(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Buffalo County, Nebraska, and its people : a record of settlement, organization, progress and achievement"

GENEALOGY COLLECTION 



BUFFALO COUNTY 



a^ 



NEBRASKA 



AND ITS PEOPLE 



ILLUSTRATED 



VOLUME II 



CHICAGO 

THE S. J. CLARKE PUBLISHING COMPANY 
1916 



1385506 




"-^J??^ 





BIOGRAPHICAL 



MAX A. HOSTETLER. 

With tne commercial development of Shelton Max A. Hostetler has been 
closely associated for many years and he has also become widely known through 
the state as the representative of the fifty-ninth district in the general assembly, 
where he has done important committee work and has been identified with much 
constructive legislation. He was born February 7, 1857, in Broadhead, Wiscon- 
sin, and after attending the rural schools made his initial step in the business 
world at farm work in Kearney county, Nebraska. He afterward formed a 
partnership with a brother for the conduct of a general mercantile business at 
Lowell and since 1878 has been the owner of a dry goods store in Shelton. Thirty- 
seven years have since come and gone, during which he has been continuously 
connected with the commercial activity of the city, and his progress has been 
based upon thorough study of the trade and the employment of modern com- 
mercial methods, leading to the attainment of honorable success. He has figured 
prominently in business circles not only of Shelton but of the state. He was the 
first president of the State Federation of Retail Merchants, to which position he 
was elected in 1906. serving for three years. He has since been its treasurer and 
is also treasurer of the Federated Merchants Mutual Insurance Company. Aside 
from the conduct of the Daylight Store, by which name his Shelton establish- 
ment is known, he is interested in other business enterprises, all of which profit 
by his sound judgment and the spirit of advancement which he infuses therein.. 

On the 2ist of September, 1880, at Gibbon, Nebraska, Mr. Hostetler was- 
married to Miss Ella M. Doggett, a daughter of Gary Armsted and Mary (Huff- 
man) Doggett, both of whom were representatives of old Virginia families, the 
former of Scotch-Irish descent, while the latter came of German and French 
lineage. The ancestral line of the Doggett family in America can be traced back 
to 1670, when representatives of the name lived in Lancaster, Virginia, and their 
history is found in the Congressional library in Washington. The great-grand- 
father served in the Revolutionary war and the grandfather served in the War 
of 1812 under two enlistments, while Gary Doggett became an officer in the 
American army in the Mexican war and held the rank of first lieutenant in the 
First Ohio Cavalry during the Civil war. Mrs. Hostetler has been very promi- 
nent in club and lodge circles in the state for thirty years and is now president 
of the Mothers' Day Association and of the Legislative Ladies' League. Both 
Mr. and Mrs. Hostetler hold membership in the Presbyterian church and fra- 
ternally he is connected with the Ancient Order of United Workmen, of which 

5 



6 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

he was financier for many years, and with the Modern Brotherhood of America. 
His political allegiance is given to the republican party. He was the president 
of the first commercial club in Shelton and served in that capacity for many 
years. He was elected president of the State Commercial Club Association at 
its organization and served in that capacity for one year, declining reelection. 
His interest in all matters pertaining to the public welfare is deep and sincere 
and has been manifest in many tangible ways whereby the substantial growth 
and development of the city has been augmented. He was a member of the town 
council of Shelton for twelve years and is now serving for the second term as 
a member of the Nebraska legislature, taking his seat in 191 3 and serving again 
through the session of 191 5. He is a member of the committees on claims and 
deficiencies, judiciary, school lands and funds, and during his connection with 
the legislature has given careful consideration to all vital questions coming up 
for settlement. He regards a public ofifice as a public trust and is ever true to 
any trust reposed in him. He has therefore made an excellent official and his 
legislative work reflects credit and honor upon the constituency that has honored 
him with election to office. 



JOHN HENNING. 



John Henning is an honored pioneer settler of Bufifalo county and a retired 
farmer now living in Kearney. He was born in Logan county, Ohio, November 
10, 1838* was reared in Union county, that state, and pursued his education in 
the public schools near his father's home. Through the periods of vacation he 
assisted in the work of the farm, early becoming familiar with the best meth- 
ods of tilling the soil and caring for the crops. He continued upon the farm 
until, feeling that his duty to his country was paramount to all else, he enlisted 
for service on the 17th of August, 1861, as a member of Company F, Thirty- 
first Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, with which he served for two years, 
seven months and nine days, when he was honorably discharged on account 
of disability. He participated in the hard fought battles of Perryville, Stone 
River and Chickamauga and a number of hotly contested skirmishes and was 
twice hit with spent balls but was not wounded. However, he sufifered injuries 
owing to the rigors and hardships of war, for he has never fully recovered his 
health and his army service has caused deafness in the left ear. For a time 
he was in the hospital at Chattanooga and also at Nashville, and at the latter 
place was honorably discharged. 

After returning home Mr. Henning worked for a time and then rented a 
farm in Ohio, upon which he resided until March, 1872, when he came to Ne- 
braska and homesteaded in Buffalo county in town 9, range 16, his place being 
located on section 14. This he at once began to develop and improve and 
thereon he continued to follow general farming until he retired in 1910 and 
came to Kearney, since which time he has sold the farm property. He brought 
his fields to a high state of cultivation and was regarded as one of the represen- 
tative agriculturists of the community. His well directed labors brought him 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 7 

substantial success and he is now the possessor of a competency which supplies 
him with all the comforts and some of the luxuries of life. 

On the 29th of April, 1865, Mr. Henning was married to Miss Eliza Jane 
Ballinger, who was also born in Logan county, Ohio, July 25, 1845, and was 
there reared and educated. She came to Buffalo county in 1872 and is num- 
bered among the pioneer women of this part of the state. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Henning were born ten children, of whom four died in infancy. Those who 
survive are : Lucy Belle, who first wedded John B. Mallady, and after his 
death became the wife of Ira Kniepdt; Eva Ellen, the wife of David Welling- 
ton, of Sac City, Iowa; Mary Alice, the wife of John Tattum, of Lincoln, 
Nebraska ; William E., who follows farming in Logan county, Colorado ; Nathan 
Thomas, who is engaged in farming in Buffalo county; and Rachel Grace, the 
wife of John Vance, a farmer of Federal, Wyoming. 

The parents were among the first members of the Methodist church of 
Kearney and few of the charter members of that organization are now living. 
They have always contributed generously to its support and done everything 
possible to promote its growth and extend its influence. Mr. Henning holds 
membership in Sedgwick Post, No. i, G. A. R. of Kearney and has held most 
of its offices save that of commander, which he declined to fill on account of 
his hearing. His wife is connected with the Ladies of the Grand Army of the 
Republic. Both are held in highest esteem, having a circle of friends that is 
coextensive with the circle of their acquaintance. They have lived to see practi- 
cally the entire development and growth of this section of the state and have 
borne their part in bringing about those changes which have wrought for the 
substantial improvement of town and county. Mr. Henning is now in the 
seventy-eighth year of his age and is one of the most highly respected of Kear- 
ney's representative pioneer citizens. 



C. S. FIELDGROVE. 



Among the men who are contributing to the development of Sharon town- 
ship along agricultural lines is C. S. Fieldgrove, who owns and operates an 
excellent farm on section 35. He was born in Lawrence county, Pennsylvania, 
on the 31st of January, 1866, and is a son of Henry and Margaret A. (Mires) 
Fieldgrove, natives of Germany and Pennsylvania respectively. The father 
came to the United States in the '50s and settled in Pennsylvania, where he 
was married. At the time of the Civil war he served in the Union army and in 
times of peace was also' willing to make personal sacrifices to promote the 
public good. After the close of the war he returned to Pennsylvania but in 
1 87 1 removed to Nebraska and became the owner of a good farm in Sharon 
township, Buffalo county, on which he lived until his demise in 1904. His wife 
has now reached the advanced age of eighty-four years. Five of their eight 
children are living. 

C. S. Fieldgrove received a college education and also gained valuable train- 
ing in agriculture through assisting his father with the farm work. He re- 
mained at home until he was twenty-seven years of age, when he bought one 



8 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

hundred and sixty acres on section 35, Sharon township, where he has since 
Hved. He also owns an interest in a fifty-six acre tract, and iiis farming and 
stockraising activities leave him little time for outside interests. He has given 
especial attention to the breeding of high grade stock and as the years have 
passed he has accumulated more than a competence. He has increased the value 
of his property by erecting fine modern buildings and he is financially inter- 
ested in the Farmers Elevator at Shelton. 

Mr. Fieldgrove was married in 1890 to Miss Sarah Boyer, a native of Michi- 
gan, by whom he had four children : Floyd H. ; Blanche, who is a graduate of 
the State Normal School and is now engaged in teaching school ; Grace, a high 
school student; and Charles M., at home. Mrs. Fieldgrove died on the ist of 
November, 1902, and her demise was sincerely mourned by her many warm 
friends. In 1904 Mr. Fieldgrove was united in marriage to Mrs. Maggie (John- 
son) Turton, who was born in Pleasant Plain, Iowa, and is a daughter of 
James W. Johnson. Mrs. Fieldgrove had two children by her first husband: 
Leona, who is now attending the State Normal School; and Bertha, who died 
in infancy. 

Mr. Fieldgrove casts his ballot in support of the republican party and has 
been called to office, having served as township treasurer and as a member of 
the school board. He is well known in local Masonic circles, belonging to the 
blue lodge at Shelton and being also identified witl^ chapter and commandery 
at Kearney. He has also taken the thirty-second degre>. ni the Scottish Rite 
and is identified with the Ancient Order of United Workmen. The success 
which he has gained is the more enviable in that it is the result solely of his 
own efforts and ffood management. 



FREEMAN MERRYMAN. 

The farming interests of the county find a worthy representative in Freeman 
Merryman, who resides on section 9, Center township. Moreover, he is a 
veteran of the Civil war and has ever been a loyal citizen, as true to his country 
in days of peace as when he followed the stars and stripes on southern battle- 
fields. Illinois claims him as a native son. He was born in Richland Grove town- 
ship, Mercer county, June 15, 1845, his father being David D. Merryman, while 
his grandfather was Timothy D. IMerryman, who was in possession of the coat 
of arms of the family. The first entry of lands by any of the family in Maine 
was made in the year 1641. The grandfather removed from Maine to Illinois in 
1834 and subsequently settled in Mercer county, casting in his lot with the pioneer 
residents of that part of the state. He had previously served his country as a 
soldier in the War of 1812. His son, David D. Merryman, wedded Miss Phoebe 
Hibbard, who was also descended from Revolutionary ancestry, the family hav- 
ing been represented in the war for independence by John Hibbard and a Captain 
Rowe. David D. Merryman was a farmer by occupation and followed that pur- 
suit in Illinois until 1882, when he removed to Buffalo county, Nebraska, and 
established his home in Kearney, where he lived retired until his death in 1891. 

Freeman Merryman, spending his youthful days under the parental roof, 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 11 

attended the public schools of Mercer county to the age of seventeen years, when 
his patriotic spirit was aroused and he enlisted for service in the Civil war, being 
enrolled with the boys in blue on the 6th of August, 1862. He was assigned to 
duty with Company C, One Hundred and Second Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and 
was honorably discharged on the 14th of June, 1865. He had been wounded at 
the battle of Resaca, Georgia, on the 15th of May, 1864. He participated in the 
campaign through Kentucky and Tennessee under Generals Thomas and Rose- 
crans and subsequently served under General Sherman until the Grand Review 
at Washington, D. C, in which he took part. He had participated in the engage- 
ments at Resaca, Cassville, Dallas, New Hope Church, Lost Mountain, Kenesaw 
Mountain, crossing the Chattahooche, Peach Tree Creek and the siege of Atlanta. 
In 1864 he had served under Fighting Joe Hooker, and as he and his comrades 
were armed with the Spencer seven-shot repeating rifles, they were kept in the 
thick of the fray. Following the Atlanta campaign Mr. Merryman took part in 
the engagements at Averysboro and at Bentonville, North Carolina, and thence 
went to Raleigh, where his regiment was stationed at the close of the war. He 
marched with Sherman's army in the Grand Review in the capital city, where 
the victorious Union troops marched through the streets of Washington, cheered 
by the thousands who watched the parade and welcomed the return of the 
veterans. 

After receiving his discharge Mr. Merryman returned to Mercer county, 
Illinois, and worked upon his father's farm for a year. He then married and 
located in Moline, Illinois, and for seventeen years was in the employ of the 
John Deere Plow Company, spending five years of that time as foreman of the 
wood department and three years as a contractor. When he left the company 
he was receiving a salary of four thousand dollars annually but was obliged to 
resign his position on account of his health. He then came to Nebraska in June, 
1883. He had visited the state in 1879 and had bought out holdings. On his 
removal to the state four years later he took up his abode in Kearney, for his 
property interests were in Buffalo county. Lie now owns one thousand and fifty 
acres of land, none of which is upon the market. For the past twelve years he 
has resided in his country home one mile south and three miles east of the busi- 
ness center of Kearney and from this point he superintends his invested interests, 
which are extensive and important and which return to him a most gratifying 
annual income. 

In 1866 Mr. Merryman was united in marriage to Miss Alcinda B. Van Meter, 
of Richland Grove, Mercer county, Illinois. To them were born four children, 
three of whom survive, as follows : Minnie E., the wife of Walter R. Gamble, 
of Kearney, Nebraska; Arthur F., who follows farming in Center township; and 
Nellie E., at home. The wife and mother passed away on the i6th of May, ,1892. 

For the past twenty years or more Mr. Merryman has done nothing save look 
after his property holdings and other interests. He has also spent considerable 
time in travel and on his trips has become acquainted with many of the notable 
public men of the day. In politics he is a republican, while fraternally he is con- 
nected with the Masons and with Sedgwick Post, No. i, G. A. R., of which he 
served for one year as commander. He has also been junior vice department 
commander of Nebraska and he served as chief of staff of the department of 
Nebraska and as aid-de-camp on the staff of General D. J. Palmer and others. 



12 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

He is one of the well known residents of Buffalo county and is a representative 
of our best type of American manhood and chivalry. By perseverance, determina- 
tion and honorable effort he has overthrown the obstacles which barred his path 
to success and has reached the goal of prosperity, while his genuine worth, broad 
mind and public spirit have made him a director of public thought and action. 
xA.t all times he is ready to lend his aid and cooperation to any movement calculated 
to benefit this section of the country or advance its wonderful development. 



KERSEY O. HOLMES. 



For the past thirty years Kersey O. Holmes has been a resident of Buffalo 
county, during which period he has been identified with commercial and finan- 
cial interests in a manner that has contributed not only to his individual suc- 
cess but to the promotion of public prosperity as well. Born in Columbiana 
county, Ohio, on the 21st of August, 1842, he is a son of Dr. Jesse Holmes, a 
native of Virginia, who in young manhood removed to Ohio, settling in Co- 
lumbiana county. Determining upon the practice of medicine as a life work, 
he obtained his professional education in Columbus, Ohio, previous to which 
time, however, he had proven a successful and capable teacher. He taught 
for a considerable period, almost exclusively in those schools conducted by the 
Society of Friends, or Quakers, of which sect he was a representative. In fact 
he became well known as one of the prominent ministers of that society. 
In various places he continued his educational labors and displayed marked 
ability in imparting readily and concisely to others the knowledge that he had 
acquired. He married Rebecca Hanna, an aunt of Marcus Hanna, who after- 
ward became United States senator from Ohio. Three children were born of 
this union, of whom two are yet living, the elder being Elizabeth, the wife of 
David Townsend, a resident of California. The wife and mother passed away 
in 1847 and Dr. Holmes afterward wedded Mercy Lloyd, while his third wife 
was Sarah M. Paxson, who bore him three children, of whom two are now 
living: Mrs. John N. Dryden, of Kearney, Nebraska; and Dr. Jesse H. Holmes, 
a member of the faculty of Swarthmore College of Pennsylvania, occupying 
the professorship of Biblical literature. The father, Dr. Jesse Holmes, removed 
to Iowa and for a time practiced his profession at Mount Pleasant and later at 
West Liberty. In 1879 he became a resident of Lincoln, Nebraska, where he 
resided until his death, about 1885. 

Kersey O. Holmes spent his early days in Ohio and with his father removed 
to Mount Pleasant, Iowa, in 1857. His primary education was obtained in the 
public schools of his native county, followed by further study in the public 
schools of Mount Pleasant. By competitive examination, which was then the 
rule, each county being entitled to a scholarship, he earned the right of admis- 
sion as a student to the State University at Iowa City, where he was in attend- 
ance for about three years. He read law at Davenport, Iowa, with the firm 
of Putnam & Rogers, and later with Edmunds & Ransom of Iowa City. In 
1865 he was admitted to the bar and for a short time was engaged in the prac- 
tice of law in Louisa and Muscatine counties, after which he removed to Des 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 13 

Moines, where he engaged in practice until his removal to Audubon, Iowa, where 
he practiced until ill health led to his relinquishment of professional activity. 

In 1886 Mr. Holmes came to Kearney, Nebraska, where he has since lived. 
For twenty-nine years he was engaged in mercantile pursuits and figured as 
one of the most prominent business men of the city in which he now makes his 
home. He also served as postmaster for four years during the administration 
of President Roosevelt. Since its organization he has been a stockholder of 
the City National Bank and called to official position is now serving as vice 
president. His judgment in business affairs is sound, his sagacity keen, his 
integrity unassailable and his enterprise unfaltering. 

On the 19th of November, 1866, Mr. Holmes was married to Miss Etta 
Raymond, a daughter of Kendall Raymond, of Monroe county. New York. Mrs. 
Holmes is a graduate of the Iowa State University, and by her marriage has 
become the mother of two sons, Ernest Raymond and Loring J., both deceased. 

In his political views Mr. Holmes is a republican and has never voted any 
other ticket. He was elected and served a part of two terms a member of the 
board of supervisors of Buffalo county and it was during his term that the 
present courthouse was erected, Mr. Holmes being made chairman of the build- 
ing committee. He has never wavered in his allegiance to the religious 
faith of his father, being still a Quaker in belief, and he has always been an 
active worker for the cause of temperance. His life has at all times been up- 
right and honorable, exemplifying the traits of sterling manhood and citizen- 
ship. The consensus of public opinion places him in the front rank among 
Kearney's leading men and wherever he is known he is held in highest regard. 



R. F. CRUIT. 



R. F. Cruit is a resident farmer of Center township, his home being on 
section 7. His residence in the county covers a period of more than three decades, 
during which time he has seen this district emerge from pioneer conditions and 
take on all the evidence of a progressive and modern civilization. He was born 
near Lancaster, Ohio, July 28, 1862, and is a son of George W. and Sarah 
(Young) Cruit, both of whom passed away in the Buckeye state. The mother 
died when her son R. F. was but seven years of age and the father, who was 
a farmer by occupation, afterward married Miss Margaret Moyer. 

R. F. Cruit was reared under the parental roof and acquired his education 
in the public schools and as a student in the Ohio Wesleyan University at Dela- 
ware, Ohio. In 1882 he came to Buffalo county, Nebraska, settling on his 
present home farm, which his father had previously purchased, George W. 
Cruit having become the owner of three quarter sections in this county at 
different times during the late '70s. R. F. Cruit engaged in teaching through 
five terms of school after locating in Buffalo county. During that time he also 
built a house and barn upon 'his land and improved his farm, thus making a 
start in the work of converting raw prairie into a valuable farm property. 
In 1 89 1 he wedded Miss Hattie Pool, of Buffalo county, a daughter of Achish 
Pool, who was one of the early pioneers of this part of the state. Mr. and 



14 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

Mrs. Cruit became parents of two children : Beulah Gertrude, now a teacher 
in the city schools of Loup, Nebraska ; and Robert Leroy, who is attending the 
Nebraska Wesleyan University at Lincoln. The wife and mother passed away 
in 1896 and in 1899 Mr. Cruit wedded Miss Bertha Smith, a native daughter 
of Buffalo county. Her father, James M. Smith, arrived in this county from 
Iowa in 1873 and homesteaded a quarter section of land in Thornton town- 
ship, on which he built a sod house, which was the birthplace of Mrs. Cruit and 
in which she spent the first seven years of her life. To the second marriage 
have been born four children, Clarence F., Ruth L., Helen V. and Mabel Lois. 

Mr. Cruit now owns two hundred and forty acres of land in his home farm 
and also another tract of two hundred acres in Grant township near Amherst. 
He is a stockholder in the Farmers Elevator Company at Kearney and the 
Farmers Elevator at Glenwood. He likewise owais stock in the Kearney 
Canning Company and in the Union Valley Telephone Company and is a busi- 
ness man of marked enterprise. He closely and thoroughly studies every situa- 
tion and guides his actions by a sound judgment that leads to success. His 
discernment is keen, his enterprise unfaltering, and his energy has brought 
him to a prominent position among the agriculturists of Buffalo county. 

In his political views Mr. Cruit is a republican and has served as a mem- 
ber of the school board and also as town treasurer for one term. Fraternally 
he is connected with the Woodmen of the World, with the Highlanders and 
with Buffalo Lodge, No. -^y, I. O. O. F. He and his wife are consistent Chris- 
tian people, the former belonging to the Methodist Episcopal church, while 
the latter is of the Evangelical faith. They are widely known and highly 
esteemed in the community where they reside, having a large circle of warm 
friends who entertain for them the deepest regard. 



WHEELER WEBSTER. 



Wheeler Webster, an up-to-date and able farmer residing on section 10, 
Gibbon township, was born in Ripley county, Indiana, in March, 1852. His 
parents, Thomas and Nancy (Dowers) Webster, were both natives of that 
county, whence in 1888 or 1889 they came to Buffalo county, Nebraska, and 
during the remainder of their lives made their home among their children. 

Wheeler Webster attended the common schools but as he was the eldest 
son and had to go to work at an early age his opportunities along educational 
lines were limited. When twenty years of age he rented land in Indiana, which 
he cultivated until 1883, when he removed to Buff"alo county, Nebraska. After 
renting for several years he purchased land and now owns two farms, one of 
eighty acres and the other of one hundred and twenty acres. However, he 
resides on the J. B. Adams farm on section 10, Gibbon township, which comprises 
three hundred and twenty acres and which he has operated for twenty-four 
years. He understands farming thoroughly and as he is energetic and willing 
to profit by the discoveries of investigators along agricultural lines he seldom 
fails to secure good crops. 

In March, 1873, Mr. Webster was married to Miss Rachel Young, also a 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 15 

native of Ripley county, Indiana, and they have become the parents of five 
children, namely : Carl, who is operating one of his father's farms ; George, 
who is engaged in the grocery business in Gibbon, Nebraska; Herbert, who 
operates his father's second farm ; Chester, who assists his father in the opera- 
tion of the Adams farm; and Nellie, the wife of Clyde Scott, a farmer of Gib- 
bon township. 

Mr. Webster supports the republican party at the polls and for about eight 
years served as road supervisor, his services in that capacity proving very 
acceptable. He holds membership in Gibbon Lodge, No. 138, K. P., and is loyal 
to the teachings of that organization concerning human brotherhood. The 
gratifying measure of success which he has gained is proof of his enterprise 
and good judgment, for since beginning his independent career he has depended 
solely upon his own resources. 



HON. PETER WINK. 



Hon. Peter Wink, for thirty-one years a resident of Buffalo county, and 
at present engaged in the real estate business in Kearney, was born in Wright 
county, Minnesota, on the 25th of September, 1859. The parents, Valentine and 
Catherine (Peters) Wink, were farming people and in pioneer times the 
father took up a homestead claim in Wright county, Minnesota, where he car- 
ried on general agricultural pursuits until his removal to Juneau county, Wis- 
consin, where his remaining days were passed, his death occurring in 1Q04. 

Peter Wink is the second in order of birth in a family of four children, all 
of whom are yet living. In his early boyhood he attended the neighboring district 
schools and when old enough he began to earn his own living, being variously 
employed. For a considerable time he rafted lumber from the pineries south 
on the Mississippi river and he was also engaged in digging two tunnels for 
the Northwestern Railroad Company. During harvest seasons he would hire 
out to farmers, receiving as high as five dollars per day for his services. This 
period of his life was filled with an abundance of hard work and was passed 
among real people who were struggling to get ahead in the world. This was 
the period perhaps which most largely developed and determined his character. 
While untiring labor was the order of the day this was also a period of enjoy- 
ment, for youth, virile and compelling, made little of obstacles. Mr. Wink 
saved considerable part of his earnings, the inherent thrift of his German 
forbears undoubtedly teaching him the importance of saving for the proverbial 
rainy day. He became foreman on a farm in Clinton county, Iowa, and occu- 
pied that position for two years. 

It was in the year 1879 that Mr. Wink was united in marriage to Miss Mary 
Farrell, and in 1884 he removed to Buffalo county, Nebraska, and purchased 
two hundred and forty acres of railroad land in Thornton township at four 
dollars per acre. For twenty-seven years he there resided, devoting his life 
to general farming and stockraising, during which period he brought his fields 
to a high state of cultivation and added many modern improvements to the 
farm, which he still owns. In 191 1, however, he left the farm and removed to 



16 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

Kearney, where he opened a real estate office and has since been engaged in 
that Hne of business. He is thoroughly conversant concerning property values 
and he has negotiated many important realty transfers, being accorded a liberal 
clientage in his line. 

As the years went on Mr. and Mrs. Wink became the parents of four chil- 
dren : Frank, John, Clara and Alice, but the last named is deceased. The mother 
passed away in May, 1909, and for his second wife Mr. Wink chose Miss 
Bertha Vermeulen. In religious faith Mr. Wink is a Roman Catholic. His 
political allegiance is given to the democratic party and in 1913 he was elected 
state senator from the twenty-second senatorial district comprising the coun- 
ties of Kearney, Buffalo and Sherman. He was reelected in 191 5 and is now 
serving for the second term. During both sessions he has been a member of 
the ways and means committee and during the session of 191 5 he was chairman 
of the committee on irrigation and water power. He took an active part in 
constructive, legislation and was the author of several bills that were passed 
and are now found on the statute books of the state. He has labored persist- 
ently for the benefit of the community and of the commonwealth and his 
efforts have been far-reaching- and resultant. 



JOHN N. DRYDEN. 



John N. Dryden was born on a farm in Dane county, Wisconsin, June r, 1856. 
His father, Nathaniel H. Dryden, and his mother, Emily Balch Dryden, were of 
southern stock, the former from Tennessee and the latter from Alabama. At 
an early date they removed to Illinois where they were married September 10, 
1840. They subsequently became pioneers, successively, in Wisconsin, in Iowa, 
and lastly in Nebraska, where they settled in Custer county in 1875. There were 
nine children, five of whom are now living. Nathaniel H. Dryden held local 
offices, such as school director, county supervisor, etc. He was a Christian citi- 
zen and exercised a strong constructive influence in building the foundations of 
the new social order in the localities where he lived. In 1884, the family mo^•ed 
to Kearney where they continued to reside until ]Mr. Dryden's death, which 
occurred April 13, 1907, at the ripe age of eighty-eight years, the wife having 
passed away at the age of eighty-three years, September 26, 1901. 

John N. Dryden was educated in the common schools of the neighborhood, 
attended the Gibbon Academy for three years, from 1876 to 1879 '^"d the fol- 
lowing three years, the Nebraska State University. He was admitted to the bar 
at Kearney, in 1886, since which time he has been engaged in the active practice 
of his profession at the same place. He has sought no official preferment, having 
occupied no political office except that of member of the board of education and 
of the public library, in his home city. He is a member of the American Bar 
Association, and at present, president of the Nebraska State Bar Association. 
Mr. Dr}^den is a republican in politics — a progressive republican and an active, 
lifelong opponent of the open saloon. For more than thirty-five years he has 
been an active member of the Methodist Episcopal church, twice has been elected 




JOHN N. DRYDEN 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 19 

delegate to the general conference of that organization and for twenty years has 
been a trustee of the Nebraska Wesleyan University. 

Air. Dryden is familiar with many aspects of pioneer life in Nebraska. During 
his boyhood days while a resident of Custer county, he drove the Star Mail Route 
from Kearney to Loup City, and thence to New Helena, a distance of one him- 
dred ten miles, niaking weekly trips at a time when the houses in some instances, 
were thirty miles apart, and many of the streams unbridged. On such trips he 
has seen as many as seventy-five elk in a single drove, and is acquainted with and 
had a practical experience in almost every phase of pioneer life in central 
Nebraska. He has been an interested witness of the changes which have occurred 
and has helped to bring about the present conditions of civilization and develop- 
ment, happiness and prosperity to our people. 

He was married to Helen M. Holmes, a daughter of Dr. Jesse and Sara M. P. 
Holmes, at Lincoln, Nebraska, January 31, 1884. Two children were born to 
these parents, Ruth Holmes Dryden, now Mrs. Herbert W. Kendall, of Fremont, 
Nebraska ; and Kenneth H. Dryden, of Kearney, Nebraska. 



GEORGE C. LUNGER. 



George C. Lunger has devoted his life to farming and has gained a gratifying 
measure of success, now owning two hundred and forty acres of fine land in 
Valley township. A native of Pennsylvania, he was born in Columbia county 
on the 23d of March, 1855, of the marriage of Jacob and Sarah (Hodge) 
Lunger, who were also born in that state. The father followed the carpenter's 
trade for fifty-five years and was widely known as an expert workman. Both 
he and his wife died in the Keystone state. 

George C. Lunger is one of a family of twelve children, nine of whom are 
living. He was educated in the public schools and remained at home until he 
reached mature years. He then began learning the mason's and plasterer's 
trades, which he followed for about four years, but in 1878 he came to Buffalo 
county, Nebraska, and took up a claim. After living thereon for two years he 
traded that place for a farm of two hundred acres on section 17, Valley town- 
ship, which he still owns. He has made many improvements upon the place 
and has brought his land to a high state of cultivation. A small town known 
as Butler has grown up opposite his farm and for eight years he served as 
postmaster, discharging his duties to the satisfaction of all concerned. He has 
interests aside from his farm, as he is a stockholder and director of the Com- 
mercial State Bank at Gibbon and a stockholder and vice president of the Grange 
Elevator Company at Gibbon. 

Mr. Lunger was married in 1882 to Miss Ida M. Wilson, who was born in 
Pennsylvania and is a daughter of Augustus and Katherine (Esler) Wilson, 
the former of whom was born in Maine and the latter in Germany. Both are 
deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Lunger have become the parents of six children, 
namely: Waldron J., who is a graduate of the Grand Island Business College 
and is now bookkeeper for the George Sickle Lumber Company at Kearney ; Ros- 
coe, assistant cashier of the Commercial Bank at Gibbon; Weaver, who is 



20 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

operating the homestead ; Beulah, attending the State Normal School at Kearney ; 
Almira, who died when two years old; and Josephine, who died at the age of 
three years. 

Mr. Lunger is a stalwart democrat and has served for a number of years 
as a member of the township committee of his party. For twenty years he 
has been on the school board and for two terms he held the office of county 
supervisor. He is identified with the Grange and has been quite active in its 
varied work, believing in the value of organization and cooperation among 
farmers. Both he and his wife are members of the United Br^tkren church, 
which indicates the principles which govern their lives. When' #e came to 
this county he had but eighty-five dollars, but he was not discouraged and reso- 
lutely set about to gain prosperity. His efforts have been richly rewarded, and 
he is now one of the substantial men of his community. 



. yROSCii^E LUNGER. 

Roscoe Lunger, the second^son of George C. Lunger, was born in Buffalo 
county on the 28th of- March,^ 1887, and was here reared. He completed the 
course offered in the common schools and subsequently attended the State 
Normal at Kearney, thus further preparing himself for the responsibilities of 
life. On leaving school he entered the City National Bank at Kearney as 
bookkeeper, but five years later, in 1912, came to Gibbon and with a partner 
purchased the Commercial Bank, of which he is now serving as assistant cashier. 
He has been a factor of no little importance in building up the business of the 
institution and is recognized as a banker of experience and ability. He also 
owns the garage building at Gibbon and derives a good financial return from 
that property. 

Mr. Lunger was married on the 6th of November, 1912, to Miss Grace 
Carlson, a native of Buffalo county, and a daughter of Alford and Clara 
(Rizer) Carlson, who are still living on their farm in this county. Mr. Lunger 
is a democrat and is now serving as township trustee. Fraternally he is a 
member of the Knights of Pythias lodge and of the Highlanders, and both he 
and his wife belong to the Methodist Episcopal church. He is one of the popu- 
lar and highly respected young men of Gibbon, and his enterprise and capability 
insure his continued success. 



GEORGE W. SMITPL 



Every community has within its borders those who are recognized as pro- 
moters of public progress through the channels of business activity. In this 
connection mention should be made of George W. Smith, the cashier of Meis- 
ner's Bank of Shelton, who is a courteous and obliging bank official, carefully 
safeguarding the interests of the institution which he represents and at the 
same time extending every possible aid to its patrons. 



k 

HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 21 

He was born in Cass county, Iowa, on the 22d of February, 1876, a son of 
Edwin L. and Carrie N. (Kitson) Smith, both of whom were natives of Cook 
county, IlHnois, where they were reared and married. Two or three years later 
they removed to Cass county, Iowa, where the father engaged in farming for 
seven years. He then took his family to Chicago, where he entered upon the 
study of medicine, matriculating in Rush Medical College, from which he was 
graduated with the class of February, 1884. In the following May he arrived 
in Shelton, Nebraska, where he followed his profession up to the time of his 
death, which occurred in February, 1912. He was accounted one of the fore- 
most cit^^ns'df Shelton, not only because of his ability and success in the pro- 
fessional field but also because of his activity along other lines. He became 
one of the organizers of the Shelton electric light plant, of which he was made 
president, and in that capacity he served until the time of his death. He was 
also identified with his son George in the drug business for several years and 
he possessed the determination and energy which enabled him to carry forward 
to successful completion whatever he undertook."".. In his earlier years he gave 
his political allegiance to the republican party^and-in after life became a Bryan 
democrat. While he was quite influential in local' political circles, he never 
sought nor desired office as a reward f«r party %alty. At the time of the 
Civil war he espoused the cause of tlie Union and went to the front in defense 
of the stars and stripes. In Masonry he attained the thirty-second degree of 
the Scottish Rite and was also a member of the Mystic Shrine at Omaha. 

George W. Smith spent his youthful days in his parents' home and obtained 
his education in the public schools, completing a course in the Shelton high 
school with the class of 1891. He then took up the study of pharmacy and was 
graduated from the pharmaceutical department of the University of Illinois 
at Chicago in the class of 1897. In January, 1898, he established a drug store 
in Shelton and has since been identified with that line of business. His establish- 
ment was incorporated in 191 5, under the name of the Smith Drug Company, 
and a liberal patronage is accorded by reason of the honorable business, methods 
followed and the earnest efifort put forth to please patrons. On the ist of 
(October, 1913, Mr. Smith extended his efforts into other fields by purchasing 
an interest in Meisner's Bank, of which he was made cashier, since which time 
he has served in that capacity. Many of the most important business interests 
of the district have felt the stimulus of the cooperation and sound* judgment 
of Mr. Smith, whose carefully directed efforts seem to take cognizance of every 
opportunity. He was one of the organizers of the Shelton Electric Light Com- 
pany, of which he was made secretary and treasurer. The first meeting of the 
Farmers Home Telephone Company was held in his drug store and he became 
its secretary, occupying the position for two years, when he disposed of his 
stock. He was also one of the organizers of the Farmers Elevator Company, 
of which he became the first secretary. For a number of years he owned a 
third interest in the Shelton Mills and he is the owner of some valuable farm 
lands in this part of the state. 

In 1900 Mr. Smith was united in marriage to Miss Blanche Lee, her father 
being Mark G. Lee, vice president of Meisner's Bank and one of Shelton's 
foremost citizens. Our subject and his wife have three children, Bernadine A., 
Edwin L. and Elenora. 



22 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

In his political views Mr. Smith is a democrat but has never sought nor 
desired public office. His wife is a member of the Presbyterian church. They 
are both held in high esteem and their sterHng traits of character have gained 
for them warm and enduring regard. Mr. Smith is most alert, energetic and 
enterprising. Few men are more prominent or more widely known in Shelton 
and this part of the county. He has been an important factor in business affairs 
and his prosperity is well deserved, as in him are embraced the characteristics 
of an unbending integrity, unabating energy and industry that never flags. 
He seems to have a genius for devising the right thiing at the right time, joined 
to everyday common sense which ever proves the balance wheel of talent. 



HON. GEORGE W. BARRETT. 

Hon. George W. Barrett is*the president of the Farmers Home Telephone 
Company of Shelton, which he was largely instrumental in organizing. He has 
also been prominently identified w^ 'Agricultural interests and is a representative 
business man, actuated at all times by a spirit of determination and enterprise 
that enables him to overcome all the difficulties and obstacles that bar the path of 
business progress. Mr. Barrett was born in Washington county, Indiana, Decem- 
ber 22, 1850, and is a son of Elijah and Helen (Prather) Barrett, both of whom 
were natives of Washington county, Indiana, where they resided until 1866. They 
then removed to Iroquois county, Illinois, where the father passed away in the 
year 1877. Later the mother removed to Kansas, where her death occurred 
in 1892. ^ 

George W. Barrett was reared at home w^th the usual experiences of the farm 
lad. His school privileges were very limit^^. as he had the opportunity for 
attending only a part of the three months' '^aftter term, which was the extent 
of the term in his district in Indiana at that time. He was a lad of sixteen years 
when his parents removed to Illinois and there he resided until the fall of 1875, 
when he came to Nebraska. He took up his abode in Shelton township, Buffalo 
county, and for two years operated rented land. In 1878 he purchased a 
relinquishment on a tree claim, which he homesteaded and developed, proving it 
up. Upon that place he has since continuously resided, his farm being pleasantly 
located about three miles southwest of Shelton. It comprises three hundred and 
sixty acres of rich and productive land, in addition to which he owns another 
farm of one hundred and thirty-five acres. He has brought his fields to a -high ^ 
state of cultivation, adding the equipments and accessories of the model^i^m o^' 
the twentieth century, and his labors annually result in the gathering of gooti 
harvests. Agriculture, however, is but one phase of his business activity, for 
to other lines he has extended his efforts, proving equally successful. He was the 
I^rincipal factor in the organization of the Farmers Home Telephone Company 
of Shelton, of which he was made the president and in that capacity has con- j 
tinued. The business is kept up to a high standard, so that excellent service 
is rendered to patrons of the line and the enterprise is one which proves of the 
utmost benefit and convenience to the district. Mr. Barrett was also one of the 



*t 



ii'i 




HON. GEORGE W. BARRETT 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 25 

organizers of the Farmers Elevator Company of Shelton, of which he served as 
president for two years. 

In 1878 Mr. Barrett was united in marriage to Miss Melvina Smith, of Sharon 
township, this county. To them have been born four children, as follows : Schuy- 
ler, who is deceased; Effie, the wife of William Oliver, who follows farming in 
Shelton township ; Charles, a resident of North Yakima, Washington ; and Leroy, 
who operates the old homestead. 

Mr. and Mrs. Barrett are members of the United Brethren church, in the 
M'ork of which they take an active and helpful interest, contributing generously 
to its support. Mr. Barrett is serving as one of the board of trustees of the 
church and fraternally he is connected with the Ancient Order of United Work- 
men. In politics he is an earnest republican and for one term he served as town- 
ship treasurer, while for several years past he has been a member of the school 
board. In 1907 he was elected to represent his district in the state legislature and 
in 1909 received indorsement of his first term's service in a reelection, so that he 
remained a member of the house for four years, during which time he was 
connected with much important and constructive legislation. He ever stood 
fearlessly in support of what he believed to be for the best interests of the 
commonwealth, nor did he hesitate to oppose any measure which he believed 
inimical to the general good. His life in its various relations and phases has 
been of value and benefit to the community in which he lives and his course at all 
times has been an honor and credit to the community which has honored him. 



FRED BARGMANN. 



Fred Bargmann, residing in Riverdale, Nebraska, is one of the foremost 
residents of the town, conducting a banking, real estate and insurance business, 
being president of the State Bank. He is a self-made man whose enterprise 
and determination have led to his success. Each year has chronicled his 
advancement in business matters, for step by step he has steadily worked his 
way upward. He was born in Hanover, Germany, November 24, 1862, a son of 
Henry and Rebecca Bargmann, both of whom were natives of that country, 
Avhere they spent their entire lives. There they reared their family of five chil- 
dren, of whom four are yet living. 

Fred Bargmann spent his boyhood and youth in Germany and in the year 
1879, when seventeen years of age, bade adieu to friends and native land and 
sailed for the new world. He did not tarry on the eastern coast but made his 
way across the country to Cook county, Illinois, where he secured employment 
as a farm hand, working in that way until 1886, when he removed to Columbus, 
Nebraska. He was there employed for two years, at the end of which time 
he and his brother embarked in the dairy business and continued actively therein 
for ten years. They then sold out and Fred Bargmann turned his attention to 
general agricultural pursuits, carrying on farming with success until 1905. He 
brought his fields- to a high state of cultivation, converting his land into a pro- 
ductive tract from which he annually gathered good harvests. In 1907 he 
removed to Riverdale, where he established the State Bank, of which he has 



26 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

since been the president. He has made this a substantial financial institution 
and it has been accorded a liberal patronage, so that the business of the bank 
has grown year by year. It has ever followed a safe, conservative policy and 
has proven a profitable undertaking. Mr. Bargmann also handles real estate" 
and insurance and these branches of his business are proving substantial sources 
of income. In addition to his- other interests he is a stockholder in the Farmers 
Elevator at Riverdale. He is the owner of a bank building in Riverdale and 
also of one hundred and sixty acres of good farming land in this county. 

Since becoming a naturalized American citizen Mr. Bargmann has been a 
stalwart advocate of republican principles and has served on the township 
board. He is a self-made man and deserves much credit for what he has 
accomplished. He has taken two trips back to his native land, thus renewing 
the acquaintances and friendship of his youth and viewing again the scenes amid 
which his boyhood days were passed. He has never regretted his determina- 
tion to come to America, for here he has found the opportunities which he 
sought and in their development has reached a most gratifying point of 
prosperity. 



JOSEPH BUCK, Jr. 



Joseph Buck, Jr., who is following agricultural pursuits on section 15, Shel- 
ton township, was born in that township, on the old Buck homestead, on the 
i6th of November, 1872. His parents, Joseph and Mary Ann (Singleton) 
Buck were natives of England but in 1869 and 1870 respectively emigrated to 
the United States and located in Buffalo county, Nebraska. The father home- 
steaded land which he cultivated until 1906, when he removed to Shelton, 
where he is still living at the age of seventy-six years. Flis wife died in 1908. 
Seven of their fourteen children have passed away. 

Joseph Buck, Jr., remained at home during the period of his minority and 
after completing his common school education attended the Gibbon Normal 
School. In the spring of 1894, when about twenty-two years of age, he began 
farming for himself and for eight years rented land. In 1902 he invested his 
savings in one hundred and seventy acres of good land on section 27, on Grand 
Island, Shelton township. In 1904 he removed to that farm and there made 
his home until January, 1910, when he took up his residence upon his present 
home place, on section 15, Shelton township, which he had purchased five years 
previously. He has erected a handsome residence, a commodious barn and out- 
buildings, and all of the improvements compare favorably with those on other 
farms in the county. He owns in all two hundred and twenty-five acres of 
land in Shelton township and as he has managed his affairs well he is one of 
the well-to-do men of his locality. 

In 1903 occurred the marriage of Mr. Buck and Miss Clara M. Maurer, 
a daughter of the late W. H. Maurer. Five children have been born to this 
union, namely: Eva W., J. Gordon, Viola H., Martin; and an infant son un- 
named. 

Mr. Buck votes the republican ticket and works loyally for the success of 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 27 

his party but has never desired to hold office as his farming interests make 
heavy demands upon his time and energy. He was one of the incorporators 
and first secretary of the Farmers Telephone Company. His entire life has 
been passed in this county and many of his stanchest friends have known him 
since boyhood. 



J. E. CHARLSON. 



J. E. Charlson, who is the proprietor and manager of the Kearney Floral 
Company at No. 1938 Second avenue, two blocks west of the opera house, has 
built up a large and flourishing business and is recognized as a man of ability 
and energy. He was born in Joliet, Will county, Illinois, but when six years 
of age the family removed to Phelps county, Nebraska, and settled on a farm. 

Mr. Charlson attended the public schools and also gave much time to assist- 
ing his father. For four years he engaged in teaching the district schools but 
at the end of that time he continued his education, attending Doane College 
at Crete, Nebraska, for one term. He then again turned his attention to agri- 
cultural pursuits, farming on his own account in this state until February, 
191 3, when he came to Kearney and purchased a half interest in his present 
business, becoming sole owner in October, 191 5, when he bought out his partner. 
There are about fifteen thousand feet of glass in his greenhouses and his equip- 
ment is modern throughout. He raises all kinds of potted plants, which he 
sells at both wholesale and retail not only in Kearney but also in neighboring 
towns. He specializes in carnations and his flowers are noted for their size, 
fragrance and beauty of color. 

On the ist of September, 1910, Mr. Charlson was married to Miss Ida 
Davidson, a native of Phelps county, Nebraska, and they have a daughter, Ruth. 
Fra-ternally he is connected with the Mystic Workers. He has gained a gratify- 
ing measure of success in his business and has not only won financial prosperity 
for himself but has also contributed to the commercial advancement of 
Kearney. 



ELMER E. TINGLEY. 



A farm of four hundred acres pays tribute to the care and labor bestowed 
upon it by Elmer E. Tingley, who is one of the progressive agriculturists of 
Buffalo county, where he is extensively engaged in the feeding of sheep and 
hogs. He is a native of Kansas, his birth having occurred at Burr Oak, Jewell 
county, on the i6th of April, 1876, his parents being Leroy M. and Rosa (Briggs) 
Tingley, the former a native of Kentucky. They were married in Jewell county, 
Kansas, and in 1884 removed to Buffalo county, settling on Elm Island in Platte 
township. There the father carried on general farming until 191 1, when he 
removed to Boise City, Idaho, where he is now living retired. 

Elmer E. Tingley was a lad of eight years when he removed with his parents 



28 HISTORY OV BUFFALO COUNTY 

to Buffalo county. Here he was reared and the district schools afforded him 
his educational privileges, his time being divided between the work of the school- 
room and the duties of the fields. He remained at home, assisting on the farm, 
until 1899, when he took up railroad work and for five years was fireman and 
subsequently engineer on the Burlington and on the Atchison, Topeka & Santa 
Fe. In 1904 he went across the line into old Mexico, working in the smelter 
at Aguascalientes, where he was employed for eight and one-half years. There 
he was made floor foreman in the sampling mill. Subsequently he served for 
three years as foreman on copper converters and later was foreman of the 
blast furnaces. In July, 191 2, he returned to Buffalo county. He left Mexico 
twice on account of troubles in that country and resumed farming on the land 
where he now lives, this farm belonging to his father-in-law. He cultivates 
four hundred acres and is extensively engaged in the feeding of sheep and hogs, 
feeding all the produce raised upon his farm and also buying both hay and corn 
extensively. He is one of the leading stock dealers of this locality and is a 
most enterprising and progressive business man. 

On the 14th of June, 1910, Mr. Tingley was united in marriage to Miss 
Carrie E. Manfull, her father being John Manfull, one of the substantial farmers 
of Platte township. Our subject and his wife have three children, Margaret 
Rosalind, Elmer Manfull and Anna Barbara. 

In his political views Mr. Tingley is independent, having never sought nor 
desired office nor does he feel himself bound by party ties. He concentrates 
his energies upon his business affairs and his progressive spirit, keen discern- 
ment and indefatigable energy are bringing to him substantial success. His life 
has been a busy and useful one, characterized at all times by well defined pur- 
pose and honorable effort. 



CHARLES LUCAS, M. D. 

Dr. Charles Lucas has the reputation of being one of the foremost physicians 
and surgeons of Shelton and Buffalo county. He fully recognizes the respon- 
sibilities and obligations which devolve upon him in his professional capacity 
and he is continually putting forth effort to advance his knowledge and pro- 
mote his efficiency in the administration of remedial agencies to check the ravages 
of disease. Indiana claims him as a native son, his birth having occurred in 
Monroe county, that state, on the 19th of November, 1866, his parents being 
Peter and Elizabeth J. (Floyd) Lucas, both of whom were natives of Indiana, 
where they were reared and married. In 1880 they became residents of Lucas 
county, Iowa, and the mother passed away there in the same year. In 1884 the 
father came to Nebraska, establishing his home in Custer county, where two 
of his sons and a daughter were residing. He continued his residence there 
up to the time of his demise, which occurred in 1888. 

Dr. Charles Lucas is indebted to the public school system for the early educa- 
tional opportunities which he enjoyed. Passing through consecutive grades, 
he was at length graduated from the high school at Chariton, Iowa, with the 
class of 1886 and in December of that year he came to Nebraska, where he 



History of buffalo county 29 

took up the profession of teaching, spending three years as a teacher in the 
schools of Custer and Lincohi counties. During one year of that time he was 
principal of the schools at Chappell, Nebraska. He regarded this, however, 
merely as an initial step to other professional labor and in the fall of 1888 entered 
upon the study of medicine under the direction of Dr. John Murray of Arnold, 
Nebraska. In the fall of 1889 he entered the Omaha Medical College, now 
the medical department of the Nebraska State University, pursuing his studies 
there for a year. He then suspended his college work for a year, during which 
period he was engaged in teaching and in clerking in a drug store in North 
Platte, thus obtaining the funds which enabled him to continue his preparation 
for the practice of medicine and surgery. During that period of clerkship he 
passed the civil service examination and a month later received an appointment 
in the war department at Washington, remaining for four years in the govern- 
ment service. During that time he continued his medical studies by attending 
night lectures at the University of Georgetown in Washington, D. C, from 
which institution he was graduated with the class of 1893. He remained in the 
government position for two years longer and continued to attend lectures and 
clinics, but in 1895 ^^^ resigned his position in Washington to return to Nebraska, 
since which time he has engaged in the practice of his profession in Shelton, 
building up a large and enviable practice. He is a thoroughly skilled physician 
and surgeon, his capability being demonstrated in the excellent results which 
have attended his efforts as he has ministered to the needs of the sick and 
suffering in this part of the county. 

On the 7th of September, 1893, Dr. Lucas was united in marriage to Miss 
Lida E. Campbell, of Garfield, Lincoln county, Nebraska. To them have been 
born three children, two of whom survive, Mary Gertrude and Charles Sinclair. 

In politics Dr. Lucas is independent, voting for men and measures rarlier 
than party. For four years he has served as a member of the board of health 
of Shelton and for the past seven years has been a member of the school board, 
putting forth effective eft'ort to promote the interests of education. Fraternally 
he is connected with Shelton Lodge, A. F. & A. M., and along strictly profes- 
sional lines he is connected with the Buffalo County Medical Society, which he 
joined on its organization, and with the Nebraska State Medical Society. His 
practice is free from hasty and ill formed judgments. He studies closely the 
needs of every individual case and never allows anything to interfere with the 
performance of his professional duties. 



E. S. HARTE. 



E. S. Harte, station agent at Gibbon and well known as a courteous and 
obliging official, always willing and ready to render aid in every possible way 
to the traveling public, has occupied this position since 1896. He was born in 
New Salem, Pennsylvania, on the 9th of April, 1866, a son of Samuel and 
Mary (Stover) Harte, both of whom were natives of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, 
where they were reared and married. In 1870 they removed to Dixon. Lee 
county, Illinois, and the father, who was a shoemaker, there worked at his 



30 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

trade for six or eight years. Subsequently he turned his attention to the butch- 
ering business, in which he actively continued up to the time of his death, which 
occurred in 1888, when he was sixty-one years of age. His wife passed away 
in 1907, at the age of eighty-three years. 

E. S. Harte acquired a common school education and at fifteen years of 
age took up the study of telegraphy, working in various offices of the Chicago 
& Northwestern system. He was employed in the city of Chicago and at vari- 
ous points throughout Illinois and in 1896 came to Gibbon, Nebraska, as sta- 
tion agent for the Union Pacific Railroad Company, in which position he has 
since continued, being the sixth oldest man in the service as agent and operator, 
havmg represented the company in that capacity for almost three decades. 
Twenty years' service at Gibbon establishes his position as one of the popular 
operators on the line, for he has the warm regard and goodwill of his fellow 
townsmen, who recognize in him an obliging official. He is the owner of one 
hundred and sixty acres of farm land in Norton county, Kansas, and he has 
an attractive home in Gibbon. 

In 1890 Mr. Harte was united in marriage to Miss Ella Lape, of Somerset, 
Pennsylvania, by whom he has two children, namely: Lloyd W., an assistant 
engineer on the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad, located at Lincoln, 
Nebraska; and Bruce S., a graduate of the Gibbon high school who is now a 
student in Creighton College of Omaha. 

Mr. Harte is a democrat in his political views and has served for nine years 
as a member of the school board, while for some years he has been a member 
of the village park board. Fraternally he is identified with Excalibar Lodge, 
No. 138, K. P., of Gibbon, and Gibbon Lodge, No. 137, I. O. O. F. He is loyal 
to the spirit of these organizations and exemplifies in his life their beneficent 
teachings. Gibbon knows him as a man of sterling worth and as a representa- 
tive citizen and as such he deserves mention in the history of Bufifalo county. 



JOHN SWENSON. 



John Swenson resides at No. 2327 T street in Lincoln, having established his 
home in the capital city four years ago. The greater part of the period of his 
manhood has been spent in the new world and no native son of this land is 
more loyal to the interests and traditions of the republic than he. His has been 
an active, useful and well spent life and he has a circle of friends almost coex- 
tensive with the circle of his acquaintance. He was born in Sweden in September, 
1838, and has therefore passed the seventy-seventh milestone on life's journey. 
He acquired his education altogether in his father's home, having no opportunity 
to attend school, but in the school of experience he has learned many valuable 
lessons and become a progressive business man. 

When twenty-two years of age he bade adieu to friends and native country 
and sailed for the United States, making his way to Illinois. He was located at 
Geneva, that state, when in 1861 civil war was declared and after watching the 
progress of events and becoming convinced that the south had no right to dis- 
rupt the Union, he enlisted in support of the stars and stripes, joining Company 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 33 

D of the Fifty-second Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He participated in a number 
of hotly contested engagements, including the battles of Fort Donelson, Shiloh 
and Corinth. In the last named engagement he had his left arm shattered, forc- 
ing amputation. After his recovery he did duty in assisting the quartermaster 
at brigade headquarters. He served in all for four years and was honorably dis- 
charged and mustered out in July, 1865. 

Realizing the need and value of educational training as a preparation for 
life's practical and responsible duties, Mr. Swenson then attended the college at 
Fulton, Illinois, where he won the Bachelor of Science degree. His residence 
in Buffalo county dates from 1874, when he cast in his lot with its pioneer settlers. 
Comparatively few had penetrated into what was then the western wilderness, 
but he saw the opportunities that might be improved here and became identified 
with the early development and improvement of this section of the state. He 
homesteaded twelve miles north of Kearney and lived thereon for three years, 
on the expiration of which period he removed to Sartoria township, on the Loup 
river, purchased land and engaged in stock-raising. Success attended his efforts 
and as he prospered in his undertakings he added to his property from time to 
time until he is now the owner of over nineteen hundred acres. His possessions 
are very extensive and from his property he derives a most gratifying annual 
income. 

Mr. Swenson was twice married. His first wife bore the maiden name of 
Fva Jane Thornton and was a native of Washington, Iowa. After her demise 
he wedded Miranda Powers, who passed away in Lincoln, leaving a son, John, 
an estimable and popular young man of nineteen years who is now attending 
school in Lincoln. 

During his residence in Buffalo county Mr. Swenson served for four years 
as superintendent of schools but aspired to no other office, and although often 
solicited to become a candidate for the legislature, refused to do so. He was 
reared in the Lutheran church and still clings to that faith. In 191 1 he removed 
to Lincoln, where he now makes his home, being pleasantly located, his income 
supplying him with all of the comforts and many of the luxuries of life. He 
deserves much credit for what he has accomplished, as all has been secured 
through his persistent, earnest efforts directed by sound judgment. His energy 
has ever been unfaltering and what he has undertaken he has carried forward 
to successful completion. His life history may well serve to encourage and inspire 
others, for it indicates that the field of opportunity is open to all and that the 
fruits of labor are certain. 



FRANK F. ROBY. 



For sixteen years Frank F. Roby has been a resident of Kearney and through- 
out the entire period has been actively identified with interests promoting its 
material welfare and progress. He is today conducting an extensive milling 
business, being one of the leading flour manufacturers of this section of the 
state. He also engages in the manufacture of ice and for both commodities 
finds a ready sale on the market. 



34 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

Air. Roby is a native of Carroll county, Ohio, born F"ebruary ii, 1861, the 
only child of Luther M. and Sarah (Knight) Roby, who were also natives of 
Ohio and of English descent. The father is living in Kearney, hale and hearty 
at the advanced age of eighty-one years. Frank F. Roby passed his youth at 
home, attending the district schools. He never worked for wages in his life. 
As a boy he would take various jobs but never at regular wages. When nine- 
teen years of age he determined to follow the advice of Horace Greeley, who 
said : "Go west, young man, go west," and accordingly he left home, making 
his way to Colorado Springs, Colorado, at which time the place contained a 
population of but eight hundred people. For a time he worked for his board 
and later he became the first student to enroll his name in the metallurgical 
department of Colorado College and was the first to successfully pass the 
examination and receive a degree from that department. He was also the first 
to assemble an assay outfit from that school, loading it on a prairie schooner, 
after which he drove one hundred and seventy-five miles into the mountains, 
where he put his outfit into effective operation. He conducted his assay plant 
for three years and then owing to failing eyesight embarked in the general grain 
and brokerage business in Colorado Springs. Subsequently he became con- 
nected with the promotion of mining properties and various other business inter- 
ests. He was likewise interested in ranching in Colorado and made his home 
in Colorado Springs until 1899. During the intervening period he visited every 
mining camp of importance in the west and in 1879 he made the trip to Pike's 
Peak, it then requiring three days to reach the summit. When Cripple Creek 
first entered upon its boom Mr. Roby was among the first to reach the camp, 
there being only three tents there at the time of his arrival. He also located 
the camp and laid out Red River City, New Mexico, and he was one of the 
first to locate claims at Bonanza, Saquache county, Colorado. There he estab- 
lished his first assay office. His experiences on the frontier alone would fill 
a volume if written in detail and would present a most interesting and accurate 
picture of life in the west, for he is thoroughly acquainted with all that con- 
stitutes the early history of Colorado, with all its romance of development and 
the tragedy of its lawlessness and loss of life. He witnessed the early lynch- 
ings and the riots and saw the birth of what seemed likely to be a future city and 
saw the opening of what came to be a great mining age. He has likewise seen 
many of the cities and mining camps collapse and fade into comparatively noth- 
ing and become but a recollection of the past. 

Overwork at length led to a complete breakdown in health and Mr. Roby was 
taken out of Colorado Springs on a stretcher, a nervous wreck. He drifted to 
Kearney, Nebraska, and here he found an altitude in which he could live in 
comfort. His energy had not all departed and he soon purchased the old milling 
property in Kearney, thinking it would prove an adjunct to his grain business 
in Colorado. In the passing of time his business increased in volume to such an 
extent that although he had come to Kearney as a temporary location he decided 
to become a permanent citizen. His export business has assumed large pro- 
portions and from his mill trainloads of flour have been shipped and the business 
has become one of the most important productive industries of the county. 
In- addition to the manufacture of flour he also manufactures ice and has a 
most gratifying patronage in that connection. He still retains extensive interests 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 35 

in Colorado, comprising ranches, live stock, city property and mining stock and 
is the largest individual ranch owner in El Paso county, Colorado. His invest- 
ments have been most judiciously made. His keen sagacity recognizes the 
value of a business situation, and he has never failed to venture where favoring- 
opportunity has led the way. 

In 1897 Mr. Roby was united in marriage to Mrs. Henrietta Ouereau. In 
his political views he is a stalwart republican and fraternally is a prominent 
Mason, being a Knight Templar and Shriner. Sixteen years' residence in Kear- 
ney has made him widely known, while his stalwart qualities as manifest in busi- 
ness, in his public relations and his private life have gained for him the con- 
fidence and warm regard of all with whom he has been associated. He has many 
sterling qualities and while he has furthered individual progress his activities 
have been of a character which have contributed as well to the general prosperity. 

1385506 

VICTOR B. WHEELOCK. 

Victor B. Wheelock, who is occupying the position of bookkeeper with the 
firm of Wort & Minton, automobile dealers in Kearney, was born at Freehold, 
Pennsylvania, November 4, 1869, a son of Matthew G. and Henrietta (Buel) 
Wheelock. The father was a druggist by occupation. In August, 1885, he 
removed from Pennsylvania to Grand Island, Nebraska, while later he made his 
way to Ravenna, in Buffalo county, arriving here in April, 1886. Here he con- 
tinued to make his home until his death, which occurred in December, 1895. 
His widow is yet living and makes her home with her children. Mr. Wheelock 
was a soldier of the Union army during the Civil war, serving as a member of 
Company K, One Hundred and Fifty-first Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 
with which he participated in the battle of Gettysburg and other important 
engagements and campaigns of the east which led up to the final victory that 
crowned the Union arms. He afterward maintained pleasant relations with his 
military comrades through his membership in the Grand Army of the Republic. 
In his fraternal relations he was a Mason and his religious belief was that of the 
Congregational church, while his political allegiance was given to the republican 
party, which found in him a stalwart and unfaltering advocate. 

Victor B. Wheelock lived with his parents until the death of his father, 
and the pubHc schools afforded him his educational opportunities. In 1905 
he was elected register of deeds of Buffalo county and by reelection was con- 
tinued in that position for nine years. That he was chosen for this offixe at 
different elections is indicative of the excellent manner in which he performed 
his duties and the confidence reposed in him. He is now employed by the 
firm of Wort & Minton as bookkeeper. 

On the 2d of June, 1896, Mr. Wheelock was united in marriage to Miss 
Nellie Teeple and they have two sons D and Jack. The mother is a member of 
the Congregational church. Mr. Wheelock has exercised his riglit of franchise 
in support of the men and measures of the republican party since age conferred 
upon him the right of franchise and fraternally he is connected with the Elks, 
the Knights of Pythias, the Modern Woodmen and the Ancient Order of United 



36 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

Workmen. He has a wide acquaintance in fraternal circles and through busi- 
ness and social connections and has attractive qualities which render him popu- 
lar wherever he is known. 



JOSEPH L. BENNETT, M. D. 

Dr. Joseph L. Bennett, physician and surgeon of Kearney, his ability bring- 
ing him prominently to the front in the ranks of his chosen profession in Buffalo 
county, is a native of Howell, Michigan, but when he was eight years of age 
the family removed to Wyoming, Jones county, Iowa, where he was reared 
and educated, passing through consecutive grades to the high school. When 
twenty-one years of age he entered Lenox College at Hopkinton, Iowa, where 
he devoted two years to pursuing a Hterary course. When nineteen years of 
age he left home and started out in life penniless. He worked for his board and 
the privilege of attending high school and during the summer months was 
employed at farm labor. He also made his own way through college, teaching 
in the district schools through the winter months and working in the fields 
through the summer seasons. After spending two years in college he entered 
the Eclectic Medical Institute at Cincinnati, Ohio, from which he was graduated 
with the class of 1874. 

Immediately afterward Dr. Bennett located in Hopkinton, Iowa, where he had 
been a college student for two years. After his marriage, which occurred in 
Wyoming, Iowa, he removed to Anita, Cass county, Iowa, where he practiced for 
five years, when he was selected to fill the chair of materia medica and thera- 
peutics in Drake University at Des Moines, delivering the second lecture given in 
the medical department of that institution. He continued to occupy that chair 
for five years, after which he practiced for some time. Later he withdrew from 
practice and in connection with his brother-in-law purchased the Bank of Cen- 
terville at Centerville, South Dakota. He remained as president for two years, 
at the end of which time he sold out and removed to Kearney, Nebraska, where 
he arrived on the 15th of November, 1888. He came to this city to accept the 
position of cashier of a bank here, but the plans fell through and it was not 
organized. He then organized the Midway Loan & Trust Company, of which 
he became secretary, and also acted as cashier of the savings bank that was con- 
nected therewith. They built what is now known as the Federal Annex, the 
second largest building in the town. Dr. Bennett continued in active connection 
with the business for two years and then sold out, after which he resumed the 
practice of his profession, in which he has since been engaged. He keeps thor- 
oughly informed concerning the latest discoveries and scientific researches in the 
field of medicine and surgery and his ability is being constantly augmented by 
his wide reading and study. 

On the loth of October, 1876, Dr. Bennett was united in marriage to Miss 
Clara A. Briggs, a native of Iowa and a former schoolmate. To them have been 
born four children, as follows : Clara L., who is engaged in the abstract busi- 
ness at Broken Bow, Nebraska; Ray B., the cashier of the State Bank at Bladen, 




DR. JOSEPH L. BENNETT 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 39 

Nebraska; Ralph R., a resident of San Jose, California; and Isamore, at home, 
who is a student in the State Normal School. 

In politics Dr. Bennett is a democrat and the only public offices he has filled 
have been in the line of his profession. For three terms he served as county 
coroner and is serving his tenth year as physician to the State Industrial School. 
He belongs to the State Eclectic Medical Society and he enjoys the high regard 
and confidence of his professional brethren as well as of the general public. He 
has substantial qualities of manhood and citizenship as well as marked profes- 
sional ability and his sterling traits have brought him the high regard of many. 
In 1875 he joined the Presbyterian church and has taken an active and prominent 
part in its work, serving as an elder for twenty-seven years. 



WILLIAM D. LEIBEE. 



William D. Leibee. who is living retired in Amherst, formerly engaged in 
stockraising and was very successful in that occupation. He owns five hun- 
dred and sixty acres of land, from which he receives a handsome income. His 
birth occurred on the 4th of March, 1840, in Middletown, Butler county, Ohio, 
and his parents were George and Marguerite (Deem) Leibee, natives of Penn- 
sylvania and Ohio respectively. While a resident of Ohio the father engaged 
in butchering but after removing to Henry county, Illinois, in 1855, he turned 
his attention to farming, acquiring title to three sections of land near Brown's 
Grove. He passed away in Henry county and his demise was deeply regretted 
by his many friends. To him and his wife were born twelve children, namely: 
John, who enlisted in an Illinois regiment for service in the Civil war and died 
while in the army; Alonzo, who died in Ohio; Melissa, the wife of Anderson 
Lytle ; Sarah Elizabeth, who married William Wayne, of Orion, Illinois ; Jane, 
the wife of James Noonan, of Henry county, Illinois ; William D. ; Joseph, who 
died in Geneseo, Illinois; Jacob, who resides in Geneseo; Daniel, a resident of 
Bakersfield, California; Ella, the widow of Alonzo Monesmith, of Geneseo; 
?nd two who died in infancy. 

William D. Leibee was fifteen years of age when he accompanied his 
parents to Illinois and there grew to manhood. In 1861, when twenty-one years 
of age, he attempted to enlist as a soldier in the Civil war but was rejected on 
account of a crippled arm. He decided to devote his life to farming, to which 
occupation he had been reared, , and followed agricultural pursuits in Illinois 
until 1885, when he came to Buffalo county, Nebraska, where he rented land 
for nine years. By carefully saving his money he accumulated sufficient capital 
at the end of that time to enable him to purchase the Black ranch in Divide town- 
ship, which comprised two hundred and forty acres. He largely concentrated 
his energies upon stockraising and as he understood the business thoroughly 
and watched the market carefully he seldom failed to sell to advantage and as 
the years passed his resources increased. He purchased additional land and 
now owns five hundred and sixty acres in this county. In 1905 he retired and 
removed to Amherst, where he has since lived, enjoying the comforts of life. 

Mr. Leibee was married in Henry county, Illinois, to Miss Sarah Eliza- 



40 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

beth Gibbs, who was born in New York on the 12th of September, 1844, and 
is a daughter of Asahel and EHzabeth Ann (Burpee) Gibbs, natives of Ver- 
mont. When Mrs. Leibee was twelve years of age the family removed to Henry 
county, Illinois, and there both of her parents passed away. Mr. and Mrs. 
Leibee have two living children. Grant, who was born in Illinois, married Miss 
Alice Murray and they have four children: Nellie, the wife of Clark Thomas, 
a traveling man living in Kearney and the mother of two sons, Robert Clark 
and Keith ; William, who is farming in Grant township and is married and 
has a son, William Jr. ; and Lloyd and Harry Frank, both at home. George, the 
younger son, married Miss Lizzie Murray, by whom he has a son, Frederick, 
and they reside in Colona, Illinois. 

Mr. Leibee casts his ballot in support of the candidates and measures of 
the democratic party and discharges tO' the full all of the duties of citizenship 
but has never been an aspirant for office. He and his wife have resided in Buffalo 
county for over thirty years and during that time have seen much of its develop- 
ment from a pioneer region to the presperous and advanced farming district 
that it is today. They have done their part in bringing about this change and 
are justly held in high esteem by all vAio know them. Their success is the 
direct result of their hard work and good management and none begrudges them 
the leisure which they are now enjoying. 



OWEN WILLIAMS. 



For a considerable period Owen Williams was identified with farming inter- 
ests in Buffalo county, making his home in Center township, where his widow 
still resides. He was born in Wales on the 14th of February, 1846, a son of 
John and Mary (Owens) Williams, who were also natives of that country, 
where they spent their entire lives, rearing their family of four children, of 
whom only one is now living. 

Owen Williams was reared and educated in Wales and came to America 
in 1869, at which time he established his home in Ohio. In that state he was 
married in 1876 to Miss Margaret J. Owens, a native of Wales and a daughter 
of Richard M. and Mary (Hughes) Owens, who were also natives of that country. 
They came to America, settling upon a farm in Ohio, where they spent their 
remaining days, their family numbering seven children, of whom four are yet 
living. 

In the year 1871 Mr. Williams purchased the farm upon which his widow 
now resides on section 7, Center township, Buffalo county, and in the year fol- 
lowing his marriage — 1877 — he removed to the farm, upon which he lived at 
that time, however, for only three months. He then returned to Ohio, where 
he remained until the spring of 1880, when he again came to Nebraska, and 
here resided until his death, concentrating his energies upon the development 
of his place. He added many substantial improvements to the farm until it 
was supplied with all the accessories and conveniences of a model farm prop- 
erty. He converted the land into rich fields and annually gathered good crops. 



I 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 41 

He also extended the boundaries of his place until it comprised three hundred 
and twenty acres, still in the possession of Mrs. Williams. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Williams were born five children : Richard O., at home ; 
Mary Belle, the wife of Dallas Henderson ; Anna Selina, at home ; Susan J., the 
wife of W. E. Storer; and Gertrude E., the wife of E. Beckler, now of Omaha, 
Nebraska. The death of the husband and father occurred January 12, 1914, 
and his remains were laid to rest in the Kearney cemetery. He was a self-made 
man who won his success entirely through his own efforts, gaining- his advance- 
ment through persistent energy and indefatigable industry. Wherever known 
he was held in high esteem and most of all where he was best known. Mrs. 
Williams still makes her home in Center township and is a devoted member 
of the Methodist Episcopal church. Her long residence in the county has 
made her widely known and she has a circle of friends almost coextensive with 
the circle of her acc^uaintance. 



CHARLES C. CARRIG. 

Charles C. Carrig, who is filling the position of postmaster of Kearney, 
and who has been actively identified with farming and commercial interests 
as well as with the official life of the community, was born in the city of Free- 
port, Illinois, on the 7th of December, 1857, his parents being James and Ellen 
(Langan) Carrig, both of whom were natives of Ireland. They had five chil- 
dren, of whom but two are now living. The Carrig and Langan families both 
emigrated from Ireland to the United States as passengers on the same sailing 
vessel in 1850 and were three months in crossing the Atlantic. James Carrig, 
who was a farmer by occupation, was married at Urbana, Ohio, and afterward 
removed to Illinois but in August, 1859, came west to Nebraska, settling in 
Platte county. He lived there for a period of forty-one years, following" agri- 
cultural pursuits and as one of the earliest settlers of the district witnessed 
many of those stirring scenes of pioneer life which have become almost a for- 
gotten dream of the past. He bore his part in the work of public progress 
and development and still remains an honored resident of Nebraska, having 
hi 1900 removed to Kearney, where he now resides, at the advanced age of 
eighty-seven years. For a long period he has sur\'ived his wife, who passed 
away in 1900. 

Charles C. Carrig was but two years of age when he became a resident 
of Nebraska. He was reared upon the home farm in Platte county, there 
remaining until 1883, during which time in his boyhood days he assisted in 
the work of the old home place and attended the district school. In 1876 he 
became a student in the Bryant & Stratton Business College at Davenport, Iowa, 
being graduated therefrom in 1878. For the succeeding two years he was deputy 
county clerk at Columbus, Nebraska, and then turned his attention to mercan- 
tile pursuits, establishing a general store in 1883 at Platte Center, there con- 
tinuing in business until 1890. At that time he became cashier of the Farmers 
& Merchants Bank of that place, occupying the position for five years. From 
1895 until 1898 he operated a grain elevator at Platte Center for the Omaha 



42 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

Elevator Company, but in the latter year he removed to Buffalo, Nebraska^ 
and became steward and bookkeeper of the State Industrial School under appoint- 
ment of Governor Poynter. After serving in that capacity for two years he 
came to Kearney and was made assistant deputy county treasurer, in which 
capacity he remained for two years. He next embarked in the real estate and 
insurance business in Kearney, continuing therein until May 21, 1914, when by 
appointment of President Wilson he was made postmaster of Kearney and is 
now filling that position. 

On the 13th of May, 1894, Mr. Carrig was married to Miss Catherine Perkin- 
son, and to this union four sons have been born, Earl, Carl, Phillip and Paul. 
The religious faith of the family is that of the Roman Cathohc church and in 
political belief Mr. Carrig has always been a democrat. He has attractive social 
qualities which render him popular and he has a wide and favorable acquaintance 
in the county in which he now makes his home. 



HON. BRUNO O. HOSTETLER. 

Hon. Bruno O. Hostetler is judge of the twelfth judicial district of Nebraska, 
comprising the counties of Buffalo, Sherman and Custer. In speaking of the 
history of the bar one is led to the reflection that the legal profession demands 
not only a high order of ability but a rare combination of talent, learning, 
tact, patience and industry. The successful lawyer and the competent judge 
must be a man of well balanced intellect, thoroughly familiar with the law and 
practice and of comprehensive general information, possessed of an analytical 
mind and a self-control that will enable him to lose his individuality, his per- 
sonal feelings, his prejudices and his peculiarities of disposition in the dignity, 
impartiality and equity of the office to which life, property, right and liberty 
must look for protection. Possessing these qualities. Judge Hostetler justly 
merits the high honor which is conferred upon him by his elevation to the 
bench. 

A native of Iowa, the Judge was born upon a farm near Janesville, May 
20, 1861, his parents being David and Elizabeth (Schafer) Hostetler, the former 
a native of Ohio and the latter of Silesia, Germany. The Hostetlers, however, 
are of Swiss descent. The father was a farmer by occupation and about the 
year i860 removed to Iowa, later taking up his abode upon a farm between 
Waverly and Shell Rock. While there residing his wife died and he afterward 
removed to Kearney, Nebraska, where his last days were spent, his death 
occurring in 1903. 

Bruno O. Hostetler was reared upon a farm and acquired his primary edu- 
cation in the district schools and in the public schools at Waverly. He after^ 
ward matriculated in the Iowa State University at Iowa City and was grad- 
uated with the degree of Bachelor of Arts in the year 1885. He then continued 
his law studies there and in 1887 completed a course in the law department 
of that institution. He ranked second in a class of thirty-six when graduated 
from the collegiate course, and in 1888 he received his M. A. degree from the 
State University. 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 43 

On the 24th of November, 1887, Judge Flostetler was united in marriage to 
Miss Margaret B. Miller, and the same year located for the practice of law in 
Kearney, where he has since lived, during which period he has been identified 
with most of the important litigation that has been heard in the courts of the 
district. Along with those qualities indispensable to the lawyer— a keen, rapid, 
analytical mind, plus the business sense and a ready capacity for hard work — ^lie 
brought to the starting point of his legal career certain rare gifts — eloquence 
of language and a strong personality. Moreover, he has ever displayed a 
thorough grasp of the law and the ability to accurately apply its principles, which 
have been factors in his effectiveness as an advocate. 

To Judge and Mrs. Hostetler has been born a daughter, Florence Maxine, 
who is a graduate of the Kearney high school, of the Iowa State University 
and the Nebraska State Normal School, and is now the wife of Annan Ray- 
mond, a lawyer of Omaha. 

Judge Flostetler is identified with the Ancient Order of United Workmen 
and the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. In politics he has always been 
a republican and in 1898 was elected mayor of Kearney, which position he filled 
for three years, giving to the city a businesslike administration. In the fall of 
1903 he was elected presiding judge of the twelfth judicial district and has 
since remained upon the bench, where his decisions indicate strong mentality, 
careful analysis, a thorough knowledge of the law and an unbiased judgment. 



IRA A. KIRK. 



Banking interests in Gibbon find a worthy representative in Ira A. Kirk, 
cashier of the Exchange Bank and a member of its board of directors. He was 
born in Ripley county, Indiana, on the nth of October, 1869, a son of Thomas 
and Sarah (Blackwell) Kirk, who were natives of Kentucky and Indiana re- 
spectively. They were married in the latter state, to which the father had 
removed in his childhood days with his parents. He continued his residence 
there until 1885, when he brought his family to Gibbon, Nebraska, where he 
engaged in the coal business, with which he was prominently identified up to 
the time of his death. He also became one of the organizers of the Exchange 
Bank of Gibbon, of which he was made vice president. His activity, his 
sterling personal worth and his fidelity in matters of citizenship made him one of 
the foremost residents of Gibbon, where he passed away December 9, 1904, 
his wife surviving until January 27, 1910. He was a member of the Masonic 
lodge and became one of the organizers and charter members of Granite Lodge, 
No. 189, A. F. & A. M., of Gibbon. In politics he was a stanch republican and 
served in a number of the town offices. His wife was a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church and both were held in the highest esteem wherever they 
were known. 

Ira A. Kirk was a youth of sixteen years when he became a resident of 
Gibbon and in the public schools he continued his education, supplemented by a 
course in the United Brethren College of this place, from which he was grad- 
uated with the class of 1889. Immediately following the completion of his 



44 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

studies he entered the Exchange Bank in the capacity of bookkeeper and in 
1898 he was advanced to the position of assistant cashier, while in 1905 he 
became cashier of the institution, which important position he has since filled, 
largely directing the policy and activities of the bank. Fie has ever mani- 
fested a most progressive spirit in the conduct of business affairs and at the 
same time carefully safeguards the interests of those whom he represents. 

In 1897 ^^^- Kirk was united in marriage to Miss Clara Robb, of Gibbon, 
and they have one daughter, Esther Myrtle. In his political views Mr. Kirk is 
a republican and has served as township treasurer, while at the present time 
he is occupying the position of village treasurer. He has likewise been a mem- 
ber of the school board for fifteen years and the cause of education finds in 
him a stalwart champion. Fraternally he is connected with Granite Lodge, 
No. 189, A. F. & A. M., and has attained the thirty-second degree of the 
Scottish Rite in the Omaha consistory. His wife is a member of the Episcopal 
church and in the social circles of their part of the county they occupy an 
enviable position. In addition to his business interests Mr. Kirk has become 
the owner of valuable farm lands and from his property derives a gratifying 
annual income. He is a man of sterling worth whose life has been actuated by 
honorable principles and whose course has ever conformed to the highest stand- 
ards of manhood and citizenship. 



THOMAS W. BOLAN, 



Among the agriculturists of Buffalo county who, in the conduct of their 
farm work, have attained success that now enables them to live retired is Thomas 
W. Bolan, who makes his home in Kearney. He was born in County Waterford, 
Ireland, April 25, 1844, and was reared to farm life with the usual experiences of 
the farm bred boy in that section of the world. In 1861, when seventeen years 
of age, he bade adieu to friends and native country and sailed for the new 
world, landing at Boston, Massachusetts, where he had a sister living. He 
worked in a boat shop for a time and afterward followed different pursuits until 
1871, when he made his way westward to Nebraska, settling first at Overton. 

In the spring of 1872 Mr. Bolan secured a homestead claim on section 20, 
Elm Creek township, Buffalo county, where he was employed at railroad work 
a part of the time. He put up a small frame house upon his land and hired 
some breaking done. After about three years he purchased a team of oxen and 
devoted his time to the improvement of the homestead. In 1883 he sold the 
place and purchased one hundred and sixty acres just over the line in Dawson 
county. It was a tract of raw prairie and he turned his attention to the sheep 
business and to general farming, which he continued to follow until 1905, when 
he sold his stock and removed to Kearney. He had dealt quite extensively in 
sheep and also brought his farm under a high state of cultivation, converting 
much of the land into rich fields, from which he annually gathered good harvests. 

On the 2ist of February, 1884, Mr. Bolan was married to Miss Addie Gingrich,, 
who was born October 15, 1863, and was reared in Madison, Indiana, but came 
to this county with her mother in 1883. Mr. and Mrs. Bolan had a family of 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 47 

seven children : Catherine A., who was born December 5, 1884, and is the wife 
of Joseph Pflaum, of Dawson county; John T., who was born March 22, 1886, 
and is now a machinist of North Platte, Nebraska; William M., who was born 
October 19, 1887, and is now upon a ranch in California; Flora A., who was 
born June 23, 1889, ^"d is the wife of Albert Pflaum, of this county; Frances M.. 
who was bom June 25, 1892, and is the wife of Charles SterHng-, of Kearney; 
Mamie, who was born April 27, 1896, and died August 27, 1897; ^i^d Charles 
Thomas, who was born July 31, 1898, and is now attending high school. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bolan are members of the Catholic church and he gives his 
political allegiance to the democratic party. He has never sought nor desired 
office, preferring to concentrate his energies upon his business affairs, and along 
well defined lines of labor has wrought for success. 



JOHN G. LOWE. 



John G. Lowe, president of the Farmers Bank of Kearney, was born in 
Liverpool, England, October 19, 1865, and at the age of fifteen years came to 
America, making his way direct to Kearney, where he became an employe in 
the station department of the Union Pacific Railroad Company. Here he has 
since resided and has been closely identified with the material growth and wel- 
fare of the community. In 1897 ^^ became president of the Farmers Bank of 
Kearney and has been a potent factor in financial affairs of the city since that 
time. Mr. Lowe is a Knight Templar Mason and Shriner, is married and ranks 
with the city's foremost residents. 



SYDNEY E. SMITH. 



Sydney E. Smith, cashier of the Commercial State Bank of Amherst, was 
born in Peoria county, Illinois, September 9, 1858. His father, Edson F. Smith, a 
native of Pennsylvania, went to Peoria 'with his parents in the early '40s and in 
that locality turned his attention to the occupation of farming. He there remained 
until some years after his marriage. When his son Sydney was a lad of ten 
years he removed with the family to Louisa county, Iowa, where he successfully 
engaged in farming. He th^re served as county treasurer and also held other 
public offi'ces, taking an active part in the affairs of the community and in its 
■ material development. He married Sarah Hungerford, a native of New York, 
and in the year 1886 they removed to Kearney, Nebraska, where Mr. Smith lived 
retired until called to his final rest at the age of seventy-four years. His wife 
also passed away at Kearney in the faith of the Congregational church, of which 
they were devoted and loyal members. 

Sydney E. Smith was a lad of ten years when he accompanied his parents to 
Louisa county, Iowa, where he was reared upon a farm. In 1882 he came to 
Buffalo county, Nebraska, and engaged in farming near Kearney, but afterward 
purchased land near Pleasanton, and there successfully carried on general agri- 



48 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

cultural pursuits. Later he engaged in the grain business at Pleasanton and in 
1895 he was elected to the office of county clerk of Buffalo county, entering upon 
the discharge of his duties in 1896, his term covering four years. He later 
engaged in the hardware business in Kearney for a few years and in 1913 became 
cashier of the Commercial State Bank of Amherst, in which connection he has 
since remained. Mr. Smith was married to Miss Irene McKean, who was born 
in Pennsylvania, a daughter of J. S. McKean, and to them has been born one 
child, Sydney Jr., who is at home. The parents are members of the Congrega- 
tional church and Mr. Smith belongs to the Modern Woodmen Camp and to 
the Highlanders, while his political allegiance is given to the republican party. 



LESTER W. BAYLEY. 



Lester W. Bayley is well known throughout Buffalo county and is held in 
high esteem because of his ability and integrity. He owns five hundred acres of 
well improved land and resides on section 21, Shelton township. A native of 
Wayne county, Pennsylvania, he was born on the 13th of May, 1864, and is a son 
of John M. and Adaline A. (Adams) Bayley. The father was born in Clinton, 
that state, on the 28th of January, 1836, and is a son of William and Mary Ann 
(Morse) Bayley. He came to Nebraska in 1857 and located on a farm near 
Table Rock but a year later sold that place and returned to Pennsylvania, where 
he remained until 1871. He then again came to Buffalo county and from that 
year until 1905 engaged in farming on section 22, Shelton township. For the 
past ten years he has lived retired in the village of Gibbon. His wife, who bore 
the maiden name of Adaline A. Adams, was born in Wayne county, Pennsylvania, 
and is a daughter of Lester P. and Margaret T. (Cooper) Adams. By her mar- 
riage she has become the mother of five children, of whom four survive. The 
father served in the Civil war and in times of peace has also manifested a com- 
mendable interest in the public welfare. 

Lester W. Bayley was reared under the parental roof and is indebted for his 
education to the public schools. On beginning his independent career he took 
up a homestead in Hitchcock county, Nebraska, but after proving up on the 
place sold it. He was married in 1889 and for the following three years operated 
his father's farm but in the fall of 1891 he purchased his present horne place on 
section 21, Shelton township. He at once erected a residence and barn, and in 
the following spring he removed to that farm, where he has since resided. He 
owns five hundred acres of land in that township and engages in general farm- 
ing, which he finds both profitable and congenial. 

On the 14th of March, 1889, occurred the marriage of Mr. Bayley and Miss 
Clara Stonebarger, a daughter of Daniel Stonebarger. who removed by wagon 
from Illinois to Buffalo county in the fall of 1871. He homesteaded a quarter 
section of land in Sharon township, which he improved and cultivated. Mr. and 
Mrs. Bayley have six children : Thaddeus E., who is operating his grandfather's 
farm in Shelton township; Harvey J. and Ray A., both of whom are farming in 
Shelton township ; Bessie L., who is attending the State University at Lincoln ; 






HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 49 

Charles L., at home; and Bernice M., who is a student in the Gibbon high 
school. 

Mr. Bayley supports the men and measures of the republican party at the 
polls and for twenty years or more has been a member of the school board of 
district No. 22, which has one of the finest country school buildings in the state. 
The teachers are well prepared for their work and the course of study includes 
the tenth and eleventh grades, which is very unusual for a country school. The 
people of the district are justly proud of their school and it is a source of satis- 
faction to Mr. Bayley that he has had much to do with bringing it to its present 
high degree of efficiency. He belongs to Granite Lodge, No. 189, A. F. & A. M.; 
to Anchor Lodge, No. 14, A. O. U. W. ; and is also a member of the Gibbon 
Commercial Club, which indicates his active interest in the development of that 
town. He possesses unusual business ability and enterprise, and these qualities 
have not only enabled him to gain financial independence but have also made him 
a factor in the upbuilding of the material interests of his township. He has also 
contributed to its advancement along moral, educational and civic lines and is 
recognized as one of its foremost citizens. Both he and his wife are hospitable 
and generous and cordially welcome their friends to their home. There are no 
more highly esteemed people in the township than Mr. and Mrs. Bayley and the 
respect in which they are held is well deserved. 



WALTER H. GUNN. 



Walter H. Gunn, a landowner and stockman residing in Kearney, was born 
in Freeport, Illinois, on the 24th of March, 1857. I^ his childhood the fam- 
ily removed to St. Lawrence county, New York, but after living there a few 
years returned to Illinois, locating at Rockford. There he received the greater 
part of his education, completing a public school course and graduating from the 
high school, after which he attended a business college for some time. 

On beginning his independent career Mr. Gunn secured a position as traveling 
man for a machinery company, first as collector and later as salesman. While 
with that firm he covered the greater part of Illinois, but after remaining with 
them for a few years he was married and took charge of his father's farm near 
Rockford. Later he purchased land in that locality and became quite heavily 
interested in the stock business, while at the same time he operated a store in 
Fairdale, engaging in merchandising for about five years. In 1907 he sold his 
property in Illinois and came to Kearney, partly on account of his health and 
partly because of the excellent schools here. He found the change beneficial and 
as his health has improved he has invested in lands in this state. He is associated 
with George E. Dick, of Sycamore, Illinois, and F. L. Robinson in the cattle 
business. 

Mr. Gunn was married on the 27th of February, 1878, at Sycamore, Illinois, 
to Miss Mary Nichols, a native of that place, where she was reared and educated. 
To them have been born six children, namely : Herbert H., a resident of 
Esmond, Illinois ; Orrin R., a real estate dealer of Kansas City, Missouri ; Ella 
B., who graduated from the University of Nebraska and taught in the high school 



50 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

at Kearney for two years but who is now the wife of Noel A. Negley, a resident 
of Wisconsin ; Clarence, who is associated with his brother Orrin in the real 
estate business in Kansas City ; Bessie, a student in the State Normal School ; and 
Russell, who is attending school. 

Mr. Gunn supports the republican party at the polls but has never desired to 
hold office. His wife and family belong to the Methodist church. The extent of 
his financial interests ranks him with the leading business men of Kearney, and 
he is also highly esteemed as a citizen and as a man. 



CAPTAIN JOSEPH BLACK. 

In the history of Kearney it is imperative that mention be made of Capt. 
Joseph Black, because he ranked with her foremost citizens, because he was 
prominently identified with Buffalo county's business interests and because, 
as a member of the legislature, he largely promoted her welfare and upbuilding, 
his name thus becoming ineffaceably traced upon the annals of the county. He 
was born in Greenbrier county, Virginia, now West Virginia, on the 23d of 
April, 1834, and was in the seventy-eighth year of his age when death called 
him on the 29th of February, 191 2. His parents were William and Rebecca 
(Benson) Black, also natives of Greenbrier county, where their ancestors were 
pioneer settlers. William Black, with his wife and son Joseph, their eldest 
child, removed to Knox county, Illinois, in 1835, and five years afterward became 
residents of Henry county, Iowa, where the father died in 1862, at the age of 
fifty-five years. His wife survived him until 1867 and passed away at the age 
of fifty-three years. They had a large family, including: Joseph; John B., 
who died November 28, 1891 ; Samuel R., who died in Nebraska, December 
I, 191 1, having become a pioneer settler of Buffalo county and later of Thomas 
county, this state ; William P. ; Asbury ; Charles, a pioneer resident of Buft'alo 
county, who died in Kearney; and Emma, the wife of W. C. Wilson, of 
Henry county, Iowa. The two sons, John and William P., served as members 
of an Iowa regiment in the Civil war. 

Captain Black was reared upon the old homestead farm, attended the publicj 
schools, and Howe Academy at Mount Pleasant, Iowa, and in early manhood 
he embarked in merchandising in Abingdon, Illinois, but at the time of the] 
outbreak of the Civil war all business and personal considerations were put 
aside and when Rev. Milton L. Haney recruited Company K of the Fifty-I 
fifth Illinois Infantry at Abingdon on the 17th of October, 1861, the first man] 
to enlist was Joseph Black. By the 22d of the month one hundred and two" 
names had been enrolled and the company was duly organized by the election of, 
Mr. Black as captain. Two days later it marched into Camp Douglas, ever) 
man in his place. The men so diligently improved their time in the camp oJ 
instruction that when the time came for the regiment to enter the field it 
was as proficient in drill and discipline as the companies which had been undei 
instruction much longer. The excellent morale of the company was largel] 
due to Captain Black's efforts, for he soon proved himself a fine executive 
officer, firm and impartial. The majority of the regiment was made up in] 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 51 

Chicago and it became one of the historic regiments of the war by reason of 
its deeds of valor under Grant and Sherman. At Pittsburg Landing it lost 
two hundred and seventy-four out of five hundred and twelve men engaged, 
which was the heaviest loss by far in any one battle in the entire conflict. Out 
of a total enrollment of men of ten hundred and fifty-six it lost live hundred 
and seventy-seven. There were ninety-one pairs of brothers enlisted, forty- 
three of whom were killed in battle. The regiment marched thirty-two hun- 
dred and forty miles on foot and proceeded eight thousand seven hundred and 
twenty-five miles by transport. Captain Black participated in many of the 
hotly contested battles of the first twO' years of the war, including the engage- 
ments at Shiloh, Corinth, Memphis, Holly Springs, YazoO' and Arkansas Post. 
While the company was on picket duty near Shelley Depot, Tennessee, during 
the night of October 2.2, 1862, they were fired upon by guerrillas and Captain 
Black and Sergeant W. D. Lomax were slightly wounded. From November 
26, 1862, until February i, 1863, Captain Black alternated with two other 
senior captains in acting as major of the regiment and at the latter date 
he resigned. 

Captain Black left the army because of the death of his father and returned 
to Henry county to care for his mother and sisters. For a time he devoted his 
attention to general farming and later established a mercantile business in 
Mount Pleasant, Iowa, where he also became captain of a local mihtia company, 
commissioned by Governor Stone of that state. On the ist of June, 1865, he 
was united in marriage to Miss Ellen Updegraff, a daughter of Abram and 
Nellie Eleanor (Currigan) Updegrafl. She was born May 28, 1842, in Henry 
county, Iowa, where her parents settled in early days, having removed from 
Cumberland county, Pennsylvania. Captain Black and his wife continued their 
residence in Iowa until 1875 and then came to Buffalo county, where he 
devoted his attention to farming and to the live stock business and merchan- 
dising. He owned and operated a large ranch on the South Loup and another 
just south of the town on an island on the Platte river. From 1885 until 1888 
he carried on mercantile pursuits in Kearney and was recognized as one of 
the representative citizens of that place. 

As the years passed several children were added to the family and Captain 
Black is survived by his widow, four daughters and a son, namely: Nellie, the 
wife of A. C. Miller, freight agent for the Union Pacific Railroad Company 
at South Omaha; AHce, the wife of Ellsworth Turney, of Fairfield, Iowa, 
connected with the Charter Oak Wagon Works; Kathrine, the wife of Herbert 
Schars, of Webb City, Missouri ; Nancy, living with her mother in Kearney ; 
and Frank, also of Kearney. The family circle was broken by the hand of death 
when on the 29th of February, 1912, Captain Black passed away. He had 
figured prominently in public affairs. In 1880 he became treasurer of Buft'alo 
county and served in that and the ensuing year. On the 14th of April, 1884, he 
became mayor of the city and occupied that position for one year, giving to 
the city a progressive and businesslike administration. For eight years he was 
a member of the city school board and during the last three years of that time 
acted as its president. He served for twenty years on the city library board 
and he also filled the position of county commissioner. In 1895 he was chosen 
to represent his district in the state senate, of which he remained a member 



52 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

until 1898. His interest in public affairs was that of a citizen always loyal to 
the best interests of the community and he gave thoughtful and earnest consid- 
eration to all questions which came up for settlement. His political allegiance 
was given to the republican party and he belonged to the Grand Army of the 
Republic. He became a charter member of Sedgwick Post, No. i, at Kearney, 
served as its commander and always took a helpful interest in its affairs. He 
was appointed by the board of county commissioners and superintended the erec- 
tion of the Buffalo county courthouse, thus securing to the county a durable 
building. His was a well spent life, characterized by many admirable traits. 
He always stood for those things which are of the greatest benefit to the 
individual and the community and sought to further public progress by his 
cooperation and indefatigable energy. His efforts were at all times guided by 
sound judgment and those who knew him always recognized the integrity of 
his acts and his loyalty to his honest convictions. 



FREDERICK H. REDINGTON. 

Frederick H. Redington, who is managing seventeen hundred and twenty 
acres of land and is residing on section 36, Sharon township, Buffalo county, was 
born in Amherst, Lorain county, Ohio, on the 23d of January, 1856. His parents, 
Alexander H. and Jane E. (Bryant) Redington, were natives respectively of 
Massachusetts and of Gloucestershire, England. The mother accompanied her 
parents to the United States when but a child and grew to womanhood in 
Amherst, Ohio, where her marriage occurred. Her husband and his father drove 
the mail stage from Cleveland to Birmingham for many years and Alexander H. 
Redington also kept a roadhouse and served as postmaster of Amherst. In addi- 
tion to his other activities he engaged in farming to some extent and was suc- 
cessful in all his enterprises. 

Frederick H. Redington was reared at home and received his general educa- 
tion in the public schools. He was also a student at the Bryant & Stratton Busi- 
ness College of Chicago, which was owned by two of his uncles, Mr. Bryant 
being a brother of his mother and Mr. Stratton having married a sister of Mrs. 
Redington. x\fter completing his business course he went to Wyoming in the 
spring of 1881 and for ten years he was identified with the cattle business in that 
state. In 1891 he went to Omaha and became connected with Clay, Robinson & 
Company, the well known livestock commission dealers, with whom he remained 
for eleven years. Later he was with Rosenbaum Brothers & Company for six 
years and divided his time between his work at the yards and traveling on the 
road looking after loans. On the 2d of July, 1910, he came to Buffalo county, 
Nebraska, where he still resides, and has concentrated his attention upon the 
management of his wife's extensive landholdings, which comprise seventeen 
hundred and twenty acres, and in that connection he has manifested business 
acumen and foresight. 

Mr. Redington was married on the 21st of July, 1910, to Mrs. George Meis- 
ner, who was in her maidenhood Miss Nellie Forsythe. He supports the repub- 
lican party at the polls but has never had time to take an active part in politics. 





cJ^.'^^'-t^^ <94>z/L 



'/ 



I 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 55 

Fraternally he belongs to Shelton Lodge, No. 99, A. F. & A. M. ; Shelton Lodge, 
No. 92, K. P.; and Kearney Lodge, No. 984, B. P. O. E. Although he has 
resided in this county for a comparatively short period, his ability has already 
gained him recognition as one of its representative business men and citizens. 
His attractive personal qualities have also gained him the friendship of many. 



I 



W. M. ROSS. 



W. M. Ross, a well known sheep and cattle feeder making his home on sec- 
tion 13, Gibbon township, represents a business which is of the utmost value to 
western Nebraska, it being one of the most important sources of Buffalo county's 
wealth and upbuilding. In all that he undertakes Mr. Ross displays enterprise 
and determination and carries forward to successful completion any business in 
which he becomes engaged. He was born in Indianapolis, Indiana, on the 14th of 
November, 1873, ^ son of William B. and Sarah S. (McClain) Ross. The father 
is a native of Ripley county, Indiana, and the mother of Pennsylvania, whence she 
removed with her parents to Illinois in her early girlhood, her father, John 
McClain, being one of the pioneer settlers of Kane county, where he secured a 
government claim. It was in Aurora, Illinois, that Sarah S. McClain gave her 
hand in marriage to William B. Ross, who thereafter followed farming in Kane 
county until 1884, when he removed with his family to Buffalo county, Nebraska, 
and purchased a farm in Center township. He resided thereon until about 1900, 
when he removed to La Cygne, Kansas, where he is still carrying on general agri- 
cultural pursuits. 

W. M. Ross was reared under the parental roof, his boyhood days bringing 
to him the usual experiences that fall to the farm lad. He supplemented a dis- 
trict school education by study in the Gibbon Normal School and also by study 
at Kearney Hall. Following the completion of his course he taught school for 
three years, at the end of which time he resumed the occupation to which he 
had been reared, purchasing in 1897 a tract of land of eighty acres on section 3, 
Gibbon township. He located thereon and continued to engage in farming until 
1912, when he removed to Ravenna, where for eight months he occupied a posi- 
tion in the Citizens State Bank. He then purchased the Commercial State Bank 
at Amherst, of which he is still the president. In company with I. A. Kirk and 
W. C. Ogilvie he bought the Hershey ranch of four hundred acres adjoining 
Gibbon. This he is now operating and is one of the heavy stock feeders of 
Buffalo county, feeding both cattle and sheep. His business has assumed exten- 
sive proportions and is most wisely, carefully and successfully directed. 

On the 20th of September, 1900, Mr. Ross was married to Miss Mable Reedy, 
a daughter of John and Charlotte Reedy, who came to Nebraska from Tama 
county, Iowa, in 1878. To them have been born three children : John W., 
Richard R. and Elton S. 

In politics Mr. Ross is a republican. He has served as a member of the school 
board and as a member of the board of trustees of the cemetery. He conforms 
his life to the teachings of the Masonic fraternity, holding membership in Granite 
Lodge, No. 189, F. & A. M., and he is also a member of Gibbon Lodge, No. ^^y. 



56 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

I. O. O. F. Both he and his wife are consistent and faithful members and 
generous supporters of the First Baptist church of Gibbon. Theirs is one of 
the finest country homes in Bufi:'alo county, finished throughout in hardwood, 
heated by steam and, in fact, it is strictly modern in all its equipment. Moreover, 
an air of hospitaHty is ever supreme and its doors are quickly opened for the 
reception of their many friends. 



I 



MELCHOR N. TROUPE. 

Melchor N. Troupe, treasurer of Bufifalo county and resident of Kearney, is 
of Maryland 'nativity, his birth having occurred in Washington county, that 
state, on the 21st of June, 1854. His parents, Henry and Catherine (Schnebly) 
Troupe, were also natives of ]\Iaryland and Avere of German and Swiss ancestry. 
Melchor N. Troupe is of the fourth generation on the paternal side and the fifth 
on the maternal side of his people who have lived in America and is one of a 
family of ten children, seven of whom are yet living. He was reared upon his 
father's farm and during his youthful days attended the district schools. With 
his parents he removed to Pennsylvania in his boyhood and there pursued his 
studies in a select school. He continued to assist in the work of the home farm 
until the spring of 1878, when he came to Nebraska and for a time was em- 
ployed at Lincoln. Later, however, he went to Iowa and for about six years' was 
engaged in farming in Pottawattamie county. 

In 1884 Mr. Troupe removed to Buffalo county, Nebraska, and settled in 
Sartoria township, where he homesteaded one hundred and sixty acres. For 
about twenty years he resided thereon, devoting his attention to farming and 
stock raising, particularly in the breeding of shorthorn Durham cattle. His 
farming interests were carefully and wisely conducted, and success attended his 
labors, while his industry was manifest in the excellent improvements which 
he added to his place. In 1903 he became the nominee of his party for treasurer 
of Buffalo county, to which office he was duly elected. Removing to Kearney he 
served as treasurer for a term of two years, was reelected and thus served for 
four consecutive years. Upon the expiration of his second term he engaged in 
the monument business in Kearney, continuing in that line until 191 1, when he 
was again elected to the office of county treasurer, and the biennial election law 
enacted in 1913 continued his term of office to three years. In 1914 he was once 
more chosen by popular suffrage to fill the office and upon the expiration of his 
present term he will have served Buffalo county nine years as treasurer, his 
incumbency covering a longer period than any one who has ever held the office. 

