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Full text of "Bryn Mawr College Calendar, 1910"

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LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



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Bryn Mawr College 



CALENDAR 



REGISTER OF ALUMNA AND FORMER 

STUDENTS 



1910 




TRUSTEES 



Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania. 
Published by Bryn Mawr College, 

January, 1910. 



Volume III. Part 1. 



Bryn Mawr College 



CALENDAR 



REGISTER OF ALUMNA AND FORMER 

STUDENTS 



1910 



COMPILED AND TABULATED 



BY 



ISABEL MADDISON, B.Sc, Ph.D., 
Assistant to the President and Associate in Mathematics. 



Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania. 

Published by Bryn Mawr College. 
Vol. III. Part 1. January, 1910. 

Entered as second-class matter, March ZSrd, 1908, at the post-office, Bryn Mawr, 
Pennsylvania, under Act of July 16th, 1894. 



Printed by the John C. Winston Co., 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



■W / 



Bryn Mawr College Calendar. 
1910. 

Pakt 1. Register of Alumnse and Former Students. 

Part 2. Graduate Courses. 

Part 3. Undergraduate and Graduate Courses. 

Part 4. Academic Buildings and Halls of Residence, 
Plans and Descriptions. 



£rt 



Register of Alumnae and Former Students. 
Table of Contents. 

PAGE 

Doctors of Philosophy of Bryn Mawr College 5 

Masters of Arts of Bryn Mawr College 6 

Bachelors of Arts of Bryn Mawr College 9 

Associate Members of the Alurnnse Association 40 

Holders of European Fellowships 53 

Holders of Resident Fellowships 55 

Former Graduate Students .• 64 

Former Undergraduate Students 84 

Married names of Alumnae and former Students 114 

Present Graduate Students 126 

Present Undergraduate Students 129 

Statistics 147 



This abbreviated form of the Register will be published in alternate 
years, the longer form giving the academic record of eacb student in 
January, 1911, and again in January, 1913. 



Doctors of Philosophy of Bryn Maivr College. 

Bartlett, Helen, 
Care of American Express Co., 5 and G Haymarket, London, England. 

Bourland, Caroline Brown, Peoria, 111. 

Breed, Mary Bidwell, 

Read Hall, Columbia, Mo., or Care of Morgan, Harjes & Co., rue 
Haussmann, Paris, France (1909-10). 

Bunting, Martha, 2787 Broadway, New York City. 

Byrnes, Esther Fussell, 

193 Jefferson Avenue, Brooklyn, New York City. 

Claflin, Edith Frances, 

Monticello Seminary, Godfrey, 111. Summer: Felton Hall, Cam- 
bridge, Mass. 

Ellis, Ellen Deborah, 

Mt. Holyoke College, South Hadley, Mass. Summer: 2319 Green 
Street, Philadelphia. 

Emery, Annie Crosby, 163 George Street, Providence, R. I. 

Married, 1905, Professor Francis Orecnleaf Allinson. 

Evers, Helen Margaret 508 South 5th Street, Columbia, Mo. 

Franklin, Susan Braley, 

Ethical Culture School, 33 Central Park West, New York City. 
Summer: The Ferry House, Jamestown, R. I. 

Gentry, Ruth, Stilesville, Ind. 

Gwinn, Mary, 33 East Mount Vernon Place, Baltimore, Md. 

Married, 1904, Mr. Alfred Hodder. 

Hall, Edith Hayward, Woodstock, Conn. 

Hussey, Mary Inda, 8 Ocean Pathway, Ocean Grove, N. J. 

King, Helen Dean, Bryn Mawr. Pa. 

Laird, Elizabeth Rebecca, 

Mt. Holyoke College, South Hadley, Mass. 

Leftwich, Florence, Biltmore. N. C. 

Married. 1903, Mr. S. Prioleau Ravenel. 

Lord, Eleanor Louisa, 

232G North Charles Street, Baltimore. Md. summer: 46 Auburn 
Street, Maiden. Mass. 

Lowater, Frances, Bryn Mawr. Pa. 

Lyon, Dorothy Wilberforce, 571 Westminster Avenue, Elizabeth, N. J. 
Married, 1000. Mr. Emmons Bryant. 

MacDonald, Margaret Baxter State College, Pa. 

Maddison, Isabel, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Martin, Emilie Norton, ..Mt. Holyoke College, South Hadley, Mass. 

(5) 



6 Masters of Arts 

Neilson, Nellie, Mt. Holyoke College, South Hadley, Mass. 

Parris, Marion Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Peebles, Florence, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Perkins, Elizabeth Mary, .... 1355 Irving Street, Washington, D. C. 

Ragsdale, Virginia, : Jamestown, N. C. 

Reimer, Marie, East Aurora, N. Y. 

Ritchie, Mary Helen, 
Died, 1905. 

Schaeffer, Helen Elizabeth, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Married, 1908, Dr. William Bashford Huff. 

Stevens, Nettie Maria, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Stites, Sara Henry, Wyoming, Pa. 

Sweet, Marguerite, 250 West 72nd Street, New York City. 

Traver, Hope, Hartford, Conn. 

Urdahl, Margerethe, Charleston, 111. 

Married, 1906, Mr. Lewis Albert Anderson. 

Warren, Winifred, 805 Comstock Avenue, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Married, 1902, Mr. George Arthur Wilson. 

Willis, Gwendolen Brown, 941 Lake Avenue, Racine, Wis. 

Wood, Ida, 2038 Spring Garden Street, Philadelphia. 



Masters of Arts of Bryn Mawr College. 

Adaire, Nannie, 1904, 1227 West Lehigh Avenue, Philadelphia. 

Albert, Grace, 1897, .The Students' Inn, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Allen, Hope Emily, 1905, 
26 D Shepard Street, Cambridge, Mass. Summer: Kenwood. N. Y. 

Bartlett, Helen, 1892, See page 5. 

Bates, Theodora, 1905, 35 Brewster Street, Cambridge, Mass. 

Bennett, Ethel Mary, 1905, Sharon Hill, Pa. 

Married, 1906, Dr. Arthur Parker Hitchens. 

Blake, Sue Avis, 1898, 

Merion, Pa. Summer: Bradford Hills, West Chester, Pa. 

Bliss, Eleanor Frances, 1904, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Boring, Alice Middleton, 1904, 

University Inn, Orono, Me. Summer: 931 Fairmount Avenue, 
Philadelphia. 

Branson, Anna Mary, 1903, 114 Main Street, Coatesville, Pa. 

Breed, Mary Bidwell, 1894, See page 5. 

Brownell, Jane Louise, 1893, - Bryn Mawr, Pa. 



Masters of Arts 7 

Buffum, Marianna Nicholson, 1902, 

Care of Michigan Central Railroad, Grayling, Mich. 
Married, 1908, Mr. Perry Childs Hill. 

Bunker, Maeie Rowland, 1907, , Overbrook, Philadelphia. 

Byrnes, Esther Fussell, 1S91, ,. . See page 5. 

Clark, Mabel Parker, 1889, ... 145 West 78th Street, New York City. 
Married, 1894, Dr. John Henry Huddleston. 

Dimon, Abigail Camp, 1896, 367 Genesee Street, Utica, N. Y. 

Ellis, Ellen Deborah, 1901, See page 5. 

Farnham, Lois Anna, 1900, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Married, 1903, Professor David Wilbur Horn. 

Fay, Mary Luella, 1897, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Flickinger, Alice, 1906, 

227 Orchard Avenue, Webster Groves Station, St. Louis, Mo. 

Fowler, Eugenia, 1901, 90 Morningside Avenue, West, New York City. 
Married, 1909, Mr. M. K. Neale. 

Gardner, Julia Anna, 1905, 

Maryland Geological Survey, Baltimore, Md. 

Ghes, Ellen Rose, 1896, 87 via Roma, Sassari, Sardinia. 

Goff, Leah, 1889, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Haines, Jane Bowne, 1891, Cheltenham, Pa. 

Hamilton, Edith, 1894, 

1312 Park Avenue, Baltimore, Md. Summer: Mackinac, Mich. 

Harris, Elizabeth, 1890, Clayton, Mo. 

Married, 1890, Professor Edward Harrison Reiser. 

Heritage, Gertrude Langden, 1896, 

120 North 18th Street, Philadelphia. Summer: Mt. Gretna, Pa. 

Hodge, Helen Henry, 1900, 

301 South Franklin Street, Wilkes Barre, Pa. 

Hopkins, Mary Delia, 1S96, Clinton, N. Y. 

Houghton, Katharine Martha, 1900, 

133 Hawthorn Street, Hartford, Conn. 
Married, 1904, Dr. Thomas Norval Hepburn. 

Hoyt, Helen Strong, 1897, 

Care of Brown, Shipley & Co., 123 Pall Mall. London. England. 

Jeffers, Mary, 1895, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Johnson, Miriam Leigh, 1905, ...4037 Girard Avenue, Philadelphia. 

Jonas, Anna Isabel, 1904, Bridgeton, N. J. 

Jones, Grace Latimer, 1900, ..1175 East Broad Street, Columbus, O. 

'King, Georgiana Goddard, 1S96, 

Low Buildings. Bryn Mawr. Pa. Summer: Saranac Inn, Upper 
Saranac, N. Y. 

Lamberton, Helen, 1907, 753 Corinthian Avenue, Philadelphia. 



8 Masters of Arts 

Latimer, Caroline Wormeley, 1896, 

823 Hamilton Terrace, Baltimore, Md. 

Lee, Elva, 1893, Randolph, N. Y. 

Locke, Grace Perley, 1898, 179 State Street, Portland, Me. 

LOWENGRUND, HELEN MOSS, 1906, 

1827 North 18th Street, Philadelphia. 

Montgomery, Amelia, 1905, 1461 Vermont Street, Quincy, 111. 

Moser, Lillian Virginia, 1893, 

The Waynflete School, 65 State Street, Portland, Me. 

Neilson, Nellie, 1893, See page 6. 

Nichols, Content Shepard, 1899, 

Low Buildings, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Summer: 95 Carroll Street, 
Binghamton, N. T. 

Oberge, Ullericka Hendrietta, 1898, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Olsen, Sophie Yhlen, 1898, . . .Kastelsvej 25, Copenhagen, Denmark. 
Married, 1902, Dr. Henrik Bertelsen. 

O'Neil, Elizabeth Breading, 1903, . .Forrest Avenue, Ben Avon, Pa. 

Park, Marion Edwards, 1S98, Oberlin, O. 

Perkins, Agnes Frances, 1898, . .Wellesley College, Wellesley, Mass. 

Pettit, Edith, 1895, ....618 South Washington Square, Philadelphia. 
Married, 1907, Mr. Adolphe E. Borie,- 3rd. 

Rambo, Eleanor Ferguson, 1908, 

1920 North Camac Street, Philadelphia. 

Rembaugh, Bertha, 1897, 1 Broadway, New York City. 

Rhoads, Anna Ely, 1889, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Married, 1S97, Professor William Coffin Ladd. 

Rice, Edith Florence, 1907, 

647 West Phil-Elleua Street, Mt Airy, Philadelphia. 

Ritchie, Mary Helen, 1896, See page (3. 

Robinson, Virginia Pollard, 1906, 

1710 Rosewood Avenue, Louisville, Ky. 

Sampson, Edith F., 1890. 

Married, 1895, Professor John Howell Wesicott. Died, 1905. 

Sampson, Lilian Vaughan, 1891. 

409 West 117th Street, New York City. 
Married, 1904, Professor Thomas Hunt Morgan. 

Sandison, Helen Estabrook, 1906, 

Care of American Express Co., 5 and 6 Haymarket, London. Eng- 
land. Summer: 404 N. Centre Street. Terre Haute. Ind. 

de Schweinitz, Agnes, 1899, 

11 Cummings Apartments, First and D Streets, Salt Lake City. 
Utah. 
Married, 1908, Mr. Edward Robins Zalinski. 
Scott, Margaret, 1904, 4402 Pine Street, Philadelphia. 



Bachelors of Arts '.i 

Seymour, Elizabeth Day, 1897, 

34 Hillhouse Avenue, New Haven, Conn. 

Shields, Emily Ledyard, 1905, 

Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore, Md. Summer: 1902 West 6th 
Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Smith, Clara Lyford, 1907, 2G35 Park Avenue, St. Louis, Mo. 

Smith, Helen Twining, 1907, Havre de Grace, Md. 

Stites, Sara Henry, 3899 See page 6. 

Stoddard, Virginia Tryon, 1903, • Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Temple, Maud Elizabeth, 1904, 

22 Shepard Street, Cambridge, Mass. Summer: 28 Highland 
Street, Hartford, Conn. 

Thomas, Annie Heath, 1S97, 

S. E. Cor. 5Sth Street and Florence Avenue, Philadelphia. 

Thomas, Miriam, 1902, Haverford, Pa. 

Thompson, Charlotte de Macklot, 1896, 

The Terraces, Camden, S. C. 

Towle, Elizabeth Williams, 1898, 

The Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Summer: Care of Mr. II. 
L. Towle, 150 Nassau Street, New York City. 

Towle, Mary Rutter, 1899, 

107 Waverly Place, New York City. Summer: Wakefield, Mass. 

Trimble, Helen Bell, 1902, 

838 Highland Avenue, West Philadelphia. 

Yickers. Florence Childs, 1898, 

31S West Adams Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 
Married, 1905, Mr. Frank Allister McAllister. 

Walker. Ethel, 1894, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Wines. Emma Stansbury, 1894, Beaufort. N. C. 



Barlielors of Arts of Bryn jfavr College. 

Abbott, Madeline Yaughan, 1893. 

Married. 1899, Mr. Charles Elmer Bushnell. Died. 1904. 

Adair, Edith. 1909, 102S North 17th Street. Philadelphia. 

Adaire. Nannie, 1904. See page 6. 

Adams. Ei.tza Raymond. 180?,. 

4 West St. Joseph Street, Indianapolis. Ind. 
Married, 1895, Mr. Frank 'Nichols Leiois. 

Adams, Sophie Frances. 1902. 

437 West Price Street, Germantown, Philadelphia. 
Married. 1904, Mr. Bascom Johnson. 



10 Bachelors of Arts 

Axbee, Makia Ha wes, 1904, 

Rockefeller Hall, Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Summer: 
Care of Mrs. L. G. Sayles, Killingly, Conn. 

Albert, Grace, 1897, See page G. 

Albertson, Alice Owen, 1902 3940 Brown Street, Philadelphia. 

Albertson, Lydia Mitchell, 1897, 

Ashtree, Beulah Hill, Upper Norwood, London, S. E., England. 
Married, 1900, Mr. J. Wilbur Tierney. 

Albro, Alice Hopkins, 1890. 

Married, 1901, Mr. Charles A. Barker. Died, 1904. 

Allen, Frances Dean, 1902, 

Riverdale School, Riverdale on Hudson, N. T. 
Married, 1904. Mr. Frank Sutliff Hackett. 

Allen, Hope Emily, 1905, See page 8. 

Allen, Jane, 1904, 

17 East Walnut Street, Lancaster, Pa. Summer: Wawa, Pa. 

Allen, Marguerite Sheldon, 1902, 

1202 Kenilworth Avenue, Cleveland, O. 

Allis, Mary Elizabeth, 1901, 1604 Spruce Street, Philadelphia. 

Anderson, Catharine Longworth, 1906, 

Grandin Road, Cincinnati, O. 

Andrews, Elizabeth Agnes, 1899, Merion, Pa. 

Andrews, Isabel Josephine, 1898 Merion, Pa. 

Andrews, Lotta Grace, 1902, 2321 Park Avenue, Philadelphia. 

Annan, Helen Culbertson, 1891, 

39 East 67th Street, New York City. 
Married, 1900, Mr. Arthur H. Scribner. 

Anthony, Alice, 1889, Denbigh Hall, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Anthony, Emily Frances, 1889. 

96 West Forest Avenue, Detroit, Mich. 
Married, 1891, Dr. Frederick Wright Bobbins. 

Archbald. Anna, 1902, 236 Monroe Avenue, Scranton, Pa. 

Married, 1908, Mr. William Silvey. 

Archer, Caroline, 1898, 301 South 5th Street, Reading, Pa. 

Armstrong, Marguerite B., 1905, 

1330 Nineteenth Street, Washington, D. C. Summer: Union Type- 
writer Co.. Bridgeport, Conn. 

, Arnold, Dorothy H. C, 1905, 620 West End Avenue, New York City. 

Ashwell, Grace Isabel, 1905, 

Care of Woman's University Club, 17 Madison Square North, 
New York City. 

Atherton, Louise Parke, 1903, 

10 Chalmers Place, Chicago, 111. Summer: Oxford, Pa. 
Married, 1908, Mr. Samuel Dickey. 



Bachelors of Arts 11 

Atherton, Melanie Gildersleeve, 1908, 

30 West River Street, Wilkes Barre, Pa. Summer: (ilea Summit 
Springs, Pa. 

Atkins, Emma Louise, 1905, . .628 West 114th Street, New York City. 
Married, 1905, Mr. Edward B. Davis. 

Atkins, Sarah Frances, 1894, 

Care of American Express Co., 11 rue Scribe, Paris. France. 
Married, 1900, Mr. Thomas Reid Kackley. 

Atkinson, Mary Janney, 1895 Doylestown, Pa. 

Married, 1895, Mr. George Watson. 

Austin, Acnes Bell. 1903 242 South 39th Street, Philadelphia. 

Austin, Mabel Henszey, 1905, Ardmore, Pa. 

Married, 1909. Mr. Bernard Todd Con verse. 

Avery, Delia Strong, 1900, 

10 Hancock Street, Brooklvn, New York City. Summer: Leeds- 
ville, N. Y. 

Ayer, Margaret Helen, 1907, 207 Goethe Street, Chicago, 111. 

Ayer, Mary Farwell, 1901, 

518 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass. Summer: Ipswich, Mass. 

Bacon, Ethel McCleixan, 1903, ....714 Connor Avenue, .Toplin, Mo. 
Married, 1909, Mr. Aa. Levering Smith. 

Bailey, Margaret Emerson, 1907, 6 Gushing Street, Providence, R. I. 

Baird, Lucy, 1896, 927 Cherokee Road, Louisville, Ky. 

Baker, Pleasaunce, 1909, 

The Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Summer: Zellwood, Fla. 

Balch, Emily Greene, 1889, Prince Street, Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

Balch, Marion Casares, 1902, . . .Prince Street, Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

Baldwin, Juliet Catherine, 1898, 

1006 North Charles Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Ball, Rebecca Whitman, 1904, 

4445 Frankford Avenue, Frankford, Philadelphia. 

Baltz, Ellen Duncan, 1900, Whitf ord, Pa. 

Barber, Fannie Skeer, 1909, 

St. Margaret's School, Waterbury, Conn. Summer: Mauch 
Chunk, Pa. 

Barbour, Elizabeth Graeme, 1899, 

1223 Fourth Avenue, Louisville, Ky. 

Bartholomew, Clyde, 1897, ....Box 437, Manila, Philippine Islands. 

Bartholomew, Mary Eleanor, 1909, 

Pembroke West, Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Summer: 
Clark's Hill, Ind. 

Bartlett, Helen, 1S92, See page 5. 

Bartlett, Theodora, 1905, 802 Broadway, New York City. 

Barton, Katharine Sayles, 1900, Hinsdale, 111. 

Married, 1905, Mr. Robert William Childs. 



12 Bachelors of Arts 

Bates, Josephine Russell, 1907, 

35 Brewster Street, Cambridge, Mass. 

Bates, Margaret Handy, 1905, 

Care of Miss Hebb, Franklin Street, Wilmington, Del. Summer: 
35 Brewster Street, Cambridge, Mass. 

Bates, Theodora, 1905, < See page 6. 

Bean, Catharine E., 1889, Honolulu, H. I. 

Married, 1891, Mr. Isaac M. Cox. 

Bean, Susan Austin, 1905, 19 North Street, Bingbamton, N. Y. 

Bedinger, Anna Moore, 1899, 

2401 Massachusetts Avenue, Washington, D. C. Summer: An- 
chorage, Ivy. 

Bedinger, Maria Voorhees, 1891, Anchorage, Ky. 

Belin, Alice, 1892, 447 Jefferson Avenue, Scranton, Pa. 

Belleville, Marie Elizabeth, 1909, .6 Cooke Street, Providence, R. I. 

Summer: 620 Maple Lane, Sewickley, Pa. 

Benjamin, Julie De Forest, 1907, 

140 West 69th Street, New York City. 

Bennett, Ethel Mary, 1905 See page 6. 

Bent, Elizabeth Conway, 1895, 

School House Lane, Germantown, Philadelphia. Summer: North- 
east Harbor, Me. 
Married, 1907, Mr. Herbert Lincoln, Clark. 

Biedenbach, Mary Estella Dolores, 1908, 

700 North McKean Street, Butler, Pa. 

Biglow, Elsie, 1906, Walnut Street, Englewood, N. J. 

Married, 1906, Mr. St. George Barber. 

Billmeyer, Helen May, 1902, ..250 Midland Avenue, Montclair. N. J. 

Birdsall, Mabel, 1894, 29 William Street, Glens Falls, N. Y. 

Married, 1896, Mr. William Turner Coicles. 

Bishop, Mildred Remsen, 1908, . .986 Jefferson Avenue, Detroit, Mich. 
Bissell, Bessie Gertrude, 1899, . . .400 West 3rd Street, Dubuque, la. 
Blaisdell, Viola Margaret, 1907, . .410 Carteret Street, Camden. N. J. 
Blake, Sue Avis, 1898, See page 6. 

BlakeY, May Louise, 1900, Doylestown, Pa. 

Married, 1907, Mr. Thomas Ross. 

Blanchard, Elizabeth Miller. 1SS9, Belief onte, Pa. 

Blanchard, Mary Miles, 18S9 Bellefonte, Pa. 

Blauvelt, Anne Fleming, 1899, 
Died, 1900. 

Blauvelt, Elisabeth Hedges, 1896. 

153 Fifth Avenue East, Roselle, N. J. 

Bliss, Eleanora Frances, 1909, See page 6. 



Bachelors of Arts 13 

Blose, Corinne, 1902, 55 West 44th Street, New York City. 

Married, 1906. Mr. Henry Collier Wright. 

Bodine, Elizabeth Davis, 1902, 146 West State Street, Trenton, N. J. 

Bontecou, Margaret, 1909, 1H0 Highland Avenue, Orange, N. J. 

Bookstaveb, Mary Alletta, 1898, 

"The Wyoming," 55th Street and Seventh Avenue, New York City. 
Married, 1906, Mr. Charles Edward Knoblauch. 

Boring, Alice Middleton, 1904, See page 0. 

Boring, Lydia Truman, 1S96, ..931 Fairmount Avenue, Philadelphia. 

Boucher, Sophie, 1903, 237 Central Park West, New York City. 

Bowman, Elsa, 1896 100 East 76th Street, New York City. 

Boyd, Lydia Paxton, 1902, ..245 West Adams Street, Kirkwood, Mo. 
Married, 1907, Mr. Richard Melville Bay. 

Boyer, Anne Ayer, 1899, 219 Mahantongo Street, Pottsville, Pa. 

Boyer, Judith McCutcheon, 1909, 

219 Mahautongo Street, Pottsville, Pa. 

Boyer, Laura Frances, 1906,.. 219 Mahantongo Street, Pottsville, Pa. 

Boyer, Martha Getz, 1909, 

Spriugside, Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia. Bummer: 269 Herr 
Street, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Brand, Helen Page, 1903, . . .36 West Canfield Avenue, Detroit, Mich. 

Brandeis, Adele, 1908, 1226 South 2nd Street, Louisville, Ky. 

Branson, Anna Mary, 1903, See page 0. 

Branson, Katharine Fleming, 1909, 114 Main Street, Coatesville, Pa. 

Brayton, Aeby Slade, 1894, . . . .435 Cherry Street, Fall River, Mass. 

Married, 1895, Mr. Randall Kelson Durfee. 

Brayton, Helen Ireson, 1903, .294 Prospect Street, Fall River, Mass. 

Brayton, Mary Elizabeth, 1901, 

294 Prospect Street, Fall River, Mass. 

Breadv, Marcia, 1905, 

St. Katharine's School, Davenport, la. Summer: 1059 Locust 
Street, Dubuque, la. 

Breed, Mary Bidwell, 1894, See page 5. 

Brewer, Rachel Slocum, 1905, 

Canton Avenue, Milton, Mass. Summer: Princeton, Mass. 

Brown, Bertha, 1904, 

105 East 22nd Street, New York City. Summer: Westtown, Pa. 

Brown, Carolyn Trowbridge, 1900, 

142 East 27th Street, New York City. 
Married, 1S99, Mr. Herbert Radnor Lvnis. 

Brown, Emily Eastman, 1897, 

178 Hawley Street, Binghamton, N. Y. 



14 Bachelors of Arts 

Brown, Fannie Isabella, 1903, 

Kemper Hall, Keriosha, Wis. Summer: 99 Garfield Place, Brook- 
lyn, New York City. 

Brown, Helen Dalton, 1909, 

886 Madison Avenue, New York City. Summer: Mackinac Island, 
Mich. 

Brown, Louise Colbourne, 1901, 31 East 49th Street, New York City. 

Brown, Mary Pitman, 1902, ..72 Pleasant Street, Marblehead, Mass. 

Browne, Frances, 1909 65 Central Park West, New York City. 

Browne, Jennie Nicholson, 1898, . .510 Park Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Browne, Mary Nicholson, 1899, . . 510 Park Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Brownell, Eleanor Olivia, 1897, ... 84 Cornelia Street, Utica, N. Y. 

Brownell, Grace Stanley, 1907, 

322 West 56th Street, New York City. 

Brownell, Harriet Mather, 1896, 

Radnor Street, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Summer: 234 Summer Street, 
Bristol, Conn. 

Brownell, Jane Louise, 1893, See page 6. 

Brownell, Louise Sheffield. 1893, Clinton, N. Y. 

Married, 1900, Mr. Arthur Percy Saunders. 

Bruner, Grace E., 1901, Llanerch, Pa. 

Brusstar, Margaret Elizabeth, 1903, 

Pembroke West, Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Summer: 
2123 North 17th Street, Philadelphia. 

Bryan, Elizabeth Middleton, 1903, 

2 Girard Avenue, East Orange, N. J. 
Married, 1909, Dr. John Emilius Parker. 

Bryan, Kate Hampton, 1908, 

42 South Battery, Charleston, S. C. Summer: Glenroy. Flat Rock, 
N. C. 

Bryant, Elsie Harriet, 1908 234 Maple Avenue. Oak Park, 111. 

Bryant, Marian Elizabeth, 1907, . .234 Maple Avenue, Oak Park. Til. 

Buffum, Gertrude Mary, 1908, ...85 Cooke Street, Providence, R. T. 

Buffum, Marianna Nicholson, 1902, See page 7. 

Bull, Emily Louisa, 1891, Bryn Mawr. Pa. 

Bullock, Ethel Stratton. 1906 Pottsville, Pa. 

Married, 1908, Mr. Harold Kline Beecher. 

Bunker, Marie Rowland, 1907, See page 7, 

Burns, Mary Cbeighton, 1903, 

Jenkintown. Pa. Summer: 217 Radcliffe Street. Bristol. Pa. 

Burrell, Eleanor Loudenois. 1903. 

248 West 75th Street, New York City. 

Buxton, Caro Fries, 1901, 520 Summit Street. Winston-Salem, N. C. 



Bachelors of Arts 15 

Byrnes, Esther Fussell, 1891, See page 5. 

Cadbury, Je., Emma, 1898, Moorestown, N. J. 

Cadbuby, Hannah Warner, 1896, 

441 Locust Avenue, Germantown, Philadelphia. 

Caldwell, Elizabeth Miller, 1897, Scarsdale, N. Y. 

Married, 1.898, Mr, Gerard Fountain. 

Cameron, Mary Wiley. 1004 , Tucson, Ariz. 

Married, 1908. Mr. Walter James Wakefield. 

Campbell, Cornelia Sarah, 1902, Sausalito, Cal. 

Married. 1906. Mr. Harry Akin Yeazell. 

Campbell, Edith Cbowninshield, 1901, West Orange, N. J. 

Campbell, Grace Bowditch, 1900, Avalon Orchard. Mount Hood, Ore. 

Married, 1908. Mr. Sydney Gorham Babson. 

Campbell, Mary Moriarty, 1897, West Orange, N. J. 

Canan, Marjorie Stockton, 1904. 

99 rue du Bac, La Varenne, Seine, France. 
Married, 1905, Mr. Lawford Howard Fry. 

Canan, Mary Hilda, 1904, Rosemont, Pa. 

Married, 1906, Mr. Samuel Matthews Vauclain, Jr. 

Cannon, Mary Antoinette, 1907, 

59 Sacramento Street, Cambridge, Mass. Summer: Deposit, N. Y. 

Cantlin, Ethel, 1901, 

5859 Overbrook Avenue, Overbrook, Philadelphia. 

Carner, Lucy Perkins, 1908, 300 East Market Street, York, Pa. 

Carpenter, Hannah Thayer, 1898, 

137 East 40th Street. New York City. Summer: 276 Angell Street, 
Providence, R. I. 

Carrere, Anna Merven, 1908, 

471 Park Avenue, New York City. Summer: Red Oaks, White 
Plains. N. Y. 

Carroll, Elizabeth Maxwell, 1892, 

1225 Guilford Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Carter, Alice, 1899, 

809 Madison Avenue, New York City. Summer: Pengilly. Mamar- 
oneck, N. Y. 
Married. 1905, Mr. William Carter Dickerman. 

Case, Adelaide Teague, 1908, 

309 West 91st Street, New York City. Summer: Paris Hill, Me. 

Case, Clara Cary. 1904, 

Care of British Post Office, Constantinople, Turkey. 
Married. 1909, Mr. Arthur Cecil Edwards. 

Chambers. Edith. 1908. 1612 Pennsylvania Avenue, Wilmington, Del. 
Married, 1909, Mr. Joseph Edgar Rhoads. 
Chandlee, Elizabeth Betterton, 1902. 

120 Simpson Road, Ardmore, Pa. Summer: Gananoque. Ontario, 
Canada. 
Married, 1903, Mr. Horace Baker Forman, Jr. 



16 Bachelors of Arts 

Chandler, Gladys Winthrop, 1907, 

236 West Logan Square, Philadelphia. 

Ci-iapin, Edith Burwell, 1899, Manhasset, Long Island, N. Y. 

Married, 1906, Mr. Thomas Truwtun Tingey Craven. 

Chapin, Helena, 1896, 846 South George Street, York, Pa. 

Married, 1904, Mr. Alexander E. McLean. 

Chase, Bertha Poole, 1899, 150 Ocean Street, Lynn, Mass. 

Married, 1904, Mr. John Hudson Hollis. 

Chesney, Miriam, 1904 2243 William Street, Philadelphia. 

Chickering, Rebekah Munroe, 1897, 

Abbot Academy, Andover, Mass. Summer: 78 Morton Road, Mil- 
ton, Mass. 

Child, Edith, 1890, 119 Waverley Place, New York City. 

Child, Florence Chapman, 1905, 

Syracuse Hospital for Women and Children, Syracuse, N. Y. 
Summer: 5023 McKean Avenue, Germantown, Philadelphia. 

Christy, Regina Lucia, 1907, 

186 Prospect Park West, Brooklyn, New York City. 

Cilley, Alice Longfellow, 1S97, 

11 East 54th Street, New York City. 
Married, 1899, Dr. Harry Hihberd Weist. 

Claghorn, Kate Holladay, 1892. 

81 Columbia Heights, Brooklyn, New York City. 

Clapp, Amy Lilley, 1904, 3809 Spruce Street, Philadelphia. 

Clark. Anna Newhall, 1908, 

48 Garden Street, Cambridge, Mass. Summer: Jamestown, R. T. 

Clark, Elizabeth Estelle, 1907, 

252 High Street, Germantown, Philadelphia. 

Clark, Florence Wilcox, 1902, . .416 Lawe Street, Green Bay, Wis. 

Clark, Jean Butler, 1902, . .King's Hill Apartments, Portland. Ore. 
Married, 1908, Mr. Jacques Andre Fouilhoux. 

Clark, Leslie, 1904, 1853 East 89th Street, Cleveland, O. 

Clark, Mabel Parker, 18S9, See page 7. 

Clarke, Edythe, 1903, . .Round Gables, Dean Road, Brookline, Mass. 

Married, 1909, Dr. Arthur Willard Fairbanks. 

Clarke, Susan Lowell, 1901, ....15 Brimmer Street, Boston, Mass. 

Clauder, Annie Cornelia, 1905, 

1521 Fairmount Avenue, Philadelphia. Summer: 83 North 15th 
Street, East Orange, N. J. 

Clements, Helen Theodora, 1892, 

554 Soutb Lansdowne Avenue, Lansdowne, Pa. 
Married, 1892, Dr. Edward Cameron Kirk. 

Clifton, Anna Eleanor, 1909, 3218 Mt. Vernon Street, Philadelphia. 

Clinton, Ethel, 1902, 445 Franklin Street, Buffalo, N. Y, 

Married, 1906, Dr. Nelson Oorham Russell. 



Bachelors of Arts 17 

Coale, Helen Cecilia, 1889, 1113 Davis Street, Evanston, 111. 

Married, 1890, Dr. Henry Crt w. 

Cochran, Fanny Travis. 1904, 

131 South 22nd Street, Philadelphia. Summer: Cainpobello, via 
Eastport, Me. 

Cockrell, Mary, 1908, 471 Gaston Avenue, Dallas, Tex. 

Coffin. Mariam Louise, 190G, . .55 Burnett Street, East Orange, N. J. 

Coleman, Anne C, 1895, 

Chateau de Villandry, Savonniere, Indre et Loire, France. 
Married, 1S99, Dr. Joachim Leon CarvaUo. 

Colgan. Alice Ella, 1900, ...3535 Locust Street, Philadelphia. 

Congdon, Dorothy Ida, 1906, . . . .1427 Judson Avenue, Evanston, 111. 

Congdon, Elizabeth, 1902, . . 5510 Kentucky Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Married, 1907, Mr. Alexander Johnston Barron. 

Congdon, Gertrude, 1909, 1427 Judson Avenue, Evanston, 111. 

Congdon, Louise, 1908, 1427 Judson Avenue, Evanston, 111. 

Congdon, Louise Buffum, 1900, 

Summit Grove Avenue, Bryfi Mawr, Pa. 
Married, 190S, Mr. Richard Standish Francis. 

Converse, Helen Prentiss, 1901, . . 1523 Locust Street, Philadelphia. 
Married, 1905, Mr. Warren Parsons Thorpe. 

Converse, Lisa Baker, 1896, 519 West 121st Street, New York City. 

Converse, Mary Eleanor, 1898, 

1610 Locust Street, Philadelphia. Summer: Rosemont, Pa. 

Cook, Katharine Innes, 1896, 71 Appleton Street, Cambridge, Mass. 

Cooke, Bertha May. 1901, ... 25 Dungan Street, Canandaigua, N. T. 

Married. 1903, Mr. James E. Kelley. 

Cooper, Emily Smyth, 1907, 633 Penn Street, Camden, N. J. 

Cope, Julia, 1889, Haverford, Pa. 

Married, 1894, Mr. William H. Collins. 

Copeiand, Margaret Boyd, 1908, Winnetka. 111. 

Corson, Elizabeth Stlllvell, 1902, 3 Ruthven Street, Boston, Mass. 

Married, 1905, Mr. Percival Gallagher. 

Coyle, Margaret Hildegarde, 1906, 

1608 North 13th Street, Philadelphia. 
Ce'agin, Jane Heartt, 1902. 

9 North Washington Square. New York City. 
Married. 1905, Mr. D'Arcy nemsworth Kay. 
Craig, Dorothy Mayhew, 1907, 

992 Simpson Street. New York City. Summer: Skaneateles. X. Y. 

Crake, Claris Isabel, 1902, 

242 West Hoffman Street, Baltimore, Md. Summer: R. F. D. 8, 
Towson, Md. 

Crane, Edith Campdell, 1900, 

242 West Hoffman Street, Baltimore. Md. 

2 



18 Bachelors of Arts 

Crane, Helen Bond, 1909,. . 242 West Hoffman Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Crawford, Elizabeth Long, 1908, West Conskokocken, Pa. 

Crawford, Emma Walker, 1903, West Conskohocken, Pa. 

Crawford, Harriet Jean, 1902, 

Rockefeller Hall, Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Summer: 
Ury, Fox Ckase, Pkiladelpkia. 

Crawford, Mary Virginia, 1896, . . 802 Lexington Avenue, Altoona, Pa. 
Married, 1906, Dr. Charles Benjamin Dudley. 

Criswell, Eliza Helen, 1904, 

Annie Wrigkt Seminary, Tacoma, Wask. Summer: Rosemont, Pa. 

Crosby, Phoebe Sinclair, 1906, Catonsville, Md. 

Cross, Emily Redmond, 1901, . .6 Waskington Square, New York City. 

Cruice, Louise Netterville, 1906. ..1815 Spruce Street, Pkiladelpkia. 

Dabney, Edith, 1903, Seattle Electric Co., Seattle, Wask. 

Daly, Elizabeth Teresa, 1901, Hudson Terrace, Yonkers., N. Y. 

Dalzell, Dorothy, 1908, 

■ Kittery, Me. Summer: 478 Main Street, Waltkam, Mass. 

Daniels, Caroline Seymour, 1901, . . 1515 Davis Street, Evanston, 111. 

Married, 1909, Mr. Philip Wyatt Moore. 

Danielson, Rosamond, 1905, Putnam, Conn. 

Darlington, Sarah Wilson, 1894, Dunkar, Pa. 

Married, 1905, Mr. Louis Pennock Hamilton. 

Darrow, Elizabeth Tremper, 1901, 

434 Nortk 32nd Street, Pkiladelpkia. 
Married, 1906, Mr. William Hamilton Laciar. 
Davis, Etta Lincoln, 1899, . .540 West 22nd Street, New York City. 

Davis, Louise Dudley, 1897, ... .44 West 9tk Street, New York City. 
Married, 1899, Dr. Henry Harlow Brooks. 

Davis, Lucia, 1902, 

816 West Lomkard Street, Baltimore, Md. Summer: Quaker- 
town, Pa. 

Davis, Sarah Ellen, 1903, 

Care of tke Rev. William P. Davis, D.D., Red Bank, N. J. 

Daw, Elma, 1907, Troy, N. Y. 

Day, Alice Hooker, 1902, 28 Fif tk Avenue, New York City. 

Married, 1909, Mr. Percy Jackson. 

Day, Dorothea, 1903, Catskill, N. Y. 

Dean, Elisa, 1900, 2406 Second Avenue, Altoona, Pa. 

Married, 1907, Dr. Joseph Dysart Fiuclley. 

DeArmond, Elinor Margaret, 1899, 

1401 Garden Street, San Antonio, Tex. 
Married, 1902, Mr. Frank Kimmell Neill. 

Delano, Susan Adams, 1907, '. . Orange, N. J. 

Married, 1907, Mr. Charles W. McKelvey. 



Bachelors of Arts 19 

Deming, Eleanor, 1903, 

853 West End Avenue, New York City. Summer: R. F. D. 2, 
Putnam, Conn. 

Denison, Carla, 1905, 1257 Ogden Street, Denver, Colo. 

Married, 1907, Mr. Henry Swan. 

Dewees, Susan Janney, 1900, Haverford, Pa. 

Dietrich, Gertrude Elizabeth, 1903, 

The Highlands, Washington, D. C. 
Married, 190S, Mr. Herbert Knox Smith. 

Dillin, Margaret Sidner, 1909, Radnor, Pa. 

Dillingham, Alice, 1901 Englewood, N. J. 

Dimon, Abigail Camp, 1896, See page 7. 

Ditmars. Helen Sydney, 1903, 

195 East Commerce Street, Bridgeton, N. J. 
Married, 1906, Dr. Millard Freeman Sewall. 

Dodge, Elinor, 1902, Belmont, Mass. 

Doe, Julia Adrienne, 1909 314 Wells Building, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Dogura, Masa, 1897, Japanese Embassy, Washington, D. C. 

Married, 1899, Baron Yasuga Uchicla. 

Donaldson, Elise, 1909, 

The Laurel School, 10,001 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, O. Summer: 
Relay P. O., Md. 

Donnelly, Lucy Martin, 1893, .... Low Buildings, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Doolittle, Margaret Chloe, 1908, 

The Misses Kirk's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Summer: Gambier, O. 

Dorsey, Comfort Worthington, 1907, 

214 West Lanvale Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Douglas, Grace, 1902, 1636 Prairie Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

Married, 1903, Mr. Morns Leidy Johnston. 

Dudley, Dorothy, 1904, 

1345 Astor Street, Chicago, 111. Summer: Huron Mountain Club, 
Marquette, Mich. 

Dudley, Helen, 1909, 1345 Astor Street, Chicago, 111. 

Dudley, Helena Stuart, 1889. 

Denison House, 93 Tyler Street, Boston, Mass. 

Duncan, Margaret Steel, 1908, 

709 West Springfield Avenue, Urbana, 111. 

Dungan, Emily, 1902 809 West Third Street, Grand Island, Neb. 

Married, 1903, Mr. George W. Moore, Jr. 

Dunham, Anna Mary, 1908, Hubbard Woods, 111. 

Durand, Edith Pusey, 1900, Southampton, Pa. 

Durand, Mildred Pauline, 1900, Southampton, Pa. 

Du Val. Kate Isabel, 1903 1269 Hamilton Avenue. St. Louis, Mo. 

Married, 1908, Mr. Henry Sullivan Pitts. 



20 Bachelors of Arts 

Dyer, Margaret Brydie, 1898, Peveley, Mo. 

Earle, Doris, 1903, Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia. 

Eastman, Elizabeth, 1903, 505 Garfield Square, Pottsville, Pa. 

Ecob, Eleanor, 1907, 

100 Sanford Avenue, Flushing, Long Island, N. Y. Summer: 
GilbertsviHe, N. Y. 

Ecob, Katharine Gilbert, 1909, 

100 Sanford Avenue, Flushing, Long Island, N. Y. Summer: 
GilbertsviHe, N. Y. 

Eddy, Olive Gates, 1906, 5 Third Street, Warren, Pa. 

Edwards, Edith, 1901, St. James Hotel, Woonsocket, R. I. 

Ehlers, Bertha Hermine, 1904, 

3227 North 17th Street, Philadelphia. 

Ehlers, Bertha Sophie, 1909, . .3227 North 17th Street, Philadelphia. 

Elder, Grace A., 1897, 

504 Ostrom Avenue, Syracuse, N. Y. Summer: Littleton, N. H. 
Married, 1900, Mr. Frederick A. Saunders. 
Elder, Louise R., 1889, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Eldredge, Adda, 1908, 

Wykeham Rise, Washington, Conn. Summer: Marquette, Mich. 

Eldridge, Irene, 1908, 

1716 North 26th Street, Philadelphia. Summer: Avalon, N. J. 

Elliot, Myra, 1908, 2107 Pine Street, Philadelphia. 

Ellis, Ellen Deborah, 1901, See page 5. 

Ellis, Lillian Rauschere, 1906, ..215 Penn Street, Burlington, N. J. 

Ellis, Mary French, 1895, 2319 Green Street, Philadelphia. 

Ellis, Sara Frazer, 1904, 5716 Rippey Street, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Ely, Katrina Brandes, 1897, 

128 East 36th Street, New York City. Summer: "Elmwood," 
Oyster Bay, Long Island, N. Y. 
Married, 1901, Mr. Charles Lewis Tiffany. 

Emerson, Ruth, 1S93, 10 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London, W. C, England. 
Married, 1901, Mr. Henry Martineau Fletcher. 

Emery, Annie Crosby, 1892, See page 5. 

Emery, Sarah Lotta, 1900, 

419 The Ontario, Ontario Road, Washington, D. C. 
Married, 1904, Mr. Charles Tarbell Dudley. 

Emmons, Elizabeth Wales, 1901, 

1378 Beacon Street, Brookline, Mass. 

Erismann, Pauline A dele Camille, 1900, 

1 Chemin de Mereinont, Champel, Geneva, Switzerland. 

Fabian, Mary Huntington, 1907, . .1509 Ridge Avenue, Evanston, 111. 

Failing, Katharine Frederika, 1903, 

617 Johnson Street, Portland, Ore. 



Bachelors of Arts 21 

Fairbank, Nathalie, 1905, 25 East Walton Place, Chicago, 111. 

Married, 1909, Mr. Laird Bell. 

Fabnham, Lois Anna, 1900, See page 7. 

Farquhar, Dorothea, 1900, 21 Broad Street, Fitchburg, Mass. 

.Married, 1906, Mr. Frederick Gushing Cross. 

Farr, Clara E., 1S9G, 4G03 Cedar Avenue, Philadelphia. 

Farwell, Leslie, 1905, 147 Canton Avenue, Milton, Mass. 

Married, 1907, Mr. Edward Buffum Hill. 

Fauvre, Madeleine Maus, 1908, New Augusta, Ind. 

Fay, Mary Luella, 1S97, See page 7. 

Fell, Edith New lin, 1900, . . . 1534 North Broad Street, Philadelphia. 

Ferguson, Mary Rodgers, 1907, 

Care of G. S. Ferguson Co., 15 North 7th Street, Philadelphia. 

Fetterman, Mary Gertrude, 1903, 

7047 Gerinantown Avenue, Mount Airy, Philadelphia. 

Finoke, Frances Amelia, 1898, 

142 East 65th Street, New York City. Summer: Mt. Kisco, N. Y. 
Married, 1902, Mr. Learned Hand. 

Fischel, Edna, 1900, 3871 Washington Avenue, St. Louis, Mo. 

Married, 1903, Dr. George Gellhom. 

Fleischmann, Louise, 1906, Hotel St. Regis, New York City. 

Fleisher, Eleanor Louie, 1903, 1715 Spruce Street, Philadelphia. 

Married, 190S, Dr. David Riesman. 

Fleming, May Augusta, 1907, 537 West 149th Street, New York City. 

Fletcher, Katherine Sila, 1902, 

37 Canfield Avenue East, Detroit, Mich. 

Flexner, Mary, 1895, 

265 Henry Street, New York City. Summer: Care of Bernard 
Flexner, Paul Jones Building, Louisville, Ky. 

Flickinger, Alice, 1906, See page 7. 

Focht, Mildred, 1904, 

400 West USth Street, New York City. Summer: Plantsville, 
Conn. 

Foley, Louise, 1908, 236 Summit Avenue, St. Paul, Minn. 

Follansbee, Blanche Davis, 1894, Lawrence Park, Bronxville, N. Y. 
Married, 1898, Mr. Broun Caldwell. 

Follansbee, Eunice Dana, 1903, ..2342 Indiana Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

Follansbee, Susan Davis, 1S97, ...1637 Prairie Avenue, Chicago, 111. 
Married, 1S99, Mr. William Gold Hibbard, Jr. 
Forster, Dorothy, 1907, 

270 West 84th Street, New York City. Summer: Nonquitt, Mass. 
Foster, Dorothy, 1904, 

Mt. Holyoke College, South Hadley. Mass. Summer: 44 Church- 
ill Avenue, Newtonville, Mass. 



22 Bachelors of Arts 

Foster, Elizabeth Andros, 1908, 

Denbigh Hall, Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Summer: 
Glendale Road, Sharon, Mass. 

Foster, Mabel, 1907, 

1332 I Street, Washington, D. C. Summer: 120 Buell Street, Bur- 
lington, Vt. 

Foulke, Caroline Reeves, 1896, Richmond, Ind. 

Foulke, Mary Taylor Reeves, 1899, Peacedale, Richmond, Ind. 

Married, 1900, Mr. James William Morrisson. 

Fowler, Eugenia, 1901, See page 7. 

Fowler, Katharine, 1906, Haverstraw, N. Y. 

Fowler, Laura, 1901, 319 West 10th Street, Parkersburg, W. Va. 

Fowler, Susan, 1895, 420 West 118th Street, New York City. 

Frace, May, 1904, Clinton, N. J. 

Frank, Myra B. Faith, 1900, 

3211 Thirteenth Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 
Married, 1900, Dr. Milton J. Rosenau. 

Franklin, Margaret Ladd, 1908, 

103 West Monument Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Franklin, Susan Braley, 1889, See page 5. 

Frehafer, Mabel Kathryn, 1908, 

Pembroke East, Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Summer: 
Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia. 

French, Augusta Graham, 1907, ..1502 Spruce Street, Philadelphia. 

Fries, Emma Rib-dell, 1904, 1350 Orthodox Street, Philadelphia. 

Fronheiser, Mary Dorothy, 1899, 

1605 North Front Street, Harrisburg, Pa. 
Married, 1905, Mr. PhiUp Taliaferro Meredith. 

Frost, Mary Gertrude, 1897, 166 Webster Street, East Boston, Mass. 
Married, 1905, The Rev. William Satterlee Packer. 

Fry, Anna Delany, 1899, 

Care of Brown, Shipley & Co., 123 Pall Mall, Loudon, S. W., England. 

Fulton, Louise Oltphant, 1893, 

3420 Hamilton Street, Philadelphia. Summer: Melvin Village, 
N. H. 
Married, 1898, Mr. Frank Thomson Gucker. 
Furman, Rosalie Allan, 1895, 2319 Green Street, Philadelphia. 

Furness, Ruth Wadsworth, 1896, Hubbard Woods, 111. 

Married, 1898, Mr. James Foster Porter. 

Galt, Caroline Morris, 1897, 

Mt. Holyoke College, South Hadley, Mass. Summer: Marion, Va. 

Gannett, Alice Peirson, 1898, 446 East 72nd Street, New York City. 

Gardner, Evelyn Dunn, 1908, 

226 Twelfth Street, S. E., Washington, D. C. 

Gardner, Julia Anna, 1905, See page 7. 



Bachelors of Arts 23 

Garbetson, Alice Eleanoba, 1890, Hay wards, Cal. 

Gabbett, Chbistina Hallowell, 1903, 

6 Jackson Hall, Trinity Court, Boston, Mass. 

Gabbett, Ida Mebcette, 1906, ..1924 South 16th Street, Philadelphia. 

Gendeix, Annie Ashbbook, 1907, 835 North 63rd Street, Philadelphia. 

von Gebbeb, Wilhelmina Geobgina Mabie. 1903, 

Memorial Hospital, Worcester, Mass. 

Gerhabd, Alice Hill, 1907, 

522 W. James Street, Lancaster, Pa. Summer: Mt. Gretna, Pa. 

Gebhard, Elizabeth Hill, 1904, 522 West James Street, Lancaster, Pa. 

Gibb. Leonoba Walton, 1901, 

10th Street, Oak Lane, Philadelphia. Summer: Ocean City, N. J. 

Giffobd, Flora Sawyeb, 1903, 44 Marion Street, Brookline, Mass. 

Gignoux, Elise Messenger, 1902, . . . .Great Neck, Long Island, N. T. 

Giles, Ellen Rose, 1S96, See page 7. 

Gillinder, Agnes, 1904, 

4837 Pulaski Avenue. Germantown, Philadelphia. 
Married, 1907, Mr. John Thompson Carton. 

Gilroy, Helen Turnbull. 1909, 2314 Green Street, Philadelphia. 

Gilroy, Jessie Jay, 1909, 1701 Master Street, Philadelphia. 

Girdwood, Ethel Mathews, 1903, 

1732 South Fayette Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Githens. Maey Uhle, 1898, 4242 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. 

Married, 1906, Mr. Alan Calvert. 

Gleim, Maby Agnes, 1897, . .827 South Negley Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Goff, Ethel Pethebbbidge, 1903, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Goff, Gebteude Alice, 1S98, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Goff, Leah, 1889, See page 7. 

Goffe, Mildred Virginia, 1904, 36 Union Avenue, New Rochelle, N. T. 

Goldman. Agnes, 1909, 

132 East 70th Street, New York City. Summer: Care of Dr. 
Julius Goldman, 111 Broadway, New York City. 

Goldman, Bebtha, 1901, 

Care of Louis Ilirsch, 8 Rue Lafitte, Paris, France. 
Married, 1907, Mr. Bernhard Gutmann. 

Goldman, Hetty, 1903, 132 East 70th Street, New York City. 

Goldmaek, Josephine Clara, 1S98, 

270 West 94th Street, New York City. Summer: St. Huberts, N. Y. 

Goldmaek, Pauline Dorothea, 1S96, 

270 West 94th Street, New York City. Summer: St. Huberts, N. Y. 

Goldsmith, Sarah Sanson, 1908, 

102 Salisbury Street, Meyersdale, Pa. Summer: 1932 North 19th 
Street, Philadelphia. 



24 Bachelors of Arts 

Goodell, Edith, 1904, Burnharn, Mifflin County, Pa. 

Married, 1905, Mr. John Gregson, Jr. 

Goodeich, Elizabeth, 1905 1035 East 45th Street, Chicago, 111. 

Goodwin, Mary Merrick, 1909, 3927 Locust Street, Philadelphia. 

Gould, Alice Bache, 1889, 535 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass. 

Gowen, Emeline, 1890, Address unknown. 

Graves, Ellen, 1907, 

Casiila de Correo, 1682, Buenos Aires, Argentine Republic. 

Gray, Elizabeth Delano, 1898, .... 105 Laighton Street, Lynn, Mass. 

Greeley, Helen Ridenour, 1908, 4833 Woodlawn Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

Greely, Adola, 1904, Easthampton, Mass. 

Married, 1906, The Rev. Charles Lawrence Adams. 

Green, Anna Bright, 1896, Frostburg, Md. 

Married, 1S97, Mr. Roberdeau Annan. 

Greene, Cornelia Bonnell, 1897, 

279 Tulpehoeken Street, Gerniantown, Philadelphia. 
Married, 1907, Mr. Paul King. 

Gribi, Marguerite, 1904, 

426 Roslyn Place, Chicago, 111. Summer: Wake Bluff, 111. 
Married, 1906, Mr. Otto August Kreutsberg. 

Griffith, Cornelia Jeanette, 1908, 

110 Franklin Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Griffith, Elizabeth Mingus, 1 

401 Beacon Street, Boston,' M. ; aoo. 'nmer: 533 West 158th 

Street, New York City. 

Griffith, Helen, 1905, 

Whittier Hall, Columbia University, New York City. Summer: 
1307 Fourth Avenue South, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Grossmann, Bella Mira, 1896, . . .15 Mellen Street, Cambridge, Mass. 

Grotevent, Kathryn Ellen, 1905, 

1318 North 52nd Street, Philadelphia. 

Guffey, Mary Emma, 1899, 147 Bowen Street, Providence, R. I. 

Married, 1902, Mr. Carroll Miller. 

Guilford, Elizabeth Gleim, 1S98, Lansdowne, Pa. 

Haas, Anna M., 1898, 41 East Orange Street, Lancaster, Pa. 

Hacker, Emma Lydia, 1893, R. F. D. 2, Westbrook, Me. 

Married, 1899, Mr. Arthur Herbert Norton. 

Hahn, Doeoth y Anna, 1899, Box 344, South Hadley, Mass. 

Haines, Anna Jones, 1907, Moorestown, N. J. 

Haines, Gladys Priscilla, 1907, 

188 South Franklin Street, Wilkes Barre, Pa. 

Haines, Helen Eayre, 1896, Vincentown, N. J. 

Married, 1901, Mr. Henry B. Greening. 

Haines, Jane Bowne, 1892, • See page 7. 



Bachelors of Arts 25 

Haines, Marion Hartshorne, 1902, 

East Haines Street, Germantown, Philadelphia. 
Married, 190G, Mr. Samuel Emlen, Jr. 

Hall, Annette Louise, 1895, 

GS09 Cresheim Road, Germantown, Philadelphia. 
Married, 1900, Mr. Hoxcard Magill Phillips. 

Hall, Edith Rockwell, 1893, 

505 West 142nd Street, New York City. Summer: Fisher's Road, 
Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Hall, Margaret, 1899, 

120 East 31st Street, New York City. Summer: North Cohasset, 
Mass. 

Hall, Margaret Goodman, 1905, . .208 Shady Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Halsey, Cornelia Van Wyck, 1900, 

31 Boyken Street, Morristown, N. J. Summer: The Crags, Dark 
Harbor, Me. 
Married, 1907, Mr. Frederic Rogers Kellogg. 

Hamilton, Edith, 1894, See page 7. 

Hamilton, Margaret, 1897, 1312 St. Paul Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Hammond, Alice Bradford, 1898, 

154 East Grand Avenue, New Haven, Conn. 

Hann, Anna Thompson, 1907, Tuckahoe, N. J. 

Harbeson, Lynda Myra, 1903, 1532 Pairmount Avenue, Philadelphia. 

Hardy, Cora, 1899, 

105 East 19th Street. ^.iv Uty. Slimmer: St. Huberts, N. Y. 

Married, 1906, Mr. Edwin Seton Jarrett. 

Harlan, Anna Elizabeth, 1909, 357 Chestnut Street, Coatesville, Pa. 

Harley, Katharine Venai, 1908, 

Darlington Seminary, West Chester, Pa. Summer: Devon, Pa. 

Harper, Ethel, 1907, 58 East 55th Street, New York City. 

Harrington, Caroline Elizabeth, 1906, 

201 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass. 

Harris, Elizabeth, 1890, See page 7. 

Harris, Frances Brodhead, 1893, 

The Oak Road, Station Z, Philadelphia. Summer: Manchester, Yt. 
Married, 1895, Mr. Reynolds Driver Broun. 

Harris. Madeline Yaugiian, 1895, 

* "Clover Hill," Township Line and Manheim Streets, Germantown. 
Philadelphia. 
Married, 1900, Mr. Henry Inrjersoll Brown. 

Harris, Mary, 1895, 

6365 McCallum Street, Germantown, Philadelphia. 

Hartman, Gertrude, 1905, 137 East 40th Street, New York City. 

Haughwout, Helen Preston, 1906, 

91 Spooner Road, Chestnut Hill, Brookline, Mass. 
Married, 1908, Mr. William Edward Putnam, Jr. 



26 Bachelors of Arts 

Havemeyer, Adaline, 1905, 1 East 66th Street, New York City. 

Married, 1907, Mr. Peter H. B. Frelinghuysen. 

Hawkins, Alice Martin, 1907, 2143 Mt. Vernon Street, Philadelphia. 

Haynes, Mabel Stevens, 1898, 

Villa Margarita, Ungarischestrasse, 15, Przeroysl, Austria. 
Married, 1907, Captain Konrad Heissig. 

Head, Harriet Frazier, 1891, 

109 West Chelten Avenue, Germantown, Philadelphia. 

Hearne, Antoinette Claypoole, 1909, 

125 West Lancaster Avenue, Wayne, Pa. 

Hecht, Blanche, 1907, 

Manhattan Square Hotel, West 77th Street, New York City. 

Helburn, Theresa, 1908, 

310 West 80th Street, New York City. Summer: Care of Julius 
Helburn, 114 Lincoln Street, Boston, Mass. 

Hemphill, Jeannette, 1904, 
130 East 71st Street, New York City. Summer: Spring Lake, N. J. 

Hendrickson, Amanda, 1903, 

337 Manheim Street, Germantown, Philadelphia. 

Henry, Elisabeth Prentiss, 1905, 47 East 49th Street, New York City. 

Henry, Jessie Kellogg, 1903, . . . .3714 Hamilton Street, Philadelphia. 

Heritage, Gertrude Langden, 1896, See page 7. 

Herb, Etta, 189S, 108 East King Stree'c, Lancaster, Pa. 

Herr, Mary Emma, 1909, 

3802 Locust Street, Philadelphia. Slimmer: School Lane and 
Wheatland Avenue, Lancaster, Pa. 

Herrick, Clara Martha, 1905, ..Grand Valley, Garfield County, Colo. 
Married, 1908, Mr. Arthur Havemeyer. 

Hewitt, Jessie Germain, 1906, 

The Villa, Athens, Ga. Summer: Burlington, N. J. 

Heyl, Friedrika Maegeetha, 1899, 

Merion Hall, Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Summer: 
Dunkirk, N. Y. 

Hickman, Maeian Margaret, 1903, 

1708 Bolton Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Hill. Abby Gerteude, 1907, 

198 Park Avenue, Yonkers, N. Y. Summer: Kennebunk Beach, Me. 

Hill, Mary Dayton, 1896, Highland Park, New Brunswick, N. J. 

Married, 1901, Mr. Gerard Sicope. 

Hill, Vieginia Geeer, 1907, .... 3419 Hamilton Street, Philadelphia. 

Hilles, Margaret Hill, 1893, Thomas, Ala. 

Married, 1902, Mr. Joseph Esrey Johnson. Jr. 

Hills, Evelyn Agnes, 190O, 40 Washington Terrace, Bridgeport, Conn. 

Married, 1907, Mr. William Enright Davenport. 

Hodge, Helen Henry, 1900, See page 7. 



Bachelors of Aria 27 

H olden, Charlotte, 1903, 139 Canner Street, New Haven, Conn. 

Married, 1908, Mr. George Samuel Jamieson. 

Holliday, Evelyn Macfaklane, 1904, 

5715 Callowhill Street, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Married, 1909, Mr. W. Wallace Patterson. 

Holliday, Lucia Shaw, 1901, . . . 1230 Park Building, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Married, 1906, Mr. Norman Macleth. 

Holliday, Mary Early, 1909, 

1121 North Meridian Street, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Hood, Alice Watkins, 1898, 

1231 North Calvert Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Hooper, Ethel Eugenie, 1899, 

1210 Astor Street, Chicago, 111. Summer: Huron Mountain Club. 
Big Bay, Mich. 

Hopkins, Elizabeth Frances, 1893, Thornasville, Ga. 

Hopkins, Helen Rolfe, 1894, Hillside, Roland Park, Baltimore, Md. 
Married, 1900, Mr. Hunt Reynolds Mayo Thorn. 

Hopkins, Mary Delia, 189G, See page 7. 

Horner, Brita Larsena, 1907, Merchantville, N. J. 

Houghton, Edith, 1900, 

Cedar Lawn, Station II, Baltimore, Md. Summer: Care of H. C. 
Warren & Co., New Haven, Conn. 
Married, 1905, Dr. Donald Russell Hooker. 
Houghton, Katharine Martha, 1900, See page 7. 

Houghton, Marion, 1906, 

1404 East Chase Street, Baltimore, Md. Summer: 133 Hawthorne 
Street, Hartford, Conn. 

Howard, Jeannie Colston, 1901, 

708 West Main Street, Staunton, Va. 

Howard, Julia McHenry, 1909, 

919 Cathedral Street, Baltimore, Md. Summer: Oakland, Md. 

Howell, Helen Armstrong, 1904, 

101 Manhattan Avenue, New York City. 
Married, 1907, Dr. John Joseph Moorhead. 

Howell, Kati-irine Leonard, 1906, 

3307 Hamilton Street, Philadelphia. 

Howson, Agnes, 1897, 124 West Lancaster Avenue, Wayne, Pa. 

Married, 1901, Mr. Rufus Waples, Jr. 

Hoyt, Florence Stevens, 1S98, . . .609 Lennox Street, Baltimore, Md. 

HoYT, Helen Strong, 1897, See page 7. 

Hoyt, Mary E., 1893, 

Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore, Mil. Summer: Lavalette, Ocean 
Co., N. J. 
Hubbard, Frances Johnson, 1905 Houghton, Mich. 

Hubbard, Sibyl Emma, 1899, Villa Nova, Pa. 

Married, 1907, Mr. Herbert Seymour Darlington. 



28 Bachelors of Arts 

Hudson, Margaret Elizabeth, 1909, 

2111 West Berks Street, Philadelphia. 

Hulburd, Ethel, 1903, 

73 Cedar Street, Chicago, 111. Summer: Lake Forest, 111. 
Married, 1905, Mr. Hugh McBirney Johnston. 

Hull, Katharine Dent, 1903, 916 St. Paul Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Hunt, Evelyn, 1898, 112 West 55th Street, New York City. 

Hunt, Frances Elizabeth, 1893, 801 Clay Avenue, Scranton, Pa. 

Hutchin, Elizabeth Ferguson, 1901, 

3433 North 21st Street. Philadelphia. 

Hutchins, Grace, 1907, 
166 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass. Slimmer: Fir Cones, Castine, Me. 

Hutchinson, Mabel, 1889 Box 207, Newberg, Ore. 

Married, 1891, Mr. J. Henry Douglas, Jr. 

Hyman, Louise, 1908, 

49 West 56th Street, New York City. Summer: Little Boar's 
Head, N. H. 

Ingham, Mary Hall, 1903, 333 South 16th Street, Philadelphia. 

Irwin, Martha Elizabeth, 1900, ... .4 Linden Lane, Princeton, N. J. 

Jackson, Anne Warren, 1908, 1301 Market Street, Wilmington, Del. 

Jackson, Helen Hale, 1905, 

715 Church Street, Ann Arbor, Mich. Summer: Care of J. T. 
Jackson, S. E. Corner 13th and Chestnut Streets, Philadel- 
phia. 

Married, 1906, Mr. Frederic L. Paxson. 

Jacobs, Sarah, 1909, 217 South Front Street, Harrisburg, Pa. 

James, Catherine Alma, 1900, 

319 North ,6th Street, Terre Haute, Ind. Summer: 202 North 
Delaware Street, Indianapolis, Ind. 

James, Eleanor, 1902, 

Pembroke West, Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Summer: 
5608 Walnut Street, Philadelphia. 

James, Mary Denver, 1895, . .306 West 112th Street, New York City. 
Married, 1905, Mr. Arthur Sullivant Hoffman. 

James, Mary Latimer, 1904, 

St. Elizabeth's Mission, Whiterocks, Utah. 

James, Rosalie Telfair, 1903, 

420 West 118th Street, New York City. 

Janney, Marianna, 1S95, .... 1535 North Broad Street, Philadelphia. 

Jaynes, Alice Dickson, 1905, 

40 North Arlington Avenue, East Orange, N. J. 

Jeffers, Evetta Tupper, 1900, 210 South Duke Street, York, Pa. 

Jeffers, Mary, 1895, See page 7. 



Bachelors of Arts 29 

Jenkins, Martha Babcock, 1902, 

209 Livingston Street, New Haven, Conn. 
Married, 1904, Mr. Harry Ward Foote. 

Jewett, Mary Warren, 1396, Moravia, N. T. 

Johnson, Miriam Leigh, 1905, See page 7. 

Jonas, Anna Isabel, 1904 See page 7. 

Jones, Alice, 1897, Santa Monica, Cal. 

Jones, Dorothy May, 1908, . . .13S South Main Avenue, Scranton, Pa. 

Jones, Eleanor Hooper, 1901, 455 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass. 

Jones, Elsie Parry, 1900, 406 Fannin Street, Shreveport, La. 

Jones, Grace Latimer, 1900, See page 7. 

Jones, Helen Elizabeth, 1906, 

13S South Main Avenue, Scranton, Pa. 

Jones, Josephine Margharetta, 1905, 

2063 East York Street, Philadelphia. 

Jones, Margaret Carroll, 1908, 1814 Pine Street, Philadelphia. 

Jones, Ruth Lovering, 1905, 

366 East 12th Avenue, Columbus, O. Summer: Clintonville, O. 
Married, 1909, Mr. Clarence Dean Huddleston. 

Jurist, Helen Stieglitz, 1909, 

Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Summer: 916 North Broad 
Street, Philadelphia. 

Katzenstein, Josephine Howard, 1906, 

4727 Hazel Avenue, Philadelphia. 

Kawai, Michi, 1904, Makido Uchikida, Watarai, Iso, Japan. 

Keay, Frances Anne, 1899, . . 61 Hastings Avenue, East Cleveland, O. 

Married, 1907, Mr. Thomas P. Ballard. 

Keen, Dora, 1S96, 1729 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. 

Keiller, Mabel Matthew son, 1908, 

101 Elmwood Avenue, Narberth, Pa. 

Kelley, Annette Maria, 1906, 908 Main Street, Racine, Wis. 

Kelley, Olive Minard, 1909, . . 18 Elizabeth Street, Port Jervis, N. Y. 

Kellum, Margaret Dutton, 1S92, 

501 West 50th Street, New York City. 

Kempton, Helen Payson, 1905, 

216 West Sth Street, Michigan City, Ind. 

Kerr. Katharine, 1907, 

40 West 11th Street, New York City. Summer: Wainscot. Long 
Island, N. Y. 

Kidder, Anne Maynard, 1903, ..468 Riverside Drive, New York City. 
Married. 1904, Professor Edmund Beecher Wilson. 

Kieffer, Josephine Berry, 1902, 249 Charlotte Street, Lancaster, Pa. 
Married, 1905, Mr. Charles Stcin7nan Foltr. 

Kilpatrick. Mary Grace, 1900, 1027 St. Paul Street, Baltimore. MM. 



30 Bachelors of Arts 

King, Anna, 1908, 

45 Prospect Street, Stamford, Conn. Summer: Woodstock, Vt. 

King, Georgiana Goddard, 1896, See page 7. 

King, Gladys, 1905, 

46 Stuyvesant Place, New Brighton, Staten Island, N. T. 

Kinsley, Mary Anderson, 1908, ...5916 Master Street, Philadelphia. 

Kirk, Abby, 1892, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Kirk, Mary Brosius, 1897, 

George School, Pa. Summer: Kennett Square, Pa. 

Kirkbride, Elizabeth Butler, 1896, 1406 Spruce Street, Philadelphia. 

Klauder, Jeannette Cascaden, 1907, Bala, Pa. 

Klein, Gertrude, 1904, 

241 West Seymour Street, Germantown, Philadelphia. 

Knight, Emma Taft, 1905, 

Miss Porter's School, Farmington, Conn. Summer: 1213 Beacon 
Street, Brookline, Mass. 

Knowles, Leslie Appleton, 1900, ..326 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass. 

Kroeber, Johanna, 1900, ...327 Amsterdam Avenue, New York City. 
Married, 1908, Dr. Herman O. Mosenthal. 

Labold, Leona Sophie, 1909, 63 West 4th Street, Portsmouth, O. 

Lamberton, Helen, 1907, See page 7. 

Lamberton, Mary, 1904, 

4403 Osage Avenue, Philadelphia. Summer: Point Pleasant, N. J. 

Landers, Julia Ethel, 1894, . .Knickerbacker Hall, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Landsberg, Clara, 1897, 

Hull House, 800 South Halsted Street, Chicago, 111. Summer: 
420 Main Street East, Rochester, N. Y. 

Langdon,, Ida, 1903, Elmira, N. Y. 

Lange, Linda Bartels, 1903, 

233 West Preston Street, Baltimore, Md. Summer: Twilight 
Park, Haines Falls, N. Y. 

La Porte, Martha Diven, 1895, . . . 1201 Lincoln Avenue, Tyrone, Pa. 

Larrabee. Emily Dorr, 1903, 

Dana Hall, Hemenway Street, Boston, Mass. Summer: 102 
Emery Street, Portland, Me. 

Laser, Lilian J., 1909, 642 Anapaw Avenue, Hot Springs, Ark. 

Latimer, Caroline Wormeley, 1896, See page 8. 

Lattimore, Eleanor Larrabee, 1900, 

595 University Avenue, Rochester, N. Y. 

Laughlin, Agatha, 1903, 

Germantown Hospital, Germantown, Philadelphia. Summer: 337 
Manheim Street, 'Germantown, Philadelphia. 

Lauterbacii, Alice, 1906, 2783 Broadway, New York City. 

Law, Sally Porter, 1903 843 Hamilton Terrace, Baltimore, Md. 



Bachelors of Arts 31 

Lawrence, Caroline, 1889. 

3S18 Spruce Street, Philadelphia. Summer: Dune Lodge, Long- 
port, N. J. 

Lawrence, Edith, 1S97, Windsor, Vt. 

Laws, Bertha Margaret, 1001, 

Pembroke Hall, Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Lawther, Anna Bell, 1897, . . . .Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Lawton, Grace Evelyn, 1898, 30 Bull Street, Newport, R. I. 

Lee, Elva, 1893, See page 8. 

Lee, Mary Madison, 1901, Orange, Va. 

Lee, Mary Sarah, 1906, 1828 South 22nd Street, Philadelphia. 

Lee, Sylvia Knowlton, 1901, 20 Avon Street, Cambridge, Mass. 

Le Fevre, Eva Frederika, 1905, 1311 York Street, Denver, Colo. 

Leffingwell, Aimee Gilbert, 1897, 

G7 Mansfield Street, New Haven, Conn. Summer: Tbe Old Rec- 
tory, Bar Harbor, Me. 
Married, 1908, Mr. Kenneth McKenzie. 

Leftwich, Florence. 1895, See page 5. 

Lepper, Minerva Augusta, 1906, 

2516 Montgomery Avenue, Philadelphia. 

Leupp, Constance Davis, 1903, 

137 East 40th Street, New York City. Summer: 105 East 22nd 
Street, New York City. 

Levering, Ethel, 1899, 1308 Eutaw Place, Baltimore, Md. 

Married, 1909, Mr. James Margin Motley. 

Levering, Mary Armstrong, 1897, 

Hanover, N. H. Summer: 77 Monument Avenue, Bennington 
Centre, Vt. 
Married, 1905, The Rev. Joseph Haswell Rooinson. 

Lewis, Constance, 1904, 

3036 North Meridian Street, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Lewis, Elizabeth Dabney Langhorxe. 1901, 

009 Court Street, Lynchburg, Va. 

Lewis, Lucy, 1893, 1535 Pine Street, Philadelphia. 

Lewis, Margaret Charlton, 1908, ..95 Niles Street. Hartford, Conn. 

Lewis, Mayone, 1908, 

Rosemary Hall, Greenwich, Conn. Summer: 4324 Pine Street. 
Philadelphia. 

Lexow, Caroline Florence, 1908. 

722 St. Mark's Avenue. Brooklyn, New York City. Summer: 
Englewood, N. J. 

Linburg, Emma Htllman, 189*;, 

225 West State Street. Trenton, N. J. Summer: Spring Lake. X. J. 

List. Minnie Kendrick, 1908. ...3400 Hamilton Street, Philadelphia. 



32 Bachelors of Arts 

Little, Eleanor Lovell, 1905, 

34 Fairfield Street, Boston, Mass. Summer: Ponkapog, Mass. 
Married, 1906, Mr. Talbot Aldrich. 

Locke, Grace Peeley, 1898, See page 8. 

Loder, Eleanor, 1905, Wymiewood, Pa. 

Loines, Elma, 1905, 

152 Columbia Heights, Brooklyn, New York City. Summer: The 
Quarterdeck, Bolton Landing, N. Y. 

Lombardi, Lucy, 1904, Berkeley, Cal. 

Married, 1908, Lieutenant Alvin Barton Barber. 

Long, Anne Dodd, 1900, 441 South 44th Street, Philadelphia. 

LONGSTRETH, EDITH MAY, 1905, 

5318 Baynton Street, Germantown, Philadelphia. 
Loose, Katharine Riegel, 1898, . . 120 North 5th Street, Reading, Pa. 
Lord, Katharine, 1901, I Plymouth, Mass. 

LORENZ, JUSTINA, 1907, 

1608 West 1st Street, Dayton, O. Summer: Horicon, N. Y. 

Loshe, Lillie Deming, 1899, 

Low Buildings, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Summer: 49 Glenbrook Road, 
Stamford, Conn. 

LOUDERBACK, JESSIE LIVINGSTON, 1895, 

526 West 139th Street, New York City. 
Lounsbeey, Grace Constant, 1898, 86 rue de Lille, Paris, France. 

Lovell, Alice, 1903, Temascal tepee, Estado de Mexico, Mexico. 

Married, 1907, Mr. Lee Olds Kellogg. 

Lowengeund, Helen Moss, 1906, \ . See page S. 

Lowenthal, Esthee, 1905, 

Brooks Hall, West 116th Street, New York City. Summer: 14 
Buckingham Street, Rochester, N. Y. 

Loweey, Maud Mary, 1900, 

The Students' Inn, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Summer: The Esmond, 12th 
and Spruce Streets, Philadelphia. 

Lynde, Isabel Adair, 1905, Winnetka, 111. 

Married, 1909, Mr. John Francis Dammann, Jr. 

Lyon, Elizabeth Treat, 1902 1230 Forest Avenue, Evanston, 111. 

Married, 1904, Mr. Robert E. Belknap. 

MacClanahan, Anna Elizabeth Caldwell, 1906, 

St. Anthony's, Newfoundland. 
Married, 1909, Dr. Wilfred T. Grenfell. 

MacCoy, Mary Helen, 1900, 

58th Street and Overbrook Avenue, Philadelphia. 

MacCeacken, Fay Maey, 1894, 84 Grand Street, Newburgh, N. Y. 

Married, 1S99, The Rev. Frederick Emerson Stockwell. 

Macintosh, Marian T., 1890, 

620 South Washington Square, Philadelphia. 

Magruder, Rosalie Stuart, 1904, 23 State Circle, Annapolis, Md. 

Mann, Euphemia Mary, 1897, 2009 Mt. Vernon Street, Philadelphia. 



Bachelors of Arts 33 

Mappin, Lilian M., 1896 1714 Chicago Avenue, Evanston, 111. 

Marble, Elizabeth Dana, 1902, 

3201 Figueroa Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Makcus, Bertha, 1905, 1942 North 19th Street, Philadelphia. 

Marsh, Rose Guthrie, 1909, Woodland Road, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Marshall, Louise Chapin, 1905, .574 Hawthorne Place, Chicago, 111. 

Martin, Em ilie Norton, 1894, See page 5. 

Masland, Mary Elizabeth, 1901, . .007 Fifth Avenue, New York City. 

Mason, Frances Eleanor, 1905, 100 Bellevue Place, Chicago, 111. 

Married, 1905, Mr. Arthur Manierre. 

Mason, Mary Taylor, 1892, 

School House Lane, Germantown, Philadelphia. 

Matheson, Winifred, 1907, 1221 Robson Street, Vancouver, B. C. 

Matsuda, Michi, 1899, Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Mattson, Ethel, 1909, 1026 South 32nd Street, Omaha, Neb. 

Mattson, Rebecca Taylor, 1896, Box 508, Hartford, Conn. 

Married, 1901, Mr. Philip Jackson Darlington. 

Maynard, Margaret Ryerson, 1908, 29 South Broadway, Nyack, N. T. 

McAnulty, Anna, 1906, 1025 Vine Street, Scranton, Pa. 

McBride, Jessie Chambers, 1900, Navy Yard, Bremerton, Wash. 

Married, 1906, Mr. John Henry Walsh. 

McCauley, Katharine Lay, 1906, 

Care of Colonel C. A. H. McCauley, TJ. S. A., Denver, Colo. 

McCook, Caroline Alexander, 1908, 

Care of John Junius Morgan, Esq., St. James's Club, Piccadilly, 
London, England. 
Married, 1908, Mr. John Junius Morgan. 

McCoy, Anna Allison, 1905, Belief onte, Pa. 

McEwen, Madge, 1905, 3628 Russell Avenue, St. Louis, Mo. 

Married, 1906, Mr. Walter Schmitz. 

McGeorge, Beatrice, 1901, Cedar Hill, Cynwyd, Pa. 

McKeen, Elizabeth Farley, 1901, 

58 Clark Street, Brooklyn, New York City. 

McKeen, Helen Josephine, 1900, 

58 Clark Street, Brooklyn, New York City. 

McKenney, Virginia Spotswood, 1908. 

19 Union Street, Petersburg, Va. 

McLean, Charlotte Frelinghuysen, 1899, 

277 South 4th Street, Philadelphia. 

McManus, Caroline Esther, 1902, "Rosemary," Westtown, Pa. 

Married, 1903, Mr. John Rogers Dickey. 

McMullin, Mary Belle, 1893, 4805 Chester Avenue, Philadelphia. 

McMurtrte, Mary, 1889, 1104 Spruce Street, Philadelphia. 



34 Bachelors of Arts 

McWilliams, Ida Catharine, 1907, 

149 Sunbury Street, Shamokin, Pa. 

Meade, Addis Manson, 1899, Boyce, Va. 

Meigs, Alice McKinstry, 1905, 

Care of the American Embassy, London, England. Summer: Care 
of Arthur Orr, Esq., State Department, Washington, D. C. 
Married, 1908, Mr. Arthur Orr. 

Meigs, Cornelia Lynde, 1908, 511 North 3rd Street, Keokuk, la. 

Meigs, Grace Lynde, 1903, 511 North 3rd Street, Keokuk, la. 

Mendinhall, Mary Anna, 1896, Pine Crest, West Chester, Pa. 

Married, 1S97, Mr. J. Herbert Mullin. 

Merle-Smith, Dorothy, 1908, . .29 West 54th Street, New York City.' 

Merriman, Ltjcile, 1899, 10 East 97th Street, New York City. 

Married, 1906, Mr. Malcolm Farmer. 

Middleton, Helen, 1895, 509 Woodland Terrace, Philadelphia. 

Married, 1905, Mr. Thomas Smith. 

Miles, Ruth Helene, 1902, . .20 Dartmouth Street, Rochester, N. Y. 

Married, 1903, Dr. Charles R. Witherspoon. 

Miller, Dorothy Elizabeth, 1909, 

Care of Knauth, Nachod and Kiihne, Leipsic, Germany. 

Miller, Emma Louisa, 1901, 510 Sixth Avenue, Belmar, N. J. 

Married, 1905, Mr. Paul Clifford Taylor. 

Miller, Madge Daniels, 1901, . . .21 East 9th Street, New York City. 

Miller, Mary Ruth, 1905, 1912 Mt. Vernon Street, Philadelphia. 

Milligan, Louise, 1908, 

1409 North Delaware Street, Indianapolis, Ind. 

MlLTENBERGER, EUGENIA BLOW, 1909, 

3750 Lindell Avenue, St. Louis, Mo. 

Minor, Caroline, 1909, 508 East Franklin Street, Richmond, Va. 

Minor, Marie Louise, 1894 115 West 73rd Street, New York City. 

Minturn, Mildred, 1897, . . . Care of Ilottinguer et Cie, Paris, France. 

Married, 1906, Mr. Arthur Hugh Scott. 

Mitchell, Charlotte Barnard, 1899, 1707 Pine Street, Philadelphia. 

Mitchell, Charly Tiffany, 1898, 

Woodlands, Chaucer Road, Cambridge, England. 
Married, 1907, Mr. James Hopwood Jeans. 

Mitchell, Elizabeth Yeager, 1905, . . St. Mary's College, Dallas, Tex. 

Mitchell, Grace Downing, 1901, St. Davids, Pa. 

Mitchell, Renee, 1900, Mount Carmel, Pa. 

Married, 1905, Mr. Thomas M. Righter. 

Montague, Mary, 1903 504 Walnut Street, Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Married, 1909, Mr. George MI. Guild. 

Montenegro, Sara, 1902, 1006 Third Avenue, Louisville, Ky. 

Montgomery, Amelia, 1905, See page 8. 



Bachelors of Arts 35 

Mooers, Lilian Everett, 1903, 249 Haverhill Street, Lawrence, Mass. 

Moore, Lydia, 1905, 

Greenhill Avenue and Willard Street, Wilmington, Del. 

Married, 1906, Mr. Henry Tat null Bush. 

Moore, Marianne Craig, 1909, 

349 North Hanover Street, Carlisle. Pa, 

Morice, Jane Rosalie, 1899, Overbrook, Pa. 

Morison, Margaret Baker, 1907, 923 Cathedral Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Morris, Evelyn Flower, 1903, 

East Washington Lane, Germantown, Philadelphia. 

Married, 1903, Mr. Francis Reeve Cope, Jr. 

Morris, Frances Humphrey, 1902, . . 628 Maple Lane, Sewickley, Pa. 

Married, 190G, Mr. John Bruce Orr. 

Morris, Jacqueline Pascal, 1908, ...1G19 Arch Street, Philadelphia. 

Morris, Margaret, 1908, 53 Edgehill Road, New Haven, Conn. 

Morris, Margaretta, 1900, 

124 Highland Avenue, Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia. 
Married, 1907, Mr. Samuel Bryan Scott. 

Morrow, Caroline Nelye Elise, 1905, 

Kits Croft, Kinson, Dorset, England. Summer: Care of Morgan, 
Harjes & Co., Paris, France. 
Married, 1909, Mr. Chad wick Collins. 

Mort, Dorothy, 1908, 55 Edmund Place, Detroit, Mich. 

Moser, Lillian Virginia, 1893, See page 8. 

Muller, Anna, 1905, 5015 Osage Avenue, Philadelphia. 

Married, 1906, Mr. Sidney Wallace Prince. 

Muller, Lillie Elizabeth, 1903, . .5039 Osage Avenue, Philadelphia. 

Munn, Aristine Pixley, 1909, . .18 West 58th Street, New York City. 

Mygatt, Tracy Dickinson, 1909, ' 

507 W T est 138th Street, New York City. 

Neall, Adelaide Walbaum, 1900, Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia. 

Nearixg, Mary Frances, 1909, 1427 North 16th Street, Philadelphia. 

Nefp, Brownie Elizabeth, 1907, 

150 S. Main Street, Harrisonburg, Va. 

Neilson, Grace Herbert, 1906, ..Oxney, Near Dover, Kent. England. 
Married, 1909, Mr. John Constable LaCoste. 

Neilson, Nellie, 1893, See page 6. 

Neville, Mary, 1894, 722 West Main Street, Lexington, Ky. 

Neville, Zelinda, 1895. 722 West Main Street, Lexington, Ky. 

Newton, Alberta Montgomery. 1905, 

The Barnard, Park Avenue and Leavenworth Street, Omaha, Neb. 

Nichols, Content Shepard, 1899 See page S. 

Nichols, Elizabeth, 1893, 191S North Perm Street. Indianapolis, Ind. 
Married, 1S90, Mr. Charles W. Moores, 



36 Bachelors of Arts 

Nichols, Margaret Baxter, 1905, 

2525 Colfax Avenue South, Minneapolis, Miun. 
Married, 1909, Mr. Clarence Morgan Hardenbergh. 

Nichols, Margaret Parsons, 1897, 

114 South Arlington Avenue, East Orange, N. J. 
Married, 1904, Mr. William Hcmans Smith. 
Nichols, Ttrzah Lamson, 1890, . . .3207 Summer Street, Philadelphia. 

Nields, Elizabeth, 189S, 3303 Hamilton Street, Philadelphia. 

Married, 1905, Mr. Wilfred Bancroft. 

Norcross, Elizabeth, 1897, 376 North 31st Street, Portland. Ore. 

Married, 1908, Mr. Henry Minor Esterly. 

Norcross, Louise Jackson, 1900, .Carlisle, Pa. 

Norcross, Mary Jackson, 1900, Carlisle, Pa. 

Norris, Bertha Cornelia, .1904, 

539 Pelham Road, Germantown, Philadelphia. 

Norris, Mary Rachel, 1906. 

539 Pelham Road, Germantown, Philadelphia. 

North, Dorothy, 1909 7 West Walton Place, Chicago, 111. 

North, Helen Virginia. 1908, 1625 South Broad Street, Philadelphia. 

North, Lila Verplanck, 1895. 211 Oakdale Road, Roland Park, Md. 

Norton, Elsa, 1908. 700 North 40th Street, Philadelphia. 

Norton, Mabel Harriet. 1902. 1827 Arch Street, Berkeley, Cal. 

Oberge, Ullericka Hendrletta, 1898, See page 8. 

Ogllvie, Ida Helen, 1900. 

Barnard College, Columbia University, New York City. 

Oliver, Rachel Louise. 1893. . .99 Beacon Hill Avenue, Lynn, Mass. 

Olsen, Sophie Thlen, 1S9S, See page 8. 

O'Neil, Elizabeth Breading. 1903. See page S. 

Orlady, Edith Thompson. 1902 Huntingdon, Pa. 

Orrick, Christine. 1899 19 Washington Terrace. St. Louis, Mo. 

Married, 1902. Mi: William C. Fordyce. 

Ostrom, Virginia, 1901 42 West.4Sth Street, New York City. 

O'Sullivan. Mary Isabelle. 1907, ...4230 Otter Street, Philadelphia. 

Otheman, Margaret Stevens, 1905, 

41 East 53rd Street, New York City. 

Palmer, Emily Waterman, 1900, . . 3741 Locust Street, Philadelphia. 

Palmer. Henrietta Raymee, 1893, Mayfleld, Cal. 

Palmer. Madeline, 1899 305 Lawrence Street. New Haven, Conn. 

Married. 1899. Professor Charles Montague Bakevell. 

Palmer, Sara Stokes, 1904, The Meadows, Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Married, 1906. Mr. Frederic Lockwood Bacoter. 

Park, Marion Edwards, 1898, See page 8. 



Bachelors of Arts 37 

Pabbis, Marion. 1901 See page G. 

Pariush, Ethel, 1891 Radnor, Pa. 

Passmore, Frances, 1908, . . .410 Clifton Avenue, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Patterson, Margaret M., 1890, .... 1075 Penn Avenue, Denver, Colo. 
Married, 1895, Mr. Richard Crawford Campbell. 

Patterson, Mary Grafton, 1S88. 
Died, 1894. 

Paxson, Caroline Ely, 1890, 

210 Pine Street, Harrisburg, Pa. Summer: New Hope, Pa. 
Married, 1905, Mr. John C. Stive. 

Pearson, Bertha, 1904, 315 Deering Avenue, Portland, Me. 

Peck, Ethel Rogers, 2331 Le Conte Avenue, Berkeley, Cal. 

Married, 1909, Mr. Maurice Ennis Lombarili. 

Peck, Helen Lucile, 1903. 
Died, 1906. 

Peck, Louise Lyman, 1904 Palenville, N. Y. 

Married, 1906, Dr. Albert G. White. 

- Peckham, Laura, 1899, ...325 Washington Street, Glen Ridge, N. J. 
Married, 1903, Mr. Edward Hilsman Waring. 

Peckham, Mary, 1S97, : Westfield, N. J. 

Married, 1901, Mr. Josiah T. Tubby, Jr. 

Pelton, Jessie Parthenia, 1901, 254 Mill Street, Poughkeepsie, N. T. 

Pennypacker, Anna Maria Whitaker, 1897, 

Pennypacker's Mills, Schwenksville, Pa. 

Pennypacker, Eliza Broomall, 1897, 

Pennypacker's Mills, Schwenksville, Pa. 

Perkins, Agnes Frances, 1898, See page 8. 

Perkins, Elizabeth* Mary, 1900, See page »'.. 

Peters, Gabriella Brooke Forman, 1907, 

227 West 99th Street, New York City. 

Peters, Isabel Mebcein, 1904, . .33 West 49th Street, New York City. 

Pettit, Edith, 1895, See page 8. 

Pew, Ethel, 1906, Morris Avenue, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Pfaff, Ethel Curtis, 1904, 57 Ohio Street, Bangor. Me. 

Pfuhl, Sophie Augusta, 1900, ..1031 Fourth Street, Louisville, Ky. 

Phillips, Grace, 1901, 127 Hubbell Avenue, Houghton, Mich. 

Married, 1906, Mr. Gardner Rogers. 

Pinney, Grace, 1892, 120 Riverside Drive, New York City. 

Married, 1895, Mr. James M. Stewart. 

Plaisted, Martha, 190S, Sweet Briar College, Sweet Briar. Ya. 

Platt, Anna Estelle, 1909. 

1109 North Charles Street, Baltimore, Md. 



38 Bachelors of Arts 

Plunkett, Elizabeth Kellogg, 1902, 93 East Street, Pittsfield, Mass. 
Married, 1906, Dr. Brace Whitman Paddock. 

Pollock, Laura Leisenring, 1908, 

1050 East 17th Street, Brooklyn, New York City. 

Pope, Elizabeth Bogman, 1907, 104 High Street, Newburyport, Mass. 

Pobteb. Claka Phelps, 1905, 

1016 West Wayne Street, Fort Wayne, Ind. 
Married, 1909, Mr. William Page Yamelle. 

Porter, Katherine, 1S94, 149 William Street, Orange, N. J. 

Porter, Lucile Anne, 1902, 215 West Wayne Street, Fort Wayne, Ind. 
Married, 1903, Dr. Ben. Perley Weaver. 

Potts, Laurette Eustis, 1897, Pelham Manor, N. Y. 

Married, 1905, Mr. Lewis Frederic Pease. 
Powers, Anna, 1890. 
Died, 1894. 

Pratt, Anne Stokeley, 1906, Address unknown. 

Pressinger, Mildred, 1909, 5 West 81st Street, New York City. 

Price, Alice Montelius, 1903, .... Hampton Institute, Hampton, Va. 

Price, Marjorie Gertrude, 1903, 

509 S. Highland Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Married, 1904, Dr. George Scott McKnight. 

Proudfit, Josephine Voorhees, 1908, 

113 West Washington Avenue, Madison, Wis. 

Putnam, Avis, 1905, 

27 West 23rd Street, New York City (abroad 1909-10). 

Putnam, Bertha Haven, 1893, 

Mt. Holyoke College, South Hadley, Mass. 

Putnam, Margaret, 1907, 250 West 94th Street, New York City. 

Putnam, Shirley, 1909, 

1315 Connecticut Avenue, Washington, D. C. Summer: Care of Mr. 
Herbert Putnam, Library of Congress, Washington, D. C. 

Quimby, Mary Agnes, 1906, Berwyn, Pa. 

Ragsdale, Virginia, 1896, See page 6. 

Rambo, Eleanor Ferguson, 1908, See page S. 

Randolph, Harriet, 18S9, Low Buildings, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Rawson, Lucy, 1902, 352 Thrall Avenue, Clifton, Cincinnati, O. 

Married, 1909, Mr. William R. Collins. 

Rawson, Marjorie, 1906, 3767 Clifton Avenue, Clifton, Cincinnati, O. 

Raymond, Helen Jackson, 1903, 68 Walnut Street, Manchester, N. H. 
Married, 1908, Dr. John Christopher O'Connor. 

Ream, Frances Mott, 1901 S53 Seventh Avenue, New York City. 

Married, 1906, Mr. John Leisenring Kemmerer. 

Ream, Marion Buckingham, 1899, ..1365 Astor Street, Chicago, 111. 
Married, 1903, Mr. Redmond Davis Stephens. 



Bachetors of Arts 39 

Reeve, Margaret Morris, 1907, 

431 West Price Street, Germantown, Philadelphia. 

Reid, Estelle, 1894, 
Fifth Avenue Bank, Fifth Avenue and 44th Street, New York City. 

Reilly, Marion, 1901, Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Reinhardt, Christina, 1902, ..2121 Mt. Vernon Street, Philadelphia. 

Reinhardt, Esther Meredith, 1907, 

2121 Mt. Vernon Street, Philadelphia. 

Rembaugh, Bertha, 1897, See page 8. 

Rhoads, Anna Ely, 1SS9, See page 8. 

Rice, Edith Florence, 1907, See page 8. 

Richards, Annabella Elliott, 1907, Merion, Pa. 

Richards, Caroline Louise, 1906, Manson, la. 

Richardson, Mary Tuckerman, 1906, 

18 Hawthorn Street, Cambridge, Mass. 
Married, 1907, Mr. Robert Walcott. 

Richter, Ina May, 1908, 

Pine Crest Ranch, Mission Canon, Santa Barbara, Cal. 

Ridgway, Sarah Shreve, 1S98, r Columbus, N. J. 

Riegel, Ella, 1889, 
Care of J. S. Morgan & Co., 22 Old Broad Street, London, England. 

Ristine, Miriam Vaughan, 1908, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Ritchie, Mary Helen, 1896, See page 6. 

Robbins, Harriett, 1S93, Wethersfield, Conn. 

Roberts, Emma Dun woody, 1903, 

662 Stanbridge Street, Norristown, Pa. 

Roberts, Louise Elizabeth, 1908, 

16 East Main Street, Moorestown, N. J. 

Robins, Florence Eustis, 1904, . .4446 Madison Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

Robins, Helen J., 1892, 

1330 Nineteenth Street, Washington, D. C. Summer: 23 Gowen 
Avenue, Mt. Airy. Philadelphia. 

Robinson, Constance, 1898, ..207 Governor Street, Providence, R. I. 

Robinson, Helen Louise, 1901, 120 East 31st Street, New York City. 

Robinson, Leone, 1909, 4339 Morgan Street, St. Louis. Mo. 

Robinson, Virginia Pollard, 1906, See page S. 

Rock, Amy Cordova, 1893, ..1455 Belmont Street. Washington, D. C 
Married, 1899, Mr. Frederick Leslie Ransome. 
Rockwell, Martha Skerry, 1904, 

24 West Montgomery Avenue. Ardmore, Pa. 
Married, 1909, Mr. Henry Wilson Moorhouse. 
Rockwood, Eleanor Ruth, 1900, 

Care of Library Association, Portland. Ore. 



40 bachelors of Arts 

Ropes, Alice Rogers, 1906, Shao-wu, via Foochow, China. 

Married, 1909, The ReiX. Edwin Dwight Kellogg. 

Ropes, Ellen Marvin, Grossharthau. bei Dresden, Germany. 

Married, 1909, Herr Pfarrer Gottfried Martin Horn. 

Ropes, Margaret, 1903, 3 N Ranch, Oracle, Ariz. 

Rosenheimer, Bertha, 1907, 3320 Uber Street, Philadelphia. 

Ross, Anna, 1905, 19 Princeton Avenue, Swarthmore, Pa. 

Ross, Elizabeth, 1909 Haverford, Pa. 

Ross, Margaret Jane, 1904, ...626 De Kalb Street, Norristown, Pa. 
Married, 1907, Dr. Albert Rowland Garner. 

Rotan, Anne Sturm, 1902, 15 Logan Street, Lawrence, Mass. 

Married, 1904, Mr. Thomdike Dudley Howe. 

Rowley, Hannah Teresa, 1901, 

278 Alexander Street, Rochester, N. Y. 

Rulison, Lucy Constance, 1900, ... 26 rue de Lubach, Paris, France. 

Rumrill, Helen Du Bois, 1909, . . .419 Cooper Street, Camden, N. J. 

Rush, Frances Bertha, 1901, ..517 Emerson Street, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Married, 1904, Mr. Remembrance Lindsay Crawford. 

Ryan, Mary Catherine, 1909, Rosemont, Pa. 

Sachs, Alice, 1908, 135 Central Park West, New York City. 

Sackett, Mary Johnson, 1901, 237 Clermont Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Sampson, Edith F., 1890, See page 8. 

Sampson, Lilian Vaughan, 1891, See page 8. 

Sanborne, Sarah Minier, 1908, Brownell Hall. Omaha, Neb. 

Sandison, Helen Estabrook, 1906 See page 8. 

Saunders, Helen Matheson, 1897, 

260 Warburton Avenue, Yonkers, N. Y. 

Scattergood, Anna, 1896, Haverford, Pa. 

Married, 1897, Mr. Clarence Gilbert Hoag. 

Schaefer, Ethelinda Florence, 1908 Honolulu, H. I. 

Married, 1908, Mr. Alfred L. Castle. 

Schenck, Eunice Morgan, 1907, 

317 Springfield Avenue, Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia. 

Schiedt, Alice Edith, 1904, . .371 West 117th Street, New York City. 

Schiedt, Helen Lee. 1901, Lowell Road, West Orange, N. J. 

Married, 1904, Mr. Horace Arthur Woodicard. 

Schock, Caroline Franck, 1903, 

404 South 54th Street, Philadelphia. Summer: Mount Joy, Pa. 
Married, 1909, Mr. Chester Lloyd Jones. 

Schoff, Edith Gertrude, 1898, 

6388 Woodbine Avenue, Overbrook, Philadelphia. 
Married, 1906, Mr. John James Boericke. 



Bachelor h of Arts 41 

Schoff, Louise, 1902, 753 Belmont Street, Portland. Ore. 

Married, 1908, Mr.George Edgar Ehrman. 

Schoneman, May Cadette, 1899, 

6429 Drexel Road, Overbrook, Philadelphia. 

Married, 1900, Mr. Percival M. Sax. 

de Schweinitz, Agnes Julia, 1899, See page 8. 

Scofield, Jane, 1891. 
Died, 1896. 

Scott, Katharine Estheb, 1904, 

241 West Biddle Street. Baltimore, Md. Summer: 49 Arthur 
Street, Yonkers, N. Y. 

Scott, Margaret, 1904, See page 8. 

Scudder, Sylvia Church, 1901, 

19 Buckingham Street, Cambridge, Mass. Summer: Chocorua, 
N. H. 
Married, 1904, Mr. Ingersoll Botcditch. 

Seaver. Harriet Frances. 1907, 

320 Central Park West, New York City. 

Seeds, Nellie Marguerite. 1908, 

5222 Laurens Street, Germantown, Philadelphia. Summer: "For- 
est Lodge," Edgemoor, Del. 
Married, 1908, Mr. Scott Hearing. 

Seely, Bertha Warner, 1905 Brockport, N. Y. 

Selleck, Anne, 1904, 

1230 Amsterdam Avenue, New York City. Summer: Westport, 
Conn. 

Sergeant, Elizabeth Shepley, 1903, 

4 Hawthorn Road, Brookline, Mass. 

Seth, Frances Burbridge, 1902, Windsor, Walbrook, Baltimore. Md. 

Seymour, Clara Hitchcock, 1900, 

The Choate School, Wallingford, Conn. 
Married, 1900, Mr. George Clare St. John. 

Seymour, Elizabeth Day, 1897 See page 9. 

Sharpless, Edith Forsythe, 1905, 

1230 Amsterdam Avenue, New York City. Summer: Haverford, Pa. 

Sharpless, Lydia Trimble, 190S, Haverford. Pa. 

Shearer, Anne Frances, 1902, St. Asaph's Road, Bala, Pa. 

Married, 1904, Mr. John Armand Lafore. 

Shearer, Edna Aston, 1904, 5641 Cedar Avenue, Philadelphia. 

Shearman, Margaret Hilles, 1S95, 

1600 West 7th Street. Wilmington. Del. 

Sheppard, Mary, 1898, 229 Harvey Street, Germantown, Philadelphia. 

Sherwin, Anne Isabel, 1903, 10 Revere Street, Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

Shields, Emily Ledyard, 1905, See page 9. 



42 Bachelors of Arts 

Shipley, Katharine Morris, 1890, 

Bryn Mawr, Pa. Summer: Cartraff Cottage, Newport, R. I. 

Shippen, Ellen Francis, 1909, 

1217 Bloomfield Street, Hoboken, N. J. Summer: Lake Hopatting. 
N. J. 

Shoemaker, Jane Gushing, 1905, 1802 Wallace Street, Philadelphia. 

Shreve, Harriet Ridgway, 1S95, ..118 Grove Street, Plainfield, N. J. 

Shugert, Kate Dunlop, 190G, Bellefonte, Pa. 

Sickel, Corinne, 1901, 637 North 40th Street, Philadelphia. 

Married, 1904, Mr. R. Henderson Farley. 

Simpson, Frances Marion, 1906, Merion, Pa. 

Married, 1908, Dr. George Edward Pfahler. 

Sinclair, Agnes Maitland, 1903, 

800 Second Avenue, Cedar Rapids, la. 

Sinclair, Elsie Campbell, 1897. 

Married, 1899, Mr. Cortlandt Van Rensselaer Hodge. Died, 1900. 

Sinclair, Fanny Soutter, 1901, .... Elliott Avenue, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Married, 1902, Dr. Andrew Henry Woods. 

Sinn, Esther Marion, 1904, .... 1539 Monroe Avenue, Scranton, Pa. 

Sipe, Dollie Holland, 1899, .... 922 Frick Building, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Married, 1904, Mr. James Clifford Bradley. 

Slade, Annie Malcolm, 1901, . . . .Nepperhan Heights, Yonkers, N. Y. 

Sloane, Caroline Swanwick, 1900, 

S00 Hancock Street, Portland, Ore. Summer: Gearhart, Ore. 
Married, 1904, Mr. Benjamin Mathews Lombard. 

Smith, Alys Whitall Pearsall, 1890, 

Bagley Wood, Oxford, England. 
Married, 1894, The Hon. Bertrand Russell. 
Smith, Clara Lyford, 1907, See page 9. 

Smith, Clarissa Worcester, 1S96 Summit, N. J. 

Married, 1901, Mr. John Dey. 

Smith, Dorothy Ingalls, 1909, . .4725 Grand Boulevard, Chicago, 111. 

Smith, Emily James, 1889, 

335 West S6th Street, New York City. Summer: Westhampton 
Beach, Long Island, N. Y. 
Married, 1899, Mr. George Haven Putnam. 
Smith, Helen Twining, 1907, See page 9. 

Smith, Helen Williston, 1906, 

Johns Hopkins Medical School, Baltimore, Md. Summer: Ken- 
sett, Norwalk, Conn. 

Smith, Louise Pettibone, 1908, 

Hardin College, Mexico, Mo. Summer: Winchester Centre, Conn. 

Smith, Maria Welkins, 1906, . .200 West Wayne Avenue, Wayne, Pa. 

Smitheman, Helen Pugh, 1907, . .38 North 50th Street, Philadelphia. 

Snyder, Elizabeth, 1903, 9 Wyoming Avenue, Ardmore, Pa. 



Bachelors of Arts 43 

Softhgate. Maby, 1901, 431 Front Street, Hempstead, N. Y. 

Married, 1904. Mr. William Brewster. 

Spenceb, Mary Woesdale, 1005, 

2208 Maryland Avenue, Baltimore, Md. Summer: Roslyn, Long 
Island, N. Y. 
Married, 1909, Dr. J. Kent Worthington. 

Spencer, Maid Du Ply, 1003, Steyning, Sussex, England. 

Married, 1907, Dr. George Uvedale Corhett. 

Spofford, Barbara, 1909, 

155 West 58th Street, New York City. Summer: Norfolk, Conn. 

Spragfesmitii, Hflda, 1909, 29 West 68th Street, New York City. 

Staadeker. Jennie M.. 1894, ....422 East Broadway. Louisville, Ky. 

Stanwood, Alice, 1906, 393 Marlborough Street, Boston, Mass. 

Stapler, Martha Gafse, 1905, Pelham Manor, N. Y. 

Staples, Helen R., 1S93, 490 Locust Street, Dubuque, la. 

Steixer, Amy Lofise, 1899, 1038 North Eutaw Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Stevens. Alta Cornelia, 1909, 

The Kenwood Hotel, 47th Street and Kenwood Avenue, Chicago, 
111. Summer: Delavan, Wis. 

Stevens, Helen Lee, 1S92. 

1628 Sixteenth Street. N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Stevenson, Harriet, 1892. . . .610 West 147th Street, New York City. 
Married, 1894, Mr. Edward G. Pinney. 

Stewart. Margretta Shaw, 1903, Hastings, Neb. 

Married, 1909, Mr. Charles Henry Dietrich. 

Stites, Sara Hexry. 1S99, See page 6. 

Stoddard, Elizabeth Farris, 1902, Plymouth, Mass. 

Stoddard, Virginia Tryon, 1903, See page 9. 

Stoner. Mary' Ella, 1898, Frederick, Md. 

Married. 1901, Mr. Arthur Deualt Willard. 

Stof/ghtox. Leila Roosevelt. 1900, 

423 West 118th Street, New York City. 

Stoft, Gladys, 1909, 2025 Broadway. New York City. 

Straf-s. Dorothy. 1908, 

2 West 86th Street, New York City. Summer: Care of Philip 
Straus, 11 S. William Street. New York City. 

Streeter. Jflia. 1900. 100 Mamaroneck Avenue, White Plains. N. Y. 
Married, 1906. Mr. Henry Gardner. 

Strong, Axxe Hervey. 1S98, 

26 Cabot Street. Providence, R. I. Summer: 53 Salem Street, 
Andover, Mass. 

Si i- art, Sf/zette Kemper Grfndy. IOO17. 

123 Joralemon Street, Brooklyn, New York City. 

Stfrdevaxt. Wixifred, 1909, 

Bryn Mawr College. Bryn Mawr, Pa. Summer: Cragsmoor. N. Y. 



44 Bachelors of Arts 

Sturgis, Helen Rutgers, 1905, 138 East 36th Street, New York City. 

Sussman, Amy, 1902, 1S19 Octavia Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Sweet, Emma, 1907, 

Wolfe Hall, Denver, Colo. Summer: 1502 Highland Avenue, 
Salina, Kan. 

Sykes, Edith Ellen, 1903, 2032 North 18th Street, Philadelphia. 

Szold, Bertha, 1895, 2104 Chelsea Terrace, Baltimore, Md. 

Married, 1901, Mr. Louis Hiram Levin. 

Taber, Marion Russell, 1897, 348 Lexington Avenue, New York City. 

Tatlock, Jessie May, 1900, 141 East 16th Street, New York City. 

Tattersfield, Elsie Hannah, 1905, 

5019 Pulaski Avenue, Gerrnantown, Philadelphia. 

Taylor, Anne, 1889, ' College Hill, Cincinnati, O. 

Married, 1891, Mr. Frank H. Simpson. 

Taylor, Gertrude Elizabeth, 1893, 633 Francis Street, Madison, Wis. 

Married, 1893, Professor Moses Stephen Slaughter. 

Taylor, Helen Mary Anthony, 1905, 

553 West 7th Street, Cincinnati, O. 
Taylor, Marianna, 1903, 

Woman's Hospital, 22nd Street and North College Avenue, Phila- 
delphia. 

Taylor, Mary Lewis, 1892. 

Married, 1895, Professor Arthur Stanley Mackenzie. Died, 1896. 

Temple, Maud Elizabeth, 1904, See page 9 

Tevis, Julia Antony, 1902, 

The Elms, Strand-on-Green, Chiswick, London, W., England. 
Married, 1904, Mr. Elmer Bloomfield Lane. 

Thacher, Henrietta Foster, 1901, 

216 Edwards Street, New Haven, Conn. 
Thayer, Aurie Cleves, 1900, 

1362 Irving Street, N. W., Washington, D. C 
Married, 1905, Mr. Maynard Kauffman Yoakum. 

Thayer, Ellen, 1907, Flushing Institute, Flushing, N. Y. 

Thayer, Margaret, 1905, 115 School Street, Concord, N. H. 

Thomas, Annie Heath, 1897, See page 9. 

Thomas, Elsie Cecil, 1903, 16 South 20th Street, Philadelphia. 

Thomas, Helen Whitall, 1893, 

105 East 62nd Street, New York City. 
Married, 1903, Dr. Simon Flexner. 

Thomas, Jessie Dunlap, 1907, 

142 South Franklin Street, Wilkes Barre, Pa. 

Thomas, Louise Miner, 1901, 

142 South Franklin Street, Wilkes Barre, Pa. 

Thomas, Margaret Cheston, 1889, 

1004 Cathedral Street, Baltimore, Md. 
Married, 1893, Mr. Anthony Morris Carey. 



Bachelors of Arts 45 

Thomas. Martha Gibbons. 1890, 

Pembroke Hall, Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, Pa., or Whit- 
ford, Pa. 

Thomas, Miriam, 1902, See page 9. 

Thompson, Charlotte de Macklot, 1897 See page 9. 

Thompson, Elizabeth, 1!X)0 222 South 43rd Street, Philadelphia. 

Thompson. Elizabeth Taylor, 1907. 

5420 Walnut Street, Philadelphia. 

Married, 1908, Mr. Herbert Malcolm Remington. 

Thompson, Emma Osborn. 1905, 

715 Pine Street, Philadelphia. Summer: 128 Poplar Avenue, 
Wayne, Pa. 

Thobne, Luella H., 1S90. 
Died, 1897. 

Thornton, Janet, 1906, 

253 South 17th Street, Philadelphia. Summer: University Sta- 
tion, Charlottesville, Va. 

Thurber, Mary Tyler. 1899, Framingharn, Mass. 

Married, 1901, Mr. Henry Sturgis Dennison. 

Thurston, Margaret Gertrude, 1905, 

106 State Street. Portland, Me. Summer: "Ledgelawn," S. Port- 
land, Me. 

Tilley, Lydia Lois, 1895, 407 Freemason Street, Norfolk, Va. 

Todd, Anne Hampton. 1902, 2115 Spruce Street, Philadelphia. 

Totten, Edith, 1902, 1708 I Street, Washington, D. C. 

Towle, Elizabeth Williams, 189S See page 9. 

Towle, Mary Butter, 1899, See page 9. 

Tracy, Martha. 1898, 

5138 Wayne Avenue, Gerrnantown, Philadelphia. 

Tremain, Eloise Ruthven. 1904, 

28 West Loudon Street. Germantown, Philadelphia. 

Trimble. Helen Bell, 1902, See page 9. 

Trout, Ethel Wendell. 1901. . . .230 South 45th Street, Philadelphia. 

Truitt, Ada Viola. 1905, 4713 Hazel Avenue, Philadelphia. 

Tull, Alice Wright, 1904, . .302 Seventh Avenue, Asbury Park. X. J. 

Tunbbidge. Helen Elizabeth. 1897, 
Died, 1909. 

Tyler, Susan Bancroft. 1903, 

1303 Linden Avenue, Baltimore. Md. Summer: Eastern Point. 
Groton, Conn. 

Ullmann. Margaret, 1904. 1031 East 48th Street, Chicago, 111. 

Utley, Catherine Mere a. 1907, 

37 Madison Avenue. New York City. Summer: Plainfield. N. J. 



46 Bachelors of Arts 

Vail, Clara Warren. 1897, 

Grey House, Ardsley-on-Hudson. N. Y. Summer: T'other House, 
Woodstock, Vt. 
Married, 1902, Mr. Henry Stanford Brooks, Jr. 

Vail, Emily Eachel. 1891, 

125 West Chelten Avenue. Gerruantown, Philadelphia. 

Van Kirk, Edith Louise, 1898 1333 Pine Street, Philadelphia. 

Van Kirk, Susan Frances, 1894 1333 Pine Street. Philadelphia. 

Van Reypen, Alletta Louise, 1900. 

10 Norra Kajan, Helsingfors, Finland. 
Married. 1905, Baron Serge Alexander Korff. 

Van Wagenen, Kathrina Holland, 1904, 

Care of Dodd, Mead & Co., 372 Fifth Avenue, New York City. 
Summer: Alstead Centre, N. H. 

Van Wagenen, Mary Lacy, 1909, 

Grace Church School, 802 Broadway, New York City. Summer: 
100 Cleveland Street, Orange, N. J. 

Vauclain, Mary, 1904, 

Darlington Road, Schenley Park, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Married, 1907, Mr. Franklin Abbott. 

Vick, Ethel Phillips, 1908, 809 North 63rd Street, Philadelphia. 

Vickers, Florence Childs, 1898, See page 9. 

Wade, Clara Louise Whipple, 1904, 

631 Montgomery Avenue, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Wade, Grace Bennett, 1906, 

113 West Lanvale Street, Baltimore, Md. Summer: Ruxton 
P. O., Md. 

Married, 1908, Mr. Ernest Douglas Levering. 

Wade, Ruth Anita, 1909, . . . .735 Breckinridge Street, Helena, Mont. 

Wagner, Caroline Frances, 1903, 

128 Tulpehocken Street, Germantown, Philadelphia. 

Waldo, Alice Goddard, 1904, 

McMillan Hall, Washington University, St. Louis, Mo. 

Walker, Anna Martha, 1895, 2218 Elsinore Avenue, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Walker, Ethel, 1894, See page 9. 

Walker, Evangeline Holcombe, 1893. 

1527 Bolton Street, Baltimore, Md. 
Married, 1895, Professor Charles McLean Andrews. 

Walker, Evelyn, 1901 119 Park Street, Brookline, Mass. 

Walker, Susan Grimes, 1893, . . . .585 Boylston Street, Boston, Mass. 
Married, 1901, Mr. RicJiard Y. Fitzgerald. 

Wallace, Eleanor Wigton, 1903, . .445 Arcade Annex, Seattle, Wash. 
Married, 1908, Mr. Henry M. Loomis. 

Wallace, Elsie Amelia, 1907, Portland. Ore. 

Married, 1907, Mr. Aman Moore. 



Bachelors of Arts 47 

Wallace, Marjorie Newton, 1908, 

125 South Orange Avenue, South Orange, N. .7. 

Waller, Mary Kirk, 1908, River Forest, 111. 

Walters, Adeline B., 1896, 5734 Malcolm Street, Philadelphia. 

Married, 1902, Mr. Horace Edmund Gtiillou. 

Walton. Anne Garrett, 19U9, 212 W. Front Street, Media, Pa. 

Ward, Jane Shaw, 1905, 4 Tuxedo Place, Denver, Colo. 

Warner, Alberta Hinkle, 1905 Duff ryn Mawr, Pa. 

Warner, Margajret, 1895, 49 Forest Street, Hartford, Conn. 

Washburn, Margaret, 1908, 

2218 First Avenue South, Minneapolis, Minn. Summer: Wayzata, 
Minn. 

Waterbury, Ada Florence, 1905, Morristown, N. J. 

Wattson, Florence Trotter, 1903, 

111 Ilex Avenue, Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia. 

Wayne, Frances Charlotte, 1903.. 927 Clinton Street, Philadelphia. 

Weaver, Beatrice, 1902, Newburgh, N. Y. 

Weil, Mathilde, 1S92, 1730 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. 

Welles, Anna, 1908, 92 Avenue Henri Martin, Paris, France. 

Wesson, Cynthia Maria, 1909, 

330 Dartmouth Street, Boston, Mass. Summer: Cotuit, Mass. 

Wetherill, Edith, 1892, 318 West 75th Street, New York City. 

Married, 1900, Dr. Frederick Merwin Ives. 

Weygandt, Sophia, 1S89, 

105 West Walnut Lane, Germantown. Philadelphia. Summer: 
Buck Hill Falls, Pa. 
Married, 1894, Mr. John McArthur Harris. 
White, Amelia Elizabeth, 1901, 18 West 69th Street, New York City. 

White, Emma Yestine, 1909, 

1902 Pine Street, Philadelphia. Summer: Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

White, Esther Mary, 1906, 

443 West Bringhurst Street, Germantown, Philadelphia. Summer: 
Pocono Lake, Pa. 

White, Leda Florence, 1904, 

443 West Bringhurst Street, Germantown, Philadelphia. Summer: 
Pocono Lake, Pa. 

White, Martha Root, 1903 18 West 69th Street, New York City. 

White, Mary Elizabeth, 1900, 27 Broad Street, Stamford, Conn. 

Married, 1905, Mr. Charles O. Miller, Jr. 

Whitehead, Anna Marion, 1S97, 316 Chestnut Avenue, Trenton, N. J. 

Married, 1907, Mr. Edicin Herbert Grafton. 

Whitelaw, Hazel Cooper, 1908, ..2536 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, O. 

Whiting, Agnes Mary, 1894, University of Texas, Austin, Tex, 

Married, 1890, Mr. Philip Henry Wynne. 



48 Bachelors of Arts 

Whiting, Elizabeth, 1904, 

224 East Wister Street, Gerinantown, Philadelphia. 

Whitney, Annie Leslie, 1909, 

118 Berkeley Avenue, Orange, N. J. Summer: Alstead Centre, 
N. H. 

Wilkinson, Laura E., 1898, 

Fort Wayne, IncT. Summer: 2044 Master Street, Philadelphia. 
Married, 1902, Mr. Asa M. Tyler. 
Willets, Katherine Taber, 1890. 
Married, 1892, Mr. Alfred A. Gardner. Died, 1908. 
Williams, Constance Martha, 1901, 

26 Quincy Street, Boston, Mass. Summer: Bourne, Mass. 
Married, 1905. Mr. Joseph Warren. 
Williams, Esther, 1907, 

Randolph Avenue, Milton, Mass. Summer: Harbor View, Marble- 
head, Mass. 

Williams, Helen Elizabeth, 1898. 

309 South 15th Street, Philadelphia. Summer: Jenkintown, Pa. 

Williams, Kate, 1900, . . .177 13th East Street. Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Williams, Kate Elizabeth, 1900, 485 Palmetto Drive, Pasadena, Cal. 

Wilson, Elizabeth Dixon, 1908, 

108 West Baltimore Avenue, Lansdowne, Pa. 

Wilson, Helen Adams, 1903, . . . .792 Hancock Street, Portland, Ore. 

Wilson, Margaretta Bailey, 1905, 

South Lansdowne Avenue, Lansdowne, Pa. 

Windle, Letitia Butler, 1907, West Chester, Pa. 

Wines, Emma Stansbtjry, 1894 See page 9. 

Winslow, Philena Clarke, 1903, 
135 Commercial Street, Portland, Me. Summer: Cape Elizabeth, Me. 

Winsor, Elizabeth Ware, 1892, 

Dudley Road, Newton Centre, Mass. Summer: Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology, Boston, Mass. 
Married, 1898, Mr. Henry Greenleaf Pearson. 
Winter, Agnes Mary, 1907, . . 1512 North Broad Street, Philadelphia. 

Withington,. Mary Couch, 1906, 

Rosemary Hall, Greenwich, Conn. Summer: Care of H. H. 
Abbott, Vancouver, B. C, Canada. 

Woerishoffer, Carola, 1907, ... .11 East 45th Street, New York City. 

Wood, Bertha Gordon, 1898, 

The Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Summer: 122 
Hawthorn Street, New Bedford, Mass. 

' Wood, Eleanor Dennistoun. 1902. 

137 East 40th Street, New York City. Summer: Islip, Long 
Island, N. Y. 

Wood, Mary, 1900, Bryn Ayre Farm, Bound Brook, N. J. 

Married, 1909, Mr. F. Willard Ayres. 

Wood, Marnette, 1909, Hot Springs, Ark. 



Associate AUtmnce 49 

Wood, Ruth Blanche Isabella, 1904, El Rio Farm, Rehoboth, Mass. 
Married, 1900, Mr. PhiUp DeWolf. 

Woodelton, Gbace Adaline, 1908, 

202 Riverside Drive, New York City. 

Woodruff. Clara Lucei.ia, 1904, . .S00 Electric Avenue, Scranton, Pa. 

Woodruff, Lei.ia True. 1907, 

Rosemary Hall, Greenwich, Conn. Summer: S00 Electric Avenue, 
Scranton, Pa. 

Wooldridge, Grace La Pierre, 1909. 

1709 Park Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Workman, Anna Cheney. 1905. 

1922 West Dauphin Street, Philadelphia. 

Wray. Edith Sophia. 1901 Upland, Ind. 

Married, 1904. Mr. Clyde Cecil HolUday. 

Wright. Edith Buell, 1900, ..999 Woodword Avenue, Detroit, Mich. 

Wright, Lois Meta. 1903. 

Died, 1909. 

Wright, Mabel Clara, 1902, . . . .5238 Catherine Street, Philadelphia. 

Wright, Marian Adams. 1891, 

71 Francis Street. Brookline. Mass. Summer: Minot. Mass. 

Married. 1893, Mr. Thomas Ileum O'Connor. Married, 1899, Mr. Timothy 
Walsh. 

Wright, Marion Lucy. 1901 72 East 77th Street, New York City. 

Married, 1907. Mr. Robert LoAiffhlin Messimer. 

Wyeth, Helen Elizabeth, 1900, 

1814 North Bouvier Street, Philadelphia. 
Married, 1907, Mr. Joseph Otis Peirce. 

Young. Mar.torie. 1908 294 Ashmont Street, Boston, Mass. 

Young. Rose. 1907 5024 Larchwood Avenue. Philadelphia. 

Zebley. Helen Mary. 1898, 

320 Springfield Avenue, Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia. 



Associate- Members of the Alumnce Association. 

PAGH 

Allixson, Gertrude, 84 

Ames, Edith, 84 

Anderson, Eleanor Mildaxk, S4 

Arnold, Frances, 84 

Arny, Helen Worman, 84 

Bailey, Emma Doll, 85 

Baird, Alice Russell, 85 

Baird, Cora, 85 

Bartlett, Laura Alice 85 

Beggs, Ethel May, 86 

4 



50 Associate Alumnce 

PAGE 

Bernheim, Helen, 86 

Bissell, Marguerite, 86 

Boude, Mary Scott Clendenin, 86 

Bousqtjet, A. Carolina D., 66 

Brady, Josephine Edith, 86 

Bright, Josephine, 87 

Bright, Mary de Haven, 87 

Brown, Helen Davenport, 87 

Brown, Jane Mesick, 87 

Bruere, Emmie Cornelia 87 

Buzby, Anne Knox, 88 

Cadbury, Elizabeth Bartram, 88 

Carey, Josephine G., 88 

Chase, Lucy Edith, 88 

Cheney, Marjory, 89 

Clapp, Anna Verplanck, 89 

Clark, Bertha May, 67 

"Clarke, Anna Huidekoper, 89 

Clarke, Grace Tileston, 89 

Coles, Therese Pauline, 89 

Colin, Therese F., 57 

Collins, Grace Whitcomb, 89 

Crawford, Athalia Lucilla, . 90 

Curtis, Katharine Robinson, 90 

Dean, Anna Elliott, 90 

Dudley, Katharine, 91 

Dudley, Margaret, 91 

Dunn, Helen Prentiss, 91 

Eberman, Ella, 91 

Emerson, Helena Titus, 91 

Evans, Adelaide Rebecca, 92 

Evans, Rebecca Miller, 92 

Fish, Margaret Allina, 92 

Fisk, Evelyn Louise, 92 

Fleischmann, Helen, 92 

Floersheim, Edna W., 92 

Ford, Lucia Osborne, 92 

Foulke, Rebecca Mulford, 93 

Frederick, Miriam 93 

Gano, Katharine Vallette, 93 

Gerstenberg, Alice .- 93 

Goldmark, Susan, 93 

Green, Phyllis, 94 

Greene, Anne Dunkin, 94 

Haines, Lydia Rapelye, 94 

Hallowell, Bertinia, 94 

Harben, Clarissa, 94 



Associate Alum nee 51 

PAGE 

Hecht, Adelheid, 95 

Heike, Louise Ottilie, 95 

Heelings, Alice, 95 

Higginson, Elizabeth Bethune, 95 

Hill, Anna Mary, 95 

Hires, Linda Smith, 95 

Holland, Mary Elizabeth, 95 

Holman, Helen, 95 

Holman, Josephine Eoaven, 96 

Hopkins, Elizabeth, 96 

Horner, Jane Elizabeth, 96 

houghteling, harriot peaeody, 96 

Howland, Alice Gulielma 96 

Janney, Elizabeth Brinton, 97 

Justice, Hilda 97 

Kent, Margaret Yseult, 97 

Kershaw, Karie Kay, 97 

Ketchum, Florence Josephine, 97 

Kilpatrick, Ellen Perkins 98 

King , Florence, 98 

Kingsbacher, Er.ma, 98 

Kohn, Elsie, 98 

Lambert, Helen, 98 

Langdon, Julia Olivia, 98 

Lawther, Mary Roberts, 99 

Levering, Margaretta, 99 

Lewis, Ella Beasten, 99 

Lewis, Louise, 99 

Linn, Mary Hunter 99 

Logan, Annie Laurie, 99 

Lynch, Gertrude Mason, 99 

Maltby, Olive Douglas, 100 

Marsh, Cora Adriana 100 

Martin, Frances de Forest, 100 

Maurice, Emily Marshall, 100 

McCarter, Flora, 75 

McClellan, Louise French, 75 

McCormick, Caroline, 100 

McKeen, Anna Lewis, 101 

McNaughton, Celia Ruth, 101 

McLane, Hazel Ellen, 101 

Middendorp, Katharine Louise Irvin, 101 

Mifflin, Elizabeth Hornli 101 

Miles, Mary Elizabeth, 101 

Miller, Jessie Imbrie, 101 

Montenegro, Carlota, 102 

Moody, Mary Grace, 102 



52 .Associate Alumnae 

PAGE 

Morse, Kate Niles, 54 

Morton, Charlotte, 102 

Myers, Mary Calvert, . 102 

Niles, Laura, 103 

Pearson, Helen Sleeper, 77 

Phillips, Anna Tucker, 103 

Preston, Margaret Wickliffe 104 

Ramsey, Emily Yocum, 104 

Read, Helen Anna, 104 

Righter, Jane, 104 

Roche, Helen Marie, 105 

Rossmassler, Elfrida Anna, 105 

Ryan, Margaret Theresa, 105 

Schmidt, Helen, 105 

Seligman, Gladys, 106 

Seymour, Helen 106 

Sheppard, Irene, 106 

Shoemaker, Anna Peirce, 106 

Silkman, Eleanor, ] 06 

Smith, Julia Pratt, 107 

southerland, harriet rodman, 107 

Steel, Margaret Armstrong, 108 

Steele, Esther Clarkson Mayer, 108 

Stephens, Eliza Pullan, 108 

Stephens, Mary, 108 

Stevens, Mary Picton, 108 

Stevenson, Eleanor Jane 108 

Stone, Kitty Louise, 108 

Street, Jeannette Atwater, 63 

Strong, Ruth, 109 

Stubbs, Claribel 109 

Sturdevant, Frances Eloise, 109 

Sweet, Ethelwyn, 109 

Swift, Anna Vaughan, 109 

Swindell, Susie Ould, 109 

Taylor, Marion Satterthwaite, 109 

Thompson, Genevieve, 109 

Tsuda, Ume, 110 

Tudor, Mary, 110 

Tyler, Eleanor Justis, 110 

Utley, Elizabeth Minerva, 110 

Vallely, Eleanor, 110 

Vickery, Margaret 110 

Wagner, Annie de Benneville, Ill 

Wallace, Lurena Groesbeck, Ill 

Warkentin, Edna Wella, Ill 

Warren, Louise Bronson, Ill 



Former European Fellows f»3 

PACK 

Wells, Agnes Erminia Ill 

West, Anna Ervina, Ill 

Whitney, III., Emily Frances, 112 

Whittredge, Euphemia, 112 

Wight, Dorothy Talbot 112 

Williams, Alice Amelia, 112 

Williamson, Mary Peabody 112 

Willits, Esther Evans, 112 

wlnterbotham, genevieve f., 112 

Woods, Hope Rowell, 113 

WlJPPERMANN, ZOYLA GoMEZ, , 113 

Wyatt, Edith, 113 



Former Holders of European Fellowships. 

Balch, Emily Greene, See page 1 1 . 

Holder of the Bryn Mawr European Fellowship, 1889-90. 

Becker, Amanda Fbedericka, . .5870 Cabanne Avenue, St. Louis, Mo. 
Holder of the President's European Fellowship, 1903-04. 

Billmeyer, Helen May, See page 12. 

Holder of the Bryn Mawr European Fellowship, 1902-03. 

■Boeing, Alice Middleton See page G, 

Holder of the Mary E. Garrett European Fellowship, 1907-08. 

Bourland, Caroline Brown, See page 5. 

Holder of the Mary E. Garrett European Fellowship, 1900-01. 

Breed, Mary Bidwell See page ."». 

Holder of the Bryn Mawr European Fellowship, 1S94-95. 

Brooks, Harriet, 990 Cote St. Lnc Road, Montreal, Canada. 

Holder of the President's European Fellowship, 1902-03. 
Married, 1907, Mr. Frank H. Pitcher. 

Brownell, Louise Sheffield, See page 14. 

Holder of the Bryn Mawr European Fellowship. 1893-94. 

Cady, Mary Louise, Decatur, Ga. 

Holder of the Mary E. Garrett European Fellowship, 1906-07. 

Claflin, Edith Frances, See page 5 

Holder of the Mary E. Garrett European Fellowship, 1899-1900. 

Coulter. Cornelia Catlin, 

Pembroke East. Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Summer: 
Ferguson, Mo. 
Holder of the President's European Fellowship, 1908-09. 

Ellis, Ellen Deborah, See page 5. 

Holder of the Bryn Mawr European Fellowship, 1901-02. 

Emery, Annie Crosby See page 5. 

Holder of the Bryn Mawr European Fellowship, 1892-93. 



54 Former European Fellows 

Fleisher, Eleanor Louie, See page 21. 

Holder of the Bryn Mawr European Fellowship, 1903-04. 

Giles, Ellen Rose, See page 7. 

Holder of the President's European Fellowship, 1897-98. 

Hall, Edith Hayward, See page 5. 

Holder of the Mary E. Garrett European Fellowship, 1903-04. 

Hamilton, Edith, See page 7. 

Holder of the Mary E. Garrett European Fellowship, 1895-96. 

Hamilton, Margaret, See page 25. 

Holder of the Bryn Mawr European Fellowship, 1897-98. 

Hardy, Cora, See page 25. 

Holder of the Bryn Mawr European Fellowship, 1899-1900. 

Harmon, Esther, 332 Batavia Street, Toledo, O. 

Holder of the President's European Fellowship, 1907-08. 

Hill, Virginia Greer, See page 26. 

Holder of the Bryn Mawr European Fellowship, 1907-08. 

Laird, Elizareth Rebecca, See page 5. 

Holder of the President's European Fellowship, 1898-99. 

Langenbeck, Clara, The Nelson, Walnut Hills, Cincinnati, O. 

Holder of the President's European Fellowship, 1896-97. 

Leftwich, Florence, See page 5. 

Holder of the Bryn Mawr European Fellowship, 1895-96. 

Lewis, Florence Parthenia, Austin, Tex. 

Holder of the President's European Fellowship, 1899-1900. 

Lewis, Mayone, See page 31. 

Holder of the Bryn Mawr European Fellowship, 1908-09. 

Lowengrund, Helen Moss, See page 8. 

Holder of the Bryn Mawr European Fellowship, 1906-07. 

Maddison, Isabel, See page 5. 

Holder of the Mary E. Garrett European Fellowship, 1894-95. 

Martin, Emilie Norton, See page 5. 

Holder of the Mary E. Garrett European Fellowship, 1S97-9S. 

Morse, Kate Niles, 24 Park Street, Haverhill, Mass. 

Holder of the Mary E. Garrett European Fellowship, 1901-02. 

Nichols, Helen Hawley, 

Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Summer: 1424 Morse Ave- 
nue, Rogers Park, Chicago, 111. 
Holder of the Mary E. Garrett European Fellowship, 190S-09. 

Nowlin, Nadine, 42 The Lorraine, Kansas City, Mo. 

Holder of the President's European Fellowship, 1906-07. 

Park, Marion Edwards See page 8. 

Holder of the Bryn Mawr European Fellowship, 1898-99. 

Parris, Marion, See page 6. 

Holder of the Bryn Mawr Research Fellowship, 1906-07. 

Peebles, Florence, See page 6. 

Holder of the Mary E. Garrett European Fellowship, 1898-99. 



Former Resident Fellows 55 

Perkins, Elizabeth Mary, See page 6. 

Holder of the Bryn Mawr European Fellowship, 1900-01. 

Ragsdale, Virginia, See page 6. 

Holder of the Bryn Mawr European Fellowship, 1896-97. 

Reimer, Marie, See page 6. 

Holder of the Mary E. Garrett European Fellowship, 1902-03. 

Sampson, Lilian Vaughan, See page 8. 

Holder of the Bryn Mawr European Fellowship, 1891-92. 

Schaeffer, Helen Elizabeth, ' See page 0. 

Holder of the Mary E. Garrett European Fellowship, 1905-06. 

Schmidt, Gertrud Charlotte, 

631 Montgomery Avenue, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 
Holder of the President's European Fellowship, 1904-05. 

Shearer, Edna Aston, See page 41. 

Holder of the President's European Fellowship, 1905-06. 

Shields, Emily Ledyard, See page 9. 

Holder of the Bryn Mawr European Fellowship, 1905-06. 

Shipley, Katharine Morris, See page 42. 

Holder of the Bryn Mawr European Fellowship, 1890-91. 

Stevens, Nettie Maria, See page G. 

Holder of the President's European Fellowship, 1901-02. 

Stites, Sara Henry, See page 6. 

Holder of the President's European Fellowship, 1900-01. 

Traver, Hope, See page 6. 

Holder of the Mary E. Garrett European Fellowship, 1904-05. 

Wade, Clara Louise Whipple, See page 46. 

Holder of the Bryn Mawr European Fellowship, 1904-05. 

Warren, Winifred, See page 6. 

Holder of the Mary E. Garrett European Fellowship, 1S96-97. 

Weusthoff, Anna Sophie, 

Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Summer: 135 East 95th 

Street, New York City. 

Holder of Special Ottendorfer Memorial Research Fellowship in Teutonic 
Philology, 1907-0S ; Holder of Ottendorfer Memorial Research Fellowship 
in Teutonic Philology, 1908-09. 



Former Resident Fellows. 

Albert, Grace, See page 6. 

Fellow in History, 1903-04. 

Atkinson, Mabel, ..26 Denning Road, Hampstead, London, England. 

Fellow in Economics and Politics, 1902-03. 

