Jessie Kellogg Henry on May 5, 
1917, at her parents' home in Philadelphia, 
and extends to her family deepest sympathy. 

For one year after her graduation from Bryn 
Mawr College Jessie Henry was instructor in 
mathematics and chemistry at Jacob Tome 
Institute, Port Deposit, Md.; and from 1903 
to 1904, teacher in the High School at Chelten- 
ham, Pa. From 1905 until the time of her 
death she taught mathematics in the Philadel- 
phia High School for Girls of which institution 
she was a distinguished graduate, having been 



first honor girl of her class. She was also on 
the honor roll of the Class of 1903 Bryn Mawr 
College. 

In addition to teaching she was zealous in 
church activities and her loss is felt keenly 
by the congregation of the Presbyterian Church 
of the Tabernacle, Philadelphia. 

The news of her death, a sudden one follow- 
ing a short illness of less than a week, was a 
great shock to her friends; for the high standard 
which she maintained throughout her academic 
career was manifest in every phase of her life 
and her high integrity and splendid loyalty 
won her the admiration and love of her friends 
and associates. 



THE CLUBS 



NEW YORK 

137 East 40th Street 
Isabel Peters, 33 



West 49th 



Secretary, 
Street. 

In April the Bryn Mawr women of New 
York City and vicinity held a meeting at the 
Club house. They were called together by the 
President of the Club to discuss what action in 
the present state of war they should take as a 
body. The meeting, after discussing possible 
ways of giving help, organized the National 



Service Committee of the Bryn Mawr Women of 
New York City and an executive committee 
was appointed, of which Mrs. Edward E. 
Loomis became chairman. The Club house was 
an active center for organizing units to serve 
in taking the census. The Board of Gover- 
nors have placed the living room of the Club 
at the disposal of the Red Cross during July 
and August. 

At the last tea of the season, held in May, the 
matriculation students were the invited guests. 






1917] 



The Clubs 



93 



OHIO 

The following is part of the report read at the 
first inclusive state meeting of the Ohio Bryn 
Mawr Club : 

The resolutions [these resolutions are given 
in full in the April Quarterly] were pre- 
sented in person by the temporary secretary at 
the annual meeting of the Alumnae Association 
in Bryn Mawr on February 2. They were re- 
ceived with especial enthusiasm and interest, 
because for some time past the Board of Di- 
rectors of the Association have felt the need of 
" strengthening the system of local organiza- 
tion" and they were delighted to know that 
steps were being taken in Ohio to organize the 
Bryn Mawr alumnae and former students. 
On February 19, a third meeting was called to 
report to the Columbus members of the Club 
what was accomplished at the alumnae meet- 
ing in Bryn Mawr. 

Mrs. Kellogg's letter, an extract of which had 
been sent to every Bryn Mawr person in Ohio, 
was read and all the important matters that 
were discussed at the alumnae meeting were 
put before the local members of the Club. As 
a result of this meeting the local Club decided 
to plan definitely for a spring meeting and have 
membership cards sent to all Bryn Mawr 
people in Ohio asking them to join. It was 
also voted that Mrs. Clarence Perkins be made 
chairman of a committee to arrange for a meet- 
ing of graduate students and members of the 
senior class of the Ohio State University who 
might be interested in knowing about the 
opportunities offered by the graduate school 
of Bryn Mawr College. Mrs. Perkins arranged 
a very attractive tea in her own home on the 
afternoon of March 24. About 22 students 
were present; Miss Jones showed lantern slides 
of the Bryn Mawr buildings and campus and 
explained the fellowships and scholarships that 
Bryn Mawr offers. Mrs. Bloom told of the 
graduate life, and Miss Werner of the under- 
graduate life at Bryn Mawr. 

Following out the publicity plan of the Club, 
Miss Jones went to the Western College for 
Women at Oxford, Ohio, and at a special meet- 
ing of the senior class told its members of the 
advantages of the graduate courses at Bryn 
Mawr. While there she was the guest of the 
president and was invited to address the whole 
college. 

On March 31, Miss Jones and Miss Werner 
were invited to be present at a meeting in 



Cincinnati, which the Cincinnati Bryn Mawrters 
arranged. This meeting was very well at- 
tended and a definite organization was started 
by appointing a committee with Miss Marjorie 
Rawson as chairman. Through this committee 
the secretary of the Club may notify the local 
members more directly of what is going on. 

During the spring plans were slowly shaping 
themselves for the State meeting; Dr. Marion 
Parris Smith of Bryn Mawr consented to come 
from Bryn Mawr to speak at our first inclusive 
meeting; membership blanks were being sent 
in with blanks filled and letters were coming to 
the secretary endorsing the plans of the Club. 
The Toledo group of Bryn Mawrters reported 
a meeting in Toledo, at which plans for making 
Bryn Mawr more widely known in the schools 
and elsewhere were discussed. In Cleveland 
Mrs. Samuel Strong called a meeting, and there 
they too discussed plans for Bryn Mawr pub- 
licity and what they could undertake to do in 
Cleveland. 

As a result of the cooperation of many of 
the Bryn Mawr alumnae and former students 
in Ohio the Club has been able to secure forty- 
six members out of a possible ninety-two. 
With forty-six members therefore the Ohio 
Bryn Mawr Club comes into existence. 

Adeline A. Werner. 

Of this first meeting Miss Werner writes: 
"Our first meeting we feel was a great success. 
We had ten out-of-town Bryn Mawrters repre- 
senting Cincinnati, Sidney, Cleveland, Youngs- 
town, Athens and Portsmouth; there were 
twenty-five in all. Dr. Marion Parris Smith 
came from Bryn Mawr for the occasion, mak- 
ing the day an unusually interesting one. 
The business meeting began at twelve o'clock. 
At this meeting the enclosed report was read, 
and the advisability of having the Club dis- 
cussed, a constitution adopted, and officers 
for the coming year elected. The officers are: 
President, Grace Latimer Jones, of Columbus; 
Vice-President at large, Mrs. D. H. Good- 
willie, of Toledo; First Vice-President, Marjorie 
Rawson, of Cincinnati; Second Vice-President, 
Mrs. Samuel Strong of Cleveland; Secretary- 
Treasurer, Adeline Werner, of Columbus. 

"There was a luncheon following the meet- 
ing at which luncheon Dr. Smith spoke on 
'The first year of the new plan of government 
at Bryn JMawr.' This was, of course, very 
interesting to all of us. 

"After luncheon we had a vocational confer- 



94 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[July 



ence at which seven Deans of Women of Ohio 
Colleges were present and took part in the 
Round Table discussion. Mrs. Smith opened 
the meeting by a little address, 'Vocational 
Opportunities for Women and where to find 
them.' Informal discussion and tea fol- 
lowed. . . . 



"Our first attempt at a State meeting was 
tremendously worth while; we feel that now 
we in Ohio, organized as we are, can be of real 
active service and assistance to the Bryn Mawr 
Alumnae Association." 



NEWS FROM THE CLASSES 

The news of this department is compiled from information furnished by class secretaries, Bryn Mawr Clubs, and 
from other reliable sources for which the Editor is responsible. Acknowledgment is also due to the Bryn Mawr College 
News for items of news. 

Alumnae and former students of Bryn Mawr College are earnestly requested to 
send directly to the Quarterly — or if they prefer, to their Class Secretaries — for 
use in these columns, items of news concerning themselves. There is a constant 
demand, on the part of Quarterly readers, for abundant class news. But the 
class news can be complete, accurate, and timely only if each one will take the 
trouble to send in promptly information concerning herself. And the Classes that 
have not secretaries willing to act as correspondents for the Quarterly are urged 
to appoint such officers. 



1893 

Secretary, Mrs. J. E. Johnson, Jr., Heath- 
cote Inn, Scarsdale, N. Y. 

Lillian Moser did not teach last winter but 
went south with a Vassar friend, making her 
longest stay in Charleston, S. C. On her re- 
turn she had a very interesting experience in 
visiting some of the mission stations of the 
Episcopal Church among the mill-workers in 
South Carolina and the mountain missions in 
North Carolina. She is now keeping house 
for her father, doing church and Red Cross 
work. 

1896 

Georgiana King sailed for Spain on June 2. 
She expects to continue some work in archaeology. 

1899 

Secretary, Mrs. E. H. Waring, 325 Wash- 
ington Street, Glen Ridge, N. J. 

Madeline Palmer (Mrs. Charles M. Bakewell) 
has a daughter, Mildred Palmer, born June 14. 

Ethel Levering (Mrs. James M. Motley) is 
living permanently in Baltimore, as her hus- 
band has resigned the position he held as pro- 
fessor of economics at Brown University and 
has accepted the position of vice-president of 
the United States Fidelity and Guarantee 
Company in Baltimore. 

Marion Ream (Mrs. Redmond D. Stephens), 
after spending the winter with her mother in 



New York and in Florida, visited Dorothy 
Fronheiser (Mrs. Philip T. Meredith) in Har- 
risburg and then went West for the summer. 

The two older daughters of Mary Thurber 
(Mrs. Henry S. Dennison) are preparing for 
college. 

Margaret Hall has planted a large crop of 
potatoes at her home in North Cohasset, and 
is going to raise chickens and calves to help 
increase the food supply. 

Frances Keay (Mrs. Thomas P. Ballard) 
gave, during the winter, lectures in law at the 
Western Reserve University and at Oberlin Col- 
lege. At Oberlin the title was "Legal Status of 
Women;" at the Western Reserve there were 
three: "Domestic Relations," "Household 
Laws," "Business Laws." The "Household 
Laws" was given again in May for the Wo- 
man's Club of Cleveland and may be enlarged 
and printed. 

1900 

Constance Rulison writes: "The class will be 
interested to hear that Jessie Tatlock's Greek 
and Roman Mythology, published in January 
by the Century Company, is meeting with de- 
served success, having already been adopted as 
text-book by several important preparatory 
schools and at least one college — the Univer- 
sity of Missouri." 

Sarah L. Emery (Mrs. Charles T. Dudley) 
has offered her school, Wabanaki, with its 



1917] 



News from the Classes 



95 



accommodations for eighty children, to the 
Government for the use of children of Army 
and Navy and National Guard Officers. 

1901 

Emily Cross and Marjory Cheney, ex-'03, 
sailed for France on June 9 to work with Dr. 
May Putnam on the Franco-American Com- 
mittee for the Care of Children of the Frontier. 

1903 

Secretary, Mrs. H. K. Smith, Farmington, 
Conn. 

Louise Atherton (Mrs. Samuel Dickey) has 
a son, born in April. 

Dorothea Day (Mrs. Asa D. Watkins) has a 
son, born in March. 

Charlotte Morton, ex-'03, has announced 
her engagement to Frank Lanagan of Albany, 
N. Y. 

Martha White has gone to France to carry on 
her work with the Surgical Dressings Committee. 

1904 

Secretary, Emma O. Thompson, 213 South 
50th Street, Philadelphia. 

Eleanor Bliss has passed examinations for 
the position of assistant geologist of the U. S. 
G. S. 

Bertha Brown was married at Westtown, on 
June 18, to Walter D. Lambert. 

Anne Buzby (Mrs. Louis Palmer) is serving 
on the committee of the Wayne Chapter of 
the American Red Cross. 

Maud Temple has been appointed instruc- 
tor in Old French and Spanish at Mt. Holyoke. 

Eloise Tremain has been appointed prin- 
cipal of the Episcopal Church School, at Salt 
Lake City. 

Esther Sinn was married on June 16, at 
Brooklyn, N. Y., to Rudolph Carl Menendorffer. 
She will be at home after August 1 at 875 West 
180th Street, New York City. 

1905 

Secretary, Mrs. C. M. Hardenbergh, 3824 
Warwick Boulevard, Kansas City, Mo. 

Alice Meigs (Mrs. Arthur Orr) has a daugh- 
ter, Alice, born in May. 

Jane Ward spent part of the winter making 
addresses relative to her missionary work in 
China. 

Mr. and Mrs. G. Quincy Dunlop (Bertha 
Seeley) announce the birth of a daughter, 
Evelyn Cornelia, on April 14. 

Isabel Ashwell (Mrs. Edward H. Raymond, 
Jr.) has a daughter, Grace Allison, born April 1. 



1906 

Secretary, Maria Smith, St. Davids, Pa. 

Laura Boyer has recovered from a severe 
attack of infantile paralysis, which developed 
immediately after her return from St. Louis, 
where she had lead a normal class at the Gen- 
eral Convention of the Episcopal Church in 
October. Her case has been a very unusual 
one. She was completely paralyzed but grad- 
ually regained control of all her muscles and 
is now as well as ever, although still weak. 

Ethel Bullock (Mrs. Harold K. Beecher) is 
very active in organizing Belgian relief work in 
Schuylkill County. 

Louise Fleischmann spent February on a 
plantation near Tallahassee, and in March, 
with Alice Lauterbach, visited Laura Boyer 
and Ethel Bullock Beecher in Pottsville, Pa. 

Anna MacClanahan (Mrs. Wilfred T. Gren- 
fell) has a daughter, born last spring. 

1907 

Katharine Kerr has sailed for France with 
the Nurses' Unit from the New York Presby- 
terian Hospital. 

Elizabeth Pope has announced her engage- 
ment to Edward Behr of New York. 

Mary Calvert Myers, ex-'07, was married 
recently to Dr. Edward Beasley of Baltimore. 

Margaret Blodgett, ex-'07, has started a 
business in Massachusetts as curator for private 
libraries. 

1908 

Secretary, Mrs. Dudley Montgomery, 25 
Langdon Street, Madison, Wis. 

Nellie Seeds (Mrs. Scott Nearing) was elected 
president of the Toledo Suffrage Association at 
the spring meeting. Mrs. Nearing was active 
in the campaign for Presidential Suffrage in 
Ohio and spent several days lobbying at Co- 
lumbus prior to the passage of the bill. She is 
spending the summer at Chautauqua, N. Y., 
where her husband teaches in the summer 
school. 

Annie Carrere sailed for France early in June 
to work with the American Fund for French 
wounded. 

Louise Congdon (Mrs. J. P. Balmer) has 
moved to 1427 Judson Avenue, Evanston, 111. 

Margaret C. Lewis is to be married this sum- 
mer. 

Louise Pettibone Smith received her Ph.D. 
from Bryn Mawr in June. 

Rose Marsh was married to the Rev. Jacob 
Simpson Payton at Pittsburgh on June 16. 



96 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[July 



1909 

Secretary, Frances Browne, 15 East 10th 
Street, New York City. 

Margaret Ames, ex-'09, was married on April 
21 to Cushing Frederick Wright of St. Paul. 

Pleasaunce Baker expects to be near Phila- 
delphia until the middle of August. She will 
spend the latter part of the summer in New 
England. 

Marie Belleville expects to sail for China in 
the latter part of August. She will work under 
the Y. W. C. A. 

Julia Doe is taking a course in College Ad- 
ministration for Women at the University of 
Wisconsin. At the same time she expects to 
teach Latin in the summer school of the Uni- 
versity and assist in the office of the Dean of 
Women. 

Alice Miller, ex-'09, is staying near Balti- 
more this summer and hopes to do regular work 
at the Johns Hopkins Hospital dispensary in 
the Social Service Department. 

Mary Nearing is in charge of the student 
workers on the Bryn Mawr Farm. She will be 
there most of the summer. 

Lillian Laser (Mrs. Berthold Strauss) has 
done work with the Juvenile Aid Society in 
child placing. She is also chairman on the 
Committee on Volunteer Service of the Phila- 
delphia College Club. This Committee acts 
as a clearing-house for volunteer workers and 
the various organizations and agencies which 
need their services. It is working out many of 
the problems that are constantly arising in the 
use of volunteer service. The high schools are 
cooperating in the work and hoping to make 
volunteer service a factor in the social educa- 
tion of girls of that age in the city. 

Eleanor Clifton is working in the municipal 
court statistical department in Philadelphia. 

Mildred Pressinger (Mrs. C. O. von Kien- 
busch) is spending the summer on Long Island 
with her two small boys. 

Grace Wooldridge (Mrs. E. P. Dewes) has 
three little girls now. Grace, the Class Baby, 
is six years old, Dorothy four, and the baby 
eight months. 

Cynthia Wesson expects to drive a car in 
France for the American Fund for French 
Wounded. 

Alta Stevens took a draftsman's course at 
the Art Institute last winter and has been doing 
some interior decorating. 

Aristine Munn (Mrs* Charles Recht), M.D., 
gave a series of lectures last spring on "Defec- 



tive Children and Probation" for the Woman's 
Legal Education Society. 

Geraldine Watson, M.D., ex-'09, is still at 
Bellevue Hospital. She has joined the Belle- 
vue Unit and will go with it to France pro- 
vided the United States Government consents 
to give the army commission to women. 

Barbara Spofford (Mrs. S. A. Morgan) has 
been giving a course in mental testing to 
teachers of subnormal children at New York 
University, and directing an experimental class 
of subnormals in one of the New York public 
schools. She is also assistant director of one 
of the departments in the University. Her 
further activities consist in work as chairman 
of the Randall's Island Committee of the State 
Charities Aid, as member of the Board of Gov- 
ernors of the A. C. A., and in writing inci- 
dental book reviews and editorials for the 
magazine Unguarded. 

Helen Scott has been teaching English and 
French in the Peabody Conservatory of Music 
in Baltimore. She is attending several Chau- 
tauqua courses this summer. 

Ellen Shippen is head of the research work 
of Valentine, Lead and Gregg, Industrial Coun- 
cillors, a work which involves an investigation 
into the causes of the various phases of indus- 
trial unrest which are so apparent today. 

Emily Howson is associate professor of physics 
in Lake Erie College, Painesville, O. She has 
introduced a new course this year called House- 
hold Physics which has been very popular. 
She is now studying at Madison, Wis. 

Leona Labold works for suffrage and is on 
the Board of Library Trustees in Portsmouth, O. 

Marianne Moore's latest appearance in 
print is with a poem included in the Golden 
Year, an anthology edited by Rufus B. Wilson 
and published by Mitchell Kennerly. Her 
poems have appeared in Poetry, the Egoist, 
Contemporary Verse, and Bruno's Weekly, and 
some will be included in the Others' Anthology 
(1917). 

Mary Goodwin was married in April to the 
Rev. Charles Storrs in Shaown, China. She 
went out to China last fall with Alice Ropes 
(Mrs. E. D. Kellogg), '06, and has been teach- 
ing English in the Boys' School and studying 
Chinese. 

Mary Herr is attending the summer school at 
Teachers College in preparation for her work 
next year at the Brearley School, where in addi- 
tion to her work as librarian, she will teach 
some classes in English. 



1917] 



News from the Classes 



97 



Frances Ferris, ex-'09, is taking courses at 
the Columbia summer school. 

Anna Harlan is president of the Y. W. C. A. 
of Coatesville and leader of an industrial club 
in the Association, president of the Century 
Club (civic), chairman of a committee in the 
State Federation of Pennsylvania Club Women, 
and is on the Board of Managers of the Visit- 
ing Nurses' Association. 

Dorothy Miller is working in the Organized 
Charities of New York City. 

May Putnam, M.D., is physician to the 
Franco-American Committee for the Care of 
Children from the Frontier. She has her office 
in Paris and visits the children, when neces- 
sary, in their colonies which usually consist of 
disused convents and chateaux in Brittany, 
Burgundy, and Touraine. 

Antoinette Hearne (Mrs. J. X. Farrer) has a 
daughter, Jane Hearne, born in March. 

Georgina Biddle has been working for her 
M.A. in chemistry at the University of Penn- 
sylvania. 

Margaret Bontecou received her M.A. in 
history and economics this spring. She has 
resigned from the position of warden of Den- 
bigh after having held it for three years. 

Bertha Ehlers, warden of Radnor last year, 
is to be warden of Denbigh. 

Margaret Vickery has come North for the 
summer. She will return to her work as sixth- 
grade teacher in the Colored Industrial School, 
Calhoun, Ala., next winter and will probably 
take a course at the Teachers College, Columbia, 
this summer. 

Frances Browne has been appointed a mem- 
ber of the War Committee of Women's Uni- 
versity Club of New York. 

Florence Ballin, ex-'09, has written a book 
on Tennis for Girls which is published by 
Spalding's American Sports Publishing Co. 

Shirley Putnam sailed on the Rochambeau 
on June 23 to do relief work in France. 

1910 

Secretary, Mrs. H. B. Van Dyne, Troy, Pa. 

Susanne C. Allinson has announced her en- 
gagement to Henry C. Emery, representative 
of the Guaranty Trust Company in Petrograd. 

Jeanne Kerr has announced her engagement 
to Udo Fleischmann, of New York, a brother 
of Louise Fleischmann, '06. 

Frances Lord, ex-' 10, was married to the 
Rev. Sidney Robbins on June 9, at Plymouth, 
Mass. 



Izette Taber (Mrs. A. V. de Forest) is now 
living at Salt Marsh House, Shore Road, Strat- 
ford, Conn. 

1911 

Class Correspondent, Margaret J. Hobart, 
Sommariva, Easthampton, N. Y. 

Helen Henderson was married to Sydney 
Green, Jr., on Wednesday, April 25, in Em- 
manuel Church, Cumberland, Md. Mr. and 
Mrs. Green will live in Petersburg, Va. 

Margaret Hobart has accepted the position 
of Associate Editor for Woman's Work on the 
New York Churchman. Her office address is 
381 Fourth Avenue, New York City. 

Leila Houghteling spent several weeks in the 
east in May and June. She attended the wed- 
ding of Lawrence Houghteling and Laura 
Delano, '14, in Washington on May 26, visited 
Norvelle Browne in New York, spent commence- 
ment week at Bryn Mawr, and then together 
with Norvelle Browne, ex-'ll, Harriet Hough- 
teling, ex-'07, and Margaret Ayer Barnes, 
ex-'07, motored back to Chicago. 

Helen Parkhurst received her doctor's de- 
gree at Bryn Mawr at Commencement. She 
has accepted the position of instructor in logic 
at Barnard College. 

Mary Taylor has resigned her position as sec- 
retary to the Dean at Bryn Mawr and has ac- 
cepted a business position in New York. 

Alpine Parker was married on Saturday, 
June 30, to George Bennett Filbert at the 
Friends' Meeting House, Baltimore, Md. 

Jeannette Allen (Mrs. F. M. Andrews) has a 
son, her second child, Allen, born May 10. 

1912 

Acting Secretary, Mary Peirce, Haverford, Pa. 

Mary Vennum has announced her engage- 
ment to Bruce Van Cleve, who is studying 
law at the University of Illinois. 

Died, after a long illness: Dr. Walter Clark 
Haupt, husband of Mary Morgan, on Sunday, 
June 3, in New York. 

Christine Hammer and Elizabeth Faries will 
sail for China in July. Next winter Catherine 
Arthurs and Elizabeth Faries expect to or- 
ganize a new school near Canton in connec- 
tion with the True Light Seminary. Christine 
Hammer will teach English in this school. 

Mary Alden's husband, the Rev. E. S. Lane, 
is chaplain at Fort Niagara for the summer. 

Dorothy Chase and her mother motored from 
Chicago to Bryn Mawr College the end of May, 
reaching Bryn Mawr in time for 1912's reunion. 



THX BYBN MAWB ALUMNAE QUABTBRLY, VOL. XI, NO. 2 



98 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[July 



Helen Colter (Mrs. N. L. Pierson), ex-' 12, 
has a son, Aaron Applegate, born March 28. 

Rosalie Day is living in New York this sum- 
mer, studying music and keeping house for 
some friends. 

Gladys Edgerton has given up her position 
on the editorial staff of the Century Dictionary. 

Leonora Lucas returned in May from her 
trip to Australia, China and Japan. While in 
Tokyo, she saw Ai Hoshino. 

Winifred Scripture (Mrs. Percy C. Fleming) 
is living at 891 East 14th Street, Brooklyn. 
Mr. Fleming is in the Officers Training Camp 
at Plattsburg. 

Alice Stratton was graduated in April from 
the Nurses' Training School of the University 
Hospital in Philadelphia. She is still nursing 
there. 

Dorothy Wolff (Mrs. Paul Douglas) and her 
husband have taken M. Beck's house on the 
Bryn Mawr College grounds for July and 
August. Mr. Douglas expects to finish his 
Ph.D. thesis this summer. 

Jean Stirling was married recently to Stephen 
Gregory at St. John's, Washington, D. C. 

Gladys Chamberlain is the social worker for 
the Madison Avenue Presbyterian Church. 

Henrietta Runyon (Mrs. G. H. L. Winfrey) 
has a daughter, Roberta Lane, born April 8. 

1913 

Secretary, Nathalie Swift, 20 West 55th 
Street, New York City. 

Agathe Deming taught last winter in the 
Domestic Science Department of Drexel In- 
stitute. 

Marie Pinney, ex-' 13, is working as the chil- 
dren's librarian in the Carnegie Library in 
Bois6, Idaho. 

Clara Pond is doing family history work 
among the prisoners brought to the Psycho- 
pathic Department of the City Police Head- 
quarters in New York. 

Keinath Stohr (Mrs. E. S. Davey) has a 
second daughter. 

Lillie Walton (Mrs. R. T. Fox), ex-'13, has a 
son, Robert Thomas Fox, Jr., born June 2, 
1916. 

Sara Halpen is working in the office of the 
Midvale Steel Company. 

Katharine Williams is continuing her social 
work with King's Chapel, Boston, in placing 
working girls, finding them lodgings and giving 
them advice and entertainment. 



Elizabeth Fabian (Mrs. Ronald Webster) 
has a daughter, Elizabeth Fabian, born June 
22, 1916. 

Marian Irwin has been doing research work 
at Harvard towards a Ph.D. degree. 

Margaret Blaine took a three months' nurs- 
ing course in New York in the autumn. In 
February she managed the revival of "David 
Garrick" at Bryn Mawr. 

Josephine Brown is farming in Minnesota. 

Alice Ames, ex-' 13, worked in Paris for the 
American Fund for French Wounded from 
June to December, 1916. She has now an- 
nounced her engagement to Dr. Bronson 
Crothers, of Cambridge. Dr. Crothers has 
sailed with the Harvard Unit for France. 

Alice Hearne has announced her engagement 
to Julius Rockwell of Taunton, Mass. 

Helen Evans, ex-' 13, was married June 12 to 
Dr. Robert M. Lewis of Baltimore. 

Nora Swanzy, ex-' 13, was married in April 
to George Young Bennett of Texas. 

Clara Murray, ex-' 13, was married June 2 to 
Auville Eager. 

Lucile Shadburn (Mrs. J. B. Yow), ex-'13, 
has a son, born in April. 

Eleanor Bontecou was graduated at the New 
York University Law School, receiving the 
degree of B.L. 

Ellen Faulkner is to be in Miss Spence's 
School next winter. 

1914 

Secretary, Ida W. Pritchett, 22 East 91st 
Street, New York City. 

Dorothea Bechtel (Mrs. John Marshall) has 
a son, John Marshall, Jr., born April 14. 

Helen Shaw has announced her engagement 
to William Crosby of La Crosse, Wis., instructor 
in English at the Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology. 

Nancy Van Dyke, ex-'13, was married on 
May 5 to Gilbert H. Scribner, 3rd, of Winnetka. 

Lucille Thompson was married on May 29 
to Francis Caldwell of Philadelphia. Mr. and 
Mrs. Caldwell will live at Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Margaret Sears (Mrs. Leonard C. Bigelow) 
has a daughter, Barbara, born May 2. 

Laura Delano was married to James Lawrence 
Houghteling in Washington on May 26. 

About thirty members of the Class were at 
Bryn Mawr for some part of reunion, though 
not all came to class supper. The Class Baby 
did not make her appearance at this reunion. 



1917] 



News from the Classes 



99 



Leah Cadbury sailed on June 16 for Bor- 
deaux. She will spend a year in England 
working in the Friends' Ambulance Unit Hos- 
pital in Birmingham. 

Eleanor Washburn, ex-' 14, was married on 
June 2 to Charles Emery of Colorado Springs. 

1915 

Secretary, Katharine W. McCollin, 2049 
Upland Way, Philadelphia. 

Mary Albertson will teach in Virginia next 
winter. 

Emily Noyes has been appointed an English 
Reader at Bryn Mawr and will live in Pen-y- 
Groes with Dean Taft. 

Catharine Bryant is secretary of the Print 
Club in Philadelphia. 

Mary Chamberlain (Mrs. A. R. Moore) will 
receive the degree of Ph.D. at Rutgers College 
next year. She will be the first women to re- 
ceive a degree at Rutgers. 

Marguerite Darkow has been doing research 
work for the Children's Bureau at Washington 
on Woman and Child Labor in Europe during 
the war. She is tutoring at the school which 
Amy MacMaster is in charge of at Schroon 
Lake. 

Harriet Bradford is visiting in the East this 
summer. 

After reunion Olga Erbsloh had a house party 
at Seabright, N. J. Ruth Tinker, Harriet 
Bradford, Gertrude Emery, Ruth Hopkinson, 
Vashti McCreery, and Katharine McCollin 
were there. 

Marjorie Fyfe is staying in Palo Alto for 
the summer. She is assistant to the organizer 
of the Red Cross in Palo Alto. She will return 
to Stanford University next winter. 

Olga Erbsloh has been making a study of 
employers' welfare work for the School of Phil- 
anthropy, New York. 

Dagmar Perkins has lectured at Harvard on 
the psychology of the dance. 

Cecilia Sargent will return to Cape May 
Court House to teach English and Latin next 
year. 

Atala Scudder was married to Dr. Townsend 
Davison on June 2. 

Elizabeth Smith attended the Convention 
of Charities and Corrections at Pittsburgh 
in June. 

Isabel Smith has received a graduate scholar- 
ship in geology and will return to Bryn Mawr 
next winter. She will be Choir Leader as she 
was in 1914-15. 



Myra Richards (Mrs. K. D. Jessen) has a 
daughter, Ingeborg Anna Marie, born May 28. 

Angeleine Spence is assistant to the Treas- 
urer of the Alumnae Association of Wellesley 
College. 

Margaret Bradway, Mildred Jacobs, and 
Adrienne Kenyon received the degree of M.A. 
at Bryn Mawr in June. 

Helen Taft has been appointed Dean of 
Bryn Mawr College. 

Ruth Tinker has announced her engage- 
ment to Daniel P. Morse, Jr. Mr. Morse is a 
member of the Aviation Corps. 

Amy MacMaster has received a graduate 
scholarship in philosophy and will return to 
Bryn Mawr next winter. She is in charge of 
a tutoring school at Scroon Lake this summer. 

Vashti McCreery, ex-' 15, has received the 
degree of B.S. at the University of Illinois. 

Ruth Hopkinson is traveling saleswoman for 
a Cleveland publishing firm selling illustrated 
Bibles. 

Julia Harrison, ex-' 15, is taking the second 
year nursing course at Johns Hopkins. 

1916 

Secretary, Adeline Werner, 1640 Broad 
Street, Columbus, Ohio. 

Margaret Dodd was married to Paul San- 
gree, May 5, in Cambridge, Mass. 

Louise Dillingham has taken a position as 
secretary to the business manager of the 
Guanica Centrale Sugar Factory, Porto Rico. 
She will sail in the fall. 

Katherine Trowbridge, ex-' 16, was married in 
June to George Perkins, Princeton, 1917, a son 
of George W. Perkins. 

Louise Wagner (Mrs. Donald Baird), ex-' 16, 
has a daughter, born June 2. 

1917 

Frances Curtin has announced her engage- 
ment to Dr. Herbert Haynes of Clarkesburg, 
W. Va. 

Eleanor Dulles and Margaret Henderson 
sailed on the Espagne directly after Com- 
mencement to work in France. 

Ex-'18 

Ruth Cheney has announced her engage- 
ment to Thomas Winthrop Streeter of Con 
cord, N. H. 



LITERARY NOTES 



All publications received will be acknowledged in this column. The editor begs that copies of books or articles by or 
about the Bryn Mawr Faculty and Bryn Mawr Students, or book reviews written by alumnae, will be sent to the 
Quarterly for review, notice, or printing. 



BOOKS REVIEWED 

Elan Vital. By Helen Williston Brown. 

Boston: The Gorham Press, 1917.' $1.00. 

This little book contains thirty-four poems 
of varying merit, but all executed with such 
clearness that the reader does not sigh for foot- 
notes. There is nothing vague in Mrs. Brown's 
work: her poetry is direct, simple, sincere, 
and strikingly lucid. A few ambiguous phrases, 
like "the random pavement," occur rarely. 

As its name implies, the book is indeed a 
"vital spark." The writer expresses her feel- 
ings with a vigor and a candor unusual in a 
woman. She is not afraid to describe a girl's 
first love; her worship of an ideal; her final 
vivid realization of true love. Here is one of 
the poems that show best her clearness of 
diction, her strength of feeling, and her frank- 
ness. 

TWO WAYS 

Yours is a level, tranquil way; 

I wander forth with outstretched hands 
Where dumb and wild emotions sway 

In dim and far volcanic lands. 

But I, who fail in half I do, 

And smile to see my own despair, 
Perceive a glory hid from you 

Tho' you should seek it everywhere. 

And I, who waste my soul in strife, 
In fighting blackness, catch a gleam, — 

I know of love outlasting life, 
That is to you an empty dream. 

So yours may be the level road 

Where skies are fair and fields are bright, 

Serene and tranquil your abode. 
I walk among the gods tonight. 

Mrs. Brown can also paint a scene with the 
brush of an artist. Her descriptions are power- 
ful. In Dispensary, for example, contains this 
vivid word-picture : 

The colored lady with rheumatic pains 
Of ten years' standing, and an endless row 
Of ugly babies, patched with eczema. 
Coffee and cabbage, and a taste of beer, 
As like as not will prove to be their fare. 
The little boy with the infected knee. 
How his face haunts you! 



Mrs. Brown's work is noticeably lacking in 
images and metaphors. Her imaginative gift 
is shown more in her material, in her choice 
and treatment of a subject, than in her diction. 
On the Origins of Romance describes the sordid, 
stupid life of a cave-man and how he awakens 
to "warm emotion for the magic of the moon." 
The Imaginative Chauffeur sings the chauffeur's 
joy in his free life in the open. 

I hold all their lives in the crook of my elbow, 

Like a Viking of old, who sails over the ocean, 

Like a warrior of old, who rides through the wide world 

I traverse the earth, a free man among free men. 

Spring's Lament for Winter is another imag- 
inative and beautiful poem; a difficult subject 
skillfully handled. 

A sense of humor is the rarest of gifts, — 
which Mrs. Brown possesses in good measure. 
The Army of Metchnikoff, which describes a 
battle between bacilli and blood cells, is very 
amusing. The hero of the piece is a "leuko- 
cyte" — a personage probably received in med- 
ical circles only, for the present reviewer never 
met him and cannot find his name in the glos- 
saries at her disposal. The Third Year Stu- 
dent's Nightmare is even more mirth-provoking 
and can be recommended as an antidote to 
melancholy. These humorous poems are 
worthy to be ranked among some of the Bab 
Ballads. However, one could wish that the 
author had written enough of them for a vol- 
ume all to themselves, or that she had put them 
in a group apart, in her book, so that the tran- 
sition to or from verses of a more serious order 
might not shock the reader. To be told: 

The baby cried, and cried, and cried, 
I put a bandage on its head 
But 'twas a tape-worm instead, 



If you should see a mouse at night 
Would it be purple, green or white? 

and then, on the very next page, 

I should not know the hand of God 
Unless it were in earthly guise, 

is nothing short of disconcerting. 
100 



1917] 



Literary Notes 



101 



But this is a small matter. What is much 
more important is that Mrs. Brown has written 
some poems of lasting beauty. Youth, com- 
posed in early girlhood, shows great promise. 
Elan Vital, Spring's Lament for Winter, The 
Campus, Ad Astra, Of the Earth, Two Ways, On 
the Origins of Romance, To Alice, To N. W. W. 
are worth reading and remembering. The Cam- 
pus will appeal most to all lovers of Bryn 
Mawr and will be given in full at the end of this 
study. 

Vivid and vital though Mrs. Brown's poems 
are, they are not always perfect in structure. 
To Alice is marred by the last stanza, in which 
the system of versification suddenly changes 
and we get: 

Admiringly I hear her talk, 

And what I must suppose is 
That, where I find a gravel walk, 

She treads a path of roses. 

Compare the second verse of this stanza with 
the second verses of all the other stanzas, and 
a foot is discovered to have been dropped. 
The second verses in question are: "Who with 
the eyes of faith can see," "When rightly 
viewed give excellent shade," "Quite close 
together, three feet high," and "Embower half 
the garden wall." Then why "And what I 
must suppose is?" Then there is that ques- 
tion of "free verse," beloved by those poets who, 
if examined in music, generally would be found 
to be "tone-deaf" and utterly devoid of any 
sense of rhythm. (Think how some of our 
most distinguished writers of free verse must 
look on a ball-room floor!) Free verse is now 
the fashion; it stumbles along on its weak, 
deformed legs, arriving somehow. We usually 
recognize it when we see it coming. But to 
the present reviewer's taste, at least, a mixture 
of free verse with lyric or regular verse is con- 
fusing and displeasing. Take Reunion, for in- 
stance. The first half of this poem is composed 
in good blank verse, the latter half in free verse. 
When the present reviewer reads, in another 
poem, 

The light of sudden laughter in his eyes 
Was sweet to me as are the flowers in May. 

and a few lines farther on, 

. . . . and I knew 
From long and close attention, 
Just what he was at, 

then the present reviewer feels the way she 
does when the Sixth Avenue L jolts round the 



curve at Park Place. This kind of thing can 
never be beautiful, and poetry — the best 
poetry — ought to be beautiful. 

In passing, for the sake of the second edition 
of this book, a word must be said of the shock- 
ingly faulty punctuation of the first edition. 
The present reviewer, once having failed to 
pass her entrance examination in punctuation 
for Bryn Mawr, feels a little natural hesitation 
about criticizing the punctuation of others. 
But 

He hastens to the nearest vein. 

Protrudes his nose into a crack, 
Then wriggles through with might and main, 

Once inside, joins a motley pack! 
Of stupid, bumping, red blood cells, etc. 

penetrates even to her unpunctuated conscious- 
ness. Yet in justice to Mrs. Brown be it said 
that such startling phenomena are often due to 
the vagaries of type-setters. 

Because the highest type of poetry is beau- 
tiful, we could wish that Mrs. Brown had omit- 
ted certain colorless verses from her volume. A 
poet cannot always write his best; but at least 
he can refrain from publishing anything except 
his best. There are poems in Elan Vital which 
seem to be sketches, notes, experiments, any- 
thing but expressions of moods that "will out." 
Let us read The Difference: 

A teacher will teach what authorities deem 
You should know, nor permit you to doubt it. 

A professor is so much in love with his theme 
That he just has to tell you about it. 

Scarcely poetry, this, and unworthy to be 
placed next to The Campus on the opposite 
page. 

Mrs. Brown is self-confessedly a materialist. 
In one of her best poems, Of the Earth, she says, 

And I, with my white feet of clay, 
My heart so full of earthly things, 
I have no self to soar on wings 

Into some pallid, unknown day. 

But loving best the blue-green earth, 
I turn to it with clinging hands. 
Is this not all my life demands — 

The light and love of the green earth? 

For so my mind and heart have grown 
Out of this world of time and sense, 
That I should be, if taken thence, 

An empty ghost of the Unknown. 

Love of the dear green earth and dread of the 
unknown are natural feelings, common to all. 



102 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[July 



The present reviewer would not wish to take 
exception to Mrs. Brown's views as expressed, 
and expressed beautifully, in this poem. But 
The Final Victor is more than the expression 
of a mood; it reads like a permanent philosophy, 
whose burden is "There is no god save Death 
alone." This is a very powerful poem, and its 
measured cadences ring clear and true as the 
tolling of a bell. The last three stanzas: 

The heaped up knowledge of the years 
Like chaff before the wind is blown 

When death with dread intent appears. 
There is no god but Death alone. 

Love triumphs, glorious for a while, 
Thinking she may her lord disown, 

Death waits with a contemptuous smile. 
There is no god but Death alone. 

Like one who watches children play 
Who heed not how the time has flown, 

He stops the game at close of day, 
There is no god but Death alone. 

It may be over-reaching the role of reviewer 
to ask Mrs. Brown, what of Dante .... 
does not he still live in the hearts of men? 
. . . And is not love, like a flower, al- 

ways blossoming again, — even though for some- 
body else? .... And what of Kitchener 
of Khartoum? Has Mrs. Brown read A. J. 
Burr's poem, Kitchener's March? Here are 
the last two stanzas: 

There's a body drifting down 
For the mighty sea to keep. 
There's a spirit cannot die 

While a heart is left to leap 
In the land he gave his all, 

Steel alike to praise and hate. 
He has saved the life he spent — 
Death has struck too late! 

Not the muffled drums for him, 

Nor the wailing of the fife. 
Trumpets blaring to the charge 

Were the music of his life. 
Let the music of his death 

Be the feet of marching men. 
Let his heart a thousandfold 

Take the field again! 



The flower grew from the hearts of men, 

In the darkness and the clay, 
But its blossoms turned where God's sun burned 

In the white space far away. 

Because the flower grew in the clay, 

Men said it was defiled, 
But the Spirit above, who rules in love, 

Beheld the flower and smiled. 



Warm praise and thanks to the author of 
Elan Vital for giving us so large a share of her 
heart and brain; may she continue to produce 
poems like Ad Astra and The Campus! 



THE CAMPUS 

In autumn when the ivy leaves turned crimson 

On the grey stone buildings, 

The maple trees were yellow as gold, 

And the sun shone out of a deep blue sky. 

How my heart leaped up to greet it in the 

morning 
When I ran to chapel through the frosty air. 

On winter nights, when the wind blew 

Across the cold white snow, 

The buildings standing black against the sky 

Were full of lighted windows; 

The campus lights glowed yellow and round, 

Leading away into the darkness, 

And far above, the frosty moon 

Slid swiftly behind the windy clouds. 

But, oh! in the springtime, 

The lawns of the campus were greener than 
emerald; 

Against the grey walls the ivy leaves shim- 
mered; 

The cherry trees bloomed, and the pink and 
white dogwood; 

Oh, then with the strength of my youth, how 
I loved it! 

E. C. F., 
June 9, 1917. 



But happily Mrs. Brown's philosophy is not 
entirely consistent, or she could not have writ- 
ten an exquisite little lyric called Ad Astra. 

Out of the sorrowing hearts of men, 

Hearts with rapture and anguish wrung, 

Out of the shade that sin had made, 
A crimson flower sprung. 



BOOKS RECEIVED 

The Earliest Precursor or Our Present- 
Day Monthly Miscellanies. By Dorothy 
Foster. Reprinted from the Publications of 
the Modern Language Association of Amer- 
ica, Vol. XXXII, No. 1. 1917. 



1917] 



Literary Notes 



103 



NOTES 

"An Experiment in Hours" is the title of an 
article in the New Republic for June 9 by Mary 
D. Hopkins. 

The Friends' Quarterly Examiner of London 
for January, 1917, had a poem, "The War- 
Wind," by Elizabeth Chandlee Forman. 

Mary Senior had a poem in the North Amer- 
ican Review for March entitled, "Dream Life." 

Elizabeth Shepley Sergeant continues to 
write for the New Republic. One sentence in a 
recent article, "The Presence of Death," espe- 
cially deserves quotation, as it is deeply sig- 
nificant for the interpretation of the war- 
tragedy: ". . . . it is certain that man's 
gift for making the best of things is the out- 
standing glory of this war." 

A former Bryn Mawr pupil of Dr. Richard T. 
Holbrook writes thus in regard to Dr. Hol- 
brook's Living French, A New Course in Read- 
ing, Writing and Speaking the French Lan- 
guage: "I have seen the proof-sheets, and am 
convinced that this grammar is the best French 
text-book so far produced." This student ob- 
tained permission from Ginn & Company to 
publish the announcement of this book. Ex- 
tracts from the announcement are: "Living 
French applies to the teacher's problem a 
notably fresh and vigorous point of view 
. . . . It is intended for college under- 
graduates and for the upper grades of secondary 
schools .... it gives the richest store 
of essential information as to French sounds, 
forms, and syntax thus far offered for under- 
graduate beginners or for advanced and review 
work." 

LETTER SENT TO CLASS COLLEC- 
TORS AND MEMBERS OF 
FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Whitford, Pa., June 20, 1917. 



Dear 

On Wednesday evening, June 6, $5000 was 
still lacking for the completion of the Mary 
E. Garrett Memorial Endowment Fund of 
$100,000. 

By dint of hard work on the part of several 
class collectors, and by sending out a number of 
night letters asking for ten contributions of 
$500 each, the total amount was promised just 
in time to report it to President Thomas as 
the procession started, so that she could make 



the announcement in her commencement ad- 
dress. 

The Finance Committee congratulates the 
collectors and all the alumnae on this remarkable 
achievement in a year when they might easily 
have been discouraged by the pressure of other 
demands. 

We may all feel unmixed satisfaction in hav- 
ing completed the fund on the date originally 
set by the Alumnae Association, and in having 
helped at this critical time to maintain educa- 
tional standards and to make some of Bryn 
Mawr's teaching salaries approach more nearly 
a "living wage." 

The enclosed list shows that there is a margin 
of about $1000, which we trust will more than 
cover any errors in recording last minute re- 
ports or any pledges which it may not be pos- 
sible to collect before the end of the year. 
The balance will of course be used to start the 
next $100,000 of the Endowment Fund. 

The collectors are reminded that they are 
responsible for collecting pledges from their 
classes — and that November 15 is the date on 
which final payment of 1917 collections should 
be made to the Treasurer. 

Very sincerely yours, 

Martha G. Thomas, 
Chairman Finance Committee. 



COLLECTIONS SINCE JANUARY 1, 1917 

Ph.D $179.00 

'89 643.00 

'90 220.75 

'91 500.00 

'92 1,415.00 

'93 493.00 

'94 107.00 

'95 1,021.00 

'96 1,346.20 

'97 5,000.00 

'98 398.00 

'99 852.00 

'00 300.00 

'01 620.70 

'02 700.00 

'03 643.00 

'04 2,404.00 

'05 952.00 

'06 1,120.50 

'07 - 3,184.12 

'08 349.00 



104 The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly [July 

'09 $1,528.00 Summary 

'10 1,066.00 

'11 569.00 On hand January 1, 1917 $49,371.62 

'12 3,000 . 00 Total cash and pledges since January 

'13 1,585.21 1, 1917 37,347.38 

'14 1,097.00 Undergraduates 11,000.00 

'15 2,753.90 Interest 1917 (estimated) 2,500.00 

'16 1,500.00 President Thomas (pledge) 500.00 

'17 500.00 Mr. Frederic R. Strawbridge 

Boston Club Concert 1,300.00 (pledge) 500.00 



$37,347.38 $101,219.00 



&^^&<tm&W;:Sj¥m^ 





RYN MAWR 
ALUMNAE 



^QUARTERLY 

/ Vol. 



Vol. XI NOVEMBER, 1917 



No. 3 




Published by the Alumnae Association 

of 
Bryn Mawr College 




Entered at the Port Office, Baltimore, Md., as second cla*» mail matter under the Act of July 



THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE 
QUARTERLY 



Editor-in-Chief 

Elva Lee, '93 

Randolph, New York 

Campus Editor 

Mary Swift Rupert, '18 

Rockefeller Hall, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Advertising Manager 
Elizabeth Brakeley, '16 

Furnaid Hall, Columbia University, New York City 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Address by President M. Carey Thomas 105 

With the Alumnae 109 

War Work Ill 

News from the Campus 123 

The Bryn Mawr Patriotic Farm 128 

A Summer Experience in Social Work 130 

The Clubs. 133 

News from the Classes , 134 



Contributions to the Quarterly, books for review, and subscriptions should be sent to 
the Editor-in-Chief, Elva Lee, Randolph, New York. Cheques should be drawn payable 
to Jane B. Haines, Cheltenham, Pa. The Quarterly is published in January, April, July, 
and November of each year. The price of subscription is one dollar a year, and single 
copies are sold for twenty-five cents each. Any failure to receive numbers of the Quar- 
terly should be reported promptly to the Editor. Changes of address should be reported 
to the Editor not later than the first day of each month of issue. News items may be 
tent to the Editors. 

Copyright, 1917, by the Alumnae AjgociatioQ of Bryn Mawr College. 



THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE 
QUARTERLY 



VOLUME XI 



NOVEMBER, 1917 



No. 3 



ADDRESS AT THE OPENING OF THE THIRTY-THIRD YEAR OF BRYN 

MAWR COLLEGE, BY PRESIDENT M. CAREY THOMAS, 

OCTOBER 3, 1917 



It is always one of the greatest pleas- 
ures of the whole college year to us of 
the faculty to see the students returning 
after the long summer vacation and 
filling the silent gray buildings and the 
vacant campus with movement and life. 
But today we welcome you with more 
pleasure and satisfaction than ever be- 
fore because in times like this young 
women and young men who are entering 
college are an important part of that 
great patriotic youthful army which 
is called to serve the United States. 
Many of your brothers are already train- 
ing themselves for service in military 
camps and will soon join the vast 
citizen army which has been called by 
the President of the United States "the 
army of freedom" and their places will 
be taken when they march away by 
many others of your brothers who in 
their turn will fight what I confidently 
believe is "the good fight of faith and 
righteousness." Your brothers of the 
draft age have left, or will soon leave, 
their college work, their professions, 
their business, and the love and comfort 
of their happy homes to bear their part 
in carnage and slaughter so frightful and 
so abhorrent that our imagination can- 
not even conceive of it. They are going 
willingly to die for a great cause. I 
have crossed the continent twice this 
summer and everywhere I have found 



this supreme willingness to serve. At 
the Grand Canyon of the Arizona so 
many young men had already volun- 
teered that the draft quota was already 
full and there was no one left to be called 
in the the draft. In Minnesota and 
California it was the same. Everywhere 
our drivers, guides, hotel clerks, and the 
other people with whom one comes in 
contact on a journey, as well as the 
young professors and students whom I 
met in California, seemed to be of one 
mind. Even those who had not vol- 
unteered seemed to be ready. I heard 
over and over again the words, "If I 
am called I am willing," and in these 
words our American democracy seemed 
to me abundantly to justify itself and 
our faith in it. 

All the older generation, all the women 
in middle life, your mothers and elder 
sisters, are helping the United States in 
every way in their power and are longing 
to help more. Everywhere in all the 
fourteen countries that have joined to- 
gether to fight Germany the women of 
each country are standing behind its 
men, as has been said, like a "wall of 
living fire," filling in all the vacant 
places, doing work that women have 
never done before, and doing it extra- 
ordinarily well, inspiring, sympathizing, 
fighting just as hard behind the lines as 
men are fighting in front of the lines, 



105 



106 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly [November 



and fighting like them with the same in- 
tense conviction of right. Never again 
can it be said that women should 
not vote because they will not fight. 
These three years have proved that in 
modern war victory cannot possibly be 
won without women and that women 
like men will meet the supreme test of 
patriotism and will sacrifice for a great 
cause all that they hold most dear. 

And you, students of Bryn Mawr Col- 
lege and your brothers below the draft 
age who are in college, are certainly as 
patriotic as if you were at the front in 
France. It is your manifest duty to go 
steadfastly on with your college work. 
Your country's need for your trained 
intelligence and your efficient service will 
be as urgent in the great reconstruction 
period after the war as is now its need of 
women to do active war service and of 
men to fight. It is the truest patriotism 
to devote yourselves to study. It is 
disloyal to leave college now. 

Last year in the months immediately 
after the United States entered into the 
war almost all college students, both 
men and women, felt that they must 
actively fit themselves for fighting or for 
ambulance and hospital service, or at 
least that they must prepare material 
to be used in fighting or relief work, and 
we of the faculty sympathized in this 
point of view. It seemed to us also that 
perhaps this might be the supreme duty 
and that perhaps study might be for the 
moment less important. But in the 
time that has elapsed since then we 
have come to see things in better per- 
spective. It has now become clear that 
your highest duty is to dedicate your- 
selves this year wholeheartedly to study 
in a kind of way that in times of peace 
is possible only in professional schools. 
Young men who have idled through col- 
lege will often sacrifice exercise, health, 



and all social engagements, and work 
ten or twelve hours a day at law, medi- 
cine, or engineering because they know 
that their knowledge is to be put to an 
immediate practical test in earning a liv- 
ing. In times like these all college men 
and women may be sure that they will be 
needed for immediate practical service. 
So many men have left college never 
to return to their studies, and perhaps 
never to return at all, that the burden of 
intelligent leadership will fall on college 
women and the few college men who will 
take their degrees within the next few 
years. You will be called on to meet 
this test immediately on leaving college. 
It is therefore your highest duty to 
your country to be well prepared. 

I am shocked to find how many of 
our last year's freshman class have left 
college for reasons connected with war. 
It seems to me a grave mistake of judg- 
ment. Everything in life is a question of 
comparative values. True wisdom con- 
sists in just and fair discrimination. 
Cecil Chesterton in the course of an argu- 
ment against pacifism says that the 
pacifists' claim that "all war is wicked 
irrespective of what the war is about," 
is like saying that "all hammering is 
wrong irrespective of whether you ham- 
mer the head of a nail or the head of 
your aunt." Now it seems to me to 
show precisely such a lack of discrimina- 
tion of true values for you to leave col- 
lege now to do war work, or for you to 
let rolling bandages or knitting soldiers' 
socks interfere with your studying as 
hard as you possibly can. 

I asked a freshman yesterday what 
she had in mind to do after she took 
her degree, and she replied "war work." 
She showed wisdom in waiting until she 
had finished her four years' college 
course to do war work but to realize 
that even one Bryn Mawr freshman was 



1917] 



Address by President Thomas 



107 



looking forward to four years more of war 
made my heart stand still. Even if the 
inconceivable happens, even if there are 
four years more of war, and even if all of 
the ten millions of young men of draft age 
are called to the front there will still remain 
in the United States an abundance of 
women, even women of college age, to 
fill in all the vacant places. Even then 
you would not be needed until you have 
finished your college course. The girls 
in college at the present time are (I 
grieve to say) a small part (only a 
little over one-third) of all the girls of 
the same age not in college. Let these 
less fortunate — I am going to add these 
less patriotic girls — take over this im- 
mediate war service. You can help 
most and serve best by devoting your 
whole time to your studies for four full 
years. The President was speaking for 
civilization and for the United States 
when he urged all young people to go on 
with their studies as a patriotic service. 
And it is just as much the patriotic duty 
of your families to spare you from home 
to complete your college course as it is 
their patriotic duty to send your broth- 
ers to trie front. It will be a dire loss to 
our country if our young women leave 
college through a mistaken sense of duty. 

It is for this reason that the college 
has broken its fixed rule, which is, as 
you know, to admit only as many stu- 
dents as can be given rooms in our halls 
of residence. We have this year ad- 
mitted a war class of 141 freshmen, the 
largest class in the history of the college, 
21 of whom are living off the college 
campus in a house rented to accommo- 
date them. In times like these no girl 
should be refused a college education. 

To this large freshman class I want to 
say on behalf of the faculty and older 
college students that we give you a 
warm welcome to Bryn Mawr College. 



We all of us wish to use our best en- 
deavor to help you to get the most 
out of your college course. Some of yon 
are the daughters of alumnae of Bryn 
Mawr College, some of you are sisters 
of former or present students, some of 
you are daughters of mothers who longed 
to come to Bryn Mawr themselves and 
could not, many of you have been des- 
tined for Bryn Mawr from your cradles; 
as always, a large proportion of you have 
chosen Bryn Mawr because of its high 
standards of scholarship. I wish to ap- 
peal to all of the older students to help 
the faculty to justify this choice of our 
freshmen. Let us in this year above all 
years raise high the standards of scholar- 
ship and behaviour and spiritual life at 
Bryn Mawr. In times of such terrible 
suffering and such supreme sacrifices or- 
dinary amusements, mere gaiety and 
material pleasures seem out of place. 
Why not take advantage of this feeling 
to advance tne Bryn Mawr standards 
of pure scholarship. From 1900 to 1908 
the College had to get the necessary 
buildings and physical equipment. 
From 1908 to 1910 it had to beg for ad- 
ditional endowment to carry on its work. 
Since then for the past seven years we 
have been strengthening our teaching 
and breaking up our large lecture 
courses into smaller sections by the ap- 
pointment of new professors. I believe 
that the College has never been so well 
equipped as now to do the best quality 
of academic work. Never has our fac- 
ulty been stronger or more able to help 
our students to do scholarly work. Our 
new plan of democratic faculty gov- 
ernment which went into effect at the 
beginning of last year has been a splen- 
did success. We all of us believed in 
it then hut it has justified itself now 
even beyond our utmost expectations. 
It is a world movement to associate to- 



108 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly [November 



gether in government and control every- 
one who is working for the good of 
an institution like a college, or a busi- 
ness, or a railway, or a country. This 
is what is meant by true democracy. 
This is what the the United States is 
fighting for. It is the most worth while 
thing in all the world. It is happy for 
the future of Bryn Mawr that she has 
led the way in academic democracy. I 
am confident that within a few years all 
colleges will adopt this form of govern- 
ment. This year I hope that we may 
take a further step in the same direction 
and associate our students more closely 
with the teaching of the college. The 
faculty has granted the students the 
privilege of conferences with it on aca- 
demic matters. I hope the students 
will use this privilege. 

Our sincerest gratitude and admiration 
are due to Miss Martha Thomas, the 
Wardens, Dean Taft, and the patriotic 
students who have done such splendid 
work on the twenty acres of farm land so 
kindly given to us by Mr. and Mrs. Philip 
Sharpies of West Chester. Our Bryn 
Mawr farmers have won golden opinions 
from everyone and have raised and 
canned ample supplies of vegetables for 
use during the year. Through their ex- 
ertions the college is removed to a great 
extent from the list of consumers. Our 
students have freed thousands of dol- 
lars worth of food for the starving Bel- 
gians, Poles and Servians. I know of 
no other college that has done this pre- 
cise form of patriotic work. 

Our college table this year will con- 
form to war conditions. We shall have 
one meatless day — probably on Tues- 
day — and another beefless day — proba- 
bly on Friday — and two other days 
when as far as possible bread made 
of corn and barley will be used instead 
of bread made of wheat which is needed 



for the starving peoples of Europe. We 
are sure that this patriotic menu will 
have the support of our student body. 

This year as in the past two years at- 
tendance at college classes will be in your 
own hands. Your record of attendance 
was very good last year but not as good 
as in 1915-16. This was probably due 
to the first distraction of war relief work. 
We feel confident that this year you 
will maintain and improve the record of 
1915-16. Your personal conduct is as 
it has been from the opening of the col- 
lege your responsibility. Every indi- 
vidual student must bear her full share 
of this responsibility. Your self-gov- 
ernment like every other kind of demo- 
cratic government is a success or a failure 
according as every member does or does 
not do her part in attending meetings 
and supporting the officers of the asso- 
ciation whom she has herself elected to 
represent her. This is the condition of 
all successful democratic government. 

I wish to close with a few words about 
China. As most of you know I have 
spent the summer there. China is a 
wonderful country. The Chinese are a 
wonderful people with a wonderful 
future as well as a wonderful past. 
Everyone who knows China and the 
Chinese feels this. I went to China to 
escape for a few weeks from the world 
war but while I was there China herself 
declared war on Germany. I found the 
country in a death struggle against the 
tyrannical prime minister in Peking rul- 
ing by means of the army of the north 
without parliamentary authority while 
Sun-Yat-Sen,the great republican leader 
and reformer, and about half of the mem- 
bers of the Chinese parliament which 
had been dissolved by the army of the 
north were gathered together in south- 
ern China carrying on parliamentary 
government. All of the diplomats in 



1917] 



With the Alumnae 



109 



Peking seemed to me to be on the wrong 
side of the question. They seemed to 
me to care most of all for "a strong 
man in China/' with whom they could 
deal. They were unable to read the 
writing on the wall. Even ancient, an- 
cestor-ridden China feels the struggle of 
a new freedom and is determined to be 
a democracy. The very coolies in the 
streets are cleaning themselves up with 
the aid of the policemen of the republic 
and are getting rid of the worst of their 
evil smells. 

In China as no where else in the 
world one comes face to face with 
ancient and mediaeval history. When 
one stands on the great Wall of China, 
built 2500 years before Christ, and looks 
over the Mongolian desert from which 



swept over China and Asia successive 
hordes of Mongols destroying civiliza- 
tion before them; when one reviews the 
course of history, as everyone must who 
visits China, one is compelled to reach 
the conclusion that in the past brutal 
destruction of great and gifted nations 
has terribly damaged the human race. 
Such destruction scientifically planned, 
with horrors undreamed of even by the 
ancient Assyrians, is now being carried 
out by Germany in Belgium, Northern 
France, Poland, Servia and Armenia. 
The normal development of nations so 
crucified in the past has been arrested 
for centuries, sometimes forever. It is 
to arrest such overwhelming disaster, 
to give freedom, to remain ourselves 
free, that all our patriotism is needed. 



WITH THE ALUMNAE 



OFFICERS 
1916-1918 

President, Cornelia Halsey Kellogg (Mrs. Fred- 
eric Rogers Kellogg), '00, Morristown, N. J. 

Vice President, Mary Richardson Walcott (Mrs. 
Robert Walcott), '06, 152 Brattle Street, Cambridge, 
Mass. 

Recording Secretary, Louise Congdon Francis (Mrs. 
Richard Standish Francis), '00, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Corresponding Secretary, Abigail Camp Dimon, '96, 
367 Genesee Street, Utica, N. Y. 

Treasurer, Jane Bowne Haines, '91, Cheltenham, Pa. 

ALT7VNAE MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN 
MAWR COLLEGE 

Elizabeth B. Kirkbrede, '96, 1406 Spruce Street, 
Philadelphia. 

Elizabeth Nields Bancroft, '98, (Mrs. Wilfred 
Bancroft), Slatersville, R. I. 

academic committee 

Pauline Goldmark, Chairman, 270 West 94th Street, 
New York City. 

Esther Lowenthal, Smith College, Northampton, 
Mass. 

Eli'abeth Shepley Sergeant, 4 Hawthorn Road, 
Brookline, Mass. 

Helen Emerson, 162 Blackstone Boulevard, Provi- 
dence, R. I. 

s Ellen D. Ellis, Mt. Holyoke College, South Hadley, 
Mass. 

Frances Fincke Hand (Mrs. Learned Hand), 142 
East 65th Street, New York City. 

Frances Browne, 15 East 10th Street, New York 
City. 

Cornelia Halsey Kellogg (Mrs. F. R. Kellogg), 
Morristown, N. J. 



THE ACADEMIC COMMITTEE 

Following its conference last February with 
a committee of the faculty at which the rela- 
tions of the Alumnae Association and the faculty 
under the new form of government were in- 
formally discussed, the Academic Committee 
sent the following letter to the faculty: 

"To the Faculty of Bryn Mawr College: 
The Academic Committee of the Alumnae As- 
sociation of Bryn Mawr College, following the 
conference held with the President and five 
members of the faculty on January 27 wishes to 
bring to the attention of the faculty as a whole 
certain suggestions for a more direct and co- 
operative relation between the Academic Com- 
mittee and the faculty. 

"It will be remembered that, according to its 
agreement made with the Trustees of the Col- 
lege in 1893, the Academic Committee has al- 
ways acted as "the official means of communi- 
cation between the authorities and the Alumnae 
Association of Bryn Mawr College." Its duties, 
however, were at first rather informally exer- 
cised. But with the growth of the Association 
and the lessening of direct contact between 
individual alumnae and the college, its useful- 
ness and responsibility have greatly increased. 
It has now become not only theoretically but 
in fact a clearing house of alumnae opinion; the 









*r 



A- ^ 



**> 



%* 



110 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[November 



accredited intermediary between the Associa- 
tion and the College. 

"Realizing the heavier obligations laid upon 
the Academic Committee and the difficulty of 
meeting them without better organization, 
President Thomas in 1916 offered to broaden 
the functions of the Committee by discussing 
with it, "in advance, before making recommen- 
dations to the Board of Directors important 
matters concerning the academic management 
of the College;" it being, however, understood 
that the alumnae, on their side, should give the 
Committee time to confer with the College 
authorities before individuals or groups of alum- 
nae began public agitation on the matters in 
question. 

"The Alumnae Association voted (January, 
1916) to accept this agreement, and the present 
Academic Committee has found of the greatest 
value to its work during the past year the better 
understanding that has followed. President 
Thomas has given largely of her time and in- 
terest in more frequent conferences and meet- 
ings with the Committee. Various members of 
the faculty have with equal generosity met in- 
dividual members of the Committee in informal 
conference. The alumnae have made a special 
effort to bring us their problems, criticisms and 
queries. We have accordingly been called upon 
to interpret to many alumnae groups the re- 
organization of the College under the new plan 
of government; and most of our regular sub- 
committee work for the year (Reports on the 
Tutoring School; on the Appointment Bureau, 
etc., etc.) has been undertaken at the request 
of alumnae in different parts of the country. 

"We believe that new developments in the 
College in which the alumnae necessarily feel a 
particular interest; such as changes in entrance 
examinations or curriculum; such as the founda- 
tion of new departments; such as the proposed 
Honors degree cannot adequately be studied by 
the Academic Committee and reported to the 
alumnae without consultation with the faculty 
while such changes are in progress. We value 
highly the custom of annual conference with a 
special committee of the faculty appointed by 
the President of the College; we note also with 
satisfaction that Section III. of the faculty 
By Laws provides for a standing committee of 
the faculty to confer with the Academic Com- 
mittee. It is our hope that we may have an 
opportunity to discuss special subjects with both 
committees in future. But as neither provides 
for taking up without delay with the faculty, 



important business which may call for imme- 
diate attention, we should like to ask further: 

"That the faculty will, when desirable, author- 
ize its standing or special committees to confer 
formally with the Academic Committee, it being 
understood, as provided in the plan of govern- 
ment, that on these occasions the President of 
the College shall be the presiding officer; and 
further: 

"That the faculty will occasionally grant, to 
the sub-committees of the Academic Committee 
which concern themselves with various phases 
of the academic work the privilege of meeting in 
informal conference with the appropriate com- 
mittees of the faculty. 

"The Academic Committee, on its side, wishes 
to make clear that it will welcome any oppor- 
tunity to meet upon request with committees 
of the faculty either in formal session or in- 
formally through its sub-committees; to receive 
communications from the faculty on important 
matters; and to cooperate with the faculty on 
special pieces of work. 

"The above privileges, if granted by the faculty 
will, we venture to promise, be conservatively 
used by the Academic Committee. We would 
not burden the faculty with additional com- 
mittee work or ask for privileges that would 
necessitate constitutional changes in the new 
plan of government. But believing earnestly 
that the alumnae have an inherent interest in 
the academic side of the College — that such an 
interest is a necessary corollary of a high devo- 
tion to the Bryn Mawr academic standard, and 
a spur to the outstanding alumnae activity, the 
raising of endowment — we ask you to acquaint 
us as fully as possible with the academic policies 
of the College. It is to the alumnae that the 
college must chiefly look to present its ideals 
and to interpret its needs to the outside world. 

"The proposals of this Committee for a new 
basis of understanding with the faculty are, 
however, made in a tentative spirit; should 
they not commend themselves, we hope that the 
faculty will make other suggestions as to how 
it and the Academic Committee may work to- 
gether constructively for their common aim — 
the welfare of Bryn Mawr College.' ' 

Elizabeth Shepley Sergeant, 
For the Academic Committee, 1916-17." 

March 13, 1917 

In reply to this letter, Dr. Huff, secretary of 
the faculty, transmitted the resolution which is 
given below. With this generous response to 



1917] 



War Work 



111 



its request, the Academic Committee can pro- 
ceed with its work on a basis of understanding 
that augurs well for the future. 

"Resolved that the Faculty express its ap- 
preciation of the desire for cooperation shown 
by the Academic Committee of the Alumnae in 
the letter of March 10, 1917, and its willingness 



to give the Academic Committee, or its sub- 
committees, opportunity for the expression of 
opinion on matters of general academic interest." 
From the Faculty Minutes, meeting of April 
26, 1917, approved May 17, 1917. 

Wm. B. Huff, 
Secretary. 



WAR WORK 



WAR RELIEF WORK 

(Prepared by Miss Dimon) 

As a result of inquiries from alumnae 
about war relief work of one sort or 
another, I have collected some informa- 
tion that may interest those who would 
like to do volunteer work abroad or at 
home. I have not had time to make a 
systematic investigation, but have re- 
ceived circulars from one or two sources 
and have talked with or written to the 
committees in charge. The information 
obtained is summarized in the following 
notes. The details of the Red Cross 
Canteen Service in France were secured 
after receiving Leah Cadbury's letter, 
which is printed below. If the notes in 
this issue prove of general interest, and 
information about other organizations 
is desired, it can be secured and printed 
in the following issues of the Quarterly. 

RED CROSS CANTEEN SERVICE IN 
FRANCE 

Nature of work. Maintaining canteens where 
food and small articles can be purchased by the 
soldiers and where they can rest and read. 
For particulars see Leah Cadbury's letter. 

Application should be made to Miss Florence 
M. Marshall, Director, Woman's Bureau, 
American Red Cross, Washington, D. C. 
Requirements for Applicants 

1. Must be between thirty and fifty years of 
age. 

2. Must speak French well. 

3. Must have excellent health. 

4. Must volunteer services and pay all ex- 
penses if possible. 

5. Must be free from all German connections. 



6. Must not have a husband in army service 
either here or abroad. 

7. Must be willing to sign pledge for six 
month's service in France or Belgium wherever 
assigned. 

8. Must wear uniform when on duty. 

9. Must be vaccinated for smallpox and in- 
oculated for typhoid and para-typhoid. 

10. Must give names of four references. 

In general: Applicants should be capable of 
hard physical labor, adaptable to any sort of 
conditions, ready to accept orders cheerfully 
and to undertake whatever work is given them, 
democratic in sentiment and excellent mixers. 
No woman not ready to give full time con- 
scientious service should apply. 

NEED FOR WORKERS 

September 18, 1917. 

"The first call for canteen service was cabled 
from Major Murphy, Red Cross Commissioner 
for France and Belgium, who asked for fifty 
women between the ages of thirty and fifty to 
work in the army zone under orders as canteen 
workers with French soldiers. That unit is com- 
plete ... we are expecting further calls for 
this and other service, but we have no means of 
knowing when or what they will be." 

Additional information. The Woman's Bureau 
states that $1000 will cover all expenses for six 
months, including equipment, living expenses, 
and passage. 

Applications received at any time will be filed 
to be used when the demand comes. 

At least four Bryn Mawr alumnae or former 
students went with the first unit: Ellen Kil- 
patrick, ex-'99, Gertrude Ely, ex- '00, Alice Mil- 
ler, ex-'09, and Mary Tongue, '13. 

THE AMERICAN FRIENDS' RECON- 
STRUCTION UNIT 

FRANCE 

Nature of work. Two distinct kinds of work 
exist: relief work with refugees (imigris); re- 



112 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[November 



construction in regions evacuated by the armies 
where the people (sinistres) have never left or 
have returned. 

At Bar-le-Duc, Troyes and other places, 
Friends have given refugees employment, whole- 
some recreation, medical and hospital aid, have 
distributed clothing, and have housed them in 
sanitary settlements of transportable houses. 
At Samoens a settlement house "by the side of 
the road" has been established to relieve the 
intense suffering of a few of the travel-worn 
refugees returning from Switzerland to Anne- 
masse. An orphanage is maintained near Fon- 
tette in the Aube. 

Reconstruction work. The reconstruction work 
has been chiefly in the regions of the Marne, 
Meurthe-et-Moselle and Meuse. Houses (tem- 
porary and permanent) have been built; villages 
restored; clothing, household and garden sup- 
plies distributed. 

The agricultural problem becomes increas- 
ingly serious. More and more land goes out 
of cultivation each season through lack of 
labor, machines and seeds, and because of the 
spread of weeds. The English Committee has 
started an agricultural center for the storage and 
repair of machines and as an organizing point 
for a staff of workers. 

At Dole, in the Jura, a construction camp for 
making portable houses is maintained. 

Medical and hospital work. Deterioration of 
health, particularly among the refugees, is be- 
coming the greatest single menace to France. 
Not only do the living conditions greatly con- 
duce to disease, but very few doctors and hos- 
pitals are available to the civil population. 
Friends have established the following work, 
which is hoped to greatly increase: 

A Maternity Hospital at Chalons, which 
cared Tor 1429 ases in two years. 

A Convales ent Home and Cottage Hospital 
at Sermaize, with an important out-patient 
department 

A Children's Convalescent Home at Bettan- 
court. 

A Convalescent Home at Samoens for refugees. 

RUSSIA 

To aid the English workers, this Committee 
has recently sent a group of women, and ex- 
pects to send more in the spring. The Friends' 
work is in the district of Buzuluk, in the Prov- 
ince of Samara. The Friends did not find a 
single doctor in the whole area of 100,000 souls, 
of whom one quarter are refugees, 1400 miles 



from home. The people are a motley collection 
of Little Russians, Poles, Lithuanians, Tartars, 
Cossacks and Bashkirs, in addition to Austrian, 
Turkish and German prisoners. 

The work consists of general and medical re- 
lief at the following centres: 

Lubimofka. Hospital and out-patient de- 
partment. Workroom and trades school. 

Mogotovo. Settlement House for general 
relief. Out-patient dispensary. 

Andreafka and Bogdanofka. Centers for 
district nursing and employment in simple 
industries. 

Application should be made to Miss Lucy 
Biddle Lewis, 20 South Twelfth Street, Phila- 
delphia, who can furnish any additional infor- 
mation. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR APPLICANTS 

1. Must be at least twenty- three years of age. 

2. Must speak French readily. 

3. Must volunteer for twelve months. 

4. Must be in good health. 

5. Must present at least four letters of recom- 
mendation, one of which testifies to the appli- 
cant's conversational ability in French. 

Need of workers. There is no demand at the 
present moment for women workers, but appli- 
cations will be received and there will probably 
be a call in the near future. 

Additional information. The Friends Recon- 
struction Unit is under the American Red Cross 
and works in cooperation with the English 
Friends. In France Margery Scattergood, '17, 
is working under the unit, and Esther White, 
'06 and Anna Jones Haines, '07 were two of the 
group of seven women sent to Russia by the 
unit last summer. No salary is paid the work- 
ers, but their expenses are paid by the Friends' 
Committee if they are not able to meet them 
themselves. 

NATIONAL LEAGUE FOR WOMAN'S 
SERVICE 

PENNSYLVANIA STATE COMMITTEE 

Nature of work. 

(a) Social welfare. Entertaining children at 

recreational centres, day nurseries and 
in hospitals. Visiting houses where 
mothers have to work out of the house, 
etc., etc. 

(b) Canteen work. Feeding and entertain- 

ing soldiers. Serving proper food in 
neighborhood of factories and munition 
plants. 



1917] 



War Work 



113 



(c) Home Economics. Classes to teach plain 

cooking and food substitutes. 

(d) Motor Driving. Doing errands for Fed- 

eral, state or municipal government. 
Taking of welfare workers to destina- 
tion, etc. 

(e) Hospital Entertainment. Teaching knit- 

ting or sewing; writing letters to the 
Front from sick wife, sister or mother. 

(f) General Service. Stenography, typewrit- 

ing, switchboard, wireless. 

Application. Write to 1713 Walnut Street, 
Philadelphia. 

Membership. Membership entails nothing 
more than the signing of one's name to the en- 
rollment blank, thus showing a willingness to 
serve. Following this the groups under the dif- 
ferent headings, Home Economics, Social Wel- 
fare, etc., come together to plan work. 

Additional information. Leaflets describing 
the work in more detail and also giving infor- 
mation about training courses preparing for var- 
ious sorts of war relief work may be obtained 
from 1713 Walnut Street. The National League 
for Woman's Service has Committees in the other 
states. 

LEAH CADBURY'S LETTER 

Uffculme Hospital, 
Queensbridge Road, 
Kings Heath, near Birmingham. 
Dear Miss Dimon: 

About a fortnight ago I had a chance to find 
some work for our Alumnae Association. I do 
hope you will take hold of the scheme. 

The American Red Cross Committee in 
France has been requested by the French gov- 
ernment to organize a chain of canteens or 
foyers at all troop railway centres in France. 
Money and workers are needed at once. The 
money is forthcoming but not the workers, at 
least not efficient workers. A very good can- 
teen is running at Bar-le-Duc, and I worked for 
a week there in order to learn the details of the 
system, afterwards to send you a report and ask 
for volunteers. 

Bar-le-Duc is a junction for troops passing to 
and fro, there are barracks in the neighborhood 
(within 15 or 20 miles) and one of the main mili- 
tary high roads passes through the town, so 
there is a steady stream of soldiers of all nations. 

The canteen is always open except for one 
short hour in the morning, 5-6, when the "pla- 
ton, " as we call the man of all work, hoses the 
whole place and cleans out the rubbish. The 



canteen undertakes to give the soldiers hot and 
cold food at any time, in fact it is a Child's res- 
taurant always running at noonday speed. Dif- 
ferent foyers have different menus but the whole 
system is in general the same. We sold at 
cost price, coffee (hot and cold and au lait), tea 
(the same), chocolate, boullion, syrups, limon- 
ade — no wines of any sort — bread in all sizes of 
chunks, "tartines," ragout, steak, rosbif, pota- 
toes, salad, eggs (fresh cooked or hardboiled), 
ham and eggs, confitures, miscellanies such as 
stamps, paper, petits gateaux, tobacco, smoked 
meats, and chocolates. 

We worked under very primitive conditions, 
and there were many faults in our methods, 
but we fed the men and cheered them a bit be- 
fore they passed on. Generally for drinks and 
other prepared foods the men paid direct to the 
waitresses, who served behind a counter. The 
men carried their food to a table and when they 
finished were supposed to bring back the dishes, 
For eggs and other things ordered from the 
kitchen the men gave their order at the caisse 
and paid there. Each order was numbered and 
the man was given a duplicate number. He 
then went to the other end of the counter, near 
the kitchen, and waited till his number was 
called. Then he too carried off his eggs in 
triumph. 

I liked the order work most of all. The cook 
slid the plate of food through the window and 
then I'd call the number, "Trent-trois; Trent- 
trois; TRENT-TROIS!" No response but a 
burst of laughter from the men, and perhaps 
29 would offer his number. Suddenly somebody 
more experienced in foreigner's French, would 
understand me and repeat, with just the same 
pronunciation, I'm sure. But 33 would under- 
stand him and hustle up for his supper. 