On the 21 st of March, 1882, in Iowa, Mr. Troupe was married to Miss 
Elizabeth Taylor, who was a native of Jennings county, Indiana, and a daughter 
of Allen C. and Eliza Taylor. Mrs. Troupe is a graduate of the Northern Indiana 
Normal School at A^alparaiso, and at the time of her marriage was engaged in 
teaching in Iowa. Harry, the eldest son of Mr. and Airs. Troupe, was born in 
Iowa, and during their residence in Buffalo county four other children have 
been added to the household, these being Louis, Kathrine, Marie and John. 
The two eldest are married. Harrv wedded Pearl Miller and resides in Kcar- 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 57 

ney, where he is engaged in the abstract and insurance business. Louis wedded 
Miss Margaret Smith, and is engaged in the telephone business. Kathrine fol- 
lowed teaching for four years in Buffalo^ county and for two years in Valley 
county and is now a student at the State Normal School at Kearney. Marie is 
now engaged in teaching for the second year at Albion^ Boone county, Nebraska. 
John is a high school student at Kearney. 

Mr. and Mrs. Troupe are members of the Presbyterian church, and fra- 
ternally he is connected with the Lidependent Order, of Odd Fellows, the Benevo- 
lent Protective Order of Elks and the Ancient Order of United Workmen. Li 
politics he is a republican. There is no resident of the county who has wider 
personal acquaintance than !Mr. Troupe, and his popularity is indicated in the 
fact that he has again and again been chosen for the position which he now 
fills and on each occasion has been accorded a very substantial and gratifying ma- 
jority. His political as well as his personal integrity is above question, and his 
entire ofificial career has been marked by honor. 



S. N. FREEMAN. 



S. N. Freeman, living in Center township, is a man of sterling character, 
his personal worth gaining for him the confidence, goodwill and high regard 
of all with whom he comes in contact. He is the owner of an excellent farm 
of one hundred and sixty acres upon which is a fine home beautifully situated 
on an elevation overlooking the valley. Mr. Freeman was born in Sweden on 
the I St of December, 1846, and is a son of Mr. and Mrs. Nels Nelson, both of 
whom died in Sweden. He was reared under the parental roof and the public 
schools of the neighborhood afforded him his educational privileges. At 
eighteen years of age he enlisted in the regular army and served for six years. 
In 1870 he completed his arrangements to come to the new world and after 
bidding adieu to friends and native country sailed for the United States. Fie 
spent the first winter after his arrival near Burlington in Des Moines county, 
Iowa, and in the following summer was employed on government work along 
the Mississippi river. In 1872 he settled in Moline, Illinois, where for eleven 
years he was in the employ of a lumber company. In 1885 he came to Nebraska 
and located on his present home farm, which he had purchased five years prior 
to his removal to that place. He has diligently and persistently directed the 
work of the farm since that time, has brought his fields to a high state of cul- 
tivation and has added to the \alue of his place by the improvements which he 
has put upon it. 

In Moline, Illinois, Mr. Freeman was united in marriage to Miss Lottie 
Holberg, a native of Sweden, by whom he has three children, namely: Esther, 
at home ; Bernett, who is engaged in farming in Center township, this county ; 
and Rose, the wife of Melvin Jones, of Chicago, Illinois. The wife and mother 
died July 9, 1891, and was laid to rest in the Kearney cemetery. 

Politically Mr. Freeman is a republican who keeps well informed on the 
questions and issues of the day, although he has never been an office seeker. 
He and his family are members of the Lutheran church and throughout his 



58 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

entire life his course has conformed to high Christian principles. He has never 
sought to take advantage of the necessities of his fellowmen in any business 
transaction but has put forth his effort in accordance with the rules that gov- 
ern industry and strict and unswerving integrity. 



JOHN N. NUTTER. 



John N. Nutter, a well-to-do retired farmer living on section i6, Shelton 
township, has resided upon his present farm for thirty-two years. He was born 
in Gloucester, New Jersey, on the 6th of March, 1856, of the marriage of Wil- 
liam and Dinah (Ingham) Nutter, both of whom were natives of Lancashire, 
England, where they grew to manhood and womanhood. They were married 
there and continued to live there for several years, but in the early '50s came to 
the United States with their two children and after remaining for a short time 
in Gloucester, New Jersey, located in Philadelphia. The father, who was a cot- 
ton mill operative, worked in the mills in Philadelphia for several years and 
made his way upward to the position of superintendent of the mills. He was a 
member of the Mormon church and in i860 went to Salt Lake City with a Mormon 
colony, but he only remained there for a short time, as he became dissatisfied 
with the way in which affairs were managed and consequently severed his con- 
nection with the colony. He came eastward as far as Nebraska and located in 
Hall county near Shelton. During the Civil war the Indians were so hostile that 
he was forced to leave his farm and return to England, but after six or eight 
months he again came to the United States and accepted the position of superin- 
tendent of cotton mills in Gloucester, New Jersey. In 1869 he returned to 
Nebraska and preempted the northeast quarter of section 8, Shelton township, 
Buffalo county. He resided upon that place until his demise, which occurred in 
1908. His wife is still living and makes her home with her son M. D., who is 
operating the homestead. 

John N. Nutter remained at home during the period of his minority and 
received his education in the public schools. When twenty-one years of age he 
began farming on his own account and in 1878 he leased a tract of school land, 
which he subsequently purchased and on which he now resides. In the same 
year he took up a homestead in Platte township, on which he lived for five years, 
but in 1883, having proved up on his claim, he removed to the first mentioned 
farm, on which he has now lived continuously for thirty-two years. He owns 
seven hundred and twenty acres of excellent land and his enterprise and effi- 
ciency have enabled him to gain financial independence. In 191 5 he retired from 
the active work of the farm, although he is still residing in Shelton township. 
He is a stockholder in the Farmers Elevator at Gibbon. 

In 1881 Mr. Nutter was united in marriage to Miss Anna Carlson, who was 
then a resident of Kearney, but whose birth occurred in Sweden. They have 
become the parents of five children, namely : Olive, the wife of Charles Holmes, 
of South Denver, Colorado ; Effie, who married John Graham, of Hall county, 
Nebraska ; Herbert, who is traveling auditor for the Wells Fargo Express Com 
pany; Elsie, the wife of John Evans, of Salem, Oregon; and Beatrice, who mar- 






b 




JOHN N. NUTTER 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 61 

ried John Hogg, of Vancouver, Washington. For his second wife Mr. Nutter 
married Miss Jennie Ringholdson, a native of Sweden, who came to this country 
in 1893 and located in Kearney, Nebraska, where they were married while Mr. 
Nutter was serving as sheriff. There are six children by this union : Ina, now 
Mrs. Everett Reynolds, of Red Elm, South Dakota; Hilda, who is teaching 
school in Lincoln county; and Marjorie, Harold, Daniel and Jean, all of whom 
are at home. 

Mr. Nutter is a liberal democrat and is well informed on the political issues 
of the day. For two terms he held the office of sheriff of Buffalo county, serving 
in that capacity from 1892 to 1896, and his record is highly creditable to his 
ability and public spirit. He is prominent in local fraternal circles, belonging 
to Gibbon Lodge, No. t^j, L O. O. F. ; Granite Lodge, No. 189, A. F. & A. M.; 
Kearney Chapter, R. A. M. ; ExcaHbur Lodge, No. 138, K. P.; and to the local 
organization of the Ancient Order of United Workmen and the Knights of the 
INIaccabees. He is interested in everything that pertains to the public welfare 
and is recognized as one of the valued citizens of his township. 



CLIFFORD CLINTON REED. 

CHfford Clinton Reed, editor and part owner of the Shelton Clipper, has, 
in the publication of this journal, entered upon a work with which his father 
was closely associated for many years, maintaining in connection therewith the 
highest standards of newspaper publication. Clifford C. Reed was born in 
Shelton July 19, 1889, his parents being Frank D. and Hattie (McKnight) Reed. 
The father was a native of Middleport, Ohio, born June 30, 1862, and in that 
state was reared and educated. In early life he learned the printer's trade, which 
he followed in several states, mostly in the middle west, and at one time he 
was a member of the State Journal force at Lincoln, Nebraska. He was also 
associated with his uncle, Dr. F. B. Reed, in the publication of a newspaper at 
Peru, Nebraska, previous to his removal to Shelton. He became a resident of 
this city in 1884 and in connection with his brother, William M. Reed, purchased 
the Shelton Clipper. The partnership continued until 1895, when the brother 
retired, after which the father continued the publication of the paper alone until 
his demise, being regarded as one of the ablest as well as one of the oldest news- 
paper men in the state. On the i6th of July, 1885, he wedded Miss Hattie 
McKnight, of Hastings, Nebraska, and to them were born five children: Mrs. 
E. L. Templin, Clifford C, Wauneta, Geneva and Frank. Through appointment 
of President McKinley Mr. Reed became postmaster at Shelton and filled the 
office for twelve years, when in 1910 he voluntarily resigned to devote his full 
time to the publication of the Clipper and the management of the newspaper 
office. He died November 7, 191 1, and was laid to rest in the cemetery at Hast- 
ings. Newspapers throughout the state spoke of him in terms of highest regard. 
He was a man of fine personal appearance and the physical was but an index 
of the noble spirit within. 

One who was long associated with him in business and in social life and who 
knew him perhaps better than any one outside of his immediate family circle 



62 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

said: "There are times when words — mere words — fall far short of expressing 
the feelings of the heart. Today we mourn the death of a true friend. Yet our 
loss is small compared with that of the ones who are bereft of a husband and 
father. To say one word of comfort would be to say that his life work was 
done well. He made true friends. His good deeds were many and they will 
always linger in the memory of the people of Nebraska who knew him. Frank 
Reed will receive a reward for his many good deeds of kindness, for his charity 
toward his fellowmen and for the life of usefulness to all. To know him better 
was to respect him more. His warmest friends were those who knew him best. 
Eight years ago his ofifice was destroyed by fire. In a few moments practically 
the work of a lifetime was gone. But Frank Reed was not dismayed. He looked 
on the bright side. Before the fire was out a new outfit was ordered and he 
commenced the work over again. A new paper rose from those ruins and it 
was better than it had ever been. It had in it Frank Reed's determination to 
make his paper the best country newspaper in the state. This was his ideal. 
He lived up to it. His many newspaper friends point with pride to The Shelton 
Clipper. Not even the fire caused him to miss a single issue. The paper came 
out on time. No matter how busy with other affairs, his first consideration was 
for those who were subscribers for his newspaper. He always gave them the 
best that was in him. He was a loyal, self-sacrificing citi.^en, public-spirited 
and generous. Shelton sustains a deep loss. Frank Reed fought many battles 
for Shelton and won. In his home life he was a generous and wise provider. 
The care of those near and dear to him by kindred ties was uppermost in 
his mind. He loved his home. It was very dear to him. I never saw him 
happier than when the family gathered at the home. He wanted them to have 
the pleasures of life, no matter what sacrifices it meant to him. No husband 
could be more kind. No father could bestow greater love and affection on 
his children. Friends were always welcome at his home. A stranger in 
need was never turned away empty handed. His deeds of charity were many. 
Frank Reed stood high in the estimation of the newspaper fraternity of the 
state. For years he attended the meetings of the Nebraska Press AssociatioUj 
and was one of the factors in keeping up the organization. In 1905 he was 
elected vice president and the year following unanimously chosen as president, an] 
office which he filled with honor. His newspaper was looked on by members of thej 
craft as an ideal paper for a town of this size. He took a very active part in the 
association meetings and during the twenty-seven years of his newspaper life sel-| 
dom missed a meeting. No meeting was thought to be quite complete without 
Frank Reed's presence. He was prominent in lodge work. He was a member oi 
Kearney lodge of Elks, a member of the Shelton lodge of Knights of Pythias, ofj 
Phoenix lodge in the Ancient Order of United Workmen, of the Modern Wood- 
men, Royal Highlanders and Modern Brotherhood of America. He enjoyed his 
associations in the lodge room and was regarded highly by his fraternal] 
brethren." 

Another wrote of Mr. Reed: "It was my pleasure and profit to know] 
Frank Reed for over eight years and during that time I came to regard him! 
as one of the most resourceful, most talented and most successful men in the 
•country newspaper business. In the Clipper he published a paper that woulc 
have been a creditable representative of a community many times as large asl 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 63 

Shelton. For the quantity of news matter that it contained, for the quaHty 
of its editorials and for its typographical appearance it was a model worthy 
to be copied by any progressive newspaper man in the state. Mr. Reed had 
abilities that would have made him successful in any field, regardless of its 
size, but it was one of the commendable qualities of the man that he pre- 
ferred to remain in Shelton, where perhaps he could be of more service than in 
a field of larger promise. But he was more than a talented newspaper man, 
he was a friend to every man and woman in the business. He may have had 
his faults but they were buried in a sea of unselfishness and gentle tolerance." 

Hugh McVicker, of the Nebraska State Journal of Lincoln, wrote : "Whole- 
someness and cheerfulness were dominating traits in the life of Frank D. Reed. 
He was a masterful, aggressive man in the sense that he met and overcame 
difiiculties, but he was never domineering or a bully. He loved success and 
achieved it by hard and honest work, not by discrediting other men, for he 
disliked the hypocrite, backbiter and fault-finder. He was essentially an opti- 
mist; the pessimist to him was a. good deal of a mystery. Had he been less 
generous he probably would have been wealthy. To me his passing is a per- 
sonal bereavement. We were friends for over thirty years — chums in our 
youth and companions in later life. To those bound to him by closer ties — his 
family first, to whom he was devotedly attached — and to his business asso- 
ciates in a less degree, his loss is a tragedy." 

Adam Breede, editor of the Hastings Tribune, said: "To be a man among 
men, a brother to his fellowmen, an honest, upright and courageous citizen, 
such was the courage, disposition and ambition of Frank Reed as I knew him. 
He was brave, good, generous, and kind — and he dared to do all that may be- 
come a man. His thoughts and exertions were more for the good of others 
than they were for himself. His virtues were many and his friends loved him 
for the splendid type of true manhood that he w^as." 

Another said: "I counted the friendship of Frank Reed as one of the 
very pleasant experiences of my life. I do not recall exactly when I first met him. 
He was one of those persons whom one feels that he had always known. My 
acquaintance with him covered the span of a quarter of a century. I never 
met him but that I was conscious of being in the presence of a large-hearted, 
genial man of a most wholesome nature. And as he was a good friend and 
true, by those same qualities he was also a kind and proud husband and father. 
I think there was no finer trait of his character than his consideration and 
affection for his family, which he always unconsciously showed. Though of 
a most genial personality, he was firm and courageous in defending what he 
believed to be right and hesitated not to condemn what he knew to be wrong. 
This made him a good editor and a valuable citizen. It is of such as he we 
may well apply the words of Shakespeare, The elements in him were so mixed 
that the whole world ought to stand up and say, "This was a man." 

When Frank D. Reed lay down his work never again to pen an editorial, 
his task was taken up by his son, Clifford C. Reed, who had been reared in 
Shelton and was educated in its public schools, being graduated from the high 
school with the class of 1907. When his text-books were put aside he had 
the business training and experience that came to him as assistant to his father 
in the printing office and the influence of the standards maintained by the 



64 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

elder Reed could not fail to have its effect upon the son. Upon the fathers 
death he assumed charge of the Shelton Clipper, in which work he is associated 
with his brother-in-law, E. L. Templin. They maintain the high standard 
established by the father and Mr. Reed is displaying in the conduct of the 
paper much of the developing ability which brought his father to a foremost 
place among the journalists of the state. 

In his political views Mr. Reed is a stalwart republican, tenacious in his 
support of what he believes to be right and progressive in his opinions. His 
fraternal relations are with Shelton Lodge, No. 92, K. P. He has a very 
wide acquaintance in the city in which he has always lived and his circle of 
friends is almost coextensive therewith. 



C. VAN DYCK BASTEN, M. D. 

Dr. C. Van Dyck Basten, a prominent and valued representative of the 
medical profession in western ^^^?febraska, who has practiced continuously in 
Kearney since May, 1883, was pOrn at Kingston, Ulster county, New York, on 
the 25th of May, 1859, ^"^ is one of the three surviving members in a family 
of five children who were born of the marriage of Gfeorge W. and Esther 
(Bevier) Basten. He was reared upon his father's farm with the usual expe- 
riences of the farm lad and acquired his early education in Ulster Academy. Eor 
two years he read medicine under the direction of Drs. Crispell & Smith, at 
Kingston, and later continued his studies with Dr. W. C. Goodno, of Philadel- 
phia, as his preceptor. Still later he entered the Hahnemann Medical College in 
1879, remaining a student in that institution for two years, but owing to failing 
health was compelled to relinquish his studies for a time. Later he went to 
Iowa and completed his medical education in the medical department of the State 
University at Iowa City, receiving his degree in 1883. Since that time he has 
taken numerous post-graduate courses in New York, Chicago and elsewhere, 
and by continued study and investigation keeps abreast with the mostM:ientific 
research and progress. 

Dr. Basten began the practice of his profession at Kearney in May, 1883, and 
has since here remained, winning early recognition as one of the foremost physi- 
cians of this part of the state — a position which he has since retained. He is 
ever careful in the diagnosis of his cases and his judgment is seldom at fault in 
regard to the outcome of disease. His professional duties are most conscien- 
tiously performed and his sympathy and consideration are elements in his popu- 
larity as well as the skill which he displays in practice. 

On the 24th of November, 1885, Dr. Basten was married to Miss Adah 
Seaman, of Kearney, and they have an adopted daughter, Mary Edna. The 
religious faith of the family is that of the Methodist church, and Dr. Basten is 
connected with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and with the Masonici 
fraternity, in which he has attained high rank, being now a Knight Templar. 
His political allegiance is given to the republican party, and although he keeps] 
well informed on the questions and issues of the day he does not seek office. Hisj 
membership along professional lines is with the Buffalo County and the Nebraska 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 65 

State Medical Societies. He is an extremely busy and successful practitioner, an 
industrious and ambitious student and in his expressions concerning brother 
physicians is friendly and indulgent. 



SILAS B. FUNK. 



Buffalo county has been signally favored in the class of men who have occu- 
pied her public offices, for on the whole they have been patriotic citizens, loyal 
to the trust reposed in them and capable in the discharge of their varied and 
important duties. Such a one is Silas B. Funk, now serving asȤheriff. A native 
of Franklin county, Pennsylvania, he was born December 12, 1854, his parents 
being Henry and Margaret (Good) Funk, who were also natives of the Key- 
stone state and representatives of what is known as Pennsylvania Dutch stock. 

Upon the home farm of his parents, Silas B. Funk was reared and in his boy- 
hood days attended the common schools, but at the age of twelve years started 
out in life on his own responsibility. At that period he became imbued with 
the ambition to go west and see something of. the new country. He ran away 
from home, proqeeded as far as Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, and there joined a 
wagon train drawn by oxen, bound for Salt Lake City, then known as Camp 
Douglas. With this wagon train he passed up the Platte river and over the site 
where Kearney now stands, but at that period there was nothing here save 
prairie dogs and rattlesijakes. The entire countryside was unsettled. Over it 
roamed wandering tribes of Indians, and the buffaloes and coyotes were numer- 
ous. Mr. Funk was employed at driving a team of oxen, the train belonging to 
Caldwell & Company, of Leavenworth. After unloading at Camp Douglas, they 
started on the return trip and spent the winter about forty miles southwest of 
Cheyenne. In the spring of 1867 they proceeded to North Platte, to which town 
the Union Pacific, Railroad had been extended and there the ox train was sold. 
During the surhiner Mr. Funk acted as assistant wagon master. From North 
Platte he proceeded to Fort Leavenworth, and there joined another train bound 
for Fort Union, New Mexico. From there he went to Texas and became a 
cow puncher, continuing in that business for about fifteen years. 

In the fall of 1882 Mr. Funk arrived in Buffalo county, Nebraska, and began 
farming in Loup township, where he carried on business for seven years. On the 
expiration of that period he removed to Kearney and became connected with the 
police force. In 1897 he was elected sheriff of the county and served for two 
terms of two years each. Later he spent five years in Wyoming and Utah as a 
detective for the Union Pacific Railroad, and later again became a member of 
the Kearney police force, in which connection he remained until he was once 
more elected sheriff of the county in 1914, and resumed the duties of the office 
-in the following January. His life has been a stirring and ofttimes exciting and 
dangerous one. He has had many encounters with the Indians during his freight- 
ing and cowboy days, and met all of the experiences incident to life on the 
frontier. He deserves much credit for work which he did in early times when 
as a freighter, cowboy and detective he aided in planting the seeds of civilization 



ee HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

and in bringing about normal conditions in rendering life and property safe and 
in promoting progress. 

Mr. Funk was married in 1879 ^o Miss Elizabeth Hunter, and by this mar- 
riage he has one daughter living, Mabel, now the wife of Victor Beck, of Broken 
Bow, Nebraska. The wife and mother passed away in 1886, and for his second 
wife Mr. Funk chose Mrs. Anna B. Lower, of Kearney, their marriage being 
celebrated November 4, 1890. Mrs. Funk is a member of the Congregational 
church, 

Mr. Funk has membership with the Masons, having attained the Knights 
Tem.plar degree of the York Rite, while with the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine he 
has crossed the sands of the desert. In varied relations he has proven his man- 
hood and his worth, and those who know him speak of him in terms of warm 
regard. 



JOSEPH NELSON ASHBURN. 

Joseph Nelson Ashburn, proprietor of the Gibbon Roller Mills, belongs to 
that class of men to whom opportunity is ever the pathway to success. He has 
never been afraid to venture where favoring opportunity has led the way and 
his diligence and determination are carrying him steadily forward. He was 
born in Trumbull county, Ohio, September 7, 1869, a son of Dillon P. and Emily 
A. (Brown) Ashburn, the former a native of Ohio and the latter of New York. 
The father came with the colony that settled in this section of Buffalo county 
and thus the family has been represented here since pioneer times. 

Joseph N. Ashburn was reared upon the old homestead place and supple- 
mented his district school education by stody in the Gibbon high school and in 
the United Brethren College at Gibbon. Att|Lj :ompleting his studies he served 
as assistant postmaster for four years, his ^^ther having been appointed to 
the postition of postmaster at Gibbon. Later j.'"N. Ashburn occupied the position 
of collector for the implement house of David Bradley & Company for a short 
time, but in 1893 l^is father represented the dairy interests at the Columbian 
Exposition in Chicago and J. N. Ashburn remained at the exposition from July 
until November, being connected with the bureau of awards. He afterward 
returned to Gibbon and for three years was employed in the drug store of 
M. H. Noble. Subsequently he worked in the lumber yard of W. H. Buck 
for a short period, and when he had retired from that position he became asso- 
ciated with the Beatrice Creamery Company of Lincoln, which he represented 
upon the road and in other important capacities for nine years. He then went 
to Coeur dAlene, Idaho, where he was employed by the Kidd Island Lumber 
Company, acting unofficially as manager, while later he became secretary of the 
company. He remained with that company for three years, and in 1910 returned 
to Nebraska, spending a short time with an Omaha lumber company which he 
represented upon the road. In the spring of 191 1 he came to Gibbon as yard 
manager for W. H. Buck, in which capacity he served until 1913. In April 
of the latter year he purchased a half interest in the Gibbon Roller Mills and 
upon the death of Roy A. Da\'is, the senior partner, on the 31st of October, 1914, 




DILLON P. ASHBURN 




MRS. DILLON P. ASHBURN 



rjf^i^g^ 



\ 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 71 

he purchased his interest in the business and became sole proprietor of what is 
now one of the leading productive industries of Buffalo county. 

On the 28th of June, 1898, Mr. Ashburn was united in marriage to Miss 
Hattie B. McConnaughey, her father being Orlando McConnaughey, one of the 
prominent men of Gibbon. To them have been born four children, namely: 
Bernice L., Harry Arthur, Constance D. and Edith L. 

Mr. Ashburn is a prominent Mason, belonging to Granite Lodge, No. 189, 
A. F. & A. M., while in Omaha Consistory he has attained the thirty-second degree 
of the Scottish Rite. Both he and his wife are connected with the Order of the 
Eastern Star. In politics he is a republican, and while he has never held public 
office, he has served as a member of the school board. Since starting out in 
business life on his own account he has gradually worked his way upward, 
improving his opportunities and utilizing his advantages until he has become one 
of the active, well known and prosperous business men of Buffalo county. 



EARL E. HILL. 



j Earl E. Hill is a member of the firm of Hill Brothers, general merchants of 
Riverdale, and is numbered among the most enterprising and progressive business 
men of his part of the county. He is now acting as postmaster and at all times 
he is interested in the progress and development of the district in which he lives 
to the extent of giving active cooperation to various movements for the general 
good. He was born October 28, 1881, in the town where he still resides, and 
is a son of Cosmo S. and Mary (Delano) Hill. The father's birth occurred in 
Bethel, Vermont, in 1848 and, emigrating westward in 1873, he settled at River- 
dale, Nebraska, purchasing a relinquishment to an eighty-acre tract of land which 
he at once began to develop and improve. He was a son of Steven Hill, who 
was also a native of Vermont. 

The birth of Earl E. Hill occurred on -|he old homestead farm in River- 
dale township and his education was acquired in the district schools. When not 
occupied with his lessons he aided in the work of the fields and afterward took 
up the active task of further developing and improving his father's farm on 
section 4, Riverdale township, there giving his attention to general agricultural 
pursuits until 1904, when he engaged in the grain business at Riverdale, estab- 
lishing an elevator. In 1906 he formed a partnership with J. E, Nelson and 
embarked in general mechandising under the firm style of Hill & Nelson. That 
relationship was maintained until 1910, when Mr. Nelson disposed of his 
interest to E. S. Hill, a brother of E. E. Hill, and the firm name was changed to 
Hill Brothers, under which style the business has since been conducted. They 
have a well appointed store, carrying a large and carefully selected line of 
goods and drawing a gratifying trade not only from the village but from the 
surrounding country as well. Earl E. Hill is also postmaster of Riverdale, having 
been appointed April 25, 1910, the postoffice being located in the general store 
of Hill Brothers. 

On the 1st of August, 1906, at Riverdale, Mr. Hill was joined in wedlock 
to Miss Mary A. Ball, a native of Wisconsin and a daughter of Gilbert and 



72 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

Mary Ball. They have two children, lona and Irene, who are eight and six 
years of age respectively. Mr. Hill belongs to Riverdale Camp, No. 1072, 
M. W. A., and to Riverdale Lodge, No. 352, I. O. O. F., and in the former he 
served as venerable consul for four terms. In politics he is a democrat where 
national issues are involved but at local elections casts an independent ballot. 
He concentrates his efforts upon his business affairs and success in large measure 
is attending him, for the methods which he pursues are in accordance with 
modern business principles. X 



A. F. BILLS. 



A. F. Bills, manager of the Farmers Elevator Company at Shelton, is thor- 
oughly acquainted with every phase of the grain trade and is thus well qualified 
to carry on the work which now engages his attention. His birth occurred in Pike 
county, Illinois, on the ist of March, 1858, his parents being Arthur F. and Eliza- 
beth (Wilkes) Bills, the former born in New York of English parentage, while the 
latter was a native of Louisville, Kentucky. They were married in Louisville, Ken- 
tucky, and soon afterward or in the year 185 1 removed to Pike county, Illinois, 
where the father engaged in farming and stock raising. He purchased three hun- 
dred and twenty acres of land and was quite a heavy stock buyer. During the Civil 
war he had government contracts to furnish meat to the troops and for a long pe- 
riod he carried on an extensive business. In 1862, he returned to Kentucky and at 
Bowling Green borrowed five thousand dollars to use in his live-stock transactions. 
This he brought back with him in gold and silver and hid it in a buckwheat bin in 
an old unused log cabin. A few days later a little daughter discovered the hiding 
place of the money and he therefore hid it in another place. The Missouri bush- 
whackers were troublesome and raids were frequent. A few nights later a 
number of watchdogs which he kept made a great fuss and the next morning 
he was found dead outside his door. He had evidently gone out to find what 
was causing the disturbance. The hiding place of the money was never found, 
nor was it ever known whether or not the bushwhackers had succeeded in making 
their escape with it. Through the death of the father and the loss of this money^ 
the family were obliged to lose their farm. Subsequently the mother became th( 
wife of Isaiah Lewton and they remove^, to Minnesota, where they resided for 
year. The following year they became residents of Augusta, Hancock county 
Illinois, and in 1872 the family went to •Nebraska, settling in Hall county, where- 
Mr. Lewton homesteaded one hundred Snd^.^ixty acres of land. In 1874 they 
removed to Wood River, where the death of Mr. Lewton occurred about 1883. 
The mother afterward came to She^l^^c^Jand tnade her home with her son, A. F. 
Bills, until her death in 1885. Jt w^ Mr. Lewton who shot the last buffalo 
ever killed in this section of the state. Five buffaloes crossed the Platte river 
on June 23, 1875, and he succeeded in bringing down one of the number. 

A. F. Bills was educated in the common schools and started out as a farmer 
when but seventeen years of age by purchasing eighty acres of land in Jackson 
township. Hall county. There he began farming on his own account and in 
1878 he traded this land for a grocery store in Shelton. A year later, however, 



^M 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 



73 



he failed in business and resumed his agricultural pursuits, to which he again 
devoted his energies for three years. On the expiration of that period he once 
more became a resident of Shelton and for five years was employed in the grocery 
and drug store of Hostetler Brothers. He then once more resumed farmino- 
m which business he continued actively and successfully until 1910, when he sokl 
all but ten acres of his land which lies within the city limits of Shelton For 
many years he has bought grain and hay for the sheep feeders of this section 
and in 1910, because of his recognized ability in that direction, he was placed 
in charge of the Farmers grain elevator at Shelton, where he is now wisely, capa- 
bly and successfully conducting business. 

On the 1st of January, 1879, Mr. Bills was joined in wedlock to Miss Mary 
Walsh, a daughter of Patrick Walsh, who came out to Fort Kearney as a soldier 
in 1866 and after his enlistment expired homesteaded the quarter section on 
which Shelton now stands. This was in 1869 or two years prior to the comincr 
of the colony. To Mr. and Mrs. Bills have been born nine children, six of whom 
survive, as follows: Frank A., who is a railroad man of Los Angeles, California; 
Rufus L., a railroad man of Portland, Oregon; Joseph L., who is a professional 
ball player with the Des Moines (la.) team; and Nora, Mary R. and John P., 
all at home. 

In his political views Mr. Bills is a democrat and for seven years filled the 
office of marshal in Shelton. He belongs to Shelton Lodge, A. F. & A. M., to the 
Ancient Order of United Workmen and to the Catholic church. His life has been 
a busy one fraught with earnest effort, and whatever success he has achieved is 
attributable entirely to his own labors. Gradually he has worked his way upward 
step by step and is now a prominent representative of commercial activity in 
Buffalo county. 



JAMES A. BOYD. 



Diligence and enterprise are the factors that count most in business life and 
Mr. Boyd is possessed of those quaHtfes in large measure. Since the organization 
of the Farmers Bank of Kearney in 1890 he has been its cashier and has con- 
tributed in large measure to its success, |pr he displays sound judgment and keen 
sagacity in business aft"airs and has throughly acquainted himself with every 
phase of modern banking. A native of Illinois, he was born upon a farm in 
Whiteside county, April 14, 1858. The father, John Boyd, was a native of Scot- 
land and when a young man came to ^fe-ica at a time when sailing vessels 
afforded the only means of crossing tli^^^lntic. Two years later he returned 
to the land of hills and heather and ther^ferried Isabelle Archibald. About the 
year 1-856 he returned to the United State! for a permanent residence and 
located in Whiteside county, Illinois, before a railroad had been built through 
that county. His remaining days were there passed and his death occurred in 
December, 191 1. For more than four years he had survived his wife, who died 
in March, 1907. 

The early life of James A. Boyd was passed upon the home farm, during 
which period he assisted in such work as was necessary in the development of the 



74 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

fields according to the methods then in use. His education was obtained in the 
graded schools of Morrison and he followed farming in his native state until 
1889. 

In the meantime he had married Miss May Robertson, a sister of Lew Robert- 
son, who was the first president of the Farmers Bank at Kearney, the wedding 
being celebrated on the i6th of September, 1885. In March, 1889, they removed 
to Kearney and Mr. Boyd became connected with the First National Bank, 
where his duties comprised almost everything except the voting of stock. He 
continued in that connection until 1890, when he took an active part in the 
organization of the Farmers Bank, of which he was elected cashier and has so 
continued to the present time — a period of more than a quarter of a century. 
He has been most careful to safeguard the interests of depositors and thus make 
the institution worthy of public patronage. His progressiveness is tempered by a 
safe conservatism and at the same time he has kept the bank in touch with the 
most modern financial methods. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Boyd have been born two children but the elder, John Earl, 
died when but eleven months old. The younger, James W., is with his parents, who 
are well known in social circles of this city, where they have many warm j 
friends. Aside from his business relations Mr. Boyd has otherwise become f 
identified with the material interests and development of Kearney and Buffalo 
county. He served as a member of the city council for six years and exercised 
his official prerogatives in support of many plans and measures for the general 
good. Socially he is identified with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. 
Those who know him find him a genial, courteous gentleman, always obliging, 
and by reason of his sterling worth he has become well established in public 
reg-ard. 



DAVID ROACH. 



David Roach owns one hundred and sixty acres of well developed land in 
Gibbon township and finds that its cultivation and improvement leaves him little 
time for outside interests. He was born in Pennsylvania on the 15th of April, 
1853, and is one of three living children of a family of eleven, whose parents 
were Thomas and Jennie (Ore) Roach, both natives of England, whence they 
emigrated to America in 1850. They settled in Pennsylvania, where the mother 
passed away, and the father subsequently removed to Illinois and still later to 
Nebraska, where his death occurred. 

David Roach acquired a common school education and remained under the 
parental roof until he was twenty-two years of age. He was then engineer in a 
sawmill for three years, after which he went to Logan county, Illinois, where he 
spent seven years. At the end of that time he came to Buffalo county, Nebraska, 
and after working as a laborer for three years, began farming. In 1905 he pur- 
chased his present farm, which comprises one hundred and sixty acres on section 
9, Gibbon township, and which is in a high state of development. He raises the 
usual crops and also considerable stock, and his well directed labors yield him a 
crratifying return. 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 75 

In 1875 occurred the marriage of Mr. Roach and Aliss Georgia Cass, and 
they became the parents of two children : Harry, who is farming in this township ; 
and Hattie, the wife of Carl Webster. In 1889 the wife and mother departed 
this life, and in 1895 Mr. Roach married Miss May Marshall, who died in 
April, 1914. 

Mr. Roach is a republican and for twenty years has served as school 
director, his long continuance in the office indicating the confidence which is 
placed in his ability He is an active worker in the Grange and owns stock in 
the Farmers Elevator at Gibbon. He recognizes the value of cooperation and 
believes that it should be more fully applied to the solution of the problem of 
the modern farmer. His religious faith is indicated by the fact that he holds 
membership in the Presbyterian church, and the uprightness of his life has gained 
him the sincere respect of all who have had dealings with him. He has worked 
hard and has saved his money carefully, with the result that he is now in com- 
fortable circumstances and is recognized as one of the efficient and prosperous 
farmers of his township. 



THOMAS ELLIS. 



Thomas Ellis, who carries on general agricultural pursuits on section 24, 
Shelton township, was born in Dubuque county, Iowa, on the 2d of March, 1862, 
his parents being Edward and Mary (Loomis) Ellis. The father was probably 
a native of the United States, although his parents came from England. The 
mother was born in Erie county, Pennsylvania, and became the wife of Stephen 
J. McKee, with whom she came to Nebraska in 1865. She lived for a short time 
in Hall county, and afterward removed to Buffalo county. Mr. McKee died in 
Hall county in 1878. Her third husband was William Fines, who died about 
1891. Mrs. Fines survives and now resides in Shelton. 

Thomas Ellis was three years of age when brought by his mother to Nebraska, 
and was educated in the district schools but attended for only a part of three 
terms. He began farming on his own account in 1881, when he put in his first 
crop, but in that year he raised more foxtail than he did wheat and he worked 
all the following winter on the section in order to pay his bills. In the spring of 
1882 he went to Colorado, where he was employed through the summer in a 
stone quarry at Lyons. In the fall he again came to Buffalo county and the fol- 
lowing spring resumed farming. In 1887 he purchased the Ash Way farm in 
Shelton township of one hundred and forty acres and later bought an additional 
tract of eighty acres, but during the widespread financial panic of 1893, like thou- 
sands of others, he was unable to make his payments upon his property. There- 
fore he again had to resort to renting, but in the spring of 1898 he once more 
made a financial start that enabled him to purchase two hundred and twenty- 
three acres of his present farm. He has since resided thereon, concentrating his 
energies upon the further development and improvement of his place, which is 
pleasantly situated on section 24, Shelton township. He concentrates his efforts 
upon the cultivation and development of his fields and as the years have gone by 



76 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

has made changes which have transformed his place mto one of the excellent 
farm properties of the county. 

On the 28th of March, 1885, Mr. Ellis was united in marriage to Miss Julia 
Spicer, of Hall county, Nebraska, by whom he has seven children, as follows : 
Glen and Harvey, both at home; Bertha, who is the wife of Charles Ketner, of 
Shelton, Nebraska ; Adrian ; and George, Clarence and Grace, all yet under the 
parental roof. 

In politics Mr. Ellis is independent, voting for men and measures rather than 
party. Fraternally he is identified with Shelton Lodge, No. 141, I. O. O. F., 
and Shelton Lodge, No. 92, K. P. He has a wide acquaintance not only in 
lodge circles but through other connections and is regarded as one of the substan- 
tial business men and representative citizens of Buffalo county. 



CHARLES BISHOP. 



Charles Bishop is one of the most venerable and highly honored citizens of 
Kearney. He has now attained the advanced age of eighty-six years and the 
precious prize of keen mentality is his, for his mind is clear, his memory good 
and he keeps well informed on the questions, issues and interests of the day. 
He is a retired farmer, having been identified with general agricultural pursuits 
for a long period. His birth occurred in Kennebec county, Maine, on the i8th 
of January, 1830, his parents being Squire and Hannah (Morey) Bishop. The 
father, a native of Maine, was a shoemaker by trade and also a farmer and spent 
his entire life in the Pine Tree state, where he passed away at the age of seventy- 
seven years. His parents were Jesse and Patience (Titus) Bishop and the 
ancestral line can be traced back to Edward Bishop, of Salem, Massachusetts, 
who came from England to the new world in 1639. The mother of Charles 
Bishop was born in Sandwich, Massachusetts, but was reared in Maine and spent 
the greater part of her life in that state. 

Charles Bishop spent his boyhood days at home, receiving the usual training 
of the farm lad. He attended the subscription schools and in his youth assisted 
his father. He afterward w^orked at putting on soles on shoes near Boston for 
about three years and in the spring of 1852 he made the trip by way of the water 
route to California and spent some time in the mines at Coloma. He engaged 
in prospecting and in surface mining and was fairly successful, devoting four 
and one-half years to that business. In 1857 he returned home and the proceeds 
of his labor amounted to two thousand dollars, which he carried with him in 
gold. 

In the spring of 1858 Mr. Bishop removed westward to Shelby county, Mis- 
souri, and purchased a farm in Macon county, after which he carried on general 
agricultural pursuits until September 15, 1862, when he offered his services to the 
government, enlisting at St. Louis as a member of Company A, Twenty-seventh 
Missouri Volunteer Infantry. He was soon afterward made an ambulance] 
driver and acted in that capacity until mustered out on the 22d of July, 1865,; 
following the close of the war. He had rendered valuable aid to his country in| 
that connection and his military record was a commendable one. 




CHARLES BISHOP 



I 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 79 

With the close of the war Mr. Bishop returned to his farm in Macon county, 
where he carried on general agricultural pursuits until the fall of 1874, when he 
sold his property there and came to Nebraska, settling on section 4, Divide town- 
ship, Buffalo county. With characteristic energy he began to develop and till 
the soil and carried on his farm work with growing success year by year until 
the spring of 1899, when he rented his farm and came to Kearney, where he is 
now living retired. 

On the 9th of December, 1858, Mr. Bishop was married to Miss Mary Trott, 
who was born in Ohio, July 2^, 1837. She removed to Missouri in 1858 with 
her father and her death occurred on the 17th of January, 1894. She held mem- 
bership in the Methodist Episcopal church and was a most active worker in both 
church and Sunday school in an early day. By her marriage she became the 
mother of eight children, as follows: William G., who follows farming in 
Rusco township; EHzabeth, who is the wife of A. H. Tandy, of Oskaloosa, Iowa; 
Francis H., a resident of Nelson, Nebraska, and a conductor on the Rock Island 
Railway ; Mattie, who gave her hand in marriage to F. P. Wilsie and passed away 
at the age of twenty-eight years, leaving three sons; Anna M., at home; Charles 
E., who rents his father's farm; Mabel, who is the wife of Albert Gravley, of 
Pleasanton, Buffalo county; and Mamie, who gave her hand in marriage to 
Charles Gravley, of Pleasanton, Nebraska. 

In his political views Mr. Bishop is a republican and was one of the first sup- 
porters of the party. He served as school treasurer for several years and also 
as township treasurer and has always been interested in the welfare, progress 
and upbuilding of his community. He belongs to the Methodist Episcopal church 
and to its teachings his life has conformed in all respects. He is a member of 
Sedgwick Post, No. i, G. A. R., of Kearney and thus maintains pleasant relations 
with his old military comrades. He has always been as true and loyal to his 
country and the old flag in times of peace as he was when he followed the 
nation's starry banner upon the battlefields of the south. 



CHAUNCEY COOK. 



Chauncey Cook, a well known and highly esteemed farmer living on section 
5, Shelton township, Buffalo county, was born in Otsego county. New York, on 
the 6th of October, 1861. His parents, Chauncey and Lucy B. (Allen) Cook, 
were likewise natives of that county but were married in Erie county, Pennsyl- 
vania, where the mother had removed with her parents when a girl. Following 
their marriage they located on a farm in Otsego county, New York, where the 
father passed away on the 5th of February, 1875. Five years later the mother 
and three sons came west to Buffalo county, Nebraska, and she purchased the 
farm which our subject now owns. She passed away on the 8th of April, 1889. 

Chauncey Cook was reared at home and received his education in the com- 
mon schools of New York. He accompanied his mother to this county and fol- 
lowing her demise inherited the home farm, which he is still operating. He 
has lived upon that place ever since his arrival in this county thirty-five years 
ago and before it came into his possession he assisted in its cultivation. The 



80 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

improvements upon the farm are substantial and modern, and the residence is 
one of the most attractive and convenient farm homes in the township. He 
devotes his undivided attention to the farm Avork, and his well directed labors 
are rewarded by a gratifying financial return. 

On the i8th of July, 1900, Mr. Cook was united in marriage to Miss Ella 
Nixon, a resident of Kearney, Nebraska, but a native of Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania, whence she came to Buffalo county with her parents. Mr. and Mrs. Cook 
have four children : Walter, who is attending the Shelton high school ; Daphne 
A., who is attending the district school; Leland N. ; and Ralph. 

Mr, Cook indorses the principles of the democratic party and supports its 
candidates at the polls. He is now servang for the second term as assessor of 
Shelton township and is making a highly creditable record in that capacity. He 
belongs to Shelton Lodge, No. 141, L O. O. F. In developing his farm he has 
promoted the agricultural interests of the county and in so doing has contributed 
to its prosperity, as it derives its greatest wealth from its rich land. 



H. F. FLINT. 



H, F. Flint is identified with financial circles as president of the Exchange 
Bank of Gibbon and with agricultural interests as the owner of an excellent farm 
ot two hundred and forty acres. His birth occurred in Vermont on the 25th of 
January, 1845, and he is a son of Calvin and Dollie (Delano) Flint, both of 
whom were born in Connecticut, but were married in Vermont, where they 
passed the remainder of their lives. Our subject is the only one now living of 
their family of eight children. He grew to manhood in his native state and 
there received his education. When twenty-three years of age he went to Ohio, 
whence in 1876, he came to Buft'alo county, Nebraska. 

After engaging in the cattle business for four years Mr. Flint sold out and 
became a dealer in coal and implements at Gibbon but five years later disposed 
of that business and entered the employ of the Gibbon Bank, of which he was 
cashier for four months. At the end of that time he and J. H. Davis organized 
a bank known as the James H. Davis & Company Bank, of which Mr. Flint was 
cashier for six years. He and Mr. Davis next organized the First National Bank 
of Gibbon with a paid up capital of fifty thousand dollars, and for five years Mr. 
Flint was cashier of that institution. The First National Bank was then discon- 
tinued, but Mr. Davis and Mr. Flint remained factors in financial circles, organ- 
izing the Exchange Bank, of which oiir subject is now the president. His long 
experience in connection with banking eminently qualifies him to direct the affairs 
of the institution, which has gained the confidence of the public and is accorded 
a large and representative patronage. He owns an interest in the bank building 
and also holds title to two hundred and forty acres of good land in Buffalo county, 
from which he derives a substantial addition to his income. 

In 1869 occurred the marriage of Mr. Flint and Miss Susan H. Whitney, who 
was born in Vermont, and they became the parents of twin daughters, Nettie and 
Nellie, the latter of whom died at the age of seven and a half years. Nettie 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 81 

became the wife of R. A. St. John and died in 1902, leaving an infant son, 
Horace F. St. John, who makes his home with our subject and his wife., 

Mr. FHnt is a member of the Odd Fellows lodge at Gibbon, in which he has 
filled all the chairs, and he is also identified with the Ancient Order of United 
Workmen. He takes the interest of a good citizen in public affairs, although not 
an aspirant for office. Both he and his wife attend the Methodist Episcopal 
church. That he is now one of the substantial men of his community is due 
not to any good fortune or unusually favoring circumstances but to his enterprise, 
industry and foresight. 



ERNEST STEVEN HILL. 

Ernest Steven Hill is a member of the firm of Hill Brothers, general mer- 
chants at Riverdale, and is a wide-awake, enterprising business man, alert to 
opportunities pointing to success, guided in all that he does by latidable ambition, 
while his efiforts are characterized by both enterprise and business integrity. He 
was born September 28, 1875, in Riverdale, his parents being Cosmo S. and 
Mary J. (Delano) Hill. The father was born in Bethel, Vermont, in 1848, and 
was a son of Steven Hill, also a native of the Green Mountain state. Removing 
to the west, C. S. Hill established his home upon a farm near Riverdale and it 
was upon that property that Ernest S. Hill spent his boyhood and youth, obtain- 
ing his education in the district schools of the town in which he now resides. He 
continued at home until 1898, when he purchased a farm of eighty acres on sec- 
tion 32, Divide township. This was a tract of partially improved land but with 
characteristic energy he began its further development and cultivation and trans- 
formed it into productive fields. He now rents the farm to a tenant, while in 
1910 he retired from active agricultural life and purchased the interest of J. E. 
Nelson in the firm of Hill & Nelson, general merchants of Riverdale, thus joining 
his brother in the conduct of an enterprise which is now carried on under the 
style of Hill Brothers. They have a large and carefully selected stock, thus 
meeting the demands and varied taste of their customers and in all they do they 
display close conformity to the highest standards of commercial ethics. 

On the 31st of December, 1899, Mr. Hill was married to Miss Gertrude 
Whitney, a daughter of W. A. and Martha Whitney, of Riverdale. She was born 
in Illinois and came to Riverdale when four years of age. By her marriage she 
has become the mother of two children : Herbert E., now in school ; and Bernice, 
three years of age. 

The parents hold membership in the Christian church in Riverdale and gener- 
ously contribute to its support, while in its work they take an active and helpful 
interest. Mr. Hill belongs to Modern Woodman Camp, No. 1072, and served 
as its clerk in 1899. He has also passed through all of the chairs in Riverdale 
Lodge No. 352, I. O. O. F. His wife is a member of the Royal Neighbors and 
the Rebekah degree of Odd Fellows, and for many years has been camp clerk 
of the Royal Neighbors and is still filling that position. Mr. Hill has been called 
to several local offices. He is treasurer of Riverdale township, having been 
elected in 19 14 for a two years' term and for several years he has been a member 



82 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

of the district school board in the same district in which he attended school and 
in which his children are now pupils. His entire Hfe has been spent in this 
locality and the fact that many of his stanchest friends are those who have 
known him from his early boyhood is indicative of the fact that his has been an 
honorable career, and that his saHent characteristics are such as commend him 
to the confidence, high regard and friendship of all. 



JOSEPH C. SAYLOR. 

Joseph C. Saylor, who is a member of the Buffalo county bar, came to 
Kearney, Nebraska, from Chicago, Illinois, in the year 1905. He was born near 
Lexington, Kentucky, August 5, 1877, O" ^ farm, which his parents still own. 
•In that state, he received his public school education. After finishing high school, 
he taught two years in the public schools, after which he attended school at the 
State University of Kentucky for two years. Again he taught another term. 
He then went to Valparaiso (Indiana) University to attend school and there, 
after two years more, he finished the regular scientific course in 1900. The fol- 
lowing year he did post-graduate work. 

Mr. Saylor then took up the study of law and in the year 1904 finished the 
course, and also took his degree in elocution and oratory, which course he had 
pursued some of the time through his regular literary course and in his post- 
graduate year. He also did special work in Georgetown College and in Chicago 
University. He made his home in Chicago from 1898 to 1905. 

On the 2d of June, 1904, Mr. Saylor was united in marriage to Miss Huldah 
V. Ericson, of Kearney, Nebraska, who was his schoolmate in the literary depart- 
ment at Valparaiso University, finishing her scientific course in 1901 and her 
classic course, and post-graduate work in the year 1904, and who for two years 
was principal of the Red Cloud high school, teaching history, English and German ' 
and who is now a prominent club and church worker in Kearney. She was elected 
president of the Nineteenth Century Club for 1916. 

Mr. Saylor practiced law at Red Cloud, Nebraska, from 1905 to 1910, where 
his splendid qualifications and industry rapidly took him from, a small beginning 
to a position among the highest and best of the attorneys of the Webster county 
•bar. During this period he gave some little time to politics, being secretary of 
the republican central committee in 1907, chairman of the same the year follow- 
ing, then a member of the state executive committee and congressional delegate to 
the national convention of Taft Clubs at Cincinnati in 1908. He made forty 
speeches for the national republican ticket in Illinois and Kentucky in 1904, while 
yet a student at the university. Also in 1908, under the auspices of the repub- 
lican central committee, he stumped the greater part of the sixth congressional dis- 
trict of Nebraska for the republican candidates. He has shown much ability asj 
a public speaker, having been in demand for such work, and having delivered] 
several Decoration Day speeches and addresses on other such occasions. 

But in 1910, Mr. Saylor decided to move to a larger and better territory, where] 
he could have greater opportunities for the practice of his profession. So he and] 
Mrs. Saylor returned to Kearney where they have since resided. Since coming toj 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 85 

Kearney, Mr. Saylor has given his entire time to the practice of law and is 
devotedly attached to his chosen profession. He prepares his cases with pre- 
cision and care, is methodical in habit, diligent in research and conscientious in 
the discharge of every duty. He has made rapid advancement, being now 
accorded a large clientage that connects him with much important litigation, and 
having a practice second to none in this territory. 

In his political views, as we have indicated, Mr. Saylor is a republican, and 
while he is decidedly not an office seeker, takes much interest in, and keeps well 
informed on, the questions and issues of the day. He is a member of the Com- 
mercial Club and takes an active interest in matters pertaining to the develop- 
ment of his home city and the territory around. He is also a member of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, being past grand of that organization, and 
is a member of other lodges. In religious beliefs, he is a Baptist and his aid 
and influence are given on the side of development and improvement along many 
lines having to do with the welfare of both the individual and the community. 



CHARLES KRASSMAN. 

Charles Krassman, chairman of 'the board of supervisors, has in the dis- 
charge of his official duties displayed a recognition of public needs and oppor- 
tunities and has worked earnestly and effectively toward upholding the public 
good. He is a native of the kingdom of Prussia, his birth occurring on the 
28th of March, 1846. He was seven years of age when his parents, Charles 
and Elizabeth (Schultz) Krassman, came to the new world, crossing the Atlantic 
on board a sailing vessel which required seven weeks and six days to make the 
voyage. Upon arrival in this country the family lived in Chicago for about 
four months and then removed to Galena, Illinois, where the father worked 
at the carpenter's trade, he and his wife spending their remaining days at that 
place. They were the parents of five children, of whom three passed away in 
Germany, and one in Chicago, Illinois, leaving Charles Krassman as the only 
surviving member. He was reared in Galena, Illinois, acquired a common school 
education and afterwards at Galena learned the harness maker's trade, follow- 
ing that occupation for a number of years. He was well acquainted with General 
U. S. Grant, who at that time was practically unknown to the world, and he pur- 
chased a part of the furniture of the Grant home when the future general 
and president broke up housekeeping at Galena. 

For his first wife Charles Krassman chose Miss Adelia Barthold, and to 
them were born four children, Ernest, Elizabeth, August and Charles. The wife 
and mother passed away in 1872 and for his second wife Mr. Krassman chose 
Miss Frances Nealand, by whom he has four children, Mary, William, Albert 
and Bertha. His third and present wife was Mrs. Fanny Newberry. 

From Galena Mr. Krassman removed to Cedar Falls, Iowa, about 188 1, and 
there resided until 1884, when he came to Kearney. Here he has lived practically 
throughout the intervening period to the present time. Upon his arrival Kearney 
was but an overgrown village, containing but three brick buildings, a little 
board sidewalk and no paving or lighting system. Mr. Krassman began working 



86 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

at his trade for W. A. Downing, with whom he remained for a quarter of a 
century, and he still follows his trade, being a well known workman in his line. ■■ 
His life has been one of untiring industry and thrift, and whatever success he 
has achieved is attributable entirely to his own efforts. 

In politics ]\Ir. Krassman is a republican, having always given stalwart 
allegiance to the party since age brought him the right of franchise. In 1908 
he was elected a member of the county board of supervisors, serving for 
two years, and in 1910 he was reelected and served for another two years. 
For the third time he was chosen to the position, and the legislative enactment 
of 1913, whereby the county officers held over for one year longer than the 
specified term of two years, made his total service in this connection seven 
years. In January, 1915, he was elected chairman of the board and is now 
acting in that capacity, in which connection he is directing the work of public 
improvement in the county and managing the various details of the county's 
business. In religious faith he is a Protestant and fraternally he is identified 
with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 



LESTER M. STEARNS, M. D. 

Dr. Lester M. Stearns, city physician of Kearney and one well qualified by 
thorough study and broad reading for the onerous and responsible duties of 
the profession, has attained considerable prominence in his chosen field. Aside 
from serving as city physician, he is the secretary of the Bufi"alo County Medical 
Society and is medical superintendent of the Nebraska State Tubercular Hospital 
at Kearney. 

Mr. Stearns was born in Chicago, November 16, 1883, and was there reared 
and educated, supplementing his early training received in the public schools by 
a course in the Lewis Institute of that city. He afterward attended the College 
of Physicians and Surgeons at Chicago, from which institution he was gradu- 
ated in June, 1905. For two years he was physician at the West Side Hospital 
in Chicago and was also a member of the staff of the Oak Park liospital and 
dispensary physician of the Chicago Clinical School. In 1909 he went abroad 
for post-graduate work in Vienna and had the benefit of instruction under some 
of the most eminent physicians and surgeons of the old world. He became a 
resident of Kearney in 1908 and here entered upon the general practice of sur- 
gery, in which he displayed marked ability. He has comprehensive knowledge of 
anatomy and the component parts of the human body, recognizes the onslaughts 
made upon it by disease and displays great care, delicacy and precision in the 
performance of needed operations. For two years he served as physician at the 
State Hospital of Kearney and was county coroner for three years. 

On the 20th of June, 1906, Dr. Stearns was married to Miss Rosine D. 
Alspaugh, a native of Indiana. Fraternally he is connected with the Masonic, 
Elks and Knights of Pythias lodges at Kearney. He is a member of the Buft'alo 
County Medical Society, and, as stated, is serving as its secretary. He also 
belongs to the Nebraska State Medical Association and to the American Medical 
Association, and through attendance at their sessions as well as by wide reading 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 87 

keeps in touch with the advanced thought of the profession. He votes with 
the democratic party but has held no office outside the strict path of his pro- 
fession and prefers to concentrate his energies upon his duties as a physician 
and surgreon. 



W. L. RANDALL. 



W. L. Randall is prominent in public affairs of Gibbon and Buffalo county 
and has also been a factor in the business development of his town, as he is 
conducting a general store there. A native of Ohio, his birth occurred on the 
5th of September, i860, and he is a son of John D. and Jane (Beatty) Randall, 
the former born in Connecticut and the latter in Ohio. They were married in the 
Buckeye state, whence, in 1878, they removed to Buffalo county, Nebraska. They 
took up their residence upon a farm in this county and continued to live there 
until called by death. Five of their seven children survive. 

W. L. Randall was reared at home and received his education in the common 
schools of Ohio. After the removal of the family to this county he concentrated 
his energies upon assisting his father in the farm work and was so occupied until 
1886. He then entered the creamery business in Gibbon, but after two years 
turned his attention to merchandising, forming a partnership with his father- 
in-law. Captain R. Westcott. The firm owned and conducted two stores^ one at 
Gibbon and one at Wood River, our subject being in charge of the latter, but in 
1891 he sold out his mercantile interests and removed to Lincoln, Nebraska, where 
for two years he taught in the Lincoln Business College. He was then for six 
months in the employ of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad as operator 
and later held a similar position with the Union Pacific Railroad for four years. 
In 1898 he reentered the mercantile field and for six years conducted a store in 
Gibbon but at the end of that time traded that business for a stock ranch. After 
selling that property he was manager for one year of the Farmers Department 
Store at Gothenburg, Nebraska. He then returned to Gibbon and has since 
owned and managed one of the best and most-up-to-date general stores in the 
county. His large stock of goods, his courteous service and reliable business 
methods all commend him to the support of the public, and he has built up a large 
and lucrative patronage. 

Mr. Randall was married in 1882 to i\Iiss Emma May Westcott, who was 
born in Iowa of the marriage of Captain R. and Mary Westcott, both of whom 
are deceased. Her father served as a soldier of the Civil war and Mr. Randall's 
father also took part in that struggle and in the war with Mexico. Both men 
crossed the plains with ox teams during the gold excitement in the west. Mr. and 
Mrs. Randall have become the parents of seven children, namely : Frances, now 
the wife of L. T. Osborn, of Gibbon; Ruby and Ruth, twins, both of whom are 
dead ; one who died in infancy, unnamed ; Rex R., who is associated with his 
father in business ; and Gerald and Donald, both at home. 

Mr. Randall is a loyal supporter of the republican party and has been called 
to the office of mayor. He is at the present time serving as a member of the 
school board, as chief of the fire department, as deputy state fire marshal, and as 



88 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

town clerk and is proving thoroughly capable in the discharge of his varied 
duties. Fraternally he holds membership in Gibbon Lodge, No. 37, L O. O. F. ; 
Excalibar Lodge, No. 138, K. P.; and Gibbon Lodge, No. 35, A. O. U. W., and 
in those organizations has passed through all the chairs. His wife is a member of 
the Presbyterian church and takes a praiseworthy interest in its work. He gives 
the closest attention to his business affairs but has never forgotten that it is the 
duty of every good citizen to concern himself for the public welfare and has 
always done his share in promoting the advancement and development of his 
community along various lines. 



WILL A. TARBELL. 



Will A. Tarbell makes his home in Kearney, but is actively identified with 
agricultural and stock raising interests, being the owner of four hundred acres 
of excellent land in Hamilton and Dawson counties. He was born July 15, 1853, 
in Mason, Hillsboro county. New Hampshire. His father, William Tarbell, also 
a native of that place, was born August 11, 1823, and was a son of Lemuel 
Tarbell, likewise a native of Mason, where his father, Thomas Tarbell, settled at a 
very early period in colonial days, the latter's ancestors coming from Wales to 
America some time between 1620 and 1630. When the colonies attemped to throw 
off the yoke of British oppression Lemuel Tarbell joined the American troops and 
served in the Revolutionary war. He married Lydia Warren, a descendant of 
General Warren, who fought at the battle of Bunker Hill. William Tarbell 
followed the occupation of farming in Hillsboro county, New Hampshire, and 
there met and later in Boston wedded Mary A. Miller, who was born in Albany, 
New York, January 11, 1828, a daughter of John Miller, a native of the Empire 
state. Her mother, Matilda Hillyard, who was born at Rutland, Vermont, in 
1795, lived in the Green Mountain state for about eighty years and then took up 
her abode in xA.drian, Michigan, where she passed away in 1879. In the family 
of Mr. and Mrs. William Tarbell were six children, four sons and two daughters, 
four of whom are yet living, namely: Will A., of this review; Eugene M., a 
stockman residing at Lexington, Nebraska ; Clarence E., a contractor who makes 
his home at Olney Springs, Colorado ; and Emily E., who is the wife of James 
A-. West, a contractor and builder of Fremont, Nebraska. 

Will A. Tarbell was but four years of age when his parents left the old home 
in the Granite state and removed to Hillsdale, Michigan, where the father pur- 
chased some timber land and improved a farm, making his home there until 1887, 
when he sold that property and went to Fremont, Nebraska. His son and name- 
sake worked on the farm in Hillsdale county, Michigan, and at odd times was 
employed by neighboring farmers. His education was acquired in the district 
schools of that locality and in early youth he learned the value of industry and 
determination as factors in the attainment of success. In September, 1882, he 
left his father's farm and went to Fremont, Nebraska, where he secured a posi- 
tion as salesman with D. Crowell, a coal and lumber merchant, with whom he 
continued until January i, 1887, when he was appointed agent for the Nye, 
Wilson, Morehouse Company, which was extensively engaged in the coal, lum- 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 89 

ber, grain and live stock business at Davey, Nebraska, twelve miles north of 
Lincoln. He continued in that connection for four years, or until 1891, after 
which he purchased a grain and live stock business at Marquette, Nebraska, 
where he operated until the spring of 1906. He then moved to Kearney, Buf- 
falo county, and sold his business at Marquette. The money from this sale 
was invested in four hundred acres of land in Hamilton and Dawson counties 
and he is now superintending the raising, shipping and feeding of stock upon 
that ranch, although he makes his home in Kearney. He specializes in the rais- 
ing of Duroc Jersey hogs and is one of the prominent representatives of the 
business in this part of the state, carefully and wisely directing his interests, so 
that excellent results accrue. 

On the 20th of February, 1890, in Fremont, Nebraska, Mr. Tarbell was united 
in marriage to Miss Sue Roseman, a daughter of Edward D. and Mary T. 
Roseman. Mrs. Tarbell is a member of the Methodist church. Mr. Tarbell is 
serving on the board of the Carnegie library of Kearney and is always interested 
in public affairs relating to the welfare and improvement of the community. He 
usually votes the republican ticket but considers the capability and character of 
the candidate and he always favors the temperance cause, doing everything 
in his power to promote temperance principles. His life has been honorable 
and upright. Manly and sincere at all times, he has enjoyed the respect, confi- 
dence and good will of his fellowmen and by well directed activity in business 
affairs he has attained creditable and desirable success, ultimately winning a 
place among the substantial citizens of his adopted county. 



RAYMOND L. HART, M. D. 

Dr. Raymond L. Hart, actively engaged in the general practice of medicine 
at Amherst and also figuring prominently in business circles as the vice president 
of the First National Bank there, was born in Meigs county, Ohio, August 6, 
1872, his parents being James and Elizabeth J. (Hayes) Hart, the former a 
native of New Jersey and the latter of Ohio, in which state they were married. 
Having removed to Ohio, James Hart there enlisted for service in the Civil war 
as a member of the Eighteenth Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He lost his eyesight 
while with the army, although he later recovered it. When his son Raymond 
was ten years of age he removed with the family to Nebraska, settling in Fair- 
fi.eld. Clay county, where his remaining days were passed, his death there occur- 
ring three years ago. 

Dr. Hart was reared upon the old homestead farm in Clay county until he 
was fifteen years of age, but, not wishing to follow the occupation of farming, 
he determined upon a professional career, and with that end in view, after having 
been employed in a drug store for some time, he entered the medical department 
of the State University of Iowa, in which he completed a course by graduation on 
the 1st of March, 1897. On the 22d of October of the same year he located 
for practice in Amherst, where he has since remained, and during the nineteen 
years which have since elapsed his professional progress and advancement have 
been continuous, as wide reading and study have kept him in touch with the 



90 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 



general trend of improvement in methods of medical and surgical practice. He 
is a member of the Buffalo County, the Nebraska State and the American Med- 
ical Associations. Aside from his practice his business interests connect him 
with the First National Bank of Amherst, of which he is the vice president. 

Dr. Hart was united in marriage to Miss Lottie Crable, a native of Nebraska 
and a daughter of David Crable. They have one child, Helen Dorothea. Dr. 
Flart belongs to the Modern Woodmen Camp of Amherst, and in Masonic circles 
has attained high rank. Lie holds membership with the lodge at Miller and 
with the chapter and commandery at Kearney, and he exemplifies in his life 
the beneficent spirit of the craft, which is based upon a recognition of the 
brotherhood of mankind and of the obligations thereby imposed. 



LION. FRANCIS GREGG HAMER. 



Hon. Francis Gregg Hamer, of Kearney, is serving as a judge of the supreme 
court of the state, and is regarded as one of the most capable jurists who has 
ever graced the court of last resort, the profession acknowledging him the peer 
of any member .of the appellate court. His decisions indicate strong mentality, 
a careful analysis, a thorough knowledge of the law, patient examination of 
the case and an unbiased judgment. His has been a life of usefulness stretching 
out from the pioneer period in Nebraska's history to the present era of advance- 
ment and progress. Throughout the years his influence has been a potent force 
in advancing material, intellectual and moral progress. 

A native of Ohio, Judge Hamer was born in Seneca county on the 20th of 
February, 1843, ^"^1 is the eldest of a family of four children whose parents were 
Francis and Mary (Mahan) Hamer, both of whom were born near Canton, 
Ohio. The father was a farmer by occupation and in following agricultural 
pursuits provided for the support of his family. His first wife died about 1852. 
Shortly afterward he removed to Indiana and settled in Carroll county near the 
place where the village of Flora was afterward built. After the lapse of two 
years he married Airs. Rebecca Stoops and they became the parents of three 
children. He was a man of marked diligence and unusual industry, which quali- 
ties enabled him to accumulate a competence. He gave each of his children a 
small farm or its equivalent in other property. He enjoyed but ordinary educa- 
tional privileges but being a wide reader he became unusually well informed and 
was a man of liberal and progressive views. He and his two brothers, David and 
Daniel, were active in the affairs of the neighborhood and particularly in all 
matters of public interest. They led at the neighborhood debates of whatever 
character they might be, and Indiana is a state where public discussion is com- 
mon. He died in his eighty-third year, known to all in his locality for his broadj 
and kindly spirit and his desire to help those who were unable to help themselves. 

Francis G. Hamer obtained something of the rudiments of an education ir 
his native state. Lie was quite a speller and reader although at the time of the! 
removal he was a little less than ten years of age. Since he was large enough! 
he began to work with his father and uncles in clearing the little farms which] 
they owned. He could soon cut down trees and pick brush. He also helped tol 




U'y\.CK^A^^^J^^^^ y_ 7/?7Ut^i/\ X/l 




fu,^A.^^<^^c^^. 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 93 

pile up the logs and to burn them off the ground. He assisted in planting and 
harvesting the crops. The first year after arriving at the Indiana home he fol- 
lowed his father who cut the wheat with a cradle. He raked the wheat up in 
bundles and one of the uncles bound it. A few years later the father and the 
uncles had cleared enough of the land so as to give employment in cutting the 
wheat crop to seven or eight cradlers. At the age of sixteen he attended school 
at Delphi, the county seat. There were fifty young men and young women in 
the advanced grade. Subsequently he attended school near Springfield, Illinois, 
for the period of eighteen months. He there frequently saw Abraham Lincoln 
on the streets of Springfield. At the end of this time he returned home and was 
employed as a district school teacher within three miles of where his father lived. 
He taught during a period covering three winters. In this he was reasonably 
successful and took great pride in it. When he returns now to the old neigh- 
borhood where he was reared he still visits the pupils of the old district school 
where he taught. When he was twenty years old he went to Indianapolis and 
became a student in the law oftice of George K. Perrin and William R. Manlove. 
Later he continued his legal education in the law school at Indianapolis. He 
was one of forty-five students, some of whom have become quite distinguished 
in their profession. 

Judge Hamer attributes much of his success to the fact that he became a mem- 
ber of a literary and debating society when he was at the age of eighteen years. 
He continued in that society until he reached the age of twenty-six. There were 
several men in the society who were then prominent, and others who afterward 
became successful. There was one general, one colonel, one lecturer, two editors, 
several lawyers and a group of young men who became successful politicians 
and preachers. It was the habit in that society to investigate and talk about the 
questions which were then of interest to the public. Often these debates were 
very spirited. Judge Hamer became a debater early in life and is of the opinion 
that his experience in the debating society has very much assisted him in his 
eft"orts as a trial lawyer. 

Judge Hamer came to Nebraska in December, 1869. He was in Omaha a 
short time and then went to Lincoln. It was January 7, 1870, when he arrived at 
Lincoln. There he at once entered upon the active work of his profession. It 
only took him about six months to acquire a business which enabled him to live 
in a modest way. He continued to live at Lincoln until the 29th of June, 1872, 
when he came to Kearney, which at that time had no existence except on the 
map. It was a place yet to be. On December 6, 1869, Judge Hamer was mar- 
ried to Miss Rebecca A. McCord of Delphi, Indiana. Up to the time that Judge 
Hamer went on the supreme bench he gave a great deal of his time to building 
up the city of Kearney. He was the first lawyer to locate here, and he imme- 
diately began to work industriously for the town. He was soon a very busy 
lawyer. He was employed in nearly all the important cases in the western part 
of the state. Much of his business came from other lawyers who secured him 
to assist in the trial of their cases. He was diligent to study the evidence before 
the case was tried. He saw the witnesses, if possible, and ascertained what they 
were likely to swear to. If their testimony was probably unfriendly he did all 
that he could to anticipate it. He saw the witnesses on the other side. He also 
studied the law of the case with great energy. However forcible others might 



94 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

be there were none more forcible than he. Every contest was like a boxing 
match. If the case was a close one and only an application of the law might win 
it he was full of research and ingenuity. He has always displayed remarkable 
clearness of expression and an adequate and precise diction which enabled him 
to make the courts and the juries understand the salient points of his arguments. 
He was full of a fine gradation of meaning and was generally able to make a 
dictinction between the case which he represented and the one which was cited 
against him. He has been engaged in the trial of all kinds of cases. He was at 
first famous in the trial of criminal cases where he appeared for the defense, but 
subsequently he tried many civil cases and in these civil cases, often to be won 
by the application of some legal principle not clearly understood, he was almost 
universally successful. He would find a new application of the law for which 
he would never cease to contend. He was nearly always capable of reversing 
the judgment of the district court when that court was against him. He would 
find some sort of substantial error that entitled him to a new trial. He could 
work agreeably with almost any lawyer. While he had plenty of self-respect 
he did not appear to be vain. If the other lawyer was against him he tried to 
beat him and then made friends with him. He was not always successful in the 
case, but he nearly always made a friend of the lawyer. 

In December, 1883, he was appointed judge of the district court of the tenth 
judicial district of Nebraska to fill a vacancy caused by the death of the Hon. 
Samuel L. Savidge. He immediately plunged into the work of this district. It 
was about three hundred miles long by one hundred and fifty miles wide. In 
1884 he was elected to fill out the unexpired term and was afterward reelected 
in 1888. He served as district judge a little more than eight years. Prior to this 
he had been a candidate for the nomination for supreme judge of the state. He 
was the high man in the contest until the last ballot gave a narrow majority to 
the Hon. Manoah B. Reese, who has since been chief justice and who served two 
terms on the supreme bench. In the fall of 1891 he was defeated by Silas A. 
Holcomb by an official vote of thirteen, Mr. Holcomb serving as judge three 
years, and then becoming governor of the state. Judge Hamer then resumed his 
practice as a lawyer and immediately built up a splendid business. He went 
all over the state and tried contested cases in very many of the important county 
seats. In the fall of 191 1 he was elected as a member of the supreme bench, and 
in January, 191 2, entered upon his present term of office. He is devotedly 
attached to the profession of the law. He is systematic and methodical in his 
habits. He is always a sober man and conscientious in the discharge of his duty 
as a judge. While he is inflexibly just and is ready to punish the guilty, he is 
never inclined to be severe against those who have not been properly convicted. 
In such cases his tendency is to reverse the judgment of the district court so 
that the man who has been mistreated may get a fair trial. His reported opinions 
show a careful study of the evidence and the law applicable to the case, together 
with profound legal learning, superior ability and impartial judgment. 

Judge and Mrs. Hamer have become parents of a son and daughter: Thomas 
Francis, a prominent member of the Kearney bar and a busy trial lawyer; and 
Grace Julia, the wife of Jacob Kanzler, a lawyer of Portland, Oregon. In poli- 
tics Judge Hamer has always been a republican. He formerly loved hunting 
and was an expert rifle shot, but in his later years he has given this up because 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 95 

of his growing dislike to deprive any living thing of life. He is inclined to make 
friends of the younger members of the bar and ready to lend a helping hand 
where he may properly do so. 



MRS. REBECCA A. HAMER. 

Mrs. Rebecca A. Hamer, wife of Francis G. Hamer, has had much of the 
life of a pioneer. She was born and reared at Delphi, Indiana, where she became 
a teacher and was so engaged up to the time of her marriage. Her father was 
a successful farmer and one of the substantial men of the neighborhood in which 
he lived. His name was William McCord. He was the father of two sons and 
six daughters. 

Mrs. Hamer was a homesteader with her husband. It was not properly a 
homestead but a preemption. It consisted of one hundred and sixty acres north- 
west of Kearney and extending down to within a mile and a half of the postoffice. 
It was a small house that was built on this land. At the end of nineteen months 
Mrs. Hamer and her husband left the claim and moved to the new home they 
had built in Kearney. 

Mrs. Hamer has given considerable time to the care of her two children, 
Thomas Francis and Grace Julia. She had a mother's anxiety for their success 
and to that end she instructed and advised them. She was full of entertainment 
and talked to them in such a way as to claim their attention and win their con- 
fidence. They still rely upon her as the good mother whom they may always 
trust. In all the years they have lived together she has been a loyal and com- 
petent assistant to her husband. By her sterling qualities she has won the con- 
fidence and goodwill of her neighbors. 



WILLIAM SHRADER. 



William Shrader, an alert and enterprising farmer of Garfield township, 
living on section 24, was born in Wayne county, Iowa, June 6, 1870, a son of 
Casper and Anna (Gereke) Shrader, both of whom were natives of Germany, 
whence they came to America in childhood days with their respective parents. 
They were residents of Iowa and were married in that state, where they con- 
tinued to reside until 1877, when they removed to Kansas, spending a number 
of years in that locality. In 1890 they arrived in Buffalo county and the father 
purchased the north half of section 24, Garfield township. Upon that farm the 
mother passed away the following year and ten years afterward Mr. Shrader 
removed to Ravenna, where he has since made his home with a daughter. 

William Shrader acquired a common school education in Kansas and was 
twenty years of age when the family removed to Buffalo county. The following 
year he began farming on his own. account, cultivating rented land for three 
years, after which he spent six years as superintendent for H. J. Robinson of 
Shelton, Nebraska, who controls extensive ranching interests. In that connec- 



96 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

tion Mr. Shrader fed eighteen thousand head of sheep. The position was an 
excellent one, but he desired to engage in business on his own account that his 
labors might more directly benefit himself, and in 1901 he bought eighty acres 
of land in Cherry Creek township, upon which he resided for five years. In 
1906 he invested in his present farm, comprising two hundred and forty acres 
of land, and in 191 1 he also added to his property holdings by the purchase of 
one hundred and sixty acres adjoining Paola, Kansas. Upon that place there is 
a gas well, which furnishes a portion of the gas for Paola. He has displayed 
sound judgment in making his investments, and keen sagacity characterizes his 
management of all his business interests. In addition to his agricultural interests 
he is a stockholder in the local telephone company at Ravenna and in the tele- 
phone company at Paola, Kansas. 

Mr. Shrader has been married twice. His first wife, whom he wedded in 
1892, died in 1908, and in September, 1914, he married Miss Daisy Woodward, 
of Lincoln, Nebraska. To his first marriage there were born two children, one 
of whom, Walter, is now living. 

In politics Mr. Shrader is a republican, keenly interested in the party and 
its success but never seeking public office. His religious faith is evidenced by 
his membership in the Methodist church, to the teachings of which he is most 
loyal. All who know him esteem him highly. He has lived in this county 
throughout the entire period of his majority and the sterling traits of his man- 
hood have endeared him to those with whom he has come in contact, his fellow 
townsmen recognizing him as a representative business man and a public-spirited 
citizen. 



GEORGE L. GARDNER. 

George L. Gardner, who was the first settler of Gardner township, still owns 
four hundred and eighty acres of land in that township but makes his home in 
Shelton. He is enjoying a period of rest and leisure to which his labor in former 
years justly entitles him. His birth occurred in New York state, July 22, 1843, 
and his parents were William T. and Eunice B. (Roushey) Gardner, also natives 
of the Empire state. They were married there but subsequently removed to 
Pennsylvania, and in 1878 they came to Bufifalo county, Nebraska. While living 
in New York the father followed the tanner's trade but engaged in farming in 
Pennsylvania and in this state. 

George L. Gardner is one of a family of six children, four of whom are still 
living. He was given excellent educational advantages, as after completing the 
course offered in the common schools he attended the Smithfield Academy and 
the Waverly Institute at Waverly, New York. He remained at home until 1861, 
when, as a youth of eighteen years, he enlisted in Company F, Sixth Pennsyl- 
vania Volunteer Infantry, with which he served at the front for three years 
and two months. He enlisted as a private but was promoted to the rank of 
sergeant, and his record is one of which he has every right to be proud. He 
was engaged in forty-two battles, including the seven days' fight before Rich- 
mond ; Bull Run, which continued for three days ; and Antietam, in which he 
was shot through the right lung. This wound incapacitated him for military 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 97 

service for three months, but as soon as he had recovered he returned to the 
firing Hne and fought in the three days' battle of Gettysburg; in the battle of the 
Wilderness, which also lasted for three days ; in the battle of Spottsylvania 
Courthouse, a six days' engagement ; in the four days' battle at North Anna 
river; and in the last battle of Cold Harbor. He was mustered out at Harris- 
burg, Pennsylvania, June ii, 1864, and returned home, where he remained until 
the spring of 1875. In that year he came to Buffalo county, Nebraska, and took 
up land in what is now Gardner township. He was the first settler within the 
limits of that township, which was named for him, and he had to face all of 
the obstacles that usually confront the pioneer. However, he had faith in the 
future of the county and persevered in his work of developing a farm from 
the wilderness, and brought his land to a high state of cultivation. As the years 
passed the township increased in population and the inconveniences and hardships 
of pioneer life gave way to the advantages of an advanced civilization. He still 
owns four hundred and eighty acres of land, but since 1895 has lived retired in 
Shelton, where he owns a fine residence. 

Mr. Gardner was married in 1883 to Miss Anna L. Walters, by whom he had 
five children: Edna N., the wife of G. L. Bastian ; Clara, the deceased wife of 
Ralph R. Bennett ; Lois E., who was principal of the local schools for four years 
but is now teaching in the high school at Scotts Bluff; Mary E., who is principal 
of the Morrill high school ; and Elma, who died in infancy. The wife and mother 
passed away in May, 1899, and was buried in Shelton cemetery. In June, 191 5, 
Mr. Gardner was again married, Mrs. Laura Wickwire becoming his wife. 

Mr. Gardner casts his ballot in support of the candidates and measures of 
the republican party and served for two terms as supervisor of Buffalo county. 
Fraternally he is identified with Shelton Lodge, No. 99, A. F. & A. M., in which 
he has filled the position of master for four years, and he is also a member of 
Joe Llooker Post, No. 28, G. A. R., thus keeping in touch with his army comrades 
of former days. His wife is a member of the Presbyterian church. The same 
public spirit which prompted him to offer his life if need be to preserve the 
Union has manifested itself in times of peace in a willingness to subordinate pri- 
vate interests to the general welfare and a readiness to cooperate in movements 
seeking the advancement of his community. 



MENTOR A. BROWN. 

Mentor A. Brown, publisher of the daily and semi-weekly Hub at Kearney 
and well known as a representative of journalistic interests in western Nebraska, 
was born at Janesville, Wisconsin, on the 19th of February, 1853. He is a son of 
Jeremiah and Ann (Pound) Brown, both of whom were graduates of Milton 
College, famous in the early educational annals of the Badger state. The mother 
died in Grant county, Wisconsin, during the infancy of their son Mentor, and 
the father afterward married again. He died while serving the Union cause 
during the Civil war when with Sherman on his famous march to the sea. 

In 1866 Mentor A. Brown went to Jefferson, Iowa, and there when thirteen 
years of age began his career in the "art preservative" as printer's deyil on the 



98 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

Jefferson New Era. He started westward in 1870 and for a time worked as 
journeyman printer at Council Bluffs, at Omaha and at Nebraska City. In 
1871 he was employed on the Beatrice Express, and subsequently acquired a 
financial interest in that paper. In 1888 he came to Kearney and on the 226. 
of October of that year established the daily Hub and continued the publication 
of the semi-weekly Hub as a continuation of the Central Nebraska Press. He 
has since issued both papers and through their columns has become a potent 
factor in the upbuilding of Kearney and the substantial development of Buffalo 
county. He stanchly champions every measure and movement for the general 
good and as the years have gone on has exerted his efforts and his influence 
along lines which have been far-reaching and beneficial. 

Mr. Brown has been twice married and is the father of five living children, 
namely: Mabel L., who is the wife of C. E. Eustice, of Auburn, Nebraska; 
Olive, who is Mrs. George H. Connell, of Gait, California; Ulysses A. and 
Oliver F., who are connected with the Hub; and Hugh R. 

In his political views Mr. Brown is a republican, well informed on the ques- 
tions and issues of the day and able to support his position by intelligent argu- 
ment or terse, well written editorials. In religious faith he is an Episcopalian, 
and fraternally is identified with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and 
the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. He belongs also to the Commercial 
Club and heartily cooperates in its various plans and measures to further the 
welfare and progress of Kearney and the county. In 1904 he was appointed 
postmaster of Kearney and ably served in that capacity for eight years. 



WALTER WARREN BARNEY. 

It has often been said that death loves a shining mark, and this statement 
seemed to find verification when Walter Warren Barney, of Kearney, was called 
to the home beyond. He was a most popular citizen who deserved the high esteem 
and honor in which he was held. He was born at Roanoke, Illinois, October 23, 
1862, a son of Calvin E. and Eliza (Morrison) Barney. The father was of 
English lineage, the family having been established in Vermont during colonial 
days, while the mother was of English nativity. W. W. Barney was reared in 
Roanoke and there attended school to the age of fifteen years, after which he 
removed to Pekin. About the year 1880 the family became residents of Nebraska 
and there Calvin E. Barney resumed the practice of law in a small way, while 
W. W. Barney secured a clerkship in the store of George Kramer, with whom 
he remained for a time. Later he was appointed to the position of deputy under 
Mr. Scott and later served under Homer I. Allen, who was then county treasurer, 
and subsequently, under the firm name of Allen & Barney, he wrote up a set of 
abstract of titles to Buffalo county lands and in connection therewith embarked 
in the real estate business, that partnership continuing until the death of Mr. 
Allen. Mr. Barney then succeeded to the business and later his sons became 
identified with him. He remained in the business until his demise and made 
steady progress along that line. While he had had but limited educational oppor- 




WALTER W. BAEXEY 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 101 

tunities in youth, he read extensively, was a close observer and in that way 
became recognized as a man of superior learning and wide information. 

In April, 1885, Mr. Barney was united in marriage to Miss Anna Thornton. 
There are four children to mourn the loss of the father : Arthur L., Ralph M., 
Howard and Mildred. All of the children live in Kearney. 

In his political views Mr. Barney was an earnest republican, recognized as 
one of the party leaders in Buffalo county. He served as chairman of the county 
central committee and for eight years was city treasurer. He was also a Knight 
Templar Mason and a member of the Modern Woodmen of the World. His 
religious belief was manifest in his activity as a member of the Methodist Episco- 
pal church and his interest in community affairs was evidenced in the fact that 
he was one of the organizers of the Commercial Club and was one of its first 
presidents. Few men receive the love, confidence and goodwill which were 
accorded him. On the 23d of February, 191 5, there appeared in the Kearney 
Morning Times the following editorial, which is a splendid characterization of 
a citizen whom every one mourned : 'Tt seems to the writer that the hardest 
task which has confronted him since coming to Kearney is the one which has 
just been completed — the writing of the story of W. W. Barney's death. The 
shock to the community which came, as the quickly moving news passed from 
man to man, on Monday was made the more intense because of the love and 
respect which those who met him in their everyday life had learned to have for 
him. It is a powerful tribute to the qualities of a man when the eyes of big 
strong men fill with tears as they mention his name. It has been an unselfish and 
remarkable life when its passing grips the heartstrings of a city; when the busi- 
ness men will go about their work almost dazed by the bigness of their loss. What 
represented the material place of Mr. Barney will now be vacant. There will be 
no one to fill this place, but what could be more inspiring to the gatherings of 
those with whom it was his custom to meet, than the memory of this man. Broad, 
honest, straightforward, keen and square, his memory should prove a benedic- 
tion in the council halls of the city's active work — a vision of his bigness should 
ever guide the acts and thoughts of his old associates and lead them with the 
moral strength Mr. Barney had. Kearney has lost a wise counsellor but she has 
a precious memory." 



I 



WILLIAM CHARLES OGILVIE. 



One of the strong and substantial financial institutions of Buffalo county is 
the Exchange Bank of Gibbon, of which William Charles Ogilvie is assistant 
cashier. His fellow townsmen speak of him as a business man of marked capa- 
bility and enterprise and one who is ever ready to meet any emergency and who 
at all times can be counted upon for straightforward dealing. He was born July 
8, 1873, in the town in which he still makes his home, his parents being James 
and Margaret (Key) Ogilvie, both of whom were natives of Scotland. They 
came to the United States in early manhood and womanhood and were married 
in New York. The year 1871 witnessed their arrival in Nebraska, whither they 
came subsequent to the arrival of the soldiers' free homestead colony, which 



102 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

had reached here three or four days before. Setthng at Gibbon, Mr. Ogilvie was 
made station agent, in which capacity he continued up to the time of his death, 
which occurred in 1881. His widow survives and yet makes her home in Gibbon. 

Wilham Charles Ogilvie was reared under the parental roof and the public 
schools of his native town afforded him his educational privileges. When a 
youth of but fourteen he became a wage earner, securing a clerkship in a 
grocery store, where he was employed for two years. The succeeding two years 
he devoted to the improvement of his education, following which he visited with 
his mother and sister in Scotland for a year. He then returned to Gibbon and 
for some time occupied clerkships in various stores, but in 1895 went to Chicago 
where he entered the employ of Swift & Company, with whom he remained for 
eight years. He spent two years of that time in Chicago, five years in England, 
and one year in Kansas City. He then returned to Gibbon and for a time was 
associated with his brother-in-law, G. W. Linger, on his ranch south of the town. 
In 1905 he entered the Exchange Bank of Gibbon as assistant cashier, in which 
capacity he has since served. He is most thorough in all of his work, systematic 
and faithful in the discharge of his duties, and at the same time is a courteous 
and obliging official. He is associated with I. A. Kirk and W. M. Ross in owning 
and operating the Hershey ranch, and is working his way steadily upward in 
business circles, already being regarded as one of the substantial and repre- 
sentative men of the community. 

On the 20th of December, 1910, Mr. Ogilvie was married to Miss Mary O. 
Robb, of Gibbon, and to them have been born two children, Margaret and Mary 
Caroline. In his political views Mr. Ogilvie is a republican and has served as a 
member of the town board, as clerk of the board and in other local offices. He 
is most loyal to public interests and cooperates in all well defined plans for the 
benefit and improvement of the district. At the present writing he is secretary 
of the library board of Gibbon. He belongs to Granite Lodge, No. 189, A. F. 
& A. M., and to the Woodmen of the World, and the Ancient Order of United 
Workmen, while he and his wife are members of the Presbyterian church, 
contributing generously to its support and adhering loyally to its principles. He 
is a^self-made man, having been dependent upon his own resources from the age 
of fan.t.tfen years, and step by step he has worked his way upward, his ability 
and detefrninatioirwinning him the success which is his. 



Q NATHAN P. McDONALD. 

Nathan P. McDonald, ex-county attorney of Buffalo county and one of the 
strong and able representatives of the Kearney bar, has practiced here continu- 
ously since January, 1894, and throughout that period has made steady progress 
in a profession to which right, property, life and liberty must look for protection. 
He was born upon a farm near Columbus, Pennsylvania, on the 6th of Novem- 
ber, 1862, and is one of two children born of the marriage of Donald and Arcelia 
(Calkins) Badgly McDonald, the former a native of Scotland, while the latter was 
born in this country of Scotch parentage. By a previous marriage Mrs. McDonald 
had two children. 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 103 

Nathan P. McDonald was reared to manhood in his native state and after 
completing a common school education pursued a course in an academy at Sugar 
Grove and for two years was a student in the Otterbein (Ohio) College. In 1886 
he made his way westward to Kansas and during the ensuing winter taught school 
at Louisville. In the spring of 1887 he arrived in Buffalo county, Nebraska, and 
accepted the position of principal of the schools at Elm Creek, there remaining 
until December, 1889, when he came to Kearney to fill the office of county 
superintendent of schools, to which position he had been elected in the fall of 
that year. For four years he served in that capacity. For a number of years he 
had been reading law under the direction of Hon. Thomas H. Cornett and Hon. 
H. M. Sinclair, of Kearney, and in 1893 was admitted to the bar. He entered 
upon active practice in January, 1894, and has since followed his profession in 
this city, covering a period of more than twenty-two years. In 1900 he was 
elected county attorney and served in that capacity for four years. 

On the ist of January, 1888, Mr. McDonald was united in marriage to Miss 
Ella Upton, a daughter of I. C. Upton, of Roanoke, Illinois. They have one son, 
Archie L. 

Mr. McDonald gives his political allegiance to the republican party and fra- 
ternally is identified with the Masonic organization, in which he has attained the 
orders of Christian knighthood. His life conforms to the teachings of the craft 
and his sterling traits commend him at all times to the confidence and goodwill 
of the general public. 



FRED A. TURNER. 



The excellent condition of Fred A. Turner's farm on section 3, Gibbon town- 
ship, indicates his energy and good management and he derives a gratifying 
financial return from his land. He is a native of Thornton township, Buffalo 
county, and was born on the 6th of July, 1876. His parents, Bartlett and Mary 
(Standard) Turner, were both born in Missouri, where they grew to maturity 

land were married, but in 1873 or 1874 they came to Buffalo county, NeJ;;^jf#ska, 

[and the father took up a homestead in Thornton township, qu^ which he^fe&ided 
until 191 1. In that year he sold his property and removed" to Kearney, where 

[he has since lived retired. |l 

Fred A. Turner was educated in the public schools and during his boyhood 
md youth helped his father with the farm work. By the time that he reached 

^maturity he was an efficient agriculturist and when twenty-one years of age 

[began farming for himself. For eighteen years he rented land but in March, 
1915, he purchased his present farm on section 3, Gibbon township, which com- 

Iprises eighty acres of rich and well improved land. He follows up-to-date 
methods and uses modern machinery and seldom fails to harvest good crops. 

:He also owns stock in the Gibbon Farmers Elevator. 

In 1898 Mr. Turner was united in marriage to Miss Blanche Ross, a daughter 

;of W. B. Ross, who in 1883 became a resident of Buffalo county. He is now, 

[however, living in La Cygne, Kansas. Mr. and Mrs. Turner have three children, 

[jay R., Donald F. and Dorothy A. 



104 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

Mr. Turner is independent in politics, casting his ballot in acordance with his 
best judgment rather than in obedience to the dictates of party leaders. Frater- 
nally he is connected with Gibbon Lodge, No. yj, L O. O. F., and both he and 
his wife attend services at the Baptist church. 



ARTHUR R. NICHOLS. 

Arthur R. Nichols, superintendent of schools of Buffalo county, occupies a 
prominent position in educational circles in Nebraska and by reason of his 
ability in leaving his impress upon the development of the school system in this 
section of the state. A native son of Nebraska, he was born in a sod house near 
Doniphan, in Hall county, December 17, 1883. His father, Andrew J. Nichols, 
is a native of Wisconsin, but during his boyhood days accompanied his parents 
on their removal to Winterset, Iowa, where he was reared to manhood. He mar- 
ried Emma J. Garrett and followed farming in Iowa until 1876, when in a 
prairie schooner he made his way to Nebraska and traded his team of horses 
and wagon for a homestead in Hall county. Thereafter he broke his land with 
a yoke of oxen and experienced all of the hardships, difficulties and privations 
incident to pioneer life, but with the course of years he converted the wild prairie 
into productive fields and remained thereon until his later life, when he removed 
to Fremont, where he and his wife now reside. They became the parents of seven 
children, all of whom are yet living. 

Arthur R. Nichols is one of twin brothers and upon the home farm he was 
reared, having the usual experiences of the farm bred boy who assists in the 
development of the fields through the summer seasons, while in the winter 
months he devotes his time to the mastery of such branches of learning as are 
taught in the country schools. His academic training was received in the Fremont 
Normal College and later he engaged in teaching school for three years, spending 
one year in a rural school and two years as principal of the Prosser schools. 
Later he attended the Fremont and Kearney Normal Schools until 1909, when 
he was graduated from the Fremont Normal. It was during this period, or 
through the winter season of 1907-8, that he served as principal of the schools 
at Miller, which was his initial step in connection with the work of teaching 
in Buffalo county. His capability being manifest to those who made it a 
point to acquaint themselves with school work, he was elected superintendent 
of the schools of Elm Creek in 1909, there remaining until the fall of 1912, 
when he went to Gibbon to become superintendent of the schools of that place. 
He was then elected county superintendent by the county commissioners in 191 5 to 
fill out the unexpired term of J. S. Elliott, who had resigned in order to accept 
an appointment on the faculty of the State Normal Board. Professor Nichols 
is therefore at the head of the educational system of Buffalo county and as such 
is putting forth effective and earnest effort for the benefit and development of 
the schools. His plans are progressive, his efforts resultant and under his guid- 
ance higher standards will be reached. 

On the 28th of May, 1913, Mr. Nichols was united in marriage to Miss Laura 
Cox, of Fairbury, Nebraska, by whom he has a son, Andrew Robert, whose birth 



I 




ARTHUR R. NICHOLS 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 107 

occurred June 21, 1914. His religious faith is indicated by his membership in 
the Christian church, while fraternally he is identified with the Masons and 
the Elks. His interest centers in all those things which have to do with the 
development and upbuilding of the county along material, intellectual and moral 
lines. His friends, and they are many, bear testimony to his sterling personal 
worth and to the excellent results which he is accomplishing in his chosen field. 



CHARLES C. BLACK. 



Charles C. Black, deceased, was a prominent pioneer settler of Kearney and 
with the development and upbuilding of the county was closely associated by 
reason of his activity along agricultural lines. He settled within the borders of 
the county when much of the land was still in possession of the government 
and secured a homestead claim which he converted into productive fields. Mr. 
Black was born near Mount Pleasant, Iowa, December 17, 1848, his parents 
being pioneers of that section. He was reared on a farm there and pursued his 
education in the schools of Mount Pleasant, taking up the profession of teaching 
school when a young man, for at that time the old homestead had been sold and 
the money divided among the heirs. Thinking perhaps to make the practice of 
law his life work, he began reading and devoted a year or two to the profession, 
but found it uncongenial. He accordingly went to Colorado, spending some 
time in Pueblo and in Canyon City in the mercantile business. The year 1876 
witnessed his arrival in Kearney, after which he secured a homestead relinquish- 
ment to fifty-seven acres two miles southwest of the city, and also took a timber 
claim of eighty acres three miles northeast of Kearney, purchasing the relinquish- 
ment to both. Thinking it time to have a helpmate on life's journey, he was 
married on the 13th of February, 1877, to Miss Elizabeth Chesley, who was 
born in Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, September 4, 1854. There she was reared and 
educated and in 1875 went to the home of a sister in Lincoln, Nebraska. The 
following year she removed to Kearney, where she engaged in the millinery 
business, having learned the trade in Wisconsin. She followed that pursuit for 
only a short time and then sold her store, for early in the following year she 
was married. 

In May, 1877, Mr. Black took up his abode upon the old homestead and bent 
his energies to the development and improvement of the place, which was largely 
a tract of wild land when it came into his possession. To the original farm of 
fifty-seven acres he added from time to time until within its borders were com- 
prised two hundred and thirty acres. He and his wife each had a little money 
and they began dealing in live stock, both raising and feeding stock. Success 
attended the efiforts of Mr. Black in this connection and he always made his live 
stock an important feature of his business, keeping on hand high grades of cattle 
and hogs, for which he found a ready sale on the market. He remained, a very 
active figure in agricultural circles up to the time of his death, which occurred 
June I, 1889, when he was but forty-one years of age. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Black were born seven children. Adah and Beulah were 
twins, but the latter died at the age of twelve years. The former became the 



108 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

wife of T. F. Hamer and died at the age of twenty-nine, leaving three sons: 
Francis, who died in 1913; Thomas, and Robert. Her children at the time of 
the mother's death went to live with their grandmother, Mrs. Black, who reared 
them. Dott is a public stenographer at the Midway Hotel of Kearney. Jessie, 
born April 2^, 1883, is the wife of Charles C. Robinson, of Santa Monica, Cali- 
fornia. Ruth is the wife of Frank Todd, of Los Angeles. Susan and Donald 
are twins and the former is now with her mother, while the latter is a prosperous 
stockman and farmer living fifteen miles from Billings, Montana. The youngest 
children were less than two years of age when Mrs. Black was left a widow with 
the care of a family of seven. She managed the farm, reared and educated her 
children most carefully and manifested a most brave and determined spirit. She 
had been on the ranch for a year when the house burned in the night and all of its 
contents were destroyed. She then came to Kearney and rented her land for a 
part of the tim^ and part of the time managed it and operated it with hired help. 
She afterward purchased another farm, which she later sold at an advance. She 
still owns the old home property, together with a nice residence in Kearney. 
She displays excellent business ability and executive force and has most capably 
controlled her interests, deserving much credit for what she has accomplished 
since the death of her husband, whose loss was an irreparable one to her, for he 
had been an active, enterprising and progressive business man and they were 
putting forth most earnest and effective effort to develop and improve their 
business interests and rear their family. 



CHARLES BON SACK. 



Charles Bonsack, a successful farmer and stock raiser of Sharon township, 
has thoroughly identified his interests with those of his county and state and 
is recognized as a public-spirited citizen. He was born in Germany on the 4th 
of February, 1857, of the marriage of Frank and Louisa Bonsack, also natives 
of that country, where they passed their entire lives. Eight of their sixteen 
children are still living. 

Charles Bonsack was reared at home and acquired his education in the schools 
of his native land. In 1881 he crossed the Atlantic to the United States and the 
next three years were spent in the vicinity of Denver, Colorado, where he 
engaged in ranching. In 1884 he went to Grand Island, Nebraska, whence the 
year following he removed to Buffalo county and purchased his present farm, 
which comprises one hundred and sixty acres on section 10, Sharon township. 
He has erected substantial buildings upon the place and takes pride in keeping 
everything about the farm in good condition. Although he raises some grain he 
gives the greater part of his attention to feeding stock and is recognized as one 
of the leading stock raisers of his locality. 

In 1885 occurred the marriage of Mr. Bonsack and Miss Kate Vogel, also 
a native of Germany, who in 1881 came with her mother to America, the father 
having passed away in Germany. The mother spent her last days in Missouri. 
Mr. and Mrs. Bonsack have become the parents of eight children : Bertha, who 
married George Jewell, of Kansas; Frank and William, both of whom are 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 109 

at home; Rosie, the wife of Lester Quackenbush, now a resident of Minnesota; 
Harvey, George and Herbert, all at home ; and Mary Ann, deceased. 

Mr. Bonsack supports the republican party and for ten years has been on the 
school board, his retention in this office proving the acceptability of his services. 
He is a member of the Grange and can be counted upon to further any move- 
ment that seeks to improve the conditions of farm life. He is determined, self- 
reliant and possesses sound judgment — qualities which do much toward insuring 
success in any line of activity. 



MILTON H. BEAN. 



Milton H. Bean is now living retired, making his home in Kearney. He is, 
however, numbered among the pioneer stockmen and farmers of Buffalo county, 
having carried on general agricultural pursuits here from 1879 until 1907, when 
his well directed industry had brought to him a measure of success sufficient to 
enable him to live retired. Mr. Bean is a native of Pennsylvania. He was born 
in Bucks county, February 2, 1843, ^ son of Manasseh and Hannah (Harr) 
Bean, who were also natives of the same county, where they spent their entire 
lives, the father there following the occupation of tailoring for a number of years, 
while in later life he gave his attention to farming. 

Milton H. Bean spent his boyhood upon the home farm and when twenty- 
three years of age left the Keystone state for Illinois, making his way to Mar- 
shall county, where for four years he cultivated rented land. Thinking to have 
better opportunities to acquire a farm in the west, he came to Buffalo county in 
1879 and purchased eighty acres at three dollars per acre. It was a wild tract 
on which not a furrow had been turned nor an improvement made. He at once 
began the task of breaking the sod and developing the fields and later he pur- 
chased an eighty-acre tract adjoining. He built thereon a little house and kept 
bachelor's hall and as he found opportunity he added to his land, purchasing 
another eighty acres soon after his arrival, while a few years later he bought 
one hundred and sixty acres, for which he paid twelve and a half dollars per 
acre. His wife also had a homestead of one hundred and sixty acres near by and 
he operated these various tracts of land, carefully cultivating his crops and also 
engaging in stock raising. His business affairs were wisely conducted and energy 
and determination at length brought to him the success which is now his and 
which enables him to rest from further labor. He lived upon his farm until 1907, 
after which he sold the home place of two hundred and forty acres and rented 
the remainder. He then came to Kearney, where he erected his present residence 
and has since made his home. 

On the 13th of March, 1884, Mr. Bean was united in marriage to Miss Kate 
Trott, who was born in Ohio, April 2, 1851, and in her girlhood days went to 
Missouri and thence to Nebraska. Here she took up a homestead in Rusco 
township, Buffalo county, proved up the property and also engaged in teaching 
school. Mr. and Mrs. Bean became the parents of a daughter, Margaret Trott, 
who is at home with her father. The wife and mother passed away January 2S, 
1900, in the faith of the Methodist church, of which she was a devoted member. 



110 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

Mr. Bean was reared in the German Reformed church. In business hfe he has 
been very successful, his advancement being made through earnest effort, close 
application and indefatigable energy. He never neglected a duty in the care 
of his fields, planted his crops in timely season, cultivated them according to mod- 
ern methods and in the course of years gained a substantial measure of prosperity. 



CHARLES B. FINCH. 



No history of Kearney would be complete without extended reference to 
Charles B. Finch, who for thirty-six years was engaged in mercantile pursuits in 
this city. Honored and respected by all, no man occupies a more enviable position 
in commercial circles, not alone by reason of the success which he has achieved but 
also owing to the straightforward policy which he has ever followed. Moreover, 
he has taken an active and helpful interest in public affairs and his influence in 
municipal matters has been far-reaching and beneficial. 