Aven, Anna Ward, Clinton, Miss. 

Fellow in Latin, 1908-09. 



56 Former Resident Fellows 

Baker, Mabel Whitman, . . . .3100 Newark Street, Washington, D. C. 

Fellow in Latin, 1S96-97. 

Married, 1903, Mr. Alfred Ettlse Brooks. 

Bancroft, Jane M., West Stockbridge, Mass. 

Fellow in History, 1SS5-S6. 

Married, 1891, Mr. George 0. Robinson. 

Bartlett, Helen, See page 5. 

Fellow in English, 1893-94. 

de Beauregard, Esther Tontant. 117 Collier Street, Toronto, Canada. 

Fellow in Romance Languages, 1S94-95. 
Married, 1905, Mr. Percy James Robinson. 

Beckwith, Minnie Ada. 

The Baldwin School. Bryn Mawr, Pa. Summer: 30 Home Street, 
New London, Conn. 
Fellow in Latin, 1903-04. 

Benneson, Cora Agnes 4 Mason Street, Cambridge, Mass. 

Fellow in History, 1S87-S8. 

Blake, Sue Avis See page 6. 

Fellow in Physics, 1906-07. 

Blanchard, Elizabeth Miller See page 12. 

Fellow in Mathematics, 1SS9-90. 

Boring, Alice Middleton See page 6. 

Fellow in Biology, 1906-07. 

Bourland, Caroline Brown, See page 5. 

Fellow in Romance Languages, 1898-99. 

Bramhall, Edith Clementine, 

Rockford College, Rockford, 111. Summer: 213 East 6th Street, 
Michigan City, Ind. 
Fellow in History, 1898-99. 

Brombacher, Caroline Garnar, 

177 Woodruff Avenue, Brooklyn, New York City. 

Fellow in Greek, 1896-97. 
Married, 1906, Mr. Sidney Stacey. 

Brooks, Harriet, See page 53. 

Fellow in Physics, 1901-02. 

Brownell, Jane Louise, See page 6. 

Fellow in Political Science, 1893-94. 

Burnley, Mary Cloyd 1029 Grove Street, Evanston, 111. 

Fellow in Chemistry, 1897-98 ; Research Fellow in Chemistry, 1908-09. 
Married, 1909, The Rev. James Madison Stifler. 

Byrnes, Esther Fussell, See page 5. 

Fellow in Biology, 1894-95. 

Cady, Mary Louise, See page 53. 

Fellow in Greek, 1905-06. 

Cam, Helen Maud, 

The Ladies' College, Cheltenham, England. Summer: Birchanger 
Rectory, Bishop's Stortford, England. 
Fellow in History, 1908-09. 



Former Resident Fellows 57 

Chamberlain, Ethel Mary, 

5711 Washington Avenue, Chicago. Summer: 915 N. Broad 
Street, Galesburg. 111. 
Fellow in Philosophy, 1908-09. 

Clark, Mabel Parker, See page 7. 

Fellow in English, 1S89-90. 

Clarke, Mary Patterson, 721 Illinois Street, Lawrence, Kan. 

Fellow in History, 1906-07. 

Clough. Ida Prescott, 37 Cedar Street, Somerville, Mass. 

Fellow in Latin, 1900-01. 

Cole, Anna Lewis, 

Sweet Briar, Va. Summer: Care of Mrs. J. Patton, Kate Avenue, 
Baltimore, Md. 
Fellow in Romance Languages, 1895-96. 

Colin, Therese F., Wellesley College, YVellesley, Mass. 

Fellow in Romance Languages. 1893-94. 
Married, , Mr. Alfred Colin. 

Cooper. Elva 042 Winchester Street, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Fellow in Mathematics, 1907-08. 

('cm Mings, Louise D. 

Vassar College. Poughkeepsie. N. T. Summer: 25G Main Street, 
East, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. 
Fellow in Mathematics, 1S98-99. 

Denis, Willey, 1420 General Taylor Street, New Orleans, La. 

Fellow in Chemistry, 1902-03. 

Dover, Mary Violette, 

Mt. Holyoke College. South Iladley, Mass. Summer: Peterboro, 
Ontario, Canada. 
Fellow in Chemistry, 1905-00. 

Dudley, Louise Georgetown, Ky. 

Fellow in English. 1906-07. 

Eddy, Helen May Mayville, X. Dak. Summer: Marengo, la. 

Fellow in Latin, 1904-05. 

Edmand. Marietta Josephine, 

1062 Berwyn Avenue, Edgewater, Chicago, 111. Summer: Pella, la. 

Fellow in Latin, 1897-98. 

Married, 1903, Dr. Frederick Perry yoole. 

Edwards. Katharine May. 

39 Wilder Hall, Wellesley. Mass. Summer: Whitney's Point, 
Broome County, X. T. 
Fellow in Greek, 18SS-S9. 

Ellis, Ellen Deborah, See page 5. 

Fellow in Economics and History. 1904-05. 

Evers, Helen Margaret See page 5. 

Fellow in Romance Languages, 1904-06. 

Faiinestock. Edith Vassar College, Poughkeepsie. X. Y. 

Fellow in Romance Languages. 1S97-98. 

Fairbanks, Charlotte 522G Spruce Street, Philadelphia. 

Fellow in Chemistry, 1S96-97. 



58 Former Resident Fellows 

Fairclough, Elizabeth Mart, 

228 Market Street, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. 
Fellow in Greek, 1893-94. 

Fabnham, Lois Anna, See page 7. 

Fellow in History, 1901-02. 

Fogg, Emily, 113 S. Wycombe Avenue, Lansdowne, Pa. 

Fellow in History. 1897-98. 

Married, 1900, Professor Edward Shericood Meade. 

Fowler, Eugenia, See page 7. 

Fellow in Physics, 1902-03. 

France, Wilmer Cave, 

Low Buildings, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Summer: The Common, Minch- 

inliampton, Gloucestershire, England. 

Fellow in Greek, 1892-93. 

Married, 1906, Mr. J. Edmund Wright. 

Franklin, Susan Bralev, See page 5. 

Fellow in Greek, 1889-90. 

Gage, Kitty Augusta, New Paltz, N. Y. 

Fellow in Greek, 1885-86. 

Gates, Fanny Cook, 

The Woman's College, Baltimore, Md. Summer: 402 Franklin 
Street, Waterloo, la. 
Fellow in Mathematics, 1896-97. 

Gentry, Ruth, See page 5. 

Fellow in Mathematics, 1890-91, 1892-93. 

Gordon, Wilhelmina, 

Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. 
Fellow in Latin, 1906-07. 

Graham, Ellen Maud, Owen Sound, Ontario, Canada. 

Fellow in History, 1896-97. 

Graham, Minnie Almira, 

Lake Erie College, Painesville, O. Summer: 34 Park Place, Lock- 
port, N. Y. 
Fellow in Chemistry, 1906-07. 

Griffin, Hattie Josephine, North Bend, Ore. 

Fellow in Latin, 1899-1900. 

Gwinn, Mary, See page 5. 

Fellow in English, 1885-87. 
Married, 1904, Mr. Alfred Hodder. 

Hahn, Dorothy Anna, See page 24. 

Fellow in Chemistry, 1907-08. 

Haines, Jane Bowne, See page 7. 

Fellow in History, 1892-93. 

Hamilton, Edith See page 7. 

Fellow in Latin, 1894-95. 

Hanington, Florence, 159 Stanley Avenue, Ottawa, Canada. 

Fellow in Mathematics, 1905-06. 

Married, 1907, Mr. Charles Reginald Carter. 



Former Resident Fellows 59 

Hardcastle, Frances, ..31 Boundary Road, London, N. W., England. 
Fellow in Mathematics, 1894-95. 

Harmon, Esther, See page 54. 

Fellow in German and Teutonic Philology, 1908-09. 

Harper, Carrie Anna, 

Mt. Holyoke College, South Hadley, Mass. Summer: Sunderland, 
Mass. 
Fellow in English, 1898-99. 

Harris, Elizabeth, See page 7. 

Fellow in Greek, 1890-91. 

Harrison, Elizabeth S Linnet Lane, Liverpool, England. 

Fellow in Greek, 1906-07. 

Hazen, Annah Putnam, 

68 Washington Square, New York City. Summer: White River, "Vt. 
Fellow in Biology, 1898-99. 

Hazlewood, Charlotte Williams, ...161 Allen Avenue, Lynn, Mass. 
Fellow in Greek, 1898-99. 

Henry, Margaret Edith, University of Texas, Austin, Tex. 

Fellow in Philosophy, 1900-01. 

Married, 1907, Dr. Alvin Saunders Johnson. 

- Hicks, Amy Maud, 

33 Downside Crescent, Hampstead, London, England. 
Fellow in Greek, 1904-05. 

Highet, Minnie Elizabeth, 
Elmira College, Elniira, N. T. Summer: Cobourg, Ontario, Canada. 
' Fellow in German and Teutonic Philology, 1896-97. 

Hill, Sarah D., Lincoln, Neb. Summer: Richmond, Ind. 

Fellow in Teutonic Philology, 1904-05. 
Married, 1908, Mr. Milton D. Baumgartner. 

Hooper, Edith Sophia, 

Heathersby, Chislehurst Road, Kent, England. 
Fellow in English, 1900-01. 

Hopkins. Mary Delia, See page 7. 

Fellow in English, 1896-97. 

Howell, Jean Kirk, 123 West 7th Street, Plainfield, N. J. 

Fellow in Biology, 1891-92. 

Hughes, Winona Alice, 

Mt. Holyoke College, South Hadley, Mass. Summer: 271 West 
Church Street, Marion, O. 
Fellow in Chemistry, 1900-01. 

Hutchinson, Anabelle Roxburgh, 

Brookside, Catterick, Yorkshire, England. 
Fellow in Romance Languages, 1899-1900. 

Hyde, Ida H., Lawrence, Kan. 

Fellow in Biology, 1892-93. 

Hyde, Winifred Florence, Berggasse 1, Jena, Germany. 

Fellow in Philosophy, 1902-04. 



60 Former Resident Fellows 

Isham, Mary Keyt. Columbus State Hospital, Columbus, O. 

Fellow in Philosophy, 1899-1900. 

Jones, Laura Lucinda, Box 353, Cobourg, Ontario, Canada. 

Fellow in English. 1894-95. 

Keys, Florence V College Avenue, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

Fellow in Greek, 1S91-92 ; Fellow in English, 1892-93. 

King, Georgiana Goddard, See page 7. 

Fellow in Philosophy, 1S96-97 ; Fellow in English, 1897-98. 

King, Helen Dean, See page 5. 

Fellow in Biology, 1897-9S. 

King, Lida Shaw, 

Women's College in Brown University, Providence, R. I. 
Fellow in Greek, 1899-1900. 

Laird, Elizabeth Rebecca, See page 5. 

Fellow in Physics, 1897-98. 

Lamberton, Helen, See page 7. 

Fellow in Physics, 1908-09. 

Langenbeck, Clara, See page 54. 

Fellow in Biology, 1S95-96. 

Leftwich, Florence, See page 5. 

Fellow in Romance Languages, 1902-03. 

Lewis, Florence Parthenia, See page 54. 

Fellow in Philosophy. 1898-99. 

Longbottom, Gertrude, ..Tbe Hollies, Louth, Lincolnshire, England. 

Fellojv in Mathematics, 1897-98. 

Lord, Eleanor Louisa See page 5. 

Fellow in History, 1889-90, 1895-96. 

Lovell, Helen Louisa, Hardiu College, Mexico, Mo. 

Fellow in Greek, 1887-88. 

Married, 1896, Mr. John Wilson Million. 

Lowater, Frances. See page 5. 

Fellow in Physics, 1896-97. 

Lundie, Elizabeth Helen, 36 Fort Street, Montreal, Canada. 

Fellow in Physics, 1905-06. 

MacDonald, Margaret Baxter See page 5. 

Fellow in Chemistry, 1898-99. 

Maddison, Isabel See page 5. 

Fellow in Mathematics, 1893-94. 

Mann, Carrie Alice. 

Fellow in Mathematics, 1903-04. 
Died, 1905. 

Marcuse, Bella, 

6 Frontenac Apartments, 442 Sanguinet Street, Montreal, Canada. 

Fellow in Chemistry, 1904-05. 
Married, 1908, Mr. Douglas Mcintosh. 

Martin, Emilie Norton, See page 5. 

Fellow in Mathematics. 1895-96. 



Former Resident Fellows 01 

Mason, Gertrude Helen, 2G27 Channing Way, Berkeley, Cal. 

Fellow in English, 1887-88. 

McNair, Grace Elizabeth Brodhead, Wis, 

Fellow in History, 1900-01. 

Merrill, Katharine Boston Normal School, Boston, Mass. 

Fellow in English, 1890-91. 

Miles, Caroline, 5728 Madison Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

Fellow in History, 1891-92. 
Married, 1895, Mr. William Hill. 

Millman, Mabel Helen, 490 Huron Street, Toronto, Canada. 

Fellow in French, 1908-09. 

Morse, Kate Niles, See page 54. 

Fellow in Greek, 1900-01. 

Morriss, Margaret Shove, 

Mt. Holyoke College. South Hadley, Mass. Summer: 1904 Mt. 
Royal Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 
Fellow in History, 1907-08. 

Mory, Ruthella Bernard The Somerset, Baltimore, Md. 

Fellow in History, 1899-1900. 

Married, 1903, Mr. Arthur BameVeld Bibbins. 

Neilson, Nellie, S<<> ] >age 6. 

Fellow in History, 1894-95. 

Nichols, Elizabeth See page 35. 

Fellow in Biology, 1893-94. 

Northway, Mary Isabel. 

1657 Burnaby Street, Vancouver, B. C, Canada. 

Fellow in Physics, 1900-01. 

Married, 1904, The Rei\. K. J. Wilson. 

Nowlin, Nadine See pa ge 54. 

Fellow in Biology, 1905-06. 

O'Grady, Marcella I Wiirzburg, Bavaria. 

Fellow in Biology, 1887-89. 

Married, 1897, Professor Theodore Boveri. 

Olsen, Sophie Yhlen. See page 8. 

Fellow in Teutonic Philology, 1899-1900. 

Parker, Emma Harriet, 

Care of American Express <"<>.. 11 rue Scribe, Paris. France. 
Summer: Cbarlestown, X. II. 

Fellow in Chemistry, 1893-94. 

Tarris, Marion. See page 6. 

Follow in Economics and Politics. 1905-06. 

Paschall, Annie Goode. 

Fellow in Greek, 1894-95. 
Died, 1895. 

Peebles, Florence, Sec page 6. 

Fellow in Biology. 1890-97. 



62 Former Resident Fellows 

Peebles, Rose Jeffries, 

Vassar College, Pougbkeepsie, N. T. Summer: 1217 South 13th 
Street, Birmingham, Ala. 
Fellow in English, 1907-08. 

Perkins, Elizabeth Mary, See page 6. 

Fellow in Latin, 1902-03. 

Petty, Mary, Greensboro, N. C. 

Fellow in Chemistry, 1895-96. 

Potts, Laurette Eustis, See page 38. 

Fellow in English, 1899-1900. 

Purdie, Eleanor, Ortler, Prestbury, Gloucestershire, England. 

Fellow in Greek, 1895-96. 

Rabourn, Sara Brewer Francis, 

551 Twenty-fifth Street, Ogden, Utah. Summer: Centralia, Mo. 
Fellow in Mathematics, 1906-07. 

Ragsdale, Virginia, See page 6. 

Fellow in Mathematics, 1902-03. 

Randolph, Harriet, See page 38. 

Fellow in Biology, 1889-90. 

Reed, Bertha, McMillan Hall, Washington University, St. Louis, Mo. 

Fellow in Teutonic Philology, 1906-07. 
Married, 1909, Mr. George Raleigh G off man. 

Reed, Margaret Adeline, Meyersdale, Pa. 

Fellow in Biology, 1908-09. 

Reimer, Marie, See page 6. 

Fellow in Chemistry, 1899-1900, 1901-02. 

Reynolds, Grace Potter, Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Fellow in Chemistry, 1908-09. 

Reynolds, Minnie Beatrice, 244 Myrtle Avenue, San Francisco, Cal. 

Fellow in Greek, 1897-98. 

Married, 1903, Mr. James A. Kinkead. 

Ritchie, Mary Helen, See page 6. 

Fellow in Latin, 1898-99. 

Rock, Amy Cordova, See page 39. 

Fellow in Chemistry, 1894-95. 

Salmon, Lucy Maynard, 263 Mill Street, Pougbkeepsie, N. Y. 

Fellow in History, 1886-87. 

Sandison, Helen Estabrook See page 8. 

Fellow in English, 1908-09. 

Satterthwaite, Sarah E., 2037 Franklin Avenue, Toledo, O. 

Fellow in Greek, 1886-87. 

Married, 1890, Dr. Francis Alexander Leslie. 

Schaeffer, Helen Elizabeth, See page 6. 

Fellow in Physics, 1904-05. 

de Schweinitz, Agnes Julia, See page S. 

Fellow in Teutonic Philology, 1902-03. 

Sew all, Hannah Robie, Forest Glen, Md. 

Fellow in History, 1888-89. 



Former Resident Felloics 63 

Shapiro, Rebecca, Marshfield, Wis. 

Fellow in Romance Languages, 1900-01. 
Married, 1904, Mr. Richard Strauss. 

Shearer, Edna Aston, See page 41 . 

Junior Fellow in Philosophy, 1904-05 ; Fellow in Philosophy, 190G-07. 

Sheavyn, Phoebe A. B., 

The Oaks, Fallowfield, Manchester, England. 
Fellow in English, 1895-96. 

Shute, Helen Winifred, 25 Fourth Street, Bangor, Me. 

Fellow in Teutonic Philology, 1893-94 ; Fellow by Courtesy, 1894-95. 
Married, 1900, Mr. Warren J. Moulton. 

Sinclair, Alice Wailuku, Maui, H. I. 

Fellow in Teutonic Philology, 1903-04. 
Married, 1906, Mr. Rowland Bacchus Dodge. 

Smith, Amelia Catherine, 4003 Powelton Avenue, Philadelphia. 

Fellow in Biologv. 1900-01. 

Married, 1901, Mr. Philip Poicell Calvert. 

Smith, Eva Maria, ...56 Gowan Avenue, Fulham, London, England. 

Fellow in Mathematics, 190S-09. 

Smith, Minna Steele, Xewnhani College, Cambridge, England. 

Fellow in Teutonic Philology, 1894-96. 

South worth, Effie A., 420 East 4th Street, Tucson, Ariz. 

Fellow in Biology, 1885-86. 

Married, 1S96, Mr. Volney Morgan Spalding. 

Stevens, Nettie Maria, See page 0. 

Fellow in Biology, 1902-03. 

Stewart, Anne Amelia, 28 South Street, Halifax, N. S., Canada. 

Fellow in Mathematics, 1886-87. 

Street, Jennette Atwater, . .47 Lakeview Avenue, Cambridge, Mass. 

Fellow in Latin, 1895-96. 

Married, 1901, Professor Edicard C. Jeffrey. 

Sweet, Marguerite, See page G. 

Fellow in English, 1891-92. 

Swindler, Mary Hamilton, 

Care of American Express Co., 5-6, Havmarket. London, England. 
Summer: 202 East 3rd Street, Bloomington, Ind. 
Fellow in Greek, 1907-09. 

Taylor, Lily Ross, 1532 University Avenue, Madison, Wis. 

Fellow in Latin, 1907-08. 

Thompson, Charlotte De Macklot, ' See page 9. 

Fellow in Romance Languages, 1896-97. 

Tibbals, Kate Watkins, Vassal- College, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

Fellow in English, 1901-02. 

Torelle. Ellen. ..1017 Fourteenth Avenue, S. E. Minneapolis, Minn. 
Fellow in Biology, 1903-04. 

Towle, Elizabeth Williams, See pagr 9. 

Fellow in Biology, 1899-1900. 

Trayer, Hope, See page 0. 

Fellpw in English, 1903-04. 



64 Former Graduate Students 

Urdahl. Margerethe, See page 6. 

Fellow in Teutonic Philology, 1900-03. 

VanDeman, Esther Boise, 

Piazza Esquilino 12, Rome, Italy. Summer: 2514 13th Street, 
Washington, D. C. 
Fellow in Latin, 1892-93. 

Waddell, Mary Evelyn Gertrude, 

St. Margaret's College, Toronto, Canada. Summer: Orono, On- 
tario, Canada. 
Fellow in Mathematics, 1904-05. 

Walker, Anna Martha, See page 46. 

Fellow in Latin, 1905-06. 

Warren, Winifred, See page 6. 

Fellow in Latin, 1S93-94. 

Wergeland, Agnes Mathilde, Laramie, Wyo. 

Fellow in History, 1890-91. 

White, Florence Donnell. 

Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. Su-mmcr: Newcastle, Me. 
Fellow in French, 1907-08. 

Wilkinson, Annie Lyndesay, 

623 Westview Street, Germantown, Philadelphia. 

Fellow in Mathematics, 1899-1900. 
Married, 1902, Dr. Joseph Head. 

Williams, Ella C, 

326 West 58th Street, New York City. Svm-mer: Burdett, N. Y. 
Fellow in Mathematics, 1885-86. 

Willis, Gwendolen Brown, See page 6. 

Fellow in Greek, 1902-04. 

Winston, Mary Frances, 1702 Massachusetts Street, Lawrence, Kan. 

Fellow in Mathematics, 1891-92. 
Married, 1900, Mr. Henry Byron Newson. 

Wood, Ida, See page 6. 

Fellow in English, 1888-89. 



Former Graduate Students. 

Abbott, Fidelia Nichols, 1908-09, 

Kniekerbaeker Hall. 1541 Central Avenue, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Summer: Quanah, Okla. 

Adaire, Nannie, 1904-05, See page 6. 

Adams, Eliza Raymond, 1893-94, See page 9. 

Adams, Sophie Frances, 1902-03, See page 9. 

Albert, Grace, 1901-03, 1904-08 See page 6. 

Allen, Elizabeth, 1902-04, 

Hotel St. George, Brooklyn, New York City. 



Former Graduate Student* 65 

Allen, Hope Emily, 1905-06, See page 6. 

Allen, Jane, 1907-09, See page 10. 

Allen, Rosa Noyes, 1898-99, 57 Rutland Square. Boston, Mass. 

. Allis, Mary Elizabeth, 1902-05, See page 10. 

Ambrister, Maud Anna, 1907-08. 

203 E. Tonhawa Street, Norman, Okla. 

Anthony, Alice, 1904-05, See page 10. 

Archibald, Sara Elizabeth, 1894-95, Malone, N. Y. 

Married, 1897, Mr. John Alexander Macintosh. 

Armfield, Lucille, 1894-95, Monroe, N. C. 

Married, 1905, Mr. Frank Armfield. 

Ashburner, Elizabeth Atkins, 1904-06, 1908-09, . . Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Atkins, Emma Louise, 1894, See page 11. 

Aven, Anna Ward, 1906-OS, See page 55. 

Bain, Emma, 1889-90, 220 De Kalb Square, Philadelphia. 

Married, 1892, Mr. Glen Levin Swiggett. 

Baker, Bessie, 1893-94. 
Died, 1899. 

Baldwin, Alice Mary, 1908-09, 

The Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Summer: Acworth, N. II. 

Baltz, Ellen Duncan, 1900-01, See page 11. 

Bareis, Grace Marie, 1897-99, 1902-0(5. 
201 West 11th Avenue, Columbus, O. Summer: Canal Winchester, O. 

Barnes, Letitia, 1905-06, Grove ( !ity, Pa. 

Barr, Dora, 1893-94. 

Married, 1900, Mr. William Broun. Died, 1903. 

Bartlett, Helen, 1892-93, 1894-95 See page 5. 

Bash, Amy Ballance, 1898-99, 

4736 Prytania Street, New Orleans, La. 
Married, 1902, Mr. C. E. A. Do icier. 

Bass, Stella, 1893-94, 

3562 Evanston Avenue, Chicago, 111. Summer: R. F. D. 1, St. 
Joseph, Mich. 
Married, 1894, Mr. Joseph E. Tilt. 
Bates, Theodora, 1905-06, See page 6. 

Beardshear, Hazel Leoni, 1S97-98 Oak Creek, Colo. 

Married, 1901, Mr. Lauren Miller Chambers. 

Becker, Amanda Fredericka, 1902-03, See page 53. 

Beckwith, M. Ethelwynn Rice, 1907-0S, 

2042 East 115th Street, Cleveland, O. 
Married, 1900, Mr. William E. Beck with. 

Beckwith, Minnie Ada, 1907-OS, See page 56. 

Bedinger, Maria Voorhees, 1S92-!>:; See page 12. 

5 



66 Former Graduate Students 

Beechley, Lorette Jesse, 1900-01, 1902, 

1111 First Avenue, Cedar Rapids, la. 

Bennett, Ethel Maey, 1906-08, . See page 6. 

Benson, Mary Estella, 1895-96, 

572 Jefferson Street, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Berry, Emma Louise, 1897-98, 373 Front Street, Owego, N. T. 

Berst, Jessie May, 1898-99, 709 Brown's Avenue, Erie, Pa. 

Birdsael, Anna Palmyra, 1899-1900, 

19 West 129th Street, New York City. Summer: Wallkill, N. Y. 

Bishoff, Ruth Spies, 1903-04, 1905-06, Halifax, Pa. 

Blackwell, Ethel B., 1891-92, 

Brookfield Road, Upper Montclair, N. J. 
Married, 1901, Mr. Alfred Brookes Robinson. 

Blair, Annie King, 1900-01, 519 Vine Street, Camden, N. J. 

Married, 1905, Mr. William W. Allen, Jr. 

Blair, Kate Ruth, 1896-97, 

1501 Neil Avenue, Columbus, O. Summer: Wilmington, O. 

Blake, Sue Avis, 1898-1900, 1904-06, See page 6. 

Blanchard, Elizabeth Miller, 1902-03, See page 12. 

Bliss, Eleanora Frances, 1904-06, 1909, See page 6. 

Borden, Fanny, 1901-02, 618 Rock Street, Fall River, Mass. 

Boring, Alice Middleton, 1904-05, See page 6. 

Boring, Lydia Truman, 1903-04, See page 13. 

Bourland, Caroline Brown, 1899-1900, 1901-02, See page 5. 

Bousquet, A. Carolina D., 1894-95, 323 Blondeau Street, Keokuk, la. 
Married, 1904, Dr. William Brooks La Force. 

Bowerman, Helen Cox, 1908-09, 

Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Summer: Point Pleasant, 
N. J. 

Boyer, Martha Getz, 1909, See page 13. 

Boysen, Marie Jeannette, 1904-05, Carlinville, 111. 

Branson, Anna Mary, 1903-05, See page 6. 

Breed, Mary Bidwell, 1S99-1901, See page 5. 

Brevitt, Jessie, 1889-90, 144 Wilson Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Brigham, Pauline Wight, 1901-02. 
Died, 1905. 

Brown, Carolyn Trowbridge, 1902-03, See page 13. 

Brown, Jeannette Swan, 1886-87, 444 Elm Street, Chicago, 111. 

Brownell, Louise Sheffield, 1896-97, See page 14. 

Bruff, Anna Marie, 1908-09, Atlantic, la. 

Budd, Harriet May, 1892-93, 706 University Avenue, Syracuse, N. Y. 
Married, 1896, Mr. Luther Ogden Wadleigh. 






Former Graduate Students 67 

Buffum, Marianna Nicholson, 1906-07, See page 7. 

Bull, Emily Louisa, 1891-92, See page 14. 

Bunting, Martha, 1891-93, See page 5. 

Burnside, Mary Hortense, 1 896-97, 

825 East High Avenue, Oskaloosa, la. Summer: Wauwausesog, 
Birch Island, Wis. / 

Married, 1899, Mr. Irving Culver Johnson. 

Burton, Cornelia R., 1903-04, Basin, Wyoming. 

Married, 1906, Dr. Herbert Taylor Harris. 

Byrnes, Esther Fussell, 1893-94, 1895-97, See page 5. 

Cadbury, Emma, Jr., 1901-02, See page 15. 

Cady, Mary Louise, 1904-05, See page 53. 

Caldwell, Effie Pearle, 1903-04, Cedar, la. 

Campbell, Marian Elizabeth, 1900-01, Address unknown. 

Married, 1902, Mr. Ralph E. Mitchell. 

( 'an ax, Marjorie Stockton, 1904-05, See page 15. 

Carroll. Anna Belle. 1888-90, Harveysburg, O. 

Married, 1892, Mr. Edgar Stinson. 

Carter, Jeannette Eva, 1891-92, Catawba, W 7 . Va. 

Cartland, Mary Alice, 1904-05. 417 Asheboro Street, Greensboro, N. C. 
Married, 1908, Mr. James G. Lewis. 

Chamberlain, Susanna Willey, 1898-99. 

237 East Terrace, Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Ctiamplin, Evangeline St. Clair, 1891-92. 1895-96, 

2222 Chapel Street, Berkeley, Cal. 

Chandlee, Edith A., 1901-02, 3212 Summer Street, Philadelphia. 

Chandlee, Elizabeth Betterton, 1907-08, See page 15. 

Chapin, Edith Burwell, 1899-1900, See page 16. 

Chase, Josephine Alzaida, 1907-08, 

Social Service House, 37 North Bennet Street, Boston, Mass. 

Chisholm, Mary E.. 1891-92, 1566 Fulton Street, Chicago, 111. 

Married. 1894, Mr. John E. Xorthrup. 

Choate, Augusta, 1905-06, Bfyn Mawr. Pa. 

( 'i.AiLiN. Edith Frances, 1897-99, See page 5. 

Clagett. Edith J.. 1904-05. 

2082 Vyse Avenue, New York City. Summer: Palmyra, Mo. 
Married, 1898. Mr. John Wainwright Evans. 
( 'lagiiorn, Kate Holladay, 1892-93 See page 16. 

Clark, Agnes Elizabeth. 1905-06. 

541 West 124th Street, New York City. 

Clark, Bertha May. 1900-01 4: > .1T Walnut Stroet. Philadelphia. 

Clark, Mabel Parker. 1890-93, See page 7. 



68 Former Graduate Students 

Clothier, Hannah Hallowell, 1S96-97, Swarthmore, Pa. 

Married, 1898, Professor William Isaac Hull. 

Cochran, Fanny Travis, 1904, See page 17. 

Coffin, Elizabeth White, 1899-1900, 

880 S. Cedar Street, Greensboro, N. C. 
Married, 1904, Mr. John W. Lewis. 

Cole, Anna Lewis, 1906-07 See page 57. 

Coleman, Anne C, 1896-97, See page 17. 

Colin, Therese F., 1894-96, See page 57. 

Collitz, Klara Hechtenberg, 1904-07, 

135 Mt. Royal Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 
Married, 1904, Professor Hermann Collitz. 

Converse, Helen Prentiss, 1901-02, See page 17. 

Cook, Ruth Hilma, 1906-07 Walnut Hill School, Natick, Mass. 

Cope, Julia, 1896-97, 1905-06, See page 17. 

Corbus, Florence Ketchum, 1908-09, Glen Road, Ardinore, Pa. 

Costelloe, Rachel Conn, 1908-09, 

Court Place, Iffley, Oxford, England. 

Coulter, Cornelia Catlin, 1907-08, See page 53. 

Cowan, Musa Kimball, 1902-03, 1410 Broadway, Parsons, Kan. 

Cowgill, Marthana M., 1906-07, 

Montezuma, Ind. Summer: San Benito, Tex. 

Coyle, Margaret Hildegarde. 1907-08, See page 17. 

Coyle, Susan Edmond, 1902-03, 

1326 Nineteenth Street, Washington, D. C. Summer: Lake Street, 
Bridgeton, N. J. 

Craig, Bess, 1902-03, Grove City, Pa. 

Craig, Marie, 1895-96, 117 East Pine Street, Grove City, Pa. 

Married, 1902, M'r. Charles E. McConkey. 

Crawford, Emma Walker, 1904-05 See page 18. 

Cummings, Louise D., 1900, 1906, See page 57. 

Curtis, Margaret, 1907-08, ..61 Trumbull Street, New Haven, Conn. 

Dale. Jennie, 1895-96 Nordhoff, Cal. Summer: Grove City, Pa. 

Married, 1904, Mr. Morgan Barnes. 

Dame, Katharine, 1894-95, 109 Summit Avenue, Ithaca, N. Y. 

Darling, Jessie, 1895-96, 5 Douglas Road, Schenectady, N. T. 

Married, 1900, Mr. Arthur W. Henshaw. 

Darlington, Beulah Walter, 1893-94, 

305 N. High Street, West Chester, Pa. 
Married, 1901, Mr. Maurice BaMioin Pratt. 

Daugherty, Ellouise, 1894-95. 
Died, 1903. 

Daughtrey, Gene, 1908-09, Georgetown, Tex. 



Former Graduate Students 69 

Davidson, Alice Reed, 1898-1900, 

704 North Avenue, West, North Side, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Davis, Mabel, 1905-0G Newmarket, Ontario, Canada. 

Davis, Ruby, 1903-04, Westtown, Pa. 

Davis, Sarah Ellen, 1905-OG, See page 18. 

Dean, Harriett Lulu, 1902-03, Seattle, Wash. 

Married, 1904, Mr. Julius Carstcnscn. 

Deitrick, Ethel, 190G-07, GOO Thirteenth Avenue, New Brighton, Pa. 

De Lacuna, Grace Mead Andrus, 1908-09, 

Yarrow East. Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 
Married, , Professor Theodore dc Leo de Lacuna. 

Denis, Willey, 1899-1901, See page 57. 

Denise, Edith, 1889-90, . . .Lake Forest, 111. Summer: Burlington, la. 

Dewell, Jessie Keyes, 1892-93, 232 Bradley Street, New Haven, Conn. 

Dimon, Abigail Camp, 1898-99, 1901-04, See page 7. 

Donnelly, Lucy Martin, 1895-97, See page 19. 

Dreutlein, Mae Cecilia, 1903-04, 

601 Chestnut Hill, Meadville, Pa. Summer: R. F. D. 3, Conneaut 
Lake, Pa. 
Married, 1908, Mr. James Clement Shults. 

Droege, Mathilde, 1908-09, 

The Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Summer: 228 East 69th 
Street, New York City. 

Easton, Margaret, 1891-92, 5931 Walnut Street, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Married, 1901, Mr. Frank Jtahm Liggett. 

Eby, Minnie Dorothy, 1901-04, 

State Normal School, Trenton, N. J. Summer: 705 Hamilton 
Avenue, Trenton, N. J. 

Edwards, Alma Taylor, 1907-08, 

Chester, S. C. Summer: 2024 Main Street, Columbia, S. C. 

Edwards, Edith, 1901-02, See page 20. 

Elmore, May Terry, 1898-1900, 

Dwight House, Englewood, N. J. Summer: 109 W. Chemung 
Place, Elmira, N. Y. 

Emery, Agnes, 1886-87, Lawrence, Kan. 

Emery, Annie Crosby, 1892-93, 1895, 1895-0<; See page 5. 

Evans, Mae J., 1893-94, Oskaloosa. la. 

Fahnestock, Edith, 1901-02, 1900-07, See page 57. 

Failing, Katharine Frederika, 1904-05 See page 20. 

Farnham, Lois Anna, 1900-01, See page 7. 

Fay, Mary Luella, 1897-98, See page 7. 

Fernald, Grace Maxwell, 1904-06, 1357 East 57th Street, Chicago, 111. 

Field, Ada Martitia, 1898-99, 1900-02, 

52 East Washington Street, Newnan. Ga. 



70 Former Graduate Students 

Fillius, Ella Sabin, 1903-04, Longraont, Colo. 

Married, 1906, Mr. Merrill Holt. 

Fleishee, Eleanob Louie, 1903-04, See page 21. 

Flickinger, Alice, 1905-06, See page 7. 

Fogg, Emily, 1898-99, See page 58. 

Fowlee, Eugenia, 1901-02, 1908-09, ., See page 7. 

Feancisco, Lucy, 1895-97, 140 Kinsey Street, Richmond, Ind. 

Feanklin, Susan Bealey, 1890-93, 1901, 1901-03, See page 5. 

Feeeman, Mary L., 1885-87, ...85 Howell Street, Canandaigna, N. Y. 

Feicke, Eleanoe Feances, 1907-08, . . 1903 Tioga Street, Philadelphia. 

Fbiedlandee, Estheb, 1S93-94, 

2803 Second Avenue. South, Minneapolis, Minn. Summer: Minne- 
tonka Beach, Minn. 

Fey, Anna Delany, 1899, See page 22. 

Fulleeton, Kathaeine, 1901-02, 1903-04, 

Low Buildings, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Summer: 195 Newbury Street, 
Brockton, Mass. 

Furnas, Edith, 1898-99, 627 Glenn Avenue, Wichita, Kau. 

Gale, Mary Eastman, 1888-90, . . 176 Pleasant Street, Laconia, N. H. 
Married, 1897, Mr. Charles Bell Hihhard. 
Gardner, Claeibel, 1893-94. 
Died, 1897. 

Gardner, Julia Anna, 1906-07, See page 7. 

Gaelow, Lulu, 1894-97. 
Died, 1897. 

Gates, Fanny Cook, 1895-96, See page 58. 

Geee, Helena, 1903-04, 

174 Post Road, Mamaroneck, N. Y. Summer: 50 Pineapple 
Street, Brooklyn, New York City. 

Giles, Ellen Rose, 1896-9S, See page 7. 

Glide, Maey L., 1899-1900, 2615 K Street, Sacramento, Cal. 

Married, 1903, Mr. Charles M. Goethe. 

Goddaed, Anna, 1891-92, 1894, 402 W. Adams Street, Muncie, Ind. 

Goddaed, Geace, 1891-92, 3172 Farnam Street, Omaha, Neb. 

Married, 1893, Mr. Gory don M. Rich. 

Gofp, Leah, 1889-90, 1893-94, See page 7. 

Goedon, Wilhelmina, 1905-06, See page 58. 

Geabill, Winogene, 1S96-97, 709 College Street, Beloit, Wis. 

Married, 1907, Mr. Robert Govt Chapin. 

Geagg, Floeence Alden, 1899-1900, 

124 South Street, Northampton, Mass. Summer: Hudson, Mass. 

Geay, Agnes Woodbuey, 1895-96, Haverf ord, Pa. 

Married, 1894, Mr. Henry SJierring Pratt. 



Former Graduate Students 71 

Greene, Ella Catherine, 1S98-99, 

The Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Summer: 155 Union 
Avenue, Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Greene, Inez Abigail, 1908-09, 2614 Telegraph Avenue, Berkeley, Cal. 

Greenwood, Celia Daphne, 1901-02, Princeton, 111. 

Grimes, Ethel, 1896-97, . .1546 Massachusetts Street, Lawrence, Kan. 
Married, 1901, Mr. J. H. Outland. 

Grossmann, Bella Mira, 1896, See page 24. 

Gwinn, Mary, 18S7-S8, See page 5. 

Hackney, Henryanna Clay, 1895-96, 

1044 West Market Street, Greensboro, N. C. 
Married, 1905, Mr. David White. 

Haines, Jane Bowne, 1891-92, 1893-94, See page 7. 

Haines, Mary, 1891-92, 1206 Twenty-first Street, Des Moines, la. 

Married, 1896, Mr. Frank Irving Herriott. 

Hale, Mabel, 1908-09, 

Cartref, Bryn Mawr, Ta. Summer: Raleigh, N. C. 

Hall, Edith Hayward, 1900-03, 1905-09, See page 5. 

Hall, Florence, 1SSS-S9, Rockford, Wilmington, Del. 

Married, 1897, Mr. John C. Phillips. 

Hanington, Florence, 1904-05, See page 58. 

Harbach, Maude Amelia, 1900-01, Oskaloosa, la. 

Hardcastle, Frances, 1892-93, ' See page 59. 

Harding, Flora Keziah, 1903-04, Cana, N. C. 

Married, 1908, Mr. Jacob Tatum Eaton. 

Harmon, Esther, 1906-07, See page 54. 

Harper, Carrie Anna, 1896-97, See page 59. 

Harrington, Emily Bevan, 1895-96. 
Died, 1906. 

Harrison, Miriam Alice, 1892-93, 

225 East Lee Street, Greensboro, N. C. 
Married, 1904, The Rev. Stephen Stanton Myriclc. 

Harrison, Susan Rachel, 1885-S7, Whittier, Cal. 

Married, 1893, Mr. Allen Clifford Johnson. 

Haskell, Caroline Flora, 1897-9S, Marshalltown, la. 

Married, 1900, Mr. Ira Oscar Kemble. 

II azen, Annah Putnam, 1897-9S, See page 59. 

Hawkins, Emma Jean, 1902-03, Malone, N. T. 

Head, Harriet Frazier, 1895-96, See page 26. 

Heath, Mary Bailey, 1893-94, 4022 Green Street, Philadelphia. 

Married, 1897, Mr. Waldemar Lee. 

Hedges, Olive, 1904-05, 337 N. Main Street, New Castle, Ind. 



72 Former Graduate Students 

Helm, Maude Lucille, 1905-06, 

312 West 0th Street, Rochester, Ind. Summer: 301 South Maine 
Street, Williamsburg, Ind. 

Hemenway, Josephine, 1S99-1900, 

135 East 55th Street, New York City. 

Henley. Florence Ruth. 1899-1900, Telluride, Colo. 

Married, 1906, Mr. Murray N. iladleij. 

Heritage, Gertrude Langden, 1S9G-1900, See page 7. 

Hewitt, Jessie Germain, 190S, See page 2G. 

Hiestand, Eleanor, 1890-93 0427 Sherwood Road, Overbrook, Pa. 

Married, 1892, Mr. William Moore. 

Hill, Sarah D., 1903-04, See page 59. 

Hilles, Margaret Hill, 1899-1900, See page 2G. 

Hilliard, Caroline E., 1885-86. Northboro, Mass. 

Hillman, Elizabeth, 1900-01, ..1083 Shady Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Himes, Anna Magdalen, 1900-01, Owaneco, 111. 

Married, 1904, Mr. George V. Metzel. 

Hodge, Helen Henry, 1901-04, See page 7. 

Hogue, Mary J., 1905-07, 

Pennsylvania College for Women, Pittsburgh, Pa. Summer: 503 
North High Street, West Chester, Pa. 

Holmes, Mary Davis, 1905-06, 

Mt. Airy, N. C. Summer: Woodland, N. C. 

Hopkins, Mary Delia, 1897-98, See page 7. 

Horine, Anna Mary, 1902-03, Carlinville, 111. 

Married, 1905, Mr. John Franklin Zimmerman. 

Horst, Mary Elizabeth, 1902-04, . . 13 South 11th Street, Reading, Pa. 
Married, 1905, Mr. Elmer Lewis Mohn. 

Hotchkiss, Ruth, 1907-09, 436 E. Buchtel Avenue, Akron, O. 

Howard, Hazel Antoinette, 1906-07, Wbittier, Cal. 

Howland, Marcella, 1891-92. 

Died, 1S94. 

Hoyt, Helen Strong, 1S97-99 See page 7. 

Huebener, Helen J.. 1904-08, 

42 Boulevard Raspail, Paris, France. Summer: 231 Lancaster 
Avenue, Lancaster. Pa. 

Huff, Frances Josephine, 1908-09. Bridgeport, Tenn. 

Hunnicutt, Gertrude Oren, 1S95-96, 

1223 Vermont Street, Lawrence, Kan. 

Hussey, Mary Ind a, 1897-1901, 1906, See page 5. 

Hutciiin. Elizabeth Ferguson, 1904-05, See page 28. 

Hyde, Ida H., 1S91-92, See page 59. 



Former Graduate Students 73 

Jackson, Alice W., 1SSS-S9 Swarthmore, Pa. 

Jackson, M. Katharine, 1908-09, 

Haverford, Pa. Summer: Care of Hans Renold, Esq., Priestnall 
Hey, Heaton Mersey, Lancashire, England. 
Married, 1908, Mr. William Hartas Jackson. 

James, Mary Denver, 1902-03, See page 28. 

Jay, Anna Elizabeth, 1900-01, 122 North 11th Street, Richmond, Ind. 

Jeffers, Mary, 1895-9S. 1903-04, 1906-07, 1908-09, See page 7. 

Jeffries, Helen Howard, 1889-90, Atkinson. Neb. 

Married, 1896, Mr. Joseph Warner Angell. 

Jobe, Mary Lenore, 1901-03, 

50 Morningside Avenue West. New York City. Summer. Tappan, O. 

Johnson, Alice Piiebe, 1902-03, Oskaloosa, la. 

Johnson, Annette, 1900-07, Decatur, Ind. Summer: Pairmount, Ind. 

Johnson, Elizabeth, 1S94-95, Pico Heights Station, Los Angeles, Cal. 
Married, 1896, Mr. Fred. Weaver Esgen. 

Johnson, Emily, 1905-00, Oskaloosa, la. 

Johnson, Mary A., 18S7-89, Marco, Fla. 

Married, 1894, Mr. Charles Louis Olds. 

Johnson, Miriam Leigh, 1905-06, See page 7. 

Joi-instin, Ruth Frances, 1903-04, London, O. 

Jolliffe, Ruby Maud, 1907-OS, Clinton, Ontario, Canada. 

Jonas, Anna Isabel, 1905-06, See page 7. 

Jones, Grace Latimer, 1901-02, See page 7. 

Kaminski, Lilian Virginia, 1S98-99, Richmond. Ind. 

Kaminski, Olive M., 1899, Richmond, Ind. 

Married, 1899, Mr. Henry Rayburn Robinson. 

Kellum, Margaret Dutton, 1897-99, 1904-05, See page 29. 

Keys, Florence V., 1895-90, See page 60. 

Kidwell, Lola May, 1900-01, ....849 Irving Avenue, San Diego, Cal. 

King, Emma Gurney,, 1902-03, 

Greensboro, N. C. Summer: High Point, N. C. 

King, Helen Dean, 1S95-97, 1901-06, See page 5. 

King, Helen Maxwell, 1908-09, 

Bryn Mawr College. I'.ryn Mawr, Pa. Summer: Olivet, Mich. 

King, Maude Gladys, 1908-09, 

2071 West Ninth Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Kingsley, Mary Winship, 1903-05, 

Tufts College, Mass. Summer: S. Ilarpswell. Me. 

Kirk. Abby, 1905-00, See page 30. 

Kirkland, Winifred Margaretta, 1S98-1900, Ilarpersville, N. Y. 

Klein, Gertrude, 1904-05, See page 30. 



74 Former Graduate Students 

Knepper, Myrtle, 1902-03, 

833 Merriweather Street, Cape Girardeau, Mo. 

Laird, Elizabeth Rebecca, 1900-01, See page 5. 

Lamb, Grace Loed, 1898-99, 354 West 9th Street, Erie, Pa. 

Lambeet, Lilian Yitalique, 1906-07, 

1221 West 22nd Street, Cedar Falls, la. Summer: 1328 East 13th 
Street, Des Moines, la. 

Lamberton, Helen, 1907-08, See page 7. 

Laek, Mabel Loyetta, 1S97-99, 156 West 80th Street, New York City. 
Married, 1S99, Dr. William John Gies. 

Lathom, Minor White, 1902-04, Hernando, Miss. 

Latimee, Caroline W oemeley, 1891-96 See page 8. 

Latta, Maud Abigall, 1904-05, Antigo, Wis. 

Lautz, Geeteude May, 1896-97, 1898-99, 

87 Hamilton Place, New York City. 
Married, 1900, Mr. Edward Milton Sutliff. 

Lawthee, Anna Bell, 1898-99, 1904-05, See page 31. 

Lee, Elva, 1893-04, See page 31. 

Leftwich, Floeence, 1902, See page 5. 

Lewis, Alice G., 1S94-95, ..30 Kounmachi, Mita Shiba, Tokio, Japan. 

Lewis, Maey H., 1893-94, ..30 Kounmachi, Mita Shiba, Tokio, Japan. 

Lewis, Rosa Ellen, 1888-S9, Oskaloosa, la. 

Lewis, Saeah Elva, 1888-89, Whittier, Cal. 

Married, 1891, Mr. M. M. Cox. 

Lindsay, Frances Jean, 1905-06, 

33 University Place, Schenectady, N. Y. 

Llewellyn, Effie Geeteude, 1902, 

38 Independence Street, Shamokin, Pa. 

Locke, Geace Peeley, 1898-99, See page 8. 

Loed, Isabel Ely, 1897-1900, 

176 Emerson Place, Brooklyn, New York City. Summer: Brock- 
way, Conn. 

Loed, Kathabine Floeence, 1900-01, 

Greenwich House, 26 Jones Street, New York City. Summer: 433 
South Willard Street, Burlington, Yt. 

Losse, Vivian Beatrice, 1902-03, . .60 Stockton Avenue, San Jos6, Cal. 

Lowater, Feances, 1897-98, 1902-06, See page 5. 

Lowengrund, Helen Moss, 1906-08, See page 8. 

Lucas, Ethel, 1904-05, . .Agricultural Department, Washington, D. C. 

Lucy, Saeah Bied, 1894-96, Address unknown. 

Lyon, Doeothy Wilbeeforce, 18S7-89, 1892, 1893-94, 1895-96, 

See page 5. 

MaoDonald, Margaret Baxter, 1897-98, 1900-01, See page 5. 



Former Graduate Students 75 

Macintosh, Marian T., 1890-91 , See page 32. 

Mack, Mary Latimer, 1898-99 Pratt, Kan. 

MacRae, Evelina, 190G-07, Address unknown. 

MacVay, Anna Pearl, 1895-97, 

Wadleigh High School. New York City. Summer: Athens, O. 

Maddison, Isabel, 1S92-93, See page 5. 

Manx, Carrie Alice, 1901-03 See page GO. 

.Marsh, Elizabeth, 1902-04, 

Care of Mr. Samuel Marsh, 120 Broadway, New York City. 

Martin, Emilie Norton, 1894-95, 189G-97, 3898-99, 1901-02, 1906-07, 

See page 5. 

McAllister, Mary Agnes, 1006-07, 

30 East High Street, Gettysburg, Pa. 

McCague, Elizabeth Welty, 189S-99, 

409 Morewood Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

McCarroll, Harriet Etta, 1S9S-1900 Re seburg, Ore. 

Married, 1902, Mr. Herbert Horace Draper. 

McCarter, Flora, 1S97-98, 

18 Oak Street, Asheville, N. C. Summer: Normandie Hotel, 
Columbus, O. 
Married, 1900, Mr. George Thurston Macauley. 

McClellan, Louise French, 1896-97, Mercer, Pa. 

McCracken, Helen, 1899-1900, Hamilton, Mont. 

McElwain, Mary Belle, 1903-04, 

68 Thurston Avenue, Ithaca, N. Y. Summer: Chambersburg, Pa. 

McGeorge, Beatrice, 1902-03, See page 33. 

McGill, Mary Buchanan, 1906-07, 

Bethany College, Topeka, Kan. Summer: Thurmont, Md. 

McIntosh, Mary Bennett, 1907-0S, Alda, Neb. 

McKee, Mary Clarissa, 1907-08, 

479 Campbell Street, Wilkinsburg, Pa. 

McLaughry, Margaret, 1893, . .113 East North Street, Newcastle, Pa. 

McLean, Charlotte Frelinghutsen, 1906-07, See page 33. 

McMahan, Una, 1908-09, 6010 Stony Island Avenue, Chicago, 111 

Married, 1909, Mr. Frank Edgerton Harkness. 

McMullen, Jeannette Craig, 1903-04, Stella, Neb. 

Married, 1907, Mr. Charles W. Beatie. 

McMullen, Jessie Poe, 1900-01, ...S37 College Avenue, Racine, Wis. 

Mendenhall, Alice Ann, 1895-96, Bloomingdale, Ind. 

Mendenhall, Gertrude W., 1S91-92, 

1023 Spring Garden Street, Greensboro, N. C. 



76 Former Graduate Students 

Meredith, Mary Anna. 1S96-97, 

672 Ostruni Street, South Bethlehem, Pa. Summer: 701 North 
East Street, Oskaloosa, la. 
Married, 1904, Professor Benjamin LeRoy Miller. 

Meredith, Rosella, 1899-1900, 3710 North 31st Street, Tacouia, Wash. 
Married, 1903, Mr. Harry John Button. 

Meredith, Susan Lttcile, 1905-00, 

672 Ostrum Street, South Bethlehem, Pa. 

Merrill, Katharine, 1SS9-90, See page 61. 

Merriman, Lucile, 1899 See page 34. 

Miller, Mary Elizabeth, 1S90-91, 42 Daua Street, Cambridge, Mass. 

Mitchell, Gertrude, 1894-95, 128 Lexington Avenue, New York City. 

Married, 1S86, Mr. John 8. Streeper. 

Montenegro, Sara, 1903-04, See page 34. 

Moore, Anna Mary, 1894-95, 

260 East Main Street, Moorestown, N. J. 
Married, 1909, Mr. Benjamin Cadbury. 

Moore, Lucile Hannah, 1902-03, 420 College Avenue, Richmond, Ind. 

Montgomery, Amelia, 1905-06, See page 8. 

Morrill, Georgiana Lea, 1888-S9. 

Hotel Sevillia, 117 West 58th Street, New York City. Summer: 
Etna, N. Y. 

Morris, Margaretta, 1901-05, See page 35. 

Morriss, Margaret Shove, 1904-06, See page 61. 

Morse, Kate Niles, 1898-99, 1900-01, See page 54. 

Moser, Lillian Virginia, 1905-08 See page 8. 

Mower, Myra, 1905-06, Newberry, S. C. 

Murdoch, Charlotte Soutter, 1897-99, Hsi-an-fu, Shensi, China. 

Married, 1907, Dr. Andrew Young. 

Murray, Marcia, 1904-05, Chariton, la. 

Married, 1905, Mr. William Alexander EUcenberry. 

Murtha, Mary Washburn, 1908-09, 

549 Riverside Drive, New York City. 

Naylor, Ella R., 1895-96, Whittier, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Married, 1904, Mr. Frank Hulburd Harris. 

Neilson, Nellie, 1893-94, 1S95-90, 1900-01, See page 6. 

Nesbit, Clara, 1S96-97 Franklin, Pa. 

Nesbit, Margaret Ethel, 1904-05 Utica, Pa. 

Married, 1909, Mr. William Walter Shaffer. 

Newlin, Flora Alice, 1890-91 2527 Vine Street, Denver, Colo. 

Married, 1894, Mr. Barclay W. Henshaw. 

Newman, Celia Elizabeth, 1907-08, 

164 East 11th Street, Eugene, Ore. Summer: 1012 North 9th 
Street, Tacoma, Wash. 



Former Graduate Students 77 

Nichols, Context Shepard, 1899-1900, Sec page 8. 

Nichols, Elizabeth, 1S94-95, See page 35. 

Nields, Elizabeth, 1900, See page 36. 

Northway, Maky Isabel, 1399-191)0, See page Gl. 

Nutting, Helen Cushing, 1908-09, 

148 Arlington Avenue, Jersey City, N. J. 

Nutting, Phoebe Gushing, 1907-09, 

Miss Wright's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Summer: 148 Arlington 
Avenue, Jersey City, N. J. 

Obekge, Ullericka Hendrietta, 189S-1900, See page 36. 

Ogilvie, Ida Helen, 1900, See page 36. 

Olsen, Sophie Yhlen, 1898-99, See page 8. 

O'Neil, Elizabeth Breading, 1905-06, See page 8. 

Paddock, Helen Laura, 1905-07, 190S-09, 

The Misses Kirk's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Summer: 241 South 
45th Street, Philadelphia. 

Palmer, Henrietta Raymer, 1895^96, See page 36. 

Palmer, Lulu Margaret, 1903-04, 

425 Third Avenue South, St. Cloud, Minn. 

Park, Marion Edwards, 1898-99, See page S. 

Tarker, Emma Harriet, 1S92-93, 1894-95, See page 61. 

Parris, Marion, 1902-05, See page 6. 

Patterson, Melissa Belle, 1894-95, 

Irwin Avenue, E. E., Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Married, 1S96, Mr. Charles Robert Porter. 

Pearsall, Deborah Olive, 1904-05, Greenville, Pa. 

Pearson, Helen Sleeper, 1S91-99, 17 Elliott Avenue, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Peckham, Emilie Comstock, 1901-03, 

32 West 40th Street, New York City. 
Married, 1006, Mr. Frank Stuart Smith. 

Peebles, Florence, 1895-98, 1903-04, 1900-09, See page 6. 

Peebles, Rose Jeffries, 1906-07, See page 62. 

Perkins, Agnes Frances, 1898-99, See page 8. 

Perkins, Elizabeth Mary, 1900-01, See page 6. 

Pettit, Edith, 1897-9S, See page S. 

Pew, Ethel, 1909, See page 37. 

Philputt, Grace Maxwell, 1908-09. 5 rue do Mogodor, Paris, France. 

Pickel, Adele Jackson, 1901-02, Douglas, Alaska. 

Platt, Julia Barlow, 18S8-S9, Pacific Grove, Gal. 

Pomeroy, Diana. 1901-02 412 West North Street, Canton. O. 

Married, 1904, The Rev. John C. Hartley. 

Pomeroy, Lida. 1901-02, 151 Park Avenue, Newcastle, Pa. 



78 Former Graduate Students 

Popejoy, Lida Elizabeth, 1905-06, Newport, Wash. 

Married, 1909, Mr. Emlyn Ivor Jones. 

PORTEEFIELD, CORA MAUD, 1900-01, 

Lindenwood College, St. Charles, Mo. Summer: 510 N. 6th 
Avenue, May wood, 111. • 

Potter, Sarah M., 1886-87, 148 Ridge Street, Glens Falls, N. T. 

Married, 1890, Dr. Howard Simmons Paine. 

Potts, Laurette Eustis, 1897-98, See page 38. 

Prentiss, May Louise, 1900-01, 1013 Nevada Street, Urbana, 111. 

Married, 1905, Mr. Joel Stebbins. 

Pulsifer, Cornelia L. Boaedman, 1905-06, 

40 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, Mass. Summer: Nonquitt, Mass. 
Married, 1881, Mr. William H. Pulsifer. 

Pyle, Miriam Weir, 1904-05, Iowa Falls, la. 

Married, 1908, Mr. Warren Thomas Johnson. 

Rabourn, Susie McDowell Weldon, 1907-08, 

551 Twenty- fifth Street, Ogden, Utah. Summer: Centralia, Mo. 

Raiford, Linnie, 1901-02, Conley, Va. 

Railsback, Martha Binford, 1897-98, 

5209 Woodlawn Avenue, Chicago, 111. 
Married, 1901, Mr. James Edson Warner. 

Ragsdale, Virginia, 1892-93, 1901-02, 1893-97, 1906-08, . . See page 6. 

Rand, Marie Gertrude, 1908-09, 

Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Summer: 631 Hancock 
Street, Brooklyn, New York City. 

Randolph, Harriet, 1896-97, See page 38. 

Rannels, Edith Kirk, 1906-07 Glouster, O. 

Married, 1908. Mr. Robert L. Lewis. 

Ranney, Caerie Louise, 1904-05, Greenville, Mich. 

Reade, Mabelle Constance, 1898-99, 1901. 
Died, 1907. 

Reed, Margaret Adaline, 1901-03, See page 62. 

Reilly, Marion, 1901-02, 1903, 1903-06, See page 39. 

Reimer, Marie, 1900-01, See page 6. 

Reinhardt, Christina, 1906-07, See page 39. 

Reitze, Harriot C, 1890-93 Princeton, N. J. 

Married, 1902, Mr. John Haughton Coney. 

Rembaugh, Bertha, 1897-98, See page 8. 

Rendel, Frances Elinor, 1908-09, 

15 Melbury Road, Kensington, London, England. 

Reynolds, Sophie S., 1892-93, 7 Hakes Avenue, Hornell, N. T. 

Married, 1903, Dr. Bertis Rupert Wakeman. 

Rhoads, Anna Ely, 1889-90, 1893-94, 1894-95, See page 8. 



Former Graduate Students 79 

Rhodes, Anna Eaton, 1895-96, R. F. D. No. 1, Seattle, Wash. 

Married, 1904, Mr. Arthur D. Rogers. 

Rice, Edith Florence, 1907-08, - See page 8. 

Rich, Sophkonia Baker, 1899-1900, 20 Sargent Street, Newton, Mass. 

Riggs, Carrie Lane, 1898-99, Richmond, Ind. 

Married, 1899, Mr. Arthur M. Charles. 

Riggs, Inez L., 1895-96, 706 Locust Street, Anaconda, Mont. 

Ritchie. Mary Helen, 1896-98, See page 6. 

Roach, Lulu Athalee, 1907-08, 

2141 Sherman Avenue, Evanston, 111. Summer: 760 South Santa 
Fe Street, Salina, Kans. 
Married, 1908, Mr. Clyde O. Marietta. 

Roberson, Cornelia, 1896-97, Guilford College, N. C. 

Roberts, Elizabeth Ellinwood, 1905-06, 1907-08, 

Box 595, Tucson, Ariz. 

Robertson, Margaret Louise, 1894-95, 

Brooks Hall, Barnard College, New York City. Summer: Wom- 
en's University Club, Madison Square North, New York City. 

Robins, Helen J., 1893-95, See page 39. 

Robinson, Estelle Ann, 1898-99, San Mateo, Cal. 

Married, 1902, Mr. John H. Kimball. 

Robinson, Virginia Pollard, 1906-07, See page 8. 

Rock, Amy Cordova, 1893-94, See page 39. 

Rodi, Irma, 1908-09, Calumet, Mich. 

Roudebush, Margaret Moore, 1901-02, Madison, Miss. 

Rowell, Mary Coyne, 1907-08, 

133 Elmwood Avenue, London, Ontario, Canada. 

Rulison, Lucy Constance, 1902-03 See page 40. 

Rupp, Sarah Elizabeth, 1905-06, York, Pa. 

Ruppersberg, Emma Anna, 1906-07, 842 S. High Street, Columbus, O. 

Saint, Pauline, 1908-09, 

119 East John Street, Alexandria, Ind. Summer: Newcastle, Ind. 

Sampson, Edith F., 1891-95 See page S. 

Sampson, Lilian Vaughan, 1S91-92, 1893-99, See page S. 

Sanderson, Ruth Elizabeth, 1908-09, 

Holliston, Mass. Summer: Moosup, Conn. 

Sandisox, Helen Estabrook, 1906-07, See page 8. 

Saunders, Catharine, 1S98-1900, 

Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. Summer: Belfast, N. Y. 

Sceets, Laura Alice, 1900-01, . .490 Lafayette Place, Milwaukee, Wis. 
Married, 1904, Mr. Thomas H. Gill. 

Schmidt, Gertrud Charlotte, 1903-05, 1906-09, See page 55. 



80 Former Graduate Students 

Schoff, Louise, 1902-03, See page 41. 

Schofield, Louise Amelia, 1907-08, 

112 East 27th Street, New York City. 

de Schweinitz, Agnes Julia, 1S99-1900, See page 8. 

Scott, Florence Bevier, 1S96-99, Bala, Pa. 

Scott, Margaret, 1904-06, See page 8. 

Seely, Bertha Warner, 1906-07, See page 41. 

Sewall, Hannah Robie, 1S89-90, See page 62. 

Shearman, Margaret Hilles, 1897-98, See page 41. 

Shelley, Helen Hjerleid, 1900-01, Eureka, Cal. 

Sheppard, Mary, 1906-07, See page 41. 

Sherman, Zillah M., 1887-88, 1311 Walnut Street, Philadelphia. 

Sherwood, Elizabeth Lee, 1905-06, 

254 Prospect Street, New Haven, Conn. 
Married, 1909, Mr. Charles E. Curtis. 

Shields, Emily Ledyard, 1905-06, See page 9. 

Shoemaker, Jane Cushing, 1907-OS, See page 42. 

Shoemaker, Martha, 1897-98, . . .215 Glen Avenue, Ann Arbor, Mich. 
Married, 1901, Mr. Walter Abner Scott. 

Shute, Florence Lupton, 1907-08, 

1315 North C Street, Richmond, Ind. 

Sinclair, Isabelle Aiken, 1900-01, 

143 West Coulter Street. Gerinantown, Philadelphia. Summer: 
4 North Avenue, Worcester, Mass. 

Smart, Florence Gertrude, 1906-07. 

18 South Street, Bellows Falls, Vt. Summer: R. F. D. 3, Bid- 
deford, Me. 

Smedley, Elizabeth B., 1895-96. 

Married, 1900, Mr. Marshall J. Reynolds. Died, 190S. 

Smith, Amelia Catherine, 1899-1900, See page 63. 

Smith, Clara Lyford, 1907-09, See page 9. 

Smith, Edith Emily, 1898-99, Ackworth, la. 

Smith, Helen Twining, 1907-OS, See page 9. 

Smith, Helen Williston, 1906-07, See page 42. 

Smith, Maria Wxlkins, 1908-09, See page 42. 

Smucker, Grace Acheson, 1905-06, 

5937 Overbrook Avenue, Philadelphia. 

Sxyder, Elizabeth, 1905-06, See page 42. 

Snyder, Michal Grace, 1905-06, 

The High School, Sherman Avenue, Allegheny, Pa. Summer: 
Sunny Valley Farm, Dutch Hill, Pa. 

Southgate, Mary, 1902, See page 43. 



Former Graduate Students 81 

Southworth, Effie A., 1886-87, '. See page 63. 

Stanton, Margaret Beaumont, 1902-03, Ames, la. 

Starr, Anna Morse, 1SS9-90, 148 W. College Street, Oberlin, O. 

Stearns, Stella Burger, 1892-93, .1105 London Road, Duluth, Minn. 

Steenberg, Bessie, 1895-96, 145 La Salle Street, Chicago, 111. 

Married, 1902, Mr. John E. Webster. 

Steeling, Susan Adelaide, 1895-96, 

109 W. Washington Avenue, Madison, Wis. 

Stevens, Nettie Maria, 1900-01, See page 6. 

Stewart, Caroline Taylor, 1895-96, Negaunee, Mich. 

Stites, Sara Henry, 1899-1900, 1902-04, See page 6. 

Stoddard, Elizabeth F arris, 1905-08, See page 43. 

Strong, Marian Una, 1894-95, 

1905 Sixteenth Street, Washington, D. C. 
Married, 1899, Mr. Marcus BaJcer. 

Sudler, Martha Virginia, 1894-95, 

2111 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. 

Suter, Martha Winkley, 1900-07, 

New York State Library, Albany, N. Y. Summer: Koxbnry, N. Y. 

Sutherland, Eva Blanche, 1905-06, 

Carrollton, Mo. Summer: Tarkio, Mo. 

Sweet, Annie Brown, 1905-00, 231 Topeka Avenue, Topeka, Kan. 

Sweet, Marguerite, 1889-91, See page 6. 

Swindler, Mary Hamilton, 1906-07, See page 63. 

Taggart, Inez Lorena, 1893-94, 

2057 Fairfax Street, Park Hill, Denver, Colo. 
Married, 1899, Mr. Joseph Yale Parcc, Jr. 

Tatum, Lucy Richardson, 1908-09, Fallsington, Pa. 

Taylor, Edith Winthrop Mendall, 1902-03, 

349 Harvard Street, Cambridge, Mass. 

Taylor, Edytha Elizabeth, 1902-03, Homestead, Pa. 

Taylor, Lily Ross, 1906-07, 190S-09, See page 63. 

Taylor, Mary Lewis, 1S93, See page 44. 

Temple, Maud Elizabeth, 1904-05, See page 9. 

Tennent, Grace Rebecca, 1905-06, 

2313 Maryland Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 
Married, 1908, Dr. Samuel Ottmar Mast. 

Thomas, Anne Heath, 1897-98, See page 9. 

Thomas, Helen Whitall, 1895-97, See page 44. 

Thomas, Martha Gibbons, 1898-1900, See page 45. 

Thomas, Miriam, 1902-03, See page 9. 

6 



82 Former Graduate Students 

Thompson, Effie Freeman, 1894-95, 

Meredith College, Raleigh, N. C. Summer: 127 Pearl Street, 
Kingston, N. T. 

Thompson, Emma Osborn, 1905-OG, See page 45. 

Thorne, Luella H., 1893-94, See page 45. 

Thurston, Blandina Sibyl, 1902-03, Liberty, Ind. 

Married. 1906, Mr. De Witt Snyder. 

Tibbals, Kate Watkins, 1900-01, See page 63. 

Tibbits, Mary Kingsley, 1889-90, 

25 Greenough Avenue, Jamaica "Plain, Mass. 

Todd, Anne Hampton, 1902-04,' See page 45. 

Todhtjnter, Bessie C, 1889-90, 

49 Cad well Avenue, Mayfield Heights. Cleveland, O. 
Married, 1898, Mr. Frederic Wayne Ballard. 

Torelle, Ellen, 1902-03, See page 63. 

Tostenson, Helen, 1901-02, Le Grand, la. 

Towle, Elizabeth Williams, 1898-99, See page 9. 

Towle, Mary Butter, 1899-1900, See page 9. 

Townes, Anna Cousins, 1905-06, Austin, Tex. 

Towns, Rosamond Fay, 1907-08, 1824 North 25th Street, Omaha, Neb. 

Traver, Hope, 1901-03, 1906, See page 6. 

Treadwell, Lois Olive, 1908-09, 

600 S. Washington Avenue, St. Peter, Minn. 

Tremain, Mary Adell, 1886-87, 2540 Vine Street, Lincoln, Neb. 

Tressel, Gertrude H.. 1901-02, 

907 W. Franklin Street, Baltimore, Md. 
Married, 1902, Dr. Harold Miloff Rider. 

Trimble, Helen Bell, 1904-05, See page 9. 

Trout, Ethel Wendell, 1901-02, See page 45. 

True, Helen Ella, 1908-09, 120 College Avenue, W. Somerville, Mass. 

Tull, Louise, 1893-95, 2008 Park Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Married, 1902, Mr. J. Henry Baker. 

Unthank, Reba Alice, 1896-97, 

Middletown, O. Summer: Lindenheim, Webster, Ind. 
Married, 1898, Dr. Edwin Barnett Shrieves. 

Upham, Sarah Derby, 1905-06, Shawano, Wis. 

Van Kirk, Susan Frances, 1902-04, 1905-06 See page 46. 

Van Wagener, Elizabeth Marie, 1902-04, 1906-09, 

7311 Reynolds Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Vickers, Florence Childs, 1899-1900, See page 9. 

Waddell, Mary Evelyn Gertrude, 1903-04 See page 64. 

Walker, Anna Martha, 1899, See page 46. 

Walker, Ethel, 1902-04, See page 9. 



Former Graduate Students 83 

Walker, Evangeline Holcombe, 1899-1902, 1905-OG, .See page 46. 

Walker, Evelyn, 1905-00, See page 46. 

Walker, Susan Grimes, 1893-95, See page 46. 

Walton, Clara Ann. 1S92-93, 

22 Grand View Avenue, Cedar Heights, Cleveland, O. 
.Married, ]0(»7, Mr. John Blodgett. 

Wangerien, Stella S., 1905-06, Yining, Kan. 

Warren, Arletta L., 1891-92, Wooster, O. 

Watson, Florence Mehitabel, 1889-90, 
Married, 1895, Mr. George Bell. Died, 1896. 

Weidensall, Clara Jean, 1906-07, 

Milwaukee State Normal School, Milwaukee, Wis. Summer: 61 
Soutlh Jackson Street, Janesville, Wis. 

Westwood, Emily Augusta, 1898-99, 470 Lake Avenue, St. Louis, Mo. 
Married, 1902. Mr. Joseph William Lewis. 

Wheeler, Emily Frances, 1887-88, 

624 Cedar Avenue, Long Beach, Cal. 

White, Alice Everett, 1908-09, High Point, N. C. 

White, Cora E., 1893-94, Belvidere, N. C. 

White, Deborah, 1897-98, Ivor, Va. 

Married, 1901, Dr. Benjamin F. Balio. 

White, Florence Donnell, 1906-07, See page 64. 

White, Julia S., 1892-94, 

Guilford College, N. C. Summer: Belvidere, N. C. 

Wieand, Helen Emma, 1907-09, 

157 Washington Avenue, Phcenixville, Pa. Summer: 259 Chest- 
nut Street, Pottstown, Pa. 

Wigg, Harriet Ella, 1901-02, 

McKinley High School, St. Louis, Mo. Summer: Oshawa, 
Ontario, Canada. 

Wilkinson, Annie Lyndesay, 1898-99, See page 64. 

Williamson, Bertha Torre y, 1907-09, 

Bryn Mawr, Pa. Summer: 14,132 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, O. 
Married, 1907, Dr. Charles Clarence Williamson. 

Wilson, Lillian Gertrude, 1906-07, Canton, N. C. 

Wines, Emma Stansbury, 1895-96, 1905-06, See page 9. 

Wood, Eleanor Densmore, 1897-99, 1906-08 Knightstown, Ind. 

Wood, Ida, 1887-88, 1889-90, See page 6. 

Workman, Annie Cheney, 1908-09, • See page 49. 

Worth, Florina Gertrude, 1896-98, 

Raleigh, N. C Summer: John Station, N. C. 
Married, 1902, The Rev. Roderick Belton John. 

Wright, Ellen C, 1888-89 Wilmington, O. 



84 Former Undergraduate Students 

Yates, Fanny, 1907, 215 W. Church Street, Elmira, N. Y. 

Young, Rose, 1907-08, See page 49. 

Zillefrow, Katharine, 1897-98, Clarksville. O. 



Former Undergraduates of Bryn Mawr College. 

Adams, Susan Willson, 1894-95, North Street, Greenwich, Conn. 

Adler, Marguerite Olga, 1905-07, . . 1620 N. 15th Street, Philadelphia. 
Married, 1907, Dr. Louis Schwartz. 

Allen, Helen Howland, 1895-97, 

35 Grove Street, New Bedford, Mass. 

Allen, Rosamond, 1899-1900, 

163 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass. Summer: "Roadside," Dover, 
Mass. 

Alling, Carolyn Elizabeth, 1S94-95, Derby, Conn. 

Allinson, Gertrude, 1885-87, Haverf ord, Pa. 

Married, 1894, Mr. Charles Shoemaker Taylor. 

Allyn, Susan Frances, 1893-95. 

Married, 1901, Mr. Harry T. Moore. Died, 1905. 

Alsop, Susan Kite, 1893-94, . . 1840 Seventh Avenue, New York City. 

Married, 1903, Mr. William B. Bell. 

Ames, Edith, 1891-93, 

R. F. D. No. 1, Lowell, Mass. Summer: Bay View, Mass. 
Married, 1896, Mr. Broolcs Stevens. 
Ames, Margaret, 1905-06, 501 Grand Avenue, St. Paul, Minn. 

Ames, Sarah Hildreth, 1893-95, Fall River, Mass. 

Married, 1901, Mr. Spencer Borden, Jr. 

Anderson, Agnes, 1896-97, College Hill, Cincinnati, O. 

Anderson, Eleanor Milbank, 1896-98, 

64 Wilshire Place, Los Angeles, Cal. 
Married, 1904, Mr. John Stewart Tanner. 

Andrews, Eleanor Anne Fyfe, 1889-90, 1895-96, ' 
Care of Dresdner Bank, 35 Franzosische Strasse, Berlin, Germany. 

Archbald, Ruth Sellers, 1902-05. 

424 Jefferson Avenue, Scranton, Pa. 

Arnold, Frances, 1893-95, 

142 East 18th Street, New York City. Summer: Windsor, Yt. 

Arny, Helen Worman, 1900-05, 

Trenton Avenue and Somerset Street, Philadelphia. 

Ashley, Edith Heyward, 1901-05, 

41 West 87th Street, New York City. 

Atwater, Ethelwyn Morrill, 1887-89, 

Married, 1895, Mr. Arthur H. Cleveland. Died, 1900. 

Atwater, Sophia Meade, 1886-88, Millville, N. J. 



Former Undergraduate Students 85 

Augur, Margaret Avert, 1903-05 401 Ontario Street, Chicago, 111. 

Austin, Annette, 1896-97. 
Died, 1908. 

Baggaley, Elizabeth, 1899-1901, 5811 Stanton Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Married, 1903, Mr. Alexander Rook Carroll. 

Bailey, Emma Doll, 1890-92, Englewood, N. J. 

Married, 1893, Mr. Robert Elliott Speer. 

Baird, Alice Russell, 1903-06, Box 2223. Bisbee, Ariz. 

Married, 1908, Mr. Max Roesler. 

Baird, Cora, 1892-95, 

2012 Spruce Street, Philadelphia. Summer: Devon, Pa. 
Married, 1898, Mr. Henry Sulger Jeanes. 

Baldauf, Cora, 1901, 1901-03, Box 820, Lexington, Ky. 

Married, 1908, Mr. F. Julius Fohs. 

Baldwin, Grace Peckham. 1892-94, 

41 Hamilton Street, East Orange, N. J. 
Married, 1907, Tlie Rev. Israel Losey White. 

Baldwin, Susan, 1891-93, Milford, Conn. 

Married, 1894, Mr. Miles Franklin Bristol. 

Ballard. Jessie May, 1899-1900. 

22 West Highland Drive, Seattle. Wash. 
Married, 1908, Dr. Harry Logan Geary. 

Ballin, Florence Antoinette. 1905-07, 

26 West 75th Street, New York City. Summer: North Hatlev, 
P. Q., Canada. 

Ballin. Marie Henrietta, 1903-05. 

26 West 75th Street, New York City. Summer: North Hatlev. 
P. Q., Canada. 

Bancroft, Alice, 1896-97, 917 Pine Street, Philadelphia. 

Bancroft, Antoinette Louise. 1888-89. 

223 Bradley Street. New Haven, Conn. 
Married, 1887, Mr. Wilson Hoicard Pierce. 

Barlow, Aileen Hardwick, 1908-09, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Barlow, Margaret, 1899-1904, Wayland. Mass. 

Barney, Saba, 1903, 1903-04, R. F. D. No. 2, Keokuk, la. 

Barnhisel, Claire Grace, 1899-1900, 

317 Alder Street, Pacific Grove, Cal. 
Married, 1903, Mr. Charles Bradford Hudson. 

Barritt, Jessie Ellen, 1888-93, Croydon. England. 

Bartlett. Laura Alice, 1901-05, 

Brunot Hall, Spokane, Wash. Summer: Oxford. McL 

Barton, Caroline Danforth, 1S99-1900 Bryn Mawr. Pa. 

Married, Professor George A. Barton. 

Bates, M. Elizabeth. 1893-96. 

Swarthmore. College, Swarthmore. Pa. Summer: 144 Winthrop 
Avenue. Wollastou, Mass. 



86 Former Undergraduate Students 

Batteesby, Emma Josephine, 1S86-89, 1899-1900, Missoula, Mont. 

Beals, Annie Read, 1894-95, 184 Winchester Street, Brookline, Mass. 
Married, 1904, Mr. Walter Adams Parker. 

Beggs, Ethel May, 1904-06, ....55 Hamilton Avenue, Columbus, O. 

Beenheim, Helen, 1904-06, 

821 Windham Avenue, Avondale, Cincinnati. O. 
Married, 1908, Mr. Albert S. Both. 

Besly, Violet, 1904-07, 399 Ontario Street, Chicago, 111. 

Bettle, Edith, 1895-96, Haverford, Pa. 

Bevan, Saeah Feetz, 1906-07, 

569 Lancaster Avenue, Haverford, Pa. Summer: R. F. D. 3, Nor- 
ristown, Pa. 

Bibb, Gebteude Buenley, 1903-05, 

SOS Seventeenth Street, Washington, D. C. 

Biddle, Helen R., 1894-95, 1429 Arch Street, Philadelphia. 

Biech, Lillie, 1887-92, 5229 Walnut Street, Philadelphia. 

Bishop, Julia Lewis, 1905-06, 276 Mill Hill Avenue, Bridgeport, Conn. 

Bissell, Mabgueeite, 1899-1901, ..400 West 3rd Street, Dubuque, la. 

Blackwell, Maegabet Biddle Guest, 1897-98, 

Ridgefield, School, Ridgefield, Conn. 
Married, 1901, Dr. Roland Jessup Mulford. 

Blake, Elinoee, 1894-96, Nantucket, Mass. 

Married, 1901, Mr. W. Channing Cabot. 

Blodgett, Emily Louise, 1901-05, South Lincoln, Mass. 

Blodgett, Maegabet Paddock, 1903-07, South Lincoln, Mass. 

Blum, Sophia, 1907-09, 

2106 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. Summer: Reno, Nev. 

Bond, Elsie Mubdoch, 1901-02, . .8 West Read Street, Baltimore, Md. 

de Bonneville, Louise, 1S95-98, 1899, 1900, 

Care of Miss Naye, 1414 Pine Street, Philadelphia. 

Bope, Lauea Eliza, 1906-07, 327 North Negley Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Boude, Mary Scott Clendenin, 1S92-93, 1894-97, Haverford, Pa. 

Married, 1902, Mr. Henry Neicbold Woolman. 

Boubne, Anna Maeia, 1899-1900, Box 1001, Hallowell, Me. 

Married, 1907, The Rev. Charles Elmer Beals. 

Bowman, Edna Alwilda, 1890-91, Saratoga, Cal. 

Married, 1908, Mr. Charles John Kuhn. 

Beady, Josephine Edith, 1901-03, 

510 North 2nd Street, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Beainebd, Bebtha, 1894-95, 403 West 11th Street, Pueblo, Colo. 

Bbandenstein, Eema, 1905-06, 

Care of Mr. M. J. Brandenstein, Spear and Mission Streets, San 
Francisco, Cal. 

Beash, Cobinne, 1906-07, 834 Marietta Avenue, Lancaster, Pa. 



Former Undergraduate Students 87 

Briggs, Helen Gebry, 1899-1901, 

18 Trenton Avenue, Edgewood Park, Pa. 

Briggs, Nellie, 1S90-91, Grinnell, la. 

Briggs, Sarah Marie, 1900-04, ..7 Waconah Road, Worcester, Mass. 
Married, 1907, Mr. Donald Brigham Logan. 

Bright, Josephine, 1903, 1903-04, Hazleton, Pa. 

Bright, Mary DeHaven, 1894-97, 1608 Summer Street, Philadelphia. 

Brodie, Elizabeth Harris, 1900-01. 
Died, 1900. 

Brooks, Ethel Helena, 1904-07, 

731 North 43rd Street, Philadelphia. 

Brooks, Frances Annette, 1894-96, Lawrence Park, Bronxville, N. Y. 
Married, 1903, Mr. Frederick Thomas Ackerrnann. 

Brown, Alice, 1908-09, 909 Grant Avenue, Denver, Colo. 

Brown, Edith Doane, 1905-07, 96 Washington Square, Salem, Mass. 

Brown, Edna Florence, 1903-06, 

119 East 62nd Street, New York City. 

Brown, Helen Davenport, 1902-05, 

21 rue Servandoni, Paris, France. Summer: Care of Messrs. 
Brown, Shipley & Co., 123 Pall Mall, London, S. W., England. 
Married, 1908, The Rev. Herbert Adams Gibbons. 

Brown, Jane Mesick, 1S9S-1902, 

46 Chestnut Street, Boston, Mass. Summer: Petersham, Mass. 

Brown, Josephine Chapin, 1906-08, 

22 Greene Street, Ogdensburg, N. Y. 

Brown, Margaret Wickliffe, 1895-96, 

Care of Fidelity Trust Company, Louisville, Ky. 

Brown, Marion Hastings, 1908-09, 

513 Portland Avenue, St. Paul, Minn. 

Brown, Mary Mason, 1892-94, 

Care of Fidelity Trust Company, Louisville, Ky. 

Browne, Margaret Went worth, 1896-98, 

105 East 22nd Street, New York City. 

Browne, Norvelle Whaley, 1907-09, 

65 Central Park West, New York City. Summer: Care of L. L. 
Browne, 2 Rector Street, New York City. 

Bruere, Emmie Cornelia, 1S98-99, 

Care of Kellogg and Rose, 115 Broadway, New York City. 
Married, 1905, Mr. Abram John Rose. 

Bryan, Henrietta King, 1904-06, 

42 South Battery, Charleston, S. C. Slimmer: Flat Rock, N. C. 

Brylawski, Beulah, 1S9S-99, 

5353 Magnolia Avenue, Germantown. Philadelphia. 
Married, 1S99, Mr. David Werner Amram. 

Bullivant, Marjorie, 1904, 1904-05, Polo Avenue, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Married, 1909, Mr. Carroll Breivster Nichols. 



S8 Former Undergraduate Students 

Bunnell, Cathakine Tomlinson, 1894-96, Stratford, Conn. 

Bush, Emma Danforth, 1899-1900, 

1301 Pennsylvania Avenue, Wilmington, Del. 

Butler, Florence Harney, 1893-94, Lake Forest, 111. 

Buxton, Anna Nash, 1903-06, 

520 Summit Street Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Buzby, Anne Knox, 1900-04, . . 108 South 36th Street, Philadelphia. 
Married, 1905, Mr. Louis Jaquette Palmer. 

Cable, Miriam Louise, 1903-05, ..1742 Asbury Avenue, Evanston, 111. 

Cadbury, Caroline Warder, 1S94-95, 

458 Locust Avenue, Germantown, Philadelphia. 
Married, 1900, Mr. William Ellis Shipley. 

Cadbury, Elizabeth Bartram. 1892-93, Haverford, Pa. 

Married, 1902, Professor Rufus M. Jones. 

Cadbury, Helen, 1904-08, Haverford, Pa. 

Calder, Helen Remington, 1899-1901, 

503 North Front Street, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Canada, Mabel Augusta, 1S96-97, 11 Dyer Street, New Haven, Conn. 
Married, 1904, Mr. Angus M. Fraser. 

Canby, Clara Greenough, 1899-1900, Leesburg, Va. 

Married, 1905, Mr. Bradshaw Beverley Chichester. 

Carey, Josephine G., 1885-86, . .122S Madison Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Married, 1889, Dr. Henry M. Thomas. 

Carey, Louise, 1904-05, 190S, 1908-09, 

509 Cathedral Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Carncross, Helen, 1898, 189S-99, 

Friends' Hospital, Frankford, Philadelphia. 

Case, Mary Gushing, 1904-06, 1907-08, 

309 West 91st Street, New York City. Summer: Paris Hill, Md. 

Case, Mary Frank, 1907-09, 14 Church Street, Bradford, Mass. 

Castelhun, Vera, 1904, 1904-05, 

Chester, Vt. Sunvmer: 51 High Street, Newburyport, Mass. 

Challen, Laura Redington, 1904, 

Dunedin, Alexandra Road, Penzance, England. 
Married, 1906, Mr. James Jewill Hill. 

Chambers, Margaret Ferguson, 1905, 1905-08, 

18 West Franklin Street, Baltimore, Md. Summer: Seven Mile 
Lane and Park Heights Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Channing, Alice, 1907-09, 

74 Sparks Street, Cambridge, Mass. Summer: Cotuit, Mass. 

Chase, Lucy Edith, 1888-89, 

3633 Jackson Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Married, 1893, Mr. William Burger Boorum. Married, 1908, Mr. Osgood 
Putnam. 

Chauvenet, Virginia Rolette, 1900-03, Sheridan, Pa. 



Former Undergraduate Students 89 

Chenault, Sue Shirley, 1890-91, 

Care of Mr. Jason Walker Chenault, 837 Third Street, Louis- 
ville, Ky. 
Married, 1894, Mr. Benjamin Franklin WatJcins. 

Cheney, Marjory, 1899-1901, South Manchester, Conn. 

Child, Cora Mott, 1S87-88, 25 Bay View Street, Burlington, Vt. 

Married, 1892, Mr. J. Lindley Hall. 

Christie, Mary Phelps, 1900-01, 1902-03, . . .Hadjin, Turkey in Asia. 
Married, 1908, The Rev. Daniel Miner Rogers. 

Churchill, Mary Gardner, 1S95-98, 

Kenilworth, 111. Summer: Milton. Mass. 

Clapp, Anna Verplanck, 1891-92, 

St. Ursanne, Canton de Berne, Switzerland. 
Married, 1900, Mr. Lionel Radiguet. 

Clark, Eleanor Bonsal, 189S-99, 

223 St. Mark's Square, Philadelphia. 
Married, 1901, Mr. Clarence Foster Hand. 

Clark, Elizabeth Morris, 1S90-91, 

532 Clinton Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Clark, Zelma Estelle, 1892-93, 0011 Woodlawn Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

Clarke, Anna Huidekoper, 1901-02, 1904-05. 

15 Brimmer Street, Boston, Mass. Summer: Tamworth, N. H. 

Clarke, Grace Tileston, 1894-95, 1896, 189(5-98. 

Ox Bow Road, South Lincoln, Mass. Summer: Fergus Falls, Minn. 
Married, 1S99, Mr. Vernon Ames Wright. 

Clemens, Olivia Susan, 1890-91. 
Died, 1896. 

Clothier, Edith, 1899-1900, Haverf ord, Pa. 

Clough, Harriett, 1900-03, 253 Ocean Street, Lynn, Mass. 

Coates, Elisa, 1890-91 Cloverbrook Farm, Fallstou, Md. 

Married, 1902, Mr. William Marbury Nelson. 

Cole, Blanche Elizabeth, 1907-09, Chester, 111. 

Coles, Therese Pauline, 1899-1900, 1907-08, 

2114 Pine Street, Philadelphia. 
Married, 1904, Dr. George Trotter Tyler. 

Collins, Anna Mary, 1903, 1903-05, 

S42 North 40th Street. Philadelphia. 

Collins, Grace Whitcomb, 1S97-98, 

407 Freemason Street, Norfolk. Va. 

Colton, Clara Beaumont, 1892-93, 

301 Second Avenue, Salt Lake City, Utah. 
Married, 1901, Dr. Union Worthington. 

Connelly, Mary Hora, 1S92-93, Albany, Ga. 

Conrad, Elisabeth, 1907-08. 

216 West Gilman Street, Madison, Wis. Summer: 3236 East 9th 
Street, Kansas City, Mo. 



90 Former Undergraduate Students 

Cook, Ruth Haewood, 1907-09, . .4853 Kenwood Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

Cooke, Elizabeth, 1890-91, Cedar Rapids, la. 

Cooke, Josephine Sophie Clark, 1904-07, 

311 West Church Street, Elmira, N. Y. 

Cooksey, Maegaeet, 1905-07, 

102 Produce Exchange. New York City. 

Coopee, Virginia Alice, 1902-03, Wallaroo, S. Australia. 

Married, 1907, Mr. David Hartwell Ladd. 

COSTELLOE, KATHEEINE ELIZABETH MAET CONN. 1908-09, 

Court Place, Iffley, Oxford, England. 

Couch, Haebiet Loed, 1907-08, 

141 Cumberland Street, Lebanon, Pa. Summer: Care of Mrs. 
Harrison Souder, Cornwall, Pa. 

Coughlin, Margaret Fat, 1894-95, 1896, 1897-99, Paisby, Ore. 

Craig, Eleanor Woodworth, 1903-04, Skaneateles, N. Y. 

Craig, Florence Colgate, 1901-04, 

258 West 72nd Street, New York City. 
Married, 1906, Mr. Arthur Edward Whitney. 

Crane, Frances Anita, 1905-06, 

2559 Michigan Avenue, Chicago, 111. Summer: Lake Forest, 111. 
Married, 1907, Mr. Robert William Leatherbee. 

Crawford, Athalia Lucilla Tiernan, 1903-06, 

West Conshohocken, Pa. 

Crawford, Dana Crissy, 1898-99, Merion, Pa. 

Culin, Mira Barrett, 1896-99, 

260 South Madison Avenue, Pasadena, Cal. 

Curtis, Katharine Robinson, 1900-03, 

421 West 21st Street, New York City. 
Married, 1905, Mr. Henry Hill Pierce. 

Curtis, Marian, 1895-96, 33 West 69th Street, New York City. 

Married, 1906, Mr. Roger Bradbury Whitman. 

Cuthbert, Marian, 1901-03, 3944 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. 

Daniels, Harriet McDoual, 1900-01, 

Union Settlement, 237 East 104th Street, New York City. Sum- 
mer: Clinton, N. Y. 

Davidson, Julia Quinta, 1897-98, 

2 West 89th Street, New York City. Sunvmer: Lake Placid, N. Y. 

Davis, Clara Marie, 1897-98, 1900, 332 Townsend Street, Lansing, Mich. 

Day, Alice Margaret, 1901-03, 

6a de Alfanso Herrera. 106, Mexico, D. F. 
Married, 1907, Mr. William Augustus McLaren. 

Dean, Anna Elliott, 1894-95, Rosemont, Pa. 

Married, 1898, Dr. Bertrand Kingsbury Wilbur. 

Dixon, Lillian, 1S88-89, Taconic School Lakeville, Conn. 



former Undergraduate Students 91 

Dixon, Marion, 1897-19UO. 
Died, 1900. 

Doepke, Adelheid, 1898-1900, 

3595 Washington Avenue, Cincinnati, O. 

Doolittle, Hilda, 1905-07, . . Flower Observatory, Upper Darby, Pa. 

Douglas, Anabel, 1SS9-90, 133 Queen's Gate, London, S. W., England. 

Douglas, Nellie Woods, 1900, . . 1649 Arapahoe Street, Denver, Colo. 
Married, 1906, Mr. Frank Adams Ellis. 

Downer, Agnes Peabody, 1901-02, Route 58, New Haven, Conn. 

Downing, Harriet Adele, 1899-1901, Colmar, Pa. 

Married, 1908, Mr. Luther Albert Gray. 

Downing, Julia Charlotte, 1899-1900, 

705 North 19th Street, Philadelphia. 

Dudley, Katharine, 1900-02, 

1345 Astor Street, Chicago, 111. Summer: Huron Mountain Club, 
Marquette, Mich. 

Dudley, Margaret, 1889-92. 

South Bethlehem, Pa. Summer: Pocono Lake Preserve, Pa. 
Married, 1899, Dr. William Pomp Walker. 

Duke, Julia Blackburn, 1893-95, 

Care of Basil W. Duke, Esq., 212 East Broadway, Louisville, Ky. 
Married, 1897, Mr. Stephen Henning. 

Dunn, Helen Prentiss, 1905^06, 

0941 Thomas Boulevard, Pittsburgh. Pa. 

Dutcher, Eva Olive, 1900-01, 

Mt. Holyoke College, South Hadley, Mass. Summer: IOC New 
York Avenue, Brooklyn, New York City. 

Dyer, Lilia, 1898, . . Pevely, Mo. 

Eastham, Williette Woodside, 1898-99, 

St. John's University, Shanghai, China. 
Married, 1903, Dr. Charles S. F. Lincoln. 

Eberman, Ella, 1893-94, West Chester, Pa. 

Married, 1899, Mr. Gibbons Gray Cormvell. 

Edison, Madeleine, 1906-08, Llewellyn Park, Orange, N. J. 

Edwards, Pauline Childs Hartman, 1903-05. 1906, 

706 West 7th Street, Pittsburgh. Kan. 
Married, 1907, Mr. Everett Shackleforcl Cason. 

Elfreth, Anna Elizabeth, 1903-04, 

12 East Read Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Elwell, Rachel Patten, 1905-08, 

2207 Mt. Vernon Street, Philadelphia. 

Ely, Gertrude Sumner. 1896, 

Bryn Mawr, Pa. Summer: Lake Placid, N. Y. 

Emerson, Helena Titus, 1896-98, 

131 East 66th Street, New York City. 



92 Former Undergraduate Students 

Emory, Luceetia Van Bibber, 189G-97, Savannah, W. Va. 

Married, 1903, Mr. Frederick Sampson. 

Engelhard, Dorothy, 1901-03, . . 1521 Hiinnan Avenue, Evanston, 111. 

Erben, Helen, 1887-S9, Radnor, Pa. 

Eebsloh, Gertrud Fanny Adeline, 1906-08. 

The Wyoming, 7th Avenue and 55th Street, New York City. Sum- 
mer: Sea Bright, N. J. 
Married, 1908, Mr. Robert Otto Miiller. 

Esselbobn, Juliet, 1894-95, . .2301 Grandview Avenue, Cincinnati, O. 
Married, 1903, Mr. Frederick A. G-eier. 

Evans, Adelaide Rebecca, 1902-06, 

4017 Delniar Avenue, St. Louis, Mo. 

Evans, Rebecca Miller, 1902-04. 

The Bartram, 33rd and Chestnut Streets, Philadelphia. 

Fanshawe, Leonora, 1895-98, 

35 Lee Street, Cambridge, Mass. Summer: Squantum, Mass. 

Married, 1905, Mr. James Ford Glapp. 

Fenollosa, Brenda, 1901-02, 

Care of Messrs. Bariug Brothers, Bankers, London, England. 
Married, 190G, Mr. Howard Morris Johnson. 

Ferguson, Lydia Sophia, 1S8S-S9, Belfast, Me. 

Ferris, Frances Canby, 1905-07, 19O8-09, 

151 West Hortter Street, Germantown, Philadelphia. 

Field, Margaret Elliot, 1S99-1900, San Juan, Porto Rico. 

Married, 1902, Mr. Laicrence Washburn Be Motte. 

Fink, Henry, 1S97-98, St. Matthews, Ky. 

Fish, Margaret Allina, 1S99-1900, 

9 Prescott Street, Longwood, Mass. 

Fisk, Evelyn Louise, 1897-1900, 

11 East 45th Street, New York City. Summer: Wilburtha, N. J. 

Fleck, Helen May, 1902-03, Rosemont, Pa. 

Fleischmann, Helen, . . . ■ Somerset Farm, East Millstone, N. J. 

Married, 1909, Mr. John Wyckoff Mettler. 

Flexner, Hortense, 1903-04, 948 Second Street, Louisville, Ky. 

Floersheim, Edna W., 1896-99, 

1828 Girard Avenue, Philadelphia. Summer: 606 Chestnut Street, 
Philadelphia. 
Married, 1902, Mr. Albert J. Bamberger. 

Forbes, Margaret, 1894-96. 

Married, 1S9S, Mr. Arnold C. Klebs. Died, 1S99. 

Ford, Grace Marie, 1893-94, Rosemont, Pa. 

Married, 1895, Mr. William Harrison Weimer, Jr. 

Ford, Lucia Osborne, 1902-06, Magnolia, Mass. 

Forman, Ada Elizabeth, 1908-09, 

1407 Garfield Avenue, South Pasadena, Cal. 



Former Undergraduate Students 93 

Foster, Mary MacTntibe, 1894-95. 

Married, 1904, Mr. Charles Henry Morrison. Died, 190~>. 

Foster, Violet Bacon, 1898-1900, The Marlborough, Washington, D. C. 

Foulke. Gwendolen, 18SS-S9, S21 St. Paul Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Married, 1894, Professor Ethan Allen Andrews. 

Foulke, Lydia, 1893-95, 135 Touro Street, Newport. R. I. 

Married, 1897, The Rev. Stanley Camagham Hughes. 

Foulke, Rebecca Mulford, 1894-97, Radnor, Pa. 

Fox, Emily Read, 1904-00 Logan Station, Philadelphia. 

Frederick. Miriam Du Bois, 1900-03. 

1059 North 00th Street, Philadelphia. 
Married, 1903, Mr. Horace Kirlc Holizingcr. 

Fuller, Julia Appleton, 1895, 1895-96, 

51 rue Spontini, Paris, France. 
Married, 1906, M. Alfred Barrelet dc Ricou. 

Fulton, Margaret Alexina, 1901-03, 

61 Park Street, Brookline, Mass. Summer: 1700 Dela Vina Street, 
Santa Barbara, Cal. 

Gage, Margaret Weld. 1895-97, 
5 Garden Street, Cambridge, Mass. Summer: R. 1, Contoocook, N. EL 

Gannon, Katharine Harriet, 1905-00. 

567 Dearborn Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

Gano, Katharine Vallette, 1902-04. College Hill, Cincinnati, O. 

Garlock, Lunette M., 1906, 

The La Renee, 685 Sterling Place. Brooklyn. New York City. 
Summer: Clayton, N. V. 

Garrett, Frances Biddle, 1885-87, Logan P. O.. Philadelphia. 

Garrett, Helen Alice, 1901-03, Linwood, Utah. 

Married, 1905, Mr. Keith Smith. 

Garrett, Mary Rhoads, 1885-87, 1889-90, Rosemont, Pa. 

Married, 1900, Mr. Henry Stokes Williams. 

Garrigues, Sidney, 1906-08 Haverf ord. Pa. 

Gerstenberg, Alice, 1903-06, 539 Deming Place, Chicago. 111. 

Gifford, Ida Eliot, 1893-95, 2 West 83rd Street, New York City. 

Gilmour, Leonie, 1891-93, 1894-96, 

218 West 16th Street. New York City. 

Gimbel, Gertrude Long, 1907-08, 

1300 North Broad Street, Philadelphia. 

Goldmark, Susan, 1894-9S 270 West 94th Street, New York City. 

Goldsmith, Sara, 1906-07, ..228 North Taylor Avenue, St. Louis. Mo. 

Goodnow, Isabel Lyall, 1905-07, 1908-09, 

49 Riverside Drive, New York City. 

Gordon, Grace Rix, 190S-O9, ..139 Gibbs Street, Newton Centre, Mass. 



94 Former Undergraduate Students 

Graham, Bessie, 1898-99, 326 South 15th Street, Philadelphia. 

Gray, Elizabeth Lawrence, 1908-09, 
Low Buildings, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Summer: Stony Beach, Hull, Mass. 

Greeley, Edith Elizabeth, 1906-08, 

4833 Woodlawn Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

Green, Marjorie Crissy, 1899-1900, Paxtang, Pa. 

Married, 1907, The Rev. Edwin 'M'cCord Unlock. 

Green, Phyllis, 1900-01, 

7 Einhorn Road, Worcester, Mass. Summer: Care of Mr. John 
P. Green, Jamestown, R. I. 

Married, 1908, Mr. Clifford Silence Anderson. 

Greene, Anne Dunkin, 1901-03, 

49 West 68th Street, New York City. 
Married, 190S, Mr. Guy Bates. 

Greenough, Eugenia, 1905-07, 724 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, O. 

Gross, Evelyn, 1898, 1898-99, 3634 Ellis Park, Chicago, 111. 

Married, 1902, Mr. G. A. Meyer. 

Gusk y, Mary Esther, 1897, . . . 5th Avenue, East End, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Gyger, Mary Campbell, 1901-04 Sharon Hill, Pa. 

Haas, Jeanne, 1900-01, 1902-03, 

Berlin erstrasse 73, Tempelhof, Bei Berlin, Germany. 
Married, 1900, Professor Albert Haas. 

Haevernick, Emma, 1901-04 646 North 44th Street, Philadelphia. 

Hailey, Ellen Lake, 1901-02, 

406 East 2nd Street, Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Haines, Lydia Rapelye, 1905-07, 

216 East 13th Street, Indianapolis, Ind. Summer: Kidders, N. T. 

Haines, Mary Sheppard, 1903-04, Box 8, Haverf ord, Pa. 

Married, 1906, Mr. Thomas Smedley Cox, Jr. 

Haldeman, Anna Marcet, 1905-08, 

Care of Mrs. Alice Haldeman, State Bank of Girard, Girard, Kan. 

Hallowell, Bertinia, 1903-05, 

2311 North Broad Street. Philadelphia. Summer: Cape May, N. J. 

Hamilton, Elizabeth Porter, 1895-97. 

22 Chestnut Park, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. 
Married, 1905, Mr. John Delatre Falconbridge. 

Hammitt, Ruth, 1904, 1904-05, 

Care of the Misses Kirk's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Happold, Myrtis Edith, 1903-04, . .9 Shirley Street, Worcester, Mass. 

Harben, Clarissa, 1899. 1899-1903. 

214 Broadway, New York City. Summer: Avon-by-the-Sea, N. J. 
Married, 1903, Mr. William Crocker Macavoy. 

Hardenbergh, Hildegarde, 1906-08, 

121 West 73rd Street, New York City. Summer: Sea Gate, New 
York Harbor, N. Y. 



Former Undergraduate Students 95 

Harnish, Blanche Marie, 1894-90, 

330 Maclay Street, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Married, 1898, The Rev. J. Ranch Stein. 

Harrington, Helen Nelthrop, 1904-05, 

Care of Rear Admiral P. F. Harrington, Navy Department, 
Washington, D. C. 

Harris, Jane Howell, 1891-93, . . .02 Myrtle Avenue. Montelair, N. J. 

Hart, Rebecca Purdt, 1901-02, Doylestown, Pa. 

Hartshorn, Joanna Dixon, 1898-99, Short Hills, N. J. 

Married, 1902, Mr. Harold Wright Hack. 

Hecht, Adelheid, 1900-02, ..1119 Kohl Building, San Francisco, Cal. 
Married, 1906, Mr. A. M. Bienenfeld. 

Heermance, Laura Woolsey, 1892-93, 

354 Edwards Street, New Haven, Conn. 

Heike, Louise Ottilie. 1899-1903, 

88 Lafayette Avenue, Brooklyn, New York City. 
Married, 1908, Dr. William Cavan Woolsey. 

Hench, Elizabeth C. 1890-92, 

Manual Training High School, Indianapolis, Ind. Summer: 1004 
North Delaware Street, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Henkle. Alice Buenna, 1902, 1902-04, 

1340 Madison Park, Chicago, 111. Summer: Harbor Springs, Mich. 

Henze. Paula, 1905-00, 209 Field Avenue, Detroit, Mich. 

Herrmann, Rose Sylphina, 1897-99. 
Died, 1902. 

Heulings, Alice, 1901-02, ..231 East Main Street, Moorestown, N. J. 

Higginson, Elizabeth Bethune, 1893-95, Dover, Mass. 

Married, 1909, Mr. Charles Jackson. 

Hill, Anna Mary, 1901-05, 198 Park Avenue, Yonkers, N. Y. 

Hires, Linda Smith, 1901-02 3732 Walnut Street, Philadelphia. 

Hoffheimer, Edith S.. 1900-07, 

10 Madrid Building. Burnet Avenue, Avondale, Cincinnati, O. 

Holland, Mary Elizabeth, 1901-05, Milford, Del. 

Hollar, Mary Rankin, 1900-04, ...4220 Spruce Street, Philadelphia. 

Holman, Helen, 1894-90, . .322 Park Place, Brooklyn, New York City. 
Married, 1905, Dr. Roger Durham. 

Holman. Josephine Bowen, 1892-00, Larchmont Manor. N. Y. 

Married, 1902, Mr. Dessii Eugen Boross. 

Holstein, Elizabeth Branton. 1894-90, 1S07-99, 

1722 Newton Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 
Married, 1901, Mr. Edgar Buckingham. 

Holt. Evelyn, 1905-08, 

14 West 55th Street, New York City. Summer: Panther Point. 
Upper Saranac, N. Y. 



96 Former Undergraduate Students 

Hooke, Harriet Henley, 1S98-99, Reedsville, Pa. 

Married, 1901, Mr. William Kennedy Heirn. 

Hooker, Elizabeth Robbins. 1892-93, 

31 Forest Street, Newton Highlands, Mass. 

Hooker, Theodora Fitch, 1906, 

920 Seventeenth Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Hopkins, Elizabeth, 1892-95, 130 East Gorham Street, Madison, Wis. 
Married, 1898, Mr. Hobart Stanley Johnson. 

Hopkins, Julia Anna, 1899-1900, Anburn, N. Y. 

Hopkins, Nellie Louise, 1895-96, Oxford, N. Y. 

Horner, Jane Elizabeth, 1891-94, 

100 Pelhain Road, Germantown, Philadelphia. 
Married, 1895, Mr. Robert Murray Hogue. 

Hosford, Elizabeth Sanborn, 1892-95 Burgin, Ky. 

Married, 1902, Mr. Lunsford Pitts Yandell. 

Houghtaling, Ikene Haslehurst, 1902-03, 

6 West 9th Street, New York City. 

Houghteling, Harriot Peabody, 1903-06, Winnetka, 111. 

Houghton, Therese Gertrude, 1897-98, 

Care of Forest Service, Tucson, Ariz. 

Howard, Mary Eloise, 1889-91, 322 Cadiz Street, Dallas, Texas. 

Married, 1897, Mr. Francis Elliott Shoup. 

Howe, Emily Cumming, 1887-89. 
Died, 1894. 

Rowland, Alice Gulielma, 1901-02, 

106 West Colvin Street, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Howland, Dorothy, 1904-05, Wood Street, Concord, Mass. 

Married, 1908, Mr. Frederic Keith Leatherbee. 

Hoy, Anna Harris, 1885-S7, Belief onte, Pa. 

Hoyt, Emily Martha, 1904-06, 1907-08, 

124 School Lane, Germantown, Philadelphia. 

Hoyt, Mary Fellows, 1895-98, 310 West 75th Street, New York City. 

Hubbard, Charlotte Armitage, 1895-96, Painesdale, Mich. 

Married, 1S.98, Mr. Horatio Stuart Ooodell. 

Huey, Katharine, 1903-06, 

57th Street and Woodland Avenue, Philadelphia. 

Hulbert, Nellie May, 1890-91. ...21 Washington Avenue, Elyria, O. 
Married, 1894, Mr. George G. Jameson. 

Hunt, Helen Dunlap, 1897-99. 
Died, 1905. 

Hurd, Helen Elizabeth, 1906-07, . .257 East 49th Street, Chicago, 111. 

Iringer, Ida Laurette, 1902-04, 

146 West 104th Street, New York City. 

Jackson, Frances Appleton, 1906-07. 
Died, 1909. 



Former Undergraduate Students 97 

Jackson, Josephine, 1S89-91, 415 Hawthorn Road, Roland Park, Md. 
Married, 1897, Mr. James Curtis BallagJi. 

Jacobs, Marguerite Eystek, 1904-06, 

106 West 92nd Street, New York City. 
Married, 1908, Mr. "William Melchior Horn. 

James, Margaret Mary, 1906-08, 

95 Irving Street, Cambridge, Mass. Summer: Cliocorua, N. H. 

Janney, Elizabeth Brinton, 1889-90, Haverford, Pa. 

Janney, Mildred, 1907-08. .. .4729 Greenwood Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

Jenks, Margery, 1904-06, Summit, N. J. 

Johnston, Marie Louise, 1901-03, Bound Brook, N. J. 

Married, 1908, Mr. Charles Adkins Baker. 

Johnston, Mary Beattie, 1903, Salem, N. T. 

Jones, Annie Elizabeth, 1906-08, 1710 B Street, Lincoln, Neb. 

Jones, Grace Llewellyn, 1S91-93, 1894-95. 

1121 Geary Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Jones, Hatite Elizabeth, 1SS8-90, 

Moses Brown School, Providence, R. I. 
Married, 1S92. Mr. Charles R. Jacob. 

Jones, Virginia, 1907-09, 

940 Western Avenue. N. S., Pittsburgh, Pa. Summer: Care of 
A. J. McQuitty, North East, Pa. 

Justice, Hilda, 1S92-94, 

West Clapier Street, Germantown, Philadelphia. 

Kamm, Caroline Augusta, 1905-07, 

215 Fourteenth Street, Portland, Ore. 

Kane, Florence Bayard, 1S98 West Chester, Pa. 

Kaufmann, Irene Saidie, 1906, 

Died, 1907. 

Keasbey, Louisa Edwina, 1895-96, ..Miller Road, Morristown, N. J. 

Kellen, Grace, 1903-05, 

342 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass. Summer: Cohasset, Mass. 

Kellen, Ruth, 1900-02. 

Married, 1905, Mr. Thomas Linwood Wiles. Died, 1909. 

Kellogg, Edith, 1901-03 51 St. Paul Street, Brookline. Mass. 

Kemmerer, Gertrude, 1897-9S, 1S99, 1899-1901. Upper Lehigh, Pa. 

Kent, Margaret Yseult. 1904-05. 

5323 Wakefield Street, Germantown, Philadelphia. 

Kerr, Fredericks M., 1899-1900, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Kershaav, Karie Kay, 1886-87, 18SS-S9, 1891-92, Riverton, N. J. 

Married, 1805, Mr. Frank Rogers TreadueU ; 1903, Mr. Benjamin Schrcibrr 
MecJiling. 

Ketchum, Florence Josephine, 1899-1900, Glenn Road, Ardmorc. Pa. 
Married, 1907, Mr. Frederick uodfrey Oorlun. 

7 



98 Former Undergraduate Students 

Kilner, Mary, 1907-09, 

335 West 78th Street, New York City. Summer: Woodstock, Vt. 

Kilpatrick, Ellen Perkins, 1895-97, 

1027 St. Paul Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Kimball, Charlotte Stuart, 1907-08, 

Normandie Heights, Roland Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Kimball, Mary Hortense, 1899, 

47 Niirnbergerstrasse, Dresden, Germany. 

King, Florence, 1892-91, Irvington-on-Hudson, N. Y. 

Kingsbacher, Erma, 1902-04, 5112 McPherson Avenue, St. Louis, Mo. 
Married, 1907, Mr. Ernest William Stix. 

Kingsbacher, Gertrude, 1906-08, 

6602 Northumberland Avenue. Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Kirkbride, Mary Amelia, 1896-99, 

Cairo, Egypt. Summer: 2212 Green Street, Philadelphia. 
Married, 1904, Mr. Reginald Godfrey Peckitt. 

Klett, Edith May, 1907-08, Las Animas, Colo. 

Married, 1909, Mr. George Albert Cunning. 

Knowland, Carolyn, 1891-92, Plainfleld, N. J. 

Married, 1S94, Mr. Francis de Lacy Hyde. 

Kohn, Elsie, 1900-02, 4726 McPherson Avenue, St. Louis, Mo. 

Married, 1908, Mr. Aaron 8. Rauh. 

de Koven, Ethel Roy, 1902-04, 

42 East 66th Street, New York City. Summer: Bar Harbor, Me. 

Lambert, Helen, 1895-97, 

330 West Johnson Street, Germantown, Philadelphia. 

Landers, Pearl Adele, 1893-95, • Keokuk, la. 

Married, 1896, Mr. Timothy Harrison. 

Langdon, Julia Olivia, 1891-93, 

Care of General Charles J. Langdon, Elmira, N. Y. 
Married, 1902, Mr. Edward Eugene Loomis. 

Lape, Esther Everett, 1901-02, .3217 Hamilton Street, Philadelphia. 

Latta, Margaret Douglas, 1905-06, 

319 Moreland Avenue, Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia. Summer: 
Rockport, Me. 
Married, 1907, Mr. Wakeman Griffin Gribbel. 

Law all, Marion Louise, 1897, 

22 S. Washington Street, Tarrytown, N. Y. 
Married, 1897, The Rev. William W. Wilcox. 

Lawrence, Emily Sylvester, 1905-07, Woodmere, L. I. 

Married, 1908, Mr. Roland Wright Smith. 

Lawther, Evelyn Teressa, 1895-96, 

1310 North Alabama Street, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Married, 1900, Mr. Oiven Davies Odell. 



Former Under graduate Students 99 

Lawther, Maky Roberts, 1891-93, 

1450 Allison Avenue, Los Angeles, Cal. Summer: 239 Seventeenth 
Street, Dubuque, la. 

Leach, Camilla, 18S9-90, Eugene, Ore 

Leuba, Berthe A., 1905-06, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Married, 1896, Professor James H. Leuba. 

Levering, Margaretta, 1896-98, 

The Oak Road, School Lane, Germantown, Philadelphia. Sum- 
mer: Care of Henry W. Brown & Co., 435 Walnut Street, 
Philadelphia. 

Married, 1904, Mr. Theodore Edmondson Brown. 

Lewis, Ella Beasten, 1901-02, 1904-05, 

1813 St. Paul Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Lewis, Louise, 1901-04, 
1820 Pine Street, Philadelphia. Suinmer: North East Harbour, Me. 

Linn, Mary Hunter, 18S7-S9, Bellefonte, Pa. 

Lit, Juliet Ephraim, 1906-09, Glenside, Pa. 

Married, 190S, Mr. J. David Stem. 

Lodge, Edith Harvey, 1899-1901, South Pittsburg, Tenn. 

Married, 190S, Mr. Charles Richard Kellcrmann. 

Logan, Annie Laurie, 1S89-90, 

98 Wadena Street, Cleveland, O. Summer: R. F. D. 4, Box 130, 
Painesville, O. 
Married, 1891, Mr. Oliver Farrar Emerson. 

Loines, Hilda, 1896-99, 

152 Columbia Heights, Brooklyn, New York City. Summer: 
Bolton Landing, Lake George, N. Y. 

Lord, Frances Shippen, 1906-08, North Street, Plymouth, Mass. 

Lowrey, Elsie Elizabeth, 1899-190O, 

The Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr. Pa. Summer: The 
Esmond, 12th and Spruce Streets, Philadelphia. 

Lurman, Katharine, 1891-92, Catonsville, Md. 

Lynch, Gertrude Mason, 1887-90, 1891-92, Address unknown. 

Married, 1895, Mr. Ruter William Springer. 

Lynch, Nora, 1903-07 Ashbourne, Pa. 

Lyon, Frances Witter, 1902-05, Watch Hill, R. I. 

Lyon, Henrietta Baldy, 1896-98, 1899-1900, 1901. 

921 West 4th Street, Williamsport, Pa. 

Lyon, Josephine Amanda, 1895-96, 

1494 Chapel Street, New Haven, Conn. 

Mabury, Bella, 1S90-91, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Macfarlane, Kathleen Selfridge, 18Sf)-90. 

1530 Spruce Street, Philadelphia. 
Married, Mr. C. 'William Macfarlane. 

MacMillan, Mary Louise, 1890-91, 

1915 Bigelow Street, Mt. Auburn, Cincinnati. O. 



100 Former Undergraduate Students 

Macnamee, Helen Viola, 1900-91, Berwyn, Pa. 

Macomber, Mary S., 1898-99, 

21 Pond Street, South Weymouth, Mass. 
Married, 1900, Mr. Herbert Huntington Longfellow. 

MacVeagh, Margaretta Cameron, 1890-93, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Maddux, Esther, 1905-08, Low Buildings, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Married, 1909, Professor David Hilt Tennent. 

Maitland, Mary Elisabeth, 1897-1900, 

4635 North Paulina Street, Chicago, 111. 
Married, 1903, Mr. Arthur St. George Dougall. 

Malott, Daisy Patterson, 1893-95, 

1030 North Pennsylvania Street, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Married, 1899, Mr. Paul Helb White. 

Malott, Ella Laura, 1892-93, 

1002 North Delaware Street, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Married, 1899, Mr. Edgar H. Evans. 

Maltby, Olive Douglas, 1905-07, Waterbury, Conn. 

Maris, Anne Gerhard, 1897-99, 2126 De Lancey Place, Philadelphia. 

Marks, Ellen Scott, 1899-1900, 305 Catoma Street, Montgomery, Ala. 
Married, 1904, Dr. M. L. Moharrem. 

Marsh, Cora Adriana, 1893-91, New London, Conn. 

Marshall, Helen, 1895-96, 71 Williams Street, Norwich, Conn. 

Martin, Frances de Forest, 1899-1901, 

Lawrenceville School, Lawrenceville, N. J. 
Married, 1903, Mr. Charles Henry Breed. 
Martin, Jean Baker, 1902-04, 1916 Wallace Street, Philadelphia. 

Martin, Mary Rockwith, 1890-93, Montreat, N. C. 

Married, 1902, Mr. James Imbrie Miller. 

Mason, Alice Eleanor, 1901-02, Thomasville, Ga. 

Married, 1904, Mr. Henry Emerson Butler. 

Mathewson, Faith Trumbull. 1892-94, 

"Argyle," Sixteenth Street Extended, Washington, D. C. 

Matless, Alice, 1901-03 103 Main Street West, Lansing, Mich. 

Married, 1904, Mr. Lees Ballinger. 

Maurice, Emily Marshall, 1905-07, Athens, Pa. 

Mayhew, Viola Adeline, 1900-01 Address unknown. 

McBurney, Alice. 1895-96, 135 East 54th Street, New York City. 

Married, 1904, Dr. Austin Fox Riggs. 

McCarthy, Edith, 1897-98, Hamilton Court, Philadelphia. 

McCormick, Caroline, 1892-94, 

18 West 52nd Street, New York City. Summer: Upper St. Regis, 
N. Y. 
Married. 1907, Mr. Francis Louis Slade. 

McCormick, Eleanor Harryman, 1900-02. 

Warren Street, Brookline, Mass. 
Married, 1908, Mr. Marshal Fabyan. 



Former Undergraduate Students 101 

McCbacken, Matilda, 1903-04, 1646 North 55th Street, Philadelphia. 

McCulloch, Agnes, 1900-01, 

1901 North Delaware Street, Indianapolis, Ind. Summer: Mac- 
kinac Island, Mich. 
Married, 1901, Mr. Hugh Henry Hanna, Jr. 

McCune, Mabel, 1896-97, 719 Arbor Street, Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Married, 1900, Mr. Herbert J. Ooulding. 

McKee, Helen, 1897-9S, 4415 Sansom Street, Philadelphia. 

Married, 1904, Mr. Arthur Hobson Quinn. 

McKeehan, M. McClube, L892-93, 17 South West Street, Carlisle, Pa. 

McKeen, Anna Lewis, 1901-05,, 

58 Clark Street. Brooklyn, New York City. Summer: Jewels 

Island, Cliff Island P. O., Me. 

McKenney, Claba Justine, 1906-07. 
Died, 1909. 

McLane, Hazel Ellen, 1904-07, Milford, N. II. 

Married, 1909, Mr. John Alexander Clark. 

McMillan, Maegabet, 1899-1900. 

505 Tenth Avenue, S. E., Minneapolis, Minn. 

McMubteie, Chablotte Feancis Edith, 1900-01, 

111 West Upsal Street, Gerniantown, Philadelphia. 

McNaughton, Celia Ruth, 1902-03, 1904-05, 

1052 East 2nd Street, Brooklyn, New York City. 

Mead, Helen Douglas, 1905-06, 
Died, 1908. 

Meeeitt, Leslie, 1902, 150 Tinison Street, Lynn, Mass. 

Married, 1908, Dr. Charles Henry Bergengren. 

Middendobf, Kathebine Louise Ievin, 1895-98, 

210 West State Street, Trenton, N. J. Summer: Spring Lake, N. J. 
Married, 1902, Mr. Henry Clayton Blackwell. 

Mifflin, Elizabeth Hoenli, 1890-93, Wayne, Pa. 

Married, 1896, Mr. David Knickerbocker Boyd. 

Miles, Maey Elizabeth, 1888-89, 

227 Queen Lane, Gerniantown, Philadelphia. 

Millee, Alice Wolff, 1905-00. 

149 West Lanvale Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Millee, Baenette, 1900-01, . .420 West 118th Street. New York City. 

Millee, Jessie Imbeie, 1897-1900, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Millee, Julia Stedman, 1902-03. 

59 Irving Place, Buffalo, N. Y. Summer: Rose Hill, Ontario, Can. 
Married, 1904, Mr. 'Newman Walbrirtge. 

Millee, Maejobie Enid, 1900-US Grand Rapids, Midi. 

Milleb, Maey Alice Edwaeds, 1894-95. 1896-97, 

Grafton Hall, Richmond Court, Beacon Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Married, 1897, Mt>: WilUam Read Buckminster. 



102 Former Undergraduate Students 

Miller, Mary Wanamaker, 1894-95, 

904 South 47th Street, Philadelphia. Summer: Cape May, N. J. 
Married, 1900, Mr. William Boswell Mount. 

Mills, Helen Elizabeth, 1905-06, 1909 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. 

Mitchell, Beulah Margaret, 1907-09, 

Chattanooga, Tenn. Summer: Lookout Mountain, Tenn. 

Mitchell, Frances Helen, 1905-06, 

St. Martin's, Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia. 

Moffitt, Rebecca Charlotte, 1899-1902. 

1721 North 2nd Street, Harrisburg, Pa. 
Married, 1904, Mr. Edgar Paul Johnston. 

Montenegro, Carlota, 1897-99, . . . 1006 Third Avenue, Louisville, Ky. 

Moody, Mary Grace, 1894-97, 

154 East Grand Avenue, New Haven, Conn. 

Moore, Ethel Belle, 1903, 1904-05, 5329 Locust Street, Philadelphia. 
Married, 1908, Mr. Frederick Eovey Wheeler. 

Moore, Hannah Irene, 1890-93, 1894-95. 
Died, 1895. 

Moore, Rachel Bigelow, 1904-06, 

335 Lafayette Avenue, Brooklyn, New York City. 

Morgan, Ellen Key Howard, 1892-93, 

210 North Broadway, Lexington, Ky. 

Morton, Charlotte, 1899-1901, 343 State Street, Albany, N. Y. 

Moss, Carolyn Ladd, 1890-93, Vashon College, Burton, Wash. 

Married, 1906, Mr. Joseph S. Reed. 

Mudge, Marion Christine, 1902-06, 

349 Elm Street, New Haven, Conn. 

Murray, Elsie, 1896-97, 735 South Main Street, Athens, Pa. 

Murray, Harriet Cock, 1898-99, Chappaqua, N. Y. 

Married, 1903, Mr. Alfred Busselle. 

Mussey, Mabel Hay Barrows, 1905-07, 

101 Central Avenue, Tompkinsville, Staten Island, N. Y. Sum- 
mer: Birchbay, Georgeville, P. Q., Canada. 
Married, 1905, Professor Henry Raymond Mussey. 

Muzzey, Marie Ella, 1903-04, 

1816 Spruce Street, Philadelphia. Summer: Shepherdstown, W. Va. 

Myers, Mary Calvert, 1903-04, 1428 Linden Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Nash, Madeline Culbertson, 1906-07, 4911 Lake Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

Nathan, Stella, 1904-06, 

3217 Clifford Street, Philadelphia. Summer: 696 City Hall, 
Philadelphia. 

Naumburg, Alice, 1898-1900, .823 West End Avenue, New York City. 
Married, 1903, Mr. Joseph M 1 . Proskaue.r. 

Nebeker. Edna, 1S98-99, Fort Collins, Colo. 

Married, 1902, Dr. Howard J. Livingston. 

Neergaard, Edith Louise, 1899-1903, 

47 Cambridge Place, Brooklyn, New York City. 
Married, 1907, Mr. Henry Hathaioay Wheeler. 



Former Undergraduate students 103 

Nelden, Mabia Louise, 1S99-1900. 

144 Eleventh East Street, Salt Lake City, Utah. 
Married, 1901, Mr. Jerome 0. Cross. 

Nichols, Helen Slocuji, 189S-1902, 

42 West 11th Street, New York City. 

Nicholson, Elisabeth Robeson, 1S91-94, 

342 Shelton Avenue, Queens Borough, New York City. 
Married, 189o, Mr. Joseph Remington Wood. 

Niles, Latjba, 1S93-97. 4411 Osage Avenue, Philadelphia. 

Northbop. Mart, 1S92-94. . .461 East Ridge Street, Marquette, Mich. 
Married, 1899, J/>\ Philip Bennet Spear. 

Ogden, Elise Lucy, 1891-92, . .941 S Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Oglevee, Jessie Eagleson, 1S95-9S, 9S Hamilton Avenue, Columbus, O. 

Oheen, Eugenia Grinnell. 190T-0S, Norman, Okla. 

Married, , Dr. Daniel Webster Ohern. 

Obbison. Agnes Louise, 1886-88, Belief onte, Pa. 

Obvis, Gebtbude Swift, 1S95-96, 35 Park Street, Northampton, Mass. 

Ott, Helen Maxwell, 1907-08, 

521 East Leverington Avenue, Roxborougk, Philadelphia. 

Packabd, Emilie, 1905-06, 806 St. Paul Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Page, Lauba Lansing Geenelle, 1903-04. 

37 East 3Sth Street, New York City. 

Palmer, Elizabeth Mabshall, 1S92-93, 

498 Terrace Avenue, Milwaukee, Wis. 
Married, 189S, Mr. Robert N. McMynn. 

Palmer, Evalina. 1896-98, 11 West 50th Street, New York City. 

Married. 1907, Mr. Angelo Sikelianos. 

Paeks, Geobgiana Mabet, 1901-04, 

1928 Rittenhouse Street, Philadelphia. 
Married, 1906, Mr. Joseph Percy Remington. 

Pabbish. Gbace, 1890-91, 

120 East 62nd Street, New York City. Summer: Southold. N. Y. 
Married, 1901, Dr. Haven Emerson. 

Pearson, Anne Rutherford, 1S92-93, 

45 Garrison Road, Brookline, Mass. 
Married, 1S93, Mr. Robert Lyon Warner. 

Pearson. Julia L., 1S94-95, 

Care of Mr. William Floyd Hunt, 45 Broadway. New York City. 
Married, 1907, Mr. William Floyd limit. 

Pelletieb, Hellxe, 1906-08, ....1437 Pearl Street, Sioux City, Iowa. 

Petebs, Edith Macausland, 1893-95, 1101 Spruce Street, Philadelphia. 

Petersen, Kate Oelzneb, 1S8S-89, 

91 Eighth Avenue. Brooklyn. New York City. Summer: Lyceum 
Club, 128 Piccadilly, London, W., England. 

Phillips. Anna Tucker, 1S99-1900, 

38 East 74th Street. New York City. Summer: Dublin Road, 
Greenwich. Conn. 
Married. 1907, Mr. Raynal Oawthorne Boiling. 



104 Former TJnder graduate Students 

Phillips, Bertha, 1896-1900, ...19 East. 59th Street, New York City. 

Plumb, Georgie Middleton, 1896-98. 

Died, 1906. 

Plumb, Helen, 1901-02, 931 Jefferson Avenue, Detroit, Mich. 

Potter, Genevieve Estelle, 1908-09, 

537 South 49th Street, Philadelphia. 

Powel, Ella Louise. 1901-02, 163 West 76th Street, New York City. 
Married, 1908, Mr. William McLean. 

Powell, Lillian Augusta, 1895-96, 2115 Broadway, Little Rock, Ark. 
Married, 189S, Mr. John Bison Fordyce. 

Preston, Jennie Florence, 1897-99, 

67 South Prospect Street, South Orange, N. J. 
Married, 1905, -Mr. Benjamin F. Jones. 

Preston, Margaret Junkin, 1908-09, 

819 North Charles Street, Baltimore, Md. Summer: P. O. Station 
H, Baltimore County, Md. 

Preston, Margaret Wickliffe, 1904-06, 

200 Market Street, Lexington, Ky. 

Price, Mary Lucretia, 1903-05, . . 1303 Seventh Avenue, Altoona, Pa. 
Married, 1908, Mr. Edward Louis Koch. 

Putnam, Corinna Haven, 1893-95, 

31 Massachusetts Avenue, Boston, Mass. Summer: Dublin, N. H. 
Married, 1899, Mr. Joseph Lindon Smith. 

Quimby, Aldana Ripley, 1906-07, 

278 West 86th Street, New York City. Summer: Hanover, N. H. 

Railsback, Monica, 1901, Shreveport, La. 

Ramsey, Emily Yocum, 1905-06, Rosemont, Pa. 

Rand, Mary Celine, 1905-09, 
1526 Harmon Place, Minneapolis, Minn. Summer: Monticello, Minn. 

Randall, Ruth, 1897, 1897-99. 
Died, 1900. 

Read, Helen Anna, 1901-02, Lansdowne, Pa. 

Reed, Katharine, 1903-05, .... 716 Amberson Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Reynolds. Margaret Anne, 1900-02, 

Care of Tucker & Vinton, 4 West 22nd Street, New York City. 
Married, 1906, Mr. Shirley Clark Hulse. 

Rhodes, Lucretia, 1908-09, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Sumner: Danville, Pa. 

Rice, M. Ethelwynn, 1898-99, See page 65. 

Richards, Adeline Mayo, 1890-91, 1894-95, 

149 Murray Street, Elizabeth, N. J. 

Richards, Theodora Leigh, 1901-03, 1492 Locust Street, Dubuque, la. 

Riddle, Mary Althea, 1893-94, ..2535 Indiana Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

Righter, Jane, 1898, 1898-1901, Mt. Carmel, Pa. 

Bobbins, Anna Cushman, 1891-93, Wethersfield, Conn. 

Married, 1899, Mr. Wilfred Willis Savage. 



Former Undergraduate Students 105 

Robins, Dorothea, 1903-05, 23 Gowen Avenue, Mt. Airy, Philadelphia. 

Roche, Helen Maeie, 1903-05, 827 Michigan Avenue, Youngstown, O. 
Married, 1907, Mr. Arthur Collson ToMn. 

Rochester, Anna, 1S9T-99, 

46 Winthrop Place, Englewood, N. J. Summer: Shelburne, N. H. 

Roelker, Mildred M.. 1890-92, 1434 Q Street, Washington, D. C. 

Married, 1899, Mr. Karl Langenbeclc. 

Romeyn, Ella Rosalind, 1906-08, 63 East 64th Street, New York City. 

RosenEeld, Grace Edith, 1906-07, 

1620 Michigan Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

Ross, Helen Kunkle, 1890-92, ...88 Federal Street, Brunswick, Me. 
Married, 1900, Mr. Allen Johnson. 

Ross, Josephine, 1900-09, Haverf ord, Pa. 

Ross, Margaret Jane, 1899-1902, 

45 Garden Street, Mt. Holly, N. J. Summer: Haverf ord, Pa. 

Rossiter, Irene, 1900-03, 11 East 9th Street, New York City. 

Rossmassler, Elfrida Anna. 1903-05, 

607 Church Lane, Gennantown, Philadelphia. 

Rumery, Marguerite, 1901, 1901-02, 

174 Winchester Street, Brooklyn, Mass. Summer: Portland, Me. 
Married, 1907, Mr. Charles Jarvis Chapman. 

Runyon, Henrietta Bronston, 1908-09, 

1022 West Grace Street, Richmond, Va. Summer: Care of Aitche- 
son A. Bowmar, Versailles, Ky. 

Rupli, Theodosia Rosalie. 1890-91, 

3401 Sixteenth Street, N.. W., Washington, D. C. 

Rushmore, Florence, 1885 North Berwick, Me. 

Married, 1902, Mr. William T. Hussey. 

Russell, Janet Lucretia, 1903-06, 

353 West 85th Street, New York City. 

Russell, Sylvia Curry, 1897-98, 221 West 6th Street, Erie, Pa. 

Ryan, Margaret Theresa, 1903-04, Rosemont, Pa. 

Sampson, Anne Russell, 1907-09, Charlottesville, Va. 

Satterlee, Mildred, 1905-06, Pittsford, N. Y. 

Schaffner, Marion, 1905-06, . . 4911 Grand Boulevard, Chicago, 111. 

Schamberg, Hermine Rice, 1907-09, 

1841 North 17th Street, Philadelphia. 

Schmauk, Emma Maria, 1899-1900, 22 North 8th Street, Lebanon, Pa. 

Schmidt, Helen, 1904-OS, 

157 Dithridge Street, Pittsburgh, Pa. Summer: Lakewood. N. Y. 

Schneider, Nancy Ross, 1903-05, Summit Hill. Pa. 

Schrader, Elizabeth Wilhelmina, 1903-04 Cohocton, N. Y. 

Married, 1908, Mr. Charles Walter Smith. 



106 Former Undergraduate Students 

Schummers, Makgreta Louise, 1899, 

170 Buffalo Avenue, Niagara Falls, N. Y. 
Married, 1902, Mr. Ray M. Van Wagnen. 

Sceibnee, Margaeet, 1902-04, 

Western Electric Co., 463 West Street, New York City. Summer: 
North Williston, Yt. 

Seabury, Catharine Regina, 1S97-98, St. Agnes School, Albany, N. Y. 

Seal, Harriette Fell, 1SS9-91, 

405 Wister Street, Germantown, Philadelphia. 

Sealy, Ella, 1S97-99, 

Care of Mr. E. R. Newell, 2 Rector Street, New York City. 
Married, 1907, Mr. Emerson Root Xeicell. 

Seable, Mabel Antoinette, 1894, 1894-96. 1897-99. 

3930 Locust Street, Philadelphia. 

Sedgwick, Elizabeth, 1S94-97, 

703 Washington Street, Wilmington, Del. 
Married, 1907, Mr. William Shaw. 

Seeds, Iola Meble, 1907-09, 

Upsal Street, West of Wayne Avenue, Germantown, Philadelphia. 

Seligman, Gladys, 1901-02, 

2 East 67th Street, New York City. Summer: Bernardsville, N. J. 
Married, 1905, Mr. Henri P. Wertlieim. 

Seligman, Rhoda Waltee, 1905-06, 524 Fifth Avenue, New York City. 