Of course we often made mistakes in order of 
serving and some poor fellow would remonstrate. 
But the poilus were always nice, even the drunk 
ones who carried off the coffee jug one night! 

At rush hours we generally had three workers, 
one at the caisse, one at the jugs, and one at the 
kitchen end of the counter! As the entrance 
to the officers' room was also at this end, the 
third worker had to look after them too! We 
had one woman to cook and another to wash, 
but frequently we had to do a bit of both ourselves. 
To do all the cooking, we had one feeble stove 
and six gas burners, two of which were always 
in use for .coffee and chocolate. Nevertheless 
we fed innumerable men. 

I might have told you a bit about our build- 
ings at first I suppose. 



114 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[November 



Entrance for officers 



KITCHEN 



om cms 



MEN'S 
READING 
ROOM 



PANTRY 



OFFICERS 



Bread cutter, hard-boiled eggs,etc, 
counter 



MEfl'S DLNLKG 
ROOM 



HEMT ROOMS 
Entrance for imri 



Everything was terribly crowded but now the 
foyer is to be twice as large, for an addition is 
being made to the front. 

The night shift from ten to five was the most 
interesting. Only two of us worked then, with 
two servants. About four or five rushes of 
men kept us busy, you may be sure, and they 
were always shivering with cold. Unfortunately 
we had no decent dortoirs for them, but soon 
some old hospital sheds will be fitted up with 
brancards and a douche so the men can sleep 
and have a bath. 

The day is divided into different shifts, but 
as we were very shorthanded we had to work 
overtime. Our living quarters were fairly com- 
fortable and clean. We had rooms in the home 
of one of the inhabitants of Bar. The beds 
were good and we could have all the cold 
water we wanted, but not very much hot. 
There are no such things as bath tubs and toi- 
lets in the houses but you can manage without 
too much trouble. We ate in an apartment in 
which two workers lived, and shared the house- 
hold expenses. Living prices vary according 
to the locality. In Paris you can get board 
and lodging for 7 francs up; in Bar I paid 21 
francs for my board and 15 francs for lodging 
for the week, a difference of 13 francs a week 
compared to Paris prices. Laundry must be 
considered too, but that is not a large item, for 
outside clothes anyway. 

And that brings me to uniform. We wore 
large overall aprons with sleeves, dark brown 
preferably, to hide the dirt (!), and caps of any 
style, just to keep our hair clean. The air is 
always blue with smoke. Strong, comfortable 
shoes are most important as one is always stand- 
ing or running (never walking) about. I would 
suggest that any worker might bring extra shoe 



soles and lots of stockings. Detachable white 
collars are also useful, for collars soil much more 
quickly than the rest of one's dress. Other 
than these articles you can wear anything you 
like, jumpers and hockey skirts would be choice! 

The work is hard and your hands are very soon 
in a pretty mess, and it's very easy to scrap with 
the other workers. For these very reasons, or 
rather difficulties, I feel that Bryn Mawrtyrs 
would do the work splendidly. For there are 
a lot of husky ones among us, and while we do 
scrap (!) I don't think we fight for personal 
advancement, do we? 

The Red Cross ought not, I think, to be asked 
to pay the expenses of volunteers. 

What can we do? Many of our best workers 
cannot afford to come if they have to pay their 
own way. Is there any means by which we 
could persuade individuals who could afford to 
come but are tied up at home to pay for others? 
Perhaps such an appeal seems preposterous, 
but if only you could once realize the terrible 
need for these foyers and it is a terrible need, 
too — you wouldn't hesitate an instant. The 
English Y. M. C. A. is looking after the Tom- 
mies, and our own Y. M. C. A. is taking over 
similar care of our troops, but there isn't a soul 
to help the poilus on their way, so they lie 
about the station, in the courtyard, or on the 
platform, hungry and sick for want of sleep, 
and filthy dirty, enduring discomfort until 
some day they just can't endure it another 
second — and someone balks, to put it mildly. 

I wish we could get at least thirty workers, 
not younger than twenty-five, right on the spot 
inside of a month. Of course hundreds more 
could be used. Please do what you can, wont 
you? I feel that this is the opening we want, and 
ours must be the first college on the field. Ac- 



1917] 



War Work 



115 



countants and housekeepers are also needed at 
this work, but especially people who wont mind 
putting their hands to any old job. And the 
work is wonderfully interesting. You should 
see a man's face light up when he hears you are 
American, or see the relief with which he pockets 
his precious sous when you ask only "2 sous" 
for a piece of bread instead of 10. "C'est pas 
cher, ca," he says, "I'll have a cup of coffee, 
too." You are asked to do many queer things, 
bind up a dog's foot, or a boy's finger, or "spik 
Inglish, avec. " Every night gives you a va- 
riety of experiences, so that you hurry to take 
your turn and are slow to leave. 

If the Board is interested, will you get in 
touch at once with the American Red Cross in 
Washington. I don't know who will be ap- 
pointed to take over the canteen work from the 
United States end. The Paris man is Reginald 
Foster, American Red Cross, Place de la Con- 
corde. Meanwhile would you be willing to 
notify individuals who have applied, that this 
work is open, and if they are interested, they 
can cable Foster and can get off at once. 
Later on, if Bryn Mawr decides to form units 
of workers, these pioneers can head them. A 
unit means about 12 workers, one of whom 
ought to be able to manage the housekeeping 
for the Foyer, not for the workers, and some- 
body, either the same person or another, ought 
to be able to keep the accounts. They aren't 
very complicated. 

There is another opening, through the 
Friends, for those of pacifist principles. French 
speaking women volunteers are wanted by the 
English Committee to do all sorts of relief work 
in France. Henry J. Cadbury, Haverford Col- 
lege, can refer you to the proper committee in 
Philadelphia. The Foyer work is the most 
pressing, however. Something must be done to 
help the men through this winter, and it's up 
to us to do it. 

Yours, 

L. T. Cadbury. 

Received, August 28, 1917. 

SMITH COLLEGE UNIT IN FRANCE 

With portable houses, sewing machines, 
kitchen utensils, bedding, food, shoes, clothing, 
ticking, straw, and agricultural implements 
eleven Smith College alumnae, who received 
their passports as members of the Smith Col- 
lege Relief Unit, are going to France this month 
to begin practical work for the suffering French 



people near Soissons. This is the first band of 
women to undertake this kind of work and is 
to be practical in every detail. 

All the members of the unit are women more 
than twenty-five years old, they have passed a 
rigid physical examination, and are in condition 
for hard, grinding work. They all speak French, 
all drive motors and each has in addition some 
special training which will fit her for valuable 
individual work. Motor trucks and supplies 
are already on their way. 

A farewell luncheon, at which the members 
of the unit will speak of the work they are to do 
is to be given within two weeks at the Woman's 
University Club. Dean Comstock of Smith, 
with other officers of the college, will be guests 
with the Presidents of Vassar, Wellesley, Bryn 
Mawr, and other women's colleges. A fund has 
already been raised to maintain the unit for six 
months, but as there will be work to be done 
for a much longer time, whether the war ends 
or not, gifts will be gladly received. . . . 

The personalties of the women of the unit 
are interesting. Mrs. Harriet Boyd Hawes, 
class of '92, of New Hampshire, is the director. 
She was for several years Director of Excava- 
tions for the American Exploration Society in 
Crete. She did relief work in the Spanish war 
and in the Balkan war. In this war, in the 
early months of 1916, she did relief work for 
the Serbians, among other things establishing 
a diet kitchen and having barracks built for the 
troops on the island of Corfu. She speaks 
French, German, Italian, Greek and a few 
other things. 

Dr. Alice Weld Tallant, '97, is a practicing 
physician in Philadelphia. With her goes her 
assistant, Dr. Maude M. Kelly of England, the 
only member of the unit who is not a Smith 
graduate. 

Marie Leonie Wolfs, '08, of New Jersey is 
a Belgian who was at Liege during the siege and 
did relief work there. Elizabeth M. Dana, '04, 
of Massachusetts, has done social and school 
work in North Carolina for a number of years. 
She practically recreated a little town by teach- 
ing the people cobbling. Ruth Gaines, '01, of 
Michigan, is a social worker, and the other mem- 
bers have qualifications of the same sort. They 
are: Majorie L. Carr, '09, Ohio; Millicent 
Vaughan Lewis, '07, of New York; Florence A. 
Hague, '09, of New Jersey; Frances Valentine, 
'02, of Massachusetts; Anne Chapin, '04, of 
Massachusetts; Elizabeth Bliss, '08, of New 
York; Lucy Mather, ex-'88, of Connecticut; 



116 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[November 



Ruth Joslin, '12, of Illinois; Marion Bennett, 
'06, of Massachusetts; Catherine Hooper, '11, 
of New Jersey; Margaret Wood, '12, of Illinois; 
Alice Teaveno, '03, of Massachusetts, and Mar- 
garet Ashley, '14, of Ohio. 

The New York Times, July 22, 1917. 

LETTERS FROM MRS. CONS 

The following letter from Miss Curtis, Mrs. 
Cons's sister, makes an appeal for more help 
for Mrs. Cons's work with French soldiers. 
Contributions should be sent to Miss Elizabeth 
White, the Marlborough-Blenheim, Atlantic 
City, N. J., who cables money to Mrs. Cons. 
A later letter from Miss Curtis contains further 
information about Mr. and Mrs. Cons: 

221 East 15th St., New York City 

September 12, 1917. 
Dear Friend: 

I am sure that you are giving all that you can 
spare to the relief work of my sister, Mme. Louis 
Cons, in France. 

She appreciates highly your stanch support, 
and thanks you warmly in the name of the sol- 
diers whom your generosity has perhaps saved 
from nervous breakdown, or even insanity. 

She does not ask us to increase our contribu- 
tions, but feels that, owing to the steady rise in 
prices, some plan must be devised to meet the 
increasing cost of the monthly packages for the 
soldiers. 

A letter from her, dated August 10, says: 

"There are so many calls from every side, I 
am harassed with the difficulty of making the 
monthly fund cover the month's distresses. 
Unless I can get more cash, I shall have to cut 
down the packages — send one where I have 
been sending two — a small one in place of a 
large one, 5 francs where I have given 10. 

"Ten of my men are in German prison-camps, 
and packages to prisoners are expensive, yet I 
cannot abandon them to slow starvation. The 
men at the front are desperately tired, after 
these weeks of hard fighting. My youngest sol- 
dier, only twenty years old, nearly fainted in 
my room today. 

"Another, whose furlough brought him 
straight from the front, in one of the worst sec- 
tors near Verdun, came in almost gasping with 
exhaustion. He sat staring and half-dazed from 
the strain of the last great 'push.' He was 
covered with mud and blood, and kept asking 
over and over, 'Am I really here? Alive?' 



He never expected to come alive from that in- 
ferno of shell and machine gun fire, bomb 
and bayonet and poison-gas. 

"One of my best soldiers, Maurice Delattre, 
wearing the 'croix de guerre' and the 'fourra- 
gere ' (given to each member of a regiment that 
has been 'cited' three times) was at the Chemin 
des Dames, which the Germans were determined 
to hold at any cost. They lost it finally, after 
innumerable attacks and counter-attacks, and 
some of the fiercest fighting of the war. There 
was no rest, day or night. The man, Maurice, 
huge for a Frenchman, and brave, suddenly 
lost his nerve, He has had terrible headaches 
lately, and a comrade at his side had just been 
struck by a shell and killed. Maurice was un- 
hurt, but covered with blood, and perhaps the 
shell-shock made him temporarily insane. At 
any rate, it seemed to him that he could not en- 
dure for another instant the horrors of the bat- 
tle, — the noise, the dirt, the heat, the slaughter. 
When ordered to the rear, he did not stop at 
the cantonment, but kept right on, mounted a 
bicycle, and rode 60 miles to Paris to see me. 

"When he reached the city, however, he sud- 
denly realized what he had done, and was 
ashamed to come to me, but wrote a pitiful lit- 
tle note telling me about it, and saying that 
when he had rested a bit, he would go straight 
to the military authorities in Paris, and deliver 
himself up. He did this, was court-martialed 
for desertion, and sent back to the front, 'pun- 
ishment dsf erred' until after the war. He felt 
terribly down-cast over his ' disgrace, ' but I am 
sure it was the result of physical exhaustion 
rather than moral weakness. One comfort came 
to him while in the military prison here. He 
heard that his wife and little girl are safe, 
though still behind the German lines. 

"Another of my men is broken-hearted to 
learn that his wife has been dead for more than 
a year, a victim of German cruelty. They had 
been married only two months when he was 
called to arms in 1914, and he had not heard 
from her since. He succeeded in sending a let- 
ter through the lines to her, but her attempt to 
reply was discovered, and she was arrested and 
imprisoned for a week or more. She was only a 
girl, and not very strong, and the harsh treat- 
ment she received probably caused her death. 
The tragedies disclosed by the retreat of the 
Germans would wring your hearts. You won- 
der how anyone can live through years of such 
suffering. 

"And these devastated villages and human 



1917] 



War Work 



117 



wrecks are the homes and the families of my 
soldiers. You can imagine the mental strain 
under which they labor, They are so grateful, 
poor fellows, for everything that is done for 
them. I cannot bear to have them miss such 
comfort as we can give them. Please try to 
think up some plan by which we can increase 
the fund enough to meet the higher prices." 

I have thought that if each one of us could 
find one new contributor, the amount we send 
might be almost doubled, without adding to 
our own pecuniary burdens. Many people 
would be glad to give, if they could be spared 
trouble of writing the necessary letter and 
check. We could take this upon ourselves, 
and by the extra money thus added to our own, 
avoid the curtailment of the work which Mme. 
Cons fears will be necessary. 

Trusting that some plan may occur to you, 
if the one proposed does not seem practical, I 
remain 

Yours very sincerely, 

Anna L. Curtis. 



"You speak of my brother-in-law 'being in 
no danger.' I suppose that is true, compara- 
tively speaking. He is instructing interpreters 
in technical German and examining documents 
found on prisoners. He is perhaps ten miles 
from the absolute front — more or less. Of 
course, there is no danger there from a surprise 
attack or from rifles or machine guns. But the 
German air-planes are a definite danger always, 
and the big guns on the German lines reach the 
place easily enough, apparently. He never 
mentions ordinary shells dropping in; I don't 
know if that is because they are very usual or 
very unusual. He did mention a gas attack, 
which drove the entire population out of the 
town (which lies in a hollow) to the hills around. 
And where those gas shells can be thrown, of 
course other shells can be, also. 

"We had a very cheerful letter from my sister 
this week. She has returned to Paris from the 
little town of Antony where she spent part of 
the summer. She says she is very much rested, 
has gained in weight, and her head does not 
feel so tired. So we are somewhat relieved of 
our fear lest she should break down." 

WAR RELIEF PLANS 

How Bryn Mawr may best be repre- 
sented in war relief work this year is a 



question occupying the minds of all un- 
dergraduates. There is a strong desire 
for cooperation with the alumnae in a 
single concentration of effort, which will 
maintain the identity of the College in 
war-work. The possibility of sending a 
reconstruction unit to France, as Smith 
College has done, stands out among a 
number of suggestions, including an am- 
bulance on the Russian or Italian front, 
a Y. M. C. A. hut, or an orphan colony 
in France. 

The reconstruction unit offers a direct 
opportunity for personal service in 
France to eight or ten Bryn Mawr 
women who would compose the unit, in 
the capacity of nurses, social workers, 
and chauffeurs, and who would have 
charge of a Bryn Mawr village. The 
cost of such a unit, sent through the 
American Fund for French Wounded, is 
$25,000. An interesting account of the 
work now going on is given in the fol- 
lowing letter and inclosure received by 
Dean Taft from the American Fund for 
French Wounded: 

M^ Dear Miss Taft: 

The American Fund for French Wounded, of 
whose work for the small hospitals of France 
you have no doubt heard, is now engaged in 
helping to restore the devastated regions of 
Northern France to a condition which will make 
possible the return of the scattered owners of 
the ruined houses. 

Units of eight to ten persons have been 
placed in various villages till we have eighteen 
villages under our supervision. The enclosed 
letter from Mrs. Dike, our chairman, and Miss 
Anne Morgan will show you on what business- 
like lines the work is being done. Various in- 
dividuals and communities have undertaken to 
rehabilitate different villages — Smith College is 
doing most successful work through its unit. 

We hope that you will feel it worth while to 
bring this very practical way of helping the 
French people to the attention of your students. 
A unit of eight to ten persons with sufficient 
financial backing, say $25,000 can make a 
whole village again self-supporting and self- 
respecting. 



118 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[November 



There is so much to be done and you have 
such a fund of well-trained, energetic, strong 
workers among your alumnae and students that 
we are eager to use them where fresh strength 
and courage are sorely needed. 

Sincerely yours 
Elizabeth Scarborough, 
Secretary, A.F.F. W. 

EXTRACTS PROM LETTERS FROM MRS. DIKE. 
CHAIRMAN OF THE CIVILIAN COMMITTEE OF 
THE AMERICAN FUND FOR FRENCH WOUNDED 

Blerancourt, Aisne, France, 
July 20, 1917. 

We are actually here in the midst of the army 
and in the heart of devastated France. We 
have been visited and inspected by the Red 
Cross many times. 

It is beyond Noyon to the North, the West and 
East that one sees the mbst appalling destruc- 
tion. Village after village is passed — nothing left 
of them but a few empty remains, remnants of 
walls, not a stick of furniture in their empty 
shells, silent deserted ruins. We know that the 
Germans have destroyed all the plumbing 
which cannot quickly be replaced and we also 
know that the unsuspicious-looking pile of sand 
may contain dangerous explosives hidden there 
on purpose. 

As we proceed we meet with fewer and fewer 
civilians, and more and more soldiers. Here 
and there we pass old men, old women and 
children still clinging faithfully to the gaping 
walls of the former homes, and while we stop 
to speak to them soldiers on the march pass us, 
their faces aglow when they see the American 
flag on our car. 

Our quarters are primitive. For thirty 
months Germans have lived in these walls. 
Now ten American women have made it their 
temporary home. You cannot imagine the con- 
dition in which we found it. For three days, 
while we were waiting for our beds to come down 
from Paris via the slow railroad, and the slower 
camion service from Noyon, we did some very 
necessary housecleaning. We put on our blue 
blouses and set to work with bits of glass to 
scrape the walls and cup-boards. Then we bor- 
rowed whitening from the Army and washed 
down the walls of the pavilion and stables that 
must for the present act as our warehouse. 

Over the very fine old stone gate we placed the 
sign of the Comite* Americain pour les Bless6s 
Francais, Section Civile pour 1' Aisne. Then 
we visited the Mayor and the prefect and the 



sous-prefect, told them of our plans, and asked 
for their cooperation. One and all expressed 
themselves delighted to have us there on the 
soil of a frontier village to work with them in 
this immense task of reconstructing the home 
life of reconquered France. 

They welcomed the idea of our dispensary 
service as there are no medicaments available 
in the army zone for civilians. What this really 
meant I think I first understood when an old 
woman told me about her grandson — a boy of 
nine years. He had been ill for several days 
and finally she ventured to go to the German 
Kommandatur of the District (it was while the 
Germans held the village) to ask if she might 
have a physician. 

"No," was the answer, "we have no phy- 
sician for the civilians." 

In desperation the following day when a 
squad of soldiers was passing through the vil- 
lage, she took the boy in her arms and ran to 
meet them. 

"Is there a doctor among you — someone who 
can help this child " she asked. 

A young man stepped forward, examined the 
child, and wrote out a prescription. She hur- 
ried to the Kommandatur for permission to go to 
the next village to have the prescription filled. 
It was refused. "I'll send an officer in the 
morning," was the only reply. 

When the officer came it was too late. The 
child was dead. 

An old blacksmith living in a piggery which 
marked the ruins of his splendid old farm was 
made happy by an iron bellows which helps 
him to restore all the wantonly destroyed agri- 
cultural implements in the district. He is now 
able to support his family of thirteen, all living 
in the same room. We are trying to get a 
small wooden house put up for them, which we 
shall furnish, and perhaps be able to save the 
childrens' lives. 

The refugees return to their ruins, old, worn- 
out with illness and suffering, dragging their 
grandchildren behind them, their sons dead at 
the front, their daughters in captivity. 

The situation is heart-rending, but they begin 
to have confidence in us, and streams of people 
come all the time, often walking many miles, to 
ask tor advice and help. 

I wish I could take cinema pictures of it all, 
of the children's classes in sewing, cooking, car- 
pentry and masonry which we have established, 
of the windows we have put in where there 
were none, of the leaky roofs we have covered, 



1917] 



War Work 



119 



of the gardens with vegetables we have started, 
of the bodies we have covered with clothes, of 
the daily fights in the air overhead between 
German and French aviators, of the guns that 
are constantly firing, and the weary troops al- 
ways on the march. 

Our workroom is nearly completed, we shall 
be able to start an honest sewing industry here 
and give them a small wage. 

The dispensary and creche is almost finished — 
a good deep cellar and very well built. The 
soldiers who are back from the trenches for a 
few days work at it constantly. Poor chaps, 
they spend sixty days in the trenches and five 
days of rest, and we have to use them in that 
five days to build or to till the ground. But 
there is no labor to be had in this country, if we 
had not the irregular work of the army to help 
us, we would have nothing. 

In three villages where there is nothing but 
ruins, we are cooperating with the Government 
to put up small three-roomed houses which we 
would furnish, and provide every one with 
means of livelihood. And now we have three 
small villages growing like mushrooms. 

We are trying to get the French Government 
to send us some tracteurs to till the ground and 
prepare it for seeding. There are no men, so 
we must organize Belgian labor if possible, and 
use it in the fields. And it must be done before 
September. In October we must organize more 
labor to plant fruit trees. 

Today has been a wonderful day. We have 
opened marvellous cases containing garments of 
the kind most needed at the moment — under- 
wear, boots — the nice, flat-heeled, square-toed 
variety, with strong leather tops — corduroy suits 
for men, skirts and blouses for women. There is 
an infinite number of those which will soon very 
soon, disappear, but I know that they will be 
replaced by others of warmer material for the 
winter. And the process of unpacking, sorting 
and listing goes steadily on. 

Our centers in the devastated departments will 
consistof a warehouse for receiving and distribut- 
ing supplies; an ouvroir where our sewing- 
machines will be used to great advantage, and 
where the women of the district may help us 
prepare mattresses and coverings; a dispensary 
and small dormitory in charge of a qualified 
nurse and aids; a small sterilization plant for 
disinfection; rabbit hutches, chicken runs and 
pasturage for cows; in other words, a small com- 
munal farm, where cattle and chickens may be 
kept until we have thoroughly investigated 
cases in need of same. 



I've been able to arrange with French Gov- 
ernment for a small quantity of coal, and our 
motor trucks are busy in their hours off duty 
finding wood, which we ourselves saw for the 
winter. We are trying to get a three horse- 
power saw to cut wood for our villages, against 
the winter cold. 

It is so vital in France to bring the refugee 
back to the soil, to provide him with seed and 
instruments, food and clothing, a few cooking 
utensils, a bed, a table and a stove. 

The undergraduates have taken the 
following steps: In place of the Red 
Cross and Belgian Relief Committees 
a single War Relief Committee has 
been formed consisting of two mem- 
bers from each class in College and 
a graduate representative. This Com- 
mittee has already raised $1896 from 
canvassing and from the proceeds of a 
lecture by Mr. Frederick C. Walcott of 
the Food Administration. It is pro- 
posed to raise more by lectures and en- 
tertainments throughout the year. May 
Day, which at first seemed the best way 
of raising money for War Relief, was 
given up by a vote of the Undergraduate 
Association, as involving too great finan- 
cial risks under the existing conditions. 

We very much hope that the alumnae 
will favor undertaking war work on 
such a scale this year and that they will 
wish to make it possible for Bryn Mawr 
to send to France a reconstruction unit. 

E. Houghton, '18 
Chairman of the War Relief Committee. 

The project of a Bryn Mawr recon- 
struction unit in France seems to me to 
be a splendid one. The reconstruction 
work is already organized along such 
lines as to give the best possible oppor- 
tunity for such a unit. There would be 
an opening for workers of varied train- 
ing and a very considerable number of 
the Bryn Mawr alumnae could give 
active as well as financial support. The 
task to be accomplished is one which 



120 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[November 



cannot fail to make a strong appeal to 
every graduate and undergraduate of 
Bryn Mawr. 

Helen Taft, '15. 

WAR WORK FOR COLLEGE 
WOMEN 

The Committee appointed last May by the 
Boston Branch of the Association of Collegiate 
Alumnae to organize homes or club-houses near 
the camp-sites is able to report on two specific 
projects which, at the time of writing, it is 
hoped will soon be actively under way. The 
possibilities of the various training-camps and 
militia and naval centres in New England were 
investigated and Ayer was found to present the 
greatest need from the point of view of numbers. 
It is, however, a small town and surrounded by 
even smaller rural communities with very few 
houses to be rented or bought. The government 
required almost everything available for its 
own use and the remaining opportunities were 
limited and vied for by a number of organiza- 
tions like ourselves anxious to be of use. Our 
Committee, after much patient search and many 
discouragements and disappointments found it- 
self reduced to the proposition of buying land 
and building. For this we had no funds and 
the project had to be reluctantly abandoned. 
Now opportunity has knocked at our door. 
There is to be erected in the town of Ayer, ad- 
joining the camp-site, a large club-house for 
drafted men — not officers as provision has al- 
ready been made for them. The local com- 
mittee of the War Department Commission on 
Training Camp Activities is putting up this 
building and planning to provide in it many 
opportunities for recreation for the men and 
also a place for them to meet their families. 
The second floor is to be given to some women's 
organization to "matronize" the social activi- 
ties of the club-house. The organization of 
women which undertakes this work is to pay 
no rent but to contribute towards the heating 
and lighting, to be responsible for keeping 
clean the second floor and to board all its helpers 
of whatever kind. A caterer has taken charge 
of the food arrangements so that men's nor 
women's committees actively interested in the 
house will have any care of that department. 
This work has been offered to our organ- 
ization of women by the Rev. Endicott Pea- 
body, chairman of the local committee and our 



Committee has accepted the offer. The task 
demands both service and money, but month- 
ly payments rather than a lump sum. The 
men's committee wishes the constant pres- 
ence of cultured women as chaperones. Col- 
lege women will be glad, we think, to live in the 
club-house for three or four days or a week or two 
at a time, paying for their meals at the restaur- 
ant in the same building and furnishing the 
home-atmosphere of the club-house with its op- 
portunities for dances, plays and all wholesome 
amusements. Our organization will be repre- 
sented on the men's committee governing the 
whole club-house and the amount of our finan- 
cial help will be left to the discretion of our 
Committee. 

The second venture to be inaugurated is in 
the nature of a small home or club-house at 
Provincetown. There are a number of coast 
patrol-boats and other naval craft either sta- 
tioned in the harbor or using it as "home port" 
and the town, in winter, is bleak and isolated. 
Sailors are on shore several hours of each day 
and have not a place of amusement or any 
building into which they can go except a dismal 
town-hall or the hotel where they must pay. 
They roam the streets forlornly or stand about 
the drug-store. The crews of the patrol-boats 
consist mainly of college men who must feel 
keenly the lack of comfortable and pleasant 
surroundings and would appreciate even more 
than the average man a home-like spot to go to. 
This Committee has rented the house of a sum- 
mer resident and proposes to establish in it a 
college woman as matron with volunteer as- 
sistants who will come and go, each staying as 
long as she can conveniently to herself. The 
house is fully furnished except for silver and 
linen, it is steam-heated and electric-lighted and 
there is a large studio with open fire-place 
which will make an admirable sitting-room for 
the men. The rent is moderate through the 
patriotism of the owners. We wish to add a 
piano, victrola, billiard table, card-tables, books, 
games, writing-materials etc. for the comfort 
and entertainment of the sailors and we need 
bedding, and table linen and inexpensive silver- 
ware. These articles we hope to have contrib- 
uted out-right, either new or second-hand. 
Money must be collected to defray the ex- 
penses of rent, fuel, light, service, food — and we 
all know what these items mean today! But 
Provincetown seems to offer a splendid oppor- 
tunity and one from which we Ought to get big 
returns for money expended. Here and at 



1917] 



War Work 



121 



Ayer — and elsewhere later — we can spend all 
we receive so let no one be afraid that her con- 
tribution, large or small, will not be acceptable. 
Money may be pledged to be paid later if pre- 
ferred and gifts of the articles enumerated above 
are also desired. Then too we wish offers of serv- 
ice from college women who would be willing to 
go and live for longer or shorter periods of time 
at these houses. Any communications may be 
addressed to the Bryn Mawr member of the 
Committee, Mrs. Talbot Aldrich, 34 Fairfield 
Street, Boston, Mass. 
[signed] 

Eleanor L. Aldrich, '05. 

REPORT TO WOMEN'S WAR 

RELIEF CORPS, PARIS, OF 

THE LAYETTE WORK OF 

MRS. HERBERT ADAMS 

GIBBONS 

Mrs. W. G. Sharp, Chairman, 

5, rue Franqais Ier, 
Paris. 
My Dear Mrs. Sharp: 

Conforming to your request of September 1, 
I beg to report as follows: 

In September, 1914, I started, wholly by 
myself, to provide layettes for the children of 
men at the Front in my own quarter, the XIV 
and the XIII and the VI and the V and the XV 
Arrondissements of Paris. I secured some lay- 
ettes from friends in America, and with money 
sent by other friends, purchased layettes or 
had them made. All cases were registered 
from the beginning, but, during the first year, 
little personal investigation was made before- 
hand, although the cases were followed up after 
the layette was given. After my fourth baby 
was born in November, 1915, I took into the 
layette work as associate, Madame Faucon- 
Johnson, of 22, rue des Ecoles. After Madame 
Johnson joined me, we were able to inscribe 
cases long before the birth of the baby, and to 
make, personally and with the valuable aid of 
other charitable organizations and the cooper- 
ation of the police, satisfactory investigation. 

The layette work has been carried on during 
these three years from my studio at 3, rue Cam- 
pagne-Premiere, and is known to the police as 
the Oeuvre "Sauvons Les Bebes!" For the 
past six months, as the work outgrew my own 
studio, I have hired an extra studio in the same 
court. There the layettes are received, and 
stored. They are distributed partly from my 



studio and partly from the home of Madame 
Faucon-Johnson, 22, rue des ficoles. 

During the first year of the War, when there 
were in my quarter many women, especially 
foreign students, without resources I had, in 
a room on the seventh floor of the apartment 
building in which I live, 120, Boulevard du 
Montparnasse, an ouvroir, known as the "Bryn 
Mawr Ouvroir," and my work is registered un- 
der this name at the Clearing House. I had 
associated with me in the ouvroir two other 
Bryn Mawr girls living in Paris, Misses Anna 
and Carlotta Welles, 92, Avenue Henri-Martin. 
The ouvroir did a great deal of sewing for the 
baby work. In the autumn of 1915, when the 
particular need of the ouvroir ceased to exist, 
it was given up. But I have always followed 
the policy of making my money serve a double 
purpose by providing sewing work in making the 
layettes for women in need, in many cases 
mothers of babies, so they could nurse their 
own babies. This sewing was mostly done at 
home, but the cutting I did almost entirely my- 
self in my studio. Women came for work just 
as they did for layettes. This policy has been 
continued up to the present writing. 

My sources of gifts in layettes have been: 
Mr. Rodman Wanamaker, and the Princeton 
Red Cross Society, for most of the boxes. Boxes 
have also come from Red Cross organizations, 
and woman's church and community clubs in 
Pittsburgh, Philadelphia (German town), East 
Orange, N. J., Cornwall, N. Y., Brooklyn, N. Y., 
and other places. Practically all of these 
boxes have reached me through the service of 
the American Relief Clearing House. I have 
received also from the Clearing House, flannel, 
shoes, miscellaneous garments, layettes and ma- 
ternity kits, and several gifts of money for spe- 
cific purposes. Other gifts in kind have reached 
me from local Paris sources, Mrs. Laurence V. 
Benet, Consul-General A. M. Thackara, Mrs. 
Carroll Greenough, Mrs. Frank H. Mason, and 
others. Mr. Rodman Wanamaker has sent, on 
several occasions, thousands of yards of good 
flannel. 

Almost all the money I have received, about 
35,000 francs, has come from members of my 
family (my mother in particular), classmates 
and others at Bryn Mawr College, and other 
personal friends, and also churches with which 
my husband or I have had connection. 

My wo*k also included making up layettes 
for individual cases, where the money has been 
given and the layettes taken for distribution by 



122 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[November 



the donor. The largest order of this kind was 
one of 3,000 francs from the wife of the Ameri- 
can Ambassador in Paris, which provided one 
hundred complete layettes and a number of 
flannel garments (the flannel provided from my 
own stock). 

In some cases, I have used my money to buy 
garments for other children, in families where I 
have a layette case, for providing milk and 
bread during limited periods, and sending 
mothers and children to the country. Although 
I have made no pretention to vestiaire work, 
thousands of older children have been provided 
with shoes, coats, and other garments. In the 
first winter of the War, I made a special trip to 
Finistere to distribute clothing sent to me by 
Princeton College boys and town folk. 

The work has taken too much time to allow 
the keeping of the detailed financial statements 
or of detailed statistics. But I have registered 
on cards, the names and other necessary infor- 
mation of over three thousand families with 
which I have been in contact. 

The salient features of my work are: 

(a) Seeking out cases of families that would 
die rather than ask for relief; 

(b) Relieving people by taking into account 
their desires and not what I think they ought 
to desire; 

(c) Personal contact of either Madame John- 
son or myself in every single case, and effort to 
follow up cases afterward; 

(d) Special stress on pre-natal encourage- 
ment by relieving mothers in advance of haunt- 
ing anxiety about having clothes for their baby 
when it arrived, and reassuring pregnant women 
that their suffering would not injure or influ- 
ence unduly the child when born; 

(e) Sympathy for fille-meres, many of whom 
have been presented by their mothers, and at- 
tempts, frequently successful, to bring about 
marriage or at least recognition of the child by 
the father. 

At the present moment, I have over a thou- 
sand cases ahead for this winter, for which 
there is no provision, and no promise of aid to 
come. For, since the American Red Cross So- 
ciety made its campaign in America for funds, 
my contributions have fallen off. Two of my 
boxes, shipped recently from Princeton, were 
lost on the Kansan. 

I am not only willing, but would be glad, to 
have this work taken over and developed 
through your central agency, but would point 
out the wisdom of having it remain in the 



neighborhood of the Boulevard du Montpar- 
nasse, where it is near the great maternity hos- 
pitals, whose patients have learned the way to 
my door. It would be splendid if Madame 
Faucon- Johnson could be persuaded by you to 
continue in this work. I think that no better 
real aid could be given to France than to en- 
courage natality, and to aid in the care of the 
new-born children, who are the hope of the 
future. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Helen Davenport Gibbons. 
Paris, September 7, 1917. 

NOTES FROM WAR WORKERS 
ABROAD 

Shirley Putnam is working in Paris under 
Miss Gassette, sculptor and painter before the 
war, who is now using her knowledge of anat- 
omy and her genuine creative ingenuity in in- 
venting and improving on splints and apparatus 
used in hospitals. 

"The French Government order for 2200 
femur suspensions, etc., keeps us all busy doing 
our turn at the various parts. Then besides 
hospital cases there are the 'ambulatory' ones. 
That's where the human interest comes in. 
Poor old (usually about 25 or so — they are!) 
poilus, with a limp arm or cramped fingers or 
three vertebrae fractured! You see the hospi- 
tals don't have time or patience to work out 
individual and prolonged treatments for these 
bad fractures. Miss Gassette works in consul- 
tation with the doctors and the French ones, 
at least, who've had the longest time to watch 
her, are all for her. As for the men, they adore 
her. One poor fellow, who is all bent double 
from having been crushed under the earth 
three days, was sent from the hospital as hope- 
less and who is now gradually being straight- 
ened up, said, the other day: 'Vous savez, pour 
moi, Miss Gassette, c'est un dieu!'" 

IDA PRITCHETT'S WORK ON 
ANTITOXINS 

In response to a request from the Quarterly, 
Ida Pritchett, '14, has kindly written the fol- 
lowing note concerning her work at the Rocke- 
feller Institute: 

"Short of a detailed account there is not 
much to tell about our work at the Institute be- 
yond the fact that we have been able to produce 






1917] 



News from the Campus 



123 



an antitoxin which is effective against gaseous 
gangrene. Gas infection is relatively rare in 
civil practice, but in this war the percentage of 
wounds showing gaseous gangrene is large, and 
there has been great need for some treatment 
more specific than mere wound irrigation. We 
believe that our antitoxin will go far toward 
filling this need. It possesses both preventive 
and curative properties, and we hope to be able 
to raise it to such potency that it can be given 
to every wounded man at the first dressing sta- 
tion, as is done now with tetanus antitoxin. In 
this way we hope to be able to prevent the de- 
velopment of gaseous gangrene in almost all 
cases, and to control and cure such cases as 
have already developed. Our opportunities for 
trying the antitoxin in cases of gas infection in 
human beings have so far been very few, but 
the results obtained have given us every hope 
that we shall meet with equal success in the 
treatment of war wounds. It has been an ab- 



sorbing piece of work and I feel that I have been 
very fortunate to have had even a small share 
in it." 

A REQUEST 

The Quarterly has been requested, 
by some of the alumnae who are doing 
relief work in France, to give a list of 
names and addresses of all the Bryn 
Mawr alumnae and former students 
now doing war relief work abroad. The 
Quarterly, therefore, in turn requests 
all its readers who have knowledge of 
such workers to send their names, with 
addresses if possible, to the Editor. We 
should also be glad to print letters from, 
or information about, any alumnae en- 
gaged in war relief work here or abroad. 



NEWS FROM THE CAMPUS 



CALENDAR OF EVENTS 

SEMESTER I, ACADEMIC YEAR 

1917-18 



October 3 
October 4 
October 6 

October 7 



October 10 



October 12 



October 13 



College opened at 8.45 a.m. 
Parade Night. 

Christian Association Reception 
to freshmen, Gymnasium, 8 p.m. 
Sunday evening service. Ser- 
mon by Professor George A. Bar- 
ton, Ph.D., LL.D., Professor of 
Semitic Languages and Biblical 
Literature. 

President Thomas's reception and 
address to the entering under- 
graduates at the Deanery at 3 
p.m. 
President Thomas's reception 
and address to the graduate 
students at the Deanery at 8 
p.m. 
President Thomas's Reception to 
the Faculty. The Deanery, 
8.30 to 11.30 p.m. 
Th6 dansant in the Gymnasium, 
4 to 6 p.m. for the benefit of 
the Red Cross. Address by 
Mr. Frederick A. Walcott of 
the United States Food Ad- 
ministration under the aus- 



October 14 



October 20 



October 21 
October 26 



October 27 



October 28 
November 2 
November 3 



November 4 



pices of the War Relief Com- 
mittee: The Prussian System 
and the Food Administration. 

Sunday Evening service. Ser- 
mon by the Rev. Jonathan C. 
Day, D.D., Pastor of the La- 
bour Temple, New York City. 

French senior reading examina- 
tion, 9 a.m. 

Banner Show. 

Sunday evening service. 

Faculty reception for the gradu- 
ate students in Denbigh Hall, 

8.30 p.m. 

German senior reading examina- 
tion, 9 a.m. 

Moving pictures under the aus- 
pices of the War Relief Com- 
mittee. 

Sunday evening service. 

Lantern Night. 

Party by the Philanthropic Com- 
mittee in the Gymnasium, 8 
p.m. 

Sunday evening service. Ser- 
mon by the Rev. Albert Par- 
ker Fitch, D.D., President 
of Andover Theological Semi- 
nary. 



124 



The Bryn - MaWr oAlumofBe ^%j#r terly 



[November 



November 9 Concert under the auspiesskfcfca 
the Music Committee.: . '[ vwv 

November 10 Senior Reception to the Ffe^int 
man Class. 

November 11 Sunday evening service. Ser- 
mon by the Rev. S. C^Hugke- 
son, of the Order of the Holy 
Cross, West Park, N. Y. 

November 12 Faculty tea for graduate 3 stu- 1 
dents, Merion Hall, 4 to ,6^^, . 

November 16 Meeting of the War Relief Com- 
mittee. Address by Miss Anne 

r 

Morgan. 

November 18 Sunday evening service! ' ' iSer*' 
mon by Dr. Wilfred T. GrerirR 
fell, Superintendent of the.; 
Labrador Branch- of the.JtyU^--. 
sion for Deep Sea Fishermen.. 

November 19 Thanksgiving collegiate and ma- 
triculation condition exaniina- 1 
tions begin. ;'" bagJSg 

November 23 Meeting of the Science Club. 

November 24 Moving pictures under the aus- 
pices of the War/ReT|ef ffMT 
mittee. 

November 25 Sunday evening service. Ser- 
mon by Rev. William Pierson 
Merrill, Pastor of the Brick 
Presbyterian Churcjh, ,r]N$fi 
York City. 

November 27 Collegiate and matriculation con- 
dition examinations end. 

November 28 Thanksgiving vacation<begin£ .$% 
1 p.m. 

December 3 Thanksgiving vacation ends at 
9 a.m. • , . u !o0 

December 7 Concert under the auspices p£ th^ 
Music Committee. Recital by 
Miss Kitty Cheatham. 

December 8 Senior reading examination . i^ 
French. 

December 9 Sunday evening service. Ser- 
mon by Professor Rufus M. 
Jones, Professor of Philosophy 
in Haverford College. t , 

December 11 Faculty tea for graduate stu- 
dents, Radnor Hall, 4 to 6 p.m. 

December 14 Christmas party for the maids, 
the Gymnasium, 9 p.m. 

December 15 Senior reading examination in 
German. 
Address by Ian Hay (Captain 
Beith), under the auspices of 
the War Relief Committee. 



Qec^ai>er^0 Sunday evening service. Ser- 
ai sun yi ; i ' rnon by the Rt. Rev. Charles 
lo sj'.cKi: - | Palmerston Anderson, D.D., 
bn& ,331 bI ; ; > Bishop of Chicago. 

Deoerdfoeinl9, Christmas vacation begins at 1 
sW .noi j; : p.m. 

Jariuary iitf 3 Christmas vacation ends at 9 
ovhnjyorq H a.m. 
aids sd 0} j 

CAMPUS NOTES 

-£)z "gala?, .p;. h ; 

ctEveBJK<S all when we come back we scan the 
campus anxiously and see with relief that it 
Has riotn changed. Whatever may have hap- 
pened- during the summer, however — perhaps 
errofiebusly-^we may feel ourselves to have al- 
fflk&Sp the 1 campus shows the same walls and ivy, 
the 'same: srradows across the grass. It gives us 
thfp^ante impersonal welcome. The events of 
eaclh first week repeat^in small it seems — the 
opting ngitfehts of one's own first year in Col- 
lege: — the first chapel and President Thomas's 
opening address to the freshman; the reception 
atj^^^^iely-rth^alt^jioon of the reception 
was rainy this year and one wondered whether 
the fresrfifieki'tould'jgo 6utUo s0e the gar* 
denJ : IA3Ms£i&Mv Aksbtiation? reception with its 
receiving circle, btfirigSlfd mind the awful 
dignity of the circle in one's freshmen year. 
The d&dion" of the freshmen president, Marynia 
Foot, which took place in' Miss Dimon's office, 
wafe'sfeflsa'tidhal,' though perhaps less picturesque 
tRafi ^hg^rifc'whe'ri th£' "president was elected 
wftile living rouriid arid round' the campus in a 
F^.- A ^ n ''•'-■ " '"'> <! '■•■ '■ 
^Affiaz^rigly s6on, chiefly by 'Way of the flying 
rfi5ri6^&'-by r %Mc r h' ; iiews ; travels here, we have 
learned the main features of the' coming winter: 
tnW tne$e 3 wiirbe f6ur j senior 1 examinations in 
Fr^iicTi-^fia iour in dermal; 'that these "erst- 
wrMe orals" 7 * are to be written 'in ordinary quiz 
books, in class rooms, and that nobody is to wear 
^plaM gowns; that academic work may be 
rri6difie$ to 1 perrhit the 1 givirig of war courses; 
that for 'the' first ? time in' several years, a course 
in versification will be giveti; 'that five French 
gradates h^ave-%f rived' he^e^tiiat we are to 
''HeTp^'-^ooveV-" by'dne meatless day a week, 
but that the' Biyn MaWr- Farm has furnished 
th£' 'wherewithal' Of our' winter ; fare with eight 
thousand cans of ' preferred vegetables and fruit; 
that the freshman class numbers one hundred 
arid thirty-nine students, -of- whom three are 
"(College granddaughters';'"' tlriat a Red Cross 
workshop will be kept operi by the undergradu- 



1917] 



News from the Campus 



125 



ates every evening; that College plays, such as 
Freshman Show and Banner Show, will be 
given as simply as possible and without a stage; 
that the new hall, variously nick-named Sassa- 
fras and "Vauxhall" is beginning to be called 
by its own name of "Lysyfran" or "crows' 
nest." 

It is perhaps characteristic of college life that 
we should be swamped b}' our interests, that 
in the pressing concern with what is trivial, we 
should lose sight of, or pass over too lightly, 
what is important. One might say that this is 
why the incidents of Parade Night, copied in 
the St. Louis papers, made so little stir here. 
The happy audacity of the freshmen, in writing 
their song at 5.30 a.m. on senior steps, was a 
matter of amused comment. The meeting of 
thirty juniors and sophomores in the village was 
a matter of regret. The affair must necessarily 
have seemed less to us than to outsiders. Con- 
cerning Parade Night, we are so thoroughly im- 
bued with the "do or die" spirit, that we see 
the end too large and the means too small. 
The Undergraduate Association has made new 
and more stringent rules for Parade Night, with 
the understanding that if the custom is to con- 
tinue, the example this year is to be viewed as 
a warning and an example to be shunned. 

Even thus early in the year we have been con- 
fronted with a decision to be made. To decide is 
easy. The proof of the decision rests, however, 
in the carrying out. Among the questions that 
this year brings again what has been for years 
unquestioned, is that of May Day. Whether, 
in inevitable ignorance of affairs eight months 
from now, to resolve to give May Day; or 
whether, in deference to changed and changing 
conditions — and with regard to financial risk — 
to let a time-honored custom lapse; this was 
necessarily a matter of debate. To decide 
against May Day has yet to be proved the part 
of wisdom. It was at all events, the part of 
prudence; and in its favor we may urge that May 
Day has merely been deferred. Though one 
class is to go through College without giving 
Robin Hood and the Revesby Swordesplay, or The 
Hue and Cry after Cupid in the cloisters or danc- 
ing on the green, — yet there will be other classes, 
and other May Days. 

Mary Swift Rupert, 1918. 

THE FACULTY 

President Thomas has returned from China. 
Miss King has returned from Spain. 



Dr. James Barnes was married on July 28 to 
Miss Helen Wilson of Merion. 

Dr. Rhys Carpenter has been granted leave 
of absence to serve in the National Army. 

Dr. Savage is a first lieutenant and is now at 
Fort Niagara. 

Dr. Barton, Dr. Wheeler, and Dr. Huff farmed 
a section of the campus last summer. 

Dr. Crenshaw, who was drafted, is now first 
lieutenant and is working in the Sanitary Corps 
to perfect gas masks. 

Dr. Florence Peebles has been made associate 
professor of physiology at Bryn Mawr. 

Dr. Joseph Clark Hoppin is to take Dr. Car- 
penter's work in classical archaeology this year. 

Dr. Barton has been chosen associate editor 
of the American Journal of Semitic Languages 
and Literature. 

GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Miss Grace Hawk, a graduate student, is the 
holder of a fellowship given annually at Brown 
University in honor of Anne Crosby Emery, 
Bryn Mawr '92, to be used for graduate work 
in any college. 

Miss Louise Adams, who won a special Eu- 
ropean traveling scholarship while a graduate 
student here two years ago, has returned to 
Bryn Mawr after spending the past year in 
Rome with Dr. and Mrs. Frank. 

Miss Agnes Carr Vaughan, graduate student at 
Bryn Mawr two years ago, took her Ph.D. last 
year at the University of Michigan and has re- 
turned to Bryn Mawr for further work. 

The College News. 

CHANGES IN THE FACULTY AND STAFF 
OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

Professor Joseph Clark Hoppin has been ap- 
pointed Professor of Classical Archaeology to 
fill the vacancy caused by the drafting of Pro- 
fessor Rhys Carpenter. Professor Hoppin, who 
was Associate in Classical Archaeology at Bryn 
Mawr College from 1899 to 1901, and Associate 
Professor from 1901 to 1904, has very kindly 
consented to give all the courses in Classical 
Archaeology announced this year by Professor 
Carpenter. After leaving Bryn Mawr he held 
a professorship in the American School at 
Athens, and has directed excavations in Greece. 
His book OTii&reek Vases will shortly appear. 

Dr. Florence Peebles, Ph.D. of Bryn Mawr 
College, has been appointed Associate Professor 



126 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[November 



of Physiology. Dr. Peebles took her degree at 
Bryn Mawr College in 1900, having been a Grad- 
uate Scholar in Biology at Bryn Mawr College, 
1895-1896; Fellow in Biology, 1896-1897; Mary 
E. Garrett European Fellow, Scholar of the 
Woman's Table, and Student in Biology, Zoo- 
logical Station, Naples, Universities of Mu- 
nich and Halle, 1898-1899. She was Instructor 
in Biology in the Woman's College of Baltimore 
from 1899 to 1902, and Associate Professor of 
Biology from 1902 to 1906. She studied in the 
University of Bonn in,the summer of 1906, in 
the Zoological Station at Naples in 1907, and as 
Fellow of the Association of Collegiate Alumnae 
did research work in Germany and France in 
1912-1913. From October to December, 1913 
she was Lecturer in Biology in Bryn Mawr Col- 
lege as substitute for Professor Tennent, and 
was Professor of Biology and Head of the De- 
partment in the H. Sophie Newcomb Memorial 
College, Tulane University, 1915-1917. 

Miss Esther Cloudman Dunn, Instructor in 
English at Bryn Mawr College from 1913 to 
1917, who had resigned to accept a Fellowship 
in English for this year, has been appointed 
Instructor in English and Acting Director of the 
work in English Composition in place of Profes- 
sor Howard James Savage, who has been granted 
leave of absence for war service. 

Dr. Gerard van Rossen has been appointed 
Lecturer in Physical Chemistry to fill the va- 
cancy caused by the drafting of Dr. James 
Llewellyn Crenshaw. Dr. van Rossen, who is 
a native of Heerenberg, The Netherlands, re- 
ceived the degree of Doctor of Philosophy from 
the University of Gottingen in 1910, and studied 
at the University of Berlin 1913-1914. He was 
Instructor in Chemistry in the University of 
Colorado from 1910 to 1912, and Instructor in 
Physical Chemistry in the University of Illinois, 
1915-1917. 

Miss Clara E. Mortenson has been appointed 
Instructor in Labor, Economics and Politics. 
She received the degree of Batchelor of Science 
from the University of California in 1915, and 
the degree of Master of Science in 1916. She 
was Assistant Investigator of the Industrial 
Relations Commission, 1914-1915, and Assis- 
tant in Economics in the University of California 
from 1915 to 1917. 

In consequence of the increased number of 
students it was necessary to appoint two in- 
structors in English Composition for the first 
semester: 

Miss Susan Farley Nichols, A.B., Bryn Mawr 



College, 1915, and Graduate Student Columbia 
University, 1916-1917, has been appointed full 
time Instructor; and Miss Cornelia Throop Geer, 
A.B., Barnard College, 1917, has been appointed 
half time Instructor in English. 

Miss Letitia Butler Windle, A.B., Bryn Mawr 
College, 1907, teacher of Mathematics in the 
Wykeham Rise School, Washington, Connecti- 
cut, 1907-1908; in the Stevens School, German- 
town, 1909-1915, and in the Gordon-Roney 
School, Philadelphia, 1915-1916, has been ap- 
pointed Warden of Radnor Hall. 

Miss Bertha Sophie Ehlershas been appointed 
Warden of Denbigh Hall instead of Radnor 
Hall, filling the vacancy created by the resigna- 
tion of Miss Margaret Bontecou. 

Miss May Morris, Ph.B., Dickinson College, 
1909, and graduate Pratt Institute of Library 
Science, 1917, has been appointed Assistant to 
the Circulation and Reference Librarian. 

Dr. M. Leola Carrico has been appointed As- 
sistant Physician in Residence. 

ADDRESSES UNKNOWN* 

ALUMNAE 

Brand, Helen Page (Mrs. Raymond I. Hall), 

1903 
Hann, Anna Thompson, 1907 
Hecht, Blanche, 1907 
Montgomery, Hazel Margaret, 1912 

FORMER GRADUATE STUDENTS 

AshbuWr, Elizabeth Atkins, 1904-06, 1908-09 
Bash, Amy Ballance (Mrs. C. E. A. Dowler), 

1898-99 
Beyfuss, Margarete Friede Bertha, 1913-14 
Downing, Maud, 1903-08 
Goddard, Grace (Mrs. Corydon M. Rich), 1891- 

92 
Hattersley, Mabel, 1910-11 
Hunnicutt, Gertrude Oren, 1895, 1895-96 
King, Maude Gladys, 1908-09 
Lark, Mabel Loyetta (Mrs. William George 

Gies), 1897-99 
Lucas, Ethel (Mrs. Eugene Stanton Nostrand), 

1904-05 
Rendel, Frances Elinor, 1908-09 
Schmidt, Annalise, 1909-10 
Steenberg, Bessie (Mrs. John E. Webster) 

1895-96 

* Information as to unknown or incorrect addresses will 
be gratefully received by the Editor, Office of the Re- 
cording Dean, Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 



1917 



News from the Campus 



127 



FORMER UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

Andrews, Eleanor Anne Fyfe, 1889-90, 1895-96 

Barritt, Jessie Ellen, 1888-93 

Battersby, Emma Josephine, 1886-89, 1899- 

1900 
Briggs, Nellie, 1890-91 
Butler, Florence Harney, 1893-94 
Emory, Lucretia Van Bibber, (Mrs. Frederick 

Sampson), 1896-97 
Goldsmith, Sara, 1906-07 
Hulbert, Nellie May (Mrs. George C. Jameson), 

1890-91 
Iringer, Ida Laurette, 1902-04 
Jones, Grace Llewellyn, 1891-93, 1894-95 
Kimball, Mary Hortense, 1899 
Lynch, Nora, 1903-07 
Mabury, Bella, 1890-91 
Mayhew, Viola Adeline, 1900-01 
Moore, Ethel Belle, (Mrs. Frederick Hovey 

Wheeler), 1903, 1904-05 
Orvis, Gertrude Swift, 1895-96 
Sollenberger, Maud, 1899-01 
Upperman, Evelyn Beatrice (Mrs. Ralph E. T. 

Binz), 1900-01 
Willett, Josephine Lape (Mrs. Julian Badiate- 

Zonca), 1893-94 
Wolcott, Laura, 1894, 1894-95 

ADDITIONAL ADDRESSES UNKNOWN, NOVEMBER, 

1917 

Mrs. Alexander Anderson (Elizabeth Carring- 
ton Rand) 1912-14 



Mrs. Lewis Albert Anderson (Margerethe Ur- 
dahl) Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College, 1904 

Mrs. Bob Andrews (Emily Martha Hoyt) 1904- 
06, 1907-08 

Barnes, Aida Cromwell, 1909-11 

Mrs. Braunschweiger (Sylva Lucile Reiss) 1914- 
15 

Briggs, Helen Gerry, 1899-1901 

Cornell, Esther Stuart, A.B., Bryn Mawr Col- 
lege, 1912 

Elfreth, Anna Elizabeth, 1903-04 

Gates, Fanny Cook, Fellow in Mathematics, 
1896-97 Graduate Scholar in Mathematics, 
1895-96 

Grossman, Bella Mira, A.B., Bryn Mawr, Col- 
lege, 1896. Graduate Student, 1896 

Miller, Barnette, 1900-01, Hearer in English 
and French 

Mrs. Wilson Howard Pierce (Antoinette Louise 
Bancroft) 1888-89 

Ranney, Carrie Louise, Graduate Student in 
English and German, 1904-05 

Mrs. Aa. Levering Smith (Ethel McClellan 
Bacon) A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1903 

Mrs. Edward Warren Sturdevant (Louise Net- 
terville Cruice) A.B., 1906, Bryn Mawr Col- 
lege 

Mrs. Asa M. Tyler, (Laura E. Wilkinson) A.B., 
Bryn Mawr College, 1898 

VanDeman, Esther Boise, Fellow in Latin, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1892 

Wade, Clara Louise Whipple, A.B., Bryn 
Mawr College, 1904 



THE BRYN MAWR PATRIOTIC FARM 



A project so much photographed in 
the Sunday supplements needs no in- 
troduction to the Quarterly readers, 
and yet perhaps a few facts and first 
hand anecdotes will not come amiss. 
Shortly after Easter the idea of a college 
farm was first aired on the campus and 
through the generosity of Mr. P. E. 
Sharpies of West Chester, Pa., it became 
a reality by the first part of May. The 
story goes that Mr. Sharpies thought that 
farming was something that women could 
not do and threw down the gauntlet in 
the shape of twenty acres of good land 
on an outlying part of his large estate 
at Fern Hill, two miles from West Ches- 
ter. Mrs. Sharpies accepted the chal- 
lenge and through the interest and 
efforts of Dr. Jane Baker and Miss 
Martha Thomas the College was given 
an opportunity to prove what it could 
do in this field so foreign to its usual 
activities. 

What did it accomplish? Has the 
experiment paid? These are the ques- 
tions we meet on every side. As a be- 
ginning groups of undergraduates and 
alumnae spent the last three Saturdays 
of May planting and preparing the 
ground. This was done under the di- 
rection of Professor A. D. Cromwell of 
the State Normal School at West Ches- 
ter, who continued to act as superintend- 
ent throughout the summer. The dis- 
tribution of crops was as follows: five 
acres of potatoes! seven acres of sweet 
corn, five acres of beans, and three acres 
of general garden truck. 

A house was rented in West Chester 
and was occupied from June 1 to October 
1 by groups of undergraduates, alumnae, 
and a few outside friends. The number 



of workers varied from ten to twenty- 
six at a time, averaging eighteen or 
twenty most oi the time. In all about 
eighty individuals took part in the work, 
with three of the wardens, Mary Near- 
ing, '09, Bertha Ehlers, '09, and Alice 
Hawkins, '07, acting as managers. 

The living arrangements were simple 
in the extreme, and the meals, which 
were eaten at a nearby boarding-house, 
neither abundant nor appetizing. Each 
worker had to pay $7.50 a week for board 
and lodging, and to earn this amount 
she had to work thirty-seven and a half 
hours a week at twenty cents an hour. 
Saturday night was pay day and it was 
highly diverting to see the line of girls 
with their business-like time cards wait- 
ing their turn in the manager's room. 
Rainy weather meant a dead loss, as in- 
come and expenses would not meet, but 
some weeks workers actually had net 
earnings as much as two dollars. Riches 
indeed with few chances of dissipation 
beyond movies, a soda water palace, and 
an ice cream cone shop boasting more 
different flavors than could be sampled 
in less than a fortnight's stay unless one 
was extravagant enough to eat more 
than one an evening. 

The day began at 6 a.m. Dressing 
was a simple matter — the fewer and 
briefer the garments the better for all 
purposes and comforts. After a hasty 
breakfast the tooting of a horn was a sig- 
nal that the truck was ready to start. 
The college motor truck — a Ford en- 
gine with an omnibus top — played a 
leading role in the farm drama. At the 
beginning of the summer its name was 
Pallas Athena, then reminiscences from 
oral reading suggested Schwarze Zuge in 



128 



1917] 



The Bryn Mawr Patriotic Farm 



129 






"Frau Sorge;" by October, familiarity 
had bred contempt and Tilly Superford 
became the regular title. In spite of 
the vituperation heaped upon it when it 
simply would not crank, and had to 
be pushed half a block to make it start, 
or when its brakes refused to work and 
it started gently down hill backward, 
the truck endeared itself somehow to 
its hangers-on and it is impossible to 
say how much it added to the summer. 

Work began about seven and lasted 
until twelve. Then the truck took 
every one in to luncheon in West Chester, 
returning an hour later. By five work 
was over for the day, and again the 
truck was useful in taking the hot tired 
laborers to the really beautiful little 
lake on Mr. Sharples's estate, where a 
swim made every one over. Even after 
eight hours work with the thermometer 
100° in the shade — and there was no 
shade — diving contests and games of 
"Follow the Leader" were in order. 
The spirit of The Man with the Hoe 
never showed its dark countenance 
among us. Instead it was an inspira- 
tion to see such an exhibition of inde- 
fatigable youth. Here is a reserve re- 
source for our country, tried and proved. 

During those eight hours a day every 
kind of agricultural labor was practiced 
at one time or another. We did have the 
services of one man and a horse plough 
several hours a day, but there were few 
girls who did not try their hand at guid- 
ing that plough, and no one found it an 
impossible or even an exhausting task. 
Our rows of beans were one-third of a 
mile long and it took 5 hours to hoe 
down one row and back another. Many 
a morning was spent at that — steady 
unrelieved toil. Pushing a hand culti- 
vator is also hard work but a lot of it 
was done. Scattering fertilizer, trans- 
planting in all its guises, weeding, — 



these were gentle occupations for 
the afternoon. Many unforeseen jobs 
cropped up. The most formidable of 
these was building the cannery. This 
the girls actually did themselves, laying 
a cement floor in neat squares, making 
cement steps and ovens, building the 
roof and adjustable sides of lumber, 
with the direction and assistance, of 
course, of Mr. Cromwell and the one 
man. It was a very creditable piece of 
work and was much admired by the 
many visitors. 

About the end of July work in the 
field gave place to work in the can- 
nery. Peas, beets, beans, chard, corn, 
and peaches were all canned in large 
quantities both in glass and in tin. One 
day sixteen persons picked, prepared, 
and canned 3000 ears of corn and 9 
bushels of beans. It was interesting to 
see people work out systems of efficiency 
and little labor-saving devices. Rival 
methods of snipping beans or cutting 
corn off the cob gave zest to what might 
have been monotonous work. Standing 
three or four hours at a stretch, packing 
or soldering, is no joyful task. 

Too high praise cannot be given to the 
spirit shown by the workers. With the 
possible exception of one small group 
which did not stay long, there was 
absolutely no shirking and no complain- 
ing, no unpleasant comparing of the 
relative advantages of different tasks 
assigned. The many disagreeable draw- 
backs were met invariably with humor- 
ous jests. They were "the right stuff." 
An octogenarian in the neighborhood 
who had been very much opposed to 
the project — "He didn't want no gold- 
braceleted, diamond-ringed girls fooling 
around a farm" — capitulated after 
about six weeks. He bragged all over 
the country about the Bryn Mawr girls' 
weedless garden. "They work harder 



130 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[November 



than boys and they don't care how they 
look, "was one day's comment, "and the 
best of it is that every one's a perfect 
lady." 

Now what did all this accomplish? 
Not so much in actual bushels, perhaps, 
as we had hoped. Throughout the sum- 
mer, Low Buildings, the College Inn, 
and some West Chester tradespeople 
were constant customers, and for the 
past month the college halls have ob- 
tained a large part of their fresh vege- 
tables straight from the farm. Nearly 
400 bushels of potatoes, a large quantity 
of other root vegetables, and about 9000 
quarts of canned goods are now stored 
for the winter's use. Not enough for the 
whole year as had been hoped, but every- 
thing there is adds so much more to the 
country's resources, releases so much 
more to the general market and to our 
soldiers at the front. It has been 
therefore a genuinely successful patriotic 
adventure. 

Has it paid? In actual dollars and 
cents, no! The scheme was financed 



by about ten generous friends of the Col- 
lege who lent $5000. How nearly this 
can be repaid cannot be estimated until 
the price to be paid by the College for 
the farm products has been settled, as 
all the crops are not in yet. The cost of 
initial equipment must be remembered 
and, of course, the unskilled labor. But 
all educational adventures are expen- 
sive and must be paid for by liberal- 
minded people. One never really pays 
the full amount for a year's tuition or 
an opera ticket that they actually cost — 
some one else foots the bill. Our def- 
icit, we trust, will not be large, and eighty 
girls have had a remarkable experience 
and have become valuable agricultural 
assets. No one who saw those girls work 
at all kinds of dirty, disagreeable, dif- 
ficult tasks in the heat of a Pennsyl- 
vania summer can ever doubt that 
women are able to do their part at home 
if the men must go away. It is no 
longer a theory, but a fact. 

Alice Martin Hawkins. 



A SUMMER EXPERIENCE IN SOCIAL WORK 



As Bryn Mawr's undergraduate rep- 
resentative, I take this opportunity 
to describe to the alumnae through 
these columns, my scattered impres- 
sions of a unique Social Service Con- 
ference of the past summer. This 
conference, if I may call it such, was 
conducted by the Charity Organization 
Society of New York City and was in 
the nature of an experiment. That is, 
it was carried out for the first time last 
summer and its continuance depended 
upon its success. Six representatives of 
women's colleges and th r ee of men's 
colleges, all from the class of 1918, were 
the guests of the C. O. S. for the month 
of July, and during that month were 



given an idea of the scope and methods 
of modern social service. The women 
lived at Hartley Settlement House, the 
men at Union Settlement House, and 
all representatives reported each week 
day for "work" at nine o'clock. This 
work was all done under the direction 
of Mr. Karl De Schweinitz, the head 
"publicity man" of the C. O. S., and 
consisted in case work in the District 
Offices every other day, investigation of 
institutions and welfare agencies one day 
a week, lectures one day and " round 
table " discussions until noon on Sat- 
urday the sixth day. 

The idea of this conference originated 
with Mr. De Schweinitz, who first 



1917] 



A Summer Experience in Social Work 



131 



thought of it as a sort of advertisement 
for the New York School of Philanthropy, 
which is run under the auspices of the 
C. O. S. He, in common with others 
who are interested in the advancement 
and perfection of Social Work as a pro- 
fession, realized the crying need for 
efficient and trained workers. College 
graduates form the most promising ma- 
terial, so he conceived of this conference 
as a means of arousing interest in social 
work among the students at the various 
progressive eastern colleges. Mrs. Glenn, 
the chairman of the Civilian Relief Com- 
mittee of the Red Cross in New York 
City, and also an ardent C. O. S. sup- 
porter, became enthusiastic about Mr. 
De Schweinitz's scheme as a means of 
helping to educate intelligent workers 
for patriotic social work. She finally ob- 
tained the money for the experiment 
from Miss Jennings of New York and 
the conference was launched on its 
course. 

Bulletins announcing the conference 
were sent around to Wellesley, Mt. Hol- 
yoke, Wells, Smith, Vassar, and Bryn 
Mawr among the women's colleges, and 
Bowdoin, Dartmouth, Amherst, Brown 
and Haverford among the men's (owing 
to the war only Haverford and Amherst 
among the latter were represented). As 
far as I could learn there was keen com- 
petition almost everywhere for the honor 
of representing the College. Such was 
not the case at Bryn Mawr. Whereas 
at Vassar with about 300 members of 
the junior class there were some thirty 
competitors, at Wells with a round 50 
there were some twelve, at Bryn Mawr 
with 60 only one or two juniors were 
anxious to view Social Work at close range 
under such favorable auspices. If it 
were not for the growing enthusiasm 
for work at the Community Centre un- 
der Hilda Smith, 1910, this fact would 



argue certainly a deplorable lack of 
interest in Social Service among the un- 
dergraduates at Bryn Mawr. 

The month of July, for these nine 
representatives, may be described as a 
year of the School of Philanthropy in a 
nut shell. We had fewer lectures in pro- 
portion to the work, more visiting of 
institutions, more case work. The last 
was the most directly practical part 
of the course. We were apportioned 
among the most centrally located dis- 
tricts, two or three of us in each district. 
Miss Butler, the Vassar representative, 
and I worked in Clinton District, the 
neighborhood between 48th and 60th 
Streets, on the West Side, lying in what 
is known as " Hell's Kitchen." At first 
we were each given quite simple " cases, " 
people whose records had already been 
investigated. Later on we did some of 
the investigating ourselves and learned 
the terrors of exploring 1 1th Avenue and 
the docks in search of a drunken hus- 
band's employer, and also the joys of 
discovering a clean and exemplary 
"past" for some of the unfortunate ap- 
plicants for aid who had gained our 
easily aroused sympathies. We were of- 
ten discouraged by the seeming hopeless- 
ness of "rehabilitating" the shiftless and 
spineless families of the neighborhood 
who take charity as a matter of course; 
but again a tearful Irish smile of grati- 
tude made a hundred flights of dark 
tenement house stairs seem like the road 
to Heaven — a place where there would be 
no necessity of augmenting hard earned 
wages by charity in order to produce a 
"minimum standard of living." 

Because of the long walks and climbs, 
and the constant giving of our energies 
and sympathies, the district work was 
the most ^trying as well as the most in- 
teresting part of the course . We learned 
to look forward to the days when we 



132 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[November 



went in a body to visit the various in- 
stitutions selected by Mr. De Schweinitz 
as illustrative of cur lectures on the de- 
velopment of charitable and welfare 
work. We learned the intricacies of the 
city transportation system, when to take 
the Bronx and when the Broadway sub- 
way, as well as what hospital to send 
our pet tubercular "case" to, or what 
reformatory to hold up as a dreadful 
alternative for a mischievous gangster 
for whom a district juvenile judge held 
no terrors. On some of the hottest 
days trips by water to Sea-Bright Hos- 
pital or to Sing Sing prison were a great 
relief after the torrid streets of the city. 
Among other institutions visited were 
Bedford Reformatory for women, and 
the Jewish Orphanage. At both of these 
places we were shown by the superin- 
tendants the modern trend in institu- 
tional work. Among the organizations 
visited because of their highly developed 
system of welfare work, were the Metro- 
politan Life Insurance Company, the 
American Telephone and Telegraph Com- 
pany, and Lord & Taylor's Department 
Store. In each of these companies a 
high official accompanied us through the 
welfare department and explained the 
employer's point of view in regard to the 
employees' welfare. Some of us were 
ardent socialists and scornfully regarded 
these laudable efforts en the part of 
"capital," as weak substitutes for a 
"living wage." 

Lectures by leading social workers 
were tucked in at odd moments. For 
instance one day after visiting the head 
quarters of the Joint Board of Sanitary 
Control in the Cloak and Suit Trades, 
we lunched at a Turkish restaurant and 
heard a talk between courses by Miss 
Taylor of the Child Labor Law Commit- 
tee, on her work. On another day we 
went through the lower East Side and 



Chinatown, lunched at a Chinese restaur- 
ant and discussed the immigration ques- 
tion. Mr. Everson of the Criminal 
Courts Committee of the C. O. S. ex- 
plained the part of the C. O. S. in de- 
veloping the criminal court system in 
New York and then took us to a session 
of the Juvenile Court and later to a 
criminal court hearing. Some of the 
lecturers who stand out in my mind are 
Miss Van Kleek of the Sage Foundation, 
who spoke about Labor Unions and 
Scientific Management, Mr. Kirchwey, 
former warden of Sing Sing, who gave 
an informal talk on prison reform, at tea 
with the School of Philanthropy people, 
Mr. Frank Persons, former Secretary of 
the C. O. S. who inspired us with a 
talk on his work with the Red Cross, 
Mr. Edward T. Devine who described 
a pet project, the institution of a train- 
ing school for our soldiers who may be 
blinded in this war. 

Perhaps a word will not be amiss about 
another kind of "social" life of the 
month. One of the most interesting 
phases of the work was "getting ac- 
quainted with each other." The round 
table discussions with Mr. De Schweinitz 
and our District "bosses," where prob- 
lems of the week's work and topics of 
general interest were brought up, soon 
caused lively arguments about the fun- 
damental theories behind Modern Social 
Work: did we believe in Socialism or In- 
dividualism; what right has a social wor- 
ker to "investigate" an applicant's past 
life, what is the ultimate aim of charita- 
ble work; how can we educate the people 
to help themselves; what is the best 
way to reach the child; is the Settlement 
House being replaced by the playground 
association, and so on ad infinitum. Some 
days we would continue our discussions 
in a semi-Bohemian lunch room near the 
C. O. S. main office, and perhaps would 



1917] 



The Clubs 



133 



forget our dessert in striving to settle 
the problems of the world and of the 
universe. Mr. De Schweinitz was from 
the beginning, "one of us" giving ear to 
all of our half-baked ideas, and by his 
own enthusiastic contributions to the 
discussion helped us to "get somewhere " 
before dispersing. 

A valuable part of our training was 
our life in the Settlement Houses. At 
Hartly House we had the advantage of 
being under the direction of Miss 
Matthews, We were usually too ex- 
hausted after our day's activities to be 
of real service to her in her settlement 
work, but found great pleasure in assist- 
ing the playroom worker, helping with 
"bank evening," even entertaining the 
neighborhood Red Cross workers with 
a musical program. 

At the end of the month we were all 
genuinely sorry that the course was 
finished. One of our number, the Am- 
herst representative, stayed on as a vol- 
unteer worker in his district office, and 
the rest of us were keenly desirous to 
take up some form of social work as a 
profession. We were especially im- 
pressed with the close relation between 
case work and war relief work. We 



saw how the C. O. S. had taken charge 
and carried through the Civilian Relief 
of the Red Cross after the Mexican 
trouble. We saw the value of a knowl- 
edge of case work to the aspirant for 
service in Reconstruction work after this 
war. Now, when the nation is going to 
need efficient helpers in War Relief 
work, a thorough training in practical 
social work is a patriotic duty for those 
who have the time for it. It seems that 
the day when the "willing "but untrained 
worker can be of service has passed. 
Each guest of the C. O. S. during the 
conference, returned to college, as a 
senior, fired with the desire to arouse 
interest in social work, to interest their 
fellow students in taking a post graduate 
course at the School of Philanthropy, to 
urge them to train themselves to be 
of service to the country as available 
relief workers. Thus the purposes of 
the originators of the idea of this July 
course of work have already been par- 
tially accomplished. Let us hope that 
the experiment was a success and that 
the authorities will be encouraged to 
extend the same opportunity to other 
undergraduates in years to come. 

Adelaide W. Shaffer, 1918. 



THE CLUBS 



NEW YORK 

137 East 40th Street 

President, Mrs. Adolphe Borie, 3rd, '95; Treasurer, 
Edith Child, '90; Assistant Treasurer, Sophie Boucher, 
'03; Secretary, Isabel Peters, '04, 33 West 49th Street; 
Chairman of Entertainment Committee, Florence Water- 
bury, '05; Chairman of House Committee, Louise Fleisch- 
uann, '06; Chairman of Committee on Admissions, Mary 
Herr, '09. 

The Club has reopened for the winter, and Mrs. Rudolph 
McCabe, the superintendent, will be glad to answer any 
inquiries about rooms. 

BOSTON 

144 Bowdoin Street 

President, Syl\ia 1 K. Lee, 42 Avon Street, Cambridge, 
Mass. 

Secretary, Anna^Fry, The Ludlow, Copley Square. 



CHICAGO 



President, Mrs. Cecil Barnes, 1153 N. Dearborn 
Street. 

BALTIMORE 

President, Mrs. Heruan Mosenthal, '00, 1501 Mt. 
Royal Avenue. 

Secretary, Mildred McCay, Roland Park, Md. 

A feeling among the older alumnae that it would be 
desirable to keep in touch with college affairs and with 
one another caused the reorganization of the old Bryn 
Mawr Club, which had been inactive for some years. 
The constitution of that Club was taken over, Mrs. Her- 
man Mosenthal was made president and monthly meetings 
were held at the houses of the members. Through the 
courtesy of *Edith Hamilton arrangements were made for 
basket ball games on Saturday mornings in the gymnasium 
of the Bryn Mawr School. 



134 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[November 



PITTSBURGH 

President, Sara F. Ellis, '04, 5716 Rippey Street. 

Secretary, Mrs. R. L. Crawford, 517 Emerson Street. 

The $200 competitive entrance scholarship offered by 
the Club was conferred this year, 1917-18, on Helen Ben- 
nett. The Club offers a similar scholarship for 1918-19, 
and is now preparing to send to the preparatory schools of 
Allegheny County a poster to this effect. 

The Club is also supporting a French orphan this year 
and clothing a little girl in Pittsburgh who is a ward of the 
Juvenile Court. 

At the first fall meeting it was decided not to serve the 
usual four o'clock tea at the monthly meetings. This was 
done in compliance with the request made by Mr. Hoover. 

WASHINGTON 

Secretary, Henrietta S. Riggs, 131 Maryland Avenue, 
N. E. 



ST. LOUIS 

President, Mrs. E. W. Stdc, 5112 Waterman Avenue- 

CHINA 

President, Mrs. A. H. Woods, Canton Christian Col- 
lege, Canton. 

LOS ANGELES 

President, Mrs. J. H. Douglas, Jr., 523 South Painter 
Street, Whittier, Cal. 

Secretary, Ethel Richardson, 277 East Bellevue 
Drive, Pasadena. 

OHIO 

President, Grace Latimer Jones, '00, 1175 East Broad 
Street, Columbus, Ohio. 

Secretary, Adeline Werner, 1640 East Broad Street, 
Columbus, Ohio. 



NEWS FROM THE CLASSES 

The news of this department is compiled from information furnished by class secretaries, Bryn Mawr Clubs, and 
from other reliable sources for which the Editor is responsible. Acknowledgment is also due to the Bryn Mawr College 
News for items of news. 

Alumnae and former students of Bryn Mawr College are earnestly requested to 
send directly to the Quarterly — or if they prefer, to their Class Secretaries — for 
use in these columns, items of news concerning themselves. There is a constant 
demand, on the part of Quarterly readers, for abundant class news. But the 
class news can be complete, accurate, and timely only if each one will take the 
trouble to send in promptly information concerning herself. And the Classes that 
have not secretaries willing to act as correspondents for the Quarterly are urged 
to appoint such officers. 



1889 

Harriet Randolph is spending the winter in 
New York and is living with Susan Franklin. 

Ella Riegel spent the summer in Spain with 
Georgiana King, '96, studying French influence 
upon Spanish art. 

Margaret Rhoads Ladd, daughter of Anna 
Rhoads (Mrs. W. C. Ladd), is a member of the 
Class of 1921 and is the matriculation scholar 
for Pennsylvania and the South with an average 
of 85.65. 

Alice Gould has a position in the espionage 
department of the American Embassy in Madrid. 

1892 

Secretary, Mrs. F. M. Ives, 318 West 75th 
Street, New York City. 