A native of Illinois, he was born on Christmas day of 1848 at Dallas City, 
Hancock county. His father, John M. Finch, was a native of Pennsylvania and 
removed to Illinois prior to the era of railroad building in that state. For a time 
he lived at Rock Island and about the year 1840 removed to Nauvoo, which was 
then owned almost wholly by the Mormons. He there engaged in mercantile pur- 
suits and during his residence at Nauvoo often had discussions with Joseph Smith, 
the Mormon prophet and leader. At the time of the uprising which resulted 
in the lynching of Smith, he and others were compelled to seek homes else- 
where. Accordingly he located at what is now Dallas City, Illinois, on the 
Mississippi river, and there resumed his interrupted mercantile career. He also 
embarked in pork packing on a small scale, making shipments to the south. He 
continued his residence at Dallas City until about 1884, when he came to 
Kearney, Nebraska, where he died in 1888. His wife bore the maiden name of 
Elizabeth Bostwick and was a daughter of Dr. Bostwick, one of the old time 
physicians of Fort Madison, Iowa, who lost his life while attempting to cross 
the Mississippi river on the ice in answer to a professional call. Mrs. Finch 
passed away in Kearney in 1893. In the family were five children who reached 
adult age. 

Charles B. Finch was reared to manhood in Illinois, where he acquired such 
education as the common schools afforded. When but fourteen years of age he 
began clerking in his father's store and was thus employed for some time, after 
which he was admitted to a partnership in the business and still later became his 
father's successor, continuing active at Dallas City until 1879, when he shipped 
his stock to Kearney, Nebraska, and here opened a general mercantile store. In 
a short time he confined his attention exclusively to dry goods and developed 
one of the largest and best equipped establishments of that kind in the city. For 
thirty-six years he was actively identified with the mercantile history of the 
place and his business largely set the standard for similar enterprises in the town. 
In 1879 his brother, Ed B. Finch, removed to Kearney and joined him in business, 
becoming a partner a number of years later. Together they conducted their dry 
goods interests until February, 1915, when they sold out and thus passed out of 






HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 111 

existence as the property of the firm of Finch Brothers one of the oldest and 
most reliable mercantile establishments of Buffalo county. Charles B. Finch is 
now practically hving retired but is still interested in the Finch-Patterson Motor 
Company, in which he holds considerable stock. 

Mr. Finch had five children, as follows: Charles and Edith, both of whom 
are deceased; Elizabeth Blanche, the wife of H. R. Krug, of Asbury Park, 
New Jersey; Sadie B., a student of National Park Seminary of Washington, 
D. C. ; and John M., now on the Pacific coast. 

Fraternally Mr. Finch is connected with Masonry. In this he has taken every 
degree of the Scottish Rite, including the thirty-third, and the Knights of the 
Red Cross of Constantine and the Royal Order of Scotland, and every degree 
and order of the York Rite, and in addition is a member of Tangier Temple of 
the Mystic Shrine, at Omaha. He has served as worshipful master of the lodge 
where he was raised in Illinois ; commander of Mt. Hebron Commandery at 
Kearney and grand commander of the state of Nebraska. 

There is no phase of Kearney's development with which Mr Finch is not 
familiar. On his arrival here the city was but an overgrown frontier village, 
there being but a few brick buildings in the place at that time, while the country 
homes through the surrounding district were largely sod houses. At that time 
Kearney could boast of only wooden sidewalks and there was no street lighting, 
nor had water works been installed. With the work of progress and improvement 
he has always been actively identified and his labors have been directly bene- 
ficial along many lines. While a democrat in politics, he was elected as a candi- 
date of the business men of Kearney for the office of mayor and served in that 
capacity for three years. It was during his incumbency that the first Board of 
Trade was organized and he was elected its first president. During his adminis- 
tration the streets were renamed, the houses were numbered, a sewer system was 
inaugurated and the electric lighting system was established. Miles of cement 
sidewalks were built and other substantial improvements were carried forward. 
Mr. Finch has never believed in hampering public progress by useless retrench- 
ment nor was there any useless expenditure in his administration. He conducted 
municipal affairs upon business principles and the same qualities which won for 
him success as a merchant furthered the interests and welfare of his city. 



JOHN CONROY. 



John Conroy is identified with agricultural interests as the owner of land in 
Scotts Bluff county, Nebraska, but gives his time to his duties as postmaster of 
Shelton, Buffalo county, where he resides. He was born in Ireland on the 25th 
of September, 1851, of the marriage of Patrick and Elizabeth (Moran) Conroy, 
both of whom were born in that country. The father died in February, 1861, in 
Ireland, and in March, 1867, his wife came to America with her seven children. 
The family lived in Pennsylvania for some time but the death of the mother 
occurred in Buffalo, New York. There were seven sons in the family, of whom 
five are still living. 

John Conroy remained at home until he was twenty years of age and then 



112 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

began learning the tanner's trade, which he followed in Pennsylvania until 1878. 
In that year he came to Buffalo county, Nebraska, and bought a farm six 
miles north of Shelton, where he lived for eight years. In 1886 he was appointed 
postmaster of Shelton by President Cleveland and for four years served in that 
capacity. During that time he conducted a general store, which was located in 
the same building as the postoffice, but in 1893 he disposed of that business. For 
four years he was deputy postmaster and then served as assessor of both the 
township and city of Shelton until 1914, when he was again made postmaster, 
receiving his appointment from President Wilson. He understands the duties 
of the office thoroughly, is systematic and accurate in his work, and his services 
as postmaster are very satisfactory to his fellow citizens. He owns three hundred 
and twenty acres in Scotts Bluff county and derives therefrom a gratifying finan- 
cial return. 

In 1874 Mr. Conroy was united in marriage to Miss Anna Edwards, a native 
of Ireland and a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George Edwards, both of whom are 
deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Conroy have become the parents of seven children : 
William G., deceased ; Mary Elizabeth, the wife of H. C. Gumprecht ; Ellen, at 
home; Kathryn J., wIto is deputy postmaster; Fannie, the wife of T. P. Hoye; 
John, deceased ; and Stewart P., at home. 

]\Ir. Conroy has given his political allegiance to the democratic party since 
age conferred upon him the right of franchise, and has always been active in 
public affairs. He has served on the town board, was for six years a member of 
the school board and for ten years held the office of assessor. Both he and his 
wife are members of the Roman Catholic church and aid in the work of that 
organization. He not only has the respect of all who have been associated with 
him but has also gained the warm personal regard of many. 



J. W. MILLER, M. D. 



Dr. J. W. Miller is an able physician and surgeon who is enjoying a large 
practice at Gibbon and from the surrounding country. His colleagues and con- 
temporaries acknowledge his ability and attest his worth as a man and citizen as 
well as a physician. He was born in Koszta, Iowa, May 10, 1859, and is a son 
of Dr. Ephraim P. and Margaret (Dey) Miller, both of whom were natives of 
Pennsylvania, where they were reared and married. They subsequently removed 
to Koszta, Iowa, where Dr. Miller engaged in the practice of medicine up to the 
time of his death, which occurred about 1863. His widow afterward became the 
wife of Amos Pettyes and removed to Reedsburg, Wisconsin, where Dr. J. W. 
Miller was reared and educated, passing through consecutive grades in the pub- 
lic schools until graduated from the Reedsburg high school. 

In 1880 J. W. Miller took up the study of medicine, pursuing his reading under 
the preceptorship of Dr. Samuel Hall of Reedsburg until the fall of 1881, when 
he entered Rush Medical College of Chicago, there pursuing the full course, 
which he completed by graduation in March, 1884. He then returned to Reeds- 
burg and entered upon active practice in connection with his former preceptor. 
Dr. Hall, with whom he remained from March until September. At that time 



I 




HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 115 

he removed to Mason City, Nebraska, where he was successfully identified with 
the practice of his profession until 1895. In that year he removed to Gibbon, 
where he has since been located. He is today the oldest practicing physician of 
the town and is numbered among the leading physicians and surgeons of Buffalo 
county. He has had broad practical experience through almost a third of a 
century and during this period he has kept in touch with the trend of modern 
thought and scientific investigation by broad reading and study. He is very 
careful in the diagnosis of his cases and seldom at fault in determining the 
outcome of disease. 

On the 14th of October, 1891, Dr. Miller was united in marriage to Miss 
Mary L. Walker, of Mason City, Nebraska, and to them have been born four 
children, of whom three are living: Edith, who is a graduate of the State 
University of Nebraska of the class of 191 5, and is now a teacher in the public 
schools of Howell, this state ; Erwin, who is pursuing a course in mechanical 
engineering in the State University ; and Arthur, a student of the Gibbon high 
school. 

The parents hold membership in the Presbyterian church and, being people 
of the highest respectability, occupy an enviable position in social circles. Dr. 
Miller is a member of Granite Lodge, No. 189, A. F. & A. M., and of the 
Modern Woodmen Camp. Along strictly professional lines he has connection 
with the Bufifalo County Medical Society and with the Nebraska State Medical 
Society and he thus keeps abreast with the trend of modern thought and investi- 
gation along professional lines. He holds to high ideals in his chosen life work 
and his ability is manifest in the excellent results which attend his labors. 



C. M. BECK. 



C. M. beck, of Gibbon, is successfully engaged in the real estate and insur- 
ance business ; is also manager of the Farmers Home Telephone Company and 
Is likewise an extensive landholder. His birth occurred in Ohio on the nth of 
November, 1859, and he is a son of Daniel and Elizabeth (Kramer) Beck, natives 
of Pennsylvania who removed to Ohio at an early day in the history of that state. 
The father followed the occupation of carpentering and was recognized as an 
.expert workman. Both he and his wife passed away in the Buckeye state. 
(Seven of their ten children are still living. 

C. M. Beck was reared in Ohio and there received his education, but in 188S 
he came to Buffalo county, Nebraska, and opened a real estate and insurance 
ofifice in Gibbon. He has since continued active in those fields and in the years 
that have since intervened has handled a large amount of business. He is also 
a heavy stockholder in the Farmers Home Telephone Company, of which he is 
manager, and owns stock in the Exchange Bank. He has fully recognized the 
value of real estate as an investment and has acquired title to seven hundred 
and sixty acres of excellent land, all of which is improved. He has been quick 
to utilize opportunities, and his enterprise and sound judgment have enabled him 
to win financial independence 

In 1890 Mr. Beck was united in marriage to Miss Susie M. Henderson, a 



116 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

native of Iowa and a daughter of Colonel P. P. and Catherine Henderson. Mr. 
and Mrs. Beck are the parents of a son, Gerald II., who was bom July 5, 1894, 
and is now taking the medical course at the State University of Nebraska at 
Lincoln. 

Mr. Beck is a republican and has served as clerk and town treasurer. He 
holds membership in Granite Lodge, No. 189, A. F. & A, M., in which he has 
filled all of the chairs, and he is also identified with the York Rite, having taken 
the commandcry degrees. For twenty-five years he served as clerk of CJibbon 
Camp, No. 708, M. \\\ A., his long retention in that office indicating the high 
esteem in which he is held in that organization. His wife belongs to the Metho- 
dist Fpiscopal church. He has resided in this county for more than a quarter of 
a century and during that time has gained the warm friendship of many and 
the sincere respect of all with whom he has been associated. 



WARREN PRATT. 



Warren Pratt, whose residence in Kearney, dating from Jamuiry 7. iS<Si. 
covers a period of more than a third of a century and compasses the period of 
greatest development and progress here, is now engaged in the practice of law 
and has long been identified with the most important litigation heard in the 
courts of his district. The consensus of public opinion i)laces him in a con- 
spicuous and enviable position among the foremost lawyers of western Nebraska 
and his reputation has been eanied at the price of indefatigable eflforl. broad 
study and devotion to the interests of his clients. 

Mr. Pratt was born at New Boston, Illinois, on the 3d of February. 1859, 
and is one of a family of seven children, of whom three are now living. The 
parents were I^cey and Elizabeth (Baker) Pratt, natives of Ohio and England 
respectively. The father became a contractor and for some time operated a 
planing mill at New Boston, where he died in the year 1871. 

When but twelve years of age \\'arrcn Pratt started out in life on his own 
account, working on a farm th«^ugh the summer months, while in the winter 
seasons he largely attended the district schools until he reached the age of 
twenty years, when he took up the j)rofession of teaching, securing^jwp^iion 
in a district school. In the fall of 1880 he came with a manajfipPrster to 
Nebraska, settling in Xemaha county, and in January, iS8i^^^^ar rived in 
Kearney, which at that time was a small town upon the wmc^^ rentier. For 
three months he assisted a cousin who was conducting a grocery store in 
Kearney, but having determined to make the practice of law his life work, 
he put aside mercantile pursuits and became a student in the office of E. C. 
Calkins, who directed his reading until his admission to the bar in 1883. He at 
once entered upon the practice of his profession with his preceptor under the 
firm name of Calkins & Pratt, and for thirty-three years he has been continu- 
ously engaged in the active practice of law in Kearney. During this period he 
has been identified with most of the important litigation tried in the courts of 
the district and is regarded as a wise counselor and strong advocate. He pre- 
pares his cases with great thoroughness, presents them with clearness and 



HISTORY OF DUFFALO COUNTY 117 

cogency, ami as the years have passed has won for his chents many favorable 
verdicts which have established his reputation as a learned and able lawyer. 

On the 22(1 of June, 1887, Mr. Pratt was unitetl in marriage to Miss Amelia 

E. W'onner. a daughter of Henry Wonner, of Osceola, Iowa. To them have 

been born three children, namely: Helen; and Ruth and Marjorie. who are 

school teachers in Nebraska. Mrs. Pratt is a member of the i'resbyterian church. 

Mr. Pratt gave his political allegiance to the democratic party until it 

inserted in its platform the free silver plank, since which time he has affiliated 

with the republican party. He belongs to the IJenevolent Protective ( )rder of 

I !lks. Outside of his profession he has business interests as one of the organizers 

of the Kearney Telephone C'omi)any. which was formed in 1905 and of which 

he has been presiilent practically throughout the ensuiiig years. At this writing 

tols. president of the Buffalo County Bar Association and he enjoys the highest 

P||,|^^rd of his contemporaries in i)nictice. He is at all times fair and just 

How practitioners, treats the court with the studied courtesy which is its 

e and is careful at all times to conform his practice to the highest standards of 

professional ethics. 



KDMLND n. DUNCAN. 



lulmund H. i/ungan is a retired farmer and stock raiser living in Kearney. 
His residence in this part of the state dates from pioneer times and he is familiar 
with every phase of its development and progress. He was born in Mercer 
county, Illinois, in June, 1852, a son of Aaron and Tama (Pratt) Dungan. The 
father was a native of r)hio and was reared in that state and in Illinois, the 
family removing to Mercer county. He conducted a livery barn at New 
Boston. Mercer county, for a number of years and afterward purchased and 
conducted a farm near Aledo. but in 1876 removed to Kearney county, Nebraska, 
and secured a homestead claim near I*'ort Kearney. He squatted upon the prop- 
erty first and when the reser\ation was opened in the same year he homesteaded 
and built one of the first houses on the b'ort Kearney military reservation. This 
he improved and develofx-d. carrying on the farm work year after year up to the 
time of his d eath, which occurred when he was sixty-three years of age. His 
poiitica't^^jlinncc was given to the republican party. The mother was a native 
of Indiana aiul was thirteen years of age when the family removed to Mercer 
county, Illinois, where her parents were among the early settlers. She came to 
Nebraska in 1876, being one of the pioneer women in this part of the state, and 
surviving her husband for some time, she spent her later years in the home of 
her son I''dmund. passing away when about eighty years of age. She was a con- 
sistent and faithful member of the Methodist church and guided her life according 
to its teachings. In the family were four children, of whom two died in infancy, 
the others being: John P.. who made his home in P.ufTalo county but is now 
deceased; and Edmund H. 

The latter is the only survivor of the family. His boyhood days were spent 
at home, and on attaining his majority he began farming. He was twenty-four 
years of age when he removed with the family to Nebraska, where he secured 



118 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

a homestead and began the arduous task of developmg a new farm. He con- 
verted the raw prairie into productive fields and continued to engage in farming 
and stock raising until 1910. He afterward rented his farm to his sons and 
came to Kearney, retiring from business life. He had purchased his father's 
homestead and is now the owner of three hundred and twenty acres of good 
land which affords him an excellent annual income. Diligence was the rule of 
his life and enterprise guided him in all of his activities, while laudable ambition 
proved the spur to his activity. 

On the 23d of March, 1876, J\Ir. Dungan was married to Miss Rhoda 
Reynolds, who was born near Rock Island, Illinois, a daughter of Drury and 
Esther (Love) Reynolds, both of whom were natives of Ohio. The father was 
reared in the Buckeye state and the mother in Illinois, and when a young man 
he removed to Illinois, spending his last days in Rock Island county, where" te 
departed this life at the age of sixty-three years. He had been one of^the^ 
pioneer settlers and valued citizens of that part of the state. His widow^ 
vied and was called to her final rest when eighty years of age, her last 
being spent in Mercer county, Illinois. She was a consistent member of the 
Christian church. Their daughter, Mrs. Dungan, was reared and educated in 
Rock Island county and came to Nebraska in 1876, ten days after her marriage. 
]\Ir. and INIrs. Dungan are the parents of eight children, as follows : Myrtle, 
who is the wife of Gardner Sawin, of Baird, Nebraska; Schuyler, who follows 
farming in Ke^i^^ihc^l^nty, Nebraska; Howard, who is also engaged in farm- 
ing in Kearndy couhty^/'this state; Floyd, living on the home farm; Everett, a 
merchant ofrCearney; Dale, a student in the State University; Stella, at home; 
and Glenn, who is employed in the government reclamation service. Another 
child, the first born, died in early life. Mrs. Dungan is a member of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church. Mr. Dungan gives his political allegiance to the repub- 
lican party but has never been ambitious to hold office, as he has preferred to 
concentrate his energies upon his business affairs and his diligence and determi- 
nation in farm work have brought to him the substantial measure of prosperity 
which is now his. 




W. H. SWARTSLEY. 



W. H. Swartsley is. engaged in the real estate business at Riverdale, which 
town has largely been built up through his eft'orts. He also has important 
landed interests and is giving considerable attention to the breeding, raising and. 
sale of Duroc-Jersey hogs. He has made his home in Buffalo county since 
1907, prior to which time he was a resident of Platte county, Nebraska. His 
birth occurred in Woodford county, Illinois, in 1862, his parents being John C. 
and Jennie L. Swartsley, who were natives of Virginia. They came to Illinois 
in 1853, settling in Woodford county, and in 1881 they arrived in Platte county, 
Nebraska, where the father secured land and concentrated his energies upon the 
development and improvement of his farm, his death occurring about two years 
ago. He was an energetic, industrious and prosperous agriculturist and was a 
prominent and influential citizen. His political allegiance was given to the demo- 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 119 

cratic party and he was called upon to represent Platte county in the state legis- 
lature. His wife has also passed away, her death occurring in Platte county. 

W. H. Swartsley was in his teens at the time of the removal of the family 
to Platte county, and after he had attained his majority he turned his attention 
to general farming in Bismark township, where he owned land. He carefully, 
persistently and successfully tilled the soil for some time and also taught school 
for almost sixteen years, and in 1907 he arrived in Buffalo county, where he has 
since made his home. Here he has operated largely in real estate and has con- 
ducted many important business interests. He organized the Riverdale State 
Bank, which has been a very important factor in the development of local busi- 
ness enterprises, and served as a member of its board of directors until he turned 
^IjiS' iSEterests over to his son Lee, who was the deputy county treasurer of 
^ Buffalo county for eight years. In association with his sons Mr. Swartsley 
Ic owns three hundred and seventy acres of rich and productive land in Riverdale 
township, whereon he is engaged in general farming and stock raising. They 
have the finest drove of full-blooded Duroc- Jersey hogs in the county, and they 
make a specialty of the stock raising feature of their business. Air. Swartsley 
has also done much toward the upbuilding of the attractive little town of River- 
dale. He platted part of the town and then sold lots, was instrumental in induc- 
ing merchants to locate there and had a large part in securing the schoolhouse. 
There is no important feature of the town's upbuilding and development with 
. which he has not been associated. ^ '' 

Mr. Swartsley married Miss Alice May Burns, who was born in Oskaloosa, 
Iowa, and they have three children : Lee, formerly deputy county treasurer ; 
O. E., who is conducting the ranch; and Grace, who is an accomplished musician 
living at home. The family residence is the finest home in the village and 
Mr. Swartsley is a most progressive, active, energetic man, forming his plans 
readily and carrying them forward to successful completion. If a pen picture 
could accurately delineate his business characteristics, such might be given in 
these words : a progressive 'spirit ruled by more than ordinary intelligence and 
good judgment; a deep earnestness impelled and fostered by indomitable perse- 
verance; a native justice expressing itself in correct principle and practice. His 
intellect early grasped the eternal truth that industry wins and industry has 
been the beacon light of his life. He is well known in fraternal circles, belong- 
ing to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias and the 
Woodmen, and his wife and daughter are members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, which he attends. 



J. O. GRIFFIN. 



J. O. Grififin owns and operates three hundred and twenty acres of productive 
land on section 16, Gibbon township, and has gained financial independence 
through his agricultural activities. His birth occurred in Stark county, Illinois, 
on the 27th of June, 1867, and he is one of six living children in a family of 
eight born to E. J. and Rebecca (Nicholas) Griffin. The father was a native of 



120 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

Pennsylvania and the mother's birth occurred in Ohio, but they were married in 
Ilh'nois, where the mother passed away and where the father still resides. 

J. O. Griffin grew to manhood and received his education in Illinois, but in 
1894, when about twenty-seven years of age, he came to Buffalo county, 
Nebraska, and took up his residence on a farm which he operated for some time. 
Later he purchased his present place, which comprises three hundred and twenty 
acres on section 16, Gibbon township, and is now well improved. He keeps 
everything in excellent repair and uses the latest machinery in his work, thus 
increasing his efficiency. He receives a good income from the sale of his grain 
and stock and ranks among the progressive and successful farmers of the county. 

Mr. Griffin was married in 1896 to Miss Clara Philipar, who was born in 
Pennsylvania but was brought to this state when but a year old by her parents, 
Peter and Anna Philipar. The father is dead but the mother is still living. Mr^ 
and Mrs. Griffin have six children: Ruth and Bruce, both high school students ffa 
Leslie; Earl; Ezra; and Carl. 

Mr. Griffin gives his political support to the republican party at national elec- 
tions, but where only local issues are at stake supports the best man irrespective 
of party lines. His fraternal affiliation is with the Modern Woodmen of 
America, and he and his family attend the Methodist Episcopal church. His 
circle of friends is almost coextensive with the circle of his acquaintance, and 
his salient characteristics are those which invariably command respect and warm 
regard. 




OSCAR G. KNOX. 



Oscar G. Knox, manager and one of the stockholders of the Farmers Elevator 
at Riverdale, is a wide-awake and progressive business man, alert to his oppor- 
tunities and energetic in all that he undertakes. He was born in Indiana on the 
20th of May, 1870, and is a son of William E. and Emma J. (Trimble) Knox, 
both of whom were natives of Kentucky, whence they removed to Indiana in 
1868, there residing for eleven years. In 1879 ^hey became residents of Buffalo 
county, Nebraska, casting in their lot with its pioneer settlers, at which time the 
father secured a homestead claim which he converted from a tract of wild prairie 
into rich and productive fields. He died in the year 1899 ^^'^^ is survived by his 
widow, who is now a resident of Riverdale. However, she still owns the old 
liomestead in this county on which she reared her family of five children. -There 
were four sons and a daughter, but the latter has passed away. 

Oscar G. Knox was largely reared and educated in Buffalo county, where 
he came with his parents when a little lad of nine summers. He attended the 
common schools and was reared to the occupation of farming, early becoming 
familiar with the best methods of tilling the soil and caring for the crops. After 
attaining his majority he began farming on his own account, purchasing a tract 
of land on section 4, Riverdale township, where he continued to live for sixteen 
years, during which period he brought his fields to a high state of cultivation and 
also improved his farm with good buildings, making it one of the model properties 
of the community. He is now the owner of three hundred and twenty acres of 
land which constitutes one of the attractive features of the district because of 



1 



W' 




OSCAR G. KNOX 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 123 

its well kept appearance and its modern accessories. He still gives to the farm 
his personal supervision and while residing thereon he made a specialty of breed- 
ing and raising Duroc Jersey hogs. He is now manager of the Farmers Elevator 
Company at Riverdale, of which he is one of the stockholders, and he is capably 
directing the business under his control, making it a profitable venture for those 
who are financially interested therein. 

On the 27th of August, 1890, Mr. Knox was married to Miss Ella Rogers, 
who was born in Iowa, a daughter of John and Edith (Talbott) Rogers, both 
of whom are deceased. In their family were ten children, of whom five are yet 
living. Mr. and Mrs. Knox have become the parents of six children: Ethel, 
the wife of J. F. Richardson; Earl R. ; Jesse S., who is married and lives on 
the home farm; Ada, who is a graduate of the State Normal School and is now 
engaged in teaching; and Albert and Mildred, still under the parental roof. 

The parents are members of the Christian church and Mr. Knox is identified 
with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, belonging to Lodge No. 353, in 
which he has filled all of the chairs. He is also a member of the Modern Wood- 
men camp. His political allegiance is given to the republican party and he has 
held all of the local township offices and has also been a member of the school 
board. His fellow townsmen, appreciative of his worth and ability, have called 
him to higher office and for two terms he represented his district in the state 
legislature, where he gave earnest consideration to all the questions which came 
up for settlement and earnestly sought to advance the best interests of the com- 
monwealth. Those who know him esteem him highly, for in every relation of 
life he has been found progressive, trustworthy and reliable and thus he has 
gained the goodwill and confidence of even those who oppose him politically. 



CHRISTOPHER PUTNAM. 

Christopher Putnam, one of the early settlers of Buffalo county, Nebraska, 
was a native of the Empire state, where he was reared and where he was united 
in marriage to Harriett Nichols. In April, 1871, Mr. Putnam joined the soldiers' 
free homestead colony which came to Nebraska and made settlement in Buffalo 
county. He arrived in April of that year and the following September was 
joined by his family. He secured a homestead of one hundred and sixty acres 
a half mile east of the Gibbon postoffice but now within the village limits. Sub- 
sequently he purchased other lands, adding to his possessions from time to time 
until ultimately he became the owner of six or seven hundred acres. He died 
January 9, 1906, and is still survived by his wife, who yet makes her home in 
Gibbon. 

Mr. Putnam was a leader of public thought and opinion. He served as the 
first county superintendent of schools in Buffalo county and aided in laying a 
substantial foundation upon which to build the educational interests of this part 
of the state. He afterward served as county surveyor and as county clerk and 
proved a most capable pubHc official, discharging his duties with promptness 
and fidelity. In early life he had received good educational opportunities and 
he ever remained a student of the signs of the times, keeping in touch with 



124 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

advanced thought. In addition to his other business interests he operated a 
branch of the Omaha National Bank in Gibbon for a number of years and was 
bookkeeper and secretary of the Gibbon MilHng Company for several years. He 
carried forward to successful completion whatever he undertook and the spirit 
of progress actuated him at all times. His fellow townsmen respected him for 
what he accomplished and the methods which he pursued and his course at every 
point of his career would bear close investigation and scrutiny. To him and his 
wife were born four children, as follows: T. Orson, manager of the credit 
department of the Bemis Bag Company of Omaha, Nebraska; Eva A., the wife 
of Victor Van Duzer, of Berryville, Arkansas; John J., who is at the head of 
the bacteriological department of the University of Idaho; and Charles A., of 
Gibbon. 



ISAAC BUCK. 



Isaac Buck is meeting with gratifying success in the operation of four hun- 
dred acres of fine land on section 21, Shelton township, and has gained a place 
among the up-to-date and well-to-do farmers of his locality. His birth occurred 
upon that farm on the 15th of September, 1874, and he is one of seven living 
children in a family of fourteen born to Joseph and Mary Ann (Singleton) 
Buck. Both parents were natives of England, but in 1869 they came to America 
and at once made their way to Buffalo county, Nebraska. Some time later the 
father homesteaded the farm which our subject is now operating and continued 
to live there until 1906, when he removed to Shelton, where he still makes his 
home. He has reached the advanced age of seventy-six years and is accorded 
the honor to which his long and useful life entitles him. His wife died about 
1908. 

Isaac Buck was reared at home and acquired his education in the public 
schools. He early began helping his father with the farm work and when six- 
teen years of age took charge of the operation of the place. He cultivates four 
hundred acres and manifests a thorough knowledge of farming and sound busi- 
ness judgment in the management of his affairs. He derives a good income 
from his labors and also finds his work congenial. In addition to farming he 
operates a steam threshing outfit, which he owns, and derives a good financial 
return from this enterprise. 

On the nth of November, 1896, Mr. Buck was married to Miss Abbie Lip- 
pincott, who was born in Friend, Nebraska, and is a daughter of J. F. and Janna 
(Vance) Lippincott, both of whom were natives of Pennsylvania. In the early 
'70s, however, they came to Nebraska and here the mother passed away, although 
the father is still living. Mrs. Buck is one of a family of nine children and by 
her marriage has become the mother of three children, namely: Levi V., Alvin 
J. and Stewart T., all of whom are high school students and have good voices 
and unusual musical talent. 

Mr. Buck is independent in politics and although he takes the interest of a 
good citizen in public affairs, he has never been an aspirant for office. He and 
his family attend the United Presbyterian church and their influence is a factor 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 125 

that makes for the moral advancement of their community. He has based his 
success upon close attention to his business and the prosperity which he has 
gained is well deserved. 



ELLSWORTH BOWKER. 

Ellsworth Bowker, clerk of the twelfth judicial district for Buffalo county and 
secretary of the Kearney Canning Company, is thus actively identified with pro- 
fessional and commercial interests and by reason thereof has become widely and 
favorably known. His official record is characterized by unfaltering fidelity to 
duty and his activity in commercial circles is of a character that has contributed 
in large measure to the success of the undertaking with which he is connected. 
Mr. Bowker is a native of Sangamon county, Illinois. He was bom September 
17, 1863, and was one of a family of seven children, three of whom are yet living, 
their parents being John and Hetty (Barnett) Bowker. 

His youthful days were spent upon a farm until he reached the age of eighteen 
years, during which period he attended the district schools and in the acquire- 
ment of his' education laid the foundation of his later success. While still at 
home he took up the study of telegraphy. He had a brother who was acting 
as station agent at Rochester, Illinois, three miles from the family home. They 
cut poles in the woods, set them up and strung wire upon them and several of 
the boys of the neighborhood cut in on this line and thus got their first start in 
telegraphic work. Ellsworth Bowker gained a considerable knowledge of the 
business and at eighteen years of age had secured the appointment of telegraph 
operator at Oak Mills, Kansas, on the Missouri Pacific Railroad. He followed 
railroad work until 1900 and during part of that time was located at Springfield, 
Illinois, where he acted as day operator for the master mechanic of the Wabash 
Railroad. He was also the first train dispatcher at Marshalltown, Iowa, on what 
was then known as the Diagonal Railway, a part of the Wisconsin, Iowa & 
Nebraska system and now a part of the Chicago Great Western. His business 
duties took him to various points and while with the Western Union he spent some 
time at Omaha and in other cities. During the last seven years of his railroad life 
he was a conductor on the Chicago, Burlington & Ouincy Railroad. In May, 1885, 
he went to Custer county, Nebraska, where he secured a homestead, on which he 
made the necessary improvements that won for him the title to the land. That 
place was situated six miles from the present site of Mason City but at that time 
no railroad had been built through the district. When the railroad was built Mr. 
Bowker became the first agent at that point and returned to his old occupation. 
Later he deeded his land to his wife's parents and it has since been their home. 
In 1900 Mr. Bowker abandoned railroad work and embarked in merchandising at 
Ravenna, Buffalo county, in which he continued for three years. He then became 
an assistant in the county treasurer's office under M. N. Troupe and in 1907 he 
was elected clerk of the district court, to which office he was reelected and is now 
serving for the second term, making a most excellent record in the position by 
the prompt, capable and systematic manner in which he discharges his duties. 

Into other fields he has also extended his activities. In 191 1 he was appointed 



126 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

by the Kearney Commercial Club as chairman of a committee to see about 
estabhshing a canning company at this place. The project was reported upon 
favorably, a company was organized and since that time Mr. Bowker has been 
its secretary. He is also the owner of a small tract of land, on which he 
installed the first irrigating system in Buffalo county. This he has converted 
into a truck farm and plant nursery, which he conducts with the aid of his sons 
under the name of the Bowker Plant Nursery. His business affairs are always 
wisely directed and his energy and enterprise enable him to overcome all the 
difficulties and obstacles in his path and work his way steadily upward. 

On the ist of March, 1885, Mr. Bowker was united in marriage to Miss Rosa 
B. Mercer, of Jasper county, Iowa, and to them were born twelve children : 
Chauncey Pearl and Grace, both now deceased ; J. Sherman ; Ethel B., the wife of 
Stanley McCormack; Charles; Harold; Edward, deceased; Mabel, the wife of 
BertDady; Elwood; Vera; Wesley; and Kenneth. 

Mrs. Bowker is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church and Mr. Bowker 
belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Knights of Pythias. 
Both are widely known in Kearney and other parts of the county and have a circle 
of friends almost coextensive with the circle of their acquaintance. In a review 
of his life it will be noticed that from an early age he has depended upon his 
own resources and that his advancement has been won at the price of earnest, 
self-denying labor. Working his way steadily upward, he has gained a position 
in business circles that is the direct result of persistent, earnest and intelligently 
directed effort and his substantial qualities are recognized and appreciated by 
many with whom he comes in contact. 



SWAN FARRIS. 



The history of Swan Farris is the record of a self-made man who owes his 
advancement entirely to his ability, enterprise and determination, and his record 
proves that success and an honored name may be won simultaneously. Moreover, 
he has reached out into the broader realms of thought, keeping in touch with many 
modern questions and problems, and is today a most interesting as well as vener- 
able gentleman, his mind being a storehouse of valuable information and remin- 
iscence. A native of Sweden, he was born in Skanay, June 12, 1836, a son of 
Farris and Swanberg (Olsen) Handricks. The father was born in the village 
of Trolle-Ljungby, Sweden, June 13, 1804, and was a carpenter and building 
contractor of his native town. There he passed away May 4, 1863, and after his 
demise his widow came to the new world, joining her son Swan at his home in 
Galesburg, Illinois, where she died October 21, 1867. 

Swan Farris, an only child, was reared in Sweden and obtained his educa- 
tion in the graded and high schools of Trolle-Ljungby. At the age of seventeen 
years he went to Copenhagen, Denmark, to learn the trade of stone engraving, 
remaining there for two years, and on one of his frequent visits home to his 
parents in Sweden he met a party of neighbors who were his old schoolmates, 
who were coming to America. They induced him to join them and he left the old 
home village in the spring of 1856, when nineteen years of age, to come to the 




SWAX FARRIS 



t 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 129 

new world. He spent nine weeks on a sailing vessel, after which he landed in 
New York city, passing through the old immigrant station of Castle Garden. After 
a few days spent in the eastern metropolis he made his way to Chicago by rail, 
canal and the Great Lakes. He recalls the fact that the railroad train made such 
slow time that some of the boys of the party left the train, picked apples in an 
orchard near the track and again caught the train. 

]\Ir. Farris remained in Chicago for several weeks, but not finding employ- 
ment, went to Moline, Illinois, where he obtained a situation with the John Deere 
Plow Company, making parts of plows. After two years he left that position 
and began to work as a raftsman, running rafts on the Mississippi river from 
Black River, Wisconsin, to Alton, Illinois. He was afterward cabin waiter on 
Mississippi river steamboats and gradually drifted to the contracting business, 
building levees along the Mississippi in the states of Mississippi and Louisiana. 
He built canal ditches and did other such work and afterward became an express 
driver in New Orleans, conveying negro slaves from Arcade Hall in that city, 
the slave market place, to the railroad and boat landings as they were being 
shipped to their new owners. This was a responsible job owing to the value of 
the negroes in his charge. In 1859 he left New Orleans and went to Utica, 
Mississippi, where he again engaged in the contracting business, building ponds 
and dams on the cotton plantations to hold the water for the cattle to drink. When 
war was declared, as he was not a believer in slavery, he left the south and 
removed to Galesburg, Illinois, where he conducted a restaurant and bought 
and sold land. In connection with a business associate he purchased in 1878 ten 
thousand acres of good land in Phelps county, Nebraska, but his health began to 
fail and he sold most of his land again for about two dollars and seventy-five 
cents per acre, having paid for it two dollars and fifty cents. 

Mr. Farris made five trips back to his old home in Sweden and while on one 
of these visits his father died May 4. 1863. He then brought his mother back 
with him to the new world and they established their home at Galesburg, Illinois. 
Mr. Farris still owns one and a half sections of the ten thousand acres of land 
which he and his partner purchased in Phelps county in 1878 and his landed 
possessions also include one and a half sections in Buffalo county, four hundred 
and eighty acres of this being on section 17, Odessa township, and eighty acres 
on section 18, Odessa township. He also has a quarter section in Holland county, 
Nebraska, near Scandinavia. All this land is improved and much of it has been 
brought under cultivation, while some is used as pasture land. All is rented to 
good tenants and from his property Mr. Farris derives a substantial annual 
income. He has never personally cultivated the land, for he is not a farmer. 
On leaving Galesburg, Illinois, he removed to Chicago, where he remained for 
four years, and on the advice of his physician that he seek a change of climate 
for the benefit of his health, he removed to> Kearney in 1888 and purchased a 
handsome residence at 18 10 Seventh avenue, where he lives retired save for the 
supervision which he gives to his invested interests. His investments have been 
most judiciously made and notable success has crowned his efforts. 

In the fall of 1863 Swan Farris was married to Miss Ellen Isapson, a 
native of Sweden, their wedding being celebrated in Galesburg, Illinois. She 
died a year later and at Galesburg, on the 9th of September, 1869, Mr. Farris 
wedded Miss CeciHa Petersen, who passed away at Kearney, March 30, 1913. 



130 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

Mr. Farris is a member of the Lutheran church at Kearney and has always 
given his poHtical allegiance to the republican party. He possesses one of the 
fine libraries of the state. He has many books that he has purchased on his 
trips through Europe, including seventy-five volumes which are very old and 
rare editions. One is a textbook on religion, published January 15, 1496. He also 
has a history of Rome printed in the Latin language at Venice, Italy, in August, 
1475. The book published in 1496, a volume of large size, still has its original 
binding, but the history of Rome was rebound in the sixteenth century. Of the 
seventy-five volumes none was published subsequent to 1550. He also has 
many small Bibles, prayer books and other volumes of that character which are 
more than four hundred years old and most of these have the original binding. 
They are printed in German and Latin languages, both of which Mr. Farris 
reads. He also has in his library some books written by hand by the old monks 
before printing was invented. He possesses one of the world's rarest collections 
of coins of all nations, some of which were issued before the Christian era and 
all collected by him prior to forty years ago. These include copper, gold and 
silver coins and he has almost a complete set of Scandinavian coins, including 
four of the old plate coins six by four inches and a quarter of an inch thick. Some 
of these date back to the eighth century. Of the rare plate coins he secured three 
in Sweden and one in Germany. Sweden is the only nation that ever used a 
copper coin that was not round. His collection is valued at many thousands of 
dollars and Mr. Farris has exhibited the collection at various times He keeps 
the coins in the safe deposit vault in the bank at Kearney, as they are worth too 
much to be in his home. 

Mr. Farris has arranged by his will that his valuable library of old books and 
his collection of coins shall be given to some Swedish institution of learning. He 
has no living relatives and he intends that his estate shall go to some charitable 
or religious institution which in his opinion will do the most possible good with 
it. He is a man of religious tendencies, actuated in all that he does by his Chris- 
tian faith and belief and is most charitable, again and again extending a helping 
hand where aid is needed. He is a public-spirited citizen, at all times aiding in 
matters for the benefit of his community. He enjoys excellent health at the age 
of eighty years and is one of Buffalo county's most honored and valued citizens, 
a man with whom association means expansion and elevation. 



ANDREW KNOBEL. 



Andrew Knobel, deceased, was one of the pioneer settlers of Buft'alo county, 
who during the years of his active life here followed the occupation of farming 
and contributed in substantial measure to the agricultural development of the 
district. A native of Switzerland, he was born in Canton Glarus in October, 
1837, and when a young man came to the United States, settling in New York. 
Five years later he sent for his sweetheart to join him and they were married 
in the state of New York. She bore the maiden name of Katharina Hefti and was 
born in Canton Glarus, December 10, 1842, being twenty-one years of age when 
she crossed the Atlantic to the new world. She had worked in a muslin factory 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 131 

in Switzerland but saw no bright outlook for a business future there and desired 
to get away. 

Air. Knobel was employed as a coachman in New York and after carefully 
saving his earnings he purchased a little tract of land of four acres, upon which 
they established their home. While living thereon he worked by the day at a wage 
of a dollar and a half. Later they removed to Wisconsin, but soon afterward 
returned to New York and in 1880 they arrived in Buffalo county, Nebraska, 
influenced to make this change by the fact that Mrs. Knobel had a sister and a 
brother-in-law, John Streif, living in this county. They made the journey by 
train to Buffalo county and for a short period remained in the home of Mr. 
Streif, after which they purchased the farm upon which the family has since 
resided. It was a tract of railroad land and the people who had previously 
owned it had abandoned it. 

Mr. Knobel purchased the property and for five years he and his family 
occupied a sod house. There was also a sod stable upon the place giving shelter 
to his stock. He was a good manager and hard worker and in time became a 
successful farmer. He was building the present frame residence, which was 
almost completed, when he caught cold and died within four days, passing away 
in the latter part of October, 1891. 

Several years ago Mrs. Knobel became convinced that the Bible authorized 
the observance of Saturday as the real Sabbath and since that time she has 
been identified with the Seventh Day Adventists and Mr. Knobel also adopted 
the same belief. Four children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Knobel : Andrew, 
who lives with his mother and owns and cultivates five hundred acres of land; 
David, who is married and follows farming on a tract of eight acres belonging 
to his mother in Elm Creek township ; Fred, who is married and follows farm- 
ing in Odessa township ; and Libby, the wife of Tom Elliott, a resident farmer 
of Odessa township. 

Mrs. Knobel tells many interesting tales concerning pioneer times. On one 
occasion, before experience had taught them the lesson, her husband set fire to the 
stubble on their place. The wind was in the south and swept the blaze across the 
fields like a race horse. The thatch roof on the stable caught fire and the building 
was destroyed, but neighbors rushed in and saved the sod house. A couple of 
chickens belonging to the family living on the place were burned to death and a 
young dog was tied in the stable with a chain. No one thought of the animal, so 
he too became a sacrifice to the carelessness and inexperience of the easterners. 
When the family left New York Mr. Knobel was told that he must carry a 
gun, feeling that it was unsafe to penetrate so far into the west unprotected. 
Accordingly he bought a gun and carried it over his shoulder, but it proved to be 
a nuisance on many occasions, for the conductors would not allow it to be taken 
into the coach but would take charge of it on the train until it was handed back 
to Air. Knobel when he had reached his destination. Many of the old settlers had 
little ambition and therefore failed to make good in their new suroundings, not 
being willing to endure the hardships and trials which are always incidents of 
pioneer life. In those days cornmeal mush was the staple article of diet. Soon 
after arriving Mrs. Knobel attended a quilting, at which her companions of the 
party asked her if the family were eating mush. She did not even know what the 
dish was but she did not plead ignorance, saying simply that they had not eaten 



132 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

any as yet. They told her that she would have to eventually come to it, but the 
family went to work, raised wheat, had it ground and have never yet had to resort 
to the dish mentioned. Mrs. Knobel has continuously lived upon the old home 
farm, which was willed to her by her husband. It comprises one hundred and 
sixty acres of land in Odessa township, in addition to which she owns another 
eighty acre tract in Elm Creek township. 

Her parents, Andrew and Elizabeth Hefti, came to Buffalo county when Mn 
and Mrs. Knobel removed here and both her father and mother passed away in this 
coimty. Mrs. Knobel is still hale and hearty and enjoys excellent health, although 
she has now passed the seventy-third milestone on life's journey. There is no 
feature of pioneer life in Buffalo county with which she is not familiar and her 
experiences, if told in detail, would constitute a most interesting volume, giving 
an excellent picture of conditions which existed here in the early days. 



WALTER KNUTZEN. 



Walter Knutzen, a prominent contractor of Kearney who has been promi- 
nently identified with important building operations in this part of the state, is 
one of those citizens whose lives indicate what may be accomplished by young 
men of foreign birth who seek the opportunities of the new world and who are 
ruled in their activities by enterprise and energy. Mr. Knutzen was born near 
Mandal, Norway, November 8, 1848, and there spent the days of his boyhood 
and youth. He began to learn cabinetmaking when sixteen years of age, devot- 
ing five years to the trade, after which he shipped as a sailor before the mast, 
sailing between ports of England, United States, Canada, France and Holland 
for two years. In the spring of 1872 he came to New York and thence went 
by coast steamer to Savannah, Georgia. After a short time he removed to Buf- 
falo, New York, and sailed upon the Great Lakes for a season. In 1872 he made 
his way to Chicago, where he spent two years working at the carpenter's trade. 
He afterward removed to Houghton county, Michigan, where he followed car- 
pentering for five years and also took some contracts. He then returned to the 
old home and married. A few months later, or in May, 1879, he arrived in 
Kearney, which was then a small town, and here he has since engaged in con- 
tracting, being very closely identified with the building operations of the city 
throughout the intervening period covering thirty-seven years. For four years 
he engaged in contract work in Colorado but during that period regarded Kearney 
as his home. He built the high school at Fort Collins, Colorado, also the State 
Normal School at Greeley and, in fact, was accorded a large number of con- 
tracts in that state. In Kearney he has probably erected more buildings than 
any other one man and has received contracts in otlfer parts of the state. He 
erected a fine high school building in Kearney and many substantial and beautiful 
structures stand as monuments to his skill and enterprise. 

In 1879 i" Norway Mr. Knutzen was married to Miss Abelone Jensen, who 
was also born at Mandal, Norway, and they have become the parents of five 
children: Annie C, at home; Julia P., a teacher at Helena, Montana; Agnes, a 
teacher in the Nebraska State Normal School ; Henry, a student in the Nebraska 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 133 

University; and Harriet, who is in the State Normal. The children have been 
provided with excellent educational advantages and all are graduates of the 
high school. Mr. Knutzen is a member of the Masonic fraternity and the 
Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. He has many substantial qualities, among 
which are the sterling characteristics of industry, reliabihty, progressiveness 
and determination. His life has been well spent and he has been the architect 
and builder of his own fortune. 



FRED A. NYE. 



The bar of Buffalo county has for twenty-eight years numbered Fred A. Nye 
among its members and his position has ever been an honored one. Ability has 
brought him steadily to the front and his powers as an advocate have connected 
him with much of the important litigation heard in the courts of middle western 
Nebraska. A native of Iowa, he was born in Muscatine county, June 26, 1862, 
a son of Alfred and Sarah R. (Silverthorn) Nye. The ancestral line is traced 
back to Benjamin Nye, who came from England in 1635, in young manhood, and 
established his home in the village of Sandwich, Barnstable county, Massachu- 
setts. He was the progenitor of the family in the new world and among his 
descendants were those who served with the colonies in their struggle for inde- 
pendence. The father was a farmer and dealt extensively in stock. In 1885 
the family first came to Buffalo county, not with the intention of making a loca- 
tion at that time but more with the view of a possible return. The same year 
they made their way back to Iowa and in 1886 the father passed away in that 
state. Mrs. Nye with her youngest son, Fred A. (the other children having 
then reached years of maturity and located elsewhere), removed to Buffalo 
county and established her permanent home, settling in Kearney in 1888. There 
she continued to reside until called to her final rest in 1902. 

Fred A. Nye was reared on the old homestead farm in Iowa and obtained 
his primary education in the district schools and in the academy at Wilton. Later 
his parents removed to Iowa City in order to accord him the benefit of educa- 
tional opportunities there, after which he matriculated in the State University 
in September, 1883. He completed the full four years' course and was graduated 
with the degree of Bachelor of Philosophy. He not only pursued that course 
but also took work in law which enabled him to graduate from the law depart- 
ment in the year 1888. 

Mr. Nye began his professional career in Kearney in the following August 
and has continued in active practice here since that time. No dreary novitiate 
awaited him. He made steady progress, study and broadening experience quali- 
fying him for active professional duties. Careful analysis enables him to readily 
ascertain the relation between cause and effect and his reasoning is characterized 
by terse and decisive logic, while in argument he is strong and in expression 
is clear and felicitous. 

On the 17th of May, 1893, Mr. Nye was married to Miss Helena M. Barlow, 
of Keriton, Ohio, and they have become the parents of six children, Lucile E., 
Maurice Barlow, John H., Mary N., Sarah Gertrude and Benjamin I. Mrs. Nye 



134 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. Nye, who belongs to the 
democratic party, has taken an active part in shaping the political history of the 
community but has never save on one occasion aspired to political preferment. 
This exception was when in 1896 he became county attorney, to which office he 
was reelected, serving for two terms, or four years. He is a member of Phi 
Kappa Psi, a college fraternity, and he possesses attractive social qualities which 
render him popular, while his ability has gained for him a foremost place in the 
ranks of the legal profession in his county. 



JOHN M. BAYLEY. 



Among the retired farmers living at Gibbon is John M. Bayley, who is widely 
known and highly esteemed throughout the county. His birth occurred at Clin- 
ton, Wayne county, Pennsylvania, on the 28th of January, 1836, and his parents 
were William and Mary Ann (Morse) Bayley, both natives of Massachusetts. 
Their marriage was celebrated in that state and they resided there until 1814, 
when they removed to Pennsylvania, where the father became a landowner and 
engaged in farming. Both he and his wife passed away in that state. 

John M. Bayley is one of a family of eight children, all of whom grew to 
maturity, but only four are now living. He was educated in his native state 
and remained under the parental roof until 1857, when he removed to Nebraska 
and located upon a farm in the vicinity of Table Rock. A year later he sold that 
place and returned to Pennsylvania, where he remained until 1871, in which year 
he came to Buffalo county, Nebraska, with the soldiers free homestead colony. 
He settled upon a farm on section 22, Shelton township, and for thirty-four years 
devoted his time and attention to the operation and development of that place. As 
the years passed his capital increased, for he was an efficient farmer and man- 
aged his affairs well, and in 1905, feeling that he had accumulated a competence, 
he retired and removed to Gibbon, where he is now living. He still owns three 
hundred and sixty-eight acres of land in Shelton township and also holds title 
to his fine residence in Gibbon. 

Mr. Bayley was married in i860 to Miss Adaline A. Adams, whose birth 
occurred in Wayne county, Pennsylvania, and who is a daughter of Lester P. 
and Margaret T. (Cooper) Adams, both natives of the state of New York. In 
1830 they went to Pennsylvania and located on a farm there, where they passed 
their remaining days. Mrs. Bayley is the only one living of a family of eleven 
children. She had six brothers at the front at the same time during the Civil 
war and one died while in the army. Mr. and Mrs. Bayley are the parents of 
five children, namely; Harriet T., deceased; Lester W., who is farming in 
Buffalo county ; John A., who is living on a farm in Washington state ; Mabel, 
the wife of Henry J. Clifton, now of Red Elm, South Dakota ; and Nettie, who 
married S. A. A. Walker. Previous to her marriage Mrs. Bayley taught school 
for eight terms in Pennsylvania and was very successful in that profession. 

Mr. Bayley supports the republican party at the polls and served on the 
school board for a number of years in addition to holding the office of road super- 
visor. His wife holds membership in the Presbyterian church. He went to the 




5 ^ 



. 


p'^ 




m W^mt 


"•i:.,«li*- ^ 


I^B 




■ ''■ ' ^. ■''',<■'?" 


.-/vj,,-,! ^\ 



MRS. JOHN M. BAYLEY 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 139 

defense of the Union at the time of the Civil war, enlisting in Company E, One 
Hundred and Seventy-ninth Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, and remained in 
the army until he was honorably discharged at Philadelphia in August, 1863. His 
brother Edgar died while in the service. Our subject began his career with 
practically nothing but is now a man of independent means, his enterprise, good 
judgment and hard work having brought him financial success. 



THOMAS J. PARRISH. 



No history of Buffalo county would be complete without extended reference 
to Thomas J. Parrish, who is one of the most extensive landowners in this part of 
the state, having about two thousand acres in the northern part of Buffalo county, 
whereon he and his sons are extensively engaged in farming and stock raising. 
He was born in Shelby county, Indiana, September 28, 1848, and was there 
reared and educated, attending the public schools. His youthful days were spent 
upon the home farm until he was about seventeen years of age, when he left home 
and began clerking in a hardware store in Franklin, Indiana, there remaining 
until 1874, which year witnessed his arrival in Kearney. He became identified 
with the business interests of the city as a clerk in the hardware store of V. B. 
Clarke, with whom he spent five years. The county seat at that time was a small 
village just emerging into some commercial importance. During that period he 
secured a homestead and timber claim in Sartoria township, proved up the 
property, secured title thereto and is still owner of the land. In 1879 he embarked 
in the#hardware business on his own account and continued in active connection 
with the trade until 1885, when he sold his store and turned his attention to the 
live stock business, although he continued to make his home in Kearney. He 
purchased railroad land until he now owns about two thousand acres, his holdings 
making him one of the extensive landowners of the county. He breeds pure 
blooded Polled Angus cattle and Duroc Jersey hogs, conducting the business on a 
very large scale, his annual shipments constituting one of the important features 
of the live stock industry in this part of the state. 

Mr. Parrish was united in marriage tO' Miss Letitia Megran, a native of 
Stevens Point, Wisconsin, where she was reared and educated. They have four 
children as follows : Frank M., who is associated with his father in the operation 
of his ranch; Leo M., who is engaged in business as an insurance collector of 
Boise, Idaho; Jay M., a practicing attorney of Boise, Idaho; and Ina M., who is 
the wife of Frank L. Empey, of Kearney. Mr. and Mrs. Parrish also have five 
grandchildren. 

Politically Mr. Parrish is a republican but was reared in the faith of the 
democratic party. He has never cared to accept office, as his time has been fully 
occupied by business affairs. He has not confined his attention solely to his farm- 
ing, stock raising and merchandising interests, for he has been a stockholder in 
the cotton mill, also in a military school, in a bank and in other enterprises which 
have contributed to the welfare and improvement of the community and at the 
same time have constituted a source of individual success. Fraternally he is 
connected with the Masonic order, in which he has attained high rank and is now 
Vol. n— 7 



140 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

a member of the Mystic Shrine at Omaha. He and his wife hold membership in 
the Presbyterian church. Wherever he is known he is held in high esteem because 
of his activity, his thorough reliability and many other sterling traits of character 
such as command confidence, goodwill and high regard in every land and clime. 



BERNIE F. HENLINE. 



Bernie F. Henline is the popular and capable young cashier of the Commercial 
Bank of Gibbon. A native of Illinois, he was born in McLean county on the 3d of 
June, 1886, of the marriage of Ira F. and Sina I. (Arbuckle) Henline, both of 
whom were likewise born in the Prairie state. In 1888 they removed to Buffalo 
county, Nebraska, and located upon a farm, which the father operated for a 
number of years. The mother has passed away but he is still living and now 
makes his home in Kearney. They became the parents of four children, all of 
whom survive. 

Bernie F. Henline attended the common schools and prepared for entering 
the business world by taking a commercial course in the Kearney State Normal. 
He then entered the employ of the Commercial National Bank at Kearney, where 
he held the office of assistant cashier, but in 191 2 he was made cashier of the 
Commercial Bank of Gibbon, the policy of which he has since controlled. He 
understands the many ways in which a bank may contribute to the legitimate 
business development of a community and has made the Commercial Bank an 
important factor in the business life of Gibbon and has at the same time safe- 
guarded the funds of the stockholders and depositors. He is a director in the 
bank and owns forty-five per cent of the stock of the institution. He also holds 
title to a good residence property at Kearney. 

In igo8 occurred the marriage of Mr. Henline and Miss Nellie Welland; and 
they have three children, Paul W., Robert J. and an infant unnamed. Mr. 
Henline supports the republican party and is now serving as a member of the town 
board. He belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights of 
Pythias, the Elks, the Highlanders and the Mystic Workers of the World and is 
popular both within and without those organizations. His wife is a communicant 
of the Episcopal church. He has depended for his success upon a careful study of 
banking, close attention to all phases of the business of the institution with which 
he is connected, enterprise and integrity, and his influence in financial circles has 
steadily increased as his worth has become more widely known. 



HON. JAMES E. MILLER. 

As a member of the Nebraska senate Hon. James E. Miller made a record of 
legislative service resulting in permanent good to the state and, moreover, he is 
known as a man of rugged honesty and unsullied rectitude, his character worth 
gaining him the high position which he occupies today in public regard. For a 
long period he was identified with agricultural interests but is now living retired 



HISTORY OF 13UFFALO COUNTY 141 

in Kearney, having gained in former years the measure of success which now 
provides him with all of the comforts and some of the luxuries of life. 

Mr. Miller was born at Tarentum, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, on the 
28th of May, 1837, and is therefore nearing the eightieth milestone on life's 
journey. He is a son of James ]\Iiller, a grandson of Gideon Miller and a great- 
grandson of Gideon Miller, Sr. The progenitor of the family in America was 
probably of English birth and at all events it is known that the family has been 
represented on this side of the Atlantic from a period antedating the Revo- 
lutionary war. They became residents of western Pennsylvania at an early day, 
when the Indians were numerous in that section of the country. Gideon Miller, 
Jr., married Miss Rachel Coe, a daughter of Benjamin Coe, who was an officer of 
the Revolutionary war and in recognition of his services was given a grant of 
four hundred acres of land on Bull creek in Allegheny county. James Miller in 
1826 aided in laying out the town of Tarentum, where he conducted a store, 
operated a grist and saw mill and also served as postmaster. There the youngest 
of his children, James E. Miller, was born, and it is said that his was the first 
birth in Tarentum. Having arrived at years of maturity, James Miller wedded 
Nellie McConnell and they had a family of five children, of whom but one is now 
living. 

With his parents James E. Miller removed to Scott county, Iowa, in 1844, 
when that state was still under territorial rule, and there he grew to manhood. The 
year after the arrival of the family in that locality both his father and mother 
died. They were pioneer settlers of the locality, being among the first to establish 
a home in Scott county. 

James E. Miller had but little opportunity to secure an education and there 
were few pleasures in his youth, for he was left an orphan when but eight years of 
age and instead of being sheltered by parental care and love during his youthful 
days he was forced to spend his time among people who cared more for what he 
could do for them than for what they could do for him. Necessity forced him to 
work for others until he reached the age of eighteen years, when he started out 
to earn his livelihood unhampered by the restrictions of those whom he served. 
For two years he worked for himself and during that period practiced the closest 
economy as well as industry, thereby earning enough to enable him to pay his 
tuition at Knox College Academy in Galesburg, Illinois. When he had reached 
the age of twenty he had saved enough money to buy four yoke of oxen, with 
which he broke the prairie for two years. 

In i860 Mr. Miller became a victim of the gold fever and with a company 
from eastern Iowa crossed the ]\Iissouri river at Nebraska City, where the com- 
pany divided. A part of the number took the Platte valley route, passing through 
Nebraska before Lincoln was founded. They proceeded by way of Fort Kearney 
and saw thousands of buft'aloes, in fact such great herds crossed their path that 
at times they were detained on their journey, having to wait until the animals went 
on. At length they reached their destination, near Pikes Peak, but in that fall 
Mr. Miller returned to civilization in time to vote for Abraham Lincoln. It was 
his intention to go again to the gold fields in the following spring but the unsettled 
condition of the times prior to the Civil war decided him to the contrary. 

On the 25th of November, 1861, his patriotic spirit aroused, Mr. Miller 
enlisted in Company B, Second Iowa A^olunteer Infantry, with which he served 



142 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

for three years and eight months and was then honorably discharged at Louis- 
ville, Kentucky, on the 12th of July, 1865. He participated in every battle and 
campaign of his regiment, including Fort Donelson, Shiloh, the siege of Corinth, 
luka, the second battle of Corinth and thence proceeded to Chattanooga after the 
battles of Lookout Mountain and Missionary Ridge. It was at this time that he 
with his companions reenlisted and they joined Sherman's army in time to par- 
ticipate in the Atlanta campaign, taking part in the battles of Altoona Pass, 
Peachtree Creek, Kenesaw Mountain, Jonesboro, and in fact all of the principal 
engagements up to and including the capture of Atlanta. Mr. Aliller was with 
Sherman on the famous march to the sea, participating in the siege and capture of 
Savannah. He thence proceeded northward through the Carolinas, taking part 
in the battle of Bentonville and finally concluding his military career by par- 
ticipating in the grand review at Washington, where thousands of victorious 
soldiers marched through the streets of the capital amid cheering thousands who 
welcomed their return. 

After the war Mr. Miller returned to Iowa and engaged in farming in that 
state until 1873, when he came to Buffalo county, Nebraska, and homesteaded a 
quarter section in Cedar township. He first built a sod house and in the early 
days experienced all of the hardships of pioneer times. For thirty-one years he 
lived upon that place and witnessed the transformation of the county from a great 
expanse of unbroken prairie to a thickly settled, prosperous district showing all 
of the improved conditions of modern times. Year by year he carefully tilled the 
soil and converted his land into productive fields, becoming the owner of one of 
the fine farm properties of the county. In 1904 he sold his homestead place and 
removed to Monmouth, Illinois, to be near his daughter, who was attending 
college there. In 191 1, however, he returned to Buffalo county and settled in 
Kearney, where he has since lived, enjoying a rest which he has truly earned and 
richly deserves. 

On the i6th of March, 1866, Mr. Miller was united in marriage to Miss Ann 
J. Duncan, a daughter of James and Jane (Wilson) Duncan, who were at that 
time farming people of Scott county, Iowa. Mrs. Miller was born in Allegheny 
county, P'ennsylvania, March 16, 1845, and in April, 1855, went with her parents 
to Scott county, Iowa, where she remained until after her marriage. Together 
Mr. and Mrs. Miller have lived in happiness for the golden period of fifty years. 
Nine children have been born to them : John A. ; James C. ; Lorena Jane, the wife 
of John J. Foster ; William Van, who died in infancy ; Frank G. ; Fred D. ; Louis 
D., who died in infancy; George C. ; and Grace E. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Miller are members of the United Presbyterian church. 
In politics he was an ardent republican and is now a progressive democrat. In 
1898 and again in 1900 he was elected to the state senate by a fusion of the 
democrat and populist parties and while serving in the upper house of the state 
legislature he became connected with many important measures which have had 
to do with the betterment of the state. His efforts therein were of permanent 
good, for he carefully considered each question which came up for settlement and 
supported only such measures as his judgment told him were of worth to the 
commonwealth. He introduced and secured the enactment of a statute providing 
that in all public schools in the state there should be taught "the elementary 
principles of agriculture, including a fair knowledge of the habits and structure 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 143 

of common plants, insects, birds and c|uadmpeds." Nebraska was the first state 
to provide for the teaching of agriculture in the public schools. His political 
integrity, like his rectitude in other relations of life, remained unquestioned. He 
has ever held to the highest standards of manhood, has never used intoxicants, 
has never been known to take advantage of his fellowmen in any business trans- 
action nor sought to lessen the opportunities of a fellow traveler on life's journey. 
On the contrary he had held to the highest principles and in every possible way 
has endeavored to assist others. 



WILLIAM SCHLATTMANN. 

William Schlattmann, who carries on general farming on section 25, Center 
township, manifests a progressive spirit in all that he undertakes and by well 
defined efl'ort and capable management he has won a place among the substan- 
tial farmers of the county, now giving his attention to the operation of five 
hundred and sixty acres of land. lie was born in Germany on the 20th of 
March, 1871, a son of Henry Schlattmann, who died in Germany. In 1882, when 
a little lad of eleven years, his son William came to the United States with a 
neighbor's family and after arriving in the new world took up his abode with 
an uncle, W^illiam Frede, who lived in Yates county, Nebraska. He remained 
with his uncle for about four years, after which he secured employment as a 
farm hand in the neighborhood, being thus engaged until 1892. In that year 
Mr. Schlattmann was united in marriage to Miss Emma Wlenke, a native of 
Yates county, Nebraska. ITer father, Henry Wienke, came to this state from 
Germany in 1871. The year following his marriage Mr. Schlattmann engaged 
in the cultivation of a rented farm and in 1893 removed to Nuckolls county, 
Nebraska, where he subsequently purchased land, making his home in that locality 
for nine years. In 1902 he removed to Thayer county and in 1904 came to 
Buft'alo county, where he purchased his present home place of three hundred and 
twenty acres situated on section 25, Center township. Later he bought another 
tract of one hundred and ten acres in Platte township, which he also owns. He 
is one of the progressive and extensive farmers of Center township, for he 
rents a tract of two hundred and forty acres near his home place, so that he is 
now operating altogether five hundred and sixty acres of land, while his son 
Henry rents and cultivates one hundred and sixty acres, and his daughter 
Minnie, in cooperation with a lady friend, had one hundred and thirty acres of 
wheat planted in 191 5. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Schlattmann have been born twelve children, eleven of 
whom are still living, as follows : Minnie, Henry W., Fred E., William H., 
Albert J., Edward, Annie, John, Lulu, Raymond and Arvid, all at home. 3ilrs. 
Schlattmann is one of the typical home mothers who lives for her family and 
their welfare and finds her greatest happiness in promoting the pleasure and 
comfort of her children. Mr. Schlattmann has given his undivided attention to 
his farming and stock raising interests and his energy and determination have 
brought him to his present enviable position in business circles. Efi^ort intelli- 
gently directed never fails to win its legitimate reward, and Mr. Schlattmann's 



lU ' HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

life record proves what may be accomplished when there is the will to dare and 
to do. Politically he is independent, supporting men and measures rather than 
party. Fraternally he is identified with the Eagles, while his religious faith is 
indicated by his membership in the Lutheran church, to which his wife and 
children also belong. 



HERMAN KAHLE. 



That the district surrounding Kearney is a rich agricultural section is evidenced 
in the fact that the city now contains many retired farmers — men who have care- 
fully cultivated their fields and gained good returns therefrom. Moreover, the 
careful husbanding of their resources has led to the attainment of success and 
they are now numbered among the substantial agriculturists of the community. 
Such a one is Herman Kahle, who in 1880 arrived in Nebraska and purchased a 
relinquishment, after which he followed farming until the fall of 1904, when he 
retired from active life and took up his abode in Kearney. 

He was born in Hanover, Germany, December 23, 1848, and when about 
eighteen years of age came to the United States, landing in New York in Novem- 
ber, 1867. He at once made his way to Will county, IlHnois, where he had a 
brother living, and there he worked upon a farm at husking corn for his brother 
for a time. He afterward worked upon a farm in the employ of a cousin for a 
year and continued to spend his time as a farm hand until he went to Chicago. 
Fie secured employment in the suburb of Oak Park and was there at the time of 
the great fire of 1871. He was employed in various ways, spending some time in 
the service of an ice company, and while thus engaged was injured. He con- 
tinued to work for others until 1874, when he was married and rented a farm at 
Green Garden, Will county, Illinois, where he continued for six years. 

In 1880 he came to Nebraska and purchased a relinquishment claim six miles 
south of Kearney, upon which a squatter had previously settled. Mr. Kahle at 
once began the further development and improvement of the place and thereon 
continued to engage in farming until the fall of 1914, when he retired from active 
business life. He had added an adjoining tract of one hundred and eight acres to 
his farm and still later purchased one hundred and sixteen acres. He next 
liought the Dugan farm of one hundred and sixty acres and still later another 
tract of two hundred acres, so that he now owns altogether about eight hundred 
acres in Buffalo and Kearney counties. His possessions thus became extensive 
and include some very valuable farming land, which he has converted into rich 
and productive fields, making the place one of the valuable farm properties of the 
county. 

On the 29th of January, 1874, Mr. Kahle was married to Miss Louisa 
Buchmcir, who was born in Will county, Illinois, April 21, 1853, and was there 
reared, coming to Nebraska with her husband in 1880. Seven children have 
been born to them : Emma, the wife of August Busch, a resident farmer of 
Buft'alo county; Anna, the wife of Ed Nuss, a farmer of Kearney county; John 
and Frederick, who carry on general agricultural pursuits in Kearney county ; 



> 

a 

'73 

o 

:^ 
o 




HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 147 

Edith, who died at the age of fifteen years; and WilHam and Louis, who follow 
farming in Kearney county. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kahle are members of the Lutheran church, to the teachings 
of which they are consistently loyal. In politics Mr. Kahle is a liberal democrat 
but has never been an office seekeer. His entire life up to the time of his retire- 
ment was given to farming and stock raising. He worked earnestly, made judi- 
cious investments, directed his energies along well defined lines of labor, avoided 
useless expenditure and, in a word, through the careful control of his business 
interests gained substantial success. 



W. B. LUKENBILL. 



W. B. Lukenbill, a prosperous stock raiser and farmer of Gibbon township, 
was born in Warren county, Iowa, on the 31st of March, 1864. His parents, 
Henry and Elizabeth (Davis) Lukenbill, were natives respectively of Indiana 
and Ohio but were married in Iowa, where both lived until called by death. To 
them were born ten children, of whom nine are still living. 

W. B. Lukenbill grew to manhood in his native state and received his educa- 
tion in the public schools. Following his marriage he came to Buffalo county, 
Nebraska, and bought his present home farm, which comprises one hundred and 
sixty acres on section 34, Gibbon township. He also owns fifty-seven acres on 
section 27, that township, and has brought all of his land to a high state of cultt- 
\ation. Although he raises some grain he gives the greater part of his attention 
to raising polled Durham cattle and Duroc Jersey hogs, for which he seldom 
fails to receive a high price as he studies the markets carefully. 

Mr. Lukenbill was married in Iowa to Miss Lydia A. Heiny, a daughter of 
G. W. and Mary Ann (Davis) Heiny, both of whom died in the Hawkeye state. 
She is one of a family of seven children, of whom six are living, and by her 
marriage has become the mother of two sons and a daughter, namely : George, 
Birdie and Benjamin. 

Mr. Lukenbill supports the candidates of the republican party at the polls 
and has served his district acceptably as a member of the school board. He is 
identified with the Modern Woodmen of America and has many friends both 
within and without that organization. He and his wife are in comfortable cir- 
cumstances and have made all that they have by hard work and good manage- 
ment and are among the most highly esteemed residents of their township. 



ALBERT C. KILLIAN. 



Public interests of Kearney find a worthy representative in Albert C. Killian, 
one of the representative merchants of the city and now president of the Kearney 
Commercial Club. He took up his abode here in November, 191 1, and has since 
been identified with its progress and prosperity. He is a native of Pittsburgh, 



148 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

Pennsylvania, born August 8, 1867, and when but a year old he was brought to 
Nebraska by his parents, Thomas and Katharine (Maresh) Killian, who secured 
a homestead claim in the northwestern part of Saunders county. There he con- 
tinued to reside until called to his final rest in 1882 and his widow passed away 
in Wahoo in 1889. 

The early boyhood days of Albert C. Killian were passed at work on the 
farm, and when but eight years of age he was actively engaged in the work of 
the fields, driving a team of horses in harrowing and in similar work. After 
leaving the district schools he continued his education in the schools of Wahoo 
between 1879 ^"^ 1883 and attended the Fremont Normal and Business College, 
from which he was graduated with the class of 1886. For a year and a half he 
was at Cedar Bluffs, Nebraska, where he was connected with the mercantile 
establishment of Killian Brothers, and at the end of that period he was trans- 
ferred to Wahoo, where he remained until November, 191 1, since which time he 
has been a resident of Kearney. He continued at Wahoo for twenty-three years 
and during the latter part of that period was secretary and treasurer of the firm 
of Killian Brothers. He gained broad business experience in that connection 
and was thus well qualified to carry on mercantile pursuits after his removal to 
Kearney. 

On the 2d of January, 1894, Mr. Killian was united in marriage to Miss 
Nora C. Steen, by whom he has four children, as follows : Margaret L., a teacher 
of domestic science and chemistry at Wayne, Nebraska ; Gertrude S. ; Dorothy 
O. ; and John Steen. Mrs. Killian is past president of the Wahoo Chapter, 
P. E. O., of Wahoo; is present president of Kearney Chapter, P. E. O. of 
Kearney, and was elected state organizer of the P. E. O. society, one of the 
largest exclusive ladies' secret organizations in the world, at the last annual con- 
vention. She is also actively identified with the Eastern Star of the Masonic 
order. 

Mr. Killian belongs to the Elks, the Knights of Pythias and the T. P. A. In 
politics he is a democrat and while living in Wahoo served two years on the 
city council and seven and one-half years on the school board. His identification 
with public interests in Kearney has been of an important character and that he 
is a man of marked enterprise is indicated in the fact that he has been chosen 
to the presidency of the Kearney Commercial Club. In this connection he is 
studying the problems relative to the city's upbuilding along material lines and 
to its municipal improvement. He utilizes practical methods while working 
toward high ideals and the results he accomplishes are far-reaching and beneficial. 



PATRICK WALSH. 



On the 17th of November, 1902, the news spread through Shelton and Bufi'alo 
county that Patrick Walsh had passed away. He was one of the county's best 
known pioneer settlers and had been closely associated with the work of early 
development, improvement and progress, taking an active part in planting the 
seeds of civilization which in later years have borne ripe fruit. His death there- 
fore was the occasion of deep and widespread regret and his history cannot fail 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 149 

to prove of interest to many of our readers. He was born in County Sligo, 
Ireland, and when about twenty-one years of age came to the United States, 
settling in Mississippi near Kosciusko. There he was married on the 26th of 
January, 1856, to Miss Agnes Welch, who was also a native of County Sligo and 
was brought to the United States by her parents when about eight years of age. 
Mr. Walsh afterward joined the army and in 1864 came to Buffalo county as a 
member of Company D, Fifth United States Volunteer Infantry, which was sta- 
tioned at Fort Kearney, where he remained until 1865, when he was mustered 
out. The following year he was joined by his family, who made their way by 
passenger train as far as Grand Island, at which point their few household effects 
were loaded on a flat car and thus traveled to Buda, which at that time was the 
terminus of the Union Pacific Railroad. They slept the first night under the shel- 
ter of a load of hay. The following day they forded the Platte river with an ox 
team and the family lived at the fort until the following ]\Iarch, when Sergeant 
Cody prevailed upon them to remove to his squatter's claim at Wood River Center, 
now Shelton. Thereon they made their temporary home until Mr. Walsh located 
his homestead in 1869 on the present site of Shelton covering the northwest 
cjuarter of section i, Shelton township. 

After being discharged from the army Mr. Walsh took sub-contracts under 
James E. Boyd, afterward governor of Nebraska, on the grading of the Union 
Pacific as far west as Rawlins, Wyoming. While he had had but limited educa- 
tional privileges, he always made excellent use of his opportunities and by read- 
ing and observation added continually to his fund of knowledge. He became 
quite a well educated man, was a fine penman, used excellent diction, and also 
became a master in spelling. His worth was recognized throughout the com- 
munity in which he made his home. He was closely identified with every move- 
ment of a public nature that was of interest and benefit to the town of Shelton. 
When he first located upon his claim Buffalo county was unorganized, although 
the district was known by that name. In 1870 he and several of his neiglibors 
who arrived about the same time that he did, petitioned for the organization of 
Buffalo county and Governor Butler issued his proclamation establishing the 
county and fixing the temporary county seat at Shelton, which was then known 
as Wood River Center. Mr. Walsh was appointed probate judge of the new 
county with authority to appoint county commissioners. He served in that 
capacity until the first regular election, when he was elected to the same position. 
He was also appointed deputy county clerk under ]\Iartin Slattery and after 
the election the county treasurer failed to qualify and the county commissioners 
appointed Mr. Walsh to that position. He then resigned the office of deputy 
clerk but continued to act as judge and treasurer. He also filled the position of 
superintendent of public instruction and he was afterward elected to the office of 
county commissioner, in which capacity he displayed the same faithfulness to 
duty that had marked his course in the other offices. 

Mr. Walsh was largely instrumental in securing the establishment of the 
postoffice at Shelton and continued to act as postmaster until 1879, within which 
period, through his influence, the name of the town and postoffice was changed 
to Shelton. It was Mr. Walsh who had the town of Shelton platted and it was 
he who was at the head of every movement for the advancement of the interests 
of the town. There was no project for the benefit and upbuilding of the com- 



150 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

muiiity with which he was not associated and his aid and influence were at all 
times given for public benefit and progress. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Walsh were born nine children : J. P., who is deceased ; 
J. T. and W. E., both of whom are residents of Omaha; Mrs. Mary Bills, who 
lives in Fortuna, California; Mrs. Anna Michael, deceased; Rose, the wife of 
Charles Frietenbach ; P. J., deceased, who resided in Laramie, Wyoming; Mrs. 
Maggie Barney, of Oakland, California; and Ella, the deceased wife of Fred 
Simpson, of Omaha. 

The religious faith of Mr. Walsh was that of the Catholic church, in which 
he was reared and to which he always loyally adhered. His political belief was 
that of the democratic party and his allegiance thereto never faltered. He never 
had occasion to regret his determination to come to the new world, for in this 
country he found the opportunities which he sought and which are always open 
to ambitious, energetic young men. Gradually he worked his way upward, win- 
ning not only material success but also the high regard and goodwill of all with 
whom he came in contact, and his worth to the community in which he lived is 
acknowledged by all who knew him. 



JOHN A. LARIMER. 



Many interests and activities connect JoRn A. Larimer with the public life of 
Kearney and Bufi"alo county. He is engaged in the real estate business, is a 
notary public and is serving on the board of supervisors. His life has been one 
of intense and well directed activity and his sterling worth has led to his selection 
for a number of public offices. 

His birth occurred in Fayette county, Ohio, April 22, 1839, and he was nine 
years of age when he removed to McLean county, Illinois, with his parents, 
Robert and Elizabeth (Robinson) Larimer, who were natives of Union county. 
Pennsylvania, where they were reared. In 1832 they removed to Fayette county, 
Ohio, and in 1848 became residents of McLean county, Illinois, where Robert 
Larimer, who was a tanner by trade, turned his attention to general agricultural 
]mrsuits. For thirty-six years that county remained the home of the family, 
during which period they were prominently identified with farming interests. In 
1885 they arrived in Nebraska and settled in Center township about two and a 
half miles northeast of Kearney. There Robert Larimer and his wife spent their 
remaining days, being in active connection with agricultural interests until called 
to their final rest. Mrs. Larimer passed away on the 19th of March, 1889, and 
Mr. Larimer survived her only until the ist of September of the same year. They 
were Presbyterians in religious faith and were earnest Christian people who 
enjoyed and commanded the respect of all with whom they came in contact. 
Their remains now repose in the old burying ground in McLean county, Illinois. 

John A. Larimer was reared on his father's farm in Illinois, and his educa- 
tion was acquired in the old time district school, but his opportunities in that 
direction were extremely limited and he did not find it possible to attend school 
for more than three months during the year and that was during the winter season 
when it was not necessary to work in the fields. He walked two and a half miles 



i 




JOHN A. LARIMER 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 153 

to school and thus acquired his educational training under considerable difficulties. 
During the remainder of the year he was engaged in feeding cattle and in per- 
forming the various duties incident to the cultivation of crops. 

When civil wair threatened the destruction of the Union he enlisted on the 
15th of August, 1861, as a member of Company C, Thirty-third Illinois Volunteer 
Infantry, and was mustered in on the 226. of August. In chronological sequence 
his military career covered the battle of Fredericktown, Missouri, after which he 
joined General Curtis" army at Batesville, Arkansas, and then proceeded to 
Helena and was in the engagement at Cache Creek, or Cotton Plant. In the 
winter of 1862-3 he campaigned in southeastern Missouri and then fought in the 
battles of Port Gibson, Champion Hills and Black River Bridge and the siege of 
\'icksburg. From the last named place he followed up the retreating rebels to 
Jackson, participating in the campaign of the Bayou Teche, and he afterward 
proceeded to New Orleans, whence he was ordered to Brownsville, Texas, and 
to Aransas Pass, and participated in the capture of Fort Esperanza. The troops 
then moved to Idaho and to Port Lavaca, and on the 18th of April, 1864, the 
members of the regiment veteranized and proceeded to New Orleans and after- 
ward to Brashear City, Louisiana. On the i8th of March, 1865, they participated 
in the Mobile expedition and took part in the reduction of Spanish Fort. They 
then went to Montgomer^^ Alabama, and there received the welcome news of 
the surrender of Generals Lee and Johnston. J\Ir. Larimer was mustered out at 
Vicksburg, Mississippi, on the 24th of November. 1865, and was ordered to Camp 
Butler, Illinois, where he received his final pay and was honorably discharged. 
He had been promoted to the rank of sergeant and then to orderly sergeant. 

Following the close of the war Mr. Larimer engaged in farming in Illinois 
for a short time and later became the first merchant at Arrowsmith, that state, 
where he also filled the office of postmaster from ]^Iarch, 1872, until July, 1885. 
In the latter year he became a resident of Bufifalo county, Nebraska, where he 
has since made his home. His attention was concentrated upon agricultural 
interests until 1902, when he left his farm and has since resided in Kearney, where 
at the present time he is engaged in the real estate business. He is thoroughly 
well informed concerning property values, knows the property that is upon the 
market and in the course of years has negotiated various important realty trans- 
actions. 

While living in Illinois, i\Ir. Larimer was married at Springfield, Ohio, on 
the 13th of February, 1868, to Miss Elizabeth J. Cowan, who was born and 
reared in that place. They have become the parents of six children : Edward C. 
and Robert P., who reside in Kearney; William O., who met death in a railway 
accident at Grand Island, in October, 1901 ; Anna and Cora, both of whom 
died in early childhood in Illinois ; and John Harvey, who makes his home in 
Pocatello, Idaho. 

Mr. and Mrs. Larimer are members of the Presbyterian church and are loyal 
to its teachings and principles. Fraternally he is connected with the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows and has been secretary of the lodge at Kearney for the 
past twelve years. He maintains pleasant relationship with the "boys in blue" 
as a member of the Grand Army of the Republic and when in companionship his 
military comrades delight in recounting scenes and occurrences that marked the 
progress of the war. In politics he has always been a stalwart republican and 



154 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

while in Illinois he served for two terms as a member of the board of supervisors 
of McLean county. In 1889 he was elected a member of the board of super- 
visors of Buffalo county and is now serving his fifth term by reelection, a fact 
indicative of his personal popularity and the confidence reposed in him. He has 
made a most excellent record, endeavoring at all times to further the public wel- 
fare and care for public interests in a businesslike, progressive manner. 



VIRGIL C. CHASE. 



Virgil C. Chase came to Kearney in August, 1885, and on the ist of Septem- 
ber of that year established a retail clothing business. He has since pursued the 
even tenor of his way, and as one who knows him well expressed it, '"he can 
always be relied upon to do the right thing in the right place and at the right 
time." In other words, he has the qualities of the reliable, substantial, thorough- 
going and enterprising business man and his work is therefore of value to the 
community in which he lives. He was born in Franklin county, Kentucky, on 
the 6th of December, 1858, and is one of a family of ten children, four of whom 
are now living, who were born of the marriage of James A. and Jane (Johnson) 
Chase, who were also natives of Kentucky. The father was a Cumberland Pres- 
byterian minister and the great-grandfather was a member of the Lewis and 
Clark expedition and made surveys through the Platte valley before the advent 
of the white settlers. Rev. James A. Chase early became an abolitionist, and 
owing to the fact that his father was an extensive slave owner, they became 
estranged. During the Civil war he piloted the Union recruits through the 
enemy's lines until they reached the Federal forces. All through his life he ga^e 
his attention to ministerial work and was not denied the full harvest nor the 
aftermath of his labors. He passed away in Lincoln, Illinois, in 1884, after a 
residence there covering twenty years. 

Virgil C. Chase was the eighth of nine sons and was the eighth in order of 
birth among his father's ten children. When his parents removed to Illinois . 
he was but a small lad and there he w^as reared to manhood, spending his boy- 
hood days upon the home farm and attending the district schools. He later added 
to his knowledge by study in the Lincoln University at Lincoln, Illinois, which 
he entered in 1875 '^"'^ from which he was graduated in 1880 with the degree 
of Bachelor of Philosophy. For two years he engaged in teaching school, after 
which he turned his attention to mercantile pursuits, filling a clerkship for three 
years. At the end of that period he removed to Kearney and on the ist of Sep- 
tember, 1885, opened a store for the sale of men's clothing and furnishings. He 
has since continued the business with more than an average degree of success, 
his prosperity being attributable to his close attention to business and his square 
dealing with the public at all times. He has ever recognized the fact that satis- 
fied customers are the best advertisement and he also attributes not a little of his 
success to the wise counsel and assistance of his wife. 

On the 27th of December, 1882, Mr. Chase was united in marriage to Miss 
Lillian Zimmerman, of Ashmore, Illinois. To them have been born four chil- 
dren, namely: Ruby, James Roy, Norma L. and \^irgil R. In his political views 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 155 

Mr. Chase is a republican but has never in any sense been an aspirant for pubUc 
office. His fellow townsmen, appreciative of his worth and ability, however, have 
three times elected him a member of the city council and as a member of the 
board of aldermen he has exercised his official prerogatives in support of many 
progressive measures for the benefit of the community. He also served for two 
terms as a member of the school board. While on the council he advocated all 
important measures for the municipal welfare and labored effectively and 
earnestly to decrease the bonded indebtedness of Kearney. He belongs to the 
Commercial Club and cooperates also with its movements and projected plans 
for municipal and material welfare in Kearney. Fraternally he is identified with 
the iModern Woodmen and the Ancient Order of United Workmen and both 
he and his wife are consistent and faithful members of the Presbyterian church, 
in the work of which they are actively and helpfully interested. In a word, their 
influence is always on the side of progress and improvement and their labors 
have been far-reaching and resultant. 



JACOB SCHNOOR. 



Jacob Schnoor, of Amherst, has been manager of the Gilcrist Lumber Com- 
pany since its organization and is also the owner of farm property, on which he 
is engaged in live stock dealing. He was born in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, 
January 12, 1867, a son of Claus and Cecelia Schnoor, who spent their entire 
lives in the fatherland. 

Jacob Schnoor was thrown upon his own resources when quite young and 
was a youth of only sixteen years when he sailed from Germany for the new 
world, making the voyage alone, since which time he has been dependent entirely 
upon his own resources. He located first in Crawford county, Iowa, and in 1890 
he arrived in Buffalo county, where he found employment with the Gilcrist Lum- 
ber Company, which had just established business in Amherst following the 
founding of the town. Mr. Schnoor has remained manager of the business 
throughout this entire period, has carefully directed its interests and has developed 
a trade of substantial and gratifying proportions. He is an enterprising and 
progressive business man, ready to meet any emergency, and his substantial quali- 
ties have made him well liked. In addition to his connection with the lumber 
trade he is the owner of two hundred and four acres of land in Grant township 
and he and his sons have engaged in stock farming. Mr. Schnoor has bought 
and shipped stock for several years and has made that branch of his business 
an important source of income. 

It was in 1891 that Mr. Schnoor was united in marriage to Miss Betty Ken- 
ney, who was born in Austria but was reared in this county. They have become 
the parents of eight children: Arthur, who is, married and has homesteaded 
in Wyoming; and Mayme, Walter, Frank, Theodore, John, Reba and Meta, all 
at home. In his political views Mr. Schnoor is a republican, well versed on the 
questions and issues of the day, but is not an office seeker. Fraternally he is 
connected with the Modern Woodmen of America but his interest and activities 
center chiefly upon his business, and his concentration, close application and 



156 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

indefatigable energy have brought to him the substantial measure of success 
which is today his and which ranks him with the representative residents of 
Amherst and the county. 



S. A. A. WALKER. 



S. A. A. Walker, who is the owner of a well patronized hardware store in 
Gibbon, is a Canadian by birth and his natal day was the 23d of March, 187^. 
He is one of a family of ten children, all of whom are living and whose parents 
are Robert and Margaret (Baird) Walker, natives respectively of Ireland and 
Canada. In 1842 the father went to the Dominion with his parents and was 
there reared and educated. He was married in Canada and continued to reside 
there until 1884, when with his family he removed to Custer county, Nebraska, 
whence ten years later he came to Buffalo county. While hving in Custer county 
he engaged in farming but after removing to this county conducted a hotel in 
Gibbon for four years and then retired. 

S. A. A. Walker was reared under the parental roof and received a good 
education, graduating from the high school at Gibbon. He entered the business 
world as a clerk in the hardware store of L. J. Babcock and in 1901 purchased 
the business from his employer. He has since conducted the store and his 
comprehensive knowledge of the hardware business, combined with his natural 
ability, has enabled him to manage his affairs successfully. He is accorded a 
large and representative patronage and is ranked among the leading business 
men of Gibbon. He also owns eleven lots and business and residence property 
in Gibbon and derives a substantial addition to his income from his rents. 

Mr. Walker was married in 1894 to Miss Nettie E. Bayley, a daughter of 
J. M. and Adaline (Adams) Bayley, who were born in Pennsylvania but in 1871 
removed to this county, where they are still living. Mrs. Walker is one of a 
family of five children, of whom four survive. She has become the mother of 
a son, Leroy Allen, who was born on the 24th of October, 1909. 

Mr. Walker casts his ballot in support of the democratic party and for four 
years was a member of the village board. He is identified with Granite Lodge, 
No. 189, A. F. & A. M., in which he has filled all of the chairs, and with Gibbon 
Lodge, No. 35, A. O. U. W., and in religious faith both he and his wife are 
Presbyterians. He is widely known and highly esteemed not only because of 
his energy and sound judgment but also because of his sterling integrity. 



WILLIAM SCHRAMM. 

William Schramm is the oldest merchant now living in Kearney. He has 
made his home here for more than four decades and for more than three decades 
has been actively engaged in the drug trade. His life history if written in detail 
would give a most interesting account of the development of the west, for he 
has lived in this section of the country from the time when the Indians were far 
more numerous than the white settlers and when the government protected the 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 157 

citizens and the travelers upon the western plains by the maintenance of a num- 
ber of forts, the soldiers attempting to hold in check the depredations of the red 
men upon life and property. 

Mr. Schramm was born in Pickaway county, Ohio, January 31, 1843, ^^is 
parents being John G. and Amelia E. (Lowell) Schramm, both of whom were 
of German nativity. The father was reared in his native country and there 
studied to become a chemist. He married in Germany and his children, five in 
number, were all born in that country save the youngest. About the year 1840 
he came to the United States with his family, crossing the ocean on one of the 
slow-going vessels of that period. For a time he resided in Ohio and then 
removed to Burlington, Iowa, where he died about 1851. 

William Schramm was reared to manhood in Iowa and pursued his educa- 
tion in the public schools of Burlington. When still quite young he became a 
clerk in a drug store, but being in frail health the confinement of the store 
proved detrimental to him and he therefore followed the advice of his physician 
to go west and seek a more congenial climate that would enable him to remain 
in the open. This was about the year 1863 and for a time he was employed as 
a driver in freighting government goods between the frontier posts west of the 
Missouri river. For two winters he traded with the old Jack Morrow outfit 
among the Indians and learned to talk and understand their language fairly well. 
This trading could be carried on only during the winter seasons, for in the sum- 
mer months when the weather was favorable the Indians followed their nomadic 
life, roaming around seeking game wherever it could be found and frequently 
going upon the warpath. While thus engaged Mr. Schramm occasionally passed 
through old Fort Kearney before the present city of Kearney was dreamed of. 
Their trading or freighting route was mostly south of the Platte river. 

In 1869 he went to Omaha and in April, 1872, he removed to what is now 
Kearney, at that time a tiny hamlet containing but three buildings — a residence 
built by Captain Anderson, who was afterward sheriff of the county; Dart's 
grocery store and a building of four rooms so constructed that each room was 
in the corner of a claim, so that the owners thereof could live upon and prove 
up their claims and thus comply with the law which compelled residence upon 
the property. Two of these owners were James A. and George E. Smith. Mr. 
Schramm preempted a quarter section of land on Wood river and resided thereon 
for a year and a half. In the fall of 1873 he came to Kearney and began packing 
ice from Wood river. He also weighed coal and grain for the firm of More & 
Seaman and for a short time he also conducted a furniture store and utilized his 
three teams in draying. He was thus variously engaged until 1884, when he 
opened a drug store and since that time has carried on the business, covering a 
period of thirty-two years. 

Mr. Schrai7im was called upon to mourn the loss of his first wife on the 28th 
of February, 191 1. There were six children born of that marriage: Oscar 
Hugo, who died in 1891 ; William, who died in the early '70s, when about eighteen 
months old ; Luella, who died at the age of ten years ; Jennie, who died when 
three years of age; Herman H., who also died in early childhood; and Grace L.. 
now Mrs. J. A. Brink, of Denver, Colorado. On the 28th of September, 1913, 
Mr. Schramm was united in marriage to Miss Essie B. Traver. 

Fraternally he is connected with the Knights of Pythias, and his religious 



158 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

faith is indicated in his membership in the Presbyterian church. PoHtically he 
is affiliated with no party, voting according to the dictates of his judgment. For 
four years he served as city treasurer and at all times he has cooperated in plans 
and movements for the upbuilding and benefit of the city in which he resides. 
Here he has made his home for forty-two years and has witnessed every change 
that has occurred in the development of Kearney from its infancy to the present 
time. Men have come and gone until he is now the oldest living settler of the 
place. He has prospered to a reasonable extent and at one time was the owner 
of two drug stores, one of which, however, he sold to a clerk, S. A. D. Henline, 
who likewise is now considered one of the early merchants of the town. There 
is no phase of frontier life in Nebraska with which Mr. Schramm is not familiar, 
and he relates many interesting incidents of the early days and of the events 
which have shaped later progress and improvement. 



DALLAS HENDERSON. 

Dallas Henderson, actively engaged in farming in Center township and win- 
ning success through well directed energy, was born March 27, 1876, in the town- 
ship which is still his home, his parents being Abram and Lienor (Rught) 
Henderson, who were natives of Illinois and Pennsylvania respectively. Follow- 
ing the Civil war, Mr. Henderson removed to Misssouri and in 1872 came to 
Buffalo county, which was then a frontier district, giving little indication of 
future growth and improvement. He homesteaded a farm in Center township 
and bore his part in the early development of the district, but in 1879 was 
called to his final rest. His widow survives and is still living on the old home- 
stead property which has now been her home for forty-four years. 

Dallas Henderson is one of a family of eleven children, seven of whom are 
still living. His youthful experiences were those which usually fall to the farm 
lad, his time being divided between the duties of the schoolroom, the pleasures 
of the playground and the work of the fields. He continued at home until 
eighteen years of age and then began teaching school. He afterward attended 
the Lincoln Normal School for a year, but before that he spent four years as a 
student in the Kearney Military School. With the outbreak of the Spanish- 
American war in 1898 his patriotic spirit was aroused and he enlisted for 
service in the Philippines as a member of Company I, First Nebraska Regiment. 
He served for a year and was engaged in almost continuous fighting during that 
period. He was wounded in the right leg and for six weeks remained in the 
hospital. While at the front he was promoted to the rank of corporal, and at 
the end of the year he received an honorable discharge. Mr. Henderson then 
remained in the Philippines, where he engaged in teaching school for four years, 
conducting the first night school taught on the Islands. In 1903 he returned to 
his home in Nebraska and purchased a farm in Thornton township, on which 
he lived for two years. He then sold that property and bought the farm of one 
hundred and sixty acres whereon he now resides, the place being pleasantly 
located on section 9, Center township. He has since concentrated his energies 
upon the improvement of the place, has erected good buildings, has divided his 




MK. AND MK,S. DALLAS HKXDERSDN 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 161 

farm into fields of convenient size by well kept fences and is today the owner 
of an excellent and desirable property. He makes a specialty of breeding and 
raising Duroc- Jersey hogs and Plymouth Rock chickens and is quite successful in 
that work, keeping some of the best stock to be found in the county. 

In 1904 Mr. Henderson was united in marriage to Miss Mamie Williams, 
who was born in Buffalo county, Nebraska, a daughter of Owen and Margaret 
J. (Owens) Williams, mentioned elsewhere in this work. Mr. and Mrs. Hen- 
derson have become the parents of three children, Laura Marie, Margaret E. 
and Eugene C. 

The parents attend the Presbyterian church and Mr. Henderson gives his 
political allegiance to the progressive party. He is now serving as clerk of his 
township and was school treasurer, and he is interested in all of the plans 
and projects for the improvement of the community and the advancement of its 
material, intellectual and moral progress. Fraternally he is connected with the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Modern Woodmen of America, 
and he has also been initiated into the Masonic fraternity. He exemplifies in 
his life the beneficent spirit of these organizations and is well known as a 
man whose many sterling traits of character entitle him to warm regard. 



RAY R. COOK. 



Ray R. Cook, who is operating the old home farm of five hundred and twenty 
acres on sections 34 and 35, Gibbon township, is recognized as a successful and 
progressive agriculturist and as a factor in the development of the county along 
material lines. He was born in Wisconsin on the 7th of April, 1868, a son of 
Henry and Mary W. (Warner) Cook. 

The father's birth occurred on the 4th of March, 1824, in Rutland, Vermont, 
and his parents were Samuel and Chloe (Warner) Cook, both natives of the 
state of New York. When their son Henry was twelve years of age they 
removed to Buffalo, New York, and not long after taking up their residence in 
that city both died of cholera. Henry Cook was then taken by his mother's 
people, who cared for him until he reached manhood. He was one of the 
California forty-niners and after his return from the coast he located in Chicago, 
where, in 1853, he was married to Miss Mary W. Warner, a native of Erie 
county. New York, and a daughter of Hyman Warner, a native of Vermont. 
Following their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Cook located on a farm near Marengo, 
Illinois, but after living there for two or three years removed to Clinton, Wis- 
consin, where the father was prominently identified with mercantile interests 
for about eighteen years. In 1875 they came to Gibbon, Buffalo county, 
Nebraska, and for several years followed mercantile pursuits here, but later 
turned his attention to operating his farm in Gibbon township, where he resided 
for some time. Subsequently he returned to Gibbon and engaged in the grain 
business there until his demise, which occurred on the 20th of February, 1892. 
He was widely known throughout the county and his death was deeply regretted 
by his many friends. His widow owns three hundred and twenty acres of good 
land in Gibbon township but resides in the town of Gibbon. She was reared in 



162 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

the Congregational faith and throughout her Hfe has manifested great considera- 
tion for others. By her marriage she became the mother of nine children, of 
whom five are still living, namely: Hattie, at home; Frank H., who is a mer- 
chant living at Buda, Nebraska; Ray R. ; Atto B., who is superintendent of 
schools at Hugo, Colorado; and May E., at home. 

Ray R. Cook accompanied his parents to this county in 1875 when about seven 
years of age and here grew to manhood. During his boyhood and youth he 
divided his time between attending the common and high schools and assisting 
his father. Since attaining his majority he has operated the home farm, which 
comprises five hundred and twenty acres of productive land on sections 34 and 
35 Gibbon township. He specializes in breeding and feeding stock and as he 
fully appreciates the importance of proper housing and scientific feeding his 
stock are kept in fine condition and seldom fail to bring a good price on the 
market. 

Mr. Cook supports the republican party at the polls and for years has been 
a member of the school board, proving very efficient in that capacity. He belongs 
to Excalibar Lodge, No. 138, K. P., and Gibbon Lodge. No. 37, L O. O. F., in 
which he has filled all of the chairs, and the teachings of those organizations con- 
cerning human brotherhood find expression in his daily life. His energy and 
ability have gained him gratifying success in his chosen occupation, and his 
integrity has won him the sincere respect of all who have come in contact with 
him. 



GUSTAVE F. PRASCHER. 

Gustave F. Prascher passed away May 31, 1904, and in his death Buft'alo 
county lost a worthy and representative citizen. He was born in Prussia, Ger- 
many, December 16, 1846, and his father, Frederick Prascher, was also a native 
of that country. He pursued his education in the public schools and afterward 
as a sailor went to sea, spending some time on sailing vessels of the early days. 
He came to America in 1867, when twenty-one years of age, landing at New 
York, whence he removed to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Avhere he worked in the lum- 
ber camps, shipping lumber and doing other such work. He at length joined the 
regular army, enlisting at Oshkosh, Wisconsin, in the Ninth United States 
Infantry, with which he served for five years, being engaged in active duty on the 
frontier. He participated in some of the severe Indian campaigns in the Black 
Hills of Dakota and was many times called upon to protect the Indian agents from 
attack. He was promoted to the rank of corporal and was honorably discharged 
in 1873 at Fort Laramie, Wyoming. He was afterward appointed government 
teamster at Fort Laramie, which position he held for three years. 

Having become imbued with the spirit of the west and recognizing the 
excellent opportunities offered in the country's wide western domain, INTr. 
Prascher determined to remain and purchased a relinquishment to one hundred 
and sixty acres on section 4, Riverdale township. Buffalo county. Nebraska, which 
tract had originally been the Miller claim. A few improvements had been made 
upon it when it came into his possession and he continued the work of further 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 163 

improvement and development, fenced the fields and brought his land to a high 
state of cultivation. This property is still in the possession of the family and is 
now being farmed by his eldest son, George Arthur. It was upon this place that 
Mr. Prascher passed away, having given many years of his life to active agri- 
cultural pursuits. 

It was on the 27th of October, 1874, at Cheyenne, Wyoming, that Mr. 
Prascher wedded Miss Amanda Johanna Swenson, a daughter of Swen Guneson. 
She was born at Pasturp, Sweden, April 12, 1844, and came with some neighbors 
to America in 1867, landing at New York, whence they made their way to Swede 
Bend, Boonesboro, Iowa, remaining there for a year. She afterward became a 
resident of Denison, Iowa, remaining with the families of Rev. Denison and 
Judge Bassett for about two years. She then went to Omaha and afterward to 
Evanston, Wyoming, but remained in the latter place for only a brief period. She 
then made her way to Sidney, Nebraska, where she lived with the family of an 
army ofificer and it was in this way that she formed the acquaintance of Mr. 
Prascher, who was at that time a soldier. Mr. and Mrs. Prascher became the 
parents of seven children, of whom Hilda, Harry, Emil Sanfred and Edward 
Frederick, all died in infancy. George Arthur, now living on the old homestead, 
wedded Miss Pearl Ball, and they have a son, Leonard Arthur. Lillie Alfreda is 
the wife of Emil J. Neilson, a merchant of Riverdale, and they have a daughter, 
Mildred. Ralph Leroy is connected with the grain elevator at Riverdale. 

Mr. and Mrs. Prascher joined the Christian church in 1894 and the latter still 
has connection therewith. Mr. Prascher also held membership in the Loyal Mystic 
League at Kearney and for a number of years was a member of the school board 
of Riverdale township. He filled the office of justice of the peace of Riverdale 
for several terms and his record as a man and citizen is most commendable. Those 
who knew him esteemed him for his sterling worth, for in every relation of life he 
was upright and honorable. He ever led a busy and useful life. After his dis- 
charge from the army he was a teamster in#the early days, driving a government 
mule train between Fort D. A. Russell and Camp Carling, and also from Camp 
Carling to Fort Laramie, Wyoming, in this way keeping soldiers at the outposts 
supplied with provisions, clothing and other necessities. While thus engaged he 
had to brave the elements of the weather, at times encountering severe storms and 
he also had to guard his train from the attack of hostile Indians, for bands of 
vSioux were roaming the plains, attacking the white settlers. Mr. and Mrs. 
Prascher were living at Fort Laramie when the Custer massacre occurred in 1876 
and he equipped the pack train of mules which carried the supplies of General 
Crook's relief expedition, which went to the relief of General Custer. Colonel 
W. F. Cody, better known as Buft'alo Bill, acted as guide for General Crook's 
army from Fort Laramie to the Custer battlefield. 