Married, 1907, Mr. Frederick Lewisohn. 

Selkregg, Clara Hudson, 1896-97, North East, Pa. 

Sellers, Mabjobie, 1900-01 Burnham, Pa. 

Married, 1906, Mr. James Cadicalader Sellers, Jr. 

Seymour, Helen, 1901, 1901-05, 

1917 Kalorama Road, Washington, D. C. 

Shaepless, Amy Cope, 1896-98 Haverford, Pa. 

Sharpless, Helen, 1894-96, Haverford, Pa. 

Sheppard, Irene, 1898-99, 

229 Harvey Street, Germantown, Philadelphia. 

Shebbebt, Helen, 1904-05, 1800 North Calvert Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Shipley, Mabgueeita, 1906-07, 

356 Resor Avenue, Clifton, Cincinnati, O. 

Shoemaker, Anna Peirce, 1S87-89, 

3409 Baring Street, Philadelphia. Summer: Seaside Park, N. J. 
Married, 1891, Mr. Alfred J. Ferris. 

Sic'hel, Marie Etta, 1S96-97, 

"The Ormonde," 2030 Broadwav, New York Citv. Summer: West 
End, N. J. 
Married, 1902, Mr. Ernest A, Limourg. 

Siesel, Claude Feances, 1905-00, 1102 Bidwell Street, Allegheny, Pa. 

Stlkman, Eleanor, 1900-04, 396 Park Avenue, Yonkers, N. Y. 

Married, 1907, Mr. Theodore Oilman, Jr. 



Former Undergraduate Students 107 

Silverman. Irma. 1898-1900, 614 West 136th Street, New York City, 
Married, 1901, Mr. Lionel Schoenthal. 
Simpson, Florence, 1903-04. 
Died, 1906. 

Sissox, Emma Isabella. 1900-08, Morristown, N. J. 

Sk inner, Mary Elizabeth, 1907-09. 1002 Poplar Street, Lincoln, Neb. 
Skinner, Myra Child, 1907-09 1602 Poplar Street, Lincoln, Neb. 

Small, Flora, 1897-90. 

54 West 85th Street, New York City, summer: Edgemere, Long 
Island, N. Y. 

Smartt, Myra Kennedy, 1900. 1900-01, 

510 Fort Wood Place, Chattanooga, Tenn. Summer: Albion View 
R. F. D., Walden's Ridge, via Chattanooga, Tenn. 
Married, 1906, Mr. Paul John Kruesi. 

Smith. Julia Pratt, 1899-1903, 105 East 38th Street, New York City. 

Smith, Louise Eugenie, 1905-06, 

840 Clay Avenue, Scranton. Pa. Summer: Madison, Conn. 

Smith, Mary Fairbank, 1S93-94. 
Died, 1907. 

Smyth, Adelaide Gertrude. 1S97-1900, Winnetka, 111. 

Married, 1902, Mr. Charles Beaton Buell. 

Smyth, Eleanor A., 1S98-99, ...91 Walker Street, Cambridge, Mass. 
Married, Professor Herbert Weir Smyth. 

Smythe, Helen Goldsborough, 1893-94, 

15 Humboldt Avenue, Providence, R. I. 

Solis-Cohen, Emily Elvira, 1905-07, 

1525 Walnut Street, Philadelphia. 

Sollenberger, Maud, 1899-1901, Mahanoy City, Pa. 

Soule, Judith Brasher, 1908-09, 

1051 Beacon Street, Brookline, Mass. 
Married, 1907, Mr. Winsor Soule. 

Souther. Catherine. 1906-08, 

The Clinton, Tenth and Clinton Streets, Philadelphia. Summer: 
Bass Rocks, Gloucester, Mass. 

Southerland, Harriet Rodman, 1900-02, 

1921 N Street, Washington, D. C. 

Southwick, Katharine Mason, 1901-03, 

449 Park Avenue, New York City. 
Married, 1907, Mr. Ernst G-unther Vi\ 

Southwick, Lola Josephine, 1900-07, ..1021 A Street, Lincoln, Neb. 

Siangler, II. Mary, 1898-99, Mercersburg. Pa. 

Spencer. Adeline Jo.xes, 1902-n!. . .5 Von Lent Place, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Married, 1903, Mr. Charles Henry Curry. 

Spenceb, Harriett Bennett. 1898-1900, 1901-02, 

301 Highland Avenue. Syracuse. N. Y. 
Married, 1903, Mr. Harry Cook Pierce. 



10S Former Undergraduate Students 

Spebey, Maude Feanklin, 1900-01, 

2432 Haazland Avenue, Fort Wayne, Ind. 

Steaens, Alice Anita, 1907-09, 

20 Corso Regina Elena, Florence, Italy. Summer: Norfolk, Conn. 

Steel, Maegaeet Aemsteong, 1S86-89, 1894-95 Port Deposit, Md. 

Steele, Estheb Clabkson Mayee, 1891-92. 
The Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Summer: Beach Haven, N. J. 

Steinbach, Edna Hoetense, 1906-07, 

1309 North Broad Street, Philadelphia. 

Stephens, Eliza Pullan, 1S88-90. 

185 Greenwood Avenue, Trenton, N. J. 
Married, 1897, Mr. Neil Robert Montgomery. 

Stephens, Elizabeth Ballantine. 1S93-97, 

412 Warburton Avenue, Yonkers, N. Y. 
Married, 1902, Mr. William Lapham Saunders. 

Stephens, Louise Beiee, 1889-90, 52 Bellevue Place, Chicago, 111. 

Married, 1898, Mr. William Tan Doren Wright. 

Stephens, Maey, 1887-90, 

2632 Prairie Avenue. Chicago, 111. Summer: Camp Littlebrook, 
Lake Placid, N. Y. 
Married, 1896, Mr. Ralph Martin Shaio. 

Stevens, Maey Picton, 1904-06, 

1704 Twenty-first Street, Superior, Wis. 
Married, 1907, Mr. Ogclen H. Hammond. 

Stevenson, Eleanob Jane, 1S86-87, 

3501 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Stewart, Bebniece, 1903-06, 30 Broad Street, New York City. 

Married, 1906, Mr. Charles Arthur Mackenzie. 

Stewaet, Feances Mobbow, 1906-09, 

186 East McMillan Street, Mt. Auburn, Cincinnati, O. 
Married, 1909, Mr. Goodrich Barbour Rhodes. 

Stewaet, Helen, 1898-1901, 

President's House, Auburn Seminary, Auburn, N. Y. 

Stieling, Maegaeet Yates, 1895-96, 

209 West Lanvale Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Stites, Helen Chenoweth, 1897-98, 1899, 

Care of Columbia University, New York City. 
Married, 1906, Mr. John Glanville Gill. 

Stone, Kitty Louise, 1902-04, Saginaw West, Mich. 

Stoeeb, Emily Lyman, 1906-08, 

286 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass. Summer: Waltham, Mass. 

Stores, Janet, 1905-06, 

640 Monroe Avenue, Scranton, Pa. Sunnmer: Glenburn, Pa. 

Strauss, Saea, 1895-97, 154 West 72nd Street, New York City. 

Married, 1904, Dr. Albert Fabian Hess. 

Stbong, Anna Louise, 1903-04, Oak Park, 111. 

Steong, Mibiam, 1898-1900, 722 Flanders Street, Portland, Ore. 

Married, 1908, Mr. Harry Stinson Sladen. 



Former Undergraduate Student* 109 

Strong, Ruth, 1899-1901, 1902, 1902-0::. 

63 East 105th Street, Cleveland, O. 
Married, 1905, Mr. S. Sterling McMillin. 

Stuart, Adelina Allyn, 1904, 1904-06, 

Park Avenue Hotel, Dallas, Tex. 

Stubbs, Claribel, 1S93-98, Merion, Pa. 

Studdifoed, Jannetta Gordon, 1895-96, 

374 West 116th Street, New York City. 

Sturdevant, Frances Eloise, 1898-1900. 

307 Fifth Avenue, New York City. 
Married, 1905, Mr. Robin Dale Compton. 

Sturgis, Mary Bowler Vautier, 1902-03, ...Manayunk, Philadelphia. 

Sussman, Alice, 1903-04, 166 First Avenue, San Francisco, Cal. 

Married, 1906, Mr. Walter Amstein. 

Suzuki, Uta, 1904-06, Narabu, Shimotsuki, Japan. 

Sweet, Ethelwyn, 1903-07, 

498 East Fulton Street, Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Swift, Anna Vaughan, 1887-89, Sedgely, Marshallton, Del. 

Married, 1894, Mr. Charles G. Rupert. 

Swift, Frances Dorr, 1891-93, 1500 Rodney Street, Wilmington, Del. 
Married, 1897, Mr. Henry Lea Tatnall, Jr. 

Swindell, Susie Ould, 1900-02. 

519 Fifth Street, Brooklyn, New York City. 
Married, 1906, Mr. Claude Carlyle Nvckols. 

Tanner, Ruth Frances, 1907-09, The Connecticut, Washington, D. C. 

Taylor, Bertha Anna, 1892-93, Sewickley, Pa. 

Taylor, Elizabeth Willis, 1907-09. 

33 West 90th Street, New York City. 

Taylor, Marion Satterthwaite, 1890-92, 

47 Thorn Street, Sewickley, Pa. 
Married, 1898, Mr. Charles A. Woods. 

Taylor, Mary Warren, 1905-07, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Thayer, Dorothy, 1907-09, New Canaan, Conn. 

Thomas, Mary Grace, 1SS5-87, .29 East 77th Street, New York City. 
Married, 18S8, Mr. Thomas K. Worthington. 

Thompson, Agnes May, 1903-04, 
Chester, Conn. Summer: 1134 Quinnipiac Avenue, New Haven, Conn. 

Thompson, Genevieve, 1903-05, 69 North 23rd Street, Portland, Ore. 

Thompson, Julia, 1906-08, "Seven Cedars," Lake Forest, 111. 

Thomson, Sarah Kezia, 1896-97, 

213 East Wheeling Street, Washington, Pa. 

Throop, Susan Everett, 1890-91, 

202 St. John's Place, Brooklyn, New York. 

Towle. Sarah Isabel, 1S97-1900, 107 Waverly Place. New York City. 
Married, 1905, Mr. living Clark Moller. 



110 Former Undergraduate Students 

Townsend, Elizabeth Parker, 1902-04, 

Hawthorn Road, Brookline, Mass. Summer: Cohasset, Mass. 

Trask, Lillia M. D., 1891-93, . . . 155 Highland Avenue, Orange, N. J. 

Trowbridge, Janette, 1899-1900, Eastford, Conn. 

Trueman, Mary Emmoline, 1901-04, 

900 Spruce Street, Philadelphia. Summer: 512 Fourth Avenue, 
Asbury Park, N. J. 

Tsuda, Ume, 1889-92, 16 Goban Cho, Tokio, Japan. 

Tudor, Mary, 1903-04, S3 Marlborough Street, Boston, Mass. 

Married, 1907, Mr. Roland Gray. 

Tyler, Eleanor Justis, 1895-97, 

1303 Linden Avenue, Baltimore, Md. Summer: Groton, Conn. 

Tyler, Mary Graham, 1903-04, ..3638 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. 

Underhill, Mary Rebecca, 1901-03, 

Covelo, Cal. Summer: Tamalpais Road, Berkeley, Cal. 

Underhill, Ruth, 1892-93, ...105 East 60th Street, New York City. 
Married, 1904, Mr. Harold Tredioay White. 

Upperman, Evelyn Beatrice, 1900-01, 

5525 Pemberton Street, Philadelphia. 
Married, 1901, Mr. Ralph E. T. Binz. 

Utley, Elizabeth Minerva, 1900, 1900-01, 1902-03, 

1221 Twelfth Avenue, Altoona, Pa. 
Married, 1907, Mr. Isaac Biddle Thomas. 

Vail, Alice, 1894-97 1811 Berkeley Way, Berkeley, Cal. 

Married, 1897, Mr. Walter Tail Holloway. 

Vaille, Harriet Wolcott, 189S-190O, 

1401 Franklin Street, Denver, Colo. 

"Vallely, Eleanor, 1904-05, 

3452 South Flower Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Van Hise, Mary Janet, 1905-07, 772 Langdon Street, Madison, Wis. 

Van Horn, Olive Ostrander, 1907-08, 

150 Dana Street, Wilkes Barre, Pa. 

Van Norden, Emma Philips, 1889-90. 
Died, 1906. 

Van Voorhis, Lavinia, 1902-04, 

4 North Vermont Avenue, Atlantic City, N. J. 

Vaucxain, Anne, 1903-06, Rosemont, Pa. 

Venner, Gertrude Amy, 190S-09, 

321 West 75th Street, New York City. 

Vickers, Lillian, 1899-1902. 
Died, 1901. 

Vickery, Margaret, 1905-07, 

263 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass. Summer: Ipswich, Mass. 

Vickery, Ruth Perkins, 1907-08, Bellingham, Wash. 

Married, 1909, Mr. Bradford ButtricJc Holmes. 

Vilas, Margaret, 1904-06, 5625 Madison Avenue, Chicago, 111. 



Former Undergraduate Students 111 

Vollmer, Genevieve, 1900, Care of Deutsche Bank, Berlin, Germany. 

Waddington, Mary Elizabeth, 1893-94, 

126 East 24th Street, New York City. 

Wagner, Annie de Benneville, 1888-90. 

5904 Wayne Avenue, Gerinantown, Philadelphia. Summer: Long- 
port, N. J. 
Married, 1904, Mr. Franklin C. Dickey. 

Waldron, Helen Stockton, 1902-03, 

G44 Groveland Park, Chicago, 111. 
Married, 1907, Mr. Clifford Giddings Wells. 

Walker, Esther, 1906-09, 423 State Street, Albany, N. Y. 

Wallace, Lurena Groesbeck, 1904-06, Narberth, Pa. 

Walton, Edith Thompson, 1904, 1904-06, Bala, Pa. 

Wardwell, Alice Dox, 1903-04, 53 East 77th Street, New York City. 
Wardwell, Florence, 1S94-95*, 

53 East 77th Street, New York City. Summer: Springfield Cen- 
tre, N. Y. 

Warkentin, Edna Wella, 1896-9S, 

723 North 9th Street, Kansas City, Kan. 
Married, 1901, Mr. Maurice L. Alden. 

Warren, Louise Bronson, 1894-96, 

405 Seaview Avenue, Bridgeport, Conn. 

Warren, Marion Parsons, 1903-05, 50 Cedar Street, Chicago, 111. 

Watkins, Eleanor Merriken, 1892-94, 

18 West Street, Annapolis, Md. Summer: Dublin, N. H. 
Married, 1896, Mr. Joseph Mason Reeves. 

Watson, Geraldine Eggleston, 1905-08, 

590 Fifth Street, Brooklyn, New York City. 

Weadley, Lidie Babb, 1903-07, Strafford, Pa. 

Weaver, Marguerite Elizabeth, 1903-06, 

251 Harvey Street, Gerinantown, Philadelphia. 

Wehle, Fannie Brandeis, 1896-98, 

146 Claes de Vrieselaan, Rotterdam, Holland. 
Married, 1901, Mr. Karel H. de Haas. 

Weld. Eloise Minot, 1897-99. 
Died, 1908. 

Weldin, Grace Tussey, 1901-03 "Cedarcliffe," Wilmington, Del. 

Wells, Agnes Erminia, 1901-02, 

4811 McCulloch Street, Duluth, Minn. Summer: Upper Jay, N. Y. 

Wells, Alice Mary, 1902-03," Lebanon Springs, N. Y. 

West. Anna Ervina, 1891-95, Wynnewood, Pa. 

Married, 1898, Mr. W. Nelson L. West. 

Wheeler, Ada Maria, 1S97-9S Belfast Road, Camden, Me. 

Wheeler, May L., 1900-01, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Married, Professor Arthur Leslie Wheeler. 



112 Former Undergraduate Students 

Wheeler, Winifred Fat, 1893-04. 
Died, 1896. 

Whitall, Margaret Cooper, 1S85-88, 
Died, 1892. 

Whitall, Margaret Millan, 1902, 1902-05, 
Died, 1907. 

White. Eva Grove. 1899-1901, Sidney, O. 

Harried, 1905, Mr. Ralph Colwell Kali. 

White. Lulu Johnson, 1899-1900, 
Died, 1899. 

White, Margaret, 1901-02, 11 Highland Street, Cambridge, Mass. 

Whitney, III, Emily Francis, 1905-07, Vineyard Haven, Mass. 

Whitney, Ruth Bowman, 1899-1901, 

26 Marlborough Street, Boston, Mass. Summer: Cohasset, Mass. 
Married, 1906, Mr. Herbert Lyman. 

Wiiittredge, Euphemia, 1893-94, 4 West 40th Street, New York City. 

Wight, Dorothy Talbot, 1903-06, 

75 Gates Avenue, Montclair. N. J. Summer: Fisher's Island, N. T. 

Wilder, Laura, 1906-07, .5811 Monroe Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

Willett, Josephine Lape, 1893-94, Glens Falls, N. T. 

Williams, Alice Amelia, 1896-99, ..702 East Broadway, Streator, 111. 

Williams, Sophia Wells, 1S93-94, 36 Elm Street, Westerly, R. I. 

Williamson, Mary Peabody, 1899-1901, 

The Monterey, 3922 Prospect Avenue. Cleveland, O. Summer: 
Springbank, Lake Shore Boulevard, Cleveland, O. 

Willits, Esther Evans, 1894-96 Haverford, Ta. 

Married, 1S9S, Mr. Arthur Henry Thomas. 

Willits. Virginia White. 1898-99, 

Care of Mr. Albert B. Willits, 645 North 16th Street, Philadelphia. 

Wilson, Catharine Victoria. 1899-1902, 

379 South Broadway Park. Lexington. Ky. Summer: Care of Mrs. 
Robert T. Wilson. 4217 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. 
Married, 1908, Dr. Lloyd Cadie Daniels. 

Wilson. Genevieve. 1906-08, 

3342 Walnut Street. Philadelphia. Summer: Paulsboro. N. J. 

Wilson. Margaret Adelaide. 1S97-1900, 405 Clay Street, Portland, Ore. 

Winchester, Evelyn Lee, 1903-05, 

1336 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tenn. 

Wing, Marie Remington, 1903-04, 1905-07, 

3834 Prospect Avenue, Cleveland, O. 

Winslow, Ellen Augusta, 1887-89, 

100 Monmouth Street, Springfield, Mass. 

Winsor, Mary, 1902-05, 1907-08, Haverford, Pa. 

Wintherbotham, Genevieve F., 1900-01, 1902, 1902-03, 

American Consulate, Copenhagen, Denmark. 
Married, 1908, Mr. Frank Roger Mowrer. 



Former Under graduate Students 113 

Wischan, Pauline, 1904, 1904-05, 726 North 7th Street, Philadelphia. 

Witherspoon, Pauline Fulton, 1901-03, 

The Belgravia, Louisville, Ky. Summer: Madison, Term. 

Wolcott, Laura, 1894, 1894-95, Address unknown. 

Wolf, Blanche, 1904-06, 1607 North Broad Street, Philadelphia. 

Wolf, May Violet, 1893-95, 926 Y Street, Washington, D. C. 

Woods, Hope, 1900-03, 

373 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, Mass. Summer: Yacht 
Viator, American Yacht Club, Mai-blehead Neck, Mass. 
Married, 1909, Mr. Merrill Hunt. 

Wright, Elizabeth, 1903-07, 

140 South Kentucky Avenue, Atlantic City, N. J. 

WUPPERMANN, ZOYLA GOMEZ, 1900, 1900-01, 

19 Elmwood Park, Newtonville, Mass. 
Married, 1905, Mr. Clarence N. Cook. 
Wyatt, Edith Franklin, 1892-94,.. 4632 Sheridan Road, Chicago, 111. 

Wye, Theodora Ethel. 1901, 1901-03, 

Teachers' College, Columbia University, New York City. 

Wyman, Florence Julien, 1907-08. 

12 West 12th Street. New York City. Summer: Ridge Street, 
Portchester, N. Y. 

Yardley, Anna Hall, 1890-95, Milford, Del. 

Married, 1900, Mr. Charles Gibbons Prettyman. 

Yardley, Clara Margaretta, 1894-97, 

171 Oakdale Street, Cleveland, O. 
Married, 1905, Mr. Ernest Pulsford. 

Yardley, Virginia Greer, 1897-99, 

40S West 23rd Street, New York City. 

Yeatts, May Day, 1898-1900, 135 Poplar Avenue, Wayne, Pa. 

Married, 1905, Mr. Charles Henry Howson. 

Young, Anne Whittemore. 1903-05, 

8807 Bay 15th Street, Bath Beach, Brooklyn. New York City. 

Young, Louise Steele, 1890-94, 

36 West Phil-Ellena Street, Germantown, Philadelphia. 
Married, 1901, Mr. Alfred S. Weill. 
ZlEGLER, HATTIE FLORENCE, 1899-1900, 

16 North McDowell Street, Charlotte, N. C. 






114 Married Names 



Married Names of Alumna and Former Students. 

PAGE 

Abbott, Mrs. Franklin (Vauclain, Mary) 46 

Ackermann, Mrs. Frederick Thomas (Brooks, Frances Annette) 87 

Adams, Mrs. Charles Lawrence (Greely, Adola) 24 

Alden, Mrs. Maurice L. (Warkentin, Edna Wella) Ill 

Aldrich, Mrs. Talbot (Little, Eleanor Lovell) 32 

Allen, Mrs. William W., Jr. (Blair, Annie King) 66 

Allinson, Mrs. Francis Greenleaf (Emery, Annie Crosby) 5 

Amram, Mrs. David Werner (Brylawski, Beulah) 87 

Anderson, Mrs. Clifford Spence (Green, Phyllis) 94 

Anderson, Mrs. Lewis Albert (Urdahl, Margerethe) 6 

Andrews, Mrs. Charles McLean (Walker, Evangeline Holoombe) 46 

Andrews, Mrs. Ethan Allen (Foulke, Gwendolen) 93 

Angell, Mrs. Joseph Warner (Jeffries, Helen Howard) 73 

Annan, Mrs. Roberdeau (Green, Anna Bright) 24 

Armfield, Mrs. Frank (Armfield, Lucille) 65 

Arnstein, Mrs. Walter (Sussman, Alice) 109 

Ayres, Mrs. F. Willard (Wood, Mary) 48 

Babb, Mrs. Benjamin F. (White, Deborah Bertha) 83 

Babson, Mrs. Sydney Gorham (Campbell, Grace Bowditch) 15 

Baker, Mrs. Charles Adkins (Johnston, Marie Louise). 97 

Baker, Mrs. J. Henry (Tull, Louise) 82 

Baker, Mrs. Marcus (Strong, Marion Una) 81 

Bakewell, Mrs. Charles Montague (Palmer, Madeline) 36 

Ballagh, Mrs. James Curtis (Jackson, Josephine) 97 

Ballard, Mrs. Frederick Wayne (Todhunter, Bessie C.) 82 

Ballard, Mrs. Thomas P. (Keay, Frances Anne) 29 

Ballinger, Mrs. Lees (Matless, Alice) 100 

Bamberger, Mrs. Albert J. (Floersheim, Edna W.) 92 

Bancroft, Mrs. Wilfred (Nields, Elizabeth) 36 

Barber, Mrs. Alvin Barton (Lombardi, Lucy) 32 

Barber, Mrs. St. George (Biglow, Elsie) 12 

Barker, Mrs. Charles A. (Albro, Alice Hopkins) 10 

Barnes, Mrs. Morgan (Dale, Jennie) 68 

Barron, Mrs. Alexander Johnston (Congdon, Elizabeth) 17 

Barton, Mrs. George A. (Barton, Caroline Danforth) 85 

Bates, Mrs. Guy (Greene, Anne Dunkin) 94 

Baumgartner, Mrs. Milton D. (Hill, Sarah D.) 59 

Baxter, Mrs. Frederick Lockwood (Palmer, Sara Stokes) .36 

Beals, Mrs. Charles E. (Bourne, Anna Maria) 86 

Beatie, Mrs. Charles W. (McMullen, Jeannette Craig) 75 

Beckwith, Mrs. William E. (Rice, M. Ethelwynn) 65 

Beecher, Mrs. Harold Kline (Bullock, Ethel Stratton) 14 

Belknap, Mrs. Robert E. (Lyon, Elizabeth Treat) 32 

Bell, Mrs. George (Watson, Florence M.) 83 

Bell, Mrs. William B. (Alsop, Susan Kite) 84 

Bell, Mrs. Laird (Fairbank, Nathalie) 21 

Bergengren, Mrs. Charles Henry (Merritt, Leslie) 101 

Bertelsen, Mrs. Henrik (Olsen, Sophie Yhlen) 8 

Bibbins, Mrs. Arthur Barneveld (Mory, Ruthelia Bernard) 61 

Bienenfeld, Mrs. A. M. (Hecht, Adelheid) 95 

Binz, Mrs. Ralph E. T. (Upperman, Evelyn Beatrice) 110 

Blackwell, Mrs. Henry Clayton (Middendorf, Katherine Louise Irvin) 101 

Blodgett, Mrs. John (Walton, Clara Ann) '. 83 

Boericke, Mrs. John James (Schoff, Edith Gertrude) 40 

Bolling, Mrs. Raynal Cawthorne (Phillips, Anna Tucker) 103 



Married \ ames 115 

PAGE 

Borden, Mrs. Spencer, Jr. (Ames, Sarah Hildreth) 84 

Borie, Mrs. Adolphe E., 3rd (Pettit, Edith) 8 

Boross, Mrs. Dezso Eugen (Holman, Josephine Bowen) 95 

Boveri, Mrs. Theodore (O'Grady, Marcella I.) 61 

Bowditch, Mrs. Ingersoll (Scudder, Sylvia Church) 41 

Boyd, Mrs. David Knickerbocker (Mifflin, Elizabeth Hornli) 101 

Bradley, Mrs. James Clifford (Sipe, Dollie Holland) 42 

Breed, Mrs. Charles Henry (Martin, Frances de Forest) 100 

Brewster, Mrs. William (Southgate, Mary) 43 

Bristol, Mrs. Miles Franklin (Baldwin, Susan A.) 85 

Brooks, Mrs. Alfred H. (Baker, Mabel Whitman) 56 

Brooks, Mrs. Henry Harlow (Davis, Louise Dudley) 18 

Brooks, Mrs. Henry Stanford, Jr. (Vail, Clara Warren) 46 

Bkown, Mrs. Henry Ingersoll (Harris, Madeline Vaughan) 25 

Brown, Mrs. Reynolds Driver (Harris, Frances Brodhead) 25 

Brown, Mrs. Theodore Edmondson (Levering, Margaretta) 99 

Brown, Mrs. William (Barr, Dora) 65 

Bryant, Mrs. Emmons (Lyon, Dorothy Wilberforce) 5 

Buckingham, Mrs. Edgar (Holstein, Elizabeth Branton) 95 

Bockminster, Mrs. William Read (Miller, Mary Alice Edwards) 101 

Buell, Mrs. Charles Seaton (Smyth, Adelaide Gertrude) 107 

Bush, Mrs. Henry Tatnall (Moore, Lydia) 35 

Bushnell, Mrs. Charles Elmer (Abbott, M. V.) 9 

Busselle, Mrs. Alfred (Murray, Harriet Cock) 102 

Butler, Mrs. Henry- Emerson (Mason, Alice Eleanor) 100 

Cabot, Mrs. W. Channing (Blake, Elinore) 86 

Cadbury, AIrs. Benjamin (Moore, Anna Mary) 76 

Caldwell, Mrs. Brown (Follansbee, Blanche Davis) 21 

Calvert, Mrs. Alan (Githens, Mary Uhle) 23 

Calvert, Mrs. Philip Powell (Smith, Amelia Catherine) 63 

Campbell, Mrs. Richard Crawford (Patterson, Margaret M.) 37 

Carey', Mrs. Anthony Morris (Thomas, Margaret Chest on) 44 

Carroll, Mrs. Alexander Rook (Baggaley, Elizabeth) 85 

Carson, Mrs. John Thompson (Gilhnder, Agnes) 23 

Carstenson, Mrs. Julius (Dean, Harriett Lulu) 69 

Carter, Mrs. Charles Reginald (Hanington, Florence) 58 

Carvallo, Mrs. Joachim Leon (Coleman, Anne C.) 17 

Cason, Mrs. Everett S. (Edwards, Pauline Childs Hartman) 91 

Castle, Mrs. Alfred L. (Schaefer, Ethelinda F.) 40 

Chambers, Mrs. Lauren Miller (Beardshear, Hazel Leoni) 65 

Chapin, Mrs. Robert Coit (Grabill, Winogene) 70 

Chapman, Mrs. Charles J. (Rumery, Marguerite) 105 

Charles, Mrs. Arthur M. (Riggs, Carrie Lane) 79 

Chichester, Mrs. Bradshaw Beverley (Canby, Clara Greenough) 88 

Childs, Mrs. Robert William (Barton, Katherine Sayles) 11 

Clapp, Mrs. James Ford (Fanshawe, Leonora) 92 

Clark, Mrs. Herbert L. (Bent, Elizabeth Conway) 12 

Clark, Mrs. John Alexander (McLane, Hazel Ellen) 101 

Cleveland, Mrs. Arthur H. (Atwater, Ethelwyn M.) 84 

Coffman, Mrs. George Raleigh (Reed, Bertha) 62 

Colin, Mrs. Alfred (Colin, TheYese F.) 57 

Collins, Mrs. Chadwick (Morrow, Caroline) 35 

Collins, Mrs. William H. (Cope, Julia) 17 

Collins, Mrs. William R. (Rawson, Lucy) 38 

Collitz, Mrs. Hermann (Collitz, Mara Hechtenberg) 68 

Coney-, Mrs. John Haughton (Reitze, Harriot C.) 7S 

Converse, Mrs. Bernard Todd (Austin, Mabel Henszey) 11 

Compton, Mrs. Robin Dale (Sturdevant, Frances Eloise) 109 



116 Married Names 

PAGE 

Cook, Mrs. Clarence N. (Wuppermann, Zoyla Gomez) 113 

Cope, Mrs. Francis R., Jr. (Morris, Evelyn Flower) 35 

Corbett, Mrs. George Holmes Uvedale (Spencer, Maud Du Puy) 43 

Corbus, Mrs. Frederick Godfrey (Ketchum, Florence Josephine) 97 

Coenwell, Mrs. Gibbons Gray (Eberman, Ella) 91 

Cowles, Mrs. William Turner (Birdsall, Mabel) 12 

Cox, Mrs. Isaac M. (Bean, Catherine E.) 12 

Cox, Mrs. M. M. (Lewis, Sarah Elva) 74 

Cox, Mrs. Thomas Smedley, Jr. (Haines, Mary Sheppard) 94 

Craven, Mrs. Thomas Truxtun Tingey (Chapin, Edith Burwell) 16 

Crawford, Mrs. Remembrance Lindsay (Rush, Frances Bertha) 40 

Crew, Mrs. Henry (Coale, Helen Cecilia) 17 

Cross, Mrs. Frederick Gushing (Farquhar, Dorothea) 21 

Cross, Mrs. Jerome O. (Nelden, Maria Louise) 103 

Cunning, Mrs. George Albert (Klett, Edith May) 98 

Curry, Mrs. Charles Henry (Spencer, Adeline Jones) 107 

Curtis, Mrs. Charles E. (Sherwood, Elizabeth Lee) 80 

Dammann, Mrs. John Francis, Jr. (Lynde, Isabel Adair) 32 

Daniels, Mrs. Lloyd Cadie (Wilson, Catharine Victoria) 112 

Darlington, Mrs. Herbert Seymour (Hubbard, Sybil E.) 27 

Darlington, Mrs. Philip Jackson (Mattson, Rebecca T.) 33 

Davenport, Mrs. William Enright (Hills, Evelyn Agnes) 26 

Davis, Mrs. Edward B. (Atkins, Emma Louise) 11 

Day, Mrs. Richard Melville (Boyd, Lydia Paxton) 13 

Dennison, Mrs. Henry Sturgis (Thurber, Mary Tyler) 45 

Dey, Mrs. John (Smith, Clarissa Worcester) 42 

Dickerman, Mrs. William Carter (Carter, Alice) 15 

Dickey, Mrs. Franklin C. (Wagner, Annie de Benneville) Ill 

Dickey, Mrs. John Rogers (McManus, Caroline E.) 33 

Dickey, Mrs. Samuel (Atherton, Louise Parke) 10 

Dietrich, Mrs. Charles Henry (Stewart, Margretta Shaw) 43 

Dodge, Mrs. Rowland Bacchus (Sinclair, Alice) 63 

Dougall, Mrs. Arthur St. George (Maitland, Mary Elizabeth) . 100 

Douglas, Mrs. J. Henry, Jr. (Hutchinson, Mabel) 28 

Dowler, Mrs. C. E. A. (Bash, Amy Ballance) 65 

Draper, Mrs. Herbert Horace (McCarroll, Harriet Etta) 75 

Dudley, Mrs. Charles Benjamin (Crawford, Mary V.) 18 

Dudley, Mrs. Charles Tarbell (Emery, Sarah Lotta) 20 

Durfee, Mrs. Randall Nelson (Brayton, Abby Slade) 13 

Durham, Mrs. Roger (Holman, Helen) 95 

Dutton, Mrs. Harry John (Meredith, Rosella) 76 

Eaton, Mrs. Jacob Tatum (Harding, Flora Keziah) 71 

Edwards, Mrs. Arthur Cecil (Case, Clara Cary) 15 

Ehrman, Mrs. George Edgar (Schoff, Louise) 41 

Eikenberry, Mrs. William A. (Murray, Marcia) 76 

Ellis, Mrs. Frank Adams (Douglas, Nellie Woods) 91 

Emerson, Mrs. Haven (Parrish, Grace) 103 

Emerson, Mrs. Oliver Farrar (Logan, Annie Laurie) 99 

Emlen, Mrs. Samuel, Jr. (Haines, Marion Hartshorne) 25 

Esgen, Mrs. Fred Weaver (Johnson, Elizabeth) 73 

Esterly, Mrs. Henry Minor (Norcross, Elizabeth) 36 

Evans, Mrs. Edgar H. (Malott, Ella Laura) 100 

Evans, Mrs. John Wainwright (Clagett, Edith J.) 67 

Fabyan, Mrs. Marshall (McCormick, Eleanor Harryman) 100 

Fairbanks, Mrs. Arthur Willard, (Clarke, Edythe) 16 

Falconbridge, Mrs. John Delatre (Hamilton, Elizabeth Porter) 94 

Farley, Mrs. R. Henderson (Sickel, Corinne) : 42 

Farmer, Mrs. Malcolm (Merriman, Lucille) 34 

Ferris, Mrs. Alfred J. (Shoemaker, Anna Peirce) 106 



Married Names 117 

PAGE 

Findley, Mrs. Joseph Dysart (Dean, Elisa) 18 

Fitzgerald, Mrs. Richard Y. (Walker, Susan Grimes) 46 

Fletcher, Mrs. Henry Martineau (Emerson, Ruth) 20 

Flexner, Mrs. Simon (Thomas, Helen Whitall) 44 

Fohs, Mrs. F. Julius (Baldauf, Cora) 85 

Foltz, Mrs. Charles Steinman (Kieffer, Josephine Berry) 29 

Foote, Mrs. Harry Ward (Jenkins, Martha Babcock) 29 

Fordyce, Mrs. John R. (Powell, Lillian Augusta) 104 

Fordyce, Mrs. William 0. (Orrick, Christine) 36 

Forman, Mrs. Horace Baker, Jr. (Chandlee, Elizabeth Betterton) 15 

Fouilhoux, Mrs . J. Andre (Clark, Jean Butler) 16 

Fountain, Mrs. Gerard (Caldwell, Elizabeth Miller) 15 

Francis, Mrs. Richard Standish (Congdon, Louise Buffum) 17 

Fraser, Mrs. Agnus M. (Canada, Mabel Augusta) 88 

Frelinghuysen, Mrs. Peter H. B. (Havemeyer, Adeline) 26 

Fry, Mrs. Lawford Howard (Canan, Marjorie Stockton) 15 

Gallagher, Mrs. Percival (Corson, Elizabeth Stillwell) 17 

Gardner, Mrs. Alfred A. (Willets, Katherine Taber) 48 

Gardner, Mrs. Henry (Streeter, Julia) 43 

Garner, Mrs. Albert Rowland (Ross, Margaret Jane) 40 

Geary, Mrs. Harry Logan (Ballard, Jessie M.) 85 

Geier, Mrs. Frederick A. (Esselborn, Juliet) 92 

Gellhorn, Mrs. George (Fischel, Edna) 21 

Gibbons, Mrs. Herbert Adams (Brown, Helen Davenport) 87 

Gies, Mrs. William John (Lark, Mabel Loyetta) 74 

Gilman, Mrs. Theodore, Jr. (Silkman, Eleanor) 106 

Gill, Mrs. John Glanville (Stites, Helen Chenoweth) 10S 

Gill, Mrs. Thomas H. (Sceets, Laura Alice) TQ 

Goethe, Mrs. Charles M. (Glide, Mary L.) 70 

Goodell, Mrs. Horatio Stuart (Hubbard, Charlotte Armitage) 96 

Goulding, Mrs. Herbert J. (McCune, Mabel) 101 

Grafton, Mrs. Edwin Herbert (Whitehead, Anna Marion) 47 

Gray, Mrs. Luther Albert (Downing, Harriet Adele) 91 

Gray, Mrs. Roland (Tudor, Mary) 110 

Greening, Mrs. Henry B. (Haines, Helen Eayre) 24 

Gregson, Mrs. John, Jr. (Goodell, Edith) 24 

Grenfell, Mrs. Wilfred T. (MacClanahan, A. E.) 32 

Gribbel, Mrs. W. Griffin (Latta, Margaret Douglas) 98 

Gucker, Mrs. Frank Thomson (Fulton, Louise Oliphant) 22 

Guild, Mrs. George M. (Montague, Mary) 34 

Guillou, Mrs. Horace Edmund (Walters, Adeline B.) 47 

Gutman, Mrs. Bernhard (Goldman, Bertha) 23 

Haas, Mrs. Albert (Haas, Jeanne) 94 

de Haas, Mrs. Karel Hendrick (Wehle, Fannie Brandeis) Ill 

Hack, Mrs. Harold Wright (Hartshorn, Joanna Dixon) 95 

Hackett, Mrs. Frank Sutliff (Allen, Frances Dean) 10 

Hadley, Mrs. Murray N. (Henley, Florence Ruth) 72 

Hall, Mrs. J. Lindley (Child, Clara Mott) 89 

Hamilton, Mrs. Louis Pennock (Darlington, Sarah WiJson) 18 

Hammond, Mrs. Ogden H. (Stevens, Mary Picton) 108 

Hand, Mrs. Clarence Foster (Clark, Eleanor Bonsai) 89 

Hand, Mrs. Learned (Fincke, Frances Amelia) 21 

Hanley, Mrs. John Cheney (Pomeroy, Diana) 77 

Hanna, Mrs. Hugh Henry, Jr. (McCulloch, Agnes) 101 

Hardenbergh, Mrs. Clarence Morgan (Nichols, Margaret B.) 36 

Harkness, Mrs. Frank Edgerton (McMahan, Una) 75 

Harris, Mrs. Frank Hulburd (Naylor, Ella R .) 76 

Harris, Mrs. Herbert Taylor (Burton, Cornelia R.) 67 



118 Married Names 

PAGE 

Harris, Mrs. John McArthur (Weygandt, Sophia) 47 

Harrison, Mrs. Timothy (Landers, Pearl Adele) 98 

Havemeter, Mrs. Arthur (Herrick, Clara Martha) 26 

Head, Mrs. Joseph (Wilkinson, Annie Lyndesay) 64 

Heim, Mrs. William Kennedy (Hooke, Harriet Henley) 96 

Heissig, Mrs. Konrad (Haynes, Mabel Stevens) 26 

Henning, Mrs. Stephen (Duke, Julia Blackburn) 91 

Henshaw, Mrs. Arthur W. (Darling, Jessie) 68 

Henshaw, Mrs. Barclay W. (Newlin, Flora Alice) 76 

Hepburn, Mrs. Thomas Norval (Houghton, Katherine Martha). 7 

Herriott, Mrs. Frank Irving (Haines, Mary) 71 

Hess, Mrs. Alfred Fablan (Strauss, Sara) 10S 

Hibbard, Mrs. Charles Bell (Gale, Mary Eastman) 70 

Hibbard, Mrs. Willlam Gold, Jr. (Follansbee, Susan Davis) 21 

Hill, Mrs. Edward Buffum (Farwell, Leslie) 21 

Hill, Mrs. James Jewill (Challen, Laura Redington) 88 

Hill, Mrs. Perry Childs (Buffum, Marianna Nicholson) 7 

Hill, Mrs. William (Miles, Caroline) 61 

Hitchens, Mrs. Arthur Parker (Bennett, Ethel Mary) 6 

Ho ag, Mrs. Clarence Gilbert (Scattergood, Anna) 40 

Hodder, Mrs. Alfred (Gwinn, Mary) 5 

Hodge, Mrs. Cortlandt Van Rensselaer {Sinclair, Elsie Campbell) 42 

Hoffman, Mrs. Arthur Sullivant (James, Mary Denver) 28 

Hogue, Mrs. Robert Murray (Horner, Jane Elizabeth) 96 

Holliday, Mrs. Clyde Cecil (Wray, Edith Sophia) 48 

Hollis, Mrs. John Hudson (Chase, Bertha Poole) 16 

Hollowat, Mrs. Walter Vail (Vail, Alice) 1 10 

Holmes, Mrs. Bradford Buttrick (Vickery, Ruth Perkins) 110 

Holt, Mrs. Merrill (Fillius, Ella Sabin) 70 

Holtzinger, Mrs. Horace Kirk (Frederick, Miriam Du Bois) 93 

Hooker, Mrs. Donald Russell (Houghton, Edith) 27 

Horn, Mrs. David Wilbur (Farnham, Lois Anna) 7 

Horn, Mrs. Gottfried Martin (Ropes, Ellen M.) 40 

Horn, Mrs. William Melchior (Jacobs, Marguerite Eyster) 97 

Howe, Mrs. Thorndike Dudley (Rotan, Anne Sturm) 40 

Howson, Mrs. Charles Henry (Yeatts, May Day) 113 

Huddleson, Mrs. Clarence Dean (Jones, Ruth Lovering) 29 

Huddleston, Mrs. John Henry (Clark, Mabel Parker) 7 

Hudson, Mrs. Charles Bradford (Bamhisel, Claire Grace) 85 

Huff, Mrs. William Bashford (Schaeffer, Helen Elizabeth) 6 

Hughes, Mrs. Stanley Carnaghan (Foulke, Lydia) 93 

Hull, Mrs. William Isaac (Clothier, Hannah Hallowell) 68 

Hulse, Mrs. Shirley Clark (Reynolds, Margaret Anne) 104 

Hunt, Mrs. Merrill (Woods, Hope) 113 

Hunt, Mrs. William Floyd (Pearson, Julia A.) 103 

Hussey, Mrs. William T. (Rushmore, Florence) 105 

Hyde, Mrs. Francis de Lacy (Knowland, Carolyn) 98 

Ives, Mrs. Frederick Merwin (Wetherill, Edith) 47 

Jackson, Mrs. Charles (Higginson, Elizabeth B.) 95 

Jackson, Mrs. William Hartas (Jackson, M. Katherine) 73 

Jackson, Mrs. Percy (Day, Alice Hooker) 18 

Jacob, Mrs. Charles R. (Jones, Hattie Elizabeth) 97 

Jameson, Mrs. George C. (Hulbert, Nellie May) 96 

Jamieson, Mrs. George Samuel (Holden, Charlotte) 27 

Jarrett, Mrs. Edwin Seton (Hardy, Cora) 25 

Jeanes, Mrs. Henry Sulger (Baird, Cora) 85 

Jeans, Mrs. James Hopwood (Mitchell, Charly Tiffany) 34 

Jeffrey, Mrs. Edward C. (Street, Jennette Atwater) 63 



Married Names 119 

PAGE 

John, Mrs. Roderick Belton (Worth, Fiorina Gertrude) 83 

Johnson, Mrs. Allen (Ross, Helen Kunkle) 105 

Johnson, Mrs. Allen Clifford (Harrison, Susan Rachel) 71 

Johnson, Mrs. Alvin Saunders (Henry, Margaret E.) 59 

Johnson, Mrs. Bascom (Adams, Sophie Frances) 9 

Johnson, Mrs. Hobart Stanley (Hopkins, Elizabeth) 95 

Johnson, Mrs. Howard Morris (Fenollosa, Brenda) 92 

Johnson, Mrs. Irving Culver (Burnside, Mary Hortense) 67 

Johnson, Mrs. Joseph Esrey, Jr. (Plilles, Margaret Hill) 26 

Johnson, Mrs. Warren Thomas (Pyle, Miriam Weir) 78 

Johnston, Mrs. Edgar Paul- (Moffitt, Rebecca Charlotte) 102 

Johnston, Mrs. Hugh McBirney (Hulburd, Ethel) 28 

Johnston, Mrs. Morris Leidy (Douglas, Grace) 19 

Jones, Mrs. Benjamin F. (Preston, Jennie Florence) 104 

Jones, Mrs. Chester Lloyd (Schock, Caroline Franck) 40 

Jones, Mrs. Emlyn Ivor (Popejoy, Laura Elizabeth) 78 

Jones, Mrs. Rufus M. (Cadbury, Elizabeth Bartram) 89 

Kackley, Mrs. Thomas Reid (Atkins, Sarah F.) 11 

Kaii, Mrs. Ralph C. (White, Eva Grove) 112 

Kay, Mrs. d Arcy Hemsworth (Cragin, Jane Heartt) 17 

Keiser, Mrs. Edward Harrison (Harris, Elizabeth) 7 

Kellermann, Mrs. Charles Richard (Lodge, Edith Harvey) 99 

Kelley, Mrs. James E. (Cooke, Bertha May) 17 

Kellogg, Mrs. Edwin Dwight (Ropes, Alice Rogers) 40 

Kellogg, Mrs. Frederick R. (Halsey, Cornelia Van Wyck) 25 

Kellogg, Mrs. Lee Olds (Lovell, Alice) 32 

Kemble, Mrs. Ira Oscar (Haskell, Caroline Flora) 71 

Kemmerer, Mrs. John Leisenring ((Ream, Frances Mott) 38 

Kimball, Mrs. John H. (Robinson, Estelle Ann) 79 

King, Mrs. Paul (Greene, Cornelia Bonnell) 24 

Kinkead, Mrs. James A. (Reynolds, Minnie Beatrice) 62 

Kirk, Mrs. Edward Cameron (Clements, Helen Theodora) 16 

Klebs, Mrs. Arnold C. (Forbes, Margaret) 92 

Knoblauch, Mrs. Charles Edward (Bookstaver, Mary A.) 13 

Koch, Mrs. Edward Louis (Price, Mary Lucretia) 104 

Korff, Mrs. Serge Elexander (Van Reypen, Alletta Louise) 46 

Kreutzberg, Mrs. Otto August (Gribi, Marguerite) 24 

Kruesi, Mrs. Paul John (Smartt, Myra Kennedy) 107 

Kuhn, Mrs. Charles John (Bowman, Edna Alwilda) 86 

Laciar, Mrs. William Hamilton (Darrow, Elizabeth Tremper) 18 

La Coste, Mrs. John Constable (Neilson, Grace Herbert) 35 

Ladd, Mrs. David Hartwell (Cooper, Virginia Alice) 90 

Ladd, Mrs. William Coffin (Rhoads, Anna Ely) 8 

LaForce, Mrs. William Brooks (Bousquet, A. Carolina D.) 66 

Lafore, Mrs. John Armand (Shearer, Anne Frances) 41 

Lane, Mrs. Elmer Bloomfield (Tevis, Julia Antony) 44 

Langenbeck, Mrs. Karl (Roelker, Mildred M.) 105 

Leatherbee, Mrs. Frederic Keith (Howland, Dorothy) 96 

Leatherbee, Mrs. Robert William (Crane, Frances Anita) 90 

Lee, Mrs. Waldemar (Heath, Mary Bailey) 71 

Leslie, Mrs. Francis Alexander (Satterthwaite, Sarah E.) 62 

Leuba, Mrs. James H. (Leuba, Berthe A.) 99 

Levering, Mrs. Ernest Douglas (Wade, Grace Bennett) 40 

Levin, Mrs. Louis Hiram (Szold, Bertha) 44 

I.i.v. is, Mrs. Frank Nichols (Adams, Eliza Raymond) 9 

Lewis, Mrs. Herbert Radnor (Brown, Carolyn Trowbridge) 13 

Lewis, Mrs. James G. (Cartland, Mary Alice) 67 

Lewis, Mrs. John W. (Coffin, Elizabeth White) 68 



120 Married Names 

PAGE 

Lewis, Mes. Joseph William (Westwood, Emily Augusta) 83 

Lewis, Mrs. Robert L. (Rannels, Edith Kirk) 78 

Lewisohn, Mrs. Frederick (Seligman, Rhoda Walter) 106 

Liggett, Mrs. Frank Rahm (Eastern, Margaret) 69 

Limburg, Mrs. Ernest A. (Sichel, Marie Etta) 106 

Lincoln, Mrs. Charles S. F. (Eastham, Williette W.) 91 

Livingston, Mrs. Howard J. (Nebeker, Edna) 102 

Logan, Mrs. Donald Brigham (Briggs, Sara Marie) 87 

Lombard, Mrs. Benjamin Mathews (Sloane, Caroline Swanwick) 42 

Lombardi, Mrs. Maurice Ennis (Peck, Ethel Rogers) 37 

Longfellow, Mrs. Herbert Huntington (Macomber, Mary S.) 100 

Loomis, Mrs. Edward Eugene (Langdon, Julia Oliva) 98 

Loomis, Mrs. Henry M. (Wallace, Eleanor Wigt on) 46 

Lyman, Mrs. Herbert (Whitney, Ruth Bowman) 112 

Macauley, Mrs. George Thurston (McCarter, Flora) 75 

Macavoy, Mrs. William Crocker (Harben, Clarissa) 94 

Macbeth, Mrs. Norman (Holliday, Lucia Shaw) 27 

Macfarlane, Mrs. C. William (Macfarlane, Kathleen Selfridge) 99 

Macintosh, Mrs. John Alexander (Archibald, Sara Elizabeth) 65 

Mackenzie, Mrs. Arthur S. ( Taylor, Mary Lewis) 44 

Mackenzie, Mrs. Charles Arthur (Stewart, Berniece) 108 

Manierre, Mrs. Arthur (Mason, Frances Eleanor) 33 

Marietta, Mrs. Clyde O. (Roach, Lulu Athalee) 79 

Mast, Mrs. Samuel Ottmar (Tennent, Grace Rebecca) 81 

McAllister, Mrs. Frank Allister ( Vickers, Florence Childs) 9 

McConkey, Mrs. Charles E. (Craig, Marie) 68 

McIntosh, Mrs. Douglas (Marcuse, Bella) 60 

McKelvey, Mrs. Charles W. (Delano, Susan Adams) 18 

McKenzie, Mrs. Kenneth (Leffingwell, Aimee Gilbert) 31 

McKnight, Mrs. George Scott (Price, Majorie Gertrude) 38 

McLaren, Mrs. William Augustus (Day, Alice Margaret) 90 

McLean, Mrs. Alexander E. (Chapin, Helena) 16 

McLean, Mrs. William (Powel, Ella Louise) 104 

McMillin, Mrs. S. Sterling (Strong, Ruth) 109 

McMynn, Mrs. Robert N. (Palmer, Elizabeth Marshall) 103 

Meade, Mrs. Edward Sherwood (Fogg, Emily) 58 

Mechling, Mrs. Benjamin Schreiber (Kershaw, Karie Kay) 97 

Meredith, Mrs. Philip Taliaferro (Fronheiser, Mary Dorothy) 22 

Messimer, Mrs. Robert L. (Wright, Marion Lucy) 49 

Mettler, Mrs. John Wyckoff (Fleischmann, Helen) 92 

Metzel, Mrs. George V. (Himes, Anna Magdalen) 72 

Meyer, Mrs. Gustave A. (Gross, Evelyn) 94 

Miller, Mrs. Benjamin LeRoy (Meredith, Mary Anna)) 76 

Miller, Mrs. Carroll (Guffey, Mary Emma) 24 

Miller, Mrs. Charles O., Jr. (White, Mary Elizabeth) 47 

Miller, Mrs. J. Imbrie (Martin, Mary Rockwith) 100 

Million, Mrs. John Wilson (Lovell, Helen Louisa) 60 

Mitchell, Mrs. Ralph E. (Campbell, Marion Elizabeth) 67 

Moharrem, Mrs. M. L. (Marks, Ellen Scott) 100 

Mohn, Mrs. Elmer Lewis (Horst, Mary Elizabeth) 72 

Moller, Mrs. Irving Clark (Towle, Sarah Isabel) 109 

Montgomery, Mrs. Neil Robert (Stephens, Eliza Pullen) 108 

Moore, Mrs. Aman (Wallace, Elsie Amelia) 46 

Moore, Mrs. George W., Jr. (Dungan, Emily) 19 

Moore, Mrs. Harry T. {AUyn, Susan Frances) 84 

Moore, Mrs. Philip Wyatt (Daniels, Caroline Seymour) 18 

Moore, Mrs. William (Hiestand, Eleanor) 72 

Moores, Mrs. Charles W. (Nichols, Elizabeth) 35 



Married Names 121 

PAGE 

Moohhead, Mrs. John Joseph (Howell, Helen A.) 27 

Moorhouse, Mrs. Henry Wilson (Rockwell, Martha Skerry) 39 

Morgan, Mrs. John Junius (McCook, Caroline Alexander) 33 

Morgan, Mrs. Thomas Hunt (Sampson, Lilian Vaughan) 8 

Morrison, Mrs. Charles Henry (Foster, Mary Maclntire) 93 

Morrisson, Mrs. James William (Foulke, Mary Taylor Reeves) 22 

Mosenthal, Mrs. Herman O. (Kroeber, Johanna) 30 

Motley, Mrs. James Marvin (Levering, Ethel) 31 

de Motte, Mrs. Lawrence Washburn (Field, Margaret Elliot) 92 

Moulton, Mrs. Warren J. (Shute, Helen Winifred) 63 

Mount, Mrs. William Boswell (Miller, Mary Wanamaker) 102 

Moweee, Mrs. Frank R. (Winterbotham, Genevieve F.) 112 

Mulford, Mrs. Roland Jessup (Blackwell, Margaret Biddle Guest) 86 

Muller, Mrs. Robert Otto (Erbsloh, Gertrud F. A.) 92 

Mulijn, Mrs. J. Herbert (Mendinhall, Mary Anna) 3-4 

Muloch, Mrs. Edwin McC. (Green, Marjorie Crissy) 94 

Mussey, Mrs. Henry Raymond (Mussey, Mabel H. Barrows) 102 

Myrick, Mrs. Stephen Sianton (Harrison, Miriam Alice) 71 

Neale, Mrs. M. K. (Fowler, Eugenia) 7 

Nearing, Mrs. Scott (Seeds, Nellie Margueritel 41 

Neill, Mrs. Frank Kimmei.i. (DeArmond, Elinor Margaret) 18 

Nelson, Mrs. William Marbury (Coates, Elisa) 89 

Newell, Mrs. Emerson R. (Sealy, Ella) 106 

Newson, Mrs. Henry Byron (Winston, Mary Frances) 64 

Nichols, Mrs. Carroll Brewster (Bullivant, Marjorie) 87 

Noble, Mrs. Frederic Perry- (Edmand, Marietta Josephine) 57 

Northrup, Mrs. John E. (Chisholm, Mary E.) 07 

Norton, Mrs. Arthur Herbert (Hacker, Emma Lydia) 24 

Nuckols, Mrs. Claude Carlyle (Swindell, Susie Ould) 109 

O'Connor, Mrs. John Christopher (Raymond, Helen Jackson) 38 

Odell, Mrs. Owen Davies (Lawther, Evelyn Teressa) 98 

Ohern, Mrs. Daniel Webster (Ohern, Eugenia Grinnell) 103 

Olds, Mrs. Charles Louis (Johnson, Mary A.) 73 

Orr, Mrs. Arthur (Meigs, Alice McKinstrey) 34 

Orr, Mrs. John Bruce (Morris, Frances Humphrey) 35 

Outland, Mrs. J. H. (Grimes, Ethel) 71 

Packer, Mrs. William Satterlee (Frost, Mary Gertrude) 22 

Paddock, Mrs. Brace Whitman (Plunkett, Elizabeth Kellogg) 38 

Paine, Mrs. Howard Simmons (Potter, Sarah M.) 78 

Palmer, Mrs. Louis Jacquette (Buzby, Anne Knox) 88 

Parce, Mrs. Joseph Yale, Jr. (Taggart, Inez Lorena) SI 

Parker, Mrs. John Emilius (Bryan, Elizabeth M.) 14 

Parker, Mrs. Walter Adams (Beals, Annie Read) 86 

Patterson, Mrs. W. Wallace (Holliday, Evelyn Macfarlane) 27 

Paxson, Mrs. Frederick Logan (Jackson, Helen Hale) 28 

Pearson, Mrs. Henry Greenleaf (Winsor, Elizabeth Ware) 48 

Pease, Mrs. Lewis Frederic (Potts, Laurette Eustis) 38 

Peckitt, Mrs. R. G. (Kirkbride, Mary Amelia) 98 

Peirce, Mrs. Joseph Otis (Wyeth, Helen Elizabeth) 49 

Pfahler, Mrs. George Edward (Simpson, Frances Marion) 42 

Philips, Mrs. John C. (Hall, Florence) 71 

Phillips, Mrs. Howard Magill (Hall, Annette Louise) 25 

Pierce, Mrs. Harry Cook (Spencer, Harriett Bennett) 107 

Pierce, Mrs. Henry- Hill (Curtis, Katherine Robinson) 90 

Pierce, Mrs. Wilson Howard (Bancroft, Antoinette Louise) 85 

Pinney, Mrs. Edward G. (Stevenson, Harriet) 43 

Pitcher, Mrs. Frank H. (Brooks, Harriet) 53 

Pitts, Mrs. Henry Sullivan (DuVal, Kate Isabel) 19 



122 Married Names 

PAGE 

Porter, Mrs. Charles Robert (Patterson, Mellissa Belle) 77 

Porter, Mrs. James Foster (Furness, Ruth Wadsworth) 22 

Pratt, Mrs. Henry Sherring (Gray, Agnes Woodbury) 70 

Pratt, Mrs. Maurice Baldwin (Darlington, Beulah Walter) 68 

Prettyman, Mrs. Charles Gibbons (Yardley, Anna Hall) 113 

Prince, Mrs. Sidney Wallace (Miiller, Anna) 35 

Proskauer, Mrs. Joseph M. (Naumberg, Alice) 102 

Pulsford, Mrs. Ernest (Yardley, Clara Magaretta) 113 

Pulsifer, Mrs. William H. (Pulsifer, Cornelia L. Boardman) 78 

Putman, Mrs. George Haven (Smith, Emily James) 42 

Putnam, Mrs. Osgood (Chase, Lucy Edith) 88 

Putnam, Mrs. William Edward, Jr. (Haughwort, Helen Preston) 25 

Quinn, Mrs. Arthur Hobson (McKee, Helen) 101 

Radiguet, Mrs. Lionel (Clapp, Anna Verplanck) 89° 

Ransome, Mrs. Frederick Leslie (Rock, Amy Cordova) 39 

Rauh, Mrs. Aaron S. (Kohn, Elsie) 98 

Ravenel, Mrs. S. Prioleau (Leftwich, Florence) 5 

Reed, Mrs. Joseph S. (Moss, Carolyn Ladd) 102 

Reeves, Mrs. Joseph Mason (Watkins, Eleanor Merriken) Ill 

Remington, Mrs. Herbert Malcolm (Thompson, Elizabeth T.) 45 

Remington, Mrs. Joseph Percy (Parks, Georgiana M.) 103 

Reynolds, Mrs. Marshall J. (Smedley, Elizabeth B.) 80 

Rhoads, Mrs. Joseph Edgar (Chambers, Edith) 15 

Rhodes, Mrs. Goodrich Babrour (Stewart, Frances M.) 108 

Rich, Mrs. Corydon M. (Goddard, Grace) 70 

de Ricou, Mrs. Alfred Barrelet (Fuller, Julia Appleton) 93 

Rider, Mrs. Harold Miloff (Tressel, Gertrude H.) 82 

Riesman, Mrs. David (Fleisher, Eleanor Louie) 21 

Riggs, Mrs. Austin Fox (McBurney, Alice) 100 

Righter, Mrs. Thomas M. (Mitchell, Renee) 34 

Robbins, Mrs. Frederick Wright (Anthony, Emily Frances) 10 

Robinson, Mrs. Alfred Brookes (Blackwell, Ethel B.) 66 

Robinson, Mrs. George O. (Bancroft, Jane M.) 56 

Robinson, Mrs. Henry Rayburn (Kaminski, Olive M.) 73 

Robinson, Mrs. Joseph Haswell (Levering, Mary A.) 31 

Robinson, Mrs. Percy J. (de Beauregard, Esther Tontant) 56 

Roesler, Mrs. Max (Baird, Alice Russell) 85 

Rogers, Mrs. Arthur D. (Rhodes, Anna Eaton) 79 

Rogers, Mrs. Daniel Miner (Christie, Mary Phelps) 89 

Rogers, Mrs. Gardner (Phillips, Grace) 37 

Rose, Mrs. Abram John (Bruere, Emmie Cornelia) 87 

Rosenau, Mrs. Milton J. (Frank, Myra B. Faith) 22 

Ross, Mrs. Thomas (Blakey, May Louise) 12 

Roth, Mrs. Albert S. (Bernheim, Helen) 86 

Rupert, Mrs. Charles G. (Swift, Anna Vaughan) 109 

Russell, Mrs. Bertrand (Smith, Alys Whitall Pearsall) 42 

Russsell, Mrs. Nelson Gorham (Clinton, Ethel) 16 

St. John, Mrs. George Clare (Seymour, Clara Hitchcock) 41 

Sampson, Mrs. Frederick (Emory, Lucretia Van Bibber) 92 

Saunders, Mrs. Arthur Percy (Brownell, Louise Sheffield) 14 

Saunders, Mrs. Frederick A. (Elder, Grace A.) 20 

Saunders, Mrs. Willla.m Lapham (Stephens, Elizabeth Ballantine) 108 

Savage, Mrs. Wilfred Willis (Robbins, Anna Cushman) 104 

Sax, Mrs. Percival M. (Schoneman, May Cadette) 41 

Schmitz, Mrs. Walter (McEwen, Madge) 33 

Schoenthal, Mrs. Lionel (Silverman, Irma) 107 

Schwartz, Mrs. Louis (Adler, Marguerite Olga) 84 

Scott, Mrs. Arthur Hugh (Minturn, Mildred) 34 



Married Names 123 

PAGE 

Scott, Mrs. Samuel Bryan (Morris, Margaretta) 35 

Scott, Mrs. Walter Abner (Shoemaker, Martha) 80 

Scribner, Mrs. Arthur H. (Annan, Helen Culbertson) '. . 10 

Sellers, Mrs. James Cadwalader, Jr. (Sellers, Marjorie) 100 

Sewall, Mrs. Millard Freeman (Ditmars, Helen Sidney) 19 

Shaffer, Mrs. William Walter (Nesbit, Ethel) 76 

Shaw, Mrs. Ralph M. (Stephens, Mary) 108 

Shaw, Mrs. William (Sedgwick, Elizabeth) 106 

Shipley, Mrs. William Ellis (Cadbury, Caroline Warder) 89 

Shoup, Mrs. Francis E. (Howard, Mary Eloise) 96 

Shrieves, Mrs. Edwin Barnett (Unthank, Reba Alice) 82 

Shults, Mrs. James Clement (Dreutlein, Mae Cecilia) 69 

Sikelianos, Mrs. Angelo (Palmer, Evalina) 103 

Silvey, Mrs. William (Archbald, Anna) 10 

Simpson, Mrs. Frank H. (Taylor, Anne) 44 

Slade, Mrs. Francis Louis (McCormick, Caroline) 100 

Sladen, Mrs. Harry Stinson (Strong, Miriam) 108 

Slaughter, Mrs. Moses Stephen (Taylor, Gertrude Elizabeth) 44 

Smith, Mrs. Aa. Levering (Bacon, Ethel McClellan) 11 

Smith, Mrs. Charles Walter (Schrader, Elizabeth W.) 105 

Smith, Mrs. Frank Stuart (Peckham, Emily Comstock) 77 

Smith, Mrs. Herbert Knox (Dietrich, Gertrude Elizabeth) 19 

Smith, Mrs. Joseph Lindon (Putnam, Corinna Haven) 104 

Smith, Mrs. Keith (Garrett, Helen Alice) 93 

Smith, Mrs. Roland Wright (Lawrence, Emily Sylvester) 9S 

Smith, Mrs. Thomas (Middleton, Helen) 34 

Smith, Mrs. William Hemans (Nichols, Margaret P.) 36 

Smyth, Mrs. Herbert Weir (Smyth, Eleanor A.) 107 

Snyder, Mrs. DeWitt (Thurston, Blandina Sibyl) 82 

Soule, Mrs. Winsor (Soule, Judith Brasher) 107 

Spalding, Mrs. Volney Morgan (Southworth, Effie A.) 63 

Spear, Mrs. Philip Bennet (Northrup, Mary) 103 

Speer, Mrs. Robert Elliott (Bailey, Emma Doll) 85 

Springer, Mrs. Ruter William (Lynch, Gertrude Mason) 99 

Stacey, Mrs. Sidney G. (Brombacher, Caroline Garner) 56 

Stebbins, Mrs. Joel (Prentiss, May Louise) 78 

Stein, Mrs. J. Rauch (Harnish, Blanche Marie) 95 

Stephens, Mrs. Redmond Davis (Ream, Marion Buckingham) 38 

Stern, Mrs. J. David (Lit, Juliet Ephraim) 99 

Stevens, Mrs. Brooks (Ames, Edith) 84 

Stewart, Mrs. James M. (Pinney, Grace) 37 

Stifler, Mrs. James Madison (Burnley, Mary Cloyd) 56 

Stine, Mrs. John C. (Paxson, Caroline Ely) 37 

Stinson, Mrs. Edgar (Carroll, Anna Belle) 67 

Stix, Mrs. Ernest William (Kingsbacher, Erma) 98 

Stockwell, Mrs. Frederick Emerson (MacCracken, Fay Mary) 32 

Strauss, Mrs. Richard (Shapiro, Rebecca) 63 

Streeper, Mrs. John S. (Mitchell, Gertrude) . . . 76 

Sutliff, Mrs. Edward Milton (Lautz, Gertrude May) 74 

Swan, Mrs. Henry (Denison, Carla) 19 

Swiggett, Mrs. Glen Levin (Bain, Emma) 65 

Swope, Mrs. Gerard (Hill, Mary Dayton) 26 

Tanner, Mrs. John Stewart (Anderson, Eleanor Milbank) 84 

Tatnall, Mrs. Henry Lea, Jr. (Swift, Frances Dorr) 109 

Taylor, Mrs. Charles Shoemaker (Allinson, Gertrude) 84 

Taylor, Mrs. Paul Clifford (Miller, Emma Louise) 34 

Tennent, Mrs. David Hilt (Maddux, Esther) 100 

Thom, Mrs. Hunt Reynolds Mayo (Hopkins, Helen Kolfe) 27 



124 Married Karnes 

PAGE 

Thomas, Mrs. Arthur Henet (Willits, Esther Evans) 112 

Thomas, Mrs. Henry M. (Carey, Josephine G.) 88 

Thomas, Mrs. Isaac Biddle (Utley, Elizabeth Minerva) 110 

Thorpe, Mrs. Warren Parsons (Converse, Helen Prentiss) 17 

Tierney, Mrs. J. Wilbur (Albertson, Lydia Mitchell) 10 

Tiffany, Mrs. Charles Lewis (Ely, Katrina Brandes) 20 

Tilt, Mrs. Joseph Edward (Bass, Stella) 65 

Tobin, Mrs. Arthur Collson (Roche, Helen Marie) 105 

Tubby, Mrs. Josiah T., Jr. (Peckham, Mary) 37 

Tyler, Mrs. Asa M. (Wilkinson, Laura E.) 48 

Tyler, Mrs. George Trotter (Coles, Therese Pauline) 89 

Uchida, Baroness Yasuga (Dogura, Masa) 19 

Van Wagnen, Mrs. Ray M. (Schummers, Margreta L.) 106 

Vauclain, Mrs. Samuel M., Jr. (Canan, Mary Hilda) 15 

Vietor, Mrs. Ernest C. (Southwick, Katherine Mason) 107 

Wadleigh, Mrs. Luther Ogden (Budd, Harriet May) 66 

Wakefield, Mrs. Walter James (Cameron, Mary Wiley) 15 

Wakeman, Mrs. Bertis R. (Reynolds, Sophie S.) 78 

Walbridge, Mrs. Newman (Miller, Julia Stedman) 101 

Walcott, Mrs. Robert (Richardson, Mary Tuckerman) 39 

Walker, Mrs. William Pomp (Dudley, Margaret) 91 

Walsh, Mrs. John Henry (McBride, Jessie Chambers) 33 

Walsh, Mrs. Timothy (Wright, Marian Adams) 49 

Waples, Mrs. Rufus, Jr. (Howson, Agnes) ' 27 

Waring, Mrs. Edward H. (Peckham, Laura) 37 

Warner, Mrs. James Edson (Railsback, Martha Binford) 78 

Warner, Mrs. Robert Lyon (Pearson, Anne Rutherford) 103 

Warren, Mrs. Joseph (Williams, Constance Martha) 48 

Watkins, Mrs. Benjamin Franklin (Chenault , Sue Shirley) 89 

Watson, Mrs. George (Atkinson, Mary Janney) 11 

Weaver, Mrs. Ben. Perley (Porter, Lucile Anne) 38 

Webster, Mrs. John E. (Steenberg, Bessie) 81 

Weill, Mrs. Alfred S. (Young, Louise Steele) 113 

Weimer, Mrs. William Harrison, Jr. (Ford, Grace Marie) 92 

Weist, Mrs. Harry Hibbard (Cilley, Alice Longfellow) 16 

Wells, Mrs. Clifford Giddings (Waldron, Helen Stockton) Ill 

Wertheim, Mrs. Henri P. (Seligman, Gladys) 106 

West, Mrs. W. Nelson L. (West, Anna Ervina) Ill 

Westcott, Airs. John Howell (Sampson, Edith F.) 8 

Wheeler, Mrs. Arthur Leslie (Wheeler, May L.) Ill 

Wheeler, Mrs. Frederick Hovey (Moore, Ethel Belle) 102 

Wheeler, Mrs. Henry Hathaway (Neergaard, Edith Louise) 102 

White, Mrs. Albert C. (Peck, Louise Lyman) 37 

White, Mrs. David (Hackney, Henryanna Clay) 71 

White, Mrs. Harold Tredway (Underhill, Ruth) 110 

White, Mrs. Israel Losey (Baldwin, Grace Peckham) 85 

White, Mrs. Paul Helb (Malott, Daisy Patterson) 100 

Whitman, Mrs. Roger Bradury (Curtis, Marian) 90 

Whitney, Mrs. Arthur Edward (Craig, Florence Colgate) 90 

Wilbur, Mrs. Bertrand Kingsbury (Dean, Anna Elliott) 90 

Wilcox, Mrs. William W. (Lawall, Marion Louise) 98 

Wiles, Mrs. Thomas L. (Kellen, Ruth) 97 

Willard, Mrs. Arthur Dewalt (St oner, Mary Ella) 43 

Williams, Mrs. Henry S. (Garrett, Mary Rhoads) 93 

Williamson, Mrs. Charles C. (Williamson, Bertha Torrey) 83 

Wilson, Mrs Edmund Beecher (Kidder, Anne Maynard) 29 

Wilson, Mrs. George Arthur (Warren, Winifred) 6 

Wilson, Mrs. R. J. (Northway, Mary Isabel) 61 



Married Names 125 

PAGE 

Witherspoon, Mrs. Charles R. (Miles, Ruth Helene) 34 

De Wolf, Mrs. Philip (Wood, Ruth Blanche Isabella) 49 

Wood, Mrs. Joseph Remington (Nicholson, Elizabeth Robeson) 103 

Woods, Mrs. Andrew Henry (Sinclair, Fanny Soutter) 42 

Woods, Mrs. Charles A. (Taylor, Marion Satterthwaite) 109 

Woodward, Mrs. Horace Arthur (Schiedt, Helen Lee) 40 

Woolman, Mrs. Henry Newbold (Boude, Mary Scott Clendenin) 86 

Woolsey, Mrs. William Cavan (Heike, Louise Ottilie) 95 

Worthington, Mrs. J. Kent (Spencer, Mary Worsdale) 43 

Worthington, Mrs. Thomas K. (Thomas, Mary Grace) 109 

Worthington, Mrs. Union (Colton, Clara Beaumont) 89 

Wright, Mrs. Henry Collier (Blose, Corinne) 13 

Wright, Mrs. J. Edmund (France, Wilmer Cave) 58 

Wright, Mrs. Vernon Ames (Clarke, Grace Tileston) 89 

Wright, Mrs. William Van Doren (Stephens, Louise Brier) 108 

Wynne, Mrs. Philip Henry (Whiting, Agnes Mary) 47 

Vandell, Mrs. Lunsford Pitts ( Hosford, Elizabeth Sanborn) 96 

Yarnelle, Mrs. William Page (Porter, Clara Phelps) , 38 

Yeazell, Mrs. Harry Akin (Campbell, Cornelia Sarah) 15 

Yoakam, Mrs. Maynard Kauffman (Thayer, Aurie C.) 44 

Young, Mrs. Andrew (Murdoch, Charlotte Soutter) 76 

Zalinski, Mrs. Edward Robins (de Schweinitz, Agnes) 8 

Zimmerman, Mrs. John Franklin (Horine, Anna Mary) 72 






126 Present Graduate Students 



Home Addresses of Present Graduate Students, 1909-10. 

Akers, Deborah Chase, A.B., 

Care of Mr. C. E. Akers, 607 West Main Street, Decatur, 111. 

Albee, Maria Hawes, A.B., 

Care of Louis G. Sayles, Dayville, Killingly, Coun. 

Albertson, Alice Owen, A.B., 

Care of Mr. Benjamin Albertson, 3940 Brown Street, Philadelphia. 

Allison, Edith Mary, A.M., 

Care of Mr. B. A. Allison, McPherson, Kans. 

Barker, Grace Sarah Taylor, S.B., 

Care of Mr. James F. Barker, Welland, Ontario, Canada. 

Bartholomew, Mary Eleanor, A.B., 

Care of Mrs. J. N. Bartholomew, Clark's Hill, Ind. 

Belding, Josephine, A.B., 

63 Lincoln Street, Hartford, Conn. 

Behrens, Margarete Emma Johanna, 

Care of Mr. Bernhard Behrens, Grundstrasse 4, Oberloessnitz, 
Dresden, Germany. 

Bell, Emma Virginia, A.B., 

Care of Mr. Battle Bell, 604 North 3rd Avenue, Columbus, Miss. 

Bowerman, Helen Cox, A.M., 
Point Pleasant, N. J. 

Brownell, Harriet Mather, A.B., 
Radnor Street, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Brusstar, Margaret Elizabeth, A-B., 
2123 North 17th Street, Philadelphia. 

Bunker, Marie Rowland, A.M., 

Care of Mr. W. B. Bunker, Overbrook, Pa. 

Burchinal, Mary Cacy, A.M., 
Chestertown, Md. 

Byrne, Alice Hill, A.B., 

646 East King Street, Lancaster, Pa. 

Campbell, Annie Catherine, A.B.. 

Care of Dr. E. E. Campbell, Irving College, Mechanicsburg, Pa. 

Chubb, Ethel Leigh, A.M., 

Care of Mr. S. J. Chubb, 49 May Street, West Toronto, Canada. 

Clarke, Nancy Barnum, A.B., 

Care of Mr. H. P. Clarke, Brevard, N. C. 

Coleman, Jessie Hester, Ph.B., 

Care of Mrs. A. D. Coleman, S10 B Avenue, East, Oskaloosa, la. 

Coulter, Cornelia Catlin, A.B., 

Care of Mrs. Horace P. Coulter, Ferguson, Mo. 

Crawford, Emily C, A.B., 

Stanley Court, Montreal, Canada. 






Present Graduate Students 127 

Davis, Margaret, A.B., 

Care of Professor J. Franklin Davis, Guilford College, North 
Carolina. 

Dillin, Margaret Sidner, A.B., 

Care of Mr. O. S. Dill in, Radnor, Pa. 

Downing, Maud, A.B., 

Care of Mr. John Downing, 69 Gilmour Street, Ottawa, Canada. 

Dudley, Louise, A.B., Georgetown, Ky. 

Eisenhower, Anna Belle, A.M., 

Care of Mr. A. D. Eisenhower, 802 De Kalb Street, Norristown, Pa. 

Foster, Elizabeth Andros, A.M., 

Care of Mr. Charles Foster, Sharon, Mass. 

Foster, Frances Allen, A.B., 

Care of Mr. S. James Foster, Jr., S7 Williams Street, Providence, 
R. I. 

*Frank, Grace, A.B., 
Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Frehafer, Mabel Kathryn, A.B., 

Care of Mrs. Caroline Frehafer, Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia. 

Furnas, Marcia Moore, A.B., 

Care Mr. William Furnas, Earlham, Inch 

Gerlach, Elna, 

Care of Mr. E. Sehnabel, Bisehofsburg, Prussia, Germany. 

Goudge, Mabel Ensworth, A.M., 

Care of Mr. H. Goudge, 101 Victoria Road, Halifax, Nova Scotia. 

Gruening, Martha, A.B., 

Care of Mr. Emil Gruening, 30 East 57th Street, New York City. 

Harrison, Jane Annetta, A.B., 

Care of Mr. John T. Harrison, La Plata, Mo. 

Heffner, Barbara, 

Care of Mrs. Marie Heffner, Kitzingen am Main, Germany. 

Heritage, Gertrue Langden, A.M., 
120 North 18th Street, Philadelphia. 

f Huff, Helen Elizabeth, Ph.D., 

Roberts Road (College Hill), Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

James, Eleanor, A.B., 

5608 Walnut Street, Philadelphia. 

Jarvis, May Mason, A.M., 

Care of Mr. George M. Jarvis, 2010 Wichita Street, Austin, Tex. 

Johnson, Helen Moore, A.M., 

Care of Mr. Thomas M. Johnson, Osceola, Mo. 

Jurist, Helen Stieglitz, A.B., 

Care of Dr. L. Jurist. 916 North Broad Street, Philadelphia. 

*Mrs. Tenney Frank. f^rs. William Bashford Huff. 



128 Present Graduate Students 

Keiller, Mabel Mathewson, A.B., 

101 Elmwood. Avenue, Narberth, Penna. 

King, Helen Maxwell, A.B., 

Care of Mrs. S. E. Silvester, Coxsackie, N. T. 

King, Marie Seward, A.B., 

Care of Mrs. S. E. Silvester, Coxsackie, N. Y. 

LOWENGRUND, HELEN MOSS, A.M., 

1827 North 18th Street, Philadelphia. 

Lynch, Caroline Vinia, A.M., 

Low Buildings, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Macleod, Annie Louise, M.Sc, 

Care of Mrs. J. A. Forbes, Birchwood, Glace Bay, Nova Scotia. 

Mason, Mary Taylor, A.B., 

Care of Mr. Richard S. Mason, Cerve, Schoolhouse Lane, Ger- 
niantown, Philadelphia. 

Massey, Isabella Mellis. 

Girton College, Cambridge, England. 

Matsuda, Michi, A.B., 

Care of Mr. Ginpachi Matsuda, Mineyama, Tango, Japan. 

May, Elsie Gertrude, M.A., 

56 Trafalgar Road, Moseley, Birmingham, England. 

Morgan, Louise Baggott, A.B., 

Care of Mr. P. A. Morgan, 1S4 Howell Street, Providence, R. I. 

Nichols, Helen Hawley, A.B., 

Care of Dr. J. R. Nichols, Rogers Park, Chicago, 111. 

Noble, Edith, A.B., 

Care of Mr. Nathan Noble, Centerville, S. D. 

Ogden, Ellen Seton, A.B., 

St. Agnes School, Albany, N. Y. 

Oblady, Edith Thompson, A.B., 

Montgomery Avenue, Bryn Mawr. 

Peebles, Florence, Ph.D., 

815 Old Lancaster Road, Bryn Mawr. 

Peelle, Mary Pearl, A.B., 

Care of Mr. Elias H. Peelle, Wilmington, O. 

Probasco, Louise, A.B., 

Care of Mr. Edgar T. Probasco, Wilmington, O. 

Rambo, Eleanor Ferguson, A.M., 

Care of Mr. A. R. Rambo, 1920 North Camac Street, Philadelphia. 

Rand, Marie Gertrude, 

Care of Mr. L. F. Rand, 631 Hancock Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Reynolds, Grace Potter, A.M., 

Care of Mr. David B. Reynolds, 98 Bedford Street, Stamford, 
Conn. 

Richards, Annabella Elliott, A.B., 

Care of Mr. Thomas J. Ricbards, Merion Station, Pa. 



Present Undergraduate Students 129 

Richardson, Emily Martin, A.B., 
420 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass. 

Roe, Adah Blanche, A.B., 

Care of Mrs. Ellen Roe, 631 Montgomery Avenue, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Schenck, Eunice Morgan, A.B., 

Care of Mrs. N. P. Schenck, 317 Springfield Avenue, Chestnut 
Hill, Philadelphia. 

Schmidt, Annalise, 

Care of Mr. A. P. Foster, G Oakwood Court, Orange, N. J. 

Shearer. Edna Aston, A.B., 

Care of Mrs. Andrew Shearer, 5641 Cedar Avenue, Philadelphia. 

Sheldon, Eleanor, A.M., 

Care of Mrs. Emily Gushing Sheldon, 110 Malcolm Avenue, S. E., 
Minneapolis, Minn. 

Shoemaker, Jane Cushing, A.B., 

Care of Mr. Clayton F. Shoemaker, 1802 Wallace Street, Phila- 
delphia. 

Smith, Eunice Clara, A.M., 

Care of Mr. W. H. Smith, 625 East Avenue, Pawtucket, R. I. 

Spalding, Mary Caroline, A.B., 

Care of Mrs. C. N. Spalding, 200 A Street, S. E., Washington, D. C. 

, Spencer, Fannie Grace Clara, A.M., 

Care of Mr. Addison G. Spencer, 1811 South 3rd Street, Terre 
Haute, Ind. 

Stoddard, Virginia Tryon, A.M., 

Care of the Rev. James Stoddard, Mount Holly, N. J. 

Sturdevant, Winifred, A.B., 

Care of Mrs. A. D. Sturdevant. Cragsmoor, X. Y. 

Van Kirk, Edith Louise, A.B.. 

Care of Mr. John Van Kirk, 1333 Pino Street, Philadelphia. 

Wade, Clara Louise Whipple, A.B., 

Care of Mrs. C. M. Wade, Bryn Mawr. Pa. 

Weeks, Eula Adeline, A.M., 

Care of Mr. C. G. Weeks, Butler. Mo. 

Weld, Jean, A. B., 

Care of Mr. W. P. Weld, Marianna. Ark. 

Weusthoff. Anna Sophie, A.B., 

Care of Dr. II. S. Weusthoff, 135 East 95th Street, New York City. 

White. Helen Cromwell, A.B., 

Care of Mrs. R. P.. White, 150 Congress Street. Bradford. Pa. 



Present Undergraduate Students, 1909-10. 

Akers, Ruth Faith, 1912. 

Care of Mr. C. E. Akers, 607 West Main Street. Decatur, 111. 

Alden, Mary Boot/e. 1012, 

Care of Mr. J. F. Alden. 14 Meigs Street, Rochester, N. Y. 

9 



130 Present Undergraduate Students 

Alexander, Willa Buleitt, 1911, 

Care of Mr. M. J. Alexander, 617 St. James Street, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Allen, Jeannette Valerie, 1911, 

Care of Major H. T. Allen, Fort Huachuca, Ariz. 

Allen, Mary Norton, 1910, 

Care of Mr. Charles L. Allen, 2 Forest Ave., Worcester, Mass. 

Allinson, Susanne Carey, 1910, 

Care of Professor Francis G. Allinson, 163 George Street. Provi- 
dence, R. I. 

Ames, Alice, 1913, 

Care of Mr. Charles W. Ames, 501 Grand Avenue, Saint Paul, 
Minn. 

Arthurs, Ann Catherine, 1912, 

Care of Mr. Edward F. Arthurs, 7 East Preston Street, Baltimore, 
Md. 

Ashley, Mabel Pierce, 1910, 

Care of Dr. Clarence D. Ashley, 41 West 87th Street, New York 
City. 

Ashton, Dorothy Laing, 1910, 

Care of Mr. Taber Ashton, Swarthmore, Pa. 

Atherton, Sarah Henry, 1913, 

Care of Mr. Thomas Henry Atherton, 36 West River Street, 
Wilkes Barre, Pa. 

Babcock:, Ruth, 1910, 

Care of Dr. D. A. Babcock, 273 North Main Street, Fall River, 
Mass. 

Baechle, Cecelia Irene, 1913, 

Care of Mr. Edward J. Baechle, 1203 North 58th Street, Phila- 
delphia. 

Baldwin, Dorothea de Forest, 1913, 

Care of Mr. Henry de Forest Baldwin, 55 West 85th Street, New 
York City. 

Barber, Helen Dorothy, 1912, 

Care of Dr. S. J. Barber, 505 Yamhill Street, Portland, Ore. 

Barnes, Aida Cromwell, 1913, 

Care of Mrs. A. C. Barnes, 355 West End Avenue, New York City. 

Barrett, Helen Juanita, 1913. 

Care of Mr. W. Elmer Barrett, Glenolden, Pa. 

Bartholomew, Grace, 1913, 

Care of Mr. Allen R. Bartholomew, 5234 Spruce Street, Philadel- 
phia. 

Bartlett, Marguerite Gold, 1913, 

Care of Mr. C. J. Bartlett, 30 West Pomona Street, Philadelphia, 

Beardwood. Jane, 1912. 

Care of Mr. Thomas W. Beardwood, 802 North 24th Street, Phila- 
delphia. 

Beliekowsky, Sadie, 1912, 

Care of Mr. Hyman Beliekowsky. 755 North 46th Street, Phila- 
delphia. 



Present Undergraduate Students 131 

Biddle, Maria Georgina, 1910, 

Care of Mrs. George Biddle, 2017 De Lancey Place, Philadelphia. 

Bixler, Irma Bertha, 1910, 

Care of Mr. A. G. Bixler, 236 McKee Place, Philadelphia. 

Blaine, Margaret Graham, 1913. 

Care of Mr. Charles Hodge Blaine, 141 High Street, Taunton, 
Mass. 

Blake, Dorothy Turner, 1913, 

Care of Mr. Eben Symonds, 50 State Street, Boston, Mass. 

Bley, Helen Muller, 1910, 

Care of Mr. John M. Bley, Narberth, Pa. 

Boggs, Anita Uarda, 1910, 

Care of Mr. Benjamin R. Boggs, Second and Pine Streets, Harris- 
burg, Pa. 

Bontecou, Eleanor, 1913, 

Care of Mr. F. T. Bontecou, 150 Highland Avenue, Orange, N. J. 

Branch, Zelda Madison, 1913, 

Care of Dr. W. E. Cramer, Hotel Baltimore, Kansas City, Mo. 

Branham, Grace Bagnall, 1910, 

Care of Dr. J. H. Branham, 2200 Eutaw Place, Baltimore, Md. 

Brockstedt, Clarissa Beatrice, 1913, 

Care of Mr. Henry M. Brockstedt, 4902 St. Louis Avenue, St. 
Louis, Mo. 

Brown, Margaret Eaton, 1913, 

Care of Mr. Louis Brown, 705 Bidwell Street, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Brown, Mary Wilmarth, 1912, 

Care of Mr. Edward O. Brown, 121G North Stale Street, Chicago, 
111. 

Buchanan, Isabel, 1912, 

Care of Mr. James Buchanan, 473 West State Street, Trenton, 
N. J. 

Buchanan, Jessie Crow, 1913, 

Care of Mr. James Buchanan, 473 West State Street, Trenton, 
N. J. 

Buster, Frances Estelle, Hearer, 

Care of Dr. O. C. Buster, Pilot Point, Tex. 

Byrne, Laura Lawrenson, 1912, 

Care of Dr. B. J. Byrne, Ellicott City, Md. 

Cabot, Ruth, 1910, 

Care of Mr. F. E. Cabot, East Milton, Mass. 

Cam, Norah, 1912, 

Care of the Rev. W. H. Cam, Birchanger Rectory, Bishop's Stort- 
ford, Herts, England. 

Canan, Virginia Custer, 1911. 

Care of Mr. M. H. Canan, 1S03 Third Avenue. Altoona, Pa. 

Carey, Frances King, 1911, 

Caro of Mr, James Carey, Jr., 838 Park Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 



132 Present Undergraduate Students 

Caskey, Emily Edna, 1911, 

Care of Mr. Robert A. Caskey, Glenside, Penna. 

Chamberlain, Gladys Elizabeth, 1912, 

Care of Mr. William Chamberlain, 825 Congress Street, Port- 
land, Me. 

Chambers, Agnes L.. 1912, 

Care of Dr. J. W. Chambers, 18 West Franklin Street, Balti- 
more, Md. 

Chambers, Kate Ethel, 1911, 

Care of Dr. Talcott Williams, 916 Pine Street, Philadelphia. 

Chase, Carmelita, 1912, 

Care of Mr. Clement Chase, 4823 Cass Street, Omaha, Neb. 

Chase, Dorothy, 1912, 

Care of Mrs. C. C. Chase, 516 Belmont Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

Chase, Ethel Bird, 1910, 

Care of Mr. Plimpton B. Chase, The Connecticut, Washington. 
D. C. 

Checkering, Julia, 1911, 

Care of Mr. Charles H. Chickering, 3213 Clifford Street, Phila- 
delphia. 

Child, Dorothy Martin, 1910. 

Care of Mr. George C. Child, McKean Avenue, Germantown, 
Philadelphia. 

Claflin, Charlotte Isabel, 1911, 

Care of Mrs. Adelaide A. Claflin, Broad Exchange Building, Bos- 
ton, Mass. 

Clarke, Pauline Ida, 1912, 

Care of Mrs. M. Joslyn Clarke, 603 West 139th Street, New 
York City. 

Clifton, Jessie Williams, 1911, 

Care of Mr. Robert G. Clifton, 3218 Mt. Vernon Street, Phila- 
delphia. 

Clinton, Marion Dorothea, 1913, 

Care of Mrs. E. J. Clinton, American Baptist Publication Society, 
Philadelphia. 

Cockrell, Josephine, 1913, 

Care of Mr. Joseph E. Cockrell, 471 Gaston Avenue, Dallas, Tex. 

Coffin, Dorothy, 1911, 

Care of Mr. Arthur S. Coffin, Winnetka, 111. 

Cole, Dorothea, 1910, 

Care of Mr. H. C. Cole, Chester, 111. 

Collins, Ruth, 1910, 

Care of Mr. William Collins, Pitman Grove, N. J. 

Colter, Helen Margaret, 1912, 

Care of Dr. L. S. Colter, 3410 Clifton Avenue, Cincinnati, O. 

Cooper, Isabel Ruth, 1913, 

Care of Mrs. Mary P. Cooper, 40 West 96th Street, New York City. 



Present Undergraduate Students 133 

Cornell, Esther Stuart, 1911, 

Care of Mrs. Agnes Cornell, Santa Fe, New Mexico. 

Corning, Zelma Mary, 1913, 

Care of Mrs. II. Corning, Savoy Hotel, Fifth Avenue, New York 
City. 

Corwin, Margaret Trumbull, 1912, 

Care of Professor Robert Nelson Corwin, 247 St. Ronan Street, 
New Haven, Conn. 

Cox, Caroline Bessie, 1910, 

Care of Mrs. M. B. Riehle, 1825 Wallace Street, Philadelphia. 

Crane, Marion Delia, 1911, 

Care of Mrs. Carrie H. Crane, 96 Taylor Street, Providence, R. I. 

Crenshaw, Fanny Graves, 1912, 

Care of Mr. S. Dabney Crenshaw, 919 Franklin Street, West, 
Richmond, Va. 

Crocker, Clara Ballard, 1913, 

Care of Mr. George U. Crocker, 1023 Old South Building, Boston, 
Mass. 

Daddow, Virginia, 1913, 

Care of Mr. H. L. Daddow, St. Clair, Schuylkill County, Pa. 

Darkow, Angela, 1911, 

Care of Mr. Martin Darkow, 3911 Poplar Street, Philadelphia. 

Davis, Dorothy Livingston, 1913, 

Care of Mr. S. Livingston Davis. GO West 76th Street, New York 
City. 

Day, Rosalie, 1912, 

Care of Mr. Orrin Day, Catskill, N. Y. 

De Angelis, Annina, 1910, 

Care of the Hon. P. C. J. De Angel isr 11 Cottage Place, Utica, N. Y. 

Deems, Elsie, 1910, 

Care of the Rev. Edward M. Deems, 122 Spring Avenue, Ridge- 
wood, N. J. 

Delano, Catherine, 1911, 

Care of Mr. Frederic A. Delano, 510 AVellington Avenue, Chicago, 

111. 

Deming, Agathe, 1913, 

Care of Mr. Horace E. Deming, 15 William Street, New York City. 

Deming. Constance, 1910, 

Care of Mr. Horace E. Deming, 15 William Street, New York City. 

Denison, Elsa, 1910, 

Care of Mrs. Charles Denison, 1317 Ogden Street, Denver, Col. 

Depew, Christine Ellen, 1911. 

Care of Mr. J. A. Depew, Delano, Schuylkill County, Pa. 

Dessau, Florence Maud, 1913, 

Care of Mr. David Dessau, 301 West 106th Street, New York City. 

Dodd, Hannah Maria, 1911, 

Care of Mrs. Ella S. Dodd, Rehoboth, Sussex County, Del. 



i34 Present Undergraduate Students 

Doheny, Mary Elizabeth, 1910, 

Care of Mr. P. H. Doheny, Box SO, Haverford, Pa. 

Doolittle, Margaret, 1911, 

Care of Mr. Judson A. Doolittle, 102 Valentine Street, Mount 
Vernon, N. Y. 

Dulles, Margaret Josephine, 1912, 

Care of the Rev. Allen Macy Dulles, 67 South Street, Auburn, 
N. Y. 

Edgerton, Gladys, 1912, 

Care of Mrs. W. P. Edgerton, 302 Central Park West, New York 
City. 

Egan, May Margaret, 1911, 

Care of Mr. John M. Egan, Amboy, 111. 

Eichberg, Alice, 1911, 

Care of Mrs. Joseph Eichberg, G19 Oak Street, Cincinnati, O. 

Elcock, Gertrude Marie, 1912, 

Care of Mrs. Thomas R. Elcock, Glenside, Pa. 

Elmer, Eleanor Nixon, 1913, 

Care of Mr. H. N. Elmer, Winnetka, 111. 

Emerson, Helen, 1911, 

Care of Mr. Lowell Emerson, 70 Stinson Avenue, Providence, 
R. I. 

Evans, Helen Ludington, 1913, 

Care of Mr. H. G. Evans, 218 Roland Avenue, Roland Park, Md. 

Evans, Katherine Mary, 1910, 

Care of Mrs. Thomas Evans, Box 161, Nicholasville, Ky. 

Fabian, Elizabeth, 1913, 

Care of Mr. W. J. Fabian, 1509 Ridge Avenue, Evanston, 111. 

Fabian, Margaret, 1912, 

Care of Mr. W. J. Fabian, 1509 Ridge Avenue, Evanston, 111. 

Falk, Zip Solomons, 1910, 

Care of Mr. David B. Falk, 211 West Gurnett Street, Savannah, 
Ga. 

Faries, Elizabeth, 1912, 

Care of Mr. Edgar D. Faries, 7S06 Cresheim Road, Chestnut Hill, 
Philadelphia. 

Faulkner, Ellen, 1913, 

Care of Dr. Herbert K. Faulkner. Keene, N. H. 

Fendall, Mary Gertrude, 1912, 

Care of Mr. B. T. Fendall, 141 W. Lanvale Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Field, Aristine, 1911, 

Care of Dr. John P. Munn. 18 West 58th Street, New York City. 

Forster, Emma, 1911, 

Care of Rev. John B. Forster, 2631 Fillmore Street, Bridesburg, 
Pa. 

Francis, Clara Jane, 1912, 

Care of Mr. W. B. Francis, 805 Walnut Street, Martins Ferry, O. 

Friend, Margaret Alice, 1911, 

Care of Mr. J. E. Friend, 657 Astor Street, Milwaukee, Wis. 



Present Undergraduate Students 135 

Funkhouser, Elsie Lush, 1911, 

Care of Mr. Leonidas Funkhouser, 1021 D Street, Lincoln, Neb. 

Gaerigues, Margaret Ashmead, 1912, 

Care of Mr. John S. Garrigues, Haverford, Pa. 

Gayler, Ruth Hamilton, 1911, 

Care of Mr. Julius F. Gayler, 105 Fisher Avenue, White Plains, 
N. T. 

George, Mary Ruth Ethelwyn, Hearer, 

Care of Mr. Robert James George, 842 Lincoln Avenue, Allegheny, 
Pa. 

Girson, Louisa Isabel, 1913, 

Care of Mr. George A. Gibson, 1120 North 11th Street, Birming- 
ham, Ala. 

Glenn, Florence Martha, 1912, 

Care of Mr. George B. Glenn, 561 Park Avenue, Johnstown, Pa. 

Goldsmith, Cecile Adler, 1913, 

Care of Mr. Edwin M. Goldsmith, 143 East Coulter Street, Ger- 
mantown, Philadelphia. 

Goodale, Catherine Warren, 1910, 

Care of Mr. William W. Goodale. Waialua, Oahu, H. I. 

Griscom, Ethel, 1913, 

Care of Mr. W. M. Griscom, Montgomery Avenue, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Guckenheimer, Adele, 1912, 

Care of Mr. I. Guckenheimer, 5605 Irwin Avenue, Pittsburgh, 
E. E., Pa. 

Haines, Isabelle Pennock, 1913, 

Care of Mrs. Robert B. Haines, Jr., 156 School Lane, German- 
town, Philadelphia. 

Haines, Julia Loring, 1912, 

Care of Dr. M. L. Haines, 216 East 13th Street, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Halpen, Sara Marion, 1913, 

Care of Mrs. H. U. Halpen. 3318 North 17th Street, Philadelphia. 

Hamilton, Amy Gordon, 1913. 

Care of Mr. George Hamilton, Tenafly, N. J. 

Hammer, Christine Potts, 1912, 

Care of Mrs. Helen R. Hammer, Pottstown, Pa. 

Hartshorne, Anna, 1912, 

Care of Mr. Charles R. Hartshorne. Brighton, Md. 

Hart wig, Anna L., Hearer. 

1107 Spruce Street, Philadelphia. 

Hathaway, Sylvia, 1913. 

Care of Mr. Nathaniel Hathaway, 515 West Chelten Avenue, 
Germantown. Philadelphia. 

Haydock, Louisa Low, 1913, 

Care of Mr. R. R. Haydock, 5323 Magnolia Avenue, Philadelphia. 



136 Present Undergraduate Students 

Healy, Josephine, 1910, 

Care of Mr. J. Allen Healy, 61 North Franklin Street, Pottstown, 
Pa. 

Hearne, Alice, 1913, 

Care of Mr. William W. Hearne, Wayne, Pa. 

Hearne, Frances Hale, 1910, 

Care of Mr. William W. Hearne, Wayne, Pa. 

Hedges, Miriam Margaret, 1910, 

Care of Mr. John R. Hedges, Galveston, Tex. 

Heffern, Anna Constance, 1912, 

Care Mr. Andrew D. Heffern, 4519 Kingsessing Avenue, Phila- 
delphia. 

Henderson, Helen Hamilton Leiper, 1911, 

Care of Mr. Robert R. Henderson, 164 Washington Street, Cum- 
berland, Md. 

Henderson, Hildegard Gertrude, 1913, 

Care of Mr. Ernest F. Henderson, 1 Mercer Circle, Cambridge, 
Mass. 

Henderson, Louisa, 1913, 

Care of Mr. Robert R. Henderson, 164 Washington Street, Cum- 
berland, Md. 

Hibben, Elizabeth Grier, 1910, 

Care of Professor John Grier Hibben, Princeton, N. J. 

Higginson, Mary Hamot, 1911, 

Care of Mr. Charles H. Strong, 109 West 6th Street, Erie, Pa. 

Hinrichs, Gertrude, 1913, 

Care of Mr. Louis Hinrichs, 78 Douglas Road, Glen Ridge, N. J. 

Hobart, Margaret Jefferys, 1911, 

Care of Mr. H. L. Hobart, 120 Front Street, New York City. 

Hoffman, Margery E., 1911, 

Care of Mrs. Lee Hoffman, 161 North 23rd Street, Portland, Ore. 

Holmes, Maud Wislizenus, 1913, 

Care of Mr. J. M. Holmes, 3860 Page Avenue, St. Louis, Mo. 

Hoshino, Ai, 1912, 

Care of Miss Mary Haines, Cheltenham, Pa. 

HOUGHTELING, LEILA, 1911, 

Care of Mr. James L. Houghteling, Winnetka, 111. 

Houston, Julia Taylor, 1912, 

Care of Mrs. E. B. Houston, 205 West 12th Street, Pine Bluff, Ark. 

Howell, Janet Tucker, 1910, 

Care of Dr. W. H. Howell, 232 West Lanvale Street, Baltimore, 
Md. 

Howson, Beatrice, 1912, 

Care of Mr. Henry Howson, 109 North 34th Street, Philadelphia. 



Present Undergraduate Students 137 

Howson. Emily Elizabeth, 1910. 

Care of Mr. Henry Howson, 109 North 34th Street, Philadelphia. 

Hume, Mart, 1912, 

Care of Mr. James C. Hume, 224 Good Block, Des Moines, la. 

Hunter, Frances. 1912, 

Care of Mr. D. M. Hunter. Saugerties, N. T. 

Irey, Helen Chrisman, 1910, 

Care of Mr. H. B. I ivy. 608 South High Street. West Chester, Pa. 

Irish, Florence, 1913, 

Care of Mr. J. B. Irish, SI 3 West Maiu Street, Norristown, Pa. 

Irvine, Mary Agnes, 1910, 

Care of Mr. Samuel Irvine, 216 Elysian Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Irwin, Agnes Miller, 1910, 

Care of Mr. Andrew P. Irwin, S30 South 48th Street. Philadelphia. 

Irwin, Marian Iki, 1913, 

Care of Miss Sophy D. Irwin, 2027 De Lancey Place, Philadelphia. 

James, Lillie, 1910, 

Care of Mr. J. James, 3420 North 21st Street, Philadelphia. 

Johnston, Elizabeth Henrietta, 1912, 

Care of Mrs. Samuel R. Johnston, 36 North College Street. Carl- 
isle, Pa. 

Jones, Gladys, 1912, 

Care of Mr. Thomas D. Jones, Hazleton, Pa. 

Justice, Caroline Letchworth, 1911, 

Care of Mr. F. Millwood Justice. Narberth, Pa. 

Keiller, Violet Hannah, 

Care of Mrs. William Keiller, 101 Elmwood Avenue, Narberth, 
Pa. 

Kelley, Katharine Mildred, 1910, 

Care of Dr. S. W. Kelley. 2255 East 55th Street, Cleveland, O. 

Kelly, Olga Elizabeth Bredow, 1913, 

Care Dr. Howard A. Kelly. 141S Eutaw Place, Baltimore, Md. 

Kenison, Lucie, 1912, 

Care of Mr. Alphonse Kenison, 1120 Tremont Street, Galveston, 
Tex. 

Kennedy, Laura Elizabeth, 1913, 

Care of Mrs. Lillie E. Kennedy, 1S1 Circular Street, Saratoga, 
N. Y. 

Kerr, Jeanne Benedict. 1910, 

Care of Mr. Harrison D. Kerr. 31 East 49th Street. New York 
City. 

Kirk. Marion Shelmire, 1910, 

Care of Mr. Charles H. Kirk. 114 West Washington Lane, Ger- 
mantown, Philadelphia. 



138 Present Undergraduate Students 

Ladd, Mary Ethel, 1910, 

Care of Mrs. Ida M. Ladd, 2004 Mt. Vernon Street, Philadelphia. 

Lamb, Louise Emerson, 1912, 

Care of Mrs. J. E. Lamb, Station H, Baltimore, Md. 

Lamberton, Anne, 1913, 

Care of Professor William Alexander Lamberton, 4403 Osage 
Avenue, Philadelphia. 

Lautz, Helen Sophia, 1912, 

Care of Mr. Henry Lautz, 803 Park Avenue, Pekin, 111. 

Layton, Marguerite Hammond, 1911, 

Care of Mrs. Genie Layton, 1112 Jackson Avenue, Monroe, La. 

Lee, Helen, 1913, 

Care of Dr. J. Beveridge Lee, 15 Elliott Avenue, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Lehman, Lois Partridge, 1911. 

Care of Mrs. E. F. Partridge, Redlands, Cal. 

Leopold, Florence Stein, 1912, 

Care of Dr. Isaac Leopold, 142S North Broad Street, Phila- 
delphia. 

Levy, Edna Sophia, 1913, 

Care of Mr. J. Leonard Levy, 1526 Denniston Avenue, Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. 

Lewis, Rebecca Renshaw, 1912, 

Care of Mrs. Fritz Lewis, 1813 St. Paul Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Liddell, Katharine Forbes. 1910, 

Care of Mr. Forbes Liddell, 9 Murray Street, New York City. 

Light, Barbara Joyce, 1913, 

Care of Mr. H. H. Light, 330 North 9th Street, Lebanon, Pa. 

Llewellyn, Gertrude, 1912, 

Care of Mr. S. G. Llewellyn, 1246 Ridge Avenue, Evanston, 111. 

Loeb, Florence May, 1912, 

Care of Mrs. Reuben Loeb, 100 Fountain Avenue, Paducah, Ky. 

Longwell, Katherine Cavenagh, 1912, 

Care of Mr. Henry E. Longwell, 715 South Negley Avenue, Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. 

Lucas, Leonora, 1912, 

Care of Mr. William E. Lucas, 1533 Railway Exchange Building, 
Chicago, 111. 

Mabon, Rosa Vedder, 1913, 

Care of Dr. William Mabon, Ward's Island, New York City. 

Magoffin, Henrietta Floyd, 1911, 

Care of Mrs. Montrose M. Magoffin, Mercer, Pa. 

Maguire, Elizabeth Yarnall, 1913, 

Care Mr. J. Abbott Maguire, 3813 Spruce Street, Philadelphia. 

Manchester, Ruth Coe, 1913, 

Care of Mr. George *E. Manchester, 171 Spencer Street, Winsted, 
Conn. 



Present Undergraduate Students 139 

Maksh, Helen Elizabeth, 1912, 

Care of Mrs. C. F. Marsh, 530 Clinton Avenue, Brooklyn. New 
York City. 

Marshall, Rachel, 1912, 

Care of Mr. A. Marshall, Lincoln, Kan. 

Mason, Rosalind Fay, 1911, 

Care of Mr. Henry B. Mason, 100 Washington Street, Chicago, 
111. 

Matlack, Louise, 1913, 

Care of Dr. G. T. Matlack, 33 West Northampton Street, Wilkes 
Barre, Pa. 

McKelvey, Mary Alice, 1912. 

Care of Mr. John J. McKelvey, Spnyten Duyvil. New York. 

Mead, Marion Lorraine. 1912. 

Care of Mr. M. A. Mead, 1S10 Hinman Avenue, Evanston, 111. 

Mearkle, Edith, 1912, 

Care of Mr. E. F. Mearkle, 2217 South Aklrich Avenue, Minne- 
apolis, Minn. 

Mellen, Marguerite, 1913, 

Care of Mrs. John Davis Kales, 1356 North State Street, Chicago. 
111. 

Menendez, Lucinda Poillon, 1913, 

Care of Mrs. Jose Maria Menendez, 119 Old Church Road, Green- 
wich, Conn. 

Merrill, Louise Edgerton, 1910, 

Care of Mrs. W. E. Merrill. Oaksmere, New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Meyer, Else, 1912, 

Care of Mr. Julius Meyer, 1765 Prytania Street, New Orleans, La. 

Michael, Jeannette, 1913, 

Care of Mr. Edward Michael, 741 Delaware Avenue, Buffalo. 
N. Y. 

Miller, Laura Isabelle, 1911. 

Care of Mr. George P. Miller. 316 Juneau Avenue. Milwaukee, 
Wis. 

Midler. Ramona Beatrice, 1913, 

Care of Mr. Alfred J. Miller, 2539 North 17th Street. Philadel- 
phia. 

Mitchell. Pearl Boring. 1912, 

Care of Mrs. Mary D. Mitchell, 1818 Arch Street. Philadelphia. 

Mock. Eurana Dinkey, 1912, 

Care of Mrs. J. F. Mock. 339 Louella Avenue, Wayne. Pa. 

Montgomery, Hazel Margaret, 1912. 

Care of Mrs. Robena M. Montgomery, 112 West 78th Street. New 
York City. 

Moore, Elsie, 1911, 

Care of Mr. J. E. Moore, Danville, Pa. 



140 Present Undergraduate Students 

Mokgan, Marguerite Beoades, 1910, 

Care of Mr. David C. Morgan, 121 Arclmore Avenue, Ardniore, Pa. 

Morgan, Maey Alden, 1912, 

Care of Mr. K. E. Morgan, 100 Astor Street, Chicago, 111. 

Morrow, Agnes Elizabeth, 1912, 

Care of Mr. Andrew Morrow, 1230 South 58th Street, Philadel- 
phia. 

Muxeoe, Margaret Adelaide, 1913, 

Care of Mr. William Gordon Munroe, 5716 Thomas Avenue, 
Philadelphia. . 

Murphy, Edith Hamilton, 1910, 

Care of Mrs. Ellen P. Murphy, 303 South 39th Street, Philadel- 
phia. 

Murray, Agnes Laweence, 1911, 

Care of Mr. David Murray, Delhi, New York. 

Murray, Clara Hunsicker, 1913, 

Care of the Rt. Rev. John Gardner Murray, 1108 Madison Avenue, 
Baltimore, Md. 

Murray, Marjorie Frances, 1913, 

Care of Mr. David Murray, Delhi, N. Y. 

Nagel, Caroline Louise, Hearer, 

Care of Mr. John M. Nagel, 83 Pleasant Street, Meriden, Conn. 

Nash, Carolyn Ryan, 1913, 

Care of Surgeon Francis I. Nash, U. S. N. Recruiting Station, 
Philadelphia. 

Nathans, Beatrice Cornelia, 1913, 

Care of Mrs. C. O. Nathans, 614 North 16th Street, Philadelphia. 

Nearing, Dorothy, 1910, 

Care of Mr. Louis Nearing, 1427 North 16th Street, Philadelphia. 

O'Connor, Agnes, 1913, 

Care of Mr. B. F. O'Connor. 132 Franklin Place, Flushing, L. I. 

Owen, Clara Marie, 1913, 

Care of Dr. John Jones Owen, 411 Pine Street, Philadelphia. 

Page, Katharine Alice, 1913, 

Care of Mr. Walter H. Page, 130 East 67th Street, New York 
City. 

Parker, Alpine Bodine, 1911, 

.Care of Mr. John N. Parker, 1923 St. Paul Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Parkhurst, Helen Huss. 1911. 

Care of Mr. Howard E. Parkhurst. Englewood, N. J. 

Patterson, Alice Dudley, 1913, 

Care of Mr. James L. Patterson, St. Martins, Chestnut Hill, 
Philadelphia. 

Peck, Margaret Winthrop, 1912, 

Care of Mr. Epaphroditus Peck, 234 Summer Street, Bristol. 
Conn. 



Present Undergraduate Students 141 

Peirce, Mary, 1912, 

Care of Mr. Harold Peirce, 1 1 aver ford, Pa. 

Perkins, Luclle, 1913, 

Care of Mr. E. B. Perkins, Dallas. Tex. 

Pinney, Elizabeth, 1912, 

Care of Mr. G. M. Pinney, Jr., Dongan Hills, Staten Island, N. T. 

Pinney, Eva Marie, 1913. 

Care of Mr. William J. Pinney, Willmar, Minn. 

Poxd. Clara Penximax, 1913, 

Care of Professor George Gilbert Pond, State College. Pa. 

POXD, MlLLICEXT, 1910, 

Care of Professor George Gilbert Pond. State College. Pa. 

Porter, Fraxces, 1911, 

Care of Mrs. E. C. Porter, Hubbard Woods, 111. 

POTTBERG, ELLEX ESTHER. 1911. 

Care of Dr. Charles Pottberg, 233S North Broad Street, Phila- 
delphia. 

Potter. Edna Margaret. 1913. 

Care of Mr. Fred B. Potter, 129 Field Avenue, Detroit, Mich. 

Powell, Edith Williams, 1910, 

Care of Dr. William C. Powell, 25 Merion Avenue, Brvn Mawr, 
Pa. 

Prussixg, Margaret Alice, 1911, 

Care of Mr. Eugene E. Prussing, 1519 Dearborn Avenue. Chicago, 
111. 

Putnam, May, 1910, 

19 East 47th Street, New York City. 

♦Pyfer, Isabella M., 1910, 

11 West Main Street, Norristown, Pa. 

Ramsey, Helen Marguerite. 1911, 

Care of Mr. William H. Ramsey, Rosemont, Pa. 

Rawson, Gwendolyn, 1913, 

Care of Mr. Joseph Rawson, 3767 Clifton Avenue, Cincinnati, O. 

Reichenbach, Lucie Vaughax, 1910, 

Care of Mr. A. Reichenbach, Huntington, Ind. 

Rice. Phyllis, 1911, 

Care of Mr. Richard H. Rice, 124 Ocean Street, Lynn, Mass. 

Richardsox, Ethel Louise. 1911, 

Care of Mr. Aubrey J. Richardson, 2232 North 13th Street, Phila- 
delphia. 

Richter. Helex Ruth. 1913. 

Care of Mr. Max Richter, 22 East 94th Street. New York City. 

Riggs, Hexrietta Saxford, 1910, 

Care of Mr. Tinnier Riggs, 131 Maryland Avenue. N. E.. Wash- 
ington. D. C. 

*Mrs. Howard F. Pyfer. 



142 Present Undergraduate Students 

Roberts, Ruth, 1911, 

Care of Mr. T. T. Roberts, 919 West William Street, Decatur, 111. 

Robertson, Emma Sellers, 1913, 

Care of Miss Matilda S. Sellers, Bala, Pa. 

Roe, Miriam, Hearer, 

Care of Mrs. Ellen Roe, 631 Montgomery Avenue, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Rogers, Isobel Mitchell, 1911, 

Care of Dr. O. H. Rogers, 48 Highland Avenue, Yonkers, N. T. 

Rogerson, Jennie L., Hearer, 
Lowell, Me. 

Root, Mary Longaker, 1910, 

Care of Mr. Albert P. Root, 631 E. Leverington Avenue, Rox- 
borough, Philadelphia. 

Ross, Elizabeth, 1911, 

Care of Mr. Thomas W. Ross, 2051 East 90th Street, Cleveland, O. 

Ross, Frances Lubbe, 1913, 

Care of Mr. David H. Ross, Conshohocken, Pa. 

ROTAN, KATHERINE LIVINGSTON, 1910, 

Care of Mr. Edward Rotan, Waco, Tex. 

Russell, Louise Sternberg, 1911, 

Care of Mrs. W. H. Russell, 502 West 141st Street, New York 
City. 

Schram, Hilpa Serena, 1911, 

Care of Mrs. Frank S. Given, 420 Chestnut Street, Columbia, Pa. 

Schmidt, Katharine Reily. 1913, 

Care of Mr. J. C. Schmidt, 900 South George Street, York, Pa. 

Scott, Marion Sturgis, 1911, 

Care of Mr. Frank H. Scott, 1620 Corn Exchange Building, 
Chicago, 111. 

Scribner, Mary E., 1912, 

Care of Mr. C. E. Scribner, 463 West Street, New York City. 

Scripture, Winifred, 1912, 

Care of Dr. Edward W. Scripture, 53 Union Street, Montclair, 
N. J. 

Scruggs, Margaret, 1913, 

Care of Mr. Gross R. Scruggs, 193 Corsicana Street, Dallas, Tex. 

Scudder. Marie, 1913, 

Care of Mr. William T. Scudder, 1314 Judson Avenue, Evanston, 
111. 

Seely, Evelyn Elizabeth, 1910, 

Care of Mr. Charles D. Seely, Brockport, N. Y. 

Selig, Alice, 1913, 

Care of Mr. Emil Selig, 2026 North Broad Street, Philadelphia. 

Shadburn, Lucile, 1913, 

Care of Mr. W. B. Shadbnrn. Buford, Ga. 



Present Undergraduate Students 143 

Sharman, Lou May, 1912, 

Care of Mr. W. Harry Orr, 309 South 5th Street, Reading, Pa. 

Sharp, Henrietta Wogan, 1910, 

Care of Mr. J. W. Sharp, Newville, Pa. 

Shaw, Katharine Lydia, 1912, 

Care of Mr. H. C. Shaw, Glenshaw, Pa. 

Shearer, Margaret Juliet, 1910, 

Care of the Rev. George Lewis Shearer, 71 East 82nd Street, 
New York City. 

Sheldon, Martha, 1912, 

Care of Mr. H. E. Sheldon, 6315 Walnut Street, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Sheldon, Mary, 1913, 

Care of Mrs. Theodore Sheldon, 38 Bellevue Place, Chicago, 111. 

Shenstone, Mary Elsie, 1913, 

Care of Mr. Joseph N. Shenstone, 40 Walrner Road, Toronto, 
Canada. 

Shipley, Elizabeth Taylor, 1913, 

Care of Mrs. A. M. N. Shipley, Haverford, Pa. 

Shipley, Mary Boyd. 1910, 

Care of Mrs. A. M. N. Shipley, Haverford, Pa. 

Shloss, Irma Bronette, 1912, 

Care of Mr. M. Shloss, 1623 Woodland Avenue, Des Moines. la. 

Simonds, Charlotte Victorine, 1910. 

Care of Mrs. H. A. Sirnonds, Red Oak Road, Wilmington, Del. 

Simpson, Adelaide Douglas, 1913, 

Care of Mr. William M. Simpson, 616 West 137th Street, New 
York City. 

Smith. Hilda Worthington, 1910, 

Care of Mrs. J. J. Smith, 320 West 91st Street, New York City. 

Smith, Margery, 1911, 

Care of Dr. Samuel Smith. "White House," Ballston Spa, N. Y. 

Southwick, Jean Frances, 1912, 

Care of Mr. F. IT. Southwick, 31 Pierrepont Street, Brooklyn, 
New York City. 

Spry, Gladys, 1912, 

Care of Mrs. John C. Spry, 1101 Forest Avenue, Evanston, 111. 

Stearns, Anna, 1911, 

Care of Mrs. Henry Stearns, 37 Orange Street. Nashua, N. H. 

Stecher, Lorle Ida, 1912, 

Care of Mr. William A. Stecher, 120 Pomona Terrace, Philadel- 
phia. 

Steele, Edith Rachael, 1913, 

Care of Mr. George Steele, 231 Delaware Avenue, West Pittston, 
Pa. 

Stetson, Lydia Ai.mv, 1913, 

Care of Mr. Eliot Dnwes Stetson, 81 Cottage Street, Now Bed- 
ford, Mass. 



144 Present Undergraduate Students 

Stevens, Cynthia Jarden, 1912, 

Care of Mr. Edwin Stevens, 731 North Avenue West, Baltimore, 
Md. 

Stirling, Jean Wedderburn, 1912, 

Care of Mr. William R. Stirling, 1616 Prairie Avenue, Chicago, 
111. 

Stoddard, Yvonne, 1913, 

Care Mr. George H. Stoddard, 197 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass. 

Stohr, Keinath, 1913, 

Care of Mr. P. C. Stohr, 1258 Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, 111. 

Storer, Frances Louise, 1910, 

Care of Mr. G. B. Storer, 2249 Glenwood Avenue, Toledo, O. 

Stout, Katharine Houghton. 1913, 

Care of Mr. Frank D. Stout, 4S47 Ellis Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

Stratton, Alice, 1912, 

Care of Mr. H. D. Stratton, 305 North 35th Street, Philadelphia. 

Swanzy, Nora Hastings, 1913, 

Care of Mr. Francis M. Swanzy, Honolulu, H. I. 

Swift, Elizabeth, 1910, 

Care of Dr. George Montague Swift, 20 West 55th Street, New 
York City. 

Swift, Nathalie, 1913, 

Care of Dr. George Montague Swift, 20 West 55th Street, New 
York City. 

Taber, Izette, 1910, 

Care of Mr. William B. Taber. Haverford, Pa. 

Taft, Helen Herron, 1912, 

Care of His Excellency the President of the United States, The 
White House, Washington, D. C. 

Tappan, Elizabeth, 1910, 

Care of Mr. William Tappan, 1419 Bolton Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Taylor, Alice Marion, 1913, 

Care of Mr. William H. Taylor, The Ansonia, Apartment 1141, 
New York City. 

Taylor. Mary Minor Watson, 1911, 

Care of Mr. Henry Tavlor, Jr., 2001 Monument Avenue, Richmond, 
Va. 

Tenney, Elizabeth Louise, 1910, 

Care of Mr. Horace Kent Tenney, Winnetka, 111. 

Terry, Catharine Louise, 1912, 

Care of Mr. Charles A. Terry, 310 West 105th Street, New York 
City. 

Thackray, Margaret, 1913, 

Care of Mr. G. E. Thackray, Westmont, Johnstown, Pa. 

Thomas, Ethel Marian, 1912. 

Care of Mr. George B. C. Thomas, 4915 Osage Avenue, Phila- 
delphia. 



Present Undergraduate Students 145 

Thompson, Catherine Reichenbach, 1912, 

Care of Mr. -Walter L. Thompson, 5615 Howe Street, Pittsburgh, 
Pa. 

Thompson, Clara Belle, 1913, 

Care of Mr. C. M. Thompson, Hopkinsville, Ky. 

Thompson, Marjorie La Monte, 1912, 

Care of Mr. Ellis D. Thompson, The Covington, 37th and Chestnut 
Streets, Philadelphia. 

Thwing, Apphia Stanley, 1913, 

Care of President Charles F. Thwing, 11109 Bellflower Road, 
Cleveland, O. 

Tomlinson, Joy, 1913, 

Care of Mr. J. W. Tomlinson, 2007 Highland Avenue, Birming- 
ham, Ala. 

Tongue, Mary Van Arsdale, 1913, 

Care of Mr. T. T. Tongue, 116 W. Lanvale Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Tredway, Helen, 1911, 

Care of Mr. Harry E. Tredway, 45 Fenelon Place, Dubuque, la. 

Turner, Grace, 1913, 

Care of Mr. George Tryon Turner, Berwyn, Pa. 

Van Schaack, Albione Libby, 1910, 

Care of Mr. Robert H. Van Schaack, 54 Cedar Street, Chicago, 
111. 

Vennum, Mary Durham, 1912, 

Care of Mrs. L. A. Vennum, Onarga, 111. 

Vernon, Ethel, 1913, 

Care of Mr. Howard E. Vernon, 1400 Maryland Avenue, Wilming- 
ton, Del. 

Vixcent, Isabel Darlington, 1912, 

Care of Professor George E. Vincent, 5737 Lexington Avenue, 
Chicago, 111. 

Walker, Amy Morehead, 1911, 

Care of the Hon. Charles M. Walker, 1128 La Salle Avenue, 
Chicago, 111. 

Walker, Harriet Warner, 1913, 

Care of the Hon. Charles M. Walker, 1128 La Salle Avenue, 
Chicago, 111. 

Walter, Marjorie Fannie, 1912, 

Care of Mr. William I. Walter, 115 West 57th Street, New York 
City. 

Walton, Lillie Sophia, 1913, 

Care of Mr. Allen K. Walton, Hummelstown, Pa. 

Ware, Clara Crosby, 1910, 

Care of Mr. Thomas M. Ware, Hingham, Mass. 

Warner, Margaret Douglass, 1912, 

Care of Mr. Brainard H. Warner, 2100 Massachusetts Avenue, 
Washington, D. C. 

10 



146 Present Undergraduate Students 

Warrin, Martha de Raismes, 1913, 

Care of Dr. M. L. Warrin, 50 Franklin Place, Flushing, L. I. 

Watson, Louise, 1912, 

Care of Mr. John L. Watson, 225 North Hatton Street, Ports- 
mouth, Va. 

Welles, Carlotta, 1912, 

Care of Mr. Francis R. Welles, 92 Avenue Henri Martin, Paris, 
France. 

Wells, Ruth, 1911, 

Care of Professor D. C. Wells, Hanover, N. H. 

Welsh, Florence May, Hearer, 

117 West 79th Street, New York City. 

Wesner, Mary Boyde, 1910, 

Care of Dr. J. P. Frishmuth, 1107 Wallace Street, Philadelphia. 

Whittemore, Alice, 1910, 

Care of Mr. Edward Lowe, Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Wilbur, Constance Caroline, 1911, 

Care of Dr. G. F. Wilbur, 711 Grand Avenue, Asbury Park, N. J. 

Wilbur, Florence Lenore, 1910. 

Care of Dr. G. F. Wilbur, 711 Grand Avenue, Asbury Park, N. J. 

Wildman, Marion Kirk, 1910, 

Care of Mr. Frank B. Wildman, 811 West Main Street, Norris- 
town, Pa. 

Williams, Katharine Delano, 1913, 

Care of Mr. William C. Williams, 87 Milk Street, Boston, Mass. 

Williams, Mary Almira, 1911. 

Care of Mr. Charles R. Williams, 1005 North Meridian Street, 
Indianapolis, Ind. 

Wilson, Helen Anderson, 1913, 

Care of Mr. C. Colket Wilson, Wilson Farm, Paoli, Pa. 

Wolff, Dobothy Sybil, 1912. 

Care of Mr. Lewis S. Wolff, 12 East 70th Street, New York City. 

Wood, Agnes Penman, 1911, 

Care of Mr. John P. Wood, Wayne, Pa. 

Wood, Florence, 1911, 

Care of Mr. John A. Wood, Jr., 5020 Liberty Avenue, Pittsburgh. 
Pa. 

Wobthington. Mary Dorothy Whitall, 1910, 

Care of Mrs. M. G. Worthington, 29 East 77th Street, New York 
City. 

Yarnall, Emma, 1911, 

Care of Mrs. Mary M. Yarnall, 217 Cricket Avenue, Ardmore, Pa. 

Zabriskte, Zayda Justine, 1913, 

Care of Mr. Christian B. Zabriskie, 100 William Street, New 
York City. 

Ziesing, Gertrude Lenore, 1913, 

Care of Mr. August Ziesing, Glencoe, 111. 



Statistics 147 

SUMMARY OF FORMER STUDENTS TO JANUARY, 1010. 

Doctors of Philosophy of Bryn Mawr College, 30 

Masters of Arts of Bryn Mawr College 80 

Bachelors of Arts of Bryn Mawr College, 1007 

Total number of degrees conferred, 1126 

Duplicates in the above list: 
Bachelors of Arts who are also Doctors of Philosophy. . . 14 
Bachelors of Arts who are also Doctors of Philosophy 

and Masters of Arts 

Bachelors of Arts who are also Masters of Arts, 74 

04 

Total number of Alumnae, 1032 

Former European Fellows, 50 

Former Resident Fellows, 167 

• ■ 217 

Resident Fellows who also held European Fellowships,. . 2.~> 

Total number of former Fellows, 102 

Former Graduate Students including Alumna? and Fel- 
lows, 542 

- 759 
Duplicates in the above list: 

Former European Fellows who are also Alumnae 38 

Former Resident Fellows who are also Alumna? 58 

Former Resident Fellows not Alumna? who are also Euro- 
pean Fellows, 7 

Former Graduate Students who are also Alumna?, 175 

Former Graduate Students not Alumna? who are also 

Fellows, 40 

318 

Total number of Fellows and Graduate Students 

not Alumna?, 441 

Former Undergraduate Students and Hearers who left 
without taking a degree : 

After one year 284 

After two years 250 

After three years, 103 

After four years 55 

After five years, 10 

702 

Total number of former students excluding dup- 
licates 217-") 

Present Resident Graduate Students and Fellows 81 

Present Resident Undergraduate Students 332 

Total present students, 413 

Total number of former and presenl students 

excluding duplicates, 2588 



148 











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Other Occupations. 


( Manager of Shop (2). 
< Warden of College Hall, 
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\ Bookkeeper. 

Librarian. 

Dean of College, Photographer. 

Dean of Women, Innkeeper. 
Nurse. 
Librarian, Alumna; Director. 

j Bookbinder, Organist. 
\ Illustrator, Writer. 

Warden of Colles-e Hall. 


Hand Weaver, Geologist. 
Librarian, School Director. 
Agent of Government Office, 
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waraen oi college riau, 
[ Wood Carver, Editor. 
| Milliner, School Director, 
\ Warden of College Hall, 
( Bacteriologist. 

( Clerk in Shop, Editor, Journalist, 
■< Jewelry and Metal Worker, 
( Nurse, Warden of College Hall. 
| Librarian, Medical Missionary, 
s Title Searcher for Law Office, 
( School Director. 

Student of Kindergarten. 


Editor, Librarian, 

Student of Shorthand. 

Student of Law (2), 

Si udent of Shorthand. 

Editor, Student in Library School 

(2), Student of Shorthand, Actress. 










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CM 


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t-icm 


cm 


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T-t 


CM. T-t rH 


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to 


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CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


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CM 




CM CO CM t-4 CO t-t CM CO ■ 


CO ^4 ^^ r-< C<»TJ* ^H CO ^Ji C5 CS 

CO 

CO 


•siooqog 
ni 




t— < CM 't-* O-^O00»H o> © t*- CM m Oi © © •**< O ^f w 
T-t iH tH i—i t— < CM r-tr-t CM CM i— < 


230 
23.0 


With 

Higher 

Degrees. 


IT 


CO CM CM t-t -■** tJi CM t> IT* CO *-Ji ■"* CM CO rjr © r*--»* ifi CM 


1 


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00 


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TX « CO 


















T-, 


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.-H-* io*-«»o— '— iidOO X CO N CM CO .-h co © © -^ *-- © ' r- 
CM r-. r-i ^ CO (M (N CO Tji ^t> -* lO O O CO O t* O t— CO t*- O 


Per cent, of 
total number 
of Alumnae . . . 




3 

o 


1— 






c 


— 

— 
5 


c? 

X 


5c 


— 


r 
X 


tr. 

X 

' — ' 


r 


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S 

X 


OC 

•— 


s 

© 

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c 


c 


1 CO 

c: 


M- 

C 

c 


in 

c 
c: 


a 




9£ 

c 
c= 






"5 
o 



■a-a o 



150 



Statistics 



O 

w 
o 

O 



p4 
o 



H 

H 

< 



O 

H 

a 

o 

< 

PQ 

Ch 
O 

CO 

o 

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CO 

H 

<1 

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CO 



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T-H 

CM 






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n-*iortiOrHFH»ao:ococoMNmrHODOio-"HO t~ 

o 






-0161 
'X 'U^f a.iojaq 
paixiBtti l^^ox 




-"^D3tH^OOHHM0001Hfl)COOO^»0 
t-H t-H rtrHOlr^WN-iCOrHrHCSlrt 


CO 
CM 






•0161 
























THrHMCQirSCqCOCO 


CM 


27 
273 

1007 
27.1 


•6061 




















CM 


t-H CO 


■* r>- cm cm tj< t-h co 


CO 
OS CD b- 

<M -tr CO CD 

OJ OS CM 


•8061 
















CXI 


N<"MCMTf'CMCMCM'>J<COCM{M 




OS t- CD • 

cm t-h »a *o 

CM CO CM 


•Z06I 


















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OS 
O OO IQ * 

CO 00 OO CO 

T-H t- CM 


•9061 






r— i 


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(M (M 


CCNWCCWMthWth 








OS 

CM lO CM o 
t-H t"- CM 


•S06I 








y—t 








T-H T-H 


CICOONW 












OS 
CO CO o 
CM CM »0 OO 

T-H CD T-H 


•^061 












« ' 


t-H 






(-N CO t-h CO t-h 












CM 

lO O CM 

t-h o OO l— 

T-, IO l-H 


•S06I 












T-H 




t-H t-H CO CO 


T-H 
















OO 

O »0 T-H 

t-H CO o CO 
kO t-h 


- S06I 






- 




CM 


r-H -* CO t-H t-H 




















t-H 
CO IO OO 
t-h !>. CO t- 
Tji t-h 


•1061 








HrHtHClN 


CM 


C\l T-H 


















-O 
CM CM CD - 
t-h CD !>■ CD 

' CO i— I 


•0061 




- 






CO CM t-H 


«o 


T-H T-H 


















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i — i iO i — i *o 

CO »-H 


•6681 










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— 
























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CO |>. CO 

CM T-H 


•8681 




- 












CO 


























CD 
rt* t-h CO- 
CO CM CO 
CM t-h 


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CO 
CO t- CM 

CM 00 *# 


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CM 


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OS 'HH CO 

CM -^ CO 

i — 1 t-H 


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T-H 


































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T-H t-H CM 


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T-H 


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CO O t— 

t-H OS O 
T-H 


■S68I 






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o o 

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'■3681 




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T-H 1— I O »C 

*HH 

CM 


Married before 
January 1. 


/ 

■ 

1 c 

1 

1 1 


3C 
30 

J 'J 

3 

n 



i 

> 


30 


3i- 

5,0 
3 01 


50 

3 a 


1C 
JO 

/ 


J -si 



/ 


HIT 

iO 

/ 


1ST 

c 


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■ x 

- y 


a 
f 


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a 


T— 


c 

a 


- 


-t 
c 

- 


If 

c 
a 


- 


a 


OC 

c 
a 


a 
a 


Married of all 
Classes in each 
year before Jan. 1 

Total number mar- 
ried to Jan. 1. . . 

Total number of 
Bachelors of Arts 
up to Jan. 1. . . . 

Percentage mar- 
ried to Jan. 1 . . . 



Statistics 



151 



w 




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w 




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h-1 




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% 


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51 


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CM to to 










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6 

sr 

•c 

g 

a 


r married 
ig year. . . . 
r not re- 
Qg 


1 

.9 '■ 
m : 

a . 

'>% 
•8.2 


r having no 
r having 


. a 

TO C 

3 2 


r having 

children. . 

r having 


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r of chil- 

r of boys . . 
r of girls . . 
3 number 


u 
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In O 

2 -° 

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s-3acE-^s^Bga>e.id6S gefe 




eaths 
umbe 
dead 
umbe 
dead 


Ih 


a^aoas 


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g-T3 jftj^ 


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55 55 


£ 


5? 55 


55 


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55 


55 


55 


£ 5555< 




P 55 


55 





0) b 


u o 


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a E 


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^^ !h 


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to " 


■— t. 


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22 




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3-g 


•-> W 


o a 


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t. o 


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to 


B . 




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tH 


ffl m 


&•- 


4) 


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B 




B h" 


s a 


TS 


B ^T3 


0) - a> 
■»> 0) B 


o V- <u 

|2 8 


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S°^ 


hO 




s ®-< 


S-QN 


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o c.S3 


ges 
age 
iage 


CO tn u 


TDI; 


t > B 


B a £ 




Cu _ 


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H-S tH <U 


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a-32 


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152 



Statistics 



STATISTICS OF BACHELORS OF ARTS OF BRTN MAWR 

COLLEGE. 

IV. Occupations of Husbands of Married Alumnae. 



Professions. 