1893 

Secretary, Mrs. J. E. Johnson, Jr., Heath- 
cote Inn, Scarsdale, N. Y. 



Susan Walker (Mrs. R. Y. Fitzgerald) is 
planning a reunion for '93 in 1918. 

1894 

Secretary, Mrs. R. N. Durfee, 19 Highland 
Avenue, Fall River, Mass. 

Mary Breed, after a year's leave of absence, 
has returned to the Carnegie Institute of Tech- 
nology where she is Dean of the Margaret 
Morrison School. ;*$ 

Ethel Walker has given up her school in 
Lakewood and is starting a new school in 
Simsbury, Connecticut. 

1895 

Frances Swift (Mrs. H. L. Tatnall), ex-'95, 
has a daughter born in May, 1917. 

Susan Fowler spent part of the summer in 
Randolph, N. Y., with Elva Lee, '93. 

A daughter of Anna West (Mrs. W. N.jjJL. 
West) is in the Class of 1921. 



1917] 



News from the Classes 



135 



1896 

Lisa Converse is principal of Lakewood Hall, 
a new school under the direction of a board 
of trustees. 

Nancy Foster Porter, a daughter of Ruth 
Furness (Mrs. J. F. Porter) is in the Class of 
1921. 

Lydia Boring has resigned from her position 
as teacher of history and Latin in the West 
Philadelphia High School for Girls, on account 
of ill health. 

Cora Baird (Mrs. H. S. Jeanes), ex-'96, con- 
ducted a tea-house on her farm near Devon 
during the first two weeks in October for the 
benefit of the Social Welfare Department of the 
Presbyterian Hospital in Philadelphia. 

1897 

Caroline Gait has leave of absence from 
Mount Holyoke College and is studying at 
Columbia University. 

Helen Hutchins Weist, daughter of Alice 
Cilley (Mrs. H. H. Weist), is a member of the 
Class of 1921. 

1899 

Secretary, Mrs. E. H. Waring, 325 Wash- 
ington Street, Glen Ridge, N. J. 

Mary Foulke (Mrs. J. W. Morrison) has a 
son, James Lord, born in April. Her two oldest 
sons, being too young to fight, have been 
farming. Mrs. Morrison is on the Executive 
Council of the Women's Board of Council of 
National Defense, Illinois Division. 

1901 

Eugenia Fowler (Mrs. Mahlon Neale) is liv- 
ing on a farm near Uniontown, Pa., where her 
husband is developing a new coal property. 
Her address is Brownsville, Pa., R. F. D. no. 1. 

1903 

Secretary, Mrs. H. K. Smith, Farmington, 
Conn. 

The present address of Marian Hickman (Mrs. 
Francesco Quattrone) is care of American Ex- 
press Co., 6 Haymarket, London, England. 

Elizabeth Sergeant sailed to France on Sep- 
tember 15 to study problems of reconstruction 
and to write about them for the New Republic 
and to do some other writing. 

Mary Ingham made the great sacrifice last 
summer of picketing the White House and of 
serving her term in the Occoquan Work-House, 
Va., for carrying a banner inscribed with a quo- 



tation from President Wilson. At a meeting at 
her house after her release from prison over 
$8000 was raised for the campaign of the Na- 
tional Woman's Party. She spent her short 
vacation in Randolph, N. H. 

1904 

Secretary, Emma O. Thompson, 213 South 50th 
Street, Philadelphia. 

Helen Amy (Mrs. George Macan), ex-'04, 
was visited this summer by Lucile Porter (Mrs. 
B. P. Weaver), '02, Fannie Brown, '03, and 
Julia Gardner, '05. 

Clara Woodruff (Mrs. Robert Hull) and her 
two boys are living at Augusta, Ga. Her hus- 
band, Captain Robert Hull, is stationed at 
Camp Hancock with the 13 th Pennsylvania 
Infantry. Her address is 2229 Walton Way, 
Augusta, Ga. 

Maria Albee (Mrs. Edward Uhl) is living at 
229 West Hortter Street, Germantown, for the 
winter. Her husband has been made civilian 
head of the small arms production at the Gov- 
ernment arsenal, Frankford. 

If anyone has any knowledge of the '04 Class 
Letter, will she please notify Emma Thompson? 

Eloise Tremain has leave of absence from the 
Philadelphia High School this year in order that 
she may act as principal of a school in Salt Lake 
City. 

Fanny Cochran camped in the Adirondack s 
last summer. 

1905 

Secretary, Mrs. C. M. Hardenbergh, 3824 
Warwick Boulevard, Kansas City, Mo. 

Catherine Utley (Mrs. George Edwin Hill), 
whose husband died last year, has sold her home 
in Bridgeport and is taking a graduate course in 
sociology at Bryn Mawr. 

Elma Loines, who is still doing scientific re- 
search work with her father and who is an ar- 
dent worker for suffrage, spent the summer at 
their cottage on Lake George. She has been 
"counsellor, publisher and agent" for the 
"Handbook of Labor Laws of New York" re- 
cently published. 

Margaret Bates has been teaching in St. 
Mary's College, Shanghai, since September, 
1916. 

Theodora Bates is teaching in Miss Shipley's 
School. 

Helen Qrifnth has a fellowship at Ann Arbor. 
She is studying for a Ph.D. Her subject is 
prose rhythm. 



136 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[November 



Margaret Thurston was married in August to 
Roscoe Holt. Mr. Holt is a lieutenant, until 
the war ends, on the battleship Virginia — the 
present naval base is Port Jefferson. 

Margaret Nichols (Mrs. C. M. Hardenbergh) 
has taken her brother's two small boys for the 
period of the war. 

Rachael Brewer has announced her engage- 
ment to Ellsworth Huntington of Milton. Mr. 
Huntington is a geographer. He lectures three 
months of each year at Yale and travels a great 
deal. 

Dr. Florence Child has gone to France to do 
Red Cross work. 

Louise Lewis, ex-'05, spent some time at 
Lake George last summer. 

Helen Read, ex-'05, spent the summer at 
Beach Haven, N. J. 

Anna Workman (Mrs. R. M. Stinson) was in 
Maine last summer. 

Daisy Wilson was at Howard Eaton's Camp, 
Wyo., last summer and took a trip through 
Glacier National Park on horseback. 

1906 

Alice Lauterbach was married on June 27 
to Roger Flint of Newtonville, Mass. 

Esther White writes from Buzuluk, Russia, 
on August 30, that with five others, including 
one Russian, she is doing reconstruction work in 
Poland. 

Josephine Katzenstein spent the month of 
August at Lake George. 

Olive Eddy was married in September to Clin- 
ton Arthur Carpenter of Chicago. 

1907 

Secretary, Mrs. R. E. Apthorp, care of Dr. 
C. H. Williams, Hampstead Hall, Charles River 
Road, Cambridge, Mass. 

Letitia Windle has been appointed warden of 
Radnor. 

Ellen Thayer is studying at Johns Hopkins, 
and is also teaching at the Roland Park Country 
School. 

Eunice Schenck is Acting Head of the French 
Department at Bryn Mawr. 

Margaret Ayer (Mrs. Cecil Barnes) has 
moved to Washington, where her husband is 
working on the Food Commission under Mr. 
Hoover. After reunion she motored from 
Washington to Chicago with Harriot and Leila 
Hough teling and Norvelle Brown, ex-'ll. 

Dr. Edward Beasley, husband of Calvert 
Myers, is a member of the Medical Reserve and 
sailed for England in August. 



Margaret Putnam (Mrs. Max Morse) has a 
third child, Daphne, born in May. 

Anna Haines has gone with a Friends' Unit 
to do reconstruction work in Russia. They left 
Philadelphia June 25, sailed from Vancouver to 
Japan, from there to Vladivostok, thence by 
trans-Siberian railroad, finally reaching their 
destination, Buzuluk, in Samara, a province of 
Southeastern Russia, about September 1. 
Esther White, '06, is in the party. 

Alice Hawkins spent a month on the Bryn 
Mawr Farm near West Chester last summer, 
learning much about producing and canning 
vegetables, as well as running the college truck 
around the country filled with students or tin 
cans. She is warden of Merion again this year. 

Mabel O'Sullivan has a fellowship in English 
at Bryn Mawr. 

Esther Apthrop (Mrs. R. E. Williams) is to 
spend the winter with her family as her husband 
has gone to France. 

Emma Sweet (Mrs. Lyman M. Tondel) has 
moved from Selleck, Wash., to 514 Olympic 
Place, Seattle, Wash. 

1908 

Secretary, Mrs. Dudley Montgomery, 115 
Langdon Street, Madison, Wis. 

Louise Congdon (Mrs. J. P. Balmer) has a 
daughter, Cynthia, born July 18, in Evanston. 

Margaret Copeland (Mrs. Nathaniel Blatch- 
ford) spent the summer at St. Joseph, Mich. 

Louise Hyman (Mrs. J. A. Pollak) has moved 
into her new home at 927 Redway Avenue, 
Cincinnati. 

Margaret Lewis was married in August to 
Lincoln MacVeagh, 2nd, at West Wrentham, 
Mass. 

Josephine Proudfit (Mrs. Dudley Montgom- 
ery) is now living at 115 Langdon Street. Her 
husband is a Captain in the Officers Reserve 
Corps. 

Margaret Vilas, ex-'08, spent the summer in 
Madison, Wis. She has been working for the 
Navy League in Chicago. 

Mary Case is now head of the kindergarten 
at the Warren Goddard House in East 34th 
Street. 

Nellie Seeds (Mrs. Scott Nearing) spent the 
summer at Chautauqua, and in September gave 
a lecture on socialism in the City Hall of 
Jamestown, N. Y. A local paper commented 
thus: "Mrs. Nearing's appeal, and it was a 
carefully worded one, was from the standpoint 



1917] 



News from the Classes 



137 



of what she named the 'potential motherhood' 
of the nation." 

Ruth Hammitt, ex-'08, has an article, "The 
Woman Ambulance Driver in France," in the 
Outlook for October 3, 1917. 

Adelaide Case is educational director at St. 
Faith's House, the school for deaconnesses and 
other church workers connected with the Cathe- 
dral of St. John the Divine. 

1909 

Secretary, Francis Browne, 15 East 10th 
Street, New York City. 

Helen Gilroy is at Vassar this year in the 
physics department. 

Aristine Munn Recht, M.D. is Dean of 
Women at New York University. 

Katherine Branson is assistant secretary at 
Miss Madeira's school, Washington, D. C. 

Mildred Satterlee, ex-'09, was married in 
August to Captain Dwight Wetmore of Roches- 
ter, N. Y. Alta Stevens and Bertha Ehlers 
were present at the wedding. 

Bertha Ehlers has taken Margaret Bontecou's 
place as warden of Denbigh. 

Mary Nearing and Bertha Ehlers each spent 
part of their summer working on the Bryn 
Mawr Farm. 

Mary Nearing also took an agricultural course 
at the University of Pennsylvania. She is war- 
den of Rockefeller again this winter. 

Shirley Putnam sailed for Paris on June 25. 
She has done some work with the Enfants de la 
Frontiere, also canteen work for prisoners and 
wounded soldiers. She and May Putnam are 
living in a small apartment in the Latin Quarter. 
Butter is 90 cents a pound and they are allowed 
a pound and half of sugar per person a month. 

Cynthia Wesson, who was one of the five 
official motor drivers for the American Fund for 
French Wounded, has left this Committee and 
has offered herself to the Y. M. C. A. for canteen 
work, which will probably take her towards the 
East, at an American base. 

Anna Piatt has been interne in the Johns 
Hopkins Hospital this summer. 

May Putnam is still serving as physician to 
the Enfants de la Frontiere with headquarters 
in Paris. 

Catherine Goodale (Mrs Rawson Warren) 
has come back to civilization! Her husband, 
Major Warren, was recalled from the Texas 
border this summer and stationed at Camp Dix, 
Wrightstown, N. J. Mrs. Warren has since 



been touring the East — much to the joy of her 
friends. 

Mary Ryan was married in June to Timothy 
Spillane, and will live in Philadelphia. 

1910 

Secretary, Mrs. H. B. Van Dyne, Troy, Pa. 

Dr. Dorothy Child and Dr. Florence Child, 
'05, have gone to France as members of the first 
medical unit for Child Welfare sent out by the 
Red Cross. 

Miriam Hedges has announced her engage- 
ment to Alexander Russell Smith of Lossie- 
mouth, Scotland. Mr. Smith is a representa- 
tive of the Chartered Bank of India, Australia, 
and China, and is at present stationed in Hong 
Kong, China. The wedding will take place in 
December. 

Susanne Allinson was married at Petrograd 
last summer to Mr. Henry C. Emery. Mr. and 
Mrs. Emery will live in Petrograd for the present. 

Constance Deming (Mrs. Willard Lewis), 
with her two children, spent the summer in the 
North. 

Margaret James was married in October 
and expects to live in San Francisco. 

Jeanne Kerr was married in July to Udo 
Fleischmann of New York. 

Margaret Shearer has announced her engage- 
ment to Jewell K. Smith, brother of Jane Smith. 

Janet Howell was married in July to Adam 
H. Clark. 

Zip Falk was married in September to Robert 
Szold of Washington, D. C. 

Mary Boyd Shipley has sailed for China, to 
teach in Ginling College, Nanking. Ginling 
College is a union missionary college for women 
established two years ago by a union committee 
of five mission boards. It aims to have as high 
a standard as the women's colleges in America, 
and all the foreign workers there are American 
college women. 

Irma Bixler (Mrs. E. P. Poste) has a daughter, 
born in August. 

1911 

Class Correspondent, Margaret J. Hobart, 
Sommariva, Easthampton, N. Y. 

Kate Chambers (Mrs. Laurens Seelye) has 
a daughter, Dorothea Chambers, born June 6. 
Mr. Seelye is at Allentown, Pa., in charge of the 
Y. M. C. A. work in the ambulance camp. 

Mary Taylor has a position in the Guaranty 
Trust Company, New York, and is living at 160 
Waverly Place. 



138 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[November 



Norvelle Brown, ex-'ll,is teaching music at 
Rosemary Hall, Greenwich, Conn. She ex- 
pects to spend her week ends in New York with 
her family. 

Louise Russell is teaching stenography and 
typewriting at one of the Brooklyn High Schools. 

Esther Cornell is playing in The 13th Chair in 
Chicago. 

David Goodnow, husband of Margery Smith, 
has enlisted. 

Charles Herschel McKnight, husband of 
Phyllis Rice, is stationed in New York City. 
Mrs. McKnight has come to New York to be 
with her husband. 

The Rev. Deane Edwards, husband of Mar- 
garet Dulles, ex-'ll, is in Washington doing 
war work. Mrs. Edwards is living at home 
with her family. 

1912 

Secretary, Mrs. J. A. MacDonald, 3227 
Pennsylvania Street, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Leonora Lucas has announced her engage- 
ment to Daniel Tomlinson. Mr. Tomlinson is 
a civil engineer, a graduate of the Massachu- 
setts School of Technology. At present he is 
attending the second officers' training camp at 
Fort Sheridan, 111. Miss Lucas and Mr. Tom- 
linson expect to be married in November. 

Gladys Spry is doing clerical work for the 
Council of National Defence in Chicago. 

Dorothy Wolff (Mrs. Paul Douglas) and her 
husband have moved to Portland, Ore., where 
Mr. Douglas has accepted an appointment in 
Reed College. 

Gertrude Llewellyn is working in the labora- 
tory of the Evanston Hospital, and is taking 
several courses at the University of Chicago. 

Catherine Terry (Mrs. W. N. Ross) has a 
son, Charles Terry, born July 14. 

Mary Morgan (Mrs. W. C. Haupt) will live 
in New York this winter, doing work in psychol- 
ogy at Columbia. 

Mary Peirce spent most of the summer in the 
Canadian Rockies. She is a member of the 
Junior War Council of the Philadelphia Y. W. 
C. A. 

Carmelita Chase (Mrs. S. Hinton) and her 
little daughter Jean spent the summer at Wood- 
stock, N. Y. 

Irma Shloss, ex-'12, is married to Eugene 
Mannheimer of Des Moines. 

Christine Hammer has accepted a position in 
a girls' school in Canton, China. 

Pearl Mitchell studied at the University of 
Pennsylvania last summer. 



1913 

Secretary, Nathalie Swift, 156 East 79th 
Street, New York City. 

Rosa Mabon was married on June 19 to Dr. 
Thomas K. Davis. Dr. Davis is at present 
with the New York Hospital unit in France. 

Katharine Williams has announced her en- 
gagement to Lieutenant Waldo Hodgedon of 
Dedham, Mass. 

Yvonne Stoddard was married late in October 
to Henry Hayes of New York. 

Louisa Haydock is doing relief work in France. 

Mary Sheldon spent the spring and summer 
in Santa Barbara, Cal. 

Alice Hearne was married on August 2 at 
Beach Haven, N. J., to Julius Rockwell of Taun- 
ton, Mass. 

Nathalie Swift has a position in the Circu- 
lating Department of the New York Public 
Library. 

Katherine Page (Mrs. C. G. Loring) has a 
daughter, Alice Page, born September 27. 

Adelaide Simpson is Dean of Women and 
Professor of Latin at Hillsdale College, Michi- 
gan. 

Gertrude Hinrichs has announced her en- 
gagement to Samuel King of Glen Ridge, N. J. 

Helen Evans, ex-'13, was married to Robert 
Lewis last June. 

Alice Patterson is head of the Latin depart- 
ment at the Agnes Irwin School. 

1914 

Secretary, Ida W. Pritchett, 22 East 91st 
Street, New York City. 

Alice Miller was married on July 7 to William 
Merrill Chester. Mr. and Mrs. Chester are 
now in France. 

Rose Brandon was married on July 19 to Ole 
Todderud. Mr. and Mrs. Todderud will live 
in Butler, Pa. 

Helen Shaw was married on August 6 to Wil- 
liam A. Crosby. 

Helen Hinde, ex-' 14, was married in July to 
John Andrews King. 

Elizabeth Colt has returned to America and 
is working in New York. 

Isabel Benedict is working at the National 
City Bank, New York, as secretary to the as- 
sistant chief clerk. 

Elizabeth Bryant is to be Dean Taft's secre- 
tary at Bryn Mawr. 

Anne White has announced her engagement 
to Lieutenant Paul Harper, U. S. A. 

Margaret Williams has announced her en- 



1917 



News from the Classes 



139 



gagement to Captain Ray Gilman, who is sta- 
tioned at Fort Totten in the Coast Artillery. 

1915 

Secretary, Katharine W. McCollin, Over- 
brook, Pa. 

(It would be very helpful if the members of 
1915 would send the Secretary any news of 
themselves. Very often "news" has to be left 
out because it has come vaguely through various 
ways from an unknown source, or it has been 
printed as an authentic bit of news and has been 
found afterwards to be inaccurate.) 

Hazel Barnett is teaching in Dallas, Texas. 

Margaret Bradway is teaching in Miss Hill's 
School at Ardmore. 

Laura Branson has returned to Rosemary 
Hall as teacher of mathematics. She has been 
made Head Teacher of the school this winter. 

Marguerite Darkow is teaching mathematics 
and physics at Rogers Hall, Lowell, Mass. 

Olga Erbsloh is Parole Officer to the Indus- 
trial State Training School for Girls at Middle- 
town, Conn. 

Isabel Foster was editor of the Berlin Re- 
porter of Berlin, N. H., during the summer.. 

Anne Hardon, who is nursing in Hospital 
Auxiliaire No. 43, St. Valery-en-Caux, writes 
to beg any members of 1915 who can write 
French at all to correspond with one or two 
French soldiers. She will furnish names of 
those who especially are in need of such friend- 
ship. Anyone who can do this and will, please 
communicate with K. W. McCollin, Overbrook, 
Pa. 

Frances MacDonald is secretary to the Presi- 
dent and Dean of Haverford College. 

Helen McFarland was married to Donald 
Eliot Woodbridge August 11. Mr. Woodbridge 
has joined the Aviation Corps. 

Emily Noyes is instructor in English at Bryn 
Mawr. She is living in Penygroes with Dean 
Taft. 

Dagmar Perkins lectured on the Psychology 
of the Drama at the Harvard summer school un- 
der the Department of Public Speaking. She 
was unusually successful as a great many New 
York and Boston newspapers testified. The 
Boston Sunday Herald of August 12 says: 

"Miss Perkins was the first woman to speak on 
this subject at Harvard, and, in fact, she is a 
pioneer in her chosen field. The lectures given 
before large and intensely interested audiences 
showed a freshness of viewpoint and a skill in 
observation altogether remarkable in so youth- 
ful a lecturer. 



"Miss Perkins has illustrated her lectures with 
a wealth of telling points gained in her own ob- 
servation, and she reveals, in giving these, not 
only the born psychologist, but the gifted ac- 
tress as well. Lecturers are common who, 
while lecturing on voice and speech, break 
every rule of speech and intonation, but Miss 
Perkins's manner and delivery prove an agree- 
able exception to this rule." 

She has also been asked by the Government 
at Washington to visit the different soldiers' 
camps and give programs of recitations, etc. 

Clarissa Smith is assisting Miss Theodora 
Butcher in the work of the Bureau of Occupa- 
tions for Trained Women of the Association of 
Collegiate Alumnae. 

Isabel Smith is at Bryn Mawr as a graduate 
student in geology. She has been appointed 
choir leader again. 

Sara Rozet Smith was married to Lieutenant 
Richard Sutton Buel of the United States Field 
Artillery in Chicago on August 15. 

Among those who worked on the Bryn Mawr 
Farm last summer were Elsie Stelzer, Helen 
Taft, and Helen McElree. 

Katherine Streett was married to Captain 
Henry Frederick Robb of Company G, Fifth 
Maryland Regiment, on September 4 in Cum- 
berland, Md. 

Ruth Tinker was married to Daniel Parmelee 
Morse, Jr., on June 17 at Stamford, Conn. Mr. 
Morse has joined the Aviation Corps and has 
sailed for France for further training. 

Julia Harrison, ex-' 15 has written some suc- 
cessful "movie" plays for the Clif Curtis Pub- 
lishing Company, of Buffalo, N. Y. 

Ruth McKelvey, ex-'15, is living in a settle- 
ment house in New York as a social worker. 

Vashti McCreery, ex-' 15, will receive the de- 
gree of A. B. at the University of Illinois next 
June. She is living in Champagne, 111., with 
Polly Vennum, '12. 

Lillian Mudge (Mrs. Casper Thompson), 
ex-'15, has a daughter, Barbara, born in March. 

Mildred Jacobs has been appointed demon- 
strator in the psychology laboratory at Bryn 
Mawr. 

Katharine McCollin is teaching history and 
English at the Haverford Friends' School. 

Katherine Snodgrass is a graduate student at 
Columbia. 

Mary Albertson and Mallory Webster are to 
teach this*year in the Homestead School, Hot 
Springs, Va. They and Mary Morgan, ex-' 15, 
spent part of the summer together. 



140 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[November 



Elizabeth Bailey, ex-' 15, was married at 
Eaglesmere in July to Lieutenant Henry Gross. 

Adrienne Kenyon was married in November 
to Benjamin Franklin of Germantown. Mr. 
Franklin is in the officers' training camp at 
Fort Oglethorpe, Tenn. 

1916 

Secretary, Adeline Werner, 1640 Broad 
Street, Columbus, Ohio. 

Frances Witherbee, ex-' 16, was married to 
Lieutenant Herman Kobbe in June. 

Elizabeth Holliday was married to Benjamin 
P. Hitz September 22. 

Louise Dillingham is now in Porto Rico as 
secretary to the president of the Guanica Cen- 
trale Sugar factory. 

Elizabeth Brakeley is doing graduate work at 
Columbia. 

Mary Branson is teaching at Rosemary Hall 
again this year. 

Agnes Smith is teaching mathematics at St. 
Timothy's, Catonsville, Md. 

Eleanor Hill has announced her engagement 
to Professor Rhys Carpenter of Bryn Mawr. 

Ruth Lautz is teaching in the Phebe Anna 
Thome Model School at Bryn Mawr. 

Anna Lee is teaching English in a Philadel- 
phia High School. 

Chloe McKeefrey, Kathryn Batchelder, Mar- 
garet Chase, Helen Tyson, Elizabeth Brakeley 
and Elizabeth Stark received M. A. degrees at 
Bryn Mawr in June. 

Helen Chase is an aid in Dr. Blake's hospital 
in Paris. 

Adeline Werner is teaching English in the 
Columbus School for Girls. 

Emilie Strauss sailed on October 13 for Porto 
Rico to teach in the American school at Ensen- 
ada. 

Constance Kellen and Frieda Kellogg have 
gone to France with a Red Cross surgical 
dressing unit. 

1917 

Margery Scattergood is going to France as a 
member of the American Friends' Reconstruc- 
tion Unit. 

Helen Harris is doing graduate work at Bryn 
Mawr and, as College Settlements Association 
Fellow, is living at the College Settlement in 
Philadelphia. 

Margaret HofT was married in June to Eric 



Zimmerman, professor of economics at Co- 
lumbia. 

Dorothy Shipley is secretary of the Civic 
Relief Branch of the Pennsylvania Committee 
of Public Safety. 

Elizabeth Granger is in Chicago acting as 
Director of Supplies of the American Fund for 
French Wounded for the West. 

Martha Willett is in charge of the babies' ward 
at the Norwood Hospital. 

Eleanor Dulles is in Paris doing relief work 
under Mrs. Shurtleff. 

Louise Collins is studying at Teachers Col- 
lege, Columbia. 

Mary Andrews was assistant bacteriologist 
at St. Luke's Hospital, New York, last summer. 

Mary Hodge is in Haiti as secretary to the 
president of the American Sugar Company. 

Virginia Litchfield is working in the Boston 
American Field Service office. 

Margaret Henderson is an automobile driver 
for the American Fund for French Wounded in 
Paris. 

Elizabeth Emerson is at the Johns Hopkins 
Medical School. 

Natalie McFaden has given up teaching this 
semester because of illness. 

Ex-1918 

Laura Pearson was married on September 12 
to Blanchard Pratt of Lowell, Mass. 

Olive Bain was married to Lieutenant Percy 
Kittle, U. S. R., on August 22 in St. Ambrose's 
Chapel of the Cathedral of St. John the Divine. 

Ella Lindley was married to Mr. Warburton 
of Minneapolis in September. 

Ex-1919 

Winifred Robb has announced her engage- 
ment to Lieutenant William Tibbett Powers of 
the Field Artillery, U. S. R. 

Vivian Turrish has announced her engage- 
ment to Myron Bunnell of Duluth, Minn. 

Martha Watriss is taking the special training 
course for nurses offered to college women at the 
Presbyterian Hospital in New York. 

Lucretia Peters and Marguerite Kranz are 
studying at Barnard. 

Ewing Adams was married in October to Ed- 
win Baker, a son of Professor Baker of Harvard. 

Ex-1920 

Miriam Ormsby has announced her engage- 
ment to Harold Workman of Chicago. 




:%W:%%¥:¥#^ 



RYN MAWR 
ALUMNAE 



QUARTERLY 



Vol. XI 



JANUARY, 1918 




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No. 4 



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&*1Wl6TaS0*»* 



Published by the Alumnae Association 

of ' 
Bryn Mawr College 



•:•: 






Entered at the Post Office, Baltimore, Md., as second class mail matter under the Act of July 16, 1899. 



THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE 
QUARTERLY 



Editor-in-Chief 

Elva Lee, '93 

Randolph, New York 

Campus Editor 

Mary Swift Rupert, '18 

Rockefeller Hall, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Advertising Manager 
Elizabeth Brakeley, '16 

Furnald Hall, Columbia University, New York City 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

War Work 141 

With the Alumnae 153 

News From the Campus 156 

The Clubs 159 

News from the Classes 160 

Literary Notes 166 



Contributions to the Quarterly, books for review, and subscriptions should be sent to 
the Editor-in-Chief, Elva Lee, Randolph, New York. Cheques should be drawn payable 
to Jane B. Haines, Cheltenham, Pa. The Quarterly is published in January, April, July, 
and November of each year. The price of subscription is one dollar a year, and single 
copies are sold for twenty-five cents each. Any failure to receive numbers of the Quar- 
terly should be reported promptly to the Editor. Changes of address should be reported 
to the Editor not later than the first day of each month of issue. News items may be 
sent to the Editors. 

Copyright 1018, by the Alumnae Association of Bryn Mawr College. 



THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE 
QUARTERLY 

VOLUME XI JANUARY, 1918 No. 4 

WAR WORK 

THE WAR COUNCIL OF BRYN the college community. Moreover, 



MAWR COLLEGE 

The War Council of Bryn Mawr Col- 
lege was formed in November, 1917. 
Previous to this time there had been no 
organization to centralize the war work 
of the college community. There was 
a committee under the Christian Asso- 
ciation, known as the a War Relief 
Committee," which was operating a 
Red Cross workshop, and raising money 
for various relief agencies. There was 
also a Liberty Loan Committee, formed 
under the direction of Mrs. William 
Roy Smith, appointed a captain by the 
Main Line Division. The Undergradu- 
ate Association was endeavoring to 
arouse interest in Food Conservation. 
In the summer the Bryn Mawr Farm, 
which was in reality a war garden, was 
operated by individuals. They had no 
especial organization, and no especial 
responsibility, except to those generous 
donors who gave the enterprise the 
necessary financial backing. The ques- 
tion of arranging for speakers, and for 
the dissemination of information on war 
subjects was unsolved. 

This was the situation in October, 
1917. It became evident, particularly 
in the discussion of the advisability of 
giving a May Day pageant this year, 
that, outside of academic work, war 
work was to be the central interest of 



there seemed to be many opportunities 
for service which the College might very 
well render, and which were not the 
responsibility of any existing organiza- 
tion. The need therefore, for some sort 
of a clearing house for all the war ac- 
tivities of the College became apparent. 
The Christian Association was not in- 
clusive in its membership. The other 
associations did not even offer mem- 
bership to three important groups, — 
faculty, staff, and alumnae. If the col- 
lege war work was to be a success it 
must be the fruit of the united efforts of 
all groups, and if the groups were to 
cooperate they must be represented in 
the body which was to govern and direct 
the work. 

The best method of forming such a 
clearing house, however, was not as ob- 
vious as the need of it, and the difficulty 
was not solved until the College as a 
whole became informed about the Wom- 
an's Committee of the Council of Na- 
tional Defense. This was largely 
through the kindness of Mrs. Ira. C. 
Wood, former Executive Secretary of the 
Woman's Committee. She explained 
to a small group representing the vari- 
ous associations, clubs, and their com- 
mittees, the working basis of the Com- 
mittee, — is brief, the formation in each 
locality of a branch whose members 
were the heads of all the existing organi- 



141 



142 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[January 



zations of the locality. Such a group 
could then coordinate all the activities 
of the community, and apportion the 
work so that there should be as little 
duplication as possible. In this way 
very little new machinery was created, 
existing organizations were strength- 
ened and used to the limit of their ca- 
pacity for service, and much useless 
effort was avoided. 

It was on this basis then, that the 
War Council was finally formed. After 
several preliminary meetings of a tem- 
porary council, and a joint meeting of 
the Graduate Club and the Undergradu- 
ate Association, the membership of 
the permanent Council was determined 
as follows: 

Two representatives from the Faculty. 

One representative from the Staff. 

Two representatives from the 
Alumnae. 

President of the Graduate Club. 

One other representative of the Grad- 
uate Club. 

President of the Christian Associa- 
tion. 

President of the Undergraduate Asso- 
ciation. 

President of the Self-Government 
Association. 

President of the Athletic Association. 

Editor-in-Chief of the College News. 

Presidents of the four undergraduate 
classes. 

The Council has no constitution and 
no by-laws. Its executive officers are a 
Chairman and a Secretary, who also 
acts as Treasurer. Every effort is 
made to avoid details of formal order 
which would take time, and interfere 
with the quickest handling of business. 

At its first meeting the Council ap- 
pointed the directors of seven executive 
departments, these departments corre- 
sponding to seven of the ten under the 



Woman's Committee of the Council of 
National Defense. The directors are 
ex officio members of the Council, and 
upon the advice of the Council carry on 
through their departments the war 
work of the College. The Depart- 
ments are as follows: 

I. DEPARTMENT OF REGISTRATION 

This department has already secured 
a very complete registration of students, 
and a fairly complete registration of 
faculty and staff. The intention is to 
keep the registration cards on file, and 
to use them as reference in answering 
the many calls for volunteer service 
which come to the college, both for the 
academic year, and for the summer. In 
this way the department hopes to co- 
operate with existing employment agen- 
cies and committees in placement work 
to meet war needs. 

II. DEPARTMENT OF FOOD PRODUCTION 

This department has been investigat- 
ing the possibility of operating the Bryn 
Mawr War Garden in the summer of 
1918. It seems more than probable 
that land nearer the college grounds will 
be available, which will make planting 
and transporting of crops much more 
feasible than they were last year. It 
also seems probable that financial sup- 
port will not be lacking, and the ques- 
tion of the labor, which is of course 
largely that of students, is now being 
thoroughly investigated. The depart- 
ment is also making careful determina- 
tions of plantings, costs, crops, etc., 
and if it is decided to operate the Gar- 
den, will make all the necessary arrange- 
ments, and plan the schedule of labor. 
It knows no reason why the enterprise 
should not be a greater success this year 
than last, particularly in producing at 
much less cost. 



1918] 



War Work 



143 



III. DEPARTMENT OF FOOD 
CONSERVATION 

This department has been collecting 
information on the subject of Food Con- 
servation, as advocated by the present 
Food Administration, and is endeavor- 
ing to disseminate the information 
through the college. It hopes to mould 
public opinion on the subject, and to see 
that the college menus are in as much 
accord as possible with the suggestions 
offered by the Food Administration. 

IV. DEPARTMENT OF MAINTENANCE OF 
EXISTING SOCIAL AGENCIES 

The work of this department is iden- 
tical with that of the Christian Associa- 
tion. It is essential that in the multi- 
plicity of war activities no community 
should neglect the peace time activities 
which are no less important in time of 
war. 

V. DEPARTMENT OF LIBERTY LOAN 

This department, which is the former 
independent Liberty Loan Committee, 
expects to continue the work which it 
started so successfully before it became 
connected with the War Council. It 
conducts the college campaigns for sub- 
scriptions to Liberty Loans which may 
be floated during the college year. The 
campaign for the Second Liberty Loan 
resulted in a total subscription rom 
those connected with the college of 
$197,200. The department is also con- 
ducting the sale of War Savings Stamps, 
and Thrift Certificates. 

VI. DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 

This department has two bureaus. 
The Bureau of Information and Public 
Speakers is to collect and make public 
war information of interest to the Col- 
lege, to arrange for visiting speakers on 



war subjects, and to act as a publicity 
agent for the War Council in coopera- 
tion with the Press Bureau of the Col- 
lege News. This bureau has planned a 
schedule of lectures, some of which 
have been given already, and has issued 
a bulletin of the organization and func- 
tion of the Council. 

The other bureau of the Department 
of Education is the Bureau of Public 
Speaking. The members of this bu- 
reau are the presidents of the various 
clubs in College, such as the History 
Club, the Suffrage Club, the English 
Club, etc. President Thomas has also 
consented to serve on this bureau in 
connection with her work in the Asso- 
ciation of Collegiate Alumnae. The in- 
tention is to train those interested in 
public speaking on war subjects, and to 
provide material for them. It is hoped 
that this will meet the need for speakers, 
preferably with college training, who 
will speak in public schools and other 
institutions throughout the country, 
and thus convey accurate information 
to those ignorant of the causes of the 
war and the conditions under which it 
is being fought. 

VII. DEPARTMENT OF RED CROSS AND 
ALLIED RELIEF 

This department consists of the War 
Relief Committee of the Christian Asso- 
ciation, released for service under the 
War Council, and enlarged in its mem- 
bership so as to represent all groups. It 
cooperates with the local chapter of the 
Red Cross, and operates a Red Cross 
workshop in Merion Hall, which is open 
rive evenings a week for the making of 
surgical dressings, and for the distribu- 
tion of wool for war knitting. So far it 
has conducted a canvass for its Red 
Cross and Relief work which netted 
$3,000. It has also conducted a cam- 



144 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[January 



paign for the Students' Friendship War 
Fund, which resulted in a total of $2700. 
It also investigated quite thoroughly the 
different possibilities for the central re- 
lief work of the College for the year, 
which it hoped may be carried on with 
the cooperation of the alumnae. The 
results of these investigations were made 
public at a mass meeting of faculty, 
staff, alumnae, graduate and undergrad- 
uate students, held under the auspices 
of the Council on December 3, 1917. 
At that meeting it was voted that the 
final decision as to the nature of the 
main object of the college war work 
should be made at another mass meet- 
ing to be held before Christmas. This 
meeting took place on Monday, Decem- 
ber 17, 1917. After reviewing the pos- 
sibilities of raising and maintaining a 
Y. M. C. A. Hut, or of equipping and 
maintaining a Unit for Reconstruction 
Work, it was the unanimous decision of 
the meeting to support a Bryn Mawr 
Service Corps. This Corps will not act 
as a unit in any one field of service, but 
will be composed of workers in various 
fields. The funds raised will be used to 
equip and maintain workers when and 
where they are needed. Investigations 
have been made as to the number of 
Bryn Mawr women already in the field 
abroad, who may constitute the nucleus 
of such a Corps, and investigations will 
also be made as to those trained in vari- 
ous branches of service who might de- 
sire to render it, and of the opportunities 
of placing such workers through organi- 
zations like the Red Cross, the Y. M. C. 
A., and the Friends Reconstruction 
Unit. 

From December 17, therefore, until 
the end of the year, all the money raised 
in the College by canvasses and other 
means, will contribute to the fund for 
the Service Corps. It is hoped that if 



the alumnae do not feel that they can 
cooperate as an association with the de- 
partment in this campaign, they will at 
least give it their support as individuals. 
Virginia Kneeland, 
Chairman of the War Council 

of Bryn Mawr College. 

WAR WORK OF BRYN MAWR 
COLLEGE 

The members of the Alumnae Asso- 
ciation who attended the annual meet- 
ing last February and the special meet- 
ing held in Bryn Mawr last June will 
remember the plans discussed at that 
meeting for sending a unit composed of 
Bryn Mawr alumnae and former stu- 
dents to France for reconstruction and 
war work. At that time the Smith 
College alumnae and students had raised 
the required sum of $30,000 and their 
unit of sixteen women has since then 
been established in France. Wellesley 
and Radcliffe Colleges have decided to 
send a unit jointly and it will probably 
sail very soon. At our meetings it was 
not deemed advisable to undertake the 
financing and assembling of a unit but 
motions were passed allowing the Di- 
rectors to consider any war work which 
might seem feasible for the Association 
to undertake. With the opening of the 
College this year and the organization 
in the college community of a Council 
for War Work, composed of representa- 
tives from the undergraduates, faculty, 
staff and alumnae, the suggestion of 
some general plan of war work to be un- 
dertaken jointly by the College and the 
alumnae has been definitely adopted 
and for a time the idea of sending a unit 
was again revived. 

At its meeting in New York in No- 
vember the Board of Directors of the 
Alumnae Association appointed a com- 



1918] 



War Work 



145 



mittee of three to cooperate with the 
War Council. This committee is com- 
posed of Miss Martha G. Thomas, Miss 
Dimon and myself. In looking up pos- 
sible lines of war relief work we were ad- 
vised through members of the Red 
Cross and the Friends Service Commit- 
tee that no more units were desired in 
the work in France at the present time. 
There are a large number of units al- 
ready working in France and the need 
now and in the immediate future is for 
individual workers with training and 
experience who can be placed where the 
need is greatest rather than for groups 
of people who by their organization are 
compelled to work in one locality. For 
this reason the War Council has sub- 
stituted for the unit originally planned 
the idea of a Bryn Mawr Service Corps. 
This Corps would consist of individual 
alumnae and former students of Bryn 
Mawr College who are able and willing 
to undertake war relief and reconstruc- 
tion work abroad and whose expenses, 
including salary and equipment, will be 
met from a special fund raised for this 
purpose. It has been estimated that 
the expenses of a worker in France at the 
present time vary from about $2000 to 
$3000. This amount tends to increase 
with the rapid rise in living expenses. 
To support a Service Corps of ten or 
fifteen people the College and Alumnae 
Association jointly should plan to raise 
a sum of from $30,000 to $50,000 yearly. 
The War Council hopes to raise $10,000 
this year among the members of the 
college community. The Alumnae 
Association would then be respon- 
sible for the additional funds needed. 
If the plan of a Service Corps is 
adopted it would be possible to send 
trained women workers not only to 
France but also to Italy, the Balkans, 
and possibly to Russia. The advan- 



tages of the Service Corps over the Unit 
are that it enables us with our small 
group of alumnae and former students 
to place anyone applying for service 
abroad in the position and in the coun- 
try where there is the greatest need and 
for which she can do the best work and 
we can use our funds as they come in 
without waiting to reach the definite 
sum of thirty thousand. It is a much 
more flexible form of organization and 
seems from every point of view to meet 
our own limitations and the real needs in 
the war work of the moment. 

Our Committee has made inquiries in 
regard to the possibility of working un- 
der or in cooperation with the general 
war relief organizations. The Friends 
Service Committee has very kindly ex- 
pressed its willingness to take any 
trained Bryn Mawr graduate whose ex- 
penses would be met and whose experi- 
ence would make her useful in their re- 
construction and relief work. They 
need especially doctors, nurses, and 
trained social workers. They have at 
present no place for untrained and in- 
experienced workers. The American 
Red Cross, through their national offi- 
cers in Washington, have expressed the 
greatest willingness to send members of 
our Service Corps out under their or- 
ganization. They will keep on file in 
their office the names of those who wish 
to work under the Red Cross and will 
allow us to make definite recommenda- 
tions for positions which are to be filled. 
When we have an experienced candidate 
to recommend, they will cable abroad to 
see if there is a position for her to fill 
and they will gladly send out under 
their auspices any Bryn Mawr women 
whose services may be requested by ca- 
ble from Europe. The Red Cross also 
desires doctors, nurses, experienced so- 
cial workers, teachers for the grades, 



146 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[January 



organisers and administrators. A candi- 
date must be in good physical condi- 
tion, able to endure hardship and must 
speak the language of the country to 
which she wishes to go. We shall also 
be able to establish a connection with 
other organizations such as the Ameri- 
can Fund for French Wounded, the Y. 
M. C. A. and others with which many of 
our alumnae are now working. 

In looking up the possibilities for 
service we are endeavoring to get in 
touch with the Bryn Mawr women al- 
ready working abroad. From the re- 
plies to the questionnaires sent out for 
the Register of Alumnae and Former 
Students and from information gathered 
personally from many people Miss Di- 
mon has compiled the following interest- 
ing list of Bryn Mawr women in Europe: 

American Red Cross 

TRANCE 

i\ Medical and Hospital Work 

Chase, Helen S., '16 — auxiliary nurse, Dr. 
Blake's Hospital, Paris; Cox, Dorothy H. ex- 
'14 — American Hospital Supplies Association; 
Hardon, Anne, '15 — Hospital Auxiliary, No. 
43 St. Valery-en-Caux, Normandy; Hoyt, 
Mary, '99 — nurses' aid at American Hospital, 
Neuilly; Kerr, Katharine, '07 — Nurse Unit of 
New York Presbyterian Hospital, summer 1917; 
Laws, Bertha M., '01 — Bureau of Tuberculosis, 
Paris; Miller, Alice, ex-'09 — ambulance driver 
and keeper of records for Dr. Baldwin's hospi- 
tal for children in the devastated district; also 
canteen work; Moore, Dorothea, '15 — labo- 
ratory technician in Amercan Red Cross 
Hospital, No. 2, in Paris; Putnam, Shirley, '09 — 
auxiliary nurse at the American Hospital, 
Neuilly; has also done canteen work and work 
for the Children of the Frontier; White, Amelia 
Elizabeth, '01 — hospital work. 

77. Surgical Dressings 

Brownell, Mary Gertrude, '15; Gardner, 
Mabel, '14; Kellen, Constance, '15; Kellogg, 
Fredrika, M., '16; Richards, Amelia, ex-' 18; 
White, Martha, '03 — Secretary of the Surgical 
Dressings Association. 



III. Canteen Work 

Bissell, Bessie G., '99; Egan, May, '11; 
Jenks, Mrs. Robert (Maud Lowrey), '00; 
Kilpatrick, Ellen, ex-'99; Tongue, Mary '12. 

IV. Child Welfare Unit 

Child, Florence, '05 — relief work among 
children; Child, Dorothy, '09 — physician; medi- 
cal relief work among children. 

V. L' Atelier Reunion Comite (under Mrs. 
Shurtleff) 

Bixler, Rena C, '14 — reconstruction work in 
Paris; Channing, Alice, ex-' 11 — war relief 
work; resigned position as District Secretary 
of the Boston Associated Charities to under- 
take work in France; Dulles, Eleanor L., '17 — 
relief work for civilians and soldiers; Sturde- 
vant, Mrs. E. W. (Louise Cruice), '06 — relief 
work. 

American Friends Service Committee 

North, Dorothy, '09 — relief work in Paris; 
Scattergood, Margaret, '17 — Reconstruction 
Unit with the American Expeditionary Forces. 

American Fund for French Wounded 

Ayer, Elizabeth, '14 — working in Paris; Car- 
rere, Anna Merven, '08; Chester, Mrs. William 
M. (Alice Miller), '14 — driving motor truck for 
hospital supplies; El wood, Catherine Prescott, 
'15 — Secretary for Mrs. Lathrop, President of 
Comite Americain pour les Blesses Francais. 
Mrs. Lathrop in a recent letter to the "Woman's 
Club" of Minneapolis thanked them for sup- 
plies sent and added "but the very best thing 
you have sent us is Catherine Elwood. We 
could not have gotten along without her; she is 
invaluable"; Henderson, Margaret I., '17 — 
relief work. 

Franco-American Committee for the Care of 
Children of the Frontier 

Cheney, Marjorie, ex-'03 — relief work under 
Dr. Putnam; Cross, Emily, '01 — relief work un- 
der Dr. Putnam; Putnam, May — physician; 
has her office in Paris and when necessary visits 
the children in their colonies which usually are 
housed in disused convents and chateaux in 
Brittany, Burgundy, and Touraine; Smith, 
Mrs. Joseph Lindon (Corinna Putnam), ex- 
'97 — has been twice in France to gather ma- 
terial for lectures on the work of the Committee. 



1918] 



War Work 



147 



Y. M. C. A. 

Ely, Gertrude, ex-'OO — member of the War 
Council and organiser for Y. M. C. A. Canteen 
Work in France; Haydock, Louisa Low, '13 — 
work at port of debarkation of American troops; 
also hospital work under Red Cross; Holliday, 
Mary, '09 — canteen work; Wesson, Cynthia, 
'09 — canteen work at an American base toward 
eastern France; during the summer drove a 
motor car for American Fund for French 
Wounded. 

Y. W. C. A. 

Morriss, Margaret S., Ph.D. — granted leave 
of absence from Mt. Holyoke to help establish 
the work of the i\ssociation in France. 

Other work 

Baldwin, Elizabeth F., '14— work with "La 
Roue" printing books for blind soldiers; surgi- 
cal dressings and relief work. Translating for 
'L'Orphelinat de la Guerre; 'Carvallo, Mrs. 
Joachim L. (Anne Coleman), '95 — gave her 
chateau for a hospital at the beginning of the 
war; Evans, Helene, ex-' 15 — in Paris as English 
secretary to Mr. Edward T. Devine, who is doing 
Red Cross Civilian Relief Work; Gibbons, Mrs. 
Herbert Adams (Helen Brown), ex-'06 — furnish- 
ing layettes for the children of soldiers at the 
front. Volunteer worker in American Sailors and 
Soldiers Club. Lecturer to American Soldiers; 
Sergeant, Elizabeth S., '03 — in France to study 
problems of reconstruction for the New Re- 
public; Watriss, Martha, ex-' 19 — relief work 
under Mrs. Duryea. 

Unspecified 

Airport, Harriet, '17 — relief work; Hapgood, 
Mrs. Norman (Elizabeth Reynolds), ex-' 14; 
Lounsbery, Grace E., '97; Scudder, Atala,'15; 
Kuttner, Anna, ex-' 15. 

ENGLAND 

Am erican Friends Service Committee 

Cadbury, Leah, '14 — Uffculme Hospital, 
Queens Bridge Road, King's Heath as nurse's 
aid. 

Other work 

Cam, Norah, '12 — assistant fitter in an aero- 
plane works; Douglas, Anabel, Hearer, 1889- 
'90 — on Central Bureau for the Employment of 
Women; Fletcher, Mrs. Henry M. (Ethel Par- 
r ish), '91 — member of Committee for Belgian 



Relief Work of Borough of Hammersmith; 
Longbottom, Gertrude Felton, 1897-98 — Secre- 
tary of the South Rural District, Women's War 
Agricultural Committee; and of the South 
United Methodists War Saving Association; 
Scott, Mrs. A. H. (Mildred Minturn), '97— 
member of the Kensington War Pensions Com- 
mittee, Kensington Union of Democratic Con- 
trol, and London Federation Committee of the 
Union of Democratic Control. 

RUSSIA 

American Friends Service Committee 

Haines, Anna Jones, '07 — relief work in Buzu- 
luk, Russia; on 15 months' leave of absence 
from position as Inspector in Division of Hous- 
ing and Sanitation, Philadelphia; White, Esther, 
'05 — relief work among the refugees in Buzuluk. 

Unspecified 

Emery, Mrs. Henry C. (Susanne Allinson), 
'10; Korff, Baroness Serge A. (Aletta Van Rey- 
pen), '00. 

ITALY 

Frank, Mrs. Tenney, Graduate — nurse and 
head of ward in hospital for soldiers, Rome, 
May-August, 1917. 

Neutral Countries 

switzerland 

Y. M. C. A. 

Clark, Elizabeth M., ex-'94 — relief work un- 
der International Y. M. C. A. 

Unspecified 

Erismann, Camille. 

SPAIN 

Unspecified 

Gould, Alice, '89 — Espionage Department of 
the American Embassy in Madrid. 

Summary 

Working in France 54 

Working in England 6 

Working in Russia 4 

Working in Italy 1 

Working in Switzerland 2 

Working Jn Spain 1 

Total 68 



148 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[January 



Miss Dimon will be very glad to have 
any additional information. If you 
know of anyone else doing war work 
abroad will you kindly send (to Miss 
A. C. Dimon, Bryn Mawr College) her 
name and address and the work which 
she is doing. We have taken it for 
granted that all Bryn Mawr graduates 
resident in Europe at this time would be 
doing some kind of war work even 
though unspecified. Miss Dimon will 
also be glad to receive the names of 
those who are interested in serving in a 
possible Bryn Mawr Service Corps. 

In raising the fund for a Service Corps, 
if it is decided upon, we have thought 
that there might be applicants for the 
work who could defray their own ex- 
penses in part or almost wholly. The 
amount which they could contribute to 
their own maintenance could then be 
counted as their contribution to the 
Service Corps Fund. 

The question of adopting a Service 
Corps Fund as their War Relief Work for 
the winter or (another suggestion) of 
raising a fund of $30,000 for the support 
of a Y. M. C. A. Hut at the front to be 
called the Bryn Mawr Hut will be de- 
cided upon at a mass meeting called by 
the War Council for Monday, Dec. 17. 
The Alumnae Association will be asked 
to cooperate in whatever work is under- 
taken and will discuss the matter at its 
meeting in February. 

In gathering information in regard to 
Bryn Mawr women working abroad 
Miss Dimon has also collected the fol- 
lowing interesting information in re- 
gard to Bryn Mawr women in War Work 
at home: 

Government Appointments 

E. R. Fries, '04 — temporary clerk in depot of 
the Quartermaster's Corps, Philadelphia — U. S. 
Army: marking and grading examination papers 
of Reserve Officers in Q. M. C; H. Smith 



Brown, '06 — physician, lecturer on Social Hy- 
giene for the Committee on Camp Activities; 
M. Maynard, '08 — clerk at an embarcation 
camp now under construction; M. Free, '15 — 
assistant to Committee on Classification of 
Personnel in the Army; F. Bradley, '16 — 
French translator in the War College; C. M. 
Simpson, ex-'15 — yeoman, first class, U. S. N. 
R. F., Censor's Office, May 1917-October. At 
present on indefinite furlough subject to recall; 
H. Alexander, ex-' 18 — yeoman, censor of cable- 
grams; E. C. Pugh, '16 — motor messenger; E. 
C. Russell, '17, motor messenger. 

Food Administration and Conservation 

I. E. Lord, graduate — member of the Advi- 
sory Committee U. S. Food Administration, 
also of the Mayor's Committee on Food, New 
York City; F. Wardwell, ex-'98 — member of the 
Food Administration; R. Wallerstein, '14 — 
clerk in the U. S. Food Administration; M. 
Foulke Morrison, '99 — speaker in Illinois; J. 
Carejr, ex-'89 — 1st lieutenant Hoover Food 
Conservation Army. 

State and Local Work: K. Middendorf 
Blackwell, ex-'99; E. Warkentin Alden, ex-'OO; 
E. Loines, '05; M. K. List Chalfant, '08; T. 
Belding, ex-' 13; J. McBride Walsh, '00; M. 
Kilpatrick, '00; M. B. Breed, '94. 

Liberty Loan 

{State and Local Work) 

K. Middendorf Blackwell, ex-'99; E. Richard- 
son Porter, graduate; H. B. Lyon, ex-'OO; G. 
Elcock, '12; J. Brownell, '93*; E. Lee, '93; T. F. 
Hooker, '06; J. Hartshorn Hack, ex-'02; M. 
Foulke Morrison, '99; E. Fogg Mead, graduate; 
E. Dessau, '15; M. Parris Smith, '01. 

War Exemption Board Assistants 

C. L. Nagel, ex-' 13; L. Lewis, ex-'05; E. L. 
Porter, '16. 

Work in Connection with Training Camps 

H. Runyon Winfrey, ex-'12; M. Southgate 
Brewster, '01; F. Stewart Rhodes, ex-' 10; H. C. 
Bowerman, Ph.D.; E. Bailey Gross, ex-'15 — 
hostess. 

Farming and Canning 

E. Loines, '05; A. M. Price, '03; C. Archer 
'98; A. E. Van Horn, '16; I. Knauth Dunbar, ex- 






1918] 



War Work 



149 



'17; E. Hubbard Johnston, '03; R. Danielson, 
'05; M. Parris Smith, '01; A. M. Hawkins, '07; 
B. S. Ehlers, '09; M. F. Nearing, '09; L. Watson, 
'12; H. H. Taft, '15. 

Preparation for relief work 

First Aid, Home Nursing and Short Hospital 
Courses 

I. Goodnow Gillett, ex-'09; E. Hardin, gradu- 
ate; H. N. Harrington, ex-'08; H. Carroll, 
ex-'17; L. Bartlett Stoddard, ex-'05; J. Ranlet 
Swift, ex-'17; I. Peters, '04; S. Palmer Baxter, 
'04; C. R. Nash, ex-'14; B. Mitchell Hailey, ex- 
'12; E. Y. Maguire, '13; F. Hatton Kelton, '15; 
M. Thurston Holt, '05; H. A. Wilson, '03; I. 
Knauth Dunbar, ex-'17; E. Downs Evans, ex- 
15; E. Jackson Comey, '14; M. M. Harden- 
bergh, '05; G. Pray, ex-'15. 

Automobile Mechanics Course 
E. Palmer Baxter, '04. 

Working Under National Organizations 

Council of National Defense: P. D. Goldmark, 
'96, Secretary of Committee on Women in 
Industry; J. C. Goldmark, '98, member of 
Committee on the Study of Industrial Fatigue; 
A. P. Gannett, '98, member of the Ohio State 
Committee on Women and Children in Industry. 

. Women's Committee Council of National 
Defense 

M. S. Scott, '11— in Publicity Department- 
Headquarters, Washington; A. Walker Field, 
'11, executive secretary of the Department of 
Women in Industry. 

State and Local Work 

L. Norcross Lucas, '00; H. Lovell Million, 
graduate; M. Ayer Barnes, '07; I. Foster, '15; 
K. Tibbals, graduate; H. M. Barnett, ex-'16; 
M. Stewart Dietrich, '03; E. James Smith Put- 
nam, '89; B. W. Seely Dunlop, '05; S. M. San- 
borne Weaver, '08; B. H. Putnam, '93; D. 
Packard, '16; M. N. Hardenbergh, '05; M. 
McEwen Schmitz, '05; M. Foulke Morrison, '99; 
E. Fischel Gellhorn, '00; G. Dietrich Smith, '03; 
R. Danielson, '05; M. T. Corwin, '12; H. Calder 
Wallower, ex-'03; E. Biglow Barber, '06; H. 
Waldron Wells, ex-'06; E. L. Richardson, '11; 
G. Spry, '12; E. Fogg Mead, graduate; M. L. 
Cady, graduate; M. B. Breed, '94. 



American Red Cross 



Local Officers 



G. Dietrich Smith, '03; J. P. Pelton, '01, C. 

A. Marsh, ex-'97; C. Baird Jeanes, ex-'97; J. 
Niles McClellan, '14; M. Githens Calvert, '98; 

E. de Koven Hudson, ex-'06; M. Wood Chesnutt, 
09; R. Williams, '00; R. Vickery Holmes, ex- 
11; C. Vail Brooks, '97; C. B. Thompson, ex- 
13; F. Rush Crawford, '01; M. Murray Eiken- 
berry, graduate; J. Holman Boross, ex-'96; C. 
Halsey Kellogg, '00; E. Lake Hailey, hearer; E. 

B. Daw, Ph.D.; K. Curtis Price, '04; E. Lee, '93; 
M. Crawford Dudley, '96; M. E. Converse, '98; 
S. K. Thompson, ex-'OO; P. Witherspoon, ex- '05; 

F. Wood Winship, ex-'ll. 

Secretaries 

K. R. Schmidt, ex-'13; M. Southgate Brews- 
ter, '01; H. Magee Hinkle, hearer; A. King, 
'08; M. G. Fiske, ex-'19; C. Crowell, '16; V. 
Bresnehen, graduate; E. Atkins Davis, '93; P. 

C. Winslow, '03; M. V. Smith, ex-'18; M. B. 
Macintosh, graduate; E. G. Llewellyn, '02; A. 
Leffingwell McKenzie, '97; V. Daddow, ex-' 13; 
B. E. Cole, ex-'12; L. H. Fry, '04; H. K. Bryan 
McGoodwin, '08;A. C. Whitney, '09. 

Chairmen of Committees 

E. Linburg Tobin, '96; C. Colton Worthing- 
ton, ex-'96; A. Buzby Palmer, ex-'04; M. Sickle 
Limburg, ex-'OO; S. Powell Fordyce, ex-'99; M. 

D. Jarman, graduate. 

Workers under the Organization 

H. Runyon Winfrey, ex-' 12; K. Middendorf 
Blackwell, ex-'99; M. Miller Buckminster, ex- 
98; M. C. Moore, '09; R. Morice Pooley, '99 

E. W. Kelley, '16; V. Hardin, graduate; H. N 
Harrington, ex-'08; R. Furman Collins, '95; J 
Q. Davidson, ex-'Ol; E. Cantlin Buckley, '01 
1. Bringardner, graduate; M. M. Blanchard, '89 
J. Brandeis, ex-' 16; E. Warkentin Alden, ex-'OO 
H. S. Sheldon, '15; E. T. Shaefer Castle, '08 
J. Ranlet Smith, ex-' 17; H. M. Ramsey, '11; J 
ProUdfit Montgomery, '08; A. Phillips Boiling 
ex-'03; F. Hearne Brown, '10; F. Capel Schmitt 
14; C. Brown, '14; H. Woods Hunt, ex-'04; S 
M. Sanborne Weaver, '08; A. Patten Wilder 
ex-'14. 

Red Cross Work in Colleges and Institutions 

E. Winsor Pearson, '92, Massachusetts Insti- 
tute of Technology; E. H. Johnston, '12, Sweet 



150 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[January 



Briar College; F. Lowater, graduate, Wellesley 
College. 

Red Cross Work in Schools 

J. Beardwood, '12; R. Glenn, '15; F. M. 
Glenn, '12; M. Minor, '94; A. A. Boyer, '99. 

Instructors and Inspectors in Workrooms and 
Classes and Organisers 

E. P. Caldwell Marsh, graduate — speaker 
and organiser; E. S. Hoffheimer, ex-' 10 — As- 
sistant in Educational Department of Surgical 
Dressings; C. B. Thompson, ex-'13; R. Strong 
Strong, ex-'03; K. D. Hull, '03; E. C. Holliday, 
'16, Instructors; A. Sachs Plaut, '08 — inspector 
and organiser; H. Vaille Bouck, ex-02 — lecturer. 

National League for Women's Service 

M. Southgate Brewster, '01; J. P. Pelton, '01; 
S. Reynolds Wakeman, graduate; D. W. Lyon 
Bryant, graduate — Commandant Overseas Unit, 
Plattsburgh; C. A. Marsh, ex-'97; A. Sussman 
Steinhart, '02; G. Pray, ex-' 15; C. Baird Jeanes, 
ex-'96; E. B. Wright, '00. 

Y. W. C. A. 

M. Pierce, '12; A. Kellogg, Ph.D.; S. F. At- 
kins Kackley, '94; C. I. Crane, '02; A. Patten 
Wilder, ex-'14; C. Utley Hill, '07; M. L. Cady, 
graduate. 

National Security League 

B. H. Putnam, '93 — speaker. 

American Fund for French Wounded 

E. Dessau, '15; M. F. Case Pevear, ex-'ll; 
E. Granger, '17; M. Wright Walsh, '91— by 
means of cake and flower sales in the summer 
raised $1200 for the purchase of anesthetics. 

National Civic League 

D. Dalzell, '08. 

Relief Work for the Children of the Frontier 

E. Edwards, '01. 

Individual Work 

M. Christie Nute, ex-'04— giving addresses 
in behalf of the sufferers in Asia Minor; I. 
Pritchett, '14 — Assistant in the research work 
at the Rockfeller Institute which resulted in the 



discovery of the anti- toxin for gas-gangrene; 
L. Otis, ex-' 17 — Chemist in the Arco Company 
Cleveland, O. doing research work in paints 
and varnishes, taking the place of a man called 
to the army; G. Jones Markle, '13 — Attending 
to the correspondence and office work of her hus- 
band, vice-president of the Markle Bank, dur- 
ing his absence in the army; M. L. Hickman, 
'16 — running a restaurant in Louisville for the 
benefit of the Red Cross; C. Chase Hinton, 
'12 — Play-supervisor for a group of 15-20 chil- 
dren after school hours and for a tramp on 
Saturday. Fifty cents per day per child and 
one half goes to the Red Cross; A. Gerstenberg, 
ex-'07 — Volunteer work for Women's League to 
provide entertainment for the Naval Station; 
E. Little Aldrich, '05 — Member of the Commit- 
tee for Organising Homes and Clubhouses near 
army camp-sites, Boston Branch A. C. A.;E. 
Bliss, '04 — Assistant Secretary Women's Com- 
mittee for Engineer Soldiers. 

Fellowship of Reconciliation 
M. H. Shearman, '95. 

American Friends Service Committee 

H. Clothier Hull, graduate; E. Donchian, '17. 
A. G. Walton, '09. 

Emergency Aid 
S. F. Van Kirk, '94. 

American Field Service 
V. Litchfield, '17. 

War Service Committee of the Woman's 
Suffrage 

C. McCormick Slade, ex-'95. 

State Organizations 

New York State Census 

H. Hardenbergh, ex-'lO; H. Geer, graduate; 
A. D. Simpson, '13; A. M. Newton, '05. 

New York City — Mayor's Committee for National 
Defense 

F. Fincke Hand, '97; K. Ely Tiffany, '97; C. 
McCormick Slade, ex-'96. 

Pennsylvania Committee of Public Safety 

D. Shipley, '17 — Secretary. 



1918] 



War Work 



151 



Virginia Slate War Council 
H. Henderson Green, '11. 

National Service Committee of the Bryn Mawr 
Alumnae of New York City 

F. Arnold, ex-'97; E. Pettit Borie, '95; L. 
Fleischman, '06; J. Langdon Loomis, ex-'95; F. 
King, ex-'96; M. Murray, '13; E. Rapallo, 
15; F. Browne, '09. 

Miss Dimon has also collected some 
war information in regard to husbands. 

Some Occupations of Husbands 

Assistant Secretary of State, Head of South- 
ern Department of the National Food Adminis- 
tration, Food Administrator, Executive Secre- 
tary Richmond Commission on Training Camp 
Activities under the War Department, Foreign 
Representative of Guaranty Trust Co. in 
Russia, Manager of American Prisoners Relief, 
Inspector of Air planes and Airplane Engines; 
Camp Manager, Y. M. C. A., Aeronautical 
Mechanical Engineer U. S. A., Censor, Bureau 
of Investigation, Department of Justice. 

In the Army and Navy 

1 Surgeon, 9 Medical Officers Reserve Corps, 
2 Lieutenant Colonels, 1 Colonel, 3 Majors, 11 
Captains, 18 Lieutenants, 1 Lieutenant Com- 
mander, 1 Ensign, 4 in the Army rank un- 
specified, 1 Ambulance Service, 1 Hospital 
Service. 

Alumna with Son in War Service 

M. Wright Walsh, '91 — eldest son in Ameri- 
can Ambulance Field Service. 

War Council of Bryn Mawr College 

E. Orlady, '02— for the staff; M. Parris Smith, 
01 — Director of the Liberty Loan Department; 
M. G. Thomas, '89— Director of Food Con- 
servation; A. C. Dimon, '96 — Secretary; B. S. 
Ehlers, '09; — Director of Food Production. 

These statistics are naturally very in- 
complete, but they give some idea of the 
different lines of work with which Bryn 
Mawr women are connected. 

Marion Reilly. 



LETTERS 

Extracts from letters from Dr. Dorothy Child, 
1910, who with her sister, Dr. Florence Child, 
is working in a Pediatric Unit under the Chil- 
dren's Bureau of the American Red Cross. 

On Board S. S. Chicago, 

October 20, 1917. 

The trip is just about as we imagined it. 
The plan of practicing French on each other is 
easy to carry out because practically every 
body is doing it. The employees speak only 
French, and the rest of us try to follow their ex- 
ample. We have a daily class in French con- 
versation, led by a Mrs. Rogers, who is on her 
way over with her h,usband to do canteen work. 

There are about six different sets of people 
going this time — our pediatrics unit with seven 
women doctors, nine or ten men, and fifteen 
nurses; then the Y. M. C. A. sends canteen 
workers to feed and entertain the men in the 
camps and in the trenches. Some men are go- 
ing to drive ambulances, about thirty or forty 
are going to drive Red Cross supply trucks, and 
some women go to open day nurseries for the 
babies of munition workers; a band of mis- 
sionaries is returning to Africa; some recon- 
struction workers are being sent by the French 
War Relief Society, and one girl is sent by the 
Friends. There are a few French officers re- 
turning after recovering from wounds, one 
aviator, an American, Miss Winifred Holt, who 
has founded "Light Houses "for blind soldiers, 
a violinist from California, an opera singer, some 
ladies to do lab. work in Red Cross Hospitals, 
some to do secretarial work for a students' re- 
lief society in Paris, a Belgian, an Armenian, 
two Chinese, a Russian, an Alsatian, an orien- 
tal lapidist, a mother of one of the little secre- 
taries, who is going "to write articles for her 
husband's paper" (and really to take care of 
little Sec). There is one "lady doctor," who 
is only twenty-three and is a dentist. She is 
very pretty and cute, but doesn't try to speak 
French. She says all she will have to know is 
"open your mouth," and "the words for that 
are something like 'over the bush.' " All of the 
doctors are pleasant with us. We have dis- 
covered only one besides Dr. Knox that called 
himself or herself a baby specialist before this 
fall. 

Hotel dTena, Ave. d'lena, Paris, 

October 30, '17. 

We just 'heard that we are to be stationed at 
Evian, on Lake Geneva. It is the receiving 



152 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[January 



station for all the refugees from the devastated 
regions, and from what we hear there will be 
nearly a thousand new-comers to handle and 
examine every day. We will live in the hospi- 
tal, and every month or two we are to come 
back to Paris to meet the other workers and 
department heads, and discuss plans and ex- 
periences. Of course we don't know much yet 
about details. We leave here in about five 
days. 

Yesterday F. had a chance to give up her 
seat to a "mutile," a French soldier on crutches. 
The streets seem full of wounded men at times. 
Today we saw one that lost one hand, had only 
one finger left on the other, had had something 
patched up to make a lower jaw, and had ban- 
dages over both eyes. 

Some of the doctors in our unit are being 
sent to danger zones, where air craft and shells 
of all sorts axe in evidence. Our situation will 
be entirely safe and perhaps very tame in com- 
parison; but it will afford us plenty of good 
hard work, and as I understand it, we'll have 
the Alps to look at. 

Hotel Chatelet, 
Croix Rouge Americaine, 
Evian-les-Bains, 

Haute Savoie, France, 
November 8, '17. 

We have arrived safely and are sure now that 
we'll have a splendid time. It will take years 
to describe the beauties of this place where we 
have been installed. The work is the most in- 
teresting, as we take care of the refugees from 
the border (called Rapatries). 

The Red Cross has taken this estate, which 
consists of a large hotel and a number of villas 
built on a hillside. F. and I have a large room 
with a fireplace, and a smaller dressing-room. 
From our beds we can look out over Lake 
Geneva on the north, and the snow-capped 
Alps on the east. There is not any "central" 
heat in our rooms but plenty of wood for the 
fire-place. As it has been a very fine hotel in a 
fashionable watering-place, you can imagine the 
furnishings and woodwork are lovely. Isn't it 
funny that just as we were leaving Paris we 
found that May Putnam was to come with us! 
She had been working with refugee children in 
and about Paris and was asked to come down 
here. The trip on the train was interesting. 
Nobody has a sleeper; we are obliged to sit up 



all night. As you can imagine, in this part of 
the land we met dozens of trainloads of the 
blessed Poiliis going southward. 

Watch the magazines and newspapers and I'm 
sure you'll read about the things we are doing, 
because it is unique. Imagine two trainloads 
(1000 each) a day of old people and children 
entering the town, all of whom have been driven 
from their homes by the war. This children's 
hospital, if it could be developed, might be the 
greatest one in the world. 

Hopital Pour Enfants, A. R. C. 
Evian, H. S., November 11, '17. 
This is certainly a lovely place, and as soon 
as we get used to the European way of un- 
heated houses we'll be very comfortable. Last 
night it was windy and the little waves of the 
lake, dashing against the shore, sounded like 
the roar of the ocean, as we went to sleep. 

F.'s service is like a resident in our hospitals. 
She has one set of sick children in the main 
house and another in the measles house. I have 
morning and afternoon hours for dispensary pa- 
tients. A little house connecting with the gar- 
age and linen rooms is being fitted up for the 
permanent dispensary, but it is not finished 
yet. We are to have a waiting room, a dentist 
room, and two examination rooms for me. At 
present the clinic is in the main building, which 
makes more interruptions than you care for. 

I am afraid May Putnam is going to leave. 
They have given her a job that doesn't suit her 
because there isn't enough to do. Naturally, 
the hospital is not full, because it is only two 
weeks old, but I feel sure there will be enough 
for all to do when we get into full swing. 

Dr. Knox stays in Paris, helping the adminis- 
tration of the Children's Bureau and if Dr. 
Lucas goes home, Dr. Knox will probably be 
the head. 

The other women of the unit are most of 
them still in Paris learning French. We are 
glad to be chosen to begin work. We find we 
can make ourselves understood fairly well and 
are learning new words every day. 

It is likely we'll have a month's leave from 
Dec. 15 to Jan. 15, and we may either spend it 
in Paris or seeing some of the other relief work 
that is being done. The reason for our vaca- 
tion is that the convoys stop coming for a 
month. May Putnam has told me of a number 
of public health things that I'd like to see if op- 
portunity offers and I get my salary 






1918] 



With the Alumnae 



153 



Ilopital Pour Enfants, 
Evian, H. S. 

November 16, '17. 

I am waiting for my morning clinic to arrive. 
The patients are strangers in town and they all 
meet at one place and are brought up by a 
French Red Cross nurse. These French women 
are very interesting persons, the most tireless 
workers, and they have wonderful stories to tell. 
I have already seen a lot of sweet babies that 
would like Grandma Child to take care of 
them, and before we are through there will be 
thousands more. 

Our hospital grows every day. We are still 
very, very short on special equipment, espe- 
cially drugs like iodine, alcohol, ether, etc. If 
you would believe it, the whole works is rely- 
ing for instruments on the little pocket case 
that S. and E. gave me for Commencement. 
Two days later. 

We are having lots of fun and considerable 
work, re-organizing the hospital after a number 
of doctors have left. It is the most interesting 
thing ever! The thing we are best equipped to 
have is a place for measles and whooping cough 
and mumps, so that's what we are to have. 
Will tell you more when we begin to see how it 
works out. 

D. 

AGRICULTURAL WORK FOR WOxMEN 

Dean Helen Taft spoke at the Women's Uni- 
versity Club of New York City, on Monday, 
December 10, at a meeting held by the National 
Service Committee of the Club to discuss the 
needs and conditions relating to the problem of 
women's agricultural work in the near future. 
President McCracken of Vassar told of the Vas- 
sar experiment last summer and Dean Taft 
told of the work on the Bryn Mawr farm. Two 
student farmers, one from Barnard and one 
from Vassar, gave detailed experiences of the 
work. 



Miss Stevens of Barnard had spent the sum- 
mer at Bedford, N. Y., working in the unit of 
women farmers which Miss Ida Ogilvie managed 
so successfully. There were sixty women in 
this unit, mostly college students and clerks 
and stenographers. Despite their inexperi- 
ence they won the respect of the farmers after 
two or three weeks of work and were regularly 
employed all summer, at the rate of $2.00 a day, 
by the farmers throughout the region, having 
more demands for workers than they could 
meet. 

The Vassar Farm and, of course, the Bryn 
Mawr Farm gave reiterated examples of the 
fact that the girls were able to do the work of 
the men admirably. Both Dean Taft and Presi- 
dent McCracken stressed the necessity for 
arousing the interest of the country at large in 
the fact that women not only could but must 
lend their strength to the task of Food Produc- 
tion in the next few years. They brought out 
the point that the college undergraduate is the 
one eminently fitted to do such work through 
her strength and enthusiasm and the vigor of 
spirit which she brings to the task. 

Miss Carey of the Land Commission of Eng- 
land spoke of the experience which English 
women had had in the agricultural field and 
said that she had been urged by her country- 
women to awaken the women of America to the 
great necessity of taking up agricultural work. 
It is Food that will win the war, they feel, and 
without it the cause of the Allies is lost. 

This meeting marks the beginning of a cam- 
paign which the National Service Committee of 
the Women's University Club is inaugurating 
with the purpose of interesting colleges and col- 
lege women everywhere in this great movement. 
It asks them to help win the cooperation of 
women everywhere and to be ready next sum- 
mer to give themselves to this much needed 
work. 

Frances Browne, 1909. 



WITH THE ALUMNAE 



OFFICERS 
1916-1918 

President, Cornelia Halsey Kellogg (Mrs. 
Frederic Rogers Kellogg), '00, Morris- 
town, N. J. 

Vice President, Mary Richardson Walcott 
(Mrs. Robert Walcott), '06, 152 Brattle 
Street, Cambridge, Mass. 



Recording Secretary, Louise Congdon Fran- 
cis (Mrs. Richard Standish Francis), '00, 
Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Corresponding Secretary, Abigail Camp Di- 
mon, '96, 367 Genesee Street, Utica, N. Y. 

Treasurer, Jane Bowne Haines, '91, Chel- 
tenham, Pa. 



154 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[January 



ALUMNAE MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 
OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

Elizabeth B. Kirkbrede, '96, 1406 Spruce 
Street, Philadelphia. 

Elizabeth Nields Bancroft, '98 (Mrs. 
Wilfred Bancroft), Slatersville, R. I. 

ACADEMIC COMMITTEE 

Pauline Goldmark, Chairman, 270 West 
94th Street, New York City. 

Esther Lowenthal, Smith College, North- 
ampton, Mass. 

Elizabeth Shepley Sergeant, 4 Hawthorn 
Road, Brookline, Mass. 

Helen Emerson, 162 Blackstone Boulevard, 
Providence, R. I. 

Ellen D. Ellis, Mt. Holyoke College, South 
Hadley, Mass. 

Frances Fincke Hand (Mrs. Learned 
Hand), 142 East 65th Street, New York City. 

Frances Browne, 15 East 10th Street, New 
York City. 

Cornelia Halsey Kellogg (Mrs F. R. Kel- 
logg), Morristown, N. J. 

MEETING IN TAYLOR HALL 

A meeting will be held in Taylor Hall 
at eight o'clock on Friday, February 1, 
under the auspices of the Alumnae Asso- 
ciation. Four or five brief addresses 
will be given by alumnae and members 
of the college community on subjects of 
timely interest on which they can speak 
with authority. It is hoped that Presi- 
dent Thomas will speak on the patriotic 
educational work of the Association of 
Collegiate Alumnae, and Mr. Rufus 
Jones on some general topic. The 
alumnae speakers cannot yet be an- 
nounced. The meeting will be open to 
anyone interested, and it is hoped that 
as many alumnae as possible will come 
and bring their friends. 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS 

At the meeting of the Board of Di- 
rectors of the Alumnae Association on 
November 10, which was attended by 



delegates from the Branches and com- 
mittees it was suggested that a special 
effort be made this year to increase 
the enrollment of associate members. 
Ninety-three per cent of those who have 
received degrees from the College are 
members of the Alumnae Association 
and it would further the objects of the 
Association and make it of more value 
to its members if as great a percentage 
of former students belonged. A printed 
circular has been prepared by the Secre- 
tary and has been sent to all the former 
undergraduate students who are eligible 
to membership, and a letter has been 
sent to the class secretaries asking them 
to help by calling the attention of their 
classmates to the circular. If every one 
helps in bringing the campaign to notice 
it should result in a greatly increased 
membership. The Secretary therefore 
asks for as much cooperation as possible 
from individual members. 

Abigail Camp Dimon, Secretary. 