The honeymoon of Mr. and Mrs. Prascher was spent on a government mule 
train. They left Camp Carling the day after their marriage, going to Fort 
Laramie, whence they started for the Spotted Tail Indian agency, but hostile 
Indians roaming the plains prevented the train from reaching its destination. 
They were also delayed by a terrific storm when within a mile and a half of Fort 
Laramie. The food supply became exhausted and all the men of the party went to 
Fort Laramie for provisions and other necessities, leaving Mrs. Prascher behind 
in a tent on the prairie all alone. During their absence the wind increased until it 



164 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

reached the force of a tornado, tearing the tent to ribbons. She then wrapped 
herself in buffalo robes, took her husband's pistol for protection against the 
Indians and hid in the tall sage bushes until the return of the men from the fort. 
They then continued their journey to the Red Cloud agency, where they arrived 
on the same day the Indians went on the warpath. Red Cloud was the central 
office of the agency where the main United States guard was located. The upris- 
ing of the Sioux lasted three weeks. The six hundred soldiers stationed at the 
agency could not handle the uprising and General Sherman came to their relief 
and restored order and again raised the United States flag on the flag pole, the 
Indians having torn it down as soon as the soldiers would put it up. The wedding 
trip of Mr. and Mrs. Prascher was thus delayed three weeks during the uprising, 
after which they continued to Spotted Tail agency. They were familiar with 
every phase of frontier life in that Indian infested country, knew the habits, cus- 
toms and treachery of the red men and experienced all the hardships, trials and 
privations incident to pioneer existence. But they lived to witness remarkable 
changes and to enjoy the benefits of a later civilization. Mr. Prascher was one 
of those who aided in planting the seeds of improvement and progress in the west 
and his name deserves prominent mention among the valued citizens of Buffalo 
county, and no less than the men, the women of the pioneer epoch deserve the 
praise and gratitude of those who have come after them and have shared the 
benefits of their early toil. 



WILLIAM O. KING. 



William O. King is one of Kearney's substantial citizens, a quiet and careful 
man of business, who has given close attention to his commercial interests during 
the past seventeen years of his connection with mercantile circles. Thoroughness, 
diligence and enterprise have characterized his course at all times and won for 
him the respect, confidence and goodwill of those with whom he has been brought 
in contact. He was born in Morgan county, Ohio, December 22, 1863, and is a 
son of William and Ruth (Ball) King, who were also natives of Ohio. The 
father was a farmer and followed that occupation throughout his entire active life. 
In 1882 he removed with his family to Washington county, Kansas, where he 
passed away in 1902, his widow surviving him unttil 191 1. They were the parents 
of eleven children but only three are now living. 

William O. King was reared to early manhood in his native state and assisted 
in the work of the home farm. He also attended the district schools and when 
nineteen years of age went to Kansas with his parents and there carried on gen- 
eral agricultural ])ursuits until he reached the age of twenty-eight. Putting 
aside the work of the fields, he turned his attention to merchandising and for six 
years operated a "racket" store at Harrington, Kansas. In 1898 he came to 
Kearney and embarked in the retail dry goods business, his stock also including 
men's furnishings, boots and shoes. He began here in a small way but with the 
passing of the years his business has gradually increased until he now has one of 
the leading mercantile establishments of the city, carrying a large and carefully 
selected line of goods. He has ever endeavored to please his customers and his 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 165 

thoroughly reHable business methods have been one of the strong elements of his 
growing prosperity. In other ways, too, he has been identified with the material 
development and progress of Kearney and now in addition to his commercial 
interests is vice president of the Farmers Bank. 

In 1890 Mr. King was united in marriage to Miss Libbie A. Osterhout, of 
Morrowville, Kansas, and they have three daughters, Maud, Ruth and Margaret. 
Mrs. King is a member of the Congregational church and Mr. King belongs to 
the Kearney Commercial Club, to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the 
Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the Ancient Order of United Workmen. 
He is in no sense a politician and his ballot is cast with regard to the capability of 
the candidate or the value of a political measure rather than according to party 
dictation. He has never sought nor desired public office, preferring to concentrate 
his energies upon his business affairs, which have been carefully and wisely 
directed and which have brought to him substantial and well merited success. All 
who know him, and he has a wide acquaintance, speak of him in terms of high 
regard. He is entirely free from ostentation and display but is rich in those 
qualities which in every land and clime awaken goodwill, confidence and high 
esteem. 



JOSEPH OWEN, Sr. 



Joseph Owen, Sr., has been very successful as a farmer and has also found 
time to take an active interest in public affairs. He lives on section 2, Shelton 
township, and is widely known not only in that township but throughout the 
county. A native of Manchester, England, he was born on the i6th of February, 
1849, of the marriage of David and Elizabeth (Lloyd) Owen, both of whom were 
born in Wales. In 1863 they came to the United States and made their way to 
Buffalo county, Nebraska. The father died the following year and the mother 
afterward made her home with her daughter and son-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. 
Edward Oliver, who came to this county in i860. 

Jo-seph Owen, Sr., was about fourteen years of age when he accompanied his 
parents to this county and here he grew to manhood. He attended school in 
England but after his removal to Nebraska his time was taken up with agri- 
cultural pursuits. Following his father's death he made his home with his 
brother-in-law, Edward Oliver, and w^orked for neighboring farmers. About 
1869 he purchased the old Stage Station farm which adjoins his present home 
place and there began his independent career as an agriculturist. Subsequently 
he purchased a relinquishment on his present farm from his brother-in-law and 
entered the place under the homestead law. In due time he proved up on the 
claim and as the years have passed he has made many improvements upon it. The 
land is in a high state of cultivation and as he is an excellent farmer he secures a 
good income from his agricultural operations. He owns two hundred and forty 
acres located near Shelton and is also financially interested in the Shelton State 
Bank and in the Farmers Elevator at Shelton. 

In 1 871 Mr. Owen was united in marriage to Miss Sarah Ann Oliver, who 
came to Nebraska in i860 with the Mormon colony. They have become the 



166 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

parents of seven children, five of whom are Hving, namely: Elizabeth ]., now 
j\Irs. W. D. Kirkland, of Omaha; xA.lice, the wife of Thomas G. Tritt, of Shelton; 
Joseph, who is city marshal ; Ida B., who is the widow of Will Hall and resides 
with her parents; and Anna, at home. 

The republican party has a stalwart adherent in Mr. Owen, who has done 
much work in its behalf. He has been called to public office a number of times 
and has made an excellent record as a public servant. For two terms he was a 
member of the county board of supervisors, of which he was chairman for three 
years; for three terms was justice of the peace and refused to serve for the fourth 
term; and he has also been road supervisor and assessor and held the office of 
deputy sheriff under JohnX)liver. He fully recognizes the importance of a good 
school system and for forty-fetx^^ears has J^rTtreasurer of school district No. i, 
during which time he has done irifach to promote educational advancement in that 
district. He is one of the most prominent members of Shelton Lodge, No. 141, 
I. O. O. F., of which he has been permanent and recording secretary since 1886, 
and of which he was the first noble grand. For fifteen years he has been financier 
and master of the exchequer of Shelton Lodge, No. 92, K. P., and he is also con- 
nected with Anchor Lodge, No. 14, A. O. U. W., and Kearney Lodge, No. 984, 
B. P. O. E. The foregoing record of his life indicates that he has been active in 
many lines, and his sterling worth is indicated in the fact that, although his circle 
of acquaintanceship is very large, it is almost coextensive with the circle of his 
friends. 



LIENRY SLAUGHTER BELL, M. D. 

Dr. Henry Slaughter Bell, actively engaged in the practice of medicine and 
surgery at Kearney since the age of twenty-two years, was born near Branden- 
burg, Kentucky, November 19, 1848. His father, George Gray Bell, was one of 
a family of six children, five sons and one daughter, born of the marriage of 
Henry and Polly (Slaughter) Bell, both natives of Culpeper county, Virginia, 
the former born in 1782 and the latter in 1787. In early life, prior to their 
marriage, they had crossed the Alleghany mountains and settled in Kentucky. 
The grandfather of our subject died in 1851 and the grandmother in 1846. The 
Doctor's father, who was a farmer and slaveowner, passed away in 1855, leaving 
a young wife and three children, of whom Henry S. was the eldest. The others 
were Fannie, then four years old, and Mary, only one year of age. The mother 
was the youngest child of Daniel M. Jones, a prominent citizen and politician of 
Meade county, Kentucky, who was elected to the state legislature for several 
terms in succession. His wife was a member of the Lewis family. Both families 
were from Virginia and, to use the negro expression, were regarded as "quality" 
in Kentucky, this meaning that they were well bred and well-to-do families. 
When left a widow Mrs. Bell had but little experience in affairs of the world, 
but through the kindness of her brothers and brothers-in-law she was relieved of 
much responsibility in the sale of several negroes and personal property — horses, 
cattle, hogs, etc. At that time a young, healthy, adult negro sold at about one 
thousand dollars. Mrs. Bell removed with her children to Louisville, Kentucky, 




DR. HENRY S. BELL 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 169 

her father having previously gone to that city in order to marry a widow who 
was encumbered with several bad boys, children of her children. The Doctor's 
mother soon realized that the environment was not such as would improve the 
morals of her son and she turned him over to his uncle, John M. Bell, who had 
reared his own family of one son and two daughters but was anxious to try 
different plans with him. So Dr. Bell is the product of that rare opportunity of 
'T'd do differently if it were to do over again." The Doctor stood the experi- 
ence for six years, but when the Civil war broke out, on the pretext of visiting 
his mother, who in the meantime had married again and located in Rockport, 
Indiana, the boy was permitted to leave his uncle's and depart for his mother's 
home. He made the trip on what was then known as one of the palatial Ohio 
river packets and it was a great event to him. This was in 1863, when fifteen 
vears of age. Instead of stopping at Rockport, Indiana, however, he remained 
on the boat until it reached the end of its trip. On leaving the steamer the 
Doctor enlisted on the i6th of December, 1863, in Company F, First Indiana 
Cavalry. He was on duty at Fredericktown and at Belmont, Missouri, and then 
went to Rich Mountain, Arkansas. He was with General Steele at Pine Bluff 
and Helena and participated in the expedition up the Red river under General 
Banks. His active service at length brought him to the time when he received 
his honorable discharge at Duval's Bluff, Arkansas, on the 5th of July, 1865, 
after the close of the war. 

Dr. Bell then returned to his home in Indiana and entered Rockport College, 
where he completed his more specifically literary education. Having determined 
upon a professional career, he next entered Bellevue Medical College of New 
York, from which he was graduated on the 30th of March, 1878, in which year he 
began practice, locating at Decker Station, Indiana, where he remained for five 
years. He afterward spent fifteen years in active practice at Paris, Illinois, and 
in 1890 came to Kearney, where he has since remained, his ability bringing him 
prominently to the front in the practice of medicine and surgery in this city. 

Dr. Bell was married in 1873 to Miss Anna M. Barker, of Evansville, Indiana, 
who died on the 20th of September, 1887, leaving two sons, Samuel Barker and 
Robert N. The former is now engaged in farming near Evansville, Indiana, and 
the latter is conducting a drug store in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. On the 6th 
of December, 1888, Dr. Bell was again married, his second union being with Miss 
Anna M. Smith, of Paris, Illinois, and to them have been born three children: 
Henry S., who follows farming near Aurora, Illinois; Margery Shaw, now a 
teacher in the public schools of Montpelier, Idaho; and Martha Elizabeth, sixteen 
years of age, attending high school. 

In politics Dr. Bell is a republican and was appointed physician to the State 
Industrial School at Kearney by Governor Dietrich in 1898 and afterward by 
Governor Mickey, serving for six years. He is a Knight Templar Mason and a 
member of the Royal Highlanders as well as of Sedgewick Post, No. i, G. A. R., 
of Nebraska. He belongs to the American Medical Association, the Nebraska 
State Medical Society and the Buffalo County Medical Society and of the last 
named has been the president. He is much interested in all that pertains to 
progress in his profession and also in everything that tends to promote the public 
welfare, for he manifests the same spirit of loyalty in citizenship that he displayed 
when as a youth he represented himself to be eighteen years of age in order that 



170 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

he might serve his country upon the battlefields of the south. With him it has 
always been "America first," and his example of loyalty as well as of profes- 
sional activity and honor might well be followed. 



CAPTAIN JOSEPHUS C. HEFFNER. 

Captain Josephus C. Heffner, who is living retired in Kearney, is one of the 
honored veterans of the Civil war. The same spirit of loyalty which prompted 
his enlistment when the stability of the Union was threatened has ever been man- 
ifest in his career, making him a most public-spirited citizen. He was born in 
Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, on the 2d of March, 1847, ^ son of Benjamin and 
Elizabeth (Leightenteler) Heffner, who were also natives of the Keystone state, 
where they spent their entire lives, the father there following the occupation of 
farming. 

Captain Hefl:'ner's boyhood was spent on the old homestead and his education 
was acquired in the public schools, which he attended until the ist of April, 1865. 
He then enlisted for service in the Civil war, joining the army when a youth of 
but eighteen as a member of Company K, Seventy-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteer 
Infantry. He had enlisted in 1863, when but sixteen years of age, joining Com- 
pany C of the Forty-ninth Pennsylvania Infantry Regiment, but his father, feel- 
ing that he was too young for active military duty, went to Washington and 
through a personal talk with Abraham Lincoln secured his release. Two years 
passed and he then again joined the army and while at the front he participated in 
the battle of Chattanooga, receiving an honorable discharge at Harrisburg, Penn- 
sylvania, December 16, 1865. In the war record his name was misspelled 
Heiffner. 

After receiving his discharge he returned home and two years later went to Oil 
City, Pennsylvania, working in the oil fields. He had learned the blacksmith's 
trade and he engaged in dressing tools in the oil fields, where he was also 
employed as an engineer, remaining there until 1883, when he removed to Shelton, 
Nebraska, where he operated a blacksmith shop for seven years. In 1889 he came 
to Kearney, where he was appointed chief engineer of the State Reform School, 
which position he held for twenty years. He was also chief engineer at the 
Soldiers' Home at Grand Island. Nebraska, for a time but later retired and is 
now enjoying a well earned rest. He is the owner of one hundred and sixty 
acres of land seven miles north of Gibbon, which he rents and which brings to 
him a good income. 

On the 15th of June, 1876, Mr. Heffner was united in marriage to Miss Ida 
Clara Maxwell, who was born in Clarion, Pennsylvania, November 25, 1855, a 
daughter of Robert T. and Cynthiana (Pierce) Maxwell, who spent their entire 
lives in the Keystone state. There Mrs. Heffner was reared and educated, pur- 
suing a course of study in the State Normal School at Edinboro, Pennsylvania. 
By her marriage she has become the mother of three sons, as follows : Ernest 
M., who is a dental practitioner of Omaha; Clarence E., who practices dentistry 
in Falls City, Nebraska, and who participated in the Spanish-American war as a 
member of Troop E of Colonel Torey's Rough Riders; and Guy L.. who is 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 171 

general auditor in the Chicago office of the Cudahy Packing Company. Reahzing 
the value of education, Captain Heffner has sent two of his sons to the State 
University. His wife is a member of the Presbyterian church and they are both 
held in high regard throughout the community. Fraternally he is connected with 
the Ancient Order of United Workmen and the Degree of Honor. He also be- 
longed to the Grand Army posts at Shelton and at Bradford but at present is 
not associated with any post. His wife, however, is a member of Sedgwick 
Corps, No. I, W. R. C. He won his title in connection with the state military 
service, having been first lieutenant and later captain in the State National Guard. 
He has done splendid work in public service, has been equally efficient and loyal 
in support of his country's best interests and as the years have gone on the 
sterling worth of his character has endeared him to all with whom he has been 
brouffht in contact. 



JOHN A. WILT. 



A farm of one hundred and sixty acres situated on section lo, Center town- 
ship, pays tribute to the care and labor bestowed upon it by its owner, John A. 
Wilt, who is numbered among the pioneer settlers of Bufifalo county, having 
made his home within its borders since 1871, or for a period of more than 
forty-five years. He has reached the eightieth milestone on life's journey, his 
birth having occurred in Maryland, February 18, 1836, his parents being George 
and Margaret (Hackensmith) Wilt, the former a native of Adams county, 
Pennsylvania, and the latter of Maryland. They were married in Maryland and 
there spent their remaining days, rearing their family of six children in that state. 

John A. Wilt is now the only survivor of the family. He was reared and 
educated in Maryland and remained at home until he reached the age of nineteen 
years, when he learned the carpenter's trade, which he followed until after the 
outbreak of the Civil war. His patriotic spirit was aroused by the continued 
attempt of the south to overthrow the Union and he enlisted as a private for 
three years' service with Company G, Eighty-seventh Pennsylvania Infantry. He 
participated in several hard fought battles and, though often in the thickest of 
the fight, was never wounded nor injured. He was mustered out at York, 
Pennsylvania, and returned home with a most creditable military record. While 
he was never wounded, he was on one occasion captured and for three months 
was incarcerated in Libby prison, so that he went through all the experiences 
and hardships of southern army prison life. 

When the war was over Mr. Wilt resumed work at his trade. He had been 
married in Pennsylvania in 1859 ^o ^i^s Carrie H. Doll, a native of the Key- 
stone state and a daughter of Jacob Doll. They continued to reside in the east 
until 1866, when they removed to Dayton, Ohio, where they remained for five 
years. In 1871 they arrived in Buffalo county, Nebraska and took up their abode 
upon a farm near Kearney, Mr. Wilt securing a soldier's claim, on which he 
remained until 1889. He then disposed of that property and purchased the farm 
upon which he now resides, comprising one hundred and sixty acres of land on 
section 10, Center township. This property he has since improved with fine 



172 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

buildings and he has also been identified with building operations in Kearney^ 
doing much to promote the welfare of the city along that line. His has been an 
active, busy and useful life fraught with good results, and his prosperity is well 
deserved. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Wilt have been born two children : Maggie, now the wife 
of A. A. Nash ; and Cora, the wife of W. C. Nash, now of Portland, Oregon. In 
his political views Mr. Wilt is a republican but has never been an office seeker. 
He maintains pleasant relations with his old military comrades through his mem- 
bership in the Grand Army of the Republic. He and his wife deserve great credit 
for what they have accomplished, for their success is attributable entirely to 
their own labor. Every phase of Buffalo county's development is familiar to 
them, for they arrived here in pioneer times and have witnessed the changes which 
have occurred, bringing the county to its present improved condition. 



HENRY HERBST. 



Henry Herbst is a retired farmer living in Amherst but for a long period 
was actively and prominently identified with general agricultural pursuits, whereby 
he won the competence that now supplies him with all of the comforts and some 
of the luxuries of life. He has a wide acquaintance in Amherst and is acknowl- 
edged among its most venerable citizens, for he has passed the eighty-fifth mile- 
stone on life's journey, his birth having occurred in Mecklenburg, Germany, on 
the 3d of November, 1830. There he spent the period of his minority and in 
1857 bade adieu to friends and native land and sailed for the new world, spending 
seven weeks upon the ocean ere the voyage was completed. He landed in New 
York city but soon afterward made his way to Buffalo, New York, and in that 
locality worked as a farm hand for a month in order to get money with which to 
come to the west. He then made his way to Chicago and in that locality was 
employed at farm labor at a wage of ten dollars per month. 

In 1861 Mr. Herbst enlisted for service in the Civil war, putting aside all 
business and personal considerations in order to aid his adopted country during 
ihe darkest hour in her history. He joined Company C, Twenty-fourth Illinois 
Volunteer Infantry, and served for four years and eight months. In the battle 
of Chickamauga he was struck by a cannon ball in the shoulder and was left 
on the field by his regiment, after which he was captured by the Confederate 
forces and spent eighteen months in the prisons at Andersonville, Charleston and 
Florence, Alabama, having a most horrible/ experience from lack of food and 
all those comforts and sanitary conditions which are so necessary to health. 
There were forty thousand prisoners and the death rate amounted to between 
four and five hundred each day. When he was searched by the Confederates 
before being thrown into prison he had a ten dollar bill, which was concealed 
between the layers of the sole of his shoe, and this proved quite a help to him in 
getting him things that he needed. When the war was over he received an 
honorable discharge at Springfield, Illinois, and returned to his home with a 
most creditable military record. 

Mr. Herbst then took up his abode in Will county, Illinois, and was there 



^jmiT^j'^i^ji -" 




HENRY HERBST 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 175 

married in 1866 to Miss Mary Turner, who was born in Germany but during 
her infancy was taken to Will county. Some time after their marriage Mr. 
and Mrs. Herbst removed to Benton county, Iowa, and in 1884 arrived in Buffalo 
county, Nebraska, where he entered a homestead and also a tree claim in Scott 
township. Upon his land he built a frame house and with characteristic energy 
began" to till the soil and develop the farm, continuing to engage in general agri- 
cultural pursuits there until three years ago, when he was obliged to give it up 
on account of his age, having then reached the eighty-third milestone on life's 
journey. He is today the oldest resident in this part of the county, but he has 
lived an active life, has been a hard worker and is yet in excellent physical trim, 
his only ailment being stiff' shoulders, the result of being hit by a rebel cannon 
ball. 

Mr. and Mrs. Herbst became the parents of eleven children, of whom five are 
yet living; Mrs. Minnie Feldwoch, a resident of Grant township; Mary, the wife 
of S. Tool, who is living in Callaway, Nebraska; Martha, the wife of Ed Lewis, 
whose home is in Callaway, Nebraska ; Hulda, the wife of William Shate, resid- 
ing in Cherry county, Nebraska ; and Henry W., who occupies the old home farm. 

Mr. Herbst has always voted with the republican party since becoming a 
naturalized American citizen. His religious faith is that of the Lutheran church, 
to which he has ever been most loyal, exemplifying in his life its teachings and 
endeavoring at all times to live according to the golden rule. His many sub- 
stantial qualities have given him firm hold upon the affectionate regard of his 
fellow citizens and he is today one of the most venerable and honored resi- 
dents of this part of the state. 



JOHN S. MINTON. 



John S. Minton is engaged in the automobile business at Kearney and his 
agency here has become a profitable undertaking. He handles a number of well 
known cars and his ability is manifest in the success which is attending him in his 
undertaking. Iowa claims him as a native son, his birth having occurred at 
Osceola, Clarke county, November 9, 1869. He was one of five children, of whom 
two are now living, born to John H. and Elizabeth (Bush) Minton. The father 
was a native of West Virginia and was a cabinet maker by trade but in his later 
life turned his attention to farming. When a young man he left home and went 
west to Boone county, Indiana, where about 1846 he was united in marriage to 
Elizabeth Bush. In 1864 he removed to Osceola, Clarke county, Iowa, and in 
1884 removed to Frontier county, Nebraska, where he spent his remaining days, 
his death there occurring in 1891, while his wife passed away in 1896. He was a 
man of marked force of character, possessing many sterling traits which gave him 
a firm hold upon the regard and goodwill of those with whom he was associated. 
For seven years he was a schoolteacher in Indiana and in Clarke county, Iowa, 
he was honored with election to the offices of register of deeds and county clerk, 
serving in the latter position for a number of years. His duties were most faith- 
fully and capably discharged and his labors wrought for the benefit and upbuild- 
ing of the community in which he made his home. Politically his allegiance was 



176 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

given to the republican party and he was a stanch and faithful member of the 
Christian church. 

John S. Minton lived in Iowa to the age of fourteen years, spending his youth- 
ful days upon a farm in Clarke county and in Osceola. He received his edu- 
cational training in the district schools and after coming to Nebraska with his 
parents learned the blacksmith's trade. In the spring of 1897 he arrived in 
Kearney, where he began working at his trade, which he followed for a number 
of years. In 1909 he embarked in the concrete and machinery business in partner- 
ship with D. Wort under the firm style of Wort & Minton and with him in 191 1 
he established an automobile agency, representing the Ford, Maxwell, Reo and 
Oakland cars. They have si«ce conducted this business with growing success 
and annually sell a large number of these different cars, their business having 
grown to large and gratifying proportions. Mr. Minton thoroughly knows the 
good points of every machine and his ability along commercial lines makes him 
successful as a salesman. 

On the i6th of August, 1898, ]\Ir. Minton was married to Miss Anna Bryant 
and to them have been born three children. Earl, Dale and John H. Mrs. Minton 
is a member of the Christian church and Mr. Minton belongs to the Masonic 
fraternity, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Royal Highlanders. 
In politics he is a republican but he does not seek nor desire office as it is his wish 
to give his undivided attention to his business affairs and his close application and 
unremitting energy constitute strong and potent forces in his growing sucesss. 



W. H. BUCK. 



W. H. Buck, engaged in business at Gibbon as a lumber dealer, belongs to that 
class of enterprising, progressive men who recognize the fact that obstacles and 
difficulties may be overcome by persistent, earnest effort, and when one avenue 
of opportunty seems closed they can always carve out other paths whereby they 
may reach the desired goal. Mr. Buck is a native son of New England, his birth 
having occurred at Northfield, Vermont, on the loth of August, 1858. He is a 
son of Bradley and Polly (Hopkins) Buck, both of whom were natives of Ver- 
mont and are representatives of old New England families. The father devoted 
his life to the occupation of farming and both he and his wife continued their 
residence in Vermont until called to their final home. 

W. H. Buck was reared on the old homestead and acquired his education in 
the public schools. His youthful training was that of the farm and he devoted his 
attention to the work of the fields until 1888, when he left home and made his way 
to Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin. He was employed in various ways there for five 
years and in August, 1886, came to Gibbon. Prior to his arrival here he had pur- 
chased the lumber business of Fred W. Gray, of Omaha, and upon his removal to 
this town he took possession of the business, which he has since successfully 
managed and conducted, covering a period of almost thirty years. He is accorded 
a liberal patronage, for his business methods are reliable and his enterprise unfal- 
tering. He is also associated with financial interests as one of the stockholders of 
the Exchange Bank of Gibbon, and he is the owner of three hundred and forty 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 177 

acres of improved farm land near the town, from which he derives a gratifying 
annual income. 

In 1889 Mr. Buck was united in marriage to Miss Flora Woodruff, of 
Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin, and to them have been born three children : Ella 
Bernice, the wife of George E. De Wolf, superintendent of schools at North 
Bend, Nebraska; James Bradley, who is associated with his father in the lumber 
business; and Florence Beryl, who is attending the Wesleyan University at Lin- 
coln, Nebraska. 

Mr. Buck belongs to Gibbon Lodge, No. 2)7> I- O. O. F., and to the Modern 
Woodmen. His political support is given to the republican party and he has 
served in various town offices, the duties of which he has discharged with prompt- 
ness and fidelity. His entire course, public and private, commends him to the 
confidence and goodwill of all, and throughout Gibbon and his part of the county 
he is spoken of in terms of high regard. 



FRANK MAJOR. 



For thirty-three years Frank Major has been a resident of Buft'alo county and 
during the last sixteen years of this period has made his home in Kearney. He 
has witnessed the greater part of the growth and development of this section of 
the county as pioneer conditions have been replaced by the advantages of a 
modern civilization. He is now engaged in contracting and carpentering at 
Kearney and has erected some of the fine homes of the city. 

His birth occurred in Yorkshire, England, February 29, 1840, and in his 
native country he was reared to manhood. His opportunities in youth were some- 
what limited, for at the age of thirteen years he began serving an apprenticeship 
at the carpenter's trade and afterward worked as a journeyman. At that period it 
was necessary to thoroughly master all the details of the business, for carpenter 
work had not then become specialized and each individual must know how to do 
all kinds of building. In 1865, in England, he was united in marriage to Miss 
Mary A. Davison, and in 1870, accompanied by his wife and three children, he 
sailed for America, landing at Toronto, Canada, on which day the youngest 
child died. 

xA.fter a short stay in Canada the family removed to Low Moor, Clinton 
county, Iowa, where they maintained their home for thirteen years, during 
which period Mr. Major worked at the carpenter's trade. In 1883 he came to 
Nebraska and settled on a farm two miles south of the present site of Watertown 
in Buffalo county. For seventeen years he resided upon that place, converting 
it from a tract of wild prairie into richly cultivated fields, from which he annually 
gathered rich crops. He carried on his farm work according to modern pro- 
gressive methods and that his labors were at all tim.es practical is indicated in 
the excellent crops which he gathered. In the year 1900 he removed to Kearney, 
where he has since been engaged in contracting and carpentering. For the most 
part his work has been confined to the building of residences and some of the fine 
homes of Kearney have been erected by him. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Major have been born eight children, but only four of the 



178 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

number are now living: Kate, a school teacher; Charles, who conducts a grain 
elevator at Watertown, Nebraska; Jessie, who is teaching school in Spokane, 
Washington; and Frank, who is devoting his life to the work of the ministry. 
The parents are consistent and faithful members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. Since becoming a citizen of the United States Mr. Major has been 
identified with all that has worked for the best interests of his adopted country. 
He became a member of the Farmers' Alliance at its inception and afterward 
became allied with the populist party. However, he has always maintained an 
independent attitude in politics, voting according to the dictates of his judgment 
rather than guiding his course by party ties. He has never had occasion to regret 
his determination to come to the new world, for here he found the opportunities 
which he sought and has gradually worked his way upward, being both 'the 
architect and builder of his own fortune. 



FREDERICK J. SWITZ. 



Frederick J. Switz is one of the oldtime residents of Kearney km'^^^ecord 
as a soldier and citizen well entitles him to representation in th^ '^mstory of 
Bufifalo county. His entire course has been marked by loyalty to duty and by 
fidelity to every trust reposed in him, and his course is worthy of the warmest 
commendation. He is a native of the kingdom of Pi^ussia, his birth having 
occurred in Spreewald, near the village of Borgsdorf, oh the 20th of* February, 
1842. His father. Christian Switz, was a farmer in the old country' and for two 
years served in the German army. He married Elizabeth Plashna and in the 
year 1856, accompanied by his wife and six children, emigrated to the new world, 
taking passage on board a sailing vessel bound for the United States. They 
made a remarkably quick trip for that period, their voyage being terminated at 
the end of thirty days. The family located in Cleveland, Ohio, and one of the 
first things that Mr. Switz did after his arrival was to take out his first naturaliza- 
tion papers. He became imbued with a love for his adopted country and when 
treason threatened the disruption of the Union he volunteered his services in 
its defense and was enrolled as a member of the Sixth Ohio Cavalry in Septem- 
ber, 1861. He served for three years, or until the expiration of his term of, 
enlistment, and was then honorably discharged. In the old country he knew 
Franz Sigel, who was a general in the Union army during the Civil war, 
and under him Mr. Switz served, acting as aide-de-camp a part of the time. 
After the war he resumed farming, which he followed in different localities, and 
his last days were spent in the Soldiers' Home in Washington. D. C. where he 
passed away about the year 1892. 

Frederick J. Switz was nearly fourteen years of age when he was brought to 
this country by his parents. He had previously attended the public schools of 
Germany and after reaching America he learned the trade of chair making in what 
was then Newburg, Ohio, but is now a part of the eighteenth ward of Cleveland. 
He devoted two years to the work, during which time he received four dollars a 
month with his board and washing. He, too, espoused the cause of the Union 
at the time of the Civil war, enlisting on the 19th of September, 1861, as a member 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 179 

of Company G, Forty-second Ohio Volunteer Infantry, of which regiment James 
A. Garfield, later president of the United States, was commander. He was 
discharged December 2, 1864, after participating in the engagements at Middle 
Creek, Kentucky, Cumberland Gap, Chickasaw Bluff, Arkansas Post, Grand Gulf, 
Thompson Hill, Raymond, Champion's Hill, Big Black River, the siege of Vicks- 
burg, the Red River Expedition under General Banks and the battle at Duvals 
Bluff, Arkansas. He was honorably discharged at Columbus, Ohio, and returned 
home with a most creditable military record. 

Mr. Switz then resumed work in the chair factory and his ability, industry 
and honesty led to his promotion to the position of foreman. After three 
years there spent he left his old employer to engage with another concern, and in 
1869 went to Auburn, Alabama, where, under the firm name of Runnels & Switz, 
he embarked in the manufacture of furniture. After spending five years there he 
closed out the business and in February, 1874, came to Kearney, where he has 
since lived. Here he purchased a small furniture establishment owned by a 
Mr. Grant, and later he bought out the establishment of J. P. Johnson, consoli- 
dating the two. For thirty-nine years he conducted a furniture and carpet busi- 
ness and undertaking concern, and during this period he had at various times 
seveateert^^npetitors, not one of whom was able to remain in business. He was 
the first of the furniture dealers in Nebraska to add to that line a carpet depart- 
ment. His long continuance with the trade indicates the success which is his. 
In 1913 he disposed of his holdings and confined his attention thereafter to 
retailing and jobbing paints, glass and wall paper, in which business he is still 
engaged, incorporating -■fhe same under the name of the Switz Paint & Glass 
Company. He is one of the few remaining early settlers of Kearney, having 
arrived here when the city contained a population of but three hundred, and he 
has not only witnessed its growth into the bustling, enterprising city of today, 
but has contributed in large measure to its development. 

On the 7th of August, 1872, Mr. Switz was married to ?^Iiss Emma A. Raw- 
son, of Nebraska City, who died November 27, 1894. They were the parents 
of three children: Arthur F., who died when about thirty-seven years of age; 
Annie L., the wife of Charles W. Ashley, of Sioux City. Iowa ; and Bessie E., the 
wife of C. D. Van Dyke, of Sioux City. For his second wife Mr. Switz chose 
Mrs. Phoebe S. (Hotchkiss) Allen, the widow of Homer J. Allen. 

While of foreign nativity, Mr Switz has no sympathy with the Kaiser in 
the present war and is in every sense of the term a loyal American citizen, with 
a love for the land of his adoption that is unshaken. His loyalty is evidenced 
by the fact that he risked his life to preserve the Union and is further evidenced 
in his long, honorable career and his support of all those interests wdiich are a 
matter of civic virtue and civic pride. In his political belief he is a republican 
and served as county coroner for six years during the pioneer period. In religious 
faith he is a Congregationalist, and fraternally he is a [Mason, having become a 
member of Iris Lodge, No. 229. A. F. & A. M., at Cleveland, Ohio, in November, 
1868. He transferred his membership to Auburn, Alabama, and from there to 
Kearney, and is one of the four surviving charter members of the blue lodge of 
this city. He is also a member of the chapter and commandery and has served 
as master of his lodge and as eminent commander of the Knights Templar. His 
course in life has commended him to the confidence and goodwill of all and his 



180 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

enterprise and industry in business have wrought along the lines of progress 
and success, gaining him place among the substantial and honored residents of 
Kearney. Those who know him esteem him highly and his life record should 
serve as an example to all men of foreign birth who become citizens of the new 
world and who owe undivided allegiance to the stars and stripes. 



EDGAR LAFAYETTE TEMPLIX. 

Edgar Lafayette Templin, part owner of the Shelton Clipper, was born at 
Jonesboro, Washington county, Tennessee, on the 19th of November, 1879, and 
for two years there lived with his parents, Elbert and Malinda (May) Templin, 
who were natives of the same state, where they resided until 1881, when they 
came to Nebraska, settling in Nemaha county. Two years later they removed 
to Jefferson county, taking up their abode near Reynolds, where they resided until 
1909, when they removed to O'Neill, where the mother's death occurred on the 
13th of September, 1910. The father is still living there. In the family were 
fourteen children, nine sons and five daughters, all of whom have reached years 
of maturity and still survive — a notable family record. 

Edgar L. Templin was reared and educated in Jefferson county, where he 
attended the common schools, supplemented by a course in a commercial college 
at Omaha, Nebraska. After leaving school he took up telegraphy, at which he 
worked for about twelve years. He was employed by the Western Union Tele- 
graph Company at Omaha during the last six years of that period and during the 
last two years was traffic chief in the main office at Omaha. In the year 191 1 he 
came to Shelton, where he engaged in the newspaper business in partnership with 
C. C. Reed. This connection is still maintained in the ownership and conduct of 
the Shelton Clipper, one of the leading country newspapers of the state. 

On the loth of March, 1909, Mr. Templin was united in marriage to Miss 
Hazel A. Reed, who was born in Buft'alo county, a daughter of F. D. and Hattie 
Reed, mentioned elsewhere in this volume. Mr. and Mrs. Templin attend the 
Presbyterian church and he is also affiliated with the Knights of Pythias lodge 
at Shelton. His political allegiance is given to the republican party and he is 
now a member of the city council. He takes a deep and helpful interest in affairs 
pertaining to the general good and his influence and support are given in behalf 
of all those measures which are a matter of civic virtue and civic pride. 



JOHN REDDY. 

John Reddy was one of the most progressive and valued farmers and citizens 
of Buffalo county until death called him, and his memory is yet cherished by 
those who were his associates. He was born in County Sligo, Ireland, on the 
25th of May, 1846, and at the age of sixteen years entered upon an apprentice- 
shij) to the dry goods business, serving for five years in that connection in the 
city of Sligo, after which he came to the United States and for a short time lived 




JOHN REDDY 



i 


^i 




■■HIBIIIBlMlr ' 






^^j^*" 

ZL^ 


,!-^ 

% *• 






t 


i|. 





MRS. JOHN EE13DY 



.J^^ 



't^- 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 185 

in New York city. He afterward removed to Vermont and subsequently became 
a resident of Dunlap, Harrison county, Iowa. 

While there he was married in June, 1871, to Miss Mary Lehan, a native of 
County Cork, Ireland, who came to the United States with an older brother when 
she was a maiden of but nine years. She was then placed in a convent at Salem, 
Massachusetts, where she was educated. 

In 1872 Mr. and Mrs. Reddy came to Gibbon, Nebraska, and for some time 
he was in railroad service, continuing in that line of work for eight or ten years 
after coming to the new world. He then purchased a farm adjoining Gibbon 
and gave his attention to general agricultural pursuits up to the time of his death, 
which occurred on the 28th of May, 1902, his farm comprising four hundred 
acres of^rich and valuable land, which is still in the possession of the family and 
is one of the desirable properties of Buffalo county. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Reddy were born six children, of whom five are hving: 
NeUie, the wife of K. C. Baker, of Atoka, Oklahoma; Bernard E., who is engaged 
in the music business in Kearney ; Roy, acting as station agent at David City, 
Nebraska; Maud, the wife of Dr. S. D. Nixon, of Chicago, IlHnois; and Belle, 
the wife of E. G. Tunks, of Gibbon, Nebraska. 

In politics Mr. Reddy was a democrat and, while he did not seek political 
office, he served for many years as a member of the school board and did much 
to further the interests of education. He was a member of Granite Lodge, No. 
189, A. F. & A. M., and was buried with Masonic honors when death terminated 
his career. He had been a faithful exemplar of the craft and in every relation 
of life was found true and honorable, faithfully discharging the duties that 
devolved upon him and holding at all times to high principles. Mrs. Reddy still 
survives her husband and occupies a beautiful home in Gibbon. 



CLARENCE S. ROBINSON. 

Clarence S. Robinson resides at No. 613 West Twenty-first street in Kearney 
and is the owner of a valuable farm property on section 10, Divide Township, to 
the development and supervision of which he gives his time and attention. He 
was born in Iroquois county, Illinois, on the ist of February, 1859, and is a son 
of John and Janette (Leighton) Robinson, the former a native of England and 
the latter of Scotland. They came to the United States in young manhood and 
womanhood, and were married in Danville, Illinois, after which they took up their 
abode upon a farm in Vermilion county, Illinois, near the Iroquois county line. 
There the father passed away in 1862 and following his demise the mother con- 
tinued to reside upon the old homestead farm until 1890, when she took up her 
abode in Ho.opeston, Illinois, where she remained up to the time of her death, 
which occurred on the 13th of February, 1910. 

Clarence S. Robinson was reared upon the home farm and acquired his edu- 
cation in the common schools. As early as his sixteenth year he began farming 
for himself as a renter in Iroquois county and since that time has depended 
entirely upon his own resources. In 1884 he made a trip to Buffalo county, 
Nebraska, and while here purchased the north half of section 9, Divide township. 



186 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

In 1886 he returned to take up his permanent abode in this county and at 
once began the development and improvement of his half section of land, remain- 
ing upon his farm until 1903, when he removed to Kearney to educate his chil- 
dren, since which time he has made his home in the city. In the meantime he 
carefully and energetically conducted his farm work and as his financial resources 
increased he added to his property until he is now the owner of seven hundred 
and twenty acres of land all in one body in Divide township and comprising 
some of the best land in the township. He is a stockholder in the Farmers' Ele- 
vator Company of Kearney and also of Riverdale, and is a stockholder in the 
Kearney Telephone Company. 

On June 8, 1887, Mr. Robinson was married to J\Iiss Roxana Charlton, of 
Rusco township, this county, a daughter of Charles Charlton, who came to 
Buffalo county from Christianburg, Virginia, in 1885, and took up a homestead 
in Rusco township. He now resides in Yates Center, Kansas. For many years 
he served as postmaster of Pleasanton, and he was widely and favorably known in 
this county because of his close connection with its development and his thorough 
I'eliability in business affairs. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Robinson have been born six children : Laura, who is now 
a teacher in the Kearney schools; Grace, the wife of H. D. Wagner, of Oregon, 
Illinois ; Arthur, who is cultivating his father's farm ; Donald, who is employed 
in Kearney; and Glen and Sidney, who are both in school. In his political views 
Mr. Robinson is a democrat and has served as township clerk, as township treas- 
urer and as a member of the school board, discharging the duties of these various 
positions in a most creditable manner. He and his wife are members of the 
Christian church and guide their lives according to its teachings. For a long 
period Mr. Robinson has been known as one of the representative business men 
and agriculturists of his community. After removing to the city he rented his 
land for seven or eight years, but for the past four or five years has operated 
one hundred and sixty acres himself and is now busily engaged in the active work 
of tilling the fields and in the management of his property interests, his business 
affairs being well directed, splendid success crowning his efforts. 



A. T. REYNOLDS. 



As cashier 01 the National Bank of Amherst, which he organized, A. T. Rey- 
nolds occupies an important place in the financial circles of Buffalo county. He 
is a native of Nebraska, his birth having occurred in Madison county in 1877, and 
he is a son of D. F. and Emma (Twiss) Reynolds, who are now living in Lin- 
coln. The father farmed for many years but has put aside the cares of active 
life and is enjoying a period of well earned leisure. 

A. T. Reynolds passed his boyhood upon the home farm in Madison county 
and received his early education in the district schools. Subsequently he was 
a student in the Fremont Normal School and in the State Normal School at 
Peru and for three years thereafter engaged in teaching school. Later he entered 
the insurance field but in 1903 he came to Amherst and organized the Farmers 
State Bank, which was capitalized at five thousand dollars. The officers were: 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 187 

A. U. Dann, president; R. L. Hart, vice president; and A. T. Reynolds, cashier. 
In 1908 the institution was nationalized and since that time has been known 
as the First National Bank of Amherst. The capital has been increased to 
twenty-five thousand dollars and there is now a surplus of five thousand dollars. 
The bank owns its own building, which is a substantial brick structure, and its 
business is steadily increasing. The officers remain the same and the prosperity 
of the institution is proof of their efficiency and sound judgment. The policy of 
the bank has been such as to gain the confidence of the public and at the same 
time to encourage the legitimate business expansion of the community. 

Mr. Reynolds is a republican in politics. He is identified with the Masonic 
blue lodge at Miller and with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows at Amherst 
and is popular both within and without those organizations. His business interests 
demand the greater part of his time and yet he is always willing to cooperate 
with various agencies in securing the material and civic advancement of Amherst. 
Neither his ability nor integrity has ever been questioned and he is justly held 
in high esteem wherever known. 



RICHARD HIBBERD. 



Richard Hibberd is a contractor and brick manufacturer of Kearney who has 
won place among the substantial business men of the city. His activities are of 
a character that contribute to public prosperity as well as to individual success and 
his life record is an illustration of what may be accomplished when determination, 
enterprise and laudable ambition point out the way. Mr. Hibberd is a native of 
England, his birth having occurred in Staffordshire on the 12th of April, 1845, 
his parents being John and Lucy (Baxter) Hibberd. The father was a hardwood 
lumber dealer, but the mother's people were for many generations connected with 
the business of brick manufacturing. 

Richard Hibberd acquired a common school education and afterward learned 
the rudiments of the brick industry with his maternal relatives. When a young 
man of eighteen he came to America and after looking to some extent for a loca- 
tion in the east he determined to seek the opportunities for a livelihood offered in 
the interior. Accordingly he purchased an immigrant ticket to Chicago and thence 
another ticket to Galena, Illinois. In passing through Sterling, en route to Galena, 
the appearance of that place impressed him favorably, so he left the train, at 
which time he had but five cents in his pocket. He found employment as a 
farm hand at twenty dollars per month and after working for one month he 
entered the service of General J. B. Steadman in the secret service of the Federal 
army. He was not enlisted at that time owing to the fact that, being a foreigner 
and resident of this country for but a short time, it was deemed unwise for him to 
have any legal connection with the Union forces in case it happened that he 
should be captured by the enemy. For a year and nine months he served in the 
capacity of secret service man and in January, 1865, was mustered in as a mem- 
ber of Company B, One Hundred and Forty-seventh Illinois Volunteer Infantry. 
Prior to this, however, he had done service in Tennessee, Alabama and Georgia, 
his work often being of a most important and hazardous character. After his 



188 . HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

enlistment he went to the front at Dalton, Georgia, and was employed at picket 
work along the route that General Sherman's army traversed the preceding year. 
He ended his military career when mustered out at Savannah, Georgia, January 
30, 1866, being paid off at Springfield, Illinois, on the 9th of February. He had 
rendered valiant and valuable aid to his adopted land and there has never been 
any citizen more loyal to American interests than has Richard Hibberd, who came 
to America with the full intention of becoming a citizen of this country and not 
giving to it a half-hearted allegiance. 

The war over, Mr. Hibberd embarked in partnership with his brother, J. E. 
Hibberd, in the business of manufacturing brick at Spring Hill, Whiteside county, 
Illinois, and there remained for a year, after which he engaged in brickmaking 
at various places. In 1868 he and his brother purchased a farm in Henry county, 
Illinois, and in connection with the cultivation of their land continued brickmaking 
for two years. 

At the end of that time Richard Hibberd sold out and went to England on a 
visit. While there, on the 28th of February, 1870, he married Miss Emma M. 
Gould and in May of that year returned to America with his wife. For a time 
he engaged in brickmaking in Geneseo, Illinois, and on the 17th of April, 1871, 
he arrived in Lincoln, Nebraska, where he remained for six years, doing con- 
tract work and also manufacturing brick. He afterward lived at Seward and at 
David City, engaged in the same line of business, but in the meantime home- 
steaded one hundred and sixty acres in York county. In July, 1880, he came to 
Kearney, having taken the contract to complete the building of the State Reform 
(now the Industrial) School, since which time he has made his home in this 
city. For thirty-six years he has had more to do with the erection of public 
buildings and business blocks throughout middle Nebraska than any other one 
man. The school buildings of Kearney, the Methodist Episcopal, the Episcopal, 
the Presbyterian and United Brethren churches of Kearney, the Odd Fellows 
Hall, the Masonic Temple, Kearney Hall and many other structures in Kearney, 
the Masonic Hall at Grand Island, the opera house at Hastings, the main building 
of the Deaf and Dumb Asylum at Omaha and numerous others all stand as 
monuments to the skill, enterprise and ability of Mr. Hibberd, who by reason 
of the efficiency to which he has attained in his chosen field of labor has long 
ranked as the foremost contractor of this part of the state. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Hibberd have been born six children, as follows : John C, 
a bricklayer of Kearney; Charles F., who is a bricklayer residing at North 
Platte ; Elma B., principal of the Hawthorn school in Kearney ; Lucy C, who is 
the wife of L. B. Clark, of Lincoln, Nebraska; W^illiam E., a bricklayer of Kear- 
ney; and Adelbert L., who is a practicing physician of Miller, Buffalo county, 
and is also a bricklayer by trade. 

In politics Mr. Hibberd is independent, voting for men and measures rather 
than for party. He served on the city council for one term but otherwise has 
never sought or held public office, preferring to concentrate his energies upon 
his business affairs, which have been wisely directed and have brought to him nota- 
ble and deserved success. His labors have constituted an important element in the 
adornment of various cities, for he always holds to the highest architectural 
standards and combines beauty with stability, utility and convenience. Starting 
upon his business career in the new world with but a single nickel in his pocket 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 189 

and today ranking with the most substantial citizens of central Nebraska, his 
record should serve to inspire and encourage others, showing what may be accom- 
plished when there is the will to dare and to do. Moreover, his life record 
is an indication of the fact that success and an honored name may be won 
simultaneously. 



JOHN GORDON. 



John Gordon is engaged in business in Kearney as a coal dealer and was for- 
merly for a long period station agent in this city, being a most popular and effi- 
cient representative of the road. His friends — and they are many — speak of him 
as a most obliging, kindly, helpful and courteous man and entertain for him 
the warmest regard. He was born in Toronto, Canada, January i8, 1859, and 
there spent the period of his boyhood and youth. When eighteen years of age 
he learned telegraphy and while thus engaged he provided for his own support by 
piling wood and in doing other work. When he had mastered the business he 
became an operator and ticket agent at Park Hill, Canada, a town on the Grand 
Trunk Railway, and there remained until 1884, when he crossed the border 
into the United States, where competition is keener but where advancement is 
more quickly secured. He made his way to McCook, Nebraska, but soon after- 
ward accepted a position at Hagler, Nebraska, seven miles from the Colorado' 
line on the Burlington road. He spent twelve years in station service for that 
road, remaining for three years at Denver and afterward becoming agent at 
Alliance, Nebraska, but his health failed and he then gave up his position,, 
going to Detroit, where he was a traveling salesman, representing a wholesale 
glove and mitten house. Three years were passed in that connection, after which 
he removed to Friend, Nebraska, where he returned as station agent for four or 
five years for the Burlington railroad. On the expiration of that period he came 
to Kearney and was agent at this place for ten years, when again his health 
failed. He was then made traveling freight and passenger agent out of Denver 
but after a time he resigned and turned his attention to the coal trade. When 
he gave up his position as station agent at Kearney the business men of the city 
presented him with a diamond ring in which his name is engraved. He stood very 
high with the railroad company, being one of its trusted employes, ever carefully 
safeguarding the interests of the road and at the same time giving most courteous 
treatment to its patrons, doing all in his power to further the interests and con- 
venience of travelers. 

On the 24th of June, 1885, in London, Canada, Mr. Gordon was united in 
marriage to Miss Tillie Maddocks, who is a native of Plymouth, England, but 
was brought to Canada when seven years of age. Since her marriage she has 
lived in Nebraska and she is the mother of two children : Norma, who is a 
teacher in the Gibbon schools ; and Paul, who is associated with his father in the 
coal business. 

Politically Mr. Gordon is a republican and keeps well informed on the ques- 
tions and issues of the day but has never consented to accept office. He belongs 
to the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, and he also has membership in the 



190 ■ HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

Presbyterian church. His Hfe has been guided by sound principles and actuated 
by high ideals, and all who know him attest his genuine worth and speak of the 
high regard in which he is held. 



FRANK E. BEEMAN. 



Frank E. Beeman, practicing at the Kearney bar, is a native of Trumbull 
county, Ohio, his natal day being September i, 1861. He is a son of Oliver 
Keth Beeman, well remembered by many of the residents of Kearney, and is a 
grandson of Ansel Beeman whose father, Nathaniel Beeman, was a resident of 
Kent, Litchfield county, Connecticut. The family was established in America 
by Symon Beeman who removed from Scotland to Springfield, Massachusetts, 
in 1640. He was the father of Samuel whose son, Samuel, was the father of 
Thomas, Sr. The last named went from Stonington, Connecticut, to Kent, that 
state, in 1740. His son Ezekiel was the father of Nathaniel, who married 
Rachel Keth. They became parents of two children. The younger, Ansel, born 
in 1787, was left motherless when two years of age and when a youth of 
seventeen years he drove an ox team through the wilderness to Ohio, becoming 
a pioneer of the famous Western Reserve. There in 181 1 he married Anna 
Maria Gibson, a daughter of Eleazer and Mary Gibson, the former having 
been an officer of the Connecticut line during the Revolutionary war and for 
his service he was granted a pension of eighty dollars per year during his life- 
time. Seven children were born to Ansel Beeman and his wife, including Oliver 
Keth Beeman, whose birth occurred in Mahoning county, Ohio, September 3, 
1827, and he there grew to manhood. He acquired a good practical education 
and started out in life as a district school-teacher. Being an exceptionally fine 
penman he was often called upon to draw up legal documents such as wills, 
deeds, conveyances, etc., and in time he obtained a practical knowledge of 
ordinary legal procedure and practiced law in a small way. However, the 
greater part of his life was devoted to farming and stock raising and he was 
largely instrumental in introducing graded merino sheep and graded cattle in 
his part of the country. In this way he accumulated a considerable amount of 
this world's goods. On the 7th of February, 1856, he married Harriet P. 
Misner, and in the year 1888 removed to Kearney, Nebraska, where he passed 
his remaining days, his death occurring January 12, 191 5. The male members 
of the Beeman family as far back as there is record of them were exceptionally 
large and powerful, being noted for their great physical strength, and Oliver 
Keth Beeman was no exception to this rule. His political allegiance was given 
to the republican party and he held membership in the Masonic order. He was 
a liberal contributor to religious work and helpful public enterprises and his 
chief characteristic was his sturdy, rugged honesty and his unswerving integrity. 
His widow survives him and yet resides in Kearney. 

Frank E. Beeman came to Kearney a briefless lawyer in January, 1888, and 
he was hard put in his early professional career to make his income keep up with 
his living expenses. Probably his first case was when he was appointed by the 
court to defend a man for attempted murder and while his client was justly 




FRANK E. BEEMAN 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 193 

sentenced to the penitentiary, the trial gave Mr. Beeman a standing at the bar 
so that his legal career thenceforward was one of creditable success. He had 
passed his boyhood days in his native state and for a time was a student at the 
Western Reserve Seminary. In 1879 he taught school and to prepare for his 
university course attended the high school at Ann Arbor, Michigan, from which 
he was graduated on the 22d of June, 1883. In the fall of 1884 he matriculated 
at the State University of Michigan, completing the classical course and receiving 
the bachelor of arts degree in 1887. In conjunction with his other work he 
attended the legal department of the university in 1886 and 1887 and in February 
of the latter year, upon special examination, was admitted to the bar. He 
spent the remainder of the year in Nebraska seeking a suitable location and at 
length deciding upon Kearney, has since made this city his home. 

Mr. Beeman's wife, who in her maidenhood was Miss Irene Osborn, and 
to whom he was married in 1884, died February 11, 1907, leaving two children, 
Burke Osborn and Irene. Mr. Beeman is a member of the Phi Gamma Delta, 
a college fraternity, and two fraternal organizations, the Knights of Pythias and 
the Ancient Order of United Workmen. He ranks very high as a lawyer and 
citizen. In his profession he is sound, clear minded and well trained, felicitous 
and clear in argument, thoroughly in earnest, full of the vigor of conviction, 
never abusive of his adversaries, imbued with the highest courtesy and yet a 
foe worthy of the steel of the most able opponent. 



H. J. DUNKIN. 

H. J. Dunkin, who is filling the office of postmaster at Gibbon, was born at 
Rossie, New York, on the 29th of July, 1855, and is a son of John and Ann Eva 
Dunkin, both natives of England. They emigrated to America in 1852 and settled 
in the state of New York, where the father passed away in 1855. Subsequently 
the mother removed with her family to Vermont and in 1871 came to Bufialo 
county, Nebraska, and took up her residence upon a farm. She died in 1901 
in Gibbon. 

H. J. Dunkin was one of a family of seven children born to his parents, of 
whom four are living. He remained at home with his mother until he attained 
his majority and during his boyhood and youth attended the public schools in the 
acquirement of an education. In 1879, when about twenty-four years of age, he 
became a traveling salesman and after devoting twelve years to that work was 
for eight years engaged in the grocery business at Gibbon. He then sold out 
and traveled for seventeen more years but in 19 15 was appointed postmaster of 
Gibbon, which office he is now acceptably filling. He is prompt and systematic 
in the performance of his work and is proving a popular official. He has been 
successful financially and owns a business property and his residence in Gibbon. 

In 1880 Mr. Dunkin was married to Miss Robbie Masters, who was bom in 
Illinois, of the marriage of Benjamin F. and Lovina (Empie) Masters, the for- 
mer of whom was born in Pennsylvania and the latter in Ohio. They were 
early settlers of Illinois but subsequently removed to Custer county, Nebraska, 
where the father passed away. The mother is still living and resides at Lincoln. 



194 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

Mr. and Mrs. Dunkin have four children, namely : Walter, a resident of Kansas 
City, Missouri; Gladys, the wife of C. C. Hall, of Portland, Oregon; Eva, de- 
ceased; and Harry B., who is a graduate of the local high school and is now 
assistant postmaster. 

Mr. Dunkin supports the candidates and measures of the democratic party 
at the polls and takes the interest of a good citizen in everything relating to the 
public welfare. Fraternally he belongs to Granite Lodge, No. 189, A. F. & A. M., 
and his wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. They are well 
known in Gibbon and their many admirable qualities have gained them the 
respect and warm regard of those who have been closely associated with them. 



DAVID WEBBERT. 



The name of David Webbert is closely interwoven with the early history 
of Kearney, for he left the impress of his individuality upon various activities 
which have led to the development and upbuilding of this city and county. A 
native of Carlisle, Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, he was a son of John 
Webbert, while his grandfather, a native of France, became the founder of the 
family in the new world, arriving in America about the beginning of the nine- 
teenth century. In early manhood David Webbert went to Dayton, Ohio, where 
for many years he followed carpentering and contracting, and during that period 
he was united in marriage with Miss Mary A. Arnold. In July, 1872, he arrived 
in central Nebraska when the country was an almost unbroken expanse of wild 
prairie. He took up his abode in Kearney, being among its first settlers, and 
here he worked at his trade, his services being in constant demand in the growing 
frontier village. Many of the buildings now standing were erected by him and 
are still evidences of his skill and handiwork. He led a most industrious life 
and was accounted one of the substantial citizens of his community. 

Mr. Webbert was also a man of marked characteristics, decided in his 
views and ever unfaltering in his support of his honest opinions. While living in 
Ohio he was among the first to respond to the country's call for troops to put 
down the rebellion and was enrolled for the hundred-days' service, while later 
he was connected with the One Hundred and Thirty-first Ohio Volunteer In- 
fantry. That he proved a valiant and loyal soldier is evidenced in the fact that 
he was presented a "certificate of thanks" bearing the signature of the martyred 
president, and on the strength of this he was granted a homestead a short dis- 
tance east of Kearney, together with a pension. He was a quiet, unassuming, 
unobstrusive man who attended strictly to his own business without interfering in 
the affairs of his neighbors. He was also generous to a fault, often to his own 
financial detriment. He was quiet and even tempered in disposition and always 
attained his ends without serious friction. No man in the community was more 
widely respected than he. Honest, industrious and law-abiding, he stood for all 
that is best in American citizenship. His religious faith was evidenced by his 
membership in the United Brethren church and his political indorsement was 
given to the republican party. He died in July, 1894, survived by his widow, 
and five children, namely: Lillie A., the wife of Frank S. Rhone, of Kearney; 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 195 

Reuben R., a carpenter at Dayton, Ohio; Benjamin O., a carpenter of Kearney; 
Henry A., of Kearney; and Henrietta, the wife of Charles E. Taylor, of 
Dayton, Ohio. 



HENRY A. WEBBERT. 

Henry A. Webbert, still living at Kearney, was born at Dayton, Ohio, Febru- 
ary 15, 1 87 1, but was reared and educated in the city which is now his home. 
He began learning the printer's trade with Rhone Brothers on the 12th of April, 
1886, and has followed that pursuit in many different localities, although always 
considering Kearney his home. He is now conducting a general printing business 
and is accorded a liberal patronage in that connection. He is also interested in 
various other lines of endeavor and his sound judgment and keen discrimination 
are regarded as valuable assets in any undertaking with which he becomes 
identified. 

On the 22d of March, 1893, Mr. Webbert was united in marriage to Miss 
Hattie G. Taylor, by whom he has three children, David Arnold, Henry James 
and Mary Louise. Mr. Webbert is well known in fraternal circles, being identi- 
fied with the Masons, the Odd Fellows and the Knights of Pythias. He has 
served as high priest of the Royal Arch chapter and as eminent commander for 
the Knights Templar and does everything in his power to further the work of 
the craft. His religious faith is that of the Episcopal church and his political 
belief that of the republican party. He served for four years as assessor of 
Kearney and at the present time is occupying the position of city treasurer, 
discharging his duties promptly, systematically and capably. He was also one 
of the organizers of the Buffalo County and Midway Fair Association, of which 
he is now the treasurer, and he was a charter member and is a director of the 
Kearney Commercial Club. He is also treasurer of the State Volunteer Firemen's 
Association. His activities along many lines have been of benefit to the city in 
which practically his entire life has been passed and he is a progressive, public- 
spirited man who ever looks to the welfare and upbuilding of the district in which 
he lives. The work instituted by the father in pioneer times is being carried on 
by the son. so that the name of Webbert figures prominently in connection with 
public affairs. 



CHARLES H. PRATT. 



Among the young business men of Riverdale whose enterprise is contributing 
in large measure to the business development and general improvement of the 
town is Charles H. Pratt, who is now cashier of the State Bank. Iowa claims 
him as a native son, his birth having occurred in Sioux county on the 8th of 
September, 1886, his parents being Thomas and Mary Hanna (White) Pratt, 
who are farming people of this county. The family removed to Buffalo county 
during the early boyhood of Charles H. Pratt, who was here reared and edu- 



196 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

cated. He supplemented his early opportunities in that direction by a course in 
the high school at Kearney and in the excellent business college of which that city 
is justly proud. After thus receiving a thorough training he obtained a posi- 
tion in the office of the county treasurer and in 1907 he came into the bank at 
Riverdale, known as the State Bank, of which he has since been the cashier 
and in which he now owns a controlling interest. He has been very active in its 
management and has contributed in substantial measure to its success. He is one 
of the well known and valued citizens of the town, where he owns a pleasant resi- 
dence and two lots. 

Mr. Pratt was married on the i6th of June, 191 5, to Miss Hilda G. Peterson, a 
native of this county and a daughter of John O. and Othelia H. Peterson. The 
father is deceased but the mother still resides on the old homestead farm, where 
she has reared her family of five children. Mr. and Mrs. Pratt attend the Metho- 
dist Episcopal church and he is well known in fraternal circles, belonging to the 
Odd Fellows Lodge No. 352, the Modern Woodmen of America, the Ancient 
Order of United Workmen and the Rebekah degree of the Odd Fellows. In 
politics he is a republican and is now serving as treasurer of the school board at 
Riverdale. His interest in community affairs is that of a public-spirited citizen 
who cooperates in all plans and measures for the general good and puts forth 
earnest effort to brins: to a successful conclusion whatever he undertakes. 



CARLTON B. CASS. 



Carlton B. Cass, the owner and editor of the Ravenna News, has made 
the paper a factor of importance in the molding of public opinion and has at 
all times sought to advance the community welfare. He is a native of New 
York, his birth having occurred in Albany on the 9th of June, 1868. His parents, 
Horatio G. and Mary J. (Babcock) Cass, were likewise born in the Empire state 
and the father was a member of the faculty of the State Normal College for 
some time. At length he left the educational field and engaged in the grocery 
business in Albany but at the time of the panic of 1873 failed. Two years later 
he removed to Hamilton county, Nebraska, and located at Aurora, where he 
taught school for a while. Subsequently he turned his attention to the mason's 
trade and for a number of years engaged in contracting. Still later he held the 
office of water commissioner of Aurora for ten years and is still living there at 
the age of seventy-five years. Following the death of the mother of our subject, 
in 1870, he remarried and in 1885 lost his second wife. 

Carlton B. Cass was about seven years of age when the family home was 
established in Aurora, Nebraska, and received his education in the public schools 
there. After putting aside his textbooks he entered the office of the Hamilton 
County News and after serving his apprenticeship worked for two years as a 
journeyman printer. In 1886 he came to Ravenna, Buffalo county, and estab- 
lished the Ravenna Star, which he conducted for a year and then sold to his 
competitor. He next went to Stratton, Hitchcock county, and founded the 
Stratton Democrat, which he published for one year. He then returned to 
Ravenna and took charge of the Ravenna News, having purchased a large 
interest therein. After paying off a five hundred dollar mortgage on the plant 




CAELTON B. CASS 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 199 

he became the sole owner of the paper, which he has since pubhshed. The 
paper has a circulation of a thousand and is ranked among the progressive, 
reliable and well edited weeklies of this state. The plant is thoroughly modern 
in its equipment and in addition to publishing the News Mr. Cass does a large 
job business and has built up an enviable reputation for high class work. 

On the 27th of January, 1900, Mr. Cass was married to Miss Theressa 
Petrick, a daughter of Carl and Barbara (Wesley) Petrick, natives of Bohemia. 
The father, who was a farmer, emigrated to America and located in Fillmore 
county, Nebraska, in 1883. He purchased a section of land there which he 
operated successfully until 1889, when he removed to Custer county, this state. 
There he lived until his demise in 1901 and the following year his wife also 
passed to the great beyond. Mr. and Mrs. Cass have five children, namely: 
Mildred F., who was born December 27, 1900; H. Allen, born August 5, 1902; 
Marion, August 9, 1904; Lyman, September 12, 1906; and Marjorie, August 11, 
1908. 

Mr. Cass has held the office of city clerk for more than twenty-five years, 
and from 1890 until 1896 served ably as justice of the peace. He has been a 
member of the school board for ten years, and was recently elected president of 
the same. For a quarter of a century he has also been superintendent of the 
cemetery and in all of his ofticial positions he has made a record creditable alike 
to his ability and public spirit. Fraternally he is well known, belonging to the 
Knights of Pythias, the Ancient Order of United Workmen, the Royal High- 
landers, the Modern Woodmen of America and the Modern Brotherhood of 
America. He is one of the leading citizens of Ravenna and never fails to use 
his personal influence and that of his paper to promote the material and civic 
?idvancement of the town. 



JOHN D. LOEWENSTEIN. 

John D. Loewenstein is a member of the city council at Kearney and one whose 
record in office is most commendable, for he has brought to the discharge of his 
duties sagacious business methods and has fought against all untried theories. 
All recognize the effectiveness and value of his public service and reelection has 
continued him in the office. His residence in Bufi^alo county dates from April, 
1878, and for twenty-seven years of this time he was engaged in general farming 
in Center township. His birth occurred in Birmingham, now a part of Pitts- 
burgh, Pennsylvania, January 23, 1854, but he was only a year old when his 
parents, Daniel and Elizabeth (Moesta) Loewenstein, removed to Iowa City, 
Iowa, which was then the capital of the state, and there the father worked at his 
trade of wagon making. 

It was at that place that John D. Loewenstein was reared to manhood, acquir- 
ing his education in the public schools, in which he passed through consecutive 
grades until he became a high school student. After his textbooks were put aside 
he spent four years at work at the wagon maker's trade in connection with his 
father, and in young manhood he came to Buffalo county, Nebraska, arriving here 
thirty-eight years ago. Soon after he reached his destination he purchased a 



200 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

half section of railroad land in Center township for five dollars per acre and to 
this he added from time to time until he now owns an entire section of land, 
from which he derives a gratifying annual income. In 1878 he returned to Iowa, 
was married, brought his bride to Buffalo county and has here since remained. 
Year by year he carefully and systematically tilled the soil, converting his land 
into highly cultivated and productive fields, and as the years passed on he man- 
aged to acquire a handsome competence. Satisfied at length with what he had 
attained in a business way, he left the farm and removed to Kearney, where he 
has made his home since April, 1905, deriving a good annual income from his 
farm property. '" 

On the nth of December, 1878, in Iowa, Mr. Loewenstein was united in 
marriage to Miss Mary A. Schmidt, and to them have been born nine children : 
Daniel J., William H., Frank F., Alva, Christina, Ida, Henrietta, Amelia and 
Clara Frances. 

In his political views Mr. Loewenstein is an earnest democrat and in 1912 
was elected a member of the city council, since which time he has served in that 
body. He puts forth every effort to safeguard the interests of the city, is care- 
ful in the expenditure of public moneys and yet avoids that useless retrenchment 
which- Jiampers progress. In religious faith he is a Lutheran, and his life has 
ever been ^jdi^d^y high and honorable principles which have made him a man 
among men, respected and honored wherever known and most of all where he is 
best known. '% 



WILLIAM J. SMITH. 



An excellent farm of two hundred and ten acres in Shelton township pays 
tribute to the care and cultivation which its owner, William J. Smith, bestows 
upon it, and its well kept appearance testifies to his enterprise and industry. He 
was born in Lawrence county, Pennsylvania, on the loth of October, 1858, of the 
marriage of George and Jane (Stanley) Smith, both of whom were natives of 
Pennsylvania, where the demise of the mother occurred. In the fall of 1872 the 
father removed with his family to Buffalo county, Nebraska, and here purchased 
three hundred and twenty acres of land, which he cultivated until his death. To 
him and his wife were born five children, of whom three are still living. 

William J. Smith was educated in the public schools of this county and 
remained at home until he reached mature years, after which he purchased his 
present farm, which comprises two hundred and ten acres on section 16, Shelton 
township. He has made many improvements upon the place and has conserved 
the fertility of the soil. He carries on general farming but gives the greater part 
of his attention to stock raising, which he finds very profitable. 

In 1881 occurred the marriage of Mr. Smith and Miss Tacy Walker, who. 
was bom in Ohio and is a daughter of Samuel Walker, deceased. Her demise 
occurred in 1899 and she was laid to rest in the Shelton cemetery. Besides her 
husband she left four children : Frank Benson ; Laura B., the wife of Francis 
Johnson ; and Tillie G., and Bessie, both at home. In 1901 Mr. Smith was again 
married, Miss Nona Boyce becoming his wife. She is a native of West Vir- 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 201 

ginia and is a daughter of Isaac Boyce, a resident of Colorado. To this union 
five children have been born, namely: Louise E. ; Dale E.; Rachel, deceased; 
John; and Stanley. 

Mr. Smith supports the republican party at the polls and is now acceptably 
filling the office of justice of the peace, while for a number of years he served 
as a member of the school board. He belongs to the Ancient Order of United 
Workmen, and both he and his wife are members of the United Brethren church. 
When he began his independent career Mr. Smith had no capital but he possessed 
the more valuable assets of determination and energy and he has become one of 
the substantial residents of Shelton township. 



RICHARD SULLIVAN, D. O. 

Dr. Richard Sullivan, who is conducting an infirmary of osteopathy at Kear- 
ney, was born in Springfield, Massachusetts, on the 15th of April, 1872, and was 
but four years of age when his parents removed with their family jtp; northwestern 
Iowa, where he spent his youthful days and pu^ued a public, school^eaucation. 
He was about eighteen years of age when h^ entered a drug .store, in 'which he 
remained for three years, and during that time he also took up the study of 
telegraphy, having two brothers who were operators. ¥ - afterward became sta- 
tion master and operator at Smithland, Iowa, on the ± inois Central Railroad, 
was also at Remsen and Fonda, Iowa, and for ten years was in Colorado, occupy- 
ing positions as telegraph operator and. station agent. He made good in this con- 
nection but sought a broader field of labor and entered the Amerijcan School of 
Osteopathy at Kirksville, Missouri, where he was graduated. He then located 
for practice in Kearney in September, 1912, and has here successfully followed his 
profession, doing excellent work as the years have gone on. 

On the 17th of January, 1900, Dr. Sullivan was united in marriage to Miss 
Effie Pratt, a native of Harlan, Shelby county, Iowa, by whom he has had two 
children, namely: Pratt, who died in infancy; and Elaine, born September i, 
1902, who is at home. In politics Dr. Sullivan is independent and fraternally he 
is connected with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the Knights of 
Pythias. Laudable ambition has prompted him to take the forward steps in his 
career and his course has been marked by a steady progression that is now bring- 
ing him to the front in his chosen profession. 



J. G. WALKER. 



A high type of business enterprise is manifest in the commercial career of 
T. G. Walker, a druggist of Gibbon, who was born in the province of Ontario, 
Canada, on August 10, 1868, a son of Robert and Margaret (Baird) Walker. 
The father was a native of Ireland and was brought to the United States by his 
parents when a child of but three years. The mother was bom in Ontario. Fol- 
lowing their marriage they located on a farm in Ontario and it was upon the 



202 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

old homestead there that J. G. Walker was reared, while his educational oppor- 
tunities were those afforded by the public schools of the neighborhood, supple- 
mented by a high school course in Ontario and in Custer county, Nebraska. He 
was sixteen years of age when he came with his father's family to this state. 
Their goods were shipped to Grand Island and from that point J. G. Walker and 
his brother John drove with wagon and team across the country to Sherman 
county, where they lived for a year, devoting their attention to the cultivation 
of their farm, which was situa^|^ just across the boundary line in Custer county. 
The father had previously _^0^4 that land as a homestead claim and the 
family bent their energies to the task of breaking the sod and cultivating the 
wild prairie. In 1885 they took up their abode upon the homestead. 

J. G. Walker continued to assist in the work of the farm until 1890, when he 
went to Mason City, where he learned the drug business and there worked in 
a drug store until 1896. He then took a course in pharmacy and was given 
honorable mention in his class. Subsequently he came to Gibbon and engaged 
in the drug business for himself, since which time he has conducted his store. He 
has a well appointed establishment, carrying a large and carefully selected line 
of drugs and druggists' sundries, and he has built up a good trade by reason of 
honorable methods, unfaltering industry and laudable ambition. He is also the 
owner of one hundred and sixty acres of land in Bowman county. North Dakota. 

In August, 1900, Mr. Walker was united in marriage to Miss Sybil N. Con- 
verse, of Loup City, Sherman county, Nebraska, by whom he has four children, 
namely: Marie, Margaret, Robert and Wilbur. 

Mr. Walker is a republican in politics and has served on the village board 
and on the school board, acting as president of the latter at the present time. 
Fraternally he is identified with Granite Lodge, No. 189, A. F. & A. M. ; Omaha 
Consistory, A. & A. S. R. ; and the Ancient Order of United Workmen. He and 
his wife are members of the Presbyterian church and sterling worth has gained 
them an enviable place in public regard. Mr. Walker's residence in Nebraska 
covers a period of almost a third of a century, during which time he has witnessed 
notable changes and has borne his part in the work of general improvement and 
advancement. He is never remiss in the duties of citizenship, never fails in his 
obligations to his fellowmen and at all times stands for those things which are 
most worth while in manhood and in citizenship. 



E. G. TUNKS. 



E. G. Tunks is successfully engaged in the real estate and insurance business 
at Gibbon and has gained a place among the enterprising and able young business 
men of his town. His birth occurred in Illinois on the 14th of June, 1886, and 
he is a son of S. E. and Josephine (Kent) Tunks, both natives of that state. The 
father is still living but the mother has passed away. They were the parents of 
three children, of whom one is deceased. 

E. G. Tunks was reared at home and received his education in the schools of 
his native state but in 1900, when about fourteen years of age, he went to 
Iowa, where he remained for four years. He was subsequently for a similar 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 203 

period in South Dakota but in 1908 he came to Gibbon, Buffalo county, Nebraska, 
and aided in instaUing the electric light plant here, of which he was manager 
for some time. Subsequently, however, he entered the real estate and insurance 
held, in which he has since been active, and he now handles much valuable 
property annually and does a good business as an insurance agent. 

On the 2d of June, 1909, Mr. Tunks was united in marriage to Miss Rena B. 
Reddy, a native of this county and a daughter of John and Mary (Lehan) Reddy. 
Her parents were both born in Ireland but ernigrated to the United States in 
early life and in 1871 located on a farm in^^ft'alo county, where the father 
passed away. The mother is still liv^g at the age of sixty-seven years. Mrs. 
Tunks is one of a family of six children, of whom five survive, and by her 
marriage has become the mother of a son, Lehan Kent, whose birth occurred on 
the 14th of August, 191 5. 

Mr. Tunks gives his political support to the republican party and discharges 
to the full all of the obligations of citizenship. Fraternally he is connected with 
Gibbon Lodge, No. 37, I. O. O. F., in which he has filled all of the chairs, and 
with Granite Lodge, No. 189, A. F. & A.. M., and in religious faith both he and 
his wife are Presbyterians. The gratifying measure of prosperity which Mr. 
Tunks has gained is the more creditable in that it is due solely to his own well 
directed efforts, as he began his career without capital. 



JAMES D. HAWTHORNE. 

James D. Hawthorne, well known as a jeweler of Kearney, came to this city 
in the spring of 1878 and has remained here continuously since, or for a period 
of thirty-eight years. With the exception of one year he has been in business 
at the same location throughout the entire time. Kearney upon his arrival was 
a frontier town — a straggling village of about one thousand population. There 
was no street lighting, no paving and the part of the town that lies in the vicinity 
of the depot was built on stilts. Hf^>has witnessed the transformation of this 
little frontier village into a modern city with all the advantages and opportunities 
known to the enterprising western metropolis, and in the work of progress and 
development he has borne his part, his labors being directly resultant along lines 
of continued growth, development and improvement. 

Mr. Hawthorne is of Canadian birth. He first opened his eyes to the light 
of day at Thorold on the 23d of June, 1853, his parents being Sampson and Ann 
(Curry) Hawthorne. The father was a miller by occupation and in 1866 came 
to the United States, settling at Cedar Rapids, Iowa, where he and his wife spent 
their remaining days. 

It was there that James D. Hawthorne was reared to manhood and the public 
schools afforded him his educational privileges. After his textbooks were put 
aside he began learning the jeweler's trade and in 1878 when a young man of 
twenty-five years he removed to Kearney and cast in his lot for weal or woe 
with the Httle town that at that time did not present a very promising appearance 
but which he believed might become a commercial center of some importance. 
He began business here in a small way and the success which he has attained as 



20i HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

the years have passed by has been due tO' close application, indefatigable industry 
and thoroughly reliable business methods. He has increased his stock according 
to the demands of the trade and has ever maintained one of the well appointed 
jewelry establishments of the city. 

Mr. Hawthorne was married in 1875 to Miss Linnie Gwinn, who died leaving 
four children; Nellie, now the wife of Verne Black; Lillian, the wife of C. W. 
Stoufer; Jay G. ; and Karl S. For his second wife Mr. Hawthorne chose Miss 
Clara F. Gillmann, whom he wedded in February, 1907. He is a Knight Templar 
Mason, a member of the Mystic Shrine, and also a member of the Order of the 
Eastern Star, of which he is a past gra§d patron. In religious belief he is a 
Protestant. He belongs to the Kearney Commercial Club and cooperates in all 
of its plans and projects for the upbuilding and development of the city. He is 
ever a courteous, affable, genial gentleman, quiet and unassuming in manner, but 
possessed of those sterling qualities which win respect and honor in every land 
and clime. His business integrity is above question and his entire commercial 
career has been based upon the old adage that honesty is the best policy. 



JASPER F. WALKER. 



Jasper F. Walker, of Shelton, has practiced l^w for about a quarter of a 
century and has gained a distinctly creditable place in his profession. He was 
born in Hancock county, Indiana, on the 13th of September, 1847, ^ son of 
Wiley and Eliza (Moore) Walker, natives respectively of North Carolina and 
Vermont. The mother's birth occurred on the 8th of October, 1820, and when 
fourteen years of age she removed to Indiana, where she began teaching at the 
age of sixteen. Wiley Walker left North Carolina in 1833, when sixteen years 
of age, and went to Indiana, where he remained until his demise on the 15th of 
December, 1862. His wife survived for many years, dying on the 17th of 
August, 1901, when almost eighty years of age, but never remarried. 

That branch of the Walker family to which our subject belongs is of Scotch 
origin and has been traced back to the seventeenth or eighteenth century to a 
General Walker, who commanded at the siege of Derby. Robert Walker emi- 
grated to America before the Revolutionary war and settled in North Carolina, 
where his son, Robert Walker II, was born and grew to manhood. He was 
married on the 7th of June, 1777, and became the father of Robert Walker III, 
who had a family of sixteen children, thirteen of whom grew to mature years 
and accompanied their father on his removal to Hancock county, Indiana, in the 
early '30s. Most of them settled in that county and reared large families and 
there are yet many representatives of the name there. 

Jasper F. Walker received his education at the Battle Ground Collegiate Insti- 
tute in Battle Ground, Indiana, a town which has grown up on the site of the 
battle of Tippecanoe. For some time he engaged in teaching school, following 
that profession in both Indiana and Nebraska. He removed to the latter state in 
March, 1870, and settled on a homestead in Hall county, where he lived until 
1889, when he became a resident of Shelton, Buffalo county. He abandoned 
teaching for the practice of law and for about twenty-five years has been a 







9tm..M 





7 /f 



MR. AND MRS. JASPER F. WALKER 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 207 

member of the Nebraska bar. He has an intimate knowledge of statute law and 
precedent, and the power of convincing argument makes his legal learning effec- 
tive. He takes great pains in the preparation of his cases and his record shows 
that he has won a large percentage of favorable verdicts. 

Mr. Walker was married on the 9th of March, 1870, to Miss Joann McCord, 
a daughter of Elias and Eliza McCord, of Hancock county, Indiana. Her father 
was one of the leading farmers of that county and was also active in public affairs, 
serving for several years as a member of the board of county commissioners. 
He passed away in 1901, after surviving his wife for three decades, her demise 
having occurred in 1871. Mrs. Walker was born October 10, 1849, ^^^ received 
her education in the common schools of the Hoosier state. By her marriage she 
has become the mother of three children: Sylvia Myrtle, now Mrs. George 
W. Dawson; Daisy E., the wife of Edward L. Stubblefield; and Jesse C, who 
married Agnes M. Mundle. 

Mr. Walker supports the candidates and measures of the republican party 
as he believes that its policies are based upon sound principles of government. 
In 1891 he became a member of the Ancient Order of United Workmen and 
since 1897 has belonged to the Loyal Mystic Legion. His ■ religious faith is 
indicated by the fact that he holds membership in the Methodist Episcopal 
church. When but sixteen years of age he joined the Indiana Legion, which 
was a military organization formed subsequent to Morgan's raid of Indiana for 
the purpose of preventing a repetition of the raid. He has always manifested 
a praiseworthy concern for the public good and has been willing to cooperate 
in the furtherance of projects for the advancement of his community and state. 



LOUIS A. KOEPPE. 



Louis A. Koeppe, known far and wide as an auctioneer and also engaged in 
the handling of new and second-hand merchandise at Kearney, was born at 
Neenah, Wisconsin, August 19, 1870, and was one of a family of six children, 
four of whom are now living, whose parents were Bernhardt and Dorothy 
(Schnella) Koeppe, natives of Germany. Both were born and reared in the 
vicinity of Berlin and in that country the father learned and followed the milling 
business. About the year 1866 he came to America and for a time engaged in 
carpentering in Wisconsin, but his later life was devoted to general agricultural 
pursuits. He removed from Wisconsin to Boulder, Colorado, but in the fall of 
1872 bought a team of mares and a prairie schooner and, joining a wagon train, 
in which were twenty-three other teams, traveled eastward through an Indian 
infested country until he finally reached Buffalo county, Nebraska. Here he 
secured both a homestead and timber claim in Divide township and thereon 
resided for many years, passing through the usual experiences incident to fron- 
tier life. He lived there during the period of Indian scares and the grasshopper 
plague and the drought, all of which entailed hardships that are utterly unknown 
to the present generation and of which they can form no adequate conception. It 
was a time which tried men's souls, for in a measure life was unsafe and, more- 
over, the early settlers had to see all their work upon the farms count for naught, 



Vol. II — 10 



208 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

for the grasshoppers descended upon their crops, leaving nothing green. Mr. 
Koeppe finally went to California, where he passed away in 1897. 

Louis A. Koeppe had none of the advantages offered the boy of the present' 
day — the opportunities to secure an education and learn a trade or receive other 
business equipment. He was reared to manhood on the old homestead claim 
which his father had entered from the government and was put to work when but 
a child, having to bear his part in the burden of contributing to the general sup- 
port of the family. When eleven years of age his mother died and there thus 
devolved upon him those burdens which would have been relieved had he had a 
mother's counsel and care. 

At nineteen years of age Mr. Koeppe embarked in the livestock business and 
was gaining a good start when the bank at Kearney, in which his money was 
deposited, failed and left him without a dollar. He gathered together from his 
wrecked fortune sufficient means to take him to Bozeman, Montana, where, with 
a capital of less than one hundred dollars he embarked in the new and second- 
hand merchandise business. He there resided until 1899, with the exception of 
about a year during that period, which he spent in Buffalo county. It was dur- 
ing this time that he began crying sales and, possessing natural aptitude for the 
work, he soon won a reputation as an auctioneer and his services were more and 
more in demand in that connection. For the last seventeen years he has lived in 
Kearney and has engaged in the handling of new and second-hand merchandise in 
connection with the crying of sales. In the occupation of auctioneering he has 
become widely and favorably known, not only in Buffalo but throughout many of 
the adjacent counties. His life has been one of unfaltering industry, his entire 
career being characterized by hard work and close application. 

In 1897 occurred the marriage of Mr. Koeppe and Miss Minnie Schift'mann, 
of Butte, Montana, and to them has been born a son, Arthur S. The family is 
well known in Kearney, where they have resided for about two decades, and Mr. 
Koeppe has a wide acquaintance throughout the state. He has an abundance of 
vitality, a breezy manner, energy and alertness. He is quick at repartee, and his 
ready word has been an important asset in his success. 



ORLANDO McCONNAUGHEY. 

Orlando McConnaughey, who owns an excellent farm on section 24, Gibbon 
township, adjoining the town of Gibbon, at one time held title to seven hundred 
and fifty acres of excellent land but has now disposed of a part of his property. 
He was born near Hillsboro, in Highland county, Ohio, on the 2rst of December, 
1847, ^ son of Andrew and Mary (Vance) McConnaughey, both natives of Penn- 
sylvania. They were reared and married in that state but subsequently removed 
to a farm in Highland county, Ohio, where they resided until called by death. 

Orlando McConnaughey was educated in the district schools and during his 
boyhood and youth also received valuable training in farm work through assisting 
his father. In the spring of 1870 he purchased a small farm in his native county 
and engaged in its operation until 1882, when he decided to take advantage of 
the opportunities in the rapidly developing state of Nebraska and accordingly 






HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 209 

came to Buffalo county, buying a section of land in Shelton township. Some 
time later he purchased his present home farm adjoining the town of Gibbon, 
which at one time comprised seven hundred and fifty acres. He has since dis- 
posed of a part of this place but still owns three hundred and twenty acres. He 
has been very successful, his well directed labors yielding him substantial returns 
annually, and he ranks among the well-to-do men of his township. 

Mr. McConnaughey was married on the 13th of January, 1870, to Miss Julia 
A. Wilcoxon, who was born near Freeport, Illinois. They have become the par- 
ents of five children, of whom three survive, namely: Thena C, the wife of W. 
Boyd Smith, of Omaha; Hattie B., who married J. N. Ashburn, owner of the 
Gibbon mills; and Eft'ie C, the wife of O. J. Milius, of Ralston, this state. 

The republican party has a stanch adherent in Mr. McConnaughey, but he has 
never sought ofiice, preferring to discharge his civic duties as a private citizen. 
He holds membership in Granite Lodge, No. 189, A. F. & A. M., and in Nebraska 
Consistory, No. i, A. & A. S. R., of Omaha. Both he and his wife are identified 
with the Baptist church and he has served as a member of the board of trustees, 
thus giving proof of his interest in the work of the organization. His life has con- 
formed to high standards of morality, and his many admirable qualities have 
gained him the respect and warm regard of those who have been associated with 
him. 



VICTOR L. JOHNSON. 



Victor L. Johnson, cashier of the Shelton State Bank, has gained a place 
among the bankers of Buffalo county that is distinctly creditable to his ability and 
enterprise. He was born on the 20th of April, 1883, of the marriage of Nelson 
W. and Agnes C. (Hare) Johnson, both of whom were born in the state of New 
York, where the father passed away and where the mother is still living. They 
became the parents of six children, of whom one is deceased. 

Victor L. Johnson was reared and educated in the Empire state and remained 
there until 1902, when, as a young man of about nineteen years, he came to 
Shelton, Buffalo county, Nebraska, and entered the Shelton Bank as assistant 
cashier, which office he held until 1905, when he went to Heartwell.. He was 
cashier of the Heartwell State Bank until 191 2, in which year he accepted the 
position of cashier of the Shelton State Bank, in which capacity he is still serving. 
He is not only thoroughly familiar with banking routine but also understands 
the underlying principles of banking and keeps in touch with financial conditions 
throughout this section and in fact throughout the country at large. Under his 
able management the bank has paid good dividends and has also furnished ample 
security to the stockholders and depositors. He has gained a measure of success 
that many a man older than he might well envy and he owns his comfortable and 
attractive residence. 

Mr. Johnson was married in 1907 to Miss Marie Reasoner, who was born in 
Ashland, Nebraska, and they have become the parents of a daughter, Anna ^larie, 
born September 28, 1913. Mr. Johnson gives his political support to the repub- 
lican party and is now town treasurer. He belongs to Shelton Lodge, No. 99, 



210 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

F. & A. M., in which he has filled all of the chairs, and in religious faith both he 
and his wife are Presbyterians. They are well known and have many warm 
friends, who esteem them highly for their admirable traits of character. 



CASSIUS B. MANUEL. 

Many tangible evidences of the public spirit of Cassius B. Manuel can be given 
and so far-reaching and important has been his work in behalf of the community 
in which he lives that no history of Buffalo county would be complete without the 
record of his life. He was born in McKean county, Pennsylvania, on the 28th 
of January, i860, and during his infancy was taken by his parents to Missouri, 
in which state his early years were passed. His father, Benjamin F. Manuel, was 
a son of Francis Manuel, a native of Portugal, iii which country the family name 
was Emmanuel. Benjamin F. Manuel was born at Eastport, Maine, and after 
serving an apprenticeship of seven years in Rochester, New York, became a con- 
tractor and builder. He wedded Anna Barclay, a native of Shippen, New York, 
and of English ancestry, being a direct descendant of Sir Robert Barclay. While 
in Missouri the family resided at Mexico, Macon City, and at Glenwood, and it 
was during this time that Mr. Manuel enlisted for service in the Union cause, 
becoming a member of Company H, Third Iowa Cavalry. He was honorably 
discharged in 1863 owing to injuries sustained in the service and returned to 
Missouri, where he engaged in contracting and building. He also gave some 
attention to farming and likewise established a brickyard, which he operated with 
the aid of his sons. In September, 1872, he removed with his family to Howard 
county, Nebraska, where he homesteaded a claim, residing thereon until the death 
of his wife, which occurred in 1887. Later he removed to California, where he 
passed away in 1900. 

Cassius B. Manuel was little more than twelve years of age when the family 
removed to Nebraska. His youthful days were spent in helping with the work of 
the home farm and making brick. He well remembers the grasshopper plague 
and the later droughts when the springtime promise of harvests was utterly 
destroyed and the farmers had to face the condition of passing through season 
after season without harvesting any crops. 

When seventeen years of age Cassius B. Manuel spent a season with his father 
and a brother in the Black Hills engaged in mining, in conducting a store, in 
freighting supplies for the miners and in avoiding the hostile Indians. His edu- 
cational training was completed in the State Normal College at Peru, Nebraska, 
and in 1882 he taught his first school, which was near Clarks, Nebraska. A large 
proportion of his subsequent life has been devoted to educational work and, hav- 
ing been elected superintendent of the schools of Howard county, he served in 
that position for four years. He has proven a most able educator, imparting 
readily and clearly to others the knowledge that he has acquired, and his efforts 
have been an important element in advancing the school system of the state. 

In early boyhood Mr. Manuel became deeply interested in politics, at which 
period his enthusiasm found expression in carrying a torch in political parades. 
For a time he was editorial writer on the St. Paul Phonograph and afterward 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 211 

became the owner of the St. Paul Press. At a subsequent date he purchased the 
Phonograph and consoHdated the two papers under the name of the Phonograph- 
Press. In conducting that journal he attained wide renown as a trenchant, force- 
ful newspaper writer and his paper became an important factor in shaping polit- 
ical belief. His activities also extended in other directions, for he became one of 
the organizers of the Farmers Alliance and the populist party. In 1906 he was 
chosen chairman of the populist state central committee, in which position he serv- 
ed for six years. By appointment of Governor Shallenberger he became superin- 
tendent of the State Industrial School for Boys at Kearney in 1909 and two years 
later was reappointed, because of his fitness for the position, by Governor Aldrich, 
who was of another political faith. The school was in a deplorable condition when 
Mr. Manuel became superintendent, sanitary conditions were very bad, the morale 
of the school was at a low ebb and it was conducted much after the manner of a 
penal institution. There was also an utter lack of harmony between the officers 
and the boys. Mr. Manuel at once set about to improve these conditions and bring 
order out of chaos. Modern scientific methods improved the sanitation ; the boys 
were no longer treated as felons ; and a bond of sympathy and helpfulness between 
officers and boys wrought a marked change for the better. In fact, in every way 
a great advancement was made from a humanitarian standpoint; an honor system 
was inaugurated which had much to do with the improvement, for the boys felt 
that fidelity to the school standards brought returns. In fact, the honor system 
and the furlough introduced by Mr. Manuel resulted in reducing the number of 
runaways and incorrigibles to a minimum. For four years Mr. Manuel con- 
tinued at the head of this institution to its lasting good, to his own personal credit 
and to the satisfaction of all concerned. Since that time he has been secretary, 
treasurer and business manager of the Denzler-Manuel Furniture Company of 
Kearney, of which he was one of the organizers. 

On the 4th of May, 1886, Mr. Manuel was united in marriage to Miss Etta 
Imes, and to them have been born four children : Bessie ; Ruth, now the wife of 
Walter E. Wade of Downs, Kansas ; Ruby R. ; and Cassius Barclay, who died 
July 4, 1910. 

Mr. Manuel is a Knight Templar Mason and is also identified with the Ancient 
Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. His has been a well spent life 
fraught with good results for the benefit of his fellow townsmen and characterized 
by broad humanitarianism. His course commends him to the honor and regard of 
all and wherever he is known he is spoken of in terms of high regard. 



O. E. LOWELL. 



The operation of five hundred acres of excellent land which he owns affords 
O. E. Lowell scope for his energy and enterprise, and his well directed labors 
yield him a large financial return. A native of Missouri, he was born on the 12th 
of January, 1862, of the marriage of Luther K. and Sarah Jane (Kirk) Lowell, 
who were born respectively in Ohio and Michigan. The father served in the 
Union army during the Civil war and died while at the front. Later the mother 
married Abram Barrett, of Wisconsin, and in the fall of 1871 they removed to 



212 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

Buffalo county, Nebraska, where she passed away. Our subject is the youngest 
of three children, the others being : George L., a resident of Colorado ; and Maria 
E., the wife of P. E. Mundal, of Hailey, Idaho. 

O. E. Lowell attended the common schools in his boyhood but when fourteen 
years of age began supporting himself. After working as a farm hand for a 
few years he rented land and later took up a homestead, in Hitchcock county, 
Nebraska. In 1889 he sold that place and coming to Buffalo county, purchased 
his present home farm on section 10, Platte township. He proved successful as a 
farmer from the hrst and as the years passed he invested his savings in additional 
land and has acquired title to five hundred acres, all of which is well improved. 
He raises both grain and stock but gives the greater part of his attention to 
the latter branch of his business. He is also financially interested in the Farmers 
Elevator Company at Gibbon. 

Mr. Lowell was married in 1884 to Miss Sarah Zimmerman, and they have 
become the parents of nine children, namely: Rhoda, deceased; Nettie B., at 
home; Richard, residing at Kearney; Elsie M., the wife of Chester Smith; Otto 
E. ; Elton E., at home ; Reuben ; Ruth L. ; and Jessie E. 

Mr. Lowell exercises his right of franchise in support of the democratic party 
and for more than twenty years he has held the ofifices of justice of the peace and 
school director. Fraternally he belongs to the Workmen and the Grange, and 
both he and his wife are identified with the United Brethern church — associa- 
tions which indicate much concerning his interests. His business ability and 
integrity are generally recognized, and personally he is popular. 



EDWIN A. MILLER. 



Edwin A. Miller, conducting business as a funeral director at Kearney, is well 
known in Buffalo county, where he has been active in public affairs, serving 
at one time as county clerk. He was born in Dayton, Ohio, January 26, i860, 
and is one of the four surviving children in a family of seven, born of the mar- 
riage of Frederick Miller and Lydia Aley, who were natives of Maryland and 
Ohio respectively. The father was a farmer by occupation and Edwin A. 
Miller was reared upon the old home farm. His educational opportunities were 
only such as could be obtained in the district schools and even then he could 
attend only in the winter seasons, as his' services were needed in the work of the 
fields through the summer months. When eighteen years of age he began learning 
the carpenter's trade but still continued to make his home with his parents. He 
was identified with building operations and with farming for one year prior to 
1884. On the 31st day of March, 1883, both his parents died of typhoid pneu- 
monia, within fifteen minutes of each other. 

In the following March Mr. Miller came west to Kearney, Nebraska, and at 
once began work at the carpenter's trade in this city, continuing to follow that 
occupation until 1891. During the succeeding two years he was connected with 
the implement business. In 1894 he was engaged in the grain and feed business, 
during the period when com sold as low as eight cents per bushel, and other grains 
brought proportionate prices. He stored away thousands of bushels and in 




EDWIN A. MILLER 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 215 

December, 1901, he sold his corn and for four years thereafter was deputy county 
clerk under A. V. Offill. In the fall of 1905 he was the successful nominee of 
the republican party for the office of county clerk and after acceptably serving 
for a term of two years his record was accorded public indorsement in a reelec- 
tion, so that his connection with the office covered four years as deputy and four 
additional years as clerk. He retired from the position on the 31st of December, 
1909, with an excellent record, his course being marked by systematic methods, 
capability and unfaltering fidelity. While yet filling the office of clerk in 1908 
he opened an undertaking establishment, which he conducted for about a year 
through an employe but since January, 1909, he has given his undivided attention 
to the business and that he might better serve the public he took a course in a 
Cincinnati college of embalming, from which he was granted a diploma in 
May, 1 9 10. 

On the 8th of October, 1889, Air. Miller was united in marriage to Miss Phoebe 
A. Herbert, and to them have been born five children : Pearl E., the wife of 
Harry T. Troupe; Florence A., the wife of Emil R. Parks; one who died in 
infancy; Alberta M., who died at the age of seven and a half years; and 
Clara Bell. 

Mr. and Mrs. Aliller are members of the Presbyterian church and he is an 
Odd Fellow, belonging to the subordinate lodge, encampment and the Rebekahs. 
He is also serving as major of the First Battalion of the Second Regiment of the 
Patriarchs Militant of that order. He has attained the Royal Arch degree in 
Masonry and is a member of the Eastern Star, while on the membership rolls of 
a number of insurance fraternal organizations his name is also found. He has 
served consecutively for seventeen years as secretary of the Nebraska State 
Volunteer Firemen's Association. He has led a busy and useful life charac- 
terized by advancement along material lines and by fidelity to every duty. He 
has a wide acquaintance and the favorable regard of many friends and in 
Kearney is accounted a representative citizen. 



FRED C. SCOTT. 



Fred C. Scott, a prosperous hardware and furniture merchant of Kearney 
whose business methods measure up to modern commercial standards and 
exemplify the progressive spirit of the age, was born in Decatur county, Iowa, 
December 5, 1861. His father, Josiah A. Scott, was a native of Ohio, where he 
grew to manhood. He afterward became a resident of Pleasanton, Decatur 
county, Iowa, settHng there just prior to the Civil war, and he was there engaged 
in mercantile pursuits. While residing in that city he wedded Mary Bowman, a 
representative of an old Virginia family, and after two children had been bom 
to them they removed to Indiana, the father engaging in merchandising at Middle- 
town, that state, for a time. Finally, however, he went to Anamosa, Iowa, with 
his family and there passed away in the year 1892. His widow survives, yet 
making her home in that city. 

Fred C. Scott inherited many of his father's sterling attributes of character 
and business ability. In his boyhood he became assistant in his father's hardware 



216 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

store and learned from him the old adage that honesty is the best policy and that 
the road to success is along the line of upright dealing. He learned too that correct 
valuation must be placed upon opportunity, industry and determination. His 
literary education was acquired in the schools of Middletown, Indiana, and of 
Anamosa, Iowa, supplemented by a course in a commercial college in Chicago. 
In March, 1888, he arrived in Nebraska and for seventeen years was engaged in 
the hardware business at David City. While there he organized the David City 
Telephone Company, of which he was the sole owner, this being one of the 
earliest in the independent telephone field in this state. 

In the year 1905 Mr. Scott removed to Kearney and since that time has made 
this city his home, his attention being given to the furniture and hardware trade. 
He has a well appointed store, carrying a large and carefully selected line in both 
departments, and his earnest efforts to please his patrons, his reasonable prices 
and his straightforward dealing have been the salient features in his growing 
success. He is courteous and obliging and his life record proves that prosperity 
and an honored name may be won simultaneously. 

On the 25th of September, 1890, Air. Scott was united in marriage to Miss 
Ella Prentice, of Anamosa, Iowa, and to them have been born three children: 
Ruth Alda, Mary Elizabeth and Cree Prentice. The religious faith of the family 
is that of the Methodist church, in which the parents and children hold member- 
ship. Mr. Scott belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and his po- 
litical indorsement is given to the democratic party. Anyone meeting him face to 
face would know at once that he is an individual embodying all the elements of 
what, in this country, we term "a square man," one in whom to have confidence, 
a dependable man in any relation and in any emergency. He has never hesitated 
to take a forward step when the way is open and, though content with what he 
has attained as he has gone along, he has always been ready to make an advance. 
Fortunate in possessing ability and character that inspire confidence in others, 
the simple weight of his character and ability have carried him into important 
relations. 



LEWIS A. WIGHT. 



Lewis A. Wight, of Gibbon, who is proving very efficient as the mail carrier 
of rural route No. 2, was born in Henry county, Illinois, on the 4th of October, 
i860. His parents, William K. and Sophia (Eastman) Wight, were natives 
respectively of Lake county, Ohio, and of New York state. Their marriage 
occurred in the Empire state, whence, in 1858, they removed to Henry county, 
Illinois, where the father engaged in farming until 1886, when he came with his 
family to this county and located upon a farm in Gibbon township. At length 
he put aside the work of the fields and removed to Gibbon, where his demise 
occurred December 9, 1903. To him and his wife were born seven children, of 
whom six sons survive. 

Lewis A. Wight remained at home for a number of years after attaining his 
majority and devoted his time to assisting his father, but following his marriage in 
1 891 he assumed charge of the operation of the homestead. He farmed success- 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 217 

fully until 1905. He was then made carrier on route No. 3, but subsequently 
transferred to No. 2 and removed to Gibbon, where he has since lived. Although 
he gives the greater part of his time to the discharge of his duties as mail carrier, 
he still owns eighty acres of land in Buffalo county and eighty acres in Sas- 
katchewan, Canada, from which he derives a gratifying financial return. He also 
holds title to his comfortable residence in Gibbon. 

Mr. Wight was married in 1891 to Miss Minnie Fulmer, a native of New 
York and a daughter of D. M. and Ellen E. (Longstreet) Fulmer, who were born 
in that state but in 1880 came to this county. The father purchased land here and 
devoted the remainder of his life to its cultivation. The mother is still living. 
Mrs. Wight is one of a family of five children, all of whom survive. Mr. and 
Mrs. Wight have no children of their own but have an adopted son, Clyde F., 
who is now attending the local high school. 