Professors 30 

Physicians 28 

Engineers (9 Civil, 5 Mechani- 
cal, 4 Mining, 2 Electrical, 2 

Consulting, 2 not specified) . 24 
Lawyers (1 Judge, 1 District 

Attorney) 22 

Clergymen (3 Missionaries) ... 9 

Teachers in Schools 5 

Architects 9 

Artists 3 

Officers in Army 3 

Scientists 3 

Ambassador 1 

Secretary of Embassy 1 

Inspector of Schools 1 

Musician 1 

Students 2 



142 

Business and Commerce. 

Officials and Managers of Com- 
panies 22 

Merchants (10 Wholesale, 6 Re- 
tail) 16 

Manufacturers 10 



Chemists 6 

Bankers 5 

Stock or Bond Brokers 5 

Real Estate 4 

Railroad Officials 3 

Secretaries (2 of Colleges) .... 4 

Editors 3 

Farmers 3 

Insurance 3 

Builders 2 

Publishers 2 

Trustees 2 

Accountant 1 

Contractor 1 

Capitalist 1 

Electrician 1 

Fruit Expert 1 

Government Official 1 

Hotel Keeper 1 

Photographer 1 

Shipbuilder 1 

Steamship Agent 1 

100 

Not stated 31 

Total 273 



UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS AND HEARERS WHO LEFT 
WITHOUT TAKING A DEGREE. 



Number of years in College. 


Under- 
graduates. 


Hearers. 


Total. 


Per cent. 




15 

226 

16 

221 

14 

87 

9 

1 

5 


8 
35 

1 
12 


23 

261 

17 

233 

14 

89 

10 

45 

4 

6 


3.3 


One 

Two 

Two and one-half 


37.2 
2.4 

33.2 
2.0 


Three 

Four and one-half 


2 
1 
3 


12.7 
1.4 
6.4 
0.6 


Five: 


1 


0.8 






Total 


639 


63 


702 









Bryn Mawr College 



CALENDAR 



GRADUATE COURSES 



1910 




T »USTEES 



Bryn. Mawr, Pennsylvania. 

Published by Bryn Mawr College, 

March, 1910. 



Volume III. Part 2. 



Bryn Mawr College 



CALENDAR 



GRADUATE COURSES 



1910 



Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania. 

Published by Bryn Mawr College. 
Vol. III. Part 2. March, 1910. 

Entered as second-class matter, March 23d, 1908, at the post-office, Bryn Mawr, 
Pennsylvania, under Act of July 16th, 1894, 

Printed by the John C. Winston Co. 
Philadelphia, Pcnna. 



Bryn Mawr College Calendar. 



1910. 

Part 1. Register of Alumnge and Former Students. 



Part 2. Graduate Courses. 



Part 3. Undergraduate and Graduate Courses. 



Part 4. Academic Buildings and Halls of Residence, 
Plans and Descriptions. 



BRYN MAWR COLLEGE. 



College Calendar. 



1910. 






1911. 






JANUARY. 


JULY. 


JANUARY. 


Su. 


M. 


Tu. 


W. 


Th. 


Fr. 


Sa. 

1 


Su. 


M. 


Tu. 


W. 


Th. 


Fr. 

1 


Sa. 
2 


Su. 
1 


M. 
?, 


Tu. 

3 


W. 

4 


Th. 
5 


Fr. 
6 


Sa. 
7 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


29 


30 


31 










30 


31 












31 




























FEBRUARY. 


AUGUST. 


FEBRUARY. 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 








1 


?, 


3 


4 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


13 


14 


15 


16 


IV 


18 


19 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


2b 


26 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


19 


20 


21 


n 


23 


24 


25 


27 


28 












28 


29 


30 


31 








26 


27 


28 










MARCH. 


SEPTEMBER. 


MARCH. 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 










1 


2 


3 








1 


2 


3 


4 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


5 


6 


V 


8 


9 


10 


11 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


12 


18 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 




•• 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


•• 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 




APRIL. 


OCTOBER. 






APRIL. 












.. 




1 


2 














1 














1 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


9 


10 


11 


12 


18 


14 


15 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


23 
30 


24 
31 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


23 
30 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


MAY. 


NOVEMBER. 


MAY. 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


fi 


7 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


7 


8 


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•• 



The academic year will close with the Conferring of Degrees at eleven 
o'clock, on June Sth, 1911. 



Academic Year, 1910-11. 



September 27th. 
October 3rd. 

October 4th. 

October 5th. 

October 6th. 
October 27th. 
October 22nd. 
October 29th. 
November 14th. 



November 19th. 
November 22nd. 
November 23rd. 
November 28th 
December 3rd. 
December 21st. 
January 5th. 
January 9th. 
January 14th. 
January 25th. 
January 31st. 
February 4th. 

February 6th. 
February 7th. 

February 8th. 

February 9th. 
March 2nd. 
March 13th. 
March 18th. 

March 29th. 

April 3rd. 

April 11th. 

April 12th. 
April 20th. 



Matriculation examinations begin. 

Registration of students. Halls of Residence open for 

students at three p. m. 
Registration of students. 
Matriculation examinations end. 
The work of the twenty-sixth academic year begins at 

a quarter to nine o'clock. 
Examinations for advanced standing begin. 
Examinations for advanced standing end. 
Senior oral examination in French. 
Senior oral examination in German. 
Private reading examinations begin. 
Collegiate and matriculation condition examinations 

begin. 
Private reading examinations end. 

Collegiate and matriculation condition examinations end . 
Thanksgiving vacation begins at one o'clock. 
Thanksgiving vacation ends at nine o'clock. 
Senior oral examinations in French and German. 
Christmas vacation begins at one o'clock. 
Christmas vacation ends at nine o'clock. 
Private reading examinations begin. 
Private reading examinations end. 
Half-yearly collegiate examinations begin. 
Matriculation examinations begin. 
Collegiate examinations end. 
Annual meeting of the Alumnae Association. 
Vacation. 
Vacation. 

Matriculation examinations end. 
The work of the second semester begins at a quarter to 

nine o'clock. 
Examinations for advanced standing begin. 
Examinations for advanced standing end. 
Private reading examinations begin. 
Private reading examinations end. 
Senior oral examinations in French and German. 
Mid-semester examinations in matriculation Greek, 

German and French. 
Collegiate and matriculation condition examinations 

begin. 
Collegiate and matriculation condition examinations 

end. 
Easter vacation begins at one o'clock. 
Easter vacation ends at nine o'clock. 



May 13th. Senior oral examinations in French and German. 

May ] 5th. Private reading examinations begin. 

May 20th. Private reading examinations end. 

May 23rd. Vacation. 

May 24th. Collegiate examinations begin. 

June 1st. Matriculation examinations begin. 

June 3rd. Collegiate examinations end. 

June 7th. Matriculation examinations end. 

June 8th. Conferring of degrees and close of twenty-sixth aca- 
demic year. 

Academic Year 1911-12. 

September 26th. Matriculation examinations begin. 

October 2nd. Registration of students. Halls of Residence open for' 

students at three p. m. 
October 3rd. ■ Registration of students. 

Matriculation examinations end. 
October 4th. The work of the twenty-seventh academic year begins 

at a quarter to nine o'clock. 



6 



Corporation. 

Howard Comfort, 
President. 



Asa S. Wing, 

Treasurer. 

Albert K. Smiley. 
Edward Bettle, Jr. 
Howard Comfort. 
Justus C. Strawbridge. 
James Wood. 
Rufus M. Jones. 



Edward Bettle, Jr., 
Secretary. 

Alexander C. Wood. 
M. Carey Thomas. 
Francis R. Cope, Jr. 
Asa S. Wing. 
Charles J. Rhoads. 
Thomas Raeburn White. 



Frederic H. Strawbridge. 



Board of Directors. 



Howard Comfort, 

Chairman. 



Asa S. Wing, 

Treasurer. 

Albert K. Smiley. 
Edward Bettle, Jr. 
Howard Comfort. 
Justus C. Strawbridge. 
James Wood. 
• Rufus M. Jones. 
Alexander C. Wood. 
M. Carey Thomas. 



Edward Bettle, Jr., 

Secretary. 

Francis R. Cope, Jr. 
Mary E. Garrett. 
Elizabeth Butler Kirkbride. 
Asa S. Wing. 
Charles J. Rhoads. 
Thomas Raeburn White. 
Frederic H. Strawbridge. 
Anna Rhoads Ladd. 



Academic Appointments. 

Academic Yeae, 1909-10. 

M. Carey Thomas, Ph.D., LL.D., President of the College and 

Professor of English. 

A.B., Cornell University, 1877 ; studied at the Johns Hopkins University, 
1877-78 ; University of Leipsic, 1879-82 ; Ph.D., University of Ziirich, 1882 ; 
Sorbonne and College de France, 1883 ; Dean of the Faculty of Bryn Mawr 
College and Professor of English, 1885-94. 

Charlotte Angas Scott, D.Sc, Alumnae Professor of Mathematics. 

Lincoln, England. Graduate in Honours, Girton College, University of Cam- 
bridge, England, 1880 ; B.Sc, University of London, 1882 ; Lecturer on 
Mathematics in Girton College, 1880-84 ; lectured in connection with Newn- 
harn College, University of Cambridge, England, 1880-83 ; D.Sc, University 
of London, 1885. 

George A. Barton, Ph.D., Professor of Biolical Literature and Semitic 

Languages. 

A.B.. Haverford College, 1882, and A.M., 1885 ; studied under the direction of 
the American Institute of Hebrew. 1885-86 ; Harvard University, 1888-91 ; 
Thayer Scholar, Harvard University, 1889-91 ; A.M., Harvard University. 
1890 ; Ph.D., Harvard University, 1891 : Director of the American School 
of Oriental Study and Research in Palestine, 1902-03. 

Joseph W. Warren, M.D., Associate Professor of Physiology. 

A.B., Harvard College, 1871 ; University of Berlin, 1871-72 ; University of 
Leipsic, 1872-73 ; University of Bonn, 1873-79 ; M.D., University of Bonn, 
1880 ; Assistant and Instructor in Physiology, Harvard Medical School, 
1881-91 : Lecturer in Medical Department of the University of the City of 
New York, 1885-86 ; Lecturer in Physiology, University of Michigan, 1889. 

Elmer P. Kohler, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 

A.B., Muhlenberg College, 1886, and A.M., 1889 ; Johns Hopkins University, 
1889-91 ; Fellow in Chemistry, Johns Hopkins University, 1891-92 ; Ph.D., 
Johns Hopkins University, 1892. 

Florence Bascom, Ph.D., Professor of Geology. 

A.B., University of Wisconsin, 1882, B.Sc, 1884, and A.M., 1887 ; Johns 
Hopkins University. 1891-93 ; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1893 ; 
Assistant in Geologv and Instructor in Petrography, Ohio State University, 
1893-95. 

Isabel Maddison, B.Sc, Ph.D., Assistant to the President and 

Associate in Mathematics. 

Reading, England. B.Sc, University of London, 1893, Ph.D., Brvn Mawr 
College, 1896, and B.A., Trinity College. Dublin, 1905 ; Graduate* in Hon- 
ours, First Class, in the Cambridge Mathematical Tripos, 1892 ; Graduate 
Student in Mathematics, Bryn M'awr College, 1892-93. and Fellow in 
Mathematics, 1893-94 ; Holder of the Mary E. Garrett European Fellow- 
ship, and Student in Mathematics, University of Gottingen, 1894-95. ' 

Wilmer Cave Wright, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Greek. 

Shrewsbury, England. Girton College, University of Cambridge. England, 
1888-92 : Graduate in Honours, Cambridge Classical Tripos, 1892 ; Ph.D., 
University of Chicago. 1895 ; Fellow in Greek, Bryn Mawr College, 1892- 
93: Fellow in Latin, University of Chicago, 1893-94, and Fellow in Greek, 
1894-95 ; Reader in Greek and Latin, University of Chicago, 1895-96. • 

James H. Letjba, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology and Education and 
Director of the Psychological Laboratory. 

Neuchatel, Switzerland. B.S.. University of Neuchatel, 1886 : Ph.B., Ursinus 
College, 1888 ; Scholar in Psychology, Clark University, 1892-93 : Fellow 
in Psychology, Clark University, 1893-95 ; Ph.D., Clark University, 1896. 



8 

Fongee DeHaan, Ph.D., Professor of Spanish. 

Leeuwarden, Holland. Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University. 1895 ; Instructor in 
Modern Languages, Lehigh University. 1885-91 ; Fellow in Romance Lan- 
guages, Johns Hopkins University, 1893-94, Assistant in Romance Lan- 
guages, 1893-95, Instructor in Romance Languages, 1895-96, and Associate 
in Romance Languages, 1806-97. 

Albert Schinz, Ph.D., Associate Professor of French Literature. 

Neuchatel, Switzerland. A.B., University of Neuchatel, 1888, and A.M., 1889. 
Licentiate in Theology. 1892 ; Student, University of Berlin, 1892-93 ; 
University of Tubingen, 1893 ; Ph.D., University of Tubingen, 1894 ; Sor- 
bonne and College de France, 1894 ; Privatdocent, University of Neu- 
chatel, 1896-97 ; Instructor in French, Clark University, 1897-98 ; Instruc- 
tor in French, University of Minnesota, 1898-99. 

Arthur Leslie Wheeler, Ph.D., Professor of Latin. 

A.B., Yale University, 1893 ; Scholar and Student in Classics, Yale College, 
1893-96 ; Ph.D., Yale University, 1896 ; Instructor and Tutor in Latin 
Yale College, 1894-1900. 

Henry Nevtll Sawders,* Ph.D., Professor of Greek. 

Edinburgh, Scotland. A.B., Trinity University, Toronto, 1894, and A.M., 
1897 ; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1903 ; Fellow in Greek, Johns 
Hopkins University, 1897-98 ; Lecturer in Greek, McGill University, 
1900-02. 

William Bashford Huff, Ph.D., Professor of Physics. 

A.B., University of Wisconsin, 1889 ; A.M., University of Chicago, 1896 ; 
Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1900 ; Lecture Assistant in Physics, 
Johns Hopkins University, 1899-1900, Assistant in Physics, 1900-01, 
and Instructor in Physics, 1901-02. 

William Roy Smith, Ph.D., Associate Professor of History. 

A.B., University of Texas, 1897, and A.M., 1898 ; Ph.D., Columbia University, 
1903 ; Acting Professor of History and Political Science, University of 
Colorado, 1900-01 ; Lecturer in History, Barnard College, 1901-02. 

J. Edmund Wright, f M.A., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

Liverpool, England. Graduate in Honours (Senior Wrangler) in the Cam- 
bridge Mathematical Tripos. 1900, and First Division, First Class, Mathe- 
matical Tripos, Part II, 1901 ; Smith's Prizeman, 1902 ; Fellow of Trinity 
College, University of Cambridge, England. , 

Lucy Martin Donnelly, A.B., Associate Professor of English. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1893 ; University of Oxford, England, and Univer- 
sity of Leipsic, 1893-94, Sorbonne and College de France, and University 
of Leipsic, 1894-95. 

Clarence Carroll Clark, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English. 

A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1896 ; Ph.D., Yale University, 1903 ; Scholar 
in Romance Languages, Johns Hopkins University, 1S96-97 ; Instructor 
in Modern Languages, Toledo, Ohio, 1897-99 ; Scholar in English, Yale 
University, 1901-02 ; Student in Oxford, Cambridge, and Berlin, 1902-03. 

Karl Detlev Jessen, Ph.D., Associate Professor of German Litera- 
ture. 

Winnemark, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, A.B., University of Chicago, 
1896, and Fellow in German, 1897-98 ; Ph.D., University of Berlin, 1901 ; 
University of Chicago. 1895-98 ; University of Kiel, 1899 ; University of 
Berlin, 1898-99, 1899-1901 ; Acting Professor of Modern Languages, 
Eureka College, 1896 ; Instructor in German, Iowa State University, 
1897 ; Instructor in German, Harvard University, 1901-03, and Lecturer 
on German Literature and Aesthetics, 1904. 

Tenney Frank, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Latin. 

A.B., University of Kansas, 1898, and A.M., 1899 : Ph.D., University of 
Chicago, 1903 ; Fellow, University of Chicago, 1899-1901 ; Assistant and 
Associate in Latin, University of Chicago, 1901-04. 

*Granted leave of absence for the second semester. 
fDied, February 20, 1910. 



9 

David Hilt Tennent, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Biology. 

S.B., Olivet College, 1900 ; Fellow. Johns Hopkins University, 1902-04 ; 
Bruce Fellow, Johns Hopkins University, 1904 ; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins 
University, 1904. 

Nettie Maria Stevens, Ph.D., Associate in Experimental Morphology. 

A.B., Leland Stanford. Jr., University, 1S99, and A.M., 1900 ; Ph.D.. Bryn 
Mawr College, 1903 ; Student in Hopkins Seaside Laboratory, Pacific 
Grove, Summer, 1897, 1898, 1899, and 1900 ; Graduate Scholar in Biology, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1900-01 ; Holder of the President's European Fellow- 
ship, 1901-02 ; Student. Zoological Station, Naples, and University of 
Wurzburg, 1901-02. 1908-09 ; Fellow in Biology, Bryn Mawr College, 
1902-03, and Research Fellow in Biology, 1903-04 ; Carnegie Research 
Assistant, 1904-05 ; Alice Freeman Palmer Research Fellow, 1908-09. 

Carleton Fairchild Brown, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English 
Philology. 

A.B., Carleton College, 1888 ; A.M., Harvard University, 1901, and Ph.D. 

1903. Shattuck Scholar, Harvard University, 1901-03 ; Instructor in 
English, Harvard University, 1903-05. 

Caroline Louise Ransom, Ph.D., Associate Professor of the History 

of Art and Classical Archaeology. 

A.B., Mt. Holvoke College, 1896; A.M., University of Chicago, 1900 and 
Ph.D., 1905 ; Fellow, University of Chicago, 1898-99, 1903-05 ; Student in 
Berlin, London, Paris, and Athens, 1900-03. 

James Barnes, Ph.D., Associate in Physics. 

Halifax. Nova Scotia. B.A., Dalhousie University, Honours in Mathematics 
and Physics, 1899, and M.A., 1900 ; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 

1904. Holder of 1851 Exhibition Science Research Scholarship, 1900-03 ; 
Fellow. Johns Hopkins University, 1903-04, and Assistant in Physics. 
1904-06. 

Richard Thayer Holbrook, Ph.D., Associate Professor of French 
Philology and Italian. 

A.B., Yale University, 1893 : Ph.D., Columbia University, 1902. Sorbonne. 
College de France, Ecole des Chartes, 1893-94, 1895-96 ; Student in Italy 
and University of Berlin, 1894-95 ; Student in Spain, 1901 : Tutor in the 
Romance Languages and Literatures, Yale Universitv, 1896-1901, and 
Columbia University, 1902-06. 

Theodore de Leo de Laguna, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Phil- 
osophy. 

A.B., University of California, 1896, and A.M., 1899 ; Ph.D., Cornell Univer- 
sity, 1901. Teacher in the Government Schools of the Philippine Islands, 
1901-04 ; Honorary Fellow and Assistant in Philosophy. Cornell University. 
1904-05 ; Assistant Professor of the Philosophy of Education, University 
of Michigan, 1905-07. 

Charles Clarence Williamson, Ph.D., Associate in Economics and 
Politics. 

A.B., Western Reserve University, 1904 ; Ph.D.. Columbia University. 190". 
Assistant in Economics and Graduate Student, Western Reserve Univer- 
sity, First Semester, 1904-05: Scholar in Political Economy, University 
of Wisconsin, 1904-05; Graduate Student. University of Wisconsin. "I9nr>- 
06; University Fellow in Political Economy, Columbia University, 1906-07; 
Research Assistant of the Carnegie Institution, 1905-07. 

Hans Weyhe, Ph.D., Associate in Teutonic Philology and Sanskrit. 

Dessau. Germany. Ph.D., University of Leipsic. 1903: University of Munich. 
1897; University of Leipsic, 1897-99; University of Berlin, 1899-1901. 

Marion Parris, Ph.D., Associate in Economics and Politics. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1901, and Ph.D., 1909. Graduate Student, Bryn 
Mawr College, 1902-05, Fellow in Economics and Politics, 1905-06 : Bryn 
Mawr College Research Fellow and Student in Economics and Politics, 
University of Vienna, 1906-07. 



10 

William Henry Allison, Ph.D., Associate in History. 

A.B., Harvard University, 1893 ; B.D., Newton Theological Institution, 1902 ; 
Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1905 ; Fellow in Church History. University 
of Chicago, 1902-04 ; Professor of Church History, Pacific Theological 
Seminary, 1904-05 : Professor of History and Political Science, Franklin 
College, 1905-08 ; Research Assistant of the Carnegie Institution, 1906-08. 

Frederick Hutton Getman, Ph.D., Associate in Chemistry. 

Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1903. Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 
1893-96 ; University of Virginia, 1896-97 ; Fellow in Chemistry, Johns 
Hopkins University. 1902-03, and Fellow by Courtesy, 1903-04 ; Carnegie 
Research Assistant in Physical Chemistry, 1903-04 ; Lecturer in Physical 
Chemistry, College of the City of New York, 1904-05, and Lecturer in 
Physics, Columbia University, 1907-08. 

M. Phillips Mason, Ph.D., Associate in Philosophy. 

A.B., Harvard University, 1899, A.M., 1900, and Ph.D., 1904. Corpus 
Christi College, University of Oxford, 1899-1900; Universities of Heidel- 
berg and Berlin. 1900-01 : University of Marburg, 1901-02 ; Sorbonne and 
College de France, 1902 ; Harvard University, 1902-04 ; John Harvard Fel- 
low of Harvard University, 1902-03 ; Instructor in Philosophv. Princeton 
University, 1905-07. 

Clarence Errol Ferree, Ph.D., Associate in Experimental Psychology. 

B.S., Ohio Wesleyan University, 1900, A.M., 1901. and M.S.. 1902; Ph.D.. 
Cornell University, 1909. Fellow in Psychology, Cornell University, 1902- 
03 ; Assistant in Psychology, Cornell University, 1903-07. 

Marion Reilly, A.B., Demi of the College and Reader in Philosophy. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1901 ; Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 
1901-02, 1903, 1903-06 ; Newnham College, University of Cambridge, 
Spring, 1907. 

Samuel Arthur King, M.A., ~N on-Resident Lecturer in English 
Diction. 

Tynemouth, England. M.A.. University of London. 1900. Special Lecturer 
in Elocution, Johns Hopkins University, 1901 ; Special Lecturer in Elocu- 
tion, University of California, 1902. 

Orie Latham Hatcher, Ph.D., Lecturer in Elizabethan Literature. 

A.B., Vassar College, 1888. Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1903. Graduate 
Student, University of Chicago, 1901-03, and Fellow in English, 1903-04. 

Chester Albert Reeds, M.S., Lecturer in Geology. 

B.S.. University of Oklahoma. 1905 ; M.S., Yale University, 1907 ; Graduate 
Scholar, Yale University, 1905-06: and Fellow, 1906-08. Field Assistant, 
U. S. Geological Survey. 1903-06 ; Instructor in Mineralogy and Petrology, 
University of Oklahoma, February to June, 1908. 

Frederick A. Blossom, Lecturer in French. 

A.B., Amherst College, 1898; Johns Hopkins University. 1903-04, 1909. 
Student of Romance Languages in Paris and Grenoble, 1905-08. 

Roland G. Kent, Ph.D., Non-resident Lecturer in Sanskrit. 

A.B., Swarthmore College, 1895, B.L., 1896 and A.M., 1898. Ph.D., University 
of Pennsylvania, 1903. Student, Universities of Berlin and Munich and 
the American School of Classical Studies at Athens. 1899-1902 ; University 
of Pennsylvania Second Semester, 3902, Harrison Fellow in Classics, 
1902-03, Harrison Research Fellow in Classics, 1903-04, Instructor in 
Greek and Latin, 1904-09, and Assistant Professor of Comparative Philol- 
ogy, 1909-10. 

Rose Chamberlin, M.A., Reader in German. 

Great Yarmouth, England. M.A., Trinity College, Dublin, 1905 ; Graduate in 
Honours, Newnham College, University of Cambridge, England, 1886 
(Mediaeval and Modern Languages Tripos, First Class). 



11 

Harriet Randolph, Ph.D.. Demonstrator in Biology and Header in 
Botany. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College. 1889 ; Fellow in Biology, Bryn Mawr College, 
1S89-00 ; University of Zurich, 1890-92 ; Ph.D., University of Ziirich, 1892. 

Katharine Fullerton. A.M., Reader in English. 
A.B., Radcliffe College, 1900, and A.M., 1901. 

Regina Katharine Crandall, Ph.D., Reader in English. 

A.B., Smith College, 1890 : Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1902. Graduate 
Student, University of Chicago, 1893-94, and Fellow in History, 1894-96 ; 
Assistant in History, Smith College, 1896-99 ; Instructor in History, 
Wellesley College, 1899-1900. 

Georgiana Goddard King, A.M., Reader in English. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1896, and A.M.. 1897. Fellow in Philosophy, Brvn 
Mawr College, 1896-97, and Fellow in English, 1897-98. College de France, 
First Semester, 1898-99. 

Abby Kirk, A.B., Reader in Elementary Greek. 

A.B.. Bryn Mawr College, 1892. Reader in English, Bryn Mawr College, 
1S92-98. 

Maud Downing, A.B., Reader in Semitic Languages. 

A.B., University of Toronto, 1902. Graduate Student, University of Toronto, 
1902-03 : Graduate Scholar, Bryn Mawr College, 1903-07 ; Honorary Fellow 
in Semitic Languages, Johns Hopkins University, 1908-09. 

Clara Leonora Nicolay, Ph.D., Reader in Elementary French. 

Berlin, Germany. L.L.A., St. Andrew's University, 1900 ; A.M., University 
of Pennsylvania, 1901, and Ph.D., 1907. University College, Nottingham, 
England, 1892-97 ; Student in France and Germany, 1903. 

Virginia Ragsdale, Ph.D., Reader in Mathematics. 

S.B.. Guilford College. 1892. Graduate Scholar in Mathematics, Bryn Mawr 
College, 1892-93. and Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1893-97. 
1907-08. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1896, and Ph.D., 1906. Holder of 
the Bryn Mawr Euronean Fellowship, and Assistant Demonstrator in 
Physics, Bryn Mawr College, 1896-97 ; Student, University of Gottingen, 
1897-98 ; Holder of Fellowship of the Baltimore Association for the Pro- 
motion of the University Education of Women, Graduate Scholar, and 
Fellow by Courtesy in Mathematics, Bryn Mawr College, 1901-02, and 
Fellow in Mathematics, 1902-03. 

Lillie Deming Loshe, Ph.D., Reader in English. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1899 ; A.M., Columbia University. 1903, and 
Ph.D., 1908. Gradunte Student, Barnard College, 1899-1900; Columbia 
University, 1901-04, First Semester, 1904-05, and 1905-07. 

Content Shepard Xichols, A.M., Reader in English. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1899, and A.M., 1900. Graduate Scholar in Latin 
and English. Bryn Mawr College, 1899-1900 ; Assistant Reader in English, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1900. 

Elizabeth Andros Foster, A.M., Reader in Latin. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1908, and A.M., 1909. Graduate Scholar in Latin, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1908-09. 

Isabelle Stone, Ph.D., Reader in G-reelc. 

A.B., Wellesley College, 1905, and Ph.D., Cornell University. 1908. Graduate 
Student. Cornell University, 1905-07, and Fellow in Greek and Latin, 1907- 
08 ; Alice Freeman Palmer Fellow of Wellesley College and Student in 
Greece and Italy, 1908-09. 

Helen Elizabeth Huff, Ph.D., Reader in Mathematics. 

A.B., Dickinson College, 1903, A.M.. 190.", and Ph.D., Brvn Mawr College, 
190S. Graduate scholar in Mathematics, Bryn Mawr College, 1903-04, 
and Graduate Studenl in Physics, 1907-08: Fellow in Physics, Bryn 
Mawr College, 1904-05; Holder of the Mary E. Garrett European Fellow- 
ship and Student, University of Gottingen. 1905-06: Demonstrator in 
Physics, Bryn Mawr College, 1906-07 ; Teacher in the Baldwin School, 
Bryn Mawr, Ta., 1907-08. 



12 

Frances Lowatee, B.Sc, Ph.D., Demonstrator in Physics. 

Nottingham, England. B.Sc, University of London, 1900; Ph.D., Bryn Mawr 
College, 1906 ; University College, Nottingham, 1888-91. 1892-93 ; Newn- 
ham College, University of Cambridge, England, 1891-92 ; Fellow in Physics, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1896-97, and Graduate Scholar in Physics, 1897-98 ; 
Secretary of Bryn Mawr College, 1898-99. 

Geetrude Langden Heeitage, A.M., Demonstrator in Chemistry. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1896, and A.M., 1899. Graduate Student in 
Chemistry, Bryn Mawr College, 1896-97, 1898-1900, and Graduate Student 
in Mathematics and Chemistry, 1897-98. 

Caeoline Vinia Lynch, A.M., Demonstrator in the History of Art 

and Classical Archaeology. 

A.B., Smith College, 1S94, and A.M., Columbia University, 1908. American 
School of Classical Studies in Rome, 1904-05 ; Columbia University, 
1906-07; Radcliffe College, 1895-96, 1907-09. 

Anna Bell Lawthee, A.B., Secretary of the College. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1S97. Assistant Bursar, Bryn Mawr College, 
1898-1900 ; Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1898-99, 1904-05 ; War- 
den of Merion Hall, 1904, 1904-05. 

Ethel Walker, A.M., Recording Secretary and Appointment Secre- 
tary. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1894, and A.M., 1904. Graduate Scholar in 
Archaeology, Bryn Mawr College, 1902-04 ; Recording Secretary, 1904-06, 
1907-10 and Appointment Secretary, 1905-10. 

Maey Letitia Jones, B.L., B.L.S., Librarian. 

B.L., University of Nebraska, 1885 ; B.L.S., New York State Library School, 
1892. Acting Librarian and Adjunct Professor of Bibliography, University 
of Nebraska, 1892-97 ; Librarian and Assistant Professor of Library 
Economy, University of Illinois, 1897 ; Classifier, Iowa State University, 
1898 ; Second Assistant Librarian, Los Angeles Public Library, 1898-99, 
and Librarian, 1900.-05. 

Constance M. K. Applebee, Director of Athletics and Gymnastics. 

Licentiate, British College of Physical Education, 1898, and Member, 1899. 
Gymnasium Mistress, Girls' Grammar School, Bradford, Yorkshire, 1899- 
1900 ; in the Arnold Poster High School, Burnley, Yorkshire, 1899-1901 ; 
in the High School, Halifax, Yorkshire, 1900-01 ; Head of Private Gym- 
nasium, Ilkley, Yorkshire, 1899-1901 ; Harvard School of Physical Training, 
Summer, 1901 ; Hockey Coach, Vassar College, Wellesley College, Radcliffe 
College, Mt. Holyoke College, Smith College, Bryn M'awr College, Boston 
Normal School of Gymnastics, 1901-04 ; Hockey Coach, Harvard Summer 
School of Gymnastics, 1906. , 

Elizabeth Laweence Gray, Assistant Director of Athletics and Gym- 
nastics. 

Graduate, Sargent Normal School of Physical Education, Boston, Mass., 190S. 
Student, Gilbert Summer Normal School of Classic Dancing, 1908 ; In- 
structor in Gymnastics, Playgrounds, Cambridge, Mass., Summer, 1908, 
1909. 

Maey Ellen Bakee, A.B., B.L.S., Head Cataloguer. 

A.B., Lincoln University, 1900. B.L.S., New York State Library School, 
1908. Assistant in Latin, Missouri Valley College, 1901-05, and Librarian, 
1902-06. Illinois State Library School, 1906-07; New York State Library 
School, 1907-08. 

Bessie Homes Jennings, Assistant Cataloguer. 
Graduate, Drexel Institute Library School, 1900. 

Maey Waeeen Tayloe, Secretary to the Director of Athletics and 
Gymnastics. 



13 

Thomas F. Branson, M.D., Attending Physician of the College. 

Anne Heath Thomas, A.M., M.D., Visiting Physician of the College. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1897, and A.M., 1898. M.D., Woman's Medical 
College of Pennsylvania, 1905. Graduate Scholar in Physics and Biology, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1897-98 ; Teacher of Chemistry in the State Normal 
School, Trenton, N. .T., 1898-1902 ; Student, Woman's Medical College of 
Pennsylvania, 1902-05 : Interne, Woman's Hospital of Philadelphia, 1905- 
06 ; Resident at the Evening Dispensary for Working Women and Girls, 
Baltimore, Md.. and Graduate Student in Medicine, Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1906-07 : Physician, Registrar and Assistant in Clinic in the Wo- 
man's Hospital. Philadelphia, and Assistant in Clinic in the Hospital of the 
Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania, 1907-08 ; Instructor in Thera- 
peutics and Physical Diagnosis, Woman's Medical College, and Assistant 
Visiting Physician, Bryn Mawr College, 1908-09. 

Helen Muephy, M.D., Examining Oculist. 

M.D., Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania, 1893 ; Assistant Demon- 
strator in Histology, Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania, 1894-96 ; 
Instructor in Materia Medica, 1896-1902 ; Instructor in Diseases of the 
Eve, Philadelphia Polyclinic and College for Graduates in Medicine, 
1895-97. 

The following physicians have consented to serve as consultants 
in special cases : 

Ella B. Everitt, M.D., Consultant Gynecologist. 

John H. Musser. M.D., Consultant Physician. 

George de Schweinitz, M.D., Consultant Oculist. 

Robert G. Le Conte, M.D., Consultant Surgeon. 

Francis R. Packard, M.D., Consultant Aurist. 

James K. Young, M.D., Consultant Orthopceclist. 



The Academic Committee of the Alumnce. 

Ruth Wadsworth Furness Porter, A.B. (Mrs. James Foster Porter). 
Chairman, Hubbard Woods, III. 

Evelyn Walker, A.B., Secretary, 119 Park Street, Brookline, Mass. 

Eleanor Louisa Lord, Ph.D., Woman's College of Baltimore, Balti- 
more, Md. 

Susan Fowler, A. B. (ex-officio), 420 West 118th Street, New York 
City. 

Bertha Haven Putnam, Ph.D., Mt. Holyolce College, South Hadley. 
Mass. 

Gertrude Elizabeth Dietrich Smith, A.B. (Mrs. Herbert Knox 
Smith), The Highlands, Washington, D. C. 

Louise Parke Atherton Dickey, A.B. (Mrs. Samuel Dickey), 10 
Chalmers Place, Chicago, III. 

Helen J. Robins. A.B., 23 Goicen Avenue, Mt. Airy, Philadelphia. 



14 

Honorary Corresponding Secretaries. 

The folloioing honorary corresponding secretaries, all of whom are grad- 
uates of Bryn Mawr College, have kindly consented to act as representatives 
of the college in the cities in which they live, and will at any time be glad 
to answer questions about the college: 

New York City : Miss Emily Redmond Cross, 6 Washington Square. 
Philadelphia : Mrs. Adolph E. Borie, 618 8. Washington Square. 
Baltimore : Mrs. Anthony Morris Carey, 1004 Cathedral Street. 

Pittsburgh, Pa. : Mrs. John Bruce Orr, G28 Maple Lane, Sewickley, 

Pa. 
Scranton, Pa. : Miss Alice Belin. 

Syracuse, N. Y. : Mrs. Frederick A. Saunders, 504 Ostrom Avenue. 
Utica, N. Y. : Mrs. Arthur Percy Saunders, Clinton, N. T. 
New Haven, Conn. : Miss Elizabeth Day Seymour, 34 Hillhouse 

Avenue. 

Boston, Mass. : Mrs. Ingersoll Bowditch, 19 Buckingham Street, 
Cambridge. 

Fall River, Mass. : Mrs. Randall Nelson Durfee, 435 Cherry 
Street. 

Washington, D. C. : Mrs. Herbert Knox Smith, The Highlands. 

Winston, N. C. : Miss Caro Fries Buxton, 520 Summit Street. 

Chicago, III. : Miss Ethel Eugenie Hooper, 1210 Asior Street. 

Indianapolis, Ind. : Mrs. Frank Nichols Lewis, 4 West St. Joe 
Street. 

Madison, Wis. : Mrs. Moses Stephen Slaughter, 633 Francis Street. 
Minneapolis, Minn. : Miss Margaret Washburn, 2218 First Avenue, 

South. 
St. Louis, Mo. : Mrs. George Gellhorn, 3871 Washington Avenue. 
Portland, Ore. : Mrs. Henry Minor Esterly, 376 North 31st Street. 

Los Angeles, Cal. : Miss Elizabeth Dana Marble, 3201 Figueroa 

Street. 

Salt Lake City, Utah : Miss Kate Williams, 177 13th East Street. 
England : The Hon. Mrs. Bertrand Russell, Bagley Wood, Oxford. 
Mrs. Henry Martineau Fletcher, 10 Lincoln's Inn 
Fields, London, W. C. 



15 

Students. 



Fellows and Graduate Students, Academic Year, 1909-10. 

Bontecou, Margaret, Bryn Mawr European Fellow. 

Orange, N. J. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1909. Maria L. Eastman Brooke 
Hall Memorial Scholar, 1908-09. 

Swindler, Mary Hamilton, Mary E. Garrett European Fellow. 

Bloomington, Ind. A.B., University of Indiana, 1905, and A.M., 1906. Grad- 
uate Scholar in Greek, Bryn Mawr College, 1906-07, and Fellow in Greek, 
1907-09 ; Student, Universities of Oxford and Berlin, and American 
School of Classical Studies, Athens, 1909-10. 

Harmon, Esther, 

Ottendorfer Memorial Research Fellow in Teutonic Philology. 

Toledo, O. A.B., University of Michigan, 1906. Graduate Scholar in Teu- 
tonic Philology, Bryn Mawr College, 1906-07. Holder of the President's 
European Fellowship and Student, University of Berlin, 1907-08 ; Fellow in 
German and Teutonic Philology, Bryn Mawr College, 1908-09 ; Student, 
University of Munich, 1909-10. 

Sandison, Helen Estabeook, Special European Felloio. 

Terre Haute, Ind. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1906, and A.M., 1907. Gradu- 
ate Scholar, Bryn Mawr College. 1906-07 ; Assistant Principal of the High 
School, Brookville, Ind., 1907-08; Fellow in English, Bryn Mawr College, 
1908-09 ; Student, University of Oxford, 1909-10. 

Spenoer, Fannie Grace Clara, Research Fellow in Chemistry. 

Terre Haute, Ind. A.B., University of Illinois, 1908, and A.M., 1909. 

Coulter, Cornelia Catlen, Fellow in Latin. 

Ferguson, Mo. A.B., Washington University, 1907. Graduate Scholar in 
Latin, Bryn Mawr College, 1907-08 ; Holder of the President's European 
Fellowship and Student, University of Munich, 1908-09. 

Smith, Eunice Clara, Felloio in English. 

Pawtucket, R. I. A.B., Brown University, 1907, and A.M., 1909. 

Harrison, Jane Annetta, Fellow in German. 

La Plata, Mo. A.B. and B.S., University of Missouri, 1906, and A.M., 1907. 
Graduate Student, University of Missouri, 1908-09. 

King, Helen Maxwell, Fellow in Romance Languages. 

Olivet, Mich. A.B., Olivet College, 1907, and A.M., 1908. Graduate Student, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1908-09. 

Shoemaker, Jane Cushing, Fellow in Economies and Politics. 

Philadelphia. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1905. Graduate Student, Bryn 
Mawr College, 1907-08. 

Rand, Marie Gertrude, Fellow in Philosophy. 

Brooklyn, New York City. A.B., Cornell University, 1908. Graduate Scholar 
in Psychology, 1908-09. 

Bowerman, Helen Cox, Felloio in Archaeology. 

Point Pleasant, N. J. A.B., Mount Holyoke College, 1901 ; A.M., University 
of Rochester, 1903. Teacher of English and Latin in the High School, 
Macedon, N. Y., 1903-05 ; Instructor in Latin, Western College for Women. 
Oxford, O., 1905-07 ; Associate Professor of Latin, 1907-08 ; Graduate 
Scholar in Archseology, Bryn Mawr College, 1908-09. 

Weeks, Eula Adeline, Felloio in Mathematics. 

Butler, Mo. A.B. and B.S., University of Missouri, 1908, and A.M., 1909. 
Teacher in the High School, Rich Hill, Mo., 1901-05. 

Frehafer, Mabel Kathryn, Felloio in Physics. 

Philadelphia. A.B. Bryn Mawr College, 1908. Graduate Student in Physics. 
University of Wisconsin, 1908-09. 



16 

Macleod, Annie Louise, Fellow in Chemistry. 

Grace Bay, Nova Scotia. A.B., McGill University, 1904, and M.Sc, 1905. 
Demonstrator in Chemistry, McGill University, 1905-08 ; Assistant in 
Chemistry, Barnard College, 190S-09. 

Jarvis, May Mason, Fellow in Biology. 

Austin, Tex. A.B., University of Texas, 1906, and A.M., 190S. Tutor in 
Zoology, University of Texas, 1907-09. 

Massey, Isabella Mellis, British Graduate Scholar. 

London, England. Girton College, University of Cambridge, 1905-09. Med- 
iaeval and Modern Languages Tripos, Part I, Class I, 1908, Part II, Class 
II, 1909. 

May, Elsie Gertrude, British Graduate Scholar. 

Birmingham, England. Mason College, Birmingham, 1893-97 ; St. Hugh's 
Hall, University ' of Oxford, 1879-99. Final Honours School of English 
Language and Literature, University of Oxford, 1899 ; ; M.A., University of 
Birmingham, 1901. Teacher in the Pontypool Countv School, 1901-03, in 
the Blackburn High School, 1903-04, in the Worcester High School, 1904-08, 
and in the Streatham Hill High School, 1908-09. 

Behrens, Margarete Emma Johanna, . . . .German Graduate Scholar. 

Dresden, Saxony. University of Munich, 1907-09 ; University of Jena, 1907 ; 
University of Kiel, 1909. 

Gerlach, Elna, German Graduate Scholar. 

Bischofsburg, Prussia. University of Munich, 1906-09. 

Heffner, Barbaba, German Graduate Scholar. 

Kitzingen, Bavaria. University of Wiirzburg, 1903-04, 1905-09 ; University 
of Munich, 1904-05 ; Ph.D., University of Wiirzburg, 1907. 

Schmidt, Annalise, German Graduate Scholar. 

Munich, Bavaria. University of Berlin, 1905-06, 1907-08 ; University of 
Munich, 1906-07, 1908-09. 

Akers, Deborah Chase, Graduate Scholar in Psychology. 

Decatur, 111. Western College, 1904-06 ; Milliken University, 1906 ; Univer- 
sity of Illinois, 1907-08 ; A.B., University of Illinois, 1908. 

Albee, Maria Hawes, Graduate Scholar in Greek. 

Killingly, Conn. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1904 ; Graduate Student in Greek 
and Archaeology, Yale University, 1904-05, and in Latin and Archaeology, 
1905-06 ; Instructor in German and History in the High School ; New Haven, 
Conn., 1904-05, and in German and Latin, 19u5-06, 1907-09 ; Head of the 
Classical Department and Assistant Principal, Tudor Hall, Indianapolis, 
Ind., 1906-07 ; Assistant in the Secretary's Office, Yale University, 1908-09 : 
Teacher of Latin in Miss Wright's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., 1909-10. 

Albertson, Alice Owen English. 

Philadelphia. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1902. Teacher in the Friends' Select 
School, Philadelphia, 1902-09. 

Albertson, Anna Mary, English. 

Magnolia, N. J. A.B., Wellesley College, 1909. 

Allison, Edith Mary, Graduate Scholar in Psychology. 

McPherson, Kan. Washburn College, 1903-04, 1905 ; McPherson College, 
1906-07 ; Universitv of Colorado, 1907-08 ; A. B., University of Colorado, 
1908, and A.M., 1909 ; Assistant in Biology, University of Colorado, 1908-09. 

Barker, Grace Sarah Taylor, Graduate Scholar in Physics. 

Welland, Ontario, Canada. S.B., University of Chicago, 1907 ; Teacher in the 
University School for Girls, Chicago, 1907-09. 

Bartholomew, Mary Eleanor, English. 

Chicago, Illinois. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1909. Teacher of English in 
the Baldwin School. Bryn Mawr, Pa., 1909-10. 



17 

Belding, Josephine, Greek. 

Hartford, Conn. A.B., Mt. Holyoke College, 1902. Secretary to the As- 
sistant to the President, Bryn Mawr College, 1909-10. 

Bell, Emma Virginia, English, German, and History. 

Columbus, Miss. A.B., Mississippi Industrial Institute and College, 1909. 

Bkownell, Harriet Mather, Archaeology. 

Bryn Mawr, Pa. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1896. Teacher of Latin, Greek, 
and Mathematics in the Passaic Collegiate School, Passaic, N. J., 1896-99, 
and Teacher of Greek and Latin, 1899-1905 ; Student in Latin and Archae- 
ology, University of Munich, and American School of Classical Studies, 
Rome, 1905-06 ; Teacher of Latin in the Holman School, Philadelphia, 
1906-10, and Assistant to the Principal, 1908-10. 

Brusstae, Margaret Elizabeth, Mathematics. 

Philadelphia. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1903. Teacher of Latin and Math- 
ematics, Miss Gleim's School, Pittsburgh, Pa., 1903-04 ; Teacher of Math- 
ematics in the Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., 1904-10 ; Graduate 
Scholar in Mathematics, Bryn Mawr College, 1907-08, and Graduate 
Student, 1908-10. 

Bunker, Marie, English and Psychology. 

Overbrook, Philadelphia. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1907, and A.M., 1908. 
Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1907-09. 

Burchinal, Marie Cacy, German and Teutonic Philology. 

Chestertown, Md. A.B., Washington College, 1896, and A.M., 1899. Student, 
University of Marburg, 1903 ; Graduate Scholar in Romance Languages, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1905-06, and in Teutonic Philology, 1906-07 ; 
Graduate Student, Johns Hopkins University, 1908-09 ; Instructor in 
German, Woman's College of Baltimore, 1907-09 ; First Assistant in Ger- 
man, William Penn High School, Philadelphia, 1909-10. 

Byrne, Alice Hill, Greek and Latin. 

Lancaster, Pa. A.B., Wellesley College, 1908. Teacher of Latin and Greek 
in the Union High School, Coleraine, Pa., 1899-1900, in Mrs. Blackwood's 
School, Lancaster, Pa., 1896-99, and 1900-01, and in Miss Stahr's School, 
Lancaster, Pa., 1901-09. 

Campbell, Annie Catherine, . . .English, Economics, and Philosophy. 

Mechanicsburg, Pa. A.B., Irving College, 1907. Graduate Student, Bryn 
Mawr College, 1908-09. 

Chubb, Ethel Leigh, Graduate Scholar in Latin. 

West Toronto, Canada. A.B., University of Toronto, 1906, and M.A., 1909 ; 
Lecturer in Westminster College, Toronto, 1906-09. 

Clarke, Nancy Barnum, Psychology, Geology, and Biology. 

Brevard, N. C. B.S., College for women, Columbia, S. C, 1909. 

Coleman, Jessie Hester, Penn College Scholar. 

Oskaloosa, la. Ph.B., Penn College, 1909. 

Crawford, Emily C, Graduate Scholar in Latin. 

Montreal, Canada. A.B., McGill University, 1907. Graduate Scholar in 
Greek, Bryn Mawr College, 1907-08, and Graduate Scholar in Latin, 
1908-09. 

Davis, Margaret, Guilford College Scholar. 

Guilford College, N. C. A.B., Guilford College, 1909. 

Dillin, Margaret Sidner, Graduate Scholar in Latin. 

Radnor, Pa. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1909. 

Downing, Maud, Semitic Languages. 

Pournier, Ontario, Canada. A.B., University of Toronto, 1902. Graduate 
Student, University of Toronto, 1902-03 :' Graduate Scholar in Psychology, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1903-04, and in Semitic Languages, 1904-07, and 
Reader in Semitic Languages, 1907-10 ; Honorary Fellow in Semitic Lan- 
guages, .Tohns Hopkins University, 1908-09. 



18 

Dudley, Louise, Graduate Scholar in English. 

Georgetown, Ky. A.B., Georgetown College, 1905. Graduate Student, Bryn 
Mawr College, 1905-06 ; Teacher in Kemper Hall, Kenosha, Wis., 1907-08 ; 
Research Student in the Bibliotheque Nationale, Paris, 1908-09 ; Univer- 
sity of Oxford, 1909. 

Eisenhower, Anna Belle, Italian. 

Norristown, Pa. A.B., Swarthmore College, 1899. A.B., Radcliffe College, 
1900, and A.M., 1907. Instructor in Classics and French in the High 
School, Norristown, 1904-06 ; Graduate Student, Radcliffe College, 1906- 
07 ; Head of French Department in the Friends' Central School, Phila- 
delphia, 1907-10. 

Fostee, Elizabeth Andros, Latin and Spanish. 

Sharon, Mass. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1908, and A.M., 1909. Graduate 
Scholar in Latin, Bryn Mawr College, 1908-09, and Reader in Latin, 
1909-10. 

Foster, Frances Allen, Scholar in English. 

Providence, R. I. A.B., Brown University, 1909. 

Frank:,* Grace, German and French. 

Bryn Mawr, Pa. A.B., University of Chicago, 1906. Graduate Student, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1907-09. 

Furnas, Marcia Moore, Earlham College Scholar. 

Earlham, Ind. A.B., Earlham College, 1906. 

Goudge, Mabel Ensworth, Greek, Latin, and Psychology. 

Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. A.B., Dalhousie University, 1908, and A.M., 
1909. 

Gruening, Martha, English, Philosophy, and Chemistry. 

New York City. A.B., Smith College, 1909. 

Heritage, Gertrude Langden, Italian. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1896, and A.M., 1899. Graduate Student, Bryn 
Mawr College, 1896-1901. Demonstrator in Chemistry, Bryn Mawr Col- 
lege, 1896-1910. 

HuFF,f Helen Elizabeth, Physics. 

Bryn Mawr, Pa. A.B., Dickinson College, 1903, A.M., 1905, and Ph.D.. 
Bryn Mawr College, 1908. Graduate Scholar in Mathematics, Bryn Mawr 
College, 1903-04, and Graduate Student in Physics, 1907-08 : Fellow in 
Physics, Bryn Mawr College, 1904-05 ; Holder of the Mary E. Garrett 
European Fellowship and Student, University of Gottingen, 1905-06 ; 
Demonstrator in Physics, Bryn Mawr College, 1906-07 ; Teacher in the 
Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, 1907-08 ; Reader in Mathematics, Bryn 
Mawr College, Second Semester 1909-10. 

James, Eleanor, Scholar in Latin. 

Philadelphia. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1902. Teacher in the Public School, 
Milford, Del., 1902-03, and in Miss Gleim's School, Pittsburgh, Pa., 
1903-08 ; Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1908-09 ; Teacher of 
Latin in the Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., 1908-10. 

Johnson, Helen Moore, Scholar in Greek. 

Osceola, Mo. Drury College, 1903-05 ; University of Missouri, 1905-08 ; 
Tulane University, 1908-09 ; ; A.B., University of Missouri, 1907, and A.M., 
1908. 

Jurist, Helen Stieglitz, Scholar in German. 

Philadelphia. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1909. 

Keiller, Mabel Matthewson, 

English, History of Art, and Mathematics. 
Narberth, Pa. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1908. Private Tutor, 1908-09. 

*Mrs. Tenney Frank. 
fMrs. William Bashford Huff. 



19 

King, Marie Seward, German, Teutonic Philology, and French. 

Olivet, Mich. A.B., Olivet College, 1907, and A.M., 1908. Professor of 
German and French, Des Moines College, 1908-09. 

Lowengrund, Helen Moss, English. 

Philadelphia. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1906, and A.M., 1907. Graduate 
Scholar in Latin, Bryn Mawr College, 1906-07, and Graduate Scholar in 
English, 1907-08 ; Teacher of Historv in the Girls' High School, Phil- 
adelphia, 1908-10. 

Lynch, Caroline Vinia, Archceology. 

Boston, Mass. A.B., Smith College, 1894 ; A.M., Columbia University, 1908. 
Graduate Student, Radcliffe College, 1895-96, 1907-09 ; Columbia Univer- 
sity, 1906-07 ; American School of Classical Studies in Rome, 1904-05. 

Mason, Mary Taylor, Physics, Chemistry, and Biology. 

Germantown, Philadelphia. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1892. Graduate 
Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1892-94 ; Teacher of History in Mrs. E. L. 
Head's School, 1892-93, and 1897-98 ; Member of School Board, 38th Sec- 
tion, Philadelphia, 1896-99 ; Member of the Board of Education for the 
38th Section, Philadelphia, 1899-1903. 

Matsuda, Michi, Scholar in English. 

Tango, Japan. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1899. Teacher in Kobe College, 
Kobe, Japan, 1899-1904, and in the Doshisha, Kyoto, Japan, 1904-08 ; 
Graduate Scholar in Economics, Bryn Mawr College, 1908-09. 

Morgan, Louise Baggott, Scholar in English. 

Providence, R. I. A.B. and A.M., Brown University, 1907. Graduate Scholar 
in English, Bryn Mawr College, 1907-09. 

Nichols, Helen Hawley, Scholar in Semitic Languages. 

Marietta, O. A.B., Marietta College, 1906. Graduate Student Bryn Mawr 
College, 1906-07, and Graduate Scholar in Semitic Languages, 1907-08 ; 
Holder of the Mary E. Garrett European Fellowship, and Student, Univer- 
sity of Oxford, 1908-09. 

Noble, Edith, Latin and German. 

Centerville, S. Dak. A.B., Dakota Wesleyan University, 1902 ; Ph.B., De 
Pauw University, 1902. Chicago University, Summer term, 1905 ; Instruc- 
tor in Latin and English in the High School, Centerville, 1902-03 ; Instruc- 
tor in Latin in the High School, Mitchell, S. Dak., 1903-06 ; Instructor in 
English, Dakota Wesleyan University, 1906-07, and Professor of Latin, 
1907-09. 

Ogden, Ellen Seton, Scholar in Semitic Languages. 

Albany, N. Y. L.B., University of Nashville, 1895. Teacher of Latin and 
Mathematics in the Winthrop Model School, Peabody Normal College, 1895- 
96 ; Graduate Student in Teutonic Philology and Semitic Languages, Bryn 
Mawr College, 1896-98 ; Junior Bursar, Bryn Mawr College, 1898-1901 ; 
Student in Semitics, Columbia University, 1901-02 ; Head of the English 
Department, St. Agnes School, Albany, N. Y., 1902-09, and Instructor in 
Biblical Study, 1904-09. 

Orlady, Edith Thompson, French. 

Bryn Mawr. Pa. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1902. Warden of Pembroke Hall 
West, 1903-05, and Warden of Rockefeller Hall, 1905-06; Graduate Stu- 
dent, Bryn Mawr College, 1903-06, 1907-09. 

Peebles, Florence, Biology. 

Bryn Mawr, Pa. A.B., Woman's College of Baltimore. 1895, and Ph.D., 
Bryn Mawr College, 1900. Graduate Scholar in Biologv, Brvn Mawr Col- 
lege, 1895-96 ; Fellow in Biology, 1896-97, and Graduate Student, 1S97- 
98, 1903-04, 1906-09 ; Holder of the Mary E. Garrett European Fellowship. 
Scholar of the Woman's Table and Student in Biology, Zoological Station, 
Naples, Universities of Munich and Halle, 1898-99 ; Instructor in Biology. 
Woman's College of Baltimore. 1899-1902; and Associate Professor of 
Biology, 1902-06; Teacher of Science in Miss Wright's School. Bryn Mawr, 
Pa., 1906-07 ; Assistant Demonstrator in Biologv, Bryn Mawr College, 
1907-10; Student, University of Bonn, Summer, 1906. 



20 

Peelle, Mary Pearl, English 

Wilmington, O. A.B., Wilmington College, 1909. 

Probasco, Louise, Latin and History of Art. 

Wilmington, O. A.B., Wilmington College, 1909. 

Rambo, Eleanor Ferguson, .Latin. 

Philadelphia. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1908, and A.M., 1909. Graduate 
Scholar in Greek, 1908-09. 

Reynolds, Grace Potter, Physics and Chemistry. 

Stamford, Conn. A.B., Smith College, 1904 ; A.M., Columbia University, 1905. 
Graduate Student, Columbia University, 1904-05 ; Assistant in Chemistry, 
Barnard College, 1906-08 ; Fellow in Chemistry, Bryn Mawr College, 1908-09. 

Richards, Annabella Elliott, Physics and Chemistry. 

Merion, Pa. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1907. Graduate Scholar in Chemistry, 
1908-09. 

Richardson, Emily Martin, .English. 

Boston, Mass. A.B., Radcliffe College, 1904. Teacher of English in the 
Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., 1907-10. 

Roe, Adah Blanche, Scholar in German. 

Omaha, Neb. A.B., Woman's College of Baltimore, 1909. 

Schenck, Eunice Morgan, Scholar in French. 

Philadelphia. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1907. Graduate Student, Bryn 
Mawr College, 1908-09. 

Shearer, Edna Aston, Philosophy. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1904. Junior Fellow in Philosophy, Bryn Mawr 
College, 1904-05 ; Holder of the President's Fellowship, and Student, Uni- 
versities of Edinburgh and Aberdeen, 1905-06 ; Fellow in Philosophy, Bryn 
Mawr College, 1906-07 ; Teacher of English in the Baldwin School, Bryn 
Mawr, Pa., 1907-10, and Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1907-08. 

Sheldon, Eleanor, — Scholar in English. 

Minneapolis, Minn. A.B., University of Minnesota, 1904, and A.M., 1909. 
Assistant in English, University of Minnesota, 1905-09 ; Teacher of Inter- 
pretative Literature in the Minneapolis School of Music and Oratory, 
1906-09. 

Snyder, Elizabeth, German. 

Ardmore, Pa. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1903. Teacher of French and 
German in the Lower Merion High School, Ardmore, 1903-09 ; Teacher in 
the Girls' High School, Philadelphia, December, 1908, to February, 1909 ; 
Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1905-06. 

Spalding, Mary Caroline, Scholar in English. 

Bryn Mawr, Pa. A.B., Vassar College, 1901. Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr 
College, 1906-08, and Graduate Scholar, 1908-09 ; Teacher in the Misses 
Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, 1906-10. 

Stoddard, Virginia Tryon, Philosophy. 

Mt. Holly, N. J. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1903, and A.M., 1909. Warden 
of Radnor Hall and Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1904-09. 

Sturdevant, Winifred, German. 

Cragsmoor, N. Y. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1909. 

Van Kirk, Edith Louise, Latin and English. 

Philadelphia. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1898. Assistant in Mrs. Van Kirk's 
Training School for Kindergarten Teachers, Philadelphia, 1898-1900 ; Stu- 
dent of German, 1900-01 ; Teacher in Mrs. Van Kirk's Kindergarten Train- 
ing School, 1901-02, 1903-05 ; Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 
1902-03. 



21 

Wade, Clara Louise Whipple, Archeology. 

Bryn Mawr, Fa. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1904. Holder of the Bryn Mawr 
European Fellowship and Scholar in Latin, Bryn Mawr College and Private 
Tutor, 1904-05 ; Student, University of Munich, 1905-06 ; Graduate Student, 
Bryn Mawr College, and Private Tutor, 1906-07 ; Teacher of Latin and Ger- 
man in the Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, 1907-10. 

Weld, Jean, English, French, and Education. 

Marianna, Ark. A.B., University of Arkansas, 1907. 

Weusthoff, Anna Sophie, Teutonic Philology. 

New York City. A.B., Woman's College of Baltimore, 1906. Graduate 
Scholar in Teutonic Philology, Bryn Mawr College, 1906-07 ; Student, 
University of Berlin, 1907-09 ; Special Ottendorfer Memorial Research 
Fellow in Teutonic Philology, 1907-08, and Ottendorfer Memorial Research 
Fellow, 1908-09 ; Fellow of Woman's College of Baltimore, 1909-10. 

White, Helen Beardsley Cromwell, Scholar in Geology. 

Bradford, Pa. A.B., Allegheny College, 1909. 



Former Holders of European Fellowships. 

Balch, Emily Greene, Prince Street, Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

Holder of the Bryn Mawr European Fellowship, 1889-90. A.B., Bryn Mawr 
College, 1889, group, Greek and Latin. Student in Political Science, Con- 
servatoire des Arts et des Metiers, Paris, and under the direction of 
Professor Emile Levasseur, 1890-91 ; University of Chicago, 1895 ; Uni- 
versity of Berlin, 1S95-96 ; Member of Board of Trustees for Children of 
the City of Boston, 1897-98 ; Assistant in Economics, Wellesley College, 
1896-97, Instructor in Economics, 1897-1903, Associate Professor of 
Economics and Sociology, 1903-07, and Acting Head of the Department, 
1907-10. 

Becker, Amanda Fredericka, . .5870 Cabanne Avenue, St. Louis, Mo. 

Holder of the President's European Fellowship, 1903-04. B.Sc, Missouri 
State University, 1901, and A.M., 1902. Holder of Teaching Fellowship, 
Missouri State University, 1901-02 ; Graduate Scholar, Bryn Mawr College, 
1902-03 ; Student, University of Gottingen, 1903-04 : Teacher of Mathe- 
matics in the Yeatman High School, St. Louis, Mo., "1904-08, and in the 
Soldan High School, St. Louis, 1909-10. 

Billmeyer, Helen May, 250 Midland Avenue, Montclair, N. J. 

Holder of the Bryn Mawr European Fellowship, 1902-03. A.B., Bryn Mawr 
College, 1902, group, History and Political Science; University of Berlin. 
1903-04 ; Private Tutor, 1909-10. 

Boring, Alice Middleton, .... 931 Fairmount Avenue, Philadelphia. 

Holder of the Mary E. Garrett European Fellowship, 1907-08. A.B., Bryn 
Mawr College, 1904, group, Chemistry and Biology, and A.M., 1905. Grad- 
uate Scholar in Biology, and Assistant in the Biological Laboratory, Bryn 
Mawr College, 1904-05 ; Moore Fellow in Zoology, University of Pennsyl- 
vania, 1905-06 ; Fellow in Biology, Bryn Mawr College, 1906-07 ; Instructor 
in Zoology, Vassar College. 1907-OS: Student, University of Wurztrarg, 
and Zoological Station, Naples, 1908-09 ; Instructor in Zoolosv, University 
of Maine, 1909-10. 

Bourland, Caroline Brown, Peoria, 111. 

Holder of the Mary E. Garrett European Fellowship, 1900-01. A.B., Smith 
College, 1893 ; Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College, 1905, subjects, Spanish, Old 
French, and Italian. Teacher of French and German in Mrs. Starrett's 
School, Oak Park, 111., 1895-96, and in the High School, Peoria, 1896- 
97 ; Student, Sorbonne and College de France, 1897-98 ; Fellow in Romance 
Languages, Bryn Mawr College, 1898-99 ; Graduate Scholar and Fellow by 



23 

Courtesy in Romance Languages, Bryn Mawr College, 1899-1900, 1901-02 ; 
Student in Romance Languages, Madrid, Spain, 1900-01 ; Instructor in 
Spanish and French, Smith College, 1902-06, and Associate Professor, 
1906-10. 

Breed, Mary Bidwell, Read Hall, Columbia, Mo. 

Holder of the Bryn Mawr European Fellowship, 1894-95. A.B., Bryn Mawr 
College, 1894, group, Chemistry and Biology, A.M., 1895, and Ph.D., 1901, 
subjects, Chemistry and Mathematics. Graduate Student, and Assistant 
in the Chemical Laboratory, Bryn Mawr College, 1894-95 ; Student in 
Chemistry, University of Heidelberg, 1895-96 ; Professor of Science, Penn- 
sylvania College for Women, 1897-99 ; Fellow by Courtesy and Graduate 
Scholar in Mathematics, Physics, and Chemistry, Bryn Mawr College, 
1899-1901 ; Dean of Women and Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Indiana 
University, Bloomington, Ind., 1901-06 ; Adviser of Women, University 
of Missouri, 1906-10. , 

Brooks, Harriet, 990 Cote St. Luc Road, Montreal, Canada 

Holder of the President's European Fellowship. 1902-03. A.B., McGill Uni 
versify, 1898, and A.M., 1901. Graduate Student, McGill University, 1898 
99 ; Tutor in Mathematics, and Research Student in Physics, Royal Vic 
toria College, 1899-1901 : Fellow in Physics, Bryn Mawr College, 1901-02 . 
Student, University of Cambridge, England, 1902-03 ; Lecturer in Mathe- 
matics, Royal Victoria College of McGill University, Montreal, 1903-04 
Tutor in Physics, Barnard College, 1904-06 ; Research Student, Sorbonne, 
1906-07. 

Married, 1907, Mr. Frank H. Pitcher. 

Bbownell, Louise Sheffield, Clinton, N. Y. 

Holder of the Bryn Mawr European Fellowship, 1893-94. A.B., Bryn Mawr 
College, 1893, group, Greek and Latin. Student in Greek and English, 
University of Oxford, England, and University of Leipsic, 1893-94 ; Grad- 
uate Student in Greek, Columbia College, 1894-95, and Graduate Student 
in English, 1895-96 ; Graduate Student in Greek and English, Bryn Mawr 
College, 1896-97 ; Warden of Sage College, and Lecturer in English Litera- 
ture, Cornell University, 1897-1900 ; Associate Head of the Balliol School, 
Utica, N. Y., 1900-05; Private Tutor, 1905-10. 

Married, 1900, Mr. Arthur Percy Saunders. 

Cady, Mary Louise, Decatur, Ga. 

Holder of the Mary E. Garrett European Fellowship, 1906-07. A.B. and A.M., 
Radcliffe College, 1904. Graduate Scholar in Greek. Bryn Mawr College, 
1904-05 ; Fellow in Greek, Bryn Mawr College, 1905-06 ; Student, University 
of Berlin, 1906-07 ; Teacher in the Agnes Scott College, Decatur, Ga., 
1907-08, and Professor of Greek, 1908-10. 

Claflin, Edith Frances, Felton Hall, Cambridge, Mass. 

Holder of the Mary E. Garrett European Fellowship. 1899-1900. A.B., 
Radcliffe College, 1897 : Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College, 1906, subjects, Greek 
and Latin. Graduate Scholar in Greek and Latin, Bryn Mawr College, 
1897-98, and Graduate Student, 1898-99 ; Student at the American School 
of Classical Studies, Athens, 1899-1900 ; Private Research Work, Harvard 
University Library, 1900-01 ; Instructor in Literature in the Prospect Hill 
School. Greenfield, Mass., 1901-02. and in Classics and Classical History, 
1902-07 ; Instructor in Greek and Latin and Lecturer in Ancient History in 
Monticello Seminary, Godfrey, 111., 1907-10. 

Coulter, Cornelia Catlin, See page 15. 

Holder of the President's European Fellowship, 1908-09. - 

Ellis, Ellen Deborah, 

Mt. Holyoke College, Soutb Hadley, Mass. 

Holder of the Bryn Mawr European Fellowship, 1901-02. A.B., Bryn Mawr 
College, 1901, group, History and Political Science, A.M., 1902, and Ph.D., 
1905, subjects, Economics and Politics and History. Graduate Student, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1901-02, 1903-04 ; Fellow in Economics and Politics, 
1904-05 ; Student, University of Leipsic, 1902-03 ; Instructor in History, 
Mt. Holyoke College, 1905-08 : Associate Professor and Acting Head of the 
Department of History, 1908-09 ; Associate Professor and Head of the 
Department of Pure Economics and Political Science, 1909-10. 



23 

Emeby, Annie Crosby, 163 George Street, Providence, R. I. 

Holder of the Bryn Mawr European Fellowship, 1892-93. A.B., Bryn Mawr 
College, 1892, group, Greek and Latin, and Ph.D., 1896, subjects, Latin and 
Greek. Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1892-93 ; Student, University 
of Leipsic, 1893-94 ; Secretary to the President, and Graduate Student, 
Bryn Mawr College, Second Semester, 1894-95, and 1895-96 ; Dean of Women 
and Assistant Professor of Classical Philology, University of Wisconsin, 
1897-1900 ; Dean of the Women's College in Brown University, 1900-05 ; 
Alumnae Member of the Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College, 1906-09. 

Married, 1905, Professor Francis Oreenleaf Allinson. 

Fleisheb, Eleanob Louie, 1715 Spruce Street, Philadelphia. 

Holder of the Bryn Mawr European Fellowship, 1903-04. A.B., Bryn Mawr 
College, 1903, group, English and German. Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr 
College, 1903-04 ; Chairman of Executive Committee, Neighbors' Guild, 1904- 
06 ; Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1906-07. 

Married, 1908, Dr. David Riesman. 

Giles, Ellen Rose, 87 Via Roma, Sassari, Sardinia, Ita]y. 

Holder of the President's European Fellowship, 1897-98. A.B., and A.M., 
Bryn Mawr College, 1896, group, Greek and Semitic Languages. Graduate 
Scholar in Semitic Languages, Bryn Mawr College, 1896-97, and Graduate 
Scholar in Philosophy, 1897-98 ; Student in Philosophy, University of 
Berlin, 1S98-99, and Sorbonne, 1899 ; Private Tutor, 1899-1901 ; Editorial 
and Journalistic Work, 1901-06. 

Halt,, Edith Haywabd, Woodstock, Conn. 

Holder of the Mary E. Garrett European Fellowship, 1903-04. A.B., Smith 
College, 1899 ; Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College, 1908. Subjects, Archaeology and 
Greek. Teacher of Greek and History in Woodstock Academy, Woodstock, 
Vt., 1899-1900 ; Teacher of Latin and Greek in the Misses Shipley's School, 
Bryn Mawr, Pa., 1900-01 and 1905-09 ; Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr 
College, 1900-01, 1905-09, and Graduate Scholar, 1901-03 ; Holder 
of the Agnes Hoppin Memorial Fellowship and Student at the American 
School of Classical Studies, Athens, 1903-05. Lecturer in Archaeology, 
Mount Holyoke College, Second Semester, 1908-09, and First Semester, 
1909-10 ; Member of Expedition of the American School of Classical Studies, 
Athens to Eastern Crete, 1910. 

Hamilton, Edith, 1312 Park Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Holder of the Mary E. Garrett European Fellowship, 1895-96. A.B. and A.M., 
Bryn Mawr College, 1894, group, Greek and Latin. Fellow in Latin, Bryn 
Mawr College, 1894-95 ; Student, Universities of Leipsic and Munich, 1895- 
96 ; Head Mistress of the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore, 1896-1910. 

Hamilton, Mabgabet, 1312 Park Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Holder of the Bryn Mawr European Fellowship, 1897-98. A.B., Bryn Mawr 
College, 1897, group, Chemistry and Biology. Sorbonne, 1898-99 ; Teacher 
of Science, Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore, 1900-10. 

Habdy, Coba, 105 East 19th Street, New York City. 

Holder of the Bryn Mawr European Fellowship, 1899-1900. A.B., Bryn 
Mawr College, 1899, group, Latin and French. Student at the Sorbonne, 
College de France and University of Oxford, 1899-1900 ; Teacher of Greek 
and English in Ward Seminary, Nashville, Tenn., and Graduate Student, 
Vanderbilt University, 1902-03 ; Teacher of English and Literature in St. 
Timothy's School, Catonsville, Md., 1903-06. 

Married, 1906, Mr. Edwin Seton Jarrett. 

Haemon, Estheb, 322 Batavia Street, Toledo, O. 

Holder of the President's European Fellowship, 1907-08. A.B., University 
of Michigan, 1900. Graduate Scholar in Teutonic Philolosrv, Brvn Mawr 
College, 1906-07 : Student, University of Berlin, 1907-08 ; Fellow in 
German, Bryn Mawr College, 1908-09 : Ottendorfor Memorial Research 
Fellow in Teutonic Philology, and Student, University of Munich, 1909-10. 



24 



Hill, Virginia Gbeeb, 3419 Hamilton Street, Philadelphia. 

Holder of the Bryn Mawr European Fellowship, 1907-08. A.B., Bryn Mawr 
College, 1907, group, Latin and Mathematics. Student, University of 
Zurich, 1907-08 ; Teacher of Latin and Mathematics in the Agnes Irwin 
School, Philadelphia, 1908-10. 

Laird, Elizabeth Rebecca, 

Mt. Holyoke College, South Hadley, Mass. 

Holder of the President's European Fellowship, 189S-99. A.B., University of 
Toronto, 1896 ; Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College, 1901, subjects, Physics and 
Mathematics. Teacher in Ontario Ladies' College, 1896-97 ; Fellow in 
Physics, Bryn Mawr College, 1897-98 ; Student, University of Berlin, 1898- 
99 ; Graduate Scholar and Fellow by Courtesy in Mathematics and Physics, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1900-01 ; Instructor in Physics, Mount Holyoke Col- 
lege, 1901-03, Acting Head of the Department of Physics, 1903-04, and 
Professor of Physics, 1904-10. 

Langenbeck, Claea, The Nelson, Walnut Hills, Cincinnati, O. 

Holder of the President's European Fellowship, 1896-97. Ph.G., Cincinnati 
College of Pharmacy, 1890; S.B., University of Cincinnati, 1S95. Fellow in 
Biology, Bryn Mawr College, 1895-96 ; Student, University of Marburg, 
1896-98 ; Professor of Biology, Wells College, 1898-1901 ; Instructor In the 

• Cincinnati College Preparatory Scnool for Girls, 1901-06. 

Leftwich, Florence, . Biltmore, N. C. 

Holder of the Bryn Mawr European Fellowship, 1895-96. Wellesley College, 
1884-85. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1895, group, Greek and Latin, and 
Ph.D., 1906, subjects, Old French, Latin, and Spanish. Student, Sorbonne 
and College de France, 1895-96 ; Mistress of Modern Languages, Mississippi 
Industrial Institute and College, Columbus, Miss., 1896-98 ; Fellow by 
Courtesy in Romance Languages, Bryn Mawr College, 1898-99 ; Holder of 
the European Fellowship of the Baltimore Association for the Promotion 
of the University Education of Women, and Student, University of Zurich, 
1899-1900 ; Teacher of French in the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore, Md., 
1900-01 ; Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1902 ; Fellow in Romance 
Languages, Bryn Mawr College, 1902-03. 

Married, 1903, Mr. 8. Prioleau Ravenel. 

Lewis, Floeence Paethenia, Austin, Tex. 

Holder of the President's European Fellowship, 1899-1900. A.B., University 
of Texas, 1897, and A.M., 1898. Fellow in Philosophy, Bryn Mawr College, 
1898-99 ; Student. Sorbonne and College de France, 1899-1900 : Teacher in 
the University Preparatory School, Austin, 1900-02 ; Student, University of 
Texas, 1901-03 : Tutor in Mathematics, University of Texas. 1902-05 ; Fel- 
low of the Baltimore Association for the Promotion of the University Edu- 
cation of Women and Graduate Student, Johns Hopkins University, 1907-09. 

Lewis, Mayone, 4324 Pine Street, Philadelphia. 

Holder of the ,Bryn Mawr European Fellowship, 190S-09. A.B., Bryn Mawr 
College, 1908. Student. Universities of Munich and Paris, 1908-09 ; Teacher 
of Greek and Latin and Tutor in Latin and French, Rosemary Hall, Green- 
wich, Conn., 1909-10. 

Lowengbund, Helen Moss, . . . 1827 North 18th Street, Philadelphia. 

Holder of the Bryn Mawr European Fellowship, 1906-07. A.B., Bryn Mawr 
College, 1906, group, Latin and English, and A.M., 1907. Graduate 
Scholar in Latin, Bryn Mawr College, 1906-07 ;• Graduate Scholar in Eng- 
lish, 1907-08, and Graduate Student in English, 1909-10 ; Teacher of His- 
tory in the Girls' High School, Philadelphia, 1908-10. 

Maddison, Isabel, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Holder of the Mary E. Garrett European Fellowship, 1894-95. University 
College of South Wales and Monmouthshire, 1885-89 ; Girton College, Uni- 
versity of Cambridge, England, 1889-92 ; Mathematical Tripos, First Class, 
1892 ; Oxford Mathematical Final Honour School, 1892 ; B.Sc, University 
of London, Mathematical Honours, 1893 ; Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College, 1896, 
subjects, Mathematics, Applied Mathematics and Physics ; A.B., Trinity 
College, Dublin, 1905. Graduate Student in Mathematics, Bryn Mawr 
College, 1892-93, and Fellow in Mathematics, 1893-94 ; Student in Mathe- 



25 



matics. University of GGttingen, 1894-95 ; Assistant Secretary to the Presi- 
dent, Bryn Mawr College, 1895-96 ; Secretary to the President, and Reader 
in Mathematics, 1896-1904 ; Assistant to the President, and Reader in 
Mathematics, 1904-06, and Assistant to the President and Associate in 
Mathematics, 1906-10. 

Martin, Emtlie Norton, 

Mt. Holyoke College, South Hadley, Mass. 

Holder of the Mary E. Garrett European Fellowship, 1897-98. A.B., Bryn 
Mawr College, 1894, group, Latin and Mathematics, and Ph.D., 1901, sub- 
jects, Mathematics and Physics. Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, First 
Semester. 1894-95, 1896-97, 1901-02 ; Teacher of Latin in the Bryn Mawr 
School, Baltimore. Md., January-June, 1895 ; Fellow in Mathematics, Bryn 
Mawr College, 1895-96 ; Student, University of Gottingen, 1897-98 ; Fellow 
by Courtesy in Mathematics, Bryn Mawr College, 1898-99 ; Teacher of 
Mathematics in the Misses Kirk's School, Rosemont, Pa., 1899-1900, and 
Private Tutor, 1899-1902 ; Private Tutor, 1902-03 ; Instructor in Mathe- 
matics, Mt. Holyoke College, 1903-04, First Semester. 1904-05, 1907-10; 
Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, and Private Tutor, 1906-07. 

Morse, Kate Niles, 24 Park Street, Haverhill, Mass. 

Holder of the Mary E. Garrett European Fellowship. 1901-02. A.B., Mt. 
Holyoke College, 1898, and A.M., 1900. Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr 
College, 1898-99 ; Fellow in Greek, Bryn Mawr College. 1900-01 : University 
of Berlin, and American School of Classical Studies, Athens, 1901-02 ; Grad- 
uate Student, Radcliffe College, 1903, 1906-07. 

Nichols, Helen Hawlet, 

1424 Morse Avenue, Rogers Park, Chicago. III. 

Holder of the Mary E. Garrett European Fellowship, 1908-09. A.B., Marietta 
College, 1906. Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College. 1906-07, and 
Graduate Scholar in Semitic Languages, 1907-0S, 1909-10 ; Student. Univer- 
sity of Oxford, 190S-09. 

Nowlin, Nadine, 42 The Lorraine, Kansas City, Mo. 

Holder of the President's European Fellowship, 1906-07. A.B. and A.M., 
University of Kansas, 1903. Fellow in Biology, Bryn Mawr College, 1905- 
06 ; Demonstrator in Biology, University of Kansas, 1906-08 ; Graduate 
Student, University of Munich, 1908-09. 

Park, Marion Edwards, Oberlin, O. 

Holder of the Bryn Mawr European Fellowship, 1898-99. A.B., Bryn Mawr 
College, 1898. group, Greek and English, and A.M., 1899. Graduate Stu- 
dent, Bryn Mawr College, 1898-99 ; Graduate Student, Autumn Quarter, 
University of Chicago. 1900-01 ; American School of Classical Studies, 
Athens. Greece, 1901-02 ; Instructor in Classics, Colorado College, 1902- 
03, 1904-06, and Acting Dean of Women, 1903-04 ; Teacher of English 
in Miss Wheeler's School, Providence, R. I., 1906-07, and of Classics, 
1907-10. 

Parris, Marion, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Holder of Bryn Mawr College Research Fellowship, 1906-07. A.B.. Bryn 
M.iwr College, 1901, and Ph.D., 1909. Subjects. Economics and Politics 
and Philosophy. Private Tutor, 1901-02 : Warden of Summit Grove. Brvn 
Mawr College. 1902-04. and of Rockefeller Hall, 1904-05 : Graduate Stu- 
dent, Bryn Mawr College, 1902-05; Fellow in Economics. Bryn Mawr Col- 
lego, 1905-06: Student. University of Vienna. 1906-07: Reader in Eco- 
nomics and Politics, Bryn Mawr College, 1907-08, and Associate in Eco- 
nomics and Politics, 1908-10. 

Peebles, Florence, See page 19. 

Holder of the Mary E. Garrett European Fellowship, 1898-99. 

Perkins, Elizabeth Mary, ...1355 Irving Street, Washington, D. C. 

Holder of the Bryn Mawr European Fellowship. 1900-01. A.B.. Bryn Mawr 
College, 1900, group. Greek and Latin, and Ph.D., 1904. subjects, Latin 
and Greek. Graduate Student. Bryn Mawr College, 1900^01 ; Student, 
Universities of Berlin and Munich, 1901-02: Fellow in Latin. Bryn Mawr 



26 



College, 1902-03 ; Teacher of Latin and German in the Western High 
School, Washington, 1903-04, of Latin, 1904-05, and of Greek and Latin, 
1905-06 ; Instructor in Latin, Vassar College, 1906-07 ; Graduate Student, 
Columbia University, 1907-08. Tutor in Latin, High School Department, 
Normal College, New York City, 1907-10 ; on leave of absence, 1909-10. 

Ragsdale, Virginia, Jamestown, N. C. 

Holder of the Bryn Mawr European Fellowship, 1896-97. S.B., Guilford 
College, 1892. Graduate Scholar in Mathematics, Bryn Mawr College, 
1892-93, and Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1893-97. A.B., 
Bryn Mawr College, 1896, group, Mathematics and Physics, Ph.D., 1906, 
subjects, Mathematics and Physics. Assistant Demonstrator in Physics, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1896-97 ; Student, University of Gottingen, 1897-98 ; 
Teacher of Science and Mathematics in the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore, 
Md., 1898-1900, and Assistant Teacher of Mathematics, 1900-01 ; Holder 
of Fellowship of the Baltimore Association for the Promotion of the Uni- 
versity Education of Women, Graduate Scholar, and Fellow by Courtesy 
in Mathematics, Bryn Mawr College, 1901-02 ; Fellow in Mathematics, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1902-03 ; Teacher of Mathematics in Dr. J. Sachs's 
School for Girls, New York City, 1903-05 ; Teacher of Mathematics in the 
Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., 1906-10, and Reader in Mathematics, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1908-10. 

Reimee, Marie, East Aurora, N. Y. 

Holder of the Mary E. Garrett European Fellowship, 1902-03. A.B., Vassar 
College, 1897, and Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College, 1903, subjects, Chemistry 
and Physiology. Graduate Scholar in Chemistry, Vassar College, 1897-98 ; 
Assistant in the Chemical Laboratory, Vassar College, 1898-99 ; B'ellow in 
Chemistry, Bryn Mawr College, 1899-1900, 1901-02 ; Graduate Scholar, and 
Fellow by Courtesy in Chemistry, Bryn Mawr College, 1900-01 ; Student, 
University of Berlin, 1902-03 ; Lecturer in Chemistry, Barnard College, 
1903-04, Instructor in Chemistry, 1904-09, and Adjunct Professor of 
Chemistry, 1909-10. 

Sampson, Lilian Vattghan, . . 409 West 117th Street, New York City. 

Holder of the Bryn Mawr European Fellowship, 1891-92. A.B., Bryn Mawr 
College, 1891, group, Mathematics and Physics, and A.M., 1894. Student, 
University of Zurich, 1892-93 ; Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 
1891-92, and 1893-99 ; Research Work in Biology, 1904-06. 

Married, 1904, Professor Thomas Hunt Morgan. 

Schaefeer, Helen Elizabeth, Roberts Road, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Holder of the Mary E. Garrett European Fellowship, 1905-06. A.B., Dickin- 
son College, 1903, A.M., 1905, and Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College, 1908, subjects, 
Physics, Pure and Applied Mathematics. Graduate Scholar in Mathema- 
tics, Bryn Mawr College, 1903-04, and Graduate Student in Physics, 1907- 
10 ; Fellow in Physics, Bryn Mawr College, 1904-05 ; Student. University of 
G5ttingen, 1905-06 ; Demonstrator in Physics, Bryn Mawr College, 1906-07 ; 
Teacher in the Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., 1907-08 ; Reader in 
Mathematics, Bryn Mawr College, Second Semester, 1909-10. 

Married, 1908, Dr. William Bashford Huff. 

Schmidt, Gertrud Charlotte, 

631 Montgomery Avenue, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Holder of the President's European Fellowship, 1904-05. B.L.. University of 
Wisconsin, 1900. Graduate Student, Radcliffe College, 1900-01, 1902-03 ; 
A.M., Radcliffe College, 1903 ; Assistant in German, Smith College, 1901- 
02 ; Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1903-05, 1906-09 : Teacher of 
German in Miss Wright's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., 1903-05, 1906-10 ; Stu- 
dent, University of Leipsic, 1905-06, University of Grenoble, Summer, 1905. 

Shearer, Edna Aston, 5641 Cedar Avenue, Philadelphia. 

Holder of the President's European Fellowship, 1905-06. A.B., Bryn Mawr 
College, 1904, group, English and Philosophy. Junior Fellow in Philosophy, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1904-05 ; Student, Universities of Edinburgh and 
Aberdeen, 1905-06 ; Fellow in Philosophy, Bryn Mawr College, 1906-07 ; 
Teacher of English in the Baldwin School. Bryn Mawr, Pa., 1907-10, and 
Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1907-08, 1909-10. 



27 



Shields, Emily Ledyard, . . . .1902 West 6th Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Holder of the Bryn Mawr European Fellowship, 1905-06. A.B., Bryn Mawr 
College, 1905, group, Greek and Mathematics, and A.M., 1906. Graduate 
Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1905-06 ; Recording Secretary and Appoint- 
ment Secretary, Bryn Mawr College, 1906-07 ; Student, University of 
Oxford, and University of Berlin, 1907-08 ; Teacher in the Bryn Mawr 
School, Baltimore, Md., 1909-10. 

Shipley, Katharine Morris, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Holder of the Bryn Mawr European Fellowship, 1890-91. A.B., Bryn Mawr 
College, 1890, group, Latin and English. Student in Latin and English, 
University of Leipsic, 1890-91 ; Sorhonne and College de France, 1891-92 ; 
Newnham College, University of Cambridge, England, May Term, 1892 ; 
Associate Principal and Supervisor of English in the Misses Shipley s 
School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., 1894-1910. 

Stevens, Nettie Maria, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Holder of the President's European Fellowship, 1901-02. A.B., Leland 
Stanford, Jr., University, 1S99, and A.M., 1900, Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College, 
1903, subjects, Morphology and Physiology. Student in the Hopkins Sea- 
side Laboratory, Pacific Grove, Cal., summers, 1897, 1S98, and 1899 ; 
Graduate Scholar in Biology, Bryn Mawr College, 1900-01 ; Student, Zoo- 
logical Station, Naples, 1901-02, March to May, 1909, University of 
Wiirzburg, 1902, Fellow in Biology, Bryn Mawr College, 1902-03 ; Research 
Fellow in Biology, Bryn Mawr College, First Semester, 1903-04 ; Reader in 
Experimental Morphology, Bryn Mawr College, 1904-05, and Associate in 
Experimental Morphology, 1905-10 ; Carnegie Research Assistant, 1904-06 ; 
Alice Freeman Palmer Research Fellow and Student, University of Wiirz- 
burg, on leave of absence, 1908-09. 

Stites, Sara Henry, Wyoming, Pa. 

Holder of the President's European Fellowship, 1900-01. A.B., Bryn Mawr 
College, 1899, group, History and Political Science, A.M., 1900, and Ph.D., 
1905, subjects, Economics and Politics and History. Graduate Scholar in 
History and Political Science, Bryn Mawr College, 1899-1900 ; Student at 
the Sorbonne and College de France, 1900-01 ; University of Leipsic, 1901- 
02 ; Graduate Scholar and Fellow by Courtesy in Political Science, Bryn 
Mawr College, 1902-04 ; Co-Principal of the Wilkes Barre Institute, Wilkcs- 
Barre, Pa., 1904-10. 

Traver, Hope, Hartford, Conn. 

Holder of the Mary E. Garrett European Fellowship, 1904-05. A.B., Vassar 
College, 1896 ; Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College, 1907, subjects, English and 
History. Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, and Private Tutor, 
Whitford, Pa., 1901-02 ; Graduate Scholar, Bryn Mawr College, and Teacher 
of English in Miss Wright's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., 1902-03 ; Fellow in 
English, Bryn Mawr College, 1903-04 ; Student, University of Munich, 
1904-05, and First Semester, 1905-06; Graduate Scholar and Fellow by 
Courtesy, Bryn Mawr College, Second Semester, 1905-00 ; Teacher of 
English in Huntington Hall, Los Angeles, Cal., 1906-09. 

Wade, Clara Louise Whipple, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Holder of the Bryn Mawr European Fellowship, 1904-05. A.B., Bryn Mawr 
College, 1904, group, Greek and Latin. Scholar in Latin, Bryn Mawr 
College and Private Tutor, 1904-05 ; Student, University of Munich, 1905- 
06 ; Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College and Private Tutor, 1906-09 ; 
Teacher of Latin and German in the Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, 
Pa., 1907-10. 

Warren, Winifred, 805 Comstock Avenue, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Holder of the Mary E. Garrett European Fellowship, 1896-97. A.B., Boston 
University, 1891, and A.M., 1894 ; Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College, 1S9S. sub- 
jects. Greek and Latin. Fellow in Latin, Bryn Mawr College, 1893-94, 
and Fellow by Courtesy in Latin, 1894-96 ; Student in Classical Philology, 
Universities of Munich and Berlin, 1896-97 ; Instructor in Latin, Vassar 
College, 1897-1902. 

Married, 1902, Mr. George Arthur Wilson. 

Weusthoff, Anna Sophie, See page 21. 

Holder of Special Ottendorfer Memorial Research Fellowship in Teutonic 
Philology, 1907-08, and of Ottendorfer Memorial Fellowship in Teutonic 
Philology, 1908-09. 



28 



Former Resident Fellows. 

Albert, Grace, The Students' Inn, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Fellow in History, 1903-04. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1897, group, Greek 
and Latin, and A.M., 1903. Private Tutor, 1897-99 ; Teacher of Latin 
in the Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., 1899-1901, of History, 
1905-06, and Secretary, 1901-02 ; Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 
1901-02, and 1904-08 ; Graduate Scholar in History and Economics and 
Politics, 1902-03 ; Fellow in History and Student, University of London, 
engaged in research work in the Public Records Office, London, and in the 
University of Oxford, 1903-04 ; Head of Department of History in the 
Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, 1906-10. 

Atkinson, Mabel, ..26 Denning Road, Hampstead, London, England. 

Fellow in Economics and Politics, 1902-03. A.M., Glasgow University, 1900. 
Holder of Research Studentship, London School of Economics, 1900-02 ; 
Classical Mistress, High School, Newcastle, England, 1903-04 ; Lecturer in 
Philosophy and Assistant to the Professor of Classics, Armstrong College, 
University of Durham, 1904-08 ; Member of the Board of Faculties, Uni- 
versity of Durham, 1905-07 ; Honorary Secretary, Settlement Association, 
Newcastle-on-Tyne, 1906-07 ; Lecturer in Economics, King's College, Lon- 
don, 1908-09. 

Aven, Anna Ward, Clinton, Miss. 

Fellow in Latin, 1908-09. A.B., Mississippi College, 1905. Graduate Student 
in Greek and Latin, Bryn Mawr College, 1906-07, and Graduate Scholar in 
Latin, 1907-08. 

Baker, Mabel Whitman, . . . 3100 Newark Street, Washington, D. C. 

Fellow in Latin, 1896-97. Columbian University, 1893-95 ; Teacher in Nor- 
wood Institute, Washington, 1895-96 ; Teacher of Latin in the Western 
High School, 'Washington, 1897-1903. 

Married, 1903, Mr. Alfred Eulse Brooks. 

Bancroft, Jane M West Stockbridge, Mass. 

Fellow in History, 1885-86. Ph.B., Syracuse University, 1877, Ph.M., 1880, 
and Ph.D., 1884. Professor of French Language arid Literature, North- 
western University, 1877-85 ; University of Zurich, 1886-87 ; Sorbonne and 
College de France, 1888. 

Married, 1891, Mr. George O. Robinson. 

Bartlett, Helen, 

Care of American Express Co., 5 and 6 Haymarket, London, England. 

Fellow in English, 1893-94. Newnham College, University of Cambridge, 
England, 1889 ; studied in Berlin, 1882-84, and 1890. A.B., Bryn Mawr 
College, 1892, group, English and German, A.M., 1893, and Ph.D., 1896, 
subjects, English and German. Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 
1892-93, 1894-95 ; Holder of the American Fellowship of the Associa- 
tion of Collegiate Alumnae, 1894-95 ; Instructor in German and. French 
in the Portland Academy, Portland, Ore., 1896-97 ; Dean of Women, 
Head of the Modern Language Department and Assistant Professor of 
German in the Bradley Polytechnic Institute, Peoria, 111., 1897-1904, Dean 
of Women, Head of the Modern Language Department, and Professor of 
German, 1904-09 ; Student, University of Berlin, 1905 ; Traveling in 
Europe on leave of absence, 1907-09. 

de Beauregard, Esther Tontant, 117 Collier Street, Toronto, Canada. 

Fellow in Romance Languages. 1894-95. A.B., University of Toronto, 1894 ; 
Ontario Normal College, 1895-96 ; Teacher of Modern Languages, Niagara 
Falls Collegiate Institute, 1897-1900 ; Graduate Student in English, Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, 1900-01 ; Teacher of English and French in Mrs. 
Chapman and Miss Jones's School, Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia, 1900-05. 

Married, 1905, Mr. Percy James Robinson. 

Beckwith, Minnie Ada, 30 Home Street, New London, Conn. 

Fellow in Latin, 1903-04. A.B., University of Chicago, 1902. Graduate 
Scholar, University of Chicago, 1902-03 ; Teacher of Latin and Greek in Miss 
Florence Baldwin's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., 1904-10 ; Graduate Student, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1907-08. 



29 

Benneson, Cora Agnes, 4 Mason Street, Cambridge, Mass. 

Fellow in History, 1887-88. A.B., University of Michigan, 1878, LLB., 
1880, and A.M., 1883. Graduate Student, Radcliffe College, 1897-1902; 
Attorney and Counsellor-at-Law, Cambridge, 1894-1909 ; Special Commis- 
sioner in Massachusetts, 1895-1910. 

Blake, Sue Avis, Merion, Pa. 

Fellow in Physics. 1906-07. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1898, group, Mathema- 
tics and Physics, and A.M., 1900. Demonstrator and Graduate Student in 
Physics, Bryn Mawr College, 1898-99, 1904-06 : Graduate Student, Bryn 
Mawr College, and Teacher of Mathematics and Science in the Misses Ship- 
ley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., 1899-1900 ; Assistant in Physics, Smith Col- 
lege, 1900-02, 1903-04 ; Fellow in Physics, University of Pennsylvania, 
1907-08 ; Private Tutor, 1909-10. 

Blanchard, Elizabeth Miller, Bellefonte, Pa. 

Fellow in Mathematics. 1889-90. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1889, group, Greek 
and Mathematics. Teacher of Mathematics in the Bryn Mawr School, Balti- 
more, Md., 1891-92 ; Teacher of Mathematics in the Misses Shipley's 
School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., 1895-1908, and in Miss Irwin's School, Philadel- 
phia. 1896-1908 : Graduate Student. Brvn Mawr College, 1902-03 ; Assist- 
ant Manager of the Bellefonte Basket Shop, 1908-10. 

Boring, Alice Middleton, See page 21. 

Fellow in Biology, 1906-07. 

Bourland, Caroline Brown, See page 21. 

Fellow in Romance Languages, 1898-99. 

Bramhall, Edith Clementine, 

213 East 6th Street, Michigan City, Ind. 

Fellow in History, 1898-99. A.B., University of Indiana, 1S95 ; A.M., Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, 1896. and Ph.D., 1898 ; Teacher of History in 
the Manual Training High School, Indianapolis. Ind., 1899-1900 ; In- 
structor in History and Economics, Rockford College, 1900-02, and Pro- 
fessor, 1902-10. 

Brombacher, Caroline Garnar, 

177 Woodruff Avenue, Brooklyn, New York City. 

Fellow in Greek, 1896-97. A.B., Barnard College, 1895. Assistant Teacher 
of Mathematics and Latin in the Erasmus Hall Hish School. Brooklyn, 
1897-99. of Mathematics and Greek. 1899-1901, and" of Greek. 1901-06; 
Graduate Student, Columbia University, 1903-04. 

Married, 1906, Mr. Sidney O. Stacey. 

Brooks. Harriet See page 22. 

Fellow in Physics, 1901-02. 

Brownell, Jane Louise, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Fellow in Political Science. 1893-94. A.B.. Bryn Mawr College, 1893, group, 
History and Political Science, and A.M.. 1894. Teacher of Mathematics in 
the Bryn Mawr School. Baltimore, Md., 1894-1902, and Associate Mis- 
tress, 1897-1902 ; Associate Principal of Miss Florence Baldwin's School, 
Bryn Mawr, 1902-06 ; Head of the Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr. 1906-10. 

Burnley, Mary Cloyd, 1029 Grove Street, Evanston, 111. 

Fellow in Chemistry. 1897-98. A.B.. Woman's College of Baltimore. 1897. 
and A.M., 1899. Assistant in Chemistry, Vassar College, 1898-1900. and 
Instructor in Chemistry, 1900-1908 ; Research Fellow in Chemistry, Bryn 
Mawr College, 1908, 1908-09. 

Married, 1909, The Rev. James Madison SUfler. 

Byrnes, Esther Fussell, 

lO^ Jefferson Avenue, Brooklyn, New York City. 

Fellow in Biology. 1894-95. A.B.. Bryn Mawr College. 1891. group. Chem- 
istry and Biology. A.M.. 1894. and Ph.D., 1898. subjects. Morphology and 
Physiology. Assistant in Biological Laboratory, Vassar College, 1891-93; 



30 

Graduate Scholar in Biology, Bryn Mawr College, 1893-94 ; Graduate Stu- 
dent in Biology, 1895-97 ; Teacher of Physiology and Zoology in the Girls' 
High School, Brooklyn, New York City, 1897-1908 ; Fellow of the New 
York Academy of Science ; Chairman of the Section of Biology of the New 
York State Science Teachers' Association, 1906. 

Cady, Mary Louise, See page 22. 

Fellow in Greek, 1905-06. 

Cam, Helen Maud, Astell House, Cheltenham, England. 

Fellow in History, 190S-09. B.A., University of London, 1908, and M.A., 
1909. Royal Holloway College, 1904-07. Assistant Mistress, Cheltenham 
Ladies' College, 1909-10. 

Chamberlain, Ethel Mary, . .915 North Broad Street, Galesburg, 111. 

Fellow in Philosophy, 1908-09. A.B., Lombard College, 1906. Graduate 
Scholar, University of Chicago, 1907-08, and Fellow in Psychology, 1909-10. 

Clark, Mabel Parker 145 West 78th Street, New York City. 

Fellow in English, 1889-90. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1889, group, Greek 
and English, and A.M., 1890. Reader in English, and Graduate Student, 
1890-93; Graduate Student, Barnard College, 1893-94. 

Married, 1894, Dr. John Henry Uuddleston. 

Clarke, Mary Patterson, 721 Illinois Street, Lawrence, Kan. 

Fellow in History, 1906-07. A.B., University of Kansas, 1903, and A.M., 
1905. Graduate Student, University of Kansas, 1904-05, and Fellow in 
History, 1905-06 ; Principal and Teacher of History in the High School, 
Carterville, Mo., 1907-08. 

Clough, Ida Prescott, 37 Cedar Street, Somerville, Mass. 

Fellow in Latin, 1900-01. A.B., Radcliffe -College, 1896, and A.M., 1900. 
Graduate Student, Radcliffe College, 1899-1900 ; University of Berlin, 
1901-02. 

Cole, Anna Lewis, 

Care of Mrs. J. Patton, Kate Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Fellow in Romance Languages, 1895-96. A.B., Woman's College of Baltimore, 
1892, and A.M., 1894. Student in English and French, Sorbonne, 1894-95 ; 
Head Teacher of Modern Languages, Winthrop Normal and Industrial Col- 
lege, Rock Hill, S. C, 1897-1903, 1904-05 ; Fellow in Romance Languages, 
University of Chicago, 1903-04 ; Head of French Department, Friends' Cen- 
tral School, Philadelphia, 1905-07 ; Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr Col- 
lege and University of Pennsylvania, 1906-07 ; Teacher of French in Sweet 
Briar College, Sweet Briar, Va., 1907-08, and Head of French Depart- 
ment, 1908-10. 

Colin, Therese F., Wellesley College, Wellesley, Mass. 

Fellow in Romance Languages, 1893-94. Diplomee et agregee, College de Neu- 
chatel, 1875 ; A.M., Leland Stanford, Jr.. University, 1893 ; Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania, 1897; Officier de l'lnstruction Publique, Paris, 1906; 
Museum d'Histoire Naturelle, Paris, 1883-85 ; University of the City of 
New York, 1887-88 ; Reader in Romance Languages, and Graduate Student, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1894-96 ; Student in Romance Philology and Literature, 
Sorbonne, College de France, Ecole des Hautes Etudes, Ecole des Chartes, 
Paris, 1895 ; Head of French Department in Miss Florence Baldwin's 
School, Bryn Mawr, Pa.. 1896-1904 ; Associate Professor of French, Welles- 
ley College, 1904-06, Professor-Elect, 1906-07, and Professor of French Lan- 
guage and Literature, 1907-10, and Head of the Department of French, 
1905-10. 

Married, , Mr. Alfred Colin. 

Cooper, Elva, 942 Winchester Street, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Fellow in Mathematics, 1907-08. A.B., University of Wisconsin. 1904, and 
A.M., 1906. Student in Mathematics, University of Wisconsin, 1905-06 ; 
Graduate Scholar in Mathematics, University of Wisconsin, and Teacher 
of Mathematics, 1906-07. Instructor in Mathematics, University of Wash- 
ington, 1908-09. 



31 

Cummings, Louise D., 

256 Main Street, East, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. 

Fellow in Mathematics, 1S98-99. A.B., University of Toronto, 1895, and A.M., 
1902. Fellow, University of Pennsylvania, 1896-97 ; Examiner in Mathe- 
matics, University of Toronto, 1897 ; Graduate Student, University of Chi- 
cago, 1897-98 ; Fellow by Courtesy in Mathematics, Bryn Mawr College, 
1900 : Instructor in Mathematics, St. Margaret's College. Toronto, Ont., 
1901-02 ; Instructor in Mathematics, Vassar College, 1902-10 ; Graduate 
Scholar, Bryn Mawr College, Second Semester, 1905-06. 

Denis, Willey, 1420 General Taylor Street, New Orleans, La. 

Fellow in Chemistry, 1902-03. A.B., Tulane University, 1899, and A.M., 
1902 ; Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1907. Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr 
College, 1899-1901; Tulane University, 1901-02, 1903-04, University of 
Chicago, 1905-07 ; Assistant Chemist, U. S. Department of Agriculture, 
Bureau of Foods, 1907-09. 

Dover, Mary Violette, 

194 Hunter Street, East, Peterboro, Ontario, Canada. 

Fellow in Chemistry, 1905-06. A.B., McGill University, 1898, and M.Sc, 

1900. Ph.D., Universitv of Breslau, 1906-08. Instructor in Chemistry, Mt. 
Holyoke College, 1909-10. 

Dudley, Louise See page 18. 

Fellow in English, 1906-07. 

Eddy, Helen May, Marengo, la. 

Fellow in Latin, 1904-05. A.B., University of Iowa, 1900, and A.M.. 1903. 
Fellow in Latin, University of Iowa, 1901-04. Teacher of Latin in the High 
School, Fairfield, la., 1905-06, and of Latin and Greek in the Winona Park 
School for Women, Winona Lake, Ind., 1906-08 ; Teacher of Latin and 
German in the State Normal School, Mayville, N. D., 1908-10. 

Edmand, Marietta Josephine, 

1062 Berwyn Avenue, Edgwater, Chicago, 111. 

Fellow in Latin, 1897-98. A.B., Central University of Iowa, 1887, and A.M., 
1890 ; A.B. and A.M., University of Chicago, 1897. Assistant in Academic 
Department, Iowa Wesleyan University, 1887-90, and Principal of Aca- 
demic Department, 1890-93 ; Professor of Latin, Iowa Wesleyan University, 
1893-95 ; Graduate Student in Greek and Latin, University of Chicago, 
1895-97 ; Professor of Latin and Greek, Milwaukee-Downer College, Mil- 
waukee, Wis., 1898-99. and Professor of Latin, 1899-1903 ; American School 
of Classical Studies, Rome, 1901-02. 

Married, 1903, Dr. Frederio Perry Noble. 

Edwards, Katharine May, 39 Wilder Hall, Wellesley, Mass. 

Fellow in Greek, 1888-89. A.B., Cornell University, 1888, and Ph.D., 1895. 
Instructor in Greek, Wellesley College, 1889-93 ; Graduate Student, Cornell 
University, 1893-94 ; Associate Professor of Greek, Wellesley College, 1894- 

1901, and' Associate Professor of Greek and Comparative Philology, 1901-10. 

Ellis, Ellen Deborah, See page 22. 

Fellow in Economics and History, 1904-05. 

Evers, Helen Margaret, 508 S. Fifth Street, Columbus, Mo. 

Fellow in Romance Languages, 1903-05. A.B., Washington University, 1899 ; 
A.M., University of Missouri, 1902 ; Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College, 1905, sub- 
jects, French and Spanish. Graduate Student, University of Missouri, 
1901-02 ; Fellow in Romance Languages, 1902-03 ; Teacher of French in the 
Gleim School, Pittsburgh, Pa., 1906-07 ; Acting Instructor in Romance 
Languages, University of Missouri, 1905-06, and Instructor, 1907-09. 

Fahnestock, Edith, 18 Lincoln Street, New Rochelle, N. T. 

Fellow in Romance Languages, 1897-98. L.B., Western Reserve University, 
1894. University of Zurich and Sorbonne, 1894-96; Mistress of Modern 
Languages, Mississippi Industrial Institute and College. Columbus, Miss., 
1898-1901, 1902-05 ; Graduate Scholar and Fellow by Courtesy in Romance 
Languages, Bryn Mawr College, 1901-02, and Graduate Scholar, 1906-07 : 
Instructor in Romance Languages, Mt. Holyoke College, 1907-08, and in 



32 

Fairbanks, Charlotte, 5226 Spruce Street, Philadelphia. 

Fellow in Chemistry, 1S96-97. A.B., Smith College, 1894; Ph.D., Yale Uni- 
versity, 1896 ; M.D., Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania, 1902. In- 
structor in Chemistry, Wellesley College, 1897-99 ; Woman's Medical College 
of Pennsylvania, 1899-1902 ; Physician, 1905-07 ; Instructor in Chemistry 
and Materia Medica, Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania, 1906-07. 

Faibclotjgh, Elizabeth Mary, 

228 Market Street, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. 

Fellow in Greek, 1893-94. A.B., McGill University, 1893. Private Tutor, 
1898-1900. 

Farnham, Lois Anna, 22 Old Lancaster Road, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Fellow in Economics and Politics, 1901-02. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1900, 
group, History and Political Science, and A.M., 1901. Graduate Scholar 
in History, Political Science, and Law, Bryn Mawr College, 1900-01. 

Married, 1903, Professor DavM Wilbur Horn. 

Fogg, Emily, 113 S. Wycombe Avenue, Lansdowne, Pa. 

Fellow in History, 1897-98. Wellesley College, 1889-91 ; A.B., University of 
Chicago, 1897. Graduate Scholar and Fellow by Courtesy in History, 
1898-99 ; Fellow in Sociology, University of Pennsylvania, 1899-1900 ; Stu- 
dent, University of Pennsylvania, and Teacher of Economic Geography in 
Mrs. Head's School, Germantown, Philadelphia, and of History in the 
Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., 1900-01. 

Married, 1900, Professor Edward Shenoood Meade. 

Fowler, Eugenia, 90 Morningside Avenue, West, New York City. 

Fellow in Physics, 1902-03. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1901, and A.M., 1902. 
Mistress of Llanberis, and Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1901-02 ; 
Secretary and Manager of Athletics, St. Timothy's School, Catonsville, 
1903-07; Manager of Low Buildings, Bryn Mawr College, 1908-09. 

Married, 1909, Mr. M. K. Neale. 

France, Wilmer Cave, Low Buildings, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Fellow in Greek, 1892-93. Girton College, University of Cambridge, Eng- 
land, 1888-92 ; Classical Tripos, 1892 ; Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1895 ; 
Fellow in Latin, University of Chicago, 1893-94, and Fellow in Greek, 
1894-95 ; Reader in Greek and Latin, University of Chicago, 1895-96 ; 
Reader in Classical Literature, Bryn Mawr College. 1897-99 ; Associate 
in Classical Literature, 1899-1901, Associate in Greek, 1901-03, 1905-06, 
Lecturer in Greek Literature, 1906-07, and Associate Professor of Greek, 
1907-10. 

Married, 1906, Mr. J. Edmund Wright. 

Franklin, Susan Braley, 

63rd Street and Central Park West, New York City. 

Fellow in Greek, 1889-90. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1889, group, Greek 
and Latin, and Ph.D., 1895, subjects, Greek, Latin, and Sanskrit. Fallow 
by Courtesy in Greek, 1890-93 ; Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 
1890-93, and second semester, 1901-03 ; Holder of the American Fellowship 
of the Association of Collegiate Alumna?, 1S92-93 ; Instructor in Latin, 
Vassar College, 1893-97 ; American School of Classical Studies, Athens, and 
University of Berlin, 1898-99 ; Teacher of Greek and Latin in Miss Florence 
Baldwin's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., 1897-98, and 1899-1904; Head of the 
Classical Department, Ethical Culture School, New York City, 1904-10. 

Gage, Kitty Augusta, New Paltz, N. Y. 

Fellow in Greek, 1885-86. A.B., Boston University, 1878 ; A.M., Cornell Uni- 
versity, 1885. Teacher of Latin and French in the State Normal School, 
New Paltz, 1893-1909. 

Gates, Fanny Cook, 402 Franklin Street, Waterloo, la. 

Fellow in Mathematics, 1896-97. B.S., Northwestern University, 1894, and 
M.S., 1895. Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1909. Fellow in Mathe- 
matics, Northwestern University, 1894-95 ; Graduate Scholar in Mathe- 
matics, Bryn Mawr College, 1S95-96 ; Holder of European Fellowship of 
the Association of Collegiate Alumna?, and Student in Mathematics and 
Physics, University of Gottingen, 1897-98 ; Graduate Student, University 



33 

of Chicago, Summer Term, 1899 ; Instructor in Physics, Woman's College 
of Baltimore, 1898-1901, Associate Professor of Physics, 1901-06, and 
Professor of Physics, 1906-10 ; Research Student, McGill University, 1902- 
03 ; Research Student, Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge, England, April 
to August, 1905 and 1906. 

Gentry, Ruth, Stilesville, Ind. 

Fellow in Mathematics, 1890-91. Ph.B., University of Michigan, 1890 ; 
Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College, 1890, subjects, Mathematics and Physics. 
Fellow by Courtesy in Mathematics, Bryn Mawr College, 1893-94 ; Holder 
of the European Fellowship of the Association of Collegiate Alumnse, 
and Student in Mathematics, University of Berlin, 1891-92; Student at 
the Sorhonne, 1892-93 ; Instructor in Mathematics, Vassar College, 1894- 
1900, and Associate Professor of Mathematics, 1900-02 ; Associate Principal 
of Private School, Pittsburgh, Pa., and Head of Department of Mathema- 
tics, 1902-05. 

Gordon, Wilhelmina, 

Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. 

Fellow in Latin, 1906-07. M.A., Queen's University, 1905. Graduate Scholar 
in English, Bryn Mawr College, 1905-06, Somerville College, Oxford, 
England, 1908-09. Tutor in English, Queen's University, 1909-10. 

Graham, Ellen Maud, Owen Sound, Ontario, Canada. 

Fellow in History, 1S96-97. A.B., University of Toronto, 1S96. Canadian 
Government Teacher in South Africa, 1902-04 ; Teacher of Modern Lan- 
guages, Harriston, Ont., 1905-06 ; Principal of the Girls' High School, 
Quebec, P. Q., 1906-09. 

Graham, Minnie Almira, 34 Park Place, Lockport, N. Y. 

Fellow in Chemistry, 1906-07. A.B., Mount Holyoke College, 1900 ; A.M., 
University of Michigan, 1906. Teacher of Mathematics and Science in the 
High School, Hancock, N. Y., 1900-01, and Instructor in Chemistry, Mount 
Holyoke College, 1902-05 ; Student in Physics, Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology, First Semester, and Teacher of Science in the High School, 
Braintree, Mass., 1901-02 ; Graduate Student. University of Michigan, and 
Holder of the '86 Fellowship of Mount Holyoke College, 1905-06 ; Profes- 
sor of Chemistry, Lake Erie College, 1907-10. 

Griffin, Hattie Josephine, North Bend, Ore. 

Fellow in Latin, 1899-1900. A.B., University of Wisconsin, 1898, and A.M., 
1902. Alumni Fellow in Latin, University of Wisconsin, 1898-99; Fellow 
in Latin, University of Wisconsin, 1901-02 ; Assistant in the High School, 
Crystal Falls, Michigan, 1902-03 ; Professor of Ancient and Modern Lan- 
guages, Nebraska Central College, 1903-07 ; Principal of the High School, 
North Bend, 1907-09, and Teacher of Latin and English, 1909-10. 

Gwinn, Mary, 33 Mount Vernon Place East, Baltimore, Md. 

Fellow in English, 18S5-87. University of Leipsic, 1879-82 ; University of 
Zurich, 18S2 ; Sorbonne and College de France, 18S3. Ph.D., Bryn Mawr 
College, 1888. Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 18S7-88, and As- 
sociate in English, 1888-93 ; Associate Professor of English, Bryn Mawr Col- 
lege, 1893-97, and Professor of English, 1S97-1904. 

Married, 1904, Mr. Alfred Eodder. 

Hahn, Dorothy Anna, Box 344, South Hadley, Mass. 

Fellow in Chemistry, 1907-08. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1S99, group, Chem- 
istry and Biology. Professor of Chemistry and Biology, Pennsylvania 
College for Women, Pittsburgh, Pa.. 1899-1906 ; Professor of Biology, Kin- 
dergarten College, Pittsburgh, 1904-06 ; Student, Universitv of Leipsic, 
1906-07 ; Instructor in Chemistry, Mount Holyoke College, 1908-10. 

Haines, Jane Bowne, Cheltenham, Pa. 

Fellow in History, 1892-93. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1891, group, History 
and Political Science, and A.M., 1892. Graduate Student, Bryu Mawr 
College, 1891-92, 1893-94, and Associate Librarian, 1895-98 ; Student, New 
York State Library School, Albany, N. Y., 1898-99 ; Assistant in the Cata- 
loguing Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D. C, 1900-03 ; Pri- 
vate Indexer and Bibliographer, 1903-10. 



34 



Hamilton, Edith, See page 23. 

Fellow in Latin, 1894-95. 

Hanington, Florence, 59 Stanley Avenue, Ottawa, Canada. 

Fellow in Mathematics, 1905-06. A.B., Trinity University, 1904. Graduate 
Scholar in Mathematics, Bryn Mawr College, 1904-05 ; Secretary of Bryn 
Mawr College, 1906-07. 

Married, 1907, Mr. Charles Reginald Carter. 

Hardcastle, Frances, ..31 Boundary Road, London, N. W., England. 

Fellow in Mathematics, 1894-95. M.A., Trinity College, Dublin, 1907. Gir- 
ton College, University of Cambridge, England, 1888-92 ; Mathematical 
Tripos, Part I, 1891 ; Part II, 1892. Graduate Student in Mathematics, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1892-93 ; Honorary Fellow in Mathematics, University 
of Chicago, 1893-94 ; Graduate Student in Mathematics, Girton College, 
1895-96; Pfeiffer Student of Girton College, 1902-03; Hon. Secretary, Na- 
tional Union of Women's Suffrage Societies, London, 1906-09. 

Harmon, Esther, See page 15. 

Fellow in German, 1908-09. 

Harper, Carrie Anna, Sunderland, Mass. 

Fellow in English, 1898-99. A.B., Radcliffe College, 1896. and A.M., 1898. 
Graduate Scholar in English, Bryn Mawr College, 1896-97 ; Graduate Stu- 
dent in English, Radcliffe College, 1897-98, 1906-07 ; Teacher of English 
in the Gilman School, Cambridge, Mass., 1899-1907 ; Instructor in English 
Literature, Mt. Holyoke College, 1907-10. 

Harris, Elizabeth, Clayton, Mo. 

Fellow in Greek, 1890-91. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1890, group, Greek and 
Latin, and A.M., 1891. Teacher of Greek and Latin in the Collegiate 
Grammar School, New York City, 1891-92 ; Teacher of Greek and Latin in 
Miss Florence Baldwin's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., 1892-96. 

Married, 1896, Professor Edtcard Harrison Reiser. 

Harrison, Elizabeth, 8 Linnet Lane, Liverpool, England. 

Fellow in Greek, 1906-07. Liverpool University College, 1897-98 ; Newnham 
College, University of Cambridge, England, 1898-1902 ; Classical Tripos, 
Part I, 1901 ; Part II, 1902 ; Temporary Assistant Lecturer in Latin, Uni- 
versity of Liverpool, and Private Tutor, 1908-10. 

Hazen, Annah Putnam, White River, Vt. 

Fellow in Biology, 1898-99. L.B., Smith College, 1895 ; S.M., Dartmouth Col- 
lege, 1897. Graduate Student in Biology, Dartmouth College, 1895-96 ; 
Graduate Scholar in Biology, Bryn Mawr College, i897-98 ; Teacher of 
Biology in the State Normal School, Plymouth, N. H., 1899-1900 ; Assistant 
in Zoology, Smith College, 1900-03 ; Teacher of Biology in the Wadleigh 
High School, New York City, 1903-09 ; First Assistant in Biology, Eastern 
District High School, New York City, 1909-10. 

Hazlewood, Charlotte "Williams, . . . .161 Allen Avenue, Lynn, Mass. 

Fellow in Greek, 1898-99. A.B., Wellesley College. 1891. Teacher of Greek 
and Latin in the Classical High School, Lynn, 1891-96 ; Graduate Student, 
Yale University, 1896-97, and Graduate Scholar, 1897-98 : Substitute 
Teacher, Shaw University, Raleigh, N. C, Second Semester, 1908-09. 

Henry, Margaret Edith, University of Texas, Austin, Tex. 

Fellow in Philosophy, 1900-01. A.B., University of Nebraska, 1898, and A.M., 
1900 ; A.M., Radcliffe College, 1902. Graduate Scholar in Philosophy, Uni- 
versity of Nebraska, 1898-99, and Fellow, 1899-1900 ; Graduate Student, 
Radcliffe College, 1901-02. 

Married, Dr. Alvin Saunders Johnson. 

Hicks, Amy Maud, 

33 Downside Crescent, Hampstead, London, England. 

Fellow in Greek, 1904-05. A.B., University of London, 1900, and A.M., 1901. 
Student, Girton College, University of Cambridge, England, 1895-99, Clas- 
sical Tripos, Part I, 1898, Part II, 1899 ; Student, University College, Lon- 
don, 1900-02 ; Teacher of Classics in St. Mary's College, Paddington, Lon- 
don, 1906-09. 



35 

Highet, Minnie Elizabeth, Cobourg, Ontario, Canada. 

Fellow in German and Teutonic Philology, 1896-97. A.B., Victoria Univer- 
sity, 1891, and A.M., 1892 ; Ph.M., Cornell University, 1894, and Ph.D., 
1895. Teacher of Modern Languages, Bowmanville High School, 1892-93 ; 
Professor of Modern Languages and History, State Normal School, New 
Paltz, N. T., 1897-1900 ; University of Berlin, 1901-02 ; Professor of Ger- 
man. Elmira College, 1902-10. 

Hill, Sarah D., Lincoln, Neb. 

Fellow in Teutonic Philology, 1904-05. A.B., Earlham College, 1901. Grad- 
uate Scholar, Bryn Mawr College, 1903-04 ; Assistant in German and 
French, Earlham College, 1905-08. 

Married, 1908, Mr. Milton D. Buiimgartner. 

Hoopee, Edith Sophia, 

Heathersby, Cbislehurst Road, Kent, England. 

Fellow in English, 1900-01. M.A., University of Edinburgh, 1900, Honours 
in Philosophy, 1899, in English, 1900. 

Hopkins, Mary Delia, Clinton, N. Y. 

Fellow in English, 1896-97. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, group, English and 
German, and A.M., 1896. Reader in English, and Graduate Student, Bryn 
Mawr College, 1897-98, and Reader in English, 1899-1901 ; Teacher of 
Latin and English in the Granger Place School, Canandaigua, N. Y. 1902- 
04 ; Teacher of English in the Balliol School, Utica, N. Y., 1901-02, and 
of English, German, and Latin, 1905-07 ; Teacher of English and Latin 
in Miss Davidge's School, New York City, and Private Tutor, 1904-05 ; 
Teacher of Latin and English in the Veltin School, New York City, and 
Graduate Student, Columbia University, 1908-09. 

Howell, Jean Kirk, 123 West 7th Street, Plainfield, N. J. 

Fellow in Biology, 1891-92. Ph.B., Cornell University, 1888, and S.M., 
1890. Assistant in Botany, Barnard College, 1892-96 ; Teacher of Science 
In the Phillips High School, Watertown, Mass., 1898-99 ; Teacher of Sci- 
ence in Miss Ingol's School, Cambridge, Mass., 1899-1905, and in the Plain- 
field Seminary, Plainfield, 1905-10. 

Hughes, Winona Alice, 271 West Church Street, Marion, O. 

Fellow in Chemistry, 1900-01. Ph.B., University of Wooster, 1891. Grad- 
uate Student, Cornell University, Summer School, 1894 ; Harvard Uni- 
versity, Summer School, 1895 ; University of Chicago, 1897-99 ; Teacher of 
Science in the Public Schools, Marion, 1892-97, and in the High School, 
Mansfield, O., 1899-1900 ; Teacher of Science in the High School, Ottumwa, 
la., 1901-02 ; Teacher of Chemistry and Zoology in the High School Mans- 
field, 1902-06 ; Instructor in Chemistry, Mt. Holyoke College, 1906-10. 

Hutchinson, Anabelle Roxburgh, 

Brookside, Catterick, Yorkshire. England. 

Fellow in Romance Languages, 1899-1900. Newnham College, University of 
Cambridge. England, 1895-99 ; Mediaeval and Modern Languages Tripos, 
1898 ; Sorbonne, 1900-01 ; Assistant Librarian, University Library. Cam- 
bridge, 1902-05 ; Assistant Lecturer in French, Newnham College, 1902-06 ; 
Tutor in French and Italian, University Correspondence College, Cam- 
bridge, and Examiner in French and Italian, Joint Board Matriculation, 
Manchester University, 1909-10. 

Hyde, Ida H., Lawrence, Kan. 

Fellow in Biology, 1892-93. S.B., Cornell University, 1891 ; Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Heidelberg, 1896. Student Assistant in Biolosry. Bryn Mawr Col- 
lege, 1891-92 ; Holder of the European Fellowship of the Association of 
Collegiate Alumnae, and Student in Biology, University of Strassburg, 
1893-94 ; Holder of the Phebe Hunt Fellowship of the Association of Col- 
legiate Alumnae, and Student in Biology, University of Heidelberg, 1894-96 ; 
Teacher of Science in Miss Ingol's School, Cambridge. Mass., 1898-99 ; 
Professor of Physiology, and Head of Department of Physiology, University 
of Kansas. 1899-1910. 



36 

Hyde, Winifred Florence, Berggasse 1, Jena, Germany. 

Fellow in Philosophy, 1902-04. A.B., University of Nebraska, 1900. Scholar 
in Philosophy, University of Nebraska, 1900-01 ; University of Denver, 
Summer of 1901 ; Teacher in the High School, Lincoln, Neb., 1901-02 ; 
Scholar in Philosophy, Cornell University, 1904-05 ; Holder of the Euro- 
pean Fellowship of the Boston Woman's Educational Association, 1905-06, 
and Student at the University of Jena, 1905-10. 

[sham, Mary Keyt, 849 Oak Street, Walnut Hills, Cincinnati, O. 

Fellow in Philosophy, 1899-1900. A.B., Wellesley College, 1894 ; A.M., Uni- 
versity of Cincinnati, 1898. M.D., Laura Memorial Medical College, 1903. 
Graduate Student in Philosophy and Psychology, University of Cincin- 
nati, 1897-98 ; Graduate Student in Philosophy and Psychology, University 
of Chicago, 1898-99 ; Lecturer on Psychology and Student, Laura Memorial 
Medical College, Cincinnati, 1900-03 ; Interne and House Physician at the 
Presbyterian Hospital, Cincinnati, 1903-04 ; Physician, 1904-08 ; Secretary, 
Academy of Medicine of Cincinnati, 1907-08 ; Assistant Physician, Columbus 
State Hospital, Columbus, O., 1908-10. 

Jones, Laura Ltjcinda, Box 353, Cobourg, Ontario, Canada. 

Fellow in English, 1894-95. A.B., University of Toronto, 1891. Teacher of 
Modern Languages in the Collegiate Institute, Kingston, Ont., 1895-97 ; 
Teacher of English, and Student in German in the Hohere Tochterschule 
Tegeler, Eberswalde, Berlin, 1897-98 ; Teacher of English, French, and 
German in the Collegiate Institute, Cobourg, 1898-1909 ; Member of the 
Board of the Public Library, Cobourg, 1904-08. 

Keys, Florence V., College Avenue, Poughkeepsie, N. T. 

Fellow in Greek, 1891-92; Fellow in English, 1892-93. A.B., University of 
Toronto, 1891. Examiner in English, University of T'oronto, 1894-95; 
Reader in English, Bryn Mawr College, 1893-97, and Graduate Student in 
English, 1895-96 ; University of Oxford, England, 1897-98 ; University of 
Berlin, 1898-99 ; Reader in English, College Entrance Examination Board, 
1900-02 ; Student, University of Munich, 1904-05 ; Instructor in English, 
Vassar College, 1899-1904, and Associate Professor of English, 1904-10. 

King, Georgiana Goddard, Low Buildings, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Fellow in Philosophy, 1896-97 ; Fellow in English, 1897-98. A.B., Bryn 
Mawr College, and George W. Childs Prize Essayist, 1896, group, Political 
Science and Philosophy, and A.M., 1897. Student at the College de France, 
First Semester, 1898-99 ; Teacher of English, Philosophy, and History of 
Art in the Misses Graham's School, New York City, 1899-1906 ; Reader in 
English, Bryn Mawr College, 1906-10. 

King, Helen Dean, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Fellow in Biology, 1897-98. A.B., Vassar College, 1892; Ph.D., Bryn Mawr 
College, 1901, subjects, Morphology, Palaeontology, and Physiology. Grad- 
uate Student in Biology, Vassar College, and Assistant in the Biological 
Laboratory, 1894-95 ; Graduate Scholar in Biology, Bryn Mawr College, 
1895-96, and Graduate Student in Biology, 1896-97 and 1901-06, and Fellow 
by Courtesy in Biology, 1898-1901 ; Teacher of Science in Miss Florence 
Baldwin's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., 1899-1907 ; University Fellow for 
Research in Zoology, University of Pennsylvania, 1906-08 ; Investigator, 
Wistar Institute of Anatomy and Biology, Philadelphia, 1908-09, and 
Assistant in Anatomy, 1909-10. , 

King, Lida Shaw, 

Women's College in Brown University, Providence, R. I. 

Fellow in Greek, 1899-1900. A.B., Vassar College, 1890; A.M., Brown Uni- 
versity, 1894. Fellow in Greek, Vassar College, 1894-95 ; Instructor in 
Greek and Latin, Vassar College, 1895-97 ; Graduate Student in Greek and 
Greek History, Harvard University, 1897-98 ; Instructor in Latin, Packer 
Collegiate Institute, Brooklyn, New York City, 1898-99 ; Student, Ameri- 
can School of Classical Studies, Athens, 1899-1901 ; Holder of the Agnes 
Hoppin Memorial Fellowship, 1900-01 ; Director of Classical Department, 
Packer Collegiate Institute, 1901-02 ; Dean of the Women's College in 
Brown University, 1905-10 ; Assistant Professor of Classical Philology, 
1905-09, and Professor of Classical Literature and Archaeology, 1909-10. 

Laird, Elizabeth Rebecca See page 24. 

Fellow in Physics, 1S97-98. 



37 



Lamberton, Helen, 753 Corinthian Avenue, Philadelphia. 

Fellow in Physics, 1908-09. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1907, and A.M., 1908. 
Graduate Scholar in Physics, Bryn Mawr College, 1907-08 ; Teacher of 
Mathematics in the Philadelphia High School for Girls, 1909, and Teacher 
of Physics, 1909-10 ; Graduate Student in Physics, University of Pennsyl- 
vania, 1909-10. 

Langenbeck, Clara, See page 24. 

Fellow in Biology, 1895-96. 

Leftwioh, Florence, See page 24. 

Fellow in Romance Languages, 1902-03. 

Lewis, Florence, See page 24. 

Fellow in Philosophy, 1S98-99. 

Longbottom, Gertrude, . . The Hollies, Louth, Lincolnshire, England. 

Fellow in Mathematics, 1897-98. Girton College, University of Cambridge, 
England, 1893-97 ; Mathematical Tripos, Part I, 1896 ; Part II, 1897. M.A., 
Trinity College, Dublin, 1905. Teacher of Latin in the Municipal Technical 
School, Louth, 1899-1900, and Teacher of Mathematics, 1900-06 ; Governor 
of King Edward VI Girls' Grammar School, Louth, 1902-09 ; Manager of 
the Louth British (Elementary) School, 1904-09; Private Tutor, 1909-10. 

Lord, Eleanor Louisa, ! 46 Auburn Street, Maiden, Mass. 

Fellow in History, 1889-90, 1895-96. A.B., Smith College, 1887, and A.M., 
1890 ; Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College, 1898, subjects, History and Political 
Science. Instructor in History, Smith College, 1890-94 ; Holder of the 
European Fellowship of the Women's Educational Association of Boston, 
and Student in History, Newnham College, University of Cambridge, Eng- 
land, 1894-95 ; Instructor in History, Woman's College of Baltimore, 1897- 
1901 : Associate Professor, 1901-04, and Professor of History, 1904-10 ; 
President of the History Teachers' Association of Maryland, 1908-09. 

Lovell, Helen Louisa, Hardin College, Mexico, Mo. 

Fellow in Greek, 1887-88. A.B., University of Michigan, 1887. Graduate 
Student, University of Michigan, 1888-89 ; Teacher of Latin and History 
in the Girls 1 Classical School, Indianapolis, Ind., 1889-90 ; Associate in 
Greek and Latin, Woman's College of Baltimore, 1890-91, and Associate 
Professor, 1891-93 ; Acting Professor of Greek and Latin, Earlham Col- 
lege, 1893-94 ; Graduate Student, University of Chicago, 1894-95, and Fel- 
low in Greek, 1895-96 ; Professor of Greek, Hardin College, Mexico, 1896- 
1900, Professor of Greek and Philosophy, 1900-05, and Professor of Latin 
and Greek, 1905-09. 

Married, 1896, Mr. John Wilson Million. 

Lowater, Frances, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Fellow in Physics, 1896-97. B.Sc, University of London, 1900; Ph.D., 
Bryn Mawr College, 1906, subjects. Physics, Mathematics and Applied 
Mathematics, University College, Nottingham, England, 1888-91, 1892-93 ; 
Newnham College, University of Cambridge, England, 1891-92 ; Demon- 
strator in Physics, Bryn Mawr College, 1893-96, 1897-98, 1899-1905. and 
1907-10 ; Graduate Scholar in Physics, 1897-98, and Graduate Student in 
Physics and Mathematics, 1894-96, 1899-1900 ; Secretary of Bryn Mawr 
College, 1898-99. 

Lundie, Elizabeth Helen, 36 Fort Street, Montreal, Canada. 

Fellow in Physics, 1905-06. A.B.. McGill University, 1903, and M.Sc, 1904. 
Assistant in Chemistry in the High School, Montreal, 1908-10. 

MacDonald, Margaret Baxter, State College, Pa. 

Fellow In Chemistry, 1898-99. Pennsylvania State College, 1893-95 ; B S , 
Mt. Holyoke College, 1898; Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College, 1902, subjects. 
Chemistry and Physiology. Student Assistant in Chemical Laboratory, 
Mt. Holyoke College, 1895-97 ; Graduate Scholar In Chemistry and Phys- 
iology, Bryn Mawr College, 1897-98, and Pepper Fellow in Chemistry, Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, 1899-1900 ; Graduate Scholar and Fellow by 
Courtesy in Chemistry, Bryn Mawr College, 1900-01 ; Teacher of Chemis- 
try and Physics, Asheville College, Asheville, N. C, 1901-02 ; Professor of 



38 



Chemistry, New Jersey State Normal School, 1902-04 ; Instructor in Chem- 
istry, Vassar College, 1905-06 ; Assistant Chemist, Delaware College Ex- 
perimental Station, 1906-07 ; Instructor in Chemistry, Pennsylvania State 
College, 1907-09, and Assistant Professor of Agricultural Chemistry, 1909-10. 

Maddison, Isabel, See page 24. 

Fellow in Mathematics, 1893-94. 
Mann, Careie Alice. 

Fellow in Mathematics, 1903-04. A.B., Wellesley College, 1893. Graduate 
Student, Bryn Mawr College, and Teacher of Mathematics in the Misses 
Kirk's School, Rosemont, Pa., 1901-03 ; Teacher of Mathematics in Mrs. 
Chapman and Miss Jones's School, Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia, 1904-05. 

Died, 1905. 

Marcuse, Bella, 

6 Frontenac Apartments, 442 Sanguinet Street, Montreal, Canada. 

Fellow in Chemistry, 1904-05. A.B., McGill University, 1900, and M.Sc, 
1903. Student, University of Breslau, 1900-01 ; Assistant, McGill Model 
School. Montreal, Canada, January to June, 1904 ; Student in French, Mc- 
Gill University, 1905-07, and Private Tutor, 1905-08 ; Recording Secre- 
tary of the National Council of Women of Canada, 1908-09. 

Married, 1908, Dr. Douglas Mcintosh. 

Martin, Emilie Norton, See page 25. 

Fellow in Mathematics, 1895-96. 

Mason, Gertrude Helen, 2627 Channing Way, Berkeley, Cal. 

Fellow in English, 1887-88. Ph.B., University of Michigan, 1876, and Ph.M., 
1888. Graduate Student in English, University of Michigan, 1888-89 ; 
Teacher of English in the High School, Petaluma, Cal., 1889-95, in the 
High School, San Diego, Cal., 1895-96 ; Graduate Student in English, 
Leland Stanford, Jr., University, 1896-97 and 1900-01 ; Assistant to Dr. 
Ewald Fliigel on Chaucer Lexicon, 1904-05 ; Teacher of English in the 
Kern County High School, Bakersfleld, Cal., 1897-98., and in the Union 
High School, Haywards, Cal., 1899-1900 ; Private Tutor in English, 1900-02, 
1905-09. 

McNair, Grace Elizabeth, Brodhead, Wis. 

Fellow in History, 1900-01. L.B., University of Wisconsin, 1898, and L.M., 
1899. Assistant in History in the High School, Madison, Wis., 1899-1900 ; 
Assistant in Latin, German, and History in the High School, Brodhead, 
1902-04 ; Assistant in History in the High School, Neenah, Wis., 1904. 

Merrill, Katharine, Boston Normal School, Boston, Mass. 

Fellow in English, 1890-91. A.B., University of Kansas, 1889. Graduate 
Student in English, Bryn Mawr College, 1889-90 ; Harvard Annex, 1891-92 ; 
Assistant Professor of English Language and Literature, University of 
Illinois, 1892-97 ; Fellow in English, University of Chicago, 1897-98 ; 
Teacher of English, Austin High School, Chicago, 111., 1898-1903 ; Teacher 
of the History of Literature in the Leland Powers School of the Spoken 
Word, Boston, 1905-08 ; Teacher in the Department of Expression and 
Reading, Boston Normal School, 1908-09. 