THE FIRE PREVENTION STUDY 

Last August was published the Report of the 
Fire Prevention Study, conducted by Fanny 
Travis Cochran, Bryn Mawr, 1902, and Florence 
Lucas Sanville, Barnard, 1901; and on Novem- 
ber 8, the Industrial Board of the Depart- 
ment of Labor and Industry of the Common- 
wealth of Pennsylvania took the following 
action : 

"Moved by Doctor Jackson and seconded by 
Doctor Garver that the Board recommend for 
observance the regulations and practices pro- 
mulgated by the Bryn Mawr Fire Prevention 
Committee in connection with the Department 
of Labor and Industry. They also moved that 
the Secretary be instructed to furnish copies of 
the report containing such regulations to those 
applying, and also be instructed to send to the 
Philadelphia Fire Department a copy of this 
report, conveying to that Department the re- 
commendation of the Industrial Board that the 
places in Philadelphia not complying therewith 
be brought to the standards worked out in the 
report. Further, that the Committee on Egress 



1918] 



With the Alumnae 



155 



be instructed to report a code on fire protection 
in factories and work-rooms including the Bryn 
Mawr regulations as far as they are applicable 
and also such additional regulations with regard 
to fire protection as they may deem proper. 
Unanimously agreed to." 

The Executive Committee feels that the 
authors of the report have done a good piece of 
work, and that the action of the Industrial 
Board insures practical results. 

The report was submitted a year before it was 
published, and the interval was occupied by a 
discussion which may prove to be not the least 
important part of our work. Mr. H. W. For- 
ster, Chief Engineer of the Independence In- 
spection Bureau, was a member of our Advisory 
Committee. The Committee on Safety to 
Life of the National Fire Prevention Associa- 
tion, of which he is chairman, had prepared, 
and reduced to tabular form, a rule for regulat- 
ing the number of persons that can safely oc- 
cupy buildings of different heights and types of 
construction, based on units of stair width. 
This table, representing a great deal of expert 
labor and carrying the authority of Mr. For- 
ster's recommendation, was approved by our 
Advisory Committee for adoption in the report. 
But not unanimously; there was from the first 
a vigorous opposition from a minority of one, 
Mr. H. Fitz John Porter, of New York City, 
who has been for years an innovator in fire pro- 
tection. By degrees the Executive Committee 
came to have a glimmering of the principle in- 
volved in the highly technical considerations 
presented in the table and opposed by Mr. Por- 
ter. As our education proceeded, we became 
more and more sure that our troublous duty 
lay in declining to adopt the table. Mr. J. O. 
Hammett, Chief of the Bureau of Fire Preven- 
tion of New York City, also a member of our 
Advisory Committee, was also found to be in 
opposition. Miss Frances Perkins, Executive 
Secretary of the Committee on Safety of the 
City of New York, took the same side and was 
of the greatest service in educating the 
Committee. 

Mr. Forster's committee was to report to the 
N. F. P. A. at its annual meeting in Washing- 
ton last spring. Through his courtesy, I was 
given a hearing at their final meeting. Mr. 
Hammett kindly wrote a strong statement of 
his criticisms for me to present at this meeting, 
and Miss Perkins attended with me to argue the 
case for the opposition. As a result of her able 
argument, the committee modified their report 



considerably in the direction of our contention. 
Even thus, it was not what we had come to be- 
lieve it should be. Miss Perkins and Mr. Ham- 
mett went to the Washington meeting and op- 
posed the report. It was referred back to the 
committee for reconsideration, and Miss Per- 
kins was added to the committee. If this re- 
port had been adopted by the N. F. P. A., we 
believe a mistake would have been made in 
national fire prevention which it would be very 
hard to correct. 

Emily James Putnam, 
Chairman of the Executive Committee. 



The interesting and very impressive report of 
the Fire Prevention Study is in three parts: 
(1) a short general summary; (2) an illustrated 
narrative giving a vivid picture of actual con- 
ditions; (3) a convenient tabulation of the 
findings of the workers with reference notes. 
In a "Foreword" Mrs. Putnam says: 

"In presenting this report the givers of the 
Study hope to make a beginning in three differ- 
ent directions. They hope, in the first place, 
to lessen the risk of death by fire for the more 
helpless members of the community. They 
hope also to show the desirability of making 
such gifts as this directly to the state, instead 
of duplicating or confusing the work of the 
state by private effort. And they hope to 
start the habit among Bryn Mawr women, and 
perhaps among college women everywhere, of 
organizing themselves into groups of good citi- 
zens who may be counted on at any time for 
cooperative citizens' work." 

Following this foreword is this statement 
from Mr. D. Knickerbacker Boyd of the Ad- 
visory Committee: 

"At one of the later meetings of the Com- 
mittee with the Advisory Board the men com- 
prising the latter voted that the report would 
be incomplete if it did not include some refer- 
ence to their appreciation of the opportunity 
which had been afforded them to act in this 
capacity. It was desired by them that a para- 
graph be inserted as their testimonial to the 
foresight, public spirit and zeal of the women 
who had made this study possible and to those 
who in collaboration with them had performed 
with signal courage and untiring purpose an 
unusually difficult task, which will bring about 
substantial benefits to the woman workers and 
all the other people of this State." 



156 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[January 



NEWS FROM THE CAMPUS 



CALENDAR OF EVENTS 

ACADEMIC YEAR 1917-1918, 
SEMESTER I 

December 11 Faculty Tea for graduate stu- 
dents, Radnor Hall, 4 to 6 p.m. 

December 12 Lecture by Lieutenant Hector 
McQuarrie on "Trench Life 
and America's War Problems" 
under the auspices of the War 
Council, in Taylor Hall at 4.15. 

December 14 Christmas Party for the maids, 
The Gymnasium, 9 p. m. 

December 15 Senior Reading Examination in 
German, 8 a.m. 
Lecture by Ian Hay (Major 
Beith) in the Gymnasium, 8 
p.m. under the auspices of the 
History Club for War Relief. 
The lecture will be illustrated 
with lantern slides. 

December 16 Sunday evening service. Christ- 
mas sermon by the Rt. Rev. 
Charles Palmerston Anderson, 
D.D., Bishop of Chicago. (Un- • 
able to come on account of ill- 
ness, place taken by the Rev. 
Corydon C. Tyler, Chestnut 
Hill, Philadelphia.) 

December 19 Christmas vacation begins at 1 
p.m. 

January 3 Christmas vacation ends at 9 
a.m. 

January 4 Reserved for War Council Lec- 
ture. 

January 5 Reserved for War Council Lec- 
ture. 

January 6 Sunday evening service. Ser- 
mon by the Rev. Charles R. 
Brown, D.D., Dean of the 
School of Religion of Yale 
University. 

January 11 Lecture by Miss Helen Fraser, of 
England, on "The Work of 
Women in England," in the 
chapel at 4.15 p.m. 
Swimming Meet at 8 p.m. 

January 12 Reserved for the Science Club. 

January 13 Sunday evening service. Sermon 
by the Rev. George L. Richard- 
son, D.D., Rector of St. Mary's 
Church, Philadelphia. 



January 14 President Thomas at home to the 
Senior Class, The Deanery, 
8.30 to 10.30 p.m. 

January 16 Faculty Tea for graduate stu- 
dents, Merion Hall, 4 to 6 p.m. 

January 17 Matriculation Examinations be- 
gin. 

January 18 War Council lecture in the chapel, 
4.30 p.m. 
Swimming Meet, 8 p.m. 

January 19 Performance of George Bernard 
Shaw's " Candida" in the Gym- 
nasium at 8 p.m., for the bene- 
fit of War Relief, by the Clif- 
ford Devereux Company. 

January 20 Sunday evening service. Sermon 
by the Rev. John McDowell, 
D.D., Pastor of Park Presby- 
terian Church, Newark, N. J. 

January 21 President Thomas at home to the 
graduate students. 

January 23 Collegiate examinations begin. 

January 27 Sunday evening service. 

February 2 Meeting of the Alumnae Asso- 
ciation. 
End of examinations. 
End of First Semester. 

February 6 Second Semester begins at 9 a.m. 
Registration at first lecture re- 
quired. 

CAMPUS NOTES 

If one should try to find a phrase with which 
to define the difference between this year and 
other years in College it might be "interest in 
war- work." Though in previous years we have 
been keenly interested in the war, yet never be- 
fore have we been so anxious to "do our bit." 
The Service Flag on Taylor is a badge of col- 
legiate enthusiasm. 

The desire manifests itself in ways that are 
many and various. Everyone knits — sweaters, 
wristers, mufflers and helmets increase and 
multiply day by day. What has most caught 
the popular fancy is the knitting of socks which 
can be adorned with brilliant clocks or chequers 
or stripes. 

We have tried to organize our enthusiasm in 
the forming of the present War Council. This 
council was formed primarily on the model of 
the Woman's Committee of the National Coun- 



1918] 



News from the Campus 



157 



cil of Defense, as explained by its executive 
secretary, Mrs. Ira C. Wood. Mrs. Wood 
spoke at the Deanery on October 22nd to a 
meeting which included Dean Taft, the execu- 
tives of the office, members of the faculty and 
the heads of all student organizations. It was 
at this meeting and at the smaller meeting fol- 
lowing that the plan for the present War Coun- 
cil was formed. This plan was definitely 
authorized at a meeting of the Undergraduate 
Association and Graduate Club. The Council 
is composed of two representatives from the 
faculty, one from the staff, two from the alum- 
nae, the presidents of the Self-Government, 
Undergraduate, Athletic, and Christian Asso- 
ciations, and of the four classes, and the managing 
editor of the News. There was some discus- 
sion, pro and con, over the election of an under- 
graduate chairman. Virginia Kneeland, presi- 
dent of the Undergraduate Association, was 
finally elected. 

The change in organization from the Red 
Cross and War Relief Committee of last year 
was made largely with the aim of establishing a 
body with which the alumnae could cooperate 
easily and effectively. There might have been 
difficulties in the way of such cooperation with 
a sub-committee of the Christian Association; 
to the plan of making the original committee 
independent of any association, the objection 
was raised that it would start a precedent of 
sporadic committees, "straying around loose." 
A Service Corps has been definitely decided 
upon as the object of the war-relief work during 
the second semester. 

The Liberty Loan Drive achieved a success 
which exactly tripled the sum which had been 
set. The red, white, and blue booth, though 
singularly out of place among the busts in Tay- 
lor, was extremely effective. Dr. Marion Par- 
ris Smith was Captain of the Team. Members 
of the faculty made stump speeches on behalf 
of the Liberty Loan in the hall dining-rooms. 
In Rockefeller, Dr. Gray described a personal 
experience in war economy, in patching an old 
suit instead of purchasing a new one. The 
drive netted $197,200 

A sense of the undergraduate meeting was 
taken with regard to instituting war economies 
in food. Zeal for meatless and wheatless days 
has however been somewhat mitigated by 
President Thomas, who urged the practical 
considerations that there is only one entirety 
wheatless flour — a meal made in Rhode Island, 
and unfortunately unobtainable — and that some 



young calves must be killed, and might as well 
be utilized as "buried in coffins." 

One of the many expedients for raising money 
for war relief was that of movies on the 
Gymnasium on Saturday night. The first 
night the "movies" failed to materialize, the 
film having been censored, but since then the 
College has sat enthralled before "The Desire of 
the Moth" and "The Lash of Power." 

The meeting which voted to give up May- 
Day voted that Class plays and shows should 
be given without a stage and as simply as possi- 
ble. Banner Show and Senior Reception went 
beyond the most modern theories in simplicity 
of staging. The costumes and properties for 
the skit given at Senior Reception consisted 
mainly of two chairs arranged as a bed, a blue 
quilt, a borrowed blue negligee and an alarm 
clock. Banner Show was a vaudeville, its snap 
and go making it by no means a change for the 
worse from the more ambitious and laboured 
attempt of last year. The social success of the 
year has perhaps been Sophomore Dance, at 
which the costume de rigileur was naval uniform, 
and at which the Gymnasium, equipped with- 
a gang-plank, life-preservers, ropes, and deck 
chairs, did duty as the deck of a man-of-war. 
The burst of enthusiasm that instituted pre- 
paredness courses last May has lasted over the 
summer, and preparedness courses are still 
going on. The present courses are typewriting 
and shorthand. 

The "100 per cent registration" asked for by 
the Women's Council of National Defense, has 
been put through, and though few students 
had attainments useful in the practical lines of 
work asked for by the registration card yet 
several signed their willingness to go "any- 
where, any time." 

The Red Cross Workshop has transformed 
the Merion sitting-room into a scene of busy in- 
dustry against a background of spotless white 
oilcloth tables and vivid posters. It turns out 
an average of over a thousand dressings a week. 
Trench candles also are being made and paraf- 
fined. 

Among the extra-war activities that go on in 
spite of the world crisis are Senior Orals. The 
innovation of having them written this year has 
been accompanied by the startling effect of 
shattering all known records of failure. 

Less grim, lighter it, lone, s the incident of 
the Trophy CIud. After remaining quiescent 
for some time, the club has been revived — a 
select circle with a membership of six, all of 



158 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[January 



whom are officers. They have undertaken the 
work of mending '17's tattered banner, which 
must again hang in the gymnasium for the 
water-polo season. Thus does the well-mean- 
ing reformer lay hands on what was once sacred. 
Most of the speakers here have been men just 
back from the front, among them, Ian Hay, 
Francis B. Sayre, Lieutenant Hector Mac- 
Quarrie, of the Royal Field Artillery, and Major 
Boehm of the 169th Canadian Infantry. M. 
Anatole Le Braz spoke on the French spirit and 
ex-President Taft gave interesting lights on 
"the way to crush kultur." 

Mary Swift Rupert. 

THE FACULTY AND STAFF 

Dr. Frank addressed the annual meeting of 
the Pennsylvania Society of the Archaeological 
Institute of America on archaeological work in 
Rome. 

Dr. Rhys Carpenter, now a sergeant at Camp 
Meade has been put in charge of a section of 
drafted Italians on account of his knowledge of 
their language. 

Miss Hilda Smith, '10, director of the com- 
munity center, and Miss Susan Myra Kings- 
bury, Carola Woerishoffer Professor of Social 
Economy, attended the I. C. S. A. conference 
at Dennison House in Boston, 

Lieutenant Howard Savage has been trans- 
ferred from Fort Niagara to Camp Green, 
Charlottesville, N. C. 

Dean Taft attended the conference of the 
Intercollegiate Bureau of Occupations in New 
York. 

Both Dr. de Laguna and Mrs. de Laguna are 
represented in a volume of philosophical essays, 
compiled recently by the associates and pupils 
of Professor Creighton of Cornell. Mrs. de 
Laguna also has an essay, "Phenomena and 
Their Determination," in the Philosophical Re- 
view for November. 

M. Beck has been asked by the American 
Folk-lore Society to direct a critical edition of 
Canadian folk-songs. 

The November number of the Journal of 
Theology contains an article by Dr. Barton on 
"The new Babylonian Material concerning the 
Creation and Paradise." 

Miss Cornelia Geer, whose story, "Pearls 
before Swine," appeared in the Atlantic Monthly, 
has had another story, "The Irish of It" ac- 
cepted by that magazine. 

Dr. Fenwick lectured for three weeks at Fort 



Travis and Fort Sam Houston, Texas, on the 
National Insurance Act. 

Miss Dunn, acting head of the Department 
of English Composition, has an article on "John 
Rastell and Gentleman and Nobility" in the 
Modern Language Review. 

In Thanksgiving vacation Professor G. G. 
King spoke before the Fortnightly Club of 
Chicago at its annual open meeting. Her sub- 
ject was, "The Way of St. James," based on 
her recent travels in Spain. 

Dr. Savage has been working with Lieutenant 
Raflrey, Attache a la mission d 'information aux 
Etats Unis, on a series of pamphlets on the tac- 
tics of trench warfare. The subjects of these 
pamphlets are "Grenades and Grenade War- 
fare," "Infantry in Attack," "Liaison," and 
"Gasses" and "Flame." 

Dr. Wheeler had an article "The Plot of 
Empedicus" in a recent number of the American 
Journal of Philology. 

Dr. Kingsbury and Miss McBride had an 
article "Social Welfare in Time of War and 
Disaster" in the Survey of October 27, 1917. 

NEW APPOINTMENT 

Agnes Rutherford Riddell, Reader in Spanish 
and French, A.B., University of Toronto, 1896, 
with first class honors in Modern Languages; 
and A.M., 1897, Honors Ontario Normal Col- 
lege, 1898; Ph.D. University of Chicago, 1916. 
Teacher of French and German, Oshawa High 
School, 1898-1901; Assistant Reader, Department 
of English, University of Toronto, 1902-11; 
teacher of English, Branksome Hall, Toronto, 
1904-05; teacher of German, Latin and English, 
Westbourne School, Toronto, 1906-10; 
Graduate Student in Romance Languages, 
University of Chicago, January 1912 to August 
1913; teacher of Latin and English, West- 
bourne School, Toronto, 1913-14; Fellow in 
Romance Languages, University of Chicago, 
1914-15; Acting Head of Kelly Hall, University 
of Chicago, summers of 1913, 1914 and 1915; 
Professor of Romance Languages, College of 
Emporia, Emporia, Kansas, September 1915 to 
December 1917; Dean of Women, College of 
Emporia, 1915-17. 

Dr. Riddell is giving the minor Spanish in 
two sections, owing to the large number in the 
class. She is also conducting the tutoring 
classes in French. 

Dr. de Sarauw gives the major Spanish and 
conducts the tutoring classes in German. 

Professor De Haan went to Holland last sum- 
mer and has been unable to get a steamer back. 



1918] 



The Clubs 



159 



THE CLUBS 



NEW YORK 

137 East 40th Street 

President, Mrs. Adolphe Boree, 59 East 
65th Street; Acting Secretary, Fannie Barber, 
539 West End Avenue. 

The Club, like other organizations, has been 
feeling the stress of war conditions. Our secre- 
tary, Isabel H. Peters, '04, sailed for France 
some weeks ago in the Red Cross ship which 
carried a number of Bryn Mawr graduates 
among its passengers, bound for national serv- 
ice on the other side. We were fortunate in 
securing Fannie Skeer Barber, '09, to fill her 
place, but Miss Barber is new to her duties as 
yet, so that the indulgence of the readers of the 
Quarterly is asked for the informal report 
here submitted by the Club's Treasurer. 

The year opened well. The rooms reserved 
for permanent tenants are pleasantly filled, the 
demand for accommodation by transients far 
larger than our limited quarters can meet ade- 
quately, and the restaurant, especially at 
luncheon, has been most generously patronized. 
The new superintendent, Mrs. McCabe, is di- 
recting the house with great tact and ability, 
making it homelike and attractive. The Club 
is in every sense prospering and alive, though 
the high cost of living is keeping our profits low. 

There has been one Club luncheon, the sub- 
ject of which was Food Conservation. There 
was a luncheon for undergraduates the Friday 
following Christmas. Other luncheons of gen- 
eral interest will occur through the winter, pre- 
senting speakers on subjects of vital interest. 

The most timely recent activity of the Club 
is the organization of the National Service 
Committee, which embraces both members and 
non-members. Our Committee owes a good 
deal to a similar organization in the Women's 
University Club. Between these two Com- 
mittees there has been a profitable interchange 
of ideas, and members for various kinds of 
service. 

In its first job, helping in the work of regis- 
tration, the Bryn Mawr Club Committee worked 
under the Suffrage organization, and in the 
work for the Liberty Loan it enrolled itself un- 
der the Women's Liberty Loan Committee. 
Its later work, now well organized and in prog- 
ress, will be fully reported in a later issue of the 
Quarterly. 

Edith Child, Treasurer. 



BOSTON 
144 Bowdoin Street 

President, Sylvia K. Lee, 25 Chauncy Street, 
Cambridge, Mass. 

Secretary, Anna Fry, The Ludlow, Copley 
Square. 

The Bryn Mawr Club of Boston is doing a 
bit of war work this winter in giving the use of 
its club room to the nurses employed by the 
State Child Conservation Committee for con- 
ferences, rest and lodging when it is needed. 
The following members of the Club are in 
France doing war work: Elizabeth Ayer, 
Katharine Dodd, Louise L. Haydock, Con- 
stance Kellen, Elizabeth S. Sergeant, Cynthia 
M. Wesson. 

CHICAGO 

President, Mrs. Cecil Barnes, 1153 N. 
Dearborn Street. 

BALTIMORE 

President, Helen Irvin, '15, 1702 Park 
Place. 

Secretary, Mildred McCay, Roland Park, 
Md. 

PITTSBURGH 

President, Sara F. Ellis, '04, 5716 Rippey 
Street. 

Secretary, Mrs. R. L. Crawford, 517 Emer- 
son Street. 

WASHINGTON 

Secretary, Henrietta S. Riggs, 131 Mary- 
land Avenue, N. E. 

ST. LOUIS 

President, Mrs. E. W. Stix, 5112 Waterman 
Avenue. 

CHINA 

President, Mrs. A. H. Woods, Canton Christ- 
ian College, Canton. 



160 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[January 



LOS ANGELES 

President, Mrs. J. H. Douglas, Jr., 523 
South Painter Street, Whittier, Cal. 

Secretary, Ethel Richardson, 277 East 
Bellevue Drive, Pasadena. 



OHIO 

President, Grace Latimer Jones, '00, 1175 
East Broad Street, Columbus, Ohio. 

Secretary, Adeline Werner, 1640 East 
Broad Street, Columbus, Ohio. 



NEWS FROM THE CLASSES 

The news of this department is compiled from information furnished by class secretaries, Bryn Mawr Clubs, and 
from other reliable sources for which the Editor is responsible. Acknowledgment is also due to the Bryn Mawr College 
News for items of news. 



1892 

Secretary, Mrs. F. M. Ives, 318 West 75th 
Street, New York City. 

Frances Harris (Mrs. R. D. Brown) has 
closed her house and is spending the winter 
with her sister in Germantown, her husband, 
Reynolds Driver Brown, having resigned from 
the Law Faculty of the University of Pennsyl- 
vania to do Y. M. C. A. war work. 

Dr. Frederick M. Ives, husband of Edith 
Wetherill Ives, holds a commission as captain 
in the O. M. R. C. and Mrs. Ives writes that 
the family has been waiting for his orders to go 
on active duty since last May. 

1894 

"Mrs. Wayne MacVeagh, of Washington, D. 
C, has announced the marriage of her daughter, 
Margaretta Cameron, to Naval Constructor 
Stuart Farrar Smith, United States Navy. The 
ceremony, which took place on Monday, No- 
vember 12, at Mrs. MacVeagh's residence, 1719 
Massachusetts avenue, was very quiet, none 
but members of the immediate families being 
present. 

"Mrs. Farrar Smith's father, the late Wayne 
MacVeagh, though most of his life one of the 
leading citizens of Pennsylvania and a most dis- 
tinguished lawyer, was Attorney General in 
President Garfield's Cabinet, and was the first 
American Ambassador to Italy, having been 
appointed by President Cleveland. 

"Naval Constructor Smith's father, Major 
General William Farrar Smith, served with dis- 
tinction during the Civil War as chief engineer 
of the Army of the Cumberland and as a corps 
commander in the Army of the Potomac. He 
was well known in Philadelphia, where he spent 
the last years of his life." 

The following is from a letter from Ethel 
Walker: "The statement that appeared in the 



last issue of the Alumnae Quarterly under 
my name in the class records was inaccurate 
and misleading. This statement was that I 
had given up my school at Lakewood, N. J., 
and had started a new school at Simsbury, 
Connecticut. I did not give up my school at 
Lakewood. I gave up Lakewood because my 
school had outgrown my accommodations there, 
which consisted of three rented houses, and I 
was not able to find or build in Lakewood a 
suitable building for the school. With the 
approval and cooperation of my alumnae and 
the parents of the girls who were then attend- 
ing the school and were entered in the school 
for this coming year, I moved the school to 
Simsbury, Connecticut, where I was so fortu- 
nate as to procure the Stuart Dodge property, 
a large and very beautiful place of four hundred 
acres, admirably adapted to our purposes and 
with great possibilities of development. . . . 
We have a building that provides for the sixty- 
two boarding pupils now in residence. The 
school has increased to this number this year 
as over against forty-five resident pupils last 
year. It is not, however, my intention to en- 
large the school beyond this point, but, rather, 
gradually to reduce the numbers to about 
fifty." 

1898 

Elizabeth Nields (Mrs. Wilfred Bancroft) 
has moved from Ardmore to Slatersville, R. I. 

Marion Park has gone to Boston to be regis- 
trar of Simmons College in place of Evelyn 
Walker, '01, resigned. 

Leila Stoughton is going to France as Red 
Cross nurse from the Bellevue Unit, New 
York. 

Alice Gannett is Headworker in the Good- 
rich Social Settlement, 1420 East 31st Street, 
Cleveland, Ohio. 



1918] 



News from the Classes 



161 



1899 

Secretary, Mrs. E. H. Waring, 325 Washing- 
ton Street, Glen Ridge, N. J. 

Ellen Kilpatrick, ex-'99, is doing canteen 
work with the Red Cross in France. 

Mary F. Hoyt, ex- '99, is nursing in a hospital 
at Neuilly. 

Dorothy Fronheiser's husband, Philip T. 
Meredith has enlisted in the Pennsylvania 
National Guard and is at Camp Hancock, Ga. 

Marion Ream (Mrs. R. D. Stephens) is 
spending the winter in Washington with her 
mother. 

The following is taken from a Dubuque, la., 
paper: 

"It will be of tremendous interest to Dubu- 
quers to learn that Miss Elizabeth Bissell, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. L. C. Bissell, has just 
been notified by the National Red Cross or- 
ganization in Washington, of her appointment 
to work in the Canteen department in France. 
She will sail early in December. 

"Miss Bissell is just the type of woman to be 
chosen for this service for she is a splendid 
French scholar, which, of course, is one of the 
essentials to qualify for service in France. For 
the past several weeks she has been in Chicago, 
studying conversational French, in order to be- 
come perfectly familiar with the new and vari- 
ous war terms. 

"Like many other Bryn Mawr graduates, 
she is to do this splendid service for her country, 
entirely at her own expense. She is an ardent 
suffragist, and her work as corresponding secre- 
tary of the Iowa Equal Suffrage Association has 
given her office experience, and has taught her 
to know how to deal with groups of organized 
women workers. It will be remembered that 
during the Red Cross drive last June Miss Bis- 
sell was one of the most active workers, and was 
also very prominent in the thrift and conserva- 
tion campaign done throughout Iowa. She is 
known in her home city as a great humanitarian, 
being one of the workers in the Humane Society 
since its organization." 

1901 

Evelyn Walker has resigned her position as 
registrar of Simmons College. 

1904 

Secretary, Emma O. Thompson, 213 South 
50th Street, Philadelphia. 



Nannie Adaire's brother, Alexander Adaire, 
is stationed at Camp Hancock, Ga. 

Sadie Briggs (Mrs. Donald Logan), ex-'04, 
writes that her husband left for France with the 
Massachusetts State Guard last October. Mrs. 
Logan has a daughter, Constance Briggs Logan, 
born December, 18, 1917. 

Marjorie Canan (Mrs. Lawford H. Fry) has a 
daughter, Alison Marjorie Fry, born May 11, 
1917, at Burnham, Pa. Mrs. Fry has been 
chairman of Home and Belgian Relief Com- 
mittee for two years, executive secretary of the 
local Red Cross Chapter for the past year, and 
chairman of a committee which raised one thou- 
sand dollars for the "Hostess House " fund of the 
Y. W. C. A. Her brother is an aviator in 
France. 

Dr. Mary James has returned from China for 
a year's leave of absence. She is living in 
Philadelphia and is studying in the Graduate 
School of Medicine of the University of Penn- 
sylvania. 

Helen Amy (Mrs. G. C. Macan, Jr.), ex-'04, 
is treasurer of the Intercollegiate Community 
Service Association, of which Dr. Susan Kings- 
bury is president. 

Bertha Brown's (Mrs. Walter Lambert) hus- 
band is a first lieutenant in the Engineer Officers 
Reserve. He was six weeks in Engineers' 
Camp at Belvoir and American University 
Camps, Washington, D. C, and is now at 
Camp Dix, N. J., training men. Mrs. Lam- 
bert's address is care of Mrs. Henry Cadbury, 
Haverford College, Haverford, Pa. 

1905 

Secretary, Mrs. CM. Hardenbergh, 3824 
Warwick Boulevard, Kansas City, Mo. 

Rachael Brewer was married at Milton, 
Mass., on December 22 to Ellsworth Hunting- 
ton. Mr. Ellsworth Huntington is a well 
known geographer who has written several 
books of general interest. He has made studies 
of desert and semi-desert regions in various 
parts of the world and found evidence of varia- 
tions of climate and humidity which recur in 
longer and shorter cycles and which are accom- 
panied by evidence that certain of these re- 
gions have been within historic times suitable 
for human life. These researches throw an 
interesting light on the history of the desert 
regions of Asia and other parts of the world. 

Avis Putnam (Mrs. Edouard Dethier) has a 
second son, Charles Putnam Dethier, born in 
New York on December 10. 



162 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[January 



Patsy Gardner, Ph.D., is with a canteen 
"somewhere in France." 

1906 

Louise Cruice (Mrs. E. W. Sturdevant) is in 
France and her address is care of Morgan, 
Harjes and Company, Paris. 

Elizabeth Townsend (Mrs. J. R. Torbert), 
ex- '06, has a daughter, Margaret Torbert, born 
October 13, 1917. 

1907 

Secretary, Mrs. R. E. Apthorp, Hampstead 
Hall, Charles River Road, Cambridge, Mass. 

Fourteen members of 1907 living around 
New York City attended an informal luncheon 
at the Bryn Mawr Club on Saturday, Decem- 
ber 1, which was so successful that a repetition 
in the spring was suggested. 

Marion Warren (Mrs. Sanger Steele), ex-'07, 
has moved to Hartsdale, N. Y. 

Berniece Stewart (Mrs. C. A. Mackenzie) is 
living in New York City. 

Katharine Kerr is at home again after two 
months' nursing in France with the Presby- 
terian Hospital Unit. 

Margaret Ayer (Mrs. Cecil Barnes) has 
moved with her family from Chicago to 1240 
Nineteenth Street, Washington D. C, in order 
to be with her husband while he is working un- 
der Mr. Hoover. 

Grace Hutchins is in New York, teaching at 
St. Faith's School. In the morning she has 
classes in the New Testament, and in the after- 
noon she is in charge of the athletics. She is 
also studying Greek. 

Ellen Graves is working in the Supply Serv- 
ice Department of the Red Cross in Boston. 

Margaret Blodgett, ex-'07, has just finished 
an interesting piece of library work in Ply- 
mouth, Mass., for the Pilgrim Society. 

Margaret Morison is again teaching at the 
Winsor School in Boston and is living at the 
Elizabeth Peabody House Settlement. 

Esther W T il>liams (Mrs. R. E. Apthorp) is 
working in the Civilian Relief Department of 
the Red Cross in Boston. 

1908 

Secretary, Mrs. Dudley Montgomery, 115 
Langdon Street, Madison, Wis. 

1908 is planning for its tenth reunion next 
June. Members of the class are asked to send 
items of interest for the reunion paper to Ade- 
laide Case. 



Marjorie Wallace (Mrs. Robert H. Nichols) 
has a third child, a daughter Jane Hastings 
Nichols, born in Binghampton, N. Y., on Sep- 
tember 3. 

Louise Hyman (Mrs. Julian Pollak) has a 
second child, David, born in October. 

Anna Carrere will remain in France until 
spring working for the A. F. F. W. 

Anna King is head of the Department of 
Civilian Relief of the Red Cross of Boston, and 
Beth Harrington (Mrs. A. H. Brooks), '06, 
Marjorie Young, Emily Storer, ex-'lO, and 
Mary Miller (Mrs. W. R. Buckminster), ex-'98, 
are also working there. 

1909 

Secretary, Frances Browne, 15 East Tenth 
Street, New York City. 

Dr. Dorothy Child and her sister, Florence, 
'05, have gone to France as members of the first 
unit of women doctors to be organized in this 
country for service in France. The unit num- 
bers ten women army doctors, in the service of 
the Red Cross. They will be stationed at a 
base hospital with Pershing's army 'somewhere 
in France.' 

Cynthia Wesson is at the head of a Y. M. C. A. 
canteen station in the American Artillery Base 
in France. Dr. Cockett and two other women 
are working with her. There are 4000 men at 
the Base and they manage to serve from three 
to four hundred a day with hot drinks, food and 
amusement. 

Shirley Putnam is working as nurses' aid in 
the American Ambulance Hospital at Neuilly. 

"Billy" Miller is working in a private hospi- 
tal unit in the devastated region of France. 

Dr. May Putnam gave up her work with the 
Frontier children in Paris to join a Red Cross 
Hospital Unit at Evian in Switzerland, where 
the repatriated children of France and Belgium 
are being taken care of as they pass through 
Switzerland on their way back to their homes. 
She found there a plant and staff far larger 
than was necessary for the work needed at that 
particular point. During her stay of two 
weeks there were never more than thirty pa- 
tients, only six of them really ill, as against 
seventy resident doctors, nurses and staff. It 
seemed a deplorable misdirection of funds and 
working power, which was hard to account for. 
May sent in her resignation after two weeks and 
returned to Paris where she hopes to find a post 
where her services can be of greater value. 






1918] 



News from the Classes 



163 



Catherine Goodale (Mrs. Rawson Warren) is 
living at the Pig'n Whistle, Brown's Mills, near 
Camp Dix. 

Gladys Stout (Mrs. R. B. Bowler) is settled 
in her apartment at 152 East 40th Street. 

Katherine Ecob managed the annual Bryn 
Mawr Day at the College Settlement Sale and 
Tea Room in December with great success. 

1909 had a small reunion on the day of the 
College Settlement Sale, at which Celeste Webb, 
Fannie Barber, Mary Herr, Hilda Sprague- 
smith (Mrs. Victor Starzenski), Marianne 
Moore, Mildred Pressinger (Mrs. C. O. von 
Kienbusch), Katherine Ecob and Frances 
Browne were present. 

Fannie Barber is spending the winter in New 
York again at 539 West End Avenue. 

Helen Crane is working in the Central 
Branch of the Y. W. C. A. in New York City. 

Celeste Webb has been substituting in the 
registrar's office of the National Training School 
of the Y. W. C. A. in New York City. She is 
now in Baltimore. 

Marie Belleville is in Pekin, China, and is 
studying at the School of Languages, prepara- 
tory to doing Y. W. C. A. work. She is also 
doing some teaching of physical work. 

Bertha Ehlers has been elected Head of the 
Food Production Department of the War 
Council of the College. 

Mary Herr is teaching English at the Brear- 
ley School in addition to her work as librarian 
of the school. 

Evelyn Holt (Mrs. P. W. Lowry), ex- '09, is 
spending the winter in New York. Her hus- 
band, Lieutenant Lowry of the 49th Infantry, 
U. S. A., has been ill with pneumonia but he 
hopes to be able to join his regiment, which is 
stationed at Tenafly, shortly after the first of 
the year. 

Mary Rand (Mrs. Stephen Birch), ex- '09, 
has a daughter, Mary Marshall Rand, born 
May 2, 1917. 

Emily Whitney (Mrs. Allan Briggs), ex-09, is 
in Paris with her three children. Her husband, 
Captain Briggs, was ordered to this country 
from Vienna to report and hoped to be sent 
back to Europe. He is now stationed on the 
Mexican border. 

Barbara Spofford (Mrs. S. A. Morgan) has a 
son, John Spofford, born November 13, 1917. 

Isabel Goodnow (Mrs. E. K. Gillett), ex-'09, 
has a second son, Frank Goodnow, born Octo- 
ber 5, 1917. 



Mildred Satterlee (Mrs. Dwight Wetmore), 
ex- '09, is spending the winter near Camp Dix. 
Wrightstown, N. J., where her husband is 
stationed. 

Frances Ferris, ex-'09, and Dorothy North 
passed through Paris several months ago on 
their way to join one of the Friends' Reconstruc- 
tion units. 

Janet Van Hise, ex- '09, is spending the win- 
ter at home in Madison, W T is. 

Lacy Van Wagenen is now a professional 
photographer. Her work is considered excel- 
lent and has found its way into many of the 
recent photography exhibitions. 

Frances Ferris is in France with the Friends 
Reconstruction Unit, Anglo-American, of the 
Red Cross. Her address is: Missions de la 
Societe des Amis, 99 Boulevard de la Rochelle, 
Bar-le-Duc, Meuse, France. The last letter 
received by her mother came Nov. 20, and 
since then there has again been active fighting 
at Bar-le-Duc. Frances is the only American 
with her unit and is eager to get in touch with 
other Bryn Mawr people near her. The work 
of this unit has been to reclaim an old chateau 
for the use of refugees and to make warm 
garments. They have to take to the cellar 
during air raids. 

1910 

Secretary, Mrs. H. B. Van Dyne, Troy, Pa. 

Elsa Denison (Mrs. Dayton Voorhees) has a 
son, Dayton Voorhees, Jr. 

Clara Ware was married in August, 1917, to 
Hubert Baker Goodrich, associate professor of 
biology at Wesleyan University. 

Margaret Shearer was married on January 5 
to Jewell Kellogg Smith. Mr. and Mrs. Smith 
will live at 27 Charlton Street, New York. 

Elsie Deems was married on December 20 to 
Carol Kane Neilson. 

Eleanor Anderson, ex-' 10, was married on 
January 5 to Frederick Barber Campbell of 
New York. 

1911 

Correspondent, Margaret J. Hobart, The 
Churchman, 381 Fourth Avenue, New York 
City. 

Mollie Kilner, ex-'ll, was married on Novem- 
ber 3 to William S. Wheeler in Portland, Ore- 
gon. Mrs. Wheeler has been studying in the 
nurses' training school of one of the Portland 
hospitals for two years. Mr. Wheeler is in the 
ship building business. 



164 



The Bryn Mawr AJumnae Quarterly 



[January 



Helen Parkhurst is teaching logic and hold- 
ing conferences with the students in history of 
philosophy at Barnard College. She is living 
at 220 Waverly Place, in Greenwich Village. 

Charlotte Clafiin has completed four years 
of service with the Department of Health of 
Newark, N. J., as teacher of infant hygiene, and 
has accepted a similar position as infant wel- 
fare worker with the Civic League of Framing- 
ham, Mass. 

Elizabeth Taylor (Mrs. John F. Russell, Jr.), 
ex-'ll, is doing volunteer legal work for her 
local Exemption Board. She has moved into 
a new apartment at 29 West 12th Street. 

Margaret Prussing (Mrs. A. S. Le Vino), 
with her husband and baby, went to California 
January 2. They expect to spend six months 
there. Their address is: care Metro Studios, 
Lillian Way, Hollywood, Cal. 

Nine of the New York members of 1911 had 
a reunion dinner at the Camouflage in Green- 
wich Village on Friday night, December 14, 
and went to the theatre (peanut gallery) after- 
wards. 

Hilpa Schram (Mrs. Darnall Wood) is living 
in East Orange, N. J., at 75 Lennox Avenue. 

1912 

Secretary, Mrs. J. A. MacDonald, 3227 N. 
Pennsylvania Street, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Laura Byrne is teaching English and econo- 
mics at the Dominican Junior College at San 
Rafael, California. 

Florence Leopold (Mrs. Lester Wolf) has 
moved from New York and is now living at 
Elkins Park, Pa. 

Irma Shloss, who was married last April to 
Rabbi Eugene Mannheimer, is living at 1808 
Ingersoll Avenue, Des Moines, la. 

Marjorie Walter (Mrs. H. L. Goodhart) is 
staying in Washington during her husband's 
service there as lieutenant in the Ordnance 
Department. 

Leonora Lucas was married to Lieutenant D. 
A. Tomlinson on December 1 at Evanston, 111. 

Carlotta Welles has returned to France but 
expects to spend the latter part of the winter in 
California. 

1913 

Secretary, Nathalie Swift, 156 East 79th 
Street, New York City. 

Sylvia Hathaway (Mrs. Harold Evans), ex- 
'13, has a son, Nathaniel Hathaway Evans, 
born in November. 

Clara Crocker (Mrs. Courtenay Crocker), 
ex-'13, has a son, Courtenay Crocker, Jr. 



Mary Tongue is doing canteen work with the 
Red Cross in France. 

Katherine Schmidt, ex-'13, has been taking 
the course for trained attendants in New York. 

1914 

Secretary, Ida Pritchett, 22 East 91st Street, 
New York City. 

Elizabeth Ayer has gone to Paris to drive an 
automobile for the American Fund for French 
Wounded. Her address is care of the Credit 
Lyonnais. 

Evelyn Shaw (Mrs. John McCutcheon) has a 
son, born in November. 

1915 

Secretary, Katherine W. McCollin, 2049 
Upland Way, Philadelphia. 

Frances Boyer is teaching Latin at the Bryn 
Mawr School in Baltimore. 

Margaret Free is in Washington doing psy- 
chological work for the Government. 

Mary Goodhue is studying at the University 
of Pennsylvania. 

Mildred Justice is working in the Department 
of Employment of the National Bank of Com- 
merce of New York. She and Catharine Simp- 
son, ex-' 15, are sharing an apartment together. 

The following was taken from the Philadelphia 
Bulletin of November 15, 1917: 

"The marriage of Miss Adrienne Kenyon, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Alan Douglas Kenyon 
of New York, and Lieutenant Benjamin Frank- 
lin, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Franklin 
of 166 West Hortter Street, Germantown, was 
quietly solemnized yesterday at the home of the 
bride's parents, 322 West 100th Street, in the 
presence of the immediate families. The cere- 
mony was performed by the Rev. Dr. Harry Pierce 
Nichols. The bride who was given in marriage 
by her father, had as her only attendant her 
sister, Miss Frieda Kenyon, who was the maid 
of honor. Lieutenant Franklin had as his best 
man Mr. Douglas Kenyon, a brother of the 
bride and a member of the United States section 
of the Royal Flying Corps. Lieutenant Frank- 
lin was at the first Plattsburgh camp this year 
and then at Camp Oglethorpe, Ga., where he 
received his commission." 

Frances MacDonald was married on Novem- 
ber 2 to E. Clarke Stiles of Pittsburgh. Mr. 
Stiles was graduated from the Pennsylvania 
State College in 1914. 

Ruth Newman is in charge of all the girls' 
club work at the Spring Street Settlement, New 
York City. 



1918] 



News from the Classes 



165 



Susan Nichols is acting as a temporary Eng- 
lish reader at Bryn Mawr College. She is living 
in Penygroes with Emily Noyes and Helen Taft. 

Isabel Smith is assistant warden of Pembroke. 

Emily Van Horn is secretary to Mr. Sherman 
of New York, a member of the United States 
Shipping Board. 

Julia Harrison, ex-'15, is in the second year 
of the Nursing Course at Johns Hopkins. 

Marjorie Tappan, ex-'15, is taking graduate 
work at Columbia University. 

Clarissa Smith was recently married to Henry 
Ware. 

1916 

Secretary, Adeline Werner, 1640 Broad 
Street, Columbus, Ohio. 

Margaret Mabon, ex-' 16, was married on 
October 31 to Dr. David K. Henderson of the 
Medical Corps of the British Army and went 
abroad with him. 

Joanna Ross has announced her engagement 
to Murray Chism, Yale, 1916. Mr. Chism is 
training at Camp Meade. 

Jeanette Greenewald has announced her en- 
gagement to Benjamin H. Gordon of New York. 
Mr. Gordon is a graduate of Harvard, 1907, 
and of the Law School, 1910. 

Nannie Gail (Mrs. Reany Wolfe) has a 
daughter, born in November, the Class Baby 
of 1916. 



1917 

Natalie McFaden was married on New Year's 
Day to Captain Wyndham Boiling Blanton, 
M. R. C, of Richmond, Va. 

Elizabeth Faulkner, ex-'17, was married on 
January 3 to Walter Lacy. 

Louise Collins has announced her engagement 
to N. Peniston Davis, who returned recently 
from Russia where he has been working for the 
Y. M. C. A. in the prison camps. 

Monica O'Shea's play "The Rushlight" has 
been reprinted from the Lantern in The Drama. 

1919 

"M. Watriss, ex-'19, sailed on the Rochambeau 
a few weeks ago to do reconstruction work in 
France. She expects to be sent out from Paris, 
where she will have her headquarters with Mrs. 
Nina Duryea, on relief visits to villages in 
northern and eastern France. 

"From June to October she took a nurses' 
training course, especially shortened for college 
women, at the Presbyterian Hospital in New 
York and was the first member of the class to 
be entrusted with a patient. 

"A post has been offered her in Mrs. Mon- 
roe's Hospital at Neuilly, where she may spend 
part of the winter." 

The College News. 



LITERARY NOTES 



All publications received will be acknowledged in this column. The editor begs that copies of books or articles by or 
about the Bryn Mawr Faculty and Bryn Mawr Students, or book reviews written by alumnae, will be sent to the 
Quarterly for review, notice, or printing. 



BOOKS RECEIVED 

Manual of Good English. By H. N. Mac- 
Cracken, Ph.D., and Helen E. Sandison, 
Ph.D. New York: The MacMillan Com- 
pany, 1917. $.90. 

This compact manual contains a surprising 
amount of material for its size. Its analysis of 
usage is logical and clear, and the character and 
large number of examples and exercisss give a 
special usefulness to the book. The marginal 
synopses are a great convenience. 

What Makes Christmas Christmas : A moral- 
ity play in one act written by Grace Latimer 
Jones. Columbus, Ohio: Spahr and Glenn, 
1917. 

"I pine and I sigh 

For no gift and no gold; 
The glow in the west 
Is treasure to me!" 



This verse indicates the reply to the query im- 
plied in the title. The play is an attractive one 
for Christmas entertainments and is far superior 
in setting, theme, and dialogue to the usual oc- 
casional plays for girls. 

Pageant Scenes. For the observance of the 
Four Hundredth Anniversary of the Protes- 
tant Reformation. By Marjorie Young. 
Boston: The Beacon Press. 
In these scenes the author has given a pic- 
turesque presentment of one act in the drama 
of progressing religious freedom. 

The First Annual Report of the Women's 
Agricultural Camp at Bedford, N. Y. 1917. 
Ida H. Ogilvie is Dean of the Camp. 



NOTICE 



The Government Committee on Pub- 
lic Information, Division of Civic and 
Educational Co-operation, is making 
a special effort to get its publications 
into the hands of college men and women, 
faculty, students and alumni alike. 
Plans are being made for some person 
to look after the business in each in- 
stitution, and posters will be provided 



calling attention to the booklets with 
instructions as to where and to whom 
applications should be made. Personal 
applications for these booklets made to 
the Committee will be welcomed. Ap- 
plications for the booklets may be sent 
to Mr. Guy Stanton Ford, Director, 
Committee of Public Information, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 



106 



tf^^sss&s^^ 



w&m 




RYN MAWR 
ALUMNAE 



QUARTERLY 



I 



5A 



Vol. Xll 



APRIL, 1918 



No. 1 




Published by the Alumnae Association 

of 
Bryn Mawr College 



%^^4%mmm®mm®mmMmmmmmw^mmmmmmmmsmzmmi 



Entered at tie Port Office. Baltimore, M4, as second class mail matter under toe Act "of July 16, 1JM. 



THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE 
QUARTERLY 



Editor-in-Chief 

Elva Lee, '93 

Randolph, New York 

Campus Editor 

Mary Swift Rupert, '18 

Rockefeller Hall, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Advertising Manager 
Elizabeth Brakeley, '16 

Freehold, N. J. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Annual Report 1 

War Council of Bryn Mawr College 40 

Bryn Mawr Service Corps 41 

Letters 47 

Bulletin of the Patriotic Farm 51 

Bryn Mawr College Patriotic Farm 51 

Ginling College 53 

News from the Campus 55 

The Clubs 57 

The Classes 58 

Literary Notes 64 

The College Woman's Plattsburg 65 

Contributions to the Quarterly, books for review, and subscriptions should be sent to 
the Editor-in Chief, Elva Lee, Randolph, New York. Cheques should be drawn payable 
to Bertha S. Ehlers, Denbigh Hall, Bryn Mawr, Pa. The Quarterly is published in Janu- 
ary, April, July, and November of each year. The price of subscription is one dollar a 
year, and single copies are sold for twenty-five cents each. Any failure to receive numbers 
of the Quarterly should be reported promptly to the Editor. Changes of address should 
be reported to the Editor not later than the first day of each month of issue. News 
items may be sent to the Editors. 

Copyright. iqi8, by the Alumnae Association of Bryn Mawr College. 



THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE 
QUARTERLY 



VOLUME XII 



APRIL, 1918 



No. 1 



TWENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 
OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE, 1917-1918 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 
Officers, 1918-1920 

President, Louise Congdon Francis (Mrs. 
Richard S. Francis), '00, Bryn Mawr, Penna. 

Vice-President, Katherine Delano Grant, 
(Mrs. Alexander G. Grant), '11, 31 Massa- 
chusetts Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Recording Secretary, Hilda Worthington 
Smith, '10, West Park, N. Y. 

Corresponding Secretary, Katherine McCol- 
lin, '15. 

Treasurer, Bertha Ehlers, '09, Denbigh 
Hall, Bryn Mawr, Penna. 

OFFICERS OF THE LOCAL BRANCHES 

Philadelphia 
November, 1916 to November, 1917 

Chairman, Elizabeth Bent Clark (Mrs. 
Herbert L. Clark), '95, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Vice-Chairman, Julia Cope Collins (Mrs. 
William H. Collins), '89, Haverford, Pa. 

Secretary-Treasurer, Agnes M. Irwin, '10, 
830 South 48th Street, Philadelphia. 

Directors, Jacqueline Morris Evans (Mrs. 
Edward W. Evans), '08, 151 East Coulter 
Street, Germantown, Philadelphia. Katha- 
rine W. McCollin, '16, 2049 Upland Way, 
Philadelphia. 

New York 

Chairman, Katherine Ecob, '09, Flushing, 
Long Island, New York. 

Boston 

The officers of the Boston Bryn Mawr Club 
act also as Branch Officers. 



Baltimore 

The Officers of the Baltimore Bryn Mawr 
Club act also as Branch Officers. 



OFFICERS OF THE BRYN MAWR CLUBS 

New York 

137 East 40th Street 

February, 1918 to February, 1919 

President, Barbara Spofford Morgan 
(Mrs. Shepard Ashman Morgan), '09, 163 
East 80th Street. 

Vice President, Helen Howell Moorhead 
(Mrs. John Joseph Moorhead), '04. 

Secretary, Fannie Skeer Barber, 09, 
539 West End Ave. 

Treasurer, Dorothy Forster Miller (Mrs. 
Rutger Bleecker Miller), '07. 

Boston 
144 Bowdoin Street 
April, 1917 to April, 1918 

President, Sylvia Lee, '01, 25 Chauncy Street 
Cambridge, Mass. 

Vice-President, Sylvia Scudder Bowditch 
(Mrs. Ingersoll Bowditch), '01, 

Corresponding-Secretary, Anna D. Fry, '99, 
The Ludlow, Copley Square. 

Recording Secretary, Marion C. Balch 

Chairman House Committee, Hannah T. 
Rowley, '01, 

Chairman, Membership Committee, Eugenia 
Jackson Comey (Mrs. Arthur Coleman 
Comey), '14, ^ 

Chicago 

Names of Officers not reported. 



2 The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly [April 

Baltimore COMMITTEES 

January, 1918 to January, 1919 academic committee 

Pauline Goldmark, '96, Chairman, 

President, Helen Walkley Irvin, '15, 270W. 94th Street, New York City.1916-1919 

1702 Park Place. Elizabeth Shepley Sergeant, '03. . 1915-1919 

Vice-President and Treasurer, Montgomery HeL£N Emerson? ^ 1917-1919 

Arthurs Supplee (Mrs. James Franklin Ellen D . Ellis, '01 1917-1920 

Supplee), '14. Frances Finke Hand, '98 1917-1921 

Secretary, Mildred McCoy, 16 Roland Frances Browne, '09 1917-1921 

Park, Md. Esther Lowenthal, '05 1918-1921 

p.,, , , Louise Congdon Francis, '00 (ex-officio) 

conference committee 
May, 1917 to May, 1918 

Gertrude Buffum Barrows, '08 
President, Sara F. Ellis, '04, 5716 Rippey (Mrs. Richard Lee Barrows), 

Street. Chairman, Haverford, Pa 1918-1919 

Vice-President, Margaret J. Yost, '16. Mrs. Tenney Frank 1918-1919 

Treasurer, Minnie List Chalfant (Mrs. Alice Patterson, '13 1918-1919 

Frederick B. Chalfant), '08. Mary Peirce, '12 1918-1919 

Secretary, Frances Rush Crawford (Mrs. 
R. L. Crawford), '01, 517 Emerson Street. . loan fund committee 

Martha G. Thomas, '89, Chairman, 

Washington Whitford, Pa 1916-1921 

„ , ,„'„ ^ , 4ntn Mary Peirce, '12 1913-1918 

October, 1917 to October, 1918 Katherine L. Howell, '06 1914-1919 

President, Henrietta S. Riggs, '10, 131 Mary C ' Smit ?> ' 14 J 91 ™ 

Maryland Avenue, N. E. Doris Earle ' ° 3 1917 ~ 1922 

Vice-President and Treasurer, Marcia committee on athletics 

B READY, '05. 

Secretary, Madeleine Edison Sloane (Mrs. Maud Dessau, '13, Chairman 1915-1920 

J. E. Sloane), '10. Mary G. Branson, '16 

Alice Hawkins, '07 

St. Louis Frederica Kellogg, '16 

Not reported. james e. rhoads scholarships committee 

China Marian Porris Smith (Mrs. Wil- 

liam R. Smith, Chairman, Low 

President, Fanny Sinclair Woods (Mrs. Buildings, Bryn Mawr, Pa 1915-1918 

A. H. Woods, '01, Canton Christian College, Julia Cope Collins, '89 1916-1918 

Canton. Anne Hampton Todd, '02 1917-1920 

Los Angeles health statistics committee 

Not reported. Dr. Katherine Porter, '94, Isabel Maddi- 

son, Ph.D.; Eleanor L. Lord, Ph.D. 
Ohio 

NOMINATING COMMITTEE 

January, 1918 to January, 1919 

Elizabeth Tappan, '10, Chairman, 

President, Grace Latimer Jones, '00, 1175 1419 Bolton Street, Baltimore,Md.. 1915-1919 

East Broad Street, Columbus. Marion Edwards Park, '98 1917-1921 

Vice-President, Secretary, and Treasurer, Elizabeth Lewis Otey, '01 1917-1921 

Adeline A. Werner, '16, 1640 East Broad Alice Hearne, '13 1917-1921 

Street, Columbus. Josephine Niles, '14 1917-1921 



1918] 



Annual Report of Alumnae Association 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Martha G. Thomas, '89, Chairman, 

Whitford, Pa 1916-1921 

Bertha Eiilers, '09 (ex-offlcio) 

Mary Crawford Dudley, '96 1916-1921 

Elizabeth B. Kirkbride, '96 1916-1921 

Clara Vail Brooks, '97 1916-1921 

Elizabeth Caldwell Fountain, '97 . 1916-1921 

Mary Peirce, '12 1916-1921 

Sibyl Hubbard Darlington, '99. . .1916-1921 

Marian Parris Smith, '01 1916-1921 

Elizabeth Bent Clark, '95 1916-1921 

Caroline McCormick, Slade, '96. .1916-1921 

Margaret Bontecou, '09 1916-1921 

Margarft Ayer Barnes, '07 

Louise Watson, '12, Secretary 



Clara Vail Brooks, '97, Chairman 
of Sub-Committee on Publicity 

ALUMNAE MEMBERS OF THE BOARD 

OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR 

COLLEGE 

Elizabeth B. Kirkbride, '96, 
1406 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, 

December, 1915 to December, 1921 
Elizabeth Nields Bancroft 
(Mrs. Wilfred Bancroft), '98 
Slatersville, R. I. 

December, 1915 to December, 1918 

COLLECTORS 

ICollectors given in special number.] 



THE MINUTES OF THE ANNUAL MEETING 
February 2, 1918 



Mrs. Walcott, the Vice-President, presided, 
in the absence of the President. 

The reading of the minutes was omitted. 

Mrs. Walcott read the annual report of the 
Board of Directors, which was accepted. A 
rising vote of sympathy was taken for the 
families and friends of members of the Alumnae 
Association who have died this past year: 
Ruth Gentry, Ph.D., Jessie Henry, 1903, and 
Elizabeth O'Neill Montgomery, 1898. 

Reports of Committees and Branches fol- 
lowed. 

Miss Haines read the report of the Treasurer, 
her final annual report after twenty-seven years 
of active service in this office. The report 
showed that some of the pledges for the Endow- 
ment Fund have not yet been paid in, although 
the Fund has been completed. 

A rising vote of thanks to Miss Haines for 
her long and faithful work as Treasurer was 
taken. 

Miss Goldmark read the report of the Aca- 
demic Committee. 

Miss Bontecou read the report of the Finance 
Committee. 

Mrs. Bancroft and Miss Kirkbride gave 
reports from the alumnae members of the 
Board of Directors of the College. 

As a supplement to the report of the Finance 
Committee, Mrs. Brooks outlined a new scheme 
for publicity among the alumnae, as a means of 
interesting them and keeping them in touch 
with the College. Such a plan has been tried 



with great success at Yale, with the result that 
class collections have tripled in the last year. 
As in all advertising schemes, there must be an 
initial expense, and to provide for this a motion 
was made by Mrs. Bancroft: that the Board of 
Directors be empowered to ask the Association for 
such an appropriation as may be necessary to 
put the publicity campaign of the Alumnae 
Association on a business basis. The motion 
was passed. 

Reports from the Branches came next in 
order of business. Mrs. Clark gave the Phila- 
delphia report, and Frances Browne the New 
York one. The Washington Branch had no 
report to make, and the Boston Branch sent a 
letter, printed in this issue of the Quarterly. 

As A. C. A. Councillor for the Bryn Mawr 
Alumnae Association, Miss Reilly gave an 
interesting report. 

The report of the Carola Woerishoffer Me- 
morial Committee was read. 

Mrs. Walcott asked that the Association 
ratify all Committee appointments made by 
the Board of Directors. 

A motion was made that these appointments 
be ratified. Passed. 

unfinished business 

In regard to the proposed amendment to the 
By-Laws, tkat the Academic Committee be 
increased to nine members, Miss Goldmark 
recommended that this change be postponed 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



until the next meeting, to give the Committee 
time for further consideration of the matter. 
Such a motion was made and passed. 

Miss McCollin gave a report from the Con- 
ference Committee, and suggested that this 
Committee should be given a wider scope for 
its activity, as at present there is not much for 
it to do. The Academic Committee, it was 
suggested, might well work in closer coopera- 
tion with the Conference Committee, in order 
to be in closer touch with the undergraduates. 
This closer connection would give the Con- 
ference Committee an opportunity to discuss 
more important matters. 

Miss Dimon reported the request of the 
delegates at a special meeting last January for 
a collection of slides, pictures, etc., of the 
College to be sent on request to schools. 

A motion was made that a committtee of three 
be appointed to arrange for a collection of slides, 
pictures, exhibits, etc., to send to schools, and 
that an appropriation of $100 be made for this 
purpose. 

Mrs. Bancroft thought that the appropria- 
tion seemed large. 

Miss Dimon explained that there was a real 
need for such illustrative material in the pre- 
paratory schools, and that the collection might 
be made with slight expense, or more elabo- 
rately. 

Mrs. Johnson suggested that we might 
charge the schools for expenses, and so be 
reimbursed for the money. 

It was suggested that such an exhibit might 
be part of the general publicity campaign of 
the Finance Committee. Miss Reilly thought 
the two should be separate things, as one is to 
be among the alumnae themselves, and the 
other for schools and clubs. When the A. C. A. 
was arranging for college exhibits in Rhode 
Island and elsewhere, Bryn Mawr had no 
pictures to send. It would be worth while to 
fill this demand in order to reach possible 
students. 

Mrs. Fountain inquired why this was not a 
college matter, and asked whether the College 
could not arrange to have such a collection to 
be sent to schools. 

Miss Maddison explained that the College has 
no appropriation for such a collection. Many 
requests are received for such an exhibit from 
schools, but at present there are no good pic- 
tures to send. The College would welcome the 
cooperation of the Alumnae Association in the 
matter. An appropriation of $100 would prob- 



ably provide a good collection of panoramic 
photographs. 

Mrs. Bancroft thought that this was not a 
pressing need this year when the College is so 
crowded with students that there is no need of 
further publicity work. 

The question was called for, and the motion 
was passed. 

Miss Goldmark reported that the Seniors 
had made a request to the faculty for a course 
in Sex Hygiene, to be given under the Health 
Department. Such a course will be given in 
the second semester. Miss Goldmark thought 
such a request an encouraging sign in the 
development of the College. 

The meeting adjourned for luncheon in 
Pembroke. President Thomas was present at 
the luncheon, and made a short speech of 
welcome to the alumnae. 

AFTERNOON MEETING 

The Board of Directors of the Alumnae 
Association of Bryn Mawr College offer the 
following changes in the By-Laws: 

Amend Article IV, Section 1 to read: "The 
annual dues for each member of the Associa- 
tion shall be two dollars," etc. 

Amend Article IV, Section 2, to read "The 
dues for each member that enters the Associa- 
tion in June shall be one dollar," etc. 

Amend Article IV, Section 3, to read "Any 
member of the Association may become a 
life member of the Association upon payment 
at any time of thirty dollars," etc. 

These amendments to the By-Laws of the 
Association cannot come up for a vote of the 
Association until next year. The proposed 
amendment was read and put aside to be acted 
on at the next annual meeting. 

At the suggestion of Mrs. Clark the question 
of the deed of gift to the Mary E. Garrett 
Endowment Fund and the discussion of the 
patriotic farm were postponed until after the 
discussion of war relief work. 

Miss Reilly reported for the Committee on 
War Relief Work as follows: 

A Committee of three was appointed late in 
November to cooperate with the War Council 
and the organization of the College in any work 
that they might undertake for the year. The 
Committee was composed of Miss Thomas, 
Miss Dimon and Miss Reilly, chairman, and 
had instructions to cooperate with the War 
Council in whatever it undertook in every pos- 
sible way, except that it could not pledge the 



1918] 



Annual Report of Alumnae Association 



Alumnae Association as a whole for any action. 
The Committee has cooperated in that spirit 
with the War Council of the College. 

When the Committee was appointed there 
were three propositions before the War Council 
which had to be considered in connection with 
what should be undertaken as the great war 
work of the year. The War Council and the 
college community desired not only to do 
something which would involve a large sum 
of money, but which would include the service 
of Bryn Mawr women. A tremendous amount 
of work has been done in the College, Red Cross, 
relief and social work, and an astonishing 
amount of money has been raised, considering 
the size of Bryn Mawr. We cannot stress too 
strongly the activities and financial support of 
the College for its war work. They felt that 
they could raise only a small sum to contribute 
towards this large particular job which they 
could undertake — $10,000, and would have to 
cooperate with some association from the out- 
side, preferably the Alumnae Association. 
The three possibilities before them were as 
follows : 

LAY. M. C A. hut, which meant the rais- 
ing of $30,000 to be paid over directly to the 
Y. M. C. A. with the possible employment of 
four to six Bryn Mawr women as canteen 
workers under the Y. M. C. A. 

2. A unit to be sent abroad under the aus- 
pices of the Red Cross, or American Fund for 
French W T ounded on the lines of the Smith 
unit. The initial expense of this would be 
$30,000, with additional expense afterwards. 

The criticism of these two propositions was 
that the Y. M. C. A. hut seemed to be open to 
the objection that it did not leave much room 
for the service of Bryn Mawr women and in- 
volved a large fixed sum of money. The criti- 
cism of the Bryn Mawr unit was the question 
of money and workers of definite type to be 
placed in one locality. It was felt that Bryn 
Mawr might not have sixteen available women 
of that type for a unit and might not be able to 
raise the exact amount of money required. It 
also seemed that there might be a great number 
of individuals who could go but could not go as 
a unit. A number of units had already been 
organized to go abroad and too many units 
might become a burden if they could not be 
used to meet changed conditions and shifting 
circumstances. 

3. Out of the objections grew the idea of a 
Bryn Mawr Sendee Corps, a unit in the sense 



that it is financed from one source and one 
fund, but made up of individuals who can be 
placed in those positions and sent out under 
organizations to countries in which they can 
be of particular service (i.e., ten good doctors 
could be placed in different places under dif- 
ferent organizations). The unit would be mak- 
ing use of individual Bryn Mawr women of 
experience and training in positions and coun- 
tries where they would be of greatest use. 
The Service Corps would give variety and 
opportunity for any work which it seemed 
might appeal to the Alumnae Association as a 
whole, — reconstruction, relief work, Y. M. C. A. 
canteen work and also would leave us a little 
free to enter any other line of work that might 
come up. Publicity work for the government 
could be done under a Service Corps, and also 
if educational work of definite character comes 
up later on would leave scope for it. It would 
also make it possible to use money as it comes 
in and not have to wait until it is all collected. 
It takes $2000 to $3000 to support one worker 
abroad now. The Service Corps would enable 
us to make use of a great variety of trained 
people and the tremendous interest in work in 
the foreign field now and at home in the 
future. It appealed to the undergraduate 
committee and to the War Council. 

Two mass meetings were held at the College. 
The meeting in December decided definitely 
and unanimously on the Service Corps, and at 
the meeting the Alumnae Committee offered 
cooperation in every way, and agreed to present 
it to the alumnae. 

The next question was whether it was a 
workable scheme and could be carried out well. 
Dr. Rufus Jones, of the Friends' Reconstruc- 
tion Work said that that committee would be 
glad to send Bryn Mawr women. (Two Bryn 
Mawr alumnae are already working with the 
Friends' Reconstruction unit in Russia.) The 
Red Cross officials in Washington also said 
that they would be delighted to have Bryn 
Mawr women sent out under these circum- 
stances, and that from the pressure of public 
opinion they were almost compelled to take as 
workers only people who came as volunteers 
and did not need salaries. They said that 
there is a need for teachers as well as for doc- 
tors, executives, etc. (Bryn Mawr is repre- 
sented in the Y. M. C. A. by Mrs. Slade, who is 
chairmarT of the Personnel Committee, and in 
the Y. W. C. A. by Mrs. Robert E. Speer.) 

We have working abroad at present sixty 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



Bryn Mawr women, working with all sorts of 
organizations. The idea is to connect up with 
the Bryn Mawr women abroad and get from 
them information as to whether they need 
assistance, etc. and information about work 
now going on abropd. 

The only complication is tfot there is now 
some feeling in the undergraduate body that 
they might wish to take further action on the 
Bryn Mawr Service Corps, and in taking any 
action we ought to take it either independently 
or with some view as to the action of the College 
in taking back its support of the Service 
Corps 

About $30,000, would have to be raised 
immediately as a nucleus. We hope very 
much that we may cooperate with the College 
because it is essential that the college com- 
munity should not only have a money raising 
interest in the war but should be in touch with 
the great work being done, and Bryn Mawr 
women working with their support could give 
them this, which will be very valuable in the 
future. We really want to make our trained 
women count in the work of the world which is 
to come, and to do this we must have women 
who have worked abroad. 

The Committee was authorized to cooperate 
with the War Council, and as soon as they 
decided on the Service Corps, it took steps 
toward^ raising funds. The first pledge of 
$500 came from Mrs. Alba Johnson. Other 
amounts have also been promised, and a num- 
ber of volunteers who could go in the immediate 
future, some of whom can support themselves 
in part, offered themselves. Arrangements 
have been discussed for raising this fund locally 
through Branches. 

The Committee would make the following 
recommendations in regard to the organiza- 
tion of the Service Corps: 

1. Funds for the Service Corps should be 
raised by the Department of Red Cross and 
Allied Relief of the College, and by the Alum- 
nae Association. 

2. That the Association appoint a committee 
of three to carry on the work of collection of 
funds and the enrollment for the Service Corps 
among the alumnae and former students of the 
College. 

3. That a Committee of six be appointed as 
an Executive Committee for the Bryn Mawr 
Service Corps, the three members of the Alum- 
nae Committee, and three members of the 
College War Council. It is recommended that 



the three members from the College War 
Council should be the Chairman of the War 
Council, the Chairman of the Committee on 
Red Cross and Allied Relief, and a member from 
the faculty. 

4. The function of this Executive Committee 
shall be to make final decisions and arrange- 
ments for all members of the Service Corps 
and to expend the funds. 

5. That the Treasurer be empowered to 
receive the moneys raised for the Service 
Corps including the amount raised by the 
Department of Red Cross and Allied Relief, 
if they so desire. 

A suggestion was made that the names of all 
Bryn Mawr women working abroad be posted 
at College as a sort of service list. 

Mrs. Slade, representing the Personnel Com- 
mittee of the Y. M. C. A. spoke in favor of 
establishing a Y. M. C. A. Canteen Unit. 
[Mrs. Slade's speech appears at the end of this 
article.] 

Miss Reilly: I think we shall eventually have 
ten women for canteen work, but my idea of a 
Service Corps is to use our money as soon as 
we can. 

Mrs. Slade: I will take Bryn Mawr women 
one by one as fast as you can send them to us. 

Miss Reilly: I therefore place before the 
association a recommendation that they adopt 
the Service Corps for War Relief Work. 

Dr. Tracy: My information in regard to the 
foreign work is entirely the work of medical 
women. Facts are proving that the more 
flexible unit is found to be the most satis- 
factory form in so far as the work of medical 
women is concerned. The American Women's 
Hospitals Committee is an organization brought 
together by the War Service Committee. Dr. 
Morton presented the platform of the organiza- 
tion to the authorities in Washington upon its 
organization, and Dr. Morton was asked to go on 
the General Medical Board. From that time as 
the movement has grown, most of the women 
physicians who have been sent abroad have been 
sent after recommendation by this organization, 
and the authorities in Washington now look to 
Dr. Morton's committee for the candidates 
whom they shall send abroad. That organiza- 
tion now is definitely making plans to raise 
$300,000 with which to send over a hospital 
equipment to be placed in France, and later 
one for Servia, from which they want to send 
dispensary units and units for civilian relief, 
doing independent work although connected 






1918] 



Annual Report of Alumnae Association 



with the hospital. In these units there will be 
the greatest need not only for doctors and 
nurses but also for college women who have 
done social service work, and the organization 
is exceedingly anxious to have affiliations with 
college women who are organized for such work. 
I would like to suggest that the committee shall 
get in touch with Dr. Walker, of the American 
Women's Hospitals Committee, so that they 
may find the place for women physicians and 
nurses, graduates of Bryn Mawr to place them 
where they can be of greatest service. 

Miss Helen Taft: The important considera- 
tion in connection with the Service Corps is 
that it allows so much flexibility and so much 
change of plan according to change of circum- 
stances. It is quite possible that at present 
the greatest need for workers is in the Y. M. C. 
A. in France, but we feel that the circum- 
stances and reports from abroad change so 
often as to what is needed that if we commit 
ourselves to some one unit and some definite 
undertaking things might change and we might 
find ourselves left with something on our hands 
which might not be the most useful thing we 
might be doing, and that is why the plan for 
the Service Corps was chosen instead of Recon- 
struction work or a Y. M. C. A. hut. Although 
we undoubtedly would want to send workers 
to the Y. M. C. A. and the Red Cross if we 
work in connection with them and supply them 
with the best people, we would be filling their 
essential need without putting ourselves in the 
position of supporting a unit which might 
possibly not be needed in exactly the circum- 
stances under which it was started. We also 
had a feeling that people ought to be willing to 
serve as individuals where needed rather than 
go in a group as Bryn Mawr graduates. They 
should be willing to go where they were needed 
and not insist on being kept together when 
they get to France. There has arisen consider- 
able embarrassment from the fact that units 
heretofore have insisted on being kept together, 
which made it difficult to use them freely and 
effectively. This was really the reason why 
we decided on the Service Corps and I think 
that if it could be combined with the idea of 
the Y. M. C. A. it would be more satisfactory 
than if the Alumnae Association and College 
were to pledge themselves to a definite unit 
under one organization. 

Miss Macintosh: Another point in favor of 
the Service Corps in collecting funds is that 
people might give through Bryn Mawr to 



funds in which they were particularly inter- 
ested. None of the objections seem to hold 
good against the Service Corps. It meets the 
demands of all those who are urging spec : al 
cases. Anything fits in. 

Mrs. Slade: I think the Service Corps is the 
finest idea I have heard from any college, far 
and away the finest. 

Miss Reilly (In answer to a question about 
including in the Service Corps Bryn Mawr 
alumnae to do War Work in this country) : 

Bryn Mawr alumnae are doing so much in 
this country that not very much could be 
added to the work of Bryn Mawr alumnae in 
this country. The really great work : s to 
supply the need for workers abroad. 

The motion for the adoption of a Service 
Corps as the form of War Relief Work was unani- 
mously passed. 

The motion as to the organization of such a 
Service Corps was also passed unanimously. 

Miss Goldmark: The question arises as to 
whether we should specify that an alumnae 
member be chairman of the committee as the 
alumnae will be responsible for the funds and 
for the work. 

Miss Reilly: We felt that in this the initiative 
had come from the War Council and that it 
seemed that the matter of a chairman was not 
of very great concern. We felt that if we had 
the attitude of meeting the undergraduates on 
equal terms it would be desirable. We should 
not take the attitude of being more important. 

All the recommendations of the Committee 
as to organization were adopted unanimously. 

Miss Dimon: The Board should be empow- 
ered to fill vacancies on the Committee of 
three. 

A motion that a committee of three be appointed 
by the Board of Directors was then passed with 
the recommendation that the members of the 
present committee shoidd remain in office: Miss 
Thomas, Miss Dimon, Miss Reilly, Chairman. 

The next subject of discussion was the 
Bryn Mawr Patriotic Farm. 

Miss Goldmark: I hope that I am opening a 
good deal of discussion on the question of 
Bryn Mawr's participating in the great food 
movement. It seems to me that Bryn Mawr 
made a very remarkable showing last summer 
with very little preparation and through the 
energy and ability of a very few of the alumnae 
without the support of the alumnae as a whole. 
The farm was eminently successful. Bryn 
Mawr College has been able to go off the 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



market this winter pretty successfully in being 
able to get its vegetables directly from that 
farm. It was the best agricultural experi- 
ment that any college or institution has carried 
on with so little preparation, It is high time 
for the Alumnae Association to get back of the 
proposition. It is as much our job as this 
fine foreign work we are going to do. I think 
that the proposition of getting funds for it, 
even up to $7000 should be undertaken at once 
by the Alumnae Association because that 
money is going to come back this year with a 
good deal more success. People last year got 
back a little less than half of what they gave 
as a gift. I hope very much that we shall be 
able to get pledges and begin getting seeds 
next week. 

Miss Hilda Loines: There is great necessity 
for agricultural production this year. The 
food condition will probably be worse this 
coming year than in the past and America 
must make up for the deficiency of the rest of 
the word, and we must increase our acreage. 
From all parts of the country have come the 
reports that the farmers are not going to in- 
crease their acreage but decrease it because 
they have no labor in sight at present. There 
is also the transportation shortage, another 
reason why it is so important for every com- 
munity to be self-supporting just so far as it 
can be. This is the great service which the 
B ryn Mawr farm rendered last year. It released 
food for the army abroad and released space in 
the cars which is so valuable at the present 
time. I think it will be a valuable contribu- 
tion of Bryn Mawr to the work of the country 
for this year. 

Miss Goldmark (in answer to a question as to 
where the funds were to come from) : It is alto- 
gether a volunteer movement. The Alumnae 
Association fund will not be called upon but 
we pledge ourselves to raise the fund among 
ourselves and the friends of the College and not 
from the alumnae treasury. 

Miss Ehlers (in answer to a question about 
the use of the grounds and equipment of the 
Baldwin School for the coming summer): The 
Baldwin School simply offers its plant because 
it has large kitchens excellently equipped for 
canning, etc. Miss Johnson has offered what- 
ever part of the building we wish. The school 
itself takes care of the reception rooms and the 
part of the building it keeps open for the sum- 
mer. It gives in addition electric light, cold 
storage and steam equipment. Miss Johnson 



wants the plant used for patriotic purposes 
and has not the time to organize such work 
herself, and gives it over to the college, asking 
only that alumnae and teachers of the school 
who wish to work have the privilege of working 
with us, and asking for the privilege of buying 
surplus food, as the College did this year, at the 
market prices. 

Miss Kirk: I think some acknowledgement 
ought to be made of this splendid offer. 

Miss Ehlers: Miss Johnson also offers a 
truck which makes it possible to deliver surplus 
products. 

We hope moreover to have enough surplus 
labor as a small land squad to supply the de- 
mand for workers in the neighborhood. Some- 
one asked the other day whether we could 
possibly supply workers in Chestnut Hill, and 
I thought that it could be done. The Baldwin 
School offers possibilities of indefinite expansion 
and can be cut down as low as necessary. 

(Miss Johnson's offer also includes 5 acres of 
land for cultivation.) 

The resolution that the Alumnae Association 
guarantee the fund for the Patriotic Farm for 
next year was passed unanimously. 

Whereas food production during the period 
of the war is a national service to which the 
Bryn Mawr alumnae pledge their support, and 

Whereas, the Bryn Mawr Farm last sum- 
mer proved its value by supplying vegetables 
and fruits for the College during the winter 
months and thus relieved the demand on 
public markets, be it 

Resolved, that the Alumnae Association 
authorize its Directors to appoint a Bryn 
Mawr Farm Committee consisting of three 
members to cooperate with the Department of 
Food Production of the War Council of Bryn 
Mawr College in securing the best available 
farm land and in organizing and directing a 
land squad of undergraduates, alumnae and 
others for the cultivation of crops; be it further 

Resolved, that the committee be given power 
to accept the cooperation offered by the Bald- 
win School in the use of its equipment and 
grounds; and be it finally 

Resolved, that the Alumnae Association 
appeal to its members to raise a guarantee 
fund of $7000 for this purpose. 

A vote of thanks was then moved to Miss 
Johnson for her very generous offer. 

Miss Goldmark: I think that this oppor- 
tunity should not go by without having alum- 



1918] 



Annual Report of Alumnae Association 



9 



nae, who want to, make application at once in 
regard to their pledges for the guarantee fund. 

Miss Elders: One other suggestion about 
the farm. The Farm Committee think 

might very well consider not only our own 
twenty acres here and the small Land Squad 
to be sent out from this particular center but 
the possibility of having Bryn Mawr alumnae 
go into other centers as the kind of leaders 
described by Miss Ogilvie last night to work 
in any other sense that the Land Army of 
America might include. I would suggest 
that information be spread among alumnae 
that alumnae are wanted just as much as 
undergraduates on our own farm and in the 
Land Squad. 