Mr. Wight supports the republican party and has served as a member of the 
town board. He has also served several years as member of the library board. 
Fraternally he belongs to the Ancient Order of United Workmen, and both he and 
his wife attend the services of the Methodist Episcopal church. During the many 
years of their residence in this county they have gained a wide acquaintanceship 
and have made and retained a host of friends. 



CHRISTIAN JACOBSON. 

Among the residents of Kearney who have been enabled to put aside the 
onerous duties of business life is Christian Jacobson, who for a considerable 
period was identified with agricultural pursuits and afterward engaged in the 
cement contracting business. His indefatigable energy and intelligently directed 
effort brought him the success which now enables him to rest from further labor. 
He was born in Denmark on the 19th of March, 1846, and there spent the period 
of his boyhood and youth, his time being largely devoted to the acquirement of an 
education. In May, 1866, when a young man of twenty years, he landed at New 
York after a six weeks' voyage upon the Atlantic. He then made his way to New 
Jersey, where for three months he was employed in a brickyard and on the 
expiration of that period he removed to Davenport, Iowa, and later to Illinois, 
where he was employed as a farm hand for two years. He afterward spent four 
months in Omaha, Nebraska, and then returned to his old home in Denmark, 
where he served for two years in the regular army and was also employed for two 
years. The lure of America, however, was upon him and, returning to Illinois, 
he secured employment on the farm on which he had previously worked for two 
years. His second engagement covered seven years and during the last year of 
that time he acted as foreman. Saving his money, for he was ambitious to engage 
in business on his own account, he came to Buffalo county in 1879 and purchased 
one hundred and sixty acres of land in Divide township. This was railroad land 
for which he paid five dollars per acre. With characteristic energy he began to 
develop the wild prairie tract, added many modern improvements and brought his 
fields to a high state of cultivation. He continued to follow farming and stock 
raising successfully for many years and the sale of his crops, adding to his 



218 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

income, enabled him to purchase more land from time to time until he became 
the owner of eight hundred acres, which he successfully cultivated until 1904, 
when he turned the farm over to his sons and retired from active agricultural 
life. Removing to Kearney, he then engaged in the cement contracting business, 
building sidewalks for about five years, during which time he put in miles and 
miles of sidewalk and curbing. He was accorded a very liberal patronage in that 
connection but at length put aside active business cares to enjoy a rest which he 
had richly earned and fully deserves. 

Mr. Jacobson has been married twice. On the 9th of March, 1875, he wedded 
Miss Charlotta Peterson, who was born in Sweden and came to the United 
States in 1872. By her marriage she became the mother of seven children, as 
follows : Johanna, who is the wife of William CuUoch and lives in Colorado ; 
Frederick William, who resides on his father's farm ; Eliza, who gave her hand in 
marriage to Ed. S. Shovlain, of Buffalo county, Nebraska ; Carl A., who lives on 
his father's farm; Walter C, a resident of Montana; Martin Elmer, who makes 
his home in Idaho ; and Laura, who is the wife of Charles Robbins, a miller 
of this county. The wife and mother passed away in July, 191 1, and on the 7th 
of October, 191 4, Mr. Jacobson was again married, his second union being with 
Miss Mary Kellam, who was born in Yorkshire, England, and' emigrated to the 
United States when about sixteen years of age. In 1886 she took up her abode 
in Kansas and in the year 1889 came to Kearney, Nebraska. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jacobson attend the Episcopal church, Mrs. Jacobson having 
been the organist there for years, and he exercises his right of franchise in sup- 
port of the men and measures of the democratic party. He has served as school 
director and was assessor for thirteen years and in all matters of citizenship 
maintains a public-spirited attitude, supporting those plans and measures which 
he deems of greatest value to the community. Actuated by a laudable ambition, 
he has ever worked his way steadily upward and in his business career has used 
only constructive methods, his path having never been strewn with the wreck of 
other men's failures. Industry has been his watchword and it has brought him 
success. 



EMORY WYMAN. 



Emory Wyman is now living retired at Gibbon but for many years was 
actively identified with agricultural and with creamery interests. He has now 
passed the eighty-first milestone on life's journey, his birth having occurred at 
Jamestown, New York, July 3, 1834. His parents were Ezra and Emeline 
(Seymour) Wyman, who were also natives of New York. On leaving that state 
they removed to Michigan, where they lived for eleven years and then became 
residents of Wisconsin. Subsequently they returned to Jamestown, New York, 
where they resided until 1861, when they once more went to Wisconsin, where 
their remaining days were passed. In their family were eleven children, of 
whom six brothers served in defense of the Union during the Civil war. Two 
of the number died while at the front defending the stars and stripes and four 
of them are now on the pension roll of the country. 



I 




EMORY WYMAX JX 1864 




EMORY WY:\IAX 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 221 

Emory Wyman started out to earn his own living when but a Httle lad of 
seven years. His youthful days were largely spent in Wisconsin and his boy- 
hood was a period of earnest and unremitting toil in which he had few advantages, 
educational or otherwise. The need of his country aroused his patriotic spirit in 
1861 and he offered his services to the government, enlisting as a member of 
Company A, Sixth Wisconsin Infantry, with which he remained until 1862, 
when he joined the Nineteenth Wisconsin Regiment and so served until 1864. 
Although he participated in a number of the most hotly contested engagements 
of the war, he was never wounded, nor was he ill in the hospital. In July, 1864, 
he was overcome by the heat and never saw his regiment after that. When he 
had partially recovered he was assigned to light duty as an invalid. 

After being mustered out in Maryland Mr. Wyman returned to Wisconsin, 
where he resided until 1880. He then removed to Clinton county, Iowa, where 
he lived for one year and during that period had charge of four creameries. In 
1882 he arrived in Shelton, Nebraska, and settled upon a farm in that locality, 
devoting eighteen years to general agricultural pursuits. He then returned 
to the village of Shelton, where he made his home until 1906, when he came to 
Gibbon, where he has since lived. 

Mr. Wyman has been married twice. In 1865 he wedded Miss Orra Tyler, 
by whom he had six children, as follows : Albert L., superintendent of the 
county farm of Buffalo county ; Bernett, who is also a resident of this county ; 
Delia, who is the wife of John Icke, of Madison, Wisconsin; Frankie, who gave 
her hand in marriage to Dr. J, E. Mettlin, of Bloomfield, Nebraska ; Grace, living 
in Madison, Wisconsin, who is superintendent of the rural schools of Dane 
county, that state ; and Cassius, deceased. The wife and mother passed away in 
1902 and the following year Mr. Wyman was again married, his second union 
being with Mrs. Margaret Henry, of Chicago. The latter is a devoted and 
consistent member of the Christian church. 

Mr. Wyman belongs to the Grand Army post at Shelton and thus maintains 
pleasant relations with his military comrades. In politics he is a republican and 
for years served as a member of the school board, while in 1889 he was elected 
to represent his district in the state legislature. In former years he took an active 
interest in politics and gave earnest aid and support to many measures for the 
public good, but at the present time he is largely leaving all political as well as 
business activities to others. However he still feels an interest in affairs of the 
day and notably for one of his years keeps in touch with the trend of modern 
thought and progress. He is now one of the venerable citizens of the county — a 
man whose well spent life has made him worthy the goodwill and respect which 
are accorded him. 



RICHARD P. ZIMMERMAN. 

Among the progressive and efficient farmers of Shelton township is Richard 
P. Zimmerman, who owns an excellent farm on section 21. He was born in 
Schuylkill county, Pennsylvania, on the 25th of November, 1861, and is a son of 
Adam W. and Louise E. (Miller) Zimmerman, natives of Pennsylvania, who 



222 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

removed with their family to Buffalo county, Nebraska, in the fall of 1871. The 
father homesteaded land on section 28, Shelton township, and devoted his time 
to its cultivation and improvement until his demise on the 5th of September, 1908. 
The mother survives and still lives on the homestead. 

Richard P. Zimmerman was ten years of age at the time of the removal to 
this state and received the greater part of his education in the district schools of 
Buffalo county. About 1885 or 1886 he took charge of the home farm and also 
operated rented land. Several years previously, in 1882, he had purchased eighty 
acres on section 21, Shelton township, but he continued to live on the home place 
until 1909, when he removed to his farm on section 21. He has added to his 
holdings from time to time and now owns two hundred and eighty acres of 
valuable land. He derives a good income from his agricultural pursuits and is 
also a stockholder in the Independent Telephone Company of Shelton. 

In 1892 Mr. Zimmerman was married to ]\liss Phillipena Vohland, of Shelton 
township, a daughter of Lawrence Vohland, a well known farmer. Six children 
have been born to this union, of whom five survive, namely: Irl R. L., Alva G., 
Reuel B., Lila G. and Lulu C, all of whom are at home. Blanch is deceased. 

Mr. Zimmerman takes the interest of a good citizen in public affairs and in 
casting his ballet votes according to the dictates of his judgment and not accord- 
ing to party lines. He and his wife are both members of the United Brethren 
church and can be depended upon to aid in the furtherance of its work. He has 
based his success upon industry, the careful planning of his work, and integrity 
and the prosperity which he has gained is well deserved. 



TIMOTHY J. TODD, D. D. S. 

Dr. Timothy J. Todd, actively engaged in the practice of dentistry in Kearney 
and also extending his professional efforts into other fields, is a son of Edwin R. 
and Mary Ellen (Thomas) Todd. In 1856 his father homesteaded four miles west 
of Plattsmouth and the farm which he there developed is still owned by the family 
and is being operated by his youngest son. In the family were seven sons, one of 
whom, G. W. Todd, is a dentist of Omaha, Nebraska. Another has passed away, 
while the other four are following farming. 

Of this number Dr. Timothy J. Todd was born in Plattsmouth, Nebraska, on 
the 5th of March, 1879, and there spent the days of his boyhood and youth, attend- 
ing the public and high schools. Determining upon a professional career, he 
entered the Omaha Dental College, from which he was graduated in 1903. He 
then began practice at Wahoo, Nebraska, where he remained until 19 12, when 
he came to Kearney and has here since followed his profession. 

On the 25th of May, 1904, Dr. Todd was married to Miss Minta Mauzy, of 
Plattsmouth, Nebraska, who was born in Virginia but was reared and educated 
in Plattsmouth. One son has been born of this marriage, Henri Edwin, ten years 
of age. 

Dr. Todd is very prominent in fraternal circles, being identified with a number 
of organizations which are based upon the principle of mutual brotherliness and 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 223 

kindliness. He belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Benevolent 
Protective Order of Elks, the Knights of Pythias, the Dramatic Order of the 
Knights of Khorassan, the Woodmen of the World, the Modern Woodmen of 
America, the Knights and Ladies of Security and the Ancient Order of United 
Workmen. His political allegiance is given to the republican party but he neither 
seeks nor desires public office, preferring to concentrate his energies upon his 
business affairs. He holds membership in the district, state and national dental 
societies and thus keeps in touch with the advanced thought of the profession. 
He has the latest improved instruments and appliances to facilitate his work and 
his mechanical skill and ingenuity are an important factor in his success, while 
added thereto he has comprehensive knowledge of the science of his profession. 



JOHN H. SNYDER. 



John H. Snyder is identified with farming interests in Center township, still 
owning and occupying the old homestead property of eighty acres on section 6. 
Mr. Snyder has always been a progressive and public-spirited citizen and his 
loyalty to the country was manifest by his valiant service in the Civil war. He has 
now passed the eighty-first milestone on life's journey, his birth having occurred 
in Germany, October lo, 1835, his parents being Valentine and Anna Snyder, who 
were natives of the fatherland and there spent their entire lives. They had a 
family of six children, all born in Germany. 

John H. Snyder came to America when but twelve years of age with an 
uncle, who located at Wheeling, West Virginia. After two years Mr. Snyder 
removed to Ohio, where he continued until 1861, when, in response to the coun- 
try's call for aid to crush out the rebellion in the south, he oft'ered his services to 
the government, enlisting as a member of Company A, Eighteenth Ohio Volunteer 
Infantry, with which he served for three and a half years. He participated in the 
battle of Stone River, the battle of Chickamaugua and a number of other hotly 
contested engagements, never faltering in the performance of his duty, whether on 
the firing line or stationed on the lonely picket line. On one occasion he was 
wounded in the left leg and at the close of the war he was mustered out at 
Columbus, Ohio. 

Air. Snyder continued to reside at Columbus until 1877, when he returned to 
Germany, where he spent about four months. He then came again to the new 
world and for a brief period resided in Ohio, after which he removed to Iowa. 
Two years later he removed to Buffalo county, Nebraska, where he has since lived, 
and for a considerable period he was actively identified with general agricultural 
pursuits. He and his wife still own the old homestead property of eighty acres 
which is situated on section 6, Center township. His labors brought good results 
in the cultivation of his fields and he gathered good harvests which returned to 
him a substantial annual income. 

In 1882 Mr. Snyder was united in marriage to Mrs. Lienor (Rught) Hen- 
derson, a native of Pennsylvania and a daughter of Peter and Catherine (Brad- 
ley) Rught, who were likewise bom in the Keystone state, whence they removed 



224 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

to Indiana, where their remaining days were passed. Their daughter Elenor 
became the wife of Abram Henderson and to them were born eleven children: 
Ida, the wife of Edwin Frederick; John, now living in Canada; Maggie, the wife 
of John Wolf; Charles, whose home is in Idaho; Elizabeth, the wife of E. R. 
Webb; Dallas; and Efifa, the wife of W. C. Beens; and four who are deceased. 
Mr. and Mrs. Snyder have become the parents of three children : Rosa, the wife 
of Charles Anderson; Albert; and Anna, at home. 

Mrs. Snyder is a member of the Presbyterian church. Mr. Snyder gives his 
pohtical allegiance to the repubHcan party but has never been a politician in the 
sense of office seeking, preferring to concentrate his energies upon his business 
affairs. He has worked persistently and energetically in the development of his 
farm and as the years passed by his labors wrought good results and he obtained 
the competence which supplies him with the comforts of life in the evening of his 
days. 



DAVID ANDREWS. 



In the history of the pioneer development of Buffalo county it is imperative 
that mention be made of David Andrews, who was one of its earliest settlers and 
whose contribution to the work of development and improvement was of marked 
value. New England claimed him as a native son, for his birth occurred at 
Cabot, Vermont, August i, 1821. He was reared upon the farm and always 
followed agricultural pursuits. In early manhood he wedded Elizabeth House, a 
daughter of Halsey House, and about the time of the close of the Civil war they 
removed westward to Colorado but lived there for only one season. They then 
returned east as far as Grinnell, Iowa, where they made their home until 1873. 
In that year the women of the family came to Buffalo county by rail, while the 
men of the family made the trip across the country by wagon. After reaching 
his destination David Andrews first purchased railway land and afterward 
secured a homestead claim which had been entered by another. This was located 
on Wood river in Center township. There Mr. Andrews spent the remainder of 
his life, concentrating his energies upon general agricultural pursuits, his labors 
resulting in the development of a fine farm. He was a man of but ordinary 
education, but worked most diligently and persistently, and was considered an 
excellent neighbor and friend. He lived a quiet, unostentatious life and by reason 
of the sterling worth of his character commanded and enjoyed the respect of all 
who knew him. He passed away September i, 1900, when in the eightieth year 
of his age, and his widow survived him until July 7, 191 3, when she too passed 
away. She was a member of the Presbyterian church and like her husband, 
enjoyed the goodwill of all with whom she came in contact. They were the 
parents of three children : Flora E., now the wife of Lloyd D. Forehand, of 
Kearney ; Edgar H. ; and Albert, who died when ten years of age. 

Edgar H. Andrews, the surviving son, was born in Williamstown, V^ermont, 
January 3, 1855, and remained with his parents in his native state until the 
removal of the family to the west. He came with them to Buffalo county the 
year following the county's organization and his educational opportunities were 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 225 

those afforded by the district schools, supplemented by a two years' course in the 
Gibbon high school. He took the examination and was granted a teacher's cer- 
tificate, although he never actively followed the profession. He was reared to 
manhood much after the manner of most boys of his time, dividing his attention 
between the duties of the schoolroom, the pleasures of the playground and the 
work of the fields. For forty-three years he has been a resident of Buffalo 
county and has witnessed the greater part of its growth and development. The 
land which was originally purchased by his father at five dollars or less per acre 
has increased in value until it is today worth more than one hundred dollars per 
acre. In those days farm work was accomplished by actual manual labor but 
now modern inventions have largely revolutionized the methods of farm work, 
relieving the agriculturist of much of the drudgery which formerly devolved 
upon him. 

On the 14th of September, 1880, Edgar H. Andrews was married to Miss 
Carrie Longstreet, who was bom December 11, 1858, at Syracuse, New York, a 
daughter of Cornelius and Esther Longstreet. In 1900 Mr. Andrews was called 
upon to mourn the loss of his wife, who died on the 4th of March of that year. 
They had become parents of two daughters, of whom the younger, Bessie, survives 
the mother, while the elder, Abbie, died when but eighteen months old. For his 
second wife Mr. Andrews chose Anna Deets, a daughter of L. S. Deets, of 
Kearney, and three children have been born of this marriage, Blanche, Ila Fay 
and Elizabeth. 

Mr. Andrews was engaged in farming and stock raising, giving especial 
attention to handling Percheron horses and Poland China hogs, until 1910, when 
he removed to Kearney, where he has since resided. He is the owner of a half 
section of land, which is a part of his father's original purchase, in Buft'alo 
county, and also three-quarters of a section farther west in Perkins county. His 
business affairs are capably conducted and enterprise and industry constitute the 
basis of his prosperity. In his political views he is a democrat and in the fall of 
191 1 he was elected county sheriff and occupied that position for three years, 
his terms ending in December, 1914. He belongs to the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows and to the Modern Woodmen. His sterling worth is widely 
acknowledged and wherever he is known he is held in the warmest regard. He 
represents one of the old pioneer families and the work which his father began 
in early days he continues to the benefit of the county at large. 



EDWARD R. EDWARDS. 

Edward R. Edwards, engaged in the manufacture of cement blocks and stone 
at Kearney, is a business man of notable enterprise and determination, who has 
won well merited success through close application and indefatigable industry. 
He was born in Dodge county, Wisconsin, July 23, 1855, and was there reared 
and educated, spending his youthful days upon the home farm. In 1875, he 
arrived in Kearney and soon afterward became actively identified with farming, 
spending two years upon his father's land and assisting actively in its cultivation 
and improvement. He then returned to Kearney, where he secured employment 



226 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

in connection with the hotel and livery business but after three years went to 
Denver, Colorado, where after two months he entered the employ of Webber 
Brothers at their lumberyard in Jefferson, Colorado, continuing in that business 
for a year. Later for about six months he was engaged in cutting cord wood. 
When he left their employ he again made his way to Buffalo county and made 
investment in land, purchasing a farm, upon which he lived for twelve years. He 
then sold that land and bought a section, on which he lived for three years, when 
he once more sold out and came to Kearney. Here he has since engaged in the 
cement business, manufacturing cement blocks and stone. He has gained a liberal 
patronage because of the excellence of his product and his thoroughly reliable 
business methods. He has taken contracts for laying miles and miles of cement 
walk in Kearney and his contracts are very faithfully and promptly executed. 

On the 29th of Dece»(Mjj||^886, Mr. Edwards was married to Miss Lou Blair, 
a native of California, Si^Se)" have three children: Maude, the wife of Emil 
Swartz, of Kearney; Clifford E., who is associated with his father in business; 
and Hazel, who is in school. The parents are members of the Christian church 
and loyally adhere to its teachings, while fraternally Mr. Edwards is connected 
with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Since starting out in life in early 
manhood he has been dependent upon his own resources and has steadily and per- 
sistently worked his way upward, his indefatigable efforts and determination 
winning for him the success which is now his. 




HOWARD V. MAURER. 

Howard V. Maurer, who carries on general farming on section 28, Shelton 
township, where he now resides with his mother, was born upon this place on 
the 26th of May, 1879, ^ son of William H. and Elizabeth A. (Worley) Maurer, 
the former a native of Wayne county, Ohio, and the latter of Williams county, 
Ohio. They were married at West Unity, that state, on the 2d of October, 1875, 
and about 1877 arrived in Buffalo county, Nebraska. They took up their abode 
in Hall county in the fall of that year and there remained until the following 
January, when the military reserve was placed upon the market and Mr. Maurer 
filed on a homestead, securing the tract of land upon which his widow and son 
still reside. There he remained up to the time of his death, which occurred 
December 31, 1907. In his political views he was a democrat but was never an 
office seeker. At one time he affiliated with the Masons but later, being unable 
to attend the meetings, he allowed his membership to lapse. He belonged to the 
United Brethren church, as does his wife, and throughout the community they 
were held in the highest esteem because of their many sterling traits of character. 

Howard V. Maurer was reared upon the home farm and acquired his educa- 
tion in the district schools. He remained a resident of Nebraska until 1904, when 
he went to the Pacific coast, where he spent one year. He then returned to his 
native county and engaged in farming upon rented land. After two years, how- 
ever, his father desired him to return home and take charge of the farm, which 
he did. A year later his father died and Mr. Maurer has since managed the prop- 
erty, cultivating one hundred and forty-five acres of land in the home place and 






rm' 




WILLIAM H. MAURER 




MRS. WILLIAM H. ^MAURER 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 231 

one hundred and fifty-eight acres in other sections of Shelton and Platte town- 
ships. He concentrates his energies upon the further development and improve- 
ment of the property and his progressive methods place him with the leading 
farmers of his part of the state. 

]Mr. Maurer is a member of Gibbon Lodge, No. yj, L O. O. F. In politics 
he is independent, nor does he seek political advancement of any kind, being 
content to concentrate his energies upon his farming interests, which, wisely 
directed, are bringing substantial returns. 



ALBERT C. BESSIE. 



Albert C. Bessie, one of the early settlers of Buffalo county, came to this 
state in the spring of 1878. He was accompanied by his son, Charles D. Bessie, 
and had been preceded by his daughter, Mrs. W. H. Salisbury, who with her 
husband had been one of the original settlers of the Fort Kearney military reser- 
vation, coming there in 1876. 

Mr. Bessie and his wife, Jemima Malvina (Gary) Bessie, were natives of the 
Empire state. About 1870 they removed from New York to Kane county, 
Illinois, where they made their home for four years and where Mr. Bessie was 
engaged in the dairy business. Leaving there, he and his son located in the 
vicinity of Crown Point, Indiana, where they farmed extensively and also 
carried on a dairy business, operating a butter factory and finding a ready market 
for their product in Chicago. Four years later they joined the daughter and 
sister here in Nebraska, establishing homes near hers at Kearney and both 
taking homesteads in Center township near the old Stone schoolhouse, which 
was built in the autumn following their arrival. 

Having always been identified with church and Sunday school work, the 
three families saw in the erection of the public edifice an opportunity to secure 
religious privileges near home" and also to be a benefit to the youth of their 
neighborhood, who had so far been denied such opportunities. Uniting their 
efforts with those of a few neighbors, a meeting was called at the schoolhouse on 
the first Sunday of November, 1878, and the assistance of a Sunday school mis- 
sionary was secured and a Sunday school organization was effected. While 
most of the families around were willing to attend the school, but few people 
were willing or able to take a leading part. As a result the Bessie family were 
compelled to fill the ofifices or see the project fail, so the election of the first 
officers resulted as follows : Mrs. W. H. Salisbury, superintendent ; A. C. Bessie, 
assistant superintendent ; C. D. Bessie, secretary and librarian ; and Mrs. C. D. 
Bessie, organist. Superintendent, assistant superintendent and organist, and 
Mrs. A. C. Bessie also taught classes. For some weeks the organ was provided 
by Mr. and Mrs. C. D. Bessie, being loaded intO' the wagon and taken to the 
schoolhouse every Sunday. Later enough money was subscribed to purchase 
a second hand instrument, while the library and singing books were secured from 
the former homes of the families in Illinois and Iowa. They were thus identified 
with the social and religious life of the rural community during the years of 
their residence in the country. 



232 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

After living on the farm for some years the father moved to Kearney and 
devoted his later life to buying and shipping grain. He was a man of more than 
average education, capable in business and at all times taking an active and 
helpful interest in public affairs. In the Methodist church he was an earnest 
worker and loyal member and jn politics he was a democrat. Perhaps his chief 
characteristic was his love of home. He possessed a quiet, unassuming manner 
and in every relation of life manifested the utmost integrity, his honesty and 
square dealing at all times winning him high and enduring regard. He died 
April 7, 1900, while his wife passed away on the 2d of August, 1908. 



CHARLES D. BESSIE. 



Charles D. Bessie is conducting an important and growing business at 
Kearney as a dealer in hay and is numbered among the representative business 
men of his city, for he is wide-awake, alert, enterprising and energetic. He 
was born in Onondaga county. New York, December 17, 1853, ^ son of Albert C. 
and Jemima Malvina (Gary) Bessie, and spent his youthful days in the three 
states of New York, Illinois and Indiana, accordingly as his parents moved from 
place to place, and through the period of his boyhood he assisted his father in 
farming and dairying. He began his education in the district schools and after- 
ward had the benefit of instruction in the Elgin (111.) Academy. On the 8th 
of January, 1878, he was married at Marion, Iowa, to Miss Ella Louise Bonnelle, 
who had formerly been a resident of Crown Point, Indiana, where she occupied 
the position of clerk in the postoffice. She was a daughter of Job D. Bonnelle, 
who was born at Euclid, Ohio, March 23, 1816, and on the 4th of September, 
1839, at West Creek, Indiana, wedded Miss Ursula Ann Jackson. He served as 
sheriff of Lake county at one time, was a tailor by trade and about 1840 removed 
to Wisconsin but later returned to Crown Point, Lake county, Indiana. After 
his demise his widow came to Kearney, Nebraska, passing away at the home 
of her daughter, Mrs. Bessie, on the 26th of March, 1899. For more than two 
decades she had survived her husband, whose death occurred at Lake City, 
Minnesota, November 15, 1878. To them were born six children, three of 
whom are yet living. The Bonnelles came originally from France. The father 
of Mrs. Ursula A. (Jackson) Bonnelle participated in the War of 1812 and one 
of her brothers served in the Mexican war. 

Following their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Bessie started on their wedding 
journey, which was a trip tO' Buffalo county, Nebraska, Mr. Bessie bringing with 
him a car load of horses. At that time he had no expectation of making this his 
future home but, liking the country, he traded for a quarter section of land and 
concluded to remain. As a result he has made this his permanent place of 
abode. His first home was a one room house, the boards running up and down, 
with a lean-to shed for a kitchen. For a time Mr. and Mrs. Bessie regarded 
their stay in this county merely as a pleasurable outing, but later settled down to 
the fact that this was to be their permanent home. There was plenty of hard 
work to do for each, both early and late, but their home-building period was one 
of the happiest of their lives, as they worked on together actuated by the laudable 



1 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 233 

desire of becoming OAvners of a home that would render them independent finan- 
cially. For seven years they resided upon the farm and then removed to 
Kearney, where Mr. Bessie was the first man to engage in the business of street 
sprinkling. Later he began buying and selling grain, his first equipment for that 
business being a scoop and a broom. Subsequently, in connection with A. G. 
Scott, he embarked in the elevator business, with which he was identified for 
about fifteen years. Since that time he has been connected with the hay trade, 
practically covering the period since the beginning of the growing of alfalfa. 
He began by furnishing hay for the railroad feed yards and since that time his 
business has steadily grown and developed until his shipments cover practically 
all the east half of the United States, extending as far south as the Mason and 
Dixon line, while his transactions amount to approximately twenty thousand dol- 
lars per month. He has won for himself a very creditable position in business 
circles as an enterprising, progressive man and it is characteristic of him that 
he carries forward to successful completion whatever he undertakes. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Bessie have been born four children, as follows : May, 
who is the wife of George W. Foltz, of Osceola, Iowa, and the mother of five 
sons ; Blanche, living in Osceola, Iowa, who is the wife of Ernest C. Temple and 
the mother of one son ; Charles Albert, who is associated with his father in 
the hay business at Kearney and wedded Fredaline Maddux, by whom he has 
two daughters ; and Frank Edmund, who resides with his parents in Kearney. 

In his political views Mr. Bessie is a democrat and fraternally is connected 
with the Knights of Pythias, the Ancient Order of United Workmen and the 
Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. In the early days he was a member of 
the volunteer fire department at a time when his sprinkling wagon was one of the 
chief assets of the department. He has lived to witness much of Kearney's 
growth and progress and has conducted his business afi'airs along lines which 
have made his interests a feature in the material development of his adopted 
city. 



ALLEN WISEMAN. 



Allen Wiseman, who is a well-to-do stock raiser, owning two hundred acres 
of good land in Platte township, was born in Marion county, Missouri, on the 
20th of August, 1873. His parents, George and Sarah (Mauck) Wiseman, were 
natives of Indiana, where they were reared and married. In 1869, however, 
they removed to Missouri and there the mother passed away in 1873. Fifteen 
years later the father removed to Logan county, Nebraska, whence he came to 
Buffalo county, where he lived until 1900. He then went to Kansas and spent 
his last days there. To him and his wife were born two children, the brother of 
our subject being Perry Wiseman, now a resident of Kansas. 

Allen Wiseman attended the normal school at Gibbon, Nebraska, after com- 
pleting the public school course and when seventeen years of age began his inde- 
pendent career. He worked as a laborer for three years, after which he rented 
a farm until he had accumulated sufficient capital to enable him to buy his present 
place, which comprises two hundred acres on section 6, Platte township. He 



234 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

has made many improvements upon the farm and keeps everything in excellent 
condition, taking justifiable pride in its appearance. He engages in raising hogs 
principally and as his stock is of high grade he is able to sell at a good 
price. He manages his business affairs well and as the years have passed his 
capital has increased steadily. 

Mr. Wiseman was married in 1902 to Miss Maud Shovel, a native of this 
county, by whom he has had six children: Ray N. ; Maud Alice, deceased; 
Ralph T. ; Clifford S. ; Ruth G. ; and Grace M. 

Mr. Wiseman supports the republican party at the polls but has never had 
political aspirations. He is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows 
at Gibbon and is loyal to the teachings of that organization. His record should 
serve as a stimulus to ambitious young men who are starting out in life without 
capital, for he had practically nothing when he began his career and by well 
planned labor has gained a competence. 



HON. GEORGE N. SMITH. 

Hon. George N. Smith is one of the retired citizens of Kearney and is one 
of the honored pioneer settlers, familiar with every phase of frontier life, while 
with the work of general improvement and development he has been closely 
associated in many ways, leaving the impress of his individuality upon the 
material progress and also upon the political history of his county. He was born 
in Goffstown, New Hampshire, October 30, 1843, ^^^ ""^'^^ there reared to farm 
life, while in the public schools he had the opportunity to secure a limited educa- 
tion. He had reached the age of twenty-one years when on the 17th of August, 
1864, he responded to the country's call for troops, enlisting as a member of Com- 
pany B, First New Hampshire Heavy Artillery, with which command he served 
until the close of the war. being on duty most of the time around the fortifica- 
tions in the vicinity of Washington. He was doing detached duty when Presi- 
dent Lincoln was assassinated and was given charge of the squad under Major 
Reed to do scout duty in order to apprehend the criminal. He was honorably 
discharged at Concord, New Hampshire, x\ugust 17, 1865, just one year from 
the date of his enlistment. 

Mr. Smith afterward concentrated his attention upon general farming until 
October, 1871, when he came to Buffalo county and settled on section 14, Center 
township. This was a tract of wild and unimproved land which he entered as 
a homestead and which he operated for thirty-three years, carefully and per- 
sistently carrying on the work of the fields, so that his la,bors greatly enhanced 
the value of his property, which he sold in 1903 for fifty dollars per acre and 
which is today worth one hundred and twenty dollars per acre. He had made 
excellent improvements upon his land, converting it into one of the highly 
developed tracts of the county. Year by year he tilled the soil, raising good crops, 
but eventually satisfied with what he had acquired of this world's goods and 
feeling that his competence was sufficient to enable him to meet all of the demands 
of life throughout his remaining days, retired in 1903 and removed to Kearney. 

On the 25th of August. 1866, in New Hampshire, Mr. Smith was married to 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 237 

Miss Elizabeth Dunbar, who was born in Croydon, New Hampshire, October i8, 
1843, and was there reared and educated. In August, 1872, they brought their 
family to this county, having at that time two small children, and their original 
home was a little sod house in which they lived in true pioneer style, sharing in 
all the hardships and privations incident to frontier life but making the most of 
their opportunities and contributing in substantial measure to the development 
of the cominunity. They had five children, as follows : Minnie B., who gave 
her hand in marriage to John Powell, an agriculturist of Buffalo county ; George 
William, a ranchman living in Arthur county, Nebraska; Grace P., who is the 
wife of Fred Ryness, of Omaha; Bert C, living in Kearney; and Arthur G., who 
also makes his home in Kearney. The three last named are natives of Buffalo 
county. Mr. and Mrs. Smith have eleven grand children. They will have been 
married fifty years on the 25th of August, 1916, and expect to celebrate their 
golden wedding. 

Mr. Smith has always been deeply interested in the welfare and progress of 
his community and has cooperated in many plans and measures for the general 
good. He assisted in building the first schoolhouse in his district and took the 
census of the school children. He also assisted in the Sunday-school work and 
has put forth every effort to promote the intellectual and moral progress of the 
community. In fraternal circles, too, he is well known. In 1873 he became a 
member of Buft"alo Lodge, No. 38, I. O. O. F., and with one exception is the 
only one identified with the lodge that was a member at that time. He is also 
connected with the Ancient Order of United Workmen and with Sedgwick Post, 
No. I, G. A. R., and he has passed through all of the chairs in the Odd Fellows 
lodge and in the Grand Army post. In politics he has usually followed an inde- 
pendent course. About the time he attained his majority he was chosen a select- 
man and after he came to this county was a member of the school board for a 
quarter of a century, also member of the election board each year and for six 
years was a member of the executive board of the Soldiers" Home. About 1890 
he was chosen to represent his district in the state legislature and was reelected 
on the populist ticket. He served for two terms, representing the district which 
then comprised Buffalo and Sherman counties. Lie gave careful consideration 
to each question that came up for settlement and intelligent support to those 
measures in which he believed, and his course at all times has been actuated by 
devotion to the general good. There are few residents in this part of the state 
who are more familiar with the story of pioneer fife and conditions, for actual 
experience brought Mr. Smith into close touch with all the phases of the fron- 
tier, so that his memory forms a connecting link between the primitive past and 
the progressive present. 



ADOLPH E. ERAZIM. 



Adoiph E. Erazim, the popular and efficient young cashier of the Citizens 
State Bank of Ravenna, was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on the 30th of 
November, 1883, of the marriage of Charles and Josephine (Mayer) Erazim, 
natives of Bohemia. In young manhood the father came to America and after 



238 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

living in Baltimore, Maryland, for a time went to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 
where he was employed in a factory for a few years. Subsequently he emigrated 
to Kansas and after farming there for a year came to Buffalo county, Nebraska, 
in 1885. For two years he operated rented land, but at the end of that time 
possessed sufficient capital to purchase a farm in Gardner township. He devoted 
four years to the improvement and operation of that place, after which he sold 
it and bought land in Sherman county. He farmed there for several years and 
then went to Saline county, Nebraska, where he bought land and took up his 
residence, although he still retained his holdings in Sherman county. He passed 
away there in May, 1908, after having survived his wife for a decade, her demise 
having occurred in May, 1898. 

Adolph E. Erazim was reared under the parental roof and received his 
general education in the district schools of Sherman county and in the schools of 
Ravenna. After completing the high school course he entered a business college 
at Grand Island, Nebraska, where he specialized in stenography and bookkeeping. 
His first position was that of stenographer for the Mason City Banking Com- 
pany at Mason City, Nebraska, but after remaining there for six months his 
ability led to his becoming bookkeeper in the Citizens State Bank of Ravenna. 
In 1905 he was promoted to the position of assistant cashier and he served in 
that capacity until 1913, gaining a thorough knowledge of banking procedure 
during that time. Since 1913 he has been cashier of the bank and the steady 
growth of its business has been largely due to his wise management of its affairs. 
He keeps in close touch with local business conditions and with the trend of 
banking throughout the county and follows a progressive policy tempered with 
sufficient conservatism to protect the interests intrusted to his care. 

The Citizens State Bank was organized in 1902 by John S. Skrable and 
William Benesh, of Elberon, Iowa, and Joseph Simon, Joseph Shebl and Edward 
Miner, of Buffalo county. In 1903 they sold out to L. P. Southworth and 
Edward Cronau, who conducted the bank for two years, after which they dis- 
posed of their interest therein to Frank INIcGiverin and parties from Fremont. 
Subsequently Mr. McGiverin sold his interest to A. T. Shellenbarger, who 
served as cashier until 1912, when he disposed of his stock in the bank. The 
present officers are : F. J. Coates, of Grand Island, president ; M. L. Bonson, vice 
president; A. E. Erazim, cashier; H. J. Klatt, assistant cashier; and L. V. Kozel, 
bookkeeper. The institution is capitalized for twenty-five thousand dollars, has 
a surplus of five thousand dollars and deposits of one hundred and seventy-five 
thousand dollars, and its loans amount to about one hundred and sixty-five 
thousand dollars. In addition to his connection with the bank, Mr. Erazim 
has other business interests, representing the St. Paul Fire & Marine Insurance 
Company of St. Paul, Minnesota, and the Fidelity Phoenix Fire Insurance Com- 
pany of New York. 

In February, 1906, Mr. Erazim was united in marriage to Al^iss Bella Hlava, 
a daughter of Joseph B. and Josephine (Lokijeck) Hlava, natives of Bohemia. 
The father, who was a tailor, emigrated to America in early manhood and fol- 
lowed his trade in Chicago for a time. He then went to Wisconsin and pur- 
chased land, which he cultivated until 1886, when he came to Buffalo county, 
Nebraska. For a number of years he worked at his trade here and then pur- 
chased land a half mile west of Ravenna. He operated that place until 1909, 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 239 

when he sold and removed to Ravenna, where he has since Hved retired. His 
wufe also survives. Mr. and Mrs. Erazim have a daughter, Jane J., who was 
born on the 14th of August, 1914. The family home is a commodious modern 
residence on Upper Appian avenue. 

Mr. Erazim supports the republican party at the polls, as he believes in 
its principles, and he has been called to public office, having served for six years 
as treasurer of Garfield township and for five years as treasurer of Ravenna, 
which office he holds at present. He is identified with the Knights of Pythias 
and for two years served as keeper of the records and seals. His religious faith 
is that of the Congregational church. He speaks two languages fluently, is 
afi"able and courteous in his business relations and is very popular with the 
patrons of the bank. He has already gained an enviable measure of prosperity 
and his many friends predict a still greater success for him in the future. 



FRANK ASHTON PACKARD, M. D. 

Dr. Frank Ashton Packard is a prominent and able physician of Kearney, 
where he has practiced his profession continuously and successfully during the 
past three decades. His birth occurred in St. Lawrence county, New York, on 
the 9th of July, 1853, his parents being Edson Allen and Mary (Bosford) Packard, 
natives of New York and Vermont respectively. By occupation the father was 
an agriculturist. The maternal grandmother of Edson A. Packard was an Alden, 
descended from John and Priscilla Alden. The Packards were originally from 
England but for many generations have lived in America. 

Frank A. Packard was reared on the home farm and in the acquirement of 
his education attended the public schools and an academy at Canton, New York. 
Subsequently he began reading medicine with Dr. H. O. Bartlett of Milton Falls, 
Vermont, whose wife was his cousin and with whom he made his home. While 
still residing at Milton Falls he attended lectures at the medical department of 
the University of Vermont in Burlington, twenty miles distant. He was grad- 
uated from that institution on his twentieth birthday and in the same year — 1873 — 
came west, locating at Monmouth, Iowa, where he followed his profession for 
six years. On the expiration of that period he removed to Anamosa, Iowa, and 
there remained as a medical practitioner for seven years. On the ist of Septem- 
ber, 1886, he arrived in Kearney, Nebraska, v^here he has been actively engaged 
in the practice of medicine throughout the past three decades. He encountered 
all of the difficulties and hardships of the pioneer practitioner but discharged his 
duties with self-sacrificing conscientiousness and has long been the loved family 
physician in many a household. In 1889, in 1894 and again in 1900 he took post- 
graduate work at Rush Medical College of Chicago, and he has also kept in touch 
with the steady advance of the profession as a member of the Buffalo County 
IMedical Society, the Nebraska State Medical Society and the American Medical 
Association. 

Dr. Packard has been married twice. In 1880, at Monmouth, Iowa, he wedded 
Miss Dyantha Louisa Lake, by whom he had two sons, namely: Lawrence Ralph, 
a physician of Whitehall, Montana ; and Gerald J., a practicing dentist of Living- 



240 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

ston, Montana. The wife and mother passed away in 1892 and two years later 
Dr. Packard was again married, his second union being with Mrs. Helen A. 
Townsley, who has a daughter by her former marriage, Lora E., the wife of 
J. Burt Porterfield, of De Land, Illinois. 

The Doctor gives his political allegiance to the republican party, is a Protestant 
in religious belief and is identified with a number of fraternal insurance organiza- 
tions. In 191 3 he was elected grand medical examiner for the state of Nebraska 
of the Ancient Order of United Workmen. During the long period of his resi- 
dence in Kearney he has won an enviable position in both professional and social 
circles and he is widely recognized as a leading representative of his profession. 



ROBERT HAINES. 



Robert Haines, now living retired at Kearney, was born near North Greenfield, 
Logan county, Ohio, December i, 1841, and is a son of David and Elizabeth 
(Branson) Haines. The father, a native of Ohio, was a son of Joseph Haines, 
who was born in Culpeper county, Virginia, where he was reared. When a 
young man of eighteen years he went to Ohio, becoming one of the pioneer 
farmers of that state. He also engaged in preaching as a local minister of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, in which connection he did good work, especially in 
camp meetings. He served as a soldier in the War of 1812, acting as a scout, 
and he was a large man of fine physique who possessed a vigorous constitution 
and reached the ripe old age of eighty-four years. Hfe traced his ancestry back to 
one of seven brothers, who came from Germany at an early period in the 
colonization of the new world. His son, David Llaines, took up the occupation of 
farming, which he made his life work. He always remained a resident of Ohio, 
where he died in his ninetieth year. His wife was also a native of Ohio and 
there spent her entire life, passing away at the age of forty-four years. 

Robert Haines spent his youthful days upon the old homestead farm and 
had the usual experiences of the boy who divides his time between the acquire- 
ment of an education in the district schools and the work of the fields. On 
attaining his majority he started out in business independently, working as a 
farm hand and at the carpenter's trade, and at the time of his marriage he rented 
land and began farming on his own account. All business and personal considera- 
tions, however, were put aside at the time of the Civil war, for he enlisted in 
August, 1862, as a member of Company H, Ninety-sixth Ohio Volunteer Infantry. 
After three days, however, he became ill with a fever and was unable to go to 
the front. On the 25th of December, 1863, he reenlisted from Logan county, 
Ohio, for three years' service and was mustered in on the 8th of January, 1864, 
at Cleveland, Ohio, as a private, refusing the rank of corporal. He was with 
Captain Samuel Starr's company and later he was made corporal, remaining 
with that company until he received an honorable discharge on the 13th of July, 
1865, at Columbus, Ohio, following the close of the war. 

Mr. Haines continued a resident of the Buckeye state until 1872, when he 
came to Buft'alo county, Nebraska, and secured a homestead claim on section 26, 
Center township. That was before the town of Kearney had been established. 




ROBERT HAINES 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 243 

He built a small frame house fourteen by sixteen feet and remained upon the 
homestead until he secured his title thereto. About 1878 he removed to Kearney 
and built a residence at the corner of Twenty-second and C streets, where he has 
since made his home. However, he continued to manage his farm year after 
year until about igoo, when he rented the place and has since lived retired, 
enjoying a well earned rest. 

On the 25th of February, 1869, ]\Ir. Haines was married to Miss Emma lone 
Scott, a native of Hardin county, Ohio, where she was reared and educated. In 
1872 she arrived in Buffalo county, becoming one of its pioneer women. She 
was an active worker in the Sunday school and church in the days when religious 
services were held at the homes of the settlers. Her life was fraught with many 
good deeds and was actuated by kindly purposes. She died October 3, 1913, 
leaving an adopted daughter, Beatrice, who is now the wife of Jesse S. Barlow 
and resides in Kearney. 

Mr. Haines is a member of Smith Gavitt Post, No. 299, G. A. R., in which he 
has filled all of the ofifices, serving as commander for three years, which office 
he was occupying at the time the monument at Kearney was dedicated. He served 
as justice of the peace and as assessor for two years, filling both offices during the 
years 1875 and 1876. He served by appointment as a member of the city 
council of Kearney and was afterward elected and occupied the position for 
two terms, making a creditable record in office by his fidelity to duty and his 
devotion to the best interests of the community in which he resides. He has lived 
in the county for forty-four years and has therefore witnessed almost its entire 
growth and development. He has taken an active part in what has been accom- 
plished and is interested in everything pertaining to the public welfare. He has 
many reminiscences of pioneer times which give an excellent picture of condi- 
tions that existed in the early days and indicate the later trend of progress. In 
this county he is widely known and his circle of friends is almost coextensive 
with the circle of his acquaintance. 



WASHINGTON MILBOURN. 

Washington Milboum was one of the early settlers of Buffalo county, taking 
up his residence in Elm Creek township in 1872, and he was well known and 
highly esteemed. He was a veteran of the Civil war and the patriotism which 
prompted him to enlist in the Union army also led him to further the public wel- 
fare in times of peace. His birth occurred in Carroll county, Ohio, on the 24th 
of August, 1826, and he removed with the family to Columbiana county and thence 
to Stark county, Ohio. He grew to manhood in the Buckeye state and there 
received his education. In young manhood he went to Woodford county, 
Illinois, where he was living at the time of the Civil war and where he enlisted in 
the Eighth Illinois Cavalry. He participated in the battle of Mobile and in other 
engagements and remained with his command until mustered out at New Orleans 
in 1865. He returned to Illinois and continued to live there until 1872, when he 
came to Buffalo county and located in Elm Creek township. He gained a 



244 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

gratifying measure of success as a farmer and devoted his time to agricultural 
pursuits until his demise in 1903. 

Mr. Milbourn Avas married in Stark county, Ohio, on the 28th of November, 
1850, to Miss Susan Pflasterer, who was born on the 21st of March, 1830, in 
Baden, Germany, and was confirmed in the Presbyterian church on the 28th of 
October, 1843. She too passed away in Elm Creek township, this county. Mr. 
and Mrs. Milbourn became the parents of six children, namely: George F., who 
is living in Oklahoma; William F., a farmer of Elm Creek township; Abraham 
Lincoln, who is living in Dawson county, this state; Addie E., the wife of John 
F. Daul, a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this work; Rosa Anna Mar- 
garet, who married J. L. Larrie, of Omaha; and Emma Jane, who died when 
live years old. 

Mr. Milbourn gave his political allegiance to the republican party but did not 
take a very active part in politics, as his private interests commanded his un- 
divided attention. He was a man of high principles and his integrity gained him 
the respect of all with whom he came into contact. He did his share in develop- 
ing the county into the prosperous and advanced farming section which it is 
today, and his memory is justly held in honor. 



AARON T. SHELLENBARGER. 

Aaron T. Shellenbarger is one of the most prominent men in the business and 
industrial circles of Ravenna. For a number of years he was a leading stock- 
holder and the cashier of the Citizens State Bank of Ravenna and since disposing 
of his interest in the institution has been active in other fields. He organized the 
Ravenna Electric Light & Power Company, which he has since managed, and 
which has not only returned good dividends but has also been of great advantage 
to the business interests of the town. 

Mr. Shellenbarger was born in Tama county, Iowa, on the 29th of September, 
1858, a son of Peter S. and Hulda M. (Parker) Shellenbarger, natives respectively 
of Pennsylvania and Vermont. The father, who was a farmer by occupation, 
was an early settler of Michigan and followed agricultural pursuits there until 
1854, when he removed to Tama county, Iowa. He purchased land there and 
devoted several years to its cultivation but at length returned to Michigan, where 
he remained for four years. At the end of that time he again went to Iowa but 
subsequently removed to Kansas. After living there for three years he went 
to California, where he resided until called by death in October, 191 1. His wife 
died in August, 1910. 

Aaron T. Shellenbarger is largely a self-educated man, as he had little oppor- 
tunity to attend school in his youth. He has read widely and his keen intelligence 
and habit of close observation have enabled him to gain much knowledge and 
practical wisdom from his contact with other men. He remained at home until 
he reached the age of twenty-one years and then began operating rented land 
in Tama county. In 1880 he went to Kansas but after farming there for a year 
returned to Iowa. A year later he came to Ravenna, Bufifalo county, Nebraska, 
and during the first summer followed agricultural pursuits. He started in busi- 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 245 

ness by establishing a peanut stand in Ravenna and subsequently embarked in the 
grocery business, later adding a stock of dry goods. He soon demonstrated his 
business acumen and as his patronage increased he enlarged his stock and after 
removing once or twice to provide more room for his rapidly expanding business 
he purchased a one story building located on the site now occupied by the Citizens 
State Bank. Later the building was remodeled, an additional story being added, 
and it \vas veneered with brick, being the first brick or brick-veneered building in 
the business part of Ravenna. ]\Ir. Shellenbarger conducted a general store for 
twelve years, after which he sold out to C. J. Stevens, of x\nsley. He also bought 
and sold live stock and grain and in partnership with Dr. Bentley engaged in stock 
raising on a large scale. After selling his mercantile business he and Dr. Bentley 
bought the State Bank of Ravenna, which they conducted for seven years. At 
the end of that time Mr. Shellenbarger sold part of his interest therein and turned 
his attention to milling, buying the Seeley flour mill in partnership with C. N. 
Davenport. Six months later the mill was destroyed by fire, but the owners 
immediately rebuilt it and operated it very successfully until they disposed of it to 
Messrs. A. R. Kinney and C. F. Tidball, of Crete, Nebraska. During all of this 
time Mr. Shellenbarger was still engaged in the stock business and in the operation 
of his six hundred and forty acre ranch near Ravenna, which he has since sold. 
After disposing of the mill he became connected with the management of the 
State Bank of Ravenna, but after a short time purchased the controlling interest 
in the Citizens State Bank of Ravenna and became cashier of that institution. 
He held that position until 1912, when he sold his stock in the bank, although he 
still holds title to the building and fixtures. 

After leaving the bank Air. Shellenbarger organized the Ravenna Electric 
Light & Power Company and built a fine modern plant and equipped it with the 
latest machinery at a cost of thirty-two thousand, six hundred dollars. He has 
since controlled the affairs of this company and it has become one of the leading 
industrial enterprises of the county. It furnishes power for the mill, creamery 
and pumping station and also the meat markets and garages in the town. The 
city heat and light are also furnished from the plant and the service given is 
excellent. A full line of electrical supplies are also carried in the sales room and 
all branches of the business of the company have shown a steady increa^^e. 
Mr. Shellenbarger owns several residence properties in Ravenna, which he rents, 
and also valuable business property. 

Mr. Shellenbarger was married on the 2d of November, 1879, to Miss Zelda J. 
Reedy, a daughter of John W. and Susan O. Reedy, natives of Pennsylvania. 
Her father, who w^as a farmer, removed to Tama county, Iowa, in an early day 
in the history of that county and purchased land there, which he cultivated the 
remainder of his fife. He passed away in 1909 and his wife died in 1879. Mrs. 
Shellenbarger died on the 9th of October, 1912. On the 14th of October, 1914, 
Mr. Shellenbarger was again married. Miss Irene Pool becoming his wife. Her 
parents, Eratus H. and Gertrude S. (Tilson) Pool, were both natives of Michi- 
gan but became pioneer settlers of Buffalo county, Nebraska, where the father 
purchased land. He died in 1898 but is survived by his wife, who resides with 
Mr. and Mrs. Shellenbarger. 

Mr. Shellenbarger is a stanch democrat in politics and has served as city and 
township treasurer, as a member of the city council, as chairman of the council 



246 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

and as special deputy sheriff. He was also a member of the board of education 
for twelve years and during that time served as treasurer and as chairman of 
the board. He belongs to the Modern Woodmen of America and the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows and is loyal to the teachings of those organizations. The 
guiding influence of his life, however, has been his Christian faith and he has 
been very influential in building up the local Methodist Episcopal church. He 
and his wife were the organizers of the congregation and he is now the only 
living charter member. He has served on the official board of the churqji since 
it was organized and for a number of years was superintendent of the Sunday 
school. The high esteem in which he is held as a business man and the confidence 
which is felt in his integrity are indicated in the fact that he has served as admin- 
istrator of numerous estates and has been receiver of three large mercantile 
establishments. His conduct of the interests intrusted to him has always been 
highly satisfactory to all parties concerned. Although he is now one of the 
wealthy men of Ravenna and one of its leading citizens, he began his career 
without capital other than his energy and good judgment and for a few years 
was in straitened circumstances. As a boy, however, he had become accustomed 
to hard work, as his parents were pioneers, and it was necessary that all of the 
family aid in the development of the home farm. This early training in industi-y 
and perseverance stood him in good stead when he was struggling to gain a foot- 
hold. During the year that he spent in Kansas he lost all of his crops through 
drought and at the end of the season found himself with only two hundred and 
fifty dollars in cash. He traded his horses for a yoke of oxen and started back 
to Iowa. On the way he visited the John Reedy family, who were living in 
Schneider township, Buffalo county, Nebraska, and was so impressed with the 
county that after a year he took up his permanent residence here. Few men 
are so widely known in the county and there is none who is held in higher esteem. 



WILLIS D. OLDHAM. 



For a quarter of a century Willis D. Oldham has been an active practitioner 
at the bar of Kearney, and colleagues and contemporaries speak of him as one 
of the strong and able lawyers in this part of the state. He closely conforms 
his practice, to high professional ethics and his devotion to the interests of his 
clients has become proverbial. 

Mr. Oldham is a native of West \''irginia. His birth occurred in Ohio 
county on the 25th of May, 1859, and he is one of six children, all of whom are 
still living, born of the marriage of John M. and Isabel (Armstrong) Oldham, 
who were natives of West Virginia and Pennsylvania respectively. The Oldhams 
came from the lowlands of Scotland, where the name was spelled Auldhame. 
The year 1653 witnessed their arrival in America, at which time they formed 
a part of the Jamestown colony. The Armstrongs were from the Scotch border 
and joined the American colonies in 1773, settling in Washington county, Pennsyl- 
vania, at a little town called West Alexander, where a Scotch colony had estab- 
lished homes. James Armstrong, the great-grandfather of Willis D. Oldham, 
served with the colonial army all through the Revolutionary war and Colonel 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 249 

W. D. Oldham was a captain from Culpeper county, Virginia, throughout the 
period of hostiHties which brought independence to the nation. Afterward he 
rendered mihtary service during the Indian uprising, which occurred in the 
administration of President Washington and during the retreat of General St. 
Clair, which covered the rear of the army, he was killed. He was a brother of 
\\'illis D. Oldham's great-grandfather and he had a younger brother, Richard, 
who was a lieutenant in the War of 1812, and was the only commissioned officer 
that was killed at New Orleans. Two brothers of John M. Oldham and uncles 
of Willis D. Oldham served in the Mexican war, their names being Benjamin 
and Wyley. At the time of the Civil war John M. Oldham espoused the cause 
of his country and served on the staff of General Wheat in a West Virginia regi- 
ment, while two of his brothers served with the Confederate army. In the 
year 1866 John M. Oldham and his family removed to Putnam county, Indiana, 
where he owned land but a year later he disposed of his holdings there and 
removed to Adair county, Missouri, where he followed farming until 1879, 
when he removed to Cole county, Missouri, there residing for twenty years, 
during which time he held a number of official positions. He continued his 
residence at that place until called to his final rest. 

Willis D. Oldham attained man's estate in Missouri. He acquired his 
primary education in the public schools and subsequently entered the State Nor- 
mal School at Kirksville, from which he was graduated with the class of 1878. 
He afterward engaged in teaching school in Clay and Saline counties and for 
two years was assistant state superintendent of public instruction at Jefferson 
City, becoming recognized as one of the foremost educators of Missouri. During 
that period he began reading law and subsequently entered the office of Hon. F. M. 
Harrington at Kirksville, who for a score of years was a representative in the 
state legislature, and is yet living in Kirksville at a very advanced age. Having 
mastered many of the principles of jurisprudence Mr. Oldham successfully 
passed the required examination and in 1881 was admitted to the bar. He then 
engaged in the practice of law at Kirksville for nine years and in 1890 removed to 
Kearney, Nebraska, where he has since made his home, actively following his 
profession. He served for one term as a deputy attorney general of Nebraska, 
covering the years from 1898 until 1900 and he was also appointed supreme 
court commissioner in May, 1901, acting in that capacity until May, .1907. In 
his chosen profession he has made steady progress. His reputation as a lawyer 
has been won through earnest, honest labor, and his standing at the bar is a 
merited tribute to his ability, as his practice has become large and of an important 
character. In the preparation of his cases he has at no time confined his reading 
to limitations of the questions at issue but has gone beyond and compassed every 
contingency and provided not alone for the expected but for the unexpected, which 
happens in the courts quite as frequently as out of them. 

On the 7th of October, 1890, in Mexico, Missouri, Mr. Oldham wedded Miss 
Belle Fentem, and they have become parents of four children: Isabel, the wife 
of William Ford, of Kearney; Helen F. ; Junius; and Bruce. 

Fraternally Mr. Oldham is connected with the Elks, the Knights of the 
Maccabees and the Ancient Order of United Workmen. In politics he has always 
been a democrat and since coming to Nebraska he has been identified with all 
that pertains to the public weal. He has worked earnestly for democratic prin- 



250 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

ciples and was one of the organizers of the democratic party in the sixth district, 
comprising thirty-three counties. He served as one of the delegates at large to 
the national democratic convention which nominated Bryan in 1900, on which 
occasion Judge Oldham made the nominating speech. His opinions have long 
carried weight in party councils and he has been associated in molding public 
thought and opinion with many of the most eminent democrats of the west. 
However, he regards the pursviits of private life as abundantly worthy his best 
efforts and is satisfied to give his attention to the practice of law. in which 
connection his legal ability, his analytical mind, and the readiness with which he 
grasps the points in an argument all combine to make him one of the ablest 
lawyers who have graced the courts of Nebraska in recent years. 



AUGUST KLUGE. 



August Kluge, deceased, was one of the well known farmers of Buft'alo 
county and at his death left behind many friends. He was born in Germany in 
May, 1843, ^ son of Jacob and Anna Kluge, who were natives of that country. 
The father was a farmer by occupation and never came to the new world, nor 
did his wife ever cross the Atlantic. 

August Kluge was reared and educated in his native country, remaining at 
home until 1880, when he decided to emigrate to the United States. He made 
Buffalo county his destination and here purchased one hundred and sixty acres 
of good land on section 35, Garfield township. This he improved and operated 
until his death, which occurred in August, 1898, after an illness of seven years. 
He lived a busy and useful life, wisely using his opportunities for the attainment 
of success, and in his business dealings was always regarded as thoroughly 
reliable. 

It was in July, 1874, that Mr Kluge was united in marriage to Miss Anna 
Doehler, a daughter of Gotlieb and Fredericka (Heil) Doehler, who were natives 
of Germany. The wife and mother passed away in 1857 ^^^^ ^^e father came 
to America with Mr. and Mrs. Kluge, making his home with them until his 
demise, which occurred in 1881. ^Irs. Kluge was born in Germany in March, 
1852, and by her marriage became the mother of eight children, as follows: 
Louisa, born March 18, 1877, who is the widow of B. F. Hill and resides in 
Greeley, Colorado; Clara, born March 31, 1882, who is the wife of Herman 
Polenz and resides in Sherman county, Nebraska ; Hulda, who was born in 
March, 1885, and lives in California; Edwin, whose birth occurred in October, 
1886, and who operates the home place; Arno A., born September 26, 1888, who 
lives at home with his mother and is the only electrician of Ravenna, carrying 
a stock of electrical supplies and finding constant demand for his services; 
Minnie and Paul, who died in Germany in the year 1878; and Alyrtlc. who 
passed away in 1906. 

In September, 1910, Mrs. Kluge removed to Ravenna, renting the farm to 
her son. She purchased a nice home in the northwest part of the town and 
has since occupied it. She is a devoted member of the Lutheran church and has 
many admirable characteristics which endear her to those with whom she has 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 251 

been brought in contact. After her husband's death she continued the work of 
improving the farm, paying off the mortgage on the place, and displayed excel- 
lent business management in the conduct of her interests. She is now com- 
fortably situated in life, deriving a gratifying income from the farm of one 
hundred and sixty acres which she owns. 



FRANK J. WILKIE, D. D. S. 

Dr. Frank J. Wilkie, of Ravenna, is not only one of the most prominent young 
dentists of Buft'alo county but is also serving as mayor and has proved very 
capable in the management of municipal affairs. He was born upon a farm near 
Brock, Nemaha county, Nebraska, on the 3d of October, 1883. His parents, 
Harvey J. and Julia (Thompson) Wilkie, were both natives of New York. The 
father was taken to Illinois by his parents and there grew to manhood but in 
1866 decided to remove farther west and drove across the country to Nemaha 
county, Nebraska, where both he and his father took up homesteads. Harvey 
J. Wilkie operated his farm there for many years and then lived retired for a 
decade, but found that he could not endure a life of inactivity and returned to 
the farm, which he is still cultivating. He has made many improvements upon 
the place and is recognized as a factor in the agricultural development of his 
locality. His wife passed away on the 30th of May, 1908. 

Frank J. Wilkie was reared at home and in the acquirement of his early 
education attended the district schools of Nemaha county. When fifteen years 
of age he became a student in the State Normal School at Peru, Nebraska, where 
he remained for three years, taking a scientific course. He then spent a year 
in an Omaha Business College, after which he engaged in farming on his own 
account for a year. Having decided to devote his life to the practice of dentistry, 
he entered the College of Dentistry of Creighton University at Omaha and com- 
pleted the three years' course by graduation in 1908. On the loth of June of 
that year he located in Ravenna, Buffalo county, Nebraska, where he has since 
been actively engaged in the practice of his profession. He is very skillful in 
his work and this, combined with his thorough knowledge of the scientific prin- 
ciples underlying dentistry and his scrupulous regard for cleanliness, has resulted 
in his building up a large and representative patronage. He is progressive and 
up-to-date and has spared no expense in the equipment of his office, which lacks 
nothing that could add to his efficiency. There are very few dental offices in 
the state that are so well furnished and Dr. Wilkie takes justifiable pride in his 
equipment. 

On the 23d of December, 1908, occurred the marriage of Dr. Wilkie and Miss 
Nancy C. Larson, who is a daughter of Andrew and Hannah (Lawson) Larson, 
natives of Denmark. The father, who was an agriculturist, came to America 
about 1875 and settled upon a farm in South Dakota. Subsequently he went 
to Furnas county, Nebraska, where he purchased land which he has since 
operated and improved. His wife also survives. Dr. and Mrs. Wilkie have a 
daughter, Helen M., who was born November 20, 1909. 

Dr. Wilkie is a democrat in political belief and has always taken an active 



252 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

interest in public affairs. He served for one term as a member of the city 
council and in the spring of 191 5 was elected mayor of Ravenna, which office 
he is now filling. He is practical and businesslike in the administration of the 
affairs of the town and his official course has gained the commendation of all 
good citizens. Fraternally he belongs to the Elks, the Masons and the Knights 
of Pythias and along strictly professional lines is identified with the District, 
State and National Dental Societies. His religious faith is indicated by his 
membership in the Methodist Episcopal church. A local publication has said 
of him: "Dr. Wilkie is a representative of Ravenna's younger business and 
professional men, who are certain to have a large and important part to play in 
the future development of the town. He is initiative and progressive, which 
coupled with aggressive industry and ability will win for him a prominent place 
in the councils of his fellowmen." 



FREDERICK HAUG. 



Frederick Haug, a well-to-do retired farmer living in Shelton township, was 
born in Pennsylvania on the 4th of November, 185 1. He is one of a family of 
nine children, of whom eight are living, and is a son of John and Mary (Bender) 
Haug, natives of Germany, who in 1848 came to America and settled in Penn- 
sylvania. There their marriage occurred and there they resided until 1871, in 
which year they came to Buffalo county, Nebraska, where both passed away. 

Frederick Haug was about twenty years of age at the time of the removal of 
the family to this county and continued to reside at home until he was twenty- 
seven years old, when he began operating a homestead which he had entered in 
1872. For ten years he farmed that place, after which he purchased his present 
farm on section 9, Shelton township. He owns three hundred and fifty-six acres 
of as good land as there is in the county and he has not only conserved its fer- 
tility but has also added to its value by making many improvements. He has 
erected fine buildings and planted an orchard of seven acres, which supplies the 
family with an abundance of all kinds of fruit. He is now living retired, his 
well directed activity in former years having made him a man of independent 
means. He carried on general farming and found both grain raising and stock 
raising profitable. 

In 1880 Air. Haug was married to Miss Sarah A. Oliver, who was the second 
white girl born in Buffalo county. Her natal year was i860 and she was a 
daughter of James and Ellen Oliver, both of whom were born in England. In 
i860 they came to America and settled in Buffalo county, Nebraska, where the 
father died. The mother, however, is still living. Mrs. Haug passed away in 
August, 1909, and was laid to rest in Shelton cemetery. She left two children, 
namely: Bertha A., the wife of O. O. Hayman ; and James H., who is operating 
the home farm. 

Mr. Haug is a republican in politics but, although he is interested in pubhc 
affairs, he has never sought ofiice. He is affiliated with Shelton Lodge, No. 141, 
I. O. O. F., at Shelton, in which he has held all the chairs, and he is also a mem- 
ber of the United Brethren church, to which his wife also belonged. He is a 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 255 

man of many admirable qualities and during the many years of his residence in 
this county has gained the sincere friendship of those who have been closely 
associated with him. 



ADAM DAUL. 



Adam Daul, who is a retired farmer living in the village of Elm Creek, was 
born in Washington county, Wisconsin, thirty miles north of Milwaukee, a son 
of Frederick Daul, a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this work Our sub- 
ject was but five years of age when his mother died, but his father kept the 
family together and he grew to manhood in his native county. In 1873 he 
accompanied his father to Buffalo county, Nebraska, where he lived until 1880, 
when he went back to Wisconsin with his wife's family and purchased eighty 
acres of land there, which he cultivated for nine years. In 1889, however, his 
father persuaded him to return to Buft'alo county, which he did, and at once 
began the operation of a farm which his father gave him. He was actively 
engaged in agricultural pursuits in Elm Creek township until 1912, and as he 
was practical and energetic in his work he seldom failed to harvest good crops 
and his resources increased from year to year. In 19 12, feeling that he had 
accumulated sufficient of this world's goods to provide him with the comforts of 
life during his remaining years, he returned to Elm Creek, where he is now 
living. He owns his residence here and also still holds title to his farm. 

Mr. Daul married Miss Mary Emick, who was also born in Washington 
county, Wisconsin, and is a daughter of Jacob and Catherine Emick, both natives 
of Germany. The father died in Dawson county, Nebraska, in the fall of 1880, 
but the mother is living in Wisconsin. Mr. and Mrs. Daul have become the 
parents of five children, namely: Kate, the wife of Ray Lloyd, a farmer of 
Dawson county; John, who is engaged in merchandising in Elm Creek; Jacob, 
who is manager of the Stickle lumberyard at Overton ; Lillie, the wife of Oliver 
Cowdry, who is operating his father-in-law's farm ; and August, at home. 

Mr. Daul was reared in the Catholic faith and his wife was reared in the 
Lutheran church, but the difference in their religious beliefs has never caused 
any disagreement between them. Both are well and favorably known, not only 
in Elm Creek but throughout the county, and their personal friends are many. 
The rest which they are now enjoying is well deserved, as it is the direct result 
of their own industry and good management. 



CHARLES W. KIBLER. 

Charles W. Kibler, Kearney's popular mayor, was born at Tipton, Indiana, 
on the 29th of April, 1869, and was one of a family of eleven children, nine of 
whom are now living, born of the marriage of George W. and Lavina (Corn- 
wall) Kibler, who were of German and English ancestry respectively. During 
his early life the father was a farmer and in the fall of 1873 removed with his 

Vol. 11 — 12 



256 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

family to Nebraska, securing a homestead claim in Colfax county. He complied 
with the law concerning the acquirement of property and after securing title to 
his place continued its improvement for a time but finally removed to Leigh, 
Nebraska, where he now resides, being employed as a traveling salesman. 

Charles W. Kibler was about five years of age when he was brought to this 
state. Flis education was acquired in the public schools and at twenty-one years 
of age he started out in life on his own account as a farmer, at which business 
he continued for four years. He afterward spent four years as a traveling sales- 
man and in 1903 he came to Kearney, where he organized the Kearney Land 
Company, of which he has since been the president and executive head, directing 
the business carried on by the firm, which is now extensive and of an important 
character. He also assisted in organizing the Kearney Canning Company, of 
which he is the vice president. His business judgment is sound, his enterprise 
unfaltering and his energy enables him to accomplish what he undertakes. 

On the 23d of December, 1891, Mr. Kibler was united in marriage to Miss 
May Walling, by whom he has three daughters, namely: Augusta May, Ada 
Nora and Alta Hannah. The religious faith of the family is that of the Presby- 
terian church. Mr. Kibler is a member of the Modern Woodmen camp and of 
the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. His political allegiance is unfalteringly 
given to the republican party and for four years he served as a member of 
the city council before his election to the office of mayor of Kearney in 191 5. 
He is now the chief executive of the city and is exercising his ofificial preroga- 
tives in support of many progressive plans and measures which are resulting 
beneficially to the city's upbuilding and improvement. During the years 1910 
and 191 1 he served as president of the Kearney Commercial Club. 



THOMAS J. SCOTT. 



Thomas J. Scott, register of deeds for Buffalo county, was born in Danville, 
Vermilion county, Illinois, July 29, 1851, his parents being Francis F. and Harriet 
(De Lay) Scott, the former a native of Seneca county. New York, and the latter 
of Vermilion county, Illinois. The father was but a young lad when his parents 
removed westward to the then frontier of Illinois, where he was reared to man- 
hood upon a farm. He then married and afterwards he followed agricultural 
pursuits, continuing his residence in Vermilion county until March, 1886, when 
he removed with his family to Nebraska, and settled in Kearney. After his 
arrival here he practically lived retired from active business, although to some 
extent he engaged in buying live stock. His remaining days were here passed, 
his death occurring December 29, 1898. His widow survived him for several 
years, passing away August 5, 191 5. They were charter members of the United 
Brethren church of Kearney and continued in active membership therewith until 
called to the home beyond. 

Thomas J. Scott, who was one of four children, three of whom are now 
living, is the only member of the family residing in Buffalo county at the present 
time. He was reared to farm work in Vermilion county, Illinois, and acquired 
his educational training in the district schools. After his textbooks were put 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 257 

aside he gave his attention to the work of the fields and also engaged in clerk- 
ing in a store in Danville until 1885, when he sought the opportunities offered 
in Nebraska and visited this state. He decided to make Kearney his future home 
and accordingly, accompanied by the members of his father's family, he removed 
to Kearney in 1886. Here he was first employed as a clerk in a grocery store 
and occupied that position until he became a deputy in the county treasurer's 
office in 1890. He was thus employed until 1893, when the office of register of 
deeds was created and Mr. Scott was the first man elected to that position. After 
serving for a term of four years he resumed clerking for a time and was then 
appointed to the office of deputy county treasurer. For years he was connected 
with county offices in various capacities, being employed because of his experi- 
ence and ability regardless of his political views. He also became connected with 
the real estate business and the careful management of his financial- interests 
enabled him in course of time to buy a farm of one hundred and sixty acres in 
Dawson county. He still owns this property and a good residence at No. 2003 
Seventh avenue. In 19 14 he was once more called to public office, being elected 
on the democratic ticket to the office of register of deeds, in which capacity he 
is now capably serving, thus again filling the position in which he was the first 
incumbent. 

Mr. Scott was married November 24, 1887, to Miss Estelle Grant, of Odessa, 
Nebraska, and to this union three children have been born, Everett B., Susan 
and Myron L. The parents are members of the United Brethren church and 
Mr. Scott is identified with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Ancient 
Order of United Workmen and the Modern Woodmen. He has never regretted 
his determination to come to Nebraska. For thirty years he has here made 
his home, witnessing much of the growth and development of the county and 
cooperating in many movements and measures that have resulted beneficially 
for the community. He has a wide acquaintance and his worth is acknowledged 
by all who know him. 



HARRY. L. CRAWFORD. 

Among the representative citizens of Ravenna is Harry L. Crawford, who is 
conducting a furniture and undertaking business. He was born near Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania, on the 20th of February, 1878, a son of James S. and Barbara J. 
(Love) Crawford, natives of the Keystone state. The father engaged in farm- 
ing there until February, 1883, when with his family he removed to Columbus, 
Platte county, Nebraska. In 1886 a further removal was made to Buffalo 
county, and the family home was established on one hundred and sixty acres of 
land on section 9, Cedar township, which the father had purchased in the fall 
of 1883. He at once began making improvements upon the place and devoted 
his time and energies to agricultural pursuits during the remainder of his life. 
He passed away on the 20th of January, 1890, after an illness of three years. 
His wife survives him and resides with our subject, who is the oldest in a family 
of five children, the others being as follows: George, who was born on the 6th 
of November, 1879, passed away on the loth of July, 1893. John is also deceased. 



258 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

Frank E., born March 24, 1883, is now assistant cashier in a bank at Bladen, 
Nebraska. On the 19th of July, 1910, he was united in marriage to Miss Mabel 
Hassler. Clarence was born January 8, 1886, and died October 6, 1900. 

Harry L. Crawford received a good education, attending the Sunflower dis- 
trict school. Following the demise of his father in 1890 he assumed the man- 
agement of the farm and engaged in agricultural pursuits until 1908. In that 
year the family removed to Kearney and shortly afterward he went to Chicago 
and took a course in the Barnes School of Anatomy, Sanitary Science and 
Embalming and after completing his school work he spent several months in 
the employ of Chicago undertakers, thus securing valuable practical experience. 
After his return to Kearney he became connected with A. G. Bower, the prin- 
cipal undertaker of Kearney, and remained with him for four and a half years. 
In June, 1913, however, he came to Ravenna and purchased the O. L. Miller 
furniture and undertaking business, which he has since very successfully con- 
ducted. He carries an unusually large stock of high grade furniture and his 
annual sales reach a gratifying total. His ability as a funeral director is recog- 
nized throughout the county and he is accorded a large patronage in that con- 
nection. 

Mr. Crawford casts his ballot in support of the democratic party but has 
never sought nor desired office, l^raternally he belongs to the Royal Highland- 
ers and the Knights of Pythias, and his religious allegiance is given to the 
Methodist Episcopal church. Along professional lines he is identified with the 
Nebraska State Funeral Directors Association. He is progressive and energetic 
and these qualities, combined with his courtesy and attractive personality, insure 
his continued and g-rowinsr success. 



FREDERICK DAUL. 



Frederick Daul, who was one of the most prosperous of the early settlers of 
Buffalo county, was born in Baden, Germany, in 1818, of the marriage of Frank 
and Ursula Daul. They were members of the Catholic church and the father 
was a farmer by occupation. 

Frederick Daul grew to manhood in his native county but when twenty-two 
years of age came to America, locating first in New York state, whence he 
removed to Wisconsin. He lived there for a number of years but in 1873 came 
with his family to Buffalo county, Nebraska, and located on section 31, Elm 
Creek township. He was a progressive and efficient agriculturist and became 
one of the wealthy men of his locality, he and his sons owning over fifteen hun- 
dred acres of land. 

Mr. Daul was married in Wisconsin to Miss Anna Dengle, likewise a native 
of Germany. She passed away in that state, leaving five children, namely: 
John F. and Adam, sketches of whom appear elsewhere in this work; Agnes, 
who became the wife of \^alentine Nichols and died in Kearney county, this state; 
Kate, now Mrs. William Milbourn, of Elm Creek township; and Maggie, the 
wife of A. L. Milbourn, of Dawson county. Followiing the demise of his first 
wife ]\Ir. Daul was married to Miss Mary Martinau, a native of Holland. She 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 259 

passed away in Buffalo county at the advanced age of eighty-four years, and his 
demise occurred here when he was seventy-six years old. He was a democrat 
in political belief and his religious faith was that of the Roman Catholic church. 
His was an active and useful life, and his many friends mourned his demise and 
long ^cherished his memory. 



WILLIAM BRADY^ 



William Brady, who was a pioneer settler and farmer of Gibbon township, 
Buffalo county, was born on Christmas Day, 1838, in the province of Ulster, 
Ireland. His parents, William and Eliza Brady, were also natives of Ireland, 
where they lived during the greater part of their lives, although their last days 
were spent in America. William Brady of this review was reared to agricultural 
pursuits and engaged in farming independently in Argyle, New Y^ork, for some 
time. There he was married on the 14th of February, 1866, to Miss Mary 
McGowan, a daughter of Harry and Mary McGowan, natives of Ireland, where 
they spent their entire lives, passing away when their daughter was eight years 
of age. Mr. and Mrs. Brady became the parents of four children, namely : Ida 
M., who is now the wife of W. J. Bloodgood ; Mary E., now Mrs. H. A. Gaarde ; 
James A., who married Miss Bertha Cain ; and Grace, who died in childhood. 

Mr. Brady remained in New York until 1871, when he removed with his 
family to Buffalo county, Nebraska, coming here with the Soldiers' Free Home- 
stead colony. He took up a claim in Gibbon township and at once began its 
development and improvement but was not to enjoy his new home for but a 
short period, as he was accidentally killed in a clay pit along Wood river in 1872 
when he was getting clay with which to make the brick for the first courthouse 
of Buffalo county. His wife continued to reside upon the homestead and in 
five years proved up on the place and received the patent in her own name. She 
had many difficulties to overcome but persevered bravely and brought the farm 
to a high state of development. On the 29th of August, 1882, she was again 
married, becoming the wife of S. R. Traut. They continued to live upon the 
farm and Mr. Traut passed away a number of years later. She still owns the 
place and supervises its operation, but since 1903 has lived in the village of 
Gibbon, where she has many warm friends. 

Mr. Brady was a Presbyterian in religious faith and his life was guided by 
high standards of ethics. He always manifested a keen interest in the public 
welfare and at the time of the Civil w^ar his patriotism led him to enlist in the 
One Hundred and Twenty-third Regiment, New York Volunteer Infantry, with 
which he was at the front for two years and ten months, or until the close of 
the war, when he received his honorable discharge. His salient qualities of 
character were those that are associated with the highest type of manhood and, 
although he had only lived in this county for a year at the time of his death, 
he had gained the respect and the esteem of those who were brought into contact 
with him. 

Mrs. Brady has the honor of being a charter member of the first church estab- 
lished in Buffalo county, which is the Presbyterian church of Gibbon, organized 



260 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

in 1872. She has always been one of its most loyal supporters and attendants 
and in that faith has reared her children. In the early days the church passed 
through many vicissitudes and would have been disbanded had it not been for 
Mrs. Brady and three others, who attended a meeting of the presbytery and 
prevailed Upon them not to disband the church. It is now in a very flourishing 
condition and in 1909 a beautiful new house of worship was erected on the 
old site. 



LYMAN GARY. 



Lyman Gary has been one of the most extensive landowners of Buffalo county 
but has now retired from active business life and is enjoying a rest which he 
has truly earned and richly deserves. He has figured prominently in connection 
with public affairs in this county as county treasurer, having served in that posi- 
tion for three terms, and at' all times has been a stalwart champion of those 
interests and movements which have w^orked for the benefit and upbuilding of 
this district. He was born in Androscoggin county, Maine, on the i8th of July, 
1847, t^ son of Horace and Lurana (Bradford) Gary, the latter a descendant of 
Governor Bradford of the Plymouth colony in the sixth generation. The Garys 
are also of an old New England family. 

Lyman Gary spent his youthful days upon the home IcxVin and attended the 
public schools, after which he continued his education in Auburn Academy and 
in the Westbrook Seminary at Westbrook, Maine. In 1868 he left New England 
for Illinois, where he was engaged on the construction of what is now the Great 
Western Railroad. In 1869 he went to Tama county, Iowa, and purchased a 
farm, which he operated until elected county treasurer of Tama county. He 
then leased his farm during his two years' term of office, after which he returned 
to the farm and resided thereon until 1886. In that year he came to Nebraska 
and took up his abode upon a farm in Schneider township, Buffalo county. He 
purchased a partly improved tract of land and added thereto from time to time 
until he became the owner of sixteen hundred acres, on which he engaged in rais- 
ing and feeding stock, becoming one of the extensive landowners and stock deal- 
ers of the county. He continued his agricultural pursuits until the fall of 1891, 
when he was elected treasurer on the populist ticket. He then leased his farm 
and came to Kearney, where he filled the office for two years in a most acceptable 
and creditable manner. He then returned to the farm, upon which he lived until 
1895, when he was reelected county treasurer, and again he was chosen to that 
position in 1897. He continued in the office therefore for six years and on the 
expiration of his third term retired from the position as he had entered it — with 
the confidence and goodwill of all concerned. He established his home in Kearney, 
renting his farms, and has since lived retired, enjoying in well earned rest the 
fruits of his former toil. 

On the 3d of July, 1870, Mr. Gary was married to Miss Lavina Rines, of 
Tama county, Iowa, who was born in Morrow county, Ohio, January 15, 1846. 
In 1854 she went to Tama county with her parents, Jackson and Lavina (Goffing) 
Rines, who became pioneer residents of Tama county, where Mrs. Gary was 




LYMAN GARY 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 263 

reared and educated. To Mr. and Mrs. Gary four children have been born, 
namely: Zoe, who died at the age of nineteen years; Jessie and Myrtie, a^ home; 
and Horace ]., a rancher of Wyoming. 

Mr. Gary is ever ready to extend a brotherly kindness to those who are in need 
of assistance. He has made a most creditable record both in business and in 
office, for he has ever been faultless in honor, fearless in conduct and stainless 
in reputation. He may justly be accounted one of the most public-spirited men 
of his community and many tangible evidences of his devotion to the general 
o-ood can be cited. 



GEORGE H. DOWNING. 

George H. Downing has resided almost continuously in Nebraska from the 
age of fifteen years and throughout the entire period since 1869 has been closely 
associated with industrial and commercial interests. In his career he has not 
found all days equally bright. Indeed in his commercial experience he has seen 
the gathering of clouds that threatened disastrous storms, but his rich inheritance 
of energy and pluck has enabled him to turn defeats into victories and promised 
failures into brilliant successes. His strict integrity, business conservatism and 
jup^nent have always been so uniformly recognized that he has enjoyed public 
confidence to an enviable degree and during the last two decades has witnessed 
a steady increase in his business until he is now one of the prosperous citizens 
of Kearney. 

Mr. Downing was born in Addison county, A^ermontjTanuary 27, 1854, and 
there made his home until he reached the age of twelve firars. His parents were 
Loyal and Jane M. (Annam) Downing, whose ancestors were originally from 
England, whence they came to America probably during colonial days. Loyal 
Downing engaged in the shoe business at Bristol, Vermont, where his death 
occurred, after which his widow, with her youngest son, George H., made her 
way westward to Wisconsin in 1866, influenced to this step by the fact that she 
had relatives living in that state. She took up her abode upon a farm in Dodge 
county, near Waupun, and there George H. Downing resided until about the year 
1869, when with his mother and his brother, Rollin L., he came west to Nebraska, 
driving a team the entire distance. They made the journey in a wagon, traveling 
after the primitive manner of the times, and took up their abode at Nebraska 
City, where George H. Downing saw the first railroad engine rafted across the 
river at that point. Soon afterward he found employment driving a team between 
Lincoln and Nebraska City for the Nebraska City Transfer Company, which 
brought him a wage of two dollars per day. At that time there was no railroad 
in Lincoln and in fact pioneer conditions existed throughout the state. His work 
was largely hauling lumber, for which ten dollars per thousand feet was paid. 
He also hauled general merchandise at the rate of fifty cents per hundredweight. 
In 1871, with his mother, he removed to Lincoln and in the spring of that year 
purchased a farm five miles southeast of the city, on which they resided for a 
year. Later they returned to Lincoln, where Mr. Downing found employment 
as a tinsmith with S. Way & Company, this being the first hardware and tin 



264 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

concern in Lincoln. While thus employed Mr. Downing, with five others, laid 
the tin roof for the State Lisane Asylum, it requiring six weeks to complete 
the work. 

After about two years, or in 1873, he removed to Orleans, Nebraska, where 
he and his brother, Rollin L., established a hardware and tin business which 
they conducted with success for a period of nine years. It was there that he 
witnessed and experienced the great grasshopper plague and drought which has 
become an epochal point in Nebraska history. In 1882 he sold his interest in 
the store and removed to Kearney, where his brother had previously located, there 
turning his attention to the lumber business, in which he was associated with his 
brother for about a year. Believing that there was great opportunity for suc- 
cessful operation in the real estate field and banking business in South Dakota, 
he formed a partnership with George W. Lumley, who had been cashier in Sen- 
ator Burton's bank at Orleans, Nebraska. They went to Vermilion, South 
Dakota, and founded the Clay County Bank, which they established upon a sub- 
stantial basis and were successfully conducting when the country became involved 
in a widespread financial panic. They were carrying large loans on real estate 
and their entire capital, together with about ten thousand dollars of borrowed 
money, was lost. Mr. Downing then returned to Kearney in 1887 just as he 
ha'd started out in business life — without a dollar. Borrowing money, he bought 
out the Bartlett & Downing coal business and for twenty-three years continued 
active in that line, building up a large trade, and during that period he succeeded 
in paying back every dollar of his indebtedness with twelve per cent interest 
thereon. He built up a coal trade amounting to five hundred car loads of coal 
annually and during the latter part of the period in which he engaged in that 
business he also added lumber to his operations and secured a good patronage 
along that line. In 1907 he founded the Kearney Floral Company and built 
the finest plant of the kind in Nebraska. It was during this twenty-three years 
that Mr. Downing passed through the hardest working period of his life. It 
was discouraging beyond comprehension to have thousands of dollars indebted- 
ness bearing twelve per cent interest to pay and at the same time support his 
family, but with marked determination and resolution He set himself to the task 
and his persistency of purpose triumphed over obstacles and difficulties and • 
his unremitting labor has at length relieved him of all debt and in addition has 
yielded him a deserved competency. In 1910 he disposed of his coal and lumber 
business and for the past two decades has been interested in the dry cleaning 
and laundry business, in which he is still financially interested but of late years 
has taken no active part in the business. 

On the 1 2th of April, 1875, Mr. Downing was united in marriage to Miss 
Lavinia Skinner, by whom he has three children, as follows : Edna E., who is 
the wife of Dr. W. E. Kellogg, of Sterling, Colorado ; Irvin L. ; and Lorin G. 
Mrs. Downing is a member of the Congregational church. Fraternally Mr. Down- 
ing is identified with the Masonic organization, in which he has attained the orders 
of Christian knighthood and also belongs to the Mystic Shrine. He is likewise 
a member of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the Royal High- 
landers. In politics he is a republican but has never aspired to political ofiice. 
He was once elected treasurer of the city of Orleans, but as he believed no busi- 
ness man should neglect his business for public office, he would not qualify for 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 265 

the position. He came unscathed through conditions that would have utterly 
disheartened and discouraged a man of less resolute spirit and the integrity of 
his methods has never been questioned. He has indeed won that honored name 
which is rather to be chosen than great riches and his entire course constitutes 
an example that others might well follow. Though conditions seemed to be 
against him for many years, he has at length wrested success from the hands 
of fate and the course which he has ever pursued has made him one of the valued 
residents of his city. 



CARL E. LINN. 



Carl E. Linn, one of the leading young business men of Ravenna, is a mem- 
ber of the firm of Hermon & Linn, which owns the only store devoted exclusively 
to clothing in the town. The management of the establishment has devolved 
largely upon Mr. Linn, as his partner is a non-resident, and the large and repre- 
sentative patronage which is accorded it is proof of his ability and enterprise. 

He was born in Clyde, Kansas, on the 28th of January, 1883, ^^^ is a son of 
Charles and Sophia (Nelson) Linn, natives of Sweden. The father became an 
early settler of Iowa and engaged in farming there until 1872, when he removed 
to Kansas and took up a homestead, on which he has since lived. At the time 
of the Civil war he proved his loyalty to his adopted country and served in the 
Union army for four years as a member of an Iowa regiment. Both he and his 
wife are still living. 

Carl E. Linn was reared in Kansas and is indebted for his education to the 
public schools. When eighteen years of age he found employment in a clothing 
store in Clyde owned by J. K. Hermon. He soon gained the complete con- 
fidence of his employer and when a branch store was established in Ravenna 
seven years later Mr. Linn was placed in charge of the business an,^^|*&ame a 
member of the firm. Subsequently he purchased the interest of MfVKerSI in 
the business, th u^ ^^|^iyig half owner of the store, and the firm name became 
Hermon & Linn. ^?5r unusually large and well selected stock is carried and 
everything about the store is thoroughly up-to-date. It is located in the hand- 
some new Smaha building and its equipment would do credit to a town much 
larger than Ravenna. The annual volume of business has shown a steady growth, 
and the enterprise is recognized as an important factor in the business expansion 
of Ravenna. 

Mr. Linn was married in February, 1905, at Clyde, Kansas, to Miss Bessie 
French. Her parents, Charles and Anna (Bagley) French, were both born in 
New York and were among the early settlers of Clyde, Kansas, where they still 
live. The father has devoted his life to railroading. Mr. and Mrs. Linn have 
three children: Gwendolyn M., who was born in November, 1906; Charles E., 
whose birth occurred on the 24th of April, 1913 ; and Lurline L., whose birth 
occurred on the 24th of November, 191 5. 

Mr. Linn has taken an active interest in public afifairs since attaining his 
majority and is a loyal supporter of the republican party. For one year he served 
as mayor of Ravenna and is at present a member of the town council. He is 



266 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

very efficient in the discharge of his official duties, giving the same careful 
thought to the management of municipal affairs that he has always given to the 
conduct of his business interests. Fraternally he belongs to the Knights of 
Pythias and Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and his religious faith is that 
of the Lutheran church, while his wife belongs to the Methodist church. He 
not only has the energy and progressive spirit which we associate with the young 
man, but he also has much of that soundness of judgment which often comes 
only with long experience. His many friends predict for him still greater suc- 
cess in the future. 



JOHN A. HOGG. 



John A. Hogg is now living retired in Shelton, although in former years he 
was actively identified with farming interests. He was born in Butler county, 
Pennsylvania, on the 29th of Alarch, 1844, being a son of Robert and a grandson 
of Robert Hogg, Sr., w^ho was one of the prominent figures in the War of 1812. 
In 1865 John A. Hogg became a resident of Iowa, establishing his home in 
Poweshiek county. He had previously taken up the carpenter's trade in Penn- 
sylvania and continued to work at that occupation in Iowa. He was married 
in 1865 to Miss Margaret Hall, the daughter of a carpenter, William Hall, and 
for four years he and his father-in-law worked together but in 1872 Mr. Hogg 
turned his attention to commercial pursuits, establishing a grocery business in 
A'litchellville. In seven years, however, he lost all that he had made in the 
years of his connection with carpentering and building. 

In 1879 ^^- Hogg arrived in Nebraska and after paying freight on his goods 
and meeting other necessary expenses he found that his cash capital amounted 
to but three dollars. He secured employment on the Shelton mills at a dollar 
per day and a week later, demanding more salary, was given a dollar and a 
quarter per day. After the millwright took charge he was paid a dollar and a 
half per day, for his ability in the line of his trade was recognized. In 1879 he 
traded a gold watch for a relinquishment on a homestead, on which he subse- 
cjuently built a sod house. He lived in that primitive structure for a year 
without having a floor in it. He occupied the homestead until 1906, when he 
took a trip to Oregon with the twofold purpose of recuperating his health and 
of visiting his son, Robert W., who had removed to the Willamette valley in 
1904, settling near Salem, where in connection with his farming operations he 
engaged extensively in the breeding of thoroughbred hogs, winning a wide and 
well deserved reputation in that connection. For two years he was chosen 
superintendent of the stock exhibit at the state fair at Salem and he also made 
exhibits of his hogs at the San Francisco exposition in 191 5, winning sixteen 
hundred and seventy-five dollars in prizes, which included the reserve cham- 
pion prize for sows. He also sold twelve hundred and twenty-five dollars' worth 
of stock, selling nine animals for nine hundred dollars, which fact shows the 
high grade of hogs he has raised. 

In 1908 John A. Hogg returned to Shelton, Nebraska, where he purchased 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 269 

town property and has since made his home, but he is still the owner of the old 
homestead, from which he derives a substantial and gratifying income. 

As previously stated, Mr. Hogg was married in 1865 to Miss Margaret Hall, 
who was born in Butler county, Pennsylvania, on the 9th of April, 1844, and is 
a daughter of William and Minerva (Thompson) Hall. In 191 5 they cele- 
brated their golden wedding and the accompanying picture is a group of their 
descendants. To them have been born twelve children, nine of whom still sur- 
vive, as follows: Robert W., who is a resident of Salem, Oregon; Mary M., 
the wife of L. B. Van Dyke, of Custer county, Nebraska; Lola M., who gave her 
hand in marriage to A. P. Johnson, a practicing attorney of Broken Bow, 
Nebraska; Sarah, who is the wife of I. E. Lux, of Crookston, Nebraska; 
John A., Jr., the proprietor of a book and stationery store at Vancouver, Wash- 
ington; Floyd Cleveland, an agriculturist of Buffalo county, Nebraska; Eliza- 
beth, who is the wife of M. D. Nutter, a farmer of Buffalo county, this state; 
Rose F., the wife of Professor Earl Glendon, who is superintendent of the high 
school at Stapleton, Nebraska; and Irwin, who operates the home farm. 

In politics Mr. Hogg is independent, considering the capability of a candidate 
rather than his party affiliation. In 1889 he was one of the organizers of the 
Farmers 'Alliance in Buff'alo county and was one of five delegates chosen by that 
body to find out whether the Alliance wanted to go into political action. He was 
one of the five representatives from Buff'alo county to the St. Louis convention 
of the people's party, being an anti-monopolist. In 1893 he was elected to the 
board of supervisors of this county. Fraternally he is connected with Shelton 
Lodge, No. 99, A. F. & A. M., while both he and his wife are active and prom- 
inent members in the Presbyterian church of Shelton, in which he has served as 
an elder for seven years, doing all in his power to promote the growth and 
extend the influence of the church and bring about that moral development for 
which the church stands. His life has ever been an honorable and upright one, 
fraught with integrity in every relation, and those who know him have ever 
felt that he is worthy of trust. 



JOHN THIESSEN. 



John Thiessen established a blacksmith shop in Ravenna a short time after 
the town was founded and has ever since been connected with business interests 
there. He still owns the blacksmith shop, which, however, is now operated by 
his son, and he gives his personal attention to the management of a garage and 
automobile repair shop which he established a few years ago. He was born in 
Germany in January, i860, of the marriage of Claus and Margaret (Kroeger) 
Thiessen, likewise natives of that country. The father followed the miller's 
trade in his native land until 1870 and then emigrated with his family to America. 
After Jocating at Grand Island, Nebraska, he worked at his trade for many 
years, or until his demise in 1907. His wife is still living at Grand Island. 

John Thiessen was about ten years of age when brought by his parents to 
the United States and grew to manhood in Grand Island. He attended the public 
schools there in the acquirement of an education and after putting aside his text- 



270 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

books learned the blacksmith's trade, which he followed in Grand Island for eight 
years. Fie then removed to Hampton, Hamilton county, Nebraska, which had 
just been founded. He was the first blacksmith in the town and was for many 
years actively engaged in the conduct of his shop but is now leaving its manage- 
ment to his son. In 191 1 he turned his attention to the automobile business and 
erected a well designed and substantial garage fifty by ninety feet in dimensions. 
Fie handles the Buick and Studebaker cars and also conducts a first class repair 
and machine shop. All of his business interests are well managed and return 
to him a good profit. 

In 1882 Mr. Thiessen was married to Miss Anna Schrader, a daughter of 
Flenry and Celia Schrader, natives of Denmark, who emigrated to the United 
States about 1872. After living in New York for a short time they came to 
Flamilton county, Nebraska, where the father purchased railroad land. He 
operated his farm for many years but is now living retired in Marquette, this 
state. His wife also survives. Mr. and Mrs. Thiessen have become the parents 
of nine children, namely, Henry, William, Maude, Lillian, Marjorie, Nellie, Babe, 
Edward and Charles, but Maude is deceased, her death occuring in 191 5. 

Mr. Thiessen supports the republican party at the polls and for a considerable 
period has served on the town council and also held the office of mayor for two 
terms. He is well known in local fraternal circles, belonging to the Knights of 
Pythias, the Modern Woodmen of America and the Royal Highlanders, and in 
religious faith is a Congregationalist. He has always taken the keenest interest 
in the public welfare and during the many years of his residence in Ravenna has 
done much to promote its advancement along business, civic and moral lines. 



E. E. BLISS. 



E. E. Bliss, who is ably filling the responsible position of cashier of the City 
Bank of Elm Creek, is a native of Buffalo county, his birth having occurred on 
the family homestead in Gardner township. His father, N. T. Bliss, was born 
in Pennsylvania but in early manhood removed to Buffalo county, Nebraska, 
and took up a claim in- Gardner township. He devoted his life to agricultural 
pursuits and to stock dealing and gained a gratifying measure of success. He 
has passed away but his wife, who was in her maidenhood Miss Edith M. 
Rogers, survives. 

E. E. Bliss was reared on the home farm and in the acquirement of his educa- 
tion attended the district schools and the schools of Shelton. He has been con- 
nected with banking interests for a number of years and has proven his ability 
as cashier of the City Bank of Elm Creek, of which his brother, C. G. Bliss, is 
president. The institution was organized in 1907 and during the nine years of 
its existence has gained a creditable place among the banks of Buft'alo county. 
It has been so managed that the interests of depositors and stockholders have 
been safeguarded, while the legitimate business expansion of the community has 
also been furthered. 

Mr. Bliss was married in 1910 to Miss Lucile Nash, a native of Kearney 
and a daughter of William Nash, now a resident of Portland, Oregon. Two 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 271 

children have been born to this union, namely : William ; and Geneva, who died 
November 27, 19 15. 

Mr. Bliss supports the republican party at the polls but has never taken a 
very active interest in politics, as his business activities have demanded his undi- 
vided attention. He takes a commendable interest in the public welfare and is 
recognized as a factor in both the financial and civic development of his com- 
munity. 



SAMUEL URWILLER. 



Samuel Urwiller is now living retired at Ravenna but for thirty years was 
actively identified with farming interests in this county, ranking with the enter- 
prising agriculturists of Cherry Creek township. He was born in Switzerland, 
July 28, 1844, a son of Jacob and Elizabeth (Lerch) Urwiller, who were also 
natives of the land of the x\lps. The father, who was a weaver by trade, came 
to America- with his family in 1854, settling in Rochester, New York, where he 
was employed until 1857. He then removed to Marshall, Michigan, where he 
purchased land and developed a farm, continuing its operation until 1883, when 
he sold out and came to Nebraska, establishing his home in Buffalo county, to 
which district his children had preceded him. He and his wife afterward made 
their home with their children, Mrs. Urwiller passing away in 1886, while Mr. 
Urwiller survived until December 23, 1891. 

Samuel Urwiller was a young lad of ten years at the time of the emigration 
to the new world. His youth was largely passed in IMichigan, where he attended 
school to some extent, but he is in considerable measure a self-educated as well 
as a self-made man. His parents were in straitened financial circumstances and 
the children found it necessary to go to work early in order to provide for their 
own support. When but eleven years of age Samuel Urwiller secured employ- 
ment at farm labor and was thus engaged until after he attained his majority. 
At the age of twenty-three years he began to learn the carpenter's trade, which 
he followed in Michigan for fifteen years. His entire life has been one of untir- 
ing industry and thrift. In 1878 he removed to Buffalo county and secured a 
homestead on section 4, Gardner township, but he relinquished this and removed 
to Cherry Creek township, purchasing a preemption of one hundred and sixty 
acres on section 32. He improved that farm and continued its cultivation for 
thirty years, transforming it into a valuable property. He resided thereon until 
1908, when he rented the place and removed to Ravenna, purchasing a nice 
home in the western part of the town. Here he has since resided and is now 
enjoying a rest which he has truly earned and richly deserves. While upon the 
farm he made a specialty of raising white Hereford cattle and Poland China 
and Duroc- Jersey hog5. In addition to his home place in Cherry Creek township 
he purchased eighty acres in Gardner township and through the careful direc- 
tion of his farm work won notable success. 

On the ist of April, 1868, Mr. Urwiller was united in marriage to Miss 
Libbie Haselton, by whom he had five children, as follows: Lewis J., who was 
born March 10, 1869, and resides in Florida; Frederick T., whose birth occurred 



272 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

October 23, 1871, and who follows farming in Gardner township; Charles S., 
who was born April 21, 1874, and makes his home in Florida; Lizzie M., who 
was born February 2, 1877, and is the wife of Jacob Richardson, of Peru, 
Nebraska; and Jessie L., who was born in December, 1879, and now lives in 
California with her husband, A. O. George. The wife and mother passed away 
on the 5th of November, 1883, and on the 4th of July of the following year Mr. 
Urwiller was again married, his second union being with Miss Emma Vouth, a 
daughter of Henry and Susanna (Frost) A^outh, who were natives of London, 
England. The father, a fisherman in England, emigrated to Canada in 1836 
and spent the remainder of his life in that country, his demise occurring in 
1848. The mother, who survived him for six decades, was called to her final 
rest in 1908. By his second wife ]\Ir. Urwiller had four children, namely: 
Dora, who was born June 11, 1885, and died on the 30th of August, 1891 ; 
Willie, who was born March 3, 1887, and cultivates his father's farm; Adeline 
A., who was born December 20, 1889, and is the wife of Walter Puchard, an 
agriculturist of Garfield towaiship ; and one who died in infancy. 

In his political views Mr. Urwiller has always been an earnest democrat, 
giving stalwart allegiance to the party and its principles. He served as town- 
ship clerk of Cherry Creek township, also as constable and for many years was 
a member of the school Iroard. His religious faith is that of the Methodist 
church and he guides his life according to its teachings. His has been an active 
and well spent life and his career demonstrated what may be accomplished when 
energy and determination lead the w^, . Working his way steadily upward, he 
has achieved financial "Independence and his life record indicates that success 
and an honored name may be won simultaneously. 



FRANK D. BROWN. 



The prosperity which the First Bank of Miller is enjoying is in large measure 
due to the business acumen and sound judgment of Frank D. Brown, who has 
been its cashier since its organization. He was born in the state of New York 
on the 9th of September, 1862, a son of A. C. and Sarah (Rogers) Brown, both 
likewise natives of the Empire state and both now deceased. He received his 
education in the public schools of his native state but when twenty-one years 
of age determined to try his fortune in the middle west and removed to St. Paul, 
Nebraska. He engaged in the stock business there until 1887, when in company 
with J. E. Dickerman, he organized The First Bank of Armada, which later 
became the First Bank of Miller and of which he has since been cashier. He is 
thoroughly familiar with the routine of banking practice and also understands 
the basic financial principles Avhicli underlie the banking business. He also keeps 
in close touch with local conditions and with the general trend of business 
throughout the country and is thus able to so direct the affairs of the bank 
that the interests of depositors are carefully safeguarded and at the same time 
dividends are returned to the stockholders. 