Miles, Caroline, 5728 Madison Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

Fellow in History, 1891-92. A.B., Earlham College, 1887; A.M., University 
of Michigan, 1890, and Ph.D., 1892. Teacher of Latin in the Friends' 
Academy, Bloomingdale, Ind., 1888-89 ; University of Michigan. 1889-91 ; 
Instructor in Philosophy and Political Economy, Mt. Holyoke College, 1892- 
93 ; Tutor in History, Wellesley College, 1893-94, and Instructor in 
Psychology, 1894-95; University Extension Work, Chicago, 1897-1900; As- 
sistant Reference Librarian, John Crerar Library, Chicago, 1900-04. 

Married, 1895, Mr. William Hill. 

Millman, Mabel Helen, 490 Huron Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. 

Fellow in French, 1908-09. A.B., University of Toronto, 1907. Graduate 
Student, University of Toronto, June, 1907, to January, 1908 ; Teacher of 
History in the Westbourne School, Toronto, January to June, 1908, and of 
Latin in Havergal College, Toronto, April to June, 1908. 



39 



Morriss, Margaret Shove, ...1W4 Ml. Royal Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Fellow in History, 1907-08. A.B., Woman's College of Baltimore, 1904. 
Holder of Foundation Scholarship, Bryn Mawr College, 1904-06; Holder of 
the Alumnae Fellowship of the Woman's College of Baltimore and Research 
Student at the Public Record Office, London, 1906-07 ; Instructor in His- 
tory, Mt. Holyoke College, 1908-10. 

Morse, Kate Niles, See page 25. 

Fellow in Greek, 1900-01. 

Mory, Ruthella Bernard, The Somerset, Baltimore, Md. 

Fellow in History, 1899-1900. A.B., Woman's College of Baltimore, 1897; 
Ph.M., University of Chicago, 1899. Student in English and History, Uni- 
versity of Oxford, England, 1897-98 ; Graduate Student in History and 
History of Art, University of Chicago, 1898-99 ; Student, London School 
of Economics, 1900 ; Research work in History in the British Museum and 
in the Public Record Office, London, 1900-02. 

Married, 1903, Mr. Arthur Bameveld BibMns. 

Neilson, Nellie, Mt. Holyoke College, South Hadley, Mass. 

Fellow in History, 1894-95. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1893, group, Greek and 
English, A.M., 1894, and Ph.D., 1899, subjects, History and English. Grad- 
uate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1893-94, 1895-96, 1900-01 ; Holder of 
the American Fellowship of the Association of Collegiate Alumna?, 1895-96 ; 
Research work in History in Cambridge, England, and in the Public Record 
Office, London, 1896-97 ; Teacher of History in Miss Irwin's School, Phila- 
delphia, 1897-1900 ; Private Research work, 1897-1905 ; Reader in English, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1900-02 : Instructor in History, Mt. Holyoke College, 
1902-03 ; Acting Professor of European History, 1903-04, and Professor of 
History, 1904-10 ; in England on leave of absence, 1908-09. 

Nichols, Elizabeth, 1918 N. Penn Street, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Fellow in Biology, 1893-94. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1893, group, Chemis- 
try and Biology. Graduate Student, 1894-95 ; Teacher of Science in the 
Girls' High School, Philadelphia, 1895-96 ; Secretary of the Indianapolis 
Branch of the Needlework Guild of America, 1907-08. 

Married, 1896, Mr. diaries W. Moores. 

North way, Mary Isabel, 

1657 Burnaby Street, "Vancouver, B. C, Canada. 

Fellow in Physics, 1900-01. A.B., University of Toronto, 1898. Ontario Nor- 
mal College, 1898-99 ; Graduate Scholar in Physics, Bryn Mawr College, 
1899-1900 ; Student of Domestic Science, 1901-02 ; Assistant in Physics 
Department, Smith College, 1902-03. 

Married, 1904, The Rev. R.. J. Wilson. 

Nowlin, Nadine, See page 25. 

Fellow in Biology, 1905-06. 

O'Grady. Marcella I Wiirzburg, Bavaria. 

Fellow in Biology, 1887-89. S.B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 
1885. Teacher of Science in the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore, Md., 
1885-87 ; Demonstrator in Biology, Bryn Mawr College, 1887-89 ; Associate 
Professor of Biology, V"assar College, 1889-93, and Professor of Biology, 
1893-97. 

Married, 1897, Professor Theodore Boveri. 

Olsen, Sophie Thlen, Kastelsvej 25, Copenhagen, Denmark. 

Fellow in Teutonic Philology, 1899-1900. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1898, 
group, Greek and Latin, and A.M., 1899. A.M., University of Copenhagen, 
1902. Graduate Scholar in English and Teutonic Philology, Bryn Mawr 
College, 1S98-99 ; Student, Universities of Copenhagen and Leipsic,'l900-01 ; 
University of Copenhagen, 1901-02 ; Teacher of English Literature in the 
Zahle Institute for Teachers, Copenhagen, 1905-10 ; and Teacher of English 
in the State College for Teachers, Copenhagen, 1908-10. 

Married, 1902, Dr. HenriJc Bertelsen. 



40 



Paeker, Emma Harriet, Charlestown, N. H. 

Fellow in Chemistry, 1893-94. S.B., Smith College, 1887. Graduate Student 
in Chemistry, Bryn Mawr College, 1892-93, and Graduate Scholar in 
Chemistry, 1894-95 ; Instructor in Chemistry, Wellesley College, 1895-97 ; 
Teacher of Science in the High School, New Bedford, Mass., 1897-1900 ; 
Teacher of Chemistry in the High School, Newton, Mass., 1900-09 ; Stu- 
dent of Chemistry, the Sorbonne and University of Berlin, 1909-10. 

Parbis, Marion See page 25. 

Fellow in Economics and Politics, 1905-06. 

Paschall, Annie Goode. 

Fellow in Greek, 1894-95. A.B., Vanderbilt University, 1894. 

Died, 1895. 

Peebles, Florence, See page 19. 

Fellow in Biology, 1896-97. 

Peebles, Rose Jeffries, . . . 1217 South 13th Street, Birmingham, Ala. 

Fellow in English, 1907-08. A.B., Mississippi State College for Women, 1891, 
University of Chicago, Summer, 1897, 1898, 1905 ; Harvard University, 
Summer, 1902 ; Columbia University, Summer, 1903 ; Graduate Student in 
English, Bryn Mawr College, 1906-07, and Graduate Scholar and Fellow by 
Courtesy in English, 1908-09 ; Special Research Scholar and Student, 
British Museum and Bodleian Library, Oxford, Summer, 1909 ; Instructor 
in English, Vassar College, 1909-10. 

Perkins, Elizabeth Mary, See page 25. 

Fellow in Latin, 1902-03. 

Petty, Maby, Greensboro, N. C. 

Fellow in Chemistry. 1895-96. S.B., Wellesley College. 1885. Teacher of 
Latin, Guilford College, 1888-93 : Teacher of Chemistry and Physics in 
the State Normal and Industrial College, Greensboro, 1893-95, and 1896-99, 
and Head of Department of Chemistry. 1899-1909 ; Member of Book Com- 
mittee of Public Library, Greensboro, 1905-06. 

Potts, Laueette Etjstis, Pelham Manor, N. Y. 

Fellow in English, 1899-1900. Mistress of Pembroke Hall East, Bryn Mawr 

' College, 1895-96. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1897, group, Latin and English. 

Sorbonne and College de France, 1896-97 ; Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr 

College, 1897-98, Reader in English, 1897-99 ; Student, University of Munich, 

1900-01 ; Chairman of Eurydice Chorus, Pelham Manor, 1908-09. 

Married, 1905, Mr. Lewis Frederic Pease. 

Puedie, Eleanoe, Ortler, Prestbury, Gloucestershire, England. 

Fellow in Greek, 1895-96. Newnham College, University of Cambridge, Eng- 
land, 1890-94 ; Classical Tripos, Part I, First Class, 1893 ; Part II, 1894 ; 
Ph.D., University of Freiburg, 1S97. Holder of the Marion Kennedy Stu- 
dentship, and Student in Indo-European Philology, University of Freiburg, 
1894-95 ; Classical Mistress in the Notting Hill High School, London, 1897- 
98 ; Head Classical Tutor, Cheltenham Ladies' College, Cheltenham, Eng- 
land, 1898-1909. 

Rabouen, Sara -Beewee Francis, Centralia, Mo. 

Fellow in Mathematics, 1906-07. A.B., University of Missouri, 1902, and 
A.M., 1904. Scholar in Mathematics, University of Missouri, 1903-04 ; 
Assistant Principal and Teacher of Mathematics in the High School, 
Fredericktown, Mo., 1907-08, and Principal, 1908-09. 

Ragsdale, Virginia See page 26. 

Fellow in Mathematics, 1902-03. 

Randolph, Haeeiet, See page 11. 

Fellow in Biology, 1889-90. 



41 



Reed, Bertha, McMillan Hall, Washington University, St. Louis, Mo. 

Fellow in Teutonic Philology, 1906-07. Illinois Woman's College, 1893-96. 
Ph.B., De Pauw University, 1898, and A.M., 1900. University of Berlin, 
Winter Semester, 1902-03, University of Zurich, 1903, 1903-04. Instructor 
in German, Bradley Polytechnic Institute, Peoria, 111., 1907-09. 

Married, 1909, Mr. George Raleigh Coffman. 

Reed, Margaret Adaline, Meyersdale, Pa. 

Fellow in Biology, 1908-09. A.B., Woman's College of Baltimore, 1901. 
Graduate Student in Biology, Bryn Mawr College, 1901-03, and Graduate 
Scholar, 1902-03. Wood's Holl Laboratory, Summers of 1900 and 1902 ; 
Assistant in Zoological Laboratory, Columbia University, 1903-05 ; Univer- 
sity of Ziirich, Summer, 1906 ; Assistant in Zoology, Columbia University, 
1903-06 ; Lecturer in Physiology, New York Medical College for Women, 
and Barnard College. 1904-07 ; Student in Berlin, Summer, 1908. 

Reimer, Marie, See page 26. 

Fellow in Chemistry, 1899-1900, 1901-02. 

Reynolds, Grace Potter, See page 20. 

Fellow in Chemistry, 1908-09. 

Reynolds, Minnie Beatrice, 244 Myrtle Avenue, San Francisco, Cal. 

Fellow in Greek, 1897-98. A.B., University of California, 1895, and A.M., 
1897. Instructor in Greek and Latin in the High School, Centerville, Cal., 
1S96-97 ; Fellow by Courtesy in Greek, Bryn Mawr College, 1898-99 ; Teacher 
of Latin in the Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., 1898-99 ; In- 
structor in Latin, Vassar College, 1899-1900 ; Instructor in Greek in the 
High School, Los Angeles, Cal., 1900-01 ; Teacher of Greek and Latin in 
the High School, San Francisco, 1901-03. 

Married, 1903, Mr. James A. Kinkead. 

Ritchie, Mary Helen, 

Fellow in Latin, 1898-99. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1896, group, Greek and 
Latin. A.M., 1897, and Ph.D., 1902, subjects, Latin and Greek. Grad- 
uate Scholar in Greek and Latin, Bryn Mawr College, 1896-97, Graduate 
Student, 1897-98 ; Secretary of Bryn Mawr College, 1899-1904. 

Died, 1905. 

Rock, Amy Cordova, 1455 Belmont Street, Washington, D. C. 

Fellow in Chemistry, 1894-95. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1S93, group, Physics 
and Chemistrv. Assistant in Chemical Laboratory and Graduate Student. 
Bryn Mawr College, 1893-94 ; Student, University of Heidelberg, 1895-96, 
and University of Berlin, 1S96-97 ; Chairman of Committee on Home 
Economics in the Washington Branch of the Association of Collegiate 
Alumna?, 1906-08 ; Corresponding Secretary of the Washington Committee 
of the League for Social Service, 1907-08. 

Married, 1899, Mr. Frederick Leslie Ransome. 

Salmon, Lucy Maynard, 263 Mill Street, Poughkeepsie, N. T. 

Fellow in History, 1886-87. A.B., University of Michigan, 1876, and A.M., 
1883. Teacher of History In the Indiana State Normal School, 18S3-86 : 
Associate Professor of History, Vassar College, 1887-89, and Professor of 
History, 1889-1910. 

Sandison, Helen Estabrook See page 1 5. 

Fellow in English, 1908-09. 

Satterthwaite, Sarah E., 2037 Franklin Avenue, Toledo, O. 

Fellow in Greek, 1886-87. A.B., University of Michigan, 1886. Assistant In 
Greek and Latin, Hope College, Holland, Mich., 1887-88 ; Private Tutor in 
Greek and Latin, 1898-1900. 

Married, 1890, Dr. Francis Alexander Leslie. 

Schaeefer, Helen Elizabeth, See page 26, 

Fellow in Physics, 1904-05. 



42 

DE SCHWEINITZ, AGNES, 

11 Curnmings Apartments, First and D Streets, Salt Lake City, 
Utah. 

Fellow in Teutonic Philology, 1902-03. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1899, 
group, German and French, and A.M., 1900. Graduate Scholar in German 
and Teutonic Philology, Bryn Mawr College, 1899-1900 ; Teacher of German 
in the Portland School, Portland, Ore., 1900-01 ; University of Leipsic. 
1901-02 ; Teacher of German in the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore, Md., 
1903-08. 

Married, 1908, Mr. Edward Rooins Zalinski. 

Sewall, Hannah Robie, Forest Glen, Md. 

Fellow in History, 1888-89. A.B., University of Minnesota, 1884, and Ph.D., 
1898 ; A.M., University of Michigan, 1887. Fellow hy Courtesy in His- 
tory, Bryn Mawr College, 1889-90 ; Assistant in Political Science, Univer- 
sity of Minnesota, 1893-1901 ; Assistant, Boston Children's Aid Society, 
1904-07. 

Shapiro, Rebecca, Marshfield, Wis. 

Fellow in Romance Languages, 1900-01. L.B., University of Wisconsin, 1898, 
and L.M., 1900. Graduate Student, University of Wisconsin, 1899-1900 ; 
Assistant Principal of the High School, Grand Rapids, Wis., 1902-03. 

Married, 1904, Mr. Richard Strauss. 

Shearer, Edna Aston, See page 26. 

Junior Fellow in Philosophy, 1904-05 ; Fellow in Philosophy, 1906-07. 

Sheavyn, Phoebe A. B., The Oaks, Fallowfleld, Manchester, England. 

Fellow in English. 1895-96. Scholar, University College of Wales, Aberyst- 
wyth, Wales, 1887-89, and 1892-94 ; B.A., University of London, 18S9 ; M.A., 
1894, and D.Litt., 1906. Reader in English, Bryn Mawr College, 1894-95 ; 
Lecturer and Tutor in English Literature to the Association for Promoting 
the Education of Women in Oxford, England, 1896-1905 ; Resident Tutor 
and Lecturer in English, Somerville College, University of Oxford, England, 
1897-1905 ; Member of Governing Committee of Women's University Settle- 
ment, Southwark, London, 1900-07 ; Member of Governing Court of Univer- 
sity of Wales ; Member of Council of University College of Wales ; Tutor 
for Women Students, University of Manchester, Warden of Women's Hall 
of Residence, and Special Lecturer in English Literature. 1907-10 ; Presi- 
dent of Manchester Branch of Federation of University Women, 1908-09. 

Shute, Helen Winifred, 25 Fourth Street, Bangor, Me. 

Fellow in Teutonic Philology, 1893-94. A.B., Smith College, 1887. Assistant 
in German, Smith College, 1887-93 ; Fellow hy Courtesy in Teutonic Phil- 
ology, Bryn Mawr College, 1894-95 ; Student in Teutonic Philology, Uni- 
versity of Gottingen, 1895-99 ; Alumnae Trustee of Smith College, 1902-05. 

Married, 1900, Mr. Warren J. Moulton. 

Sinclair, Alice, Wailuku, Maui, H. I. 

Fellow in Teutonic Philology, 1903-04. Ph.B., Oberlin College, 1899. Teacher 
of German and Science in the Kent Place School, Summit, N. J., 1900-02 ; 
Student, University of Marburg, 1902-03 ; Teacher of German and English, 
Brockport State Normal School, Brockport, N. Y., 1904-05, and of French 
and German, 1905-06. 

Married, 1906, Mr. Rowland Bacchus Dodge. 

Smith, Amelia Catherine 4003 Powelton Avenue, Philadelphia. 

Fellow in Biology, 1900-01. S.B., University of Pennsylvania, 1899. Grad- 
uate Scholar in Biology, Bryn Mawr College, 1899-1900 ; Demonstrator in 
Zoology, University of Pennsylvania, 1901-02 ; Graduate Student, Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, 1904-06. 

Married, 1901, Mr. Philip Powell Calvert. 

Smith, Eva Maria, 56 Gowan Avenue, Fulhana, London, England. 

Fellow in Mathematics, 1908-09. Newnham College, University of Cam- 
bridge, 1904-08. Cambridge Mathematical Tripos, First Class, Part I, 
1907, and Part II, 1908. 



43 

Smith, Minna Steele, Newnham College, Cambridge, England. 

Fellow in Teutonic Philology, 1894-96. Newnham College, University of Cam- 
bridge, 1890-94; Mediaeval and Modern Languages Tripos, First Class, 
1S93. Assistant Lecturer in English, Newnham College, 1896-98 : 
Staff Lecturer in Mediaeval and Modern Languages, Newnham College, 1898- 
1903, and Head Lecturer in Mediaeval and Modern Languages, 1905-10 ; 
Lecturer in English, Girton College, University of Cambridge, 1898-1903, 
and 1906-10. 

Southworth, Effie A., .420 East 4th Street, Tucson, Ariz. 

Fellow in Biology, 1885-86. S.B., University of Michigan, 1885. Student 
Assistant in the Biological Laboratory, Bi-yn Mawr College, 1886-87 ; As- 
sistant Mycologist of the United States Agricultural Bureau, Washington, 
D. C, 1887-92 ; Assistant in Botany, Barnard College, 1892-95. 

Married, 1896, Mr. Volney Morgan Spalding. 

Stevens, Nettie Maria, See page 27. 

Fellow in Biology, 1902-03. 

Stewart, Anne Amelia, ... 28 South Street, Halifax, N. S., Canada. 

Fellow in Mathematics, 1886-87. University College, London, 1880-82; B.Sc, 
Dalhousie College, 1886. Teacher of Mathematics in Miss Mary E. Ste- 
vens's School, Germantown, Philadelphia, 1888-93, 1895-96 ; Student in 
Mathematics and Physics, Newnham College, University of Cambridge, Eng- 
land, 1893-95 ; Teacher of Mathematics in the Stevens School, German- 
town, 1896-99 ; Private Tutor, 1900-03, 1908-09 ; Teacher of Mathematics, 
St. Margaret's College, Toronto, Canada, 1903-04 ; Teacher of Mathematics, 
Miss Knox's School, Briarcliff Manor, N. Y., 1905-06; Private Tutor, 
1909-10. 

Street, Jennette Atwater, ..47 Lakeview Avenue, Cambridge, Mass. 

Fellow in Latin. 1895-96. A.B., University of Toronto. 1895. Teacher of 

Classics, St. Margaret's College, Toronto, Canada, 1897-1901. 
Married, 1901, Professor Edward C. Jeffrey. 

Sweet, Marguerite 250 West 72nd Street, New York City. 

Fellow in English, 1891-92. A.B., Vassar College, 1887 ; Ph.D., Bryn Mawr 
College, 1892, subjects, English and Teutonic Philology. Graduate Student 
in Teutonic Philology and English, Bryn Mawr College, 1889-90. Graduate 
Scholar in Teutonic Philology, 1890-91 ; Instructor in English, Vassar Col- 
lege, 1892-97 ; Professor of English Literature, Mt. Holyoke College, 1897- 
99; Teacher of English in the Misses Ely's School, New York City, 1S99- 
1905 ; Academic Head of the Hawthorne School, New York City, 1906-10. 

Swindler, Mary Hamilton, See page 15. 

Fellow in Greek, 1907-09. 

Taylor, Lily Ross, 1532 University Avenue, Madison, Wis. 

A.B., University of Wisconsin, 1906. Graduate Scholar in Latin, Brvn Mawr 
College, 1906-07 ; Fellow in Latin, 1907-08 ; Reader in Latin, and Gradu- 
ate Student in Greek and Latin, 1908-09 ; Student, University of Bonn, 
Summer, 1909, and American School of Classical Studies, Rome," 1909-10. 

Thompson, Charlotte de Mackxot, ....The Terraces, Camden, S. C. 

Fellow in Romance Languages, 1896-97. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1890, 
group, Greek and French, and A.M., 1S97. 

Tibbals, Kate Watkins, "Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

Fellow In English, 1901-02. A.B., Wellesley College, 1899 ; Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania, 1904. Graduate Scholar in English, Brvn Mawr Col- 
lege, 1900-01 ; Fellow in English, University of Pennsylvania, 1902-03, 
and University Fellow, 1903-04 ; Instructor in English, Wellesley College, 
1904-05 ; Instructor in English Literature, Vassar College, 1905-10. 

Torelle, Ellen, 1017 14th Avenue, S. E. Minneapolis, Minn. 

Fellow in Biology, 1903-04. Ph.B., University of Minnesota, 1901, and A.M., 
1902. Graduate Scholar, Bryn Mawr College, 1902-03 ; Dean of Milwaukee- 
Downer College and Professor of Biology, 1905-08 ; Scholar of the Naples 
Table Association for Promoting Scientific Research by Women, 1909-10. 



44 

Towle, Elizabeth Wiliams, . .The Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Fellow in Biology, 1899-1900. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1898, group, Chem- 
istry and Biology, and A.M., 1899. Graduate Scholar in Physics and 
Biology, Bryn Mawr College, 1898-99 ; Teacher of Science in the High 
School, Middletown, Conn., 1900-01 ; Instructor in Biology, Rockford College, 
Rockford, 111., 1901-03 ; Fellow in Physiology, University of Chicago, 1903- 
04 ; Graduate Student, Columbia University, 1904-06 ; Teacher of Physiology 
in Miss Jacobi's School, New York City, 1904-05 ; Teacher of Science in the 
Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., 1907-10. 

Traver, Hope, See page 27. 

Fellow in English, 1903-04. 

Urdahl, Margerethe, Charleston, 111. 

Fellow in Teutonic Philology, 1900-02, and Special Fellow in Teutonic Phil- 
ology, 1902-03. L.B., University of Wisconsin, 1896, and Ph.D., Bryn 
Mawr College, 1904, subjects, Teutonic Philology, German Literature and 
Sanscrit. Student, University of Berlin, 1898 and 1899 ; University of 
Heidelberg Summer Term, 1899 ; University of Christiania, October, 1899 ; 
T'eacher of German and Latin in the Chelten Hills School, Wyncote, Pa., 
1903-04; Teacher of German and History, Eastern Illinois State Normal 
School, Charleston, 111., 1905-06. 

Married, 1906, Mr. Lewis Albert Anderson. 

VanDeman, Esther Boise, 2514 13th Street, Washington, D. C. 

Fellow in Latin, 1892-93. A.B., University of Michigan, 1891, and A.M., 
1892 ; Ph.D., University of Chicago, 189S. Instructor in Latin, Welles- 
ley College, 1893-95 ; Teacher of Latin in the Bryn Mawr School, Balti- 
more, Md., 1895-96 ; Fellow in Latin, University of Chicago, 1896-98 ; Act- 
ing Professor of Latin, Mt. Holyoke College, 1898-9©., and Associate Pro- 
fessor of Latin, 1899-1901 ; American School of Classical Studies, Rome, 
1901-03 ; Associate Professor of Latin, the Woman's College, Baltimore, 
1903-06 ; Fellow in Classical Archaeology of the Carnegie Institution, Rome, 
1906-08, and Research Associate, 1908-10. 

Waddell, Mary Evelyn Gertrude, Orono, Ontario, Canada. 

Fellow in Mathematics, 1904-05. A.B., University of Toronto, 1903, and 
A.M., 1904. Graduate Scholar in Mathematics and Physics, Bryn Mawr 
College, 1903-04 ; Instructor in Mathematics in St. Margaret's College, To- 
ronto, and Graduate Student and Tutor, University of Toronto, 1906-10. 

Walker, Anna Martha, . . . .2218 Elsinore Avenue, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Fellow in Latin, 1905-06. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1895, group, Greek and 
Latin ; A.M., Leland Stanford, Jr., University, 1901. Teacher of English 
in the National Institute for Girls, Guatemala City, Central America, 
1896-97 ; Graduate Student, Leland Stanford Jr., University, 1897-98, 
1900-01 ; Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, Second Semester, 1898- 
99 ; Teacher in the Misses Wyllie's School, Mt. Holly, N. J., 1899-1900 ; 
Teacher of Latin and French in the High School, Ogden, Utah, 1901-02, and 
Teacher of Latin and Spanish, 1902-04 ; Student, American School of Clas- 
sical Studies, Rome, 1904-05 ; T'eacher of Greek in the High School, Los 
Angeles, Cal., 1906-10. 

Warren, Winifred See page 27. 

Fellow in Latin, 1893-94. 

Wergeland, Agnes Mathilde, Laramie, Wyo. 

Fellow in History, 1890-91. Studied under the direction of Prof. Konrad 
Maurer, Munich, 1884-86 ; University of Zurich, 1888-90 ; Ph.D., University 
of Zurich, 1890. Reader in History of Art, Bryn Mawr College, 1891-93 ; 
Docent in History, University of Chicago, 1896-1902, and Non-Resident 
Reader in History, University Extension Division, 1903-05, and Non- 
Resident Instructor, 1906-09 ; Professor of History and French and Spanish, 
University of Wyoming, 1902-10. 

White, Florence Donnell Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

Fellow in French, 1907-08. A.B., Mt. Holyoke College, 1903, and A.M., 1907, 
Student, University of Paris, 1903-04 ; Graduate Scholar in Romance 
Languages, Bryn Mawr College, 1906-07 ; Instructor in French, Vassar 



45 

Wilkinson, Annie Lyndesay, 

623 Westview Street, Germantown, Philadelphia. 

Fellow In Mathematics, 1899-1900. A.B., Vassar College, 1897, and A.M., 
1898. Graduate Scholar, Vassar College, 1897-98. Bahbott Fellow of 
Vassar College, and Graduate Scholar in German and Mathematics, Bryn 
Mawr College, 1898-99 ; Instructor in Mathematics, Vassar College, 1900-02. 

Married, 1902, Dr. Joseph Head. 

Williams, Ella C, 326 West 58th Street, New York City. 

Fellow in Mathematics, 1885-86. A.M., University of Michigan, 1880. Studied 
under Professor Schwarz, Gottingen, Germany, 1S83-85 ; Newnham College, 
University of Cambridge, England, Spring Term, 1884 ; Teacher of Mathe- 
matics in Miss Moses's School, New York City, 1886-87 ; Teacher of Mathe- 
matics in the State Normal School, Plymouth, N. H., "1887-89 ; Teacher of 
Mathematics in Miss Spence's School, New York City, 1892-1910. 

Willis, Gwendolen Brown, 941 Lake Avenue, Racine, Wis. 

Fellow in Greek, 1902-04. A.B., University of Chicago, 1896, Ph.D.. Bryn 
Mawr College, 1906, subjects, Greek and Archaeology. Graduate Student, 
University of Chicago, 1900-01 ; American School of Classical Studies, 
Athens, 1901-02 ; Teacher of Greek and Latin, Milwaukee-Downer College, 
1904-10. 

Winston, Mary Frances, 1702 Massachusetts Street, Lawrence, Kan. 

Fellow in Mathematics, 1891-92. A.B., University of Wisconsin, 1889 ; Ph.D., 
University of Gottingen, 1897 ; Teacher of Mathematics, Downer Col- 
lege, 1889-91 ; Honorary Fellow in Mathematics, University of Chicago, 
1892-93 ; Holder of the European Fellowship of the Association of Col- 
legiate Alumnae, 1895-96 ; Student in Mathematics, University of Gottin- 
gen, 1893-96 ; Professor of Mathematics, Kansas State Agricultural Col- 
lege, 1897-1900. 

Married, 1900, Mr. Henry Byron Newson. 

Wood, Ida, 203S Spring Garden Street, Philadelphia. 

Fellow in English, 1888-89. A.B., Vassar College, 1877, and A.M., 1889 ; 
Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College. 1891. Graduate Student in English, Bryn 
Mawr College, 1887-88, 1889-90, and Fellow by Courtesy in English, 1890- 
91 ; Secretary of the Woman's Department, University of Pennsylvania, 
1892-93 ; Secretary of the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore, Md., 1894-96. 



46 



SUMMAET OF FELLOWSHIPS AWARDED. 

Eukopean Fellowships. Founded. Held by 

Bryn Mawr European By the Trustees in 1885. .20 students 

Mary E. Garrett European/By Miss Garrett in 1894. .15 students 
President M. Carey Thomas 

European By Miss Garrett in 1896.. .13 students 

Bryn Mawr Research. ... .By Anonymous Donor, 1906. 1 student 
Special Ottendorfer Memo- 
rial Research Fellowship 
in Teutonic Philology ..By Mrs. Anna Woeris- 

hoeffer in 1907 1 student 



Total number of European Fellows 50 

Resident Fellowships. Founded by the Trustees in Held by 

In Greek 1885 21 students 

In Latin 1892 16 students 

In English 1885 *20 students 

In Teutonic Philology 1893 9 students 

In Romance Languages 1893 12 students 

In History and Economics and 

Politics 1885 23 students 

In Philosophy 1896 7 students 

In Mathematics 1885 20 students 

In Physics 1896 9 students 

In Chemistry 1893 14 students 

In Biology 1885 18 students 

Research Fellowship in Chemistry . . . 1907 f 1 student 



Total number of Resident Fellows, omitting duplicates 167 



Total $217 



*Two students have held Fellowships in English who also held Fellowships 
in other subjects. 

fThis student previously held a Fellowship in Chemistry. 

JOf these twenty-five have held both European and Resident Fellowships. 



BRYN MAWR COLLEGE. 



GRADUATE COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 



Bryn Mawr College, situated at Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania, 
five miles from Philadelphia, was endowed by Dr. Joseph W. 
Taylor, of Burlington, New Jersey, who purposed founding an 
institution of learning for the advanced education of women 
which should afford them "all the advantages of a college 
education that are so freely offered to young men." In the 
spring of 1885 the first program was issued, and the college 
opened for instruction in the following autumn. 

Three classes of persons are admitted to the lectures and class 
work of the college — graduate students, undergraduate students, 
and hearers. For the convenience of graduate students the regu- 
lations of the graduate department and the graduate courses of 
instruction are published separately. No undergraduates are 
admitted to graduate courses. 

Regulations of the Graduate Department. 

From the first it has been the policy of the Trustees of Bryn 
Mawr College to organise no department in which they could not 
provide for graduate as well as undergraduate study. Only such 
instructors have been chosen as are qualified to direct both grad- 
uate and undergraduate work. In each department a consecu- 
tive series of graduate courses pursued throughout three years 
provides preparation in the chief or major subject of the exami- 
nation for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, and certain courses 
may be pursued for one or two years and offered as one of the two 
minor or secondary subjects. 

Admission. 

Graduate students must have presented a diploma from some 
college of acknowledged standing.* They may pursue any 

* The certificates of the women's colleges of the English universities of Oxford and 
Cambridge, are regarded as equivalent to a first degree, — i. e. to the degree of Bache- 
lor of Arts. 

(47) 



48 

courses offered by the college for which their previous training 
has fitted them; but they must satisfy the several instructors of 
their ability to profit by the courses they desire to follow, and 
may be required to pursue certain introductory or auxiliary 
studies before they are admitted to the advanced or purely 
graduate courses. They are, moreover, entitled to personal guid- 
ance and direction, supervision of their general reading and 
furtherance of their investigations, from the instructors, and 
their needs will be considered in the arrangement of new courses 
of lectures; they must consult the President in regard to the 
courses they are to pursue, and must be duly registered for those 
courses at the President's office. 

A reading knowledge of French and German is regarded as of 
the utmost importance to all graduate students, and is required of 
all candidates for a second degree. The undergraduate depart- 
ment will afford the student every opportunity for making good 
any deficiencies in this respect. 

Fellowships and Scholarships. 

The most distinguished place among the graduate students is 
held by the Fellows, who must reside in the college during the 
academic year. Twelve resident fellowships, of the value of 
five hundred and twenty-five dollars each, are awarded annually 
in Greek, Latin, English, German and Teutonic Philology, 
Romance Languages, History or Economics and Politics, Phil- 
osophy, Archaeology, Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry, and 
Biology. They are open for competition to graduates of Bryn 
Mawr College, or of any other college of good standing, and will 
be awarded only to candidates who have completed at least one 
year of graduate work after obtaining their first degree. The 
fellowships are intended as an honor, and are awarded in 
recognition of previous attainments; generally speaking, they 
will be awarded to the candidates that have studied longest 
or to those whose work gives most promise of future success. 

The holder of a fellowship is expected to devote at least one 
half her time to the department in which the fellowship is 
awarded, and to show, by the presentation of a thesis or in some 
other manner, that her studies have not been without result. 



49 



All fellows may study for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, 
the fellowship being counted, for this purpose, as equivalent to 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts. Fellows that continue their 
studies at the college after the expiration of the fellowship, may, 
by a vote of the directors, receive the rank of Fellows by Courtesy. 

A Research Fellowship in Chemistry has been founded and 
was awarded for the first time in 1907. It is open to graduate 
students who have received the degree of Doctor of Philosophy 
or who have completed equivalent work. The fellowship is of 
the value of seven hundred and fifty dollars, and the holder is 
required to reside at Bryn Mawr College for one year and to 
assist the head of the Department of Chemistry in research work. 

Fellows are expected to attend all college functions, to wear 
academic dress, to assist in the conduct of examinations, and to 
give about an hour a week to the care of special libraries in the 
halls of residence and in the seminaries, but no such service may 
be required of them except by a written request from the presi- 
dent's office; they are not permitted, while holding the fellow- 
ship, to teach, or to undertake any other duties in addition to 
their college work. Fellows are required to reside in the college 
and are assigned rooms by the Secretary of the College. They 
are charged the usual fee of four hundred and five dollars for 
tuition, board, room rent, and infirmary fee. 

Eighteen Graduate Scholarships, of the value of two hundred 
dollars each, may be awarded to candidates next in merit to the 
successful candidates for the fellowships; they are also open for 
competition to graduates of Bryn Mawr College, or of any other 
college of good standing. Scholars are expected to reside in the 
college, to attend all college functions, to wear academic dress 
and to assist in the conduct of examinations. 

Ten Graduate Scholarships, of the value of four hundred 
and five dollars each, were founded in 1909 and are open, 
five to English, Scotch, or Irish women, and five to German 
women, whose academic work has reached a standard equiv- 
alent to that denoted by the Bachelor's degree of any 
American college or university of acknowledged standing. 
The amount of the scholarship, four hundred and five dollars, 
covers the fees for tuition, board, residence, and infirmary 
fee for the academic year. A furnished single room is 



50 

assigned to each scholar, but this is not available in the 
Christmas and Easter vacations when scholars who remain 
at the College will have to pay the expenses of board and 
residence at approximately the same rate as is charged for 
graduate students during the academic year. 

Application for resident fellowships or scholarships should be 
made as early as possible to the President of the College, and 
must be made not later than the fifteenth* of April preceding the 
academic year for which the fellowship or scholarship is desired. 
Blank forms of application will be forwarded to the applicants. 
A definite answer will be given within two weeks from the latest 
date set for receiving applications. Any original papers, printed 
or in manuscript, which have been prepared by the applicant 
and sent in support of her application, will be returned, when 
stamps for that purpose are enclosed, or specific directions for 
return by express are given. Letters or testimonials from pro- 
fessors and instructors will be filed for reference. 

The Anna Ottendorfer Memorial Research Fellowship in 
German and Teutonic Philology of the value of seven hundred 
dollars applicable to the expenses of one year's study and resi- 
dence at some German university is awarded annually to a 
graduate student who has completed at least one year of graduate 
study at Bryn Mawr College. The fellowship will be awarded 
to the candidate who has pursued the most advanced work, or 
whose studies afford the most promise of future success. She 
must show such proficiency in her studies or in independent work 
as to furnish reason to believe that she will be able to conduct 
independent investigations in the field of Teutonic Philology or 
German. 

Two European fellowships, founded by Miss Garrett, of Balti- 
more, are open to graduate students who are enrolled as candi- 
dates for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. One, founded in 
1896, and named by the donor the President M. Carey Thomas 

* In the case of candidates for the Scholarships open to British and German women 
applications must be received by April the first. Applications for the scholarships 
should be accompanied by full particulars of the candidate's academic work, by 
diplomas or certificates and by letters of recommendation from professors and should 
be addressed in the case of British candidates to the President of Bryn Mawr College, 
Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania, T*. S. A., and in the case of German candidates to Seiner 
Excellenz dem Herrn Staatssekretar des Innern, Reichsamt des Innern, Berlin, Ger- 
many. 



51 

Fellowship, is awarded annually on the ground of excellence in 
scholarship to a student in her first year of graduate work at 
Bryn Mawr College; the other, founded in 1894, and known 
as the Mary E. Garrett Fellowship, is awarded annually 
on the ground of excellence in scholarship to a student still in 
residence who has for two years pursued graduate studies at 
Bryn Mawr College. These fellowships, of the value of five 
hundred dollars each, are intended to defray the expenses of one 
year's study and residence at some foreign university, English or 
Continental. The choice of a university may be determined by 
the holder's own preference, subject to the approval of the 
Faculty. 

Studies Leading to a Second Degree. 

Graduates of Bryn Mawr College, and graduates of other col- 
leges, who shall have satisfied the Academic Council that the 
course of study for which they received a degree is equivalent to 
that for which the degree of Bachelor of Arts is given at Bryn 
Mawr College, or who shall have attended such additional courses 
of lectures as may be prescribed, may apply to the Academic 
Council to be enrolled as candidates for the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy and Master of Arts ; admission to the graduate school 
does not, in itself, qualify a student to become a candidate for 
this degree. A separate degree of Master of Arts is open to 
graduates of Bryn Mawr College, but to them only. 

The Degree of Master of Arts. 

The candidate for the degree of Master of Arts must be a Bache- 
lor of Arts of Bryn Mawr College and must have studied for 
one full year in the graduate school of Bryn Mawr College, 
devoting herself to systematic advanced work approved by the 
Graduate Committee of the Academic Council. The candidate 
must submit her proposed course of study for the approval of 
this committee on or before the second Wednesday in November. 
She must pass a special written examination on each subject to 
the satisfaction of the department in which she has studied, and 
must announce her candidacy to the President not later than the 
first day of May in the academic year in which the degree is to 
be conferred. 



52 



The Degree of Doctor of Philosophy and Master of Arts. 

The degree of Doctor of Philosophy and Master of Arts may be 
conferred upon graduates of Bryn Mawr College, and upon gradu- 
ates of other colleges who shall have satisfied the Academic 
Council either that the course of study for which they received a 
degree is equivalent to that for which the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts is given by Bryn Mawr College, or that it has been adequately 
supplemented by subsequent study. 

The candidate must have pursued for at least three years, after 
having received the first degree, a course of liberal (non-profes- 
sional) study at some college or university approved by the 
Academic Council, and must have spent at least two of these 
years at Bryn Mawr College. The course of study leading to 
the degree of Doctor of Philosophy and Master of Arts must 
consist of one principal, or major, subject and one or two sub- 
ordinate, or minor, subjects and must be divided between at least 
two departments. Two-thirds of the candidate's time should be 
spent on the major subject and the remaining one- third on the 
minor subject or subjects, and the suggested combination of 
major and minor subjects for the final examination must 
have been submitted for approval to the Graduate Committee. 
The candidate may be required to pursue certain auxiliary 
studies in connection with the subject that she has elected; 
and the degree of Doctor of Philosophy is given to no one 
who cannot read French and German, or who is unacquainted 
with Latin. The candidate must have written, on some 
subject connected with her major subject of study, a disserta- 
tion approved by the Faculty that bears satisfactory evidence 
of original research and must pass written examinations 
and an oral examination in the presence of the members of the 
Faculty on both major and minor subjects. These examinations 
are held after the dissertation has been accepted by the depart- 
ment in which it is offered and must be taken within the academic 
year in which the candidate applies for the degree. The degree 
is not conferred until the candidate has satisfied the above 
requirements and deposited one hundred and fifty printed copies 
of her dissertation, bound according to a prescribed model, in 
the office of the Secretary of the College. The degree of Doctor 
of Philosophy will in no case be conferred by the college as an 
honorary degree. 



53 



Expenses. 

For graduate students attending six or more hours a week 
of lectures, and for fellows and graduate scholars the tuition 
fee is one hundred and twenty-five dollars a year, payable 
half-yearly in advance. For other graduate students who do 
not wish to devote all their time to graduate work the fees 
are as follows, payable in advance: for one hour a week of 
lectures, ten dollars a semester; for two hours a week of lectures, 
twenty dollars a semester; for three hours a week of lectures, 
thirty dollars u semester; and for four or five hours a week 
of lectures, forty dollars a semester.* This arrangement is 
made especially for non-resident graduate students, but those 
who wish to take five hours a week of lectures or less may 
live in the college halls on the understanding that they must 
give up their rooms if needed for students who are taking the 
full amount of graduate work and paying the regular tuition fee. 
The tuition fee for the semester becomes due as soon as the stu- 
dent is registered in the college office. No reduction of this fee 
can be made on account of absence or for any other reason what- 
soever. Graduate students are admitted to residence or to 
attendance on lectures at any time during the year, and in this 
case a proportionate reduction is made in the charges for board 
and room-rent and for tuition. Every student who enters the 
college must register immediately at the comptroller's office, and 
must register her courses at the president's office within two weeks 
after entrance under penalty of exclusion from the college. Any 
change made later in the courses registered must be reported 
immediately to the president's office, or the courses will not be 
permitted to count, and a charge of one dollar will be made for 
each change made in the course after it has been definitely 
registered. 

* The fees charged are reckoned on the basis of the actual hours of conference or lec- 
ture, irrespective of the number of undergraduate hours to which the course is regarded 
as equivalent. 

In counting the number of hours for which a graduate student is registered the 
following special arrangements are made in regard to laboratory courses: payment 
for a one hour lecture course in a scientific department entitles the student to four hours 
of laboratory work in addition with no extra charge except the laboratory fee. Stu- 
dents registered for laboratory work only, are charged the following tuition fee: for 
each two and one-half hours of undergraduate laboratory course and for each five hours 
of graduate laboratory course the same fee as for a one hour lecture course. The labora- 
tory fees as stated on page 54 are charged in addition to the charge for tuition. 



54 



Graduate students taking courses in scientific departments (Physics, Chemistry, 
Geology, Biology, and Psychology) amounting to six or more hours a week of lecture 
courses or its equivalent in laboratory courses are charged a laboratory fee of eigh- 
teen dollars a semester, with the following exceptions: if the student takes, as a regu- 
lar student, courses in subjects not enumerated above amounting to six hours a week 
the laboratory fee is reduced to twelve doUars a semester; and if she takes, as a regular 
student, courses in subjects not enumerated above amounting to ten hours a week the 
laboratory fee is reduced to six dollars a semester. 

Graduate students taking less than six hours a week of lectures, or its equivalent in 
laboratory work, are charged a laboratory fee of ten dollars a semester for every labora- 
tory course of four or more hours a week, and of five dollars a semester for every labora- 
tory course of less than four hours a week. 

In courses in geology each hour of field work counts as one hour of laboratory work. 

Residence. 

Residence in the college buildings is optional except for holders 
of resident fellowships and scholarships. In each hall of resi- 
dence, except Merion Hall, a special wing or corridor is reserved 
for graduate students, and in order to secure entire quiet no 
undergraduate students are permitted to engage rooms in the 
graduate wings. The expense of board and residence in the 
graduate wings of the college halls is two hundred and seventy- 
five dollars. Of this amount two hundred dollars is the charge 
for board, and is payable half-yearly in advance; the remainder 
is room-rent, and is payable yearly in advance. Every student 
has a separate bedroom. Room-rent includes all expenses of 
furnishing, service, heating, and light. 

Plans and descriptions of the academic buildings and of the 
halls of residence, Merion Hall, Radnor Hall, Denbigh Hall, 
Pembroke Hall West, Pembroke Hall East, and Rockefeller Hall, 
with a full account of the halls and tariff of rooms, are published 
as Part 4 of the Bryn Mawr College Calendar and may be ob- 
tained by application to the Secretary of the College. Each of the 
halls of residence (except Pembroke, which has a common dining- 
hall and kitchen for the two wings) has its separate kitchen and 
clining-hall, provides accommodation for from sixty to seventy 
students, and is under the charge of a resident warden. 

Application for rooms should be made as early as possible. 
The demand for graduate rooms is very great, and since every 
room unnecessarily reserved may prevent some other student 
from entering the college, a deposit of fifteen dollars is required 
in order that the application may be registered. In case the 
applicant enters the college in the year for which the room is 
reserved, the amount of the deposit is deducted from the first 



55 



college bill. If she changes the date of her application or files 
formal notice of withdrawal at the secretary's office before July- 
fifteenth of the year for which the application is made, the deposit 
will be refunded. If, for any reason whatever, the change or 
withdrawal be made later than July fifteenth, the amount will be 
forfeited. Students making application for a room in February 
forfeit the deposit if they do not file formal notice of withdrawal 
at the secretary's office before December first of the academic 
year for which the room is reserved. In order to make applica- 
tion for a room it is necessary to sign a room-contract, which will 
be sent on application, and return it with the fee of fifteen dollars 
to the Secretary of the College. A deposit of fifteen dollars 
must also be made by each student in residence in order to 
insure the tenure of her room for the following academic year. 
This sum will be forfeited if formal notice of withdrawal is not 
filed at the secretary's office on or before May first of the current 
year. 

Every applicant giving up later than the first of September the 
room or suite of rooms assigned to her for the ensuing academic 
year is responsible for the rent thereof for the whole year. Every 
applicant for a room in February will be responsible for the rent of 
the room or suite of rooms assigned to her for one semester, unless 
she gives formal notice of withdrawal to the Secretary before 
the first of January. The charges for room rent are not subject 
to remission or deduction under any circumstances, being con- 
sidered forfeit in case of withdrawal for any cause whatever. 
The applicant is not entitled to relet the rooms thus left vacant, 
but this right the college reserves to itself. No refund will be 
made to the applicant in case the room or suite of rooms thus left 
vacant are relet by the college. Any student who changes her 
room is required to pay an extra fee of fifteen dollars. 

Students are expected to provide their own rugs and towels, but in every other respect 
the rooms are completely furnished. Electric reading lamps, table napkins, sheets, etc. , 
are provided by the college. No part whatever need be taken by the students in the care 
of their own rooms. 

There are open fire-places in nearly all the studies and in many single rooms, but the 
rooms are sufficiently heated by steam. The air in each room is changed every ten 
minutes, and the temperature is regulated by a thermostat in each room. The students ' 
personal washing may be done by any laundry recommended by the college for 50 cents 
a dozen, or about $8 a half-year for one dozen pieces a week. 

No charge is made for sending meals to students that are in the infirmary by the 
order of a physician. 

Accommodation is provided for graduate students that wish to remain at t lie college 
during the Christmas and Easter vacations at $1.25 a day or $8.75 a week. 



56 



The health of the students is under the charge of a Health 
Committee consisting of the President, the Dean of the College, 
the Director of Athletics, the Senior Warden, and the physicians 
of the College. 

The Visiting Physician of the College is in her office in the 
college during the hours from four to six of every afternoon, 
except Sundajr, and may be consulted by the students without 
charge. 

Every student entering the college will be vaccinated unless 
she can furnish satisfactory proof that she has been success- 
fully vaccinated not more than two years previously. 

The conduct of the students in all matters not purely aca- 
demic, or affecting the management of the halls of residence, or 
the student body as a whole, is in the hands of the Students' 
Association for Self-Government, which was organised in 1892. 
All persons studying in Bryn Mawr College, whether graduates 
or undergraduates, are members of this association. 

The college reserves the right to exclude at any time students 
whose conduct or academic standing renders them undesirable 
members of the college community, and in such cases the fees due 
to the college are not refunded or remitted. 

In 1893 the Bryn Mawr Graduate Club was organised by the 
graduate students then in residence, its object being to further 
the social life of the graduate students and to facilitate inter- 
change of opinion with other colleges and universities doing 
graduate work. A room in Denbigh Hall is set apart by 
the college to be used by the members as a club-room. Informal 
meetings are frequently held in these rooms, and several times 
during the year the club invites the Faculty and friends of the 
college to larger social gatherings, which are addressed by well- 
known speakers. 

Summary of Expenses of Graduate Students. 

Tuition for the semester, payable on registration: 

For one hour* a week of lectures $ 10.00 

For two hours a week of lectures $ 20.00 

For three hours a week of lectures $ 30.00 

For four or five hours a week of lectures $ 40.00 

For six or more hours a week of lectures $ 62.50 

Room-rent for the academic year, payable on registration : . . $ 75.00 

Board for the semester payable on registration $100.00 

* See footnote page 53. 



57 



Students whose fees are not paid within one month of the date 
fixed are not permitted to continue in residence or in attendance 
on their classes. 

Total expenses for the academic year: 

Tuition fee, for six or more hours a week of lectures S125.00 

Room-rent 8 75.00 

Board $200.00 

Infirmary fee S 5.00 

Total for tuition, residence, and infirmary care for the academic 

year ' S405.00 

Laboratory fees for the academic year S10 to S3G 

The Students' Loan Fund of Betn Mawr College was founded by the Class of 
1890 for the purpose of receiving contributions, however small, from those who are 
interested in aiding students to obtain an education. The money thus contributed is 
distributed in the form of partial aid, and as a loan. It is as a rule applied to the assist- 
ance of those students only who have attended courses in the college for at least one 
year. The Fund is managed by a committee consisting of the President of the College 
and representatives of the Alumnae Association of Bryn Mawr College. The committee 
reports yearly to the Board of Trustees and to the Alumnae Association. The committee 
consists of the following members: President M. Carey Thomas; Miss Martha G. 
Thomas, Secretary and Treasurer, Bryn Mawr College; Miss Mary Taylor Mason, 
School House Lane, Germantown, Philadelphia; Mrs. George Edward Pfahler, Merion, 
Pa.; Mrs. Bernard Todd Converse, Ardmore, Pa., and Miss Anne Hampton Todd, 
2115 Spruce Street, Philadelphia. Contributions may be sent to any member of the 
committee. Applications for loans should be sent to the Treasurer of the committee, 
and all applications for loans for any given year should be made before May 1st of 
the preceding academic year. 

Libraries. 

The fact that the college is situated in the suburbs of Phila- 
delphia enables the student to make use of all the resources of 
the libraries of Philadelphia, as well as of those of the college 
proper. 

The college library has been collected within the past twenty- 
four years, and is designed to be, as far as possible, a library for 
special study. There are at present on its shelves about sixty 
thousand bound volumes, and ten thousand doctors' disserta- 
tions and pamphlets, the collection including the classical 
library of the late Professor Sauppe, of Gottingen, which was 
presented to the college in 1894, and the Semitic library of the 
late Professor Amiaud, of Paris, acquired in 1892. A more 
detailed description of these two collections may be found on 
pages 66 and 89. 

The sum of about five thousand dollars is expended yearly 
for books under the direction of the heads of the several col- 
legiate departments, and, in addition to many gifts of books, 



58 



about twenty thousand dollars has been presented to the library 
during the past ten years for expenditure in special departments. 
Over four hundred publications and reviews in the English, 
German, Greek, French, Italian, Spanish, Norse, and Swedish 
languages, are taken by the library, as follows: 



General and Miscellaneous Periodicals. 



Academy. 

Annates Politiques et Litteraires. 

Athenaeum. 

Atlantic Monthly. 
♦Bibliotheque de la Faculty des Let- 
tres de l'Universite de Paris. 

Bookman. 

Bookman (English). 
♦Book News Monthly. 

Bookseller. 
*Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly. 

Bulletin of Bibliography. 
* Bulletin of the New York Public 
Library. 

Century. 
♦Columbia University Quarterly. 

Contemporary Review. 

Country Life in America. 

La Cultura. 

Cumulative Book Index. 

Deutsche Rundschau. 

Dial. 

Fortnightly Review. 

Forum. 

Gottingische Gelehrte Anzeigen. 

Harper's Monthly Magazine. 

Harper's Weekly. 

Harvard- Graduate Magazine. 

Internationale Wochenschrift fur 
Wissenschaft, Kunst u. Technik. 

Jahresverzeichniss der an den deut- 
schen Schulanstalten erschienenen 
Abhandlungen. 
*Johns Hopkins University, Circulars. 

Library Journal. 

Mercure de France. 

Mind and Body. 

*Monthly Bulletin of the Carnegie 
Library of Pittsburgh. 



Miinchener allgemeine Zeitung. 

Nachrichten von der Konlglichen 
Gesellschaft der Wissenschaften, 
Gottingen. 

Nation. 

Nationale Deutschland. 

Neue Rundschau. 

Nineteenth Century. 

North American Review. 

Notes and Queries. 

Nuova Antologia. 

Outlook. 
♦Pennsylvania Library Notes. 

Preussische Jahrbiicher. 

Publishers' Weekly. 

Punch. 

Putnam's Monthly and the Critic. 

Quarterly Review. 
*Rassegna Contemporanea. 

Reader's Guide to Periodical Litera- 
ture. 

Review of Reviews. 

Revue Critique d'Histoire et de Lit- 
erature. 

Revue de Paris. 

Revue des Deux Mondes. 

Revue Politique et LitWraire : Revue 
Bleue. 

Saturday Review. 

Scribner's Magazine. 

Spectator. 

Der Tiirmer. 
♦Tipyn o' Bob. 

*University of Colorado, Studies. 
♦University of Nebraska, Studies. 
♦University of Washington, Studies. 

Westminster Review. 

Die Woche. 

World's Work. 



*Bryn Mawr Record. 
New York Evening Post. 
New York Times. 



Newspapers. 

New York Tribune. 
Philadelphia Public Ledger. 



♦Presented by the Publishers. 



59 



Art and Archaeology. 



American Journal of Archaeology. 

Bulletin de Correspondance helle- 
nique. 
♦Bulletin of the Metropolitan Mu- 
seum of Art, New York. 

Burlington Magazine. 

Ephemeris Archaiologike. 

Jahrbuch des Kaiserlich deutschen 
archaologischen Instituts. 

Jahresbericht liber die Fortschritte 
der classischen Alterthumswissen- 
schaft. 

Jahreshefte des osterreichischen 
archaologischen Institutes in Wien. 



Journal of Hellenic Studies. 

Mittheilungen des Kaiserlich deut- 
schen archasologischen Instituts, 
Athenische Abteilung. 

Mittheilungen des Kaiserlich deut- 
schen archaeologischen Instituts, 
Romische Abteilung. 

♦Museum of Fine Arts Bulletin, Bos- 
ton. 

Revue Arch£oIogique. 

Zeitschrift des Deutschen Palastina 
Vereins. 



Economics 

♦Advocate of Peace. 

Allgemeines statistisches Archiv. 

American Federationist. 
♦American Flag. 

American Journal of Sociology. 

American Political Science Review. 

Annals of the American Academy of 
Political and Social Science. 

Bibliographia Economica Univer- 
salis. 
♦Bulletin of the New York State 

Department of Labor. 
♦Bulletin of the University of Wis- 
consin, Economics and Political 
Science Series. 

Columbia Law Review. 

Economic Journal. 

Economic Review. 

Equity Series. 

Harvard Law Review. 

International Socialist Review. 

Jahrbiicher fur Nationalokonomle u. 
Statistik. 

Johns Hopliins University Studies 
in Historical and Political Science. 



and Politics. 

Journal of Political Economy. 

Journal of the Royal Statistical So- 
ciety. 

Political Science Quarterly. 

Publications of the American Eco- 
nomic Association. 

Publications of the American Sta- 
tistical Association. 

Quarterly Journal of Economics. 

Revue Bibliographique." 
♦Southern Workman. 

Survey. 
♦University of Missouri Studies, So- 
cial Science Series. 
♦University of Pennsylvania Publica- 
tions, Series in Political Economy 
and Public Law. 

Vierteljahrschrift fur Philosophie u. 
Soziologie. 

Yale Review. 

Zeitschrift fur Socialwissenschaft. 

Zeitschrift fiir Volkswirtschaft, So- 
cial-politik u. Verwaltung. 



Education. 
Educational Review. 
Educational Times. 
Elementary School Teacher. 
Journal of Educational Psychology. 
Journal of Pedagogy. 
Lehrproben and Lehrgange. 
Pedagogical Seminary. 



Education. 

♦Publications of the Association of 
Collegiate Alumna?. 
Revue Internationale de l'Enseigne- 

ment Sup£rieur. 
Revue Universitaire. 
School Review. 
♦University of California Publica- 
tions, Education. 



♦Presented by the Publishers. 



60 



American Historical Review. 
^Bulletin of the University of Wis- 
consin, History Series. 
English Historical Review. 
Historische Vierteljahrschrift. 
Historische Zeitschrift. 
* Illinois State Historical Society 
Journal. 



History. 

Klio, Beitrage zur alten Geschlchte. 
Pennsylvania Magazine of History. 
Revue des Questions Historiques. 
Revue Historique. 
*University of Pennsylvania Publica- 
tions, Series in History. 
* University of Toronto Studies, His- 
tory and Economics. 



Philology and Literature, Classical. 



Bulletin Bibliographique et P6da- 
gogique du Musee Beige. 

Classical Journal. 

Classical Philology. 

Classical Quarterly. 

Classical Review. 

Classical Weekly. 

Harvard Studies in Classical Philol- 
ogy. 

Hermes. 

Mnemosyne. 

Le Musee Beige, Revue de Philolo- 
gie Classique. 



Philologische Untersuchungen. 

Quellen und Forschung zur latei- 
nischen Philologie. 

Revue de Philologie. 

Revue des Etudes Grecques. 

Rheinisches Museum fur Philologie. 

Rivista di Filologia. 

Studi Italian! di Filologia Classica. 

Wiener Studien, Zeitschrift fur clas- 
sische Philologie. 

Wochenschrif t f iir klasslsche Philolo- 
gie. 



Philology and Literature, General and Comparative. 



American Journal of Philology. 
Berliner philologische Wochen- 

schrift. 
Eranos. 

Indogermanische Forschungen. 
Journal of Philology. 
Memoires de la Societe Neo-philolo- 

gique a Helsingfors. 
Neue Jahrbiicher fur das klassische 

Altertum, Geschichte und deutsche 

Literatur. 



Transactions of the American Philo- 
logical Association. 
* University of Pennsylvania Publica- 
tions, Series in Philosophy and 
Literature. 

Zeitschrift fur das Gymnasialwesen. 

Zeitschrift fur die osterreichischen 
Gymnasien. 

Zeitschrift fur vergleichende Litera- 
turgeschichte. 

Zeitschrift fiir vergleichende Sprach- 
forschung. 



Philology and Literature, Modern 



Anglia. 

Anglistische Forschungen. 

Annales de la SociSte' Jean-Jacques 

Rousseau. 
Annales Romantiques. 
Archiv fiir das Studium der neueren 

Sprachen. 
Archivio Glottologico Italiano. 
Arkiv for Nordisk Filologi. 
Beiblatt zur Anglia : Mitteilungen 

iiber englische Sprache und Lit- 

teratur. 



Beitrage zur Geschichte der deut- 
schen Sprache und Literatur. 

Bonner Studien zur englischen Phil- 
ologie. 

British Society of Franciscan 
Studies. 

Bulletin de la SocI6t6 des Anciens 
Textes Frangais. 

Bulletin hispanique. 

Chaucer Society, Publications (Both 
series). 

Deutsche Literaturzeitung. 



♦Presented by the Publishers. 



61 



Dialect notes. 

Early English Text Society Publi- 
cations (Both series*. 

Englische Studien. 

Euphorion. 

German American Annals. 

Germanisch-romanische Monats- 
schrift. 

Giornale Dantesco. 

Glornale Storico della Letteratura 
Italiana. 

Goethe Jahrbuch. 

Jahrbuch der deutschen Shakespeare 
Gesellschaft. 

Jahrbuch des Verelns fur nieder- 
deutsche Sprachforschung. 

Jahresbericht iiber die Erscheinun- 
gen auf dem Gebiete der german- 
lschen Phllologie. 

Journal of Germanic Philology. 

Kleler Studien zur englischen Phil- 
ologie. 

Korrespondenzblatt des Vereins fur 
niederdeutsche Sprachforschung. 

Kritischer Jahresbericht iiber die 
Fortschritte der romanischen Phl- 
lologie. 

Literarische Echo. 

Literarisches Centralblatt. 

Literaturblatt fiir germaniscbe und 
romanische Phllologie. 

Le maltre Phonetique. 

Modern Language Notes. 

Modern Language Review. 

Modern Philology. 



Miinchener Beitrage zur romanischen 
und englischen Philologie. 

Palaestra. 

Poet-lore. 

Publications of the Modern Lan- 
guage Association. 

Quellen und Forschungen zur Sprach- 
und Culturgeschicbte der german- 
ischen V51ker. 

Rassegna Bibliografica. 

Revue d'Histoire Litteraire de la 
France. 

Revue des Etudes Rabelaisiennes. 

Revue Germanique. 

Revue Hispanique. 

Romania. 

Romanische Forschungen. 

Schriften der Goethe Gesellschaft. 

Scottish Text Society, Publications. 

Societe des Anciens Textes fran- 
cais, Publications. 

Societe des Textes Frangais Mo- 
dernes, Publications. 

Studi Medievali. 

Wiener Beitrage zur englischen 
Philologie. 

Zeitschrift fiir den deutschen Unter- 
richt. 

Zeitschrift fiir deutsche Philologie. 

Zeitschrift fiir deutsches Altertum 
und deutsche Litteratur. 

Zeitschrift fiir franzosische Sprache 
und Litteratur. 

Zeitschrift fiir romanische Philolo- 
gie. 



Philology and Literature, Semitic. 



American Journal of Semitic Lan- 
guages and Literatures. 

Proceedings of the Society of Bib- 
lical Archaeology. 

Recueil d'arcbseologie orientale. 



Recueil de Travaux relatifs a la 
Philologie et a l'Archeologie egyp- 
tiennes et assyriennes. 

Zeitschrift fiir agyptische Sprache 
und Altertumskunde. 

Zeitschrift fiir Assyriologie. 



Philosophy and 

American Journal of Psychology. 

Annee Psycbologique. 

Archiv fiir die gesamte Psycholo- 

gie. 
Archiv fiir Geschichte der Philoso- 

phie. 
Archiv fiir systematische Philoso- 

phie. 
Archives de Psychologie. 
Archives of Psychology. 
British Journal of Psychology. 



Psychology. 

Bulletin de l'lnstitut Psychologique. 
International Journal of Ethics. 
Journal de Psychologie. 
Journal fiir Psychologie und Neu- 

rologie. 
Journal of Philosophy, Psychology 

and Scientific Methods. 
Mind. 
Monist. 

Philosophical Magazine. 
Philosophical Review. 



62 



Psychological Bulletin. 

Psychological Review. 

Psycholgical Review ; Monograph 
Supplements. 

Psychological Review ; Psychologi- 
cal Index. 

Psychologische Arbeiten. 

Psychologische Studien. 

Revue de l'Hypnotisme. 

Revue de Metaphysique. 

Revue Philosophique. 



*University of California Publica- 
tions, Philosophy. 

♦University of Toronto Studies, 
Psychology Series. 
Vierteljahrsschrift fur wissenschaft- 

liche Philosophie. 
Zeitschrift fur Psychologie und 
Physiologie der Sinnesorgane : 1 
aht., Zeitschrift fiir Psychologie. 
2 abt., Zeitschrift fiir Sinnesphy- 
siologie. 



Religion. 



American Friend. 

American Journal of Religious Psy- 
chology and Education. 

American Journal of Theology. 
f Association Monthly. 
fAustralasian Intercollegian. 
*Baptist Missionary Magazine. 
fBible Student and Teacher. 

Biblical World. 

Bibliotheca Sacra. 
*Deaconess Advocate. 
fDeutsche christliche Studenten-Be- 

wegung-Mitteilungen. 
fEvangel. 

Expositor. 

Expository Times. 
* Friends' Missionary Advocate. 
*Hartford Seminary Record. 

Harvard Theological Review. 



jHerald of Gospel Liberty. 
| Intercollegian. 

Journal of Biblical Literature. 

Journal of Theological Studies. 
•j-Medical Missionary. 
-{-Missionary Review. 

Proceedings of the Society of Bib- 
lical Archaeology. 
♦Publications of the American Jewisb 

Historical Society. 
-(-Record of Christian Work. 

Religious Education. 

Revue Biblique. 
* Spirit of Missions. 
f Student Movement. 
♦Washington Chapel Chronicle. 
♦Woman's Missionary Friend. 
tYoung Women of Canada. 



Science, Biology. 



American Journal of Anatomy. 

American Journal of Physiology. 

American Naturalist. 

Anatomischer Anzeiger. 

Archiv fiir Anatomie und Physiolo- 
gie. 

Archiv fiir die gesammte Physiologie. 

Arehlv fiir Entwicklungsmechanik 
der Organismen. 

Archiv fiir mikroskopische Anato- 
mie. 

Archiv fiir Protistenkunde. 

Bibliographia Physiologica. 

Biologisches Centralblatt. 

Biometrika. 

Botanische Zeitung. 1. Abtheilung. 

Botanische Zeitung. 2. Abtheilung. 

Botanisches Centralblatt. 



* Brown University, Contributions 
from the Biological Laboratory. 
Centralblatt fiir Physiologie. 
♦Illinois State Laboratory of Natural 
History Bulletin. 
Jahrbiicher fiir wissenschaftliche 

Botanik. 
Journal de Physiologie. 
Journal of Experimental Zoology. 
Journal of Physiology. 
Journal of the Royal Microscopical 

Society. 
Mittheilungen aus der Zoologischen 

Station zu Neapel. 
Quarterly Journal of Microscopical 

Science. 
♦University of California Publica- 
tions, Physiology. 



♦Presented by the Publishers. 



fin Christian Union Library. 



63 



*University of California Publica- 
tions, Zoology. 

♦University of Pennsylvania,. Contri- 
butions from tbe Botanical Labo- 
ratories. 

♦University of Pennsylvania, Contri- 
butions from the Zoological Labo- 
ratories. 



♦University of Toronto Studies, Bio- 
logical Series. 
University of Toronto Studies, Phys- 
iological Series. 

Zeitschrift fiir wissenschaftliche 
Zoologie. 

Zoologischer Anzeiger. 



Science, General. 



American Journal of Science. 

Attl della Ileale Accademia della 

Scienze di Torino. 
Bulletin de l'Academie Imperiale des 

Sciences de St. P<§tersbourg. 
♦Bulletin of the University of Wis- 
consin, Engineering Series. 
♦Bulletin of the University of Wis- 
consin, Science Series. 
Comtes Rendus des Seances de 

l'Academie des Sciences. 
Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society 
Journal. 
♦Kansas University, Science Bul- 
letin. 
Nature. 
♦New York State Museum Bulletin. 

Science, Geology, 

Centralblatt fiir Mineralogie. 

Economic Geology. 

Geographical Journal. 

Geological Magazine. 

Geologisches Centralblatt. 
♦Georgia Geological Survey Bulletin. 
♦Illinois Geological Survey Bulletin. 

Journal of Geography. 

Journal of Geology. 

Meteorologische Zeitschrift. 

MIneralogical Magazine. 



♦Oklahoma University Research Bul- 
letin. 

Philosophical Transactions of the 
Royal Society of London. 

Popular Science Monthly. 

Proceedings of the American Philo- 
sophical Society. 

Proceedings of the Royal Society 
of London. 

Science. 
♦Technology Review. 
♦University of Missouri Studies, Sci- 
ence Series. 

Verhandlungen der physikalisch- 
medicinischen Gesellschaft zu 
Wiirzburg. 



and Geography. 

Mineralogische und petrographische 
Mittheilungen. 

National Geographic Magazine. 

Neues Jahrbuch fiir Mineralogie, 
Geologie und Palaeontologie. 

Philadelphia Geographical Society 
Bulletin. 

Quarterly Journal of the Geological 
Society. 
*U. S. Monthly Weather Review. 
♦University of Toronto Studies, Geo- 
logical Series. 



Mathematics, Chemistry, and Physics. 



Acta Mathematlca. 

American Chemical Journal. 

American Journal of Mathematics. 

Annalen der Chemie. 

Annalen der Physik. 

Annales de Chimie et de Physique. 

Annales de la Faculte des Sciences 

de 1'Universite de Toulouse. 
Annales Sclentifiques de l'Ecole 

Normale Superieure. 



der 



Annali di Matematica. 
Astrophysical Journal. 
Beiblatter zu den Annalen 

Physik. 
Berichte der deutschen chemischen 

Gesellschaft. 
Bibliotheca Mathematica. 
Bollettino di Bibliografia e Storia 

delle Scienze Matematiche. 
Bulletin de la Soci£te Mathematique. 



"Presented by the Publishers. 



64 



Bulletin des Sciences Math6matiques. 

Bulletin of the American Mathe- 
matical Society. 

Giornale di Matematiche. 

Jahrhuch iiber die Portschritte der 
Mathematik. 

Jahresbericht der deutschen mathe- 
matiker Vereinigung. 

Jahresbericht fiber die Fortschritte 
der Chemie. 

Journal de Mathfimatiques. 

Journal de Physique. 

Journal ffir die reine und ange- 
wandte Mathematik. 

Journal fur praktische Chemie. 

Journal of the Chemical Society. 

Mathematische Annalen. 

Messenger of Mathematics. 

Monatshefte fur Chemie. 

Physical Review. 

Physikalische Zeitschrift. 



Proceedings of the London Mathe- 
matical Society. 

Quarterly Journal of Mathematics. 

Rendiconti del Circolo Matematico 
di Palermo. 

Science Abstracts. 

Transactions of the American 
Mathematical Society. 
*U. S. Bureau of Standards Bulletin. 
♦University of Pennsylvania Publica- 
tions, Astronomical Series. 
♦University of Toronto Studies, Pa- 
pers from the Chemical Labora- 
tories. 
♦University of Toronto Studies, Pa- 
pers from the Physical Labora- 
tories. 

Zeitschrift ffir anorganische chemie. 

Zeitschrift ffir Elektrochemle. 

Zeitschrift fur Mathematik und 
Physik. 

Zeitschrift ffir physikalische Chemie. 



The library is open daily from eight a.m. to ten p.m. Books 
may be taken out by the students unless specially reserved for 
library reference use. 

There are in Philadelphia the following important libraries 
which are available for students : 

The Philadelphia Library Company, which- contains about 
227,000 volumes and 30,000 pamphlets, and is at all times 
open to the students for consultation. Private subscription, 
for four volumes, $12 a year, or $10 for nine months. 

The Mercantile Library, which contains about 190,000 volumes 
and 10,000 pamphlets. Private subscription, $2.00 a year for 
two separate works at a time. 

The Library of the Academy of Natural Sciences, which contains 
about 60,000 volumes. The Council of the Academy has gen- 
erously conceded the use of its library and of its museum to the 
students of Bryn Mawr College. 

The Library of the University of Pennsylvania, which contains 
about 300,000 volumes and 50,000 pamphlets. The custodians 
of this library have always shown great courtesy in placing rare 
volumes at the disposal of the college. 



♦Presented by the Publishers. 



65 

The Free Library of Philadelphia, which contains about 340,000 
volumes and 59,000 pamphlets, and is at all times open to the 
students for consultation. 

Sanskrit and Comparative Philology. 

The instruction in this department is under the direction of 
Dr. Hans Weyhe, Associate in Teutonic Philology and Sanskrit, 
and Dr. Roland G. Kent, Non-resident Lecturer in Sanskrit. 

Graduate Courses. 
Dr. Weyhe offers in each year the following graduate courses : 

Lectures on Comparative Philology, and Philological Seminary. 

Two hours a week throughout the year. 

Students entering this course are expected to be familiar with German and French. 
A short preliminary course in Sanskrit is also of great aid to the student. The lectures 
on comparative philology treat of the connection of the Greek and Latin languages 
with the related languages of the Aryan group, first, phonetically, secondly, from the 
point of view of grammatical forms, and lastly, from the point of view of syntax. In 
the first part of the course, which covers what during the last few years has been the 
field of the most active research, the student is introduced to the latest theories and 
discoveries in Aryan phonetics, and is expected to read and criticise the articles appear- 
ing from time to time in the philological journals, and to prepare reports on these 
articles. The same method is pursued during the investigation of the history of forms ; 
and in the third part of the course the student begins the study of comparative syntax 
by a close comparison of the use of cases and verbal forms in Sanskrit, Greek, and Latin. 

Elementary Sanskrit. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

Whitney's Grammar and Lanman's Reader are used. 

The courses in Comparative Philology and in Elementary Sanskrit will not, as a rule, 
be given in the same year. 

Dr. Kent offers in 1909-10 the following graduate course: 

Advanced Sanskrit. One hour a week throughout the year. 

Lectures are given on the phonology and morphology of Sanskrit. The study of 
Lanman's Reader is continued and Kalidasa's Sakuntala, Act I. is read. 

Greek. 

The instruction in this department is under the direction of 
Dr. Henry Nevill Sanders,* Professor of Greek; Dr. Wilmer 
Cave Wright, Associate Professor of Greek; Dr. George A. Barton, 
Professor of Biblical Literature and Semitic Languages, Dr. 
Caroline Louise Ransom, Associate Professor of the History of 
Art and Classical Archaeology, Miss Abby Kirk, Reader in Ele- 
mentary Greek, and Dr. Isabelle Stone, Reader in Greek. 

Exceptional facilities for the study of all departments of clas- 

* Granted leave of absence for the second semester, 1909-10. 



66 

sical philology are offered by the large classical library owned 
by the College. The greater part of this library is formed by 
the well-known collection of the late Professor Hermann Sauppe, 
of Gottingen, which was acquired in 1894. This has been 
supplemented by purchases made by the college library, so that 
the classical library now numbers some seven thousand volumes, 
including complete sets of most of the important journals, and 
about seven thousand dissertations and monographs. 

Graduate Courses. 

The graduate courses in Greek are varied from year to year in two series , 
Attic Tragedy, Orators, and Historians, and the Homeric Question, Me- 
nander, Plato, and Aristophanes, in order that they may be pursued by a 
student for consecutive years. Students electing Greek as part of the 
work for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy are required to offer with each 
three hour seminary a two hour seminary and vice versa, so as to make up 
five hours of seminary work, but both seminaries need not be taken in the 
same year. Three five hour courses are required of students who offer 
Greek as a major subject in the examination for the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy; two five hour courses are required when Greek is the only 
minor subject offered, and one five hour course when two minors are 
offered. The post-major courses also are open to graduate students. 
A large part of the work expected of graduate students consists of courses 
of reading pursued under the direction of the department; and reports of 
this reading are from time to time required of the students. A reading 
knowledge of French and German is required. The course in comparative 
philology conducted by Dr. Weyhe is recommended to graduate students 
of Greek. For graduate courses in History of Art and Classical Archae- 
ology, which may be offered as a minor by students taking Greek as a 
subject for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, see page 103. 

No undergraduates are admitted to graduate courses. 

Dr. Sanders conducts in each year the following graduate 
seminary: 

Greek Seminary. Three hours a week throughout the year. 

In 1909-10 Greek orators are studied in the seminary. The work consists of the 
reading of large portions of all the orators and the critical interpretation of a selected 
part of each. Lectures are given on legal antiquities, the syntax, and the style of 
the various authors, in conjunction with which Dionysius of Halicarnassus and the 
Greek Rhetoricians are studied. The later rhetoricians are treated and their criticism 
of antiquity investigated. Students are expected to provide themselves with the 
Teubner text editions of Antiphon, Andocides, Lysias, Isocrates, Isaeus, iEschines, Hy- 
pereides, and Demosthenes. The classical library is well equipped with works on the 
orators. The seminary met in 1909-10 during the first semester only. 

In 1910-11 the main subject of the seminary is the Greek Historians. Thucydides 
is studied in detail and reports are made on data of history contained in Greek literature 
in general. Lectures are given by the instructor on subjects connected with Greek 






67 



historiography, such as the composition of Thucydides's history, the syntax and style 
of Thucydides, the history of early prose, Greek historical inscriptions. 

In 1911-12 the subject of the seminary is Attic Tragedy. The special work of the 
seminary is devoted to the editing of Euripides's Orestes. Members of the seminary 
report on special subjects and give critical summaries of current classical literature. 

Dr. Wright conducts in each year the following graduate 
seminary: 

Greek Seminary. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

In 1909-10 the subject of the seminary in the first semester is Menander. A thor- 
ough study of all the extant fragments of Menander is made with reports by the students 
on Menander's style, metres, -text, and influence on Latin Comedy. The recent dis- 
covery of considerable remains of Menander's Comedies and the publication of the 
Cairo Menander (1907) have provided sufficient material to make such a course profitable 
to students of the Greek drama. 

In the second semester the subject of the seminary is the Homeric Question, and the 
work consists of a review of the discussions of the Homeric poems since the publication 
of Wolf's Prolegomena. The various tests that have been applied to the poems by 
archaeologists, linguists, historians of myths, and aesthetic critics are taken up and 
criticised in detail. 

In 1910-11 the subject of the seminary is Aristophanes. The aim of the seminary is 
to make the students familiar with the more important Aristophanic literature up to 
the present day. Portions of the text are interpreted by the class and reports on 
assigned topics, literary, historical, and archaeological, connected with the plays are 
expected from all the members. All the comedies of Aristophanes are read in the course 
of the year; lectures are given by the instructor on the metres and syntax of Aristo- 
phanes, on the dramatic structure of the plays and on the history of Attic comedy. 
Part of the work consists of analyses of Latin and German dissertations on Aristophanes 
which are presented by members of the class. Every member of the class should pro- 
vide herself in advance with a complete text of Aristophanes. The Teubner (Leipsic) 
or Clarendon Press'(Oxford) editions are recommended. 

In 1911-12 the seminary will be on Plato. The work is mainly literary and critical. 
Lectures on the style, philosophy, and chronology of the dialogues are given by the 
instructor; a detailed interpretation of a portion of Plato, and reports on topics set for 
discussion are given by the class. The students are expected to read the Republic, 
Thecetetus, Parmenides, and Sophist and discuss certain problems arising from these 
dialogues. The aim of the course is to lay a foundation for independent work by 
familiarising the students with the achievements of German scholarship and the general 
field of Platonic literature up to the present day. Analyses of German and Latin dis- 
sertations are expected from the class. Lutoslawski's Origin and Growth of Plato's 
Logic will be studied and criticised in detail. Every member of the seminary should 
provide herself in advance with a complete text of Plato. The Teubner (Leipsic) or 
Clarendon Press (Oxford) editions are recommended. 

Dr. Wright conducts in 1909-10 the following graduate 
seminary : 

bemmary in .Plato. Two hours a week during the second semester. 

Post-Major Courses. 

Dr. Sanders offers in 1909-10 the following post-major courses, 
open to graduate students: 

jEschylus, Oresteia. Two hours a week during the first semester. 

Aristophanes, Acharnians, Knights. One hour a week during the first semester. 



68 



Dr. Sanders offers in 1910-11 the following post-major courses, 
open to graduate students: 

Private Orations of the Attic O rators . Two hours a week during the first semester. 
Sophocles, Antigone. One hour a week during the first semester. 

AlschylUS, Agamemnon. Two hours a week during the second semester. 

Bacchylldes. One hour a iveek during the second semester. 

Dr. Sanders offers in 1911-12 the following post-major courses, 
open to graduate students: 

Lucian. Two hours a week during the first semester. 

Sophocles, Trachinice. One hour a week during the first semester. 

Greek Prose Composition, Rhetoric, and the Theory of Imitative Writing. 

One hour a week during the second semester. 

Greek MellC Poets. One hour a week during the second semester. 

Euripides, Heracles. One hour a week during the second semester. 

Dr. Wright offers in 1909-10 the following post-major course, 
open to graduate students: 

TheocntUS. One hour a week during the second semester. 

Dr. Stone offers in 1909-10 the following post-major courses, 
open to graduate students: 

Pindar. Two hours a week during the second semester. 

Sophocles, hilectra. One hour a week during the second semester. 

Free Elective Courses. 

Free elective courses, amounting to five hours a week, are offered in 
Classical Art and Archaeology; see page 104. 

A free elective course of two hours a week is offered in New Testament 
Greek; see page 93. 

Latin. 

The instruction in this department is under the direction of 
Dr. Arthur Leslie Wheeler, Professor of Latin, Dr. Tenney 
Frank, Associate Professor of Latin, and Miss Elizabeth Andros 
Foster, Reader in Latin. 

Graduate Courses. 

The graduate work in Latin is conducted according to the seminary 
method, and is intended not only to broaden the student's knowledge, but 
also to teach methods of work. The graduate courses in Latin are varied 
from year to year in two series, Roman Comedy, Lyric Poetry and Elegy, 
and Roman History, Epigraphy and Literature, or Syntax. Students 



69 



electing Latin as part of the work for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy- 
are required to offer with each three hour seminary a two hour seminary 
and vice versa, so as to make up five hours of seminary work, but both 
seminaries need not be taken in the same year. Such students are recom- 
mended to attend the Journal Club. Three five hour courses are required 
of students who offer Latin as a major subject in the examination for the 
degree of Doctor of Philosophy; two five hour courses are required when 
Latin is the only minor subject offered and one five hour course when two 
minors are offered. It is desirable that all students who intend to do 
advanced work in Latin should have some knowledge of Greek. A reading 
knowledge of French and German is also necessary. 
No undergraduates are admitted to graduate courses. 

Dr. Wheeler conducts in each year the following graduate 
seminary: 

Latin Seminary. Three hours a week throughout the year . 

In 1909-10 the subject of the seminary is Latin Comedy. All the plays of 
Plautus and Terence are read by the students: single plays form the basis of special 
work on the language, text, metres, etc. 

Students should provide themselves with the text edition of Plautus, edited by W. M. 
Lindsay, Oxford, 1903-04, and with Dziatzko's text of Terence, Leipsic, Tauchnitz, 1884. 
The plays of Plautus, annotated by Brix, Leipsic, Teubner, 1888-1901, and by Lorenz, 
Berlin, Weidmann, 1876-86, and the plays of Terence, annotated by Dziatzko (re- 
vised by Hauler), 1898 and 1903 (Teubner), and by Spengel, 1879 and 1905, Weidmann, 
are also recommended. P. Terenti Afri Comoedice, edited by S. G. Ashmore, Oxford 
University Press, New York, 1908, is a convenient commentary. 

In 1910-11 the subject of the seminary will be the Roman Lyric in the Period of the 
Republic. After a rapid survey of the fragmentary lyric remains of the predecessors 
aDd contemporaries of Catullus, the poems of Catullus himself will be studied in 
detail. Students should have Catulli carmina (Oxford text, 1904), edited by Robinson 
Ellis, and either the same scholar's Commentary on Catullus, Oxford, Clarendon Press, 
1889 (second edition), or G. Friedrich's Catulli Veronensis liber, Leipsic und Berlin 
1908 (Teubner). 

In 1911-12 Roman Elegy as represented by Tibullus, Propertius, and Ovid is 
the subject of the seminary. In addition to a careful study of selected poems 
an effort is made to trace the history of elegy among the Romans. The various 
topics connected with the subject are treated in detail as far as time permits, and 
the students are encouraged to familiarise themselves with the best literature in 
editions, periodicals, and dissertations. The text recommended is the Oxford Clarendon 
Press edition of Catullus, Tibullus, and Propertius edited by Ellis, Postgate, and Philli- 
more, 1906 (one volume). 

Dr. Frank conducts in each year the following graduate 
seminary : 

Latin Seminary. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

In 1909-10 Roman History from the sources is the subject of the seminary. The 
object of this study is to examine in detail the course of events during the last years of 
the Roman Republic, and to familiarise the student with the sources of historical 
knowledge for that period. The course consists largely of research work on the part 
of the student. 

In 1910-11 the work of the seminary is Latin Epigraphy and Palaeography. About 
two-thirds of the course is devoted to the study of the Corpus Inscriptionum. The 
questions assigned for investigation deal mainly with Roman political institutions 



70 



public and private life, and with historical grammar. Dessau's Inscriptiones Latinae 
Selectae is used in the class room. The paleographical facsimiles of Chatelain, Zange- 
meister and Wattenbach, and Arndt form the basis for work in the latter part of the 
course. 

In 1911-12 selected topics in Roman Literature will be studied. The work consists 
of studies in the beginnings of the Roman epic, tragedy, and prose, special attention 
being paid to the relation of the literature to historical events and native influences. 
The students will read reports on special subjects assigned to them. A study of Latin 
Syntax may be substituted. 

Dr. Wheeler and Dr. Frank together conduct the journal club. 

Latin Journal Club. One and a half hours once a fortnight throughout the year. 

The advanced students and the instructors meet to report on and discuss recent 
reviews and critical articles. 

Post-Major Courses. 

Dr. Wheeler offers in 1909-10 and again in 1911-12 the 

following post-major course, open to graduate students: 

Roman Satire, its Origin and Development. 

Two hours a week throughout the year. 

The subject is treated historically in order to give an outline of the origin and develop- 
ment of Satire. The class reads selections from Horace, Persius, Seneca, Petronius, and 
Juvenal, together with some of the fragments of Ennius, Lucilius, and Varro. The read- 
ings are supplemented by occasional lectures. Each student is required to prepare one 
or more papers on assigned topics in each semester. 

Dr. Wheeler offers in 1910-11 and again in 1912-13 the 
following post-major course, open to graduate students: 
Roman Elegy, its Origin and Development. 

Two hours a week throughout the year. 

An effort is made to trace historically the development of this branch of poetry among 
the Romans. Selections from Catullus, Tibullus, Propertius, and Ovid are read. The 
readings are supplemented by occasional lectures. Special attention is devoted to the 
structure and reading of the elegiac distich and to the characteristics of Roman poetic 
diction. Each student is required to prepare one or more papers on assigned topics in 
each semester. 

Dr. Frank offers in 1909-10 and again in 1911-12 the 
following post-major courses, open to graduate students: 

Lucretius. Three hours a week during the first semester. 

The first three books of the De Rerum Natura and selections from the fourth, fifth, 
and sixth books are studied. 

Lectures On Roman History. Two hours a week during the first semester. 

Collateral reading is assigned from the Latin sources and independent reports on 
special topics required. 

Advanced Latin Prose Composition. One hour a week throughout the year. 

Cicero and. Cajsar. Three hours a week during the second semester. 

An effort is made by means of lectures, discussions and extensive reading to 

gain an intimate acquaintance with the literary work and the political careers of 
Cicero and Caesar. 






71 



Catullus, and Horace, Epistles. Two hours a week during the second semester 

In connection with the reading of Horace's Ars Poetica special stress is laid upon 
his theories of literary criticism. 

Dr. Frank offers in 1910-11 and again in 1912-13 the 
following post-major courses, open to graduate students: 

The Life and Works of Vergil. Three hours a week during the first semester. 

The larger part of the Aeneid, two books of the Georgics and some of the Eclogues and 
Pseudo-Vergiliana are read and discussed. 

Pliny, Letters; Martial. Two hours a week during the first semester. 

Special attention is paid to a study of the political and social conditions of the period 
included in the course. 

Advanced Latin Prose Composition. One hour a week throughout the year. 

Roman Prose of the Empire. Three hours a week during the second semester. 

Selections from Velleius, Seneca, Quintilian, Tacitus, Suetonius, Apuleius, and 
Minucius Felix are read. 

Seneca and Lucan. Two hours a week during the second semester. 

Three tragedies of Seneca and portions of Lucan 's Pharsalia are read. 

Modeen Languages. 

Professors and instructors: Dr. M. Carey Thomas, Dr. Fonger 
DeHaan, Dr. Albert Schinz, Miss Lucy Martin Donnelly, Dr. 
Karl Detlev Jessen, Dr. Clarence Carroll Clark, Dr. Carleton 
Fairchild Brown, Dr. Richard Thayer Holbrook, Dr. Hans 
Weyhe, Mr. Samuel Arthur King, Mr. Frederick A. Blossom, 
Miss Rose Chamberlin, Miss Katharine Fullerton, Dr. Regina 
Katharine Crandall, Dr. Orie Latham Hatcher, Miss Georgiana 
Goddard King, Dr. Clara Leonora Nicolay, Dr. Lillie Deming 
Loshe, and Miss Content Shephard Nichols. 

English. 

The instruction in this department is under the direction of Dr. 
M. Carey Thomas, Professor of English, Miss Lucy Martin Don- 
nelly, Associate Professor of English, Dr. Clarence Carroll 
Clark, Associate Professor of English, Dr. Carleton Fairchild 
Brown, Associate Professor of English Philology, Mr. Samuel 
Arthur King, Non-resident Lecturer in English Diction, Dr. 
Orie Latham Hatcher, Lecturer in Elizabethan Literature, and 
Associate (elect) in Comparative Literature and Elizabethan 
Literature, Miss Katharine Fullerton, Dr. Regina Katharine 
Crandall, Miss Georgiana Goddard King, Dr. Lillie Deming 
Loshe, and Miss Content Shepard Nichols, Readers in English. 



72 

Graduate Courses. 

There are offered each year distinct graduate seminaries and courses 
in English literature and in English language, and these seminaries and 
courses are varied so as to enable candidates for the degree of Doctor 
of Philosophy to pursue graduate work for three or more successive 
years. The graduate courses in literature presuppose at least as much 
knowledge as is obtained in the two years' course of undergraduate 
lectures on English literature and in one of the literature years of the 
English major; and the graduate courses in Anglo-Saxon presuppose as 
much knowledge of Anglo-Saxon as is obtained in the language year in the 
English major. 

Students who choose English as their chief subject in their examination 
for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy must have, if they specialise in 
literature, at least as much knowledge of Anglo-Saxon, and if they 
specialise in language, at least as much knowledge of literature, as is 
obtained in the courses required of those students who make English one 
of the chief subjects, of undergraduate study, and must have taken at least 
the equivalent of the essay work in the required English course. 

The graduate instruction in English literature includes the direction 
of private reading and the assignment of topics for investigation. 

No undergraduates are admitted to graduate courses. 

Dr. Clark conducts in each year the following graduate semi- 
nary: 

Seminary in English Literature. Three hours a week throughout the year. 

In 1909-10 seventeenth century prose writers are studied. The authors usually 
chosen for discussion are Bacon, Milton, and Hooker. 

In 1910-11 the literary movement of the eighteenth centurv will be studied in con- 
nection with Johnson. 

In 1911-12 romantic criticism is the subject of the seminary. The overthrow of 
eighteenth century standards, and the rise of a new school of criticism is studied 
in the works of Coleridge, Hazlitt, and Lamb. 

Dr. Brown conducts in each year the following graduate semi- 
nary: 

Seminary in Middle English. Three hours a week throughout the year. 

In 1909-10 the beginnings of English Drama are the subject of the seminary. 
Though the cycles of the mystery plays are considered in general, the larger part of 
the time is devoted to the study of the English morality plays. Particular attention 
is given to the connection between the moralities and the didactic treatises and the 
debates. The moralities and the secular drama are studied historically up to the 
time of Heywood. In addition to the reading and discussion of selected plays, 
lectures are given by the instructor with the object of setting various elements of dra- 
matic development in proper proportion. Critical reports on assigned topics are 
required from the students. 

In 1910-11 the subject will be the Middle English Romances. All the romances 
represented in Middle English will be read, and the relation of these English versions to 
their Latin and Old French originals will be discussed. The romance cycles will be 
taken up in the following order: Troy story, Alexander saga, romances of Germanic 



73 



origin, Arthurian cycle, Charlemagne cycle. Special investigations of various elements 
in individual romances will be undertaken from time to time by the members of the 
seminary. 

In 1911-12 the seminary will undertake the study of The Vision of Piers the Plovjman 
and the works of Chaucer. Attention will be devoted not so much to the critical 
reading of the texts themselves as to the examination of the questions of authorship 
and chronology which have recently been raised. These poems will also be discussed 
in their relation to the other literature of the fourteenth "century. Special subjects for 
individual investigation will be assigned to the members of the seminary. 



Dr. Brown offers in 1909-10 and again in 1911-12 the fol- 
lowing graduate course: 

Cynewulf and Csedmon. Two hours a week throughout the year 

Several of the poems traditionally ascribed to these authors are critically studied. 
Lectures are given with a view to furnishing a thorough introduction to Anglo-Saxon 
Christian poetry and the literary problems connected with it. This course is open to 
graduate students who have already taken the course in Anglo-Saxon grammar and 
reading of Anglo-Saxon texts or its equivalent. 

Dr. Brown offers in 1910-11 and again in 1912-13 the fol- 
lowing graduate courses: 

Beowulf. Two hours a week throughout the year 

This course gives in the first place a general survey of Beowulf criticism, including 
textual problems, theories as to the composition of the poem, and an enquiry into 
its historical and mythological elements. In this connection a study is also made 
of the other pieces of Anglo-Saxon heathen poetry. This course is open to graduate 
students who have already taken the course in Anglo-Saxon Grammar and reading 
of Anglo-Saxon Texts, or its equivalent. 

English Historical Grammar. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

In this course the development of the English Language is traced from the earliest 
times. After an outline has been given of the history and external relations of English , 
the change and decay of inflections, the use of prepositions and the more important 
points in historical syntax are discussed. The course presupposes a knowledge of 
Anglo-Saxon and Middle English. 

Dr. Hatcher conducts in each year the following graduate 
seminary : 

Seminary in Elizabethan Literature. Three hours a week throughout the year. 

Shakespeare is the subject of the seminary in 1909-10. In the first semester 
as detailed a review as is practicable is made of the results of Shakesperian 
scholarship as regards critical problems of biography, authorship, chronology and 
source material of the plays, a comparison of varying versions of separate plays, the 
influence of earlier and contemporary dramatists, etc. Dramatic records relating to 
Shakespeare are also examined at first hand and evidences of his participation in 
the general dramatic activities of his time noted. In the second semester students 
are given individual problems for investigation. 

In 1910-11 Spenser will be studied in the light of Mediaeval and Renaissance culture. 
The subjects taken up will be the inspiration, models, and sources of Spenser's poetry ; 
the many influences working upon him, and those emanating from him, as shown in the 
significant blending of classical, mediaeval, and Renaissance tendencies in his poetry, 
and his initiative in solving the literary problems of his time. In the first semester all 
the works of Spenser will be read and the results of Spenserian research examined. 
The second semester will be devoted largely to the investigation by each student of 
some special problem. 



74 



In 1911-12 English drama from 1558 to 1642 will be studied, as the chief literary 
expression of the' period. The conditions of its origin and continued production, its 
nature, extent, variety, development and decadence are discussed and a reasonable 
proportion of the extant plays of the period are read continuously as a background 
for other work. A brief introductory study is made of dramatic genres and of the 
broader principles of dramatic construction, and the remainder of the first semester is 
devoted to the examination of contemporary documents and other sources of informa- 
tion in regard to Elizabethan drama. In the latter half of the year each student 
investigates some special problem, such as dramatic inter-relationship or authorship, 
and gives reports upon her work. 

Dr. Hatcher offers in 1909-10 the following graduate course: 
Dramatic Theory and Technique in England until 1642. 

One hour a week throughout the year. 
The course inquires into the critical origins of English dramatic theory and into the 
technique of the various types of drama appearing in England before the closing of the 
theatres in 1642. An attempt is made to differentiate important sub-types of comedy 
and tragedy, and the essential characteristics of tragi-comedy, masque, and pastoral are 
noted. The inquiry includes references to foreign models and analyses of representative 
English plays of each type. The course is related to the seminary for 1909-10, dealing 
with Shakespeare, but may be elected separately. 

Dr. Hatcher offers in 1910-11 the following graduate course: 

The Drama as a Reflection of Contemporary Life. 

One hour a week throughout the year. 

Some one period in the development of the drama is chosen as the basis of study, 
usually the classical, the Elizabethan, or the modern, and the drama of that period is 
related as far as practicable to the social, economic and religious conditions of the time. 
The themes, situations, moral codes, and technical construction of the plays of the 
period selected are examined. In 1910-11 the modern period will probably be chosen and 
the material taken from recent and contemporary drama in Europe and America. The 
course is related to the seminary in Elizabethan literature but may be elected separately. 

Dr. Hatcher offers in 1911-12 the following graduate course: 

The Indebtedness of Elizabethan Literature to Continental 

One hour a week throughout the year. 
The course deals with the stimulus of earlier literary activity in the Romance countries 
and the consequent earlier development there of critical theories, the arts of versifica- 
tion, and of definite literary types. The models contributed to English literature by 
Italy, France, and Spain in epic, pastoral, tragedy, comedy, lyric, etc. are studied as 
well as the material actually borrowed and incorporated into Elizabethan literature. 
The significance of Elizabethan translations is emphasised. The course is related to the 
seminary in Elizabethan literature but may be elected separately. 

Dr. Clark, Dr. Brown, and Dr. Hatcher together conduct the 
journal club. 

English Journal Club. One and a half hours a fortnight throughout the year. 

The advanced students and the instructors meet to report on and discuss recent 
reviews and critical articles. 

The following advanced undergraduate courses maybe attended 
by graduate students: 

Miss Donnelly offers in 1910-11 the following course: 

English Poetry from 1780 to 1832. Two hours a week throughout the year. 



75 



This course consists of a detailed study of the poetry of Cowper, Burns, Wordsworth, 
Coleridge, Scott, Byron, Shelley, and Keats; special attention is paid to the rise and 
development of the Romantic movement in English poetry, with occasional reference 
to similar movements in France and Germany. 

Dr. Hatcher offers in 1909-10 and Miss Donnelly offers in 
1911-12 the following course: 

English Drama. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

This course is intended to give students that have completed the required course in 
English a more intimate knowledge of the later Elizabethan and the Jacobean drama. 
The lectures follow the development of the realistic and romantic tendencies in 
the comedy and tragedy of the period both as an expression of the national life and 
of the individual genius of the various dramatists. Selected plays of Shakespeare, 
Middleton, Ben Jonson, Beaumont and Fletcher, and other dramatists are read in 
connection with the lectures. 

Dr. Clark offers in each year the following courses : 

Classical and Romantic Prose. Three hours a week throughout the year. 

In the first semester the writings of Edmund Burke are considered with special 
reference to Classicism and Romanticism, and to the ideas of the French revolution. 
In the second semester the works of Lamb, Hazlitt, and De Quincey are studied. 

English Critics of the Nineteenth Century. 

Three hours a week throughout the year. 

The essayists and critics after 1832 are studied. In the first semester the authors 

usually chosen are Carlyle, Matthew Arnold, and Newman. Short papers and one long 

essay must be prepared by the students attending the course. In the second semester 

Ruskin, Pater, and Swinburne are discussed. 

Dr. Brown offers in each year the following course : 
Anglo-Saxon Grammar and reading of Anglo-Saxon Texts. 

Two hours a week throughout the year. 
The course begins with an outline of Anglo-Saxon grammar as presented in Bright 's 
Anglo-Saxon Reader. Selections in prose and verse from Bright's reader are next 
read with the class. In the second semester after a brief study of alliterative verse 
selections from Beowulf are read. Throughout the year lectures are given outlining 
the literature of the period and texts are read in translation. 

Dr. Brown offers in 1909-10 and again in 1911-12 the fol- 
lowing courses: 

Middle English Poetry. Three hours a week during the first semester. 

The course begins with an outline of Middle English grammar sufficient to enable 
the students to read ordinary texts intelligently. Selections are then read from 
Layamon's Brut, Robert of Gloucester's Chronicle, Barbour's Bruce, Richard Rolle, 
Robert of Brunne's Handlyng Synne, Langland's Vision of Piers the Plowman, Gower's 
Confessio Amantis, and other pieces of Middle English literature. Lectures are given 
on the development of the language and literature during this period. The course is 
designed as an introduction to the course on Chaucer given in the second semester 
but may be taken independently. 

Chaucer. Three hours a week during the second semester. 

In this course the best of the Canterbury Tales are studied, also the Legend of Good 
Women, The House of Fame, and portions of Troilus and Criseyde. The lectures discuss 
Chaucer's sources and literary art, and his relation to the English, French, and Italian 
literature of his time. Students taking this course are recommended, but not required , 
to have taken the course in Middle English poetry. 



76 



Dr. Brown offers in 1910-11 and again in 1912-13 the fol- 
lowing course: 

Middle English Romances. Three hours a week throughout the year. 

Selected romances are read by the members of the class. The lectures deal with the 
development of Romance literature in English with special reference to the romances 
of Germanic origin and the Arthurian cycle. 

Dr. Hatcher offers in 1910-11 and in each succeeding year 
the following courses : 

The Epic. Three hours a week during the first semester. 

The course is devoted to study of translations of the greater epics, but deals es- 
pecially with those representing the classical tradition, the Iliad, the Odyssey, the 
Mneid, and the greater Renaissance epics, Orlando Furioso, Jerusalem Delivered, the 
Faerie Queene and with Paradise Lost. The lectures discuss the literary value of the 
epics read and the origins and significance of epic poetry, and relate the artistic 
form of the epics studied to the critical theories of Aristotle and those of the Italian 
Renaissance. 

The Pastoral. Three hours a week during the second semester. 

The course deals with the best literature which has grouped itself round the pastoral 
tradition. It is devoted largely to literary appreciation, and significant pastoral litera- 
ture not available in adequate translations is discussed in the lectures, to include 
the Eclogues of Mantuan, the Arcadia of Sannazzaro, the Diana of Montemayor and 
I'Astree of d'Urfe - . The lectures trace the pastoral idea from its rise in the Idylls of 
Theocritus, through the romance and later classical eclogue into the Renaissance types 
of eclogue, pastoral lyric, novel, and drama. The reading for the course will include 
the Idylls of Theocritus, Bion and Moschus; Daphnis and Chloe, Vergil's Eclogues, 
Tasso's Aminta, Guarini's II Pastor Fido, Sidney's Arcadia, Lodge's Rosalynd, the 
Mantuan Eclogues of Barclay and others, Spenser's Shepherd's Calendar, Fletcher's 
Faithful Shepherdess, and Jonson's Sad Shepherd. 

Dr. Hatcher offers in 1911-12 and in each succeeding year 
the following courses: 

The Sonnet and Minor Lyric Forms. 

Three hours a week during the first semester. 
The lectures trace the rise of modern lyric poetry among the Troubadours and the 
spread of Provencal and other early Romance lyric forms from Italy, France, and Spain 
into England. The development of the sonnet form is emphasised and the English 
sonnet studied from its beginnings down to the present time with special reference to the 
sonnets of Sidney, Spenser, Shakespeare, Milton, Wordsworth, and Rossetti. The 
reading includes Ballades and Rondeaux, Scott's translations; Ballads and Lyrics of 
Old France, Andrew Lang's translations; Smith's Troubadours at Home, Rossetti 's 
Early Italian Poets, Petrarch's Sonnets, Bullen's Elizabethan Lyrics, Sidney Lee's 
Elizabethan Sonnets, and selected lyrics from The Oxford Book of English Verse. 
Previous study of Latin and French is assumed. 

The Drama. Three hours a week during the second semester. 

The object of the course is to suggest the many forms in which the human instinct 
for dramatic expression has manifested itself in different countries and periods, and to 
acquaint the student with the more significant of these forms in their historical order. 
The lectures inquire into the nature of the dramatic essence underlying all these forms, 
and attempt some comparison of the dramatic ideals and canons of the classical period 
with those of the Renaissance and with those of our own time. A few representative 
types of drama are studied in plays selected from different literatures and periods. 



77 

Dr. Clark offers in 1909-10 and again in 1911-12 the following 
free elective courses : 

Victorian Poets. Two hours a week during the first semester. 

The works of Tennyson, Arnold, Clough, Fitzgerald, and Landor are studied. 

Victorian Poets (continued). Two hours a week during the second semester. 

The Pre-Raphaelite movement is considered, and the works of Morris, Rossetti, Swin- 
burne, and Browning are studied. 

Dr. Clark offers in 1910-11 the following free elective courses: 

English Fiction in the Nineteenth Century. 

Two hours a week during the first semester. 

The history of the novel up to the nineteenth century is presented briefly. The 
novels of Jane Austen and Walter Scott are studied as an introduction to the work of the 
second semester. 

English Fiction in the Nineteenth Century (continued). 

Two hours a week during the second semester. 
The development of fiction is considered in the works of Thackeray, Dickens, Trollope, 
George Eliot, George Meredith, and others. 

Dr. Brown offers in 1909-10 and again in 1911-12 the follow- 
ing free elective course : 

The English Ballad. One hour a week throughout the year. 

The course is designed as an introduction to the study of popular poetry. Selections 
from the ballad literature of England and Scotland, representative of various types and 
periods, are read in class. The lectures illustrate the origins and history of the ballad 
as developed in English and other literatures, together with a study of various imitations 
of the genuine ballad. 

Dr. Hatcher offers in 1909-10 the following free elective 
course: 

The Elizabethan Age in Non-dramatic Literature. 

Two hours a week throughout the year. 

The lectures trace the national and foreign influences creating the first great body 
of English literature, and show the making of vocabulary, critical theories of prose 
and poetry, and the development of various types of literature, — epic, pastoral, novel, 
sonnet, and minor lyric and prose forms. The reading involves the best representa- 
tives of each of these types and some acquaintance with the critical literature of the 
period. 

Miss Fullerton offers in each year the following free elective 
course: 

Descriptive and Narrative Writing. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

Lectures are given on the theory and practice of description and on the style and 
methods of the best modern writers of short stories, both English and French. Students 
are required to write papers each week. 

Dr. Crandall offers in each year the following free elective 
course : 

Argumentation. Two hours a week throughout the year. 



78 



In the first semester the technique of argumentation is studied, and in the second 
semester the relation between the laws of thought emphasised in the first semester and 
the ordinary forms of prose composition is established. 

Miss King offers in 1909-10 and again in 1911-12 the following 
free elective course: 

Imitative Writing. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

This course consists of a study of the formation of style by the method of imitation. 
The lectures deal with the elements and the psychology of style, and as far as may 
be necessary, with the authors selected for imitation. 

Miss King offers in 1910-11 the following free elective course: 

Theory and Practice of Verse Composition. 

Two hours a week throughout the year. 

This course is not historical but theoretical and practical. The lectures deal with the 
theory of poetry, the difference between poetry and prose and the laws of verse in 
English. Students are required to write short exercises in verse every week. 

Mr. King offers in 1909-10 and again in 1911-12 the following 
free elective course in Elocution: 

Reading of Shakespeare. One hour a week throughout the year. 

This course is open only to those students who have taken the course in general read- 
ing of prose authors. A special study is made of the principles of correct delivery of 
blank verse. The needs of those students who intend to teach English literature, and 
desire to read Shakespeare to their pupils, are given special attention. 

Mr. King offers in 1910-11 and again in 1912-13 the following 
free elective course in Elocution : 

General Reading of Prose Authors. One hour a week throughout the year. 

This course is open only to those students who have attended the required course in 
elocution or who have done equivalent work. 

German. 

The instruction in this department is under the direction of 
Dr. Karl Detlev Jessen, Associate Professor of German Litera- 
ture, Dr. Hans Weyhe, Associate in Teutonic Philology and 
Sanskrit, and Miss Rose Chamberlin, Reader in German. 

Graduate Courses. 

The graduate courses offered in German philology may be found under 
the head of General Teutonic Philology. 

Graduate work in the history of modern German literature is conducted 
according to the seminary method. The courses are so varied that they 
may be followed by graduate students throughout three successive years 
and cover the work required of students who offer German literature as a 
major or a minor for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. 

No undergraduates are admitted to graduate courses. 



79 



Dr. Jessen conducts in each year the following graduate semi- 
nary: 

Seminary in German Literature. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

Although the seminary meets only two hours a week throughout the year, the amount 
of reading required makes the course equivalent to five hours a week. It is hoped that 
the students will become familiar in these courses with the methods of scientific literary 
criticism and investigation. 

In 1909-10 Goethe as a lyrical poet is studied. 

In 1910-11 Goethe's life and works will be the subject of the seminary. Goethe's views 
on aesthetics and philosophy, translations by and from Goethe, Goethe and romanticism, 
text criticism applied to selected works, studies of Goethe's style and use of words, and 
similar subjects will be investigated. 

In 1911-12 the Romantic School and the Volkslied are studied. 

Dr. Jessen offers in 1909-10 the following graduate courses: 

Goethe's Weltanschauung. One hour a week during the first semester. 

In this course the philosophy of Goethe is studied with a view to its importance 
in understanding the currents of thought underlying modern German culture. Its 
unscholastic character gives it special interest. The students are referred to the writ- 
ings of Wilhelm Bode, Moritz Heynacher, Hermann Siebeck, and others on the subject. 

Germanic Antiquities. One hour a week during the second semester. 

This course deals with the study of ethnic conditions and characteristics, the racial 
and social conditions of the Germanic peoples and the important influences exerted 
by classical study and the Christian religion. The recent scientific discussions of 
Comte Gobineau, H. St. Chamberlain, and others have emphasised the importance 
of the subject. Tacitus's Germania will be read with reference to Miillenhoff, Deutsche 
A Uertumskunde. 

Dr. Jessen offers in 1910-11 the following graduate courses: 

German Metrics. One hour a week during the first semester. 

This course consists of lectures on Deutsche Metrik or Verslehre, with an introduction 
to phonetics, this being an indispensable Hilfswissenschaft for the study of German 
literature. 

German PoetlCS. One hour a week during the second semester. 

Lectures will be given on Deutsche Poetik and Stilistik. 

Dr. Jessen offers in 1911-12 the following graduate courses: 

German .Literary Criticism. One hour a week during the first semester. 

The lectures trace the development of literary and aesthetic criticism in Germany 
from Leibniz to Schiller and Goethe. The course is comparative, and French and 
English literary criticism are also considered. Lessing' s Laokobn and Hamburgische 
Dramaturgic and Schiller's essays on aesthetics are specially studied. The course is 
open to those students only who have a reading knowledge of French and German. 

lne German ±LSSay. One hour a week during the second semester. 

The history of the essay in German literature is studied and the most eminent German 
essayists, Schopenhauer, Herman Grimm, Karl Hillebrand, Friedrich Nietzsche, etc., 
are discussed. The influence of French, English, and American writers, in particular 
Montaigne, Macaulay, and Emerson, is traced, and incidentally the evolution of modern 
German prose style is treated. 



80 



Dr. Jessen offers in each year, if the time of the department 
permits, the following graduate course : 

Goethe S Faust. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

This course is intended to give a detailed introduction to the problems of Faust- 
philologie, dealing with both the first and second part of Faust. 

Dr. Jessen and Dr. Weyhe conduct in each year the Germanic 
journal club. 

Germanic Journal Club. Two hours once a fortnight throughout the year. 

At the meetings recent books and articles are reviewed and the results of special 
investigations presented for discussion, comment and criticism. 

Post-Major Courses. 

Dr. Jessen offers in 1909-10 and again in 1911-12 the following 

post-major courses, open to graduate students: 

German Literature from 1850 to the present time. 

Two hours a week during the first semester . 

The subject of this course is, in the first semester, the Epigonen-Literatur. The 
development of the modern German Novelle is discussed and Keller's, Storm's, and C. F. 
Meyer's works are specially studied. A full account of the poets of the Miinchener 
Schule is given, in particular of Richard Wagner, Reuter, Groth, Freytag, Spielhagen, 
Scheffel, Raabe, Geibel, Heyse, and Schack. 

German Literature from 1850 to the present time (continued). 

Two hours a week during the second semester. 

In the second semester among the subjects discussed are the influence of French, 
Russian, and Scandinavian literatures, especially of the work of Zola and Ibsen on 
German literature; modern German realism and naturalism as represented by Fontane, 
Anzengruber, Wildenbruch, Hauptmann, Sudermann, Liliencron, and Rosegger; the 
increased importance of women in literature, and the work of Marie von Ebner- 
Eschenbach, Luise von Francois, Ricarda Huch, Helene Bohlau, Isolde Kurz, Clara 
Viebig and others; the significance of Nietzsche for German life and literature; neo- 
romanticism and Heimatsdichtung. 

Dr. Jessen offers in 1910-11 and again in 1912-13 the following 
post-major courses, open to graduate students: 
Lectures on the History of German Literature from the Romantic School 

till 1850. Two hours a week during the first semester. 

This course begins with a general study of the principles of philosophy, life, art, and 
poetry, as represented by the Romantic School, which is followed by lectures on the 
literary movements, expressed mainly in lyric poetry and in the novel, which supersede 
the Romantic Weltanschauung. The lyrics of the war of liberation, the Weltschmerz, 
and the political revolution; the novel of Jungdeutschland; the drama of Heinrich von 
Kleist; the works of the Schlegels, Tieck, Holderlin, Jean Paul, Novalis, Uhland, 
Lenau, Heine, Immermann, Freiligrath, Herwegh, Gutzkow, Morike, and Gotthelf, 
are the principal topics discussed. 

German Drama in the Nineteenth Century. 

Two hours a week during the second semester. 

The drama of Heinrich von Kleist is studied with special reference to that of the 
classical period, and to the dramatic efforts of the Romanticists. The place of Grill- 
parzer in German literature is defined, as well as the significance of Grabbe and Raimund. 



81 



This leads to Otto Ludwig and to Friedrich Hebbel, who is the central figure, chrono- 
logically as well as in importance, of the German drama during the nineteenth century. 
The course ends with a review of Anzengruber, Wildenbruch, Sudermann, Hauptmann, 
and of other modern writers. 

Dr. Jessen offers in each year the following post-major course, 
open to graduate students: 

Advanced Critical Reading. One hour a week throughout the year. 

The reading is selected from works discussed in the post-major lectures on literature. 
The students give reports on dramas or novels, the object of the discussion being to trace 
the characteristics of the author, as shown in his works. Special attention will be paid 
to the needs of students who intend to teach German. 

Dr. Weyhe offers in each year the following post-major course, 
open to graduate students: 

Elementary Middle High German. One hour a week throughout the year. 

This course has been arranged primarily for undergraduate students who wish to be 
able to read the Middle High German classics in the original. Wright's Middle High 
German Primer (2nd edition, Oxford, 1899) is used. 

Free Elective Course. 
Miss Chamberlin offers in each year the following free elective 
course: 

Advanced German Prose Composition and Reading of Modern German. 

Two hours a week throughout the year. 

Attention is given in this course to the needs of students wishing to make teaching 
their profession. Each student is required to lecture to the class at least once during 
the year. 

General Teutonic Philology. 

The instruction in this department is under the direction of Dr. 
Hans Weyhe, Associate in Teutonic Philology and Sanskrit. 

Special attention is called to the facilities for the study of 
comparative teutonic philology offered by Bryn Mawr College. 
The English and the German departments together have provided 
for a complete course in teutonic philology, comprising both the 
study of the individual languages (Gothic, Norse, Anglo-Saxon, 
Old Saxon, Old High German, Middle High German, Platt- 
Deutsch, etc.) and the study of general comparative philology. 

The courses in introduction to the study of teutonic philology, 
Gothic and Middle High German grammar (first-year course), are 
designed for students in their first year of graduate study in 
Teutonic languages, and the remaining qourses for students in 
their second or third year. 



82 



Students intending to elect teutonic philology are advised to 
study Greek for at least one year during their undergraduate 
course. 

Graduate Courses. 
Dr. Weyhe offers the following graduate courses : 

Introduction to the Study of Teutonic Philology. 

One hour a week throughout the year. 

These lectures deal with the following topics: a discussion of Teutonic in its relation 
to the cognate Aryan languages; a brief sketch of the single Teutonic languages, accom- 
panied by an account of the chief grammatical and lexicographic works on each ; a 
discussion of the aim and method of historical and comparative grammar, including 
problems such as those of the relationship of dialects and the consistency of phonetic 
laws; a brief history of Teutonic philology, and finally the outlines of general phonetics. 

Gothic. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

Gothic phonetics and inflection are studied in connection with the elements of com- 
parative Aryan grammar. Braune's Gotische Grammatik (6th ed., Halle, 1905) ; or 
Streitberg's Gotisches Elementarbuch (2nd ed., Heidelberg, 1906) are used as text-books. 

As a thorough knowledge of Gothic is the foundation of the study of historical and 
comparative Teutonic grammar, every graduate student of Teutonic grammar is 
advised to take this course as early as possible. 

Middle High German Grammar and reading of Middle High German 

Texts (first-year COUrse). Two hours a week throughout the year. 

This course includes a brief abstract of Middle High German grammar, with special 
reference to the difference between Middle High German and Modern German, and a 
study of the most prominent authors in Middle High German. Part of Hartmann's 
Armer Heinrich is read, and is followed by selections from the Nibelungenlied,, a brief 
account being given of the ' 'Nibelungenfrage " and of the manuscripts of the Nibelungen- 
lied. 

Students of Middle High German should be provided with Paul's Mittelhochd. Gram- 
matik (6th ed., Halle, 1904), or Michels's Mittelhochd. Elementarbuch (Heidelberg, 1900). 

For a more complete treatment of the subject T. Wright's Historical German Grammar 
(Vol. 1, Oxford, 1907) is recommended. 

This course is required of all students that make German the minor subject in their 
examination for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. 

The private reading includes the works of the authors treated in the course. 

Uld -tilgn German. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

This course is offered to students acquainted with Gothic and Middle High German, 
or at least modern German, and includes a practical study of Old High German gram- 
mar, and a comparison of the Old High German sounds and forms with those of Middle 
and Modern High German. Selections are read from Old High German texts, arranged 
so as to proceed from easy to more difficult pieces, and to illustrate the differences 
between the Old High German dialects. 

Middle High German (second-year course). 

One hour a week throughout the year. 

This course is intended for students that have followed the first year's course in Middle 
High German. The first semester is devoted to the Hofisches Epos (Veldeke, Wolfram, 
Gottfried von Strassburg, Rudolf von Ems, Conrad von Wiirzburg), and the second 
semester to Minnesangs Fruhling and Walther von der Vogelweide. 

Old oaxon. Two hours a week during the second semester. 

The work presupposes on the part of the students a sufficient knowledge of Gothic 



83 



and Anglo-Saxon. Holthausen's Altsachsisches Elementarbuch (Heidelberg, 1899); 
the Heliand (in Sievers's or Heyne's or Behaghel's edition), and Zangemeister-Braune's 
Bruchatilcke der allsachsischen Bibeldichtung (Heidelberg, 1894) are used. The reading 
is supplemented by a discussion of the West Germanic alliterative verse with reference 
to versification and poetic style in Anglo-Saxon. 

Old Norse. Two hours a week during the second semester. 

This course may, by request, be substituted for the course in Old Saxon. 

Students entering this course are supposed to be acquainted with Gothic and with 
Anglo-Saxon or Old High German grammar. In the grammatical part of the course 
attention is paid to the relation between Gothic and Norse, and to the differences 
between the East Teutonic and West Teutonic branches. Among the texts read, 
selections from the younger and the older Eddas take a prominent place. 

The books used are Sweet's Icelandic Primer (Oxford, 1886), or Holthausen's Altis- 
landisches Elementarbuch (Weimar, 1895), and Hildebrand's Edda (2nd edition, Pader- 
born, 1904), with Gering's Glossar (3rd edition, Paderborn, 1907). For advanced 
students the reading of one of the larger Islendinga sogur, preceded by an introduction 
to the history of Iceland, may be substituted. 

Attention is called to the facilities afforded for the study of Old Norse. A consider- 
able portion of the library of the late philologist, Th. Wise"n, of Lund, was acquired by 
Bryn Mawr College, and hence the library is probably as well supplied as any other 
college library in the United States with Old Norse texts, Norse periodicals, and works 
on Old Norse language and literature. 

Comparative Teutonic Grammar. One hour a week throughout the year. 

The study of comparative Teutonic philology is recommended to those students only 
who are acquainted with the single old Teutonic languages, and have studied Gothic, 
Old High German, Old Saxon, Anglo-Saxon, and Norse. The object of the course is 
to compare the various old Teutonic languages with each other and with the related 
Aryan languages, — or in other words (1) to reconstruct the primitive Teutonic lan- 
guage; (2) to point out the characteristic features of primitive Teutonic in distinction 
from primitive Aryan; (3) to carry down the history of early Teutonic from the period 
of unity into the early stages of the individual Teutonic languages. 

Teutonic Seminary. One hour a week throughout the year. 

This seminary is arranged for the benefit of the most advanced students in Teutonic 
philology. Its object is to encourage independent work on the part of the students. 
The exercises consist mainly of the discussion of special topics by the instructor and 
the students. The subjects for discussion are announced in advance, and the members 
of the seminary are expected to study the literature on these subjects, and to make an 
effort to contribute some additional material, or an independent opinion of their own. 

In addition to the above courses, others in Old Frisian, Dutch, Middle 
Low German, or Modern Low German may be arranged for students that 
have previously studied Gothic, Old and Middle High German, Anglo- 
Saxon, and Old Saxon. 

Romance Languages. 
French. 

The instruction in this department is under the direction of 
Dr. Albert Schinz, Associate Professor of French Literature, Dr. 
Richard Thayer Holbrook, Associate Professor of French Phil- 
ology and Italian, Mr. Frederick A. Blossom, Lecturer in French, 
and Dr. Clara Leonora Nicolay, Reader in Elementary French. 



84 



Graduate Courses. 

There are offered each year three distinct graduate courses in French, 
two in literature and one in language, and these courses are varied so that 
they may be followed by the graduate student throughout three years. 

Graduate students interested in the study of literature will find it to 
their advantage to attend the lectures on French literature two hours a 
week throughout the two years of the major course in French. 

No undergraduates are admitted to graduate courses. 

Dr. Schinz conducts in each year the following graduate semi- 
nary: 

Seminary in French Literature. Three hours a week throughout the year. 

In 1909-10 and again in 1911-12 the subject of the seminary is Victor Hugo. The 
seminary deals with his lyrical works. The following subjects are treated: Victor 
Hugo as a Royalist and Catholic poet; his indebtedness to Chateaubriand, Sainte- 
Beuve, Nodier and other contemporaries; his attitude towards Napoleon I, the 
Republic of 1848 and Napoleon III. ; and his social, political and religious ideas in the 
period of his maturity and of his old age. 

In 1910-11 Rousseau is the subject of the seminary. In the first semester, after a 
discussion of his life, a study is made of the Confessions, Reveries, and Correspondance. 
Special attention is paid to the controversy Co?ifessions versus Memoires d'Epinay, as 
transformed by the discoveries of Mrs. MacDonald. The questions of Rousseau's 
insanity and suicide are discussed. The second semester is devoted chiefly to the study 
of Texte's Jean Jacques Rousseau et le cosmopolitisme litteraire. The Lettre a d'Alem- 
bert and the Nouvelle Heloise will serve as a text to this theory. 

In 1912-13 the subject of the seminary will be Montaigne. Various problems con- 
nected with his life, his relations to Protestantism and to the political problems of his 
time, the question of the authorship of the Discours sur la servitude volontaire, the 
origin and sources of the essays, Montaigne and the Renaissance, and Montaigne and 
Plutarch will be discussed. A special study Will be made of Montaigne's style and of 
the Apologie de Raymond de Sebonde. 

Mr. Blossom conducts in each year the following graduate semi- 
nary: 

Seminary in French Language and Literature. 

Two hours a week throughout the year. 

In 1910-11 the work of the seminary is an analytical study of the modern French 
language. Questions of syntax, style and vocabulary are discussed with a view to 
acquiring a thorough command of the idiomatic language. In 1913-14 the seminary in 
Moliere will be substituted for the above. The subjects studied will be: French Com- 
edy before Moliere, Moliere 's comedies, their Latin, Italian, and French sources, his 
style and method of composition, the nature of his "comique, " his philosophy and 
his morality are discussed. 

In 1911-12 the subject of the seminary is La 'Matiere de Bretagne' et Vepopee cour- 
toise. The course includes a careful study of the Lais of Marie de France, the poems 
referring to Tristan, and the Romans of Chretien de Troie; these are studied in con- 
nection with the question of their origin in Celtic countries and their later development 
in France. The different theories that have been proposed as to their origin and 
evolution are examined and discussed and an attempt is made to determine their com- 
parative value. 

The subject of the seminary in 1912-13 is Ronsard and the Pleiade, the object 
being to determine the origin, the extent, and the success of the Renaissance move- 



85 



ment in France. The chief works of Ronsard and his successors, especially Du 
Bellay and Baif, will be read and discussed. 

The course in Old French Philology is intended for students in their 
first year of graduate study; that in Provencal and the Old French Semi- 
nary for students in their second or third year of graduate study; the 
Journal Club may be attended by students in their first, second, or third 
year of graduate study. The course in Old French Readings is designed 
to be taken in connection with the seminary in Old French. 

Dr. Holbrook offers in each year the following graduate 
courses : 

Old French Philology. Three hours a week throughout the year. 

This course consists of lectures on the phonology, morphology, and syntax of Old 
French, and is designed not only for students whose main pursuit is Romance phil- 
ology, but also for those who wish to acquire more precise knowledge of the French 
elements in Middle English. The main principles of Historical Grammar are stud- 
ied in the Extraits de la Chanson de Roland, published by Gaston Paris, and in various 
texts in L. Constans's Chrestomathie. Other books used are Passy's Sounds of the 
French Language, Grandgent's Introduction to Vulgar Latin, Nyrop's Grammaire His- 
torique de VAncien Francois, and Schwan's Grammaire de I'Ancien Francais. 

Old French Readings. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

Various typical Old French masterpieces are studied from a scientific standpoint. 
The essential facts of Old French grammar are reviewed and rare or difficult locu- 
tions are minutely examined for the sake of precise interpretation ; dialectal fea- 
tures are considered and attention is given to the relation of manuscripts to printed 
texts. In addition to the works named below, students are expected to supply 
themselves with Gaston Paris's Litterature francaise au moyen Age. 

The following courses may be rearranged to suit the needs of students in any particu- 
lar year. 

In 1909-10 and again in 1911-12 epic and historical literature is the subject of the 
course. The texts required are Stengel's edition of the Chanson de Roland (Leipsic, 
1900); the Pelerinage de Charlemagne (ed. by Koschwitz, Leipsic, 1900), and the 
Extraits des Chroniqueurs Francais (Villehardouin, Joinville, Froissart, Commines), 
ed. by G. Paris and A. Jeanroy, Paris, 1893. 

In 1910-11 dramatic literature will be studied. Various mysteries and miracle 
plays will be examined; but the course will deal mainly with purely mediaeval comedy 
(ca. 1260- - ca. 1530). The texts used are Adam de la Hale's Jeu de la feuillee (edition of 
Rambeau, Marburg, 1886, and of Langlois, Paris, 1895); Paul Lacroix's Recueil (Paris, 
1859), and the facsimile of Guillaume Le Roy's Patelin (I486?), printed for the Socie'te' 
des textes Francais modernes. 

Old French Seminary. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

The work of the seminary is on the most important Old French dialects. Texts in 
Norman, Picard, Francian and Franco-Provencal are studied with reference to their 
dialectal features in order that the student may acquire the power to determine 
approximately the origin of other texts in which the same dialectal features occur. 

Old Provencal. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

This course is intended for students of Old French who wish to begin the study of the 
language and literature of the Troubadours. The books required are Grandgent's 
Outline of the Phonology and Morphology of Old Provencal (Boston, 1905) and Appel's 
Provenzalische Chrestomathie (latest edition). 



86 

Dr. DeHaan, Dr. Schinz, Dr. Holbrook and Mr. Blossom, 

together conduct the journal club in Romance languages. 

Romance Languages Journal Club. 

One and a half hours a fortnight throughout the year. 

The journal club is intended to make the advanced students familiar with all the 
important European periodicals and with new books dealing with Romance Philology. 
For each session of the club an important article chosen from some one of the various 
periodicals is assigned to a student for review. The student is also referred to previous 
articles or publications treating of the same subject as that of the review, and is expected 
to present to the club a chronological outline of the history and stages of the discussion 
on the given point. Thus the students become familiar with the names of leading 
Romance scholars and with the particular lines of research in which each of the latter 
excels. At the same time such reviews prepare the way for seminary work and original 
investigations. 

Post-Major Courses. 

Dr. Schinz offers in 1909-10 and again in 1911-12 the follow- 
ing post-major course, open to graduate students: 

The Short Story (Nouvelle) in the Nineteenth Century. 

Two hours a week throughout the year 

The genre nouvelle is studied in connection with the following writers : Xavier de 
Maistre, Chateaubriand, Nodier, de Vigny, de Musset, Balzac, Merimee, Gautier, La- 
boulaye, Daudet, Bourget, Maupassant, France, Bazin, Rod, Coppee, Loti, Villiers de 
l'lsle Adam, de Regnier, and others. In 1909-10 this course was given one hour a 
week throughout the year. , 

Dr. Schinz offers in 1910-11 and again in 1912-13 the follow- 
ing post-major course, open to graduate students: 

French Lyric Poetry of the Nineteenth Century. 

Two hours a week throughout the year. 

In the first semester the lectures treat lyric poetry until the year 1866. Special 
attention is paid to the period from 1850 to 1866, while Lamartine, Hugo, Sainte- 
Beuve, de Vigny, and de Musset are treated only so far as is necessary for the under- 
standing of the evolution of lyric poetry in their successors, Baudelaire, Gautier, de 
Banville, Leconte de Lisle, etc. The lectures of the second semester treat contem- 
porary lyric poetry from 1866 to 1900. A careful study is made of the Parnassian 
and Symbolist schools. 

Mr. Blossom offers in each year the following post-major 
course, open to graduate students: 

Teachers' Course in Advanced French. One hour a week throughout the year. 

This course is especially intended to give students the practical knowledge of French 
required for teaching the language. A correct pronunciation is taught by means 
of a study of French phonetics, of the comparative value of sounds, of the tonic and 
oratorical accents, and of the rhythmical language. Classical texts are analysed as 
a preparation for exercises in composition and lectures on the principles of French 
rhetoric will be given. 

Mr. Blossom offers in 1909-10 the following post-major course, 
open to graduate students: 

The Evolution of the French Novel. Two hours a week throughout the year. 



87 



In this course the development of the novel is studied from its rise with Aslrie 
through the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries to the end of the romantic period. 
Students are required to read and report on representative novels of each epoch. 

Mr. Blossom offers in 1910-11 the following post-major course, 
open to graduate students : 

French Lyric Poetry to the End of the Eighteenth Century. 

One hour a week throughout the year. 

After a study of the principles of French versification, the history of lyric poetry in 
France is studied from its origin to the end of the eighteenth century, particular atten- 
tion being paid to the works of Rutebeuf, Charles d 'Orleans, Villon, Marot, and Ronsard. 

Mr. Blossom offers in 1911-12 the following post-major course, 
open to graduate students : 

The Romantic Drama of the nineteenth century. 

Two hours a week throughout the year. 

The lectures deal with the origin and development of the romantic drama in the 

works of Victor Hugo, Alexandre Dumas pere. Alfred de Vigny, and Alfred deMusset. 

Its renaissance in the latter part of the century in Richepin and Edmond Rostand is 

then discussed. 

Mr. Blossom offers in 1912-13 the following post-major course, 

open to graduate students : 

Origin, development, and decline of realistic comedy. 

Two hours .a week throughout the year. 

The lectures treat of the origin of realistic comedy in Beaumarchais ; its period of 
highest development in Augier, Dumas fils, Pailleron, and Sardou; its decline, the 
comedienaturaliste; new systems and new writers, Jules Lemaitre and Edmond Rostand. 

Italian. 

The instruction in this department is under the direction of 
Dr. Richard Thayer Holbrook, Associate Professor of French 
Philology and Italian. 

Graduate Courses. 
Dr. Holbrook offers in each year the following graduate 
courses : 

Italian .Philology. One hour a week throughout the year. 

This course presupposes a knowledge of Old French Philology and the equivalent of 
the minor and major courses in Italian offered at Bryn Mawr College. The work is 
founded upon the treatise entitled Die Italienische Sprache by D'Ovidio and Meyer 
Liibke in Grober's Grundriss (Strassburg, 1906). Various passages from thirteenth 
and fourteenth century authors are examined critically from a phonological and 
morphological point of view. 

Old Italian Readings. One hour a week throughovX the year. 

Students should provide themselves with the first volume of D'Ancona and Bacci'e 
Manuale della Letteratura Italiana (Florence, 1904). 



88 

Dr. DeHaan, Dr. Schinz, Dr. Holbrook and Mr. Blossom 

together conduct the journal club in Romance languages. 

Romance Languages Journal Club. 

One and a half hours a fortnight throughout the year. 

Dr. Holbrook offers in each year the following undergraduate 
courses, open to graduate students: 

First Year. 
Modern Italian. Three hours a week throughout the year. 

This course is designed to prepare beginners for the study of Italian literature, as well 
as for the practical use of the language. Reading is taken up from the start, a careful 
pronunciation is insisted upon, and the essentials of the grammar are taught by a critical 
observation of the texts used and by graded exercises in the rendering of English into 
Italian. The books used are the following: C. H. Grandgent's Italian Grammar; Bowen's 
Italian Reader and Hecker's II Piccolo Italiano; Giuseppe Finzi's Petrarca (1900); 
De Marchi's Storie; selections from the verse and prose of Renato Fucini and others. 

Representative Italian Classics in English Translations 

Two hours a week throughout the year. 

This course deals with typical masterpieces of Italian literature from Dante to Cellini. 
The author's life, character, and surroundings, his place in literary history, and his 
translators are discussed. 

The works studied are as follows: Dante and his Circle (for early lyrics). Vita Nuova, 
most of the Inferno, parts of the Purgatorio and Paradiso; Boccaccio, Life of Dante and 
several tales translated by John Payne and J. M. Rigg; Petrarch, selected Letters, Sonnets 
and Triumphs; Ariosto, Orlando Furioso; Tasso, Jerusalem Delivered; Castiglione, 
The Courtier; Cellini, Life. Knowledge of Italian is not required. 

Second Year. 

Italian Classical Literature. Three hours a week throughout the year. 

The work in this course is to translate most of the Inferno and parts of the Pur- 
gatorio and Paradiso; then selections from Ariosto and Tasso. For these two the 
study of difficult modern prose and poetry may be substituted, with exercises in 
writing and speaking. Training in pronunciation will be given throughout the course. 
The lectures on literature are delivered in Italian. 

Spanish. 

The instruction in this department is under the direction of 
Dr. Fonger DeHaan, Professor of Spanish. 

Graduate Courses. 
Dr. DeHaan offers in each year the following graduate courses : 
Lectures in Spanish on Spanish Literary History till the death of 
Calderon (1681 ). One hour a week throughout the year. 

The lectures are supplemented by extensive private reading of important works. 
Essays in Spanish. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

Spanish Philology. One hour a week throughout the year. 

Old Spanish Readings. One hour a week throughout the year. 



89 ' 



Dr. DeHaan, Dr. Schinz, Dr. Holbrook and Mr. Blossom 

together conduct the journal club in Romance languages. 

Romance Languages Journal Club. 

One and a half hours a fortnight throughout the year. 

Post-Major Courses. 

Dr. DeHaan offers in each year the following post-major course, 
open to graduate students : 

Spanish. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

This course in composition and conversation is offered to those students who have 
completed the major course. 

Dr. DeHaan offers in each year the following undergraduate 
courses, open to graduate students: 

First Year. 

Spanish. Five hours a week throughout the year. 

The object of this course is to give beginners a good knowledge of modern Spanish, and 
to ground them thoroughly in the essentials of the grammar. As a preparation for 
understanding the spoken language, two half -hours a week during the second semester 
are devoted to dictation. The books studied are the following (taken up in the order 
indicated): DeHaan's Cuentos Modernos; Perez Nieva, Tomds el torrero (Madrid, 
Coleccidn Klong); De Haan's Selected Works of G. A. Bequer; Hartzenbusch, Los 
Amantes de Teruel (Obras, vol. III.); Zorrilla, Granada (Madrid, 1895, 2 vols.). 