Dr. Marion Parris Smith: May I bring to 
the attention of members of the Alumnae 
Association who own land that it is perfectly 
possible to get plenty of the very best labor 
from our own undergraduate body, students 
who are not able to go to work on the Bryn 
Mawr farm but could work in other parts of 
the country, the possibility of small units to 
work on their own places in other parts of the 
country? It is not only a necessity but a duty 
for every land owner to use his land to the 
utmost of its capacity whether he make or 
lose money by it. We will be glad to give 
information about a unit of five who operated 
four acre- and a cannery last summer. 

Mrs. Jeanes: I am very glad that a general 
appeal was made for enrollment in this work. 
I know of five other units to be organized in 
the neighborhood of Philadelphia, so there will 
be plenty of opportunities for anv who are 
interested at all in this service. 

Miss Ogilvie: I hope very much that the 
news will spread among the alumnae and among 
those not connected with the College, and also 
friends. We are going to use a great many 
people on the land in different communities. 
They can be used in various capacities: people 
for hard work; people of executive ability to be 
at the heads; book-keeping as well as expert 
agricultural work. 

Mrs. Johnson then presented the following 
resolution. 

Resolved, that the Finance Committee be 
authorized, subject to the approval of the Board 
of Directors, to prepare the necessary agreement 
for the transfer of the Mary E. Garrett Endow- 
ment Fund. This motion was passed. 

Miss Kirkbride then offered resolutions for the 
Finance Committee, about the Deed of Gift: 



1. Whereas Section 7 of the Resolutions of 
February 4, 1911, in regard to the terms of a 
future deed of gift reads as follows: 

Resolved, that when the next addition is made 
to the Fund, the Directors of Bryn Mawr Col- 
lege be asked to accept a new deed of gift for 
the entire Alumnae Academic Endowment 
Fund embodying these resolutions in place of 
the deeds of gift of 1909 and 1910 and whereas 
it seems expedient to put this resolution into 
effect at the present time, therefore be it 

Resolved, that the Directors of Bryn Mawr 
College be asked to accept a deed for the Mary 
E. Garrett Endowment Fund on the general 
lines of the deed of 1909, and that the con- 
sideration of a new deed for the entire fund be 
postponed. 

2. The Association at a special meeting held 
May 7, 1910, voted to accept the offer of the 
Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College to 
name a professorship in recognition of each 
$100,000 to enable the college to receive the 
gift of the General Education Board. Over 
$200,000 was given at that time, $100,000 for 
Endowment and $53,000 for debt, this entitling 
the Association to name two Chairs, but the 
names have never been given. It is now pro- 
posed to name these two Chairs in the two 
departments which head the list in the program, 
i.e., Greek and Latin, and to name the Mary 
E. Garrett Chair for the third department in 
the program, i.e., English. 

Resolved, that in consideration of gifts made 
to the College by the Alumnae Association in 
1910 the Directors of Bryn Mawr College be 
requested to name the professorships of Greek 
and Latin the Alumnae Professorship of Greek, 
and the Alumnae Professorship of Latin. 

3. Whereas the alumnae of Bryn Mawr 
College and the undergraduates of the years 
1915-1917 wish to express in a fitting memorial 
their gratitude for the long and generous serv- 
ices of Mary E. Garrett to the College, and 
whereas it was ordered by the Alumnae Asso- 
ciation on January 29, 1916, that this memorial 
should take the form of a professorship to be 
named in honour of Mary E. Garrett and that 
the next installment of $100,000 of the Alum- 
nae Academic Endowment Fund be presented 
to the College for this purpose, therefore be it 

Resolved, that as soon as $100,000 have been 
collected the Board of Directors of the Alum- 
nae Association be empowered to transfer this 
sum to the Trustees of Bryn Mawr College 
under a deed of gift in substantially the form 



10 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



exhibited to the meeting and which was ordered 
to be made a part of the minutes. 

These three resolutions were passed unani- 
mously. 

Miss Kirkbride then read the terms of the 
Deed of Gift which were accepted unanimously. 

This Indenture, made this 

day of A. D. 1918, between the 

Alumnae Association of Bryn Mawr College, a 
corporation organized under and by virtue of 
the laws of the State of Pennsylvania, of the 
first part, hereinafter called the "Donor," and 
the Trustees of Bryn Mawr College, a corpora- 
tion organized under and by virtue of the 
laws of the State of Pennsylvania, of the second 
part, hereinafter calle^ the "Donee," 

Whereas, it is the intention of the Donor to 
add to the Endowment of Bryn Mawr College 
a fund to be known as "The Mary E. Garrett 
Alumnae Endowment Fund," of which the 
income may be used for Academic salaries; 

And Whereas, it is the intention of Donor 
in making this gift to increase salaries paid to 
associate professors and professors, and not to 
enable the Donee to expend for other purposes 
money which but for this gift would have been 
used to pay professors or associate professors; 

And Whereas, the Donor, at a meeting of 
its members duly called, passed a resolution as 
follows: 

Resolved: that as soon as $100,000 have 
been collected the Board of Directors of the 
Alumnae Association be empowered to transfer 
this sum to the Trustees of Bryn Mawr College 
under a deed of gift in substantially the form 
exhibited to the meeting and which was ordered 
to be made a part of the minutes. 

Now This Indenture Witnesseth, That 
the donor for the purposes above mentioned 
has given, granted and confirmed, and by 
these presents does give, grant and confirm 
unto the Donee, its successors and assigns, the 
sum of One- Hundred Thousand Dollars ($100,- 
000.) In Trust, to invest the same and keep 
invested, and use the income thereof in accord- 
ance with the following conditions and for the 
following purposes: 

1. It shall be held as a fund for the endow- 
ment of a Chair to be known as "The Mary 
E. Garrett Alumnae Chair of English." 

2. The annual income of the fund shall be 
devoted primarily to the payment of the salary 
of the holder of the endowed Chair. If, in 
order that disproportionate salaries in the 
College shall not be paid, it is deemed inadvis- 



able by the Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr 
College to pay the whole of said fund in any 
year to the holder of the endowed Chair, the 
surplus shall be used in that or any subsequent 
year to increase the salaries of associate pro- 
fessors (primarily those who are receiving less 
than Two Thousand Five Hundred Dollars 
($2,500) a year) and second the salaries of 
full professors, and, provided, that the amount 
which but for this endowment would be re- 
quired to be expended for the salary of the 
holder of the Chair endowed, shall be used in 
the same manner to increase the salaries of 
associate professors and of full professors. 

3. The Donee shall have full power to invest 
the fund at its discretion without being re- 
stricted to so-called legal securities, provided 
that no part of it shall be invested in halls of 
residence for students. 

4. The Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr 
College shall make an annual report of the 
fund, showing income, expenditures, and invest- 
ments, to the Board of Directors of the Donor. 

5. If any of the terms of this deed are not 
carried out, the fund hereby granted shall 
revert to the Donor, and its successors: Pro- 
vided, however, that the terms of the deed 
may be changed by the mutual consent of the 
Donor and Donee, upon request of the Board 
of Directors of Bryn Mawr College. 

6. If gifts are made for the Endowment 
Fund of the College, conditional upon the 
raising of other funds, it is agreed that the 
gift hereby made may be treated and used as a 
part of such funds to be raised by the College: 
Provided, that the conditions herein contained 
are not altered by the conditions imposed by 
the donors of such other gifts. 

7. It is mutually understood and agreed 
that the terms of this deed are to bind the 
successors and assigns of the parties hereto. 

In Witness Whereof, the Donor, the 
Alumnae Association of Bryn Mawr College, 
has caused this Indenture to be signed by its 
President, attested by its Secretary, and its 
corporate seal to be hereto affixed, and the 
Donee, the Trustees of Bryn Mawr College, 
has caused this Indenture to be signed by its 
Chairman, attested by its Secretary, and its 
corporate seal to be hereto affixed the day and 
year first above written. 

Alumnae Association 
of Bryn Mawr College, 

By 

President. 



1918] 



Annual Report of Alumnae Association 



11 



Attest: 

Secretary. 

Trustees of Bryn Mawr College, 

By — 

President. 
Attest: 

Secretary 

Miss Reilly announced an informal confer- 
ence about the Service Corps in Pembroke 
East at seven thirty, which all alumnae were 
invited to attend. 

Mrs. Esrey Johnson announced that $780 
had been raised for the Farm Fund, and Miss 
Reilly that $515, had been raised for the Serv- 
ice Corps. 

The Secretary than read the result of the 
election of officers, as follows: 
For President: 

Louise Congdon Francis, '00 384 

'Jeanne Kerr Fleischmann, '10 155 

Vice-President: 

Johanna Kroeber Mosenthal, '00 170 

Catherine Delano Grant, '11 379 

Recording Secretary 

Alice M. Hawkins, '07 129 

Hilda W. Smith, '10 403 

Corresponding Secretary, 

Margaret Bontecou, '09 380 

Isabel Benedict, '14 133 

Treasurer, 

Bertha Ehlers, '09 558 

Katharine McCollin, '15 137 

Result of Election for Academic Committee 

Grace Latimer Jones 267 

Esther Lowenthal 271 

Respectfully submitted, 

Hilda W. Smith, Secretary 

MRS. SLADE'S SPEECH ON Y. M. C. A. 
CANTEEN WORK 

I feel that the plan which I wish to present 
could be done under the Service Corps, and 
first let me tell you how I came to be interested 
in this work. It was last spring after the entry 
of the United States into war. Both the 
British and the Canadian government sent men 
here to tell our President what the condition 
in the camps had been and what dangers troops 
face before they get to the trenches. Major 
Burke said that the first group of Canadian 
soldiers sent over were landed and sent to 
Salisbury Plain, that there was no one to look 
out for them, they had all the liquor they could 



possibly drink, and were open to every evil 
influence with nothing to counteract it. The 
majority of these men came down with venereal 
disease. More of these troops were incapaci- 
tated through venereal disease than through 
German guns. He said we did not take in, 
any of us, the frightful home-sickness that 
came to those boys going abroad. Most of 
them had never been across and were lost, and 
he said the only answer we have found has 
been through the Y. M. C. A. huts which we 
place up to the edge of the trenches so that they 
are the last thing the man sees before he goes 
into the trench, and the first thing he sees when 
he comes out. Men can not do all of the 
Y. M. C. A. work. One woman can do more 
than 100 men in creating an "atmosphere/* 
a new word in war. 

The British, Canadian and French have 
found this out. The first thing that General 
Pershing did was to cable over here to tell 
our government that they must give the Y. M. 
C. A. every possible facility and that they must 
bring women over and that they must bring 
them at once. 

I did nothing at the time, but in August when 
I was taking what I considered a perfectly 
deserved holiday, Gertrude Ely walked into 
camp one day. She had been working for six 
weeks in a Y. M. C. A. hut on this side. She 
came to talk over going to Europe for the huts 
over there, and did not know really where her 
duty lay. We talked all that evening and all 
night, and just about sunrise she said, "Well, 
I have to take the train and go back, and I 
have decided that I will go, but you will have 
to stand behind me." And since then it has 
been my duty to find women to go over, and 
find women who will stand behind her, and 
behind the boys. 

It is not difficult to find women to go over, 
but very hard to find the best women in the 
country to go, which is what they must have. 
The vast majority of women who have gone 
over have made good, and few have not suc- 
ceeded. I come down finally to the belief that 
what we have to have is a combination some- 
thing like this, a trained woman who is able 
to adapt herself to circumstances with great 
rapidity, who can be absolutely understanding of 
a situation, absolutely sympathetic, and utterly 
impersonal. Now to my mind college training 
does help" you in these lines. College women 
seem to be able to do that particular sort of 
thing. They seem to be able to throw them- 



12 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



selves whole-heartedly into a game and keep 
on the outside and look at it at the same time. 

For doctors and nurses to go into this work 
would seem wrong, or for agriculturists, but 
for women who are not needed it seems to me 
the opportunity of their lives. Telegrams come 
saying "Send us finer women." "Get the 
best you have in America." "The oppor- 
tunity here is endless." Even General Pershing 
cables saying, "We must get the best women 
that America has." 

We need trained and educated women to do 
canteen service because it is an entering wedge. 
You do anything that comes along and has to 
be done; you get your opportunity to hold on 
to these men. It is a case of building up the 
morals of the army. 

My idea of a unit came about in this way. 
Why do you not arrange to have the Bryn 
Mawr unit sent under the Y. M. C. A. to be 
put in some place where they can be used? 
They are going to be asked to choose their own 
leader, the one person who will be responsible 
for the others. The whole thing is under army 
orders and restrictions. 

The plan that I made out was to ask the 
other women's colleges. Let us have a group 
of Bryn Mawr women, the best group that 
you can give us to go over under the Y. M. C. A. 
Our specific task is to take care of our boys 
over there. I want a Bryn Mawr unit; I can 
not go home without feeling we are going to 
have it; I want a group of Bryn Mawr women 
to go and work out such a high type of organi- 
zation that it can be copied in the other camps. 
Send me women who can teach, women who 
can teach anything. Soldiers are so eager for 
something to take them out of themselves. 
There are two professors from Grinnell holding 
classes in higher mathematics, which are so 
popular that they had to repeat them to get 
all the men in who wanted to attend them. 

(Mrs. Slade then read a letter describing the 
canteen work, a copy of which is attached.) 

Now for the plan. It costs about $2000 a 
year to maintain a worker for a year and pay 
her expenses. A unit of ten would cost $20,000. 
This money will be raised and the women will 
be sent over. We can just as well ask the 
friends of Bryn Mawr to give an extra $20,000 
in addition to the $30,000 planned for. Money 
seems the least thing. Appoint a Personnel 
Committee and decide upon the women whom 
you want to represent Bryn Mawr among the 
American soldiers and I shall be glad to get 
their passports and send them over. 



LETTER 

"On active service with the American 
Expeditionary Force, Y. M. C. A. U. S. 
Army P. O. 

France, December 30, 1917. 
"Dear Ann: 

By this time you people may think that 
and I have gone West, for I have re- 
ceived no mail so far from the States, so don't 
know whether my cables, etc., ever went 
through. I can hardly believe that I have 
been out of the United States over a month 

Our canteen, crude as it would seem to you, 
is one of the best camp canteens running. We 
have a good-sized portable hut with mud floor 
and canvas windows. The rats are so plenti- 
ful that the air holes around the base of the 
building are numerous. There are two small 
camp stoves in the front and center of the 
place and at the end are the canteen counter 
and kitchen. Back of the counter we have 
boards on the floor and so we don't freeze fast 
when we stop moving for a minute. It's really 
very comfortable and the crowd we are with 
are splendid. But I must not get my cart 
before the horse. To proceed, the counter 
end of the hut has a camp cook stove and it is 
truly marvelous what can be done on that 
leaky, smoky thing, it takes in splendid fashion. 
None of us ought to catch anything for the 
place is so filled with smoke, tobacco and wood 
that when things get under way you can't 
see more than three yards before you. Never- 
theless we all love it and I for one would be 
completely broken-hearted if I had to come 
home. 

I find that running a girl's camp for three 
years stands me in good stead here, otherwise I 
should be simply swamped at the amount of 
supplies and the large quantities of things that 
must be prepared. We serve hot lemonade, 
cocoa, coffee, jam, meat and cheese sandwiches, 
canned peaches, pears, soups and pork and 
beans. Then each day some little extra is 
baked up, such as mince pies, cake, etc. . . 

The canteen is open from 11.30 in the morn- 
ing until 8.30 at night. We have to report at 
9 to get things prepared. There are five other 
women on the place with us so there is no 
overwork. Each woman has one night off a 
week, one day off and every three months one 
week off. Sunday is my day off, hence the 
letter. 



1918] 



Annual Report of Alumnae Association 



13 



And I'd give anything under the sun, I think, 
to be back in the States for just one-half hour, 
be able to condense the population of the 
country so that they would just about fill the 
assembly hall and then get at them. Good 
heavens, it drives me mad when I stop to 
think of what we as a nation could do, what we 
have done and what is left to be done. You 
people in the States have no more idea of the 
conditions over here than a mouse in your 
bread tin. The spirit here is wonderful, and 
we have as many French soldiers as we have 
Americans so one can judge fairly well. Of 
course I come more closely in contact with our 
army and I am more and more impressed with 
the fact that an American soldier is the biggest- 
hearted thing on earth. 

By the way before I forget it, I'm enclosing 
a list of books that are really very much in 
demand among our men. The girls' organiza- 
tion could get at this as well as magazines. 
They are simply wild for reading material. 
. . . Warm gloves I find are another 

thing badly needed. One of the boys who 
drives our car for us, wears a pair of woolen 
gloves out about in a day. 

The Christmas mail came in in fine style both 
for the canteen workers and for the boys. It 
was touching to see those boys insist on having 
Ruth and me share their Christmas, they knew 
we wouldn't get any mail and around they 
came with candy, gum and cake. The canteen 
crowd looked after us in a lovely way, and as 
we just landed the Saturday before Christmas 
I think we appreciated it even more because 
they were extremely busy and we were absolute 
strangers. I suppose I ought to close, but I 
must tell you a little more about our Christmas. 
I have had some unusual Christmases, but 
this will always stand out as the most impres- 
sive, I think. 

Christmas Eve we did not open until 5.30. 
We divided our people into groups and with 
the volunteer help of the soldiers started out 
for Christmas trees, holly, mistletoe and greens. 
We had three huts to trim and when we were 
through it certainly did look beautiful. The 
tree in the hilt was a dear, we covered the base 
with moss. One of the girls had sent for 
candles and trimmings from Paris so it was 
finished up in true American style. Our hut 
has electric lights, when they are on, each one 
had a red shade so when promptly at 5.30 the 
doors were open the candles lighted and the 
lights turned on we were very proud of our- 



selves. A French band gave us music from 5 
to 6 and played, mind you, all the up-to-date 
American rags. When the soldiers came in an 
odd thing happened in a good many cases. It 
isn't often you see a man give way to emotion 
but some of the youngsters in the crowd nearly 
broke down, and man after man as they came 
to the counter to give their orders, thanked us 
for having the trees and started to tell about 
their families and how homesick they were. 
One boy in particular I shall remember, a great 
big baby-faced youngster had had no box as 
yet, and when I told him I couldn't get any 
Christmas mail because I hadn't been over 
long enough so that I was just as homesick as 
he, what did he do but chase out of the hut 
and return in a few minutes with two German 
hand grenades and six rapid fire gun cartridges, 
things he had been collecting to take home. 
They were for me and there was no refusing 
him. I took them and gave him two pieces of 
mince pie in return. Needless to say I never 
had a present, nor never hope to have one, 
that I shall prize as much as this particular 
offering. It spoke volumes. 

In the middle hut we put on an entertain- 
ment, the men having built a fine stage for 
us ... . Scenes from Dickens' "Christ- 
mas Carol." We had some dear little French 
peasant children and found enough soldiers 
with talent to complete the cast, the women's 
parts, of course, we easily filled from our own 
group. It took very well. 

One of the Captains had got together men 
for a choir and they had practiced Christmas 
music, so they had a part on the programme, 
and they went around the camp and town 
singing. 

We were lucky to have with us one of the best 
known of the American clergy working among 
the troops in France, Bishop Israel, of northern 
Pennsylvania. He conducted the Christmas 
service in the middle hut Christmas morning. 
I don't think I have ever attended a communion 
service that carried me out of myself so much. 
After the service we went down to the hospital 
with the choir and sang in some of the wards, 
and where we couldn't go inside we sang by 
the windows. How the men who were well 
enough did clap and call for more. 

We couldn't have had better weather, ex- 
tremely cold, ice and snow, a full moon and 
more or less sunshine during the day. What 
more could one ask fdr at Christmas time? 
There's a heavy mist tonight so no doubt the 



14 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



Boche will try to entertain us in some way 
before morning. 

I'm jumping around here on topics so no 
one would ever think I had once upon a time 
in the dim ages tried to teach unity, coherence, 
etc., in composition work. However, I'm 
just putting down what comes into my mind, 
when it comes for fear I'll forget it. Add 
popular music to that list of things the boys 
need and to be real selfish if any of you people 
get hold of any good books or the Atlantic, 
etc. send them along for the women. We are 



destitute of reading material and can't get 
any of the better magazines or books in Paris. 

Best wishes to you all for a bright 1918. I 
can tell you now America will never see me 
until the war is over, and I'm not sure if it will 
then. There is too much to be done here that 
only a woman can do, and the French woman 
as a class is absolutely inadequate to the 
occasion. 

Best love to you, 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE ALUMNAE 

ASSOCIATION 



We meet here today feeling more than ever 
the importance of an institution such as Bryn 
Mawr in its movement towards the organized 
intelligence of women, in its encouragement of 
patriotism and of all the activities which patrio- 
tism implies. Our interest centres in the deci- 
sion which this Association will make in the 
afternoon in regard to War Relief Work, but 
we must not lose sight of the details which make 
our alumnae a force for efficiency in any kind 
of work, war or peace. 

I wish that Mrs. Kellogg might have been 
here to lead the meeting and present the report 
of the Board of Directors of the Association. 
It is with regret that I most inadequately take 
her place. 

Our routine work has of course gone on as 
usual. Through the resignation of Mrs. 
Francis we were left without a recording secre- 
tary, and appointed in her place Hilda Worth- 
ington Smith. 

In the Academic Committee there have been 
many changes. Gertrude Hartman resigned 
almost immediately upon her election, and was 
followed in office by Esther Lowenthal. Last 
month Frances Fincke Hand and Ellen Ellis 
found themselves unable to continue in office, 
and the Board appointed Katherine Lord and 
Bertha Rembaugh. 

Jane Haines on account of illness was obliged 
for some months to delegate her arduous task 
as treasurer of the Association and Elizabeth 
Kirkbride nobly responded by giving us gene- 
rously of her valuable time. 

During Easter week there was a meeting of 
the A. C. A. in Washington, to which the 
following delegates were appointed by the 
Board: 



Marcia Brady, '05; Florence Hatton Kelton, 
'15; Marion Parris Smith, '01; Martha Thomas, 
'89; Amy Rock Ransome, '93; Aurie Thayer 
Yoakam, '99; Mary Kilpa trick, '00; Cornelia 
Halsey Kellogg, '00; Johanna Kroeber Mosen- 
thal, '00; Lucy Lombardi Barber, '04. 

Dues to the A. C. A. were reduced to $2.50 a 
hundred members with a maximum of $40.00. 
The five year term for which Bryn Mawr joined 
the A. C. A. as an affiliated member ends this 
spring, and the Board recommends that the 
Alumnae Association continue its connection 
with the Collegiate Organization. 

News comes from Ohio that a Bryn Mawr 
Club has been organized there including the 
whole state, Grace Jones, President, Adelaide 
Werner, Secretary, and Vice-Presidents from 
the principal cities where there are groups of 
alumnae. At their first annual meeting in 
May the Ohio Club asked to have Marion 
Parris Smith come out and talk to them, and 
paid half her railroad expenses, the other half 
being met by a gift to the Association. The 
Club also sent a delegate to the November 
meeting of the Board of Directors in New York. 
This meeting has taken on an interesting 
development. It started by including delegates 
from the different Branch Organizations to sit 
in conference, but this year there were also 
present College Directors, members of Com- 
mittees, and nominees for office. 

Our social activities during the past year 
have undergone some changes. A tea was 
held in Rockefeller after the Alumnae Meeting, 
and was attended by the faculty and staff of 
the College as well as by the alumnae. The 
alumnae supper was given up, and replaced 
by a tea in Pembroke on Commencement 



1918] 



Annual Report of Alumnae Association 



15 



afternoon. Speeches were made by President 
Thomas, by the Dean-Elect, Miss Helen Taft, 
and by speakers from the Re-uning Classes. 
The present officers recommend to the incoming 
Board that the latter consider changing the 
general alumnae day to Tuesday of Commence- 
ment week, and suggest that they institute a 
tea instead of a supper. On account of the war 
the Board has expressed a desire for a war menu 
if possible at today's luncheon. 

The finances of the Association are in a poor 
state (poor being said advisedly), and at the 
November meeting, after thorough discussion, 
it was thought advisable to recommend raising 
the dues of the Association to $2.00. The Board 
will offer an amendment to this effect. It will 
also ask for an expression of opinion as to the 
advisability of asking for sustaining contribu- 
tions from the members. A campaign was 
carried on to increase the number of associate 
members, and all former undergraduates were 
circularized. Class Secretaries and Clubs and 
Branches were asked to cooperate, and a notice 
of the campaign was put in the Quarterly and 
the College News. As a result only 18 former 
students have been admitted as associate 
members. Will all those present please do 
their best to add to this number? 

The Finance Committee will report to us how 
they completed the $100,000 Mary E. Garrett 
Memorial Fund by Commencement day, 1917. 
$7,000 of the fund was raised in the last two 
days by the untiring and enthusiastic efforts 
of Martha Thomas and Elizabeth Kirkbride, 
Chairman and Secretary of the Finance Com- 
mittee. We must at this meeting provide for 
the drawing up of a Deed of Gift. 

The most important action before us is in 
regard to War Relief Work. At the annual 
meeting in 1917 the Association authorized 
the Board of Directors to act at its discre- 
tion on motions made by Leah Cadbury to 
organize a self-supporting unit of Bryn Mawr 
alumnae to work in one of the belligerent 
countries. The Board ascertained from the 
Directors of the College that they had no objec- 
tion to having the name of Bryn Mawr used in 
connection with such a unit; but even after two 
months and a half it seemed impossible to appoint 
a committee to organize the unit. With the 



declaration of war the related question arose as 
to what action the Alumnae Association should 
take about war work at home, and after due 
considerations of the problems the Board of 
Directors decided to call a special meeting of 
the Association in Commencement week to 
consider the "attitude of the Association 
toward organizing as a body for patriotic 
service." 

At this meeting many suggestions for home 
service were made, and the question of relief 
work abroad was scarcely considered. The 
meeting finally passed a resolution declaring its 
sense to be "That while this Association does 
not see any opportunity in the present crisis to 
offer active service without duplicating other 
and more effective work, it holds itself ready to 
do what it can when the need arises." 

The question of war work arose again in 
various ways. Leah Cadbury wrote urging 
the sending of Bryn Mawr alumnae as Red 
Cross canteen workers, and the undergraduates 
began the year with an urgent desire to turn 
their efforts toward raising funds for some defi- 
nite object. They wished the cooperation of 
the alumnae, faculty, staff, graduate students, 
and all members of the College Community; 
and organized the War Council of Bryn Mawr 
College, of which you heard last evening. The 
Board appointed Martha Thomas and Abigail 
Dimon as the alumnae representatives. At 
the November meeting of the Board the ques- 
tion of War Relief Work was fully discussed, 
and accounts given of various activities that 
had been thought of for Bryn Mawr. A com- 
mittee of three was appointed by the Board, 
with Marion Reilly as Chairman and Martha 
Thomas and Abigail Dimon as the other two 
members. This Committee will report to the 
Association in the afternoon. 

There is one definite recommendation in the 
above report, namely that the Bryn Mawr 
Alumnae Association continue its connection 
with the Association of Collegiate Alumnae. 
The Board understands that the Association in 
accepting this report authorizes the renewal of 
membership. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Mary Richardson Walcott, 

Acting-President. 



16 The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly [April 

REPORT OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 
I. Alumnae Academic Endowment Fund of January 15, 1909 

Principal: 

Cash and securities received January 15, 1909 $100,000.00 

Net additions because of differences between par value and value at which securities were taken and 

sold 1,72 1 . 14 

Transferred from income account 2,235 . 08 

$103,956.22 
nvestments: 

Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Rwy. Co., General Mortgage. 4% $3,000.00 

New York Central and Hudson River R. R. Co. l\% 5,000.00 

Chicago, Burlington and Quincy R. R. Co., Illinois Division Mtge. 4% 5,000.00 

Standard Steel Works Co., 1st Mtge. 5% 5,000.00 

Cost of certain improvements on the College Grounds assumed as an investment for this Fund as 

agreed upon with the Alumnae Association. 4J% 25,000 . 00 

Northern Pacific Railway, General Lien. 3% 3,000 . 00 

Mortgage No. 7, Lombaert Ave., Bryn Mawr, Pa. 4J% 35,000.00 

Southern Pacific Co. Equipment. 41% 13,000.00 

Pennsylvania General Freight Equipment. 4J% 3,000.00 

Share in Mortgage No. 8, 1415 South Twenty -first St., Philadelphia. 5^% 750.00 

Pennsylvania R. R Co., General Mortgage. 41% 5,000 . 00 

Bryn Mawr College Inn Association, Second Mortgage. 5% 1,000.00 

United States Liberty Loan. 31% 200.00 

Uninvested and due from the Trustees 206.22 



Total Par Value, $103,956.22 

Income: 

Receipts: 

Balance Sept. 30, 1916 $1,815.05 

Interest on investments Oct. 1, 1916 to Sept. 30, 1917 4,548.28 $6,363.33 



Expenditures: 

Salary of holder of endowed chair 3,000. 00 

Increase in salaries of three full professors who are heads of departments 1,500.00 

Balance 1,863.33 $6,363.33 



Note. — The amount ($3000) which but for this endowment would have been expended for the salary of the holder of 
the endowed chair was used to increase the salaries of six full professors who are heads of departments. 

II. Alumnae Academic Endowment Fund of June 2, 1910 

Principal: 

Received from Alumnae Association $150,000.00 

Net additions because of differences between par value and value at which securities were taken 

and sold 6,830.02 

Total par value of Fund $156,830.02 

Investments: 

Chesapeake and Ohio Rwy. Co., General Mortgage. 4*% $25,000.00 

Mortgage No. 1, 12 acres Camden County, N. J. 6% 12,000.00 

New York Central Lines Equipment. 41% 10,000.00 

Norfolk and Western Railway Divisional First Lien and General Mortgage. 4% 22,000.00 

Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Rwy. Co., First Refunding Mortgage. 4% 25,000.00 

Reading Company and Philadelphia and Reading Coal and Iron Co.. General Mortgage. 4% 15,000.00 

Northern Pacific Rwy. Co., General Lien. 3% 2,000.00 

Baltimore & Ohio Equipment Trust. 41% 2,000.00 

The Virginian Railway Co., 1st Mortgage. 5% 3,000.00 

New York & Erie R. R. Co. 4% 5,000.00 

Lehigh Valley R. R. Co., General Consol. Mortgage. 41% 13,000.00 

Pennsylvania General Freight Equipment. 41% 3,000.00 

Mortgage No. 3 (share), 641/653 Buena Ave., Chicago, 111. 5% 1,100.00 

Chicago Union Station Co., First Mortgage. 41% 2,000.00 

Wabash R. R. Co., Second Mortgage. 5% 6,000.00 

Union Pacific R. R. Co., First Lien Refunding Mortgage. 4% 4,000.00 

Mortgage No. 4, 809 West Franklin St., Richmond, Va. 5% 3,500.00 

Mortgage No. 5, 4281 Viola St., Philadelphia, Pa. 5 T 4 ff % 2,100.00 

United States Liberty Loan. 31% 1,100.00 

Uninvested and due from the Trustees 30 . 02 

Total par value $156.830.02 

Income: 

Receipts: 

Interest October 1, 1916 to September 30, 1917 $6,825.34 

Expenditures: 

Academic salaries $6,825 . 34 



1918] 



Annual Report of Alumnae Association 



17 



SUMMARY OF INCOME AND EXPENDITURES OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 
For the Year October 1, 1916, to September 30, 1917 

INCOME 
. Securities 

Founder's Endowment $21,564.29 

Alumnae Endowment for Professorships 
of 1909 4,500.00 

Alumnae Academic Endowment Fund of 
1910 6,825.34 

General Endowment Fund 11,513.00 

Justus C. Strawbridge Fund 421 .58 

Carola Woerishoffer Endowment Fund 31,115.32 

Undergraduate May Day, 1914, Endow- 
ment Fund 124.45 

Elizabeth S. Shippen Endowment Fund... 9,012.85 

Interest $2,328.87 

Less net interest received at 

College 784.49 1,544.38 

$86,621.21 

. Productive Real Estate 

Income from Founder's En- 
dowment invested in Mer- 
ion, Radnor, Denbigh, Pem- 
broke East and West $45,036.34 

Income from Founder's En- 
dowment invested in Pro- 
fessors' houses 3,410.99 

48,447.33 

Income from General Endowment Fund 

invested in Rockefeller Hall 11,337.57 



59,784.90 



$146,406.11 



Income from Special Funds: 

Unexpended balances of In- 
come, October 1, 1916: 

A. Scholarship Funds $1,903.26 

B. Memorial Funds 1,976.97 

C. Other Funds 1,871.03 



Received during the year: 

a. For Memorial Scholar- 

ships (Hooper, Rhoads, 
Brooke Hall, Powers, 
Gillespie, Stevens, An- 
thony, Simpson, Hallo- 
well, Longstreth, Ship- 
pen, Kendrick, Huff) . . 

b. Other Memorial Funds 

(Ottendorfer Fellow- 
ship; Ritchie Prize; 
Rhoads, Chamberlain, 
Wright and Stevens 
Book Funds; Swift 
Planting Fund) 



5,751.26 



4,394.59 



868.04 



18 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



c. Other Funds (1902 Book 
Fund; Alumnae En- 
dowment Fund, Smiley- 
Fund) $165.60 

Unexpended balances October 1, 1917: 

A. Scholarship Funds 

B. Memorial Funds 

C. Other Funds 



Students' Fees: 

A. Added to College Income: 

Tuition 

Laboratory Fees $4,401 .80 

Laboratory Supplies 170. 13 

Geological Excursions 324.30 

Graduation Fees 873.53 

Changing Rooms Fees 185.00 

Music Rooms Fees, net 78.25 

Entrance Examination 

Fees, net 2,368.63 



B. Given to Library for Books: 
Deferred and Condition Examination 

Fees 

Late Registration and Course Book 
Fines 

C. Given to Gymnasium for Apparatus: 
Gymnasium Fines 



$5,428.23 



2,360.56 
2,685.98 
1,964.69 



80,624.25 



$11,179.49 



7,011.23 



$4,168.26 



8,401.64 

888.00 
195.00 



89,025.89 



1,083.00 
260.25 



Net receipt from sale of books 

Interest on College Income invested in 1905 Infirmary, Trefa, Aelwyd 

and prepaid insurance, Comptroller's bank balance, etc 

Net receipts from all other sources 

Donations to Current Income: 

Received during 1916-17 11,840.49 

Unexpended balance of Donations received 

during previous years 3,273.63 

15,114.12 



90,369.14 
45.08 

784.49 
2,676.51 



Less balance unexpended September 30, 
1917 



Ruth Emerson Fletcher Bequest: 

Unexpended balance, Sept. 30, 1916 284.97 

Unexpended balance, Sept. 30, 1917 69 . 25 

Added to receipts from principal for expenditure 



2,810.00 



12,304.12 



215.72 



Total net receipts from all sources, expended for College running 

expenses, from October 1, 1916, to September 30, 1917 $256,969.43 



1918] Annual Report of Alumnae Association 19 

EXPENDITURES 

A.— ACADEMIC 
Teaching Salaries 

19 Full Professors $53,700.00 

14 Associate Professors $26,800.00 

Donations given for Associate Professors' 

Salaries 3,028.46 

29,828.46 

7 Associates 11,300.00 

2 Lecturers 3,700.00 

6 Instructors 6,500.00 

4 Readers 2,745.00 

5 Demonstrators 3,800.00 

Student Assistants 933 . 62 

Oral Classes 235 . 14 



$112,742.22 



Academic Administration Salaries 

(Only the portion of time given to Aca- 
demic work is charged) 
President, Deans, Secretaries and Stenog- 
raphers (part) $13,451 .08 

Comptroller's Office (60%) 2,629 . 26 

Business Office (part) 2,216.36 

Proctors and Student Messengers 206. 11 






18,502.81 

Fellowships and Scholarships 

A. From College Income: 
Fellowships and Gradu- 
ate Scholarships $15,966.37 

Foreign Graduate Schol- 
arships 2,088.50 

Undergraduate Scholar- 
ships 2,700.00 

$20,754.87 

B. From Income of Special Funds: 
Fellowship and Gradu- 
ate Scholarships 1,150.00 

Undergraduate Scholar- 
ships 2,787.29 

3,937.29 

C. From Donations: 
Fellowships and Graduate 

Scholarships 3,375.85 

Undergraduate Scholar- 
ships 700.00 

4,075.85 28,768.01 

Laboratories 

From College Income 

Physical 1,452.35 

Chemical 1,666.97 

Physical Chemistry 54.47 

Geological 732.81 

Biological '934.80 

Psychological 912 . 35 

Educational Psychology 238.86 

Social Economy 1,002.29 

6,994.90 



20 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



Library 

A. From College Income: 

Maintenance (one-half entire cost) 

Salaries 

New Books Purchased 

Tablets in Cloister 



$3,692.07 

7,019.82 

7,002.22 

289.74 



B. From Income of Special Funds: 

New Books Purchased 

C. From Donations: 

New Books Purchased 



Gymnasium 

From College Income: 
Maintenance of Building. 

Salaries 

Apparatus 



18,003.85 
175.97 
330.85 



3,340.49 

3,300.00 

78.64 



Religious Services 

Public Lectures 

College Entertaining 

Subscriptions to Foreign Schools 

A. Athens 

B. Jerusalem 

C. Rome 

D. Naples 



Subscription to Wood's Hole Biological Laboratory... . 
Subscription to College Entrance Examination Board. 
Subscription to Educational Societies 



250.00 

100.00 

200.00 

50.00 

100.00 

100.00 

9.00 



Class Room Supplies 

Modern Art Equipment from Donations 

Modern Art and Prize from Special Funds 

Bureau of Appointments 

Academic Committee of Alumnae, Travelling Expenses and Entertain- 
ment 

Expenses of Professors attending meetings of Professional Societies. . . 

Dean's Travelling Expenses 

Academic Incidentals 

Travelling Expenses of Candidates for Appointment 

Dalton Shop — Supplies for Instrument Maker 

Oral Classes — French and German 

Excess of cost over receipts 

Publicity 

Monographs and Supervising Ph.D. Thesis 

Academic Administration Expenses 

Office Expenses (60%) 

Telephone (60%) 

Printing 

Employees' Compensation Insurance 

Maintenance of Academic Buildings 

(Taylor Hall, $5,975.65; Dalton Hall, $5,519.61; one- 
half of Library, $3,692.08; Rent of one-half of Car- 
tref, $1,000.00; Advanced Psychological Laboratory, 
$149.31). 



18,510.67 



6,719.13 

1,744.25 

420.88 

354.43 



600.00 



209.00 


369.70 


474.98 


270.72 


292.93 


33.75 


107.84 


53.35 


80.51 


407.34 


85.71 


135.00 


77.64 


46.31 



11,936.01 




717.00 




4,768.15 




258.19 






7,679.35 






16,336.65 



1918] 



Annual Report of Alumnae Association 



21 



Maintenance of Grounds and Fire Protection 

Legal Advice 

Other Teaching and Academic Expenses 

Expenses paid by Treasurer 

Interest 

Printing 

Auditing 

Comptroller's Bond 

Sundries 

Permanent Improvements 

Power Plant, (part) $413.20; grounds, $26.68; auto 
service, $696.27). 
Total Academic Expenditures 



$3,247.85 

46.75 

250.00 

50.00 

48.62 



'$14,548.09 

308 00 

42.00 



3,643.22 
1,136 15 



$231,695.54 



B.— NON-ACADEMIC ADMINISTRATION 



Salaries 

President's, Dean's, Secretaries' 

Stenographers' (part) 

Comptroller's Office (40%) 

Business Office (part) 

Minutes of Directors (full) 



and 



Expenses 

Office Expenses (40%) 

Telephone (40%) 

Employees' Compensation Insurance. 



5,977.32 

1,752.84 

2,333.15 

300.00 



1,290.67 
478.00 
172.13 



Grounds and Fire Protection. 



10,363.31 



1,940.80 
13,455.91 



1905 Infirmary 

Salaries 

Expenses 

Interest on amount loaned to complete 
building 



Receipts: 

Undergraduate Fees 

Graduate Fees 

Refunds for extra service. 
All other income 



$3,440.00 

270.00 

513.61 

4.50 



Quarantine (October, 1916, Poliomyelitis) 

Loss on Non-Productive Real Estate 

Yarrow West 

Sundry Items of Non-academic Incidentals. 

Christmas Donations 

Taxes for 1916 and 1917 

Supply Room — Increases in Supplies on hand.. 
Auditing Financial Report for 1916-17 



$3,659.60 
3,203.25 

875.56 

7.738.41 



4,228.11 



$3,510.30 

279.72 

197.08 
11.00 
216.20 
296.39 
690.91 
105.00 



1 Note — 60% of the cost of Maintenance of Grounds and 40% of Fire Protection is considered as academic, the bal- 
ance as non-academic. 



22 The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 'April 

Expenditures from Gifts 

Tablet in Memory of Mary Elizabeth 

Garrett $955.00 

Portrait of Mary Elizabeth Garrett 579.09 

Higginson Memorial in Pembroke 76.96 

Screens for 1905 Infirmary 21 . 13 

Repairs to Library Clock 23.65 

Lantern at Rockefeller Service Door 21.00 

Door Plate for Alumnae Room 7.00 

Books for President's Office 8.00 

Musical Recital 36.00 

English Composition Prize 39.49 

American Flags 46.75 

Work on Campus 81 . 50 

Alterations to Deanery 889.04 

Extension of Deanery Garage 872.70 

Alterations to Cartref 125.67 

Donation to American School at Athens 

for land for Women's Dormitory 450.00 

Cleaning Marble Busts in Taylor Hall. .. . 161.00 

$4,393.98 

Permanent Improvements 1,600.89 

Power plant (part) $275.46; Grounds, $17.79; Pembroke 

new rooms, $94.56; Garage at Penygroes, $843.46; 

Auto Service, $464.18. 
Total Non-academic Expenditures $27,061.49 



Total Expenditures for the year 258,757.03 

Total Net Receipts 256,969.43 



Deficit for Year 211,787. 60 



APPENDIX A 

Donations 
donations for scholarships 

Unexpended balances of donations given in previous years and brought forward from 1915-16. 

Composed of: 

Unexpend*i 
Expended Balanct 

Donation from Mrs. Frank L. Wesson $500.00 $500.00 

Anonymous donation for scholarship 400.00 400.00 

Anonymous per Dean Reilly, special scholarship 300.00 300.00 

Anonymous per Dean Reilly, special scholarship 200.00 200.00 

Anonymous per Dean Reilly, special scholarship 500.00 500.00 

From Class 1912 for scholarships 200.00 200.00 

$2,100.00 $900.00 $1,200.00 

Received during 1916-17: 

Scholarships. 

From Alumnae Association of Girls' High and Normal Schools, one scholar- 
ship 100.00 100.00 

From the Board of Education of the City of Philadelphia, six scholarships. 600.00 600.00 

From Alexander Simpson, Jr., special scholarship 200.00 200.00 

John White Johnston, special scholarship 375 .00 375 .00 

Mrs. Thomas Scattergood, special scholarship 300.00 300.00 

Bryn Mawr School scholarships 700.00 700.00 

Chicago Bryn Mawr Club 100.00 100.00 

* Note— This figure differs from the Treasurer's Summary owing to the fact that the Treasurer has not separated the 
operating expenses of the College proper from the operating expenses of the Phebe Anna Thome Model School (see pages 
16 and 17). The deficit of the Phebe Anna Thome Model School is $184.99 and the College Deficit is $1,787.60. This 
explains why the deficit for the year is shown as $1,972.59 in the Summary of the Treasurer. 



1918] 



Annual Report of Alumnae Association 



23 



From Mrs. J. Campbell Harris, for one Thos. H. Powers Memorial scholar- 
ship $200.00 $200.00 

From Mrs. Frederick W. Hallowell for one Robert G. Valentine Memorial 

scholarship 200.00 

From Class 1912 for scholarships. 221.50 221.50 

From Rufus M. Jones for scholarship 100.00 

From T. Raeburn White for scholarships 200.00 

$3,296.50 $2,796.50 



$200.00 

MOO. 00 
•200.00 

$500.00 

$5,396.50 $3,696.50 $1,700.00 

Unexpended donations for scholarships 1915-16 2,100.00 

Donations received for scholarships 1916-17 3,296.50 

Total $5,396 . 50 

Expended during 1916-17 3,696.50 

Unexpended balance $1,700.00 

OTHER DONATIONS 

[These donations represent only cash donations received at the college office. All other gifts may be found enumerated 
under "'gifts" in the President's Report for 1916-17. j 
Unexpended balances of donations given in previous years and amounts expended of same during 1916-17 

Unexpended 

Balance Expended Balance 
From Tustus C. Strawbridge for lantern for service door of Rockefeller 

Hall $25.00 $21.00 $4.00 

From Elma'Loines, Class of 1905. for Physical Laboratory Apparatus 18.75 18.75 

Balance of Donation from Dean Reilly for equipment Mathematical Depart- 
ment 74.20 74.20 

Balance of Donation from Class of 1903 for clock for Library Reading 

Room 23 .65 23 .65 

From Cynthia M. Wesson, for gymnastic apparatus 365 .00 365 .00 

From Ella Riegel, Class 1889, amount reported as expended but returned to 

Treasurer in 1915-16 46.22 46.22 

Balance of Mary Elizabeth Garrett donation — books for the President's 

office 13.33 8.00 5.33 

From Class 1898, for books English Department 49.94 49.94 

Class 1903, books for Library 22.61 22.61 

Class 1900, for books in History 14.27 14.27 

From Bryn Mawr Alumnae Club of Baltimore for books 6.77 6.77 

From Class 1904 for books 402.41 197.26 205.15 

From Ella Riegel for Spanish Art 50.00 50.00 

From several Students for Screens for Infirmary 34.38 21.13 13.25 

From S. A. King for Cartref Alteration 25.10 25.10 

From Undergraduate Association for expenses of next May Day 2. 00 2. 00 

Total $1,173.63 $485.95 $687.68 

Donations received 1916-17 Unexpended 

Expended Balance 

For Library 

From Lucy M. Donnelly $25 .00 $25 .00 

From Mary B. Wesner 5.00 5.00 

From Grace Albert 5.00 $5.00 

From Class 1903 10.00 10.00 

From Watson B. Dickerman for purchase of Gazette des Beaux Arts 100.00 100.00 

For Art Department 

From Ella Riegel 130.00 130.00 

From Caroline E. Newton 5.00 5.00 

From Mary Converse 15.00 12.17 2.83 

For Improvements 

Anonymous per Martha G. Thomas for memorial windows for Mary H. 

Higginson 76.96 76.96 

From Class 1911 for Pembroke Hall 7.00 7.00 

From S. A. King for Cartref Alteration 100.57 100.57 

For Sundry Items 

Frances Merry for Alice Travers Recital 36.00 36.00 

$515.53 $407.70 $107.83 

PRESIDENT'S GIFT OF $5,000.00 FOR 1916-17 

Unexpended 

Expended Balance 

For Land for Women's Building of the American School at Athens $450.00 $450.00 

For Memorial Tablet in Library for Mary Elizabeth Garrett 955 . 00 955 . 00 

For Gazette des Beaux Arts 400.00 231 .59 $168.41 

For Portrait of Mary E. Garrett 500 . 00 500 . 00 

For Framing Portrait 79.09 79.09 

For Graduate Scholarships 379.35 379.35 

For Cleaning marble busts in Taylor Hall 161.00 161.00 

For English Essay Prize 39.49 39.49 

For American Flags 46 . 75 46 . 75 

For work done on Campus 81 .50 81 .50 

For New Library, Deanery 889 . 04 889 .04 

For enlarging Deanery Garage 872 . 70 872 . 70 

For Lantern Slides for Department of Classical Archaeology * 50.00 50.00 

Unexpended balance 96.08 96.08 

$5,000.00 $4,685.51 $314.49 



E Note — Expended $50.00 for Emergency Fees, 1917-18, for 2 and 4 students respectively. 



24 The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly [April 

SPECIAL DONATIONS FOR ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS' SALARIES 

1916-1917 

Received Expended 

E. C. Henderson $656.41 656.41 

Albert Strauss 200.00 200.00 

Allan Marquand 100.00 100.00 

George S. Macrum 100.00 100.00 

G. W. Leutkemeyer 100.00 100.00 

James Timpson 250.00 250.00 

Carleton Mosely 234.41 234.41 

Maitland F. Griggs 100.00 100.00 

Walton Clark 234.41 234.41 

Winifred W. Gatling 100.00 100.00 

Charlotte H. Sorchan 234.41 234.41 

Margaret Scattergood 234.41 234.41 

Lilian H. Casselberry 200.00 200.00 

Mary Chase Clark 50.00 50.00 

Mary Cams 234 .41 234 . 41 

$3,028.46 $3,028.46 
SUMMARY OF UNEXPENDED BALANCES 

Donation Account 

Unexpended balance scholarships $1,700.00 

Unexpended balance of other Donations previous to 1916-17 687 . 68 

Unexpended balance Donations 1916-17 107 . 83 

President's Gift for 1916-17 314.49 

From Undergraduates for expenses of next May Day 13 .25 

$2,823.25 

APPENDIX B 

Phebe Anna Thorne Model School 
operating account 

1916-1917 

Receipts: 

Income from Phebe Anna Thorne Fund 

received by Treasurer $7,858. 17 

Other receipts by Comptroller 

Tuition $9,700.00 

Interest on note 7.40 

Books paid for by pupils 175 .28 

Supplies paid for by pupils 283 . 40 

Pupils' Dress paid for by pupils 230. 75 

Garden Produce sold 28.41 

Luncheons paid for by Teachers 15 . 43 

Refunds: 

Provisions sold $5 . 02 

Entertainments 35 . 41 

Teachers' travelling expenses 56 

Rent for rooms in Dolgelly 66.81 107.80 10,548.47 



Total income $18,406 . 64 

Expenditures: 

Salaries paid by Treasurer $9,787 .83 

Salaries paid by Comptroller $191 .44 

Director's living expenses 615.58 

Travelling expenses of Teachers 316.02 

Special preparations for Art Teacher 300. 00 

Expense for Candidates for appointment 1.17 

Books for Library 77.12 

Class Room Books 157.46 

Class Room Supplies 210.04 

Class Room Equipment 25 .91 

Rental of Piano 51 .00 

Health Examinations 32 . 00 

Tickets for Skating Pond 48 .00 

Pupils' Dress 617 . 10 

Laundry 11 .22 

Garden 10.53 

Entertainments 39.33 

Installing Clock and Bell ringing system 144.52 

Office expense 27.14 

Incidentals, postage, printing, etc 157.38 

Telephone 54.81 

Rent of Dolgelly. 1,300.00 

Heating and Electric Lighting 418.05 

Water Rent 38.21 

Gas 50.02 

Grounds 109.62 

Repairs 248 . 49 

Furniture 609 . 58 

Insurance 45 . 04 

Provisions 1,706.16 

Wages 983.86 8,596.80 

Total Operating Expenditure $18,384. 6i 

Surplus, 1916-17 $221.0 



1918] 



Annual Report of Alumnae Association 



25 



CONSTRUCTION ACCOUNT 
1916-1917 

Accumulated deficit on Construction to September 30, 1916 $8,347 . 15 

Alterations to Dolgelly (1915-16) 

Balance on Alterations to Plumbing in Basement $21 .00 

Balance on Third floor Alterations 186.00 

Completion of Alterations (begun in 1915-16) 207.00 

Deficit on Construction to September 30th ,1917 $8,554.55 

SUMMARY FOR 1916-17 

Deficit on Construction $207 .00 

Surplus on Operating Account 22.01 

Net deficit for year $184 . 99 

Deficit from previous years 11,831 .08 $12,016.07 

SUMMARY OF MODEL SCHOOL DEBT 

Deficit on Construction $8,554.55 

Deficit on Operating Account $3,483 . 53 

Surplus on Operating Account for 1916-17 , 22 .01 

Net deficit on Operating Account 3,461 .52 

Total deficit September 30, 1915 $12,016.07 



Cost of Tuition in Bryn Mawr College for the Year 1916-1917 



Students in Bryn Mawr College in year 1916-1917 — 453. 

under -graduate students — 366 



Graduate students — 87; 



CALCULATION 

100% 70% 
Total Undergraduate 

Number of Students 453 366 

Teaching Salaries $109,713.76 $76,799.63 

Academic Salaries (non-teaching) 13,775 .81 9,643.07 

Academic Salaries (60% administrative and executive) 15,046 . 82 10,532 .77 

Academic Expenses 76,228.88 53,360.22 

Total $214,765 .27 $150,335 .69 

Cost per Student $474.09 $410. 75 

COST PER GRADUATE STUDENT — TUITION ONLY, $740.57 

Teaching Salaries $32,914.13 $378.33 

Academic Salaries (non-teaching) 4,132 .74 47 . 50 

Academic Salaries Administrative 4,514 . 05 51 . 88 

Academic Expenses 22,868 . 66 262 . 86 

$64,429.58 $740.57 



30% 

Graduate 



87 



$32,914.13 

4,132.74 

4,514.05 

22,868.66 

$64,429.58 
$740.57 



COST PER UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT — TUITION ONLY, $410.75 

Teaching Salaries $76,799 . 63 $209 . 83 

Academic Salaries (non-teaching) 9,643 .07 26 . 35 

Academic Salaries (administrative) 10,532 .77 28 . 78 

Academic Expenses 53,360.22 145.79 

$150,335.69 $410.75 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 

January 22, 1918 
We have audited the accounts of both the Treasurer and Comptroller of Bryn Mawr College for the fiscal year ended 
30th September, 1917, and found them to be correct, and we hereby certify that the receipts and expenditures of the Col- 
lege for the year contained in this Financial Report are properly stated from the books of the Treasurer and Comptroller. 

Lybrand , Ross Brothers and Montgomery 
Certified Public Accountants 



26 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



REPORT OF THE A. C. A. COUNCILLOR 



The Regular Biennial Convention was held in 
Washington in Easter week, 1917. The con- 
vention was of more than usual interest because 
of the entrance of the United States into the 
European War. There were present 53 repre- 
sentatives from Alumnae Associations represent- 
ing Barnard, Bryn Mawr, University of Michi- 
gan, Radcliffe, Smith, Wellesley — representa- 
tives from 29 colleges out of 52 universities and 
44 Branches of the 97. The representation 
from all parts of the country was unusually 
good. 

After the regular reports of the officers and 
standing committees, the Convention discussed 
the work which the Association might undertake 
to aid the government at this crisis. The As- 
sociation offered its services unreservedly to the 
government to aid in "the selection, testing, 
and distribution of food supplies, and the care 
of whatever is connected with the provision, 
preparation and serving of food in the Commis- 
sary department of training camps, and, if need 
arises, of the home and expeditionary armies" 
and in connection with the training camps to 
introduce "adequate relaxation and amuse- 
ments." A committee of five, comprised of 
Miss Wooley, and Miss Pendleton as alternates, 
Mrs. Mathews, Mrs. Martin, Mrs. Morgan, and 
President Thomas as chairman, was appointed 
to carry on the War Service of the Association. 
It was not afterwards found possible to carry out 
this programme as other organizations had 
already undertaken this work, but the War Serv- 
ice has recommended to the Branches the 
formation of training classes and bureaus for 
speakers to carry on a campaign for patriotic 
education of the communities in connection 
with the problems arising from the war. 

There was some discussion of the advisability 
of carrying on the Journal of the Association at 
a probable additional expenditure of $2000. It 
was felt however, that with the large new mem- 
bership of the Association and the probably 
national work of the war, a paper or magazine 
was essential for necessary publicity. It was 
therefore continued. 

A Pan-American Fellowship of the value of 
$500 to be given to a student from some South 
American country was decided upon and 
added to the fellowships already awarded 
annually by the Association. 

The representation of Alumnae Associations 
had been provided for by a resolution appended 



to the Constitution and known as Mrs. Olin's 
resolution and had been adopted for five years. 
The experiment had been tried for five years 
and was felt to be so entirely successful that the 
terms of the resolution were inserted in the 
Constitution by unanimous consent. Owing 
to a recommendation which was presented by 
the Conference of Alumnae Association mem- 
bers, the provision for alumnae group represen- 
tation was adopted in the following form: 

AFFILIATED MEMBERS 

Alumnae associations and other groups of 
alumnae of any college or university approved 
by the Committee on Recognition of Colleges 
and Universities may secure affiliated member- 
ship for the alumnae of their respective insti- 
tutions by the payment of annual dues as 
follows: For one hundred members, $2.50 a 
year; for every additional one hundred mem- 
bers or major fraction thereof, an additional 
$2.50 a year, until the amount of $40 is reached, 
which shall be the maximum sum paid by any 
alumnae association or group of alumnae. 

Seconded and carried by unanimous vote. 

This provides for a reduction from $10 for 
every 100 members to $2.50 which greatly 
lessens the expense involved and a maximum 
of $40 instead of $150. 

It was felt that the cost of representation 
kept out large groups who had not the organi- 
zation to raise such a sum. For the first time 
a group of women from a co-educational insti- 
tution was represented. The University of 
Michigan came in with a large group of its 
alumnae. And the movement to form such 
groups among the alumnae of our large uni- 
versities has been much stimulated. It is 
hoped that at the next biennial, many others 
may be represented. 

The Association passed resolutions endorsing 
the opening of civil service examinations to 
women and equal pay for equal work in all 
government positions; supporting a bill pro- 
viding for a women's division of the Depart- 
ment of Labor; requesting the Commissioner 
of Education to provide for the education and 
Americanizing of immigrant women as well as 
immigrant men; and endorsing the Federal 
Suffrage Amendment. 

The topics discussed by the Conference of 
Affiliated Alumnae Associations were: 



1918] 



Annual Report of Alumnae Association 



27 



(1) The Graduate Council— whether it is 

making good or whether it is frequently 
an organ of obstruction. 

(2) Systems of Clubs and Branches found 

most efficient by other Alumnae 
Associations. 

(3) Visiting Committee of Alumnae to the 

Academic departments. 

(4) Social training of students. 

(5) University control — with special emphasis 

on alumnae relationships in each 
branch of the College organization and 
also to the public. 

(6) To what extent, if any, ought Alumnae 

Associations to support or endorse 
projects or causes other than their 
respective colleges and alumnae 
interests. 



(7) Policy of regarding Alumnae Trustees 

as Alumnae Delegates on the Board 
and definitely instructing them. 

(8) Methods of standardizing work in spoken 

English, in practice in affiliated colleges. 

(9) Affiliations with the A. C. A. Fee for 

affiliation. 
Miss Mabel Pierce, President of Wellesley 
Alumnae Association was appointed chairman 
of next conference. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Marion Reilly, 

Councillor of B. M. C. Alumnae Association 

Recommendation that the Association renew 
its membership and affiliate regularly with the 
Association of Collegiate Alumnae under the 
new provisions of its constitution for affiliated 
membership. 



REPORT OF THE JAMES E. RHOADS SCHOLARSHIPS COMMITTEE 



This year eight students applied for the 
James E. Rhoads Junior Scholarship and twelve 
for the sophomore scholarship. The alumnae 
members of the committee interviewed per- 
sonally each student, consulted her professors 
and instructors concerning her ability and her 
promise and in committee discussed very fully 
the degree of financial need. The alumnae 
members of the committee then met with 
President Thomas, Dean Schenk and a com- 
mittee of the faculty. The James E. Rhoads 
Junior Scholarship was awarded to Helen 
Prescott, grade 82.797. The James E. Rhoads 
Sophomore Scholarship was awarded to Marie 
P. Litzinger, grade 89.466. 



President Thomas invited the alumnae mem- 
bers to remain and assist the faculty members in 
awarding the other undergraduate scholarships. 

Do the alumnae realize that the average 
student requiring financial assistance leaves 
college heavily burdened with debt, that the 
scholarships are neither numerous nor of 
sufficient value? Today it costs a student in 
residence $585 with an emergency charge of 
$50. The scholarships range in amount from 
$160 to $250. In other words a student must 
earn or borrow between $300 and $400 a year. 
Respectfully submitted, 

Anne Hampton Todd, 
Secretary. 



REPORT OF THE CONFERENCE COMMITTEE 



The first meeting of the Conference Com- 
mittee for the year 1917-18 was held on Wed- 
nesday, November 7, 1917, at 4.30 p.m. in 
Room 4, Pembroke West. Those present were 
Gertrude B. Barrows, '08, Alice Patterson, '13 
and Katharine McCollin, '15, Chairman, 
representing the alumnae, Virginia Kneeland, 
President of the Undergraduate Association, 
and the four class presidents, representing the 
undergraduates, and Miss Gable, representing 
the graduate students. 

Miss Kneeland first spoke of the fact that 
President Thomas was calling a meeting of 
undergraduate representatives to talk over the 
complaints which she had received from the 



parents of freshmen because, they said, their 
daughters were made to feel it a social duty to 
stay up until all hours of the night at parties 
given them by upper classmen and in conse- 
quence were tired out a great part of their 
time, and had to neglect their work. Miss 
Kneeland asked the alumnae if, to their knowl- 
edge, there had ever been a Light Rule, and if 
they would be in favor of one now. The 
alumnae were under the impression that there 
never had been one, and decided that they 
were not in favor of one now, or ever 

Miss McCollin had a small criticism to make 
of the College News, for its apparent attitude 
toward Pacifists, as indicated in several issues, 



28 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



notably in featuring in the first column of the 
front page a remark made by Mr. Walcott 
when lecturing at Bryn Mawr, in answer to a 
question, which showed an intolerant feeling 
toward Pacifists. Miss McCollin's criticism 
was only if this indicated an intolerant attitude 
of the College toward a conscientious and 
serious-minded group of people, an attitude 
which the entire meeting considered unworthy 
of Bryn Mawr. The undergraduates assured 
the alumnae that no such attitude was present 
in the College, and that the remark of Mr. 
Walcott was merely featured as an interesting 
bit of news. 

One other question which the undergraduates 
wished to ask the alumnae before the meeting 
turned to the main question of War Work, was 
whether the alumnae objected to the Senior 
Class omitting to sing every class song as far 
back as ten years, at Lantern Night singing. 
They said that instead of singing each song, 
badly as was inevitable, they merely called for 
the song from the class, and then cheered the 
class if the class did not respond. The alum- 
nae stated that they thought this a good plan. 



The meeting then turned to the question of 
War Work. Miss Knee] and explained the 
present plan which has just been perfected for 
bringing Bryn Mawr War Work to the height 
of efiiciency. As to the Bryn Mawr Unit, the 
undergraduates expressed themselves as entirely 
willing to leave the choice of it to the alumnae 
and to cooperate with them in working for the 
Unit after it was decided upon. They hoped 
however that it would be decided upon imme- 
diately as it would be difficult to work for the 
Unit, if its purpose was unknown until Febru- 
ary. Miss Patterson suggested that a joint 
committee of alumnae and undergraduates be 
appointed to talk over and, if possible, to 
decide upon, the nature of the Unit immediately. 

Since there was no further business to come 
before the meeting, the meeting adjourned with 
many thanks to Miss Kneeland for her hospi- 
tality in allowing the meeting to be held in her 
room, and for the delicious afternoon tea which 
she served. 

Respectfully submitted. 

Katharine W. McCollin, 

Chairman. 



REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE 



COMPLETION OF MARY E. GARRETT ENDOWMENT 
FUND 

The class collectors and the Finance Com- 
mittee have had a busy year's work in com- 
pleting the Mary E. Garrett Endowment Fund. 
$32,000 had to be raised at the date of the 
alumnae meeting in 1917. $8839 was promised 
at the meeting as the result of Mrs. Slade's 
stirring appeal. The usual circular was issued 
for class collectors in February. Meetings 
were held monthly through the spring. In 
April $11,000 was needed. Reports on June 1 
showed $5000 still lacking. Hurry calls from 
collectors and night letters from the Com- 
mittee brought the last required pledges just 
as the Commencement procession was starting 
and President Thomas announced the comple- 
tion of the Fund in her Commencement address. 
June, 1917, was the date originally planned by 
the Association when it voted to give its 
next $100,000 as a memorial to Miss Garrett. 

The fund has been kept closely invested in 
high grade railroad securities and in United 
States Liberty Bonds. Most of the pledges 
have now been paid. The status of the Fund 
on February 1 was as follows: 



Securities at cost $90,686.87 

Cash, February 1 7,003 .38 



Pledges which may be counted 
on early in 1918 at least. . . . 



$97,690.25 
1,200.00 



$98,890.25 

A few doubtful pledges, which the Committee 
thought it could count on last June, will not be 
paid, but if we wait a few months before trans- 
ferring the Fund there will be sufficient interest 
to make up the difference. The Treasurer of 
the Board of Trustees has stated that he believes 
the College will accept the securities at cost, as 
the present shrinkage in market value is abnor- 
mal. The provisions of the deed of gift ought 
to be approved by this meeting, so that the 
transfer can be made in time to have the in- 
come used for next year's salaries. 

FINANCES OF THE ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

The Finance Committee wishes to join the 
whole Association in its appreciation of Miss 
Haines' long and faithful services as Treasurer 
and in its regret at her retirement. It would 



1918] 



Annual Report of Alumnae Association 



29 



like to recommend that the Board assist the 
new Treasurer, whoever she may be, by ap- 
pointing a trust company as fiscal agent, thus 
shifting some of the responsibility for making 
investments and the care of securities. 

It also concurs in the proposal for an increase 
in annual dues, believing that the association 
ought to have a larger fund at its disposal for 
current expenses. The increased cost of the 
Quarterly alone would justify raising the dues. 

PLANS FOR 1918 COLLECTIONS 

The 1918 collections will be made as usual 
for endowment and the continued increase of 
academic salaries. The collectors have already 
approved a plan for linking up collections 
with the next Liberty Loan Drive by asking the 
classes which are interested in doing so to 
buy Liberty Loans and make their gifts in 
that form. 

We have had during the year most valuable 
advice from Mr. Henry Stanford Brooks who is 
now the Chairman of the Yale Alumni Fund. 
At the close of this report Mrs. Brooks will 
outline some of the ways in which we hope to 
profit by Mr. Brooks' remarkable success of 
last year. Just as Mrs. Brooks originally 
started the class collections at Bryn Mawr, 
so we hope that she is now starting us on a 
career of greatly increased helpfulness to the 
College. 



WAR WORK 

The proposal to collect funds for the Bryn 
Mawr Service Corps has been brought before 
the Finance Committee and has met with its 
cordial approval. It believes that this work 
should be done by special committees formed 
in the local groups of Bryn Mawr alumnae, that 
it should not be on class lines and should not 
be allowed to interfere with the regular class 
collections. 

If the question of the College's entering the 
contributory insurance plan of the Carnegie 
Foundation becomes urgent, as it readily may 
within the next year or two, the Committee 
believes that this also might be handled on a 
plan to be worked out in relation to the regular 
Endowment Fund Collections. 

CLASS COLLECTORS 

The following class collectors have been 
appointed: 

Elizabeth Nields Bancroft to succeed Bertha 
G. Wood, '98. 

Cornelia Halsey Kellogg to succeed Kate 
Williams, '00. 

Sylvia Lee to succeed Marion Parris Smith, 
'01. 

Myra Elliott Vauclain to succeed Jacqueline 
Morris Evans, '08. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Martha G. Thomas, 

Chairman. 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON ATHLETICS 



On June 2, 1917, at 4.00 a p.m. very good 
Water Polo Game was played between the 
alumnae and the Varsity: the score being 3: 1 
in favor of the Varsity. The alumnae team 
were: 

Forwards: L. Cox Harmon, '14; A. C. Miller 
Chester, '14; G. Emery, '15. 

Halfback: C. Dowd, '16. 

Guards: M. Coolidge, '14; C. Kellen, '16. 

Goal: E. Ayer, '14. 

The Substitutes: D. Ashton, '10 (forward) 
and L. Cadbury, '14 (goal). 

Both played for a few minutes. 

BASKET BALL 

On June 6 at 10 a.m. the Annual Basket 
Ball game between alumnae and Varsity was 
played. The score was 18 : 2 in favor of the 



Varsity. The individual players on the alum- 
nae side were fairly good but their team work 
was very poor. The Alumnae Team were: ' 

Forwards: L. Cox Harmon, '14; H. Emerson, 
'11; A. C. Miller Chester '14 (each playing one 
half). 

Centers: M. Egan, '11; E. G. Balderston, '14; 
H. Kirk, '14. 

Guards: H. F. Carey, '14; B. S. Ehlers, '09. 

Substitute: C. Dowd, '16. 

At a meeting of the officers of the Athletic 
Association of the College and of the Alumnae 
Athletic Committee represented by E. M. 
White and B. S. Ehlers, it was decided that a 
Water Polo Match should be a regular event of 
the commencement athletics and that a Fenc- 
ing Match should be a regular event of the 
college year — the Fencing Match to take place 



30 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



possibly at the Gymnastic Meet of the under- 
graduates. 

The possibility of having the Alumnae- 
Varsity Hockey Match on the first Saturday 
of the regular hockey season was considered — 
but the question was not definitely settled. 

TENNIS 

The Annual Alumnae Tournament was 
played during Commencement week. The 
entrees were: E. Hill, '16; I. Smith, '15; H. 
Kirk, '14; M. E. Warren, '14; E. Ayer, '14; 
E. G. Balderston, '14; A. Werner, '16; A. C. 
Miller Chester, '14; A. M. Hawkins, '07; 
M. R. Moorehouse, '04. 

Winner of the tournament was A. C. Miller 
Chester, '14. 



HOCKEY 

The Alumnae Varsity game was played on 
Wednesday October 31, the score 5: 4 in favor 
of the Varsity. The game was close and good 
in both halves. The Alumnae Team were: 

Forwards: J. Katzenstein, '06; L. B. Windle, 
'07, (each playing one half); B. S. Ehlers, '09; 
M. Kirk, '10; M. Willard, '17; H. Kirk, '14. 

Half Backs: H. Harris, '17; M. F. Nearing, 
'09; A. M. Hawkins, '07. 

Full Backs: M. Thompson, '17; H. Smith, 
'10. 

Goal: S. Jelliffe, '17. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Bertha S. Ehlers 
for M. Dessau 



REPORT OF STUDENTS' LOAN FUND COMMITTEE 



The Students Loan Fund Committee has 
made loans amounting to $850 to five students, 
for use in the year 1917-18 and received pay- 
ments on account of loans amounting to $1135 
from nine students between January 1 and 
December 31, 1917. The class of 1917 on its 
graduation gave $100 to the fund and the class 
of 1914 added the $38.50 to the $61.50 given 
on its graduation thus completing the $100 
promised. Gifts from four alumnae are grate- 



fully acknowledged, and amounted to $142. 
Two, at least of these contributions were 
prompted by the reading of the article in the 
Quarterly calling attention to the needs of 
this Fund. The full financial report of the 
Committee is to be found in the report of the 
Treasurer of the Alumnae Association. 

[signed] Martha G. Thomas, 

Secretary. 



REPORT OF THE CAROLA WOERISHOFFER MEMORIAL FUND 

COMMITTEE 



In accordance with the plan outlined in our 
last year's report, the sum of $200, being the 
income from the Carola Woerishoffer Memorial 
Fund for the years 1915 and 1916, was contrib- 
uted through your committee to the National 
Women's Trade Union League as the nucleus 
of a scholarship for a New York working girl 
at the League's Training School in Chicago. 
The object of the school is to train for service 
as organizers and leaders in the labor move- 
ment women who have already shown qualities 



of able leadership in the Unions to which they 
belong. The rest of the money needed for the 
years scholarship of $735 was raised by the 
National Women's Trade Union League, and 
the scholarship was awarded to Mabel Leslie, 
a young woman recommended by the New 
York League. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Margaret Franklin, 

Chairman. 
February, 1918. 



1918] Annual Report of Alumnae Association 31 

TREASURER'S REPORT 

December 31, 1917 

BALANCE SHEET 

ASSETS 
Endoumient Fund Assets: 
Investments at Cost: 

5000 Atlantic City Ry. 5's 1919 $4,891 .00 

1000 Balto. & Ohio R. R. 4^'s Equip. Tr. 1919 976.71 

5500 Balto. & Ohio R. R. Prior Lien 3£'s 1925 5,047.50 

2000 Beth. Steel 1st ext. 5's 1926 2,000.00 

5000 Bryn Mawr College Inn Assn. 5's 1946 5,000 . 00 

1000 Central Dist. Tel. Co. 5's 1943 920.00 

2000 Chic, Mil. & St. Paul 4's 1925 1,880.00 

5000 Chic. Rys. Co. 1st 5's 1927 5,018.75 

1000 Choctaw, Okla. & Gulf G. M. 5's 1919 990.00 

5000 Colorado Springs E. Co. 1st 5's 1920 4,950.00 

5000 Erie R. R. Equip. 5's 1920 4,984.50 

5000 Lake Shore & Mich. So. Ry. 4's 1931 4,622 .50 

4000 Lansing Fuel & Gas Co. Cons. 5's 1921 3,910.00 

2000 Lehigh Valley R. R. Co. Cons. 4£'s 1923 2,000 . 00 

5000 Lehigh & Wilkes Barre C. Co. 4's 1925 4,700 .00 

2000 New York Cent. & H. R. Deb. 4's 1934 1,802 .50 

2000 New York & Erie R. R. 5's 1920 2,000.00 

5000 Nor. Pac. Gt. Nor. C. B. & Q. Coll. Tr. 4's 1921 4,806. 25 

2000 Penna. Co. 1st Mtg. 4£'s 1921 1,970.00 

4000 Phila., Balto & Wash. 4's 1924 3,780.00 

1000 Phila. R. T. Co. Eq. Tr. 5's 1923 992.40 

1000 Phila. Sub. G. & E. 1st M. & R. 5's 1960 1,000.00 

5000 Portland Ry. Co. 1st Ref. 5's 1930 5,000.00 

2000 Schuylkill River E. side R. R. Co. 1st Mtg. 4's 1925 1,975.00 

1000 Southern Pac. Equip. 4£'s 1920 973.32 

2000 So. Carolina & Ga. R. R. 1st 5's 1919 1,990.00 

2400 U. S. 2nd Lib. Loan 1917 4% 2,400.00 



$80,580.43 
Undergraduate Fund 

1000 Balto. & Ohio 4|'s Equip. Tr. 1922 979.22 

2000 Beth. Steel 1st ext. 5's 1926 2,000.00 

1000 Georgia Ry. & E. Co. 1st Cons. 5's 1932 990.00 

2000 New York & Erie 4|'s 1923 1,952.22 

1000 Penna. Co. 1st Mtg. 4§'s 1921 985.00 

$3200 U. S. 2nd Liberty Loan 1917 4% 3,200.00 

$90,686.87 

Cash Uninvested $3,365 .62 

Undergraduate Fund 22 .51 3,388. 13 $94,075 .00 

Loan Fund Assets: 

Loans to Students fc 10,258.00 

Cash " 786.32 11,044.32 



32 The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly [April 

Alumnae Fund Assets: 

Investments at Cost: 

41 shares Lehigh Coal & Nav. Co. Stock $3,313 .48 

T % rights Lehigh Coal & Nav. Co. Stock 2 . 10 

Cash 2,331 .04 $5,646.62 



General Fund Assets: 

Cash 292.32 



$111,058.26 

LIABILITIES 

Endowment Fund: 

Balance January 1, 1917 $51,705. 12 

Deduct balance due on promises — now charged off 2,325 .00 

49,380.12 
Contributions, subscriptions, etc., during year 44,694. 88 $94,075 .00 

Loan Fund: 

Balance January 1, 1917 $10,583 . 62 

Donations and interest received during year 460.70 11,044.32 

Alumnae Fund: 

Principal Balance January 1, 1917 $3,524.86 

Life memberships received during year 260 . 00 

3,784.86 

Interest Balance January, 1917 $1,633.24 

Accretions during year 228.52 1,861 .76 5,646.62 

Accumulated Fund For General Purposes 211 .97 

Accounts Payable 80 . 35 

$111,058.26 

RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS FROM JANUARY 1, 1917, TO DECEMBER 31, 1917 

GENERAL TREASURY 

Receipts 

Balance January 1, 1917 $21.39 

Dues $2,092.00 

Interest on Deposits 10 . 30 

Alumnae Tea 31 .94 

Total receipts, 2,134.24 

Total, $2,155.63 

Disbursements 

Dues Associated Collegiate Alumnae $130.00 

Endowment Fund Expenses 139 . 35 

Printing 102.90 

Postage and Stationery 99 . 23 

Traveling Expenses (Board of Directors) 96 . 38 

Expenses of Academic Committee 294 . 32 

Expenses of Athletic Committee 4.33 

Typewriting and Clerical Services 191 . 39 



1918] Annual Report of Alumnae Association 33 

Miscellaneous Expenses and Alumnae Tea $ 87 . 18 

Quarterly Account 718.23 

Total Disbursements, 1,863 .31 

Balance December 31, 1917: 292.32 

Total $2,155.63 

LOAN FUND 

Receipts 

Balance January 1, 1917 $40.62 

Donations $391 .00 

Repayments of Loans by Students 1,135.00 

Interest on Loans 61.31 

Interest on Deposits 8 . 39 

Total Receipts 1,595 . 70 

$1,636.32 
Disbursements 

Loans to Students $850.00 

Balance December 31, 1917: 786.32 

$1,636.32 
ALUMNAE FUND 

Receipts 

Balance January 1, 1917 $2,044.62 

Life memberships $260 . 00 

Interest on Deposits 80 . 77 

Income from Investments 148 .00 

Total receipts 488. 77 

$2,533.39 
DisbttrsemenJs 
Investments Purchased 

4 shares Lehigh Coal & Nav. Co. Stock $200.00 

T \ rights Lehigh Coal & Nav. Stock 2. 10 

Commission on purchase of securities .25 

Balance December 31, 1917 2,331 .04 

$2,533.39 
ENDOWMENT FUND 

Receipts 

Balance in bank January 1, 1917 $9,770.94 

Donations $31,794. 13 

Donations— Undergraduates 7,000.00 

$38,794.13 

Subscriptions paid 8 . 50 

Interest on Deposits 1 239 .09 

Interest on Deposits Undergraduate Fund 12 . 03 251 . 12 



34 The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly [April 

Interest on Investments $2,538. 16 

Interest on Investments — Undergraduate Fund 67 . 50 $2,605 . 66 

Total receipts, $41,659.41 



$51,430.35 
Disbursements 
Investments purchased: 

5000 Atlantic City Ry. 5's 1919 $4,891 .00 

3000 Balto. & Ohio Prior Lien 3£'s 1925 2,730.00 

2000 Beth. Steel 1st ext. 5's 1926 2,000.00 

1000 Choc, Okla & Gulf G. M. 5's 1919 990.00 

3000 Lake Shore & Mich. So. Ry. 4's 1931 2,722 .50 

2000 Lehigh Valley R. R. Co. cons. 4i's 1923 2,000 .00 

5000 Lehigh & Wilkes Barre C. Co. 4's 1925 4,700.00 

2000 New York & Erie R. R. 5's 1920 2,000.00 

5000 Nor. Pac. Gt. Nor. C. B. & Q. Coll. Tr. 4's 1921 4,806.25 

2000 Penna. Co. 1st Mtg. 4£'s 1921 1,970.00 

4000 P. B. & W. 4's 1924 3,780.00 

2000 So. Carolina & Ga. R. R. 1st 5's 1919 1,990.00 

2100 U. S. 2nd Liberty Loan of 1917 4% 2,100.00 

4 00 Erie R. R. Equip. 5's 1920 4,000.00 

$40,679.75 
Investments purchased account Undergraduate Fund : 

1000 Balto. & Ohio 4£% Equip. Tr. 1922 979.22 

2000 Beth. Steel 1st ext. 5's 1926 f 2,000.00 

1000 Georgia Ry. & E. Co. 1st con. 5's 1932 990.00 

2000 New York & Erie 4|'s 1923 1,952.22 

1000 Penna. Co. 1st Mtg. 4§'s 1921 985.00 

$47,586.19 

Accrued interest on bonds purchased $384.98 

Account Undergraduate Fund 71 . 05 456 . 03 

Total Disbursements 48,042 .22 

Balance December 3 i, 1917: 3,388.13 



$51,430.35 



QUARTERLY" ACCOUNT FOR YEAR 1917 



Receipts 

Subscriptions and Sales $22 . 75 

Advertising 191 .25 

Refund from printers 50 . 00 

Total Receipts 264.03 

Balance transferred from GeneralT reasury Acct 718 . 23 

Total $982.23 

Disbursements 

Printing $642.32 

Salaries 300.00 

Sundries, postage, stationery, etc 39 . 91 

Total Disbursements $982 . 23 



1918] 



Annual Report of Alumnae Association 



35 



We have audited the accounts of 

THE ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

for the year ending December 31, 1917, and have inspected ths Endowment Fund securities and 
verified the cash on hand at the close of the year, and we certify that the annexed Balance Sheet 
and relative accounts are properly drawn up so as to exhibit a correct view of the financial position 
of the Association at December 31, 1917, and of the operations for the year ending on that date. 