Mr. Brown was married in January, 1888, at St. Paul, Nebraska, to Miss 
Nela A. Norton, likewise a native of New York, and they have two sons: 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 273 

F. Ross, who is assistant cashier of the bank; and Claire Norton, who is at 
home. 

Mr. Brown gives his pohtical allegiance to the republican party as he believes 
that its policies are based upon sound principles of government. His fraternal 
affiliations connect him with the Masonic blue lodge and chapter, the Modern 
Woodmen of America and the Knights of Pythias, and in his life he exemplifies 
the spirit of brotherhood which is at the foundation of those orders. He has 
been engaged in banking in Miller for twenty-eight years and is well informed 
in regard to the history of the town. He furnished the data in regard to 
Miller for this history of Buffalo county. He has been an important factor 
in the business and financial life of Miller and has also done his part in promot- 
ing the civic advancement of the town. 



E. ARTHUR MESERVEY, D. D. S. 

Dentistry is unique among the professions in that it demands efficiency and 
capability of a threefold nature. The successful dentist must of necessity have 
marked mechanical ingenuity, must add thereto broad scientific knowledge and, 
moreover, must have the usual business ability .,\Yithout which the financial 
interests of the profession would come to disaster. Well equipped in all of 
these particulars. Dr. Meservey has gained a place ahiong the leading dentists 
of Buffalo county. He was born upon a farm near Fontanelle, Nebraska, April 
I, 1870, and represents old families of Maine, his parents being Henry E. and 
Ruth (Philbrick) Meservey, who were natives of the Pine Tree state. The 
father was there reared and following his marriage he removed westward with 
his family about the time of the close of the Civil war. Nebraska was his des- 
tination and he took up his abode upon a tract of land near Fontanelle which 
he entered from the government. Not a furrow had been turned nor an 
improvement made upon that place but he at once began its development and 
lived there for some time after securing title to the land. Later, however, he 
removed to Blair, where he opened a drug store. It was subsequent to that time 
that his first wife died and later he married again and continued his residence 
in Blair until he, too, was called to the home beyond. 

Dr. E. A. Meservey completed his literary training in the Blair high school, 
succeeding which he was for four years employed as a clerk in a grocery store. 
He then took up the study of dentistry at Council Bluffs, Iowa, in connection 
with Dr. H. S. West, with whom he continued as an apprentice for a year and 
a half. In 1895 he became one of the first students in the Omaha Dental College 
and after studying there for two years matriculated in the dental department 
of the Northwestern University at Chicago, from which he was graduated with 
the class of 1898. Immediately afterward he came to Kearney and embarked 
upon the practice of his profession, in which he has since continued. In 1908 
he did post-graduate work in the Northwestern University and at all times he has 
kept in touch with the onward march of the profession. He utilizes the most 
advanced methods known to dentistry and his ofifice is splendidly equipped with 
modern dental appliances. He is a member of the Nebraska State Dental Society 



274 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

and his prominence in the profession is indicated in the fact that in 1909 he was 
elected to the presidency of the state organization. He is also a member of the 
District Dental Society, of which he has served both as vice president and secre- 
tary. In 1913 he received the appointment of member of the state dental board, 
in which capacity he is now serving. 

On the 17th of October, 1901, Dr. Meservey was married to Miss Ida 
Patience Waite, of Greenfield, Massachusetts, and they have become the parents 
of three children, Douglas Wyman, Doris Agnes and Bruce Waite. Dr. Meser- 
vey is a republican in his political views, fraternally he is connected with the 
Masons and the Elks and in religious faith is an Episcopalian. His life has ever 
been guided by high purposes and in his chosen calling he manifests a close con- 
formity to the most advanced ethical standards of the profession. 



SAMUEL CLAY BASSETT. 

GENEALOGICAL OR ANCESTRAL RECORD OF BASSETT FAMILY. 

1. John Bassett with his wife Margery came from England and located in 
New Haven, Connecticut, in the year 1642-3. He was sometimes called "Old 
Bassett" in the records. He with his son, Robert, was a committee to repair the 
fence and gate towards the farms, August 18, 1645. "Old Bassett" and Henry 
Peck were appointed by the town to set the great guns. John Bassett and his 
son, Robert, were appointed a committee to repair the meeting house. John died 
in New Haven, Connecticut, February 15, 1652. Margery died in Stamford, 
Connecticut, 1654. 

2. Robert, son of John and Margery Bassett, born in England, married Mary 
, probably in England. He was known as "Robert the Drummer." 

3. Robert, son of Robert and Mary Bassett, was born in 1640. In 1687 he 
married Elizabeth, daughter of Ensign Samuel and Sarah (Baldwin) Riggs. 
He located at Stratford, Connecticut, where he built a house in 1683. 

4. Samuel, son of Robert and Elizabeth (Riggs) Bassett, was born Novem- 
ber 28, 1692. In 1 719 he married Deborah, daughter of Thomas and Mary 
(Clark) Bennett. Samuel was commissioned ensign in 1722, lieutenant in 1732 
and captain in 1735. Fie was justice of the peace from 1739 to 1791. He repre- 
sented the town of Derby in the general court from 1733 to 1764. He built a 
house in Derby, Connecticut, which was standing in the year 1902. 

5. Joseph, son of Captain Samuel and Deborah (Bennett) Bassett, was born 
August 31, 1722. He married Sarah Hawkins, November 16, 1748. 

6. Samuel, son of Joseph and Sarah (Hawkins) Bassett, was born June 25, 
1 75 1, and married Sally At well in 1791. Samuel located in Dutchess county. 
New York, about the year 1791. He leased a Van Rensselaer grant of land, 
the life of the lease expiring on the death of the last of the three persons named 
in the lease. This land he cleared of timber and improved until about the year 
1820, when, the lease expiring, Samuel was overbid and the land was leased to 
a higher bidder. Samuel, disheartened and discouraged, moved with his wife 
and the younger children of the family to Delaware county. New York, and in 



» 



I 

I 




MRS. SAMUEL C. BASSETT 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY ^ 279 

the town of Walton he took timbered land and started again to make a home for 
his family. He lived but a few years, leaving his children to clear and improve 
the farm. 

7. Clark, son of Samuel and Sally (Atwell) Bassett, was born in Dutchess 
county, New York, February 9, 1810. He came with his parents to Delaware 
county, New York, in 1820, and when fourteen years of age, his father having 
died, he was "bound out" for a term of seven years to learn the wagon maker's 
trade at Derby, Connecticut. When of age, with a suit of clothes and one hun- 
dred dollars in money, he returned to the family home and for thirteen years 
labored on the home farm, caring for his mother and younger and unmarried 
sisters. Clark, in the year 1843, niarried Mary M. Hanford, daughter of Stephen 
and Mary Hanford, and moved, in a covered wagon, to Virginia, where, in the 
town of Bedford, and later in the village of Big Lick, in Roanoke county, he 
engaged in the mercantile business and, there being no public schools, his wife, 
Mary, taught a private school. Being in political belief an anti-slavery whig 
and a reader of the New York Tribune, he realized that the slave holding state 
of Virginia was not a desirable place to raise a family and in the year 185 1 
moved to Steuben county. New York, where he purchased an improved farm 
on which he resided during the remainder of his life, the farm still, in the year 
1915, being in possession of the youngest son of his family. Clark Bassett died 
in 1883; his wife Mary in 1897. In their family were seven children, Samuel C, 
Benjamin C, James W., Mary C, Matilda E., George S. and Emma N., all of 
whom lived to maturity and of whom five were still living in the year 191 5. 

Samuel Clay Bassett, the subject of this sketch, was born in a log cabin, in 
the town of Walton, Delaware county, New York, July 14, 1844. He attended a 
rural school and in 1861 graduated from Corning Academy at Corning, New 
York. In the year 1864 he enlisted in Company E, One Hundred and F"orty- 
second New York Infantry, serving until the close of the war and being honorably 
discharged. In the year 1867 he married Lucia M. Baker, only daughter of 
Enos S. and Elizabeth P. Baker, who was born in Grant county, Wiscohsin, 
September 17, 1845. I" the year 1871, with his wife and two children, he came 
to Nebraska, taking a soldier's homestead claim, one hundred and sixty acres, in 
Buffalo county, on which the family have since continuously resided, the name 
given this home being Echo Farm. 

He was a member of the soldiers' free homestead colony, which made settle- 
ment in Buffalo county, Nebraska, April 7, 1871. He taught five terms of school, 
the first being the first term of winter school taught in the county, and served 
twenty years as a member of the school board in district No. 8. He was secre- 
tary of the first Buffalo County Agricultural Society, 1875, was a charter mem- 
ber and the first president of the Nebraska Dairymen's Association, 1885, of 
which he served for twenty-five years as secretary, was a member of the Nebraska 
State Board of Agriculture for fourteen years and served for two terms as presi- 
dent of the board, 1899-1900, and v^as a charter member of the Nebraska Farm- 
ers' Congress, 19 10, and of the Nebraska Pure Grain and Seed Growers' Asso- 
ciation, 1912. He was secretary of the first Buffalo county republican conven- 
tion in 1 87 1, and served as a member of the state legislature in 1885 and again 
in 191 1. He was a charter member of G. K. Warren Post, No. 113, G. A. R., 
1882, of Gibbon Lodge, No. 35, A. O. U. W., 1884, of Gibbon Camp, No. 708, 



i 



280 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

M, W. A., 1885, was vice president of the Nebraska State Historical Society, 
1909-15, a charter member and president of the Gibbon Library Association, 
1910-12, and a charter member and first president of the Nebraska Hall of 
Agricultural Achievement, 1916. 

Lucia (Baker) Bassett was a granddaughter of Rev. Alfred Bronson, a 
pioneer Methodist missionary minister who made settlement at Prairie du Chien, 
Wisconsin, in 1836. She was graduated from Cooperstown Seminary, Coopers- 
town, New York, with the class of 1865. A descendant of pioneers for many 
generations, she was imbued with the true pioneer spirit, enduring without com- 
plaint the toil and privations incident to pioneer life, taking pride and pleasure 
in helping to develop the resources of Buffalo county and the state of Nebraska, 
in preparing the way for the homes of generations of happy, prosperous people. 
She took an active part and interest in the social and educational life of the 
community. She was a charter member and served as chief of honor of Mary 
Tate Lodge, D. of H., 1893, was a charter member and served as president of 
G. K. Warren Woman's Relief Corps, No. 189, 1889, was a charter member 
and' served as president of the Woman's Study League of Gibbon, 1904, and 
was a charter member of Wild Rose Camp, Royal Neighbors, M. W. A., 1893. 
Her death occurred February 9, 1907. She rests from her labors after a life of 
usefulness, filled with kind deeds to others, in Riverside cemetery, Gibbon, 
Nebraska. To Samuel C. and Lucia M. Bassett were born seven children, all of 
whom in the year 1915 were living, namely: Mary E., who married Edward M. 
Prouty; Clark S.; Samuel B.; Alfred B. ; Martha L., who married George L. 
Prouty ; June ; and Laura Lee. 



CHARLES L. ZIMPFER. 

Charles L. Zimpfer has the distinction of being the youngest merchant in 
Ravenna and although he is now only twenty-two years of age has been engaged 
in business on his own account for five years. He was born in Ravenna on the 
9th of January, 1894, of the marriage of Louis and Louisa (Krautler) Zimpfer, 
both natives of Germany. They came to America in early life and first 
located in Fort Worth, Texas, where the father followed the baker's trade, which 
he had learned in Germany. After living in the Lone Star state for about twelve 
years they removed to Ravenna, Nebraska, and he conducted a bakery here 
until his death on the 226. of July, 1904. The mother continued the business 
for a year and then sold out. She is still living and makes her home at Ravenna, 
having an interest in the grocery store which is managed by our subject. There 
are three children in the family, namely : Helen, who was bom on the 28th of 
October, 1892, and is associated with her brother in the conduct of the grocery 
business; Charles L. ; and Dorothy, whose birth occurred on the 12th of March, 
1899. 

Charles L. Zimpfer attended school in Ravenna and completed the junior 
year in the high school. As he was the only son he felt it incumbent upon him 
to engage in business as soon as possible and thus provide for the support of the 
family. He then opened a grocery store with the assistance of his sister Helen. 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 281 

He at once proved that he possessed a knowledge of business conditions and a 
soundness of judgment unusual for one of his years and the business prospered 
from the beginning. Although the other members of the family are interested 
financially in the store its management has always devolved upon him and the 
success which he has gained is highly creditable. He gives the closest attention 
to every detail of the business and his enterprise and industry leave no doubt 
as to his future. 

Mr. Zimpfer is a member of the Masonic order and the Knights of Pythias. 
He is one of the important factors in the business life of Ravenna and as the 
years have passed his trade has constantly grown, his liberal policy and the high 
quality of his goods having commended him to the support of the representative 
people of the town. With such a record it is needless to say that he is highly 
esteemed by all who know him. 



ALBERT A. GEHRKE, D. O. 

Dr. Albert A. Gehrke, of Ravenna, has gained a large practice as an osteo- 
path and has also been connected with business interests, having conducted the 
Pastime Moving Picture Theater for some time, although that enterprise is ^low 
rented and managed by his son-in-law. He was born in Fond du Lac, Wis- 
consin, on the 28th of February, 1861. His parents, August and Wilhelmina 
(Buss) Gehrke, were both born in Berlin, Germany, but in 1857 came to America 
and became pioneer settlers of Forest county, Wisconsin. The father purchased 
sixty acres of timber land, all of which he cleared in the course of time. Irp 
1874 he removed to Bufifalo county, Nebraska, and homesteaded a quarter sec- 
tion of land five miles east of Ravenna. He also took up a timber claim of one 
hundred and sixty acres and devoted the remainder of his life to the improve- 
ment of his land. He passed away in 1876 but was survived by his wife until 
1892. He served during the Civil war for six months as a member of a Wis- 
consin regiment and was at all times loyal to his adopted country. 

Dr. Albert A. Gehrke received the greater part of his education in Wiscon- 
sin, as he was thirteen years of age when the family home was established in 
this county. At that time this district was but sparsely settled and deer, antelope, 
gray foxes and other game abounded and along the Loup river beaver and similar 
fur bearing animals were plentiful. He shot deer on the present townsite of 
Ravenna and during the winters spent a great deal of time hunting and trapping. 
His father died when he was but fifteen years of age and the operation of the 
home farm devolved upon him and his brothers. As soon as they became of age 
they took up claims in the vicinity of the family homestead and thus acquired 
land which has since become valuable. Dr. Gehrke purchased a relinquishment 
to a homestead on the Loup river about four miles east of Ravenna and lived 
there for about twenty-five years, when he sold out and removed to Ravenna. 

While still engaged in farming he became much interested in osteopathy and, 
although he was handicapped by lack of educational opportunities in his youth, 
he believed that he could remedy that deficiency and took up the study of anatomy 
and other necessary scientific studies. In 1900 he went to Omaha and took a 



282 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

year's course in magnetic healing, after which he returned to Ravenna and prac- 
ticed as a masseur for five years, during which time he continued his home study. 
At length he felt that he was ready for a college course and accordingly entered 
the Still College of Osteopathy in Des Moines, the leading school of osteopathy 
in this country if not in the world. He was graduated with the degree of D. O, 
with the class of 1906 and located for practice at Central City, Nebraska. In 
1907, however, he became a resident of Ravenna and has since engaged in 
practice here. His ability is widely recognized and his practice is large and 
representative. In 1908, in order to secure an electric plant for use in his pro- 
fession, he purchased a moving picture outfit and, being a good business man, 
recognized the advantage of securing the greatest use possible of his equipment 
and accordingly went into the moving picture business. Under his able manage- 
ment this venture proved successful and at length he opened a modem and 
thoroughly equipped moving picture theater known as the Pastime Theater. It 
is handsomely decorated, the films shown are of the very best and the theater 
is now one of the most popular places of amusement in Ravenna. Dr. Gehrke 
managed its affairs personally for several years but has since rented the theater 
to a son-in-law. He also holds title to his residence, which is commodious and 
well designed. 

Dr. Gehrke was married December 7, 1882, to Miss Gretchen Bohn, a daugh- 
ter of John and Margereth Bohn, natives of Germany. The father died in 
Germany in 1865 and the mother subsequently remarried. In 1872 the family 
emigrated to the United States and located in Grand Island, Nebraska, where 
the stepfather of Mrs. Gehrke engaged in farming. He passed away in 1898, 
and the mother died in October, 191 5. Eight children have been bom to Dr. 
and Mrs. Gehrke, of whom four died in infancy, the others being: Amanda, 
the wife of Joseph Eckel, a merchant of Ravenna ; Rudy, a barber residing at 
Pueblo, Colorado; Augusta, the wife of Gust Holub, who runs the Pastime 
Theater of Ravenna; and Edith, who is attending school. 

Dr. Gehrke has given careful study to the political and economic problems 
of the day and has become convinced of the correctness of the principles of the 
socialist party, which he accordingly supports. The success which he has made 
as an osteopath is highly creditable to his ability and his determination and force 
of character, for he did not begin his professional preparation until he was forty 
years of age. Many men would have considered it impossible for them to take 
tip a professional career at that time, but he believed that he could fulfill his 
ambition and by dint of hard study carried out his purpose and is now ranked 
among the most successful physicians of Ravenna. 



C. G. BLISS. 



C. G. Bliss, president of the City Bank of Elm Creek, which he organized in 
1907, is one of the leading financiers of Buffalo county. He was born on the 
loth of May, 1883, a son of N. T. Bliss, a native of Pennsylvania, who as a 
young man came to Buffalo county. He homesteaded land in Gardner town- 
ship and for many years successfully engaged in farming and stock dealing. He 



1 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 283 

is now deceased. His widow, who was in her maidenhood Miss Edith M. 
Rogers, is still living. 

C. G. Bliss was reared upon the home farm and received his education in the 
Shelton schools. After reaching mature years he engaged in the real estate 
business, being secretary of the Wood River Land & Loan Company, but in 1907 
he turned his attention to banking, organizing at that time the City Bank of Elm 
Creek, of which he has since been president. He gives his careful attention to 
the direction of the affairs of the institution and his natural ability, combined 
with his close study of banking, has made him very efficient as a bank official. 

Mr. Bliss was married in 1910 to Miss Jessie Stebbins, who was born in 
Buffalo county and is a daughter of John and Ida M. Stebbins. Two children 
have been bom to their union, namely, John and Jessie. 

Mr. Bliss supports the republican party at the polls and is at present serving 
acceptably as a member of the school board. He belongs to the Methodist 
Episcopal church and can be counted upon to further the moral advancement 
of his community. He has achieved much success, although he is a young man, 
and his enterprise and good judgment are factors in the business expansion of 
Elm Creek. Personally he is popular and his sterling integrity has gained him 
the respect of all who have been associated with him. His entire life has been 
passed in BuiTalo county and his accurate knowledge of conditions here has been 
of advantage to him in his business career. His father was one of the pioneers 
of the county and played well his part as one of those who have developed it 
from a pioneer district, and the same public spirit and regard for the general 
welfare have characterized Mr. Bliss of this review in his work. 



IRA F. HENLINE. 



Ira F. Henline is a well known and highly respected resident of Kearney, 
deriving his income from property interests and other investments, which include 
connection with the Commercial Bank of Gibbon, of which he has been the 
president since 1912. He was born upon a farm near Bloomington, McLean 
county, Illinois, March i, 1858, his parents being James J. and Sarah (Smith) 
Henline, who were natives of Kentucky. The father was a farmer and stock 
raiser and both he and his wife passed away in Illinois, where they reared their 
family of eleven children, nine of whom are yet living. 

Ira F. Henline spent his youthful days upon his father's farm in McLean 
county, Illinois, and there acquired his education in the district schools, dividing 
his time between his textbooks and the work of the fields. He continued to 
follow agricultural pursuits as long as he made McLean county his home, and 
while he was still residing there he was married at Pontiac, Illinois, on the 12th 
of March, 1884, to Miss Sina E. Arbuckle. 

In 1888 he came to Nebraska and purchased a farm of one hundred and 
sixty acres on Wood river in 'Center township, Buffalo county. He has since 
lived in this county and for about fourteen years he gave undivided attention 
to agricultural pursuits, making his home upon the farm on which he first 
settled, until the year 1902, when he removed to Buda, having in the meantime 



284 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

purchased two hundred and eight acres of land adjoining that village. He there- 
after continued to engage in farming but also devoted much of his attention to 
buying, feeding and shipping stock. Since that time he has made stock dealing 
an important branch of his business and from it has derived a very gratifying 
annual income. For a number of years he bought thousands of hogs annually 
and shipped them west to Portland, Oregon, San Francisco and Los Angeles. 
Since January, 1910, he has made his home in Kearney and from this point 
has carried on his business operations. He is the owner of a quarter sec- 
tion of land in Thornton township in addition to his property at Buda, so that 
his holdings now comprise three hundred and sixty-eight acres of valuable and 
productive land in this part of the state. In 1912 he became associated with 
the Commercial Bank of Gibbon and at that date was elected president, in which 
position he has since continued. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Henline were born four children : Bernie F., who is cashier 
of the Commercial Bank at Gibbon; Vernie T., who is more commonly known 
as "Judge" and who operates a ranch at Buda and is also engaged in the live 
stock business; Lulu B., the wife of J. W. McKearney, of Kearney; and Beulah 
J. The wife and mother passed away January 13, 1914, her death being deeply 
regretted not only by her immediate family, but also by many friends. She was 
a member of the Methodist Episcopal church and lived a life in consistent har- 
mony with her professions. Mr. Henline also belongs to the Alethodist church 
and he is likewise identified with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the 
Ancient Order of United Workmen and the Modern Woodmen of America. 
In politics he is a republican where national issues are involved, but does not 
hold himself bound by party ties and in his political activities frequently fol- 
lows an independent course. Those who know him esteem him for his sterling 
worth. He fearlessly expresses his honest convictions, his position never being 
an equivocal one, and his influence is always given on the side of progress, im- 
provement, justice and truth. 



O. O. OLSON. 



O. O. Olson, who is successfully engaged in stock raising in Platte township, 
was born in Galesburg, Illinois, on the ist of March, 1876, a son of Otto and 
Hattie (Ackers.on) Olson, both natives of Sweden, whence they emigrated to 
the United States in 1866. They lived in Illinois until 1878, in which year they 
went to Phelps county, Nebraska, but subsequently removed to Cuming county, 
and there the father passed away, although the mother is still living. They 
were the parents of eight children, of whom seven survive. 

O. O. Olson assisted in the operation of the homestead until he was twenty- 
three years of age and then assumed charge of the farm work. As the years 
passed he saved his money carefully and at length purchased three hundred 
acres of good land on sections 12, 13 and 14, Platte township. He is now living, 
however, upon a farm on sections 10 and 11 belonging to his wife, and he 
specializes in the raising of high grade horses, mules, cattle and hogs. His well 




MR. AND MRS. 0. U. ULSOX 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 281 

directed activities yield him a good return and he is ranked among the substantial 
men of his locality. 

In 1889 Mr. Olson was married to Miss Anna Hanson, who was born in 
Wisconsin and is a daughter of Nels and Emelia Hanson, now residents of Kear- 
ney. Mr. and Mrs. Olson have six children, namely : Loring, Violet, Esther, 
Gilbert, Oren and Gladys. 

The family attend the Methodist Episcopal church and take a commendable 
interest in its varied lines of activity. Mr. Olson is a republican in politics 
and for the last ten years has served on the school board. Fraternally he belongs 
to the Odd Fellows lodge at Gibbon, in which he has filled a number of the 
chairs, and to the Modern Woodmen of America. His success is the result of 
■^ergy and sound judgment, and in gaining individual prosperity he has also 
promoted the agricultural interests of his township. 



BARTA KASE. 



Barta Kase, who for many years has resided in Ravenna, has built up a large 
and gratifying patronage 'and derives a substantial profit from his boot and shoe 
business. He has been established in business in Ravenna longer than any other 
merchant of the town and has contributed in no small degree to its development 
along commercial lines. His birth occurred. in Kolovec, in the province of Pil- 
sen, Bohemia, on the 24th of August, 1861, and his parents were Paul and Eva 
(Kroulek) Kase, likewise natives of Bohemia. The father engaged in farming 
and also devoted considerable attention to the stock business and met with grati- 
fying success, in both occupations. He passed away on the 25th of December, 
1914, and his wife died in 1901. 

Barta Kase attended the village schools and when fifteen years of age was 
apprenticed'" f6^ a shoemaker, his parents paying two hundred dollars for his 
nistruction^ftftie trade. In November, 1879, he emigrated to America and made 
his way to tlTe middle west, locating at West Point, Nebraska. After working 
as a farm hand for a year he removed to Omaha and as he was a skilled cornet 
player found employment in an orchestra. Subsequently he traveled with the 
Sells Brothers' show as a musician and during that time met Joseph Bohac, 
also a musician, in connection with whom he later organized and managed a 
small concert band in Omaha. After four years they removed to Lincoln and 
conducted a band there until February, 1886, when they decided to turn their 
attention to business pursuits. Mr. Bohac was a hamessmaker by trade and 
as the Burlington Railroad was letting contracts at that time for grading the 
extension of their lines from Grand Island to Broken Bow the young men decided 
that there would be excellent business opportunities near the construction camps. 
They erected a small shop on the Smith place on Beaver creek and began to 
make and repair harness. As soon as the grading outfits came they had all 
the work that they could do and after the road was completed they continued in 
business, having in the meantime built up a permanent trade in the county. In 
1 89 1 Mr. Kase sold his interest in that business and in the same year established 
a shoe store in Ravenna, which had grown up at the point which he and Mr. 



288 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

Bohac had chosen for the location of their harness shop. He has since continued 
in the boot and shoe business and has the only store dealing exclusively in shoes 
in the town. He carries a large and diversified stock of high grade footwear 
and his thorough knowledge of everything pertaining to the making of shoes 
has been of great advantage to him as a merchant. He is one of the most pros- 
perous business men of Ravenna and in addition to owning the building in which 
his store is located has erected a commodious residence for himself and has also 
built each of his children a home. 

Mr. Kase was married in May, 1884, to Miss Annie Maly, a daughter of 
John and Magdalena Maly, natives of Bohemia, who settled in Saunders county, 
Nebraska, in 1867. They took up a homestead eight miles from Wahoo and 
lived thereon for many years. At length, however, they retired and removed 
to Ravenna, where the father passed away in 1897 ^"^ where the mother is still 
living. Mr. and Mrs. Kase had three children. Joseph, who was born in August, 
1885, died in the same year. Joseph, second of the name, whose birth occurred 
on the 22d of October, 1886, was the first male child born in Ravenna. He is 
now engaged in railroading and resides in Ravenna. Bessie, who was born in 
April, 1888, is the wife of John Chandler, manager of the telephone company 
at Loup City, Nebraska. 

Mr. Kase supports the republican party at the polls and along fraternal lines 
is connected with the Knights of Pythias. His religious faith is that of the 
Roman Catholic church. He has never ceased to give a great deal of attention 
to music and is still at the head of the Ravenna band, which he and Mr. Bohac 
organized and which has done much to promote an interest in music in the town. 
As he located here before the town was thought of he has witnessed its entire 
development and takes justifiable pride in the fact that he has done much to 
promote its advancement along various lines of activity. 



GEORGE MILLER. 



George Miller is a fine type of a self-made man — a man who is not dis- 
heartened by a lack of unusual opportunity but who resolutely makes the best 
of conditions as they are and through enterprise and good judgment eventually 
wins success. He has at all times depended upon his own resources and is now 
one of the wealthy men of Buffalo county, owning seventeen hundred and eighty- 
four acres of fine land in the county. He resides in Elm Creek township and 
has brought all of his land to a high state of cultivation. 

Mr. Miller was born in Delaware county. New York, on the 9th of February, 
1 841, a son of William and Fanny (Hicks) Miller, also natives of the Empire 
state. They removed to Iowa when our subject was but a small child and two 
years later went to Missouri, where they resided until the Civil war, at which 
time removal was made to Jones county, Iowa. There the mother passed away, 
but the father died in Audubon county, that state. 

George Miller was reared upon the home farm in Missouri and when sixteen 
years of age began freighting across the plains, making several trips to Mexico 
and subsequently going to Wyoming. While there he worked for contractors 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 289 

who were freighting for the government and while in their employ drove six 
yoke of oxen, there often being twenty-five teams in a train, and he met with 
many interesting experiences in those pioneer days. In August, 1871, he 
removed to Buffalo county, Nebraska, and purchased a timber claim of one 
hundred and sixty acres in Elm Creek township. For the first year he lived in 
a dugout but at the end of that time built his present home. In a comparatively 
short time he had his land under cultivation and was receiving a gratifying 
income therefrom. As soon as he had accumulated sufficient capital he invested 
in more land and gradually has added to his holdings until he now owns ten 
hundred and fifty-four acres in a body in Elm Creek township and seven hundred 
and thirty acres in Logan township. In managing his business affairs he has 
manifested a progressive spirit and a well founded faith in the agricultural 
future of the county, and the wisdom of his course has been vindicated as he 
is now financially independent. 

Mr. Miller was married, in Jones county, Iowa, to Miss Angela Cohoon, a 
native of that county, who passed away on the 29th of August, 1912. For six 
years previous to this the family had resided in Arkansas for the benefit of her 
health. She was the mother of nine children, namely : Alma, at home ; Howard, 
who is married and resides on land belonging to his father; Archie, who is also 
farming land belonging to his father and is married ; Bert, who is operating 
some of his father's land and is married; Kate, the wife of Harry Skinner, of 
Pueblo, Colorado; Georgia, the wife of John Loibl, of Elm Creek; Roy, who is 
operating his father's farm in Logan township and is married; and Harry and 
Dolly, both of whom died in infancy. 

Mr. Miller has been a member of the Methodist church for many years and 
takes a commendable interest in its work. His wife was likewise identified with 
that church. He votes the democratic ticket but has never sought public office. 
His observation has convinced him of the great evil wrought by the liquor traffic 
and he is a stalwart worker in the cause of temperance. Although he is a man 
of wealth and has reached the age at which many retire he is still a hard worker 
and finds much satisfaction in activity. 



J. W. FRANK, M. D. 



Dr. J. W. Frank has resided in Elm Creek for thirty years and was for many 
years a leading physician and surgeon but is now practically retired. His birth 
occurred in Marysville, Ohio, on the 12th of January, 1841. His parents were 
W. H. and Rachel (Wolford) Frank, both likewise natives of Ohio. In 1856 
they removed with their family to Henry county, Iowa, and in 1883 became resi- 
dents of Kearney, Nebraska, where both passed away. The father was by trade 
a carpenter and joiner. 

J. W. Frank passed his boyhood in Ohio and Iowa and received his general 
education in the common schools. On the 3d of October, 1861, he enlisted in 
Company D, Fourth Iowa Cavalry, for three years and while with his command 
fought in several important engagements, such as the battles of Memphis and 
Meridian and the sieg^e of Vicksburgf. He was on board the Maria sroinsf from 



290 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

St. Louis to Memphis when the ship was blown up on the nth of December, 
1864, and he received terrible injuries, his legs being broken in five places. He 
was sent to a hospital at St. Louis, where he remained until discharged in July, 
1864. He has never fully recovered from the effects of his injuries. 

After his discharge from the hospital Dr. Frank returned to Henry county, 
Iowa, and, having determined on the practice of medicine as a life work, entered 
the Keokuk Medical College, from which he received the M. D. degree on the 
completion of the course. He then located in Mahaska county, Iowa, for prac- 
tice and remained there until 1883, when he came to Nebraska. For two years 
he was located in Phelps county, just south of Elm Creek, to which town he 
removed in 1885. He has since resided there and until three years ago was 
very active in practice. At that time he removed his ofifice to his home, expect- 
ing to retire, but as his old patients still call him he has never given up his prac- 
tice. He has won a gratifying measure of success in his chosen profession, due 
to his careful preparation, his close study of the cases intrusted to him and his 
wide reading, which has kept him in touch with the advance in medical science. 
He owns a good farm in Elm Creek township and derives therefrom a gratifying 
financial return. 

Dr. Frank was married in Mahaska county, Iowa, to Miss Martha Frances 
Johnson, a native of Ohio and a daughter of Samuel and Frances (Gillogly) 
Johnson, who were also born in that state, whence they removed to Mahaska 
county, Iowa, during the Civil war. Six children have been born to Dr. and 
Mrs. Frank, namely: Lena, the wife of Mark Jones, a merchant of Elm Creek; 
Myrtle, who married Albert Calhoun, of Kearney; Josie, the wife of Hugh 
Graham, a resident of Montana; Mina, who married Fred Shumaker, of Elm 
Creek; Jessie, at home; and Joseph Vern, who resides on his father's farm. 
There are also fourteen grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. 

Dr. Frank casts his ballot in support of the men and measures of the republi- 
can party and a number of years ago served as a member of the city council and 
of the school board and also held other local offices. He holds membership in 
the Grand Army post at Kearney and finds much pleasure in associating with 
his comrades of the '60s. His wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. Both are widely and favorably known and their worth is indicated by 
the fact that those who have been brought into closest contact with them are 
their warmest friends. 



WYMAN S. CLAPP. 



Important' business interests claim the attention of Wyman S. Clapp, who is 
active in the control and management of the Kearney Telephone Company as its 
secretary and treasurer and also of the Lake Kearney Ice Company, of which 
he is one of the principal stockholders. His residence in this state covers a period 
of twenty-seven years, during which time he has not only won a creditable and 
enviable position in business circles but has also taken an active part in public 
affairs relating to municipal conditions. Of New England nativity, he was born 




WYMAN S. CLAPP 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 293 

at Deerfield, Franklin county, Massachusetts, October 30, 1862, a son of Thomas 
G. and Hannah (Ball) Clapp. 

Mr. Clapp was reared upon a farm and attended the public schools in early 
youth, passing through consecutive grades to his graduation from the Deerfield 
high school. He continued his studies during his last year in high school under 
trying circumstances. He had to work on the farm during the day, master his 
lessons at night and twice a week he would go to Deerfield to recite, but he kept 
up with his class and the resolution and spirit of ambition which he displayed 
at that time have remained characteristics of his later life. He continued to work 
at farm labor until he reached the age of twenty-three years, when he entered 
the employ of H. D. Watson, proprietor of a Greenfield publishing house, as 
bookkeeper. In February, 1890, he came west for Mr. Watson, who had pre- 
ceded him and had established a real estate business in Kearney. Here he 
entered ]Mr. Watson's office as bookkeeper and confidential man and continued 
with him in that capacity until 1898 but two years before began in the fire 
insurance business in a small way. In 1898 he purchased the business of Sher- 
wood & Baldwin, one of the old fire and accident insurance agencies of Kearney, 
and since that time has been recognized as one of the leading representatives of 
insurance interests in Kearney and this part of the state. He has extended the 
scope of his activities to include life insurance and he also handles surety bonds 
and has added real estate dealing to his other lines. About 1893 he became a 
stockholder of the Home Telephone Company, which in 1905 was merged into 
the Kearney Telephone Company. Of the former he was secretary and treasurer 
and after its consolidation with the latter he continued in the same official 
position and is acting in that capacity at the present time. He is likewise the 
principal stockholder of the Lake Kearney Ice Company, which is conducting a 
business of large and gratifying proportions. His varied interests are extensive 
and important, bringing him prominently before the public as a foremost repre- 
sentative of commercial and financial activity. 

In November, 1888, Mr. Clapp was married to Miss Agnes T. Wait, of Green- 
field, Massachusetts. He is prominently and widely known through his fra- 
ternal relations and is especially active in Masonic circles. He belongs to the 
blue lodge and chapter at Kearney, the consistory at Hastings, in which he has 
taken the thirty-second degree, and the council at Lexington. He has served 
as high priest at Kearney Chapter, No. 23, R. A. M., and as eminent commander 
of Mount Hebron Commandery, No. 2, K. T. He was appointed grand captain 
of the guard of the Grand Commandery of Nebraska in 1910 ; was grand warden 
in 191 1 ; grand standard bearer in 1912; was elected grand junior warden in 
1913; became grand senior warden in 1914 and in 1915 was elected to his pres- 
ent position, that of grand captain general. He also belongs to the Knights of 
Pythias and the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. In politics he is an 
earnest democrat where national issues are involved but casts an independent 
local ballot, supporting men and measures rather than party. For six years he 
served as a member of the city council, during which time he was a member of 
the finance committee and for the greater part of that time was its chairman. He 
also acted as president of the city council and he exercised his official preroga- 
tives in support of many plans and measures for the public good. His work 
resulted beneficially for the city and the worth of his labors was acknowledged 



294 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

by all fair-minded men. Mr. Clapp has made steady advancement in his business 
career, progressing step by step and gaining at every point a broader outlook and 
wider opportunities. 



H. HENRY RASMUSSEN. 

Among the men who are ranked as important factors in the commercial life 
of Ravenna is H. Henry Rasmussen, the proprietor of a well stocked grocery 
store. His birth occurred in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, on the 24th of 
August, 1861, and he is a son of Lawrence and Gondeline (Friede) Rasmussen, 
likewise natives of that country. The father followed the occupation of farming 
and lived on Sylt island in the North Sea, which was a popular summer resort. 
One night in the winter of 1869 he and several others went across the ice to the 
mainland for the mail and he never returned, having broken through the ice 
and been drowned. Subsequently they found his body, which was taken home 
for burial. His wife passed away in 1868. 

H. Henry Rasmussen was thus left an orphan when eight years of age but 
nevertheless he received good educational opportunities, completing a thorough 
common school course. When fifteen years of age he was bound out as a lock- 
smith's apprentice and after devoting three years to learning the trade worked 
thereat in Hamburg and elsewhere. When twenty-two years of age he emi- 
grated to the United States and for a year worked in a plumbers' supply factory 
in Chicago but at the end of that time went to Rock Island, Illinois, where he 
found employment in a locksmith's shop. After devoting a year to farm work 
he came to Nebraska in 1886 and became connected with a store at Syracuse. 
The following year he went to Nebraska City and devoted two years to clerk- 
ing in a general store there, after which he was similarly employed in Lincoln 
for three years. Desiring to go into business on his own account, he removed 
to Alva, Nebraska, and turned his attention to well drilling but met with a 
severe accident which incapacitated him for further work along that line. He 
again became connected with merchandising, securing a position as salesman 
in the Boston Store at Omaha. His ability led to his promotion and for seven 
years he had charge of an important department in the store. Not being satis- 
fied to work for others, he accordingly resigned his position and for a year 
had charge of the Singer Sewing Machine office at Harlan, Iowa, on a commis- 
sion basis. At the end of that time he reentered the Boston Store at Omaha, 
where he remained until 1902.- He then accepted a position as manager of the 
C. J. Stevens mercantile business in Ravenna, where he remained for two years, 
or until the store was sold. At that time he bought a small stock of confec- 
tionery and enlarged the business as rapidly as his limited capital would permit. 
In time he added a full line of groceries and as the years have passed his trade 
has shown a steady growth, and he now has one of the leading groceries in 
Ravenna. He carries a large stock and has built up an enviable reputation for 
reasonable prices and fair dealing. 

Mr. Rasmussen was married in Lincoln, in 1890, to Miss Mattie Copley, a 
daughter of John and Mary Copley, natives respectively of Ireland and Scotland. 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 295 

They came to America in young manhood and womanhood and for a time lived 
in New York, where the father engaged in farming. Subsequently he followed 
that occupation in Champaign county, Illinois, but in 1883 the family removed 
to Nebraska, locating near Unadilla, where the father bought a quarter section 
of land. He concentrated his energies upon the development of his farm and 
continued to follow agricultural pursuits until his demise, which occurred in 
1900. His wife survives and resides with our subject. To Mr. and Mrs. Ras- 
mussen have been boni four sons, John, Roy, Earl and Hugh. 

Mr. Rasmussen supports the democratic party at the polls but has never 
taken a very active part in politics as his business affairs have required prac- 
tically his entire attention. His fraternal connections are with the Knights of 
Pythias and the Modern Woodmen of America, and in religion he is a Lutheran. 
He deserves much credit for what he has accomplished as a business man, for 
he has depended solely upon his own resources and through his sound judgment, 
careful attention to details and his strict adherence to high standards of busi- 
ness honor he has gained a gratifying measure of success. In addition to his 
store he owns his residence and is recognized as one of the substantial mea of 
Ravenna. The same qualities which have enabled him to make a place for him- 
self in the business world have also gained him the respect and esteem of all 
who have been associated with him. 



JOSEPH SMAHA. 

Joseph Smaha, who for three decades has been engaged in the meat market 
business in Ravenna, was born at Neiarn, Bohemia, near the Bavarian border, 
on the 25th of November, 1863. His father, Joseph Smaha, was also a native 
of that country, but his mother, who bore the maiden name of Frances Her- 
mann, was German by birth. The father engaged in farming for some time but 
when our subject was two years of age removed toi Domazlice, a city of about 
twenty thousand inhabitants, and there he became an innkeeper. Four years 
later a removal was made to the village of Meletice, where both parents resided 
until called by death. The demise of the father occurred on the 12th of Decem- 
ber, 1873, but the mother survived for many years, dying on the 30th of July, 
191 2, at the venerable age of eighty-seven years. 

Joseph Smaha received his education in his native country and when four- 
teen years of age decided to try his fortune in the new world. He made the trip 
to the United States alone and had a narrow escape from death while on the 
voyage, as the ship collided with another vessel in a heavy fog in mid ocean. 
One of the ships sank but the passengers were transferred to the other vessel, 
which managed to reach New York in a crippled condition. Mr. Smaha made his 
way at once to Nebraska, joining his brother George at Omaha. After a short 
time he went to Wahoo, Saunders county, and for a year was employed as a 
hired hand there. He then returned to Omaha and after working in a packing 
house for three months entered a meat market there and learned the butcher's 
trade. In the fall of 1880 he went to David City, where his brother had estab- 
lished a market, but two years later our subject turned his attention to other 



296 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

work, going out with a government surveying party to the Bad Lands district 
seventy-five miles northwest of Fort Niobrara, Nebraska. 

Subsequently Mr. Smaha worked at the butcher's trade in Lincoln and Omaha 
and in 1886 came with his brother George to Ravenna, Buffalo county, Nebraska, 
and established a meat business here. The town had been founded only a short 
time before and proved an excellent location for a market. The brothers con- 
tinued in business together for four years, at the end of which time our subject 
bought his brother's interest and became sole owner of the meat market. For 
more than twenty years he was alone in the management of the business, but 
when his oldest son reached mature years he took him into partnership and the 
business is now conducted under the name of Joseph Smaha & Sons. His second 
son, Adolph O., is now also connected with the business. Mr. Smaha under- 
stands everything pertaining to the butcher's trade and the conduct of a meat 
market and as he adds to this thorough knowledge, good judgment, enterprise and 
unswerving integrity, it is but natural that he should have built up a large 
and profitable patronage. He owns the building in which his business is located 
and also holds title to forty acres of land adjoining Ravenna and two good resi- 
dence properties in the town. 

In August, 1882, Mr. Smaha was united in marriage to Miss Lucy Slavik, 
a daughter of Matt and Frances (Masek) Slavik, natives of Bohemia, who 
emigrated to America about 1872. The father was a farmer by occupation and 
purchased land in Butler county, Nebraska, which he operated for many years. 
At length, having accumulated a competence, he retired from active life and 
made his home with Mr. Smaha until his demise in July, 1905. His wife sur- 
vives at the age of eighty-nine years and is living with our subject. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Smaha have been born ten children, namely : Joseph F., 
who was born on the 9th of December, 1883, and is engaged in business with 
his father; Minnie, whose birth occurred June 9, 1885, and who is teaching 
school in CaHfornia ; Adolph O., who was born on the i8th of November, 1888, 
and is also associated with his father in business; Elizabeth, bom April 16, 1891, 
Emil, born March 21, 1894, Blanch, born March 28, 1898, and Eldine, born July 
31, 1908, all of whom are at home; and three who died in infancy. 

Mr. Smaha believes in the principles of the republican party and loyally sup- 
ports its candidates at the polls. He has served as a member of the town coun- 
cil and is at the present time a member of the fire department, of which he was 
•the first chief. He has always discharged his official duties with a conscientious 
regard for the public welfare and is recognized as a good citizen. Fraternally 
he belongs to the Knights of Pythias, of which he is a charter member, and to 
the Modern Woodmen of America, and his religious belief is that of the Meth- 
odist church, to which he belongs. He deserves much credit for what he has 
accomplished, for he came to America when a boy of fourteen years and not 
only had to meet the usual obstacles that confront one who starts out in life 
without capital or the aid of influential friends, but he also had the additional 
handicap of being unable to understand English. However, he soon acquired a 
good knowledge of the language and his enterprise and determination have 
enabled him to win a gratifying measure of prosperity. In 191 2 he turned over 
the management of his shop to his son, and he and his two daughters, Minnie 
and Elizabeth, and his son Adolph O. made a trip to Bohemia, as he wished to 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 297 

visit his aged mother whom he had not seen since he left home as a boy of four- 
teen years. They spent about a year in Europe and after his return Mr. Smaha 
again became actively connected with the conduct of his business. 



O. J. LLOYD. 



O. J. Lloyd, a retired farmer living in Elm Creek, has been honored by his 
fellow citizens by election to the ofifice of mayor and is efficiently and conscien- 
tiously discharging the duties devolving upon him. His birth occurred in Bunker 
township, Mercer county, Illinois, on the 19th of ]\Iarch, 1851, and he is a son 
of James and Catherine (Burroughs) Lloyd, tfie former born in Erie, Penn- 
sylvania, on the 3d of September, 1827, and the latter in Salem, New Jersey, on 
the 26th of February, 1825. The paternal grandfather of our subject, Benijah 
Lloyd, settled at Millersburg, Mercer county, Illinois, in 1834 and took up land 
on a soldier's claim. He was a tailor by trade. He passed away at Millers- 
burg, as did his wife, who was in her maidenhood Elizabeth Dunn. The parents 
of our subject were married on the 15th of February, 1850, in Mercer county, 
Illinois, to which place the father had removed as a boy with his parents in 1834. 
Lie engaged in farming there on reaching mature years and became the owner 
of three hundred and eighty acres of excellent land. He also owned land in 
Nebraska and was in good circumstances. He passed away in Mercer county 
on the 2 1st of October, 1901. His religious faith was that of the Presbyterian 
church and he gave his political allegiance to the democratic party. He served 
as assessor of his township and made an excellent record in that capacity. Llis 
wife makes her home with our subject and on the 26th of February, 1916, cele- 
brated her ninety-first birthday. 

O. J. Lloyd was reared upon the home farm in Mercer county, Illinois, and 
for a considerable period engaged in farming independently there, as he owned 
a valuable tract of land in that county. In 1887 he sold out and came to Buffalo 
county, Nebraska, passing the first winter in Elm Creek in order to give his 
children the advantages of the schools here. On the 8th of January, 1888, when 
he was living in Elm Creek, occurred the terrible blizzard, which is still remem- 
bered for its severity. The following spring he took up his residence upon 
his farm of two hundred and eighty acres in Dawson county and resided there 
for many years. In 1896 he removed to Elm Creek, but after making his home 
here for two years returned to the farm, where he resided until 191 3, when he 
retired and again took up his residence in Elm Creek. He was prompt and enter- 
prising in carrying on the work of his farm and his progressive methods, com- 
bined with his successful management of the business phase of farming, enabled 
him to gain more than a competence. 

Mr. Lloyd was married in Mercer county, Illinois, to Miss Frankie Vernon, 
who was born in that county and died in February, 1895. To them were born 
five children. Ray V., who was born January 13, 1873, is living on his father's 
farm in Dawson county. Earl E., whose birth occurred on the 17th of May, 
1874, received his education in the Elm Creek schools. He later worked for a 
time in a bank, after which he entered the employ of the Union Pacific Railroad 



298 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

as timekeeper. He has since worked his way steadily upward and is now hold- 
ing a good position in the auditing department of that road at Omaha. Oliver 
M. was born on the nth of November, 1878, and likewise received his educa- 
tion in the Elm Creek schools. While employed with a surveying gang on a 
railroad the district engineer noted his ability and helped him to secure training 
as a civil engineer. He is now engineer for mines near Salt Lake City. Florence, 
who was born September 28, 1880, married Charles Shepherd, a railroad man 
living at Pocatello, Idaho. Bessie, whose birth occurred on the 21st of June, 
1887, is at home. In 1898 Mr. Lloyd was married the second time. Miss Emma 
Callendine becoming his wife, but she is now deceased. 

Mr. Lloyd is a stalwart democrat and has held a number of local offices. In 
1897, while living in Elm Creek, he served as president of the village board and 
while living in Dawson county Served as assessor of his township and lacked but 
fifteen votes of being elected county clerk. He is now serving as mayor, or as 
president of the village board of Elm Creek, of which he had for two years 
previously been a member. He has always discharged his official duties with 
an eye single to the public welfare, and his record as an office holder is creditable 
alike to his ability and his integrity. Fraternally he is connected with the Ancient 
Order of United Workmen, the Degree of Honor and the Modern Woodmen of 
America, all of Elm Creek, and his religious faith is indicated by his member- 
ship in the Methodist Episcopal church. He is a man of great energy and 
unusual soundness of judgment and these qualities have been important factors 
in his success as a farmer and in his influence as a man of affairs. 



H. S. STEELE. 



H. S. Steele, one of the well-to-do and successful farmers of Elm Creek 
township, is entitled to honor as a veteran of the Civil war, having served 
throughout that conflict as a member of an Ohio regiment. He was born in 
what is now West Virginia on the 25th of 'November, 1840, the only son of 
James and Caroline Steele, natives of Virginia. He was left an orphan at an 
early age and was reared by his maternal grandmother. While still a boy he 
removed to Ross county, Ohio, and later to Fayette county, that state. In 1861 
he enlisted at Washington Courthouse, Ohio, in Company A, Fifty-fourth Ohio 
Volunteer Infantry, and remained with that command for three years and three 
weeks. He took part in the following engagements, Shiloh, Chickasaw Swamps, 
Fort Heinman, Corinth, Vicksburg, Atlanta and Jonesburg. He was never 
wounded although he had a number of very narrow escapes, having the bottom 
of his canteen shot off at Shiloh and on one occasion having his musket knocked 
out of his hand by a spent cannon ball. At another time a minie ball passed 
through his belt. 

After Mr. Steele was honorably discharged from military service he removed 
to Woodford county, Illinois, where he remained until 1873, when he came to 
Buffalo county, Nebraska. He had a soldier's claim and took up one hundred 
and sixty acres of land in Elk Creek township, on which he has since lived. He 
passed through the usual pioneer experiences and in addition to the hardships 



x. 




Jl 


^>'%^a V^«^H 


<m 


j^^9 --^mB-^^M 




Mk f" ^m 




p^' JP 




-d 


"^^v ^^I^^^^^H 


€ 

^*'^ 




""**' ^.M|H|^^^^H 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 301 

incident to all life on the frontier had to contend with the grasshopper plagues 
and with droughts. He never wavered, however, in his faith in the ultimate 
prosperity of the country and this belief has been justified as he has seen his land 
increase greatly in value and as he has gained financial success. Fie owns three 
hundred and sixty acres in Elm Creek township and one hundred and sixty acres 
in Perkins county, this state, and derives a gratifying income from his land. He 
has always been progressive in his work, and his industry and good manage- 
ment have enabled him to accumulate a competence. 

In 1870 Mr. Steele was united in marriage at Bloomington, Illinois, to Miss 
Mary Frances Lucas, who was born in Kentucky on the loth of July, 1851, a 
daughter of Thomas and Minerva Lucas, natives of the Blue Grass state, who, 
however, were living in Woodford county, Illinois, at the time of their daughter's 
marriage. They subsequently came to Buffalo county, Nebraska, and both 
passed away here. To Mr. and Mrs. Steele have been born seven children, 
namely: Laura M., the wife of William Schrack, of Elm Creek; Charles, who is 
farming in Phelps county; Bert, a farmer of Elm Creek township; and Elmer 
and Ellsworth, twins, Clifford and William Henry, all four of whom are at 
home. 

Mr. Steele supports the republican party as a rule although if the occasion 
demands he votes an independent ticket. He has served as a member of the 
school board and has at all times manifested a commendable interest in the edu- 
cational advancement of his district. Both he and his wife hold membership 
in the Methodist Episcopal church and their many excellent qualities have won 
them the respect and esteem of all who have been brought in contact with them. 
Mr. Steele proved his patriotism when as a young man he enlisted in the Union 
army and it is characteristic of him that he should meet to the full every obliga- 
tion resting upon him. 



WALTER S. NICHOLS, B. V. Sc. 

Dr. Walter S. Nichols, of Ravenna, has a large and profitable practice as a 
veterinarian and owns a modern, well equipped veterinary hospital. His birth 
occurred in Marshall county, Iowa, on the 13th of May, 1882, and he is a son 
of Horace M. and Mary T. (Tomlinson) Nichols, both natives of Marshall 
county, Iowa, the former born in 1854 and the latter in 1855. The father farmed 
in his native county until 1910, when he retired and removed to Stroud, Okla- 
homa, where he still resides. In April, 1890, his wife was called to her reward. 

Dr. Nichols was reared in Marshall county, Iowa, and received his early 
education in the public schools of Marshalltown. Subsequently he devoted 
three years to the study of agriculture in the State College at Ames and in the 
fall of 1902 he came to Buffalo county, Nebraska, and purchased a farm seven 
miles north of Gibbon. He operated that place until 1907, when he sold out 
and entered the University of Toronto at Toronto, Canada, where he took a 
veterinary course, graduating in April, 1910. In May of that year he returned 
to Buffalo county and located at Ravenna, where he has since remained. He 
has been very successful in his chosen profession and has gained the confidence 



302 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

of the public and of his professional colleagues. In 191 1 he erected an ofifice 
and also a hospital, which is provided with all of the equipment of an up-to-date 
institution of the kind. In 191 5 he built a good residence adjoining the hos- 
pital and he also owns other residence property in Ravenna which he rents, and 
holds title to a good farm in Keith county, this state. He is likewise a stock- 
holder and director of the Sweetwater State Bank and financially he is in com- 
fortable circumstances. 

Dr. Nichols was married on the 24th of December, 191 1, to Miss Esther 
Newberg, a daughter of George and Trina (Anderson) Newberg, natives 
respectively of Sweden and Norway. In 1880 they became settlers of Sherman 
county, Nebraska, locating eight miles north of Ravenna, where the father took 
up a homestead which he has since improved and operated. He has reached the 
age of seventy years and his wife is sixty-eight years old. 

Dr. Nichols is a republican in his political belief but his professional duties 
have left him little time to take an active part in public afl:airs. He is a Methodist 
and fraternally his connection is with the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows. He holds membership in the State Veterinary Medical Association and 
the Missouri Valley Veterinary Medical Association and in this way and by 
constant reading keeps in touch with the advanced thought that is being made 
in veterinary science. He has gained a wide acquaintance and his many excel- 
lent qualities have enabled him to win the warm regard and the respect of all 
with whom he has been associated. 



REX M. JONES. 



Rex M. Jones, a retired farmer living at Elm Creek, has witnessed much of 
the development of Buffalo county, as he has resided here for about forty-five 
years. His birth occurred at Norristown, Montgomery county, Pennsylvania, 
on the 30th of October, 1838, his parents being Mark and Eliza (Shearer) 
Jones, likewise natives of that county. The paternal grandfather, John Jones, 
was a native of Wales and met his death in 1850 by being kicked by a horse. 
The father of our subject was a wheelwright by trade but in his later years 
engaged in buying and shipping stock, and it was he who shipped the first load of 
cattle into Philadelphia over the Pennsylvania Central Railroad. A celebration 
was held in Philadelphia when the train arrived, as the importance of new 
railroad connections was recognized. 

Rex M. Jones was intimately acquainted with Andrew Carnegie as a boy, 
as they often played together, and Mr. Carnegie drove boat mules on the Schuyl- 
kill river for our subject's grandfather. Mr. Jones received his education in 
the common schools and still has a picture of the schoolhouse where he attended 
school and on the picture is written "Plymouth Quaker Meeting House, built 
prior to 1680." When twelve years of age he entered the employ of Dan Rice, 
the famous show man of the early days, whose winter quarters were near his 
home. He drove the five horse team of the band wagon from Norristown, 
Pennsylvania, to Marion county, Ohio, being with the show the entire summer. 
In 1 87 1 he removed to Yates City, Illinois, and was living there at the time of 



HISTORY OF BCFFALO COUNTY 303- 

the great Chicago fire. In December of that year he came to Buffalo county, 
Nebraska, and purchased one hundred and sixty acres of railroad land in what 
is now Elm Creek township. In March of the following year his family joined 
him and they took up their home upon the farm, which was totally unimproved. 
For a number of years they lived in a sod house but at length were able to erect 
a good frame residence. At the time that they settled in this county there was 
nothing at the town of Elm Creek save a railway station and a section house. 
Air. Jones engaged in farming upon his place and not only brought his land 
to a high state of cultivation but also made many improvements upon it. About 
1905 he put aside the active work of the fields and removed to Elm Creek, where 
he is now enjoying a period of well deserved leisure made possible by his well 
directed labors of the past. 

Mr. Jones was married in Montgomery county, Pennsylvania, February 16, 
i860, to Miss Mary Elizabeth Hart White, who was also born in Norristown. 
They have had four children, namely: William, who is working in the shops 
at North Platte, Nebraska ; Elva, the wife of Ed Fitzgerald ; Mark J., a mer- 
chant of Elm Creek; and Nettie, who died while attending school at Norris- 
town, Pennsylvania. 

Mr. Jones is a republican and although he has never held ofifice has been 
quite influential in local political affairs, his support of a candidate going far 
toward securing his election. His people were stanch abolitionists at the time 
of the agitation against slavery and he himself drove many a slave over the 
underground railroad. His family were members of the Friends church and 
he has never departed from the faith in which he was reared. At the time of 
the Civil war he met and shook hands with Jefferson Davis, the president of 
the Confederacy, and he has many interesting reminiscences of that period 
of the country's history. In 1894 he visited his old home in Norristown, Penn- 
sylvania, and he has in his possession a picture of the house in which he was 
born. He has gained his success by industry and good management, and the 
leisure which he now enjoys is well deserved. During the '50s he worked for 
twenty-five and fifty cents a day, but by the time that he removed to this county 
he had accumulated considerable capital so that, although he had to endure 
some hardships' in this new region, he did not suffer as did some of the settlers. 



EDWARD C. STANTON. 

Edward C. Stanton, who is successfully conducting a retail liquor business 
in Ravenna, was born in Grundy county, Illinois, on the 7th of July, 1866, a son 
of Patrick and Mary (Dorgan) Stanton, natives respectively of La Salle county, 
Illinois, and Ireland. The father devoted his life to farming and followed agri- 
cultural pursuits in Grundy county, Illinois, until 1880, when he removed to 
Clay county, Nebraska. After renting land there for eight years he went to 
the vicinity of Kearney and purchased a farm which he cultivated until 1910. 
In that year he retired from active life and removed to Hartwell, where he 
is still living. His wife also survives. 

Edward C. Stanton was reared and educated in his native county and 



304 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

remained with his parents until he reached the age of thirty-one years. He then 
rented a farm which he operated for five years, at the end of which time he 
engaged in the saloon business at Gibbon. Two years later he came to Ravenna 
and for the past fourteen years he has conducted a retail liquor business here. 
He is a man of enterprise and good business judgment and is now in com- 
fortable circumstances. 

On the 19th of June, 1905, Mr. Stanton was united in marriage to Miss 
Tonnie Hildebrand. Her parents, John and Josephine (Slodivenik) Hildebrand, 
were born in Bohemia but became early settlers of Sherman county, Nebraska, 
M^here the father engaged in farming until his demise in 1888. The mother 
afterward married James Kostal, who is engaged in farming in Sherman county. 
Mr. and Mrs. Stanton have a son, Edward P., whose birth occurred in June, 1908. 

Mr. Stanton supports the republican party at the polls but has never had 
the time nor inclination to take an active part in political affairs. Fraternally 
he is identified with the Woodmen of the World and his religious faith is that 
of the Roman Catholic church. He is well known in Ravenna and since locat- 
ing here has gained many friends. 



JUNIUS S. DONNELL. 

Junius S. Donnell is a comparatively recent addition to the citizenship of 
Kearney and Bufifalo county, but already has made for himself an enviable and 
creditable place in the business and financial circles of the city, being now presi- 
dent of the Central National Bank. He is honored and respected by all who 
know him, not alone by reason of the success he has achieved but also because 
of the straightforward business policy which he has ever followed. He was 
born at Oak Ridge, North Carolina, on the 8th of February, 1865, and the first 
twenty-one years of his life were passed in that locality, during which period 
he worked upon the home farm and completed his educational training at the 
Oak Ridge high school. During the summer of 1886, having attained his majority, 
he went to Kansas and embarked in mercantile pursuits at Ness City. Two years 
later he became a resident of Dotham, Missouri, where for ten years he continued 
in the same line of business. It was on the expiration of that period that he 
entered upon his banking career, serving as cashier of the Exchange Bank in 
Fairfax, Missouri, for six years, then becoming the owner of the Farmers & 
Merchants Bank at Craig, Missouri, which he operated for five years. 

In 19 10 Mr. Donnell removed to Kearney and entered business circles here as 
assistant cashier of the City National Bank, bringing with him the ripe experi- 
•ence of a successful business man and banker. Two years later he became the 
cashier of the Central National Bank and in 1915 was elected its president, the 
position which he now occupies. He is bending his energies toward adminis- 
trative direction and executive control and the wisdom of his judgment and his 
keen sagacity find expression in the growing success of the institution of which 
he is the head. 

In January, 1901, Mr. Donnell was united in marriage to Miss Una Whitford, 
and to them have been born two children, Marian and Francis. The family 

I 




JUNIUS S. DONNELL 



HISTORY OP BUFFALO COUNTY 307 

attend the services of the Christian church and are interested in the moral progress 
of the community. Mr. Donnell is also a member of the Kearney Commercial 
Club and cooperates heartily in all of its plans and projects for the city's upbuild- 
ing and development. Fraternally he is connected with the Benevolent Pro- 
tective Order of Elks and the Knights of Pythias, and his political allegiance is 
given to the democratic party. He now considers Kearney as his permanent 
home and is interested in all that pertains to its welfare and the substantial growth 
of the community. 



JOHN F. DAUL. 

I 

John F. Daul, who owns five hundred acres of excellent land, is one of the 
most successful and progressive farmers of Elm Creek township. He was born 
in Washington county, Wisconsin, thirty miles north of Milwaukee, on the 26th 
of May, 1852. A sketch of his father, Frederick Daul, appears elsewhere in this 
work. During our subject's childhood the family removed to Kewaunee county, 
Wisconsin, and there he grew to mature years. In 1873 removal was made to 
Buffalo county, Nebraska, the father, who was quite well-to-do, chartering a 
car and shipping a team of horses and his household goods by rail. The family 
settled in what is now Elm Creek township, where the father purchased a half 
section of railroad land. 

John F. Daul had but limited school advantages, as, being the oldest in the 
family, he had to go to work when a boy. He received thorough training under 
his father in all kinds of agricultural labor and continued to assist with the 
operation of the home farm until he was thirty-five years of age. He then 
located upon his present place, which he has brought to a high state of develop- 
ment. He has made all of the improvements, which compare favorably witli 
those of other farms in the neighborhood, and has carefully conserved the fer- 
tility of the soil. He holds title to five hundred acres of land, from which he- 
derives a gratifying income. For a few years he lived elsewhere, but has again 
taken up his residence on his farm. While living in Wisconsin he began running 
a threshing outfit and continued in that business for twenty-four consecutive 
seasons, becoming very expert in that work. He claims that in the twenty-four 
years he did not waste as much grain as most threshers of the present day 
do on one job, as he not only understood the business thoroughly but also took 
pains to do the work well and to avoid waste. 

Mr. Daul was married in 1880 in this county to Miss Addie E. Milbourn, 
who was born in McLean county, Illinois, but accompanied her parents to this 
county in 1872. Further mention of her father, Washington Milbourn, appear.s 
elsewhere in this work. Previous to her marriage she worked for others, receiv- 
ing a wage of one dollar per week. To Mr. and Mrs. Daul have been born two 
children. John O., who is a hardware merchant of Elm Creek, married Miss 
Olive Fitzgerald, a daughter of Daniel Fitzgerald, an early settler of Buffalo 
county. She passed away leaving a daughter, Mary Alice, now three years old, 
who is living with our subject and his wife. Fred, the younger son, is living 
with his parents. He has spent considerable time in the west and owns two 



308 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

hundred acres of land near Baker, Oregon, and one hundred and sixty acres in 
Colorado. 

Mr. Daul is independent in politics, voting for the man rather than the party. 
At one time he served as township treasurer and proved a very capable and con- 
scientious official. Both he and his w^ife belong to the Catholic church, in the 
work of which they take a commendable interest. They are widely known 
throughout the county in which they have lived for many years, and their genuine 
worth is indicated in the fact that those who have been most intimately asso- 
ciated with them are their stanchest friends. 



GADDIS P. HAGEMAN. 

Gaddis P. Hageman, who is living retired in Ravenna, is entitled to honor as 
a veteran of the Civil war, having served in that conflict as a member of an Ohio 
regiment. He was bom in Milford, Clermont county, Ohio, on the 17th of 
September, 1841, and his parents, Simon and Delilah (Wood) Hageman, were 
also born in that state, w4iere they continued to reside until about 1863, when 
they removed with their family to Johnson, Nemaha county, Nebraska. The 
father followed the tailor's trade throughout his life and was very successful in 
that connection. He passed away when almost eighty-six years of age, on the 
30th of September, 1903, and was survived by his wife until the 27th of Novem- 
ber, 1904, her demise occurring when she was past the age of eighty-one years. 

Gaddis P. Hageman was reared in Shelby county, Ohio, and attended the 
common schools there in the acquirement of his education. On the i6th of 
September, 1861, the day before his twentieth birthday, he enlisted in Company 
F, Twentieth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, with which he went to the front. On 
the I2th of May, 1863, he was wounded in the head at Raymond, Mississippi. 
On leaving the hospital on the 24th of May he was taken prisoner and was 
confined in Libby prison until the 7th of June. He subsequently rejoined his 
regiment and remained in military service until the 19th of July, 1865, when he 
was honorably discharged. He has never recovered from the effects of his 
wound as it impaired his hearing. 

After his return from the army Mr. Hageman worked as a common laborer 
until 1880, when he removed to Gage county, Nebraska. For four years he 
operated rented land near Wymore but at the end of that time removed to the 
town and became connected with the coal and grain business. He was engaged 
hi that field in Wymore until 1906, when he went to Edgemont, South Dakota, 
where he remained for three years, after which he came to Ravenna, Nebraska, 
and he has since lived in honorable retirement from the cares of business life. 
His well directed labors in former years were rewarded by a substantial finan- 
cial return and he has more than sufficient to provide him with the comforts of 
life. 

Mr. Hageman was married on the 19th of November, 1867, to Miss Mary 
J. Hawkins, a daughter of Richard and Lydia (Davis) Hawkins, natives respec- 
tively of Kentucky and of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Her father engaged in 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 309 

farming in the Buckeye state until his demise, which occurred in 1869. He was 
survived for about six years by his wife, who passed away in 1875. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hageman have become the parents of ten children. Martha 
A., born on the 23d of September, 1868, is now the wife of P. G. Calkins, of 
Woodruff, Kansas. Anna L., whose birth occurred on the ist of February, 
1870, married C. H. Rockey and they reside in Alliance, Nebraska. Charles O., 
born on the 2d of May, 1872, is now an engineer on the Burlington Railroad and 
resides in Ravenna. Arthur L., whose natal day was June 25, 1874, is now living 
at Brocksburg, this state. Albert E. was born December 23, 1876, and is 
now a resident of Fort Collins, Colorado. Simon R., whose birth occurred on 
the 7th of March, 1878, is a resident of Kansas City, Missouri. Harold G., 
born November 30, 1880, is a machinist and resides at Sheridan, Wyoming. 
Ennis L., born March 21, 1885, died on the 21st of August of that year. Rosie 
M. was born on the 8th of September, 1886, and married E. L. Routh, who is a 
fireman on the Burlington Railroad and resides in Ravenna. The other member 
of the family died in infancy. 

Mr. Hageman has been a republican since age conferred upon him the right 
of franchise and takes pride in the fact that the first man for whom he voted 
for president was Abraham Lincoln. His religious faith is that of the Metho- 
dist church, and his only fraternal associations are with the Grand Army of the 
Republic. He greatly enjoys meeting his old comrades and never tires of re- 
living the days when he marched with Sherman to the sea and aided in the 
defense of the Union. Since removing to Ravenna he has gained the full con- 
fidence and the sincere respect of his fellow citizens, who recognize in him a 
man of sterling character. 



CHRIS WEDEMEYER. 



Chris Wedemeyer is now living practically retired on a well improved place 
of twenty acres at the edge of Ravenna but still holds title to valuable farms in 
Schneider and Garfield townships. A native of Germany, his birth occurred in 
September, 1861, and he is a son of Conrad and Margaret (Todter) Wedemeyer, 
also natives of Germany. The father devoted his entire active life to farming 
and passed away in his native land in 1888. He was survived for twelve years 
by his wife, who died in 1900. 

Chris Wedemeyer received his education in the fatherland and remained at 
home until he was fourteen years of age but in 1876 he decided to take advantage 
of the opportunities offered in America and on emigrating to this country went 
to Casey, Iowa, where he had relatives. He worked as a farm hand until he 
was twenty-one years of age and then rented land in Montgomery county, Iowa, 
which he cultivated for a year. At the end of that time he came to Buffalo 
county, Nebraska, and purchased land in Schneider township, on which he re- 
sided until 191 1, when he retired and renting the farm, removed to his present 
home on twenty acres of land on the outskirts of Ravenna. He built a fine mod- 
ern residence and has otherwise improved his place, and his farm in Schneider 
township is also in a high state of development. In addition to the four hundred 



310 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

acres which he owns in that township he holds title to a half section in Garfield 
township and his income from his land is sufficient to provide him with the com- 
forts and some of the luxuries of life. In addition to his real estate holdings he 
owns stock in the Ravenna Electric Light plant and the Ravenna Telephone 
Company. 

Mr. Wedemeyer was married in January, 1910, to Mrs. Minnie (Evers) 
Wedemeyer, widow of his brother Henry. She is a daughter of Peter H. and 
Marie (Mueller) Evers, natives of Germany, who in 1882 located in Denison, 
Iowa. They are still living there and both have reached the age of eighty-one 
years. By her marriage to Henry Wedemeyer, who died in 1900, Mrs. Wede- 
meyer has three sons, namely, Fred, Henry and Bernhard, all of whom are 
farming in Schneider township. 

Mr. Wedemeyer is independent in politics as he believes that the qualifications 
of a candidate are of more importance than his party allegiance. In religious 
faith he is a Lutheran, and fraternally he belongs to the Modern Woodmen 
of America. In 1914 he and his wife made a trip to Germany and were 
there at the time of the outbreak of the European war. He began his career as 
a boy in his teens without capital other than his energy and sound judgment but 
through persistent and well directed labor has gained financial independence. 
His sterling qualities of character have also won him the sincere respect and 
esteem of his fellow citizens. 



ISAAC K. HENNINGER. 

Isaac K. Ilenninger, a resident farmer of Sharon township, makes his home 
on section 22 and holds title to nine hundred and forty acres of land. He was 
born in Ohio, October 20, 1868, a son of Captain Solomon F. and Barbara (Kauf- 
man) Henninger, the former a native of Ohio and the latter of Erie county, 
Pennsylvania. The father was reared in his native state and at the outbreak of 
the Civil war in 1861 he enlisted as a member of Company H, Twentieth Ohio 
Volunteer Infantry, with which he served for four years, or until the close of 
the war, being promoted to the captaincy of his company. After the cessation of 
hostilities he returned to his home in Trumbull county, Ohio, purchased a farm 
and settled down to the pursuits of peace. In the spring of 1872 he came with 
his family to Nebraska, settling in Buffalo county, and upon his arrival home- 
steaded a quarter section of land which is now owned by his son Isaac. The 
father afterward purchased other lands, owning at one time five hundred and 
sixty acres, so that he was numbered among the extensive landowners of the 
county. He remained upon the old homestead until 1892, when he retired and 
removed to Shelton, where his death occurred February 17, 1908. He was one 
of the well known pioneers of Buffalo county, a man of sterling character, 
highly esteemed wherever known and most highly honored where best known. 
His wife was born in Erie county, Pennsylvania, July 31, 1833, and during her 
girlhood removed with her parents to Trumbull county, Ohio, where, on the 29th 
of March, 1855, she was united in marriage to Solomon F. Henninger. She was 
a member of the Presbyterian church and was widely known as a consistent 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 318 

Christian woman and a devoted and loving wife and mother. She passed away 
at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Eugene Freeman, of Beatrice, Nebraska, on 
the 24th of November, 1914, after which her remains were brought back to 
Shelton for interment by the side of her husband in the Shehon cemetery. 

Isaac K. Henninger acquired a pubHc school education and assisted his father 
in the early development and improvement of the home farm. In 1892 he took 
charge of the home place of three hundred and twenty acres and has since 
cultivated that land. Upon his father's death he acquired title to the homestead 
property of one hundred and sixty acres. He is accounted one of the pro- 
gressive and enterprising agriculturists of his district and his place presents a 
neat and attractive appearance, embodying all progressive methods of farming. 
Fie has added to his holdings and now owns nine hundred and forty acres. He 
is a stockholder of the Farmers Elevator Company of Shelton and he is one of 
the extensive live stock dealers of the county, feeding three carloads of sheep 
annually. 

On the 6th of December, 1893, Mr. Henninger was married to Miss 
Elizabeth E. Slattery, a daughter of Martin Slattery, one of the earliest of the 
Buffalo county pioneers. He was born in Ireland August 31, 1831, and his 
parents died when he was but fourteen years of age. He afterward came to the 
United States to make his home with a married sister in Ohio and in 1863 he 
removed to Pennsylvania, where in 1866 he was united in marriage to Mrs. 
Margaret Carmichael. The same year he came west to make a home for him- 
self and his bride, choosing Shelton, Nebraska, as his location. There he was 
employed for some years by the Union Pacific Railroad Company, but resigned 
his position to engage in farming, in which vocation he won substantial success, 
acquiring eight hundred acres of valuable land in Buffalo county. He pos- 
sessed many sterling characteristics that endeared him to all and made his 
death, which occurred on the 27th of May, 1896, a matter of wide regret. Mr. 
and Mrs. Henninger have become the parents of two children : Franklin S., 
who is attending the State University ; and George Stewart, a pupil in the Shelton 
high school. 

Mr. Henninger is a member of Shelton Lodge, No. 99, A. F. & A. M. ; 
Shelton Lodge, No. 92, K. P. ; and of the Loyal Mystic Legion ; while his wife 
holds membership in the Presbyterian church. In politics he is a democrat and 
for many years has served as a member of the town board and cooperates heartily 
and earnestly in all measures and movements that look to the betterment and 
benefit of the community. His life has been one of diligence and untiring in- 
dustry and he ranks with the leading agriculturists of his part of the state. 



I 



C. L. EWER. 



The spirit ot progress and advancement actuates C. L. Ewer at every point 
in his career. The consensus of public opinion names him as one of the most 
alert, enterprising and progressive business men of Pleasanton, who' has worked 
untiringly for the interests of the town as well as to promote his individual ad- 
vancement along business lines. He is now manager of the lumberyards of 



314 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

the Farmers Grain Company at Pleasanton, and is one of the citizens whom 
Buffalo county is proud to number among- her native sons. His birth occurred in 
Cedar township, on the 2d of February, 1885, his parents being Abraham Lincoln 
and Elizabeth (Tollefsen) Ewer. The father, who is still living on the old home 
farm in Cedar township, is one of the old settlers of Buffalo county, having made 
his home within its borders from early pioneer times. 

C. L. Ewer was reared on the old homestead and the district schools afforded 
Jiim his educational privileges, while in the school of experience he has also 
learned many valuable lessons, particularly concerning business management. 
On reaching his majority in 1906 he identified himself with the lumber business, 
accepting a position in the office of the F. H. Gilcrest Lumber Company of 
Pleasanton. He remained in charge of the yards of this company up to the time 
they were absorbed by the Farmers Grain Company in July, 191 5, at which time 
he was made manager of the business and in that capacity is still serving. He 
is determined and progressive, readily discriminating between the essential and 
the non-essential and watchful at all times for those opportunities which lead to 
general advancement. 

Mr. Ewer was married in November, 191 1, to Miss Ella Smith, of Elmwood, 
Nebraska, and to them have been born two children, Frederick C. and Bruce 
M. Mr. Ewer is a member of Lotus Lodge, F. & A. M. of Ravenna, and also 
has membership with the Royal Llighlanders. In politics he is independent with 
republican tendencies, and he is serving as present clerk in his township. He 
ranks with the representative business men of his community. He is never 
afraid to venture where favoring opportunity leads the way and he is fortunate 
in that he possesses character and ability which inspire confidence in others, the 
simple weight of his character and ability carrying him into important business 
and public relations. 



FINIS MORRISON BARNEY. 

Finis Morrison Barney, who is engaged in the jewelry business in Elm 
Creek, was born at Roanoke, Woodford county, Illinois, on the nth of August, 
1864, and is the third son of Calvin E. and Eliza A. (Morrison) Barney, the for- 
mer of whom was born in Windham, Vermont, March 10, 1837, and the latter 
in Lancashire, England, June 5, 1840. Four children were born to them, two 
of whom are still living. Our subject is a descendent in the ninth generation of 
Jacob Barney, who with a brother emigrated from England in 1634 and ser- 
tled at Salem, Massachusetts, since which time the family has resided in Amer- 
ica. The great-grandfather of our subject was closely identified with the War 
of the Revolution, sacrificing his fortune in behalf of the cause of independence. 
Hiram Barney, the grandfather of our subject, was born in Chester, Vermont, 
on the loth of March, 1809, and on the 31st of December, 1831, was united in 
marriage to Miss Clarissa Marshall. To them ten children were born, nine of 
whom grew to manhood and womanhood and five are still living. In 1840 
Hiram Barney removed to Richland county, Illinois, but in 1854 took up his 
residence in Woodford county, that state where he made his home for twenty- 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 315 

six years. In 1880 he became a resident of Kearney, Nebraska, but subse- 
quently removed to Minden, this state, where his death occurred at the home of 
his daughter, Mrs. Lewis A. Kent, on the 5th of February, 1902, at the age of 
ninety-three years. His wife died in Kearney on the 7th of January, 1892. At 
the age of nine years he became a member of the Methodist Episcopal church 
and from that time until his death sought to conform his life to its teachings. 
He was active in its work and was a prominent member of the various congre- 
gations with which he was identified. He was also prominently connected with 
the Kearney National Bank. 

One of his sons, R. E. Barney, was closely identified with the early history 
of Kearney and Buffalo county. He came to Nebraska in 1868 and first located 
at Lowell, fifteen miles southeast of Kearney, but in 1870 removed to the latter 
city at the time when so many of the residents of Lowell settled in Kearney. At 
that time he moved his livery barn to the new town and was engaged in business 
there along that line until 1882, when he became one of the original stockholders 
of the Kearney Canal Company, About the same time he located upon a ranch 
nine miles west of Kearney, at the edge of the Platte valley, and his property 
afterward became known as the Empire ranch. For ten years he devoted his 
attention practically to the raising of horses on an extensive scale but at the end 
of that time sold out and removed with his family to Everett, Washington. His 
present home, however, is at Riverside, California. From 1877 to 1880 he, 
together with his father and brother, Calvin E. Barney, shipped many carloads 
of horses into Kearney, where they were sold tO' the early settlers of the sur- 
rounding country. At one time he was quite well-to-do and his ranch sold for 
over one hundred thousand dollars, but during the financial depression between 
the years 1890 and 1900 he lost heavily as at that time the bicycle industry had 
a depressing eft'ect on the horse business and he lost nearly everything he pos- 
sessed. He is a Mason of high degree and during the Civil war served in the 
same regiment as his brother, Calvin E. 

On the 2 1 St of June, 1859, at Olney, Illinois, Calvin E. Barney was united in 
marriage to Miss Eliza A. Morrison, and for a time they made their home at 
Metamora, Illinois, where Mr. Barney studied law. It was there that he met 
and became personally acquainted with Abraham Lincoln when the latter was 
engaged in the practice of law at the county seat of Woodford county. In 1861 
Mr. Barney became a resident of El Paso, Illinois, where he practiced law and 
took an active part in politics. The country having become engaged in civil war, 
he enlisted in the One Hundred and Eighth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, which 
regiment he was largely instrumental in raising, and he served as a member of 
the hospital corps until the close of hostilities. Disabilities and disease con- 
tracted during the war interfered with his resumption of the practice of law and 
after his return from the front he became connected with the railway mail ser- 
vice. In 1872 he removed to Pekin, Illinois, where he made his home until 1877 
and for the following three years was a resident of Roanoke, that state. It was 
in the fall of 1880 that he came to Buffalo county, Nebraska, and located in 
Kearney but subsequently lived on a ranch in Custer county from 1881 to 1888. 
In the latter year he succeeded a son at Elm Creek and was engaged in mer- 
cantile business there until 1890, when he returned to Kearney and lived retired. 
Since the death of his wife, which occurred at Ashland, Oregon, on the loth 



316 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

of October, 1913, he has spent the winters in California and Redondo might be 
called his present home. 

Finis M. Barney accompanied his parents on their various removals during 
his boyhood and is indebted to the public schools of El Paso, Pekin and Roanoke, 
Illinois, and Kearney, Nebraska, for the early educational privileges he enjoyed. 
He continued to attend school from the age of five years until 1881 and thus 
received a good practical education. He was sixteen at the time he accompanied 
his parents on their removal to Nebraska and for several years remained on the 
ranch in Pleasant Valley in the southeast comer of Custer county. Leaving the 
parental roof at the age of twenty years, he worked for a short time at the car- 
penter's trade and later clerked in Kearney and Shelton. In 1886 he removed to 
Elm Creek, where he clerked for his brother and father for about three years. 
In 1889 he homesteaded in Custer county under the preemption act but resumed 
work at the carpenter's trade in Kearney in 1891, for one year. It was in 1892 
that he decided to make the jewelry business his life work and entered into part- 
nership with Louis Hoefer, and the following year, dissolving partnership, he 
moved the stock from Kearney to Elm Creek. In 1901 Mr. Barney graduated 
in optometry and is now doing an excellent business as a jeweler and optician. 
He is an ardent student of the sciences, particularly electrical, keeping fully 
posted along such lines, and is a skilled mechanician, having taken out several 
patents on machinery, as he is of an ingenious turn of mind. He has written a 
number of scientific papers. He is also a lover of nature and has taken up the 
art of photography as a means of recreation and has become very proficient in 
the same. He has an especially fine collection of views of Buffalo county and 
the views of Elm Creek which appear in this history were taken by him. 

Mr. Barney is a republican in his political allegiance and discharges to the 
full all duties of citizenship but has never sought office. His religious faith is 
that of the Methodist church. During the thirty years that he has resided in 
Buffalo county he has gained many warm friends who esteem him highly for 
his many admirable qualities. 



CHARLES MINER. 



Charles Miner, who is now engaged in the real estate business in Ravenna, 
was for eighteen years postmaster and is probably known to more people in the 
county than any other man in his community. He was born in Jefferson county, 
Ohio, on the 15th of August, 1848, a son of John W. and Rebecca (Dudgeon) 
Miner, natives of Ohio. The father, who was a farmer, cultivated land which 
he owned in Jefferson county, Ohio, for many years, but at length went to Wis- 
consin, where he resided until 1867. In that year he removed to Butler county, 
Iowa, locating upon a farm near Shellrock, where he lived during his remaining 
days. He passed away in April, 1879, and was survived for many years by his 
wife, who died in May, 1908. 

Charles Miner was reared at home and received his education in Wisconsin, 
as he was but six years of age when the family removed to that state. He 
accompanied his parents to Iowa and on beginning his independent career turned 



i 




CHARLES :\IINEH 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 319 

his attention to teaching, which profession he followed for eighteen terms in 
Butler county. He taught both winter and summer schools and was ranked 
among the ablest teachers of that part of Iowa. In the spring of 1884 he came 
to Nebraska and after living for about five months in Kearney, during which 
time he investigated the advantages of various parts of this district, he decided 
to locate permanently in Garfield township and homesteaded the southwest 
quarter of section 20, near the present location of the town of South Ravenna. 
After living upon that place for two years he entered the employ of F. G. Hamer, 
now one of the judges of the Nebraska supreme court, as manager of the Hamer 
ranch, which was located one mile south of Ravenna. At that time as many 
as three hundred head of cattle and horses were kept upon the ranch and its 
management required a man of energy and business acumen. Mr. Miner was 
very successful in that connection and remained upon the ranch until 1896, 
when he purchased four hundred and eighty acres of land two miles southwest 
of Ravenna, where he made his home until 1897, when he was appointed post- 
master of Ravenna by President McKinley and removed to town to assume the 
duties of his office. He served in that capacity for eighteen consecutive years, 
his long retention in the position proving beyond doubt his efticiency and con- 
scientiousness as an official. He not only performed his work systematically 
and accurately but was also courteous in all of his dealings with the public, and 
held the goodwill of the community. Since his retirement from the office he 
has engaged in the real estate and insurance business and has met with a gratify- 
ing measure of success in that field. He also has other business interests, as he 
is a stockholder in the State Bank of Ravenna and is president of the Ravenna 
Telephone Company. 

Mr. Miner was married on the nth of September, 1875, at Faribault, Minne- 
sota, to Miss Alice Green, a daughter of William M. and Ellen F. (West) 
Green, natives respectively of Massachusetts and Wisconsin. The father, who 
was a carpenter and millwright by trade, removed to Minnesota in the early '50s 
and followed his trade there until 1861, when he enlisted for service in the Civil 
war, joining a Minnesota regiment. He was at the front for four years and 
made a record of which he has just cause to be proud. After the close of the 
war he returned home and continued to work at his trade until called by death 
in June, 1896. His wife died on the 15th of March, 1871. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Miner have been born three children: Grace M., whose birth occurred in May, 
1880, and who is now the wife of E. A. Hollingshead, a resident of Ravenna; 
Edward, who was born in March, 1883, and is now engaged in the automobile 
business in Spokane, Washington ; and Clara, whose birth occurred in 1887 
and who died on the 22d of August of the^ following year. 

Mr Miner has supported the republican party since age conferred upon him 
the right of franchise and has long been recognized as one of the political leaders 
of his county. Few men have been more active in public afl^airs and few have 
done more to secure the success of the republican party. In addition to his long 
and able service as postmaster of Ravenna he was for almost thirty years a 
member of the school board of district No. 69, which he aided in organizing, 
and at the time of his retirement from the office was presented by his fellow 
members with a handsome silver loving cup as a token of their appreciation of 
his devoted and efficient work in behalf of the schools. For seven years he 



320 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

served as county supervisor and in that capacity also proved a capable and public- 
spirited official. He is connected fraternally with the Masonic order and the 
Knights of Pythias and his religious faith is that of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. He has resided in Buffalo county for over thirty years and during 
practically the entire time has served in some official capacity or other, and the 
fact that neither his ability nor integrity has ever been questioned is irrefutable 
proof of his genuine worth. He is also popular personally and those who have 
been most intimately associated with him are his warmest friends. 



D. PHILLIPS. 



D. Phillips is president and manager of a company that is conducting a flour- 
ishing lumber business at Pleasanton. The spirit of enterprise actuates him in 
all that he does and progress and advancement have characterized his entire 
business career, which has covered connection with the grain as well as with the 
lumber trade. He was born in Indiana, November 12, 1868, a son of John and 
Hannah (Hosier) Phillips, who were natives of that state. The father was a 
farmer by occupation and, removing to Illinois, there cultivated a tract of land 
until 1878, which year witnessed his arrival in Buffalo county. He secured a 
homestead in Rusco township, which he developed and improved, there carrying 
on general agricultural pursuits for many years. Eventually, however, he retired 
and removed to Kearney, where he resided until his death, which occurred in 
November, 1910. His widow now resides with Mr. Phillips of this review. 
For three years the father was a soldier of the Fifty-first Indiana Volunteer 
Infantry, entering the army when a lad of but thirteen years. He was wounded in 
an engagement and was captured, being incarcerated in Libby prison for five 
months. Few of his years could boast active connection with the army that 
defended the Union at the time of the Civil war. 

D. Phillips was reared and educated in Buffalo county. During his youthful 
days he had the usual environment and experience of the farm lad and to his 
father he gave the benefit of his services until he attained his majority, when he 
secured a homestead in Cedar township and began farming on his own account, 
devoting ten years to the development, operation and improvement of his land, 
which he then rented and removed to Pleasanton. He then turned his attention 
to the grain and lumber business and organized the Farmers Grain Company, 
with headquarters in Omaha. The company operates eight grain elevators and 
two lumberyards and the business has now reached extensive, gratifying and 
profitable proportions. Mr. Phillips is president and manager of the business 
at Pleasanton, which includes the grain trade and also a lumber business. The 
latter was established in July, 191 3, and during the first four months the sales 
amounted to twenty-five thousand dollars. The patronage has steadily increased 
and as the head of this undertaking Mr. Phillips ranks as one of the foremost 
business men of the county. He also has elevators at Poole, Buda and Miller 
in Buffalo county, while the other local centers of the company's business are 
in the eastern part of the state. 

On the 2d of March, 1892, Mr. Phillips was united in marriage to Miss Ada 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 321 

Pierson, by whom he has five children, as follows : Walter, who is twenty-three 
years of age and operates his father's farm; William, a young man of nineteen, 
who is attending school at Kearney ; and Mary, Sybil and Dean, who are sixteen," 
fourteen and eleven years of age respectively and are all under the parental roof. 
Mr. Phillips gives his political allegiance to the democratic party and has 
filled several local offices, serving as justice of the peace, as township clerk and 
as road supervisor of Cedar township. He was likewise school director for ten 
years and the cause of education finds in him a stalwart champion. He belongs 
to the Masonic fraternity and his religious faith is that of the United Brethren. 
He has taken an active interest in the work of his church, contributing gener- 
ously to its support and doing all in his power to further its upbuilding. For 
fifteen years he served as one of its trustees. His life has been an active and 
useful one, fraught with good results, and while business has naturally occupied 
the greater part of his attention, he has never allowed it to interfere with his 
duties in other relations. In all of his business dealings he has been able to dis- 
criminate readily between the essential and the nonessential and moreover has 
the faculty of coordinating seemingly diverse elements into a unified and har- 
monious whole. Success attends his labors and the methods which he pursues 
in its attainment place him beyond the point of envy or adverse criticism. 



WILLIAM O. PICKETT. 

William O. Pickett was formerly engaged in agricultural pursuits in this 
county but for a number of years has made his home in Sweetwater, where he 
is living retired. He has been one of the leaders in public affairs of the county 
and has been elected to a number of local offices, which he has filled to the entire 
satisfaction of his constituents. A native of Polk county, Illinois, he was born 
on the 13th of June, 1840, and is a son of James and Mary (Evett) Pickett, 
the former born in Virginia and the latter in Ireland. The father took up his 
residence in Indiana when that state was still a frontier region and farmed there 
until 1877, when he came to Buffalo county, Nebraska, and located in Kearney. 
He passed away in Missouri in 1899, having survived his wife for three decades, 
as her demise occurred in 1869. 

William O. Pickett grew to mature years in Indiana and attended the public 
schools in the acquirement of an education. On the ist of July, 1861, he en- 
listed in Company H, Twenty-third Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and was at the 
front for four years and two months. He participated in a number of hard en- 
gagements and in one of the battles in the vicinity of Vicksburg he was wounded. 
He was honorably discharged at Indianapolis, July 31, 1865, having served all 
through the war and, returning home again, took up farming. He remained in 
Indiana until 1877, when he came to Buffalo county, Nebraska, and took up a 
homestead in Beaver township, to the development and improvement of which 
he gave much of his time and energy until 1899. He then sold the place and 
removed to Sweetwater, where he has since resided. In the same year he was 
appointed postmaster and for seven years he held that office, proving at all times 
efficient and courteous. 



322 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

Mr. Pickett was married to Miss Mary E. Parr on the 3d of April, 1864. 
Her parents, John and Ruth Parr, were born in Virginia but became early set- 
tlers of Indiana and continued to reside there until they passed away, the father 
in 1887 and the mother three years later. Mr. and Mrs. Pickett have become 
the parents of nine children, three of whom, Ora, James and Katie, are deceased, 
the others being: Annie, Robert, Daisy, Sally R., Catherine and Delia. 

Mr. Pickett indorses the policies of the democratic party and works loyally 
for its success at the polls. He has held a number of offices, and in addition to 
his seven years' service as postmaster, has been constable, assessor, clerk, road- 
master and county commissioner, serving for four years in the last named capac- 
ity. His religious faith is that of the Baptist church, and through his 
membership in the Grand Army of the Republic he keeps in touch with the other 
veterans of the Civil war. He is well known not only in Sweetwater but also 
throughout the county and those who have been most closely associated with him 
hold him in the highest esteem. As an official he has always been systematic, 
capable and conscientious, and as a private citizen he has willingly cooperated in 
movements seeking the general welfare. 



EPHRAIM OLIVER. 



Ephraim Oliver, who owns five hundred and eighty acres of good land in 
Shelton township, is one of the leading stock raisers of the county. He was born 
in Manchester, England, on the 14th of January, 1852, of the marriage of Edward 
and Sarah Oliver, both natives of that country. The year i860 witnessed their 
emigration to America and they first settled in Buffalo county, Nebraska, but 
two years later the father removed to Salt Lake City, where his demise occurred. 
The mother passed away in this county. 

Ephraim Oliver is one of a family of eleven children, of whom five are still 
living. His education was mainly acquired in the public schools of Bufi'alo county, 
Nebraska, as he was but eight years of age when the family settled here. He 
remained at home until he attained his majority and then purchased the old home- 
stead on section 2, Shelton township, which he still owns. He has bought addi- 
tional land and now holds title to five hundred and eighty acres, all of which is 
well improved. He raises some grain but devotes the greater part of his atten- 
tion to stock raising and feeding and in 191 5 fed one hundred head of steers 
and seven hundred head of sheep. He understands every phase of stock raising 
and also pays great attention to the marketing of his stock and the success which 
he has gained is well deserved. 

On the 6th of April, 1875, Mr. Oliver was united in marriage to Miss Dorothy 
Fieldgrove, a daughter of William Henry and ^Margaret Fieldgrove, further men- 
tion of whom occurs elsewhere in this work. . Mr. and Mrs. Oliver have eleven 
children: William E. ; Walter E. ; Edward H. ; Cora, the wife of William J. 
Pierce; John E. ; Chester Arthur and Charles A., twins; Howard L. ; George H. ; 
Vernon J. ; and Dewey S. 

Mr. Oliver indorses the policies of the republican party and loyally supports 
its candidates at the polls. For many years he has served as a member of the 





MR. ANJJ MR.S. EPHRAIM OLIVER 



o a 




HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 327 

school board and during that time has done much to promote educational advance- 
ment in his district. The greater part of his life has been passed in the middle 
west and he possesses in a marked degree the qualities characteristic of this sec- 
tion, namely, self-reliance, enterprise and the determination that overcomes 
obstacles, and he merits the title of a self-made man, for he began his career 
without capital or the aid of influential friends. 



STEPHEN A. D. HENLINE. 

Stephen A. D. Henline came to Kearney in July, 1885, at which time the city 
contained a population of a little more than one thousand. He has remained 
here continuously since and his business activity has been a tangible asset in 
the development and upbuilding of the community, while his support of forces 
working for the moral betterment of the community has contributed to public 
progress along that 4ine. He was born near Lexington, Illinois, on the 25th of 
December, i860, a son of William M. and Sarah C. (Steward) Henline, who 
were also natives of that state. The father was a farmer and was a son of 
George Henline, who settled in McLean county, Illinois, when that section of the 
country was in its primitive condition, much of the land being still in the posses- 
sion of the government. He entered a tract at the usual government price of a 
dollar and a quarter per acre and began the development of a farm whereon 
William M. Henline was born in 1838. There he was reared and educated, 
having the usual experiences of the lad who spends his youth upon the frontier. 
He married a daughter of William Steward, who removed from Kentucky to 
^IcLea'n county, Illinois, about the time of the arrival of the Henline family 
there. His educational training was limited but this he remedied in later years 
by reading and observation. He possessed a retentive memory and from his 
study and life's experiences he gained many valuable lessons. In politics he 
was a democrat and his high standing in the regard of his fellowmen is indi- 
cated in the fact that he was never defeated for an office for which he was a 
candidate, although he lived in a district that normally had a strong republican 
majority. He had the happy faculty of making friends and he never sacrificed 
a friendship, for regard once gained was always his. He belonged to the United 
Brethren church, of which he was a devout and faithful member. In all business 
affairs he was thoroughly reliable and would rather suffer loss than cause another 
to do so. If a question ever arose as to rights, he invariably gave way rather 
than to enter into a law suit. He died in 1895, on the farm where his birth oc- 
curred, having long survived his wife, who passed away in 1872. 

In the life record of S. A. D. Henline, Christmas day has proven an import- 
ant date. He was bom on that day and was named in honor of Stephen A. 
Douglas. He had a brother born on that date in 1862, and on Christmas day of 
1884 he married Nellie Biggs, whose birth had occurred on Christmas day of 
1864. On her mother's side she is a direct descendant of Barbara Fritchie and 
on her father's of John Quincy Adams. S. A. D. Henline was reared on a 
farm in his native county and was graduated from the Lexington high school 

with the class of 1880. He afterward engaged in teaching for four years and 
Vol. n— 15 



328 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

on the expiration of that period made his way westward to Nebraska in company 
with his wife, who was also a successful teacher. They located in Kearney and 
Mr. Henline became a partner of L. G. Fletcher in the drug business. Subse- 
quently he sold out to his partner, after which he engaged in various occupations. 
For a time he was employed at a dollar and a half per day to dig the ditch 
connected with the establishment of the waterworks system in Kearney. He was 
also employed as a clerk in the drug store of William Schramm, who at that 
time owned two drug stores in this city. In 1889 ^e purchased the Schramm 
store at No. 2214 Central avenue and since then he has been in the drug business 
in Kearney at different locations and has prospered. In many ways he has 
been identified with the material welfare and growth of Kearney and is a great 
believer in its future prosperity. He became one of the organizers of the 
Kearney Savings & Loan Association, of which he has been the only president, 
and in this connection he figures prominently in financial circles of the city. 

Mr. Henline always attributes much of his success to the assistance and 
cooperation of his wife, who was reared upon a farm and taught school for two 
years before coming to Nebraska. She also engaged in teaching music both 
before and after her arrival in this state and acted as organist in the church for 
a number of years. Her life has been one of untiring industry for the benefit 
of her home or for the community and her sound judgment in business matters 
has been a substantial element in the success of Mr. Henline. She cooperated 
with him in the early days in the efl:orts to economize and get ahead and he pays 
her high tribute for her assistance. Mrs. Henline has also been a great church 
worker and for eleven years was president of the Ladies Aid Society. It was 
during that period that the new house of worship was built and the Aid Society 
contributed to the building fund twenty-five hundred dollars besides an addi- 
tional two thousand dollars for finishing the basement. Mrs. Henline also be- 
came an active member of the Nineteenth Century Club and was one of the 
leaders in the organization of the Community Club, of which she was the first 
and only president, for after her decision to retire from such active participation 
in afifairs of that character there seemed to be no one to carry her work forward 
and the Community Club has ceased to exist. In her church work and in all 
of her social and civic endeavors she has known no such word as defeat, possess- 
ing in notable measure the power to win cooperation and coordination, so that 
with Mrs. Henline as leader all have worked together for the common good. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Henline have been born two sons : Ralph Gregory, who was 
married in 191 5 to Miss Lois Kindt, of La Grande, Oregon, where he is teaching 
school ; and Roy Biggs, who is attending the Northwestern University at Chi- 
cago. The family is well known here and their influence has ever been on the 
side of progress, reform and improvement. 

Fraternally Mr. Henline is connected with the Masons and has attained the 
Knight Templar degree in the order. For many years he has been a member 
of the Kearney Commercial Club and is an ardent supporter of all those forces 
and plans which the club adopts for the development and substantial improve- 
ment of the city. Politically he is an independent democrat. While he believes 
in many principles of the democratic party, he has never felt bound by party 
ties and acts according to the dictates of his own judgment. He served for 
two years as a member of the city council, during which time he was its presi- 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 329 

dent and chairman of the finance committee. It was during that period that the 
final adjustment over the purchase of the waterworks system was consummated. 
He is a devoted member of the Methodist Episcopal church and successively at 
three difterent conventions he was president of the Epworth League of the West 
Nebraska Conference. He also acted as a delegate to the Methodist General 
Conference held in Chicago in 1896. He served as chairman of the finance com- 
mittee that had in charge the erection of the new forty thousand dollar church 
edifice in Kearney and with every phase of church work in this city for many 
years he has been closely and helpfully associated. He has never been neglectful 
of any of his duties in relation to the municipal or moral welfare and at the 
same time he has so directed his business affairs that he has worked his way 
upward from a humble position to one of prominence and affluence. 



RIGHT B. WORT. 



Right B. Wort, a well known grain merchant of Buft'alo county operating at 
Pleasanton, as a member of the firm of Wort Brothers, has the quaHties which 
win success. No matter in how much fantastic theorizing one may indulge as to 
the cause of success, it is always found that honorable business advancement is 
due to indefatigable energy and close application and these are the qualities which 
Mr. Wort displays in his business career. He was born in Canada, March 4, 1864, 
and is a son of John and Martha (Teeple) Wort, natives of England and Canada 
respectively. The father came to America in early life, crossing the Atlantic to 
Canada, where he remained for some time and then came to the United States, 
settling in McHenry county, Illinois. There he carried on farming until 1879, 
when he came to Bufi^alo county, Nebraska, and purchased land in Thornton 
township. He carried on farming there throughout his remaining days but was 
not long permitted to enjoy his new home, for his death occurred in 1881. His 
widow survives and is now living in Kearney. 

Right B. Wort was a youth of fifteen years when the family arrived in this 
county and through the period "of his boyhood and youth he assisted in the 
work of the fields, remaining with his mother to the age of twenty-eight years. 
He afterward carried on farming independently for a year and then came to Pleas- 
anton, where he engaged in the grain business with his brother under the firm 
name of Wort Brothers. They have since conducted business under that style 
and the name has become a synonym for enterprise, indefatigable energy and wise 
management. They are thoroughly reliable in all their dealings and the grain 
raisers of that district enjoy trading with them. Right B. Wort also operates an 
elevator at Poole, in this county, and is engaged in the automobile business. He 
owned the first Ford in Pleasanton and is now agent for both the Ford and 
Maxwell cars. He conducts a good garage in the town. The brothers also handle 
farm implements at Poole and are representative business men of the community 
as well as wide-awake and progressive at all times. 

In March, 1891, Right B. Wort was married to Miss Jennie Fleharty, a 
daughter of George and Anna Fleharty, who were natives of Ireland and became 
residents of this county in early pioneer times. The father was a civil engineer 



330 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

and acted as the first surveyor of the county. He also purchased land here and 
carried on general farming for many years but finally retired in 1900 and now 
makes his home with Mr. and Mrs. Wort, his wife having passed away in 1909. To 
Mr. and Mrs. Wort have been born two children, Hazel and Helen, the former 
the wife of Charles Claus, of Pleasanton. Helen is attending school. 