Private reading: Palacio V aides, Jose; Gald6s, Marianela. 

Second Year. 

Lectures in Spanish on Spanish Literary History of the Nineteenth 

Century. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

Spanish Composition. One hour a week throughout the year. 

Critical Reading in Spanish. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

Private reading: Private reading supplementing the lectures on literary history com- 
prises representative works in the various branches of literature. 

Semitic Languages and Biblical Literature. 

The instruction in this department is under the direction of 
Dr. George A. Barton, Professor of Biblical Literature and Semitic 
Languages, and Miss Maud Downing, Reader in Semitic Lan- 
guages. 

The college was particularly fortunate in securing in the year 
1892 the library of the late M. Arthur Amiaud, of Paris. While 
M. Amiaud was especially eminent as an Assyriologist, he was 
also prominent as a general Semitic student. His library was 



90 

the collection of an active scholar, and forms a working library 
for the student in every department of Semitic study. It is 
especially rich in the Hebrew, Syriac, and Assyrian languages, 
containing several works, indispensable to the student, which 
are now out of print. Another Semitic library containing many 
works on the Talmud and on Jewish literature was acquired in 
1904. Mr. Albert J. Edmunds presented to the college in 1907 
his library of 200 volumes on the history of religion. The con- 
tents of these libraries, together with the books already owned by 
the college and those easily accessible in neighboring libraries, 
form an exceptionally good collection of material for the specialist 
in Semitic languages. A good working collection of cuneiform 
tablets is under the control of the department, and affords an 
excellent opportunity for students of Assyrian to become familiar 
with original documents. 

Graduate Courses. 

The graduate courses in Semitic languages are varied from year to year, 
as indicated below, so that they may be pursued by a student for four 
successive years. Those who offer Semitic languages as the major subject 
in the examination for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy are required to 
spend in Semitic work half their time for at least three years. 

The work of the department is so arranged that students may special- 
ise in Hebrew or Assyrian. Students who offer Hebrew or Assyrian as the 
major subject in the examination for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy 
must possess a knowledge of the grammatical forms of five Semitic 
languages and in this enumeration Syriac and Jewish Aramaic may not 
count as separate languages. Students that offer Semitic languages as 
the minor subject in the examination for the degree of Doctor of Phi- 
losophy must show that they have a knowledge of three Semitic languages. 

The regular alternation of courses is indicated below and at least five 
hours a week will be given in each year, the courses being selected accord- 
ing to the needs of the graduate students. Graduate students may enter 
in any year of the four years' course, as there will be afforded each year an 
opportunity for graduate students to begin Hebrew. 

No undergraduates are admitted to graduate courses. 

Dr. Barton offers in 1909-10 the following graduate courses: 

Assyrian Seminary. One hour a week throughout the year. 

The work of the seminary consists of a critical study of Sumerian texts. 

Hebrew Seminary. One hour a week throughout the year. 

The Psalter and the book of Job, Canticles, Ecclesiastes or one of the historical or 
prophetic books is discussed. 



91 



Aramaic Seminary. One hour a week throughout the year. 

One hour of the course is devoted to Jewish Aramaic including a study of the Talmud 
and Aramaic inscriptions. The remaining hour is spent on Syriac and the Sinai 
gospels and the poetry of Ephraim are studied. 

Comparative Semitic Grammar. One hour a week throughout the year. 

The course is devoted to Semitic phonetics and grammatical forms with a comparison 
of old Hamitic. In connection with the work selected Egyptian texts are read, to 
supply the student with Hamitic linguistic material. The first semester is devoted to 
phonetic material and its laws, the second to the pronoun and the verb. 

EthlopiC. One hour a week throughout the year. 

The grammar and Chreslomathia of Praetorius and Dillmann are used, and in the 
latter part of the course selections are read from the book of Enoch. 

Seminary in Arabic Literature. One hour a week throughout the year. 

The work of the seminary is a study of the pre-Islamic poets, the Coran, and the 
traditions. 

Dr. Barton offers in 1910-11 the following graduate courses: 

Semitic Seminary. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

This seminary is devoted to Hebrew or Assyrian, the languages that may be offered 
as major subjects for the doctor's degree. The time may be devoted to one of 
these languages, or may be divided between the two, according to the needs of the 
students. In Assyrian the subject may be chosen from one of the following: the oldest 
Babylonian inscriptions, temple archives of Telloh, Sumerian hymns, the code of 
Hammurabi, or mythological poetry. In Hebrew, one of the following subjects may 
be selected: Job, the Psalter, Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ecclesiastes and the Song of Songs, or 
Hebrew Epigraphy. In the Hebrew seminary the students are trained in textual criti- 
cism through the use of the ancient versions. 

Elementary Semitic Languages. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

This course may be devoted to the elements of Hebrew, or of Aramaic (Syriac and 
Jewish Aramaic), or Assyrian, or Arabic according to the needs of the students. The 
time may, if necessary, be divided between two of these languages. 

Hebrew, The Prophets. One hour a week throughout the year. 

The text of one or more of the Prophets is critically interpreted, and Hebrew syntax 
and composition are studied. 

Hebrew Literature. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

This course is devoted to a study of the Prophets, the Pentateuch, and the historical 
books of the Old Testament. 

Ethiopif. One hour a week throughout the year. 

This course is a continuation of that given in 1909-10. 

Dr. Barton offers in 1911-12 the folloAving graduate courses: 

Semitic Seminary. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

The work of the seminary is continued as given in 1910-11. 

Seminary in Aramaic and Arabic. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

This seminary is devoted to Arabic or Aramaic, the languages that may be offered as 
minor subjects for the doctor's degree. The time may be devoted to one of the 
languages, or may be divided between the two, according to the needs of the students. 
In Arabic the subject may be chosen from one of the following: the Coran, pre-Islamic 
poetry, Arabic geographers, or South Arabic inscriptions. In Aramaic, one of the 



92 



following subjects may be selected : a comparative study of the Syriac Versions of the 
Gospels, the Syriac Version of one of the Old Testament books, the writings of Gregory 
Bar Hebraeus, or of Efraem, the Targum or one of the Old Testament books, the 
Talmud, or Aramaic inscriptions. 

Comparative Semitic Grammar. One hour a week throughout the year. 

The grammar of Brockelmann is used as a basis with comparisons from the Egyptian 
and other Hamitic languages. 

Egyptian. One hour a week throughout the year. 

The elements of Egyptian and Coptic grammar are taught, and some texts in each 
language interpreted. 

Seminary in New Testament Greek. One hour. a week throughout the year. 

A thorough study is made of some book of the New Testament, and the students are 
guided in critical studies, both textual and historical. 

Miss Downing offers in 1909-10 the following graduate courses: 

Elementary Aramaic. One hour a week throughout the year. 

Elementary Arabic. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

This course consists of a study of the elements of the language, the interpretation of 
selections from Briinnow's Chrestomathia and from the Thousand and One Nights, 
together with Arabic prose composition. 

Free Elective Courses. 

The courses in Biblical Literature and Oriental History are intended 
primarily for undergraduate students, but may be elected by graduate 
students also. 

Dr. Barton offers in 1909-10 and again in 1911-12 the following 
free elective courses in Biblical literature: 

New Testament Biography. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

The first semester of this course is devoted to a careful study of the life and teaching 
of Christ; the second semester to the life and teaching of St. Paul. The Gospels and 
Epistles are read, together with the most helpful of the modern works on these topics. 
The course is illustrated by photographs of the most important places connected with 
the lives of Christ and St. Paul. 

History of the Old Testament Canon. One hour a week throughout the year. 

In this course the history of the composition and collection of the books of the Old 
Testament is studied. The instruction is given in lectures, and reading is assigned in 
the Old Testament and in modern literature concerning it. 

Dr. Barton offers in 1910-11 and again in 1912-13 the follow- 
ing free elective courses in Biblical literature : 

History of Christian Doctrine. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

In the first semester Christianity is studied as presented by its Founder and by the 
apostles, and in the second semester the history of Christian doctrine from 100 A. D. to 
the present time is briefly reviewed, and problems presented by modern thought are 
touched upon. 

History of the New Testament Canon. One hour a week throughout the year. 

This course consists of a study of the New Testament, similar in its methods and 
aims to the course on the Old Testament Canon. 



93 

Dr. Barton offers in each year the following free elective course: 

Oriental History. Five hours a week throughout the year. 

This course treats in broad outlines the history and civilisation of the Classical Orient. 
The beginnings of the Hamito-Semitic race, and the influence of environment upon its 
primitive institutions are first studied. The separation of the. races into the different 
nations is then traced, and the history of the principal Oriental nations, Egyptians, 
Babylonians, Assyrians, Phoenicians, Hebrews, Hittites, Sabaeans, and Persians; of 
Alexander and his successors; of the Parthians, and the oriental empire of the Romans. 
is followed in outline. Special attention is paid to the history of the Hebrews, and to 
their unique religious contribution to the civilisation of the world. The course con- 
cludes with a study of the Arabic caliphates, and of Mohammedan civilisation. The 
lectures are illustrated by archaeological specimens and by photographs. Either sem- 
ester may be elected separately. 

Dr. Barton offers in each year, when the time of the depart- 
ment permits, the following free elective courses: 

Biblical Geography and Archaeology. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

The course begins with a survey of the physical features of Palestine and an estimate 
of their effect upon its civilisation. The succession of races dominant in Palestine since 
the beginning of history is then reviewed, after which the positions of the places impor- 
tant in the Biblical narratives are carefully noted. The principal Biblical narratives 
are studied in connection with the geography of the country and the archseological 
remains of the period. In this way the narratives of the Patriarchs, Kings, Prophets, 
and Apostles, as well as the life of Christ, are illustrated. The course is illustrated by 
photographs. Use is made throughout the course of the publications of the Palestine 
Exploration Fund, and of other modern explorers. 

New Testament Greek. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

This course presupposes a knowledge of classical Greek. After some introductory 
lectures on the formation and peculiarities of the New Testament Greek, one hour a 
week during the first semester is devoted to lectures on the history of the New Testament 
text, both in its written and in its printed form, the helps extant for emending it, and 
the method of using them. The remainder of the time is devoted to the interpretation 
of the New Testament Epistles, especially those of Paul. The students are expected 
to read privately during the first semester the text of one of the Gospels, and during the 
second, either the Acts of the Apostles, the Apocalypse, or the Epistle to the Hebrews. 



History. 

The instruction in this department is under the direction of 
Dr. William Henry Allison, Associate in History, and Dr. 
William Roy Smith, Associate Professor of History. 

Graduate Courses. 

Two distinct seminary courses in English history and in American his- 
tory are offered to graduate students in history in addition to a course in 
Historical Method and Criticism and the direction of private reading and 
original research. 

No undergraduates are admitted to graduate courses 



94 



Dr. Allison conducts in each year the following graduate 
seminary: 

Seminary in English History. Three hours a week throughout the year. 

In 1909-10 the subject of the seminary is special privileges in England, 1559 
to 1660. The social, political, and economic conditions in England in the period from 
the accession of Elizabeth to the Restoration are investigated for the purpose of 
discovering the special privileges enjoyed by particular classes, local groups or indi- 
viduals. The origin and nature of some of these are further studied with their 
general and specific effects as discernible in English history. In part it is a study of 
feudal survivals, in part a study of post-Reformation developments. 

In 1910-11 seventeenth century English Puritanism will be the subject of the sem- 
inary. Problems in the historical development of Puritanism will be assigned to the 
students for investigation and some of the typical writings examined. Each student 
will make a special study of one particular Puritan of the period. 

In 1911-12 genetic studies in the reform period of English history, 1815 to 1845, 
will be the subject of the seminary. The reform movements which sought legislative 
support in Parliament will be discussed and an attempt will be made to discover the 
various forces, especially the organised forces, favoring or opposing these movements. 

Dr. Allison offers in each year the following graduate 
course : 

Historical Method and Criticism. 

Two hours once a fortnight throughout the year. 
The questions dealt with in this course are the scope of historical work and its rela- 
tions to allied subjects; the outlines of historical bibliography; the great collections 
of printed material; archives and MSS.; editing, criticism, and evidence. 

Dr. Smith conducts in each year the following graduate 
seminary : 

Seminary in American History. Three hours a week throughout the year. 

In 1909-10 the revolution, the confederation and the constitution are the subjects 
of study. American history from 1776 to 1789 is discussed primarily from the 
local point of view as a step in the conflict between the seaboard aristocracy and the 
democracy of the frontier. The social and economic forces which led to the adoption 
of the Federal Constitution and the subsequent formation of national political parties 
are investigated. 

In 1910-11 the American colonies in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries will 
be the subject of the seminary. The political, constitutional, and social problems of 
the colonies in the seventeenth century will be studied in the first semester. In the 
second semester, special stress is laid upon the development in the eighteenth century 
of the imperial administrative machinery and upon the ethnical distribution of popula- 
tion in the colonies. 

In 1911-12 the subject of the seminary will be slavery and the negro problem. After 
a preliminary survey of the history of slavery in the colonial period such topics as the 
slavery compromises of the constitution, the growth of slavery in the South, the abolition 
of the slave trade, the Missouri Compromise, the anti-Slavery movement, nullification, 
the Mexican War, the Wilmot Proviso, the compromise measures of 1850, the Kansas- 
Nebraska bill, the Dred Scott decision, the abolition of slavery, and the adoption of the 
thirteenth, fourteenth, and fifteenth amendments are discussed. Special attention is 
paid to the conflict between sectionalism and nationalism and to the connection between 
slavery, territorial expansion, and the development of constitutional theories. 



95 



Dr. Smith and Dr. Allison conduct in each year the historical 
journal club: 

Historical Journal Club. Two hours once a fortnight throughout the year. 

The instructors in the department of history and the graduate students who are 

pursuing advanced courses in history meet once a fortnight to make reports upon 

assigned topics, review recent articles and books, and present the results of special 

investigations. 

Post-Major Courses. 
Dr. Allison offers in 1909-10 and again in 1911-12 the 
following post-major courses, open to graduate students: 
The Reform Period of English History, 1815-1845. 

Two hours a week during the first semester. 
Beginning with a brief survey of conditions at the close of the Napoleonic period, 
the various liberalising and reform movements will be considered both in their internal 
developments and in their reactions upon English life. Among the movements con- 
sidered will be Catholic emancipation, parliamentary reform, philanthropic enter- 
prise, the Chartist agitation, the repeal of the corn laws. 

British Imperialism. Two hours a week during the second semester. 

This course will study the causes of British expansion and its directions, the events 
in colonial history important in their reaction upon English politics, and especially 
the history of the British imperial system. 

Dr. Allison offers in 1910-11 and again in 1912-13 the 
following post-major courses, open to graduate students: 

England in the Tudor Period. Two hours a week during the first semester. 

This course consists of a survey of English history during the reigns of the five Tudor 
sovereigns, noting particularly the significance of the period for the constitutional, 
political, social, and religious development of England. 

England in the Stuart Period. Two hours a week during the second semester. 
This course follows the same general lines as the course on the Tudor period. 

Dr. Smith offers in 1909-10 and again in 1911-12 the follow- 
ing post-major course, open to graduate students: 

American Constitutional History to 1789. 

Three hours a week throughout the year. 

The text-books used in the course are MacDonald's Select Charters of American History 
and Select Documents of the History of the United States. The members of the class 
are also systematically referred, not only to the general authorities, but also to colonial 
charters and constitutions, the records of the colonial governments as far as they are 
available, the journals of Congress, and other documentary materials. 

Dr. Smith offers in 1910-11 and again in 1912-13 the 
following post-major course, open to graduate students: 
American Constitutional History, from 1789 to the present time. 

Three hours a week throughout the year. 

The lectures deal with the leading aspects of the political, constitutional, and economic 

history of the United States from the ratification of the constitution to the present time. 

The text-books used are MacDonald's Select Documents of the History of the United 



96 



States and Select Statutes of United States History, but frequent additional references 
are given to the leading secondary authorities. To a limited extent use will be made 
of such documents as are available in the library, and special topics will be assigned 
for discussion and report. 

Economics and Politics. 

The instruction in this department is under the direction of 
Dr. Charles Clarence Williamson, Associate in Economics and 
Politics, and Dr. Marion Parris, Associate in Economics and 
Politics. 

Graduate Courses. 

In addition to the post-major courses, which may be elected by graduate 
students, six hours of graduate lectures and seminary work are offered in 
each year. 

No undergraduates are admitted to graduate courses. 

Dr. Williamson offers in each year the following graduate 
seminary : 

Economic Seminary. Three hours a week throughout the year. 

In 1909-10 labor problems are studied in the seminary. The rise of the problems is 
traced, the history and functions of labor organisations are discussed and considerable 
attention is paid to the principles of labor legislation. 

In 1910-11 various important social and economic problems caused by the growth 
of monopolies will be studied. The aim is to develop general principles upon which 
a democratic state should proceed in an effort to subject its railroads, trusts, and other 
more or less non-competitive industries to a wise social control. 

In 1911-12 the seminary will make a study of the history and theories of socialism, 
the purpose being to trace the origin and development of current socialistic doctrines 
and movements and to examine carefully the arguments for and against socialism in 
order to reach some conclusion as to the possibility or practibility of making socialistic 
theories a basis for economic and social reforms. 

Dr. Parris offers in each year the following graduate seminary : 

Economic Seminary. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

In 1909-10 the subject of the seminary is a critical study of modern theories of value. 
A short historical introduction serves as a review of the principal economic theories of 
value in the English and German schools. 

In 1910-11 the modern German theory of value is the subject of the seminary. The 
main object of the seminary is to define certain psychological and philosophical posi- 
tions. The works of Ehrenfels, Meinong, Kraus, Kreibig, and Chuel are studied and 
criticised. 

In 1911-12 the theories of capital and interest of modern German, Italian, and Ameri- 
can economists will be studied and critically compared. 

Dr. Williamson and Dr. Parris conduct in each year the 
economic journal club: 

Economic Journal Club. Two hours once a fortnight throughout the year. 

At the meetings recent books and articles are reviewed and the results of special 
investigations presented for discussion, comment, and criticism. 



97 



Post-Major Courses. 

Dr. Williamson offers in 1909-10 and again in 1911-12 the 
following post-major course, open to graduate students: 

Industrial Problems. Three hours a week throughout the year. 

The lectures of this course deal with certain economic problems which involve political 
action. Among the more important subjects taken up are the following: problems of 
money and banking; the commercial policy of the principal countries, with special 
reference to the tariff situation in the United States; the rise of the transportation 
problem and a comparison of the methods of government control in use in various 
countries; industrial combinations, their development and their relation to the state. 
Typical combinations are studied and the results of anti-trust legislation examined. 
The aim is to put before the student the significant facts of our commercial and indus- 
trial development, accompanied by an economic analysis of the problems created and a 
discussion of the political factors to be reckoned with in their solution. 

Dr. Williamson offers in 1910-11 and again in 1912-13 the 
following post-major course, open to graduate students: 

Public Economy. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

This course begins with a discussion of the nature of the public economy and its 
relation to private economics. An examination of theories of the economic activity of 
the modern state is followed by a discussion of public expenditure, its objects, its 
growth in modern democratic societies, and its social and industrial effects. Problems 
of public health, care of the dependent classes, the economic burden of war and the 
preparation for war, state forestry and the general problem of the conservation of 
natural resources, are discussed in this connection. The tax system in American states 
and cities, together with the general principles of taxation, are discussed fully. Atten- 
tion is also called to the nature and significance of the non-tax revenues. The course 
concludes with a brief study of state and local budgets and public debts. 

Dr. Parris offers in 1909-10 the following post-major course, 
open to graduate students: 

Theoretical Sociology. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

The first semester's work is a history of sociological theory. The students 
read selections from Auguste Comte, Herbert Spencer, Professor Giddings, and others. 
In the second semester the various social problems confronting the modern state are 
considered, such as the congestion of population, housing and transportation problems 
in American and Continental cities, immigration and race problems in America, the 
standard of riving among various economic groups, etc. 

The lectures are supplemented by written reports on specially assigned reading and 
by written and oral quizzes. 

Dr. Parris offers in 1910-11 and again in 1912-13 the follow- 
ing post-major course, open to graduate students: 

Utilitarian Theory in Economics. Three hours a week throughout the year. 

The object of this course is to study the influence of utilitarian ethical theory in 
shaping the thought of the English classical school. Hume, Paley, Bentham, Adam 
Smith, James Mill, Ricardo, Malthus and J. S. Mill are read critically The lectures are 
supplemented by written reports on specially assigned reading and by oral and written 
quizzes. 



98 

Dr. Parris offers in 1911-12 the following post-major course, 
open to graduate students: 

Sociology and the Social Institutions. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

This course is designed to introduce the students to the problems of modern sociology. 
The first semesters' work will be a review of the literature of sociology. The students 
will read selections from the works of Comte, Spencer, Giddings, Ratzenhofer, Small, 
and others. In the second semester the genesis and history of the social institutions 
will be studied; the family, church, state, the institution of private property, corrective 
and preventive institutions, etc. The lectures are supplemented by written reports 
and specially assigned reading, and by written and oral quizzes. 

Free Elective Courses. 
Dr. Parris offers in 1909-10 and again in 1911-12 the follow- 
ing free elective course, open to graduate students: 

Methods of Social Research. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

The course begins with a brief account of modern institutions for social research and 
social reform. Various methods of social research will then be studied and reports 
required on special problems in social statistics, and the collection and graphical repre- 
sentation of material. Booth's Life and Labour in London, Bailey's Modern Social 
Conditions and Henderson's Modern Methods of Charity will be used as text-books. 
The course is open only to those students who have attended the minor course in 
economics and politics. 

Dr. Williamson offers in 1910-11 the following free elective 
course, open to graduate students : 

Municipal Problems. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

This course consists of a general survey of the more important social, political, and 
economic problems of American cities. The chief topics treated are, the growth of 
urban population with its economic and political results, political parties in municipal 
government, civil service reform, the municipal functions such as police and fire pro- 
tection, police courts, sanitation and public health, education, institutions of public 
charity and correction, playgrounds, parks, city planning, and the liquor traffic. The 
policy of municipal ownership of public utilities will be examined in its various 
aspects. The course is open only to those students who have attended the minor 
course in Economics and Politics. 

Philosophy. 

The instruction in this department is under the direction of 
Dr. Theodore de Leo de Laguna, Associate Professor of Phi- 
losophy, Dr. James H. Leuba, Professor of Psychology and Edu- 
cation and Director of the Psychological Laboratory, Dr. M. 
Phillips Mason, Associate in Philosophy, Dr. Clarence Errol 
Ferree, Associate in Psychology, and Miss Marion Reilly, Reader 
in Philosophy. 

Graduate Courses. 

In addition to the post-major courses, which may be elected by graduate 
students, ten hours of graduate lectures and seminary work are offered in 



99 

each year. The laboratory of experimental psychology is open to graduate 
students for research work. 

No undergraduates are admitted to graduate courses. 

Dr. de Laguna conducts in each year the following graduate 
seminary : 

Ethical Seminary. Three hours a week throughout the year. 

The subject of the seminary is either a study of one of the chief problems of ethics 
or a critical examination of some important movement of thought. 

In 1909-10 Hume and his contemporaries are studied. A brief preliminary survey 
is made of the course of English ethical thought from Hobbes to Shaftesbury. 
This is followed by a more careful examination of selected writings of Mandeville, 
Butler, and Hutcheson, with a view to tracing their probable influence upon Hume. 
Finally, the principal task of the year is a comparative study of the ethical doc- 
trines of Hume's Treatise on Human Nature and Enquiry into the Principles of Morals, 
with incidental reference to Hartley and Adam Smith. 

In 1910-11, the subject will be English evolutionary ethics, as exemplified in the 
writings of Darwin, Clifford, Spencer, Stephen, Alexander, and Hobhouse, and as criti- 
cized by Green, Sorley, Huxley, and Pringle-Pattison. Special attention is given 
to the problem of determining the nature and limitations of the genetic method 
as applied in ethical research. 

In 1911-12 the subject of the seminary will be the ethics of Plato. The dialogues in 
which moral questions are prominently discussed are read in approximate chronological 
order; and the development of Plato's ethics is studied in the light of its interrelations 
with his theories of knowledge and of reality. 

Dr. Mason conducts in each year the following graduate 
seminary: 

Metaphysical Seminary. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

The subject of the seminary is usually an examination of one of the more important 
metaphysical theories of recent times. The chief object of the inquiry is to indicate the 
fundamental postulates and tacit agreements of contemporary philosophical thought. 

In 1910-11 the subject of the seminary will be the theory of knowledge. The general 
nature of knowledge, its structure and its relation to the mind, are studied. An attempt 
is made to develop the criteria of truth and to show what bearing these criteria have on 
experience. The work centres in a study of Kant's Critique of Pure Reason. 

In 1911-12 the subject of the seminary will be the relation of knowledge to natural 
science and to the normative sciences. The fundamental postulates of the world of 
facts and the world of values are studied critically, and special attention is given to the 
logical basis of psychology. Pearson's Grammar of Science is used as the foundation of 
the work. 

In 1912-13 the subject of the seminary will be the relation of knowledge to being. 
Various ontological systems are studied with a view to determining the limits of knowl- 
edge and the ultimate nature of reality. Bradley's Appearance and Reality is used as 
the foundation of the work. 

Dr. de Laguna and Dr. Mason conduct in each year the jour- 
nal club. 

Philosophical Journal Club. Two hours once a fortnight throughout the year. 

The advanced students and the instructors meet to report on and discuss recent 
reviews and critical articles. 



100 



Dr. Leuba offers in each year the following graduate seminary : 

Psychological Seminary. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

As the foundation of the work of the seminary one or two of the following subjects 
will be chosen each year: a comparative study of Wundt, William James, James 
Ward, Stout, and other ps ychologists ; language, myths, customs; attention, apper- 
ception, the will; the psychology of religion and of ethics; psychology of the 
beautiful; psychiatry and criminology; animal and child psychology, comparative 
psychology. 

Dr. Ferree offers in each year the following graduate course: 

Systematic Psychology. Three hours a week throughout the year. 

This course is intended, primarily, to give a systematic presentation of the litera- 
ture of experimental psychology. Due consideration, however, will be given to all 
points of systematic importance. The work is grouped about the following topics: 
sensation, the simpler sense complexes, perception and idea, feeling and the affective 
processes, attention, action, and the intellectual processes (memory, association, 
imagination, etc). The course covers three years; but the topics chosen and the 
time devoted to each vary from year to year according to the needs of the students. 

Dr. Leuba and Dr. Ferree together conduct in each year the 
journal club and the laboratory work. 

Psychological Journal Club. One hour a week throughout the year. 

The advanced students meet with the instructors once a week to hear or read reports 
on the literature of the subject and on the work done in the laboratory. 

Psychological Laboratory Work. 
The laboratory work consists of individual practice and research 

Free Elective Courses. 

Dr. de Laguna offers in 1909-10 and again in 1911-12 the 
following free elective course, open to graduate students : 

Rousseau's Social Philosophy. One hour a week throughout the year. 

In this course Rousseau 'h theories of art, politics, and religion are discussed. 

Dr. de Laguna offers in 1910-11 and again in 1912-13 the 
following free elective course, open to graduate students: 

Theory of Pragmatism. One hour a week throughout the year. 

A brief introduction gives a sketch of the Darwinian theory of evolution and of its 
application to functional psychology. The greater part of the second semester is 
devoted to class discussion of Professor James's book on Pragmatism. 

Dr. Mason offers in each year the following free elective 
courses, open to graduate students: 

Elementary Logic. One hour a week during the first semester. 

This course is an introduction to deductive and inductive logic, including the theories 
of definition, classification, the transformation of judgments, the canons of the syllo- 
gism, the formation of concepts, the general methods of observation and experiment , 
analogy, and the use of hypotheses. 



101 

The Philosophy of Nature. One hour a week during the second semester. 

This course is an introduction to the study of the fundamental postulates of natural 
science. Such problems as the following will be discussed: The value of mathematical 
principles in natural science, the necessity of time and space as fundamental principles, 
the meaning of induction, the relation of the inorganic world to the organic, the relation 
of psychology to natural science, and finally the place of natural science in the world of 
knowledge and its relation to ethics and aesthetics. 

Post-Major Courses. 
Dr. Mason offers in each year the following post-major 
courses, open to graduate students: 

Types of Metaphysical Theory. Three hours a week throughout the year. 

Each semester is devoted to the examination of some important type of metaphysical 
theory. After the historical development of the theory under investigation has been 
traced, its implications and relationships are examined and criticised. The particular 
subjects selected vary from year to year. 

Studies in the Theory of Knowledge. 

Two hours a week throughout the year. 

Typical theories of knowledge, both idealistic and empirical, are examined. The 
discussion centres around the nature of truth, and an attempt is made to show how it 
is related to the mind and to the empirical world. 

Dr. Leuba and Dr. Ferree offer in each year the following post- 
major course, open to graduate students: 

Advanced Experimental Psychology. Three hours a week throughout the year. 

The object of this course is to provide the preparation in laboratory work necessary 
for graduate work in psychology. The course consists of one lecture a week given by 
Dr. Ferree and five hours of laboratory work, in qualitative and quantitative psychology, 
conducted by Dr. Leuba and Dr. Ferree. 

Education. 

The instruction in this department is under the direction of 
Dr. James H. Leuba, Professor of Psychology and Education, 
and Director of the Psychological Laboratory. The instruction 
offered covers five hours of lectures a week, in addition to the 
time devoted to the seminary; it includes two hours a week of 
free elective work, and three hours a week of graduate work. 

It is the purpose of the department to offer to students intend- 
ing to become teachers an opportunity to obtain a technical 
preparation sufficient for their profession. Hitherto practical 
training has been thought necessary for teachers of primary 
schools only, but similar training is very desirable for teachers 
in high schools and colleges also. Indeed, it is already becoming 
increasingly difficult for college graduates without practical and 
theoretical pedagogical knowledge to secure good positions. In 



103 

addition to the lectures open to undergraduates, courses will be 
organised for graduate students only; conducted with special 
reference to preparation for the headship and superintendence of 
schools. Education cannot be studied to the best advantage 
unless an acquaintance with at least the rudiments of psychology 
is presupposed. The elementary experimental course in psychol- 
ogy is therefore earnestly recommended to all students of educa- 
tion. 

Graduate Courses. 

Graduate students are recommended to follow the work offered in the 
undergraduate course mentioned below. 
No undergraduates are admitted to graduate courses. 

Dr. Leuba offers in each year the following graduate courses: 
The Psychology of Mental and Bodily Growth with reference to 

Education. One hour a week throughout the year. 

A knowledge of elementary psychology is assumed in this course. 

Lectures upon school-hygiene; physical training; organisation of educa- 
tion in the United States and in Europe; the training of teachers, etc. 

Two hours a week throughout the year. 

Free Elective Course. 
Dr. Leuba offers in each year the following free elective course, 
open to graduate students: 

Education. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

This course deals with the great educator? and their systems considered with reference 
to modern educational methods and the problems of to-day. 

History of Art and Classical Archaeology. 

The instruction in this department is under the direction of 
Dr. Caroline Louise Ransom, Associate Professor of the History of 
Art and Classical Archaeology, Miss Georgiana Goddard King, 
Reader in English, and Miss Caroline Vinia Lynch, Demonstrator 
in the History of Art and Classical Archaeology. 

An archaeological seminary of two hours a week throughout the 
year is offered to graduate students who have done elementary 
archaeological work, and also a journal club meeting one and a 
half hours a fortnight. 

The undergraduate work is divided into courses of three 
hours a week, and two hours a week, and these change from year 
to year so that every student has an opportunity, during the 
course of four years, of taking each undergraduate course offered 



103 

in the department. The courses in the Art of the Greek and 
Roman, Early Christian, Mediaeval, and Renaissance periods are 
designed to give an outline of the history of European archi- 
tecture, sculpture, and painting. Students wishing a more 
complete introduction to the history of art are advised to elect 
also the course in Egyptian Art. Additional courses in classical 
art and archaeology are offered for students of Greek and Latin 
wishing to study classical antiquities. 

In addition to the graduate courses announced, other courses 
will be provided as need for them arises, and individual students 
will be directed in special work by means of private confer- 
ences. 

Graduate Courses. 

Two courses are offered to graduate students in addition to the elective 
courses which are open also to undergraduate students. A reading knowl- 
edge of French and German is indispensable for graduate work in art and 
archaeology. 

No undergraduates are admitted to graduate courses. 

Dr. Ransom conducts in each year the following graduate 
seminary: 

Archaeological Seminary. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

This course is open only to graduate students who have had some previous training in 
classical archaeology. 

In 1909-10 Roman architecture and topography are the subjects of the seminary 
in the first semester and Greek vases of the fifth century are studied in the second 
semester. 

In 1910-11 the subjects of the seminary will be Cretan antiquities in the first semester 
and Greek and Roman pottery in the second semester. 

In 1911-12 Greek and Roman coins will be studied in the first semester and Greek 
and Roman sculpture will be the subject of the seminary in the second semester. 

Dr. Ransom and Miss Lynch conduct the journal club in 
each year: 

Archaeological Journal Club. 

One and a half hours once a fortnight throughout the year. 

The graduate students and the instructors meet for the presentation and discussion 
of topics of current archaeological literature. 

Free Elective Courses. 
Dr. Ransom offers in 1909-10 the following free elective 
courses, open to graduate students: 

History of Architecture. Three hours a week throughout the year. 

This course consists of a survey of Greek, Roman, Early Christian, Mediaeval, and 
Renaissance architecture; it is illustrated with lantern slides. 



104 

Egyptian Art. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

The architecture, sculpture, pottery, and other material remains of ancient Egypt are 
considered beginning with the prehistoric period and continuing to the time of the 
Roman supremacy in Egypt. Special attention is given to subjects bearing on the art 
of Greece. The lectures are illustrated with lantern slides. 

Dr. Ransom offers in 1910-11 the following free elective 
courses, open to graduate students: 

History of Painting. Three hours a week throughout the year. 

This course consists of a survey of the history of painting in Europe beginning with 
the art of painting among the Greeks and ending with the sixteenth century schools. 
The lectures are illustrated with lantern slides. 

Greek and Roman Vases. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

A good collection of original material for illustration is in the possession of the 
department. 

Dr. Ransom offers in 1911-12 the following free elective 
courses, open to graduate students: 

History of Sculpture. Three hours a week throughout the year. 

Greek and Roman sculpture are studied in the first semester and Renaissance sculp- 
ture in the second semester. The lectures are illustrated with lantern slides. 

The Seventeenth and Eighteenth Century Schools of Painting. 

Two hours a week throughout the year. 
The lectures are illustrated with lantern slides. 

Miss King offers in 1909-10 and again in 1911-12 the following 

free elective course, open to graduate students: 

Italian Renaissance Painting from the Middle of the Thirteenth to the 

Middle of the Sixteenth Century. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

In the first semester the Italian Primitives are studied, chiefly in the schools of 
Florence, Siena, and Umbria; in the second semester the painters of the High Renais- 
sance, with special attention to those of Venice and the north of Italy. 

Miss King offers in 1910-11 the following free elective course, 
open to graduate students: 

Gothic Architecture. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

The first semester is devoted to Romanesque and pointed architecture in Italy and 
Germany, with special attention to the introduction of Gothic into Italy by the Cister- 
cians, and the second semester to the development of Gothic in France with parallels 
from English ecclesiastical architecture. 

Mathematics. 

The instruction in this department is under the direction of 
Dr. Charlotte Angas Scott, Professor of Mathematics, Mr. 
J. Edmund Wright,* Associate Professor of Mathematics, Dr. 

* Died, February 20th, 1910. The courses offered by Professor Wright will be given 
by an instructor whose appointment will be announced later. 



105 

Isabel Maddison, Associate in Mathematics, and Dr. Virginia 
Ragsdale and Dr. Helen Elizabeth Huff, Readers in Mathematics. 

Graduate Courses. 

The graduate courses consist of lectures and seminary work, supple- 
mented by private reading under the direction of the instructors, the 
courses being arranged each year with reference to the wishes and degree 
of preparation of the students concerned. 

No undergraduates are admitted to graduate courses. 

Dr. Scott offers in 1909-10 the following graduate course: 

Theory of Algebraic Invariants. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

In this course binary and ternary forms are considered by means of Aronhold's sym- 
bolic notation. During the first semester the work is purely algebraic, during the second 
semester more attention is paid to the geometrical applications. A general knowledge 
of plane algebraic curves is necessary for students taking this course. 

Dr. Scott offers in 1909-10 the following graduate seminary: 
Seminary in the Theory of Plane Algebraic Curves. 

Two hour 8 a week during the second semester. 

Dr. Scott offers in 1910-11 the following graduate course: 

Theory of Surfaces. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

A general knowledge of plane algebraic curves is necessary for students taking this 
course. 

Dr. Scott offers in 1911-12 the following; graduate course: 



& to* 



Plane Algebraic Curves. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

The course deals with the general theory of plane algebraic curves, "with special 
attention to topological investigations. 

The following graduate course will be offered in 1910-11 by an 
instructor whose appointment will be announced later: 

Elliptic Functions. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

A knowledge of the elementary properties of elliptic functions is presupposed; the 
properties of the theta functions are considered and some time is spent on the transform- 
ation theory. In the latter portion of the course the properties of modular functions 
are discussed. 

The following graduate course will be offered in 1911-12 by an 
instructor whose appointment will be announced later: 

Theory of Functions. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

A knowledge of the elements of the theory is presupposed. The course will contain 
some account of the theory of functions of more than one independent variable and 
in particular will include a discussion of the properties of multiply periodic functions. 

The following graduate course will be offered in 1912-13 by an 
instructor whose appointment will be announced later: 

Linear Differential Equations. Two hours a week throughout the year. 



106 

This course consists of a discussion of the general theory of these equations, particular 
attention being paid to those of the second order. A detailed account is given of those 
equations whose singular points are regular. The expression of the variables as uni- 
form functions of a parameter is dealt with and in this connection the elementary 
properties of automorphic functions are given. Solution by means of definite integrals 
and equations of the type which arise in connection with mathematical physics are 
discussed. 

Dr. Scott and Mr. Wright* together conduct the journal club. 

Mathematical Journal Club. One hour a fortnight throughout the year. 

The journal club holds fortnightly meetings at which reports on special topics or 
memoirs are presented by the instructors and the graduate students. 

Post-Major Courses. 

The post-major courses in mathematics are designed to bridge over the 
interval between the ordinary undergraduate studies and advanced work. 
They deal, therefore, with the subjects of the major course, carried to 
higher developments and treated by higher methods. As the order of 
mathematical studies differs in different colleges, graduate students 
frequently find it advisable to devote a part of their time to these courses. 
Regular written work is expected from all mathematical students, and a 
reading knowledge of French and German is presupposed. 

The post -major courses in any one year amount to four or five hours 
a week. The courses given are the following, with occasional modifications: 

I. (a.) Lectures Introductory to Modern Analytical Geometry, in con- 
nection with Salmon's Conic Sections and Scott's Modern Analytical 
Geometry, Dr. Scott. 

or, I. (&.) Lectures on Modern Pure Geometry, Dr. Scott. 

or, I. (c.) Lectures on Special Topics in Geometry, such as Homogen- 
eous Coordinates, Circular Coordinates, Families of Curves, Certain 
Transcendental Curves, Geometrical Transformations, etc., Dr. Scott. 

Special permission to take this course before completing the two years of the major 
course may be granted to students whose work in the major course has shown that 
they are able to profit by the lectures. 

II. (a.) Lectures Introductory to Modern Algebra, in connection with 
Salmon's Modern Higher Algebra, and Elliott's Algebra of Quantics, Mr. 
Wright.* 

or, II. (6.) Lectures preparatory to the Theory of Functions, in con- 
nection with Harkness and Morley's Introduction to the Theory of Analytic 
Functions and Chrystal's Algebra, Vol. II, Mr. Wright.* 

or, II. (c.) Lectures on Differential Equations, ordinary and partial, 
Mr. Wright .* 

or, II. (d.) A general course in Analysis, dealing with the higher devel- 
opment of subjects only touched upon in the major course, such as Deter- 

*.See footnote page 104. 



107 

minants, Fourier's Series, Infinite Series, Definite Integrals, etc., Mr. 
Wright.* 

III. (a.) Lectures on Analytical Geometry of Three Dimensions, Dr. 
Maddison. 

or, III. (6.) A practical course in Differential Equations, Dr. Maddison. 

or, III. (c.) Lectures on the Theory of Envelopes, Dr. Maddison. 

In 1909-10 the following post-major courses are offered: 

I. (a.) Dr. Scott. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

II. (6.) Mr. Wright.* Two hours a week during the first semester. 

III. (a.) Dr. Maddison. One hour a week throughout the year. 

In 1910-11 the following post-major courses are offered: 

I. (c.) Dr. Scott. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

II. (a.) Two hours a week during the first semester. 
II- (c.) Two hours a week during the second semester. 

III. (a.) Dr. Maddison. One hour a week throughout the year. 

In 1911-12 the following post-major courses are offered: 

I. (a.) Dr. Scott. One hour a week throughout the year. 

II. (a.) Two hours a week throughout the year. 

III. (c.) Dr. Maddison. One hour a week throughout the year. 

Free Elective Courses. 

Dr. Scott offers in 1909-10 and again in 1911-12 the follow- 
ing free elective course, open to graduate students : 

Graphical Mathematics. One hour a week throughout the year. 

The course deals with statistical work, probability, and theory of errors. It is recom- 
mended to students of economics as well as to students of physics. A knowledge of 
mathematics equivalent to that obtained in the minor course or in the course in mathe- 
matical processes and computations is presupposed. 

Dr. Scott offers in 1910-11 the following free elective course, 
open to graduate students: 

Fundamental Theorems of Algebra and Geometry. 

One hour a week throughout the year. 

This course is offered in alternate years. Certain standard problems of historical 
interest are considered in order to elucidate some of the fundamental principles of 
mathematics. Either semester may be taken separately. No knowledge of mathe- 
matics beyond the requirement for matriculation is presupposed. It is hoped that 
the work will prove useful to those intending to teach elementary mathematics. 

* See footnote page 104. 



108 

Science. 
Physics, Chemistry, Geology, Biology. 

Professors and instructors: Dr. Joseph W. Warren, Dr. Elmer 
P. Kohler, Dr. Florence Bascom, Dr. William B. Huff, Dr. David 
Hilt Tennent, Dr. Nettie Maria Stevens, Dr. James Barnes, Dr. 
Frederick Hutton Getman, Mr. Chester Albert Reeds, Dr. 
Harriet Randolph, Dr. Frances Lowater, and Miss Gertrude 
Langden Heritage. 

In January, 1893, the Trustees opened Dalton Hall, a large 
building, containing ample laboratories, lecture-rooms, research- 
rooms, special libraries, and professors' rooms for the work of 
the scientific departments. The chemical, geological, biological, 
and physical laboratories and the laboratory for experimental 
psychology are open for students from nine to six daily. 

The chemical department includes a lecture-room, a large 
laboratory for the first-year students, and several smaller ones 
for advanced and special work, a special room for physical 
chemistry, preparation and balance rooms, and a chemical 
library. The supply of apparatus and chemicals has been care- 
fully selected for the purpose of instruction and research, and 
is increasing from year to year. The chemical library contains, 
besides necessary treatises and reference books, complete sets of 
the most important chemical journals. 

The biological laboratories are equipped with the best (Zeiss) 
microscopes, microtomes, etc., and are supplied with apparatus 
for the study of experimental physiology. 

The physical laboratories are carefully furnished with the 
apparatus necessary for thorough work. 

Graduate work in the natural sciences is highly special, and 
consists of laboratory work, private reading, and special investi- 
gations pursued by the student under the guidance of the 
instructors. 

Physics. 

The instruction in this department is under the direction of 
Dr. William B. Huff, Professor of Physics, Dr. James Barnes, 
Associate in Physics, and Dr. Frances Lowater, Demonstrator 
in Physics. 



109 

Graduate Courses. 

The graduate courses consist of lectures, laboratory work, and original 
research work under the direction of the instructors, the lecture courses 
varying from year to year so that they may be pursued by students 
through consecutive years. A good working library containing the current 
and bound numbers of all the important physical journals is kept in the 
laboratory. 

No undergraduates are admitted to graduate courses. 

Dr. Huff offers in 1910-11 the following graduate courses: 

Radioactivity. Three hours a week during the first semester. 

The earlier lectures deal with the motion of a charged particle in the field. A dis- 
cussion of the methods of measuring the velocity of a moving charged particle, and the 
ratio of its charge to its mass follows. After a discussion of the various radioactive 
processes a brief account of the theories of the structure of the atom is given. 

Discharge of Electricity through Gases. 

Three hours a week during the second semester. 

The lectures deal primarily with the study of ions and the part they play in the 
mechanism of the electric discharge. 

Dr. Huff offers in 1912-13 the following graduate course: 

Mathematical Theory of Electricity and Magnetism. 

Three hours a week throughout the year. 

The lectures are based on Maxwell's standard work, and include a somewhat detailed 
account of the later development of the theory. 

Dr. Barnes offers in 1909-10 the following graduate course: 

Thermo-dynamics and Radiation. Three hours a week throughout the year. 

The modern developments of thermo-dynamics and radiation are considered. Atten- 
tion is paid to the application of the laws of thermo-dynamics in physical chemistry. 

Dr. Barnes offers in 1911-12 the following graduate course: 

Physical Optics. Three hours a week throughout the year. 

This course gives a general mathematical discussion of physical optics. Students are 
expected to give detailed reports on the methods and results of investigations which 
illustrate the theory. 

In each year Dr. Huff and Dr. Barnes together conduct the 
seminary, the journal club, and the laboratory work. 

Physical Seminary and Journal Club. One hour a week throughout the year. 

The advanced students meet with the instructors once a week to hear or read papers 
on assigned topics in physics. 

Laboratory work. 

The laboratory work is arranged for the purpose of familiarising the student with the 
methods of research ; the student begins by repeating methods and investigations of well- 
known experimenters, with any modifications that may be suggested, passing on to 
points of investigation left untouched by previous experimenters, and finally to the 



110 

study of new methods and the prosecution of original research. Students taking 
physics as their chief subject for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy are expected to 
spend all the time possible in the laboratory. In the basement there is a constant-tem- 
perature vault designed for accurate comparison of lengths, etc., and the laboratory is 
provided with special rooms for magnetic, optical, and electrical work. A well-equipped 
shop and a trained mechanic make it possible to have special forms of apparatus con- 
structed which are needed in research work. 



Post-Major Courses. 

Dr. Huff offers in 1909-10 the following post-major courses, 
open to graduate students: 

Properties of Matter. Three hours a week during the first semester. 

The lectures cover the general subject of the properties of matter studied from the 
point of view of the Molecular Theory. The different theories of matter are discussed 
and an account of recent investigations concerning the relations of matter and electric- 
ity is given. Poynting and Thomson's Properties of Matter is read in connection with 
the course. 

Ineory of Sound. Three hours a week during the second semester. 

The lectures form an introduction to the theory of modes of vibration of pipes, strings, 
and rods. The theory of music and of musical instruments is then studied. Poynting 
and Thomson's Sound is used during the earlier part of the course, and frequent refer- 
ences are made to Helmholtz and Rayleigh. 

Dr. Huff offers in 1911-12 the following post-major course, 
open to graduate students: 

Electricity and Magnetism. Three hours a week throughout the year. 

The lectures of this course treat typical mathematical and experimental problems 
chosen from the various parts of the entire subject. Emphasis is laid upon giving clear 
ideas of physical phenomena. A large number of problems on potential and attraction 
are assigned. 

Dr. Barnes offers in 1910-11 the following post-major course, 
open to graduate students : 

Spectroscopy. Three hours a week throughout the year. 

The course begins with a complete discussion of the apparatus used in this subject; 
the results of past and present investigations are then considered, and problems for 
investigation are pointed out. The many important applications of spectroscopy 
to astronomy are not neglected. The standard book of reference is Kayser's Hand- 
ouch der Spectroscopic Detailed reports of laboratory investigations are required 
and in this work Mann's Manual of Advanced Optics will be found useful. 

Dr. Barnes offers in 1912-13 the following post-major course, 
open to graduate students: 

General Optics. Three hours a week throughout the year. 

These lectures give a general discussion of the theories advanced to explain many 
phenomena in light. Students are required to have a good knowledge of elementary 
optics and to be sufficiently familiar with optical apparatus to undertake a detailed 
study of some special problem. 



Ill 

Chemistry. 

The instruction in this department is under the direction of 
Dr. Elmer P. Kohler, Professor of Chemistry, Dr. Frederick 
Hutton Getman, Associate in Chemistry, and Miss Gertrude 
Langden Heritage, Demonstrator in Chemistry. 

Graduate Courses. 

The advanced courses in chemistry consist of lectures upon inorganic, 
organic, and physical chemistry, seminary work, reports upon current 
chemical literature, and laboratory exercises. In the laboratory work 
the students are required to become familiar with the literature bearing 
upon the subjects they are studying, and it is therefore necessary for 
them to have a reading knowledge of French and German. 

The lecture courses are varied from year to year to meet the require- 
ments of students and to form a consecutive course for those who wish to 
make chemistry the chief subject in the examination for the degree of 
Doctor of Philosophy. Such students may specialise either in organic 
chemistry, under the direction of Dr. Kohler or in inorganic and 
physical chemistry, under the direction of Dr. Getman, but students who 
make organic chemistry the major subject of examination must take 
physical chemistry as one of their minor subjects, and students who make 
inorganic chemistry the major subject, must take organic chemistry as 
one of the minor subjects. 

No undergraduates are admitted to graduate courses. 

Dr. Kohler conducts in each year the following graduate 
seminary: 

Chemical Seminary, Organic Chemistry. One hour a week throughout the year. 

The students who specialise in organic chemistry present formal reports upon assigned 
topics. 

Dr. Getman conducts in each year the following graduate 
seminary : 

Chemical Seminary, Inorganic Chemistry. 

One hour a week throughout the year. 

The course consists of lectures, required reading, and reports on various topics. 
Modern determinations of atomic weight, the constitution of the chromic chlorides, 
the separation of the rare earths and radio-activity have been among the subjects 
treated. The needs of the individual students are considered in selecting the subjects 
for discussion. 

Dr. Kohler offers in 1910-11 and again in 1912-13 the follow- 
ing graduate course : 

Advanced Organic Chemistry. Three hours a week throughout the year. 



112 

Dr. Getman offers in 1909-10 and again in 1911-12 the follow- 
ing graduate course: 

.Physical Chemistry. Three hours a week throughout the year. 

The lectures give a general survey of the subject, including the laws of gases, the 
elements of Thermodynamics, the theory of solutions, chemical kinetics, equilibria, 
thermo-chemistry, and electro-chemistry. 

The laboratory work in connection with the course includes the determination of 
specific gravities of solids and liquids, the molecular weights of vapors and dissolved 
substances; the study of reaction velocities, calorimetry, and electro-chemical measure- 
ments. 

Dr. Kohler and Dr. Getman together conduct the journal club. 

Chemical Journal Club. One hour a week throughout the year. 

The advanced students, with the instructors, meet to hear reports and discussions on 
recent scientific articles. 

Post-Major Courses. 
Dr. Kohler offers in 1909-10 and again in 1911-12 the follow- 
ing post-major course, open to graduate students: 

Organic Chemistry, selected topics. Three hours a week throughout the year. 

The aim of this course is to lay the foundation for independent work in organic 
chemistry. The lectures begin with a study of current problems as illustrated by some 
particular class of organic compounds. This is followed by a discussion of the labora- 
tory methods available for the solution of such problems. 

The laboratory work is varied to meet the wants of the individual students. In 
general the student begins with the preparation of some of the more important 
substances that are discussed in the lectures. This is followed by organic analyses, 
molecular weight determinations, and the transformations necessary to establish the 
structural formulas of the substances prepared. In the second semester some element- 
ary problem in organic chemistry is assigned to each student. 

Dr. Getman offers in 1910-11 and again in 1912-13 the follow- 
ing post-major course, open to graduate students: 

Inorganic Chemistry. Three hours a week throughout the year. 

The aim of the lectures is to extend the students' knowledge of inorganic and theoreti- 
cal chemistry and to lay a foundation for independent work in this subject. One 
hour a week is given to a discussion of the laboratory work and subjects suggested 
directly by it. 

The laboratory work includes the calibration of instruments; the preparation of 
pure substances; advanced quantitative analysis, comprising the elements of gas and 
water analysis; and such physico-chemical measurements as the needs of the indi- 
vidual student may indicate. 

Geology. 

The instruction in this department is under the direction of 
Dr. Florence Bascom, Professor of Geology, and Mr. Chester 
Albert Reeds, Lecturer in Geology. 

The instruction offered in geology includes, in addition to the 
minor and major courses, two hours a, week of free elective 



113 

work, two post-major courses of three hours a week open only 
to graduates and to undergraduates that have completed the 
major course in geology and three graduate courses of five, 
three, and two hours a week respectively. 

Post-major courses in petrography and palaeontology are 
offered in each year, and are designed to train the student in 
petrographic methods for the exact determination of rock species 
and rock families and in the principles of invertebrate and 
vertebrate palaeontology. They are an essential preliminary 
to research work in the science. 

Excellent illustrative material for the graduate and under- 
graduate courses is furnished by the geological collections of the 
college, including the Theodore D. Rand rock and mineral collec- 
tion, which alone contains over 20,000 specimens, by the private 
collections of the instructors, and by material lent by the United 
States Geological Survey. The department is also fortunate in 
its proximity to the museum of the Academy of Natural Science 
of Philadelphia. Within easy reach of the college there are ex- 
cellent collecting fields for fossil, mineral, and rock specimens. 

Graduate Courses. 

The graduate courses in petrology and mineralogy should be preceded 
by the major and post-major courses or their equivalents and are intended 
primarily for graduate students wishing to make geology a major subject 
for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. The graduate course in mineralogy 
is also intended to meet the needs of graduate students in chemistry who 
wish to make mineralogy a minor subject for the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy. The graduate course in historical geology is designed pri- 
marily for graduate students wishing to make geology a major subject for 
the degree of Doctor of Philosophy; it may also be taken by graduate 
students in biology who wish to make historical geology a minor sub- 
ject for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. Further graduate courses 
in petrology will be arranged to suit the requirements of candidates for 
the degree of Doctor of Philosophy and research problems will be assigned. 

No undergraduates are admitted to graduate courses. 

Dr. Bascom offers the following graduate courses : 

Lectures On Petrology. One hour a week throughout the year. 

rield Work. Four hours a week throughout the year. 

Laboratory Work. Eight hours a week throughout the year 

The lectures deal with the problems of tnetamorphism of both aqueous and igneous 
rocks. The character of metamorphic processes and the conditions which control these 



114 

processes, the megascopic and microscopic structures, and the criteria determining the 
origin, classification, geographic distribution, and geologic occurrence of metamorphic 
rocks are treated. Direction is given in research-work, map making, and advanced 
field work. The amount of laboratory, field work, and private reading required makes 
the course the equivalent of five hours a week. 

Lectures On Mineralogy. One hour a week throughout the year. 

Laboratory Work. Three hours a week throughout the year. 

Both the lectures and laboratory practice deal with crystal measurement by means 
of the two-circle goniometer, with crystal projection, and crystal drawing. 

The works of Goldschmidt, Hintze, Groth, Tschermak, and Dana are used as refer- 
ence books. 

Mr. Reeds offers in each year the following graduate course: 
Lectures on Advanced Historical Geology. 

One hour a week throughout the year. 
r leld Work. Three hours a week throughout the year. 

Laboratory Work. Three and a half hours a week throughout the year . 

A detailed study is made of the rocks of one or more geological periods. The faunas 
and floras in these rocks are studied with respect to their development and to their 
associations in the various geographic areas and zoologic provinces. The student will 
study the literature bearing on the periods under consideration and, in the field, will 
make a systematic investigation of an assigned area in the vicinity of the college. 

Dr. Bascom and Mr. Reeds together conduct the journal club: 

Geological Journal Club. One hour a week throughout the year. 

The graduate students and the instructors meet for the presentation and discussion of 
recent geological literature. 

Post-Major Courses. 

Dr. Bascom offers in each year the following post-major course, 
open to graduate students: 

Lectures On Petrography. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

rield Work. Three hours a week throughout the year. 

.Laboratory Work. Two and a half hours a week throughout the year. 

During the first semester the lectures deal with the principles of optical crystal- 
lography, the optical means of mineral determination, and the petrographic characters 
of rock-forming minerals. In the second semester the structure, composition, charac- 
ters, origin, geographical distribution, and geological associations of the igneous rocks 
are treated. Practice is given in the quantitative chemical classification of igneous 
rocks for the purpose of determining their position in the new system. Petrographical 
investigation in the field and laboratory is included in the course. The works of Groth, 
Rosenbusch, Zirkel, and Michel Le"vy are used for reference. Special field problems 
are given to the students for independent solution. 

Mr. Reeds offers in each year the following post-major course, 
open to graduate students: 

Lectures on Palaeontology. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

r leld Work. Three hours a week throughout the year 



115 

Laboratory Work. Two and a half hours a week throughout the year . 

The course presupposes a knowledge of Historical Geology. A systematic study is 
made of the various classes of animals which are found in a fossil state. Special atten- 
tion is given to the relations of these classes to each other as bearing on their origin and 
on the theory of evolution. Weekly excursions are made to neighboring fossiliferous 
localities to collect fossils, and to observe their occurrence in the rocks. The student 
has access, not only to the representative palseontological collection of Bryn Mawr 
College, but also to the large collections of the several academies and institutes in Phil- 
adelphia. 

Free Elective Courses. 

Mr. Reeds offers in each year the following free elective courses, 
open to graduate students: 

Lectures On Meteorology. Two hours a week during the first semester. 

The course consists of lectures on atmospheric phenomena illustrated by a selected 
series of lantern slides. Weather maps and forecasts are received daily from Wash- 
ington and, by means of these, weather conditions in the United States are studied 
and observations are made on phenomena attending storms. 

Lectures on Oceanography. Two hours a week during the second semester. 

The course consists of a study of the ocean. The lectures treat of the relief of the 
sea bottom, the various sediments laid down thereon, animal life in the sea, the condi- 
tions under which it exists, and causes of and barriers to the migration of faunas. 



Biology. 

The instruction in this department is under the direction of 
Dr. David Hilt Tennent, Associate Professor of Biology, Dr. 
Joseph W. Warren, Associate Professor of Physiology, Dr. 
Nettie Maria Stevens, Associate in Experimental Morphology, 
and Dr. Harriet Randolph, Demonstrator in Biology and Reader 
in Botany. 

Graduate Courses. 

The advanced courses are varied from year to year, so as to form a con- 
secutive course for students that wish to make biology one of the chief 
subjects of the examination for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. Such 
students may specialise either In animal morphology under the guidance 
of Dr. Tennent and Dr. Stevens, or in animal physiology under the guidance 
of Dr. Warren. 

No undergraduates are admitted to graduate courses. 

Dr. Tennent offers in 1909-10 the following graduate course: 

Problems in Embryology. One hour a week throughout the year. 

The embryology of invertebrates with special reference to germinal organisation, 
cleavage, and differentiation, and to the problems of inheritance and development is 
studied. 



116 

Dr. Tennent offers in 1910-11 the following graduate course: 

The Evolution of Organisms. One hour a week throughout the year. 

This course of lectures deals with the growth of the idea of organic evolution, the 
greater part of the course being devoted to a critical examination of the work of Lam- 
arck, Darwin, and De Vries. 

Dr. Tennent offers in 1911-12 the following graduate course: 

Adaptation of Organisms. One hour a week throughout the year. 

In this course the adaptation of organisms to environment, the origin of adaptations 
and the theories that have been advanced to account for adaptation are considered. 

Dr. Warren offers in 1909-10 the following graduate course: 
Selected Problems of Nutrition with special reference to recent dis- 
cussions of standard diets. One hour a week throughout the year. 

Dr. Warren offers in 1910-11 the following graduate courses: 

The Interstitial Secretion of Glands ("Internal Secretion"). 

One hour a week during the first semester. 

Selected Problems in Respiration and their bearing on the Nature 
of Metabolism, and the Problem of Animal Heat (Thermometry and 

Calorimetry) . One hour a week during the second semester. 

Dr. Warren offers in 1911-12 the following graduate courses: 

An Introduction to the History and Literature of Animal Physiology. 

One hour a week during the first semester. 

The Problem of the Knee-jerk, and a Discussion of the Graphic Method 

in its Application to Physiology. One hour a week during the second semester. 

Dr. Stevens offers in each year the following graduate course : 

Advanced Experimental Morphology. One hour a week throughout the year. 

Tne topics treated in this course vary from year to year according to the needs of the 
graduate students attending the course and the work being done by prominent investi- 
gators in the field of experimental morphology. Special use is made of the recent 
periodical literature. The subjects considered in 1905-10 were experimental mor- 
phology from a historical standpoint, Darwin's experimental work, some problems in 
regeneration, problems in experimental embryology, statistical methods for the study 
of biological variation, sex determination, the mutation theory and Mendelism. A selec- 
tion from these topics will be given in 1910-11, unless some other subjects seem more 
desirable. Problems for laboratory research are assigned to students who desire to do 
research work in experimental morphology or cytology. 

Dr. Tennent, Dr. Warren, and Dr. Stevens together conduct 
the journal club, the seminary, and the laboratory work. 

Biological Journal Club. One hour a fortnight throughout the year. 

The advanced students and the instructors meet fortnightly for the discussion of 
topics of current biological literature. 

Biological Seminary. One hour a fortnight throughout the year. 

The graduate students and the instructors meet fortnightly for the formal presenta- 
tion of assigned topics. 



117 

Laboratory Work. 

There is no regular course of laboratory instruction for graduates. Each student 
desiring to devote a considerable portion of her time to such work is given a problem 
for verification or extension. The nature of the work depends in each case on the 
qualifications of the student. 

Post-Major Courses. 

Dr. Tennent offers in 1908-09 and again in 1910-11 the follow- 
ing post-major course, open to graduate students: 

Embryology. One hour a week throughout the year. 

This course consists of lectures and laboratory work on the embryology of the verte- 
brates. In the lectures an effort is made not only to discuss the embryology of specific 
forms but also to consider carefully the fundamental questions of embryological interest. 
The development of Amphioxus, Ascidian, Amia, Lepidosteus, Squalus, Ctenolabrus, 
Necturus, Rana, Chrysemys, Chick, and Mammal is studied. After the study of these 
forms some elementary problem in embryology is assigned to each student. 

Dr. Tennent offers in 1909-10 and again in 1911-12 the follow- 
ing pos1>major courses, open to graduate students: 
Comparative Anatomy and Embryology of the Protochordates. 

One hour a week during the first semester. 

This course of lectures, assigned reading, and laboratory work is intended to supple- 
ment the major course in zoology. Types of the principal groups of the protochordates 
are studied in the laboratory and some individual work is assigned. 

The Structure of Protoplasm and the Cell. 

One hour a week during the second semester. 

The structure of protoplasm, the mechanism of cell division, fertilisation, reduction, 
and some of the problems of cell organisation are described and studied. 

Dr. Warren offers in each year the following post-major courses, 
open to graduate students: 

Advanced Physiology. One hour a week throughout the year. 

The topics selected depend upon the previous training of the students, and as far as 
possible the preferences of the students are consulted. Occasional conferences are held 
for the discussion of essays prepared by the students and presenting the more important 
evidence concerning the fundamental problems of physiology. By this means it is 
hoped to familiarise the student with the literature and with the methods of investiga- 
tion. In suitable cases and by special permission of the instructor this course may be 
extended by laboratory work and private reading. In this way it may be made 
equivalent to a course of two or three hours a week. 

Lectures on the Structure and Function of the Central Nervous 
bystem. One hour a week throughout the year. 

This course may, under special circumstances, be taken at the same time as the major 
course. The finer structure of the nervous system of the higher vertebrates is discussed 
in considerable detail. The physiology of the cord and brain is presented as fully as the 
time will permit. This course may also be taken as a one hour elective by properly 
qualified students. 

Lectures and Demonstrations in Physiological Chemistry. 

Two hours a week throughout the year. 
The instruction in this course is given by lectures and conferences on selected topics 



118 

and also by laboratory work of about three hours a week. It treats of the problems 
of secretion and excretion, and also of the principal questions of nutrition in consid- 
erable detail and with reference to the more modern theories relating to these processes. 
The lectures are intended to supplement those of the major year, and a preliminary 
training in chemistry equivalent to that obtained in the minor course is required. 
This course may be taken as a two hour elective by properly qualified students. 

Human Osteology. One hour a week throughout the year. 

This course is intended for students in the preliminary medical course; it may also be 
taken as a free elective course by properly qualified students receiving special permission. 
Two hours laboratory work is required in connection with the course. 

Dr. Stevens offers in each year the following post-major course, 
open to graduate students: 

Problems in Experimental Morphology. One hour a week throughout the year. 

The object of this course is to give a general historical view of experimental mor- 
phology, to discuss some of the methods employed, to point out the results already 
obtained, and to indicate the nature of the work now being done in this subject. The 
students will be referred to the most recent literature on the subject and an attempt 
will be made to make them familiar with the most interesting present day research 
problems in experimental morphology and cytology. This course may be taken in 
exceptional cases as a one hour course with one and a half hours laboratory work or 
assigned reading, but it is recommended that it be taken with five hours laboratory 
work as a three hour course. 

Dr. Tennent, Dr. Warren, and Dr. Stevens conduct laboratory 

work in connection with the above courses: 

Laboratory Work. 

It is desirable that as much laboratory work as possible should be done in connection 
with the courses offered above. The object of the laboratory work is to give the student 
experience in the use of apparatus and in adapting it to research. Some special problem 
is assigned to each student; at the end of the year the results of the work are presented 
in writing. 

Free Elective Course. 

Dr. Tennent offers in each year the following free elective 
course, open to graduate students : 

Theoretical Biology. One hour a week throughout the year. 

This course deals chiefly with the subjects of evolution and heredity, and is open 
to students who have taken a minor course in biology, chemistry, geology, or physics, 
or have done equivalent work. A considerable amount of assigned reading will be 
required. 

COLLEGE BUILDINGS. 

The college buildings are situated at Bryn Mawr, in the sub- 
urbs of Philadelphia, five miles west of the city, on the main line 
of the Pennsylvania Railroad. The site of the college is four 
hundred and twenty feet above sea level, in the midst of a beau- 
tiful rolling country made accessible by good roads in every 
direction. The college grounds cover fifty-two acres, and include 



119 

lawns, tennis courts, and two large athletic fields, one of which 
is converted in winter into a skating-pond. 

Taylor Hall (named after the founder), a large building of Port 
Deposit stone, contains a general assembly room, ten lecture- 
rooms, and the offices of administration. 

The library, the gift of the friends, graduates, and students of 
the college, begun in April, 1903, was completed in February, 1907. 
It is built of gray stone in the Jacobean Gothic style of architec- 
ture of the period of 1630, and forms three sides of a closed quad- 
rangle. The main building, devoted to the library proper, faces 
east and is opposite and parallel to Taylor Hall at a distance of 
about fifty yards; the principal entrances of the two buildings 
face each other and are connected by a broad cement path. The 
east front is one hundred and seventy-four feet long and contains 
a three story stack with accommodation for eighty-eight thousand 
volumes, and above this a large reading-room with desks for one 
hundred and thirty-six readers, each desk screened to a height of 
two feet, as in the British Museum reading-room, to secure privacy 
to the reader. No books of reference are kept in the main reading- 
room. Beyond the reading-room on the south side is the news- 
paper and magazine room, and reached through this a student's 
study room. On the north side is the Art Seminary, containing 
collections of photographs, vases, and coins. The main building 
contains offices for the librarians and cataloguers, a study room 
for the non-resident students, and four cloak rooms. The wings 
of the building, running symmetrically about two hundred feet 
in length from the north and south ends of the main building, 
contain twelve seminary rooms and twenty-five professors' 
offices. The books needed for graduate study and research are 
kept in the seminary rooms and graduate lectures are held in 
them. The seminaries are arranged as follows: Greek, Latin, 
English, German, French, Italian and Spanish, and Philosophy 
in the north wing; Mathematics, History, Economics, Psychology, 
and Semitic Languages in the south wing. The total book 
capacity of the library, including the seminary libraries and the 
books for general study which are kept in the stack, is 168,449 
volumes. The building is absolutely fire-proof. Professors' 
offices for the senior professors in each department adjoin the 
seminary rooms. There are also two seminary lecture-rooms 
accommodating about fifteen students, one general lecture-room 



120 

accommodating forty-two students, four interview rooms, and a 
library for the use of the Christian Union. 

On the first floor of the south wing the department of experi- 
mental psychology has two large laboratories, one for general 
work and one for research. The basement of the north wing 
contains rooms for the Monograph Committee of the Faculty, 
the Alumnae Association, the Students' Association for Self- 
Government, and fire-proof safe rooms for the records and 
archives of the college. The quadrangular court enclosed by the 
building is surrounded by cloisters and in the centre of the grass 
enclosure is a fountain, the gift of the class of 1901. 

The library is open for students on week-days from 8 a. m. till 
10 p. m. and on Sundays from 2 p. m. till 10 p. m. It is open for 
the faculty at all hours. 

In January, 1893, the scientific departments of the college were 
transferred to Dalton Hall, a stone building erected by the Trus- 
tees out of funds in large part contributed by the generosity of 
friends of the college. Dalton Hall is entirely occupied by the 
scientific departments, the special scientific libraries, and the 
consultation-rooms of the professors of science. The first floor 
and the basement are reserved for physics, the second floor is 
reserved for biology, the third floor for chemistry, and the fourth 
and fifth floors for geology. In December, 1893, a greenhouse 
designed for the use of the botanical department was added to 
Dalton Hall as the gift of the alumnae and students. 

Around Taylor Hall the Trustees have erected halls of residence 
for the accommodation of students. Plans, drawings, and 
descriptions of the six halls of residence, Merion Hall, Radnor 
Hall, Denbigh Hall, Pembroke Hall East, Pembroke Hall West, 
and Rockefeller Hall, the gift of Mr. John D. Rockefeller, and 
of the academic buildings, Taylor Hall, the Library, and Dalton 
Hall, are published in a separate pamphlet to be obtained from 
the Secretary of the College. 

The new gymnasium, erected on the site of the first gym- 
nasium and the gift of the Athletic Association, the alumnse 
and thirteen neighbors of the college, was completed in Feb- 
ruary, 1909. It is open to the students from 8 a. m. till 10 p. m., 
daily, contains a large hall for gymnastic exercises, with a run- 
ning or walking track for use in rainy weather; a room for the 
director, and an adjoining room for the examination and record 



121 

of the physical development of the students, a waiting room, 
and cloak rooms. In the basement are bathrooms for use after 
exercise and a swimming-tank, sixty-nine feet long, twenty 
feet wide, and from four to seven and a half feet deep, given 
in 1894 by the alumnae,, students, and friends of the college, 
and well supplied with spring boards, life preservers, and other 
apparatus for the teaching of swimming. The gymnasium is 
under the charge of a director and two assistants. 

There is on the grounds, separated from the other buildings, a 
cottage infirmary, or hospital, with accommodation for patients 
and nurses, and its own kitchen and bathrooms. 

A central power-house, which was erected in 1903 as part of 
the gift of Mr. John D. Rockefeller, furnishes heat, electric light, 
and hot water for all the college buildings. Steam is conducted 
through tunnels underground to coils in the basement of each 
building. Air brought in from the outside is blown through the 
heaters by powerful fans and distributed to the various rooms, 
and the piping system is so adjusted as to change the air com- 
pletely in every room once in every ten minutes throughout the 
day and night. The temperature is regulated by thermostats 
in the heating coils as well as in the individual rooms. The 
electric lights, including electric reading-lamps for each student, 
are installed in the most approved manner and the voltage is 
kept constant so that there is no fluctuation. A constant and 
abundant supply of hot water is laid od and maintained at a 
temperature of 180 degrees, during all the twenty-four hours of 
the day, in all the bathrooms and stationary washstands and 
tea pantries. 

The Delaware and Atlantic Telegraph and Telephone Com- 
pany, a branch of the long-distance Bell Telephone Company, 
maintains telephone pay stations in each of the halls of residence, 
in the library and in the gymnasium, by means of which the 
students may be communicated with at any time. Near the 
college are a Postal Telegraph-Cable Company office (service 
6 a. m. to 12 p. m.), an Adams Express office, a United States 
money-order office, and two banks. There are good roads in 
every direction. Horses for riding and driving may be kept 
at livery near the college, at a cost of twenty-five dollars a 
month. 



I 



Bryn Mawr College 
calendar 

UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE 

COURSES 



1910 




Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania. 

Published by Bryn Mawr College, 

May, 1910. 



Volume III. Part 3. 



Bryn Mawr College 



CALENDAR 



UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE 

COURSES 



1910 



Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania. 

Published by Bryn Mawr College. 

Vol. III. Part 3. May, 1910. 

Entered as second-class matter, March 2Sd, 1908, at the post-office, Bryn Mawr, 
Pennsylvania, under Act of July 16th, 1894* 

Printed by The John C. Winston Co. 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



Bryn Mawr College Calendar. 
1910. 

Part 1. Register of Alumnae and Former Students. 

Part 2. Graduate Courses. 

Part 3. Undergraduate and Graduate Courses. 



■-& 1 



Part 4. Academic Buildings and Halls of Residence, 
Plans and Descriptions. 



BRYN MAWR COLLEGE. 



College Calendar. 



1910. 


1911. 


JANUARY. 


JULY. 


JANUARY. 


Su. 


M. 


Tu. 


W. 


Th. 


Fr. 


Sa. 

1 


Su. 


M. 


Tu. 


W. 


Th. 


Fr. 
1 


Sa. 
2 


Su. 
1 


M. 

?, 


Tu. 
3 


W. 
4 


Th. 
5 


Fr. 
fi 


Sa. 
7 


2 


3 


4 


b 


6 


7 


8 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


?0 


21 


]b 


IV 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


22 


23 


24 


85 


26 


27 


?8 


23 
30 


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FEBRUARY. 


AUGUST. 


FEBRUARY. 






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SEPTEMBER. 




MARCH. 








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" 


APRIL. 


OCTOBER. 


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MAY. 


NOVEMBER. 


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JUNE. 


DECEMBER. 


JUNE. 








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•• 



The academic year will close with the Conferring of Degrees at eleven 
o'clock, on June 8th, 1911. 



Academic Year, 1910-11. 



September 27th. 
October 3rd. 

October 4th. 

October 5th. 

October 6th. 
October 27th. 
October 22nd. 
October 29th. 
November 14th. 



November 19th. 
November 22nd. 
November 23rd. 
November 28th 
December 3rd. 
December 21st. 
January 5th. 
January 16th. 
January 21st. 
January 25th. 
January 31st. 
February 4th. 

February 6th. 
February 7th. 

February 8th. 

February 9th. 
March 2nd. 
March 13th. 
March 18th. 

March 29th. 

April 3rd. 

April 11th. 

April 12th. 
April 20th. 



Matriculation examinations begin. 

Registration of students. Halls of Residence open for 

students at three p. m. 
Registration of students. 
Matriculation examinations end. 
The work of the twenty-sixth academic year begins at 

a quarter to nine o'clock. 
Examinations for advanced standing begin. 
Examinations for advanced standing end. 
Senior oral examination in French. 
Senior oral examination in German. 
Private reading examinations begin. 
Collegiate and matriculation condition examinations 

begin. 
Private reading examinations end. 
Collegiate and matriculation condition examinations end. 
Thanksgiving vacation begins at one o'clock. 
Thanksgiving vacation ends at nine o'clock. 
Senior oral examinations in French and German. 
Christmas vacation begins at one o'clock. 
Christmas vacation ends at nine o'clock. 
Private reading examinations begin. 
Private reading examinations end. 
Half-yearly collegiate examinations begin. 
Matriculation examinations begin. 
Collegiate examinations end. 
Annual meeting of the Alumna? Association. 
Vacation. 
Vacation. 

Matriculation examinations end. 
The work of the second semester begins at a quarter to 

nine o'clock. 
Examinations for advanced standing begin. 
Examinations for advanced standing end. 
Private reading examinations begin. 
Private reading examinations end. 
Senior oral examinations in French and German. 
Mid-semester examinations in matriculation Greek, 

German and French. 
Collegiate and matriculation condition examinations 

begin. 
Collegiate and matriculation condition examinations 

end. 
Easter vacation begins at one o'clock. 
Easter vacation ends at nine o'clock. 







May 13th. 
May 15th. 
May 20th. 
May 23rd. 
May 24th. 
June 1st. 
June 3rd. 
June 7th. 
June 8th. 



September 26th. 
October 2nd. 

October 3rd. 

October 4th. 



Senior oral examinations in French and German. 
Private reading examinations begin. 
Private reading examinations end. 
Vacation. 

Collegiate examinations begin. 
Matriculation examinations begin. 
Collegiate examinations end. 
Matriculation examinations end. 

Conferring of degrees and close of twenty-sixth aca- 
demic year. 

Academic Year 1911-12. 

Matriculation examinations begin. 

Registration of students. Halls of Residence open for 

students at three p. m. 
Registration of students. 
Matriculation examinations end. 
The work of the twenty-seventh academic year begins 

at a quarter to nine o'clock. 



Examinations for Matriculation. 

Examinations for matriculation are held during the week preceding 
the opening of each academic year, during the last week but one of each 
academic year, and during the last week of the first semester of each year. 



Spring, 1910 



Thursday, May 26. 

Minor Latin, A 9$ — 12$ 

Trigonometry, 9$ — 11$ 

Minor Latin, B, 2$ — 5$ 

Solid Geometry, 2$ — 4$ 

Friday, May 27. 
English Composition, . . 9$ — 12$ 
English Grammar, etc., . . . 2$ — 4$ 
Greek Poets, 4f — 5f 

Saturday, May 28. 

Algebra 9$— 12 

Latin Poets, 2$ — 4 

Greek Grammar and Com- 
position, 4J — 5J 

Autumn, 1910. 

Tuesday, September 27. 

English Composition, . . . 9$ — 12$ 

English Grammar, etc., . . 2$ — 4$ 

Greek Poets, 4f — 5f 

Wednesday, September 28. 

Algebra, 9$— 12 

Latin Poets, 2$ — 4 

Greek Grammar and Corn- 
position, 4J — 5J 

Thursday, September 29. 

French, 9$— 12$ 

History, 2$ — 4 

Greek Prose Authors, . . . 4l\ — 5 \ 

Friday, September 30. 

Geometry, 9$ — 12 

Latin Composition, .... 2$ — 4 
Science, 4J — 5f 

Saturday, October 1. 
German, 9$ — 12$ 

Latin Prose Authors, . . . 2$ — 4$ 

Monday, October 3. 

Minor Latin, A, 9$ — 12$ 

Trigonometry, 2$ — 4$ 

Tuesday, October 4. 

Minor Latin, B, 9$ — 12$ 

Solid Geometry, 2$ — 4$ 



Monday, May 30. 

French 9$— 12$ 

History 2$ — 4 

Greek Prose Authors, . . . 4 \ — b\ 

Tuesday, May 31. 

Geometry 9$ — 12 

Latin Composition, .... 2$ — 4 
Science 4J — 5$ 

Wednesday, June 1 

German, 9$ — 12$ 

Latin Prose Authors, . . . 2$ — 4$ 

Winter, 1911. 

Tuesday, January 31. 
English Composition, . . 9$ — 12$ 

English Grammar 2$ — 4$ 

Greek Poets 4f — 5J 

Wednesday, February 1. 

Algebra 9$ — 12 

Latin Poets, 2$ — 4 

Greek Grammar and Com- 
position 4J — 5J 

Thursday, February 2. 

French, 9$— 12$ 

History, 2$ — 4 

Greek Prose Authors, . . . 4£ — 5i 

Friday, February 3. 

Geometry, 9$ — 12 

Latin Composition, .... 2$ — 4 
Science, 4J — 5f 

Saturday, February 4. 

German, 9$ — 12$ 

Latin Prose Authors, . . . 2$ — 4$ 

Monday, February 6. 

Minor Latin, A, 9$ — 12$ 

Trigonometry, 2$ — 4$ 

Tuesday, February 7. 

Minor Latin, B 9$ — 12$ 

Solid Geometry 2$ — 4$ 



8 



Thxjksday, June 1 
Minor Latin, A, . . 
Trigonometry, .... 
Minor Latin, B, . . , 
Solid Geometry, . . . 

Friday, June 2 
English Composition, 
English Grammar, etc., . 
Greek Poets, 

Saturday, June 3 

Algebra, , 

Latin Poets, 

Greek Grammar and Com 
position, , 



Spring, 

9^ — 124 

9J— 11* 

24—54 

24—44 

94—124 

24—44 
. 4 4 04 

. 94—12 

. 24—4 



H-51 



Autumn, 1911. 

Tuesday, September 26. 

English Composition, . . 94 — 124 

English Grammar, etc., . . 24 — 44 

Greek Poets, 4| — 5| 

Wednesday, September 27. 

Algebra, 94 — 12 

Latin Poets, 24 — 4 

Greek Grammar and Com- 
position, 4J — 5\ 

Thursday, September 28. 

French, 94—124 

History, 24 — 4 

Greek Prose Authors, . . . A\ — 5J 

Friday, September 29. 

Geometry, 94 — 12 

Latin Composition, . . . 24 — 4 
Science, 4J — 5f 

Saturday, September 30. 

German 94 — 124 

Latin Prose Authors, . . . 24 — 44 

Monday, October 2. 

Minor Latin, A 94 — 124 

Trigonometry, 24 — 44 

Tuesday, October 3. 



Minor Latin, B, 



94—124 



Solid Geometry, 24 — 44 



1911. 

Monday, June 5. 

French 94 — 124 

History, 24 — 4 

Greek Prose Authors, . . . 4$ — 5 \ 

Tuesday, June 6. 

Geometry, 94 — 12 

Latin Composition, .... 24 — 4 
Science, 4J — 5f 

Wednesday, June 7. 

German, 94 — 124 

Latin Prose Authors, . . . 24 — 44 

Winter, 1912. 

Tuesday, January 30. 

English Composition, . . 94 — 124 

English Grammar, . . . 24 — 44 

Greek Poets, 4f — 5f 

Wednesday, January 31. 

Algebra, 94 — 12 

Latin Poets, 24 — 4 

Greek Grammar and Com- 
position, 4J — 5£ 

Thursday, February 1. 

French, 94 — 124 

History, 24 — 4 

Greek Prose Authors, . . . 4\ — 5\ 

Friday, February 2. 

Geometry, 94 — 12 

Latin Composition, . . . 24 — 4 
Science, 4J — 5f 

Saturday, February 3. 

German, 94 — 124 

Latin Prose Authors, . . . 24 — 44 

Monday, February 5. 
Minor Latin, A, .... 94 — 124 
Trigonometry, 2\ — 44 

Tuesday, February 6. 
Minor Latin, B, .... 94 — 124 
Solid Geometry, 24 — 44 



Corporation. 



Howard Comfort, 
President. 



Asa S. Wing, 

Treasurer. 

Albert K. Smiley. 
Edward Bettle, Jr. 
Howard Comfort. 
Justus C. Strawbridge. 
James Wood. 
Rufus M. Jones. 



Edward Bettle, Jr., 
Secretary. 

Alexander C. Wood. 
M. Carey Thomas. 
Francis R. Cope, Jr. 
Asa S. Wing. 
Charles J. Rhoads. 
Thomas Raeburn White. 



Frederic H. Strawbridge. 



Board of Directors. 



Howard Comfort, 

Chairman. 



Asa S. Wing, 

Treasurer. 

Albert K. Smiley. 
Edward Bettle, Jr. 
Howard Comfort. 
Justus C. Strawbridge. 
James Wood. 
Rufus M. Jones. 
Alexander C. Wood. 
M. Carey Thomas. 



Edward Bettle, Jr., 

Secretary. 

Francis R. Cope, Jr. 
Mary E. Garrett. 
Elizabeth Butler Kirkbride. 
Asa S. Wing. 
Charles J. Rhoads. 
Thomas Raeburn White. 
Frederic H. Strawbridge. 
Anna Rhoads Ladd. 



10 

Officers of Administration. 

academic year, 1909-10. 

President, 

M. Carey Thomas, Ph.D., LL.D. 
Office: Taylor Hall. 

Assistant to the President, 

Isabel Maddison, B.Sc, Ph.D. 
Office: Taylor Hall 

Dean of the College, 

Marion Reilly, A.B. 
Office: The Library. 

Wardens of the Halls of Residence. 

Martha Gibbons Thomas, A.B., Pembroke Hall. 
Alice Anthony, A.B., Denbigh Hall. 
Virginia Tryon Stoddard, A.B., Radnor Hall. 
Harriet Jean Crawford, A.B., Rockefeller Hall. 
Bertha Margaret Laws, A.B., Pembroke Hall. 
Friedrika Margretha Heyl, A.B., Merion Hall. 

Secretary, 
Anna Bell Lawther, A.B. Office: Taylor Hall. 

Recording and Appointment Secretary, 
Ethel Walker, A.M. Office: Taylor Hall. 

Librarian, 
Mary Letitia Jones, B.L., B.L.S. Office: The Library. 

Director of Athletics and Gymnastics, 
Constance M. K. Applebee. Office: The Gymnasium. 

Comptroller, 
James G. Forrester. Office: Taylor Hall. 

Business Manager, 
Charles A. Worden. Office: Taylor Hall. 

Junior Bursar, 
May L. Manning. Office: Rockefeller Hall. 

Attending Physician of the College, 

Thomas F. Branson, M.D. Office hours, daily, 8 to 9.30 and 2 to 3, 
Rosemont, Penna. 

Visiting Physician of the College, 

Anne Heath Thomas, M.D. Office hours, daily, 1.30 to 3, 132 South 
18th Street, Philadelphia; Merion Hall, Bryn Mawr College, daily 
except Sunday, 4 to 6. 



11 

Academic Appointments. 

Academic Year, 1909-10. 

M. Carey Thomas, Ph.D., LL.D., President of the College and 

Professor of English. 

A.B., Cornell University, 1877 ; studied at the Johns Hopkins University. 
1877-78 ; University of Leipsic, 1879-82 ; Ph.D., University of Zurich, 1882 ; 
Sorbonne and College de France, 1883 ; Dean of the Faculty of Bryn Mawr 
College and Professor of English, 1885-94. 

Charlotte Angas Scott, D.Sc, Alumnce Professor of Mathematics. 

Lincoln, England. Graduate in Honours, Girton College, University of Cam- 
bridge, England, 1880; B.Sc., University of London, 1882; Lecturer on 
Mathematics in Girton College, 1880-84 ; lectured in connection with Newn- 
ham College, University of Cambridge, England, 1880-83 ; D.Sc, University 
of London, 1885. 

George A. Barton, Ph.D., Professor of Biblical Literature and Semitic 

Languages. 

A.B.. Haverford College, 1882, and A.M., 1885 ; studied under the direction of 
the American Institute of Hebrew, 1885-86 ; Harvard University, 1888-91 ; 
Thayer Scholar, Harvard University, 1889-91 ; A.M., Harvard University, 
1890 ; Ph.D., Harvard University, 1891 ; Director of the American School 
of Oriental Study and Research in Palestine, 1902-03. 

Joseph W. Warren, M.D., Associate Professor of Physiology. 

A.B., Harvard College, 1871 ; University of Berlin, 1871-72 ; University of 
Leipsic, 1872-73 ; University of Bonn, 1873-79 ; M.D., University of Bonn, 
1880 ; Assistant and Instructor in Physiology, Harvard Medical School, 
1881-91 ; Lecturer in Medical Department of the University of the City of 
New York, 1885-86 ; Lecturer in Physiology, University of Michigan, 1889. 

Elmer P. Kohler, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 

A.B., Muhlenberg College, 1886, and A.M., 1889 : Johns Hopkins University, 
1889-91 ; Fellow in Chemistry, Johns Hopkins University, 1891-92 ; Ph.D., 
Johns Hopkins University, 1892. 

Florence Bascom, Ph.D., Professor of Geology. 

A.B., University of Wisconsin, 1882, B.Sc, 1884, and A.M., 1887 ; Johns 
Hopkins University, 1891-93 ; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1893 ; 
Assistant in Geology and Instructor in Petrography, Ohio State University, 
1893-95. 

Isabel Maddison, B.Sc, Ph.D., Assistant to the President and 

Associate in Mathematics. 

Reading, England. B.Sc, University of London, 1893, Ph.D.. Bryn Mawr 
College, 1896, and B.A., Trinity College, Dublin. 1905 ; Graduate in Hon- 
ours, First Class, in the Cambridge Mathematical Tripos, 1892 : Graduate 
Student in Mathematics, Bryn Mawr College, 1892-93, and Fellow in 
Mathematics, 1S93-94 ; Holder of the Mary E. Garrett Europenn Fellow- 
ship, and Student in Mathematics, University of Gottingen, 1894-95. 

Wilmer Cave Wright, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Oreelc. 

Shrewsbury, England. Girton College, Universitv of Cambridge. England, 
1888-92 : Graduate in Honours, Cambridge Classical Tripos, 1892 ; Ph.D.. 
University of Chicago, 1895 ; Fellow in Greek, Bryn Mawr College, 1892- 
93 ; Fellow in Latin, University of Chicago, 1893-94, and Fellow in Greek, 
1894-95 ; Reader in Greek and Latin, University of Chicago, 1895-96. 

James H. Leuba, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology and Education and 

Director of the Psychological Laboratory. 

Neuchatel, Switzerland. B.S., University of Neuchatel, 1886 : Ph.B., Ursinus 
College, 1888; Scholar in Psychology, Clark University, 1892-93: Fellow 
in Psychology, Clark University, 1893-95 ; Ph.D., Clark University, 1896. 



12 

Pongee DeHaan, Ph.D., Professor of Spanish. 

Leeuwarden, Holland. Ph.D., .Johns Hopkins University. 1895 ; Instructor in 
Modern Languages, Lehigh University, 1885-91 ; Fellow in Romance Lan- 
guages, Johns Hopkins University, 1893-94, Assistant in Romance Lan- 
guages, 1893-95, Instructor in Romance Languages, 1895-96, and Associate 
in Romance Languages, 1896-97. 

Albert Schinz, Ph.D., Associate Professor of French Literature. 

Neuchatel, Switzerland. A.B., University of Neuchatel, 1888, and A.M., 1889. 
Licentiate in Theology, 1892 ; Student, University of Berlin, 1892-93 ; 
University of Tubingen, 1893 ; Ph.D., University of Tubingen, 1894 ; Sor- 
bonne and College de France, 1894 ; Privatdocent, University of Neu- 
chatel, 1896-97 ; Instructor in French, Clark University, 1897-98 ; Instruc- 
tor in French, University of Minnesota, 1898-99. 

Arthue Leslie Wheelee, Ph.D., Professor of Latin. 

A.B., Tale University, 1893 ; Scholar and Student in Classics, Tale College, 
1893-96; Ph.D., Tale University, 1896; Instructor and Tutor in Latin. 
Tale College, 1894-1900. 

Henry Nevtll Sanders,* Ph.D., Professor of Greek. 

Edinburgh^ Scotland. A.B., Trinity University, Toronto, 1894, and A.M., 
1897 ; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1903 ; Fellow in Greek, Johns 
Hopkins University, 1897-98 ; Lecturer in Greek, McGill University, 
1900-02. 

William Bashford Huff, Ph.D., Professor of Physics. 

A.B., University of Wisconsin, 1889 ; A.M., University of Chicago, 1896 ; 
Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1900 ; Lecture Assistant in Physics, 
Johns Hopkins University, 1899-1900, Assistant in Physics, 1900-01, 
and Instructor in Physics, 1901-02. 

William Roy Smith, Ph.D., Associate Professor of History. 

A.B., University of Texas, 1897, and A.M., 1898 ; Ph.D., Columbia University, 
1903 ; Acting Professor of History and Political Science, University of 
Colorado, 1900-01 ; Lecturer in History, Barnard College, 1901-02. 

J. Edmund Wright,! M.A., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

Liverpool, England. Graduate in Honours (Senior Wrangler) in the Cam- 
bridge Mathematical Tripos, 1900, and First Division, First Class, Mathe- 
matical Tripos, Part II, 1901 ; Smith's Prizeman, 1902 ; Fellow of Trinity 
College, University of Cambridge, England. 

Lucy Martin Donnelly, A.B., Associate Professor of English. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1893 ; University of Oxford, England, and Univer- 
sity of Leipsic, 1893-94, Sorbonne and College de France, and University 
of Leipsic, 1894-95. 

Clarence Carroll Clark, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English. 

A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1896 ; Ph.D., Tale University, 1903 ; Scholar 
in Romance Languages. Johns Hopkins University, 1896-97 ; Instructor 
in Modern Languages. Toledo, Ohio, 1897-99 ; Scholar in English, Tale 
University, 1901-02 ; Student in Oxford, Cambridge, and Berlin, 1902-03. 

Karl Detlev Jessen, Ph.D., Associate Professor of German Litera- 
ture. 

Winnemark, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany. A.B., University of Chicago, 
1896, and Fellow in German, 1897-98 ; Ph.D., University of Berlin, 1901 ; 
University of Chicago, 1895-98; University of Kiel, 1899; University of 
Berlin, 1898-99, 1899-1901 ; Acting Professor of Modern Languages, 
Eureka College, 1896 ; Instructor in German, Iowa State University. 
1897 ; Instructor in German, Harvard University, 1901-03, and Lecturer 
on German Literature and Aesthetics, 1904. 

Tenney Frank, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Latin. 

A.B., University of Kansas, 1898, and A.M., 1899; Ph.D., University of 
Chicago, 1903 ; Fellow, University of Chicago, 1899-1901 ; Assistant and 
Associate in Latin, University of Chicago, 1901-04. 

* Granted leave of absence for the second semester, 1909-10. 
fDied, February 20, 1910. 



13 

David Hilt Tennent, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Biology. 

S.B., Olivet College, 1900; Fellow, Johns Hopkins University, 1902-04; 
Bruce Fellow, Johns Hopkins University, 1904 ; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins 
University, 1904. 

Nettie Maria Stevens, Ph.D., Associate in Experimental Morphology. 

A.B., Leland Stanford, Jr., University, 1899, and A.M., 1900 ; Ph.D., Bryn 
Mawr College, 1903 ; Student in Hopkins Seaside Laboratory, Pacific 
Grove, Summer, 1897, 1898, 1899, and 1900 ; Graduate Scholar in Biology, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1900-01 ; Holder of the President's European Fellow- 
ship, 1901-02 ; Student, Zoological Station, Naples, and University of 
Wiirzburg, 1901-02, 1908-09 ; Fellow in Biology, Bryn Mawr College, 
1902-03, and Research Fellow in Biology, 1903-04 ; Carnegie Research 
Assistant, 1904-05 ; Alice Freeman Palmer Research Fellow, 1908-09. 

Carleton Fairchied Brown, Ph.D., Associate Professor and Profes- 
sor {elect) of English Philology. 

A.B., Carleton College, 1888 ; A.M., Harvard University, 1901, and Ph.D.. 

1903. Shattuck Scholar, Harvard University, 1901-03 ; Instructor in 
English, Harvard University, 1903-05. 

Caroline Louise Ransom, Ph.D., Associate Professor of tlie History 
of Art and Classical Archccology. 

A.B., Mt. Holyoke College, 1896 ; A.M., University of Chicago, 1900 and 
Ph.D., 1905 ; Fellow, University of Chicago, 1898-99, 1903-05 ; Student in 
Berlin, London, Paris, and Athens. 1900-03. 

James Barnes, Ph.D., Associate in Physics. 

Halifax, Nova Scotia. B.A., Dalhousie University, Honours in Mathematics 
and Physics, 1899, and M.A., 1900 ; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 

1904. Holder of 1851 Exhibition Science Research Scholarship, 1900-03 ; 
Fellow, Johns Hopkins University, 1903-04, and Assistant in Physics. 
1904-06. 

Richard Thayer Holbrook, Ph.D., Associate Professor of French 
Philology and Italian. 

A.B., Yale University, 1893 ; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1902. Sorbonne. 
College de France, Ecole des Chartes, 1893-94, 1895-96 ; Student in Italy 
and University of Berlin, 1894-95 ; Student in Spain, 1901 ; Tutor in the 
Romance Languages and Literatures, Yale University, 1896-1901, and 
Columbia University, 1902-06. 

Theodore de Leo de Laguna, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Phil- 
osophy. 

A.B., University of California, 1896, and A.M., 1899 ; Ph.D., Cornell Univer- 
sity, 1901. Teacher in the Government Schools of the Philippine Islands, 
1901-04 ; Honorary Fellow and Assistant in Philosophy, Cornell University, 
1904-05 ; Assistant Professor of the Philosophy of Education, University 
of Michigan, 1905-07. 

Charles Clarence Williamson, Ph.D., Associate in Economics and 
Politics. 

A.B., Western Reserve University, 1904 ; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1907. 
Assistant in Economics and Graduate Student, Western Reserve Univer- 
sity, First Semester, 1904-05 ; Scholar in Political Economy, University 
of Wisconsin, 1904-05 ; Graduate Student, University of Wisconsin, 1905- 
06 ; University Fellow in Political Economy, Columbia University, 1906-07 ; 
Research Assistant of the Carnegie Institution, 1905-07. 

Hans Weyhe, Ph.D., Associate in Teutonic Philology and Sanskrit. 

Dessau, Germany. Ph.D., University of Leipsic, 1903 ; University of Munich, 
1897 ; University of Leipsic, 1897-99 ; University of Berlin, 1899-1901. 

Marion Parris, Ph.D., Associate in Economics. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1901, and Ph.D., 1909. Graduate Student. Bryn 
Mawr College, 1902-05, Fellow in Economics and Politics, 1905-06 ; Bryn 
Mawr College Research Fellow and Student in Economics and Politics, 
University of Vienna, 1906-07. 



14 

William Henry Allison, Ph.D., Associate in History. 

A.B., Harvard University, 1893 ; B.D., Newton Theological Institution, 1902 ; 
Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1905 ; Fellow in Church History. University 
of Chicago, 1902-04 ; Professor of Church History, Pacific Theological 
Seminary, 1904-05 ; Professor of History and Political Science, Franklin 
College, 1905-08 ; Research Assistant of the Carnegie Institution, 1906-08. 

Frederick Hutton Getman, Ph.D., Associate in Chemistry. 

Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1903. Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 
1893-96 ; University of Virginia, 1896-97 ; Fellow in Chemistry, Johns 
Hopkins University, 1902-03, and Fellow by Courtesy, 1903-04 ; Carnegie 
Research Assistant in Physical Chemistry, 1903-04 ; Lecturer in Physical 
Chemistry, College of the City of New York, 1904-05, and Lecturer in 
Physics, Columbia University, 1907-08. 

M. Phillips Mason, Ph.D., Associate in Philosophy. 

A.B., Harvard University, 1899, A.M., 1900, and Ph.D., 1904. Corpus 
Christi College, University of Oxford, 1899-1900 ; Universities of Heidel- 
berg and Berlin, 1900-01 ; University of Marburg, 1901-02 ; Sorhonne and 
College de France, 1902 ; Harvard University, 1902-04 ; John Harvard Fel- 
low of Harvard University, 1902-03 ; Instructor in Philosophy, Princeton 
University, 1905-07. 

Clarence Errol Ferree, Ph.D., Associate in Experimental Psychology. 

B.S., Ohio Wesleyan University, 1900, A.M., 1901, and M.S., 1902 ; Ph.D., 
Cornell University, 1909. Fellow in Psychology, Cornell University, 1902- 
03 ; Assistant in Psychology, Cornell University, 1903-07. 

Alfred Horatio Upham, Ph.D., Associate Professor (elect) of Eng- 
lish Literature. 

A.B., Miami University, 1897, and A.M., 1898 ; A.M., Harvard University, 
1901 ; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1908. Instructor in Latin and Greek, 
Miami University, 1897-1900 ; Graduate Student, Harvard Unversity, 1900- 
02 ; Professor of English, Agricultural College of Utah, 1902-05 ; Columbia 
of English, Miami University, 1906-08, and Professor of English and Head 
of the Department, 1908-10. 

Marion Reilly, A.B., Dean of the College. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1901 ; Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 
1901-02, 1903, 1903-06; Newnham College, University of Cambridge, 
Spring, 1907. 

Samuel Arthur King, M.A., 2V on-Resident Lecturer in English 
Diction. 

Tynemouth, England. M.A., University of London, 1900. Special Lecturer 
in Elocution, Johns Hopkins University, 1901 ; Special Lecturer in Elocu- 
tion, University of California, 1902. 

Orie Latham Hatcher, Ph.D., Lecturer in Elizabethan Literature 

and Associate {elect) in Comparative Literature and Elizabethan 

Literature. 

A.B., Vassar College, 1888. Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1903. Graduate 
Student, University of Chicago, 1901-03, and Fellow in English, 1903-04. 

Chester Albert Reeds, M.S., Lecturer in Geology. 

B.S., University of Oklahoma, 1905 ; M.S., Yale University, 1907 ; Graduate 
Scholar, Yale University, 1905-06 ; and Fellow, 1906-08. Field Assistant, 
U. S. Geological Survey, 1903-06 ; Instructor in Mineralogy and Petrology, 
University of Oklahoma, February to June, 1908. 

Frederick A. Blossom, Lecturer in French. 

A.B., Amherst College, 1898 ; Johns Hopkins University, 1903-04, 1909. 
Student of Romance Languages in Paris and Grenoble, 1905-08. 

Roland G. Kent, Ph.D., Non-resident Lecturer in Sanskrit. 

A.B., Swarthmore College, 1895, B.L., 1896 and A.M., 1898. Ph.D., University 
of Pennsylvania, 1903. Student, Universities of Berlin and Munich and 
the American School of Classical Studios at Athens, 1899-1902 ; University 



15 

of Pennsylvania, Second Semester, 1902, Harrison Fellow in Classics, 
1902-03, Harrison Research Fellow in Classics, 1903-04, Instructor in 
Greek and Latin, 1904-09> and Assistant Professor of Comparative Philol- 
ogy, 1909-10. 

Rose Chamberlin, M.A., Reader in German. 

Great Yarmouth, England. M.A., Trinity College, Dublin, 1905 ; Graduate in 
Honours, Newnham College, University of Cambridge, England, 1886 
(Mediaeval and Modern Languages Tripos, First Class). 

Habriet Randolph, Ph.D., Demonstrator in Biology and Reader in 

Botany. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1889 ; Fellow in Biology, Bryn Mawr College, 
1889-90 ; University of Zurich, 1890-92 ; Ph.D., University of Zurich, 1892. 

Katharine Fullebton, A.M., Reader in English. 
A.B., Radcliffe College, 1900, and A.M., 1901. 

Regina Katharine Crandall, Ph.D., Reader in English. 

A.B., Smith College, 1890; Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1902. Graduate 
Student, University of Chicago, 1893-94, and Fellow in History, 1894-96 ; 
Assistant in History, Smith College, 1896-99 ; Instructor in History, 
Wellesley College, 1899-1900. 

Georgiana Goddard King, A.M., Reader in English. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1896, and A.M., 1897. Fellow in Philosophy, Bryn 
Mawr College, 1896-97, and Fellow in English, 1897-98. College de France, 
First Semester, 1898-99. 

Abby Kirk, A.B., Reader in Elementary Greek. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1892. Reader in English, Bryn Mawr College. 
1892-98. 

Maud Downing, A.B., Reader in Semitic Languages. 

A.B., University of Toronto, 1902. Graduate Student, University of Toronto. 
1902-03 ; Graduate Scholar, Bryn Mawr College, 1903-07 ; Honorary Fellow 
in Semitic Languages, Johns Hopkins University, 1908-09. 

Clara Leonora Nicolay,* Ph.D., Reader of Elementary French. 

Berlin, Germany. L.L.A., St. Andrew's University, 1900 ; A.M., University 
of Pennsylvania, 1901, and Ph.D., 1907. University College, Nottingham. 
England, 1892-97 ; Student in France and Germany, 1903. 

Virginia Ragsdale, Ph.D., Reader in Mathematics. 

S.B., Guilford College, 1892. Graduate Scholar in Mathematics, Bryn Mawr 
College, 1892-93, and Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1893-97. 
1907-08. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1896, and Ph.D., 1906. Holder of 
the Bryn Mawr European Fellowship, and Assistant Demonstrator in 
Physics, Bryn Mawr College, 1896-97 ; Student, University of Gottingen, 
1897-98 ; Holder of Fellowship of the Baltimore Association for the Pro- 
motion of the University Education of Women, Graduate Scholar, and 
Fellow by Courtesy in Mathematics, Bryn Mawr College, 1901-02, and 
Fellow in Mathematics, 1902-03. 

Lillie Deming Loshe, Ph.D., Reader in English. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1899 ; A.M., Columbia University, 1903, and 
Ph.D., 1908. Graduate Student, Barnard College. 1899-1900 ; Columbia 
University, 1901-04, First Semester, 1904-05, and 1905-07. 

Content Shepard Nichols, A.M., Reader in English. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1899, and A.M., 1900. Graduate Scholar in Latin 
and English, Bryn Mawr College, 1899-1900 ; Assistant Reader in English, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1900. 

Elizabeth Andros Foster, A.M., Reader in Latin. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1908, and A.M., 1909. Graduate Scholar in Latin. 
Bryn Mawr College, 1908-09. 

♦Resigned March 1, 1910. 



16 

Isabelle Stone, Ph.D., Reader in Greek. 

A.B., Wellesley College, 1005, and Ph.D., Cornell University, 1908. Graduate 
Student, Cornell University, 1905-07, and Fellow in Greek and Latin, 1907- 
08 ; Alice Freeman Palmer Fellow of Wellesley College and Student in 
Greece and Italy, 1908-09. 

Helen Elizabeth Huff, Ph.D., Reader in Mathematics. 

A.B., Dickinson College, 1903, A.M., 1905, and Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College, 
1908. Graduate Scholar in Mathematics. Bryn Mawr College, 1903-04, 
and Graduate Student in Physics, 1907-08 ; Fellow in Physics, Bryn 
Mawr College, 1904-05 ; Holder of the Mary B. Garrett European Fellow- 
ship and Student, University of Gottingen, 1905-06 ; Demonstrator in 
Physics, Bryn Mawr College, 1906-07 ; Teacher in the Baldwin School, 
Bryn Mawr, Pa., 1907-08. 

Emma Haebeeli, Ph.D., Reader {elect) in Elementary French. 

Berne, Switzerland, Ph.D., University of Berne, 1903. Graduate Student, 
University of Berne, and Tutor in French and German, 1904-05, 1906-09 ; 
Instructor in French and German, Virginia College, Roanoke, Va., 1909-10. 

Martha Plaisted, A.B., Reader (elect) in English. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1908. Instructor in English, Sweet Briar College, 
1908-10. 

Frances Lowater, B.Sc, Ph.D., Demonstrator in Physics. 

Nottingham, England. B.Sc, University of London, 1900 ; Ph.D., Bryn Mawr 
College, 1906 ; University College, Nottingham, 1888-91. 1892-93 ; Newn- 
ham College, University of Cambridge, England, 1891-92 ; Fellow in Physics, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1896-97, and Graduate Scholar in Physics, 1897-98 ; 
Secretary of Bryn Mawr College, 1898-99. 

Gertrude Langden Heritage, A.M., Demonstrator in Chemistry. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1896, and A.M., 1899. Graduate Student in 
Chemistry, Bryn Mawr College, 1896-97, 1898-1900, and Graduate Student 
in Mathematics and Chemistry, 1897-98. 

Caroline Vinia Lynch, A.M., Demonstrator in the History of Art 

and Classical Archwology. 

A.B., Smith College, 1894, and A.M., Columbia University, 1908. American 
School of Classical Studies in Rome, 1904-05 ; Columbia University, 
1906-07 ; Radcliffe College, 1895-96, 1907-09. 

Anna Bell Lawther, A.B., Secretary of the College. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1897. Assistant Bursar, Bryn Mawr College, 
1898-1900 ; Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1898-99, 1904-05 ; War- 
den of Merion Hall, 1904, 1904-05. 

Ethe^ Walker, A.M., Recording Secretary and Appointment Secre- 
tary. 
A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1894, and A.M., 1904. Graduate Scholar in 

Archaeology, Bryn Mawr College, 1902-04 ; Recording Secretary, 1904-06, 

1907-10, and Appointment Secretary, 1905-10. 

Mary Letitia Jones, B.L., B.L.S., Librarian. 

B.L., University of Nebraska, 1885 ; B.L.S., New York State Library School. 
1892. Acting Librarian and Adjunct Professor of Bibliography, University 
of Nebraska, 1892-97 ; Librarian and Assistant Professor of Library 
Economy, University of Illinois, 1897 ; Classifier, Iowa State University, 
1898 ; Second Assistant Librarian, Los Angeles Public Library, 1898-99, 
and Librarian, 1900-05. 

Constance M. K. Applebee, Director of Athletics and Gymnastics. 

Licentiate, British College of Physical Education, 1898, and Member, 1899. 
Gymnasium Mistress, Girls' Grammar School, Bradford, Yorkshire, 1899- 
1900 ; in the Arnold Foster High School, Burnley, Yorkshire, 1899-1901 ; 
in the High School, Halifax, Yorkshire, 1900-01 ; Head of Private Gym- 
nasium, Ilkley, Yorkshire, 1899-1901 ; Harvard School of Physical Training, 
Summer, 1901 ; Hockey Coach, Vassar College, Wellesley College, Radcliffe 
College, Mt. Holyoke College, Smith College, Bryn Mfawr College, Boston 
Normal School of Gymnastics, 1901-04 ; Hockey Coach, Harvard Summer 
School of Gymnastics, 1906. 



17 

Elizabeth Lawrence Gray, Assistant Director of Athletics and Gym- 
nastics. 

Graduate, Sargent Normal School of Physical Education, Boston, Mass., 1908 ; 
Student, Gilbert Summer Normal School of Classic Dancing, 1908 ; In- 
structor in Gymnastics, Playgrounds, Cambridge, Mass., Summer, 1908, 
1909. 

Mary Ellen Baker, A.B., B.L.S., Head Cataloguer. 

A.B., Lincoln University, 1900. B.L.S., New York State Library School, 
1908. Assistant in Latin, Missouri Valley College, 1901-05, and Librarian, 
1902-06. Illinois State Library School, 1906-07; New York State Library 
School, 1907-08. 

Bessie Homer Jennings, Assistant Cataloguer. 
Graduate, Drexel Institute Library School, 1900. 

Mary Warren Taylor, Secretary to the Director of Athletics and 
Gymnastics. 

Thomas F. Branson, M.D., Attending Physician of the College. 

Anne Heath Thomas, A.M., M.D., Visiting Physician of the College. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1897, and A.M., 1898. M.D., Woman's Medical 
College of Pennsylvania, 1905. Graduate Scholar in Physics and Biology, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1897-98 ; Teacher of Chemistry in the State Normal 
School, Trenton, N. J., 1898-1902 ; Student, Woman's Medical College of 
Pennsylvania, 1902-05 ; Interne, Woman's Hospital of Philadelphia, 1905- 
06 ; Resident at the Evening Dispensary for Working Women and Girls, 
Baltimore, Md., and Graduate Student in Medicine, Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1906-07 ; Physician, Registrar and Assistant in Clinic in the Wo- 
man's Hospital, Philadelphia, and Assistant in Clinic in the Hospital of the 
Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania, 1907-08 ; Instructor in Thera- 
peutics and Physical Diagnosis, Woman's Medical College, and Assistant 
Visiting Physician, Bryn Mawr College, 1908-09. 

Helen Murphy, M.D., Examining Oculist. 

M.D., Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania, 1803 ; Assistant Demon- 
strator in Histology, Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania, 1894-96 ; 
Instructor in Materia Medica, 1896-1902 ; Instructor in Diseases of the 
Eye, Philadelphia Polyclinic and College for Graduates in Medicine, 
1895-97. 

. The following physicians have consented to serve as consultants 
in special cases: 

Ella B. Everitt, M.D., Consultant Gynecologist. 
John H. Mtjsser, M.D., Consultant Physician. 
George de Schweinitz, M.D., Consultant Oculist. 
Robert G. Le Conte, M.D., Consultant Surgeon. 
Francis R. Packard, M.D., Consultant Aurist. 
James K. Young, M.D., Consultant Orthopcedist. 



The Academic Committee of the Alumnce. 

Ruth Wadsworth Furness Porter, A.B. (Mrs. James Foster Porter), 
Chairman, Hubbard Woods, III. 

Evelyn Walker, A.B., Secretary, 119 Park Street, Brookline, Mass. 

Susan Fowler, A. B. (ex-officio) , 420 West 118th Street, New York 
City. 

Eleanor Louisa Lord, Ph.D., Woman's College of Baltimore, Balti- 
more, Md. 



18 

Bertha Haven Putnam, Ph.D., lit. Holyoke College, South Hadley, 
Mass. 

Geetrude Elizabeth Dietrich Smith, A.B. (Mrs. Herbert Knox 
Smith), The Highlands, Washington, D. C. 

Louise Parke Atherton Dickey, A.B. (Mrs. Samuel Dickey), 10 
Chalmers Place, Chicago, III. 

Helen J. Robins, A.B., 23 Goiven Avenue, Mt. Airy, Philadelphia. 



Honorary Corresponding Secretaries. 

The following honorary corresponding secretaries, all of whom are grad- 
uates of Bryn Hawr College, have kindly consented to act as representatives 
of the college in the cities in which they live, and will at any time be glad 
to answer questions about the college: 

New York City : Miss Emily Redmond Cross, 6 Washington Square. 
Philadelphia : Mrs. Adolph E. Borie, 618 S. Washington Square. 
Baltimore: Mrs. Anthony Morris Carey, 1004 Cathedral Street. 

Pittsburgh, Pa. : Mrs. John Bruce Orr, 628 Maple Lane, Sewickley, 

Pa. 
Scranton, Pa. : Miss Alice Belin. 

Syracuse, N. Y. : Mrs. Frederick A. Saunders, 504 Ostrom Avenue. 
Utica, N. Y. : Mrs. Arthur Percy Saunders, Clinton, N. Y. 

New Haven, Conn. : Miss Elizabeth Day Seymour, 34 Hillhouse 
Avenue. 

Boston, Mass. : Mrs. Ingersoll Bowditch, 19 Buckingham Street, 
Cambridge. 

Fall River, Mass. : Mrs. Randall Nelson Durfee, 435 Cherry 
Street. 

Washington, D. C. : Mrs. Herbert Knox Smith, The Highlands. 

Winston, N. C. : Miss Caro Fries Buxton, 520 Summit Street. 

Chicago, III. : Miss Ethel Eugenie Hooper, 1210 Asior Street. 

Indianapolis, Ind. : Mrs. Frank Nichols Lewis, 4 West St. Joe 
Street. 

Madison, Wis. : Mrs. Moses Stephen Slaughter, 633 Francis Street. 
Minneapolis, Minn. : Miss Margaret Washburn, 2218 First Avenue, 

South. 
St. Louis, Mo. : Mrs. George Gellhorn, 3871 Washington Avenue. 
Portland, Ore. : Mrs. Henry Minor Esterly, 376 North 31st Street. 

Los Angeles, Cal. : Miss Elizabeth Dana Marble, 3201 Figueroa 
Street. 

Salt Lake City, Utah : Miss Kate Williams, 177 13th East Street. 

England: The Hon. Mrs. Bertrand Russell, Bagley Wood, Oxford. 



19 

Students. 



Fellows and Graduate Students, Academic Year, 1909-10. 

Bontecou, Margaret, Bryn Mawr European Felloic. 

Orange, N. J. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1909. Maria L. Eastman Brooke 
Hall Memorial Scholar, 1908-09. 

Swindler, Mary Hamilton Mary E. Garrett European Fellow. 

Bloomirigton, Ind. A.B., University of Indiana, 1905, and A.M.. 1906. Grad- 
uate Scholar in Greek, Bryn Mawr College, 1906-07, and Fellow in Greek, 
1907-09 ; Student, Universities of Oxford and Berlin, and American 
School of Classical Studies, Athens, 1909-10. 

Harmon, Esther, 

Ottendorfer Memorial Research Fellow in Teutonic Philology. 

Toledo, O. A.B., University of Michigan, 1906. Graduate Scholar in Teu- 
tonic Philology, Bryn Mawr College, 1906-07. Holder of the President's 
European Fellowship and Student, University of Berlin, 1907-08 ; Fellow in 
German and Teutonic Philology, Bryn Mawr College, 1908-09 ; Student, 
University of Munich, 1909-10. 

Sandison, Helen Estabeook, Special European Fellow. 

Terre Haute, Ind. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1906, and A.M., 1907. Gradu- 
ate Scholar, Bryn Mawr College. 1906-07 ; Assistant Principal of the High 
School, Brookville, Ind., 1907-08 ; Fellow in English, Bryn Mawr College, 
1908-09 ; Student, University of Oxford, 1909-10. 

Spencer, Fannie Grace Clara, Research Fellow in Chemistry. 

Terre Haute, Ind. A.B., University of Illinois, 1908, and A.M., 1909. 

Coulter, Cornelia Catlin, Fellow in Latin. 

Ferguson, Mo. A.B., Washington University, 1907. Graduate Scholar in 
Latin, Bryn Mawr College, 1907-08 ; Holder of the President's European 
Fellowship and Student, University of Munich, 1908-09. 

Smith, Eunice Clara, Fellow in English. 

Pawtucket, R. I. A.B., Brown University, 1907, and A.M., 1909. 
Harrison, Jane Annetta, Fellow in German. 

La Plata, Mo. A.B. and B.S., University of Missouri, 1906, and A.M., 1907. 
Graduate Student, University of Missouri, 1908-09. 

King, Helen Maxwell, Fellow in Romance Languages. 

Olivet, Mich. A.B., Olivet College, 1907, and A.M., 1908. Graduate Student, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1908-09. 

Shoemaker, Jane Cushing Fellow in Economics and Politics. 

Philadelphia. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1905. Graduate Student', Bryn 
Mawr College, 1907-08. 

Rand, Marie Gertrude, Felloio in Philosophy. 

Brooklyn, New York City. A.B., Cornell University, 1908. Graduate Scholar 
in Psychology, 1908-09. 

Bowerman, Helen Cox, Felloio in Archaeology. 

Point Pleasant, N. J. A.B., Mount Holyoke College, 1901 ; A.M., University 
of Rochester, 1903. Teacher of English and Latin in the High Schooi, 
Macedon, N. Y., 1903-05 ; Instructor in Latin. Western College for Women, 
Oxford, O., 1905-07 ; Associate Professor of Latin, 1907-08 ; Graduate 
Scholar in Archaeology, Bryn Mawr College, 1908-09. 

Weeks, Eula Adeline, Felloic in Mathematics. 

Butler, Mo. A.B. and B.S., University of Missouri, 1908, and A.M., 1909. 
Teacher in the High School, Rich Hill, Mo., 1901-05. 

Frehafer, Mabel Kathryn, Fellow in Physics. 

Philadelphia. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1908. Graduate Student in Physics, 
University of Wisconsin, 1908-09. 



20 

Macleod, Annie Louise, Fellow in Chemistry. 

Grace Bay, Nova Scotia. A.B., McGill University, 1904, and M.Sc, 1905. 
Demonstrator in Chemistry, McGill University, 1905-08 ; Assistant in 
Chemistry, Barnard College, 1908-09. 

Jaevis, May Mason, Fellow in Biology. 

Austin, Tex. A.B., University of Texas, 1906, and A.M., 1908. Tutor in 
Zoology, University of Texas, 1907-09. 

Massey, Isabella Mellis, British Graduate Scholar. 

London, England. Girton College, University of Cambridge, 1905-09. Med- 
iaeval and Modern Languages Tripos, Part I, Class I, 1908, Part II, Class 
II, 1909. 

May, Elsie Gebtbude, British Graduate Scholar. 

Birmingham, England. Mason College, Birmingham, 1893-97 ; St. Hugh's 
Hall, University of Oxford, 1897-99. Final Honours School of English 
Language and Literature, University of Oxford, 1899 ; M.A., University of 
Birmingham, 1901. Teacher in the Pontypool County School, 1901-03, in 
the Blackburn High School, 1903-04, in the Worcester High School, 1904-08, 
and in the Streatham Hill High School, 1908-09. 

Behbens, Mabgabete Emma Johanna, German Graduate Scholar. 

Dresden, Saxony. University of Munich, 1907-09 ; University of Jena, 1907 ; 
University of Kiel, 1909. 

Geblach, Elna, German Graduate Scholar. 

Bischofsburg, Prussia. University of Munich, 1906-09. 

Heffneb, Baebaba, German Graduate Scholar. 

Kitzingen, Bavaria. University of Wiirzburg, 1903-04, 1905-09 ; University 
of Munich, 1904-05 ; Ph.D., University of Wiirzburg, 1907. 

Schmidt, Annalise, German Graduate Scholar. 

Munich, Bavaria. University of Berlin, 1905-06, 1907-08 ; University of 
Munich, 1906-07, 1908-09. 

Akebs, Deboeah Chase, Graduate Scholar in Psychology. 

Decatur, 111. Western College, 1904-06 ; Milliken University, 1906 ; Univer- 
sity of Illinois, 1907-08 ; A.B., University of Illinois, 1908. 

Albee, Maeia Hawes Graduate Scholar in Greek. 

Killingly, Conn. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1904 ; Graduate Student in Greek 
and Archaeology, Yale University, 1904-05, and in Latin and Archaeology, 
1905-06 ; Instructor in German and History in the High School, New Haven, 
Conn., 1904-05, and in German and Latin, 1905-06, 1907-09 ; Head of the 
Classical Department and Assistant Principal, Tudor Hall, Indianapolis, 
Ind., 1906-07 ; Assistant in the Secretary's Office, Yale University, 1908-09 : 
Teacher of Latin in Miss Wright's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., 1909-10. 

Albebtson, Alice Owen English. 

Philadelphia. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1902. Teacher in the Friends' Select 
School, Philadelphia, 1902-09. 

Albebtson, Anna Maby, English. 

Magnolia, N. J. A.B., Wellesley College, 1909. 

Allison, Edith Maby, Graduate Scholar in Psychology. 

McPherson, Kan. Washburn College, 1903-04, 1905 ; McPherson College, 
1906-07 ; University of Colorado, 1907-08 ; A.B., University of Colorado, 
1908, and A.M., 1909 ; Assistant in Biology, University of Colorado, 1908-09. 

Baekeb, Geace Saeah Tayloe, Gi~aduate Scholar in Physics. 

Welland, Ontario, Canada. S.B., University of Chicago, 1907 ; Teacher in the 
University School for Girls, Chicago, 1907-09. 

Bartholomew, Maby Eleanoe, English. 

Chicago, Illinois. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1909. Teacher of English in 
the Baldwin School. Bryn Mawr, Pa., 1909-10. 



21 
Belding, Josephine, Greek. 

Hartford, Conn. A.B., Mt. Holyoke College, 1902. Secretary to the Assistant 
to the President, Bryn Mawr College, 1909-10. 

Bell, Emma Virginia, English, German, and History. 

Columbus, Miss. A.B., Mississippi Industrial Institute and College, 1909. 

Brownell, Harriet Mather, Archaeology. 

Bryn Mawr, Pa. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1896. Teacher of Latin, Greek, 
and Mathematics in the Passaic Collegiate School, Passaic, N. J., 1896-99, 
and Teacher of Greek and Latin, 1899-1905 ; Student in Latin and Archae- 
ology, University of Munich, and American School of Classical Studies, 
Rome, 1905-06 ; Teacher of Latin in the Holman School, Philadelphia, 
1906-10, and Assistant to the Principal, 1908-10. 

Brusstar, Margaret Elizabeth, Mathematics. 

Philadelphia. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1903. Teacher of Latin and Math- 
ematics, Miss Gleim's School, Pittsburgh, Pa., 1903-04 ; Teacher of Math- 
ematics in the Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., 1904-10 ; Graduate 
Scholar in Mathematics, Bryn Mawr College, 1907-08, and Graduate 
Student, 1908-10. 

Bunker, Marie, English and Psychology. 

Overbrook, Philadelphia. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1907, and A.M., 1908. 
Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1907-09. 

Burchinal, Marie Cacy, German and Teutonic Philology. 

Chestertown, Md. A.B., Washington College, 1S96, and A.M., 1899. Student, 
University of Marburg, 1903 ; Graduate Scholar in Romance Languages, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1905-06, and in Teutonic Philology, 1906-07 ; 
Graduate Student, Johns Hopkins University, 1908-09 ; Instructor in 
German, Woman's College of Baltimore, 1907-09 ; First Assistant in Ger- 
man, William Penn High School, Philadelphia, 1909-10. 

Byrne, Alice Hill, Greek and Latin. 

Lancaster, Pa. A.B., Wellesley College, 1908. Teacher of Latin and Greek 
in the Union High School, Coleraine, Pa., 1899-1900, in Mrs. Blackwood's 
School, Lancaster, 1896-99, and 1900-01, and in Miss Stahr's School, 
Lancaster, 1901-07 ; Principal of the Shippen School, Lancaster, 1908-09 ; 
Teacher of Latin in Miss Hills's School, Philadelphia, 1909-10. 

Campbell, Annie Catherine, ...English, Economics, and Philosophy. 

Mechanicsburg, Pa. A.B., Irving College, 1907. Graduate Student, Bryn 
Mawr College, 1908-09. 

Chubb, Ethel Leigh, Graduate Scholar in Latin. 

West Toronto, Canada. B.A., University of Toronto, 1906, and M.A., 1909 ; 
Lecturer in Westminster College, Toronto, 1906-09. 

Clarke, Nancy Barnum, Psychology, Geology, and Biology. 

Brevard, N. C. B.S., College for Women, Columbia, S. C, 1909. 

Coleman, Jessie Hester, Penn College Scholar. 

Oskaloosa, la. Ph.B., Penn College, 1909. 

Crawford, Emily C, Graduate Scholar in Latin. 

Montreal, Canada. A.B., McGill University, 1907. Graduate Scholar in 
Greek, Bryn Mawr College, 1907-08, and Graduate Scholar in Latin, 
1908-09. 

Davts, Margaret, Guilford College Scholar. 

Guilford College, N. C. A.B., Guilford College, 1909. 

Dillin, Margaret Sidner, Graduate Scholar in Latin. 

Radnor, Pa. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1909. 

Downing, Maud, Semitic Languages. 

Pournier, Ontario, Canada. A.B., University of Toronto, 1902. Graduate 
Student. University of Toronto, 1902-03 : Graduate Scholar in Psychology. 
Bryn Mawr College, 1903-04, and in Semitic Languages, 1904-07, and 
Reader in Semitic Languages, 1907-10 ; Honorary Fellow in Semitic Lan- 
guages, Johns Hopkins University, 1908-09. 



22 
Dudley, Louise, Graduate Scholar in English. 

Georgetown, Ky. A.B., Georgetown College, 1905. Graduate Student, Bryn 
Mawr College, 1905-06 ; Teacher In Kemper Hall, Kenosha, Wis., 1907-08 ; 
Research Student in the Bibliotheque Nationale, Paris, 1908-09 ; Univer- 
sity of Oxford, 1909. 

Eisenhower, Anna Belle, Italian. 

Norristown, Pa. A.B., Swarthmore College, 1899. A.B., Radcliffe College, 
1900, and A.M., 1907. Instructor in Classics and French in the High 
School, Norristown, 1904-06; Graduate Student, Radcliffe College, 1906- 
07 ; Head of French Department in the Friends' Central School, Phila- 
delphia, 1907-10. 

Foster, Elizabeth Andeos, Latin and Spanish. 

Sharon, Mass. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1908, and A.M., 1909. Graduate 
Scholar in Latin, Bryn Mawr College, 1908-09, and Reader in Latin, 
1909-10. 

Fostek, Frances Allen, Scholar in English. 

Providence, R. I. A.B., Brown University, 1909. 

Frank,* Grace German and French. 

Bryn Mawr, Pa. A.B., University of Chicago, 1906. Graduate Student, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1907-09. 

Furnas, Marcia Moore, Earlham College Scholar. 

Earlham, Ind. A.B., Earlham College, 1906. 

Goudge, Mabel Ensworth, Greek, Latin, and Psychology. 

Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. A.B., Dalhousie University, 1908, and A.M.. 
1909. 

Gruening, Martha, English, Philosophy, and Chemistry. 

New York City. A.B., Smith College, 1909. 

Heritage, Gertrude Langden, Italian. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1896, and A.M., 1899. Graduate Student, Bryn 
Mawr College, 1896-1901. Demonstrator in Chemistry, Bryn Mawr Col- 
lege, 1896-1910. 

HuFF,f Helen Elizabeth, Ph ysics. 

Bryn Mawr, Pa. A.B., Dickinson College, 1903, A.M., 1905, and Ph.D.. 
Bryn Mawr College, 1908. Graduate Scholar in Mathematics, Bryn Mawr 
College, 1903-04, and Graduate Student in Physics, 1907-08 : Fellow In 
Physics, Bryn Mawr College. 1904-05 ; Holder of the Mary B. Garrett 
European Fellowship and Student, University of Gottingen, 1905-06 ; 
Demonstrator in Physics, Bryn Mawr College, 1906-07 ; Teacher in the 
Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, 1907-08 ; Reader in Mathematics, Bryn 
Mawr College, Second Semester 1909-10. 

James, Eleanor, Scholar in Latin. 

Philadelphia. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1902. Teacher in the Public School, 
Milford, Del., 1902-03, and in Miss Gleim's School, Pittsburgh, Pa., 
1903-08 ; Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1908-09 ; Teacher of 
Latin in the Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., 1908-10. 

Johnson, Helen Moore, Scholar in Greek. 

Osceola, Mo. Drury College, 1903-05 ; University of Missouri, 1905-08 ; 
Tulane University, 1908-09 ; A.B., University of Missouri, 1907, and A.M., 
1908. 

Jurist, Helen Stieglitz, Scholar^ in German. 

Philadelphia. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1909. 

Keilleb, Mabel Matthewson, 

English, History of Art, and Mathematics. 
Narberth, Pa. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1908. . Private Tutor, 1908-09. 

*Mrs. Tenney Frank. 
fMrs. William Bashford Huff. 



23 

King, Marie Seward, German, Teutonic Philology, and French. 

Olivet, Mich. A.B., Olivet College, 1907, and A.M., 1908. Professor of 
German and French, Des Moines College, 1908-09. 

Lowengrund, Helen Moss, English. 

Philadelphia. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1906, and A.M., 1907. Graduate 
Scholar in Latin, Bryn Mawr College, 1906-07, and Graduate Scholar in 
English, 1907-08 ; Teacher of History in the Girls' High School, Phil- 
adelphia, 1908-10. 

Lynch, Caroline Vinia, Archceology. 

Boston, Mass. A.B., Smith College, 1894 ; A.M., Columbia University, 1908. 
American School of Classical Studies in Rome, 1904-05 ; Graduate Student, 
Radcliffe College, 1895-96, 1907-09; Columbia University, 1906-07; Dem- 
onstrator in the History of Art and Classical Archaeology, Bryn Mawr 
College, 1909-10. 

Mason, Mary Taylor, Physics, Chemistry, and Biology. 

Germantown, Philadelphia. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1892. Graduate 
Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1892-94 ; Teacher of History in Mrs. E. L. 
Head's School, 1892-93, and 1897-98; Member of School Board, 38th Sec- 
tion, Philadelphia, 1896-99 ; Member of the Board of Education for the 
38th Section, Philadelphia, 1899-1903. 

Matsuda, Michi, Scholar in English 

Tango, Japan. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1899. Teacher in Kobe College, 
Kobe, Japan, 1899-1904, and in the Doshisha, Kyoto, Japan, 1904-08 , 
Graduate Scholar in Economics, Bryn Mawr College, 1908-09. 

Morgan, Louise Baggott, Scholar in English. 

Providence, R. I. A.B. and A.M., Brown University, 1907. Graduate Scholar 
in English, Bryn Mawr College, 1907-09. 

Nichols, Helen Hawley, Scholar in Semitic Languages. 

Marietta, O. A.B., Marietta College, 1906. Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr 

College, 1906-07, and Graduate Scholar in Semitic Languages, 1907-08 ; 

Holder of the Mary E. Garrett European Fellowship, and Student, Univer- 
sity of Oxford, 1908-09. 

Noble, Edith, Latin and German. 

Centerville, S. Dak. A.B., Dakota Wesleyan University, 1902 ; Ph.B., D* 
Pauw University, 1902. Chicago University, Summer term, 1905 ; Instruc- 
tor in Latin and English in the High School, Centerville, 1902-03 ; Instruc 
tor in Latin in the High School, Mitchell, S. Dak., 1903-06 ; Instructor in 
English, Dakota Wesleyan University, 1906-07, and Professor of Latin, 
1907-09. 

Ogden, Ellen Seton, Scholar in Semitic Languages. 

Albany, N. Y. L.B., University of Nashville, 1895. Teacher of Latin and 
Mathematics in the Winthrop Model School, Peabody Normal College, 1895- 
96 ; Graduate Student in Teutonic Philology and Semitic Languages, Brvn 
Mawr College, 1896-9S ; Junior Bursar, Bryn Mawr College, 1898-1901 ; 
Student in Semitics, Columbia University, 1901-02 : Head of the English 
Department, St. Agnes School, Albany, N. Y., 1902-09, and Instructor in 
Biblical Study, 1904-09. 

Orlady, Edith Thompson, French. 

Brvn Mawr, Pa. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1902. Warden of Pembroke Hall 
West, 1903-05, and Warden of Rockefeller Hall, 1905-06 ; Graduate Stu- 
dent, Bryn Mawr College, 1903-06, 1907-09. 

Peebles, Florence, Biology. 

Bryn Mawr, Pa. A.B., Woman's College of Baltimore, 1S95, and Ph.D., 
Bryn Mawr College, 1900. Graduate Scholar in Biology, Bryn Mawr Col- 
lege, 1895-96 ; Fellow in Biology, 1896-97, and Graduate Student, 1897- 
98. 1903-04, 1906-09 ; Holder of the Mary E. Garrett European Fellowship. 
Scholar of the Woman's Table and Student in Biology, Zoological Station, 
Naples, Universities of Munich and Halle, 1898-99 ; Instructor in Biology. 
Woman's College of Baltimore, 1899-1902 ; and Associate Professor of 
Biology, 1902-06; Teacher of Science in Miss Wright's School, Bryn Mawr : 
Pa., 1906-07 ; Assistant Demonstrator in Biology, Bryn Mawr College 
1907-10 ; Student, University of Bonn, Summer, 1906. 



24 

Peelle, Mary Pearl, English 

Wilmington, O. A.B., Wilmington College, 1909. 

Pkobasco, Louise, Latin and History of Art. 

Wilmington, O. A.B., Wilmington College, 1909. 

Rambo, Eleanor Ferguson Latin. 

Philadelphia. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1908, and A.M., 1909. Graduate 
Scholar in Greek, 1908-09. 

Reynolds, Grace Potter, Physics and Chemistry. 

Stamford, Conn. A.B., Smith College, 1904 ; A.M., Columbia University, 1905. 
Graduate Student, Columbia University, 1904-05 ; Assistant in Chemistry, 
Barnard College, 1906-08 ; Fellow in Chemistry, Bryn Mawr College, 1908-09. 

Richards, Annabella Elliott, Physics and Chemistry. 

Merion, Pa. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1907. Graduate Scholar in Chemistry, 
1908-09. 

Richardson, Emily Martin, English. 

Boston, Mass. A.B., Radcliffe College, 1904. Teacher of English in the 
Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., 1907-10. 

Roe, Adah Blanche, Scholar in German. 

Omaha, Neb. A.B., Woman's College of Baltimore, 1909. 

Schenck, Eunice Morgan, Scholar in French. 

Philadelphia. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1907. Graduate Student, Bryn 
Mawr College, 1908-09. 

Shearer, Edna Aston, Philosophy. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1904. Junior Fellow in Philosophy, Bryn Mawr 
College, 1904-05 ; Holder of the President's Fellowship, and Student, Uni- 
versities of Edinburgh and Aberdeen, 1905-06 ; Fellow in Philosophy, Bryn 
Mawr College, 1906-07 ; Teacher of English in the Baldwin School, Bryn 
Mawr, Pa., 1907-10, and Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1907-08. 