Price, Waterhouse & Company. 
Jane B. Haines. 
Treasurer 



REPORT OF THE QUARTERLY 



The regular mailing list of the Quarterly 
has about 1625 names; to these will be added 
nearly 100 names in April for the members of 
the Class of 1918 and the Ph.D's. The number 
of names to be withdrawn for non payment of 
dues is about equal to the number of those who 
have paid up to date and have been restored 
to the list. The postal regulations are very 
strict in this respect and the Quarterly cannot 
carry on its mailing list the names of those who 
are two years behind with their association 
dues. 

There are about thirty subscribers outside 
of the Association. 

The April, July and November numbers 
appeared nearly on time, but the January 



number may be unusually late because of the 
delay of copy and proof in the mails. 

It is encouraging to be able to report again 
the increasing interest of the alumnae in the 
Quarterly. The Quarterly, and its place 
as an Association organ, seem now to be accepted 
facts. 

The advertising department is in the hands 
of Elizabeth Brakeley, '16, and is carefully 
attended to, though the small circulation of 
the Quarterly makes it almost impossible to 
get any other advertisements than those sup- 
plied by a few alumnae. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Elva Lee. 



REPORT OF THE PHILADELPHIA BRANCH 



The activities of the Philadelphia Branch 
during 1917, and their plans for the coming 
year may be summarized briefly as follows: 

In the spring of 1917 a concert was given to 
the College and friends of the College by the 
Philadelphia Branch, at which Marcia von 
Dresser was the soloist. It was a great success 
both from a musical standpoint, and because it 
brought more closely together the students 
and the Philadelphia alumnae. 

At the annual meeting of the Philadelphia 
Branch on December 8, 1917, the Branch put 
itself on record as approving the raising of the 
annual dues of the Alumnae Association from 
$1.50 to $2.00 a year, and asked to have the 
matter taken up at the first possible meeting. 

With the idea of linking up work for the 
Endowment Fund with the Government loan 
plans, a motion was passed at the annual 
meeting that every member of the Philadelphia 
Branch be asked to invest in a Thrift Card and 
that these cards when filled out be turned over 



to the Treasurer of the Alumnae Association 
for the Academic Fund as a gift from the 
Philadelphia Branch. This plan was carried 
out, and up to the present time 26 members of 
the Branch have bought from the Treasurer a 
Thrift Card to be used for this purpose. This 
means a sum of $107.12 now on hand, for the 
Endowment Fund, which will be worth $130 on 
January 1, 1923. 

A motion was also passed at the annual 
meeting that a Committee of three be appointed 
to confer with Miss Ehlers' Committee on the 
Bryn Mawr Patriotic Farm and the War 
Council of the College as to the advisability of 
the alumnae assuming some responsibility for 
the farm another year, and the Branch put 
itself on record as favoring a continuance of 
the farm if it can be done on a basis that would 
seem practical to the committee. 

The Philadelphia Branch agrees to guarantee 
the expenses of a piano recital to be given to the 
College by Miss Rulison. 



36 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



The Branch also passed a motion by which it 
becomes a contributing member of the Bureau 
of Occupations for Trained Women, and there- 
by has a corporate member on the Board of 
Directors. 

The members of the Branch were much 
interested in Miss Kneeland's account of the 



War Relief Work now being done at the College, 
and in Mr. J. Henry Scattergood's talk on the 
Reconstruction Work of the Friends in France. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Elizabeth Conway Clark, 

Chairman. 



REPORT OF THE NEW YORK BRANCH 



The New York Branch has, every year, a 
wider range of activities. We now have four 
standing committees which undertake the 
work of the Branch not directly connected with 
the Alumnae Association. 

The Branch contributes annually to the sup- 
port of the New York Intercollegiate Bureau 
of Occupations. The placement department 
of the Bureau is now self-supporting, but the 
research and advisory departments are depend- 
ent upon the contributions of college organiza- 
tions. Mrs. Percy Jackson is our director on 
the Board of the Bureau. 

Our representative to the College Settlement 
Association is Mrs. John Gould. The New 
York Branch assisted in the annual sale of the 
Settlement, and succeeded, on the day assigned 
to Bryn Mawr, in making a fair average, as 
compared to colleges of larger size. 

A committee of vocational advisers has just 
been appointed, with Mrs. Shepard Morgan 
as chairman. This committee will confer with 
the Dean of the College, and will do anything 
it can to assist in the work of the appointment 
bureau at Bryn Mawr. The committee plans 
for this spring, a survey of the schools of New 
York, with reference to the opportunities they 
offer to Bryn Mawr alumnae who wish to teach. 

Perhaps our most active and important com- 
mittee is the National Service Committee 
which was organized last spring by Mrs. Edward 



Loomis, who is now chairman. The com- 
mittee took an active part in the census of 
New York, in the Red Cross campaign for 
funds last June, in the Liberty Loan campaign, 
in the Red Cross membership drive at Christ- 
mas, and is now helping in the sale of War 
Savings Stamps. It has also undertaken to 
supply the entertainment and refreshments 
at a Y. M. C. A. hut at Camp Upton, one 
Saturday afternoon every month. Through 
the efforts of Mrs. Borie, the New York organi- 
zations of other colleges will cooperate in this 
work, and every Saturday afternoon is now 
provided for. Mrs. Loomis, Miss King, Mrs. 
Borie, Miss Fleischmann, and the other officers 
and members of the committee have done a 
tremendous amount of work. The plans for 
the hut at Camp Upton included raising $125 
for Bryn Mawr's share of the equipment of the 
hut, (besides $25 a month for the refreshments) 
and finding volunteers to act as hostesses 
and entertainers. 

The National Service Committee will under- 
take the work of raising money for the Bryn 
Mawr Service Corps, if that is decided upon, 
and the New York Branch hopes to do its 
share, whatever it is. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Katharine G. Ecob, 
Chairman. 



REPORT OF THE BOSTON BRANCH 



There is not much to report about the Boston 
Branch. The members of the Club have been 
so busy as individuals in various kinds of war 
and civic work that it seemed desirable not to 
undertake anything as a unit. But we have 
done one thing. It seemed to many of us an 
extravagance to maintain a club-room for our 
convenience, which should stand idle so 
much of the time. We were sure that there 



must be women who could help us use it; the 
problem was to find them. At last, however, 
we learned through Anne Strong of a need 
that it seemed our place to meet. The State 
Department of Health of Massachusetts has 
appointed eight public health nurses to do 
Child Conservation Work throughout the 
state. The Chief Nurse has her office at the 
State House and the nurses came to Boston 



1918] 



Annual Report of Alumnae Association 



37 



to report there from time to time. Now our 
club-room is close by the State House. So we 
have offered these nurses the use of our room 
for rest or for conference, or for the night; 
and they share our privilege at the restaurant of 
the Business Women's Club near by. They 
have written very gratefully accepting our offer, 
and I understand that they find the room very 
useful. It is a satisfaction to help, even a 



little, the women who are doing such splendid 
work. 

I very much regret that I cannot be present 
at the annual meeting this year. Mrs. Walcott, 
however, has promised to report to us on the 
proceedings. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Sylvia Lee, 
President. 



BY-LAWS 



Article I 



MEMBERSHIP 



Section 1. Any person who has received the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts or of Doctor of Philosophy from Bryn 
Mawr College is entitled to full membership in the Alumnae 
Association of Bryn Mawr College, and to all privileges 
pertaining to such membership. 

Sec. 2. Former students of the College who have 
not received degrees may become Associate Members of 
the Alumnae Association upon unanimous election by the 
Board of Directors. Applications for associate member- 
ship must be made to the Board of Directors at least two 
months before the annual meeting, and the names of the 
applicants elected by the Board of Directors must be 
presented at this meeting. 

To be eligible for associate membership a former stu- 
dent must have pursued courses in the College for at least 
two consecutive semesters, and if a matriculated student, 
at least four academic years must have elapsed since the 
date of her entering the College. A return to the College 
for undergraduate work shall terminate an associate 
membership, and render the student ineligible for re- 
election during the period of this new attendance at the 
College. 

Associate members are entitled to all the rights and 
privileges of full membership, except the power of voting 
and the right to hold office in the Board of Directors, or to 
serve on standing committees. 

Article II 

MEETINGS 

Section 1. There shall be each year one regular 
meeting of the Association. This meeting shall be held 
at Bryn Mawr College, on a date to be fixed annually 
by the Board of Directors, preferably the Saturday of the 
mid-year recess. 

Sec. 2. Two weeks before the annual meeting notices 
of the date and of the business to be brought before the 
meeting shall be sent to each member of the Alumnae 
Association. If it should be necessary to bring before the 
meeting business of which no previous notice could be 
given, action may be taken upon such business only by a 
two-thirds vote of the members present at the meeting. 

Sec. 3. Special meetings of the Association may be 
called at any time by the Corresponding Secretary at the 
request of the President, or of five members of the Associ- 
ation, provided that notice of the meeting and of all 
business to be brought before it be sent to each member of 
the Association two weeks in advance. 



Sec. 4. In cases demanding immediate action on 
matters clearly not affecting the financial or general 
policy of the Association, special meetings may be called 
by the Corresponding Secretary with less than two weeks' 
notice at the request of the Board of Directors or of ten 
members of the Association. At special meetings called 
on less than two weeks' notice action may be taken only 
by a two-thirds vote of the members present. 

Sec. 5. Fifteen members of the Association shall 
constitute a quorum for the transaction of business. 

Article III 

MANAGEMENT 

Section 1. The Officers of the Association shall 
constitute a Board of Directors, to which shall be entrusted 
the management of the affairs of the Association in the 
interim of its meetings. 

Article IV 



Section 1. The annual dues for each member of the 
Association shall be one dollar and fifty cents, payable to 
the Treasurer at the annual meeting. Associate members 
shall pay the same dues as full members of the Association, 
but shall be exempt from all assessments. 

Sec. 2. The dues for each member that enters the 
Association in June shall be seventy-five cents for the 
part year from June to the following February, payable to 
the Treasurer on graduation from the College. 

Sec. 3. Any member of the Association may become 
a life member of the Association upon payment at any time 
of thirty dollars; and upon such payment she shall become 
exempt from all annual dues and assessments. 

Sec. 4. The names of members who fail to pay the 
annual dues for four successive years shall be stricken 
from the membership list. The Board of Directors may 
at its discretion remit the dues of any member sub silentio . 

Article V 

BRANCH ORGANIZATIONS 

Section 1. Any 25 or more members of the Bryn 
Mawr College Alumnae Association may form a local 
branch, the geographical limits to be submitted to the 
Board of Directors of the Alumnae Association and to be 
approved*by the Board of Directors. 

Sec. 2. Any alumna or former student of Bryn 
Mawr College who is eligible to membership in the Bryn 



38 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



Mawr College Alumnae Association may be a member of a 
Branch Organization. 

Sec. 3. Every Branch Organization shall report to 
The Alumnae Association at the annual meeting. 

Article VI 

COMMITTEES 

Section 1. There shall be two Alumnae members 
of the Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College in ac- 
cordance with the by-laws of the Trustees of Bryn Mawr 
College. 

Sec. 2. The Standing Committees of the Association 
shall be: an Academic Committee, consisting of seven 
members; a Conference Committee, consisting of four 
members; a Students' Loan Fund Committee, consisting 
of five members; a James E. Rhoads Scholarships Com- 
mittee, consisting of three members; a Nominating Com- 
mittee, consisting of five members; a Finance Committee, 
consisting of three members and the Treasurer ex officio; 
and a Committee on Athletics, consisting of five members. 

Article VII 

ELECTIONS AND APPOINTMENTS 

Section 1. Elections for Officers shall be held bienni- 
ally and elections for members of the Academic Committee 
annually, before the regular meeting, and the results of the 
elections shall be announced at that meeting; in every 
case the candidate receiving the greatest number of votes 
shall be declared elected. No ballot shall be valid that 
is not returned in a sealed envelope marked "Ballot." 

Sec. 2. The elections for the nomination of an Alum- 
nae Director shall be held every three years on the last 
Thursday in May. No ballot shall be valid that is not 
signed and returned in a sealed envelope marked "Ballot." 
The alumna receiving the highest number of votes shall 
be nominated to the Trustees for the office of Alumnae 
Director. At the first election in the year 1906, and at 
other elections when there is a vacancy to be filled, the 
alumna receiving the highest number of votes shall be 
nominated to the Trustees for the regular term of six 
years, and the alumna receiving the second highest number 
of votes for the term of three years. 

Sec. 3. The OScers of the Association shall be nomi- 
nated by the Nominating Committee, and elected by ballot 
of the whole Association. They shall hold office for two 
years or until others are elected in their places. The Board 
of Directors shall have power to fill any vacancy in its 
own body for an unexpiied term. 

Sec. 4. The members of the Academic Committee 
shall be nominated as follows: The Board of Directors shall 
make at least twice as many nominations as there are 
vacancies in the Committee. Furthermore, any twenty- 
five alumnae may nominate one candidate for any vacancy 
n the Committee; provided that they sign the nomination 
and file it with the Recording Secretary by December 1, 
preceding the annual meetings. The members of the 
Academic Committee shall be elected by ballot of the 
whole Association and shall each hold office for four years 
or until others are elected in their places. The Board of 
Directors shall have power to fill any vacancy in the 
Committee, such appointment to hold until the next 
regular election. 

Sec. 5. (a) The Alumnae Directors shall be nomi- 
nated as follows: The Board of Directors of the Alumnae 
Association shall make at least three times as many nomi- 
nations as there are vacancies among the Alumnae Direc- 



tors. It may at its discretion include in such nominations 
names proposed in writing by any 25 members of the Alum- 
nae Association qualified to vote for Alumnae Directors. 

(b) Every Bachelor of Arts or Doctor of Philosophy 
of Bryn Mawr College shall be qualified to vote for 
Alumnae Directors, provided that at least five years 
shall have elapsed since the Bachelor's degree was con- 
ferred upon her, and provided that she shall have paid her 
dues up to and including the current year. 

(c) Every Bachelor of Arts or Doctor of Philosophy 
shall be eligible for the office of Alumnae Director, pro- 
vided that at least five years shall have elapsed since the 
Bachelor's degree was conferred upon her, and provided 
that she is not at the time of nomination or during her 
term of office a member or the wife of a member of the staff 
of Bryn Mawr College, nor a member of the staff of any 
other college. 

(d) An Alumnae Director shall serve for six years or so 
much thereof as she may continue to be eligible. When- 
ever a vacancy shall occur among the Alumnae Directors 
a nomination for such vacancy shall be made by the Board 
of Directors of the Alumnae Association to the Trustees. 
An Alumnae Director so nominated shall hold her office 
until her successor has been voted for at the next regular 
election for Alumnae Director and duly elected by the 
Trustees. 

(e) In case by reason of a tie it should be uncertain 
which alumna has received the nomination of the Alumnae 
Association for Alumnae Director, the Board of Directors 
of the Alumnae Association shall nominate to the Trustees 
one of the two candidates receiving an equal number of 
votes. 

Sec. 6. The members of the Conference Committee 
shall be appointed annually by the Board of Directors 
and shall each hold office for one year or until others are 
appointed in their places. 

Sec. 7. The members of the Students' Loan Fund 
Committee shall be appointed by the Board of Directors 
from candidates recommended by the Loan Fund Com- 
mittee. They shall each hold office for five years or until 
others are appointed in their places. One new member 
shall be appointed each year to succeed the retiring mem- 
ber, and no member, with the exception of the Treasurer, 
shall be eligible for re-election until one year has elapsed 
after the expiration of her term of office. 

Sec. 8. The members of the James E. Rhoads Scholar- 
ships Committee shall be appointed by the Board of Direc- 
tors, and shall each hold office for three years, or until 
others are appointed in their places. One new member 
shall be appointed each year to succeed the retiring mem- 
ber, and no member shall be eligible for re-election until 
one year has elapsed after the expiration of her term of 
office. 

Sec. 9. The Health Statistics Committee shall be a 
permanent committee, appointed by the Board of Direc- 
tors in consultation with the President of Bryn Mawr 
College. The Chairman of this Committee is empowered 
to fill vacancies in the Committee; a vacancy in the chair- 
manship shall be filled by the Board of Directors in con- 
sultation with the President of Bryn Mawr College. 

Sec. 10. The members of the Nominating Committee 
shall be appointed biennially by the Board of Directors, 
and shall each hold office for four years, or until others are 
appointed in their places. Two members of the Committee 
shall be appointed in the year preceding an election for 
officers, and three members in the year preceding the next 
election for officers, and thereafter in the same order before 
alternate elections. 



1918] 



Annual Report of Alumnae Association 



39 



Sec. 11. The members of the Finance Committee 
shall be appointed by the Board of Directors and shall 
each hold office for four years, or until others are appointed 
in their places. 

Sec. 12. The members of the Committee on Athletics 
shall be appointed by the Board of Directors and shall each 
hold office for five years, or until others are appointed in 
their places. One new member shall be appointed each 
year to succeed the retiring member. 

Sec. 13. The appointments of the Board of Directors 
for the year ensuing shall be made in time to be reported 
by the Board to the annual meeting for ratification by the 
Association. 

Article VIII 



Section 1. The President shall preside at all meet- 
ings of the Association and of the Board of Directors, and 
shall perform such other duties as regularly pertain to her 
office She shall be a member ex efficio of all the commit- 
tees of the Association and shall countersign all vouchers 
drawn by the Treasurer before they are paid. She shall 
appoint such commitees as are not otherwise provided for. 

Sec. 2. The Vice-President shall perform all the 
duties of the President in the absence of the latter. 

Sec. 3. The Recording Secretary shall keep the 
minutes oi the Association and of the Board of Directors, 
and shall perform such other duties as regularly pertain 
to the office of clerk. She shall have the custody of all 
documents and records belonging to the Association which 
do not pertain to special or standing committees, and she 
shall be the custodian of the seal of the Association. She 
shall notify committees of all motions in any way affecting 
them; she shall receive all ballots cast for the elections, and 
with the Chairman of the Nominating Committee shall act 
as teller for the same; and she shall be responsible for the 
publication of the Annual Report, which should be mailed 
to the Alumnae within two months after the annual meeting. 

Sec. 4. The Corresponding Secretary shall conduct 
all the necessary correspondence of the Association; she 
shall send out all notices, and shall inform officers and 
committees of their election or appointment. 

Sec. 5. The Treasurer shall be the custodian of all 
funds of the Association and shall pay them out only by 
vouchers countersigned by the President; she shall collect 
all dues and assessments, shall file vouchers for all dis- 
bursements, and shall keep an account of all receipts and 
expenditures. She shall report on the finances of the 
Association when called upon, to the Association or to 
the Board of Directors, and she shall make to the Associa- 
tion at the annual meeting a full report, the correctness 
of which must be attested by a certified public accountant. 

Sec. 6. The Board of Directors shall prepare all 
business for the meetings of the Association, and shall 
have full power to transact in the interim of its meetings 
all business not otherwise provided for in these by-laws. 
It shall have control of all funds of the Association; it 
shall supervise the expenditures of committees, and it 
shall have power to levy assessments not exceeding in any 
one year the amount of the annual dues. At least one 
month before each annual meeting it shall send to each 
member of the Association a ballot presenting nomi- 
nations for the Academic Committee in accordance with 
Art. VI, Sec. 4; biennially, at least one month before the 
annual meeting, it shall send to each member of the associ- 
ation the ballot prepared by the Nominating Committee in 
accordance with Art. VII, Sec. 13. Every three years, at 



least one month before the last Thursday in May, it shall 
send to each member of the Association qualified to vote 
for Alumnae Directors a ballot presenting nominations for 
Alumnae Directors in accordance with Art. VI, Sec. 5. 
Through the President and Recording Secretary, it shall 
certify to the Trustees the names of persons voted for and 
the number of votes received for each person in elections 
for Alumnae Directors. It shall appoint before each an- 
nual meeting the members of the Conference Committee, 
and fill such vacancies on the Students' Loan Fund Com- 
mittee. The James E. Rhoads Scholarships Committee, 
the Finance Committee, and the Committee on Athletics, 
as may be necessary by reason of expiration of terms of 
office. It shall also appoint, in alternate years before the 
regular meeting preceding the biennial election, the mem- 
bers of the Nominating Committee; and in case a vacancy 
occurs it shall appoint, in consultation with the President 
of Bryn Mawr College, the chairman of the Health Statis- 
tics Committee. It shall report all appointments to the 
regular meeting next following for ratification by the Asso- 
ciation. A majority of the Board shall constitute a 
quorum for the transaction of business. The Board of 
Directors shall be at all times responsible to the Association. 

Sec. 7. The Academic Committee shall hold at least 
one meeting each academic year to confer with the Presi- 
dent of Bryn Mawr College on matters of interest con- 
nected with the College. It shall have full power to 
arrange the times of its meetings. 

Sec. 8. The Alumnae members of the Board of 
Directors of Bryn Mawr College shall perform such duties 
as are prescribed by the laws of the Trustees and Directors 
of Bryn Mawr College. 

Sec. 9. The Conference Committee shall hold at least 
two meetings each academic year, one in the autumn and 
one in the spring, to confer with committees from the 
Undergraduate Association and the Graduate Club at 
Bryn Mawr College, on matters of interest to the three 
associations. It shall have power to call special meetings 
at its discretion. 

Sec. 10. The Students' Loan Fund Committee shall 
have immediate charge of the Loan Fund, and its disburse- 
ments, subject to the Approval of the Board of Directors- 
It shall confer with the President of Bryn Mawr College 
regarding all loans. 

Sec. 11. The James E. Rhoads Scholarships Com 
mittee shall, with the president of Bryn Mawr College and 
the Committee appointed by the Academic Council of the 
Faculty, nominate annually the candidates for the James 
E. Rhoads Scholarships to be conferred by The Board of 
Trustees of Bryn Mawr College according to the provisions 
contained in the Deed of Gift. 

Sec. 12. The Health Statistics Committee shall 
collect from the members of the Association information 
that may serve as a basis for statistics regarding the health 
and occupation of college women. The Committee, sub- 
ject to the approval of the Board of Directors, shall have 
power to determine the best methods of carrying out the 
duties assigned to it. 

Sec. 13. The Nominating Committee shall biennially 
prepare a ballot presenting alternate nominations for the 
officers of the Association and shall file it with the Record- 
ing Secretary by December 1 preceding the annual meeting. 

Sec. 14. The Finance Committee may, with the 
approval^ the Board of Directors of the Alumnae Associ- 
ation, indicate purposes for which money shall be raised 
by the Alumnae Association. It shall devise ways and 
means, and take charge of collecting moneys for such 



40 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



purposes, and when authorized by the Alumnae Associ- 
ation shall prepare, subject to the approval of the Board of 
Directors, the necessary agreements for the transfer of 
gifts from the Alumnae Association. All collections 
from the Alumnae Association shall be subject to its 
supervision. The Finance Committee shall have power to 
add to its number. 

Sec. 15. The Committee on Athletics shall try to 
stimulate an interest in athletics among the members of the 
Alumnae Association, and shall take official charge of all 
contests that are participated in by both alumnae and 
undergraduates. 

Sec. 16. The Board of Directors and all Committees 
shall report to the Association at the annual meeting, and 
the Students' Loan Fund Committee shall report also to 
the Board of Trustees of Bryn Mawr College. 



Article IX 



RULES OF ORDER 



The rules of parliamentary practice as set forth in 
Roberts' "Rules of Order" shall govern the proceedings 
of this Association in so far as they are not inconsistent 
with any provisions of its charter or by-laws. 

Article x 
amendment of by-laws 
These by-laws may be amended or new ones framed by 
a two-thirds vote of the members present at any regular 
meeting of the Association, provided that details of pro- 
posed amendments and additions have been given in 
writing at a previous regular meeting of the Association, 
either by the Board of Directors or by five members of the 
Association. 



WAR WORK 



WORK OF THE WAR COUNCIL 
OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

In the last issue of the Quarterly the his- 
tory, organization, and aims of the depart- 
ments of the War Council were outlined. Some 
of the departments, in particular those of 
Liberty Loan and of Red Cross and Allied 
Relief, had already accomplished a good deal, 
but most of the work up to that time had been 
organization and formulation of plans. At a 
mass meeting held Monday, March 18, how- 
ever, the Directors of Departments reported 
much work actually done. 

Miss Kingsbury, reporting for the Depart- 
ment of Registration said that the filing and 
classifying of the registration cards had been 
completed, and that they had already been 
used as reference several times. She said that 
the department had arranged for a Vocational 
Conference on April 13, and was hoping that 
Miss Julia Lathrop would speak the evening 
before on the opportunities for women in 
Government service. The Conference is to 
consist of small round table conferences led by 
alumnae who represent the following lines of 
work: Medicine, Law, Teaching, Psychology 
applied to Social Work, Social Service, Business, 
and Journalism. Miss Kingsbury also reported 
that the department is ready to act as an 
employment bureau in offering opportunities 
for summer war service, for the most part 
volunteer, — in three lines, — agriculture, social 
service, and clerical work. 

Miss Alice Hawkins, appointed Director of 
the Department of Food Production in place 
of Miss Ehlers who resigned, reported that the 
farmer who has been engaged is starting work 



immediately, and that there would be a great 
deal of work for volunteers as soon as the Easter 
holidays were over. As there is a full report 
from the Alumnae Farm Committee elsewhere 
in this issue, which deals with all that this 
department has accomplished, there is no 
need for further details here. 

Miss Martha Thomas reported that the 
Department of Food Conservation had been 
meeting regularly every two weeks, and had 
made public all the information it had been 
able to secure in regard to the dictates of the 
Food Administration. Pledge cards, concern- 
ing individual economy have been distributed 
and signed by a great number of the College 
Community and in response to a request from 
Mr. Cook, the Pennsylvania State Food Admin- 
istrator, the meals in the college dining rooms 
are planned in accordance with the Pennsyl- 
vania State voluntary food ration. 

There was no report at the meeting from the 
Department of Maintenance of Existing Social 
Agencies, whose work is identical with that of 
the Christian Association, but in all its activi- 
ties throughout the year it has been fully as 
successful as usual. 

There was no report from the Department of 
Liberty Loan. Since the campaign for the 
Second Liberty Loan, which resulted in a total 
subscription of $197,200, this department has 
been conducting the sale of War Savings 
Stamps. It also expects to offer Liberty 
Bonds of the third issue, for sale and possibly 
to have another patriotic rally, but it does not 
intend to conduct the exhaustive canvass for 
the Third Loan that it did for the Second, as 
many subscribers are still paying for their 
bonds on the installment plan. 



1918] 



War Work 



41 



Miss Turle, reporting for the Department of 
Education, said that although the department 
had been very active in getting speakers in the 
early part of the year, it was now allowing 
speakers to come under the auspices of the 
different classes, who by charging admission 
were thereby able to add to their Service Corps 
funds. The department has also been busy 
cataloguing the war literature, most of which it 
has received through gifts, and so making this, 
together with information on a bulletin board 
in the New Book Room, easily available The 
Bureau of Public Speaking under this depart- 
ment has been meeting every week to train 
speakers on war subjects, and will be able to 
offer several "three minute women" for the 
Thrift Stamp campaign, and for the Third 
Loan. 

Miss Houghton reported for the Department 
of Red Cross and Allied Relief, which has been 
conducting the $10,000 campaign for the 
Service Corps. $7606.63 has been raised in 
money and pledges to date, as follows: Faculty 
$1003; Graduates $211; Varsity Fund $3049, 
and the rest from the classes, 1918 being the 
only class as yet to complete the quota assigned 
by the department. The department plans 
for two speakers for information on the subject 
of Reconstruction Work, Dr. Tallant of the 
Smith Unit, and Miss Wright of the American 
Fund for French Wounded. In addition to 
this work for the Service Corps, over $1000 
worth of wool has been issued, and the Red 
Cross Workshop has now reached an average 
of over 2000 dressings per week. 

This completes the report of the work of the 
executive departments. The War Council 
itself has met regularly every two weeks to 
discuss matters of policy and organization, and 
to apportion the work of the various depart- 
ments. Through the channels offered by the 
representation on the Council of all the college 
organizations, through mass meetings and 
through the College News, an effort has been 
made to keep the College in touch with the 
work. At the mass meeting on March 18, a 
slight modification of the present organization, 
suggested by the War Council, was ratified. 
In addition to the representatives already 
on the Council there are to be for the coming 
year, a representative from each of the three 
lower classes, elected by those classes, and the 
Chairman from the Senior class to be nominated 
and elected by the College. It has not been 
decided as yet, whether the Director of Depart- 



ments for the year 1918-1919 shall be chosen 
this spring or next fall. In any case, there is 
a good deal of change in the membership this 
spring, since the new chairman and all the new 
presidents of associations come into office. 
With so much of the routine work of organiza- 
tion accomplished, and with a membership 
which now satisfies everyone as being repre- 
sentative, there seems to be no reason why the 
work of the Council in the coming year should 
not be attended with all success. 

Virginia Kneeland, 
Chairman of the War Council of 
Bryn Mawr College. 1917-1818. 

THE BRYN MAWR SERVICE 
CORPS 

At a mass meeting held in Taylor Hall on 
February 12, the Bryn Mawr Service Corps 
was brought up for more complete discussion 
than had been given it at earlier meetings, 
and was unanimously supported by the vote 
of the meeting. The plan of the Corps was 
described in the January Quarterly and a 
circular and appeal for its support has been 
sent to every alumna and former student. 
The Alumnae War Relief Committee recom- 
mended to the Alumnae Association and to 
this mass meeting that the administration of 
the funds for the Service Corps and the deci- 
sions and arrangements in regard to members 
be put in the hands of an administrative com- 
mittee to consist of six members, three ap- 
pointed by the Alumnae Association and three 
from the War Council. The Alumnae Associa- 
tion appointed Marion Reilly, Martha Thomas, 
and Abigail Dimon as its the three representa- 
tives, but the mass meeting desired to add to the 
personnel an additional undergraduate to be 
elected by the Undergraduate Association. 
The War Council members are the Chairman 
of the War Council, Virginia Kneeland; the 
Director of the Department of Red Cross and 
Allied Relief, Elizabeth Houghton; and a 
faculty member, Dean Taft. The undergrad- 
uate Association elected Dorothea Chambers, 
1919, as the third undergraduate represen- 
tative. When the committee was complete it 
organized by electing Marion Reilly as chair- 
man and Abigail Dimon as Secretary-Treasurer. 
It expects to hold regular meetings once a week 
and has begun on the work of selecting the 
members of the Corps. 

Information as to the need and qualifications 
for workers has been sent to the committee by 






42 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



three of the Bryn Mawr people abroad — 
Elizabeth Sergeant, '03, Helene Evans, ex-' 15 
and Cynthia Wesson, '09. The letters from 
Elizabeth Sergeant and Helene Evans are espe- 
cially full and are printed in part in this number 
of the Quarterly. Before going to Rome 
Helene Evans had been the secretary of Mr. 
Devine, of the Bureau of Refugees in Paris so 
that her information about Red Cross workers 
is of great interest. Cynthia Wesson inclosed 
a letter from Gertrude Ely, who has charge of 
the women canteen workers of the Y. M. C. A., 
describing a canteen unit and the qualifications 
for the workers. Carrie McCormick Slade on 
this side puts the need for Y. M. C. A. canteen 
workers strongly before us. The Red Cross 
also tells us that it needs Italian speaking 
women for Social service among the Italian 
refugees. There is a strong desire among the 
undergraduates to aid in Armenian Relief work 
and the committee is watching for an oppor- 
tunity to send a member of the Corps to such 
work. One unit has recently been sent to 
Palestine for work among the Greeks and 
Armenians and it is quite possible that another 
may be sent in the/early summer. 

A number of alumnae have volunteered to 
serve on the Corps and it is hoped that many 
more will respond when the appeal and the 
circular of information reaches them. The 
committee has prepared a card for registration 
which it asks to have filled out by all the volun- 
teers, as well as a physician's certificate vouch- 
ing for the physical condition of the volunteer. 
It is to be understood that the organization 
under which workers go out will have its own 
registration blank and physician's certificate 
in addition to the one filled out for the Service 
Corps. The number of volunteers will be 
much greater than the funds of the Service 
Corps will permit of sending so the committee 
will have to exercise careful judgment in select- 
ing those workers who most fully meet pressing 
need on the other side. Two members of the 
Service Corps have already been designated, 
Elizabeth Sergeant, an account of whose activi- 
ties is given elsewhere in this number of the 
Quarterly, and Margaret Bontecou, who sails 
the latter part of March as a Y. M. C. A. 
canteen worker in France. Both of these 
members meet the larger part of their expenses. 
In making the financial arrangements the 
Chairman and Secretary-Treasurer of the 
Joint Administrative Committee draw an 
order on the Treasurer of the Alumnae Associa- 



tion for a designated sum to be paid to the 
member going out for service. The latter repays 
in cash or gives a pledge for the amount she is 
able to contribute. She is asked to sign a 
receipt that includes a clause promising to 
refund any surplus that may not be used for 
the purposes of the Corps. She is also asked 
to send a classified statement of her expenses 
from time to time. 

Money is coming in well for the Corps. The 
Department of Red Cross and Allied Relief 
collects from the College Community and 
hands the sum collected to the Treasurer of 
the Alumnae Association every month. The 
first of March it handed in $1835.37. On 
March 15 the fund collected from the alum- 
nae amounted to $396.43 while the pledges 
handed to the committee represented $2239 
additional. Since the general appeal was not 
sent out until March 11 and the local campaigns 
which are to be instituted in as many districts 
as possible were not then under way these sums 
represent for the most part voluntary sub- 
scriptions and make an encouraging beginning. 
Abigail Camp Dimon, 

Secretary. 

The Bryn Mawr Service Corps has appointed 
Elizabeth S. Sergeant, '03, its first representa- 
tive in France. Miss Sergeant went abroad in 
September to do a series of investigations for 
the New Republic and with the plan also of 
writing articles for other magazines. 

"As a matter of fact," she says in a letter 
of January 31, "I have been able to do no 
writing of that sort. It would be very easy if 
I had the time, if I took the time from the 
"liaison work" (so called!) in which my knowl- 
edge of France immediately involved me, and 
from my researches for the New Republic. 
As to the former, I have nothing whatever to 
show for it but it has taken much energy and 
many hours: finding this French person for 
that American and vice versa, trying to bring 
certain American authorities and certain 
French together and help in getting their 
ideas "across" to each other; listening to 
French criticism and American criticism and 
passing it along tactfully, etc. I have seen 
quite a little of the Publicity Department of 
the Civil Affairs Department of the American 
Red Cross — but had to refuse an offer to give 
them half-time. Yet they have taken a certain 
amount of solid time! Through Gertrude 
Ely and Martha McCook who are at the head 



1918] 



War Work 



43 



of the woman's side of the Y. M. C. A. and 
very powerful in the inner councils I have 
followed their problems more or less. They 
have asked me to lecture or talk to the "boys" 
on French subjects, and Arthur Gleason is also 
anxious to have me write an article of "con- 
structive criticism." All this I surely mean to 
do, want much to do, but have not yet had time 
for. The speaking trips are fearfully tiring and 
can't be combined with anything else. I should 
like immensely to give a solid month or two to 
them, and that is what they would like. . . . 
"The army meanwhile has got me in its toils. 
I had some letters from Washington, which 
combined with the name of the New Republic 
led them to offer me a trip to G. H. Q. and 
through the "zone." No other women had 
been allowed at G. H. Q., they said, except 
through the Y. M. C. A. I think this isn't 
strictly true, but pretty nearly. Anyhow 
nobody else has spent several days at G. H. Q. 
hearing an account of the special problems 
from the chiefs of all the sections. Each one 
explained his work to me, and I of course saw 
General Pershing and lunched and dined at the 
various messes. Then I also saw the training 
camps and lunched with officers of the line 
along the way. Then they (i.e., the top of 
the General Staff) decided they wanted me to 
see the whole thing and would send me down 
the "line of communication" to the base port, 
in order to be able to describe for America the 
problem of the army from the sea to G. H. Q. 
But at that point I picked up a purely Ameri- 
can grippe germ which gave me a long siege, 
partly in an army hospital; I am only just all 
right again. It has lost me six or seven weeks' 
work, at least effective work. I am now on the 
point of starting on the delayed trip, which I 
shall make partly through the good offices of 
the American Red Cross, thereby getting 
material for a Red Cross article: Dr. (Major) 
Lambert ("medecin chef") is taking Mrs. 
Borden Harriman (sent over by the Council of 
National Defense) and Miss Ruth Morgan — 
and me. I am very incidental but a seat in a 
limousine n'est pas a refuser here and now! 
The army cars are very, very cold, and the 
trains are hours late and unheated. Between 
the Y. M. C. A. and this very thorough official 
view I'm getting I ought to know a great deal 
about the army, and it is absorbingly interest- 
ing. Then again, of course, half the problems 
are Franco-American and need very nice inter- 
pretation if they are not to offend. 



"I seem to be coming last to my chief work 
for the New Republic: to find out what the 
loss of France has been along all lines, in men, 
in agriculture, in industry, etc., — and what 
America should do to help. That is the 
toughest proposition of all, for facts are not 
available, or confidential if obtained. Then 
the interpretation is again awfully difficult, 
for political reasons often, — and the whole 
reconstruction question is in an absolutely 
fluid state. That has meant endless talk and 
sitting on doorsteps of deputies, etc., getting 
horses in itself for the journeys takes forever. 
The journeys are essential, I have been twice to 
the "liberated" region for considerable times, 
and must go back this spring. I have also been 
to reconquered Alsace and to Verdun but that 
was a different sort of thing. I am very much 
in touch with the people who are dealing with 
the liberated region, French and American Red 
Cross, and feel as if I were getting somewhere — 
might get somewhere if I had time enough. 
Three months went nowhere, as you can per- 
haps understand." 

Since the above was written an admirable 
article entitled "The Soil of France" has 
appeared in the New Republic of March 2nd. 
In December was published an article on the 
liaison work of which Miss Sergeant speaks in 
her letter. 

Extracts from a letter from Elizabeth Sergeant, 
'03, to Marion Reilly, Chairman of the Alum- 
nae War Relief Committee and the Joint 
Administrative Service Corps Committee: 

Paris, January 31. 
Dear Marion: 

Your letter of January 8 reached me about 
a week ago — pretty quick for these days! 
I am enormously interested in the Bryn Mawr 
Service Corps and feel sure you are right not to 
send a "unit." The day for that has a little 
passed, and even Smith, which has been doing 
splendid work (much praised by the French) 
has found it best to give up independence and 
come under the Red Cross. I adjoin some 
scratchy notes, very incomplete, but all I 
have been able to manage in a particularly 
busy week. I am convinced that the Bryn 
Mawr woman would be invaluable here; there is 
far more than enough work for the able, but the 
incapable and the unserious are going perhaps 
to make^ difficulties for the rest of us. I think 
passports will be and should be more and 
more closely watched, and anyone who come s 



44 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



should be prepared to stick to her job for 
a reasonable time, like six months, whether or 
not it is what she expected. Lots of women 
have come supposedly for a definite society, 
that society having guaranteed the passport — 
and then leave the society promptly for one 
they like better. Another interesting point: 
American women draw back from the more 
disagreeable jobs. This is asserted by the 
American in charge of the Y. M. C. A. "Eagle 
Hut" in London. The English women do the 
6 a.m. work and the night work, etc. — the 
Americans never can! Americans in the Eng- 
lish Red Cross say the same thing. I haven't 
heard this said often in France but there are 
endless women who are not working eight 
hours a day — who are here primarily for fun. 
Tell your people they must be ready to convert 
the American army to a belief in women by 
their efficiency and seriousness. 

NOTES ON WORKERS, ETC. 

Living expenses and equipment. The cost of 
living is very high indeed, not only food, room, 
but all incidentals, such as cleaning, cobbling, 
veils, gloves, washing, etc. In my opinion 
nobody, even though she works in an office 
from 9-6, wears a uniform (as the A. R. C. 
and Y. M. C. A do) and is pretty sturdy, 
should have less than 700 francs per month 
and if she had no resources of her own that 
would be a narrow margin. Seven hundred 
and fifty would be fairer, — say $5 per day. 
This is Paris and it does not mean hotels, 
either, generally speaking. They cost — the 
reasonable ones — anywhere from 18 to 25 
francs per day. I know of just one pension 
at 10 francs a day. No bathroom, unhealed, 
and out of the way. Most pensions are 14 or 
15 and this does not include sufficient heat 
usually. That question will not be important 
in the spring (heat, I mean) as it is in mid- 
winter. The Red Cross building is splendidly 
heated; so are most other places where Ameri- 
cans work — unless they are not heated at all, 
like the Alcazar d'fite where girls pack all day 
in sweaters and mittens. I don't know whether 
it would be possible for you to adjust your 
financing to the age of the worker. But 
certainly the "young and healthy and un- 
trained" can get along with less, especially 
if they are doing out of door or office work, 
than women of more years and judgment, and 
therefore responsibility and fatigue. But I 
think anyone without personal resources to 



supplement the Bryn Mawr money would be 
worried if she had less than 25 francs a day 
allowance. As an example of what things 
cost, I find having my shoes soled and heeled 
will cost 20 francs ($4.00). Washerwomen 
charge 1,25 for a nightgown ($0.25) and other 
things in proportion. A very penurious week's 
wash costs at least $2.00. I am looking for- 
ward with dismay to having to buy shoes for 
$15 or $20! Be sure that people bring plenty 
of boots, shoes, stockings, underwear, sweaters, 
etc. Hard alcohol, cold cream, soap, are very 
expensive here. Cleaning fluid not to be had. 
Bring a little extra sugar if tea at home ever 
desired, as it can't be bought by anybody 
without a card, and you don't have a card if 
you live in a pension or hotel. Bring type- 
writer paper for personal use. No typewriters 
can be bought here except with French key- 
boards and at very high price and very scarce 
at that. 

I find Mrs. Ford of the Women's War Relief 
Corps (registering all women) confirms me 
that 750 francs is the right amount for Paris. 
She says from 500-600 out of Paris — i.e., in 
canteen towns. The A. R. C. allows 360 
francs per month as bare living expenses for 
workers it partially supports in canteens and 
the Y. M. C. A. the same amount, but this 
would not cover journeys, stops in hotels be- 
tween assignments (they are changed about 
and often have to wait several weeks in Paris 
before being sent any where) and stops in hotels 
in canteen towns before lodgings are found. A 
friend who has been at one said she had to pay 
8 francs a day for her room for three weeks 
before getting other arrangements. The ho- 
tels in the war zone are however poor, almost 
as dear as Paris, because practically "officers' 
clubs." Meals on trains cost 6 francs. The 
friend just mentioned who has been here since 
September says 600 francs a month would be 
just right in canteens. But remember, both 
for the 750 francs and the 600 francs, that 
prices may go up still more at any moment. 

Will the demand for women workers increase? 
Undoubtedly, though there may be opposition 
from the army. The truth is, there are many 
useless and frivolous women here, not really 
working, and eating up the food. I under- 
stand the Intelligence Section of the army is 
thinking of registering all women, and regulat- 
ing things far more strictly, possibly with medi- 
cal requirements. Dr. Blake thinks that all 
women who come should be at least 28 and 



1918] 



War Work 



45 



should be passed before coming, not by the 
family doctor but by an impersonal doctor 
with careful study of past history; and that 
those whose energy and vitality get exhausted 
should be subject to medical control and sent 
home to make room for others. 

There is no question that the A. R. C. and 
the Y. M. C. A. are going to need women in 
greatly increasing numbers and their standard 
is steadily rising. Women of college training 
would be most welcome to certain canteen 
heads .... 

Kind of woman needed 

Canteen work is going to grow enormously 
and is, I think, very valuable and interesting 
work. There are canteens for French soldiers 
and the A. R. C. is also starting many for 
American soldiers. Requirements there are, 
age, 25-40, preferably nearer 25; "husky" 
health — used to "roughing it," to standing on 
your feet; adaptability, willingness to be 
bossed, circumspection, good disposition, should 
speak French a little, know how to put on 
bandages (First Aid Course); social gifts also 
welcome if not absolutely insisted on (I think 
they are). The able people here soon rise to 
the top, or should, and will be put in charge of 
new canteens as they are opened. There is no 
cooking required — 8 hour shifts — night work. 
Strict rules for social life (i.e., about dining 
with officers, etc.) 

Enormous demand for first rate bureau 
workers. Stenographers and typewriters are 
snapped up on every side, and good executive 
secretaries are more precious than rubies. 
Any bureau of the A. R. C. (I speak at random 
but I know at least three) would absorb as 
many as available — i.e., women with knowl- 
edge of filing, library education, record keep- 
ing, etc., as well as stenography and typewriting 
and general trained intelligence. 

The Refugee and Child Welfare Tubercu- 
losis Departments are using social service 
workers and of course nurses and doctors. 
No doubt graduates of Miss Kingsbury's 
would be welcome. The Child Welfare Tuber- 
culosis and Housing campaign will probably 
be extended greatly very soon and more work- 
ers demanded. Very interesting for social 
workers and sociologists. 

Chaufeuses are always needed. 

Dietitians will be needed. 

Nurses' auxiliaries should register. There 
aren't enough nurses here for the wounded 



— when they begin to come in. At present 
auxiliaries are treated like dirt in many places. 

Laboratory experts are said to be needed but 
I don't know details. 

Reconstruction work is enormously interest- 
ing in the field for people who know and care 
for France. Here health, ability to run a car, 
resourcefulness, energy, tact, practically neces- 
sary, and medical or nurse's training, car- 
pentry, etc., all to the good. I understand 
Miss Anne Morgan wants college graduates 
for her most successful work at Blerancourt. 
She has done more than anyone in actual 
rebuilding and has cooperated with the French 
and got general respect. The Smith Unit 
has been most successful also; is now coming 
under the A. R. C. like everything else. The 
Friends have done splendid work. Living 
conditions, etc., are very Spartan with them. 
Send only the strongest, and nobody with a 
tendency to flirtation as they are suspicious of 
women. 

The Y. M. C. A. wants "women of resource 
and magnetism." "Popular leader quality." 
There are, or they say so many second rate 
men that is all the more important for the 
women to be "thoroughbreds." They will be 
put in situations where no conventional laws 
hold and must know how to control them. 
The fairly young — 25 to 30 — will probably be 
most successful with the privates and the 
more attractive and good looking the better; 
the more social experience the better, provided 
they are serious and steady. None of those 
with husbands in the army are acceptable. 
Married welcome otherwise. There are no 
two opinions in the rank and file of the army 
as to the enormous good these women do. 
The young officers and privates will tell you 
that the whole tone of a camp is changed by 
their presence (this is also true of A. R. C. 
canteens) and the "huts" are popular just in 
proportion as women are there. They need a 

lot at where there will be a very large 

number of men (privates) on leave every week — 
girls who can walk and dance and help "enter- 
tain" and amuse. 

In the Y. M. C. A. the capable and excep- 
tional person will undoubtedly rise to the top. 
It is less certain in the A. R. C. and some heart 
burning might result for canteen workers. 
Knowledge of French (conversation) essential 
for A. R. C. field workers; liking for the aver- 
age American essential for the Y. M. C. A. 
field workers 



46 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



Elizabeth White is now working for the 
Y. M. C. A. (answering soldiers' letters, and 
buying what they ask for from violin strings 
to pajamas). Variety is not lacking in jobs; 
but practically all relief and reconstruction will 
be under A. R. C. and the Y. M. C. A. is the 
other big opportunity 

Kindest regards and my warmest thanks 
again, 

Elizabeth Shepley Sergeant. 

Croce Rossa Americana 
112, Via del Plebiscito, 
Rome, January 31, 1918. 
Dear Miss Dimon: 

This address is no longer correct, for the 
office by the time this letter gets to you will 
be moved into a fine old villa at the corner of 
via Sicilia and via Romagno. For myself, I 
have been in Rome since Saturday noon; came 
in response to a telegram received in Paris 
Monday afternoon and Thursday evening I 
left. 

I asked Mr. Devine just how to answer your 
letter — which, by the way, I passed on to 
Dorothea Moore for reply. I asked her to 
tell you all she could about all the Bryn Mawr 
girls that she knows about. Anne Hardon 
came over a year ago last December. She 
served as an aid in a hospital at the front for 
five months, I believe; then she acted as chauf- 
feur in the south of France for a number of 
months, and when I left Paris she was ready to 
start out to the French line to serve with a 
canteen as soon as her papers could be put 
through. She was to be stationed in the war 
zone and papers are exceedingly difficult to 
arrange. 

As for myself, I came over the middle of 
September and acted as secretary to Edward 
T. Devine, Chief of the Bureau for Refugees, 
until I left for Rome last week. Here I am 
with the Publicity Department. This was 
simply a means of getting to Italy; as soon as 
anything turns up which will give me the 
opportunity to get out and work among the 
people I am going to try to get into that. I 
wanted to do Reconstruction when I left U.S.A. 
but most of that is absolutely volunteer, and I 
must have my expenses paid. 

Now, as to your letter. Mr. Devine says 
that what you said about the undesirability 
of college units was true some time back but 
that word has now been sent to Washington 
that the A. R. C. will use college units if alum- 



nae want to come that way, provided the 
people are willing to do what can be done by 
such groups when they get here — everything is 
not adapted to that variety of service. An 
effort will be made to keep groups togethei 
and to insure that each group should be under 
the leadership of a trained, experienced per- 
son — social work, reconstruction work, canteen, 
medical, etc. Also each group should contain, 
if possible, a person thoroughly familiar with 
the medical and sanitary situation. A speak- 
ing knowledge of French is strongly advisable, 
although not obligatory for all forms of work. 
Those who are to be sent out to work among 
the rapatries, for instance, can do little without 
it, for that work demands constant interrela- 
tion with government officials, clergy, French 
organizations already in the field, and the 
people. Individuals can be used to better 
advantage than groups. Persons sent should 
have genuine ability, a sympathetic interest in 
people, facility in getting grasp on a difficult 
situation rapidly, and tact. 

In many instances the A. R. C. representa- 
tive has to harmonize the French agencies — 
government, clerical, war societies of all kinds, 
which in many places are now at enmity. 
Also, A. R. C. workers and organization stand 
on a precarious footing and are hampered in 
their efforts to be useful at every turn. Who- 
ever goes out must be prepared to meet all the 
obstacles that long protracted war, — mis- 
understanding, privation, and the falling off 
in interest in the victims of the war which is in- 
evitable after four years of their presence, — can 
produce. The people must be husky, equipped 
for resisting the French climate under war con- 
ditions (cold, dampness, mud) and ready to 
pitch in and work hard. Volunteers (expenses 
paid — francs 450 to 600 a month) and espe- 
cially those who can come without expense to 
the A. R. C. at all are most wanted, but they 
must have the needed qualifications first. 
$100 to $125 a month will be paid to people 
who are equal to the job if they cannot come 
otherwise. Mr. W. Frank Persons, A. R. C. 
Headquarters, Washington, D. C, is the 
proper person to address. All of this refers to 
France only; I know nothing as yet of the 
Italian situation. The organization here is 
small and will not develop to anything like 
the proportions of the French organization 
unless there should be a repetition of October's 
reverses. The mushroom growth will be 
avoided here, under all circumstances. In 



1918] 



War Work 



47 



France whoever was on the spot, good or bad, 
was impressed into the service wherever the 
most pressing need was, regardless of qualifica- 
tions (usually lack of them) and some of them 
are still in such misfit positions, although as 
they can be replaced this is being done. 

Above all, send level headed people and 
those who are old enough to be sensible; send 
no one under 25. Difficulty has been experi- 
enced in the canteen service, for instance, on 
account of lack of dignity, to put it mildly. 

It should be impressed on groups coming 
over that each one of us in the field shoulders 
a big responsibility — the A. R. C, the Ameri- 
can people, and the American government are 
being judged by us. At all times we are under 
scrutiny, for we are all marked as attaches of 
the A. R. C, and in all parts of France we are 
present. Our past record as money spenders 
is also against us. We have to remember con- 
stantly that we are the trustees of the contri- 
bution being sent to Europe, and accountable 
to the American people for its most effective 
use. This is not preaching. More and more 
the chiefs are seeing the necessity for stressing 
the points in this paragraph. Our contribu- 
butions could be dispelled in countless ways if 
the most careful discrimination were not 
practiced. In the Bureau with which I was 
formerly connected care is now being taken to 
make it clear that our delegates are distributing 
A. R. C. supplies and that they represent the 
great masses of the United States and not only 
a few wealthy people. 

Farewell, 

Helene R Evans. 

Additional Information About Bryn 
Mawr Women in Europe 

FRANCE 

American Red Cross 

1. Canteen Work 

Hardon, Anne, '15. January 31 was ready 
to start out for war zone as canteen worker on 
the French line. 

Hoyt, Mary, '99 

2. American Friends' Service Committee 

Ferris, Frances, ex' 09. Relief work. 

F. M. C. A. 
King, Helen M., Grad. 



Other Work 

Lounsbury, Grace, C, '97. Content 
Nichols writes she is "doing a splendid work as 
head of a hospital for French soldiers suffering 
from nervous lesions. It was at Piriac but is 
now transferred to some other point." 



Cadbury, Leah, '14. Relief work among 
refugees. 

Taylor, Lily Ross, Ph.D., Gave up her 
fellowship at the American School of Classical 
Studies, Rome, to do relief work among refugees 
under the A. R. C. She is at Livorno. 

LETTERS 

From Mrs. Cons 

January 10, 1918. 
Dear Elizabeth: 

Last month I was so busy getting out pack- 
ages that I had no time to write. I hope that 
you understood and did not think it strange 
that no letter came from me. We sent out 
277 packages and 57 money orders in twenty- 
two days. You will realize what a job it was 
when I tell of the time spent on 45 of them. It 
took me two days and a half to buy the where- 
withal to make them. Then I worked all the 
next day from 8.30 a.m. to 9 p.m., with twenty 
minutes for lunch and ten minutes for supper. 
Three other persons worked five hours and a 
half on them that day and the next day I 
worked from 8.30 a.m. till 5 p.m. finishing the 
book-keeping, tying up, addressing, sealing, 
stamping, weighing, etc. — and I didn't lose 
any time either. The weighing things for the 
post office is a nuisance but has to be done 
for the 2 pound packages. For the express 
packages — we don't have to bother. 

Of course this time everything was extra 
nice. The packages were lovely. Elizabeth, 
I wish you could have seen them. I spent 
over 5000 francs but it was worth it. The St. 
Nicholas packages for the Belgians were a 
ginger bread St. Nicholas, a nice apple, a pretty 
box of candy, nuts and figs and a little present 
(pipe, cards, letter paper, game, cigarettes or 
purse). The whole wrapped in white tissue 
paper, tied with the Belgian colors and a 
"PoulbotZ card with a message for each. I had 
such fun with those cards. For a huge Belgian 
with feet in proportion there was the knitting 



48 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



class. A little girl making socks gets up and 
cries: "Teacher, she says that my godson has 
big feet." I wrote on it "Cher Pierrot, naturelle- 
ment e'est le pur hasard qui fait que je vous 
envoie cette carte. Personne n'a jamais dit que 
vous aviez de grands pieds et d'ailleurs vous 
etes mon cousin et non mon filleuV — (he calls 
me cousin.) They (the cards) were all selected 
to fit and the men are still talking and laughing 
about them. 

The little Christmas packages for the French- 
men were the same except that there were 
marrons glaces instead of the St. Nicholas 
and a little calendar instead of the card. The 
calendars were little beauties — selected too for 
the men. In addition to these small packages, 
all the men, French and Belgians, had either 
money or a large package of unusually nice 
goodies (ham or chicken instead of beef or veal, 
for instance), and all the chinks were filled 
with nuts — they were most attractive. 

The little families had money, 10 francs to a 
person — and two bound volumes of Mon 
Journal for the children, and if the father was 
an ex-soldier, he had his little Christmas pack- 
age, too. All the miners had money and a 



The prisoners, thanks to your mother's 
generous gift — had packages twice as large as 
usual — about 12 pounds in one big package 
(dried beans, lentils or peas, rice, beef, sugar, 
cocoa, jam, tomato sauce, chocolate, coffee, 
condensed milk, prunes, bouillon cubes, and a 
nice cake). A small package sent separately 
contained candy, nuts and a "noix de jambon 
fumee" (the center of a ham smoked). I am 
dreadfully afraid the Germans will take that 
ham but I thought I'd risk it — the men would 
enjoy it so much. I have nineteen prisoners 
on my list now. I don't know how many 
soldiers there are. As soon as I have time I 
am going to make out my annual report — it 
will be interesting to me as well as to you for 
I don't really know how much I've done this 
year. I know, however, that other men are 
jealous of my men and stand around to see 
them open their packages — which speaks well 
for them, does it not? As I think things over 
I feel satisfied. Several small families are 
getting on their feet in addition to the soldiers — 
several miners have been clothed — two in new 
suits. Little by little they are being helped — 
yes, I feel satisfied. It is so good to have the 
money necessary but I have to be very careful 
now as I get to be known more widely. People 



try to get things on false pretenses, so I am not 
being too "easy." I have just brought to 
light one such dishonest attempt. A woman 
took the addresses out of one of my soldiers' 
note books and wrote to his godmother and to 
me pretending to be a "rapatriee" with her 
old parents. I smelled a rat — why I don't 
know, but the letter did not seem sincere and I 
have since gotten the facts from my soldier. 
I am glad that I gave her nothing. I have 
written to the godmother to warn her. 

I have attended to the various things men- 
tioned in your letters and those sent me — it is 
useless to enumerate. 

The January cable came to-day. I was 
afraid it might be much smaller — but it is a 
goodly one, too. Don't worry when checks 
come in late — I must have 8000 or 9000 francs 
now (with to-day's cable). Of course last 
month was a bad one — but last month's cable 
will cover this month's expenses. 

I will not write more tonight for I am a little 
weary. Adolphe was here to help me with the 
work so I did not get sick, but I am of course a 
little tired. Will write more later. With 
many thanks and best New Year's wishes and 
love, 

Jeanette. 

I know of no other way than through the 
American Girls' Aid or the parcel post to 
send to me. 

Please excuse mistakes — I have had a hard 
day and my poor brain gets fagged toward 
night. 

Teanette 

from miss curtis 

221 East 15th Street, New York City. 
February 18, 1918. 
Dear Friend: 

Having received several inquries from former 
Bryn Mawr students as to the whereabouts of 
my sister and her husband, Professor Louis 
Cons, it has occurred to me that other members 
of their classes might be glad to hear something 
of their work since the beginning of the war. 

After six weeks spent at Gap, a training- 
camp and mobilization center in the south of 
France, Professor Cons was sent to the front 
near Rheims about the middle of October, 
1914. He served in the trenches without 
furlough till September, 1915, eleven months 
of incessant toil and constant danger. He had 
many narrow escapes twice the visor of his 



1918] 



War Work 



49 



cap was shot away, his pipe was broken in his 
mouth by a ball, men on either side of him 
were killed, and yet he suffered no injury, 
until March, when he and a comrade were the 
victims of the first poison-gas bomb thrown in 
that sector. The bomb exploded over the 
small dug-out in which the two men were 
sleeping. Both were buried in the debris, 
and were unconscious when rescued. For two 
days the pain was intense, with violent nausea, 
bleeding from nose and ears, and from the 
lungs. In the case of Professor Cons, .he 
treatment was successful, and he soon returned 
to the trenches, though the effects of the poi- 
son were felt for two or three months. 

In June, 1915, his regiment was transferred 
to the terrible Verdun sector where he remained 
for eighteen months, and where his knowledge 
of German soon caused his appointment to 
special service in a "fixed post" of the first line. 
In November, 1915 he received his "citation" 
and his "Croix de guerre" for courage and 
devotion to duty under fire. 

For the past year he has been giving instruc- 
tion in technical German to Chiefs of Special 
Posts, and examining and analyzing for the 
General Staff the documents, note-books, 
letters, etc., found on German prisoners. 
Thousands of documents pass through his 
hands, and much valuable information is 
obtained. This work is done behind the lines, 
and in comparative safety, though not out of 
range of shell-fire, or attacks from the air. 

Early in the war, the sympathies of Professor 
Cons were strongly aroused by the sight of the 
poor men in the trenches whose homes in the 
north of France had been buried under the 
German avalanche. These men had only their 
wage of a penny a day for all the small neces- 
saries, and were so forlorn and uncared-for 
that Professor Cons asked his wife to write to 
some of them whom he knew personally, and 
do what she could to cheer them, and, if pos- 
sible, to supply their needs. 

She had been actively engaged in relief work 
of various kinds from the beginning of the war, 
and was able to obtain for these friendless men 
the underwear and knitted articles most needed 
for their comfort and health. A friend in the 
Belgian army appealed to her in behalf of 
thirty men in his company who seemed to him 
especia ly worthy of help. Other friends added 
more names to the list, until she has now one 
hundred and seventy soldiers under her care, 



from homesick boys of twenty, to the anxious 
fathers of lost families. But to all she is 
Petit ■ Maman, whose letters and little packages 
of useful articles are eagerly awaited. For- 
merly their furloughs were spent in the trenches, 
as their homes and friends were behind the 
German lines, but now they come to her in 
Paris, and find in her little parlor with its 
bright fire or blooming plants, a friendly wel- 
come and a touch of the home feeling which goes 
far toward restoring hope and courage. 

The accompanying circulars which have 
been sent out from time to time, give some 
further details of her work and its needs. 
Very sincerely yours, 

Anna L. Curtis. 

The following letter from Madame Louis 
Cons speaks for itself: 

Paris, January 1918. 
Dear : 

I am sorry to hear of the coal shortage at 
home. We know how to sympathize with 
you, for we have shivered here through four 
terrible winters. We have fire part of the day 
n Paris, but in Belgium and in the parts of 
France still held by the Germans we hear that 
no fires are allowed in the houses, and that 
every blanket and garment of wool or fur has 
been taken by the Boches, except one suit for 
each person. Even the children are robbed of 
bedding. In an orphan asylum in Noyon, the 
little beds stood close together in a long row 
without a scrap of covering, no mattresses, 
and no pillows The children had absolutely 
nothing but the lothes they had worn day and 
night, from December till April, when the 
French and British troops entered the town. 
Twelve thousand people were found in the 
ruined houses of this place; but not a stick of 
furniture or a household utensil of any kind 
had been left. 

To such desolation as this, many of my 
soldiers have been returned to work the re- 
covered mines, and it is for these men that I 
am forced to make a special appeal. Men 
from other districts sent back to industrial life 
find their homes and families and their civilian 
clothes waiting for them. But my men have 
noth ng at all e cept the one old uniform 
which has perhaps seen months of hard wear 
in trench and battle. They are often sick, 
weakened by the hardships of three years at 
the fronts and they are not as well paid for 
their labor as formerly, while the cost of living 
is much higher. 



50 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



These men are still "mobilized," still under 
military orders, but are no longer maintained 
by the over-burdened government, as when 
they were at the front. In cases where they 
have been joined by their families their small 
wage — from $1.00 to $1.50 per day — is entirely 
inadequate for their needs utterly destitute as 
they are. 

One of my men, Floreal Devillez, is a miner 
from Lens. Last June he was sent to work in 
the mines, and in September his little family 
was repatriated. Jeanne, his wife, has suffered 
much, and is not very strong, while the chil- 
dren are both small. All they could bring 
from the little home was a change of underwear 
for each. Floreal obtained two beds from the 
military bureau, bought a stove with his savings, 
and a few little things with the $20 I sent, and 
wrote to me, Mon bonheur «'a plus homes 
(My happiness has no bounds). He set seri- 
ously to work to build up a home, but his wife 
fell sick and he himself was obliged to go to a 
hospital for an operation, during which time 
his wife and children had but 60 cents a day to 
live on. 

I procured a big bundle of garments for them, 
and sent money from time to time. But until 
they can get on their feet again — get clothing, 
and dishes and furniture, — they need regular 
help every month, for Floreal earns just barely 
enough for food and fuel. I should like to 
lave 150 francs a month for them, for a time. 
They are industrious worthy people. Jeanne 
was a dressmaker, and can make a little go a 
long way for clothes. 

Noel Gambiez is another miner who began 
work in the mines at the age of ten. He has 
very little education, but is a quiet, middle- 
aged man, with the natural tact and delicacy 
so pleasing in many of the lower-class French. 
He lived in Auby-pres-Douai, with his wife 
and three little children, Jocelyn, Mireille and 
Marceau, and they had a very happy home. 
Noel was sober and industrious, and was getting 
along well, when the war broke out, and he 
was called to arms. The town was captured 
by the advancing Germans, and it was two 
years before he heard a word from his family, 
though he tried in every way possible. In 1916 
I succeeded in getting a line from them through 
an office here. They were hen all living, 
under the usual conditions of German military 
occupation. 

In one of the heavy attacks on the German 
lines, Noel's section led the assault. A hand- 



grenade exploded just in front of him and his 
face was terribly torn and cut. He was in 
hospital for some time, and though much 
scarred, does not look grotesque or repulsive. 
From the hospital he was sent to work in the 
mines in the south of France. 

Last November his three children were 
brought back by a cousin. But the little 
mother is dead — killed before her own door 
by a fragment of shell, during a bombardment. 
Noel, distracted with grief and care, hardly 
knew where to turn, or what to do. All the 
children were ill, — one with bronchitis, another 
with an abscess back of the ear which caused 
severe hemorrhages through the nose, and had 
to be operated on; the third with an intestinal 
trouble, brought on by privation. 

Noel was nearly wild. He could not work, 
because, at first, he could find no one to take 
care of his children: and they could not live 
on the ten cents a day per child given by the 
government, and the forty cents a day Noel 
receives when not working. Finally I told 
him that if he could find some one to stay 
with the children, I would help him pay her. 
That is what he has done, and his children 
have a woman's care once more. She is the 
widow of a soldier, herself back from the North 
with one child. She asks 5 francs a day. 
I must find this money regularly, if we are to 
save the children, and keep the family together. 

Charles Bryckaert, from Carvin, is a miner, 
chauffeur, "handy man." He is married, and 
has two little boys, one of whom, three years 
old he has never seen. Two years ago, he was 
told that his wife and children had been killed 
by a shell which fell on the house during a 
bombardment. Only last month he heard 
that they are in Belgium, alive but still behind 
the German lines. " f\ *'■ '■■-'■■ .'■■' 

Charles is very brave and sturdy, with a 
good-natured face and blue eyes. He was at 
Verdun for a long time and then his regiment 
was sent to Greece. There he contracted 
malaria, and was, in consequence, returned to 
France, to work in the mines. He earns just 
6 francs a day, has to pay 5 francs for rather 
poor board, and in order to save 20 cents for 
soap, laundry, and all little necessaries, he 
sleeps on the straw in a barn, with his old 
"capote" for a cover. I have clothed him, 
for he had only his uniform; but should be 
glad if he could sleep in a bed in a house. A 
barn is no place for a man who is still often 
shaken with chills and fever. 



1918] 



War Work 



51 



These stories, which I have told so briefly 
and inadequately, are typical cases, — the 
details no more poignant than in scores of 
others, — the men no more deserving. There is 
a pressing need of immediate help, and I turn 
to you, as I have turned before, with a special 
plea for my "miners' fund." If you were 
here, you would see that no words can tell the 
bitter need. 

As ever, gratefully yours, 

JE ANNETTE CURTIS CONS. 

Checks for this fund, as for the friendless 
men in the trenches should be made to the 
order of Elizabeth White and sent to her at 
The Marlborough-Blenheim, Atlantic City, 
N.J. 

All contributions are cabled to Madame 

Cons the first of every month by Miss White. 

I shall be glad to answer any questions or 

give further information regarding the work of 

my sister, Madame Cons. 

Yours very truly, 

Anna L. Curtis, 
22 East 15th Street, 
New York. N. Y. 

BULLETIN OF THE PATRIOTIC 
FARM 

The plans for the Patriotic Farm are making 
satisfactory progress. Mr. W. E. Hinckle 
Smith has loaned thirty acres of land within 
two miles of the campus to be used for the 
Farm this summer. The part of the campus 
under cultivation last year will probably be 



used again and the land behind the Baldwin 
School is to be used for a kitchen garden, to 
supply vegetables for the farmers. 

A farmer has been engaged and is already at 
work. Seedlings have been started under 
glass and the ploughing will begin within a 
few weeks. Abigail Camp Dimon, (1896) now 
the Recording Secretary of the College, is to be 
the director of the Farm after June 20. It is 
hoped that some other alumna can be found to 
take charge up to that time and relieve Alice 
Hawkins, who as the head of the Food Produc- 
tion Committee is at present making necessary 
arrangements. Myra Elliot Vauclain has been 
appointed chairman of the finance committee 
which is to raise the guarantee fund of $7000 
from the alumnae. 

There is an opportunity for quite a number 
of alumnae to enlist as farm hands. Provided 
they work for as much as one month, the wages 
will be 17 cents an hour for the first two weeks 
and 20 cents an hour thereafter. This ought 
to enable the workers to earn enough to cover 
their board of $6.50 a week. The alumnae are 
requested to come if possible in July, August or 
September, rather than in June as the heaviest 
registration of undergraduates is for the latter 
month. It would be well to write at once to 
Alice Hawkins, Merion Hall, for the registra- 
tion is made very definite this year and only 
the number of workers actually needed will be 
employed at any time. 

Helen Taft, 1915, 
Alumnae Farm Committee. 

April 1. 



BRYN MAWR COLLEGE PATRIOTIC FARM 

(Twenty acres lent to the College by Mr. and Mrs. Philip M. Sharpless) 



Expense Account 

20 acres partially fertilized (seeding 
and preparing under the direction 
of Mr. Arthur D. Cromwell before 
the farm was taken over by the 

I students) $197.56 

Fertilizer 95.33 

Seeds, plants, spraying, etc 289.24 

Ploughing with horse-plough 191 . 10 

Hauling 189.16 

Cannery (construction) 432 . 17 

Canning supplies 1,723 . 79 

Tools, etc 64.51 

Telephone 3 .90 



Motor truck (running expenses) 462 . 31 

House for lodging students: 

Rent, operating expenses. . $730.75 

Furnishings of house 56.84 

Board of Manager of house 84.78 872.37 

Mr. Cromwell at $1.00 per hour 644.50 

College students at 20 cents per 

hour 1,911.02 

Total expenses $7,076.96 

Receipts 
Farm produce: 

227 bushels potatoes at $1.50 per bushel. 
92 baskets tomatoes at 50 cents to $1.10 per 
basket. 



52 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



124f bushels beets at 70 cents per bushel 

67 bushels carrots at $1.10 per bushel. 

42 baskets lima beans at 90 cents to $1.10 

per basket. 
2,000 heads cabbage at $25 per ton. 
4 baskets kohl-rabi at 25 cents per basket. 
13 baskets Swiss chard at 25 cents per basket. 
26 bushels turnips at $1.20 per bushel. 

2 baskets onions at 10 cents per quart. 
10 endive at 5 cents each. 

18 bunches parsley at 5 cents each. 

10 baskets string beans 90 cents to $1.10 per 

basket. 
140 bunches radishes at 5 cents per bunch. 
1,515 dozen ears corn at 15 to 28 cents per 

dozen. 
7 bushels navy beans (estimated at $8 to 

$12 per bushel) 
212 cans beets at contract price, April, 

1917 $0.12 

34 cans peas at contract price, April, 

1917 18 

2,312 cans tomatoes at contract price, 

April, 1917 10 

2,964 cans corn at contract price, 

April, 1917 17 

84 cans Swiss chard at contract price, 

April, 1917 16 

1,905 cans peaches at contract price, 

April, 1917 18 

126 cans cherries at contract price, 

April, 1917 18 

3 cans soup at contract price, April, 

1917 18 

2,729 cans string beans at contract 
price, April, 1917 18 



Cash received for all farm pro- 
duce sold $2'412.24 

Estimated value of pro- 
duce not yet sold: 

Stored at Bryn Mawr. . . $178.55 
1,050 cabbages stored at 
farm 40.00 

Beans stored at farm 70.00 288.55 

Total value of produce $2,700.79 

Refunds: 





Actual: 


Cans sold 


$5.00 


Labels sold 


2.69 


Fertilizer sold. . . 


6.68 


Gasoline re- 




turned 


1.13 


Estimated: 


16,000 tin cans. 


$600.00 


Jars and large 




cans 


10.00 


Canning equip- 




ment, includ- 




ing tools 


125.00 



$15.50 



735.00 

From students for lodging at $1.50 

per week* 

Interest on bank balance 



750.50 

364.66 
13.71 



Total receipts $3,829.66 

Deficit on Patriotic Farm 3,247.96 

$7,076.96 



$7,076.96 



METHOD OF FINANCING PATRIOTIC FARM 



Donations: 

Refund from Arthur 
D. Cromwell (for 
time at 50 cents 
per hour) $322.25 

From Alumna who 
rented and oper- 
ated lodging house 
(loss on operating 
account) 366.09 

To Refund College for 
depreciation on om- 
nibus body truck. . 51.80 



From four students, 

wages refunded $41 . 52 

From an Alumna 5 . 00 

$786.66 

Borrowed cash re- 
turned $2,771.00 

Balance for distri- 
bution 1,589.66 

$4,360.66 

Donations 786.66 

Cash loss excluding 
donations 2,460.64 



* The students paid $6.00 for meals at boarding house nearby. 



1918] 



With the Alumnae 



53 



Cash Advances without Interest: 

For harvesting of 

crops $2,250.00 

For purchase of 
omnibus top to Ford 
chassis (afterward 
purchased by Col- 
lege.) 521.00 



inancing Loans: 




7 loans of $500 each . . 


$3,500.00 


2 loans of $250 each . 


500.00 


1 loan of $50 


50.00 



4,050.00 

Total cash supplied $7,607 . 66 

$7,607.66 



$2,771.00 



On the $4,050 lent for financing the farm we have paid only 39 cents on the dollar. If these 
canned goods had been sold for the market price in September, 1917, we could have paid 63 cents 
on the dollar. 

Note. — The price paid by the College for canned goods is the price offered at the time the Col- 
lege would otherwise place its contract, in April, 1917, for the College year 1917-1918. 



GINLING COLLEGE 



Ginling College, 

Nanking, China, 
December 2, 1917. 

To the Editor of the Alumnae Quarterly: 

To-day as I walked home from Chinese 
Church through the narrow stony streets of 
Nanking with some of our students, one of 
the juniors said to me, "Have you written 
your Ginling letter to Bryn Mawr yet?" 
And I had to confess that the long-promised 
letter to my fellow-alumnae about their sister- 
college here in China had been thrust aside 
time after time to give way to other things 
more pressing. Now that Miss Dong has 
reminded me, I am sitting down at once, 
because I really do want to tell you about this 
new college — a real college — which only three 
years ago opened its doors to the women of 
the Yangtze Valley. That year it had a fresh- 
man class of nine, but now by the entrance of 
a class of twenty, it has doubled its second 
year's enrollment and brought the total up to 
thirty-five. Isn't that splendid growth by 
geometrical progression a sign of the need that 
is felt in this part of China for such an 
institution? 

When I first heard of Ginling College last 
July at home, I thought it sounded like a place 
of splendid possibilities, and as soon as I reached 
here in October and saw the faces of the stu- 
dents, I was convinced of it. You perhaps 
imagine, as I used to, that Chinese faces are 
stolid and unresponsive; indeed, I was quite 
prepared to find them so, but to my great sur- 
prise and pleasure from the very first day these 
girls have seemed to me very little different 
from American girls. Of course most of our 
students have been prepared in Mission school 
where they have overcome their first timidity 



and have lost the dull look of so many of the 
uneducated, non-Christian Chinese. 