Mr. W^ort has served on the town board for several years and has also been 
township clerk. Politically his allegiance is given to the democratic party, while 
fraternally he is connected with the Masons and with the United Workmen, loyally 
adhering to the purposes of those organizations. He represents one of the old 
and honored pioneer families of the county and the work which was instituted 
by his father has been carried on by him and constitutes an important feature in 
business development and substantial upbuilding of the district in which he lives. 




JOHN S 

John S. Salsbury earned the right to a period of leisure by many, years of well 
directed labors as an agriculturist and is now living in honorable retirement in 
Ravenna. He was born in Saratoga county, New York, on the 8th of October, 
1842, of the marriage of James W. and Caroline (Creal) Salsbury, natives of 
New York and of English descent. The father was a farmer and followed that 
occupation in New York until 1844, when he started for the territory of Iowa 
but died on the way on the 4th of November. His wife was killed on the 3d of 
July, 1848, by lightning. 

John S. Salsbury was educated in Lee and Page counties, Iowa, and in 1861, 
when eighteen years of age, enlisted in Company F, First Nebraska Infantry, 
for service in the Civil war. He remained in the army until July, 1866, and 
participated in much hard fighting. Following his honorable discharge from 
military service he returned to Page county, Iowa, and purchased land there, 
which he operated for ten years. At the end of that time he went to Clarinda, 
Iowa, but in 1879 he removed to Sherman county, Nebraska. He did teaming 
there until 1882, when he took up a homestead of one hundred and sixty acres 
in Garfield precinct, Buffalo county. He was one of. the first settlers in that 
precinct and was tlie man|0fco gave it its name. Fie at once began to break the 
prairie sod and in a comparatively short time had his land under cultivation. 
He made many improvements upon his place, on which he lived for two decades, 
or until 1902. He then retired from active life and built a nice home in the 
northern part of Ravenna, where he has since resided. 

Mr. Salsbury was married in July, 1864, to Miss Rachel H. Reynolds, a 
daughter of John and Annie Reynolds, pioneers of Page county, Iowa. Mr. 
Reynolds died in 1863, but he was survived by his wife until 1903. Mr. and 
Mrs. Salsbury became the parents of seven children, namely : Alvin, who was 
born August 18, 1867, and died on the 12th of September, 1887; Annie C, who 
was born August 30, 1868, and died on the 17th of October, 1890; Rachel P., 
who was born on the 7th of March, 1870, and died on the 28th of February, 1886; 
Katie, whose birth occurred August 25, 1871, and who died June 8, 1883; Mary 
E., who was born October 24, 1873, and died on the ist of January, 1897; Roy 



I 




HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 333 

C, whose birth occurred on the 22d of March, 1876, and who is Hving in Ra- 
venna; and Guy A., who was born on the ist of February, 1878, and resides in 
Texas. The wife and mother passed away on the 29th of December, 1897, 
after a six months' illness. Her demise was mourned by many friends. 

On the 26th of October, 1904, Mr. Salsbury was again married, Mrs. ]\'Iary 
J. Jamison becoming his wife. Her parents, Ephraim and Christina (Forney) 
McKinney, were natives respectively of Ohio and Pennsylvania. In 1855 her 
father removed to Butler county, Iowa, where he purchased land which he oper- 
ated until 1890. He then came to Buffalo county, Nebraska, and bought a farm 
in Cherry Creek precinct, to the cultivation of which he devoted the remainder 
of his life. He died in January, 1903, and his wife passed away in December, 
1908. By her marriage to Samuel Jamison, Mrs. Salsbury became the mother 
of five children, namely: Clara A., who was born in August, 1863, and is now 
the wife of George Nichols, of Butler county, Iowa ; Flora, whose birth occurred 
in April, 1865, and who died on the 30th of May, 1894; Mary I., who was born 
in July, 1867, and is now the wife of Theodore Clark, of Franklin county, Iowa; 
Henrietta, who was born in December, 1873, and married A. L. Nowell, of But- 
ler county, Iowa; and Mabel I., whose birth occurred in April, 1875, and who 
gave her hand in marriage to E. E. Polk, of Butler county, Iowa. Mr. Jamison 
died on the 17th, of January, 1898, after a long illness. 

Mr. Salsbury casts an independent ballot, refusing to follow blindly the 
dictates of party leaders. He has been quite active in public affairs, served as 
the first supervisor of Garfield township, has been justice of the peace, road 
overseer, constable and deputy sheriff, and for twenty years was treasurer of his 
school district. Fraternally he is quite prominent, belonging to the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, the Ancient Order of United Workmen and the Mystic 
Legion, and he is now filling the office of commander of Cedar Mountain Post, 
G. A. R. His religious faith is that of the Methodist Episcopal church. During 
the many years of his residence in this county he has witnessed a great transfor- 
mation as pioneer conditions have given way to advancement and progress, and 
he takes justifiable pride in the fact that he has aided in bringing about this 
transformation. 



LOUIS WEIDNER. 



Louis Weidner. one of the pioneers of Buft'alo county and one of its success- 
ful business men, is now living retired, his home being just outside the city 
limits of Ravenna. He is one of the worthy citizens that Germany has furnished 
to the new world, his birth having occurred in Saxony on the 27th of October, 
1844, his parents having been Gottlieb and Christina (Lichtenstein) Weidner. 
The father died in Germany when his son Louis was twenty-two years of age. 
Two years later the latter wedded Miss Fredericka Habercrom and in 1874 they 
came to the United States accompanied by his mother, who otherwise would 
have been left alone in Germany. She remained with Mr. and Mrs. Weidner until 
her death, which occurred on the homestead farm in this county in 1880, six 
years after her arrival in the new world. 



334 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

On reaching the United States Louis Weidner made his way at once to Buf- 
falo county, influenced to this step by the fact that a friend, Louis White, had 
previously settled here. He had spent a short time in the lake region of Michigan 
and had finally come to Nebraska, after which he had written to Mr. Weidner 
concerning the resources and the opportunities of this country. On reaching 
his destination Mr. W^eidner had about fifty dollars in cash. He says that there 
was no money in the county at that time, so that his capital vanished like snow 
on a sunshiny spring day. He arrived in Buffalo county on the 21st of September, 
1874, and the following week filed on a preemption on section 2, Schneider town- 
ship. This he later changed to a homestead, which he proved up as such, con- 
verting it into a valuable and fertile farm, on which he resided until the 5th of 
March, 1910, when he removed to his present place of residence just outside the 
corporation limits of Ravenna, having here a small place of thirty acres. How- 
ever, he still owns the homestead property of one hundred and sixty acres in 
Schneider township together with eighty acres just across the road from that 
farm and another tract of two hundred acres on section 6, Schneider township, 
and a farm of two hundred acres on section 25, Garfield township. He likewise 
had another place of one hundred and sixty acres which he has given to his son 
Earnest. As the years passed he added to his holdings from time to time until 
he became one of the large landowners of the county, having a valuable, property 
from which he derived a most gratifying annual income. His possessions are 
such as now enable him to live retired in the enjoyment of a well earned rest, 
having all of the comforts and some of the luxuries of life. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Weidner were born four children, of whom three are yet 
living, namely: Louisa, the wife of JNIoritz Muelbach, a farmer of Schneider 
township ; Earnest, who is a carpenter by trade and resides in Ravenna ; and 
Selma, the wife of Herman Kappler, a farmer of Sharon township. 

In politics Mr. Weidner has always followed an independent course. He 
served for some years as township clerk and as tovv'nship treasurer and has ever 
been loyal to the best interests of the community, seeking at all times the public 
good. He has exerted considerable influence in community affairs and has ever 
been regarded as one of the highly esteemed residents of his part of the state, 
in Avhich he has now lived for forty-two years, witnessing its progress from 
pioneer times, while his memory forms a connecting link between the primitive 
past and the progressive present. 



J. D. HAYES. 



In this country where opportunity has been more evenly distributed than in 
the older countries of Europe the qualities of energy, foresight, self-reliance and 
sound judgment have always been held in the highest esteem and the man who, 
possessing these qualities, has been able to work his way up from poverty to 
afl^uence is highly honored. Such a man is J. D. Flayes, of Elm Creek township, 
who began his career empty-handed and now owns four hundred acres of fine 
land in Bufifalo county and three hundred and twenty acres in Kansas. 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 335 

He was bom in Ireland in 1859, a son of Patrick and Catherine (Carmody) 
Hayes, likewise natives of that country. When he was six years of age his 
father came to America and after working in a dye factory at Lowell, Massa- 
chusetts, for a year went to Lewistown, Pennsylvania, where he learned the 
ax-making trade, which he followed for three years. At the end of that time 
he provided a comfortable home there for his wafe and children, who joined 
him. Three years later a removal was made to Onarga, Illinois, where the 
father worked on a railroad for six years, after which he engaged in farming 
for a similar period. In 1880 he removed to Cass county, Nebraska, where he 
became the owner of two hundred acres of good land. He devoted his time and 
attention to the cultivation of his place until 1901, when he retired from active 
life. He resided among his children from that time until his demise, which 
occurred in March, 191 5, when he was eighty- four years of age. His wife passed 
away in 1899. To them were born thirteen children, of whom five are still 
living, namely : J. D. ; Mrs. Catherine Murphy, a resident of Greeley, Nebraska ; 
Louisa, the widow of Thomas Bourk; Ellen Augusta, who married John Murphy, 
of Cass county; and William, of Plainville, Kansas. 

J. D. Hayes spent his boyhood largely in Pennsylvania and Illinois and 
received a common school education. When eighteen years of age he left home 
and began working as a farm hand. He was so engaged for several years and 
the low scale of wages which then prevailed is indicated by the fact that he never 
received more than sixteen dollars per month for his work. In February, 1886, 
he went to Cheyenne county, Kansas, having determined to engage in farming 
on his own account. He homesteaded one hundred and sixty acres and also took 
up a similar tract as a tree claim. He lived there for seven years, during which 
time he made many improvements upon the place but at the expiration of that 
period he removed to Cass county, Nebraska. Later he spent five years in Cum- 
ing county, this state, and in 1905 he came to Buffalo county and purchased an 
improved farm of two hundred and forty acres in Elm Creek township. After 
living there for five years he removed to an unimproved farm of eighty acres in 
the same township, where he has since lived. He has erected a good residence 
and bams and made other improvements upon the place, which is now in a high 
state of development. He owns in all four hundred acres of excellent land in 
Elm Creek township and devotes his attention chiefly to stock raising, finding 
that more profitable than the raising of grain. He has worked hard and untir- 
ingly since boyhood, and the financial independence which he has gained is due 
to his industry and good management rather than to fortunate circumstances, 
lie still holds title to the three hundred and twenty acres in Kansas and is one 
of the men of wealth of his community. 

Mr. Hayes was married in 1882 to Margaret J. Kennedy, a native of Canada 
and a daughter of Michael and Jane (Tighe) Kennedy. Her father is deceased 
but her mother is still living and resides with her son, W. J. Kennedy. To Mr. 
and Mrs. Hayes eleven children have been born, of whom four died in infancy. 
Those living are : Joseph, who is married and is living in Elm Creek ; James P., 
who is attending a veterinary college at Kansas City; John E., who is operating 
one of his father's farms; Jane, the wife of Judson Lloyd, of Elm Creek; 
Margaret Ellen, a senior in the Elm Creek high school; and Martin and William, 
both at home. 



336 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

Mr. Hayes gives his political allegiance to the democratic party but has been 
too much occupied with his farm work to take an active part in politics. In early 
life he determined that if enterprise and sound judgment could win success that 
he would gain prosperity and he never lost sight of his goal. His persistency 
and energy have been rewarded and he has gained a most gratifying measure 
of wealth. All who know him recognize his ability and the force of his per- 
sonality. 



WILLIAM F. CROSSLEY. 

William F. Crossley is one of the oldest and most prominent contractors of 
Kearney and the excellence of his workmanship and the reliability of his busi- 
ness methods have resulted in securing for him an extensive patronage so that 
he has handled a large amount of business, and there today stand many monu- 
ments to his skill and ability in the fine homes and substantial structures of the 
city. He justly deserves to-be called a self-made man, for he started out in life 
empty handed and as the architect of his own fortunes has builded wisely and 
well. He was born in Hancock county, Indiana, on the 7th of April, 1857, and 
was there reared and educated. His father was a carpenter and during his youth 
William F. Crossley assisted him and gained a practical working knowledge of 
the trade. He also devoted a portion of his time to farming and was equally 
thorough in his work along that line. On the 23d of December, 1879, he arrived 
in Kearney and took up a homestead in Odessa township. He rented his land 
during the first year and remained in Kearney, where he worked at carpenter- 
mg in order to secure the money that would enable him to continue his farm 
work. He proved up on the homestead in 1885 ^"<^ after about five years' resi- 
dence in the county he took up contract work. When he first came to Nebraska 
he was employed for about five years by Aaron Scott. At the end of that time 
his tool chest was destroyed by fire and he said that he would never buy another. 
He therefore began contracting and during the period of the boom he did an 
extensive business and has always been accorded a liberal share of the public 
patronage. Thoroughness and reliability have ever characterized the work which 
he has done personally and that which he has supervised. He has believed that 
satisfied patrons are the best advertisement and it has been in that way that he 
has increased his business. In the years in which he has been identified with con- 
tracting in Kearney he has erected many buildings and the improvement and 
adornment of the city along architectural lines is largely due to him. During the 
first year he built twenty-two thousand dollars worth of residences, also the 
Methodist Episcopal and the Episcopal churches and two wings of the State 
Normal School. He has also erected the high school building, the Ten Cent 
Store building and the Masonic Temple, is completing Keens block and also 
building an auditorium for the State Normal School, which when completed in 
September, 1916, will seat fifteen hundred people. He has also done work at 
Grand Island and at Holdridge but now devotes his time chiefly to home build- 
ing. As the years have passed he has utilized his opportunities for judicious 
investment and has become the owner of considerable valuable property in 




WILLIAM F. CEOSSLEY 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 339 

Kearney. His property includes a good business block in Kearney which he rents 
and desirable residence property. 

On the 23d of March, 1885, Mr. Crossley was married to Miss Mary Calhoun, 
a native of Ohio, who in 1872 came to Buffalo county with her parents, her 
father securing a homestead near Riverdale. He was Peter Calhoun, one of 
the veterans of the Civil war, and he became one of the worthy pioneer settlers 
of the west. Mrs. Crossley was reared in this county and by her marriage became 
the mother of two daughters, one of whom died at the age of three years. Wilma 
R. is attending the Chicago University. She is a graduate of the high school of 
Kearney and also of the State University of Nebraska, and for three years was 
a teacher of German in the city schools of Kearney. While in the State Uni- 
versity she went to Germany as a student. Mr. and Mrs. Crossley are members 
of the Methodist Episcopal church, in the work of which they are actively and 
helpfully interested, and for several years Mr. Crossley has been one of the 
church trustees. In Masonry he has passed up through the various branches until 
he has become a Knight Templar, and he has filled all of the chairs of the lodge. 
He deserves great credit for what he has accomplished as the years have gone by, 
for his enterprise and indefatigable energy have brought to him his prosperity. 
He has ever enjoyed an unassailable reputation for fair dealing and the reliability 
of his methods has featured as a strong element in his growing prosperity. 



A. L. RANDALL, M. D. 

Dr. A. L. Randall, who since his graduation from the Northwestern Uni- 
versity at Chicago in the class of 1903 has been engaged in the practice of medicine 
and surgery, located at Pleasanton in 1904, where he has since remained, and 
during this period his practice has grown steadily, as the public has recognized 
his ability and his devotion to the highest ethical standards of the profession. 
He was born in Shelby county, Iowa, November 20, 1878, a son of A. J. and 
Elizabeth (Springstead) Randall, who were natives of New York and Canada 
respectively. The father, who was a farmer by occupation, removed to Shelby 
county, Iowa, at an early period in the development of that district, there pur- 
chased land and operated his farm throughout his remaining days, his death 
occurring in 1895. His widow surv-ives and now makes her home with a son 
in Kansas. 

Dr. Randall was reared and educated in Denison, Iowa, and was graduated 
from the high school with the class of 1895. He also attended the normal school 
there for two years and afterward entered the Northwestern University at 
Chicago, where he pursued the medical course, winning his professional degree 
with the class of 1903. It was his desire to qualify himself most thoroughly and 
he gave close attention to the branches of study which constitute the medical 
curriculum. He then returned to Denison, where he remained in active practice 
for a year but in 1904 removed to Pleasanton, where he has since remained, con- 
tinuously engaging in practice during this time. His ability has brought him 
prominently to the front and his practice is now extensive, covering a wide 
territory. He is also the owner of a half section of land in Beaver township 



340 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

and is engaged extensively in the cattle business, handling thoroughbred Aber- 
deen Angus cattle, having at the present time ninety head upon his place. He 
also owns a quarter section of land near Sartoria, Nebraska. 

On the 25th of August, 1908, Mr. Randall was united in marriage to Miss 
Edith West, by whom he has a son, Reginald C, whose birth occurred July 30, 
191 5. In his political views Dr. Randall is a republican and keeps thoroughly 
informed concerning the questions and issues of the day. For four years he 
has served on the town board, taking an active interest in furthering the welfare 
of the community in which he resides. Fraternally he is connected with the 
Masons and in his life exemplifies the beneficent spirit of the craft, which is 
based upon a recognition of the brotherhood of man. Those who know him, 
and he has a wide acquaintance, esteem him highly because of his professional 
skill, his devotion to duty and his sterling personal worth. He is always courteous 
and obliging and his efforts have been attended with substantial success. 



THEODORE W. OLSON. 

Theodore W. Olson has been established in business in Sweetwater longer 
than any other merchant of the town and also has the largest patronage, having 
kept in touch with the advancement in merchandising methods and retained the 
prestige which he gained at the start. His birth occurred in Chicago, Illinois, 
on the 28th of March, 1872, and his parents were Annon and Mary Olson, 
natives of Norway. The father emigrated to America in young manhood and 
located in Chicago when that city gave little promise of becoming the great 
trade center that it is today and for twenty-six years he was a sailor on the 
great lakes. In 1881 he removed westward to Sherman county, Nebraska, where 
he purchased land, to the operation of which he devoted the remainder of his 
life. He passed away in 191 1, when eighty-one years of age, and his wife died 
in 1877. 

Theodore W. Olson was reared and educated in Chicago and in Sherman 
county, Nebraska, and remained with his parents until he reached the age of 
twenty-six years. He began farming on his own account but after a year decided 
to devote his energies to merchandising and, coming to Sweetwater, Buffalo 
county, purchased a stock of general merchandise and also bought the building 
in which his store is located. He has since conducted that establishment and 
has been in business here longer than any other merchant of the town. His 
patronage has grown steadily and he has anticipated the demands of his cus- 
tomers, adding to the line of goods carried from time to time with the result that 
he has the most complete stock in Sweetwater. He also owns eighty acres of 
fine land on section 9, Beaver township, from which he derives a gratifying 
addition to his income. 

On the nth of September, 1912, Air. Olson Avas united in marriage to Miss 
Frances E. Hetrick. Her parents, Amos and Sarah Fletrick, were natives of 
Buffalo county but after farming here for some time removed to Sherman 
county, whence they went to Valley county, where the father is still engaged 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 341 

in agricultural pursuits. Mr. and Mrs. Olson have two children, namely : Helen, 
whose birth occurred on the i6th of July, 1913; and Ida, born March 17, 1915. 
Mr. Olson supports the republican party and was for five years postmaster 
of Sweetwater, making an excellent record in that connection. He is identi- 
tied with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and his religious faith is indi- 
cated by the fact that he holds membership in the Lutheran church. His life 
has been characterized by enterprise and also by sound judgment — a combination 
of qualities which never fails to win success. 



W. R. SCRIBNER. 



W. R. Scribner, the efficient vice president of the Pleasanton State Bank, 
has been identified with this institution since 191 2 and has contributed in sub- 
stantial measure to its upbuilding and success. He was born in Seward county, 
Nebraska, September 21, 1881, a son of C. L. and Emma (White) Scribner, the 
former a native of Maine and the latter of Illinois. Removing to the west, the 
father conducted a hotel at Staplehurst, in Seward county, from 1884 until 1910. 
He had previously come to Nebraska in 1871 and has since here resided with 
the exception of two years spent in California. He is now living retired at 
Uavid City, in Butler county, enjoying a rest which he has truly earned and 
richly deserves. His wife also survives. 

W. R. Scribner was largely reared and educated in Staplehurst and was a 
member of the second graduating class completing the course in the high school 
there, the date of his graduation being 1897. He then began his independent 
career and Was employed as a farm hand for two years. Subsequently he worked 
in a lumberyard for two years and in 1904 he came to Pleasanton, Buffalo 
county, where he accepted the position of manager for the Gilcrest Lumber 
Company, with which he continued until August 2^, 1912. He then became 
assistant cashier of the Pleasanton State Bank and held that position until Decem- 
ber, 191 5, when he purchased the interest of E. W. Noyes in the bank and 
became its vice president, which executive position he now fills with A. H. 
Crammer as the president and F. L. Grammer as cashier. 

On the loth of April, 1907, Mr. Scribner was united in marriage to Miss 
Anna Thiessen, a daughter of Henry and Alvina Thiessen, who are natives 
of Germany and on emigrating to the new world took up their abode in Hall 
county, Nebraska. The father was long and actively identified with general 
agricultural pursuits but is now living retired with his wife in the home of Mr. 
and Airs. Scribner. Our subject and his wife have three children, namely: 
A. Lucille, who was born February 12, 1908; Blanche B., whose birth occurred 
October 31, 1910; and Florence E., whose natal day was February 2, 1913. 

Mr. Scribner has been called to several local offices by the vote of his fellow 
townsmen, who recognize his fidelity to the best interests of the community. 
He has served as township clerk here for six years and as village clerk for six 
years and has also been a member of the town board. Flis political allegiance 
is given to the democratic party, for he is a firm believer in its principles. He is 
interested in the cause of education and has served as school director of Pleasan- 



342 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

ton for three years. He belongs to the Masonic fraternity, the Modern "Woodmen 
of America and to the United Brethren church and in these associations are found 
the rules which govern his conduct and shape his course in his relations with his 
fellowmen. Those who know him esteem him most highly and he has a large 
circle of warm friends in Pleasanton and throughout the county. He possesses 
the enterprising spirit which has characterized and dominated the west with its 
development and upbuilding, for he is a native son of Nebraska, having spent 
his entire life within its borders. 



J. D. McCartney. 



J. D. McCartney, a well-to-do retired farmer residing at Elm Creek, is 
entitled to honor as a veteran of the Civil war, having served for a considerable 
period in an Iowa regiment. At the time the war broke out he was in the 
south and was compelled to serve in the Confederate army but at length escaped 
and made his way to the Union lines. He was born in Lawrence county, Ohio, 
on the 26th of September, 1839, of the marriage of William and Elizabeth 
(Davidson) McCartney, natives of Virginia and Kentucky, respectively. The 
father, who was a farmer by occupation, eventually removed from Ohio to 
Wisconsin and there his demise occurred but our subject took the body back to 
Ohio for burial. The mother died in Ohio in 1862. 

J. D. McCartney was reared in the Buckeye state and received a limited 
education there. As his parents were poor he had to begin earning his living 
at an early age and when nineteen began his independent career. After work- 
ing for a time as a farm hand he was employed on a steamboat on the Ohio river 
running to Cincinnati. He gained a thorough knowledge of steamboating but 
in the fall of 1859 decided to try his hand at other work and went to Arkansas, 
spending the winter chopping wood on tho? Whijte river in Monroe county. He 
was still there when the Civil war broke mit and when the Confederates began 
scouting for recruits he was noticed and would have been compelled to join 
the Confederate army then bad not a man from Mississippi who was at that 
time living in Arkansas befriended him. This man had a soi> whom he did not 
wish to see enter the army and, having persuaded our subject to go home with 
him, he told his son and Mr. McCartney to hide in the swamps, saying that he 
would smuggle food to them until the war was over if it lasted a thousand years. 
During the daytime they, hid in the swamps and at night they crept into the 
house. One night as there was company at the house they were late in getting 
in and at daylight were awakened by the barking of dogs'. They found them- 
selves in the hands of Confederates, who compelled them to join the army 
although, as there was no one to administer the oath, they did not formally 
enlist. Their division marched against an expected attack from gunboats that 
were supposed to come up the river in an attempt to join General Curtis' troops 
from the north. On reaching the White river, however, the gunboats had re- 
turned down the stream. On learning this the Confederates started for Little 
Rock but on the way our subject and his friend invented an excuse for falling 
behind and finally dropped out of the march. They intended to hide their horses 




J. D. McCAETNEY 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 345 

in the woods until the army should pass but the animals were restive and made 
so much noise that they finally decided to turn them loose. After hiding their 
saddles in a cane patch they let the horses go and then started for the Union 
army, which they thought would go to Helena, Arkansas, fifty miles distant. 
Our subject's companion led the way until Mr. McCartney was convinced that 
they were traveling in a circle and he then took the lead and succeeded in reach- 
ing the Union lines at Helena. He knew that moss always grows the heaviest 
on the north side of a tree and this knowledge was of great advantage to them 
in finding their way across the country. One night they built a smudge and he 
and his companion each marked a tree in what each believed to be the east. In 
the morning it was found that Mr. McCartney was right, while, according to his 
friend, the sun rose in the west. Mr. McCartney told his story to General Curtis, 
of the Fourth Iowa Cavalry, at Helena and enlisted in Company G of that 
regiment on the ist of August, 1862. He continued with that command until 
he was mustered out on the 15th of August, 1865, at Atlanta, Georgia, and four 
days later he was honorably discharged at Davenport, Iowa. Although he had 
many interesting adventures before he succeeded in enlisting in the Union army 
he was thereafter fortunate, escaping being wounded or taken prisoner or being 
confined in a hospital by sickness. 

Following the war Mr. McCartney returned to Gallia, Ohio, where he re- 
mained for several years. He then resided for ten years in Wisconsin, after 
which he spent a summer in Sioux county, Iowa, but in 1882 he drove by 
wagon to Buftalo county, Nebraska, bringing with him three cows. He home- 
steaded one hundred and sixty acres of prairie and took up a timber claim of 
one hundred and sixty acres and for seven years lived in a sod house. At length, 
however, he built a commodious frame residence and he became in time one of 
the large landowners of Logan township, he and his son holding title to eight 
hundred acres. He engaged in farming until 1909, in which year he retired 
and took up his residence in Elm Creek, where he owns a comfortable home and 
where he has since lived. He still has two hundred and forty acres of land in 
Logan township, from wdiich he derives a gratifying income. 

Mr. McCartney was married in Gallia county, Ohio, in 1867, to Miss Louisa 
Dowdy, who was born in that county on the nth of February, 1843, and is a 
daughter of David and Celia (Cheatwood) Dowdy, natives respectively of Vir- 
ginia and Kentucky, both of whom passed away in Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. 
McCartney have four children. E. E., a farmer of Logan township, has eight 
children. Susan N. married R. M. Walker, who died in 1903, and she after- 
ward became the wife of Charles Wilbur. She passed away five years ago, 
leaving three children, who are now living in Morrill county, Nebraska. Nina 
Belle is the wife of S. C. Cheney, of Morrill county, and they have four chil- 
dren. Lillie married J. C. Leemaster, also of Morrill county, and their children 
are three in number. ]\Ir. and Mrs. McCartney have eighteen grandchildren 
and four great-grandchildren. 

Mr. McCartney supported the republican party for many years but in 1912 
voted for Woodrow Wilson for president. He was a member of the Hatton 
Grand Army Post at Elm Creek until that organization was disbanded and he 
found much satisfaction in associating with others who went to the defense of 
the Union in its time of need. He at one time belonged to the Baptist church 



346 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

and subsequently joined the Christian church but for several years has not 
attended any church. Although he is seventy-six years of age he is still hale 
and hearty and is active, as indolence is foreign to his nature. The success 
which he has won is the direct result of his untiring industry and his good 
management, and all who know him respect him highly. 



JOHN WILSON. 



John Wilson, police magistrate and justice of the peace of Kearney, was bom 
in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, about ten miles from Pittsburgh on the 21st 
of February, 1849, ^^^d was there reared upon a farm until he reached the age 
of sixteen years. His parents, Samuel and Mary (Owens) Wilson, were natives 
of the north of Ireland and were Scotch Presbyterians in their religious belief. 
John Wilson, the father of Samuel Wilson, and in whose honor the subject of 
this review was named, came with his wife and children to America about the 
year 1825 and settled in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, at which time Samuel Wilson 
was a youth of eight years. He was there reared and married, his wife's people 
coming to America from, the same locality in Ireland as did the Wilson family. 
In March, 1865, he removed with his wife and children to Illinois and settled 
near Geneseo, in Henry county, where he remained to the time of his death, 
which occurred in 1906. He and his wife were the parents of six sons and 
three daughters. 

John Wilson, the eldest of this family, spent his boyhood days under the 
parental roof, aiding in the work of the home farm and attending the district 
schools of the neighborhood. Farming continued to be his occupation until 1876, 
when he was appointed to the office of deputy sheriff of Henry county, Illinois, 
serving in that capacity for ten years. In 1883 he resigned and in October of 
that year removed to Kearney, Nebraska, where he turned his attention to the 
livery business in partnership with his brother, Samuel Wilson. He continued 
in the livery business and in buying horses until 1888, when he was elected 
sheriff of Buffalo county and in that position served for two terms, or for four 
years in all. His second election, which occurred in 1890, was won by a 
majority of seventeen hundred, the largest ever given any candidate up to that 
time and possibly the largest ever given in the county. Still higher official honors 
awaited him, however, for in 1892 he was elected to the lower house of the state 
legislature, being one of the few that escaped the populistic landslide of that year. 
In 1895 he was appointed deputy collector of internal revenue under J. E. Houtz, 
his territory comprising all of Nebraska west of Grand Island, in which city he 
made his headquarters, and extending as far north as Ord and south to the Platte 
river. Until 1913 he was in the leasing and sales department of the Union 
Pacific Railroad in Kearney and in 1914 was elected police magistrate and justice 
of the peace in Kearney and has since occupied that position. He was chief of 
the Kearney fire department for fifteen years, from 1884 to 1899. 

Judge Wilson was married May 25, 1881, to Miss Rosa M. Beecher, of Galva, 
Illinois, and to this union five children have been born : Pearl, who died at the 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 3J[7 

age of two years; John Howard; Archie, who passed away in infancy; Ella "SI.; 
and Richard B. 

Judge Wilson is a prominent i\Iason and is present eminent commander of 
Mount Hebron Commandery at Kearney. He also belongs to Tangier Temple, 
A. A. O. N. M. S., and is connected with the Knights of Pythias as well. In 
politics he is a stalwart republican and has long been recognized as one of the 
leaders of his party in this section of the state, his opinions carrying weight in its 
councils. He possesses a genial nature and a social disposition, which go far 
toward winning him personal popularity, but his ability has kept him in office 
and places him at the front as one of the leaders of public thought and action. 



CHARLES W. WALLACE. 

Charles W. Wallace gained a substantial competence through his well directed 
activities as a stock raiser and is now living retired in Ravenna. He was born 
in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on the 226. of February, 1859. His father served 
in the navy during the Civil war and was killed at New Orleans and his mother 
died shortly after his birth, so that our subject knows practically nothing of his 
parents. He was bound out to a farmer and remained with him until 1876. 
In the spring of the following year he removed to Belle Plaine, Iowa, and for 
three years was employed as a farm hand in that locality but at the end of that 
time he came still farther west. He made the journey to Buffalo county, 
Nebraska, in a covered wagon and purchased one hundred and sixty acres of 
railroad land on section 25, Schneider township. His previous experience in 
farm work well qualified him to carry on agricultural pursuits on his own account 
and as the years passed his resources increased. He gave the greater part of 
his attention to stock-raising, specializing in pure blooded Percheron and Shire 
horses. He was recognized as one of the most successful horse breeders of the 
county and for some time was secretary and treasurer of the Schneider Town- 
ship Imported Horse Company, composed of horse breeders. He also raised 
high grade hogs and cattle and seldom failed tO' sell his stock to good advantage. 
In 1912 he retired from active life and removed to Ravenna, where he purchased 
a good residence in the northern part of the town, where he has since lived. 
He is a stockholder and director of the Bell Telephone Company and is inde- 
pendent financially. 

In December, 1879, Mr. Wallace was united in marriage to Miss Martha 
Shafer, a daughter of Frederick and Mary (Meisner) Shafer. Her parents 
were both born in Germany but became pioneer settlers of Tama county, Iowa, 
where the father owned and operated a good farm. He also held title to four 
hundred and eighty acres in Gardner township, Buffalo county, Nebraska, which 
he purchased for his son. He served throughout the entire Civil war for a period 
of four and a half years with an Iowa regiment and was taken prisoner and 
held for fourteen months in a prison at Tyler, Texas. He was also wounded 
but in spite of the hardships and suffering which he underwent his loyalty to his 
adopted country never wavered. He passed away in October, 191 1, and his wife 
died in 1899. Mr. and Mrs. Wallace have become the parents of five children. 



348 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

namely: John C, a resident of Ravenna; Viola M., the wife of James Vogt, 
who is operating our subject's farm; Frederick S., who is assistant superin- 
tendent of the Industrial School at Kearney; Charles R., who is farming in 
Schneider township, this county; and Anna K., the wife of Wayne McWhinney, 
a farmer of Sherman county. 

Mr. Wallace supports the democratic party at the polls and has held a number 
of public offices. For years he was justice of the peace of Schneider township, 
for two years was a member of the board of county supervisors, for twenty 
years he served on the school board and is at present assessor of Ravenna. 
Fraternally he is affiliated with the Modem Woodmen of America. He takes a 
commendable interest in everything relating to the public welfare and is one of 
the most highly esteemed citizens of Ravenna. 



FRANK FIALA. 



Frank Fiala, who is living practically retired upon a valuable farm adjoining 
the townsite of Ravenna, is one of the most widely known and most highly 
esteemed residents of this section of the state. He is almost seventy-three years 
of age but is still straight as an arrow, active and vigorous, and is interested in 
all of the afifairs of the day. His has been an eventful life and in its course he 
has experienced the rigors of hard military campaigns, has known what it means 
to come to a strange country without capital and to gain prosperity only to lose 
all that he has won by hard labor, but his courage has never faltered and his 
determination and energy have enabled him to gain a substantial competence 
which is sufficient to provide him with all of the comforts of life. 

Frank Fiala was born in the village of Horelice, nine miles from Prague, the 
capital of Bohemia, and his natal day was the 28th of April, 1843. His parents, 
James and Veronica Fiala, were likewise born in that country. The father 
engaged in the coal business, hauling coal to the city of Prague, and in the winter 
of 1846 was frozen while making the trip. His widow married Joseph Horak and 
in 1864 they came to America and located in Washington county, Iowa, where 
Mr. Horak purchased land, which he operated until his demise in 1908. He had 
survived his wife for a year, her death occurring in 1907. 

Frank Fiala started to school in his native village when he was six years of 
age and when twelve years old was sent to Prague, where he lived with a relative 
and attended school, taking up, among other things, the study of German. In 
1859 war broke out between Austria and Italy and patriotic feeling ran high 
among the students in the University of Prague, over eight hundred of whom, 
including Mr. Fiala, enlisted in the Austrian ar-my. He was a member of a 
company of sharpshooters and for eight months was almost constantly on the 
skirmish line. He received six cents per day and rations, which consisted of a 
daily allowance of two and a half pounds of black bread. The principal engage- 
ment in which he fought was the storming of the fortress of Verona, Italy. He 
was only sixteen years of age when he enlisted but he made a highly creditable j 
record as a soldier and met with many thrilling experiences unusual to a boy of 
his years. At the close of the war he was discharged and returned to HoreliceJ 




MRS. FRANK FIALA 




FRANK FIALA 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 353 

where he held the position of accountant and timekeeper in an iron mine until 
he was twenty-one years of age. In the meantime he had formed the acquaint- 
ance of Vojte Naprstek, who in after years became one of the leaders of the 
Bohemian people throughout the world. Mr. Naprstek convinced Mr. Fiala 
that the advantages afforded in America were superior to those offered by his 
country under Austrian rule and he at once began to agitate the question of 
emigration among the people of Horelice. Many of his friends and neigh- 
bors emigrated, as did his mother and stepfather, and he himself was making 
preparations to leave when the government called upon him to enter upon the 
required eight years of military duty. He accordingly entered the army and 
was attached to the Seventh Regiment of Cuirassiers, in which he later became 
a lieutenant. His regiment was stationed for a considerable period at Vienna 
and was transferred to various places in Hungary. At that time Maximilian, 
archduke of Austria, was attempting to establish an empire in Mexico and Mr. 
Fiala applied for a transfer to his army, believing that he could thus find an 
opportunity to carry out his plan of emigrating to America. However, his re- 
Cjuest was refused, as the authorities learned that he intended to beconie a resi- 
dent of the United States after the expiration of his term of service. While 
in the Austrian army the Austro-Prussian war occurred and he was in a 
great deal of the hardest fighting. Among other engagements he participated 
in the bloody three days' battle of Kenig-Krac and during that engagement 
was wounded twice, had two horses killed under him and the third horse 
was wounded by a stroke of a saber directed at Mr. Fiala's person. 

At the end of five of his eight years' service Mr. Fiala asked for a furlough 
of thirty days and, taking advantage of his opportunity, took ship for America 
and landed at New York city in February, 1869. He did not have a dollar but 
succeeded in borrowing twenty dollars from friends and started for Chicago 
with a party of immigrants. After a very disagreeable trip which lasted ten 
days he reached that city and found work as a runner for an immigrant hotel, 
thus securing enough money to pay his fare to Iowa, where his mother, step- 
father and other relatives were located. He was employed as a hired man 
near Richmond, Iowa, for a time and while there met a Bohemian girl who 
had recently removed from New York with her parents. They were married 
after an acquaintance of one day, although at that time Mr. Fiala did not have 
enough money to pay for the license. He began farming on his own account, 
but at the end of a year found that his profit was but seventy dollars and 
determined to turn his attention to- other pursuits. His wife was an expert 
cigar maker, having learned the trade in New York and they concluded to 
return to that city and there secured work almost immediately. Mr. Fiala also 
learned the cigar maker's trade and was the first president of the Cigar 
Makers Union of New York city. The panic of 1873 affected the cigar indus- 
try as seriously as it did other commercial enterprises and Mr. and Mrs. Fiala 
determined to again try their fortune in the west. They had saved some 
capital and established a cigar factory in Iowa City, which they conducted suc- 
cessfully for about five years, but in 1878 the factory and stock were destroyed 
by fire, involving a loss of twenty thousand dollars. 

Mr. Fiala again found himself penniless and was compelled to start life 
anew. While living in Iowa City he had made the acquaintance of Edward 

Vol. 11—16 



354 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

Rosewater, the editor of the Omaha Bee, and also John Rositzky, the pub- 
lisher of an influential Bohemian paper, Pokrok Zapadn, and they told him of 
the opportunities offered energetic, ambitious men in Nebraska. He went to 
Kearney in April, 1878, and after investigating conditions in the state decided 
in favor of Sherman county. He removed his family there, taking up a home- 
stead of one hundred and sixty acres three miles north of Ravenna. He also 
took up a one hundred and sixty acre timber claim on section 28, tov^nship 
13, range 14, and at once began the improvement of his land. He found con- 
ditions even more satisfactory than he had thought and as the years passed his 
resources constantly increased. After farming successfully for seventeen years 
he sold his land in this state and went to Florida, investing his capital in timber 
lands. He took several cars of cattle and horses with him but within a year 
his stock sickened and died and he also lost heavily in his land investments. In 
addition to this misfortune he and nearly all of his family were taken sick and 
one son died there. For the third time he was without capital, but he secured 
funds from loyal friends and started to return to Nebraska with his family. 
His money was gone by the time he reached Missouri and he remained there 
for a year. 

In the fall of 1896 he and his family took up their residence in Grand Is- 
land, and his wife and one of his daughters found employment in a Grand 
Island cigar factory, while he obtained a position with a Bohemian news- 
paper, which he represented throughout the state for a year. During that time 
he also represented a cigar house on the road, and he was also a representative 
of the Union Fire Insurance Company. At the end of five years the combined 
efforts of the family had accumulated sufficient capital to purchase a farm of 
orte^ hundred and sixty acres in Sherman county two miles from Ravenna. 
Mr. Fiaia again concentrated his energies upon agricultural pursuits and again 
his labors were rewarded by prosperity. A few years later he purchased a 
valuable tract of eighty acres adjoining the townsite of Ravenna on the north 
and this is now the family home, the quarter section having been sold in 191 1 
at a substantial advance over the cost price. Part of the eighty acres has also 
been disposed of as a subdivision of Ravenna. The family are now in very 
comfortable circumstances and Mr. Fiala is living practically retired, enjoying 
a leisure which is richly deserved and leaving the operation of the home farm 
to his son. In 1885 he organized the Union Fire Insurance Company of 
Nebraska, of which he became vice president and a director, but at the time 
of his removal to Florida he resigned those offices. However, since returning 
to Nebraska he has again become connected with that concern and is now 
serving as its agent. 

Mr. Fiala was married on the 19th of April, 1870, to Miss Anna Bratnsov- 
sky, a daughter of Frank and Josephine Bratnsovsky, natives of Bohemia, 
who emigrated to America in 1864. After living for a short time in New 
York city they continued their way westward and settled in Washington county, 
Iowa, where they purchased land. The father devoted the remainder of his 
life to farming and met with gratifying success in that occupation. He died 
in 1898 at Des Moines, and the mother passed away in that city in 1883. 

Mr. and Mrs. Fiala have become the parents of fourteen children, as fol- 
lows: Toney, Avho was born in New York city in May, 1871; Anna, whose 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 355 

birth occurred in New Y'ork on the 28th of May, 1872; Frank, born in Iowa 
City, Iowa, in September, 1873; Amos, whose birth occurred in Iowa City in 
June, 1875, and who died on the 22d of September, 1906; Charles, who was 
born in Iowa City on the 17th of October, 1877; Emma, whose birth occurred 
on the 1 2th of October, 1878, and who died on the 2d of September, 1908, 
leaving five children; Joseph, who was born on the 22d of February, 1881, 
and is a resident of Spokane, Washington; Clara, who was born in Sherman 
county, Nebraska, in August, 1882; Libbie, whose birth occurred in Sherman 
county on the 21st of May, 1884; William, born in Sherman county on the 
15th of September, 1885; James, born on the 21st of November, 1887; Vlasta, 
born July 19, 1889; John, whose birth occurred on the 5th of February, 1891, 
and who died on the 19th of that month; and Albert, who was b'orn on the 7th 
of February, 1892, and died on the 28th of March, 1895. 

Mr. Fiala is a stalwart adherent of the democratic party and has always 
taken the keenest interest in public affairs. He has at all times manifested 
that high order of patriotism which is ready to subordinate personal interests 
to the general welfare and at the time of the Spanish-American war he signi- 
fied his willingness to serve his country as a soldier, offering to raise a regiment 
of Bohemian-American volunteers for service whenever needed. Governor 
Holcomb personally thanked Mr. Fiala and promised him the privilege asked in 
case more troops were recjuired, but, as Nebraska's quota was already more than 
filled, he was not given the opportunity to raise his regiment. For six years he 
served as justice of the peace in Sherman county, this state, and he was also 
elected county supervisor and county treasurer, but would not accept those 
offices. Fraternally he belongs to the Bohemian Lodge and he was a charter 
member of both the Knights of Pythias and the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, but has since demitted from those organizations. For many^-yearsUie 
has been recognized as one of the leading citizens of Bohemian descent in 
Nebraska and it was largely due to his influence that the Bohemian settlements 
in this locality were formed. Moreover, during the pioneer days of the county 
he often sheltered immigrants who had recently arrived and were without funds 
and there are many families who are now in prosperous circumstances who owe 
their success largely to him, as he aided them in getting a start in this new 
country. He was reared in the faith of the Roman Catholic church but is now 
a free thinker, and he has often been called upon to officiate at the funeral of 
those holding similar beliefs. He has always conformed his life to high stan- 
dards of ethics and his genuine worth is acknowledged by all who have been 
brought in contact with him in any^ relation of life. :-?^ 



HARRY N. JONES, D. D. S. 

Dentistry may be said to be almost unique among occupations, as it is at once 
a profession, a trade and a business. Such being the case, it follows that in 
order to attain the highest success in it, one must be thoroughly conversant with 
the theory of the profession, must be expert with the many tools and appliances 
incidental to the practice of modern dentistry and must possess business qualihca- 



356 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

tions adequate to dealing with the financial side. In all of these particulars 
Dr. Harrv' X. Jones is well qualified and therefore has attained prestige among 
the able representatives of dentistry in Kearney, where he has maintained an 
office since January, 1909. He was born in Fremont county, Iowa, near Sidney, 
on the 17th of October, 1875, and in his youthful days accompanied his parents 
on their removal to Kansas, the family home being established upon a farm near 
■\Iankato, where he was reared. He there attended the public schools of the dis- 
trict and afterward continued his education in the high school of Minden, 
Nebraska, while later he spent three years as a student in the State University 
at Lincoln. He was in the period of early manhood at the time of the outbreak 
of the war with Spain and, loyal to his native country, he enlisted in 1898 as a 
member of Company D, First Nebraska \^olunteer Infantry. With his regiment 
he went to Manila and saw active service for five months in the Philippines, 
participating with his regiment in nearly all of the military engagements that 
occurred on the islands. He then returned to the United States and was 
honorably discharged at San Francisco, August 23, 1899, coming out without a 
wound, although he was many times in the thickest of the fight. 

When his military experience was over Dr. Jones became a fireman on an 
engine of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad, running out of McCook, 
Nebraska, for three years but became imbued with the desire to enter upon a 
professional career and, deciding upon dentistry, he entered the Chicago College 
of Dental Surgery, from which he was graduated with the class of 1905. He 
then practiced for a year at Holdredge and for two years at Kenesaw, Nebraska, 
and in January, 1909, he located at Kearney, where he has since continued, 
having now a well appointed office equipped with the latest appliances of dental 
surgery. He is doing excellent work, for he keeps in touch with the advanced 
methods of the profession and possesses that mechanical skill which is an indis- 
pensable requisite of the dentist. 

On the 19th of June, 1907, Dr. Jones was united in marriage to Miss Minnie 
Rowell, a native of Mount Ayr, Iowa, w4io was reared and educated in McCook, 
Nebraska, and they have one son, Glenn Rowell, who was born October 10, 1914. 
Dr. Jones gives his political allegiance to the republican party and fraternally he 
is connected with the Masons, the Knights of Pythias and the Benevolent Pro- 
tective Order of Elks. Both he and his wife hold membership in the Episcopal 
church and they are well known socially in Kearney, where they have gained a 
wide acquaintance and won many friends, their own home being a most hos- 
pitable one. 



CHARLES W. SHAHAN. 

Charles W. Shahan, who has been identified wath the commercial development., 
of Kearney during the past quarter of a century, is now manager and treasure! 
of the Kearney Hardware Company, which controls one of the leading mercan-j 
tile establishments of the county. He is a man of resolute purpose and unfalter- 
ing determination who carries forward to successful completion whatever he 
undertakes. A native of West Virginia, he was born at Kingwood on the 2d oi 
November, 1870, a son of John W. and Diana E. (Parsons) Shahan. 




CHARLES W. SHAHAN 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 359 

Charles W. Shanan was but eight years of age when he accompanied his 
parents to Buffalo county and was a youth of fifteen when the family home was 
established in Kearney.- He completed his education in the Kearney schools and 
entered upon his business career as a clerk in the hardware store of Hubbell 
Brothers, while later he secured a similar position with the W. E. Jackway Hard- 
ware Company. In 1905 he formed a corporation that bought out the last named 
concern and merged it into the Kearney Hardware Company, which has developed 
into one of the leading mercantile enterprises of the city. They carry a large and 
well selected stock of shelf and heavy hardware and their trade has constantly 
grown as the result of commercial methods which will bear the closest investiga- 
tion and scrutiny. 

On the 226. of November, 1893, Mr. Shahan was married to Miss Mabel H. 
Rice and he and his wife belong to the Methodist Episcopal church, while in the 
social circles of the city they occupy a prominent and enviable position. Fra- 
ternally Mr. Shahan is connected with the Modern Woodmen, with the Odd Fel- 
lows and with the Highlanders. In politics he is a republican but aside from exer- 
cising his right of franchise and manifesting a keen interest in the welfare of the 
country he has taken no active part in politics nor in any sense has he been an ofifice 
seeker. His whole time and attention are devoted to his business affairs, and to the 
general material progress and development of city and county. He is remiss in 
none of the duties of citizenship and supports all plans and measures for the public 
good. His private business affairs are an element in Kearney's commercial activity 
and she is proud to number him among her representative merchants. He has con- 
ducted his interests along well defined lines of labor and the intelligent direc- 
tion of his activities has brought him well merited prosperity. 



ALMON G. BOWER. 



Almon G. Bower, who is engaged in the undertaking business at Kearney, 
is a representative of an old family of Indiana and was born at Wolcottville, 
Lagrange county, that state, April 13, 1851. His father, Philip Bower, was a 
native of Ohio and became a cabinetmaker by trade, but in later life turned his 
attention to farming. He was married in Ohio to Miss Mary Yager and in 
pioneer times removed to Indiana, settling in the midst of the forests of Lagrange 
county, where he had to cut down the timber and make a clearing in order to 
develop a farm. It was in that frontier home that all. of his children were born, 
with the exception of the eldest. He continued to engage in general agricultural 
pursuits and also to some extent worked at his trade. In the early days he cut 
the live timber, sawed it and converted it into cof^ns for the dead or used it in 
the construction of household furniture. 

It was upon the homestead farm that Almon G. Bower was reared to man- 
hood, and in the district schools of the neighborhood he acquired his education. 
After attaining his majority he taught in the district schools for two terms, 
and the entire period of his youth was one of earnest and unremitting toil, 
during which he shared with the family in all of the hardships and privations 
incident to pioneer life. When nineteen years of age he went to Montana and 



360 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

for two years was employed in a mill at Helena before the railroad had reached 
that place. He afterward returned to Indiana, where he engaged in farming 
for three years, and while there residing he was married. 

In 1885 Mr. Bower came to Nebraska and for a number of years resided 
at Ulysses, Butler county, where he engaged in the undertaking business. In 
1898 he came to Kearney and has here since made his home. For a time he was 
engaged in the furniture and undertaking business but for a number of years 
has devoted his attention exclusively to the latter and for some time his son, 
Verne R., has been associated with him. The son was probably the youngest 
licensed embalmer in the state when he was graduated from the H. S. Eckles 
Embalming School of Philadelphia in the year 1906. A. G. Bower is also a 
licensed embalmer, having completed the prescribed course at Lincoln, being 
one of the first in the state to receive a diploma. 

Mr. Bower was united in marriage to i\Iiss Mary I. Meeker and they became 
the parents of two children : One who died in childhood ; and Carrie, the wife of 
Artie Dickinson, of Indiana. After the death of his first wife, Mr. Bower mar- 
ried Clara L. Hibbard, and the children born to this union are as follows : 
Verne R., who is in partnership in the imdertaking business in Kearney with 
his father and wedded Miss Mabel A. Wallace, by whom he has a daughter, 
Ardis ; Clyde H., who resides on a ranch in Douglas, Wyoming, and married 
Miss Hazel Tracy, by whom he has two children ; and Clara, at home, attending 
the State Normal School at Kearney. The wife and mother passed away in 
1906 and Mr. Bower subsequently wedded Miss Alabel Flint, who was a teacher 
in the public schools of Kearney. Mrs. Mary Bower and Mrs. Clara Bower 
had also taught school prior to marriage. Almon G. and Mabel (Flint) Bower 
are members of the Methodist Episcopal church and are well known in the city 
in which they reside. They have gained a wide acquaintance and have an exten- 
sive circle of warm friends who appreciate their many sterling traits of character 
and entertain for them the highest regard. 



J. FI. RODGERS. 



J. H. Rodgers, of Gibbon township, who is meeting with gratifying success 
as a farmer, was born in Greene county, Ohio, on the loth of November, 1869, 
of the marriage of William A. and Mary E. Rodgers, both natives of Fayette 
county, that state. In 1882 they migrated with their family to Buffalo county, 
Nebraska, and settled in the town of Gibbon. The father, however, pur- 
chased seven hundred and twenty acres of land in Valley township, and there 
began breeding full blooded cattle, having brought some pure blooded Short- 
horns and Jerseys from Ohio. After living in Gibbon for four years he removed 
to his farm a half mile west of that town and there resided until his death, which 
occurred in 191 1. His wife survives and makes her home with her children. 
He was a stanch republican in politics and was for ten years postmaster of 
Gibbon and for three terms has served on the board of county supervisors. 
Fie was at one time the republican nominee for the legislature but as that year 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 361 

was marked by a populist landslide he was defeated. He held membership in 
tlie Masonic order and was buried with Masonic honors. 

J. H. Rodgers received a good education and remained at home until he 
attained his majority. He then accepted a position with the Gibbon Milling 
Company, with which he remained for about five years, at the end of which time 
he decided to devote his life to farming and took charge of the operation of the 
home farm. He raises both grain and high grade stock and derives a good 
income from both branches of his business. He is thoroughly practical and at 
the same time progressive, and the prosperity which he has gained is well deserved. 

Mr. Rodgers was married in 1897 to Miss Jennie M. Robb, of Gibbon, by 
whom he has two children, Myrl G. and Mary A. Mr. Rodgers supports the 
republican party at the polls and discharges to the full all of the duties of a good 
citizen. He has spent the greater part of his life in this county and has thor- 
oughly identified his interests with those of his community, cooperating in move- 
ments seeking the general welfare. 



WILLIAM FOWLER. 



I 



WilHam Fowler, who is living retired in Ravenna after many years of suc- 
cessful farming, was born in Indiana on the 3d of December, 1846. His parents, 
fohn and Nancy (Culver) Fowler, were both natives of Kentucky but removed to 
Indiana in the early '40s. The father rented land there, to the cultivation of which 
he devoted the remainder of his life. He passed away in 1884 and the mother 
died in August, 1882. 

William Fowler was reared in his native state and received his education in 
its common schools. In August, 1862, when not yet fifteen years of age, he 
enlisted in Company G, Sixty-sixth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and went to the 
front with that command. He was taken prisoner in the first engagement in 
which he participated — the battle of Richmond, Kentucky — and after being held 
for three days was paroled. At the close of the war he returned home and resided 
with his parents until 1867, when, at the age of twenty-one years, he removed to 
the northeastern part of Missouri and began farming on his own account. He 
operated rented land there until 1877, in which year he came to Nebraska and 
settled in Sherman county, just across the line from Buffalo county. He took 
up a quarter section as a homestead and as soon as possible brought his land 
under cultivation. From time to time he made improvements upon his place 
and in his work used the latest machinery, thus increasing his efficiency. In 
1908, believing that he had accumulated sufficient capital, he retired from active 
life and, selling his farm, removed to Ravenna, where he built a fine residence 
four blocks north of the schoolhouse. His home is thoroughly modern and he 
lacks none of the comforts of life. He also erected another good residence which 
he rents. 

On the 3d of November, 1868, Mr. Fowler was united in marriage to Ellen 
Pickett, a daughter of James and Mary (Evett) Pickett, natives of Indiana. Her 
father devoted his life to farming and at the time of his demise was living in 
Crawford county, Indiana. He and his four sons were all members of Company 



362 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

H, Twenty-third Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and served during three years of 
the Civil war. He passed away on the 8th of February, 1900, and his wife died 
on the 26th of December, 1868. Mr. and Mrs. Fowler have become the parents 
of six children, namely: Lina, who was born on the 17th of March, 1870, and is 
now the wife of John Jungle, of Ravenna; Sima, who was born on the nth 
of September, 1872, and die.d on the 8th of February, 1874; Minnie, whose birth 
occurred on the 17th of July, 1873, and who is now the widow of Oscar J. 
Binden, and resides in Montana; Ursula, who was born October 11, 1875, and 
is the wife of Jidwin Callaway, a farmer of Sherman county; Susie, who was 
born January 20, 1881, and gave her hand in marriage to Harry Branton, of 
Great Falls, Montana; and William, Jr., whose birth occurred July 14, 1884, and 
who was killed in a railroad accident in California on the 19th of October, 1914. 
Mr. and Mrs. Fowler also have an adopted daughter, Katheryn O'Neill Fowler, 
who was born on the 26th of August, 1889, and whom they have reared since 
she was a week old. 

Mr. Fowler supports the democratic party at the polls and in times of peace 
has manifested the same willingness to subordinate personal interests to the 
general good that prompted him to enlist in the Union army at the time of the 
Civil war. He is a loyal member of the Grand Army of the Republic, thus keep- 
ing in touch with his comrades, and his religious faith is that of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. The leisure which he now enjoys is the direct result of his 
industry and good management in former years and all of his friends rejoice in his 
prosperity. 



ORAN H. CRUMLEY. 



Oran H. Crumley, of Shelton, has met with marked success as a stock feeder 
and dealer and is also a large landowner in the county. He was born in Greene 
county, Iowa, on the 13th of March, 1871, a son of Jacob and Sarah Crumley, 
natives respectively of Virginia and Ohio. In 1856 they became residents of 
Iowa and twelve years later they removed to Otoe county, Nebraska, whence 
they subsequently came to Buffalo county, where both are still living. They had 
twelve children but seven have passed away. 

Oran H. Crumley was given good educational advantages, completing a high 
school course. On beginning his independent career he turned his attention to 
dealing in hogs and cattle but subsequently engaged in merchandising in Shelton 
for ten years. In 1907 he sold his store and reentered the live stock business. 
He buys and sells stock of all kinds and his good business judgment, combined 
with his thorough knowledge of stock, enables him to secure a good profit from 
his transactions. He is also one of the heaviest stock feeders in the county and 
he and his wife together own sixteen hundred acres of finely improved land. 
Through his enterprise and good management he has gained financial inde- 
pendence and he has also been a factor in promoting stock raising interests 
throughout the county. 

Mr. Crumley was married in 1898 to Miss Nora Meisner, a native of Buffalo 
county and a daughter of George and Rachel Meisner, both deceased. Her 




OEAN H. CEUMLEY 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 365 

father was one of the wealthy men of this county and was widely and favorably 
known. Mr. and Mrs. Crumley have become the parents of six children : Rachel, 
who is attending high school ; Leon L. ; Lawrence and Loyal, twins ; one who died 
in infancy; and Oran. 

Mr. Crumley is a stanch adherent of the republican party but his extensive 
business interests have left him no time to take an active part in politics. He is 
affiliated with the Knights of Pythias and the Elks, and his wife is a member of 
the Presbyterian church. He not only has the respect of all who have been asso- 
ciated with him in any relation of life but has also gained the warm friendship 
of many. 



WALTER L. STICKEL. 

Walter L. Stickel is a well known lumberman of Kearney and in various 
other ways has been identified wuth the business development of the city through 
the past decade and a half. He is a western man in birth, in spirit and in 
training and the enterprise which has dominated the upbuilding of this section 
of the country finds exemplification in his life. He was bom in Kansas on the 
3d of December, 1872, a son of Fletcher A. and Nancy (Scott) Stickel. His 
father was a lumberman and, it was in his employ that Walter L. Stickel learned 
the business in all of its details and ramifications. His youthful days were 
passed in attendance at the public schools and in rendering assistance to his 
father at the lumberyard, and he completed his scholastic training in Baker 
University at Baldwin, Kansas, and at Cornell (la.) College. His initial inde- 
pendent effort in business was made in 1894, when he purchased a lumberyard 
in Council Grove, Kansas, which he conducted for seven years and then sold. 
In 1901 he came to Kearney and purchased the lumber business of George H. 
Downing & Son. Since that time he has purchased other yards and has opened 
branch establishments at various points. He has also extended the scope of 
his business to include the retailing of coal and he is today regarded as one of 
tjie most prominent lumbermen of Nebraska, his operations in that field being 
very extensive. In various other ways his energy and business ability have 
contributed to the upbuilding of Kearney and of Buffalo county. His diligence 
is at all times a tangible asset in his success and in commercial aflFairs his judg- 
ment is sound and his sagacity keen. His company owns the "1733 Ranch," so 
named because it lies seventeen hundred and thirty-three miles from each of the 
cities of Boston and San Francisco. It lies wholly within the borders of Buffalo 
county, near Kearney, and is one of the old historic places of this part of the 
state, comprising over five thousand acres of rich and productive land. It is a 
credit to the county and to its owner. In addition to his other interests Mr. 
Stickel is a director of the Central National Bank. In business affairs he dis- 
plays sound judgment and keen sagacity, recognizing and utilizing opportunities 
which others pass heedlessly by. His interests have extended in scope and 
importance year by year and placed him in a most prominent and enviable posi- 
tion among the business men in the western part of the state. 



366 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

In June, 1894, Mr. Stickel was united in marriage to Miss Anna May Wells, 
by whom he has three children, namely : Edna A., Daphne and Walter L., Jr. 
Mr. Stickel belongs to the Kearney Commercial Club and cooperates in all of 
its plans for the development of the city along business lines and for the advance- 
ment of municipal interests. In politics he is a republican and is a supporter of 
all those measures which are a matter of civic virtue and civic pride. Fraternally 
he is a Knight Templar Mason and member of the Mystic Shrine and also 
belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. To him belongs the honor 
of completing the first seedling mile of the Lincoln Highway in the state of 
Nebraska and thus he is taking active part in improving public highways. In a 
word he is a most public-spirited citizen, never neglecting his duties or his 
obligations in relation to the general welfare, and his cooperation has proved 
a valuable asset in furthering plans and projects for the public good. At the 
same time he is a most forceful and resourceful business man whose executive 
ability and excellent management have brought to the concerns with which he is 
connected a large degree of success. 



JAMES B. MINER. 

James B. Miner, a well known farmer residing in Ravenna, was born in 
Ohio on the 15th of October, 1854, an^ is'a son of John and Rebecca (Dudgeon) 
Miner, an account of whose lives appe6*B**in the sketch of Charles Miner. Our 
subject was reared and educated in Shellrock, Butler county, Iowa, and remained 
with his parents until he became of age. He then began working for others 
although he continued to reside at home for several years, but at length he rented 
land, from the cultivation of which he gained a fair income. He carefully saved 
his money and when twenty-eight years of age he purchased forty acres and 
two years later bought eighty acres more. The operation of his farm occupied 
his time and attention. 

In January, 1887, Mr. Miner sold that place and came to Ravenna, Buffalo 
county, Nebraska, as he had heard that there were good opportunities for the 
agriculturist in this section. He bought a quarter section one and a half miles 
south of the town and at once set a^out improving the place, which he soon 
brought to a high state of developm^L He invested his capital in more land 
from time to time and at one time held title to eight hundred acres. He has 
since sold one hundred and sixty acres but still owns an entire section, which 
lies on sections 20, 21 and 8, Garfield township, the buildings being on section 21. 
He is still operating that place but since 1910 has lived in Ravenna. He goes 
back and forth to the farm and gives his personal attention to the cultivajtion 
of crops and the care of stock. He receives a handsome return from his land 
and is financially independent. He raises a considerable number of cattle 
annually and has nothing but high grade stock. In addition to his farming 
interests he has other investments, owning stock in the Ravenna Electric Light & 
Power Company. 

Mr. Miner was married in October, 1879, to Miss Alinnie Rowley, who was 
born in New York on the 3d of November, 1862, and who is a daughter of David 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 367 

and Arlatia (Woodruff) Rowley, natives of the Empire state. The father was 
a farmer by occupation and in 1870 removed with his family to Butler county, 
Iowa, where he purchased land which he operated for many years. At length, 
feeling that he had accumulated a competence, he retired from active life and 
removed to Shellrock, where he died in March, 1909. His wife passed away 
in August, 1900. 

Air. and Mrs. Miner have become the parents of eleven children, namely: 
Guy D., who was born July 4, 1881, and died in April, 1901 ; Edith, who was 
born on the 4th of August, 1882, and who is now the wife of James Runyon, 
of Minatare, Nebraska; Bertha, born January 22, 1884, now the wife of Lewis 
Case, who is farming land belonging to our subject; Floyd, who was born March 
6, 1886, and is road overseer of Garfield township; Lee, who was born January 
30, 1889, and is farming in this county; Walter, born December 23, 1890, who 
married Nellie E. Duncan and is a dentist at Norfolk, Nebraska; Arlatia, who 
was born April 2, 1893, and is now the wife of Clifton Turner, a resident of 
Minatare, Nebraska; and Elizabeth, born January 12, 1896, Fay, born April 
18, 1897, Raymond, April 17, 1899, and Ethel, March 23, 1901, all of whom are 
at home. 

Mr. Miner gives his political allegiance to the republican party and has 
served for six years as constable, proving efficient and energetic in the discharge 
of his duties. He belongs to the Methodist Episcopal church and is also identi- 
fied with the Modem Brotherhood of America. He is not only energetic and 
practical in carrying on his farm ^^^i[fe but he is also progressive, adopting new 
methods that promise to be of val^ii^€H|ice removing to Ravenna in order to 
give his children the advantages of the 'public schools here he has interested 
himself in the progress of the community along various lines and is recognized 
as a public-spirited citizen. 



F. A. MUELLER. 



F. A. Mueller, cashier of the Farmers State Bank of Pleasanton, was one of 
the dominant factors in the organization of this institution and is now a member 
of its board of directors, taking active part in shaping its policy and directing 
its growth. In business affairs hiS' plans are always well defined and his enter- 
prise has led him steadily forward to the goal of success. He was born in 
Germany, fourteen miles south of Berlin, on the 14th of June, 1881, a son of 
Ludwig and Ida (Kupferschmidt) Mueller, who came to the United States in 
1882, locating in Hamilton county, near the town of Hampton, Nebraska, taking 
up their abode upon a rented farm. Carefully saving his earnings, his industry 
and his economical expenditure enabled Mr. Mueller in 1889 to purchase a farm 
of one hundred and sixty acres in Rusco township, Buffalo county, Nebraska, 
to which place he removed his family in the spring of 1890. He continued upon 
the farm for almost two decades, or until 1909, when he retired and removed 
to Pleasanton. He had carefully, persistently and successfully cultivated his 
place, transforming his land into very productive fields and making the farm a 
most profitable one. On the organization of the Farmers State Bank of Pleasan- 



368 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

ton he became a stockholder and in January, 1915, was elected vice president of 
the bank, in which capacity he is now serving. For ten years he was postmaster 
of the Peake postoffice located on his farm. He also served as justice of the 
peace and has long been regarded as one of the influential men of his township, 
his aid being always given on the side of right, progress and improvement. 

F. A. Mueller, an only child, was educated in the public schools near his 
father's home and from his early youth worked in cooperation with his father 
in the further development and management of the home farm, being thus actively 
engaged until 1909, when he became associated with John R. Bonson in the 
organization of the F"armers State Bank of Pleasanton, which opened its doors 
for business on the nth of June, of that year, Mr. Bonson being made cashier 
of the institution, while Mr. Mueller became assistant cashier. On the 12th of 
December, 191 1, the latter purchased the former's interest in the bank and at 
the same time was made cashier, in which capacity he has since continued. He 
is one of the well known representatives of financial interests in Bufifalo county, 
strong and resourceful in business management, yet conservative to the point 
of most carefully safeguarding the interests of depositors and stockholders. 

On the 8th of June, 1905, Mr. Mueller wedded Miss Anna Schipman, of 
Grand Island, Nebraska, and this union has been blessed with four children, 
Erick, Elsie, Helen and Ruth. The parents are members of the Lutheran church 
and in his political views Mr. Mueller is a republican. He has served as justice 
of the peace and as a member of the school board and is a stalwart champion 
of progressive education. In fact he stands for improvement and progress along 
all lines and accomplishes what he undertakes either in a business way or for 
the benefit of the community. 



L. P. SOUTHWORTH. 



L. P. Southworth is now living retired in Ravenna but for many years was 
a most active business man and along the lines of intelligently directed business 
enterprise won his success. He was born in Oneida county, New York, on the 
16th of April, 1837, a son of James and Adelia W. (Day) Southworth, who 
were also natives of that county, where they were reared and married. In 1838 
they removed to Newark, La Salle county, Illinois, where the father passed away 
in 1841, while the mother, long surviving him, died in that county in 1889. Mr. 
Southworth was a lawyer by profession and thus provided for the support of his 
family. 

L. P. Southworth was reared at home, acquiring his education in the public 
schools. The educational opportunities of that day and period, however, were 
very limited. The little temple of learning in which he pursued his studies was 
seated with slab benches, heated by a big fireplace and ec|uipped in the most 
primitive way, while the method of instruction was little better than the furnish- 
ings. As a youth he worked as a farm hand and on reaching manhood Iiej 
rented land and began farming for himself. At the outbreak of the Civil war! 
he felt that his duty to his country was paramount to every other interest and on 
the 15th of August, 1 861, enlisted as a member of Company F, Thirty-sixth 




L. P. SOUTHWOETH 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 371 

Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He served for four years and three months at the 
front and was honorably discharged and mustered out on the 6th of November, 
1865. He was wounded in the arm at Racceca and it was also at that place 
that he was promoted to the rank of second lieutenant of his company. He has 
a valuable souvenir of the war in an officer's sword, which he took from a Con- 
federate officer, whom he captured at Mission Ridge. This particular sword is 
a tine example of the high art attained by the English cutlers of an early day. 

After receiving his discharge Lieutenant Southworth returned to his home 
and on the 14th of the following March was united in marriage to Miss Lodecia 
Eybond, of La Salle county, Illinois, by whom he had five children but only one 
is now living, Jessie S., the wife of C. M. Wann, living at Hays, Kansas. Some 
time following his marriage Mr. Southworth removed to Iroquois county, 
Illinois, wdiere he resided for five years and then returned to La Salle county. 
In 1876 he became a resident of Chicago, where he engaged in the live stock 
commission business until 1881, when he removed to Russell county, Kansas, 
where he engaged in the business of cattle and sheep raising, there continuing 
for five years. Subsequently he devoted his time to trailing sheep throughout 
the western country, driving them from points as far as the state of Oregon. 
He bought and handled from fifty to one hundred thousand head per year. In 
the meantime he removed to Denver, Colorado, where he made his home for 
fourteen years. In 1903 he came to Ravenna, where he has since resided. For 
five or six years after taking up his abode here he remained active in stock 
buying and the shipping business and also held a controlling interest in the 
Citizens State Bank, of which he was president. In 1907, however, he disposed 
of his interest in the bank and retired from the live stock business, so that he is 
now enjoying a rest which he has truly earned and richly deserves. His has 
been a most active life, fraught with good results. He is a man of persistent 
purpose, carrying forward to successful completion whatever he undertakes and 
his well defined plans, carefully executed, have brought him the success which is 
now his. He is one of the best known horse men in this p^rt of the country, 
having won many prizes with his horses, and is recognized as one of the best 
judges of fast horses in the west and has owned among others such as Fred R., 
a trotter with a mark of 2:17; Tip Top, a pacer with a mark as four year old of 
2:15^4 and Western Flyer, a pacer with a mark of 2:17. 

In politics Mr. Southworth is an earnest republican but has never been an 
office seeker. He has membership in Lotus Lodge, No. 6, A. F. & A. M. Having 
joined the order in 1862, he' is now the oldest Mason in Ravenna and he has 
ever been most loyal to the craft, closely observing its teachings in all his relations 
with his fellowmen. 



S. L. LEAS. 



A quarter section of excellent land in Gibbon township pays tribute to its 
owner, S. L. Leas, who is an up-to-date and efficient agriculturist. A native of 
Indiana, he was born on the 9th of January, 1861, of the marriage of William 
and Susanna (Shafifstall) Leas, the former of whom was born in Ohio and the 



372 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

latter in Pennsylvania. They were married, however, in Indiana, and there the 
mother passed away in 1907, after having survived her husband for more than 
four decades, his demise occurring in 1865. 

S. L. Leas is one of two living children of a family of six. Lie received his 
education in his native state and remained there until 1887, when he came to 
Buffalo county, Nebraska, and purchased his present farm, which comprises one 
hundred and sixty acres on sections 2, 9 and 14, Gibbon township. He has 
spared neither time nor expense in improving his farm, which is one of the most 
valuable properties of his locality and from which he derives a handsome income. 
He specializes in raising and feeding stock and studies the markets carefully, so 
as to sell to the best advantage. He is financially interested in the Farmers 
Elevator at Gibbon. 

Mr. Leas was married in 1882 to Miss Flora Ransburg, a native of Ohio, 
by whom he has two children, namely : Fern, who engaged in teaching for a num- 
ber of years ; and Bonnie B., who has taught school for six years. 

Mr. Leas supports the republican party at the polls and has served acceptably 
as a member of the school board for many years. Fraternally he belongs to the 
Ancient Order of United Workmen, and his wife is a member of the Presby- 
terian church. In developing his farm he has not only gained financial success 
but has also had a part in the advancement of the agricultural interests of the 
county and along other lines as well he has contributed to community progress. 



C. R. LIPPINCOTT. 



C. R. Lippincott manages an excellent farm of three hundred and forty acres 
in Platte township and is there specializing in the raising of high grade stock. 
His birth occurred in Franklin county, Pennsylvania, on the 3d of May, 1878, 
and he is a son of James F. and Jane S. (Vance) Lippincott, both natives of 
Pennsylvania. On leaving that state they removed to Fillmore county, Nebraska, 
but a short time afterward went to Gosper county, whence they came to Bufifalo 
county. They settled upon a farm on section i. Platte township, and there 
resided until 1906, when they went to the state of Washington. Two years later, 
however, they removed to Misssouri, where the mother passed away. The father 
is still living and still makes his home in that state. 

C. R. Lippincott is one of six living children of a family of nine and he 
received his education in the common schools. During his boyhood and youth 
he assisted his father, and by the time he reached his majority he was thorovighly 
familiar with agricultural work, this knowledge enabling him to assume charge 
of the home farm in 1899. ^^^ ^'''^s since engaged in stock-raising and derives a 
handsome income from the sale of his cattle and hogs. The farm comprises 
three hundred and forty acres of good land and is improved with substantial and 
commodious buildings. 

Mr. Lippincott was married in 1898 to Miss Olga Moldrup, who was born in 
Illinois of the marriage of Peter and Marie (Jensen) Moldrup, natives of Den- 
mark, who in 1870 emigrated to the United States. They first located in Chicago, 
but in 1882 became residents of Kearney county, Nebraska. The father [)assed 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 373 

away in Alissouri in February, 1915, and the mother is now a resident of that 
state. They were the parents of two children, but only Mrs. Lippincott is now 
living. Mr. and Mrs. Lippincott have seven children: Hazel M. and Dessa C, 
both of whom are high school students ; Sadie L. ; Abbie R. ; Ethel J. ; Maxine ; 
and Marjorie. 

Mr. Lippincott indorses the principles of the republican party and supports 
its candidates at the polls. He has served as a member of the school board and 
takes the interest of a public-spirited citizen in the affairs of local government. 
His wife belongs to the Church of Latter Day Saints. His energy and good judg- 
ment have gained him success in his chosen occupation and his sterling worth as 
a man has won him the warm regard of those who have been associated with him. 



WILLIAM CLARK KEEP. 

William Clark Keep is engaged in farming on eighty acres of land adjoining 
the town of Elm Creek and also owns five hundred and twenty acres of addi- 
tional land and derives a gratifying financial return from his farm property. 
He was bom near New ]\Iilford, Susquehanna county, Pennsylvania, on the 
13th of July, 1856, a son of Joel Keep, a native of Connecticut. The family 
record has been traced back to the Mayflower and there is a story to the effect 
that at one time all the members of the family were massacred on their way 
home from church with the exception of a boy and girl, who had been left at 
home and from whom all of the present representatives of the family are 
descended. Joel Keep was a blacksmith in his early manhood but subsequently 
engaged in buying lands, which he improved and then sold. Still later he turned 
his attention to the lumber business. He was twice married, his first wife being 
Almira Hocomb, by whom he had four children, all now deceased: Charles 
Melville ; Lucia, who married Miles Corse ; John ; and Ellen, who married Daniel 
D. Thompkins. Mr. Keep chose as his second wife Mrs. Lucy Ann (Hendrick) 
Simonds, and to their union were born three children, namely : William Clark ; 
Edward A., who resides in Callaway, Nebraska ; and ]\Iary Frances, the wife 
of Judson Very, of Callaway, Nebraska. The father passed away in Pennsyl- 
vania and the mother died in Nebraska. 

William C. Keep was reared in the Keystone state and there received a 
common school education. In 1879 ^^^ decided to try his fortune in Buft'alo 
county, Nebraska, where several of his neighbors and friends had recently 
located, and accordingly came to Elm Creek. For a year and a half he was 
employed in the Davis eating house, which is remembered by all of the early 
settlers, and after Mrs. Davis had sold out he remained with her successor for 
some time. While working in Elm Creek Mr. Keep entered a tree claim of one 
hundred and sixty acres and a homestead of one hundred and sixty acres in Dawson 
county, but for a considerable period he retained his position in Elm Creek and 
spent the week ends on his farm. At length he took up his residence on that place 
and turned his whole attention to its improvement and cultivation. Still later he 
engaged in the furniture and undertaking business in Elm Creek and for fifteen 



374 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

years attempted to conduct his mercantile interests and to farm at the same time. 
He found, however, that the two undertakings interfered with each other and he 
disposed of his store and has since given all of his time to agricultural pursuits. 
He now resides on an eighty acre tract adjoining Elm Creek, but he also owns a 
ranch of three hundred and sixty acres in Dawson county and one hundred and 
sixty acres on section 15, Elm Creek township, this county. He manages his affairs 
well and is recognized as one of the most efficient farmers of his township. His 
home farm is finely improved and he takes justifiable pride in keeping everything 
in good condition. 

Mr. Keep was married in 1886 to Miss Elizabeth G. Wells, who was born in 
Harrisonville, Ohio, on the 20th of March, 1869, and is a daughter of Apollo 
A. and Mary E. (Stephens) Wells, now residents of Dawson county, Nebraska. 
The family home was established in this state when Mrs. Keep was twelve years 
of age. By her marriage she has become the mother of five sons, namely, Roy 
W., Earl M., William Clark, Jr., Harold W. and Raymond S. 

Mr. Keep is a republican and is now serving acceptably as a member of the 
school board and for several years held the office of township clerk. Both he 
and his wife are active workers in the Methodist Episcopal church and the 
sincerity of their faith is evidenced in their daily lives. Their home, which is 
provided with all of the comforts of life, is noted for its warm-hearted hos- 
pitality. Their genuine worth is acknowledged by all who have been associated 
with them and they have many friends throughout the county. 



MRS. MARY L. FINES. 

Mrs. Mary L. Fines is one of the most respected residents of Shelton and is 
familiar with a great deal of the history of Bufifalo county, for she has resided 
within its borders since 1865. She was born in Indiana of the marriage of 
Oliver and Sabrina (Hall) Loomis, natives respectively of New York and of 
Pennsylvania. They were married in the former state and resided there until 
1838, when they removed to Indiana, which was then a frontier region. Subse- 
quently they lived for three years in Ohio, after which they went to Iowa and 
took up a claim. Seven years later they sold that place and removed to Worth- 
ington, that state. The mother's death occurred at Manchester, Iowa, but the 
father passed away in Nebraska. 

Mrs. Mary Fines is the only one living of a family of seven children. She 
is indebted to the public schools for her education and remained at home until 
she was united in marriage to Edward Ellis, by whom she had two children, 
Robert and Thomas. Robert Ellis resides in Libertyville, Illinois, and is one of 
the well-to-do and highly respected citizens of that place. Thomas Ellis lives 
on a fine farm near Shelton, Nebraska, and is prosperous and greatly esteemed. 
P'or her second husband she married Stephen J. McKee, who enlisted in 1861 
in the Union army for service in the Civil war. He remained at the front until 
the close of hostilities, making a creditable record as a soldier, and in 1865, 
after peace was restored, he and his wife removed to Bufifalo county, Nebraska, 




STBPHEX J. McKEE 




MRS. MARY L. FINES 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 379 

where his demise occurred in 1877. By that union there were six children but 
only two, James and David, are now Hving. After the death of her second 
husband Mrs. McKee became the wife of W. F. Fines, who passed away on the 
13th of February, 1891. 

Mrs. Fines still owns one hundred and sixty acres of excellent land in Gardner 
township, this county, which is well improved and which one of her sons is 
operating. She also owns her residence and three lots in Shelton and derives a 
good income from that property. She holds membership in the Methodist Epis- 
copal church, in the work of which she takes a commendable interest, and her 
many good qualities have gained her the warm regard of all who have been 
closely associated with her. 



W. R. HANKINS. 



W. R. Hankins, who is engaged in general farming on section 3, Garfield 
township, is a progressive agriculturist whose labors have been carefully directed 
and have thus won him substantial success. He was born in Poweshiek county, 
Iowa, on the 5th of January, 1876, and is a son of Gilbert M. and Mary C. 
(Lytle) Hankins, the former a native of Ohio and the latter of Pennsylvania. 
At the time of the Civil war the father espoused the cause of the Union and 
enlisted as a member of Company A, Fifty-third Ohio Volunteer Infantry, 
doing active duty at the front. 

Following the close of hostilities he removed from Ohio to Missouri and 
subsequently became a resident of Iowa, where he was married and made his 
home until 1878. In that year he came to Buffalo county and took up a timber 
claim and also a homestead in Cherry Creek township, remaining upon that 
place to the time of his death, which occurred in 1898, while his wife survived 
until 1900. He was one of the progressive agriculturists of the community and 
brought his fields to a high state of cultivation, his labors resulting in the devel- 
opment of an excellent farm. 

W. R. Hankins was but two years of age when the family removed to 
Nebraska and upon the old homestead he was reared with the usual experiences 
that fall to the lot of the farm lad. He attended the common schools and fol- 
lowing the death of his father he and his brothers took charge of the old home- 
stead, which they operated in partnership. 

In 1902 Mr. Hankins was married tO' Miss Emma G. Johnson, a native of 
Boone county, Nebraska, and after his marriage located upon the farm which 
is now his home and which had been purchased by himself and his brothers after 
the father's death. In subsequent years when the division was made, Mr. 
Hankins acquired two hundred and forty acres of rich and productive land, 
which he has brought to a high state of cultivation, converting the tract into a 
valuable farm from which he annually gathers good harvests. Flis life has been 
a busy and useful one and his labors have brought good results. In addition 
to tilling the soil he makes a specialty of breeding registered Percheron horses 
and at the present time has upon his place twenty head or more of registered 



Vol. 11—17 



380 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

Percherons besides seventeen other horses. This is an important feature of his 
business and adds materially to his income. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Hankins have been born three children, Roger, Mervin 
and Gertrude. The parents are members of the Baptist church and are interested 
in the progress and welfare of the community, their aid and influence being 
given always on the side of right and improvement. Mr. Hankins is a democrat 
in his political views and, while he has never sought nor held political office, he 
is serving at the present time as a member of the school board and the cause 
of education finds in him a stalwart champion. Practically his entire life has 
been passed in this county and those who know him entertain for him warm 
regard because his salient traits of character are such as in every land and clime 
win confidence and good will. 



CHESTER HOLLOW AY. 

i 

That Chester Holloway is a man of enterprise and business acumen is indi- ^ 
cated by the fact that he holds title to twelve hundred and eighty acres of fine 
land in Buffalo and Lincoln counties. He has been one of the most extensive 
cattle breeders and raisers of the county and is still active in that line although 
since 1907 he has made his home in Gibbon. His birth occurred on the 9th of 
January, 1846, and his parents were Ira and Achsah (Bouton) Holloway, natives 
respectively of New York and Ohio. They were married in the latter state and 
subsequently removed to Michigan, where both passed away. 

Chester Holloway was reared and educated in the Buckeye state and remained 
at home until 1863, when, at the age of seventeen years, he enlisted in Company 
E, Ninety-third Ohio Infantry, for service in the Civil war. He remained with 
that command until the close of hostilities and participated in several skir- 
mishes. After being mustered out at Winchester, Virginia, he returned to Ohio, 
whence in 1867 he went to Kansas, where he worked for the government at 
Fort Leavenworth. He made two trips from that fort to old Fort Hays, in 
New Mexico, with cavalry horses during the time that the United States troops 
were fighting the Indians. At that time there were many Indians throughout 
the west. After leaving Kansas he resided in Michigan for six years but in 
1882 sold his farm in Ohio and took a trip through the southern part of the 
United States, going to New Orleans and Galveston and thence through New 
Mexico and Arizona to Yuma, Arizona, and on to San Francisco, California. 
From that city he came to Nebraska and, liking the conditions in this state 
better than those he had found elsewhere in his travels, he located in Buffalo 
county, purchasing land in Valley township, on which he lived for more than 
two decades. His well directed labors brought him substantial financial returns 
and year by year he increased his holdings, becoming at length the owner of 
twelve hundred and eighty acres, a large part of which is improved. He special- 
ized in the raising of cattle and became one of the largest shippers in the county. 
He has been through a number of severe droughts but has so managed his affairs 
as to minimize his losses. In 1900 there was almost a total crop failure and he 
was compelled to ship all of his cattle and horses to Cherry county, where he 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 381 

owns a ranch and where the drought was not so bad. Again, in 1904, this county- 
suffered from a terrible drought and again his ranch in Cherry county saved 
him from loss, as he drove his cattle and horses there. Since 1907 he has lived 
in Gibbon. He is interested financially in the Bankers Mortgage & Loan Com- 
pany at Omaha and the Ravenna Telephone Company and owns valuable busi- 
ness property in Gibbon. He was formerly a stockholder in the Commercial 
Bank of this place but has now disposed of his interest therein. 

Mr. Holloway is a republican in politics and for fifteen years he has served 
as a member of the school board. Fraternally he belongs to the Knights of 
Pythias lodge and he is in sympathy with the work of the various churches 
although not a church member. His influence has been perhaps most strongly 
felt along the lines of agricultural development, but he has also had a part in the 
promotion of the civic and moral advancement of his community and has 
measured up to a high standard of citizenship. His many admirable qualities 
have enabled him to gain and retain warm friends and all who have come in 
contact with him respect him highly. 



CHRISTIAN BOHN. 



Christian Bohn, actively engaged in general farming on section 6, Cherry 
Creek township, is one of the substantial citizens that Gennany has furnished to 
Buffalo county. He was born in Holstein, Germany, February 19, 1859, his 
parents being John and Margaret (Alpan) Bohn, who were natives of that land. 
In the year 1873 the family came to the new world. The father had died in 
Germany in 1863 and the mother 'had afterward married Peter Gehrt. Crossing 
the Atlantic, they rented land in Hall county, Nebraska, where they resided from 
1873 until 1880 and then came to Buffalo county, where Mr. Gehrt secured a 
homestead in Garfield township. Not a furrow had been turned nor an improve- 
ment made upon the place, but with characteristic energy he began its develop- 
ment and operated the farm until his death, which occurred in November, 1898. 
His widow long survived him, her death occurring in September, 191 5. 

Christian Bohn was a youth of fourteen years when the family came from 
the fatherland to the new world and from that time forward he provided for 
his own support, beginning work as a farm hand. He w-as thus employed until 
1 881, when he became a resident of Buffalo county and entered a claim in 
Cherry Creek township, securing one hundred and sixty acres on section 6. He 
at once began to break the sod and till the soil and from time to time added 
improvements to his place until he converted it into one of the best farms of 
the locality. As his financial resources increased he kept adding to his land until 
he is now the owner of six hundred and sixty acres, of which a quarter section 
is in Sherman county. He has operated his farm continuously for thirty-five 
years and the changes which he has wrought have made it a very valuable and 
desirable property, constituting one of the attractive features of the landscape. 
He feeds a car load of cattle per year and a car load of hogs and he raises only 
high grade stock, making this an important feature of his business. 

In December, 1883, Mr. Bohn was married to Miss Katherine Hauser, a 



382 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

daughter of John G. and Katherine (Habarar) Hauser, who were natives of 
Germany and came to the new world in 1882, settling in Sherman county, 
Nebraska. Her father there purchased land and carried on general farming for 
many years or until 1908, when he put aside business cares and retired from 
active life. He now makes his home with his son, his wife having passed away 
in May, 1908. To Mr. and Mrs. Bohn were born six children, namely: John, 
who is married and has one child; George; William, who died in 1899; Amanda, 
who married Fred Stein, a farmer of Sherman county, and has three children; 
Minnie, who married Frank Hoffman, of Grand Island, and has two children ; 
and Frieda. 

In politics Mr. Bohn maintains an independent attitude, voting according to 
the dictates of his judgment without regard to party ties. His religious faith 
is that of the Lutheran church, to which he is ever loyal. As the years have 
gone by he has made continuous progress in the attainment of success and is 
now one of the substantial farmers of the community in which he has made his 
home for more than a third of a century. 



JAMES M. EASTERLING. 

James M. Easterling was born near West Liberty, Kentucky, August 2;^, 
i860. He was educated in the common schools and the West Liberty schools. 
He devoted five years to teaching. Later he graduated from the law depart- 
ments of the Georgetown and the Columbian universities and graduated also 
from the Martyn College in the literary department. 

He came to Kearney, Nebraska, August 15,* 1888, where he has since resided. 
He helped to organize the populist party and in 1892 was its nominee for secretary 
of state, but with the ticket was defeated. He has lived to see the principles for 
which he labored become dominant in state and nation. He served two terms 
as county judge, two terms as county attorney for Buffalo county and one term 
as member of the lower house of the legislature, declining a renomination. 

He was married September i, 1892, to Miss Viola M. Kretchmer, of Red 
Oak, Iowa. To this union have been born four children: Bernhard K., 
Gretchen B., Pauline E. and Cynthia E. 

Mr. Easterling loves the simple life of the home circle, where he finds his 
greatest happiness. He never shirked a responsibility nor abandoned a duty. 



JAMES JOSHUA SMITH. 

James Joshua Smith, who was an efficient and prosperous farmer of Elm 
Creek township, was widely known throughout the county and his demise was 
the occasion of sincere regret. His birth occurred in Toledo, Ohio, on the i6th 
of March, 1862, and he lived in that state until 1883, when as a young man he, 
with his sister Augusta, accompanied his father, James Smith, on his removal to 
Buffalo county, Nebraska. The family home was established on a farm in Elm 



I 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 385 

Creek township and the father engaged in agricultural pursuits until his demise. 
He was successful and held title to almost a section of land. 

James J. Smith received valuable training in farming through assisting his 
father and acquired his education in the public schools of Ohio. Following his 
marriage he became the owner of part of his father's land and at the time of 
his death his holdings comprised two hundred and sixty acres in township 9, 
range 18, section 19. He built a good house upon the place, set out a grove and 
made other improvements, thus adding to the value of the farm. He devoted 
his entire time to the cultivation of his land and his well directed labors yielded 
him a good return. 

Mr. Smith married Miss Susie E. Walker, who was born in Burlington, 
Iowa. Both her parents, David C. and Elizabeth (Prugh) Walker, are now 
deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Smith became the parents of two children, Harry 
Glenn and Bessie Mildred. 

Mr. Smith was a member of the Methodist church and gave his political 
allegiance to the republican party. Since his demise, which occurred on the 
loth of September, 1901, his widow, son and daughter have conducted the 
farm and have proved capable in their management of the place. Mrs. Smith 
is an active worker in the Methodist Episcopal church, sings in the choir and 
takes part in various movements seeking the moral advancement of her com- 
munity. She has manifested good business ability in carrying on the farm work 
and her personal qualities are such that she has won the friendship of many. 



MICHAEL O'CONNOR. 

Michael O'Connor is a retired farmer and cattle raiser residing on his farm 
a mile and a half south of the town of St. Michael, on section 14, Cherry Creek 
township, and he is one of the honored pioneer settlers of Buffalo county, who 
has been identified with the development of this section of the state since the 
days when it was a frontier district and when residence here involved many 
hardships and privations. He has lived to see the notable changes which have 
been wrought by time and man and in fact has borne a full share in bringing 
about present day conditions of progress and improvement. He was born in 
County Mayo, Ireland, on the 20th of September, 1850, and there spent the days 
of his youth, pursuing his education in the public schools. 

About 1875 Mr. O'Connor married Miss Elizabeth Kyne, a native of County 
Galway, Ireland, and after reaching manhood he engaged in general merchan- 
dising in the town of Con, in County Mayo. But the reports which reached 
him concerning the opportunities and advantages of the new world at length 
led him to sever his connection with the Emerald isle and sail for the United 
States. It was in 1885 that he crossed the Atlantic with his wife and four 
children, making his way direct to Nebraska, where he preempted eighty acres 
and purchased a relinquishment on an adjoining eighty acre tract. Subsequently 
he entered one hundred and sixty acres as a homestead and he also took up 
eighty acres as a tree claim. He first put up a sod house, in which he lived for 
a decade, when pioneer improvements gave way before the advantages of modern 



386 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

civilization. For several years he was one of the extensive sheep growers of 
Buffalo county, running on his ranch as high as ten thousand head of sheep, but 
in later years he has given his attention largely to the cattle industry and now 
has under his control some fourteen hundred and forty acres of land, but in 
recent years has turned over the operation of much of his farm lands to his sons. 
When the town of St. Michael, which he helped survey, was established it was 
named in his honor by the town site company. He was instrumental in securing 
the establishment of the postoffice at St. Michael and was appointed the first 
postmaster and later he was honored with election to the mayoralty of the town, 
which was the beginning of an election year by year that has continued him in 
office without opposition to the present time. He puts forth earnest and effective 
effort to advance the public welfare and has not only been a cooperant factor 
in many movements for the general good but has taken the initial step in advanc- 
ing public interests. He has served as a member of the town board and as a 
member of the school board and has been justice of the peace, in which connec- 
tion he has rendered decisions that are strictly fair and impartial. 

To Mr. and Mrs. O'Connor have been born eight children : Thomas, a resi- 
dent of Grand Island; Patrick, of St. Michael; Michael, who makes his home 
in Valley county, Nebraska ; David, at home ; Anthony, who is a stockman of 
Cherry Creek township ; John, who is the owner of a mine in Nevada ; Kate, at 
home; and Mary, who makes her home with her brother Patrick. The wife 
and mother passed away March i6, 191 5, her death being deeply deplored by 
all who knew her. Mr. O'Connor is a member of the Catholic church and in 
politics is independent. His platform in politics is progress and improvement 
and thereon he stands for the benefit of the community in which he lives. His 
business career has been a notable one by reason of the success which he has 
achieved and the honorable methods which he has followed in its attainment. 



HENRY JAMES DUGDALE. 

Among the successful and energetic farmers of Shelton township is num- 
bered Henry James Dugdale, who was born in Shelton, Nebraska, then known 
as Wood River Center, on the loth of July, i860. His father, Henry Dugdale, 
a machinist by trade, was born in England, as was his mother, Sarah Jane 
Dugdale. 

Our subject was reared in this county and is indebted for his education to 
the district schools. Early in life he became familiar with farming and on 
beginning his independent career determined to follow the occupation to which 
he had been reared. He has never had occasion to regret his choice of a life 
work, for he has not only gained a gratifying measure of prosperity but has also 
found agricultural pursuits congenial. He gives careful attention to his work, 
follows up-to-date methods and uses improved machinery and his well directed 
energy has resulted in the attainment of success. 

Mr. Dugdale was married on the 13th of March. 1888, at Imperial, this state, 
to Miss Lillie May Allsop, a daughter of William and Helen Allsop. To this 
union have been born the following children : Lulu Estelle, the wife of Walter 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 387 

VV. Rice, of Kearney; Ralph Earl, who married Ethel V. Roberts, of Toledo, 
Ohio; Delia Irene; Lee Allsop; and Thelma Helen. 

Mr. Dugdale has never been remiss in any of the duties of a good citizen 
but has not taken an active part in politics, preferring to devote his time to his 
agricultural interests. He was one of the charter members of Lodge No. 141, 
I. O. O. F., of Shelton township, organized in 1883, and is still identified with 
that organization. His entire life has been passed in this county and his genuine 
worth is indicated by the fact that those who have known him intimately since 
childhood hold him in the highest esteem and warmest regard. 



WILLIAM F. STARK. 



Among the native sons of Buffalo county who have recognized the fact that 
the opportunities offered the ambitious young men here are the equal of those 
to be found elsewhere, is William F. Stark, who is operating the home farm in 
Garfield township, on which he was born on the 23d of September, 1880. His 
parents, Fred and Wilhelmina (Gaten) Stark, were natives of Germany but 
both came to America about i860. The father followed the miller's trade at 
Davenport, Iowa, for a short time, after which he went to Grand Island, 
Nebraska, where he was employed in a mill until he removed to Gibbon, Buffalo 
county. He worked in the Davis mill there for twO' years, at the end of which 
time he turned his attention to farming, taking up a homestead and timber claim 
in Garfield township, his holdings comprising three hundred acres. He was 
one of the first settlers in the township and had to perform all of the arduous 
tasks incident to developing a farm from the virgin prairie, for his land was 
totally unimproved when it came into his possession. He brought the land under 
cultivation, erected good buildings and at the time of his demise his place was 
in a high state of development. He passed away on the 31st of Alarch, 1901, 
and was' survived by his wife until the 21st of April, 1912. 

William F. Stark was reared at home and in the acquirement of his education 
attended the district schools. He was early trained to farm work and remained 
with his parents until they were called from this life. Following the demise of 
his mother he came into possession of the home farm, as he bought out his 
sister's interest in the place and he has since operated the homestead on his own 
account. He has made additional improvements upon the farm and has been 
very successful as an agriculturist. In addition to raising grain he breeds thor- 
oughbred Polled Durham cattle and other high grade stock. The most important 
factors in his prosperity are his thorough knowledge of agriculture, his willing- 
ness to utilize new methods and new machinery, and his sound business judgment. 

On the 1 8th of April, 191 5, Mr. Stark was united in marriage to Miss Ida 
Betke, a daughter of William and Bertha (Shiefelbein) Betke, natives of Ger- 
many. The father was brought by his parents to America in 1879 and the 
family home was established in this county, the father homesteading a claim in 
Garfield township. Following his demise his son William became the owner 
of the home farm, which he has since operated. The mother of Mrs! Stark is 
also still living. 



388 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

Mr. Stark is a socialist in his political belief and has given much careful 
study to the economic, political and sociological problems of the day. His fra- 
ternal connection is with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He is an 
energetic and representative young farmer and his personal worth is attested 
by the fact that those who have been associated with him since boyhood hold 
him in the highest respect and esteem. 



CHARLES E. CLARK. 



Charles E. Clark, cashier of the State Bank of Poole, has made a remarkable , 
record in that capacity, having so conducted the affairs of the institution that its ; 
business has increased about one hundred and sixty per cent since he took i 
charge in 1909, although the volurne t)f the banking business throughout the state 
has shown a decrease during this period owing to poor crops. His birth occurred 
on the 15th of May, 1877, in Wayne county, Iowa, near Promise City, and he is 
a son of Thomas and Diana (Scott) Clark. His paternal great-great grandfather 
was the master of a sailing vessel and his gireat grandmother was born at sea 
and lived orf the ocean until she was married at the age of eighteen years. Samuel 
Clark, the grandfather of our subject, was well acquainted with both Lincoln 
and Douglas, traveling with them when in their famous debates they drove home 
to the people the importance of the issues then before the country. 

Charles E. Clark spent much of his boyhood upon a farm in Clay county, 
Nebraska, halfway between Clay Center and Fairfield, his parents having removed 
there when he was but seven years old. Eight years later the family came to 
Buffalo county and located upon a farm in Valley township nine miles north 
of Gibbon. He received his early education in the district schools of Clay and 
Buffalo counties and subsequently took a course in the Gibbon high school. For 
a time he engaged in farming but later turned his attention to the profession of 
teaching, which he followed for eleven years. He was one of the best educators 
in the county and during the last three years of his professional work served as 
the superintendent of schools in Pleasanton, during which time he did much to 
advance the educational standards there. 

In 1909 Mr. Clark entered the business field, becoming cashier of the State 
Bank of Poole, and he has discharged the important duties devolving upon him 
in that capacity in a manner worthy of the highest praise. He has proved 
seemingly infallible in judgment and has made the bank of service to the com- 
munity in many different ways. The institution not only does a general banking 
business but also issues letters of credit and foreign drafts or money orders, 
sells travelers' checks, writes farm insurance, deals in farm loans and negotiates 
the transfer of realty. Although the policy of the bank has been characterized 
by a progressive spirit and a desire to promote the business expansion of the 
community, yet the first care of the ofificers has at all times been to safeguard 
the interests of depositors and stockholders, as they realize that only by so doing 
can they secure permanent prosperity. Five times as much surplus is carried as 
is required by law and a considerable amount of the earnings of the bank is left 
in the undivided profits account, thus still further increasing the safety of the 




CHAELES E. CLAEK 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 391 

depositors' money. Moreover, the bank is operating under the Depositors Guar- 
antee Law of the State of Nebraska, which is very strict in its provisions. The 
institution was organized in July, 1905, with a paid up capital of five thousand 
dollars and opened its doors for business in a rented building that had a sign in 
front that read "Board and Lodging." The interior of the banking rooms was 
as unprepossessing as the exterior and a homemade counter served as a desk. 
In spite of this exceedingly humble beginning the institution prospered and in 
1910 the capital stock was increased to ten thousand dollars and not long after- 
ward a manganese steel burglar proof safe was purchased. In the fall of 191 1 
the business had reached such a volume that the stockholders erected in a good 
location a brick building with a large fire-proof vault provided with safety 
deposit boxes for the accommodation of those who wish to rent them. Subse- 
quently additional improvements were made in the equipment of the bank and 
the stockholders have always shown a willingness to use part of the earnings 
of the business in making things more convenient for the bank's customers. 
When Mr. Clark became cashier the resources of the bank were thirty-nine 
thousand, two hundred and ninety-nine dollars and ninety cents, and on the 
1 2th of December, 191 5, they totaled one hundred and three thousand, four 
hundred and twenty-nine dollars and fifty-four cents. The remarkable growth 
of the business in the last six years is in itself proof of his unusual business 
ability. He has the full confidence of all who have had dealings with him and 
he is popular with the bank's patrons, as he is never found lacking in courtesy. 

Mr. Clark was married in 1899 to Miss Edna Reedy, a daughter of John 
Reedy, one of the leading citizens of Buffalo county. She is a descendant of 
a family which was established in the United States in the early days of its 
history and whose representatives have been highly esteemed in their respective 
communities. She is a woman of sound business judgment and is efficiently 
filling the position of assistant cashier of the State Bank of Poole. By her 
marriage she has become the mother of four children. Hazel, Marjorie, Charles, 
Jr., and Ruth. 

Mr. Clark gives his political allegiance to the democratic party and has 
taken a prominent part in local public affairs. He was one of the incorporators 
of the village of Poole, served as chairman of the village board of trustees 
during the first years of its existence and held the office of township treasurer 
of Beaver township for some time. He can be counted upon to take a leading 
part in all movements seeking to promote the civic and business advancement 
of his town and county and no resident of Poole is held in greater respect 
than he. 



REUBEN B. MILLER. 