Sheldon, Eleanor, Scholar in English. 

Minneapolis, Minn. A.B., University of Minnesota, 1904, and A.M., 1909. 
Assistant in English, University of Minnesota, 1905-09 ; Teacher of Inter- 
pretative Literature in the Minneapolis School of Music and Oratory, 
1906-09. 

Snyder, Elizabeth, German. 

Ardmore, Pa. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1903. Teacher of French and 
German in the Lower Merion High School, Ardmore, 1903-09 ; Teacher in 
the Girls' High School, Philadelphia, December, 1908, to February, 1909 ; 
Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1905-06. 

Spalding, Mary Caroline, Scholar in English. 

Bryn Mawr, Pa. A.B., Vassar College, 1901. Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr 
College, 1906-08, and Graduate Scholar, 1908-09 ; Teacher in the Misses 
Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, 1906-10. 

Stoddard, Virginia Tryon, Philosophy. 

Mt. Holly, N. J. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1903, and A.M., 1909. Warden 
of Radnor Hall and Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1904-10. 

Sturdevant, Winifred, German. 

Cragsmoor, N. Y. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1909. 

Van Kirk, Edith Louise, Latin and English. 

Philadelphia. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1898. Assistant in Mrs. Van Kirk's 
Training School for Kindergarten Teachers, Philadelphia, 1898-1900 ; Stu- 
dent of German, 1900-01 ; Teacher in Mrs. Van Kirk's Kindergarten Train- 
ing School, 1901-02, 1903-05 ; Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 
1902-03. 



25 

Wade, Clara Louise Whipple, Archaeology. 

Bryn Mawr, Pa. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1904. Holder of the Bryn Mawr 
European Fellowship and Scholar in Latin. Bryn Mawr College and Private 
Tutor, 1904-05 : Student, University of Munich, 1905-06 ; Graduate Student, 
Bryn Mawr College, and Private Tutor, 1906-07 ; Teacher of Latin and Ger- 
man in the Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, 1907-10. 

Weld, Jean, English, French, and Education. 

Marianna, Ark. A.B., University of Arkansas, 1907. 

Weusthoff, Anna Sophie, Teutonic Philology. 

New York City. A.B., Woman's College of Baltimore, 1906. Graduate 
Scholar in Teutonic Philology, Bryn Mawr College, 1906-07 ; Student, 
University of Berlin, 1907-09 ; Special Ottendorfer Memorial Research 
Fellow in Teutonic Philology, 1907-08, and Ottendorfer Memorial Research 
Fellow, 1908-09 ; Fellow of Woman's College of Baltimore, 1909-10. 

White, Helen Beabdsley Cromwell, Scholar in Geology. 

Bradford, Pa. A.B., Allegheny College, 1909. 



Undergraduate Students, Academic Year, 1909-10. 

Akers, Ruth Faith, Group, Latin, Italian, and Spanish, 1908-10. 

Decatur, 111. Prepared by the High School, Decatur. 

Alden, Mary Bogue, 

Group, History and Economics and Politics, 1908-10. 

Rochester, N. Y. Prepared by the High School, Rochester, and by the 
Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Alexander, Willa Bullitt, 

Group, History and Economics and Politics. 1907-10. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. Prepared by the Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Allen, Jeannette Valerie, Group, , 1907-10. 

Fort Yellowstone, Wyo. Prepared by Rosemary Hall, Greenwich, Conn. 

Allen, Mary Norton, Group, Latin and French. 1905-10. 

Worcester, Mass. Prepared by Wykeham Rise, Washington, Conn., and by 
private tuition. 

Allinson, Susanne Carey Group, Greek and Latin, 1906-10. 

Providence, R. I. Prepared by Miss Wheeler's School, Providence, and by 
the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore, Md. 

Ames, Alice, Group, , 1909-10. 

Saint Paul, Minn. Prepared by Miss Loomis's School, Saint Paul, and by 
Miss Winsor's School, Boston, Mass. 

Arthurs, Ann Catharine, . . . .' Group, , 1908-10. 

Baltimore, Md. Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. Holder 
of Bryn Mawr School Scholarship, 1908-10. 

Ashley, Mabel Pierce, 

Group, History and Economics and Politics, 1906-10. 
New York City. Prepared by the Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Ashton, Dorothy Laing, 

Group, History and Economics and Politics. 1906-10. 

Germantown, Philadelphia. Prepared by the Swarthmore Preparatory School, 
Swarthmore, Pa, Swarthmore College, 1905-06. 



26 

Athebton, Sarah Henry, Group, — , 1909-10. 

Wilkes Barre, Pa. Prepared by the Wilkes Barre Institute. 

Babcock, Ruth, Group, Latin and French, 1906-10. 

Fall River, Mass. Prepared by the B. M. C. Durfee High School, Fall River, 
and by the Balliol School, Utica, N. T. 

Baechle, Cecelia Irene, Group, , 1909-10. 

Philadelphia. Prepared bv Notre Dame Academy, Hamilton, O., and by 
the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of City Scholarship, 1909-10. 

Baldwin, Dorothea de Forest, Group, , 1909-10. 

New York City. Prepared by Rye Seminary, Rye, N. Y., by Mrs. Merrill's 
School for Girls, Oaksmere, N. Y., and by private tuition. 

Barber, Helen Dorothy, Group, , 1908-10. 

Portland, Ore. Prepared by the Portland Academy. 

Barnes, Aida Cromwell, Group, , 1909-10. 

New York City. Prepared by St. Agatha's School, New York City. 

Barrett, Helen Juanita, Group, , 1909-10. 

Glenolden, Pa. Prepared by the Friends' Central School, Philadelphia. 

Bartholomew, Grace, Group, , 1909-10. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of 
Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholarship, 1909-10. 

Bartlett, Marguerite Gold, Group, , 1909-10. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the High School, Chester, Pa., and by the Girls' 
High School, Philadelphia. 

Beardwood, Jane, Group, German and French, 1908-10. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. 

Beliekowsky, Sadie Group, Greek and Latin, 1908-10. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder 
of Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholarship, 1908-10. 

Biddle, Maria Geoegina, 

Group, History and Economics and Politics, 1905-06, 1907-10. 
Philadelphia. Prepared by the Agnes Irwin School, Philadelphia. 

Bixler, Irma Bertha, 

Group, History and Economics and Politics, 1906-10. 

Pittsburgh, Pa. Prepared by the Pennsylvania College for Women and by 
the Misses Kirk's School, Rosemont, Pa. 

Blaine, Margaeet Geaham, G\~oup, , 1909-10. 

Taunton, Mass. Prepared by the High School, Taunton, and by Miss May's 
School, Boston, Mass. 

Blake, Dorothy Tueneb, Group, , 1909-10. 

Boston, Mass. Prepared by Miss Haskell and Miss Dean's School, Boston. 
Holder of the First Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholarship for the New 
England States, 1909-10. 

Bley, Helen Mullee, Group, Greek and Latin, 1906-10. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder 
of the First (equal) Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholarship for Pennsyl- 
vania and the Southern States, 1906-07, and of Trustees' Philadelphia 
Girls' High School Scholarship, 1906-10 ; Holder of the Brooke Hall 
Memorial Scholarship, 1909-10. 

Boggs, Anita Uaeda, Group, German and Spanish, 1906-10. 

Harrisburg. Pa. Prepared by the Misses Sergeant and Miss Bent's School, 
Harrisburg. 



27 

Bontecou, Eleanor, Group, , 1909-10. 

Orange, N. J. Prepared by Miss Beard's School, Orange. Holder of First 
Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholarship for New York, New Jersey, and 
Delaware, 1908-09. 

Branch, Zelda Madison, . . . .Group, Philosophy and Physics, 1909-10. 

Kansas City, Mo. University of Texas, First Semester, 1906-07 ; University 
of Nebraska, 1907-09. 

Branham, Grace Bagnall, Group, Greelc and Latin, 1906-10. 

Baltimore, Md. Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. 

Brockstedt, Clarissa Beatrice, Group, , 1909-10. 

St. Louis, Mo. Prepared by the Yeatman High School, St. Louis. 

Brown, Margaret Eaton, Group, , 1909-10. 

Pittsburgh, Pa. Prepared by Miss Gleim's School, Pittsburgh. 

Brown, Mary Wtlmarth, Group, , 1908-10. 

Chicago, 111. Prepared by the University High School, Chicago. 
Buchanan, Isabel, Group, , 1908, 1908-10. 

Trenton, N. J. Prepared by the Misses Shipley's School and by Miss Clara 
L. W. Wade and by the Misses Kirk's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Buchanan, Jessie Crow, Group, , 1909-10. 

Trenton, N. J. Prepared by the State Model School, Trenton. 

Buster, Frances Estelle, Hearer in Latin, English and Philosophy. 

Pilot Point. Tex. Franklin College, Pilot Point, 1890-1900 ; North Texas 
Normal College, Denton, Tex., 1900-01. 

Byrne, Laura Laurenson, Group, , 1908-10. 

Ellicott City, Md. Prepared by St. Timothy's School, Catonsville, Md. 

Cabot, Ruth, Group, Greek and Latin, 1906-10. 

Milton, Mass. Prepared by the Milton Academy, Milton. 

Cam, Norah, Group, Mathematics and Physics, 1908-10. 

Bishop's Stortford, England. Prepared by private tuition. Holder of Maria 
Hopper Scholarship, 1909-10. 

Canan, Virginia Custer, Group, Latin and English, 1907-10. 

Altoona, Pa. Prepared by the Birmingham High School, Birmingham, Pa. 

Carey, Frances King, Group, Greelc and Latin, 1907-10. 

Baltimore, Md. Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore, and by the 
Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Caskey, Emily Edna, Group, Latin and German, 1907-10. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder 
of City Scholarship. 1907-10. 

Chamberlain, Gladys Elizabeth, Group, Latin and German, 1908-10. 

Portland, Me. Prepared by the Waynflete School, Portland. Holder of 
Second Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholarship for the New England States, 
1908-09. 

Chambers, Agnes, 

Group, History and Economics and Politics, 1908-10. 
Baltimore, Md. Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. 
Chambers, Kate Ethei Group. German and French, 1907-10. 

Adana, Turkey. Prepared by Miss Irwin's School, Philadelphia, and by 
private tuition. 

Chase, Carmelita Group. , 190S-10. 

Omaha, Neb. Prepared by Brownell Hall, Omaha. 



28 

Chase, Dorothy, Group, Latin and Mathematics, 1908-10. 

Chicago, III. Prepared by the Kirkland School, Chicago, and by the Lake- 
view High School, Chicago. 

Chase, Ethel Bied, 

Group, Economics and Politics and Philosophy, 1906-10. 
Washington, D. C. Prepared by the Friends' School, Washington. 

Chickebing, Julia, 

Group, History and Economics and Politics, 1907-10. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder 
of City Scholarship, 1907-10. 

Child, Dorothy Martin Group, Latin and French, 1905-10. 

Germantown, Philadelphia. Prepared by the Agnes Irwin School, Phila- 
delphia. Holder of Foundation Scholarship, 1905-09. 

Claflin, Charlotte Isabel, Group, Greek and English, 1907-10. 

Cambridge, Mass. Prepared by the Cambridge Latin School, Cambridge. 
Holder of the Second Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholarship for the New 
England States, 1907-08. 

Clarke, Pauline Ida, Group, , 1908-10. 

New York City. Prepared by the Balliol School, Utica, N. Y. Holder of 
the James E. Rhoads' Sophomore Scholarship, 1909-10. 

Clifton, Jessie Williams, Group, Greek and Latin, 1907-10. 

Philadelphia. Prepared bv the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder 
of City Scholarship, 1907-10. 

Clinton, Marion Dorothea, Group, Greek and Latin, 1909-10. 

Portland, Ore. Prepared by the Lincoln High School, Portland, and by 
Portland Academy. Holder of the First Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholar- 
ship for the Western States, 1909-10. 

Cockbell, Josephine Eleanor, Group, , 1909-10. 

Dallas, Tex. Prepared by St. Mary's College, Dallas, and by the Misses 
Kirk's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Coffin, Dorothy, Group, Latin and French, 1907-10. 

Winnetka, 111. Prepared by the Girton School, Winnetka. 

Cole, Dorothea, 

Group, History and Economics and Politics, 1906-10. 
Chester, 111. Prepared by the Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 
Collins, Ruth, Group, English and Philosophy, 1906-10. 

Pitman Grove, N. J. Prepared by the Drexel Institute, Philadelphia, and 
by private tuition. Holder of Anna M. Powers Memorial Scholarship, 
1909-10. 

Colter, Helen Margaret Group, , 1908-10. 

Cincinnati, O. Prepared by the Bartholomew-Clifton School, Cincinnati. 
Holder of First Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholarship for the Western 
States, 1908-09. 

Cooper, Isabel Ruth, Group, , 1909-10. 

New York City. Prepared by the Le Baron Drumm School, New York City, 
and by the Gordon-Winston School, New York City. 

Cobnell, Esther Stuart, 

Group, History and Economics and Politics, 1907-10. 
Coraopolis, Pa. University of Chicago, 1906-07. 

Corning, Zelma Maby, Group, , 1909-10. 

New York City. Prepared by the Veltin School, New York City. 



29 

Corwin, Margaret Tbumbuli Group, , 1908-10. 

New Haven, Conn. Prepared by the High School, New Haven. 

Cox, Caroline Bessie, Group, Latin and English, 1906-10. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by Miss Keyser's School, Philadelphia. 

Crane, Marion Delia, Group, English and Philosophy, 1907-10. 

Providence, R. I. Prepared by the High School, Abington, Mass., and by 
private tuition. Holder of the .Tames E. Rhoads Sophomore Scholarship, 
1908-09 ; Holder of the James B. Rhoads Junior Scholarship, 1909-10. 

Crenshaw, Fanny Graves, Group. , 1908-10. 

Richmond, Va. Prepared by Miss Ellett's School, Richmond. 

Crocker, Clara Ballard, Group, , 1909-10. 

Boston, Mass. Prepared by Miss Winsor's School, Boston. 

Daddow, Virginia, Group, , 1909-10. 

St. Clair, Pa. Prepared by the High School, Pottsville, Pa., and by the 
Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Darkow, Angela Charlotte. Group, Greek and Latin, 1907-10. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder 
of First Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholarship for Pennsylvania and the 
Southern States, 1907-08, and of Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School 
Scholarship, 1907-10 ; Holder of the Maria Hopper Sophomore Scholarship. 
1908-09. 

Davis, Dorothy Livingston, Group, , 1909-10. 

New York City. Prepared by the Le Baron Drumm School, New York City, 
and by the Gordon-Winston School, New York City. 

Day, Rosalie, .-. Group, , 1908-10. 

Catskill, N. Y. Prepared by Wykeham Rise, Washington, Conn. 

De Angelis, Annina, Group, German and French, 1906-10. 

Utica, N. Y. Prepared by the Balliol School, TJtica. 

Deems, Elsie, Group, English and German, 1906-10. 

Hornell, N. Y. Prepared by the High School, Hornellsville, and by the 
Balliol School, Utica, N. Y. 

Delano, Catharine, Group, English and Philosophy, 1907-10. 

Chicago, 111. Prepared by the Francis W. Parker School, Chicago, and by 
Rosemary Hall, Greenwich, Conn. 

Deming, Agatha, Group, , 1909-10. 

New York City. Prepared by the Veltin School, New York City. 

Deming, Constance, 

Group, History and Economics and Politics, 1906-10. 

New York City. Prepared by the Veltin School, New York City, and by 
the Balliol School, TJtica, N. Y. 

Denison. Elsa, Group, History and Economics and Politics, 1906-10. 

Denver, Colo. Prepared by the Manual Training High School, Denver, and 
by the Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Depew, Christine Ellen Group, . 1907-10. 

Delano, Pa. Prepared by the Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., and 
by private tuition. 

Dessau, Florence Maud, Group, , 1909-10 

New York City. Prepared by the Le Baron Drumm School, New York City. 
and by the Gordon-Winston School. New York City. Holder of the First 
Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholarship for New York, New Jersey and Dela- 
ware, 1909-10. 



30 

Dodd, Hannah Maria, Group, Latin and French, 1907-10. 

Midway, Del. Prepared by the Misses Hebb's School, Wilmington, Del. 

Doheny, Mary Elizabeth, Group, Latin and French, 1906-10. 

Haverford, Pa. Prepared by the Lower Merion High School, Ardmore. Pa. 

Doolittle, Margaret , Group, Greek and Latin, 1907-10. 

Mt. Vernon, N. Y. Prepared by the Lockwood Collegiate Institute, Heath- 
cote Hall, Scarsdale, N. Y. 

Dulles, Margaret Josephine, Group, , 1907-08, 1909-10. 

Auburn, N. Y. Prepared by the High School, Auburn, and by private tuition. 

Edgerton, Gladys, Group, - -, 1908-10. 

New York City. Prepared by Mrs. Merrill's School for Girls, Oaksmere, N. Y. 

Egan, May Margaret, . . Group, French and Spanish, 1905-07, 1909-10. 

Amboy, 111. Prepared by Miss Hartridge's School, Savannah, Ga., and by 
Rosemary Hall, Greenwich, Conn. 

Eichberg, Alice, Group, Latin and English, 1907-10. 

Cincinnati, O. Prepared by the Bartholomew-Clifton School, Cincinnati. 
Holder of the First Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholarship for the Western 
States, 1907-08. 

Elcock, Gertrude Marie, Group, , 1908-10. 

Glenside, Pa. Prepared by the Agnes Irwin School, Philadelphia. Holder of 
Maria Hopper Scholarship, 1909-10. 

Elmer, Eleanor Nixon, Group, , 1909-10. 

Winnetka, 111. Prepared by the Girton School, Winnetka, and by Rosemary 
Hall, Greenwich, Conn. 

Emerson, Helen, Group, Mathematics and Physics, 1907-10. 

Providence, R. I. Prepared by the Lincoln School, Providence. Holder of 
the First Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholarship for the New England 
States, 1907-08. 

Evans, Helen Ludington, Group, , 1909-10. 

Baltimore, Md. Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. 

Evans, Katherine Mary, . . . Group, Chemistry and Biology, 1906-10. 
Nicholasville, Ky. Prepared by the Bartholomew-Clifton School, Cincinnati, O. 

Fabian, Elizabeth Storrs,, Group, — , 1909-10. 

Evanston, 111. Prepared by the High School, Evanston. 

Fabian, Margaret, Group, French and , 1908-10. 

Evanston, 111. Prepared by the Evanston Township High School. North- 
western University, 1906-07. 

Falk, Zip Solomons, 

Group, Economics and Politics and Philosophy, 1906-10. 

Savannah, Ga. Prepared by Memminger Normal School, Charleston, and 
by private tuition. 

Faries, Elizabeth, Group, ■ — , 1908-10. 

Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia. Prepared by the Wissahickon Heights School, 
Chestnut Hill. 

Faulkner, Ellen, Group, , 1909-10. 

Keene, N. IT. Prepared by the High School, Keene, by the MacDuffie School, 
Springfield, Mass., and by private tuition. 

Fendall, Mary Gertrude, Group, , 1908-10. 

Baltimore, Md. Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. 



31 

Field, Aristine, Group, Greek and Latin, 1907-10. 

Lincoln Park, N. Y. Prepared by the High School, Rochester, N. Y., and by 
the Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Fokster, Emma, Group, Latin and German, 1907-10. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder 
of City Scholarship, 1907-10, and Holder of Anna M. Powers Memorial 
Scholarship, 1909-10. 

Francis, Clara Jane, 

Group, History and Economics and Politics, 1908-10. 
Martins Ferry, O. Prepared by the High School, Martins Ferry. 

Friend, Margaret Alice, 

Group, Economics and Politics and Philosophy, 1907-10 

Milwaukee, Wis. Prepared by Milwaukee-Downer College. 

Funkhouser, Elsie Lush, Group, Greek and Latin, 1907-10. 

Lincoln, Neb. University of Nebraska, 1906-07. 

Garrigues, Margaret Ashmead, 

Group, History and Economics and Politics, 1908-10. 
Haverford, Pa. Prepared by the Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Gayler, Ruth Hamilton, Group, Greek and Latin, 1907-10. 

Stamford, N. Y. Prepared by the High School, Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

George, Mary Ruth Ethelwyn, 

Hearer in English, German, Spanish, Italian, Economics and 

Politics, Philosophy and Art, 1906-10. 

Allegheny, Pa. Prepared by the High School, Allegheny, and by the Pre- 
paratory School of the Pennsylvania College for Women. 

Gibson, Louise Isabel, Group, , 1909-10. 

Birmingham, Ala. Prepared by the Margaret Allen School, Birmingham. 

Glenn, Florence Martha, Group, Latin and German, 1908-10. 

Johnstown, Pa. Prepared by the High School, Johnstown. 

Goldsmith, Cecile Adler, Group, , 1909-10. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of 
City Scholarship, 1909-10. 

Goodale, Catharine Warren, 

Group, History and Economics and Politics, 1905-08, 1909, 1909-10. 
Waialua, Oahu, H. I. Prepared by Oahu College, Honolulu, H. I. 

Gray, Elizabeth Lawrence, 

Hearer oy Courtesy in English, Philosophy and Art, 1908-09, 1910. 

Lowell, Mass. Assistant Director of Athletics and Gymnastics, Bryn Mawr 
College, 1908-10. 

Griscom, Ethel Lydia, Group, , 1909, 1909-10. 

Bryn Mawr, Pa. Prepared by Tudor Hall School, Forest Hill, London, Eng- 
land, and by Miss Mary Jeffers and Miss Florence Peebles, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Guckenheimer, Adele, Group, , 1908-10. 

Pittsburgh, Pa. Prepared by Miss Gleim's School, Pittsburgh. 

Haines, Isabelle Pennock, Group, , 1909-10. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by Wykeham Rise, Washington, Conn., and by private 
tuition. 

Haines, Julia Loring, 

Group, History and Economics and Politics, 1908-10. 

Indianapolis, Ind. Prepared by the Shortrldge High School, Indianapolis, 

by the Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., and by private tuition. 



32 

Halpen, Sara Marion Group, , 1909-10. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of 
City Scholarship, 1909-10. 

Hamilton, Amy Gordon, Group, , 1909-10. 

Tenafly, N. J. Prepared by the Dwight School, Englewood, N. J. 

Hammer, Christine Potts, 

Group, History and Economics and Politics, 1908-10. 
Pottstown, Pa. Prepared by Dana Hall, Wellesley, Mass. 

Hartshorne, Anna, Group, Latin and German, 1908-10. 

Brighton. Md. Prepared by the Westtown Boarding School, Westtown, Pa. 
Foundation Scholar, 1908-10. 

Hartwig, Anna L., Hearer by Courtesy in French, 1909-10. 

Philadelphia. Trained Nurse, Bryn Mawr College, 1908-10. 

Hathaway, Sylvia, Group, , 1909-10. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Friends' School, Germantown, Philadelphia, 
by Miss Low's School, Stamford, Conn., and by the Agnes Irwin School, 
Philadelphia. 

Haydock, Louisa Low, Group, , 1909-10. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Friends' School, Germantown, Philadelphia, 
by the Agnes Irwin School, Philadelphia, and by the Low-Heywood School, 
Stamford, Conn. 

Healy, Josephine, 

Group, History and Economics and Politics, 1906-10. 
Pottstown, Pa. Prepared by the Misses Kirk's School, Rosemont, Pa. 

Hearne, Alice, Group, , 1909-10. 

Wayne, Pa. Prepared by the Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Hearne, Frances Hale, 

Group, Latin and Italian and Spanish, 1906-10. 

Wayne, Pa. Prepared by the Radnor High School, Wayne, by the Misses 
Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., and by private tuition. 

Hedges, Miriam Margaret, 

Group, History and Economics and Politics, 1906-10. 

Galveston, lex. Prepared by the Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Heffern, Anna Constance, Group, •, 1908-10. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of 
Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholarship, 1908-10. 

Henderson, Helen Hamilton Leipeb, 

Group, History and Economics and Politics, 1907-10. 
Cumberland, Md. Prepared by the Misses Kirk's School, Rosemont, Pa. 

Henderson, Hildegarde Gertrude, Group, - , 1909-10. 

Cambridge, Mass. Prepared by the Berkeley Street School, Cambridge, and 
the Misses Smith's School, Cambridge. 

Henderson, Louisa, Group, , 1909-10. 

Cumberland, Md. Prepared by Allegheny County Academy, Cumberland, Md. 

Hibben, Elizabeth Grier, ...... .Group, Latm and German, 1906-10. 

Princeton, N. J. Prepared by the Princeton School, Princeton. 

Higginson, Mary Hamot, 

Group, History and Economics and Politics, 1907-10. 
Fall River, Mass. Prepared by the Balliol School, Utica, N. Y. 



33 

Hinrichs, Gertrude Mary, Group, , 1909-10. 

Glen Ridge, N. J. Prepared by the High School, Glen Ridge, and by private 
tuition. 

Hobabt, Margaret Jefferys, Group, Greek and Latin, 1907-10. 

New York City. Prepared by the Brearley School, New York City. Holder 
of the First Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholarship for New York, New 
Jersey and Delaware, 1907-08. 

Hoffman, Margery Elizabeth, 

Group, History and Economics and Politics, 1907-10. 

Portland, Ore. Prepared by Miss Ingol's School, Cambridge, Mass., by the 
Lee School, Cambridge, and by private tuition. 

Holmes, Maud Wislizenus, Group, , 1909-10. 

St. Louis, Mo. Prepared by Mary Institute, St. Louis. Holder of the Sec- 
ond Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholarship for the Western States, 1909-10. 

Hoshino, Ai, Group, Chemistry and Biology, 1908-10. 

Tokio, Japan. Prepared by Miss Tsuda's School, Tokio, by the Stevens School, 
Germantown, Pa., and by the Misses Kirk's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Houghtellng, Leila, 

Group, History and Economics and Politics, 1907-10. 

Winnetka, 111. Prepared by the Girton School, Winnetka, and by Miss Spence's 
School, New York City. 

Houston, Julia Taylor, Group, English and French, 1908-10. 

Pine Bluff, Ark. Prepared by the High School, Pine Bluff, by Elizabeth Col- 
lege, Charlotte, N. C, and by private tuition. 

Howell, Janet Tucker, ..Group, Mathematics and Physics, 1906-10. 

Baltimore, Md. Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. Holder of 
Bryn Mawr School Scholarship, 1906-08. 

Howson, Beatrice, Group, , 1908-10. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Friends' Central School, Philadelphia. - 

Howson, Emily Elizabeth, ....Group, Physics and Biology, 1906-10. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Friends' Central School, Philadelphia, and 
by private tuition. 

Hume, Mary, Group, , 1908-10. 

Des Moines, la. Prepared by the High School, West Des Moines, by Dea 
Moines College, by the Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., and by 
private tuition. 

Hunter, Frances, Group, , 1908-10. 

Saugerties, N. Y. Prepared by the High School, Saugerties, and by the Misses 
Graham's School, New York City. 

Irey, Helen Chrisman, .... Group, Latin and Mathematics, 1906-10. 

West Chester, Pa. Prepared by the Collegiate Institute for Girls, Philadel- 
phia, and by the Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Irish, Florence Catherine, Group, , 1909-10. 

Norristown, Pa. Prepared by Miss Roney's School, Bala, Pa. 

Irvine, Mary Agnes, Group, Mathematics and Physics, 1906-10. 

Pittsburgh, Pa. Prepared by Miss Glelm's School, Pittsburgh. 

Irwin, Agnes Miller, Group, Latin and German, 1906-10. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder 

of Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholarship, 1906-10. 

Irwin, Marian Iki, Group, , 1909-10. 

Tokio, Japan. Prepared by the Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

3 



34 

James, Lillie, Group, Latin and English, 1906-10. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder 
of City Scholarship, 1906-10. 

Johnston, Elizabeth Henrietta, 

Group, Mathematics and , 1908-10. 

Carlisle, Pa. Prepared by the High School, East Orange, N. J., and by 
Metzger College, Carlisle. 

Jones, Gladys, Group, , 1908-10. 

Hazleton, Pa. Prepared by the Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Justice, Caroline I/etchwokth 

Group, Mathematics and Physics, 1907-10. 

Narberth, Pa. Prepared by the Lower Merion High School, Ardmore, Pa. 

Holder of the Trustees' Lower Merion High School Scholarship, 1907-10. 

Keillee, Violet Hannah, Group, Chemistry and Biology, 1906-10. 

Narberth, Pa. Prepared by the Central High School, Washington, O. C, by 
the Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., and by Miss Sayward's School, 
Overbrook, Philadelphia. 

Kelley, Katharine Mildred, .... Group, Latin and German, 1907-10. 

Cleveland, O. Prepared by the Central High School, Cleveland. Western 
Reserve University, 1905-07. 

Kelly, Olga Elizabeth Bredow, Group, , 1909-10. 

Baltimore, Md. Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. 

Kenison, Lucie, Group, French and Spanish, 1908-10. 

Galveston, Tex. Prepared by the Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Kennedy, Laura Elizabeth, Group, , 1909-10. 

Saratoga Springs, N. Y. Prepared by the High School, Saratoga Springs. 

Kerr, Jeanne Benedict, 

Group, History and Economics and Politics, 1906-10. 
New York City. Prepared by Miss Spence's School, New York City. 

Kirk, Marion Shelmire, Group, Latm and German, 1906-08. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of 
City Scholarship, 1906-10 ; Holder of Maria Hopper Scholarship, 1907-08. 

Ladd, Mary Ethel, Group, Greek and Latin, 1906-10. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of 
City Scholarship, 1906-10. Holder of the Mary E. Stevens Scholarship, 
1908-09. 

Lamb, Louise Emerson, Group, French and , 1908-10. 

Baltimore, Md. Prepared by Ecole Vinet, Lausanne, Switzerland, and by the 
Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. 

Lamberton, Anne, Group, , 1909-10. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Gordon School, Philadelphia. 

Lautz, Helen Sophia, Group, Latin and Italian and Spanish, 1908-10. 

Pekin, 111. Prepared by the High School, Pekin, and by the Misses Shipley's 
School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Layton, Margaret Hammond, ...Group, Latin and German, 1907-10. 

Monroe, La. Prepared by the Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., and 
by private study. 

Lee, Helen, Group, , 1909-10. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by Milwaukee-Downer College. 



35 

Lehman, Lois Partridce, Group, , 1907-08, 1909, 1909-10. 

Redlands, Cal. Prepared by the High School, Redlands. Smith College, 1906- 
07. 

Leopold, Florence Stein, 

Group, History and Economics and Politics, 1908-10. 
Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. 

Levy, Edna Sophie, Group, , 1909-10. 

Pittsburgh, Pa. Prepared by the High School, Pittsburgh. 

Lewis, Rebecca Renshaw, Group, Latin and Spanish, 1908-10. 

Baltimore, Md. Prepared by the Brvn Mawr School, Baltimore. Holder of 
Bryn Mawr School Scholarship, 1908-10. 

Liddell, Katharine FoPvBes, Group, Latin and English, 1906-10. 

Charlotte, N. C. Prepared by the Calhoun-Chamberlain School, Montgomery, 
Ala. Holder of James E. Rhoads Junior Scholarship, 1908-09 ; Holder of 
Maria Hopper Scholarship, 1909-10. 

Light, Barbara Joyce, Group, , 1909-10. 

Lebanon, Pa. Prepared by the Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., and 
by Miss Mary Jeffers and Miss Florence Peebles, Bryn Mawr. 

Livingston, Frances Elizabeth, Group, , 1910. 

Lawrence, Long Island, N. Y. Prepared by St. Mary's Hall, Burlington, N. J., 
and by Miss Mary Jeffers and Miss Florence Peebles, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Llewellyn, Gertrude Group, , 1908-10. 

Evanston, 111. Prepared by the Girton School, Winnetka, 111., and by the 
Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Loeb, Florence May, Group, German and French, 1908-10. 

Paducah, Ky. Prepared by the Girls' Classical School, Indianapolis, and by 
Miss Brown's Classical School for Girls, Boston, Mass. 

Longwell, Katherine Cavenagh, . . Group, Greek and Latin, 1908-10. 

Pittsburgh, Pa. Prepared by Frankby House School, Hoylake, England, and 
by Miss Gleim's School, Pittsburgh. 

Lucas, Leonora, Group, French and Italian, 1908-10. 

Evanston, 111. Prepared by the Academy of the University of Illinois. Uni- 
versity of Illinois, 1905-06. 

Mabon, Rosa Vedder Group, , 1909-10. 

New York City. Prepared by St. Agnes School, Albany, N. Y., and by the 
Brearley School, New York City. 

Magoffin, Henrietta Floyd Group, Latin and French, 1907-10. 

Mercer, Pa. Prepared by the High School, and by the Academy, Mercer. 

Magutre, Elizabeth Yarnall, Group, , 1909-10. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Holman School, Philadelphia, and by the 
Agnes Irwin School, Philadelphia. 

Manchester, Ruth Coe, Group, Greek and , 1909-10. 

Winsted, Conn. Prepared by the Gilbert School, Winsted, Conn. Holder of 
the Second Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholarship for the New England 
States, 1909-10. 

Marsh, Helen Elizabeth, 

Group, History and Economics and Politics, 1908-10. 

Brooklyn, New York City. Prepared by the Friends' Seminary, New York City, 
and by private tuition. 

Marshall, Rachel, 

Group, History and Economics and Politics, 190S-10. 
Lincoln, Kan. Kansas State University, 1906-08. 



36 

Mason, Rosalind Fay, Group, English and French, 1907-10. 

Chicago, 111. Prepared by the University School for Girls, Chicago. 

Matlack, Louise, Group, , 1909-10. 

Wilkes Barre, Pa. Prepared by the Wilkes Barre Institute and by Rosemary 
Hall, Greenwich, Conn. 

McKelvey, Mary Alice, Group, , 1908-10. 

New York City. Prepared by the Brearley School, New York City. 

Mead, Marion Loraine, Group, , 1908-10. 

Evanston, HI. Prepared by the Girton School, Winnetka, 111., and by the 
Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Mearkle, Edith, Group, French and Italian and Spanish, 1908-10. 

Minneapolis, Minn. Prepared by the Central High School, Minneapolis. 

Mellen, Marguerite, Group, , 1909-10. 

Chicago, 111. Prepared by the University School for Girls, Chicago, and by 
Rosemary Hall, Greenwich, Conn. 

Menendez, Lucinda Poillon, Group, , 1909-10. 

Greenwich, Conn. Prepared by Rosemary Hall, Greenwich, Conn. 

Merrill, Louise Edgerton, . . Group, Latin and Mathematics, 1906-10. 

New Rochelle, N. Y. Prepared by Miss Cooper's School, Albany, N. Y., by 
the Brearley School, New York City, and by private tuition. 

Meyer, Else Group, , 1908-10. 

New Orleans, La. Prepared by private tuition. 

Michael, Jeanette, Group, , 1909-10. 

Buffalo, N. Y. Prepared by St. Margaret's School, Buffalo, and by Rosemary 
Hall, Greenwich, Conn. 

Miller, Laura Isabelle, 

Group, History and Economics and Politics, 1907-10. 

Milwaukee, Wis. Prepared by Milwaukee-Downer College, and by the Bald- 
win School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Miller, Ramona Beatrice, Group, , 1909-10. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of 
the First Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholarship for Pennsylvania and the 
Southern States, and of the Simon Muhr Scholarship, 1909-10. 

Mitchell, Pearl Boring, Group, English and Philosophy, 1908-10. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of 
the Minnie Murdoch Kendrick Scholarship, 1908-10. 

Mock, Eurana Dinkey, 

Group, History and Economics and Politics, 1908, 1908-10. 

St. Davids, Pa. Prepared by Brantwood Hall, Lawrence Park, N. Y., and by 
the Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Montgomery, Hazel Margaret Group, •, 1908-10. 

New York City. Prepared by the Misses Kirk's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., by 
the Brearley School, New York City, and by private tuition. 

Moore, Elsie, Group, Mathematics and Geology, 1907-10. 

Danville, Pa. Prepared by the High School, Danville, and by private tuition. 

Morgan, Marguerite Broades, 

Group, Latin and German, 1905-08, 1909, 1909-10. 
Ardmore, Pa. Prepared by the Lower Merion High School, Ardmore. 

Morgan, Mary Alden, Group, , 1908-10. 

Chicago, 111. Prepared by the University High School, Chicago, and by 
private tuition. 



37 

Morrow, Agnes Elizabeth Group, , 1908-10. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. 

Munroe, Margaret Adelaide, Group, , 1909-10. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of 
the L. C. B. Saul Memorial Scholarship and Holder of City Scholarship, 
1909-10. 

Murphy, Edith Hamilton, Group, Latin and English, 1906-10. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia, and by 
Miss Hills's School for Girls, Philadelphia. 

Murray, Agnes Laurence, Group, French and Spanish, 1907-10. 

Delhi, N. Y. Prepared by St. Agnes School, Albany, N. Y. Holder of Maria 
Hopper Sophomore Scholarship, 1908-09 ; Holder of Mary E. Stevens Junior 
Scholarship, 1909-10. 

Murray, Clara Hunsicker, Group, Mathematics and , 1909-10. 

Baltimore, Md. Prepared by the Brvn Mawr School. Baltimore. Holder of 
Special Scholarship, 1909-10. 

Murray, Majorie Frances, Group, , 1909-10. 

Delhi, N. Y. Prepared by Delaware Academy, Delhi, and by St. Agnes School, 
Albany, N. Y. 

Nagel, Caroline Louise, 

Hearer in English, German, French and Philosophy, 1909-10. 

Meriden, Conn. Prepared by Miss Osborn's School, Meriden, Conn. ; Ecole 
Chevalier, Vevey, Switzerland, and by private tuition. 

Nash, Caroline Ryan, Group, , 1909-10. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the National Cathedral School, Washington, D. C. 

Nathans, Beatrice Cornelia, Group, , 1909-10. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by Miss Keyser's School, Philadelphia, by Miss 
Gordon's School, Philadelphia, and by private tuition. 

Nearing, Dorothy, Group, Mathematics and Chemistry, 1906-10. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of 
. City Scholarship, 1906-10. 

O'Connor, Agnes, Group. , 1909-10. 

Flushing. N. Y. Prepared by the High School, Flushing. 

Owen, Clara Marie, Group, , 1909-10. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. 

Page, Katharine Alice, Group, , 1909-10. 

New York City. Prepared by the Dwight School, Englewood, N. J. 

Parker, Alpine Bodine, 

Group, History and Economics and Politics, 1907-10. 

Baltimore, Md. Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. Holder of 
Foundation Scholarship, 1907-10. 

Parkhurst, Helen Huss, Group, Latin and English, 1907-10. 

Englewood, N. J. Prepared by the Dwight School, Englewood. 

Patterson, Alice Dudley Group, , 1909-10. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Wissahickon Heights School, Chestnut Hill. 
Philadelphia, and by the Agnes Irwin School, Philadelphia. Holder of the 
Second Brvn Mawr Matriculation Scholarship for Pennsylvania and the 
Southern States, 1909-10. 

Peck, Margaret Wtnthrop Group, Greek and Latin, 190S-10. 

Bristol, Conn. Prepared by the High School, Bristol, and by the Baldwin 
School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 



38 

Peibce, Mary, Group, , 1908-10. 

Haverford, Pa. Prepared by the Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., and by 
the Agnes Irwin School, Philadelphia. 

Perkins, Lucile, Group, , 1909-10. 

Dallas, Tex. Prepared by St. Mary's College. Dallas, by Madame Yeatman, 
Paris, France ; by the Misses Kirk's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., and by private 
tuition. 

Pinney, Elizabeth, Group, , 1908-10. 

New Brighton, Staten Island. Prepared by the Brearley School, New York 
City. 

Pinney, Marie, Group, , 1909-10. 

Willmar, Minn. Prepared by Stanley Hall, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Pond, Clara Penniman, Group, — -, 1909-10. 

State College, Pa. Pennsylvania State College, 1907-09. 

Pond, Mlllicent, Group, Mathematics and Chemistry, 1907-10. 

State College, Pa. Prepared by private tuition. Pennsylvania State College, 
1905-07. 

Porter, Frances, Group, Physics and Biology, 1907-10. 

Hubbard Woods, 111. Prepared by the Girton School, Winnetka, 111. 

Pottberg, Ellen Esther, Group, Physics and OJiemistry, 1907-10. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of 
Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholarship, 1907-10. 

Potter, Edna Margaret, Group, , 1909-10. 

Detroit, Mich. Prepared by the Eastern High School, Detroit, and by the 
Mt. Ida School for Girls, Newton, Miss. 

Powell, Edith Williams, Group, , 1902-05, 1909-10. 

Bryn Mawr, Pa. Prepared by the Lower Merion High School, Ardmore, Pa., 
and by private tuition. 

Prussing, Margaret Alice, ... .Group, English and German, 1907-10. 

Chicago, 111. Prepared by the Chicago Latin School, Chicago. 

Putnam, May, . .Group, History and Economics and Politics, 1905-10. 

New York City. Prepared by the Brearley School, New York City. 

Tyfer,* Isabella May, 

Group, German and French, 1904-06, 1908, 19OS-10. 
Norristown, Pa. Prepared by the Berlitz School and by private tuition. 

Ramsey, Helen Marguerite, 

Group, History and Economics and Politics, 1907-10. 
Rosemont, Pa. Prepared by the Lower Merion High School, Ardmore, Pa. 

Rawson, Gwendolyn, Group, , 1909-10. 

Cincinnati, O. Prepared by the College Preparatory School, Cincinnati. 
Reichenbach, Lucie Vaughan, . . . Group, Latin and French, 1906-10. 

Huntington, Ind. Prepared by the Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., and 
by private tuition. 

Rice, Phyllis, . . Group, History and Economics and Politics, 1907-10. 

Lynn, Mass. Prepared by Miss Hazard's School, Boston, Mass., and by the 
Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Richardson, Ethel Louise, . ... .Group, Latin and English, 1907-10. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the High School, Colorado Springs, Colo., by 
the High School, Pasadena, Cal., and by private tuition. 

♦Mrs. Howard F. Pyfer. 



39 

Richter, Helen Ruth, Group, , 1909-10. 

New York City. Prepared by the Gardiner School, New York City, and by 
the Benjamin Deane School, New York City. 

Riggs, Henrietta Sanford, 

Group, History and Economics and Politics, 1906-10. 

Washington, D. C. Prepared by the Friends' School, Washington, and by 
private tuition. 

Roberts, Ruth, Group, History and Economics and Politics, 1907-10. 

Decatur, 111. Prepared by the High School, Decatur, and by the Misses 
Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Robertson, Emma Sellers, Group, , 1909-10. 

Bala, Pa. Prepared by All Saints School, Germantown, Philadelphia, and 
by Miss Roney's School, Bala, Pa. 

Roe, Miriam, Hearer oy Courtesy in English, 1909-10. 

Omaha, Neb. Prepared by the High School, Omaha. Assistant in Bryn Mawr 
College Library, 1909-10. 

Rogers, Isobel Mitchell, . . . Group, Physics and Chemistry, 1907-10. 

Yonkers, N. Y. Prepared by the Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., and by 
private tuition. 

Rogerson, Jennie L., Hearer oy Courtesy in English, 1909-10. 

Lowell, Me. Prepared by the Normal Academy, Lee, Me. Trained Nurse, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1909-10. 

Root, Mary Longaker, Group, Latin and Mathematics, 1906-10. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of 
City Scholarship, 1906-10. 

Ross, Elizabeth, Group, Physics and Geology, 1907-10. 

Cleveland, O. Prepared by the Central High School, Cleveland. 

Ross, Frances Lubbe, Group, , 1909-10. 

Conshohocken, Pa. Prepared by the Agnes Irwin School, Philadelphia, and 
by the Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

ROTAN, KATHERXNE LIVINGSTON, 

Group, Chemistry and Biology, 1906-10. 
Waco, Tex. Prepared by Rosemary Hall, Greenwich, Conn. 
Russell, Louise Sternberg, .... Group, German and French, 1907-10. 
Cooperstown, N. Y. Prepared by the Balliol School, Utlca, N. Y. 

Schram, Helpa Serena, 

Group, History and Economics and Politics, 1907-10. 

Columbia, Pa. Prepared by the Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 
Holder of Elizabeth Duane Gillespie Scholarship in American History, 
1909-10. 

Schmidt, Katharine Reily, Group, , 1909-10. 

York, Pa. Prepared by Oldfield, Glencoe, Md., and by Rosemary Hall, Green- 
wich, Conn. 

Scott, Helen Townsend, . . Group, Greek and English, 1905-09, 1910. 

Baltimore, Md. Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. 

Scott, Marion Sturges, Group, English and Philosophy, 1907-10. 

Chicago, 111. Prepared by the Girls' Latin School, Chicago, and by Rose- 
mary Hall, Greenwich, Conn. 

Scribner, Mary E. 

Group, History and Economics and Politics, 1908-10. 

Chicago, 111. Prepared by the Kenwood Institute, Chicago, and by Rose- 
mary Hall, Greenwich, Conn. 



40 

Scripture, Winifred, Group, Physics and Chemistry, 1908-10. 

New York City. Prepared by Luisen Schule, Berlin, and by Siebertsche 
Institut, Munich, Germany, and by Chappaqua Mountain Institute, Chap- 
paqua, N. Y. 

Scruggs, Margaret, Group, , 1909-10. 

Dallas, Tex. Prepared by Cowart Hall, Dallas, and by the Misses Kirk's 
School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Sctjdder, Marie Graves Group, , 1909-10. 

Evanston, 111. Prepared by Lake View High School, Chicago. Northwestern 
University, 1907-09. 

Seely, Evelyn Elizabeth, Group, Latin and German, 1907-10. 

Brockport, N. Y. Prepared by the State Normal School, Brockport. Mt. 
Holyoke College, 1906-07. 

Selig, Alice, Group, , 1909-10. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. 

Shadburn, Lucile, Group, , 1909-10. 

Buford, Ga. Prepared by Brenan College, Gainesville, Ga., by the Lucy Cobb 
Institute, Athens, Ga. ; by the National Park Seminary, Forest Glen, Md., 
and by Miss Mary Jeffers and Miss Florence Peebles, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Sharman, Lou May, Group, Mathematics and Physics, 1908-10. 

Reading, Pa. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Reading. 

Sharp, Henrietta Wogan, . . Group, English and Philosophy, 1906-10. 

Newville, Pa. Prepared by the Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., and 
by private tuition. 

Shaw, Katharine Lydia, Group, , 1908-10. 

Glenshaw, Pa. Prepared by Preparatory School of Pennsylvania College, 
by Miss Gleim's School, Pittsburgh, and by private tuition. 

Shearer., Margaret Juliet, Group, Greek and English, 1906-10. 

New York City. Prepared by the Merrill-Van Laer School, New York City, 
and by the Brearley School, New York City. 

Sheldon, Martha, Group, , 1908-10. 

Pittsburgh, Pa. Prepared by Miss Gleim's School, Pittsburgh. 

Sheldon, Mary, Group, , 1909-10. 

Chicago, 111. Prepared by Rosemary Hall, Greenwich, Conn., and by Miss 
Spence's School, New York City. 

Shenstone, Mary Elsie, Group, , 1909-10. 

Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Prepared by Miss Veal's School, Toronto. Uni- 
versity of Toronto, 1908-09. 

Shipley, Elizabeth Taylor, Group, , 1909-10. 

Haverford, Pa. Prepared by the Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 
Holder of Foundation Scholarship, 1909-10. 

Shipley, Mary Boyd, Group, Latin and French, 1906-10. 

Haverford, Pa. Prepared by the Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 
Holder of Foundation Scholarship, 1909-10. 

Shloss, Irma Bronette, Group, , 1908-10. 

Des Moines, la. Prepared by the High School, West Des Moines. 
Simonds, Charlotte Victorine, 

Group, Mathematics and Physics, 1905-10. 

New York City. Prepared by the Brearley School, New York City. Holder 

of the Second Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholarship for New York, New 
Jersey, and Delaware, 1906-07. 



41 

Simpson, Adelaide Douglas, Group, , 1909-10. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of 
Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholarship, 1909-10. 

Smith, Hilda Worthington, 

Group, Economics and Politics and Philosophy, 1906-10. 
West Park, N. Y. Prepared by the Veltin School, New York City. 

Smith, Margery, Group, History and Economics and Politics, 1907-10. 

Balston Spa, N. Y. Prepared by the Bennett School, Irvington-on-Hud- 
son, N. Y. 

Southwick, Jean Frances, 

Group, History and Economics and Politics, 1908-10. 
Brooklyn, New York City. Prepared by Packer Collegiate Institute, Brooklyn. 

Spry, Gladys, . . Group, History and Economics and Politics, 1908-10. 

Evanston, 111. Prepared by the High School, Evanston. Northwestern 
University, 1907-08. 

Stearns, Anna, Group, Latin and French, 1907-10. 

Nashua, N. H. Prepared by the High School, Nashua, and by private tuition. 

Stecher, Lorle Ida, Group, , 1908-10. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Manual Training High School, Indianapolis, 
Ind., and by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of City Scholar- 
ship, 1908-10. 

Steele, Edith Rachael, Group, , 1909-10. 

Pittston, Pa. Prepared by the High School, West Pittston, Pa., and by 
Wyoming Seminary, Kingston, Pa. 

Stetson, Lydia Almy, Group, , 1909-10. 

New Bedford, Mass. Prepared by the Friends' Academy, New Bedford, and by 
Rosemary Hall, Greenwich, Conn. 

Stevens, Cynthia Jarden, 

Group, History and Economics and Politics, 1908-10. 
Baltimore, Md. Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. 

Stirling. Jean Wedderburn Group. , 1908-10. 

Chicago, 111. Prepared by the Dearborn Seminary, Chicago, and by the 
University High School, Chicago. Holder of Second Bryn Mawr Matricula- 
tion Scholarship for the Western States, 1908-09. 

Stoddard, Yvonne, Group, , 1909-10. 

Boston, Mass. Prepared by Miss Haskoll and Miss Dean's School, Boston. 
Holder of First Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholarship for the New England 
States, 1906-07. 

Stohr, Keinath, Ch-oup, , 1909-10. 

Chicago, 111. Prepared by the Chicago Latin School, Chicago. 

Storer, Frances Louise, 

Group, History and Economics and Politics, 1906-08, 1909, 1900-10. 

Toledo, O. Prepared by the High School, Champaign, 111., and by private 
tuition. University of Illinois, 1905-06. 

Stout, Katharine Houghton, Group, , 1909-10. 

Chicago, 111. Prepared by the Ross-Boyesen School, and by Rosemary Hall, 
Greenwich, Conn. 

Stratton, Alice Group, , 1908-10. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Bardwell School, Philadelphia, and by Miss 
Hills's School, Philadelphia. 



42 

Swanzy, Noea Hastings, Group, , 1909-10. 

Honolulu, H. I. Prepared by Oahu College, Honolulu, and by Wykeham Rise, 
Washington, Conn. 

Swift, Elisabeth, 

Group, History and Economics and Politics, 1906-10. 
New York City. Prepared by the Brearley School, New York City. 

Swift, Nathalie, Group, , 1909-10. 

New York City. Prepared by the Brearley School, New York City. Holder 
of Second Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholarship for New York, New Jersey 
and Delaware, 1909-10. 

Tabee, Izette, . . Group, History and Economics and Politics, 1906-10. 
Haverford, Pa. Prepared by the Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Taft, Helen Hebron, 

Group, History and Economics and Politics, 1908-10. 

Washington, D. C. Prepared by the National Cathedral School, Washington, 

and by the Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Holder of First Bryn Mawr 
Matriculation Scholarship for Pennsylvania and the Southern States, 
1908-09. 

Tappan, Elizabeth, Group, Greek, and Latin, 1906-10. 

Baltimore, Md. Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. Holder of 
Bryn Mawr School Scholarship, 1906-08. 

Taylor, Alice Marion, Group, — , 1909-10. 

New York City. Prepared by the Willard School, Berlin, Germany. 

Taylor, Mary Minor Watson, 

Group, Mathematics and Physics, 1907-10. 

Richmond, Va. Prepared by Miss Morris's School, Richmond, and by private 
tuition. 

Tenney, Elizabeth Louise, 

Group, History and Economics and Politics, 1906-10. 

Chicago, 111. Prepared by the University High School, Chicago. University 
of Chicago, 1905-06. 

Terry, Catherine Louise, 

Group, History and Economics and Politics, 1908-10. 
New York City. Prepared by the Veltin School, New York City. 

Thackray, Margaret, Group, , 1909, 1909-10. 

Johnstown, Pa. Prepared by the High School, Johnstown. 

Thomas, Ethel Marian, Group, , 1908-10. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Philadelphia Collegiate Institute, by the 
Misses Kirk's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., and by private tuition. 

Thompson, Catherine Reichenbach, Group, , 1908-10. 

Pittsburgh, Pa. Prepared by the High School, Pittsburgh, and by Dilworth 
Hall, Pittsburgh. 

Thompson, Clara Belle, . . Group, Mathematics and , 1909-10. 

Hopkinsville, Ky. Prepared by the High School, East Denver, Colo. ; by the 
the High School, Paducah, Ky., and by the Girls' High School, Louis- 
ville, Ky. 

Thompson, Marjorie La Monte, 

Group, English and Philosophy, 1908-10. 
Philadelphia. Prepared by Miss Gordon's School, Philadelphia. 

Thwing, Apphia Stanley Group, , 1909-10. 

Cleveland, O. Prepared by the Laurel School, Cleveland. 



43 

Tomlinson, Joy, Group, , 1909-10. 

Birmingham, Ala. Prepared by the Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Tongue, Maby Van Absdale, Group, , 1909-10. 

Baltimore, Md. Prepared by the Brvn Mawr School, Baltimore. Holder of 
Bryn Mawr School Scholarship, 1909-10. 

Tredway, Helen, Group, Physics and Chemistry, 1907-10. 

Dubuque, la. Prepared by the High School, Dubuque. Holder of the Second 
Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholarship for the Western States, 1907-08. 

Turner, Grace, Group, Greek and Latin, 1909-10. 

Berwyn, Pa. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. 

Van Schaack, Albione Libby, 

Group, History and Economics and Politics, 1906-10. 
Chicago, 111. Prepared by the Girton School, Winnetka, 111. 

Vennum, Mary Durham, . .Group, Mathematics and Physics, 1908-10. 

Onarga, 111. Prepared by Grand Prairie Seminary, Onarga, by Miss Wright's 
School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., and by private tuition. 

Vernon, Ethel, Group, , 1909-10. 

Wilmington, Del. Prepared by the Friends' School, Wilmington. 

Vincent, Isabel Darlington, 

Group, French and Italian and Spanish, 1908-10. 
Chicago, 111. Prepared by the University High School, Chicago. 

Walker, Amy Morehead, Group, , 1907-10. 

Chicago, 111. Prepared by the Girls' Latin School, Chicago. 

Walker, Estheb, 

Group, History and Economics and Politics, 1906-09, 1910. 
Albany, N. Y. Prepared by the Fenimore Cooper School for Girls, Albany. 

Walker, Harriet Warner, Group, , 1909-10. 

Chicago, 111. Prepared by the Girls' Latin School, Chicago. 

Walter, Marjorie Fannie, 

Group, History and Economics and Politics, 1908-10. 

New York City. Prepared by St. Mary's School, New York City, and by 
private tuition. 

Walton, Lillie Sophia, Group, , 1909-10. 

Hummelstown. Pa. Prepared by the High School, Hummelstown, and by the 
Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Ware, Clara Crosby, 

Group, History and Economics and Politics, 1906-10. 

Hingham, Mass. Prepared by the High School, Hingham, and by private 
tuition. 

Warner, Margaret Douglas, Group, English and Philosophy, 1908-10. 

Washington, D. C. Prepared by the Holton-Arms School, Washington. 

Warrin, Martha de Raismes, Group, , 1909-10. 

Flushing, Long Island, N. Y. Prepared by Miss Master's School, New York 
City, and by private tuition. 

Watson, Louise, Group, Mathematics and Philosophy, 1908-10. 

Portsmouth, Va. Prepared by the Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Webb, Celeste, , 

Group, History and Economics and Politics, 1905-09, 1910. 
Baltimore, Md. Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. 



44 

Welles, Cablotta, Group, , 1908-10. 

Paris, France. Prepared by Villa Dupont, Paris, and by the Baldwin School, 

Bryn Mawr, Pa. Holder of Second Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholarship 
for Pennsylvania and the Southern States, 1907-08. 

Welsh, Florence May, 

Hearer in English, Philosophy, Art and Biology, 1909-10. 
East Orange, N. J. Prepared by the Veltin School, New York City. 

Wells, Ruth Group, Greek and English, 1907-10. 

Hanover, N. H. Prepared by the High School, Hanover, N. H. 

Wesner, Mary Boyde, Group, Latin and German, 1906-10. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder 
of City Scholarship, 1906-10. 

Whittemore, Alice Group, Mathematics and Physics, 1906-10. 

Grand Rapids, Mich. Prepared by St. Timothy's School, Catonsville, Md., 
and by private tuition. 

Wilbur, Constance Caroline, 

Group, Mathematics and Geology, 1907-10. 
Asbury Park, N. J. Prepared by the High School, Asbury Park. 

WlLBUB, FLOEENCE LeNORE, 

Group, History and Economics and Politics, 1906-10. 
Asbury Park, N. J. Prepared by the High School, Asbury Park. 

Wildman, Marion Kirk Group, German and Spanish, 1906-10. 

Norristown. Pa. Prepared by the High School, Norristown, by the Baldwin 
School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., and by private tuition. 

Williams, Katharine Delano, Group, , 1909-10. 

Dedham, Mass. Prepared by Miss Winsor's School, Boston, Mass. 

Williams, Mary Almira, 

Group, Economics and Politics and Philosophy, 1907-10. 

Indianapolis, Ind. Prepared by the Girls' Classical School, Indianapolis, and 
by the Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Wilson, Helen Anderson, Group, , 1909-10. 

Paoli, Pa. Prepared by Miss Helen R. Potts, Swedeland, Pa., by Miss Child's 
College Preparatory Classes, Philadelphia, and by the Misses Kirk's School, 
Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Wolff, Dorothy Sybil, 

Group, Economics and Politics and Philosophy, 1908-10. 
New York City. Prepared by the Finch School, New York City. 

Wood, Agnes Penman, 

Group, History and Economics and Politics, 1907-10. 

Wayne, Pa. Prepared by the Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., and 
by private tuition. 

Wood, Florence, Group, History and Economics and Politics, 1907-10. 

Pittsburgh, Pa. Prepared by the Thurston Preparatory School, East End, 
Pittsburgh. 

WORTHLNGTON, MARY DOROTHY WHITALL, 

Group, Chemistry and Biology, 1906-10. 

New York City. Prepared by the High School, Kensington, London, England. 

Yarnall, Emma Group, Latin and French, 1907-10. 

Ardmore, Pa. Prepared by the Lower Merion High School, Ardmore, and 
by the Friends' Central School, Philadelphia. 



45 

Zabriskie, Zayda Justine, Group, , 1909-10. 

New York City. Prepared by Miss Porter's School, Farmington, Conn., and 
by the Brearley School, New York City. 

Ziesing, Gertrude Lenore, Group, , 1909-10. 

Glencoe, 111. Prepared by the Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 



SUMMARY OF STUDENTS. 

Class of 1910 72 

" " 1911 65 

" " 1912 86 

" " 1913 105 

" " 1914 1 

Hearers 8 

337 

Resident Fellows 12 

Graduates 72 

84 

European Fellows 4 



Total 425 



BRYN MAWR COLLEGE. 



Bryn Mawr College was founded by Dr. Joseph W. Taylor, Introduc- 
of Burlington, New Jersey, who died January 18th, 1880. By tor V 
his will he left the greater portion of his estate for the purpose ' a einen ' 
of establishing and maintaining an institution of advanced 
learning for women. The college is situated in the suburbs of 
Philadelphia, at Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania, five miles to the 
west of the city. The site was purchased by the founder on 
account of its healthfulness and beauty, and the college build- 
ings were begun during his lifetime. In 1880, the year of his 
death, the college was incorporated by the authority of the 
State of Pennsylvania, and invested with power to confer 
degrees. A circular of information was issued by the trustees 
in 1883. A president and a dean of the faculty were elected in 
the spring of 1884, and during the remainder of the year plans 
were matured and appointments made in the faculty. The 
courtesy of the presiding officers and instructors of existing 
universities and colleges facilitated an acquaintance with the 
prevailing college curriculum, and the domestic organisation of 
the woman's colleges, Vassar, Smith, and Wellesley, received 
careful consideration. To the Johns Hopkins University 
acknowledgment is especially due, since from it has been 
borrowed the system of major and minor electives in fixed 
combination to which Bryn Mawr College first gave the name 
of the Group System. In the spring of 1885 the first program 
was issued, and the college was opened for instruction in the 
autumn of 1885. 

Three classes of persons are admitted to the lectures and class Admis- 
work of the'college — graduate students, undergraduate students, sion. 
and hearers. 

Graduate students must have presented a diploma from some Graduate 
college of acknowledged standing. They may pursue any Students. 

(47) 



48 

courses offered by the college for which their previous training 
has fitted them; but they must satisfy the several instructors of 
their ability to profit by the courses they desire to follow, and 
may be required to pursue certain introductory or auxiliary 
studies before they are admitted to the advanced or purely 
graduate courses.* They are, moreover, entitled to personal 
guidance and direction, supervision of their general reading and 
furtherance of their investigations, from the instructors, and 
their needs are considered in the arrangement of new courses of 
lectures. 

Fellows The most distinguished place among the graduate students is 
c< 'hi * ^eld by the fellows and graduate scholars, who must reside in 
the college during the academic year. Four European traveling 
fellowships, thirteen resident fellowships and eighteen graduate 
scholarships are awarded annually. The conditions of the 
award and the duties of holders of fellowships and scholarships 
are stated on pages 68 to 70. 

Under- Undergraduate students must have fulfilled the requirements 

graduate f or matriculation, and may enter the college at any age at 

which those requirements have been fulfilled. The studies 

leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts are stated on pages 

57 to 64. 

Those students who do not wish to study for a degree are per- 
mitted to pursue any undergraduate courses offered by the Col- 
lege for which their previous training has fitted them; they will, 
in the event of a change of plan, be credited with such of their 
studies as may have coincided with the studies leading to a 
degree. Attention is called to the fact that the Group System 
enables all candidates for a degree to specialise in two or more 
subjects. 
Hearers. Hearers are excused from passing the matriculation examina- 
tion; but they are strictly distinguished from matriculated 
students, and are entitled to reside in the college only when by 
so doing they exclude no matriculated student, and when the 
courses pursued by them are equivalent in number to those 

*For the convenience of graduate students the courses offered in the graduate 
departments of the college are reprinted from this in a separate part of the calendar, 
Part 2, Graduate Courses, which may be obtained free of charge by applying to the 
Secretary of the College. 



49 

ordinarily pursued in each year by candidates for a degree. 
They must be women of at least twenty-five years of age, and 
must furnish proof that they have at some time pursued the 
studies included in the matriculation examination. They must 
satisfy the several instructors that they can profit by the 
courses that they desire to follow, and their admission to recita- 
tions, examinations, and laboratory exercises depends on the 
express consent of the instructor in charge. Hearers differ, 
moreover, from matriculated students in that they are not 
recognised by the College, and may receive only such certificates 
of collegiate study as may be given them by the several instruc- 
tors. They may not receive degrees. 

The examination for matriculation must be taken by all who Examina- 
wish to pursue their studies in the undergraduate department of jyfc}l r h',- 
the college, either as candidates for a degree or as students pur- lotion. 
suing special courses, with the exception of such applicants 
for admission as present a certificate of honorable dismissal 
from some college or university of acknowledged standing.* 

*The examinations of the College Entrance Examination Board which are 
designated by Bryn Mawr College as equivalent to the matriculation examina- 
tions of the College will be accepted, subject to the same conditions which 
govern the Bryn Mawr College examinations. 

The passing mark for both sets of examinations is the same, sixty per cent. 

The matriculation examination may not be taken in more than two 
divisions ; but, if this rule be observed, candidates may divide the divisions 
as they please between the examination of Bryn Mawr College and of the 
College Entrance Examination Board ; both divisions may be taken in the 
Bryn Mawr College examination, or in the examination of the College En- 
trance Examination Board ; or one division may be taken in the Bryn Mawr 
College examination, and the other in the examination of the College En- 
trance Examination Board. 

Not more than one calendar year and the summer vacation may elapse 
between the two divisions of the examination for admission. There is no 
other restriction as to time ; for example, candidates may present themselves 
for the first division of their examination in the spring examination of Bryn 
Mawr College, held during the last week in May and the first week in June, 
and for the second division at the examination held by the College Entrance 
Examination Board in the fourth week of June of the same year ; or if they 
fail in the spring examination of Bryn Mawr College they may try the same 
subjects again in the examination of the College Entrance Examination 
Board three weeks later. 

In case a sufficient number of sections to secure admission is not passed 
in two divisions of the examination the sections taken in one division must 
be cancelled, and all the sections offered in the cancelled division (except 
those sections which have been also offered in the division which is to be 
counted) must be offered again, together with a sufficient number of the 



50 

The examination for matriculation is open to those also 
who wish to take it as a test of proficiency in elementary 
studies, but have no intention of entering the college; and 
certificates are given to those who are successful in passing the 
examination.*! 

sections in which the candidate has been conditioned to ensure her passing 
in the required number of sections. 

Candidates who have passed the fifteen sections necessary for admission 
may remove conditions by passing the corresponding examinations in the 
Bryn Mawr College or the College Entrance Examination Board examina 
tion ; in the case of a condition in French or German, however, the entire 
examination in the language must be taken, unless the condition is in 
grammar only, in which case it may be removed by passing the Bryn Mawr 
College examination in grammar ; and in the case of a condition in English 
Composition incurred in the Bryn Mawr College examination the entire ex- 
amination in English, a and b must be passed in order to remove the condi- 
tion by passing the College Entrance Examination Board's examination. 

Candidates taking the College Entrance Examination Board's examination 
will not be considered in the awarding of the eight Bryn Mawr competitive 
entrance examination scholarships, unless the final division of the examination 
be taken in the spring Bryn Mawr College examination. Candidates are not 
eligible when the finals are taken in the autumn examination. 

Table of Equivalent Examinations. 
College Entrance Examination Bryn Mawr College 

Board Examination. Examination. 

Subjects. Subjects. Sections . 

Mathematics: a, i and ii, = Algebra 2 

Mathematics: c = Plane Geometry 2 

Latin: Z, = Latin Grammar and Prose Composi- 
tion 1 

Latin: p, = Latin Prose Authors. 2 

Latin : q, = Latin Poetry 1 

English : b, = English Grammar 1 

English : a, = English Composition 3 

History: o or c or rf, = Greek and Roman, or English, or 

American History 1 

Physics, or Chemistry, or Botany, or 

Geography, or Zoology: = Science 1 

Greek: / = Greek Grammar and Composition. . 1 

Greek: g, = Greek Prose Authors 1 

Greek : h, = Greek Poetry 1 

French: a, and combined examination 

(6 and c), = French Grammar and Translation. . 3 

German: o, and combined examination 

(6 and c) = German Grammar and Translation . 3 

Examinations for Advanced Standing. 

Mathematics : d, = Solid Geometry. 

Mathematics : e, ■= Trigonometry. 

No Equivalent = Minor Latin. 

* Printed sets of matriculation papers may be obtained for thirty cents from the 
Secretary of the College. 

t For the eight competitive entrance scholarships, awarded annually, see page 77. 



51 

Blank forms of application for admission may be obtained 
from the Secretary of the College. 

Examinations are held in the spring, autumn, and winter of 
every year at Bryn Mawr College, and in the spring of every year 
may be held at other places; they are always held in the spring 
at the regular centres: Baltimore, Boston, Chicago, New York, 
Pittsburgh, Portland (Oregon), Richmond and London (England), 
and candidates taking examinations at these places are charged 
a fee of five dollars for the whole or any part of the examination. 
Examinations may also be held by request at other places, but 
in this case the candidates must defray the whole expense of 
the examination, the minimum fee being five dollars. In the 
past six years examinations have been held by request at the 
following places: 

California: Berkeley, Los Angeles, Pasadena, San Francisco; 
Colorado: Denver; Connecticut: Greenwich, Washington; Dis- 
trict of Columbia: Washington; Georgia: Savannah; Indiana: 
Fort Wayne, Indianapolis; Iowa: Dubuque; Kentucky: Louis- 
ville; Massachusetts: Cambridge, Fall River; Michigan: Detroit; 
Minnesota: Minneapolis; Missouri: St. Louis; New Jersey: 
Trenton; New York: Binghamton, Buffalo, New Rochelle, 
Rochester, Utica; North Carolina: Biltmore; Ohio: Cincinnati, 
Cleveland, Columbus; Pennsylvania: Carlisle, Harrisburg, 
Lititz, Pittsburgh, Scranton, Wilkes Barre; Rhode Island: 
Providence; Virginia: Richmond; Wisconsin: Fond du Lac, 
Madison, Milwaukee; France: Paris; Asia Minor: Tarsus. 

Candidates who intend to present themselves for examination 
at Bryn Mawr College must apply to the Secretary of the Col- 
lege at least two weeks before the date set for the beginning of 
the examinations and the application should be made on a form to 
be obtained from the Secretary of the College, and must be accom- 
panied by the fee of five dollars, charged for each division 
of the examination. Candidates who do not apply two weeks 
before the date of the beginning of the examinations will 
be charged an additional fee of five dollars. Candidates 
intending to take examinations elsewhere than at Bryn 
Mawr College must apply to the Secretary of the College at 
least six weeks before the date set for the beginning of the 
examinations. Candidates who fail to do this will be charged 



52 

a fee of five dollars in addition to the fee charged for the 
examination. 

Tabular Statement. — In order to obtain a certificate of ad- 
mission to Bryn Mawr College the candidate must be examined 
in all* of the following subjects, counted as equivalent to 
twenty sections, must take the examination in not more than 
two divisions, and must pass not fewer than four sections in the 
first division and not fewer than fifteen sections in the two 
divisions. No candidate will be admitted to Bryn Mawr Col- 
lege if conditioned in more than five sections. • 

Subjects Sections. 

Algebra 2 

Plane Geometry 2 

Latin Grammar and Prose Composition 1 

Latin Prose Authors 2 

Latin Poetry 1 

English Grammar 1 

English Composition 3 

History 1 

Science 1 

Greek Grammar and Prose Composition. . . 1 

Greek Prose Authors 1 

Greek Poetry 1 



German Grammar and Translation 3 

French Grammar and Translation 3 



• Two of these three languages. 



20 



The number of sections allotted to each subject indicates approximately the time 
which should be devoted to preparation for that subject. Thus if, for example, the 
candidate studies five subjects in each year during the last four years of preparation 
for college, then Mathematics, Latin, and English should be studied for all four years, 
since each counts as four sections of the examination; History and Science should be 
studied for one year, since each counts as one section; and the two languages (Greek 
and German, or Greek and French, or German and French) should each be studied 
for three years, since each counts as three sections, or three-twentieths of the 
examination. 

The examination may not be taken in more than two divisions, and in each division 
the candidate may offer any sections she pleases, provided that, if she offer French 
or German, she offer in the same division of the examination all the three sections 
grammar and prose and verse translation. 

If more than one calendar year and the summer vacation elapse between the two 
divisions of the examination for admission the first division is cancelled and must be 
repeated. In case a sufficient number of sections to secure admission is not passed 

* Candidates are expected to show by their papers that all the subjects required for 
matriculation have been studied for a reasonable length of time. Total failure in the 
second division of the examination in any subject, when such failure is of a character 
to indicate that the subject has been presented as a mere form, prevents the candidate 
from receiving any certificate, unless she can produce satisfactory evidence that the 
subject in question has been faithfully studied for a reasonable length of time. 



53 

in two divisions of the examination the sections taken in one division must be can- 
celled, and all the sections offered in the cancelled division (except those sections 
which have been offered in the division which is to be counted) must be offered again, 
together with a sufficient number of the sections in which the candidate has been 
conditioned to ensure her passing in the required number of sections. 

Candidates who have passed the fifteen sections necessary for admission may 
remove conditions by passing the corresponding examinations before or after entering 
the college. All entrance conditions must be passed off within twelve months after 
the student enters the college, under penalty of exclusion from full college work 
during the following year. A fee of three dollars is charged for each condition 
examination except conditions in spelling and punctuation for which the fee is one 
dollar. Students with entrance conditions in Greek, Latin, English, German, French, 
or Mathematics are not permitted to attend the college courses in these subjects until 
the conditions have been passed off. 

The candidate may offer for examination before entrance the 
remaining language (either French, or German, or Greek.* which- 
ever was not included by the candidate in the above twenty 
sections), and if this subject is not passed before entrance, 
the candidate must pass an examination in it before receiving 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts.f 

Candidates desiring to enter with advanced standing may 
offer for examination before entrance trigonometry! and solid 
geometry. These subjects are not necessarily included in the 

* Students that have omitted Greek in the examination for matriculation may sub- 
stitute for the matriculation course in Greek the minor course in Latin. The minor 
course in Latin may also be offered for examination by candidates for matriculation 
that desire to enter the college with advanced standing, and, at their discretion, by 
matriculated students without attendance on the college classes, provided it is offered 
before the beginning of the student's junior year. The minor course is considered 
for this purpose as comprising two sections, constituted as follows: 

A. Cicero, Selected Letters, 1. 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11, 16, 17, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 
30, 31, 33, 37, 38, 39, 42, 44, 45, 47, 48, 49, 52, 75, 76, 91, 92 {Letters of Cicero, ed- 
ited by F. F. Abbott, Boston, Ginn and Company), Livy, Book xxi., Latin Prose 
Composition, including a detailed knowledge of the more abstruse Latin constructions 
and some facility in turning simple English narrative into Latin. 

B. Horace, Odes, except i. 25, 27, 33, 36; ii. 5; Hi. 6, 15, 20; iv. 1, 10, 13; Epodes, 
except 3, 5, 8, 11, 12, 15, 17; Carmen Sceculare; Satires i. 1, 5, 6, 9; ii. 6; Epistles i. 1, 
5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 14, 20. 

No substitutions are allowed for any part of the above requirements, except in the 
case of students entering with advanced standing from other colleges. 

There are two examinations, one in Section A and one in Section B, each three hours 
in length. These examinations may be taken in different years, and in the order pre- 
ferred by the candidate; or one section may be studied in the college class, and the 
other offered for examination without attendance upon the class. Examinations in 
Minor Latin are held only at the time of the regular matriculation examinations at 
the beginning and end of the college year, and in February. 

t If this examination is not passed before the beginning of the student's third year in 
the college, she must enter the college class in the subject. 

% For examinations in the College Entrance Examination Board equivalent to those 
which may be offered for advanced standing, see page 50. 



54 

requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Arts, but students 
that have passed these examinations are credited with the equiv- 
alent number of hours of free elective work, each examination 
counting for this purpose as equivalent to two hours a week of 
free electives for one semester. Such advanced standing ex- 
aminations will enable the student to lighten her work in 
college or to enlarge her choice of elective studies, but will not 
enable her to shorten the time of obtaining the Bachelor's 
degree, which represents in every case four years of study in 
the college classes. 

Mathematics I. Mathematics. — (1) and (2) Algebra. (3) and (4) Plane Geometry. 

The examination in Algebra comprises Elementary Operations, Quadratic Equa- 
tions, Problems, Ratio, Proportion, Variation, Arithmetical and Geometrical Pro- 
gressions, the Binomial Theorem for Positive Integral Exponents. 

While there is no formal examination in Arithmetic, an adequate knowledge of the 
subject is required throughout the mathematical examinations : in all the papers there 
are some numerical problems, and the correct solution of a fair number of these is 
regarded as essential. 

In Algebra, C. Smith's Elementary Algebra (American edition, revised by Irving 
Stringham), and in Geometry, Phillips and Fisher's Elements of Geometry (abridged 
edition) or Wentworth's Geometry, will serve to indicate the preparation required for 
these examinations. 



Latin. II. Latin. — .(1) Grammar and Composition. (2) and (3) Translation at 

sight of simple passages in Latin prose. (4) Translation at sight of 
simple passages in Latin poetry. Due allowance is made for unusual 
words, and there are questions testing the candidate's practical knowl- 
edge of grammar and prosody. 

The so-called Roman method of pronunciation as explained in one of the standard 
Latin grammars is required. 

As many schools are introducing the "natural method" as a substitute for thorough 
grammatical training, attention is called to the fact that special stress is laid on an 
accurate and ready knowledge of grammatical forms. A knowledge of paradigms and 
parts of irregular verbs is insisted upon. 

History. III. History. — (1) The outlines of the History of Greece and Rome; 

or the outlines of the History of England; or the outlines of the History 

of the United States. 

Botsford's History of Greece, Botsford's History of Rome, Andrews's History of Eng- 
land, Cheyney's A Short History of England, and McLaughlin's History of the American 
Nation, or Adams and Trent's History of the United States, will serve to indicate the 
preparation required. 

English. English. — (1) English Grammar. (2), (3) and (4) English Composi- 

tion. The examinations in grammar and composition may be divided 
and may be taken in either division of the entrance examination. The 
examination in English composition consists of a critical composition, and, 
in addition, in order that the three sections of the examination may not 
depend solely on this critical paper, of one or two paragraphs in which 



55 

the candidate is asked to give in descriptive or narrative form the sub- 
stance of important parts of the required reading. 

In 1910 candidates must be familiar with Chaucer's Prologue and Knight's 
Tale; Shakespeare's Richard II. Henry IV (expurgated), Henry V, Macbeth, and The 
Merchant of Venice ; Milton's Lycidas, Comus, L' Allegro, and II Penseroso ; the Sir 
Roger de Coverley Papers in the Spectator; Matthew Arnold's Essay on Gray; Gray's 
Elegy in a Country Churchyard; Burke's Speech on Conciliation with America; Words- 
worth's Michael, Intimations of Immortality, " Three years she grew in sun and 
shower," The Solitary Reaper^ "O Nightingale/ thou surely art," "The world is too 
much with us," "Earth has not anything to show more fair," "It is not to be thought of 
that the flood " ; Coleridge's Ancient Mariner and Christabel; Shelley's Adonais, Sen- 
sitive Plant, and To a Skylark; Keats's Eve of St. Agnes, Ode to Autumn, and Ode to a 
Nightingale; Tennyson's Passing of Arthur; Carlyle's Essay on Burns; Scott's Ivan- 
hoe; Thackeray's Henry Esmond. 

In 1911 candidates must be familiar with Chaucer's Prologue and Knight's Tale; 
Shakespeare's Richard II, Henry IV (expurgated), Henry V, Macbeth, and As You 
Like It; Milton's Lycidas, Comus, L' Allegro, and II Penseroso; the <StV Roger de Cov- 
erley Papers in the Spectator ; Matthew Arnold's Essay on Gray; Gray's Elegy in 
a Country Churchyard; Burke's Speech on Conciliation with America; Wordsworth's 
Michael, Tinlern Abbey, "Three years she grew in sun and shower," The Solitary 
Reaper, "O Nightingale! thou surely art," "The world is too much with us," "Earth has 
not anything to show more fair ," "It is not to be thought of that the flood"; Cole- 
ridge's Ancient Mariner and Christabel; Shelley's Adonais, Sensitive Plant, and To a 
Skylark ; Keats's Eve of St. Agnes, Ode to Autumn, and Ode to a Nightingale; 
Tennyson's Passing of Arthur; Carlyle's Essay on Burns; Scott's Ivanhoe; Haw- 
thorne's House of the Seven Gables; Thackeray's Henry Esmond. 

In 1912 candidates must be familiar with Chaucer's Prologue and Knight's Tale; 
Shakespeare's Richard II, Henry IV (expurgated), Henry V, Macbeth, and The Merchant 
of Venice; Milton's Lycidas, Comus, L' Allegro, and II Penseroso; the Sir Roger de Cov- 
erley Papers in the Spectator; Matthew Arnold's Essay on Gray; Gray's Elegy in a 
Country Churchyard; Burke's Speech on Conciliation with America; Wordsworth's 
Michael, Tinlern Abbey, "Three years she grew in sun and shower," The Solitary Reaper, 
"O Nightingale! thou surely art," ' ' The world is too much with us, " ' 'Earth has not any- 
thing to show more fair," "It is not to be thought of that the flood"; Coleridge's Ancient 
Mariner and Christabel; Shelley's Adonais, Sensitive Plant, and To a Skylark; Keats's 
Eve of St. Agnes, Ode to Autumn, and Ode to a Nightingale; Tennyson's Passing of 
Arthur; Carlyle's Essay on Burns; Scott's Ivanhoe; Hawthorne's House of the Seven 
Gables; Thackeray's Henry Esmond. 

In 1913 candidates must be familiar with Chaucer's Prologue and Knight's Tale; 
Shakespeare's Richard II, Henry IV (expurgated), Henry V, and The Merchant of Venice; 
Milton's Paradise Lost, Books I and II; the Sir Roger de Coverley Papers in the Spec- 
tator; Matthew Arnold's Essay on Gray; Gray's Elegy in a Country Churchyard; Burke's 
Speech on Conciliation with America; Wordsworth's Michael, Tintern Abbey, "Three 
years she grew in sun and shower," The Solitary Reaper, "O Nightingale! thou surely 
art," "The world is too much with us," "Earth has not anything to show more fair," 
"It is not to be thought of that the flood"; Coleridge's Ancient Mariner and Christabel; 
Shelley's Ode to the West Wind, To a Skylark, To a Cloud, and ' 'Swiftly walk over the 
Western Wave"; Keats's Eve of St. Agnes, Ode to Autumn, and Ode to a Nightingale; 
Tennyson's Passing of Arthur; Macaulay's Life of Johnson; Scott's Ivanhoe; Haw- 
thorne's House of the Seven Gables; Stevenson's Kidnapped. 

The following books agreed on for the years 1910, and 1911 by the Associations 
of the Colleges and Schools of the New England States, the Middle States and Maryland, 
the North Central States, and the Southern States, will be accepted in those years as 
equivalents for the books prescribed for the English examinations of Bryn Mawr Col- 
lege: Chaucer's Prologue; Shakespeare's Henry V, Macbeth, and The Merchant of 
Venice; Milton's L' Allegro, II Penseroso, Lycidas, and Comus; the Sir Roger de Cover- 



56 



ley Papers in the Spectator; Palgrave's Golden Treasury {-first series) Book IV, with 
special attention to Wordsworth, Keats, and Shelley; De Quincey's Joan of Arc and 
The English Mail Coach; Burke's Speech on Conciliation with America; Scott's Ivanhoe; 
Hawthorne's House of the Seven Gables; Carlyle's Essay on Burns; Ruskin's Sesame and 
Lilies; Tennyson's Gareth and Lynette, Lancelot and Elaine, and the Passing of Arthur. 

In 1912 and 1913 Coleridge's Ancient Mariner must be added to and Milton's Lycidas 
omitted from this list; and in 1913 Macaulay's Life of Johnson must be added to and 
Carlyle's Essay on Burns omitted from this list. 

The books prescribed for candidates taking the regular examinations for matricu- 
lation in any given year are required also of candidates taking the matriculation exami- 
nation held in January of the year following. Candidates passing off conditions 
after admission to the college may offer the books prescribed in the examination in 
which the condition was imposed. 

In preparing for this examination special attention should be given to paragraph- 
structure and sentence-structure. Robins and Perkins's Introduction to the Study of 
Rhetoric, Hill's Foundations of Rhetoric, Abbott's How to Write Clearly, and Bigelow's 
Handbook of Punctuation, will serve to indicate the preparation required for this division 
of the examination. 

Science. Science. — (1) The elements of one of the following sciences: — Physics, 

or Chemistry, or Botany, or Physiology, or Physical Geography. 

Carhart and Chute's Elements of Physics, or Mann and Twiss's Physics; Remsen's 
Introduction to the Study of Chemistry (Briefer Course) ; Atkinson's Elementary Botany 
or Barnes's Plant Life or Bergen and Davis's Principles of Botany used in connection 
with Spalding's Introduction to Botany or Caldwell's Plant Morphology; Hough and 
Sedgwick's Elements of Physiology, or Fitz.'s Physiology and Hygiene will serve to indi- 
cate the preparation required. Candidates are advised, whenever possible, to offer 
Physics, as this study forms the best basis for scientific work. It is recommended 
that candidates should have some knowledge of the metric system. 

IV. Two of the following languages : 

Greek. Greek. — (1) Grammar and Composition. (2) Translation at sight of 

simple passages in Attic prose, such as Xenophon's Anabasis or Memora- 
bilia. (3) Translation at sight of passages of average difficulty from 
Homer. In (2) and (3) due allowance is made for unusual words and there 
are questions testing the candidate's practical knowledge of grammar and 
prosody. 

White's First Greek Book will serve to indicate the preparation required in prose 
composition. 

French. French. — (1) The examination in French is in three divisions, one to 

test the candidate's knowledge of ordinary grammatical forms, the other 
two, her power to read at sight ordinary French prose and verse. 

For the examination in reading no texts are assigned, the examination being in- 
tended to test the candidate's ability to read any ordinary French whatsoever. Candi- 
dates preparing for these examinations are advised to acquire as large a vocabulary as 
possible; they are further advised in their study of verbs to concentrate their attention 
on the regular verbs, the auxiliaries etre, avoir, such important irregular verbs as alter, 
devoir, dire, faire, mettre, prendre, pouvoir, vouloir, tenir, venir, voir, ecrire, lire, croire, 
boire, and the typical verbs conduire, craindre, paraitre, partir, and to acquire a fair 
knowledge of the use of the various past tenses and of the rules of the subjunctive. 

Teachers preparing students that wish to elect French in the college are advised to 
train their pupils to write French from dictation in order to enable them to understand 
lectures delivered in that language. 



57 

German. — (1) The examination in German is similar to that in French, German. 
and tests the candidate's knowledge of ordinary grammatical forms, and 
ability to read ordinary German at .sight. 

Every candidate for the degree of Bachelor of Arts must have studies 
passed examinations on work amounting to one hundred and Leading 
twenty hours* and must have obtained an examination grade Degree of 
above that of "passed," that is, the grade of seventy per cent or B< i c ^ e ^y 
over, on half of these one hundred and twenty hours; she must 
also possess at the time of graduation a reading knowledge of 
French and German and some acquaintance with Latin. In 
the last year before graduation, oral examinations are held to 
test her ability to read French and German at sight. She must 
have been in attendance on college classes in Bryn Mawr Col- 
lege, or in some other college of high standing, for a period 
of four years; she must have exercised regularly four hours a 
week in accordance with the rules of the department of Physical 
Culture. 

If a student at the end of her junior year, or in February of 
her senior year, has received a grade below seventy per cent 
in as many as one-half of the hours that she has taken out of 
the one hundred and twenty to be offered for the degree, she 
will not be allowed to graduate at the end of her senior year; 
but if she wishes to continue her studies at Bryn Mawr College, 
must plan to remain for an additional year. She will be on 

* The word hour here means one hour a week for one semester. In calculating the 
standing of students under this rule every course offered for examination, including the 
fourth language, trigonometry, and solid geometry, when offered for advanced 
standing in the matriculation examination, must be included except as explained 
below. A grade once obtained in an examination may not be cancelled, the first 
one hundred and twenty hours of examinations offered qualifying, or disqualify- 
ing, for a degree. Grades received on examinations offered for work not taken in 
the college classes must be counted in these one hundred and twenty hours, except 
in the case of students who enter with advanced standing from other colleges, and 
give notice within the first two weeks after their entrance of a desire to offer for 
examination subjects already pursued. Such students will, in case they fail \n these 
examinations, be granted the privilege of cancelling them so that they shall not 
count in estimating their standing under the merit law, provided they enter the 
corresponding courses as regular students without further examination. A similar 
privilege will be granted to students who offer trigonometry or solid geometry or a 
fourth language in the matriculation examination before entering the college and also 
to students who offer proof within two weeks after entering the college that they have 
studied these subjects in school or college classes or under private tuition. These 
students are not required to enter the corresponding college classes provided they fail 
in the examination. Since this rule was passed no student who has not fulfilled the 
requirements as above stated has received a degree. 



58 

probation during these two years and her work will be pre- 
scribed by a committee of the Faculty, the object being to 
enable her to raise the standard of her work so that she may 
not ultimately be disqualified by her grades from obtaining 
a degree. 

No student who, at any time during her course, has received 
a grade below seventy per cent in as many as one-half of the 
hours that she has taken will be permitted to hold office in any 
of the organisations of the College, to take part in entertain- 
ments requiring preparation, or to undertake any paid work. 

The following course of study must be pursued by every can- 
didate for the degree of Bachelor of Arts: 

Required Greek or French or German* five hours a week for one year, when this 
subject has not been included in the examination for matriculation. Those 
students, however, who wish to omit Greek may substitute for the 
required course in Greek the minor course in Latin, t 

English, five hours a week for two years. 

Philosophy, five hours a week for one year. 

Science, five hours a week for one year. 

Science, or History, or Economics and Politics, or Philosophy, or Mathe- 
matics, five hours a week for one year. 

Tivo Major Courses, of five hours a week for two years each, constituting 
one of the following Groups: any Language with any Language; J Com- 
parative Literature with English, or Italian, or Spanish; J History with 
Economics and Politics; Economics and Politics with Philosophy; Archae- 
ology and History of Art with Greek or Latin; Philosophy with Greek, or 
English, or Mathematics, or Physics; Mathematics with Greek, or Latin, 
or Physics, or Chemistry, or Geology; any Science with any Science. 
Free Elective F re e Elective Courses, amounting to ten hours a week for one year, to be 
Courses . cnosen by the student. It should be noted that a single study may be 
taken as a free elective, without electing the group that includes it, and 
any courses open as free electives, may be chosen without taking the 
remainder of the minor course of which they may form a part. 

* The College provides matriculation classes, five hours a week throughout one year, 
for th6se students who in the examination for matriculation may have omitted Greek, 
French, or German. Attendance on these classes is not obligatory before the beginning 
of the junior year, the student being free until then to make good her deficiencies by 
private study. 

tA student choosing Latin as one of the languages of her Group, and not wishing to 
study Greek, may substitute for the year of minor Latin five hours a week for one year 
of post-major Latin, or of French, or of German, or of Italian, or of Spanish. 

t For the purpose of forming a Group, Italian and Spanish may count as one lan- 
guage, they may be combined so as to form a course of five hours a week for two 
years, as explained on page 122. 



59 



The studies required for a degree may for convenience be 
tabulated as follows: 

Required Courses (Five hours a week for One Year Each). 



Tabular 
Statement. 



1 and 2. 

English. 

[Two Courses.] 



3. 

Philosophy. 



4. 
Science : 
Physics, 

or 
Chemistry, 

or 
Geology, 

or 
Biology. 



5. 

Science, 

or 

History, 

or 

Economics and 

Politics, 

or 

Philosophy, or 

Mathematics.! 



6.* 

Matriculation 

French, 

or 

Matriculation 

German, 

or 

Matriculation 

Greek (or 

Minor Latin). f 



Two Major Courses (Five hours a week for Two Years Each). 
Constituting any one of the following forty-three groups : 



I— XX. 


XXI. 


XXII. 


XXIII. 


Any Language 


Comparative 


Comparative 


Comparative 


with 


Literature 


Literature 


Literature 


any Language § 


with 


with 


with 


(Twenty Groups) . 


English. 


Italian. 


Spanish. 


XXIV. 


XXV. 


XXVI. 


XXVII. 


Comparative 


History with 


Economics and 


Philosophy 


Literature 


Economics and 


Politics with 


with 


with 


Politics. 


Philosophy. 


Greek. 


Italian and 








Spanish. § 









* The College provides matriculation classes, five hours a week throughout one year, 
for those students who in the examination for matriculation may have omitted Greek, 
French, or German; attendance on these classes is not obligatory before the begin- 
ning of the junior year, the student being free until then to make good her deficiencies 
by private study. Students not wishing to study Greek may substitute the course in 
minor Latin for the examination in matriculation Greek. Minor Latin may not be 
offered for examination without attendance on the college class after the beginning of 
the junior year. 

t A student choosing Latin as one of the languages of her group, and not wishing to 
study Greek, may substitute for the year of minor Latin five hours a week for one 
year of post-major Latin, or of French, or of German, or of Italian, or of Spanish. 

t Students electing minor mathematics must also elect trigonometry, two hours for 
one semester, or offer it for examination before entering these courses. Trigonometry 
and solid geometry may not be offered for examination without attendance on the 
college class after the beginning of the junior year. 

§ For the purpose of forming a group, Italian and Spanish may count as one lan- 
guage; they may be combined so as to form a course of fi\e hours a week for two 
years, as explained on page 122. 



60 



The 

Group 

System. 



Major 
Course. 



XXVIII. 


XXIX. 


XXX. 


XXXI. 


Philosophy 


Philosophy 


Philosophy 


Archaeology and 


with 


with 


with 


History of Art 


English. 


Mathematics. 


Physics. 


with 
Greek. 


XXXII. 


XXXIII. 


XXXIV. 


XXXV. 


Archaeology and 


Mathematics 


Mathematics 


Mathematics 


History of Art 


with 


with 


with 


with 


Greek. 


Latin. 


Physics. 


Latin. 








XXXVI. 


XXXVII. 


XXXVIII— XLIII. 


Mathematics 


Mathematics 


Any Science 




with 


with 


with 




Chemistry. 


Geology. 


any Science 
(Six Groups). 





Required 
Courses. 



Free Elective Courses. 

Ten hours a week for one year in any subject, or subjects, the student 
may elect. 

All candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Arts must elect 
their courses in accordance with the Group System, and a 
comprehension of it is essential to an understanding of the 
courses of instruction. 

In all departments as yet fully organised there is a course of 
five hours a week for two years, called a Major Course. When- 
ever one year of this course is of such a nature that it may be 
taken separately, it is marked as a Minor Course. It is required 
of every candidate for a degree to take two such major courses 
as shall be homogeneous, or shall complete each other, and 
major courses which fulfil this condition are designated as 
Groups. The object of this system is to enable the student 
to acquire the foundations of a specialist's knowledge; and 
the Required Courses, namely, English, philosophy, science, 
(or, if a second year of science be not elected, history, or econom- 
ics and politics, or philosophy, or mathematics) are intended 
in part to supplement the Group, and in part to insure a more 
liberal training than could be obtained if every student com- 
bined elective studies at pleasure. 

The required two years' course in English serves as a general 
introduction to the study of language and comparative literature. 
The required two years in science (or the substitute permitted 



61 

of one year's course in science and one j^ear's course in history, 
economics and politics, philosophy, or mathematics), permit 
the student of chemistry and biology to pursue advanced courses 
in one or both of these branches ; or to take a major course in 
physics; and they give for one year at least to the student of 
history and literature the same kind of instruction and discipline 
as is received by the scientific student. The one year's course 
in philosophy is a general introduction into the study of the 
laws, conditions, and history of thought. 

In almost all departments post-major courses, truly advanced Post-major 
courses which answer to graduate courses in many colleges, are 
organised and may be elected by students that have completed 
the major, or group, work in the subject. 

All minor courses that do not presuppose required courses Free Elective 
may be elected by any student, and special free elective courses oun 
of one, two, or three hours a week, are offered in many depart- 
ments. 

The following may serve as examples of some of the many 
combinations of studies that may be made by those candidates 
for a degree who wish to specialise as far as possible in particular 
departments: Matriculation French, Matriculation German, 
Matriculation Greek, and Minor Latin are bracketed as being 
properly included in the examination for matriculation. These 
bracketed courses may be offered for examination before the 
beginning of the junior year without attendance on the college 
classes. 

Classics. As Required Studies, [Matriculation French, or Matriculation 
German, or Matriculation Greek], English, Philosophy, Science (Physics, 
or Chemistry, or Geology, or Biology), another Science, (or Mediaeval, or 
Oriental History, or Minor Economics and Politics, or Minor Philosophy, 
or Minor Mathematics). As a Group, Greek and Latin. As Free Elec- 
tives, Post-major Greek and Latin, or Art and Archaeology, ten hours a 
week for one year. 

Modern Languages (other than English). As Required Studies, [Ma- 
triculation French, or Matriculation German, or Matriculation Greek, or 
Minor Latin], English, Philosophy, Science (Physics, or Chemistry, or 
Geology, or Biology), another Science, (or Mediaeval, or Oriental History, 
or Minor Economics and Politics, or Minor Mathematics). As a Group, 
German and French, or German and Italian and Spanish, or French and 
Italian and Spanish. As Free Electives, Italian and Spanish, or Post- 
major French or German, ten hours a week for one year. 



62 

English. As Required Studies, [Matriculation French, or Matriculation 
German, or Matriculation Greek, or Minor Latin], English, Philosophy, 
Science (Physics, or Chemistry, or Geology, or Biology), another Science, 
{or Mediaeval, or Oriental History, or Minor Economics and Politics, or 
Minor Philosophy). As a Group, Greek and English, or Latin and Eng- 
lish, or English and German, or English and French, or English and 
Italian and Spanish, or English and Spanish, or English and Comparative 
Literature, or English and Philosophy. As Free Electives, Latin and Ger- 
man, ten hours a week for one year. 

Mathematics (with Greek). As Required Studies, [Matriculation 
French, or Matriculation German, or Matriculation Greek], English, 
Philosophy, Physics, another Science, (or Post-major Mathematics, or 
Mediaeval, or Oriental History, or Minor Economics and Politics). As a 
Group, Mathematics and Greek. As Free Electives, Trigonometry, Post- 
major Mathematics, and Post-major Greek, ten hours a week for one 
year. 

Mathematics (with Physics). As Required Studies, [Matriculation 
French, or Matriculation German, or Matriculation Greek, or Minor Lathi], 
English, Philosophy, Chemistry, another Science, (Geology, or Biology), 
or Post-major Mathematics. As a Group, Mathematics and Physics. As 
Free Electives, Trigonometry, Post-major Mathematics, and Post-major 
Physics, ten hours a week for one year. 

History. As Required Studies, [Matriculation French, or Matriculation 
German, or Matriculation Greek, or Minor Latin], English, Philosophy, any 
Science, another Science, (or Oriental History, or Post-major History, 
or Economics and Politics, or Minor Philosophy, or Mathematics). As a 
Group, History and Economics and Politics. As Free Electives, Post-major 
History and Economics and Politics, ten hours a week for one year. 

Philosophy (with Greek). As Required Studies, [Matriculation French, 
or Matriculation German, or Matriculation Greek], English, Philosophy, 
Science, (Physics, or Chemistry, or Geology, or Biology), another Science, 
(or Mediaeval, or Oriental History, or Minor Economics and Politics, or 
Minor Mathematics). As a Group, Greek and Philosophy. As Free Elec- 
tives, Post-major Greek and Post-major Philosophy, ten hours a week for 
one year. 

Philosophy (with English). As Required Studies, [Matriculation 
French, or Matriculation German, or Matriculation Greek, or Minor Latin]. 
English, Philosophy, Science, (Physics, or Chemistry, or Geology, or 
Biology), another Science, (or Mediaeval, or Oriental History, or Minor 
Economics and Politics). As a Group, English and Philosophy. As Free 
Electives, Post-major Philosophy and Comparative Literature, ten hours 
a week for one year. 

Philosophy (with Economics and Politics, or with Mathematics, or 
with Physics). As Required Studies, [Matriculation French, or Matricu- 
lation German, or Matriculation Greek, or Minor Latin], English, Phi- 



63 

losophy, Science, (Physics, or Chemistry, or Geology, or Biology), another 
Science, (or Mediaeval, or Oriental History). As a Group, Philosophy 
with Economics and Politics, or with Mathematics, or with Physics. As 
Free Electives, Post-major Philosophy, Trigonometry and Post-major 
Economics, or Mathematics, or Physics, ten hours a week for one year. 

Archaeology and Art (with Greek). As Required Studies [Matricu- 
lation French or Matriculation German, or Matriculation Greek], English, 
Philosophy, Science (Physics, or Chemistry, or Biology, or Geology), another 
Science, (or Mediaeval, or Oriental History, or Minor Philosophy, or Mathe- 
matics). As a Group, Greek and Archaeology and Art. As Free Electives, 
Post-major Archaeology and Art, Post-major Greek, or Minor Latin, ten 
hours a week for a year. 

Science. As Required Studies, [Matriculation French, or Matriculation 
German, or Matriculation Greek, or Minor Latin], English, Philosophy, 
Science, (Physics, or Chemistry, or Geology, or Biology), another Science, 
(or Mediaeval, or Oriental History, or Minor Economics and Politics, or 
Minor Philosophy, or Minor Mathematics, or Elective Mathematics). As 
a Group, Physics and Chemistry, or Physics and Geology, or Physics and 
Biology, or Chemistry and Geology, or Chemistry and Biology, or Geology 
and Biology. As Free Electives, Mathematics and Physics, or Chemistry, 
or Geology, or Biology, ten hours a week for one year. 

Preliminary Medical Course. As Required Studies, [Matriculation 
French, or Matriculation German, or Matriculation Greek, or Minor Latin], 
English, Philosophy, Minor Physics, Major Physics. As a Group, Chem- 
istry and Biology. As Free Electives, Post-major Biology and Post-major 
Chemistry, or Minor Latin, (if not taken as a required study) ten hours a 
week for one year. 

The following combinations may be adopted by those who 
wish to pursue a three years' course in history, economics and 
politics, or science, or English, yet do not wish to elect an 
historical, economic, or a scientific or language group. 

I. As Required Studies, [Matriculation French, or Matriculation Ger- 
man, or Matriculation Greek, or Minor Latin], English, Philosophy, any 
Science, Mediaeval History. As a Group, any Language with any Lan- 
guage, or Chemistry and Biology. As Free Electives, Modern History, 
five hours a week for one year, and Post-major History five hours a week 
for one year. 

II. As above, but for Mediaeval History substitute Minor Economics 
and Politics, and for Modern History, Major Economics and Politics, and 
for Post-major History, Post-major Economics and Politics. 

III. .4s Required Studies, [Matriculation French, or Matriculation Ger- 
man, or Matriculation Greek, or Minor Latin], English, Philosophy, Phy- 
sics and Chemistry, or Geology, or Biology. As a Group, any Language 
with any Language. As Free Electives, Major and Post-major Physics or 
Chemistry, or Geology, or Biology, five hours a week for two years. 



64 

IV. As Required Studies, [Matriculation French, or Matriculation Ger- 
man, or Matriculation Greek, or Minor Latin], English, Philosophy, Science, 
(Physics, or Chemistry, or Geology, or Biology), another Science, (or 
Mediaeval, or Oriental History, or Minor Economics and Politics, or Minor 
Philosophy, or Minor Mathematics, or Elective Mathematics). As a 
Group, Greek and Latin. As Free Electives, Minor and Major English, 
five hours a week for two years. 

Every student is expected to consult the President in regard to 
the details and best arrangement of her various studies, and to 
register her course of study in the president's office before enter- 
ing upon college work. 

The studies leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts, may, as a 
rule, be taken in any order preferred by the student, but students 
are advised to plan their work carefully in advance with reference 
to the lecture schedule in order that a conflict of hours may not 
later in their course prevent them from electing all the studies 
which they desire. Students who elect English as a major study, 
for example, must take the general English literature lectures 
and essay work in their first and second years in the college 
because they are required to complete this work before entering 
the major course in English; again, a student choosing philosophy 
as one of her major studies must take the general course in 
philosophy in her first year if she wishes to elect post-major work 
in philosophy. Students choosing a scientific group, such as 
chemistry and biology, must arrange their courses so as to avoid 
conflicts in the hours for laboratory work. Trigonometry is 
required for the work of the minor course in mathematics and 
for the work of the major year of the group course in physics. 

Those students who have not decided on their group may 
in the first year pursue required studies only, or may elect 
one of the courses belonging to the group to which they most 
incline, with the understanding that if they should desire to 
change their group that course will be counted as a free elective ; 
those students whose tastes are already fully formed, or who are 
uncertain how many years they shall remain in college, may 
enter at once on free elective studies and on the study of both 
subjects of their group. There are obvious advantages for the 
student in deferring as long as possible the choice of her free 
electives and her group, inasmuch as the required studies, by 



65 

accustoming her to the methods of laboratory work, and to the 
study of languages, literature, and history, afford her every 
opportunity of ascertaining her true tastes and aptitudes. 

The students are not divided into the traditional college 
classes, and there is no limit of time for graduation; in order to 
pursue a wider course of reading in connection with single sub- 
jects, or to attend a greater variety of lectures, the ablest stu- 
dents may choose to defer graduation; personal considerations 
only determine the time spent in completing the studies re- 
quired for a degree. Nevertheless these requirements con- 
stitute strictly a four years' course; that is to say, if the time 
given to lectures and class work be, as is usual, fifteen hours a 
week, a student passing the ordinary matriculation examination, 
and availing herself of the preliminary courses of the college in 
the subjects which that examination did not include, in all cases 
requires precisely four years. To give more time for advanced 
studies and to lighten the college course, students are permitted 
to take examinations in certain subjects included in the course 
without attending the college classes in these subjects. Trigo- 
nometry and the fourth language (Matriculation French, or 
German, or Greek, or Minor Latin) may be taken in this way 
if offered before the beginning of the junior year. A student 
who can furnish proof that she has acquired advanced knowledge 
of German or French by attendance on regular advanced classes 
conducted by a school, or college, or by visiting teachers, or 
by residence abroad, or by study under German or French 
governesses at home, is permitted to take examinations for 
advanced standing in reading and composition in these languages, 
but only in the first three weeks after entering college. It is 
impossible for a student to reduce the length of the college course 
by one year unless she enters with knowledge considerably in 
advance of that required by the entrance examinations; other- 
wise the student will not be permitted to undertake the extra 
work which is too much to be accomplished during the summer 
vacations. Students entering college at the beginning of the 
second semester are not permitted to register for more than 
fifteen hours of college work, or to offer advanced standing 
examinations in order to complete the work required for a degree 
in less than four years. 



66 

Studies Graduates of Bryn Mawr College, and graduates of other 

too 1 ** colleges who shall have satisfied the Academic Council that the 

Second course of study for which they have received a degree is equiva- 

negree. ^ QB ^ ^ Q ^^ f Qr ^j^ ^he d e g ree f Bachelor of Arts is given by 

Bryn Mawr College, or who shall have attended such additional 
courses of lectures as may be prescribed, may apply to the Aca- 
demic Council to be enrolled as candidates for the degree of 
Doctor of Philosophy and Master of Arts; admission to the 
graduate school does not in itself qualify a student to become 
a candidate for this degree. A separate degree of Master of 
Arts' is open to graduates of Bryn Mawr College, but to them only. 
The Degree The candidate for the degree of Master of Arts must be a 
Master of Bachelor of Arts of Bryn Mawr College, and must have studied 
Arts. for one full year in the graduate school of Bryn Mawr College, 
devoting herself to systematic advanced work approved by the 
Graduate Committee of the Academic Council. The candidate 
must submit her proposed course of study for the approval of 
this committee on or before the second Wednesday in November. 
She must pass a special written examination on each subject to 
the satisfaction of the department in which she has studied, and 
must announce her candidacy to the President not later than the 
first day of May in the academic year in which the degree is to 
be conferred. 

The Degree The degree of Doctor of Philosophy and Master of Arts may 
D °f ,be conferred upon graduates of Bryn Mawr College, and upon 
Philosophy graduates of other colleges who shall have satisfied the Academic 
and Council either that the course of study for which they received a 
Arts. degree is equivalent to that for which the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts is given by Bryn Mawr College, or that it has been ade- 
quately supplemented by subsequent study. 

The candidate must have pursued for at least three years, after 
having received the first degree, a course of liberal (non-profes- 
sional) study at some college or university approved by the Aca- 
demic Council, and must have spent at least two of these years at 
Bryn Mawr College. The course of study leading to the degree 
of Doctor of Philosophy and Master of Arts must consist of one 
principal, or major, subject and of one or two subordinate, or 
minor, subjects and must be divided between at least two depart- 
ments. Two-thirds of the candidate's time should be spent on 



67 

the major subject and the remaining one-third on the minor 
subject or subjects, and the proposed combination of major and 
minor subjects must have been submitted for approval to the 
Graduate Committee. The candidate may be required to pursue 
certain auxiliary studies in connection with the subject that 
she has elected; and the degree of Doctor of Philosophy is given 
to no one who cannot read French and German, or who is 
unacquainted with Latin. The candidate must have written, 
on some subject connected with her major subject of study, a 
dissertation approved by the Faculty that bears satisfactory 
evidence of original research and must pass written examinations 
and an oral examination in the presence of the members of the 
Faculty on both major and minor subjects. These examinations 
are held after the dissertation has been accepted by the depart- 
ment in which it is offered and must be taken within the academic 
year in which the candidate applies for the degree. The degree 
is not conferred until the candidate has satisfied the above 
requirements and deposited one hundred and fifty printed copies 
of her dissertation, bound according to a prescribed model, in 
the office of the Secretary of the College. The degree of Doctor 
of Philosophy will in no case be conferred by the college as an 
honorary degree. 

The Bryn Mawr European Fellowship of the value of $500 European 
was founded in 1889. It is awarded annually to a member of Traveling 
the graduating class of Bryn Mawr College on the ground of ships. 
excellence in scholarship. The fellowship is intended to defray 
the expenses of one year's study and residence at some foreign 
university, English or Continental. The choice of a university 
may be determined by the holder's own preference, subject to 
the approval of the Faculty. 

The President M. Carey Thomas European Fellowship of the 
value of $500 was founded in 1896 by Miss Garrett of Baltimore 
and is awarded annually on the ground of excellence in scholar- 
ship to a student in her first year of graduate work at Bryn 
Mawr College. The fellowship is intended to defray the expenses 
of one year's study and residence at some foreign university, 
English or Continental. The choice of a university may be 
determined by the holder's own preference, subject to the 
approval of the Faculty. 



68 

The Mary E. Garrett European Fellowship of the value of $500 
was founded in 1894 by Miss Garrett of Baltimore and is awarded 
annually on the ground of excellence in scholarship to a student 
still in residence who has for two years pursued graduate studies 
at Bryn Mawr College. The fellowship is intended to defray 
the expenses of one year's study and residence at some foreign 
university, English or Continental. The choice of a university 
may be determined by the holder's own preference, subject to 
the approval of the Faculty. 

The Anna Ottendorfer Memorial Research Fellowship in 
German and Teutonic Philology of the value of $700 was founded 
in 1907 by Mrs. Anna Woerishoffer of New York City in memory of 
her mother. It is intended to defray the expenses of one year's 
study and residence at some German university and is awarded 
annually to a graduate student who has completed at least one 
year of graduate study at Bryn Mawr College but is not neces- 
sarily still in residence when making application for the fellow- 
ship. The fellowship will be awarded to the candidate who 
has pursued the most advanced work, or whose studies afford 
the most promise of future success. She must show such 
proficiency in her studies or in independent work as to furnish 
reason to believe that she will be able to conduct independent 
investigations in the field of Teutonic Philology or German. 
The choice of a university may be determined by the holder's 
own preference subject to the approval of the Faculty. Appli- 
cation for the fellowship should be addressed to the President. 

Resident Twelve resident fellowships, of the value of $525 each, are 
Felloiv- awar d e cL annually in Greek, Latin, English, German and Teutonic 
Philology, Romance Languages, History or Economics and 
Politics, Philosophy, Archaeology, Mathematics, Physics, Chem- 
istry, and Biology. They are open for competition to graduates 
of Bryn Mawr College, or of any other college of good standing, 
and will be awarded only to candidates who have completed at 
least one year of graduate work after obtaining their first degree. 
The fellowships are intended as an honor, and are awarded in 
recognition of previous attainments; generally speaking, they 
will be awarded to the candidates that have studied longest 
or to those whose work gives most promise of future success. 
All fellows may study for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, 



69 



the fellowship being counted, for this purpose, as equivalent to 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts. Fellows that continue their 
studies at the college after the expiration of the fellowship, 
may, by a vote of the directors, receive the rank of Fellows by 
Courtesy. 

A Research Fellowship in Chemistry of the value of $750 was 
founded in 1907. It is open to graduate students who have 
received the degree of Doctor of Philosophy or who have com- 
pleted equivalent work. The holder is required to reside at 
Bryn Mawr College for one year and to assist the head of the 
Department of Chemistry in research work. 

Fellows are expected to attend all college functions, to wear 
academic dress, to assist in the conduct of examinations, and to 
give about an hour a week to the care of special libraries in the 
halls of residence and in the seminaries, but no such sendee may 
be required of them except by a written request from the presi- 
dent's office; they are not permitted, while holding the fellow- 
ship, to teach, or to undertake any other duties in addition to 
their college work. They are required to reside in the college 
and are assigned rooms by the Secretary of the College. They 
are charged the usual fee of four hundred and five dollars for 
tuition, board, room-rent, and infirmary care. 

The holder of a fellowship is expected to devote at least one 
half her time to the department in which the fellowship is 
awarded, and to show, by the presentation of a thesis or in some 
other manner, that her studies have not been without result. 

Eighteen Graduate Scholarships, of the value of $200 each, 
may be awarded to candidates next in merit to the successful 
candidates for the fellowships; they are also open for compet- 
ition to graduates of Bryn Mawr College, or of any other college 
of good standing. 

Ten Graduate Scholarships, of the value of $405 each, were 
founded in 1909, five for English, Scotch, or Irish women, and 
five for German women, and are open for competition to all 
women of the prescribed nationality whose academic work has 
reached a standard equivalent to that denoted by the Bachelor's 
degree of any American college or university of acknowledged 
standing. The amount of the scholarship, four hundred and five 



Duties of 

Resident 

Fellows. 



Resident 

Graduate 

Sell of at - 

sh ips. 



Scholar- 
ships fm 

British 

and 
German 
Women. 






70 

dollars, covers the fees for tuition, board, residence, including 
light, heat, and service, and infirmary care for the academic 
year. A furnished single room in the graduate wing of one of 
the halls of residence is assigned to each scholar. 
Duties of Scholars are expected to reside in the college, to attend all 

LIPS'? CbPYI,t 

Scholars, college functions, to wear academic dress and to assist in the 
conduct of examinations. 
Applications Application for resident fellowships or scholarships should be 

fo T T?P 9? ' GLPYlti 

Fellowships m ade as early as possible to the President of the College, and 
and _ must be made not later than the fifteenth* of April preceding the 
academic year for which the fellowship or scholarship is desired. 
Blank forms of application will be forwarded to the applicants. 
A definite answer will be given within two weeks from the latest 
date set for receiving applications. Any original papers, printed 
or in manuscript, which have been prepared by the applicant 
and sent in support of her application, will be returned, when 
stamps for that purpose are enclosed, or specific directions for 
return by express are given. Letters or testimonials from pro- 
fessors and instructors will be filed for reference. 
Tuition For graduate students attending six or more hours a week 
Graduate °^ Inures, and for fellows and graduate scholars the tuition 
Students, fee is one hundred and twenty-five dollars a year, payable 
half-yearly in advance. For other graduate students who do 
not wish to devote all their time to graduate work the fees 
are as follows, payable in advance: for one hour a week of 
lectures, ten dollars a semester; for two hours a week of lectures, 
twenty dollars a semester; for three hours a week of lectures, 
thirty dollars a semester; and for four or five hours a week 
of lectures, forty dollars a semester, f This arrangement is 

*In the case of candidates for the Scholarships open to British and German women 
applications must be received by April the first. Applications for the scholarships 
should be accompanied by full particulars of the candidate's academic work, by diplomas 
or certificates and by letters of recommendation from professors and should be addressed 
in the case of British candidates to the President of Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, 
Pennsylvania, U. S. A., and in the case of German candidates to Seiner Excellenz dem 
Herrn Staatssekretar des Innern, Reichsamt des Innern, Berlin, Germany. 

tThe fees charged are reckoned on the basis of the actual hours of conference or lec- 
ture, irrespective of the number of undergraduate hours to which the course is 
regarded as equivalent. 

In counting the number of hours for which a graduate student is registered the 
following special arrangements are made in regard to laboratory courses: payment 
for a one hour lecture course in a scientific department entitles the student to four hours 



n 

made especially for non-resident graduate students, but those 
who wish to take five hours a week of lectures or less may 
live in the college halls on the understanding that they must 
give up their rooms if needed for students who are taking the 
full amount of graduate work and paying the regular tuition fee. 
The tuition fee for the semester becomes due as soon as the stu- 
dent is registered in the college office. No reduction of this fee can 
be made on account of absence or for any other reason whatsoever. 
Graduate students are admitted to residence or to attendance on 
lectures at any time during the year, and in this case a proportion- 
ate reduction is made in the charges for board and room-rent 
and for tuition. Every student who enters the college must regis- 
ter immediately at the comptroller's office, and must register her 
courses at the president's office within two weeks after entrance 
under penalty of exclusion from the college. Any change made 
later in the courses registered must be reported immediately to 
the president's office, or the courses will not be permitted to 
count, and a charge of one dollar will be made for each change 
made in the course after it has been definitely registered. 

Graduate students taking courses in scientific departments (Physics, Chemistry, 
Geology, Biology, and Psychology) amounting to six or more hours a week of lecture 
courses or its equivalent in laboratory courses are charged a laboratory fee of eigh- 
teen dollars a semester, with the following exceptions : if the student takes, as a regu- 
lar student, courses in subjects not enumerated above amounting to six hours a week 
the laboratory fee is reduced to twelve dollars a semester ; and if she takes, as a regular 
student, courses in subjects not enumerated above amounting to ten hours a week the 
laboratory fee is reduced to six dollars a semester. 

Graduate students taking less than six hours a week of lectures, or its equivalent in 
laboratory work, are charged a laboratory fee of ten dollars a semester for every labora- 
tory course of four or more hours a week, and of five dollars a semester fo^jpvery labora- 
tory course of less than four hours a week. 

Residence in the college buildings is optional except for holders Residence 
of resident fellowships and scholarships. In each hall of residence, ^ /°i u t e 
except Merion Hall, a special wing or corridor is reserved for Students. 
graduate students, and in order to secure entire quiet no under- 
graduate students are permitted to engage rooms in the graduate 
wings. The expense of board and residence in the graduate 
wings of the college halls is two hundred and seventy-five dollars. 



of laboratory work in addition with no extra charge except the laboratory fee. Stu- 
dents registered for laboratory work only, are charged the following tuition fee: for 
each two and one-half hours of undergraduate laboratory course and for each five hours 
of graduate laboratory course the same fee as for a one hour lecture course. The labora- 
tory fees as stated on page 71 are charged in addition to the charge for tuition. 



72 

Of this amount two hundred dollars is the charge for board, 
and is payable half-yearly in advance; the remainder is room- 
rent, and is payable yearly in advance. Every student has a 
separate bedroom. Room-rent includes all expenses of furnish- 
ing, service, heating, and light.* 

A deposit of fifteen dollars is required from each graduate 
student, fellow, or scholar who desires to reserve a room in a 
hall of residence. The amount of this deposit will be deducted 
from the rent if the room is occupied by the student; it will 
be refunded if the student gives formal notice to the Secre- 
tary of the College before the fifteenth of July preceding the 
academic year for which the application is made that she wishes 
to withdraw her application. In other cases the deposit will be 
forfeited. 
Summary For graduate students the fees are as follows: 

Tf-ifyt. Tuition for the semester, payable on registration: 

■5L For one hourf a week of lectures $ 10 .00 

fi,j .f For two hours a week of lectures $ 20.00 

w, , . For three hours a week of lectures $ 30.00 

For four or five hours a week of lectures $ 40 .00 

For six or more hours a week of lectures $ 62 . 50 

Room-rent for the academic year, payable on registration $ 75.00 

Board for the semester payable on registration $100.00 

Students whose fees are not paid within one month of the date 
fixed are not permitted to continue in residence or in attendance 
on their classes. 

Total expenses for the academic year: 

Tuition fee, for six or more hours a week of lectures $125.00 

Room-rent $ 75 .00 

Board $200.00 

Infirmary fee $ 5 . 00 

Total for tuition, residence, and infirmary care for the 

academic year $405 . 00 

Laboratory fees for the academic year $10 to $36 

Tuition For undergraduate students and hearers the charge for tuition 

for i s two hundred dollars a year, irrespective of the number of 

graduate courses attended or the actual time of attendance, and is payable 

Students. j n advance. J No reduction of this fee can be made on account 

* Rugs and towels must be furnished by the students themselves. Graduate stu- 
dents will, on request, be supplied with rugs. 

t See footnote, page 70. 

t Students that intend to take the degree of Bachelor of Arts in February will be 
charged only one half the regular tuition fee if they register this intention in the comp- 
troller's office before beginning their college work, provided their entire academic work 
cari be completed in the first semester. 



73 

of absence or for any other reason whatsoever. Every student 
who enters the college must register immediately at the comp- 
troller's office, and must register her courses at the president's 
office within two weeks after entrance under penalty of exclusion 
from the college. Any change made later in the courses regis- 
tered must be reported immediately to the president's office, 
or the courses will not be permitted to count, and a charge of 
one dollar will be made for each change made in the course 
after it has been definitely registered. 

For undergraduate students there is an additional charge of ten dollars a semester 
for materials and apparatus for every laboratory course of four or more hours a week, 
and of five dollars a semester for every laboratory course of less than four hours a week. 

In courses in Geology each hour of field work is counted as one hour of labora- 
tory work. Not more than one laboratory course is required of candidates for a degree. 

Residence in the college buildings is required of all under- Residence 
graduate students except those who reside with their families jt°1 , 
in Philadelphia or in the neighborhood. The expense of graduate 
board and residence in the college halls for undergraduate Students. 
students is three hundred dollars a year and upwards, accord- 
ing to the room or rooms occupied by the student; in about one- 
third of the college rooms the expense of board and residence is 
three hundred or three hundred and twenty-five dollars. Of 
this charge two hundred dollars is the charge for board, and is 
payable half-yearly in advance; the remainder is room-rent, 
and is payable yearly in advance. Every student has a separate 
bedroom. Room-rent includes all expense of furnishing, service, 
heating, and light.* 

The health of the students is under the charge of a Health 
Committee consisting of the President, the Dean of the 
College, the Director of Athletics, the Senior Warden, and the 
physicians of the College. See page 171 of this Calendar. 

Every student entering the college will be vaccinated unless 
she can furnish satisfactory proof that she has been success- 
fully vaccinated not more than two years previously. 

The conduct of the students in all matters not purely aca- 
demic, or affecting the management of the halls of residence, or 
the student body as a whole, is in the hands of the Students' 
Association for Self-Go vernment, which was organised in 1892. 
All persons studying in Bryn Mawr College, whether graduates 
or undergraduates, are members of this association. 

*Rugs and towels must be furnished by the students themselves. 



74 

The College reserves the right to exclude at any time students 
whose conduct or academic standing renders them undesirable 
members of the college community, and in such cases the fees due 
to the college are not refunded or remitted. 

Plans and descriptions of the academic buildings and of the 
halls of residence, Merion Hall, Radnor Hall, Denbigh Hall, 
Pembroke Hall West, Pembroke Hall East, and Rockefeller Hall, 
with a full account of the halls and tariff of rooms/are published 
as Part 4 of the Bryn Mawr College Calendar and may be ob- 
tained by application to the Secretary of the College. Each of the 
halls of residence (except Pembroke, which has a common dining- 
hall and kitchen for the two wings) has its separate kitchen and 
dining-hall, provides accommodation for from sixty to seventy 
students, and is under the charge of a resident warden. Applica- 
tion for rooms should be made as early as possible. The demand 
for rooms is very great and since every room unnecessarily 
reserved may prevent some other student from entering the 
college, every application for a room or suite of rooms, whether 
made by a student already in residence or by a candidate for 
admission to the college, must be accompanied by a deposit of 
fifteen dollars, otherwise the application will not be registered. 
The amount of this deposit will be deducted from the rent if the 
room or suite of rooms assigned be occupied by the applicant. 
The amount of this deposit will be refunded in the following 
cases: 

a. If an applicant who is a student of the college gives formal 
notice to the Secretary of the College that she wishes to withdraw 
her application before the first of May preceding the academic 
year for which the application is made. 

b. If a candidate who has applied for admission to the college 
in October gives formal notice to the Secretary of the College 
that she wishes to withdraw her application before the fifteenth 
of July preceding the academic year for which the application is 
made. 

c. If a candidate who has applied for admission to the college 
in February gives formal notice to the Secretary of the College 
that she wishes to withdraw her application before the first of 
December preceding the semester for which the application is 
made. 



75 

In all other cases the deposit will be forfeited to the college. 

The above mentioned deposit of fifteen dollars must also be 
made by each student in residence in order to insure the tenure 
of her room for the following academic year.* 

Every applicant giving up later than the first of September the 
room or suite of rooms assigned to her for the ensuing academic 
year is responsible for the rent thereof for the whole year; excep- 
tion will be made only in the case of applicants that take, and fail 
to pass, the autumn examinations for matriculation, but even in 
such case the deposit cannot be refunded. Every applicant for a 
room in February will, with the above exceptions, be respon- 
sible for the rent of the room or suite of rooms assigned to her 
for one semester, unless she gives formal notice of withdrawal to 
the Secretary before the first of January. The charges for room- 
rent are not subject to remission or deduction under any circum- 
stances, being considered forfeit in case of withdrawal for any 
cause whatever. The applicant is not entitled to relet the rooms 
thus left vacant, this right being reserved exclusively by the 
college, no refund being made to the applicant in case the room 
or suite of rooms thus left vacant are relet. Every student who 
changes her room is required to pay an extra fee of fifteen dollars. 

In case of prolonged illness and absence from the college 
extending over six weeks or more, there will be a proportionate 
reduction in the charge for board. 

Rooms are assigned to the entering class during the summer 
preceding the academic year for which application is made. 
No particular room or set of rooms may be applied for. Appli- 
cants are allowed to choose in turn from among all the rooms 
left vacant, the order of choice being determined by the date at 
which the application is registered. Cheques should be drawn 
payable to Bryn Mawr College. 

Students are expected to provide their own rugs and towels, but in every other 
respect the rooms are completely furnished. Electric reading lamps, table napkins, 
sheets, etc., are provided by the college. No part whatever need be taken by the 
students in the care of their own rooms. 

There are open fire-places in nearly all the studies and in many single rooms, but the 
rooms are sufficiently heated by steam; the air in each room is changed every ten 

♦Every student except a member of the freshman class who moves from one hall to 
another is charged a fee of ten dollars for moving, and every student except a member 
of the freshman class who moves from one room to another in the same hall is charged 
a fee of five dollars. This fee entitles a student to have five pieces moved free of charge. 



76 



Summary 

of 
Expenses 
for 
Under- 
graduate 
Students. 



Loan 
Fund. 



minutes, and the temperature is regulated by a thermostat in each room. Electric 
reading lamps are provided in every room. The students' personal washing may be 
done by any laundry recommended by the college for 50 cents a dozen, or about $8 a 
half-year for one dozen pieces a week. On account of the danger of infectious diseases 
students in residence are not permitted to send their washing to private laundresses. 

No charge is made for sending meals to students that are in the infirmaries by the 
order of the physicians of the college. 

Accommodation is provided for students that wish to remain at the college during 
the Christmas and Easter vacations at $1.25 a day or $8.75 a week for graduate, and 
$1.50 a day or $10.50 a week for undergraduate students. 

Students who expect to spend any part of the Christmas or Easter vacations in 
Bryn Mawr, Philadelphia, or the immediate neighborhood, not in their own homes and 
not in the college halls of residence, are required to consult the Secretary in regard to 
the arrangements that they wish to make. 

For undergraduate students the fees are as follows : 

Tuition for the academic year, payable October 1st $200.00 

Room-rent for the academic year, payable October 1st $100.00* 

or $125, $150, $175, $200, $225, $250, $275, $300, $350, de- 
pending on the room or rooms occupied. 

Infirmary fee for the academic year, payable October 1st $ 5.00 

Board for the academic year, payable in equal instalments, 

October 1st and February 1st $200.00 

Total for tuition, residence and infirmary fee for the 

academic year with minimum room-rent $505.00 

Laboratory fees, for laboratory course of less than four hours a 

week for the academic year $ 10 .00 

For laboratory course of four or more hours a week for the aca- 
demic year $20.00 

Graduation fee $ 20 .00 

Students whose fees are not paid within one month of the date 
fixed are not permitted to continue in residence or in attendance 
on their classes. 

The Students' Loan Fund of Bryn Mawr College was founded by the Class of 
1890 for the purpose of receiving contributions, however small, from those who are 
interested in aiding students to obtain an education. The money thus contributed is 
distributed in the form of partial aid, and as a loan. It is as a rule applied to the assist- 
ance of those students only who have attended courses in the college for at least one 
year. The Fund is managed by a committee consisting of the President of the College 
and representatives of the Alumnae Association of Bryn Mawr College. The committee 
reports yearly to the Board of Trustees and to the Alumnae Association. The com- 
mittee consists of the following members: President M. Carey Thomas; Miss Martha G. 
Thomas, Secretary and Treasurer, Bryn Mawr College; Miss Mary Taylor Mason, 
School House Lane, Germantown, Philadelphia; Mrs. Bernard Todd Converse, Ard- 
more, Pa., and Miss Anne Hampton Todd, 2115 Spruce Street, Philadelphia. Contri- 
butions may be sent to any member of the committee. Applications for loans should 
be sent to the Treasurer of the committee, and all applications for loans for any given 
year should be made before April 20th, of the preceding academic year. 



* In about one-sixth of the college rooms the rent is $100, making the cost of board, 
residence, and tuition for undergraduate students $500; but students desiring to apply 
for rooms at $100 must file a statement at the president's office that they are unable 
to afford rooms at a higher price. 



77 

Scholarships — Eight competitive entrance scholarships, four of the value of 8300 ScholciV- 
and four of the value of S200, were founded by the College in 1896. They are awarded sllips. 
annually to candidates receiving their final certificates in the spring matriculation 
examinations of Bryn Mawr College, a first scholarship of the value of §300 and 
a second of the value of $200 being open to candidates from each of the following 
districts: — (a) The New England States; (6) New York, New Jersey, and Delaware; 
(c) Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, and Wisconsin, and the States west of the Missis- 
sippi River; (d) Pennsylvania and all places not included in (a), (b), and (c). The 
district to which a candidate is considered to belong is determined by the school at which 
she receives her final preparation, or in case of preparation by private study by the 
place of residence during the year preceding the final examination; but candidates may 
present themselves for examination at any place where such examination is held. These 
scholarships, which are to be held for one year only, are awarded in each of the abo%e 
named districts on the basis of the sum total of marks obtained by the candidate, but 
no one is eligible for the first scholarship who has received more than two conditions in 
the twenty sections of the examination, and no one is eligible for the second scholarship 
who has received more than four conditions in the twenty sections of the examination. 
When the examination has been divided no account is taken of those conditions incurred 
in the first division which have been passed off in the final examination. The com- 
petition is limited to those who intend to spend at least one year in residence at Bryn 
Mawr College, who have not studied at any other college, and have not cancelled any 
division of the Bryn Mawr College matriculation examinations. All those who present 
themselves are ipso facto candidates for these scholarships, no formal declaration of 
candidacy being required. 

Eight scholarships for non-resident students of $200 each, entitling the, holder to 
free tuition, renewable for four consecutive years, were founded by the College in 1893, 
and were presented to the public schools of Philadelphia through Dr. Brooks, the Super- 
intendent of the Public Schools of Philadelphia, on the following terms: 1. The candi- 
date shall have complied with the requirements for admission to Bryn Mawr College, 
and shall have received all her preparation for the entrance examination of Bryn Mawr 
College in the High School for Girls, Philadelphia; 2. She shall have been recommended 
by the Board of Education of Philadelphia, and their recommendation shall have been 
approved by the Directors of Bryn Mawr College; 3. The scholarship shall be renewed 
annually by the Directors, until the holder has completed her fourth year at college, 
provided her conduct and academic work have been satisfactory to the authorities of 
the college. 

The L. C. B. Saul Memorial Scholarship. In 1893 the Alumnae Association of 
the Girls' High and Normal School of Philadelphia founded at Bryn Mawr College 
a scholarship entitling the holder to free tuition, renewable for four years. This 
scholarship is awarded every four years to the graduate of the Girls' High School 
who passes the matriculation examination of Bryn Mawr College for that year with 
the highest credit. In 1904 the scholarship was renamed the L. C. B. Saul Me- 
morial Scholarship. 

One scholarship of $200 entitling the holder to one year's free tuition, was founded by 
the College in 1895, and was presented to the School Board of Education of Lower 
Merion Township, Montgomery County, Pa., for the benefit of graduates of the High 
School of Lower Merion Township, Ardmore, Pa., on the following terms: 1. The can- 
didate shall have complied with the requirements for admission to Bryn Mawr College, 
and shall have received all her preparation for the entrance examinations in the Lower 
Merion High School; 2. She shall have been recommended by the School Board of 
Education of Lower Merion Township, and their recommendation shall have been, 
approved by the Directors of Bryn Mawr College ; 3. If in any year there shall be, in 
the judgment of the School Board of Education of Lower Merion Township, no satis- 
factory candidate in the graduating class, the scholarship may be renewed during the 
following year for the benefit of a former holder, provided her conduct and academic 
work have been satisfactory to the authorities of the college. 



78 

One scholarship of $200 entitling the holder to one year's free tuition was founded 
by the Directors in 1909 and was presented to the School Board of Education of Norris- 
town, Pa., for the benefit of graduates of Norristown High School, on the following 
terms: 1. That the candidate shall have received all her preparation for Bryn Mawr 
College in the Norristown High School; 2. That she shall have successfully passed 
the entrance examinations of Bryn Mawr College not later than the June preceding 
the autumn in which she wishes to enter the college ; 3. That this scholarship shall not 
be awarded twice to the same person unless the Superintendent of Schools shall file in 
the office of the President of the College a statement to the effect that no other member 
of the graduating class is able to compete for the scholarship; 4. That the candidate 
shall have been nominated to the Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College by the 
Superintendent of Schools or by the Board of Education and that such nomination 
shall have been duly approved by the Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College. 

One competitive scholarship of the value of $200, renewable till graduation, is open 
annually for competition to members of the Society of Friends who are unable to pay 
the full charge for tuition and residence. This scholarship is awarded, as far as 
possible, under the same rules as those governing the award of the eight competitive 
entrance scholarships of Bryn Mawr College. Two additional scholarships of the value 
of $200 each are open for competition to graduate students who are members of the 
Society of Friends and need financial assistance. Three scholarships, of $400 each, 
for one year, are open to those graduates of Earlham, Penn, and Guilford Colleges 
respectively, who in the preceding year have completed the course of their several 
colleges with most distinction. These scholarships have been established by the Trus- 
tees in accordance with the desire of the Founder of the college to promote the advanced 
education of women in the Society of Friends, of which he was a member. 

Four scholarships of $500 each, renewable for four consecutive years, were founded 
in 1885 by the Board of Managers of the Bryn Mawr School, of Baltimore, Maryland. 
One of these scholarships is open annually to the graduate of the Bryn Mawr School 
who has completed the school course with most distinction. 

The James E. Rhoads Memorial Scholarships, two in number, each of the value of $250 
for one year, were founded in 1897 by the Alumnse Association of Bryn Mawr College, in 
memory of the first President of the College, Dr. James E. Rhoads. The first of these 
scholarships is the James E. Rhoads Sophomore Scholarship , and is open to those stu- 
dents only who have completed college work amounting to not less than ten and not 
more than twenty-two and a half hours (three semesters' work) for a year, and have been 
in attendance upon lectures at Bryn Mawr College not less than one semester. The 
second of these scholarships is the James E. Rhoads Junior Scholarship, and is open to 
those students only who have completed college work amounting to not less than twenty 
and not more than thirty-seven and a half hours (five semesters' work) for a year, and 
have been in attendance upon lectures at Bryn Mawr College not less than three semes- 
ters. To be eligible for either of these two scholarships a student shall have obtained 
a high degree of excellence in her work, shall express her intention of fulfilling the re- 
quirements for the degree of A.B. at Bryn Mawr College, and shall prove her need of 
financial aid to the satisfaction of the nominating committee. In case either scholar- 
ship is awarded to a non-resident student, its value shall not exceed $150. The nomi- 
nating committee consists of the President of Bryn Mawr College, two members of 
the Academic Council of the College, appointed annually by the Council, the Presi- 
dent of the Alumnae Association of Bryn Mawr College and three other members of the 
Alumnaa Association appointed by the executive committee of the Alumnae Association. 
Applications for the scholarships should be addressed to the Assistant to the President, 
Bryn Mawr College, to be forwarded to the Chairman of the Committee. 

The Mary E. Stevens Scholarship of the value of $160 founded in 1896 by former 
pupils of Miss Mary E. Stevens's School is awarded to a member of the Sophomore 
class who needs financial assistance, to be held at Bryn Mawr College during the 
junior year. It is open to those students only who have registered for college 
work amounting to not less than forty and not more than sixty-five hours for a 



79 

semester and have been in attendance upon lectures at Bryn Mawr College not less 
than three semesters. Applications for this Scholarship should be addressed to th 
President of Bryn Mawr College. 

Two Maria Hopper Scholarships of the value of $200 each were founded in 1901 by 
the bequest of the late Maria Hopper of Philadelphia. They are awarded, on the ground 
of excellence in scholarship, to two members of the freshman class who need financial 
assistance, to be held at Bryn Mawr College during the sophomore year. They are 
open to those students only who have registered for college work amounting to not less 
than twenty and not more than forty-five hours for a semester and have been in attend- 
ance upon lectures at Bryn Mawr College not less than one semester. Applications 
for these scholarships should be addressed to the President of Bryn Mawr College. 

The Anna M. Powers Memorial Scholarship of the value of $200 was founded in 1902 
by Mrs. J. Campbell Harris in memory of her mother, Anna M. Powers. The scholar- 
ship is open to members of the junior class who need financial aid in order to complete 
the work for the degree and is to be held in the senior year. The holder is nominated 
by the donor subject to the approval of the President and Faculty of the College. 

The Maria L. Eastman Brooke Hall Memorial Scholarship of the value of $100 was 
founded in 1901 in memory of Maria L. Eastman, Principal of Brooke Hall School for 
Girls, Media, Pa., by the Alumnae and former pupils of the school. It is awarded each 
year on the ground of scholarship, irrespective of the need of financial aid, to a member 
of the junior class to be held during the senior year. No application for the scholarship 
is necessary. 

A special Thomas H. Powers Memorial Scholarship of the value of $200 is given in 
1910 by Mrs. J. Campbell Harris in memory of her father, Thomas H. Powers. The 
holder is nominated by the donor subject to the approval of the President and Faculty 
of the College. 

The Elizabeth Duane Gillespie Scholarship in American History of the value of $60 
was founded in 1903 by the Pennsylvania Society of Colonial Dames of America, in 
memory of Elizabeth Duane Gillespie. It is awarded annually to a member of the 
sophomore or junior class, on condition that the holder of the scholarship devote to 
the study of American history at least four hours a week for one year during the last 
two years of her college course. The candidate is to be selected by the Faculty of Bryn 
Mawr College on the ground of excellence in scholarship. 

The Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania presented to Bryn Mawr College in 
1910 a scholarship to be awarded to a graduate of the college recommended by the 
President and Faculty as in their opinion qualified to take up the study of medicine. 
The holder is given free tuition for one year at the Woman's Medical College of Penn- 
sylvania and the scholarship will be renewed for the three remaining years of the 
medical course if the holder's record prove satisfactory. 

Foundation of Scholarships. — The sum of five thousand dollars given or left by 
will to the Directors of Bryn Mawr College, will found a perpetual scholarship giving 
free tuition to one student every year. The scholarship may be given in memory of 
and named after any person designated by the donor. 



Form of Bequest.* 

I give, devise and bequeath 

to the Trustees of Bryn Mawr College. 



* The bequest may be made, if desired, for endowment, foundation [of professors' 
chairs, scholarships, fellowships, or for some other specified purpose. 



80 

INSTRUCTION. 

Libraries. The fact that the college is situated in the suburbs of Phila- 
delphia enables the student to make use of all the resources of 
the libraries of Philadelphia, as well as of those of the college 
proper. 

The college library has been collected within the past twenty- 
four years, and is designed to be, as far as possible, a library for 
special study. There are at present on its shelves about sixty 
thousand bound volumes, and ten thousand doctors' disserta- 
tions and pamphlets, the collection including the classical 
library of the late Professor Sauppe, of Gottingen, which was 
presented to the college in 1894, and the Semitic library of the 
late Professor Amiaud, of Paris, acquired in 1892. A more 
detailed description of these two collections may be found on 
pages 90 and 128. 

The books needed principally for graduate and research work 
are shelved in the fourteen seminary libraries and the books on 
physics, chemistry, geology and biology in the departmental 
libraries in Dalton Hall adjoining the laboratories in these sub- 
jects. The books of reference, sets of periodicals, and proceed- 
ings of societies and the main collection of the library are kept 
in the stack room. 

In each of the six halls of residence are collections of from 
five to six hundred volumes each, consisting of books useful to 
undergraduate students, not only supplementing their private 
libraries, but duplicating such books in the general library as 
are most used. A seventh collection of this character is kept 
in the main library for the use of non-resident students. 

Students may take from the general and departmental libra- 
ries for periods of two weeks each, any books except reference 
books and books reserved for special use. Books in the hall 
libraries and books reserved for special use may be taken for two 
hours. 

The sum of about five thousand dollars is expended yearly 
for books under the direction of the heads of the several colle- 
giate departments, and, in addition to many gifts of books, about 
twenty thousand dollars has been presented to the library during 
the past ten years for expenditure in special departments. Over 
four hundred publications and reviews in the English, German, 



81 



Greek, French, Italian, Spanish, Norse, and Swedish languages, 
are taken by the library, as follows : 

General and Miscellaneous Periodicals. 



Academy. 

Annales Politiques et Littfiraires. 

Athenaeum. 

Atlantic Monthly. 
♦Bibliotheque de la Faculty des Let- 
tres de l'UniversIte' de Paris. 

Bookman. 

Bookman (English). 
*Book News Monthly. 

Bookseller. 
*Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly. 

Bulletin of Bibliography. 
♦Bulletin of the New York Public 
Library. 

Century. 
♦Columbia University Quarterly. 

Contemporary Review. 

Country Life in America. 

La Cultura. 

Cumulative Book Index. 

Deutsche Rundschau. 

Dial. 

Fortnightly Review. 

Forum. 

Gottingische Gelehrte Anzeigen. 

Harper's Monthly Magazine. 

Harper's Weekly. 

Harvard Graduate Magazine. 

Internationale Wochenschrift fur 
Wissenschaft, Kunst u. Technik. 

Jahresverzeichniss der an den deut- 
schen Schulanstalten erschienenen 
Abhandlungen. 
♦Johns Hopkins University, Circulars. 

Library Journal. 

Mercure de France. 

Mind and Body. 
♦Monthly Bulletin of the Carnegie 
Library of Pittsburgh. 



Munchener allgemeine Zeitung. 

Nachrichten von der Konlgllchen 
Gesellschaft der Wissenschaften, 
Gottingen. 

Nation. 

Nationale Deutschland; 

Neue Rundschau. 

Nineteenth Century. 

North American Review. 

Notes and Queries. 

Nuova Antologia. 

Outlook. 
♦Pennsylvania Library Notes. 

Preussische Jahrbiicher. 

Publishers' Weekly. 

Punch. 

Putnam's Monthly and the Critic. 

Quarterly Review. 
♦Rassegna Contemporanea. 

Reader's Guide to Periodical Litera- 
ture. 

Review of Reviews. 

Revue Critique d'Histoire et de Lit- 
erature. 

Revue de Paris. 

Revue des Deux Mondes. 

Revue Politique et Lltt6raire : Revue 
Bleue. 

Saturday Review. 

Scribner's Magazine. 

Spectator. 

Der Ttirmer. 
♦Tipyn o* Bob. 

♦University of Colorado, Studies. 
♦University of Nebraska, Studies. 
♦University of Washington, Studies. 

Westminster Review. 

Die Woche. 

World's Work. 



♦Bryn Mawr Record. 
New York Evening Post. 
New York Times. 



Newspapers. 

New York Tribune. 
Philadelphia Public Ledger. 



Art and Archaeology. 



American Journal of Archaeology. 
Bulletin de Correspondance hell£- 
nlque. 



♦Bulletin of the Metropolitan Mu- 
seum of Art, New York. 
Burlington Magazine. 



'Presented by the Publishers. 



82 



Ephemeris Archaiologike. 

Jahrbuch des Kalserlich deutschen 
archaologlschen Institute. 

Jahresbericht fiber die Fortschritte 
der classischen Alterthumswissen- 
schaft. 

Jahresbefte des osterreichischen 
archaologlschen Institutes In Wien. 

Journal of Hellenic Studies. 

Mittbeilungen des Kalserlich deut- 
schen archasologischen Instltuts, 
Athenische Abteilung. 



Mittheilungen des Kalserlich deut- 
schen archseologischen Instituts, 
Romische Abteilung. 

*Museum of Fine Arts Bulletin, Bos- 
ton. 

Revue Arch€ologique. 
Zeitschrift des Deutschen Palastina 
Vereins. 



Economics and Politics. 



* Advocate of Peace. 

Allgemeines statistisches Archiv. 

American Federationist. 
*American Flag. 

American Journal of Sociology. 

American Political Science Review. 

Annals of the American Academy of 
Political and Social Science. 

Bibliographia Economica Univer- 
salis. 
♦Bulletin of the New York State 

Department of Labor. 
•Bulletin of the University of Wis- 
consin, Economics and Political 
Science Series. 

Columbia Law Review. 

Economic Journal. 

Economic Review. 

Equity Series. 

Harvard Law Review. 

International Socialist Review. 

Jahrbiicher fur Nationalokonomle u. 
Statistik. 

Johns Hopkins University Studies 
in Historical and Political Science. 



Journal of Political Economy. 

Journal of the Royal Statistical So- 
ciety. 

Political Science Quarterly. 

Publications of the American Eco- 
nomic Association. 

Publications of the American Sta- 
tistical Association. 

Quarterly Journal of Economics. 

Revue Bibliographique. 
* Southern Workman. 

Survey. 
•University of Missouri Studies, So- 
cial Science Series. 
•University of Pennsylvania Publica- 
tions, Series in Political Economy 
and Public Law. 

Vierteljahrschrlft fur Philosophic u. 
Soziologie. 

Yale Review. 

Zeitschrift fiir Socialwlssenschaft. 

Zeitschrift fiir Volkswirtschaft, So- 
cial-politik u. Verwaltung. 



Education. 
Educational Review. 
Educational Times. 
Elementary School Teacher. 
Journal of Educational Psychology. 
Journal of Pedagogy. 
Lehrproben and Lehrgange. 
Pedagogical Seminary. 



Education. 

* Publications of the Association of 
Collegiate Alumna?. 
Revue Internationale de 1'Enseigne- 

ment Supgrieur. 
Revue Universitaire. 
School Review. 
•University of California Publica- 
tions, Education. 



American Historical Review. 
• Bulletin of the University of Wis 
consin, History Series. 



History. 

English Historical Review. 
Historische Vierteljahrschrift. 
Historische Zeitschrift. 



•Presented by the Publishers. 



83 



♦Illinois State Historical Society 
Journal. 
Klio, Beitrage zur alten Geschlchte. 
Pennsylvania Magazine of History. 
Revue des Questions HIstoriques. 



Revue Historique. 
♦University of Pennsylvania Publica- 
tions, Series in History. 
♦University of Toronto Studies, His- 
tory and Economics. 



Philology and Literature, Classical. 



Bulletin Bibliographlque et P6da- 
goglque du Musee Beige. 

Classical Journal. 

Classical Philology. 

Classical Quarterly. 

Classical Review. 

Classical Weekly. 

Harvard Studies in Classical Philol- 
ogy. 

Hermes. 

Mnemosyne. 

Le Musee Beige, Revue de Phllolo- 
gie Classique. 



Philologische Untersuchungen. 

Quellen und Forschungen zur latel- 
nischen Philologie. 

Revue de Philologie. 

Revue des Etudes Grecques. 

Rheiniscnes Museum fiir Philologie. 

Rivista di Filologia. 

Studi Italianl dl Filologia Classlca. 

Wiener Studlen, Zeitschrift fur clas- 
sische Philologie. 

Wochenschrift fur klasslsche Philolo- 
gie. 



Philology and Literature, 

American Journal of Philology. 

Berliner philologische Wochen- 
schrift. 

Eranos. 

Indogermanlsche Forschungen. 

Journal of Philology. 

Memoires de la Societe" Neo-phllolo- 
glque a Helsingfors. 

Neue Jahrbiicher fur das klasslsche 
Altertum, Geschichte und deutsche 
Llteratur. 



General and Comparative. 

Transactions of the American Philo- 
logical Association. 
♦University of Pennsylvania Publica- 
tions, Series in Philosophy and 
Literature. 

Zeitschrift fiir das Gymnasialwesen. 

Zeitschrift fur die 6'sterreichischen 
Gymnaslen. 

Zeitschrift fiir vergleichende Litera- 
turgeschichte. 

Zeitschrift fiir vergleichende Sprach- 
forschung. 



Philology and Literature, Modern. 



Anglia. 

Anglistische Forschungen. 

Annales de la Soci6t6 Jean-Jacques 

Rousseau. 
Annales Romantiques. 
Archiv fiir das Studium der neueren 

Sprachen. 
Archivio Glottologico Itallano. 
Arkiv for Nordisk Filologl. 
Beiblatt zur Anglia : Mltteilungen 

iiber engllsche Sprache und Llt- 

teratur. 
Beitrage zur Geschlchte der deut- 

schen Sprache und Llteratur. 
Bonner Studien zur englischen Phil- 
ologie. 
British Society of Franciscan 

Studies. 



Bulletin de la Soclete" des Anclens 
Textes Frangais. 

Bulletin hispanique. 

Chaucer Society, Publications (Both 
series). 

Deutsche Literaturzeitung. 

Dialect notes. 

Early English Text Society Publi- 
cations (Both series). 

Engllsche Studien. 

Euphorion. 

German American Annals. 

Germanisch-romanische Monats- 
schrift. 

Giornale Dantesco. 

Giornale Storico della Letteratura 
Italiana. 

Goethe Jahrbuch. 



♦Presented by the Publishers. 



84 



Jahrbuch der deutschen Shakespeare 

Gesellschaft. 

Jahrbuch des Vereins fur nieder- 
deutsche Sprachforschung. 

Jahresbericht iiber die Erscheinun- 
gen auf dem Gebiete der german- 
ischen Philologie. 

Journal of Germanic Philology. 

Kieler Studien zur englischen Phil- 
ologie. 

Korrespondenzblatt des Vereins fur 
niederdentsche Sprachforschung. 

Kritischer Jahresbericht iiber die 
Fortschritte der romanischen Phi- 
lologie. 

Literarische Echo. 

Literarisches Centralblatt. 

Literaturblatt fur germanisehe und 
romanische Philologie. 

Le maltre Phonetique. 

Modern Language Notes. 

Modern Language Review. 

Modern Philology. 

Miinchener Beitrage zur romanischen 
und englischen Philologie. 

Palaestra. 

Poet-lore. 

Publications of the Modern Lan- 
guage Association. 



Quellen und Forschungen zur Sprach- 

und Culturgeschichte der german- 

ischen VOlker. 
Rassegna Bibliograflca. 
Revue d'Histoire Litteraire de la 

France. 
Revue des Etudes Rabelaisiennes. 
Revue Germanique. 
Revue Hispanique. 
Romania. 

Romanische Forschungen. 
Schriften der Goethe Gesellschaft. 
Scottish Text Society, Publications. 
Societe des Anciens Textes fran- 

cais, Publications. 
Socifite des Textes Francois Mo- 

dernes, Publications. 
Studi Medievali. 
Wiener Beitrage zur englischen 

Philologie. . 
Zeitschrift fiir den deutschen Unter- 

richt. 
Zeitschrift fiir deutsche Philologie. 
Zeitschrift fiir deutsches Altertum 

und deutsche Litteratur. 
Zeitschrift fiir franzosische Sprache 

und Litteratur. 
Zeitschrift fiir romanische Philolo- 
gie. 



Philology and Literature, Semitic. 



American Journal of Semitic Lan- 
guages and Literatures. 

Proceedings of the Society of Bib- 
lical Archaeology. 

Recueil d'archaeologie orientale. 



Recueil de Travaux relatifs a la 
Philologie et tl l'Archeologie egyp- 
tiennes et assyriennes. 

Zeitschrift fiir agyptische Sprache 
und Altertumskunde. 

Zeitschrift fiir Assyriologie. 



Philosophy and PsycJwlogy. 



American Journal of Psychology. 

Annt'e Psychologique. 

Archiv fiir die gesamte Psycholo- 
gic 

Archiv fiir Geschichte der Philoso- 
phle. 

Archiv fiir systematische Philoso- 
phic 

Archives de Psychologie. 

Archives of Psychology. 

British Journal of Psychology. 

Bulletin de l'Institut Psychologique. 

International Journal of Ethics. 

Journal de Psychologie. 

Journal fiir Psychologie und Neu- 
rologie. 



Journal of Philosophy, Psychology 
and Scientific Methods. 

Mind. 

Monist. 

Philosophical Magazine. 

Philosophical Review. 

Psychological Bulletin. 

Psychological Review. 

Psycholgical Review ; Monograph 
Supplements. 

Psychological Review ; Psychologi- 
cal Index. 

Psychologische Arbeiten. 

Psychologische Studien. 

Revue de 1'Hypnotisme. 

Revue de Metaphysique. 



85 



Revue Philosophique. 
♦University of California Publica- 
tions, Philosophy. 
♦University of Toronto Studies, 

Psychology Series. 
Vierteljahrsschrift fur wissenschaft- 
liche Philosophie. 



Zeitschrift fur Psychologie und 
Physiologie der Sinnesorgane : 1 
aht., Zeitschrift fiir Psychologie. 
2 abt., Zeitschrift fiir Sinnesphy- 
siologie. 



Religion. 



American Friend. 

American Journal of Religious Psy 
chology and Education. 

American Journal of Theology, 
f Association Monthly. 
•{-Australasian Intercollegian. 
♦Baptist Missionary Magazine. 
fBible Student and Teacher. 

Biblical World. 

Bibliotheca Sacra. 
♦Deaconess Advocate. 
•{•Deutsche christliche Studenten-Be- 

wegung-Mitteilungen. 
•{•Evangel. 

Expositor. 

Expository Times. 
♦Friends' Missionary Advocate. 
♦Hartford Seminary Record. 

Harvard Theological Review. 



yllerald of Gospel Liberty. 
■j-Intercollegian. 

Journal of Biblical Literature. 

Journal of Theological Studies. 
•{Medical Missionary. 
-{•Missionary Review. 

Proceedings of the Society of Bib- 
lical Archaeology. 
♦Publications of the American Jewish 

Historical Society. 
-{-Record of Christian Work. 

Religious Education. 

Revue Bibliqne. 
♦Spirit of Missions. 
fStudent Movement. 
♦Washington Chapel Chronicle. 
♦Woman's Missionary Friend. 
fYoung Women of Canada. 



Science, Biology. 



American Journal of Anatomy. 

American Journal of Physiology. 

American Naturalist. 

Anatomischer Anzeiger. 

Archiv fiir Anatomie und Physiolo- 
gle. 

Archiv fiir die gesammte Physiologic 

Archiv fiir Bhtwicklungsmechanik 
der Organismen. 

Archiv fiir mikroskopische Anato- 
mie. 

Archiv fiir Protistenkunde. 

Bibliographia Physiologica. 

Biologisches Centralblatt. 

Biometrika. 

Botanische Zeitung. 1. Abtheihmg. 

Botanische Zeitung. 2. Abtheilung. 

Botanisches Centralblatt. 
♦Brown University, Contributions 
from the Biological Laboratory. 

Centralblatt fiir Pliysiologic 
♦Illinois State Laboratory of Natural 
History Bulletin. 



Jahrbiicher fiir wissenschaftliche 

Botanik. 
Journal de Physiologic 
Journal of Experimental Zoology. 
Journal of Physiology. 
Journal of the Royal Microscopical 

Society. 
Mittheilungen aus der Zoologischen 

Station zu Neapel. 
Quarterly Journal of Microscopical 

Science. 
♦University of California Publica- 
tions. Physiology. 
♦University of California Publica- 
tions, Zoology. 
♦University of Pennsylvania, Contri- 
butions from the Botanical Labo- 
ratories. 
♦University of Pennsylvania, Contri- 
butions from the Zoological Labo- 
ratories. 
♦University of Toronto Studies, Bio- 
logical Series. 



♦Presented by the Publishers. 



fin Christian Union Library. 



86 



University of Toronto Studies, Phys- 
iological Series. 



Science, 

American Journal of Science. 

Atti della Iteale Accademia della 

Scienze di Torino. 
Bulletin de PAcadSmie Imperiale des 

Sciences de St. Pgtersbourg. 
♦Bulletin of the University of Wis- 
consin, Engineering Series. 
♦Bulletin of the University of Wis- 
consin, Science Series. 
Comtes Rendus des Stances de 

l'Acad€mie des Sciences. 
Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society 

Journal. 
*Kansas University, Science Bul- 
letin. 
Nature. 
*New York State Museum Bulletin. 

Science, Geology, 

Centralblatt fur Mineralogle. 

Economic Geology. 

Geographical Journal. 

Geological Magazine. 

Geologisches Centralblatt. 
*Georgia Geological Survey Bulletin. 
* Illinois Geological Survey Bulletin. 

Journal of Geography. 

Journal of Geology. 

Meteorologische Zeitschrlft. 

Mineralogical Magazine. 



Zeitschrlft fur wlssenschaftliche 

Zoologie. 
Zoologischer Anzeiger. 

General. 

1 * Oklahoma University Research Bul- 



letin. 

Philosophical Transactions of the 
Royal Society of London. 

Popular Science Monthly. 

Proceedings of the American Philo- 
sophical Society. 

Proceedings of the Royal Society 
of London. 

Science. 
♦Technology Review. 
•University of Missouri Studies, Sci- 
ence Series. 

Verhandlungen der physikalisch- 
medicinischen Gesellschaft zu 
Wiirzburg. 



and Geography. 

Mineralogische und petrographlsche 
Mittheilungen. 

National Geographic Magazine, 

Neues Jahrbuch fur Mineralogle, 
Geologie und Palaeontologie. 

Philadelphia Geographical Society 
Bulletin. 

Quarterly Journal of the Geological 
Society. 
*U. S. Monthly Weather Review. 
*University of Toronto Studies, Geo- 
logical Series. 



Mathematics, Chemistry, and Physics. 



Acta Mathematica. 

American Chemical Journal. 

American Journal of Mathematics. 

Annalen der Chemie. 

Annalen der Physik. 

Annales de Chimie et de Physique. 

Annales de la Faculte des Sciences 

de 1'Universite de Toulouse. 
Annales Sclentifiques de 1'EcoIe 

Normale Sup<§rieure. 
Annali dl Matematlca. 
Astrophysical Journal. 
Beiblatter zu den Annalen der 

Physik. 
Berichte der deutschen chemischen 

Gesellschaft. 



Bibliotheca Mathematica. 

Bollettino di Bibliografla e Storia 
delle Scienze Matematiche. 

Bulletin de la Societe" Mathgmatlque. 

Bulletin des Sciences Math6matiques. 

Bulletin of the American Mathe- 
matical Society. 

Giornale di Matematiche. 

Jahrbuch iiber die Fortschritte der 
Mathematik. 

Jahresbericht der deutschen mathe- 
matiker Vereinigung. 

Jahresbericht fiber die Fortschritte 
der Chemie. 

Journal de Math6matiques. 



•Presented by the Publishers. 



87 



Journal de Physique. 

Journal fiir die relne und ange- 
wandte Mathematik. 

Journal fiir praktische Chemle. 

Journal of the Chemical Society. 

Mathematische Annalen. 

Messenger of Mathematics. 

Monatshefte fiir Chemie. 

Physical Review. 

Physikalische Zeitschrift. 

Proceedings of the London Mathe- 
matical Society. 

Quarterly Journal of Mathematics. 

Rendiconti del Circolo Matematico 
di Palermo. 

Science Ahstracts. 



Transactions of the American 
Mathematical Society. 
*U. S. Bureau of Standards Bulletin. 
♦University of Pennsylvania Publica- 
tions, Astronomical Series. 
♦University of Toronto Studies, Pa- 
pers from the Chemical Labora- 
tories. 
♦University of Toronto Studies, Pa- 
pers from the Physical Labora- 
tories. 
Zeitschrift fiir anorganische Chemie. 
Zeitschrift fiir Elektrochemie. 
Zeitschrift fur Mathematik und 

Physik. 
Zeitschrift fiir physikalische Chemie. 



The library is open daily from eight a.m. to ten p.m. Books 
may be taken out by the students unless specially reserved for 
library reference use. 

There are in Philadelphia the following important libraries 
which are available for students: 

The Philadelphia Library Company, which contains about 
227,000 volumes and 30,000 pamphlets, and is at all times open 
to the students for consultation. Private subscription, for 
four volumes, $12 a year, or $10 for nine months. 

The Mercantile Library, which contains about 190,000 volumes 
and 10,000 pamphlets. Private subscription, $2.00 a year for 
two separate works at a time. 

The Library of the Academy of Natural Sciences, which contains 
about 60,000 volumes. The Council of the Academy has gen- 
erously conceded the use of its library and of its museum to the 
students of Bryn Mawr College. 

The Library of the University of Pennsylvania, which contains 
about 300,000 volumes and 50,000 pamphlets. The custodians 
of this library have always shown great courtesy in placing rare 
volumes at the disposal of the college. 

The Free Library of Philadelphia, which contains about 340,000 
volumes and 59,000 pamphlets, and is at all times open to the 
students for consultation. 



♦Presented by the Publishers. 



88 

Courses There are offered each year to undergraduates major courses 
Study. °f fi ye hours a week, for two years, in the following subjects: 
Greek, Latin, English,. German, French, Italian and Spanish, 
Comparative Literature, History, Economics and Politics, 
Philosophy, Archaeology and History of Art, Mathematics, Phys- 
ics, Chemistry, Geology, and Biology; and elective courses in the 
above and in Biblical Literature, Experimental Psychology, 
Education, Meteorology and Oceanography. 

Graduate courses are offered in Sanskrit, and Indo-European 
Philology, Greek, Latin, English Philology including Anglo- 
Saxon, Early and Middle English, English Literature, German 
Literature, Gothic, Teutonic Philology, Old Norse, Old High 
German, Middle High German, Old Saxon, Modern and Old 
French, Italian, Spanish, and other Romance Languages, Hebrew, 
Aramaic, Assyrian, Biblical Literature, History, Economics and 
Politics, Philosophy, Experimental Psychology, Education, 
Classical Archaeology, History of Art, and Mathematics, Physics, 
Chemistry, Physical Chemistry, Geology, Mineralogy, Palaeon- 
tology, Morphology, Physiology, and Physiological Chemistry. 
Courses in The courses in language and literature are meant, first of all, 
Language ^o k e complete in themselves, and extensive enough to meet the 
Literature, needs of special students, and secondly, to facilitate the study of 
comparative philology or of comparative literature. Whenever 
it has been practicable, as in Greek and Latin and in the modern 
languages, one half of the major course has been devoted to 
strictly linguistic studies, and the other half to the history of 
literature. The group work in English is constructed on this 
model, one half of the course being devoted to philology, and 
the other half to literary interpretation. Courses of parallel 
reading are required of all students of language and literature, 
precisely as laboratory work is required of the students of 
chemistry or biology; these courses are intended to acquaint the 
students with the works of numerous authors, and it is especially 
hoped that students of Greek and Latin will, by this means, 
accustom themselves to read these languages without assistance. 
The courses in ancient and modern languages are of equal 
difficulty, and are placed on a footing of equality. The tradi- 
tional separation between ancient and modern languages has 
been disregarded, because, although strictly classical students may 
always be inclined to combine Greek and Latin, there is, never- 



89 

theless, no modern literature of which the study may not fitly 
be preceded, or supplemented, by the study of Latin or Greek. 

Whenever possible, as in the courses in Greek, Latin, English, Lectures. 
German, and French literature, in history, politics, philosophy, 
the history of art, mathematics, and science, the instruction is 
given by means of lectures. It is the object of these lectures to 
give a clear and succinct statement of facts and principles; to 
enumerate and criticise with frankness hand-books, authorities, 
and editions; to bring the student's knowledge up to date, and 
to inform her, step by step, what things have been definitely 
ascertained and what things remain to be investigated. It is 
intended that the notes taken on these lectures, in addition to 
their immediate practical use, shall be of lasting value for refer- 
ence, and be the starting-point, or at least the schedule, of studies 
to be undertaken at some future day. Every isolated student 
knows how difficult it is to be initiated into the modern scholastic 
movement otherwise than orally; and, therefore, in addition to 
the lectures, the several instructors appoint certain hours in 
which the students may consult them freely. The lectures are 
accompanied by class work, prescribed reading, and by frequent 
examinations; they are strictly special, not popular. 

The Professors or Associates appointed are the recognised 
heads of their departments, and only such instructors have 
been chosen as are qualified to direct both graduate and under- 
graduate work. 

The undergraduate and graduate courses offered in the years Courses of 

1909-10 and 1910-11 are as follows: Instruc- 

tion. 

Sanskrit, Greek, and Latin. 

Professors and instructors: Dr. Arthur Leslie Wheeler, Dr. 
Henry Nevill Sanders, Dr. Wilmer Cave Wright, Dr. George A. 
Barton, Dr. Tenney Frank, Dr. Caroline Louise Ransom, Dr. 
Hans Weyhe, Dr. Roland G. Kent, Miss Abby Kirk, Miss Eliza- 
beth Andros Foster, and Dr. Isabelle Stone. 

Exceptional facilities for the study of all departments of 
classical philology are offered by the large classical library owned 
by the college. The greater part of this library is formed by 
the well-known collection of the late Professor Hermann Sauppe, 



90 

of Gottingen, which was acquired in 1894. This has been supple- 
mented by purchases made by the college library, so that the 
classical library now numbers some seven thousand volumes, 
including complete sets of most of the important journals, and 
about seven thousand dissertations and monographs. 

Sanskrit and Comparative Philology. 

The instruction in this department is under the direction of 
Dr. Hans Weyhe, Associate in Teutonic Philology and Sanskrit, 
and Dr. Roland G. Kent, Non-resident Lecturer in Sanskrit. 

Graduate Courses. 
Graduate Lectures on Comparative Philology, and Philological Seminary, Dr. 

Courses. Weyhe. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

Students entering this course are expected to be familiar with German and French; 
a short preliminary course in Sanskrit is also of great aid to the student. The lectures 
on comparative philology treat of the connection of the Greek and Latin languages with 
the related languages of the Aryan group, first, phonetically, secondly, from the point of 
view of grammatical forms, and lastly, from the point of view of syntax. In the first 
part of the course, which covers what during the last few years has been the field of the 
most active research, the student is introduced to the latest theories and discoveries in 
Aryan phonetics, and is expected to read and criticise the articles appearing from time to 
time in the philological journals, and to prepare reports on these articles. The same 
method is pursued during the investigation of the history of forms; and in the third 
part of the course the student begins the study of comparative syntax by a close com- 
parison of the use of cases and verbal forms in Sanskrit, Greek, and Latin. 

Elementary Sanskrit, Dr. Weyhe. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

Whitney's Grammar and Lanman's Reader are used. 

The courses in Comparative Philology and in Elementary Sanskrit will not, as a rule 
be given in the same year. 

Advanced Sanskrit, Dr. Kent. , One hour a week throughout the year. 

(Given in 1909-10.) 

Lectures are given on the phonology and morphology of Sanskrit. The study of 
Lanman's Reader is continued and Kalidasa's Sakuntala, Act I. is read. 

Greek. 

The instruction in this department is under the direction of 
Dr. Henry Nevill Sanders*, Professor of Greek; Dr. Wilmer Cave 
Wright, Associate Professor of Greek; Dr. George A. Barton, 
Professor of Biblical Literature and Semitic Languages ; Dr. Caro- 
line Louise Ransom, Associate Professor in the History of Art 
and Classical Archseology, Miss Abby Kirk, Reader in Elementary 
Greek and Dr. Isabelle Stone, Reader in Greek. The instruction 



♦Granted leave of absence for the second semester of 1909-10. 



91 

offered in Classical Greek covers twenty-three hours of lectures 
and recitations a week apart from courses in Classical Art and 
Archseology and New Testament Greek; it includes five hours 
a week of Matriculation Greek; ten hours a week of under-grad- 
uate major and minor work; three hours a week of post-major 
work, open only to graduates and to undergraduates that have 
completed the major course in Greek; and five hours a week of 
graduate work. 

A course of five hours a week throughout the year is provided for those Matricu- 
students that wish to study Greek, and whose examination for matricula- lotion 
tion did not include it. Grammar and Composition are studied. Xeno- *-*<>w rse ' 
phon's Anabasis or Memorabilia and selections from Homer are read. 
Students that wish may substitute for this course the minor, or first year's 
course in Latin. Either the matriculation course in Greek or the minor 
course in Latin is required of all candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Arts 
that have not passed the matriculation examination in Greek. This course 
is given by Miss Kirk under the direction of Dr. Wright. 

First Yeah. 
(Minor Course.) 
1st Semester. (Given in each year.) 

Plato, Apology, Crito, Dr. Sanders. Two hours a weeL Major 

Greek Prose Composition, Dr. Sanders. One hour a week. Course. 

Homer, Odyssey, Dr. Wright. Two hours a week _ 

(May be taken as a free elective.) 

The Greek courses may not be offered for examination for advanced standing without 
class attendance. 

Private reading: Euripides, Alcestis, 11. 1 to end must be read by students taking the 
five-hour course; Euripides, Alcestis, 11. 1-475 must be read by students taking the 
course in Homer only; Sophocles, Philoctetes, 11. 1-728 must be read by students taking 
the courses in Plato and in Greek Prose Composition, omitting the course in Homer. 
Examinations on the private reading must be taken at one of two stated times during 
the semester by all students pursuing the Greek courses. 

2nd Semester. 

Euripides, Medea* Dr. Sanders. Two hour8 a week , 

Greek Prose Composition,* Dr. Sanders. 0ne h0UT a weelc _ 

Homer, Iliad, Dr. Wright. Two hours a week _ 

(May be taken as a free elective.) 

The Greek courses may not be offered for examination for advanced standing without 
class attendance. 

Private reading: Sophocles. Philoctetes, 11. 1-1080 and 1218-1313 must be read 
by students taking the five-hour course; Euripides, Alcestis, 11. 476-961 must be read 

♦This course wasTgiven by Dr. Stone in 1909-10. 



92 

by students taking the course in Homer only; Sophocles, Philoctetes, II. 729 to end 
must be read by students taking the courses in Euripides and Greek Prose Composition , 
omitting the course in Homer. Examinations on the private reading must be taken at 
one of two stated times during the semester by all students pursuing the Greek courses. 

Second Year. 
1st Semester. {Given in each year.) 

Demosthenes, Dr. Sanders. Two hours a week. 

Aristophanes, Frogs, Dr. Sanders. One hour a week. 

History of Greek Literature, Ionio-Dorian, and Attic periods, Dr. 
Wright. Two hours a week. 

No student is admitted to any part of the major course in Greek who has not com- 
pleted all the work of the minor course. 

Private reading: ^Eschylus, Prometheus Vinctus, 11. 1 to end must be read by 
students taking the five-hour course: ^Eschylus, Persa, 11. 1-680 must be read by 
students taking the courses in Demosthenes and Aristophanes, omitting the course in 
Greek literature; ^Eschylus, Prometheus Vinctus, 11. 1-436 must be read by students 
taking the course in Greek literature, omitting the courses in Demosthenes and Aris- 
tophanes. Examinations on the private reading must be taken at one of two stated 
times during the semester by all students pursuing the Greek courses. 

2nd Semester 

yEschylus, Agamemnon* Dr. Sanders. Two hours a week 

Sophocles, CEdi-pus Rex* Dr. Sanders. One hour a week. 

History of Greek Literature, Attic, Alexandrine, and Grseco-Roman 

periods, Dr. Wright. Two hours a week. 

No student is admitted to any part of the major course in Greek who has not com- 
pleted all the work of the minor course. 

The second year's work of the major course may be divided so as to cover a period 
of two years; but if elected for the first semester, the lectures on literature must be 
elected for the second semester also. The lectures on Demosthenes and ^schylus 
and the one-hour courses in Aristophanes and Sophocles may not be elected separately. 

Private reading: iEschylus, Persce, 11. 1 to end must be read by students taking the 
five-hour course; ^Eschylus, Persae, 11. 681 to end must be read by students taking the 
courses in YEschylus and Sophocles, omitting the course in Greek literature: 
.Eschylus, Prometheus Vinctus, 11. 437-876 must be read by students taking the course 
in Greek literature, omitting the courses in iEschylus and Sophocles. Examina- 
tions on the private reading must be taken at one of two stated times during the 
semester by all students pursuing the Greek courses. 

Group: Greek with any language, or with Philosophy, or with 
Archaeology and Art, or with Mathematics. 

Free Elective Courses. 

Freer Minor courses, amounting to five hours a week which may be taken us 

Elective f ree electives, are offered in Classical Archaeology and the History of Art. 
Courses. See pageg 145 to 147 

* This course was given by Dr. Stone in 1909-10. 



93 



Post-major Courses. 

The post-major courses are designed to bridge over the interval between 
the ordinary undergraduate studies and graduate work. As the amount 
of time given to undergraduate subjects differs in different colleges gradu- 
ate students frequently find it advisable to elect some of these courses. 
Post-major courses are offered in Classical Archaeology and History of Art; 
see page 147. No student that has not completed the minor and major 
courses in Greek is admitted to any post-major course in Greek. 

In 1909-10 the following post-major courses are offered: 
1st Semester 

^Eschylus, Oresteia, Dr. Sanders. 

Aristophanes, Acharnians, Knights, Dr. Sanders. 

2nd Semester. 

Theocritus, Dr. Wright. 
Pindar, Dr. Stone. 
Sophocles, Electra, Dr. Stone. 

In 1910-11 the following post-major courses are offered. 
1st Semester. 

Private Orations of the Attic Orators, Dr. Sanders. 
Sophocles, Antigone, Dr. Sanders. 

2nd Semester 

Thucydides, Dr. Sanders. 

Aristotle, Poetics, Bacchylides, Dr. Sanders. 

In 1911-12 the following post-major courses are offered: 
1st Semester. 
Lucian, Dr. Sanders. 
Sophocles, Trachiniae, Dr. Sanders. 

2nd Semester. 

Melic Poets, Dr. Sanders. 

Greek Prose Composition, Rhetoric, and the Theory of Imitative Writ- 
ng, Dr. Sanders. 0ne hour a week 

Euripides, Heracles, Dr Sanders. one hour a week. 



Post- 
Major 

Courses. 



Two hours a week. 
One hour a week. 

One hour a week. 

Two hour 8 a week. 

One hour a week. 



Two hours a week. 
One hour a week. 

Two hour 8 a week. 
One hour a week. 



Two hour 8 a week. 
One hour a week. 

One hour a week. 



Graduate Courses. 

Five hours a week of seminary work are offered each year to graduate Graduate 
students of Greek, accompanied by the direction of private reading and Courses. 
original research. The books needed by the graduate students are col- 
lected in the seminary library of the department. No undergraduates are 



94 

admitted to graduate courses or to the seminary library, but the post- 
major courses of the department amounting to three hours a week may be 
elected by graduates. 

The seminary subjects in Greek are varied from year to year in two series, 
Attic Tragedy, Orators, and Historians, and the Homeric Question, Me- 
nander, Plato, and Aristophanes, in order that they may be pursued by a 
student for consecutive years. Students electing Greek as part of the 
work for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy are required to offer with each 
three hour seminary a two hour seminary and vice versa, so as to make up 
five hours of seminary work, but both seminaries need not be taken in the 
same year. Three five hour courses are required of students who offer 
Greek as a major subject in the examination for the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy; two five hour courses are required when Greek is the only 
minor subject offered, and one five hour course when two minors are 
offered. A large part of the work expected of graduate students consists 
of courses of reading pursued under the direction of the department; and 
reports of this reading are from time to time required of the students. A 
' reading knowledge of French and German is required. The course in com- 
parative philology conducted by Dr. Weyhe is recommended to graduate 
students of Greek. For graduate courses in History of Art and Classical 
Archaeology, which may be offered as a minor by students taking Greek 
as a subject for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, see pages 147-148. 

Greek Seminary, Dr. Sanders. Three hours a week throughout the year. 

{Given in each year.) 

In 1909-10 Greek orators are studied in the seminary. The work consists of the 
reading of large portions of all the orators and the critical interpretation of a selected 
part of each. Lectures are given on legal antiquities, the syntax, and the style of 
the various authors, in conjunction with which Dionysius of Halicarnassus and the 
Greek Rhetoricians are studied. The later rhetoricians are treated and their criticism 
of antiquity investigated. Students are expected to provide themselves with the 
Teubner text editions of Antiphon, Andocides, Lysias, Isocrates, Isseus, iEschines, Hy- 
pereides, and Demosthenes. The classical library is well equipped with works on the 
orators. This seminary met in 1909-10 during the first semester only. 

In 1910-11 the main subject of the seminary is the Greek Historians. Thucydides 
is studied in detail and reports are made on data of history contained in Greek literature 
in general. Lectures are given by the instructor on subjects connected with Greek 
historiography, such as the composition of Thucydides 's history, the syntax and style 
of Thucydides, the history of early prose, Greek historical inscriptions. 

In 1911-12 the subject of the seminary is Attic Tragedy. The special work of the 
seminary is devoted to the editing of Euripides's Orestes. Members of the seminary 
report on special subjects and give critical summaries of current classical literature. 

Greek Seminary, Dr. Wright. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

(Given in each year.) 

In 1909-10 the subject of the seminary in the first semester is Menander. A thor- 
ough study of all the extant fragments of Menander is made with reports by the students 
on Menander's style, metres, text, and influence on Latin Comedy. The recent dis- 
covery of considerable remains of Menander's Comedies and the publication of the 
Cairo Menander (1907) have provided sufficient material tomakesuchacourse profitable 
to students of the Greek drama. 



95 

[n the second semester the subject of the seminary is the Homeric Question, and the 
work consists of a review of the discussions of the Homeric poems since the publication 
of Wolf's Prolegomena. The various tests that have been applied to the poems by 
archaeologists, linguists, historians of myths, and aesthetic critics are taken up and 
criticised in detail. 

In 1901-11 the subject of the seminary is Aristophanes. The aim of the seminary is 
to make the students familiar with the more important Aristophanic literature up to 
the present day. Portions of the text are interpreted by the class and reports on 
assigned topics, literary, historical, and archaeological, connected with the plays are 
expected from all the members. All the comedies of Aristophanes are read in the course 
of the year; lectures are given by the instructor on the metres and syntax of Aristo- 
phanes, on the dramatic structure of the plays and on the history of Attic comedy. 
Part of the work consists of analyses of Latin and German dissertations on Aristophanes 
which are presented by members of the class. Every member of the class should pro- 
vide herself in advance with a complete text of Aristophanes. The Teubner (Leipsic) 
or Clarendon Press (Oxford) editions are recommended. 

In 1911-12 the seminary will be on Plato. The work is mainly literary and critical. 
Lectures on the style, philosophy, and chronology of the dialogues are given by the 
instructor; a detailed interpretation of a portion of Plato, and reports on topics set for 
discussion are given by the class. The students are expected to read the Republic, 
Thecetetus, Parmenides, and Sophist and discuss certain problems arising from these 
dialogues. The aim of the course is to lay a foundation for independent work by 
familiarising the students with the achievements of German scholarship and the general 
field of Platonic literature up to the present day. Analyses of German and Latin dis- 
sertations are expected from the class. Lutoslawski's Origin and Growth of Plato's 
Logic will be studied and criticised in detail. Every member of the seminary should 
provide herself in advance with a complete text of Plato. The Teubner (Leipsic) or 
Clarendon Press (Oxford) editions are recommended. 

Seminary in Plato, Dr. Wright. Two hours a week during the second semester. 

(.Given in 1909-10.) 

Latin. 

The instruction in this department is under the direction of 
Dr. Arthur Leslie Wheeler, Professor of Latin, Dr.Tenney Frank, 
Associate Professor of Latin, and Miss Elizabeth Andros Foster, 
Reader in Latin. The instruction offered in Latin covers twenty- 
four hours of lectures and recitations a week, and includes ten 
hours a week of undergraduate major and minor work; eight 
hours a week of post-major work open only to graduates and to 
undergraduates that have completed the major course in Latin ; 
and six hours a week of graduate work. 

First Year. 
(.Minor Course.)* 
1st Semester. (Given in each year.) 

Livy, Books xxi and xxii, Dr Wheeler. Two hours a week. Major 

— — _ (Joursc . 

* For regulations regarding the passing off of the Minor Latin, see footnote, page 53. 
Students passing off the Minor Latin course for advanced standing are not re- 
quired to take the separate examinations in private reading. 



96 

Latin Prose Composition, Dr. Wheeler. Owe hour a week. 

Horace, Odes, Dr. Frank. Two hours a week. 

(May be taken as a free elective.) 

Private reading: Stories from Gellius (first half) must be read by students taking the 
courses in Livy and Latin Prose Composition; Sallust, Catilina (first half) must be read 
by students taking the course in Horace. Examinations on the private reading must 
be taken at one of two stated times during the semester by all students pursuing the 
Latin courses. 

2nd Semester 

Cicero, Letters, Dr. Wheeler. Two hows a week. 

Latin Prose Composition, Dr. Wheeler. One hour a week. 

Horace, Selections from the Satires and Epistles and Vergil, Eclogues, 

Dr. Frank. Two hours a week. 

(May be taken as a free elective.) 

Private reading: Stories from Gellius (second half) must be read by students taking 
the courses in Cicero and Latin Prose Composition; Sallust, Catilina (second half) 
must be read by students taking the course in Horace. Examinations on the private 
reading must be taken at one of two stated times during the semester by all students 
pursuing the Latin courses. 

Second Year. 
1st Semester. (.Given in each year.) 

Tacitus, Annals, Dr. Wheeler. Three hours a week. 

The reading is devoted chiefly to those parts of Books i-vi bearing on the character 
of Tiberius, a study of which forms one of the main objects of the course. Other impor- 
tant topics are Tacitus's method as a historian, his style as a writer, the peculiarities of 
"Silver" Latin, etc. Several lectures are given on these and other subjects. 

No student is admitted to any part of the major course in Latin who has not com- 
pleted the work of the minor course. The major courses may not be offered for exami- 
nation for advanced standing without class attendance. 

Lectures on Latin Literature, Dr. Frank. Two hours a week. 

The lectures in this course treat the history of Latin Literature from its earliest 
beginnings down to the end of the second century of the Christian era, including all the 
authors from whose writings any important remains have been preserved. The 
libraries in each hall contain texts and translations of the most important authors and 
extensive reading is required. 

Private reading: Cicero, De Senectute (first half) must be read by students taking 
the course in Tacitus; Tacitus, Agricola (first half) must be read by students taking the 
course in Latin Literature. Examinations on the private reading must be taken at 
one of two stated times during the semester by all students pursuing the Latin courses. 

2nd Semester. 

Latin Comedy, Plautus and Terence, Dr. Wheeler. Three hours a week. 

The origin, development, and characteristics of Roman comedy are studied. Much 
attention is devoted to the peculiarities of archaic and colloquial Latin and to the read- 
ing of the simpler metres. Such topics as the theatre, stage, and actors receive special 
treatment in lectures. Three or four plays are read in class. 

Lectures on Latin Literature (continued), Dr. Frank. Two hours a week. 

The second year's work of the major course may be divided so as to cover a period 
of two years; but if elected for the first semester, the lectures on literature must be 
elected for the second semester also. 



97 

No student is admitted to any part of the major course in Latin who has not com- 
pleted the work of the minor course. The major courses may not be offered for exami- 
nation for advanced standing without class attendance. 

Private reading: Cicero, De Seneclule (second half) must be read by students taking 
the course in Latin Comedy; Tacitus, Agricola (second half) must be read by students 
taking the course in Latin Literature. Examinations on the private reading must be 
taken at one of two stated times during the semester by all students pursuing the Latin 
courses. 

Group: Latin with'any language, or with Archaeology and Art, 
or with Mathematics. 

Post-major Courses. 

The post-major courses are designed to bridge over the interval between JPost- 
the ordinary undergraduate studies and graduate work. As the amount 3Iajor 
of time given to undergraduate subjects differs in different colleges grad- Courses. 
uate students frequently find it advisable to elect some of these courses. 
No student that has not completed the minor and major courses in Latin 
is admitted to any post-major course in Latin. 

In 1909-10 and again in 1911-12 the following post-major courses are offered: 
1st Semester. 

Roman Satire, its Origin and Development, Dr. Wheeler. 

Two hours a week. 
The subject is treated historically in order to give an outline of the origin and 
development of Satire. The class reads selections from Horace, Persius, Seneca, 
Petronius, and Juvenal, together with some of the fragments of Ennius, Lucilius, and 
Varro. The readings are supplemented by occasional lectures. Each student is 
required to prepare at least one paper on an assigned topic in each semester. 

Lectures on Roman History, Dr. Frank. Three hours a week. 

Collateral reading will be assigned from the Latin sources and independent reports on 
special topics required. 

Lucretius, Dr. Frank. Two hours a weeki 

The first three books of the De Rerum Natura and selections from the remaining 
books are studied. 

Advanced Latin Prose Composition, Dr. Frank. One hour a week. 

2nd Semester. 

Roman Satire (continued), Dr. Wheeler. Two hour3 a week . 

Cicero and Caesar, Dr. Frank. Three hours a week ^ 

An effort will be made by means of lectures, discussions and extensive reading to 
gain an intimate acquaintance with the literary work and the political careers of 
Cicero and Caesar. 

Catullus and Horace, Epistles, Dr. Frank. Two hour8 a week% 

In connection with the reading of Horace's Ars Poetica special stress will be laid upon 
his theories of literary criticism. 

Advanced Latin Prose Composition (continued), Dr. Frank. 

One hour a week. 
7 



98 

In 1910-11 and again in 1912-13 the following post-major courses are offered: 
1st Semester. 

Roman Elegy, its Origin and Development, Dr. Wheeler. 

Two hours a week. 

An effort is made to trace historically the development of this branch of poetry among 
the Romans. Selections from Catullus, Tibullus, Propertius, and Ovid are read and the 
readings are supplemented by occasional lectures. Special attention is devoted to 
the structure and reading of the elegiac distich and to the characteristics of Roman 
poetic diction. Each student is required to prepare papers on assigned topics in each 
semester. 

The Life and Works of Vergil, Dr Frank. Three hours a week. 

The larger part of the Aeneid, two books of the Georgics and some of the Eclogues 
and Pseudo-Vergiliana are read and discussed. 

Pliny, Letters, Martial, Dr. Frank. Two hours a week. 

. Special attention is paid to a study of the political and social conditions of the 
period embraced in the course. 

Advanced Latin Prose Composition, Dr. Frank one hour a week. 

2nd Semester. 

Roman Elegy (continued), Dr. Wheeler. Two hours a week. 

Roman Prose of the Empire, Dr. Frank. Three hours a week. 

Selections from Velleius, Seneca, Quintilian, Tacitus, Suetonius, Apuleius and 
Minucius Felix will be read. 

Seneca and Lucan, Dr. Frank. Two hours a week. 

Three tragedies of Seneca and portions of Lucan 's Pharsalia will be read. 

Advanced Latin Prose Composition (continued), Dr. Frank. 



One hour a week. 



Graduate Courses. 



Graduate Six hours a week of seminary work and graduate lectures are offered 
Courses, each year to graduate students of Latin accompanied by the direction of 
private reading and original research. The books needed by graduate 
students are collected in the seminary library of the department. No under- 
graduates are admitted to graduate courses or to the seminary library, but 
the post-major courses of the department amounting to eight hours a week 
may be elected by graduates. 

The graduate work in Latin is conducted according to the seminary 
method, and is intended not only to broaden the student's knowledge, but 
also to teach methods of work. The graduate courses in Latin are varied 
from year to year in two series, Roman Comedy, Lyric Poetry and Elegy, 
and Roman History, Epigraphy and Literature, or Syntax. Students 
electing Latin as part of the work for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy 
are required to offer with each three hour seminary a two hour seminary 
and vice versa, so as to make up five hours of seminary work, but both 
seminaries need not be taken in the same year. Such students are recom- 
mended to attend the Journal Club. Three five hour courses are required 
of students who offer Latin as a major subject in the examination for the 



99 

degree of Doctor of Philosophy; two five hour courses are required when 
Latin is the only minor subject offered and one five hour course when two 
minors are offered. It is desirable that all students who intend to do 
advanced work in Latin should have some knowledge of Greek. A reading 
knowledge of French and German is also necessary. 

Latin Seminary, Dr. Wheeler. Three hours a week throughout the year. 

In 1909-10 the subject of the seminary is Latin Comedy. All the plays of Plautus 
and Terence are read by the students: single plays form the basis of special work on the 
language, text, metres, etc. 

Students should provide themselves with the text edition of Plautus, edited by W. M. 
Lindsay, Oxford, 1903-04, and with Dziatzko's text of Terence. Leipsic, Tauchnitz, 1884. 
The plays of Plautus, annotated by Brix, Leipsic, Teubner, 1888-1901, and by Lorenz, 
Berlin, Weidmann, 1876-86, and the plays of Terence, annotated by Dziatzko (re- 
vised by Hauler), 1898 and 1903 (Teubner), and by Spengel, 1879 and 1905, Weidmann, 
are also recommended. P. Terenti Afri Comoediue, edited by S. G. Ashmore, Oxford 
University Press, New York, 1908, is a convenient commentary. 

In 1910-11 the subject of the seminary will be the Roman Lyric in the Period of the 
Republic. After a rapid survey of the fragmentary lyric remains of the predecessors 
and contemporaries of Catullus, the poems of Catullus himself will be studied in detail. 
Students should have Catulli carmina (Oxford text, 1904). edited by Robinson Ellis, 
and either the same scholar's Commentary on Catullus, Oxford, Clarendon Press, 1889 
(second edition), or G. Friedrich's Catulli Veronensis liber, Leipsic and Berlin, 1908. 
(Teubner). 

In 1911-12 Roman Elegy as represented by Tibullus, Propertius, and Ovid is 
the subject of the seminary. In addition to a careful study of selected poems an 
effort is made to trace the history of elegy among the Romans. The various topics 
connected with the subject are treated in detail as far as time permits, and the students 
are encouraged to familiarise themselves with the best literature in editions, periodicals, 
and dissertations. The text recommended is the Oxford Clarendon Press edition of 
Catullus, Tibullus, and Propertius edited by Ellis, Postgate, and Phillimore, 1906 (one 
volume). 

Latin Seminary, Dr. Frank. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

In 1909-10 Roman History from the sources is the subject of the seminary. The 
object of this study is to examine in detail the course of events during the last years of 
the Roman Republic, and to familiarise the student with the sources of historical 
knowledge for that period. The course consists largely of research work on the part 
of the student. 

In 1910-11 the work of the seminary is Latin Epigraphy and Pakeography. About 
two-thirds of the course is devoted to the study of the Corpus Inscriptionum. The 
questions assigned for investigation deal mainly with Roman political institutions, 
public and private life, and with historical grammar. Dessau's Inscriptiones Latinae 
Selectae is used in the class room. The paleographical facsimiles of Chatelain, Zano-e- 
meister and "Wattenbach, and Arndt form the basis for work in the latter part of the 
course. 

In 1911-12 selected topics in Roman Literature will be studied. The work consists 
of studies in the beginning of the Roman epic, tragedy, and prose, special attention 
being paid to the relation of the literature to historical events and native influences. 
The students will read reports on special subjects assigned to them. A study of Latin 
Syntax may be substituted. 

Latin Journal Club, Dr. Wheeler and Dr. Frank. 

One and a half hours once a fortnight throughout the year. 
The instructors and the advanced students meet to report on and discuss recent 
articles and books. 



100 

Modern Languages. 

Professors and instructors: Dr. M. Carey Thomas, Dr. Fonger 
DeHaan, Dr. Albert Schinz, Miss Lucy Martin Donnelly, Dr. 
Karl Detlev Jessen, Dr. Clarence Carroll Clark, Dr. Carleton 
Fairchild Brown, Dr.. Richard Thayer Holbrook, Dr. Hans 
Weyhe, Dr. Alfred Horatio Upham (elect), Mr. Samuel Arthur 
King, Mr. Frederick A. Blossom, Dr. Orie Latham Hatcher, 
Miss Rose Chamberlin, Miss Katharine Fullerton, Dr. Regina 
Katharine Crandall, Miss Georgiana Goddard King, Dr. Clara 
Leonora Nicolay, Dr. Lillie Deming Loshe, Miss Content Shepard 
Nichols, Dr. Emma Haeberli (elect), and Miss Martha Plaisted 
(elect). 

English. 

The instruction in this department is under the direction of Dr. 
M. Carey Thomas, Professor of English, Miss Lucy Martin Don- 
nelly, Associate Professor of English, Dr. Clarence Carroll Clark, 
Associate Professor of English, Dr. Carleton Fairchild Brown, 
Associate Professor and Professor (elect) of English Philology, 
Dr. Alfred Horatio Upham, Associate Professor (elect) of English 
Literature, Mr. Samuel Arthur King, Non-resident Lecturer in 
English Diction, Dr. Orie Latham Hatcher, Lecturer in Eliza- 
bethan Literature and Associate (elect), in Comparative Litera- 
ture and Elizabethan Literature, Miss Katharine Fullerton, Dr. 
Regina Katharine Crandall, Miss Georgiana Goddard King, Dr. 
Lillie Deming Loshe, and Miss Content Shepard Nichols, Readers 
in English, and Miss Martha Plaisted, Reader (elect) in English. 
The instruction offered in English covers forty-four hours of 
lectures and recitations a week, and includes two years of lectures 
on literature and language required of every candidate for the 
Bachelor's degree; two years of Minor and Major English, which 
presuppose as much information as is contained in the required 
course, and may be elected in combination with the major course 
in any other language, or with comparative literature, or as a 
free elective; eight hours a week of free elective work; two 
hours a week of elective courses in elocution, and graduate 
courses in English literature, Anglo-Saxon, and Early and Middle 
English, and Elizabethan Literature. 



101 

The required course consists of lectures on literature and language, in Required 
which the history of English literature is regarded as far as possible from bourse. 
the point of view of European literature generally; a study of the 
principles of English composition with constant practice in writing; and 
courses of private reading, which are meant to familiarise the student 
with English authors. The instruction in English composition is given in 
three ways: in introductory lectures, in written corrections on papers 
written by the students, and in conferences between the instructors and 
students. The course in English composition and rhetoric is connected 
with the lectures on literature and language and may not be elected 
separately. 

First Yeah. 

{Given in each year.) 
1st Semester. 

Lectures on the history of the English language and Anglo-Saxon litera- 
ture, with an introduction into the study of early Teutonic literature and 
mythology, Miss Donnelly. Three hours a week. 

The Principles of Articulation, Mr. King. One hour a fortnight. 

This course deals with a system of oral gymnastics, by which a distinct, firm, and 
fluent articulation can be acquired. The means of instruction for improving the 
quality of the speaking voice, and for acquiring a correct production, are pointed out. 
Special attention is paid to the cure of nasality and other vicious habits of speaking. 
The common errors of articulation and the vulgarisms constantly heard in every- 
day speech are clearly defined. A special class will be formed to assist those students 
whose defects of articulation are so marked as to make it difficult for them to work 
with the other members of the class. 

English Composition and Rhetoric, Miss Donnelly, Miss Fullerton, Dr. 

Crandall, Miss King, Dr. Loshe, Miss Nichols. One and a half hours a week. 

The lectures on the history of the English language and the course in English com- 
position and rhetoric may not be elected separately. The work in English composition 
consists of five short papers each week on subjects drawn from the student's personal 
experience, and one longer paper each fortnight on a subject drawn from the lectures 
on the history of the English language and literature. In the rhetoric course the 
principles of English composition are studied and their practice taught in the papers 
written by the students. A written examination is held on the work in English com- 
position and rhetoric at the end of the semester. Written examinations on the lec- 
tures are held from time to time during the semester and credit is given for the style 
and structure of the papers. 

2nd Semester. 

Lectures on the history of English literature to the death of Spenser, 
inclusive, with an introduction into the study of mediaeval literature, 
Miss Donnelly. Three hours a week. 

The Principles of Articulation (continued), Mr. King. One hour a fortnight. 

English Composition and Rhetoric, Miss Donnelly, Dr. Crandall, Miss 
Fullerton, Miss King, Dr. Loshe, Miss Nichols. One and a half hours a week. 

The lectures on the history of English literature and the course in English com- 
position and rhetoric may not be elected separately. The work of the second semester 
is divided into two parts. The first part exactly continues the arrangement of the first 



102 

semester; in the second part the work consists of one short paper each fortnight on a 
subject drawn from ihe student's personal experience and two long papers on a subject 
drawn from the lectures. In the rhetoric course the principles of English composition 
are studied throughout the semester and their practice taught in the papers written by 
the students. A written examination on the work in English composition and rhetoric 
is held at the end of each semester. Written examinations on the lectures on the his- 
tory of English literature are held from time to time during the semester and credit is 
given for the style and structure of the papers. 

Second Year. 

(Given in each year.) 
1st Semester. 

Lectures on the history of English literature from the death of Spenser 
to the Restoration, inclusive, with a short account of the influences of the 
contemporary continental literatures, Miss Donnelly. Three hours a week. 

The Sonant Properties of Speech, Mr. King. One hour a fortnight. 

This course consists of a detailed study of the principles of inflection, pitch, and 
rhythm, together with special treatment of emphasis and rules on pausing. Students 
are required from time to time to read aloud in order that individual faults may be 
corrected. 

English Composition, Miss Donnelly, Miss Fullerton, Dr. Crandall, Miss 

King, Dr. Loshe, Miss Nichols. One and a half hours a week. 

The lectures on the history of English literature and the course in English com- 
position may not be elected separately. The course in English composition consists of 
one short paper each week on a subject drawn from the student's personal experience, 
two argumentative papers, and one critical paper on a subject drawn from the lectures 
on the history of English literature. A written examination on the work in English 
composition is held at the end of each semester. Written examinations on the lectures 
on the history of English literature are held from time to time during the semester and 
at the end of each semester and credit is given for the style and structure of the papers 

2nd Semester. 

Lectures on the history of English literature from the Restoration to the 
present time, Miss Donnelly. Three hours a week. 

The Sonant Properties of Speech (continued), Mr. King. 

One hour a fortnight. 

English Composition, Miss Donnelly, Miss Fullerton, Dr. Crandall, Miss 

King, Dr. Loshe, Miss Nichols. One and a half hours a week. 

The lectures on the history of English literature and the course in English composition 
may not be elected separately. The work of the semester in English composition con- 
sists of one short paper each week on a subject drawn from the student's personal experi- 
ence, one twenty-four page critical paper on an author chosen by the student with 
the approval of her instructor, and two shorter so-called imitative papers during the 
writing of which the principles of imitative writing are discussed in the lectures. A 
written examination is held on the work at the end of each semester. Written examina- 
tions on the lectures on the history of English literature are held from time to time dur- 
ing the semester and at the end of each semester and credit is given for the style and 
structure of the papers. 

3Iajor The major course in English differs slightly from the other major courses 

Course. f ^h e college, in that it must always have been preceded by two years' 

study of English in the required undergraduate courses, and is intended for 



103 

graduate students or for those undergraduate students who are anxious to 
specialise in English. Any of the courses, except the courses in English 
Drama, in Classical and Romantic Prose, and in Middle English Poetry 
and Chaucer, may be taken separately as free electives by students that have 
completed the required course. Students wishing to specialise in language 
may substitute the course in Middle English Romances or the courses in 
Middle English Poetry and Chaucer for the course in Classical and Roman- 
tic Prose, and the course in Anglo-Saxon for either the course in English 
Poetry from 1780 to 1832 or the course in English Drama, but all students 
taking a major course in English must take either the course in Anglo- 
Saxon or the course in Middle English Romances, or the courses in Middle 
English Poetry and Chaucer. 

First Year. 

Minor Course. (Literature.) 

English Critics of the Nineteenth Century, Dr. Clark. 

Three hours a week throughout the year. 
(Given in each year.) 

The essayists and critics after 1832 are studied. In the first semester the authors 
usually chosen are Carlyle, Matthew Arnold, and Newman; in the second semester 
Ruskin, Pater, and Swinburne are discussed. Short papers and one long essay must 
be prepared by the students attending the course. 

This course will be given in 1910-11 by Dr. Upham. 

English Poetry from 1780 to 1832, Miss Donnelly. 

Two hours a week throughout the year. 
(Given in 1910-11 and again in 1912-13.) 

This course consists of a detailed study of the poetry of Cowper, Burns, Wordsworth, 
Coleridge, Scott, Byron, Shelley, and Keats; special attention is paid to the rise and 
development of the Romantic movement in English poetry, with occasional refer- 
ence to similar movements in France and Germany. The course in English Drama or 
the course in Anglo-Saxon may be substituted for this course if desired. 

Minor Course. (Language.; 

Anglo-Saxon, Dr. Brown. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

(Given in each year.) 

The course begins with an outline of Anglo-Saxon grammar as presented in Bright's 
Anglo-Saxon Reader. Selections in prose and verse from Bright's reader are next 
read with the class. In the second semester after a brief study of alliterative verse 
selections from Beowulf are read. Throughout the year lectures are given outlining 
the literature of the period and texts are read in translation. The course on English 
Poetry from 1780 to 1832, or the course on English Drama may be substituted for 
this course if desired. 

Middle English Romances, Dr. Brown. 

Three hours a v>eek throughout the year. 
(Given in 1910-11 and again in 1912-13.) 
Selected romances are read by the members of the class. The lectures treat the 
development of romance literature in English with special reference to the romances 
of Germanic origin and the Arthurian cycle. The course in Classical and Romantic 
Prose or the courses in Middle English Poetry and Chaucer may be substituted for 
this course if desired. 



104 

Second Year. 
{Literature.') 

Classical and Romantic Prose, Dr. Clark. 

Three hours a week throughout the year. 
{Given in each year.) 

In the first semester the writings of Edmund Burke are considered with 
special reference to Classicism and Romanticism, and to the ideas of the French revo- 
lution. In the second semester the works of Lamb, Hazlitt, and De Quincey are 
studied. This course is open only to those students who have taken the course in Eng- 
lish Critics of the Nineteenth Century. The courses in Middle English Poetry and 
Chaucer, or the course in Middle English Romances may be substituted for this 
course if desired. 

This course will be given in 1910-11 by Dr. Upham. 

English Drama, Miss Donnelly. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

{Given in 1909-10 and again in 1911-12.) 

This course is intended to give students that have completed the required course in 
English a more intimate knowledge of the later Elizabethan and the Jacobean drama. 
The lectures follow the development of the realistic and romantic tendencies in the 
comedy and tragedy of the period both as an expression of the national life and 
of the individual genius of the various dramatists. Selected plays of Shakespeare, 
Middleton, Ben Jonson, Beaumont and Fletcher, and other dramatists are read in con- 
nection with the lectures. This course is open only to those students who are taking the 
English group. The course in English Poetry from 1780 to 1832, or the course in Anglo- 
Saxon may be substituted for this course if desired. 

This course was given in 1909-10 by Dr. Hatcher. 

{Language.) 

Middle English Poetry, Dr. Brown. Three hours a week during the first semester. 

{Given in 1909-10 and again in 1911-12.) 

The purpose of the course is to give the student a direct acquaintance with some of 
the more important pieces of Middle English verse. Selections are read from Laya- 
mon's Brut, Robert of Gloucester's Chronicle, Laurence Minot, Robert of Brunne's 
Handlyng Synne, and Langland's Vision of Piers the Plowman. The Owl and the Nightin- 
gale and Pearl will be read in full. In connection with the reading of these texts lectures 
are given on the development of the language and literature during the Middle English 
period. The course is designed as an introduction to the course on Chaucer given in the 
second semester but may be taken independently. This course is open only to those 
students who are taking or have taken at least one other course in English in addition 
to the required courses. The course in Classical and Romantic Prose or the course in 
Middle English Romances may be substituted for this course and the course on Chaucer 
if desired. 

Chaucer, Dr. Brown. Three hours a week during the second semester. 

{Given in 1909-10 and again in 1911-12.) 

In this course the best of the Canterbury Tales are studied, also the Legend of 
Good Women, The House of Fame, and portions of Troilus and Criseyde. The lec- 
tures discuss Chaucer's sources and literary art, and his relation to the English, 
French, and Italian literature of his time. It is desirable but not essential that 
this course should be preceded by the course in Middle English Poetry. This course is 
open only to those students who are taking at least one other course in English in addi- 
tion to the required courses. 

The course in Classical and Romantic Prose or the course in Middle English 
Romances may be substituted for this course if desired. 

Group: English with any language, or English with compara- 
tive literature, or English with philosophy. 



105 

Free Elective Courses. 

Prose Writers of the Queen Anne Period, Miss Donnelly. Free 

One hour a week throughout the year. Elective 
(Giwntn 1911-12.) Courses. 

Among the writers studied will be Addison, Steele, Swift, and Bolingbroke. Two short 
papers will be required in each semester. This course is open only to those students 
who have attended the first and second year general courses in English literature 
and have received no grade below that of merit or have received the grade of credit 
in at least two semesters of these courses. 

English Letter Writers, Miss Donnelly. One hour a week throughout the year. 

{Given in 1912-13.) 

The more important letter writers of the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth 
centuries will be studied and special stress will be laid on their characters, their relation 
to their times, and their style. The students will be required to write short papers 
from time to time. This course is open only to those students who have attended the 
first and second year general courses in English literature and have received no grade 
below that of merit or have received the grade of credit in at least two semesters of these 
courses. 

Victorian .roets, Dr. dark. Two hours a week during the first semester. 

{Given in 1909-10 and again in 1910-11.) 
The works of Tennyson, Arnold, Clough, Fitzgerald, and Landor are studied. The 
course is open only to those students who have completed the two years' required 
course in English. The course will be given by Miss King in 1910-11. 

Victorian Poets (continued), Dr. Clark. 

Two hours a week during the second semester. 

{Given in 1909-10 and again in 1910-11.) 

The Pre-Raphaelite movement is considered and the works of Morris, Piossetti, 

Swinburne, and Browning are studied. The course is open only to those students 

who have completed the two years' required course in English. The course will be 

given by Miss King in 1910-11. 

The English Ballad, Dr. Brown. One hour a week throughout the year. 

{Given in 1909-10.) 

This course is designed as an introduction to the study of popular poetry. Selections 
from the ballad literature of England and Scotland, representative of various types 
and periods, are read in class. The lectures illustrate the origins and history of the 
ballad as developed in English and other literatures, together with a study of various 
imitations of the genuine ballad. The course is open only to those students who have 
completed the two years' required course in English. 

The Elizabethan Age in Non-dramatic Literature, Dr. Hatcher. 

Two hours a week throughout the year. 
{Given in 1909-10.) 

The lectures trace the national and foreign influences creating the first great body 
of English literature, and show the making of vocabulary, critical theories of prose 
and poetry, and the development of various types of literature, — epic, pastoral, novel, 
sonnet, and minor lyric and prose forms. The reading involves the best representa- 
tives of each of these types and some acquaintance with the critical literature of the 
period. The course is open only to those students who have completed the two years' 
required course in English. 

Descriptive and Narrative Writing, Miss Fullerton. 

Two hours a week throughout the year. 
{Given in each year.) 



106 

Lectures are given on the theory and practice of description and on the style 
and methods of the best modern writers of short stories, both English and French. 
Students are required to write papers each week. The course is open to qualified 
graduate students, to undergraduate students who have completed the two years 
of required English Composition and have obtained the grade of merit in two 
semesters or the grade of credit in one semester of the work, and to students that 
have taken the major course in English literature. It may not be substituted for 
any other essay course or for any part of the major English course, and no student may 
take this course at the same time that she is taking another course in English Compo- 
sition. 

Argumentation, Dr. Crandall. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

{Given in each year.) 

In the first semester the course takes up the technique of Argumentation, and 
in the second semester establishes the relation between the laws of thought em- 
phasised in the first semester and the ordinary forms of prose composition. The 
course is open to students who have obtained the grade of merit in two semesters, or 
of credit in one semester of the required course in English Composition, but no student 
may take this course at the same time that she is taking another course in English Com- 
position. 

Imitative Writing, Miss King. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

{Given in 1909-10 and again in 1911-12.) 

This course consists of a study of the formation of style by the method of imitation. 
The lectures deal with the elements and the psychology of style, and as far as may be 
necessary, with the authors selected for imitation. The course is open to students who 
have obtained the grade of merit in two semesters or of credit in one semester of the 
required course in English Composition, but no student may take this course at the 
same time that she is taking another course in English Composition. 

Theory and Practice of Verse Composition, Miss King. 

Two hours a week throughout the year. 

{Given in 1910-11.) 

This course is not historical but theoretical and practical. The lectures deal with the 
theory of poetry, the difference between poetry and prose and the laws of verse in 
English. Students are required to write short exercises in verse every week. The 
course is open to students who have obtained the grade of merit in two semesters or of 
credit in one semester of the required course in English Composition, but no student 
may take this course at the same time that she is taking another course in English 
Composition. 

Reading of Shakespeare, Mr. King. One hour a week throughout the year. 

{Given in 1909-10 and again in 1911-12.) 

This course is open only to those students who have attended the lectures in English 
diction given in the general course. A special study is made of the principles of correct 
delivery of blank verse. The needs of those students who expect to teach English litera- 
ture, and desire to read Shakespeare to their pupils, are given special attention. 

General Reading of Prose Authors, Mr. King. 

One hour a week throughout the year. 

{Given in 1910-11 and again in 1912-13.) 

This course is open only to those students who have attended the lectures in English 
diction given in the general course. 

Graduate Courses. 
Graduate Twelve hours a week of seminary work and graduate lectures are 
Courses. ff e red each year to graduate students of English, accompanied by the 
direction of private reading and original research, and the courses are 



107 

varied from year to year, so that they may be pursued by students through 
three or more consecutive years. The books needed by the graduate stu- 
dents are collected in the seminary library of the department. No under- 
graduates are admitted to graduate courses or to the seminary libraries, 
but the major or third and fourth year courses of the department amount- 
ing to ten hours a week may be elected by graduate students. There are 
offered each year two graduate seminaries in English literature and one in 
English language. The graduate seminaries in literature presuppose at 
least as much knowledge as is obtained in the two years' course of under- 
graduate lectures on English literature and in one of the literature years of 
the English group; and the graduate courses in Anglo-Saxon presuppose 
as much knowledge of Anglo-Saxon as is obtained in the language year in 
the English group. 

Students who choose English as the chief subject in their examination for 
the degree of Doctor of Philosophy must have, if they specialise in litera- 
ture, at least as much knowledge of Anglo-Saxon, and, if they specialise 
in language, at least as much knowledge of literature, as is obtained in 
the courses required of those students who make English one of the chief 
subjects of undergraduate study, and must have taken at least the equiva- 
lent of the English Composition in the required English course. 

Seminary in Middle English, Dr. Brown. 

Three hours a week throughout the year. 
(Given in each year.) 

In 1909-10 the beginnings of English Drama are the subject of the seminary. Though 
the cycles of the mystery plays are considered in general, the larger part of the 
time is devoted to the study of the English morality plays. Particular attention 
is given to the connection between the moralities and the didactic treatises and the 
debates. The moralities and the secular drama are studied historically up to the 
time of Heywood. In addition to the reading and discussion of selected plays, lectures 
are given by the instructor with the object of setting various elements of dramatic 
development in proper proportion. Critical reports on assigned topics are required 
from the students. 

In 1910-11 the subject will be the Middle English Romances. All the romances 
represented in Middle English will be read, and the relation of these English versions to 
their Latin and Old French originals will be discussed. The romance cycles will be 
taken up in the following order: Troy story, Alexander saga, romances of Germanic 
origin, Arthurian cycle, Charlemagne cycle. Special investigations of various elements 
in individual romances will be undertaken from time to time by the members of the 
seminary. 

In 1911-12 the seminary will undertake the study of The Vision of Piers the Plowman 
and the works of Chaucer. Attention will be devoted not so much to the critical 
reading of the texts themselves as to the examination of the questions of authorship 
and chronology which have recently been raised. These poems will also be discussed 
in their relation to the other literature of the fourteenth century. Special subjects for 
individual investigation will be assigned to the members of the seminary. 

Cynewulf and Csedmon, Dr. Brown. Two hours a week throughout the year. 
(Given in 1909-10 and again in 1911-12.) 

Several of the poems traditionally ascribed to these authors are critically stud- 
ied. Lectures will be given furnishing an introduction to Anglo-Saxon Christian 
poetry and the literary problems connected with it. This course is open to grad- 
uate students who have already taken the course in Anglo-Saxon Grammar and 
reading of Anglo-Saxon Texts, or its equivalent. 



108 

Beowulf, Dr. Brown. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

{Given in 1910-11 and again in 1912-13.) 

This course gives in the first place a general survey of Beowulf criticism, in- 
cluding textual problems, theories as to the composition of the poem, and an 
enquiry into its historical and mythological elements. In this connection a study 
is also made of the other pieces of Anglo-Saxon heathen poetry. This course is 
open to graduate students who have already taken the course in Anglo-Saxon 
or its equivalent. 

English Historical Grammar, Dr. Brown. 

Two hours a week throughout the year. 
{Given in 1910-11 and again in 1912-13.) 

In this course the development of the English language is traced from the earliest 
times. After an outline of the history and external relations of English, the change 
and decay of inflections, the use of prepositions and the more important points in 
historical syntax are discussed. The course presupposes a knowledge of Anglo- 
Saxon and Middle English. 

Seminary in English Literature, Dr. Upham. 

Three hours a week throughout the year. 
{Given in each year.) 

In 1909-10 Seventeenth Century Prose writers were studied, the authors chosen were 
Bacon, Milton and Hooker. The seminary was conducted by Dr. Clark. 

In 1910-11 the subject of the seminary will be the literary and critical activity of the 
mid-eighteenth century, centering in Dr. Johnson and his circle. Particular attention 
will be given to the breaking down of classical standards, the manifestations of roman- 
ticism and their effect at home and abroad, the rise of periodical literature, etc. 

The seminary for 1911-12 will deal with English sentimentalism in its relations with 
the continental movement. Richardson, Sterne and minor novelists will be considered, 
as well as similar tendencies displayed in the domestic drama of the period. 

In 1912-13 the seminary will consider the liberal or revolutionary phase of the Roman- 
tic movement, as seen particularly in the work of Byron and Shelley. Careful study 
will be made of the relations of these poets to their contemporaries and to various 
foreign influences. 

Seminary in Elizabethan Drama, Dr. Hatcher. 

Three hours a week throughout the year. 
{Given in each year.) 

Shakespeare is the subject of the seminary in 1909-10. In the first semester as 
detailed a review as is practicable is made of the results of Shakesperian scholarship 
as regards critical problems of biography, authorship, chronology and source material 
of the plays, comparison of varying versions of separate plays, the influence of earlier 
and contemporary dramatists, etc. Dramatic records relating to Shakespeare are also 
examined at first hand, and evidences of his participation in the general dramatic 
activities of his time noted. In the second semester students are given individual 
problems for investigation. 

In 1910-11 Spenser will be studied in the fight of mediaeval and Renaissance culture. 
Inquiry will be made into the inspiration, models, and sources of Spenser's poetry; 
the manv influences working upon him, and those emanating from him, as shown in 
the significant blending of classical, mediaeval, and Renaissance tendencies in his 
poetry, and his initiative in solving the literary problems of his time. In the first 
semester all the works of Spenser will be read and the results of Spenserian research 
examined. The second semester will be devoted largely to the investigation by each 
student of some special problem. 

In 1911-12 English drama from 1558 to 1642 will be studied, as the chief literary 
expression of the period. The conditions of its origin and continued production, its 
nature, extent, variety, development, and decadence will be discussed and a reasonable 



109 

proportion of the extant plays of the period read continuously as a background 
for other work. A brief introductory study is made of dramatic genres and of the 
broader principles of dramatic construction, and the remainder of the first semester is 
devoted to the examination of contemporary documents and other sources of informa- 
tion in regard to Elizabethan drama. In the latter half of the year each student 
investigates some special problem, such as dramatic inter-relationship or authorship, 
and gives reports upon her work. 

English Journal Club, Miss Donnelly, Dr. Clark, Dr. Brown, and Dr. 

Hatcher. One and a half hours a fortnight throughout the year. 

{Given in each year.) 

The advanced students and the instructors meet to report on and discuss recent 
reviews and critical articles. 

German. 

The instruction in this department is under the direction of 
Dr. Karl Detlev Jessen, Associate Professor of German Literature, 
Dr. Hans Weyhe, Associate in Teutonic Philology and Sanskrit, 
and Miss Rose Chamberlin, Reader in German. 

The instruction offered in German covers thirty-one hours 
of lectures and recitations a week; it includes five hours a 
week of matriculation German; ten hours a week of under- 
graduate major and minor work; two hours of free elective; 
four hours a week of post-major work, open only to graduates 
and to undergraduates that have completed the major course 
in German, and ten hours a week of graduate work in modern 
German literature and in Teutonic philology. 

A class for beginners in German, under the direction of Miss Rose Jlatricu- 
Chamberlin, five hours a week throughout the year, is provided, in order lotion 
that those students whose matriculation examination did not include bourse. 
German may with less difficulty obtain the reading knowledge of it that 
they must possess before receiving a degree. By great diligence such 
students may acquire sufficient knowledge to be admitted, should they 
desire it, into the first year of the major course in German. 

The major course in German presupposes as much knowledge as is 3Iajor 
required to pass the matriculation examination in this subject. Course. 

First Year. 
(.Minor Course.) 
(.Given in each year.) 
Lectures on the History of German Literature from the period of Roman- 
ticism to the present time, Dr. Jessen. Two hours a week throughout the year. 
These lectures are delivered in German and discuss the masterpieces of German 
literature in the nineteenth century. Weicher's Deutsche Litteraturgeschichte is recom- 
mended for reference. 



110 

This course is open as a free elective to all students that have passed the matricula- 
tion examination in German. 

Private reading: Grillparzer, Sappho, must be read by students taking the course 
in the first semester ; Sudermann, Die Heimat, must be read by students taking the course 
in the second semester. Examinations on the private reading must be taken at one of 
two stated times during the semester for which the reading is assigned by all students 
pursuing the German courses. 

One hour a week throughout 
the year. 



Critical Reading of Modern German Au- 
thors, Dr. Jessen. 



Two hours a week throughout 
the year. 



German Grammar and Prose Composition, 
Dr. Weyhe. 

The course in critical reading consists of translations of modern German novels such 
as G. Keller's Kleider machen Leute; E. von Wildenbruch's Der Letzte; H. Bohlau's 
Ratsmadelgeschichten and especially of modern "German essay prose. For translation of 
English into German, Hawthorne's Tales of the White Hills and Sketches, or texts of 
similar difficulty are used. German grammar is carefully reviewed in von Jagemann's 
German Syntax (Henry Holt and Co., New York). 

The course in Critical Reading and the course in Grammar and Prose Composition 
may not be elected separately, and the examination in these subjects may not be 
divided. The courses are open as a free elective to all students that have passed the 
matriculation examination in German. 

Private reading: Schiller, Geschichte des dreissigjahrigen Krieges, Book III, (Ed 
Palmer, New York; Henry Holt & Co.), must be read by students taking the courses 
in the first semester; Goethe, Hermann und Dorothea, and Schiller, Brautv. Messina, 
must be read by students taking the courses in the second semester. Examinations 
on the private reading must be taken at one of two stated times during the semes- 
ter for which the reading is assigned by all students pursuing the German courses. 

The advanced standing examinations, or examinations taken without attendance on 
college classes, in the reading and grammar of the minor, three hours a week for two 
semesters, may be taken by those students only who are able to submit satisfactory 
evidence that they have obtained before entering the college, by regular and systematic 
study, or by residence abroad or work under German governesses the necessary advanced 
knowledge, and are able to pass the examination in the first three weeks after entering 
the college. Failure to pass at the first trial will disqualify from further trials. The 
examination on the private reading that accompanies these courses must be taken not 
later than the third semester after that in which the advanced standing examination is 
offered. 

Second Yeab. 
{Given in each year.) 

Lectures on the History of German Literature from Luther to the 
Romantic School, Dr. Jessen. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

These lectures are delivered in German and discuss the great classical authors, as 
well as the most modern poets and novelists. 

Selected Reading, Dr. Jessen. One hour a week throughout the year. 

This course in selected reading is planned to illustrate the lectures on literature. 
Neither the lectures nor the reading may be elected separately. 

Private reading: Goethe, Iphigenie; and Lessing, Nathan der Weise, must be read by 
students taking the courses in the first semester; Sudermann, Frau Sorge and Haupt- 
mann, Die Versunkene Glocke, (New York: Henry Holt & Co.), must be read by 
students taking the courses in the second semester. Examinations on the private 
reading must be taken at one of two stated times during the semester for which 
the reading is assigned, by all students pursuing the German courses. 



Ill 

Goethe, Faust (2nd Part), Dr. JeSSen. ~| One hour a week throughout the year. 

German Prose Composition, Dr. Weyhe. j One hour a week throughout the year. 

In the course in Prose Composition the students translate selected passages of 
difficult English prose into German. 

The course in Faust and the course in Prose Composition may not be elected sepa- 
rately, and the examination in these subjects may not be divided. 

Private reading: Goethe, Faust, (ls< part), must be read by students taking the 
courses in the first semester; Goethe, Tasso, must be read by students taking the 
courses in the second semester. Examinations on the private reading must be taken 
at one of two stated times during the semester for which the reading is assigned by 
all students pursuing the German courses. 

An advanced standing examination, or an examination taken without attendance on 
the college class, in the prose composition of the major, one hour a week for two 
semesters, may be taken by those students only who are able to submit satisfactory evi- 
dence that they have obtained before entering the college, by regular and systematic 
study, or by residence abroad or work under German governesses the necessary advanced 
knowledge, and are able to pass the examination in the first three weeks after entering 
the college. Failure to pass at the first trial will disqualify from further trials. The 
examination on the private reading that accompanies this course must be taken 
not later than the third semester after that in which the advanced standing examination 
is offered. 

Group: German with any language. 

Free Elective Course. 

Advanced German Composition and Reading of Modern Prose, Miss Free 
Chamberlin. Two hours a week throughout the year. ^ ec ** re 

Course. 

(.Given in each year.) 

Attention is given in this course to the needs of students wishing to make teaching 
their profession. Each student is required to lecture to the class at least once during 
the year. 

Post-major Courses. 

The post-major courses are designed to bridge over the interval between Post- 

the ordinary undergraduate studies and graduate work. As the amount of Major 

time given to undergraduate subjects differs in different colleges graduate Courses. 
students frequently find it advisable to elect some of these courses. 

Lectures on the History of German Literature from the Romantic School 

till 1850, Dr. JeSSen. Two hours a week during the first semester. 

(Given in 1909-10 and again in 1911-12.) 
This course begins with a general study of the principles of philosophy, life, art, and 
poetry, as represented by the Romantic School, which is followed by lectures on the 
literary movements, expressed mainly in lyric poetry and in the novel, which supersede 
the Romantic Weltanschauung. The lyrics of the war of liberation, the Wellschmerz, 
and the political revolution ; the novel of Jungdeutschland; the drama of Heinrich von 
Kleist; the works of the Schlegels, Tieck, Holderlin, Jean Paul, Novalis, Uhland, 
Lenau, Heine, Immermann, Freiligrath, Herwegh, Gutzkow, Morike, and Gotthelf, 
are the principal topics discussed. 

German Drama in the Nineteenth Century, Dr. Jessen. 

Two hours a week during the second semester. 
(Given in 1909-10 and again in 1911-12.) 



112 

The drama of Heinrich von Kleist is studied with special reference to that of the 
classical period, and to the dramatic efforts of the Romanticists. The place of Grill- 
parzer in German literature is defined, as well as the significance of Grabbe and Raimund. 
This leads to Otto Ludwig and to Friedrich Hebbel, who is the central figure, chron- 
ologically as well as in importance, of the German drama during the nineteenth century. 
The course ends with a review of Anzengruber, Wildenbruch, Sudermann, Hauptmann, 
and of other modern writers of less importance. 

German Literature from 1850 to the Present Time, Dr. Jessen. 

Two hours a week, during the first semester. 

(Given in 1910-11 and again in 1912-13.) 

The subject of this course is, in the first semester, the Epigonen-Literatur. The 
development of the modern German Novelle is discussed and Keller's, Storm's, and C. F. 
Meyer's works are specially studied. A full account of the poets of the MUnchener 
Schule is given, as well as of Richard Wagner, Reuter, Groth, Freytag, Spielhagen, 
Scheffel, Raabe, Geibel, Heyse, and Schack. 

German Literature from 1850 to the Present Time (continued), Dr. 
Jessen. Two hours a week during the second semester. 

(Given in 1910-11 and again in 1912-13.) 

In the second semester among the subjects discussed are the influence of French, Rus- 
sian, and Scandinavian literatures, especially of the work of Zola and Ibsen on German 
literature; modern German realism and naturalism, as represented by Fontane, 
Anzengruber, Wildenbruch, Hauptmann, Sudermann, Liliencron, and Rosegger; the 
increased importance of women in literature, and the work of Marie von Ebner- 
Eschenbach, Luise von Francois, Ricarda Huch, Helene Bohlau, Isolde Kurz, Clara 
Viebig, and others; the significance of Nietzsche for German life and literature; 
Neo-romanticism and Heimatsdichtung. 

Advanced Critical Reading, Dr. Jessen. One hour a week throughout the year. 

(Given in each year.) 

The reading is selected from works discussed in the post-major lectures on literature. 
The students give reports on dramas or novels, the object of the discussion being to 
trace the characteristics of the author, as shown in his works. Special attention will be 
paid to the needs of students who intend to teach German. 

Elementary Middle High German, Dr. Weyhe. 

One hour a week throughout the year. 

(Given in each year.) 

This course has been arranged primarily for undergraduate students who wish to be 
able to read the Middle High German classics in the original. A general acquaintance 
with the history of early German literature, such as may be obtained from the lectures 
on the history of German literature in the minor course, is presupposed. Wright's 
Middle High German Primer (2nd edition, Oxford, 1899) is used. 

Graduate Courses. 

Graduate Ten hours a week of seminary work and graduate lectures are offered 
Courses, each year to graduate students of German and Teutonic Philology accom- 
panied by the direction of private reading and original research. The 
books needed by the graduate students are collected in the seminary 
library of the department. No undergraduates are admitted to graduate 
courses or to the seminary libraries, but the post-major courses of the 
department, amounting to four hours a week, may be elected by graduate 
students. 



113 

The graduate courses offered in German Philology may be found under 
the head of General Teutonic Philology. 

Graduate work in the history of modern German literature is conducted 
according to the seminary method. The courses are varied so that the}' 
may be followed by graduate students throughout three successive years 
and cover the work required of students who offer German literature as 
a major or minor for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. 

Seminary in German Literature, Dr. Jessen. 

Two hours a week throughout the year. 
{Given in each year.) 

Although the seminary meets only two hours a week throughout the year, the amount 
of reading required makes the course equivalent to five hours a week. It is hoped that 
the students will become familiar in these courses with the methods of scientific literary 
criticism and investigation. 

In 1909-10 Goethe as a lyrical poet is studied. 

In 1910-11 Goethe's life and works win be the subject of the seminary. Goethe's 
views on aesthetics and philosophy, translations by and from Goethe, Goethe and 
romanticism, text criticism applied to selected works, studies of Goethe's style and 
use of words, and similar subjects are investigated. 

In 1911-12 the Romantic School and the Volkslied will be studied. 

Goethe's Weltanschauung, Dr. Jessen. 

One hour a week during the first semester. 
{Given in 1909-10 and again in 1912-13.) 
In this course the philosophy of Goethe is studied with a view to its impor- 
tance in understanding the currents of thought underlying modern German 
culture. Its unscholastic character gives it special interest. The students are 
referred to the writings of Wilhelm Bode, Moritz Heynacher, Hermann Siebeck, 
and others on the subject. 

Germanic Antiquities, Dr. Jessen. One hour a week during the second semester. 

{Given in 1909-10 and again in 1912-13.) 

This course deals with the study of ethnic conditions and characteristics, the 
racial and social conditions of the Germanic peoples and the important influences 
exerted by classical study and the Christian religion. The recent scientific discus- 
sions of Comte Gobineau, H. St. Chamberlain, and others have emphasised the im- 
portance of the subject. Tacitus 's Germania will be read with reference to Mul- 
lenhoff, Deutsche Altertumskunde. 

German Metrics, Dr. Jessen. One hour a week during the first semester. 

{Given in 1910-11.) 

This course consists of lectures on Deutsche Metrik or Verslehre, with an introduction 
to phonetics, this being an indispensable Hilfswissenschaft for the study of German litera- 
ture. 

German Poetics, Dr. Jessen. One hour a week during the second semester. 

{Given in 1910-11.) 
Lectures will be given on Deutsche Poelik and Stilistik. 

German Literary Criticism, Dr. Jessen. 

One hour a week during the first semester. 
{Given in 1911-12.) 

The lectures trace the development of literary and sesthetic criticism in Germany 
from Leibniz to Schiller and Goethe. The course is comparative in character, and 

8 



114 

French and English literary criticism are also considered. Lessing's Laokoon and Ham- 
burgische Dramaturgie and Schiller's essays on aesthetics are studied. A good reading 
knowledge of French and German is required. 

The German Essay, Dr. lessen. One hour a week during the second semester. 

{Given in 1911-12.) 

The history of the essay in German literature is studied, and the most eminent German 
essayists, Schopenhauer, Herman Grimm, Karl Hillebrand, Friedrich Nietzsche, etc., 
are discussed; the influence of French, English, and American writers, in particular 
Montaigne, Macaulay, and Emerson, is investigated. Incidentally questions touching 
on the evolution of modern German prose style are dealt with. 

Goethe's Faust, Dr. lessen. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

{Given in each year when the time of the department permits.) 
This course is intended as an introduction to the problems of Faustphilologie, dealing 
with both the first and second parts. 

General Teutonic Philology. 

The instruction in this department is under the direction of 
Dr. Hans Weyhe, Associate in Teutonic Philology and Sanskrit. 
Special attention is called to the facilities for the study of com- 
parative Teutonic philology offered by Bryn Mawr College. The 
English and the German departments together have provided 
for a complete course in Teutonic philology, comprising both the 
study of the individual languages (Gothic, Norse, Anglo-Saxon, 
Old Saxon, Old High German, Middle High German, Platt- 
Deutsch, etc.) and the study of general comparative philology. 

The courses in introduction to the study of Teutonic phi- 
lology, Gothic and Middle High German grammar (first year 
course), are designed for students in their first year of graduate 
study in Teutonic languages and the remaining courses for 
students in their second or third year. The courses given in each 
year will be planned to meet the needs of the graduate students. 

Students intending to elect Teutonic philology are advised to 
study Greek for at least one year during their undergraduate 
course. 

Graduate Courses. 
{Given in each year.) 
^Graduate Introduction to the study of Teutonic Philology, Dr. Weyhe. 

f^OUVSeS, Q ne ^ 0Mr a wee k throughout the year. 

These lectures deal with the following topics: a discussion of Teutonic in its relation to 
the cognate Aryan languages ; a brief sketch of the various Teutonic languages, accom- 
panied by an account of the chief grammatical and lexicographic works on each; a 
discussion of the aim and method of historical and comparative grammar, including 
problems such as the relationship of dialects, and the consistency of phonetic laws; a 
brief history of Teutonic philology, and the outlines of general phonetics. 



115 

Gothic, Dr. Weyhe. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

Gothic phonetics and inflection are studied in connection with the elements of com- 
parative Aryan grammar. Braune's Golische Grarnmatik (6th ed., Halle, 1905), or 
Streitberg's Gotisches Elementarbuch (2nd ed., Heidelberg, 1906) are used as text-books. 

As a thorough knowledge of Gothic is the foundation of the study of historical and 
comparative Teutonic grammar, every graduate student of Teutonic grammar is ad- 
vised to take this course as early as possible. 

Middle High German Grammar and reading of Middle High German 

Texts (first year course), Dr. Weyhe. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

This course includes a brief abstract of Middle High German grammar, with special 
reference to the difference between Middle High German and Modern German, and a 
study of the most prominent authors in Middle High German. Part of Hartmann's 
Armer Heinrich is read; it is followed by selections from the Nibelungenlied, a brief 
account being given of the "Nibelungenfrage" and of the manuscripts of the Nibelun- 
genlied. 

Students of Middle High German should be provided with Paul's Mittelhochd. Grarn- 
matik (6th ed., Halle, 1904), or Michels's Mittelhochd. Elementarbuch (Heidelberg, 1900). 
For a more complete treatment of the subject T. Wright's Historical German Grammar 
(Vol. 1, Oxford, 1907) is recommended. The private reading includes the works of 
the authors treated in the course. 

This course is required of all students that make German the minor subject in their 
examination for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. 

Old High German, Dr. Weyhe. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

This course is offered to students acquainted with Gothic and Middle High German, or 
at least modern German, and includes a practical study of Old High German grammar, 
and a comparison of the Old High German sounds and forms with those of Middle and 
Modern High German. Selections are read from Old High German texts, arranged so 
as to proceed from easy to more difficult pieces, and to illustrate the differences be- 
tween the Old High German dialects. 

Middle High German (second year course), Dr. Weyhe. 

One hour a week throughout the year. 

This course is intended for students that have followed the first year's course in 
Middle High German. The first semester is devoted to the Hofisches Epos (Veldeke, 
Wolfram, Gottfried von Strassburg, Rudolf von Ems, Konrad von WQrzburg), and the 
second semester to Minnesangs Friihling and Walther von der Vogelweide. 

Old Saxon, Dr. Weyhe. Two hours a week during the second semester. 

The work presupposes on the part of the students a sufficient knowledge of Gothic 
and Anglo-Saxon. Holthausen's Altsachsisches Elementarbuch (Heidelberg, 1899); the 
Heliand (in Sievers's or Heyne's or Behaghel's edition), and Zangemeister-Braune's 
Bruchstilcke der altsdchsischen Bibeldichtung (Heidelberg, 1894) are used. The reading 
is supplemented by a discussion of the West Germanic alliterative verse with reference 
to versification and poetic style in Anglo-Saxon. 

Old Norse, Dr. Weyhe. Two hours a week during the second semester. 

This course may, by request, be substituted for the course in Old Saxon. 

Students entering this course are supposed to be acquainted with Gothic and with 
Anglo-Saxon or Old High German grammar. In the grammatical part of the course 
attention is paid to the relation between Gothic and Norse, and to the differences 
between the East Teutonic and West Teutonic branches. Among the texts read, 
selections from the younger and the older Eddas take a prominent place. 

The books used are Sweet's Icelandic Primer (Oxford, 1886), or Holthausen's Altis- 
landisches Elementarbuch (Weimar, 1895); and Hildebrand's Edda (2nd edition, Pader- 
born, 1904), with Gering's Glossar (3rd edition, Paderborn, 1907). For advanced 
students the reading of one of the larger Islendinga sogur, preceded by an introduction 
to the history of Iceland, may be substituted. 



116 

Attention is called to the facilities afforded for the study of Old Norse. A consider- 
able portion of the library of the late philologist, Th. Wisen, of Lund, was acquired 
by Bryn Mawr College, and hence the library is probably as well supplied as any other 
college library in the United States with Old Norse texts, Norse periodicals, and works 
on Old Norse language and literature. 

Comparative Teutonic Grammar, Dr. Weyhe. 

One hour a week throughout the year. 

The study of comparative Teutonic philology is recommended to those students only 
who are acquainted with the single old Teutonic languages, and have studied Gothic, 
Old High German, Old Saxon, Anglo-Saxon, and Norse. The object of the course is 
to compare the various old Teutonic languages with each other and with the related 
Aryan languages, — or in other words (1) to reconstruct the primitive Teutonic language; 
(2) to point out the characteristic features of primitive Teutonic as distinguished from 
primitive Aryan; (3) to carry down the history of early Teutonic from the period of 
unity into the early stages of the individual Teutonic languages. 

Teutonic Seminary, Dr. Weyhe. One hour a week throughout the year. 

This seminary is arranged for the benefit of the most advanced students in Teutonic 
philology. Its object is to encourage independent work on the part of the students. 
The exercises consist mainly of the discussion of special topics by the instructor and 
the students. The subjects for discussion are announced in advance, and the members 
of the seminary are expected to study the literature on these subjects, and'to make an 
effort to contribute some additional material, or an independent opinion of their own. 

In addition to the above courses, others in Old Frisian, 
Middle Low German, or Modern Low German may be arranged 
for students that have previously studied Gothic, Old and Middle 
High German, Anglo-Saxon, and Old Saxon. 

French 

The instruction in this department is under the direction of 
Dr. Albert Schinz, Associate Professor of French Literature, Dr. 
Richard Thayer Holbrook, Associate Professor of French Philo- 
logy and Italian, Mr. Frederick A. Blossom, Lecturer in French, 
Dr. Clara Leonora Nicolay,* Reader in Elementary French, and 
Miss Emma Haeberli, Reader (elect) in Elementary French. 

The instruction offered in French covers thirty- three hours of 
lectures and recitations a week; it includes five hours a week of 
matriculation French; ten hours a week of undergraduate major 
and minor work; five hours a week of post-major work, open 
only to graduates and to undergraduates that have completed 
the major course in French; and thirteen hours a week of gradu- 
ate work in modern French literature and in Old French literature 
and language. 

^Resigned March 1, 1910. The course given by her was continued by Miss Marie 
Seward King. 



117 



Course. 



Major 
Coarse. 



A class for beginners in French, five hours a week throughout the year, Matricu- 
is provided, in order that those students whose matriculation examination lation 
did not include French may with less difficulty obtain the reading knowl- 
edge of it that they must possess before receiving a degree. By great 
diligence such students may acquire sufficient knowledge to be admitted, 
should they desire it, into the first year of the major course in French. 
This course is given by Dr. Haeberli under the direction of Dr. Schinz. 

Entrance to the major course in French presupposes as much knowledge 
as is required to pass the matriculation examination in this subject. All 
the courses in French are conducted in the French language. 

First Year. 

{Minor Course.) 

{Given in each year.) 

Lectures on the history of French Literature of the eighteenth century, 

accompanied by collateral readings of representative French authors, 

Mr. Blossom. Three hours a week throughout the year. 

These lectures are delivered in French, and students are expected to take notes and 
answer questions in French. The aim of the lectures is to familiarise the students with 
the spoken language of France and form and direct their literary taste. 

Private reading: Lesage, Gil Bias (Heath, Boston); Montesquieu, Lettres Persanes; 
Marivaux, Les fausses confidences (Macmillan), must be read by students taking the 
course in the first semester. Voltaire, Zaire (Scott, Foresman Co., Chicago); Buffon, 
Extracts, Bernardin de St. Pierre, Paul et Virginie (Holt and Co., New York), must 
be read by students taking the course in the second semester. Examinations on the 
private reading must be taken at one of two stated times during the semester for 
which the reading is assigned, by all students pursuing the French courses. 

Critical Readings in French prose and poetry. Practical Exercises in 
French Syntax and Composition, Dr. Schinz. 

Two hours a week throughout the year. 

The class is conducted in French, and students are expected to take notes and to 
answer questions in French. 

Private reading: Balzac, Les Chouans, must be read by students taking the course 
in the first semester; de Vigny, Grandeur et Servitude Militaire must be read by stu- 
dents taking the course in the second semester. Examinations on the private reading 
must be taken at one of two stated times during the semester for which the reading 
is assigned by all students pursuing the French courses. 

The advanced standing examinations, or examinations taken without attendance on 
the college classes, in the reading and composition of the minor, two hours a week for two 
semesters, may be taken by those students only who are able to submit satisfactory 
evidence that they have obtained before entering the college, by regular and systematic 
study, or by residence abroad or work under French governesses the necessary advanced 
knowledge and are able to pass the examination in the first three weeks after entering 
the college. Failure to pass at the first trial will disqualify from further trials. The 
examination in translation will consist of sight translation from French (usually poetry) 
into English. V. Hugo's Les Chdtiments (Hachette, Paris), La Legende des Siecles, id. 
(the first two volumes), or Schinz's Selections from Victor Hugo (Heath, Boston), will 
give an idea of the kind of translation required. The examination in composition will 
as a rule consist in translating a few detached sentences of every-day idiomatic English, 
such as may be found in Sweet's Primer of Spoken English, or the German edition of it 
{Elementarbuch des Gesprochenen Englisch. Oxford, Clarendon Press), or Chardenal's 
French Exercises for Advanced Pupils (Allyn and Bacon, Boston). The private reading 
examinations must be taken not later than the third semester after that in which the 
advanced standing examination is offered. 



118 

Second Year. 
{Given in each year.) 

Lectures on the history of French Literature from the earliest times to 
the end of the seventeenth century, accompanied by collateral reading, 

Dr. bchinz. Three hours a week throughout the year. 

These lectures are delivered in French. The collateral reading in connection with 
the lectures, on which examinations are held at stated intervals, consists, for the 
period preceding the seventeenth century, of passages chosen from such works as 
Gautier's Epopees Francoises or Petit de Julleville's Histoire du Thedtre en France; 
and for the seventeenth century of selections from the leading authors of the time. 
Malherbe, Boileau, Corneille, Racine, Moliere, La Fontaine, Descartes, Pascal, La 
Rochefoucauld, Mme. de Se"vigne\ the great pulpit orators, and others, find a place in 
the course. During the first semester a number of selections from sixteenth century 
writers are also read in class, one hour out of the three being specially devoted to this 
purpose. 

Private reading: Chanson de Roland (traduction Gautier), and Be"dier, Tristan et 
Iseut, must be read by students taking the course in the first semester; Corneille, he 
Cid, Cinna; Racine, Andromaque, Athalie; Moliere, Tartuffe; Boileau, Art Poetique 
(Chant I), Pascal, Lettre Provinciate, V/Bossuet, Oraison funebre de Conde must be read 
by students taking the course in the second semester. Examinations on the private 
reading must be taken at one of two stated times during the semester for which the 
reading is assigned by all students pursuing the French courses. 

Critical Readings and Studies in Classical French Comedy, Mr. Blossom. 

One hour a week throughout the year. 
Moliere, Thedtre Choisi (ed. Thirion, Hachette, Paris) is used in both semesters. 

Studies in French Style, Composition, etc., Mr. Blossom. 

One hour a week throughout the year. 

The two one-hour courses given by Mr. Blossom may not be elected separately. 

Private reading: Corneille, Le Menteur (ed.P. de Julleville, Hachette, Paris) Molie're, 
Thedtre Choisi (ed. Thirion, Hachette, Paris), Le Marriage Force, Don Juan, Le Medecin 
Malgre lui, and Les Fourberies de Scapin, must be read by students taking the courses 
in the first semester; Racine, Les Plaideurs (ed. G. Lanson, Hachette, Paris) ; Regnard, 
Scenes Choisies par Charles Boudhors (Hachette, Paris), Le Joueur and Les Folies 
Amoureuses; Lesage, Turcaret (ed. by Kerr, O. C, Heath, Boston), must be read by 
students taking the courses in the second semester. Examinations on the private 
reading must be taken at one of two stated times during the semester for which the 
reading is assigned by all students pursuing the French courses. 

The advanced standing examinations or examinations taken without attendance on 
the college classes in the reading and composition of the major, two hours a week for two 
semesters, may be taken by those students only who are able to submit satisfactory 
evidence that they have obtained before entering the college by regular and systematic 
study, or by residence abroad or work under French governesses, the necessary advanced 
knowledge and are able to pass the examination in the first three weeks after entering 
the college. Failure to pass at the first trial will disqualify from further trials. The 
examination in translation will consist of sight translation from French (usually poetry), 
into English. V. Hugo's Les Chdtiments (Hachette, Paris), La Legende des Siecles, 
id. (the first two volumes), or Warren's Selections from Victor Hugo (Holt, New York) 
will give an idea of the kind of translation required. More difficult passages will be 
selected than for the minor advanced standing examination. The composition consists 
of one or two pieces of connected English, taken from such books as Stevenson's Treasure 
Island, Jerome K. Jerome's Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow. No specific question on 
French grammar is asked ; students are expected to show their knowledge of grammar 
in the composition. Cameron's The Elements of French Composition (Holt, New York), 
and Storm's French Dialogues (Macmillan, London) will be found useful in composition 



Courses. 



119 

work. The private readjng examinations must be taken not later than the third 
semester after that in which the advanced standing examination is offered. 

Group: French with Italian and Spanish, or with any lan- 
guage. 

Post-major Courses. 

The post-major courses are designed to bridge over the interval between Post- 
the ordinary undergraduate studies and graduate work. As the amount of ^J- a J™*_ 
time given to undergraduate subjects differs in different colleges graduate 
students frequently find it advisable to elect some of these courses. 

The short story (nouvelle) in the nineteenth century, Dr. Schinz. 

Two hours a week throughout the year. 
(Given in 1909-10 and again in 1911-12.) 

The genre novelle is studied in connection with the following writers: Xavier de 
Maistre, Chateaubriand, Nodier, de Vigny, de Musset, Balzac, M^rimee, Flaubert, 
Gautier, Laboulaye, Daudet, Bourget, Maupassant, France, Copp£e, Loti, Villiers 
de l'lsle Adam, de Reorder, and others. In 1909-10 the course was given only one hour 
a week throughout the year. 

French Lyric Poetry of the nineteenth century, Dr. Schinz. 

Two hours a week throughout the year. 
(Given in 1910-11 and again in 1912-13.) 
In the first semester the lectures treat lyric poetry until the year 1866. Special atten- 
tion is paid to the period from 1850 to 1866, while Lamartine, Hugo, Sainte Beuve, 
de Vigny, and de Musset are treated only so far as is necessary for the Understanding of 
the evolution of lyric poetry in their successors, Baudelaire, Gautier, de Banville, Leconte 
de Lisle, etc. The lectures of the second semester treat contemporary lyric poetry from 
1866 to 1900. A careful study is made of the Parnassian and Symbolist schools. 

Teachers' Course in Advanced French, Mr. Blossom. 

One hour a week throughout the year. 
(Given in each year.) 

This course is especially intended to give students the practical knowledge of French 
required for teaching the language. A correct pronunciation is taught by means 
of a study of French phonetics, of the comparative value of sounds, of the tonic and 
oratorical accents, and of the rhythmical language. Classical texts are analysed as 
a preparation for exercises in composition and lectures on the principles of French 
rhetoric are given. 

The Evolution of the French Novel, Mr. Blossom. 

Two hours a week throughout the year. 
(Given in 1909-10.) 
In this course the development of the novel is studied from its rise with Aslree through 
the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries to the end of the romantic period. Students 
are required to read and report on representative novels of each epoch. 

French Lyric Poetry to the End of the Eighteenth Century, Mr. Blossom. 

One hour a week throughout the year. 
(Given in 1910-11.) 
After a study of the principles of French versification, the history of lyric poetry in 
France is studied from its origin to the end of the eighteenth century, particular atten- 
tion being paid to the works of Rutebeauf, Charles d'Orleans, Villon, Marot.and Ron- 
sard. 



120 



The Romantic Drama of the nineteenth century, Mr. Blossom. 

Two hours a week throughout the year. 

{Given in 1911-12.) 

The lectures deal with the origin and development of the romantic drama in the 
works of Victor Hugo, Alexandre Dumas pere, Alfred de Vigny, and Alfred de Musset. 
Its renaissance in the latter part of the century in Richepin and Edmond Rostand is 
then discussed. 

Origin, development, and decline of realistic comedy, Mr. Blossom. 

Two hours a week throughout the year. 
{Given in 1912-13.) 

The lectures treat of the origin of realistic comedy in Beaumarchais ; its period of 
highest development in Augier, Dumas fils, Pailleron, and Sardou; its decline, the 
comedie naturaliste; new systems and new writers, Jules Lemaitre and Edmond Rostand. 



Graduate 

Courses. 



Literature. 



Graduate Courses. 

Thirteen hours a week of seminary work and graduate lectures are offered 
each year to graduate students of French, accompanied by the direction 
of private reading and original research. The books needed by the grad- 
uate students are collected in the seminary library of the department. 
No undergraduates are admitted to graduate courses or to the seminary 
libraries, but the post-major courses of the department amounting to four 
or five hours a week may be elected by graduate students. Graduate 
students interested in the study of literature will also find it to their 
advantage to attend the lectures on French literature two hours a week 
throughout the two years of the major course in French. 

There are offered each year three distinct graduate courses in French, 
two in literature and one in language, and these courses are varied so that 
they may be followed by graduate students throughout three years, and 
cover the work required of students who offer French language or literature 
as a major or minor for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. 

Seminary in French Literature, Dr. Schinz. 

Three hours a week throughout the year. 
(Given in each year.) 

In 1909-10 and again in 1911-12 the subject of the seminary is Victor Hugo. The 
seminary deals with his lyrical works. The following subjects are treated: Victor 
Hugo as a Royalist and Catholic poet; his indebtedness to Chateaubriand, Sainte- 
Beuve, Nodier and other contemporaries ; his attitude towards Napoleon I, the Republic 
of 1848 and Napoleon III.; and his social, political and religious ideas in the period of 
his maturity and of his old age. 

In 1910-11 Rousseau is the subject of the seminary. In the first semester, after a 
discussion of his life, a study is made of the Confessions, Reveries, and Correspondance. 
Special attention is paid to the controversy Confessions versus Memoires d'Epinay, as 
transformed by the discoveries of Mrs. MacDonald. The questions of Rousseau's 
insanity and suicide are discussed. The second semester is devoted chiefly to the study 
of Texte's Jean Jacques Rousseau et le cosmopolitisme litteraire. The Lettre a d'Alem- 
bert and the Nouvelle Heloise will serve as a text to this theory. 

In 1912-13 the subject of the seminary will be Montaigne. Various problems con- 
nected with his life, his relations to Protestantism and to the political problems of his 
time, the question of the authorship of the Discours sur la servitude volontaire, the 



121 

origin and sources of the essays, Montaigne and the Renaissance, and Montaigne and 
Plutarch will be discussed. A special study will be made of Montaigne's style and of 
the Apologie de Raymond de Sebonde. 

Seminary in French Language and Literature, Mr. Blossom. 

Two hours a week throughout the year. 
(Given in each year.) 

In 1910-11 the work of the seminary is an analytical study of the modern French 
language. Questions of syntax, style and vocabulary are discussed with a view to 
acquiring a thorough command of the idiomatic language. In 1913-14 the seminary in 
Molie're will be substituted for the above. The subjects studied will be: French Com- 
edy before Molie're, Moliere's comedies, their Latin, Italian, and French sources, his 
style and method of composition, the nature of his "comique," his philosophy and 
his morality are discussed. 

In 1911-12 the subject of the seminary is La 'Matiere de Bretagne' et Vepopee cour- 
toise. The course includes a careful study of the Lais of Marie de France, the poems 
referring to Tristan, and the Romans of Chretien de Troie; these are studied in con- 
nection with the question of their origin in Celtic countries and their later development 
in France. The different theories that have been proposed as to their origin and 
evolution are examined and discussed and an attempt is made to determine their com- 
parative value. 

The subject of the seminary in 1912-13 is Ronsard and the Pleiade, the object being 
to determine the origin, the extent, and the success of the Renaissance movement in 
France. The chief works of Ronsard and his successors, especially Du Bellay and 
Baif, will be read and discussed. 

The course in Old French Philology is intended for students in their first Language. 
year of graduate study; that in Old Provencal and the Old French Semi- 
nary for students in their second or third year of graduate study; the 
Journal Club may be attended by students in their first, second, or third 
year of graduate study. The course in Old French Readings is designed 
to be taken in connection with the seminary in Old French Literature. 

Old French Philology, Dr. Holbrook. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

(Given in each year.) 

This course consists of lectures on the Phonology, Morphology, and Syntax of Old 
French, and is designed not only for students whose main pursuit is Romance philology, 
but also for those who wish to acquire more precise knowledge of the French elements in 
Middle English. The main principles of Historical Grammar will be studied in the 
Extraits de la Chanson de Roland, published by Gaston Paris, and in various texts in L. 
Constans's Chrestomathie. Other books used are Passy's Sounds of the French Language, 
Grandgent's Introduction to Vulgar Latin, Nyrop's Grammaire Historique de VAncien 
Francais, and Schwan's Grammaire de VAncien Francais. 

Old French Readings, Dr. Holbrook. One hour a week throughout the year. 

Various typical Old French masterpieces are studied from a scientific standpoint. 
The essential facts of Old French grammar are reviewed and rare or difficult locu- 
tions will be minutely examined for the sake of precise interpretation ; dialectal features 
are considered and attention is given to the relation of manuscripts to printed 
texts. In addition to the works named below, students are expected to supply them- 
selves with Gaston Paris 's Litttrature jrancaise au moyen dge. 

The following courses may be rearranged to suit the needs of students in any particu- 
lar year. 

In 1909-10 and again in 1911-12 epic and historical literature is the subject of the 
course. The texts required are Stengel's edition of the Chanson de Roland (I.eipsic 



122 

1900); the Pelerinage de Charlemagne (ed. by Koschwitz, Leipsic, 1900), and the 
Extraits des Chroniquers Francais (Villehardouin, Joinville, Froissart, Commines) , 
ed. by G. Paris and A. Jeanroy, Paris, 1803. 

In 1910-11 dramatic literature will be studied. Various mysteries and miracle 
plays will be examined; but the course will deal mainly with purely mediaeval comedy 
(ca. 1260 — ca. 1530). The texts used are Adam de la Hale's Jeu de la feuillee (edition of 
Rambeau, Marburg, 1886, and of Langlois, Paris, 1895); Paul Lacroix's Recueil (Paris, 
1859), and the facsimile of Guillaume Le Roy's Patelin (I486?), printed for the Socie'te' 
des textes Francais modernes. 

Old French Seminary, Dr. Holbrook. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

(Given in each year.) 

The work of the seminary is on the most important Old French dialects. Texts in 
Norman, Picard, Francian and Franco-Provencal are studied with reference to their 
dialectal features in order that the student may acquire the power to determine approxi- 
mately the origin of other texts in which the same dialectal features occur. 

Old Provencal, Dr. Holbrook. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

(Given in. each year.) 

This course is intended for students of Old French who wish to begin the study of the 
language and literature of the Troubadours. The books required are Grandgent's 
Outline of the Phonology and Morphology of Old Provencal (Boston, 1905) and Appel's 
Provenzalische Chrestomathie (latest edition). 

Romance Languages Journal Club, Dr. DeHaan, Dr. Schinz, Dr. Hol- 
brook, Mr. Blossom. One and a half hours a fortnight throughout the year. 

(Given in each year.) 

The instructors and advanced students meet to report on and discuss recent reviews 
and critical articles. 

Italian. 

The instruction in this department is under the direction of 
Dr. Richard Thayer Holbrook, Associate Professor of French 
Philology and Italian. 

The instruction offered in Italian covers ten hours of lectures 
and recitations a week; it includes eight hours a week of under- 
graduate minor and major work; and two hours a week # of 
graduate work. 

A combination of five hours a week for one year of the 
minor course in Italian with five hours a week for one year of 
the minor course in Spanish forms a major course and may be 
taken with any other language or with comparative literature 
to form a group. Any of the undergraduate courses in Italian 
may be taken as free elective courses. 

First Yeae. 
(Minor Course.) 
(Given in each year.) 
Major Italian, Dr. Holbrook. Three hours a week throughout the year. 

bourse. (May be taken as a free elective.) 



123 

This course is designed to prepare beginners for the study of Italian literature, as well 
as for the practical use of the language. Reading is taken up from the start, a careful 
pronunciation is insisted upon, and the essentials of the grammar are taught by a critical 
observation of the texts used and by graded exercises in the rendering of English into 
Italian. The books read are the following: C. H. Grandgent's Italian Grammar; 
Bowen's Italian Reader and Hecker's II Piccolo Italiano; Giuseppe Finzi's Petrarca 
(1900); De Marchi's Storie; also selections from the verse and prose of Renato Fucini. 

Representative Italian Classics in English Translations, Dr. Holbrook. 

Two hour 8 a week throughout the year. 
(May be taken as a free elective.) 

This course deals with typical masterpieces of Italian literature from Dante to Cellini. 
The author's life, character, and surroundings, his place in literary history, and his trans- 
lators are discussed. 

The works studied are as follows: Dante and his Circle (for early lyrics). Vita Nuova, 
most of the Inferno, parts of the Purgatorio and Paradiso; Boccaccio, Life of Dante and 
several tales translated by John Payne and J. M. Rigg; Petrarch, selected Letters, 
Sonnets and Triumphs; Ariosto, Orlando Furioso; Tasso, Jerusalem Delivered; Cas- 
tiglione, The Courtier; Cellini, Life. Knowledge of Italian is not required. 

Second Year. 
(Given in each year.) 
Italian Classical Literature, Dr. Holbrook. 

' Three hours a week throughout the year. 

The work in this course is to translate most of the Inferno and parts of the Purgatorio 

and Paradiso; then selections from Ariosto and Tasso. For these two the study of 

difficult modern prose and poetry may be substituted, with exercises in writing and 

speaking. Training in pronunciation will be given throughout the course. 

Group: Italian and Spanish with any language, or with com- 
parative literature. 

Graduate Courses. 

Three hours a week of seminary work and graduate lectures are offered Graduate 
each year to graduate students of Italian accompanied by the direction of Courses. 
private reading and original research. The books needed by the graduate 
students are collected in the seminary library of the department. No 
undergraduates are admitted to graduate courses or to the seminarv 
libraries. 

Italian Philology, Dr. Holbrook. ne hour a week throughout the year. 

(Given in each year.) 

This course presupposes a knowledge of Old French philology and the equivalent of 
tho minor and major courses in Italian offered at Bryn Mawr College. The work is 
founded upon the treatise entitled Die Italienische Sprache by D'Ovidio and Meyer 
Liibke in Grober's Grundriss (Strassburg, 1906). Various passages from thirteenth 
and fourteenth century authors are examined critically from a phonological and 
morphological point of view. 

Old Italian Readings, Dr. Holbrook. One hour a week throughout the year. 

(Given in each year.) 

Students should provide themselves with the first volume of D'Anconaand Bacci's 
Manuale delta Letleratura Ilaliana (Florence, 1904). 



124 
Romance Languages Journal Club, Dr. DeHaan, Dr. Schinz, Dr. Hol- 

brook, Mr. Blossom. One and a half hours a fortnight throughout the year. 

The instructors and advanced students meet to report on and discuss recent reviews 
and critical articles. 

Spanish. 

The instruction in this department is under the direction of Dr. 
Fonger DeHaan, Professor of Spanish. 

The instruction offered in Spanish covers eighteen hours of 
lectures and recitations a week; it includes ten hours a week of 
undergraduate minor and major work; two hours a week of 
post-major work open only to graduates and to undergraduates 
that have completed the major course in Spanish; and six hours 
a week of graduate work. 

A combination of five hours a week for one year of the minor 
course in Spanish with five hours a week for one year of the minor 
course in Italian forms a major course, and may be taken with 
any other language to form a group. Students may thus elect 
ten hours of Spanish, or five hours of Spanish and five hours of 
Italian to form a major course. 

First Year. 

{Minor Course.) 

{Given in each year.) 

JMajOV Spanish, Dr. DeHaan. Five hours a week throughout the year. 

C/OUVSe, The object of this course is to give beginners a good knowledge of modern Spanish, 

and to ground them thoroughly in the essentials of the grammar. As a preparation for 
understanding the spoken language, two half-hours a week during the second semester 
are devoted to dictation. The books studied are the following (taken up in the order 
indicated): DeHaan's Cuentos Modernos; Perez Nieva, Tomds el torrero (Madrid. Colec- 
cidn Klong) ; DeHaan's Selected Works of G. A. Bequer; Hartzenbusch, Los Amantes 
de Teruel (Obras, vol. III.); Zorrilla, Granada (Madrid, 1895, 2 vols.). 
Private reading: Palacio Valdes, Jose; Galdds, Marianela. 

Second Year. 
{Given in each year.) 
Lectures in Spanish on Spanish Literary History of the Nineteenth Cen- 
tury, Dr. DeHaan. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

Spanish Composition, Dr. DeHaan. One hour a week throughout the year. 

Critical Reading in Spanish, Dr. DeHaan. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

Private reading supplementing the lectures on literary history comprises representa- 
tive works in the various branches of literature. 

Group: Spanish, or Italian and Spanish with any language, 
or with comparative literature. 



LJ 



125 

Post-Major Course. 

The post-major course is designed to bridge over the interval between JPost- 

the ordinary undergraduate studies and graduate work. As the amount of JMaJor 

time given to undergraduate subjects differs in different colleges graduate ^ ou * e ' 
students frequently find it advisable to elect this course. 

Advanced Spanish, Dr. DeHaan. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

{Given in each year.) 

The course consists of readings of classical, pre-classical and modern literature, trans- 
lation of English prose into Spanish, and the writing of compositions in Spanish. Some 
time is devoted to the study of the history of Spanish literature. 

Graduate Courses. 

Six hours a week of seminary work and graduate lectures are offered Graduate 
each year to graduate students of Spanish accompanied by the direction Courses. 
of private reading and original research. The books needed by the grad- 
uate students are collected in the seminary library of the department. 
No undergraduates are admitted to graduate courses or to the seminar 
libraries, but the post-major course of the department amounting to two 
hours a week may be elected by graduate students. 

Spanish Philology, Dr. DeHaan. One hour a week throughout the year. 

Old Spanish Readings, Dr. DeHaan. One hour a week throughout the year. 

Lectures in Spanish on Spanish Literary History till the death of Calde- 
ron (1681), Dr. DeHaan. One hour a week throughout the year. 

The lectures are supplemented by extensive private reading of important works. 

Essays in Spanish, Dr. DeHaan. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

Romance Languages Journal Club, Dr. DeHaan, Dr. Schinz, Dr. Hol- 

brook, Mr. Blossom. One and a half hours a fortnight throughout the year. 

The instructors and advanced students meet to report on and discuss recent reviews 
and critical articles. 

Comparative Literature. 

The instruction in this department is under the direction of 
Dr. Orie Latham Hatcher, Lecturer in Elizabethan Literature 
and Associate (elect) in Comparative and Elizabethan Liter- 
atures, and Dr. Alfred Horatio Upham, Associate Professor 
(elect) of English Literature. 

The instruction offered in comparative literature covers nine 
hours of lectures and recitations a week; it includes eight hours 
a week of undergraduate minor and major work and one hour 
a week of graduate work. Any of the undergraduate courses may 
be taken as free elective courses. 



126 

First Year. 
(Minor Course.) 

Major The Epic, Dr. Hatcher. Three hours a week during the first semester. 

(Given in 1910-11 and in each succeeding year.) 

The lectures discuss the origins and significance of epic poetry, include some mention 
of oriental and early Teutonic epic literature, and relate the artistic form of the epics 
studied to the critical theories of Aristotle, and those of the Italian Renaissance. The 
required reading includes the Iliad, the Odyssey and the Aeneid, the greater Renaissance 
epics, Orlando Furioso, Jersualem Delivered and The Fairie Queene; and Paradise Lost. 

The Pastoral, Dr. Hatcher. Three hours a week during the second semester. 

(Given in 1910-11 and in each succeeding year.) 

The course deals with the best literature associated with the pastoral tradition. 
The lectures supplement the range of the acquired reading, and trace the pastoral idea 
from its rise in the Idylls of Theocritus through the later classical eclogue and pastoral 
romance into the Renaissance types of eclogue, pastoral lyric, novel and drama. The 
reading will include the Idylls of Theocritus, Bion and Moschus, Daphnis and Chloe, 
Tasso's Aminta, Sidney's Arcadia, Lodge's Rosalynd, Spenser's Shepherd's Calendar, 
Fletcher's Faithful Shepherdess, Jonson's Sad Shepherd, etc. 

Neo-classicism in France and England, Dr. Upham. 

Two hours a week throughout the year. 

(Given in 1910-11 and again in 1912-13.) 

This course is concerned with the influence exercised by French critical theory and 
literary practise upon the literature of England from the Restoration to the death of 
Pope (1744). The lectures consider the rise of Deism and the enthronement of reason 
and good taste, the conflict of the Ancients and Moderns, the vogue of satire and 
didacticism, and the application of theory to the various literary types. Careful out- 
side reading is required. 

Second Year. 

The Sonnet and Minor Lyric Forms, Dr. Hatcher. • 

Three hours a week during the first semester. 

(Given in 1911-12 and in each succeeding year.) 

The lectures trace the rise of modern lyric poetry among the Troubadours and the 
spread of Provencal and other early Romance lyric forms from Italy, France, and Spain 
into England. The development of the sonnet form is emphasised and the English 
sonnet studied from its beginnings down to the present time with special reference to the 
sonnets of Sidney, Spenser, Shakespeare, Milton, Wordsworth, and Rossetti. The 
reading includes Ballades and Rondeaux, Scott's translations; Ballads and Lyrics of 
Old France, Andrew Lang's translations; Rossetti's Early Italian Poets, Petrarch's 
Sonnets, Bullen's Elizabethan Lyrics, Sidney Lee's Elizabethan Sonnets, etc. Previous 
study of Latin and French is assumed. 

The Drama, Dr. Hatcher. Three hours a week during the second semester. 

(Given in 1911-12 and in each succeeding year.) 

The object of the course is to suggest the many forms in which the human instinct 
for dramatic expression has manifested itself in different countries and periods, and to 
acquaint the student with the more significant of these forms in their historical order. 
The lectures inquire into the nature of the dramatic essence underlying all these forms i 
and attempt some comparison of the dramatic ideals and canons of the classical period 
with those of the Renaissance, and with those of our own time. A few representative 
types of drama are studied in plays selected from different literatures and periods. 



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127 
The Foreign Relations of Nineteenth Century Romanticism, Dr. Upham. 

Two hours a week throughout the year. 

(.Given in 1911-12 and again in 1913-14.) 

A study of the various phases of the general Romantic movement in their effect on 
English thought and letters after 1800. Attention will be given to the influence of 
philosophical idealism, the final shaping of the mediaeval element, the revolutionary 
impulse, the relation of nature and art, the Hellenistic reaction, the Italian revival, and 
the diffusion of romanticism in later literature. Careful outside reading is required. 

Group: Comparative Literature with English, or with Italian, 
or with Spanish, or with Italian and Spanish. 

Graduate Courses. 

The graduate courses in comparative literature change from year to Graduate 
year throughout a cycle of three years. They may be taken by graduate Courses. 
students of English in connection with the seminary in Elizabethan litera- 
ture or may be elected separately. 

Dramatic Theory and Technique in England until 1642, Dr. Hatcher. 

One hour a week throughout the year. 

(Given in 1909-10.) 

The course inquires into the critical origins of English dramatic theory and into the 
technique of the various types of drama appearing in England before the closing of the 
theatres in 1642. An attempt is made to differentiate important sub-types of comedy 
and tragedy, and the essential characteristics of tragi-comedy, masque, and pastoral are 
noted. The inquiry includes references to foreign models and analyses of representative 
English plays of each type. The course is related to the seminary for 1909-10, dealing 
with Shakespeare, but may be elected separately. 

Drama as a Reflection of Contemporary Life, Dr. Hatcher. 

One hour a week throughout the year. 

(Given in 1910-11.) 

Some one period in the development of the drama is chosen as the basis of study, 
as, for example, the Elizabethan, or the modern, and the drama of that period is related 
as far as practicable to the social, economic and religious conditions of the time. The 
themes, situations, moral codes, and technical construction of plays of the period 
selected are examined. The course is related to the seminary in Elizabethan literature 
but may be elected separately. 

The Indebtedness of Elizabethan Literature to Continental, Dr. Hatcher. 

One hour a week throughout the year. 

(Given in 1911-12.) 

The course deals with the stimulus felt in Elizabethan England from the earlier 
literary activity in the Romance countries and the consequent earlier development 
there of critical theories, the arts of versification, and of definite literary types. The 
models contributed to English literature by Italy, France, and Spain in epic, pastoral, 
tragedy, comedy, lyric, etc, are studied as well as the material actually borrowed and 
incorporated into Elizabethan literature. The significance of Elizabethan translations 
is emphasised. The course is related to the seminary in Elizabethan literature but 
may be elected separately. 



128 

Semitic Languages and Biblical Literature. 

The instruction in this department is under the direction of 
Dr. George A. Barton, Professor of Biblical Literature and 
Semitic Languages and Miss Maud Downing, Reader in Semitic 
Languages. The instruction offered in this department includes 
five hours a week of Oriental History, three hours a week of free 
elective courses in Biblical Literature, and eight hours a week 
of graduate courses in Semitic Languages. 

The college was particularly fortunate in securing in the year 
1892 the. library of the late M. Arthur Amiaud, of Paris. While 
M. Amiaud was especially eminent as an Assyriologist, he was 
also prominent as a general Semitic student. His library was 
the collection of an active scholar, and forms a working library 
for the student in every department of Semitic study. It is 
especially rich in the Hebrew, Syriac, and Assyrian languages, 
containing several works, indispensable to the student, which 
are now out of print. Another Semitic library containing many 
works on the Talmud and on Jewish literature was acquired in 
1904. In 1907 Mr. Albert J. Edmunds presented to the college 
his library of 200 volumes on the history of religion. The con- 
tents of these libraries, together with the books already owned 
by the college and those easily accessible in neighboring libraries, 
form an exceptionally good collection of material for the specialist 
in Semitic languages. A good working collection of cuneiform 
tablets is under the control of the department, and affords an 
excellent opportunity for students of Assyrian to become familiar 
with original documents. 

Minor Course. 
(Given in each year.) 

Minor Oriental History, Dr. Barton. Five hours a week throughout the year. 

iyOUTSem (May be taken as a free elective or may be substituted for the second year of required 

science.) 

This course treats in broad outlines the history and civilisation of the classical orient. 
The beginnings of the Hamito-Semitic race, and the influence of environment upon 
its primitive institutions are first studied. The separation of the races into the 
different nations is then traced, and the history of the principal oriental nations, 
Egyptians, Babylonians, Assyrians, Phoenicians, Hebrews, Hittites, Sabaians, and 
Persians; of Alexander and his successors; of the Parthians, and the oriental em- 
pire of the Romans, is followed in outline. Special attention is paid to the history 
of the Hebrews, and to their unique religious contribution to the civilisation of the 
world. The course concludes with a study of the Arabic caliphates, and of Moham- 
medan civilisation. The lectures are illustrated by archaeological specimens and by 
photographs. Either semester may be elected separately. 



129 

Fhee Elective Courses. 

The courses in Biblical Literature are intended primarily for under- Free 

graduate students, but may be elected by graduate students also. Elective 

Courses. 
History of the Old Testament Canon, Dr. Barton. 

One hour a week throughout the year. 

(Given in 1909-10 and again in 1911-12.) 

In this course the history of the composition and collection of the books of the Old 
Testament is studied. The instruction is given in lectures, and readings are assigned 
in the Old Testament itself and in modern literature concerning it. 

New Testament Biography, Dr. Barton. 

Two hours a week throughout the year. 
(Given in 1909-10 and again in 1911-12.) 

The first semester of this course is devoted to a careful study of the life and teaching 
of Christ; the second semester, to the life and teaching of St. Paul. The instruction is 
given in lectures, and the Gospels and Epistles are read together with the most helpful 
of the modern works on these topics. The course is illustrated by photographs 
of the most important places connected with the lives of Christ and St. Paul. 

History of the New Testament Canon, Dr. Barton. 

One hour a week throughout the year. 

(Given in 1910-11 and again in 1912-13.) 

This course, which alternates with the course on the Old Testament Canon, consists 
of a study of the New Testament. 

The History of Christian Doctrine, Dr. Barton. 

Two hours a week throughout the year. 

(Given in 1910-11 and again in 1912-13.) 

In the first semester Christianity is studied as presented by its Founder and by the 

apostles, and in the second semester the history of Christian doctrine from 100 A. D. 

to the present time is briefly reviewed, and problems presented by modern thought 

are touched upon. 

Graduate Courses. 

Seminary work and graduate lectures amounting to at least five hours Graduate