If you should come to visit Ginling you 
would be driven from the railway station away 
across to the southern part of the city of Nan- 
king, to an old Chinese "gung-gwan" or official 
residence built originally for the fifth son of 
Li Hung-chang, and therefore of course a 
very high-class dwelling. One glance at our 
walls would be sufficient, for in China the 
higher the rank of the family, the higher the 
wall around the house. After you had pushed 
open the heavy door, you would be met by the 
slow old gateman who with much solemnity 
would lead you through court after court, and 
perhaps even through one of our ever-fascinat- 
ing round doorways, back to the faculty quar- 
ters in the rear court, the most honorable 
part of the house. There you would notice a 
balcony and a full second-story, which does not 
exist in the other courts. The house is built 
in two-halves lengthwise with four main courts 
and four side courts on each side, and one-half 
belongs to the students, the other to the faculty. 
The dormitories and bed-rooms are of course 
in the two rear courts. Everywhere the wood- 
work is beautifully carved in intricate Chinese 
patterns, which one could spend days and 
weeks studying. Indeed, I should like to 
spend all my time and use all my films taking 
pictures of the carvings, if I knew any one who 
was interested in design. And let me say here 
that if any one who reads this would really 
like some such pictures, I should be more than 
glad to take them and send them. 

As the rooms here are all along the back or 
north walls of the courts, the sunshine pours 
in everywhere, for the south walls of the rooms 
are wooden only half-way up and the rest is 
carved and filled in with glass or paper. 



54 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



From the faculty court we would take you 
out through various smaller courts to our large, 
walled garden, where chrysanthemums and 
roses grow in profusion, and where a large 
pond, a smaller lotus-pool, arched trellisses, 
and a large tea-pavilion make it a favorite 
spot for both students and faculty. 

Through the far garden wall a gate leads into 
another large enclosure which contains rows of 
ne vegetables, and beyond, a good tennis-court 
where we like to spend an hour or so every day. 
Can you wonder that with such a setting 
Ginling College is a pleasant place to live in? 

But the college is growing rapidly, as I told 
you, and a Chinese residence, no matter if it is 
supposed to be "a house of a hundred rooms," 
is not elastic. Besides, the Li gung-gwan 
lies across the city from the other foreign insti- 
tutions, which makes our use of the Library of 
the University of Nanking rather difficult, to 
mention only one drawback. So the college 
has bought land out beyond the University 
and in two or three years we shall have college 
buildings with all the conveniences, and a 
beautiful campus of about twenty acres. You 
can imagine how pleased I was when the Presi- 
dent of Ginling asked me to send for pictures 
of the halls at Bryn Mawr, as the long, low, 
crenellated style was what she wanted for 
Ginling. 

Our faculty includes three Chinese — the 
matron, the Chinese classics teacher, and the 
American-trained doctor who gives lectures on 
hygiene — and nine Americans, two of whom 
are now at home on furlough. We consider 
ourselves a fairly representative body as we 
come from Mt. Holyoke, Goucher, the Uni- 
versity of Chicago, Vassar, Oberlin, the Uni- 
versity of Michigan, Bryn Mawr, and two 
from Smith. Smith is giving one thousand 
dollars a year to Ginling; how I wish Bryn 
Mawr could lend a hand in this pioneer educa- 
tional work for the women of China, at least 
so that our girls would not think that Smith 
is the only college in America! 

The students — I have spoken about their 
faces before — are such interesting girls! Many 
of them have already taught for a number of 
years, so that some of them are over thirty, 
and also in this year's freshman class we have 
one or two as young as sixteen. They are so 
ambitious, so eager to learn everything they 
can, so anxious to be better trained to help 
their country through the years of growth 
ahead! They are already at work doing what 
they can right here in our neighborhood. 
Every afternoon from two to five they have a 



little day-school for the children who live 
nearby, the fame of which has spread to such a 
degree that one Chinese woman actually moved 
into this section of the city so that her chil- 
dren misrht come to the Ginling School. On 
Sundays there is a Sunday-school with pupils 
of all ages, and the mothers who come have a 
class of their own. We often go in to see the 
tots as they sit around their little tables listen- 
ing to their teachers or pick up their little 
wooden stools and trot back to the chapel for 
the closing exercises. 

My particular job is to teach English, and 
teaching English to these Chinese girls is a 
problem, certainly, but also a source of much 
pleasure and amusement. As all the college 
work in all the courses except the Chinese 
classics is done in English, they are supposed 
to be prepared in that language when they 
come, but they do have the quaintest ways of 
saying things. In describing the first fright 
among the girls when a fire was discovered in 
their dormitory one night this fall, one of the 
juniors wrote, "Words ran but no action was 
taken," and I had not the heart to correct such 
vivid phraseology. Another said in gratitude 
for the preservation of the college, "We should 
be thankful for luckies in unluckies." And a 
freshman, trying to make a sentence with the 
verb "erect," wrote, "The turkey's tail is 
erected!" 

We like to look back to the days of those 
first students at Bryn Mawr and the promise 
of the years that lay before them, which they 
are so splendidly fulfilling; how much greater 
promise and possibility lies before these first 
Ginling students in this great old country 
which is just beginning to allow a place of 
service to its womanhood. Bryn Mawr has in 
the past year shown special interest in the 
education of Chinese girls, and I only hope 
that her interest will grow so as to include not 
only those few individuals who will go to 
America to study, but also the ever-growing 
number who will have their higher education 
in their own country, here in this new college 
of Ginling. 

I hope that my own friends to whom I was 
unable to write last summer because of the 
suddenness of my leaving home will consider 
this partly as a personal letter and will know 
that I am thinking often of them all. 

With greetings from the college women of 
China to the college women of America, I am, 
Always sincerely, 
Maey Boyd Shipley, 
B. M. C, 1910. 



1918] 



News from the Campus 



55 



NEWS FROM THE CAMPUS 



CALENDAR OF EVENTS 

ACADEMIC YEAR 1917-18, SECOND 
SEMESTER 

February 6 College opens for the second 
semseter at 9 a.m. 
First of a series of six lectures on 
successive Wednesday even- 
ings on Comparative Religions 
by Kate Chambers Seelye 
(Mrs. Laurens Hickok Seelye), 
Bryn Mawr College, 1911. 

February 8 Performance of the No Mai 
Classic Dances by Miss Clara 
Blattner, assisted by Mrs. 
Elsie J. Blattner, for the bene- 
fit of the Chinese Scholarship 
Fund. 

February 9 Performance of Ibsen's " Ghosts" 
by The Clifford Devereux 
Company, in the Gymnasium. 

February 11 President Thomas at home to 
the Senior Class. 

February 14 Faculty Tea for Graduate Stu- 
dents in Denbigh Hall. 

February 15 Concert under the auspices of 
the Music Committee. Re- 
cital of lute music by Mr. 
Thomas Wilford. 

February 16 Lecture by Mr. Fullerton L. 
Waldo, F.R.G.S. "The War 
Front." Illustrated by British 
Official Moving Pictures, for 
the benefit of the Service 
Corps. 

February 17 Sermon by the Rev. William J. 
Cox, Rector of St. Andrew's 
Church, Philadelphia. 

February 19 Lecture by M. le Chanoine B. 
Cabanel, Chaplain of the 66th 
Division of the Chasseurs 
Alpins. Lecture under the 
auspices of the French Club. 
Mes Impressions de Guerre. 

February 22 Carnival in the Gymnasium for 
the Graduate Students' Serv- 
ice Corps Fund. 

February 24 Sunday evening service. Ser- 
mon by the Rev. Father 
James O. S. Huntington, of 
the Order of the Holy Cross, 
West Park, New York. 



February 25 President Thomas at home to 
the Graduate Students. 

March 1 Lecture by M. le Capitaine 

Paul Cande, of the First 
French Engineers, Chevalier 
de la Legion d'Honneur, Croix 
de Guerre, under the auspices 
of the Graduate Club for the 
benefit of the Service Corps. 
"France under Fire." Senior 
Reception for Graduate stu- 
dents. 

March 3 Sunday evening service. Ser- 
mon by Dr. Stephen S. Wise, 
Rabbi of the Free Synagogue, 
New York City. 

March 8 Freshman Show. "What's 'At." 

March 9 Party for the Bates Camp, in 
the Gymnasium. 

March 10 Sunday evening service. Ser- 
mon by Mr. Robert Elliot 
Speer, Secretary of the Presby- 
terian Board of Foreign 
Missions. 

March 11 President Thomas at home to 
the Senior Class. 

March 15 Announcement of European 
Fellowships at chapel at 8.45 
a.m. 
Gymnasium Contest, 1920 vs. 

1921, 4.30 p.m. 
Fellowship Dinners, 6.30 p.m. 

March 16 Concert under the auspices of 
the Music Committee, piano 
recital by Miss Constance 
Rulison, A.B., Bryn Mawr 
College 1900, teacher in the 
David Mannes Music School. 

March 17 Sunday evening service. Ser- 
mon by Professor Charles R. 
Erdman, of Princeton Theo- 
logical Seminary. 

March 18 President Thomas at home to 
the Graduate Students. 

March 20 Address by Dr. Alice Weld 
Tallant, Head of the Smith 
College Reconstruction Unit 
on "Reconstruction Work in 
France," in Taylor Hall at 
4.15 p.m. 

March 21 » Christian Association Confer- 

and 22 ence conducted by the Rev. 

George A. Johnston Ross, 






56 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



March 22 
March 23 



March 24 



March 27 
April 4 
April 5 



April 6 



April 7 



April 12 



April 13 
April 14 
April 15 

April 17 



April 18 



Professor of Practical The- 
ology in Union Theological 
Seminary, New York City. 

Faculty Tea for Graduate Stu- 
dents in Radnor Hall, 4 to 6. 

Address by Sergeant Ruth Far- 
nam of the Crack Serbian 
Cavalry on "A Nation at 
Bay" under the auspices of 
the Class of 1920 for the Bryn 
Mawr Service Corps, in Taylor 
Hall at 8 p.m. 

Sunday evening service. Ser- 
mon by Dr. Andrew Mutch, 
pastor of the Bryn Mawr 
Presbyterian Church, 

Easter vacation begins at 1 p.m. 

Easter vacation ends at 9 a. m. 

Address by Miss Florence H. 
Wright, member of the Bleran- 
court Unit of the American 
Fund for French Wounded, 
and a private view of the mov- 
ing pictures taken by the 
French Army photographers 
of the work of the Civilian 
Committee at Blerancourt, 
Aisne, France, in the Gym- 
nasium under the auspices of 
the War Council. 

The Dansant in the Gymnasium 
for the benefit of the Silver 
Bay Fund. 

Silver Bay meeting in the 
chapel at 8 p.m. 

Sunday evening service. Ser- 
mon by the Right Rev. Bishop 
Rhinelander, D.D., Bishop of 
Pennsylvania. 

Address by Miss Julia L. La- 
throp, Head of the Children's 
Bureau, Washington, D. C. 
under the auspices of the 
Registration Committee of the 
War Council at 4.30 p.m. 

Reserved for the Graduate Club. 

Sunday evening service. 

President Thomas at home to 
the Senior Class. 

Meeting of the Graduate Club. 
Address by Dr. Paul Haupt, of 
Johns Hopkins University. 

Conferences under the auspices 
of the War Council with Miss 
Helen Fraser, of England. 



April 19 Performances of the Varsity 

and 20 Play, "The Admirable Crich- 

ton," for the benefit of the 
Bryn Mawr Service Corps. 

CAMPUS NOTES 

After mid-years and before Easter life at 
College settles into more or less of a routine. 
Except for the weekly appearance of the News 
and a gradual moderation of the weather we 
hardly notice the passage of time. Under the 
management of the Department of Education 
of the War Council there have been frequent 
lectures Fridays and Saturdays in Taylor, for 
the most part by men "back from the front." 
In this way we have heard widely varying, 
personal experiences of the war. Major Beith's 
bitter observation that the weather was con- 
sistently pro-German, Doctor Clarence Ussher's 
account of the massacre of the Armenians, M. 
Cabanel's Impressions de Guerre as Chaplain of 
the "Blue Devils," presented pictures not easily 
effaceable. The concerts given here have been 
attended by small but enthusiastic audiences. 
On March 16, Miss Rulison, 1900, gave a piano 
recital in Taylor. 

It is perhaps because of the many lectures 
that our knitting progresses so fast. The 
promptness with which the second order for 
low-priced wool went in to a woolen mill brought 
forth a protest from the Manager. "No more 
wool will be sent to Bryn Mawr," it ran, "un- 
less the mills are assured that it is not being 
sold for profit." 

Because the great interest of the College as a 
whole is the furtherance of the Service Corps, 
many usual activities have been discontinued. 
Not only has it become apparent how easily 
they may be done without, but, on the whole, 
how little they are missed. Among the things 
that are not greatly mourned is the Class Book 
with its somewhat insistent humori. Garden 
party, one of the pleasantest festivities, will 
not be given. 

Varsity dramatics, so long an anticipation 
in the heart of every class stage-manager, has 
become a fact, and the dream of an "all star 
cast" is about to be realized. The play 
chosen is "The Admirable Crichton." M. 
Martin, '19, is stage-manager and A. Harrison, 
'20, will take the leading part. The try-outs 
before the casting committee must have been 
amusing. One of the chief difficulties was to 
obtain a Crichton whose "English accent" did 



1918] 



The Clubs 



57 



not betray the local peculiarities of Indiana 
or Richmond. Mrs. Patch, who coached Beau 
Brummel, the junior-senior supper play last 
year, will coach the Varsity performance. 

Freshman show was on the whole a success- 
ful departure from the conventional. The plot 
was a burlesque adaptation of the Cinderella 
story, with a garden party instead of a ball, 
and a prince in khaki. 

The general desire to raise money has given 
rise to the usual petty traffic in shoe-blacking, 
darning, note-copying, and so forth, and to 
the ever-popular insurance for merits. A new 
and distinctly sensational way of raising the 
fund was the " International-Interworld Letter 
Company." This novel organization of which 
the personnel preserved the strictest anonym- 
ity, engaged for the benefit of the Service 
Corps, to give written communications from 
any celebrities alive or dead. Among the 
spirits to speak were Giotto, Roosevelt, Vergil 
and Homer. 

The faculty gave a White Elephant Sale at 
which Dr. De Laguna acted as auctioneer. 
He secured four dollars for an imposing, al- 
though false, front of books, and almost as 
much for a small woolly dog answering, he 
said, to the name of Ecstasy. 

A singularly unsuccessful venture in behalf 
of the Service Corps was the engagement of 
the Clifford Devereux Company in Ghosts. 
Regina, interpreted as a demure parlor-maid in 
frilled cap and apron, and Oswald, who wore a 
succession of brilliant smoking jackets ranging 
from orange to cerise, stood out in startling 
contrast to all pre-conceived ideas. The audi- 
ence passed an evening at once harrowing and 
hilarious. 

Mary Swift Rupert. 



THE EUROPEAN FELLOWSHIPS 

In consequence of war conditions it is not 
probable that the winners of the scholarships 
this year will be able to go abroad immediately, 
but after the war is over they expect to go to 
Europe and continue their studies. 

Eva Alice Worrall Bryne of Philadelphia 
is the winner this year of the Mary E. Garrett, 
or second year, European Fellowship. 

Isabel F. Smith of Los Angeles, California* 
is the winner this year of the President's Euro- 
pean Fellowship open to students who have 
studied for one year in the Bryn Mawr College 
graduate school. 

Olga Marx of New York City has been 
awarded the Anna Ottendorfer Memorial 
Research Fellowship in Teutonic Philology. 

Margaret Catherine Tlmpson of New 
York City has been awarded the highest prize 
open to the Senior Class of 1918: the Bryn 
Mawr European Fellowship. Her average 
grade on all the courses which she has taken in 
College is 89.34 per cent. 

The following are the honor students of the 
class of 1918. Students who have received a 
grade of between 85 and 90 receive their degree 
magna cum laude. These students are: Mar- 
garet Catherine Timpson, Virginia Kneeland, 
Therese Mathilde Born, Irene Loeb, Louise 
Ffrost Hodges. 

The degree cum laude has been won by the 
following students with a grade between 80 
and 85 on all their college work: Gladys Hagy 
Cassel, Elizabeth Houghton, Ella Mary Rosen- 
berg, Lilian Lorraine Fraser, Helen Whitcomb, 
Katharine Truman Sharpless. 



THE CLUBS 



BALTIMORE 

The Bryn Mawr Club of Baltimore has a 
membership of sixty-five, of whom five joined 
within the last year. The list, which had run 
on from the former Bryn Mawr Club, was 
revised and sifted last spring, and now 
includes only names of those that have ex- 
pressed their desire to attend meetings, etc. 

The Club meets one afternoon every month 
at the house of some member, and the meet- 
ings have been increasingly well attended, and 
have been fairly representative of older and 



younger classes. Tea is served at the meetings 
and the Club has continued its policy of keep- 
ing them purely social in character, since 
everyone seems fully occupied with patriotic 
and other forms of service. During the last 
few months, short addresses have been made 
by Club members or other Bryn Mawrters, on 
their own work, in various fields, and this has 
added greatly to the interest of the meetings. 
The CIuJd was very glad to be able to con- 
tribute $40 to the Mary E. Garrett Endowment 
Fund last spring. Through an unfortunate 



58 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



mistake the money was not sent until some 

time after commencement. 
The officers of the Club during 1917 were: 
President: Johanna Kroeber Mosenthal; 

Secretary: Mildred McCay; Treasurer: Helen 

Evans Lewis (resigned in June and succeeded 

by Martha Arthurs Supplee. 

Report submitted by Johanna K. Mosenthal. 

PITTSBURGH 

The Bryn Mawr Club of Pittsburgh, besides 
keeping up its $200 scholarship is still support- 
ing a French orphan and has taken three of the 
Second Liberty Loan Bonds. 



OHIO 

The Ohio Club sent Harriet Sheldon; '14, to 
the meeting of Bryn Mawr women held in 
New York in November. 

Miss Jones went to Youngstown in the winter 
and addressed a group of women on the sub- 
ject of Bryn Mawr at the home of Rebecca 
Fordyce, '16. 

We have sent to every Bryn Mawr woman 
in Ohio a War Questionnaire. In this way we 
hope to get statistics as to the war activities of 
Bryn Mawr women, and perhaps to help the 
College in registering the war activities of the 
alumnae and former students. 



NEWS FROM THE CLASSES 

The news of this department is compiled from information furnished by class secretaries, Bryn Mawr Clubs, and from 
other reliable sources for which the Editor is responsible. Acknowledgment is also due to the Bryn Mawr College New 
for items of news. 



The following alumnae were present at the 
annual meeting 

Ph.D's. 

Isabel Maddison, Florence Peebles. 

1889 
Gertrude A. Taylor. 

1890 
Marian T. Macintosh. 

1891 
Emily L. Bull, Esther F. Byrnes. 
1892 



Abby Kirk. 



1893 



Helen Thomas Flexner, Lucy Martin Don- 
nelly, Margaret Hilles Johnson. 

1895 

Elizabeth Conway Bent Clark, Mary Jeffers. 

1896 

Cora Baird Jeanes, Mary S. C. Boude Wool- 
man, Gertrude Heritage Green, Mary Mendin- 
hall Mullin, Lydia T. Boring, Caroline McCor- 
mick Slade, Pauline Goldmark, Abigail Camp 
Dimon. 

1897 

Mary E. Converse, Mary L. Fay, Clara Vail 
Brooks, Sue Avis Blake, Grace Albert, Eliza- 
beth Caldwell Fountain. 



1898 
Martha Tracy, Elizabeth Nields Bancroft. 

1899 

Sibyl Hubbard Darlington, Evetta Jeffers 
Schock. 

1900 

Grace Campbell Babson, Louise Congdon 
Francis, Margaretta Morris Scott. 
1901 

Elizabeth F. Hutchin. 

1902 

Edith T. Orlady, Anne Hampton Todd, 
Emily Dungan Moore, Eleanor James, Fanny 
Travis Cochran. 

1903 

Elizabeth Snyder, Emma D. Roberts, Emma 
C. Bechtel, Virginia T. Stoddard, Doris Earle, 
Margaret E. Brusstar. 

1904 

Margaret Scott, Emma R. Fries, Martha 
Rockwell Moorhouse, Emma Osborn Thomp- 
son, Mary Latimer James. 

1905 
Theodora Bates, Elma Loines. 

1907 

Athalia L. T. Crawford, Annabella E. 
Richards. 



1918] 



News from the Classes 



59 



1908 

Helen Cadbury Bush, Myra Elliot Vauclain, 
Gertrude Buffum Barrows. 

1909 

Emma White Mitchell, Helen C. Irey, 
Bertha S. Ehlers. 

1910 

Marion S. Kirk, Edith H. Murphy, M. B. 
Wesner, Agnes M. Irwin. 



1911 



Helen M. Ramsey. 

1912 

Lorle Stecher, Anna Hartshorne Brown' 
Mary Pierce. 

1913 

R. Beatrice Miller, Florence C. Irish, Agathe 
Deming, Elizabeth Yarnall Maguire, Alice D. 
Patterson, Alice H. Rockwell. 

1915 

Mary B. Goodhue, Helen Taft, Amy Mac- 
Master, Katharine W. McCollin. 

1916 
Ruth E. Lautz, Joanna Ross. 



Thalia S. Dole. 



1917 



PH.D'S. 



Margaret Shove Morriss, Ph.D., 1911, had a 
letter in the Mount Holyoke News of January 
16, describing some of her experiences at a 
base hospital in France. The following para- 
graph is taken from this letter: 

"Before I stop I must tell you about a party 
I went to last night. The major at the head 
of our unit is much interested in the French 
Foyer des Soldats run by the town. Every 
week they give a stunt party there for the 
peimissionaires, run by the soldiers themselves. 
Last night the hall was packed by over a 
thousand poilus — so tired and dragged out they 
look, but so courteous to us. They had a 
number of amusing songs and stunts. First the 
leader announced that the major was going to 
serve white bread sandwiches to all the men 
there. You know they haven't tasted white 
bread for three years. Then the nurses and 
the rest of us went out and got trays piled 
high with sandwiches, and every man got at 



least one. They cheered and clapped for the 
major and for the infirmieres at a great rate, 
and a most charming young fellow made a 
gracious speech of appreciation. One of our 
doctors sang for them too. It was a regular 
Franco-American love feast, and really moving 
to see. It was the most interesting thing of the 
kind that I have seen since I have been here." 
Ruth Gentry, Ph.D., 1896, died late in 1917. 

1892 

Secretary, Mrs. F. M. Ives, 318 West 75th 
Street, New York City. 

Abby Kirk was seriously ill with pneumonia 
in February. 

Edith Hall is investigating the condition of 
the working children of the South under the 
new Federal Child Labor Law. 

On Saturday, March 16, 1918, Margaret 
Newbold, daughter of Frederick M. Ives and 
Edith Wetherill Ives, died, aged eight years. 

1894 

Abby Brayton (Mrs. R. N. Durfee) is Chair- 
man of Education, Woman's Committee of 
Council of National Defense; member of 
Executive Committee of War Savings Stamps; 
member of Executive Committee of Girls' 
Patriotic League, Garment Department of 
Red Cross W T ork. 

1896 

Ida Ogilvie is at the head of the units organ- 
ized in New York State for the Woman's Land 
Army and has charge of organizing the units 
throughout the country. 

Tirzah Nichols has volunteered to take 
charge of the housekeeping for the Bryn Mawr 
Patriotic Farm for two months. 

1897 

Ida Gifford, ex-'97, who is now living in 
Brookline, was a worker at the Boston Metro- 
politan chapter of the Red Cross during the 
last summer and fall. The Faulkner Hospital 
at Jamaica Plain, of which she is a graduate 
nurse, has offered beds to the Naval Reserve 
Corps and is already doing its share in caring 
for the United States sailors. 

1899 

Secretary, Mrs. E. H. Waring, 325 Washing- 
ton Street Glen Ridge, N. J. 

Elizabeth Bissell is at a canteen at Creil, 
about 7 miles from Chantilly. 



60 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



1900 

Constance Rulison gave a piano recital at 
College on March 16. Among those who came 
on to hear it were Renee Mitchell (Mrs. Thomas 
M. Righter) and Anne Boyer, '99. 

1902 

Mrs. Corra Bacon-Foster, mother of Violet 
Bacon-Foster, ex-'02, died in Washington in 
January. The following is taken from a long 
article in the Washington Evening Star: "Mrs. 
Corra Bacon-Foster was prominently identified 
with various patriotic societies, and was well 
known as an author .... She was con- 
sidered an authority on the history of the 
Chesapeake ane Ohio Canal .... She 
helped to organize the first woman's club in 
Texas. She was a member of the Houston 
Board of Trade for several years .... 
A charter member of the Red Cross has this to 
say about Mrs. Bacon-Foster: 'She was well 
known as a fine writer and speaker, but the 
crowning glory of her life was her unselfish 
devotion to Clara Barton, founder of the 
American Red Cross, as shown by her patriotic 
study of the official records of the civil war 
and the years following, for the purpose of 
preserving in clear form the splendid story of 
Clara Barton's work in founding and develop- 
ing the Red Cross.' " 

1903 

Secretary, Mrs. H. K. Smith. Westward, 
Farmington, Conn. 

Dr. Marianna Taylor has gone to France to 
join one of the reconstruction units. 

Philena Winslow left in March to work in 
one of the Y. M. C. A. huts in France. 

Eunice Follansbee (Mrs. William Hale) 
spent the winter in Washington, where her 
husband is doing work for the Council of 
National Defense. 

1904 

Secretary, Emma O. Thompson, 213 South 
50th Street, Philadelphia. 

Lieutenant Charles Lewis, brother of Con- 
stance Lewis, is in the 26th Infantry, regulars. 
They have had experience already in the front 
line trenches, sallying out "over the top" and 
into "no man's land." Two other brothers, 
Lieutenants Philip and Edward Lewis expect 
to leave for France soon. 

Mary Christie (Mrs. W. L. Nute), ex-'04, is 
living at 162 Anderson Avenue, Palisade, N. J. 



Her husband, who returned from Turkey last 
August, is studying at the College of Physicians 
and Surgeons, New York. 

Helen Howell (Mrs. John Moorhead) is 
doing Red Cross work in New York. Her 
husband is head of a hospital in France. 

Dr. Mary James spoke before the College 
Club of Philadelphia on "Interior China." 
She is studying medicine in New York. Her 
address is 281 Fourth Avenue, New York City. 

Isabelle Peters has been in France since last 
November. She is at a canteen at Creil, about 
7 miles from Chantilly. 

Margaret Reynolds (Mrs. Shirley Hulse), 
ex-'04, is living in Philadelphia. Her husband 
is doing Government work at Hog Island. 

1905 

Secretary, Mrs. C. M. Hardenbergh, 3824 
Warwick Boulevard, Kansas City, Mo. 

Nan Workman (Mrs. R. M. Stinson) has a 
second daughter, Nancy, born in December. 

Rachel Brewer (Mrs. Ellsworth Huntington) 
is now living at 343 Humphrey Street, New 
Haven, Conn. 

Frederica Le Fevre (Mrs H. E. Bellamy) 
has a rather unique war work — singing to the 
soldiers and making them sing. She also 
organized choirs for the Christmas Red Cross 
campaign and continues in song leading for the 
Red Cross. She teaches French for the Red 
Cross and sang in four benefit concerts in 
February. 

Carla Denison (Mrs. Henry Swan) spent the 
winter in Santa Barbara with her three children. 

Patsy Gardner went to France in December. 
She is at Criel, near Chantilly, doing canteen 
work. 

Bertha Seely (Mrs. Quincy Dunlop) has 
moved from Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, to 
Indianapolis. 

1907 

Secretary, Mrs. R. E. Apthorp, care of Dr. 
C. H. Williams, Hampstead Hall, Charles 
River Road, Cambridge, Mass. 

Anna N. Clark has just taken her final vows 
as a sister in St. Margaret's Episcopal convent, 
Boston. In future she will be called Sister 
Deborah. 

1908 

Secretary, Mrs. Dudley Montgomery, 115 
Langdon Street, Madison, Wisconsin. 

Louise Congdon (Mrs. J. P. Balmer) and her 



1918] 



News from the Classes 



61 



husband are spending the spring months in 
California. 

Anna Carrere, who has been chief shipping 
clerk in the Paris office of the A. F. F. W., is 
expected home in May. 

Theresa Helburn spent the winter at San 
Ysidro Ranch, Santa Barbara. 

Margaret Lewis (Mrs. Lincoln MacVeagh) 
spent the winter in Richmond, Va., to be near 
her husband, Captain MacVeagh, who is at 
Spartanburg. 

Louise Milligan (Mrs. C. D. Herron) is at 
Camp Lee, Va., with her husband, Colonel 
Herron of the 313th Field Artillery. 

Josephine Proudfit (Mrs. Dudley Mont- 
gomery) spent part of the winter with her 
husband, Captain Montgomery, who is at 
Fort Des Moines, Iowa. 

1909 

Secretary, Frances Browne, 15 East 10th 
Street, New York City. 

Evelyn Holt (Mrs. Philip Lowry), ex-'09, 
has a son, Philip Holt Lowry, born February 
20. Mrs. Lowry is staying with her mother in 
New York. Her husband, Lieut. Lowry of 
the 49th Infantry, is stationed at Camp Merritt, 
Tenafly, N. J. 

Mildred Durand was married on January 12 
to Charles Burton Gordy. Mr. Gordy is in the 
U. S. Navy and is stationed at League Island. 
Mr. and Mrs. Gordy are living at Southampton 
with her father. 

Alice Miller, ex- '09, is still in France. She 
is doing canteen work for American soldiers at 
Bourg in the south of France. She and Mary 
Tongue are working together. 

Cynthia Wesson and May Putnam arrived 
from France on March 20, bringing the latest 
news from "Billy' Miller, May Egan, Shirley 
Putnam and the many other Bryn Mawrters 
near Paris. 

Margaret Bontecou sailed about March 25 
for Paris to do Y. M. C. A. canteen work. 

Florence Ballin is playing tennis as much 
as her health will allow. She made a splendid 
showing in the tournament at Pinehurst this 
winter but is still not sufficiently recovered 
from her illness of a year ago to play as much 
as she wishes. 

Celeste Webb is continuing her work as 
registrar at the National Training School of the 
Y. W. C. A. in New York. 

Barbara Spofford (Mrs. S. A. Morgan) was 



elected president of the New York Bryn Mawr 
Club at the annual meeting in February. 

Fannie Barber was elected secretary of the 
Club. 

Mary Goodwin (Mrs. C. L. Storrs) has a 
daughter, Margaret Shippen Storrs, born 
January 16 at Shaown, Fukien, China. 

Frances Browne is doing special work with 
small children in New York. She expects to 
go the first of May to Cape Cod where she will 
continue her work for two months. 

1910 

Secretary, Mrs. H. B. Van Dyne, Troy, Pa. 

The American University Courier has the 
following : 

"Miss A. W. Maris Boggs, Dean of the 
Bureau of Commercial Economy, and student 
in the American University, making a thorough 
investigation in visual education, has recently 
received some flattering recognition of her 
work. She has been proposed for member- 
ship in the Royal Geographical Society of 
England. She was also asked by the Belgian 
Minister of Education to join with the Baroness 
Moncheur, wife of the High Commissioner of 
the Belgian Mission to the United States in 
1917, in translating Leon de Paeuw's "La 
Re-education Professionnelle des Soldats 
Mutiles et Estrophies." The author of this 
work is in charge of schools for the professional 
re-education of Belgian cripples, and chief of 
the civil cabinet of the Belgian Minister of 
War. This is a very important work, the first 
of its kind to be published in this country, 
and will prove valuable in planning for the 
reeducation of wounded and maimed American 
soldiers. The translation has been completed. 
The United States War Department has had a 
few hundred copies mimeographed for its use, 
and the work is soon to be issued by an Ameri- 
can publishing house." 

1911 

Secretary, Margaret J. Hobart, The 
Churchman, 381 Fourth Avenue, New York 
City. 

Amy Walker (Mrs. James A. Field) is execu- 
tive secretary of the Department of Women in 
Industry of the Woman's Committee of the 
Council of National Defense. She has been 
identified with the labor movements of the 
Chicago Women's Trade League and was for 
some time editor of Life and Labor. She 
began her duties at the National Headquarters 



62 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



of the Women's Committee in Washington in 
the early winter. 

Marjorie Hoffman was married to Ferdinand 
Conrad Smith on January 9 in Portland, Ore. 
The wedding was hurried because Mr. Smith, 
who was stationed with the Medical Corps at 
Camp Lewis, expected at any time to be sent 
abroad. At the time of the wedding the 
bridegroom was ill with scarlet fever. For- 
tunately the bride escaped the infection. 

Constance Wilbur is engaged to Sergeant J. 
Frank McKeehan of Middleboro, Ky. Ser- 
geant McKeehan is a graduate of Columbia 
and is stationed now at Camp Dix, N. J., with 
the Medical Corps. 

Elizabeth Taylor (Mrs. John F. Russell, Jr.) 
has been elected vice-president of the New 
York Bryn Mawr Club, and has been reelected 
president of the Spence School Alumnae Asso- 
ciation. She is on the Trades Committee for 
the Liberty Loan Drive in April. 

Margaret Doolittle is teaching phonetics in 
the Hartford School of Missions, Hartford, 
Conn., while under missionary appointment for 
Syria. Of course conditions at present are too 
uncertain for her to be able to proceed with her 
plans. 

Kate Chambers (Mrs. Laurens Seelye) has 
been teaching a class in the history of religion 
at Bryn Mawr this last semester. The class is 
under the auspices of the Christian Association. 

Phyllis Rice (Mrs. Herschel McKnight) has 
gone to Washington, where her husband has 
been transferred. Lieutenant McKnight is in 
the Ordnance Department. 

Marion Crane (Mrs. Charles Carroll) has a 
son, Charles Carroll, Jr., born on January 10 in 
New York City. Mrs. Carroll's address is 
320 West 15th Street. 

Esther Cornell played the leading part in 
The 13th Chair on tour this winter. The com- 
pany expects to finish its tour very soon. 

Margaret Hobart is chairman of the com- 
mittee on civic education of the New York 
Churchwomen's Club, and is arranging for 
classes on "your vote and how to use it" for 
the women's and girls' societies in the New 
York Episcopal churches. 

Helen Emerson is in New York doing Gov- 
ernment work. 

Anita Stearns (Mrs. W. M. Stevens) has 
moved to Charlestown, W. Va., where her 
husband is engaged in ammunition work. 

Ruth Vickery (Mrs. B. B. Holmes) is prob- 
ably coming to Boston to live there with her 



children for the duration of the war. Her 
husband is a captain in the National Guard, 
and has been ordered to Fort Sill, Oklahoma, 
for fourteen weeks intensive training. He has 
been given Battery 623. Mrs. Holmes has 
rented her ranch. She has recently taken a 
course at the State Normal College — "both 
afternoon and evening courses with lessons to 
do in the evening which make me feel quite 
kittenish" she writes. 

1912 

Secretary, Mrs. J. A. MacDonald, 3227 N. 
Pennsylvania Street, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Winifred Scripture (Mrs. Percy C. Fleming) 
has a son, Peter Dawson Fleming, born January 
17. 

Katherine Longwell has announced her 
engagement to Lieut. Frank Ristine, Field 
Artillery. 

Mary Vennum was married in December to 
Lieut. Bruce Van Cleave, U. S. R., in Evanston, 
111. 

Mary Scribner (Mrs. Chapin Palmer) has a 
daughter, Mary Ellen, born January 17, 1918. 

Julia Houston was married to Hilton Howell 
Railey on January 26 in New York. Mr and 
Mrs. Railey live at 26 Jones Street, New York. 

Agnes Morrow sailed for France in April as a 
canteen worker under the Y. M. C. A. 

1913 

Secretary, Nathalie Swift, 156 East 79th 
Street, New York City. 

Helen Richter (Mrs. Maximilian Elser, Jr.) 
is a research clerk in the Army War College. 
Her husband is in the Intelligence Section of 
the Army War College. 

Emma Robertson is teaching at Brownell 
Hall, Omaha, Nebraska. 

Dorothea Baldwin is going to France to do 
organization with the American Red Cross. 

Gertrude Hinrichs was married to Samuel G. 
King on January 21, in Glen Ridge, N. J. 

Lucjnda Menendez was married in February 
to Bertram Pierre Rambo, who is Assistant 
Paymaster, U. S. N. R. 

Clara Pond has announced her engagement 
to Theodore D. Richards of Pittsburgh. 

Louise Gibson is studying miniature paint- 
ing in New York. 

Elizabeth Shipley, ex-'13, is teaching at the 
Pine Mountain Settlement School, Pine Moun- 
tain, Ky. 

Helen Evans (Mrs. Robert M. Lewis), ex-'13, 



1918] 



News from the Classes 



63 



is living in Newport, R. I., where her husband 
is stationed with the U. S. Naval Reserves. 

Alice Ames, ex-'13, was married to Dr. 
Bronson Crothers in December. 

Mary Tongue has announced her engage- 
ment to Ferdinand Eberstadt of East Orange, 
N.J. 

1914 

Secretary, Ida W. Pritchett, 22 East 91st 
Street, New York City. 

Anne White was married on January 21 to 
Captain Paul Church Harper of the 17th U S. 
Artillery. 

1916 

Secretary, Adeline Werner, 1640 Broad 
Street, Columbus, Ohio. 

Margaret Russell was married on January 12 
to Roger Kellen at Plymouth, Mass. 

Frances Bradley is translating French at 
the U. S. Army War College, Washington 
Barracks. 

Buckner Kirk is taking a business course in 
Baltimore. 

Dorothy Packard is working in the Informa- 
tion Department of the Council of National 
Defense in Chicago. She has published a 
pamphlet "Woman's Part in the War Work" 



which is being distributed by the Council of 
National Defense. 

Eva Bryne is in the English Department of 
Bryn Mawr College. 

Mary Lee Hickman is conducting a Red 
Cross Tea Room in Louisville. 

Dorothy Evans, ex-'16, is studying for an 
M. A. at the Ohio State University. 

Adeline Werner was married in April to 
Captain Webb I. Vorys, 332d Infantry, Camp 
Sherman, Ohio. 

1917 

Thalia Smith was married in New York on 
October 22 to Harold Dole, a first lieutenant 
in the Aviation Corps. 

1918 

Amelia Richards, ex-'18, died at the Roose- 
velt Hospital, New York City, February 6 of 
pernicious anemia. She had sailed for France 
in November to work on surgical dressings, 
but was obliged to return on account of illness. 

Ex-1920 

Helen Bolles died of tuberculosis at Wilming- 
ton, N. C, early in February. 



LITERARY NOTES 



All publications received will be acknowledged in this column. The editor begs that copies of books or articles by or 
about the Bryn Mawr Faculty and Bryn Mawr Students, or book reviews written by alumnae, will be sent to the Quar- 
terly, for review, notice, or printing 



BOOKS REVIEWED 

america asserts herself 

The Wind in the Corn, and Other Poems. 

By Edith Franklin Wyatt. D. Appleton 

and Company, New York. $1.00. 

Any nation — like any individual — on leaving 
a comfortable isolation, must naturally wish to 
consider, and make evident, just what the con- 
tribution is that it is offering to Society. In a 
way, life has been so easy at home. All sorts of 
little tricks of manner have become usual and 
unnoticed, and all sorts of slacknesses have had 
the comfortable indulgence of The Home. If 
one has to appear in a new, strange world, how 
is one going to feel self-assured and competent? 
Traditional good breeding, of course, and classi- 
cal education often seem to encourage imita- 
tion — discipleship — and a very modest bearing 
in the presence of that great world one supposes 
has the long habit of clear, distinct, well- 
reasoned arrogance. The homebred person 
may properly feel only modest and self-effacing. 
And if he does not show confident and hopeful 
vigor, perhaps it is just as well, in the interest 
of good manners. 

But it is lucky for any society — or person — 
when it arrives at the perception that what life, 
however full of amenity, really wants is char- 
acter, the free self-assurance of independent 
feeling. One gets let in for much crudity and 
roughness, of course, but one does not suppress 
and grow shamefaced about direct and sincere 
experience. 

And even eastern "cultivated" America is 
showing signs of at last having got to the point 
of counting up proudly the contribution of the 
country as a whole. Not spreadeagle-wise, — 
that was a very youthful schoolboy bragging, 
but like a young man determined to cut a 
figure in the great world by reason of his confi- 
dence in his own realization of the valuable 
difference of his experience from that of his 
elders. And nothing after all so excites one's 
pleasure as the bearing of a man quietly sur- 
of his distinction, no matter where in the world. 
Of course, one is speaking in the way of aes- 



thetic definition, and not suffering fools gladly! 
It is this bearing that "new America" is gain- 
ing. He is doing his work according to his 
deep valuation of his particular experience, and 
not wishing that to be more like what Europe 
has already weighed and affirmed as good — 
though any likeness may make appreciation 
seem ever so easy! 

In the arts, and especially in writing, this 
new proud and well-reasoned self-confidence is 
expressing itself often. Every week one can 
find some sincere effort to dig us up at the 
roots and find us indigenous. It used to be 
much harder for the average cultivated East- 
erner to feel very indigenous when he read 
about new America. Chicago presented as a 
Moloch, for instance, had a hothouse quality. 
Everything seemed to grow — and wither 
promptly — from a shallow frame over a radia- 
tor, West and Middle West were not given a 
proper deep nourishing soil. Was he only 
squeamish, the average cultivated Easterner, 
or was he healthily natural, when he refused the 
hothouse for his producer? 

Edith Wyatt has been always a lover of the 
America that has deep roots. And these, not in 
the East, but in and about that Dreiserian 
Moloch. She has loved the prairies, the over- 
land swing of America's adventure, and the 
"profound cadences of tremendous fresh 
waters." She has, too, an intimate sense of 
how much moving there has been in almost 
every American family history — of how little 
one piece of country has contained any long 
family experience. This makes our domestic 
quality different from Europe's — "for better or 
for worse" — though one never hears from her 
the depressing hint that it can be for worse. 

She has collected now many of her very 
winning verses, because we have been think- 
ing with especial gravity of what our country 
has to send overseas" and because her book 
is "an attempt to express both something of 
the dream of democracy — her vision of the 
pursuit of happiness — and some of the over- 
land ways of the living presence of our country." 

It is pleasant that our primordial instinct 



64 



College Women's Plattsburg 



65 



of self-preservation is aroused now for our 
spiritual contribution. We are rapidly grow- 
ing close again to our hardy self-reliant forebears, 
whose quality, too, was perhaps brought out 



by wars, over a hundred years ago. The more 
oncoming we are to self discovery, the cheerier 
we feel. 

Edith Pettit Borie. 



'THE COLLEGE WOMAN'S PLATTSBURG" 



To meet the National emergency in mili- 
tary and public health nursing by recruiting 
college women — who are especially wanted 
because their previous education facilitates 
intensive training and rapid advancement to 
the posts of urgent need — there has been 
established at Vassar College a new summer 
school, known as the Training Camp for Nurses. 
This Camp will open June 24 and continue 
until September 13, and will be under the 
auspices of the National Council of Defense 
and the Red Cross. 

The Camp provides an opportunity for 
college graduates to fit themselves for active 
service in one of the leading and most necessary 
professions of today with a shorter period of 
preparation than has ever been possible here- 
tofore. The Plattsburg system, by giving men 
of higher education intensive theoretical training 
in military work has officered our army in time 
to meet the emergency without lowering the 
standards. The Vassar idea is its equivalent 
in the nursing profession. It is designed to 
overcome the shortage of nurses that now 
confronts the country, when 12,000 scientifi- 
cally trained women are needed for every million 
soldiers, when our Allies are calling on America 
for trained women to officer their hospitals, 
and when the public health standards of the 
country are menaced by new working and 
living conditions and a growing scarcity of 
doctors and nurses in civilian practice. 

Although only the R.N. — the registered 
trained nurse — is officially recognized as able 
to perform the exacting duties required, young 
women undergoing training will have plenty of 
chances for actual war work. That is the very 
reason why every effort is being made to obtain 
nurses in the shortest possible time. In addi- 
tion to the opportunity for immediate patriotic 
sendee, there is the chance to enter a profession 
of dignity and relatively high rewards. 

In the first place, the better positions of the 
nursing profession are the ones most in need! of 
candidates. In the second place, even while 
taking the probationary course, the nurse is at 
no expense and is actually engaged in practical 



work. In the next place, should the war soon 
cease, opportunities would increase rather than 
diminish; for the field of public health nursing, 
sadly short of nurses now, is steadily widening. 
Public health work is coming to be more and 
more recognized as an exceptionally interesting 
and dignified profession, and the only drawback 
to its extension at present is the shortage of 
well-educated women of the sort who can take 
responsibility, act on their own initiative, and 
develop the latent possibilities of their jobs. 

Salaries in the nursing profession range from 
$1500 to $5000 with, in most cases, maintenance 
under pleasant conditions. Promotion, espe- 
cially in these days of stress, comes rapidly, 
and from the very start the nurse is assured of 
as rapid progress as her ability justifies. . . . 
The three months at the Camp will eliminate 
the " drudge period" of the nurses' training, 
doing away with much of the manual labor 
and elementary instruction, thus permitting 
the student to step right into advanced hospital 
work to complete her training for the "R.N." 
degree. 

The trustees of Vassar have not only turned 
over the four large quadrangle dormitories for 
the Camp students, the newest hall for the 
Camp faculty, the laboratories, infirmary and 
other special buildings for instruction purposes, 
but they have also made every effort to insure 
the physical comfort of the new students. The 
college farm will supply fresh vegetables and 
milk and full maid service will be continued. 
The grounds will be kept up, the lakes, athletic 
fields, tennis courts, etc., in running order and 
open to the Camp Workers, under supervision 
of an experienced educational director. In 
addition, the undergraduates have interested 
themselves in the newcomers so much that they 
have agreed to leave their rooms entirely 
furnished with all the knick knacks and com- 
forts to make the "campers" feel at home. A 
recreation director will be on duty, and enter- 
tainment^ will be given in the large theatre of 
the "Student's Building" and in the outdoor 
theatre as well. 



66 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



There will be a number of scholarships allow- 
ing students to take the course entirely with- 
out expense. One alumna of Vassar for 
example, too old, as she says, to become a 
nurse, has offered to "serve by proxy," by 
paying the tuition and maintenance fees of 
some younger woman. The regular fees will 
amount to $95, which will cover everything, 
tuition, board, lodging, and laundry — less 
than a woman could live on in her own home 
for the same period. 

The course of study has been devised by the 
National Emergency Nursing Committee of 
the Council of National Defense; and het 
faculty already comprises the leading medical 
and nursing authorities of the country. The 
acuity and advisory board together present 



an array of names which no hospital or training 
school in America has ever been able to show. 

The Dean of the Camp is Herbert E. Mills, 
professor of economics at Vassar. Dr. C.-E. A. 
Winslow of Yale University will be professor 
of bacteriology and hygiene; Miss Florence 
Sabin, Johns Hopkins, anatomy and physi- 
ology; Professor Margaret Washburn, Vassar, 
psychology; Dr. Wm. H. Park, New York 
Department of Health, bacteriology; Professor 
Helen Pope, Carnegie Institute, dietetics. 

Anyone who wishes information as to the 
Camp or the opportunities for nurses should 
write the Recruiting Committee, 106 East 
52d Street, New York City, or courses, instruc- 
tors, etc., may be obtained by addressing 
Dean Mills, Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 



All communications for the July Quarterly should be addressed to 
Miss Isabel Foster, care of the Republic, Waterbury, Connecticut. 






%$&:3&:3&^ 




RYN MAWR 
ALUMNAE 
ARTERLY 



Vol. X! 



JULY, 1918 



No. 2 




"'Vmaut—*' 



Published by the Alumnae Association 

of - 
Bryn Mawr College 



§ 



1 



g 



I 

I 
1 
1 
1 
I 
I 



•:•: 



% 



S8S&^^^ 



Entered at tbe Post Office, Baltimore, Mi, as second class mail matter under the Act of July 16. 18W. 



THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE 
QUARTERLY 



Editor-in-Chief 

Isabel Foster, '15 

Waterbury, Connecticut 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Report of the Academic Committee 67 

Celebration of May Day 69 

Conferring of Degrees 72 

The Alumnae Supper 76 

June Class Reunions 79 

War Work S2 

The Bryn Mawr Community Center 87 

Courses in Industrial Supervision 90 

News from the Clubs 91 

News from the Classes 91 



Contributions to the Quarterly, books for review, and subscriptions should be sent to 
the Editor-in Chief, Isabel Foster, The Republican, Waterbury, Conn. Cheques should be 
drawn payable to Bertha Ehlers, Bryn Mawr, Pa. The Quarterly is published in Janu- 
ary, April, July, and November of each year. The price of subscription is one dollar a 
year, and single copies are sold for twenty-five cents each. Any failure to receive numbers 
of the Quarterly should be reported promptly to the Editor. Changes of address should 
be reported to the Editor not later than the first day of each month of issue. News 
items may be sent to the Editors. 

Copyright, iqi8, by the Alumnae Association of JJryo Mawr College. 



THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE 
QUARTERLY 



VOLUME XII 



JULY, 1918 



No. 2 



REPORT OF THE ACADEMIC COMMITTEE 



While the last college year has been marked 
by no such momentous events as the year be- 
fore, the Academic Committee has to report 
important changes of policy instituted by the 
Faculty which cannot fail to be of deep interest 
to the Alumnae. 

The new scheme of organization made it neces- 
sary for the Committee to enter into closer con- 
nection with the Faculty. As noted in the Fall 
Quarterly, a very satisfactory basis of com- 
munication was established. The Committee 
has made a point of keeping itself as fully in- 
formed as possible of the changes contemplated 
at the College. It has held five meetings and 
conferences during the year, viz: two members 
attended the conference with the heads of pre- 
paratory schools called by the Faculty to con- 
sider changes in the entrance examinations. It 
met the President and members of the Curricu- 
lum Committee last June to acquaint itself in 
detail with the new entrance requirements. The 
usual spring and fall meetings were held in New 
York and the yearly conferences with the Presi- 
dent and Dean and with members of the Faculty 
took place in January. 

Three members — Elizabeth Sergeant, Frances 
Hand and Ellen Ellis — were unable owing to a 
variety of reasons to attend the conferences. 
The Committee was fortunate, however, in 
having Katherine Lord and Bertha Rembaugh 
act as substitutes. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS 

At various times the Committee has suggested 
that the Tutoring School should be discontinued 
which was carried on for several years in one of 
the College buildings during the month of 
September. The Committee had consistently 
held that hurried cramming at the last moment 
should not be countenanced as a substitute for 
thorough preparation. Last fall the school was 



discontinued and a Summer Tutoring School 
was held at an Adirondack camp without official 
connection with the college. This plan appar- 
ently offers a satisfactory solution of the past 
difficulties. 

Honors. It has not been found possible to 
offer advanced work for the degree with honors 
as suggested by the Committee. The Faculty 
voted that it could not make the necessary ad- 
justments of the curriculum, while the College, 
like other institutions on a fixed income, is feel- 
ing the stress of the war so acutely and cannot 
consider increasing the teaching staff. 

Honorary Degrees. Following a request made 
at the last Alumnae meeting, the Committee 
inquired whether honorary degrees could be 
awarded. The original charter of the College, 
it was found, makes no provision for degrees of 
this kind. 

PENSIONS 

It will be remembered that being classed as a 
denominational college, Bryn Mawr could not 
participate in the original Carnegie pensions. 
Now a contributory scheme of insurance is un- 
der consideration, one-half of the premiums to 
be paid by the College, one-half by the bene- 
ficiary and the expenses of administration to be 
borne by the new Carnegie Corporation. This 
insurance will be open to all colleges desiring to 
participate. The older members of the Faculty 
cannot however, be provided for. Their "ac- 
crued liabilities," on account of the prohibitive 
cost, will have to be otherwise met. But for 
the rest of the Faculty, Bryn Mawr should be 
able to accept the plan as soon as the full details 
are worked out. It is estimated that if the 
retiring age is fixed between 65 and 68 years the 
College appropriation will amount to about one- 
fifth of"the salary budget. If other colleges 
assume this obligation and Bryn Mawr is un- 



67 



68 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[July 



able to do so, it will obviously be left at a great 
disadvantage in making new Faculty appoint- 
ments. 

Under the terms of office now adopted at 
Bryn Mawr the Faculty is likely to become more 
stationary, making the need of some form of 
pension more urgent from year to year. It is 
important, therefore, that the Alumnae should 
understand the situation fully and be able to 
give intelligent support to any future plans to 
meet the need. 

ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS 

The changes in the examinations are the most 
far reaching that have been made in the history 
of the College. They are believed to make 
possible a better balanced school program than 
the excessive amount of language under the old 
scheme. While English and Latin remain oblig- 
atory, only one foreign language is required and 
a choice can be made of French, German or 
Greek. Science now consists of a five point 
Physics course together with a minor science. 
Both ancient and English history are required, 
American history being allowed, however, as a 
substitute in schools which are required by law 
to teach it. 

New types of entrance examinations are 
being introduced. The greatest divergence 
from the old paper is shown in the English test. 
Instead of the correction of incorrect sentences 
and a long literary composition, one paper asks 
for a composition on any one of four subjects, — 
one drawn from the students' reading, the others 
drawn from other experience. The second 
paper tests the candidate's general knowledge of 
the periods of literature covered by the required 
reading and her power of literary appreciation. 

The changes in the entrance examinations are 
coupled with changes in the Orals. They are 
now to be written examinations, popularly 
called "written orals." The foreign language 
offered at entrance is to be tested by yearly 
examinations, except that students entering on 
Greek and taking a course in College are ex- 
cused from the written examination in Greek 
the following term. A second foreign language 
must be offered as a Junior oral. This may be 



French, German or Spanish. If the student 
has taken Greek for entrance, she must offer 
either French or German. 

A number of interesting questions present 
themselves as to the probable effect of the 
changes in the language requirements on a 
student's college course. When will she pre- 
pare for the Junior Oral? Will an increasing 
number of students use five hours of elective in 
beginning an elementary language? This may 
mean the sacrifice of an elective course. On 
the whole, however, the relief from the tension 
and excitement of the old orals opens the way 
for a more satisfactory testing of a student's 
ability to read a foreign language. 

INCREASE IN FRESHMAN CLASS 

In view of the increase in the size of the Fresh- 
man Class, 139 having entered in fall, the Com- 
mittee called attention to the disadvantages of 
having students live off the Campus, and sug- 
gested various methods for weeding out the 
weaker students now in college. It urged that 
in future the merit rule be made to eliminate the 
students who failed to make the required points 
in their first three years. President Thomas 
stated that since the merit law came into opera- 
tion for the class of 1907, 62 students had been 
placed on probation. Of this number only 16 
or 26 per cent have graduated and 51 per cent 
has left College without degrees. There can 
be no question that these figures prove the need 
of a more effective method of ruling out the lag- 
gards, in order to make room for the stronger 
students. It was also suggested that after due 
warning a stricter ruling might be made regard- 
ing students at the end of their first year, as 
much leniency has been shown in excluding 
freshmen who are manifestly incapable of doing 
or disinclined to do satisfactory work. 

The Committee has throughout attempted to 
interpret the desires of the Alumnae in regard 
to the manifold changes now taking place at 
the College. It calls upon the Alumnae again, 
for their sustained interest and support. 

Pauline Goldmark, 

Chairman. 



1918] 



Celebration of May Day 
CELEBRATION OF MAY DAY 



69 



May Day was celebrated at Bryn Mawr Col- 
lege on May 1 , with the usual ceremonies. 

At 7 o'clock the Seniors sang on the tower of 
Rockefeller Hall the Latin Hymn "Te Deum 
Patrem Colimus" which has been sung on 
Rockefeller tower each May Day morning since 
the hall was built, taken over from the ancient 
celebration at Magdalen College, Oxford, where 
the choristers sing each May Day morning. 
Afterwards in brilliant sunshine the four classes 
danced around the four May Poles erected on 
the college campus. The President of the Se- 
nior Class, Miss Louise Ffrcst Hodges, was the 
May Queen, and a basket of May flowers was 
presented to President Thomas. 

After the chapel service immediately following 
President Thomas made the announcements of 
Fellowships, Scholarships and Prizes awarded 
by the Faculty, as follows: 

RESIDENT FELLOWSHIPS CONFERRED FOR 1918-19 

Value $525 

Greek. Marjorie Josephine Milne, of 
Columbus, Ohio. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 
1917. Graduate Scholar in Greek, Bryn Mawr 
College, 1917-18. 

Latin. Clara Elizabeth Yntema, of Hol- 
land, Michigan. A.B., Hope College, 1916; 
A.M., University of Michigan, 1918. Teacher 
in High School, Cass City, Michigan, 1916-17. 
Graduate Student, University of Michigan, 
1917-18. 

English. Grace Ethel Hawk of Reading, 
Pennsylvania. A.B., Brown University, 1917. 
Graduate Scholar in English, Bryn Mawr Col- 
lege, 1917-18. 

French. Helen Elizabeth Patch, of Ban- 
gor, Maine. A.B., Mount Holyoke College, 

1914. Teacher in the East Maine Conference 
Seminary, Bucksport, Maine, 1914-16, and in 
the High School, Bangor, Maine, 1916-17. 
Graduate Scholar in French, Bryn Mawr Col- 
lege, 1917-18. 

History. Leona Christine Gabel, of Syra- 
cuse, New York. A.B., Syracuse University, 

1915. Teacher in the High School, Canastota, 
New York, 1915-17. Graduate Scholar in 
History, Bryn Mawr College, 1917-18. 

Economics. Helen Adair, of Kearney, 
Nebraska. A.B., Barnard College, 1914, and 
A.M., Columbia University, 1916. Fellow in 



Economics and Politics, Bryn Mawr College, 
1917-18. 

Social Economy. Georgia Louise Baxter, 
of Morrison, Colorado. A.B., University of 
Denver, 1914, A.M., University of California, 
1917. Teacher and Matron, State Industrial 
School for Girls, 1914-15. Worker in Juvenile 
Court, San Francisco, 1915-17. Carola Woe- 
rishofTer Fellow in Social Economy and Social 
Pvesearch, Bryn Mawr College, 1917-18. 

Helen Ross, of Independence, Missouri. 
A.B. and B.S., University of Missouri, 1911. 
Graduate Student, University of Missouri, 
1916-17. Teacher in High Schools, 1911-17. 
Susan B. Anthony Memorial Scholar, Bryn 
Mawr College, 1917-18. 

Philosophy. Margaret Georgiana Mel- 
vin, of New Brunswick, Canada. A.B., McGill 
University, 1917. Graduate Scholar in Phil- 
osophy, Br,vn Mawr College, 1917-18. 

Psychology. Margaret Montague Monroe, 
of Asheville, North Carolina. A.B., Mount 
Holyoke College, 1915. Graduate Scholar in 
Psychology, Bryn Mawr College, 1916-17. 
Teaching in High Schools, 1915-16, 1917-18. 

Education. Inez May Neterer, Seattle, 
Washington. A.B., Mills College, 1916. Gradu- 
ate Scholar in Social Economy, Bryn Mawr 
College, 1916-18. 

Mathematics. Margaret Buchanan, of 
Morgantown, West Virginia. A.B., University 
of West Virginia, 1916. Graduate Student in 
Mathematics, Bryn Mawr College, 1912-14. 
Instructor in Mathematics, University of West 
Virginia, 1910-12, 1915-18. 

Physics. Nora May Mohler, of Carlisle, 
Pennsylvania. A.B., Dickinson College, 1917. 
Graduate Scholar in Mathematics, Bryn Mawr 
College, 1917-18. 

Chemistry. Elise Tobin, of Brooklyn, New 
York. B.S., Barnard College, 1915. Graduate 
Scholar in Chemistry, Bryn Mawr College, 
1915-17, and Fellow in Chemistry, 1917-18. 

Geology. Isabel F. Smith, of Los Angeles, 
California. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1915. 
Teacher in Miss W T heeler's School, Providence, 
R. I., 1915-17. Graduate Scholar in Geology, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1917-18. 

Biology. Mary Drusilla Flather, of 
Lowell, Massachusetts. Ph.B., Women's Col- 
lege in Brown University, 1917. Laboratory 
Assistant'in Comparative Anatomy, Brown Uni- 



70 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[July 



versity, 1916-17. Student in Biology, Bryn 
Mawr College, 1917-18. 

Bryn Mawr College Intercollegiate Community 
Sendee Association Fellowship. Amelia Kel- 
logg MacMaster, of Elizabeth, New Jersey. 
A.B., Bryn Mawr College, February, 1917. 
Graduate Scholar in Philosophy, 1917-18. 

FELLOWSHIPS AWARDED 

Mary E. Garrett European Fellowship, of the 
value of $500, open to a graduate student in her 
second year of graduate study. Eva Alice 
Worrall Bryne, of Philadelphia. A.B., Bryn 
Mawr College, 1916, and A.M., 1917. Graduate 
Scholar in Latin, Bryn Mawr College, 1916-17. 
Graduate Scholar in English and Reader in 
English, 1917-18. 

President's European Fellowship, of the value 
of $500, open to a graduate student in her first 
year of graduate study. Isabel F. Smith, of 
Los Angeles, California. A.B., Bryn Mawr 
College, 1915, and A.M., 1918. Graduate 
Scholar in Geology, Bryn Mawr College, 
1917-18. 

Bryn Mawr European Fellowship, of the value 
of $500, awarded to a member of the gradu- 
ating class. Margaret Catherine Timpson, 
of New York City. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 
1918. 

Anna Ottendorfer Memorial Research Fellow- 
ship in Teutonic Philology, of the value of $700. 
Olga Marx, of New York City. A.B., Barnard 
College, 1915; A.M., Columbia University, 
1917. Graduate student, Columbia University, 
1916-17. Fellow in German, Bryn Mawr Col- 
lege, 1917-18. 

AWARD OF GRADUATE SCHOLARSHIPS FOR 1918-19 

Susan B. Anthony Memorial Scholarship, 
value $450. Gwendolyn Hughes, of Lincoln, 
Nebraska. A.B., University of Nebraska, 1916, 
and A.M., 1917. Scholar in Political Science 
and Sociology, University of Nebraska, 1916-17, 
and Fellow, 1917-18. 

Graduate Scholarships of the value of $200 

Greek.. Edith Marion Smith, of Peoria, 
Illinois. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1918. 

Latin. Cora Snowden Neely, of Philadel- 
phia. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1918. 

English. Eva Alice Worrall Bryne, of 
Philadelphia. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1916, 
and A.M., 1917. Graduate Scholar in Latin, 
1916-17, and Reader in English, 1917-18. 



Therese Mathilde Born, of Indianapolis, 
Indiana. Prepared by Tudor Hall, Indian- 
apolis. Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholar, 
1914-15. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1918. 

German. Olga Marx, of New York City. 
A.B., Barnard College, 1915; A.M., Columbia 
University, 1917. Fellow in German, Bryn 
Mawr College, 1917-18. 

French. Judith Hemenway, of New York 
City. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1918. 

Lucile Babcock, of Minneapolis, Minne- 
sota. A.B., University of Minnesota, 1915. 
Teacher in the West High School, Des Moines, 
Iowa, 1916-18. 

Semitic Languages. Beatrice Allard, of 
Wellesley, Massachusetts. A.B., Mount Hol- 
yoke College, 1915. Graduate Scholar in 
Semitic Languages, Bryn Mawr College, 1915- 
16, and Fellow, 1916-18. 

History. Margaret Woodbury, of Colum- 
bus, Ohio. A.B., Ohio State University, 1915. 
Graduate Scholar in History, Bryn Mawr Col- 
lege, 1915-16, and Fellow, 1916-18. 

Economics and Politics. Helen Graham 
Bristow, of Brooklyn, New York. A.B., 
Mount Holyoke College, 1918. 

Social Economy and Social Research. Leah 
Hannah Feder, of Passaic, N. J. A.B., 
Mount Holyoke College, 1918. 

Eleanor Copenhaver, of Marion, Virginia. 
A.B., Westhampton College, 1917. 

Robert G. Valentine Scholar in Social Economy. 
Jane Stodder Davies, of Tufts College, Mas- 
sachusetts. A.B., Jackson College, 1918. 

Special Scholar in Social Economy. Irma 
Caroline Lonegren, of Portland, Oregon. 
A.B., Reed College, 1915. Probation Officer, 
Juvenile Court, Multomah County, Oregon, 
1915-18. 

Philosophy. Anita Mary Furlong Flynn, 
of Waterford, New York. A.B., Smith College, 
1918. 

Psychology. Elizabath Sohier Bryant, of 
Cohasset, Massachusetts. A.B., Bryn Mawr 
College, 1914. Student of Secretarial Work 
and Secretary, 1914-17. Secretary to the Dean 
of the College, Bryn Mawr College, 1917-18. 

Dorthy Theresa Buckley, of Sioux City, 
Iowa. A.B., Michigan University, 1918. 

Archaeology. Grace W. Nelson, of Welles- 
ley, Massachusetts. A.B., Wellesley College 
1917, and A.M., 1918. 

Biology. Mary J. Guthrie, of Columbia, 
Missouri. A.B., University of Missouri, 1916, 






1918] 



Celebration of May Day 



71 



and A.M., 1918. Assistant in Zoology, Univer- 
sity of Missouri, 1916-18. 

Hope Hibbard, of Columbia, Missouri. A. 
B., University of Missouri, 1916, and A.M., 
1918. Assistant in Zoology, University of 
Missouri, 1916-18. 

Dorothy Austin Sewell, of Walton, New 
York. A.B., Smith College, 1916. Graduate 
Student, Cornell University, 1916-17. Fellow 
in Biology, Bryn Mawr College, 1917-18. 

Constance Lynch Springer, of Carlisle, 
Pennsylvania. A.B., Dickinson College, 1918. 

Earlham College Graduate Scholarship, of the 
ralue of $400. Lena Hivnor, of Richmond, 
Indiana. A.B., Earlham College, 1918. 

UNDERGRADUATE SCHOLARSHIPS 

Maria L. Eastman Brooke Hall Memorial 
Scholarship, value $100. Awarded to student 
with the highest average grade in all her sub- 
jects by the middle of her Junior year. Francis 
Blakiston Day, of Philadelphia. Prepared by 
the Wissahickon Heights School, St. Martins, 
Philadelphia, and by the Friends' School, Ger- 
mantown. 

First Charles S. Hinchman Memorial Scholar- 
ship, value $500. Awarded for special ability. 
Marie Litzinger, of Bedford, Pennsylvania. 
Prepared by the High School, Bedford. 

Second Charles S. Hinchman Memorial 
Scholarship, value $500. Edith Macrum, of 
Oakmont, Pennsylvania. Prepared by the 
Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania. 

Elizabeth S. Ship pen Foreign Scholarship, 
value $200. Margaret Catherine Timpson, 
of New York City. Winner of the Bryn Mawr 
European Fellowship. 

Elizabeth S. Ship pen Scholarship in Foreign 
Languages, value $100. Ernestine Emma 
Mercer, of Philadelphia. Group, Greek and 
Latin. Grade 90.65 in Greek. 

Elizabeth S. Shippen Scholarship in Science^ 
value $100. Adelaide Landon, of New York 
City. Group, Mathematics and Physics. Grade 
87.7 in Physics. 

Mary Anna Longstreth Senior Scholarship, 
value $200. Jessie Mebane, of Wilkes-Barre, 
Pennsylvania. Prepared by the Wilkes-Barre 
Institute and by private tuition. 

Anna M. Powers Senior Scholarship, value 
$200. Margaret Gilman, of Wellesley, Mass- 
achusetts. Prepared by the Misses Allen's 
School, W r est Newton, Massachusetts, and by 
Dana Hall, Wellesley. 



Special Senior Scholarship, value $100. Edith 
Mary Howes, of Philadelphia, Pa. Prepared 
by the Girls' High School, West Philadelphia, 
and by private tuition. 

Special Senior Scholarship, value $1 00. Helen 
Coreene Karns, of Benton, Pennsylvania. 
Prepared by Wilkes-Barre Institute, Wilkes- 
Barre, Pennsylvania. 

Special Senior Scholarship, value $100. Enid 
Schurman MacDonald, of Vancouver, B. C 
Prepared by the King Edward High School, 
Vancouver, and by the Broadway High School, 
Seattle, Washington. 

James E. Rhoads Junior Scholarship, value 
$250. Arline Fearon Preston, of Fallston, 
Maryland. Prepared by Belair Academy, 
Belair, Maryland, and by the Hannah More 
Academy, Reisterstown, Maryland. 

James E. Rhoads Sophomore Scholarship, 
value $100. Beatrice Norah Spinelli, of 
Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High 
School, West Philadelphia. 

James E. Rhoads Sophomore Scholarship, 
value $150. Mary Helen Macdonald, of 
Ardmore, Pennsylvania. Prepared by the 
Lower Merion High School, Ardmore, Penn- 
sylvania. 

Mary E. Stevens Junior Scholarship, value 
$200. Margaret Dent of Philadelphia. Pre- 
pared by Miss Walker's School, Lakewood, N. J. 

Anna Hallo-well Junior Scholarship, value 
$100. Julia Newton Cochran, of The Plains, 
Va. Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, 
Baltimore. 

Special Junior Scholarship, value $200. Mary 
Katherine Cary, of Richmond, Virginia. Pre- 
pared by The Virginia Randolph Ellett School, 
Richmond, Virginia. 

Special Junior Scholarship, value $200. Mary 
Louise Mall, of Baltimore, Maryland. Pre- 
pared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. 

Special Junior Scholarship, value $125. 
Francis Louise von Hofsten, of Winnetka, 
Illinois. Prepared by the Girton School, 
W T innetka. 

Special Junior Scholarship, value $100. Hilda 
Buttenwieser, of Cincinnati, Ohio. Prepared 
by the University School, Cincinnati. 

Special Junior Scholarship, value $300. Ruth 
Jackson Woodruff, of Scranton, Pennsylvania. 
Prepared by the Central High School, Scranton. 

Maria Hopper Sophomore Scholarship, value 
$200. Henrietta Elizabeth Baldwin, of 
Williamsport, Pennsylvania. Prepared by the 



72 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[July 



High School, Williamsport, and by the Misses 
Kirk's School, Bryn Mawr. 

Maria Hopper Sophomore Scholarship, value 
$200. Ruth Louise Karns, of Benton, Penn- 
sylvania. Prepared by Wilkes-Barre Institute, 
Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. 

Thomas H. Powers Sophomore Scholarship, 
value $200. Bessie Eunia Ostroff, of Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania. Prepared by the Wil- 
liam Penn High School and by the Girls' High 
School, Philadelphia. 

Special Sophomore Scholarship, value $125. 
Louise Cadot, of Richmond, Virginia. Pre- 
pared by the Randolph Ellett School, Richmond. 

Special Sophomore Scholarship, value $100. 
Agnes Hollingsworth, of Ardmore, Pennsyl- 
vania. Prepared by the Lower Merion High 
School, Ardmore. 

Special Sophomore Scholarship, value $100. 
Sidney Virginia Donaldson, of Ardmore, 
Pennsylvania. Prepared by the Lower Merion 
High School, Ardmore. 



Chicago Bryn Mawr Club Scholarship, value 
$100. Anna Munson Sanford, of Honey 
Brook, Pennsylvania. Prepared by Hannah 
More Academy, Reisterstown, Maryland, and 
by private tuition. 

Elizabeth Duane Gillespie Scholarship in 
American History, value $60. Mary Ethelyn 
Tyler, of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Pre- 
pared by the Wissahickon Heights School, St. 
Martins, Philadelphia. 

George W. Childs Essay Prize for Best Writer in 
the Senior Class: A watch. Mary Swift 
Rupert, of Marshallton, Delaware. Prepared 
by the Misses Hebb's School, Wilmington, 
Delaware. 

Mary Helen Ritchie Memorial Prize. A set 
of Shakespeare's Works. Virginia Kneeland 
of New York City. Prepared by the Brearley 
School, New York City. Bryn Mawr Matri- 
culation Scholar for New York, New Jersey and 
Delaware, 1914-15; Elizabeth S. Shippen 
Scholar in Science, 1917-18. 



CONFERRING OF DEGREES ON 79 STUDENTS GRADU- 
ATED AND LIST OF FELLOWSHIPS, HONORS 
AND PRIZES 



The Thirty- third } r ear of Bryn Mawr College 
closed June 6 with the conferring of degrees. 
Sixty-two students received the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts, eleven the degree of Master of 
Arts, and six the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. 

The Gymnasium was crowded by the friends 
of the College and friends and relatives of the 
Seniors. 

After the exercises closed luncheon of 350 
covers was served for the friends of the Senior 
Class in Radnor Hall. 

The Directors and Faculty and friends of the 
College were invited to luncheon at the Deanery 
by President Thomas to meet Dean West. 

Among the guests present were Mr. and Mrs. 
Alexander C. Wood, of Riverton, New Jersey, 
Professor and Mrs. Rufus M. Jones, of Haver- 
ford College, Mr. Frederic H. Strawbridge, of 
Germantown, Mrs. William Coflin Ladd, of 
Bryn Mawr, Miss Elizabeth Butler Kirkbride, 
of Philadelphia, Mrs. Wilfred Bancroft, of Rhode 
Island, Mr. and Mrs. Abram Francis Huston, of 
Coatesville, of the Board of Directors; and the 
members of the Faculty of the College. 

President M. Carey Thomas conferred the 
degrees, scholarships and prizes and spoke as 
follows: 



"Education at the present time is a patriotic 
duty. It is our duty to live in order to make 
sure that our boys below fighting age and all our 
girls shall receive an education that will enable 
them after the war is over to rebuild the world 
that we have permitted to be torn down on firm 
foundations of international law and order and 
lasting peace through international compulsory 
courts of justice enforced by the police force of 
the whole civilized world. We of the older 
generations must see to it that all our boys and 
girls understand that to stay in high school until 
graduation is their patriotic duty and that it is 
a still higher patriotic duty to stay in college 
until graduation. 

"History shows that devastating wars — and 
what other war in all history has even remotely 
approached this in horror! — have been followed 
by years — more often by centuries — of collapse. 
We have only to recall the moral, intellectual, 
and physical decay of "the glory that was Greece 
and the grandeur that was Rome;" the centuries 
long exhaustion of Renaissance Italy, the com- 
plete disappearance as a great nation of majestic 
Spain; the brutal barbarism into which Germany 
sank after the Thirty Years War, the effects of 
which may be recognized to-day in the hideous 



1918] 



Conferring of Degrees 



73 



savagery with which she wages war; the slow 
recovery of the arts of peace in Europe after the 
Napoleonic Wars; — we have only to recall the 
after-effects of these and other long wars to 
realize that we are facing overwhelming intel- 
lectual and spiritual disaster. Already its 
dark shadow is creeping over our schools and 
colleges. 

"Not only are boys and girls deserting their 
high schools and college studies from a vague 
unrest and a misplaced desire of helping to win 
the war but schools are shortening their terms, 
children are being drafted into industry and 
farming, child labor laws are becoming a dead 
letter; already in the schools there is an appall- 
ing and ever increasing shortage of teachers, 
men teachers altogether disappearing and 
women refusing to go into the teaching pro- 
fession but taking up better paid, more exciting 
war jobs. Surely with all the vast resources of 
men and women power in the United States, as 
yet scarcely touched by the demands of war, we 
can compel our school boards to save our chil- 
dren from the terrible menace of illiteracy. 
Surely we can make a sufficient number of the 
thousands upon thousands of college women in 
this country see that as teachers in the schools 
they are standing shoulder to shoulder with 
their brothers in Flanders and Picardy in the 
performance of patriotic duty. And if we fail 
to do this we must see that they are paid living 
salaries and are drafted into the schools like their 
brothers into the trenches." 

In connection with Dean West's address on 
"Our Need of the Classics," President Thomas 
emphasized suggesting the forming of a National 
League for the Defense of the Humanities, 
whose object would be broader in scope than the 
defence of the classics and would embrace Phil- 
osophy, Mathematics, History and other lan- 
guages. She suggested that such a league might 
devote itself to studying new methods of teach- 
ing classics and mathematics in order to bring 
them in touch with modern things, that it might 
hold conventions and send speakers to high 
schools and colleges and bring over from Great 
Britain and France eminent scholars to speak 
on classical culture. 

In introducing Dean West President Thomas 
recalled the fact that the colleges of Bryn Mawr 
and Princeton were the most beautiful examples 
of Collegiate Gothic in the United States; that 
although this style had originated at Bryn 
Mawr, it had been perfected at Princeton. She 
also recalled the fact that Bryn Mawr and 



Princeton were among the few colleges that in- 
sisted on classical training. 

President Thomas said that both Bryn Mawr 
and Princeton had had a hand in developing the 
President of the United States; that like the 
Gothic Architecture he had begun at Bryn 
Mawr as Professor of History in 1885, and at 
Princeton had developed from a Professor to a 
President of the University, and while at Prince- 
ton had been groomed for Governor of New 
Jersey and President of the United States. 

President Thomas spoke of Dean West's 
book on "The Value of the Classics" as one of 
the most convincing arguments for a liberal 
education that had ever been made. 

"We need the classics more than ever just 
now in our higher education, not only because of 
their proved value for modern thought and life; 
but for special patriotic and civilized reasons 
which the war compels us to consider. We need 
the classics especially to combat the false theory 
of a national as distinct from an international 
culture and civilization. We hear it said that 
'this is the twentieth century' and that Ameri- 
can education should have little to do with the 
past, that the centre of all our American educa- 
tion should be our national language and our 
national literature. It is hard to say whether 
the chief feature of this theory is its plausibility, 
its specious appeal to our national pride, or its 
absurdity. Let us keep our heads cool and clear 
and remember that this is the very argument on 
which the Kaiser has based his brutally domi- 
neering attempts for nearly thirty years to 
establish a distinctive German Kultur, dominant 
and exclusive of the old classic training and his- 
tory in which the best modern civilization is so 
deeply rooted and from which it derives the 
priceless lesson of democratic freedom. Hear 
the Kaiser's own words on this subject as taken 
from the officially authorized edition of his 
speech in Berlin on December 4, 1890. These 
are his words: 'The trouble is, first of all, that we 
lack a truly national basis. We must take Ger- 
man as the foundation of the Gymnasium. We 
must educate national young Germans and not 
young Greeks and Romans. We must depart 
from the basis which has stood for centuries, the 
old monastic education of the Middle Ages, in 
which Latin was the standard, and a little 
Greek. This is no longer the standard. We 
must make German the basis.' 

"Consider what this means, it means to throw 
away the*" best lessons of experience. It means 
that the civilized world shall consent to forget 



74 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[July 



what it ought to remember. It means that a 
basis for international education of a high 
order is destroyed and that in its place is put an 
exclusive national Kultur which will be in con- 
flict with all others, no matter how they are 
organized, unless they tamely submit to it. 
This is the question which is now being settled 
on the battle front in France. Which side do 
we take?" 

CANDIDATES FOR HIGHER DEGREES 

Master of Arts 

Bertha Clark Greenough, of Rhode Island. 
A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1917. Scholar in 
Economics and Politics, Bryn Mawr College, 
1917-18. 

Marion Rebecca Halle, of Ohio. A.B., 
Bryn Mawr CoUege, 1917. 

Helen Marie Harris, of Pennsylvania. A. 
B., Bryn Mawr College, 1917. Bryn Mawr-In- 
tercollegiate Community Service Association 
Fellow, 1917-18. 

Istar Aldja Haupt, of Maryland. A.B., 
Bryn Mawr College, 1917. Scholar in Psy- 
chology, Bryn Mawr College, 1917-18. 

Catherine Utley Hill, (Mrs. George Ed- 
win Hill), of Connecticut. A.B., Bryn Mawr 
College, 1907. Social Worker, 1905-1 7. 

Sylvia Canfield Jelliffe, of New York 
City. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1917. 

Amelia Kellogg MacM aster, of New Jer- 
sey. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, February, 1917. 
Graduate Scholar in Philosophy, Bryn Mawr 
College, 1917-18, and Special Scholar, second 
semester, 1916-17. 

Marjorie Josephine Milne, of Minnesota. 
A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1917. Scholar in 
Greek, Bryn Mawr College, 1917-18. 

Ryu Sato, of Japan. A.B., Bryn Mawr 
College, 1917. Scholar in Chemistry, Bryn 
Mawr College, 1917-18. 

Elizabeth Kline Stark, of New York. A. 
B., Bryn Mawr College, 1916. Assistant Dem- 
onstrator in Experimental Psychology, 1916-18. 

Mildred McCreary Willard, of Pennsyl- 
vania. A. B., Bryn Mawr College, 1917. 
Scholar in Psychology, Bryn Mawr College, 
1917-18. 

Doctor of Philosophy 

Alice Hill Byrne, of Pennsylvania. A.B., 
Wellesley College, 1908. Teacher in Prepara- 
tory Schools, 1894-1917. Graduate Student in 
Greek and Latin, Bryn Mawr College, 1908-10; 



1911-14 Graduate Scholar in Greek, 1910-11; 
Graduate Scholar in Latin, 1914-16; Instructor 
in Latin and Greek, Western College, Oxford, 
O., 1917-18. Subjects: Latin and Greek. Dis- 
sertation: Titus Pomponius Atticus. Chapters 
from a Biography. 

Janet Malcolm MacDonald, of Iowa. A. 
B., Morningside College, 1910; A.M., Univer- 
sity of Illinois, 1913. Graduate Scholar in 
Archaeology, Bryn Mawr College, 1915-17, and 
Fellow in Archaeology, 1917-18. Assistant 
Principal in the High School, Aurelia, la., 1911- 
12; and Instructor in Latin, Morningside Col- 
lege, 1913-15. Subjects: Classical Archaeology, 
Oriental Archaeology and Latin. Dissertation: 
The Uses of Symbolism in Greek Art. 

Marion Edwards Park, of Massachusetts. 
A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1898, and A.M., 1899. 
Holder of the Bryn Mawr European Fellowship, 
1898-99, and Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr 
College, 1898-99, 1912-14: Graduate Student, 
Autumn Quarter, University of Chicago, 1900- 
01; American School of Classical Studies, 
Athens, Greece, 1901-02; Instructor in Classics 
Colorado College, 1902-03, 1904-06, and Acting 
Dean of Women, 1903-04; Teacher in Miss 
Wheeler's School, Providence, R. I., 1906-09; 
Acting Dean of the College, Bryn Mawr Col- 
lege, 1911-12; Assistant Professor of Classics, 
Colorado College, 1914-15; Graduate Student, 
Johns Hopkins University, 1915-16, and Fellow 
in Latin, Bryn Mawr College, 1916-17; Acting 
Dean of Simmons College, 1918. Subjects: 
Latin and Greek. Dissertation: The Plebs 
in Cicero's Day. A study of their Provenance 
and of their Employment. 

Mary Edith Pinney, of Kansas. A.B., 
Kansas State University, 1908, and A.M., 1910. 
Teaching Fellow in Zoology, Kansas State 
University, 1909-10, and High School Instruc- 
tor, Alma, Kansas, 1908-09; Fellow in Biology, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1910-11; President's Eu- 
ropean Fellow and Student, Universities of 
Bonn and Heidelberg and Zoological Station, 
Naples, 1911-12; Instructor in Zoology, Kan- 
sas State University, 1912-13; Demonstrator 
in Biology and Graduate Student. Bryn Mawr 
College, 1913-17; Instructor in Zoology Wel- 
lesley College, 1917-18. Subjects: Morphology, 
Physiology, and Botany. Dissertation: A Study 
of the Relation of the Behaviour of the Chro- 
matin to Development and Heredity in Teleost 
Hybrids. 

Eleanor Ferguson Rambo, of Pennsylvania. 
A.B., Bryn Mawr CoUege, 1908, and A.M., 1909. 



1918] 



Conferring of Degrees 



75 



Scholar in Greek, Bryn Mawr College, 1908-09; 
Graduate Student in Latin, 1909-10, and in 
Archaeology, 1911-12; Teacher of Mathematics 
in the Misses Kirk's School, Bryn Mawr, 1909- 
10; Private Tutor, 1910-11; Teacher of Latin 
in Miss Wright's School, Bryn Mawr, and Pri- 
vate Tutor, 1912-16; Graduate Scholar in 
Archaeology, Bryn Mawr College, 1914-15; 
Awarded Fellowship of the American Archaeolog- 
ical Institute in the School of Classical Studies 
in Athens, 1915; Graduate Student, 1915-16, 
and Fellow in Archaeology, 1916-17; Teacher in 
the Phebe Anna Thome Model School, 1917-18. 
Subjects: Classical Archaeology, Ancient His- 
tory, and Latin. Dissertation: Lions in Greek 
Art. 

Helen Emma Wleand Cole, (Mrs. Samuel 
Valentine Cole), of Pennsylvania. A.B., Mount 
Holyoke College, 1906, and A.M., 1908. In- 
structor in Latin, Cox College, College Park, Ga., 
1906-07; Teacher of Latin and German in the 
High School, Phcenixville, Pa., 1909-10; Stu- 
dent in Pottstown Business College, 1910-11; 
Secretary to Dean of Philadelphia College of 
Pharmacy, 1911; Instructor in Wheaton Col- 
lege, Norton, Mass., 1911-13, and Assistant 
Professor of Latin, 1913-15; Teacher in Miss 
Wright's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., 1915-16. 
Graduate Scholar in Latin and Archaeology, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1907-09, and Graduate 
Student in Latin, 1915-17. Subjects: Latin 
and Archaeology. Dissertation: Deception in 
Plautus. A Study in the Technique of Roman 
Comedy. 

Bachelor of Arts. 

(2 February, 1918; 6 June, 1918) 

In the group of Greek and Latin: Edith 
Marion Smith, of Pennsylvania; Louise Tun- 
stall Smith, of Maryland. 

In the group of Greek and Classical Archceology: 
Henrietta Norris Huff, of Pennsylvania. 

In the group of Latin and English: Anna 
Martha Booth, of Philadelphia; Therese 
Mathilde Born, of Indiana, magna cum laude; 
Gladys Hagy Cassel, of Philadelphia, cum 
laude. 

In the group of Latin and French: Judith 
Martha Bassett Hemenway, of Vermont; 
Cora Snowden Neely, of Philadelphia. 

In the group of Latin and Philosophy: Marion 
O'Connor, of Massachusetts. 

In the group of Latin and Classical Archaeology: 
Mary Summerfield Gardiner, of New York; 
Irene Loeb, of Missouri, magna cum laude. 



In the group of Latin and Mathematics: Eu- 
genie Margaret Lynch, of Pennsylvania. 

In the group of English and German: Anna 
Ethel Lubar, of Philadelphia. 

In the group of English and French: Helen 
Moseman Wilson, of Michigan. 

In the group of English and I tali an and Spanish: 
Charlotte Wright Dodge, of New York; 
Lucy Evans, of New York; Katherine 
Aurelia Holi.iday, of Indiana; Elizabeth 
Houghton, of Massachusetts, cum laude. 

In the group of English and Philosophy: Alice 
Harrison Newlin, of Pennsylvania; Re- 
becca Garrett Rhoads, of Delaware. 

In the group of English and Psychology: 
Adeline Ogden Showell, of Ohio; Mar- 
garet Worch, of Rhode Island. 

In the group of German and Spanish: Ella 
Mary Rosenberg, of Philadelphia, cum laude. 

In the group of French and Italian and Spanish: 
Helen Edward Walker, of Chicago. 

In the group of French and Spanish: Kathe- 
rine Vermisye Dufourcq, of New York City; 
Ruth Eloise Hart, of New York; Harriet 
Hobbs, of New York City. 

In the group of French and Modern History: 
Janette Ralston Hollis, of Massachusetts. 
Work for degree completed February, 1918. 
Hildegarde King Kendig, of New York; 
Katharine Truman Sharpless, of Pennsyl- 
vania, cum laude. 

In the group of French and History of Art: 
Mary Swift Rupert, of Delaware; Fannie 
Espen Teller, of Philadelphia. 

In the group of Spanish and History of Art: 
Annette Eleanor Gest, of New Jersey. 

In the group of Modern History and Economics 
and Politics: Eleanor Riggs Atherton, of 
Pennsylvania; Mary Evelyn Babbitt, of 
Pennsylvania; Martha Bailey, of Pennsyl- 
vania; Mary Boyd, of New York City; Louise 
Frost Hodges, of the District of Columbia, 
magna cum laude; Adelalde Wallace Shaffer, 
of Tennessee; Margaret Catherine Timpson, 
of New York City, magna cum laude; Pene- 
lope Turle, of Minnesota. 

In the group of Modern History and History oj 
Art: Helen Iola Butterfield, of New York 
City; Helen Whitcomb, of Massachusetts, 
cum laude. 

In the group of Economics and Politics and 
Philosophy and Psychology: Frances Buffum, 
of Massachusetts; Lilian Lorraine Fraser, 
of Minnesota, cum laude; James Marion 
Israel, of Minnesota; Leslie Richaedson, of 
Massachusetts. 



76 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[July 



In th-e group of Economics and Politics and 
Psychology: Frances Birda Curtin, of West 
Virginia (work for the degree completed in Feb- 
ruary, 1918) ; Marjorie Trueheart Williams, 
of Texas. 

In the group of Philosophy and Psychology: 
Jeannette Ridlon, of Chicago. 

In the group of Psychology and Biology: Mar- 
garet Howell Bacon, of Philadelphia; Mary 
Keesey Stair, of Pennsylvania. 

In the group of Mathematics and Physics: 
Beulah Helen Fegley, of Pennsylvania; 



Helen Pickering Jones, of Pennsylvania; 
Hester Agnes Quimby, of Philadelphia. 

In the group of Physics and Biology: Mar- 
garet Mall, of Baltimore. 

In the group of Chemistry and Biology: Mary 
Bartow Andrews, of New Jersey; Charlotte 
Teresa Howell, of Baltimore; Marjorie 
Sharps Jefferies, of Pennsylvania; Virginia 
Kneeland, of New York City, magna cum 
laude; Gertrude Reymershoffer, of Texas; 
Marjorie Lord Strauss, of New York 
City. 



THE ALUMNAE SUPPER 



After a few words of welcome from Mrs. 
Francis, at Alumnae Supper, June 4, Mrs. Ban- 
croft (Elizabeth Nields, 1898) was introduced as 
toastmistress. 

Margaret Bacon, 1918, in speaking in be- 
half of the graduating class emphasized the feel- 
ing of cooperation between the Alumnae Associ- 
ation and the undergraduates during the past 
year especially in their work for the Service 
Corps. 

Professor Hoppin, in commenting on the 
changes in the college on returning after a num- 
ber of years, spoke with regret of the fact that 
the students no longer wear cap and gown to 
classes and urged a return to "that extremely 
wise and proper tradition." The immaturity 
of the students at present and a lowering of 
the standards a bit he attributed to the ten- 
dency of the preparatory schools to cram up 
their pupils for college and ignore general cul- 
ture. He regretted the giving up of the honor 
system for the present system of proctoring. 
Mr. Hoppin spoke favorably of the new consti- 
tution, which has resulted in an increased 
harmoniousness and homogeneity in the faculty, 
of the increased number of positions open to 
women on the faculty, and of the friendly rela- 
tions between faculty and students. 

Dean Taft: I thought I would like to tell 
you briefly this evening about the war work 
which has been done at the college and the war 
work in which we cooperated with you this winter. 
When I came here in the fall there was no or- 
ganization for war work peculiarly, what war 
work had been done was done under the Chris- 
tian Association and there was a general feeling 
of dissatisfaction that it should be a sub-com- 
mittee under an organization. Everyone felt 
that it should be a special committee and we 
were very fortunate in having with us at that 



time Mrs. Wood of the Women's Committee 
of the Council of National Defense, and Presi- 
dent Thomas invited a number of undergradu- 
ates and faculty to hear Mrs. Wood, and it was 
from that talk that the War Council resulted, 
an organization which could form committees 
to undertake the work which might come up 
during the year. 

The first important thing that came up was 
what should be the object, and the Bryn Mawr 
Service Corps was the choice. We thought at 
first of a B. M. unit of a Y. M. C. A. hut, but 
we began to see that there might be division in 
the college over what organization to support, 
and there were difficulties about a unit. We 
were fortunate in having the suggestion made 
that we could send alumnae of Bryn Mawr 
abroad, support them financially and allow them 
to work under any organization which needed 
them and which most needed help, thus giving 
us an opportunity of sending alumnae to any 
part of Europe where they were needed. 

The other object which we have undertaken 
to support is the Bryn Mawr Farm. We were 
uncertain in the beginning of the year whether it 
was well to try to carry on the farm this sum- 
mer. However we decided that if possible we 
would like to carry it on under better circum- 
stances this summer and we were fortunate 
enough to have land offered to us in this neigh- 
borhood, and we are now embarked on an even 
larger farm than last summer and it shows signs 
of greater progress than this time last summer. 
The planting has been done earlier this year, and 
practically all the land is planted now. I do 
not know what we can say about the finances of 
the farm. We have almost completed the 
$7000 which the Alumnae Association pledged 
at the meeting in February, completed except 
for $600. There is every reason to think that 



1918] 



The Alumnae Supper 



77 



we ought to come out even. We have had 
volunteer labor this spring and are very careful 
about wages, and are raising only the things 
which seemed profitable last year. The farm is 
being run as economically as possible and with 
last year's experience ought to be successful 
financially. 

One or two other matters I would like to men- 
tion. First, the work of the Appointment 
Bureau during the war. The Labor Bureau in 
Washington has asked all the colleges to co- 
operate with them and to give publicity to Civil 
Service examinations and positions open in 
Washington. It would be a great help to have 
the alumnae write to me and tell me what posi- 
tions they would be willing to take and what 
training they have had. The more alumnae 
whom I can persuade to register with the Ap- 
pointment Bureau the better. Anyone willing 
to take a government position may find her 
peculiar needs filled through the Appointment 
Bureau at any time. 

A few words about the year in general at the 
college, it has been a year of reorganization and 
the introduction of many new things. There 
was a conflict between the war work and col- 
lege work but we have accomplished a good deal 
in the way of organizing ourselves on a war 
basis, and next year we will be able to run more 
smoothly. It is hard to keep before the stu- 
dents that the college work is a war service and 
a patriotic duty. The War Council and the 
Undergraduate Association have decided to take 
a firm stand on this question. One hears com- 
plaints of the students taking things up and then 
dropping them but I think that everyone who 
has worked in the college this year must feel how 
tremendously in earnest all the college have been 
about every patriotic work they have taken up. 
The undergraduates are most ready to respond. 
The situation in the college is most encouraging 
for next year and I hope the Alumnae Associ- 
ation will cooperate as completely as they have 
during the last year. 

Mrs. Riesmann (Eleanor Fleisher, 1903) gave 
an account of the activities of her classmates at 
home and abroad, many of them in active war 
service. 

Mr. Arthur Thomas, a trustee of the college 
and the chairman of the Buildings and Grounds 
Committee, told of the opportunities for national 
service open to laboratory technicians in the 
Medical Department of the Army, and told of the 
twenty weeks course now being given at the 
Philadelphia Polyclinic Hospital in Laboratory 



Technique and Clincial Pathology and urged 
upon the alumnae consideration of preparation 
for this form of service. 

Mlle. Chalufour, one of the five graduate 
students from France this year, spoke of her 
impressions of American college life. 

Marjorie Young (1908) urged on the alum- 
nae the importance of not giving up their regular 
class reunions, as 1908 had done this year, on 
account of the war, as it is a big thing to come 
back and get in touch with each other and 
college again. 

Dr. Huff presented the case for scientific 
studies as against classics, and made a plea for 
the teaching of more qualitative and less quan- 
titative science in the preparatory schools. 

Mrs. Loring (Katherine Page, 1913) told of 
the war activities of members of the class of 
1913. 

Helen Harris (1917) gave an account of the 
members of her class. 

President Thomas: I am only going to keep 
you for a very few moments. I always look for- 
ward to the pleasure of welcoming you to the 
college at your Alumnae Supper. You need no 
welcome; the college is yours and always will 
be yours. I think for the first time we have 
eaten this alumnae supper in a hall other than 
Pembroke. I do not remember any alumnae 
supper before Pembroke was built, and it seems 
to me that Rockefeller and Miss Nearing have 
carried on the Pembroke tradition. They have 
proved the efficiency of the Bryn Mawr gradu- 
ate in furnishing such a repast as this for one 
dollar. 

I want to say a few words about the new en- 
trance examinations for Bryn Mawr College. 
Bryn Mawr has been working over the entrance 
requirements and has altered them in the direc- 
tion of more science and more history. We have 
given up the 4th (?) foreign language, and have 
got Physics from everyone who enters and 
Ancient History. We are going to build on 
splendid foundations, Physics and Ancient His- 
tory. One point from the foreign language has 
been given to Physics which now counts 2, 
one to English or American History, and one for 
another science. There is an option of one 
foreign language. 

We are going to try and see if we can't select 
out of the students who pass the entrance ex- 
aminations the most worthy of Bryn Mawr. I 
am sure you will be glad to hear that the Under- 
graduate" Association have cordially approved 
the motion of the Faculty and Senate that 



78 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[July 



juniors who have not one half their merits must 
go to another college. It will be an interesting 
development to watch whether, by selecting 
students not only by examinations but in some 
other way, we can have a college where really 
first-class students could study with other first- 
class students. There are about 500 colleges 
where first-class students have to study with 
second-class students. 

Another thing that I believe is quite an inter- 
esting new development is the conference 
granted by the faculty to the students. The 
undergraduates are able to confer with com- 
mittees of the faculty on academic matters. I 
have been deeply interested in those confer- 
ences which I have been able to attend, in which 
the students have talked over various things 
that they have felt about the academic work, and 
I think many of the faculty feel as I do that it is 
something that will develop in the future and 
bring us to a much higher academic standard if 
we understand each other's point of view on 
academic matters. 

A few words about our great gratification that 
our Carola Woerishofer Department has been 
selected to train these three units to be industrial 
supervisors. We feel very much gratified that 
Mr. Frankfurter, the new industrial superin- 
tendent, President Hopkins of Dartmouth 
College, and all seem to think that the Carola 
Woerishofer Department is the department in 
the United States that can do this training 
better than any other, and we are greatly grati- 
fied that the Y. W. C. A. has set aside $5000 for 
each course. It is to include scholarships of 
$300 each in this department. We hope to have 
36 graduates in this department next year all 
through the year. I can think of few things 
more important than training for these positions. 
There is going to be a rush of women to industry 
and we must have women to take care of them. 

Dalton will be open this summer at govern- 
ment request. Dr. Brunei, two graduates, one 
member of the graduating class and one junior 
will work there. 

Few things have made me prouder than the 
splendid patriotism that you have shown since 
this war began. Not only the graduates but the 
undergraduates have been wonderful and if their 
academic work has suffered I think they have 
seen that themselves and they are going to 
regulate it in a very wise way by conscripting 
themselves. The undergraduates and faculty 
have decided not to have courses that do not 
give the kind of intellectual training that we 
want every course to give at Bryn Mawr. 



The graduates of Bryn Mawr have done just 
what I should have expected. They have felt 
that this war is really a war of civilization. It 
is everything we care for, and on the other side 
going backward from the principles of freedom 
and justice, and I know scarcely a Bryn Mawr 
graduate who has not gone directly to the point 
and not thrown herself enthusiastically into win- 
ning this war. If you are not already engaged, I 
hope you will consider the opportunities of pa- 
triotic speaking. We must develop public opinion 
behind this war so that people understand not 
only the necessity of supporting this war but 
understand what is involved. I think we can 
make it a holy war, a war to end war. If you 
are not already spending your whole time in 
war- winning activities I hope you will add to 
what you are doing patriotic education, and will 
let our Patriotic Speaking Bureaus make use of 
you because in a great democracy like ours we 
must enlighten the people and I know no body 
of women who can do it better than Bryn Mawr 
women. 

I feel that there are certain outside activities 
that you ought to carry on. I feel that you 
ought not to give up coming back to Bryn Mawr 
for reunions, you ought not to sever your con- 
nections with the college. We ought to place 
with patriotic duty the duty of the highest kind 
of education. We must bear in mind that men 
and women must be fitted to do the great work 
of reconstruction after the war. Your work be- 
hind the lines is I think to keep up the highest 
standards of education and not to relax your 
interest in what we like to think is one of the 
strong factors. So I want to commend your 
college to you in addition to your war activities. 

The election of Mrs. Hand as Alumnae Di- 
rector in Mrs. Bancroft's place was announced, 
and the meeting ended with the singing of "Thou 
Gracious Inspiration" and "Star Spangled 
Banner." 

LTST OF ALUMNAE SUPPER 

Martha Thomas, Anna Rhoads Ladd, Julia 
Cope Collins, Katharine M. Shipley, Marian W. 
Walsh, Anna E. West, Mrs. Herbert T. Clark, 
Mary Jeffers, Marianna Janney, Anna S. Hoag, 
Pauline Goldmark, Elizabeth B. Kirkbride, 
Mary M. Mellin, A. C. Dimon, Sue Avis Blake, 
Mrs. B. K. Wilbur, Bertha G. Wood, Elizabeth 
N. Bancroft, Mrs. Adam Calvert, M. G. Con- 
verse, Mrs. J. J. Boericke, Helen W. Woodall, 
Josephine Goldmark, Anna D. Fry, Mrs. N. C. 
Cregar, Louise Congdon Francis, Florence 
Peebles, Lois Farnham Hone, Beatrice Mc- 



1918] 



June Class Reunions 



79 



George, Mrs. H. A. Woodward, Edith T. 

Orlady, Miriam Thomas, Mrs. J. C. Hoppin, 
Eleanor James, Julia Pratt Smith, Margaret 
S. Dietrich, Virginia T. Stoddard, Helen Met- 
tler (ex) Sophie Boncher, Agnes M. Sinclair, 
Elizabeth M. Utley Thomas, Elsie T. Mc- 
Ginley, Eleanor Deming, Eleanor Fleisher Ries- 
man, Agnes B. Austin, C. F. Wagner, Amy T. 
Clapp, Gertrude B. Barrows, Mary T. James, 
Emma C. Thompson, Clarah Hull, Edith T. 
Wood, Catherine Utley Hill, Theodora Bates, 
Anna C. Clauder, Virginia P. Robinson, M. J. 
0'Sullivan ; Letitia Windle, Alice M. Hawkins, 
Annabella Richards, Katherine V. Harley, 
Eunice M. Schenk, Margaret A. Barner, Athalia 
Crawford, Grace A. Woodleton, Lydia Sharp- 
less Perry, Marjorie Young, Agnes Irwin, 



H. W. Smith, Leonora S. Tomlinson, Louise 
Watson, Florence M. Glenn, Gladys Spry, 
M. Alden Lane, Mary Pierce, Beatrice Hawson, 
Elizabeth Shipley, Mrs. Hayes, K. 1). Williams, 
Maud D. Holmes, Agathe Deming, F. M. Des- 
san, Elsie H. Steltzer, Zena J. Blanc, K. W. 
McCollin, Mrs. Albert M. Greenfield, Amy 
McMaster, Louise Collins and Caroline Cad- 
bury Shipley, Isabel Maddison Ph.D., Miriam 
Thomas, Bertha Ehlers, Mary Nearing, Cynthia 
Wesson, Ryu Sato, Isabel Smith, Elizabeth 
Brakeley, Helen Harris, Margaret Bacon, Hope 
Traver, Ph.D., Lydia Sharpless Perry, Anne 
Barrett Walton, Edith Chambers Rhoads, Myra 
Elliot Vauclain, Emma Loines, Eleanor F. 
Rambo. 



JUNE CLASS REUNIONS 



1898 



Twenty-two members of the class of '98 
lunched together at the Cottage Tea Room, 
Bryn Mawr on June 4. 

The most important person at this twentieth 
reunion was Sarah Ridgway who had just an- 
nounced her engagement to Mr. George Howard 
Bruce. Then came Rebecca Foulke Cregar with 
stories of the new '98 baby — Mary Rebecca 
Cregar and then Anna Dean Wilbur with photo- 
graphs of her ten splendid children, five boys and 
five girls. 

The rest of us were: Martha Tracy, (Dr. 
Tracy) , the new dean of the W 7 oman's Medical 
College of Pennsylvania; Josephine Goldmark, 
working and writing for the National Con- 
sumers' League; Frances Brooks Ackermann, 
our new voter from New York; Mary Sheppard 
who is working with the Charity Organization in 
White Plains, New York; Mary Bright; Dr. 
Jennie Brown; Isabel Andrews; Esther Willi ts 
Thomas; Helen Williams Woodall; Bertha 
Wood; Ullericka Oberge; Edith Schorl Boe- 
ricke; Cora Hardy Jarritt; Mary Githens 
Calvert; Anna Haas; Helen Sharpless; Alice 
Hood; Anna Fry, and Elizabeth Nields Bancroft. 

Almost everyone was deep in some form of war 
relief work and the different reports were very 
interesting. 

Letters were received from Caroline Archer, 
our real farmer; Catherine Bunnell Mitchell, a 
cheerful dweller in the sand dunes of California; 
May Bookstaver Knoblauch; Bertha Brainerd, 
director of the commercial department of the 



Portland Y. M. C. A.; Hannah Carpenter, con- 
valescent "rom a nervous breakdown; Grace 
Clarke Wright with much news of her four fine 
children and their home in Minneapolis; Mar- 
gery De Armond Neill, full of joy in her study of 
metaphysics and her pretty home in Corpus 
Christi, Texas; Juliet Esselbom Geier, deep in 
war relief work; Alice Garnett, head worker at 
the Goodrich Social Settlement, Cleveland; 
Elizabeth Gray; Alice Hammond and Mary 
Moody, successful teachers in New Haven; 
Blanche Harnish Stein who is about to send a 
daughter to Bryn Mawr; Etta Herr and Agnes 
Perkins, living in Wellesley where Agnes teaches; 
Grace Locke who told of her experiences with 
Prussianism when studying in Berlin; Katherine 
Loose, our novelist; Marion Park, dean of 
Simmons College, Boston and Ph.D. Bryn 
Mawr this year; Ella Stones Willard, Anne 
Strong who is one of the organizers of the Vassar 
Summer Course in nursing and is writing for 
the Red Cress courses in nursing; Florence 
Wardwell, who has been working in Washing- 
ton for the Food Administration; Louise War- 
ren, Margaret Coughlin in San Francisco; and 
Elizabeth Holstein Buckingham. 

As there seemed no way to hear from Sophie 
Olsen Bertelsen, we wrote to Mrs. Olsen who 
replied with a charming picture of Sophie's 
home and her three fine children in Roskilde, 
Denmark. Her eldest child, Charlotte, 14, the 
fifth of June is '98's class baby, unfortunately 
she will not come to Bryn Mawr. 

The cTass regalia this year was particularly 
fetching as it included a large dark blue knitting 



80 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[July 



bag. There were no festivities at Bryn Mawr 
where we could show ourselves, but our own 
appreciation was expressed repeatedly. We all 
felt that had the times been more auspicious we 
should have made a remarkedly good showing. 
Elizabeth Nields Bancroft. 

1903 

Ninteen hundred and three celebrated its 
fifteenth anniversary by a reunion supper at the 
College Inn June 3, 1918. The following mem- 
bers were present: Margaretta Stewart Diet- 
rich, Elsie Thomas McGinley, Charlotte Moffitt 
Johnston, Emma Crawford Bechtel, Julia Pratt 
Smith, Agatha Laughlin, Eleanor Deming, 
Elizabeth Snyder, Emma Roberts, Elsie Lowrey, 
Agnes Austin, Virginia Stoddard, Elizabeth 
Utley Thomas, Agnes Sinclair, Helen Fleisch- 
man Mettler, Louise Atherton Dickey, Myra 
Harbeson, Sophie Boucher, Charlotte Morton 
Lanagan, Hetty Goldman and Eleanor Fleisher 
Riesman. 

Miss Patty Thomas came to the Supper to tell 
of the organization and work of the Bryn Mawr 
Service Corps and of the Patriotic Farm. Mar- 
garetta Stewart Dietrich, acting as toastmis- 
tress, called on each of those present for an ac- 
count of her activities during the past years. 

Eight members of 1903 are abroad. 

Elizabeth Shepley Sergeant was sent to France 
by the New Republic to write for this journal 
about conditions abroad. She will remain in 
France as the first member of the Bryn Mawr 
Service Corps. 

Philena Winslow is in Paris working with the 
Y. M. C. A. 

Martha White is also in Paris — she has had 
charge of a surgical dressings depot. 

Margery Cheney has been working for French 
orphans. 

Dr. Marianna Taylor is chief of a children's 
hospital in France. 

Amanda Hendrickson dTncisa, Edith Clothier 
Sanderson, and Maud Spencer Corbett are all 
married and working abroad — Amanda in Paris, 
Edith and Maud in England. 

Elizabeth Snyder is going over to do canteen 
work with the Intercollegiate Community Serv- 
ice Unit of the Y. M. C. A., representing the 
Bryn Mawr Service Corps on this unit. 

Dr. Grace Lynde Meigs is in charge of the 
Division of Hygiene of the Children's Bureau of 
the United States Department of Labor, and as 
such plans the Child Hygiene and Conservation 
movements all over the country. 



Dr. Sally Porter Law McGlannan is taking the 
place of her husband's assistant who has gone to 
the Front. 

Dr. Linda Lange is doing work at Johns Hop- 
kins Hospital. 

Agathe Laughlin is head nurse and anesthetist 
at the Germantown Hospital, Philadelphia. 

Hetty Goldman, after thrilling adventures in 
Greece and the Balkans, in 1913 and 1914, has 
been doing important but not spectacular work 
for the Government. 

Eleanor Deming has been conducting a girls' 
camp in the Adirondacks, teaching domestic 
science and food conservation and doing public 
speaking under the auspices of the College 
Women's Bureau. 

Agnes Sinclair has been doing propaganda 
work for the Liberty Loan in Cedar Rapids, 
Iowa. 

Elsie Thomas McGinley has been conducting 
courses in current topics in Lansdowne, Pa. 

Margaret Field de Motte was married in 
June to Charles Nevill Buck, being given in 
marriage by her son, John Field de Motte. 

Constance Leupp Todd has a second sod. 
She is President of the Consumer's League of 
the District of Columbia. 

May Montague Guild lost her husband and a 
son within a short time. 

Helen Bray ton is farming on a large scale in 
Connecticut. 

Charlotte Moffitt Johnston is one of the or- 
ganizers of the Red Cross at Harrisburg and 
instructs in surgical dressings. 

Gertrude Dietrich Smith is one of the leaders 
in Red Cross work and in the Council of National 
Defense in Connecticut. 

Dorothea Day Watkins is living in Catskill, 
New York, having left Spartanburg on account 
of her husband's health. 

Alice Lovell Kellogg is in Guaquil, Ecuador, 
where her husband is in charge of large mining 
operations. Her trip to South America with 
four small children, the youngest, twins, but a 
few months old, was full of amusing incidents. 

Ethel Hulburd Johnston ran a Community 
Cannery last summer which canned seven thou- 
sand quarts of fruits and vegetables. Last win- 
ter she was in charge of a Red Cross Packing 
Committee in Chicago, which inspected and 
repacked all hospital garments from the Middle 
Western States, about fifty boxes-full a day. 

Helen Calder Wallower is Vice-Chairman of 
the Oklahoma Woman's Committee, Council 
of National Defense, and as City Chairman for 



1918] 



June Class Reunions 



81 



Oklahoma City, organized and started all the 
Council work there. She was also in charge of 
food conservation, in connection with which she 
held a tremendous Food Show and is now erect- 
ing a Community Market. 

Mabel Norton is in charge of the workroom 
for Military Relief of the Pasadena Red Cross, 
working there every day all day. 

Fannie Brown is teaching at the Brearley 
School in New York City. 

Elizabeth B ryan Parker is now living in Orange, 
New Jersey. 

Emily Larrabee is principal of the Pelham 
Manor School. 

Agnes Austin will be one of the principals of 
Miss Hill's School in Philadelphia. 

Julia Pratt Smith has taken Red Cross Hospital 
courses, fitting her to be Nurses' Aid and is now 
working in the Boston City Hospital as Dresser 
in the Surgical Out-Patient Department. 

Sophie Boucher conducts Red Cross work at 
her summer home on Racquette Lake. 

Katherine D. Bull has a large surgical dress- 
ing class in Baltimore. 

Myra Smartt Kruesi has organized food con- 
servation work on a large scale in Chattanooga 
and throughout Tennessee under the auspices of 
the Council of National Defense, of which she is 
County Chairman. She has been talking in all 
of the schools, planning exhibitions, running war 
gardens, addressing Pastor's Associations and 
Farmers' Conventions, playing hostess to many 
boys at Camp Oglethorpe, and in addition, tak- 
ing care of her four children. 

Edith Lodge Kellerman has a fifth boy. 

Margaretta Stewart Dietrich has been doing 
general War Propaganda work in Hastings, 
Neb., as a federal speaker on food production 
and conservation. She is Vice-Chairman for 
Civilian Relief of the Red Cross. She has also 
been teaching French to enlisted men, and most 
patriotically raising sheep and pigs. 

Ninteen hundred and three is represented in 
the Bryn Mawr community by Martha Boyer, 
who is teaching in the Baldwin School, Margaret 
Brusstar, who is head of the department of 
mathematics in the Shipley School, and Elsie 
Lowrey, who is assistant principal at the latter 
school, and in charge of the pupils' Red Cross 
work. 



Emma Crawford Bechtel is raising a family 
and a good crop of vegetables. 

Gertrude Fetterman i s running the Penn Cot- 
tage, a Tea Room at Wynnewood. 

Myra Harbeson is doing editorial work on 
Everybody's. 

Emma Roberts is teaching at the Friends' 
School in Germantown. 

Virginia Stoddard is teaching at the Agnes 
Irwin School, Philadelphia. 

Helen Ditmars Sewall, whose husband, Dr. 
Sewall, is in the United States Army, is teach- 
ing Latin and Spanish in the Bridge ton, New 
York High School and taking care of her family 
besides. 

Carrie Wagner is doing excellent work with 
her girls' and boys' clubs in Germantown. 

Elizabeth Utley Thomas is on a committee for 
the collection and distribution of surplus produce 
in Haverford. 

Helen Fleischman Mettler is canning and pre- 
serving the vegetables that she grows on her 
large estate. 

Louise Atherton Dickey is teaching four 
children, conducting a farm, and preserving 
vegetables by the process of dehydration. 

Doris Earle has been working very hard in the 
Visiting Nurse Society and doing case work for 
the Home Service Section of the Red Cross. 

Elizabeth Eastman is in Winchester, Mass. 
This spring she acted as hostess for the A. C. A. 
Home Club for men in uniform at Province- 
town, Mass. 

Charlotte Morton, who was married last year, 
to Mr. F. R. Lanagan, is interested in City War 
Gardens in Albany, New York. 

Edythe Clark Fairbanks has a baby daughter, 
born in 1917. 

Ida Langdon has been doing war work at 
Elmira, New York, packing supplies, and making 
speeches before all sorts of assemblies to popu- 
larize the Liberty Loan. 

Rosalie Jones has been studying in the School 
of Philanthropy in New York. 

Helen Raymond O'Connor's husband is a 
Captain in the Medical Reserve Corps. 

Eleanor Fleisher Reisman has been active in 
the organization of the Women of South Phila- 
delphia for the Liberty Loan, and is devoting 
much time to Hospital Social Service Work. 
She has a baby daughter, born in 1917. 



82 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[July 



WAR WORK 



THE SERVICE CORPS 

By Abigail Camp Dimon, Secretary 

Since the organization of the Corps and the 
selection of the first two workers as reported in 
the April Quarterly the Joint Administrative 
Committee has considered fifty candidates for 
service abroad. Of these six have not sent in 
formal application blanks and therefore have not 
been definitely considered as yet, twelve have 
either withdrawn or the Committee has decided 
that it cannot help them at present, seven cannot 
obtain passports because they have brothers in 
the service, four are under age, twelve are still on 
the lists to be acted on later or when requests are 
made for work of a special nature, and nine have 
been accepted and appropriations made for their 
support as follows: 

1. Dr. Frederick W. MacCallum head of a 
mission sent to Persia for Armenian and Syrian 
Relief is to be considered a member of the Corps 
and has been given a discretionary fund of $1000 
to be expended in relief work and $350 which is 
estimated as living expenses for six months in 
Persia. The commission consists of six or seven 
members, all men and sailed from Seattle about 
the end of May. Dr. MacCullum is detained 
by the illness of one of his sons who was with the 
British army, and will join them later. One of 
the members of the commission is Dr. Harry 
Pratt Judson, President of the University of 
Chicago, who is especially interested in the 
political effect of the manifestation of good will 
and sympathy on the part of the American 
people towards Persia. 

2. Agnes Morrow, 1912, sailed for France 
about the first of May as a Y. M. C. A. Canteen 
worker. The Service Corps has appropriated 
$2000, which is the estimate of her expenses for 
one year. 

3. Laura Hatch, Fellow in Geology at Bryn 
Mawr, 1912-13, sailed about the middle of June 
as a Y. M. C. A. Canteen worker. The Y. M. 
C. A. had arranged to pay the greater part of her 
expenses and the Service Corps appropriated 
$500 to complete the sum necessary for one 
year's work. 

4. Elizabeth Snyder, 1903, is to go as a mem- 
ber of the Intercollegiate Community Service 
Association unit for Y. M. C. A. Canteen work 
in France. This unit is made up of members 
from different colleges who go in two groups each 
of which hopes to work together as a unit in 
France if circumstances permit. Miss Snyder's 



group is to sail about June 20th and the Service 
Corps pays her full expenses, $2000. 

5. Margaret Bradway, 1915, is to go abroad as 
a Red Cross Canteen worker about the first of 
July. Since graduating she has had an experi- 
ence of several summers in Junior Chautauqua 
work through the state and has been very suc- 
cessful in it. The committee has appropriated 
$900 towards her expenses, the rest being paid 
by the Red Cross. 

6. Marjorie Rawson, 1906, is making arrange- 
ments to go abroad as a Red Cross Canteen 
worker and has been taken as a member of the 
Bryn Mawr Service Corps, paying her own 
expenses. 

7. Esther White, 1906, is working in Russia 
under the American Friends Service Commit- 
tee. She has been there since last summer, 
engaged in relief work in the government of 
Samara, where great numbers of refugees from 
the battle front took refuge during the first two 
years of the war. The Friends plan to continue 
to keep her there and the Service Corps Commit- 
tee has appropriated $500 towards her support. 

8. Anna Jones Haines, 1907, is working in the 
same unit with Esther White and the Committee 
has made the same appropriation for her. 

9. Mary Shenstone, 1913, has been engaged 
in "family rehabilitation" work since graduating 
and the Committee has appropriated $2000 to 
send her abroad if it is possible to arrange. She 
is a British subject and has brothers in the Brit- 
ish army but it is hoped that this may not make 
her going impossible. 

Margaret Bontecou who sailed about the first 
of April is doing Y. M. C. A. Canteen work in 
France and Elizabeth Sergeant continues her 
writing and liason work in Paris. 

The War Council raised the $10,000 that it 
aimed at before the end of the year. The alum- 
nae have promised $12,000 and actually paid 
$7800. Deducting the appropriation given 
above and those made for Miss Bontecou and 
Miss Sergeant the Committee can now count on 
nearly $12,000 in cash and promises. Most of 
the promises will fall due on July first. The 
committee has not lost hope that the restriction 
as to brothers in the service may be removed and 
if it is it would like to send several of the can- 
didates at once. The Y. M. C. A. had accepted 
two of them and the Red Cross has cabled from 
France asking for three others by name. If the 
rule is given up there will be a number of other 
candidates who are holding back now because 
of the impossibility of obtaining passports. In 



1918] 



War Work 



S3 



any case there will undoubtedly be new promis- 
ing applicants for membership in the Corps, calls 
for additional support will come from workers 
who are financed only partially or for a limited 
time and workers already in the field may need 
assistance in continuing the work they are 
doing. The committee expects therefore to 
appropriate by the end of the summer all of the 
money in the treasury. It anticipates that the 
work of the Corps will continue to develop and 
that it will be necessary for the War Council 
and alumnae to continue and even to increase 
their generous support, so the Corps can meet 
the demands made upon it. 

CAROLINE STEVENS COM- 
MENDED 

Caroline Stevens '17, has been commended by 
Major Moorehead, commanding officer of hos- 
pital No. — in France for her bravery and atten- 
tion to duty on a night when the hospital was 
bombed by the Germans. The following is 
taken from a report from Julia C. Stimson, chief 
nurse, American Red Cross in France: 

"Major Moorehead commanding office of 
hospital No. — said he could not speak too 
highly of the efficiency of the nurses. He made 
special mention of their bravery at the time of 
air raids. He particularly mentioned the excel- 
lent work of Miss Turnbull, the nurse in charge, 
and felt that especial praise should be given to 
Miss Elmyra Bears of Cambridge, Mass. (Wal- 
tham Nurses Training School, Waltham, Mass.), 
who gave ether with the greatest calm, all during 
the night of May 29, when bombs were cracking 
all around the hospital. He spoke particularly 
too, of the attention to duty and bravery of Miss 
Louise Dildine of Columbus, Ohio, (Lawrence 
Hospital), Miss Constance Cooke, of Berkeley, 
(Children's Hospital and Alexander Maternity 
Hospital, San Francisco), nurses; and Miss 
Stevens, Miss Harte and Miss Ehret, nurses aids, 
all of whom were on duty at this hospital that 
harrowing night. 

"Major Murphy reported bravery on the part 
of Miss Natalie Scott, a nurse's aid, on the night 

when B was so horribly raided. One 

wing of the hospital was struck and several 
buildings adjacent completely demolished. Al- 
most all the windows were shattered. In an 
annex, nearby, were several American patients 
who had been part of Miss Scott's responsibility. 
Immediately after the bomb fell and destroyed 
the intervening houses, Miss Scott in the pitchy 



darkness, crawled over the pile of bricks and 
broken timbers and made her way into the annex 
to sec how her patients were, and to reassure 
them. A few days later, during another raid, 
Miss Scott, although completely worn out, re- 
mained day and night at the side of a dying 
American patient." 

LETTERS FROM FRANCE 

Margaret Bontecou, '09, who is working with 
the Y. M. C. A. at Brest as a member of the 
Bryn Mawr Service Corps writes the following 
letters about her work at a dry canteen. 

"May 3rd. 

"Almost immediately on reporting to my 
chief, I was assigned to a post left vacant the 
following day, and started in with my work 
almost immediately. The hut contains a dry 
canteen, and I can tell you that my qualifica- 
tions for keeping a country store will be con- 
siderably increased. I shall be doubly expert 
because here I have to handle two kinds of 
money, French and American, and give change 
in both at one time. You'll be interested to hear 
that we sell playing cards, and the men are 
allowed to use them in the huts, and as for the 
tobacco, I have never handled so much in my 
life, from chewing plug up to Pall Malls. 

"Immediately the question of living accom- 
modations came up, and very fortunately, be- 
fore being in the place twenty-four hours, I 
found myself the joint possessor of an apartment 
of three rooms and kitchenette, together with a 
gem of a maid called Josephine. Josephine 
cooks for us, does the marketing, and mending 
and washing except for the sheets and pillow 
cases, blacks our boots, corrects my French, and 
all for 50 fr. a month. The apartment cost 
150 fr. a month, and with everything we expect 
to live on about 400 francs at the outside, apiece, 
which, considering the prices here, is very 
reasonable. 

"There is electricity at every point in the 
apartment, but the plumbing is lacking. One 
faucet in the kitchenette constitutes our supply, 
but it is remarkable how one can adjust oneself 
to such conditions. The only things lacking 
are a cat and a canary. 

"The dining-sitting room contains every- 
thing from a writing desk to a complete outfit 
of spears and Fiji Island clubs. The Metro- 
politan Museum has nothing on us as regards 
Boule cabinets. We use them to keep our tooth 
brushes in." 



84 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[July 



"May 12th. 

"Perhaps you would like to hear what the 
day's program is. Breakfast about 8.30 — 
sounds very lazy, doesn't it, but it is none too 
early. Then after talking over the menu for the 
day with Josephine, I start off for the hut, 
reaching there about 9.30. Two parrots which 
I pass on the way always call out a cheerful 
good morning, which acts as a welcome diver- 
sion. Usually I find the men three deep at the 
canteen counter, so that means plunging in with- 
out any ceremony, selling everything from shoe 
strings up, making change in all kinds of money, 
as any allied coin seems to be in circulation 
now, talking about Newark, N. J., to a man who 
comes from Roseville, listening while a man from 
California tells me what a wonderful state that 
is, giving information (which I often need my- 
self) about everything imaginable. 

"At 12 we close the canteen and take an hour 
or so out for lunch, opening up again at 1.30. 
This session lasts until 5. Then home again, 
supper at 6, canteen at 7. Three nights a week 
we have movies and two afternoons, one night, 
an address of some sort, and one night informal 
stunts. Once a month we are allowed to have 
a dance. Wednesday night, Bible classes. Also 
many French classes all through the week." 

"May 31st. 

"Yesterday afternoon, being Memorial Day, 
we went out to the cemetery where some of our 
men are buried and held a service there with the 
French people. Every grave is marked with a 
white cross, and has been adopted by some 
French woman who keeps it most beautifully 
decorated with growing plants and flowers. In 
this cemetery are graves of all the allied na- 
tions, to say nothing of some Germans. Even the 
latter are well cared for, though the flowers are 
lacking. I wish the families at home could know 
about this and could know that the women here 
who were asked to care for one grave have in 
most cases begged for two or three." 

"June 7. 

"The newest addition to our hut is a soda- 
water fountain, the real article with every sort 
of contrivance. One of the men who was soda- 
fountain clerk for three years is going to give 
us lessons in its operation, and we are hoping 
to start next week." 

"May 18th. 
"Miss Halloran returned Monday night and 
her return means that I can slacken up a bit on 
my work and take a little time off, much as I 



hate to do it, because it is the sort of thing that 
absorbs one terribly. The men are so nice and 
as friendly as can be. They'd give you any- 
thing they had. One man I went to see out in 
the hospital last Sunday and brought him some 
flowers. He has been like a dog at my heels ever 
since, and has saved me many a step. Another 
one brought me a jar of jam, and two very stale 
doughnuts. A third snatched two pies from his 
mess and presented them to us wrapped in news- 
paper. Every little thing you do is so much 
appreciated. 

"If any one tells you again that smoking is not 
allowed in the Y huts, you tell them it's a lie. 
Every night my clothes are permeated with the 
the smell of tobacco, and I shall have to take to 
smoking in self defense. We sell more tobacco 
than anything else, and what I don't know about 
all brands from chewing up isn't worth know- 
ing." 

LETTER FROM ELIZABETH 
SERGEANT 

Paris, May 24, 1918. 

"I am hoping my last letter reached Marion 
Reilly safely. Dr. Devine cabled for three peo- 
ple whose names she sent — I trust the brother 
clause can be got by somehow, for it is a shame 
that it should keep away the people who are 
needed. Can't they be persuaded to apply it 
only to the useless people? 

"I have been writing very steadily for the 
past two months and have sent back (if this is 
interesting!) three articles on the Red Cross and 
one on the Y. M. C. A. and one on the bombard- 
ment of Paris plus a short sketch of the front 
to the New Republic (i. e., six articles in all). I 
have also been to the front (with Mr. Carter of 
the Y. M. C. A. to see their work there) and to 
one of the American Headquarters again. My 
army articles have been delayed by the sudden 
changes but I now hope to finish these up at 
once. 

"I have been living half in Paris half in the 
country. Going back and forth is complicated 
and time-devouring, but on the whole it pays 
for one gets refreshed between whiles. The 
country (i. e., near Paris where of course I have 
to stay) is perhaps less "safe" than town be- 
cause the defense is good now, and the creatures, 
being driven off by the barrage, drop their bombs 
outside. I have learned that a bomb dropped 
on Wednesday night very close to the place I 
have been living. I moved on Tuesday! So it 
goes. One ceases to pay the least attention to 
that sort of thing. I am now at Jong-en- Josas 



1918] 



War Work 



85 



about four miles from Versailles in a little house 
belonging to Mme. Halioz — the sweetest spot 
you can imagine. I have it all to myself, and 
the caretaker feeds me on vegetables from the 
garden. My hostess will be back later. Mean- 
while the sensation of being in a house, and the 
pleasure of a real cold tub in the morning (of 
course hot ones are unknown) all this warm 
weather combine to make me feel almost as if 
I were at home. I have had a cold and a rather 
sharp touch of neuritis (result of sudden change 
from winter to summer) and of holding a pen so 
constantly) so I am taking it easily for a few 
days — though heaven knows I ought not! 

"I had hoped that by June I might be able 
to stop writing for a while and do some canteen 
work for Red Cross or Y. M. C. A. by way of a 
complete change — and another kind of enlight- 
enment. Possibly I still can by the middle of 
June. Joseph Lindon Smith the painter, of 
Medea fame, has just turned up in Y. M. C. A. 
uniform to organise amateur dramatics in the 
army! i.e., to make the men self-sufficing, especi- 
ally at the front. He wants me to help him, 
if only for a month because I know the A. E. F. 
and could give suggestions about organization, 
etc. It would be a very interesting experience: 
Mr. Carter is all in for it, but I fear he may want 
me before I am free. . . . Would the Bryn 
Mawr Service Corps approve of this? I assure 
you that one wishes one had a hundred lives as 
never before! Because there are not enough 
women here for a certain kind of responsible job. 
My two days' experience with the Y. M. C. A. at 
the front made me feel that canteen work by 
women was vitally important, and I hope the 
Y. M. C. A. may decide to use women far more 
than it has yet — as I have said in my article. 
There is no question of the human reward to the 
woman of the work. It is enormous and im- 
mediate. That is why it is tempting to the poor 
scribe — one reason — besides the fact that is the 
real way to understand the A. E. F. 

"Whether or not I can desert my journalistic 
job for a time really depends a good deal on the 
next few weeks' events — we await the offensive 
and know not what may come of it, though we 
are confident, and morale is excellent. 

"It must be lovely at college these May days. 
You are not waked at three A.M. by barrage fire 
and shrapnel on your roof, as I two nights ago! 
But as I look out at the peaceful valley it is just 
as hard for me to believe in it. 

"Best wishes to you all, 

E. S. Sergeant." 



A WORKER AT HOME 

Myra K. Smartt (Mrs. Paul John Kruesi) 
ex-1903 who is chairman of the Woman's Com- 
mittee of the Council of National Defense writes 
from Chattanooga of her duties in the canton- 
ment city and the surrounding country. The 
letter reads: 

"My dear Eleanor: 

"About a week ago I began a letter to Ger- 
trude D. Smith in answer to an appeal to send 
her an account of myself for the 1903 reunion — 
that letter was never finished and now at this 
very last minute I am going to risk sending you 
a little resume of the work I've been doing, be- 
cause I have not been idle. 

"My war work began a year ago when I be- 
gan running a Red Cross Market, taking orders 
for vegetables from my own garden, eggs and 
chickens from my hen-house, and whole wheat 
bread, cracker biscuits, and coffee cake, which 
I myself made. Twice each week I made de- 
liveries to Signal Mountain Inn colony, six 
miles from here, the money I turned into our 
Red Cross Auxiliary Fund. I had a busy sum- 
mer as I canned enough beans, peas, tomatoes 
and soup mixture for my family all winter, spent 
two days each week at Red Cross, and, a half of 
two more marketing my Red Cross vegetables. 

All went well till my oldest daughter broke her 
arm, then I had to give up my market. While I 
stayed at home with her I planned a Food Con- 
servation Exhibit for the Chattanooga District 
Fair, October 1st. It was very interesting work, 
but it was work. I had a table of war breads of 
which I gave a taste of each. Also had a table 
of Soy beans and soy-bean dishes, Soy bean 
bread, etc., to taste. Had a table of 100 caloric 
portions of everyday foods. I tried to have all 
the substitutes for sugar, fats, and wheat. Two 
of us stayed in the exhibit all day long, dressed 
in Hoover aprons and caps, and I never answered 
as many questions in my life. The exhibit was 
a great success, and to my utter amazement I 
found myself called upon to go out and give 
talks and demonstrations. 

It was just at this time that I was made 
County Chairman of the Woman's Committee, 
and work began in earnest. This county is 
about fifty-five miles long and I've covered it 
again and again these last eight months. We 
had a whirlwind campaign for Food Conserva- 
tion, I sp»ke in each of the 44 school houses, then 
went back to each with a patriotic speaker and 
had a parents' meeting. We put on bread con- 



86 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[July 



tests, using substitutes, with special prizes for 
good com bread. 

"In January and February we had what is 
called the Farmers' Short Course. The County 
Farm Agent, the Home Demonstration Agent, 
and several experts from the University of Ten- 
nessee spent a whole day at every school in the 
County giving, in the morning, special instruc- 
tions, to fa mers, urging greater production, 
hog aising, etc. In the Woman's Section we 
had a cooking demonstration, a demonstration 
of setting the table, a clothing demonstration, a 
butter-making exhibit, a cottage cheese demon- 
stration, and I gave a child welfare demonstra- 
tion of bathing the baby, the care and feeding of 
the baby. In the afternoon we had a joint ses- 
sion always, during the last hour, and I had to 
give a talk outlining the work of the Woman's 
Committee, we sold thrift stamps and Liberty 
Bonds as we went, and organized a Red Cross 
Auxiliary wherever possible — as I was asked to 
be the extension agent of the Red Cross. 

Just at the end of this short course my chil- 
dren all four had measles, and my second 
little girl was only out one day when she 
developed a desperate case of scarlet fever. 
I could not get a nurse and had to take entire 
care of her seven weeks. Nurses are so scarce 
in this Cantonment City that I couldn't even 
find a practical nur e to take care of my other 
three children, so had to go in and out of my 
patient's room to plan my household and c ee my 
other babies at least twice a day. It was a very 
trying time for all of us, but we lived through t, 
all of us, and s em normal again, only I will 
never catch up with those seven weeks which 
got ahead of me while I was in quarantine. 

"I am Agriculture Chairman of the Woman's 
Service League and have had to help plan the 
garden campaign for the City and County. 

"One warm Spring day I was out at the new 
Crittendon Home and the four acres of unfilled 
ground seemed so promising that I said I would 
be their Agricultural Chairman. You can 
imagine the job I've had when I tell you we can 
not get farm help here. I finally secured the 
work house force to do my heavy plowing and 
then had to start in to train i he girls to do the 
work. These girls would much rather be in jail 
than work, and especially than work on a farm. 
I found I had to take my hoe or rake or plow and 
go right with them all day long, working harder 
than they. 

"I decided we would have to have a working 
supervisor, so we wrote to Vassar to a Miss 



Campbell who was at the head of the Vassar 
Farm last year. She said she would accept the 
position but we would have to furnish her a farm 
laborer, and some one would have to plan the 
garden as she did not understand planning. 
She didn't come. I tell you this because I am 
sure Bryn Mawr farmerettes are not of that type. 
If you ever hear of any Bryn Mawr girl who 
wants to work and likes hard work please refer 
her to me as my Crittendon Home Farm is a 
millstone around my neck. 

"This farm has taken a great deal of my time 
and energy all Spring. Days when I could get 
away from my hoeing I've had to make another 
tour of the County. We have held an all day 
patriotic meeting at most of my County Wo- 
man's Committee units, outlining the work for 
Childrens' Year and other plans. 

"A year ago I could not make a talk before a 
dozen people, today I tremble and shrink but I 
go ahead, I've made over two hundred talks this 
year, some Thrift Stamp, some Liberty Bond, 
some Red Cross, many Woman's Committee. 
I went before the Chattanooga Pastor's Associ- 
ation three months ago, told them they were not 
using their pulpits as they should, and asked for 
a Food Conservation — or rather Wheat Con- 
servation sermon. 

"The next Sunday I occupied the pulpit at our 
church for a fifteen minute talk, and when I 
finished the minister asked how many in the 
house would agree to do without wheat until 
our next harvest, and every member of the 
audience rose, pledging themselves. I could 
go en with a long recital of the things I've under- 
taken, but I only want to tell you enough to let 
you know I haven't been idle. 

"Three weeks ago I went up to Knoxville to 
make an address before the Farmers Convention 
of Tennessee Farmers. My subject was, 
"Training Our Boys and Girls to Help Solve the 
Labor Shortage in the Farm Home." I suppose 
they felt my Crittenden Home experience would 
help me to solve the problem. I'm sure all of 
us were glad when my talk was over. 

"This winter has been a very trying one in 
Chattanooga because every few days you get a 
letter from some one whose son or brother, hus- 
band or sweetheart is at Oglethorpe and they 
want us to hunt them up; we all of us have 
kept open house all Winter, sometimes as many 
as six soldiers for Sunday dinner. We love it, 
love the men, love to do this little bit for them, 
but the servant question is a big one. I've 
always said I'd rather walk than drive my own 



1918] 



The Bryn Mawr Community Center 



87 



car, but now I drive myself — have to, to get 
there. 

"I've been dictating to a stenographer until 
I can scarcely manage my pen any more. Be- 
fore me here is a typewriter — I'll soon be able to 
type my own letters, I'm sure you are sorry I 
haven't already mastered the machine. 

"I do wonder if you have heard from May 
Montague Guild. Her husband died this win- 
ter and just seven weeks later her dream-baby 
boy, his father's namesake, and May's joy, died 
very, very suddenly. May packed up and took 
the other two children out to California, to get 
away, from herself and every one. 

"Please tell the girls that I love Bryn Mawr and 
1903, 1 hope that some of you still remember me, 
I remember each one of you and long to be with 



you this reunion time. I do need the inspiration 
and wish I could be there to get it. 

"My service flag bears three stars, and my 
one desire is to serve my country as my three 
splendid brothers are doing. Please send me any 
accounts of the reunion that are available. 

"I've moved my family from our town house 
to our mountain home this last week, my house 
girl deserted me the day of the move and I've 
had only one assistant hence my delay in writing. 

"Please excuse haste in writing and in com- 
position. 

Always Faithfully 

Myra Smartt Kruesi, 

Signal Mountain. 
Sunday. 



THE BRYN MAWR COMMUNITY CENTER 

By Hilda Worthington Smith, Director 



The Community Center, we are glad to be- 
lieve, has at last, at the beginning of its third 
year of work, passed the experimental stage. 
Because it is meeting a genuine demand in the 
community, the work is rapidly expanding. 
From up and down Lancaster Pike, from the 
tiny houses on the Italian district of Whitehall, 
from the comfortable homes on the shady back 
streets come the children to our playground and 
kindergarten, and the older people to the lec- 
tures and club meetings at the Center. One of 
the volunteers, coming in on a busy Saturday 
morning last year, remarked, "Why, the Com- 
munity is so thick that you can't see the Center." 

On that day there was a dramatic rehearsal 
in one side of our large room, a meeting of the 
Little Mothers' League in the other, story tell- 
ing and registration of books in the reading 
room, a violin lesson in the kitchen, a mandolin 
lesson in the office, a lively game of quoits in the 
hall, and a game of checkers on the cellar stairs. 
As a climax to a busy morning, the Director 
stumbled in the hall over a brown paper parcel — 
which squawked — and found two live hens, 
waiting to be cooked for the Italian supper that 
night. 

This spring it became impossible to st niggle 
along in these rooms in the back of the Public 
School, where thirty activities were carried on 
in space only adequate for five. Our one large 
room was in a state of constant transformation 
from school lunch-room to kindergarten, from 
kindergarten to gymnasium, from gymnasium 



to Night School class room, or lecture hall. Our 
books and our boys were overflowing the little 
reading-room. The necessity of constantly 
shifting equipment, of sorting out different 
groups of people going and coming, and the 
difficulty of keeping the rooms quiet for business 
meetings or lectures made it impossible for the 
work to develop. We asked the School Board 
for more room in the building, or for permission 
to alter certain unused parts of it for our own 
purposes. In spite of a petition signed with 
hearty endorsement by all our prominent tax- 
payers and business men, our main requests 
were refused, although to meet the pressure of 
public opinion one more room was given to us. 
This we promptly turned over our to kinder- 
garten and to the Italian Night School for daily 
use 

In April we decided to rent a charming old 
colonial house on Lancaster Avenue, one of the 
first houses in Bryn Mawr, set back in its shady 
yard, two blocks from the Community Center. 
This house we have named "The Milestone" as 
the oldest stone in the vicinity is just outside the 
gate, and the house marks a definite step in our 
progress. The big sunny front room is the 
library, presided over now by a part-time li- 
brarian. There was no public library in Bryn 
Mawr, and we have made a small start, hoping 
that later several collections of books may be 
consolidated and eventually turned over to the 
town. At present our fear is that we shall soon 
have to move all our books again, as they are 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[July 



increasing so fast that one large room will no 
longer hold them. 

Across the hall is a smaller room with a big 
fireplace, and a deep window seat, used for com- 
mittee meetings, club parties and other social 
occasions. Just next our pantry, it is con- 
venient for serving refreshment. Comfortable 
wicker chairs, water-colors, and gay cretonne 
curtains all help to make this room attractive. 
Here our newly organized Franco-American 
Alliance, and the British Association started 
this spring. The Main Line Canning Commit- 
tee, the Hospital Social Service Committee, and 
many others all use this room for their meetings. 
Upstairs there is a larger club room for women, 
a green and brown room, with a piano and gas 
stoves. The girls from the laundry and from 
some of the stores along the Pike come here every 
day for their noon hour to eat their lunch, and 
several clubs of women, white or colored, meet 
in the evenings for sewing or Red Cross work. 
The big office and work room is on this floor too, 
furnished largely with old desks and bookcases 
left stranded in the college attics. Upstairs on 
the third floor the Girl Scouts, two troops of 
them, have their meetings, and are helping to 
furnish the rooms. Even in these two months 
it has meant a great deal to the Center to have 
such an attractive home for our girls' and 
women's activities. 

Our old rooms in the Public School still house 
the little children and the boys, our Night 
School, kindergarten, and any big lectures, 
exhibits, plays or entertainments. Here at 
noon on every school day we serve a hot lun- 
cheon at three cents a dish to the eighty or more 
children who march in with their bowls and 
spoons to the long tables. In the afternoon our 
thirty kindergarten children have no sooner left 
the building than the older children are waiting 
at the door for their clubs and classes — gym- 
nastics and folk-dancing, handicrafts, cooking, 
dramatics, story hour or playground work. A 
sewing class last year included two small boys, 
who sewed assiduously until they found they 
were not allowed to wear a thimble on every 
finger. A fairy play which was rehearsed on 
the same day chosen by a cooking class threat- 
ened to be broken up by one small cook, who 
wept because she could not have a pair of pixie 
wings pinned on her shoulders. 

In the basement the boys have fitted up a 
game room, with two pool tables, quoits and 
boxing gloves, and a bewildering array of flags 
and posters on the walls. At first the rivalry 



between the four different clubs which used the 
room was so intense that a daily list of broken 
windows and an occasional black eye resulted. 
Now an embryonic self government system is in 
force, and there is comparative peace. Next 
winter we hope to have our large room upstairs 
altered for a gymnasium, and then it will be 
more possible to provide occupation for the 
crowd of older boys who haunt our doors during 
the winter evenings. 

The Italian Night School, with twenty-five 
men, meets five times a week for instruction in 
English, American history, civics, etc., in prep- 
aration for their citizenship papers. After 
each lesson we have an hour of singing, thor- 
oughly enjoyed by teachers and pupils. The 
men spell out with difficulty the words of the 
American songs, but throw themselves heartily 
into their own folk songs or arias. Several jolly 
parties have been given by these men for their 
friends, but they invariably are unwilling to 
include the women. So we are starting work in 
the Whitehall district, with the Italian women at 
home. Ten of these women have been studying 
English this winter, and now we have found a 
large group of children whose mothers are eager 
to have us open a second kindergarten for them 
in this district. 

Our usual series of fortnightly lectures and 
entertainments has been continued this winter, 
under the management of Miss Mary Jeffers. 
Travel talks, lectures on the war, and patriotic 
addresses have been varied with concerts and 
food demonstrations, given to audiences varying 
from fifty to two hundred and fifty people 
Electricity, recently installed, will make it pos- 
sible for us to operate our own lantern another 
year. Outside organizations make frequent use 
of our rooms. Suppers given by the Garage 
Men's Association, tableaux arranged for the 
Red Cross by the Sons of Italy, meetings of the 
Main Line Idle Hour Croquet Club or the 
Colored Debating Society are equally welcome. 
This last named organization chose as the sub- 
ject of a debate: "Resolved: that it is largely 
the fault of men that women are so little 
respected." 

The summer playground is a special feature of 
the work of the Center. One hundred children 
on an average come every day for regular play- 
ground activities, under the direction of a trained 
leader. This is a branch of the work especially 
appreciated by the parents, who are glad to get 
children away from the hot and dusty Pike dur- 
ing the long summer days. Inside the building, 



1918] 



The Bryn Mawr Community Center 



89 



in summer, our rooms are given up to canning. 
Over 8000 jars of fruit were preserved last year, 
besides a large quantity of dried vegetables. 

In cooperation with other Bryn Mawr or- 
ganizations, the Center has taken an active part 
in Community Christmas Trees, Clean-up Cam- 
paigns, Baby Weeks, Child Labor Exhibits, and 
other community movements. It is our hope 
to develop next year a campaign for a school 
nurse, and some plan of probation work for our 
unruly boys. During these two years of war, 
we have tried to help in every form of patriotic 
work. Recently twelve girls' clubs along the 
Main Line have formed a federation, on the 
Patriotic League basis, with their headquarters 
at the Center. Two clubs at a time arranged a 
series of competitive suppers, served for one 
hundred people, as demonstrations of food con- 
servation. Several patriotic mass meetings for 
girls have been held; at one of these Mrs. Wil- 
liam Roy Smith and Dean Helen Taft were the 
speakers. A special effort to start some much 
needed vocational work among the girls re- 
sulted in two evenings of conferences on ste- 
nography, farming, salesmanship, telephone 
operating and other occupations open to women. 
At present this Patriotic League is canvassing 
and registering girls as summer volunteers for 
work with the Canning Committee, the Red 
Cross and the Community Center. Two First 
Aid classes have been arranged by the Center, 
and it has taken part in campaigns for thrift 
stamps, in patriotic song festivals and other 
forms of community work. 

It is with the heartiest appreciation that the 
Community Center Committee thinks of the 
help given us during these past two years by the 
College. More than eighty students have taken 
an active part this year in the work of the Cen- 
ter, sixty of them giving two hours a week regu- 
larly, and others doing occasional work, such as 
poster making or helping with entertainments. 
Although at first this help could not always be 
counted on, during this past winter the students 
have been very regular. Each volunteer is 
asked to register at the Center for work, and is 
placed according to her ability or previous ex- 
perience. She is notified that she will be dropped 
if her work is not regular. Students have been 
acting as assistants in clubs of classes for chil- 
dren — cooking, basketry, gymnastics, folk- 
dancing, etc. — as dramatic coaches, library 
helpers, playground workers, night school 
teachers, piano players, publicity workers, cleri- 



cal assistants, Girl Scout leaders, and in many 
other capacities. Three of the graduate stu- 
dents from the Carola Woerishoffer Department 
have been doing their field work at the Center, 
and have rendered valuable assistance. This 
year in addition to their practical work, each 
student worker has been asked to come to a fort- 
nightly conference, and to do a small amount of 
recommended reading following the line of her 
practical work. These conferences, led often 
by outside social workers, have been well 
attended. 

An attempt is to be made this coming winter 
to standardize the practical work of the students 
so that there may be regular advancement from 
less skilled work, such as clerical helpers, or 
class assistants, to the more skilled service of 
club leaders, club organizers, and assistant super- 
visors. Any break in the work of the students, 
such as Christmas vacation or a long period of 
quarantine, shows us in how many ways we use 
their help. Indeed, it is not too much to say 
that during these two years of experiment, the 
work of the Center could not have been de- 
veloped without it. 

Many of the College staff and faculty have also 
given us valuable help. Miss Reed, the Col- 
lege librarian, has been Chairman of our library 
committee until this spring, when it was taken 
over by Mrs. David W. Horn. Members of the 
faculty have given lectures and concerts at the 
Center, and have served on various committees. 
The Christian Association has during our two 
years of work given $500 to the Center, besides its 
active help through the Social Service Commit- 
tee. The interest and support of the boarding 
schools in Bryn Mawr has also been most en- 
couraging. The Baldwin School has placed its 
tennis courts and athletic fields at our disposal 
for the past three summers, and teachers from 
this and other schools have given of their scanty 
leisure for night school teaching, lectures, or 
committee work. This general interest in the 
Center shown by the many different groups in 
the community has made possible rapid devel- 
opments. Even in war time, a request for 
volunteer help has rarely been refused. 

These many volunteers., however, demand 
constant direction and supervision, and it is not 
possible to give them this at present with our 
inadequate number of regular workers. Next 
year we hope for salaries for three more trained 
workers— «f or the supervision of children's 



90 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[July 



classes, for adulc activities, and for our constant 
publicity work. With our increased running 
expenses at the Milestone, our present budget is 
far too small. The Community Center needs 
the support of the Alumnae, as well as of the 
present college community. Come and see the 
Center in operation when you are back to Bryn 
Mawr, and in the meantime, send us a contri- 
bution, however, small, to meet our many needs. 
We should be glad to know that many more 
Alumnae were having a share in our work, 
which is bringing the college in close touch with 
the community of which it is a part. 



NEW BUREAU AT CLEVELAND 

Cleveland is making an effort to aid in meet- 
ing the demand for Trained Women in all fields 
of work, by the establishment of a Bureau of 
Occupations for Trained Women, in the State- 
City Labor Exchange. The Bureau is in a posi- 
tion to give advice and assistance to college 
graduates who are interested in finding positions 
in or near Cleveland in business, social work, 
library work, home economics and many special 
branches of opportunity. No charge is made to 
either applicant or employer. 

Further information may be secured from the 
Secretary, Miss Lucy M. Park, Room 108, City 
Hall, Cleveland, Ohio. 



COURSES IN INDUSTRIAL SUPERVISION OFFERED BY THE 
CAROLA WOERISHOFFER DEPARTMENT 



The National War Council of the Y. W. C. A., 
realizing that there are few women with sufficient 
training available for positions as industrial 
supervisors of women in industry, has offered to 
Bryn Mawr College a sum of money to meet the 
expenses of a training course to prepare women 
under the Carola Woerishoffer Graduate De- 
partment. The object of the course is to pre- 
pare women who are college graduates for in- 
dustrial positions through which they may aid 
in the solution of the present industrial problems 
affecting women. These problems have arisen 
as a result of the increasing number of women, 
both single and married, being employed either 
because of the expansion of industry or because 
of the drafting of men for the army. The posi- 
tions for which such courses prepare them are 
employment managers, industrial superin- 
tendents of women's work, welfare superin- 
tendants, industrial secretaries, and leaders, 
investigators of industrial problems affecting 
women and factory inspectors. 

The plan provides for three groups of courses, 
one beginning June 17, 1918, one beginning 
October 1, 1918, and one February 1, 1919. 
These courses will last for eight months. The 
work in the summer will be for one month at 
Bryn Mawr and for three months in New Eng- 
land factories under the supervision of Miss 
Anne Bezanson, who is to have charge of the 
work in labor courses at Bryn Mawr next year. 
The fall work will be the regular courses offered 
under the Department and coooperating de- 
partments of the college together with additional 
courses in industrial hygiene and employment 



management. The field work will be conducted 
in the industrial establishments in and about 
Philadelphia and the training in factory inspec- 
tion will be carried on in cooperation with the 
State Department of Labor and Industry. 
Scholarships to the value of $300 are being 
offered by the War Council of the Y. W. C. A. 
The minimum expense will be about $400. 
There is a very large demand for women to fill 
the positions for which these courses will prepare 
them. 

The purpose of the course has the hearty en- 
dorsement of Mr. Felix Frankfurter, chairman 
of the United States Labor Policies Board and 
effective cooperation is assured. The course is 
planned with the endorsement of the office of the 
Secretary of War and the general scheme is fully 
approved by Dr. E. M. Hopkins, in charge of 
Industrial Relations of the Quartermaster's 
Department. The Commissioner of Labor and 
the Department of Labor and Industry of 
Pennsylvania earnestly second this endeavor to 
meet the present industrial needs and will accord 
the fullest cooperation and assistance in carry- 
ing out the proposed training. 

On the seventeenth of June the first group of 
students began work at Bryn Mawr, living at 
Lysyfran and taking their meals at Low Build- 
ings. There are twelve students in all, among 
whom are graduates of Smith, Radcliffe, Welles- 
ley, Cornell, Mills, and other colleges and uni- 
versities of the West and South. Some of these 
have done graduate work at Bryn Mawr, Rad- 
cliffe, Cornell, and the University of Pennsyl- 
vania. The students are large y recruited from 






1918] 



News from the Classes 



91 



the ranks of teachers; all have been out of col- 
lege two years or more. Three are graduates of 
the class of 1917, two of 1916; the others are 
graduates of from four to ten years standing. 
One student has been in the School of Archi- 
tecture at Columbia, and expects to use her 
industrial training in the field of industrial hous- 
ing. Two students have had secretarial ex- 
perience. 

During this month the field work of the stu- 
dents has been in the nature of observation 
visits to industrial establishments. Interesting 
trips have been made to the Eddystone Muni- 



tions Plant, the Miller Lock Company, the 
Fayette R. Plumb Company, the General Elec- 
tric Co., and others. On the thirteenth of July 
the students leave for New England to spend all 
their time in industrial establishments to which 
we have been introduced by the office of the 
Secretary of War. 

The interest in the course is widespread, and 
the attitude of people generally, as judged by the 
number of inquiries and applications up to the 
present time, is indicative of the need for such 
training in the present emergency. 



NEWS FROM THE CLUBS 



NEW YORK 

President, Mrs. Shepard Morgan; vice-presi- 
dent, Mrs. John F. Russell, Jr.; secretary, Miss 
Fannie Baker; treasurer, Mrs. Rutger Miller. 

The annual dinner of the club was given in 
honor of President Thomas who spoke on the 
work of the college and of the alumnae in the 
war. The other speakers were alumnae who are 
especially identified with war work, Dr. Ida 
Ogilvie for the land army, Miss Marion Reilly 
for the service corps, Mrs. F. Louis Slade for war 
savings stamps and Mrs. John F. Russell, Jr., 
for the Liberty Loan. Capt. Baldenpefer, now 
exchange professor at Columbia, also spoke. 

The club has established a new class of mem- 
bership called associates with ones of two dollars 
a year and partial privileges of the house. 

During the spring and until July 1 the house 
and restaurant have been unusually full. The 
restaurant is closed during July and August, but 
members may take rooms and have breakfast 
served. The Cosmopolitan Club has very 



kindly offered during these two months to the 
Bryn Mawr Club. 

In the spring the house committee installed 
electric lights and the year has been so profitable 
as to permit making improvements for the com- 
fort of the house in cold weather and redecor- 
ating the main floor and hallways. 

PITTSBURGH 

At the annual meeting of the Pittsburgh club 
in May the following officers were elected: presi- 
dent, Miss Helen Schmidt; vice-president, Miss 
Sarah T. Ellis; treasurer, Mrs. Frederick B. 
Chalpart; secretary, Miss Henrietta Magoffin. 

The club has again awarded for the second 
time a scholarship of $200 for the student in 
Allegheny County having the highest average 
in entrance examinations. 

The club has adopted a French orphan, holds 
Liberty Bonds, and has one star on its service 
flag, as Miss Rena BLxler is now in France doing 
volunteer war relief work. The club still cares 
for a ward of the juvenile court, Pittsburgh. 



NEWS FROM THE CLASSES 



1890 

Marian T. Macintosh spoke in Chapel one 
morning this spring on the opportunity for col- 
lege women to organize women in their com- 
munities for farm work this summer. 

1892 

Edith Wetherne Ives lost her youngest child, 
Margaret Newbold Ives, who was born June 
25, 1909, on March 16. 



1893 

Lida Adams (Mrs. Frank N. Lewis) returned 
to America in May on the Shinyo Maru. Mr. 
and Mrs. Lewis have spent the last eighteen 
months in Japan. 

1894 

Edith Hamilton of the Bryn Mawr School 
spoke on teaching at the vocational conference 
held at Bryn Mawr on April 13. 

Man- 5reed of the Carnegie Institution of 
Technology also spoke at this conference. 



92 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[July 



Ethel Walker is directing a tutoring school for 
girls at Simsbury, Conn. The session is from 
July 22 to September 21. The school is under 
the same management as the Roxbury Tutoring 
School for Boys and will have many of the same 
teachers. 

Abby Brayton Durfee is chairman of the de- 
partment of education, Woman's Committee of 
the Council of National Defense, executive com- 
mittee of the War Savings Stamps and active in 
Red Cross work. 

Emma Bailey Speer as president of the 
National Y. W. C. A. is chairman ex-officio of 
the War Work Council of the Y. W. C. A. 

Louise Tring Weill is Pennsylvania chairman 
of the Woman's National League for the Con- 
servation of Platinum. 

Elizabeth M. Clark is in Switzerland in charge 
of the work among the foreign women students. 

1895 

Susan Fowler, of the Brearley School, spoke 
on teaching at a vocational conference held at 
Bryn Mawr on April 13. 

Elizabeth Bent (Mrs. Herbert C