Reuben B. Miller is successfully engaged in stock raising on a fine farm in 
Cherry Creek township and specializes in mule foot hogs. He was born in 
Michigan on the 13th of April, 1878, and his parents were John G. and Mary 
(Stuber) Miller, natives respectively of Germany and of Switzerland. The 
father came to America in young manhood and settled in Michigan, where he 



392 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

farmed until 1880, when he removed with his family to Buffalo county, Nebraska, 
and bought a homestead right. He made many improvements upon his place, 
which he operated until his demise in September, 1897. He was survived for 
a number of years by his wife, who passed away in May, 1912. 

Reuben B. Miller was reared and educated in Buffalo county, Nebraska, as 
he was but two years of age when the family removed here, and he remained 
under the parental roof until he attained his majority. He then worked as a 
farm hand for one year, after which he rented land which he operated until 
1908. He then bought one hundred and sixty acres in Gardner township, but 
three years later sold that property and purchased five hundred acres of excellent 
land on sections t,2, 29 and 20, Cherry Creek township, which he still owns. He 
has carefully conserved the fertility of the soil, kept everything about the place 
in first class condition and has also made a number of improvements. He grows 
some grain but pays particular attention to stock raising, keeping about one 
hundred head of cattle and specializing in thoroughbred mule foot hogs. He 
understands all phases of farming thoroughly and as he gives much thought to 
the management of his work and keeps in touch with the findings of those who 
are engaged in the scientific study of agricultural problems, he is very efficient 
and receives a handsome income from his land. 

Mr. Miller was married in February, 1899, to Miss Louise Nutter, a daugh- 
ter of William and Dina (Hingham) Nutter, both of whom were born in 
England. The father came to America in 1852 and after working for some time 
as a factory boss in Philadelphia he went to Utah, having been converted to the 
Mormon faith. He remained there for eighteen months but at the end of that 
time became disgusted with conditions and decided to locate elsewhere. He 
came to Buffalo county and took up his residence in the vicinity of Shelton, but 
those were pioneer times and the Indians were so hostile that he was compelled 
to leave. He returned to England but some time later came again to this country 
and located on a farm near Gibbon, Nebraska, which became the family home- 
stead. He operated that place for many years and passed away in May, 1905. 
His wife is still living on the home farm. Mr. and Mrs. Miller have two chil- 
dren: Gerald D., born on the 6th of October, 1902; and Ruby G., whose birth 
occurred on the 22d of July, 1905. 

Mr. Miller indorses the principles of the republican party and has worked 
loyally for its success at the polls. Fraternally he belongs to the Royal High- 
landers and the Modern Woodmen of America. 



SAMUEL CAMPBELL. 



Samuel Campbell, a resident farmer living in Divide township, was born 
in Stark county, Illinois, March 18, 1885, a son of William and Jeannette (Watt) 
Campbell, both of whom were natives of Scotland. They came to America in 
early life and first settled near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Subsequently they 
removed to Stark county, Illinois, where they took up their abode upon a farm, 
making their home in that district until 1893, when they removed to Buffalo 
county, Nebraska, and established their home on the farm on section 25, Divide 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 393 

township, on which their son Samuel now resides. Both the father and mother 
spent their remaining days upon that place. In their family were five children : 
]\Iary Jane, the wife of M. B. Whitcher; William; Jeannette, the wife of F. A. 
Snedeker; Alexander; and Samuel. 

The last named was reared and educated in this county, attending the 
common schools. He was early trained to the work of the farm and after his 
education was completed he settled down upon the old homestead and is today 
the owner of one hundred and sixty acres on section 25, Divide township, where 
he carries on general agricultural pursuits, meeting with good success in his 
undertakings. In addition to cultivating the cereals best adapted to soil and 
climate he makes a specialty of raising stock, of which he keeps good grades. 

In 1908 Mr. Campbell was united in marriage to Miss Maidie Parks, a native 
of Platte county, Nebraska, who was born February 3, i8go. Her parents, 
J. F. and Ella (Patterson) Parks, are now living in Thornton township. To 
]\Ir. and Mrs. Campbell have been born four children, namely: Boyce G., Muriel 
AL, J. R. and Melvin S. 

The wife and mother passed away in February, 1914, and was laid to rest in 
the Kearney cemetery. She was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
which Mr. Campbell and the family attend. He is one of the enterprising and 
leading farmers and stock raisers of his township, progressive in all that he 
does, his labors bringing to him well merited and well earned success. 



WILLIAM STARK. 



Agricultural interests in Buffalo county find a worthy representative in 
William Stark, who is engaged in general farming on section 2, Garfield town- 
ship. He has resided upon this place since 1880 and for many years has been 
prominently, actively and extensively engaged in the raising of cattle and hogs. 
In a word, he is regarded as one of the foremost business men in this part of 
the state and has won notable success in the able conduct of his business affairs. 
He was born in Germany on the 3d of June, 1858, a son of John C. and Anna 
(Nelson) Stark, who came to the United States in 1862 and settled in Daven- 
port, Iowa. Six years afterward they removed to Council Bluffs, Iowa, where 
they remained for a year, and then became residents of Grand Island, Nebraska, 
where they passed the remainder of their lives. The father was a brick mason 
and in following that pursuit provided for his family. 

William Stark spent his youthful days at home and pursued his education 
in the common schools. In his early years he became a cowboy and thus was 
employed for eight years on the Platte river bottoms. It was his ambition, 
however, to engage in business on his own account as a farmer and stock raiser 
and in 1880 he took up his abode upon a tract of land on section 2, Garfield 
township, securing a homestead and also purchasing one hundred and sixty 
acres of railroad land. With characteristic energy he began the development of 
a farm and transformed the wild prairie into fertile fields. He extended the 
scope of his activities to include the cattle business, with which he has since 
been prominently identified. He breeds and raises high grade Polled Durham 



394 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

cattle and Poland China hogs and is one of the leading stock dealers of this part 
of the state. " As his financial resources have increased he has extended the 
boundaries of his farm from time to time and is now the owner of seven hundred 
and twenty acres of valuable land, while in Garfield township he is regarded 
as one of its foremost citizens. 

In 1882 occurred the marriage of Mr. Stark and Miss Fredericka Krehmke, 
a native of Germany, who came to the United States with her parents about 
1875. To this marriage have been born nine children, of whom eight are yet 
living: Lucy, now the wife of Arthur Kenyon, of Castana, Iowa; Minnie, who 
married Frank Huryta, of Ravenna, Nebraska ; Anna, the wife of Leo Colter, 
a farmer of Sherman county ; Lilly, Edna and John, all at home ; Leo, who 
resides in Ravenna; and Christie, at home. Nellie, who married Albert Polenz, 
of Ravenna, died November 20, 191 3. There are also six grandchildren. The 
wife and mother passed away March 21, 1902, her death being a matter of deep 
regret to many friends as well as to her immediate family. 

In his political belief Mr. Stark is a socialist and his study of the questions 
and issues of the day has led him to give intelligent support to the principles 
which he indorses. Fraternally he is connected with the Modern Woodmen of 
America, but his efforts and interests have been most largely concentrated upon 
his business affairs and diligence and determination have constituted the founda- 
tion upon which he has builded his notable and desirable success. His business 
affairs have been most carefully managed and energy and industry have brought 
him to the fore in this connection, so that he stands today as one of the most 
prominent and prosperous farmers and stock raisers of Buffalo county. 



MRS. EVA C. BARR. 



Mrs. Eva C. Barr, who has been phenomenally successful in the management 
of the West Hotel, which she has conducted for a number of years, has made 
it one of the most popular and best known small town hotels in the state. In 
her business career she has had many difffculties to overcome but has never 
become discouraged, and her energy, self-reliance and sound judgment have 
enabled her to turn seeming defeat into success and she is now one of the influ- 
ential factors in the business development of Ravenna. 

Mrs. Barr was born upon a farm near Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin, and 
during her childhood and youth resided in several different places, her parents 
removing to Iowa and later to Joplin, Missouri. She attended school in the 
latter place and subsequently accompanied her parents to Harlan county, 
Nebraska, where she spent several years. Later she removed to Bloomington 
and was there married. She and her husband lived for a time at Hastings but 
were later engaged in business first at Hansen and then at Prosser, this state. 
At length Mrs. Barr found herself thrown upon her own resources with two 
children to provide for and rear to maturity and she at once bravely set herself 
to the task. For two years she was a traveling saleswoman for the Hammond 
Printing Company of Fremont, selling advertising novelties and fancy stationery, 
and while on the road she realized the need for better hotels in small towns. 




MES. EVA C. BARE 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 397 

Through her own experience she learned conditions as they were and also 
learned what improvements would be most appreciated by the traveling public 
and determined to go into the hotel business as soon as the opportunity offered. 

At length she accepted a proposition to take charge of a small hotel in Litch- 
field and at once began to put her plans into execution. She personally attended 
to the minutest details of the business ai?d spared no time nor thought in making 
the hotel a model of its kind. She insisted on the utmost cleanliness throughout 
the establishment, prepared the meals with her own hands and made the hotel 
an attractive and cheerful place. The wisdom of her course was soon evident, 
for within a very short time the business had increased to such an extent that 
the hotel proved altogether too small. In providing for the comfort of her 
guests she did the work of two women, but her energy and endurance proved 
equal to the demands made upon her and she gained such confidence in her 
theories and in her ability to work them out satisfactorily that on the ist of 
January, 1910, she leased the West Hotel in Ravenna, which she has since 
conducted. With a much larger house and a greater volume of business she 
still gives personal attention to the comfort of her guests and to the preparation 
of the food, doing the more particular part of the cooking herself, and also 
manages the financial end of the business. The reputation of the West Hotel 
has grown rapidly and there are many traveling men in this section of the state 
who make it a point to put up at the West as much as possible, as it has a 
standard of service usually found only in much larger hostelries. At length the 
patronage outgrew the capacity and Mrs. Barr then assumed the management 
of the adjoining hotel and is now conducting it as an annex to the West Hotel. 
Her business foresight, her enterprise and executive ability are recognized by 
all who have come in contact with her and she is considered one of the most 
valued residents of Ravenna. 

Mrs. Barr's two children are now grown and her daughter is the wife of 
O. A. Nellis, of Hastings, Nebraska. Her son, S. G. Barr, is residing in Fort 
Morgan, Colorado, and is connected with the sugar plant there. He married 
Miss May West, of Haigler, Nebraska, whose father is a prominent cattleman. 
Mr. and Mrs. Barr have a daughter, Lenore, three years old. 



HANS HENRY LUTH. 



Hans Henry Luth, carrying on general agricultural pursuits on section 2, 
Schneider township, was born- in Germany on the 23d of June, 1851, a son of 
Frederick and Dorothy Luth, who were also natives of that country. The father 
worked as a general laborer for many years, or until 1878, when he came to the 
new world, after which he made his home with his children until his death, 
which occurred in 1882. His wife had passed away ere he crossed the Atlantic. 

Hans Henry Luth was educated in the fatherland and at the age of seventeen 
years came to America, settling in Clinton county, Iowa, where he was employed 
as a farm hand for ten years. He next went to Crawford county, Iowa, where 
he worked for a year, and during this period he carefully added to his earnings 
until the sum was sufficient to enable him to purchase forty acres of land. He 



I 



398 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

afterward added another tract of forty acres and for nine years continued th^ 
cultivation and improvement of that farm, but eventually sold out and came to" 
Buffalo county, where he arrived in 1889. Here he purchased one hundred 
and sixty acres on section 2, Schneider township, and has since made notable 
changes and improvements upon the place, his labors converting it into a very 
valuable, desirable and beautiful fann. It is equipped with all modern acces- 
sories, conveniences and improvements and constitutes one of the pleasing 
features of the landscape. In addition to this property he also owns one hun- 
dred and sixty acres on section 31, Garfield township. In addition to tilling the 
soil for the cultivation of the crops best adapted to conditions here he makes a 
specialty of raising thoroughbred Polled Hereford cattle. 

In January, 1876, Mr. Luth was married to Miss Margaret Ohde, a daughter 
of Jacob and Dorothy Ohde, who were natives of Germany and who came to 
the United States in 1870. They settled in Clinton county, Iowa, where Mr, 
Ohde purchased a farm, which he cultivated for a considerable period. He 
then sold that property and removed to Crawford county, Iowa, where he again 
invested in a farm, upon which he spent his remaining days. To the marriage 
of Mr. and Mrs. Luth have been born nine children : Fred, now a resident of 
Colorado; Peter, who died in 1903; Henry, who makes his home in Ravenna, 
Nebraska; George, at home; Annie, the wife of Max Weidner, living in Ravenna; 
Max, at home; Rose, the wife of B. Sheik, living near Shelton; Laura, the wife 
of Asa McKinney, a resident of Ravenna ; and August, who is also under the 
parental roof. 

In his political views Mr. Luth is independent, nor has he been very active 
along political lines. He has served, however, as road supervisor and he has 
also filled the office of school director. He is a member of the Highlanders 
Lodge and his religious faith is indicated by his membership in the Lutheran 
church. Substantial qualities characterize him and his salient traits are those 
which have won him warm regard and the respect of those with whom he has 
been associated. 



FRED A. PIERSON. 



Fred A. Pierson, devoting his time and energies to general farming on 
section 9, Cherry Creek township, has extensive and important agricultural 
interests, operating his father's farm properties embracing fourteen hundred 
and forty acres. To control and manage this demands excellent business ability 
and executive force — qualities which Fred A. Pierson displays. He was born 
in Bremer county, Iowa, on the ist of November, 1876, a son of Charles A. 
Pierson, of whom extended mention is made elsewhere in this volume. His 
youthful days were spent in the usual manner of farm lads, his time being 
divided between the acquirement of a public school education and the work of 
the fields. Actual experience brought him a knowledge of the best methods of 
tilling the soil and caring for the crops, and about the time he attained his 
majority he began farming on his own account in Bremer county, Iowa. In 
later years he carried on agricultural pursuits in Minnesota and in North Dakota 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 399 

and in 1910 he arrived in Buffalo county, where he has since made his home. 
The foHowing year he took charge of his father's extensive land holdings, which 
he has since managed and developed and today he is numbered among the large 
farmers of the county, carefully and wisely directing the cultivation of fourteen 
hundred and forty acres of land. He raises large crops of the cereals best 
adapted to soil and climate and he also has good stock upon his place. His 
plans are carefully formed and promptly executed, for his business must be 
thoroughly systematized in order that there shall be no loss of time, labor or 
material. The work is conducted in accordance with the most progressive 
agricultural methods and excellent buildings upon the place furnish ample shelter 
for grain, stock and farm machinery. 

On the 19th of October, 1903, Mr. Pierson was married to Miss Gertrude 
Cooper, of Bremer county, Iowa, and to this union two children have been born, 
Flora Irene and Charles Oscar. In politics Mr. Pierson is a republican, voting 
for the men and measures of the party because of his endorsement of its plat- 
form. He and his wife are members of the Baptist church, to the teachings of 
which they are loyal, while to the support of the church they make generous 
contribution. They are also well known socially and their own home is justly 
celebrated for its warm hearted hospitality. 



GEORGE W. DUNCAN. 

George W. Duncan has been identified with business interests of Poole for 
many years and is now confining his attention to general merchandising, although 
he was formerly also engaged in the lumber business and at one time dealt in 
grain. His birth occurred on the loth of August, 1855, in Le Claire, Iowa, to 
which place his parents, James and Jane (Wilson) Duncan, had removed on the 
5th of April, 1855. They were both natives of Pennsylvania. The father 
became the owner of a valuable tract of land in Scott county and engaged in 
its cultivation and improvement until he was called by death in October, 1877. 
His wife survived him for more than nine years, dying in January, 1887. 

George W. Duncan grew to manhood in his native county and entered the 
public schools at the usual age, there securing a good education. In 1878 he was 
appointed administrator for his father's estate and performed the duties devolv- 
ing upon him in a very efficient manner. About that time he came to Buffalo 
county, Nebraska, to see a sister who was living here and, although he had no 
intention of locating in the county when he came, found it so much to his liking 
that he took up a homestead in Cedar township. For eight years he operated 
that place, after which he took up his residence upon other land which he had 
acquired. From time to time he invested in real estate and at length became the 
owner of eight hundred acres in this county. In December, 1891, he came to 
Poole and began dealing in grain, but the following spring he turned his attention 
to general mercantile interests, erecting a store building and stocking it with a 
well selected line of merchandise. He has been very successful and has con- 
ducted the store with the exception of four years, which he spent upon his farm. 
For some time he was also engaged in the lumber business, but has now disposed 



400 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

of his interest in that connection. In addition to his valuable land holdings in 
this county he owns three good farms in Oregon and as his investments have 
all been wisely made he derives a good income therefrom. 

Mr. Duncan was married on the 19th of August, 1885, to Miss Susie Pool, 
whose parents, A. H. and Gertrude (Tilson) Pool, were natives respectively of 
New York and Michigan, but took up their residence in Buffalo county in 1876. 
The father was for some time engaged in business as a partner of our subject 
but passed away in 1893. The mother is still living in Ravenna. Mr. and Mrs. 
Duncan have become the parents of four children: Edgar E., who is in the 
lumber business at Farnham, Nebraska; Walter R., at home; Frank K., who is 
attending school in Ravenna; and Lelia H., who is also attending school there. 

Mr. Duncan is an adherent of the democratic party and has served for two 
years as county commissioner and has also held the offices of assessor and town- 
ship clerk. His fraternal affiliation is with the Loyal Mystic Legion and he 
gives his religious allegiance' to the United Presbyterian church. In the conduct 
of his various business enterprises he has shown himself farsighted, energetic 
and alert and the gratifying success which has rewarded his labors is richly 
deserved. 



CHARLES F. HIGHLAND. 

Charles F. Highland is still living upon his farm in Beaver township but is not 
active in its operation. He is, however, connected with business interests as a 
member of the firm of Highland & Son, well known grain dealers. He was born 
in Walworth, Wisconsin, in December, 1854, of the marriage of Thomas and 
Elizabeth (Walton) Highland, both natives of England. They were brought to 
the United States as children by their respective parents and here grew to 
maturity. The father engaged in farming in Wisconsin until 1864, when he went 
to Delaware county, Iowa, where he purchased land which he operated for nine 
years. At the end of that time he removed to Buena Vista county and there he 
resided until he passed from this life in 1879. Fie was survived for many years 
by his wife, whose demise occurred in July, 1912. 

Charles F. Highland is indebted for his education to the public schools and 
remained at home with his parents until he was twenty-five years old, when he 
bought a tract of land in Beuna Vista county, Iowa, which he operated for five 
years, or until 1885. On selling that place he bought a farm in Sac county, the 
same state, which he disposed of in 1888, the year in which he came to Buff'alo 
county, Nebraska. He rented a farm four and a half miles southeast of Ravenna 
for a year and operated leased land in Cherry Creek township for a similar period 
of time. He then lived in Sherman county for two years, operating land belonging 
to others, but at the end of that time he had accumulated sufficient capital to 
purchase land and bought one hundred and sixtj^-five acres on section 4, Beaver 
township, on which the town of Sweetwater is now located. Subsequently he sold 
sixteen acres to the town but continued to operate the remainder of his farm 
until 1910, when he rented the land to his son. He raised both grain and stock, 
specializing in high grade Poland China hogs and Red Polled cattle, and his 




ME. AND MRS. CHAELES F. HIGHLAND 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 405 

well directed labors yielded him a substantial return. He still resides upon the 
place but now devotes his energy to the grain business which is conducted under 
the firm name of Highland & Son. He has dealt in grain more or less since 1891, 
but the present firm has been in existence for only about two years. In 1908 the 
firm of Highland Brothers engaged in the general mercantile business in Sweet- 
water, but three and a half years later sold their stock of goods and turned 
their attention to dealing in grain, continuing under the same firm style for two 
years longer. At the end of that time one brother sold his interest to his father, 
Charles F. Highland, and the name was changed to Highland & Son. The firm 
operates two elevators and does a large and growing business. 

Mr. Highland of this review was married on the 25th of December, 1879, 
to Miss Melvina Hollandsworth, a daughter of John and Sarah A. (Bird) Hol- 
landsworth, both of whom were born in Kentucky. Tier father became connected 
with mercantile interests in Prairie City, Illinois, where he engaged in business 
during the greater part of his active life. He passed away in 1885, but his wife 
is still living and resides with her daughter, Mrs. Highland. The latter is the 
mother of seven children : Lester, who is manager of an elevator at Ravenna, 
Nebraska ; Loren, who is operating his father's farm ; Jay M., who is in partner- 
ship with his father in the grain business ; Ethel, the wife of Harry Swartz, of 
Ravenna ; Floy, who is postmistress at Sweetwater ; Roy, at home ; and Dean, 
who is attending college at Grand Island. 

Mr. Highland is independent in politics, voting for the man irrespective of 
party. He served as postmaster of Sweetwater for nine years and was also jus- 
tice of the peace of Beaver township for a considerable period. He is affiliated 
Avith the Modern Brotherhood of America, and also with the Grange and the 
Farmers Alliance and is a Presbyterian in religious faith. He has measured up 
to all of the obligations of life and is justly esteemed as a successful business 
man and a good citizen. 



JOSEPH C. MAHONEY. 

Joseph C. Mahoney, the agent at Poole for the Union Pacific Railroad, was 
born in Onondaga county, New York, in June, 1869, of the marriage of Thomas 
J. and Laura B. (Longstreet) Mahoney, the former a native of Ireland and the 
latter of New York. The father was brought by his parents to the United States 
when seven years of age and was reared in New York, where he engaged in 
farming and truck gardening after reaching man's estate. In 1873 he removed 
with his family to Buffalo county, Nebraska, and entered a homestead four and 
a half miles west of Gibbon. He made many improvements upon that place 
and operated it for twelve years, but at the end of that time he sold the property 
and removed to Gibbon, where he spent the remainder of his life. He died in 
April, 1894, and his wife passed away in April, 1888. He was a veteran of the 
Civil war, enlisting with Company E, One Hundred and Forty-fourth New York 
Volunteer Infantry, with which he went to the front. After nine months' active 
service he was wounded, losing his left arm, and it was some time before he 

Vol. 11—18 



406 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

recovered. However, his patriotic spirit was not lessened and as soon as he 
was well enough he joined the navy and remained in that service for two years. 

Joseph C. Mahoney was but four years of age at the time of the removal of 
the family to this county and here he grew to manhotDd. He is indebted for his 
education to the public schools and he remained with his parents until his mother's 
demise. He then went to work for himself and after being employed as a cow- 
boy for six years he turned his attention to railroading, securing a position with 
the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad. After spending two and a half years in 
that connection he learned telegraphy and was for a short time in the employ of 
the Burlington Railroad. In 1897, however, he entered the service of the Union 
Pacific Railroad, with which he has since been connected. For eight years he 
has been that company's agent at Poole and has discharged his duties to the entire 
satisfaction of his superiors. He is systematic and accurate in the conduct of 
the business and advances the interests of the road in every way possible. 

Mr. Mahoney was married in November, 1899, to Miss Eudora Gramley, who 
is a daughter of Henry W. and Maria C. (Musser) Gramley, natives of Penn- 
sylvania. Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Mahoney : Katherine, 
whose birth occurred on the 20th of August, 1900; Myrle, who was born on the 
4th of December, 1901 ; and J. Carroll, Jr., who was born April i, 1912. 

Mr. Mahoney is a stanch supporter of the republican party and has taken an 
active part in the affairs of local government, having served as township clerk 
of Beaver township for two terms and as village clerk since the organization of] 
the village of Poole. He holds membership in the Masonic order and also in 
the Methodist church, associations which indicate the principles which guide his 
life. He not only has the satisfaction of knowing that his work is well done and 
that he is a factor in the civic life of his community, but he has also gained many ' 
warm friends and has won a fair measure of financial success. 



SCHUYLER M. BLAIR. 

Schuyler M. Blair, an efficient young farmer residing on section 9, Plattej 
township, was born upon the farm where he still lives on the nth of October,] 
1888. His parents, J. W. and Nancy E. (Hollenbeck) Blair, were natives] 
respectively of New York and Pennsylvania. The father served throughout 
the Civil war and although he was in many hard fought engagements came out 
without a scratch. About 1880 he removed to Bufifalo county, Nebraska, and 
took up his residence upon a good farm in Platte township. He operated that 
place until 1905, when he removed to Colorado, where his demise occurred. 
His wife survives and still resides in that state. They were the parents of ten 
children, of whom nine are living. 

Schuyler M. Blair is indebted for his education to the public schools and 
for his thorough training in agricultural work to his father. After beginning 
his independent career he farmed in Colorado for a time but in 1908 returned 
to Bufifalo county, Nebraska, and in association with his brother George began 
farming the old homestead of three hundred and twenty acres on section 9, 
Platte township. His land is naturally productive and is in a high state of 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 407 

cultivation, and as the brothers are practical and energetic farmers they receive 
a handsome income from their labors. They raise both grain and stock, finding 
such a course more profitable than specializing in either. 

Mr. Blair of this review was married in 1907 to Miss Bertha Keeler, who 
was born in Iowa and is a daughter of Samuel and Alma (Alois) Keeler. The 
father has passed away but the mother is still living and makes her home in 
Colorado. Mr. and Mrs. Blair are the parents of three children : Lilly A. ; 
Martina R. ; and Leroy, deceased. 

Mr. Blair votes the republican ticket and both he and his wife attend the 
Methodist Episcopal church. Although a young man he has already won a 
highly creditable measure of success and his many friends predict for him 
continued prosperity. The greater part of his life has been passed in this county 
and he is greatly interested in its advancement and progress and co-operates 
heartily in movements calculated to further its development. 



PHILLIP F. KNERL. 



Phillip F. Knerl, busily occupied day after day with the labors of the farm 
and faithfully performing each day the labors that it brings, is meeting with 
success in his undertakings and is regarded as one of the enterprising agricul- 
turists of Garfield township, his home being on section 35, where he has two 
hundred and forty acres of rich and productive land. He is a native son of 
New Jersey, his birth having occurred in Rahway, on the 19th of November, 
1852, his parents being John and Margaret Knerl, who were natives of Neouren- 
burg, Germany. They were married on the ocean when crossing the briny deep 
to the new world, and Phillip F. Knerl is their oldest child. The father died in 
Benton Harbor, Michigan, April 11, 1902, at the age of seventy-five years, while 
the mother survived until February 14, 1914, and passed away at the age of 
eighty-two years. 

Phillip F. Knerl was a lad of nine years when his parents left the east and 
became residents of Marshall, Michigan, where they remained for seven years 
and then established their home at Decatur, that state. At the usual age he 
became a public school pupil and had good educational advantages until he 
reached the age of fifteen, when the family removed to a farm near Keeler, 
Michigan, spending fifteen years there. Later the family home was removed 
to Benton Harbor, Michigan, where it has since been maintained. 

It was in the year 1884 that Phillip F. Knerl left the parental roof and 
removed to Bufi'alo county, at which time he purchased railroad land in Garfield 
township. Two years later the Chicago, Burlington & Ouincy Railroad was 
built through the township and the town of Ravenna was founded about six and 
a half miles from the Knerl farm. In those pioneer times the family met all the 
hardships and privations which feature as factors in frontier life, but resolute 
purpose and unfaltering courage enabled them to meet all difficulties and pass 
on to the days when advantages and opportunities are easily obtainable. Mr. 
Knerl brought his land to a high state of cultivation, carefully and wisely 
directing the labors of the fields, and as his financial resources increased he 



408 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

added to his property until he now has an excellent farm of two hundred and 
forty acres equipped with all modern accessories and conveniences. His resi- 
dence is one of the fine farm homes of the county, supplied with an acetylene 
gas lighting plant and a well equipped lavatory, hot and cold water being piped 
throughout the house. In fact the home has all of the conveniences of the 
modern city residence and it has been Mr. Knerl's delight to supply his family 
with all of the comforts and many of the luxuries of life. 

It was in 1884 that Mr. Knerl was married to Miss Lucinda Endrick, for- 
merly a resident of Bainbridge, Michigan. Almost immediately after their 
marriage they removed to Nebraska and here they have reared their family of 
nine children : Oscar, a machinist by trade, who is employed in the Union 
Pacific shops at Grand Island; Orrin, cashier of the Dixon County Bank, at 
Ponca, Nebraska; John, also a machinist in the employ of the Union Pacific 
Railroad Company at Grand Island ; Calvin, who is actively engaged in the 
cultivation of the home farm; Mrs. E. N. Thomas, residing in Ravenna; Floyd, 
who is attending Buckley's Business College, at York, Nebraska; and Charles, 
Eddie and Alice, all at home. A contemporary writer has said : "The Knerl 
home is a hospitable social center, and is in many ways an ideal country home, 
where there is fine family unit and spirit, and from which there have gone into 
the world a number of bright and capable young men and women who are 
'making good' in their various callings and walks of life, while Mr. and Mrs. 
Knerl, still in the prime of life, have reached a condition where they can take 
life a little easier and render thanks that they cast their lot in Nebraska and had 
the grit and determination to stay by it until they won success." 

Mr. and Mrs. Knerl hold membership in the Evangelical church and frater- 
nally he is identified with Ravenna Lodge, No. 347, I. O. O. F., and with the 
Ancient Order of United Workmen. In politics he is an earnest republican, 
giving stalwart support to the principles of the party, and for eight years he 
served as justice of the peace, his decisions in that connection being strictly fair 
and impartial. He has also been school director for many years and the cause 
of education has found in him a warm champion. He ranks today as one of the 
foremost citizens of his county, wide awake, alert and enterprising, ready for 
any emergency that may come in business or in public affairs. His life has never 
been self-centered, for he has reached out in helpfulness to public interests and 
given active aid to many plans and measures for the general good. 



CASPER H. SHRADER. 

Casper H. Shrader is now living retired in Ravenna, having rented his farm, 
upon which he lived for many years and from which he derived a most gratify- 
ing annual income. He was born in Prussia, May 20, 1843, ^ son of Charles 
and Kate Shrader, who were natives of Prussia. The father was a farmer and 
continued to carry on agricultural pursuits in his native country until 1850, 
when he came to America and settled in Des Moines county, Iowa, where he 
rented land for four years. He then purchased eighty acres which he operated 
for many years but ultimately retired and made his home with his daughter at 



GO 

> 

>> 

a 

> 




HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 411 

Burlington, Iowa, throughout his remaining days, death calling him in 1895. For 
a long period he had survived his w^ife, who passed away in 1878. 

Casper H. Shrader was but seven years of age when the family home was 
established in Des Moines county, where he was reared and educated. Flis 
school privileges were somewhat limited, for he put aside his textbooks in order 
to earn his living, being employed as a farm hand until eighteen years of age. 
He then responded to the country's call for troops to crush out the rebellion in 
the south, enlisting at Burlington, Iowa, in 1862 as a member of Company D, 
Twenty-fifth Iowa Infantry, with which he served until June, 1865, when he 
received an honorable discharge. He had participated in a number of hotly con- 
tested engagements and with a most creditable military record he returned to 
his home, having proven his loyalty and valor upon various southern battle- 
fields. 

For three years Mr. Shrader remained at home and was then married, after 
which he began farming on his own account, renting land in Des Moines county 
which he operated for two years. He afterward removed to Wayne county, 
Iowa, and bought one hundred and twenty acres, which he continued to cultivate 
for six years, when he sold that property and removed to Kansas. He traded 
a team, wagon and harness for one hundred and sixty acres of land and con- 
tinued its cultivation for eight years, after which he sold out and purchased a 
restaurant, which he conducted for four months. He afterward engaged in 
railroading for two years and later went to Pratt county, Kansas, where he 
operated a rented farm for two years. In 1890 he arrived in Buffalo county, 
Nebraska, and became identified with its agricultural interests through renting 
one hundred and sixty acres upon which he lived for two years. He next went 
to Sherman county, Nebraska, where he followed farming for eight years, and 
on the expiration of that period he returned to Buffalo county, where he made 
investment in one hundred and sixty acres on section 24, Garfield township. At 
once he began the further development and improvement of that tract and tO' 
it added one hundred and sixty acres by a later purchase. Year by year he 
tilled the soil and cultivated his crops and added to the improvements upon the 
place until 1909, when he retired and rented the farm. He next removed to- 
Ravenna and purchased a nice home. In fact he bought two houses in the town 
and has since resided here, making his home at the present time with a daughter. 

On the 7th of July, 1868, Mr. Shrader was united in marriage to Miss Anna 
Gereke, by whom he had nine children, as follows : William, who follows farm- 
ing in Garfield township, Buffalo county; Gust, also an agriculturist of this 
county; Clara, the wife of John Grover, who is engaged in farming in Cherry 
Creek township; Fred, who is engaged in farming near Litchfield, Nebraska; 
Delia, who passed away in 1895; Frank, who operates one of his father's farms; 
Felix, who also cultivates land belonging to his father; Wesley, whose demise 
occurred in 1887; and Rachel, who is the wife of Henry Unzicker and resides 
at Ravenna. The wife and mother passed away in July, 1891, and on the 7th 
of January, 1892, Mr. Shrader was again married, his second union being with 
Mrs. Kate Seckora, who had four children who were reared by Mr. Shrader. 
The second wife died on the 14th of December, 191 1. 

Mr. Shrader cast his first presidential vote for Abraham Lincoln and has 
since supported the candidates of the republican party, believing firmly in the 



412 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

principles of its platform as factors in good government. He is a member of the 
Grand Army post and also of the Methodist church and his life is actuated 
by high and honorable principles, being the expression of honest conviction and 
of devotion to all the duties which devolve upon him. 



ALBERT V. HLAVA. 



Albert V. Hlava, a hardware dealer of Ravenna, is one of the most promi- 
nent citizens and leading business men of the town. He was born in Bohemia 
on the 23d of April, 1857, and is a son of Joseph and Mary Hlava, also natives 
of that country, where the father engaged in the wholesale fruit business. About 
1866 he emigrated with his family to America and located in Wisconsin, where 
he followed the shoemaker's trade, which he had learned in his native land. He 
passed away in Saline county, Nebraska, on the 15th of January, 1888, and his 
wife died on Christmas Day, 1878. 

Albert V. Hlava was reared in Wisconsin and early had to begin providing 
for his own support. His educational advantages were limited, as he attended 
school for but nine months in all. As a boy he worked on a farm belonging to 
his sister and later learned the shoemaker's trade which he followed in several 
towns in Wisconsin and in Marquette, Michigan, At length he went to work in 
the copper mines, where he remained from the ist of November, until the iSth 
of the following January. He then walked to Green Bay, Wisconsin, a distance 
of two hundred and eighty miles, and during much of the way found the snow 
four feet deep. No one but a man of much endurance and physical strength could 
have made the journey, but he arrived at his destination safely and for four 
months thereafter worked at shoemaking. On the 13th of July, 1874, he removed 
to Crete, Nebraska, and learned the carpenter's trade from his brother, for whom 
he worked for some time. He then assisted farmers with the threshing during 
the summer and subsequently began the operation of a farm of one hundred 
and sixty acres near Wilber which he and his brother owned. During this time 
he kept bachelor's hall and he devoted his spare hours to the study of music. 
In 1877 his parents joined him and in the following year he was married. He 
continued to farm in Saline county until 1879, ii'' which year he removed to 
Wilber, and a year later he became a resident of Wymore, Nebraska. He fol- 
lowed the shoemaker's trade there until May, 1883, when he returned to Wilber 
and took charge of a hardware business there in which he had purchased an 
interest in 1880. For over four years he was actively engaged in the manage- 
ment of that enterprise, but in November, 1887, he sold out and came to Ravenna, 
arriving here on the nth of the month. The town had been founded only a 
year previously and the hardware business which he established was the third in 
the town. In 1889 he sold out and in 1890 removed to Pleasanton, where he 
conducted a hardware store until the 14th of April, 1899. ^^ that time he moved 
his stock to Ravenna, where he has since engaged in business. He owns the 
property in which his store is located and he carries an unusually large stock 
for a town of the size of Ravenna. He is also a tinner, having learned that 
trade in Wilber, and does considerable work along that line. He has built up 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 413 

a large trade in hardware and has not only gained a competence but has also 
contributed to the business expansion of his community. 

Mr. Hlava was married in July, 1878, to Miss Anna M. Rezabek, a daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Rezabek, both natives of Bohemia. They came to 
America many years ago and in the fall of 1866 located at St. Louis, whence in 
1883 the family removed to Saline county, Nebraska, where the father farmed 
until his death in 1909. The mother had died many years previously, her demise 
occurring in 1882. Mr. and Mrs. Hlava have become the parents of eight chil- 
dren, as follows : Emma, who is the wife of William Karel, of Ravenna, and 
is engaged in the millinery business; Judith, who married O. O. Matousek, a 
farmer of South Dakota; Elsie, who married A. A. Meek and now resides with 
her parents; Lombard J., who is associated with his father in the hardware busi- 
ness, the firm name being A. V. Hlava & Son ; Benjamin H., at home ; Adolph 
v., who is attending the State University at Lincoln; and Flora and Qara, both 
of whom are teaching school in South Dakota. 

Albert V. Hlava supports the democratic party at the polls and has been 
called to office a number of times. He was a member of the city council of 
Ravenna for four years, was township treasurer for a similar period, was 
census enumerator in 19 10, held the office of assessor of Garfield township for 
four years, is serving his fifth year as a member of the board of supervisors of 
Buffalo county and was postmaster at Pleasanton during the second Cleveland 
administration. He has also been prominent in fraternal circles. Since 1893 
he has served as financier of the United Workmen lodge, he has been treasurer 
of the Masonic lodge, was for a year venerable consul of the Modern Wood- 
men of America and for a year and a half held the office of clerk of that organ- 
ization, and he has served for two years as president of the Bohemian Lodge 
at Ravenna, as a member of its board of directors for three years and as finan- 
•cier for ten years. He has also been identified with the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows and for a period of years belonged to the Knights of Pythias lodge, 
of which he was a charter member. He can be depended upon to further the 
moral interests of the community. Since boyhood he has worked hard and he 
has not only won a competence but has also gained valuable knowledge and 
practical wisdom from his various experiences. His business ability is generally 
recognized and his integrity has always been above question. 



WILLIAM KLEIN. 



Among the successful business men of Poole is William Klein, who is the 
owner of a well stocked general store and who has gained prosperity entirely 
through his own efforts. He has also been prominent in public affairs and is 
now serving as clerk of Beaver township. A native of Iowa, he was born in 
Jasper county in December, 1883, and is a son of Peter and Maggie (Cuparis) 
Klein, natives respectively of Marion county, Iowa, and of Holland. The father 
followed agricultural pursuits in Marion and Jasper counties, Iowa, for a num- 
ber of years but in 1886 came to Buffalo county, Nebraska, with his family and 
purchased a homestead right in Schneider township. He concentrated his ener- 



414 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

gies upon the development of that farm until 1907, when he sold out and pur- 
chased land in Beaver township, on which he resided until 1912. He then retired 
from active life and removed to Poole, building a comfortable residence, where 
he has since lived. His wife also survives. They are the parents of ten chil- 
dren, John, Letitia, Jacob, Nellie, Ella, William, Lizzie, Earl, Arthur, and one 
who died in infancy. 

William Klein was but a child when brought by his parents to this county 
and here he grew to manhood. He received his education in the public schools 
and also gained valuable knowledge concerning agricultural methods through 
assisting his father. He remained at home until he was of age and then began 
his independent career, renting land for eight years. At the end of that time 
he decided that business pursuits would be more congenial than farming and 
removed to Poole and bought a general merchandise business, which he has 
since conducted. He also owns the building in which his store is) located and 
his good management, integrity and progressive policy have enabled him to 
build up a large and representative patronage. 

Mr. Klein was married in February, 1909, to Miss Clara E. Huston, a daugh- 
ter of John and Martha Huston, pioneers of Buffalo county. To this union three 
children have been born : WiUiam, whose birth occurred on the 4th of May, 
1910; Eileen, born March 30, 1915; and one who died in infancy. 

Mr. Klein is independent in politics, studying the political situation carefully 
and voting according to the dictates of his judgment. He has been honored by 
election to office, having served as treasurer of Poole and being at present clerk 
of Beaver township and school moderator at F'oole. In religious faith he is a 
United Presbyterian and his influence is always on the side of right and moral 
advancement. He is held in high esteem by all who know him and his many 
friends recognize his genuine worth. 



GEORGE BUOL, M. D. 



Dr. George Buol has been engaged in the practice of medicine in Ravenna 
since 191 1 and has gained a patronage that would be a credit to a man of much 
longer professional experience. He was born on the loth of March, 1886, in 
Randolph, Cedar county, Nebraska, of the marriage of Martin and Anna (Rich- 
ard) Buol, natives of Switzerland and of Iowa respectively. The father settled 
in Cedar county, Nebraska, when it was still a frontier region and is engaged in 
banking and in the real estate business in Randolph. His wife passed away in 
May, 191 1. 

George Buol was reared in his native town and after completing the high 
school course there entered the medical college of the State University of Ne- 
braska, from which he was graduated in 1910. He devoted a year to hospital 
work and in September, 191 1, began the independent practice of his profession at 
Ravenna, where he has since remained. In a comparatively short time he demon- 
strated his ability and has a high standing in his profession. 

Dr. Buol was married in August, 191 3, to Miss Urilla Rudy, by whom he 
has a daughter, Betty A., born on the 23d of June, 19 14. 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 417 

Dr. Buol is independent in politics and keeps well informed on all questions 
and issues of the day. His religious belief is that of the Presbyterian church, 
and fraternally he is connected with the Knights of Pythias and the Masons. 
Through his membership in the Buffalo County and Nebraska State Medical 
Societies and the American Medical Association he keeps in touch with other 
progressive physicians and he also does much reading on professional subjects. 
He is not only held in high esteem as a physician but he is also popular personally. 



HON. CARL F. BODINSON. 

Hon. Carl F. Bodinson, who was one of the successful pioneer merchants of 
Kearney and was also prominently identified with political activity here, left the 
impress of his individuality for good upon the history of Buffalo county. A 
native of Sweden, he was born at Soderhamn on the 29th of June, 1846, and 
spent his early life in his parents' home. After acquiring a common school edu- 
cation he engaged in clerking for a time in a hardware store. The opportunities 
of the new world, however, attracted him and in 1865, when nineteen years of 
age, he came to the United States, making his way at once into the interior of 
the country. He located first at Galva, Illinois, where he worked in a general 
store until 1870. Lie carefully saved his earnings during that period until his 
economical expenditure and his industry had brought him capital sufficient to 
enable him to engage in business on his own account. He then purchased a stock 
of groceries and conducted his store at Galva until 1878, when he disposed of 
his interests there and came to Kearney. Here he opened a grocery store, which 
he managed successfully for about eleven years, when he sold out and for a year 
engaged in no business. During that period he made a trip back to his old home 
in Sweden, where he found great pleasure in renewing the acquaintances of his 
youth and visiting again the scenes amid which his boyhood days were passed. 
At the end of that time he came once more to Kearney and purchased the Har- 
rington hardware store. Concentrating his energies upon the trade, he built up 
a good business, ever recognizing the fact that satisfied customers are the best 
advertisement. The integrity of his busness methods was never called into ques- 
tion and his enterprise and industry were potent factors in his growing success. 

On December 28, 1870, Mr. Bodinson was united in marriage to Miss Louise 
W. Dahlgren, who was born at Victoria, Knox county, Illinois, April 9, 1852, 
and was there reared and educated. She came to Kearney with her husband 
when this was a straggling frontier village and gave little evidence of becoming 
the attractive city it is today. To Mr. and Mrs. Bodinson were born three 
sons: Fred P., who is now president of the Citizens National Bank of Baker, 
Oregon : Frank, who is a traveling salesman with the Faeth Iron Company of 
Kansas City, Missouri; and Roy, who now operates the Bodinson hardware store 
at Kearney. For some years he was associated in this undertaking with his 
father, the connection being maintained until the latter's death on the 24th of 

December, 1913. > r 1 tvt • ^ 

Mr Bodinson was a consistent and exemplary member of the Masonic fra- 
ternity and politically he was a prominent democrat, his opinions carrying weight 



418 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

in the local organizations of his party. In 1899 he was elected county treasurer 
on the democratic ticket and made so excellent a record in the office that he was 
reelected in 1901, serving for two terms. In 1908 he was elected to the state 
senate and was reelected in 1910, so that he remained a member of the upper 
house of the general assembly for four years, during which time he gave careful 
consideration to the vital questions which came up for settlement and supported 
the measures which he deemed beneficial to the state, while just as strongly he 
opposed those which he regarded as inimical to the best interests of the common- 
wealth. He was a man of marked personal worth, who held to high ideals and 
never deviated from a course which he believed to be right between himself and 
his fellowmen. He was self-made, his prosperity being attributable to his own 
efl:orts, but he always believed, as Abraham Lincoln expressed it, that "There is 
something better than making a living — making a life." 



MAURICE A. HOOVER, M. D. 

Dr. Maurice A. Hoover, who by the consensus of public opinion on the part 
of his fellowmen and his fellow practitioners, is accorded a prominent position 
among the physicians of Buffalo county, has practiced continuously in Kearney 
since April, 1883, or for almost a third of a century. He was born in Marion 
county, Indiana, near the city of Indianapolis, April 6, 1858, and is a son of 
Perry C. and Catherine M. (Bender) Hoover. The father was also a native 
of A'larion county, born in Wayne township, in 1832, and the mother was a 
native of Pennsylvania and of Pennsylvania Dutch descent. During his active 
life time Perry C. Hoover followed merchandising and farming. He was one 
of a family of thirteen children and he and his twin were the youngest of the 
household. The Hoovers were descended from Andrew Hoeffer, of German 
nativity, who' lived and died in the fatherland. Through generations, however, 
this branch of the family has been represented in America and for the most 
part its members have been connected with the Quaker faith. Five of the 
brothers of Perry C. Hoover, the son of Andrew Hoover, served the Union 
cause during the Civil war and three of them laid down their lives upon the 
altar of their country. In so doing they set aside the Quaker prejudice against 
war, feeling that their first duty was to preserve the Union. Perry C. Hoover 
died in February, 1912, and his widow survived him only until September, 1914. 

Dr. Maurice A. Hoover was reared in his native state and acquired his 
primary education in the public schools, after which he spent four years as a 
student in Wabash College at Crawfordsville, Indiana. During his college days 
he devoted the summer months to reading medicine under the direction of Drs. 
P. H. and H. Jameson, of Indianapolis, and in 1879 he matriculated in the 
Indiana Medical College, a department of Butler University, from which he was 
graduated on the 2d of March, 1881. He had put his theoretical knowledge to 
the practical test by serving as interne in the Marion County Hospital during the 
summer months of the last year of his medical collegiate term, and after securing 
his degree he located for practice in Indianapolis, where he remained until the 
spring of 1883. In April of that year he came to Kearney, Nebraska, where he 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 419 

has since made his home and throughout the entire period has engaged in the 
general practice of medicine and surgery. His first call was sixty miles from 
Kearney and he frequently answered calls in early days that required three days 
driving day and night. At the time of the Spanish-American war he was major 
surgeon of the Second Nebraska Volunteer Infantry and was stationed at Chicka- 
mauga Park until mustered out on the 20th of October, 1898, his term of 
enlistment covering the period from April of that year. 

On the 6th of November, 1883, Dr. Hoover was united in marriage to Miss 
Eva Cox, of Crawfordsville, Indiana. She died leaving one daughter, Bessie, 
now the wife of Jay Sinclair, of Des Moines, Iowa. For his second wife Dr. 
Hoover chose Agnes Pearson, but she, too, has departed this life, and for his 
third wife the Doctor wedded Stella E. Tucker, their marriage being celebrated 
in May, 1901. To this union have been born four children: lone I., Amber A., 
Thelma T. and Maurine A. 

Dr. and Airs. Hoover belong to the First Christian church of Kearney and 
are interested in all that pertains to the moral upbuilding of the community, nor 
is the Doctor neglectful of his duties of citizenship. His cooperation can be 
counted upon to further any measure looking to public betterment. He served 
for two terms as coroner of Buffalo county but refused further office holding. 
For sixteen years he has served as a member of the Kearney school board, his 
present term expiring in 191 7. He was acting pension examiner before the board 
was appointed and although he has not served continuously he is now secretary 
of the local board. He is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
the Knights of Pythias and of various fraternal insurance organizations. He 
belongs also to the Kearney Commercial Club and is a member of the old volunteer 
fire department. Notwithstanding his varied interests he has largely concentrated 
his energies upon his professional duties and from 1887 until 1900 was surgeon 
for the Chicago. Burlington & Quincy and the Union Pacific Railroad Companies 
and the Black Hills brangh line. In his practice he is most careful and consci- 
entious in diagnosing cases and his ability is manifest in the successful outcome 
of his treatment. Fie has kept in touch with the advanced thought of the pro- 
fession, reading broadly and thinking deeply, and his work has been attended 
with excellent results, placing him among the foremost physicians of his part of 
the state. 



ALFRED T. ANDERSON. 

Alfred T. Anderson, a photographer of Kearney conducting a well appointed 
studio, is of Swedish nativity. His birth occurred in Sweden, July 17, 1865, but 
when he was only two years of age he was brought to America by his parents, 
August and Ingar (Timmans) Anderson. The family home was established 
first at Knoxville, Illinois, and afterward a removal was made to Galesburg and 
later to Woodhull, Illinois. In November, 1875, the family removed to Kearney, 
where Mr. Anderson began the manufacture of wagons and later extended the 
scope of his business activities to include the manufacture of buggies, this being 
the first concern of its kind in Kearney. He continued his residence in this city 



420 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

for a number of years, but in 1881 sold out and since then has Hved at various 
places in the western part of the United States. Mrs. Anderson died in 1879, 
and of their family of six children three are now living. 

Alfred T. Anderson was reared in Illinois to the age of ten years but for the 
past forty years has been a resident of Kearney. His education was completed in 
the public schools here, supplemented by one term's study in a private denomina- 
tional school at Minneapolis. When sixteen years of age he started out in life 
on his own account by learning the photographic art under the direction of 
J. A. Stridborg, with whom he remained for about three years. After that time 
Mr. Stridborg took up the business of ranching and left Mr. Anderson in charge 
of his photographic gallery as manager. He proved faithful to the trust and 
subsequently purchased the business of his employer, since which time he has 
conducted his studio in Kearney. He utilizes the modern processes and methods 
of photography and has a well equipped establishment in which he turns out 
work of the highest grade. He has appreciation for all the artistic phases of the 
business and at the same time the mechanical work is done in the best possible 
style. He has taken a special course of training at St. Louis under Mr. Guerin, 
one of the foremost photographers of the country. Moreover, by attending 
conventions and by careful reading of the best literature on the subject of pho- 
tography he has kept abreast of the times in his profession. When he began 
business here his establishment was south of the Union Pacific railroad tracks, 
but later he opened a studio on the second floor at No. 21 11 Central avenue, 
there continuing until 1908, when he built his present studio at No. 14 West 
Twenty-second street. This is a one story and basement brick structure which 
he designed to meet his ideas of a thoroughly up-to-date and modern photographic 
establishment. 

On the nth of September, 1892, Mr. Anderson was united in marriage to 
Miss Alma M. Wickstrom, of Holdredge, Nebraska, by whom he has three 
daughters, Ruth M., Miriam E. and Elizabeth T. The family are members of 
the Baptist church. Mr. Anderson was twice elected a member of the school 
board but resigned during his second term in order to take a vacation in the far 
west: He is, however, always interested in the welfare and upbuilding of his 
city and co-operates in many plans and measures for the general good. 



JOHN W. SHAHAN. 



John W. Shahan, of Lincoln, is acceptably discharging his responsible duties 
as chief clerk of the board of charities and corrections and as secretary of the 
state prison board and advisory board of pardons. He gives the most careful 
study to the many problems with which his work has to deal and keeps well 
informed as to the outcome of various plans that are being tried in different parts 
of the country in connection with social servdce work and the reformation of 
delinquents. He was born in West Virginia on the loth of November, 1848, of 
the marriage of Alexander S. and Louisa (Stone) Shahan, both natives of Vir- 
ginia. The father devoted his life to agricultural pursuits, and both he and 
his wife died in West Virginia. 




JOHN W. SHAHAJSr 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 423 

John W. Shahan passed the days of his boyhood and youth in his native state 
and after attending the pubhc schools continued his education in an academy. 
When twenty-one years of age he was made deputy sheriff of his county, and in 
those days the holder of that office was required to collect the taxes. He would 
saddle his horse Monday morning and be gone until the end of the week, his 
duties as tax collector making it necessary for him to travel to all parts of the 
cotmty. Sometmes he had to see a man three or four times before he could 
succeed in getting the taxes and occasionally he had to levy on the property. He 
also served as deputy clerk and recorder and held that position for several years. 
While he was deputy clerk he called fori his own marriage license, and the clerk 
told him that as he was familiar with the issuing of such licenses and as he knew 
where the blanks were he might as well write out his own, which he did. After 
returning to private life he engaged in merchandising for two years and then 
followed agricultural pursuits for a similar period of time. In 1878 he came to 
Nebraska and in November of that year located in Gibbon precinct, Buffalo county, 
homesteading a quarter section of fine land on the Platte river. This had been 
previously filed on and ten acres of the ground was broken. His first home was 
a sod house, which was warm in winter and cool in summer and quite comfortable, 
but nevertheless he was determined that as soon as he could afford it he would 
build a frame house. The roof was made of boards which were covered with tar 
paper and sod was laid on top of the paper. As the ends of the boards reached 
to the center of the sod wall the paper broke at that point and this caused the 
water to soak through into the wall, gradually weakening it. One morning after 
a particularly heavy rain Mr. Shahan discovered that one wall had slipped away 
and he made up his mind that he was going to have a frame house at once. With 
only five dollars in cash and a promise to pay in the fall he went to Gibbon and 
purchased sufficient material to build a frame residence. He engaged in farming 
for seven years but in 1885 removed to Kearney and took up the duties of deputy 
county clerk, in which capacity he served for two years. Some time later he was 
again made the incumbent in that office and held the position for four years, his 
continued service attesting the satisfactoriness of his work. For four years he 
was deputy county treasurer under M. N. Troupe; was a member of the city 
council the same length of time; and its president for two years of that time. 

(Mr. Shahan resided in Kearney for twenty-three years but in 1909 was made 
deputy state auditor under Silas R. Barton and removed to Lincoln, where he has 
since resided. He held that position for four years and continued in the office 
for six months after his term had expired. He was then appointed chief clerk 
of the board of charities and corrections and secretary of the state prison board 
and advisory board of pardons and is still the incumbent in those offices. The 
\ work of those boards is closely connected with the welfare of the people of the 
entire state and it is fortunate that a man of so much ability and of such marked 
public spirit has been chosen as secretary. He is widely known and all who have 
been associated with him in any capacity recognize his sound judgment, his knowl- 
edge of conditions and his unswerving integrity. Although he makes his home 
in Lincoln he still holds title to his homestead in Buffalo county. 

Mr. Shahan was married in West Virginia to Miss Diana E. Parsons, a native 
of Virginia, and they have four sons and two daughters living, namely: Charles 
W., a hardware merchant of Kearney; Roy, a real estate dealer of Alamosa, Colo- 



424 > HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

rado; Louise, the wife of O. P. Sells, of Denver; James A., of Omaha; Florence, 
who is at home and who formerly taught in Bufifalo county but has now been a 
teacher in the Lincoln schools for four years ; and Clare J., who is living in Omaha. 
Mr. Shahan is a stalwart adherent of the republican party and does all in his 
power to further the civic advancement of his community. He has been a lifelong 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church, in whose teachings are found the 
principles which govern his conduct, and he is also identified with the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows at Kearney. He has resided in Nebraska since pioneer 
times and has taken much pleasure in witnessing its constant and rapid develop- 
ment and has at all times been willing to co-operate with others in promoting the 
public welfare. 



JOHN D. LIPPINCOTT. 

John D. Lippincott, a well-to-do farmer residing on section 36, Platte town- 
ship, was born in Franklin county, Pennsylvania, of the marriage of James and 
Jane (Vance) Lippincott, further mention of whom appears elsewhere in this 
work in connection with the sketch of C. R. Lippincott, a brother of our subject. 
Mr. Lippincott of this review was reared and educated in Pennsylvania, but in 
1887 became a resident of Buffalo county, Nebraska. Subsequently he purchased 
his present home farm on section 36, Platte township, which comprises one 
hundred fifty-three and one-half acres of productive land and the cultivation of 
which demands practically his entire time. He is thoroughly practical in his 
methods and is also progressive, and his well directed labors yield him a good 
financial return. 

In 1892 Mr Lippincott was united in marriage to Miss Noma Schlegel, who 
was born in Pennsylvania and is a daughter of Moses and Sarah (Foulk) 
Schlegel, likewise natives of that state. They were early settlers of Nebraska but 
subsequently removed to Oklahoma, 'where they are now living. Mr. and Mrs 
Lippincott have six children: Ora E., the wife of N. Lacy; Opal V., Otis Pearl, ■ 
Moses M. and David V., all four at home ; and Charles E., deceased. ^ 

Mr. Lippincott gives his political allegiance to the republican party and has 
served his district acceptably as school director. He is a successful farmer and a 
public-spirited citizen and is justly held in high esteem by those who know him. 



HERMAN LIESINGER. 

Herman Liesinger, a farmer of Platte township, has earned the title of a self- 
made man, as he began without capital and through his own efforts has gained 
financial independence. He was born in New York on the 9th of January, 1848, 
of the marriage of Herman and Bertha (Broadcross) Liesinger, natives of Ger- 
many. About 1847 they left their native land and came to America, locating in 
the state of New York, where they remained for some time. They afterward 
lived successively in Wisconsin and South Dakota, and the father passed away 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 425 

in the latter state. The mother is still living at the advance'd age of eighty-six 
years. Fifteen of their sixteen children survive. 

Herman Liesinger received a common school education in his native state and 
remained at home until he was fourteen years of age, when he began providing 
for his own support. In 1870 he came to Bufifalo county, Nebraska, and began 
farming in Platte township. He has prospered and has invested in land from 
time to time so that he now owns four hundred acres in Buffalo county and one 
hundred and twenty acres in Dundy county, all of which is well improved. His 
home farm is situated on sections 10 and 15, Platte township, and its well kept 
appearance indicates his energy and good management. 

Mr. Liesinger was married in 1874 to Miss Ada Perkins, who was born in 
Wisconsin. Her parents, Hiram and Lucinda (Reed) Perkins, were both natives 
of the state of New York, but in their youth removed to Wisconsin, where their 
marriage occurred. The father passed away in that state, but the mother spent 
her last days in Idaho. In their family were two children but Mrs. Liesinger is 
the only survivor. By her marriage she has become the mother of eight children, 
namely : Emma, the wife of A. H. Svinger of Kearney ; Bertha, who married 
N. Leisy a resident of Wyoming; Lula, now Mrs. M. Dunkleberger ; Maud, who 
married Joe Argo; Walter; William; one who died in infancy; and Lillie E., at 
home. 

The family attend the Methodist Episcopal church and do their part in fur- 
thering movements seeking the moral advancement of their community. Mr. 
Liesinger is a republican and has held the office of school treasurer but has never 
been very active politically. For many years he gave his closest attention to the 
cultivation and improvement of his land but is now living retired and is enjoying 
a period of well deserved leisure. 



M. B. WHITCHER. 



M. B. Whitcher, residing on section 25, Divide township, owns and operates 
an excellent farm of eighty acres which has now been in his possession for more 
than two decades. His birth occurred in Stark county, Illinois, on the 14th of 
March, 1867, his parents being John and Alma (Hall) Whitcher, who were 
natives of Vermont and Pennsylvania respectively. In 1849 they took up their 
abode on a farm in Stark county, Illinois, and there spent the remainder of their 
lives. To them were born seven children, five of whom are yet living. 

M. B. Whitcher was reared and educated in his native county and there 
spent the first twenty-six years of his life. In the spring of 1893 he came to 
Buffalo county, Nebraska, and purchased the farm of eighty acres on section 25, 
Divide township, on which he has resided continuously since, being actively and 
successfully engaged in its operation. He carries on his farm work in a system- 
atic, practical and up-to-date manner and annually gathers rich crops which find 
a ready sale on the market. 

In 1892 Mr. Whitcher was joined in wedlock to Miss Mary Jane Campbell, 
her parents being William and Jeannette (Watt) Campbell, of whoni more 
extended mention is made on another page of this work in connection with the 



426 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

sketch of Samuel Campbell, brother of Mrs. Whitcher. Our subject and his 
wife have seven children, namely: Jennie, who is the wife of L. E. Hubbard 
and resides in Iowa ; William M., John D., Isabel, Eva E., Edith C. and Franklin 
A., all of whom are still under the parental roof. 

Since age conferred upon him the right of franchise Mr. Whitcher has 
supported the men and measures of the democracy, believing firmly in its prin- 
ciples. He has ably served as a member of the school board and the cause of 
education has ever found in him a stanch champion. His wife is a devoted and 
consistent member of the Presbyterian church. Mr. Whitcher is a self-made 
man whose success has come as the direct reward of industry, perseverance and 
energy and he enjoys an enviable reputation as one of the prominent and repre- 
sentative agriculturists of Divide township. 



ALBERT P. HAUSCHILD. 

No history of Buffalo county would be complete without reference to Albert 
P. Hauschild, who is one of the most extensive landowners of this part of 
the state, having more than three thousand acres. His home place is on section 
1 8, Cherry Creek township, where he occupies an attractive residence in which 
are found all of the comforts and many of the luxuries of life. He deserves 
much credit for what he has accomplished, his success being the legitimate out- 
come of intelligently directed effort. 

Mr. Hauschild was born in the kingdom of Saxony, Germany, September 27, 
1866, a son of August and Christina (Schmieder) Hauschild, who were also 
natives of the same country. The father owned and cultivated a farm there until 
1881, when he crossed the Atlantic and established his home in Shelton, Buffalo 
county, Nebraska, but after a short time removed to Cherry Creek township, 
securing a homestead claim of one hundred and sixty acres on section 18, that 
is now the property of his son Albert. He at once began to develop and improve 
the land, which he brought to a high state of cultivation, continuing the work of 
the fields there until his life's labors were ended in death on the 12th of February, 
1894. For about eight years he had survived his wife, who passed away INIarch 
21, 1886. 

Albert P. Hauschild was reared in Germany to the age of fifteen years and 
during that period pursued his education in the schools of that country. After 
accompanying his parents to the new world in 1881 he was employed as a farm 
hand for two years and later purchased eighty acres of railroad land in Cherry 
Creek township. With characteristic energy he began to develop and improve 
that tract, which he cultivated for four years and then sold, turning the money 
over to his father, for at that time he had not attained his majority. He after- 
ward went to Colorado, where he worked with his brother as a carpenter for 
a year, during which period he saved seven hundred dollars and also turned that 
amount over to his father to help feed the stock. In 1891 he began speculating 
in broom corn, purchasing a considerable amount. Success attended him in this 
venture, in which he made three dollars for every dollar invested. He cleared 
up enough to pay off all his indebtedness which had been incurred on account of 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 427 

bad crops. In 1892 he went south with a covered wagon, thus journeying across 
the country, and located in Oklahoma, but after a short time returned to Kansas 
and engaged in the operation of a broom factory at Salina. In the conduct of 
that business in sixty days he had made thirty thousand dollars single handed. 
He then became associated with capitalists who backed him financially and he 
established a big factory in which he employed fifty men. He was making 
money so rapidly, however, that his financial backers froze him out. He finally 
got back into the business, however, for a while, but his father met with a bad 
accident and Mr. Hauschild on that account had to sell out and return home in 
1893. He then rented the home place, which he continued to cultivate for three 
years, at the end of which time he purchased the property, and since that date 
has continued buying whenever advantageous opportunity has presented until he 
now owns over two thousand acres in Buffalo county, together with a section 
and a half in Sherman and Custer counties. He has continuously improved his 
place, operating it since making his first purchase, and he is today one of the 
extensive landowners of this part of the state. He is also engaged largely in 
feeding stock and has about two hundred head of cattle all of the time, together 
with four hundred head of hogs and from seventy-five tO' one hundred head of 
horses. 

On Christmas Day, 1909, Mr. Hauschild was married to Miss Marie Ahrens, 
a daughter of Louis and Fredericka Ahrens, who were natives of Germany and 
came to America in 1907, since which time the father has been engaged in 
farming in Cherry Creek township, Buffalo county. Mr. and Mrs. Hauschild 
have four children: Gertrude, born September 19, 1910; Mabel, May 26, 1912; 
Daisy, October 4, 1913; and Albert, August 8, 1915. 

Politically Mr. Hauschild does not ally himself with any party. His religious 
faith is that of the Lutheran church and his membership relations also include 
connection with the Modern Woodmen of America and the Modern Brotherhood 
of America. His has been a most active and useful life, during which he has 
made steady progress, and his course has never been strewn with the wreck of 
other men's fortunes, for he has followed constructive measures in his business 
and has won his success by the wise utilization of time, talent and opportunity, 
recognizing advantages which others have passed heedlessly by. 



MISS MINNIE BERTHA HAUSCHILD. 



^. 

Hauschild, and who personally owns two fine farms in Cherry Creek township, 
was born in 1874, in the kingdom of Saxony, of the marriage of August and 
Christina (Schmieder) Hauschild, who were also natives of the same country, 
where the father engaged in farming until 1881, when he emigrated to the 
United States. He made his way to Buffalo county, Nebraska, and took up a 
homestead on section 18, Cherry Creek township. 

Our subject remained in Germany for about three months after her father 
and two brothers had removed to the United States, but at the end of that time 
she and her mother, two older sisters and one brother crossed the Atlantic 



428 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

and at once came to this county, joining the father on the homestead. 
Following her mother's death in 1886, she took charge of the home and 
throughout all the years of hardship during which the family was getting a 
start in the new world she manifested unwavering determination and courage. 
After her father was injured and her brother Albert returned home she co-oper- 
ated with him in every way and had much to do with the success that came to 
the family. Following the demise of the father in 1894 she continued as house- 
keeper for her brother for a number of years, or until his marriage, and still 
makes her home with him. She assists in whatever work is on hand and in all 
that she does manifests great energy, sound judgment and good business ability. 
Her brother, in recognition of her valuable assistance, gave her four hundred 
acres of fine land and this was subsequently traded for other property, securing 
thereby a handsome profit. Through several deals and wise investment in 
California real estate she now has an income which makes her financially inde-. 
pendent, and the ability with which she has managed her affairs shows that she 
has the same business insight which has always characterized her brother. She 
owns two well improved farms in Cherry Creek township, one of two hundred 
and forty acres and one of one hundred and sixty acres, both of which are 
rented. She is widely known throughout the county and is held in high esteem 
because of her many excellent qualities of character, and those who have been 
closely associated with her are her warm friends. 



CHARLES A. PIERSON. 

Charles A. Pierson, who carries on general farming on section 8, Cherry 
Creek township, is one of the foremost representatives of agricultural life in 
Buffalo county. He has important and extensive interests, carefully managed 
and wisely directed, and his life record indicates what may be accomplished when 
determination and energy lead the way, for his success is attributable to close 
application and sound judgment in business affairs. He was born in Sweden, on 
the 19th of October, 1846, and is a son of James and Anna BendiCta (Hanson) 
Pierson, who came tO' the United States in 1849 when their son Charles was 
but three years of age. They settled first at Kenosha, Wisconsin. The father, 
who was a university graduate and for twenty years a professor in a university 
of Sweden, desired to give his children the greater educational advantages offered 
in the new world and in 1849 he organized a colony of Swedish people, char- 
tered a sailing vessel, and in that way came tO' America, the colony settling at or 
near Kenosha, Wisconsin. Mr. Pierson was a very versatile man, ready for any 
emergency, and possessing marked talent along many lines. He was a graduate 
physician and surgeon, possessed notable musical talent and marked mechanical 
skill, and after establishing his home in Wisconsin he built a number of pipe 
organs for churches. He was also the owner of the farm on which the family 
resided and which his sons operated. In 1863 ^^ ^^^^ Wisconsin and removed to 
Bremer county, Iowa, where his remaining days were passed. 

Charles A. Pierson was reared under the parental roof and mastered the 
branches of learning taught in the public schools. He possessed, however, an 




ME. AND MES. CHAELES A. PIEESON 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 431 

insatiable appetite for knowledge and has been not only a student of books but 
also of human nature, and in the school of experience has learned many valuable 
lessons. In 1868 he was united in marriage to Miss Eliza J. Rickel, of Bremer 
county, Iowa, and to them have been born seven children, of whom five are yet 
living: Arthur J., who is engaged in business in New Hampton, Iowa; Estelle 
1., the wife of Rev. Parker Smith, who is located at Parker, South Dakota; 
Frederick A., who operates the home farm; Ellen M., the wife of Fred Knott, 
who is engaged in farming at Waverly, Iowa; and Victor L., a farmer of Wayne, 
Nebraska. ^ i I 

Soon after his marriage Mr. Pierson made his first investment in land, pur- 
chasing one hundred and twenty acres in Bremer county, Iowa. He afterward 
bought an additional tract of eighty acres adjoining and later purchased another 
farm of one hundred and sixty acres a mile distant from the home place. In 
early days he began raising and dealing in cattle and has made the cattle industry 
the dominant feature of his business career. In April, 1898, he came to Buffalo 
county, at which time he purchased eight hundred acres of land. In June of that 
year he removed his family to the new home and here he has since engaged 
extensively in the cattle business. He now owns fourteen hundred and forty 
acres of land and is one of the very successful, enterprising and progressive 
business men of Buffalo county. 

For his second wife Mr. Pierson chose Mrs. Norman H. Hall, formerly 
Miss Nancy Ann Phillis, of Washington county, Ohio. In his political views 
he is a republican but has never been an office seeker and his business affairs 
have made constant demand upon his time and attention. He ranks as one of 
the foremost farmers and cattle raisers of Buffalo county and deserves much 
credit for what he has accomplished. Energy and determination have been the 
crowning points in his career. He has never allowed difficulties to bar his path 
if they could be overcome by persistent, earnest effort, and he has ever realized 
that when one avenue of opportunity seems closed it is possible to seek out 
another path which will lead to the desired goal. 



CHARLES A. SPENCER. 

Charles A. Spencer was one of the early settlers of Gibbon township, coming 
to this township only seven days after the first so-called "colony settlement." He 
was born April 6, 1851, at Ophir Center, La Salle county, Illinois, and when 
about sixteen years of age accompanied his mother to Livingston county, Illinois, 
his father having given his life as a sacrifice to his country, meeting death in the 
battle of Fort Donelson while serving with the Union army. 

On the 26th of February, 1878, Charles A. Spencer was united in marriage 
to Miss Rachel Sharp, also of Livingston county, Illinois. She was born June 
8, 1852, at Swegol, New York, and in her girlhood was taken by her parents to 
Streator, Illinois. Mr. and Mrs. Spencer, with their nine months old son. George 
S., came to Gibbon, Nebraska, in January, 1880, and purchased the northeast 
quarter of section 19, Gibbon township, from the Union Pacific Railroad. For 
seventeen years he devoted his time to the cultivation of his farm and also the 



432 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

northwest quarter of section 20 and the south half of the northwest quarter of 
section 29, Valley township. He and his wife passed through the many hardships 
and privations known only to the inhabitants of that period in building the home 
with their own labor and converting the raw prairie land into fields of sod corn 
and spring wheat. For several years their crops were destroyed by summer 
droughts and stock was cared for with difficulty owing to the lack of fences and 
also owing to extremely severe winters. These worthy people are to be numbered 
with the courageous settlers who never will be fully rewarded or their efforts 
fully appreciated by those who enjoy the beautiful country into which this land 
has developed. Two other sons were born to Mr. and Mrs. Spencer: Walter A., 
on the 2d of July, 1881 ; and R. Le Verne, on May 25, 1889. 

In 1898 the Spencer family exchanged their holdings for a half section of 
splendidly improved land on sections 4 and 9, commonly known as the Spencer 
Farm Home. About 1908 the parents retired from active life and took up their 
residence in Gibbon, where Mr. Spencer passed away November 19, 1913, and 
where his widow still resides. From early life they had been active in church 
work and he was also a member of the Ancient Order of United Workmen for 
many years. He was a quiet, sympathetic man who shunned publicity but was 
ever ready to stand for community betterment. His genuine worth will always 
be remembered by those who knew him. 1 



GEORGE S. SPENCER. 



George S. Spencer was born April 10, 1879, at Dwight, Illinois, and when nine 
months of age was brought to Gibbon, Nebraska, by his parents. After com- 
pleting a common school education he devoted his entire time to farming and 
stock raising and his untiring efforts have won him the reputation of being a 
most efficient agriculturist and stockman and have gained for him a competency 
in comparatively early life. 

He was united in marriage to Mary B. Morris, also of Gibbon, and to this 
union two daughters have been born, Mildred and Ruth. With their children 
they reside on their farm a half mile north of Butler, on the northwest quarter 
of section 17, Valley township. They have always been very active in church and 
social circles of the community and enjoy in large measure the regard and esteem 
of those who know them. 



WALTER A. SPENCER. 

Walter A. Spencer was born July 2, 1881, at Gibbon, reared at home and 
after completing his common school education took a commercial course at the 
Gibbon Business College and also attended and graduated from the Nebraska 
State Normal School at Wayne. Subsequently he became a student in the State 
University at Lincoln and completed the science course by graduation with the 
class of 1910, at which time the degree of Bachelor of Science was conferred 
upon him. Afterward he taught mathematics and astronomy in the Lincoln 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 433 

College of the James Milliken University at Lincoln, Illinois, and later he was 
for some time connected with the City National Bank of Lincoln, Nebraska, but 
in 1912 he turned his attention to farming and has since operated the home farm. 
His early training in agricultural work has enabled him to gain a gratifying 
measure of success as a farmer and his business ability and experience are of 
value to him in the management of the business phases of agriculture. He keeps 
in touch with the discoveries made by investigators who are seeking to learn 
more of the scientific principles underlying farming and is recognized as one of 
the most progressive and efficient agriculturists of his township. 

On the 25th of July, 1909, Mr. Spencer was united in marriage to Miss Pearl 
G. Francis, of Gibbon township. Her father, Charles Francis, passed away when 
she was a child ; her mother, Anna M., has resided for several years in the county. 
Mr. and Mrs. Spencer have a daughter, Evelyn Marie. 

Mr. Spencer supports the republican party at the polls, but although he keeps 
well informed on the questions before the people he has not been an aspirant 
for office. Fie and his wife are both members of the Presbyterian church and 
cooperate in movements seeking the moral welfare of their community. Mr. 
Spencer is not only a prosperous agriculturist, contributing to the development 
of his county along that line, but he is also identified with business interests as a 
stockholder in the Gibbon Grange Co-operative Elevator Company. He is widely 
known and his genuine worth is attested by the fact that those who have been 
jntimately associated with him since boyhood hold him in the highest esteem. 



R. LE VERNE SPENCER. 

R. Le Verne Spencer was born May 25, 1889, at Gibbon. He finished the 
common school education and was a student in the Gibbon high school and also 
in the Lincoln Business College and the State Agricultural College, both of 
Lincoln, Nebraska. Such training qualified him for following his father's occu- 
pation of farming and in this vocation he has been constantly engaged. He was 
united in marriage to Pearl G. Gilming on the 5th of March, 1914, and to them 
has been born a son, Charles Le V^erne. The family occupies a farm five miles 
northwest of Gibbon, comprising the west half of the northeast cjuarter of section 
9, Gibbon township, adjoining the old homestead farm of the Spencer family, 
where his brother, Walter A., now resides. R. Le Verne Spencer is a very active 
agriculturist, showing ability in farm management and also much active and 
helpful interest in community impro\'ement and advancement. 



JAMES E. CRIFFIELD. 



James E. Criffield. who owns and manages the largest general store in Poole, 
has not only built up his own business but has also contributed to the general 
advancement of Poole. He was born in Michigan in July, 1867, and is a son of 
Dacon and Jane (Emmons) Criffield, the former a native of Ohio and the latter 



484 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

of Pennsylvania. The father, who devoted the greater part of his Hfe to agri- 
cultural pursuits, removed to Michigan and engaged in farming there until 1883, 
when he came to Buffalo county, Nebraska, and took up a timber claim, which 
he improved and operated for several years. After selling that place he went 
to Missouri, where he farmed for three years, and then went into the hotel busi- 
ness at Westboro, that state. He passed away in September, 1898, and his wife 
died in 1872. 

James E. Criflield remained in Michigan until he was sixteen years of age 
and then accompanied his parents to Buffalo county, Nebraska. When twenty 
years old he began clerking in a store at Hazard, this state, and worked in the 
employ of others until October, 1903, when he came to Poole and engaged in the 
general mercantile business on his own account. He has prospered beyond his 
expectations and is now the leading merchant in the town. He is continually 
seeking to improve the service which he gives his customers and his liberal 
business policy and the high quality of his goods have gained him a large and 
profitable patronage. 

On the 4th of March, 1894, occurred the marriage of Mr. Crifheld and Miss 
Arvilla Bateman and to them was born a son, Charles, who died in 1895. Mr. 
Criffield supports the democratic party at the polls and for two years served as 
a member of the town board. His success is the direct result of his enterprise, 
his careful study of business conditions and his constant effort to satisfy the 
demands of his patrons and he ranks among the most able business men of the 
county. He has many admirable personal characteristics and there are many 
who are his warm friends. 



DAN MORRIS. 



The history of Dan Morris is a life record which should have its inspirational 
value for all young men who are forced to start out in life empty handed, as it 
indicates what may be accomplished when energy and determination lead the way. 
I-Iis advancement has not been due to genius or to any fortunate combination of 
circumstances but is the outcome of clear judgment, indefatigable industry and 
experience. He was born on a farm near Indianapolis, Indiana, February 10, 
1878, a son of Nimrod and Ruth A. (Crouch) Morris, who removed from Indiana 
to Buffalo county, Nebraska, when their son Dan was about ten years of age. 
The father here took up the occupation of farming and still owns, occupies and 
cultivates a farm near Gibbon. 

Dan Morris, who was one of a family of six children, acquired his early educa- 
tion in attendance at the district schools and alternated his school work with the 
labors of the farm, early becoming familiar with the best methods of tilling the 
soil and caring for the crops. Later he took up the profession of teaching and 
when seventeen years of age he became a student in the Peru State Normal School, 
where he remained for a year. He then returned to Kearney and again taught 
school for about a year, after which he secured the position of messenger in the 
City National Bank. Within fourteen years he had occupied every position in the 
bank until in the fall of 191 5 he was elected to the presidency of the institution 




DAN MOEEIS 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 437 

which he entered in a most humble capacity and is today the largest individual 
owner of the stock. He has acquainted himself with every phase and branch of 
the business and his thoroughness, fidelity and capability have brought him steadily 
forward until he is now recognized as one of the leading financiers of Kearney 
and this part of the state. He has also made judicious investment in real estate 
and in addition to his fine residence in the city he owns eighteen hundred acres of 
ranch land in Custer county, on which he is pasturing about three hundred head 
of cattle. He has concentrated his efforts, however, most largely upon the banking 
business. When he became connected with the bank the deposits were about one 
hundred thousand dollars and these today have been increased to over one million 
dollars. There is no question to whom the credit of the bank's growth and develop- 
ment is due. In all business affairs Mr. Morris displays keen sagacity and his 
successes have never been measured by another's losses. Fourteen years from the 
position of errand boy to president indicates rapid progress and denotes marked 
ability and enterprise. 

On the 27th of May, 1901, Mr. Morris was united in marriage to Miss Ella 
M. Thomas, a daughter of A. E. and Belle Thomas. They have two daughters, 
Ruby and Fern, who are attending school. The family are members of the Meth- 
odist church and are promiment socially, occupying a leading position in those 
social circles where true worth and intelligence are accepted as passports into 
good society. Mr. Morris also belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 
He is a very charitable man, giving generously and freely wherever aid is needed 
and being very quick at all times to assist anyone who is willing to aid himself. 
He responds with readiness to a tale of sorrow or distress and does all in his 
power to ameliorate the hard conditions of life for the unfortunate. In politics 
he is a stanch democrat but not a politician in the sense of office seeking. He has 
served as president of the state educational board of Nebraska and in that connec- 
tion has done much to further the cause of public instruction. He is president of 
the Bankers Association of the fifth district of Nebraska and is president of the 
Chautauqua Association of Buffalo county. In a word he has deep interest in all 
that pertains to the welfare, upbuilding and progress of his adopted county, giving 
active co-operation to those movements which tend to bring about higher ideals 
of citizenship, promoting civic progress along many lines. 



WILLIAM S. ELDRIDGE. 

William S. Eldridge, the efficient postmaster of Poole, is also connected with 
business interests there as the manager of the Wort Brothers' grain business. A 
native of Michigan, he was born in Cadillac on the 7th of October, 1878, of the 
marriage of Daniel and Marguerite (McGowan) Eldridge, both also born in 
the Wolverine state. The father, who was a lumber dealer, eventually removed 
to New Mexico, where he lived until his death in 1912. At the time of the Civil 
w^ar he served for four and a half years with the Fifth Michigan Volunteer 
Infantry and his military record was one of which he was justly proud. His 
wife preceded him in death, her demise occurring in September, 1908. 

William S. Eldridge is indebted to the public schools for his education and 



438 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

after reaching mature years entered the employ of Wort Brothers, grain dealers, 
and for some time was stationed at Pleasanton, Nebraska. In 1899, however, 
he was made manager of their business at Poole and has since remained here. 
In the management of the affairs intrusted to him he displays excellent judg- 
ment and a spirit of initiative that enables him to take advantage of opportuni- 
ties for increasing the business of the company. Since 1910 he has served as 
postmaster of Poole and has also proved very efficient in that capacity. 

Mr. Eldridge was married in June, 1905, to Miss Louise E. Tilson, a daugh- 
ter of W. Z. and Emily (Piderit) Tilson. Her father was born in Michigan and 
her mother in Wisconsin, but they located in Buffalo county, Nebraska, in an 
early day in the history of this section and took up a homestead, which the 
father is still operating. Mr. and Mrs. Eldridge have four children, namely: 
Clififord, who was born on the 27th of August, 1906; Nona, whose birth occurred 
on the 19th of January, 1908; Ralph, born December 12, 1912; and Lucille, 
December 29, 1915. 

Mr. Eldridge has supported the republican party since age conferred upon 
him the right of franchise and takes a lively interest in the questions and issues 
of the day. He is identified with the Knights of Pythias and the Masonic lodges 
at Ravenna and also with the Modern Woodmen of America and the Modern 
Brotherhood of America. He holds in full measure the respect of his fellow 
citizens and his personal friends are many. 



JAMES J. VACEK. 



James J. Vacek, a well known and prosperous young farmer of Garfield 
township, was born in Schneider township, this county, in August, 1885. His 
parents, John and Anna (Posusta) Vacek, were born in Bohemia and on their 
emigration to America first settled in Michigan, whence they soon afterward 
removed to Iowa. After living there for a year and a half they came to Bufifalo 
county, Nebraska, and the father purchased land in Schneider township, to the 
cultivation of which he devoted his energies until his death in 1909. His wife 
still lives on the old home place. 

Mr. Vacek received his education in the common schools of Schneider town- 
ship and was also early trained in the various phases of farm work. He remained 
with his parents until he was twenty-four years of age, when he removed to a 
farm of one hundred and sixty acres on section 23, Garfield township, which his 
father purchased at that time and gave him. He has since cultivated that place, 
to which he has given the name of Never-Fail Farm, and has made a number of 
improvements thereon which have added to its value and facilitated its operation. 
It is conveniently located on the main road between Grand Island and Ravenna. 
Mr. Vacek keeps everything in excellent condition and is prompt and enterprising 
in his work. He raises grain and also stock, feeding about a carload of high 
grade cattle annually. 

Mr. Vacek is a democrat and loyally supports the candidates of that party at 
the polls but has never sought office. His religious faith is indicated by the fact 
that he is a communicant of the Roman Catholic church. He has passed his 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 439 

entire life in the county and manifests a commendable interest in everything 
relating to its welfare and development. He is widely known and is recognized 
as a successful farmer and good citizen. 



JOHN STOEGER. 



Prominent among the extensive landowners of Buffalo county is John Stoeger, 
and his valuable property is the visible evidence of a life of well directed energy 
and thrift. Believing that the west held opportunity, he sought the advantages 
offered in this county and in their utilization has advanced steadily toward the 
goal of prosperity. He was born in Hendricks county, Indiana, October 25, 1858, 
and is a son of John and Mary Stoeger, who were natives of Germany, whence 
they came to America on a sailing vessel in the '40s. When the long voyage was 
ended they made their way across the country to Hendricks county, Indiana, where 
the father, who was a tanner, worked at his trade. He afterward followed the 
same business in Illinois, but prior to the Civil war purchased land in Crawford 
county, Illinois, which he cultivated for about eighteen years, becoming one of 
the well known general farmers of that district. He afterward made his home 
with his son John for three years and subsequently resided in Cairo, Nebraska, 
to the time of his death, which occurred in February, 1907, when he had reached 
the age of seventy-four. His widow survives him and has attained the very 
remarkable old age of ninety-one years. 

John Stoeger was reared and educated in Illinois and remained with his parents 
until he reached the age of thirty-five. From his early youth he assisted in the 
farm work and as his age and strength increased assumed more and more largely 
the duties and responsibilities of the work of the fields. In 1893 he and three 
brothers came to Buffalo county and purchased five hundred and sixty acres of 
land on section 10, Cherry Creek township. At once they began to develop and 
improve the tract and it was not long before a marked change was seen in the 
appearance of the place, showing the result of their labors. They continued their 
farming operations together and kept adding to their land from time to time by 
additional purchase until they owned twenty-three hundred acres. Their partner- 
ship was maintained for four years and was then dissolved, after which John 
Stoeger and his brother William remained in business for thirteen years. During 
this period they bought more land and owned three thousand acres, but eventually 
they, too, divided their interests and William Stoeger retired from active business 
life. John Stoeger, however, is still carrying on general farming and is accounted 
one of the progressive, active and enterprising agriculturists of his part of the 
state. He now owns thirteen hundred and sixty acres in Cherry Creek township, 
fourteen hundred acres in Sherman county, Nebraska, one hundred and sixty 
acres in Merrick county, Nebraska, twenty acres in Hall comity, adjoining the 
town of Grand Island, two hundred and three acres in Texas, fifty acres of irri- 
gated land in Utah and town property in Salem, Oregon. He maintains his home 
on section 10, Cherry Creek township, and has operated his place since coming to 
the county, with the exception of four years spent in Grand Island, one year m 
Utah and one and a half years in Oregon. He has thus been closely identified 



440 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

with the agricukural development of this part of the state and his efforts have 
been a force in directing material progress and improvement in Buffalo county. 
He is also a stockholder in the Farmers State Bank at Cairo, Nebraska, and upon 
his place he feeds about fifty head of cattle and seventy-five head of hogs annually. 
In December, 1896, Mr. Stoeger was married to Miss Lizzie Feldmayer, a 
daughter of William and Mary Feldmayer, who were natives of Germany and in 
early life came to the new world. Her father served for three years during the 
Civil war as a soldier of an Ohio regiment and following the close of hostilities 
returned to Germany. He was there married, after which he came again to the 
new world and on that occasion settled in Buffalo county, where he secured a 
homestead claim, devoting his remaining days to the cultivation and improvement 
of his place. He died in 1909, while his wife passed away in 1907. Mr. and Mrs. 
Stoeger have become the parents of seven children, Toney, Lee, Richard, Charles, 
Walter, Harvey and Marie. Mr. Stoeger is a member of the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows and of the Modern Woodmen camp and he and his family hold 
membership in the Lutheran church. He is possessed of many sterling traits of 
character and he enjoys the good will and confidence of his fellowmen because 
his life has been upright and worthy of respect. 



CHARLES A. CLARK. 



The Ravenna Creamery Company is one of the most successful business 
enterprises of the town of Ravenna, and its growth and prosperity is indicative 
of the energy and ability of its owners and managers. Charles A. Clark, who is 
president of the company, was born in St. Lawrence county. New York, on the 
28th of June. 1848, a son of Joseph and Rizpah (Field) Clark, both natives of 
New Hampshire. The father, who was a millwright, carpenter and wheelwright 
by trade, removed to New York in 1832 and there followed his trade until his 
demise in February, 1877. Flis wife had died in July of the previous year. 

Charles A. Clark grew to manhood in his native state and there received a 
common school and academic education, and he taught school several terms, also 
learning the carpenter's trade from his father which he followed for a short 
time. On the ist of January, 1875, however, he engaged in the creamery busi- 
ness, building and running the second creamery established in St. Lawrence 
county — a county which now has upward of forty creameries. He continued 
the business in his native town for nineteen years, or until April, 1894, when 
he came to Ravenna, Buffalo county. Nebraska, and entered the employ of the 
Ravenna Creamery Company. Shortly afterward he purchased the entire capital 
stock of the corporation, and he with the other members of his family has since 
conducted the business. They have not only made the local plant one of the 
most successful creameries in this part of the state but have also established a 
creamery at Ord and one at Loup City. The business at Ord includes the 
manufacture of ice cream, and all three creameries are largely patronized. The 
central plant at Ravenna employs from fifteen to twenty people and numbers 
among its patrons practically all of the farmers in the district tributary to 
Ravenna. Mr. Clark has seen many improvements and wonderful development 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 443 

in the creamery business in his forty years of experience until butter making 
has become practically an exact '"science." His business also includes a large 
poultry fattening and dressing plant, and quite a large output of eggs and several 
thousand gallons of ice cream annually. 

In October, 1871, occurred the marriage of Mr. Clark and Miss Josephine 
Stearns, a daughter of Joseph and Charlotte (Beard) Stearns, natives of New 
York, where the father engaged in farming during his active life. Both he and 
his wife are now deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Clark have four children, namely: 
Joseph S. Clark, Rizpah F. Conn, Charlotte A. Miner, and Charles A. Clark, Jr., 
all of whom, with C. D. Conn and R. W. Miner, are interested in the business of 
the Ravenna Creamery Company. 

Mr. and Mrs. Clark are loyal and earnest members of the Congregational 
church, and Mr. Clark is deeply interested in every movement that tends to 
curtail the rights and privileges of John Barleycorn, though he has time for but 
little political activity. However, in 1910 at the personal solicitation of his many 
temperance friends, he entered the primary contest and was nominated on the 
republican ticket as candidate for the state senate from Buffalo and Sherman 
counties. The issue was on county option, which Mr. Clark warmly espoused, 
and for which he made a strong campaign. He was defeated by a small majority, 
the "wets" adopting their usual crooked tactics of bringing forward at the^ 
eleventh hour, by petition a wet republican, who had been defeated in the pri- 
mary, thus dividing the republican vote and electing the democrat. Two years 
later he was requested to enter the race again for the same position and was 
assured of loyal and strong support, but he could at that time see no moral issue at 
stake and declined to leave his business for the uncertainties of politics. Since 
coming to Ravenna he has made a highly creditable place for himself among the 
business men of the town and his personal characteristics are such that he has 
gained the warm friendship of those who have been closely associated with him. 



WILLIAM M. FELDMAYER. 

Garfield township numbers among its citizens many enterprising farmers, 
wide awake to their opportunities, and careful and systematic in the management 
of their business interests. Such a one is William M. Feldmayer, who is living 
on section 6. He was born in Germany, March 25, 1877, a son of William and 
Anna Feldmayer, who came to the United States in 1882, at which time they 
took up their abode upon a farm that is now the home of their son William. 
The father purchased a relinquishment and subsequently entered the land to 
which he secured the title by complying with the homestead laws. With char- 
acteristic energy he began the development of the place, converting wild prairie 
into productive fields, arid as the years passed his labors wrought a marked 
change in the appearance of his place, the wild prairie grasses being no longer 
seen, the same district being converted into fields of waving grain. It was upon 
the old homestead property that the father continued to reside until his life's 
labors were ended in death, January i, 1906. For about two and a half years 
he had survived his wife, who died June 16, 1903. 



444 HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 

William M. Feldmayer was reared upon the home farm, to which he was 
brought when a lad of five years. He acquired a common school education and 
as his age and strength increased more and more largely took up the work of 
the fields, receiving his initial training under his father. In 1901 he and his 
brother Christian began farming on the old homestead and continued to cooperate 
in the development and improvement of the place until 1909, having purchased 
the interests of the other heirs in the father's estate after his death. In 1909, 
however, William Feldmayer purchased the interest of his brother Christian in 
the farm and became sole owner, in addition to which he has another tract of 
one hundred and twenty acres across the road on section 7, Garfield township, 
so that his holdings now comprise two hundred and eighty acres, with the excep- 
tion of the railroad right of way through the one hundred and twenty acre farm. 

In 1909 Mr. Feldmayer was married to Miss Amma Belle McCoy, of Christian 
county, Missouri, and their two children are William Glen and Ada Lucille. 

Mr. Feldmayer belongs to Ravenna Lodge, No. 366, I. O. O. F. In his 
political views he is a republican, voting for the men and measures of the party 
but not seeking office. His attention is concentrated upon his business affairs 
and he makes a specialty of raising cattle, keeping high grades of stock upon his 
place, while his annual sales reach a gratifying figure. He has closely studied 
the best methods of caring for his stock and his industry, resistless and deter- 
mined, has brought him a gratifying measure of success. 



JAMES G. HARRIS. 



James G. Harris, who is living retired in Ravenna, was born in England on 
the 14th of November, 1854, a son of Henry and Charlotte (Pippler) Harris, also 
natives of that country. In 1865 the father came with his family to America and 
located in Boone county, Illinois, where he engaged in farming, although he had 
been a veterinarian in England. In 1877 he sold his property and, coming to 
Buffalo county, Nebraska, took up one hundred and sixty acres on section 18, 
Gardner township, as a homestead. He brought that place to a high state of 
development and devoted the remainder of his life to its operation. He passed 
away in January, 1894, and his wife died in 1887. 

James G. Harris was reared and educated in his native country and in Boone 
county, Illinois, and remained with his parents until he was twenty-four years 
of age, when he took up a homestead of one hundred and sixty acres on section 
18, Gardner township, this county, not far from the home farm. For thirty years 
he devoted his time and energy to the cultivation of his land and in addition to 
raising grain he engaged to a considerable extent in stock raising, feeding as many 
as one hundred and forty hogs a year and also raising a number of cattle. In 
1908 he retired and purchased ten acres of land on the edge of Ravenna, where 
he erected a good residence. He has since lived in town but still takes a keen 
interest in agricultural affairs. He has added to his homestead and now owns 
two hundred and forty acres, all of which is located in Gardner township. 

Mr. Harris was married on the ist of March, 1883, to Miss Flora M. Lewis, 
a daughter of W. L. and Susan E. (Magee) Lewis, natives of Pennsylvania and 




DE. JOHN H. PENN 

Physician and surgeon for tlie Chicago, Burlington & Quincy 
and Union Pacific Kaihoads. 



HISTORY OF BUFFALO COUNTY 447 

pioneers of Buffalo county, Nebraska. The father homesteaded on section 18, 
Gardner township, and engaged in farming there for ten years, but at length 
removed to Custer county, Nebraska, where he remained until his death in 1908. 
He is survived by his wife. Mr. and Mrs. Harris have six children, namely: 
Eugene, who is farming in Cherry Creek township; Le Roy, who is operating 
the home place; Elsie, the wife of Albert Van Bbier, of Grand Island, Nebraska; 
Ethel, who married Ralph Farr, a livery man of Ravenna; Arthur, who is farming 
in Cherry Creek township ; and Earl, at home. 

Mr. Harris is a stanch advocate of the republican party and has served as 
road overseer of Gardner township. In religious faith he is a Methodist and 
fraternally he is identified with the Mystic Legion. His life has been one of well 
directed and efficient activity and he is now enjoying a period of leisure which is 
richly deserved. 



INDEX 



Anderson, A. T 419 

Andrews, David 224 

Ashburn, J. N 66 

Bargmann, Fred 25 

Barney, F. M 314 

Barney, W, W 98 

Barr, Mrs. E. C 394 

Barrett, G. W 22 

Bassett, S. C 274 

Basten, C. V. D 64 

Bayley, J. M 134 

Bayley, L. W 48 

Bean, M. H 109 

Beck, C. M 115 

Beeman, F. E 190 

Bell, H. S 166 

Bennett, J. L 36 

Bessie, A. C 231 

Bessie, C. D 232 

Bills, A. F 72 

Bishop, Charles 76 

Black, Joseph 50 

Black, C. C 107 

Blair, S. M 406 

Bliss, C. G 282 

Bliss, E. E 270 

Bodinson, C. F 417 

Bohn, Christian 381 

Bolan, T. W 44 

Bonsack, Charles 108 

Bower, A. G . . 359 

Bowker, Ellsworth 125 

Boyd, J. A 73 

Brady, William 259 

Brown, F. D 272 

Brown, M. A 97 

Buck, Isaac 124 

Buck, Joseph, Jr ■ 26 

Buck, W. H 176 

Buol, George 414 

Campbell, Samuel 392 

Carrig, C. C 41 

Cary, Lyman 260 

Cass, C. B 196 

Charlson, J. E 27 

Chase, V. C 154 

Clapp, W. S 290 

Clark, C. A 440 

Clark, C. E 388 

Conroy, John Ill 

Cook, Chauncey 79 

Cook, K. R 161 

Crawford, H. L 257 



Criffield, J. E 433 

Crossley, W. F 336 

Cruit, R. F 13 

Crumley, 0. H 362 

Daul, Adam 255 

Daul, Frederick 258 

Daul, J. F 307 

Donnell, J. S 304 

DoAvning, G. H 263 

Dryden, J. N 16 

Dugdale, H. J 386 

Duncan, G. W 399 

Dungan, E. H 117 

Dunkin, H. J 193 

Easterling, J. M 382 

Edwards, E. R 225 

Eldridge, W. S 437 

Ellis, Thomas 75 

Erazim, A. E 237 

Ewer, C. L 313 

Farris, Swan 126 

Feldmayer, W. M 443 

Fiala, Frank 348 

Fieldgrove, C. S 7 

Finch, C. B 110 

Fines, Mrs. Mary L 374 

Flint, H. F 80 

Prowler, William 361 

Frank, J. W 289 

Freeman, S. N 57 

Funk, S. B 65 

Gardner, G. L 96 

Gehrke, A. A 281 

Gordon, John 189 

Griffin, J. 119 

Gunn, W. H 49 

Hageman, G. P 308 

Haines, Robert 240 

Hamer, F. G 90 

Hamer, Rebecca A 95 

Hankins, W. R 379 

Harris, J. G 444 

Hart, R. L 89 

Harte, E. S 29 

Haug, Frederick 252 

Hauschild, A. P 426 

Hauschild, Minnie B 427 

Hawthorne, J. D 203 

Hayes, J. D 334 

Hetfner, J. C 170 



449 



450 



INDEX 



Henderson, Dallas 158 

Henline, B. F 140 

Henline, I. F 283 

Henline, S. A. D 327 

Henning, John 6 

Henninger, I. K 310 

Herbst, Henry 172 

Hibberd, Richard 187 

Highland, C. F 400 

Hill, E. E 71 

Hill, E. S 81 

Hlava, A. V 412 

Ho'gg, J. A 266 

Holloway, Chester 380 

Holmes, K. 12 

Hoover, M. A 418 

Hosteller, B. 42 

Hostetler, M. A 5 

Jacobson, Christian 217 

Johnson, V. L. 209 

Jones, H. N 355 

Jones, R. M 302 

Kahle, Herman 144 

Kase, Barta 287 

Keep, W. C 373 

Kibler, C. W 255 

Killian, A. C 147 

King, W. 164 

Kirk, I. A 43 

Klein, William 413 

Kluge, August 250 

Knerl, P. F. 407 

Knobel, Ancire'^ 130 

Knox, 0. G. 120 

Knutzen, Walter 132 

Koeppe, L. A 207 

Krassman, Charles 85 

Larimer, J. A 150 

Leas, S. L 371 

Leibee, W. D 39 

Liesinger, Herman 424 

Linn, C. E 265 

Lippincott, C. R 372 

Lippincott, J. D 424 

Lloyd, O. J 297 

Loewenstein, J. D 199 

Lowe, J. G 47 

Lowell, O. E 211 

Lucas, Charles 28 

Lukenbill, W. B 147 

Lunger, G. C 19 

Lunger, Roscoe 20 

Luth, H. H 397 

McCartney, J. D 342 

McConnaughey, Orlando 208 

McDonald, N. P 102 

Mahoney, J. C 405 

Major, Frank 177 

Manuel, C. B 210 

Maurer, H. V 226 

Merryman, Freeman 8 

Meservey, E. A 273 

Milbourn, Washington 243 

Miller, E. A 212 

Miller, George 288 

Miller, J. E 140 

Miller, J. W 112 



Miller, R. B 391 

Miner, Charles 316 

Miner, J. B 366 

Minton, J. S 175 

Morris, Dan 434 

Mueller, F. A 367 

Nichols, A. R 104 

Nichols, W. S 301 

Nutter, J. N 58 

Nye, F. A 133 

O'Connor, Michael 385 

Ogilvie, W. C 101 

Oldham, W. D 246 

Oliver, Ephraim 322 

Olson, 0.0 284 

Olson, T. W 340 

Owen, Joseph, Sr 165 

Packard, F. A 239 

Parrish, T. J 139 

Penn, J. H 445 

Phillips, D 320 

Pickett, W. 321 

Pierson, C. A 428 

Pierson, F. A 398 

Prascher, G. F 162 

Pratt, C. H 195 

Pratt, Warren 116 

Putnam, Christopher 123 

Randall, A. L 339 

Randall, W. L 87 

Rasmussen, H. H 294 

Reddy, John 180 

Redington, F. H 52 

Reed, C. C 61 

Reynolds, A. T 186 

Roach, David 74 

Robinson, C. S 185 

Roby, F. F 33 

Rodgers, J. H 360 

Ross, W. M 55 

Salsbury, J. S 330 

Savior, J. C 82 

Schlattmann, William 143 

Schnoor, Jacob 155 

Schramm, William 156 

Scott, F. C 215 

Scott, T. J 256 

Scribner, W, R 341 

Shahan, C. W 356 

Shalian, J. W 420 

Shellenbarger, A. T 244 

Shrader, C. H 408 

Shrader, William 95 

Smaha, Joseph 295 

Smitli, G. N 234 

Smith, G. W 20 

Smith, J. J 382 

Smith, S. E 47 

Smith, W. J 200 

Snyder, J. H 223 

Southworth, L. P 368 

Spencer, C. A 431 

Spencer, G. S 432 

Spencer, R. L 433 

Spencer, W. A 432 

Stanton, E. C 303 



INDEX 



451 



Stark, William 393 

Stark, W. F 387 

Stearns, L. M 86 

Steele, H. S 298 

Stickel, W. L 365 

Stoeger, John 439 

Sullivan, Richard 201 

Swartsley, W. H 118 

Swenson, John 30 

Svvitz, F. J 178 

Tarbell, W. A 88 

Templin, E. L 180 

Thiessen, John 269 

Tingley, E. E 27 

Todd, T. J 222 

Troupe, M. N 56 

Tunks, E. G 202 

Turner, F. A 103 

Urwiller, Samuel 271 

Vacek, J. J 438 



Walker, J. F 204 

Walker, J. G 201 

Walker, S. A. A 156 

Wallace, C. W 347 

Walsh, Patrick 148 

Webbert, David 194 

Webbert, H. A 195 

Webster, Wheeler 14 

Wedemeyer, Chris 309 

Weidner, Louis 333 

Wlieelock, V. B 35 

Whitcher, M. B 425 

Wight, L. A 216 

Wilkie, F. J 251 

Williams, Owen 40 

Wilson, John 346 

Wilt, J. A 171 

Wink, Peter 15 

Wiseman, Allen 233 

Wort, R. B 329 

Wyman, Emory 218 

Zimmerman, R. P 221 

Zimpfer, C. L 280 



%: